Regulated Nurses: Canadian Trends, 2005 to 2009 pic December 2010

Regulated Nurses: Canadian Trends, 2005 to 2009 pic December 2010
pic
Regulated Nurses:
Canadian Trends, 2005 to 2009
December 2010
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Table of Contents
Table of Contents
Executive Summary ............................................................................................................xi
Regulated Nursing Workforce Continues to Grow ...................................................... xi Regulated Nursing Workforce Across Age Groups .................................................... xi Mobility Trends of Regulated Nursing Graduates ....................................................... xi Registered Nurses ....................................................................................................... xi Licensed Practical Nurses ........................................................................................... xii Registered Psychiatric Nurses .................................................................................... xii About the Canadian Institute for Health Information ........................................................ xiii
About This Report .............................................................................................................. xv
One Report for Three Nursing Professions .................................................................xv What’s New This Year?................................................................................................xv Acknowledgements ......................................................................................................... xvii
Regulatory Authorities for the Registered Nursing Profession ........................... xvii Regulatory Authorities for the Licensed Practical Nursing Profession .............. xviii Regulatory Authorities for the Registered Psychiatric Nursing Profession ....... xviii National Organizations ...................................................................................... xviii Introduction ......................................................................................................................... 1
The Canadian Regulated Nursing Workforce .............................................................. 3 Registered Nurses ........................................................................................................ 4 Licensed Practical Nurses ............................................................................................ 4 Registered Psychiatric Nurses ..................................................................................... 4 Notes to Readers .......................................................................................................... 4 Chapter 1—Regulated Nurses in Canada: Trends of Registered Nurses .......................... 7
Workforce Trends: How Many Registered Nurses? ..................................................... 9 Employment Trends: Is the Workforce Changing? .................................................... 12 Registered Nurses Not Employed in Nursing ...................................................... 14 Employment Status.............................................................................................. 15 Multiple Employment ........................................................................................... 18 Place of Work ....................................................................................................... 20 Position ................................................................................................................ 21 Area of Responsibility .......................................................................................... 23 Demographic Trends: Sex and Age Composition of the Registered
Nursing Workforce...................................................................................................... 24 Age Group of the Workforce ................................................................................ 26 Average Age of the Workforce ............................................................................. 27 Exiting and Entering the Workforce ..................................................................... 29 Regulated Nurses: Canadian Trends, 2005 to 2009
Age of the Workforce ........................................................................................... 31 Years Since Graduation ....................................................................................... 32 Education Trends ....................................................................................................... 33 Entry-to-Practice Education ................................................................................. 33 Higher Education for Registered Nurses ............................................................. 35 Average Age at Graduation.................................................................................. 37 Canadian Nurses Association Certification Program .......................................... 38 Mobility Trends: A Mobile Workforce ......................................................................... 39 Migration Within Canada...................................................................................... 39 Working Outside Province/Territory of Registration ............................................ 41 Internationally Educated Registered Nurses ....................................................... 42 Urban/Rural Distribution of the Workforce ........................................................... 44 Registered Nurses in the Territories: Characteristics of the Northern Workforce ...... 46 Nurse Practitioner Employment Trends: Is the Workforce Changing? ...................... 47 Place of Work ....................................................................................................... 50 Area of Responsibility .......................................................................................... 51 Nurse Practitioner Demographic Trends: Sex Composition ...................................... 52 Age of the Workforce ........................................................................................... 53 Nurse Practitioner Mobility Trends ............................................................................. 54 Urban/Rural Distribution of the Nurse Practitioner Workforce ............................. 55 Chapter 2—Regulated Nurses in Canada: Trends of Licensed Practical Nurses ............ 57
Workforce Trends: How Many Licensed Practical Nurses? ....................................... 59 Employment Trends: Is the Workforce Changing? .................................................... 61 Licensed Practical Nurses Not Employed in Nursing .......................................... 63 Employment Status .............................................................................................. 64 Multiple Employment ........................................................................................... 66 Place of Work ....................................................................................................... 68 Position ................................................................................................................ 69 Area of Responsibility .......................................................................................... 71 Demographic Trends: Sex and Age Composition of the Licensed Practical
Nursing Workforce...................................................................................................... 72 Age Group of the Workforce ................................................................................ 74 Average Age of the Workforce ............................................................................. 75 Exiting and Entering the Workforce ..................................................................... 77 Age of the Workforce ........................................................................................... 79 Years Since Graduation ....................................................................................... 80 Education Trends ....................................................................................................... 81 Entry-to-Practice Education ................................................................................. 81 Average Age at Graduation.................................................................................. 84 ii
Table of Contents
Mobility Trends: A Mobile Workforce ......................................................................... 84 Migration Within Canada ..................................................................................... 85 Working Outside Province/Territory of Registration ............................................ 87 Internationally Educated Licensed Practical Nurses ........................................... 88 Urban/Rural Distribution of the Workforce ........................................................... 90 Licensed Practical Nurses in the Territories: Characteristics of the
Northern Workforce .................................................................................................... 92 Chapter 3—Regulated Nurses in Canada: Trends of Registered Psychiatric Nurses ..... 95
Workforce Trends: How Many Registered Psychiatric Nurses? ................................ 97 Employment Trends: Is the Workforce Changing? .................................................... 99 Employment Status............................................................................................ 101 Multiple Employment ......................................................................................... 103 Place of Work ..................................................................................................... 105 Position .............................................................................................................. 106 Area of Responsibility ........................................................................................ 108 Demographic Trends: Sex and Age Composition of the Registered Psychiatric
Nursing Workforce.................................................................................................... 109 Age Group of the Workforce .............................................................................. 111 Average Age of the Workforce ........................................................................... 112 Exiting and Entering the Workforce ................................................................... 114 Age of the Workforce ......................................................................................... 116 Years Since Graduation ..................................................................................... 117 Education Trends ..................................................................................................... 118 Entry-to-Practice Education ............................................................................... 118 Higher Education for Registered Psychiatric Nurses ........................................ 118 Average Age at Graduation ............................................................................... 120 Mobility Trends: A Mobile Workforce ....................................................................... 120 Migration in the Western Provinces ................................................................... 121 Internationally Educated Registered Psychiatric Nurses ................................... 123 Urban/Rural Distribution of the Workforce ......................................................... 126 Chapter 4—Regulated Nursing Workforce by Health Region ........................................ 129
Assigning the Regulated Nursing Workforce to Health Regions ............................. 131 Health Region Peer Groups ..................................................................................... 131 Rates per 100,000 Population by Health Region ..................................................... 132 Chapter 5—Methodological Notes ................................................................................. 139
Data Quality .............................................................................................................. 141 Privacy and Confidentiality ................................................................................ 141 Data Collection................................................................................................... 141 Population of Interest ......................................................................................... 141 iii
Regulated Nurses: Canadian Trends, 2005 to 2009
Population of Reference and Collection Period................................................. 142 Non-Practising Registrations ............................................................................. 142 First-Time Registrants ........................................................................................ 142 Nurses on Leave ................................................................................................ 143 Non-Response ................................................................................................... 143 Duplicate Records.............................................................................................. 145 Defining the Workforce ...................................................................................... 145 Re-Coding Employment Status ......................................................................... 145 Analytical Methods ............................................................................................. 148 Urban/Rural Statistics ........................................................................................ 148 Comparability of Data ........................................................................................ 149 Methodological and Historical Changes to Registered Nursing Data,
2005 to 2009 ............................................................................................................. 149 Historical Review and Data Limitations .............................................................. 149 Methodological and Historical Changes to Licensed Practical Nursing Data,
2005 to 2009 ............................................................................................................. 154 Historical Revisions and Data Limitations .......................................................... 154 Methodological and Historical Changes to Registered Psychiatric
Nursing Data, 2005 to 2009 ...................................................................................... 155 Historical Revisions and Data Limitations .......................................................... 155 Provincial/Territorial Nursing Workforce Highlights and Profiles .................................... 159
Regulated Nursing Contact Information ......................................................................... 187
References ...................................................................................................................... 195
iv
Table of Contents
List of Figures
Figure 1
Ratio of Practising Nurses to Practising Physicians Within Selected
Countries, 2006 ............................................................................................... 1 Figure 2
Practising Nurses per 10,000 Population Within Selected Countries, 2006 ... 2 Figure 3
Regulated Nursing Workforce (Employed in Nursing), Canada, 2009 ........... 3
Figure 4 Registered Nurses, by Employment Status, Canada, 2009............................ 9 Figure 5 Registered Nursing Workforce, Canada, 1980 to 2009 ................................ 10 Figure 6
Registered Nursing Workforce per 100,000 Population, Canada,
1986 to 2009 .................................................................................................. 11
Figure 7 Registered Nurses Employed in Nursing With Multiple Employers,
by Employment Status, by Age Group, Canada, 2009 ................................. 19 Figure 8 Registered Nursing Workforce, by Place of Work, by Jurisdiction and
Canada, 2005 and 2009 ................................................................................ 20 Figure 9 Average Age of Regulated Nursing Workforce Compared to Selected
Health Occupations, Canada, 2005 to 2009 ................................................. 27 Figure 10
Registered Nursing Workforce, by Age Groups 55+, 60+ and 65+,
by Jurisdiction and Canada, 2009 ................................................................ 31
Figure 11 Registered Nursing Workforce, by Years Since Graduation,
by Jurisdiction and Canada, 2005 and 2009 ................................................ 32 Figure 12 Registered Nurses Graduating From Diploma and Baccalaureate
Programs, Canada, 1999 to 2009 ................................................................. 34 Figure 13 Registered Nursing Workforce, by Jurisdiction of Graduation and
Registration, Canada, 2009 ........................................................................... 39 Figure 14 Registered Nursing Worforce, by Jurisdiction of Registration and Top
Three Destinations of Graduation, Canada, 2009 ......................................... 40 Figure 15 Registered Nurses Working Outside of Jurisdiction of Registration,
by Country of Employment, Canada, 2009 ................................................... 41 Figure 16 Internationally Educated Registered Nurses in the Workforce,
by Country of Graduation, 2009 .................................................................... 43 Figure 17 Registered Nursing Workforce, by Urban/Rural/Remote/Territories
Designation, Canada, 2009 ........................................................................... 44 Figure 18 Registered Nursing Workforce, by Urban/Rural/Remote/Territories
Designation, by Jurisdiction, 2009 ................................................................ 45 Figure 19 Registered Nursing Workforce, by Place of Work, by Provincial or
Territorial Level, Canada, 2009...................................................................... 46 Figure 20 Nurse Practitioner Workforce, by Place of Work, Canada, 2005,
2007 and 2009 ............................................................................................... 50 v
Regulated Nurses: Canadian Trends, 2005 to 2009
Figure 21 Nurse Practitioner Workforce, by Urban/Rural/Remote/Territories
Designation, Canada, 2009 ........................................................................... 55 Figure 22
Licensed Practical Nurses, by Employment Status, Canada, 2009 .............. 59 Figure 23 Licensed Practical Nursing Workforce per 100,000 Population, Canada,
2005 to 2009 .................................................................................................. 60 Figure 24 Licensed Practical Nurses Employed in Nursing With Multiple
Employers, by Employment Status, by Age Group, Canada, 2009.............. 67 Figure 25 Licensed Practical Nursing Workforce, by Place of Work,
by Jurisdiction and Canada, 2005 and 2009 ................................................ 68 Figure 26 Average Age of Regulated Nursing Workforce Compared to Selected
Health Occupations, Canada, 2005 to 2009 ................................................. 75 Figure 27 Licensed Practical Nursing Workforce, by Age Groups 55+, 60+ and
65+, by Jurisdiction and Canada, 2009........................................................ 79 Figure 28 Licensed Practical Nursing Workforce, by Years Since Graduation,
by Jurisdiction and Canada, 2005 and 2009 ................................................ 80 Figure 29 Licensed Practical Nurses Graduating From Diploma/Certificate
Programs, Canada, 2007 to 2009 ................................................................. 83 Figure 30 Licensed Practical Nursing Workforce, by Jurisdiction of Graduation and
Registration, Canada, 2009 ........................................................................... 85 Figure 31 Licensed Practical Nursing Workforce, by Jurisdiction of Registration and
Top Three Destinations of Graduation, Canada, 2009.................................. 86 Figure 32 Licensed Practical Nurses Working Outside of Jurisdiction of
Registration, by Country of Employment, Canada, 2009.............................. 87 Figure 33 Internationally Educated Licensed Practical Nurses in the Workforce,
by Country of Graduation, 2009 .................................................................... 89 Figure 34 Licensed Practical Nursing Workforce, by Urban/Rural/Remote/
Territories Designation, Canada, 2009 .......................................................... 90 Figure 35 Licensed Practical Nursing Workforce, by Urban/Rural/Remote/
Territories Designation, by Jurisdiction, 2009 ............................................... 91 Figure 36 Licensed Practical Nursing Workforce, by Place of Work, by Provincial
or Territorial Level, Canada, 2009 ................................................................. 93 Figure 37 Registered Psychiatric Nurses, by Employment Status, Western
Provinces, 2009 ............................................................................................. 97 Figure 38 Registered Psychiatric Nursing Workforce per 100,000 Population,
Western Provinces, 2005 to 2009 .................................................................. 98 Figure 39 Registered Psychiatric Nurses Employed in Psychiatric Nursing With
Multiple Employers, by Employment Status, by Age Group, Western
Provinces, 2009 ........................................................................................... 104 Figure 40 Registered Psychiatric Nursing Workforce, by Place of Work,
by Province and Western Provinces, 2005 and 2009 ................................. 105 vi
Table of Contents
Figure 41 Average Age of Regulated Nursing Workforce Compared to Selected
Health Occupations, Canada, 2005 to 2009 ............................................... 112 Figure 42 Registered Psychiatric Nursing Workforce, by Age Groups 55+, 60+
and 65+, by Province and Western Provinces, 2009 ................................. 116 Figure 43 Registered Psychiatric Nursing Workforce, by Years Since
Graduation, by Province and Western Provinces, 2005 and 2009 ............. 117 Figure 44 Registered Psychiatric Nurses Graduating From Diploma and
Baccalaureate Programs, Western Provinces, 2007 to 2009 ...................... 119 Figure 45
Registered Psychiatric Nursing Workforce, by Province of Graduation
and Registration, Western Provinces, 2009 ................................................ 121
Figure 46 Registered Psychiatric Nursing Workforce, by Province of Registration
and Top Two Destinations of Graduation, Western Provinces, 2009 ......... 122 Figure 47 Internationally Educated Registered Psychiatric Nurses in the
Workforce, by Country of Graduation, 2009 ............................................... 125 Figure 48 Registered Psychiatric Nursing Workforce, by Urban/Rural/Remote/
Territories Designation, Western Provinces, 2009 ...................................... 126 Figure 49 Registered Psychiatric Nursing Workforce, by Urban/Rural/Remote/
Territories Designation, by Province, 2009 ................................................. 127 Figure 50
Tracking Regulatory Authority Data to CIHI: The Regulated
Nursing Workforce ...................................................................................... 146 vii
Regulated Nurses: Canadian Trends, 2005 to 2009
List of Tables
viii
Table 1 Registered Nurses, by Employment Status, Canada, 2005 to 2009............. 12 Table 2 Registered Nursing Workforce, by Jurisdiction and Canada,
2005 to 2009 .................................................................................................. 13 Table 3 Registered Nurses Not Employed in Nursing, by Employment Status,
by Age Group, Canada, 2005 to 2009 .......................................................... 14 Table 4 Registered Nursing Workforce, by Employment Status, by Jurisdiction
and Canada, 2005 to 2009 ............................................................................ 15 Table 5 Registered Nurses Employed in Nursing With Multiple Employers, by
Employment Status With Primary Employer, Canada, 2005 to 2009 ........... 18 Table 6 Registered Nursing Workforce, by Position, by Jurisdiction and Canada,
2005 to 2009 .................................................................................................. 21 Table 7 Registered Nursing Workforce, by Area of Responsibility, Canada, 2009 ... 23 Table 8 Registered Nursing Workforce, by Sex, by Jurisdiction and Canada,
2005 to 2009 .................................................................................................. 24 Table 9 Registered Nursing Workforce, by Age Group, by Jurisdiction and
Canada, 2009 ................................................................................................ 26 Table 10 Average Age of the Registered Nursing Workforce, by Jurisdiction and
Canada, 2005 to 2009 ................................................................................... 28 Table 11
Registered Nurses: Rate of New Registrations and Exit Rates,
by Age Group, by Jurisdiction, 2005 to 2009................................................ 29
Table 12 Status of Baccalaureate Entry-to-Practice Requirements for Registered
Nurses, Canada ............................................................................................. 33 Table 13 Registered Nursing Workforce, by Highest Education in Nursing,
by Jurisdiction and Canada, 2005 to 2009 ................................................... 35 Table 14 Registered Nursing Graduates and Average Age at Graduation,
by Range of Graduation Years, Canada, 1980 to 2009 ................................ 37 Table 15 Registered Nurses With Valid CNA Certification, by Specialty,
Canada, 2005 to 2009 ................................................................................... 38 Table 16 Registered Nursing Workforce, by Location of Graduation in Canada
and International, by Jurisdiction and Canada, 2005 to 2009 ...................... 42 Table 17 Year of Implementation of Nurse Practitioner Legislation, by Jurisdiction ... 47 Table 18 Nurse Practitioner Workforce, by Employment Status, Canada,
2005 to 2009 .................................................................................................. 48 Table 19
Nurse Practitioner Workforce, by Jurisdiction and Canada, 2005 to 2009 ... 49 Table 20
Nurse Practitioner Workforce, by Area of Responsibility, Canada, 2009 ...... 51 Table 21
Nurse Practitioner Workforce, by Sex, Canada, 2005 to 2009...................... 52 Table of Contents
Table 22
Nurse Practitioner Workforce, by Age Group, Canada, 2009 ....................... 53 Table 23 Nurse Practitioner Workforce, by Location of Graduation,
by Canada and International, 2005 to 2009 .................................................. 54 Table 24
Licensed Practical Nurses, by Employment Status, Canada,
2005 to 2009 .................................................................................................. 61 Table 25 Licensed Practical Nursing Workforce, by Jurisdiction and Canada,
2005 to 2009 .................................................................................................. 62 Table 26 Licensed Practical Nurses Not Employed in Nursing, by Employment
Status, by Age Group, Canada, 2005 to 2009 .............................................. 63 Table 27 Licensed Practical Nursing Workforce, by Employment Status, by
Jurisdiction and Canada, 2005 to 2009 ........................................................ 64 Table 28 Licensed Practical Nurses Employed in Nursing With Multiple Employers,
by Employment Status With Primary Employer, Canada, 2005 to 2009 ...... 66 Table 29 Licensed Practical Nursing Workforce, by Position, by Jurisdiction and
Canada, 2005 to 2009 ................................................................................... 69 Table 30 Licensed Practical Nursing Workforce, by Area of Responsibility,
Canada, 2009 ................................................................................................ 71 Table 31 Licensed Practical Nursing Workforce, by Sex, by Jurisdiction and
Canada, 2005 to 2009 ................................................................................... 72 Table 32 Licensed Practical Nursing Workforce, by Age Group, by Jurisdiction
and Canada, 2009 ......................................................................................... 74 Table 33 Average Age of the Licensed Practical Nursing Workforce,
by Jurisdiction and Canada, 2005 to 2009 ................................................... 76 Table 34 Licensed Practical Nurses: Rate of New Registrations and Exit Rates,
by Age Group, by Jurisdiction, 2005 to 2009................................................ 77 Table 35 Licensed Practical Nursing Workforce, by Education in Practical
Nursing, by Jurisdiction and Canada, 2005 to 2009 ..................................... 81 Table 36 Licensed Practical Nursing Graduates and Average Age at Graduation,
by Range of Graduation Years, Canada, 1985 to 2009 ................................ 84 Table 37
Licensed Practical Nursing Workforce, by Location of Graduation,
by Canada and International, 2005 to 2009 .................................................. 88
Table 38
Registered Psychiatric Nurses, by Employment Status, Western
Provinces, 2005 to 2009 ................................................................................ 99 Table 39
Registered Psychiatric Nursing Workforce, by Province and Western
Provinces, 2005 to 2009 .............................................................................. 100
Table 40 Registered Psychiatric Nursing Workforce, by Employment Status,
by Province and Western Provinces, 2005 to 2009 .................................... 101 Table 41 Registered Psychiatric Nurses Employed in Psychiatric Nursing With
Multiple Employers, by Employment Status With Primary Employer,
Western Provinces, 2005 to 2009................................................................ 103 ix
Regulated Nurses: Canadian Trends, 2005 to 2009
x
Table 42 Registered Psychiatric Nursing Workforce, by Position, by Province
and Western Provinces, 2005 to 2009 ........................................................ 106 Table 43 Registered Psychiatric Nursing Workforce, by Area of Responsibility,
Western Provinces, 2009 ............................................................................. 108 Table 44 Registered Psychiatric Nursing Workforce, by Sex, by Province and
Western Provinces, 2005 to 2009 ................................................................ 109 Table 45 Registered Psychiatric Nursing Workforce, by Age Group, by Province
and Western Provinces, 2009...................................................................... 111 Table 46 Average Age of the Registered Psychiatric Nursing Workforce,
by Province and Western Provinces, 2005 to 2009 .................................... 113 Table 47 Registered Psychiatric Nurses: Rate of New Registrations and
Exit Rates, by Age Group, by Province, 2005 to 2009 ................................ 114 Table 48 Registered Psychiatric Nursing Workforce, by Highest Level of
Education in Psychiatric Nursing, Western Provinces, 2005 to 2009 ......... 118 Table 49 Registered Psychiatric Nursing Graduates and Average Age at
Graduation, by Range of Graduation Years, Western Provinces,
1985 to 2009 ................................................................................................ 120 Table 50 Registered Psychiatric Nursing Workforce, by Location of Graduation
in Western Provinces and International, by Province and Western
Provinces, 2005 to 2009 .............................................................................. 123 Table 51
Regulated Nursing Workforce, by Health Region, Canada, 2009 .............. 132 Table 52 Principal Characteristics of Each Peer Group as Defined
by Statistics Canada .................................................................................... 137 Table 53
Percentage of Records Employed in Nursing With Not Stated
Responses, by Data Element and Province/Territory of Registration,
Canada, 2009 .............................................................................................. 144
Executive Summary
Executive Summary
Regulated Nurses: Canadian Trends, 2005 to 2009 draws on data from the Canadian
Institute for Health Information’s Nursing Database, which covers the three regulated
nursing professions in Canada: registered nurses (RNs), licensed practical nurses
(LPNs) and registered psychiatric nurses (RPNs). This report presents five-year
workforce trends across Canada, across regulated nursing professions and across a
variety of demographic, education, mobility and employment characteristics, in order
to inform health human resource planning in Canada.
Regulated Nursing Workforce Continues to Grow
There were 348,499 regulated nurses working in nursing in Canada in 2009, 76.4%
of whom were RNs, 22.1% of whom were LPNs and 1.5% of whom were RPNs.
These proportions remained relatively steady over the last five years.
In 2009, as in previous years, the number of regulated nurses in the workforce grew, with
an annual percentage change of 2.0% contributing to an overall growth rate of 8.5% for
the 2005 to 2009 period. Both the RN and LPN workforces grew at rates exceeding that
of the Canadian population, and RPN workforce growth kept pace with population
growth in the western provinces over the five-year period from 2005 to 2009.
Regulated Nursing Workforce Across Age Groups
In each of the regulated nursing professions, the average age of entry into the workforce
increased. Regulated nurses are now often age 30 or older when they graduate
and begin their nursing careers. In 2009, the ages 40 to 59 dominated the nursing
professions; this age group constituted 57.1% of the RN workforce, 54.1% of the
LPN workforce and 62.1% of the RPN workforce.
Mobility Trends of Regulated Nursing Graduates
Within Canada, the top three destinations for work for Canadian-educated regulated
nursing graduates who moved away from their jurisdiction of graduation were
British Columbia, Alberta and Ontario.
The proportion of regulated nurses educated internationally grew slightly over the last
five years. Overall, in 2009, 7.0% of the regulated nursing workforce was educated
outside of Canada.
Registered Nurses
The Canadian RN workforce grew by less than 2% each year since 2005 to a total of
266,341 RNs in 2009. The proportion of females remained high, at 93.8%.
The average age of an RN in 2009 was 45.2, a slight increase of less than one year
(0.5 years) over the average age observed in 2005.
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Regulated Nurses: Canadian Trends, 2005 to 2009
RNs worked most often in hospitals (62.6%) in 2009; the community health sector
employed 14.2% of RNs.
In 2009, 31.6% of internationally educated RN graduates were educated in the
Philippines and 17.6% were educated in the United Kingdom. A total of 8.3% of the RN
workforce graduated from an international RN program, which represents the highest
proportion of international graduates among the Canadian nursing professions.
Between 2005 and 2009, the number of licensed nurse practitioners (NPs) in the
workforce more than doubled, from 943 in 2005 to 1,990 in 2009. As of 2007, all
territories and provinces except the Yukon had licensed NP programs.
Licensed Practical Nurses
The Canadian LPN workforce grew to 76,944 in 2009. This represents an increase of
18.5% since 2005. The proportion of females remained steady at 92.7%.
The average age of an LPN was 43.4 in 2009, a decrease of nearly one year, from
44.3, in 2005. This is the only nursing profession of the three that showed a decrease
in average age over the time period studied. For LPNs who graduated between 2005
and 2009 and were in the workforce in 2009, the average age of graduation was 30.9.
LPNs worked mostly in hospitals (45.6%) and in long-term care facilities (39.1%) in 2009.
This proportion remained relatively consistent over the last five years.
Of the LPNs educated outside Canada who specified a location of graduation in 2009,
28.3% were educated in the Philippines and 21.0% were educated in the United
Kingdom. A total of 2.3% of the LPN workforce in 2009 was educated outside Canada,
an increase from the 2.0% observed in 2008; this represents a substantially smaller
proportion than that observed for RPNs and RNs.
Registered Psychiatric Nurses
The total Canadian RPN workforce grew to 5,214 in 2009. The growth rate increased
each year over the five-year period for an overall rate of 5.0% from 2005 to 2009.
Of the three nursing professions, RPNs have the highest proportion of males, at 22.5%.
This ratio has not changed substantially over the last five years.
The average age of an RPN was the highest of the three workforces, at 47.6 in 2009.
This represents an increase of 0.6 years above the average age of an RPN in 2005.
RPNs worked mostly in the hospital sector in 2009 (43.9%).
Overall, 7.8% of the RPN workforce in 2009 was educated outside of Canada, the majority
having been educated in the United Kingdom (82.2%).
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About the Canadian Institute for Health Information
About the Canadian Institute
for Health Information
The Canadian Institute for Health Information (CIHI) collects and analyzes information
on health and health care in Canada and makes it publicly available. Canada’s federal,
provincial and territorial governments created CIHI as a not-for-profit, independent
organization dedicated to forging a common approach to Canadian health information.
CIHI’s goal: to provide timely, accurate and comparable information. CIHI’s data and
reports inform health policies, support the effective delivery of health services and raise
awareness among Canadians of the factors that contribute to good health.
One of many databases maintained at CIHI is the Nursing Database (NDB), which
holds administrative data on each of the three regulated nursing professions in Canada.
Regulated nurses include registered nurses (including nurse practitioners), licensed
practical nurses and registered psychiatric nurses.
Any questions or requests regarding this publication or the data should be directed to:
Program Lead, Health Human Resources (Nursing)
Canadian Institute for Health Information
495 Richmond Road, Suite 600
Ottawa, Ontario K2A 4H6
Phone: 613-241-7860
Fax: 613-241-8120
Email: [email protected]
For more information, visit our website at www.cihi.ca.
xiii
About This Report
About This Report
The Health Human Resources team at CIHI is pleased to present Regulated Nurses:
Canadian Trends, 2005 to 2009.
The data contained in this report, related to the supply and distribution of the regulated
nursing workforces, is a key component of health human resource planning in Canada
and is published annually by CIHI. This information has been used by governments,
researchers, stakeholders and advocacy groups, as well as private and public
organizations, media and regulated nurses. CIHI has been providing comprehensive
data on the supply and distribution of regulated nurses in Canada since 2002, and on
registered nurses since 1999.
One Report for Three Nursing Professions
As of the 2007 publication year, information on each of the three regulated nursing
professions is in one publication.
What’s New This Year?
Chapters 1 to 3 contain data on each of the regulated nursing professions. Within these
chapters, the age group tables were re-introduced in this year’s publication for the
year 2009.
Chapter 5 contains the registered nurses, the licensed practical nurses and the
registered psychiatric nurses Methodological Notes.
xv
Acknowledgements
Acknowledgements
The Canadian Institute for Health Information (CIHI) wishes to acknowledge and thank
the following individuals from the Health Human Resources—Nursing team at CIHI for
their contribution to this report:
• Carol Brulé, Manager
• Robert Pelletier, Program Lead
• Jeannine Poston, Project Manager/Senior Analyst
• Margaret Mousseau, Senior Analyst
• Omar Kazmi, Analyst
• Susan Linde, Analyst
• Yann Vinette, Analyst
• Puneet Dhillon, Intern
CIHI would also like to thank the following organizations. A national database of
regulated nursing data could not exist without their effort, commitment and collaboration.
Regulatory Authorities for the Registered Nursing Profession
• Association of Registered Nurses of Newfoundland and Labrador
• Association of Registered Nurses of Prince Edward Island
• College of Registered Nurses of Nova Scotia
• Nurses Association of New Brunswick / Association des infirmières et infirmiers du
Nouveau-Brunswick
• Ordre des infirmières et infirmiers du Québec
• College of Nurses of Ontario / Ordre des infirmières et infirmiers de l’Ontario
• College of Registered Nurses of Manitoba
• Saskatchewan Registered Nurses’ Association
• College & Association of Registered Nurses of Alberta
• College of Registered Nurses of British Columbia
• Yukon Registered Nurses Association
• Registered Nurses Association of Northwest Territories and Nunavut
xvii
Regulated Nurses: Canadian Trends, 2005 to 2009
Regulatory Authorities for the Licensed Practical Nursing Profession
• College of Licensed Practical Nurses of Newfoundland and Labrador
• Licensed Practical Nurses Association of Prince Edward Island
• College of Licensed Practical Nurses of Nova Scotia
• Association of New Brunswick Licensed Practical Nurses / Association des
infirmier(ère)s auxiliaires autorisé(e)s du Nouveau-Brunswick
• Ordre des infirmières et infirmiers auxiliaires du Québec
• College of Nurses of Ontario / Ordre des infirmières et infirmiers de l’Ontario
• College of Licensed Practical Nurses of Manitoba
• Saskatchewan Association of Licensed Practical Nurses
• College of Licensed Practical Nurses of Alberta
• College of Licensed Practical Nurses of British Columbia
• Yukon Consumer Services
• Licensed Practical Nurses, Department of Health and Social Services, Government of
the Northwest Territories
Regulatory Authorities for the Registered Psychiatric
Nursing Profession
• College of Registered Psychiatric Nurses of Manitoba
• Registered Psychiatric Nurses Association of Saskatchewan
• College of Registered Psychiatric Nurses of Alberta
• College of Registered Psychiatric Nurses of British Columbia
• Yukon Consumer Services
Note: Registered psychiatric nurses are regulated in five jurisdictions in Canada:
Manitoba, Saskatchewan, Alberta, British Columbia and the Yukon.
National Organizations
• Canadian Nurses Association / Association des infirmières et infirmiers du Canada
• Canadian Association of Schools of Nursing / Association canadienne des écoles de
sciences infirmières
Please note: The analyses and conclusions in this document do not necessarily reflect
those of the individuals or organizations mentioned above.
Finally, we wish to extend our thanks and gratitude to all regulated nurses caring for and
improving the lives of Canadians.
xviii
Introduction
Introduction
The provision of high-quality health care services requires a workforce that is well
equipped not only to respond to current needs but also to face future challenges.
We often hear sentiments and questions about the supply and availability of heath care
professionals: “Are there enough regulated nurses in Canada? Will they be there when
I need them?” These questions highlight the public’s perspective on health care and
remind us that health human resource planning affects all of us.
Health care planners anticipate needs by comparing the existing health workforce
supply with expected future health care needs of the population. The gaps can then
inform the development and implementation of policies to ensure that the right people,
with the right skills, in the right settings are providing high-quality care. This report
provides baseline data for health human resource planners on the supply and selected
characteristics of the regulated nursing workforce across the country. Figure 1 compares
the ratio of practising nurses to practising physicians among selected countries.
Figure 1: Ratio of Practising Nurses to Practising Physicians Within Selected
Countries, 2006
Notes
Data presented is from 2006 (the most recent year for which full data was available).
Refer to source for additional information regarding definitions.
Source
Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development, OECD Health Data 2009 Version: November 09 (Paris,
France: OECD, 2009), accessed from www.ecosante.org/index2.php?base=OCDE&langs=ENG&langh=ENG.
1
Regulated Nurses: Canadian Trends, 2005 to 2009
Figure 2 shows that Canada had one of the highest numbers of practising nurses per
10,000 population among selected countries. Similar to other countries, Canada faces
various health human resource challenges. Geography in particular may influence the
distribution of and demand for health resources, including health care providers.
Figure 2: Practising Nurses per 10,000 Population Within Selected Countries, 2006
Notes
Data presented is from 2006 (the most recent year for which full data was available).
Refer to source for additional information regarding definitions.
Source
Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development, OECD Health Data 2009 Version: November 09 (Paris,
France: OECD, 2009), accessed from www.ecosante.org/index2.php?base=OCDE&langs=ENG&langh=ENG.
2
Introduction
The Canadian Regulated Nursing Workforce
In Canada, the largest group within the paid health care workforce is regulated nurses,
with a total workforce of 348,499 in 2009. The regulated nursing workforce is made
up of three types of health care professionals: registered nurses (RNs) (including
nurse practitioners), registered psychiatric nurses (RPNs) and licensed practical nurses
(LPNs). Each provincial and territorial jurisdiction in Canada is responsible for the
legislation covering the regulated nursing professions, and each jurisdiction has its own
regulatory body for each profession for the regulation and licensing of its members.
Figure 3: Regulated Nursing Workforce (Employed in Nursing), Canada, 2009
Note
Totals may not sum to 100% due to rounding.
Source
Nursing Database, Canadian Institute for Health Information.
3
Regulated Nurses: Canadian Trends, 2005 to 2009
Registered Nurses
Registered nurses (RNs) work both autonomously and in collaboration with others.
RNs coordinate health care, deliver direct services and support clients in their self-care
decisions and actions in health, illness, injury and disability in all stages of life. RNs
contribute to the health care system through their work in direct practice, education,
administration, research and policy in a wide array of settings.
Nurse practitioners (NPs) are RNs with additional educational preparation and
experience. NPs may order and interpret diagnostic tests, prescribe pharmaceuticals,
medical devices and other therapies and perform procedures. NPs often work in primary
care settings, such as community health centres or remote nursing stations. As well,
NPs may work in other work locations, including clinics, long-term care facilities and
hospitals. NPs are licensed in all provinces and territories in Canada except the Yukon.
Licensed Practical Nurses
Licensed practical nurses (LPNs) work independently or in collaboration with other
members of the health care team. LPNs assess clients and work in health promotion
and illness prevention. They assess, plan, implement and evaluate care for clients.
LPNs practise in a variety of settings, such as hospitals, homes for the aged, public
health units, community nursing agencies, private practices, clinics, doctors’ offices,
schools, adult day care centres, private homes, community health centres, child care
centres and children’s camps.
Registered Psychiatric Nurses
Registered psychiatric nurses (RPNs) are regulated separately from other regulated
nursing professionals in four provinces and one territory: Manitoba, Saskatchewan,
Alberta, British Columbia and the Yukon. RPNs provide services to clients whose primary
care needs relate to mental and developmental health. RPN duties include planning,
implementing and evaluating therapies and programs on the basis of psychiatric nursing
assessments. They often work in acute psychiatry, long-term geriatric care and home
care, residential and community programs for the developmentally handicapped,
forensic psychiatry, institutional and community-based corrections and community
mental health programs.
Notes to Readers
1. The statistics presented in this publication and on the CIHI website were reviewed
and authorized by representatives of the provincial/territorial regulatory authorities
responsible for the regulation and licensure of regulated nurses, as listed in the
Contact Information section of this publication.
2. The term “regulated nursing workforce,” as used in this publication and
accompanying documents, includes members of the LPN, RN and RPN workforces
who reported being employed in their profession at the time of annual registration.
4
Introduction
3. CIHI statistics will differ from those published by provincial/territorial regulatory
authorities for the following reasons:
i.
Collection period—CIHI collects data after the first 6 months of the 12-month
registration period, in an effort to ensure timely information. The resulting
under-coverage has typically been only 1% to 5%; the counts released by
CIHI are generally lower than provincial/territorial statistics.
ii.
Differences in definition—regulatory authorities typically report the total number
of active registrations received during the registration year. CIHI divides the
active total into four categories: employed in nursing, employed in other than
nursing, not employed and not stated. Regulated nurses employed in nursing
are the focus of this report, and those falling into the other categories are
excluded from most analyses.
iii.
Exclusions from CIHI data—CIHI statistics do not necessarily include regulated
nurses who were on leave at the time of annual registration or first-time
registrants. These regulated nurses may be included in statistics published by
provincial/territorial regulatory authorities.
iv.
CIHI editing and processing—CIHI applies methodologies to standardize the
information about each regulated nursing workforce across the country. For
example, potential duplicate records are removed when the province of
registration is not the same as the province of employment. The footnotes and
Chapter 5 provide more information regarding the specific methodologies used
and their application.
4. Because CIHI and the provincial/territorial regulatory authorities are continually
working to improve data quality, these figures may not be comparable to historical
data. Historical changes for each profession are listed at the end of each chapter.
See Chapter 5 (Methodological Notes) for more detailed explanations of these concepts.
5
Chapter 1—Regulated Nurses in Canada:
Trends of Registered Nurses
Chapter 1—Regulated Nurses in Canada: Trends of Registered Nurses
Workforce Trends: How Many Registered Nurses?
The regulated nursing workforce is of critical importance to the health of Canadians and
thus to health human resource planners. This chapter presents data on registered nurses
(RNs), including nurse practitioners (NPs), in Canada in 2009, and illustrates key trends
over the last five years. A section specific to NPs is included at the end of this chapter.
The RN workforce is defined as those RNs (including NPs) employed in nursing within
Canada. These nurses represented 76.4% of the total regulated nursing workforce in
2009. The Employment Status indicator classifies RNs as either working in nursing,
working outside of nursing or not working. The indicator further classifies RNs in the
workforce as working in part-time, full-time or casual positions. As illustrated in Figure 4,
the vast majority of RNs who register in Canada are in the RN workforce, with more than
half of those employed in full-time positions (58.7%).
Figure 4: Registered Nurses, by Employment Status, Canada, 2009
Notes
Totals may not sum to 100% due to rounding.
Employed RNs with employed—status unknown are excluded from the percentage distribution of full time,
part time and casual.
See Chapter 5 (Methodological Notes) for more information regarding collection and comparability of data.
Source
Nursing Database, Canadian Institute for Health Information.
9
Regulated Nurses: Canadian Trends, 2005 to 2009
The size of the RN workforce has increased relatively steadily since 1980, when data first
became available. Figure 5 illustrates the growth trend of the RN workforce over time.
Figure 5: Registered Nursing Workforce, Canada, 1980 to 2009
Notes
In 1988, the decrease is largely attributed to a substantial increase in the number of Employment Status not stated
records in the Ontario data for that year.
In 2000, the increase is partially attributed to the identification of comparatively fewer duplicates in the Ontario and
Quebec data that year.
In 2003, the increase is partially attributed to methodological changes in the submission of data that year.
See Chapter 5 (Methodological Notes) for more information regarding collection and comparability of data.
Source
Nursing Database, Canadian Institute for Health Information.
Three distinct trends are evident in Figure 5:
1. The average annual growth ratei of the RN workforce was approximately 3.3%
between 1980 and 1993. A flattening of the growth curve was seen between 1993
and 2002, reflecting a period of fiscal restraint in health care spending that also
affected the growth in the number of health care providers, resulting in an average
annual growth rate of the registered nursing workforce of approximately -0.2%.
2. The average annual growth rate between 2002 and 2009 was approximately 2.1%.
The previous high of 235,738 RNs in Canada in 1993 was surpassed in 2003.
The positive trend since 2002 may be due, in part, to reinvestment in health care,
resulting in an increase in the number of RNs in the workforce.
3. The number of RNs per 100,000 population shows a similar trend over the three
time periods (see Figure 6); however, the high ratio of the early 1990s (824 RNs per
100,000 population) has not been reached since. In 2009, there were 789 RNs per
100,000 population in Canada.
i.
10
See Chapter 5 (Methodological Notes) for average annual growth rate formula.
Chapter 1—Regulated Nurses in Canada: Trends of Registered Nurses
Figure 6: Registered Nursing Workforce per 100,000 Population, Canada,
1986 to 2009
Notes
In 1988, the decrease is largely attributed to a substantial increase in the number of Employment Status not stated
records in the Ontario data for that year.
In 2000, the increase is partially attributed to the identification of comparatively fewer duplicates in the Ontario and
Quebec data that year.
In 2003, the increase is partially attributed to methodological changes in the submission of data that year.
The population estimates used in this publication are from Statistics Canada, Demography Division, and are based on
Canadian Demographic Estimates, 2008–2009, preliminary postcensal (PP) estimates of the population counted on
July 1, 2009, Canada, provinces and territories.
See Chapter 5 (Methodological Notes) for more information regarding collection and comparability of data.
Source
Nursing Database, Canadian Institute for Health Information.
11
Regulated Nurses: Canadian Trends, 2005 to 2009
Employment Trends: Is the Workforce Changing?
Table 1 shows the supply of all RNs (including NPs) over the period 2005 to 2009. The
total supply of RNs in Canada was 284,690 in 2009. This represents an increase of 1.9%
from 2008. Although the increase in the number of RNs employed in nursing was not
uniform across the country (see Table 2), each year between 2005 and 2009 saw an
increase in the Canadian RN workforce of less than 2%, for an overall increase of 6.0%
in the RN workforce over the period. Additional information on RNs by jurisdiction is
available in the data tables on CIHI’s website.
Table 1: Registered Nurses, by Employment Status, Canada, 2005 to 2009
Employed in Nursing
Regular
Regular
Basis,
Basis, Full
Part
Time
Time
Regular
Basis,
Subtotal
Status
Unknown
Casual
Basis
Grand
Total
Not Employed in Nursing
Employed in Other
Than Nursing
Not Employed
Not Stated Subtotal
Seeking
Not Seeking
Seeking
Not Seeking
Employment Employment
Employment Employment
in Nursing
in Nursing
A
B
C
E=
A+B+
C+D
D
F
G
H
I
K=
F+G+ L = E+K
H+I+J
J
Count
2005
137,045
82,224
28,043
3,930 251,242
432
4,598
2,767
6,145
3,213
17,155 268,397
2006
141,047
82,120
27,366
3,286 253,819
377
4,399
2,396
6,155
3,699
17,026 270,845
2007
146,052
81,929
27,197
2,783 257,961
365
4,540
2,428
6,025
2,955
16,313 274,274
2008
151,420
80,879
28,219
1,371 261,889
351
4,519
2,263
5,625
4,699
17,457 279,346
2009
156,178
81,442
28,533
188 266,341
422
4,668
2,295
5,898
5,066
18,349 284,690
Annual Percentage Change
2005
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
2006
2.9%
-0.1%
-2.4%
-16.4%
1.0%
-12.7%
-4.3%
-13.4%
0.2%
15.1%
-0.8%
0.9%
2007
3.5%
-0.2%
-0.6%
-15.3%
1.6%
-3.2%
3.2%
1.3%
-2.1%
-20.1%
-4.2%
1.3%
2008
3.7%
-1.3%
3.8%
-50.7%
1.5%
-3.8%
-0.5%
-6.8%
-6.6%
59.0%
7.0%
1.8%
2009
3.1%
0.7%
1.1%
-86.3%
1.7%
20.2%
3.3%
1.4%
4.9%
7.8%
5.1%
1.9%
Percentage Distribution
2005
51.1%
30.6%
10.4%
1.5%
93.6%
0.2%
1.7%
1.0%
2.3%
1.2%
6.4%
100.0%
2006
52.1%
30.3%
10.1%
1.2%
93.7%
0.1%
1.6%
0.9%
2.3%
1.4%
6.3%
100.0%
2007
53.3%
29.9%
9.9%
1.0%
94.1%
0.1%
1.7%
0.9%
2.2%
1.1%
5.9%
100.0%
2008
54.2%
29.0%
10.1%
0.5%
93.8%
0.1%
1.6%
0.8%
2.0%
1.7%
6.2%
100.0%
2009
54.9%
28.6%
10.0%
0.1%
93.6%
0.1%
1.6%
0.8%
2.1%
1.8%
6.4%
100.0%
Notes
– Data is not applicable or does not exist.
Totals may not sum to 100% due to rounding.
See Chapter 5 (Methodological Notes) for more information regarding collection and comparability of data.
Source
Nursing Database, Canadian Institute for Health Information.
12
Chapter 1—Regulated Nurses in Canada: Trends of Registered Nurses
RNs employed in nursing but reported as employed—status unknown are those who
reported employment data but who failed to indicate their status as full time, part time
or casual. Accordingly, they are included in the workforce but are excluded from some
analyses in the report, as indicated in table footnotes.
Table 2: Registered Nursing Workforce, by Jurisdiction and Canada, 2005 to 2009
N.L.
P.E.I.
N.S.
N.B.
Que.
Ont.
Man. Sask.
Alta.
B.C.
Y.T.
N.W.T./
Nun.
Canada
Count
2005
5,496
1,443 8,733 7,526 63,827 89,429 10,811 8,549 26,355 27,814
302
957
251,242
2006
5,515
1,428 8,790 7,680 64,014 90,061 10,902 8,480 26,752 28,840
324
1,033
253,819
2007
5,574
1,435 8,843 7,726 64,955 90,978 10,825 8,669 27,527 30,059
322
1,048
257,961
2008
5,724
1,479 8,871 7,757 65,531 92,884 10,902 8,823 28,501 29,863
334
1,220
261,889
2009
5,825
1,406 8,929 7,866 66,055 94,296 11,153 9,117 29,405 30,900
367
1,022
266,341
–
–
–
Annual Percentage Change
2005
–
–
2006
0.3%
2007
1.1%
2008
2009
–
–
–
–
-1.0%
0.7% 2.0%
0.3%
0.5%
0.6% 0.6%
1.5%
2.7%
3.1%
0.3% 0.4%
1.8%
-4.9%
0.7% 1.4%
–
–
–
–
0.7%
0.8% -0.8%
1.5%
3.7% 7.3%
7.9%
1.0%
1.0%
-0.7% 2.2%
2.9%
4.2% -0.6%
1.5%
1.6%
0.9%
2.1%
0.7% 1.8%
3.5%
-0.7% 3.7%
16.4%
1.5%
0.8%
1.5%
2.3% 3.3%
3.2%
3.5% 9.9%
-16.2%
1.7%
Percentage Distribution
2005
2.2%
0.6%
3.5% 3.0% 25.4% 35.6%
4.3% 3.4% 10.5% 11.1% 0.1%
0.4%
100.0%
2006
2.2%
0.6%
3.5% 3.0% 25.2% 35.5%
4.3% 3.3% 10.5% 11.4% 0.1%
0.4%
100.0%
2007
2.2%
0.6%
3.4% 3.0% 25.2% 35.3%
4.2% 3.4% 10.7% 11.7% 0.1%
0.4%
100.0%
2008
2.2%
0.6%
3.4% 3.0% 25.0% 35.5%
4.2% 3.4% 10.9% 11.4% 0.1%
0.5%
100.0%
2009
2.2%
0.5%
3.4% 3.0% 24.8% 35.4%
4.2% 3.4% 11.0% 11.6% 0.1%
0.4%
100.0%
Notes
– Data is not applicable or does not exist.
Totals may not sum to 100% due to rounding.
Northwest Territories and Nunavut data is combined, as RNs did not specify in which territory they worked the majority of
the time.
Data released by CIHI may differ from data from other sources due to CIHI’s nationally standardized methodology.
RNs employed in a jurisdiction different from their jurisdiction of registration are excluded to avoid duplication.
Northern territories data may include inter-jurisdictional duplicates.
See Chapter 5 (Methodological Notes) for more information regarding collection and comparability of data.
Source
Nursing Database, Canadian Institute for Health Information.
13
Regulated Nurses: Canadian Trends, 2005 to 2009
Registered Nurses Not Employed in Nursing
Effective health human resource planning requires an understanding of both the current
and the potential workforce. While the analyses in this chapter focus on RNs currently
employed in nursing, it is also important to understand the profile of the RN profession
as a whole and to investigate trends with respect to RNs who register but do not work
in nursing.
As shown in Table 3, RNs in the 50 and older age groups account for the largest
proportion of RNs who were not seeking employment between 2005 and 2009.
For nurses seeking employment in 2009, there was a smaller proportion seeking
employment in nursing compared with 2005 for the age groups younger than 30, 30
to 39 and 40 to 49. In contrast, the 50 to 59 and 60 and older age groups had a higher
proportion of nurses seeking employment in nursing compared with 2005.
Table 3: Registered Nurses Not Employed in Nursing, by Employment Status,
by Age Group, Canada, 2005 to 2009
<30
30–39
40–49
50–59
60+
Canada
Count
Employed (Not in Nursing) but
Seeking Nursing Employment
Employed (Not in Nursing) but Not
Seeking Nursing Employment
2005
450
793
758
772
425
3,198
2006
339
640
645
725
424
2,773
2007
324
611
705
672
480
2,792
2008
308
504
596
679
527
2,614
2009
301
495
584
738
599
2,717
2005
262
1,500
2,534
3,779
2,668
10,743
2006
228
1,365
2,329
3,691
2,941
10,554
2007
202
1,208
2,215
3,670
3,270
10,565
2008
176
1,094
2,053
3,432
3,389
10,144
2009
227
1,073
1,993
3,412
3,861
10,566
Annual Percentage Change
Employed (Not in Nursing) but
Seeking Nursing Employment
Employed (Not in Nursing) but Not
Seeking Nursing Employment
2005
–
–
–
–
–
–
2006
-24.7%
-19.3%
-14.9%
-6.1%
-0.2%
-13.3%
2007
-4.4%
-4.5%
9.3%
-7.3%
13.2%
0.7%
2008
-4.9%
-17.5%
-15.5%
1.0%
9.8%
-6.4%
2009
-2.3%
-1.8%
-2.0%
8.7%
13.7%
3.9%
2005
–
–
–
–
–
–
2006
-13.0%
-9.0%
-8.1%
-2.3%
10.2%
-1.8%
2007
-11.4%
-11.5%
-4.9%
-0.6%
11.2%
0.1%
2008
-12.9%
-9.4%
-7.3%
-6.5%
3.6%
-4.0%
2009
29.0%
-1.9%
-2.9%
-0.6%
13.9%
4.2%
2005
14.1%
24.8%
23.7%
24.1%
13.3%
100.0%
2006
12.2%
23.1%
23.3%
26.1%
15.3%
100.0%
2007
11.6%
21.9%
25.3%
24.1%
17.2%
100.0%
2008
11.8%
19.3%
22.8%
26.0%
20.2%
100.0%
2009
11.1%
18.2%
21.5%
27.2%
22.0%
100.0%
Percentage Distribution
Employed (Not in Nursing) but
Seeking Nursing Employment
14
Chapter 1—Regulated Nurses in Canada: Trends of Registered Nurses
Table 3: Registered Nurses Not Employed in Nursing, by Employment Status, by
Age Group, Canada, 2005 to 2009 (cont’d)
<30
Employed (Not in Nursing) but Not
Seeking Nursing Employment
30–39
40–49
50–59
60+
Canada
2005
2.4%
14.0%
23.6%
35.2%
24.8%
100.0%
2006
2.2%
12.9%
22.1%
35.0%
27.9%
100.0%
2007
1.9%
11.4%
21.0%
34.7%
31.0%
100.0%
2008
1.7%
10.8%
20.2%
33.8%
33.4%
100.0%
2009
2.1%
10.2%
18.9%
32.3%
36.5%
100.0%
Notes
– Data is not applicable or does not exist.
Employment Status not employed in nursing includes RNs who are not working or working in positions outside
of nursing.
Totals may not sum to 100% due to rounding.
See Chapter 5 (Methodological Notes) for more information regarding collection and comparability of data.
Source
Nursing Database, Canadian Institute for Health Information.
Employment Status
Table 4 shows that the majority of RNs employed in nursing were employed on a regular
basis in full-time positions and that their number steadily increased over the previous five
years. In 2009, 156,178 RNs (58.7% of the workforce) were working in full-time positions.
Table 4: Registered Nursing Workforce, by Employment Status, by Jurisdiction and Canada,
2005 to 2009
N.L.
P.E.I.
N.S.
N.B.
Que.
Ont.
Man. Sask.
Alta.
B.C.
N.W.T./
Canada
Nun.
Y.T.
Count
Employed,
Full Time
Employed,
Part Time
Employed,
Casual
Employed,
Status
Unknown
2005
3,853
770
5,446
4,806 34,081 53,696 5,184 4,685 10,074
14,316
134
– 137,045
2006
3,794
729
5,565
4,865 35,172 55,462 5,204 4,713 10,286
15,119
138
– 141,047
2007
3,946
695
5,656
4,890 36,111 57,403 5,146 4,845 10,711
16,499
150
– 146,052
2008
4,229
779
5,685
4,987 36,755 60,236 5,190 5,054 11,196
16,531
160
618 151,420
2009
4,362
747
5,797
5,127 37,458 61,840 5,263 5,350 12,119
17,353
185
577 156,178
2005
979
532
2,377
2,195 20,637 27,846 4,800 2,859 11,548
8,351
100
–
82,224
2006
982
546
2,346
2,235 20,684 27,218 4,871 2,819 11,782
8,535
102
–
82,120
2007
932
554
2,353
2,260 20,903 26,308 4,867 2,783 12,118
8,762
89
–
81,929
2008
876
547
2,290
2,222 20,948 25,208 4,850 2,649 12,582
8,609
98
–
80,879
2009
835
525
2,216
2,135 21,403 24,795 4,884 2,591 13,221
8,734
103
–
81,442
2005
664
140
910
525
7,035
7,887
767
978
3,923
5,147
67
–
28,043
2006
739
153
879
580
7,376
7,381
788
948
3,813
4,625
84
–
27,366
2007
696
183
834
576
7,433
7,267
788 1,024
3,700
4,617
79
–
27,197
2008
619
153
895
548
7,459
7,440
862 1,119
3,725
4,723
74
602
28,219
2009
628
134
916
604
7,022
7,661
992 1,176
4,065
4,813
77
445
28,533
2005
–
1
–
–
2,074
–
60
27
810
–
1
957
3,930
2006
–
–
–
–
782
–
39
–
871
561
–
1,033
3,286
2007
–
3
–
–
508
–
24
17
998
181
4
1,048
2,783
2008
–
–
1
–
369
–
–
1
998
–
2
–
1,371
2009
–
–
–
–
172
–
14
–
–
–
2
–
188
(continued)
15
Regulated Nurses: Canadian Trends, 2005 to 2009
Table 4: Registered Nursing Workforce, by Employment Status, by Jurisdiction and Canada,
2005 to 2009 (cont’d)
N.L.
P.E.I.
N.S.
N.B.
Que.
Ont.
Man. Sask.
Alta.
B.C.
N.W.T./
Canada
Nun.
Y.T.
Annual Percentage Change
Employed, 2005
Full Time
2006
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
-1.5%
-5.3%
2.2%
1.2%
3.2%
3.3%
0.4%
0.6%
2.1%
5.6%
3.0%
–
2.9%
2007
4.0%
-4.7%
1.6%
0.5%
2.7%
3.5% -1.1%
2.8%
4.1%
9.1%
8.7%
–
3.5%
2008
7.2% 12.1%
0.5%
2.0%
1.8%
4.9%
0.9%
4.3%
4.5%
0.2%
6.7%
–
3.7%
2009
3.1%
-4.1%
2.0%
2.8%
1.9%
2.7%
1.4%
5.9%
8.2%
5.0% 15.6%
-6.6%
3.1%
Employed, 2005
Part Time
2006
–
–
0.3%
2007
-5.1%
2008
2009
Employed, 2005
Casual
2006
–
2007
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
2.6% -1.3%
1.8%
0.2%
-2.3%
1.5% -1.4%
2.0%
2.2%
2.0%
–
-0.1%
1.5%
0.3%
1.1%
1.1%
-3.3% -0.1% -1.3%
2.9%
2.7%
12.7%
–
-0.2%
-6.0%
-1.3% -2.7%
-1.7%
0.2%
-4.2% -0.3% -4.8%
3.8%
–
-1.3%
-4.7%
-4.0% -3.2%
-3.9%
2.2%
-1.6%
5.1%
1.5%
5.1%
–
0.7%
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
9.3% -3.4% 10.5%
4.8%
-6.4%
2.7% -3.1%
-2.8%
-10.1% 25.4%
–
-2.4%
0.8%
-1.5%
0.0%
8.0%
-3.0%
-0.2% -6.0%
–
-0.6%
2.4%
9.4%
9.3%
0.7%
2.3% -6.3%
3.0% 15.1%
5.1%
9.1%
1.9%
11.3%
–
–
-5.8% 19.6% -5.1%
-0.7%
2008 -11.1% -16.4%
7.3%
-4.9%
0.3%
2009
2.3% 10.2%
-5.9%
Employed, 2005
Full Time
2006
70.1% 53.4% 62.4% 63.9%
55.2%
68.8% 51.1% 63.3% 63.3%
55.6%
2007
70.8% 48.5% 64.0% 63.3%
2008
73.9% 52.7% 64.1% 64.3%
2009
0.7% -2.2%
–
-1.7% 10.1%
–
3.8%
4.1%
-26.1%
1.1%
60.0% 48.2% 55.0% 39.4%
51.5% 44.5%
–
55.4%
61.6% 47.9% 55.6% 39.7%
53.5% 42.6%
–
56.3%
56.0%
63.1% 47.6% 56.0% 40.4%
55.2% 47.2%
–
57.2%
56.4%
64.9% 47.6% 57.3% 40.7%
55.4% 48.2%
50.7%
58.1%
74.9% 53.1% 64.9% 65.2%
56.9%
65.6% 47.2% 58.7% 41.2%
56.2% 50.7%
56.5%
58.7%
Employed, 2005
Part Time
2006
17.8% 36.9% 27.2% 29.2%
33.4%
31.1% 44.6% 33.5% 45.2%
30.0% 33.2%
–
33.2%
17.8% 38.2% 26.7% 29.1%
32.7%
30.2% 44.8% 33.2% 45.5%
30.2% 31.5%
–
32.8%
2007
16.7% 38.7% 26.6% 29.3%
32.4%
28.9% 45.1% 32.2% 45.7%
29.3% 28.0%
–
32.1%
2008
15.3% 37.0% 25.8% 28.6%
32.1%
27.1% 44.5% 30.0% 45.7%
28.8% 29.5%
–
31.0%
2009
14.3% 37.3% 24.8% 27.1%
32.5%
26.3% 43.8% 28.4% 45.0%
28.3% 28.2%
–
30.6%
1.5% -12.4%
Percentage Distribution
(continued)
16
Chapter 1—Regulated Nurses in Canada: Trends of Registered Nurses
Table 4: Registered Nursing Workforce, by Employment Status, by Jurisdiction and Canada,
2005 to 2009 (cont’d)
N.L.
P.E.I.
N.S.
N.B.
Employed, 2005 12.1% 9.7% 10.4% 7.0%
Casual
2006 13.4% 10.7% 10.0% 7.6%
Que.
Ont.
Man. Sask.
Alta.
B.C.
Y.T.
N.W.T./
Canada
Nun.
11.4%
8.8%
7.1% 11.5% 15.4% 18.5% 22.3%
–
11.3%
11.7%
8.2%
7.3% 11.2% 14.7% 16.4% 25.9%
–
10.9%
9.4% 7.5%
11.5%
8.0%
7.3% 11.8% 13.9% 15.5% 24.8%
–
10.7%
2008 10.8% 10.3% 10.1% 7.1%
11.4%
8.0%
7.9% 12.7% 13.5% 15.8% 22.3%
49.3%
10.8%
2009 10.8%
10.7%
8.1%
8.9% 12.9% 13.8% 15.6% 21.1%
43.5%
10.7%
2007 12.5% 12.8%
9.5% 10.3% 7.7%
Notes
– Data is not applicable or does not exist.
Totals may not sum to 100% due to rounding.
Employed RNs with employed—status unknown are excluded from the percentage distribution.
From 2005 to 2007, the Northwest Territories/Nunavut submitted all Employment Status records as unknown.
Northwest Territories and Nunavut data is combined, as RNs did not specify in which territory they worked the majority of the time.
Data released by CIHI may differ from data from other sources due to CIHI’s nationally standardized methodology.
RNs employed in a jurisdiction different from their jurisdiction of registration are excluded to avoid duplication.
Northern territories data may include inter-jurisdictional duplicates.
See Chapter 5 (Methodological Notes) for more information regarding collection and comparability of data.
Source
Nursing Database, Canadian Institute for Health Information.
As Table 4 demonstrates, the percentage of the RN workforce employed on a full-time
basis varied across jurisdictions in 2009, from 74.9% in Newfoundland and Labrador and
65.6% in Ontario to 41.2% in Alberta and 47.2% in Manitoba. The proportion of RNs in
part-time positions ranged from 45.0% in Alberta and 43.8% in Manitoba to 14.3% in
Newfoundland and Labrador and 24.8% in Nova Scotia.
The average age of full-time RNs was 44.7, the average age of part-time RNs was 45.2
and the average age of casual worker RNs was 48.1.
There was a larger proportion of male RNs employed in full-time positions in 2009 than
of female RNs. In that year, 73.8% of male RNs were employed full time, compared to
58.2% of female RNs. Only 17.9% of male RNs had part-time employment, compared to
30.8% of female RNs. Casual employment rates followed a similar pattern, with 11.0% of
female RNs and 8.2% of male RNs employed on a casual basis.
17
Regulated Nurses: Canadian Trends, 2005 to 2009
Multiple Employment
It is not uncommon for RNs to have more than one nursing job, often with multiple
employers. In 2009, 13.2% of the RN workforce who reported on their multiple
employment status had more than one employer in nursing. The proportion of nurses
with multiple employment who reported working in full-time positions increased over the
five-year period from 39.9% in 2005 to 47.9% in 2009. In contrast, as shown in Table 5,
both the part-time and casual categories demonstrated decreasing proportions over the
same five-year period.
Table 5: Registered Nurses Employed in Nursing With Multiple Employers,
by Employment Status With Primary Employer, Canada, 2005 to 2009
Employed,
Status
Unknown
Total With
Multiple
Employers
Employed,
Full Time
Employed,
Part Time
Employed,
Casual
2005
13,321
13,795
6,270
653
34,039
2006
13,271
13,129
5,399
299
32,098
2007
15,408
13,752
5,335
439
34,934
2008
16,170
13,155
5,344
204
34,873
2009
16,668
12,872
5,253
29
34,822
–
–
–
–
–
2006
-0.4%
-4.8%
-13.9%
–
-5.7%
2007
16.1%
4.7%
-1.2%
–
8.8%
2008
4.9%
-4.3%
0.2%
–
-0.2%
2009
3.1%
-2.2%
-1.7%
–
-0.1%
2005
39.9%
41.3%
18.8%
–
100.0%
2006
41.7%
41.3%
17.0%
–
100.0%
2007
44.7%
39.9%
15.5%
–
100.0%
2008
46.6%
37.9%
15.4%
–
100.0%
2009
47.9%
37.0%
15.1%
–
100.0%
Count
Annual Percentage Change
2005
Percentage Distribution
Notes
– Data is not applicable or does not exist.
Non-response for Multiple Employment (% of RN workforce): 2005, n = 1,156 (0.5%); 2006, n = 1,944 (0.8%);
2007, n = 872 (0.3%); 2008, n = 1,833 (0.7%); 2009, n = 1,574 (0.6%).
Totals may not sum to 100% due to rounding.
RNs with Multiple Employment and Employment Status unknown are excluded from percentage distribution.
See Chapter 5 (Methodological Notes) for more information regarding collection and comparability of data.
Source
Nursing Database, Canadian Institute for Health Information.
18
Chapter 1—Regulated Nurses in Canada: Trends of Registered Nurses
Figure 7 shows the distribution by age group of RNs working for multiple employers;
RNs age 40 to 49 comprised the largest group working for multiple employers in 2009.
Further breakdown by Employment Status indicates that, in 2009, a higher proportion of
full-time RNs were working in multiple positions for all age groups (with the exception of
60 and older) compared to the part-time and casual categories.
Figure 7: Registered Nurses Employed in Nursing With Multiple Employers,
by Employment Status, by Age Group, Canada, 2009
Notes
Non-response for Multiple Employment (% of RN workforce): n = 1,574 (0.6%).
See Chapter 5 (Methodological Notes) for more information regarding collection and comparability of data.
Source
Nursing Database, Canadian Institute for Health Information.
19
Regulated Nurses: Canadian Trends, 2005 to 2009
Place of Work
The hospital sector employed 62.6% of the RN workforce in Canada in 2009. Figure 8
shows a slight increase in the proportion of RNs employed in the community health
sector in Canada, from 13.5% in 2005, to 14.2% in 2009. The greatest proportion of
nurses working in this sector in 2009 was in the Northwest Territories and Nunavut,
at 41.5%. Employment in the nursing home/long-term care (LTC) sector fluctuated
in Canada between 11.7% and 9.9% (in 2009) over the five-year period.
Figure 8: Registered Nursing Workforce, by Place of Work, by Jurisdiction and Canada, 2005 and 2009
Notes
† Digit suppressed to ensure confidentiality.
The percentage has been removed for Place of Work community health and nursing home/LTC in accordance with
CIHI privacy policy.
Non-response for Place of Work (% of RN workforce): 2005, n = 2,988 (1.2%); 2009, n = 8,942 (3.4%).
In 2009, Manitoba had an extensive increase of non-responses due to the result of registered nurses and nurse
practitioners who failed to indicate their primary place of work.
Hospital includes data from hospital (general, maternal, pediatric, psychiatric), mental health centre and
rehabilitation/convalescent centre.
Community Health includes data from community health centre, home care agency, nursing station (outpost or clinic)
and public health department/unit.
Nursing Home/LTC includes data from nursing home/long-term care facility.
Other Place of Work includes data from business/industry/occupational health office, private nursing agency/private
duty, self-employed, physician’s office/family practice unit, educational institution, association/government and other.
Totals may not sum to 100% due to rounding.
Northwest Territories and Nunavut data is combined, as RNs did not specify in which territory they worked the majority
of the time.
Data released by CIHI may differ from data from other sources due to CIHI’s nationally standardized methodology.
RNs employed in a jurisdiction different from their jurisdiction of registration are excluded to avoid duplication.
Northern territories data may include inter-jurisdictional duplicates.
See Chapter 5 (Methodological Notes) for more information regarding collection and comparability of data.
Source
Nursing Database, Canadian Institute for Health Information.
20
Chapter 1—Regulated Nurses in Canada: Trends of Registered Nurses
In 2009, the average age of RNs working in the hospital sector was 43.5, compared
to the average age of 47.1 for RNs employed in community health and 49.2 for RNs
employed in the nursing home/long-term care sector.
Position
In 2009, 205,069 RNs (77.8%) were employed as staff nurses/community health nurses
in Canada, an increase of 1.4% from 202,258 in 2008 (see Table 6).
Table 6: Registered Nursing Workforce, by Position, by Jurisdiction and Canada,
2005 to 2009
N.L.
P.E.I.
N.S.
N.B.
Que.
Ont.
Man. Sask.
Alta.
B.C.
Y.T.
N.W.T./
Canada
Nun.
Count
Staff
Nurse
Manager
Other
Positions
2005 4,369
1,074 6,941 6,120 47,990 67,418 8,091 6,913 21,043 21,965
218
679 192,821
2006 4,380
1,090 6,935 6,241 49,763 67,514 8,190 6,872 20,574 22,673
236
782 195,250
2007 4,332
1,084 6,934 6,239 51,149 68,699 8,148 6,957 21,814 23,391
239
766 199,752
2008 4,440
1,131 6,855 6,230 51,800 70,308 8,187 7,066 22,193 22,913
249
886 202,258
2009 4,464
1,073 6,818 6,285 52,847 71,364 8,203 6,989 22,347 23,639
295
745 205,069
2005
580
211 1,005
836
4,066
5,326
837
750
1,643
2,119
26
86
17,485
2006
558
180
996
877
4,214
5,493
821
701
1,693
2,225
26
81
17,865
2007
580
175
967
900
4,256
5,525
842
734
1,843
2,343
29
89
18,283
2008
597
167
979
896
4,068
5,529
841
729
1,913
2,468
31
136
18,354
5,612
2009
646
161
989
934
3,954
818
673
1,997
2,611
41
110
18,546
2005
526
158
782
570
7,071 14,182 1,859
872
3,450
3,286
58
151
32,965
2006
573
157
855
562
8,349 14,624 1,850
899
3,554
3,447
56
135
35,061
2007
652
175
934
587
8,634 15,407 1,782
976
3,822
3,772
54
162
36,957
2008
686
181 1,026
631
8,472 15,942 1,846 1,001
3,852
4,356
45
168
38,206
2009
713
172 1,110
647
8,857 16,431 1,903 1,350
3,895
4,594
26
142
39,840
–
–
–
–
–
–
1.2% -0.6%
Annual Percentage Change
Staff
Nurse
2005
–
2006
0.3%
2007 -1.1%
Manager
2008
2.5%
2009
0.5%
2005
–
–
–
–
–
–
1.5% -0.1%
2.0%
3.7%
0.1%
-2.2%
3.2%
8.3%
15.2%
1.3%
0.0%
2.8%
1.8% -0.5%
1.2%
6.0%
3.2%
1.3%
-2.0%
2.3%
4.3% -1.1% -0.1%
-2.0%
4.2%
15.7%
1.3%
3.2% 18.5% -15.9%
1.4%
-0.6%
0.0%
–
1.3%
2.3%
0.5%
1.6%
1.7%
0.9%
2.0%
1.5%
0.2% -1.1%
0.7%
–
–
–
–
2006 -3.8% -14.7% -0.9%
4.9%
2007
3.9%
-2.8% -2.9%
2.6%
2008
2.9%
-4.6%
1.2% -0.4%
2009
8.2%
-3.6%
1.0%
-5.1% -0.5%
–
4.2%
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
3.6%
3.1% -1.9% -6.5%
3.0%
5.0%
0.0%
-5.8%
2.2%
1.0%
0.6%
4.7%
8.9%
5.3% 11.5%
9.9%
2.3%
-4.4%
0.1% -0.1% -0.7%
3.8%
5.3%
52.8%
0.4%
-2.8%
1.5% -2.7% -7.7%
4.4%
5.8% 32.3% -19.1%
1.0%
2.6%
6.9%
(continued)
21
Regulated Nurses: Canadian Trends, 2005 to 2009
Table 6: Registered Nursing Workforce, by Position, by Jurisdiction and Canada,
2005 to 2009 (cont’d)
N.L.
Other
Positions
2005
2006
–
P.E.I.
–
8.9% -0.6%
N.S.
–
N.B.
–
Que.
–
Ont.
Man. Sask.
–
Alta.
B.C.
N.W.T./
Canada
Nun.
Y.T.
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
9.3% -1.4% 18.1%
3.1% -0.5%
3.1%
3.0%
4.9%
-3.4%
-10.6%
6.4%
2007 13.8% 11.5%
9.2%
4.4%
3.4%
5.4% -3.7%
8.6%
7.5%
9.4%
-3.6%
20.0%
5.4%
2008
5.2%
3.4%
9.9%
7.5%
-1.9%
3.5%
3.6%
2.6%
0.8% 15.5% -16.7%
3.7%
3.4%
2009
3.9% -5.0%
8.2%
2.5%
4.5%
3.1%
3.1% 34.9%
5.5% -42.2%
-15.5%
4.3%
2005 79.8% 74.4% 79.5% 81.3% 81.2% 77.6% 75.0% 81.0% 80.5% 80.3% 72.2%
74.1%
79.3%
2006 79.5% 76.4% 78.9% 81.3% 79.8% 77.0% 75.4% 81.1% 79.7% 80.0% 74.2%
78.4%
78.7%
2007 77.9% 75.6% 78.5% 80.8% 79.9% 76.6% 75.6% 80.3% 79.4% 79.3% 74.2%
75.3%
78.3%
2008 77.6% 76.5% 77.4% 80.3% 80.5% 76.6% 75.3% 80.3% 79.4% 77.1% 76.6%
74.5%
78.1%
2009 76.7% 76.3% 76.5% 79.9% 80.5% 76.4% 75.1% 77.6% 79.1% 76.6% 81.5%
74.7%
77.8%
1.1%
Percentage Distribution
Staff
Nurse
Manager
Other
Positions
2005 10.6% 14.6% 11.5% 11.1%
6.9%
6.1%
7.8%
8.8%
6.3%
7.7%
8.6%
9.4%
7.2%
2006 10.1% 12.6% 11.3% 11.4%
6.8%
6.3%
7.6%
8.3%
6.6%
7.8%
8.2%
8.1%
7.2%
2007 10.4% 12.2% 10.9% 11.6%
6.6%
6.2%
7.8%
8.5%
6.7%
7.9%
9.0%
8.8%
7.2%
2008 10.4% 11.3% 11.0% 11.6%
6.3%
6.0%
7.7%
8.3%
6.8%
8.3%
9.5%
11.4%
7.1%
2009 11.1% 11.5% 11.1% 11.9%
6.0%
6.0%
7.5%
7.5%
7.1%
8.5% 11.3%
11.0%
7.0%
2005
9.6% 10.9%
9.0%
7.6% 12.0% 16.3% 17.2% 10.2% 13.2% 12.0% 19.2%
16.5%
13.6%
2006 10.4% 11.0%
9.7%
7.3% 13.4% 16.7% 17.0% 10.6% 13.8% 12.2% 17.6%
13.5%
14.1%
2007 11.7% 12.2% 10.6%
7.6% 13.5% 17.2% 16.5% 11.3% 13.9% 12.8% 16.8%
15.9%
14.5%
2008 12.0% 12.2% 11.6%
8.1% 13.2% 17.4% 17.0% 11.4% 13.8% 14.6% 13.8%
14.1%
14.8%
2009 12.2% 12.2% 12.4%
8.2% 13.5% 17.6% 17.4% 15.0% 13.8% 14.9%
14.2%
15.1%
7.2%
Notes
– Data is not applicable or does not exist.
Non-response for Position (% of RN workforce): 2005, n = 7,971 (3.2%); 2006, n = 5,643 (2.2%); 2007, n = 2,969 (1.2%);
2008, n = 3,071 (1.2%); 2009, n = 2,886 (1.1%).
Staff Nurse includes RN staff nurse/community health nurse.
Manager includes chief nursing officer/chief executive officer, director/assistant director and manager/
assistant manager.
Other Positions includes instructor/professor/educator, researcher, consultant, clinical specialist, nurse midwife,
nurse practitioner and other.
Totals may not sum to 100% due to rounding.
In 2006, in the Northwest Territories and Nunavut, relief nurses identified themselves under the category
other positions.
Northwest Territories and Nunavut data is combined, as the RNs did not specify in which territory they worked the
majority of the time.
Data released by CIHI may differ from data from other sources due to CIHI’s nationally standardized methodology.
RNs employed in a jurisdiction different from their jurisdiction of registration are excluded to avoid duplication.
Northern territories data may include inter-jurisdictional duplicates.
See Chapter 5 (Methodological Notes) for more information regarding collection and comparability of data.
Source
Nursing Database, Canadian Institute for Health Information.
22
Chapter 1—Regulated Nurses in Canada: Trends of Registered Nurses
Area of Responsibility
The proportion of the registered nursing workforce in direct care ranged from 91.7% in
Alberta and 90.9% in the Northwest Territories and Nunavut to 86.8% in Quebec and
87.8% in Manitoba. Many health human resource planners are interested in these totals,
as the numbers represent RNs providing services directly to patients.
Areas of responsibility covered by RNs that fall outside of direct care include administration,
education and research. The proportion of RNs employed in administration in 2009 was
highest in the Yukon (8.3%) and Quebec (8.0%) and lowest in Alberta, British Columbia and
Saskatchewan (less than 5.0%).
Overall, RNs who provide direct care to patients are younger than RNs in administration,
education and research. In 2009, the average age was 44.8 for RNs in direct care, 49.5
for RNs working in administration, 48.8 for RNs working in education and 47.2 for RNs
working in research.
Table 7: Registered Nursing Workforce, by Area of Responsibility, Canada, 2009
Count
Direct Care
Medical/Surgical
Geriatric/Long-Term Care
Critical Care (Burn)
Emergency Room
Maternal/Newborn
Community Health
Psychiatric/Mental Health
Operating Room
Nursing in Several Clinical Areas
Home Care
Pediatric
Public Health
Ambulatory Care
Rehabilitation
Oncology
Occupational Health
Telehealth
Other Patient Care
Total Direct Care
Total Administration
Total Education
Total Research
Total
44,409
25,573
19,096
17,262
14,969
13,862
13,478
12,883
8,916
7,411
7,352
7,017
6,216
4,024
3,488
2,898
1,232
23,945
234,031
17,039
9,098
1,995
262,163
Percentage
16.9%
9.8%
7.3%
6.6%
5.7%
5.3%
5.1%
4.9%
3.4%
2.8%
2.8%
2.7%
2.4%
1.5%
1.3%
1.1%
0.5%
9.1%
89.3%
6.5%
3.5%
0.8%
100.0%
Notes
Non-response for Area of Responsibility (% of RN workforce): n = 4,178 (1.6%).
Totals may not sum to 100% due to rounding.
Direct Care includes data from medical/surgical, psychiatric/mental health, pediatric, maternal/newborn, geriatric/
long-term care, critical care, community health, ambulatory care, home care, occupational health, operating room,
emergency room, nursing in several clinical areas, oncology, rehabilitation, public health, telehealth and other patient care.
Administration includes data from nursing services, nursing education and other administration.
Education includes data from teaching students, teaching employees, teaching patients/clients and other education.
Research includes data from nursing research and other research.
See Chapter 5 (Methodological Notes) for more information regarding collection and comparability of data.
Source
Nursing Database, Canadian Institute for Health Information.
23
Regulated Nurses: Canadian Trends, 2005 to 2009
In 2009, consistent with past trends, the greatest proportion of RNs worked in medicine/
surgery and geriatric/long-term care. The area of responsibility with the most RNs,
medicine/surgery, also attracted the most recent graduates. In 2009, 32.7% of
RNs in their first five years of nursing chose to work in medicine/surgery. These nurses
accounted for 28.1% of all RNs working in medicine/surgery. Among male RNs, the most
frequently identified areas of responsibility in 2009 were medicine/surgery (17.2%) and
psychiatric/mental health (12.9%).
Demographic Trends: Sex and Age Composition of the
Registered Nursing Workforce
Almost all RNs (93.8%) in the Canadian workforce were female in 2009, a proportion
that had not changed substantially over the previous five years. The proportion of males
increased by slightly more than one-half of one percentage point over the five-year
period (see Table 8).
Additional information on RN demographic characteristics and trends by jurisdiction is
available in the data tables on the CIHI website.
Table 8: Registered Nursing Workforce, by Sex, by Jurisdiction and Canada,
2005 to 2009
N.L.
P.E.I.
N.S.
N.B.
Que.
Ont.
Man. Sask.
Alta.
B.C.
N.W.T./
Canada
Nun.
Y.T.
Count
Female 2005 5,252 1,405 8,447 7,220 58,008 85,553 10,215 8,255 25,351 26,415
276
860 237,257
2006 5,271 1,390 8,479 7,354 58,166 86,093 10,290 8,180 25,704 27,361
289
943 239,520
2007 5,311 1,396 8,513 7,392 58,915 86,854 10,209 8,347 26,366 28,410
291
955 242,959
2008 5,445 1,442 8,513 7,418 59,321 88,575 10,266 8,473 27,268 28,146
300
1,101 246,268
2009 5,533 1,372 8,569 7,513 59,678 89,753 10,456 8,699 28,060 28,984
328
921 249,866
Male
2005
244
38
286
306
5,819
3,876
596
294
1,004
1,399
26
97
13,985
2006
244
38
311
326
5,848
3,968
612
300
1,048
1,479
35
90
14,299
2007
263
39
330
334
6,040
4,124
616
322
1,161
1,649
31
93
15,002
2008
279
37
358
339
6,210
4,309
636
350
1,233
1,717
34
119
15,621
2009
292
34
360
353
6,377
4,543
697
418
1,345
1,916
39
101
16,475
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
2006
0.4% -1.1%
0.4%
1.9%
0.3%
0.6%
0.7% -0.9%
1.4%
3.6%
4.7%
9.7%
1.0%
2007
0.8%
0.4%
0.4%
0.5%
1.3%
0.9%
-0.8%
2.0%
2.6%
3.8%
0.7%
1.3%
1.4%
2008
2.5%
3.3%
0.0%
0.4%
0.7%
2.0%
0.6%
1.5%
3.4%
-0.9%
3.1%
15.3%
1.4%
2009
1.6% -4.9%
0.7%
1.3%
0.6%
1.3%
1.9%
2.7%
2.9%
3.0%
9.3% -16.3%
1.5%
Annual Percentage Change
Female 2005
Male
–
2005
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
2006
0.0%
0.0%
8.7%
6.5%
0.5%
2.4%
2.7%
2.0%
4.4%
5.7%
34.6%
-7.2%
2.2%
2007
7.8%
2.6%
6.1%
2.5%
3.3%
3.9%
0.7%
7.3% 10.8% 11.5% -11.4%
2008
6.1% -5.1%
8.5%
1.5%
2.8%
4.5%
3.2%
8.7%
2009
4.7% -8.1%
0.6%
4.1%
2.7%
5.4%
9.6% 19.4%
6.2%
4.1%
9.1% 11.6%
3.3%
4.9%
28.0%
4.1%
14.7% -15.1%
5.5%
9.7%
(continued)
24
Chapter 1—Regulated Nurses in Canada: Trends of Registered Nurses
Table 8: Registered Nursing Workforce, by Sex, by Jurisdiction and Canada,
2005 to 2009 (cont’d)
N.L.
P.E.I.
N.S.
N.B.
Que.
Ont.
Man. Sask.
Alta.
B.C.
Y.T.
N.W.T./
Canada
Nun.
Percentage Distribution
Female 2005 95.6% 97.4% 96.7% 95.9% 90.9% 95.7% 94.5% 96.6% 96.2% 95.0% 91.4%
89.9%
94.4%
2006 95.6% 97.3% 96.5% 95.8% 90.9% 95.6% 94.4% 96.5% 96.1% 94.9% 89.2%
91.3%
94.4%
2007 95.3% 97.3% 96.3% 95.7% 90.7% 95.5% 94.3% 96.3% 95.8% 94.5% 90.4%
91.1%
94.2%
2008 95.1% 97.5% 96.0% 95.6% 90.5% 95.4% 94.2% 96.0% 95.7% 94.3% 89.8%
90.2%
94.0%
2009 95.0% 97.6% 96.0% 95.5% 90.3% 95.2% 93.8% 95.4% 95.4% 93.8% 89.4%
90.1%
93.8%
Male
2005
4.4%
2.6%
3.3%
4.1%
9.1%
4.3%
5.5%
3.4%
3.8%
5.0%
8.6%
10.1%
5.6%
2006
4.4%
2.7%
3.5%
4.2%
9.1%
4.4%
5.6%
3.5%
3.9%
5.1% 10.8%
8.7%
5.6%
2007
4.7%
2.7%
3.7%
4.3%
9.3%
4.5%
5.7%
3.7%
4.2%
5.5%
9.6%
8.9%
5.8%
2008
4.9%
2.5%
4.0%
4.4%
9.5%
4.6%
5.8%
4.0%
4.3%
5.7% 10.2%
9.8%
6.0%
2009
5.0%
2.4%
4.0%
4.5%
9.7%
4.8%
6.2%
4.6%
4.6%
6.2% 10.6%
9.9%
6.2%
Notes
– Data is not applicable or does not exist.
Totals may not sum to 100% due to rounding.
In 2007, 2008 and 2009, the College of Registered Nurses of Manitoba submitted aggregate tables for sex.
Northwest Territories and Nunavut data is combined, as the RNs did not specify in which territory they worked the majority of
the time.
Data released by CIHI may differ from data from other sources due to CIHI’s nationally standardized methodology.
RNs employed in a jurisdiction different from their jurisdiction of registration are excluded to avoid duplication.
Northern territories data may include inter-jurisdictional duplicates.
See Chapter 5 (Methodological Notes) for more information regarding collection and comparability of data.
Source
Nursing Database, Canadian Institute for Health Information.
More than one-third of all male RNs in the workforce were employed in Quebec in 2009.
In that year, 6,377 males accounted for 9.7% of the province’s workforce. The territories
had similar ratios of males in the workforce. In contrast, 2.4% of the workforce in Prince
Edward Island, 4.0% of the workforce in Nova Scotia and 4.6% of the workforce in
Saskatchewan were male. The average age of male RNs was 42.7 in 2009, compared
to 45.4 for females.
Although male RNs constituted only 6.2% of the RN workforce in 2009, they accounted
for 17.2% of all RNs employed in medicine/surgery.
25
Regulated Nurses: Canadian Trends, 2005 to 2009
Age Group of the Workforce
In 2009, the majority of jurisdictions had their highest proportion of RNs in the 45-to-49
age group. These included Prince Edward Island, Nova Scotia, New Brunswick, Ontario,
Manitoba, the Northwest Territories and Nunavut. In Canada as a whole, the top four age
groups were 40 to 44 (12.8%), 45 to 49 (14.9%), 50 to 54 (15.4%) and 55 to 59 (14.0%),
which account for 57.1% of the RN workforce.
Table 9: Registered Nursing Workforce, by Age Group, by Jurisdiction and Canada, 2009
Age
Group
N.L.
<30
12.5%
7.4%
8.3% 10.7% 15.9%
9.3%
8.0% 12.3% 14.1%
9.3% 13.4%
11.4%
11.6%
30–34
10.9%
7.0%
6.8%
8.8%
9.1%
9.5% 11.7%
13.6%
9.7%
35–39
14.1% 11.0%
9.6% 10.9% 10.9% 11.4% 11.1% 10.1% 11.7% 11.2% 10.1%
11.1%
11.2%
40–44
17.4% 13.7% 13.5% 16.0% 12.7% 13.0% 13.5% 11.0% 12.2% 11.5% 11.4%
10.0%
12.8%
45–49
16.6% 16.4% 18.4% 17.3% 14.0% 15.3% 16.5% 15.1% 13.3% 14.4% 14.7%
13.7%
14.9%
50–54
13.9% 14.3% 18.2% 15.5% 16.1% 14.7% 16.4% 16.3% 13.9% 16.3% 16.1%
13.3%
15.4%
55–59
9.7% 15.8% 14.3% 13.6% 12.5% 14.9% 15.1% 15.7% 12.8% 15.3% 13.4%
13.6%
14.0%
60+
5.0% 14.4% 10.9%
13.4%
10.5%
P.E.I.
N.S.
N.B.
Que.
8.4% 11.2%
7.6%
Ont.
Man.
Sask.
Alta.
8.6% 10.7%
B.C.
6.7% 12.6% 10.2% 10.9% 11.3% 12.5%
Y.T.
9.3%
N.W.T./
Canada
Nun.
Notes
Totals may not sum to 100% due to rounding.
Northwest Territories and Nunavut data is combined, as the RNs did not specify in which territory they worked the
majority of the time.
Data released by CIHI may differ from data from other sources due to CIHI’s nationally standardized methodology.
RNs employed in a jurisdiction different from their jurisdiction of registration are excluded to avoid duplication.
Northern territories data may include inter-jurisdictional duplicates.
See Chapter 5 (Methodological Notes) for more information regarding collection and comparability of data.
Source
Nursing Database, Canadian Institute for Health Information.
26
Chapter 1—Regulated Nurses in Canada: Trends of Registered Nurses
Average Age of the Workforce
Average age may be used in addition to age groupings to describe trends and to make
comparisons between the RN workforce and other professions. As Figure 9 shows, the
average age of selected health occupations increased over the period 2005 to 2009.
The average age of the RN workforce increased over this period as well, but at a slower
rate (less than one year change over five years).
In addition to the aging of each worker, several variables affect the rate at which the
average age of the workforce changes. They include the rates of entry into and exit
from the workforce and the ages of the workers entering and exiting the workforce.
Figure 9: Average Age of Regulated Nursing Workforce Compared to Selected
Health Occupations, Canada, 2005 to 2009
Notes
The RPN workforce of the four western provinces represents the total RPN workforce in Canada.
For 2007, 2008 and 2009, Manitoba RN data was excluded from average age calculation for Canada, as the College of
Registered Nurses of Manitoba submitted aggregate tables for average age.
For 2008, Manitoba LPN data was excluded from average age calculation for Canada, as the College of Licensed
Practical Nurses of Manitoba submitted aggregate tables for average age.
See Chapter 5 (Methodological Notes) for more information regarding collection and comparability of data.
Sources
Nursing Database, Occupational Therapist Database, Pharmacist Database, Physiotherapist Database and Scott’s
Medical Database, Canadian Institute for Health Information; for 2005 occupational therapist, physiotherapist and
pharmacist values and 2006 physiotherapist value, Labour Force Survey, Statistics Canada.
27
Regulated Nurses: Canadian Trends, 2005 to 2009
Table 10 shows the range of average ages across the country from 2005 to 2009.
In each case, the change from the previous year was relatively small; over five years,
the average age increased by half a year for all Canadian RNs. The largest average
increases were in Prince Edward Island at 1.8 years, the Northwest Territories and
Nunavut at 1.5 years and Nova Scotia at 1.3 years. The average age fell slightly in
the Yukon over the period.
Table 10: Average Age of the Registered Nursing Workforce, by Jurisdiction and
Canada, 2005 to 2009
N.L.
P.E.I.
N.S.
N.B.
Que.
Ont.
Man.
Sask. Alta. B.C. Y.T.
N.W.T./
Canada
Nun.
Average Age
2005
41.9
45.6
45.5
43.9
43.4
45.2
45.2
45.6 44.6 46.4 44.7
43.8
44.7
2006
42.2
45.8
45.8
44.2
43.5
45.6
45.4
45.9 44.8 46.4 44.7
44.3
44.9
2007
42.5
46.2
46.2
44.5
43.4
45.9
45.9
46.0 44.6 46.2 45.6
44.6
45.0
2008
42.7
46.3
46.6
44.7
43.3
46.1
46.1
45.9 44.6 46.5 45.3
44.5
45.1
2009
42.9
47.4
46.8
45.0
43.4
46.3
46.2
45.8 44.6 46.4 44.4
45.3
45.2
–
–
–
Annual Increase/Decrease in Average Age
2005
–
–
–
–
–
2006
0.3
0.2
0.3
0.3
0.1
0.4
0.2
0.3
2007
0.3
0.4
0.4
0.3
-0.1
0.3
0.5
0.1
2008
0.2
0.1
0.4
0.2
-0.1
0.2
0.2
-0.1
2009
0.2
1.1
0.2
0.3
0.1
0.2
0.1
-0.1
–
–
–
–
–
0.2
0.0
0.0
0.5
0.2
-0.2
-0.2
0.9
0.3
0.1
0.0
0.3
-0.3
-0.1
0.1
0.0
-0.1
-0.9
0.8
0.1
Notes
– Data is not applicable or does not exist.
For 2007, 2008 and 2009, Manitoba RN data was excluded from average age calculation for Canada, as the College of
Registered Nurses of Manitoba submitted aggregate tables for average age.
Northern territories data may include inter-jurisdictional duplicates.
Northwest Territories and Nunavut data is combined, as RNs did not specify in which territory they worked the majority
of the time.
Data released by CIHI may differ from data from other sources due to CIHI’s nationally standardized methodology.
RNs employed in a jurisdiction different from their jurisdiction of registration are excluded to avoid duplication.
See Chapter 5 (Methodological Notes) for more information regarding collection and comparability of data.
Source
Nursing Database, Canadian Institute for Health Information.
28
Chapter 1—Regulated Nurses in Canada: Trends of Registered Nurses
Exiting and Entering the Workforce
Table 11 represents not only the workforce but all RNs who registered with a specific
jurisdiction. A new registrant may be a new graduate, an immigrant, an interprovincial
migrant or an RN re-registering following an absence of one year or more. An exit may
be an RN who left the profession (either permanently or temporarily) or retired, or an
RN who is registered in another jurisdiction or country in year “x” and may still be
practising nursing in another province, territory or country.
Table 11 shows new registration rates and exit rates by jurisdiction and by age group.
Exit rates show that RNs in the 60 and older age group had the highest prevalence of
leaving nursing across all regions in Canada (with the exception of Prince Edward
Island, New Brunswick and the Northwest Territories and Nunavut) in 2009 (2008 exits).
The highest exit rates were seen with RNs age 60 and older in the Yukon (38.5%), the
Northwest Territories and Nunavut (26.1%) and Quebec (18.4%). Higher exit rates were
also seen in the youngest age group, with high exit rates in RNs younger than 30 in the
Northwest Territories and Nunavut (32.9%), the Yukon (25.8%) and New Brunswick
(15.5%). Given the low registration rates for the group of RNs age 60 and older, it is
plausible that a sizable portion of RNs age 60 and older who did not re-register in 2009
(2008 exits) retired from nursing. The RNs younger than 30 who did not re-register may
have moved to another jurisdiction within or outside of Canada to continue practising
nursing, left the profession temporarily to pursue education, taken a leave of absence or
left the profession permanently. Note that many RNs who take a leave of absence or
pursue further education maintain their registration and are thus not counted as exits.
Table 11: Registered Nurses: Rate of New Registrations and Exit Rates, by Age Group,
by Jurisdiction, 2005 to 2009
New
Registration
Rates
Age
Group
N.L.
<30
2006 26.8% 30.1%
39.0% 29.9% 23.0% 22.3% 31.0% 27.3% 31.5% 34.4% 45.5%
46.8%
2007 29.3% 27.4%
31.4% 29.5% 24.4% 23.8% 17.3% 28.1% 34.7% 40.2% 44.0%
51.7%
2008 29.1% 30.4%
31.7% 30.9% 22.6% 30.1% 28.3% 30.9% 31.4% 26.0% 48.4%
53.3%
2009 27.4%
33.8% 29.6% 18.7% 26.4% 30.6% 34.0% 30.8% 36.3% 57.1%
27.6%
30–39
40–49
50–59
P.E.I.
2.9%
N.S.
N.B.
Que.
Ont.
Man. Sask. Alta.
B.C.
Y.T.
N.W.T./
Nun.
2006
8.4% 10.4%
12.4% 13.9%
6.0%
7.8% 10.1%
6.8% 11.4% 18.1% 16.2%
28.4%
2007
9.3% 15.3%
15.2% 13.0%
8.1%
6.6%
6.6% 10.1% 14.1% 17.7% 16.4%
21.9%
2008 10.4% 12.5%
14.4% 10.3%
8.2%
6.3% 10.1% 10.0% 15.0% 12.0% 28.2%
27.7%
2009
9.8%
0.4%
15.0% 15.0%
8.2%
6.2% 12.5% 11.3% 14.1% 18.9% 30.0%
12.7%
2006
1.7%
4.2%
3.7%
4.7%
1.8%
5.0%
3.2%
3.1%
4.2%
6.0% 13.1%
20.8%
2007
1.9%
4.8%
4.4%
3.2%
2.8%
4.3%
2.6%
3.1%
6.1%
5.2% 12.0%
15.4%
2008
2.3%
4.1%
3.6%
3.7%
2.7%
3.7%
3.5%
2.7%
5.7%
4.5%
8.4%
27.6%
2009
1.7%
0.2%
4.3%
3.0%
2.6%
3.8%
4.6%
3.6%
5.1%
6.4% 20.8%
13.6%
2006
2.0%
1.9%
3.4%
3.9%
1.4%
3.6%
1.9%
1.6%
2.7%
3.8% 17.9%
18.5%
2007
1.8%
4.0%
2.7%
2.5%
1.7%
3.7%
1.2%
2.4%
3.5%
3.4%
9.9%
18.2%
2008
2.3%
3.3%
2.5%
3.2%
1.5%
3.5%
1.7%
2.1%
3.6%
2.3% 12.9%
19.8%
2009
1.7%
0.2%
2.5%
2.8%
1.6%
2.8%
2.8%
1.9%
2.8%
3.2% 10.2%
9.1%
(continued)
29
Regulated Nurses: Canadian Trends, 2005 to 2009
Table 11: Registered Nurses: Rate of New Registrations and Exit Rates, by Age Group,
by Jurisdiction, 2005 to 2009 (cont’d)
Age
Group
60+
Exit Rates
<30
30–39
40–49
50–59
60+
N.L.
P.E.I.
2006
5.4%
2.2%
2007
4.9%
2008
3.8%
2009
4.5%
Man. Sask. Alta.
B.C.
Que.
Ont.
3.1%
4.9%
5.1%
5.2%
2.2%
1.2%
2.1%
4.8% 13.0% 23.2%
6.1%
3.4%
2.5%
4.0%
5.3%
1.7%
3.4%
2.9%
4.4%
6.0%
4.1%
6.2%
5.0%
4.9%
1.6%
2.1%
3.2%
3.1% 26.9% 23.9%
0.5%
4.0%
6.4%
5.7%
4.0%
3.2%
3.2%
2.9%
3.8% 14.7%
2005 14.7% 18.2%
17.4% 13.9%
6.3%
6.3%
9.8%
8.5% 12.1% 11.2% 15.4% 24.5%
2006 14.5% 19.1%
18.2% 15.0%
6.5%
5.6%
6.5%
6.5% 11.5% 11.4% 36.4% 22.9%
4.8% 17.9%
7.3%
8.1%
16.4% 14.7%
6.3%
4.4%
9.1%
6.9% 11.0% 10.8% 24.0% 17.2%
2008
9.6% 14.9%
14.8% 15.5%
5.8%
4.0%
8.3%
6.9% 10.8% 11.9% 25.8% 32.9%
2005
5.1%
10.2%
8.7%
4.0%
4.4%
6.8%
6.6%
8.3%
7.8%
8.1% 18.9% 24.4%
6.9%
7.6% 23.4%
2006
5.8%
9.3%
9.8%
7.2%
4.2%
3.9%
4.3%
4.2%
9.7%
2007
6.1%
4.0%
10.5%
8.7%
4.1%
3.3%
5.4%
4.9%
9.8% 10.2% 15.1% 18.6%
2008
6.2%
6.1%
10.7%
8.5%
4.1%
3.4%
6.1%
5.6%
9.7%
9.4% 23.1% 30.2%
2005
2.0%
3.7%
4.1%
3.2%
1.8%
3.8%
3.1%
2.9%
4.0%
3.0% 11.5% 18.3%
2006
2.4%
5.6%
3.0%
4.1%
1.7%
3.3%
2.4%
2.1%
3.9%
3.0% 10.1% 21.5%
2007
1.6%
3.5%
3.1%
2.8%
2.0%
2.8%
2.6%
2.3%
3.7%
3.9% 15.2% 16.9%
2008
1.5%
1.6%
3.6%
3.3%
1.7%
2.7%
2.3%
2.7%
3.3%
3.3%
4.8% 27.9%
2005
7.4%
7.6%
5.1%
6.7%
7.7%
5.9%
4.3%
4.8%
4.7%
4.8% 10.8% 15.6%
2006
6.1%
6.3%
5.3%
6.0%
7.2%
5.3%
4.3%
3.5%
5.7%
4.1%
2007
4.9%
4.9%
5.0%
6.9%
8.2%
4.6%
4.6%
4.3%
5.1%
5.4% 13.5% 13.4%
2008
6.3%
2.6%
4.6%
5.8%
7.5%
4.5%
4.8%
3.8%
4.7%
5.5% 12.9% 20.8%
8.4% 14.8%
2005 26.8% 15.5%
14.4% 17.1% 21.0% 17.9% 16.2% 19.8% 14.2% 17.5% 34.8% 13.0%
2006 20.3% 13.8%
16.4% 17.5% 21.5% 15.0% 14.7% 16.2% 17.6% 16.2% 17.4% 25.3%
2007 20.6% 12.9%
14.1% 20.1% 20.7% 13.1% 14.3% 16.0% 12.5% 16.2% 38.1% 18.8%
2008 15.0% 12.6%
16.3% 14.7% 18.4% 13.1% 14.1% 12.9% 11.6% 14.9% 38.5% 26.1%
Notes
Rates will not sum to 100%.
CIHI collects data after the first 6 months of the 12-month registration period. This may result in 1% to 5%
under-coverage (loss of new registrants who registered after month 6 of the registration period).
Northern territories data may include inter-jurisdictional duplicates.
Northwest Territories and Nunavut data is combined, as the RNs did not specify in which territory they worked the
majority of the time.
Data released by CIHI may differ from data from other sources due to CIHI’s nationally standardized methodology.
See Chapter 5 (Methodological Notes) for more information regarding collection and comparability of data.
Source
Nursing Database, Canadian Institute for Health Information.
30
Y.T.
N.W.T/
Nun.
N.B.
2007 10.0%
N.S.
Chapter 1—Regulated Nurses in Canada: Trends of Registered Nurses
Age of the Workforce
Figure 10 highlights the proportion of the RN workforce in each province/territory at or
above three typical ages of retirement in 2009: 55, 60 and 65. Note that this illustration is
cumulative. An RN at age 65 is counted in all three categories and an RN at age 60 is
counted in two categories.
Information on the age of the RN workforce across Canada shows that a large portion of
nurses within these age groups (55 and older, at 24.5%, 60 and older, at 10.5%, and 65
and older, at 3.1%) may be preparing for retirement in the near future.
Figure 10: Registered Nursing Workforce, by Age Groups 55+, 60+ and 65+,
by Jurisdiction and Canada, 2009
Notes
Northwest Territories and Nunavut data is combined, as the RNs did not specify in which territory they worked the
majority of the time.
Data released by CIHI may differ from data from other sources due to CIHI’s nationally standardized methodology.
RNs employed in a jurisdiction different from their jurisdiction of registration are excluded to avoid duplication.
In 2007, 2008 and 2009, the College of Registered Nurses of Manitoba submitted aggregate tables for age group.
Northern territories data may include inter-jurisdictional duplicates.
See Chapter 5 (Methodological Notes) for more information regarding collection and comparability of data.
Source
Nursing Database, Canadian Institute for Health Information.
31
Regulated Nurses: Canadian Trends, 2005 to 2009
Years Since Graduation
Since employment patterns of RNs change as their careers evolve, assumptions and
analyses based on age indicators alone may be incomplete. It may be useful as well
to consider the number of years since graduation from an RN program.
Figure 11 illustrates the distribution of RNs by number of years since graduation.
Note that this indicates the maximum number of years an RN could have been in the
workforce and does not necessarily reflect the actual number of years worked, because
time spent out of the workforce (such as in continuing education or family leave) is not
accounted for.
Figure 11: Registered Nursing Workforce, by Years Since Graduation, by Jurisdiction and Canada,
2005 and 2009
Notes
Non-response for Year of Graduation (% of RN workforce): 2005, n = 45 (<0.1%); 2009, n = 40 (<0.1%).
Totals may not sum to 100% due to rounding.
Northwest Territories and Nunavut data is combined, as the RNs did not specify in which territory they worked the
majority of the time.
Data released by CIHI may differ from data from other sources due to CIHI’s nationally standardized methodology.
RNs employed in a jurisdiction different from their jurisdiction of registration are excluded to avoid duplication.
Northern territories data may include inter-jurisdictional duplicates.
See Chapter 5 (Methodological Notes) for more information regarding collection and comparability of data.
Source
Nursing Database, Canadian Institute for Health Information.
32
Chapter 1—Regulated Nurses in Canada: Trends of Registered Nurses
The trend from 2005 and 2009 shows an increase in every province in the 31+ years
since graduation group. The cohort 0 to 10 years since graduation increased noticeably
more in Saskatchewan, Alberta and the Yukon than in other jurisdictions, and the
proportion of RNs in this youngest cohort decreased in Newfoundland and Labrador
and Ontario.
Education Trends
Entry-to-Practice Education
The education programs that qualify individuals to become RNs in Canada, and those
available to RNs, have evolved over five decades. During the 1960s and 1970s, many
nursing students graduated from a two- or three-year hospital-based program, earning
a diploma in nursing. By the 1990s, most education programs in Canada were offered
either at community colleges (three-year diploma) or at universities (four-year
baccalaureate). In addition to completing the entry-to-practice education requirements,
all RNs, except those registering in Quebec, must pass a national exam administered by
the Canadian Nurses Association.
Table 12 shows the different stages of the transition from diploma to baccalaureate
entry-to-practice requirements for RNs in each jurisdiction. Additional information on RN
education characteristics and trends by jurisdiction is available in the data tables on the
CIHI website.
Table 12: Status of Baccalaureate Entry-to-Practice Requirements for Registered
Nurses, Canada
Jurisdiction
Target Year and Status
Atlantic Provinces
(Prince Edward Island,
Newfoundland and Labrador,
New Brunswick and
Nova Scotia)
1998 completed
Saskatchewan
2000 completed
Ontario
2005 completed
British Columbia
2006 completed
Manitoba
In progress: the final intake of diploma students took place in 2010.
Transition will be completed in 2013.
Alberta
2009 completed
Northwest Territories
and Nunavut
2010 completed
Quebec
In progress: Quebec continues to offer diploma programs while supporting
the development of baccalaureate partnerships between Collèges
d’enseignement général et professionnel (CEGEP) and universities.
The Yukon
The Yukon has no entry-level educational programs.
Source
Canadian Nurses Association, 2009.
33
Regulated Nurses: Canadian Trends, 2005 to 2009
Of the 266,341 RNs employed in nursing in Canada in 2009, 23.7% earned a
baccalaureate before entering practice. The percentage of RNs entering practice with
a diploma decreased to 76.3% in 2009, while the percentage who earned a master’s
degree before entering practice climbed to 0.05% in 2009.
Graduation data collected through the National Student and Faculty Survey of Canadian
Schools of Nursing, released by the Canadian Nurses Association (CNA) and the
Canadian Association of Schools of Nursing (CASN), illustrates the trend toward
baccalaureate education in nursing, as the number of students graduating from
nursing diploma programs continues to decrease (see Figure 12).
Figure 12: Registered Nurses Graduating From Diploma and Baccalaureate
Programs, Canada, 1999 to 2009
Notes
Graduates refers to the number of students who successfully graduated from the program. Graduate data is collected
on a calendar-year basis.
Diploma includes diploma, diploma exit, diploma bridge to RN and DEC.
Baccalaureate includes standard, generic, collaborative, accelerated, fast track, advanced, second degree entry,
compressed and technology in nursing, psychiatric nurse to RN baccalaureate, practical nurse to RN baccalaureate.
For more detailed notes, please refer to the Student and Faculty Survey of Canadian Schools of Nursing Survey
methodology document, available from the CNA and CASN.
Sources
Canadian Nurses Association and Canadian Association Schools of Nursing.
34
Chapter 1—Regulated Nurses in Canada: Trends of Registered Nurses
Higher Education for Registered Nurses
In 2009, a total of 97,651 (36.7%) RNs in the workforce had obtained a baccalaureate as
their highest education in nursing (see Table 13).
Table 13: Registered Nursing Workforce, by Highest Education in Nursing, by Jurisdiction and
Canada, 2005 to 2009
N.L.
P.E.I.
N.S.
N.B.
Que.
Ont.
Man. Sask.
Alta.
B.C.
N.W.T./
Canada
Nun.
Y.T.
Count
Diploma
Baccalaureate
Master’s/
Doctorate
2005 3,788
928 5,813 4,367
38,375 65,850 7,205 5,826 15,436 17,293
159
678 165,718
2006 3,678
884 5,578 4,317
38,179 64,319 7,055 5,576 15,142 17,299
163
706 162,896
2007 3,575
868 5,438 4,162
38,141 62,025 6,905 5,497 15,019 16,653
156
686 159,125
2008 3,518
1,061 5,258 3,986
45,033 60,439 6,730 5,306 14,957 15,799
150
742 162,979
2009 3,442
1,02† 5,097 3,906
44,810 58,501 6,678 5,668 14,887 15,389
15†
550 160,111
2005 1,594
486 2,698 2,998
23,803 21,432 3,385 2,596 10,110
9,666
138
265
79,171
2006 1,706
517 2,954 3,175
24,156 23,384 3,595 2,763 10,820 10,618
152
312
84,152
2007 1,852
531 3,137 3,378
25,064 26,325 3,668 3,005 11,715 12,332
158
344
91,509
2008 2,040
418 3,323 3,541
18,704 29,506 3,900 3,332 12,624 12,942
178
457
90,965
2009 2,211
380 3,526 3,745
19,406 32,506 4,183 3,230 13,521 14,315
200
428
97,651
2005
113
29
222
161
1,649
2,147
221
121
801
855
5
12
6,336
2006
131
27
258
188
1,679
2,358
252
136
781
923
9
14
6,756
2007
147
32
268
186
1,750
2,628
252
163
781
1,069
8
18
7,302
2008
166
–
290
230
1,794
2,939
272
185
920
1,122
6
21
7,945
2009
172
*
306
215
1,839
3,289
292
218
997
1,194
†
44
8,576
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
-4.7% -4.0% -1.1%
-0.5%
-2.3% -2.1% -4.3%
-1.9%
0.0%
2.5%
4.1%
-1.7%
Annual Percentage Change
Diploma
2005
–
2006 -2.9%
Baccalaureate
Master’s/
Doctorate
2007 -2.8%
-1.8% -2.5% -3.6%
-0.1%
-3.6% -2.1% -1.4%
-0.8%
-3.7%
-4.3%
-2.8%
-2.3%
2008 -1.6%
22.2% -3.3% -4.2%
18.1%
-2.6% -2.5% -3.5%
-0.4%
-5.1%
-3.8%
8.2%
2.4%
2009 -2.2%
†
6.8%
-0.5%
-2.6%
†
-25.9%
-1.8%
2005
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
2006
7.0%
6.4%
9.5%
5.9%
1.5%
9.1%
6.2%
6.4%
7.0%
9.8% 10.1%
17.7%
6.3%
2007
8.6%
3.8% 12.6%
2.0%
8.8%
8.3% 16.1%
-3.1% -2.0%
-0.5%
-3.2% -0.8%
2.7%
6.2%
6.4%
3.9%
10.3%
8.7%
2008 10.2% -21.3%
5.9%
4.8% -25.4% 12.1%
6.3% 10.9%
7.8%
4.9% 12.7%
32.8%
-0.6%
2009
8.4%
-9.1%
6.1%
5.8%
7.3% -3.1%
7.1% 10.6% 12.4%
2005
–
–
–
–
–
2006 15.9%
-6.9% 16.2% 16.8%
1.8%
2007 12.2%
18.5%
3.9% -1.1%
4.2% 11.5%
0.0% 19.9%
2008 12.9%
–
8.2% 23.7%
2.5% 11.8%
7.9% 13.5% 17.8%
2009
3.6%
–
5.5% -6.5%
3.8% 10.2%
–
–
–
9.8% 14.0% 12.4%
-2.5%
2.5% 11.9%
–
7.4% 17.8%
-6.3%
7.4%
–
–
–
8.0% 80.0%
16.7%
6.6%
–
0.0% 15.8% -11.1%
8.4%
28.6%
8.1%
5.0% -25.0%
16.7%
8.8%
†
109.5%
7.9%
6.4%
(continued)
35
Regulated Nurses: Canadian Trends, 2005 to 2009
Table 13: Registered Nursing Workforce, by Highest Education in Nursing, by Jurisdiction and
Canada, 2005 to 2009 (cont’d)
N.L.
P.E.I.
N.S.
N.B.
Que.
Ont.
Man. Sask.
Alta.
B.C.
N.W.T./
Canada
Nun.
Y.T.
Percentage Distribution
Diploma
2005 68.9%
64.3% 66.6% 58.0%
60.1% 73.6% 66.6% 68.2% 58.6% 62.2% 52.6%
71.0%
66.0%
2006 66.7%
61.9% 63.5% 56.2%
59.6% 71.4% 64.7% 65.8% 56.6% 60.0% 50.3%
68.4%
64.2%
2007 64.1%
60.7% 61.5% 53.9%
58.7% 68.2% 63.8% 63.4% 54.6% 55.4% 48.4%
65.5%
61.7%
2008 61.5%
71.7% 59.3% 51.4%
68.7% 65.1% 61.7% 60.1% 52.5% 52.9% 44.9%
60.8%
62.2%
†
53.8%
60.1%
2009 59.1%
Baccalaureate
Master’s/
Doctorate
†
57.1% 49.7%
67.8% 62.0% 59.9% 62.2% 50.6% 49.8%
2005 29.0%
33.7% 30.9% 39.8%
37.3% 24.0% 31.3% 30.4% 38.4% 34.8% 45.7%
27.7%
31.5%
2006 30.9%
36.2% 33.6% 41.3%
37.7% 26.0% 33.0% 32.6% 40.5% 36.8% 46.9%
30.2%
33.2%
2007 33.2%
37.1% 35.5% 43.7%
38.6% 28.9% 33.9% 34.7% 42.6% 41.0% 49.1%
32.8%
35.5%
2008 35.6%
28.3% 37.5% 45.6%
28.5% 31.8% 35.8% 37.8% 44.3% 43.3% 53.3%
37.5%
34.7%
2009 38.0%
27.0% 39.5% 47.6%
29.4% 34.5% 37.5% 35.4% 46.0% 46.3% 54.5%
41.9%
36.7%
2005
2.1%
2.0%
2.5%
2.1%
2.6%
2.4%
2.0%
1.4%
3.0%
3.1%
1.7%
1.3%
2.5%
2006
2.4%
1.9%
2.9%
2.4%
2.6%
2.6%
2.3%
1.6%
2.9%
3.2%
2.8%
1.4%
2.7%
2007
2.6%
2.2%
3.0%
2.4%
2.7%
2.9%
2.3%
1.9%
2.8%
3.6%
2.5%
1.7%
2.8%
2008
2.9%
–
3.3%
3.0%
2.7%
3.2%
2.5%
2.1%
3.2%
3.8%
1.8%
1.7%
3.0%
2009
3.0%
†
3.4%
2.7%
2.8%
3.5%
2.6%
2.4%
3.4%
3.9%
†
4.3%
3.2%
Notes
– Data is not applicable or does not exist.
* Value suppressed in accordance with CIHI privacy policy; cell value is from 1 to 4.
† Digit suppressed to ensure confidentiality.
Non-response for Highest Education in Registered Nursing (% of RN workforce): 2005, n = 17 (<0.1%); 2006,
n = 15 (<0.1%); 2007, n = 25 (<0.1%); 2009, n = 3 (<0.1%).
Master’s/doctorate are combined to avoid cell suppression due to small values.
Totals may not sum to 100% due to rounding.
Northwest Territories and Nunavut data is combined, as RNs did not specify in which territory they worked the majority
of the time.
Data released by CIHI may differ from data from other sources due to CIHI’s nationally standardized methodology.
RNs employed in a jurisdiction different from their jurisdiction of registration are excluded to avoid duplication.
Northern territories data may include inter-jurisdictional duplicates.
See Chapter 5 (Methodological Notes) for more information regarding collection and comparability of data.
Source
Nursing Database, Canadian Institute for Health Information.
36
Chapter 1—Regulated Nurses in Canada: Trends of Registered Nurses
How many RNs generally return to school after completing their entry-to-practice
education? In 2009, the largest proportion of the workforce seeking advanced
education, following entry-to-practice education, were those returning for a post-diploma
baccalaureate. Of these, 39.1% (38,219) initially earned a diploma in nursing, then
returned to school for a baccalaureate; 62,980 RNs had already earned a baccalaureate
before entering nursing practice, bringing the total number of RNs in the workforce
holding baccalaureates to 97,651 (36.7%). In addition, a total of 8,576 RNs obtained
either a master’s degree or doctorate as their highest education in nursing following
entry-to-practice education (this includes RNs who initially obtained a diploma).
Average Age at Graduation
The age at which a student graduates from a nursing program and is eligible to enter the
RN workforce is an important indicator of the number of years the average RN will
contribute to the workforce.
Table 14: Registered Nursing Graduates and Average Age at Graduation,
by Range of Graduation Years, Canada, 1980 to 2009
Number of Graduates
Average Age
at Graduation
1980–1984
30,522
22.9
1985–1989
34,344
24.6
1990–1994
34,375
26.0
1995–1999
28,022
26.0
2000–2004
31,209
26.8
2005–2009
31,227
26.5
Graduation Year
Notes
Manitoba RN graduate age data for 2007, 2008 and 2009 is excluded from average age at graduation calculation for
Canada, as the College of Registered Nurses of Manitoba submitted aggregate tables for average age; number of
graduates includes Manitoba RN graduates to reflect total RN workforce.
RN graduates to reflect total RN workforce.
See Chapter 5 (Methodological Notes) for more information regarding collection and comparability of data.
Source
Nursing Database, Canadian Institute for Health Information.
37
Regulated Nurses: Canadian Trends, 2005 to 2009
The trend of increasing age at graduation has slowed since the early 1990s. In 2009,
32.2% of the workforce that had graduated in the previous five years was age 30 or older
at graduation.
Canadian Nurses Association Certification Program
Since 2003, the CNA has offered a voluntary national certification program in a broad
selection of specialties. The certification program has grown both in the number of
programs available and in the number of RNs writing the qualifying examinations.
When looking at Table 15, keep in mind that certification is not mandatory, that all areas
of specialty do not have certification programs and that RNs may have more than one
specialty. Accordingly, the total number certified does not represent all RNs working in
a specific area of responsibility.
Table 15: Registered Nurses With Valid CNA Certification, by Specialty, Canada,
2005 to 2009
2005
Cardiovascular
Community Health
Critical Care
Critical Care—Pediatrics
Emergency
Enterostomal Therapy
Gastroenterology
Gerontology
2006
2007
2008
2009
660
713
722
774
793
–
148
216
338
460
1,263
1,223
1,166
1,190
1,191
61
94
104
100
113
1,353
1,307
1,323
1,345
1,333
–
–
–
–
66
147
171
205
235
231
1,822
1,937
1,988
2,104
2,073
Hospice Palliative Care
756
916
1,103
1,247
1,232
Nephrology
963
1,019
1,052
1,080
1,103
Neuroscience
207
223
237
258
269
Occupational Health
952
926
908
888
879
1,231
1,332
1,323
1,360
1,431
Oncology
Orthopedics
–
73
125
153
169
619
621
642
665
719
Perioperative
1,672
1,585
1,552
1,566
1,560
Psychiatric/Mental Health
1,761
1,729
1,734
1,750
1,765
–
71
121
172
216
13,467
14,088
14,521
15,225
15,603
Perinatal
Rehabilitation
Total
Notes
– Data is not applicable or does not exist.
The overall total is inclusive of occupational health nursing reciprocity candidates; however, these candidates are not
included in the total count for this particular area of specialty.
Source
Canadian Nurses Association Department of Regulatory Policy.
38
Chapter 1—Regulated Nurses in Canada: Trends of Registered Nurses
Mobility Trends: A Mobile Workforce
Regulated nurses are in demand in Canada and around the world. As a result, graduates
from regulated nursing programs often have numerous options as to where they will
practise. Canadian graduates may choose to remain in their current province or territory,
to migrate to another Canadian province or territory or to emigrate to another country.
International graduates may choose to immigrate to Canada, either through their own
initiative or through a provincial nursing recruitment program.
As CIHI does not collect citizenship or immigration data, the mobility trends in this chapter
related to interprovincial and international mobility are based on indicators developed by
CIHI using data on employment, location of residence and location of graduation. Additional
information on RN mobility trends is available in the data tables on the CIHI website.
Migration Within Canada
Each provincial and territorial workforce combines registered nurses who originally graduated
from within the jurisdiction, those who graduated from other Canadian jurisdictions and those
who graduated from outside the country. Overall, nearly 9 out of 10 (87.8%) registered nurses
who graduated from Canadian registered nursing programs who were working in Canada in 2009
either did not move after graduation or eventually returned to their jurisdiction of graduation.
Figure 13: Registered Nursing Workforce, by Jurisdiction of Graduation and
Registration, Canada, 2009
Notes
Includes only RNs educated in Canadian nursing programs employed in Canada, in 2009 (N = 242,968).
Totals may not sum to 100% due to rounding.
Northwest Territories and Nunavut data is combined, as RNs did not specify in which territory they worked the majority of the time.
Data released by CIHI may differ from data from other sources due to CIHI’s nationally standardized methodology.
RNs employed in a jurisdiction different from their jurisdiction of registration are excluded to avoid duplication.
Northern territories data may include inter-jurisdictional duplicates.
See Chapter 5 (Methodological Notes) for more information regarding collection and comparability of data.
Source
Nursing Database, Canadian Institute for Health Information.
39
Regulated Nurses: Canadian Trends, 2005 to 2009
Among registered nurses employed in 2009, those graduating from registered nursing
programs in Quebec (94.2%), Ontario (91.7%) and British Columbia (91.2%) were the
most likely to be employed in their province of graduation (see Figure 13).
In contrast, among registered nurses who originally graduated from registered nursing
programs in Saskatchewan who were employed in Canada in 2009, 69.7% were
employed in the province. Similarly, 70.0% of RNs who originally graduated from
Newfoundland and Labrador and 70.0% of RNs who originally graduated from
Prince Edward Island remained in those provinces.
Figure 14 shows the top three destinations for those who moved some time between
their graduation year and 2009, as a comparison of the jurisdiction of graduation to the
jurisdiction of current registration. The data does not account for mobility and migration
in the intervening years.
Figure 14: Registered Nursing Worforce, by Jurisdiction of Registration and Top
Three Destinations of Graduation, Canada, 2009
Notes
Includes only RNs educated in of Canadian nursing programs employed in Canada, in 2009 (N = 242,968).
Northwest Territories and Nunavut data is combined, as the RNs did not specify in which territory they worked the
majority of the time.
Data released by CIHI may differ from data from other sources due to CIHI’s nationally standardized methodology.
RNs employed in a jurisdiction different from their jurisdiction of registration are excluded to avoid duplication.
Northern territories data may include inter-jurisdictional duplicates.
See Chapter 5 (Methodological Notes) for more information regarding collection and comparability of data.
Source
Nursing Database, Canadian Institute for Health Information.
40
Chapter 1—Regulated Nurses in Canada: Trends of Registered Nurses
Overall, the provinces of British Columbia, Alberta and Ontario figure prominently as
destinations for migrating nurses from across the country. In contrast, the Yukon (1.1%)
and Newfoundland and Labrador (1.2%) received the least number of migrating nurses.
Working Outside Province/Territory of Registration
RNs who work outside their province or territory of registration may be working outside
Canada or in another jurisdiction within Canada. Note that CIHI can report on RNs
working outside Canada only if they maintain registration with a Canadian province
or territory.
Figure 15 illustrates the top destinations for RNs who were registered in a Canadian
province or territory in 2009 but working either abroad or in another jurisdiction in
Canada. Of the 6,257 RNs who were not working in their province/territory of registration,
3,235 (51.7%) were employed in the United States, with an additional 10.6% employed in
other locations.
Figure 15: Registered Nurses Working Outside of Jurisdiction of Registration,
by Country of Employment, Canada, 2009
Notes
Includes only those who worked outside of their jurisdiction of registration, in 2009 (N = 6,257).
Totals may not sum to 100% due to rounding.
See Chapter 5 (Methodological Notes) for more information regarding collection and comparability of data.
Source
Nursing Database, Canadian Institute for Health Information.
41
Regulated Nurses: Canadian Trends, 2005 to 2009
Internationally Educated Registered Nurses
In the absence of citizenship and immigration data, CIHI uses the location of graduation
as an indicator of trends in immigration. The assumption is made that an RN who
studied outside of Canada immigrated, but the total number also includes Canadian
citizens and residents who studied abroad.
Table 16: Registered Nursing Workforce, by Location of Graduation in Canada and International,
by Jurisdiction and Canada, 2005 to 2009
N.L.
Count
Canada
P.E.I.
N.S.
N.B.
Que.
Ont.
Man.
Sask.
2005
5,390
1,409 8,526 7,436 62,268 78,507 10,087 8,209
2006
5,411
1,396 8,573 7,579 62,489 78,687 10,169 8,169
2007
5,481
1,404 8,631 7,613 63,425 79,521 10,103 8,341
2008
5,630
1,447 8,650 7,641 63,943 81,315 10,187 8,482
2009
5,733
1,378 8,694 7,748 64,371 82,697 10,419 8,639
International
2005
103
32
207
90 1,559 10,684
724
239
2006
96
30
217
100 1,525 11,231
733
224
2007
91
29
212
107 1,528 11,320
722
240
2008
85
29
221
115 1,586 11,430
715
247
2009
91
26
235
117 1,683 10,850
734
180
Annual Percentage Change
Canada
2005
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
2006
0.4% -0.9% 0.6% 1.9% 0.4% 0.2% 0.8% -0.5%
2007
1.3%
0.6% 0.7% 0.4% 1.5% 1.1% -0.6%
2.1%
2008
2.7%
3.1% 0.2% 0.4% 0.8% 2.3% 0.8%
1.7%
2009
1.8% -4.8% 0.5% 1.4% 0.7% 1.7% 2.3%
1.9%
International
2005
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
2006
-6.8% -6.3% 4.8% 11.1% -2.2% 5.1% 1.2% -6.3%
2007
-5.2% -3.3% -2.3% 7.0% 0.2% 0.8% -1.5%
7.1%
2008
-6.6%
0.0% 4.2% 7.5% 3.8% 1.0% -1.0%
2.9%
2009
7.1% -10.3% 6.3% 1.7% 6.1% -5.1% 2.7% -27.1%
Percentage Distribution
Canada
2005
98.1% 97.8% 97.6% 98.8% 97.6% 88.0% 93.3% 97.2%
2006
98.3% 97.9% 97.5% 98.7% 97.6% 87.5% 93.3% 97.3%
2007
98.4% 98.0% 97.6% 98.6% 97.6% 87.5% 93.3% 97.2%
2008
98.5% 98.0% 97.5% 98.5% 97.6% 87.7% 93.4% 97.2%
2009
98.4% 98.1% 97.4% 98.5% 97.5% 88.4% 93.4% 98.0%
International
2005
1.9%
2.2% 2.4% 1.2% 2.4% 12.0% 6.7%
2.8%
2006
1.7%
2.1% 2.5% 1.3% 2.4% 12.5% 6.7%
2.7%
2007
1.6%
2.0% 2.4% 1.4% 2.4% 12.5% 6.7%
2.8%
2008
1.5%
2.0% 2.5% 1.5% 2.4% 12.3% 6.6%
2.8%
2009
1.6%
1.9% 2.6% 1.5% 2.5% 11.6% 6.6%
2.0%
Y.T.
B.C.
23,511
23,921
24,628
25,698
26,374
1,167
1,190
1,259
2,726
2,924
23,420
24,297
25,247
25,051
25,731
4,258
4,414
4,686
4,695
5,066
278
298
296
304
336
24
26
25
25
30
865
930
946
1,112
934
90
101
100
106
87
229,906
231,919
235,636
239,460
243,054
19,177
19,887
20,319
21,980
22,023
–
1.7%
3.0%
4.3%
2.6%
–
2.0%
5.8%
116.5%
7.3%
–
3.7%
3.9%
-0.8%
2.7%
–
3.7%
6.2%
0.2%
7.9%
–
7.2%
-0.7%
2.7%
10.5%
–
8.3%
-3.8%
0.0%
20.0%
–
7.5%
1.7%
17.5%
-16.0%
–
12.2%
-1.0%
6.0%
-17.9%
–
0.9%
1.6%
1.6%
1.5%
–
3.7%
2.2%
8.2%
0.2%
95.3%
95.3%
95.1%
90.4%
90.0%
4.7%
4.7%
4.9%
9.6%
10.0%
84.6%
84.6%
84.3%
84.2%
83.6%
15.4%
15.4%
15.7%
15.8%
16.4%
92.1%
92.0%
92.2%
92.4%
91.8%
7.9%
8.0%
7.8%
7.6%
8.2%
90.6%
90.2%
90.4%
91.3%
91.5%
9.4%
9.8%
9.6%
8.7%
8.5%
92.3%
92.1%
92.1%
91.6%
91.7%
7.7%
7.9%
7.9%
8.4%
8.3%
Notes
– Data is not applicable or does not exist.
Non-response for Location of Graduation (% of RN workforce): 2005, n = 2,159 (0.9%); 2006, n = 2,013 (0.8%);
2007, n = 2,006 (0.8%); 2008, n = 449 (0.2%); 2009, n = 1,264 (0.5%).
Totals may not sum to 100% due to rounding.
Northwest Territories and Nunavut data is combined, as the RNs did not specify in which territory they worked the
majority of the time.
Data released by CIHI may differ from data from other sources due to CIHI’s nationally standardized methodology.
RNs employed in a jurisdiction different from their jurisdiction of registration are excluded to avoid duplication.
Northern territories data may include inter-jurisdictional duplicates.
See Chapter 5 (Methodological Notes) for more information regarding collection and comparability of data.
Source
Nursing Database, Canadian Institute for Health Information.
42
N.W.T./
Canada
Nun.
Alta.
Chapter 1—Regulated Nurses in Canada: Trends of Registered Nurses
Of the RNs employed in Canada who reported their location of graduation in 2009,
91.7% (243,054) graduated from a nursing program in Canada and 8.3% (22,023)
graduated from an international nursing program.
Table 16 shows that the RN workforces of British Columbia (16.4%), Ontario (11.6%)
and Alberta (10.0%) had the highest concentrations of internationally educated RNs in
2009. In contrast, only 1.5% of the RN workforce in New Brunswick, as well as 1.6% in
Newfoundland and Labrador, graduated from an international nursing school.
Figure 16: Internationally Educated Registered Nurses in the Workforce,
by Country of Graduation, 2009
Notes
Includes only RNs who were educated outside of Canada, in 2009 (N = 22,023).
Totals may not sum to 100% due to rounding.
Data released by CIHI may differ from data from other sources due to CIHI’s nationally standardized methodology.
See Chapter 5 (Methodological Notes) for more information regarding collection and comparability of data.
Source
Nursing Database, Canadian Institute for Health Information.
43
Regulated Nurses: Canadian Trends, 2005 to 2009
For the 22,023 RNs in Canada who graduated from an international nursing program
in 2009, the seven most frequently identified countries of graduation are identified in
Figure 16. Almost half of all international graduates attended nursing programs in the
Philippines or the United Kingdom. Graduates from the United States comprised 7.4%
of all internationally educated graduates in the RN workforce.
Urban/Rural Distribution of the Workforce
Geographical differences in Canada create numerous challenges for health care
providers and planners. The urban/rural distribution of the population is a challenge
not only in the northern territories but also in each of the provinces.
To determine if RNs were practising in a rural or an urban setting, a postal code analysis was
performed. In most cases, the postal code used was that of the workplace; however, where
the postal code of the workplace was not submitted to CIHI, the postal code of residence
was used.ii Figures 17 and 18 illustrate the urban/rural/remote/territories distribution of the
RN workforce in Canada in 2009. In 2009, 89.3% of the RN workforce worked in urban areas
of Canada, ranging from highs of 94.1% in British Columbia and in Ontario to lows of 57.5%
in the Northwest Territories/Nunavut and 67.8% in Newfoundland and Labrador.
Figure 17: Registered Nursing Workforce, by Urban/Rural/Remote/Territories
Designation, Canada, 2009
Notes
Totals may not sum to 100% due to rounding.
Urban areas are defined as communities with populations greater than 10,000 persons.
Rural areas are defined as communities in relatively close proximity to urban areas.
Remote areas are defined as those communities with relatively little social and economic interaction with urban areas.
Territories are defined as areas outside of Whitehorse and Yellowknife in the northern territories.
See Chapter 5 (Methodological Notes) for more information regarding collection and comparability of data.
Source
Nursing Database, Canadian Institute for Health Information.
ii.
44
See Chapter 5 (Methodological Notes) for a description of the postal code analysis.
Chapter 1—Regulated Nurses in Canada: Trends of Registered Nurses
Figure 18: Registered Nursing Workforce, by Urban/Rural/Remote/Territories
Designation, by Jurisdiction, 2009
Notes
Totals may not sum to 100% due to rounding.
Urban areas are defined as communities with populations greater than 10,000 persons.
Rural areas are defined as communities in relatively close proximity to urban areas.
Remote areas are defined as those communities with relatively little social and economic interaction with urban areas.
Territories are defined as areas outside of Whitehorse and Yellowknife in the northern territories.
Northwest Territories and Nunavut data is combined, as RNs did not specify in which territory they worked the majority
of the time.
Postal code analysis for the Quebec RN workforce was provided by l’Ordre des infirmières et infirmiers du Québec.
Postal code analysis for the Manitoba RN workforce was provided by the College of Registered Psychiatric Nurses
of Manitoba.
Data released by CIHI may differ from data from other sources due to CIHI’s nationally standardized methodology.
RNs employed in a jurisdiction different from their jurisdiction of registration are excluded to avoid duplication.
Northern territories data may include inter-jurisdictional duplicates.
See Chapter 5 (Methodological Notes) for more information regarding collection and comparability of data.
Source
Nursing Database, Canadian Institute for Health Information.
45
Regulated Nurses: Canadian Trends, 2005 to 2009
Registered Nurses in the Territories: Characteristics
of the Northern Workforce
The nature and delivery of nursing services in the northern territories differ from those in the
Canadian provinces. It is not uncommon for RNs to travel north on short-term work contracts
and to return to their home province for the remainder of the year. Therefore, in addition to
the RNs who are registered and working only in the northern territories, those RNs who are
registered in a territory and another jurisdiction are also included in the northern RN workforce.
Some of the employment patterns described in this section also exist in northern or rural areas
of each Canadian province. The health region analysis in Chapter 4 of this report provides
insight into some of the characteristics and services of each health region.
Figure 19 shows that the majority of RNs working in the territories worked in hospitals (40.0%).
Notably, 39.8% of RNs in the territories were employed in community health centres, home
care agencies or nursing stations (outpost or clinic) and public health departments/units.
In contrast, 14.1% of RNs employed in the provinces worked in these types of facilities.
Figure 19: Registered Nursing Workforce, by Place of Work, by Provincial or
Territorial Level, Canada, 2009
Notes
Non-response for Place of Work (% of RN workforce): n = 8,942 (3.4%).
Hospital includes data from hospital (general, maternal, pediatric, psychiatric), mental health centre and
rehabilitation/convalescent centre.
Community Health includes data from community health centre, home care agency, nursing station (outpost or clinic)
and public health department/unit.
Nursing Home/LTC includes data from nursing home/long-term care facility.
Other Place of Work includes data from business/industry/occupational health office, private nursing agency/private
duty, self-employed, physician’s office/family practice unit, educational institution, association/government and other.
Totals may not sum to 100% due to rounding.
Data released by CIHI may differ from data from other sources due to CIHI’s nationally standardized methodology.
See Chapter 5 (Methodological Notes) for more information regarding collection and comparability of data.
Source
Nursing Database, Canadian Institute for Health Information.
46
Chapter 1—Regulated Nurses in Canada: Trends of Registered Nurses
In 2009, 37.7% of the RN workforce in the Northwest Territories and Nunavut and 46.6%
of the Yukon RN workforce were employed in the hospital sector. The community health
sector accounted for 41.5% of the RN workforce in the Northwest Territories and
Nunavut and 35.3% of the Yukon RN workforce.
Among RNs employed in the territories, the three most frequently identified areas of
responsibility were community health (26.9%), medicine/surgery (9.9%) and emergency
care (8.5%). RNs employed in the provinces most frequently identified medicine/surgery
(17.0%), geriatric/long-term care (9.8%) and other patient care (9.2%) as their area of
responsibility. More than 70% of RNs in both the territories (76.5%) and the provinces
(77.9%) identified their position as staff nurse/community health nurse.
Internationally educated RNs comprised a similar percentage of the territorial workforce
(8.4%) as the provincial workforce (8.3%).
Among the Canadian-trained RN workforce, Ontario graduates comprised more than
one-quarter (25.4%) of the workforce in the northern territories, while Alberta graduates
comprised 13.6% and British Columbia graduates comprised 11.2%. With only one RN
education program in the territories, graduates from the north accounted for only 8.5%
of Canadian-trained RNs in the territorial workforce.
Nurse Practitioner Employment Trends: Is the
Workforce Changing?
The previous section on RNs included data on nurse practitioners (NPs). In this section,
a selection of data is presented only for NPs, to illustrate some trends relevant to this
emerging specialty. An NP is an advanced practice RN with additional education in
health assessment, diagnosis and management of illness and injuries, including
ordering tests and prescribing drugs.1 NPs have been regulated in all provinces
and territories except the Yukon since 2006.
Table 17: Year of Implementation of Nurse Practitioner Legislation, by Jurisdiction
N.L.
P.E.I.
N.S.
N.B.
Que. Ont. Man. Sask. Alta.
B.C.
Y.T.
N.W.T.
Nun.
First Year
1997
of Regulation
2006
2002
2002
2003 1997 2005
2005
RP
2004
2004
2003
2002
Notes
RP: regulation pending.
From 1996 to 2002, NPs in Alberta were referred to as RNs providing extended services. In June 2002, regulations
were changed to refer to these nurses as nurse practitioners. Refer to the College and Association of Registered
Nurses of Alberta for additional information.
47
Regulated Nurses: Canadian Trends, 2005 to 2009
Table 18 illustrates the supply trends of all NPs between 2005 and 2009. The total
number of NPs employed in nursing in Canada was 1,990 in 2009, representing an
increase of 22.4% since 2008, but representing only 0.7% of the total RN workforce.
The years between 2005 and 2009 saw a doubling of the NP workforce in Canada. The
percentage change must be interpreted with caution as the number of NPs is small.
Table 18: Nurse Practitioner Workforce, by Employment Status, Canada, 2005 to 2009
Employed in Nursing
Regular
Regular
Basis, Full Basis, Part
Time
Time
Not Employed in Nursing
Regular
Basis,
Status
Unknown
Casual
Basis
Subtotal
Employed
in Other
Than
Nursing
or Not
Employed
Not
Stated
Grand
Total
Subtotal
Count
2005
720
168
31
24
943
24
9
33
976
2006
858
198
47
26
1,129
24
9
33
1,162
2007
964
273
62
45
1,344
42
7
49
1,393
2008
1,275
267
75
9
1,626
28
15
43
1,669
2009
1,599
298
93
0
1,990
44
14
58
2,048
Annual Percentage Change
2005
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
2006
19.2%
17.9%
51.6%
8.3%
19.7%
0.0%
0.0%
0.0%
19.1%
2007
12.4%
37.9%
31.9%
73.1%
19.0%
75.0%
-22.2%
48.5%
19.9%
2008
32.3%
-2.2%
21.0%
-80.0%
21.0%
-33.3%
114.3%
-12.2%
19.8%
2009
25.4%
11.6%
24.0%
-100.0%
22.4%
57.1%
-6.7%
34.9%
22.7%
Percentage Distribution
2005
73.8%
17.2%
3.2%
2.5%
96.6%
2.5%
0.9%
3.4%
100.0%
2006
73.8%
17.0%
4.0%
2.2%
97.2%
2.1%
0.8%
2.8%
100.0%
2007
69.2%
19.6%
4.5%
3.2%
96.5%
3.0%
0.5%
3.5%
100.0%
2008
76.4%
16.0%
4.5%
0.5%
97.4%
1.7%
0.9%
2.6%
100.0%
2009
78.1%
14.6%
4.5%
0.0%
97.2%
2.1%
0.7%
2.8%
100.0%
Notes
– Data is not applicable or does not exist.
Number of jurisdictions submitting NP data: 9 in 2005; 10 in 2006; 11 in 2007, 2008 and 2009. Therefore, caution is
warranted in interpreting annual percentage change values secondary to variability of number of jurisdictions
submitting NP data.
Totals may not sum to 100% due to rounding.
See Chapter 5 (Methodological Notes) for more information regarding collection and comparability of data.
Source
Nursing Database, Canadian Institute for Health Information.
48
Chapter 1—Regulated Nurses in Canada: Trends of Registered Nurses
NPs employed in nursing but reported as employed—status unknown are those
who reported a workplace but failed to indicate their status (full time, part time or
casual). Accordingly, they are included in the workforce but are excluded from some
analyses in the report, as indicated in table footnotes. The number of NPs reported as
employed—status unknown decreased every year since 2005.
The majority of NPs working in nursing were employed on a regular basis in full-time
positions; this number steadily increased from 2005 to 2009. In 2009, 1,599 (80.4%) NPs
were working in regular full-time positions.
Table 19: Nurse Practitioner Workforce, by Jurisdiction and Canada, 2005 to 2009
N.L.
P.E.I.
N.S.
N.B.
Que.
Ont.
Man.
Sask.
Alta.
B.C.
Y.T.
N.W.T./
Nun.
Canada
Count
2005
66
–
37
19
–
590
*
74
130
*
–
19
943
2006
89
–
61
24
17
639
*
88
156
3†
–
16
1,129
2007
96
*
72
29
17
731
3†
97
176
50
–
42
1,344
2008
99
*
80
49
29
872
4†
98
210
88
–
52
1,626
1,124
†
111
251
119
–
46
1,990
2009
94
*
85
55
38
6
Annual Percentage Change
2005
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
2006
34.8%
–
64.9%
26.3%
–
8.3%
†
18.9%
20.0%
†
–
-15.8%
19.7%
2007
7.9%
–
18.0%
20.8%
0.0%
14.4%
†
10.2%
12.8%
†
–
162.5%
19.0%
2008
3.1%
†
11.1%
69.0%
70.6%
19.3%
†
1.0%
19.3%
76.0%
–
23.8%
21.0%
2009
-5.1%
†
6.3%
12.2%
31.0%
28.9%
†
13.3%
19.5%
35.2%
–
-11.5%
22.4%
3.9%
2.0%
–
62.6%
†
7.8%
13.8%
†
–
2.0%
100.0%
Percentage Distribution
2005
7.0%
–
2006
7.9%
–
5.4%
2.1%
1.5%
56.6%
†
7.8%
13.8%
†
–
1.4%
100.0%
2007
7.1%
†
5.4%
2.2%
1.3%
54.4%
†
7.2%
13.1%
3.7%
–
3.1%
100.0%
2008
6.1%
†
4.9%
3.0%
1.8%
53.6%
†
6.0%
12.9%
5.4%
–
3.2%
100.0%
4.7%
†
56.5%
†
5.6%
12.6%
6.0%
–
2.3%
100.0%
2009
4.3%
2.8%
1.9%
Notes
– Data is not applicable or does not exist.
* Value suppressed in accordance with CIHI privacy policy; cell value is from 1 to 4.
† Digit suppressed to ensure confidentiality.
Number of jurisdictions submitting NP data: 9 in 2005; 10 in 2006; 11 in 2007, 2008 and 2009. Therefore, caution is warranted in
interpreting annual percentage change values secondary to variability of number of jurisdictions submitting NP data.
Totals may not sum to 100% due to rounding.
Northwest Territories and Nunavut data is combined, as NPs did not specify in which territory they worked the majority of the time.
Data released by CIHI may differ from data from other sources due to CIHI’s nationally standardized methodology.
NPs employed in a jurisdiction different from their jurisdiction of registration are excluded to avoid duplication.
Northern territories data may include inter-jurisdictional duplicates.
See Chapter 5 (Methodological Notes) for more information regarding collection and comparability of data.
Source
Nursing Database, Canadian Institute for Health Information.
49
Regulated Nurses: Canadian Trends, 2005 to 2009
As Table 19 shows, the size of the NP workforce varies substantially by jurisdiction.
This variability is likely due to the timing of the implementation of NP legislation in
each Canadian jurisdiction. As of 2009, the Yukon did not have legislation regulating
nurse practitioners.
Place of Work
Figure 20 shows that, while the proportion of NPs employed in the community health
sector has decreased, the proportion in the hospital sector has increased.
Figure 20: Nurse Practitioner Workforce, by Place of Work, Canada, 2005,
2007 and 2009
Notes
Number of jurisdictions submitting NP data: 9 in 2005; 11 in 2007 and 2009.
Non-response for Place of Work (% of NP workforce): 2005, n = 38 (4.0%); 2007, n = 48 (3.6%); 2009, n = 80 (4.0%).
Hospital includes data from hospital (general, maternal, pediatric, psychiatric), mental health centre and
rehabilitation/convalescent centre.
Community Health includes data from community health centre, home care agency, nursing station (outpost or clinic)
and public health department/unit.
Nursing Home/LTC includes data from nursing home/long-term care facility.
Other Place of Work includes data from business/industry/occupational health office, private nursing agency/private
duty, self-employed, physician’s office/family practice unit, educational institution, association/government and other.
See Chapter 5 (Methodological Notes) for more information regarding collection and comparability of data.
Source
Nursing Database, Canadian Institute for Health Information.
50
Chapter 1—Regulated Nurses in Canada: Trends of Registered Nurses
Area of Responsibility
The highest proportion of NPs, 48.0%, reported their area of responsibility as other
patient care in 2009.
Table 20: Nurse Practitioner Workforce, by Area of Responsibility, Canada, 2009
Count
Percentage
Direct Care
Medical/Surgical
137
7.1%
Community Health
137
7.1%
Geriatric/Long-Term Care
93
4.8%
Ambulatory Care
89
4.6%
Emergency Room
87
4.5%
Pediatric
86
4.4%
Nursing in Several Clinical Areas
74
3.8%
Critical Care (Burn)
57
2.9%
Public Health
32
1.6%
Psychiatric/Mental Health
21
1.1%
Maternal/Newborn
21
1.1%
Oncology
19
1.0%
Occupational Health
15
0.8%
†
†
Home Care
7
0.4%
Operating Room
*
†
Telehealth
*
†
932
48.0%
Rehabilitation
Other Patient Care
Total Direct Care
1,817
93.7%
Total Administration
45
2.3%
Total Education
71
3.7%
Total Research
Total
7
0.4%
1,940
100.0%
Notes
– Data is not applicable or does not exist.
* Value suppressed in accordance with CIHI privacy policy; cell value is from 1 to 4.
† Digit suppressed to ensure confidentiality.
Number of jurisdictions licensing NPs: 11 in 2009.
Non-response for Area of Responsibility (% of all NPs): n = 50 (2.5%).
Totals may not sum to 100% due to rounding.
Direct Care includes data from medical/surgical, psychiatric/mental health, pediatric, maternal/newborn, geriatric/
long-term care, critical care, community health, ambulatory care, home care, occupational health, operating room,
emergency room, nursing in several clinical areas, oncology, rehabilitation, public health, telehealth and other
patient care.
Administration includes data from nursing services, nursing education and other administration.
Education includes data from teaching students, teaching employees, teaching patients/clients and other education.
Research includes data from nursing research and other research.
See Chapter 5 (Methodological Notes) for more information regarding collection and comparability of data.
Source
Nursing Database, Canadian Institute for Health Information.
51
Regulated Nurses: Canadian Trends, 2005 to 2009
Nurse Practitioner Demographic Trends:
Sex Composition
Almost all NPs in the Canadian workforce (94.0%) were female in 2009, a proportion that
had not changed substantially over five years (see Table 21). This resembles the pattern
in the RN workforce as a whole.
Table 21: Nurse Practitioner Workforce, by Sex, Canada, 2005 to 2009
Female
Male
Total
2005
887
56
943
2006
1,064
65
1,129
2007
1,267
78
1,345
2008
1,536
90
1,626
2009
1,871
119
1,990
Count
Annual Percentage Change
2005
–
–
–
2006
20.0%
16.1%
19.7%
2007
19.1%
20.0%
19.1%
2008
21.2%
15.4%
20.9%
2009
21.8%
32.2%
22.4%
Percentage Distribution
2005
94.1%
5.9%
100.0%
2006
94.2%
5.8%
100.0%
2007
94.2%
5.8%
100.0%
2008
94.5%
5.5%
100.0%
2009
94.0%
6.0%
100.0%
Notes
– Data is not applicable or does not exist.
Number of jurisdictions submitting NP data: 9 in 2005; 10 in 2006; 11 in 2007, 2008 and 2009. Therefore, caution
is warranted in interpreting annual percentage change values secondary to variability of number of jurisdictions
submitting NP data.
Totals may not sum to 100% due to rounding.
See Chapter 5 (Methodological Notes) for more information regarding collection and comparability of data.
Source
Nursing Database, Canadian Institute for Health Information.
52
Chapter 1—Regulated Nurses in Canada: Trends of Registered Nurses
Age of the Workforce
In 2009, the average age of NPs was 45.5 (excluding Manitoba) and the majority of
jurisdictions had their highest proportion of NPs in the 45-to-49 age group. In Canada
as a whole, the top four age groups were 35 to 39 (13.5%), 40 to 44 (18.6%), 45 to 49
(23.2%) and 50 to 54 (16.6%), which accounts for 71.9% of the NP workforce.
Table 22: Nurse Practitioner Workforce, by Age Group, Canada, 2009
Age Groups
<30
Canada
2.0%
30–34
10.6%
35–39
13.5%
40–44
18.6%
45–49
23.2%
50–54
16.6%
55–59
11.5%
60+
4.1%
Notes
Number of jurisdictions submitting NP data: 11 in 2009.
Totals may not sum to 100% due to rounding.
See Chapter 5 (Methodological Notes) for more information regarding collection and comparability of data.
Source
Nursing Database, Canadian Institute for Health Information.
53
Regulated Nurses: Canadian Trends, 2005 to 2009
Nurse Practitioner Mobility Trends
Of the NPs employed in Canada who reported their location of graduation in 2009,
Table 23 shows that 95.9% (1,900), graduated from a nursing program in Canada, and
4.1% (81) graduated from an international nursing program. Since 2005, the proportion
of internationally educated nurses in the Canadian NP workforce remained stable at
close to 4.0%.
Table 23: Nurse Practitioner Workforce, by Location of Graduation, by Canada and
International, 2005 to 2009
Canada
International
Total
Count
2005
824
36
860
2006
991
42
1,033
2007
1,189
50
1,239
2008
1,460
66
1,526
2009
1,900
81
1,981
Annual Percentage Change
2005
–
–
–
2006
20.3%
16.7%
20.1%
2007
20.0%
19.0%
19.9%
2008
22.8%
32.0%
23.2%
2009
30.1%
22.7%
29.8%
2005
95.8%
4.2%
100.0%
2006
95.9%
4.1%
100.0%
2007
96.0%
4.0%
100.0%
2008
95.7%
4.3%
100.0%
2009
95.9%
4.1%
100.0%
Percentage Distribution
Notes
– Data is not applicable or does not exist.
Saskatchewan NP counts are not included in totals, as Location of Graduation was not provided in 2008.
Number of jurisdictions submitting NP data: 9 in 2005; 10 in 2006; 11 in 2007, 2008 and 2009. Therefore, caution
is warranted in interpreting annual percentage change values secondary to variability of number of jurisdictions
submitting NP data.
Non-response for Location of Graduation (% of NP workforce): 2005, n = 9 (1.0%); 2006, n = 8 (0.7%); 2007,
n = 8 (0.6%); 2008, n = 2 (0.1%); 2009, n = 2 (<0.1%).
Totals may not sum to 100% due to rounding.
Data released by CIHI may differ from data from other sources due to CIHI’s nationally standardized methodology.
See Chapter 5 (Methodological Notes) for more information regarding collection and comparability of data.
Source
Nursing Database, Canadian Institute for Health Information.
54
Chapter 1—Regulated Nurses in Canada: Trends of Registered Nurses
Urban/Rural Distribution of the Nurse Practitioner Workforce
Figure 21 illustrates the urban/rural distribution of the NP workforce in Canada. In 2009,
78.8% of NPs worked in urban Canada, 9.5% worked in rural settings, 10.6% worked in
remote settings and 1.1% worked in the territories. The distribution was different for the
RN workforce: 89.3% of RNs worked in urban settings, 4.4% worked in rural settings,
6.1% worked in remote settings and 0.2% worked in the territories.
Figure 21: Nurse Practitioner Workforce, by Urban/Rural/Remote/
Territories Designation, Canada, 2009
Notes
Number of jurisdictions licensing NPs: 11 in 2009.
Totals may not sum to 100% due to rounding.
Urban areas are defined as communities with populations greater than 10,000 persons.
Rural areas are defined as communities in relatively close proximity to urban areas.
Remote areas are defined as those communities with relatively little social and economic interaction with urban areas.
Territories are defined as areas outside of Whitehorse and Yellowknife in the northern territories.
See Chapter 5 (Methodological Notes) for more information regarding collection and comparability of data.
Source
Nursing Database, Canadian Institute for Health Information.
55
Chapter 2—Regulated Nurses in Canada:
Trends of Licensed Practical Nurses
Chapter 2—Regulated Nurses in Canada: Trends of Licensed Practical Nurses
Workforce Trends: How Many Licensed
Practical Nurses?
The regulated nursing workforce is of critical importance to the health of Canadians,
and thus to health human resource planners. This chapter presents data on licensed
practical nurses (LPNs) working in Canada in 2009 and illustrates key trends over the
last five years.
The LPN workforce is defined as LPNs employed in practical nursing within Canada.
They represented 22.1% of the total regulated nursing workforce in 2009. The
Employment Status indicator classifies LPNs as working either in nursing or outside
of nursing, or as not working. The indicator further classifies LPNs in the workforce
as working in part-time, full-time or casual positions. As shown in Figure 22, the vast
majority of LPNs who registered in Canada were in the LPN workforce, and close
to half (50.2%) were employed in full-time positions.
Figure 22: Licensed Practical Nurses, by Employment Status, Canada, 2009
Notes
Totals may not sum to 100% due to rounding.
Employed LPNs with employed—status unknown are excluded from the percentage distribution of full time,
part time and casual.
See Chapter 5 (Methodological Notes) for more information regarding collection and comparability of data.
Source
Nursing Database, Canadian Institute for Health Information.
59
Regulated Nurses: Canadian Trends, 2005 to 2009
Figure 23 illustrates the growth trend of the LPN workforce per 100,000 population
between 2005 and 2009. There were 228 LPNs per 100,000 population in Canada for
2009. Since 2005, the growth of the LPN workforce was consistently higher than the
rate of population growth.
Figure 23: Licensed Practical Nursing Workforce per 100,000 Population, Canada,
2005 to 2009
Notes
The population estimates used in this publication are from Statistics Canada, Demography Division, and are based on
Canadian Demographic Estimates, 2008–2009, preliminary postcensal (PP) estimates of the population counted on
July 1, 2009, Canada, provinces and territories.
See Chapter 5 (Methodological Notes) for more information regarding collection and comparability of data.
Source
Nursing Database, Canadian Institute for Health Information.
60
Chapter 2—Regulated Nurses in Canada: Trends of Licensed Practical Nurses
Employment Trends: Is the Workforce Changing?
Table 24 shows the supply of LPNs in Canada over the period 2005 to 2009. In 2009
there were 85,277 LPNs in Canada, 5.2% more than in 2008, and 17.8% more than in
2005. The number of LPNs employed in nursing increased every year between 2005 and
2009, though the increase was not uniform across the country (see Table 25). Additional
information on LPNs by jurisdiction is available in the data tables on the CIHI website.
Table 24: Licensed Practical Nurses, by Employment Status, Canada, 2005 to 2009
Employed in Practical Nursing
Regular
Regular
Regular
Basis, Casual
Basis,
Basis, Full
Subtotal
Part
Basis
Status
Time
Time
Unknown
Not Employed in Practical Nursing
Employed in Other
Than Practical Nursing
Not Employed
Grand Total
Not Stated Subtotal
Seeking
Not Seeking
Seeking
Not Seeking Employment Employment
Employment Employment in Practical in Practical
Nursing
Nursing
A
B
Count
2005
30,217 23,395
2006
31,282 23,991
2007
32,909 23,927
2008
36,408 25,751
2009
38,623 25,952
Annual Percentage Change
2005
–
–
2006
3.5%
2.5%
2007
5.2%
-0.3%
2008
10.6%
7.6%
2009
6.1%
0.8%
Percentage Distribution
2005
41.7% 32.3%
2006
41.7% 32.0%
2007
42.1% 30.6%
2008
44.9% 31.8%
2009
45.3% 30.4%
C
E=
A+B+
C+D
D
10,754
11,485
12,535
12,185
12,356
587
542
338
36
13
–
6.8%
9.1%
-2.8%
1.4%
–
-7.7%
-37.6%
-89.3%
-63.9%
14.8%
15.3%
16.1%
15.0%
14.5%
0.8%
0.7%
0.4%
0.0%
0.0%
64,953
67,300
69,709
74,380
76,944
–
3.6%
3.6%
6.7%
3.4%
89.7%
89.8%
89.3%
91.7%
90.2%
F
G
H
I
K=
F+G+H
+I+J
J
L = E+K
229
214
201
221
201
2,434
2,216
2,232
2,140
2,097
1,140
1,522
1,402
1,626
2,220
1,606
1,553
1,584
1,429
1,399
2,059
2,163
2,952
1,303
2,416
7,468
7,668
8,371
6,719
8,333
72,421
74,968
78,080
81,099
85,277
–
-6.6%
-6.1%
10.0%
-9.0%
–
-9.0%
0.7%
-4.1%
-2.0%
–
33.5%
-7.9%
16.0%
36.5%
–
-3.3%
2.0%
-9.8%
-2.1%
–
5.1%
36.5%
-55.9%
85.4%
–
2.7%
9.2%
-19.7%
24.0%
–
3.5%
4.2%
3.9%
5.2%
0.3%
0.3%
0.3%
0.3%
0.2%
3.4%
3.0%
2.9%
2.6%
2.5%
1.6%
2.0%
1.8%
2.0%
2.6%
2.2%
2.1%
2.0%
1.8%
1.6%
2.8%
2.9%
3.8%
1.6%
2.8%
10.3%
10.2%
10.7%
8.3%
9.8%
100.0%
100.0%
100.0%
100.0%
100.0%
Notes
– Data is not applicable or does not exist.
Totals may not sum to 100% due to rounding.
See Chapter 5 (Methodological Notes) for more information regarding collection and comparability of data.
Source
Nursing Database, Canadian Institute for Health Information.
61
Regulated Nurses: Canadian Trends, 2005 to 2009
LPNs employed in nursing but reported as employed—status unknown are those who
reported employment data but who failed to indicate their status as full time, part time
or casual. Accordingly, they are included in the workforce but are excluded from some
analyses in the report, as indicated in table footnotes.
Table 25: Licensed Practical Nursing Workforce, by Jurisdiction and Canada,
2005 to 2009
N.L.
P.E.I.
N.S.
N.B.
Que.
Ont.
Man. Sask. Alta.
B.C.
Y.T. N.W.T. Canada
Count
2005
2,698
606
3,127
2,633 16,293 24,458 2,590 2,194 5,313 4,884
56
101
64,953
2006
2,639
599
3,174
2,646 17,104 25,084 2,652 2,224 5,614 5,412
60
92
67,300
2007
2,598
623
3,160
2,734 17,492 26,126 2,671 2,381 5,986 5,791
59
88
69,709
2008
2,530
631
3,250
2,731 19,581 27,435 2,615 2,514 6,232 6,705
62
94
74,380
2009
2,521
665
3,357
2,729 19,184 28,804 2,651 2,629 6,669 7,577
64
94
76,944
–
–
–
–
7.1%
-8.9%
3.6%
7.0% -1.7%
-4.3%
3.6%
Annual Percentage Change
2005
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
2006
-2.2%
-1.2%
1.5%
0.5%
5.0%
2.6%
2.4% 1.4% 5.7% 10.8%
2007
-1.6%
4.0%
-0.4%
3.3%
2.3%
4.2%
0.7% 7.1% 6.6%
2008
-2.6%
1.3%
2.8%
-0.1%
11.9%
5.0% -2.1% 5.6% 4.1% 15.8%
5.1%
6.8%
6.7%
2009
-0.4%
5.4%
3.3%
-0.1%
-2.0%
5.0%
1.4% 4.6% 7.0% 13.0%
3.2%
0.0%
3.4%
Percentage Distribution
2005
4.2%
0.9%
4.8%
4.1%
25.1% 37.7%
4.0% 3.4% 8.2%
7.5%
0.1%
0.2%
100.0%
2006
3.9%
0.9%
4.7%
3.9%
25.4% 37.3%
3.9% 3.3% 8.3%
8.0%
0.1%
0.1%
100.0%
2007
3.7%
0.9%
4.5%
3.9%
25.1% 37.5%
3.8% 3.4% 8.6%
8.3%
0.1%
0.1%
100.0%
2008
3.4%
0.8%
4.4%
3.7%
26.3% 36.9%
3.5% 3.4% 8.4%
9.0%
0.1%
0.1%
100.0%
2009
3.3%
0.9%
4.4%
3.5%
24.9% 37.4%
3.4% 3.4% 8.7%
9.8%
0.1%
0.1%
100.0%
Notes
– Data is not applicable or does not exist.
Totals may not sum to 100% due to rounding.
Data released by CIHI may differ from data from other sources due to CIHI’s nationally standardized methodology.
LPNs employed in a jurisdiction different from their jurisdiction of registration are excluded to avoid duplication.
Northern territories data may include inter-jurisdictional duplicates.
Data is not collected for Nunavut.
See Chapter 5 (Methodological Notes) for more information regarding collection and comparability of data.
Source
Nursing Database, Canadian Institute for Health Information.
62
Chapter 2—Regulated Nurses in Canada: Trends of Licensed Practical Nurses
Licensed Practical Nurses Not Employed in Nursing
Effective health human resource planning requires an understanding of both the current and
the potential workforce. While the analysis in this chapter focuses on LPNs currently employed
in nursing, it is also important to understand the profile of the LPN profession as a whole and
to investigate trends with respect to LPNs who register but do not work in nursing.
Table 26 shows that the largest proportion of LPNs who were seeking employment were
younger than 30. The majority of LPNs not employed in nursing and not seeking
employment between 2005 and 2009 were age 50 to 59.
Table 26: Licensed Practical Nurses Not Employed in Nursing, by Employment
Status, by Age Group, Canada, 2005 to 2009
<30
Count
Employed (Not in Nursing) but Seeking
Nursing Employment
Employed (Not in Nursing) but Not
Seeking Nursing Employment
Annual Percentage Change
Employed (Not in Nursing) but
Seeking Nursing Employment
Employed (Not in Nursing) but Not
Seeking Nursing Employment
Percentage Distribution
Employed (Not in Nursing) but Seeking
Nursing Employment
Employed (Not in Nursing) but Not
Seeking Nursing Employment
30–39
40–49
50–59
60+
Canada
2005
2006
2007
2008
2009
2005
2006
2007
2008
2009
368
477
424
502
755
142
132
166
133
127
297
398
353
435
651
630
557
577
473
445
326
410
369
417
483
1,238
1,087
1,026
918
806
304
341
316
340
373
1,561
1,466
1,432
1,395
1,365
74
110
140
153
159
469
527
614
650
753
1,369
1,736
1,602
1,847
2,421
4,040
3,769
3,815
3,569
3,496
2005
2006
2007
2008
2009
2005
2006
2007
2008
2009
–
29.6%
-11.1%
18.4%
50.4%
–
-7.0%
25.8%
-19.9%
-4.5%
–
34.0%
-11.3%
23.2%
49.7%
–
-11.6%
3.6%
-18.0%
-5.9%
–
25.8%
-10.0%
13.0%
15.8%
–
-12.2%
-5.6%
-10.5%
-12.2%
–
12.2%
-7.3%
7.6%
9.7%
–
-6.1%
-2.3%
-2.6%
-2.2%
–
48.6%
27.3%
9.3%
3.9%
–
12.4%
16.5%
5.9%
15.8%
–
26.8%
-7.7%
15.3%
31.1%
–
-6.7%
1.2%
-6.4%
-2.0%
2005
2006
2007
2008
2009
2005
2006
2007
2008
2009
26.9%
27.5%
26.5%
27.2%
31.2%
3.5%
3.5%
4.4%
3.7%
3.6%
21.7%
22.9%
22.0%
23.6%
26.9%
15.6%
14.8%
15.1%
13.3%
12.7%
23.8%
23.6%
23.0%
22.6%
20.0%
30.6%
28.8%
26.9%
25.7%
23.1%
22.2%
19.6%
19.7%
18.4%
15.4%
38.6%
38.9%
37.5%
39.1%
39.0%
5.4%
6.3%
8.7%
8.3%
6.6%
11.6%
14.0%
16.1%
18.2%
21.5%
100.0%
100.0%
100.0%
100.0%
100.0%
100.0%
100.0%
100.0%
100.0%
100.0%
Notes
– Data is not applicable or does not exist.
Totals may not sum to 100% due to rounding.
Employment Status not employed in nursing includes LPNs who are not working or working in positions outside
of nursing.
See Chapter 5 (Methodological Notes) for more information regarding collection and comparability of data.
Source
Nursing Database, Canadian Institute for Health Information.
63
Regulated Nurses: Canadian Trends, 2005 to 2009
Employment Status
The majority of LPNs employed in nursing were employed on a regular basis in full-time
positions, with 38,623 (50.2%) of the workforce working in full-time positions in 2009.
Table 27: Licensed Practical Nursing Workforce, by Employment Status, by Jurisdiction and Canada,
2005 to 2009
N.L.
P.E.I.
N.S.
N.B.
Que.
Ont.
Man.
Sask.
Alta.
B.C.
Y.T.
N.W.T.
Canada
Count
Employed,
Full Time
Employed,
Part Time
Employed,
Casual
Employed,
Status
Unknown
2005
1,508
250
1,544
1,306
5,992 13,448
863
1,043
2,093
2,052
39
79
30,217
2006
1,434
253
1,587
1,274
6,187 13,765
867
1,015
2,244
2,542
40
74
31,282
2007
1,466
272
1,602
1,368
6,493 14,357
873
1,178
2,454
2,737
37
72
32,909
2008
1,489
285
1,676
1,366
7,860 15,451
908
1,365
2,696
3,192
40
80
36,408
2009
1,633
261
1,780
1,462
7,556 16,873
936
1,471
3,030
3,492
48
81
38,623
2005
181
236
716
785
7,181
8,748
1,393
441
2,450
1,252
7
5
23,395
2006
170
229
786
795
7,470
9,027
1,414
750
2,568
768
8
6
23,991
†
2007
152
232
852
817
7,627
9,391
1,438
622
2,67
112
8
*
23,927
2008
150
238
869
855
9,079
9,627
1,432
707
2,703
75
11
5
25,751
2009
125
249
1,024
852
8,958
9,577
1,450
761
2,720
222
9
5
25,952
2005
1,009
120
863
542
2,768
2,262
257
668
770
1,468
10
17
10,754
2006
1,032
117
798
575
3,045
2,292
285
456
802
2,060
12
11
11,485
†
†
12,535
2007
979
119
696
548
3,372
2,378
274
427
85
2,857
14
1
2008
891
108
703
510
2,642
2,357
275
433
833
3,413
11
9
12,185
2009
763
155
551
415
2,670
2,354
265
396
919
3,853
7
8
12,356
2005
–
–
4
–
352
–
77
42
–
112
–
–
587
2006
3
–
3
2
402
–
86
3
–
42
–
1
542
2007
1
–
10
1
–
–
86
154
–
85
–
1
338
2008
–
–
2
–
–
–
–
9
–
25
–
–
36
2009
–
–
2
–
–
–
–
1
–
10
–
–
13
2005
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
2006
-4.9%
1.2%
2.8%
-2.5%
3.3%
2.4%
0.5%
-2.7%
7.2%
23.9%
2.6%
-6.3%
3.5%
2007
2.2%
7.5%
0.9%
7.4%
4.9%
4.3%
0.7% 16.1%
9.4%
7.7%
-7.5%
-2.7%
5.2%
2008
1.6%
4.8%
4.6%
-0.1% 21.1%
7.6%
4.0% 15.9%
9.9%
16.6%
8.1%
11.1%
10.6%
2009
9.7%
-8.4%
6.2%
9.2%
3.1%
9.4% 20.0%
1.3%
6.1%
Annual Percentage Change
Employed,
Full Time
7.0%
-3.9%
7.8% 12.4%
(continued)
64
Chapter 2—Regulated Nurses in Canada: Trends of Licensed Practical Nurses
Table 27: Licensed Practical Nursing Workforce, by Employment Status, by Jurisdiction and Canada, 2005
to 2009 (cont’d)
N.L.
Employed,
Part Time
Employed,
Casual
P.E.I.
N.S.
N.B.
Que.
Ont.
Man.
2005
–
–
–
–
–
–
2006
-6.1%
-3.0%
9.8%
1.3%
4.0%
3.2%
2007
-10.6%
1.3%
8.4%
2.8%
2.1%
4.0%
–
Sask.
Alta.
B.C.
Y.T.
N.W.T.
Canada
–
–
–
–
–
–
1.5% 70.1%
4.8%
-38.7%
14.3%
20.0%
2.5%
1.7% -17.1%
†
0.0%
†
-0.3%
-0.4% 13.7%
†
-33.0%
37.5%
†
7.6%
0.6% 196.0%
-18.2%
0.0%
0.8%
–
–
–
-85.4%
2008
-1.3%
2.6%
2.0%
4.7%
19.0%
2.5%
2009
-16.7%
4.6%
17.8%
-0.4%
-1.3%
-0.5%
1.3%
7.6%
2005
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
2006
2.3%
-2.5%
-7.5%
6.1%
10.0%
1.3% 10.9% -31.7%
4.2%
40.3%
20.0% -35.3%
6.8%
38.7%
16.7%
†
9.1%
†
-2.8%
1.4%
2007
2008
-5.1%
-12.8%
-4.7%
10.7%
-6.9% -21.6%
3.8%
-3.9%
-0.9%
0.4%
-0.1%
-3.6%
-6.4%
1.4%
†
19.5%
-21.4%
-8.5% 10.3%
12.9%
-36.4% -11.1%
-9.2%
1.0%
-14.4% 43.5%
-21.6%
-18.6%
1.1%
2005
55.9% 41.3%
49.4%
49.6%
37.6%
55.0% 34.3% 48.5% 39.4%
43.0%
69.6%
78.2%
46.9%
2006
54.4% 42.2%
50.0%
48.2%
37.0%
54.9% 33.8% 45.7% 40.0%
47.3%
66.7%
81.3%
46.9%
2007
56.4% 43.7%
50.9%
50.1%
37.1%
55.0% 33.8% 52.9% 41.0%
48.0%
62.7%
82.8%
47.4%
2008
58.9% 45.2%
51.6%
50.0%
40.1%
56.3% 34.7% 54.5% 43.3%
47.8%
64.5%
85.1%
49.0%
2009
64.8% 39.2%
53.1%
53.6%
39.4%
58.6% 35.3% 56.0% 45.4%
46.1%
75.0%
86.2%
50.2%
2005
6.7% 38.9%
22.9%
29.8%
45.0%
35.8% 55.4% 20.5% 46.1%
26.2%
12.5%
5.0%
36.3%
2006
6.4% 38.2%
24.8%
30.1%
44.7%
36.0% 55.1% 33.8% 45.7%
14.3%
13.3%
6.6%
35.9%
†
2.0%
13.6%
†
34.5%
2009
-9.0%
1.7%
†
Percentage Distribution
Employed,
Full Time
Employed,
Part Time
Employed,
Casual
2007
5.9% 37.2%
27.0%
29.9%
43.6%
35.9% 55.6% 27.9%
2008
5.9% 37.7%
26.8%
31.3%
46.4%
35.1% 54.8% 28.2% 43.4%
1.1%
17.7%
5.3%
34.6%
2009
5.0% 37.4%
30.5%
31.2%
46.7%
33.2% 54.7% 29.0% 40.8%
2.9%
14.1%
5.3%
33.7%
2005
37.4% 19.8%
27.6%
20.6%
17.4%
9.2% 10.2% 31.0% 14.5%
30.8%
17.9%
16.8%
16.7%
2006
39.2% 19.5%
25.2%
21.7%
18.2%
9.1% 11.1% 20.5% 14.3%
38.4%
20.0%
12.1%
17.2%
†
50.1%
23.7%
†
18.1%
2007
37.7% 19.1%
22.1%
20.1%
19.3%
9.1% 10.6% 19.2%
2008
35.2% 17.1%
21.6%
18.7%
13.5%
8.6% 10.5% 17.3% 13.4%
51.1%
17.7%
9.6%
16.4%
2009
30.3% 23.3%
16.4%
15.2%
13.9%
8.2% 10.0% 15.1% 13.8%
50.9%
10.9%
8.5%
16.1%
Notes
– Data is not applicable or does not exist.
* Value suppressed in accordance with CIHI privacy policy; cell value is from 1 to 4.
† Digit suppressed to ensure confidentiality.
Totals may not sum to 100% due to rounding.
Employed LPNs with employed—status unknown are excluded from the percentage distributions.
Data released by CIHI may differ from data from other sources due to CIHI’s nationally standardized methodology.
LPNs employed in a jurisdiction different from their jurisdiction of registration are excluded to avoid duplication.
Northern territories data may include inter-jurisdictional duplicates.
Data is not collected for Nunavut.
See Chapter 5 (Methodological Notes) for more information regarding collection and comparability of data.
Source
Nursing Database, Canadian Institute for Health Information.
65
Regulated Nurses: Canadian Trends, 2005 to 2009
As Table 27 demonstrates, the percentage of the LPN workforce employed on a full-time
basis varied across jurisdictions in 2009, from 35.3% in Manitoba and 45.4% in Alberta
to 86.2% in the Northwest Territories and 75.0% in the Yukon. The proportion of LPNs
in part-time positions ranged from 2.9% in British Columbia and 5.3% in the Northwest
Territories to 54.7% in Manitoba and 46.7% in Quebec.
The average age of LPNs was 45.1 for full-time workers, 42.3 for part-time workers and
40.7 for casual workers.
A higher proportion of male LPNs (60.1%) than female LPNs (49.4%) were employed
in full-time positions in 2009. Only 25.1% of male LPNs had part-time employment,
compared to 34.4% of female LPNs. There were 14.8% of male LPNs and 16.2% of
female LPNs employed on a casual basis.
Multiple Employment
It is not uncommon for LPNs to have more than one nursing job, often with multiple
employers. In 2009, 17.5% of the LPN workforce who reported on their multiple employment
status had more than one employer in nursing. The proportion of nurses with multiple
employment who reported working in full-time positions increased over the five-year period
from 28.9% in 2005 to 37.8% in 2009. In contrast, as shown in Table 28, both the part-time
and casual categories demonstrated decreasing proportions over the same five-year period.
Table 28: Licensed Practical Nurses Employed in Nursing With Multiple Employers,
by Employment Status With Primary Employer, Canada, 2005 to 2009
Employed,
Full Time
Count
2005
2,922
2006
3,293
2007
3,913
2008
4,628
2009
5,070
Annual Percentage Change
2005
–
2006
12.7%
2007
18.8%
2008
18.3%
2009
9.6%
Percentage Distribution
2005
28.9%
2006
30.2%
2007
32.0%
2008
35.9%
2009
37.8%
Employed,
Part Time
Employed,
Casual
Employed,
Status Unknown
Total With
Multiple
Employers
4,389
4,534
4,760
5,116
5,072
2,799
3,085
3,564
3,150
3,282
164
140
64
5
2
10,274
11,052
12,301
12,899
13,426
–
3.3%
5.0%
7.5%
-0.9%
–
10.2%
15.5%
-11.6%
4.2%
–
–
–
–
–
–
7.6%
11.3%
4.9%
4.1%
43.4%
41.6%
38.9%
39.7%
37.8%
27.7%
28.3%
29.1%
24.4%
24.4%
–
–
–
–
–
100.0%
100.0%
100.0%
100.0%
100.0%
Notes
– Data is not applicable or does not exist.
Non-response for Multiple Employment (% of LPN workforce): 2005, n = 249 (0.4%); 2006, n = 175 (0.3%); 2007,
n = 159 (0.2%); 2008, n = 1,638 (2.2%); 2009, n = 106 (0.1%).
Employed LPNs with Employment Status employed—status unknown are excluded from percentage distribution.
Totals may not sum to 100% due to rounding.
See Chapter 5 (Methodological Notes) for more information regarding collection and comparability of data.
Source
Nursing Database, Canadian Institute for Health Information.
66
Chapter 2—Regulated Nurses in Canada: Trends of Licensed Practical Nurses
Figure 24 shows the distribution by age group of LPNs working for multiple employers;
LPN age groups 30 to 39 and 40 to 49 comprised the largest groups working for multiple
employers in 2009. Further breakdown by Employment Status indicates that, in 2009,
the highest proportion of nurses working full time for multiple employers was in the 40-to49 age group.
Figure 24: Licensed Practical Nurses Employed in Nursing With Multiple
Employers, by Employment Status, by Age Group, Canada, 2009
Notes
Non-response for Multiple Employment (% of LPN workforce): n = 106 (0.1%)
See Chapter 5 (Methodological Notes) for more information regarding collection and comparability of data.
Source
Nursing Database, Canadian Institute for Health Information.
67
Regulated Nurses: Canadian Trends, 2005 to 2009
Place of Work
The proportion of LPNs working in the hospital sector decreased between 2005 and
2009, from 47.5% to 45.6%. This was accompanied by an increase of LPNs working in
the community health sector (from 6.7% to 7.8%) and in other places of work (from 6.3%
to 7.4%).
Figure 25: Licensed Practical Nursing Workforce, by Place of Work, by Jurisdiction and Canada,
2005 and 2009
Notes
† Digit suppressed to ensure confidentiality.
The percentage has been removed for Place of Work community health and nursing home/LTC in accordance with
CIHI privacy policy.
Non-response for Place of Work (% of LPN workforce): 2005, n = 1,512 (2.3%); 2009, n = 5,252 (6.8%).
Hospital includes data from hospital (general, maternal, pediatric, psychiatric), mental health centre and
rehabilitation/convalescent centre.
Community Health includes data from community health centre, home care agency, nursing station (outpost or clinic)
and public health department/unit.
Nursing Home/LTC includes data from nursing home/long-term care facility.
Other Place of Work includes data from business/industry/occupational health office, private nursing agency/private
duty, self-employed, physician’s office/family practice unit, educational institution, association/government and other.
Totals may not sum to 100% due to rounding.
Data released by CIHI may differ from data from other sources due to CIHI’s nationally standardized methodology.
LPNs employed in a jurisdiction different from their jurisdiction of registration are excluded to avoid duplication.
Northern territories data may include inter-jurisdictional duplicates.
Data is not collected for Nunavut.
See Chapter 5 (Methodological Notes) for more information regarding collection and comparability of data.
Source
Nursing Database, Canadian Institute for Health Information.
68
Chapter 2—Regulated Nurses in Canada: Trends of Licensed Practical Nurses
In 2009, the average age of LPNs working in the hospital sector was 43.2, compared to
the average age of 45.1 for LPNs employed in community health and 43.8 for LPNs in
the nursing home/long-term care sector.
Position
In 2009, 70,138 LPNs (92.0%) were employed as staff practical nurses/community health
practical nurses in Canada, an increase of 5.5% from 66,451 in 2008, shown in Table 29.
Table 29: Licensed Practical Nursing Workforce, by Position, by Jurisdiction and Canada,
2005 to 2009
N.L.
P.E.I.
N.S.
N.B.
Que.
Ont.
Man.
2,868
2,233
15,454 20,858
Sask.
Alta.
B.C.
Y.T. N.W.T. Canada
Count
Staff Nurse 2005
2006
Manager
Other
Positions
2,570
555
2,511
546
2,906
2,344
16,125 21,533
2,450
2,498
1,996
2,039
4,936
4,47†
5,245
†
4,99
†
–
9†
58,496
–
†
60,831
†
8
2007
2,460
564
2,864
2,448
16,819 22,892
2,519
2,188
5,560
5,31
–
8
63,718
2008
2,400
565
2,954
2,471
17,448 23,863
2,446
2,260
5,767
6,18†
–
9†
66,451
2009
2,398
606
3,086
2,448
18,517 25,141
2,468
2,301
6,127
6,959
–
87
70,138
2005
–
7
67
57
6
504
46
14
55
54
–
–
810
2006
–
10
69
52
0
548
51
17
49
57
–
–
853
†
2007
–
6
75
53
–
568
46
15
68
6
–
*
895
2008
–
8
89
52
–
636
42
15
78
86
–
0
1,006
2009
–
8
85
50
–
663
47
16
95
10†
–
*
1,066
2005
122
43
148
343
603
1,993
94
178
322
34†
–
*
4,199
320
†
–
*
4,024
†
2006
120
39
144
250
649
1,887
103
164
34
2007
128
52
157
230
638
2,057
106
176
358
40
–
*
4,308
2008
122
56
160
207
345
2,381
127
239
387
43†
–
*
4,456
†
–
†
5,022
2009
120
49
155
231
633
2,458
136
309
447
47
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
†
4.0%
–
†
4.7%
4.3%
Annual Percentage Change
Staff Nurse 2005
Manager
–
2006
-2.3%
-1.6%
1.3%
5.0%
4.3%
3.2%
2.0%
2.2%
6.3%
†
2007
-2.0%
3.3%
-1.4%
4.4%
4.3%
6.3%
0.8%
7.3%
6.0%
†
2008
-2.4%
0.2%
3.1%
0.9%
3.7%
4.2%
-2.9%
3.3%
3.7%
†
–
†
2009
-0.1%
7.3%
4.5%
-0.9%
6.1%
5.4%
0.9%
1.8%
6.2%
†
–
†
5.5%
2005
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
2006
– 42.9%
3.0%
8.7% 10.9% 21.4% -10.9%
2007
– -40.0%
8.7%
-8.8% -100.0%
1.9%
–
2008
– 33.3% 18.7%
-1.9%
–
2009
–
-3.8%
–
0.0%
-4.5%
5.6%
–
–
5.3%
-9.8% -11.8% 38.8%
†
–
†
4.9%
-8.7%
0.0% 14.7%
†
–
†
12.4%
4.2% 11.9%
6.7% 21.8%
†
–
†
6.0%
3.6%
12.0%
(continued)
69
Regulated Nurses: Canadian Trends, 2005 to 2009
Table 29: Licensed Practical Nursing Workforce, by Position, by Jurisdiction and Canada,
2005 to 2009 (cont’d)
N.L.
Other
Positions
P.E.I.
2005
–
–
2006
-1.6%
-9.3%
2007
6.7% 33.3%
N.S.
N.B.
Que.
Ont.
Man.
Sask.
Alta.
B.C.
Y.T. N.W.T. Canada
–
–
–
–
–
–
†
-2.7% -27.1%
7.6%
-5.3%
9.6%
-7.9%
-0.6%
†
–
†
-4.2%
-1.7%
9.0%
2.9%
7.3% 11.9%
†
–
†
7.1%
8.1%
†
–
†
3.4%
7.1% 29.3% 15.5%
†
–
†
12.7%
89.3% 94.6% 91.2% 92.9%
†
–
†
92.1%
89.8% 94.2% 91.8% 93.4%
†
–
†
92.6%
92.5%
–
9.0%
-8.0%
2008
-4.7%
7.7%
1.9% -10.0%
-45.9%
2009
-1.6% -12.5%
-3.1% 11.6%
83.5%
95.5% 91.7% 93.0% 84.8%
96.2%
15.8% 19.8% 35.8%
3.2%
–
†
–
Percentage Distribution
Staff Nurse 2005
2006
Manager
Other
Positions
95.4% 91.8% 93.2% 88.6%
96.1%
2007
95.1% 90.7% 92.5% 89.6%
96.3%
89.7% 94.3% 92.0% 92.9%
†
–
†
2008
95.2% 89.8% 92.2% 90.5%
98.1%
88.8% 93.5% 89.9% 92.5%
†
–
†
92.4%
2009
95.2% 91.4% 92.8% 89.7%
96.7%
89.0% 93.1% 87.6% 91.9%
92.3%
–
92.6%
92.0%
2005
–
1.2%
2.2%
2.2%
0.0%
2.2%
1.8%
0.6%
1.0%
1.1%
–
–
1.3%
2006
–
1.7%
2.2%
2.0%
0.0%
2.3%
1.9%
0.8%
0.9%
1.1%
–
–
1.3%
–
†
1.3%
–
0.0%
1.4%
1.4%
2007
–
1.0%
2.4%
1.9%
–
2.2%
1.7%
0.6%
1.1%
†
2008
–
1.3%
2.8%
1.9%
–
2.4%
1.6%
0.6%
1.3%
1.3%
–
†
–
†
6.6%
6.1%
2009
–
1.2%
2.6%
1.8%
–
2.3%
1.8%
0.6%
1.4%
†
2005
4.5%
7.1%
4.8% 13.0%
3.8%
8.5%
3.6%
8.1%
6.1%
†
5.7%
†
–
†
–
†
6.3%
–
†
6.2%
–
†
6.6%
2006
4.6%
6.6%
4.6%
9.4%
3.9%
7.9%
3.9%
7.4%
2007
4.9%
8.4%
5.1%
8.4%
3.7%
8.1%
4.0%
7.4%
6.0%
†
2008
4.8%
8.9%
5.0%
7.6%
1.9%
8.9%
4.9%
9.5%
6.2%
†
6.7%
†
2009
4.8%
7.4%
4.7%
8.5%
3.3%
8.7%
5.1% 11.8%
Notes
– Data is not applicable or does not exist.
* Value suppressed in accordance with CIHI privacy policy; cell value is from 1 to 4.
† Digit suppressed to ensure confidentiality.
Non-response for Position (% of LPN workforce): 2005, n = 1,448 (2.2%); 2006, n = 1,592 (2.4%); 2007,
n = 788 (1.1%); 2008, n = 2,467 (3.3%); 2009, n = 718 (1.0%).
Position data from the Yukon was not submitted to CIHI.
Staff Nurse includes LPN staff nurse/community health nurse.
Manager includes coordinator/care manager.
Other Positions includes instructor/professor/educator, LPN specialty and other.
Totals may not sum to 100% due to rounding.
Data released by CIHI may differ from data from other sources due to CIHI’s nationally standardized methodology.
LPNs employed in a jurisdiction different from their jurisdiction of registration are excluded to avoid duplication.
Northern territories data may include inter-jurisdictional duplicates.
Data is not collected for Nunavut.
See Chapter 5 (Methodological Notes) for more information regarding collection and comparability of data.
Source
Nursing Database, Canadian Institute for Health Information.
70
Chapter 2—Regulated Nurses in Canada: Trends of Licensed Practical Nurses
Area of Responsibility
The proportion of the licensed practical nursing workforce in direct care ranged from
95.3% in the Yukon and 95.7% in New Brunswick to 99.6% in Newfoundland and
Labrador and 100.0% in the Northwest Territories. Many health human resource
planners are interested in these totals, as these numbers represent the LPNs providing
services directly to patients. Areas of responsibility covered by LPNs that fall outside of
direct care include administration, education and research.
Overall, LPNs who provide direct care to patients or who are involved in research are
younger than those working in administration or education. In 2009, the average age
was 43.4 for LPNs in direct care, 45.3 for LPNs working in administration, 43.6 for LPNs
working in education and 39.6 for those working in research.
Table 30: Licensed Practical Nursing Workforce, by Area of Responsibility,
Canada, 2009
Count
Percentage
Direct Care
Geriatric/Long-Term Care
33,087
43.4%
Medical/Surgical
13,860
18.2%
Nursing in Several Clinical Areas
5,090
6.7%
Psychiatric/Mental Health
3,674
4.8%
Rehabilitation
2,885
3.8%
Community Health
2,787
3.7%
Home Care
1,622
2.1%
Ambulatory Care
1,230
1.6%
Palliative Care
1,229
1.6%
Emergency Room
1,091
1.4%
Operating Room
985
1.3%
Maternal/Newborn
897
1.2%
Pediatric
820
1.1%
Public Health
253
0.3%
Critical Care (Burn)
240
0.3%
Occupational Health
176
0.2%
149
0.2%
Oncology
Other Patient Care
4,730
6.2%
74,805
98.1%
Total Administration
745
1.0%
Total Education
657
0.9%
Total Research
33
<0.1%
76,240
100.0%
Total Direct Care
Total
Notes
<0.1: Value is less than 0.05%; value is replaced to prevent displaying cells of 0.0 that are not true zero values.
Non-response for Area of Responsibility (% of LPN workforce): n = 704 (1.0%).
Totals may not sum to 100% due to rounding.
Direct Care includes data from medical/surgical, psychiatric/mental health, pediatric, maternal/newborn, geriatric/long-term
care, critical care, community health, ambulatory care, home care, occupational health, operating room, emergency room,
nursing in several clinical areas, oncology, rehabilitation, palliative care, public health and other patient care.
Administration/Education/Research includes data from nursing services, nursing education, other administration, teaching
students, teaching employees, teaching patients/clients, other education, nursing research only and other research.
See Chapter 5 (Methodological Notes) for more information regarding collection and comparability of data.
Source
Nursing Database, Canadian Institute for Health Information.
71
Regulated Nurses: Canadian Trends, 2005 to 2009
In 2009, the greatest proportion of LPNs worked in geriatric/long-term care and
medical/surgical areas. Each year, these were typically among the most frequently
identified areas of responsibility. The area of responsibility with the most LPNs,
geriatric/long-term care, also attracted the most recent graduates. In 2009, 41.9% of
LPNs in their first five years of nursing chose to work in geriatric/long-term care. These
nurses accounted for 31.1% of all LPNs working in geriatric/long-term care. Among male
LPNs, the most frequently identified areas of responsibility in 2009 were geriatric/
long-term care (36.9%) and medicine/surgery (17.5%).
Demographic Trends: Sex and Age Composition of the
Licensed Practical Nursing Workforce
Almost all LPNs (92.7%) in the Canadian workforce were female in 2009. This proportion
had not changed substantially for the previous five years (see Table 31). Additional
information on LPN demographic characteristic trends by jurisdiction is available in the
data tables on the CIHI website.
Table 31: Licensed Practical Nursing Workforce, by Sex, by Jurisdiction and Canada,
2005 to 2009
N.L.
P.E.I.
N.S.
N.B.
Que.
Ont.
Man. Sask. Alta.
B.C.
Y.T.
N.W.T. Canada
Count
Female
Male
2005
2,353
555 2,968 2,364 15,002 23,033 2,472 2,128 5,076 4,442
52
85
60,530
2006
2,307
548 3,011 2,366 15,712 23,596 2,522 2,157 5,361 4,906
56
79
62,621
2007
2,268
567 2,995 2,444 16,068 24,543 2,537 2,305 5,718 5,239
57
77
64,818
2008
2,216
572 3,076 2,429 17,887 25,744 2,482 2,428 5,959 6,069
58
79
68,999
2009
2,222
607 3,187 2,419 17,517 26,949 2,509 2,538 6,322 6,912
6†
8†
71,326
†
2005
345
51
159
269
1,291
1,425
118
66
237
442
*
1
4,423
2006
332
51
163
280
1,392
1,488
130
67
253
506
*
1†
4,679
*
†
4,891
†
2007
330
56
165
290
1,424
1,583
134
76
268
552
1
2008
314
59
174
302
1,694
1,691
133
86
273
636
*
1
5,381
2009
299
58
170
310
1,667
1,855
142
91
347
665
*
1†
5,618
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
2006
-2.0% -1.3%
1.4%
0.1%
4.7%
2.4%
2.0%
1.4%
5.6% 10.4%
7.7%
-7.1%
3.5%
2007
-1.7%
3.5% -0.5%
3.3%
2.3%
4.0%
0.6%
6.9%
6.7%
6.8%
1.8%
-2.5%
3.5%
2008
-2.3%
0.9%
2.7% -0.6% 11.3%
4.9% -2.2%
5.3%
4.2% 15.8%
1.8%
2.6%
6.5%
2009
0.3%
6.1%
3.6% -0.4%
-2.1%
4.7%
1.1%
4.5%
6.1% 13.9%
†
†
3.4%
2005
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
6.8% 14.5%
†
†
5.8%
5.9%
9.1%
†
†
4.5%
1.9% 15.2%
†
†
10.0%
†
†
4.4%
Annual Percentage Change
Female
Male
2005
–
–
–
2006
-3.8%
0.0%
2.5%
4.1%
7.8%
4.4% 10.2%
2007
-0.6%
9.8%
1.2%
3.6%
2.3%
6.4%
2008
2009
-4.8%
5.4%
5.5%
-4.8% -1.7% -2.3%
4.1% 19.0%
2.6%
-1.6%
1.5%
3.1% 13.4%
6.8% -0.7% 13.2%
9.7%
6.8%
–
5.8% 27.1%
4.6%
(continued)
72
Chapter 2—Regulated Nurses in Canada: Trends of Licensed Practical Nurses
Table 31: Licensed Practical Nursing Workforce, by Sex, by Jurisdiction and Canada,
2005 to 2009 (cont’d)
N.L.
P.E.I.
N.S.
N.B.
Que.
Ont.
Man. Sask. Alta.
B.C.
Y.T.
N.W.T. Canada
Percentage Distribution
Female
Male
2005 87.2% 91.6% 94.9% 89.8% 92.1% 94.2% 95.4% 97.0% 95.5% 91.0% 92.9% 84.2%
93.2%
2006 87.4% 91.5% 94.9% 89.4% 91.9% 94.1% 95.1% 97.0% 95.5% 90.7% 93.3% 85.9%
93.0%
2007 87.3% 91.0% 94.8% 89.4% 91.9% 93.9% 95.0% 96.8% 95.5% 90.5% 96.6% 87.5%
93.0%
2008 87.6% 90.6% 94.6% 88.9% 91.3% 93.8% 94.9% 96.6% 95.6% 90.5% 93.5% 84.0%
92.8%
2009 88.1% 91.3% 94.9% 88.6% 91.3% 93.6% 94.6% 96.5% 94.8% 91.2%
†
†
92.7%
2005 12.8%
9.0%
†
†
6.8%
9.3%
†
†
7.0%
†
7.0%
2006 12.6%
8.4%
8.5%
5.1% 10.2%
5.1% 10.6%
7.9%
8.1%
5.8%
5.9%
4.6%
4.9%
3.0%
3.0%
4.5%
4.5%
2007 12.7%
9.0%
5.2% 10.6%
8.1%
6.1%
5.0%
3.2%
4.5%
9.5%
†
2008 12.4%
9.4%
5.4% 11.1%
8.7%
6.2%
5.1%
3.4%
4.4%
9.5%
†
†
7.2%
8.8%
†
†
7.3%
2009 11.9%
8.7%
5.1% 11.4%
8.7%
6.4%
5.4%
3.5%
5.2%
Notes
– Data is not applicable or does not exist.
* Value suppressed in accordance with CIHI privacy policy; cell value is from 1 to 4.
† Digit suppressed to ensure confidentiality.
Totals may not sum to 100% due to rounding.
Data released by CIHI may differ from data from other sources due to CIHI’s nationally standardized methodology.
LPNs employed in a jurisdiction different from their jurisdiction of registration are excluded to avoid duplication.
Northern territories data may include inter-jurisdictional duplicates.
Data is not collected for Nunavut.
In 2008, the College of Licensed Practical Nurses of Manitoba submitted aggregate tables for sex.
See Chapter 5 (Methodological Notes) for more information regarding collection and comparability of data.
Source
Nursing Database, Canadian Institute for Health Information.
In 2009, jurisdictions with the highest proportions of male LPNs were Newfoundland and
Labrador, at 11.9%, the Northwest Territories, at 11.7%, and New Brunswick, at 11.4%.
In contrast, 3.5% of Saskatchewan’s LPNs were male. The average age of male LPNs
was 43.1 in 2009, compared to 43.4 for females. The area of responsibility that attracted
the highest proportion of the male workforce was geriatric/long-term care at 36.6%.
The male LPN workforce represents 7.3% of the total LPN workforce.
73
Regulated Nurses: Canadian Trends, 2005 to 2009
Age Group of the Workforce
In 2009, the majority of jurisdictions had their highest proportion of LPNs in the 50-to54 age group. These included Prince Edward Island, New Brunswick, Ontario, Manitoba
and the Northwest Territories. In Canada as a whole, the top four age groups were
younger than 30 (15.7%), 40 to 44 (12.7%), 45 to 49 (14.5%) and 50 to 54 (15.1%),
which account for 58.0% of the LPN workforce.
Table 32: Licensed Practical Nursing Workforce, by Age Group, by Jurisdiction and
Canada, 2009
Age
Group
<30
N.L.
8.3%
P.E.I.
N.B.
Que.
Ont.
Sask.
Alta.
B.C.
Y.T.
N.W.T. Canada
9.4%
11.7%
15.7%
9.7% 12.3% 10.9% 12.7%
†
†
10.7%
9.7% 10.8% 12.2%
†
†
11.8%
40–44
15.2% 16.7% 14.3% 14.3% 13.5% 12.4% 12.3%
8.9% 10.0% 12.9%
†
†
12.7%
45–49
19.8% 16.4% 16.6% 15.8% 14.8% 14.3% 14.6% 12.8% 12.4% 13.2% 25.0%
10.6%
14.5%
50–54
17.7% 17.7% 16.5% 15.9% 15.8% 14.9% 15.6% 15.6% 12.6% 13.7% 12.5%
21.3%
15.1%
55–59
12.3% 14.6% 11.5% 10.8%
9.6%
11.7%
10.6%
8.0%
9.2%
35–39
11.0%
60+
9.3% 11.6% 17.2% 14.5%
Man.
9.2% 19.6% 20.9% 20.2%
30–34
8.6%
N.S.
8.7% 10.0% 11.5% 12.1%
9.3%
7.2% 13.3% 13.2% 12.9% 11.1% 11.7%
6.7% 10.1%
8.5%
6.8%
9.4% 13.3% 14.4% 13.0% 11.6%
9.7% 20.3%
4.2% 10.1% 12.4%
5.4%
8.1% 10.9%
9.4%
Notes
* Value suppressed in accordance with CIHI privacy policy; cell value is from 1 to 4.
† Digit suppressed to ensure confidentiality.
Non-response for Age Group (% of LPN workforce): n = 1 (<0.1%).
Totals may not sum to 100% due to rounding.
Data released by CIHI may differ from data from other sources due to CIHI’s nationally standardized methodology.
LPNs employed in a jurisdiction different from their jurisdiction of registration are excluded to avoid duplication.
Northern territories data may include inter-jurisdictional duplicates.
Data is not collected for Nunavut.
See Chapter 5 (Methodological Notes) for more information regarding collection and comparability of data.
Source
Nursing Database, Canadian Institute for Health Information.
74
Chapter 2—Regulated Nurses in Canada: Trends of Licensed Practical Nurses
Average Age of the Workforce
Average age may be used in addition to age groupings to describe trends and to make
comparisons between the LPN workforce and other professions. As Figure 26 shows,
the average age of selected health occupations increased between the years 2005 and
2009. In addition to the aging of each worker, several variables affect the rate at which
the average age of the workforce changes. They include the rates of entry into and exit
from the workforce and the ages of the workers entering and exiting the workforce.
Figure 26: Average Age of Regulated Nursing Workforce Compared to Selected
Health Occupations, Canada, 2005 to 2009
Notes
Totals may not sum to 100% due to rounding.
The RPN workforce of the four western provinces represents the total RPN workforce in Canada.
For 2007, 2008 and 2009, Manitoba RN data was excluded from average age calculation for Canada, as the College of
Registered Nurses of Manitoba submitted aggregate tables for average age.
For 2008, Manitoba LPN data was excluded from average age calculation for Canada, as the College of Licensed
Practical Nurses of Manitoba submitted aggregate tables for average age.
See Chapter 5 (Methodological Notes) for more information regarding collection and comparability of data.
Sources
Nursing Database, Occupational Therapist Database, Pharmacist Database, Physiotherapist Database and Scott’s
Medical Database, Canadian Institute for Health Information; for 2005 occupational therapist, physiotherapist and
pharmacist values and 2006 physiotherapist value, Labour Force Survey, Statistics Canada.
75
Regulated Nurses: Canadian Trends, 2005 to 2009
Table 33 shows the range of average ages across the country from 2005 to 2009. The
average age for Canadian LPNs declined from 44.3 in 2005 to 43.4 in 2009. The largest
increases were in the Northwest Territories and Prince Edward Island, where the average
age rose by 1.6 and 1.3 years. The largest decreases were seen in Quebec and British
Columbia, where the average age decreased by 1.7 and 2.1 years, respectively.
Table 33: Average Age of the Licensed Practical Nursing Workforce, by Jurisdiction
and Canada, 2005 to 2009
N.L.
P.E.I.
N.S.
N.B.
Que.
Ont.
Man.
Sask.
Alta.
B.C.
Y.T.
N.W.T.
Canada
Average Age
2005
44.4
45.0
44.1
42.8
43.6
45.2
44.9
44.0
43.8
43.5
47.1
43.5
44.3
2006
44.5
45.0
44.4
43.0
43.0
45.1
45.2
44.1
43.5
42.9
47.6
44.9
44.1
2007
44.8
45.5
44.9
43.2
42.7
44.9
45.4
43.5
43.3
42.3
48.3
45.6
43.9
2008
45.0
45.9
44.9
43.1
41.5
44.7
46.2
43.2
43.2
41.8
47.3
44.8
43.4
2009
45.2
46.3
44.8
43.7
41.9
44.5
46.1
42.9
42.9
41.4
46.7
45.1
43.4
Annual Increase/Decrease in Average Age
2005
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
2006
0.1
0.0
0.3
0.2
-0.6
-0.1
0.3
0.1
-0.3
-0.6
0.5
1.4
-0.2
2007
0.3
0.5
0.5
0.2
-0.3
-0.2
0.2
-0.6
-0.2
-0.6
0.7
0.7
-0.2
2008
0.2
0.4
0.0
-0.1
-1.2
-0.2
0.8
-0.3
-0.1
-0.5
-1.0
-0.8
-0.5
2009
0.2
0.4
-0.1
0.6
0.4
-0.2
-0.1
-0.3
-0.3
-0.4
-0.6
0.3
0.0
Notes
– Data is not applicable or does not exist.
For 2008, Manitoba LPN data was excluded from average age calculation for Canada, as the College of Licensed
Practical Nurses of Manitoba submitted aggregate tables for average age.
Data released by CIHI may differ from data from other sources due to CIHI’s nationally standardized methodology.
Northern territories data may include inter-jurisdictional duplicates.
Data is not collected for Nunavut.
See Chapter 5 (Methodological Notes) for more information regarding collection and comparability of data.
Source
Nursing Database, Canadian Institute for Health Information.
76
Chapter 2—Regulated Nurses in Canada: Trends of Licensed Practical Nurses
Exiting and Entering the Workforce
Table 34 represents all LPNs who registered with a specific jurisdiction, not only the
workforce. A new registrant may be a new graduate, an immigrant, an interprovincial
mover or an LPN re-registering following an absence of one year or more. An exit may
be an LPN who has left the profession (either temporarily or permanently) or retired, or
an LPN who is registered in another jurisdiction or country in year “x” and may still be
practising nursing in another province, territory or country.
Table 34 shows new registration rates and exit rates by jurisdiction and by age
group. Exit rates show that LPNs in the 60 and older age group had the highest
prevalence of leaving nursing across all regions in Canada (with the exception of
Prince Edward Island, Manitoba, Alberta and the territories) in 2009. The highest exit
rates by jurisdiction were seen with LPNs age 60 and older in Newfoundland and
Labrador (22.5%), Quebec (20.4%) and New Brunswick (17.0%). Higher exit rates were
also seen in the youngest age group, with high exit rates in LPNs younger than age 30
in Manitoba (16.0%), Newfoundland and Labrador (11.7%), New Brunswick (11.7%) and
Quebec (11.6%). Given the low registration rates for the group of LPNs age 60 and older
across all regions of Canada, it is plausible that a large portion of LPNs age 60 and older
who did not re-register in 2009 (2008 exits) retired from nursing. The LPNs younger than
30 who did not re-register may have moved to another jurisdiction within or outside
of Canada to continue practising nursing, left the profession temporarily to pursue
education, taken a leave of absence or left the profession permanently. Note that many
LPNs who take a leave of absence or pursue further education maintain their registration
and are thus not counted as exits.
Table 34: Licensed Practical Nurses: Rate of New Registrations and Exit Rates, by Age
Group, by Jurisdiction, 2005 to 2009
Age
Group
New Registration
Rates
<30
N.L.
P.E.I.
N.S.
N.B.
Que.
Ont.
Man. Sask. Alta.
B.C. Territories
2006 22.8% 29.6% 28.9% 22.7% 32.2% 35.6% 26.9% 20.8% 31.4% 40.3%
50.0%
2007 21.4% 31.1% 31.1% 19.7% 27.7% 33.3% 25.0% 33.5% 30.0% 33.5%
75.0%
2008 25.7% 20.0% 41.7% 27.6% 42.2% 29.1% 30.5% 28.7% 29.8% 40.7%
70.0%
2009 29.7% 31.6% 38.3% 14.8% 14.8% 29.5% 31.0% 29.6% 30.6% 37.3%
52.9%
30–39 2006
6.1% 10.2% 11.5% 13.8% 19.7% 13.0% 11.2% 16.0% 18.5% 25.8%
10.7%
2007
7.5% 12.8% 11.7% 14.1% 18.1% 13.5% 12.7% 21.2% 20.1% 19.3%
35.5%
2008
6.8% 15.8% 13.5% 10.3% 27.7% 13.8% 10.4% 15.3% 18.1% 22.9%
17.1%
8.3% 14.2% 14.7% 10.5%
8.9% 13.9% 16.7% 12.4% 18.2% 19.0%
12.1%
40–49 2006
2009
2.6%
9.4%
4.9%
6.8%
8.5%
8.5%
6.2%
4.2%
9.5% 16.9%
12.3%
2007
2.1%
9.3%
4.1%
6.0%
6.5%
8.4%
6.7%
7.9% 10.7% 14.5%
13.5%
2008
2.4%
8.7%
7.2%
6.7% 12.7%
8.1%
7.6%
5.1%
8.9% 15.6%
8.2%
2009
2.7%
5.0%
6.8%
5.4%
7.8%
8.3%
6.8%
9.7% 14.8%
9.5%
3.4%
(continued)
77
Regulated Nurses: Canadian Trends, 2005 to 2009
Table 34: Licensed Practical Nurses: Rate of New Registrations and Exit Rates, by Age
Group, by Jurisdiction, 2005 to 2009 (cont’d)
Age
Group
N.L.
P.E.I.
N.S.
N.B.
Que.
Ont.
New Registration 50–59 2006
Rates (cont’d)
2007
0.8%
3.5%
4.1%
2.0%
2.4%
5.4%
3.1%
1.9%
3.5% 12.6%
7.8%
1.2%
9.4%
3.8%
3.7% 44.8%
5.5%
1.4%
2.2%
6.6%
9.3%
4.3%
2008
1.9%
3.6%
2.8%
3.4% 36.2%
4.6%
2.6%
2.7%
4.8%
6.8%
8.5%
2009
1.6%
4.7%
4.0%
5.1%
1.1%
4.4%
3.0%
2.7%
3.9%
6.7%
10.0%
2006
2.7% 11.1%
1.6%
6.4%
2.6%
5.7%
1.4%
1.3%
3.6%
8.7%
12.5%
2007
2.1%
2.1%
2.8%
3.5% 54.0%
4.9%
1.2%
3.4%
2.6%
6.3%
8.3%
2008
0.7%
3.9%
4.4%
2.4% 56.4%
5.7%
0.7%
1.7%
2.0%
4.3%
7.7%
2009
1.8%
7.5%
2.8%
3.8%
1.6%
4.3%
2.7%
2.4%
1.7%
3.2%
12.5%
2005
4.0%
9.6% 10.3% 11.1%
9.8%
8.8% 11.2%
8.6% 11.6% 14.8%
44.4%
2006
9.1%
9.3% 14.5%
8.0% 12.2%
6.1% 10.4% 11.3% 13.0% 10.4%
83.3%
2007
9.4% 13.1% 12.9%
9.8% 12.4%
4.8% 19.6%
60+
Exit Rates
<30
2008 11.7%
Man. Sask. Alta.
B.C. Territories
7.8% 16.1% 10.3%
0.0%
8.0% 11.1% 11.7% 11.6%
9.1%
6.0% 16.0% 10.3% 10.9% 10.4%
10.0%
7.8%
9.7%
7.0%
7.0%
5.9%
8.0% 10.5%
9.1%
14.3%
2006
4.3% 14.1% 11.0%
6.3%
8.3%
6.8%
8.9%
6.4% 10.9%
8.1%
37.5%
2007
6.6% 10.3%
7.7%
7.7%
8.1%
5.3% 12.9%
6.6% 11.2%
7.4%
11.1%
2008
3.8%
6.1%
7.6%
8.3%
8.3%
5.5% 11.0%
6.4%
9.7%
7.5%
36.4%
40–49 2005
3.0%
8.0%
4.9%
5.4%
3.0%
7.2%
3.6%
3.7%
5.5%
9.9%
11.3%
2006
3.4%
5.4%
4.8%
3.3%
4.4%
5.8%
5.7%
3.3%
5.5%
9.0%
17.5%
2007
3.4%
2.9%
5.3%
6.8%
4.3%
4.5%
5.6%
2.2%
6.0%
4.5%
5.8%
2008
2.9%
3.2%
4.2%
3.8%
3.3%
4.8%
6.5%
3.6%
5.1%
4.8%
22.4%
50–59 2005 10.9% 11.6%
5.4%
9.5% 11.5%
8.8%
4.8%
6.0%
6.1% 13.4%
11.4%
30–39 2005
60+
4.5%
2006
7.7%
4.1%
6.2%
5.8% 55.3%
7.5%
4.5%
4.5%
5.3% 12.9%
2007
8.4%
6.3%
6.3% 10.2% 47.6%
7.2%
6.9%
4.1%
5.8%
5.0%
10.9%
2008
6.2%
2.0%
7.6%
6.3%
6.2%
5.4%
4.3%
5.9%
8.5%
7.0%
8.3%
2005 30.6% 29.3% 14.0% 20.8% 25.2% 20.0% 11.6% 16.8% 11.6% 30.8%
0.0%
2006 21.6% 15.6% 17.5% 15.6% 64.8% 17.8% 12.8% 22.3% 14.4% 34.5%
25.0%
2007 29.9% 20.8% 17.0% 24.6% 66.2% 13.6% 14.8% 16.1% 12.2% 10.7%
25.0%
2008 22.5%
5.9% 16.5% 17.0% 20.4% 14.2% 10.5% 16.3% 10.3% 12.5%
Notes
Rates will not sum to 100%.
CIHI collects data after the first 6 months of the 12-month registration period. This may result in 1% to 5%
under-coverage (loss of new registrants who registered after month 6 of the registration period).
Data released by CIHI may differ from data from other sources due to CIHI’s nationally standardized methodology.
LPNs employed in a jurisdiction different from their jurisdiction of registration are excluded to avoid duplication.
Northern territories data may include inter-jurisdictional duplicates.
Data is not collected for Nunavut.
See Chapter 5 (Methodological Notes) for more information regarding collection and comparability of data.
Source
Nursing Database, Canadian Institute for Health Information.
78
9.8%
7.7%
Chapter 2—Regulated Nurses in Canada: Trends of Licensed Practical Nurses
Age of the Workforce
Figure 27 highlights the proportion of the LPN workforce in each province/territory at or
above three typical ages of retirement in 2009: 55, 60 and 65. Note that this illustration is
cumulative. An LPN at age 65 is counted in all three categories, and an LPN at age 60 is
counted in two categories.
Information on the age of the LPN workforce across Canada shows that a large portion
of practical nurses within these age groups (55 and older, at 19.6%, 60 and older, at
8.0%, and 65 and older, at 1.8%) may be preparing for retirement in the near future.
Figure 27: Licensed Practical Nursing Workforce, by Age Groups 55+, 60+ and
65+, by Jurisdiction and Canada, 2009
Notes
Data released by CIHI may differ from data from other sources due to CIHI’s nationally standardized methodology.
LPNs employed in a jurisdiction different from their jurisdiction of registration are excluded to avoid duplication.
Northern territories data may include inter-jurisdictional duplicates.
Data is not collected for Nunavut.
In 2008, the College of Licensed Practical Nurses of Manitoba submitted aggregate tables for age group.
See Chapter 5 (Methodological Notes) for more information regarding collection and comparability of data.
Source
Nursing Database, Canadian Institute for Health Information.
79
Regulated Nurses: Canadian Trends, 2005 to 2009
Years Since Graduation
As employment patterns of LPNs change as their careers evolve, assumptions and
analyses based on age indicators alone may be incomplete. It may be useful as well
to consider the number of years since graduation from an LPN program.
Figure 28 illustrates the distribution of LPNs by number of years since graduation.
Note that this indicates the maximum number of years an LPN could have been in the
workforce, and does not necessarily reflect the actual number of years worked, because
time spent out of the workforce (such as in continuing education or family leave) is not
accounted for.
The trend for Canada, from 2005 to 2009, shows an increase in the cohort 0 to 10 years
since graduation, while all other cohorts show a decrease.
Figure 28: Licensed Practical Nursing Workforce, by Years Since Graduation, by Jurisdiction and
Canada, 2005 and 2009
Notes
Non-response for Year of Graduation (% of LPN workforce): 2005, n = 33 (<0.1%); 2009, n = 115 (0.2%).
Totals may not sum to 100% due to rounding.
Data released by CIHI may differ from data from other sources due to CIHI’s nationally standardized methodology.
LPNs employed in a jurisdiction different from their jurisdiction of registration are excluded to avoid duplication.
Northern territories data may include inter-jurisdictional duplicates.
Data is not collected for Nunavut.
See Chapter 5 (Methodological Notes) for more information regarding collection and comparability of data.
Source
Nursing Database, Canadian Institute for Health Information.
80
Chapter 2—Regulated Nurses in Canada: Trends of Licensed Practical Nurses
Education Trends
Entry-to-Practice Education
Educational programs for LPNs are offered in most Canadian jurisdictions. The first
formal LPN training program was offered in 1945, in Manitoba. Other jurisdictions
followed by delivering similar programs tailored to meet jurisdictional needs while
offering variation in content and expectations. Once delivered primarily in hospitals,
practical nursing education is now offered in post-secondary institutions.
LPNs in Canada graduate from an approved program with a diploma/certificate or
equivalency. Equivalency status is granted to an individual coming from another
jurisdictional LPN program or educated in another country. An assessment of
equivalency by LPN regulatory bodies can permit initial registration as an LPN.
Graduates of an approved program are eligible to write national examinations and are
eligible for licensure if they achieve a passing grade. The national exam is written in all
jurisdictions except Quebec, which administers a provincial examination.
In the 2009 LPN workforce, a total of 75,055 (97.5%) LPNs had obtained a diploma/
certificate as their education in practical nursing (see Table 35). The remaining 2.5%
had equivalencies.
Table 35: Licensed Practical Nursing Workforce, by Education in Practical Nursing,
by Jurisdiction and Canada, 2005 to 2009
N.L.
P.E.I.
N.S.
N.B.
Que.
Ont.
Man. Sask.
Alta.
B.C.
Y.T. N.W.T. Canada
Count
Diploma/
Certificate
2005 2,651
601
3,077
2,615 15,916
24,45† 2,401 2,142
5,20† 4,425
56
101
63,647
2006 2,591
594
3,125
2,629 16,655
25,08† 2,457 2,172
5,51† 4,990
60
92
65,955
2007 2,551
616
3,112
2,718 16,967
26,126 2,467 2,329
5,890 5,406
59
88
68,329
2008 2,487
624
3,204
2,731 18,880
27,435 2,374 2,462
6,127 6,177
62
94
72,657
2009 2,480
659
3,317
2,729 18,464
28,804 2,399 2,579
6,385 7,081
64
94
75,055
†
Equivalency 2005
47
5
50
18
377
*
189
52
10
459
–
–
1,306
2006
48
5
49
17
449
*
195
52
10†
422
–
–
1,345
2007
47
7
48
16
525
0
204
52
96
385
–
–
1,380
2008
43
7
46
0
701
–
241
52
105
528
–
–
1,723
2009
41
6
40
–
720
–
252
50
284
496
–
–
1,889
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
2.3%
1.4%
†
12.8% 7.1%
-8.9%
3.6%
0.4%
7.2%
†
8.3% -1.7%
-4.3%
3.6%
5.0% -3.8%
5.7%
4.0% 14.3% 5.1%
6.8%
6.3%
5.0%
4.8%
4.2% 14.6% 3.2%
0.0%
3.3%
Annual Percentage Change
Diploma/
Certificate
2005
–
2006 -2.3%
-1.2%
1.6%
0.5%
4.6%
†
2007 -1.5%
3.7%
-0.4%
3.4%
1.9%
†
2008 -2.5%
1.3%
3.0%
2009 -0.3%
5.6%
3.5%
0.5% 11.3%
-0.1%
-2.2%
1.1%
(continued)
81
Regulated Nurses: Canadian Trends, 2005 to 2009
Table 35: Licensed Practical Nursing Workforce, by Education in Practical Nursing, by
Jurisdiction and Canada, 2005 to 2009 (cont’d)
N.L.
P.E.I.
N.S.
N.B.
Que.
Man. Sask.
Alta.
B.C.
Y.T. N.W.T. Canada
Equivalency 2005
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
2006
2.1%
0.0%
-2.0%
-5.6% 19.1%
†
3.2%
0.0%
†
-8.1%
–
–
3.0%
2007 -2.1% 40.0%
-2.0%
-5.9% 16.9%
†
4.6%
0.0%
†
-8.8%
–
–
2.6%
– 18.1%
0.0%
2008 -8.5%
0.0%
2009 -4.7% -14.3%
–
Ont.
-4.2% -100.0% 33.5%
-13.0%
–
2.7%
–
99.3% 97.7%
†
99.4% 97.4%
†
9.4% 37.1%
–
–
24.9%
4.6% -3.8% 170.5% -6.1%
–
–
9.6%
Percentage Distribution
Diploma/
Certificate
2005 98.3% 99.2%
98.4%
2006 98.2% 99.2%
98.5%
2007 98.2% 98.9%
98.5%
2008 98.3% 98.9%
98.6%
2009 98.4% 99.1%
98.8%
Equivalency 2005
1.7%
0.8%
1.6%
92.7% 97.6%
†
90.6%
–
–
98.0%
92.6% 97.7%
†
92.2%
–
–
98.0%
98.4% 93.4%
–
–
98.0%
100.0% 96.4%
99.4% 97.0% 100.0% 92.4% 97.8%
– 90.8% 97.9%
98.3% 92.1%
–
–
97.7%
– 96.2%
– 90.5% 98.1%
95.7% 93.5%
0.7%
2.3%
†
–
–
97.5%
2.4%
†
9.4%
–
–
2.0%
7.4%
2.3%
†
7.8%
–
–
2.0%
7.3%
2006
1.8%
0.8%
1.5%
0.6%
2.6%
†
2007
1.8%
1.1%
1.5%
0.6%
3.0%
0.0%
7.6%
2.2%
1.6%
6.6%
–
–
2.0%
2008
1.7%
1.1%
1.4%
0.0%
3.6%
–
9.2%
2.1%
1.7%
7.9%
–
–
2.3%
2009
1.6%
0.9%
1.2%
–
3.8%
–
9.5%
1.9%
4.3%
6.5%
–
–
2.5%
Notes
–
Data is not applicable or does not exist.
*
Value suppressed in accordance with CIHI privacy policy; cell value is from 1 to 4.
†
Digit suppressed to ensure confidentiality.
Totals may not sum to 100% due to rounding.
Data released by CIHI may differ from data from other sources due to CIHI’s nationally standardized methodology.
LPNs employed in a jurisdiction different from their jurisdiction of registration are excluded to avoid duplication.
Northern territories data may include inter-jurisdictional duplicates.
Data is not collected for Nunavut.
See Chapter 5 (Methodological Notes) for more information regarding collection and comparability of data.
Source
Nursing Database, Canadian Institute for Health Information.
82
Chapter 2—Regulated Nurses in Canada: Trends of Licensed Practical Nurses
Figure 29 illustrates the trends of graduates from diploma/certificate programs from 2007
to 2009.
Figure 29: Licensed Practical Nurses Graduating From Diploma/Certificate
Programs, Canada, 2007 to 2009
Notes
Graduates refers to the number of students who successfully graduated from the program. Graduate data is collected
on a calendar year basis.
For more detailed notes, please refer to the Student and Faculty Survey of Canadian Schools of Nursing methodology
document, available from the CNA and CASN.
Sources
Canadian Nurses Association and Canadian Association Schools of Nursing.
83
Regulated Nurses: Canadian Trends, 2005 to 2009
Average Age at Graduation
The age at which a student graduates from a nursing program and is eligible to enter
the LPN workforce is an important indicator of the number of years an average LPN will
contribute to the workforce. As Table 36 illustrates, practical nurses have been entering
the workforce later; thus, unless they stay later at the end of their careers, their years of
service will be reduced.
Table 36: Licensed Practical Nursing Graduates and Average Age at Graduation,
by Range of Graduation Years, Canada, 1985 to 2009
Graduation Year
Number of Graduates
Average Age at Graduation
1985–1989
5,947
25.8
1990–1994
7,726
28.7
1995–1999
7,026
29.8
2000–2004
13,011
31.0
2005–2009
20,822
30.9
Notes
Manitoba LPN graduate age data for 2008 is excluded from average age at graduation calculation for Canada, as the
College of Licensed Practical Nurses of Manitoba submitted aggregate tables for average age; number of graduates
includes Manitoba LPN graduates to reflect total LPN workforce.
See Chapter 5 (Methodological Notes) for more information regarding collection and comparability of data.
Source
Nursing Database, Canadian Institute for Health Information.
The trend of increasing age at graduation has slowed since the early 1990s. In 2009,
56.8% of the workforce who had graduated in the previous five years were older than 30
when they graduated.
Mobility Trends: A Mobile Workforce
Regulated nurses are in demand in Canada and around the world. As a result, graduates
from regulated nursing programs often have numerous options as to where they will
practise. Canadian graduates may choose to remain in their current province or territory,
to migrate to another Canadian province or territory or to emigrate to another country.
International graduates may choose to immigrate to Canada, either through their own
initiative or through a provincial nursing recruitment program.
As CIHI does not collect citizenship or immigration data, the mobility trends in this
chapter related to interprovincial, territorial and international mobility are based on
indicators developed by CIHI using data on employment, location of residence and
location of graduation. Additional information on LPN mobility trends is available in the
data tables on the CIHI website.
84
Chapter 2—Regulated Nurses in Canada: Trends of Licensed Practical Nurses
Migration Within Canada
Each provincial/territorial workforce combines licensed practical nurses who originally
graduated from within the jurisdiction, those who graduated from other Canadian
jurisdictions and those who graduated from outside the country. Overall, more than 9 out
of 10 (94.3%) licensed practical nurses who graduated from Canadian licensed practical
nursing programs who were working in Canada in 2009 either did not move after
graduation or eventually returned to their jurisdiction of graduation.
Figure 30: Licensed Practical Nursing Workforce, by Jurisdiction of Graduation
and Registration, Canada, 2009
Notes
Includes only LPNs educated in Canadian LPN programs employed in Canada, in 2009 (N = 75,061).
Totals may not sum to 100% due to rounding.
Data released by CIHI may differ from data from other sources due to CIHI’s nationally standardized methodology.
LPNs employed in a jurisdiction different from their jurisdiction of registration are excluded to avoid duplication.
Northern territories data may include inter-jurisdictional duplicates.
Data is not collected for Nunavut.
See Chapter 5 (Methodological Notes) for more information regarding collection and comparability of data.
Source
Nursing Database, Canadian Institute for Health Information.
85
Regulated Nurses: Canadian Trends, 2005 to 2009
Figure 31 shows the top three destinations for those who moved sometime between
their graduation year and 2009, comparing the jurisdiction of graduation to the current
jurisdiction of registration. The data does not account for mobility and migration in the
intervening years.
Figure 31: Licensed Practical Nursing Workforce, by Jurisdiction of Registration
and Top Three Destinations of Graduation, Canada, 2009
Notes
Includes only LPNs educated in Canadian LPN programs employed in Canada, in 2009 (N = 75,061).
Data released by CIHI may differ from data from other sources due to CIHI’s nationally standardized methodology.
LPNs employed in a jurisdiction different from their jurisdiction of registration are excluded to avoid duplication.
Northern territories data may include inter-jurisdictional duplicates.
Data is not collected for Nunavut.
See Chapter 5 (Methodological Notes) for more information regarding collection and comparability of data.
Source
Nursing Database, Canadian Institute for Health Information.
86
Chapter 2—Regulated Nurses in Canada: Trends of Licensed Practical Nurses
Overall, the provinces of Ontario, British Columbia and Alberta figure prominently as
destinations for migrating practical nurses from across the country. In contrast, the
Yukon (0.7%) and Prince Edward Island (1.3%) received very low numbers of migrating
practical nurses, while Quebec received none.
Working Outside Province/Territory of Registration
LPNs who work outside of their province or territory of registration may be working
outside Canada or in another jurisdiction within Canada. Note that CIHI can report on
LPNs working outside Canada only if they maintain registration with a Canadian province
or territory.
Figure 32 illustrates the top destinations for LPNs registered in a Canadian province or
territory who were working either abroad or in another jurisdiction in Canada. Of the 446
LPNs who were not working in their province/territory of registration, 89 (20.0%) were
employed in the United States; an additional 3.8% were employed in other locations.
Figure 32: Licensed Practical Nurses Working Outside of Jurisdiction of
Registration, by Country of Employment, Canada, 2009
Notes
Includes only those LPNs who worked outside of their jurisdiction of registration, in 2009 (N = 446).
Totals may not sum to 100% due to rounding.
See Chapter 5 (Methodological Notes) for more information regarding collection and comparability of data.
Source
Nursing Database, Canadian Institute for Health Information.
87
Regulated Nurses: Canadian Trends, 2005 to 2009
Internationally Educated Licensed Practical Nurses
In the absence of citizenship and immigration data, CIHI uses the location of graduation
as an indicator of trends in immigration. The assumption is made that an LPN who
studied outside of Canada immigrated, but the total number does include Canadian
citizens who studied abroad.
Table 37: Licensed Practical Nursing Workforce, by Location of Graduation,
by Canada and International, 2005 to 2009
Canada
International
Total
Count
2005
47,386
1,216
48,602
2006
48,933
1,231
50,164
2007
67,804
1,321
69,125
2008
72,852
1,485
74,337
2009
75,062
1,805
76,867
Percentage Distribution
2005
97.5%
2.5%
100.0%
2006
97.5%
2.5%
100.0%
2007
98.1%
1.9%
100.0%
2008
98.0%
2.0%
100.0%
2009
97.7%
2.3%
100.0%
Notes
– Data is not applicable or does not exist.
Non-response for Location of Graduation (% of all LPNs): 2005, n = 16,351 (25.2%); 2006, n = 17,136 (25.5%); 2007,
n = 584 (0.8%); 2008, n = 43 (0.1%); 2009, n = 77 (0.1%).
For 2005 and 2006, Quebec did not submit any data for Location of Graduation all records were defaulted to
not stated.
Totals may not sum to 100% due to rounding.
Data released by CIHI may differ from data from other sources due to CIHI’s nationally standardized methodology.
See Chapter 5 (Methodological Notes) for more information regarding collection and comparability of data.
Source
Nursing Database, Canadian Institute for Health Information.
88
Chapter 2—Regulated Nurses in Canada: Trends of Licensed Practical Nurses
Of the LPNs employed in Canada who reported their location of graduation in 2009,
97.7% (75,062) graduated from a practical nursing program in Canada and 2.3% (1,805)
graduated from an international practical nursing program.
The workforces of Alberta and Ontario had the highest concentrations of internationally
educated LPNs, with 4.2% and 4.1%, respectively. The four eastern provinces all had
very low concentrations of internationally educated LPNs.
For the 1,805 LPNs in Canada who graduated from an international practical nursing
program, the seven most frequently identified countries of graduation are identified in
Figure 33. Close to half of all international graduates attended nursing programs in the
United Kingdom or the Philippines. Additionally, 11.1% were graduates from programs
in the United States.
Figure 33: Internationally Educated Licensed Practical Nurses in the Workforce,
by Country of Graduation, 2009
Notes
Includes only those LPNs who were educated outside of Canada, in 2009 (N = 1,805).
Totals may not sum to 100% due to rounding.
Data released by CIHI may differ from data from other sources due to CIHI’s nationally standardized methodology.
See Chapter 5 (Methodological Notes) for more information regarding collection and comparability of data.
Source
Nursing Database, Canadian Institute for Health Information.
89
Regulated Nurses: Canadian Trends, 2005 to 2009
Urban/Rural Distribution of the Workforce
Geographical differences in Canada create numerous challenges to health care
providers and planners. The urban/rural distribution of the population is a challenge
not only in the northern territories but also in each of the provinces.
To determine if LPNs were practising in a rural or an urban setting, a postal code
analysis was performed. In most cases, the postal code used was that of the workplace;
however, when Postal Code of Employer (Worksite) was not submitted to CIHI, Postal
Code of Residence was used.iii Figures 34 and 35 illustrate the urban/rural/remote/
territories distribution of the LPN workforce in Canada in 2009. In 2009, 82.1% of the LPN
workforce worked in urban areas of Canada, ranging from highs of 98.4% in the Yukon
and 90.6% in British Columbia to lows of 39.4% in the Northwest Territories and 53.9% in
Newfoundland and Labrador.
Figure 34: Licensed Practical Nursing Workforce, by Urban/Rural/Remote/
Territories Designation, Canada, 2009
Notes
Totals may not sum to 100% due to rounding.
Urban areas are defined as communities with populations greater than 10,000 persons.
Rural areas are defined as communities in relatively close proximity to urban areas.
Remote areas are defined as those communities with relatively little social and economic interaction with urban areas.
Territories are defined as areas outside of Whitehorse and Yellowknife in the northern territories.
See Chapter 5 (Methodological Notes) for more information regarding collection and comparability of data.
Source
Nursing Database, Canadian Institute for Health Information.
iii. See Chapter 5 (Methodological Notes) for a description of the postal code analysis.
90
Chapter 2—Regulated Nurses in Canada: Trends of Licensed Practical Nurses
Figure 35: Licensed Practical Nursing Workforce, by Urban/Rural/Remote/
Territories Designation, by Jurisdiction, 2009
Notes
Totals may not sum to 100% due to rounding.
Urban areas are defined as communities with populations greater than 10,000 persons.
Rural areas are defined as communities in relatively close proximity to urban areas.
Remote areas are defined as those communities with relatively little social and economic interaction with urban areas.
Territories are defined as areas outside of Whitehorse and Yellowknife in the northern territories.
Data released by CIHI may differ from data from other sources due to CIHI’s nationally standardized methodology.
LPNs employed in a jurisdiction different from their jurisdiction of registration are excluded to avoid duplication.
Northern territories data may include inter-jurisdictional duplicates.
Data is not collected for Nunavut.
See Chapter 5 (Methodological Notes) for more information regarding collection and comparability of data.
Source
Nursing Database, Canadian Institute for Health Information.
91
Regulated Nurses: Canadian Trends, 2005 to 2009
Licensed Practical Nurses in the Territories: Characteristics
of the Northern Workforce
The nature and delivery of nursing services in the northern territories differ from those in
the Canadian provinces. It is not uncommon for LPNs to travel north on short-term work
contracts and to return to their home province for the remainder of the year. Therefore,
in addition to the LPNs who are registered and working only in the northern territories,
LPNs who are registered in a territory and another jurisdiction are also included in the
northern LPN workforce.
Some of the employment patterns described in this section also exist in northern or rural
areas of each Canadian province. The health region analysis in Chapter 4 of this report
provides some insight on the characteristics and services in each health region.
Figure 36 shows that the majority of LPNs working in the territories worked in hospitals
(40.5%). Notably, LPNs in the territories were also employed in nursing homes or
long-term care facilities and community health centres. Of those LPNs working in the
provinces, 45.6% worked in hospitals, 39.1% worked in nursing homes or long-term
care facilities and 7.8% worked in community health centres.
92
Chapter 2—Regulated Nurses in Canada: Trends of Licensed Practical Nurses
Figure 36: Licensed Practical Nursing Workforce, by Place of Work, by Provincial
or Territorial Level, Canada, 2009
Notes
† Digit suppressed to ensure confidentiality.
The territories Place of Work community health and nursing home/LTC percentage has been removed in accordance
with CIHI privacy policy.\
Non-response for Place of Work (% of LPN workforce): n = 5,252 (6.8%).
Hospital includes data from hospital (general, maternal, pediatric, psychiatric), mental health centre and
rehabilitation/convalescent centre.
Community Health includes data from community health centre, home care agency, nursing station (outpost or clinic)
and public health department/unit.
Nursing Home/LTC includes data from nursing home/long-term care facility.
Other Place of Work includes data from business/industry/occupational health office, private nursing agency/private
duty, self-employed, physician’s office/family practice unit, educational institution, association/government and other.
Totals may not sum to 100% due to rounding.
Data released by CIHI may differ from data from other sources due to CIHI’s nationally standardized methodology.
See Chapter 5 (Methodological Notes) for more information regarding collection and comparability of data.
Source
Nursing Database, Canadian Institute for Health Information.
Among LPNs employed in the territories, the most frequently identified areas of
responsibility were geriatric/long-term care (50.6%), medicine/surgery (12.7%),
ambulatory care (12.7%) and several clinical areas (5.1%). LPNs employed in the
provinces most frequently identified geriatric/long-term care (43.4%), medicine/surgery
(18.2%) and other patient care (6.2%) as their area of responsibility. Most LPNs in the
territories (92.6%) and almost all LPNs in the provinces (92.0%) identified their position
as staff nurse/community health nurse.
93
Chapter 3—Regulated Nurses in Canada: Trends
of Registered Psychiatric Nurses
Chapter 3—Regulated Nurses in Canada: Trends of Registered Psychiatric Nurses
Workforce Trends: How Many Registered
Psychiatric Nurses?
The regulated nursing workforce is of critical importance to the health of Canadians,
and thus to health human resource planners. Registered psychiatric nurses (RPNs)
are regulated as a separate profession in four provinces and one territory: Manitoba,
Saskatchewan, Alberta, British Columbia and the Yukon. This chapter presents data on
RPNs working in the four western provinces in 2009 and illustrates key trends over the
last five years. Yukon data is not presented in this report as current numbers would
require suppression in accordance with the CIHI privacy policy.
The RPN workforce is defined as RPNs employed in psychiatric nursing in the
western provinces. They represent 1.5% of the total regulated nursing workforce. The
Employment Status indicator classifies RPNs as either working in psychiatric nursing,
working outside of psychiatric nursing or not working. The indicator further classifies
RPNs in the workforce as working in part-time, full-time or casual positions. As illustrated
in Figure 37, the vast majority of RPNs who registered in the western provinces in 2009
were in the RPN workforce, with two-thirds employed in full-time positions (67.1%).
Figure 37: Registered Psychiatric Nurses, by Employment Status,
Western Provinces, 2009
Notes
Totals may not sum to 100% due to rounding.
Employed RPNs with employed—status unknown are excluded from the percentage distribution of full time, part time
and casual.
The RPN workforce of the four western provinces represents the total RPN workforce in Canada.
See Chapter 5 (Methodological Notes) for more information regarding collection and comparability of data.
Source
Nursing Database, Canadian Institute for Health Information.
97
Regulated Nurses: Canadian Trends, 2005 to 2009
Within the provinces where RPNs provide care, the ratio of these nurses per person to
the population decreased to approximately 50 RPNs per 100,000 population between
2005 and 2009.
Figure 38: Registered Psychiatric Nursing Workforce per 100,000 Population,
Western Provinces, 2005 to 2009
Notes
The total population of the four western provinces (Manitoba, Saskatchewan, Alberta and British Columbia) was used
in calculating the workforce per 100,000 population.
The RPN workforce of the four western provinces represents the total RPN workforce in Canada.
The population estimates used in this publication are from Statistics Canada, Demography Division, and are based on
Canadian Demographic Estimates, 2008–2009, preliminary postcensal (PP) estimates of the population counted on
July 1, 2009, Canada, provinces and territories.
See Chapter 5 (Methodological Notes) for more information regarding collection and comparability of data.
Source
Nursing Database, Canadian Institute for Health Information.
98
Chapter 3—Regulated Nurses in Canada: Trends of Registered Psychiatric Nurses
Employment Trends: Is the Workforce Changing?
Table 38 shows the supply of all RPNs over the period 2005 to 2009. In 2009, there were
5,321 RPNs in the western provinces, 1.5% more than in 2008 and 5.8% more than
in 2005. Except for 2005, the number of RPNs employed in the western provinces
remained relatively stable between the years 2005 and 2009. Additional information
on RPNs by province is available in the data tables on the CIHI website.
Table 38: Registered Psychiatric Nurses, by Employment Status, Western Provinces, 2005 to 2009
Employed in Psychiatric Nursing
Grand
Total
Not Employed in Psychiatric Nursing
Regular
Regular
Regular
Basis, Casual Basis,
Employed in Other
Basis, Full
Subtotal
Part
Basis
Status
Than Psychiatric Nursing
Time
Time
Unknown
Not
Subtotal
Stated
Not Employed
Seeking
Not Seeking
Seeking
Not Seeking Employment Employment
Employment Employment in Psychiatric in Psychiatric
Nursing
Nursing
A
B
C
Count
2005
1,995
797
187
2006
3,407
958
631
2007
3,448 1,015
621
2008
3,480
965
655
2009
3,479
971
736
Annual Percentage Change
2005
–
–
–
2006
70.8% 20.2% 237.4%
2007
1.2%
5.9% -1.6%
2008
0.9% -4.9%
5.5%
2009
0.0%
0.6% 12.4%
Percentage Distribution
2005
39.7% 15.9%
3.7%
2006
65.1% 18.3% 12.1%
2007
65.9% 19.4% 11.9%
2008
66.4% 18.4% 12.5%
2009
65.4% 18.2% 13.8%
D
E=
A+B+
C+D
F
G
H
I
1,985
55
40
62
28
4,964
5,051
5,124
5,162
5,214
0
9
*
*
0
*
6
0
*
*
*
22
23
28
36
*
13
–
-97.2%
-27.3%
55.0%
-54.8%
–
1.8%
1.4%
0.7%
1.0%
–
–
–
–
–
†
†
†
†
-100.0%
–
4.5%
21.7%
28.6%
†
39.5%
1.1%
0.8%
1.2%
0.5%
98.7%
96.5%
98.0%
98.5%
98.0%
0.0%
0.2%
†
†
†
†
†
7
22
†
†
0.2%
†
5,027
5,235
5,230
5,241
5,321
–
127.1%
-42.5%
-49.4%
–
192.1%
-42.4%
-25.5%
35.4%
–
4.1%
-0.1%
0.2%
1.5%
1.3%
3.5%
2.0%
1.5%
2.0%
100.0%
100.0%
100.0%
100.0%
100.0%
1.2%
2.6%
1.5%
0.7%
†
0.4%
0.4%
0.5%
0.7%
0.0%
63
184
106
79
107
†
†
†
59
134
77
39
4†
214.3%
0.1%
0.0%
†
K=
F+G+H L = E+K
+I+J
J
†
0.1%
0.4%
†
Notes
–
Data is not applicable or does not exist.
*
Value suppressed in accordance with CIHI privacy policy; cell value is from 1 to 4.
†
Digit suppressed to ensure confidentiality.
Totals may not sum to 100% due to rounding.
The RPN workforce of the four western provinces represents the total RPN workforce in Canada.
See Chapter 5 (Methodological Notes) for more information regarding collection and comparability of data.
Source
Nursing Database, Canadian Institute for Health Information.
99
Regulated Nurses: Canadian Trends, 2005 to 2009
RPNs employed in psychiatric nursing but reported as employed—status unknown are
those who reported employment data but who failed to indicate their status as full time,
part time or casual. Accordingly, they are included in the workforce but are excluded
from some analyses in the report, as indicated in table footnotes.
Table 39: Registered Psychiatric Nursing Workforce, by Province and Western
Provinces, 2005 to 2009
Man.
Sask.
Alta.
B.C.
Western
Provinces
2005
952
933
1,125
1,954
4,964
2006
956
900
1,144
2,051
5,051
2007
952
880
1,158
2,134
5,124
2008
935
892
1,157
2,178
5,162
2009
949
866
1,202
2,197
5,214
Count
Annual Percentage Change
2005
–
–
–
–
–
2006
0.4%
-3.5%
1.7%
5.0%
1.8%
2007
-0.4%
-2.2%
1.2%
4.0%
1.4%
2008
-1.8%
1.4%
-0.1%
2.1%
0.7%
2009
1.5%
-2.9%
3.9%
0.9%
1.0%
Percentage Distribution
2005
19.2%
18.8%
22.7%
39.4%
100.0%
2006
18.9%
17.8%
22.6%
40.6%
100.0%
2007
18.6%
17.2%
22.6%
41.6%
100.0%
2008
18.1%
17.3%
22.4%
42.2%
100.0%
2009
18.2%
16.6%
23.1%
42.1%
100.0%
Notes
– Data is not applicable or does not exist.
Totals may not sum to 100% due to rounding.
The RPN workforce of the four western provinces represents the total RPN workforce in Canada.
Data released by CIHI may differ from data from other sources due to CIHI’s nationally standardized methodology.
RPNs employed in a province different from their province of registration are excluded to avoid duplication.
See Chapter 5 (Methodological Notes) for more information regarding collection and comparability of data.
Source
Nursing Database, Canadian Institute for Health Information.
100
Chapter 3—Regulated Nurses in Canada: Trends of Registered Psychiatric Nurses
Employment Status
Table 40 shows that the majority of RPNs employed in psychiatric nursing were
employed on a regular basis in full-time positions (3,479 or 67.1% in 2009).
Table 40: Registered Psychiatric Nursing Workforce, by Employment Status,
by Province and Western Provinces, 2005 to 2009
Man.
Sask.
Alta.
B.C.
Western
Provinces
Count
Employed,
Full Time
Employed,
Part Time
Employed,
Casual
Employed,
Status
Unknown
2005
601
724
670
–
1,995
2006
599
708
663
1,437
3,407
2007
599
698
664
1,487
3,448
2008
586
697
656
1,541
3,480
2009
530
675
706
1,568
3,479
2005
286
146
365
–
797
2006
293
127
366
172
958
2007
283
120
377
235
1,015
2008
277
100
370
218
965
2009
254
126
379
212
971
2005
48
62
77
–
187
2006
53
46
108
424
631
2007
68
49
114
390
621
2008
63
70
120
402
655
2009
152
53
117
414
736
2005
17
1
13
1,954
1,985
2006
11
19
7
18
55
2007
2
13
3
22
40
2008
9
25
11
17
62
2009
13
12
–
3
28
2005
–
–
–
–
–
2006
-0.3%
-2.2%
-1.0%
–
‡
2007
0.0%
-1.4%
0.2%
3.5%
1.2%
2008
-2.2%
-0.1%
-1.2%
3.6%
0.9%
Annual Percentage Change
Employed,
Full Time
Employed,
Part Time
2009
-9.6%
-3.2%
7.6%
1.8%
0.0%
2005
–
–
–
–
–
2006
2.4%
-13.0%
0.3%
–
‡
2007
-3.4%
-5.5%
3.0%
36.6%
5.9%
2008
-2.1%
-16.7%
-1.9%
-7.2%
-4.9%
2009
-8.3%
26.0%
2.4%
-2.8%
0.6%
(continued)
101
Regulated Nurses: Canadian Trends, 2005 to 2009
Table 40: Registered Psychiatric Nursing Workforce, by Employment Status,
by Province and Western Provinces, 2005 to 2009 (cont’d)
Man.
Employed,
Casual
Sask.
Alta.
B.C.
Western
Provinces
2005
–
–
–
–
–
2006
10.4%
-25.8%
40.3%
–
‡
2007
28.3%
6.5%
5.6%
-8.0%
-1.6%
2008
-7.4%
42.9%
5.3%
3.1%
5.5%
2009
141.3%
-24.3%
-2.5%
3.0%
12.4%
Percentage Distribution
Employed,
Full Time
Employed, Part
Time
Employed,
Casual
2005
64.3%
77.7%
60.3%
–
‡
2006
63.4%
80.4%
58.3%
70.7%
68.2%
2007
63.1%
80.5%
57.5%
70.4%
67.8%
2008
63.3%
80.4%
57.2%
71.3%
68.2%
2009
56.6%
79.0%
58.7%
71.5%
67.1%
2005
30.6%
15.7%
32.8%
–
‡
2006
31.0%
14.4%
32.2%
8.5%
19.2%
2007
29.8%
13.8%
32.6%
11.1%
20.0%
2008
29.9%
11.5%
32.3%
10.1%
18.9%
2009
27.1%
14.8%
31.5%
9.7%
18.7%
2005
5.1%
6.7%
6.9%
–
‡
2006
5.6%
5.2%
9.5%
20.9%
12.6%
2007
7.2%
5.7%
9.9%
18.5%
12.2%
2008
6.8%
8.1%
10.5%
18.6%
12.8%
2009
16.2%
6.2%
9.7%
18.9%
14.2%
Notes
– Data is not applicable or does not exist.
‡ As a result of British Columbia defaulting all RPN Employment Status to employed in psychiatric nursing—
status unknown in 2005, value is not reported as it is not representative of all western provinces.
Totals may not sum to 100% due to rounding.
Employed RPNs with employed—status unknown are excluded from the percentage distribution.
In 2005, British Columbia defaulted all RPNs to Employment Status employed in psychiatric nursing—status unknown.
In 2006, for Saskatchewan data, changes to the registration form permitted selection of part time or casual for
Employment Status.
The differences between Manitoba’s 2008 and 2009 Employment Status were the result of a database change in 2009.
The RPN workforce of the four western provinces represents the total RPN workforce in Canada.
Data released by CIHI may differ from data from other sources due to CIHI’s nationally standardized methodology.
RPNs employed in a province different from their province of registration are excluded to avoid duplication.
See Chapter 5 (Methodological Notes) for more information regarding collection and comparability of data.
Source
Nursing Database, Canadian Institute for Health Information.
102
Chapter 3—Regulated Nurses in Canada: Trends of Registered Psychiatric Nurses
As Table 40 demonstrates, the percentage of the RPN workforce employed in full-time positions
varied across the provinces in 2009, from 56.6% in Manitoba to 79.0% in Saskatchewan.
The average age of RPNs working full time was 47.6, that of RPNs working part time was
46.9 and that of RPNs working on a casual basis was 48.9.
There was a larger proportion of male RPNs employed in full-time positions in 2009 than
of female RPNs. In that year, 78.7% of male RPNs were employed full time, compared to
63.7% of female RPNs. Only 10.2% of male RPNs had part-time employment, compared
to 21.2% of female RPNs. Casual employment rates followed a similar pattern, with
11.1% of male RPNs and 15.1% of female RPNs employed on a casual basis.
Multiple Employment
It is not uncommon for RPNs to have more than one psychiatric nursing job, often with
multiple employers. In 2009, 20.8% of the RPN workforce who reported on their multiple
employment status had more than one employer in psychiatric nursing. The proportion
of psychiatric nurses with multiple employment who reported working in part-time
positions decreased over the five-year period from 38.0% in 2005 to 21.2% in 2009.
Table 41: Registered Psychiatric Nurses Employed in Psychiatric Nursing With
Multiple Employers, by Employment Status With Primary Employer,
Western Provinces, 2005 to 2009
Employed,
Full Time
Count
2005
276
2006
571
2007
667
2008
617
2009
579
Annual Percentage Change
2005
–
‡
2006
2007
16.8%
2008
-7.5%
2009
-6.2%
Percentage Distribution
‡
2005
2006
55.2%
2007
57.2%
2008
60.0%
2009
54.0%
Employed,
Part Time
Employed,
Casual
Employed,
Status Unknown
Total With
Multiple
Employers
200
248
297
240
227
50
215
203
171
266
481
16
3
6
6
1,007
1,050
1,170
1,034
1,078
–
–
‡
19.8%
-19.2%
-5.4%
-5.6%
-15.8%
55.6%
–
–
–
–
–
–
‡
11.4%
-11.6%
4.3%
–
–
–
–
–
100.0%
100.0%
100.0%
100.0%
‡
‡
24.0%
25.4%
23.3%
21.2%
20.8%
17.4%
16.6%
24.8%
‡
‡
Notes
– Data is not applicable or does not exist.
‡ As a result of British Columbia defaulting all RPN Employment Status to employed in psychiatric nursing—
status unknown in 2005, value is not reported as it is not representative of all western provinces.
Non-response for Multiple Employment (% of RPN workforce): 2005, n = 27 (0.5%); 2006, n = 13 (0.3%);
2007, n = 44 (0.9%); 2008, n = 94 (1.8%); 2009, n = 42 (0.8%).
Totals may not sum to 100% due to rounding.
Employed RPNs with Employment Status employed—status unknown are excluded from percentage distribution.
The RPN workforce of the four western provinces represents the total RPN workforce in Canada.
See Chapter 5 (Methodological Notes) for more information regarding collection and comparability of data.
Source
Nursing Database, Canadian Institute for Health Information.
103
Regulated Nurses: Canadian Trends, 2005 to 2009
Figure 39 shows the distribution by age group of RPNs working for multiple employers;
RPNs age 40 to 49 comprised the largest group in 2009. Breakdown by Employment
Status indicates that in 2009, a higher proportion of full-time RPNs were working in
multiple positions for all age groups compared to the part-time and casual categories.
Figure 39: Registered Psychiatric Nurses Employed in Psychiatric Nursing
With Multiple Employers, by Employment Status, by Age Group,
Western Provinces, 2009
Notes
Non-response for Multiple Employment (% of RPN workforce): 2005, n = 27 (0.5%); 2006, n = 13 (0.3%);
2007, n = 44 (0.9%); 2008, n = 94 (1.8%); 2009, n= 42 (0.8%).
The RPN workforce of the four western provinces represents the total RPN workforce in Canada.
See Chapter 5 (Methodological Notes) for more information regarding collection and comparability of data.
Source
Nursing Database, Canadian Institute for Health Information.
104
Chapter 3—Regulated Nurses in Canada: Trends of Registered Psychiatric Nurses
Place of Work
The hospital sector employed 43.9% of the RPN workforce in the western provinces. The
greatest proportion of psychiatric nurses working in this sector in 2009 was found in
Alberta, at 59.3%, and British Columbia, at 45.1%. Employment in the community health
sector was largest in British Columbia; in Saskatchewan the nursing home/long-term
care sector was the largest.
Figure 40: Registered Psychiatric Nursing Workforce, by Place of Work,
by Province and Western Provinces, 2005 and 2009
Notes
Non-response for Place of Work (% of RPN workforce): 2005, n = 45 (0.9%); 2009, n = 34 (0.7%).
Hospital includes data from hospital (general, maternal, pediatric, psychiatric).
Community Health includes data from community mental health agency/community health centre, home care agency
and nursing station (outpost or clinic).
Nursing Home/LTC includes data from nursing home/long-term care facility and residential care facility.
Other Place of Work includes data from business/industry/occupational health office, private nursing agency or
psychiatric nursing agency/private duty, self-employed/private practice, physician’s office/family practice unit,
correctional agency, educational institution, association/government and other.
Totals may not sum to 100% due to rounding.
The RPN workforce of the four western provinces represents the total RPN workforce in Canada.
Data released by CIHI may differ from data from other sources due to CIHI’s nationally standardized methodology.
RPNs employed in a province different from their province of registration are excluded to avoid duplication.
See Chapter 5 (Methodological Notes) for more information regarding collection and comparability of data.
Source
Nursing Database, Canadian Institute for Health Information.
105
Regulated Nurses: Canadian Trends, 2005 to 2009
In 2009, the average age of RPNs working in the hospital sector was 45.8, compared to
the average age of 47.7 for RPNs employed in community health and 50.5 for RPNs
employed in the nursing home/long-term care sector.
Position
In 2009, 4,103 RPNs (79.0%) were employed as staff psychiatric nurses/community health
nurses in the western provinces, an increase of 2.2% from 4,013 in 2008 (see Table 42).
Table 42: Registered Psychiatric Nursing Workforce, by Position, by Province and
Western Provinces, 2005 to 2009
Man.
Sask.
Alta.
B.C.
Western
Provinces
2005
748
737
908
1,504
3,897
2006
743
717
938
1,601
3,999
2007
736
668
944
1,684
4,032
2008
702
658
936
1,717
4,013
2009
728
662
969
1,744
4,103
2005
101
114
88
297
600
2006
100
110
89
297
596
2007
105
99
88
264
556
2008
93
108
90
257
548
2009
92
103
88
264
547
2005
99
82
118
117
416
2006
113
73
111
132
429
2007
109
98
120
169
496
2008
126
95
125
184
530
2009
129
89
141
184
543
2005
–
–
–
–
–
2006
-0.7%
-2.7%
3.3%
6.4%
2.6%
2007
-0.9%
-6.8%
0.6%
5.2%
0.8%
2008
-4.6%
-1.5%
-0.8%
2.0%
-0.5%
2009
3.7%
0.6%
3.5%
1.6%
2.2%
2005
–
–
–
–
–
2006
-1.0%
-3.5%
1.1%
0.0%
-0.7%
2007
5.0%
-10.0%
-1.1%
-11.1%
-6.7%
2008
-11.4%
9.1%
2.3%
-2.7%
-1.4%
2009
-1.1%
-4.6%
-2.2%
2.7%
-0.2%
Count
Staff Nurse
Manager
Other Positions
Annual Percentage Change
Staff Nurse
Manager
Other Positions
2005
–
–
–
–
–
2006
14.1%
-11.0%
-5.9%
12.8%
3.1%
2007
-3.5%
34.2%
8.1%
28.0%
15.6%
2008
15.6%
-3.1%
4.2%
8.9%
6.9%
2009
2.4%
-6.3%
12.8%
0.0%
2.5%
(continued)
106
Chapter 3—Regulated Nurses in Canada: Trends of Registered Psychiatric Nurses
Table 42: Registered Psychiatric Nursing Workforce, by Position, by Province and
Western Provinces, 2005 to 2009 (cont’d)
Man.
Sask.
Alta.
B.C.
Western
Provinces
Percentage Distribution
Staff Nurse
Manager
Other Positions
2005
78.9%
79.0%
81.5%
78.4%
79.3%
2006
77.7%
79.7%
82.4%
78.9%
79.6%
2007
77.5%
77.2%
81.9%
79.5%
79.3%
2008
76.2%
76.4%
81.3%
79.6%
78.8%
2009
76.7%
77.5%
80.9%
79.6%
79.0%
2005
10.7%
12.2%
7.9%
15.5%
12.2%
2006
10.5%
12.2%
7.8%
14.6%
11.9%
2007
11.1%
11.4%
7.6%
12.5%
10.9%
2008
10.1%
12.5%
7.8%
11.9%
10.8%
2009
9.7%
12.1%
7.3%
12.0%
10.5%
2005
10.4%
8.8%
10.6%
6.1%
8.5%
2006
11.8%
8.1%
9.8%
6.5%
8.5%
2007
11.5%
11.3%
10.4%
8.0%
9.8%
2008
13.7%
11.0%
10.9%
8.5%
10.4%
2009
13.6%
10.4%
11.8%
8.4%
10.5%
Notes
– Data is not applicable or does not exist.
Non-response for Position (% of RPN workforce): 2005, n = 51 (1.0%); 2006, n = 27 (0.5%); 2007, n = 40 (0.8%);
2008, n = 71 (1.4%); 2009, n = 21 (0.4%).
Staff Nurse includes staff psychiatric nurse/community health psychiatric nurse.
Manager includes chief executive officer, director/assistant director and manager/assistant manager.
Other Positions includes instructor/professor/educator, consultant, clinical specialist and other.
Totals may not sum to 100% due to rounding.
The RPN workforce of the four western provinces represents the total RPN workforce in Canada.
Data released by CIHI may differ from data from other sources due to CIHI’s nationally standardized methodology.
RPNs employed in a province different from their province of registration are excluded to avoid duplication.
See Chapter 5 (Methodological Notes) for more information regarding collection and comparability of data.
Source
Nursing Database, Canadian Institute for Health Information.
107
Regulated Nurses: Canadian Trends, 2005 to 2009
Area of Responsibility
The proportion of the registered psychiatric nursing workforce in direct care was greater than
85% in all four regulated provinces. Many health human resource planners are interested in
these totals, as these numbers represent RPNs providing services directly to patients.
Areas of responsibility covered by RPNs that fall outside of direct care include
administration, education and research. The proportion of RPNs employed in
administration in 2009 was highest in Manitoba (10.6%) and Alberta (6.8%).
Overall, RPNs who provide direct care to patients are younger than RPNs in
administration and education while similar to those in research. In 2009, the average age
was 47.4 for RPNs in direct care, 50.6 for RPNs working in administration, 50.9 for RPNs
working in education and 47.5 for those working in research.
Table 43: Registered Psychiatric Nursing Workforce, by Area of Responsibility,
Western Provinces, 2009
Count
Percentage
Direct Care
Acute Services
1,175
23.1%
Geriatric/Long-Term Care
880
17.3%
Rehabilitation
490
9.6%
Forensic Services
399
7.8%
Children & Adolescent Services
284
5.6%
Crisis/Emergency Services
265
5.2%
Developmental Habilitation/Disabilities
183
3.6%
Addiction Services
168
3.3%
Medical/Surgical
30
0.6%
Pediatric
17
0.3%
Palliative Care
13
0.3%
Occupational Health
1†
†
Oncology
Other Patient Care
Total Direct Care
*
†
689
13.5%
4,607
90.4%
Total Administration
328
6.4%
Total Education
150
2.9%
Total Research
11
0.2%
5,096
100.0%
Total
Notes
– Data is not applicable or does not exist.
* Value suppressed in accordance with CIHI privacy policy; cell value is from 1 to 4.
† Digit suppressed to ensure confidentiality.
Non-response for Area of Responsibility (% of all RPNs): n = 118 (2.3%).
Totals may not sum to 100% due to rounding.
The RPN workforce of the four western provinces represents the total RPN workforce in Canada.
Direct Care includes data from medical/surgical, pediatric, geriatric/long-term care, crisis/emergency services,
occupational health, oncology, rehabilitation, palliative care, children & adolescent services, developmental
habilitation/disabilities, addiction services, acute services, forensic services and other patient care.
Administration includes data from nursing services, nursing education and other administration.
Education/Research includes data from teaching students, teaching employees, teaching patients/clients,
other education, psychiatric nursing research only and other research.
See Chapter 5 (Methodological Notes) for more information regarding collection and comparability of data.
Source
Nursing Database, Canadian Institute for Health Information.
108
Chapter 3—Regulated Nurses in Canada: Trends of Registered Psychiatric Nurses
In 2009, the greatest proportion of RPNs worked in acute services and geriatric/longterm care. The area of responsibility with the most RPNs, acute services, also attracted
the most recent graduates. In 2009, 32.8% of RPNs in their first five years of psychiatric
nursing chose to work in acute services. These nurses accounted for 19.6% of all RPNs
working in acute services. The area of responsibility that attracted the highest proportion
of the male workforce was acute services at 21.5%. The male RPN workforce represents
22.5% of the total RPN workforce.
Demographic Trends: Sex and Age Composition of the
Registered Psychiatric Nursing Workforce
Slightly more than three-quarters of RPNs (77.5%) in the Canadian workforce were
female in 2009. This proportion has not changed substantially over five years (see
Table 44). Notably, there was a substantially higher proportion of males working
in psychiatric nursing (22.5%) than in the other regulated nursing professions
(registered nursing and licensed practical nursing).
Additional information on RPN demographic characteristics and trends by province is
available in the data tables on the CIHI website.
Table 44: Registered Psychiatric Nursing Workforce, by Sex, by Province and
Western Provinces, 2005 to 2009
Man.
Sask.
Alta.
B.C.
Western
Provinces
Count
Female
Male
2005
723
792
831
1,498
3,844
2006
733
764
850
1,570
3,917
2007
736
747
859
1,630
3,972
2008
722
751
866
1,663
4,002
2009
738
733
900
1,669
4,040
2005
229
141
294
456
1,120
2006
223
136
294
481
1,134
2007
216
133
299
504
1,152
2008
213
141
291
515
1,160
2009
211
133
302
528
1,174
2005
–
–
–
–
–
2006
1.4%
-3.5%
2.3%
4.8%
1.9%
2007
0.4%
-2.2%
1.1%
3.8%
1.4%
2008
-1.9%
0.5%
0.8%
2.0%
0.8%
2009
2.2%
-2.4%
3.9%
0.4%
0.9%
2005
–
–
–
–
–
2006
-2.6%
-3.5%
0.0%
5.5%
1.3%
2007
-3.1%
-2.2%
1.7%
4.8%
1.6%
2008
-1.4%
6.0%
-2.7%
2.2%
0.7%
2009
-0.9%
-5.7%
3.8%
2.5%
1.2%
Annual Percentage Change
Female
Male
(continued)
109
Regulated Nurses: Canadian Trends, 2005 to 2009
Table 44: Registered Psychiatric Nursing Workforce, by Sex, by Province and
Western Provinces, 2005 to 2009 (cont’d)
Man.
Sask.
Alta.
B.C.
Western
Provinces
Percentage Distribution
Female
Male
2005
75.9%
84.9%
73.9%
76.7%
77.4%
2006
76.7%
84.9%
74.3%
76.5%
77.5%
2007
77.3%
84.9%
74.2%
76.4%
77.5%
2008
77.2%
84.2%
74.8%
76.4%
77.5%
2009
77.8%
84.6%
74.9%
76.0%
77.5%
2005
24.1%
15.1%
26.1%
23.3%
22.6%
2006
23.3%
15.1%
25.7%
23.5%
22.5%
2007
22.7%
15.1%
25.8%
23.6%
22.5%
2008
22.8%
15.8%
25.2%
23.6%
22.5%
2009
22.2%
15.4%
25.1%
24.0%
22.5%
Notes
– Data is not applicable or does not exist.
Totals may not sum to 100% due to rounding.
The RPN workforce of the four western provinces represents the total RPN workforce in Canada.
Data released by CIHI may differ from data from other sources due to CIHI’s nationally standardized methodology.
RPNs employed in a province different from their province of registration are excluded to avoid duplication.
See Chapter 5 (Methodological Notes) for more information regarding collection and comparability of data.
Source
Nursing Database, Canadian Institute for Health Information.
110
Chapter 3—Regulated Nurses in Canada: Trends of Registered Psychiatric Nurses
The average age of male RPNs (49.9) was higher than that of female RPNs (47.0) in
2009. In that year, males accounted for about one-quarter of the RPN workforce in
Manitoba (22.2%), Alberta (25.1%) and British Columbia (24.0%), whereas in
Saskatchewan males accounted for 15.4%.
Age Group of the Workforce
In 2009, for the western provinces as a whole, the highest proportion of RPNs was in the
50 to 54 age group (17.2%), followed by 45 to 49 (16.6%) and 60 and older (14.6%).
Table 45: Registered Psychiatric Nursing Workforce, by Age Group,
by Province and Western Provinces, 2009
Age Group
Man.
<30
8.0%
30–34
35–39
Sask.
Alta.
B.C.
1.7%
9.5%
6.5%
3.6%
6.4%
8.2%
6.7%
7.7%
11.7%
7.2%
12.0%
10.0%
40–44
10.7%
16.8%
14.3%
13.9%
13.9%
45–49
18.7%
19.6%
15.8%
15.0%
16.6%
50–54
22.1%
18.8%
16.4%
14.8%
17.2%
55–59
16.9%
14.7%
14.2%
13.4%
14.4%
9.4%
13.1%
16.2%
16.5%
14.6%
60+
6.1%
Western
Provinces
6.5%
Notes
Non-response for Age Group (% of RPN workforce): n = 3 (<0.1%).
Totals may not sum to 100% due to rounding.
The RPN workforce of the four western provinces represents the total RPN workforce in Canada.
Data released by CIHI may differ from data from other sources due to CIHI’s nationally standardized methodology.
RPNs employed in a province different from their province of registration are excluded to avoid duplication.
See Chapter 5 (Methodological Notes) for more information regarding collection and comparability of data.
Source
Nursing Database, Canadian Institute for Health Information.
111
Regulated Nurses: Canadian Trends, 2005 to 2009
Average Age of the Workforce
Average age may be used in addition to age groupings to describe trends and to make
comparisons between the RPN workforce and other professions. As Figure 41 shows,
the average age of selected health occupations increased over the period from 2005
to 2009.
In addition to the aging of each worker, several variables affect the rate at which the
average age of the workforce changes. They include the rates of entry into and exit
from the workforce and the ages of the workers entering and exiting the workforce.
Figure 41: Average Age of Regulated Nursing Workforce Compared to Selected
Health Occupations, Canada, 2005 to 2009
Notes
The RPN workforce of the four western provinces represents the total RPN workforce in Canada.
For 2007, 2008 and 2009, Manitoba RN data was excluded from average age calculation for Canada, as the College of
Registered Nurses of Manitoba submitted aggregate tables for average age.
For 2008, Manitoba LPN data was excluded from average age calculation for Canada, as the College of Licensed
Practical Nurses of Manitoba submitted aggregate tables for average age.
See Chapter 5 (Methodological Notes) for more information regarding collection and comparability of data.
Sources
Nursing Database, Occupational Therapist Database, Pharmacist Database, Physiotherapist Database and Scott’s
Medical Database, Canadian Institute for Health Information; for 2005 occupational therapist, physiotherapist and
pharmacist values and 2006 physiotherapist value, Labour Force Survey, Statistics Canada.
112
Chapter 3—Regulated Nurses in Canada: Trends of Registered Psychiatric Nurses
Table 46 shows the range of average ages across the four provinces from 2005 to 2009.
In most cases, the change from the previous year was relatively small; over five years
the average age increased by 0.6 years for all Canadian RPNs. The largest increase in
the average age was in Saskatchewan, at 2.2 years. There was a rise of 0.9 years in
Manitoba and 0.5 years in Alberta. The average age decreased in British Columbia,
by 0.2 years.
Table 46: Average Age of the Registered Psychiatric Nursing Workforce,
by Province and Western Provinces, 2005 to 2009
Western
Provinces
Man.
Sask.
Alta.
B.C.
2005
46.5
46.5
47.0
47.6
47.0
2006
46.9
47.0
47.1
47.5
47.2
2007
46.9
47.6
47.2
47.2
47.2
2008
47.4
47.9
47.7
47.2
47.5
2009
47.4
48.7
47.5
47.4
47.6
Average Age
Annual Increase/Decrease in Average Age
2005
–
–
–
–
–
2006
0.4
0.5
0.1
-0.1
0.2
2007
0.0
0.6
0.1
-0.3
0.0
2008
0.5
0.3
0.5
0.0
0.3
2009
0.0
0.8
-0.2
0.2
0.1
Notes
– Data is not applicable or does not exist.
The RPN workforce of the four western provinces represents the total RPN workforce in Canada.
Data released by CIHI may differ from data from other sources due to CIHI’s nationally standardized methodology.
See Chapter 5 (Methodological Notes) for more information regarding collection and comparability of data.
Source
Nursing Database, Canadian Institute for Health Information.
113
Regulated Nurses: Canadian Trends, 2005 to 2009
Exiting and Entering the Workforce
Table 47 represents all RPNs who registered with a specific province, not only the
workforce. A new registrant may be a new graduate, an immigrant, an interprovincial
mover or an RPN re-registering following an absence of one year or more. An exit may
be an RPN who has left the profession (either temporarily or permanently) or retired, or
an RPN who is registered in another province or country in year “x” and may still be
practising psychiatric nursing in another province, territory or country.
Table 47 shows new registration rates and exit rates by province and by age group.
The highest exit rates by provinces for RPNs were seen in psychiatric nurses age 60
and older in British Columbia (16.0%), Manitoba (12.3%) and Saskatchewan (9.1%).
Also, the highest exit rates of RPNs were seen in the age groups of younger than 30 in
Alberta (10.8%). It should be considered that a large portion of RPNs age 60 and older
who did not re-register in 2009 (2008 exits) retired from nursing.
Note that many RPNs who take a leave of absence or pursue further education maintain
their registration and are thus not counted as exits.
Table 47: Registered Psychiatric Nurses: Rate of New Registrations and Exit
Rates, by Age Group, by Province, 2005 to 2009
Age Group
New
Registration
Rates
<30
30–39
40–49
50–59
60+
Man.
Sask.
Alta.
B.C.
2006
34.4%
33.3%
41.2%
34.5%
2007
34.2%
60.0%
33.0%
50.3%
2008
27.5%
73.3%
24.7%
24.1%
2009
35.5%
13.3%
35.1%
23.1%
2007
12.6%
8.2%
8.3%
15.3%
2008
15.1%
8.2%
8.3%
15.3%
2009
14.1%
9.8%
13.9%
17.1%
2006
2.7%
5.3%
19.0%
12.2%
2006
2.7%
3.5%
3.5%
9.2%
2007
2.1%
2.4%
3.5%
8.2%
2008
2.9%
6.1%
5.3%
7.8%
2009
4.3%
2.9%
7.5%
7.4%
2006
1.8%
0.7%
1.8%
7.5%
2007
1.4%
1.5%
1.4%
5.0%
2008
1.7%
2.5%
3.6%
3.5%
2009
1.6%
1.7%
2.2%
4.2%
2006
0.0%
0.0%
3.2%
6.7%
2007
2.9%
3.2%
1.9%
4.0%
2008
4.1%
2.0%
4.3%
3.3%
2009
3.4%
0.9%
1.5%
3.6%
(continued)
114
Chapter 3—Regulated Nurses in Canada: Trends of Registered Psychiatric Nurses
Table 47: Registered Psychiatric Nurses: Rate of New Registrations and Exit Rates,
by Age Group, by Province, 2005 to 2009 (cont’d)
Age Group
Exit Rates
<30
30–39
40–49
50–59
60+
2005
Man.
Sask.
Alta.
B.C.
16.4%
11.8%
15.7%
10.6%
2006
9.8%
0.0%
7.1%
9.1%
2007
21.9%
20.0%
14.9%
9.7%
2008
8.7%
6.7%
10.8%
9.2%
2005
8.8%
7.0%
6.3%
5.0%
2006
4.8%
4.7%
3.9%
8.1%
2007
9.4%
6.6%
8.9%
4.7%
2008
7.1%
6.7%
8.2%
7.1%
2005
1.3%
2.5%
4.3%
3.3%
2006
3.5%
4.1%
3.0%
2.6%
2007
3.0%
2.1%
4.9%
4.0%
2008
1.9%
4.8%
3.1%
1.6%
2005
5.0%
5.9%
3.9%
5.4%
2006
6.9%
6.7%
4.2%
6.8%
2007
6.8%
5.3%
5.7%
6.0%
2008
6.4%
3.3%
3.9%
6.9%
2005
13.0%
20.5%
12.1%
21.5%
2006
16.7%
13.1%
9.5%
16.7%
2007
15.7%
14.9%
11.5%
16.5%
2008
12.3%
9.1%
8.6%
16.0%
Notes
Rates will not sum to 100%.
The RPN workforce of the four western provinces represents the total RPN workforce in Canada.
Data released by CIHI may differ from data from other sources due to CIHI’s nationally standardized methodology.
RPNs employed in a province different from their province of registration are excluded to avoid duplication.
See Chapter 5 (Methodological Notes) for more information regarding collection and comparability of data.
Source
Nursing Database, Canadian Institute for Health Information.
115
Regulated Nurses: Canadian Trends, 2005 to 2009
Age of the Workforce
Figure 42 highlights the proportion of the RPN workforce in each province at or above
three typical ages of retirement in 2009: 55, 60 and 65. Note that this illustration is
cumulative. An RPN at age 65 is counted in all three categories, and an RPN at age
60 is counted in two categories.
Information on the age of the RPN workforce across the western provinces shows a
large portion of psychiatric nurses within these age groups (55 and older at 29.0%,
60 and older at 14.6%, and 65 and older at 4.0%) may be preparing for retirement
in the near future.
Figure 42: Registered Psychiatric Nursing Workforce, by Age Groups 55+, 60+
and 65+, by Province and Western Provinces, 2009
Notes
The RPN workforce of the four western provinces represents the total RPN workforce in Canada.
Data released by CIHI may differ from data from other sources due to CIHI’s nationally standardized methodology.
RPNs employed in a province different from their province of registration are excluded to avoid duplication.
See Chapter 5 (Methodological Notes) for more information regarding collection and comparability of data.
Source
Nursing Database, Canadian Institute for Health Information.
116
Chapter 3—Regulated Nurses in Canada: Trends of Registered Psychiatric Nurses
Years Since Graduation
As employment patterns of RPNs change as their careers evolve, assumptions and
analyses based on age indicators alone may be incomplete. It may be useful as well
to consider the number of years since graduation from an RPN program.
Figure 43 illustrates the distribution of RPNs by number of years since graduation.
Note that this indicates the maximum number of years an RPN could have been in the
workforce and does not necessarily reflect the actual number of years worked, because
time spent out of the workforce (such as in continuing education or family leave) is not
accounted for.
Figure 43: Registered Psychiatric Nursing Workforce, by Years Since Graduation,
by Province and Western Provinces, 2005 and 2009
Notes
Totals may not sum to 100% due to rounding.
The RPN workforce of the four western provinces represents the total RPN workforce in Canada.
Data released by CIHI may differ from data from other sources due to CIHI’s nationally standardized methodology.
RPNs employed in a province different from their province of registration are excluded to avoid duplication.
See Chapter 5 (Methodological Notes) for more information regarding collection and comparability of data.
Source
Nursing Database, Canadian Institute for Health Information.
117
Regulated Nurses: Canadian Trends, 2005 to 2009
The trend from 2005 to 2009 shows the proportion of RPNs 31+ years since graduation
increased in every province with the exception of British Columbia. In the western
provinces as a whole, the cohort 31+ years since graduation increased from 26.2% to
26.8% between 2005 and 2009. The proportion of RPNs in the group 0 to 10 years since
graduation increased to 22.5% of the workforce in 2009, from 16.8% in 2005.
Education Trends
Entry-to-Practice Education
RPNs are graduates of recognized and approved post-secondary education programs.
They must meet standards for psychiatric nursing, a code of ethics and a set of expected
competencies. Although psychiatric nursing programs are now available at both the
diploma and baccalaureate levels in the western provinces, most RPNs in the current
workforce entered practice as graduates of a two- or three-year diploma program.
Higher Education for Registered Psychiatric Nurses
In the 2009 RPN workforce, a total of 462 RPNs (8.9%) had obtained a baccalaureate
as their highest education in psychiatric nursing (see Table 48), compared to 4,738
(90.9%) who had earned a diploma. As Manitoba was the first province to offer a
baccalaureate program, in 1998, the percentage of RPNs in that province with a
baccalaureate as the highest educational level was 23.1%.
Table 48: Registered Psychiatric Nursing Workforce, by Highest Level of Education
in Psychiatric Nursing, Western Provinces, 2005 to 2009
Diploma
Baccalaureate
Master’s/Doctorate
Total
2005
4,707
241
16
4,964
2006
4,760
276
15
5,051
2007
4,747
368
9
5,124
2008
4,755
399
8
5,162
2009
4,738
462
14
5,214
Count
Annual Percentage Change
2005
–
–
–
–
2006
1.1%
14.5%
-6.3%
1.8%
2007
-0.3%
33.3%
-40.0%
1.4%
2008
0.2%
8.4%
-11.1%
0.7%
2009
-0.4%
15.8%
75.0%
1.0%
Percentage Distribution
2005
94.8%
4.9%
0.3%
100.0%
2006
94.2%
5.5%
0.3%
100.0%
2007
92.6%
7.2%
0.2%
100.0%
2008
92.1%
7.7%
0.2%
100.0%
2009
90.9%
8.9%
0.3%
100.0%
Notes
– Data is not applicable or does not exist.
Totals may not sum to 100% due to rounding.
The RPN workforce of the four western provinces represents the total RPN workforce in Canada.
See Chapter 5 (Methodological Notes) for more information regarding collection and comparability of data.
Source
Nursing Database, Canadian Institute for Health Information.
118
Chapter 3—Regulated Nurses in Canada: Trends of Registered Psychiatric Nurses
Figure 44 illustrates the trends of graduates from a diploma program and baccalaureate
program from 2007 to 2009.
Figure 44: Registered Psychiatric Nurses Graduating From Diploma and
Baccalaureate Programs, Western Provinces, 2007 to 2009
Notes
Graduates refers to the number of students who successfully graduated from the program. Graduate data is collected
on a calendar year basis.
For more detailed notes, please refer to the Student and Faculty Survey of Canadian Schools of Nursing methodology
document, available from the CNA and CASN.
Sources
Canadian Nurses Association and Canadian Association Schools of Nursing.
119
Regulated Nurses: Canadian Trends, 2005 to 2009
Average Age at Graduation
The age at which a student graduates from a psychiatric nursing program and is eligible
to enter the RPN workforce is an important indicator of the number of years an average
RPN will contribute to the workforce. As Table 49 illustrates, as psychiatric nurses enter
the workforce later, their years of service will be reduced unless they stay later at the end
of their careers.
Table 49: Registered Psychiatric Nursing Graduates and Average Age at
Graduation, by Range of Graduation Years, Western Provinces,
1985 to 2009
Graduation Year
Number of Graduates
Average Age at Graduation
1985–1989
710
25.1
1990–1994
722
28.2
1995–1999
428
28.8
2000–2004
486
30.3
2005–2009
620
30.9
Notes
The total RPN workforce of the four western provinces represents the total RPN workforce in Canada.
See Chapter 5 (Methodological Notes) for more information regarding collection and comparability of data.
Source
Nursing Database, Canadian Institute for Health Information.
The trend of increasing age at graduation has slowed since the early 1990s. However,
in 2009, 54.8% of the workforce who had graduated in the previous five years were older
than 30 when they graduated.
Mobility Trends: A Mobile Workforce
Regulated nurses are in demand in Canada and around the world. As a result, graduates
from regulated nursing programs often have numerous options as to where they will
practise. Canadian graduates may choose to remain in their current province or territory,
to migrate to another Canadian province or territory or to emigrate to another country.
International graduates may choose to immigrate to Canada, either through their own
initiative or through a provincial nursing recruitment program.
As CIHI does not collect citizenship or immigration data, the mobility trends in this
chapter related to interprovincial and international mobility are based on indicators
developed by CIHI using data on employment, location of residence and location of
graduation. Additional information on RPN mobility trends is available in the data tables
on the CIHI website.
120
Chapter 3—Regulated Nurses in Canada: Trends of Registered Psychiatric Nurses
Migration in the Western Provinces
Each provincial workforce combines registered psychiatric nurses who originally
graduated from within the province, those who graduated from other Canadian
provinces and those who graduated from outside the country. Overall, more than 8 out
of 10 (84.2%) registered psychiatric nurses who graduated from Canadian registered
psychiatric nursing programs who were working in the western provinces in 2009 either
did not move after graduation or eventually returned to their province of graduation.
Figure 45: Registered Psychiatric Nursing Workforce, by Province of Graduation
and Registration, 2009
Notes
Includes only RPNs educated in Canadian nursing programs employed in the western provinces, in 2009 (N = 4,298).
Totals may not sum to 100% due to rounding.
The RPN workforce of the four western provinces represents the total RPN workforce in Canada.
Data released by CIHI may differ from data from other sources due to CIHI’s nationally standardized methodology.
RPNs employed in a province different from their province of registration are excluded to avoid duplication.
See Chapter 5 (Methodological Notes) for more information regarding collection and comparability of data.
Source
Nursing Database, Canadian Institute for Health Information.
121
Regulated Nurses: Canadian Trends, 2005 to 2009
Figure 46: Registered Psychiatric Nursing Workforce, by Province of Registration
and Top Two Destinations of Graduation, Western Provinces, 2009
Notes
Includes only RPNs educated in Canadian nursing programs employed in the western provinces, in 2009 (N = 4,298).
The RPN workforce of the four western provinces represents the total RPN workforce in Canada.
Data released by CIHI may differ from data from other sources due to CIHI’s nationally standardized methodology.
RPNs employed in a province different from their province of registration are excluded to avoid duplication.
See Chapter 5 (Methodological Notes) for more information regarding collection and comparability of data.
Source
Nursing Database, Canadian Institute for Health Information.
122
Chapter 3—Regulated Nurses in Canada: Trends of Registered Psychiatric Nurses
The provinces of British Columbia and Alberta figure most prominently as destinations
for migrating psychiatric nurses. In contrast, Manitoba (3.5%) and Saskatchewan
(13.0%) received the least number of migrating psychiatric nurses, the lowest rates in the
country. The data does not account for mobility and migration in the intervening years.
Internationally Educated Registered Psychiatric Nurses
In the absence of citizenship and immigration data, CIHI uses the location of graduation
as an indicator of trends in immigration. The assumption is made that an RPN who
studied outside of the western provinces immigrated, but the total number does include
those Canadian citizens who studied abroad.
Table 50: Registered Psychiatric Nursing Workforce, by Location of Graduation
in Western Provinces and International, by Province and Western
Provinces, 2005 to 2009
Man.
Sask.
Alta.
B.C.
Western
Provinces
Count
Western
Provinces
International
2005
942
921
1,024
1,650
4,537
2006
945
890
1,047
1,726
4,608
2007
942
870
1,062
1,786
4,660
2008
925
880
1,046
1,429
4,280
2009
939
856
1,053
1,450
4,298
2005
10
12
100
220
342
2006
11
10
97
209
327
2007
10
10
96
235
351
2008
10
11
111
175
307
2009
10
10
144
202
366
–
–
–
–
–
Annual Percentage Change
Western
Provinces
International
2005
2006
0.3%
-3.4%
2.2%
4.6%
1.6%
2007
-0.3%
-2.2%
1.4%
3.5%
1.1%
2008
-1.8%
1.1%
-1.5%
-20.0%
-8.2%
2009
1.5%
-2.7%
0.7%
1.5%
0.4%
2005
–
–
–
–
–
2006
10.0%
-16.7%
-3.0%
-5.0%
-4.4%
2007
-9.1%
0.0%
-1.0%
12.4%
7.3%
2008
0.0%
10.0%
15.6%
-25.5%
-12.5%
2009
0.0%
-9.1%
29.7%
15.4%
19.2%
(continued)
123
Regulated Nurses: Canadian Trends, 2005 to 2009
Table 50: Registered Psychiatric Nursing Workforce, by Location of Graduation
in Western Provinces and International, by Province and Western
Provinces, 2005 to 2009 (cont’d)
Man.
Sask.
Alta.
B.C.
Western
Provinces
2005
98.9%
98.7%
91.1%
88.2%
93.0%
2006
98.8%
98.9%
91.5%
89.2%
93.4%
2007
98.9%
98.9%
91.7%
88.4%
93.0%
2008
98.9%
98.8%
90.4%
89.1%
93.3%
2009
98.9%
98.8%
88.0%
87.8%
92.2%
2005
1.1%
1.3%
8.9%
11.8%
7.0%
2006
1.2%
1.1%
8.5%
10.8%
6.6%
2007
1.1%
1.1%
8.3%
11.6%
7.0%
2008
1.1%
1.2%
9.6%
10.9%
6.7%
2009
1.1%
1.2%
12.0%
12.2%
7.8%
Percentage Distribution
Western
Provinces
International
Notes
– Data is not applicable or does not exist.
Non-response for Location of Graduation (% RPN workforce): 2005, n = 85 (1.7%); 2006, n = 116 (2.3%);
2008, n = 575 (11.1%); 2009, n = 550 (10.6%).
Totals may not sum to 100% due to rounding.
The RPN workforce of the four western provinces represents the total RPN workforce in Canada.
Data released by CIHI may differ from data from other sources due to CIHI’s nationally standardized methodology.
RPNs employed in a province different from their province of registration are excluded to avoid duplication.
See Chapter 5 (Methodological Notes) for more information regarding collection and comparability of data.
Source
Nursing Database, Canadian Institute for Health Information.
124
Chapter 3—Regulated Nurses in Canada: Trends of Registered Psychiatric Nurses
Table 50 shows that the RPN workforces of British Columbia (12.2%) and Alberta (12.0%)
had the highest concentration of internationally educated RPNs in 2009. In contrast, 1.1%
of the RPN workforce in Manitoba and 1.2% of that in Saskatchewan graduated from an
international psychiatric nursing school with respect to the 2009 data year.
Of the RPNs employed in the western provinces who reported their location of
graduation in 2009, 92.2% (4,298) graduated from a psychiatric nursing program in
Canada and 7.8% (366) graduated from an international psychiatric nursing program.
Since 2005, the proportion of internationally educated RPNs in the Canadian RPN
workforce has remained between 6.6% and 7.8%.
Figure 47: Internationally Educated Registered Psychiatric Nurses in the
Workforce, by Country of Graduation, 2009
Notes
Includes only those who were educated outside of the western provinces in the workforce, in 2009 (N = 366).
Totals may not sum to 100% due to rounding.
The total RPN workforce of the four western provinces represents the total RPN workforce in Canada.
Data released by CIHI may differ from data from other sources due to CIHI’s nationally standardized methodology.
See Chapter 5 (Methodological Notes) for more information regarding collection and comparability of data.
Source
Nursing Database, Canadian Institute for Health Information.
125
Regulated Nurses: Canadian Trends, 2005 to 2009
For the 366 RPNs in the western provinces who graduated from an international psychiatric
nursing program, the seven most frequently identified countries of graduation are identified in
Figure 47. Most (82.2%) graduates graduated from psychiatric nursing programs in the United
Kingdom, while those educated in Hong Kong comprised the next largest group, at 5.7%.
Urban/Rural Distribution of the Workforce
Geographical differences in the western provinces create numerous challenges to health
care providers and planners. The urban/rural distribution of the population is a challenge
not only in the northern territories but also in each of the provinces.
To determine if RPNs were practising in a rural or an urban setting, a postal code analysis
was performed. In most cases, the postal code used was that of the workplace; however,
when Postal Code of Employer (Work Site) was not submitted to CIHI, Postal Code of
Residence was used.iv Figures 48 and 49 illustrate the urban/rural/remote/territories
distribution of the RPN workforce in the western provinces in 2009. In 2009, 83.2% of
the RPN workforce worked in urban areas of the four western provinces.
Figure 48: Registered Psychiatric Nursing Workforce, by Urban/Rural/Remote/
Territories Designation, Western Provinces, 2009
Notes
Totals may not sum to 100% due to rounding.
Urban areas are defined as communities with populations greater than 10,000 persons.
Rural areas are defined as communities in relatively close proximity to urban areas.
Remote areas are defined as those communities with relatively little social and economic interaction with urban areas.
Territories are defined as areas outside of Whitehorse and Yellowknife in the northern territories.
The total RPN workforce of the four western provinces represents the total RPN workforce in Canada.
See Chapter 5 (Methodological Notes) for more information regarding collection and comparability of data.
Source
Nursing Database, Canadian Institute for Health Information.
iv. See Chapter 5 (Methodological Notes) for a description of the postal code analysis.
126
Chapter 3—Regulated Nurses in Canada: Trends of Registered Psychiatric Nurses
Figure 49: Registered Psychiatric Nursing Workforce, by Urban/Rural/Remote/
Territories Designation, by Province, 2009
Notes
Totals may not sum to 100% due to rounding.
Urban areas are defined as communities with populations greater than 10,000 persons.
Rural areas are defined as communities in relatively close proximity to urban areas.
Remote areas are defined as those communities with relatively little social and economic interaction with urban areas.
Territories are defined as areas outside of Whitehorse and Yellowknife in the northern territories.
Data released by CIHI may differ from data from other sources due to CIHI’s nationally standardized methodology.
RPNs employed in a province different from their province of registration are excluded to avoid duplication (except
where one is a territory).
The total RPN workforce of the four western provinces represents the total RPN workforce in Canada.
See Chapter 5 (Methodological Notes) for more information regarding collection and comparability of data.
Source
Nursing Database, Canadian Institute for Health Information.
127
Chapter 4—Regulated Nursing Workforce by
Health Region
Chapter 4—Regulated Nursing Workforce by Health Region
This chapter presents information on the regulated nursing workforce by health region
and by distinct nursing profession: registered nursing, licensed practical nursing and
registered psychiatric nursing. Provincial and territorial analysis by health region was
integrated into this publication as a result of increasing demand for health information
at a regional level.
Health regions are legislated administrative areas defined by provincial ministries of
health. These administrative areas represent geographic areas of responsibility for
hospital boards or regional health authorities. Health regions, being provincial
administrative areas, are subject to change.5
Health region boundaries presented here correspond to the health regions as of 2007
(the most recent year available from Statistics Canada).
The health region data presented in this publication includes only regulated nurses who
worked in direct patient care and whose postal code was within the province or territory
of analysis; those employed in administration, education or research are excluded from
the health region totals. There were 311,885 individuals in the regulated nursing direct
care workforce, representing 89.5% of the total regulated nursing workforce.
Assigning the Regulated Nursing Workforce to
Health Regions
Postal code data and Statistics Canada’s Postal Code Conversion File (PCCF) were
used to assign the regulated nursing workforce to health regions. The six-digit Postal
Code of Employer (Work Site) was used first; when this postal code was missing or
invalid, the six-digit Postal Code of Residence was used.
CIHI would like to acknowledge the cooperation of l’Ordre des infirmières et infirmiers du
Québec, which provided CIHI with the number of RNs working in direct care employed
or living in each Quebec health region.
Health Region Peer Groups
In order to facilitate comparison between health regions, Statistics Canada developed
a methodology that groups health regions with similar socio-economic and sociodemographic characteristics into peer groups. The health region peer groups defined
by Statistics Canada are listed in Table 52.
131
Regulated Nurses: Canadian Trends, 2005 to 2009
Rates per 100,000 Population by Health Region
Using 2009 calendar year population estimates from Statistics Canada, rates were calculated
for RNs, LPNs, RPNs and the regulated nursing workforce (all three regulated nursing
professions) employed in direct care, per 100,000 population for each health region.
The rates were not adjusted to account for differences in population that may change
health status, such as age or sex. While adjusted rates can be quite useful for certain
types of analysis, this report presents the actual number of nurses providing direct care
who work in each health region.
Table 51: Regulated Nursing Workforce, by Health Region, Canada, 2009
Health
Peer
Region
Group
Code
Health Region
Name
Population
Estimate
Registered Nurses
Licensed Practical
Registered
Nurses
Psychiatric Nurses
Direct
Care
Count
Direct
Direct
Per 100,000
Per 100,000
Per 100,000
Care
Care
Count
Population
Population
Population
Count
Count
Per 100,000
Population
All Regulated
Nurses
Newfoundland and Labrador
C
1011
Eastern Regional
Integrated Health
Authority
300,920
3,345
1,112
1,339
445
–
–
4,684
1,557
I
1012
Central Regional
Integrated Health
Authority
93,538
715
764
529
566
–
–
1,244
1,330
I
1013
Western Regional
Integrated Health
Authority
77,630
751
967
464
598
–
–
1,215
1,565
H
1014
Labrador-Grenfell
Regional Integrated
Health Authority
36,837
365
991
150
407
–
–
515
1,398
Newfoundland and
Labrador (Direct
Care Total)
508,925
5,176
1,017
2,482
488
–
–
7,658
1,505
Prince Edward Island
C
1101
Kings County
(Census Division)
18,225
71
390
42
230
–
–
113
620
A
1102
Queens County
(Census Division)
77,999
772
990
455
583
–
–
1,227
1,573
C
1103
Prince County
(Census Division)
44,761
394
880
148
331
–
–
542
1,211
Prince Edward Island
(Direct Care Total)
140,985
1,237
877
645
457
–
–
1,882
1,335
Nova Scotia
C
1201
Zone 1
117,819
718
609
559
474
–
–
1,277
1,084
C
1202
Zone 2
82,263
517
628
306
372
–
–
823
1,000
C
1203
Zone 3
106,511
670
629
355
333
–
–
1,025
962
C
1204
Zone 4
90,711
725
799
279
308
–
–
1,004
1,107
I
1205
Zone 5
123,873
1,169
944
689
556
–
–
1,858
1,500
A
1206
Zone 6
417,006
3,640
873
1,095
263
–
–
4,735
1,135
Nova Scotia (Direct
Care Total)
938,183
7,439
793
3,283
350
–
– 10,722
1,143
New Brunswick
C
1301
Region 1
201,771
1,982
982
559
277
–
–
2,541
1,259
C
1302
Region 2
174,853
1,686
964
630
360
–
–
2,316
1,325
C
1303
Region 3
173,062
1,365
789
513
296
–
–
1,878
1,085
(continued)
132
Chapter 4—Regulated Nursing Workforce by Health Region
Table 51: Regulated Nursing Workforce, by Health Region, Canada, 2009 (cont’d)
Health
Peer
Region
Group
Code
Health Region
Name
Population
Estimate
Registered Nurses
Licensed Practical
Registered
Nurses
Psychiatric Nurses
Direct
Care
Count
Direct
Direct
Per 100,000
Per 100,000
Care
Care
Count
Population
Population
Count
Count
Per 100,000
Population
All Regulated
Nurses
Per 100,000
Population
C
1304
Region 4
49,425
534
1,080
183
370
–
–
717
1,451
I
1305
Region 5
26,929
379
1,407
167
620
–
–
546
2,028
I
1306
Region 6
78,205
705
901
362
463
–
–
1,067
1,364
I
1307
Region 7
45,223
388
858
154
341
–
–
542
1,199
749,468
7,039
939
2,568
343
–
–
9,607
1,282
New Brunswick
(Direct Care Total)
Quebec (régions sociosanitaires [RSS])
C
2401
Bas-Saint-Laurent
200,756
1,641
817
672
335
–
–
2,313
1,152
273,264
2,156
789
966
354
–
–
3,122
1,142
C
2402
Saguenay–LacSaint-Jean
A
2403
Capitale-Nationale
687,810
7,668
1,115
2,019
294
–
–
9,687
1,408
3,426
695
1,278
259
–
–
4,704
954
2404
Mauricie et du
Centre-du-Québec
493,084
C
A
2405
Estrie
G
2406
Montréal
307,389
2,428
790
780
254
–
–
3,208
1,044
1,906,811
18,221
956
5,639
296
–
–
23,860
A
2407
1,251
Outaouais
358,872
1,711
477
558
155
–
–
2,269
632
145,886
1,123
770
309
212
–
–
1,432
982
2408
AbitibiTémiscamingue
C
H
2409
Côte-Nord
95,704
819
856
185
193
–
–
1,004
1,049
H
2410
Nord-du-Québec
15,492
145
936
32
207
–
–
177
1,143
94,067
822
874
381
405
–
–
1,203
1,279
I
2411
Gaspésie–Îles-dela-Madeleine
D
2412
ChaudièreAppalaches
403,011
2,417
600
1,031
256
–
–
3,448
856
A
2413
Laval
391,893
2,035
519
639
163
–
–
2,674
682
A
2414
Lanaudière
457,962
2,089
456
737
161
–
–
2,826
617
A
2415
Laurentides
542,416
2,713
500
1,169
216
–
–
3,882
716
A
2416
Montérégie
1,428,475
6,690
468
2,469
173
–
–
9,159
641
F
2417
Nunavik
11,266
15†
1,34†
*
1†
–
–
153
1,358
13†
92†
†
†
–
–
136
924
2418
Terre-Cries-de-laBaie-James
14,721
F
7,828,879
56,391
720
18,866
241
–
–
75,257
961
Quebec (Direct
Care Total)
Ontario (Public Health Units)
C
3526
District of Algoma
118,931
950
799
497
418
–
–
1,447
1,217
A
3527
Brant County
138,250
734
531
334
242
–
–
1,068
773
B
3530
Durham Regional
613,655
2,535
413
1,022
167
–
–
3,557
580
A
3531
Elgin-St. Thomas
90,007
512
569
284
316
–
–
796
884
D
3533
Grey Bruce
163,243
1,019
624
484
296
–
–
1,503
921
A
3534
Haldimand-Norfolk
111,751
432
387
244
218
–
–
676
605
177,441
875
493
478
269
–
–
1,353
763
A
3535
Haliburton,
Kawartha, Pine Ridge
District
B
3536
Halton Regional
492,304
2,174
442
696
141
–
–
2,870
583
A
3537
City of Hamilton
530,420
5,356
1,010
1,483
280
–
–
6,839
1,289
978
601
462
284
–
–
1,440
885
3538
Hastings and Prince
Edward Counties
162,725
A
(continued)
133
Regulated Nurses: Canadian Trends, 2005 to 2009
Table 51: Regulated Nursing Workforce, by Health Region, Canada, 2009 (cont’d)
Health
Peer
Region
Group
Code
Health Region
Name
Population
Estimate
Registered Nurses
Licensed Practical
Registered
Nurses
Psychiatric Nurses
Direct
Care
Count
Direct
Direct
Per 100,000
Per 100,000
Care
Care
Count
Population
Population
Count
Count
Per 100,000
Population
All Regulated
Nurses
Per 100,000
Population
D
3539
Huron County
60,639
345
569
193
318
–
–
538
C
3540
Chatham-Kent
110,283
720
653
349
316
–
–
1,069
887
969
A
3541
Kingston, Frontenac
and Lennox and
Addington
194,179
2,172
1,119
730
376
–
–
2,902
1,494
A
3542
Lambton Health Unit
132,142
847
641
358
271
–
–
1,205
912
A
3543
Leeds, Grenville and
Lanark District
168,324
1,007
598
603
358
–
–
1,610
956
A
3544
Middlesex-London
452,222
5,118
1,132
1,319
292
–
–
6,437
1,423
A
3546
Niagara Regional
Area
442,908
2,296
518
1,093
247
–
–
3,389
765
C
3547
North Bay Parry
Sound District
126,057
964
765
593
470
–
–
1,557
1,235
H
3549
Northwestern
83,019
562
677
327
394
–
–
889
1,071
B
3551
City of Ottawa
882,477
7,559
857
1,963
222
–
–
9,522
1,079
A
3552
Oxford County
106,837
532
498
272
255
–
–
804
753
J
3553
Peel Regional
1,313,748
4,867
370
1,095
83
–
–
5,962
454
D
3554
Perth District
76,774
524
683
207
270
–
–
731
952
A
3555
Peterborough
County-City
138,569
1,124
811
528
381
–
–
1,652
1,192
C
3556
Porcupine
86,249
697
808
342
397
–
–
1,039
1,205
D
3557
Renfrew County and
District
103,265
604
585
395
383
–
–
999
967
A
3558
Eastern Ontario
199,061
921
463
492
247
–
–
1,413
710
B
3560
Simcoe Muskoka
District
513,904
2,906
565
1,319
257
–
–
4,225
822
C
3561
Sudbury and District
200,228
1,793
895
600
300
–
–
2,393
1,195
C
3562
Thunder Bay District
156,565
1,623
1,037
707
452
–
–
2,330
1,488
C
3563
Timiskaming
34,599
251
725
119
344
–
–
370
1,069
B
3565
Waterloo
518,203
2,614
504
1,060
205
–
–
3,674
709
B
3566
Wellington-DufferinGuelph
272,403
1,272
467
624
229
–
–
1,896
696
A
3568
Windsor-Essex
County
403,707
2,551
632
861
213
–
–
3,412
845
J
3570
York Regional
1,016,379
3,328
327
1,073
106
–
–
4,401
433
G
3595
City of Toronto
2,677,714
21,382
799
4,503
168
–
–
25,885
967
Ontario (Direct
Care Total)
13,069,182
84,144
644
27,709
212
–
– 111,853
856
Manitoba (Regional Health Authorities)
A
4610
Winnipeg
689,384
6,414
930
1,053
153
277
40
7,744
1,123
A
4615
Brandon
50,395
444
881
207
411
165
327
816
1,619
D
4620
North Eastman
43,439
117
269
68
157
17
39
202
465
E
4625
South Eastman
66,484
186
280
105
158
9
14
300
451
D
4630
Interlake
82,544
264
320
191
231
135
164
590
715
D
4640
Central
107,325
442
412
316
294
115
107
873
813
D
4645
Assiniboine
69,635
302
434
325
467
31
45
658
945
H
4660
Parkland
40,278
242
601
190
472
38
94
470
1,167
(continued)
134
Chapter 4—Regulated Nursing Workforce by Health Region
Table 51: Regulated Nursing Workforce, by Health Region, Canada, 2009 (cont’d)
Health
Peer
Region
Group
Code
Health Region
Name
Population
Estimate
Registered Nurses
Licensed Practical
Registered
Nurses
Psychiatric Nurses
Direct
Care
Count
Direct
Direct
Per 100,000
Per 100,000
Per 100,000
Care
Care
Count
Population
Population
Population
Count
Count
Per 100,000
Population
All Regulated
Nurses
H
4670
Norman
23,540
164
697
88
374
11
47
263
1,117
F
4685
Burntwood/Churchill
48,940
146
298
67
137
6
12
219
447
1,221,964
8,721
714
2,610
214
804
66 12,135
993
Manitoba (Direct
Care Total)
Saskatchewan (Regional Health Authorities)
D
4701
Sun Country
53,200
275
517
104
195
44
83
423
795
D
4702
Five Hills
53,214
324
609
114
214
108
203
546
1,026
D
4703
Cypress
42,897
279
650
118
275
18
42
415
967
A
4704
Regina Qu’Appelle
253,546
2,307
910
704
278
239
94
3,250
1,282
D
4705
Sunrise
54,254
434
800
189
348
66
122
689
1,270
A
4706
Saskatoon
307,198
2,903
945
596
194
110
36
3,609
1,175
D
4707
Heartland
42,731
248
580
100
234
34
80
382
894
D
4708
Kelsey Trail
40,236
241
599
111
276
16
40
368
915
H
4709
Prince Albert
Parkland
77,461
472
609
253
327
61
79
786
1,015
H
4710
Prairie North
70,612
452
640
250
354
73
103
775
1,098
F
4714
Mamawetan
Churchill River/
Keewatin Yatthé/
Athabasca
34,780
123
354
59
170
5
14
187
538
1,030,129
8,058
782
2,598
252
774
75 11,430
1,110
Saskatchewan
(Direct Care Total)
Alberta (Regional Health Authorities)
A
4821
Chinook
169,989
1,184
697
378
222
34
20
1,596
939
E
4822
Palliser Health
Region
111,931
688
615
265
237
22
20
975
871
B
4823
Calgary Health
Region
1,372,755
9,412
686
1,594
116
229
17 11,235
818
962
E
4824
David Thompson
330,113
2,123
643
766
232
287
87
3,176
D
4825
East Central Health
119,198
573
481
311
261
40
34
924
775
B
4826
Capital Health
1,156,839
9,972
862
2,401
208
414
36 12,787
1,105
E
4827
Aspen
190,306
797
419
347
182
18
9
1,162
611
E
4828
Peace Country
Health
148,576
770
518
337
227
29
20
1,136
765
E
4829
Northern Lights
Health Region
87,955
423
481
113
128
5
6
541
615
3,687,662
25,942
703
6,512
177
1,078
29 33,532
909
Alberta (Direct Care
Total)
British Columbia (Health Service Delivery Areas)
D
5911
East Kootenay
79,996
383
479
195
244
11
14
589
736
D
5912
Kootenay-Boundary
79,305
497
627
162
204
16
20
675
851
A
5913
Okanagan
350,945
2,397
683
971
277
137
39
3,505
999
A
5914
Thompson/Cariboo
223,039
1,235
554
455
204
69
31
1,759
789
(continued)
135
Regulated Nurses: Canadian Trends, 2005 to 2009
Table 51: Regulated Nursing Workforce, by Health Region, Canada, 2009 (cont’d)
Health
Peer
Region
Group
Code
Health Region
Name
Population
Estimate
Registered Nurses
Licensed Practical
Registered
Nurses
Psychiatric Nurses
Direct
Care
Count
Direct
Direct
Per 100,000
Per 100,000
Per 100,000
Care
Care
Count
Population
Population
Population
Count
Count
Per 100,000
Population
All Regulated
Nurses
A
5921
Fraser East
279,993
1,294
462
423
151
159
57
1,876
670
J
5922
Fraser North
596,647
3,149
528
748
125
628
105
4,525
758
J
5923
Fraser South
695,983
2,998
431
875
126
261
38
4,134
594
J
5931
Richmond
193,255
607
314
179
93
37
19
823
426
G
5932
Vancouver
643,208
6,745
1,049
830
129
265
41
7,840
1,219
J
5933
North Shore/Coast
Garibaldi
277,974
1,274
458
340
122
74
27
1,688
607
A
5941
South Vancouver
Island
367,578
3,200
871
706
192
110
30
4,016
1,093
A
5942
Central Vancouver
Island
261,476
1,413
540
656
251
74
28
2,143
820
A
5943
North Vancouver
Island
120,315
721
599
213
177
25
21
959
797
H
5951
Northwest
H
5952
Northern Interior
E
5953
Northeast
British Columbia
(Direct Care Total)
75,007
353
471
151
201
12
16
516
688
142,581
1,030
722
292
205
28
20
1,350
947
67,905
211
311
114
168
20
29
345
508
4,455,207
27,507
617
7,310
164
1,926
43 36,743
825
Northern Territories
E
6001
Yukon
33,653
283
841
59
175
–
–
342
1,016
E
6101
Northwest Territories
43,439
455
1,047
94
216
–
–
549
1,264
F
6201
Nunavut
32,183
175
544
0
0
–
–
175
544
109,275
913
836
153
140
–
–
1,066
976
689 74,736
222
4,582
Northern Territories
(Direct Care Total)
Canada
Canada
(Direct Care Total)
33,739,859 232,567
44 311,885
Notes
– Data is not applicable or does not exist.
* Value suppressed in accordance with CIHI privacy policy; cell value is from 1 to 4.
† Digit suppressed to ensure confidentiality.
The health region data presented in this publication includes only regulated nurses who work in direct patient care
and whose postal code was within the province or territory of analysis; those employed in administration, education or
research are excluded from the health region totals.
The population estimates used in this publication are from Statistics Canada, Demography Division, and are based
on Canadian Demographic Estimates, 2008–2009, preliminary postcensal (PP) estimates of the population counted on
July 1, 2009, Canada, provinces and territories.
In order to assign counts to health regions, postal codes were matched to the July 2009 release of the Statistics
Canada Postal Code Conversion File (PCCF).
Data released by CIHI may differ from data from other sources due to CIHI’s nationally standardized methodology.
The Canada registered psychiatric nurse (RPN) per 100,000 population rate was calculated using the population
estimate for the four western provinces (Manitoba, Saskatchewan, Alberta and British Columbia).
L’Ordre des infirmières et infirmiers du Québec (OIIQ) contributed the Quebec data presented in this table.
See Chapter 5 (Methodological Notes) for more information regarding the collection and comparability of data.
Sources
Nursing Database, Canadian Institute for Health Information; Statistics Canada, Table 3: Health Regions 2007 by
Peer Group (data modified: April 9, 2010 ). Accessed June 21, 2010, from <http://www.statcan.gc.ca/pub/
82-221-x/2009001/regions/hrt3-eng.htm>.
136
924
Chapter 4—Regulated Nursing Workforce by Health Region
Table 52: Principal Characteristics of Each Peer Group as Defined by
Statistics Canada
This table lists the principal characteristics for each peer group.‡
Number
Peer
Percentage of
of Health
Principal Characteristics
Group
Population
Regions
A
35
33.5%
Urban–rural mix from coast to coast
Average percentage of Aboriginal population
Average percentage of immigrant population
B
8
16.7%
Mainly urban centres in Ontario and Alberta with moderately high
population density
Low percentage of Aboriginal population
Very high employment rate
Higher than average percentage of immigrant population
C
22
10.3%
Sparsely populated urban–rural mix in eastern and central provinces
Average percentage of Aboriginal population
Average employment rate
Low percentage of immigrant population
D
18
5.1%
Mainly rural regions from Quebec to British Columbia
Average percentage of Aboriginal population
High employment rate
E
9
3.1%
Mainly rural and remote regions in the western provinces and the
territories
High proportion of Aboriginal population
Average percentage of immigrant population
F
5
0.4%
Northern and remote regions
Very high proportion of Aboriginal population
Very low employment rate
Low proportion of immigrants
G
3
15.6%
Largest metro centres with an average population density of 4,065
people per square kilometre
Very low proportion of Aboriginal population
Average employment rate
Very high proportion of immigrant population
H
10
2.0%
Rural northern regions from coast to coast
High proportion of Aboriginal population
Low proportion of immigrants
(continued)
137
Regulated Nurses: Canadian Trends, 2005 to 2009
Table 52: Principal Characteristics of Each Peer Group as Defined by
Statistics Canada (cont’d)
Number
Peer
Percentage of
of Health
Principal Characteristics
Group
Population
Regions
I
7
1.7%
Mainly rural eastern regions
Average percentage of Aboriginal population
Low employment rate
Very low percentage of immigrant population
J
6
11.6%
Mainly urban centres in Ontario and British Columbia with high
population density
Low proportion of Aboriginal population
High proportion of immigrants
Notes
Percentage of population refers to the percentage of the Canadian population living in a specific type of peer group.
The full publication and cluster analysis methodology are available from the Statistics Canada§, **, §§ website.
Sources
‡ Statistics Canada, Table 4: Summary Table of Peer Groups and Principal Characteristics (date modified: April 9,
2010). Accessed June 21, 2010, from <http://www.statcan.gc.ca/pub/82-221-x/2009001/regions/hrt4-eng.htm>.
§ Statistics Canada, Health Region Peer Groups—User Guide (date modified: April 9, 2010). Accessed
June 22, 2010, from <http://www.statcan.gc.ca/pub/82-221-x/2009001/regions/hrpg2007-eng.htm>.
** Statistics Canada, Health Region Peer Groups. Accessed June 22, 2010, from <http://www.statcan.gc.ca/pub/
82-221-x/2009001/regions/hrpg2000-eng.pdf>.
§§ Statistics Canada, Health Region Peer Groups, 2003. Accessed June 22, 2010, from
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/pub/82-221-x/2009001/regions/hrpg2003-eng.pdf>.
.
138
Chapter 5—Methodological Notes
Chapter 5—Methodological Notes
This chapter will provide a better understanding of the strengths and limitations of the
nursing data and of how it can be effectively used and analyzed. The information is
particularly important when making comparisons with other data sources and when
drawing conclusions regarding changes over time.
Data Quality
CIHI is founded upon the principles of data quality, privacy and confidentiality.
Data collection, processing, analysis and dissemination are guided by CIHI’s
commitment to ensuring high-quality data in a privacy-sensitive manner. This section
outlines methodologies used to maximize the accuracy, comparability, timeliness,
usability and relevance of the Nursing Database.
Privacy and Confidentiality
To safeguard the privacy and confidentiality of data received by CIHI, guidelines
have been developed to govern the publication and release of health information
in accordance with provincial privacy legislation.
Data Collection
To practise as a regulated nurse in Canada, annual registration with the respective
provincial or territorial regulatory authority is mandatory, requiring the completion
of a registration form. The completed registration form is the property of the
provincial/territorial regulatory authority. Through an agreement with CIHI, each
regulatory authority (and, in the case of RNs, the Canadian Nurses Association)
includes a standardized set of questions on registration forms. These questions
pertain to demographic, education/training and employment characteristics.
By agreement, regulatory authorities submit responses to the standardized questions
once per year, in accordance with an established schedule. CIHI and the regulatory
authorities jointly review and scrutinize the submitted data, applying the principles of
data quality. Once the regulatory authority and CIHI approve the final data, it is added
to the Nursing Database at CIHI for analysis and reporting.
Note that the statistics reported by CIHI may differ from the statistics reported by the
regulatory authorities, even though the source of the data (annual registration forms) is
the same. The differences are due to the population of reference, the collection period,
exclusions from CIHI data and CIHI editing and processing methodologies based on
data quality principles.
Population of Interest
The population of interest includes all regulated nurses submitting active practising registration
in a Canadian province or territory. The population of interest is also further refined to include
only regulated nurses who fit the definition formulated by CIHI in consultation with regulated
nursing stakeholders to best serve health human resource planning and research needs on a
national level. As a result, there are some regulated nurses whose data is not collected by
CIHI. These include regulated nurses submitting non-practising registrations (where available
from the provincial/territorial regulatory authority) and regulated nurses living or working
outside Canada who have not maintained a Canadian licence.
141
Regulated Nurses: Canadian Trends, 2005 to 2009
Population of Reference and Collection Period
CIHI takes steps to manipulate the population of reference of the Nursing Database
to more closely represent the population of interest. So that it can meet data quality
guidelines for timeliness, CIHI does not wait for the end of the 12-month registration
period in each jurisdiction before collecting data. Therefore, the population of reference
for the Nursing Database is all regulated nurses submitting active practising registration
in a Canadian province or territory in the first six months of the registration year.
The 12-month registration period varies among the provinces and territories, as
each jurisdiction is responsible for setting the start and end dates of its own
registration period.
The difference between the population of interest and the population of reference
enables CIHI to produce more timely data. Analyses completed annually by CIHI
indicate that fewer than 4.0% of regulated nurses register after the six-month mark,
thus ensuring that CIHI’s trends are consistent with provincial/territorial trends that
include those registering after the six-month mark.
The population of reference includes the following definitions:
Non-Practising Registrations
The target population includes regulated nurses submitting active practising
registrations; those submitting non-practising registrations are excluded. At present,
Quebec and Ontario are the only jurisdictions that do not offer the option of active
practising or non-practising registration status to RNs and LPNs (in the case of Ontario);
there is only one type of registration. Therefore, Quebec submits data on RNs who are
not practising, and Ontario submits data on RNs and LPNs who are not currently
practising. While this is not technically a source of over-coverage—because all
registrations in these provinces are considered active practising—the result is
that some data fields will have a higher proportion of not stated values.
First-Time Registrants
The jurisdictions of Nova Scotia and Ontario do not submit data from first-time RN
registrants, and Ontario and Prince Edward Island do not submit data from first-time LPN
registrants, whether they are new graduates or individuals new to the jurisdiction. As
many first-time registrants are also active practising, this is a source of under-coverage.
The Yukon and the Northwest Territories do submit information on some first-time LPN
registrants; the Yukon and the Northwest Territories do not submit data for registrants
coming from other countries. Because many first-time registrants are also active
practising LPNs, this is a source of under-coverage.
142
Chapter 5—Methodological Notes
All four jurisdictions submitting RPN data include data on first-time registrants, whether
they are new graduates or individuals new to the jurisdiction. However, the initial
registration form for the jurisdictions does not consistently ask for employment information.
This may create some under-coverage or a higher number of non-responses.
Nurses on Leave
The target population excludes any regulated nurse not currently practising at the time
of registration. This creates some confusion for regulated nurses on leave (such as
maternity/paternity leave, education leave or short-term illness or injury), as they may or
may not be returning to work during the registration period. Therefore, they may submit
an active practising registration (where the option exists) but may not actually be
practising at the time of registration.
Therefore, the assumption is made that regulated nurses on temporary leave submit
active practising registrations with full employment information (when possible) with
the intent of returning to that position when the temporary leave ends. While this is not a
source of over-coverage, the fact is that some regulated nurses are not practising for the
full year of registration.
Non-Response
Table 53 presents the item non-response, or the percentage of not stated responses, for
each data element. Only responses for regulated nurses in the workforce are included in
this report.
Many of the tables and figures throughout the report have the non-response rates
included in the footnotes.
143
144
0,0
0,0
Formation initiale en
soins infirmiers
Année d’obtention
du diplôme
0,0
0,2
2,1
0,1
0,1
Travaille en soins
infirmiers
Plusieurs emplois
Province/territoire
d’emploi
Milieu de travail
(premier employeur)
Champ d’activité
(premier employeur)
0,2
0,0
0,1
1,2
< 0,1
1,3
0,0
0,1
0,0
100,0
1,1
0,0
0,0
0,0
0,0
0,0
0,0
0,0
0,0
0,0
0,0
5,8
100,0
0,0
0,1
0,0
0,0
0,0
0,0
0,0
0,3
2,1
0,0
0,5
0,0
1,2
99,2
99,1
0,2
0,0
0,0
0,0
0,0
IAA
< 0,1
0,1
4,2
< 0,1
0,1
0,0
0,8
< 0,1
0,0
0,0
0,0
0,0
0,0
0,0
0,0
0,0
0,0
0,0
IAA
0,0
0,9
0,9
1,1
14,1
0,1
1,4
22,5
21,7
< 0,1
N.-É.
IA
N.-B.
0,0
0,0
0,0
0,0
0,3
< 0,1
1,7
0,0
0,0
< 0,1
0,0
0,0
0,0
0,0
IA
1,2
0,0
1,0
0,0
0,1
0,0
2,6
100,0
100,0
0,2
0,0
0,0
0,0
0,0
IAA
Qc
0,0
0,6
1,7
0,0
0,0
0,0
1,8
84,9
0,0
< 0,1
0,0
0,0
0,0
0,0
IA
0,0
0,2
0,0
22,4
< 0,1
0,0
9,0
99,5
97,2
0,0
0,0
0,0
0,0
0,0
IAA
Ont.
0,0
0,9
1,2
1,4
0,1
0,0
0,4
56,2
0,0
0,8
< 0,1
0,0
0,0
0,0
IA
0,0
1,9
1,9
2,8
0,1
0,0
0,5
40,0
0,0
0,1
0,1
0,0
0,0
0,0
IAA
0,0
2,1
2,1
58,9
1,7
0,0
7,1
0,0
0,0
0,0
0,0
0,0
100,0
100,0
IA
< 0,1
0,0
0,0
1,0
0,2
0,0
5,1
9,8
10,3
0,0
0,0
0,0
0,0
0,0
IAA
Man.
0,1
0,0
0,4
0,0
0,3
0,0
0,9
83,6
92,2
0,0
0,0
0,0
0,0
0,0
IPA
0,0
1,2
0,9
1,1
0,6
0,5
0,1
1,0
0,0
3,3
0,1
< 0,1
0,0
0,0
IA
0,0
0,1
0,1
0,1
0,2
0,3
0,6
13,0
16,4
0,0
0,0
0,0
0,0
0,0
IAA
Sask.
0,0
1,4
1,7
0,8
0,0
0,2
1,4
0,0
0,0
0,0
0,0
0,0
0,3
0,0
IPA
0,0
4,0
3,7
3,0
2,8
2,6
0,8
0,0
0,0
0,4
0,0
0,0
0,0
0,0
IA
0,0
0,0
0,0
0,0
0,0
0,0
1,8
0,0
0,0
0,0
0,0
0,0
0,0
0,0
IAA
Alb.
0,0
0,3
0,2
0,0
0,0
0,0
1,2
75,7
86,4
0,4
0,0
0,0
0,0
0,0
IPA
0,0
0,2
0,2
0,1
7,5
0,0
6,9
0,0
0,0
0,3
0,0
0,1
0,0
0,0
IA
0,0
0,5
0,9
1,1
0,1
0,0
1,6
46,5
52,1
0,2
1,1
0,0
0,0
0,0
IAA
C.-B.
0,0
0,2
4,4
1,2
< 0,1
1,8
0,5
5,7
5,7
24,8
0,0
0,0
0,0
0,0
IPA
Yn
3,8
1,4
11,7
1,1
0,3
0,0
0,3
0,0
0,0
0,3
0,0
0,0
0,0
0,0
IA
Remarques
< 0,1 : pourcentage inférieur à 0,05 %; la valeur est remplacée pour éviter l’affichage des cellules 0,0 qui ne sont pas de vraies valeurs nulles.
Les données des Territoires du Nord-Ouest et du Nunavut sont combinées parce que les IA n’ont pas précisé dans quel territoire elles travaillaient la majorité du temps.
Les données sur les IAA ne sont pas recueillies au Nunavut.
Source
Base de données sur les infirmières et infirmiers, Institut canadien d’information sur la santé.
Province/pays de
résidence
< 0,1
0,0
Formation dans un
domaine autre que
les soins infirmiers
Poste (premier
employeur)
0,0
Autre formation en
soins infirmiers
< 0,1
0,0
Année de naissance
Province/pays
d’obtention du
diplôme
0,0
Sexe
Î.-P.-É.
IA
IAA
T.-N.-L.
IA
0,0
100,0
0,0
0,0
0,0
0,0
4,7
3,1
3,1
0,0
0,0
0,0
0,0
0,0
IAA
0,0
2,4
3,4
0,9
0,0
74,1
3,0
69,6
0,0
0,1
0,0
0,0
0,0
0,0
IA
0,0
0,0
0,0
0,0
0,0
100,0
0,0
100,0
100,0
0,0
0,0
0,0
0,0
0,0
IAA
T.N.-O./Nun.
< 0,1
1,1
1,6
3,4
1,4
0,6
1,9
41,8
0,0
0,5
< 0,1
0,0
4,2
4,2
IA
< 0,1
0,9
0,9
6,8
0,7
0,1
3,1
50,7
39,0
0,1
0,1
0,0
0,0
0,0
IAA
Canada
Tableau 53 : Pourcentage d’enregistrements indiquant travaille en soins infirmiers avec des réponses non précisé, par élément de données et
province ou territoire d’inscription, Canada, 2009
< 0,1
0,4
2,3
0,7
0,1
0,8
0,9
35,1
39,1
10,5
0,0
0,0
0,1
0,0
IPA
Regulated Nurses: Canadian Trends, 2005 to 2009
Chapter 5—Methodological Notes
Duplicate Records
It is necessary to identify and remove duplicate records within the database. Duplicates
may arise when regulated nurses register in more than one jurisdiction. A comparison is
done between the jurisdictions of registration and employment for each record; when
they are not equal, the record is excluded. When the jurisdiction of residence is not
stated, the jurisdiction of employment is defaulted to the jurisdiction of registration and
the record is not excluded.
It is common for regulated nurses to work in the territories on a temporary basis and to
return to their home province for part of the year. In these cases, where the province of
employment is a territory, the duplicates are not excluded so that the nursing workforce
in the north will not be underestimated.
There are some cases where double-counting cannot be avoided. For example,
a regulated nurse who registers and works in more than one province/territory
simultaneously would be double-counted in the Nursing Database, as the province
of employment would match the province of registration in each jurisdiction.
The data for RNs for Nunavut and the Northwest Territories is presented as a combined
total throughout this report. The RNs in these territories are governed by the same
regulatory authority, and the territory in which RNs usually worked was not available,
so combined data was submitted to CIHI. Therefore, any duplicates between the
Northwest Territories and Nunavut cannot be resolved.
Defining the Workforce
Note the difference between the Nursing Database and the workforce. While the
database contains all records in the population of reference, the Employment Status
indicator is used to exclude from the workforce regulated nurses who are not working in
nursing (see Figure 50). Throughout this report and other CIHI publications, the focus is
on regulated nurses who are working in nursing, or the regulated nursing workforce.
Re-Coding Employment Status
Regulated nurses who fail to provide their Position Status (that is, as full time, part time
or casual) on their registration risk being excluded from the workforce. However, in
cases where Position Status was not stated but employment information was provided,
CIHI, in consultation with the regulatory authority, will change Employment Status to
employed in nursing and Position Status to employment status unknown in order to
ensure that the record is included in the workforce. This methodology has been
applied to all nursing types since 2003, with the exception of B.C. RNs in 2005.
145
Regulated Nurses: Canadian Trends, 2005 to 2009
Figure 50: Tracking Regulatory Authority Data to CIHI: The Regulated
Nursing Workforce
146
Chapter 5—Methodological Notes
A: ALL REGISTRATIONS
Number of registrations submitted to a regulatory authority for nursing.
B: TYPES OF REGISTRATIONS
Box B1 is the number of active practising registrations received by the regulatory authority.
Box B2 is the number of non-practising registrations received by the regulatory authority.
Box B3 is the number of other registrations received by the regulatory authority.
C: RECORDS SUBMITTED TO CIHI
Box C1 is the number of active practising registrations submitted during the first six
months of the registration year.
Box C2 is the number of registrants not submitted to CIHI.
D: PRIMARY AND SECONDARY REGISTRATION
Box D1 is the number of regulated nurses whose jurisdiction of registration is different
from the jurisdiction of employment. These records are outside of the population of
reference, except where either the jurisdiction of registration or employment is a territory.
Box D2 is the number of regulated nurses whose jurisdiction of registration is the same
as the jurisdiction of employment.
E: EMPLOYMENT STATUS
Box E1 is the number of regulated nurses whose Employment Status is submitted as
employed in nursing. These regulated nurses are included in the workforce.
Boxes E2 to E4 are the numbers of regulated nurses who are excluded from the
workforce, as they are not reported as employed in nursing.
F: POSITION STATUS
Boxes F1 to F4 represent the number of regulated nurses included in the nursing
workforce. A regulated nurse may have a Position Status of full time, part time,
casual or unknown.
The boxes in black are included in the workforce, and the boxes in white are either not
submitted or are excluded by CIHI.
147
Regulated Nurses: Canadian Trends, 2005 to 2009
Analytical Methods
Formula for Average Annual Increase
Chapters 1 to 3 (supply of nurses): average annual growth rate
Average Annual Growth Rate (%) = (FV / PV)(1 / t) - 1
where FV = future value; PV = present value; t = time period;
Tk + 1 = end period; T1 = start period
This formula represents the average annual growth rate over a defined time period
(t = Tk + 1 - T1). The population of each regulated nursing profession is compared at two
points in time. PV is the population of regulated nurses at the beginning of the time
period, and FV is the population at the end of the time period, or t years later.
2009 Health Region Populations
Chapters 1 to 4 (regulated nursing workforce by health region): rates per 100,000
population by health region
Using 2009 calendar year population estimates from Statistics Canada, rates were
calculated for RNs, LPNs, RPNs and the regulated nursing workforce (all three regulated
nursing professions) employed in direct care, per 100,000 population for each health region.
Urban/Rural Statistics
Urban areas are defined (in part) as communities with populations greater than 10,000
people and are labelled by Statistics Canada as either a census metropolitan area (CMA)
or a census agglomeration (CA); rural/remote is equated with communities outside
the CMA/CA boundaries and is referred to as rural and small town (RST) by
Statistics Canada.
RST communities are further subdivided by identifying the degree to which they are
influenced in terms of social and economic integration with larger urban centres (that is,
CMAs and CAs). Metropolitan influenced zone (MIZ) categories disaggregate the RST
population into four subgroups: strong MIZ, moderate MIZ, weak MIZ and no MIZ.
These urban/rural/remote categories are applied to communities (such as cities, towns
and villages) that can be equated with the Statistics Canada designation census
subdivision (CSD).
The CMA/CA and MIZ categories were collapsed. These categories may be interpreted
in the following simple manner: CMA/CA = large urban centre (urban); strong/moderate
MIZ = small towns and rural areas located relatively close to larger urban centres (rural);
weak/no MIZ = small towns, rural and remote communities distant from large urban
centres (remote).
Details of the RST and MIZ classification schemes can be found in McNiven et al.
(2000),2 du Plessis et al. (2001)3 and CIHI (2002).4
148
Chapter 5—Methodological Notes
Comparability of Data
CIHI would like to acknowledge that each regulatory authority has been extremely
cooperative and helpful in improving its data collection methods and in helping CIHI
develop methodologies to enhance data quality. As part of the data submission process,
the regulatory authorities submit to CIHI the changes that have been made to their
databases for inclusion in this publication. A review of this information is helpful when
looking at trends over time and comparing jurisdictions.
Data prior to 2002 for LPNs and RPNs was published in the CIHI publication series
Health Personnel Trends in Canada (formerly Health Personnel in Canada). The 1993 to
2001 data produced in Health Personnel Trends is not directly comparable to the data
presented in this publication because the collection methodologies have changed.
LPN and RPN data from 2002 to the present in the Health Personnel Trends series
is consistent with the figures presented in this series of publications.
For a complete listing of data elements in the Nursing Database, see the data
dictionaries on the CIHI nursing website:
• Registered Nurses System Data Dictionary and Processing Manual
• Licensed Practical Nurses System Data Dictionary and Processing Manual
• Registered Psychiatric Nurses Data Dictionary and Processing Manual
Methodological and Historical Changes to Registered
Nursing Data, 2005 to 2009
Methodological and historical changes to the data make it difficult to compare data
across time. CIHI and the regulatory authorities are continually striving to improve data
quality; therefore, the following information must be taken into consideration when
making historical comparisons and consulting previous CIHI publications. In all cases,
comparisons should be made with caution and in consideration of the historical and
methodological changes made.
RN data for the years 1994 to 2001 was published in the CIHI series Supply and
Distribution of Registered Nurses, and RN data for the 2002 data year was published in
the report Workforce Trends of Registered Nurses, 2002.
Historical Review and Data Limitations
For a complete list of the data elements related to RNs, please access the Registered
Nurses System Data Dictionary and Processing Manual on the CIHI website at
www.cihi.ca.
149
Regulated Nurses: Canadian Trends, 2005 to 2009
Nurse Practitioner
In the 2008 calendar year, the NP data was incorporated into the Nursing Database,
back to data year 2003. Consistent methodology was applied to the NP records,
including the removal of duplicates and the six-month cut-off for data collection, resulting
in a change from NP totals published in previous reports.v
In the 2009 data year, the Saskatchewan Registered Nurses Association (SRNA)
provided all data elements related to NPs. Refer to the Registered Nurses System
Data Dictionary and Processing Manual on the CIHI website at www.cihi.ca.
Employment
British Columbia—Employment Status
For the 2005 data year, Employment Status was not re-coded to unknown, thus leading
to an under-reporting of the workforce.
Northwest Territories and Nunavut—Employment Status
The RN workforce relies on a core of full-time resident RNs plus a large number of
short-term relief staff from across Canada each year. While some RNs will return each
year, some will register in the northern territories only once. This lack of stability in the
workforce will result in greater variability in the data.
Data for the Northwest Territories and Nunavut is provided by the Registered Nurses
Association of the Northwest Territories and Nunavut (RNANT/NU). For the 2005 to 2009
data years, it is not possible to accurately divide RNs between the two territories; as a
result, data for the Northwest Territories and Nunavut is combined under a single set
of statistics.
Starting in the 2008 data year, the RNANT/NU provided data for the RN and NP full-time
and casual categories, while in the past, for data years 2004 to 2007, all RNs and NPs
employed in registered nursing in the Northwest Territories and Nunavut were coded as
employed in nursing—status unknown.
Prince Edward Island—Employment Status
According to the Association of Registered Nurses of Prince Edward Island (ARNPEI),
P.E.I. has made an effort to increase the number of full-time nurses. This resulted in a
decrease in the number of part-time nurses for data year 2006. Additionally, the province
has seen an increase in formerly retired RNs who have re-entered the workforce on a
casual basis.
Ontario—Employment Status
According to the College of Nurses of Ontario (CNO), for data year 2006, the changes in
the variable Employment Status were a result of refinements in the renewal process and
resulted in changes to those employed in nursing—status unknown.
v.
150
See Chapter 5 (Methodological Notes) for more information on the re-coding of the Employment Status element.
Chapter 5—Methodological Notes
Quebec—Place of Work, Area of Responsibility, Position
L’Ordre des infirmières et infirmiers du Québec (OIIQ) made changes to its registration
form in 2005, resulting in changes to the employment fields. The OIIQ campaign for an
increase in accuracy of the information reported resulted in a decrease in the category
not stated for these fields.
The ambulatory care sub-component was removed from the list of practice areas on
the 2008 registration form. The vast majority of RNs who reported in that area are now
reporting under primary care. After discussion with various Quebec stakeholders, it
was agreed that the RNs who reported under primary care would be counted under the
community health practice area. This explains the large increase in this sub-component.
Quebec—Multiple Employment Status
Since the 2006 data year, the number of nurses with multiple employers decreased in
Quebec as a result of the creation of the health and social service centres (CSSSs).
Nurses identifying a CSSS as their employer may be working in more than one facility
operated by the CSSS; while they may be working in multiple facilities, they have only
one employer.
Ontario—Place of Work
According to the CNO, refinements in the renewal process for data year 2006 enabled
the CNO to reduce the number of not stated responses to this category.
New Brunswick—Place of Work
As of the 2008 data year, the decrease in the number of RNs selecting hospital for the
field Place of Work (Primary Employer) is the result of a coding change. Extramural
nurses, previously coded in the field hospital, are now coded under community
health centre.
During the 2005–2006 data year, the government of New Brunswick changed a number
of small hospitals into community health centres (CHCs). This resulted in an initial
increase of RNs reported in CHCs in 2005 and a subsequent decrease reported in
2006 as the RN staff was realigned to reflect staffing levels appropriate to CHCs.
Quebec—Place of Work
The Quebec Ministère de la santé et des services sociaux merged most of the province’s
public-sector hospitals, long-term care facilities and community health centres into 95
CSSSs. In the 2006 data year, more than 800 nurses identified CSSSs as their place of
work. CIHI does not have an element in its data dictionary that corresponds to this
element. As a result, the Place of Work for these RNs was defaulted to other.
Saskatchewan—Place of Work
In the 2006 data year, the decrease in the field community health centre was the result of
the addition of the new field public health department/unit.
151
Regulated Nurses: Canadian Trends, 2005 to 2009
Manitoba—Place of Work
In the 2009 data year, the decrease of the Place of Work (Primary Employer) data
element was the result of RNs and NPs failing to indicate their place of work; this
resulted in an extensive increase of not stated.
Ontario—Position
In the 2008 data year, the number of nurses selecting NP under the Position field
increased substantially. This resulted in a concomitant decrease in the number of nurses
selecting other under the Position field.
Northwest Territories and Nunavut—Position
According to the RNANT/NU, relief nurses are identifying themselves under the category
other position rather than staff or community health nurse. This was reflected in the 2006
data year.
Newfoundland and Labrador—Position
According to the Association of Registered Nurses of Newfoundland and Labrador
(ARNNL), nine NP registrants should have been categorized as nurse practitioner under
the Primary Position field and not senior manager, staff or community health nurse,
instructor/professor/educator and other positions categories, for the 2007 data year.
Demographics
Manitoba—Birth Year and Sex
Since data year 2007, the College of Registered Nurses of Manitoba (CRNM) submitted
age groups and aggregate tables instead of Birth Year and Sex as a result of changes to
provincial privacy legislation.
Manitoba—Age Group
In the 2007 data year, the CRNM did not provide Age Group information for NPs.
Education
Prince Edward Island—Other Education in Nursing and Education in Other
Than Nursing
Since data year 2006, the ARNPEI has continued to emphasize the need for increased
accuracy in regard to the information reported by registrants of the province. This has
resulted in a decrease in the responses under the category not stated and an increase in
the responses under the category none in the Other Education in Nursing and Education
in Other Than Nursing fields.
Manitoba—Other Education in Nursing
In the 2006 data year, the CRNM made a substantial correction to the 2005 data year
for the field Other Education in Nursing. This reduced the number of RNs in the
category baccalaureate.
152
Chapter 5—Methodological Notes
Northwest Territories/Nunavut—Other Education in Nursing
In the 2008 data year, the RNANT/NU provided data for the field Other Education
in Nursing for the category baccalaureate. This reduced the number of RNs in the
category none.
Alberta—Education in Other Than Nursing
The College & Association of Registered Nurses of Alberta (CARNA) made a substantial
change to the 2008 data year for the field Education in Other Than Nursing. This
reduced the number of RNs in the category none and increased the number in the
baccalaureate and master’s categories.
Alberta—Location of Graduation
In the 2008 data year, there was an increase for the categories of United Kingdom,
United States, Hong Kong and other foreign for the field Location of Graduation.
This reduced the number of RNs in the category not stated.
Saskatchewan—Location of Graduation
The SRNA nurse practitioners did not provide a Location of Graduation for data
year 2008.
Quebec—Postal Code
For all data years, postal codes were not submitted to CIHI for the fields Postal Code of
Employer (Worksite) and Postal Code of Residence by the OIIQ.
Manitoba—Postal Code
In the 2009 data year, the CRNM provided the fields Postal Code of Employer (Worksite)
and partial Postal Code of Residence. While in past years Postal Code of Employer
(Worksite) was not submitted to CIHI by the CRNM, they did provide partial Postal Code
of Residence.
Alberta—Postal Code
Until (and including) 2006, partial postal codes were submitted to CIHI for the field
Postal Code of Employer (Worksite) by the CARNA.
Yukon—Postal Code
In the 2009 data year, 75 RNs were employed in small Yukon communities outside of
Whitehorse, but were reported under the employer’s Whitehorse office postal code.
CIHI has moved those 75 RNs from urban area to rural area.
153
Regulated Nurses: Canadian Trends, 2005 to 2009
Methodological and Historical Changes to Licensed
Practical Nursing Data, 2005 to 2009
Methodological and historical changes to the data make it difficult to compare data
across time. CIHI and the regulatory authorities are continually striving to improve
data quality; therefore, the following information must be taken into consideration when
making historical comparisons and consulting previous CIHI publications. In all cases,
comparisons should be made with caution and in consideration of the historical and
methodological changes made.
LPN data for the years 1993 to 2001 was published in the CIHI series Health Personnel
Trends in Canada, and LPN data for the 2002 data year was published in the report
Workforce Trends of Licensed Practical Nurses, 2002.
Historical Revisions and Data Limitations
For a complete list of the data elements related to LPNs, please access the Licensed
Practical Nurses System Data Dictionary and Processing Manual on the CIHI website
at www.cihi.ca.
Employment
Northwest Territories—Multiple Employment Status
This data element was not collected for the data years 2002 to 2009.
Quebec—Place of Work
Data for the sub-element mental health centre was not collected for the data years 2002
to 2009, because this type of institution, as defined by CIHI, does not exist in the
province of Quebec. Over the last three years, the Quebec Ministère de la santé et des
services sociaux merged most of the province’s public-sector hospitals, long-term care
facilities and community health centres into 95 CSSSs. Since the merger, the Ordre des
infirmières et infirmiers auxiliaires du Québec (OIIAQ) has reclassified its definitions for
the field Place of Work.
New Brunswick—Position
For the 2006 data year, the Association of New Brunswick Licensed Practical Nurses
educated members on how to complete the Position section of the annual renewal
registration form. As a result, the number of registrants selecting the category other
for the element Position decreased.
Demographics
Manitoba—Birth Year and Sex
In the 2008 data year, the College of Licensed Practical Nurses of Manitoba submitted
age groups and aggregate tables instead of Birth Year and Sex as a result of changes to
provincial privacy legislation.
154
Chapter 5—Methodological Notes
Education
Nova Scotia—Initial Education in Practical Nursing
For the 2006 data year, the College of Licensed Practical Nurses of Nova Scotia
included the options certificate and diploma as collected on the annual renewal
registration form.
British Columbia—Initial Education in Practical Nursing
In data years 2006 and 2007, the responses under this field increased due to updates to
the category equivalency. This reduced the number of LPNs reported under the category
not stated.
Quebec—Location of Graduation
The OIIAQ did not submit data for this field for data years 2005 to 2006; all records were
defaulted to not stated.
Alberta—Location of Graduation
In data year 2009, there was a substantial increase in the category of Philippines for the
field Location of Graduation, as there was a larger number of practical nurses who had
graduated in this country.
Other Education in Nursing—Non-Practical Nursing
For data years 2006 to 2009, this data element was not collected by all jurisdictions,
and for data years 2004 and 2005, this was not collected from Ontario and the
Northwest Territories.
New Brunswick, Northwest Territories—Education in Other Than Nursing
This data element was not collected for the data years 2002 to 2009.
Methodological and Historical Changes to Registered
Psychiatric Nursing Data, 2005 to 2009
Methodological and historical changes to the data make it difficult to compare data
across time. CIHI and the regulatory authorities are continually striving to improve
data quality; therefore, the following information must be taken into consideration when
making historical comparisons and consulting previous CIHI publications. In all cases,
comparisons should be made with caution and in consideration of the historical and
methodological changes made.
RPN data for the years 1993 to 2001 was published in the series Health Personnel
Trends in Canada, and RPN data for the 2002 data year was published in the report
Workforce Trends of Registered Psychiatric Nurses, 2002.
Historical Revisions and Data Limitations
For a complete list of the data elements related to RPNs, please access the Registered
Psychiatric Nurses System Data Dictionary and Processing Manual on the CIHI website
at www.cihi.ca.
155
Regulated Nurses: Canadian Trends, 2005 to 2009
Employment
British Columbia—Employment Status
For the 2005 data year, the College of Registered Psychiatric Nurses of British Columbia
(CRPNBC) defaulted this field, for all registrants, to employed in psychiatric nursing—
status unknown. For the 2006 data year, the CRPNBC and CIHI worked together to
improve the reporting of Employment Status information collected on the CRPNBC’s
registration form.
Saskatchewan—Employment Status
Starting in the 2005 data year, the Registered Psychiatric Nurses Association of
Saskatchewan (RPNAS) registration form separates part-time and casual employment
into two options. In previous years, part-time and casual employment were grouped as
one option, and all RPNs who selected this were defaulted to part time unless the RPN
specifically indicated casual employment.
Manitoba—Employment Status
In the 2009 data year, the College of Registered Psychiatric Nurses of Manitoba
(CRPNM) converted/migrated to a new database. The database change was done prior
to the CIHI data collection, and it was noticed at the registration renewal period that a
high volume of the employment status data was converted incorrectly. Although, the
full-time and casual numbers did fluctuate slightly, the differences between data years
2008 and 2009 are more likely a product of these conversions.
Manitoba—Place of Work, Area of Responsibility, Position
In the 2005 data year, CRPNM began to collect and submit data for the following fields
to CIHI:
• Place of Work (second and third employer)
• Area of Responsibility (second and third employer)
• Position (second and third employer)
• Postal Code of Employer (second and third employer)
In data year 2009, CRPNM reported that the variations for Place of Work (Primary
Employer) were another instance where, prior to the CIHI data collection, the new
database seemed to have replaced some of the primary employer data with the
secondary employer data. Although CRPNM does see many (most) of its new graduates
employed in hospitals or personal care homes, there were not enough of them to
account for the large increase in the hospital category. Likewise, for retirees leaving a
community mental health agency/centre, the decrease was relatively high compared to
the number who retired.
156
Chapter 5—Methodological Notes
Education
Manitoba—Initial Education in Psychiatric Nursing and Other Education in
Psychiatric Nursing
In the 2005 data year, the CRPNM asked members to complete the entire education
section of the registration form even if they had reported education information
previously. This may have resulted in the capture of education data that was not
previously reported or not previously entered in the database.
According to the CRPNM, the variances for Other Education in Psychiatric Nursing are
based on coding changes, in the 2009 data year. Although not stated probably equals
none, it is more accurate to code these in the category not stated based on the way the
question is asked on CRPNM’s registration renewal form.
British Columbia—Location of Graduation
In data year 2008 and 2009, the number of RPNs selecting not stated under the Location
of Graduation field increased substantially. There was a concomitant decrease in the
number of RPNs selecting British Columbia under the Location of Graduation field.
157
Provincial/Territorial Nursing Workforce Highlights
and Profiles
Provincial/Territorial Nursing Workforce Highlights and Profiles
Regulated Nursing Workforce Highlights, Newfoundland
and Labrador, 2009
• The number of registrations submitted for regulated nurses in Newfoundland and
Labrador (including both employed and unemployed) increased 1.7% from 2005
to 2009, from 8,317 to 8,456.
• In 2009, there were 8,346 regulated nurses working in Newfoundland and Labrador,
69.8% of whom were RNs and 30.2% of whom were LPNs.
• In 2009, the proportion of the Newfoundland and Labrador workforce that was female
continued to be high, at 95.0% for RNs and 88.1% for LPNs.
• The average age of regulated nurses in Newfoundland and Labrador increased. The
average age of regulated nurses was 43.6 in 2009, compared to 42.7 in 2005. In 2009,
the average age of RNs was 42.9 and the average age of LPNs was 45.2.
• The proportion of full-time regulated nurses in Newfoundland and Labrador increased
from 65.4% in 2005 to 71.8% in 2009. The percentage of nurses in full-time positions
in 2009 was 74.9% for RNs and 64.8% for LPNs.
• In 2009, Newfoundland and Labrador’s regulated nurses worked most often in
hospitals, at 67.5% for RNs and 44.3% for LPNs; the community health sector attracted
12.6% of RNs and 3.5% of LPNs.
• The proportion of regulated nurses educated internationally in Newfoundland and
Labrador decreased. Overall, in 2009, 1.1% of the regulated nursing workforce in
Newfoundland and Labrador was educated outside of Canada, compared to 1.3%
in 2005.
161
Regulated Nurses: Canadian Trends, 2005 to 2009
Regulated Nursing Workforce Profile, Newfoundland and Labrador, 2009
Licensed Practical
Nurses
Registered Nurses
RN
Employed in Nursing Workforce
Sex
Male
Female
%
Canada %
5,825
–
292
5.0
5,533 95.0
%
– 2,521
Canada %
RPN
Canada %
–
–
–
–
–
299
11.9
7.3
–
–
22.5
93.8 2,222
88.1
92.7
–
–
77.5
6.2
Years
–
–
45.2
–
–
–
–
–
Age
Breakdown
<35
1,362 23.4
21.3
440
17.5
26.4
–
–
13.2
35–49
2,796 48.0
38.9 1,159
46.0
38.9
–
–
40.6
50+
1,667 28.6
39.9
922
36.6
34.7
–
–
46.2
Full Time
4,362 74.9
58.7 1,633
64.8
50.2
–
–
67.1
Part Time
835 14.3
30.6
125
5.0
33.7
–
–
18.7
Casual
628 10.8
10.7
763
30.3
16.1
–
–
14.2
–
0
–
–
–
–
–
62.6 1,117
44.3
45.6
–
–
44.0
88
3.5
7.8
–
–
24.0
9.9 1,278
Employed—Status Unknown
Place of Work
Area of
Responsibility
Position
Hospital
Highest
Education
in Nursing
Discipline
Location of
Graduation
–
733 12.6
Nursing Home/LTC Facility
526
Other Place of Work
633 10.9
Direct Care
9.0
50.7
39.1
–
–
18.7
37
1.5
7.4
–
–
13.3
89.3 2,482
13.3
99.6
98.1
–
–
90.4
636 10.9
10.7
10
0.4
1.9
–
–
9.6
Managerial Positions
646 11.1
7.0
0
0.0
1.4
–
–
10.5
77.8 2,398
Single Employer
Multiple Employers
5,184 89.1
14.2
Administration/Educ./Research
Other Positions
Multiple
Employment
Status
0
3,930 67.5
Community Health Agency
Staff/Community Health Nurse
4,464 76.7
713 12.2
5,117 88.0
699 12.0
95.2
92.0
–
–
79.0
120
4.8
6.6
–
–
10.5
86.8 2,143
85.0
82.5
–
–
79.2
13.2
15.0
17.5
–
–
20.8
100.0
–
–
90.9
15.1
378
Diploma
3,442 59.1
60.1 2,521 100.0
Baccalaureate
2,211 38.0
36.7
0
0.0
0.0
–
–
8.9
3.2
0
0.0
0.0
–
–
0.3
91.7
†
†
97.7
–
–
92.2
*
†
2.3
–
–
7.8
Master’s/Doctorate
Canadian-Trained
Internationally Educated
172
3.0
5,733 98.4
91
1.6
8.3
2,49
Notes
– Data is not applicable or does not exist.
* Value suppressed in accordance with CIHI privacy policy; cell value is from 1 to 4.
† Digit suppressed to ensure confidentiality.
Totals may not sum to 100% due to rounding.
Data released by CIHI may differ from data from other sources due to CIHI’s nationally standardized methodology.
Regulated nurses employed in a jurisdiction different from their jurisdiction of registration are excluded to
avoid duplication.
Diploma includes equivalency for entry-level education.
Employed—status unknown are excluded from percentage distributions.
Not stated are excluded from percentage distributions.
See Chapter 5 (Methodological Notes) for more information regarding collection and comparability of data.
Source
Nursing Database, Canadian Institute for Health Information.
162
%
Average Age
Employment
Status
42.9
LPN
Registered
Psychiatric Nurses
Provincial/Territorial Nursing Workforce Highlights and Profiles
Regulated Nursing Workforce Highlights,
Prince Edward Island, 2009
• The number of registrations submitted for regulated nurses in Prince Edward Island
(including both employed and unemployed) increased 4.2% from 2005 to 2009,
from 2,103 to 2,192.
• In 2009, there were 2,071 regulated nurses working in Prince Edward Island, 67.9% of
whom were RNs and 32.1% of whom were LPNs.
• In 2009, the proportion of the Prince Edward Island workforce that was female
continued to be high. Almost all RNs (97.6%) and LPNs (91.3%) were women.
• The average age of regulated nurses in Prince Edward Island increased. In 2009,
regulated nurses were 47.0, compared to 45.4 in 2005. In 2009, the average age of
RNs was 47.4 and that of LPNs was 46.3.
• The proportion of full-time regulated nurses in Prince Edward Island decreased
slightly from 49.8% in 2005 to 48.7% in 2009. The percentage of nurses in full-time
positions in 2009 was 53.1% for RNs and 39.2% for LPNs.
• In 2009, Prince Edward Island’s regulated nurses worked most often in hospitals, at
60.0% for RNs and 48.4% for LPNs; the community health sector attracted 11.3% of
RNs and 6.8% of LPNs.
• The proportion of regulated nurses educated internationally in Prince Edward Island
decreased. Overall, in 2009, 1.3% of the regulated nursing workforce in
Prince Edward Island was educated outside of Canada, compared to 1.7% in 2005.
163
Regulated Nurses: Canadian Trends, 2005 to 2009
Regulated Nursing Workforce Profile, Prince Edward Island, 2009
Licensed Practical
Nurses
Registered Nurses
RN
Employed in Nursing Workforce
Sex
Average Age
Age
Breakdown
Employment
Status
Male
Female
Area of
Responsibility
Position
Highest
Education
in Nursing
Discipline
Location of
Graduation
LPN
%
Canada %
RPN
Canada %
1,406
–
–
665
–
–
–
–
–
34
2.4
6.2
58
8.7
7.3
–
–
22.5
1,372 97.6
93.8
607
91.3
92.7
–
–
77.5
47.4
–
–
46.3
–
–
–
–
–
202 14.4
21.3
115
17.3
26.4
–
–
13.2
35–49
579 41.2
38.9
268
40.3
38.9
–
–
40.6
50+
625 44.5
39.9
282
42.4
34.7
–
–
46.2
Full Time
747 53.1
58.7
261
39.2
50.2
–
–
67.1
Part Time
525 37.3
30.6
249
37.4
33.7
–
–
18.7
Casual
134
9.5
10.7
155
23.3
16.1
–
–
14.2
0
–
–
0
–
–
–
–
–
Hospital
844 60.0
62.6
322
48.4
45.6
–
–
44.0
Community Health Agency
159 11.3
14.2
45
6.8
7.8
–
–
24.0
Nursing Home/LTC Facility
212 15.1
9.9
245
36.8
39.1
–
–
18.7
Other Place of Work
191 13.6
13.3
53
8.0
7.4
–
–
13.3
1,248 88.8
89.3
645
99.1
98.1
–
–
90.4
Administration/Educ./Research
Direct Care
158 11.2
10.7
6
0.9
1.9
–
–
9.6
Managerial Positions
161 11.5
7.0
8
1.2
1.4
–
–
10.5
1,073 76.3
77.8
606
91.4
92.0
–
–
79.0
172 12.2
15.1
49
7.4
6.6
–
–
10.5
1,401 99.6
Staff/Community Health Nurse
Single Employer
Multiple Employers
Diploma
Baccalaureate
Master’s/Doctorate
Canadian-Trained
Internationally Educated
86.8
530
79.7
82.5
–
–
79.2
0.4
13.2
135
20.3
17.5
–
–
20.8
1,025 72.9
60.1
665 100.0
100.0
–
–
90.9
5
†
†
36.7
0
0.0
0.0
–
–
8.9
*
†
3.2
0
0.0
0.0
–
–
0.3
91.7
†
†
97.7
–
–
92.2
*
†
2.3
–
–
7.8
38
1,378 98.1
26
1.9
8.3
66
Notes
– Data is not applicable or does not exist.
* Value suppressed in accordance with CIHI privacy policy; cell value is from 1 to 4.
† Digit suppressed to ensure confidentiality.
Totals may not sum to 100% due to rounding.
Data released by CIHI may differ from data from other sources due to CIHI’s nationally standardized methodology.
Regulated nurses employed in a jurisdiction different from their jurisdiction of registration are excluded to
avoid duplication.
Diploma includes equivalency for entry-level education.
Employed—status unknown are excluded from percentage distributions.
Not stated are excluded from percentage distributions.
See Chapter 5 (Methodological Notes) for more information regarding collection and comparability of data.
Source
Nursing Database, Canadian Institute for Health Information.
164
%
<35
Other Positions
Multiple
Employment
Status
Canada %
Years
Employed—Status Unknown
Place of Work
%
Registered
Psychiatric Nurses
Provincial/Territorial Nursing Workforce Highlights and Profiles
Regulated Nursing Workforce Highlights,
Nova Scotia, 2009
• The number of registrations submitted for regulated nurses in Nova Scotia (including
both employed and unemployed) increased 3.5% from 2005 to 2009, from 12,227
to 12,661.
• In 2009, there were 12,286 regulated nurses working in Nova Scotia, 72.7% of whom
were RNs and 27.3% of whom were LPNs.
• In 2009, the proportion of the Nova Scotia workforce that was female continued to be
high, at 96.0% for RNs and 94.9% for LPNs.
• The average age of regulated nurses in Nova Scotia increased. Regulated nurses
were 46.2 in 2009, compared to 45.1 in 2005. In 2009, the average age of RNs was
46.8 and that of LPNs was 44.8.
• The proportion of full-time regulated nurses in Nova Scotia increased from 59.0% in
2005 to 61.7% in 2009. The percentage of nurses in full-time positions in 2009 was
64.9% for RNs and 53.1% for LPNs.
• In 2009, Nova Scotia’s regulated nurses worked most often in hospitals, at 67.2% for
RNs and 47.5% for LPNs; the community health sector attracted 10.4% of RNs and
11.0% of LPNs.
• The proportion of regulated nurses educated internationally in Nova Scotia increased.
Overall, in 2009, 2.0% of the regulated nursing workforce in Nova Scotia was
educated outside of Canada, compared to 1.8% in 2005. A total of 2.6% of the RN
workforce and 0.4% of the LPN workforce were internationally educated.
165
Regulated Nurses: Canadian Trends, 2005 to 2009
Regulated Nursing Workforce Profile, Nova Scotia, 2009
Licensed Practical
Nurses
Registered Nurses
RN
Employed in Nursing Workforce
Sex
Male
Female
%
Canada %
8,929
–
360
4.0
8,569 96.0
– 3,357
%
Canada %
RPN
Canada %
–
–
–
–
–
170
5.1
7.3
–
–
22.5
93.8 3,187
94.9
92.7
–
–
77.5
6.2
Years
–
–
44.8
–
–
–
–
–
Age
Breakdown
<35
1,350 15.1
21.3
648
19.3
26.4
–
–
13.2
35–49
3,702 41.5
38.9 1,482
44.1
38.9
–
–
40.6
50+
3,877 43.4
39.9 1,227
36.6
34.7
–
–
46.2
Full Time
5,797 64.9
58.7 1,780
53.1
50.2
–
–
67.1
Part Time
2,216 24.8
30.6 1,024
30.5
33.7
–
–
18.7
10.7
551
16.4
16.1
–
–
14.2
–
Casual
Employed—Status Unknown
Place of Work
Hospital
Community Health Agency
Nursing Home/LTC Facility
Area of
Responsibility
Position
Multiple
Employment
Status
Highest
Education
in Nursing
Discipline
Location of
Graduation
916 10.3
0
–
6,003 67.2
930 10.4
963 10.8
2
–
–
–
–
–
62.6 1,579
47.5
45.6
–
–
44.0
14.2
364
11.0
7.8
–
–
24.0
9.9 1,204
36.3
39.1
–
–
18.7
Other Place of Work
1,032 11.6
13.3
174
5.2
7.4
–
–
13.3
Direct Care
7,457 87.2
89.3 3,284
Administration/Educ./Research 1,096 12.8
Managerial Positions
989 11.1
98.7
98.1
–
–
90.4
10.7
42
1.3
1.9
–
–
9.6
7.0
85
2.6
1.4
–
–
10.5
Staff/Community Health Nurse
6,818 76.5
77.8 3,086
92.8
92.0
–
–
79.0
Other Positions
1,110 12.4
15.1
155
4.7
6.6
–
–
10.5
Single Employer
8,135 91.1
86.8 2,832
84.4
82.5
–
–
79.2
13.2
15.6
17.5
–
–
20.8
100.0
–
–
90.9
Multiple Employers
794
8.9
522
Diploma
5,097 57.1
60.1 3,357 100.0
Baccalaureate
3,526 39.5
36.7
0
0.0
0.0
–
–
8.9
3.2
0
0.0
0.0
–
–
0.3
91.7 3,344
99.6
97.7
–
–
92.2
0.4
2.3
–
–
7.8
Master’s/Doctorate
Canadian-Trained
Internationally Educated
306
3.4
8,694 97.4
235
2.6
8.3
12
Notes
– Data is not applicable or does not exist.
Totals may not sum to 100% due to rounding.
Data released by CIHI may differ from data from other sources due to CIHI’s nationally standardized methodology.
Regulated nurses employed in a jurisdiction different from their jurisdiction of registration are excluded to
avoid duplication.
Diploma includes equivalency for entry-level education.
Employed—status unknown are excluded from percentage distributions.
Not stated are excluded from percentage distributions.
See Chapter 5 (Methodological Notes) for more information regarding collection and comparability of data.
Source
Nursing Database, Canadian Institute for Health Information.
166
%
Average Age
Employment
Status
46.8
LPN
Registered
Psychiatric Nurses
Provincial/Territorial Nursing Workforce Highlights and Profiles
Regulated Nursing Workforce Highlights,
New Brunswick, 2009
• The number of registrations submitted for regulated nurses in New Brunswick
(including both employed and unemployed) increased 3.4% from 2005 to 2009,
from 10,695 to 11,063.
• In 2009, there were 10,595 regulated nurses working in New Brunswick, 74.2% of
whom were RNs and 25.8% of whom were LPNs.
• In 2009, the proportion of the New Brunswick workforce that was female continued to
be high, at 95.5% of RNs and 88.6% of LPNs.
• The average age of regulated nurses in New Brunswick increased. The average age
of regulated nurses was 44.7 in 2009, compared to 43.6 in 2005. In 2009, the average
age of RNs was 45.0 and the average age of LPNs was 43.7.
• The proportion of full-time regulated nurses in New Brunswick increased from 60.2%
in 2005 to 62.2% in 2009. The percentage of nurses in full-time positions in 2009 was
65.2% for RNs and 53.6% for LPNs.
• In 2009, New Brunswick’s regulated nurses worked most often in hospitals, at 67.1%
for RNs and 54.8% for LPNs; the community health sector attracted 11.9% of RNs and
3.7% of LPNs.
• The proportion of regulated nurses educated internationally in New Brunswick
increased. Overall, in 2009, 1.2% of the regulated nursing workforce in New Brunswick
was educated outside of Canada, compared to 0.9% in 2005. A total of 1.5% of the RN
workforce and 0.4% of the LPN workforce were internationally educated.
167
Regulated Nurses: Canadian Trends, 2005 to 2009
Regulated Nursing Workforce Profile, New Brunswick, 2009
Licensed Practical
Nurses
Registered Nurses
RN
Employed in Nursing Workforce
Sex
Male
Female
%
Canada %
7,866
–
353
4.5
7,513 95.5
– 2,729
%
Canada %
RPN
Canada %
–
–
–
–
–
310
11.4
7.3
–
–
22.5
93.8 2,419
88.6
92.7
–
–
77.5
6.2
Years
–
–
43.7
–
–
–
–
–
Age
Breakdown
<35
1,502 19.1
21.3
632
23.2
26.4
–
–
13.2
35–49
3,477 44.2
38.9 1,183
43.3
38.9
–
–
40.6
50+
2,887 36.7
39.9
914
33.5
34.7
–
–
46.2
Full Time
5,127 65.2
58.7 1,462
53.6
50.2
–
–
67.1
Part Time
2,135 27.1
30.6
852
31.2
33.7
–
–
18.7
10.7
415
15.2
16.1
–
–
14.2
–
0
–
–
–
–
–
62.6 1,495
54.8
45.6
–
–
44.0
100
3.7
7.8
–
–
24.0
9.9 1,043
Casual
Employed—Status Unknown
Place of Work
Area of
Responsibility
Position
Hospital
Highest
Education
in Nursing
Discipline
Location of
Graduation
7.7
0
–
5,280 67.1
934 11.9
Nursing Home/LTC Facility
790 10.0
Other Place of Work
862 11.0
Direct Care
38.2
39.1
–
–
18.7
91
3.3
7.4
–
–
13.3
89.3 2,587
13.3
95.7
98.1
–
–
90.4
827 10.5
10.7
115
4.3
1.9
–
–
9.6
Managerial Positions
934 11.9
7.0
50
1.8
1.4
–
–
10.5
77.8 2,448
Single Employer
Multiple Employers
7,039 89.5
14.2
Administration/Educ./Research
Other Positions
Multiple
Employment
Status
604
Community Health Agency
Staff/Community Health Nurse
6,285 79.9
647
8.2
7,141 90.8
724
9.2
89.7
92.0
–
–
79.0
231
8.5
6.6
–
–
10.5
86.8 2,519
92.3
82.5
–
–
79.2
7.7
17.5
–
–
20.8
100.0
–
–
90.9
15.1
13.2
210
Diploma
3,906 49.7
60.1 2,729 100.0
Baccalaureate
3,745 47.6
36.7
0
0.0
0.0
–
–
8.9
3.2
0
0.0
0.0
–
–
0.3
91.7 2,713
99.6
97.7
–
–
92.2
0.4
2.3
–
–
7.8
Master’s/Doctorate
Canadian-Trained
Internationally Educated
215
2.7
7,748 98.5
117
1.5
8.3
11
Notes
– Data is not applicable or does not exist.
Totals may not sum to 100% due to rounding.
Data released by CIHI may differ from data from other sources due to CIHI’s nationally standardized methodology.
Regulated nurses employed in a jurisdiction different from their jurisdiction of registration are excluded to
avoid duplication.
Diploma includes equivalency for entry-level education.
Employed—status unknown are excluded from percentage distributions.
Not stated are excluded from percentage distributions.
See Chapter 5 (Methodological Notes) for more information regarding collection and comparability of data.
Source
Nursing Database, Canadian Institute for Health Information.
168
%
Average Age
Employment
Status
45.0
LPN
Registered
Psychiatric Nurses
Provincial/Territorial Nursing Workforce Highlights and Profiles
Regulated Nursing Workforce Highlights, Quebec, 2009
• The number of registrations submitted for regulated nurses in Quebec (including
both employed and unemployed) increased 7.0% from 2005 to 2009, from 83,159
to 88,943.
• In 2009, there were 85,239 regulated nurses working in Quebec, 77.5% of whom were
RNs and 22.5% of whom were LPNs.
• In 2009, the proportion of the Quebec workforce that was female continued to be high,
at 90.3% for RNs and 91.3% for LPNs.
• The average age of regulated nurses in Quebec decreased. The average age of
regulated nurses was 43.1 in 2009, compared to 43.5 in 2005. In 2009, the average
age of RNs was 43.4 and the average age of LPNs was 41.9.
• The proportion of full-time regulated nurses in Quebec increased from 51.6% in 2005
to 52.9% in 2009. The percentage of nurses in full-time positions in 2009 was 56.9%
for RNs and 39.4% for LPNs.
• In 2009, Quebec’s regulated nurses worked most often in hospitals, at 57.6% of RNs
and 33.7% of LPNs. The community health sector attracted 10.6% of RNs and 2.0%
of LPNs.
• The proportion of regulated nurses educated internationally in Quebec decreased.
Overall, in 2009, 2.0% of the regulated nursing workforce in Quebec was educated
outside of Canada, compared to 2.4% in 2005, all of whom were RNs; this
represented 2.5% of the RN workforce.
169
Regulated Nurses: Canadian Trends, 2005 to 2009
Regulated Nursing Workforce Profile, Quebec, 2009
Licensed Practical
Nurses
Registered Nurses
RN
Employed in Nursing Workforce
Sex
Male
Female
%
Canada %
66,055
–
6,377
9.7
59,678 90.3
%
– 19,184
Canada %
RPN
Canada %
–
–
–
–
–
1,667
8.7
7.3
–
–
22.5
93.8 17,517
91.3
92.7
–
–
77.5
6.2
Years
–
–
41.9
–
–
–
–
–
Age
Breakdown
<35
17,867 27.0
21.3
5,626
29.3
26.4
–
–
13.2
35–49
24,810 37.6
38.9
7,902
41.2
38.9
–
–
40.6
50+
23,378 35.4
39.9
5,656
29.5
34.7
–
–
46.2
Full Time
37,458 56.9
58.7
7,556
39.4
50.2
–
–
67.1
Part Time
21,403 32.5
30.6
8,958
46.7
33.7
–
–
18.7
7,022 10.7
10.7
2,670
13.9
16.1
–
–
14.2
Casual
Employed—Status Unknown
Place of Work
Hospital
Community Health Agency
Nursing Home/LTC Facility
Area of
Responsibility
Position
Multiple
Employment
Status
Highest
Education
in Nursing
Discipline
Location of
Graduation
–
–
0
–
–
–
–
–
38,040 57.6
172
62.6
5,021
33.7
45.6
–
–
44.0
6,990 10.6
14.2
293
2.0
7.8
–
–
24.0
8,530 12.9
9.9
7,728
51.9
39.1
–
–
18.7
Other Place of Work
12,495 18.9
13.3
1,843
12.4
7.4
–
–
13.3
Direct Care
56,391 86.8
89.3 18,867
Administration/Educ./Research
8,563 13.2
Managerial Positions
3,954
Staff/Community Health Nurse
6.0
52,847 80.5
Other Positions
8,857 13.5
Single Employer
59,933 90.7
Multiple Employers
6,122
98.1
–
–
90.4
317
1.7
1.9
–
–
9.6
7.0
0
0.0
1.4
–
–
10.5
77.8 18,517
96.7
92.0
–
–
79.0
633
3.3
6.6
–
–
10.5
86.8 16,201
84.5
82.5
–
–
79.2
13.2
15.1
15.5
17.5
–
–
20.8
Diploma
44,810 67.8
60.1 19,184 100.0
100.0
–
–
90.9
Baccalaureate
19,406 29.4
36.7
0
0.0
0.0
–
–
8.9
3.2
0
0.0
0.0
–
–
0.3
91.7 19,184 100.0
97.7
–
–
92.2
2.3
–
–
7.8
Master’s/Doctorate
Canadian-Trained
Internationally Educated
1,839
9.3
98.3
10.7
2.8
64,371 97.5
1,683
2.5
8.3
2,983
0
0.0
Notes
– Data is not applicable or does not exist.
Totals may not sum to 100% due to rounding.
Data released by CIHI may differ from data from other sources due to CIHI’s nationally standardized methodology.
Regulated nurses employed in a jurisdiction different from their jurisdiction of registration are excluded to
avoid duplication.
Diploma includes equivalency for entry-level education.
Employed—status unknown are excluded from percentage distributions.
Not stated are excluded from percentage distributions.
See Chapter 5 (Methodological Notes) for more information regarding collection and comparability of data.
Source
Nursing Database, Canadian Institute for Health Information.
170
%
Average Age
Employment
Status
43.4
LPN
Registered
Psychiatric Nurses
Provincial/Territorial Nursing Workforce Highlights and Profiles
Regulated Nursing Workforce Highlights, Ontario, 2009
• The number of registrations submitted for regulated nurses in Ontario (including
both employed and unemployed) increased 6.2% from 2005 to 2009, from 131,015
to 139,171.
• In 2009, there were 123,100 regulated nurses working in Ontario, 76.6% of whom were
RNs and 23.4% of whom were LPNs.
• In 2009, the proportion of the Ontario workforce that was female continued to be high,
at 95.2% for RNs and 93.6% for LPNs.
• The average age of regulated nurses in Ontario increased. Regulated nurses were
45.9 in 2009, compared to 45.2 in 2005. In 2009, the average age of RNs was 46.3; for
LPNs, the average age was 44.5.
• The proportion of full-time regulated nurses in Ontario increased from 59.0% in 2005
to 63.9% in 2009. The percentage of nurses in full-time positions in 2009 was 65.6%
for RNs and 58.6% for LPNs.
• In 2009, Ontario’s regulated nurses worked most often in hospitals, at 65.5% for RNs
and 46.4% for LPNs; the community health sector attracted 16.1% of RNs and 11.2%
of LPNs.
• The proportion of regulated nurses educated internationally in Ontario decreased.
Overall, in 2009, 9.8% of the regulated nursing workforce in Ontario was educated
outside of Canada, compared to 10.1% in 2005. A total of 11.6% of the RN workforce
and 4.1% of the LPN workforce were internationally educated.
171
Regulated Nurses: Canadian Trends, 2005 to 2009
Regulated Nursing Workforce Profile, Ontario, 2009
Licensed Practical
Nurses
Registered Nurses
RN
Employed in Nursing Workforce
Sex
Male
Female
%
Canada %
94,296
–
4,543
4.8
89,753 95.2
%
– 28,804
Canada %
RPN
Canada %
–
–
–
–
–
1,855
6.4
7.3
–
–
22.5
93.8 26,949
93.6
92.7
–
–
77.5
6.2
Years
–
–
44.5
–
–
–
–
–
Age
Breakdown
<35
17,072 18.1
21.3
6,858
23.8
26.4
–
–
13.2
35–49
37,409 39.7
38.9 10,883
37.8
38.9
–
–
40.6
50+
39,815 42.2
39.9 11,062
38.4
34.7
–
–
46.2
Full Time
61,840 65.6
58.7 16,873
58.6
50.2
–
–
67.1
Part Time
24,795 26.3
30.6
9,577
33.2
33.7
–
–
18.7
10.7
2,354
8.2
16.1
–
–
14.2
–
Casual
Employed—Status Unknown
Place of Work
Area of
Responsibility
Position
Multiple
Employment
Status
Highest
Education
in Nursing
Discipline
Location of
Graduation
7,661
8.1
0
–
0
–
–
–
–
–
Hospital
60,938 65.5
62.6 12,983
46.4
45.6
–
–
44.0
Community Health Agency
14,958 16.1
14.2
3,145
11.2
7.8
–
–
24.0
9.9 10,184
Nursing Home/LTC Facility
7,645
Other Place of Work
9,433 10.1
Direct Care
8.2
84,285 90.5
36.4
39.1
–
–
18.7
1,688
6.0
7.4
–
–
13.3
89.3 27,724
13.3
98.1
98.1
–
–
90.4
Administration/Educ./Research
8,859
9.5
10.7
545
1.9
1.9
–
–
9.6
Managerial Positions
5,612
6.0
7.0
663
2.3
1.4
–
–
10.5
Staff/Community Health Nurse
71,364 76.4
77.8 25,141
89.0
92.0
–
–
79.0
Other Positions
16,431 17.6
15.1
2,458
8.7
6.6
–
–
10.5
Single Employer
82,689 87.7
86.8 24,417
84.8
82.5
–
–
79.2
Multiple Employers
11,607 12.3
13.2
15.2
17.5
–
–
20.8
Diploma
58,501 62.0
60.1 28,804 100.0
100.0
–
–
90.9
Baccalaureate
32,506 34.5
36.7
0
0.0
0.0
–
–
8.9
3.2
0
0.0
0.0
–
–
0.3
91.7 27,591
95.9
97.7
–
–
92.2
4.1
2.3
–
–
7.8
Master’s/Doctorate
3,289
3.5
Canadian-Trained
82,697 88.4
Internationally Educated
10,850 11.6
8.3
4,387
1,183
Notes
– Data is not applicable or does not exist.
Totals may not sum to 100% due to rounding.
Data released by CIHI may differ from data from other sources due to CIHI’s nationally standardized methodology.
Regulated nurses employed in a jurisdiction different from their jurisdiction of registration are excluded to
avoid duplication.
Diploma includes equivalency for entry-level education.
Employed—status unknown are excluded from percentage distributions.
Not stated are excluded from percentage distributions.
See Chapter 5 (Methodological Notes) for more information regarding collection and comparability of data.
Source
Nursing Database, Canadian Institute for Health Information.
172
%
Average Age
Employment
Status
46.3
LPN
Registered
Psychiatric Nurses
Provincial/Territorial Nursing Workforce Highlights and Profiles
Regulated Nursing Workforce Highlights, Manitoba, 2009
• The number of registrations submitted for regulated nurses in Manitoba (including
both employed and unemployed) increased 5.8% from 2005 to 2009, from 14,863
to 15,719.
• In 2009, there were 14,753 regulated nurses working in Manitoba, 75.6% of whom
were RNs, 18.0% of whom were LPNs and 6.4% of whom were RPNs.
• In 2009, the proportion of the Manitoba workforce that was female continued to be
high; 93.8% of RNs, 94.6% of LPNs and 77.8% of RPNs were women.
• In 2009, the average age of RNs was 46.2, that of LPNs was 46.1 and that of RPNs
was 47.4.
• The proportion of full-time regulated nurses in Manitoba decreased from 46.8% in
2005 to 45.7% in 2009. The percentage of regulated nurses in full-time positions in
2009 was 47.2% for RNs, 35.3% for LPNs and 56.6% for RPNs.
• In 2009, Manitoba’s regulated nurses worked most often in hospitals, at 57.2% for
RNs, 39.4% for LPNs and 38.0% for RPNs; the community health sector attracted
17.2% of RNs, 10.9% of LPNs and 25.1% of RPNs.
• The proportion of regulated nurses educated internationally in Manitoba increased
slightly. Overall, in 2009, 5.7% of the regulated nursing workforce in Manitoba was
educated outside of Canada, compared to 5.6% in 2005. A total of 6.6% of the RN
workforce, 3.5% of the LPN workforce and 1.1% of the RPN workforce were
internationally educated.
173
Regulated Nurses: Canadian Trends, 2005 to 2009
Regulated Nursing Workforce Profile, Manitoba, 2009
Licensed Practical
Nurses
Registered Nurses
RN
Employed in Nursing Workforce
Sex
Male
Female
%
Canada %
LPN
%
Registered
Psychiatric Nurses
Canada % RPN
–
–
2,651
–
–
–
–
697
6.2
6.2
142
5.4
7.3
211 22.2
22.5
10,456 93.8
93.8
2,509
94.6
92.7
738 77.8
77.5
Average Age
Years
–
–
46.1
–
–
–
–
Age
Breakdown
<35
1,908 17.1
21.3
502
18.9
26.4
138 14.5
13.2
35–49
4,584 41.1
38.9
1,025
38.7
38.9
352 37.1
40.6
50+
4,661 41.8
39.9
1,124
42.4
34.7
459 48.4
46.2
Full Time
5,263 47.2
58.7
936
35.3
50.2
530 56.6
67.1
Part Time
4,884 43.8
30.6
1,450
54.7
33.7
254 27.1
18.7
10.7
265
10.0
16.1
152 16.2
14.2
Employment
Status
Casual
Employed—Status Unknown
Place of Work
992
8.9
14
47.4
–
–
0
–
–
–
–
2,621 57.2
62.6
1,033
39.4
45.6
361 38.0
44.0
Community Health Agency
786 17.2
14.2
285
10.9
7.8
238 25.1
24.0
Nursing Home/LTC Facility
678 14.8
9.9
1,139
43.4
39.1
238 25.1
18.7
Other Place of Work
495 10.8
13.3
168
6.4
7.4
112 11.8
13.3
Hospital
13
Area of
Responsibility
Direct Care
9,588 87.8
89.3
2,612
98.5
98.1
811 85.8
90.4
Administration/Educ./Research
1,334 12.2
10.7
39
1.5
1.9
134 14.2
9.6
Position
Managerial Positions
7.5
7.0
47
1.8
1.4
Staff/Community Health Nurse
8,203 75.1
77.8
2,468
93.1
Other Positions
1,903 17.4
15.1
136
5.1
Multiple
Employment
Status
Single Employer
9,546 85.6
86.8
1,976
Multiple Employers
1,607 14.4
13.2
675
Highest
Education
in Nursing
Discipline
Diploma
6,678 59.9
60.1
Baccalaureate
4,183 37.5
Location of
Graduation
Canadian-Trained
Master’s/Doctorate
Internationally Educated
818
9.7
10.5
92.0
728 76.7
79.0
6.6
129 13.6
10.5
74.5
82.5
806 84.9
79.2
25.5
17.5
143 15.1
20.8
2,651 100.0
100.0
730 76.9
90.9
219 23.1
8.9
36.7
0
0.0
0.0
2.6
3.2
0
0.0
0.0
10,419 93.4
91.7
2,557
96.5
97.7
8.3
94
3.5
2.3
292
734
6.6
92
Notes
– Data is not applicable or does not exist.
Totals may not sum to 100% due to rounding.
Data released by CIHI may differ from data from other sources due to CIHI’s nationally standardized methodology.
Regulated nurses employed in a jurisdiction different from their jurisdiction of registration are excluded to
avoid duplication.
The RPN workforce of the four western provinces represents the total RPN workforce in Canada.
In 2009, the College of Registered Nurses of Manitoba submitted aggregate tables for sex and average age.
Diploma includes equivalency for entry-level education.
Employed—status unknown are excluded from percentage distributions.
Not stated are excluded from percentage distributions.
See Chapter 5 (Methodological Notes) for more information regarding collection and comparability of data.
Source
Nursing Database, Canadian Institute for Health Information.
174
Canada %
11,153
46.2
949
%
0
0.0
0.3
939 98.9
92.2
10
1.1
7.8
Provincial/Territorial Nursing Workforce Highlights and Profiles
Regulated Nursing Workforce Highlights,
Saskatchewan, 2009
• The number of registrations submitted for regulated nurses in Saskatchewan
(including both employed and unemployed) increased 8.0% from 2005 to 2009,
from 11,857 to 12,810.
• In 2009, there were 12,612 regulated nurses working in Saskatchewan, 72.3% of
whom were RNs, 20.8% of whom were LPNs and 6.9% of whom were RPNs.
• In 2009, the proportion of the Saskatchewan workforce that was female continued to
be high, at 95.4% for RNs, 96.5% for LPNs and 84.6% for RPNs.
• The average age of regulated nurses in Saskatchewan remained unchanged.
Regulated nurses were 45.4 in 2009, compared to 45.4 in 2005. In 2009, the average
age of RNs was 45.8, that of LPNs was 42.9 and that of RPNs was 48.7.
• The proportion of full-time regulated nurses in Saskatchewan increased from 55.6%
in 2005 to 59.5% in 2009. The percentage of regulated nurses in full-time positions in
2009 was 58.7% for RNs, 56.0% for LPNs and 79.0% for RPNs.
• In 2009, Saskatchewan’s regulated nurses worked most often in hospitals, at 56.5%
for RNs, 66.9% for LPNs and 26.2% for RPNs; the community health sector attracted
18.5% of RNs, 8.9% of LPNs and 20.6% of RPNs.
• The proportion of regulated nurses educated internationally in Saskatchewan
decreased. Overall, in 2009, 1.8% of the regulated nursing workforce in Saskatchewan
was educated outside of Canada, compared to 2.4% in 2005. A total of 2.0% of the RN
workforce, 1.3% of the LPN workforce and 1.2% of the RPN workforce were
internationally educated.
175
Regulated Nurses: Canadian Trends, 2005 to 2009
Regulated Nursing Workforce Profile, Saskatchewan, 2009
Licensed Practical
Nurses
Registered Nurses
RN
Employed in Nursing Workforce
Sex
Male
Female
%
Canada %
LPN
%
Registered
Psychiatric Nurses
Canada %
RPN
866
Canada %
9,117
–
–
2,629
–
–
–
–
418
4.6
6.2
91
3.5
7.3
133 15.4
22.5
8,699 95.4
93.8
2,538
96.5
92.7
733 84.6
77.5
Average Age
Years
–
–
42.9
–
–
48.7
–
–
Age
Breakdown
<35
1,906 20.9
21.3
838
31.9
26.4
46
5.3
13.2
35–49
3,299 36.2
38.9
826
31.4
38.9
415 48.1
40.6
50+
3,912 42.9
39.9
965
36.7
34.7
402 46.6
46.2
Full Time
5,350 58.7
58.7
1,471
56.0
50.2
675 79.0
67.1
Part Time
2,591 28.4
30.6
761
29.0
33.7
126 14.8
18.7
Casual
1,176 12.9
10.7
396
15.1
16.1
Employment
Status
Employed—Status Unknown
Place of Work
Area of
Responsibility
Position
Multiple
Employment
Status
Highest
Education
in Nursing
Discipline
Location of
Graduation
45.8
0
53
6.2
12
14.2
–
–
1
–
–
–
–
Hospital
5,093 56.5
62.6
1,757
66.9
45.6
225 26.2
44.0
Community Health Agency
1,666 18.5
14.2
235
8.9
7.8
177 20.6
24.0
Nursing Home/LTC Facility
1,062 11.8
9.9
546
20.8
39.1
305 35.5
18.7
Other Place of Work
1,193 13.2
13.3
88
3.4
7.4
152 17.7
13.3
Direct Care
8,185 90.6
782 91.9
90.4
89.3
2,598
98.9
98.1
Administration/Educ./Research
850
9.4
10.7
28
1.1
1.9
Managerial Positions
673
7.5
7.0
16
0.6
Staff/Community Health Nurse
6,989 77.6
77.8
2,301
Other Positions
1,350 15.0
15.1
309
69
8.1
9.6
1.4
103 12.1
10.5
87.6
92.0
662 77.5
79.0
11.8
6.6
89 10.4
10.5
Single Employer
7,122 78.5
86.8
2,066
78.9
82.5
688 79.6
79.2
Multiple Employers
1,945 21.5
13.2
554
21.1
17.5
176 20.4
20.8
Diploma
5,668 62.2
60.1
2,629 100.0
100.0
838 96.8
90.9
Baccalaureate
3,230 35.4
Master’s/Doctorate
Canadian-Trained
Internationally Educated
36.7
0
0.0
0.0
28
3.2
8.9
2.4
3.2
0
0.0
0.0
0
0.0
0.3
8,639 98.0
91.7
2,596
98.7
97.7
856 98.8
92.2
8.3
33
1.3
2.3
218
180
2.0
Notes
– Data is not applicable or does not exist.
Totals may not sum to 100% due to rounding.
Data released by CIHI may differ from data from other sources due to CIHI’s nationally standardized methodology.
Regulated nurses employed in a jurisdiction different from their jurisdiction of registration are excluded to
avoid duplication.
The RPN workforce of the four western provinces represents the total RPN workforce in Canada.
Diploma includes equivalency for entry-level education.
Employed—status unknown are excluded from percentage distributions.
Not stated are excluded from percentage distributions.
See Chapter 5 (Methodological Notes) for more information regarding collection and comparability of data.
Source
Nursing Database, Canadian Institute for Health Information.
176
%
10
1.2
7.8
Provincial/Territorial Nursing Workforce Highlights and Profiles
Regulated Nursing Workforce Highlights, Alberta, 2009
• The number of registrations submitted for regulated nurses in Alberta (including
both employed and unemployed) increased 14.4% from 2005 to 2009, from 33,897
to 38,768.
• In 2009, there were 37,276 regulated nurses working in Alberta, 78.9% of whom were
RNs, 17.9% of whom were LPNs and 3.2% of whom were RPNs.
• In 2009, the proportion of the Alberta workforce that was female continued to be high,
at 95.4% of RNs, 94.8% LPNs and 74.9% of RPNs.
• The average age of regulated nurses in Alberta decreased. Regulated nurses were
44.4 in 2009, compared to 44.6 in 2005. In 2009, the average age of RNs was 44.6,
that of LPNs was 42.9 and that of RPNs was 47.5.
• The proportion of full-time regulated nurses in Alberta increased from 40.2% in 2005 to
42.5% in 2009. The percentage of regulated nurses in full-time positions in 2009 was
41.2% for RNs, 45.4% for LPNs and 58.7% for RPNs.
• In 2009, Alberta’s regulated nurses worked most often in hospitals, at 65.8% for RNs,
56.3% for LPNs and 59.4% for RPNs; the community health sector attracted 14.2% of
RNs, 10.0% of LPNs and 23.0% of RPNs.
• The proportion of regulated nurses educated internationally in Alberta increased.
Overall, in 2009, 9.0% of the regulated nursing workforce in Alberta was educated outside
of Canada, compared to 4.4% in 2005. A total of 10.0% of the RN workforce, 4.2% of
the LPN workforce and 12.0% of the RPN workforce were internationally educated.
177
Regulated Nurses: Canadian Trends, 2005 to 2009
Regulated Nursing Workforce Profile, Alberta, 2009
Licensed Practical
Nurses
Registered Nurses
RN
Employed in Nursing Workforce
Sex
Male
Female
Average Age
Years
Age
Breakdown
<35
Employment
Status
Position
Highest
Education
in Nursing
Discipline
Location of
Graduation
%
Canada %
RPN
–
–
6,669
–
–
–
1,345
4.6
6.2
347
5.2
7.3
302 25.1
22.5
28,060 95.4
93.8
6,322
94.8
92.7
900 74.9
77.5
–
42.9
–
–
–
–
2,119
31.8
26.4
191 15.9
13.2
35–49
10,957 37.3
38.9
2,216
33.2
38.9
448 37.3
40.6
50+
11,165 38.0
39.9
2,334
35.0
34.7
563 46.8
46.2
Full Time
12,119 41.2
58.7
3,030
45.4
50.2
706 58.7
67.1
Part Time
13,221 45.0
30.6
2,720
40.8
33.7
379 31.5
18.7
4,065 13.8
10.7
919
13.8
16.1
117
9.7
14.2
0
–
–
0
–
–
–
–
18,759 65.8
62.6
3,754
56.3
45.6
714 59.4
44.0
Community Health Agency
4,041 14.2
14.2
667
10.0
7.8
277 23.0
24.0
Nursing Home/LTC Facility
1,951
6.8
9.9
1,624
24.4
39.1
105
8.7
18.7
Other Place of Work
3,770 13.2
13.3
624
9.4
7.4
106
8.8
13.3
25,962 91.7
98.1 1,084 90.4
90.4
Hospital
Direct Care
0
47.5
89.3
6,518
97.7
Administration/Educ./Research
2,344
8.3
10.7
151
2.3
1.9
115
9.6
9.6
Managerial Positions
1,997
7.1
7.0
95
1.4
1.4
88
7.3
10.5
22,347 79.1
77.8
6,127
91.9
92.0
969 80.9
79.0
Other Positions
3,895 13.8
15.1
447
6.7
6.6
141 11.8
10.5
Single Employer
24,565 85.7
86.8
5,245
78.6
82.5 1,005 83.6
79.2
4,083 14.3
13.2
1,424
21.4
17.5
197 16.4
20.8
Diploma
14,887 50.6
60.1
6,669 100.0
100.0 1,162 96.7
90.9
Baccalaureate
13,521 46.0
Multiple Employers
Master’s/Doctorate
Canadian-Trained
Internationally Educated
36.7
0
0.0
0.0
35
2.9
8.9
3.4
3.2
0
0.0
0.0
5
0.4
0.3
26,374 90.0
91.7
6,392
95.8
97.7 1,053 88.0
92.2
2,924 10.0
8.3
277
4.2
997
2.3
Notes
– Data is not applicable or does not exist.
Totals may not sum to 100% due to rounding.
Data released by CIHI may differ from data from other sources due to CIHI’s nationally standardized methodology.
Regulated nurses employed in a jurisdiction different from their jurisdiction of registration are excluded to
avoid duplication.
The RPN workforce of the four western provinces represents the total RPN workforce in Canada.
Diploma includes equivalency for entry-level education.
Employed—status unknown are excluded from percentage distributions.
Not stated are excluded from percentage distributions.
See Chapter 5 (Methodological Notes) for more information regarding collection and comparability of data.
Source
Nursing Database, Canadian Institute for Health Information.
178
Canada %
29,405
44.6
– 1,202
%
21.3
Staff/Community Health Nurse
Multiple
Employment
Status
LPN
–
Employed—Status Unknown
Area of
Responsibility
Canada %
7,283 24.8
Casual
Place of Work
%
Registered
Psychiatric Nurses
144 12.0
7.8
Provincial/Territorial Nursing Workforce Highlights and Profiles
Regulated Nursing Workforce Highlights,
British Columbia, 2009
• The number of registrations submitted for regulated nurses in British Columbia
(including both employed and unemployed) increased 21.1% from 2005 to 2009, from
36,271 to 43,915.
• In 2009, there were 40,674 regulated nurses working in British Columbia, 76.0% of
whom were RNs, 18.6% of whom were LPNs and 5.4% of whom were RPNs.
• In 2009, the proportion of the British Columbia workforce that was female continued to
be high, at 93.8% of RNs, 91.2% of LPNs and 76.0% of RPNs.
• The average age of regulated nurses in British Columbia decreased. Regulated nurses
were 45.5 in 2009, compared to 46.0 in 2005. In 2009, the average age of RNs was
46.4, that of LPNs was 41.4 and that of RPNs was 47.4.
• The proportion of full-time regulated nurses in British Columbia increased from 50.2%
in 2005 to 55.1% in 2009. The percentage of regulated nurses in full-time positions in
2009 was 56.2% for RNs, 46.1% for LPNs and 71.5% for RPNs.
• In 2009, British Columbia’s regulated nurses worked most often in hospitals, at 61.7%
for RNs, 47.7% for LPNs and 45.1% for RPNs; the community health sector attracted
15.7% of RNs, 5.1% of LPNs and 25.4% of RPNs.
• The proportion of regulated nurses educated internationally in British Columbia
increased slightly. Overall, in 2009, 13.6% of the regulated nursing workforce in
British Columbia was educated outside of Canada, compared to 13.5% in 2005.
A total of 16.4% of the RN workforce, 2.6% of the LPN workforce and 12.2% of the
RPN workforce were internationally educated.
179
Regulated Nurses: Canadian Trends, 2005 to 2009
Regulated Nursing Workforce Profile, British Columbia, 2009
Licensed Practical
Nurses
Registered Nurses
RN
Employed in Nursing Workforce
Sex
Male
Female
Average Age
Years
Age
Breakdown
<35
Employment
Status
Area of
Responsibility
Position
Highest
Education
in Nursing
Discipline
Location of
Graduation
LPN
%
Canada %
30,900
–
–
7,577
–
1,916
6.2
6.2
665
8.8
28,984 93.8
93.8
6,912
91.2
46.4
RPN
– 2,197
Canada %
–
–
528 24.0
22.5
92.7 1,669 76.0
77.5
7.3
–
41.4
–
–
–
–
21.3
2,491
32.9
26.4
315 14.3
13.2
35–49
11,453 37.1
38.9
2,905
38.3
38.9
899 40.9
40.6
50+
13,629 44.1
39.9
2,181
28.8
34.7
983 44.7
46.2
Full Time
17,353 56.2
58.7
3,492
46.1
50.2 1,568 71.5
67.1
Part Time
8,734 28.3
30.6
222
2.9
33.7
212
9.7
18.7
Casual
4,813 15.6
10.7
3,853
50.9
16.1
414 18.9
14.2
–
–
10
–
–
–
–
19,037 61.7
62.6
3,577
47.7
45.6
978 45.1
44.0
Community Health Agency
4,859 15.7
14.2
385
5.1
7.8
552 25.4
24.0
Nursing Home/LTC Facility
3,038
9.8
9.9
3,005
40.1
39.1
323 14.9
18.7
Other Place of Work
3,923 12.7
13.3
527
7.0
7.4
317 14.6
13.3
98.1 1,931 91.9
90.4
Hospital
Direct Care
0
47.4
3
27,511 89.2
89.3
7,333
97.6
Administration/Educ./Research
3,335 10.8
10.7
179
2.4
1.9
170
8.1
9.6
Managerial Positions
2,611
8.5
7.0
100
1.3
1.4
264 12.0
10.5
92.0 1,744 79.6
79.0
23,639 76.6
77.8
6,959
92.3
Other Positions
4,594 14.9
15.1
479
6.4
Single Employer
23,892 77.3
86.8
5,424
7,008 22.7
13.2
2,153
Diploma
15,389 49.8
60.1
7,577 100.0
Baccalaureate
14,315 46.3
Multiple Employers
Master’s/Doctorate
Canadian-Trained
Internationally Educated
6.6
8.4
10.5
71.6
82.5 1,595 73.9
79.2
28.4
17.5
562 26.1
20.8
100.0 2,008 91.4
90.9
184
36.7
0
0.0
0.0
180
8.2
8.9
3.9
3.2
0
0.0
0.0
9
0.4
0.3
25,731 83.6
91.7
7,371
97.4
97.7 1,450 87.8
92.2
5,066 16.4
8.3
193
2.6
1,194
2.3
Notes
– Data is not applicable or does not exist.
Totals may not sum to 100% due to rounding.
Data released by CIHI may differ from data from other sources due to CIHI’s nationally standardized methodology.
Regulated nurses employed in a jurisdiction different from their jurisdiction of registration are excluded to
avoid duplication.
The RPN workforce of the four western provinces represents the total RPN workforce in Canada.
Diploma includes equivalency for entry-level education.
Employed—status unknown are excluded from percentage distributions.
Not stated are excluded from percentage distributions.
See Chapter 5 (Methodological Notes) for more information regarding collection and comparability of data.
Source
Nursing Database, Canadian Institute for Health Information.
180
%
–
Staff/Community Health Nurse
Multiple
Employment
Status
Canada %
5,818 18.8
Employed—Status Unknown
Place of Work
%
Registered
Psychiatric Nurses
202 12.2
7.8
Provincial/Territorial Nursing Workforce Highlights and Profiles
Regulated Nursing Workforce Highlights, Yukon, 2009
• The number of registrations submitted for regulated nurses in the Yukon (including
both employed and unemployed) increased 22.4% from 2005 to 2009, from 361
to 442.
• In 2009, there were 431 regulated nurses working in the Yukon, of whom 85.1% were
RNs and 14.8% were LPNs.
• In 2009, the proportion of the Yukon workforce that was female continued to be high,
at 89.4% of RNs.
• The average age of regulated nurses in the Yukon decreased. Regulated nurses were
44.8 in 2009, compared to 45.1 in 2005. In 2009, the average age of RNs was 44.4
and that of LPNs was 46.7.
• The proportion of full-time regulated nurses in the Yukon increased from 48.5% in
2005 to 54.3% in 2009. The percentage of regulated nurses in full-time positions in
2009 was 50.7% for RNs and 75.0% for LPNs.
• In 2009, the Yukon’s regulated nurses worked most often in hospitals and nursing
homes; 46.6% of RNs worked in hospitals and 56.3% of LPNs worked in nursing
homes. The community health sector attracted 35.3% of RNs and 9.4% of LPNs.
• The proportion of regulated nurses educated internationally in the Yukon increased.
Overall, in 2009, 7.0% of the regulated nursing workforce in the Yukon was educated
outside of Canada, compared to 6.7% in 2005, all of whom were RNs; this
represented 8.2% of the RN workforce.
181
Regulated Nurses: Canadian Trends, 2005 to 2009
Regulated Nursing Workforce Profile, Yukon, 2009
Licensed Practical
Nurses
Registered Nurses
RN
Employed in Nursing Workforce
Sex
Average Age
Employment
Status
Area of
Responsibility
Position
Highest
Education
in Nursing
Discipline
Location of
Graduation
%
Canada %
RPN
Canada %
–
64
–
–
–
–
–
*
†
7.3
–
–
22.5
Female
328 89.4
93.8
6†
†
92.7
–
–
77.5
Years
44.4
–
–
46.7
–
–
–
–
–
92 25.1
21.3
10
15.6
26.4
–
–
13.2
35–49
133 36.2
38.9
27
42.2
38.9
–
–
40.6
50+
142 38.7
39.9
27
42.2
34.7
–
–
46.2
Full Time
185 50.7
58.7
48
75.0
50.2
–
–
67.1
Part Time
103 28.2
30.6
9
14.1
33.7
–
–
18.7
77 21.1
10.7
7
10.9
16.1
–
–
14.2
Casual
–
–
0
–
–
–
–
–
Hospital
169 46.6
2
62.6
16
25.0
45.6
–
–
44.0
Community Health Agency
128 35.3
14.2
6
9.4
7.8
–
–
24.0
Nursing Home/LTC Facility
26
7.2
9.9
36
56.3
39.1
–
–
18.7
Other Place of Work
40 11.0
13.3
6
9.4
7.4
–
–
13.3
†
†
284 87.7
89.3
98.1
–
–
90.4
Administration/Educ./Research
Direct Care
40 12.3
10.7
*
†
1.9
–
–
9.6
Managerial Positions
41 11.3
7.0
0
0.0
1.4
–
–
10.5
295 81.5
Staff/Community Health Nurse
6
77.8
0
0.0
92.0
–
–
79.0
7.2
15.1
0
0.0
6.6
–
–
10.5
268 73.0
86.8
59
92.2
82.5
–
–
79.2
99 27.0
13.2
5
7.8
17.5
–
–
20.8
Diploma
158 43.1
60.1
64 100.0
100.0
–
–
90.9
Baccalaureate
200 54.5
Single Employer
Multiple Employers
Master’s/Doctorate
Canadian-Trained
Internationally Educated
26
36.7
0
0.0
0.0
–
–
8.9
2.5
3.2
0
0.0
0.0
–
–
0.3
336 91.8
91.7
64 100.0
97.7
–
–
92.2
2.3
–
–
7.8
9
30
8.2
8.3
0
0.0
Notes
– Data is not applicable or does not exist.
* Value suppressed in accordance with CIHI privacy policy; cell value is from 1 to 4.
† Digit suppressed to ensure confidentiality.
Totals may not sum to 100% due to rounding.
Data released by CIHI may differ from data from other sources due to CIHI’s nationally standardized methodology.
Regulated nurses employed in a jurisdiction different from their jurisdiction of registration are excluded to
avoid duplication.
Northern territories data may include inter-jurisdictional duplicates.
Diploma includes equivalency for entry-level education.
Employed—status unknown are excluded from percentage distributions.
Not stated are excluded from percentage distributions.
See Chapter 5 (Methodological Notes) for more information regarding collection and comparability of data.
Source
Nursing Database, Canadian Institute for Health Information.
182
%
6.2
Other Positions
Multiple
Employment
Status
LPN
–
Employed—Status Unknown
Place of Work
367
Canada %
39 10.6
Male
<35
Age
Breakdown
%
Registered
Psychiatric Nurses
Provincial/Territorial Nursing Workforce Highlights and Profiles
Regulated Nursing Workforce Highlights,
Northwest Territories and Nunavut, 2009
• The number of registrations submitted for regulated nurses in the Northwest
Territories and Nunavut (including both employed and unemployed) increased
6.3% from 2005 to 2009, from 1,080 to 1,148. These numbers include short-term
assignments from the provinces.
• In 2009, there were 1,116 regulated nurses working in the Northwest Territories and
Nunavut, 91.6% of whom were RNs and 8.4% of whom were LPNs.
• In 2009, the proportion of the Northwest Territories and Nunavut workforce that was
female continued to be high, at 90.1% for RNs and 88.3% for LPNs.
• The average age of regulated nurses in the Northwest Territories and Nunavut
increased. The average age of regulated nurses was 45.3 in 2009, compared to
43.8 in 2005. In 2009, the average age of RNs was 45.3 and that of LPNs was 45.1.
• The proportion of full-time regulated nurses in the Northwest Territories and Nunavut
decreased from 78.2% in 2005 to 59.0% in 2009. The percentage of regulated nurses
in full-time positions in 2009 was 56.5% for RNs and 86.2% for LPNs.
• In 2009, the Northwest Territories’ and Nunavut’s regulated nurses worked most often
in the community health and hospital sectors: 41.5% of RNs worked in community
health while 37.7% of RNs and 51.1% of LPNs worked in hospitals.
• The proportion of regulated nurses educated internationally in the Northwest
Territories and Nunavut decreased. Overall, in 2009, 7.8% of the regulated nursing
workforce in the Northwest Territories and Nunavut was educated outside of Canada,
compared to 8.6% in 2005, all of whom were RNs; this represented 8.5% of the
RN workforce.
183
Regulated Nurses: Canadian Trends, 2005 to 2009
Regulated Nursing Workforce Profile, Northwest Territories and Nunavut, 2009
Licensed Practical
Nurses
Registered Nurses
RN
Employed in Nursing Workforce
%
Canada %
LPN
%
Registered
Psychiatric Nurses
Canada %
RPN
Canada %
1,022
–
–
94
–
–
–
–
–
Male
101
9.9
6.2
11
11.7
7.3
–
–
22.5
Female
921 90.1
93.8
83
88.3
92.7
–
–
77.5
Average Age
Years
45.3
–
–
45.1
–
–
–
–
–
Age
Breakdown
<35
255 25.0
21.3
17
18.1
26.4
–
–
13.2
35–49
355 34.7
38.9
38
40.4
38.9
–
–
40.6
50+
412 40.3
39.9
39
41.5
34.7
–
–
46.2
Full Time
577 56.5
58.7
81
86.2
50.2
–
–
67.1
–
30.6
5
5.3
33.7
–
–
18.7
445 43.5
10.7
8
8.5
16.1
–
–
14.2
Sex
Employment
Status
Part Time
Casual
Employed—Status Unknown
Place of Work
Area of
Responsibility
Position
Multiple
Employment
Status
Highest
Education
in Nursing
Discipline
Location of
Graduation
0
–
–
0
–
–
–
–
–
Hospital
382 37.7
62.6
48
51.1
45.6
–
–
44.0
Community Health Agency
420 41.5
14.2
*
†
7.8
–
–
24.0
†
†
Nursing Home/LTC Facility
0
1.2
9.9
2
39.1
–
–
18.7
Other Place of Work
199 19.6
13.3
20
21.3
7.4
–
–
13.3
Direct Care
897 90.9
89.3
94 100.0
Administration/Educ./Research
Managerial Positions
12
90
9.1
110 11.0
98.1
–
–
90.4
0
0.0
1.9
–
–
9.6
7.0
*
†
1.4
–
–
10.5
†
†
10.7
Staff/Community Health Nurse
745 74.7
77.8
92.0
–
–
79.0
Other Positions
142 14.2
15.1
8
5
5.3
6.6
–
–
10.5
Single Employer
136 51.3
86.8
0
0.0
82.5
–
–
79.2
Multiple Employers
129 48.7
13.2
0
0.0
17.5
–
–
20.8
Diploma
550 53.8
60.1
94 100.0
100.0
–
–
90.9
Baccalaureate
428 41.9
Master’s/Doctorate
Canadian-Trained
Internationally Educated
36.7
0
0.0
0.0
–
–
8.9
4.3
3.2
0
0.0
0.0
–
–
0.3
934 91.5
91.7
94 100.0
97.7
–
–
92.2
2.3
–
–
7.8
44
87
8.5
8.3
0
0.0
Notes
– Data is not applicable or does not exist.
* Value suppressed in accordance with CIHI privacy policy; cell value is from 1 to 4.
† Digit suppressed to ensure confidentiality.
Totals may not sum to 100% due to rounding.
Data released by CIHI may differ from data from other sources due to CIHI’s nationally standardized methodology.
Regulated nurses employed in a jurisdiction different from their jurisdiction of registration are excluded to
avoid duplication.
Northwest Territories and Nunavut data is combined, as RNs did not specify in which territory they worked the majority
of the time.
Northern territories data may include inter-jurisdictional duplicates.
Data is not collected for LPNs in Nunavut.
Diploma includes equivalency for entry-level education.
Employed—status unknown are excluded from percentage distributions.
Not stated are excluded from percentage distributions.
See Chapter 5 (Methodological Notes) for more information regarding collection and comparability of data.
Source
Nursing Database, Canadian Institute for Health Information.
184
%
Provincial/Territorial Nursing Workforce Highlights and Profiles
Regulated Nursing Workforce Highlights, Canada, 2009
• The number of registrations submitted for regulated nurses in Canada (including
both employed and unemployed) increased 8.5% from 2005 to 2009, from 345,845
to 375,288.
• In 2009, there were 348,499 regulated nurses working in Canada, 76.4% of whom
were RNs, 22.1% of whom were LPNs and 1.5% of whom were RPNs.
• In 2009, the proportion of Canada’s workforce that was female continued to be high,
at 93.3% of the total workforce. A total of 93.8% of RNs, 92.7% of LPNs and 77.5% of
RPNs were women.
• The average age of regulated nurses in Canada increased. Regulated nurses were
44.9 in 2009, compared to 44.7 in 2005. In 2009, the average age of RNs was 45.2,
that of LPNs was 43.4 and that of RPNs was 47.6.
• The proportion of full-time regulated nurses in Canada increased from 53.8% in 2005
to 56.9% in 2009. The percentage of regulated nurses in full-time positions in 2009
was 58.7% for RNs, 50.2% for LPNs and 67.1% for RPNs.
• In 2009, Canada’s regulated nurses worked most often in hospitals, at 62.6% for RNs,
45.6% for LPNs and 44.0% of RPNs; the community health sector attracted 14.2% of
RNs, 7.8% of LPNs and 24.0% of RPNs.
• The proportion of regulated nurses educated internationally in Canada increased.
Overall, in 2009, 7.0% of the regulated nursing workforce in Canada was educated
outside of Canada, compared to 6.9% in 2005. A total of 8.3% were RNs, 2.3% were
LPNs and 7.8% were RPNs.
185
Regulated Nurses: Canadian Trends, 2005 to 2009
Regulated Nursing Workforce Profile, Canada, 2009
Registered Nurses
RN
Employed in Nursing Workforce
Sex
Male
Female
Average Age
Age
Breakdown
Employment
Status
Years
<35
Position
Highest
Education
in Nursing
Discipline
Location of
Graduation
RPN
%
–
5214
–
16,475
6.2
5,618
7.3
1,174
22.5
249,866
93.8
71,326
92.7
4,040
77.5
45.2
–
43.4
–
47.6
–
21.3
20,296
26.4
690
13.2
38.9
29,914
38.9
2,114
40.6
50+
106,170
39.9
26,733
34.7
2,407
46.2
Full Time
156,178
58.7
38,623
50.2
3,479
67.1
Part Time
81,442
30.6
25,952
33.7
971
18.7
Casual
28,533
10.7
12,356
16.1
736
14.2
188
–
13
–
28
–
161,096
62.6
32,702
45.6
2,278
44.0
Community Health Agency
Hospital
36,604
14.2
5,616
7.8
1,244
24.0
Nursing Home/LTC Facility
25,433
9.9
28,055
39.1
971
18.7
34,266
13.3
5,319
7.4
687
13.3
234,031
89.3
74,805
98.1
4,608
90.4
Administration/Educ./Research
28,132
10.7
1,435
1.9
488
9.6
Managerial Positions
18,546
7.0
1,066
1.4
547
10.5
205,069
77.8
70,138
92.0
4,103
79.0
Other Positions
39,840
15.1
5,022
6.6
543
10.5
Single Employer
229,945
86.8
63,412
82.5
4,094
79.2
34,822
13.2
13,426
17.5
1,078
20.8
160,111
60.1
76,944
100.0
4,738
90.9
97,651
36.7
0
0.0
462
8.9
Direct Care
Staff/Community Health Nurse
Multiple
Employment
Status
%
76,944
56,617
Other Place of Work
Area of
Responsibility
LPN
–
Registered
Psychiatric
Nurses
103,554
35–49
Employed—Status Unknown
Place of Work
%
266,341
Licensed
Practical Nurses
Multiple Employers
Diploma
Baccalaureate
Master’s/Doctorate
Canadian-Trained
Internationally Educated
8,576
3.2
0
0.0
14
0.3
243,054
91.7
75,062
97.7
4,298
92.2
22,023
8.3
1,805
2.3
366
7.8
Notes
– Data is not applicable or does not exist.
Totals may not sum to 100% due to rounding.
Data released by CIHI may differ from data from other sources due to CIHI’s nationally standardized methodology.
Regulated nurses employed in a jurisdiction different from their jurisdiction of registration are excluded to
avoid duplication.
Northwest Territories and Nunavut data is combined, as RNs did not specify in which territory they worked the majority
of the time.
Northern territories data may include inter-jurisdictional duplicates.
In 2009, the College of Registered Nurses of Manitoba submitted aggregate tables for sex and average age.
Data is not collected for LPNs in Nunavut.
The RPN workforce of the four western provinces represents the total RPN workforce in Canada.
Diploma includes equivalency for entry-level education.
Employed—status unknown are excluded from percentage distributions.
Not stated are excluded from percentage distributions.
See Chapter 5 (Methodological Notes) for more information regarding collection and comparability of data.
Source
Nursing Database, Canadian Institute for Health Information.
186
Regulated Nursing Contact Information
Regulated Nursing Contact Information
Provincial/Territorial Regulatory Authorities
Newfoundland and Labrador
College of Licensed Practical Nurses of Newfoundland and Labrador
9 Paton Street
St. John’s, Newfoundland and Labrador A1B 4S8
Website: www.clpnnl.ca
Association of Registered Nurses of Newfoundland and Labrador
55 Military Road
P.O. Box 6116
St. John’s, Newfoundland and Labrador A1C 2C5
Website: www.arnnl.nf.ca
Prince Edward Island
Licensed Practical Nurses Association of Prince Edward Island
161 St. Peters Road
P.O. Box 20058
Charlottetown, Prince Edward Island C1A 1E9
Website: www.lpna.ca
Association of Registered Nurses of Prince Edward Island
53 Grafton Street
Charlottetown, Prince Edward Island C1A 1K8
Website: www.arnpei.ca
Nova Scotia
College of Licensed Practical Nurses of Nova Scotia
Cogswell Tower
2000 Barrington Street, Suite 1212
Halifax, Nova Scotia B3J 3K1
Website: www.clpnns.ca
College of Registered Nurses of Nova Scotia
Barrington Tower
7071 Bayers Road, Suite 4005
Halifax, Nova Scotia B3L 2C2
Website: www.crnns.ca
189
Regulated Nurses: Canadian Trends, 2005 to 2009
New Brunswick
Association of New Brunswick Licensed Practical Nurses / Association des
infirmier(ère)s auxiliaires autorisé(e)s du Nouveau-Brunswick
384 Smythe Street
Fredericton, New Brunswick E3B 3E4
Website: www.anblpn.ca
Nurses Association of New Brunswick / Association des infirmières et infirmiers du
Nouveau-Brunswick
165 Regent Street
Fredericton, New Brunswick E3B 7B4
Website: www.nanb.nb.ca
Quebec
Ordre des infirmières et infirmiers auxiliaires du Québec
531 rue Sherbrooke Est
Montréal, Quebec H2L 1K2
Website: www.oiiaq.org
Ordre des infirmières et infirmiers du Québec
4200 boulevard Dorchester Ouest
Montréal, Quebec H3Z 1V4
Website: www.oiiq.org
Ontariovi
College of Nurses of Ontario / Ordre des infirmières et infirmiers
de l’Ontario
101 Davenport Road
Toronto, Ontario M5R 3P1
Website: www.cno.org
Manitoba
College of Licensed Practical Nurses of Manitoba
463 St. Anne’s Road
Winnipeg, Manitoba R2M 3C9
Website: www.clpnm.ca
College of Registered Nurses of Manitoba
890 Pembina Highway
Winnipeg, Manitoba R3M 2M8
Website: www.crnm.mb.ca
vi. The College of Nurses of Ontario is the provincial regulatory authority for both licensed practical nurses and
registered nurses. In Ontario, licensed practical nurses are termed “registered practical nurses.”
190
Regulated Nursing Contact Information
College of Registered Psychiatric Nurses of Manitoba
1854 Portage Avenue
Winnipeg, Manitoba R3J 0G9
Website: www.crpnm.mb.ca
Saskatchewan
Saskatchewan Association of Licensed Practical Nurses
100–2216 Lorne Street
Regina, Saskatchewan S4P 2M7
Website: www.salpn.com
Saskatchewan Registered Nurses’ Association
2066 Retallack Street
Regina, Saskatchewan S4T 7X5
Website: www.srna.org
Registered Psychiatric Nurses Association of Saskatchewan
2055 Lorne Street
Regina, Saskatchewan S4P 2M4
Website: www.rpnas.com
Alberta
College of Licensed Practical Nurses of Alberta
St. Albert Trail Place
13163, 146th Street
Edmonton, Alberta T5L 4S8
Website: www.clpna.com
College and Association of Registered Nurses of Alberta
11620, 168th Street
Edmonton, Alberta T5M 4A6
Website: www.nurses.ab.ca
College of Registered Psychiatric Nurses of Alberta
9711, 45th Avenue, Suite 201
Edmonton, Alberta T6E 5V8
Website: www.crpna.ab.ca
British Columbia
College of Licensed Practical Nurses of British Columbia
3480 Gilmore Way, Suite 260
Burnaby, British Columbia V5G 4Y1
Website: www.clpnbc.org
191
Regulated Nurses: Canadian Trends, 2005 to 2009
College of Registered Nurses of British Columbia
2855 Arbutus Street
Vancouver, British Columbia V6J 3Y8
Website: www.crnbc.ca
College of Registered Psychiatric Nurses of British Columbia
307–2502 Saint Johns Street
Port Moody, British Columbia V3H 2B4
Website: www.crpnbc.ca
Yukon
Yukon Consumer Services
P.O. Box 2703
Whitehorse, Yukon Y1A 2C6
Website: www.gov.yk.ca
Yukon Registered Nurses Association
204–4133 Fourth Avenue
Whitehorse, Yukon Y1A 1H8
Website: www.yrna.ca
Northwest Territories and Nunavut
Licensed Practical Nurses of the Northwest Territories and Nunavut
Department of Health and Social Services, Government of the
Northwest Territories
P.O. Box 1320
Yellowknife, Northwest Territories X1A 2L9
Website: www.hlthss.gov.nt.ca
Registered Nurses Association of the Northwest Territories and Nunavut
P.O. Box 2757
483 Range Lake Road
Yellowknife, Northwest Territories X1A 2R1
Website: www.rnantnu.ca
Other Nursing Associations
Practical Nurses Canada
55 St. Clair Avenue West, Suite 255
Toronto, Ontario M4V 2Y7
Website: www.pncanada.ca
Canadian Council for Practical Nurse Regulators / Conseil canadien de
réglementation des soins infirmiers auxiliaires
Website: www.ccpnr.ca
192
Regulated Nursing Contact Information
Canadian Nurses Association / Association des infirmières et infirmiers
du Canada
50 The Driveway
Ottawa, Ontario K2P 1E2
Website: www.cna-aiic.ca
Registered Psychiatric Nurses of Canada
Website: www.rpnc.ca
Canadian Association of Schools of Nursing / Association canadienne des écoles
de sciences infirmières
99 Fifth Avenue, Suite 15
Ottawa, Ontario K1S 5K4
Website: www.casn.ca
Canadian Federation of Nurses Unions / Fédération canadienne des syndicats
d’infirmières et d’infirmiers
2841 Riverside Drive
Ottawa, Ontario K1V 8X7
Website: www.nursesunions.ca
Aboriginal Nurses Association of Canada
56 Sparks Street, Suite 502
Ottawa, Ontario K1P 5A7
Website: www.anac.on.ca
193
References
References
1. Canadian Nurses Association, The Nurse Practitioner (Ottawa, Ont.: CNA, 2003), accessed on
July 22, 2008, from <http://www.cna-nurses.ca/CNA/documents/pdf/publications/PS68_Nurse_
Practitioner_June_2003_e.pdf>.
2. C. McNiven, H. Puderer and D. Janes, Census Metropolitan Area and Census Agglomeration
Influenced Zones (MIZ): A Description of the Methodology (Ottawa, Ont.: Statistics Canada, 2000),
accessed on August 31, 2009, from <http://www.statcan.gc.ca/pub/92f0138m/
92f0138m2000002-eng.pdf>.
3. V. du Plessis, et al., “Definitions of Rural,” Rural and Small Town Canada Analysis Bulletin 3,
3 (2001), accessed on August 31, 2009, from <http://www.statcan.gc.ca/pub/21-006-x/
21-006-x2001003-eng.pdf>.
4. Canadian Institute for Health Information, Supply and Distribution of Registered Nurses in Rural
and Small Town Canada (Ottawa, Ont.: CIHI, 2002), accessed on August 31, 2009, from
<http://secure.cihi.ca/cihiweb/dispPage.jsp?cw_page=download_form_e&cw_sku=
SDRNRST2000PDF&cw_ctt=1&cw_dform=N>.
5. Statistics Canada, Health Regions: Boundaries and Correspondence With Census Geography, 2007
(updates) (Ottawa, Ont.: Statistics Canada Health Statistics Division, 2009), accessed on
June 21, 2010, from < http://www.statcan.gc.ca/bsolc/olc-cel/olc-cel?catno=82-402-XIE&lang=
eng#formatdisp>.
195
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How to cite this document:
Canadian Institute for Health Information, Regulated Nurses:
Canadian Trends, 2005 to 2009 (Ottawa, Ont.: CIHI, 2010).
Cette publication est aussi disponible en français sous le titre
Infirmières réglementées : tendances canadiennes, 2005 à 2009.
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