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A race on the Lachine canal!
PRODUCTION TEAM
The Montréal Urban Biokit is an adaptation of the Urban BioKit.
Production: Biosphère, Environment Canada
Research and coordination: Etienne Angers and Line Morand
Graphic design: Yves Bilodeau
Illustration: Caroline Brunet
Writing: Etienne Angers
Acknowledgements:
Yves Alavo, Patrick Asch, Carole Castonguay, André Champoux,
Élodie Choqueux, Sylvie Comtois, Ann Dacres, Anne Desautels,
Thérèse Drapeau, Claude Joyal, Elizabeth Kilvert, Jean Langlais,
Sarah Maillot, Nathalie Matte, Glenna McGuire, Andrée Nault,
Gabrielle Normand, Michèle Picard, Jacques Tremblay,
Jean-Michel Villanove and everyone else who contributed
discerning suggestions and comments during the
production of this BioKit.
Share your discoveries, build your EcoProfile and stay inform of
any news on the BioKits Website at www.ec.gc.ca/biotrousses-biokits.
Aussi disponible en français sous le titre: BioTrousse Urbaine - Montréal
Printed on recycled paper using vegetable-based dyes
© Her Majesty the Queen in Right of Canada, represented by the Minister of the Environment, 2010
Catalogue No.: En154-60/2010E-PDF, ISBN: 978-1-100-16333-8
Legal deposit: Library and Archives Canada, 2010
FPOouleur
ion c
vers
Four Seasons of Fun for the
Whole Family!
URBAN ECOSYSTEMS
AT YOUR DOORSTEP
Are you familiar with the animals and plants
near your home? How much do you know about
the biodiversity in your neighbourhood? To help
you explore your surroundings, the Biosphère,
Environment Museum, and the Ville de Montréal
are pleased to present this urban activity.
Environment Canada’s Biosphère encourages
citizens to take action and get involved in
environmental issues. In addition to presenting exhibits
and special events, the Biosphère develops educational
and awareness-raising products for a diverse clientele
across Canada and is a recognized clearinghouse for
environmental information.
A walk on Mount Royal.
www.ec.gc.ca/biosphere
www.ville.montreal.qc.ca/english
Montréal plays a significant role in preserving and promoting
biodiversity. At the international level, the city is a member
of the Global Partnership on Cities and Biodiversity. The
United Nations Secretariat of the Convention on Biological
Diversity has been based in Montréal since 1996.
Reconnect with your environment...
and build your EcoProfile
www.ec.gc.ca/biotrousses-biokits
How the BioKit Works
1.
Choose a nearby park. Print the annex specific to your
chosen park (if applicable).
2. Gather up your equipment: GPS unit (optional), magnifying glass,
binoculars, camera, pocket-size mirror, pencil and clipboard.
3. Step out your front door and consider your surroundings
in order to answer the questions on the two following pages.
4. Walk to the park you chose in step one. Once there, continue
observing the environment around you (follow along with the
questions in the following sections of the BioKit).
5. Upon your return, discuss your outing with friends and family.
Share the results of your diagnosis and of your park annex on
the BioKits website.
When words are highlighted this way, a link to a website is available
on the BioKits website and in the PDF version of this document.
The Urban Environment
As
you step out the door and make your way
to the park, check off the numbered items in the drawing as you
notice them. What role do they play in your surroundings?
(See the examples below.)
■
■
By 2020, 90 percent of Canada’s population is expected to live in
cities. All of these cities were built in the wilderness and are still
surrounded by nature, though this may not always be obvious.
Are your surroundings welcoming to you and to nature?
■
■
■
■
■
■
■
■
Trees, plants and flowers =
improve air quality and provide shelter for
wildlife Insects and animals = show
that our urban environment is healthy An
urban water source = can ensure life, health
and safety A health clinic = protects the
well-being of people and the community Green
transportation = helps reduce greenhouse gases
A neighbourhood business = boosts the local
economy and contributes to its diversity Objects
connected with recycling = show responsible consumer
behaviour A community garden = provides a local
food supply and opportunities for socializing A public
bench = provides a spot to relax and connect with others
A public gathering spot = nurtures a sense of belonging
An activity area for young people = allows for balanced
development A cultural location = enriches the community
An historic building = gives the city character and attracts
tourists Urban art = creates beauty and a place for reflecting
Name a local place you would take your friends to
visit = a source of community pride! ______________________
illustration : Caroline Brunet
■
■
■
■
Biodiversity on your doorstep!
An alleyway is an ideal place to observe
biodiversity in the city. Is yours green or grey?
If your alleyway has several of the following
elements, it is green!
■
■
■
■
■
■
■
Concrete removed to put in plants
Trees forming a canopy over the alleyway
Flower planters made from recycled materials
Climbing vines on the walls
A community compost site
Murals decorating the area
Barrels of collected rainwater
for watering the plants
No alleyway?
No problem!
You can observe the biodiversity
in one of these places:
•
•
•
•
•
Common hop
Your yard
The sidewalk in front of your house
The balconies along your street
A public space
A schoolyard
On the sidewalk, open your eyes!
Some plants have probably made themselves at home in the
cracks and tiny spaces of the urban jungle.
Can you find these three species?
■
■
Photo: MBG, Normand Fleury
uryy
Photo: JBM, Normand Fleury
Common plantain
Note : MBG = Montréal Botanical Garden
Pineappleweed
■
Photo: JBM, Normand Fleury
Common knotgrass
the bark and leaves of the trees in your front
You can try to identify them when you get back home.
Draw oryard.photograph
The trees lining Montréal’s streets are among the
thousands that are turning the city green. Numerous
species have been planted, but about a dozen or
so are more common in all neighbourhoods.
It’s a Go!
Between your home and
the park, did you observe
green spaces?
Are animals able to travel from one green space to another? __________
If so, you may be standing in a wildlife corridor.
Wildlife corridors: In cities, parks, treed walkways, green alleys, flowerboxes, balcony
planters and gardens can serve as urban wildlife corridors. These environments provide
pathways to connect animals and plants with food, shelter and breeding areas.
Park visited: _____________________________
Date: ___________________________________
Departure time:__________________________
Return time: ____________________________
GPS coordinates: ________________________
(optional)
WEATHER
Temperature: ______________________°C
Eco-friendly tips
for urban nature
explorers:
• Do not pick plants
(including flowers, ferns, etc.)
during your outing.
■ Sunny
■ Partly cloudy
■ Cloudy
■ Rainy
■ Snowy
■ Windy
• Obey any signs asking you to stay
on pathways.
• Leave nature the way
you found it.
• Observe wild animals from a
distance and don’t feed them.
• Put your trash in waste
containers or take it home
with you.
In Montréal, wood heating is the main cause of winter smog!
A by-law now bans the addition of new wood stoves in its territory.
If you have an old model, it is possible to change it for a more recent
and much less polluting model.
Park Visit
TAKE A BREATHER!
Find out more
See “Healthy Communities”
on page 29
Did you know...
Thee American
e ca Go
Goldfi
d nch
c
is the avian emblem of M
Montr
Montréal.
tréa
éal.l.
Take a deep breath and look around you.
What is your first impression?
Talk about what you see with the people you are with.
Photo: Antonio Rizi
CRICK,
C
RICK, CRACK, TWEET!
Photo: Chantal Lepire
The sounds in our environment affect our well-being.
Close your eyes and listen
listen. Write down the sounds you hear:
From nature:
From human activity:
Prowling for Lichens
Air pollution can worsen health problems like asthma.
Did you know that the type and amount of lichens growing
on tree trunks can tell us about the air quality? Most
lichens are sensitive to air quality and deteriorate when
air pollution levels are high.
Circle the sounds you’d prefer to hear less often.
Take a look at the tree trunks around you.
Do you see any lichens?
Do you see different types of lichen?
Lichen : composed of a fungus and an alga living in
symbiosis (a relationship that benefits both). Lichen forms
a clump, sometimes coloured, on tree trunks and rocks.
Photo: MBG, Gilles Murray
Did you know...
The crabapple
is the floral emblem
of Montréal.
A Certain Something
Catch the Scent!
The atmosphere is an ocean of gases that we live in and breathe
in all the time. Describe the odours you can smell in the air:
■ Fruity?
■ Floral?
■ Diesel?
■ Other: ______________
What direction is the wind blowing from?
What did you do to find out?
in the Air
The atmosphere plays an
important role in how our planet
functions. It protects us from the
sun’s rays and regulates our
climate, making our survival
possible.
SEE ANY CLOUDS IN THE SKY? HOW ARE THEY SHAPED
AND WHAT DOES THEIR SHAPE TELL YOU?
■ Cirrus : Located high
■ Cumulus : Located low
in the sky, cirrus clouds
sometimes indicate that
rain is coming.
in the sky, these clouds often
appear in good weather.
In the hot, humid days of
summer, they can transform
into cumulonimbus clouds.
■ Stratus : Usually sitting
fairly low in the sky, stratus
clouds often cause “grey”
days and can herald storms
or drizzle.
■ Cumulonimbus :
These are large grey clouds,
taller than they are wide;
in summer, they are a sign
of stormy weather.
Urban Biodiversity
Eco-friendly tips
for clean air:
• Walk, use your bicycle,
the Bixi self-serve
bicycles, car-pooling
services or public transit.
• When you’re in a car
in Montréal, avoid
idling the engine when
you’re waiting. It’s a
municipal by-law!
Find out more
See “Air Issues”
on page 29
SHAPE GAZING
Montréal is teeming
with natural and
restored habitats.
Both are useful
because they offer
shelter and breeding
areas for plants and
animals (including
humans), and
form the urban
ecosystem.
Generally speaking, the more species there are, the healthier the environment.
How many different shapes of trees can you find?
■
■
■ Shrub
■
■
■ Other
Are the trees healthy? Look at the leaves.
Are they spotted, insect-eaten or yellow?
Photo: Frédéric Desbiens
Blue Montréal
Water is usually an element that supports
biodiversity. How convenient, since the island
of Montréal is surrounded by it!
GRAB YOUR
FISHING POLES!
The Fête de la pêche
(fishing festival) takes place
in mid-June. During this event,
you have a unique opportunity
to fish without a licence.
What types of fish
can you catch nearby?
Fishing at parc des Rapides!
Check out Montréal’s
biodiversity map.
Relics of history
Various activities are
organized each year to allow
you to discover the biodiversity
of aquatic environments.
Did you know... the island of Montréal
is surrounded by water… and islands! About
325 islands form the archipelago of Montréal,
and 83 of them are part of the city.
This map shows you the former streams that once ran through
the island of Montréal. Do you live near a former stream?
iries
s Pra
re de
Riviè
Most of these small streams have disappeared or been redirected
during the urbanization of the island. A section of the Little Saint-Pierre
River, channelled at the beginning of the 19th century, can still be seen
under the Pointe-à-Callière museum.
R
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on
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Ruisseau
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Fosrres N
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Ruis
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Go
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Ru ige
M
Ruisseau de
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Île Bizard from the air.
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Pointe-à-Callière Museum
Hide and Seek!
A healthy ecosystem
• cleans the air and water
• produces oxygen
• traps carbon dioxyde gas
• controls insects and animal
pests naturally
If you see a bird or a
squirrel pass by with
a twig, a string or something else (sometimes
unusual) in its mouth
or beak, follow it from a
distance and with a little
luck, it might lead you
right to its nest. Take
care and remember, do
not disturb the
occupants!
• encourages pollination
• helps control flooding
and erosion
• produces fertile soil
The Secret Life of Trees
• plays an important role
in the economy, health
and food safety.
Take a closer look. There could be a
nest hiding in that hollow tree trunk!
Look closely at treetops too.
See any nests made by:
These are services that the
public would otherwise pay for.
• squirrels,
• birds,
• wasps?
Or any cocoons built by insects?
Winter Comes
Look for animal tracks
in the snow or in the mud.
Notice the different
shape and arrangement
of paw-prints or footprints
and follow the trail.
and Life Goes On
Follow that Trail! Check whether animals left any clues like leftover food,
scratch marks, dung or tracks as they passed by trees. What can you see?
Sketch
Striped skunk
American
Crow
Some key things to look for:
• Does it have two feet or four?
• Are the footsteps close together
(maybe indicating a smaller animal)
or far apart (a bigger animal)?
• How many toes are there?
• How are they oriented?
Did you know that the red squirrel makes its own
maple syrup? It bites the bark to get to the woody tissue and
lets the sap flow. Once the water evaporates, it returns to
harvest the “syrup”!
a picture of the tracks you find so you can identify them
when you get back home.
Gardening!
Montréal has many initiatives that
encourage vegetable gardening in
the city. In addition to community
gardens, there are loads of other
initiatives in place.
More than 15 public markets
offer fresh regional
products. Are you familiar
with the one closest to you?
Find it using the green map.
Photo: Linda Turgeon
A BALCONY GARDEN? WHY NOT?
The Alternatives organization has developed a perfect
technique for gardening in the city where soil is rare:
container gardening. Equipped with a 5-day reserve
of water, the containers can be placed wherever you
want and can produce an impressive harvest!
Want to get your hands dirty?
Visit the site: www.rooftopgardens.ca
During the summer,
you can check out containers in operation on
the McGill University campus right in front of
Burnside Hall and behind the Cégep du Vieux
Montréal. In addition to greening a concrete
space, the produce from McGill’s garden is
given to Santropol roulant, a meals-on-wheels
organization that distributes the food through
a community kitchen.
Eco-friendly tips
gardening:
• Use compost to
fertilize your containers
and garden instead of
synthetic chemical
fertilizers. Montréal
offers free compost to
its citizens. Find out more
from your borough!
Photo : Gaëlle Janvier
Photo: Gaëlle Janvier
Montréal, melon capital?
From the late 19th century until the Second World War, the city produced the
“Montréal melon”. With its impressive size and lovely taste, this variety was highly
sought after. In Boston and New York, a single slice of the delicious fruit at a restaurant
cost as much as a steak! Read the full story on the BioKits website!
Mammals, Reptiles and Friends!
HOW MANY DIFFERENT TYPES
OF ANIMALS CAN YOU SEE?
Include pets, street animals, farm animals and wild animals:
Eco-friendly tips
for urban
biodiversity:
_____ Amphibians
• Create urban gardens:
flower beds, balcony
planters, and so on.
Grow native species.
_____ Mammals
_____ Fish
• Use chemicals
sparingly. Plants and
animals are very sensitive
to them.
_____ Reptiles
_____ Birds
_____ Others
• Find out about
threatened species
in the Montréal region,
then you wil be better
able to help protect them.
Raccoon
Find out more
See“Urban Biodiversity
Issues”on page 29
Insects Are Animals Too!
Scientists have identified up to a million species of insects so far, but estimate that
there may be as many as 30 million. Insects differ from other animals by their three
pairs of legs. With or without your magnifying glass, scour the ground or search
among the flowers for insects. Who knows, you might discover a new species!
Honey bee
Pollinating Insects:
These insects carry pollen
from flower to flower. Bees,
wasps, butterflies, beetles
and flies are among these
beneficial insects.
We owe them credit for
over 70 percent of the food
we harvest.
These days, pollinating
insects are threatened by:
• the loss of habitat,
• the use of pesticides,
• competition with other
species (often alien),
• monoculture,
• diseases and parasites,
• light pollution.
Spiders and
millipedes may not be
insects, but they
still belong to our
environmental
family!
■ Butterflies
and caterpillars
■ Ladybugs
and beetles
■ Bees, wasps
and ants
■ Flies and
mosquitoes
■ Dragonflies
and damselflies
■ Others
Vulnerable species
Montréal provides shelter to a number
of vulnerable species. How do they cope?
Put yourself in their shoes to learn
about the challenges they face.
TRANSFORM
YOURSELF INTO…
A PEREGRINE FALCON!
First, you have to find a home.
You usually like to build your nest on bluffs.
But where can you go in the city?
In the city, this bird of prey readily
trades its cliff for a skyscraper, a bridge,
or any other tall structure.
Use the falcon cam!
A webcam follows the adventures of a
Peregrine Falcon couple nesting on the Université
de Montréal’s tower:
www.ornithologie.ca/faucons
Peregrine Falcon
Photo: Gordon Court
Your nest made, you incubate your eggs to take a break, but horror of
horrors! The eggs have become more fragile than glass and often break
under your weight. How do you protect your offspring?
In the 1960s and early 1970s, DDT was being used as an
insecticide. This substance was incredibly harmful to Peregrine
Falcons because it severely weakened the shells of their eggs.
Following the gradual decline in DDT use beginning in 1969 as
well as multiple species reintroduction programs, the Peregrine
Falcon is now making a comeback.
TRANSFORM YOURSELF
INTO… A WILD LEEK!
You’re looking for a place to germinate and take root.
You prefer the maple stands in southern Quebec.
Do you see any nearby?
If you have been able to put down roots, you will
have to wait 7 to 10 years before you produce
seeds. You can multiply every 2 to 3 years thanks
to the division of your bulb.
Unfortunately, you are often harvested when
your bulb is barely big enough to divide itself,
which complicates life for you...
Photo: Eve Belisle
Urbanization, the expansion of agricultural
land, and overharvesting are the main causes
of the wild leek’s decline. The Montréal Biôdome
has been running the SEM’AIL program since
1999 to reintroduce this species in specific areas,
including in several large parks in the Ville
de Montréal.
Photo: Martin Ménard
Eco-friendly tips
for the
wild leek:
• Become a wild leek
guardian! Tell your friends
and family about the golden
rules of respectful harvesting.
Harvesting in many areas is
forbidden, including in Montréal’s
network of large parks!
Find the Invader
INVASIVE ALIEN SPECIES:
Brought into Canada accidentally or on purpose, these plant and animal species
are a major threat to biodiversity and are very difficult to control.
Which of the
following species
are considered
invasive alien
species in
Montréal?
b) Emerald ash borer
photo: Klaus Bolte,
CFS-SCF, NRCan-RNCan
a) Japanese knotweed
European Starling
c) Common buckthorn
d) Dandelion
MBG, Les Amis du Jardin
botanique de Montréal
Did you know that...
ragweed, although native to North America,
is considered an invasive species? It also
triggers allergic reactions in more than
10 percent of the population. Best get it
off of your property before August when
it releases its pollen!
The Réseau de surveillance
de la qualité de l’air de Montréal
monitors the concentration of
airborne ragweed pollen.
Find out more
See “Urban Biodiversity
Issues” on page 29
Answer:
If you guessed that they are all alien species, you’re right!
However, only a) the Japanese knotweed and b) the common buckthorn are a threat to biodiversity in Montréal.
The Emerald ash borer has been identified on the periphery of Montréal, but not yet on the island itself.
The medicinal properties of dandelions are extremely beneficial to one’s health and
discerning gourmets, both human and feathered, show a keen interest in it.
Urban Landscapes
HEAD FOR THE HILLS!
Over time, humans have transformed the natural
landscape. Look for some high ground in the park
and divide what you see into groups.
Natural features:
Structures and signs
of human activity:
hills, waterways, fields,
forests and lakes
roads, power lines, buildings, industrial sites,
church steeples, green roofs (totally or partially
covered with vegetation)
Do you see any wildlife corridors (vegetation strips)
that animals could use to move from place to place
in the city?
A DIFFERENT ANGLE!
Sometimes, just looking at something from a
different angle can lead to surprising discoveries.
• Take out your pocket-size mirror and walk
backwards. Does the landscape look any different?
• If you’re the acrobatic type, walk on your hands
and describe what you see.
• What is your favourite point of interest?
Ask the others with you to guess.
• Imagine what the landscape around you looked
like in your grandparents’ day.
• What will it look like in the future?
WATER, WATER, ANYWHERE?
Life depends on water. Look around you. Do you see
a waterway, pond or lake? Do you notice any new
varieties of plants or animals? If you wait long enough
and pay careful attention, you might get a glimpse
of the more skittish species that live in the water.
Peaceful pond in La Fontaine Park.
Fun with the coat of arms
Biodiversity is everywhere, even on
the Ville de Montréal’s coat of arms!
Take a close look around the park you’re visiting! Maybe you’ll be
able to find some of the natural elements that are there: the iris, thistle,
shamrock, rose, sugar maple, and beaver.
Photo: MBG, Roméo Meloche
Sugar maple
What do you think the elements
of the coat of arms represent?
The answer at the bottom of the page.
Ph
Photo: MBG, Gilles Murray
Iris *
Rose
Photo: MBG, Gilles Murray
Photo: MBG, Normand Fleury
Phot
Thistle
Shamrock
Beaver
Find out more
AIR ISSUES:
Ville de Montréal - Air (French only)
Réseau de surveillance de la qualité de l’air
(French only)
Clean Air Online
http://ville.montreal.qc.ca/portal/page?_pageid=916,1606798&_dad=portal&_schema=PORTAL
http://ville.montreal.qc.ca/portal/page?_pageid=4537,7190968&_dad=portal&_schema=PORTAL
www.ec.gc.ca/cleanair-airpur
WAYS TO IMPROVE THE ENVIRONMENT:
Éco-quartiers (French only)
Environment (French only)
http://ville.montreal.qc.ca/portal/page?_dad=portal&_pageid=916,1607163&_schema=PORTAL
http://ville.montreal.qc.ca/portal/page?_pageid=916,1606116&_dad=portal&_schema=PORTAL
URBAN BIODIVERSITY ISSUES:
Ville de Montréal - Biodiversity
Nature Museums
Network of large parks
Ville de Montréal - Nature in the city
Pollination
http://ville.montreal.qc.ca/portal/page?_pageid=5197,18357688&_dad=portal&_schema=PORTAL
http://ville.montreal.qc.ca/portal/page?_pageid=5557,27853619&_dad=portal&_schema=PORTAL
http://ville.montreal.qc.ca/portal/page?_pageid=175,4230570&_dad=portal&_schema=PORTAL
570&_dad=portal&_schema=PORTAL
http://ville.montreal.qc.ca/portal/page?_pageid=5697,32909558&_dad=portal&_schema=PORTAL
09558&_dad=portal&_schema=PORTAL
www.pollinationcanada.ca
HEALTHY COMMUNITIES:
Federation of Canadian Municipalities (FCM)
Montréal Urban Ecology Center
www.sustainablecommunities.fcm.ca
www.urbanecology.net
• The iris*, rose, thistle and shamrock symbolize, respectively, France, England, Scotland and Ireland, the primary
countries of origin of the early settlers of Montréal. *In French, this symbol is called the fleur de lys, (lily in English).
However, it is in fact, an iris that grew on the banks of the Lys river in France. • The branches of the sugar maple
leaves symbolize the search for harmony between all members of Montréal’s population
as well as belonging to Canada. • The beaver represents the industrious and patient
character of Montréal residents.
Answer:
Urban Environment:
Check the
boxes that apply
Now that you’ve
gathered an
abundance of
observations, use
them to reach your
own diagnosis
about the health
of your urban
environment by
filling in the chart
opposite.
You can easily
complete it on
the BioKits website
and compare your
results with others!
My Diagnosis
Excellent!
Not bad but…
Things
must improve!
Trees, bushes, balcony planters
and gardens providing a biological
corridor between your home and
the park
First impression of the park
Surrounding sounds
Air quality
Biodiversity:
plants and trees
Biodiversity: animals
Presence
of pollinators
Skating
Sk
ati
at
tin
ing oon Beaver Lake.
ke.
ke
Invasive
plant control
Waterways,
ponds or lakes
Find out more
See “Environment”
on page 29
Recommendation: Enjoy your environment
Choose one thing you
and help preserve the would like to improve
threatened species in and think up a feasible
your area.
solution.
Black swallowtail caterpillar
Many heads are
better than one!
Talk to people about
your concerns;
they might join your
improvement efforts.
Encourage biodiversity
Now it’s your turn
to promote biodiversity in Montréal!
If you have access to a yard or just a
balcony, you can take action!
What actions will you take?
Maintain a yard that
welcomes biodiversity.
Compost outdoors
or indoors using
vermicomposting.
Remove invasive
exotic plants.
House Sparrow
Common reed
Photo : Linda Turgeon
Make my alleyway
green with the help
of my neighbours
and Éco-quartier.
Grow vegetables in
a community garden,
yard or in containers.
Create a supportive
environment for fauna
with indigenous plants.
Care for your lawn in an environment-friendly way.
Buy local vegetables and
participate in a
community-supported
agriculture (CSA) program.
Turn off outdoor
lights, put a bell on
your cat and keep it
indoors at night to
encourage birds
to visit.
Think Back On Your Outing
Back Home
Create a souvenir of your excursion by
making a drawing, story, poem, photo or collage.
PRODUCTION TEAM
The Montréal Urban Biokit is an adaptation of the Urban BioKit.
Production: Biosphère, Environment Canada
Research and coordination: Etienne Angers and Line Morand
Graphic design: Yves Bilodeau
Illustration: Caroline Brunet
Writing: Etienne Angers
A race on the Lachine canal!
Share your discoveries, build your EcoProfile and stay inform of
any news on the BioKits Website at www.ec.gc.ca/biotrousses-biokits.
Aussi disponible en français sous le titre: BioTrousse Urbaine - Montréal
Printed on recycled paper using vegetable-based dyes
© Her Majesty the Queen in Right of Canada, represented by the Minister of the Environment, 2010
Catalogue No.: En154-60/2010E-PDF, ISBN: 978-1-100-16333-8
Legal deposit: Library and Archives Canada, 2010
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Acknowledgements:
Yves Alavo, Patrick Asch, Carole Castonguay, André Champoux,
Élodie Choqueux, Sylvie Comtois, Ann Dacres, Anne Desautels,
Thérèse Drapeau, Claude Joyal, Elizabeth Kilvert, Jean Langlais,
Sarah Maillot, Nathalie Matte, Glenna McGuire, Andrée Nault,
Gabrielle Normand, Michèle Picard, Jacques Tremblay,
Jean-Michel Villanove and everyone else who contributed
discerning suggestions and comments during the
production of this BioKit.
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