? Is Your Child Safe Sleep Time

? Is Your Child Safe Sleep Time
Is Your
Child Safe?
Sleep Time
Health Canada is the federal department responsible for helping the people of Canada
maintain and improve their health. We assess the safety of drugs and many consumer
products, help improve the safety of food, and provide information to Canadians to help
them make healthy decisions. We provide health services to First Nations people and to Inuit
communities. We work with the provinces to ensure our health care system serves the needs
of Canadians.
Published by authority of the Minister of Health.
Is Your Child Safe? Sleep Time
is available on Internet at the following address: www.health.gc.ca/cps
Également disponible en français sous le titre :
Votre enfant est-il en sécurité? À l’heure du coucher
This publication can be made available on request in a variety of alternative formats.
For further information or to obtain additional copies, please contact:
Publications
Health Canada
Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0K9
Tel.: (613) 954-5995
Fax: (613) 941-5366
Email: [email protected]
© Her Majesty the Queen in Right of Canada, represented by the Minister of Health, 2012
This publication may be reproduced without permission provided that its use falls within the
scope of fair dealings under the Copyright Act, and is solely for the purposes of study, research,
criticism, review or newspaper summary. The source must be fully acknowledged. However,
reproduction of this publication in whole or in part for purposes of resale or redistribution
requires the prior written permission from the Minister of Public Works and Government Services
Canada, Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0S5 or [email protected]
HC Pub.: 120077
Cat.: H129-11/2012E
ISBN: 978-1-100-20592-2
Introduction
Likely the only time you will leave your baby or young child unattended is
while he or she sleeps. The important thing is to make sure children are
sleeping where they will be safe. For this, parents and caregivers must be
aware of safe sleep practices. Health Canada has produced this guide to
provide you with information to keep your child safe during sleep time.
The Canada Consumer Product Safety Act (CCPSA), which came into force
on June 20, 2011, is administered by Health Canada. Its purpose is to
protect the public by helping to address and prevent dangers to human
health or safety that are posed by consumer products in Canada. The Act
and its regulations define the safety requirements applicable to consumer
products, several of which are covered in this guide.
The CCPSA and its regulations do not distinguish between new and used
products. Any person who sells, distributes, or gives away products that
do not comply with the legislative requirements would be contravening
the CCPSA and be subject to compliance and enforcement actions.
Is Your Child Safe? – Sleep Time
i
Table of Contents
Introduction. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . i
General Sleep Safety Tips . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1
Safe Places for a Baby to Sleep. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
Room Sharing. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
Bassinets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
Cradles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
Cribs. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7
Other Places a Baby Might Fall Asleep . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9
Bed Sharing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9
Bed-side Sleeping Products . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10
Hammocks. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11
Playpens. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12
Other Products (Baby Carriers, Bouncers,
Car Seats, Slings, Strollers and Swings) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13
Sleep Accessories Unsafe for Babies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14
Bumper Pads . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14
Sleep Positioners. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14
Other Sleep Accessories for Babies. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15
Pacifiers/Soothers. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15
Sleepwear . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16
Toys . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17
Sleep Products for Toddlers and School-Age Children . . . . 18
Portable Bed Rails. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18
Toddler Beds. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19
Bunk Beds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20
Resources. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21
Recalls. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21
Incident reporting. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21
Contact. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21
Other Resources. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22
Consumer Product Safety, Health Canada. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23
ii
Is Your Child Safe? – Sleep Time
G enera l S l e e p S a f e t y T ip s
The safest place for your baby
to sleep is on his or her back,
in a crib, cradle or bassinet.
Health Canada recommends room
sharing for the first six months of
your baby’s life.
• Avoid the use of loose bedding
or soft objects in your baby’s
sleeping area. Products like
these can be suffocation
hazards and should not be
placed where your baby sleeps:
Babies and young children should
never be placed to sleep on
standard beds, water beds, air
mattresses, couches, futons or
armchairs. A baby can suffocate
when sleeping on these unsafe
surfaces.
• comforters, heavy blankets
and quilts
Health Canada has received
reports of injuries and/or deaths
related to the improper use of
many products mentioned in
this guide. Follow the safety tips
provided to reduce the risk of
injury or death related to the use
of these products.
• Put your baby on his or her
back to sleep, both at nap time
and at bedtime.
• Your baby’s crib should be
completely empty, except for
the crib’s mattress and fitted
sheet.
• infant or adult pillows
• foam padding
• stuffed toys
• bumper pads
• sleep positioners
• Blankets can be dangerous if
a baby’s head gets covered
when he or she sleeps and may
cause suffocation. Instead of a
blanket, consider dressing your
baby in light sleep clothing, like
a one-piece sleeper. If a blanket
is needed, infants are safest
with a thin, lightweight, and
breathable blanket.
• Overheating is a risk factor for
Sudden Infant Death Syndrome
(SIDS). If the room temperature
is comfortable for you, it is also
comfortable for your baby.
• Keep your home completely
smoke free. Cigarette smoke is
harmful to babies and increases
the risk of SIDS. No one should
smoke near your baby.
Is Your Child Safe? – Sleep Time
1
• It is not safe for a baby to
sleep for long periods of time
in products such as strollers,
car seats, swings, bouncers,
slings or baby carriers, that
keep him or her in a seated or
semi-reclined position. Move
your baby to a crib, cradle or
bassinet for naps or overnight
sleep, or once you have reached
your destination.
• Cords on window blinds, shades
and curtains are a strangulation
hazard. Tie the cords out of
your child’s reach or install
a tension device for looped
cords. Whether the blind is up
or down, make sure your child
cannot reach the cords.
• Place your baby’s sleeping area
so that hazards like windows,
patio doors, lamps, candles,
electrical plugs, corded baby
monitors, extension cords and
small objects are out of your
child’s reach.
2
Is Your Child Safe? – Sleep Time
• Not everyone will take the same
care you do in making sure their
home is safe for children. When
visiting family and friends, scan
your surroundings for potential
hazards and supervise your
children closely.
• Check regularly for recalls
of children’s toys, clothing,
furniture and equipment by
contacting the manufacturer
or by visiting Health Canada’s
Consumer Product Recalls web
page: www.healthcanada.
gc.ca/cps-recalls.
Sa fe P la c e s f o r a B a b y to Sl e e p
Room Sharing
Health Canada and the Public
Health Agency of Canada
recommend room sharing for
the first six months of your baby’s
life. Room sharing is when you
place your baby to sleep in a crib,
cradle or bassinet that is within
arm’s reach of where you sleep.
Research has shown that it is
good for babies to share a room
with one or more caregivers, and
that it may reduce the risk of
Sudden Infant Death Syndrome
(SIDS).
Remember that room sharing is
not sufficient to ensure a safe
sleep for your baby. You should
follow all applicable safety tips,
including the general sleep safety
tips provided in the previous
section. In particular:
• Place your baby on his or her
back to sleep, both at naptime
and at bedtime.
• Avoid using bedside sleeping
products with the sides
lowered.
• Cords on window blinds, shades
and curtains are a strangulation
hazard. Tie the cords high
and out of your child’s reach
or install a tension device for
looped cords. Whether the blind
is up or down, make sure your
child cannot reach the cords.
• Place your baby’s sleeping area
so that hazards like windows,
patio doors, lamps, candles,
electrical plugs, corded baby
monitors, extension cords and
small objects are out of your
child’s reach.
Is Your Child Safe? – Sleep Time
3
Bassinets
A bassinet that meets current
Canadian safety regulations is an
appropriate place for your baby to
sleep until he or she reaches the
maximum weight recommended
by the manufacturer OR until your
baby can roll over, whichever
comes first. When your baby
reaches this milestone, you should
put him or her to sleep in a cradle
or crib.
• Always follow the
manufacturer’s instructions
for setting up and using the
bassinet. Only use parts
provided by the manufacturer.
Your baby’s bassinet should not
be modified in any way.
• Check often to make sure the
bassinet’s hardware is secure
and not damaged.
• Check that there are no small
parts on the bassinet that could
be a choking hazard. Make sure
there are no sharp points on
the bassinet.
• Check that the mattress is firm.
Mattresses that are too soft or
worn down in any area could
create a gap where a baby’s
face could become stuck,
causing them to suffocate.
• The bassinet mattress must
not be thicker than 3.8 cm
(1 1/2 in).
• There must not be a gap of
more than 3 cm (1 3/16 in)
between the mattress and
any part of the bassinet’s
sides. Push the mattress
firmly against the sides of
the bassinet to test this.
• If the bassinet has removable
fabric over the frame, check
often to make sure the fabric is
securely attached to the frame.
• Avoid the use of loose bedding
or soft objects in your baby’s
bassinet. Things like comforters,
quilts, heavy blankets, infant
pillows, adult pillows, foam
padding, stuffed toys, bumper
pads and sleep positioners
should not be in your baby’s
sleeping area.
4
Is Your Child Safe? – Sleep Time
• A blanket should not be draped
over the bassinet to keep light
out. This could restrict air flow,
or the blanket could fall on
a baby’s face, causing them
to suffocate.
• Use a fitted bottom sheet made
specifically for a bassinet
mattress of the same size.
• Place your baby’s bassinet
so that hazards like windows,
patio doors, lamps, candles,
electrical plugs, corded baby
monitors, extension cords and
small objects are out of your
child’s reach.
Cradles
A cradle that meets today’s
Canadian safety regulations is an
appropriate place for your baby to
sleep until he or she reaches the
maximum weight recommended
by the manufacturer OR until
your baby can push up on his or
her hands and knees, whichever
comes first. When your baby
reaches this milestone, you should
put him or her to sleep in a crib.
• Always follow the manufacturer’s
instructions for setting up and
using the cradle. Only use parts
provided by the manufacturer.
Your baby’s cradle should not be
modified in any way.
• Do not use cradles with
decorative cut-outs, corner
posts that are more than 3 mm (1/8 in) in height or
large spaces between the bars
(spacing should be no more
than 6 cm [2 3/8 in]).
• Check that there are no small
parts on the cradle that could
be a choking hazard. Make sure
there are no sharp points on
the cradle.
• Check often to make sure
that the cradle’s hardware
is securely fastened and
not damaged.
Is Your Child Safe? – Sleep Time
5
• Check that the mattress is firm.
Mattresses that are too soft or
worn down in any area could
create a gap where a baby’s
face could become stuck,
causing them to suffocate.
• The cradle mattress must
not be thicker than 3.8 cm
(1 1/2 in).
• There must not be a gap of
more than 3 cm (1 3/16 in)
between the mattress and
any part of the cradle’s sides.
Push the mattress firmly
against the sides of the cradle
to test this.
• Avoid the use of loose bedding
or soft objects in your baby’s
cradle. Things like comforters,
quilts, heavy blankets, infant
pillows, adult pillows, foam
padding, stuffed toys and sleep
positioners should not be in
your baby’s sleeping area.
6
Is Your Child Safe? – Sleep Time
• Use a fitted bottom sheet
made specifically for a cradle
mattress of the same size.
• Place your baby’s cradle so that
hazards like windows, patio
doors, lamps, candles, electrical
plugs, corded baby monitors,
extension cords and small
objects are out of your child’s
reach.
Cribs
A crib that meets current
Canadian safety regulations is
the safest place for your baby to
sleep. A crib should not be used if
the child is taller than 90 cm or if
he or she is able to climb out of it,
whichever comes first. When your
baby reaches this milestone, you
should put him or her to sleep in
a toddler or standard bed.
• Do not use a crib made before
September 1986 as it does not
meet current safety regulations.
Also, cribs older than ten years
are more likely to have broken,
worn, loose or missing parts,
and to be missing warnings or
instructions.
• Always follow the
manufacturer’s instructions for
putting together and using the
crib. Only use parts provided by
the manufacturer. Your baby’s
crib should not be modified in
any way.
• Do not use cribs with decorative
cut-outs, corner posts that
are more than 3mm (1/8 in) in
height (unless they are over
406 mm (16 in) in height) or
large spaces between the bars
(spacing should be no more
than 6 cm [2 3/8 in]).
• Check that the mattress is firm.
Mattresses that are too soft or
worn down in any area could
create a gap where a baby’s
face could become stuck,
causing them to suffocate.
• The crib mattress must not be
thicker than 15 cm (6 in).
• There must not be a gap of
more than 3 cm (1 3/16 in)
between the mattress and
any part of the crib’s sides.
Push the mattress firmly
against the sides of the crib
to test this.
• Check often to make
sure that the crib’s
hardware is securely
fastened and not
damaged.
Is Your Child Safe? – Sleep Time
7
• Check often that the crib’s
mattress support system is
secure. Shake the crib from
side to side, thump the mattress
from the top and push up
hard on the mattress support
from underneath the crib.
The mattress support system
should hold the mattress firmly
in place.
• If the crib has movable sides,
after placing your baby in the
crib, make sure both sides are
upright and locked in place.
• Avoid the use of loose bedding
or soft objects in your baby’s
crib. Things like comforters,
quilts, blankets, infant pillows,
adult pillows, foam padding,
stuffed toys, bumper pads and
sleep positioners should not be
in your baby’s sleeping area.
• Use a fitted bottom sheet made
specifically for a crib mattress
of the same size.
8
Is Your Child Safe? – Sleep Time
• Remove mobiles and toy bars
as soon as your baby begins
to push up on his or her hands
and knees.
• Place the mattress support in its
lowest position as soon as your
baby can push up on his or her
hands and knees.
Never harness or tie your baby in
a crib. Your baby should not be left
in a crib with a necklace, elastic
band, scarf or pacifier on a long
cord. These items could cause
strangulation.
Other P lac e s a B a b y
M ig h t Fa ll As l e e p
Bed Sharing
Bed sharing is when an adult
or another child sleeps on the
same surface as a baby, like
a bed, couch, chair, futon or
armchair. Health Canada does not
recommend bed sharing.
Bed sharing is not safe because
of the following potential
hazards:
• A baby can suffocate if:
• He or she becomes trapped
between objects like the
sleeping surface, the body of
the adult or another child, the
wall and other objects.
• The adult or another child
rolls over onto the baby.
• There are soft bedding
materials, like pillows or
comforters, in the bed.
• Babies sleeping on a high
surface can fall off and be
seriously hurt.
Some people believe that bed
sharing will reduce the risk of
Sudden Infant Death Syndrome
(SIDS), but there is no evidence to
support this view. In fact, research
shows that the risk of SIDS is
higher if the baby is sharing a bed
with a person who is a smoker,
very tired, or under the influence
of drugs or alcohol. For more
information about SIDS, contact
the Public Health Agency of
Canada (see Other Resources).
On the other hand, Health Canada
and the Public Health Agency
of Canada recommend room
sharing as a safe alternative to
bed sharing (see Room Sharing).
Research has shown that it is
good for babies to share a room
with one or more caregivers,
and that it may reduce the
risk of Sudden Infant Death
Syndrome (SIDS).
Is Your Child Safe? – Sleep Time
9
Bedside Sleeping Products
A bedside sleeping product looks
like a bassinet or a crib, and usually
has three closed sides and one
open side. Some may have
four sides with one that can be
lowered so an opening is created
above the mattress support. The
open side is meant to be placed
next to an adult bed. Health
Canada does not recommend
using these products with a side
lowered. Room sharing is a safer
sleeping choice for babies (see
Room Sharing).
10
Is Your Child Safe? – Sleep Time
The use of a bedside sleeping
product with a side lowered can
lead to the following hazards:
• If the space between the bed
and the product is too wide, a
baby can become trapped. It
may seem like there is no gap,
but one might be created when
the adult lies down.
• If the fabric over the frame
is not securely attached, it
can bunch up when the side
is folded down, creating an
opening between the fabric
and the product’s frame. This
opening can cause a baby to
suffocate or fall.
Hammocks
Health Canada does not
recommend using baby
hammocks because:
• Hammocks can become
unstable causing the product to
tip forward, causing a baby to
become wedged into one corner
or side and suffocate.
• Hammocks intended to be used
by infants and young children
can suddenly twist around a
child’s neck, causing them to
strangle.
• Babies placed on soft bedding
(including hammocks) can
become wedged in positions
where they cannot breathe.
• Babies and young children
using hammocks can fall from
the high surface, causing
injuries.
Is Your Child Safe? – Sleep Time
11
Playpens
Playpens are not intended to
be used for unsupervised sleep
because they do not meet the
same safety requirements and are
not as durable as cribs.
• Avoid adding blankets, pillows,
extra padding or an extra
mattress to a playpen. Using
these items could cause a baby
to suffocate.
• If a change table or bassinet
comes as an attachment for
the playpen, always follow the
manufacturer’s instructions for
putting it together and using it.
• When you are using your
playpen, keep the sides
securely locked in place. Never
leave your baby in a playpen
with any side down. A baby can
roll into the space between the
mattress and the mesh side and
suffocate.
• Never place a baby in a playpen
while the change table or
bassinet attachment is still
in place. A baby’s head can
become trapped in the gap
between the attachment and
the playpen and can strangle
or suffocate.
• Your baby should not be placed
to sleep on the change table
attachment.
• Check that the mattress pad
is firm. Mattress pads that are
worn down in any area could
create a suffocation hazard.
• Large toys or stuffed toys that
can be used to climb out of the
playpen should not be placed in
a playpen with your baby.
• Check for tears in vinyl rail
coverings, mesh panels or the
mattress pad of the playpen.
Your baby could bite off small
pieces and choke.
12
Is Your Child Safe? – Sleep Time
Other Products (Baby Carriers,
Bouncers, Car Seats, Slings,
Strollers and Swings)
It is not safe for babies to be in a
seated or semi-reclined position,
in products like strollers and car
seats to sleep. When sleeping,
a baby’s head can fall forward
because their muscles are underdeveloped, and their airway can
become constricted.
• Once you reach your destination,
move your baby to a crib, cradle
or bassinet.
• You can use things like strollers
and swings to lull your baby to
sleep, but once asleep, move
your baby to a crib, cradle or
bassinet.
Is Your Child Safe? – Sleep Time
13
Sle ep Acc e sso r i e s
U n s a fe for B a bi e s
Bumper Pads
Health Canada does not
recommend bumper pads
because:
• Long ribbons, strings or ties
can cause a baby to become
tangled or to strangle.
• Babies can suffocate if their
faces become pressed against
the fabric of a bumper pad.
• Children can use bumper pads
to climb out of their crib once
they are able to pull themselves
up into a standing position. They
could fall from the crib and be
seriously hurt.
• A baby’s head can get trapped
between the bumper pad and
the side of the crib.
Sleep Positioners
Sleep positioners are meant to
keep babies on their backs to
sleep. They are often made of two
pieces of foam that are attached
together by a piece of fabric that
the baby sleeps on. Health Canada
does not recommend using these
products because babies can
suffocate on them. Using makeshift sleep positioners, like rolled
up towels, is not recommended
either. When babies are able to
turn over on their own, do not
force them to stay on their back.
14
Is Your Child Safe? – Sleep Time
Other S le e p Acc e sso r i e s
for Ba bies
Pacifiers/Soothers
• Never tie or hang a pacifier/
soother or any other object
around a baby or child’s neck.
They can strangle on the cord
or ribbon.
• Replace pacifiers at least every
two months. You should not wait
for signs of breakdown.
• Inspect pacifiers every day:
• Check the nipple for changes
in texture, tears or holes.
These can happen with age or
exposure to heat, acidic foods
or sunlight.
• Check that the nipple and the
ring or handle stays together
when pulled on forcefully.
• Any pacifier showing signs
of breakdown should be
thrown out right away. Broken
or loose pieces are choking
hazards.
• If your baby begins to chew on
the pacifier, replace it with a
teething ring.
Is Your Child Safe? – Sleep Time
15
Sleepwear
Cotton, cotton-blend and rayon
fabrics catch fire and burn more
quickly than most synthetic
materials. Nylon and polyester
are harder to catch fire and burn
more slowly.
Loose-fitting sleepwear includes
nightgowns, bathrobes and loose
pyjamas. They are more likely
to catch fire than tight-fitting
sleepwear and should be made
of slower burning fabrics.
Tight-fitting sleepwear, like polo
pyjamas or sleepers, is less likely
to catch fire than pyjamas or
nightgowns with flowing skirts,
wide sleeves or large ruffles.
Other safety tips for children’s
clothing:
• Dress your children in actual
sleepwear when putting them to
bed, instead of T-shirts or other
day clothes. Most day clothes
do not meet the flammability
requirements for sleepwear.
16
Is Your Child Safe? – Sleep Time
• Make sure belts, ties and
sashes on your children’s
bathrobes are stitched firmly
to the centre back. Children
can strangle on any type of
cord that can be removed from
their clothing.
• Check for loose buttons or other
small parts, which can be a
choking hazard.
• Check blankets and sleepwear
regularly for loose threads and
fix them right away. Threads
can wrap around your baby’s
arms, legs or neck and cause
injury.
• Teach your children about the
dangers of fire. Tell them to
“STOP, DROP and ROLL” if their
clothes catch fire.
Toys
• Your children should not
take battery-operated toys
to bed. Batteries can leak or
overheat and cause burns or
other injuries.
• Infants can suffocate on
stuffed toys. Also, toddlers
can use large stuffed toys as
steps to climb out of their crib
or playpen.
• Make sure any toys your child
plays with do not have loose or
small parts they can choke on.
Is Your Child Safe? – Sleep Time
17
Sle ep P rod ucts f o r T o d d l e rs
a n d S c h o o l - Age C h i l d re n
Portable Bed Rails
Portable bed rails are often
installed on standard adult beds
to keep children from falling out,
but they can cause your child
to become trapped if not used
properly.
• Before each bedtime and
naptime, check that the
portable bed rails are securely
in place and that there are no
gaps between the mattress and
the bed rail.
• Never place a child who is
under two years old on a bed
fitted with portable bed rails.
• Pillows and toys should not
be placed against the bed rail
because a child can suffocate
on them if their face becomes
pressed up against them.
• To keep younger children safe
if they fall out of bed, keep
the floor area around the bed
clear, or use a crib mattress
on the floor beside the bed.
• Use portable bed rails only on a
bed that has both a box spring
and mattress, unless otherwise
instructed by the manufacturer.
18
Is Your Child Safe? – Sleep Time
• Health Canada recommends
buying only portable bed rails
that meet the latest ASTM
International standard. Ask
before you buy.
Toddler Beds
Toddler beds are often used when
a child has outgrown a crib, but
he or she is not yet big enough to
use a standard bed. These beds
are meant to be used until a child
turns about five years old. Toddler
beds usually come with guardrails
on each side of the mattress.
• The bed should be low to the
ground. The guardrails are
meant to remind your child that
they are getting close to the
edge, but they do not actually
prevent your child from falling
out of the bed or climbing over
the rail.
• Read and follow the
manufacturer’s instructions for
putting the bed together, and
read the warning labels.
• Openings in guardrails or other
parts of the bed that are above
the mattress support system
should be less than 8.4 cm
(3.3 in) apart.
• Follow the age and weight
restrictions recommended by
the manufacturer.
• Check often to make sure the
bed frame is sturdy.
• Many crib mattresses fit toddler
beds:
• Know what your crib mattress
dimensions are before
shopping for a toddler bed
and make sure both are
compatible.
• Make sure that your crib
mattress is in good condition
before using it on a toddler
bed.
• Make sure there is no large
gap between the mattress
and the guardrails, headboard
or footboard.
Is Your Child Safe? – Sleep Time
19
Bunk Beds
Children under six years of age
should never use the upper
bunk of bunk beds.
• Check often to make sure the
frame of the bunk bed is sturdy
and in good condition.
• Only buy bunk beds meeting
the latest ASTM International
standard. Ask before you buy.
• Make sure the top bunk has
guard rails on all four sides
of the bed, even if the bed is
pushed up against a wall.
• Only allow one person at a time
on the top bunk.
• Teach your children to use
the ladder to get up or down.
The ladder should always be
securely attached to the bed.
It should not be removed for
any reason.
• Children should not be allowed
to play on the top bunk. They
should also not be allowed
to play under the top bunk,
unless the area under the bed
is designed as a play area by
the manufacturer.
• Never tie ropes or cords (like
bathrobe belts or skipping
ropes) to any part of the bed.
These can be a strangulation
hazard.
20
Is Your Child Safe? – Sleep Time
• Make sure all parts of the bed,
like corner posts or ladder
uprights, do not extend more
than 0.5 cm (0.2 in) above
the upper edge (usually the
guardrails) of the bed.
• Mattresses should fit snugly
on all sides, leaving no gaps
between the mattress and the
sides of the bed. The sleeping
surface should be at least
12.7 cm (5 in) below the top
of the guardrails.
• Do not allow children younger
than six years of age on the
top bunk. If the manufacturer
allows for this option, consider
removing and storing the top
bunk, or setting it next to the
lower bunk until the child is
old enough to use it. If the top
bunk is used on the floor for a
child under the age of six years,
the guard rails should not be
used. These guardrails have
been designed to be used with
a child of at least six years of
age. Using guardrails with a
younger child could cause them
to become trapped.
Res o u rc es
Recalls
To check for consumer product recalls, go to:
www.healthcanada.gc.ca/cps-recalls
If you want to know when new information, advisories and warnings,
consumer product recalls and consultation documents about consumer
product safety are posted on the Health Canada website, subscribe to
Consumer Product Safety News: www.hc-sc.gc.ca/cps-spc/advisoriesavis/_subscribe-abonnement/index-eng.php
Incident reporting
To submit a complaint or report a problem about a consumer product,
go to: www.healthcanada.gc.ca/reportaproduct
Contact
For inquiries and complaints about consumer products, please contact
your nearest Product Safety office by calling the toll-free number
1-866‑662-0666 (calls will be routed to the nearest Product Safety office).
Is Your Child Safe? – Sleep Time
21
Other Resources
Canadian Foundation for the Study of Infant Deaths (SIDS)
www.sidscanada.org
1-800-END-SIDS
1-800-363-7437
Canadian Paediatric Society
www.cps.ca
613-526-9397
Public Health Agency of Canada
www.publichealth.gc.ca
Tobacco Control Programme, Health Canada
www.GoSmokefree.gc.ca
1-866-318-1116
Transport Canada
www.tc.gc.ca
1-800-333-0371
22
Is Your Child Safe? – Sleep Time
Consumer Product Safety,
Health Canada
Protecting and promoting the health and safety of Canadians is of the utmost
importance to the Government of Canada. The Canada Consumer Product
Safety Act (CCPSA) is the law that helps protect consumers from unsafe
products. The CCPSA and its regulations are administered by the Consumer
Product Safety Directorate (CPSD) of Health Canada.
The CPSD of Health Canada, in consultation with industry, consumers and
the medical community, has developed safety regulations for a number of
children’s products, including toys, cribs, playpens and children’s sleepwear.
The Program Development Bureau in CPSD provides information to families,
caregivers, daycare centres and health professionals through initiatives like
safety awareness campaigns, pamphlets and education bulletins.
For more information on injury prevention, please contact:
Consumer Product Safety Directorate
PDB – Outreach Unit
Health Canada
Address Locator: 3504D
Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0K9
Email: [email protected]
Toll-free: 1-866-662-0666
For inquiries and complaints about consumer products, please contact your
nearest Product Safety office by calling the toll-free number above.
Is Your Child Safe? – Sleep Time
23
Was this manual useful for you? yes no
Thank you for your participation!

* Your assessment is very important for improving the work of artificial intelligence, which forms the content of this project

Download PDF

advertisement