Safe Sleep for Your Baby Z Please take a few minutes

Safe Sleep for Your Baby Z Please take a few minutes
Safe Sleep
for Your Baby
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Please take a few minutes
to read this important information
on safe sleep practices.
The Safe Sleep for Your Baby
brochure provides parents and
caregivers with information that
can help babies sleep safely and
lower the risk of Sudden Infant
Death Syndrome, commonly
known as SIDS.
This publication was developed by the Public Health Agency of Canada.
The Safe Sleep for Your Baby brochure is available at www.publichealth.gc.ca/safesleep
Également disponible en français sous le titre : Sommeil sécuritaire pour votre bébé
To obtain additional copies, please contact:
Publications
Health Canada
PL 0900C2
Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0K9
Toll free.: 1-866-225-0709
Fax.:
(613) 941-5366
E-mail:
[email protected]
This publication can be made available in alternative formats upon request.
© Her Majesty the Queen in Right of Canada, as represented by the Minister of Health, 2010
(Revised 2014)
Pub.: 130522
Online: Cat.: HP15-8/2014E-PDF
ISBN: 978-1-100-23092-4
Space for local health care centre or practitioners’ contact information:
There are steps that you can take to help create
a safe sleep environment for your baby and
lower the risk of SIDS.
Provide a smoke-free
environment before an
d after
your baby is born.
Breastfeeding can pr
otect
your baby.
Always place your baby
on
his or her back to slee
p, at
naptime and night time.
Provide your baby with
a
safe sleep environm
ent that
has a firm surface and
no
pillows, comforters, qu
ilts or
bumper pads.
Place your baby to sle
ep in a
crib, cradle or bass
inet
next to your bed.
Smoke-free
Smoking during pregnancy exposes unborn
babies to tobacco smoke which is one of the
greatest risks for SIDS. Up to 1/3 of all SIDS
deaths could be prevented if pregnant women did not
smoke. No smoking at all is best for your baby, but
lowering the amount of cigarettes you smoke can also
lower the risk of SIDS.
Second-hand smoke also increases the risk of
SIDS after your baby is born. Avoid smoking near
your baby—in the house, in the car or anywhere your
baby sleeps or spends time. If you, your partner, family
member or friends smoke, smoke outside and far away
from your baby.
Help to quit smoking is available from your health practitioner or by contacting the pan-Canadian quitline, toll-free
at 1-866-366-3667 or www.gosmokefree.gc.ca/quit
Breastfeeding
Any amount of breastfeeding for any duration can
help protect your baby from SIDS; but exclusive
breastfeeding for the first 6 months (when
the risk of SIDS is highest) can lower the risk
of SIDS by up to 50%.
Reminder:
If you bring your
baby into bed to
breastfeed the risk of
SIDS and suffocation
do not increase so
long as you place
your baby back to
sleep in a crib, cradle
or bassinet after
the feeding.
Back to sleep
Babies who always sleep on their backs have
a lower risk of SIDS. Placing your baby on his or
her back to sleep works; since the launch of the 1999
Back to Sleep campaign in Canada, the number of
parents and caregivers who placed their babies on their
backs to sleep increased dramatically and the rate of
SIDS dropped by more than half.
Newborn babies get in the habit of sleeping the way
they are first placed, so start placing your baby on his
or her back to sleep right after he or she is born. Sleep
positioners, such as rolled up blankets or wedges, that
are meant to keep babies on their backs to sleep are
not needed and can increase the risk of suffocation.
Supervised tummy time during play time is important
to develop healthy muscles and helps to prevent your
baby from developing plagiocephaly, also known as
flat head.
Reminder:
Place your baby on his or her tummy
2–3 times a day soon after he or she
is born. Slowly work your way
up from 1 minute of tummy
time, each time, until your
baby can hold up his
or her own head, often
around 3–4 months.
Why naptime and
night time?
Babies who usually sleep on their backs but
are then placed on their tummies to sleep are
at a much higher risk of SIDS. For this reason it
is important that you, your partner, family, friends and
caregivers know to always place your baby on his or
her back to sleep—at home, in child care settings and
when travelling.
As babies get older they are usually able to turn
over onto their tummies by themselves, often around
5 months. When this happens you do not need to
reposition your baby onto his or her back to sleep.
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Safe sleep
The safest place for your baby to sleep or
nap is in a crib, cradle or bassinet that meets
current Canadian safety regulations. When
babies sleep in places that are not made for them, such
as on an adult bed, sofa or armchair, they can become
trapped and suffocate. The risk of suffocation is even
higher if a baby shares the same sleep surface with an
adult or another child.
Safe sleep environment
• Other than a firm mattress and a fitted sheet there
is no need for any extra items in the crib, cradle
or bassinet
• Soft bedding, such as pillows, comforters, quilts and
bumper pads, can increase the risk of suffocation
• Soft surfaces, such as adult beds, sofas and
armchairs, can increase the risk of suffocation
Safe crib, cradle or bassinet
• Check for a label that shows the date it was made.
If it does not have a label, it may not be safe
• Check regularly to make sure that the hardware
is tight and not damaged
• Health Canada only recommends cribs made after
September 1986 and/or no more than 10 years old
To learn more about crib, cradle and bassinet safety,
please visit Health Canada Consumer and Product
Safety at www.hc-sc.gc.ca/cps-spc/child-enfant/
equip/_crib-berc-eng.phphealthcanada.gc.ca/cps
Baby swings, bouncers, strollers and car seats are
not made for unsupervised sleep. Sleeping in a sitting
position can cause your baby’s head to fall forward
which can make it hard for your baby to breathe. For
this reason it is important to move your baby to a crib,
cradle or bassinet to sleep or when you arrive at your
destination.
Overheating is a risk for SIDS
• Your baby is safest when he or she sleeps in fitted
one-piece sleepwear that is comfortable at room
temperature and does not cause your baby to overheat
• If the room temperature is comfortable for you, then
it is comfortable for your baby
• Babies do not need extra blankets
because a baby’s movements can
cause their head to become
completely covered, which
can cause them to overheat
Reminder:
If a blanket is needed,
your baby is safest with
a thin, lightweight and
breathable blanket.
Crib, cradle or
bassinet next
to your bed
Room sharing for the first 6 months (when the
risk of SIDS is highest) helps your baby sleep
safely and lowers the risk of SIDS. Room sharing
means placing your baby to sleep in a crib, cradle or
bassinet next to your bed, in your room.
Bed sharing or co-sleeping, is when a baby shares
the same sleep surface such as an adult bed, sofa or
armchair, with an adult or another child. Sharing the
same sleep surface increases a baby’s risk of SIDS and
suffocation. This risk is even higher for babies less than
4 months old.
Sharing the same sleep surface is unsafe because a
baby can suffocate if:
• he or she becomes trapped between the sleep
surface and the body of an adult or another child,
the wall or other objects
• an adult or another child rolls over onto the baby; or
• the sleep surface has soft bedding, such as pillows,
comforters or quilts
The risk of SIDS and suffocation is even higher if a
baby shares the same sleep surface with a parent or
caregiver who smokes, is very tired, or has taken drugs,
alcohol or medications that can make them sleepy.
Reminder:
Room sharing makes it easier to breastfeed
and check on your baby at night.
Parents and all caregivers
can create a safe sleep
environment at home,
in childcare settings and
when travelling
For additional information and resources on
SIDS and Safe Sleep practices, please visit:
The Public Health Agency of Canada at
www.publichealth.gc.ca/safesleep
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