I Habitat Matters Canadian

I Habitat Matters Canadian
2 0 0 6
Resting Time –
Canadian
Brant Geese, from the
2006 Canadian Wildlife
HabitatMatters
Habitat Conservation
Stamp Series
Artist: Pierre Leduc,
Stoneham, Quebec
Twenty years, hundreds of
partnerships, and millions of
dollars later, Canada has
conserved 2.3 million hectares
(5.8 million acres) of
waterfowl habitat.
CONTENT:
National
Overview 2
Habitat Joint
Ventures 4
Species Joint
Ventures 8
Provinces 10
Contacts 16
n 1986, Canada and the United States
officially launched the North American
Waterfowl Management Plan (NAWMP), an
ambitious partnership with the goal to conserve
wetland and associated upland habitat for
waterfowl. The continental picture was
complete when Mexico joined in 1994. Now, 20 years,
hundreds of public and private partnerships and
millions of dollars in funding later, the tremendous
accomplishments of NAWMP partners in Canada have
resulted in the conservation of 2.3 million hectares
(5.8 million acres) of waterfowl habitat.
I
Despite the enormous success of the Canadian
program, a number of challenges remain. Land-use
pressures continue to mount—creeping urbanization
and the ever-increasing demand for resources
precipitate perpetual habitat loss and degradation.
Conservation partners are constantly working to
protect essential wetland and upland habitat
landscapes, and to ensure that they are managed in a
manner that supports healthy and sustainable wildlife
populations while fostering a strong and vibrant
community and economy.
Sound science, diverse and dedicated partnerships
and a landscape approach to the implementation of
on-the-ground conservation are the elemental
principles of the NAWMP program. These three
guiding principles, supported by unique funding
arrangements, such as the U.S. North American
Wetlands Conservation Act (NAWCA), are fundamental
to the success of NAWMP. Increased appropriations
under NAWCA in 2005 generated an increase in funds
for Canadian partners. These partners are working
diligently to expand Canadian funding sources as well.
In fact, since NAWCA was passed in 1989, funding from
Canadian sources has increased by over 300 percent,
demonstrating the far-reaching momentum of the
Canadian wetland conservation program.
As part of this NAWMP 20th Anniversary and Assessment
year, planning has begun for the next phase of NAWMP
implementation in Canada. In looking forward,
partners are well-positioned to build on their
successes and address any shortfalls and ongoing
challenges. The purpose of the NAWMP Assessment
is to review, assess and evaluate NAWMP progress to
date. The science-based recommendations resulting
from the Assessment will set the stage for future
long-term conservation planning, implementation and
continued on page 3
Environment
Canada
Environnement
Canada
National
Overview
NAWMP and NAWCA-funded
Habitat Conserved
Terminology
Securement:
The protection of wetland and/or upland habitat
through land title transfer or binding long-term
(minimum 10-year) conservation agreements with
a landowner.
(Million Acres) – 1986 to 2005
6.67
Enhancement:
Actions carried out on secured wetland and/or
upland habitats to increase their carrying capacity
for wetland-associated migratory birds and
other wildlife.
4.82
Management:
Activities conducted on secured wetland and/or
upland habitats to manage and maintain their
carrying capacity for wetland-associated migratory
birds and other wildlife.
Goals1
Secured
1.44
0.87
0.39
0.11
Pacific Coast
0.29
Prairie Habitat Eastern Habitat
Canadian
Intermountain4
Yukon
Northwest
Territories
Nunavut
Newfoundland
and Labrador
British
Columbia
Alberta
Saskatchewan
Manitoba
Quebec
Ontario
Progress Report3
Accomplishment Goal = 8.5M secured acres1
New
Prince Edward Island
Brunswick Nova Scotia
Joint Ventures
Pacific Coast
Canadian Intermountain
Prairie Habitat
Eastern Habitat
Achieved: 5.8M acres (68%)
Expenditure Goal = $Cdn. 2.9B 1,2
To date: $Cdn. 1.04B (36%)
2
1. These goals are under revision as per the 2004 NAWMP Update.
2. Based on $Cdn. = $U.S. 0.85.
3. Data includes PHJV, PCJV and EHJV only.
4. CIJV habitat goals are currently under consideration.
Western Boreal Program
evaluation. These recommendations will also help to
determine the content for the 2009 NAWMP Update.
Canadian partners have regarded their participation
in the Assessment process to be not only timely and
relevant, but also an excellent learning exercise for
future migratory bird planning within the joint ventures.
Another emerging focus for Canadian NAWMP
partners is the development of tools and programs
that seek to value “ecological goods and services”
(EGS) – a term that is meant to capture the notion
that ecosystems provide goods and services that
both benefit humans and have an economic value.
The continued support of
NAWCA and other U.S. and
Canadian funding partners is
essential for the success of
waterfowl and wetlandassociated migratory bird
conservation in North America.
For example, healthy landscapes provide important
EGS such as wildlife habitat, groundwater recharge,
flood and erosion control, carbon sequestration,
biodiversity and water and air purification. Full of
promise, EGS will directly connect environmental
management, such as wetland conservation, human
health and economic competitiveness, in a practical
and beneficial way for all Canadians. Among other
things, EGS will encourage landowners to make landuse decisions with more integrated social, economic
and environmental results.
From West to East across Canada, NAWMP partners
are proving their commitment to wetland conservation.
Pacific Coast Joint Venture partners are working in
the priority Fraser Valley Delta area of British
Columbia to eradicate the non-native cordgrass
(Spartina anglica), an invasive species that eventually
overwhelms the tidal mudflats.
On the Prairies, where 90 percent of the land is both
privately owned and at a premium for agriculture and
ranching, Prairie Habitat Joint Venture partners are
using the best available science to determine priority
wetland and waterfowl areas. Adaptive management
practices are being implemented in priority areas.
1986 to 2005 ($Cdn.)
$139 M (24%)
(38%)
(38%)
$220 M
Pro
vin
cia
Fe
de
ral
l/T
err
ito
ria
l
Ot
he
r
$219 M
Canadian
TOTAL CONTRIBUTIONS $1.2 B
U.S.
$337 M (52%)
Canada greatly appreciates the efforts of all involved
in ensuring the ongoing success of our migratory bird
and wetland conservation initiatives.
ed
era
This report highlights Canada’s NAWMP habitat and
species joint venture accomplishments and
challenges for 2005. The continued support of NAWCA
and other U.S. and Canadian funding partners is
essential for the success of waterfowl and wetlandassociated migratory bird conservation in North
America. Thanks to the ongoing efforts of thousands
of individuals across the continent, NAWMP is
recognized as one of the most effective conservation
partnerships in the world.
No
Fe
Twenty years ago, a handful of forward-thinking
conservationists came together with a plan to restore
dwindling waterfowl populations—their efforts
ultimately became the North American Waterfowl
Management Plan. NAWMP has successfully laid the
groundwork for comprehensive all-bird planning at
the joint-venture level through its leadership role in
North American Bird Conservation Initiative efforts.
NAWMP has changed the way that conservationists
work across the continent. Millions of hectares
and healthy waterfowl populations are its
continuing legacy.
n-f
de
ral
l
$305 M (48%)
U.S. Contributions
$642 M (53%)
In the Western Boreal Forest, the delicate balance
between the preservation and restoration of
important bird habitat and the economic realities of
resource extraction, continue to present challenges.
Partnerships with Industry, such as Louisiana Pacific
Canada, are enabling diverse interests to invest in
wetland projects through watershed-based
conservation planning.
In the Eastern Habitat Joint Venture, stewardship
initiatives, conserving the Great Lakes wetlands and
new projects in the Eastern Boreal Forest are just a
few examples of the work that is underway to further
NAWMP goals. These programs are helping to protect
critical breeding, migration and/or wintering habitat
for millions of waterfowl and over 4.6 million migratory
shorebirds that stopover on route to their wintering
grounds in Central and South America.
Total NAWMP and NAWCA Contributions to Canada
Canadian
Contributions
$578 M (47%)
Canadian partners have
regarded their participation in
the Assessment process to be not
only timely and relevant, but also
an excellent learning exercise for
future migratory bird planning
within the joint ventures.
3
Pintail Pair
Ducks Unlimited Canada
Habitat
Joint Ventures
Prairie Habitat Joint Venture
cience is the hallmark of the Prairie Habitat
Joint Venture (PHJV). The PHJV partners
continually strive to develop innovative and
adaptive approaches for waterfowl and wetland
conservation management. PHJV partners applaud
the North American Waterfowl Management Plan
(NAWMP) Committee’s current continental
assessment exercise that will determine future
NAWMP planning, implementation and evaluation.
The recent completion of the PHJV Strategic Plan and
current redevelopment of provincial implementation
plans sets out a clear conservation path that is well
aligned with the rejuvenation of North America’s
continental plan.
S
Adaptive management, fueled by the best science
available, has always been at the foundation of PHJV
planning and implementation. This remains true
today. As new science-based knowledge is gained,
changes are continually made to ensure that the most
beneficial and cost-effective programs are being
delivered.
As part of PHJV strategic planning, a new sciencebased tool called the Waterfowl Productivity Model
has recently been developed. This model is used to
better measure the impact of the PHJV program on
duck populations, and to refine program delivery.
By identifying deficits in duck-hatched nests between
the 1970s and today, a mix of habitat interventions can
be determined to restore the capability of the
waterfowl landscape. This world class planning tool
is the cornerstone for achieving PHJV/NAWMP goals.
It allows the PHJV to set measurable habitat
objectives for specific conservation programs
thereby determining:
• how past upland and wetland habitat changes
affected duck productivity;
• how conservation actions affect duck productivity;
and,
• what are the most effective or efficient means of
improving productivity.
This targeted approach maximizes the dollars
available for conservation to secure and restore the
best habitat in areas that provide the greatest longterm benefits for waterfowl.
A renewed commitment by the PHJV partnership to
improve program delivery through a strengthened
biological foundation is the path to success in the
PHJV and NAWMP continentally. As continental
NAWMP partners collectively reflect upon the
challenges and accomplishments of the past 20 years,
the PHJV is proud to help set the stage for the
renewed path of the next 20 years.
Contact Deanna Dixon, Prairie Habitat Joint Venture
Coordinator, (780) 951-8652, [email protected]
Contributions ($CN)
U.S. Federal
U.S. Non-Federal
Canadian
Total
2005
13,970,436
12,468,268
17,886,143
44,324,847
Total (1986-2005)
210,261,476
224,703,865
238,421,153
673,386,494
Accomplishments (Acres)
Secured
Enhanced
Managed
Total*
2005
153,908
98,242
230,789
153,908
Total (1986-2005)
4,822,222
1,844,129
3,709,156
4,822,222
* Secured, enhanced and managed acres are not additive.Acres are first
secured, may then be enhanced and are subsequently placed under
management.
Background Image:
4
Pintail Nest
Ducks Unlimited Canada
Western Boreal Program
he Western Boreal Program continues to
promote wetland and waterfowl conservation
in Canada’s Western Boreal Forest (WBF).
The WBF provides habitat for 12 to 14 million breeding
waterfowl annually, is home to millions of other
waterbirds and contains key molting and staging
wetlands. Industrial activities, including oil, gas and
other mineral exploration and extraction and forest
management, are resulting in a significant anthropogenic
footprint on this vast landscape. For example, it is
estimated that Saskatchewan has lost 73 percent of the
forest in the boreal transition zone since settlement.
T
The “working forest” lies mostly south of the
Canadian Shield in the Boreal Plain Ecozone south of
the 60th parallel where eutrophic wetland systems
prevail providing some of the WBF’s most productive
habitat. Protecting priority wetland and waterfowl
landscapes in the working forest is a process that
starts with the collection of information on waterfowl
and wetlands to better understand how these
systems function, and utilizing this information in
conservation planning programs. Ideally, these
programs will result in sustainable development
activities that include long-term wetland protection.
Critical to the success of wetland conservation in the
working forest are partnerships with governments,
non-government agencies and industries operating
on the land.
Industrial activities, including oil,
gas and other mineral
exploration and extraction and
forest management, are resulting
in a significant anthropogenic
footprint on this vast landscape.
The Canadian Boreal Initiative (CBI) is working with a wide range of conservation
organizations, including Ducks Unlimited Canada, First Nations, industry
and other interested parties to link science, policy and conservation activities in
Canada’s boreal forest. The CBI is supported by a number of Foundations
led by the Pew Charitable Trusts who have a strong interest in conservation issues,
including boreal wetland conservation. For several years Pew has also provided
Ducks Unlimited, Inc. with an annual grant, of which a portion is used as
NAWCA non-federal match for the Western Boreal Program.
In 2005, Ducks Unlimited Canada and Louisiana Pacific
Canada (LPC) established a 5-year partnership that
will benefit the WBF. The partnership will invest in
wetland projects and implement a watershed-based
forest conservation plan for 340,000 hectares
(840,000 acres) of public forest land in the Duck
Mountains of Manitoba where LPC is responsible for
forest management. The two partners are combining
resources to develop an enhanced wetland inventory
and to better understand forest hydrology and
impacts of forest disturbance on wetland systems.
The result will be forest-management strategies that
include wetland conservation objectives combined
with operational best-management practices to
ensure the long-term protection of watersheds and
wetland systems in the Duck Mountains.
This partnership is enhanced by the proactive
cooperation and opportunity to work with other
organizations such as the Canadian Boreal Initiative,
Pew Charitable Trusts, Canadian Wildlife Service and
the U.S. North American Wetlands Conservation Act.
Contact Gary Stewart, Manager of Boreal
Conservation Programs, Ducks Unlimited Canada,
(780) 489-8110, [email protected]
Contributions ($CN)
U.S. Federal
U.S. Non-Federal
Canadian
Total
2005
2,054,881
6,250,885
287,796
8,593,562
Total (1986-2005)
9,401,885
20,690,861
23,687,334
53,780,080
Accomplishments (Acres)
Secured**
Enhanced
Managed
Total*
2005
24,742
—
—
24,742
Total (1986-2005)
24,849
107
107
24,849
* Secured, enhanced and managed acres are not additive.Acres are first
secured, may then be enhanced and are subsequently placed under
management.
** 24,849 acres have been secured to date in the WBF.An additional
7,595,032 acres are under legal interim protection, and presently
classified as influenced acres.These areas will be transferred to the
permanent protection category in due course.
The Duck Mountain
Region (pictured) is a
high density wetland
area in Manitoba’s
commercial boreal
forest.
Ducks Unlimited Canada
5
Matchedash Bay is an Ontario EHJV First Step Initiative
located along the Lower Great Lakes. Home to 200
species of migratory birds, it is a U.S. NAWCA-funded
1,840 hectare (4,546-acre) wildlife oasis in the heart
of Southern Ontario’s cottage country.
Ducks Unlimited Canada
Pacific Coast Joint Venture
epending on which coast of North America
you live, cordgrass (Spartina anglica) draws a
different reaction. On the Atlantic coast—
a high energetic coastline— Spartina is a native
species, intentionally planted to exploit its talent—
trapping sediment to protect the coastline and
restore marshes. But on the Pacific Coast, it is a
completely different story. This sediment-trapping
feature of Spartina is actually detrimental to the
ecology of west coast marshes.
D
Once Spartina finds its home, within a few short years
the sturdy plant can transform what was a naturally
sloping tidal mudflat into what is essentially an
elevated Spartina meadow, with a steep seaward
edge. The result is a change to water circulation, and a
loss of sea life and vegetation common to mudflats,
such as eelgrass.
Eastern Habitat Joint Venture
he year 2006 marks the 20th anniversary of the
North American Waterfowl Management Plan
(NAWMP) and the 15th anniversary of the Eastern
Habitat Joint Venture (EHJV). On January 10, 2006, the
EHJV received the Nova Scotia Bay of Fundy Business
Partnership Award for their exceptional wetland
conservation achievements. After 15 years of dedicated
effort, the EHJV’s success has become a model of
conservation partnerships at work.
T
The EHJV partners have made significant gains in
habitat conservation on the eastern Canadian
landscape. Their conservation programs provide
breeding, migration and/or wintering habitat for
waterfowl using the Atlantic, Mississippi and Central
Flyways. Programs also protect critical migration
habitat for over 4.6 million shorebirds that stopover
on route to their wintering grounds in Central and
South America from their northern breeding grounds.
Intensive programs have secured and enhanced
critically important habitats for waterfowl and other
wetland-dependant wildlife. These are diverse wetland
and associated upland habitats that include coastal
islands, tidal mudflats, agricultural landscapes and vast
forested landscapes. In addition to secured and
enhanced habitats, the partners, through a variety of
stewardship initiatives, including education and
demonstration sites, have had positive influences on
nearly 3.5 million hectares (8.7 million acres). The
EHJV’s influence on policy and legislation has
positively impacted wetlands.
6
There are many unique and adaptive habitat
conservation techniques being implemented by the
partners. In Newfoundland and Labrador, a municipal
stewardship program is underway wherein 17 towns
have agreements securing a total of 12,416 hectares
(30,683 acres) and influencing an additional 68,661
hectares (169,669 acres) of wetland and associated
upland habitat. In Nova Scotia, a land securement
technique is targeting lands with unknown owners—
to date it has secured title to over 2,751 hectares
(6,800 acres) of wetlands and associated upland
habitat at a cost of $73/hectare ($29/acre). The
Province of Quebec announced a Best Management
Practices Program in conjunction with Ducks
Unlimited Canada and other partners that will see
6,300 square kilometres (15,567 square miles) of
riparian habitat protected in the boreal forest.
The partners have designed and implemented more
than 50 scientific studies to evaluate the impact of
their programs and to test new ideas. The results of
studies such as the Ontario Mallard Ecology Study,
Quebec’s Eastern Lowlands Initiative and the
New Brunswick Saint John River Floodplain Study
have been instrumental in modifying programs and
techniques. With a new EHJV 5-year strategic
document, the partners are currently drafting new
5-year implementation and evaluation plans. The
plans will incorporate knowledge and expertise
gained through these scientific studies.
All of this has been accomplished through a
comprehensive partnership that has collectively
contributed in excess of $250,000,000 CDN towards
wetland and waterfowl conservation programs in
eastern Canada.
Contact Reg Melanson, Eastern Habitat
Joint Venture Coordinator, (613) 565-6654,
[email protected]
Spartina began its migration northward up the Pacific
coast around the turn of the century. In 2003, Spartina
was discovered to be thriving at distressing levels in
the Fraser Delta, at which point Canadian private and
public organizations launched a rigorous control
program of mechanical removal. Such efforts were
successful in managing the Spartina spread.
The following year the focus was on increasing
monitoring over the 25,000 hectares (62,000 acres) of
Fraser Delta tidal mud flats where the plant thrived.
At Roberts Bank, where surveys had not been
conducted, a few individual plants were detected
in 2005. The plant is now contained and under control
in the Roberts Bank area, thanks to mechanical and
manual removal. Monitoring on Vancouver Island
indicated that Nanaimo, Nanoose Bay Estuaries and
the Lower Mainland’s Sturgeon Banks remained
Spartina-free.
DUC summer students,
Sarah Collins and Alston
Bonamis, dig up roots of
Contributions ($CN)
U.S. Federal
U.S. Non-Federal
Canadian
Total
the plucky plant Spartina
2005
4,497,953
3,834,509
7,057,841
15,390,303
Total (1986-2005)
56,422,817
57,845,842
143,742,229
258,010,888
Accomplishments (Acres)
Secured
Enhanced
Managed
Total*
2005
25,417
9,020
11,314
25,417
Total (1986-2005)
873,230
507,870
522,363
873,230
* Secured, enhanced and managed acres are not additive.Acres are first
secured, may then be enhanced and are subsequently placed under
management.
at Boundary Bay.
Ducks Unlimited Canada
As human settlement drained
and altered many Okanagan
wetlands, the Swan Lake
wetland system, one of the last
remaining undeveloped
wetlands in Greater Vernon,
continued to provide a home
for wildlife.
A cross-border workshop is in the works to help
organizations in the U.S. and Canada exchange
information about Spartina control and monitoring.
Funding for Spartina management came from Ducks
Unlimited Canada and the provincial government’s
Inter-Ministry Invasive Plant Committee. In-kind
contributions of labour were provided by the
Canadian Wildlife Service (Environment Canada), the
Vancouver Aquarium, the Corporation of Delta, the
City of Surrey and others.
Contact Saul Schneider, Pacific Coast Joint
Venture/Canadian Intermountain Joint Venture
Coordinator, (604) 666-2342, [email protected]
2005
950,289
1,184,541
2,139,253
4,274,083
Total (1986-2005)
18,194,946
19,123,792
125,593,398
162,912,136
Accomplishments (Acres)
Secured
Enhanced
Managed
Total*
and partners secured
50 hectares (123 acres)
of Swan Lake’s south
shore which sees as
many as 6,000 birds on a
Contributions ($CN)
U.S. Federal
U.S. Non-Federal
Canadian
Total
Ducks Unlimited Canada
2005
401
—
75
401
Total (1986-2005)
107,206
88,446
84,773
107,206
* Secured, enhanced and managed acres are not additive.Acres are first
secured, may then be enhanced and are subsequently placed under
management.
single day during the
height of migration.
Ducks Unlimited Canada
Canadian Intermountain
Joint Venture
wan Lake has been on the minds of Ducks
Unlimited Canada (DUC) staff since they opened
their first British Columbia office in 1969. The
value of the area to bird conservation was recognized
as far back as 1922 when an attempt to create a bird
conservation area failed. But with the encroachment
of commercial and residential development toward
its south shore, DUC had identified it as an urgent
conservation priority.
S
The wetlands along the shores of Swan Lake make it
one of the most important habitats for breeding and
staging waterfowl in the Southern Interior, as well as
a critical resting and feeding stop for migratory birds
in the Pacific Flyway. The Lake and surrounding lands
also provide important habitat for non-migratory
birds and other wetland-dependent wildlife such as
fish, amphibians, reptiles and small mammals.
As residential and commercial development continued
to move toward the south shores of Swan Lake, it
become one of the most threatened wetland habitats
in the Okanagan and DUC had identified it as an
urgent conservation priority.
For decades numerous attempts failed to secure land
and water for conservation purposes. Yet despite
setbacks, efforts to secure the habitat continued.
So when the property was finally secured in 2005, it
could not have come any sooner for conservationists.
The Swan Lake purchase was the first of its kind under
the multi-partner B.C. Trust for Public Lands, and
involved the preservation of 50 hectares (123 acres)
of land on Swan Lake’s south shore. The site will be
managed as public green space where low-impact
recreational activities such as bird-watching and
other wildlife viewing, canoeing, fishing and hiking
will be encouraged, while the biodiversity on some of
the last remaining high value wetland habitat in the
Okanagan is preserved.
Other partners contributing to the securement of Swan
Lake include the Greater Vernon Services Commission,
the Canadian Wildlife Service (Environment Canada)
the North Okanagan Naturalists, Bishop Wild Bird
Foundation and Ducks Unlimited Canada.
B.C. Trust for Public Lands is a multi-agency
partnership that includes Environment Canada’s
Canadian Wildlife Service, B.C. Ministry of Environment,
B.C. Ministry of Transportation, B.C. Ministry of
Agriculture and Lands, Union of B.C. Municipalities,
Habitat Conservation Trust Fund, Nature Conservancy
of Canada, The Nature Trust of British Columbia,
The Land Conservancy of British Columbia and the
Pacific Salmon Foundation.
Contact Saul Schneider, Pacific Coast Joint
Venture/Canadian Intermountain Joint Venture
Coordinator, (604) 666-2342, [email protected]
Contributions ($CN)
U.S. Federal
U.S. Non-Federal
Canadian
Total
2005
1,805,760
472,286
2,891,924
5,169,970
Total (1986-2005)
3,784,381
4,000,244
11,079,070
18,863,695
Accomplishments (Acres)
Secured
Enhanced
Managed
Total*
2005
11,063
19,238
37,120
11,063
Total (1986-2005)
295,413
41,250
60,589
295,413
* Secured, enhanced and managed acres are not additive.Acres are first
secured, may then be enhanced and are subsequently placed under
management.
7
Background Image:
Lesser Snow Geese
Dale Humburg, Missouri
Department of Conservation
Species
Joint Ventures
Arctic Goose Joint Venture
he Arctic Goose Joint Venture (AGJV)
partnership works with North American
Waterfowl Management Plan partners in
Canada, the United States and Mexico to facilitate the
management of North American goose populations.
Through AGJV efforts, populations are better defined
and monitored, and management agencies are more
effectively maintaining populations near objectives,
partly due to more appropriate delineation, improved
monitoring and better population dynamics
assessments. Of 16 AGJV goose populations with
accepted population objectives, 13 were at or above
management objective levels in 2005.
T
Examples of how AGJV activities and supported
projects have improved goose population
management include:
• of seven AGJV Canada goose populations, none
were assessed by breeding ground surveys in 1986,
whereas five were officially assessed by such
surveys in 2005 (and exploratory surveys are being
conducted in the range of two others);
• the greater snow goose spring staging survey
was made more geographically comprehensive
and precise;
• the mid-continent white-fronted goose population
has been re-defined as a single population rather
than two (eastern and western) populations;
8
• short grass prairie and tall grass prairie Canada
goose population boundaries have been refined;
• banding has provided the means to determine
harvest rates, survival rates and changes in
distribution or harvest patterns. Banding analyses
have been important components in the
management of several AGJV populations; and,
• the increase in the magnitude and distribution of
banding of North American light geese, influenced
through AGJV activities, will allow greatly improved
estimation of survival rates for light geese across
North America, and offer the greatest potential for
quantitative tracking of harvest strategy impacts.
From 1989 to 2005,
approximately $29 million CDN
has been spent on AGJV
endorsed projects.
From 1989 to 2005, approximately $29 million CDN has
been spent on AGJV endorsed projects. Since 1989,
64 projects have been supported, with $8.4 million
CDN funding devoted to banding, $6.7 million CDN for
surveys and $11.7 million CDN for research. The AGJV
remains dedicated to priority science for the future
management of goose populations.
Contact Deanna Dixon, Arctic Goose Joint Venture
Coordinator, (780) 951-8652, [email protected]
Contributions ($CN)*
U.S. Federal
U.S. Non-Federal
Canadian
Total
2005
493,645
347,821
1,008,500
1,849,966
Total (1986-2005)
4,726,267
7,160,498
14,791,248
26,678,013
* These contributions contain no NAWCA funding.
White-fronted Geese Pair
Ducks Unlimited Canada
Christine Lepage
conducts black duck
aerial surveys.
Daniel Bordage,
Canadian Wildlife Service
A recent increase in
Black Duck Joint Venture funding
has re-invigorated the
research program.
Sea Duck Joint Venture
he Sea Duck Joint Venture (SDJV) continues
to be an excellent example of international
cooperation under the North American
Waterfowl Management Plan (NAWMP). Not only are
several Canadian SDJV projects cost shared between
the U.S. and Canada, they are also jointly delivered.
U.S. Congressional appropriations in 2005 for the
SDJV totalled $510,219 (US). Partner agencies,
universities and corporations generated matching
funds of $1,412,460 to support 20 projects across the
continent, including the first project on scoters
wintering in Mexico. Twelve of the 20 projects were
in Canada, constituting a wide array of work on both
coasts and in the Arctic. Eiders and scoters dominated
the research work as several of these species show
the steepest rates of population decline.
T
The Canadian projects included winter ecology of
Barrow’s goldeneye in Quebec, breeding ecology of
white-winged scoters in the Mackenzie River Watershed,
spring migration and reproduction energetics of B.C.
scoters, long-tailed duck and king eiders breeding
ecology, breeding common eider survival studies in
Quebec and Newfoundland and Labrador and
continuation of banding and molt ecology studies of
surf scoters on the Labrador coast.
2005 was the first year that surveys and monitoring
were specifically funded. Canadian projects supported
under this fund, which saw $100,000 (US) of the
Congressional funds set aside for monitoring,
included sea duck breeding surveys on Victoria Island
in the Canadian Arctic, winter sea duck survey of the
B.C. coast and assessment of spring staging surveys
as a population monitoring technique for black
scoters on the Atlantic coast.
Other activities included the SDJV NAWMP
Assessment in September, a successful sea duck
conference in Annapolis, Maryland, in November and
the completion of the first draft of a report on sea
duck monitoring needs.
Contact Keith McAloney, Sea Duck Joint Venture
Coordinator, (506) 364-5013, [email protected]
Contributions ($CN)*
U.S. Federal
U.S. Non-Federal
Canadian
Total
2005**
n/a
n/a
n/a
996,006
Total (1986-2005)
n/a
n/a
n/a
4,791,600
* These contributions contain no NAWCA funding.
** Breakdown between U.S. Federal, U.S. Non-Federal, and Canadian
contributions not available at press time.
Black Duck Joint Venture
hrough the Black Duck Joint Venture (BDJV),
Canadian Wildlife Service and U.S. Fish and
Wildlife Service biologists have developed an
integrated breeding ground survey that provides the
means to track black duck populations throughout the
most important part of their breeding range. The
reasons for these population dynamics, however,
remain controversial. Is it harvest, competition and/or
hybridization with the mallard, or habitat changes on
the breeding and wintering grounds? Possibly
different factors may affect the species at different
parts of its range.
T
A recent increase in BDJV funding has re-invigorated
the research program. New research priorities have
been identified and work will be supported through a
challenge grant program.
One of the first new studies will examine the status
of the black duck at the western edge of its range,
particularly in Ontario. Recently, midwinter surveys
in the southern Mississippi Flyway indicated a
consistent decline; most of these wintering birds
would come from Ontario and western Quebec.
Analysis of various breeding ground surveys showed
that area numbers were generally stable, maybe
increasing, except in central Ontario where there
appeared to be a recent slow decline. Interestingly,
this slight decrease does not match that seen in the
winter. Checking the Midwinter Waterfowl Surveys
and Christmas Bird Counts revealed a tendency for
the species to winter farther north during the recent
warmer winters, many not even leaving Ontario.
There they can be missed as there is proportionally
less winter survey activity further north. Does this
completely explain the winter counts, or are other
factors involved? Does harvest level and distribution
play a role? What about productivity which may be
declining? These questions will be the focus of
renewed research within the BDJV.
Contact Ken Ross, Wildlife Biologist, Canadian
Wildlife Service, (613) 952-2415, [email protected]
Contributions ($CN)*
Not only are several Canadian
Sea Duck Joint Venture projects
cost shared between the U.S.
and Canada, they are also jointly
delivered.
A newly banded female eider lies motionless as she
waits for banders to leave before she returns to her
nest on Harbour Island, Nova Scotia.
U.S. Federal
U.S. Non-Federal
Canadian
Total
2005
Total (1986-2005)
71,500
234,000
341,462
646,962
1,385,860
3,313,850
6,227,807
10,927,517
* These contributions contain no NAWCA funding.
Barbara Robinson, RiverRoad Creative
9
British Columbia
he Silverdale Wetlands Project, a 46-hectare
(112-acre) land parcel in the Fraser Valley
community of Mission, British Columbia, is a
prime example of a wetland conservation project
that also serves a broader mandate of agriculture,
fisheries and waterfowl protection.
T
Silverdale is one of the few remnants of the historical
Fraser River floodplain with intact ecosystem functions
and productive foraging habitat for waterfowl.
The Silverdale acquisition is key to DUC’s strategy for
the Fraser Valley which aims to secure what little
survives of the valley’s natural habitat, and advances
the goals of the North American Waterfowl
Management Plan.
“This is an important milestone for our plan to
salvage previous wetlands in the Fraser Valley,” said
Les Bogdan, Manager of Habitat Conservation for the
DUC’s Pacific Coast Eco-region. “With 85 percent loss
of original wetlands in the Fraser Valley, the recovery
of this unique habitat in the Fraser Delta is of the
highest priority.”
Provinces
To maintain and improve the
Silverdale habitat, DUC, the District of
Mission and the Stave Valley Salmon
Enhancement Society will develop a
management plan to maximize the
potential for traditional species such
as mallard, wood duck, American
wigeon and green-winged teal.
Background Image:
Semipalmated Sandpiper
With 85 percent loss of original
wetlands in the Fraser Valley,
the recovery of this unique
habitat in the Fraser Delta is of
the highest priority.
Ducks Unlimited Canada/Wolitski
The Silverdale project was developed and completed
with the above-mentioned partners and the British
Columbia Trust for Public Lands and its partners
including: Environment Canada (Canadian Wildlife
Service), BC Ministry of Environment, BC Ministry of
Agriculture, Fisheries and Foods, Union of BC
Municipalities, Habitat Conservation Trust Fund,
Nature Conservancy of Canada, The Nature Trust of
British Columbia, The Land Conservancy of British
Columbia and the Pacific Salmon Foundation.
Contact Saul Schneider, Pacific Coast Joint
Venture/Canadian Intermountain Joint Venture
Coordinator, (604) 666-2342, [email protected]
Contributions ($CN)
U.S. Federal
U.S. Non-Federal
Canadian
Total
2005
2,958,057
4,821,929
5,105,638
12,885,624
Total (1986-2005)
25,583,221
37,261,204
137,960,377
200,804,802
Accomplishments (Acres)
Secured
Enhanced
Managed
Total*
2005
11,490
19,238
37,195
11,490
Total (1986-2005)
423,919
141,629
156,802
423,919
* Secured, enhanced and managed acres are not additive.Acres are first
secured, may then be enhanced and are subsequently placed under
management.
The Silverdale Creek habitat is a 46-hectare (112-acre)
oasis of rare wetlands in Mission—an increasingly
urbanized district in the Lower Mainland.
Ducks Unlimited Canada
10
A drainage ditch being plugged on the Kitz wetland
conservation easement will provide habitat for
waterfowl, migrating shorebirds and other wetlanddependant species.
Doug Brook, Ducks Unlimited Canada
Alberta
s we celebrate the 20th anniversary of the
North American Waterfowl Management Plan
(NAWMP) in Alberta, it is gratifying to see the
continued growth and strength of the Alberta NAWMP
partnership. We have seen huge successes in our
habitat securement program, especially the securement
of vast land holdings in the Prairie biome ranchlands.
The partnership’s influence has expanded to
generate many successes within the policy arena.
A
Creation of a new wetland policy under Alberta’s
Water for Life Strategy could have historic influences
on the Province’s wetlands. A draft policy is completed
with plans for public consultation scheduled for
Spring 2006. The Alberta Provincial Government has
demonstrated its commitment to a wetland policy
through the dedication of generous funding to the
associated wetland inventory, which includes
drained wetlands.
Another policy success story is the Beaver Hills
Initiative. This multi-partner undertaking was
spearheaded by seven municipal governments to
protect the natural capital in three central Alberta
counties. Following a local ecological goods and
services approach, this initiative stresses the need
for societal efforts to maintain natural resources
such as water, land and air, as a basis for sustainable
community development, economic growth and
prosperity.
The Alberta NAWMP Partnership is proud to celebrate
its accomplishments over the past 20 years and looks
forward to expanding, growing and adapting to
continued needs during the next 20 years. The Alberta
NAWMP Partnership has been highly successful in its
habitat securement program and more recently has
taken steps along the policy front to, not only protect
existing natural capital, but also to restore lost habitat
throughout the settled portions of the Province.
Contact Brett Calverley, Alberta North American
Waterfowl Management Plan Coordinator,
Ducks Unlimited Canada, (780) 930-1244,
[email protected]
Contributions ($CN)
U.S. Federal
U.S. Non-Federal
Canadian
Total
2005
7,502,037
7,140,156
7,383,269
22,025,462
Total (1986-2005)
92,569,433
98,300,874
111,206,199
302,076,506
Accomplishments (Acres)
Secured
Enhanced
Managed
Total*
2005
4,687
10,507
13,527
4,687
Total (1986-2005)
1,561,125
929,499
1,389,418
1,561,125
* Secured, enhanced and managed acres are not additive.Acres are first
secured, may then be enhanced and are subsequently placed under
management.
Following a local ecological
goods and services approach,
this initiative stresses the need
for societal efforts to maintain
natural resources such as water,
land and air, as a basis for
sustainable community
development, economic growth
and prosperity.
Saskatchewan
askatchewan is home to some of the highest
densities of breeding waterfowl in North
America. Restoring and protecting waterfowl
habitat in Saskatchewan continues to be the
cornerstone of reaching the goals established by
North American Waterfowl Management Plan
partners 20 years ago, particularly the restoration of
wetlands. Many wetlands have been lost in cultivated
regions of the Province. Restoring and protecting
small wetlands, as well as changing upland land use, is
critical to improving Saskatchewan’s waterfowl
productivity.
S
Ducks Unlimited Canada (DUC) has developed a new
conservation tool specifically to address this need.
Building upon the success of their existing conservation
easement program which protects native uplands and
wetlands from loss, DUC has designed a new wetland
restoration program to encourage restoration as well
as protection. As in previous programs, the wetland
restoration conservation easements protect the land
and wetlands under agreement from being broken or
drained. However, the agreement still allows the
owner to maintain grazing and haying provided the
basin is otherwise unaltered. This new program
differs from previous ones in that it provides
additional landowner incentive to restore previously
drained wetlands for future protection in perpetuity.
In Summer 2005, the first wetland restoration
conservation easement in Canada was signed on the
farm of Dale and Charlotte Kitz in east-central
Saskatchewan. The Kitz family looks forward to the
water and waterfowl returning to 29 restored
wetlands this Spring.
During 2005, water
returned to the Alberta
Contact Sharon Metz, Saskatchewan Watershed
Authority, (306) 787-9290, [email protected]
Prairie and Parkland
Regions (up 47 percent),
Contributions ($CN)
and there was an
increase in northern
shovelers since 2004.
Ducks Unlimited Canada
U.S. Federal
U.S. Non-Federal
Canadian
Total
2005
5,758,972
5,247,284
5,551,759
16,558,015
Total (1986-2005)
88,090,837
95,596,030
77,011,553
260,698,420
Accomplishments (Acres)
Secured
Enhanced
Managed
Total*
2005
154,115
60,627
190,154
154,115
Total (1986-2005)
1,929,901
721,113
1,277,609
1,929,901
* Secured, enhanced and managed acres are not additive.Acres are first
secured, may then be enhanced and are subsequently placed under
management.
11
Habitat on Murray Marsh
farms is an integral
component of the Long
Manitoba partners recently
secured funding for a pilot
project that will test conservation
based on the “ecological goods
and services” concept.
Manitoba
he power of partnerships and leveraging is
evident in Manitoba after nearly 2 decades of
North American Waterfowl Management Plan
(NAWMP) activity.
T
The launch of NAWMP stimulated new funding
commitments from Manitoba to support coordination
and delivery activities through the Manitoba Habitat
Heritage Corporation. This new delivery infrastructure
helped deliver NAWMP programming and also
levered new Canadian funding for complementary
conservation activities in NAWMP priority landscapes.
For example, Riparian Stewardship Program funding
reached $1.7 million and enhanced 23,077 hectares
(57,000 acres) of riparian and associated land, mainly
in the NAWMP target area.
NAWMP partners have also promoted changes to
public policies and programs. One outcome has been
new legislation enabling the use of conservation
easements. NAWMP partners also supported an
environmental property tax credit pilot project.
Subsequently, the Province of Manitoba enacted a
province-wide riparian tax credit program.
Point wetland complex.
Ducks Unlimited Canada
Manitoba partners recently secured funding for a
pilot project that will test conservation based on the
“ecological goods and services” concept. It will
operate in part of the NAWMP target area until 2008.
The implications for landscape-level conservation
gains in Manitoba and beyond are enormous.
NAWMP in Manitoba has been a key to these
beneficial activities. It has attracted new conservation
dollars from Canadian sources and stimulated new
and potentially far-reaching solutions to conservation
challenges.
Contact Tim Sopuck, Manager of Operations,
Manitoba Habitat Heritage Corporation,
(204) 784-4357, [email protected]
Contributions ($CN)
U.S. Federal
U.S. Non-Federal
Canadian
Total
2005
1,762,722
1,879,486
5,155,950
8,798,158
Total (1986-2005)
32,391,528
33,736,232
63,084,797
129,212,557
Accomplishments (Acres)
Secured
Enhanced
Managed
Total*
2005
19,822
27,108
27,108
19,822
Total (1986-2005)
1,334,638
181,584
1,030,689
1,334,638
* Secured, enhanced and managed acres are not additive.Acres are first
secured, may then be enhanced and are subsequently placed under
management.
Ontario
he wetlands at Long Point, a 40-kilometre-long
sand spit on the north shore of Lake Erie, are
the Eastern Habitat Joint Venture’s (EHJV) top
priority for habitat protection in Ontario. Long Point is
the most significant marsh complex on the Canadian
side of the Great Lakes, and is a Ramsar Site of
International Importance, a World Biosphere reserve
and a Globally Significant Bird Area.
T
Long Point provides habitat for hundreds of species
of plants, fish and wildlife, many of which are rare,
threatened or endangered. It is also one of Canada’s
top bird-watching sites—some 376 migratory bird
species have been recorded. The area is continentally
important to an ever-increasing population of black
duck, mallard, redhead, canvasback, scaup and
tundra swans.
Despite a long history of conservation efforts, an
ever-expanding urban population in Southern Ontario
continues to pressure Long Point’s wetlands. In fact,
the very attributes that make Long Point such a
mecca for wildlife are also what is drawing people to
the area to live.
Ducks Unlimited Canada, in conjunction with EHJV
partners, including the Nature Conservancy of
Canada, the Ontario Ministry of Natural Resources
and Environment Canada’s Canadian Wildlife Service,
spearheaded the purchase of a conservation
easement on the 235 hectare (580 acres) Murray
Marsh Farms property. Murray Marsh Farms contains
a part of the Big Creek marshes, several riverine
wetlands, a managed marsh and extensive woodlands
Manitoba NAWMP partners have levered
complementary, Canadian-funded conservation
12
activities, including riparian habitat programming.
Manitoba Habitat Heritage Corporation
Quebec
lthough its 1,200,000 square kilometres
support 75 percent of Quebec’s waterfowl
breeding pairs, the Quebec boreal forest has
traditionally been ignored, except for Black Duck Joint
Venture (BDJV) helicopter surveys and Canadian
Wildlife Service (CWS) studies on the threatened
harlequin duck and Barrow’s goldeneye.
A
and agricultural fields. The easement will provide
perpetual securement for the entire property, and
will direct land use on the remaining property. Most
importantly, it will help ensure that housing and
recreational development will be kept away from
some of the most critical areas of Long Point.
This project furthers the EHJV’s objective of working
with private landowners, local government and
conservation organizations to secure habitats through
a range of approaches.
Contact Ron Maher, Manager, Provincial Operations,
Ducks Unlimited Canada, (613) 389-0418,
[email protected]
Contributions ($CN)
U.S. Federal
U.S. Non-Federal
Canadian
Total
2005
2,320,413
2,015,760
2,471,151
6,807,324
In 2003, with the support from the Canadian Boreal
Initiative, Ducks Unlimited Canada (DUC) launched
the Quebec Boreal Program with research and
conservation components. Research focuses on
wetlands and waterfowl communities with emphasis
on black duck, in partnership with CWS, Université du
Québec en Abitibi-Témiscamingue, Laval University ,
BDJV, Quebec Ministry of Natural Resources and
Wildlife (Quebec Ministry), and National Science and
Engineering Research Council of Canada (NSERC).
Conservation focuses at three scales: protected areas
in ecoregions, riparian conservation plans at forest
management unit scale, and wildlife trees.
In 2005, the Quebec Ministry announced new best
management practices (BMPs). DUC and partners
participated in the elaboration of a BMP that protects
one fifth of the 20-metre-wide riparian forest strips
from partial cutting. This BMP alone insures the
protection of 6,300 square kilometres of Quebec’s
riparian habitats, e.g. 1.4 percent of the 451,966
square kilometres of productive public access forest.
Wetlands and deep waters cover
more than 20 percent of
Quebec’s boreal forest and
provide breeding habitats to
1.2 millions of pairs of
waterfowl. Over 50 percent of
the world population of
American black duck and 95
percent of the Canadian
population of black scoter nest
in the area.
Contact Marcel Darveau, Quebec Boreal Program,
Ducks Unlimited Canada, (418) 623-1650,
[email protected]
Contributions ($CN)
U.S. Federal
U.S. Non-Federal
Canadian
Total
2005
931,014
866,487
2,907,538
4,705,039
Total (1986-2005)
14,254,588
14,909,215
22,643,777
51,807,580
Accomplishments (Acres)
Secured
Enhanced
Managed
Total*
2005
2,801
790
790
2,801
Total (1986-2005)
48,054
24,818
27,099
48,054
* Secured, enhanced and managed acres are not additive.Acres are first
secured, may then be enhanced and are subsequently placed under
management.
Total (1986-2005)
27,777,857
28,764,810
90,516,186
147,058,853
Accomplishments (Acres)
Secured
Enhanced
Managed
Total*
2005
5,052
4,105
4,105
5,052
Total (1986-2005)
486,142
407,455
420,356
486,142
* Secured, enhanced and managed acres are not additive.Acres are first
secured, may then be enhanced and are subsequently placed under
management.
All of the 21 waterfowl species that breed in Quebec’s
boreal forest will benefit: trees for cavity-nesters,
protected sites for ground-nesters and better water
quality thanks to riparian buffers.
Marcel Darveau, Ducks Unlimited Canada
Background Image:
Tundra Swans
Ducks Unlimited Canada
13
Green-winged Teal Pair
Ducks Unlimited Canada
Historical loss associated with
the present day demand for
developable coastal vistas
represents a significant threat to
the Province’s breeding and
staging waterfowl.
New Brunswick
Background Image:
Great Blue Heron
Ducks Unlimited Canada
Nova Scotia
n 2001 the Nova Scotia Department of Natural
Resources (DNR) and Ducks Unlimited Canada
(DUC) began securing habitat with U.S. North
American Wetland Conservation Act (NAWCA) funds
under the Owners Unknown Habitat Securement
Project.
I
ew Brunswick’s 4,100-kilometre-long coastline
comprises dynamic beaches, dunes, rocky
shores and coastal wetlands. Historical loss
associated with the present day demand for
developable coastal vistas represents a significant
threat to the Province’s breeding and staging
waterfowl. Eastern Habitat Joint Venture (EHJV)
partners in New Brunswick continue to focus on
coastal habitats as an important component for the
conservation of its waterfowl populations.
Approximately 75 percent of Nova Scotia is privately
owned. However, there are hundreds of land parcels
with their title and ownership listed as “Owners/Owner
Unknown” by Service Nova Scotia and Municipal
Relations. Many of these lands provide habitat for
waterfowl, such as black duck, green-winged teal,
ring-necked duck, and other wetland-dependent
birds, amphibians, reptiles, fish, mammals and plants.
A small number provide habitat for Nova Scotia’s
endangered or at-risk species, including the piping
plover and thread-leaved sundew.
Land acquisition in the Province is increasingly
difficult which is why land donations have become
increasingly important. The Nature Conservancy of
Canada works with landowners to encourage
donations, like the generous gift of Dr. Roland Maurice.
Dr Maurice became determined to save his 6-hectare
(15-acre) Barachois property after witnessing the
degradation of the surrounding wildlife habitats. The
property is a classic coastal marsh found along the
Northumberland Strait and is a popular staging site
for black duck, northern shoveler, green-winged teal,
common tern and piping plover. It features a dune
system with numerous sand ridges that protects
diverse salt marsh with tidal channels and salt pans.
The potential for additional tax revenue, and the
Land Registration Act, has increased the effort by
municipalities to identify an owner with each parcel
within their jurisdiction. Once assessed, parcels are
sold for unpaid taxes. Nova Scotia’s Municipal
Government Act gives DNR the opportunity for first
refusal of these lands in exchange for paying the back
taxes owing to the municipality. Parcels not acquired
by DNR through the Owner Unknown provisions can
proceed to tax sale. In partnership with DUC through
the Eastern Habitat Joint Venture, DNR secures
parcels that have wetlands and coastal habitats
important for conservation.
N
It is through the public generosity of individuals like
Dr. Maurice, and the diligent efforts of the New
Brunswick EHJV partnership, that critical habitats for
waterfowl and other wetland-associated wildlife can
be protected for the future.
Contact Todd Byers, Program Manager,
New Brunswick Eastern Habitat Joint Venture,
(506) 453-2440, [email protected]
To-date over 2,750 hectares (6,800 acres) have been
acquired under the Owners Unknown Habitat
Securement Project with a project cost of
approximately $200,000 (CDN)–an unprecedented
$73 dollars per hectare ($29 per acre). There are
many more parcels under review, and it is anticipated
that DNR will be securing thousands of acres of
valuable habitat in the coming years.
Contact Glen J. Parsons, Nova Scotia Eastern Habitat
Joint Venture, (902) 679-6223, [email protected]
Nova Scotia’s EHJV partners
were recently honoured with the
Bay of Fundy Award from the
Nova Scotia Department of
Environment and Labour, in
recognition of their partnership
approach to the conservation
and sustainable use of wetlands
and coastal habitats.
Contributions ($CN)
U.S. Federal
U.S. Non-Federal
Canadian
Total
2005
561,642
330,270
549,414
1,441,326
Total (1986-2005)
4,746,953
4,652,809
10,161,850
19,561,612
Accomplishments (Acres)
Secured
Enhanced
Managed
Total*
2005
4,083
4,051
4,051
4,083
Total (1986-2005)
90,635
25,739
32,853
90,635
* Secured, enhanced and managed acres are not additive.Acres are first
secured, may then be enhanced and are subsequently placed under
management.
Contributions ($CN)
U.S. Federal
U.S. Non-Federal
Canadian
Total
2005
354,587
370,599
683,211
1,408,397
Total (1986-2005)
5,838,550
5,805,713
8,620,470
20,264,733
The spectacular Abrams
Accomplishments (Acres)
Secured
Enhanced
Managed
Total*
14
2005
426
64
2,358
426
Total (1986-2005)
67,695
19,100
28,495
67,695
* Secured, enhanced and managed acres are not additive.Acres are first
secured, may then be enhanced and are subsequently placed under
management.
River salt marsh
acquisition through the
Owner Unknown Project
is just one of many Nova
Scotia acquisitions that
benefit people and
wildlife.
Glen J. Parsons
Newfoundland and Labrador
n 1992, the town of Whitbourne, Newfoundland and
Labrador, was invited to join the Province’s Eastern
Habitat Joint Venture (EHJV) partnership to
implement a municipal stewardship plan for their
community. Whitbourne has impressive numbers of
American black duck, ring-necked duck, Canada geese
and green-winged teal occurring in a largely pristine
habitat consisting of vegetated and non-vegetated
water, slope bogs, deep marshes and forests.
I
The Sisters of St. Martha Convent gather for the PEI
Small Marsh Enhancement Project ceremony.Also in
On May 31, 1993, the Town of Whitbourne signed
Newfoundland and Labrador’s first stewardship
agreement, effectively securing 526 hectares
(1,300 acres) and influencing another 1,416 hectares
(3,500 acres) of habitat and raising awareness within
the community about the fragile nature of ecosystems
capable of supporting high numbers of waterfowl and
associated wetland species.
attendance were Sister Loretta White of the Sisters of
St. Martha Convent, PEI Ducks Unlimited Canada
representative Wade Lewis, PEI Trout Unlimited Chapter
representative Rollie Mackinnon and PEI Minister of
Health, Chester Gillan.
EHJV
Prince Edward Island
he Eastern Habitat Joint Venture (EHJV) has
had a dual focus in Prince Edward Island, firstly
to enhance and conserve wetlands in support of
North American Waterfowl Management Plan goals,
and secondly, to correct the causes of wetland habitat
degradation at their source.
T
For over a decade, the EHJV has focused on
conserving and enhancing wetlands in the island
landscape by supporting programs for soil
conservation, fencing livestock from waterways and
wetlands, small marsh enhancement and land
acquisition. In addition to wetland securement,
stewardship and conservation programs, the Agricultural
Pond and Small Marsh Enhancement Program, delivered
by Ducks Unlimited Canada, enjoyed continued
popularity and success in 2005. The completion of a
1.9 hectare (4.7 acre) Small Marsh Enhancement
Project on the grounds of the Sisters of St. Martha
Convent highlighted this success.
The Sisters of St. Martha Convent is situated in the
suburbs of Charlottetown, the Island’s Capital and
largest city, adjacent to the University of Prince
Edward Island and the Agriculture Canada Experimental
Farm. A portion of the property is still in agricultural
production. In addition to the Sisters and DUC, key
partners in this project include the PEI Department
of Environment, Energy and Forestry through the
Wildlife Conservation Fund and the PEI Chapter of
Trout Unlimited Canada. Although set in an urban
environment, this project is unique in that the
promotion of the benefits and values of wetland
conservation and stewardship are visible to a large
population base.
Since 1991, a total of 262 agricultural farm pond and
small marsh enhancement projects involving
354 landowners have been completed, enhancing
465 hectares (1,149 acres) of small wetlands in Prince
Edward Island.
Since Whitbourne’s involvement, another 16 towns have
signed stewardship agreements across the Province
securing a total of 12,417 hectares (30,683 acres) and
influencing 68,665 hectares (169,669 acres) of wetland
and associated upland habitat.
Contact Alan McLennan, Program Manager, Prince
Edward Island Eastern Habitat Joint Venture,
(902) 368-4667, [email protected]
The Stewardship Association of Municipalities was
formed to provide these stewards with a regular forum
to share knowledge and help resolve wetland
stewardship issues. In 2003, an audit of the Municipal
Wetland Stewardship Program concluded that
“Municipal Wetland Stewardship is a powerful and
effective strategy for wetland conservation.” The EHJV
program, like Whitbourne’s involvement, has come a
long way since 1993 and the Town of Whitbourne has
now approached EHJV staff to have their agreement
amended to expand the stewardship area.
Contributions ($CN)
U.S. Federal
U.S. Non-Federal
Canadian
Total
2005
230,444
207,215
202,380
640,039
Total (1986-2005)
2,523,742
2,514,477
6,147,268
11,185,487
Accomplishments (Acres)
Secured
Enhanced
Managed
Total*
2005
63
3
3
63
Total (1986-2005)
34,632
24,839
7,556
34,632
* Secured, enhanced and managed acres are not additive.Acres are first
secured, may then be enhanced and are subsequently placed under
management.
Once Whitbourne’s amended agreement is finalized,
the boundaries of the Town’s stewardship zone will
have tripled and management unit areas stand to
double. The Town of Whitbourne’s realization of the
importance of wildlife habitat, not only to waterfowl
species, but to all avian and wetland associated
species, is expected to grow exponentially.
Contact Gerry Yetman, Newfoundland and Labrador
Program Manager, Eastern Habitat Joint Venture,
(709) 637-2013, [email protected]
The Stewardship Association of
Municipalities was formed to
provide these stewards with a
regular forum to share
knowledge and help resolve
wetland stewardship issues.
Contributions ($CN)
U.S. Federal
U.S. Non-Federal
Canadian
Total
2005
99,853
44,178
244,147
388,178
Total (1986-2005)
1,281,127
1,198,818
5,652,678
8,132,623
Accomplishments (Acres)
Secured
Enhanced
Managed
Total*
2005
12,992
7
7
12,992
Total (1986-2005)
146,072
5,919
6,004
146,072
* Secured, enhanced and managed acres are not additive.Acres are first
secured, may then be enhanced and are subsequently placed under
management.
One of the many steadies on the Hodge River, a
management unit within the Whitbourne Stewardship
zone, provides important brood-rearing habitat for
black duck and green-winged teal.
Eastern Habitat Joint Venture
15
Thank you to all our partners who supported the Canadian program by contributing in 2005:
Canada
Acadia University
Access Land Services Ltd.
Action Land Consultants (2001) Ltd.
Agricultural Financial Services Corporation
Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada
Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada-Prairie
Farm Rehabilitation Administration
Aguila Exploration Consultants Ltd.
Alberni Valley Enhancement Association
Alberta Agriculture, Food and Rural
Development
Alberta Beef Producers
Alberta Community Development
Alberta Conservation Association
Alberta Environment
Alberta Fish and Game Association
Alberta Land and Lease Limited
Alberta Research Council
Alberta Sport, Recreation,
Parks & Wildlife Foundation
Alberta Sustainable Resource Development
Alberta Treasury
Alliance Pipeline Ltd. Partnership
Anonymous Donors
Anderson Exploration Ltd.
Antelope Land Services Ltd.
Apache Canada Ltd.
Aquest Energy Ltd.
ARC Resources Ltd.
Arctos Land Corporation
Arnett & Burgess Oilfield Construction
Atco Electric Ltd.
Atlas Land Consulting Ltd.
Avenir Operating Corporation
BP Canada Energy Company
Barbeejay Supplies Ltd.
Baytex Energy Ltd.
British Columbia Conservation Foundation
B.C. Hydro
Bishop Wild Bird Foundation
Bonavista Energy Trust Ltd.
Boyd PetroSearch
Brigus Resources Ltd.
British Columbia Cattlemen’s Association
British Columbia Ministry of Environment
British Columbia Ministry of Sustainable
Resource Management
British Columbia Ministry of Transportation
British Columbia Waterfowl Society
Bulrush Foundation
Burlington Resources Inc.
Cabrerra Resources Ltd.
Canada’s Green Plan
Canada West Land Services Ltd.
Canadian Circumpolar Institute
Canadian Landmasters Resource Services Ltd.
Canadian Natural Resources Ltd.
Canadian Pacific Railway Company
Canadian Water Resources Association
Cargill Limited
Caribou Land Services Ltd.
Cavalier Land Ltd.
Centrica Canada Ltd.
Clarke’s Harbour (Town of)
Clear Environmental Solutions Inc.
Climate Change Central
Columbia Basin Trust
Compara Energy Services Inc.
Complete Land Services Ltd.
Cordero Energy Inc.
Cossack Land Services Ltd.
Crispin Energy Inc.
Crystal Landing Corporation
Daylight Energy Ltd.
D.J. Old Ltd.
Delta Waterfowl Foundation
Desmarais Energy Corporation
Devon Canada Corporation
Dominion Energy Canada Ltd.
Ducks Unlimited Canada
Edmonton Springer Spaniel Club
Edwards Land (Calgary) Ltd.
EnCana Corporation
Endev Resources Partnership
Enermark Inc.
Enterra Energy Corporation
Environment Canada Atlantic Coastal Action Program
Environment Canada Canadian Wildlife Service
Environment Canada - EcoAction 2000
Environment Canada Great Lakes Sustainability Fund
Environment Canada Habitat Stewardship Program
Equatorial Energy Inc.
ExxonMobil Canada Energy
Fondation de la faune du Québec
Forest Products Association of Canada
Fortis Alberta Inc.
Friends of Cornwallis River Society
Genstar Development Partnership
Gentry Resources Ltd.
GeoTtir Inc.
Grand Petroleum Inc.
Grand River Conservation Authority
Harbinger Exploration Inc.
Horizon Land Services Ltd.
Husky Oil Operations Ltd.
Impact 2000 Inc.
Imperial Oil Resources Ltd.
Indian and Northern Affairs Canada
Integrated Geophysical Consultants Ltd.
Integrity Land Inc.
Iron Ore Company of Canada
Island Nature Trust
Jean A. MacKenzie
JED Oil Inc.
Kings County (Muncipality of)
Kings County Economic Development Agency
Kinwest Corporation
Krang Energy Inc.
Lafarge Canada Inc.
Land Solutions Inc.
Landquest Services Ltd.
Landwest Resource Services Ltd.
Lockhorn Exploration Ltd.
Logistex Land Services Ltd.
Loose Foot Computing Ltd.
Lucas Bowker & White
Luscar Ltd.
Majestic Land Services Ltd.
Mamba Production Partnership
Manitoba Agriculture, Food and
Rural Initiatives
Manitoba Conservation
Manitoba Finance
Manitoba Habitat Heritage Corporation
Manitoba Hydro
Manitoba’s “Taking Charge” Team
Manitoba Transportation and
Government Services
Manitoba Zero Tillage Research Association
Maverick Land Consultants (87) Inc.
MGV Energy Inc.
Minco Gas Co-op Ltd.
Ministère de l’Éducation, du Loisir
et du Sport du Québec
Ministère du Développement durable, de
l’Environnement et des Parcs du Québec
Mosaic Energy Ltd.
Nanaimo (Regional District of)
Native Plant Society of Saskatchewan
Natural Resources Canada Polar Continental Shelf Project
Natural Sciences and Engineering Research
Council of Canada
Nature Conservancy of Canada
Nature Trust of British Columbia
Nature Trust of New Brunswick
New Brunswick Department of Agriculture,
Fisheries and Aquaculture
New Brunswick Department of the
Environment and Local Government
New Brunswick Department of
Natural Resources
Newfoundland, Labrador Department
of Environment and Conservation
Nexen Inc.
Niven & Associates Inc.
Nor-Alta Energy Corporation
North Okanagan (Regional District of)
North Okanagan Naturalists’ Club
Northrock Resources Ltd. (Canada)
Nova Scotia Department of Agriculture
and Fisheries
Nova Scotia Department of Environment
and Labour
Nova Scotia Department of Natural Resources
Nova Scotia Department of Tourism,
Culture and Heritage
Nova Scotia Department of Transportation
and Public Works
Nova Scotia Habitat Conservation Fund
Nova Scotia Nature Trust
Oil and Gas Commission
Omera Resources Limited
Ontario Ministry of Natural Resources
Ontario Ministry of Natural Resources Fish and Wildlife Division
Canada Ontario Agreement
Healthy Wetlands-Healthy Communities
Initiative
Ecological Lands Acquisition Program
Great Lakes Heritage Coast
Ontario Trillium Foundation
Outlook Energy Corporation
Outsource Seismic Consultants Inc.
PanCanadian Petroleum Limited
Parks Canada
Elk Island National Park
Parkland Conservation Farm Association
Pengrowth Corporation
PetroBank Production Partnership
Petrofund Corporation
Petroland Services
Petrolane Consulting Ltd.
Pioneer Land Services Ltd.
Prairie Land Consultants Inc.
Prairie Plantation Inc.
Prairie Schooner Petroleum Ltd.
Prince Edward Island Department of
Transportation and Public Works
Prince Edward Island Department of
Environment, Energy and Forestry
Prince Edward Island
Wildlife Conservation Fund
Progress Energy Ltd.
Prospect Oil and Gas Management Ltd.
Pro West Land Services Ltd.
Quebec Waterfowler’s Association
Queens (Municipality of)
Real Estate Foundation of BC
Real Resources Inc.
Receiver General for Canada
Red Deer (County of)
Remington Development Corporation
Renton Land Services (1983) Ltd.
Resolution Land Services Ltd.
Richland Petroleum Corporation
Rife Resources Management Ltd.
Rockyview Energy Inc.
Ross Agri Supplies (Camrose) Inc.
Roy Northern Land and Environment Ltd.
Saskatchewan Council for Community
Development
Saskatchewan Environment
Saskatchewan Fish and Wildlife
Development Fund
Saskatchewan Watershed Authority
SaskPower
SaskTel
SBW Cattle Company Ltd.
Scott Land and Lease Ltd.
Shackleton Exploration Ltd.
Shell Canada Products Ltd.
Signalta Resources Ltd.
Slocan Forest Products Ltd.
Southeast Environmental Association
Standard Land Company Inc.
Starboard Gas Ltd.
Sundance Land Services Ltd.
Talisman Energy Inc.
Tasman Exploration Ltd.
TD Canada Trust
Tembec Inc.
Tempest Energy Corporation
Tera Environmental Consultants
Terra-Sine Resources Ltd.
The Donner Canadian Foundation
The McLean Foundation
The W. Garfield Weston Foundation
The Woodcock Foundation
Thompson & Associates, Inc.
Thunder Energy Inc.
Tides Canada Foundation
Touchdown Land Consultants Ltd.
TransCanada Pipelines Ltd.
Takota Land Ltd.
Traverse Landgroup Ltd.
Trident Exploration Corp.
Trifecta Resources Partnership
True Energy Inc.
Tudor Corporation Ltd.
Tula Foundation
Turner Foundation, Inc.
Université Laval
University of Saskatchewan
Val Vista Energy Ltd.
Vancouver International Airport Authority
Vermilion Resources Ltd.
Wave Energy Ltd.
Wayco Land Services
Wildlife Habitat Canada
Zargon Oil & Gas Ltd.
United States
Alabama Department of Conservation
and Natural Resources
Anonymous Foundation
Arizona Game and Fish Department
Arkansas Game and Fish Commission
Atlantic Flyway Council
California Department of Fish and Game
Central Flyway Council
City University of New York
Colorado Division of Wildlife
Delaware Division of Fish and Wildlife
Ducks Unlimited, Inc.
Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation
Commission
Georgia Department of Natural Resources,
Wildlife Resources Division
Idaho Fish and Game
Illinois Department of Natural Resources
Iowa Department of Natural Resources
Kansas Department of Wildlife and Parks
Kentucky Department of Fish and
Wildlife Resources
Louisiana Department of Wildlife
and Fisheries
Massachusetts Division of Fisheries
and Wildlife
Minnesota Department of Natural Resources
Mississippi Department of Wildlife,
Fisheries, and Parks
Mississippi Flyway Council
Missouri Department of Conservation
Montana Fish, Wildlife & Parks
National Fish and Wildlife Foundation
Nebraska Department of Natural Resources
Nevada Department of Conservation &
Natural Resources
New Jersey Division of Fish & Wildlife
North Carolina Wildlife Resources
Commission
North Dakota Game and Fish Department
Ohio Department of Natural Resources
Oklahoma Department of Wildlife
Conservation
Pacific Flyway Council
Paul G. Allen Forest Protection Foundation
Pennsylvania Game Commission
PEW Charitable Trusts
South Carolina Department of
Natural Resources
South Dakota Game, Fish and Parks
Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency
Texas Parks and Wildlife Department
The Nature Conservancy
TNC Wilson Challenge Fund
U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service
U.S. Forest Service
U.S. Geological Survey Biological Resources Division
Vermont Department of Environmental
Conservation
West Virginia Division of Natural Resources
Wilburforce Foundation
William H. Donner Foundation
Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources
Wyoming Game and Fish Department
We thank all our funding partners and apologize if we have inadvertently omitted any contributors from this list.
Background Image:
Contacts
Ring-necked Duck, Ducks Unlimited Canada
Canadian conservation partners
are grateful for the financial
support provided by the U.S.
North American Wetlands
Conservation Act and other U.S.
and Canadian partners.
North American Waterfowl
To view this publication electronically:
Management Plan
nawmp.ca
For information on NAWMP in Canada,
or for additional copies:
NABCI/NAWMP Coordination Office
Canadian Wildlife Service
16th Floor, 351 St. Joseph Boulevard
[email protected]
16
disponible en français.
Conservation Act Funding
wetlandscanada.org
Gatineau, Quebec K1A 0H3
(819) 934-6034
Publication également
North American Wetlands
North American Bird
Conservation Initiative
nabci.net
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