Human Resources and Skills Development Canada Departmental Performance Report 2009–2010 Estimates

Human Resources and Skills Development Canada Departmental Performance Report 2009–2010 Estimates
Human Resources and
Skills Development Canada
2009–2010 Estimates
Departmental Performance Report
Table of Contents
5
Ministers’ Messages
9
Section I Departmental Overview
10
10
11
12
19
22
23
26
30
1.1
1.2
1.3
1.4
1.5
1.6
1.7
1.8
1.9
Introduction
Raison d’Être and Responsibilities
Program Activity Architecture
Performance Summary Tables
Contribution of Priorities to Strategic Outcomes
Risk Analysis
Expenditure Profile 2009 – 2010
Summary of HRSDC’s Contributions to Canada’s Economic Action Plan
Voted and Statutory Items
31Section II Analysis of Program Activities
by Strategic Outcome
32
2.1 Strategic Outcome 
A skilled, adaptable and inclusive labour force and an efficient labour market
2.1.1 Program Activity: Skills and Employment
2.1.2 Program Activity: Learning
32
38
49
2.2 S
trategic Outcome 
Safe, fair and productive workplaces and cooperative workplace relations
2.2.1 Program Activity: Labour
49
55
55
60
67
67
73
81
81
2.3 S
trategic Outcome 
Income security, access to opportunities and well-being for individuals,
families and communities
2.3.1 Program Activity: Income Security
2.3.2 Program Activity: Social Development
2.4 S
trategic Outcome 
Service excellence for Canadians
2.4.1 Program Activity: Citizen-Centred Service
2.4.2 Program Activity: Integrity and Processing
2.5 Internal Services
2.5.1 Program Activity: Internal Services
87 Section III Supplementary Information
88
88
92
99
3.1 Electronic Tables
3.2 Financial Highlights
3.3 Specified Purpose Accounts
3.4 Statutory Annual Reports
Ministers’ Messages
Message from the Minister of
Human Resources and Skills Development
I
t is my pleasure to present Human Resources and Skills Development Canada’s
Departmental Performance Report to Parliament. The Report identifies progress made
on the priorities outlined in the 2009 – 2010 Report on Plans and Priorities.
In 2009 – 2010, the global economic slowdown was felt widely by many Canadians.
The Government of Canada’s priority was to provide support to Canadian workers
and their families and to stimulate the economy. That is why Canada’s Economic
Action Plan was created. It helped hundreds of thousands of Canadians overcome
challenges and contributed to our economic recovery.
Human Resources and Skills Development Canada played a major role in delivering several key measures
included in Canada’s Economic Action Plan. These temporary and targeted measures were designed to
protect and create jobs, as well as to support Canadians and help them prepare for the jobs of the future.
Unemployed Canadians were provided with additional support from the Employment Insurance Program.
Hardest hit groups such as youth and older workers benefited from additional funding to help them find jobs
or transition to new careers. Almost 200,000 Canadians benefited from additional investments in training
and skills development programs to help them upgrade their skills and find work. Employers also received
assistance to avoid lay offs through the Work-Sharing Program. Over 255,000 Canadians have participated
in this program since the economic downturn began.
Having the right skills and education is an essential part of preparing for jobs of the future. To support a
skilled, adaptable and inclusive workforce, HRSDC encourages Canadians to save for post-secondary
education and provides financial assistance to students. In 2009 – 2010, new student financial assistance
measures, including Canada Student Grants and the Repayment Assistance Plan, were made available.
The new Canada Student Grants reached more than 275,000 college and undergraduate students this year.
To better respond to the increased demand for services created by the economic downturn, Service Canada
implemented several measures, including re-engineering processes, increasing automation, redistributing
workloads across the country, extending hours of service and encouraging clients, when possible, to self-serve
online. As a result, Canadians were able to receive timely service and benefits from key programs such as
Employment Insurance, the Canada Pension Plan and the Old Age Security. Maintaining service excellence
in our day-to-day interactions with millions of Canadians is a continued commitment for Service Canada.
As Minister of Human Resources and Skills Development Canada, I am proud of how we helped preserve
and create jobs and how we supported families, employers and businesses through the economic downturn.
As the economy recovers, Human Resources and Skills Development Canada will be supporting Canadians
each step of the way.
The Honourable Diane Finley, P.C., M.P.
Minister of Human Resources and Skills Development
Ministers’ Message
7
A
Message from the Minister of Labour
s Canada’s Labour Minister, I am pleased with the achievements of the
Labour Program over the 2009 – 2010 fiscal year. We have met and even surpassed
our goals, and we achieved this during a particularly challenging time—facing issues
such as the global economic downturn, the 2009 H1N1 flu virus and Canada’s
transition to economic recovery.
The Labour Program contributes to Canada’s economic success and the well-being
of Canadians by fostering healthy, fair and productive workplaces, and cooperative workplace relations.
Working closely with employers, unions, provincial and territorial colleagues, and international partners,
the Labour Program continues to find innovative ways to provide support to hard-working Canadians,
to help build dynamic work environments, and to advance Canadian values and fair labour practices on
the global stage. These efforts contribute to the economic success of the country and to the strength of its
social fabric.
During the economic challenges we are currently facing, the Labour Program continues to play an
important role in the country’s economic recovery. The Wage Earner Protection Program, which was
expanded in January 2009 through Canada’s Economic Action Plan, helped over 23 500 workers recover
wages lost due to employer bankruptcy or receivership.
Another accomplishment includes the work done to promote harmonious union management relations
and to minimize the number of work stoppages. This is particularly important now as Canada’s economy
gains strength but remains fragile. In 2009 – 2010, 94% of approximately 200 collective bargaining disputes
were settled without a work stoppage.
Canadians should be able to return home safe and sound after their work day. Focused, proactive Labour
Program activities have helped workplace injuries and fatalities in high-risk industries continue to decrease
since 2005.
In 2009-2010, the Labour Program renewed the Canada-China Framework for Labour Cooperation on Labour
Matters. It also provided technical assistance to key partner countries like Peru, Colombia, Guatemala and
Honduras to help administer their labour legislation and comply with international labour standards.
As Canadian workplaces continue to evolve, we must work together to keep pace and be responsive. I am
confident that the Labour Program will continue to meet these challenges effectively.
The Honourable Lisa Raitt, P.C., M.P.
Minister of Labour
8
2010 – 2011 Estimates Report on Plans and Priorities
SectionSection
I Departmental
I Overview
Overview
Human Resources and Skills
Development Canada
1.1Introduction
1.2Raison d’Être
and Responsibilities
Through the Labour Program, HRSDC is responsible
for labour laws and policies in federally regulated
workplaces. The Labour Program’s mandate includes
promoting and protecting labour standards and
workplace health and safety, facilitating constructive
labour relations, developing labour-related policy and
program options in response to changes in economic
and social conditions, providing customized information
about industrial relations and workplace trends,
representing Canada in international organizations
dealing with labour issues, and negotiating labour
cooperation agreements and cooperative frameworks
with free trade partners and emerging economic partners.
HRSDC’s mission is to build a stronger and more
competitive Canada, to support Canadians in making
choices that help them live productive and rewarding
lives, and to improve Canadians’ quality of life. The
Department delivers its mandate through three business
lines: programs that support human resources and
skills development, the Labour Program, and Service
Canada.
Service Canada helps citizens access HRSDC’s
programs, as well as other Government of Canada
programs and services, at more than 600 points of
service across the country. In addition to in-person
services, the organization serves the needs of
Canadians online at (www.servicecanada.gc.ca) and by
telephone through 1 800 O-Canada and its integrated
network of call centres.
T
his document provides an account of the
performance of Human Resources and Skills
Development Canada (HRSDC) for the period from
April 1, 2009, to March 31, 2010. It reports the
Department’s achievements related to the commitments
set out in the 2009 – 2010 Report on Plans and Priorities.
Together, HRSDC’s three business lines deliver a range
of programs and services that affect Canadians throughout
their lives, including:
• Old Age Security;
• Canada Pension Plan;
• Employment Insurance;
• Canada Student Loans and Grants;
• National Child Benefit; and
• Universal Child Care Benefit.
These direct benefits to Canadians are part of Canada’s
social safety net and represent almost 95% of the
Department’s expenditures. They are designed to
provide seniors with basic income security, support
unemployed workers, help students finance their
post-secondary education, and assist parents who are
raising young children, particularly those in low- and
middle-income families.
HRSDC also provides funding to organizations and other
levels of government through targeted labour market
and social development programs that aim to improve
Canada’s competitiveness, increase opportunities for
vulnerable Canadians, and help Canadians become
more resilient, skilled and adaptable.
10
2009 – 2010 Estimates Departmental Performance Report
1.3Program Activity Architecture
Results for Canadians
Excellence in Everything We Do
Mission: Build a stronger and more competitive Canada, to support Canadians in making
choices that help them live productive and rewarding lives, and to improve Canadians’
quality of life.
Strategic Outcome 1
 Employment Insurance
A skilled, adaptable
and inclusive labour
force and an efficient
labour market
Skills and
Employment
 Inclusive Labour Force
 Skilled Labour Force
 Labour Market Efficiency
Learning
Strategic Outcome 2
 Student Financial Assistance
 Canada Education Savings Program
 Mediation and Conciliation
Safe, fair and productive
workplaces and cooperative
workplace relations
Labour
 Workplace Safety, Standards and Equity
 International Labour Affairs
 Workplace Information
Strategic Outcome 3
Income
Security
Income security,
access to opportunities
and well-being for
individuals, families
and communities
 Old Age Security
 Canada Pension Plan
 Canada Disability Savings Program
 National Child Benefit
Social
Development
 Homelessness Partnering Strategy
 Social Development Partnerships Program
 New Horizons for Seniors Program
 Universal Child Care Benefit
 Enabling Accessibility Fund
 Federal Elder Abuse Initiative
Strategic Outcome 4
 Government of Canada Information to Citizens
Service excellence
for Canadians
Citizen-Centred
Service
 Applications Intake
 Identification and Authentication
 Client Feedback Management
 Marketing
Integrity and
Processing
Internal Services
Support to achieving
the strategic outcomes
 Integrity
 Individual Benefit Processing
 Service Processing
 Management and Oversight Services
 Communications Services
 Legal Services
 Human Resources Management Services
 Financial Management Services
 Information Management Services
 Information Technology Services
 Real Property Services
 Material Services
 Acquisition Services
 Travel and Other Administrative Services
The HRSDC Program Activity Architecture (PAA) is a representation of the programs offered by HRSDC
and the results (strategic outcomes) that the programs are designed to achieve for Canadians. The PAA also
includes a program activity for services that are internal to the Department and are important in supporting
the achievement of HRSDC’s four strategic outcomes.
Section I Departmental Overview Human Resources and Skills Development Canada
11
1.4 Performance Summary Tables
Total Financial Resources
Planned Spending
Total Authorities
Actual Spending
94,719.8
97,622.1
97,402.7
Planned
Actual
Difference
24,508
25,109
(601)
(millions of dollars)
Total Human Resources
Full-Time Equivalents
skilled, adaptable and inclusive labour force
Strategic Outcome 1 A
and an efficient labour market
Financial Information
Under this strategic outcome, the Department helps Canadians take advantage of opportunities to develop skills and
knowledge and to participate in and complete post-secondary education. It does so by offering programs that:
• provide temporary income support to unemployed Canadians who have contributed to the Employment Insurance (EI)
program, while they look for work;
• provide loans and grants to post-secondary students;
• encourage Canadians to save for the post-secondary education of a child under 18 years of age; and
• increase skills development opportunities.
HRSDC facilitates participation in the labour force by:
• reducing barriers to the participation of groups that are under-represented in the labour force, including Aboriginal people,
older workers, youth, and people with disabilities;
• reducing barriers to interprovincial labour mobility;
• providing skills and labour market information to Canadians and newcomers; and
• improving the recognition of foreign credentials.
Strategic Outcome Indicator
Percentage of the Canadian labour force (aged 25 – 64)
with some post-secondary education
Targets
70.5%
Source: Internal HRSDC calculation using the Labour Force Survey
12
2009 – 2010 Estimates Departmental Performance Report
Performance and Historical Results
2009 – 2010 results: 71.1%
(See page 40 for breakdown.)
Historical results:
2008 – 2009: 70.7%
2007 – 2008: 70.0%
2004 – 2005: 68.0%
1990 – 1991: 52.1%
Strategic Outcome Indicator
Targets
Percentage of Canadians (aged 25 – 64) who have
attained a post-secondary education certificate, diploma
or degree
61.8%
Performance and Historical Results
2009 results: 61.4%
(See page 40 for breakdown.)
Historical results:
2008: 60.8%
2007: 60.3%
2005: 58.3%
1990: 39.6%
Source: Internal HRSDC calculation using the Labour Force Survey
During the last five years, Canada has been
ranked first among Organisation for Economic
Co-operation and Development countries
in terms of having the highest percentage
of its population having attained a
post‑secondary credential (Education at a
Glance 2009 at www.oecd.org)
Proportion of working-age Canadians (aged 25 – 64) who
participate in job-related training and employer-supported
job-related training
Source: Access and Support to Education and Training Survey
NonEmployerSupported
Job-Related
Training:
34.7%
EmployerSupported
Job-Related
Training:
25%
Non-employersupported
job-related training
Employersupported
job-related training
2008
2002
30.6%
24.6%
2008
2002
27.7%
21.7%
Note: The wording of this indicator and 2002 results
have been revised based on a new data source (Access
and Support to Education and Training Survey). The Adult
Education Training Survey, reference is the 2009 – 2010
Report on Plans and Priorities, is no longer available.
Percentage of unemployed individuals who were
unemployed for 53 weeks or more
Source: Labour Force Survey
4.1%*
2009 – 2010 results: 4.9%
Historical results:
2008 – 2009: 3.8%
2007 – 2008: 4.1%
2006 – 2007: 4.4%
2005 – 2006: 4.7%
2004 – 2005: 4.8%
Section I Departmental Overview Human Resources and Skills Development Canada
13
(Continued)
Strategic Outcome Indicator
Targets
Employment ratio (employed population in proportion
of the working-age population)
73.2%*
Performance and Historical Results
2009 – 2010 results: 71.3%
Historical results:
2008 – 2009: 73.2%
2007 – 2008: 73.7%
2006 – 2007: 73.1%
2005 – 2006: 72.6%
2004 – 2005: 72.5%
Source: Labour Force Survey
Average proportion of EI regular benefits entitlement used
59.7%
Source: Administrative data
2007 – 2008 results: 60.6%
Historical results:
2006 – 2007: 59.7%
2005 – 2006: 59.7%
2004 – 2005: 59.8%
2003 – 2004: 60.9%
2002 – 2003: 61.3%
* HRSDC used past performance to establish a target for these indicators.
2009 – 2010
(Financial
Resources,
Gross,
$ Millions)
Skills and
Employment
Learning
Total
2008 – 2009
Actual
Spendinga
18,077.6
Main
Estimates
1,772.6
Planned
Spending
21,148.1
Total
Authorities
23,865.2
Actual
Spending
23,765.6
Income security
and
employment for
Canadians
An innovative
and
knowledgebased
economy
2,117.8
2,159.0
2,159.1
2,474.3
2,466.7
20,195.4
3,931.6
23,307.2
26,339.5
26,232.3
aBeginning
Alignment to
Government
of Canada
Outcomes
in the 2009–2010 Estimates cycle, the resources for the Internal Services program activity are displayed separately from the resources for
other program activities; they are no longer distributed among the remaining program activities, as was the case in previous Main Estimates. Spending
by program activity for 2008–2009 has been restated to ensure comparability between fiscal years.
14
2009 – 2010 Estimates Departmental Performance Report
afe, fair and productive workplaces and cooperative
Strategic Outcome 2 S
workplace relations
To achieve this strategic outcome, the Department, through the Labour Program:
• develops innovative policy and program options in response to changes in the workplace and employer-employee relations;
• collects, analyzes, and disseminates information about developments in collective bargaining, labour law and trends in
workplaces across Canada;
• provides mediation and conciliation services to federally regulated employers and unions engaged in high-stakes collective
bargaining;
• enforces compliance with labour and occupational health and safety standards, as defined under the Canada Labour
Code for workplaces under federal jurisdiction;
• provides tools and advice in support of employment equity and workplace diversity;
• provides fire protection services in federal buildings and on reserves;
• administers workers’ compensation claims from federal public sector employees;
• provides oversight of the Wage Earner Protection Program;
• explores modernizing legislation and regulations;
• manages federal-provincial-territorial relations among Canada’s departments of labour;
• manages Canada’s participation in international labour forums; and
• negotiates and implements labour cooperation agreements and cooperation frameworks in the context of free trade
negotiations to advance Canada’s interests and values abroad.
Strategic Outcome Indicator
Number of problems with well addressed strategies
Target
100%
Source: Administrative data
Performance and Historical Results
2009 – 2010 result: 100%
This indicator refers to the strategies
(e.g. research, information dissemination,
policy options, legislation) planned and
successfully implemented with respect to
existing and emerging workplace issues.
A strategy is considered well-addressed if the
issue has been clearly defined and the Minister
of Labour has approved a forward-looking plan.
2009 – 2010
(Financial
Resources,
Gross,
$ Millions)
2008 – 2009
Actual
Spendinga
Main
Estimates
Planned
Spending
Total
Authorities
Actual
Spending
Labour
233.9
246.3
271.2
270.8
268.5
Total
233.9
246.3
271.2
270.8
268.5
Alignment to
Government
of Canada
Outcomes
A fair and secure
marketplace
aBeginning
in the 2009–2010 Estimates cycle, the resources for the Internal Services program activity are displayed separately from the resources for
other program activities; they are no longer distributed among the remaining program activities, as was the case in previous Main Estimates. Spending
by program activity for 2008–2009 has been restated to ensure comparability between fiscal years.
Section I Departmental Overview Human Resources and Skills Development Canada
15
Strategic Outcome 3
Income security, access to opportunities and well-being
for individuals, families and communities
HRSDC helps Canadians achieve basic income security by setting policy for and administering Canada’s public pension system, which
provides Canadians with retirement pensions, survivor pensions, and disability benefits, including the Canada Pension Plan, Old Age
Security, and the Guaranteed Income Supplement. HRSDC also sets and administers benefit-related policies through programs such as
the National Child Benefit and the Universal Child Care Benefit, and it helps Canadians with disabilities and their families save for the
future through the Canada Disability Savings Program.
The Department works with partners to increase access to opportunities and well-being for individuals, families and communities
through policies and programs that support:
• homeless individuals and families, as well as those at risk of becoming homeless;
• children and families;
• increased awareness of elder abuse;
• seniors;
• communities; and
• people with disabilities.
HRSDC is the lead federal department responsible for intercountry adoption in Canada. Through the Office for Disability Issues, HRSDC
coordinates the Government of Canada’s efforts to promote the full participation of Canadians with disabilities in learning, work and
community life.
Strategic Outcome Indicator
Number and proportion of individuals 65 years and
older who would have had low family income without
public pension support
1,946,540*
47.8% of all
seniors
Source: Survey of Labour and Income Dynamics
Number and proportion of individuals aged 65 years
and older who had low family income
219,000
seniors*
5.4% of all
seniors
Source: Survey of Labour and Income Dynamics
Performance and Historical Results
Targets
2007 results: 1,907,250; 45.6% of all seniors
Historical results:
2006: 1,946,540; 47.8% of all seniors
2005: 1,963,400; 49.9% of all seniors
2004: 1,977,400; 50.9% of all seniors
2007 results: 201,200; 4.8% of all seniors
Historical results:
2006: 219,000; 5.4% of all seniors
2005: 241,900; 6.1% of all seniors
* The intent of these performance indicators is to show the contribution of the Department’s income security programs to lowering the low-income
rate among seniors from an estimated 45.6% to 4.8% (all else being equal). Data for this indicator lags by 3 years. For this indicator, low income
is measured using Statistics Canada’s Low-Income Cut-Off (LICO), which estimates the threshold at which families spend 20% more of their
income on necessities than the average family. The exact income cut-off varies by family size and the size of the population centre where they reside.
See: http://www.statcan.gc.ca/pub/75f0002m/2010005/tbl/tbl01-eng.htm
(Financial
Resources,
Gross,
$ Millions)
Income
Security
Social
Development
Total
2009 – 2010
2008 – 2009
Actual
Spendinga
Main
Estimates
62,419.0
35,268.9
Planned
Spending
66,011.9
Total
Authorities
65,210.5
Actual
Spending
65,199.8
Income security and
employment for
Canadians
A diverse society that
promotes linguistic
duality and social
inclusion
2,794.0
2,639.5
2,769.0
2,851.4
2,796.8
65,213.0
37,908.4
68,780.9
68,061.9
67,996.6
aBeginning
Alignment to
Government of
Canada Outcomes
in the 2009 – 2010 Estimates cycle, the resources for the Internal Services program activity are displayed separately from the resources for
other program activities; they are no longer distributed among the remaining program activities, as was the case in previous Main Estimates. Spending
by program activity for 2008 – 2009 has been restated to ensure comparability between fiscal years.
16
2009 – 2010 Estimates Departmental Performance Report
Strategic Outcome 4 Service excellence for Canadians
Service Canada is the face of the Government of Canada for millions of Canadians. Through its network of service channels,
it connects Canadians with a wide range of Government programs and services. Service Canada is committed to serving
the needs of Canadians, whether they are looking for basic information about Government of Canada programs and
services; applying for national program benefits managed by HRSDC to which they are entitled, such as Old Age Security,
Canada Pension Plan or Employment Insurance; or accessing services delivered on behalf of partners, such as the Passport
Receiving Agent Service. Service Canada accomplishes this by continuing to focus on citizen-centred service excellence
and through the day-to-day contributions of its professional and knowledgeable employees.
Service excellence is about providing citizens with a consistently positive service experience and sustaining service delivery
that is efficient, affordable and fair, while helping the Department and the Government as a whole to realize important policy
and legislative objectives. Equally, it means using Service Canada’s connection to Canadians and the opportunities this
presents for positive engagement, dialogue and feedback to help ensure that policy directions, program development and
service delivery remain responsive to citizens’ changing needs and expectations. To support continuous improvement in the
delivery of service excellence, the Department conducts research and gathers feedback from citizens to help improve its
ability to deliver the right service at the right time and in the right way.
Strategic Outcome
Indicator
Percentage of clients served
who are satisfied with the
delivery of programs and
services by Service Canada
Source: Administrative data
Target
85%
Performance and Historical Results
The Department conducts a bi-annual Client Satisfaction Survey to assess
service quality from the perspective of Canadians who access services through
Service Canada. The last iteration of the survey was conducted in 2007– 2008.
Due to priorities arising from Canada’s Economic Action Plan, resources were
focussed on delivering additional services and support and as a result, the
survey was postponed to 2010 – 2011.
Historical results:
2007– 2008: 83%
2005 – 2006: 84%
2009 – 2010 results from Service Canada’s Office for Client Satisfaction
show improvements in client satisfaction. The number of complaints
received from clients in 2009 – 2010 decreased by 29% compared to
2008 – 2009. Furthermore, the number of compliments received increasing to
99 from previous results of 71 in 2007– 2008. Over 60% of the compliments
received were directed towards services provided under the Employment
Insurance program.
Section I Departmental Overview Human Resources and Skills Development Canada
17
2009 – 2010
(Financial
Resources,
Gross,
$ Millions)
CitizenCentred
Service
Integrity and
Processing
Total
2008 – 2009
Actual
Spendinga
533.8
Main
Estimates
Planned
Spending
466.9
Total
Authorities
474.5
Actual
Spending
540.9
Alignment to
Government
of Canada
Outcomes
531.1
A transparent,
accountable and
responsive federal
government
A transparent,
accountable and
responsive federal
government
688.9
553.5
553.5
826.4
804.7
1,222.7
1,020.4
1,028.0
1,367.3
1,335.8
aBeginning
in the 2009–2010 Estimates cycle, the resources for the Internal Services program activity are displayed separately from the resources for
other program activities; they are no longer distributed among the remaining program activities, as was the case in previous Main Estimates. Spending
by program activity for 2008–2009 has been restated to ensure comparability between fiscal years.
Program Activity Internal Services
(Financial
Resources,
Gross,
$ Millions)
Internal
Services
Total
2009 – 2010
2008 – 2009
Actual
Spendinga
Main
Estimates
Planned
Spending
Total
Authorities
Actual
Spending
875.7
790.8
794.2
960.0
937.4
875.7
790.8
794.2
960.0
937.4
aBeginning
in the 2009 – 2010 Estimates cycle, the resources for the Internal Services program activity are displayed separately from the resources for
other program activities; they are no longer distributed among the remaining program activities, as was the case in previous Main Estimates. Spending
by program activity for 2008 – 2009 has been restated to ensure comparability between fiscal years.
18
2009 – 2010 Estimates Departmental Performance Report
1.5Contribution of Priorities to Strategic Outcomes
Operational Priorities
Assist Canadian workers in a
period of economic downturn
through income support,
adjustment assistance and skills
investments
Status
HRSDC played a critical role in implementing the first year of Canada’s Economic
Action Plan by providing additional Employment Insurance (EI) benefits and
support to the workers most affected by the economic downturn. EI claimants
received an extra five weeks of benefits, and long-tenured workers were able to
access the Career Transition Assistance initiative and an extension of EI regular
benefits made available through Bill C-50, An Act to amend the Employment
Insurance Act and to increase benefits. Temporary job losses were avoided by
extending Work-Sharing agreements, and Canadians had increased access to
skills development and training through additional funding provided to provinces
and territories under labour market development agreements and the new
Strategic Training and Transition Fund. Eligible older workers benefited from
additional investments in the Targeted Initiative for Older Workers, and many
students received additional employment opportunities through the Canada
Summer Jobs program. Aboriginal people benefited from skills development and
training opportunities through the Aboriginal Skills and Employment Partnership
and the Aboriginal Skills and Training Strategic Investment Fund. Additional
investments supported apprentices by implementing the new Apprenticeship
Completion Grant. HRSDC also implemented the Fairness for the Self-Employed
Act, which extended EI special benefits (i.e. parental, sickness) on a voluntary
basis to the self-employed.
The Department launched the Aboriginal Skills and Employment Training Strategy
and the Skills and Partnership Fund, which are designed to increase Aboriginal
participation in the Canadian labour market. In collaboration with provinces and
territories, the Department also successfully launched both the new Canada
Student Grants Program for low- and middle-income students and the
Repayment Assistance Plan for Canada Student Loans, and it continued to
implement the Service Delivery Vision for Student Financial Assistance initiatives.
Type
New
Link to Strategic Outcomes
Strategic Outcome

A skilled, adaptable and inclusive labour force and an efficient labour market
(Continued)
Section I Departmental Overview Human Resources and Skills Development Canada
19
(Continued)
Operational Priorities
Help Canadian workers and
employers to maintain workplace
safety, fairness, productivity and
cooperation throughout the
economic downturn by providing
relevant and timely services and
support
Status
The Labour Program led the Budget 2009 initiative to expand the Wage Earner
Protection Program, which was originally developed to cover unpaid regular
wages and vacation pay when an employer goes bankrupt or enters receivership.
The expansion enables the program to also cover unpaid severance and
termination pay.
The Labour Program increased its efforts to help employers and unions negotiate
collective agreements, recognizing that economic downturns tend to generate
tensions at the bargaining table and a heightened risk of strikes and lockouts
when the economy can least afford them.
The Labour Program played an important part in the response to the 2009
H1N1 pandemic and the management of the resulting refusals to work in the
critical air transportation sector.
Type
Ongoing
Link to Strategic Outcomes
Strategic Outcome

Safe, fair and productive workplaces and cooperative workplace relations
Assist Canadians through targeted
and modernized income security
and social development measures
for vulnerable populations
(seniors, people with disabilities,
homeless people and those at risk
of becoming homeless, and
communities)
HRSDC continued to provide timely statutory benefits to Canadians through the
Canada Pension Plan (CPP), CPP Disability, Old Age Security and Guaranteed
Income Supplement programs, contributing to a stable retirement income system
and alleviating poverty among seniors.
The Department also administered programs that provide individuals and families
with access to services, information and opportunities to improve their well-being
and enhance participation in their communities.
In addition, HRSDC continued to assist homeless individuals and families, as well
as those who are at risk of homelessness, through the Homelessness Partnering
Strategy. This program exceeded its yearly targets, both in terms of funding
commitments from partners and in terms of targeted investments toward longerterm transitional and supportive housing.
Type
Ongoing
Link to Strategic Outcomes
Strategic Outcome

Income security, access to opportunities and well-being for individuals,
families and communities
(Continued)
20
2009 – 2010 Estimates Departmental Performance Report
(Concluded)
Operational Priorities
Respond to increase in demand
for services from existing Service
Canada–delivered programs
Status
The Department implemented several measures to address the increase in
demand for services as a result of the economic downturn and to maintain the
level of service Canadians have come to expect. As a result, it surpassed its
speed-of-payment target for Employment Insurance (EI), with 84.2% of benefit
payments issued within 28 days of the date applications were filed. The CPP
retirement, Old Age Security (OAS) basic and Apprenticeship Incentive Grant
programs also surpassed their respective speed-of-payment targets.
The accuracy rate in benefit payments for EI, OAS and CPP exceeded the 95%
target.
Type
New
Link to Strategic Outcomes
Strategic Outcome

Service excellence for Canadians
Management Priority
Support the organization’s core
business and priorities by delivering
efficient and effective corporate
services
Status
HRSDC’s management agenda includes a broad range of activities that support
management excellence.
The Department developed a new Risk Assessment, Management and
Mitigation approach to improve the integrity of contribution programs, which
was implemented across the portfolio as of April 1, 2010. The investment
review office oversaw a portfolio of over 40 business-change and information
technology–enabled projects in support of services to Canadians and employers,
and the Department undertook activities related to its renewal priorities of creating
a healthy and enabled workplace, strengthening and enabling leadership, and
investing in career development.
Type
New
Link to Strategic Outcomes
Strategic Outcome

A skilled, adaptable, and inclusive labour force and an efficient labour market
Strategic Outcome

Safe, fair, and productive workplaces, and cooperative workplace relations
Strategic Outcome

Income security, access to opportunities, and well-being for individuals,
families, and communities
Strategic Outcome

Service excellence for Canadians
Section I Departmental Overview Human Resources and Skills Development Canada
21
1.6Risk Analysis
Over the past year, the Canadian economy
experienced the effects of a global recession, including
an increase in unemployment and a drop in consumer
and business confidence, which fell to their lowest
levels since 2001. The economic downturn increased
demand for many of HRSDC’s programs, including
Employment Insurance (EI), labour market programs
and student financial assistance. In addition, the
Department’s key role in delivering components of
Canada’s Economic Action Plan required rapid policy
and service delivery responses.
In this context, the Department identified and
addressed four risk areas: service delivery, financial
resources, human resources and aging information
technology infrastructure.
Service Delivery
The Department faced significant increases in the
number of EI claims and applications for other labour
market programs, such as Work-Sharing. The workload
on the front lines presented an ongoing challenge to
the Department’s service delivery operations while it
was being called upon to implement key components
of Canada’s Economic Action Plan.
There was a risk that the Department would be unable
meet the increased demand for services and implement
its part of Canada’s Economic Action Plan in the required
timeframe. A departmental SWAT Committee was
established to oversee and manage risks related to
implementing Canada’s Economic Action Plan. To
meet the immediate need for increased service delivery
capacity, the Department increased its human
resources by an additional 3,000 full-time equivalents
on a temporary basis.
The Department continued to work with provincial and
territorial governments to improve service to Canadians,
strengthen accountability, clarify the roles and
responsibilities of governments, and improve collaborative
management of shared areas of responsibility. This was
done by: implementing new labour market agreements
and the Strategic Training and Transition Fund;
negotiating new or amending existing agreements with
provinces and territories for the Targeted Initiative for
Older Workers; developing letters of understanding to
22
improve information-sharing; implementing vital events
agreements; and developing memoranda of
understanding for service delivery collaboration.
These efforts allowed the Department to successfully
implement its portion of the new measures under
Canada’s Economic Action Plan while maintaining high
service standards for its programs.
Financial Resources
The rapid increase in the demand for services created
funding challenges for the Department. To ensure that
it could respond to this demand while implementing
Canada’s Economic Action Plan, the Department
instituted a process of regular reviews of its internal
plans, priorities and budgets, revising them as
appropriate and seeking additional funding authorities
as needed to deliver the Government of Canada’s
commitments. At the same time, the Department
began a review of its enabling services to identify ways
to increase the efficiency of its core internal services.
The Department took steps to improve its Performance
Measurement Framework to provide senior management
with specific performance information to guide
decision-making and the reallocation of resources.
Other efforts centred on improving ongoing due
diligence, including improving the Department’s regular
financial forecasting and reporting. The Department
also strengthened the integration of planning processes
to improve the alignment of financial and human
resources allocations with business priorities.
Human Resources
Due to the significantly increased demand for its
programs, the Department needed to reallocate its
existing human resources to priority areas, as well as
rapidly increase the size of its workforce through the
use of temporary workers. This placed significant strain
on the Department’s ability to manage its human
resources, and particularly on its ability to hire new staff
in a timely manner. To address this issue, the Department
focused its mitigation efforts on implementing the
Service Management Structural Model in the regions,
which includes the establishment of new roles, skill
profiles and recruitment strategies; standardized
training and certification programs; defined career
progression; performance management; and a reward
2009 – 2010 Estimates Departmental Performance Report
and recognition program. The Department also developed
a staffing monitoring framework and increased its use
of collective staffing.
In addition, the Department’s workforce continued to
be affected by the same demographic trends affecting
the rest of the Canadian population. An aging workforce,
combined with high levels of turnover, created a risk to
the Department’s ability to deploy the necessary human
resources to meet the needs of Canadians. This risk
placed growing pressure on the Department to take a
systematic approach to reviewing its operations to
improve the efficiency and effectiveness of the organization.
As a first step towards this goal, HRSDC continued to
support public service renewal in order to build a
healthy, enabled workplace and workforce with strong
executive and managerial leadership. Initiatives in this
area included developing the skills of employees; creating
an environment to facilitate employee empowerment
and engagement; encouraging creativity, innovation
and forward thinking; and strengthening the people
and financial management infrastructure that supports
the organization.
Aging Information Technology
Infrastructure
The Department’s aging information technology
infrastructure has placed limits on its ability to
implement new approaches to business processes.
The increased demand for the Department’s services
due to the economic downturn further stressed its
processing and operational systems.
Overall Effectiveness of
Risk Mitigation Strategies
The Department successfully mitigated these risks for
the 2009 – 2010 fiscal year, allowing its three business
lines to meet the demand for services during the
recession and to implement the Department’s
contributions to Canada’s Economic Action Plan.
Many of the risks relating to human resources and the
information technology infrastructure will persist over
the medium-term and will require the Department to
continue to monitor these areas and establish longerterm mitigation strategies. For 2010 – 2011, HRSDC
will continue to implement its multi-year plan for
managing its human and financial resources and for
addressing the Department’s aging information
technology infrastructure.
1.7Expenditure Profile
2009 – 2010
HRSDC expenditures on programs and services total
more than $97 billion, of which almost $92 billion, or
94%, directly benefits Canadians through Employment
Insurance (EI), the Canada Pension Plan, Old Age
Security, the Universal Child Care Benefit, loans
disbursed under the Canada Student Financial
Assistance Act, and other statutory transfer payment
programs. Departmental expenditures were $1.9 billion
in voted grants and contributions and $2.6 billion for
EI Part II.
The Department moved quickly over the past year to
implement measures to mitigate this risk, including the
launch of an infrastructure renewal program. This program
has been aimed at minimizing the risk to HRSDC’s
critical applications through a planned approach to
refreshing information technology infrastructure
components, starting with the high-priority business
applications that have the highest risk of failing. The
Department also put in place a rigorous investment
review process to ensure that allocated funding is
aligned with the highest-priority objectives and
developed a long-term renewal road map for
modernizing its technology infrastructure and
associated software applications.
Section I Departmental Overview Human Resources and Skills Development Canada
23
Million
Consolidated Total $97,402.7
Loans disbursed
under CSFAA
$974.4M
1.0%
Other
$632.1M
0.5%
Old Age Security /
Guaranteed Income Supplement
/ Allowance
$34,662.8M
35.6%
Voted grants and
contributions
$1,914.4M
2.0%
Gross operating
costs
$3,112.8M
3.2%
Universal Child Care Benefit /
Canada Student Loans /
Other
Employment
statutory payments
Insurance
$4,157.6M
$21,585.6M
4.3%
22.2%
Canada
Pension Plan
$30,363.0M
31.2%
Human Resources and Skills Development Canada –
Gross Expenditures
(millions of dollars)
Budgetary
Grants and Contributions
Net Operating Costs
Add Recoveries in relation to:
Canada Pension Plan
Employment Insurance Account
Workers’ Compensation
Other
274.1
1,584.3
117.4
9.7
1,127.3
Old Age Security
1,985.5
Guaranteed Income Supplement
Allowance
Other Statutory Payments:
Universal Child Care Benefit
Canada Education Savings Grant
Canada Student Loans
Canada Disability Savings Grant
Canada Learning Bond
Wage Earner Protection Program
Gross Operating Costs
3,112.8
Voted Grants and Contributions
1,914.4
Total Gross Expenditures
5,027.2
Other – W
orkers’ Compensation and
EI/CPP Charges and Recoveries
632.1
Non-Budgetary
Loans disbursed under Canada Student
Financial Assistance Act (CSFAA)
Statutory Transfer Payments
(millions of dollars)
974.4
7,736.6
534.9
2,593.6
615.7
690.7
126.8
56.7
35.0
4,118.5
Subtotal
38,781.3
Canada Pension Plan Benefits
30,363.0
Employment Insurance Benefits
Part I
Part II
Other Specified Purpose Accounts
Total Statutory Transfer Payments
aThis
amount includes payments related to Government Annuities Account, the Civil Service Insurance Fund, and the Canada
Millennium Scholarship Foundation Excellence Awards Fund.
24
26,391.3
2009 – 2010 Estimates Departmental Performance Report
18,979.8
2,605.8 21,585.6
39.1 a
90,769.0
The figure below illustrates HRSDC’s spending trend
from 2007– 2008 to 2009 – 2010. In the 2009 – 2010
fiscal year, the Department spent $97.4 billion to
contribute to achieving its expected results.
and revenue sources, Main Estimates and Supplementary
Estimates. Planned spending corresponds to the
forecasts presented in the Report on Plans and
Priorities from each respective year.
The total authorized spending for 2007 – 2008 to
2009 – 2010 includes all parliamentary appropriation
Spending Trend
100,000
98,000
$ Millions
96,000
94,000
92,000
90,000
88,000
86,000
84,000
2007 – 2008
2008 – 2009
Planned
2009 – 2010
Authorized
Actual
Total Consolidated Expenditures (Millions of dollars)
2007 – 2008
2008 – 2009
2009 – 2010a
Canada’s Economic Action Plana
2009 – 2010
Planned
84,700.4
87,125.7
94,719.8
2,037.5
Authorized
84,867.4
88,520.2
97,622.1
2,307.3
Actual
84,504.4
88,264.2
97,402.7
2,272.3
a
Canada’s Economic Action Plan initiatives are included with 2009 – 2010 figures.
Section I Departmental Overview Human Resources and Skills Development Canada
25
Actual expenditures for 2008 – 2009 were $3.8 billion
(4.5%) higher than actual expenditures for 2007 – 2008,
mainly as a result of a $2.0 billion increase in EI benefits
and a $1.5 billion increase in CPP benefits. In addition,
OAS payments were $1.4 billion higher over the same
time frame due to a change in the estimated number
of beneficiaries. These increases were offset by a
$1.8 billion decrease in spending from 2007 – 2008
related to the administration and delivery by Service
Canada of Common Experience Payments, one of the
five components included in the Indian Residential
Schools Settlement Agreement.
Initiatives under Strategic Outcome 1:
A skilled, adaptable and inclusive labour
force and an efficient labour market
In 2009 – 2010, actual expenditures were $9.1 billion
(10.4%) higher than in 2008 – 2009. This increase can
be mainly explained by a $3.6 billion increase in
EI benefits and administrative costs due to the
economic downturn, a $2.3 billion increase for
initiatives announced in Canada’s Economic Action
Plan, a $1.4 billion increase in CPP benefits, and a
$1.3 billion increase in OAS payments due to changes
in the estimated number of beneficiaries and the
forecasted average monthly rate.
1.8Summary of HRSDC’s
Contribution to
Canada’s Economic
Action Plan
As part of Budget 2009, the Government of Canada
introduced Canada’s Economic Action Plan, including
the Canada Skills and Transition Strategy. Canada’s
Economic Action Plan provided additional financial
investments and introduced new programs to support
Canadians during the recession and help them develop
the skills necessary to prosper once the economy
recovers. While full reporting on Canada’s Economic
Action Plan can be found at www.actionplan.gc.ca,
the following provides a brief performance analysis for
the contributions delivered by HRSDC in 2009 – 2010.
26
Meet Employment Insurance–related policy
and program design demands in response to
rising unemployment by:
1)providing an additional five weeks of Employment
Insurance (EI) benefits, previously only available
as a pilot project in specific regions with high
unemployment, on a national basis for a
two‑year period
In addition, the maximum duration of benefits in
areas of high unemployment has been increased
from 45 to 50 weeks. These extra five weeks of
benefits were provided to 597,376 EI claimants,
for a total of $730 million in additional benefits
delivered in 2009 – 2010 ($919.8 million and
2.6 million additional weeks of benefits overall).
In addition, 64,675 Canadians received $215
million in additional benefits under Bill C-50, An Act
to amend the Employment Insurance Act and to
increase benefits, which extended the maximum
duration of EI Part I benefits for long-tenured
workers.
2)extending the duration of Work-Sharing
agreements by 14 weeks to a maximum of
52 weeks to help more companies avoid layoffs
by offering EI income support to qualifying
workers willing to work a reduced work week
Partly as a result of this extension and the changes
to the flexibility of the program, over 255,000 workers
had participated, or were able to continue their
participation in 5,900 Work-Sharing agreements as
of March 29, 2010.
3)allowing earlier access to EI regular income
benefits for workers who use some or all of their
severance pay to invest in skills upgrading or
other training
The Department implemented the Career
Transition Assistance initiative, which consists
of: the Severance Investment for Training
Initiative, which enables workers to access EI
regular benefits earlier if they use their severance
pay to invest in skills upgrading or other training,
and the Extended Employment Insurance and
Training Incentive, which extends EI income
benefits for up to two years for long-tenured
2009 – 2010 Estimates Departmental Performance Report
workers participating in long-term training.
In 2009 – 2010, approximately 10,000 long-tenured
workers received additional benefits in order to
participate in these long-term training initiatives,
for a total of $15 million in additional benefits.
Canada provided $500 million in support of training
and skills development programs to the provinces
and territories through labour market development
agreements. A new agreement was signed with
the Government of Yukon. Then, in response
to Canada’s Economic Action Plan, Amending
agreements for labour market development
agreements were signed with all 13 provinces
and territories. It is estimated that approximately
149,000 Canadians were served as a result of this
incremental funding, with approximately 45,000
returning to work.
4) freezing EI premium rates for 2009 and 2010 in
order to support employers and employees
Canada’s Economic Action Plan announced the
freezing of the EI premium rate for 2009 and 2010
at $1.73 per $100 of insurable earnings, the same
level as in 2008. This represents projected relief of
$11.1 billion for Canadian workers and their
employers relative to what would have been the
case if rates had been set at the break-even level
over these two years.
Work with provinces and territories to facilitate
worker adjustment to the economic downturn
by supporting investments in skills acquisition
through labour market agreements and labour
market development agreements by:
1) investing $500 million, over a two-year period, in
a Strategic Training and Transition Fund (STTF) to
assist provinces and territories in providing
programs that support the needs of workers
affected by the economic downturn
In addition to funding provided through Labour
Market Agreements, the STTF assisted provinces
and territories in developing initiatives to help meet
the training needs of workers in affected communities
and sectors so they could remain in their jobs or
move to new jobs. New agreements were negotiated
with Quebec and the three territories. Amending
Agreements to Labour Market Agreements were
also signed with all 13 provinces and territories to
include the allocation for the STTF, enabling Canadians,
whether or not they qualified for EI benefits,
to participate in training or other employment programs.
In 2009 – 2010, more than 70,000 Canadians
received labour market services and programming
funded by the STTF.
2) increasing funding by $1 billion over two years
for training delivered by provinces and territories
through the EI program
In addition to ongoing employment programming
provided through Part II of the Employment
Insurance Act, in 2009 – 2010, the Government of
Improve and expand targeted program
initiatives to support workers with skills and
transition needs by:
1) providing an additional $60 million for the
Targeted Initiative for Older Workers (TIOW) over
a three‑year period (2009 – 2012) to enhance
access to skills training and address the
adjustment needs of older workers across
a wider range of communities
The additional funding made available through
Canada’s Economic Action Plan made it possible
for the TIOW to target a broader range of communities
and enabled more older workers to receive the
specialized support they need to make the
transition to new jobs. Between April 1, 2009, and
March 31, 2010, 100 new provincial/territorial TIOW
projects were approved and 32 existing projects
were extended. Once completed, these projects
will have assisted approximately 7,300 unemployed
older workers.
2) investing an additional $100 million over three
years (2009 – 2012) in the Aboriginal Skills and
Employment Partnership program to support up
to 25 new projects, which will result in the creation
of 6,000 jobs for Aboriginal Canadians
As of March 17, 2010, 20 projects had been
approved, committing additional funding made
available under Canada’s Economic Action Plan.
These projects target 4,000 Aboriginal individuals
to help them secure long-term jobs by 2012. As of
March 31, 2010, 10 of these projects had been
started, and the 10 remaining projects were
expected to start in the first quarter of 2010 – 2011.
Section I Departmental Overview Human Resources and Skills Development Canada
27
These projects funded under Canada’s Economic
Action Plan were in addition to the 16 ASEP
projects already underway.
3) investing $75 million in a new two-year (2009 – 2011)
Aboriginal Skills and Training Strategic Investment
Fund (ASTSIF)
ASTSIF lays the groundwork for a successor to the
Aboriginal Human Resources Development
Strategy and also supports additional investments
in training for Aboriginal individuals facing barriers
to employment. A national and regional application
process was completed for ASTSIF, yielding
86 approved projects. The national component of
ASTSIF is being used to support initiatives that are
partnership-based and national in scope and will
produce tools, services or promising practices to
enhance the range of client and business services
provided under the successor to the Aboriginal
Human Resources Development Strategy. The
regional component of ASTSIF will support trainingto-employment, skills development and service
improvement projects on a regional basis. ASTSIF
funding has been fully committed, and results will
be published at www.actionplan.gc.ca as soon as
they are available.
4) assisting youth by delivering targeted funding of
$20 million over two years (2009 – 2011) through
the Canada Summer Jobs program to enable
more employers to hire summer students
The Department concluded more than 22,000
agreements and helped create approximately
37,500 summer jobs for students in 2009. Over
3,500 of these jobs can be attributed to the
additional funding received under Canada’s
Economic Action Plan.
Help raise the number of completions and
encourage young people to launch a career in
one of the Red Seal skilled trades by
implementing the Apprenticeship Completion
Grant of $2,000 on an ongoing basis
The Apprenticeship Completion Grant was
implemented in July 2009 with eligibility made
retroactive to January 1, 2009, as part of Canada’s
Economic Action Plan. This grant builds on the
existing Apprenticeship Incentive Grant to encourage
28
more Canadians to complete their apprenticeship in
the Red Seal trades. In 2009 – 2010, the Department
received 24,603 applications and issued 18,861 grants.
Invest $50 million over two years (2009 – 2011)
in HRSDC’s Foreign Credential Recognition
Program and Citizenship and Immigration’s
Foreign Credential Recognition Office to
develop a pan-Canadian Framework for the
Assessment and Recognition of Foreign
Qualifications in partnership with provinces
and territories
The Pan-Canadian Framework for the Assessment
and Recognition of Foreign Qualifications and an
implementation plan were developed in conjunction
with the provincial and territorial governments and
were announced by the Minister of Human Resources
and Skills Development in November 2009. HRSDC
is co-leading the ad hoc Federal-Provincial/
Territorial Foreign Qualification Recognition Working
Group and overseeing the implementation of the
Framework through the establishment of four task
teams (Analysis, Consultation and Communication,
Informing Sharing, and Metrics & Reporting).The
Foreign Credential Recognition Program invested in
67 projects, 43 of which were supported by funding
from Canada’s Economic Action Plan.
Initiatives under Strategic Outcome 2:
Safe, fair and productive workplaces and
cooperative workplace relations
Deliver core programs, such as the Wage
Earner Protection Program, that foster safety,
fairness and productivity in workplaces under
exclusive federal jurisdiction, and ensure that
those programs are responsive to the
economic challenges facing Canadian
employers and workers.
Under Canada’s Economic Action Plan in 2009 – 2010,
the federal government expanded the scope of the
WEPP to include unpaid severance and termination
pay and committed an additional $25 million per year
to cover the new eligible amounts. As a result, HRSDC
distributed nearly $35 million in WEPP payments to
16,264 Canadian workers.
2009 – 2010 Estimates Departmental Performance Report
Canada’s Economic Action Plan Details by Initiative
2009 – 2010 Financial Resources (millions of dollars)
Initiative
Planning Spending
Total Authorities
Actual Spending
Increase in EI Regular Benefits Duration (extra 5 weeks)
575.0
919.8
919.8
New Measures for Long-Tenured Workers – The Career
Transition Assistance Initiative (EI)
250.0
15.0
15.0
EI Long-Tenured Workers (Extension of Regular
Benefits)
165.0
214.6
214.6
Work-Sharing (EI)
100.0
211.2
211.2
25.0
22.6
22.5
1,115.0
1,383.2
1,383.1
EI Training Programs (LMDA Increased Funding)
500.0
500.0
500.0
Strategic Training and Transition Fund
250.0
253.5
253.5
Canada Summer Jobs Program
10.0
10.1
10.1
YMCA/YWCA Grants for Youth Internships
15.0
15.0
15.0
Targeted Initiative for Older Workers
20.0
20.0
5.2
Apprenticeship Completion Grant
40.0
40.0
39.4
Foreign Credential Recognition Program
17.5
17.5
8.3
Aboriginal Skills and Employment Partnership
20.0
16.8
8.4
Aboriginal Skills and Training Strategic Investment Fund
25.0
24.7
24.4
Aborignal Human Resources Development Strategy
25.0
25.0
23.4
-
1.5
1.5
922.5
924.1
889.2
2,037.5
2,307.3
2,272.3
Wage Earner Protection Program
Subtotal – Direct payments to Individuals / Benefits
CONTRIBUTION AGREEMENTS / OTHER PROGRAMS
Federal Public Service Student Employment Program
Subtotal – Contribution Agreeements / Other
Programs
TOTAL HRSDC
Section I Departmental Overview Human Resources and Skills Development Canada
29
1.9Voted and Statutory Items
Voted and Statutory Items
(in millions of dollars)
Vote
Statutory
Item
Truncated Vote or Statutory Wording (millions of dollars)
1
5
7
(S)
(S)
(S)
(S)
(S)
(S)
(S)
(S)
(S)
(S)
Operating expenditures
Grants and contributions
Write-off of Debts
Contributions to employee benefit plans
Minister of Human Resources and Skills Development - Salary and motor car
allowance
Minister of Labour - Salary and motor car allowance
Old Age Security Payments
Guaranteed Income Supplement Payments
Universal Child Care Benefit
Canada Education Savings grant payments to Registered Education Savings Plans
(RESPs) trustees on behalf of RESP beneficiaries to encourage Canadians to save
for post-secondary education for their children
Allowance Payments
Canada Study Grants to qualifying full and part-time students pursuant to the
Canada Student Financial Assistance Act
Payments related to the direct financing arrangement under the Canada Student
Financial Assistance Act
(S)
Canada Learning Bond payments to Registered Education Savings Plans (RESPs)
trustees on behalf of RESP beneficiaries to support access to post-secondary
education for children from low-income families
(S)
Payments of compensation respecting government employees and merchant
seamen
The provision of funds for interest and other payments to lending institutions and
liabilities under the Canada Student Financial Assistance Act
Wage Earner Protection Program payments to eligible applicants owed wages and
vacation pay, severance pay and termination pay from employers who are either
bankrupt or in receivership as well as payments to trustees and receivers who will
provide the necessary information to determine eligibility
(S)
(S)
(S)
(S)
Canada Disability Savings Bond payments to Registered Disability Savings Plan
(RDSP) issuers on behalf of RDSP beneficiaries to encourage long-term financial
security of eligible individuals with disabilities
(S)
The provision of funds for interest payments to lending institutions under the
Canada Student Loans Act
Civil Service Insurance actuarial liability adjustments
Energy Cost Benefit
Spending of proceeds from disposal of Crown Assets
Spending pursuant to section 12(4) of the Canada Education Savings Act
Total Budgetary
Plus: Non-Budgetary
Loans disbursed under the Canada Student Financial Assistance Act
Total Department
Plus: Specified Purpose Accounts:
Employment Insurance costs
Canada Pension Plan costs
Other Specified Purpose Accounts costs
Departmental Employee Benefit Plan recoverable from Employment Insurance
Account and Canada Pension Plan
Total Consolidated Expenditures
a.
30
2008 – 2009
Actual
Spending
Actual
Spending
2009 – 2010
Main
Estimatesa
Actual
Spending
2,500.9
1,027.3
0.4
236.9
709.5
1,552.6
248.5
586.9
1,443.5
221.3
721.3
1,914.4
0.1
287.1
0.1
0.1
24,029.8
7,406.7
2,474.3
0.1
0.1
25,334.5
7,511.5
2,547.8
0.1
0.1
26,549.0
8,091.0
2,544.0
0.1
0.1
26,391.3
7,736.6
2,593.6
579.7
518.2
580.7
531.2
626.0
557.0
615.7
534.9
161.5
143.2
511.5
533.7
292.3
298.2
300.9
235.9
35.8
47.8
43.0
56.7
39.5
46.2
40.0
37.1
36.3
22.9
31.9
11.6
3.7
31.2
35.0
-
The provision of funds for liabilities including liabilities in the form of guaranteed
loans under the Canada Student Loans Act
Canada Disability Savings Grant payments to Registered Disability Savings Plan
(RDSP) issuers on behalf of RDSP beneficiaries to encourage long-term financial
security of eligible individuals with disabilities
(S)
(S)
(S)
(S)
(S)
2007 – 2008
(19.1)
-
-
(14.5)
4.5
(9.5)
0.1
3.3
83.9
-
1.9
42.9
0.1
0.1
0.1
39,321.0
0.1
0.1
0.1
0.1
39,564.5
0.1
41,587.2
0.1
0.1
0.3
41,823.0
1,099.5
40,420.5
987.9
40,552.4
596.0
42,183.2
974.4
42,797.4
16,063.2
28,135.7
45.2
18,136.5
29,699.1
42.3
(160.2)
84,504.4
(166.1)
88,264.2
As published in Main Estimates 2009-2010.
2009 – 2010 Estimates Departmental Performance Report
42,183.2
23,667.0
31,096.4
39.4
(197.5)
97,402.7
Overview
Section II Section
AnalysisI of
Program Activities
by Strategic Outcome
Human Resources and Skills
Development Canada
Analysis of Program Activities
by Strategic Outcome
he following methodology was used to assign a performance status to the
Note T
performance indicators found in this section
Result as a Percentage of Target
Performance Status
105% or greater
Exceeded
95–104%
Met
80–94%
Mostly met
60–79%
Somewhat met
Less than 60%
Not met
This methodology was established to account for the margin of error associated with measurements and to ensure balanced reporting.
2.1Strategic Outcome

Strategic Outcome 1
A skilled, adaptable
and inclusive labour
force and an efficient
labour market
 Employment Insurance
Skills and
Employment
 Skilled Labour Force
 Labour Market Efficiency
Learning
2.1.1Program Activity: Skills
and Employment
Priorities
Assist Canadian workers in a period of economic
downturn through income support, adjustment
assistance and skills investments
Benefits to Canadians
HRSDC helps Canadian workers become self-reliant
and adapt to changes in the labour market through the
Employment Insurance (EI) program, which provides
temporary income support to eligible unemployed
workers, as well as through other programs designed
to improve Canadians’ labour market outcomes and
Canada’s labour market. Since skilled workers are
unemployed less frequently and for shorter periods
of time, HRSDC encourages workers to increase their
self-reliance and adaptability and to actively seek
re-employment by helping them participate in training,
acquire credentials, and improve their skill levels.
32
 Inclusive Labour Force
 Student Financial Assistance
 Canada Education Savings Program
HRSDC makes substantial efforts to help Canadian
employers meet their labour force needs and remain
competitive. Its programs are designed to help
employers find qualified workers (domestically or
internationally trained) to meet their immediate and
long-term needs and to provide employers with tools
to invest in developing the skills of their workforce.
To support an adequate labour market supply and
increase its inclusiveness, HRSDC works to increase
the participation of under-represented groups such as
youth, people with disabilities, Aboriginal peoples and
older workers in the labour force.
HRSDC’s programs also help improve labour market
efficiency and the balance of supply and demand in
the national labour market. They do this by providing
timely, high-quality labour market information;
improving labour mobility to allow workers to move
from areas of high unemployment to areas of low
unemployment, thus reducing labour market
imbalances; and improving the recognition of
2009 – 2010 Estimates Departmental Performance Report
qualifications so that Canadians, including those who
are internationally trained, have the opportunity to find
jobs comensurate with their skills and training.
representatives, provinces and territories, Canadian
financial institutions, Aboriginal organizations and
other stakeholders.
To deliver these programs, the Department relies on
collaborative relationships with business and labour
Program Activity Skills and Employment
Financial Resources (millions of dollars) and Human Resources (Full-Time Equivalents)
2009 – 2010
2009 – 2010
Planned
Spending
Total
Authorities
Actual
Spending
Planned
Actual
Difference
21,148.1
23,865.2
23,765.6
2,251
2,151
100
Note: Financial and human resources amounts for this program activity include resources related to initiatives under Canada’s Economic Action Plan.
See page 29 for details by initiative.
anadians, including the under-represented groups and vulnerable
Expected Result C
workers, have the opportunity to acquire skills to find and maintain
productive employment
Performance Summary 2009 – 2010
Performance Indicator
Number of clients employed and/or
returned to school following an
employment program intervention
as a proportion of the total number
of clients who complete their
employment program intervention(s)
Source: Administrative data
Note: This indicator measures federally
delivered programs only: Youth Employment
Strategy, Opportunities Fund for Persons with
Disabilities, and Aboriginal Skills and
Employment Partnership.
Target, Performance Status, Historical Results
55%–62%
2009 – 2010 results: 32,941
Proportion: 56.8%
MET
Historical results:
2008 – 2009: 34,811; Proportion: 61.3%
2007 – 2008: 32,396; Proportion: 59.9%
• The total number of clients who became employed or returned to school
following an intervention was 32,941, a decrease of 5.4% over the previous
year, likely due to the economic downturn, which caused less favourable
employment conditions during the reporting period.
Section II Analysis of Program Activities by Strategic Outcome Human Resources and Skills Development Canada
33
he Red Seal program is recognized by industry as a standard for
Expected Result T
certification of competency in the skilled trades
Performance Summary 2009 – 2010
Performance Indicator
Percentage of apprentices covered
by a Red Seal trade
Source: Statistics Canada, Registered
Apprenticeship Information System
Target, Performance Status, Historical Results
88.8%
2007 results: 87.5%
MET
Historical results:
2006: 88.8%
2005: 89.1%
Note: The latest data available covers the 2007 calendar year,
and the figures reported above represent the percentage at the
end of the calendar year.
• While the number of new apprentices registering in a Red Seal trade
increased by 3.3% over the previous year, the number of new apprentices
in non–Red Seal trades increased by 27.2% over the same period. The
non–Red Seal trades of Early Childhood Educator, Information Technology
Contact Centre Agent and Software Information Systems Analyst all saw
large increases in 2007. These three apprenticeable trades are found
in one jurisdiction and account for over 40% of all apprentices in
non–Red Seal trades.
• HRSDC is a member of the Canadian Council of Directors of Apprenticeship
and provides the national secretariat for the administration of the Red Seal
Program. HRSDC continues to work with the Council to expand labour
market coverage of the Red Seal Program to new inter-jurisdictional trades.
he capacity exists for employers to deliver employment, training
Expected Result T
and assessment services to Canadians
Performance Summary 2009 – 2010
Performance Indicator
Percentage of sector councils that
meet or exceed performance
Source: Administrative data
Target, Performance Status, Historical Results
90%
2009 – 2010 results: 94%
MET
Historical results:
2008 – 2009: 97%
2007 – 2008: 95%
• Each year, sector councils are assessed against a number of factors that
evaluate their ability to meet the collective human resources needs of their
sectors. Strategically important sectors are also assessed through the size
and strength of the sector, alignment with federal and provincial priorities, and
the severity of human resources issues.
• For a council to be considered performing, it must represent its industry,
produce measurable results, understand the prevailing human resources
challenges in the sector and build on opportunities with key stakeholders.
• Due to sample size, results for this indicator vary considerably from year to
year; to account for this, HRSDC has established a 90% threshold for
acceptable performance for this indicator.
34
2009 – 2010 Estimates Departmental Performance Report
he needs of foreign workers, employers and other stakeholders
Expected Result T
are met
Performance Summary 2009 – 2010
Performance Indicator
Percent of skilled immigrants
targeted by systematic Foreign
Credential Recognition Program
interventions
Source: Administrative data
Target, Performance Status, Historical Results
60%
2009 – 2010 results: 61%
MET
Historical results:
2008 – 2009: 57%
2007 – 2008: 53.7%
• Since 2007 – 2008, the program has increased its coverage of the immigrant
labour market by more than 7% due to additional investments in the following
target occupations: dentists, geochemists and geophysicists (regulated
occupations); financial managers (non-regulated occupation); and
occupations within the tourism sector (trades).
emporary financial assistance is provided to unemployed workers
Expected Result T
who are eligible under Part 1 of the Employment Insurance Act
Performance Summary 2009 – 2010
Performance Indicator
The proportion of unemployed
individuals eligible to receive benefits,
among those who had a recent job
separation that met EI program
eligibility criteria
Source: Employment Insurance Coverage
Survey
Target, Performance Status, Historical Results
82.3%
2009 results: 86.2%
MET
Historical results:
2008: 82.2%
2007: 82.3%
2006: 82.7%
• This indicator measures the proportion of unemployed Canadians who
qualified for EI income replacement benefits because they had worked
enough hours to meet the variable entrance requirement for their EI region
prior to a recent job separation that met EI program eligibility criteria.
• By using variable entrance requirements, the EI program has built-in flexibility
specifically designed to respond to changes in local labour markets, with
entrance requirements easing and duration of benefits increasing as the
unemployment rate rises.
Section II Analysis of Program Activities by Strategic Outcome Human Resources and Skills Development Canada
35
Performance Analysis
Employment Insurance
When the economy struggles, temporary income
support is a vital resource for unemployed Canadians
while they upgrade their skills or look for work. In total,
there was $21,585.6 billion in EI benefit expenditures in
2009 – 2010, an increase of $5,277.4 billion over the
previous year.
Numerous programs to help unemployed Canadians
prepare for, find and keep employment are already in
place under Part II of the Employment Insurance Act.
Through labour market development agreements,
the Government of Canada transfers $1.95 billion each
year to the provinces and territories to support employment
programming for eligible clients. In 2009 – 2010,
731,194 clients were served, and 220,781 returned
to work. A total of 1,161,822 Employment Benefits
and Support Measures interventions were delivered
in 2009 – 2010, an increase of 93,000 over the
previous year.
Employers benefited from much-needed assistance
through the Work-Sharing program, which is available
to companies facing layoffs due to the economy.
The Department introduced greater flexibility in this
program, which increased the number of Canadians
eligible to participate. EI regulatory amendments that
make it easier for employers to submit information
electronically and that streamline both employer and
employee reporting requirements were also introduced,
expediting EI claims processing related to the WorkSharing program.
Self-employed Canadians were given access to
EI maternity, parental, adoption, sickness and
compassionate care benefits on a voluntary basis
with the implementation of the Fairness for the SelfEmployed Act. Changes introduced by the Act were
effective January 31, 2010, and benefits will start to
be paid in January 2011. As of March 2010, approximately
2,000 self-employed Canadians had opted in to the
EI program under this provision.
Long-tenured workers were assisted by Bill C-50, An
Act to amend the Employment Insurance Act and to
increase benefits, which extended EI regular benefits
for them, and the Career Transition Assistance initiative,
which was implemented to help them update their
skills and acquire new ones. This initiative, which was
delivered in partnership with provinces and territories,
36
consists of two components—the Extended Employment
Insurance and Training Incentive and the Severance
Investment for Training Initiative—and benefited more
than 10,000 long-tenured workers in 2009 – 2010.
The EI premium rate was frozen for 2009 and 2010 at
$1.73 per $100 of insurable earnings, which is the
same rate as in 2008 and the lowest rate since 1982.
Keeping the premium rate low helps employers create
and maintain jobs and Canadians keep more of their
hard-earned money when they need it most. The
Department also supported the establishment of the
Canada Employment Insurance Financing Board, and
as of September 2009, all seven members of its Board
of Directors had been appointed. Work is now underway
for the Board to be fully operational in time to set the
2011 EI premium rate, as per the Government’s
commitment in Budget 2010.
Inclusive Labour Force
In difficult economic times, unemployed adults and
specific groups who face challenges in developing
skills and participating fully in the labour market can be
more affected than others. With the support of additional
funding through the Canada Skills and Transition
Strategy, HRSDC’s programs made progress toward
meeting the needs of these groups and creating a
more inclusive labour force.
For example, through the Canada Summer Jobs
program, students were able to participate in over
37,500 summer jobs in 2009, 3,500 of which were
created as a result of additional support provided by
Budget 2009. The application phase for summer 2010
was launched in February 2010; 28,726 applications
were received. In addition, as of March 2010, more
than 400 youth were placed in internships with not-forprofit and community service organizations through
grants to the YMCA and YWCA, with a focus on
environmental projects.
Through Canada’s Economic Action Plan, HRSDC
provided increased funding of $60 million over three
years for the Targeted Initiative for Older Workers
(TIOW). TIOW contribution agreements with all
previously participating provinces and territories
(Newfoundland and Labrador, Prince Edward Island,
Nova Scotia, New Brunswick, Quebec, Saskatchewan,
British Columbia, Yukon and Northwest Territories)
were successfully amended to reflect the increased
2009 – 2010 Estimates Departmental Performance Report
Budget 2009 funds. New TIOW agreements were
also negotiated and signed with Manitoba, Nunavut
and Ontario.
Skilled Labour Force
Meeting the future need for skilled tradespeople is crucial
to the sustained growth of the economy. The Department
promoted access to apprenticeships and supported
improved labour mobility through investments in the
Red Seal skilled trades. The Apprenticeship Incentive
Grant continued to help first- and second-year/
(or equivalent) apprentices in a Red Seal trade cover
their expenses related to tuition, travel and tools.
Additionally, the Apprenticeship Completion Grant
announced in Budget 2009 further encouraged and
helped apprentices to complete their apprenticeship
program and receive journeyperson certification in
the designated Red Seal trades. In 2009 – 2010,
the Department issued nearly 59,000 Apprenticeship
Incentive Grants and nearly 19,000 Apprenticeship
Completion Grants.
Contributions to the skills development and training
needs of Canadian employers were also made through
the Sector Council Program. Through this program, the
Department facilitated employers’ access to the skills
development and training solutions needed to address
the current and anticipated labour market needs of
employers in 34 sectors of the economy.
The Workplace Skills Initiative was created to
encourage and support sustainable ways to increase
skills development and improve the human resources
practices of Canadian workplaces. Through its
remaining 2009 – 2010 commitments, the Initiative
enabled 24 organizations, along with key stakeholders
and partnering small and medium enterprises, to test
200 pilot projects in 1,500 businesses. Completed pilot
projects have generated interest from provinces, territories
and other labour market stakeholders, some of which
have adopted activities similar to those in the successful
pilot projects as best practices within their organizations.
Labour Market Efficiency
Measurable progress is being made in addressing barriers
to foreign credential recognition in Canada through
the support of the Foreign Credential Recognition
Program and the Foreign Credentials Referral Office.
The Government of Canada invested $25 million in
these areas in 2009 – 2010, and in collaboration with
provinces and territories, it supported the development
of a common framework for assessing and recognizing
newcomers’ qualifications fairly, transparently,
consistently, and in a timely manner. In 2009 – 2010,
there were 67 agreements in progress, 43 of which
were being supported with funding from Canada’s
Economic Action Plan.
The Department also undertook significant work to
follow up on the commitment made by First Ministers
on August 11, 2009 to reduce barriers to labour
mobility by recognizing, across all jurisdictions, any
worker certified for an occupation by a regulatory
authority of one province or territory. Through the
Forum of Labour Market Ministers, HRSDC worked
with provincial and territorial partners to implement the
amended Chapter 7 of the Agreement on Internal
Trade. The Department supported the implementation
directly and in conjunction with partners to raise
awareness, facilitate changes and ensure that
obligations under the new Chapter are being met.
Key stakeholders, such as national occupational
associations, were supported through 25 funding
agreements, enabling them to develop tools and
processes that will assist them in meeting their
obligations under Chapter 7. In addition, the
Department engaged federal employers that are not
subject to the Public Service Employment Act
(i.e. Crown corporations and agencies) to inform them
of their obligations under the new Chapter. Provinces
and territories are currently at different stages of
implementing Chapter 7; many are either introducing
overarching labour mobility legislation or amending
individual acts.
Plans and Achievements for 2009 – 2010
Because implementing Canada’s Economic Action
Plan was the main priority for Skills and Employment
in 2009 – 2010, plans and achievements can be found
in the section entitled “Summary of HRSDC’S
Contribution to Canada’s Economic Action Plan”.
Lessons Learned
Foreign Credential Recognition Program
The summative evaluation of the Foreign Credential
Recognition Program (FCRP) was undertaken from
April 2008 to April 2009. The evaluation, which was
designed to assess performance between 2004 and
Section II Analysis of Program Activities by Strategic Outcome Human Resources and Skills Development Canada
37
2008, determined that the FCRP is relevant and
cost-effective overall, that it has contributed to a greater
understanding and awareness of foreign credential
recognition issues, and that it has made progress in
reducing barriers to foreign credential recognition.
However, slower progress was noted with regard to
increasing the availability of foreign credential recognition
tools and processes and standardizing assessment
tools and processes in occupations beyond the initial
investments in the engineering and physician occupations.
Key recommendations in the evaluation report included
improving the selection of investments and employer
engagement strategies, adjusting the phased project
approach, and improving the mechanisms for avoiding
duplication with related federal programs.
Aboriginal Programming
The Aboriginal Human Resources Development
Strategy (AHRDS), which was launched in 1999 as a
five-year, $1.6 billion commitment to improve
Aboriginal peoples’ access to employment and skills
training, expired on March 31, 2010. The Aboriginal
Skills and Employment Training Strategy (ASETS),
the successor to the AHRDS, has been adapted to
address policy and programming gaps in the AHRDS,
as well as the fundamentals of sustainable economic
development. To achieve these ends, ASETS is built
on three strategic priorities: demand-driven skills
development; partnerships with the private sector, with
the provinces and territories, and across the federal
government; and accountability for improved results.
Responsiveness to the needs of the private sector is
essential for a successful Aboriginal labour market
strategy. Consequently, a strengthened relationship
between Aboriginal service delivery organizations and
the private sector is required. The new Program required
service providers to develop a strategy for employer
partnerships and improved integration with the private
sector, so that training is better aligned with employers’
current needs.
ASETS also aims to encourage stronger horizontal
linkages by promoting a partnership-based approach
among Aboriginal service delivery organizations and all
levels of government in the program. Partnering with
provinces, territories and municipalities is integral to the
38
efficiency and effectiveness of Aboriginal labour market
programming because it reduces duplication and
increases opportunities to leverage resources.
Improved client data, tracking, and reporting will facilitate
the analysis of results and ensure that program
adjustments are timely and appropriate. With a better
understanding of the local labour market environment
and its key players, Aboriginal service delivery organizations
will be better able to customize client plans to demand,
and to improve returns to work and prospects for
long-term employment.
Temporary Foreign Worker Program
Findings from the 2009 Fall Report of the Auditor
General of Canada to the House of Commons
(Chapter 2, “Selecting Foreign Workers under the
Immigration Program”) point to the importance of clear
operational directives and guidance as the basis of
program integrity. The lessons learned include the
importance of providing regional officers with ongoing
training in new directives to ensure clear understanding
and consistent interpretation and application; having
strong interdepartmental coordination to ensure clear
roles and responsibilities; and using effective and
proactive messaging about program policies with
external stakeholders. The Temporary Foreign Worker
Program developed a management action plan to
address and report progress on responding to the
Auditor General’s findings. The Program will next
provide an update to the House of Commons Standing
Committee on Public Accounts in January 2011.
2.1.2Program Activity: Learning
Benefits to Canadians
Participating in post-secondary education lays the
foundation for a more skilled, adaptable and inclusive
labour force and a more efficient labour market. This,
in turn, contributes to the well-being of Canadians,
Canada’s prosperity, and the quality of life of all
Canadians.
Under this program activity, HRSDC helps Canadians
attend college, university, and trade schools by issuing
loans and grants to students through the Canada
Student Loans Program (CSLP) and the Canada
2009 – 2010 Estimates Departmental Performance Report
Student Grants Program (CSGP). The Department also
encourages Canadians to save for post-secondary
education by contributing to a Registered Education
Savings Plan (RESP) through the Canada Education
Savings Program (CESP). Once student loan borrowers
leave post-secondary education, the Repayment
Assistance Plan makes it easier for them to manage
their debt by paying back what they can reasonably
afford.
For individuals, the benefits of post-secondary education
are clear: it gives them the skills and credentials they
need to succeed in the labour market. Workers with
higher-level skills and credentials tend to be more
productive, earn higher wages, have greater earnings
growth over their lifetimes, are more likely to be
employed and remain in the labour force longer,
adapt to changes in the labour market more easily,
and make career and life transitions more successfully.
As a result, they experience a higher quality of life and
use fewer government transfers such as Employment
Insurance and social assistance.
For employers, post-secondary education addresses
skills shortages and builds the skilled labour force they
need to grow their businesses. Investments in learning
programs increase the number, education level and
skills of potential employees. The increase in the
availability of skilled labour drives innovation and
reduces skills shortages that limit economic growth.
Since more educated employees tend to be more
adaptable, having a more educated workforce allows
employers to adopt new technologies and techniques
more quickly, facilitating increased productivity and
innovation. Post-secondary credentials also provide
employers with trusted evidence of a person’s skills,
perseverance and ability to complete a degree,
diploma or trade school program. Employers rely on
these credentials to assess job applicants, which
increases the efficiency of the labour market by making
it easier and less costly to match jobs with job seekers.
Furthermore, since competition is global, and jobs and
capital are becoming increasingly mobile, a greater
supply of skilled workers helps to attract and retain
foreign investment.
Learning programs also contribute to the inclusiveness
of the labour force by helping Canadians participate
more equitably in post-secondary education. They do
this by providing incentives and greater access to
financing to students from under-represented groups,
which may include students from low-income families,
students who are single parents, students with
disabilities, students from rural areas, and others.
This helps to ensure that their potential talent is more
fully utilized.
Finally, for society, research has shown that a more
educated population is strongly linked to safer communities,
a healthier population, a more sustainable environment,
higher levels of volunteerism and charitable giving,
a greater appreciation of diversity, and stronger
social cohesion.
Program Activity Learning
Financial Resources (millions of dollars) and Human Resources (Full-Time Equivalents)
2009 – 2010
2009 – 2010
Planned
Spending
Total
Authorities
Actual
Spending
Planned
Actual
Difference
2,159.1
2,474.3
2,466.7
314
443
(129)
Section II Analysis of Program Activities by Strategic Outcome Human Resources and Skills Development Canada
39
anadians have the skills and credentials to succeed in the
Expected Result C
labour market
Performance Summary 2009 – 2010
Performance Indicators
Percentage of the Canadian labour
force (aged 25 – 64) who have
attained a post-secondary education
certificate, diploma or degree
Targets, Performance Status, Historical Results
64.3%
2009 result: 65.0%
MET
Source: Internal HRSDC calculation using the
Labour Force Survey
Historical results:
2008: 64.3%
2007: 63.7%
2006: 62.8%
2005: 62.0%
2004: 60.4%
1990: 44.2%
Over the past five years, the percentage of the Canadian labour force aged
25 – 64 who have attained a post-secondary credential has been increasing
steadily.
Post-Secondary Education Attainment Rates
Canadians in the Labour Force
2009 Actual – Annual Average
Age Group
Level attained
Trades certificate or diploma
College or university
(below bachelor)
Bachelor’s degree
Graduate degree
40
15 – 24
25 – 64
65+
Total 15 – 65+
5.9%
12.3%
12.9%
11.3%
13.9%
25.6%
16.4%
23.6%
6.8%
18.5%
12.1%
16.5%
0.7%
8.6%
12.6%
7.5%
Total with post-secondary
credential
27.3%
65.0%
53.9%
58.8%
Some post-secondary
education
20.6%
6.1%
5.2%
8.3%
Total with some
post‑secondary education
47.9%
71.1%
59.1%
67.2%
2009 – 2010 Estimates Departmental Performance Report
anadians have the skills and credentials to succeed in the
Expected Result C
labour market (continued)
Performance Summary 2009 – 2010
Performance Indicators
Proportion of Canadians who were
attending university or college
Source: Internal HRSDC calculation using the
Labour Force Survey
Targets, Performance Status, Historical Results
8.4%
2009 result: 8.5%
MET
Historical results:
2008: 8.3%
2007: 8.4%
2006: 8.5%
2005: 8.6%
2004: 8.5%
1990: 7.5%
The proportion of Canadians aged 17 – 29 (the core age group for participation
in post-secondary education) who were attending university or college
increased from 18.1% in 1990 to 26.1% in 2009.
Proportion of Canadians Attending University or College
2009 Actual – Annual Average for In-School Months
Age Group
Full Time
Part Time
Total
17 – 21
37.0%
2.2%
39.2%
22 – 24
25.1%
4.1%
29.2%
25 – 29
8.1%
3.4%
11.6%
23.0%
3.1%
26.1%
Overall 17–29
Overall 15 – 64
6.8%
1.7%
8.5%
Overall 25 – 64
2.1%
1.6%
3.6%
Section II Analysis of Program Activities by Strategic Outcome Human Resources and Skills Development Canada
41
hildren under 18 have savings for their post-secondary education
Expected Result C
in RESPs
Performance Summary 2009 – 2010
Performance Indicators
Percentage of Canadians under 18 in
the 2009 calendar year who have
ever benefited from a CESP incentive
Targets, Performance Status, Historical Results
39.7%
2009 result: 40.6%
MET
Source: Administrative data
Historical results:
2008: 39.7%
2007: 37.8%
2006: 34.9%
2005: 32.4%
2004: 30.3%
With an economic slowdown, no increase in the demand for Canada Education
Savings Grants was anticipated for 2009 – 2010, as families were expected to
defer savings for education in order to cope with more immediate financial
pressures. However, participation in CESP incentives was higher than expected
and increased slightly over the previous year.
Percentage of eligible children from
low-income families who have ever
received a Canada Learning Bond
18.5%
2009 result: 19.3%
MET
Source: Administrative data
Note: For this indicator, low-income families are
defined as families who are eligible to receive
the National Child Benefit Supplement.
Historical results:
2008: 16.3%
2007: 11.8%
2006: 4.7%
2005: 0.2%
The target for Canada Learning Bond participation was met, as more families
became aware of it and applied. The Canada Learning Bond was first offered
in 2005.
amilies use RESP savings for their children’s Post-Secondary
Expected Result F
Education
Performance Summary 2009 – 2010
Performance Indicators
Total amount withdrawn from RESPs
in the 2009 calendar year to pay for
post-secondary education
Source: Administrative data
Targets, Performance Status, Historical Results
$1.5 billion
2009 result: $1.6 billion
EXCEEDED
Historical results:
2008: $1.5 billion
2007: $1.32 billion
2006: $1.09 billion
2005: $840 million
2004: $639 million
The target for the total amount withdrawn from RESPs in 2009 was exceeded
slightly. A total of 251,159 students used RESPs in 2009 to help pay for their
post-secondary education, compared to 228,794 in 2008. There was a slight
decrease of 1.6% in the average RESP withdrawal ($6,370 in 2009 versus
$6,474 in 2008), which may be related to declines in the value of some RESP
investments due to the economic downturn.
42
2009 – 2010 Estimates Departmental Performance Report
anadians repay federal student loans, using debt-management
Expected Result C
measures as needed
Performance Summary 2009 – 2010
Performance Indicators
Three-year cohort default rate for
the 2006 – 2007 repayment cohort
(by dollar value)
Source: Administrative data
Note: The three-year cohort default rate refers
to the percentage of student loans that entered
repayment in 2006 – 2007 and defaulted within
three years (by the end of 2009 – 2010). This
calculation is based on methodology used by
the Office of the Chief Actuary.
Targets, Performance Status, Historical Results
17%
2006 – 2007 cohort: 16%
MET
Historical results (based on loan year1):
2005 – 2006 cohort: 17%
2004 – 2005 cohort: 19%
2003 – 2004 cohort: 28%
2002 – 2003 cohort: 26%*
2001 – 2002 cohort: 26%*
*The figures for the 2001 – 2002 and 2002 – 2003
cohorts represent a combined default rate for
direct, risk-shared and guaranteed loans.
Despite the economic downturn in 2009, HRSDC was able to maintain a
relatively low level of default by frequently communicating with borrowers and
implementing the Repayment Assistance Plan, which makes it easier for
student loan borrowers to restructure their debt.
1
For the Canada Student Loans Program, the loan year begins August 1st and ends July 31st this allows for reporting consistent with typical periods of
study that run from September to June each year.
Section II Analysis of Program Activities by Strategic Outcome Human Resources and Skills Development Canada
43
anadians with demonstrated financial needs use federal student
Expected Result C
loans to participate in post-secondary education
Performance Summary 2009 – 2010
Performance Indicators
Number of new Canada Student
Loans issued to full-time students
Source: Administrative data
Targets, Performance Status, Historical Results
350,000
2009 – 2010 result: 398,000
EXCEEDED
Historical results (based on loan year):
2008 – 2009: 365,363
2007 – 2008: 352,708
2006 – 2007: 343,261
2005 – 2006: 343,638
2004 – 2005: 337,256
The target of 350,000 students was established based on the projections of the
student population made by the Office of the Chief Actuary. In the 2009 – 2010
loan year, HRSDC provided $2.07 billion in loans to 398,000 full-time students.
The higher number of borrowers and the higher value of the loans disbursed
may be attributable to greater demand for student loans brought on by the
economic downturn and an increase in applications due to the new Canada
Student Grants program. (Students may use one application form to apply for
both programs.)
Number of full-time students who
receive a Canada Student Grant
(CSG)
245,000
2009 – 2010 result: 286,325
EXCEEDED
Historical results:
N/A (first year of program)
Source: Administrative data
The 2009 – 2010 loan year was the first year of operation for the Canada
Student Grants Program. HRSDC issued approximately $468 million in
Canada Student Grants to more than 286,000 full-time students, including
approximately 30,000 full-time students who received multiple Canada Student
Grants. An additional 3,514 part-time students also received Canada Student
Grants, for a total of $3.8 million. The higher-than-projected result is likely due
to increased need brought on by the economic downturn.
44
2009 – 2010 Estimates Departmental Performance Report
Performance Analysis
Canadians have the skills and credentials to
succeed in the labour market
Canada has one of the most educated workforces in
the world, thanks in part to the support of HRSDC’s
programs. Once again, the Organisation for Economic
Co-operation and Development (OECD) found that
Canada placed first overall among OECD countries for
the percentage of its population with post-secondary
credentials (see Table 1).2 The percentage of Canadians
in the labour force (age 25–64) who had obtained a
post-secondary credential reached 65% in 2009.
Table 1 Post-Secondary Education Attainment
Rates (Among those aged 25 – 64)
Canadian Population
2009
2007
Canada’s Ranking
Among OECD
Countries for 2007
Trades certificate
or diploma
11.9%
12%
1st
College or university
(below bachelor)
24.1%
24%
1st
Bachelor’s degree
17.4%
25%
Graduate degree
8.0%
Total
61.4%
4th (tied with
four other countries)
61%
1st overall
The 2008 Access and Support to Education and Training
Survey found that 40% of respondents aged 18 – 24 who
had attained a post-secondary credential had used
federal student loans or withdrawals from RESPs to
help finance their post-secondary education. Within
this group, 31% had used a federal loan and 11%
used withdrawals from their RESPs,3 which shows that
both the CSLP and the CESP contribute to helping
Canadians obtain post-secondary credentials.
Canadians are able to finance their
participation in post-secondary education
Canadians continue to rely on HRSDC’s programs
and services to help them save for and finance
their participation in post-secondary education. In
2009 – 2010, the Department helped 46%4 of full-time
post-secondary students in participating provinces and
territories5 finance their post-secondary education with
loans, grants or in-study interest subsidies, while 13%6
of full- and part-time post-secondary students (8.6% in
2005) withdrew funds from their RESPs to help them
finance their post-secondary education.7 In 2009, this
represents more than 251,000 students withdrawing
$1.6 billion from their RESPs. Furthermore, the percentage
of Canadians participating in post-secondary education
continued to increase. For example, 39.2% of Canadians
aged 17 – 21 participated in post-secondary education
in 2009, compared to 37.8% in 2005 and 30.4% in 1990.
Overall, in 2009 – 2010, 490,000 full-time post-secondary
students in participating provinces and territories
benefited from the CSLP and the CSGP. Under these
programs, HRSDC invested $2.07 billion in student
loans, $179 million in subsidies to cover interest for
borrowers who are still in school, and $533 million in
grants to students facing financial difficulties.8
This was the first year of operation for the CSGP. The
introduction of the new grants was well timed, as students
faced the prospect of decreased financial resources
due to the economic downturn. See the Performance
Summary section (page 37) for further details.
As of January 1, 2010, HRSDC has taken over
responsibility for administering the remaining payments
of Millennium Excellence Awards from the Canadian
Millennium Scholarship Foundation, and it will continue
to administer these payments until December 31, 2013.
2
See Education at a Glance 2009 at www.oecd.org.
3
These numbers are not mutually exclusive, as the same person may have both withdrawn funds from an RESP and received a federal loan. For more
information about the Access and Support to Education and Training Survey, see www.statcan.gc.ca/pub/81-595-m/81-595-m2009079-eng.htm.
4
This percentage is based on the number of full-time students forecasted by the Office of the Chief Actuary for the Canada Student Loans Program
(1,059,000) and does not include Quebec, the Northwest Territories or Nunavut, as these jurisdictions do not participate in the CSLP.
5
Quebec, the Northwest Territories and Nunavut do not participate in the CSLP but do receive alternative payments.
6
This percentage is based on the number of full-time and part-time students participating in post-secondary education according to the Labour Force
Survey (1,949,390).
7
These two percentages are not mutually exclusive, as the same person may have both received a loan, grant or in-study interest subsidy and withdrawn
funds from an RESP.
8
$533 million in grants includes the new Canada Student Grants as well as Canada Access Grants, Canada Study Grants and Canadian Millennium Scholarship Foundation transitional grants.
Section II Analysis of Program Activities by Strategic Outcome Human Resources and Skills Development Canada
45
From January 1 to March 31, 2010, HRSDC disbursed
24 Millennium Excellence Award payments for a total
of $156,375.
Canadians, including those from underrepresented groups, participate equitably in
post-secondary education
Canada has a highly educated population, in part because
the student financial assistance and post-secondary
education savings incentives HRSDC provides help to
reduce financial barriers for lower-income families and
other traditionally under-represented groups. However,
although access to post-secondary education by
such groups is improving, several groups are still
under-represented. For example, the 2008 Access
and Support to Education and Training Survey found
that 9.8% of Canadians aged 18–64 with a disability
had participated in post-secondary education,
compared to 16.5% of Canadians without a disability
in the same age group. Furthermore, in 2007, 52.2%
of Canadians aged 16 and over without a disability had
a post-secondary credential, compared to only 41.6%
of those with a disability.
Student loan borrowers repay their student
loans
The Repayment Assistance Plan, also launched in 2009,
helped maintain the default rate at a lower level than
expected (16% versus the forecast 17%) by making it
easier for borrowers to avoid default by restructuring
their student loan payments to fit their financial
circumstances.
RESP was eight years of age. By the end of 2009,
the average was 3.6 years of age (4.8 in 2005),
allowing more time for the savings to grow before
they are withdrawn to pay for education.
Uptake of the Canada Learning Bond, which was
launched in 2005 and is designed to help low-income
families save for education using RESPs, increased
to over 19% of the eligible population in 2009, from
16.3% in 2008. This increase can be partly attributed
to HRSDC’s outreach strategy to inform eligible
Canadians that they are entitled to access these
benefits, as well as to an increase in the number of
children eligible to receive the Bond, following the
extension of the National Child Benefit supplement
to a greater number of families.
The 2008 Access and Support to Education and
Training Survey provided evidence that an increasing
number of parents are saving for their children’s
post-secondary education and are using RESPs to do
so. The survey found that 68% of children (aged 0 – 17)
had savings for post-secondary education (52% in
2002 and 43% in 1999). Among those with savings,
69% had used RESPs (55% in 2002 and 42% in
1999). As expected, the survey also found that the
proportion of children with post-secondary education
savings increased with the level of parental income,
as shown in Table 2.
Table 2 Children with Savings for Post-
Secondary Education by Family Income
Percent of Children with Savings
Family Income
82.5%
More than $100,000
Children under 18 have savings for
post‑secondary education in RESPs
Canadians are increasing their use of the savings
incentives offered by the CESP. As of December 2009,
40.6% of eligible children under 18 years of age had
RESP savings to help them finance their future
participation in post-secondary education, compared
to 32.4% in 2005. Moreover, Canadians contributed
$3.13 billion to RESPs in 2009 ($2.46 billion in 2005),
despite the economic downturn, although the growth
rate for RESP contributions slowed to 1%, compared
to an average of 8% per year before 2008. Families are
also contributing to RESPs earlier in their children’s
lives than in previous years. In 1998, before the CESP
was launched, the average age of a child with an
46
71.2%
$75,000 – 100,000
64.2%
$50,000 – 75,000
53.6%
$25,000 – 50,000
42.3%
Less than $25,000
Canadians make better-informed choices
about post-secondary education funding
The Access and Support to Education and Training
Survey also found that 79.4% of parents with children
were aware of the Canada Education Savings
Program; however, the Formative Evaluation of the
Additional Canada Education Savings Grant and
Canada Learning Bond found a lower level of
awareness regarding these two incentives, which are
targeted at low-income families.
2009 – 2010 Estimates Departmental Performance Report
Canadian institutions offer students
opportunities to gain international skills
The International Academic Mobility initiative supported
48 projects involving 111 Canadian partners and a
similar number of international partners, helping
350 students participate in international learning activities.
In 2009 – 2010, 87% of clients who responded reported
that their International Academic Mobility educational
experience met or exceeded their expectations, and
89% said they had acquired skills to a greater degree
than they would have if they had not participated.
Plans and Achievements for 2009 – 2010
Improve support for low- and middle-income
students by launching the Canada Student
Grants Program by August 2009
HRSDC launched a series of new grants for lowand middle-income students in 2009 – 2010. The new
Canada Student Grants Program offers more predictable
funding to students than previous programs: grant
amounts are defined clearly, grants are disbursed
evenly at the beginning of the fall and winter semesters,
and the grants are available to eligible students for
their entire undergraduate post-secondary education.
By offering more predictable funding, this program makes
it easier for students to plan for their post-secondary
education expenses.
Implement the Repayment Assistance Plan
by August 2009 to help borrowers facing
difficulties in repaying their loans
HRSDC successfully implemented the new Repayment
Assistance Plan in collaboration with provinces and
territories. Effective August 1, 2009, this new plan
provides more comprehensive, graduated support for
student borrowers experiencing difficulty in repayment.
In addition, special provisions were also implemented
to provide targeted support for borrowers with permanent
disabilities who are experiencing difficulties in repaying
their student loans.
Provide additional support for Canada Student
Loans Program service delivery to maintain
service standards
Due to the increased demand for this program during
the 2009 – 2010 fiscal year, internal resources were
reallocated to ensure that service standards were
maintained and, where possible, improved. The
Department achieved the following results:
• 100% of funds were distributed to students and
educational institutions within two days (federal
portion) and four days (provincial portion) of the date
when complete and accurate student loan
documentation was received (100% in 2008 – 2009).
• 100% of disbursements were error-free, based on
the top five pre-identified reasons for disbursement
errors (100% in 2008 – 2009).
• 83% of inbound telephone calls were answered
within 20 seconds (83% in 2008 – 2009).
• 77% of clients were satisfied with the overall quality
of service provided by the CSLP, a slight increase
over the 74 – 75% result achieved over each of the
last four years.
Provide clients with better online services,
a streamlined and simplified application
processes, and better co-ordinated
communication by implementing the Service
Delivery Vision initiatives
HRSDC worked with provincial and territorial partners
to continue implementing the Service Delivery Vision for
Student Financial Assistance initiatives. In January 2010,
the provinces and territories identified three priority
initiatives for the short term, including: developing an
electronic confirmation of enrolment solution based on
a national portal; setting up master student financial
aid agreements with British Columbia and Ontario for
2011 – 2012; and developing a single online application
for repayment assistance measures. Given the multiyear schedule for implementing the Service Delivery
Vision, HRSDC met its objectives for 2009 – 2010.
Lessons Learned
The Formative Evaluation of the Additional Canada
Education Savings Grant and Canada Learning Bond
points to lower awareness of these two incentives,
which are targeted at low-income families. These
findings provide a deeper understanding of savings
behaviour and help explain why special incentives
targeted at low-income families take longer to
implement. In response, HRSDC is taking steps
to increase awareness and participation by sending
Section II Analysis of Program Activities by Strategic Outcome Human Resources and Skills Development Canada
47
targeted mail-outs and continuing to work with nongovernmental organizations to address these barriers.
Through projects funded under the Education Savings
Community Outreach initiative, HRSDC learned about
barriers to opening RESPs and accessing the Canada
Learning Bond. Anecdotal evidence from the project
organizations identified common themes based on
interactions with clients: lower financial literacy levels
among the target populations, difficulty providing the
documents necessary to open an RESP (e.g. Social
Insurance Numbers and birth certificates), family attitudes
toward post-secondary education and its importance,
and the fees charged by financial institutions for
administering RESPs. Although participation is increasing
and has exceeded annual targets, HRSDC is implementing
outreach plans to increase awareness so that more
Canadians participate in the program and benefit from
the funding available to help them save for children’s
post-secondary education.
48
HRSDC also recognized a growing body of research
that found that providing students with information at
select points during the life of their student loans
may help them manage their finances related to their
post-secondary education more effectively, and that
a lack of awareness of the costs and benefits of
post-secondary education discourages some
Canadians from participating. As a result, HRSDC
developed online entrance and exit counselling
information sessions for student loan borrowers.
These sessions were designed to help improve
students’ and parents’ financial literacy regarding
post-secondary education.
2009 – 2010 Estimates Departmental Performance Report
2.2Strategic Outcome

Strategic Outcome 2
Safe, fair and productive
workplaces and cooperative
workplace relations
 Mediation and Conciliation
Labour
2.2.1Program Activity: Labour
Priorities
Help Canadian workers and employers to maintain
workplace safety, fairness, productivity and
cooperation throughout the economic downturn by
providing relevant and timely services and support
Benefits to Canadians
The workplace is where Canada’s wealth is generated
and where many Canadians spend a significant portion
of their day. Ensuring that workplaces are safe, fair and
productive and that workplace relations are cooperative
is important to the well-being of Canadians, the success
of business and the performance of the country’s
economy. For workers, quality of life is improved when
they can enjoy a safe workplace where they are treated
fairly and have the right to voice concerns and resolve
disagreements with employers. For businesses, having
clear ground rules for labour standards and employeremployee relations contributes to an improved
bottom line.
This program activity is directly responsible for federally
regulated workplaces in a number of strategically
important sectors of the economy, including banking;
telecommunications; broadcasting; air, interprovincial
rail, road and pipeline transportation; shipping; uranium
mining; grain handling; and Crown corporations. These
industries cover approximately 46,000 workplaces and
1.1 million employees, accounting for approximately
8.5 % of the Canadian labour force.
To promote cooperation and fairness in these sectors,
the Labour Program provides mediation and conciliation
services to assist employers and unions in settling
disputes; appoints arbitrators, adjudicators and referees
to resolve specific disputes between employers and
 Workplace Safety, Standards and Equity
 International Labour Affairs
 Workplace Information
employees; offers a comprehensive and innovative
Preventive Mediation Program to assist employers
and unions in building effective labour management
relations; provides grievance mediation to assist labour
and management in reaching voluntary settlement of
grievances as a low-cost alternative to arbitration; and
fosters cooperation through its Labour Management
Partnerships Program.
Through a coast-to-coast network of regional offices,
the Labour Program ensures that federally-regulated
workplaces are safe and fair by working with employers
and employees to ensure that laws governing
occupational health and safety, labour standards and
employment equity are respected. The Labour
Program is also responsible for the federal workers’
compensation system, the Wage Earner Protection
Program and national fire protection services in
federally owned or leased buildings and in major public
band buildings in First Nations communities.
The workplace is changing rapidly, and Labour Program
activities are helping Canadians to adjust and thrive
amidst the uncertainties of the global marketplace.
This is done by conducting research about emerging
issues such as work-life balance and by tracking and
providing a wide range of information about labour
relations and workplace trends in Canada, including
developments in federal, provincial and territorial
labour laws.
Finally, to enhance working conditions and ensure
healthy and fair workplaces for all Canadians, the
Labour Program works closely with provincial and
territorial governments, First Nations communities,
and a range of international partners. Domestically,
this entails forging partnerships and engaging in joint
projects. On the international stage, the Labour
Program leads the preparation and implementation of
labour cooperation agreements, which are part of each
Section II Analysis of Program Activities by Strategic Outcome Human Resources and Skills Development Canada
49
free trade agreement and protect Canadian companies
and workers from foreign competitors who may be
tempted to gain unfair advantages by ignoring basic
labour standards. The Labour Program also represents
Canada in multilateral forums where labour matters are
discussed, such as the International Labour
Organization, and negotiates international labour
standards that advance Canadian interests and
fundamental values abroad.
Program Activity Labour
Financial Resources (millions of dollars) and Human Resources (Full-Time Equivalents)
2009 – 2010
2009 – 2010
Planned
Spending
Total
Authorities
Actual
Spending
Planned
Actual
Difference
271.2
270.8
268.5
726
720
6
Note: Financial and human resources amounts for this program activity include resources related to initiatives under Canada’s Economic Action Plan.
See page 29 for details by initiative.
ollective bargaining disputes are resolved without
Expected Result C
a work stoppage
Performance Summary 2009 – 2010
Performance Indicators
Percentage of collective bargaining
disputes settled under Part I
(Industrial Relations) of the Canada
Labour Code without a work
stoppage
Source: Administrative data
Targets, Performance Status, Historical Results
90%
2009 – 2010 result: 94%
MET
Historical results:
2008 – 2009: 94%
2007 – 2008: 93%
2006 – 2007: 97%
2005 – 2006: 97%
2004 – 2005: 90%
In 2009 – 2010, 94% of approximately 200 collective bargaining disputes were
settled without a work stoppage.
50
2009 – 2010 Estimates Departmental Performance Report
mployers and employees in targeted higher risk industries are
Expected Result E
working cooperatively to ensure safe and healthy workplaces
Performance Summary 2009 – 2010
Performance Indicators
Percentage change, year over year,
in the rate of lost-time injuries and
fatalities within the targeted higherrisk federal jurisdiction industries
Source: Administrative data
Targets, Performance Status, Historical Results
Decrease of 15%
2005 – 2009 results:
Available in 2011
Historical results:
2001 – 2005: decrease of 20.5%
The results for the five year period
from 2005 – 2009 will not be available
until June 2011. The results will be
reported in the 2010 – 2011
Departmental Performance Report.
The Disabling Injury Incidence Rate is measured over a fixed five year period,
as it can fluctuate from year to year. The percentage rate was exceeded for the
targeted industries for the period from 2001 to 2005, with a decrease of 20.5%.
The national targeted industries included: air transport — off-board; road
transport; feed, flour, and seed; longshoring; rail transport — off-board; water
transport — off-board; and grain elevators.
Expected Result Employees and employers resolve complaints of unjust dismissal
Performance Summary 2009 – 2010
Performance Indicators
Percentage of unjust dismissal
complaints settled by inspectors
(Part II of the Canada Labour Code)
Source: Administrative data
Targets, Performance Status, Historical Results
75%
2009 – 2010 result: 71%
MOSTLY MET
Historical results:
2008 – 2009: 73%
2007 – 2008: 76%
2006 – 2007: 74%
2005 – 2006: 74%
2004 – 2005: 71%
Over the past six years, between 71% and 76% of all unjust dismissal cases
were settled, while the number of cases completed remained approximately the
same. Participating in dispute resolution with respect to unjust dismissals is not
mandatory, and successful resolution is dependent upon a variety of factors,
not all of which are within the control of Labour Program inspectors.
Section II Analysis of Program Activities by Strategic Outcome Human Resources and Skills Development Canada
51
Performance Analysis
Overall, this Program Activity met its performance
measurement targets for 2009 – 2010. Specifically,
under labour policy and legislation, a comprehensive
strategy is in place to help ensure that the Labour
Program is able to monitor developments in the
environment and bring forward appropriate policy
responses. A joint strategy with the provinces and
territories for international labour issues has been
established and is being actively pursued. In the area
of service delivery, efforts are being made to increase
proactive intervention in the context of compliance
activities, and a wide-ranging service modernization
strategy is being developed. Strategies are also in
place to modernize the Labour Program’s information
technology infrastructure, as well as to establish a
more rigorous, results-based approach to measuring
and improving performance.
One of the strategic goals of the Labour program
activity is to promote harmonious union-management
relations and thereby minimize the number of work
stoppages that disrupt the Canadian economy. To
measure the effectiveness of its services, the Labour
Program tracks the percentage of collective bargaining
disputes settled without a work stoppage, with a target
of 90%. This target has been consistently achieved or
exceeded over the past ten years, with the exception
of 2004, when the settlement rate was 89%. In
2009 – 2010, 94% of all disputes were settled without a
work stoppage. As part of the Preventive Mediation
Program, the Department offered approximately
50 workshops designed to help employers and unions
build and maintain constructive working relationships.
In addition, 13 group terminations affecting
4,258 employees across Canada were successfully
investigated. The Labour Program helped ensure that
employers provided redundant employees with measures
to minimize the effects of the group termination, including
helping the employees obtain other employment.
The Disabling Injury Incidence Rate (DIIR) is measured
over a fixed five-year period, as it can fluctuate from year
to year due to incidents that result in multiple injuries
or fatalities. For the period from 2001 to 2005, the first
five year period during which this measure was used,
the Occupational Health and Safety program set its
target to reduce the DIIR by 10% in all federal jurisdiction
industries, including industries rated as high-risk. The
reduction in those high-risk industries was 20.5%. For
52
the period from 2005 to 2009, the target for high-risk
industries is a reduction of 15%. Results for this
five-year period will be available in June 2011.
Under the Canada Labour Code, an employee who
has completed at least 12 consecutive months of
continuous employment with the same employer and
who is not covered by a collective agreement is
protected from unjust dismissal. If a settlement
agreement between the parties cannot be reached
within a reasonable timeframe, the complainant may
request that the Minister of Labour appoint an adjudicator
to hear the case. The Labour Program has set a target
of having 75% of all unjust dismissal complaints be
settled through the efforts of its inspectors prior to
being referred to adjudication. The percentage of
unjust dismissal complaints settled by inspectors has
between 71% and 76% over the past six years, while
the number of cases remained approximately the same.
Participating in dispute resolution with respect to unjust
dismissals is not mandatory, and resolving a complaint
is dependent upon the willingness of both parties to
find a solution to the dispute.
Plans and Achievements for 2009 — 2010
Deliver core programs that foster safety,
fairness and productivity in workplaces under
exclusive federal jurisdiction, and ensure
that those programs are responsive to the
economic challenges facing Canadian
employers and workers by:
1) ensuring the effective and efficient delivery
of services in the areas of occupational health
and safety, employment standards, injury
compensation, and fire safety, in part through
the implementation of modern, targeted
compliance strategies
The Labour Program finalized the development of
the Intervention Model, which is used by health and
safety officers when enforcing Part II (Occupational
Health and Safety) of the Canada Labour Code.
This model provides a structured approach to
identifying workplaces with high levels of injuries or
noncompliance and provides a uniform and
comprehensive strategy to reduce these levels. The
expected result is less day-to-day intervention by
the regulator. In 2009 – 2010, the Intervention Model
was initiated 133 times.
2009 – 2010 Estimates Departmental Performance Report
2) maintaining programs that support the full and
equal participation of all Canadians at work,
including the Legislated Employment Equity
Program, the Federal Contractors Program for
Employment Equity, the Racism-Free Workplace
Strategy and pay equity
The Department increased the number of compliance
reviews conducted under the Federal Contractors
Program to 100 from approximately 80 in the
previous year. Similar to previous years, training
was provided to more than 500 participants from
employers who fall under the Legislated Employment
Equity Program and the Federal Contractors Program,
as well as public sector employers.
In addition, the Department provided 52 workshops
to employers across Canada in partnership with the
Aboriginal Human Resource Council under the
Racism-Free Workplace Strategy. The Labour
Program also partnered with the National Film Board
of Canada to produce five films about racism and
with Statistics Canada to develop population
projections for members of visible minorities. This
will help Statistics Canada base their workforce
representation figures on current workforce availability
to reflect demographic changes within Canadian
society more accurately.
Develop innovative strategies that respond to
the short- and long-term challenges facing
Canadian workplaces by:
1) consulting with stakeholders on options for
modernizing Part III (Labour Standards) of the
Canada Labour Code
The Labour Program held consultations on the
modernization of Part III between February and
June 2009. These included online consultations,
which produced 64 written submissions from
individuals and organizations, and in-person
discussions with key Labour Program stakeholders
that covered a wide range of Part III issues of
particular interest to stakeholders. Options for
modernizing Part III (Labour Standards) of the
Canada Labour Code are now being developed.
2) assessing the recommendations presented in the
report Work Stoppages in the Federal Private
Sector, aimed at reducing the frequency and
duration of strikes and lockouts in federally
regulated industries
The Department developed and delivered a new
Post–Work Stoppage Workshop, which is intended
to help parties move beyond confrontational
behaviours and re-establish more positive industrial
relations. In addition, options for further enhancing
the Preventive Mediation Program were explored,
and terms of reference were developed for the
Minister’s Advisory Council on Workplace and
Labour Affairs, which will begin operations in fall 2010.
3) developing options for presentation before the
parliamentary committee charged with the
examination of the Employment Equity Act
As part of the ongoing monitoring of progress and
gaps related to designated group representation in
the workplace, the Department conducted an
analysis of workforce representation by
employment equity group. This analysis will be
used to assess progress with respect to the
recommendations made during the last
parliamentary review (2001). Federal departments
with responsibilities for employment equity were
consulted on an ongoing basis.
Although the mandate to conduct a review of the
Act was twice referred by the House of Commons
to the Standing Committee on Human Resources,
Skills Development, Social Development and the
Status of Persons with Disabilities, a review was
never initiated by the Committee.
Advance Canadian interests and values in the
negotiation and implementation of international
labour standards and agreements by:
1) pursuing the conclusion and implementation of
labour cooperation agreements and cooperative
frameworks with free-trade partners and
emerging economic powers
The Labour Program concluded successful
activities under the Canada-China Framework for
Labour Cooperation on Labour Matters, which was
renewed for a three-year term. Activities focused on
labour standards and industrial relations following
China’s adoption of its new Labour Contract Law
and Labour Dispute Mediation and Arbitration Law.
In addition, the Department supported the coming
into force of the Canada-Peru Agreement on
Labour Cooperation, as well as the conclusion of
successful labour cooperation agreement negotiations
with Jordan. The negotiation of labour cooperation
Section II Analysis of Program Activities by Strategic Outcome Human Resources and Skills Development Canada
53
agreements advances Canadian interests and
fundamental values abroad and protects Canadian
companies and workers from foreign competitors
who may be tempted to gain unfair advantages by
ignoring basic labour standards.
The Labour Program also implemented labour-related
technical assistance programming designed
to build the capacity of key partner countries
(e.g. Peru, Colombia, Guatemala and Honduras) to
administer their labour legislation and comply with
internationally recognized core labour standards.
2) strengthening cooperation between Canada,
the United States and Mexico in the context of
the North American Agreement on Labour
Cooperation
At the 2009 North American Leaders’ Summit,
leaders reiterated their commitment to promoting
respect for labour rights and mandated labour
ministers to continue the dialogue to address the
functioning of the North American Agreement on
Labour Cooperation. In fulfilment of this commitment,
the three countries (Canada, U.S.A. and Mexico)
engaged in high-level dialogue, with a focus on
improving the functioning of the North American
Agreement on Labour Cooperation Secretariat,
enhancing and refocusing trilateral cooperative
activities, and modernizing the Agreement.
Lessons Learned
Two recent Federal Court decisions (Canada v. Vandal
and CUPE, Air Canada Component v. Air Canada)
have required the Labour Program to rescind a policy
developed in 2007 related to the refusal to work
provisions in Part II (Occupational Health and Safety) of
the Canada Labour Code. This policy required health
and safety officers investigating a refusal to work to
first determine if an employee was refusing to perform
work that was a “normal condition of employment.”
If so, the officer would discontinue the investigation
without determining if the work posed a danger. In
these cases, there was no prescribed process for an
appeal against the officer’s decision, and the employee
could not continue to refuse to work and still be
protected by the Canada Labour Code against
disciplinary action. The policy was developed in an
attempt to stem the large number of refusals to work
being initiated by two to three employee groups who
were allegedly using the provision to press for various
policy changes in their own workplaces. The Federal
Court ruled that health and safety officers investigating
a refusal to work have a statutory duty to determine if a
danger exists, and this determination is subject to the
appeal provisions prescribed by the Code. An interim
policy was immediately put in place while a review of
Operations Program Directive 9051, “Response to a
Refusal to Work in Case of Danger,” is undertaken.
3) providing leadership and promoting Canadian
interests in international forums dealing with
labour issues, including the International Labour
Organization
Canadian priorities were reflected in resolutions
dealing with labour issues in the United Nations (UN)
General Assembly and the UN Economic and
Social Council, and in outcomes of the International
Labour Conference discussions on HIV/AIDS and
the world of work, gender equality, and the Global
Jobs Pact. The Department also advanced
International Labour Organization reform by playing
a leadership role as Chair of the Industrialized
Market Economy Group, as well as chairing the
working groups on institutional and standards
reform. In addition, the Labour Program continued
to play a leadership role with respect to the
Declaration and Plan of Action of the XVI InterAmerican Conference of Ministers of Labour and
as a working group vice-chair.
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2009 – 2010 Estimates Departmental Performance Report
2.3Strategic Outcome

Strategic Outcome 3
Income security,
access to opportunities
and well-being for
individuals, families
and communities
 Old Age Security
Income
Security
 Canada Pension Plan
 Canada Disability Savings Program
 National Child Benefit
 Homelessness Partnering Strategy
Social
Development
 Social Development Partnerships Program
 New Horizons for Seniors Program
 Universal Child Care Benefit
 Enabling Accessibility Fund
 Federal Elder Abuse Initiative
2.3.1Program Activity:
Income Security
Priority
Assist Canadians through targeted and modernized
income security and social development measures
for vulnerable populations (seniors, people with
disabilities, homeless people and those at risk of
becoming homeless, and communities)
Benefits to Canadians
Income security is essential to the quality of life and
well-being of Canadians. This program activity provides
eligible Canadians with retirement pensions, survivor
pensions, disability benefits and benefits for children,
through the Old Age Security (OAS) program and the
Canada Pension Plan (CPP).
remain responsive to the current and future needs of
Canadians. This includes efforts to expand awareness
and increase take-up of public retirement income
entitlements, with a particular focus on vulnerable
segments of the population who often experience
barriers to receiving information and assistance
through traditional government channels.
In addition, this Program Activity supports low-income
families and their children through the National Child
Benefit. Through this initiative, the federal government
works in partnership with provincial and territorial
governments to provide income support, as well as
benefits and services.
Finally, this Program Activity includes the administration
of the Canada Disability Savings Program (CDSP),
which helps parents and others save for the long-term
financial security of people with severe disabilities.
The Department undertakes national legislative
development, policy direction, program design, research
and analysis to ensure that the OAS and CPP programs
Program Activity Income Security
Financial Resources (millions of dollars) and Human Resources (Full-Time Equivalents)
2009 – 2010
2009 – 2010
Planned
Spending
Total
Authorities
Actual
Spending
Planned
Actual
Difference
66,011.9
65,210.5
65,199.8
582
352
230
Section II Analysis of Program Activities by Strategic Outcome Human Resources and Skills Development Canada
55
ligible beneficiaries receive Canada Disability Savings Bonds
Expected Result E
and Grants
Performance Summary 2009 – 2010
Performance Indicators
Number of Registered Disability
Savings Plans (RDSPs) receiving
Canada Disability Savings Bond
and the dollar value of these
bonds
Source: Administrative data
Number of RDSPs receiving
Canada Disability Savings Grant
and the dollar value of these
grants
Source: Administrative data
Note: Grants rely on contributions made
to the plan. Contributions are generally
low at the beginning of the year but
increase as the year progresses.
Targets*, Performance Status, Historical Results
10,000 plans receive a cumulative
$15 million by 2011 – 2012
18,000 plans receive a cumulative
$45 million by 2013 – 2014
Historical results:
N/A (new indicator)
2009 – 2010 results:
$42.9 million paid
16,601 plans received
$15.7 million for 2010 bonds
16,931 plans received
$16.0 million for 2009 bonds
11,662 plans received
$11.2 million for 200 bonds
EXCEEDED
15 000 plans receive
$30 million by 2011 – 2012
Historical results:
N/A (new indicator)
25 000 plans receive $80 million
by 2013 – 2014
2009 – 2010 results:
$83.9 million paid
6,213 plans received $10.4 million
in grants (for contributions made
between Jan. and March 2010)
15,997 plans received
$42.9 million in grants
(for contributions made in 2009)
11,281 plans received
$30.6 million in grants
(for contributions made in 2008)
EXCEEDED
* Targets were based on the experience of programs, including the Canada Education
Savings Grant and the Canada Learning Bond. Targets for cumulative grant and
bond payments were based on Canada Revenue Agency data on Canadians
eligible for the Disability Tax Credit in the target age range (0 – 49). When the targets
were developed, not all provinces and territories had announced their intentions
with respect to RDSP asset and income exemptions. The assumption at the time was
that this could delay full take-up of the program. At present, all provinces and
territories have announced a full or partial exemption of RDSP income and assets.
The number of major financial organizations offering the RDSP has also likely
contributed to take-up by providing greater access to issuers and increasing
promotion.
In addition, the CDSP team implemented a diverse and comprehensive outreach
strategy to increase awareness and promote take-up. Activities under this strategy
included contracts with organizations to deliver information sessions, face-to-face
meetings with organizations, two national print and radio advertising campaigns,
a 1 800 O-Canada toll-free number and the development of a website.
Note: Not all plans will attract a grant or a bond, and both are based on a calendar
year (January to December). Therefore, during one fiscal year, there could be more
than one grant or bond payment into a single plan.
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2009 – 2010 Estimates Departmental Performance Report
ocial and economic inclusion of Canada Pension Plan (CPP)
Expected Result S
contributors and their families in Canadian society
Performance Summary 2009 – 2010
Performance Indicators
Targets, Performance Status, Historical Results
Percentage of income derived
from CPP program
Replaces 25% of average
career earnings
Source: Statistics Canada
2009 – 2010 results: 18.4%
Historical results:
2008 – 2009: 19.1%
SOMEWHAT MET
The target was only somewhat met because some CPP contributors do not maximize
their contributions throughout their working life, thereby reducing the amount of their
CPP retirement pension.
The Economic Recovery Act, which received Royal Assent on December 15, 2009,
contains a provision that will change the CPP benefit calculation to allow up to one
additional year of low earnings during a person’s career without this period reducing
the benefit payment. In addition, starting in 2012, older workers receiving a CPP
retirement pension will be able to contribute to the Plan and accrue additional
post-retirement benefits.
PP contributors have a measure of protection against loss of
Expected Result C
employment income due to severe and prolonged disability
Performance Summary 2009 – 2010
Performance Indicators
Percentage of CPP contributors
who have contributory coverage/
eligibility for CPP Disability
(CPPD)
Source: Office of the Superintendent of
Financial Institutions
Targets, Performance Status, Historical Results
70% of men
63% of women
2008 results:
In order to produce accurate
information, a lag of two years is
required before releasing
statistics. CPPD coverage data
for 2008 was not available in time
to be included in this DPR.
Historical results:
2007: 69% of men and 64% of women
2006: 69% of men and 64% of women
Note: Due to recent methodological changes by the Office of
the Superintendent of Financial Institutions, the CPPD coverage
rates for men and women have been revised downward for
2007 and 2006.
Contributors to the Canada Pension Plan are eligible for CPP-D notwithstanding the
medical determination of eligibility, if they have contributed to the Plan in 4 of the last
6 years. Effective March 3, 2008, contributors who have 25 years or more of
contributory coverage are eligible for CPP-D if they have contributed in 3 of the last
6 years. In 2006 and 2007, contributory eligibility for women continued to lag behind
that of men by 5% due to less consistent labour force participation by women within
the six year period.
Section II Analysis of Program Activities by Strategic Outcome Human Resources and Skills Development Canada
57
ligible seniors receive a lifetime benefit in recognition of their
Expected Result E
contribution to Canadian society
Performance Summary 2009 – 2010
Performance Indicators
Percentage of eligible seniors
who receive the OAS pension
Source: Administrative data
Targets, Performance Status, Historical Results
96%
2009 – 2010 results: 96.3%
Historical results:
N/A
MET
OAS applications are sent to Canadians at age 64 to encourage them to apply for the
OAS pension and the Guaranteed Income Supplement (GIS) well in advance of their
eligibility date. The Department also undertook outreach initiatives through
partnerships with third parties, such as non-profit organizations, other government
organizations and service providers, to raise awareness and take-up of OAS benefits.
Performance Analysis
The Department continued to contribute to a stable
income for millions of Canadians by administering
Canada’s national pension programs. Performance
indicators show that, in the absence of these pension
programs, the incidence of low family income9 among
seniors would be almost 46%. However, with these
pension programs, the actual incidence of low income
among seniors was less than 5% in 2007. In 2009 – 2010,
CPP and OAS benefits paid to individuals and families
totalled $65.0 billion (up from $62.4 billion in 2008 – 2009
and $59.5 billion in 2007 – 2008).
In 2009 – 2010, over 3.7 million individuals received the
CPP retirement pension, for a total of $22.2 billion in
retirement benefit payments. This represented an increase
from 2008 – 2009, when approximately 3.6 million
individuals received the benefit, for a total of $21.1 billion
in benefit payments. Furthermore, approximately
4.7 million individuals received the basic OAS pension
in 2009 – 2010, for a total of $26.4 billion in benefit
payments, compared to approximately 4.6 million
individuals and $25.3 billion in 2008 – 2009. To address
the vulnerability of low-income seniors and to contribute
to a stable retirement income, approximately 1.6 million
individuals received $7.7 billion in GIS benefit payments,
an increase from 2008 – 2009, when GIS benefits
totalling $7.5 billion were paid to 1.6 million individuals.
9
The CPPD program remains Canada’s largest long-term
disability insurance plan and is an important source of
income replacement for eligible CPP contributors who
cannot work due to severe and prolonged disability.
It paid monthly benefits totalling $3.5 billion to over
317,399 eligible contributors, compared to 313,035
individuals who received benefits totalling $3.3 billion
in 2008 – 2009. HRSDC is working with experts and
partners to define a transformation strategy to establish
a client-centred approach for CPPD services and
programs and to develop options for new business
models for CPPD, while championing the needs of
people with disabilities.
HRSDC continued to deliver the recently implemented
Canada Disability Savings Program (CDSP) to help
eligible people with severe and prolonged disabilities,
their families, and others save for long-term financial
security through Registered Disability Savings Plans
(RDSPs). Outreach activities to raise awareness of the
Canada Disability Savings Grant and Bond were
successfully conducted; they included contracts with
organizations to deliver information sessions and
provide one-on-one assistance, a national print and
radio advertising campaign, and presentations at six
non-governmental organization and practitioner
conferences. Aided by these activities, 27,958 RDSPs
were registered between December 2008 (when the
CDSP became available to Canadians) and the end of
Based on Statistics Canada’s Low-Income Cut-Off (LICO) which estimates the threshold at which families spend 20% more of their income on necessities than the average family. The exact income cut-off varies by family size and size of the population centre where they reside.
See: http://www.statcan.gc.ca/pub/75f0002m/2010005/tbl/tbl01-eng.htm
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2009 – 2010 Estimates Departmental Performance Report
March 2010. During the same period, the Government
of Canada contributed $83.9 million in matching grants
and $42.9 million in bonds, far exceeding the original
projections of $30.0 million for grants and $15.0 million
for bonds.
Assist families in planning for the long-term
financial security of people with severe
disabilities by implementing and administering
the CDSP
Budget 2010 announced improvements to the RDSP
and the Grant and Bond, resulting in two significant
policy milestones. The first is a Registered Retirement
Savings Plan (RRSP) / Registered Retirement Income
Fund (RRIF) roll-over, whereby a deceased individual’s
RRSP or RRIF proceeds may be transferred to the
RDSP of a financially dependent child or grandchild
with a disability. The second is a 10-year carryforward of grant and bond entitlements, as families
of children with disabilities may not be able to
contribute regularly to their RDSPs.
With respect to the transaction system, an automated
granting system is being developed using a phasedin approach. Key milestones for 2009 – 2010 were
met with the implementation of the batch
processing system, including contract registration
and grant and bond payments effective
December 2008. The next phase included batch
processing updates to contract, beneficiary, and
holder information in September 2009.
Plans and Achievements for 2009 – 2010
Strengthen overall accountability within
Canada’s public pensions by completing the
implementation of legislative changes to OAS
and CPP, related to penalties, interest,
information sharing and e-services
Bill C-36 (Act to amend the Canada Pension Plan
and the Old Age Security Act) regulations, recently
in force, expanded the group of third parties with
whom CPP and OAS information can be shared
upon written request of the client. The penalty
provisions of Bill C-36 also came into force on
April 1, 2010, and the appropriate policy
frameworks have been developed to ensure
seamless implementation. Regulations pertaining
to the charging of interest on overpayments subject
to an administrative penalty will come into force in
April 2011. Additionally, ongoing efforts are being
made to ensure a more client-centred program
delivery approach to respond to the changing
needs of Canadians.
Identify and assess policy options in the
context of the 2007 – 2009 CPP triennial review
by working with the Department of Finance to
ensure that the CPP meets the current and
future needs of contributors and eligible
beneficiaries
HRSDC participated in the federal-provincialterritorial CPP triennial review, with an objective
to amend the CPP and CPPD to better support
work-to-retirement transitions. This process
supported the drafting of relevant sections of the
Economic Recovery Act. Once approved by
provincial and federal orders in council, this Act,
which received Royal Assent in December 2009,
will result in increased flexibility in how Canadians
live, work, and retire.
Lessons learned
Strengthening the Canada Pension Plan
In addition to remaining sustainable, the CPP must
continue to meet the changing needs of Canada’s
diverse and aging population, and its ever-evolving
labour market. Canadians are living longer and healthier
lives, creating greater opportunities for employment
later in life. With these factors in mind, the 2007 – 2009
CPP triennial review recommended amendments to
the CPP that would enhance flexibility and support
both older and younger workers in an equitable and
affordable way. Recognizing that retirement is often a
process that occurs in phases rather than as a one-time
event, the amendments were designed to better reflect
how Canadians are choosing to live, work and retire.
These amendments, negotiated with the provinces and
territories, were included in the Economic Recovery Act
which received Royal Assent on December 15, 2009.
Key amendments include:
• re-balancing pension adjustments for early and late
retirees to respond to economic and demographic
changes and to keep the CPP fair and sustainable.
Section II Analysis of Program Activities by Strategic Outcome Human Resources and Skills Development Canada
59
These adjustments will be phased in and will make
the CPP neutral so that workers will be neither financially
encouraged to retire early nor discouraged from
retiring later—the first update of actuarial factors since
early retirement was introduced to the CPP in 1987;
• allowing retirement pension applicants to receive
their CPP pension while continuing to work;
• allowing working beneficiaries to continue to build
secure CPP retirements through mandatory
contributions between the ages of 60 and 65 and
voluntary contributions until age 70; and
• increasing the general low-earnings drop-out provision,
which will enhance the average retirement, survivor
and disability benefit of virtually all contributors.
2.3.2 Program Activity: Social
Development
Benefits to Canadians
HRSDC seeks to increase participation of Canadians in
society by helping citizens, communities, the not-forprofit sector and others move forward with their own
solutions to social and economic challenges. This is
accomplished through investments in the capacity of
organizations that reduce barriers and promote access
to opportunities for these groups. The Social Development
program activity focuses on programs for children,
families, seniors, communities and people with
disabilities, as well as on preventing and reducing
homelessness.
Through the New Horizons for Seniors Program
(NHSP), the Department helps to ensure that seniors
can benefit from and contribute to their communities
through active living and participation in social
activities. By providing funding to non-profit and other
organizations, the NHSP enables seniors to share their
skills and experiences with others, helps to reduce
isolation, improves community facilities for seniors’
programs and activities, and raises awareness of the
abuse of older Canadians.
The Social Development Partnerships Program (SDPP)
advances the social development and inclusion of
children, families, people with disabilities and other
vulnerable populations. Through investments in the
not-for-profit sector, the SDPP helps improve the lives
of Canadians.
The Enabling Accessibility Fund (EAF) provides funding
to increase accessibility in communities and help all
Canadians participate fully in their communities.
The Homelessness Partnering Strategy (HPS) works
to prevent and reduce homelessness across Canada
through strategic investments in communities. It uses a
planning process that relies on communities to determine
their own needs and develop appropriate projects to
find local solutions for homeless people and those at
risk of becoming homeless.
This Program Activity also includes the Universal Child
Care Benefit (UCCB), which helps Canada’s families
balance work and family life by financially supporting
their child care choices.
Program Activity Social Development
Financial Resources (millions of dollars) and Human Resources (Full-Time Equivalents)
2009 – 2010
60
2009 – 2010
Planned
Spending
Total
Authorities
Actual
Spending
Planned
Actual
Difference
2,769.0
2,851.4
2,796.8
580
525
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2009 – 2010 Estimates Departmental Performance Report
trategic investments are made in supportive and transitional
Expected Result S
housing, shelters and services according to community plans and
including property transfers
Performance Summary 2009 – 2010
Performance Indicators
Percentage of all Homelessness
Partnering Strategy (HPS)
investments in regionally
delivered projects targeted to
long-term stable housing and
related services
Source: Administrative data
Targets, Performance Status, Historical Results
65%
2009 – 2010 results: 74.3%
EXCEEDED
Historical results:
2008 – 2009: 78%
2007 – 2008: 73.9%
The Homelessness Partnering Strategy uses a “housing first” approach, which
includes providing services together with longer-term supportive and transitional
housing to homeless people and those at risk of becoming homeless. This approach
recognizes that housing stability is a precondition for successful outcomes of other
interventions, such as education and training, life skills development, and treatment
for substance abuse or mental health challenges. A long-term target of at least 65%
of funding directed towards long-term stable housing and related services was
established when the program was renewed. Communities were advised of this
new focus, its rationale and the national target, and were encouraged to select
projects accordingly.
onger-term housing solutions, support, prevention services and
Expected Result L
shelters are being developed
Performance Summary 2009 – 2010
Performance Indicators
Amount invested in communities
by external partners (not-forprofit groups, private sector
organizations and other
government departments) for
every dollar invested by the
Homelessness Partnering
Strategy
Source: Administrative data
Targets, Performance Status, Historical Results
$1.50
2009 – 2010 results: $2.27
EXCEEDED
Historical results:
2008 – 2009: $2.99
2007 – 2008: $3.18
2006 – 2007: $1.89
Cost-matching and leveraging are key factors in the success of the Homelessness
Partnering Strategy. HPS funds in designated community projects must be matched
by community partners, and this non-HPS funding contributes to community “buy-in”
and sustainability of projects. As part of its terms and conditions, HPS set a long-term
target of projects raising at least $1.50 from other sources for every dollar invested by
the HPS. Community partners included municipal and provincial/territorial
governments, not-for-profit organizations and Crown corporations.
HPS designated communities are required to demonstrate cost-matching as a part
of their contribution agreement. Under the shared delivery model, this occurs at the
individual project level, whereas under the community entity delivery model, costmatching takes place at the community level. This accounts for some annual variance
in the amount raised. Community entity projects tend to have a higher value of
cost-matching because the higher value of the contribution agreement encompasses
the allocation for the entire community. The amount raised can therefore spike in
years where community entity contribution agreements are signed (as was the case in
2007 – 2008).
Section II Analysis of Program Activities by Strategic Outcome Human Resources and Skills Development Canada
61
Expected Result Individuals, families and community organizations move forward
with their own solutions to advance the social development and
inclusion of children, families, people with disabilities and other
vulnerable Canadians
Performance Summary 2009 – 2010
Performance Indicators
Estimated number of individuals
and families that have access to
information, programs and
services as a result of Social
Development Partnerships
Program (SDPP) funding
Source: Administrative data
Targets, Performance Status, Historical Results
1.2 million
2009 – 2010 results: 1.1 million
Historical results:
N/A (new indicator)
MOSTLY MET
In 2009 – 2010, the Social Development Partnerships Program provided funding
through 37 multi-year contribution agreements to national and community-based
not-for-profit organizations.
2009 – 2010 results are calculated using a new methodology which aggregates
estimated numbers of individuals and families for each individual project as
provided by funding recipients.
40
Number of organizations funded
through the Disability component
of the SDPP
2009 – 2010 results: 49
EXCEEDED
Source: Administrative data
Note: Organizations can receive funding
under more than one stream.
Historical results:
N/A (new indicator)
In 2009-2010, funding was provided to:
• 18 national disability organizations to increase their organizational capacity and
effectiveness in addressing the social issues and barriers that people with
disabilities face;
• 14 organizations to promote the full participation of people with disabilities in all
aspects of society and community life under the Community Inclusion Initiative of
SDPP;
• 9 accommodation projects to enable people with disabilities to fully participate in
conferences and other similar events in 2009-10 by ensuring that they are
accessible; and,
• 16 projects under the call for proposals for social development projects, which
focused on the development and promotion of best practices and models of
service delivery.
amilies and communities make informed decisions that benefit the
Expected Result F
lives of young children
Performance Summary 2009 – 2010
Performance Indicators
Number of children and parents
involved in Understanding the
Early Years (UEY) community
research activities
Source: Administrative data
62
Targets, Performance Status, Historical Results
20,000
2009 – 2010 results: 19,511
Historical results:
2008 – 2009: 68,669
MET
Almost 20,000 kindergarten children and their parents were involved in data
collection activities in 15 UEY communities in 2009 – 2010. The target and result
shows a large variation from 2008 – 2009 levels due to a difference in the number of
active projects. In 2008 – 2009, there were 36 active UEY projects, 21 of which
ended in late 2008.
2009 – 2010 Estimates Departmental Performance Report
Expected Result Seniors are engaged within communities
Performance Summary 2009 – 2010
Performance Indicators
Targets, Performance Status, Historical Results
N/A (methodology for this
indicator has changed since
the original target was
established)
Number of seniors involved in
New Horizons for Seniors
Program- funded projects
(estimated)
Source: Administrative data
Note: In 2009-2010, the number of
seniors involved in NHSP was greater than
originally targeted because the
methodology for this indicator was
changed to include both participants in
Community Participation and Leadership
projects as well as the beneficiaries of
organizations that received Capital
Assistance funding support, which were
not previously included.
Historical results:
N/A (methodology used to measure results has
changed, affecting the comparability of historical
results)
2009 – 2010 results: 270,000
A call for proposals was completed for the two NHSP funding streams: Capital
Assistance, and Community Participation and Leadership. In total, the program
issued 1,468 grants for a total of $24.4 million.
Expected Result Knowledge and awareness of elder abuse in Canadian society
Performance Summary 2009 – 2010
Performance Indicators
Number of Federal Elder Abuse
Initiative (FEAI) networks and
partnerships
Source: Administrative data
Targets, Performance Status, Historical Results
11
2009 – 2010 results: 13
Historical results:
2008 – 2009: 8
EXCEEDED
The FEAI supported a total of seven conferences, fireside chats, networks and
advisory groups designed to bring together key stakeholders to share their expertise
and experiences in the field of elder abuse prevention. An open call for proposals
was designed and launched in July 2009. Six projects by not-for-profit organizations
representing front-line professionals will commence in 2010 – 2011 to develop
educational and awareness activities for their respective memberships in order
to reduce the incidence of elder abuse.
Section II Analysis of Program Activities by Strategic Outcome Human Resources and Skills Development Canada
63
Expected Result Social and economic participation for people with disabilities
Performance Summary 2009 – 2010
Performance Indicators
Targets, Performance Status, Historical Results
280
(over three years, 2008 – 2011)
Number of building/vehicle
renovations and modifications
by EAF-funded projects
2009 – 2010 results:
169 approved projects
Source: Administrative data
Note: The total number of small projects
funded since 2008 is 335 (166 in
2008–2009 and 169 in 2009–2010),
exceeding the original target of 280.
Historical results:
2008 – 2009: 166 approved projects
(3 vehicle, 136 building and
24 communications/information/
media)
EXCEEDED
There continued to be a high demand for program funds in 2009 – 2010. The second
call for proposals for small projects resulted in 1,196 applications for funding.
The original target of 280 projects spans three years. Taken together, the total
approved projects in 2008 – 2009 (166) and 2009 – 2010 (169) exceeds the original
three-year projection because the approved projects had lower eligible project costs
on average than was anticipated during the planning process (which produced the
original target of 280 projects).
anadian parents with children under age six have financial support
Expected Result C
for child care choices
Performance Summary 2009 – 2010
Performance Indicators
Percentage of eligible families
who are receiving the UCCB for
their children under age six
Source: Canada Revenue Agency
Targets, Performance Status, Historical Results
280
100% of eligible families
2009 – 2010 results:
99% (estimated)
Historical results:
2008 – 2009: 99% (estimated)
2007: 95%
EXCEEDED
An estimated 99% of eligible families receive the UCCB.
Performance Analysis
Following the January 2009 Speech from the Throne,
funding for the Homelessness Partnering Strategy was
extended at current levels ($269.6 million) for two years,
from April 1, 2009, to March 31, 2011. This enables
the Department to continue assisting communities in
helping homeless individuals and families, as well as
those who are at risk of homelessness, move toward
self-sufficiency.
departments and agencies to address factors that may
lead to homelessness, such as incarceration, employment
status, mental health challenges, family violence and
immigration. Furthermore, seven previous horizontal
pilot projects with other federal departments and
agencies were extended for six months into 2009 – 2010
to strengthen the project evaluations and achieve more
robust results. In 2009 – 2010, a total of 65 housing
units were created through the Surplus Federal Real
Property for Homelessness Initiative, which provides
Additionally, in 2009 – 2010, the Department launched
six new horizontal pilot projects with other federal
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2009 – 2010 Estimates Departmental Performance Report
surplus federal properties to community organizations,
the not-for-profit sector and other levels of government
for projects to prevent and reduce homelessness.
To further support people with disabilities, HRSDC
conducted outreach activities to raise awareness of the
Canada Disability Savings Program; coordinated the
Department’s involvement in the 2010 Olympic and
Paralympic Winter Games; and provided funding for
169 small projects through the Enabling Accessibility
Fund. The objective of the latter program is to support
community-based projects across Canada that improve
accessibility, reduce barriers and enable Canadians,
regardless of physical ability, to participate in and
contribute to their community and the economy.
HRSDC’s Office for Disability Issues held an national
roundtable on June 25 and 26, 2009, to seek input
from stakeholders about the ratification, implementation
and reporting of the United Nations Convention on the
Rights of Persons with Disabilities. A public consultation
website was launched on June 25, 2009, and closed
for comments on August 14, 2009. The views expressed
by stakeholders through these consultations played an
important role in informing the ratification decision and
will be considered in any new measures that may be
taken at the federal level after ratification to further
implement the Convention.
The number of kindergarten children and their parents
involved in Understanding the Early Years (UEY) community
research activities met the target of 20,000, supporting
communities’ ability to use local data related to child
development. The Department also held a UEY Legacy
Forum in March 2010 to showcase the work of all UEY
projects, including pilot projects, and highlight the
accomplishments of the program.
The Elder Abuse Awareness component of the NHSP
approved 16 new multi-year contribution agreements—
many with first-time recipients—following a call for
proposals in June 2009. Through this funding,
organizations and others who work to prevent elder
abuse develop opportunities to transfer knowledge,
best practices, lessons learned and resource materials
to help raise awareness of abuse among seniors, those
that care for them and the general public. Furthermore,
the FEAI raised awareness through the “Elder Abuse
– It’s Time to Face the Reality” campaign, which
included television, print and Web components and
ran between June 15 and 29, 2009, and between
September 28 and October 25, 2009. As part of the
review process, the Advertising Campaign Evaluation
Tool was used to determine the effectiveness of the
campaign. In a post-campaign survey, 58% of
respondents indicated hearing/reading advertising
about elder abuse, which exceeds the government
advertising benchmark of 36% and demonstrates the
success of the campaign.
Plans and Achievements for 2009 – 2010
Address homelessness issues in consultation
with key partners by implementing the
renewed HPS and developing options for
future responses
To achieve an effective and seamless transition of the
HPS in 2009 – 2010, a plan was successfully implemented
to address the extension of existing project agreements
and avoid gaps in service to homeless people across
Canada on April 1, 2009. In addition, HRSDC led
consultations about the best ways to allocate federal
homelessness investments between 2011 and 2014.
Strengthen and expand front-line service and
address barriers for children and families,
people with disabilities and other vulnerable
populations across Canada by implementing
the renewed SDPP in partnership with not-forprofit organizations
An open call for proposals was held in spring 2009,
resulting in the funding of 37 new multi-year contribution
agreements—21 of which are with first-time recipients.
The priorities included caregiving over the life course
and support for the not-for-profit sector in addressing
the challenges resulting from the economic downturn.
Develop information and resource materials
for front-line workers (public health, medical,
legal, police, financial, etc.) by providing key
professional groups with the information
necessary to identify cases of elder abuse,
access the appropriate resources and take
measures to provide assistance to victims
HRSDC implemented the Federal Elder Abuse Initiative
in collaboration with partner departments and agencies,
including launching a national public awareness campaign.
In addition, the Department designed, planned and
implemented a call for proposals in July 2009, resulting
in one-time funding through six new multi-year contribution
Section II Analysis of Program Activities by Strategic Outcome Human Resources and Skills Development Canada
65
agreements with various professional groups. Through
these agreements, professional groups will provide
information sessions to their members so that those
members may better serve seniors and contribute to
an increased public and professional understanding of
elder abuse for the 2010 – 2011 fiscal year.
Lessons learned
Streamlining and improving calls for proposals:
the Enabling Accessibility Fund and the New
Horizons for Seniors Program Elder Abuse
Awareness component
The EAF was announced in Budget 2007 with funding
for three years. To facilitate the flow of funding to
communities as quickly as possible, the deadline for
the first call for proposals was limited to 30 days.
Although the uptake was significant, the short duration
of the call for proposals was criticized for not providing
sufficient time to prepare proposals for capital projects.
To address this criticism, the second call for proposals,
held in 2009, allowed applicants six weeks to prepare
and submit their proposals. The result was an even
greater uptake and a significant improvement in the
overall quality of proposals.
Canada helps the Department identify existing
materials about the financial abuse of seniors, which
could be used by partners in their programming.
Improving community-based programs:
building on the Understanding the
Early Years program
The feedback from community representatives
connected to UEY projects has been positive regarding
the impact of community-based research. Local research
is recognized as an effective engagement tool that can
involve various community partners in a project and
create synergy to enhance services. By identifying
strengths, challenges and barriers, research has
helped UEY communities acquire resources to make
changes to how services are being provided to young
children and their families; however, the overwhelming
consensus from participating projects is that government
support must provide adequate time (ideally more
than three years) and financial resources to allow
projects to address the challenges of engaging the
full range of organizations and individuals in
the community. These lessons learned will help
policy-makers develop future programs.
While the NHSP’s Elder Abuse Awareness component
was recognized as being designed to realistically attain
its stated objectives and is being implemented as
intended, the Department continues to take action in
identified areas for improvement related to design,
delivery and management issues. The following
specific measures were undertaken:
• stabilizing staff, and streamlining the internal approval
processes;
• improving communications by including the date
that applicants can expect to receive a final decision
regarding their proposals on the website, in the
application materials and in the acknowledgement
of receipt of application letter; and
• limiting potential duplication of elder abuse
awareness initiatives by regularly consulting with
other federal departments that address elder abuse,
with the Federal-Provincial-Territorial Working Group
on Safety and Security for Seniors, and with the
National Review Committee . In addition, an established
relationship with the Financial Consumer Agency of
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2009 – 2010 Estimates Departmental Performance Report
2.4Strategic Outcome

Strategic Outcome 4
Service excellence
for Canadians
 Government of Canada Information to Citizens
 Applications Intake
Citizen-Centred
Service
 Identification and Authentication
 Client Feedback Management
 Marketing
Integrity and
Processing
 Integrity
 Individual Benefit Processing
 Service Processing
2.4.1Program Activity:
Citizen‑Centered Service
Priorities
Respond to increase in demand for services from
existing Service Canada–delivered programs
Benefits to Canadians
Canadians continue to benefit from having easy access
to integrated government services through the channel
and in the official language of their choice. This program
activity aims to improve and integrate government
service delivery by providing Canadians one-stop,
personalized service and easy access to programs and
services across all of its service delivery channels:
• in person;
• by telephone;
• on the Internet; and
Guided by the ongoing feedback of citizens and
front-line employees, and in collaboration with partners,
the Department continuously refines its service strategies,
approaches and offerings, so that Canadians can
easily and securely access the government information
or services they need.
The Citizen-Centred Service Program Activity supports
the Government’s efforts to achieve single-window,
seamless service delivery to promote timely, positive
service experiences and overall client satisfaction.
HRSDC successfully implemented measures from
Canada’s Economic Action Plan to meet increased
demand for services. These measures included
improving Service Canada’s capacity for integrated
service delivery through activities such as a Rapid
Response Initiative, increased mobile outreach
activities and improved access to a variety of
web‑based service offerings.
• by mail.
These service delivery channels provide a platform for
dialogue and for building sustained client relationships
with Canadians.
Program Activity Citizen-Centred Service
Financial Resources (millions of dollars) and Human Resources (Full-Time Equivalents)
2009 – 2010
2009 – 2010
Planned
Spending
Total
Authorities
Actual
Spending
Planned
Actual
Difference
474.5
540.9
531.1
6,088
5,552
536
Note: Financial and human resources amounts for this program activity include resources related to initiatives under Canada’s Economic Action Plan.
See page 29 for details by initiative.
Section II Analysis of Program Activities by Strategic Outcome Human Resources and Skills Development Canada
67
overnment of Canada information is disseminated to citizens on
Expected Result G
behalf of other program departments
Performance Summary 2009 – 2010
Performance Indicators
Targets, Performance Status, Historical Results
80% for each channel
Percentage of clients satisfied
with information received
through the in-person,
telephone, web and mail
channels
2009 – 2010 results:
POSTPONED
The Client Satisfaction Survey
was postponed to 2010 – 2011
Source: Administrative data
Historical results:
2007 – 2008:
Internet: 84%
In-person: 88%
Telephone: 84%
Mail/fax: 83%
The latest data (2007 – 2008) from the Client Satisfaction Survey indicate that in
2008, 83% of clients expressed satisfaction with the service they received from
Service Canada, with 57% indicating that they were very satisfied.
anadians receive an accurate review of passport applications
Expected Result C
by Service Canada agents
Performance Summary 2009 – 2010
Performance Indicators
Percentage of passport
applications accurately
reviewed and authenticated
by receiving agents
Source: Passport Canada
Targets, Performance Status, Historical Results
98%
2009 – 2010 results: 97.4%*
Historical results:
N/A (new indicator)
MET
In 2009 – 2010, 412,367 passport applications were reviewed and forwarded to
Passport Canada. This represents an increase of 19.5% over 2008 – 2009. Passport
receiving agents were able to successfully deal with the sharp increase in the
volume of applications and the added steps associated with the Documentary
Evidence of Citizenship validation service.
* Note: 2.6% of applications are considered incomplete due to improper photographs, missing information,
illegible information, etc.
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2009 – 2010 Estimates Departmental Performance Report
anadians receive a timely response to the feedback they submit
Expected Result C
regarding delivery of services by Service Canada
Performance Summary 2009 – 2010
Performance Indicators
Targets, Performance Status, Historical Results
100%
Percentage of Office for Client
Satisfaction feedback replied
to within seven working days
of receipt
Source: Administrative data
2009 – 2010 results: 100%
MET
Historical results:
2008 – 2009: 100%
2007 – 2008: 100%
The Office for Client Satisfaction continually met its service standards by making
initial contact with clients within 24 hours and resolving client files within seven days.
In 2009 – 2010, the Office received close to 7,000 feedback items (including 2,727 referrals
to other departments).
Percentage of Pleasure Craft
Licence transactions completed
in one visit (percentage is based
on completed applications with
all supporting documents)
Source: Service New Brunswick
95%
WITHDRAWN
Historical results:
2008 – 2009: N/A
2007 – 2008: 89.8%
The Pleasure Craft Licence (PCL) Service Agreement between Service Canada,
Transport Canada and Service New Brunswick will end as of November 2010 and
the PCL system (built externally and managed by Service New Brunswick) cannot
report on this indicator. Issuing pleasure craft licences after November 2010
continues to be the responsibility of Transport Canada.
Expected Result Canadians are aware of Service Canada
Performance Summary 2009 – 2010
Performance Indicators
Percentage of Canadians who
are aware of Service Canada
Source: Administrative data
Targets, Performance Status, Historical Results
65%
POSTPONED
Survey not conducted
in 2009 – 2010
The General Population Survey was not conducted in 2009 – 2010 due to the
increased workload associated with Canada’s Economic Action Plan. However,
the 2007 – 2008 Client Satisfaction Survey demonstrated that 64% of surveyed
clients reported being aware of Service Canada, a significant increase from the initial
result of 30% in 2006 – 2007. In addition, according to an online survey of Canadians
conducted by the Treasury Board Secretariat in March 2009, 71% of government
website users are aware of Service Canada.
Section II Analysis of Program Activities by Strategic Outcome Human Resources and Skills Development Canada
69
Performance Analysis
In 2009 – 2010, the Department continued to improve
its service offerings and service delivery strategies to
better provide Canadians with bilingual, easy-toaccess, personalized service to help them access
government information and services.
To respond to the economic downturn, as well as to
Budget 2009 and Canada’s Economic Action Plan,
Service Canada developed a Rapid Response Initiative.
This initiative comprised the following two activities:
• Mobile Outreach, a program to provide information
sessions to raise awareness of programs such as
extended Employment Insurance (EI) benefits,
Work-Sharing, Career Transition Assistance and
self-employment benefits;
• client information sessions that provide information
to facilitate clients’ return to the workforce and/or
training as quickly as possible. A survey revealed that
86% of clients who attended a session felt confident
that they knew what resources are available to help
them, compared to 68% of those who did not attend
a session.
The Resource Determination Model for in-person service
was enhanced, and the In-Person Service Experience
Model (IPSEM) was finalized in November 2009 and
communicated to all service delivery staff. The IPSEM
outlines all the service elements and employee
behaviours required in a Service Canada Centre to
achieve service excellence. This model will create a
positive, seamless and consistent service experience
for all clients visiting the offices. Using the principles
and standards developed in the IPSEM, a Web Service
Experience Model was developed to provide direction
and guidance to service delivery staff responsible for
developing/supporting websites and applications.
The Points of Service Strategy supported efforts to
ensure that over 90% of Canadians have access to
points of service, including scheduled outreach sites,
within 50 kilometres of where they live. The hours of
service directive was updated with new guiding principles
to support Service Canada Centres in providing service
beyond core hours where necessary. The “Find a Service
Canada Office” link was refined to assist Canadians in
locating points of service more quickly via the Internet.
70
The Department continues to review the content of the
Service Canada website, in posting and updating 39%
more content in 2009 – 2010 than in the previous year.
This helps clients navigate HRSDC’s programs and
services, and ensures that program and service delivery
information is available to staff handling citizen requests
and interactions.
HRSDC also strengthened communication to clients
through foreign language interpretation services, which
are being piloted in 53 Service Canada locations to help
people who do not speak English or French access
benefits and services.
For the 2009 – 2010 fiscal year, the Employment
Insurance toll-free service responded to over 7.7 million
telephone enquiries, an 18% increase over the previous
fiscal year. For 2009 – 2010, 4 million calls (53%) were
answered within 180 seconds, a 16% increase over
the 2.4 million (37%) in 2008 – 2009. Additionally, the
number of high-volume messages received by callers
decreased by 34%. These results were due largely to
an expanded workforce (543 additional staff were
trained over the course of the year) and extended
hours in some centres (until 8:00 p.m. local time,
Monday to Friday) as well as ongoing Saturday service
(8:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. local time). This strategy gave
clients more choice and shifted call volumes away from
peak periods during the day.
In 2009 – 2010, the Canada Pension Plan (CPP) and
Old Age Security (OAS) toll-free service experienced a
6% increase in calls answered over the previous year;
however, due to resource capacity constraints, there
was a decrease of 4% in the number of agent-assisted
enquiries. As a result of the increased demand, there
was also a significant increase in the volume of blocked
and abandoned calls. This inability to meet the true call
demand contributed to a reduction in the service level
to 61% of calls answered within 180 seconds in
2009 – 2010 from 84% in 2008 – 2009.
The network continues to refine its resourcing and
scheduling strategy to better meet seasonal, weekly
and daily peak call volume periods. A new national
workforce management system will allow better
scheduling of resources across the 14 specialized call
centres to ensure that resources are available to meet
client demand.
2009 – 2010 Estimates Departmental Performance Report
Plans and Achievements for 2009 – 2010
Meet increasing demands for information,
applications and services through the various
service delivery channels for Employment
Insurance, Canada Pension Plan, Old Age
Security, Guaranteed Income Supplement,
Work-Sharing, Job Bank, grants and
contributions programs, Apprenticeship
Incentive Grants and the Wage Earner
Protection Program.
Service Canada locations across Canada received over
14 million requests for services in 2009 – 2010, compared
to 12 million in 2008 – 2009. Service Canada was able
to meet the increased demand for in-person service
and serve more clients by reviewing internal processes
to increase the efficiency of operations and by hiring
additional temporary employees.
The Department also initiated a Rapid Response
Initiative and increased Mobile Outreach activities
(contacting employers within 24 hours of publicly
announced layoffs). Regional teams delivered both
employer and worker information sessions, which were
attended by 19,460 employers and 71,419 workers.
Canadians have increasingly turned to
www.servicecanada.gc.ca for online access to forms
and information. Visits to the Service Canada website
were 76% higher than in the previous year, with
55.1 million visits during 2009 – 2010.
On the Service Canada website, special landing pages
were created for workers and employers:
• the “Finding a Job” page, which received 7.72 million
views in 2009 – 2010, a significant increase from the
1.15 million views in 2008 – 2009;
• the “Wage Earner Protection Program” page, which
is designed to better inform Canadians of eligibility
requirements and provide answers to frequently
asked questions; and
• the “Work-Sharing 2010” page, which outlines
information about the program, including recent
changes.
The Job Bank website received over 106 million visits.
It provides job seekers and employers access to
information, job matching and referrals, 24 hours a day,
7 days a week, with the exception of very short intervals
when scheduled maintenance is performed.
Specialized call centres for EI, CPP and OAS received
more than 55.8 million calls for information and services.
The interactive voice response system was able to
facilitate the resolution of 35.4 million of these calls
through self-service.
The 1 800 O-Canada general information line responded
to more than 1.9 million enquiries, exceeding the
previous year by 6.5%, and answered 90% of calls
within the service standard of 18 seconds. The 90%
service level exceeded the target of 85%. Key support
was provided to over 25 Government of Canada
communication initiatives (such as Canada’s Economic
Action Plan and the 2009 H1N1 pandemic).
Strengthen communication to clients by
bundling information for workers who have
lost their job, as well as employers facing
closures and layoffs
In response to Canada’s Economic Action Plan, the
Department:
• developed and implemented a one-hour in-person
information session for long-tenured workers who
lost their jobs;
• increased mobile outreach activities by contacting
employers within 24 hours of publicly announced
layoffs (3,925 employer information sessions and
2,555 worker information sessions were held);
• updated the Benefits Finder tool (which combines
federal and provincial benefit information) on the
Canada Benefits website to provide Canadians with
fast and accurate bundling of service and benefits
information;
• developed 36 regional handouts for workers—
including those in specific categories, such as youth,
Aboriginal people, people with disabilities and
newcomers—that bundle together both federal and
provincial program and service information about
looking for a job, financial assistance and training;
these handouts are available on the Service Canada
website and are given to clients in person by citizen
service officers and specialists;
• developed three client segment modules (Aboriginal
people, newcomers and people with disabilities) as
part of the overall training for citizen service officers
offered by the Service Canada College—each module
provides insight about a unique client segment,
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71
providing front-line staff with the knowledge
and understanding they need to better serve these
clients; and
• developed a "How to Bundle" job aid for front-line
staff to help them introduce value-added bundling of
programs and services for clients.
Direct clients to cost-effective, efficient virtual
services by using targeted marketing (web
and voice interactive telephone services) when
clients are seeking information and interacting
with the Department, and refer inquiries to
provinces to access labour market programs
The Department reached out to Canadians affected by
the economic downturn to help them access benefits
faster. Cost-effective marketing initiatives encouraged
Canadians who could self-serve to do so, thereby
taking pressure off front-line resources. Ten online
video tutorials were also launched on the Service
Canada website to assist clients with tasks such as
using the My Service Canada Account, applying for
EI benefits, completing EI reports and using labour
market information. From their launch in early
January 2010 to the end of March 2010, the videos
were viewed approximately 134,000 times. In addition,
the EI search engine was revised to better support
clients accessing EI information online. In 2009 – 2010,
the search engine received over 41 million visits.
Increase first contact resolution for a broader
range of enquiries and improve service
efficiency by expanding collaboration and
support between in-person, call centres and
processing service groups
The Department created an Integrated Channel
Management Directorate to ensure that high-quality
service is delivered consistently through the three
channels (web, telephone and in-person).
In 2009 – 2010, the EI Cross-Channel service (which
allows in-person staff to connect directly to a call
centre agent to resolve four types of client requests in
real time) responded to more than 265,000 enquiries,
with close to 70% of these enquiries resolved during
the telephone conversation. It is estimated that, by
resolving client requests during the initial interaction,
the project reduced the number of follow-up actions
sent to processing by more than 180,000.
72
Lessons Learned
While the Department has been able to maintain a high
standard of service delivery, increases in client volumes
and heightened service expectations require a strategic
and proactive approach to meet future demand. This
consideration will be addressed in future plans, starting
with a focus on improving the information provided to
clients. The key outcomes of this approach will include
further identification of service gaps, greater
coordination across delivery channels, and enhanced
tools and capacity for staff engaging with clients.
Canada’s Economic Action Plan created significant
and sudden demands on the call centre network.
Key lessons learned from the experience included:
• Introducing new agents into the network as a means
of addressing sudden changes to call volumes is
limited by the current training period of 10 to 12 weeks
for new staff.
• The strategy of employing 40% of agents on a
part-time basis (22.5 to 30 hours per week) is a key
business practice that should continue. It provides
additional flexibility and capacity to meet sudden,
short-term fluctuations in call volumes. The ratio of
full-time to part-time resources should be evaluated
on a regular basis to ensure that it continues to meet
the needs of clients.
• There is a strong correlation between delays in
processing and call volumes for the EI program.
In any future development of a service delivery
model, there should be an opportunity to share
simple processing work with call centres so that
these delays can be minimized and ultimately calls
from repeat callers reduced.
• There is a need to adopt a tiered service delivery
strategy across the telephone channels to most
efficiently respond to the volume and nature of calls.
Building on the success of the cross-channel service,
Service Canada’s call centres will be transitioning to a
client contact centre model that will allow for a more
effective, flexible and scalable service. This will help
ensure client enquiries are treated in a timely fashion by
knowledgeable agents with the appropriate resources
to resolve the request during first contact.
Client information sessions held for long-tenured
workers yielded valuable insight into how these events
might best be conducted in the future. To increase
2009 – 2010 Estimates Departmental Performance Report
take-up, the invitation process was revised by the
marketing division to better inform citizens about
registering for a session.
An internal audit of scheduled outreach services was
conducted in summer 2009 and concluded that the
service respects government and departmental
policies but is not delivered in a consistent way across
the regions. The audit resulted in a management action
plan that contributed to improving service delivery in
the network. The audit findings will also reinforce the
ongoing development of a new directive on scheduled
outreach, which is scheduled to be implemented in
summer 2010. The main objective of this directive is to
ensure a consistent national approach to providing
scheduled outreach services across the regions.
Canada Pension Plan (CPP) and Old Age Security
(OAS) benefits were delivered to the right person in the
right amount and for the intended purpose. With over
3 million EI claims in 2009 – 2010, several measures
were implemented to reduce processing time to further
benefit Canadians.
The organization continues to modernize the way
it handles processing and service delivery functions
to further enhance the efficiency, accuracy and integrity
of its operations. These efforts not only ensure public
confidence and trust in the delivery of government
services, but also yield savings for the federal
government. A total of $701.6 million in savings was
realized in 2009 – 2010. These results are measured
and reported as program savings, which consist of
both direct and indirect savings:
2.4.2Program Activity:
Integrity and Processing
• Direct savings are overpayments and associated
penalties that are identified as a result of integrity
activities and are subject to recovery.
Benefits to Canadians
• Indirect savings are reductions in future program
payments (i.e. avoidance of future costs) resulting
from the discontinuation of benefits.
Canadians have benefited greatly from swift, secure
and accurate benefit payments from the Department.
The Integrity and Processing program activity positions
the Department to be better able to ensure the accuracy
of payments, the security and privacy of personal
information, and the overall quality of service offerings.
Under Canada’s Economic Action Plan, Service Canada
implemented a variety of successful measures and
initiatives to help ensure that Employment Insurance (EI),
The Department maintains management frameworks,
processes and risk-based controls to strengthen the
integrity of its programs by ensuring operational and
service compliance. In addition, the Department
continues to place significant emphasis the importance
of protecting the information entrusted to it by Canadians.
Program Activity Integrity and Processing
Financial Resources (millions of dollars) and Human Resources (Full-Time Equivalents)
2009 – 2010
2009 – 2010
Planned
Spending
Total
Authorities
Actual
Spending
Planned
Actual
Difference
553.5
826.4
804.7
7,799
9,553
(1,754)
Note: Financial and human resources amounts for this program activity include resources related to initiatives under Canada’s Economic Action Plan.
The difference between actual and planned FTEs is largely explained by additional temporary resources linked to the increased workload brought
on by the economic downturn and implementing Canada’s Economic Action Plan.
Section II Analysis of Program Activities by Strategic Outcome Human Resources and Skills Development Canada
73
mployment Insurance applicants receive a benefit payment or a
Expected Result E
non-payment notification in a timely manner
Performance Summary 2009 – 2010
Performance Indicators
Targets, Performance Status, Historical Results
Percentage of EI benefit
payments or non-payment
notifications issued within
28 days of filing
Source: Administrative data
80%
2009 – 2010 results: 84.2%
EXCEEDED
Historical results:
2008 – 2009: 79.1%
The target was met consistently from
2004 – 2005 to 2007 – 2008.
The Department received 3,249,676 EI initial and renewal claims in 2009 – 2010, an
increase of approximately 23% since the economic downturn began in 2007 – 2008.
The increase in claim volumes required that the Department take steps to maintain
the level of service that claimants have come to expect, including:
• reassigning, hiring, and training additional staff;
• streamlining operations through process improvements;
• extending hours of operation;
• balancing workload between processing centres across the country; and,
• using overtime.
The speed of payment target was exceeded in 8 out of 12 months and every month
since August 2009. The 76.8% result in April 2009 was the lowest service result for
2009 – 2010. The year-end result (84.2%) was a significant increase from the previous
year’s 79.1% and a clear indication of how well the EI business line responded to the
economic downturn.
ligible Employment Insurance applicants receive a benefit
Expected Result E
payment in the right amount
Performance Summary 2009 – 2010
Performance Indicators
Payment accuracy of
Employment Insurance
Source: Administrative data
Targets, Performance Status, Historical Results
95%
2009 – 2010 results: 96.1%
MET
Historical results:
2008 – 2009: 95.7%
2007 – 2008: 94.3%
2006 – 2007: 94.8%
Results are a 12-month moving average ending in March 2010.
74
2009 – 2010 Estimates Departmental Performance Report
ligible Canada Pension Plan retirement benefit applicants receive
Expected Result E
a benefit payment in the right amount and in a timely manner
Performance Summary 2009 – 2010
Performance Indicators
Targets, Performance Status, Historical Results
Percentage of Canada
Pension Plan retirement
benefits paid within the
first month of entitlement
Source: Administrative data
85%
2009 – 2010 results: 96.2%
EXCEEDED
Historical results:
2008 – 2009: 91.3%
The target has been met consistently
since 2004 – 2005.
A total of 637,831 CPP applications were processed in 2009 – 2010. The target for
this indicator reflects the Department’s published service standards for this program.
95%
Payment accuracy of Canada
Pension Plan
2009 – 2010 results: 99.9%
EXCEEDED
Source: Administrative data
Historical results:
2008 – 2009 (baseline year): 99.7%
Results are a 12-month moving average ending in March 2010. The target for this
indicator reflects the Department’s published service standards for this program.
ligible Old Age Security pension applicants receive a benefit
Expected Result E
payment in the right amount and in a timely manner
Performance Summary 2009 – 2010
Performance Indicators
Percentage of Old Age Security
basic benefits paid within the
first month of entitlement
Source: Administrative data
Targets, Performance Status, Historical Results
90%
2009 – 2010 results: 91.7%
MET
Historical results:
2008 – 2009: 92.1%
The target has been met consistently
since 2004 – 2005
A total of 881,467 OAS applications were processed in 2009 – 2010, and
1,470,775 Guaranteed Income Supplements were renewed.
Payment accuracy of Old Age
Security
Source: Administrative data
95%
2009 – 2010 results: 99.5%
EXCEEDED
Historical results:
2008 – 2009: 98.4%
2007 – 2008: 97.7%
Results are a 12-month moving average ending in March 2010. The target for this
indicator reflects the Department’s published service standards for this program.
Section II Analysis of Program Activities by Strategic Outcome Human Resources and Skills Development Canada
75
pprenticeship Incentive Grant applicants receive a benefit
Expected Result A
payment or a non-payment notification in a timely manner
Performance Summary 2009 – 2010
Performance Indicators
Percentage of Apprenticeship
Incentive Grant (AIG)
payments issued within
28 calendar days of filing
Source: Administrative data
Targets, Performance Status, Historical Results
85%
2009 – 2010 results: 98%
EXCEEDED
Historical results:
2008 – 2009: 98%
2007 – 2008: 93%
A total of 81,513 AIG applications were received and 58,903 grants were paid in
2009 – 2010. The target for this indicator reflects the Department’s published service
standards for this program.
age Earner Protection Program applicants receive a benefit
Expected Result W
payment or a non-payment notification in a timely manner
Performance Summary 2009 – 2010
Performance Indicators
Percentage of Wage Earner
Protection Program (WEPP)
payments issued within
28 calendar days of filing
Source: Administrative data
76
Targets, Performance Status, Historical Results
Baseline year
2009 – 2010 results: 58%
BASELINE YEAR
Historical results:
N/A
A total of 17,957 WEPP applications were received and 16,264 payments were issued.
The WEPP was launched in July 2008. In response to the economic downturn, the
scope of the program was amended in January 2009 to include two new payment
categories: severance and termination. This resulted in a significantly higher workload
than initially forecasted, which directly affected Service Canada’s ability to consistently
meet its performance standards. In September 2009, measures were taken to increase
processing capacity. Since then, a consistent increase in monthly performance results
has been observed.
2009 – 2010 Estimates Departmental Performance Report
lients are accurately identified for the purpose of receiving
Expected Result C
the appropriate service or benefit for Social Insurance
Number‑based programs
Performance Summary 2009 – 2010
Performance Indicators
Accuracy rate of vital events
Source: Social Insurance Register
Targets, Performance Status, Historical Results
97.4%
2009 – 2010 results: 97.6%
Historical results:
2008 – 2009: 97.5%
MET
Improvements in the accuracy rates for date-of-birth and date-of-death information
in the Social Insurance Register is a result of lower error rates for current Social
Insurance Number (SIN) transactions due to an improved quality management
strategy. Vital events agreements with provinces and software improvements have
led to a higher synchronization of provincial data.
Legitimate Social Insurance
Number (SIN) accuracy rate
Source: Social Insurance Register
99.9%
2009 – 2010 results: 99.9%
MET
Historical results:
2008 – 2009: 99.9%
The high accuracy rate for SINs issued is a result of a variety of factors. Improved
internal review mechanisms, coupled with improvements in software technology,
have helped efforts to identify and resolve instances where a single individual had
been issued two SINs. Additional historical data from new vital event linkages
agreements with provinces, and a higher matching rate with provincial death data
due to software improvements has also contributed to the strong result.
Performance Analysis
The Employment Insurance (EI) system is the first point
of contact in Canada’s social safety net when an
individual faces an interruption in employment income.
Consequently, meeting citizens’ expectations of timely
payment is the prime objective for EI processing.
Payment and processing of EI benefits is done through
a national network of approximately 110 processing
sites. These sites process all new EI applications,
Work-Sharing benefits and all benefit revisions to help
ensure that payments continue on time and in the right
amount. The performance of regional operations and
systems is monitored continuously.
Applications for EI benefits increased to 3.2 million in
2009 – 2010 from 3.1 million in the previous fiscal year
and have increased by nearly 23% or 600,000 applications
since the start of the economic downturn in 2007 – 2008.
• Pending EI claim inventories, reaching as low as
84,600, were lower at the close of fiscal year
2009 – 2010 than they have been since July 2005.
• 2009 – 2010 marked the first year since 1999 – 2000
in which EI finished a fiscal year with as few as
2,500 claims (2.9%) not processed within the speed
of payment target.
• Performance shortfalls occurred in the first three
months of the 2009 – 2010 fiscal year as Service
Canada hired, trained and monitored additional
staff to respond to the increased demand for the
EI program as a result of the economic downturn.
Over the last five years, the Department has been
steadily improving its service delivery machinery to
increase performance from a client perspective and
decrease the cost of delivery. This initiative of
simplifying operational policies and procedures,
standardizing practices, and automating entitlement
calculations and decision-making has enabled the
Department to respond quickly to workload increases
stemming from the economic downturn.
The main elements of this initiative included developing
one national structural model for the service delivery
organization, supported by a national training and
Section II Analysis of Program Activities by Strategic Outcome Human Resources and Skills Development Canada
77
learning approach and centres of expertise. The rise of
the Internet as the service delivery channel of choice
for claimants enabled the work to be spread across
the country, which further assisted in coping with the
regional nature of the economic downturn.
The Department has leveraged existing payment and
processing solutions to implement new measures
announced under Canada’s Economic Action Plan.
In comparison with the past three years, during which
the average cost to process a claim ranged from
$70.27 to $72.43, the current projection of $64.06 in
2009 – 2010 represents a significant reduction, reflecting
the initial impact of streamlining and simplifying processes,
as well as automating some claims processing. This
improvement is also attributable to the increasingly
electronic nature of exchanges of information with
claimants and employers.
In 2009 – 2010, changes were made to the Employment
Insurance Regulations to decrease administrative
burdens for employers who submit records of
employment online. These changes have improved the
information employers send to the Department, and
they support faster claims processing times for the
benefit of claimants. As a direct result of marketing
efforts with employers, just over half of records of
employment (4.47 million of 8.7 million) were received
electronically in 2009 – 2010. In addition, more than
39,000 new businesses registered in 2009 – 2010 to
submit their records of employment online, an increase
of 37% over the previous fiscal year.
The demographics-driven workload under the Canada
Pension Plan and Old Age Security programs is building,
and the effort to respond is equally demanding. One of
the Department’s most significant information technology
projects, Release 7 of the Information Technology
Renewal Delivery System, was launched in May 2009.
This required carefully coordinated national direction,
with intense regional activity to ensure that all factors
were aligned for a successful launch. The new system
increases the level of automation in the adjudication
of benefits and makes it possible to further improve
Web-based services and to provide Canadians with
greater choice in accessing services.
Online applications for the Apprenticeship incentive
Grant (AIG) were made available to clients in July 2009.
Since then, an increasing proportion of individuals
78
(39%) have chosen to apply for the AIG online rather
than sending their application by mail (61%). Overall,
the Department received 81,513 AIG applications in
2009 – 2010; however, 13% of applications processed
(10,540) were rejected because of ineligibility. In
addition, 14% of applications processed (11,406) were
deemed incomplete and returned to clients. For fiscal
year 2009 – 2010, over $58.5 million was paid,
representing 94% of the overall AIG budget. Since the
program was launched, 40,637 AIG applicants have
received both level 1 and level 2 grants, obtaining the
cumulative maximum grant of $2,000.
A number of successful measures and initiatives were
implemented in the past year to ensure that EI, CPP
and OAS benefits are delivered to the right person in
the right amount and for the intended purpose:
• The national certification program for investigators
was launched, and the first trainees have graduated.
• A number of National Reviews were conducted to
identify and mitigate the risks to the CPP and OAS
programs.
• Progress has been made with respect to increased
automation for Integrity tools and programs.
Refinements include enhancing the selection criteria
for creating computer-generated investigations and
conducting regular maintenance on the Case
Management System.
• Promotional activities were undertaken to increase
employer participation in the Report on Hirings
program and the Automated Earnings Reporting
System program.
Plans and Achievements for 2009 − 2010
Maintain processing standards in the face
of expanding demand by developing action
plans with specific activities to address the
effect of the economic downturn on operations
To address the economic downturn, the Department
put a comprehensive strategy in place to deal with
increasing numbers of Employment Insurance claims,
including hiring temporary employees, recalling recent
retirees, increasing voluntary overtime and reassigning
staff from other areas of the Department. Service
Canada also increased the level of automation of claims
processing and extended the hours of operation for
EI call centres.
2009 – 2010 Estimates Departmental Performance Report
With regard to the CPP, the Department closely monitored
and mitigated the effect of the downturn on the inventory
of CPP retirement and Disability applications. The
greatest impacts were seen in CPP Disability, and in
response, a specialized unit has been handling overflow
as needed to help ensure that Canadians receive timely
and efficient service.
Risk assessment templates for identifying risks and
appropriate mitigation strategies were used to inform
decision making regarding the action plans and to
ensure the integrity of the programs.
The Service Canada College played a key role in the
launch of the latest version of the Information Technology
Renewal Delivery System (ITRDS), responding to this
change in operating systems by designing, coordinating
and delivering training to 5,338 employees within a
four-week period to help ensure that there was no
interruption in service to Canadians. Also, with the
introduction of Canada’s Economic Action Plan,
the Department deployed a total of 3,039 temporary,
full- and part-time employees across the country to
respond to the increased workload and citizen service
needs. The Service Canada College responded in record
time to support new and experienced payment service
officers, service canada benefits officers and citizen
services officers, ensuring that they were trained and
ready to support communities and individuals.
Maintain processing standards in the face of
expanding demand by continuing with EI,
CPP and OAS automation to improve the
Department’s ability to meet increased
workload demands
adjudication of benefits, helping the Department to
respond to the increased demand as a result of an
aging population and to ensure that Canadians have
greater choice in accessing services.
Ensure the integrity of departmental benefit
programs by investigating abuse, misuse and
errors in EI, CPP, OAS and SIN programs
A total of 560,633 cases were reviewed by EI, CPP
and OAS investigators, resulting in the identification of
$701.6 million in benefit program savings. This includes
1,028 major investigations with respect to EI fraud
recovering a total of $2,564,574.
The Department adopted a risk-based approach to
investigations which uses a variety of techniques to
statistically assess the risk level of EI cases prior to
investigating. A pilot was conducted and proved
successful; the model will be implemented nationally
in 2010 – 2011.
Facilitate information sharing by increasing
the number of agreements for the exchange
of vital events information with provinces
and territories
Service Canada continued its work under the
Pan‑Canadian Vital Events Initiative by negotiating
and signing a Vital Event Linkages agreement with
the province of Quebec, bringing the total number
of signed agreements to five.
Lessons Learned
For EI, HRSDC’s automation achievements to date
have led to demonstrable increases in efficiency and
productivity. Although a record claim load was
experienced in 2009 – 2010, a number of key automation
initiatives allowed the Department to consistently meet
its speed-of-payment targets: 95% of all EI applications
were automatically registered, and 41% of new claims
and 63% of renewal claims were automated. The
Department also conducted a risk assessment of the
impact of the automation and simplification of the
EI program to improve the integrity of the program and
support its ability to deliver programs and services.
The economic downturn resulted in unprecedented
volumes of EI claims over the past two fiscal years and
led to a temporary realignment of integrity resources to
processing and payment activities to help ensure that
Canadians received their benefit payments in a timely
fashion. This realignment of resources, coupled with
record EI claim volumes, created a backlog of integrity
reviews and investigations. By applying a more focused,
risk-based approach to investigations, supported by
a revised governance structure, the Department was
able to exceed its annual benefit program savings
objectives for all its statutory programs (i.e. EI, CPP
and OAS).
The new ITRDS platform supporting the delivery of the
CPP was implemented in 2009 – 2010. It will facilitate
the future development of increased automation in the
Since the significant integrity workload demands are
expected to continue to increase for one year after
claim intake returns to normal, the lessons learned in
Section II Analysis of Program Activities by Strategic Outcome Human Resources and Skills Development Canada
79
2009 – 2010 regarding increased risk-based
approaches and effective governance will be used to
support the following measures, which will be
undertaken to manage workload pressures:
• pursuing a national approach to the Integrity workload,
including by implementing the predictive risk model
nationally for the Computer Post-Audit program and
testing the application of predictive risk models for
other integrity programs;
• streamlining and simplifying Integrity processes
(business process re-engineering opportunities);
• aligning the Resource Allocation Model to focus on
high-risk and high-yield activities that will generate
higher savings; and
• creating centres of specialization in regions to
concentrate efforts on selected integrity reviews.
The Department will continue to invest in the design
and use of technologies to improve electronic services
for clients and businesses and to automate EI processing
activities. Improvements in benefit processing are
transforming the application processing network, giving
it increased flexibility to respond to fluctuating workload
volumes. The national processing network is evolving,
characterized by standardized processes that are
paperless, electronic and automated, resulting in more
accurate, timely and equitable service for Canadians.
In May 2009, Release 7 of the new ITRDS was
implemented. This transition has greatly contributed to
the reduced processing times for CPP retirement
applications. The ITRDS was a multi-year, $139.9‑million
project resulting in a new CPP delivery system. At the
end of the project, a post-implementation report was
completed, documenting a number of lessons learned
throughout the project’s life cycle. These lessons will
provide a body of knowledge to help inform future
information technology projects.
One of the key lessons learned was the need to align
people, processes and technology. While it was
challenging to build a new benefit delivery system that
includes automated decision-making support, it was
critically important to ensure that the people and
processes were prepared to adopt the new system.
The ITRDS project incorporated a change management
plan that focused on people, helping them adopt the
new system. This resulted in a shorter transition period
with a minimal impact on productivity during the early
months post-implementation.
Implementing measures under Canada’s Economic
Action Plan during the infancy of the Wage Earner
Protection Program (WEPP) resulted in an increased
workload. In an effort to address the pressures of a
new and changing program, Service Canada adjusted
the key performance indicator for fiscal year 2010 – 2011
to more accurately reflect processing capacity. The
objective of the program—timely payment of wages
owed—remains intact as workers continue to receive
WEPP payments significantly faster than the normal
bankruptcy process.
80
2009 – 2010 Estimates Departmental Performance Report
2.5 Internal Services
Internal Services
 Management and Oversight Services
Support to achieving
the strategic outcomes
 Communications Services
 Legal Services
 Human Resources Management Services
 Financial Management Services
 Information Management Services
 Information Technology Services
 Real Property Services
 Material Services
 Acquisition Services
 Travel and Other Administrative Services
2.5.1Program Activity:
Internal Services
Program Description
Internal Services support the achievement of the
Department’s strategic outcomes by effectively
providing the resources, guidance support services,
and information necessary to successfully implement,
design and deliver its programs and services. The
definition of internal services is broad and includes policy
development, research, audits, evaluation and executive
functions, as well as the more traditional transactional
corporate services such as information management,
information technology, human resources and financial
management.
At HRSDC, these services are organized into: Corporate
Governance, the Chief Financial Officer, Human
Resources Services, Strategic Policy and Research,
Legal, Public Affairs and Stakeholder Relations, Internal
Audit Services, Internal Integrity and Security, and
Information Technology.
The proportion of resources dedicated to internal
services across the country mirrors the complexity and
breadth of the Department’s mandate, as well as the
number and diversity of its points of service and
service channels. The Department’s decentralized
service delivery network is complex and is supported
by an equally complex network of internal services,
with over 2,000 FTEs in the regions.
Program Activity Internal Services
Financial Resources (millions of dollars) and Human Resources (Full-Time Equivalents)
2009 – 2010
2009 – 2010
Planned
Spending
Total
Authorities
Actual
Spending
Planned
Actual
Difference
794.2
960.0
937.4
6,168
5,813
355
Note: Financial and human resources amounts for this program activity include resources related to initiatives under Canada’s Economic Action Plan.
See page 29 for details by initiative.
Section II Analysis of Program Activities by Strategic Outcome Human Resources and Skills Development Canada
81
Expected Result A workforce that represents Canada’s diversity
Performance Summary 2009 – 2010
Performance Indicators
Percentage of employees from
designated employment equity
groups
Source: Administrative data
Targets, Performance Status, Historical Results
Women:
59.1%
2009 – 2010 results: 70.0%
Aboriginal Peoples:
3.0%
2009 – 2010 results: 4.2%
People with disabilities:
3.4%
2009 – 2010 results: 6.9%
Members of a visible minority:
12.0%
2009 – 2010 results: 11.0%
EXCEEDED
Historical results:
Women:
2008 – 2009: 70.4%
2007 – 2008: 70.7%
2006 – 2007: 70.8%
Aboriginal peoples:
2008 – 2009: 3.9%
2007 – 2008: 3.9%
2006 – 2007: 4.1%
People with disabilities:
2008 – 2009: 6.8%
2007 – 2008: 7.2%
2006 – 2007: 8.1%
Members of a visible minority:
2008 – 2009: 9.6%
2007 – 2008: 9.0%
2006 – 2007: 9.0%
The percentage of women employed by the Department exceeds the target by 10%.
The percentage of Aboriginal people in the Department’s workforce is 1.2% above
the target, and the representation rate for people with disabilities (6.9%) remains well
above the target (3.4%).
The visible minority representation rate has increased significantly since 2008 – 2009,
but at 11%, remains slightly below the target of 12%.
82
2009 – 2010 Estimates Departmental Performance Report
Expected Result A workforce that represents Canada’s diversity (continued)
Performance Summary 2009 – 2010
Performance Indicators
Percentage of employees leaving
the Department
Source: Administrative data
Targets, Performance Status, Historical Results
8.0%
2009 – 2010 results: 6.7%
EXCEEDED
Historical results:
2008 – 2009: 7.1%
2007 – 2008: 8.0%
2006 – 2007: 6.9%
The Department has exceeded its expected level of performance. By focusing on
strengthened leadership, healthy workplace initiatives, employee engagement and
career development, the percentage of employees leaving the Department has been
reduced to 6.7% from 7.1% in the previous year.
Ratio of non-advertised external
hiring to total hiring
Source: Administrative data
12%
2009 – 2010 results: 6.2%
EXCEEDED
Historical results:
2007 – 2008: 22%
For 2008 – 2009, the Department made 526 external non-advertised appointments
out of a total of 8,435 staffing processes (advertised and non-advertised). The
percentage of external non-advertised appointments therefore represented 6.2% of
the overall processes within HRSDC.
Performance Analysis
HRSDC was able to adapt and respond to the
increased demand for Internal Services resulting from
the economic downturn and implementing Canada’s
Economic Action Plan. In order to fully and quickly
implement its commitments, the Department developed
a comprehensive internal risk management process to
identify and assess risks along with associated mitigation
strategies related to its policy, program design, service
delivery and performance reporting capacities. This
approach was supported by dedicated executive
oversight and external expert advice, and it is continuing
to strengthen the management of the Department’s
efforts related to Canada’s Economic Action Plan and
ongoing business priorities.
The Department strengthened its annual strategic
planning and priority-setting exercises for the portfolio
through broader engagement of senior executives.
Business planning tables aligned to strategic outcomes
were established to implement a more holistic and
transparent resource allocation and priority-setting
process. These tables consist of assistant deputy
ministers with direct program accountabilities and the
assistant deputy ministers of complementary activities
such as the key enablers (finance, information
technology and human resources). Discussions at
these tables allowed for greater insight into priorities,
risks, trade-offs, and financial and human resource
considerations, as well as a greater focus on resultsbased decision making across the Department.
As part of the 2009 – 2010 mid-year review, the
Department noted the pressures and challenges
facing employees of the key enablers (finance, human
resources and information technology). It was recognized
that, although these enablers were able to successfully
deliver on current priorities, there was a need to review
existing processes and system requirements to better
streamline activities and move to a broader enterprise
approach for enabling services. This should enhance
the Department’s ability to recruit and retain employees
in these three critical areas. An enabling services review
was subsequently launched. HRSDC, through initiatives
such as its own Enabling Services Review and the
government-wide Administrative Services Review,
is analyzing the way internal services are currently
performed to improve service excellence, and ensure
sound stewardship and greater value for money.
Section II Analysis of Program Activities by Strategic Outcome Human Resources and Skills Development Canada
83
To address the findings of the 2008 – 2009 Management
Accountability Framework assessment, HRSDC
developed and implemented consistent and
standardized departmental financial management
processes, including a structured approach to
investment planning to better align investments with
business planning.
Efforts were also made to strengthen the management
of personal information. For example, personal
information–sharing agreements were drafted in line
with the applicable departmental legislation (the Privacy
Codes) and/or paragraph 8(2)(f) of the Privacy Act,
where applicable. The Department also updated its
inventory of personal information–sharing agreements
to improve the coordination, stewardship, and
protection of personal information.
HRSDC made significant progress in support of public
service renewal. The Department’s renewal priorities
build on those set by the Clerk of the Privy Council
in the Public Service Renewal Action Plan and are
established based on feedback received from
employees at all levels in the Department. The
Department undertook a number activities related to its
renewal priorities, including:
• Creating a healthy and enabled workplace
The Department developed a strategy for building
a healthy and enabled workplace and identified
champions and co-champions to lead the efforts.
In November 2009, it launched the Deputy Ministers’
Awards of Excellence, which recognized employees
for their outstanding contributions to the Department.
Work was also started on the development of a
departmental pride and recognition policy and
program.
• Strengthening and enabling leadership
The Department developed a new policy framework
for human resources management and drafted key
policies for informal conflict management, staffing
and classification. In addition, four training modules
related to performance measurement, virtual
management, coaching, and leadership in a time of
crisis were developed and launched by the Service
Canada College.
• Investing in career development
HRSDC completed its Professional Development
Programs Framework, and a number of development
programs are in place across the organization for
various occupational groups. The Department
84
established learning plans for all employees and is
encouraging performance discussions between
employees and their managers. In addition, phase
one of the Mentoring Program was launched with
the drafting of a mentoring framework and the
establishment of pathfinders in targeted branches.
Work is ongoing to design and develop programs
in the branches and regions targeted in phase two
of the program.
Plans and Achievements for 2009 – 2010
Ensure continuity of business operations in
response to the increased service delivery
requirements by developing business
continuity planning and information
technology security
The Department conducted a quality assessment
review and updated over 500 departmental business
continuity plans. It also implemented a permanent
practice of establishing a three-deep approach to
backing up all key positions, a strategy recognized as
a best practice.
In addition, the Department conducted seven table-top
exercises to test the Department’s business continuity
plans and overall readiness to respond to emergency
situations, such as the 2009 H1N1 pandemic. A number
of exercises were held, including one focused on the
department’s senior management, five in the regions
and one in the Labour Program. In Public Safety
Canada’s national pandemic readiness survey, the
Department achieved a rating of 100%.
In response to the 2009 H1N1 pandemic, and in
support of long-term governance of departmental
emergency management and business continuity
activities, the Department has convened a permanent
working group with this focus.
Strengthen financial management by
continuing to implement a thorough
investment review process, particularly
in support of major projects relating to
information technology and real property
investments
In 2009 – 2010, the Department invested $48.7 million
in information technology assets to address new
demand, decrease operational risks, and ensure the
sustainability of the information technology infrastructure.
2009 – 2010 Estimates Departmental Performance Report
Another $42.1 million will renew departmental facilities
to better serve Canadians across the country through
the departmental capital plan. In addition, the investment
review process oversaw a portfolio of over
40 business-change and information technology–
enabled projects in support of services to Canadians
and employers.
Develop a more empowered and effective
workforce by:
1) providing greater support to managers in creating
and implementing effective human resources
plans
Improve management of operational and
business risks by securing and modernizing
program service delivery through information
technology
As a result of a multi-year project, a new Canada
Pension Plan benefit delivery system was implemented
in May 2009, eliminating two legacy applications. Since
it was implemented, the new system has processed
over 600,000 new CPP benefits and issued over
45 million CPP benefit payments for seniors, people
with disabilities and survivors. The new system is
based on both leading-edge and proven technologies,
and it has proved to be both robust and high-performing.
The information technology cost for this initiative since
2007 – 2008 is approximately $45 million.
The Department modernized the Information Technology
Security Program through the approval of a departmental
information technology security policy in June 2009. In
addition, business continuity plans were reviewed to
ensure that recovery capabilities are sufficient to mitigate
the potential risk of systems failures, as well as to provide
Canadians with more modern and secure access to
departmental systems and services.
Communicate effectively with the general
public by raising awareness of the benefits
available to citizens and their families to help
adjust to the economic downturn
HRSDC implemented a comprehensive communications,
marketing and stakeholder relations strategy to inform
Canadian workers affected by the economic downturn
of programs and services available to them. The strategy
included a major multimedia advertising campaign;
developing and distributing promotional materials;
organizing hundreds of announcement events and
news releases, ministerial roundtables with stakeholders,
and speeches at key venues; delivering regional
outreach activities; and making significant updates to
the Department’s website to promote measures under
Canada’s Economic Action Plan.
The Department continues to integrate human
resources considerations into its strategic and
operational planning process using support tools
and human resources advisory services. Human
resources planning processes and tools have been
revised to increase integration with business
planning, including additional evidence-based
information and resulting in an increase in the
overall effectiveness of the planning cycle.
Operational human resources plans are regularly
reviewed and revised to maintain alignment with
evolving business priorities.
2) continuing to streamline and standardize
practices aimed at improving the efficiency and
effectiveness of human resources services
Several projects were implemented with the primary
objective of streamlining and simplifying human
resources service delivery by standardizing forms,
processes and templates while aligning with the
Government of Canada’s Common Human
Resources Business Processes initiative.
The Department expanded the Express Lane
Staffing web-based tool to three out of five human
resources service delivery regions (roll-out to
all regions is to be completed by the end
of summer 2010). In addition, the Department
is developing and implementing information
technology tools to help streamline human
resources service delivery and improve reporting
capabilities across the organization.
3) addressing learning and training needs related
to competency gaps in the management and
delivery of programs and services by developing
a national training strategy for grants and
contributions delivery
The Department developed a portfolio-wide grants
and contributions training strategy that, once
implemented, will deliver a core curriculum that
includes specialized and foundational training.
Section II Analysis of Program Activities by Strategic Outcome Human Resources and Skills Development Canada
85
4) streamlining management of grants and
contributions, reducing administrative burden
for stakeholders and contributing to the Web
of Rules Action Plan and the Government of
Canada Action Plan to Reform the Administration
of Grant and Contribution Programs10
A Risk Assessment, Management and Mitigation
approach (which determines the frequency, type
and intensity of monitoring activity) was designed
and implemented portfolio-wide for contribution
programs, effective April 1, 2010. As a result, staff
focus administrative efforts on the areas of highest
risk, thereby reducing reporting and other requirements
for the majority of agreement holders who have
lower-risk projects.
The Department developed a “time to
acknowledgement” service standard, effective
April 1, 2010. This measure standardizes the
process of responding to all funding requests
across the Department and provides external
groups with information about the standard of
service they can expect when submitting funding
proposals.
10Although
technically not an internal service according to the definition of Internal Services provided by the Treasury Board Secretariat, the management
of grants and contributions is a cross-cutting function that affects every grant and contribution program within the entire department. For this reason, it
was deemed appropriate to place it under internal services, which are also supportive of the whole department.
86
2009 – 2010 Estimates Departmental Performance Report
Section III Section
Supplementary
I Overview
Information
Human Resources and Skills
Development Canada
Supplementary Information
3.1Electronic Tables
All electronic supplementary information tables listed in the
2009–10 Departmental Performance Report can be found on
the Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat’s website at
http://www.tbs-sct.gc.ca/dpr-rmr/2009-2010/indexeng.asp
Supplementary Information Tables:
•Sources of Respendable and NonRespendable Revenue
• User Fees / External Fees
•Details of Transfer Payment
Programs
• Up-Front Multi-Year Funding
• Horizontal Initiatives
•Green Procurement
•Response to Parliamentary
Committees and External Audits
•Internal Audits and Evaluations
3.2Financial Highlights
The financial highlights presented within this
Departmental Performance Report are intended to
serve as a general overview of HRSDC’s financial
position and operations. The Department’s unaudited
consolidated financial statements are available online at:
HRSDC is financed by the Government of Canada
through Parliamentary authorities. Financial reporting of
authorities provided to HRSDC do not parallel financial
reporting according to generally accepted accounting
principles since authorities are primarily based on cash
flow requirements. Consequently, items recognized in
the Consolidated Statement of Operations and the
Consolidated Statement of Financial Position are not
necessarily the same as those provided through
authorities from Parliament. A reconciliation between
authorities used and the net cost of operations is set
out in Note 3 of the Department’s consolidated
financial statements.
These consolidated financial statements include the
transactions of the Employment Insurance Operating (EIO)
Account, a sub-entity under the control of HRSDC.
The accounts of this sub-entity have been consolidated
with those of HRSDC and all inter-organizational
balances and transactions have been eliminated. The
balance of the Canada Pension Plan (CPP) deposit in
the Consolidated Revenue Fund is presented as a
liability in the departmental statements. The actuarial
value of the Government Annuities Account (GAA) is
presented as a liability in the departmental statements.
The purpose of this section is to explain the Department’s
2009 – 2010 financial highlights, based on the Department’s
consolidated financial statements. The charts below
illustrate the ending balances, as of March 31, 2010
for each major financial statement grouping, along
with the corresponding change from the previous
fiscal year. In summary, between 2008 – 2009 and
2009 – 2010, the Department’s assets increased by
2%, its liabilities decreased by 5%, its expenses
increased by 13%, and its revenues decreased by 6%.
Below the charts are explanations for the variances
in each major grouping based on the most significant
factors that affected each grouping during the
fiscal year.
http://www.rhdcc-hrsdc.gc.ca/eng/publications_
resources/dpr/dpr/financial_statement/dpr_09-10_
financial_e.shtml.
88
2009 – 2010 Estimates Departmental Performance Report
Condensed Consolidated Statement of Financial Position As at March 31
(millions of dollars)
2010
2009
2.4%
14,341.1
13,999.0
-4.6%
2,777.4
2,912.8
4.3%
11,563.7
11,086.2
% Change
Total Assets
Total Liabilities
Total Equity
Assets by Type Non-financial
assets
($255.5M)
2%
Canada
Student
Loans
($10,118.4M)
70%
Due from
Consolidated
Revenue
Fund
($381.8M)
3%
Accounts
receivable
and advances
($3,585.4M)
25%
Total assets amounted to $14,341.1 million as at
March 31, 2010, an increase of $342.1 million (2.4%)
over the previous year’s total assets of $13,999.0 million.
The increase in assets is mainly due to an increase of
$771.9 million in Canada Student Loans caused by an
excess of new loans disbursed over the total amount
of repayments, which was partially offset by a decrease
of $394.1 million in the amount due from the
Consolidated Revenue Fund.
Section III Supplementary Information Human Resources and Skills Development Canada
89
Liabilities by Type
Government
Annuities
Account
($243.5M)
9%
Employee
future benefits
($310.6M)
11%
Other liabilities
($66.4M)
2%
Accounts
payable and
accrued
liabilities
($1,544.2M)
56%
Vacation pay
and
compensatory
leave ($63.7M)
2%
Due to CPP
($174.8M)
6%
Designated
mountAFund
($374.2M)
14%
Total liabilities amounted to $2,777.4 million as at
March 31, 2010, a decrease of $135.4 million (4.6%)
over the previous year’s total liabilities of
$2,912.8 million. The decrease in liabilities is mainly
due to a decrease in accounts payable and accrued
liabilities due to the timing of the payments at year-end.
Condensed Consolidated Statement of Operations (millions of dollars)
As at March 31
% Change
2010
2009
EXPENSES
Transfer payments
14.1%
62,466.0
54,741.2
1.4%
3,605.1
3,557.0
13.3%
66,071.1
58,298.2
-5.8%
17,177.0
18,231.8
-15.5%
720.9
853.3
Total revenues
-6.2%
17,897.9
19,085.1
NET COST OF OPERATIONS
22.8%
48,173.2
39,213.1
Operating expenses
Total expenses
REVENUES
EI revenues
Other
90
2009 – 2010 Estimates Departmental Performance Report
Expenses by Major Program Activity Learning
($1,916.9M)
3%
Social
Development
($2,793.6M)
4%
Skills and
Employment
($25,688.4M)
39%
Other program
activities
($836.7M)
1%
Income
Security
($34,835.5M)
53%
Total expenses for the 2009 – 2010 year amounted
to $66,071.1 million, an increase of $7,772.9 million
(13.3%) over the previous year’s total expenses of
$58,298.2 million. The increase in total expenses is
mostly attributable to:
• an increase of $6,025.4 million in Skills and
Employment expenses due to the impacts of the
global economic downturn and the Government’s
response as part of Canada Economic Action Plan;
• an increase of $1,404.1 million in Income Security
expenses due to an increase in the eligible Old Age
Security / Guaranteed Income Supplement
population, and an increase in the monthly benefit
amount, due to an aging population; and,
• an increase of $418.4 million in Learning expenses
due to the introduction of the new enhanced
measures of the Canada Student Loans Program.
Section III Supplementary Information Human Resources and Skills Development Canada
91
Revenues by Major Program Activity Other
program
activities
($322.6M)
2%
Learning
($390.4M)
2%
Skills and
Employment
($17,184.9M)
96%
Total revenues for the 2009 – 2010 year amounted to
$17,897.9 million, a decrease of $1,187.2 million
(6.2%) over the previous year’s total revenues of
$19,085.1 million. The majority of this decrease can be
explained by a decrease of $950.2 million in interest
revenue related to Employment Insurance. In fact, as
part of the amendments to the Employment Insurance
Act, which came into force on January 1, 2009, the
new EIO Account does not earn interest on the
balance of the deposit in the Consolidated Revenue
Fund in the same manner as the EI Account.
3.3Specified Purpose
Accounts
Introduction
Specified Purpose Accounts consist of special categories
of revenues and expenditures. They report transactions
of certain accounts where enabling legislation requires
that revenues be earmarked and that related payments
and expenditures be charged against such revenues.
The transactions of these accounts are to be accounted
for separately.
92
HRSDC is responsible for the stewardship of five such
accounts:
• the Employment Insurance Account;
• the Canada Pension Plan;
• the Government Annuities Account;
• the Civil Service Insurance Fund; and
• the Canada Millennium Scholarship Foundation
Excellence Awards Fund.
The Employment Insurance Account is a consolidated
Specified Purpose Account and is included in the
financial reporting of the Government of Canada.
Consolidated Specified Purpose Accounts are used
principally where the activities are similar in nature to
departmental activities and the transactions do not
represent liabilities to third parties but, in essence,
constitute government revenues and expenditures.
The Canada Pension Plan is a Specified Purpose
Account but is not consolidated as part of the
Government of Canada financial statements. It is under
joint control of the government and the participating
provinces. As administrator, the government’s authority
to spend is limited to the balance in the Plan.
The Government Annuities Account is not a
consolidated Specified Purpose Account. It was
established by the Government Annuities Act, and
2009 – 2010 Estimates Departmental Performance Report
modified by the Government Annuities Improvement
Act, which discontinued sales of annuities in 1975. The
account is valued on an actuarial basis each year, with
the deficit or surplus charged or credited to the
Consolidated Revenue Fund.
mandate. HRSDC will administer the remaining
Excellence Awards disbursements from January 1, 2010
until December 31, 2013. After this date, HRSDC will
transfer any funds remaining in the account to the
Consolidated Revenue Fund.
The Civil Service Insurance Fund is not a
consolidated Specified Purpose Account. It was
established by the Civil Service Insurance Act. Pursuant
to subsection 16(3) of the Civil Service Insurance
Regulations, the amount of actuarial deficits is
transferred from the Consolidated Revenue Fund to
the Civil Service Insurance Account in order to balance
the assets and liabilities of the program.
The following information updates forecasted data on
the Employment Insurance Account and the Canada
Pension Plan that the Department provided in the
2009 – 2010 Report on Plans and Priorities11. That
report presented multi-year financial data and general
information. Additional information about performance
and year-end data is available at the Internet addresses
provided in this section.
The Canada Millennium Scholarship Foundation
Excellence Awards Fund is not a consolidated
Specified Purpose Account. It was established
in order for HRSDC to administer the remaining
Excellence Awards payments to eligible students upon
the dissolution of the Canada Millennium Scholarship
Foundation, which was ending after its ten-year
11For
further information, see http://www.tbs-sct.gc.ca/rpp/2009-2010/index-eng.asp?acr=1383
Section III Supplementary Information Human Resources and Skills Development Canada
93
Employment Insurance Account
The table below summarizes the financial results for
the Employment Insurance Account from 2007 – 2008
to 2009 – 2010.
Employment Insurance Account Statement of Operationsa
Actual
(millions of dollars)
2007 – 2008
2008 – 2009
2009 – 2010
Expenditures
Benefits
Administrative Costs
b
Doubtful Accounts
Sub-Total
14,293
16,308
21,586
1,689
1,801
2,031
81
27
50
16,063
18,137
23,667
16,877
17,217
17,121
58
41
42
16,935
17,258
17,163
EI Premiums and Penalties
Premiums
Penalties
Sub-Total
Variance
872
(879)
(6,504)
Premium Rate
2008
2009
2010
Employee
1.73%
1.73%
1.73%
Employer
2.42%
2.42%
2.42%
(% of Insurable Earnings)
aThe
EI Account is a consolidated Specified Purpose Account and is included in the financial reporting of the Government of Canada. Consolidated
Specified Purpose Accounts are used principally where the activities are similar in nature to departmental activities and the transactions do not
represent liabilities to third parties but, in essence, constitute government revenues and expenditures.
bRepresents
write-offs and estimates of uncollectible account receivables for benefit overpayments and penalties imposed.
Note: Totals may not add due to rounding.
Revenues from Employment Insurance premiums
decreased in 2009 – 2010 due to lower insurable
earnings resulting from a decrease in employment.
Employment Insurance benefit payments increased
due to an increase in the number of beneficiaries and
higher weekly benefits. As a result, expenditures
exceeded revenues by $6.5 billion. The revenue
shortfall was partially offset by $0.1 billion in interest
earned and $1.5 billion in additional funding for measures
introduced in Budget 2009.
More detailed information is reported in the 2009 – 2010
audited Employment Insurance Account financial
statements that are included in the 2010 Public
Accounts of Canada, Volume 1, Section 4.12 HRSDC
also offers information about Employment Insurance
on its website.13 It provides information about the
authority, objectives and details of the program as well
as links to Actuarial Reports and the Employment
Insurance Commission’s annual Monitoring and
Assessment Reports.
12For
further information, see http://www.tpsgc-pwgsc.gc.ca/recgen/txt/72-eng.html
13For
further information, see http://www.hrsdc.gc.ca/en/ei/legislation/ei_act_tofprov_1.shtml
94
2009 – 2010 Estimates Departmental Performance Report
Canada Pension Plan
The following table summarizes the financial results for
the Canada Pension Plan (CPP) from 2007 – 2008 to
2009 – 2010.
More information relating to 2009 – 2010 is reported in
the Canada Pension Plan financial statements which
can be found in the 2010 Public Accounts of Canada,
Volume 1, Section 6.
Canada Pension Plan Summary
Actual
(millions of dollars)
2007 – 2008
Forecast
2008 – 2009
Actual
2009 – 2010
Revenue
Contributions
35,346
36,506
34,287
36,276
11
6
1
1
-
16,218
Investment Income
Canada Pension Plan
CPP Investment Board
a
Total Investment Income
(268)
(23,576)
(257)
(23,570)
1
16,219
35,089
12,936
34,288
52,495
27,536
29,005
30,502
30,363
599
694
742
734
Total Expenditures
28,135
29,699
31,244
31,097
Increase / Decrease
6,954
(16,763)
3,044
21,398
113,066
131,420
Total Revenue
Expenditures
Benefit Payments
Administrative Expenses
Year-end Balance
b
126,785
110,022
aCanada
Pension Plan Investment Board actual amounts are based on their audited financial statements. The Canada Pension Plan Investment Board
invests mainly in equities and fixed income securities. The investment income is composed of realized gains and losses from investments, unrealized
gains and losses on investments held at the end of the period (change in fair value) and foreign exchange gains and losses. For 2009 – 2010, there was a
net investment gain.
bAdministrative
expenses include Canada Pension Plan administrative expenses as well as Canada Pension Plan Investment Board administrative expenses.
Note: All amounts from this table for 2007 – 2008 and 2008 – 2009 are the consolidated amounts found in the audited Canada Pension Plan annual
financial statements.
Section III Supplementary Information Human Resources and Skills Development Canada
95
Government Annuities Account
The table below summarizes the financial results for
the Government Annuities Account from 2007 – 2008
to 2009 – 2010. Source of the figures is the Report of
the Chief Actuary on the Government Annuities as at
March 31, 2010.
Government Annuities Account Statement of Operations and Actuarial Liabilities
Actual
(millions of dollars)
2007 – 2008
2008 – 2009
2009 – 2010
Actuarial Liabilities –
Balance at Beginning of Year
319 .4
292.9
26 7.2
In com e
21 .1
19.4
1 7.5
Payments and Other Charges
45 .0
42.0
3 8.7
Excess of Payments and Other Charges Over Income
for the Year
23.9
22.6
21.2
2 .6
3.1
2.5
292 .9
267.2
24 3.5
Actuarial Surplus
Actuarial Liabilities –
Balance at End of the Year
The annual report and financial statements for
Government Annuities are available in the 2010 Public
Accounts of Canada, Volume 1, Section 6.14
14For
96
further information, see http://www.tpsgc-pwgsc.gc.ca/recgen/txt/index-eng.html
2009 – 2010 Estimates Departmental Performance Report
Civil Service Insurance Fund
The table below summarizes the financial results for
the Civil Service Insurance Fund from 2007 – 2008 to
2009 – 2010.
Civil Service Insurance Fund Statement of Operations and Balance
Actual
(millions of dollars)
2007 – 2008
2008 – 2009
2009 – 2010
Opening Balance
6.0
5.9
5.6
Receipts and Other Credits
0.1
0.0
0.1
Payments and Other Charges
0.2
0.3
0.3
Excess of Payments and Other Charges Over Income
for the Year
0.1
0.3
0.2
Balance at End of the Year
5.9
5.6
5.5
Note: Totals may not add due to rounding.
The annual report and financial statements for the Civil
Service Insurance Fund are available in the 2010 Public
Accounts of Canada, Volume 1, Section 6.15
15For
further information, see http://www.tpsgc-pwgsc.gc.ca/recgen/txt/index-eng.html
Section III Supplementary Information Human Resources and Skills Development Canada
97
Canada Millennium Scholarship
Foundation Excellence Awards Fund
HRSDC will administer the remaining Excellence
Awards disbursements from January 1, 2010 until
December 31, 2013. After this date, HRSDC will
transfer any funds remaining in the account to the
Consolidated Revenue Fund.
In accordance with Budget Implementation Act 2008,
the Canada Millennium Scholarship Foundation is
ending after its ten-year mandate. This Specified
Purpose Account was established by way of an
agreement between Canada Millennium Scholarship
Foundation and Human Resources and Skills
Development Canada (HRSDC) in order for HRSDC to
administer the remaining Excellence Awards payments
to eligible students upon the dissolution of the Canada
Millennium Scholarship Foundation. The transfer of
funds also includes the costs of administering this
program on behalf of the Canada Millennium
Scholarship Foundation.
Canada Millennium Scholarship
Foundation Excellence Award Fund
Statement of Operations and Balance
Actual
(millions of dollars)
2007 – 2008
Opening Balance
2008 – 2009
2009 – 2010
-
-
-
-
-
14.8
Payments and other charges
-
-
0.4
Excess of payments and other charges over receipts
for the year
-
-
(14.4)
Closing Balance
-
-
14.4
Receipts and other credits
1
1Receipts
and other credits include a one-time payment of $14.8 million from the Canada Millennium Scholarship Foundation to the Specified Purpose
Account for the purpose of administering remaining Excellence Awards between January 1, 2010 and December 31, 2013.
98
2009 – 2010 Estimates Departmental Performance Report
3.4Statutory Annual
Reports
Benefits include the basic Old Age Security pension,
the Guaranteed Income Supplement and the
Allowance. The Old Age Security program is financed
from Government of Canada general tax revenues.
Old Age Security
The Old Age Security program is one of the
cornerstones of Canada’s retirement income system.
The following tables present information about monthly
benefits, beneficiaries and payments by province or territory.
Summary of Maximum Monthly Benefits Basic
Pension
Income Supplement
Single
(millions of dollars)
Allowance
Married
Regular
Survivor
Increase
Monthly benefit by fiscal year
2009-2010 Actuals
January 1, 2010
October 1, 2009
July 1, 2009
April 1, 2009
516.96
516.96
516.96
516.96
652.51
652.51
652.51
652.51
430.90
430.90
430.90
430.90
947.86
947.86
947.86
947.86
1,050.68
1,050.68
1,050.68
1,050.68
0.0%
0.0%
0.0%
0.0%
2009-2010 Estimates
January 1, 2010
October 1, 2009
July 1, 2009
April 1, 2009
522.66
521.10
517.48
516.96
659.70
657.73
653.16
652.51
435.65
434.35
431.33
430.90
958.31
955.45
948.81
947.86
1,062.26
1,059.09
1,051.73
1,050.68
0.3%
0.7%
0.1%
0.0%
2008-2009 Actuals
January 1, 2009
October 1, 2008
July 1, 2008
April 1, 2008
516.96
516.96
505.83
502.31
652.51
652.51
638.46
634.02
430.90
430.90
421.62
418.69
947.86
947.86
927.45
921.00
1,050.68
1,050.68
1,028.06
1,020.91
0.0%
2.2%
0.7%
0.0%
6,203.52
6,234.60
6,126.18
7,830.12
7,869.30
7,732.50
5,170.80
5,196.69
5,106.33
11,374.32
11,431.29
11,232.51
12,608.16
12,671.28
12,450.99
1.3%
1.8%
3.4%
Maximum amount paid
(annual benefits)
2009-2010 Actuals
2009-2010 Estimates
2008-2009 Actuals
Section III Supplementary Information Human Resources and Skills Development Canada
99
Number of Persons Receiving Old Age Security Benefits
by Province or Territory and by Type
Province or Territory
Old Age
Security (OAS)
Pension
Newfoundland and Labrador
Prince Edward Island
Nova Scotia
New Brunswick
Quebec
Ontario
Manitoba
Saskatchewan
Alberta
British Columbia
Yukon
Northwest Territoriesa
Internationalb
Total
aData
74,884
20,645
142,077
112,962
1,142,879
1,690,561
163,581
147,341
365,759
603,784
2,638
3,098
90,885
4,561,094
March 2009
Guaranteed
Income
Supplement
GIS as % of
(GIS)
Allowance
OAS
45,766
9,320
59,515
54,434
518,355
479,751
58,026
55,326
117,370
194,667
806
1,613
8,546
1,603,495
4,360
556
4,120
4,194
30,353
26,741
3,299
3,144
5,497
11,009
55
118
62
93,508
Old Age
Security (OAS)
Pension
61.12
45.14
41.89
48.19
45.36
28.38
35.47
37.55
32.09
32.24
30.55
52.07
9.40
35.16
77,362
21,189
145,682
115,916
1,181,774
1,737,000
166,245
148,590
375,679
622,655
2,828
3,209
93,755
4,691,884
March 2010
Guaranteed
Income
Supplement
(GIS)
Allowance
46,025
9,369
60,206
55,074
533,717
493,407
56,934
53,167
116,782
200,248
859
1,628
8,371
1,635,787
GIS as % of
OAS
4,376
585
4,037
4,021
30,246
27,070
3,101
2,879
5,633
11,501
42
120
57
93,668
59.49
44.22
41.33
47.51
45.16
28.41
34.25
35.78
31.09
32.16
30.37
50.73
8.93
34.86
for Nunavut are included.
bPersons
receiving Canadian Old Age Security benefits under International Social Security Agreements.
Old Age Security Payments by Province
or Territory and by Type, Fiscal Year 2009 − 2010 Province or Territory
Old Age Security (OAS)
Pension
Guaranteed Income
Supplement (GIS)
Allowance
Total
Newfoundland and Labrador
472,649,035
197,318,079
26,300,993
696,268,107
Prince Edward Island
129,197,975
39,859,709
2,764,100
171,821,783
1,154,438,146
Nova Scotia
891,153,171
241,598,237
21,686,738
New Brunswick
708,901,231
231,599,758
22,976,187
963,477,176
Quebec
7,129,132,040
2,336,537,562
159,494,901
9,625,164,503
Ontario
10,118,967,492
2,542,272,691
164,559,895
12,825,800,077
1,010,754,263
242,152,127
17,824,747
1,270,731,137
916,236,051
224,516,699
17,066,693
1,157,819,443
Manitoba
Saskatchewan
Alberta
2,222,165,224
558,603,566
33,070,445
2,813,839,234
British Columbia
3,576,618,544
1,025,495,171
67,458,903
4,669,572,618
16, 966,723
3,863,515
261,951
21,092,190
19,540,889
8,743,201
941,810
29,225,901
Yukon
Northwest Territoriesa
Internationalb
Total
Recovery tax portion of OAS
Total including recovery tax
aData
(954,145,701)
26,391,340,840
84,072,993
7,736,633,308
450,104
534,857,467
-
-
7,736,633,308
534,857,467
for Nunavut are included.
bPersons
100
133,203,903
27,345,486,541
receiving Canadian Old Age Security benefits under International Social Security Agreements.
2009 – 2010 Estimates Departmental Performance Report
217,727,000
35,616,977,316
(954,145,701)
34,662,831,615
Consolidated Report on Canada Student Loans Combined Programs
Actual
(millions of dollars)
Forecast
2007 – 2008 2008 – 2009
Actual
2009 – 2010
Revenues
Interest Revenue on Direct Loans
Recoveries on Guaranteed Loans
Recoveries on Put-Back Loans (RS)
537.1
46.6
13.5
472.8
38.5
13.1
597.2
524.4
564.2
408.2
161.5
143.2
511.5
533.7
Loan Administration
a
Collection Costs (All regimes)
Program Delivery Costs (DL)
Risk Premium to Financial Institutions (RS)
Put-Back to Financial Institutions (RS)
Administrative Fees to Provinces and Territories and SIF (DL)
Total Loan Administration Expenses
14.4
70.8
1.3
3.8
13.7
104.0
10.7
76.0
0.7
3.8
14.7
105.9
Cost of Government Benefits to Students
b
In-Study Interest Borrowing Expense (Class A - DL)
b
In Repayment Interest Borrowing Expense (Class B - DL)
In-Study Interest Subsidy (RS & GL)
e
Repayment Assistance Programs
Claims Paid & Loans Forgiven (All regimes)
Total Cost of Govt Benefits to Students
196.4
173.6
8.0
107.5
17.0
502.5
166.9
160.7
4.0
93.2
23.2
448.0
184.7
210.4
3.5
128.9
11.8
539.3
177.4
180.0
1.4
74.9
22.5
456.2
Debt Reduction in Repayment Expense (DL)
Bad Debt Expense (DL)
Total Bad Debt Expense
12.4
293.5
305.9
53.2
293.6
346.8
12.8
326.6
339.4
133.4
129.1
262.5
Total Loan Expenses
Net Operating Results
1,073.9
1,043.9
1,479.3
1,342.8
476.7
519.5
915.1
934.6
113.9
111.0
90.5
223.1
590.6
630.5
1,005.6
1,157.7
Total Loan Revenue
532.1
24.7
7.4
369.8
27.4
11.0
Expenses
Transfer payment
Canada Study Grants, Canada Access Grants and Canada
Student Grants Program
Bad Debt Expense
3.8
60.9
1.0
3.3
20.1
89.1
5.2
61.7
0.6
3.6
19.3
90.4
c
Alternative Payments to Non-Participating Provinces (DL)
d
Final Net Operating Results
(DL) = Direct Loans
(RS) = Risk-shared Loans
(GL) = Guaranteed Loans
aThese
costs are related to collection activities performed by the Canada Revenue Agency. Figures for 2008 – 2009 have been adjusted by CRA and the
new collection costs have been reflected.
bThese
cThis
costs are related to Canada Student Direct Loans but reported by the Department of Finance.
represents the annual expense against the Provisions for Bad Debt and Debt Reduction in Repayment as required under Accrual Accounting.
dThe
figures represent the annual expense recorded under the Accrual Accounting as opposed to the actual amount disbursed to the Non-Participating
Provinces. For 2009-2010, the total amount disbursed as Alternative Payments is $127.3 M.
eInterest
Relief and Debt Reduction in Repayment has been replaced by the Repayment Assistance Programs.
For further information about the Consolidated
Report on Canada Student Loans, refer to
http://www.hrsdc.gc.ca/eng/publications_resources/
dpr/index/.shtml
Section III Supplementary Information Human Resources and Skills Development Canada
101
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