Choosing and Using Appliances With EnerGuide Includes ENERGY STAR® qualified appliances

Choosing and Using Appliances With EnerGuide Includes ENERGY STAR® qualified appliances
Choosing and Using
Appliances With EnerGuide
Includes ENERGY STAR®
qualified appliances
Aussi disponible en français sous le titre : Choix et utilisation des
appareils ménagers à l’aide d’ÉnerGuide
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Cat. No. M144-249/2013E-PDF (On-line)
ISBN 978-1-100-22074-1
© Her Majesty the Queen in Right of Canada, 2013
iii
Choosing and Using Appliances
With EnerGuide
More and more frequently, smart consumers are taking energy
efficiency into consideration when buying new appliances. They
have been using EnerGuide for years as a reliable reference
for comparing the energy consumption of major electric
household appliances and for identifying models that meet the
ENERGY STAR® specifications for energy efficiency. By doing this,
they are helping reduce the emission of greenhouse gases and air
pollution, and lowering the cost of running their homes.
EnerGuide is the official Government of Canada mark associated
with the testing, rating and labelling of major electrical appliances,
heating and cooling equipment, new homes and vehicles. The
EnerGuide label for major appliances and room air conditioners
is regulated under Canada’s Energy Efficiency Regulations.
Products that are the most energy efficient in their class are
identified with the ENERGY STAR symbol. Both EnerGuide
and ENERGY STAR are part of the Government of Canada’s
ecoENERGY initiatives, administered by Natural Resources
Canada’s Office of Energy Efficiency.
For more information, visit the OEE home page or call
1 800 O-Canada (1-800-622-6232), TTY: 1-800-926-9105
(teletype for the hearing-impaired).
iv
Contents
What is EnerGuide?. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1
The environment, EnerGuide and ENERGY STAR®. . . . . . . . 1
Improvements in appliance energy efficiency. . . . . . . . . . . 2
About Choosing and Using Appliances With EnerGuide. . . . . . 4
The EnerGuide label . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
The EnerGuide label with the ENERGY STAR symbol . . . . . . . 7
ENERGY STAR . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8
ENERGY STAR Most Efficient . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9
ENERGY STAR specifications. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9
The “second price tag” . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10
Calculating lifetime operating costs. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10
Second price tag savings: a comparison. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11
Appliance recycling. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12
Model listings, buying guide and tips
for saving energy and money . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13
Refrigerators. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14
Freezers. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18
Cooking appliances. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21
Dishwashers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23
Clothes washers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25
Clothes dryers. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27
Combination washer-dryers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29
Dehumidifiers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30
Additional resources. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32
1
What is EnerGuide?
EnerGuide rates the energy consumption and efficiency of
household appliances, heating and cooling equipment, new homes
and vehicles, and makes related information available to the
public. Administered by the Office of Energy Efficiency (OEE) of
Natural Resources Canada (NRCan), EnerGuide helps Canadian
consumers make more energy-efficient choices.
EnerGuide’s goals are
• to help conserve energy resources, which helps Canadians
enjoy cleaner air and a healthier environment by reducing the
emissions of pollutants and greenhouse gases (GHGs) that
contribute to climate change
• to help Canadians spend less money on energy
Canada’s Energy Efficiency Regulations (the Regulations)
require that all new major electrical household appliances bear
the EnerGuide label. Using the label and this guide will help you
to make informed buying decisions by comparing the energy
performance of different products. Ask your retailer for EnerGuide
information about any new appliance that does not have the label
or search NRCan’s online database for product information.
The environment, EnerGuide and
ENERGY STAR®
Many electrical utilities across Canada burn fossil fuels, such as
coal, oil and natural gas, to produce energy. Using less electricity
lowers the demand for power, and as a result, less fossil fuel
is burned to generate electricity. The combustion of fossil fuels
by electric utilities releases GHGs such as carbon dioxide and
particulates into the atmosphere. These gases contribute to the
global problem of climate change and release contaminants that
cause air pollution. By choosing energy-efficient products, you help
to reduce these emissions. Because major appliances consume up
to 14 percent of the energy used in your home, energy efficiency
helps you reduce your environmental footprint and saves you a
significant amount of money on your energy bills.
2
The EnerGuide label and guides like this one provide information
about the energy efficiency of various products that meet
Canada’s federal minimum standards for energy efficiency. By
virtue of the Regulations, Canada has set minimum energy
efficiency standards for a range of residential, commercial
and industrial products and equipment. At home, household
appliances, heating and ventilation equipment, and air
conditioners must meet minimum energy efficiency standards.
If a regulated product does not meet the minimum Canadian
standard, it cannot legally be sold in Canada. Products bearing
the EnerGuide label must first meet the minimum energy
efficiency requirements.
The ENERGY STAR symbol goes a step further. It identifies the
top energy performers in their class. You can expect long-term
savings from your ENERGY STAR qualified products because they
use less energy than standard products. To become ENERGY STAR
qualified, an appliance must not only meet Canada’s minimum
standards for energy efficiency first, but also meet or exceed
higher ENERGY STAR technical specifications. Manufacturers
voluntarily place the ENERGY STAR symbol on qualified products
after they have been certified as meeting those higher standards.
ENERGY STAR qualified products are identified by a star ( )
in the model listings .
Improvements in appliance
energy efficiency
In response to both energy efficiency regulations and the
influence of initiatives such as EnerGuide and ENERGY STAR,
today’s manufacturers strive to increase the energy efficiency of
their appliances.
But these improvements are also due to the efforts of consumers
like you. By demanding efficient and environmentally friendly
choices, you create a market in which manufacturers use
technology and innovation to continuously improve energy
performance. Innovation has paved the way to improved energy
performance; for example, new refrigerators in 2010 used an
average of at least 70 percent less energy than models produced
in 1990.
3
Residential energy use
Space heating
and cooling – 64%
Water heating – 17%
(includes hot water for appliances)
Lighting – 4%
Appliances – 14%
* Based on average household appliance energy consumption in 2008
Average annual energy consumption of new
major appliances (in kWh/yr)
1990 1997 2001 2010
Refrigerators
(467.3–521.1 L [16.5–18.4 cu. ft.])
Standard top-mounted
1044
664
572
427
ENERGY STAR qualified
–
–
440
369
658
342
337
295¹
Self-cleaning
727
759
741
530
Non-self-cleaning
786
780
786
499
1026
649
634
310
–
–
534
309
Standard (top-loading)
1218
930
905
319
ENERGY STAR qualified
–
–
304
148
1103
887
916
928
Freezers
Standard chest
Cooking appliances
Ranges (76 cm [30-in.])
Dishwashers
Standard
ENERGY STAR qualified
Clothes washers
Clothes dryers
Standard
kWh: kilowatt hour
cm: centimetre
L: litre
in.: inch
cu. ft.: cubic foot
Source: National Energy Use Database, NRCan
1
Freezer data are not as comprehensive as other appliance data, and therefore
should be used with caution.
4
About Choosing and Using Appliances
With EnerGuide
This guide provides
• links to energy consumption information for thousands of major
electrical household appliances
• a method for calculating the operating costs of comparable
electrical appliances
• tips for saving energy and money
The OEE maintains an online database of all appliance models
available in Canada that includes the most up-to-date product
information.
The model listings
• identify models that meet Canada’s Energy Efficiency
Regulations
• identify appliances that meet high-performance ENERGY STAR
technical specifications
• list only models that manufacturers and distributors indicate as
being available for sale in Canada
Except for dehumidifiers, each appliance is sorted by
• capacity or size
• features
• brand name
• model number
• estimated annual electrical energy consumption in kilowatt
hours (kWh)
5
There are many ways of using this guide. Here is a systematic
approach that you may find helpful.
First, read the introduction to the section of the product that
interests you. There you will find information on appliance types,
things to consider when buying, and tips for saving energy and
money. This information will help you in the next step.
Next, define your needs. Take into consideration the following:
• Consider how your living situation will change over the years
and the anticipated lifetime of the appliance. Will there be
little change? Will fewer or more people be depending on the
appliance?
• Measure the space available where the appliance will be
installed – height, width, depth – and add enough clearance
room to allow for air circulation around the appliance.
• Investigate models, dimensions, features and energy savings
that best suit your needs by comparing a number of products
and visiting manufacturers’ and retailers’ Internet sites.
Then, with a clearer idea of what meets your needs, go to the
product listings to
• Browse the relevant section and compare the operating costs
of the models you are considering with ones you may have
overlooked. ENERGY STAR qualified models are identified by
a star ( ).
• Calculate the “second price tag,” which is an estimate
of the cost of the energy that the product consumes
over time. Understanding this will help you make a more
informed decision.
6
The EnerGuide label
Canadians are familiar with the EnerGuide label, which has
appeared on products for more than 25 years.
The EnerGuide label is not a “seal of approval.” It simply
states verified facts about the energy performance of the unit
and affirms that the unit meets Canada’s minimum energy
efficiency standards.
Shoppers and retailers use the information on the label to
calculate and compare energy performance. Choosing a model on
the lower end of the EnerGuide label’s energy consumption scale
can really add up!
Example of an EnerGuide label
Estimated annual
energy consumption
in kilowatt hours
per year.
Where the unit stands compared with
similar models in terms of energy
consumption. When the arrowhead is
near the left end, the model is among
the most energy-efficient.
Energy consumption range of comparable models with lowest
consumption on the left and highest on the right.
7
What is a kilowatt hour?
The power utility measures electrical consumption in kilowatt
hours. One kilowatt hour is the amount of electrical energy
supplied by one kilowatt over a one-hour period. For example,
a 100-W light bulb over 10 hours uses 100 × 10 = 1000 Wh,
or 1 kWh. A three-minute hot shower also uses about 1 kWh
of energy.
Using energy-efficient appliances saves kilowatt hours:
• Saving 50 kWh is enough to run your dishwasher 35 times.
• Saving 100 kWh is enough to give you four free loads of
laundry a week for a year!
Canada’s Regulations require that the EnerGuide label appear
on all new major electrical household appliances, except for
dehumidifiers, until their first retail sale. They also require that all
appliances be verified using standardized test procedures by a
third-party verification agency approved by the Standards Council
of Canada to ensure that they meet Canada’s minimum energy
efficiency standards.
If a new appliance does not have an EnerGuide label, ask your
retailer for EnerGuide information.
The EnerGuide label with the
ENERGY STAR symbol
The ENERGY STAR symbol and information may be incorporated
into an EnerGuide label and identify appliances that meet
ENERGY STAR technical specifications and are therefore among
the most energy-efficient performers.
8
Example of an EnerGuide label with the
ENERGY STAR symbol
ENERGY STAR
The ENERGY STAR symbol is an international mark of premium
energy efficiency that appears on products that demonstrate they
meet strict energy efficiency technical specifications.
The OEE promotes the international ENERGY STAR symbol
in Canada and monitors its use. ENERGY STAR specifications
in Canada are harmonized with those of the United States
Environmental Protection Agency (EPA).
9
The ENERGY STAR symbol can appear as the bottom part of the
EnerGuide label, separately or possibly printed directly on the unit.
It also appears in brochures, catalogues, in advertising and on Web
sites. Manufacturers are not required to identify ENERGY STAR
qualified products; they do it voluntarily.
Find more information on the ENERGY STAR initiative and
up-to-date lists of ENERGY STAR qualified products.
ENERGY STAR Most Efficient
The ENERGY STAR Most Efficient initiative, piloted by the EPA
and NRCan in 2010 and 2011, is now a full-fledged offering in
2013. The ENERGY STAR Most Efficient designation identifies and
advances products in the marketplace in a number of categories
and recognizes the most efficient products among those that
qualify for the ENERGY STAR symbol. These exceptional products
represent the leading edge in efficiency, often consuming as little
as half the energy of a non-qualified model.
Look for the ENERGY STAR Most Efficient graphic, in stores and on
promotional material, to identify these products.
ENERGY STAR specifications
As markets and usage change and as technologies improve,
ENERGY STAR technical specifications are updated. ENERGY
STAR Most Efficient specifications are reviewed, and if required,
revised annually.
10
The “second price tag”
Calculating lifetime operating costs
The first price tag is familiar. It is the sticker price – the amount
you pay for an appliance. The second price tag is equally
important. It is the operating cost – the amount you pay to the
power company to operate an appliance.
Here is an easy way to calculate the second price tag
Multiply the estimated annual energy consumption – the large
kWh per year number on the EnerGuide label – by the cost of
electricity per kWh (see the rate on your utility bill).
The result of this calculation is an estimate of how much it will
cost you to operate the appliance for one year.
3
EnerGuide rating
local electricity cost
(kWh/yr)($/kWh)
= ANNUAL ELECTRICITY COST
Now multiply this annual electricity cost by the estimated life
expectancy of the appliance, as noted in the table below, to
calculate the estimated total operating cost.
3
annual electricity cost
appliance life
($/yr)(yr)
= LIFETIME ELECTRICITY COST
This method should be used for comparison only. It is not
accurate for estimating the actual cost because it does not take
into account the rise in energy prices over the lifetime of the
appliance, nor other variables, such as changes in the way you use
the appliance.
11
Life expectancies of major appliances (in years)
Dishwashers
11
Clothes washers
11
Refrigerators
13
Clothes dryers
12
Electric ranges
15
Freezers
12
Source: Appliance Magazine, July 2012
Second price tag savings: a comparison
Let’s use the EnerGuide label to compare two standard
clothes washers.
Model X, with the most efficient energy consumption rating,
uses 95 kWh/yr.
Model Y, with the least efficient energy consumption rating,
uses 492 kWh/yr.
Model X uses at least five times less electricity than model Y.
What does this mean in actual dollars when the average electricity
cost is 10 cents/kWh?
12
Model X
Annual electricity
cost calculation:
95 kWh
Model Y
Annual electricity
cost calculation:
492 kWh
$0.10/kWh
$0.10/kWh
= $9.50
= $49.20
Lifetime electricity
cost calculation:
$9.50
Lifetime electricity
cost calculation:
$49.20
3
3
3
3
life expectancy (11 years)
life expectancy (11 years)
= $104
= $541
Subtract the cost of Model X to calculate the difference:
$541 – $104 = $437
If you purchased Model X instead of Model Y, you would save at
least $437 in lifetime operating costs. This is a low estimate; the
$0.10/kWh energy rate will rise over the years and the differences
between models will increase. Clearly, your most economical
choice is also energy-wise and environmentally sound.
Appliance recycling
Be sure to choose an environmentally friendly method of disposing
of your old appliances. Many municipalities have recycling
programs that include pickup; call or visit your municipality’s Web
site to find out what programs exist in your area.
Ask if CFCs (chlorofluorocarbons) and switches are removed
before appliances are crushed for recycling. CFCs are the gases
that cool refrigerators and freezers. If not recovered properly,
CFCs will escape and damage the atmosphere’s ozone layer.
13
Model listings, buying guide and
tips for saving energy and money
This section provides information on each category of
appliance, including product types and their energy
consumption, things to consider when buying an appliance,
and tips to save energy and money.
The OEE online database includes the latest product
information for all appliance models available in Canada.
A note on model numbers
An asterisk (*) at the end of a model number represents
a variable feature such as colour, which does not affect
energy consumption. For example, if models 1234AG and
1234BG have the same features and EnerGuide ratings,
these models may be listed as 1234** or 1234*.
The number/pound sign (#) and the plus sign (+) appear in
some model numbers as part of the manufacturer’s code.
The pound sign and plus sign have no significance in terms
of a product’s energy consumption rating.
14
Refrigerators
Refrigerators
Average annual energy consumption of
new refrigerators (in kWh/yr)
467.3–521.1 L
(16.5–18.4 cu. ft.)
1990 1997 2001 2010
Standard top-mounted
1044
664
572
427
ENERGY STAR qualified
–
–
440
369
Today’s refrigerators are much better energy performers than
older models. Superior design, more efficient compressors, and
better insulation and door seals have all helped to improve
energy efficiency.
ENERGY STAR qualified refrigerators
The most energy-efficient refrigerators are ENERGY STAR
qualified – as indicated by a star ( ) in the model listings .
ENERGY STAR qualified residential refrigerators are available in
every size and type.
The energy efficiency of standard and compact refrigerators has
to exceed Canada’s minimum regulated standard by 20 percent or
more to be qualified.
15
Refrigerator types
EnerGuide categorizes refrigerators as standard without automatic
defrost, standard with automatic defrost, compact, wine chillers
with manual defrost, and wine chillers with automatic defrost.
Refrigerators without automatic defrost
Refrigerators with automatic defrost
Includes standard-size refrigerators, refrigerator-freezers and allrefrigerators (with no freezer) with automatic defrost (Types 3 to 7
on the EnerGuide label)
Compact refrigerators
Includes refrigerators and refrigerator-freezers (Types 11 to 15 on
the EnerGuide label) with total refrigerated volumes of less than
219.5 litres (L) (7.75 cubic feet [cu. ft.]) and overall heights of less
than 91.4 centimetres (cm) (36 inches [in.])
Wine chillers with manual defrost
Includes wine chillers with manual defrost (Type 19 on the
EnerGuide label)
Wine chillers with automatic defrost
Includes wine chillers with automatic defrost (Type 20 on the
EnerGuide label)
Refrigerators
Includes standard-size refrigerators and refrigerator-freezers
without automatic defrost (Types 1 and 2 on the EnerGuide label)
16
EnerGuide label refrigerator types
Refrigerators
Refrigerators without automatic defrost
Type 1
Refrigerators and refrigerator-freezers with semi-automatic
or manual defrost
Type 2
Refrigerator-freezers with partial automatic defrost
(a system in which only the refrigerator portion of
the appliance defrosts automatically and the freezer
compartment must be defrosted manually)
Refrigerators with automatic defrost
Type 3
Refrigerator-freezers with automatic defrost, with topmounted freezer, without through-the-door ice service and
all-refrigerators (with no freezer) with automatic defrost
Type 4
Refrigerator-freezers with automatic defrost, with sidemounted freezer, without through-the-door ice service
Type 5
Refrigerator-freezers with automatic defrost, with bottommounted freezer, without through-the-door ice service
Type 5A Refrigerator-freezers with automatic defrost, with bottommounted freezer, with through-the-door ice service
Type 6
Refrigerator-freezers with automatic defrost, with topmounted freezer, with through-the-door ice service
Type 7
Refrigerator-freezers with automatic defrost, with sidemounted freezer, with through-the-door ice service
Refrigerators – compact
Type 11 Compact refrigerators and refrigerator-freezers with
semiautomatic or manual defrost
Type 12 Compact refrigerators and refrigerator-freezers with partial
automatic defrost
Type 13 Compact refrigerator-freezers with automatic defrost and
top-mounted freezer and compact all-refrigerators (with no
freezer) with automatic defrost
Type 14 Compact refrigerator-freezers with automatic defrost and
side-mounted freezer
Type 15 Compact refrigerator-freezers with automatic defrost and
bottom-mounted freezer
Wine chillers
Type 19 Wine chillers with manual defrost
Type 20 Wine chillers with automatic defrost
17
Buying considerations
• Top-freezer models are more energy-efficient than side-by-side
or bottom-freezer models.
• Automatic icemakers and through-the-door or internal water
dispensers use more energy.
Saving energy and money
• Position the refrigerator at least 5 to 7 cm (2 to 3 in.) from the
wall so air can move freely around it. Refrigerator motors and
compressors generate heat, which requires sufficient space
around your refrigerator for continuous airflow. If heat cannot
escape, the refrigerator’s cooling system has to work extra hard
and uses more energy.
• Clean the condenser coils regularly so air can circulate. When
dust and pet hair build up on a refrigerator’s coils, air does
not circulate freely so the motor works harder and uses
more electricity.
• Position refrigerators away from heat sources such as ovens,
dishwashers, direct sunlight and heating vents.
• Set your refrigerator’s temperature between 1.7° and 3.3°C
(35° and 38°F) and the freezer at –18°C (0°F) for maximum
efficiency and food safety.
• Do not hold the door open longer than necessary.
• Do not place warm food or containers in the refrigerator; wait
until they cool.
• A full refrigerator is a fine thing, but do not overfill it. Restricted
air circulation inside reduces energy efficiency.
• Make sure the door seals are clean and tight. They should hold
a slip of paper snugly. If the paper slips out easily, replace the
seals. Another way to check the seals is by performing the
flashlight test: Place a lit flashlight inside the refrigerator and
close the door. If you can see light around the door, the seals
need to be replaced. Use the flashlight test for your freezer and
oven as well.
• Unplug an older, second refrigerator if you are not using it;
it probably uses twice as much energy as your newer one.
• Use municipal pickup and recycling services where available to
get rid of old refrigerators. Some jurisdictions have “refrigerator
roundup” programs with free pick-up of old, inefficient
refrigerators for recycling.
Refrigerators
• Be sure to read the owner’s manual. It includes helpful hints on
how to operate refrigerators at optimum efficiency.
18
Freezers
Average annual energy consumption of
new freezers (in kWh/yr)
1990 1997 2001 2010
Freezers
Standard chest
658
342
337
295
Note: Freezer data are not as comprehensive as other
appliance data and therefore should be used with caution.
ENERGY STAR qualified freezers
The most energy-efficient freezers are ENERGY STAR qualified –
as indicated by a star ( ) in the model listings .
To be ENERGY STAR qualified, standard-size freezers must
have energy efficiency levels that are 10 percent or more above
Canada’s minimum regulated standard, and compact freezers
must exceed the standard by at least 20 percent.
Freezer types
Freezers come in various standard and compact sizes and with a
variety of features, many of which affect energy consumption.
Upright freezers
Includes manual or automatic defrost (Types 8 and 9 on the
EnerGuide label)
Chest freezers
Includes standard chest freezers (Types 10 and 10A on the
EnerGuide label)
Compact freezers
Includes upright and chest models with manual or automatic
defrost (Types 16 to 18 on the EnerGuide label) and compact
freezers with freezer compartment volumes of less than 219.5 L
(7.75 cu. ft.) and overall heights of less than 91.4 cm (36 in.)
19
EnerGuide label freezer types
Freezers – upright
Type 8
Upright with manual defrost
Type 9
Upright with automatic defrost
Freezers – chest
Type 10 All chest freezers and all other freezers
(not defined as Type 8, Type 9 or Type 10A)
Freezers – compact
Type 16 Compact upright with manual defrost
Type 17 Compact upright with automatic defrost
Type 18 Compact chest and all other freezers (not defined as Type
16 or Type 17)
Buying considerations
• Chest freezers are generally more energy-efficient than upright
models because only a small amount of cold air flows out when
you open them. Upright freezers lose more cold air because it
flows down and out of the freezer when the door is opened.
• Freezers with automatic defrost use more energy than models
with manual defrost.
Freezers
Type 10A All chest freezers with automatic defrost
20
Saving energy and money
• Be sure to read the owner’s manual. It includes helpful hints on
how to operate a freezer at optimum efficiency.
Freezers
• Make sure the door seals are clean and tight. They should hold
a slip of paper snugly. If the paper slips out easily, replace the
seals. Another way to check the seals is by performing the
flashlight test: Place a lit flashlight inside and close the door.
If you can see light around the door, the seals need to be
replaced. Use the flashlight test for your refrigerator and oven
as well.
• Set the freezer temperature at –18°C (0°F) for maximum
efficiency and food safety.
• Do not place warm food or containers in the freezer; wait until
they cool.
• Position the freezer at least 5 to 7 cm (2 to 3 in.) from the
wall so air can move freely around it. Freezer motors and
compressors generate heat, which requires sufficient space
around your freezer for continuous airflow. If heat cannot
escape, the freezer’s cooling system has to work extra hard and
uses more energy.
• Position a freezer away from heat sources, such as ovens,
dishwashers, direct sunlight and heating vents.
• Defrost and clean the food compartment at least once a year.
• Clean the condenser coils regularly so air can circulate. When
dust and pet hair build up on the coils, air does not circulate
freely so the freezer works harder and uses more electricity.
21
Cooking appliances
(ranges, ovens and cooktops)
Average annual energy consumption of
new ranges (in kWh/yr)
76 cm (30 in.)
1990 1997 2001 2010
Self-cleaning
727
759
741
530
Non-self-cleaning
786
780
786
499
Note: There are no ENERGY STAR specifications for cooking
appliances.
Ranges
Ranges are categorized as self-cleaning or non-self-cleaning.
Ovens
Ovens are categorized as single or double units. EnerGuide
calculates the energy consumption of double ovens as an average
of the two units, rather than their total energy use.
Cooktops
CT
MT
SS
ST
TH
Conventional top
Modular top
Solid surface
Smooth top
Tungsten halogen
Note: The EnerGuide rating for cooking appliances does not
include
• modular cooktops with magnetic induction elements
• units made for a 120-volt power supply
• gas-fired cooktops and ovens
Cooking appliances
Cooking-appliance categories
22
Buying considerations
• Look for the lowest EnerGuide rating.
• Convection ovens cook more evenly and quickly and use less
energy because a fan moves heat around inside the oven
throughout the cooking process.
• Buy an oven with a window so you do not have to open the
door to check cooking progress. Every time the door is opened,
at least 20 percent of the heat is lost.
Saving energy and money
Cooking appliances
• Be sure to read the owner’s manual. It includes helpful hints
on how to operate ranges, cooktops and ovens at optimum
efficiency.
• Match pots to the size of the cooking element. The bottom of a
pot should just cover the cooking ring. When a pot is too small,
energy is lost around the outside.
• Use flat, smooth-bottomed pots that make full contact with the
element so that most of the energy goes directly into the pot.
• Use the self-cleaning feature infrequently and only immediately
after you use the oven, while it is still hot.
• Make sure the oven door seals are clean and tight. They should
hold a slip of paper snugly. If the paper slips out easily, replace
the seals. Another way to check the seals is by performing the
flashlight test: Cover the oven window with opaque material.
Place a lit flashlight inside the oven and close the door. If you
can see light around the door, the seals need to be replaced.
Use the flashlight test for your refrigerator and freezer as well.
• Lower the heat! A fast boil is no hotter than a slow boil. Once
boiling has begun, turn down the heat to the lowest setting
needed for the job at hand.
• Minimize conventional oven preheating. Except for breads and
pastries, most foods do not need a preheated oven.
• Turn off heating elements before the food is fully cooked – a
few minutes, a minute or even just 30 seconds ahead. The
heating element, the pot and the latent heat in the food will
often finish cooking the food without using more electricity.
• Use lids on pots.
• Use pressure cookers.
• Whenever possible, use the cooktop, toaster oven or microwave
oven instead of the larger oven to cook or heat smaller
quantities of food.
23
Dishwashers
Average annual energy consumption of
new dishwashers (in kWh/yr)
1990 1997 2001 2010
Standard
ENERGY STAR qualified
1026
649
634
325
–
–
534
322
The EnerGuide rating for dishwashers is based on 215 loads a year
or an average of 4 loads per week. The energy performance rating
takes into account the amount of
• energy used by the water heater for an average cycle
Soil-sensing dishwashers are also tested for the average energy
used for loads with light, medium or heavy soil.
ENERGY STAR qualified dishwashers
The most energy-efficient dishwashers are ENERGY STAR
qualified – as indicated by a star ( ) in the model listings .
ENERGY STAR qualified models use about 70 percent less energy
than those built in 1990, so replacing an old one can save a lot of
water and energy.
ENERGY STAR qualified dishwashers also use 20 to 50 percent less
energy and 35 to 60 percent less water than standard models.
To qualify for the ENERGY STAR, standard dishwashers must
achieve energy efficiency levels that are at least 17 percent
higher than Canada’s minimum regulated standard. Compact
dishwashers must be at least 15 percent more efficient.
Many ENERGY STAR dishwashers use “smart” sensors that match
the wash cycle and the amount of water to the size of each load.
They may also have an internal heater to boost the temperature of
incoming water.
Dishwashers
• electricity the dishwasher uses in standby mode or while the
appliance is idle
24
Dishwasher types
The EnerGuide label classifies dishwashers as built-in (standard
and compact) or portable (standard and compact).
Built-in dishwashers
Built-in dishwashers are permanently connected to water and
electrical supplies.
Portable dishwashers
Portable dishwashers are not permanently connected to water and
electrical supplies and can be moved around.
The terms “standard” and “compact” refer to capacity:
• The capacity of a standard dishwasher is equal to or greater
than eight place settings and six serving pieces.
Dishwashers
• The capacity of a compact dishwasher is less than eight place
settings and six serving pieces.
Buying considerations
• Match size to your typical use. Compare standard, compact and
larger models to minimize under- or over-use.
• Look for “energy-saver,” “light” and “short-wash” cycles. More
efficient cycles use less water and save energy. A no-heat drying
option has also become common.
• Some models have sensors that measure the dirt on dishes and
determine how much water is called for. There is no wasted
water, no wasted energy.
Saving energy and money
• Read the owner’s manual. It includes helpful hints about
operating the dishwasher at optimum efficiency.
• Clean the filter regularly.
• Run the dishwasher only when it is full, and use the setting
that offers the best wash in the least amount of time. Check the
manual to determine the most appropriate settings.
• Select the no-heat drying cycle (also called “air dry”).
• There is no need to rinse dishes before putting them in the
dishwasher. Rinsing, especially in hot water, wastes energy. Just
scrape off the excess food, and let the dishwasher do the job
you bought it to do.
25
Clothes washers
Average annual energy consumption of
new clothes washers (in kWh/yr)
1990 1997 2001 2010
Standard (top-loading)
1218
930
905
319
ENERGY STAR qualified
–
–
304
148
ENERGY STAR qualified clothes washers
The most energy-efficient clothes washers are ENERGY STAR
qualified – as indicated by a star ( ) in the model listings .
To be ENERGY STAR qualified, clothes washers must be standard
size – with a minimum tub capacity of 45 L (1.6 cu. ft.) – and at
least 59 percent more efficient than Canada’s minimum energy
performance standard. There is no ENERGY STAR specification for
compact clothes washers.
Clothes washer types
EnerGuide lists clothes washers as standard or compact. They
come in various sizes and configurations and with a selection of
features, many of which affect energy consumption.
Standard-size clothes washers
Standard-size clothes washers include top- and front-loading
models. Only standard models are ENERGY STAR qualified.
Compact clothes washers
Compact clothes washers include top- and front-loading models
with capacities of less than 45 L (1.6 cu. ft.). ENERGY STAR does
not qualify compact clothes washers.
Clothes washers
ENERGY STAR qualified clothes washers must have advanced
design features that use less energy and 35 to 50 percent
less water than ENERGY STAR qualified washers made before
January 1, 2007. Features include a spin cycle that extracts more
water from clothes, thus shortening the time needed in a clothes
dryer and reducing the energy needed for drying.
26
Buying considerations
• ENERGY STAR qualified front-loading and top-loading clothes
washers use substantially less energy and water. They do not
typically have an agitator post in the middle of the tub. Frontloading washers tumble clothes through a small amount of
water instead of rubbing clothes against an agitator in a full
tub. Advanced top-loading washers flip or spin clothes through
a reduced stream of water. They also have high-efficiency motors
that spin the drum at high speed to extract even more water in
the final spin cycle, which reduces the demand on dryer energy.
• Some washers, including a number of ENERGY STAR qualified
models, can be stacked with a dryer on top or installed under
a countertop, providing useful space-saving opportunities. This
guide does not identify these features, so check the manuals
and consult the manufacturers.
Saving energy and money
• Be sure to read the owner’s manual. It includes helpful hints on
operating the washer at optimum efficiency.
Clothes washers
• Do not overload, as overloading can cause mechanical failure
and reduce the effectiveness of the spin cycle.
• Go cold! Studies show that clothes rinsed in cold water come
out just as clean as those rinsed in warm water. Your waterheating bill will drop considerably.
• When cold water will not do the job, wash in warm, rather than
hot water, and rinse in cold water. You will use about 50 percent
less energy.
• For ENERGY STAR qualified units, always use High Efficiency
detergents. Many are available specifically for cold water
washing. Regular detergents can create too many suds, which
can lead to soils not being completely rinsed out of both the
laundry and the washer.
• Use a minimal amount of detergent, as residue can build up and
cause mechanical failure.
• Extra-dirty clothes? Instead of washing twice, use the
presoak option.
• If your machine does not have an automatic water-level
selector, set the water level to suit the size of each load.
• When possible, install your washer close to the water heater to
reduce the amount of heat lost through the pipes. Even when
the water heater is nearby, insulate exposed pipes, especially
when they are close to cold walls.
27
Clothes dryers
Average annual energy consumption of
new clothes dryers (in kWh/yr)
1990 1997 2001 2010
Standard
1103
887
916
928
ENERGY STAR qualified clothes dryers
Currently, there is no ENERGY STAR specification for clothes
dryers, however ENERGY STAR is currently developing one so that
consumers will soon be able to use ENERGY STAR as a criterion in
their buying decisions.
Clothes dryer types
Clothes dryers come in various sizes, and size affects energy
consumption. The EnerGuide label categorizes clothes dryers as
either standard or compact.
Standard clothes dryers
Compact clothes dryers
Compact clothes dryers include both 120- and 240-volt (V) models
with capacities of less than 125 L (4.4 cu. ft.).
Buying considerations
• Many dryers have sensors that shut the dryer off when the
clothes are dry. This saves both energy and wear and tear
on clothes.
• One secret of getting the most out of your dryer is in the
washer. The spin cycle takes less energy than the dryer to
remove the same amount of water from clothes. Buy an
ENERGY STAR qualified clothes washer that does an exceptional
job of spin drying. Clothes will be drier as you take them out of
the washer, thereby reducing the time they need in the dryer.
Clothes dryers
Standard clothes dryers include all standard-size front-loading
models.
28
Saving energy and money
• Be sure to read the owner’s manual. It includes helpful hints for
operating your dryer at optimum efficiency.
• Do not put dripping wet clothes into your dryer; it will have to
work extra hard and extra long and use more energy. Dryers
are designed to handle damp, not wet, clothes. Wring out wet
clothes or spin them in the washer first.
• Avoid drying partial loads.
• Fill but do not overfill, because too much clothing blocks
airflow, lengthens drying time and overworks the machine.
• Sort clothes by thickness before washing. A shirt will dry much
faster than a towel, especially if it is partly synthetic. Put thin,
quick-drying items in one load and thicker items, such as towels,
in another.
• Use the dryer continuously, one load right after another. This
way, the dryer remains warm, does not have to re-heat and
saves energy.
• Do not run the dryer too long. Over-drying not only uses more
electricity but also increases shrinking, wrinkles and wear. Most
loads dry in 40 to 60 minutes.
Clothes dryers
• Watch out for unintentional over-drying. It may mean that
the humidity sensors are no longer accurate and the dryer
needs servicing.
• To save money and reduce shrinking, use the “cool down”
cycle. Here, the heat is off for the last few minutes and drying
continues as unheated air is blown through tumbling clothes.
• Clean the lint screen before or after each load. A full screen can
cause your dryer to consume up to 30 percent more energy.
• Keep your dryer’s outside exhaust vent clean. A clogged vent
makes the blower work longer and harder, thereby increasing
energy consumption.
• Lint build-up in the exhaust duct and outside vent is a potential
fire hazard. Inspect and clean them at least once a year –
mark it on your calendar and refer to your owner’s manual
for guidance.
29
Combination washer-dryers
Includes
• “stacked” or “over-under” washer-dryers - in which the dryers
are built on top of the washers on one frame or are separate
and can be placed on top of washers
• “combination” washer-dryers, also referred to as “ventless,”
“integrated,” “all-in-one,” “condensed air” and “condensing”
Washer-dryer categories
Washer-dryers are available in various sizes, which affect energy
consumption.
Standard washer-dryers
Includes dryer components with capacities of at least 125 L
(4.4 cu. ft.); washer capacities must be at least 45 L (1.6 cu. ft.).
Compact washer-dryers
Includes 120- and 240-V dryer components with capacities of less
than 125 L (4.4 cu. ft.); washer capacities are less than 45 L (1.6
cu. ft.).
Standard combination washer-dryers with
condensing or gas dryers
Includes standard combination washer-dryers for which there are
energy efficiency data only for the washer components. The dryer
components of these appliances are either condensing or gas
units; therefore, they are not rated under EnerGuide.
For information and tips on operation, refer to the owner’s manual.
Combination washer-dryers
Avoid washing partial loads because combination washer-dryers
work at peak efficiency when full. For more tips on saving
energy and money, see the sections on clothes washers and
clothes dryers above.
30
Dehumidifiers
Dehumidifiers are frequently used in basements to control
dampness and in upstairs areas where moisture from everyday
activities cannot vent to the outdoors through the house envelope
or there is no mechanical ventilation. Cooking, laundry, showers
and dishwashing by a family of four can release up to 80 L
(2.8 cu. ft.) of water into the air each week, most of which must
be removed by dehumidification if it cannot escape through
other means.
It is important to find the source of any excess moisture and
correct any problems because the resulting mould and mildew
may pose health risks and damage the house. A wet basement,
for instance, may be evidence of foundation cracks or drainage
problems. Windows with excessive condensation may be a
symptom of poor ventilation. Renovated and new homes may
suffer high humidity problems due to moisture in the building
materials. In fact, moisture problems are common in today’s wellinsulated homes, which trap moisture as they keep in heat.
Portable dehumidifiers are ideal for addressing minor moisture
problems but they are not an alternative for proper ventilation,
such as air-to-air heat exchangers and heat- and energy-recovery
ventilators that are common in modern homes and are standard
new-home equipment in some jurisdictions. Talk to an HVAC
(heating, ventilating and air-conditioning) specialist to determine
what is best for your home.
The model listings include only ENERGY STAR qualified portable
plug-in models that can be easily moved to areas of greatest need.
Dehumidifiers
EnerGuide labels are not required for dehumidifiers. ENERGY STAR
qualified products, however, will continue to be voluntarily
labelled with the ENERGY STAR symbol.
31
Use the following table when selecting a standard-capacity
dehumidifier for residential use.
Area to be dehumidified
Humidity conditions*
(moisture accumulation per day)
(L)
Damp1
Wet2
46 m (500 sq. ft.)
6
7
8
93 m2 (1000 sq. ft.)
8
9
11
139 m2 (1500 sq. ft.)
10
12
14
186 m2 (2000 sq. ft.)
12
15
18
232 m (2500 sq. ft.)
15
18
21
279 m2 (3000 sq. ft.)
18
22
24
2
2
Very wet3
1
Damp – An area that feels damp and where a musty odour prevails,
especially in humid weather. Damp spots may appear on the walls and
floor.
2
et – The space feels and smells wet, walls or floor sweat, or seepage
W
is present.
3
Very wet – Walls sweat, and the floor is almost always wet.
*If capacity is not measured in metric units, remember that two pints are
equivalent to approximately 1 L.
ENERGY STAR qualified dehumidifiers
A dehumidifier energy factor (EF) is related to the water removal
capacity of the unit. The higher the EF, the more energy-efficient
the unit. To qualify for ENERGY STAR, a dehumidifier must have an
EF of 1.20 to 2.50, depending on its water removal capacity.
As of October 1, 2012, the performance criteria for ENERGY STAR
qualified dehumidifiers are as follows.
(L/day)
(pints/day)
Energy factor
(L/kWh)
<35.5
<75
≤ 1.85
35.5 to ≤ 87.5
75 to ≤ 185
≤ 2.80
Dehumidifiers
Water removal capacity
Additional resources
32
Additional resources
Publications from the Office of Energy
Efficiency
The OEE of NRCan offers many publications that will help you
understand home heating systems, home and office energy use
and transportation efficiency. These publications explain what
you can do to reduce energy use and maintenance costs as you
increase your comfort and help protect the environment.
To view or order any of these free publications, visit the
OEE’s energy publications virtual library.
Natural Resources Canada’s Office of Energy Efficiency
Leading Canadians to Energy Efficiency at Home,
at Work and on the Road
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