UltraScan Configuration Software for Thermo Scientific Transit Time Flowmeters User Guide

UltraScan Configuration Software for Thermo Scientific Transit Time Flowmeters User Guide
UltraScan
Configuration Software for Thermo Scientific
Transit Time Flowmeters
User Guide
P/N 1-0561-004
Revision B
Part of Thermo Fisher Scientific
UltraScan
Configuration Software for Thermo Scientific
Transit Time Flowmeters
User Guide
P/N 1-0561-004
Revision B
©2003 Thermo Fisher Scientific Inc. All rights reserved.
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Disclaimer: Thermo Fisher Scientific (Thermo Fisher) makes every effort to ensure the accuracy and completeness
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omissions. Thermo Fisher reserves the right to make changes to the guide or improvement to the product at any
time without notice. The material in this guide is proprietary and cannot be reproduced in any form without
expressed written consent from Thermo Fisher.
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TABLE OF CONTENTS
1. Overview and Installation .............................................................................. 1
1.1 Introduction ................................................................................................ 1
1.2 Installation Requirements ........................................................................... 2
1.2.1 Hardware Requirements ....................................................................... 2
1.2.2 For Windows® 2000/Windows NT® ........................................................ 2
1.2.3 For Palm-PC ......................................................................................... 2
1.2.4 For PC with USB Serial Port Only ......................................................... 2
1.3 Installing UltraScan ..................................................................................... 3
2. Starting UltraScan .......................................................................................... 5
2.1 Start-up Options & Serial Port Communication Setup ................................. 5
2.2 Software & Flowmeter Manufacturing Data ................................................. 7
3. The Quick Setup Screen ................................................................................ 8
3.1 Entering Installation Information .................................................................. 8
3.1.1 The Standard Transducer Option .......................................................... 9
3.1.2 The Insertion Transducer Option ......................................................... 10
3.1.3 The Flow Cell Transducer Option ........................................................ 11
3.1.4 The Manual Transducer Option ........................................................... 12
3.1.5 Additional Quick Setup Options ........................................................... 14
3.1.5.a Selecting OTHER .......................................................................... 14
3.1.5.b Entering Water Temperature ......................................................... 15
3.2 Configuring the Totalizer ........................................................................... 16
3.2.1 Setting Totalizer Units & Totalizer Multiplier ........................................ 16
3.2.2 The Totalizer Options .......................................................................... 16
3.2.3 Resetting the Totalizer ........................................................................ 17
3.3 Configuration Files .................................................................................... 17
3.3.1 Saving Configuration Files ................................................................... 17
3.3.2 Loading Configuration Files ................................................................. 17
4. Meter Output Configuration & Calibration .................................................. 18
4.1 The Out/Cal Screen .................................................................................. 18
4.1.1 The 4-20 mA Loop ............................................................................... 18
4.1.1.a Setting Up the 4-20 mA .................................................................. 19
4.1.1.b Calibrating the 4-20 mA ................................................................. 19
4.1.2 Calibrating the Frequency Card ........................................................... 23
4.1.3 The Relays .......................................................................................... 27
4.1.3.a Programming a Relay .................................................................... 27
4.1.3.b Testing the Relay ........................................................................... 28
4.1.4 Calibrating the Flowmeter .................................................................... 29
4.1.4.a Zero Set Calibration Method .......................................................... 29
4.1.4.b Scale Factor Calibration Method .................................................... 30
4.1.4.c Manual Zero Set Method ................................................................ 30
4.2 The Options Screen .................................................................................. 32
4.2.1 The Comm/Display Options ................................................................ 33
4.2.2 The Display Options ............................................................................ 34
4.2.3 The Flow Options ................................................................................ 34
4.2.3.a Setting a Low Flow Cutoff .............................................................. 34
4.2.3.b Setting a Low Signal Cutoff ............................................................ 34
4.2.3.c Adjusting the Damping Coefficient ................................................. 35
4.2.3.d Entering a Value for the Zero Flow Hold Option ............................. 35
4.2.4 Adjusting the Contrast ......................................................................... 35
4.2.5 Setting the Time & Date ...................................................................... 35
5. Configuring the Data Logger (TX10 only) ................................................... 36
5.1 Setting Up the Data Logger ....................................................................... 36
5.2 Viewing Logger Data ................................................................................. 37
5.2.1 Updating the Log ................................................................................. 37
5.2.2 Opening Saved Logs ........................................................................... 37
5.2.3 Zooming in on Data ............................................................................. 37
5.3 Saving Data Logs ..................................................................................... 38
6. Snapshot Information Capture & Report .................................................... 39
6.1 Creating a Snapshot Report ..................................................................... 39
6.2 Accessing Snapshot Reports .................................................................... 41
6.2.1 Viewing Reports .................................................................................. 41
6.2.2 Printing Reports .................................................................................. 41
6.3 Deleting Reports ....................................................................................... 42
6.4 E-mailing Reports ..................................................................................... 43
7. Off-line Operations ....................................................................................... 43
7.1 Performing a Master Erase & Loading New Firmware .............................. 43
7.2 Off-line Features ....................................................................................... 43
7.2.1 Saving Configuration Files ................................................................... 44
7.2.2 Loading Configuration Files ................................................................. 44
7.2.3 Viewing Saved Reports ....................................................................... 44
7.2.4 Viewing Saved Logs Off-line ............................................................... 45
Appendix A: Pipe Schedules ........................................................................... 47
Appendix B: Fluid Properties .......................................................................... 50
B.1 Fluid Sound Velocities & Kinematic Viscosities ........................................ 50
B.2 Clean Water Sound Speed Versus Temperature ...................................... 61
B.3 Relationship Between Specific Gravity, Viscosity, & Sound Velocity for
Petroleum Products .................................................................................. 63
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1. OVERVIEW AND INSTALLATION
1.1 Introduction
UltraScan is PC-based user interface software that runs on an IBM® or IBM®
compatible computer and works with the following transit time flowmeters:
DCT1088, DCT6088, DCT7088, and TX10. The software automatically detects
the meter type upon connection, and it provides the following remote functions:
•
flowmeter configuration (the only method of configuration for DCT1088 and
TX10; configuration via keypad still available for DCT6088 and DCT7088);
•
flowmeter monitoring and troubleshooting;
•
data logger setup and download (only for TX10 meters);
•
master erase and new firmware upload.
UltraScan combines all the functions of previously released software for transit
time meters such as TimeGateE, WinGateE, WinLoader, and earlier versions of
TimeGate, and operation is nearly identical. The previous utilities can still be used
to work with their corresponding meters, but they lack some of the features
included in newer firmware such as DctPro 6.0 and TX10 5.28 (and more recent
versions). The figure below shows the relationships between the releases and the
meters. UltraScan is currently the only utility required to work with all the transit
time meters, while DLink is needed to download data logs from DCT6088 and
DCT7088 meters.
1
1.2
Installation Requirements
1.2.1 Hardware Requirements
•
IBM® compatible PC with Intel® Pentium® II processor (or equivalent) or
higher, at least 64 Mbyte of memory, and at least 1 DB9 RS232
communications port or USB port
•
DCT firmware versions 6.0 or higher; TX10 firmware version 5.28 or higher
•
DB9 female to female cable for DCT meters or DB9 male to DB9 female
serial cable for TX10 meters
1.2.2 For Windows® 2000/Windows NT®
Your PC must be in Administrative mode in order to install this software correctly.
Without this access, this software will not work properly. Contact your PC administrator for further assistance.
1.2.3 For Palm-PC
There may be a utility running in the background which is occupying a serial
communications port; you must disable or uninstall the utility to make the port
available.
1.2.4 For PC with USB Serial Port Only
An adapter is needed to communicate with the flowmeter’s RS232 port. It is
recommended to use a Keyspan High Speed USB Serial Adapter (PN USA19QW). They are available from CatalogStuff.com (707-778-6299). It is possible
that other adapters may work; however, this is the only adapter that has been
thoroughly tested by Thermo Fisher.
2
To install:
1. Read the adapter manual on the CD.
2. Install the adapter software from the CD.
3. Go to www.Keyspan.com, download the latest driver for the USA-19QW, and
run the .exe program.
4. Reboot your computer so the new driver will take effect.
5. Plug the adapter into the USB port on the PC. The PC operating system
detects the new adapter and assigns a COM port to it.
6. Go to your Program Menu and run the Keyspan Program Assistant, which
tells you which COM port the Keyspan adapter is assigned to.
7. Connect a DB9 RS232 cable between the adapter and the flowmeter.
8. Close the Assistant and open UltraScan. If the software does not locate the
Keyspan adapter, a Communications Screen comes up. Select the COM
port which matches the one from the previous step. UltraScan then attempts
to communicate with the port and starts up normally.
1.3
Installing UltraScan
1. Insert the PolyCD into the appropriate drive.
2. Select Setup.exe in the PolyCD and click OK to run.
3. Follow the directions as they appear on the screen.
4. Once the PolyCD is installed, click the Start button in the bottom left corner of
the desktop.
5. Click Programs and select PolyCD.
3
6. Select Run from CD in the following screen.
7. Select Communications Software.
8. Select UltraScan.
9. Follow the instructions as they appear on the screen.
10. After installation is complete, click Exit.
11. Create a shortcut icon on the desktop if needed.
4
2. STARTING ULTRASCAN
2.1
Start-up Options & Serial Port Communication
Setup
To open UltraScan, double click the icon located on the desktop. The Establishing
Communication dialog (Figure 2.1-A, below) opens, with 3 options for running the
program.
Figure 2.1-A
On-line: If power is applied and if the meter is connected correctly to the
computer serial port, no user action is required; the program automatically detects
the meter type and switches to the corresponding configuration screen. However,
if the meter is connected incorrectly, the Communications Failed box (Figure
2.1-B, page 6) appears. If this occurs, check your PC for port conflicts, and
resolve as necessary. Click OK on the Communications Failed box, and the
CommPort Properties window (Figure 2.1-C, page 6) opens. This window allows
you to select a different port or change the baud rate. You do not need to change
the Connection Preferences and Flow Control sections as they are preset. Check
for errors and correct if necessary.
5
FIGURES 2.1-B & 2.1-C
Once the unit is properly connected and the communication port information is
correct, click OK on the CommPort Properties screen. Figure 2.1-A (page 5) is
initially displayed while the meter and software communicate. Once communications establish, the Quick Setup screen opens. You are now ready to configure
the software (reference Section 3).
Off-line: Meter is NOT connected, OR there is no power applied to the unit. User
can select meter type and click Offline. Off-line features include: saving/loading of
configuration files, loading of saved data logs, and viewing of saved reports
(reference Section 7.2, page 44).
Off-line Erase/Loader: Meter is connected correctly AND power is OFF. Perform
a Master Erase or upload new firmware (reference Section 7.1, page 44).
6
2.2
Software & Flowmeter Manufacturing Data
The Manufacturing (MFG) screen contains flowmeter software and hardware
information which may be used by the service technicians and engineers to track
an individual flowmeter.
FIGURE 2.2
7
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3. THE QUICK SETUP SCREEN
The Quick Setup screen requires you to enter necessary application parameters.
FIGURE 3
3.1
Entering Installation Information
If the unit is a TX10, there are 4 transducer options: Standard, Insertion, Flow
Cell, and Manual (reference Sections 3.1.1 through 3.1.4, pages 9-13). Selecting
one of these alters the Quick Setup screen, allowing you to enter the information
required for that specific transducer type.
8
If the unit is a DCT series, there is only 1 transducer option: Standard. Section
3.1.1 applies to both the TX10 and DCT units.
3.1.1 The Standard Transducer Option
All clamp-on transducers (including high temperature) belong to this category.
This is the software default. Enter the information in this section by clicking on
each pull-down menu.
Figure 3.1-A
Select pipe material, liner
material, fluid type, flow units,
mounting method, andunits.*
*Refer to Section 3.1.5 (page 14) if you chose OTHER or if you enter a water
temperature.
In the Pipe section (Figure 3.1-B, page 10) provide outer diameter of the pipe
(OD), wall thickness, and liner thickness (if applicable).
You can enter 2 of the 3 major pipe parameters (OD, ID,
thickness), and the software calculates the remaining
parameter.
If you are using a steel, stainless steel, or PVC pipe you
can select the nominal pipe size and schedule. The program calculates the pipe OD, pipe ID, and wall thickness
for you.
9
FIGURE 3.1-B
Once you have completed entering the necessary information, click the Send
button in the bottom right corner of the Quick Setup screen (Figure 3, page 8).
3.1.2 The Insertion Transducer Option
If you are using insertion transducers, select the Insertion option from the
Transducer Type pull-down menu. The Quick Setup screen changes to the
specific configuration layout (Figure 3.1-C, page 11). Required information
includes fluid type, flow units, mounting (Z or V) and pipe ID. The installation
spacing indicated is based on the configuration inputs. Once you have confirmed
the configuration, click Send.
10
FIGURE 3.1-C
3.1.3 The Flow Cell Transducer Option
If you are using flow cell transducers, select the Flow cell option from the Transducer Type pull-down menu. The Quick Setup screen changes to require only the
information applicable to flow cell transducers (Figure 3.1-D, page 12)–fluid type,
flow units, units, pipe ID, and distance. Reference Section 3.1.5 (page 14) if
you chose OTHER or if you enter a water temperature. Once you have
confirmed the configuration, click Send.
11
FIGURE 3.1-D
3.1.4 The Manual Transducer Option
This is an option which can be used when the received signal is very noisy (as
shown in Figure 3.1-E, page 13) and the detected fluid sound speed largely
deviates from the initial default value. Selecting this option causes the meter to
keep the input fluid sound speed value and stop calculating the real time fluid
sound speed. After activating this option by clicking Send, you can then go to the
Flow page (Figure 3.1-E) and use the horizontal bar and the Adjust button under
the signal image to adjust the 2 red bars to lock on to the good signal part. The
sound speed is reset according to the signal position you select.
12
This method can reduce flow reading error and fluctuation caused by fluid sound
speed uncertainty in noisy applications. However, the trade-off is that the meter is
not able to track fluid sound speed changes. It is recommended not to use this
method in an application that is subject to a large range of fluid temperature or to
composition changes which might result in significant sound speed shifts during
measurement.
FIGURE 3.1-E
13
3.1.5 Additional Quick Setup Options
3.1.5.a Selecting OTHER
If the pipe material, liner material, or fluid type you require is not listed in the pulldown menu for these parameters:
1. Choose OTHER.
2. A new screen opens. Enter the following information as necessary:
a. pipe material–pipe sound speed, pipe roughness (Figure 3.1-F, below);
b. liner material–liner sound speed, liner roughness, wall thickness
(Figure 3.1-G, page 15);
c. fluid type–fluid sound speed, fluid viscosity (Figure 3.1-H, page 15).
3. Click OK.
FIGURE 3.1-F
14
FIGURE 3.1-G
FIGURE 3.1-H
3.1.5.b Entering Water Temperature
This option has the same effect as the Other option. For clean water applications,
you can enter the water temperature, and the software converts it to the corresponding sound speed value:
1. Click in the check box to the left of Enter Water Temp in Deg F or Deg C.
2. Verify or adjust the fluid sound speed and fluid viscosity in the window that
appears (Figure 3.1-H, above).
3. Click OK and the software retains the sound speed information that you can
send to the meter.
15
3.2
Configuring the Totalizer
FIGURE 3.2
3.2.1 Setting Totalizer Units & Totalizer Multiplier
Simply select the desired units and multiplier from the respective drop-down
menus.
3.2.2 The Totalizer Options
There are 3 totalizer options available:
1. Positive (POS)–tracks the flow moving from the upstream transducer to the
downstream transducer.
2. Negative (NEG)–tracks the flow moving from the downstream transducer to
the upstream transducer.
3. Net (NET)–provides the difference between the positive and negative flow
values.
To enable 1 of these options, click in the check box to the left of the desired
option and click Send.
16
When you click Send, a warning appears. Click OK to
continue or Cancel to keep the existing Totalizer setup.
3.2.3 Resetting the Totalizer
1. In the Reset Totalizer section, select the totalizer you want reset.
2. Click the Reset Totalizer button.
3.3
Configuration Files
3.3.1 Saving Configuration Files
1. Enter all information on the Quick Setup page that is applicable.
2. Click File located in the top left corner of the window, and select Save
Configuration.
3. Enter the file name, and click Save.
3.3.2 Loading Configuration Files
1. Click File, and select Load Configuration.
2. Locate and select the file you want to open, and click Open.
3. To configure the meter accordingly, click the Send button in the bottom right
corner of the Quick Setup screen.
17
4. METER OUTPUT CONFIGURATION & CALIBRATION
4.1
The Out/Cal Screen
FIGURE 4.1-A
4.1.1 The 4-20 mA Loop
Reference the appropriate meter manual for instructions
on connecting the 4-20 mA current loop wires before
performing the procedures in this section.
18
4.1.1.a Setting Up the 4-20 mA
1. Click in the 4-20 mA check box.
2. Enter the flow rate that equals the 4 mA (minimum) reading in the Flow Rate
at 4 mA text box. In most cases this rate will be zero.
3. Enter the flow rate that equals the 20 mA (maximum) reading in the Flow
Rate at 20 mA text box.
FIGURE 4.1-B
4.1.1.b Calibrating the 4-20 mA
Refer to Figures 4.1-C through 4.1-H (pages 20-22) for this procedure.
1. On the Out/Cal page, click the check box to the left of 4-20 mA or Freq.
2. Click in the Test/Calibrate check box.
3. Click on the Calibrate button.
19
FIGURE 4.1-C: CALIBRATING 4-20 MA, STEPS 1-3
4. Follow the 5 steps as they appear on the screen (Figures 4.1-D through
4.1-H, pages 20-22).
FIGURE 4.1-D
20
FIGURE 4.1-E
FIGURE 4.1-F
21
FIGURE 4.1-G
FIGURE 4.1-H
22
4.1.2 Calibrating the Frequency Card
Reference the appropriate meter manual for instructions
on installing the frequency card before performing the
procedures in this section.
1. Click in the Frequency Card check box. Review the table that appears for the
proper jumper to install, and click OK.
3. Install the appropriate jumper.
4. Click the arrow for the drop-down menu labeled Select Frequency Range,
and select the desired range.
5. Click in the Test/Calibrate check box, and click Calibrate.
FIGURES 4.1-I (LEFT) & 4.1-J (BELOW):
CALIBRATING THE FREQUENCY CARD,
STEPS 1-3
23
FIGURE 4.1-K: CALIBRATING THE FREQUENCY CARD, STEPS 5-6
7. Follow the 5 steps as they appear on the screen (Figures 4.1-L through 4.1-P,
pages 24-26).
FIGURE 4.1-L
24
FIGURE 4.1-M
FIGURE 4.1-N
25
FIGURE 4.1-O
FIGURE 4.1-P
26
4.1.3 The Relays
Reference the appropriate meter manual for instructions
on wiring the relays before performing the procedures in
this section.
4.1.3.a Programming a Relay
1. In the Relay section, click the Relay arrow to display the drop-down menu,
and select the relay you want to program.
2. Click the Mode arrow, and select the desired mode from the drop-down
menu:
•
•
•
•
•
Off–turns off relay functions;
Program–enables operator to program relay ON and OFF conditions;
Pulse Net–sends a pulse to a remote device whenever the net totalizer
advances by 1 unit;
Pulse Pos–sends a pulse to a remote device whenever the positive
totalizer advances by 1 unit;
Pulse Neg–sends a pulse to a remote device whenever the negative
totalizer advances by 1 unit.
FIGURE 4.1-Q: PROGRAMMING A RELAY, STEPS 1-2
3. If you select the Program mode, continue to step 4. If not, click Send.
4. When you select Program, a new dialog box opens which allows you to enter
the relay On and Off conditions.
27
5. Enter the parameters for the On condition. For example, the selections for the
On condition in Figure 4.1-R (below) cause the relay to turn ON when the
FLOW is GREATER THAN (>) 110 GAL/S.
6. Enter the parameters for the Off condition. For example, the selections for the
Off condition in Figure 4.1-R (below) cause the relay to turn OFF when the
FLOW is LESS THAN (<) 100 GAL/S.
FIGURE 4.1-R: PROGRAMMING A RELAY, STEPS 3-6
4.1.3.b Testing the Relay
1. In the Relay section, click in the Test Relay check box.
2. Click the ON button, and the relay’s LED should light up. Click the OFF
button, and you should be able to hear the relay “click” as it opens or closes.
3. End the test by clicking in the Test Relay check box again.
FIGURE 4.1-S: TESTING THE RELAY, STEPS 1-2
28
4.1.4 Calibrating the Flowmeter
4.1.4.a Zero Set Calibration Method
After installing the meter, you may find that a small adjustment to the zero point
(zero set calibration) is required. Zero set calibration allows the meter to read very
close to zero under zero flow conditions.
1. Verify the following:
•
•
•
transducers are connected to the pipe;
instrument is reading flow;
low flow cutoff is disabled to allow verification of calibration.
2. Click the Zero Flow button.
FIGURE 4.1-T: ZERO SET CALIBRATION, STEP 2
3. A warning appears. If you DO want to perform the calibration, select Yes and
continue to step 4. If you DO NOT want to perform the calibration, select No.
4. Click Send.
FIGURE 4.1-U: ZERO SET
CALIBRATION, STEP 3
The software returns to the Flow
screen once the flowmeter
receives the information.
29
4.1.4.b Scale Factor Calibration Method
After setting and verifying the instrument’s zero point, you can set a scale factor
to adjust the measured flow; the measured flow is multiplied by this scale factor.
For example, if the displayed flow is twice the actual flow, you can enter a scale
factor of 0.5 to divide the displayed flow by 2.
The scale factor is preset at the factory and imprinted on the transducers. If you
require an additional scale factor, multiply the additional scale factor by the
factory-set scale factor.
Always determine the scale factor at the highest possible
flow rate achievable in order to maximize the scale factor
accuracy.
1. Enter the number to be used as the scale factor in the Scale Factor text box.
2. Click Send.
The software returns to the Flow screen once the flowmeter receives the
information.
4.1.4.c Manual Zero Set Method
This method applies a constant offset entered by the operator.
1. Verify the following:
•
•
•
transducers are connected to the pipe;
instrument is reading flow;
low flow cutoff is disabled to allow verification of calibration.
2. Minimize the flow occurring in the pipe.
3. Set the damping (reference Section 4.2.3.c, page 35) so the meter reads a
steady flow.
30
4. Enter 0 (zero) in the Zero Flow text box.
5. Click Send.
6. Take 10 separate flow readings and average. This average is designated as
P for positive in the formula seen in step 10.
7. Disconnect the transducer wires, and reverse the upstream and downstream
wires. The flowmeter displays a negative flow reading.
8. Allow the meter to settle for 10 minutes.
9. Take another 10 readings and average. This value is designated as N for
negative in the formula in step 10.
10. Determine the manual zero point (Zp) by performing the following calculation:
11. Enter this number in the Zero Flow text box.
12. Click Send.
13. Connect the transducer wires according to original orientation.
The software returns to the Flow screen once the meter receives the information.
31
4.2
The Options Screen
The appearance of the Options screen depends on whether you are operating a
DCT series meter or the TX10. Refer to Figure 4.2-A (below) for the DCT Options
screen. Refer to Figure 4.2-B (page 33) for the TX10 Options screen.
FIGURE 4.2-A: OPTIONS SCREEN FOR DCT SERIES METERS
32
FIGURE 4.2-B: OPTIONS SCREEN FOR TX10
Reference Figures 4.2-A and 4.2-B (pages 32-33 for
Sections 4.2.1 through 4.2.5 (pages 33-35).
4.2.1 The Comm/Display Options
You can change the following information in this section:
•
•
•
the baud rate which the meter uses to communicate with the software;
the unit name (Tag), using any combination of alphanumeric characters;
the unit identification number (Unit ID), using any whole number between 1
and 32,000.
33
4.2.2 The Display Options
You can configure the meter to indicate any combination of velocity, signal
strength (SS), date/time, and totalizer values.
1. Select velocity, signal strength, and date/time values by clicking in the
corresponding check boxes.
2. Select a totalizer by clicking in the Totalizer check box and selecting the
desired totalizer (pos, neg, net).
3. Select the desired number of decimal points to be displayed with the flow
value.
4. Enter the time (in seconds) that you want the display to cycle through the
selected options.
4.2.3 The Flow Options
4.2.3.a Setting a Low Flow Cutoff
When a zero flow condition occurs, hydraulic effects and other fluid movement
can prevent the meter from reading total zero. This can result in totalizer errors.
Minimize these errors by entering a low flow cutoff. The cutoff drives the meter to
zero for flow rates at or below that value. Set the cutoff as high as is practical to
maximize the stability of the zero flow setting.
4.2.3.b Setting a Low Signal Cutoff
Empty pipes, solids, bubbles, or voids in the flow stream may cause temporary
drops in signal strength. Minimize the effects of this situation by setting a low
signal cutoff. Typically, this value should be set at approximately one-half the
value of the signal strength present under low flow conditions.
34
4.2.3.c Adjusting the Damping Coefficient
The damping coefficient suppresses short term fluctuations in the indicated flow
rate. Increasing this value increases the response time to changes. Keep damping at a minimum, unless the flow rate fluctuates wildly. If this situation occurs,
increase damping just enough to reduce the fluctuation to an acceptable degree.
4.2.3.d Entering a Value for the Zero Flow Hold Option
In some applications such as sewage water measurement, floating objects or
bubbles can occasionally block ultrasonic path. This causes a short period of
weak, corrupted signal and unpredictable flow reading.
The zero flow hold option enables you to enter a time (roughly in seconds) to hold
the current flow value during low signal conditions.
This function is enabled ONLY when the low signal cutoff
value is greater than zero.
Click Send in the bottom right corner of the screen after
completing this section.
4.2.4 Adjusting the Contrast
To adjust the contrast, click and drag the pointer. Dragging the pointer to the right
increases (darkens) the contrast. Dragging the pointer to the left decreases
(lightens) the contrast.
4.2.5 Setting the Time & Date
Click the Sync Time/Date to PC button.
35
5. CONFIGURING THE DATA LOGGER (TX10 ONLY)
*This function is currently for the TX10 only. For DCT6088 and DCT7088
meters, use the DLink utility for data logging functions.
FIGURE 5
5.1
Setting Up the Data Logger
1. Click the arrow to the left of Interval (Sec) to display the drop-down menu,
and select the desired time interval.
2. Click the Start Log button.
36
3. Click the Stop Log button to quit logging data.
4. Click the Get Log button to obtain log data from the TX10. The software
displays the start date and time of the log as well as the stop date and time.
The high and low flows are also displayed.
5.2
Viewing Logger Data
5.2.1 Updating the Log
Clicking the Get Log Header button updates pertinent information such as the last
point logged, maximum flow, the log status, the number of points logged, and the
index. This information is displayed above the Get Log Header button.
5.2.2 Opening Saved Logs
1. Click File, and select Load Log.
2. Locate the log file you want to open, and select Open.
5.2.3 Zooming in on Data
Reference Figures 5.2-A and 5.2-B (page 38).
1. Move your mouse to a point on the screen.
2. Depress the left mouse button (for right-handed users), and drag the mouse
to enclose the range of data you want to zoom in on.
3. Release the mouse button, and the selected range enlarges.
4. Return to the original view by clicking in the Zoom check box.
37
FIGURE 5.2-A: ZOOMING IN ON DATA, STEPS 1-2
FIGURE 5.2-B: ZOOMING IN ON DATA, STEP 3
5.3
Saving Data Logs
1. Click File, and select Save Log.
2. Enter the log file name, and click Save.
You can use standard Windows ® operating system
procedures for saving files to or opening files from your
computer or disk.
You can import log files into any data processing or
spreadsheet software.
38
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6. SNAPSHOT INFORMATION CAPTURE & REPORT
6.1
Creating a Snapshot Report
FIGURE 6.1-A
A new feature of the UltraScan software is the snapshot report. This feature
enables you to take a “snapshot” of the Flow screen and record all essential
information regarding your application in real time. Rather than attempting to relay
all this information over the phone to a service technician or engineer, you can
e-mail this report.
39
1. Go to the Flow page, and click the Snap shot report button located on the
bottom of the page.
2. Enter all necessary information on the report page (Figure 6.1-B, below). Note
that the Report Title is a required input.
3. Click OK; the software asks you where to save the report file. The default
directory is the “Reports” subdirectory under the UltraScan program directory.
FIGURE 6.1-B
6.2
Accessing Snapshot Reports
You can view, print, and delete saved reports.
40
6.2.1 Viewing Reports
Figure 6.2-A
1. Select File.
2. Select Report.
3. Click the desired report from the list which
appears, and click View.
6.2.2 Printing Reports
1. Complete steps 1-3 in Section 6.2.1 (above) to open the report you want to
print.
2. To print page 1 (Figure 6.2-B, page 43) only, click the Print button in the top
right corner. Continue to step 3 to print page 2.
3. Click the Page: 1>>2 button on page 1 to go to page 2 (Figure 6.2-C, page
44).
4. Click the Print button in the top right corner.
41
FIGURE 6.2-B
6.3
Deleting Reports
1. Select File.
2. Select Report.
3. Click the desired report from the list which appears, and click Delete.
4. Click Yes in the warning window that appears to delete
the report, or click No if you do not want to delete the
report.
42
FIGURE 6.2-C
6.4
E-mailing Reports
For troubleshooting purposes, you can send report files as attachments in an email to your representative or the Thermo Fisher.
43
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7. OFF-LINE OPERATIONS
7.1
Performing a Master Erase & Loading New
Firmware
1. Connect the meter to the computer, and turn the meter OFF.
2. Open UltraScan, and click Erase/Loader within 10 seconds.
3. Follow the instructions as they appear on the screen.
4. To upload new firmware:
a.
b.
c.
d.
Click UpLoad.
Pick location where Hex files are located.
Click the appropriate *.Hex file to upload to the meter.
Click Open.
OR to perform a Master Erase:
Press the Master Erase button. This function resets the software to factory
defaults.
5. Restart the meter, and exit the Erase/Loader program.
7.2
Off-line Features
The meter must be disconnected or turned OFF to perform
these functions.
(TX10 configuration files: xxxx.Con; DCT configuration
files: xxx.t88)
44
7.2.1 Saving Configuration Files
1. Open UltraScan.
2. Select either TX10 or DCT series, and press OffLine.
3. Input all required configuration parameters.
4. Click File, and select Save Configuration.
5. Enter the name you want to save the file as.
6. Click Save.
7.2.2 Loading Configuration Files
1. Open UltraScan.
2. Click File, and select Load Configuration.
3. Locate and click on the file you want to open.
4. Click Open.
7.2.3 Viewing Saved Reports
Report files are saved with a *.rpt extension.
1. Open UltraScan.
2. Click File, and select Report.
3. Locate the report file you want to view.
4. Select the file, and click Open.
45
7.2.4 Viewing Saved Logs Off-line
*For TX10 only
Log files are saved with a *.txl file.
1. Open UltraScan.
2. Click Log.
3. Click File, and select Load Log.
4. Locate the log you want to view.
5. Select the log file, and click Open.
46
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1.315
1.660
1.900
2.375
2.875
3.500
4.000
4.500
5.563
6.625
8.625
10.750
12.750
14.000
16.000
18.000
20.000
24.000
30.000
36.000
42.000
48.000
3
3.5
4
5
6
8
10
12
14
16
18
20
24
30
36
42
48
OD
1
1.25
1.5
2
2.5
Nominal
Pipe Size
(in inches)
17.670
19.634
23.564
29.500
15.670
8.407
10.482
12.438
3.334
3.834
4.334
5.345
6.407
1.185
1.530
1.770
2.245
2.709
Sched.
5
17.500
19.500
23.500
29.376
35.376
8.329
10.420
12.390
13.500
15.500
3.260
3.760
4.260
5.295
6.357
1.097
1.442
1.682
2.157
2.635
Sched. 10
(Light Wall)
47
41.000
17.376
19.250
23.250
29.000
35.000
8.125
10.250
12.250
13.376
15.376
Sched.
20
40.750
17.124
19.000
22.876
28.750
34.750
8.071
10.136
12.090
13.250
15.250
Sched.
30
40.500
47.250
16.876
18.812
22.624
28.500
34.500
7.981
10.020
11.938
13.124
15.000
3.068
3.548
4.026
5.047
6.065
1.049
1.380
1.610
2.067
2.469
Sched.
40
16.500
18.376
22.062
7.813
9.750
11.626
12.812
14.688
Sched.
60
16.124
17.938
21.562
7.625
9.562
11.374
12.500
14.312
2.900
3.364
3.826
4.813
5.761
0.957
1.278
1.500
1.939
2.323
Sched.
80
15.688
17.438
20.938
7.437
9.312
11.062
12.124
13.938
Sched.
100
15.255
17.000
20.376
7.187
9.062
10.750
11.876
13.562
3.624
4.563
5.501
Sched.
120
Appendix A: Table 1
Steel, Stainless Steel and PVC Pipe Standard Schedules
ID and OD in Inches
14.438
16.062
19.312
31.312
31.876
6.813
8.500
10.126
11.188
12.812
3.438
4.313
5.187
2.624
0.815
1.160
1.338
1.687
2.125
Sched.
160
14.876
16.500
19.876
7.001
8.750
10.500
11.500
13.124
Sched.
140
41.250
47.250
17.250
19.250
23.250
29.250
35.250
7.981
10.020
12.000
13.250
15.250
3.068
3.548
4.026
5.047
6.065
1.049
1.380
1.610
2.067
2.469
Std.
Wall
41.000
47.000
17.000
19.000
23.000
29.000
35.000
7.625
9.750
11.750
13.000
15.000
2.900
3.364
3.826
4.813
5.761
0.957
1.278
1.500
1.939
2.323
X STG
APPENDIX A: PIPE SCHEDULES
48
24.28
28.98
35.98
42.00
47.98
25.80
31.74
37.96
44.20
50.50
24
30
36
42
48
57.10
63.40
76.00
88.54
25.80
32.00
38.30
44.50
50.80
13.20
15.30
17.40
19.50
21.60
54.00
60.06
72.10
84.10
24.02
29.94
36.00
41.94
47.96
11.96
13.98
16.00
18.00
20.00
3.12
4.10
6.14
8.03
9.96
ID
Class B
3.96
5.00
7.10
9.05
11.10
OD
57.80
64.20
76.88
26.32
32.40
38.70
45.10
51.40
13.50
15.65
17.80
19.92
22.06
54.00
60.20
72.10
24.22
30.00
35.98
42.02
47.98
12.14
14.17
16.20
18.18
20.22
3.06
4.04
6.08
8.18
10.16
ID
Class C
3.96
5.00
7.10
9.30
11.40
OD
58.40
64.82
26.32
32.74
39.16
45.58
51.98
13.50
15.65
17.80
19.92
22.06
53.94
60.06
24.00
30.00
36.00
42.02
48.00
12.00
14.01
16.02
18.00
20.00
3.00
3.96
6.00
8.10
10.04
ID
Class D
3.96
5.00
7.10
9.30
11.40
OD
26.90
33.10
39.60
13.78
15.98
18.16
20.34
22.54
24.28
30.00
36.00
12.14
14.18
16.20
18.20
20.24
6.06
8.10
10.12
ID
Class E
7.22
9.42
11.60
OD
26.90
33.46
40.04
13.78
15.98
18.16
20.34
22.54
24.00
30.00
36.00
12.00
14.00
16.00
18.00
20.00
6.00
8.10
10.00
ID
Class F
7.22
9.42
11.60
OD
27.76
14.08
16.32
18.54
20.78
23.02
24.26
12.14
14.18
16.18
18.22
20.24
6.08
8.10
10.12
ID
Class G
7.38
9.60
11.84
OD
Standard and double cement lining thicknesses are listed in Table 3.
For pipes with cement linings: reduce the pipe ID by twice the lining
thickness.
53.96
60.02
72.10
84.10
12.12
14.16
16.20
18.22
20.26
13.20
15.30
17.40
19.50
21.60
12
14
16
18
20
56.66
62.80
75.34
87.54
3.02
3.96
6.02
8.13
10.10
3.80
4.80
6.90
9.05
11.10
3
4
6
8
10
54
60
72
84
ID
Class A
OD
Nominal
Pipe Size
(in inches)
Appendix A: Table 2
Cast Iron Pipe Standard Classes
ID and OD in Inches
27.76
14.08
16.32
18.54
20.78
23.02
24.00
12.00
14.00
16.00
18.00
20.00
6.00
8.00
10.00
ID
Class H
7.38
9.60
11.84
OD
49
15.30
17.40
19.50
21.60
25.80
32.00
38.30
44.50
50.80
57.10
14
16
18
20
24
30
36
42
48
54
31.22
37.44
43.56
49.78
55.96
14.64
16.72
18.80
20.88
25.04
6.40
8.51
10.52
12.58
Class 50
Class 52
3.40
4.22
6.28
8.39
10.40
12.46
14.52
16.60
18.68
20.76
24.92
31.06
37.06
43.32
49.50
55.64
Class 51
3.46
4.28
6.34
8.45
10.46
12.52
14.58
16.66
18.74
20.82
24.98
31.14
37.34
43.44
49.64
55.80
30.98
37.14
43.20
49.36
55.48
14.46
16.54
18.62
20.70
24.86
3.34
4.16
6.22
8.33
10.34
12.40
Class 53
30.90
37.04
43.08
49.22
55.32
14.40
16.48
18.56
20.64
24.80
3.28
4.10
6.16
8.27
10.28
12.34
Class
54
30.82
36.94
42.96
49.08
55.16
14.34
16.42
18.50
20.58
24.74
3.22
4.04
6.10
8.21
10.22
12.28
Class 55
30.74
36.84
42.84
48.94
55.00
14.28
16.36
18.44
20.52
24.68
3.16
3.98
6.04
8.15
10.16
12.22
Class 56
0.250
0.1875
0.125
Standard
Thickness
0.500
0.375
0.250
Double
Thickness
Cement Lining
For pipes with cement linings, reduce the pipe ID by twice the lining
thickness listed above.
3.96
4.80
6.90
9.05
11.10
13.20
OD
3
4
6
8
10
12
Nominal
Pipe Size
(in inches)
Inside Diameter
Appendix A: Table 3
Ductile Iron Pipe Standard Classes
ID and OD in Inches
This page intentionally left blank.
APPENDIX B: FLUID PROPERTIES
B.1
Fluid Sound Velocities & Kinematic Viscosities
This section provides a table of fluid sound speeds and kinematic viscosities. The
information is based on material from the Cameron Hydraulic Data Book (17th
ed., Ingersoll-Rand, 1988) and Tables of Physical and Chemical Constants (13th
ed., Longmans, 1966).
NOTE: Viscosity does not have as significant an effect on flow accuracy as
sound speed since viscosity is only used to calculate flow profile. Even a
comparatively large error in viscosity results in a change of flow of only 2 to 5%.
50
51
--
40
-17.8
-17.8
98.9
98.9
SAE-10W
SAE-20W
SAE-20
SAE-30
--
--
--
--
--
--
37.8
-17.8
----
-------
25
37.8
25
20
37.8
15
0
20
50
--
--
20
70
1007
28
--
1190
20
20
c(m/s)
--1384
--
Tº C
16.1
20
24
15
SAE-5W
Automotive
crankcase oils
VI
Fed #2, V,
Asphalt,
emulsions
Fed #1
ethyl (grain)
C2H5OH
methyl
(wood)CH3OH
propyl
butyl-n
LIQUID
Acetaldehyde
CH3CHO
Acetic
anhydride
Acetone
CH3COCH3
Acetylene
tetrabromide
Alcohol
allyl
210
210
0
0
0
100
77
100
77
68
100
59
32
68
122
158
68
104
68
82
68
Tº F
61
68
75
59
--
--
--
--
--
--
----
-------
--
--
--
--
3303
3903
c(ft/s)
--4540
--
9.6-12.9
5.7-9.6
12952590
259010350
1295 max
19-75
215-1510
75-367
33-216
1.52
1.2
0.74
1.04
2.8
1.4
1.17
3.64
0.90
1.60
--
0.41
cSt
0.305
0.295
-0.88
RC-5,MC5,SC-5
RC-4,MC4,SC-4
Argon
Asphalt,
blended
RC-0,MC0,SC-0
RC-1,MC1,SC-1
RC-2,MC2,SC-1
RC-3,MC3,SC-3
Amyl
acetate
n-Amyl
alcohol
iso-Amyl
ether
Aniline
Ammonia
LIQUID
Acetic acid
10%
50%
80%
Conc.glacial
Acetylene
tetrachloride
82.8
60
82.8
60
60
50
25
37.8
37.8
50
50
60
20
10
-183
26
28.6
29.2
-17.8
28
15
Tº C
50
15
15
15
--
--
--
--
--
--
-------
1656
-816.7
1153
1224
1173
--
1155
--
c(m/s)
1584
----
180
140
180
140
140
122
77
100
100
122
122
140
68
50
-297
79
83
85
0
82
59
Tº F
122
59
59
59
--
--
--
--
--
--
-------
5432
-2679
3782
4015
3847
--
3788
--
c(ft/s)
5196
----
647-1295
604018340
270-540
17254315
540-1080
159-324
60-108
518-1080
159-324
518-1080
215-430
12952805
4.37
6.4
--
--
--
--
0.30
--
1.34
cSt
-1.35
2.27
2.85
52
37.8
20
chloride (CCl4)
Carbon tetrachloride
938
--
--
20
967
--
130
Caesium
2150
18.3
360
Cadmium
1450
Carbolic acid
(phenol)
Carbon tetra-
-104
--
--
iso-Butyl
bromide
--
-1.1
Butane-n
1074
50
--
20
--
Bromobenzene
98.9
SAE-150
--
--
--
--
Bromine
98.9
98.9
98.9
SAE-85W
SAE-14Q
98.9
SAE-80W
SAE-90
98.9
--
--
98.9
SAE-50
Automotive
gear oils
SAE-75W
c(m/s)
--
Tº C
98.9
SAE-40
Automotive
crankcase
oils, cont.
LIQUID
68
100
68
65
266
680
-155
30
-50
122
68
210
210
210
210
210
210
210
210
Tº F
3077
--
--
--
3172
7052
4756
--
--
3523
--
--
--
--
--
--
--
--
--
c(ft/s)
--
0.53
0.612
11.83
--
--
--
0.35
0.52
--
0.34
43 min
25-43
14-25
11 min
7 min
4.2 min
16.8-22.7
12.9-16.8
cSt
LIQUID
54.4
0
20
25
sulphide
CS2
15.6
18.3
0
20
20
30
25
100
Carbon di-
25%
5%
Calcium
chloride
Butyl
acetate
n-Butyl
alcohol
Butyric acid
n
Bromoform
285
Bone Oil
100
0
20
(Benzol)
C6H6
Benzophenone
Bismuth
20
Benzene
37.8
25
Tº C
Beer
Asphalt,
blended,
cont.
RS-1,MS1,SS-1
--
--
1149
--
--
--
--
1258
1172
908
--
--
1663
1316
--
1321
--
--
--
c(m/s)
68
32
77
60
65
32
68
68
86
77
212
130
545
212
32
68
68
100
77
Tº F
--
--
3769
--
--
--
--
4125
3844
2978
--
--
5455
4316
--
4333
--
--
--
c(ft/s)
0.298
0.33
--
4.0
1.156
2.3 cp
1.61
--
--
--
11.6
47.5
--
--
1.00
0.744
1.8
19-75
33-216
cSt
53
21.1
30
Diethylene
glycol
1533
--
1381
--
20
--
54.4
20
--
15.6
--
54.4
---
54.4
15.6
--
--
54.4
15.6
--
--
54.4
15.6
--
Deuterium
oxide
Diethyl ether
Salt Creek
32.6 API
35.6 API
40 API
48 API
---
15.6
54.4
Crude oil
37.8
oil
---
100
--
60
54.4
995
25
Cotton seed
Corn oil
1368
--
20
54.4
40
--
37.8
m-Chlornitrobenzene
Chloroform
--
18.6
Castor oil
c(m/s)
1500
Tº C
LIQUID
Tº F
86
70
68
68
130
60
130
60
130
60
130
60
130
60
130
100
212
130
140
77
68
104
130
100
65
c(ft/s)
5028
--
--
4530
--
--
--
--
--
--
--
--
--
--
--
--
--
--
--
3264
--
4487
--
--
4920
cSt
--
32
0.32
--
6.1
77
7.1
23.2
4.9
17.8
3.5
9.7
1.6
3.8
20.6
37.9
8.6
28.7
0.35
--
0.38
--
98-130
259-325
--
37.8
54.4
37.8
oil
Cod oil
54.4
37.8
54.4
37.8
3D
20
Diesel fuel
oils
2D
37.8
-17.8
30
20
37.8
21.1
37.8
21.1
37.8
21.1
54.4
I-Decene
Cyclohexane
Cyclohexanol
Decane-n
25 Baume
24 Baume
22 Baume
Corn starch
solutions
20
Chlorine
Chlorobenzene
Cocoanut
25
37.8
oil
Tº C
20.6
LIQUID
China wood
c(m/s)
--
--
--
--
1250
--
--
1622
1278
--
--
--
--
--
--
--
--
--
--
1302
850
--
--
Tº F
130
100
130
100
68
100
0
86
68
100
70
100
70
100
70
130
100
130
100
77
68
100
69
c(ft/s)
--
--
--
--
4100
--
--
5320
4192
--
--
--
--
--
--
--
--
--
--
4271
2788
--
--
cSt
3.97-6.78
6-11.75
1-3.97
2-6
--
1.001
2.36
--
--
173.2
303
95.2
129.8
27.5
32.1
19.4
32.1
14.7-15.7
29.8-31.6
--
--
125.5
308.5
54
25
20
10
Ether (diethyl)
Ethyl alcohol
Ethyl bromide
c(m/s)
30
30
Ethylene
glycol mono-
--
70
--
--
1.45
0.27
Conc.
80%
21.1
70
-21
--
0.21
21.1
--
monoethyl
ether
Formaldehyde
Formic acid
glycol
Ethylene
chloride
Ethylene
dichloride
Ethylene
Ethyl iodide
Diphenyl
ether
Ethanol
amide
Ethyl
acetate
CH3COOC2
H5
Ethyl glycol
5D
4D
oils, cont.
-12
70
LIQUID
Diesel fuel
50%
--
--
--
--
17.8
--
0.787
0.27
--
--
--
--
--
--
cSt
21.1
5281
4392
5300
--
3326
--
--
3057
3811
3231
3792
4169
2992
--
-11
77
86
86
70
75
68
68
50
68
77
68
212
68
c(ft/s)
4251
10%
1610
1339
Tº F
86
Freon
Formamide
25
--
21.1
glycol
methyl ether
1014
24
1616
--
20
--
932
1162
985
1156
1271
912.3
1296
Ethylene
bromide
Ethylene
dibromide
Ethylene
20
20
Ethanol
C2H5Br
100
Diphenyl
Corning 200
fluid)
siloxane (Dow
Dimethyl
ethyl ether
20
30
Diethylene
glycol mono-
Tº C
LIQUID
20
20
20
20
20
25
30
23
20
20
30
20
15
25
30
71.1
50
54.4
37.8
Tº C
--
--
--
--
1299
1587
1279
1240
--
876
1606
1133
--
1724
1462
--
--
--
--
c(m/s)
68
68
68
68
68
77
86
73
68
68
86
68
59
77
86
160
122
130
100
Tº F
--
--
--
--
4261
5205
4195
4067
--
2873
5268
3716
--
5655
4795
--
--
--
--
c(ft/s)
1.48
1.4
1.2
1.04
--
--
--
--
0.668
--
--
0.49
0.4
--
--
35.2 max
86.6 max
13.1 max
29.8 max
cSt
55
30
30
20
37.8
-256
Heptene
Heptyne
Hexane
Honey
Hydrogen
1187
--
1203
1159
1082
179.8
--
65.6
-269
--
--
71.1
37.8
--
--
37.8
50
--
21.1
---
37.8
--
37.8
21.1
--
--
37.8
21.1
--
21.1
---
21.1
c(m/s)
37.8
Tº C
Helium
Glucose
6
5B
5A
3
2
1
Fuel oils
LIQUID
-429
100
68
86
86
-452
150
100
160
122
100
70
100
70
100
70
100
70
100
70
Tº F
--
3893
--
3946
3802
3549
590
--
--
--
--
--
--
--
--
--
--
--
--
--
c(ft/s)
--
73.6
--
--
--
--
880-2420
7.7M-22M
37.5-172
97.4-660
13.6-67.1
26.4
4.91-13.7
7.4-26.4
2.06-3.97
2.69-5.84
2.11-4.28
3-7.4
2.69
2.39-4.28
cSt
n-Hexane
n-Heptane
Guaicol
50% H2O
100%
Glycerine
c
b
a
Gasolines
37.8
21.2
-17.8
37.8
22.4
-17.8
100
60
20
37.8
20.3
30
37.8
15.6
15.6
37.8
15.6
37.8
21.1
Gas oils
Tº C
50
LIQUID
Gallium
c(m/s)
--
1085
--
--
1150
--
1252
--
--
--
--
1923
--
--
--
--
--
--
--
2740
Tº F
100
70
0
100
72
0
212
140
68
100
69
86
100
60
60
100
60
100
70
122
c(ft/s)
--
3559
--
--
3772
--
4107
--
--
--
--
6307
--
--
--
--
--
--
--
8987
cSt
0.401
--
0.683
0.511
--
0.928
--
1.85 cp
5.29
176
648
--
0.40
0.46
0.64
0.71
0.88
7.4
13.9
--
56
--
93.3
37.8
54.4
20.2
20
Menhadden
oil
Merck
Methanol
1118
1482
--
--
1760
--
340
54.4
1315
--
25
37.8
Lead
Lard
--
--
20
54.4
Kerosene
37.8
2215
--
260
Ink, printers
---
15.6
93.3
--
93.3
---
93.3
15.6
--
15.6
Indium
150 SSU
215 SSU
315 SSU
--
15.6
420 SSU
--
93.3
at 100 F
--
c(m/s)
15.6
Tº C
685 SSU
Industrial
lubricants
Turbine oils
LIQUID
68
68
130
100
644
130
100
77
68
130
100
500
200
60
200
60
200
60
200
60
200
60
Tº F
3667
4862
--
--
5773
--
--
4313
--
--
--
7265
--
--
--
--
--
--
--
--
--
--
c(ft/s)
--
--
18.2
29.8
--
34.3
62.1
--
2.71
238-660
550-2200
--
6
99
7.3
151
8
259
11
367
14.5
647
cSt
LIQUID
Mercury
Menthol
oil
Linseed
---
37.8
1454
1271
--
--
--
--
--
--
--
--
--
--
--
--
--
--
--
--
--
--
--
c(m/s)
21.1
20
50
54.4
37.8
54.4
37.8
-34.4
Jet fuel (av)
Lard oil
37.8
21.1
54.4
37.8
54.4
37.8
54.4
37.8
54.4
37.8
54.4
37.8
54.4
37.8
Tº C
oil
Insulating
#2
#1
Cutting oils
#30
#20
#10
Machine
lubricants
#8
100
70
68
122
130
100
130
100
-30
100
70
130
100
130
100
130
100
130
100
130
100
130
100
Tº F
--
--
4769
4169
--
--
--
--
--
--
--
--
--
--
--
--
--
--
--
--
--
--
--
c(ft/s)
0.11
0.118
--
--
18.94
30.5
23.4-27.1
41-47.5
7.9
11.75 max
24.1 max
23-26
40-46
17-23
30-40
39-55
75-119
25-39
72-83
18-25
34-72
13-18
23-34
cSt
57
Methyl
alcohol
37.8
54.4
Neatsfoot oil
1197
--
54.4
28
--
37.8
Paraldehyde
1440
21.7
Olive oil
1390
25
Oil of camphor
82
130
100
71
77
100
68
1192
--
20
68
68
37.8
-17.8
n-Octane
1218
1248
0
20
I-Nonene
-308
75
68
130
100
77
176
75
--
20
Nonane
744.7
1462
23.8
-189
--
20
Nitrogen
Nitrobenzene
---
25
Naptha
1225
80
Naphthalene
--
977.7
3926
--
--
4723
4559
--
3910
--
3995
4093
2443
4795
--
--
--
4018
--
3207
--
24.1
43.2
--
--
0.645
--
1.266
--
--
--
--
1.67
27.5
49.7
--
0.9
--
Tº C
37.8
Palm oil
54.4
-183
20
10
37.8
-17.8
54.4
37.8
54.4
37.8
54.4
37.8
20
23.5
30
20
20
Oxygen
Oleic acid
(lubricating)
Oil
Nonene-n
strap
C, black-
B, second
A, first
Molasses
Milk
iodide
24
--
--
--
LIQUID
Methyl
Methylene
3186
2968
3710
cSt
0.44
chloride
--
36
86
c(ft/s)
Methylene
971.2
905
1131
--
bromide
24
2
Methyl
Tº F
68
Methylene
30
acetate
c(m/s)
--
iodide
20
Methyl
bromide
Tº C
LIQUID
c(m/s)
--
--
912
1442
1625
--
--
--
--
--
--
--
--
--
1064
815
--
1121
Tº F
130
100
-297
68
50
100
0
130
100
130
100
130
100
68
74
--
68
68
c(ft/s)
--
--
2991
4730
5330
--
--
--
--
--
--
--
--
--
3490
2673
--
3678
cSt
26.4
47.8
--
--
--
0.807
1.728
16.5M
1320-
2630-55M
660-3.3M
13.2M
1410-
151-1760
281-5070
1.13
--
--
0.213
--
58
acetate
n-Propyl
n-Propanol
ether
Petroleum
Petrolatum
iso-Pentane
37.8
54.4
oil
15.6
Soya bean
--
20
25%
--
--
--
1991
850
Sodium
chloride
(fused)
5%
130
100
60
68
1562
86
--
--
--
--
6530
2513
4133
19.64
35.4
2.4
1.097
--
--
--
seed oil
Sesame
Sperm oil
30%
20%
Sodium
hydroxide
(caustic
soda)
766.2
320
Sodium
30
Silicon tetra-
1260
chloride
160
Rubidium
324.7
129.9
---
37.8
--
--
2500
--
--
--
--
--
--
--
1182
1220
--
--
--
985
1351
c(m/s)
54.4
18.3
18.3
150
54.4
37.8
93.3
--
37.8
130
54.4
37.8
(wood)
54.4
--
Rapeseed
Rosin
---
37.8
100
100-120
Rosin oil
--
21.1
26
20
15.6
71.1
54.4
25
oil
--
Tº C
20
(typical)
--
--
--
--
1.13
--
--
0.342
--
0.508
decene
Quenching oil
4740
4012
23.4
--
LIQUID
I-Penta-
glycol
68
68
--
6035
4179
--
3424
--
cSt
42
Propylene
1445
1223
68
302
212
80
68
0
-3306
c(ft/s)
20
20
n-Propyl
--
1840
130
68
--
Pyridine
20
Propionic acid
Tº F
100
alcohol
150
Potassium
1274
--
26.7
100
1044
20
Phenol
--
-17.8
n-Pentane
1008
--
20
54.4
Pentane
37.8
Peanut oil
c(m/s)
--
Tº C
LIQUID
130
100
65
65
302
130
100
200
100
130
100
70
79
68
60
160
130
77
68
Tº F
c(ft/s)
--
--
--
--
8200
--
--
--
--
--
--
--
3877
4002
--
--
--
3231
4431
cSt
15.2
21-23
10
4
--
23
39.6
108-4400
216-11M
31
54.1
52
--
--
31(est)
15
20.5
--
--
59
--
c(ft/s)
---
20
20
37.8
55.6
95%
60%
Tar, pine
22.5
20
I-Tridecene
1275
30
o-Toluidine
--
20
Toluene
1313
1669
2470
240
Tin (molten)
1484
20
Tetralin
--
--
20
--
1332
82.2
130
---
37.8
---
82.2
--
82.2
37.8
--
--
82.2
37.8
--
37.8
100%
Sulphuric acid
Sulphur
78.4 Brix
80.3 Brix
82.3 Brix
84.4 Brix
82.2
68
73
86
68
464
68
132
100
68
68
68
266
180
100
180
100
180
100
180
100
180
4307
5474
4182
--
8102
4868
--
--
--
--
--
4369
--
--
--
--
--
--
--
--
--
--
--
--
0.68
--
--
108.2
559
4.4
14.5
14.6
--
160 cp
3200 cp
230 cp
6900 cp
380 cp
17 Mcp
800 cp
48 Mcp
1750 cp
180 Mcp
cSt
LIQUID
21.1
Tar, gas
RT-6
RT-4
RT-2
Tar, road-
100
50
100
50
100
50
37.8
37.8
oven
house
21.1
37.8
21.1
37.8
21.1
37.8
21.1
37.8
21.1
37.8
21.1
37.8
21.1
Tº C
Tar, coke
76 Brix
74 Brix
72 Brix
68 Brix
64 Brix
60 Brix
---
37.8
100
Tº F
86.4 Brix
c(m/s)
Sugar
solutions
Sucrose
Tº C
Sugar
solutions
Corn syrup
LIQUID
--
--
--
--
--
--
--
--
--
--
--
--
--
--
--
--
--
--
--
--
--
--
c(m/s)
212
122
212
122
212
122
100
70
100
70
100
70
100
70
100
70
100
70
100
70
100
70
Tº F
--
--
--
--
--
--
--
--
--
--
--
--
--
--
--
--
--
--
--
--
--
--
c(ft/s)
16.8-26.2
216-440
11.6-14.3
86.6-154
8.88-10.2
43.2-64.9
440-4400
3300-66M
141-308
600-1760
440
2200
238
1210
138.6
595
59.5
216.4
31.6
95.2
18.7
49.7
cSt
60
1225
---
0
25
37.8
54.4
Triethylamine
Turpentine
c(m/s)
21.1
Trielhylene
glycol
--
4944
--
--
4182
--
--
cSt
35-39.6
--
143
313
--
39.9-44.3
86.6-95.2
--
--
40
LIQUID
o-Xylene
-1352
22
--
20
54.4
72
68
130
4435
--
--
--
0.93
19.9-23.4
Zinc
hexafluoride
Xylene
sea
fresh
distilled
Water
RT-12
RT-10
RT-8
Tar, road
cont. -
15.6
20
100
50
100
50
100
50
Tº C
450
25
--
100
59
100
68
68
130
100
4018
3900
c(ft/s)
Whale oil
--
32
77
--
54.4
37.8
Tº F
70
salinity)
(surface, 3.5%
1507
--
15
37.8
Water (sea)
--
20
Varnish, spar
1275
20
I-Undecene
1189
--
Tº C
LIQUID
2700
879
--
--
--
1483
--
--
--
--
--
--
c(m/s)
842
77
--
130
60
68
212
122
212
122
212
122
Tº F
8856
2883
--
--
--
4864
--
--
--
--
--
--
c(ft/s)
--
--
1.15
0.55
1.13
1.0038
108-173
25M-75 M
53.7-86.6
4.4M13.2M
31.8-48.3
660-1760
cSt
1425.793
1446.886
1465.57
1481.968
1496.294
1508.73
1519.428
1528.481
1536.009
M/S
1402.019
*see next page for graphical representation
4677.8
4747
4808.3
4862.1
4909.1
4949.9
4985
5014.7
5039.4
5
10
15
20
25
30
35
40
45
41
50
59
68
77
86
95
104
113
Ft/S
4599.8
Cº
0
Fº
32
100 5068.4
212
5075.4
5087.2
5095.3
5099.7
5100.8
5098.7
5093.6
5085.6
5074.8
Ft/S
5059.6
55
60
65
70
75
80
85
90
95
Cº
50
131
140
149
158
167
176
185
194
203
Fº
122
1544.848
1546.982
1550.579
1553.047
1554.389
1554.724
1554.084
1552.529
1550.091
1546.799
M/S
1542.166
B.2
Clean Water Sound Speed Versus Temperature
61
62
This figure is a graph showing the approximate relationship between specific
gravity, viscosity and sound velocities for aliphatic hydrocarbons (petroleum
products).
B.3
Relationship Between Specific Gravity,
Viscosity, & Sound Velocity for Petroleum
Products
63
Thermo Fisher Scientific
81 Wyman Street
P.O. Box 9046
Waltham, Massachusetts 02454-9046
United States
www.thermofisher.com
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