NATIONAL LONGITUDINAL SURVEY OF CHILDREN & YOUTH Overview of Survey Instruments

NATIONAL LONGITUDINAL SURVEY OF CHILDREN & YOUTH Overview of Survey Instruments
NATIONAL LONGITUDINAL
SURVEY OF CHILDREN & YOUTH
Overview of Survey Instruments
for 1998-99 Data Collection
Cycle 3
Catalogue no. 89FOO78XPE, no. 3
Statistics Canada
Statistique Canada
Human Resources
Développement des ressources
Development Canada humaines Canada
1999
For further information on the National Longitudinal Survey of Children and Youth (NLSCY),
the contacts within Human Resources Development Canada and Statistics Canada are:
Susan McKellar
NLSCY Project Coordinator
Applied Research Branch
Human Resources Development
Canada
Place du Portage
Phase II - 7th Floor
165 Hôtel de Ville
Hull, Quebec K1A 0J2
Telephone:(819) 953-8101
Facsimile:(819) 953-8868
Email: [email protected]
Sylvie Michaud
NLSCY Project Manager
Special Surveys Division
Statistics Canada
Jean Talon 7th floor, C-8
Tunney's Pasture
Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0T6
Telephone:(613) 951-9482
Facsimile:(613) 951-7333
Email: [email protected]
This is a companion report to the two documents containing the survey questionnaires, National
Longitudinal Survey of Children and Youth: Survey Instruments for 1998-1999 Data
Collection, Cycle 3, Books 1 and 2, Catalogue no. 89FOO77XPE for both. Copies of these
documents are available on request. Other publications concerning the NLSCY are listed in
Appendix E.
Également disponible en français sous le titre d'Enquête longitudinale nationale sur les
enfants et les jeunes, Aperçu du matériel d'enquête pour la collecte des données de 19981999 - Cycle 3, No. de catalogue 89FOO78XPF.
These are available on the Statistics Canada website: statcan.ca\Products and
Services\Downloadable Publications (free), 89-566-XIE for the article ‘”The intricate family life
courses of Canadian children” and 89F0077XIE and 89F0078XIE for the instruments and
overviews.
A series of research papers based on Cycle 1 NLSCY data was presented at a conference
sponsored by Human Resources Development Canada in 1998; refer to the HRDC and
conference web site:
www.hrdc_drhc.gc.ca/arb/conferences/nlscyconf/ .
In addition, a series of articles exploring various aspects of the Cycle 1 data was published under
the title “Growing Up in Canada” and is available from Statistics Canada as Catalogue # 89-550MPE; the cost is $25.
Acknowledgements
The National Longitudinal Survey of Children and Youth (NLSCY) is the responsibility of a
joint team of staff in the Applied Research Branch, Human Resources Development Canada, the
Special Surveys Division, Statistics Canada and the Centre for Education Statistics, Statistics
Canada.
The NLSCY Team would like to thank all those who so generously contributed their time and
expertise to the development of the survey, including members of the Expert Advisory Group on
Children and Families (see Appendix A for a complete list of members), the federal NLSCY
Interdepartmental Committee, subject matter specialists and provincial and territorial officials.
The Team would also like to gratefully acknowledge the work of the Statistics Canada Regional
Office staff and interviewers and the continuing cooperation of the responding children and
families.
Table of Contents
Executive Summary ....................................................................................................................... 1
1.
Introduction..........................................................................................................................3
2.
The NLSCY ........................................................................................................................ 3
2.1
Purpose........................................................................................................ 3
2.2
Management of the survey.......................................................................... 3
3.
Survey Design ..................................................................................................................... 5
3.1
Definition of the NLSCY Population ......................................................... 5
3.2
Longitudinal and Cross-sectional Estimates ............................................... 6
3.2.1
Longitudinal Sample....................................................................................7
Figure 1
NLSCY Sample Design .............................................................................. 8
3.2.2
Cross-sectional Sample............................................................................... 9
3.2.3
Supplementary Sample ..............................................................................10
3.3
Integration with the National Population Health Survey (NPHS) ............ 10
3.4
Sample Allocation..................................................................................... 10
Figure 2
Number of longitudinal children in cycles 3 by age group ....................... 12
Figure 3
Number of longitudinal children in cycles 3 by province......................... 13
Figure 4
Number of children in cross-sectional and supplementary samples for
cycle 3 by age group.................................................................................. 14
3.5
Respondents .............................................................................................. 15
3.6
Data Collection ......................................................................................... 15
3.6.1
Main Collection in the Provinces...............................................................15
3.7
Data Output............................................................................................... 16
4.
NLSCY Survey Instruments ............................................................................................. 18
Figure 5
NLSCY Survey Instruments - Provinces .................................................. 20
5.
Survey Content...................................................................................................................21
Figure 6
National Longitudinal Survey of Children and Youth - Content.............. 22
5.1
Cycle 3 Content Changes.......................................................................... 23
5.2
Household Contact Section........................................................................23
5.3
Parent Questionnaire................................................................................. 23
5.4
Child Questionnaire .................................................................................. 25
5.5
10-11 Self-Complete Questionnaire ......................................................... 28
5.6
12-13 Self-Complete Questionnaire ......................................................... 28
5.7
14-15 Self-Complete Questionnaire ......................................................... 29
5.8
5.9
5.10
Reading and Mathematical Aptitude Indicator ..........................................32
Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test - Revised ..............................................32
Administrative Information....................................................................... 32
5.11
5.12
5.13
Reading Comprehension and Mathematical Skills Exercise .................... 33
Teachers' Questionnaires........................................................................... 33
Principal's Questionnaire .......................................................................... 34
Appendices
Appendix A Expert Advisory Group......................................................................................... 35
Appendix B Collection in the Yukon and Northwest Territories.............................................. 37
Figure 7:
Number of Children by Territory...............................................................38
Figure 8:
NLSCY/NPHS Survey Instruments - Yukon and NWT Collection ..........39
Appendix C The Labour Force Survey...................................................................................... 41
The vital statistics
Appendix D NLSCY Content in the Provinces ......................................................................... 45
Household record ...............................................................................................................46
Parent questionnaire...........................................................................................................47
Child questionnaire ............................................................................................................49
Tests ...................................................................................................................................56
Self-complete questionnaires .............................................................................................57
Teachers’ questionnaires....................................................................................................64
Principal’s questionnaire....................................................................................................67
Appendix E List of NLSCY Reports..........................................................................................71
Executive Summary
The National Longitudinal Survey of Children and Youth (NLSCY) is a long-term study
conducted in partnership by Human Resources Development Canada (HRDC) and Statistics
Canada. The primary objective of the NLSCY is to monitor the development and well-being of
Canada’s children as they grow from infancy to adulthood.
The NLSCY is designed to follow a representative sample of Canadian children, aged newborn
to 11 years, into adulthood, with data collection occurring at two-year intervals. The first
collection of information (cycle 1) took place in the winter and spring of 1994-95 and the second
(cycle 2) in the winter and spring of 1996-97. Collection of cycle 3 began in the fall of 1998 and
was carried until June 1999. In addition to the original sample of children, who were aged 2 to
13 years at the time of the second data collection, a new sample of newborn and 1-year-old
children was added to cycle 3 to allow for cross-sectional estimates. An extra cross-sectional
sample of children 5 years old was also added to allow some provincial estimates for that age
group.
The NLSCY is a comprehensive survey that examines a variety of factors thought to influence
child growth and development. Information is collected on the child's parent(s) and other family
members, on the characteristics of the child’s family and on the child’s school. In addition, the
NLSCY collects information on the child's health, development, temperament, behaviour,
relationships, child care and school experiences, participation in activities and family and custody
history.
Much of the information in the NLSCY is collected from parents on behalf of their children, by
means of a household interview. Additional information is collected using questionnaires
completed by the child’s teacher and principal. Children aged 10 and older complete a separate
written questionnaire in the home. Finally, the NLSCY includes two measures of achievement:
interviewers administer a receptive vocabulary test in the home to children aged 4 to 6; and
teachers administer a short test of mathematics/computation skills and reading comprehension to
children in grades 2 and above.
Data collected in cycle 1 of the survey is being released by Statistics Canada in several “waves”
due to the size of the data set. The first wave of data was released in October 1996, with a public
microdata file becoming available for purchase in November along with a volume entitled
“Growing Up in Canada”, which presented the first research studies undertaken using NLSCY
data. Further information from teachers and principals was released in April 1997. The second
wave of data was released in September 1997, with the remaining data from cycle 1 in early
1998. The first release of longitudinal information from cycle 2 was done in October 1998, at the
conference “Investing in children “. The second release of cycle 2 information was done in June
1999 and the last release of cycle 2 is planned for the fall of 1999. Statistics Canada retains a
master microdata file from which data can be requested, and will produce public microdata files
1
and accompanying documentation as well as highlights packages following each data collection.
2
1.
Introduction
The purpose of this document is to describe the content and design of cycle 3 of the
National Longitudinal Survey of Children and Youth (NLSCY). It describes the survey
instruments for the 1998-99 cycle of the NLSCY as reflected in the two documents,
National Longitudinal Survey of Children and Youth, Survey Instruments for 19981999 Data Collection, Cycle 2 - Books 1 and 2, Catalogue number 89FOO77XPE for
both.
As the NLSCY Cycle 3 content is similar to that in Cycle 1 and Cycle 2, this document
builds on the information presented in the preceding overviews, National Longitudinal
Survey of Children: Overview of Survey Instruments for 1994-95 Data Collection,
Cycle 1, and 1996-97 Data collection Cycle 2 rather than repeating much of it. The reader
should refer to this previous document for additional information. (Please see Appendix E
for a list of earlier publications regarding the survey.)
2.
The NLSCY
2.1
Purpose
The National Longitudinal Survey of Children and Youth is a long-term study conducted
in partnership by Human Resources Development Canada (HRDC) and Statistics Canada.
The primary objective of the NLSCY is to monitor the development and well-being of
Canada’s children as they grow from infancy to adulthood. More specifically, the
objectives of the NLSCY are:
•
to determine the prevalence of various biological, social and economic
characteristics and risk factors among children and youth;
•
to support Canadian understanding of the determinants of child development and
well-being and of the pathways of their influence on child outcomes; and
•
to provide this information to policy and program officials for use in developing
effective policies and strategies to help young people live healthy, active and
rewarding lives.
2.2
Management of the Survey
The NLSCY is conducted in partnership by HRDC and Statistics Canada. Statistics
Canada is responsible for data collection, while HRDC provides overall direction to the
survey. Both agencies play a role in funding, development of survey content, research
3
and dissemination of findings.
In addition, HRDC and Statistics Canada continue to benefit from the advice and input of
a variety of other interested partners. Other federal departments are kept informed of
developments and provide advice on the survey via the NLSCY Interdepartmental
Committee. Provincial and territorial governments have been kept informed of progress
and have provided input via representatives in each province and territory.
Finally, HRDC and Statistics Canada have relied heavily on advice provided by HRDC’s
Expert Advisory Group on Children and Families (EAG), a multi-disciplinary group of
Canadian and international experts in child development who are consulted on survey
design, survey questions and research priorities, and who are responsible for much of the
original research that has been conducted using the survey data. Additional experts are
consulted on an ad hoc basis as required.
4
3.
NLSCY Design
The 1998-99 NLSCY data collection is the third data collection, or cycle, for the survey.
The first data collection took place in 1994-95, and the second one in 1996-97.
For the third cycle of the survey, the NLSCY consists of two components:
1.
a main component - the collection in the provinces, which is solely the
NLSCY, and
2.
a territories' component - the collection in Yukon and Northwest
Territories which is done jointly with the National Population Health
Survey (NPHS).
Note that there is no longer a component integrated with the NPHS at the provincial level
as there was for the first cycle.
The main component is discussed in the following sections; the territories' component is
discussed in Appendix B.
3.1.
Definition of the NLSCY Population
The goal of the NLSCY is to follow, until they reached adulthood, a representative
sample of Canadian children who were aged newborn to 11 years during the first cycle in
1994-95, and to collect information about these children every two years. The NLSCY
target population for the first data collection in 1994-95 consisted of the population of
Canadian children newborn to 11 years of age who lived in private households. Children
living in institutions and children living on Indian reserves were not targeted by the
survey, as the households for the main component were selected from Statistics Canada's
Labour Force Survey (LFS) sample frame1. The children in each economic family2 were
selected at random, up to a maximum of four children per household.
1
Appendix C provides a brief description of the Labour Force Survey.
2
For the NLSCY, an economic family is defined as a family in which all members are related by blood, marriage,
common-law relationship or adoption; foster children are considered to be part of a family.
5
For the second collection, in 1996-97, the NLSCY target population for the purposes of
longitudinal estimates remained the children from the respondent households for the first
cycle, now aged 2 to 13 years and for the third collection cycle, the longitudinal cohort is
now aged between 4 and 15.
For the purposes of producing cross-sectional estimates, it was necessary to add a sample
of children aged newborn to 1 year, since these ages were no longer covered by the
longitudinal sample. In cycle 2, these children were from households selected from the
LFS sample frame, as well as from NLSCY longitudinal households with children born
between the first and second data collections. Those children were followed and
interviewed in cycle 3 and the current plans are to collect information on them until they
reach the age of 5.
Like for cycle 2, the production of cross-sectional estimates in cycle 3 required the
addition of a sample of new-borns and 1 years old. However, a lot of research suggest that
key elements of child development happen in the early years and for cycle 3, it was
decided to interview a much larger cohort of children 1 years old, as well as to interview
an additional cross-sectional sample of children 5 years old. Because of its size, the new
cohorts of 1 and 5 years old were selected from administrative files on vital statistics. The
cohort of new-borns was selected from the LFS sample frame.
3.2
Longitudinal and Cross-sectional Estimates
By definition, the first cycle of the survey provided cross-sectional, or prevalence,
information only. However, like in the second collection cycle, the NLSCY will be able
to provide cross-sectional and longitudinal information in cycle 3. The longitudinal data
are central to tracking developmental changes in children over time and to studying the
influence of children’s environments. The cross-sectional and longitudinal estimates will
be produced at the national level for each age group. They will be produced at the
provincial level for children from aggregated age groups to the extent possible, depending
on the size of the sample and the reliability of the estimates. In cycle 3, more provincial
estimates should be possible for children aged 1 and 5 years old.
Figure 1 provides an overview of the longitudinal and cross-sectional aspects of the
NLSCY. A1 to A7 represent the longitudinal sample. N1 to N6 represent the additional
cross-sectional sample for cycles 2 to 5. T1 represent an extra top-up sample of children
of 5 years old that has been interviewed in cycle 3. Cross-sectional estimates will be
produced for all age groups until cycle 4, e.g., for A1 to A7 for 1994-95, for N1 to A7 for
1996-97, for N3 to A7 for cycle 3 and for N4 to A7 in cycle 4. Starting in cycle 5, crosssectional estimates should be possible only for children aged between 0 and 5.
Longitudinal estimates will be produced starting with the second cycle to show changes
in sample characteristics between collection cycles, e.g., between A3 in 1994-95 (children
6
2-3 years of age) and A3 in 1996-97 (the same children, now 4-5 years of age). Some
longitudinal analysis will be possible on the younger age cohorts, but for a much shorter
time period.
3.2.1
Longitudinal Sample
Information will be collected on the NLSCY children at two-year intervals until they
reach adulthood. If a child moves out of the sample dwelling at a later date, the child will
be traced and will be included in the next cycle of interviewing at the new location. From
a longitudinal perspective, the child, not the dwelling, is the statistical unit. The "A's" in
Figure 1 represent the longitudinal sample and show how the sample ages with each
subsequent cycle.
For the first NLSCY data collection in 1994-95, a final responding sample was obtained
of 22,831 children new-borns to 11 years of age inclusive, in the ten provinces. (See
Appendix B for size of the sample in the two territories.)
7
Figure 1 : NLSCY Sample Design (for the first five survey cycles)
19
A7
18
A7
A6
17
16
15
A
14
G
13
E
12
11
G
10
R
9
O
8
U
7
P
6
S
5
A7
A6
A5
A7
A6
A5
A4
A7
A6
A5
A4
A3
A6
A5
A4
A3
A2
A5
A4
A3
A2
A1
A1
A4
A3
A2
4
T1
N1
A1
T2
N2
N3
3
2
A3
A2
A1
N1
N2
N3
N4
1
A2
N1
N2
N4
N5
0
A1
1994-1995
N3
1996-1997
1998-1999
N6
20002001
20022003
COLLECTION CYCLES
The longitudinal sample and the original cross-sectional sample are represented by the As
and the expanded cross-sectional sample by the Ns. The T represents an extra top-up sample
that was selected in cycle 3. Boxes A1 to A7 represent the age groups used for the
longitudinal sample: 2 years, 3 years, 4 to 5 years, 6 to 7 years, 8 to 9 years, 10 to 11 years
and 12 to 13 years for the second collection cycle (1996-97). The supplementary sample
from New Brunswick is not represented here.
8
In cycle 2 of the NLSCY, the longitudinal sample was reduced to 16, 903 children in
order to reduce respondent burden at the household level and in order to reduce costs. For
cycle 2, this longitudinal sample included children aged 2 to 13 years. So the longitudinal
sample consisted of 16, 903 children, 1, 473 of these children were non-respondents in
cycle 2. For the longitudinal sample, in cycle 3, all the children eligible for interview in
cycle 2 were re-contacted. This means that an attempt was done to try to interview
children that were in responding households in cycle 1 but that had not responded in cycle
2. An analysis will be done to see to what extent those cases were converted to
respondents.
In cycle 3, siblings or new-borns since the last interview were not added to the sample
like it was done in cycle 2.
Some children who were participants in the first collection cycle may not participate in
the subsequent cycles because of sample attrition. The numbers of these children will be
carefully monitored. However, experiences in similar longitudinal surveys such as the
National Longitudinal Survey of Youth in the United States have shown that attrition
does not appear to be a major problem.
3.2.2 Cross-sectional Sample
In the cycles subsequent to cycle 1, it is intended that the NLSCY sample will be
upgraded in age groups between 0 and 5 no longer covered by the longitudinal sample, to
maintain coverage of the lower age ranges for cross-sectional purposes. The "N's" in
Figure 1 represent the augmented portion of the cross-sectional sample. At the present
time, it is planned that children added to upgrade the sample will be followed
longitudinally only until they reach the age of 5. This means that the top-up sample of 5
years old (labelled T) will be interviewed only once.
For cycle 3, the additional sample was approximately 2,000 children 0 to 11 months. For
children 1 years old, the sample was approximately 7,900. And approximately 6,900 extra
children aged 5 have been added to the longitudinal sample.
The samples were selected from two sources : the sample of new-borns to 11 months old
was selected from households that previously participated to the Labour Force Survey.
However, it was not feasible to get the full sample of new children 1 years old through
this method. There are also constraints in the sample allocation, when the LFS is
used as a frame. Those two reasons lead to the examination of other potential sources to
be able to select the sample of 1 years old and the additional sample of 5 years old. The
samples were selected from vital statistics file on birth. The samples were allocated to
allow estimates at the provincial level.
9
One child per household was selected, except in the case of twins, when both were
selected. For the purposes of cross-sectional estimates, the cross-sectional sample as well
as the longitudinal sample will be used.
3.2.3 Supplementary Sample
In cycle 3, no supplementary sample was purchased.
3.3
Integration with the National Population Health Survey (NPHS)
The National Population Health Survey is another national longitudinal survey being
conducted by Statistics Canada in the same years as the NLSCY. Its purpose is to
produce reliable estimates of the current physical and mental health of Canadian residents
of all ages and to identify the factors that determine good and ill health. Because both the
NLSCY and the NPHS needed to collect data on the health of Canadian children, it was
initially decided that a portion of the sample and content of the two surveys would be
integrated in the provinces. The children selected by the NPHS were part of the sample
for both surveys in cycle 1.
For the second cycle, as a result of budget cuts, in addition to limiting the number of
children selected to two children in the majority of NLSCY families, it was decided to no
longer integrate the two surveys. Thus, all families in which at least one child was part of
the two surveys were eliminated from the NLSCY sample. It must be noted that these
cuts resulted in the elimination from the NLSCY of approximately 2,288 households,
representing 3,844 longitudinal children. These children are still maintained in the
NPHS. They are part of the NPHS sample and have not been added to the sample for
cycle 3.
However, the data collection in the Yukon and the Northwest Territories remains
integrated with the NPHS. Appendix B contains information on the survey in the two
territories.
3.4
Sample Allocation
The sample allocation for the first cycle of the NLSCY was based on several
requirements. Sufficient sample was required in each age group to produce reliable
estimates at the national level. There had to be a sufficient sample at the national level to
reliably measure characteristics with a national prevalence of 4% for each age group after
five survey cycles (min-p3 of 4%). Secondly, a sufficient sample in each province and
3
NLSCY data will be used to estimate the proportion of children having specific characteristics, for example, specific
behaviours. The 'min-p.' is the 'minimum proportion' or smallest proportion obtained by the survey estimates where
the estimates can be reliably released or published without qualification. If one wishes to estimate a proportion
smaller than the calculated min-p, the estimates will not be reliable and should not be released. If the estimated
10
territory was required to produce reliable estimates for all children ages newborn to 11
years, with no age breakdown.
It should be noted that the NLSCY uses a cluster sample4, not a simple random sample.
Thus, certain characteristics may not be measurable below the national level. The sample
was first allocated by age group; a second step involved an allocation by province to
make sure that the smaller provinces would have sufficient sample. Zero to 11 month
olds and one-year olds were oversampled by keeping them as separate groups.
Figure 2 presents the longitudinal sample obtained for cycle 1 and cycle 2 from
responding households and the longitudinal sample surveyed for cycle 3. The size of the
responding cycle 3 longitudinal sample is unavailable at the time of publication. Figure
3 represents these allocations by province. Figure 4 indicates the cross-sectional sample
obtained after collection for the second cycle from respondent households by age group
and by province.
proportion is greater than the min-p, the estimates can be released.
The min-p after five cycles (ten years) was considered to be a critical criterion for the NLSCY sample because the
NLSCY is a longitudinal survey. The min-p for earlier cycles should be better than the one after five cycles.
4
Because the NLSCY uses the Labour Force Survey sample frame, the LFS clusters become the basis for the NLSCY
sample as well. Cluster sampling for the LFS includes, for example, the process of sampling city blocks. Only certain
blocks are chosen to be part of the sample; dwellings are selected from within those blocks.
11
Figure 2 : Number of longitudinal children1 in cycles 1 and 2 by age group
AGE
Cycle 1
(# responding)
Cycle 2
(# responding)
Cycle 3
(# surveyed)
0
2,227
-
1
2,469
2-3
3,909
3,654
4-5
3,728
2,697
3,950
6-7
3,550
2,429
2,958
8-9
3,514
2,169
2,652
10-11
3,434
2,249
2,392
12-13
-
2,270
2,463
2,488
14-15
Total
-
15,435
22,831
16,903
1
The number of children in cycle 1 comes from the final sample of respondent households. In cycle 2, the number of
children shown is the number surveyed, after the cuts were applied to the cycle 1 sample.
2
Annex B contains the data for the Yukon and Northwest Territories.
12
Figure 3 : Number of longitudinal1 children in cycles 1, 2, and 3 by province 2
Cycle 2
(# responding)
PROVINCE
Cycle 1
(# responding)
Newfoundland
1,232
855
950
Prince Edward Island
764
435
467
Nova Scotia
1,532
1041
1,191
New Brunswick
1,426
943
1,070
Quebec
4,065
2937
3,182
Ontario
6,020
3913
4,342
Manitoba
1,789
1157
1,232
Saskatchewan
1,878
1294
1,413
Alberta
2,185
1474
1,599
1,940
1342
1,457
British Columbia
Other* and Not stated
Total
Cycle 3
(# surveyed)
77
15,468
22,831
16,903
*includes those who moved from there residence in cycle 1 to a new residence outside of the nine provinces
(i.e. Yukon, Territories) and those who were temporarily outside of Canada
13
Figure 4 :
Number of sampled children1 in cross-sectional sample in cycle 3
by province 2
PROVINCE
5 year olds
255
O year olds
59
1 year olds
557
47
263
199
103
586
245
107
585
245
338
1,239
1,606
572
1,931
2,422
193
584
242
172
579
221
225
635
660
175
653
756
1,991
7,632
Newfoundland
Prince Edward Island
Nova Scotia
New Brunswick
Quebec
Ontario
Manitoba
Saskatchewan
Alberta
British Columbia
Total
14
6,821
3.5
Respondents
The main respondent for cycle 3, as for cycle 1, was the person in the household most
knowledgeable about the child(ren). In most cases, the respondent was the mother. This
person provided information on herself, her spouse/partner, the selected child(ren) and
household members. The child was the respondent for: the direct assessment of receptive
vocabulary (4, 5 and 6-year-olds if they were in first grade or lower); self-administered
questionnaires for 10-11 year olds,12-13 year olds and 14-15 years old; and the reading
and mathematical aptitude indicator (children in second grade and over); these were
administered in the home. They were also the respondent for the Reading
Comprehension and Mathematics Computation Exercise (second grade and over) given to
them in school. The interviewer completed an evaluation of the Peabody Picture
Vocabulary Test conditions and of the indicator. The child's teacher and principal
responded to the Teacher's and Principal's Questionnaires.
3.6
Data Collection
Data collection for the third cycle of the NLSCY took place between November 1998 to
June 1999. The first period of the household collection started in November and it
collected mainly the information on the longitudinal sample. The second collection took
started in February 1999 and it focused on the collection of information for children 4 and
5 years old, as well as collecting information on non-respondents from the November
collection. The last collection started in April 1999 and collected most of its information
from children 0-3 years old. Each collection lasted approximately two months. The
school collection was carried out in the spring of 1999.
3.6.1
Main Collection in the Provinces
The main NLSCY household data collection in the provinces was carried out using
computer-assisted interviewing (CAI), either in person or by telephone. Statistics Canada
interviewers conducted the interviews. Contacting the household and asking for
demographic information was generally done by telephone. Interviews continued in
person except for households with only children aged between 0 and 3 years old, for
which interviews took place entirely by telephone in the majority of cases. This was
feasible since the children were young and weren’t required to complete a questionnaire
or a test.
Face-to face interviewing for longitudinal households was used for several reasons.
Personal interviewing helped secure the household's participation over a long period of
time and allowed for the development of a rapport between the respondent and the
interviewer. Also, the nature of some elements of the NLSCY made it necessary for
collection of a portion of the data to occur through personal interviewing. For example,
15
an interviewer-administered assessment to measure receptive vocabulary was conducted
in the home for children aged 4 to 6 years of age. In addition, 10 to 15 year olds were
asked to fill out a self-completed questionnaire, in most cases while the interview with
the parent was being conducted. Children in second grade and up were given a reading
and mathematical aptitude indicator. Furthermore, the parent's signed consent was
required in order to collect information from teachers and principals and to allow children
in grades 2 and above to be given a reading comprehension and mathematics computation
exercise in school.
Once the household collection was completed, school collection started. Questionnaires
were mailed to, and returned by, teachers and principals of school-aged children for
whom parental consent had been given.
3.7 Data Output
Cycle 1:
Data collected in cycle 1 of the survey is being released by Statistics Canada in several
“waves” due to the size of the dataset. The first wave of data was released in October
1996, with a public microdata file becoming available for purchase in November along
with a volume entitled “Growing Up in Canada”, which presented the first research
studies undertaken using NLSCY data. Further information from teachers and principals
was released in April 1997. The second wave of data was released in September 1997,
with the remaining data from cycle 1 was released in the spring of 1998, with an article
from Nicole Marcil-Gratton available on the internet on the Statistics Canada website:
statcan.ca\Products and Services\Downloadable Publications (free), No. 89-566-XIE for
the article ‘”The intricate family life courses of Canadian children” .
Cycle 2:
Processing of the data collected in cycle 2 of the survey began in May 1997, and the data
the release of the first wave was done in October 1998 at a conference called “Investing
in Children” organised by Human Resources Development Canada . At that conference, a
number of other papers were presented on further analysis done with the cycle 1 data. A
series of research papers based on Cycle 1 NLSCY data was presented at a conference
sponsored by Human Resources Development Canada in 1998; refer to the conference
web site:
www.hrdc_drhc.gc.ca/arb/conferences/nlscyconf/ .
The second release of cycle 2 data was done in June 1999, an a summary article was put
in Statistics Canada’s Daily on the internet at www.Statcan.ca\Daily News. An article on
the information reported by teachers should be released in the early fall. The third wave
release should also be done in the fall 1999.
16
Public Use Micro Data File:
Statistics Canada currently has available a cross sectional public microdata file for cycle 1
and cycle 2 and will produce a cross sectional public microdata files for Cycle 3
(expected availability date is January 2001). Each microdata files includes NLSCY public
use data and accompanying documentation. Appendix E contains a list of publications
relating to the NLSCY, some of which may be useful for those wishing to analyze the
data.
In order to ensure respondent confidentiality, a longitudinal file is not available to the
public. In addition, certain variables are not available on the public use micro data file.
Those wishing access to suppressed or longitudinal data can do so by either remote access
or through custom tabulations.
Remote Access:
Through remote access, researchers can have access to suppressed data by submitting
programs to run on the NLSCY data set at Statistics Canada. A “dummy” research file
will be made available to researchers to check the logic and syntax of their programs.
Researchers will transmit their programs electronically to Statistics Canada via the
INTERNET, which will then be moved into the Department's internal, secure
environment. Next, the code would be processed on a PC, the results vetted for
confidentiality, and shipped back to the client. It should be noted that the onus is with the
user to submit retrieval programs which are correct and tested. Statistics Canada will
review results only for confidentiality concerns and will not make any assessment
whatsoever as to whether or not the submitted program has worked properly. Remote
data access is available on a cost recovery basis. For more information please contact
[email protected]
Custom Tabulations:
Statistics Canada retains a master microdata file from which specific midrodata files and
personalized tabulations can be requested; please contact [email protected]
17
4. NLSCY Survey Instruments
The NLSCY is a comprehensive survey that examines a variety of factors thought to
influence child growth and development. Information is collected on the child's parent(s)
and other family members, on the characteristics of the child’s family and on the child’s
school. In addition, the NLSCY collects information on the child's health, development,
temperament, behaviour, relationships, child care and school experiences, participation in
activities and family and custody history.
Much of the information in cycle 3 of the NLSCY was collected from parents on behalf
of their children, by means of a household interview. Additional information was
collected using questionnaires completed by the child’s teacher and principal. Children
aged 10 and older completed a separate written questionnaire in the home. Finally, the
NLSCY included two measures of skills: a receptive vocabulary test was administered by
interviewers in the home to children aged 4 to 6; and a test of mathematics computation
skills and reading comprehension was administered in the school to children in grades 2
and above. Another measure administered in the home was a reading and mathematical
aptitude indicator; the results of this were used in determining the appropriate level for
the school mathematics and reading exercise.
The NLSCY collection in the provinces2 consisted of six sections completed by using
computer-assisted interviewing (CAI) in person and by telephone, six self-completed
instruments, two interviewer-completed evaluation questionnaires and three tests.
CAI:
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
Household Contact Section
Parent Questionnaire
Child Questionnaire
Information on the school and informed consent
Various types of administrative information (control data and data concerning the
status of questionnaires and of the indicator)
Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test-Revised (PPVT-R), for 4 and 5-year-olds and
those 6-year-olds not in grade 2 or above - only the responses to the questions and
the score are on CAI
The respondent for instruments #1 to #5 was the person most knowledgeable about the
children in the family, except for the sections answered by the interviewer. The PPVT-R
was administered directly to the child.
2
The collection in the Yukon and Northwest Territories is discussed in Appendix B.
18
Self-completed Instruments:
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
12.
13.
14.
Questionnaire for 10-11 year olds
Questionnaire for 12-13 year olds
Questionnaire for 14-15 year olds
Teacher's Questionnaire: Document 1, for kindergarten teachers
Teacher's Questionnaire: Document 2, for a school environment where the child
had one teacher for the basic academic subjects
Mathematics Teacher's Questionnaire Document 3, for a school environment
where a child/youth had different teachers for the basic academic subjects
Language Arts Teacher's Questionnaire Document 3, for a school environment
where a child/youth had different teachers for the basic academic subjects
Principal's Questionnaire
Instruments #7, #8 and #9 were completed by the child in the home; instruments #10 to
#14 were mailed to the school for completion by the teacher or principal.
Tests
15.
16.
17.
The Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test-Revised (for 4 and 5-year-olds and those 6year-olds not in grade 2 or above)
The reading and mathematical aptitude indicator (for children in second grade a
over)
The Reading Comprehension and Mathematics Computation Exercise (for
children in second grade and over)
Tests #15 and #16 were completed by the child in the home. Test #17 was completed by
the child at school.
Interviewer-completed Evaluation Instruments:
18. PPVT-R evaluation
19. Indicator evaluation
Instrument #18 and # 19 were on CAI.
Figure 5 presents a schematic of the survey instruments. Section 5 describes the NLSCY
content in detail; Appendix D outlines the subject areas covered by each instrument and
identifies the person (by age) about whom information was collected.
19
FIGURE 5 : NLSCY Survey Instruments - Provinces
Household
Contact Section
Parent
Questionnaire
Given
at home
Child
Questionnaire
Given
at school
For Children 4 to 13 years old
Children 4 to 6 years old
Peabody Picture
Vocabulary Test-R
Teachers’
and Principal’s
Questionnaires
Grade 2 +
Reading and
Mathematical Aptitude
Indicator
Grade 2 +
Children 10 to 15 years old
Reading
Comprehension and
Mathematical Skills
Exercise
Questionnaire
for 10-11 year
olds, 12-13
14-15 year olds
CAI Questionnaire
(Parent Respondent)
Test
(Child Respondent)
20
Self-completed
Questionnaire
5. Survey Content
This section describes the NLSCY cycle 3 instruments by outlining the changes from
cycle 2, to save repeating the information presented in the cycle 1 document please refer
to National Longitudinal Survey of Children: Survey Instruments for 1994-95 Data
Collection, Cycle 1 and the cycle 2 documents. The content for the collection in the
Yukon and Northwest Territories is summarized in Appendix B.
As mentioned earlier, the various cycle 3 survey instruments are presented in the
documents National Longitudinal Survey of Children and Youth: Survey
Instruments for 1998-1999 Data Collection - Cycle 3, Book 1, Catalogue No.
89FOO77XPE and National Longitudinal Survey of Children and Youth: Survey
Instruments for 1998-1999 Data Collection - Cycle 3, Book 2, Catalogue
No.89FOO77XPE. The questionnaires for the territories are available on request.
Figure 6 provides a summary of the content of the third collection cycle of the NLSCY.
Appendix D outlines the specific content covered for the provinces.
21
Figure 6: National Longitudinal Survey of Children and Youth - Cycle 3 Content
Child (depending on age)
socio-demographics
health
perinatal information
motor development
temperament
school achievement
education/school experiences
literacy
extra-curricular activities
work experience
social relationships
relationships with parents
family and custody history
child care
behaviour
self-esteem
smoking, drinking, drugs
vocabulary assessment
math computation test
reading comprehension test
locator test
Parents
socio-demographics
education
labour force activity
income
health
parental involvement in school
parental expectations re schooling
School
student population
disciplinary problems
school climate
Teacher
teaching practices
demographics
Principal
demographics
Family
demographics of members
relationships within family
family functioning
dwelling
22
5.1
Cycle 3 Content Changes
Content development for cycle 3 had two dimensions, namely a) revisions due to the
analysis of cycle 2 data, b) new material added for 14-15 year old children as a result of
consultation with experts in adolescence.
The selection of topics for inclusion in the third cycle was completed through
consultation with members of the Expert Advisory Group and others who are experts in
issues of relevance to adolescents. The objective of this consultation was to identify
content which would be of importance for both 14 and 15-year-old children participating
in the third cycle and for these same children as they grow older in subsequent collection
cycles.
Figure 7 shows a summary of cycle 3 content while the chart in Appendix D provides
more details. The following description of cycle 3 content covers major changes. Minor
changes in wording or organization are not mentioned. For a complete listing of survey
questions, refer to the cycle 2 questionnaires.
5.2
Household Contact Section
The purpose of this section is to collect information on the age, sex, marital status and
relationship of household members. These questions are the same as those collected in the
second collection cycle, with some data being confirmed only.
5.3
Parent Questionnaire
Education
In cycle 3, 5 additional questions were added to the education section on literacy and
were asked of both PMK and spouse. These questions refer to how frequently the PMK
and spouse used a public library, wrote letters, read newspapers or magazines, read
books. In addition, parents were asked about the type of reading material in the
household including newspapers, magazines, books, encyclopedias and dictionaries.
Labour Force:
The labour force section remained relatively the same from cycle 2 to cycle 3 with three
additional questions on maternity \ parental leave added to cycle 3. These questions
asked the PMK and the spouse whether they had taken any paid or unpaid maternity or
parental leave in the 12 months previous to the survey, and if so, how many weeks of
both paid and unpaid leave were taken.
23
Income:
In order to obtain a more accurate value for household income and in order to better
understand the sources of household income, changes were made to cycle 3.
In cycle 2 the PMK was asked from which sources they received household income, what
was their main source of household income, and were then asked to provide an estimate
of their total household income and personal income. If the PMK refused to provide an
exact estimate, income was assessed using a series of cascading questions relating to the
range in which their income fell.
In cycle 3, personal income was generated by obtaining the dollar amount for each source
of income and adding together all of the sources to get a total amount.. This amount was
confirmed with the PMK as the total personal income. If the PMK indicated that the
generated value wasn’t the correct amount, the amounts provided for each source of
income were reviewed and corrected as necessary. As with cycle 2, for those who
refused to provide specific amounts, personal income was determined using a set of
cascading questions relating to the range in which their personal income fell.
In addition, the spouse of the PMK was also asked about personal income, whereas this
was not done in cycle 2. Household income is determined the same way as in Cycle 2. If
the respondent hesitates to give an accurate dollar value for household income, income
was assessed using a series of cascading questions relating to the range in which their
income fell.
Adult Health
A minor change was made to the section on alcohol consumption: Question HLA_Q7
relating to the number of times the adult had 5 or more drinks on one occasion within the
previous 12 months was dropped in cycle 3. A new question, HLA=Q5A was added
which asked the average number of drinks consumed.
Family Functioning
This section remained unchanged from cycle 2.
Neighbourhood:
This section was not asked in cycle 2. In cycle 3, 9 questions from cycle 1 were added
back to the survey. These questions pertain to neighbourhood safety, community
involvement, and neighbourhood cohesion.
Social Support:
This section was not asked in cycle 2. In cycle 3, 6 questions from cycle 1 were added
back to the survey. These questions pertain to the relationships and the support which the
adult receives.
24
Socio-Demographic Characteristics:
This section was the same as in cycle 2.
Height and Weight (0-11 year olds):
HLT-Q3 and Q4 were not asked for 12 to 15 year olds. The youth were asked for this
information on the self-complete.
5.4
Child Questionnaire
Birth Weight:
The questions on the child’s weight at birth (HLT-Q4C) and delivery date (HLT-Q4D1
and HLT-Q4D2) were added for new respondents aged 2 and older in Cycle 3 so that the
file would have this important information for all children. The data had been collected
in cycle 1 for younger children (0-3 year olds in cycle 1 who were 2-5 years in cycle 2),
cycle 2 for those aged 6-13 (8- 14 years old in cycle 3). For new respondents aged 2 or
younger, this information was collected in the Medical/Biological section in cycle 3.
Use of Medication (0-13 year olds):
Question HLT-Q51A was clarified to say “Ventolin, inhalers or puffers for asthma.”
Work After Birth
In cycle 2, questions on the mother’s return tithe labour market (MED-Q29, Q30A, Q31)
were added to the medical \ biological section to ask if the mother had worked since the
birth of her last child, how many weeks/months she waited after the child’s birth to start
working, and how many hours per week the mother usually worked upon returning to her
job. These questions were added for the purpose of learning about the time interval after
which mothers returned to the labour market following the birth of a child and the extent
to which these mothers participated upon return.
In cycle 3 this section was expanded to included information on the age of the child when
the mother began working (WAB_Q2 ) and the continuity of work after birth until the
child began school for school aged children
Temperament (0-3 year olds):
After validation of the Cycle 1 results, only the fussy/difficult construct was asked for
cycle 2. In cycle 3, the unadaptable construct was added back to the survey.
Education (4-15 year olds):
Questions EDU-Q12A, EDU-Q12B were added to cycle 3 to determine if the child was in
an immersion program, and if so, the percentage of time spent in the immersion program.
Using information from cycle 2, response categories were created for question EDUQ14F on amount of time spent doing homework; in cycle 2 this question was a
25
continuous variables, with total hours and minutes being reported rather than categories
of time. In cycle 2, question EDU-Q16 asked about the frequency of contact by the
school regarding the child’s behaviour. In cycle 3, this question was broken into two
components: contact regarding positive behaviour or achievements (EDU-Q16A) and
contact regarding behaviour problems or challenges at school (EDU-Q16B). Question
EDU-Q18C was new in cycle 3 and asked the adult how frequently they talk to their child
about school work or behaviour in the class. And lastly, question EDU-Q19E was added
to assess the adults perception of whether their child’s school offers them many
opportunities to be involved in school activities.
Literacy (4-9 year olds):
The literacy section was expanded from 4-7 year olds in cycle 2 to 4-9 year olds in cycle
3. In cycle 2 , the literacy section for 7-13 year olds was dropped with a few questions
for this age group included in other sections of the survey. In cycle 3, questions about
books and reading (LIT-Q7B, LIT_Q12, LIT, Q13) and how frequently they attend the
library (LIT-Q14) were added back for this age group.
Activities (4-15 year olds):
Most of this section was dropped for 14-15 year olds - only the responsibilities and
summer camp were asked of parents of 10-11, 12-13, and 14-15 year olds. Activities
outside of school hours were covered on the Self-Complete Questionnaires for these
children. Questions ACT-Q3E and ACT- Q3F from cycle 2 on whether the child played
computer or video games and if so, how many hours on a typical day was reworked for
cycle 3. ACT-Q4A replaced these questions and asked how frequently the child spent
time on a computer, outside of school hours (most days, a few times a week, once a week,
once a month, never). ACT-Q4A and Q4B from cycle 2 on TV watching behavour was
colapsed to one question in cycle 3 (ACT-Q4B).
Behaviour (0-11 year olds):
Parents were asked about the behaviour of their children up to and including age 11 (BEH
QE1- BEH Q7F); this section was not asked of parents of 12-13 year-olds or 14-15 year
olds. Children aged 10-11, 12-13, and 14-15 answered the behaviour questions about
themselves on the Self-Complete Questionnaires. Teachers were asked the behaviour
questions about all children between the ages of 4 and 13 years.
Deviant Behaviour (10-13 year olds):
Questions on difficult behaviour (Q17A-F) were dropped in cycle 3. These questions
were asked in the self-completed questionnaire.
Motor Social Development
This section remained unchanged from cycle 2.
26
Relationships (4-9 year olds):
This section remained unchanged from cycle 2.
Parenting (4-13 year olds):
The Lempers scale (PAR-Q29A-R), which was used on the cycle 1 10-11 Self-Complete
Questionnaire, was added for 12-13 year olds in cycle 2 but was deleted from cycle 3.
These questions remain on the self-completed questionnaire for 10-11, 12-13 and 14-15
year olds
Family and Custody History:
A few new questions were added to this section. Question CUS-Q3A1 was added to
determine if the child’s parents married after the child’s birth if they were not married at
the time of the birth. Question CUSQ11D1 was added to determine the type of
arrangement for the child’s care for children whose parents broke up with no existing
court order for custody. In addition, CUSQ11F1 was added to determine why child
support payments were not agreed or not awarded for those who had a court order for
custody but did not have an agreement on child support payments. For those who did
make payments, additional questions were added in cycle 3 to determine the month and
year that these payments were first agreed to (CUSQ11G1); whether they were suppose to
receive payments in the past year (CUSQ11G2) and, if so, how these payments were to be
received (CUSQ11G3); and what proportion of payments were actually received
(CUSQ11H1). Two additional questios wre added on whether the child had seen his\her
other parent as often as agreed to in the court order (CUSQ11H2) and, if not, the reason
why (CUSQ11H3).
For those in the exclusive custody of one parent, question CUS-Q13A was added to
determine if the child was involved in the decision about his\her living arrangement.
Child Care (0-15 year olds):
Based on data from the National Child Care Survey, most of the Child Care section was
dropped for 12-13 and 14-15 year olds. Only CAR-Q8 and Q9 were asked for 12-13's
and 14-15’s. Several new questions relating to quality of care were added in cycle 3 fo 011 year olds. These questions relate how many other children are in care with the child
(CAR-Q2A1-3, CAR-Q2B1-3. CAR-QC1), the qualifications of the care provider (CARQ2A4, CAR-Q2B4 ), interactions between the care provider and child (CAR-Q2A5-8,
CAR-Q2B5-8, CAR-QC5-8,); the availability of a safer indoor and outdoor play area
(CAR-Q2A8, CAR-Q2B8, CAR-Q2D8 ); and the permanency of the arrangement (CARQ2A9, CAR-Q2B9, CAR-Q2D9)
Socio-Demographic Characteristics:
This section was the same as in cycle 2
27
5.5
10-11 Self-Complete Questionnaire
Apart from some wording changes, the 10-11 Self-Complete Questionnaire for cycle 3
was the same as for cycle 2.
School: In cycle 2, 10-11 year olds were asked the extent to which they liked math. In
Cycle 3 the response categories were changed from false, mostly false, sometimes false,
mostly true and true to I hate it, I don’t like it very much, I like it a little, I like it a lot and
I don’t take it. In addition the subjects of English and French were also added.
About me: In cycle 2 four questions were asked about looks. These questions wee
replaced with one general question (C1E-I like the way I look) in cycle 3.
My parents and me: This section was expanded in cycle 3 to include questions about
the respondents relationship with their mother (E1-E3), their relationship with their father
(E4-E6) and their parents relationship with each other (E7-E8).
Smoking and drinking: G2 is new to cycle 3 and asks if the respondent still smokes for
those who indicated trying smoking. The question was added to provide clarification to
respondents and to aid in the flow pattern of the questionnaire. Based on results from
cycle2, questions on frequency of drug use were dropped in cycle 3.
Activities: The question on whether the respondent had a job (H1f in cycle 2) was
reworded to doing odd jobs (H1h) in order to capture activities such as babysitting and
paper routes. An additional question was added on whether the respondent participated in
a hobby or craft (H1h). Question H4 was added to determine if the respondent had access
to a computer at home.
5.6
12-13 Self-Complete Questionnaire
Friends and Family: Questions A15-A17 from cycle 2 on dating were reworded and
moved to a separate Section on dating in cycle 3. Additional questions on dating were
added to determine if the respondent currently had a boyfriend/girlfriend and to find out
about the physical experiences they have had with their boyfriend/girlfriend.
Education: Questions on the importance doing various activities in school such as
making friends, participating in extra curricular activities, being on time, learning new
things, expressing you opinion and taking part in student council or other similar groups
were added to cycle 3 (B6a, B6c-g). The subject of Fine Arts (B7f) was added as a
category for which respondents reported the extent to which they liked the subject. Five
questions on school safety and bullying were dropped in cycle 3. These questions were
replaced by a set questions asking the respondent whether they had ever been spoken
28
about in a manner uncomfortable to them, threatened to be hurt but not hurt, or
physically attacked or assaulted both in the school environment and outside school.
These questions (C4-C6) were added to the About Me section.
About me: In cycle 2, four questions were asked about looks. These questions wee
replaced with one general question (C1E-I like the way I look) in cycle 3. Questions C4C6 (discussed above under education) were new to cycle 3.
Feelings and Behaviour: Based on analysis from cycle 2, questions on deviant
behaviours were reduced from 29 to 21 items.
Activities: Question E7 on internet access at home, was added in cycle 3.
Smoking and drinking: G2 is new to cycle 3 and asks if the respondent still smokes for
those who indicated trying smoking. Question F9 was added and asks the respondent if
they still drink if they indicated they had ever tried drinking. The questions was added to
provided clarification to respondents and to aid in the flow pattern of the questionnaire.
The question asking respondents how often they gambled was dropped in cycle 3.
My parents and me: This section was expanded in cycle 3 to include questions about
the respondents relationship with their mother (G1-G3), their relationship with their
father (G4-G6) and their parents relationship with each other (G7-G8).
Health: Questions on depression were dropped in cycle 3. Questions on unhealthy
eating habits (bingeing and purging) were dropped in cycle 3.
Work and money:
Respondents were asked about the number of weeks they worked for pay, the amount and
source of money they received, and how they spent their money.
5.7
14-15 Self-Complete Questionnaire
The core content for the 14-15 self complete was similar to the 12-13 questionnaire. New
questions were added and other modifications were made as outlined below.
Friends and Family:
A measure of intimacy was added. This question was adapted from Furman and
Buhmester’s Network of Relationships Inventory, and asked about how often youth
shared secrets and private feelings with their close friends (A10). A series of questions
about dating behaviour from the U.S. National Longitudinal Survey on Youth were also
added. The youth were asked what age they began “going out alone on a date with
someone of the opposite sex”(A15), how often they go on dates alone with members of
the opposite sex (A16), and if they usually go out with the same person (A17). The
29
definitions of mother, father, brothers and sisters were revised to include step and foster
(A12-A14). With regard to the number of friends, the respondent is now asked this
separately for friends who are boys and those who are girls (A6-A7).
School:
The Project Team developed new questions to determine if the child was in the same
school he or she was in two years ago (B2), the reason for the youth’s most recent change
in schools (B3), and what the child found hard to get used to about his or her new school
(B4). Question B7 was expanded from the Cycle 1 10-11 Self-Complete Questionnaire to
ask about like/dislike of science, English(writing, reading), French, gym/phys. ed., as well
as math. Rather than being asked in the Feelings and Behaviours section, the question on
skipping a day of school was moved into this section because it was considered part of
the school experience (B14). B15 on skipping class was added; it is a revised version of a
question on the U.S. National Education Longitudinal Survey. The Project Team
modified the new question B23 about educational aspirations from a question on the U.S.
National Education Longitudinal Survey.
About Me:
Questions C2 and C3 were added for 12-13 year olds from the Western Australia Child
Health Survey - Youth Self-Report. These new questions asked about the youths’
feelings about life now and in the future, specifically if the youth were “happy with how
things are” in their lives now (C2), and if the future looked good to them (C3).
Feelings and Behaviour:
Questions on suicide (D2-D6) were added; these were based on a set of questions used in
the 1992 B.C. Adolescent Health Survey. The original questions were from the U.S.
Youth Risk Behavior Survey and the Minnesota Adolescent Health Survey. Question D7
included only four items (a, b, c and e) from the cycle 1 10-11 Self-Complete deviant
behaviour list (skipping a day of school was moved to the School section, drunkenness to
the Smoking, Drinking and Drugs section). Question D7d was developed by the Project
Team at the request of Justice Canada and the Canadian Centre for Justice Statistics. The
remaining items in D7 were provided by Dr. Richard Tremblay, University of Montreal.
Activities:
A separate item was added to question E1 to recognize dance, gymnastics, and
cheerleading apart from other sports as these are physical activities in which girls
participate. Questions E2 on special responsibilities and leadership roles and E4 on
volunteer work were developed by the Project Team. Another change was collection of
more information on the amount of time spent watching television (E5, E6) and time
spent playing video games (E7, E8). To determine how much time the youth spent
looking after siblings and at home alone, questions E9 and E10, provided by Dr. Donna
Lero at the University of Guelph, were added.
Smoking, Drinking, and Drugs:
30
Dr. R. Tremblay from the University of Montreal provided questions F8-F10 on getting
drunk. These questions are important as predictors of later behaviour, including
delinquent behaviour. To shorten the questionnaire, reasons for refraining from smoking
were not asked on the 12-13 questionnaire, but were retained on the 10-11 questionnaire.
The definition of a drink was added as an introduction to the drinking section and the
definitions of various drugs were added to the introduction to the drugs section. The drug
section was reorganized into tables for frequency of use (question F13), age of first use
(F14), and use by friends (F15) for type of drug, i.e., marijuana, glue, hallucinogens,
crack/cocaine, and other (heroin, speed, PCP). These changes were made in consultation
with the Addiction Research Foundation. As it is an addictive behaviour which may
begin in adolescence, question F16 on gambling was developed by the Project Team
after review of other surveys and consultation with experts.
My Parents and Me:
Question G2 on intimacy and sharing of secrets with parents was added from Furman and
Buhmester’s Network of Relationships Inventory. Question G3 from a draft
questionnaire for the Minnesota Adolescent Health Survey, on the decision making
responsibilities of parents and youth, was also added.
Health:
H1 and H2 were added to collect height and weight information from the youth. The
World Health Organization’s Health Behaviours in School Children Survey was the
source of a new question (H3) added to measure physical indicators of stress. Based on
the review of other questionnaires, the Project Team added an item on “rashes or other
skin problems.” The CESD depression scale (H11) was added on the premise that
depression has been found to be related to many other outcomes for adolescents including
suicide. A modified version of a question on sexual behaviour from the Youth and Aids
Survey (H17) was added. As indicators of risk-taking behaviour, questions on the use of
seatbelts and helmets were added (H4 and H5); these were modified from the U.S. Youth
Risk Behaviour Survey questions which were used in the 1992 B.C. Adolescent Health
Survey. Questions were added about diet, i.e., binging and gorging (H7-H10), and
breakfast eating (H6). H6 is a modification of a question on the IEA Reading Literacy
Study; H7 - H10 are modifications of questions on the B.C. Adolescent Health Survey
which were based on items in the U.S. Youth Risk Behaviour Survey and Minnesota
Adolescent Health Survey.
Work and Money:
This section varies substantially from the section for the 12-13 Self-Complete
Questionnaire. Questions were developed by the Project Team after reviewing several
other surveys. The youth were asked how much money they received from various
sources (I1), how many hours per week they worked for pay (I2), and how they usually
spent their money (I3).
31
5.8
Reading and mathematical aptitude indicator
This short set of reading and math questions was administered in the home by the
interviewer to children in grades two and above. The child indicated his/her choice of
responses for each question to the interviewer who then checked the corresponding code
on the answer sheet. The purpose of this test was to get an indication of the child’s
abilities, in order to be able to send an appropriate level of the Reading Comprehension
and Mathematics Computation Exercise to the school for administration. If the child did
very well on the indicator, a higher level of the Exercise was used. The interviewer
completed an assessment of the environment and the child’s attitude.
5.9
Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test - Revised
The same version of the PPVT-R was used in cycle 3 as in cycle 2. As in cycle 2, the test
was administered to those 6-year-olds who are not in grade two or over and the
interviewer completed an assessment of the conditions in which the test was
administered.
5.10 Administrative information
The following is collected or updated after each interview:
1.
the participant’s permission to forward the data to Human Resources
Development Canada;
2.
the names, addresses and telephone numbers of two contact people who will be
able to help trace the participating or designated child in cycle 4 of the survey;
3.
written consent from the respondent to allow us to contact the child’s teacher in
order to have them fill out a questionnaire and test the child’s mathematical
abilities (if the child is in grade 2 or higher). The consent states the name and
address of the school, and the names of the teacher and principal; and
4.
the interviewer’s notification that initial contact took place, either by phone or in
person.
32
5.11 Reading Comprehension and Mathematical Skills Exercise
The Mathematical Skills test for students in grades two and over from cycle 1 was
expanded; in addition, reading comprehension was added to it. The new test for cycle 2
included a shortened version of the Mathematics Computation Test of the standardized
Canadian Achievement Tests, Second Edition (CAT/2); this measured a student's
proficiency in the operations of addition, subtraction, multiplication and division. The
cycle 2 test also included a brief reading and comprehension test, part of which was taken
from the CAT/2 Comprehension Test. The reading comprehension test measured a
student’s skill at grouping, organizing and analysing information from a text. The test
also assessed a student’s skill at summarizing the content of a text, predicting how it
would end, and producing ideas and impressions.
As in cycle 1, parents were asked to give consent for the student to take the test. The test
was administered at the student’s regular school.
5.12 Teachers' Questionnaires
The teacher’s questionnaire was mailed to the principal of the school attended by each
student in the survey whose parents had given consent. The principal then determined
which of the student’s teachers knew him/her best and should complete the questionnaire.
The increase in knowledge that the survey is intended to achieve must be both
longitudinal and cross-sectional. For that reason, most questions remained unchanged
since cycle 2. A few questions were added, and others reworded In cycle 2, three
different teacher questionnaires were used in cycle: one for kindergarten teachers, one for
a school environment where the student has one teacher for the basic academic subjects
and one for a school environment where the student rotates classes, i.e., has different
teachers for the basic academic subjects. In cycle 3, the questionnaire for students who
had a different teacher was replaced by two teacher questionnaires: one to be completed
by the language arts teacher and the other to be completed by the mathematics teacher.
The core content of the resulting 4 questionnaires is similar to the cycle 2 teacher
questionnaire but some modifications were made to reflect the different teaching
situations and content specific changes were made to the language arts and mathematics
teachers questionnaires. .
33
For more information about the detailed content of the teachers’ questionnaires, please
consult the cycle 3 questionnaire or Appendix D of this publication.
5.13 Principal's Questionnaire
Questionnaires were sent to the principals of schools attended by one or more children in
the NLSCY sample, subject to the approval of the school board (in the case of public
schools) or the school administration (in the case of private schools).
As with the teachers’ questionnaires, most questions remained unchanged since cycle 2.
A few questions were added, and others reworded. The latter changes were made
primarily to accommodate the aging of the sample.
For more information about the detailed content of the principal’s questionnaire, please
consult the cycle 3 questionnaire or Appendix D of this publication.
34
APPENDIX A
Expert Advisory Group on Children and Families for
National Longitudinal Survey of Children and Youth
Dr. Denise Avard
Dr. Michael Boyle
Dr. David Cheal
Dr. Gordon Cleveland
Dr. Carol Crill-Russell
Dr. Tony Doob
Dr. Martin Dooley
Dr. Carolyne A. Gorlick
Dr. Clyde Hertzman
Dr. Dan Keating
Dr. Audrey Kobayashi
Dr. Sarah Landy
Dr. Céline Le Bourdais
Dr. Donna Lero
Dr. Nicole Marcil-Gratton
Dr. Lynn McIntyre
Dr. Philip Merrigan
Dr. Dan Offord
Dr. Randy Olsen
Dr. Ray Peters
Dr. Suzanne Peters
Dr. Shelley Phipps
Dr. Barry Pless
Dr. David Ross
Dr. Michel Tousignant
Dr. Richard Tremblay
Dr. J. Douglas Willms
Dr. Frances Woolley
Executive Director, Canadian Institute of Child Health
Centre for Studies of Children at Risk, Chedoke-McMaster
Hospital
Dept. of Sociology, University of Winnipeg
Dept. of Management & Economics, University of Toronto
Children’s Services Branch, Ontario Ministry of Community and
Social Services
Centre of Criminology, University of Toronto
Department of Economics, McMaster University
School of Social Work, King’s College, University of Western
Ontario
Dept. of Health Care and Epidemiology, Faculty of Medicine,
University of British Columbia
Ontario Institute for Studies in Education
Institute of Women’s Studies, Queen’s University
C.M. Hincks’ Treatment Centre
Institut national de la recherche scientifique - urbanisation,
Université de Québec
Dept. of Family Studies, University of Guelph
Dept. of Demography, University of Montreal
Dean, Faculty of Health Professions, Dalhousie University
Département des sciences économiques, Université de Québec à
Montréal
Centre for Studies of Children at Risk, Chedoke-McMaster
Hospital
Centre for Human Resources Research, Ohio State University
Research Director, Better Beginnings, Queen’s University
CPRN Family Network Office
Economics Dept., Dalhousie University
Montreal Children’s Hospital
Canadian Council on Social Development
Lab. de recherche en écologie humaine et sociale, Université de
Québec à Montréal
Research Unit on Children's Psycho-Social Maladjustment,
University of Montreal
Department of Education, University of New Brunswick
School of Business, Carleton University
35
APPENDIX B
Collection in the Yukon and Northwest Territories
B.1
Design
Since both the NLSCY and National Population Health Survey (NPHS) were interested in
gathering data for residents of the Yukon and Northwest Territories, to reduce respondent
burden, the two surveys have been completely integrated. Content of both surveys has
been reduced and combined into one survey to keep the interview to a reasonable length.
Data collection in the Yukon and Northwest Territories (NWT) is being carried out by the
Bureau of Statistics in each territory on behalf of Statistics Canada.
Additionally, cycle 3 collection procedures have been revised to facilitate the collection
in the territories. Collection in the Yukon and NWT was done from November 1998 to
March 1999 using paper and pencil questionnaires. Telephone surveying, using random
digit dialing, was used in the majority of the Yukon. Face-to-face interviewing was used
in the NWT and in the parts of the Yukon which lacked sufficient telephone coverage.
The sample in the two territories was drawn from the population of private occupied
dwellings. The Yukon sample excludes institutions and unorganized areas. The NWT
sample has the same exclusions as well as remote areas and very small communities. In
anticipation of the division of the Northwest Territories into the Western Territory and
Nunavut in 1999, the survey sample for the NWT has been divided into the two regions.
For cycle 3, this provided a sample of 1, 093 children in the Yukon, 631 in the Western
Territory and 740 in Nunavut.
In cycle 1, every selected household with children newborn to 11 years of age had
information collected on up to three of those children in a family. In cycle 2, these
respondents were re-contacted and additions of children aged 0 to 1 year were selected in
order that each age group (from 0 to 13 years) would be represented. All these
respondents (now aged 2 to 15 in cycle 3) were re-contacted in cycle 3. Similarly, in
cycle 3, additions of children aged 0 to 1 were selected in order that each age group (0 to
15 years) would be represented. Figure 7 presents the sample sizes for the territories'
collection.
37
Figure 7: Number of Children by Territory
1
Territory
Number of Children1
Yukon
1093
Nunavut
740
Western Territory
631
NWT (Total)
1,371
TOTAL
2, 464
These are preliminary figures for Cycle3.
B.2
NLSCY Survey Instruments in the Yukon and Northwest Territories
Because the collection in the Yukon and Northwest Territories uses paper and pencil
questionnaires and not CAI, some redesigning of the questionnaires was done to facilitate
interviewing. The CAI Children's Questionnaire was split into three forms and other
questions moved to different forms. In cycle 2, a self-complete questionnaire was added
for 12 and 13 year-olds as was done in the provinces. The eight forms for the cycle 2
collection in the territories are:
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
Household
Health Core (National Population Health Survey (NPHS) only)
Parent Core
Child Core, 0-3 years
Child Core, 4-7 years
Child Core, 8-13 years
Control Form(s)
The collection in the territories does not include the Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test Revised, the self-complete questionnaire, the Teachers' and Principal's Questionnaires,
the reading and mathematical aptitude indicator or the Reading Comprehension and
Mathematics Computation test. The questionnaires for the territories are available on
request.
The following figure, Figure 8, presents a schematic of the survey instruments used in
cycle 2.
38
Figure 8: NLSCY\NPHS Survey Instruments Yukon and NWT Colllection
IF Person 12+ Selected
for NPHS
NPHS Health
Core *
Household
Record
IF Child in Household
IF Child in Household
Parent
Core
Child Core
8-13 years
Child Core
0-3 years
Child Core
4-7 years
* Health Core is not part of NLSCY
** Different questionnaires used in Yukon and NWT
39
B.3.1 NLSCY Content in the Yukon and Northwest Territories - General
As mentioned, the collection in the Yukon and NWT used a shortened version of the
NLSCY and NPHS survey instruments. Information on the NLSCY portion was
provided by a parent. This included basic demographic information on the parent(s) and
selected children; and health, education level, labour force activity and parenting styles of
the parent(s). Information also was gathered on the child's health, development,
behaviour, school experiences, and participation in activities. The detailed family and
custody history section for the main collection in the provinces was replaced by a reduced
section on current custody history. The collection in the territories excluded several
sections which are on the main NLSCY questionnaires - temperament, family
functioning, literacy and child care. Several questions were added to the questionnaires
for the territories, including one on availability of plumbing facilities, whether or not
respondents were First Nations persons, and whether an adoption was an Aboriginal
custom adoption In cycle 2, a self-complete questionnaire was added for 12 to 13 yearolds. In the Yukon, this questionnaire gathered information on health, smoking and
drinking, and work and sources of money. A different self-complete questionnaire for 12
to 13 year-olds was used in the Northwest Territories to collect information about
behaviour, schooling, etc. In Cycle 3, the self-complete questionnaires were not done.
Please refer to Section 5 of the main document for a description of the rest of the content.
The questionnaires for the territories are available on request.
40
APPENDIX C
The Labour Force Survey
C.1
Survey Coverage
The Labour Force Survey (LFS) is a monthly household survey carried out by Statistics
Canada in approximately 59,000 households throughout the country. The LFS is used to
produce monthly estimates of employment, self-employment and unemployment.
Information on variables such as industry and occupation of employment, educational
attainment, ethnic origin, and country of birth is obtained. Approximately 97% of the
population 15 years of age and over is covered in the survey. Excluded from the LFS are
the populations in the Yukon and the Northwest Territories, residents of Indian reserves,
full-time members of the Canadian Armed Forces, and residents of institutions, such as
chronic care hospitals, prisons and child residential treatment facilities. Civilian
members of the Armed Forces' households and native people living "off-reserve" are
captured by the survey.
C.2
Sample Design
The Labour Force Survey employs a stratified, multistage probability sample3 design
based on an area frame in which dwellings (residences) are the sampling units. All
eligible individuals who occupy one of the selected dwellings are part of the LFS sample.
For design purposes, each province of Canada constitutes an independent sample and is
divided into two parts composed of large cities and rural areas plus small urban centres.
Through stratification, these parts are broken down into clusters of dwellings, e.g., city
blocks, from which dwellings are selected.
It should be noted that, at the time of sample selection, no information is known about the
persons living within a selected dwelling, who are collectively known as a household. It
is the dwelling, not the household, that is chosen for the sample. If the household moves,
whoever is living in the dwelling at the time of the interview is included in the sample.
Each dwelling is retained in the LFS sample for six consecutive months and no
substitution of dwellings takes place in the event that information cannot be obtained
from a dwelling. The entire sample is divided into six representative parts or rotation
groups. Each rotation group contains some 10,000 households, representing about 20,000
individuals. The rotation of dwellings in the sample is carried out so that one-sixth of the
sample is changed each month. In other words, each month one-sixth of the dwellings,
having completed the six month stay in the sample, are replaced by new dwellings in the
same or a similar area.
3
Please refer to Methodology of the Canadian Labour Force Survey: 1984-1990, Statistics Canada, Catalogue 71526 for more details.
41
Dwellings which are currently in the sample are referred to as the active sample.
Dwellings which are no longer part of the sample are called rotates out.
The LFS sample frame was redesigned to incorporate new elements; the new frame was
phased in as of October 1994. Some of the NLSCY longitudinal sample was drawn from
the “old” frame and some from the “new.”
C.3
LFS Collection Methodology
Data collection for the LFS is carried out during the week following the LFS reference
week, which is normally the week containing the 15th day of the month; thus collection is
usually the third week of the month. Statistics Canada interviewers, who are part-time
employees hired and trained specifically to carry out the survey, contact each of the
dwellings in the sample, through personal or telephone interviews, to obtain the required
information. The interviews are carried out using Computer Assisted Personal
Interviewing (CAPI).
Each interviewer contacts approximately 65 designated dwellings per month, one-sixth of
which will be "new" dwellings. Each of these "new" dwellings is visited personally by
the interviewer, who collects information for all household members from one
knowledgeable and responsible member. Subsequent interviews may be conducted by
telephone provided the knowledgeable and responsible member agrees to this procedure.
Currently, approximately 85% of the LFS interviews after the first month are conducted
by telephone.
C.4
Using the LFS Frame for the National Longitudinal Survey of Children (NLSCY)
One advantage of using the LFS survey frame for other surveys is that each rotation group
of the LFS provides a sample capable of producing representative statistics for Canada
and each province. In addition, the household composition information collected for the
LFS is available to select a sample. Furthermore, LFS interviewers are available to do
surveys when they are not working on the LFS and are familiar with the CAPI collection
methodology. Because of these factors, the LFS frame was chosen for selecting the
longitudinal sample for the first cycle of the NLSCY. A similar procedure was used for
the second cycle in selecting the cross-sectional and supplementary samples.
Depending on the level of reliability required, the budget and the available collection
capacity, from one to six rotation groups can be surveyed in a non-LFS collection week.
This capacity can be expanded by the addition of dwellings which have rotated out prior
to the survey reference month. In theory, this approach can be used to augment a survey's
sample infinitely. In practice, however, a combination of cost and statistical reliability
limit the additional "take" to roughly three times the regular LFS sample, that is about 15
rotation groups. With regard to the NLSCY, nine rotation groups were used for the first
cycle to cover all age groups. For the second cycle, six rotation groups were used for the
first collection period and four for the second period to cover the 0-1 year olds from the
42
cross-sectional sample and the 2 to 5 year olds from the supplementary sample. A
combination of active rotation groups and rotates out was used.
The LFS Household Record collects basic demographic information such as age, sex,
marital status, educational attainment, economic family association and relationship to
head of economic family for all members of all households identified in selected
dwellings. The age data from this record is used to facilitate the selection of dwellings
with children for the NLSCY. For the third cycle, this alleviates much of the need to
screen dwellings to determine if children under two or under six (in the case of the
supplementary sample) reside in them.
43
APPENDIX D
National Longitudinal Survey of Children and Youth
Content of Cycle 3 (collection Nov. 1998 to June 1999)
The attached charts are summaries of the content of the third NLSCY collection.
The following survey instruments are included:
1.
2.
3.
4.
CAI interview with parents ( in the home)
Self-complete questionnaires (for 10-11, 12-13 and 14-15 olds in the home - paper and
pencil)
a)
Teacher’s Questionnaire (For kindergarten teachers) - Document 1
b)
Teacher’s Questionnaire (for a school environment where the child has one
teacher for the basic academic subjects) - Document 2
c)
Mathematics Teacher’s Questionnaire - (For a school environment where a
child/youth has different teachers for the basic academic subjects) - Document 3
Mathematics
d)
Language Arts Teacher’s Questionnaire (For a school environment where a
child/youth has different teachers for the basic academic subjects) - Document 3
Principal questionnaire – Document 4
The following instruments are referenced but not included:
5.
6.
7.
Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test - Revised (for 4-6 year olds in the home)
Reading and mathematical aptitude indicator (for grades 2 and up in the home)
Reading Comprehension and Mathematics Computation Exercise(for grades 2 and up in
the school)
45
NLSCY Content in the Provinces
PMK4
spouse/
partner
selected
kids <16
other
people in
household
- name
xx
xx
xx
xx
- date of birth / age
xx
xx
xx
xx
- sex
xx
xx
xx
xx
- marital status
xx
xx
- relationships – everyone to
everyone else
xx
xx
VARIABLE
HOUSEHOLD RECORD
- housing:
- owned
xx
- subsidized
xx
- condition
xx
- number of bedrooms
xx
4
Person Most Knowledgeable About Child
46
15+
xx
xx
VARIABLE
PMK
spouse/ partner
PARENT QUESTIONNAIRE
Education
Literacy
xx
xx
xx
xx
labour force activity (last 12 months)
- current main activity
xx
xx
- # of weeks worked
xx
xx
- hours worked/shifts/weekends
xx
xx
- annual employment income
xx
xx
- current/most recent employer, type
of work (including main duties)
xx
xx
- # of weeks looking for work
xx
xx
- # of weeks not working or looking
xx
xx
- reason for most recent break in
employment
xx
xx
- hours of work paid for
xx
xx
- usual wage or salary (including tips, etc.)
xx
xx
Income
- sources of household income and
amount of each source
-amount of total household income
xx
xx
xx
xx
xx
xx
- general health
xx
xx
new members only:
- chronic conditions
xx
xx
xx
xx
- sources of personal income and
amount of each source
-amount of total personal income
adult health
- limitation of activities
47
VARIABLE
PMK
Spouse/partner
Smoking
xx
xx
- alcohol consumption
xx
xx
- maternal history (mother of child <2 only):
- # of pregnancies
xx
- # of babies
xx
- age had first baby
xx
- depression
xx
family functioning
- family functioning
xx
- marital satisfaction
xx
socio-demographics
- new members only:
- country of birth/citizenship/
immigration
xx
xx
- ethnicity
xx
xx
- language of use/mother tongue/
home language
xx
xx
- religion
xx
xx
- church attendance
xx
xx
xx
xx
- race
48
AGE
OF
CHILD
0-11
mos
12-23
mos
2-3
yrs
4-5
yrs
6-7
yrs
8-9
yrs
10-11
yrs
1215
yrs
- general health status
xx
xx
xx
xx
xx
xx
xx
xx
- recent health status
xx
xx
xx
xx
xx
xx
xx
xx
- height and weight
xx
xx
xx
xx
xx
xx
xx
xx
xx
xx
xx
xx
xx
xx
xx
CHILD
QUESTIONNAIRE
Health
- birth weight, gestational
age
xx
- level of activity
xx
xx
- health status
- injuries
xx
xx
xx
xx
xx
xx
xx
xx
- asthma
xx
xx
xx
xx
xx
xx
xx
xx
- chronic conditions/
activity limitation
xx
xx
xx
xx
xx
xx
xx
xx
- nose or throat infections
xx
xx
xx
- ear infections
xx
xx
xx
- contact with professionals
xx
xx
xx
xx
xx
xx
xx
xx
- hospitalizations
xx
xx
xx
xx
xx
xx
xx
xx
- medications
xx
xx
xx
xx
xx
xx
xx
xx
xx
xx
xx
xx
xx
- traumatic event
Medical/biological
(perinatal) information
(only if respondent is
biological mother or father)
49
VARIABLE
CHILD
AGE
OF
2-3
yrs
4-5
yrs
6-7
yrs
8-9
yrs
10-11
yrs
1215
yrs
- school type
xx
xx
xx
xx
xx
- province of school
xx
xx
xx
xx
xx
- grade level
xx
xx
xx
xx
xx
- jr/sr kindergarten (≤ gr. 3)
xx
xx
xx
xx
xx
xx
xx
0-11
mos
12-23
mos
- Mom’s prenatal health
xx
xx
- prenatal smoking
xx
xx
- prenatal alcohol
consumption
xx
xx
- prenatal medication
xx
xx
- gestational age
xx
xx
- birth weight & length
xx
xx
- multiple birth
xx
xx
- delivery details
xx
xx
- special care of child after
birth
xx
xx
- general health of child at
birth
xx
xx
- Mom’s post-natal health
xx
- breast-feeding (2-3's if yes in
xx
xx
xx
- Mom’s work after birth
xx
xx
xx
Temperament
(fussy/difficult only)
xx
xx
xx
Cycle 1)
Education
- repeated
50
VARIABLE
AGE
CHILD
4-5
yrs
6-7
yrs
8-9
yrs
10-11
yrs
1215
yrs
- changed schools
xx
xx
xx
xx
xx
- # of moves in life
xx
xx
xx
xx
xx
- language taught
xx
xx
xx
xx
xx
- absenteeism
xx
xx
xx
xx
xx
- how well doing
xx
xx
xx
xx
- homework
xx
xx
xx
xx
- tutoring
xx
xx
xx
xx
0-11
mos
1223
mos
2-3
yrs
OF
- special education
xx
xx
xx
xx
xx
- behaviour problems at
school
xx
xx
xx
xx
xx
- look forward to school
xx
xx
xx
xx
xx
xx
xx
xx
xx
xx
xx
xx
xx
xx
xx
xx
- importance of good grades
to parent
xx
- parent’s expectations
- parent’s view of school
- parent’s involvement
xx
xx
xx
xx
xx
- transportation to/from
school
xx
xx
xx
xx
xx
literacy
- ever read/show pictures
xx
xx
- child looks at books
xx
xx
- child tries to write
xx
xx
- have ever read to child
xx
xx xx
51
AGE
OF
CHILD
2-3
yrs
4-5
yrs
6-7
yrs
- currently read to child
xx
xx xx
- encourage writing
xx
xx xx
VARIABLE
0-11
mos
1223
mos
8-9
yrs
10-11
yrs
1215
yrs
xx
xx
xx
xx
- child looks at books/tries
to read
xx
xx
- child talks about books
xx
xx
- library
xx
xx
activities
- nursery school, play
group/infant stimulation
programs
xx
xx
xx
xx
- sports, lessons, clubs
xx
xx
xx
- tv, video/computer games
xx
xx
xx
- read for pleasure
xx
- play alone
xx
xx
xx
xx
- responsibilities
- summer programs
xx
xx
xx
behaviour
- sleep patterns/feeding
xx
xx
xx
- separation anxiety
xx
- physical aggression/
opposition
xx
- hyperactivity/inattention
xx
xx
xx
xx
xx
- emotional disorder/anxiety
xx
xx
xx
xx
xx
xx
xx
xx
xx
- indirect aggression
52
AGE
OF
CHILD
2-3
yrs
4-5
yrs
6-7
yrs
8-9
yrs
10-11
yrs
- physical aggression/
conduct disorder
xx
xx
xx
xx
- property offence
xx
xx
xx
xx
xx
xx
xx
xx
VARIABLE
0-11
mos
12-23
mos
xx
- prosocial
1215
yrs
- stayed out late/all night
xx
xx
- questioned by police
xx
xx
- run away from home
xx
xx
motor & social
development
xx
xx
xx
relationships
xx
- do things with friends
- number of close friends
xx
xx
xx
xx
xx
- child shy
- gotten along with
friends/teachers
xx
xx
xx
- gotten along with
parents/siblings
xx
xx
xx
xx
xx
xx
xx
xx
xx
xx
xx
xx
xx
parenting
- positive interaction
xx
xx
- hostile/ineffective
parenting
53
AGE
OF
CHILD
2-3
yrs
4-5
yrs
6-7
yrs
8-9
yrs
10-11
yrs
xx
xx
xx
xx
xx
xx
xx
xx
xx
xx
VARIABLE
0-11
mos
12-23
mos
- consistent parenting
- aversive/non-aversive
parenting
1215
yrs
Xx
- parental nurturance,
rejection, monitoring
xx
- conflict resolution
xx
- time together, various
activities
xx
xx
xx
xx
xx
- child hangs around with
kids in trouble
xx
xx
xx
- parents know friends
xx
xx
xx
- basic care
xx
xx
family & custody history
(note: only changes in last 2 years
are asked - re: longitudinal kids)
- who child lived with at
birth
xx
xx
xx
xx
xx
xx
xx
xx
- who child lived with since
birth, reasons
xx
xx
xx
xx
xx
xx
xx
xx
- full siblings living
elsewhere
xx
xx
xx
xx
xx
xx
xx
xx
- whether parents were
together at child’s birth
xx
xx
xx
xx
xx
xx
xx
xx
- parents’ relationship
xx
xx
xx
xx
xx
xx
xx
xx
- previous unions of child’s
mother
xx
xx
xx
xx
xx
xx
xx
xx
54
AGE
VARIABLE
OF
CHILD
0-11
mos
12-23
mos
2-3
yrs
4-5
yrs
6-7
yrs
8-9
yrs
10-11
yrs
1215
yrs
- previous children of
mother
xx
xx
xx
xx
xx
xx
xx
xx
- previous unions of child’s
father
xx
xx
xx
xx
xx
xx
xx
xx
- previous children of father
xx
xx
xx
xx
xx
xx
xx
xx
- child’s contacts with noncustodial parent
xx
xx
xx
xx
xx
xx
xx
xx
- possible death of parent
xx
xx
xx
xx
xx
xx
xx
xx
- whether parents broke up
xx
xx
xx
xx
xx
xx
xx
xx
- separation
xx
xx
xx
xx
xx
xx
xx
xx
- living arrangements after
separation
xx
xx
xx
xx
xx
xx
xx
xx
- current custody status
xx
xx
xx
xx
xx
xx
xx
xx
- subsequent unions of
child’s mother
xx
xx
xx
xx
xx
xx
xx
xx
- previous children of
mother’s partner
xx
xx
xx
xx
xx
xx
xx
xx
- children of union
xx
xx
xx
xx
xx
xx
xx
xx
- subsequent unions of
child’s father
xx
xx
xx
xx
xx
xx
xx
xx
- previous children of
father’s partner
xx
xx
xx
xx
xx
xx
xx
xx
- children of union
xx
xx
xx
xx
xx
xx
xx
xx
- possible break-up of new
union
xx
xx
xx
xx
xx
xx
xx
xx
- subsequent unions
xx
xx
xx
xx
xx
xx
xx
xx
55
VARIABLE
AGE
OF
CHILD
0-11
mos
12-23
mos
2-3
yrs
4-5
yrs
6-7
yrs
8-9
yrs
10-11
yrs
1215
yrs
- types/hours
xx
xx
xx
xx
xx
xx
xx
- profit/non-profit etc.
xx
xx
xx
xx
xx
xx
xx
- main arrangement
xx
xx
xx
xx
xx
xx
xx
- ever used child care
xx
xx
xx
xx
xx
xx
xx
- # changes in arrangements
since started using child
care
xx
xx
xx
xx
xx
xx
xx
- summer care
xx
xx
xx
xx
- parent’s unpaid leave or
quit job for summer care
xx
xx
xx
xx
8-9
yrs
10-11
yrs
12-15
yrs
xx
xx
xx
xx
xx
xx
xx
xx
xx
xx
xx
xx
child care
TESTS
0-11
mos
12-23
mos
AGE
OF
CHILD
2-3
yrs
4-5
yrs
yrs yrs
xx
xx
6-7
in home
- PPVT (receptive vocab.)
- indicator test (≥ gr. 2)
(math and reading)
in school (≥ gr. 2)
- math computation skills
- reading skills
Administrative Information:
- permission to share data
- contacts for follow up
- teacher contact consent
56
NLSCY Self-Complete Questionnaires
Variable
10-11 SelfComplete
12-13 SelfComplete
14-15 selfComplete
Friends and Family
getting along with peers
x
x
x
time spent with friends
x
x
x
# of close friends
x
# of close friends who are girls
x
x
# of close friends who are boys
x
x
x
x
x
x
People child can confide in
x
Intimacy with friends
Gotten along with classmates
x
x
x
Gotten along with mom/dad/siblings
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
Dating
Age at time of first girl\boy friend
Currently have girl\boy friend
Dating frequency
Dates same person or different people
Physical experinces
57
Variable
10-11 SelfComplete
My School and Me
Feelings about school
Change of school in last 2 years
Reason for most recent change in school
Difficulties in adaptation to new school
How well doing in school work
Importance of good grades
Liking of Mathematics
Liking of Science
Liking of English
Liking of French
Liking of Gym/Phys.ed.
x
x
x
x
x
x
Liking of Fine Arts
School Spirit
Participation on school based activities
Safety/bullying at school and to/from school
Outsider at school
Skipped a day of school without permission
x
x
see "Feelings
and
Behaviours"
Classes cut in the last month
Been suspended
Dropped out of school
12-13 SelfComplete
14-15 selfComplete
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
My Teacher and Me
Teacher gives extra help
Teacher treats child fairly
Talk to teacher outside of class
My Parents and School
parents help with problems
encouragement of parents
parent's expectations re: school
58
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
Variable
10-11 SelfComplete
My Homework
place to study
completion of homework
x
x
About My Future
how far hope to go in school
About Me
the way I am \ like the way I look
Proud of myself
A lot of things about me are good
When I do something, I do it well
feel happy at present
feel optimistic about the future
Experiences with difficult events (break-up,
pregnancy, problem at school, death of
someone close)
Experience with discrimination
x
x
x
x
12-13 SelfComplete
14-15 selfComplete
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
59
Variable
10-11 SelfComplete
Feelings and Behaviours
conduct disorder
hyperactivity
emotional disorder
anxiety
indirect aggression
physical aggression
inattention
pro-social
suicide
stayed out late/all night
skipped school
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
gotten drunk
12-13 SelfComplete
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
14-15 selfComplete
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
see "My
School and
Me"
see "My
School and
Me"
see "Smoking,
Drinking, and
Drugs"
x
x
see "Smoking,
Drinking, and
Drugs"
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
questioned by police
questioned by teacher,principal, security
officers
run away from home
destroyed things
fought or beaten up someone (2 items)
threatened someone (2 items)
used a weapon to fight
carried or used a knife or gun (4 items)
stolen something (5 items)
Bought or sold drugs (2 items)
Break and enter somewhere to steal
used, bought or sold something stolen
used a credit or bank card without permission
x
x
60
Variable
10-11 SelfComplete
Touched someone’s private body parts or
forced them to have sex (2 items)
Driven a vehicle after drinking
Purposely started a fire somewhere
part of a group that did bad things
Smoking, Drinking, and Drugs
for each of cigarettes and alcohol:
ever used
frequency of use
age at starting
use by friends
for specific sections:
reasons for not smoking
ever been drunk
age first drunk
frequency of being drunk
12-13 SelfComplete
14-15 SelfComplete
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
see "Feelings
and
Behaviours"
for any drugs or sniffing glue/solvents (general):
ever used
age at starting
use by friends
for each of marijuana/ hash and glue/solvents:
frequency of use
age at starting
use by friends
x
x
x
x
for other drugs - including cocaine, crack, speed, LSD/acid:
frequency of use
x
for each of hallucinogens (LSD/acid), crack/cocaine, and other drugs (heroin, speed, PCP):
frequency of use
x
x
age at starting
x
x
use by friends
x
x
61
Variable
10-11 SelfComplete
My Parents and Me
Nurturance
Rejection
Monitoring
parents too busy to spend time with child
intimacy with parents
autonomy/control - decision making
Relationship with mother
Relationship with father
x
x
x
x
x
Health
Height
Weight
stress-related health problems
seat belt use
use of bicycle helmet
breakfast eating
weight control
Depression
puberty – key indicators
sexual experiences
x
Activities
sports, lessons, clubs
Job
computer/video games, TV
read for pleasure
leadership roles
Volunteering
time spent at home caring for younger sibling,
parents away
time spent alone at home, parents away
x
x
x
x
62
12-13 SelfComplete
14-15 selfComplete
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
Variable
10-11 SelfComplete
My Work and Sources of Money
amount of money received per average week
average hours of paid work per week
how spend own money
Type of employment
Summer employment
12-13 SelfComplete
x
x
x
63
14-15 selfComplete
x
x
x
x
x
TEACHER’S QUESTIONNAIRE: A SUMMARY OF CYCLE 3
QUESTION DESCRIPTION
Kindergarten
Questionnaire
One-teacher
Questionnaire
Language
Arts teacher
questionnaire
Math teacher
questionnaire
Q01
Q02
Q03
Q04,Q05
Q14
Q07-Q09
Q01
Q02
Q03
Q04,Q05
Q08
Q07
student’s education:
-how well teacher knows student
- multi-grade class
- grade / level
-level of difficulty in subject
- currently repeating grade
-immersion
- social / emotional development
- physical development
- academic performance in:
- reading
- mathematics
- written work
- non-written Communication
- sciences
- all areas
- skills in: - learning
- language / communication
Q01
Q01
Q02
Q03,Q04
Q05
Q07-Q08
Q02
Q03,Q04
Q09
Q11
Q10
Q12
Q13
Q09,Q10
Q11
Q10
Q16
Q11
Q12
Q05
Q06,Q07
- reading
- writing
- mathematics
- academic prediction / Expectation
- # of school days / instructional days
- type of program
- instruction time in subjects
- time spent using computer
- main language of instruction
- extra instruction: advanced abilities
Q08
Q09
Q10
Q11
Q13
Q14
Q11
Q15
- extra help: weak in certain skills
Q14
Q15
Q13
Q16
Q17
Q06
Q18,Q19
Q20
64
Q17
Q18,Q19
Q14,Q15
Q06
Q20,Q21
Q23,Q24,
Q25
Q22,Q26,
Q06
Q16,Q17
Q18
QUESTION DESCRIPTION
Kindergarten
Questionnaire
One-teacher
Questionnaire
Language
Arts teacher
questionnaire
Math teacher
questionnaire
Q27
- extra help: disability, other
problem
Q16 – Q18
Q21-Q23
Q28-Q30
Q19
Q24
Q25
Q30
Q31
Q31
Q32
Q39
Q40
Q19
Q20
Q27
Q28
Q26
Q27
Q28
Q32
Q33
Q34
Q29
Q41
Q42
Q43
Q38
Q29
Q30
Q31
Q26
Q20-Q23
Q26-Q28
Q33-Q37
Q21-Q25
student’s behaviour and attendance:
- # of days absent (% of time away)
- # of days skipped
- prepared for school
- behaviour scale measuring:
- conduct disorder
- hyperactivity
- emotional disorder
- anxiety
- indirect aggression
- physical aggression
- inattention
- prosocial
- social and personal skills
- work habits
- special skills / talents
- Frequency with which teacher talks to
student outside class
- Child’s outlook in class
Q24
Q25
65
QUESTION DESCRIPTION
Kindergarten
Questionnaire
One-teacher
Questionnaire
Language
Arts teacher
questionnaire
Math teacher
questionnaire
Q29
Q35
Q30
Q31
Q32
Q36
Q37
Q38
Q44
Q45
Q46
Q47
Q32
Q33
Q34
Q35
Q33
Q34
Q39
Q40
Q48
Q49
Q36
Q37
Q35
Q41
Q50
Q28
Q36
Q42
Q51
Q39
Q37
Q43
Q44,Q46,
Q48,Q50
Q45,Q47,
Q49
Q51
Q52,Q53
Q54
Q53
Q52
Q41
Q40
Q54
Q42
Q55
Q56,Q57
Q58
Q43
Q44,Q45
Q46
Q59
Q60
Q62
Q61,Q63
Q64
Q65
Q47
Q48
Q50
Q49,Q51
Q52
Q53
Involvement of parents/guardians:
- parent participation
- parent involvement
- importance of school to parents
- parent support of teaching
Efforts
student’s class and your teaching
practices:
- # of students in class
- teaching assistant / adult
volunteer
- # of students with long-term
problems
- # of students speaking nonofficial language; # immigrated to Canada
- academic rating of class
- subjects taught to student
- teaching strategies
- frequency of homework
- amount of homework
- methods of monitoring
homework
- class behaviour
- resource needs of class
-time on instructional activity
- time on non-instructional activities
- attributes of teacher & class
Q38
Q39
Q40,Q42
Q41, Q43
Q44
Computer information and
communications technology
66
Q55
Q56
Q57,Q59
Q58,Q60
Q61
QUESTION DESCRIPTION
Kindergarten
Questionnaire
One-teacher
Questionnaire
Language
Arts teacher
questionnaire
Math teacher
questionnaire
Q46
Q47
Q63
Q64
Q66
Q67
Q54
Q55
Q48- Q50
Q51
Q52
Q65-Q67
Q68
Q69
Q68-Q70
Q71
Q72
Q56-58
Q59
Q60
Q53
Q70
Q73
Q61
Q54
Q55
Q71
Q72
Q74
Q75
Q62
Q63
Perceptions of your school:
- climate of school
- school’s disciplinary policies
personal information on teacher:
- gender, age, experience
- levels of education
- main field of study of highest
level
of education
- qualifications in special
education
- qualifications in second
language
- other advanced qualifications
PRINCIPAL’S QUESTIONNAIRE: SUMMARY OF CYCLE 3
QUESTION DESCRIPTION
CYCLE 3
students in your school:
- primary/elementary grades
- intermediate/middle levels
- secondary/high school levels
- primary/elementary grades
- intermediate/middle levels
- secondary/high school levels
- primary/elementary grades
- intermediate/middle levels
- secondary/high school levels
- students’ family (economic) background
- total student enrolment in school
- students with long-term and other problems
Q01
Q04
Q07
Q02
Q05
Q08
Q03
Q06
Q09
Q10
Q11
Q12
67
QUESTION DESCRIPTION
CYCLE 3
- # of students speaking non-official language; #
immigrating to Canada; # living in rural setting
- race/ethnicity of student population
- # of new students registered during school year
- # of students who left during school year
- % of students absent on a given day
- average student absenteeism rate for the year
- % of students who are chronically late
for
school
- disciplinary problems within the school
Q13
Q14
Q15
Q16
Q17
Q18
Q19
involvement of parents/guardians:
- % of parents who volunteer help
- support of parents for school’s staff
- activity of parent-school committees
- influence of parent-school committees
Q20
Q21
Q22
Q23
characteristics of your school:
- type of school
-programs offered at school
- range of grades taught
-co-op programs
-volunteer programs
-vocational or work oriented programs
-other programs
-partnership with businesses
-status of high school graduates
- # of staff - # filling various positions by type
- total # of teachers
- # of classrooms in school
- teaching as a duty of principal
Q24,Q25
Q27
Q26
Q29-Q30
Q31-Q33
Q34-Q36
Q37
Q38-Q39
Q40
Q41
- # of volunteers working directly with students
Q45
68
Q42
Q43
QUESTION DESCRIPTION
CYCLE 3
- # of teachers/teaching assistants speaking a nonofficial language; # having a health impairment
- support services available to school
- resources available to school
Computers, informatics and
communications technology
perceptions of your school:
- feelings - re: role as principal
- expectations of students
Q46
Q47
Q48
Q49-Q52
Q53
personal information:
- gender, age
Q54, Q55
- occupational experience
- levels of education
Q56
Q57
- main field of study of highest level of education
- advanced qualifications
Q58
Q59
69
APPENDIX E
List of NLSCY Reports
Catalogue.
Number
Date
Title
93-01
February 1993
National Longitudinal Survey of Children (NLSC):
Planning Report
93-01
février 1993
Enquête longitudinale nationale sur les enfants: Rapport de
planification
93-02
March 1993
National Longitudinal Survey of Children (NLSC):
Overview
93-02F
mars 1993
Enquête longitudinale nationale sur les enfants ELNE:
Aperçu
95-01
February 1995
National Longitudinal Survey of Children: Survey
Instruments for 1994-95 Data Collection - Cycle1.
95-01F
février 1995
Enquête longitudinale nationale sur les enfants: Matériel
d'enquête pour la collecte des données de 1994-1995 Cycle 1.
95-02
February 1995
National Longitudinal Survey of Children: Overview of
Survey Instruments for 1994-95 Data Collection, Cycle 1.
95-02F
février 1995
Enquête longitudinale nationale sur les enfants: Aperçu du
matériel d'enquête pour la collecte des données de 19941995 - Cycle 1.
89-550-MPE November 1996
Growing Up in Canada
89-550-MPE novembre 1996
Grandir au Canada
November 1996
NLSCY User’s Handbook and Microdata Guide
October 1996
NLSCY Evaluation Report
octobre 1996
ELNEJ Rapport d’évaluation
71
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