T H E E V E R G... Campus Master Plan - 2014 Update

T H E   E V E R G... Campus Master Plan - 2014 Update
T H E E V E R G R E E N S TAT E C O L L E G E
Campus Master Plan - 2014 Update
VOLUME I - Site Specific Recommendations
ZIMMER GUNSUL FRASCA ARCHITECTS LLP | 2014 Update
Printed on FSC Alternative Fiber
TA B L E O F C O N T E N T S
VOLUME I
-
Site Specific Recommendations
01 Preface
02 Executive Summary
03 Process
04 Existing Conditions
05 Goals and Objectives
06 Recommendations
07 Design Guidelines
08 Acknowledgements
VOLUME II
-
Goals and Policies for Land Use
(companion document)
VOLUME III
-
Appendix
(companion document)
01
P R E FA C E
1
2
Volume I - Site Specific Recommendations
PREFACE
0 1 P R E FA C E
The Evergreen State College Campus Master Plan is a comprehensive long term
plan for the facilities and campus grounds of the college. The plan establishes
priorities for campus development consistent with the College’s Mission,
Strategic Plan and other current initiatives. The multi-volume document identifies
opportunities where the College can focus resources to meet future demands on
its facilities and land resources.
Eld Inlet
The Master Plan is structured as follows:
Volume I - Site Specific Recommendations
Volume II - Goals and Policies for Land Use (1998 Campus Master Plan; updated 2005)
Volume III - Appendix
Approximate
Campus
Boundary
Figure 1.1. Evergreen campus.
The aim of the process and plan is to provide a comprehensive document that:
(1) helps guide campus development, and (2) serves as a concept plan for future
development. This plan is a living document that will be frequently revised and
updated. This plan contains the core values that guide campus facilities and land
use decisions.
PURPOSE OF THE MASTER PLAN
Figure 1.2. The clock tower marks the main
campus core and Daniel J. Evans Library.
Figure 1.3. Red Square is the heart and ‘stage’ of
the campus.
The College has completed its strategic planning process which incorporates all
academic and support operations. A previous Master Plan was completed in
1998 and updated in 2005. The previous Master Plan provides the framework
for development on the campus with policies and statements regarding how the
College should be developed and landscaped. The earlier documents do not
provide definitive plans for various types of academic, administrative, and student
space. There is also no discussion of possible sites should additional facilities be
needed to meet the expected enrollment target or an identification of which
facilities should be modified and renovated to meet the changing academic
program needs. The previous Master Plan serves as the philosophy behind the
development of the campus and is incorporated as Volume II of the Master Plan.
Volume I specifically address facility renovations, sites for potential new facilities,
land use policies including the identification of areas for student and faculty
research and projects, use of the waterfront and accompanying beach area and
similar issues relative to the overall campus.
The overall goal of this campus Master Plan is to assist the College in translating
the strategic goals and objectives of the various College units into a physical plan
which identifies where the College should be focusing its resources to meet future
demands on its facilities and land resources. The Master Plan is a key part of the
College’s Capital Budget Request and 10-year Capital Plan that will be submitted
to the Washington State Office of Financial Management in September 2008. The
Master Plan will also guide the capital construction on the campus for at least the
next two biennia. The Master Plan covers the period from 2005 - 2020.
2014 UPDATE - Between January and May of 2014, the Master Plan was
reviewed and updated to: acknowledge project successes, adjust the
Capital Plan to extend through the 2023-2025 biennium, incorporate
emerging program initiatives, and supplement and refine priorities.
2014 Update text is bold and italicized.
THE EVERGREEN STATE COLLEGE CAMPUS MASTER PLAN | 2014 Update
3
4
02
EXECUTIVE SUMMARY
5
6
Volume I - Site Specific Recommendations
EXECUTIVE SUMMARY
02 EXECUTIVE SUMMARY
The campus master planning effort represents an important step in a process
intended to assist the College in translating the strategic goals and objectives
of the various College units into a physical plan. The multi-volume document
identifies opportunities where the College could focus resources to meet future
demands on its facilities and land resources. The plan is an important part of the
College’s Capital Budget Request and 10-year Capital Plan that will be submitted to
the Washington State Office of Financial Management in September 2008. The
plan covers the period from 2007-2020 and will help inform the development of
the campus over the next two bienna.
As part of the updated Strategic Plan, the College has established the ambitious
goal of being carbon and waste neutral by the year 2020. This sustainability focus
has informed a process that is rethinking campus operations and facilities planning
at the College.
The 2014 Master Plan Update revises and extends the Capital Plan
through the 2021-2023 biennium incorporating revised proejct listings
and addressing needs of emerging program initiatives. The Campus is
currently beginning a process to update the Stregtegic Plan; the 2014
Mater Plan update reflects the current Stretegic Plan.
The plan outlined in this document takes the ambitious sustainability initiatives set
by the College and considers a wide range of opportunities to set the stage for
making significant contributions towards balancing both carbon use and waste
production and include:
•
transportation modes and patterns
•
energy production and use
•
campus biome protection, use and enrichment
•
food production
•
construction practices
•
waste stream management
•
student life and housing
Figure 2.1. The legacy of the past and promise of a sustainable future define the campus character.
2014 Update text is bold and italicized.
THE EVERGREEN STATE COLLEGE CAMPUS MASTER PLAN | 2014 Update
7
EXECUTIVE SUMMARY
Volume I - Site Specific Recommendations
PROCESS
From the beginning, a concerted effort was made to engage the campus
community in a dialog concerning the future of the College and how to make the
campus an even better place to live, work, teach, visit and learn.
Based on the philosophy of ‘building community’, the process utilized for the
campus planning process was intensive, inclusive and collaborative. Initial steps
included gathering existing data and reviewing past Master Plans. These initial
steps were followed by a series of on-campus meetings that included open
information sessions, pizza dinner discussions, one-on-one meetings, facility and
campus tours, community presentations and focused charrettes. These events
took place over a five month period between February and June of 2007 and
included participation in the College’s annual Synergy Conference and an Eco
Charrette.
Figure 2.2. Planning input was received at the
student-sponsored annual Synergy Conference.
Figure 2.3. Meeting in the Campus Activities Building (CAB) engaged the campus community in the process.
The process was divided into the following tasks: Task 1 – Goals/Objectives/
Needs Assessment, Task 2 – Alternatives/Evaluation, Task 3 – Master Plan
Recommendations/Implementation and Documentation. This Master Plan
contains information on the process, the information collected, and a set of
project specific recommendations. This document was initially issued in a
preliminary draft format in July of 2007 to provide opportunity for comment from
campus constituents. In the fall of 2007, a series of on-campus meetings were
held to allow direct input from the community, faculty, students and staff. This
revised version of the Master Plan incorporates revisions resulting from the fall
2007 sessions as well as comments submitted via the campus website.
Figure 2.4. Seminar II Building was a venue for
input sessions to highlight sustainability.
The 2014 Master Plan update process utilized an enhanced Campus LandUse Committee (CLUC) in a series of four workshop sessions. The CLUC
was expanded to include representatives from the Tacoma Campus and
the emerging Indigenous Art Campus.
2014 Update text is bold and italicized.
8
THE EVERGREEN STATE COLLEGE CAMPUS MASTER PLAN | 2014 Update
Volume I - Site Specific Recommendations
EXECUTIVE SUMMARY
EXISTING CONDITIONS
Figure 2.5. The pedestrian bridge connection between
CAB and CRC is dysfunctional and disorienting.
The Evergreen State College campus is part of the Cooper Point Peninsula
which reaches into the southern end of Puget Sound and is located west of the
City of Olympia. The campus is located on 1,008 acres of land, which remains
predominately forested with a mixture of largely native second growth vegetation.
The campus was initially conceived in the early 1970’s to one day accommodate
approximately 12,000 students and initial projects and infrastructure elements
were constructed with this ultimate goal in mind. Current development and
facilities accommodate approximately 4,500 students (FTEs). There is student
housing on campus; however, nearly 80% of students live off-campus and
commute to campus for classes and/or events.
References to areas of the campus follow previous Master Plans including: Core
(“urban” area of the campus including the main academic, administrative,
residential, social and recreational facilities – commonly referred to as upper and
lower campus); central Core (Red Square and the major, multi-use buildings that
surround it – commonly referred to as upper campus); Clusters (group of facilities
outside the Core, including Organic Farm, Geoduck House and Maintenance
Shops, serving a specific function) and Reserve (substantially undeveloped areas
surrounding the Core and Clusters where natural ecosystems are the predominant
feature).
The majority of facilities are concentrated within the campus Core. The upper
campus central Core consists of numerous concrete buildings which create a
strong unified architectural expression. Organized around Red Square, a large
central open space, the instructional and administrative spaces of the College are
dispersed and integrated along with faculty offices, science labs and studio spaces.
Lower campus is defined by groupings of student housing facilities that adjoin a
large open space that serves as the athletic fields for the campus.
Figure 2.6. Green roofs and bioswales harvest
rainwater at SEM II.
The predominant construction technique and aesthetic utilizes exposed concrete
and glass scaled to create large spaces with limited visibility into building spaces.
The solid and somewhat imposing feel of many of the buildings limits a visitor’s
exposure to the activities going on inside the buildings and contributes to a sense
that there are a limited number of students on the campus at any given time. The
large scale of both the buildings and the areas between contribute to a sense that
the spaces and buildings are over-scaled and lack definition. Much of the campus
housing structures can be typified as being low density, aging wood framed
facilities rapidly reaching the end of their usefulness.
Located approximately five miles from downtown Olympia, and somewhat
peripheral to population centers in Thurston County, The Evergreen State College’s
setting poses significant challenges to creating an efficient transportation system
for its students, staff and faculty. Despite this relatively remote location, relatively
high levels of transit use, cycling, and ridesharing occur. This good performance
indicates a strong commitment by the College community to using alternatives to
single-occupancy vehicles. This commitment provides an essential foundation for
creating a more energy efficient and less polluting campus transportation system.
The Evergreen State College has a Central Utility Plant (CUP) that provides
steam and chilled water to the campus for heating, cooling and domestic hot
water through a comprehensive underground tunnel system. The tunnel system
connects directly to mechanical rooms in the Communications Laboratory (Comm
2014 Update text is bold and italicized.
THE EVERGREEN STATE COLLEGE CAMPUS MASTER PLAN | 2014 Update
9
EXECUTIVE SUMMARY
Volume I - Site Specific Recommendations
Lab), Seminar I (Sem I), Seminar II (Sem II), College Recreation Center (CRC), College
Activities Building (CAB), Library, Lecture Halls Building, Science Lab I (Lab I) and
Science Lab II (Lab II). A crawlspace tunnel to Housing Buildings A, B, C & D provides
steam to those buildings. A direct bury branch from that tunnel provides steam
to the Community Center and Housing Units E through U. Additional direct bury
piping (steam and chilled water) runs from the main tunnels to the Longhouse
and Arts Annex buildings. The Modular Housing buildings are heated by electric
baseboard and have no connection to the CUP. The Childcare Center has its own
gas-fired hot water boiler and is not connected to the CUP. Additional outbuildings
consist of the Farmhouse, Geoduck House and Maintenance Shops. Each of these
outbuildings has its own stand-alone heating system.
With the exception of Geoduck House, which is currently occupied by the Olympia
Community School and located near the shoreline, the campus buildings are
connected to the City of Olympia water and wastewater systems. The City of
Olympia and Evergreen have agreements for these services and the City will
continue to provide water and wastewater service to the campus. The Geoduck
House is currently served by a septic tank and drain field. This on-site wastewater
treatment system should be evaluated to verify that it is functioning properly, and
is sized correctly for the school population and soil conditions.
Figure 2.7. Informal break-out spaces encourage interaction that is at the core of the learning
environment at Evergreen.
GOALS AND OBJECTIVES
‘The Evergreen State College will be a laboratory for sustainability as demonstrated in its
operations, curriculum, and quality of life for employees and students. We will nurture values
and practical skills that motivate a lifetime commitment to a sustainable, inter-generational just
way of living on a healthy planet.’
- The Evergreen State College Sustainability Task Force
2014 Update text is bold and italicized.
10
THE EVERGREEN STATE COLLEGE CAMPUS MASTER PLAN | 2014 Update
Volume I - Site Specific Recommendations
EXECUTIVE SUMMARY
From the beginning of this campus master planning process, the Planning
Committee and consultant team understood that past master planning efforts in
1998 and again in 2005 developed very strong foundations from which to build.
The mission and goals of this master planning effort (listed below) represent direct
developments and refinements from these earlier processes.
The mission of the plan is to provide support for future Capital Budget Requests
and integrate programmatic faculty needs. As a result, a particular focus has been
placed on identifying:
•
Renovations and additions
•
Infrastructure improvements
•
Sites for potential new facilities
•
Land use/landscape policies
The following five goals were developed early in the planning process and built
upon previously stated goals from prior master planning efforts. The third goal
was significantly refined to emphasize and strengthen the campus focus on
sustainability.
•
Develop state-of-the-art learning facilities and housing options that
advance the mission of the College.
•
Provide an open and supportive environment for those who study,
work and live on campus.
•
Create a visibly sustainable campus that recognizes the College’s
aspirations of carbon and waste neutral by 2020, through
educationally rich, proactive design, planning and goal-setting.
•
Provide educational opportunities in the delivery of campus
planning, operations and services.
•
Integrate College educational activities with cultural, social, civic and
business activities of the surrounding community.
RECOMMENDATIONS
The plan illustrated in this document has been developed as a tool to understand
the impact of the projected growth in enrollment and the interrelationship of
the various planning objectives established by the College through this and past
master planning processes. The plan proposes a pattern of development that is
based on both the established building pattern that reinforces the Core of the
campus and a new direction that aims to integrate the entire campus into the
community, sustainable and educational goals of the College. At the campus
Core, proposed renovations and additions are focused on developing and
enhancing a sense of place that is sensitively scaled, provides good solar access
and forms a connectedness among adjacent buildings. New facility locations also
build upon the existing development patterns at the campus Core and reinforce
the ideas related to creating appropriately scaled outdoor spaces, establishing
visual connections between inside and outside and limiting the sprawl of the
campus. Circulation improvements – both vehicular and pedestrian – build on
existing patterns and develop a comprehensive network of connections among
the various Education Centers, upper and lower campus and the community.
2014 Update text is bold and italicized.
THE EVERGREEN STATE COLLEGE CAMPUS MASTER PLAN | 2014 Update
11
EXECUTIVE SUMMARY
Volume I - Site Specific Recommendations
At the core of the recommendations outlined in this document is an
understanding that the educational experience nurtured at the College is
based in a deeply held series of beliefs that prioritize inclusive, hands-on,
experiential, communal, collaborative, interdisciplinary teaching and learning
opportunities. The recommendations embrace the open atmosphere
embodied by the educational values of the campus and focus on supporting
the teaching paradigms that reinforce these important and unique Evergreen
characteristics.
The recent addition of the Seminar II Building in the central Core of the
campus was originally envisioned to accommodate the current and projected
classroom needs in conjunction with a series of renovations to existing
facilities. The subsequent renovations have not yielded all of the projected
spaces and specific needs remain unfulfilled. The recommendations outlined
in this document are intended to address the space needs that have been
stated during the Master Plan process. The evaluation of the proposed
projects during the earlier preliminary draft review determined a prioritized list
of projects to meet anticipated campus needs and is reflected in the listing of
projects that exists in subsequent sections of this document.
All of the investigations under taken during the planning process used
sustainability as a touchstone and integrate opportunities for hands-on student
learning, participation, engagement and community involvement. Three
general organizing categories emerged that focused on notions of Community,
Sustainability and Learning.
LEARNING
Figure 2.8. Master Plan focus: community,
sustainability and learning.
•
Develop on-campus Education Centers in Clusters in the Reserve
areas (forest and marine ecologies, organic farming, sustainable
practices, environmental stewardship, waste stream)
•
Use Red Square as a stage to showcase College’s mission
and student life
•
Create outdoor laboratories and classrooms – field study
emphasis
•
Support faculty research
•
Improved learning environments – better classroom
environments
•
Develop flexible instruction space off-campus
SUSTAINABILITY
•
Increase use of low impact alternative transportation
(walking, biking, transit, car pool)
•
Increase use of self-sustaining resources
(recycling, composting, storm water harvesting, ground water)
•
Green building practices
•
Maintain cultural resources
•
Develop alternative power sources (geo-thermal, solar, wind)
2014 Update text is bold and italicized.
12
THE EVERGREEN STATE COLLEGE CAMPUS MASTER PLAN | 2014 Update
Volume I - Site Specific Recommendations
EXECUTIVE SUMMARY
COMMUNITY
•
Support Campus as Community Resource - Invite community
and neighborhood to use campus as a learning environment
(Extended Ed, cultural events, interpretive trails, Organic Farm tours,
conferences and sport camps, sustainability tours, teaching gardens,
beach walks, nature walks, cultural walks, bicycle loops, volunteer
opportunities)
•
Increased on-campus student population
•
Leadership in innovative programs - Use the campus as a global
venue (sustainability innovations, Native American culture, innovative
programs, environmental conservation and demonstration)
•
Provide services for students and community (shops and restaurants)
One of the primary missions of this master planning process has been to develop
Land Use strategies that focus on preserving, supporting and enhancing the
Reserve areas of the campus. The approach proposed has been categorized into
four primary groups identified as Identity, Education, Circulation and Stewardship.
IDENTITY
Earlier Master Plans divided the Reserve into four quadrants – north, south, east,
and west. This naming convention does not convey the ecological, educational,
or recreational significance of the Reserve areas. This planning effort studied and
recommends the identification of place and amenity names within the Reserve.
The place naming is intended to allow research areas to be protected and the
identities of the Reserve’s areas and amenities to be formalized.
EDUCATION
Figure 2.9. Geoduck House is a unique setting for
learning on the shore of Eld Inlet.
The College has established a set of sustainability goals which include waste and
carbon neutrality by 2020. The technologies and practices that will help achieve
these goals also provide educational opportunities. This plan proposes Education
Centers at various locations within the Reserve, as well as enhancements to
existing campus facilities such as the Organic Farm. The proposed and enhanced
centers are envisioned to create a greater sense of presence in the Reserve areas
by the College that is consistent with the education mission of the College. The
centers are not generally envisioned to require the development of significant
buildings but rather as stand alone instructional support features that might
include signage, monitoring equipment and program staging spaces. By
integrating the Reserve into the activities of the College, the biomes can be
more deliberately and comprehensively monitored, studied and restored so
that the value of the Reserve areas can continue to serve as a unique regional
environmental asset.
2014 Update text is bold and italicized.
THE EVERGREEN STATE COLLEGE CAMPUS MASTER PLAN | 2014 Update
13
EXECUTIVE SUMMARY
Volume I - Site Specific Recommendations
KIFER
HOMESTEAD
Figure 2.10. Trail and road revisions connect Education Centers located strategically around the campus. UPDATED
CIRCULATION
Facilitating easy, accessible and safe campus mobility is a priority of the planning
effort. As the campus evolves, the ability to move easily among the Core facilities
and around the campus Reserve areas must be accommodated. A revised network
of roads, paths and trails are proposed to support and link areas of the campus and
connect to off campus networks. In addition to the proposed trail network, two
low traffic roads are proposed to be modified to facilitate a reconnecting of the
campus Reserve areas and to discourage and reduce non-college traffic.
2014 Update text is bold and italicized.
14
THE EVERGREEN STATE COLLEGE CAMPUS MASTER PLAN | 2014 Update
Volume I - Site Specific Recommendations
EXECUTIVE SUMMARY
Proposed revisions to exising campus circulation network should be
carefully considered and the impact of closure options should be studied
in greater detail before implementation to understand impacts to the
adjacent communties and internal campus circualtion.
STEWARDSHIP
Engendering a sense of ownership by the students, faculty, staff and surrounding
community is seen as a powerful way to ensure that the unique environmental
assets of the campus are preserved, managed, maintained and treasured for future
generations. Currently, the large contiguous land area that makes up the Reserve
areas of the campus represents a forest and meadow system that is being replaced
by encroaching suburban development as Olympia and surrounding Thurston
County populations grow. Through partnerships with state, county, community,
and environmental organizations, there may be opportunities to address regional
trail, wildlife, and environmental initiatives that leverage campus assets and connect
the College to a larger set of regional goals.
RENOVATIONS, ADDITIONS AND BUILDING SITES
In addition to developing land use strategies, the planning process developed
options for future development on the campus that included potential building
sites for academic, student life and housing facilities. Building on the idea
of enhancing the developed areas of the campus, sites for new facilities and
expanded housing options focused on currently or previously disturbed or
developed areas of the campus.
The notion of making great exterior spaces that connect directly with interior
spaces and functions – we call this ‘placemaking’ - is central to the concepts
utilized in the plan. The Master Plan recommends the creation of a series of new
and enhanced ‘places’ linked by visual and pedestrian axes. Three campus places
are recommended for enhancement as pedestrian activity hubs: Red Square, East
Campus Square, and West Campus Square. Under the Master Plan, new buildings
are proposed to enhance each of these places.
The goal of making The Evergreen State College a residential liberal arts college
adds new opportunities and potential for lower campus. ‘Placemaking’ and
community building are central to the long term strategy. Making the campus an
attractive place to live and where there is easy access to basic amenities emerged
as primary goals in shaping the thinking about the vision for the lower campus.
The goal is to add housing to achieve the ability to provide on-campus housing for
33% of the students and some faculty housing.
Working with the assumption that the projected 2020 enrollment will equal 5,000
FTEs and with an on-campus residential student population target of 33% of
the total student population, the campus needs to plan for approximately 1,650
beds. Assuming demolition of the Modular housing, the existing bed count totals
approximately 907 beds. Meeting the 2020 housing goal will require the addition
of 743 beds.
Several options for increasing the number of housing units on campus have been
developed. The illustrated option adds four additional Quad-style buildings (400
2014 Update text is bold and italicized.
THE EVERGREEN STATE COLLEGE CAMPUS MASTER PLAN | 2014 Update
15
EXECUTIVE SUMMARY
Volume I - Site Specific Recommendations
PROPOSED PROJECTS
A Longhouse Addition (Completed)
B Interdisciplinary Lab Building (Alternative Site 1)
C Interdisciplinary Lab Building (Alternative Site 2)
D Lecture Halls Renovation/Expansion
(Design 2014)
E IAC Building Projects
F Seminar I Building Renovation
G Communication Building Expansion
H CRC Renovation/Expansion
(Predesign 2014)
I
Future Building Site
J
Energy Efficiency Projects
K
Lab I & II Projects
Renovation
New/Addition
Existing
Figure 2.11. Core campus proposed projects. UPDATED
beds) enclosing courtyards to accommodate underclassmen. New suite-style
housing (Eco-Village) will be developed on the Modular housing site to appeal
to students seeking a sustainable life-style (343 beds). Retail with cottage-style
faculty housing (18 units) will be built on a portion of Lot F at the intersection
of Overhulse Road and Driftwood Road. Lot F will be reconfigured to maintain
current capacity and screened from the housing by landscaping. Additional
options are illustrated in other sections of the document.
Enrollment projections have not been realised. Current student
populations are running below 2008 levels and housing demand is
likewise down. Supporting improved housing options remains a high
priority as improved alternatives support enriched student live on
campus. Opportunites for public/private partnerships may provide
options to develop new housing and retail development in ‘F’ lot or on
adjacent sites.
In addition to addressing the needs of the main campus, the planning process
addressed recommendations for the Tacoma Campus and Reservation Based/
Community Determined Programs that, as with additional housing options, are
documented in the Recommendations section of the document.
The following is a summary of proposed new buildings and additions. These
proposed facilities are in response to the list of needs compiled during meetings.
This list should be reviewed and prioritized by the College community before
becoming a final Master Plan recommendation.
2014 Update text is bold and italicized.
16
THE EVERGREEN STATE COLLEGE CAMPUS MASTER PLAN | 2014 Update
Volume I - Site Specific Recommendations
EXECUTIVE SUMMARY
PROPOSED PROJECTS
L Quad Dorm Expansion
M Driftwood Suites Housing
N Modular Replacement Housing
O Fieldhouse Pavilion Expansion
M
N
L
O
New/Addition
Existing
Figure 2.12. One of the proposed housing alternatives. UPDATED
PROPOSED NEW BUILDINGS, RENOVATIONS AND ADDITIONS
Longhouse Expansion (Project A)
Completed
Figure 2.13. Additional Quad-style buildings
enclosing courtyards.
Interdisciplinary Lab Building – Alternative Site 1 (Project B)
Floor Plate: 16,500 gsf
Total Square Footage: 2.5 floors = 41,250 gsf
Projected Uses:
• Studios/Labs/Dirty Labs
• Flexible Interdisciplinary Labs
• Faculty Offices
• Informal Learning/Meeting Spaces
Interdisciplinary Lab Building – Alternative Site 2 (Project C)
Floor Plate: 16,500 gsf
Total Square Footage: 2.5 floors = 41,250 gsf
Projected Uses:
• Studios/Labs/Dirty Labs
• Flexible Interdisciplinary Labs
• Faculty Offices
• Informal Learning/Meeting Spaces
2014 Update text is bold and italicized.
THE EVERGREEN STATE COLLEGE CAMPUS MASTER PLAN | 2014 Update
17
EXECUTIVE SUMMARY
Volume I - Site Specific Recommendations
Lecture Halls Renovation/Expansion (Project D)
Design 2014
IAC Building Projects (Project E)
Floor Plate: varies
Total Square Footage: varies
Projected Uses:
• Fiber arts studio
• Carving arts studio
• Painting arts studio
• Glass arts studio
Seminar I Building Renovation/Addition (Project F)
Floor Plate: 11,227 gsf
Total Square Footage: 4 floors = Approximately 44,909 gsf (5,000-7,000 gsf
addition)
Projected Uses:
• Campus Police Services Offices
• Campus Health Services Offices
• Renovated Classrooms
• Fiber arts studio
• Fiber arts studio
• Faculty Offices
• General Campus Administrative Offices
• International Student Education First Center for International Education and
Exchange
Communication Building Expansion (Project G)
Total Square Footage: 60,000 gsf (addition only)
Projected Uses:
• Performance/Lecture Space
• Conference Programs and Receptions
• Flexible Interdisciplinary Labs
• Faculty Offices
CRC Renovation/Expansion (Project H)
Predesign 2014
Future Building Site (Project I)
Identified site for possible new facility TBD
• Alternate site for projects B or C
Energy Efficiency Projects (Project J)
Lab I & II Projects (Project K)
Continues updating cycle for the Lab facilities
Projected Uses:
• renovated lab and lab support
2014 Update text is bold and italicized.
18
THE EVERGREEN STATE COLLEGE CAMPUS MASTER PLAN | 2014 Update
Volume I - Site Specific Recommendations
EXECUTIVE SUMMARY
Quad Dorm Expansion (Project L)
Total Square Footage: varies
Projected Uses:
• First and Second Year Housing
Driftwood Suites Housing (Project M)
Total Square Footage: varies
Projected Uses:
• Local retail space
• Student/Married Student Housing
• Potential Faculty Housing
• Visiting Scholar Housing
Modular Replacement Housing (Project N)
Total Square Footage: varies
Projected Uses:
• Replaces Modular Housing
• Higher Density Housing
• Eco Village Location
Fieldhouse Pavilion Expansion (Project O)
Total Square Footage: 13,000 gsf
Projected Uses:
• Field House activities – lockers and team rooms
• Sport Camp and Conference Services
• Light catering and flexible meeting spaces
Goeduck House Renovation (Project P)
Total Square Footage: 5,000 gsf
• Renovation/Updating of existing facility for small retreats
• Limit uses to minimize environmental impact
Organic Farm Lab Facility (Project Q)
Total Square Footage: 12,000 gsf
• Food Grade Teaching Lab
•Greenhouse
• Equipment Storage
Terrascope Interdisciplinary Education Center (Project R)
Total Square Footage: 12,000 gsf
• Flexible Interdisciplinary Labs
• Forest Canopy Studies Lab
• Marine Studies Lab
• Equipment Storage
• Community Education Resource Center
Combined Housing and Campus Facilities Maintenance Building
(Project S)
Total Square Footage: 12,000 gsf
• Housing Maintenance Offices
• Campus Maintenance Offices
• Maintenance Vehicle Parking
• Maintenance Shop Space
• Maintenance Material Storage
2014 Update text is bold and italicized.
THE EVERGREEN STATE COLLEGE CAMPUS MASTER PLAN | 2014 Update
19
EXECUTIVE SUMMARY
Volume I - Site Specific Recommendations
Funding for the various proposed projects may occur through various possible
funding sources. In a time when receiving capital funding dollars from the State
continues to be challenging, understanding alternative strategies for funding
projects and initiatives is critical. Several various funding groupings are listed
below with appropriate project types indicated to provide a sense for how many
of the ideas embodied in the plan could be realized and include:
Funding from the State continues to be limited. alternative funding
approaches are encouraged and include exploring public/private
partnerships and leveraging grant opportunities.
CAPITAL PROJECTS
Funding in this category typically supports additions, renovations and new facility
projects and may include the proposed:
Science Buildings/Renovations
Interdisciplinary Lab Buildings
Communications Building Renovations/Expansion
Lecture Halls Renovation/Expansion
Seminar I Renovations
CAB Renovations/Additions
CRC Renovations/Additions
Arts Annex Renovations/Additions
Maintenance Facilities
MAINTENANCE PROJECTS
Funding in this category typically supports smaller projects that are targeted
at supporting and maintaining existing campus facilities and grounds and may
include the proposed:
Trails
Accessibility Improvements
Signage/Gateway Marking
Red Square Pavement Replacement
Road Removals/Changes
Reforestation Projects
Transit Waiting Areas
2014 Update text is bold and italicized.
20
THE EVERGREEN STATE COLLEGE CAMPUS MASTER PLAN | 2014 Update
Volume I - Site Specific Recommendations
EXECUTIVE SUMMARY
SPECIAL PROJECTS
Projects in this category are typically not supported directly by the Legislature and
rely on student fees, grants, gifts and other sources of revenue and may include
the proposed:
Conference Center
Extended Education Center
Performing Arts Center
Field House
Canopy Walk
Arable Land Project
Faculty Housing
Student Housing
Careful evaluation of the projects and proposals listed in this report and the input
provided during the fall of 2007 review sessions helped distinguish between
projects of greater and lesser importance to allow a refined prioritization to occur.
Key future actions emerging from the master plan process include:
Add interdisciplinary and flexible lab space
Renovate Arts Annex
Expand arable land and teaching facilities at the Organic Farm
Create Terrascope-Forest Canopy educational and retreat center
Expand student and faculty housing choices
Expand and renovate Recreational Facilities
Enhance student life facilities
Highlight economic, ecological and educational value of making campus
a laboratory for sustainability
Define and implement the most effective means of meeting the College’s
goal of carbon and waste neutrality by 2020
Centralize extended education programs on the main campus to
maximize their synergy
2014 Update text is bold and italicized.
THE EVERGREEN STATE COLLEGE CAMPUS MASTER PLAN | 2014 Update
21
22
03
PROCESS
23
24
Volume I - Site Specific Recommendations
PROCESS
03 PROCESS
Throughout the Master Plan process, every effort was made to engage the campus
community in a dialog concerning the future of the physical facilities of the
campus and how to make the campus an even better place to live, work, teach
and learn.
The Master Plan process was intensive, inclusive, collaborative, and based on the
philosophy of ‘placemaking’ and ‘building community’. Initial steps included
gathering existing data and reviewing past Master Plan documents. These
information gathering steps were followed by a series of on-campus meetings
that took the form of open information sessions, pizza dinner discussions, one-onone meetings, facility and campus tours, community presentations and focused
charrettes. These campus and community gatherings took place over a five month
period between February and June of 2007 and included participation in the
annual Evergreen student sponsored Synergy Conference and an Eco Charrette.
Figure 3.1. An ‘eco-charrette’ identified
opportunities to enhance sustainability.
Figure 3.2. Planning workshops defined means to
improve campus accessibility.
The process was divided into the following tasks: Task 1 – Goals/Objectives/
Needs Assessment, Task 2 – Alternatives/Evaluation, and Task 3 – Master Plan
Recommendations/Implementation. This plan documents the process, information
collected, and the list of recommendations developed. Opportunities for students,
faculty, staff and the greater community of The Evergreen State College to
evaluate the ideas and concepts included in this document were provided over the
course of the summer and into the fall of 2007.
Utilizing the process outlined above, functional requirements for master planning
(site circulation, parking, loading, etc.) were considered simultaneously with
potential views, sun, wind, trees, etc. These issues were evaluated in conjunction
with building function (both quantitatively and qualitatively) and in relation to the
landscape. It has been an inductive, as opposed to a deductive, process. On a
campus such as Evergreen’s, the integration of the buildings and roads with the
vegetation and the terrain are ideally seamless. In addition to such considerations,
the ‘readability’ of the campus has been enhanced to make it easily understood
by visitors, students, staff and surrounding residents. The outdoor spaces that
connect the various areas of the campus have been shaped and modified to relate
to an overall vision of the campus that will accommodate future programmatic
changes and unanticipated growth while maintaining a sense of integrity.
The overall challenge was to create a visionary and comprehensive campus master
plan for a unique state liberal arts supported college located on an exceptionally
beautiful, natural site.
While building upon past planning efforts, the process was an important new
chapter in the development of the College and responds to the challenges of
the current strategic and academic plans by creating a graphic and physical
plan that will accommodate the future vision of the College. New issues have
been addressed and old issues revisited, including ideas related to image and
identity, the role of the College in the region and community, new facilities to
accommodate enrollment and program growth, updating and renewing aging
facilities, integrating environmentally sustainable strategies, transportation and
way finding improvements, off campus development, preservation and use of
wooded and shoreline areas and making the campus experience more inviting
2014 Update text is bold and italicized.
THE EVERGREEN STATE COLLEGE CAMPUS MASTER PLAN | 2014 Update
25
PROCESS
Volume I - Site Specific Recommendations
Figure 3.3. Planning input was gathered at the annual Synergy Conference.
and accessible for existing and perspective students, faculty, staff and community.
Placemaking – the process of creating places where people want to be and go and sustainability have been fundamental drivers in the planning process.
This plan builds upon and expands recent College sustainability initiatives stated in
the Strategic Plan and exemplified by the Seminar II building. The plan establishes
LEED standards and encourages sustainable strategies related to building siting,
energy, water, stormwater and landscaping. The plan also considers the historical
development of the site, Native American influences, and natural ecologies. The
precedents from the original campus plan and its updates have been reviewed and
incorporated into this plan.
The engagement of constituents, especially students, in the planning process
has been essential in enriching both the product and participants themselves.
Early in the process, with the assistance of the faculty, opportunities for student
involvement were identified and several students became vital and active
participants in the process, focusing on place naming and process support.
In addition to meetings with the Master Plan Committee, The Campus Land Use
Committee, Senior Staff, and the Sustainability Task Force, the planning team met
with the College’s Board of Trustees, Cooper Point Association, Ralph Munro, City,
County, Thurston County Regional Planning Council staff, and Intercity Transit.
There were three periods of contact with most of these groups; near the beginning
of the process the groups were invited to offer ideas and aspirations, later they
were asked to comment on concept alternatives and finally, a third feedback
session in the fall of 2007 when the plan was updated to include comments
generated by the preliminary draft document.
Figure 3.4. Tours allowed faculty and students to
express the important and varied uses of campus
reserves areas.
The purpose of this structure was to first engage stakeholders before any major
decisions were made, to then demonstrate how their input was incorporated into
the concept alternatives, and finally to allow course corrections as the Master Plan
was finalized. The resulting product of the process was generated gradually with
continual involvement by the College community.
2014 Update text is bold and italicized.
26
THE EVERGREEN STATE COLLEGE CAMPUS MASTER PLAN | 2014 Update
Volume I - Site Specific Recommendations
PROCESS
Figure 3.5. Alternatives to suburban development are sought for on-campus housing for faculty and staff to
improve sustainability, offer affordability and build community.
TASK 1 – GOALS/OBJECTIVES/NEEDS ASSESSMENT
The Master Plan process was founded on the values and aspirations of the
College community. The planning process was kicked-off by a meeting with the
Planning Committee and subsequent individual meetings over a two-day period
with key constituents to gain a thorough understanding of their vision, goals, and
immediate and future facilities needs. Mutual goals and objectives for the Master
Plan were then identified and reviewed by the Planning Committee. These goals
and objectives have provided a touchstone throughout the planning process (see
the Mission and Goals section of this report).
The needs assessment began with a review of the 2006 Strategic Plan, purpose,
role, and recommendations of the Campus Land Use Committee, Facilities
Condition Assessment, current Capital Plan, academic plans, past Master Plan
documents from 1998 and 2005 and other background materials.
The values of an institution of higher learning are not always reflected in the built
environment of a campus. An important part of the Master Plan process has been
to detect the changes in values that have occurred over the years, as reflected
in the Strategic Plan. Related to this is the constant refocusing and refining of
academic programs. We have met with the Program Unit Coordinators (PUCs)
to discuss how they anticipate programs will change over the next decade and
beyond, and what changes in facilities and functional adjacencies are implied or
needed to support those changes.
Four interconnected information categories have been studied in this task: (1) the
historical development, natural features and ecology inventory, (2) the buildings
inventory, (3) the landscape inventory and (4) the functional infrastructure of
the site. Diagramming these existing conditions has informed decisions about
expansion, reuse, remodeling and replacement of facilities. The Open Space
Inventory evaluates the many landscape features of the campus, with the
intention of developing a comprehensive vision of campus landscape, including
plantings, public gathering spaces, views and view corridors. The Functional
2014 Update text is bold and italicized.
THE EVERGREEN STATE COLLEGE CAMPUS MASTER PLAN | 2014 Update
27
PROCESS
Volume I - Site Specific Recommendations
Infrastructure of the site includes the many overlapping systems that are necessary:
utilities, signage, access, circulation, parking, building orientation, and pedestrian
circulation. Each system has been mapped to expose how it works, where it may
be deficient, and how it can be improved. Much of this information has been
gathered from existing mapping, inventories and data available from the College.
Land use and zoning issues have been assessed. The campus is a center of more
intense use within a semi-rural area with encroaching suburban development.
While sewer, water and transportation needs of the College must be met, areas
surrounding the College are desired to retain their rural character. This sensitive
land use strategy is also consistent with the green image of the College. Land
use and zoning strategies are consistent with this intent. Continued off-campus
(satellite) development was also evaluated under the plan.
TASK 2 – ALTERNATIVES/EVALUATION
In response to input from Task 1 and working with the Planning Committee and
Senior Management, the team developed and evaluated alternatives for the
components and sub-components of the Master Plan. Attention to sustainability
and compatibility with the campus culture were integral to the development of
alternatives and the subsequent recommendations.
Figure 3.6. Current bus service is well used.
With the College’s commitment to environmental stewardship and zero net carbon
and waste production by the year 2020, issues of sustainability are at the core of
all of the concepts proposed. This commitment applies to open space and other
sustainable strategies such as energy consumption, efficiency, and reduction, view
corridors, storm water harvesting, green roofs, building sites, solar orientation,
and massing. Wayfinding elements that form “visual gateways,” such as signage
and monuments at entry points, are proposed. Public gathering spaces and
recreational areas have been identified and programming proposed.
The building renovation and development plan identifies potential new
development sites, massing alternatives, additions and renovations. All alternatives
incorporate sustainable strategies based both on the design principles established
in previous campus planning efforts and as identified during this planning process.
New housing units and renewal and renovation of existing housing and food
service facilities have been addressed.
The transportation plan has been developed to address transportation issues at
the campus core, the student housing and the connections to other regional
destinations and off campus facilities. The plan accommodates automobile
movements to minimize conflicts, provides for parking that is convenient yet
inconspicuous, emphasizes safe and convenient walking routes and will expand
paths and bike trails. Alternative transportation ideas and modes are proposed
and encouraged.
Figure 3.7. Recent transportation shelter
improvements.
Intercity Transit (IT) provides public transportation service to the campus and its
transit center is prominently located at the entry to Red Square. Means of making
public transit a more attractive option for campus users have been investigated and
outlined in the recommendations section of this document.
Our approach to determining transportation demands began with building a clear
picture of the number of people using campus facilities at specific times. Using
2014 Update text is bold and italicized.
28
THE EVERGREEN STATE COLLEGE CAMPUS MASTER PLAN | 2014 Update
Volume I - Site Specific Recommendations
PROCESS
anticipated enrollment, class schedules, activity programs and employment levels,
we have identified staff, faculty, student, and visitor populations by time of day to
determine peak periods and their duration. Changes in traffic, parking, transit,
and bicycle demand generated by proposed new campus buildings and facilities
have been calculated based on available data on the mode of travel to campus for
each population group .
Figure 3.8. Alternate modes of transportation are
utilized.
In the Reserve areas, park and wildlife sanctuary transportation planning principles
have been applied to preserve these natural areas. With the College’s input,
priorities for new pedestrian and bicycle trail connections and upgrades to existing
trails have been developed. Preferred public access routes to and through the
campus have been identified. Clearly marked trails with interpretive graphics
and providing trailheads near transit stops have been considered to increase
accessibility to these outdoor “classrooms.” A landscape plan has also been
developed to logically integrate open spaces and buildings.
Campus utility needs have been assessed and a diagram of the utilities developed.
Wet utility (water, sewer, and storm drainage) and dry utility (power, telephone,
gas, and cable) demands have been analyzed to establish needs and evaluated to
determine capacities. Again, consideration of sustainability has been central to the
assessment and recommendations for meeting the current and future needs of the
campus. These considerations are documented in later sections.
TASK 3 – MASTER PLAN RECOMMENDATIONS/IMPLEMENTATION
The Campus Master Plan has been synthesized from all that is outlined above.
The values and physical needs of the institution have been recorded, refined and
restated through interviews with those directly affected, through community and
stakeholder workshops, and through reviews by the College community, Planning
Committee, Senior Management and the Sustainability Task Force.
Figure 3.9. Signage and mapping are critical to
effective wayfinding.
Careful evaluation of the projects and proposals listed in this report and the input
provided during the fall of 2007 review sessions helped distinguish between
projects of greater and lesser importance to allow a refined prioritization to occur.
Additionally, the value of the previous planning documents were restated and
have been incorporated into the overall product of this process as supplemental
volumes. This report provides site specific recommendations and works in
conjunction with the two additional volumes that comprise the overall Campus
Master Plan vision.
The 2014 Master Plan update process utilized an enhanced Campus LandUse Committee (CLUC) in a series of four workshop sessions. The CLUC
was expanded to include representatives from the Tacoma Campus and the
emerging Indigenous Art Campus.
2014 Update text is bold and italicized.
THE EVERGREEN STATE COLLEGE CAMPUS MASTER PLAN | 2014 Update
29
30
04
EXISTING CONDITIONS
31
32
Volume I - Site Specific Recommendations
EXISTING CONDITIONS
04 EXISTING CONDITIONS
The Evergreen State College campus is part of the Cooper Point Peninsula which
reaches into the southern end of Puget Sound and is located west of the City of
Olympia. The campus is located on approximately 1,008 acres of land, which
remains predominately forested with a mixture of largely native second growth
vegetation. The campus was initially conceived in the early 1970’s to one day
accommodate approximately 12,000 students and initial projects and infrastructure
elements were constructed with this ultimate goal in mind. Current development
and facilities accommodate approximately 4,500 students. There is housing on
campus; however, nearly 80% of students live off-campus and drive to campus for
classes and/or events.
Eld Inlet
Approximate
Campus
Boundary
Figure 4.1. The College currently occupies 1.5 million SF of building space that leaves the majority of the
campus undeveloped.
The campus topography is generally made up of gradually sloping gentle terrain.
Some areas of lower elevation (southeast) and steep ravines (northern) can be
found. Bluff areas are located along the northern part adjacent to the shoreline. The
highest point lies just west of the campus Core between the main area of facilities
development and the Organic Farm on the extreme western edge of campus.
2014 Update text is bold and italicized.
THE EVERGREEN STATE COLLEGE CAMPUS MASTER PLAN | 2014 Update
33
EXISTING CONDITIONS
Volume I - Site Specific Recommendations
The forested areas of campus are vegetated with species representative of
the Western Hemlock zones of Washington and Oregon. This land is mostly
unmanaged by the College with the exception of the campus Core areas and
the Organic Farm to the east. The entire campus was logged at one time along
with much of the surrounding area. Today, there are regions of second growth
Douglas Fir found in the eastern and southeastern Reserves between the campus
Core and the Organic Farm, as well as in the northern ravine areas of the campus.
The Reserve also contains a mix of other conifers such as Western Red Cedar and
hardwood species such as Big Leaf Maple and Red Alder.
Wetland areas are located in all quadrants of the Reserve with extensive areas in
the southeastern parts of the campus, along streams on the property, north of the
meadow area next to Driftwood Road and along Evergreen Parkway. The eastern
half of the Reserve is considered by many to be the least disturbed and most
pristine on campus. This consists of contiguous patches of Douglas Fir and other
conifers. Beach areas in the northern half of the Reserve are dominated by tidal
marine plants. Campus Core landscapes are managed and consist of lawn areas,
gardens along pathways, recreational field areas and identified teaching garden.
More detailed information regarding vegetation can be found in the 1998 and
2005 Campus Master Plans and in the 2006 Floristic Study located in the Appendix
(Volume III).
Apartment
Housing
ad
Ro
ing
den
Spr
Dormitory
Housing
Hid
Weaving
Studio
Geoduck Lane
Driftwood Road
Modular
Housing
REC
PAVILLION
LIBRARY
CRC
CAB
Red
Square
SEM I
LONGHOUSE
Com
LECTURE
Central
Plant
SEM II
LAB II
LAB I
INSTRUCTIONAL
STUDENT SERVICES
Childcare
Center
ARTS
INSTRUCTIONAL SUPPORT
Overhulse
Place
Parking
M
c
n
Ca
nP
laz
a
PHYSICAL EDUCATION
OTHER
Parking
y
rkwa
n Pa
gree
Ever
Figure 4.2. Space and Building uses.
2014 Update text is bold and italicized.
34
THE EVERGREEN STATE COLLEGE CAMPUS MASTER PLAN | 2014 Update
Volume I - Site Specific Recommendations
EXISTING CONDITIONS
The majority of facilities are concentrated around the campus Core. The Core
is made up of two general areas referred to as upper and lower campus. The
upper campus Core consists of numerous concrete buildings which create a
strong unified architectural expression. Organized around Red Square, a large
central open space, the instructional and administrative spaces of the College are
dispersed and integrated along with faculty offices, science labs and studio spaces.
The predominant construction technique and aesthetic utilizes exposed concrete
and glass scaled to create large spaces with limited visibility into building spaces.
The solid and somewhat imposing feel of many of the buildings limits a visitor’s
exposure to the activities going on inside the buildings and contributes to a sense
that there are a limited number of students on the campus at any given time. The
large scale of both the buildings and the areas between contribute to a sense that
the spaces and buildings are over-scaled and lack definition.
Figure 4.3. The concrete construction used in much
of the campus hides the activities within and creates
a cold, unfriendly public realm.
Figure 4.4. Limited gathering opportunities at CRC Plaza.
Figure 4.5. Few indoor/outdoor connections between CAB and CRC.
2014 Update text is bold and italicized.
THE EVERGREEN STATE COLLEGE CAMPUS MASTER PLAN | 2014 Update
35
EXISTING CONDITIONS
Volume I - Site Specific Recommendations
Lower campus is a collection of facilities developed to support student housing and
the athletic fields. There are several housing options including shared room, multistory housing (phase I) typically used for first and second year students. Lower
density, apartment style units (phase II and III) that provide living rooms and kitchen
facilities and an apartment feel. The final option is Modular housing that provides
low density and almost an individual house feel. Occupancy rates for all of the
options vary from quarter to quarter with Fall and Winter being the most popular
with occupancies near 100%. Occupancy rates have been trending upwards
across all quarters.
Athletic fields and an open sports pavilion adjoin the housing facilities and are used
by both the community and the College for summer camp programs and current
athletic programs.
There are several main buildings at the maintenance yard site off Driftwood Road
in the east portion of the campus that support grounds maintenance, refuse
pickup and motor pool services for the College. The site houses shop buildings for
Figure 4.6. Lower Campus Athletic Fields.
Figure 4.7. Quad dormitory housing built in 1971
houses lower classmen.
Figure 4.8. Soup housing (Alphabet Soup) built as apartment style housing, 1987-1989.
Figure 4.9. The athletic fields of the College
provide a central amenity for on-campus housing.
Figure 4.10. Modular housing built in 1971 as temporary student housing.
2014 Update text is bold and italicized.
36
THE EVERGREEN STATE COLLEGE CAMPUS MASTER PLAN | 2014 Update
Volume I - Site Specific Recommendations
EXISTING CONDITIONS
office space, a woodshop, metal shop, a sign shop, paint shop, a lunch room, tool
storage, materials storage rooms and a safety equipment storage room. There are
also several other structures on-site that house additional shop and office space
including a grounds equipment storage unit, shop equipment storage, a surplus
shed, grounds office space, a hazardous materials storage unit and a boat shed.
There are two garages, one for motor pool with a mechanics office and another
bay containing a lunch room.
The site also has parking and storage space for 51 campus vehicles and
maintenance equipment, ranging from trucks, vans, tractors, mowers and forklifts
to chippers, sweepers. Vehicles are categorized as for academics, fleet, grounds/
shop, grounds, locksmith, maintenance services, motor pool and refuse. Parking is
also available for customers and staff at the site.
Residential Services office and maintenance facilities are currently located within the
Quad Buildings. To accommodate additional maintenance space and restore space
for residential uses, Residential and Dining Services will be moving temporarily to the
Modular housing site where they will potentially occupy two Modular housing units.
Figure 4.11. The Organic Farm provides a unique
campus identity and learning environments.
The campus also has several developed areas dispersed around the campus that
include the Maintenance Shops, a currently unused facility called Driftwood
House, a facility at the shore called Geoduck House currently housing a K-3 grade
independent school, and an Organic Farm that has approximately four acres of
arable land and several support buildings. The road system is comprised of a series
of adopted county roads and a parkway constructed to create a formal entry to the
College. An earthen trail system connects the farm and the shore with the campus Core.
TRANSPORTATION
The setting of the main campus of The Evergreen State College, located
approximately 5 miles from downtown Olympia and somewhat peripheral to
population centers in Thurston County, poses significant challenges to creating
an efficient transportation system for its students, staff and faculty. Despite this
seemingly remote location, strong levels of transit use, cycling, and ridesharing
occur. Such good performance indicates a strong commitment among the
College’s community to using alternatives to single-occupancy vehicles. This
commitment provides an essential foundation for creating a more energy efficient
and less polluting campus transportation system.
Modes of Travel
Table 4.1 shows the mode of travel used by staff and by students for commuting
to campus. These data come from separate surveys of those two groups, the
Commute Trip Reduction survey for staff (June 2005), and the Evergreen Student
Experience Survey 2006 for students.
2014 Update text is bold and italicized.
THE EVERGREEN STATE COLLEGE CAMPUS MASTER PLAN | 2014 Update
37
EXISTING CONDITIONS
Volume I - Site Specific Recommendations
TABLE 4.1 CURRENT MODE OF TRAVEL
Mode of Travel
Faculty & Staff
Commuter Students
Drive Alone
66%
60%
Rideshare
16%
15%
Bus
6%
20%
Bike
10%
3%
Walk
TOTAL
2%
2%
100%
100%
Bike use appears particularly strong among staff, while transit use is high for
commuting students. Both groups have high levels of ridesharing. In fact,
ridesharing rarely goes higher than these rates. Walking, not surprisingly, occurs at
low rates since comparatively few people live within reasonable walking distance
of campus. It should be noted that the strength of alternative modes is only
minimally influenced by the very modest parking charges levied on campus.
Parking Demand and Supply
Parking is monitored by Parking Services which counts the number of vehicles
present each weekday at 10:00 am, 1:00 pm and 7:30 pm. Based on counts
conducted from January 2006 through February 2007, the peak number of
vehicles parked occurs during the fall term. Figure 4.12 illustrates the variations in
demand across the academic year.
The peak occurs in the fall quarter at 1:00 pm equally on Tuesdays and
Wednesdays. At the peak, approximately 545 spaces remain vacant. Table 4.2
shows the use and availability by lot.
Parking Demand by Term and Time of Day
Supply = 1,965 Spaces
2,000
1,800
1,600
1,400
1,200
1,000
800
600
Mon
Tue
Wed
Thu
Fri
400
200
0
Winter
Spring
10:00 AM
Fall
Winter
Spring
1:00 PM
Fall
Winter
Spring
Fall
7:30 PM
Figure 4.12. Parking Demand by term and time of day.
2014 Update text is bold and italicized.
38
THE EVERGREEN STATE COLLEGE CAMPUS MASTER PLAN | 2014 Update
Volume I - Site Specific Recommendations
EXISTING CONDITIONS
TABLE 4.2 PARKING OCCUPANCY BY LOT AT PEAK TIME
FALL 2006
SPACES
VEHICLES
PARKED
SPACES
AVAILABLE
% OCCUPIED
Lot B
777
505
272
65%
Little B
182
33
149
18%
Lot C
557
548
9
98%
Lot F
318
272
46
86%
Fireweed Lot
23
2
21
9%
Meters
16
7
9
44%
Accessible Spaces
41
31
11
77%
Others
50
16
34
32%
1,965
1,414
551
72%
LOCATION
Only Lot C achieves full use, mainly due to its closer proximity to the campus Core
that offers a shorter walk. The bulk of unused parking, over 400 spaces, exists in
Lot B and in Small B. Lot F caters primarily to resident students. An early morning
(6:30 a.m.) check of Lot F and other housing area parking spaces on three separate
days in April, 2007, found an average of 234 vehicles parked, representing peak
demand for resident students.
On balance, Evergreen has more than enough parking to meet most current needs.
Exceptions include days when athletic fields host games for which too little parking
exists near the fields for spectators, and special event days such as Super Saturday
and Commencement.
Table 4.3 provides the estimated composition of demand at the peak time among
students, staff, faculty and visitors.
TABLE 4 .3 ESTIMATED COMPOSITION OF PEAK PARKING
DEMAND AT 1 P.M. DURING FALL QUARTER
POPULATION GROUP
VEHICLES
PARKED
% OF TOTAL
Faculty/Staff/Temporary Employees
469
33%
Commuting Students
688
49%
Resident Students
235
17%
25
2%
Visitors (estimated)
TOTAL
1,417
100%
Source: Tilghman Group
Commuting students account for the largest share of peak demand, in spite of
having a low rate of auto use. Student vehicles outnumber all other parked cars
due simply to the large number of students present.
Auto availability differs widely between resident and commuting students. Based
on current usage, one car is available for every 4 resident students while one car is
available for every 1.5 commuter students.
2014 Update text is bold and italicized.
THE EVERGREEN STATE COLLEGE CAMPUS MASTER PLAN | 2014 Update
39
EXISTING CONDITIONS
Volume I - Site Specific Recommendations
Parking Rates and Revenue
The amount charged to park on campus has remained constant since 2000. A rate
increase has been proposed and, if approved, would take effect in the Fall quarter of
the 2007/08 academic year. Rates apply commonly to all vehicles parking on campus
without regard to student, staff or faculty status. Table 4.4 lists current rates.
TABLE 4.4 PARKING RATES
Figure 4.13. Adequate parking exists on campus.
PERIOD
RATE (2006)
RATE (2007)
Daily Pass
$1.25
$2.00
Quarterly Permit
$32
$40
Fall/Winter/Spring Permit
$90
$115
Full Year Permit
$96
$120
$0.40 / hour
$0.30 / hour
$0.60 / hour
$0.50 / hour
Meters:
Housing Loop
All Others
In 2007, people purchasing a $115 permit pay only $12.70 per month to park,
substantially less than the cost of a transit pass, which is currently $25 per month .
Parking revenues and expenses are shown in Table 4.5.
TABLE 4.5 PARKING RATES
SOURCE
REVENUE
FY 2006
Permits Sold
$165,663
Daily Revenue
$142,846
Infractions
$ 96,351
TOTAL REVENUE
$404,860
EXPENSES
$416,467
NET REVENUE
$(11,607)
The parking system does not currently take in sufficient revenue to cover its
expenses. In addition, the system has outstanding debt incurred to pay for
expansion and improvements in parking lots in 2004.
A table found in the appendix compares parking rates at public universities and
colleges throughout the Northwest. Since many institutions offer tiered rates,
the table groups them into high, middle and low ranges. Evergreen’s current and
proposed parking rates fall at the lower end of all schools’ rate.
Transit Services
Two bus routes serve the campus from downtown Olympia: Route 41 and Route
48. Operated by Intercity Transit, these routes run from the downtown transit
center to the campus every half-hour from 6:00 am to 9:00 pm and then only
Route 41 continues hourly until midnight. With their overlapping schedules, these
two routes offer a bus every 15 minutes between campus and downtown. Due
to the popular destinations served including Evergreen, Westfield Capital Mall and
downtown Olympia, these are Intercity Transit’s most productive routes. Table 4.6
compares ridership generated by Evergreen’s campus to the total route ridership.
2014 Update text is bold and italicized.
40
THE EVERGREEN STATE COLLEGE CAMPUS MASTER PLAN | 2014 Update
Volume I - Site Specific Recommendations
EXISTING CONDITIONS
TABLE 4.6 TRANSIT RIDERSHIP AT EVERGREEN STATE COLLEGE
EVERGREEEN RIDERS
(WEEKDAY,
ON + OFF)
% OF TOTAL ROUTE
RIDERSHIP
Intercity Transit #41
780
32%
Intercity Transit #48
300
20%
1,080
28%
ROUTE
SUM
Figure 4.14. Transit stop adjacent to Red Square.
Based on Intercity Transit’s passenger counts, McCann Plaza is the primary origin
and destination of passenger trips, serving 70% of riders. Conversely, the Housing
loop generates only 1 of every 6 campus boardings, but is used by many more
disembarking riders to reach the campus core sooner than they would by riding
around to McCann Plaza (Route 41 goes first to the Housing Loop, then to
McCann Plaza requiring an additional 9 minutes). It is estimated that McCann
Plaza would actually serve 85% of riders if all routes went directly to it.
Evergreen students pay a fee for transit service amounting to $1.10 per credit up
to 12 credits. This generates over $150,000 annually which, through a negotiated
purchase, provides unlimited use passes for students to ride Intercity Transit
buses. This fee amounts to roughly $0.65 per ride (when counting only those
rides to and from campus), less than the regular fare of $0.75. The state provides
college employees with the Star Pass which is paid for with state funds outside
of Evergreen’s budget. This is a benefit to state employees here and elsewhere.
Although student fees do not subsidize employee passes, they do make more
service available to them.
Cycling & Walking Routes
Table 4.15. Providing bicycle amenities supports
alternative transportation.
Dedicated multi-purpose bike and walking paths along Evergreen Parkway
connect to other trails and roads linking campus to downtown Olympia and
area neighborhoods. The McLane trail is the primary connection. Bicycle riders,
however, face a number of gaps in the trail system and must also rely on streets
without striped paths for bikes. Gaps occur between Division Street and Evergreen
Parkway, on Cooper Point Road between Walnut Road and Evergreen Parkway,
and on Harrison Street between Kaiser and Evergreen Parkway. Sidewalks lack
continuity along Driftwood Road between Overhulse Road and Evergreen Parkway.
Trail heads for walking trails through the Reserve tend to be difficult to locate and
would benefit from better signs. Trails serving the Reserve north of Driftwood
Road lack continuity from the campus Core to their destinations.
Internal Circulation
The campus was carefully laid out to capture vehicles at the edges and preserve
the Core areas for pedestrians. Major walkways and plazas were designed to
accommodate service, security and other occasional vehicles when necessary.
However, it appears that vendor, service and security vehicles routinely travel into
the Core of campus and are frequently present on Red Square and other plazas.
While such vehicles travel slowly, avoiding serious conflicts with pedestrians and
bicycle riders, their presence and their large size (frequently full-size vans) clearly
diminish the walkable character of walkways and plazas that are intended to
be free of large vehicles. Some maintenance personnel now use smaller electric
vehicles which fit much better on paths and plazas. Opportunities to manage
vehicles better on internal roads are discussed in subsequent sections.
2014 Update text is bold and italicized.
THE EVERGREEN STATE COLLEGE CAMPUS MASTER PLAN | 2014 Update
41
EXISTING CONDITIONS
Volume I - Site Specific Recommendations
Transportation-related Carbon Emissions
With the goal of achieving zero waste and carbon neutrality by 2020, Evergreen’s
Sustainability Task Force has undertaken to calculate the College’s carbon footprint.
It estimates that transportation generates approximately 31% of the campus’s total
carbon emissions. This includes commuting, transit services to campus, use of
the college fleet, deliveries, and long-distance air travel for college purposes. The
contribution of each activity is shown in Table 4.8.
TABLE 4.8 TRANSPORTATION GENERATED CARBON EMISSIONS
PER YEAR
METRIC TONS OF
CARBON DIOXIDE
EQUIVALENT (MTCDE)
% OF TOTAL
Commuting
5,392
78%
College Fleet
292
4%
ACTIVITY
Deliveries
126
2%
Air Travel
1,077
16%
TRANSPORTATION TOTAL
6,887
100%
Source: John Pumilio, Sustainability Task Force
It is clear that the opportunity for the greatest reductions in carbon emissions will
be achieved from a focus on addressing commuting patterns.
ENGINEERING SUMMARIES
Utility Infrastructures
Chillers, boilers, electrical service, and sewer capacities were initially designed to
support a campus of 12,000 students. Not all of the chillers and boilers were
installed but space was allocated. As current and anticipated enrollment is
significantly lower today, capacity issues are not anticipated. Utility Infrastructure
components have been evaluated by the appropriate engineering consultant and
their findings follow.
Mechanical Systems
This section summarizes existing mechanical systems, including observed or
reported operational issues, and a condition assessment based on a non-invasive
field visual survey. This evaluation of the mechanical systems is based on field
notes and a review of documents and drawings made available by the College for
this assessment.
In describing and evaluating the mechanical systems, three terms are used that
should be defined. These terms are: capacity = what can be produced; connected
load = what could be used or needed; and diversity = not using the capacity at any
one time. Diversity can result from oversized or inefficient systems, space usage,
and building materials and orientation. In general, the capacity of mechanical
systems at the College exceeds demand. Although the connected loads are high,
diversity results in lower demand – as demonstrated by actual energy usage.
2014 Update text is bold and italicized.
42
THE EVERGREEN STATE COLLEGE CAMPUS MASTER PLAN | 2014 Update
Volume I - Site Specific Recommendations
EXISTING CONDITIONS
Figure 4.16. Utility framework diagram.
The College has a Central Utility Plant (CUP) that provides steam and chilled
water to the campus for heating, cooling and domestic hot water through an
underground tunnel system. The tunnel system connects directly to mechanical
rooms in the Communications Building (Comm Bldg), Seminar I (SEM I), Seminar II
(SEM II), College Recreation Center (CRC), College Activities Building (CAB), Library,
Lecture Halls Building, Science Lab I (LAB I) and Science Lab II (LAB II). A crawlspace
tunnel to Housing Buildings A, B, C & D provides steam to those buildings. A
direct bury branch from that tunnel provides steam to the Community Center
and Housing Units E through U. Additional direct bury piping (steam and chilled
water) runs from the main tunnels to the Longhouse and Arts Annex buildings.
The Modular housing buildings are heated by electric baseboard and have no
connection to the CUP. The Childcare Center has its own gas-fired hot water boiler
and is not connected to the CUP. Additional outbuildings consist of the Farmhouse,
Geoduck House, Driftwood House and Maintenance Shops. Each of these
outbuildings has its own stand-alone heating system.
Each main campus building has a steam to hot water heat exchanger for building
heating and a separate heat exchanger for domestic hot water. The CRC has
a separate heat exchanger for pool water heating, and the CAB utilizes steam
directly for kitchen purposes.
Boiler System
The Central Utility Plant contains three steam boilers. The two main boilers
produce 35,000 lbs/hr (approx. 33,964 MBH) of steam. These boilers are designed
as 250 psig boilers, but are only run at approximately 100 psig. The BTU’s per lb
2014 Update text is bold and italicized.
THE EVERGREEN STATE COLLEGE CAMPUS MASTER PLAN | 2014 Update
43
EXISTING CONDITIONS
Volume I - Site Specific Recommendations
of steam automatically drop 2-1/2 percent (at full load) by reducing the pressure
that amount. The normal full load efficiency of these boilers is approximately 80%.
Since these boilers are rarely run at full load, the actual efficiency is much lower
than it would be at full load, in addition to the 2-1/2% loss from the pressure
reduction. There is an additional 12,000 lb/hr (11,644 MBH) boiler that runs in the
summertime to produce steam for domestic hot water heating.
The main campus total heating connected load (total of heating coils) is
approximately 56,000 MBH. This does not include housing heating or any (main
campus and housing) domestic hot water capacity. From discussions with boiler
operating personnel, it appears that only one main boiler operates at any time
during the winter. The housing total heating connected load is approximately
7,700 MBH. The main campus total domestic hot water connected load is
approximately 25,000 MBH. The housing total domestic hot water connected load
is approximately 3,300 MBH. That equals a total connected load of approximately
92,000 MBH. Since only one large boiler (33,964 MBH capacity) is operated at a
time and the connected load, or possible total heating need, is 92,000 MBH, then
the actual steam production is only 37% of the total connected load. Obviously
the connected load is much greater than what is required to actually heat the
buildings due to diversity.
The existing steam system suffers from considerable leakage at all converters,
valves, condensate receivers, etc., in the existing mechanical rooms and utility
tunnel. A steam to hot water system suffers loss through the heat exchanger itself
on the magnitude of approximately 10-20%. However, most steam systems rely
on accurately receiving condensate back from the system for re-use in producing
steam. Most systems have a fair amount of loss in the condensate system, both
through transmission loss in the piping and as well as leakage at receivers, valves
and pumps. In combination with this, most mechanical rooms have been provided
with cooling, thereby using additional energy to offset the heat loss through the
steam system.
The main campus currently runs the boilers on an interruptible gas service.
This means that when the utility company is under peak load they may call the
College to have them switch from gas to oil for their heating needs. This occurs
approximately once or twice a year on average.
Cooling System
The existing Central Utility Plant (CUP) houses an existing 800-ton York centrifugal
chiller and associated pump installed in 1997 and a new 1000-ton centrifugal
chiller and chilled water pump installed in 2007. Therefore, the capacity is 1800
tons. The current total connected load is 1600 tons with no diversity. There have
not been any major complaints about lack of cooling throughout the campus,
however, the system does suffer from some pumping issues and lack of circulation
in the most remote buildings.
Primary Air Handling Systems
The eleven main campus buildings each contain a main built-up air handling
system (or systems) housed in indoor mechanical rooms that are provided hot
water and chilled water to the coils from the main campus system. Air handlers
generally have both a supply and return fan. Conditioned air is provided to the
spaces through galvanized sheet metal ducts and ceiling mounted diffusers. The
majority of equipment observed (not all equipment was visible) appears to be
2014 Update text is bold and italicized.
44
THE EVERGREEN STATE COLLEGE CAMPUS MASTER PLAN | 2014 Update
Volume I - Site Specific Recommendations
EXISTING CONDITIONS
original to the age of each building, with some minor exceptions. The existing
ductwork that was observed was generally insulated and in good condition.
Conditioned air is provided at 55ºF year round, and then heated as needed to
provide the appropriate leaving air temperature, depending upon seasonal and
space requirements.
Exhaust fans serve various spaces (mostly bathrooms and locker rooms) throughout
the buildings. Most fans are located on rooftops, although some are located in
ceilings or crawl spaces. The LAB I and LAB II buildings have mostly 100% outdoor
air systems for the labs with fume hood exhaust systems located on the roofs.
There is currently only one heat recovery unit serving a lab space in LAB II. All other
labs do not have heat recovery. The Arts Annex building also utilizes mostly 100%
outdoor air systems and its exhaust does not have heat recovery.
Pool Conditioning Systems
The main unit serving the pool area, a built-up air handler located in the lower
mechanical room, is operating as a 100% outside air system. It currently has a
heat “run-around” coil installed in its air stream. HRC-1A and HRC-1B, as well
as HRC-2A thru HRC-2D were installed in the autumn of 2002. This run-around
loop is capable of capturing nearly 900 MBH of heating value. The coil currently
located in the outside air intake air stream and the coil that is located in the return
air stream are both functioning. The pump serving this system has a newer (high
efficiency) 1.5 hp motor. All piping insulation appears to be in good condition.
At present, the exhaust air coil is located in the plenum air stream with a large
amount of free/bypass area surrounding it, and much of the rigid insulation lining
the plenum is no longer attached to the walls, blocking the air stream. This is
substantially reducing the efficiency of the run-around loop. This condition is also
allowing chlorine-laden air to be absorbed by the concrete walls.
Current drawing schedules suggest that all return air is being processed through
HRC-2A thru HRC-2D. This is presently not the case, due to factors noted.
Observations currently estimate only approximately 50% of this exhaust air is being
processed through the coils.
The main pool filter, heater, valves and main piping are located in a room beneath
the pool area. The original sand filter was a large bed style requiring the flow of a
40 HP pump. The large bed style sand filter has been converted to an open tank
for skimming. In 1988 two smaller modern, closed vessel type sand filters were
added to the system.
The original 40 HP motor SP-2 has been changed. In 1988 the pump was changed
to a 20 HP, 925 GPM at 60Ft H.
The two new sand filters added are STARK Model S1-120, having a min surface
area of 35 SF and a flow rate of 462 GPM & 13.2 GPM/SF. The flow total for the
filters is 924 GPM.
Plumbing System
A majority of existing plumbing fixtures appear to be original, but are in reasonably
good condition. Some bathrooms appear to have been renovated, and some of the
fixtures have been replaced. Many urinals have been updated to no-water type urinals.
2014 Update text is bold and italicized.
THE EVERGREEN STATE COLLEGE CAMPUS MASTER PLAN | 2014 Update
45
EXISTING CONDITIONS
Volume I - Site Specific Recommendations
Drain and vent lines all appear to be cast iron and in very good condition.
Domestic water piping appears to be a mix of copper and galvanized steel, with
the majority of visible piping being copper. No dielectric connections were visible
during our initial inspection. The majority of domestic water lines appear to be
properly jacketed and insulated. There is a mix of old and new insulation visible in
the tunnels. Specific tests would need to be performed to determine if any of the
insulation contains asbestos or other friable material.
Controls
The existing controls are a mix of pneumatic and electronic controls with some
minor hand operation. There is a main DDC system on campus that is located in
the CUP, with control components scattered throughout the buildings. Existing
control equipment varies in condition, the majority of it is original to the buildings,
but several upgrades have occurred in the last ten years. In addition, the pneumatic
system suffers from considerable leakage that affects the quality of control.
The building operators appear to have a reasonably good understanding of the
equipment and how it should be operated, but the overall DDC System needs
to be inventoried and calibrated so that all control functions and sequences are
catalogued, recorded and understood.
Fire Protection System
There is an existing wet-pipe fire protection system that serves the main campus
buildings. Existing pipe is conventional black-iron, with standard response sprinkler
heads. The piping and heads appeared to be in excellent condition.
Campus Power, Lighting and Low Voltage Systems
Campus Primary Power Distribution
Campus power is provided via two 12.5kV (kilovolts) distribution feeders (F5-1C
and F5-2C) from outdoor fused switches located south of the Central Utility Plant.
Service is provided from Puget Sound Energy by overhead lines to the outdoor
switchgear. The system was originally designed for a much larger student base.
Most of the 12.5kV feeders on campus are located in cable trays that run in the
utility tunnel covering most of the main campus. The cables were installed in the
original 1971 campus construction. Some direct bury cables have been installed
where the utility tunnel does not provide access. An example of this is the cables
serving the Housing area. The 12.5kV splices to buildings are made in oil filled
link boxes located in the utility tunnel. Transformation from 12.5kV to 480 volt, 3
phase power occurs within the main electrical gear rooms in most building. The
majority of the buildings on campus were constructed in the early to mid 1970’s.
Switchgear, transformers, panel boards and building power distribution are largely
untouched in these buildings.
Emergency power is provided at most buildings via emergency backup generators.
In some of these building there is a mix of both code required life safety and
optional emergency loads. For example in the Campus Activities Building egress
lighting loads are mixed with kitchen equipment loads.
Students currently pay $1 per credit hour towards a Green Energy Fee, which provides
the campus with one hundred percent green energy from renewable sources.
2014 Update text is bold and italicized.
46
THE EVERGREEN STATE COLLEGE CAMPUS MASTER PLAN | 2014 Update
Volume I - Site Specific Recommendations
EXISTING CONDITIONS
Lighting
Interior lighting consists of a variety of different lamp and fixture types. Many of
the existing recessed lens fluorescent and recessed incandescent down lights are
operational and in good shape. Most of the down lights have had the incandescent
lamps replaced with screw in type compact fluorescent lamps. There have been
upgrades and additions in several of the buildings with the newer type lighting
(T8 lamps and electronic ballasts) system installed. The Seminar II and Longhouse
buildings have newer lighting technology lamps and ballasts.
Exterior lighting is provided by campus standard light poles, building mounted
surface fixtures and walkway mounted recess step light type fixtures.
Lighting Control
The majority of interior lighting is controlled via wall switches only. Only a few
of the buildings and areas with additions or renovations done within the past
ten years have automatic controls to meet the Washington State energy code.
Seminar II does have limited daylighting control for fixtures within skylight zones
via daylight type photo cells. Seminar II also has a low voltage programmable
lighting control relay system and occupancy sensors controls. Lecture rooms in
Seminar II have Lutron Grafik Eye control systems for pre-set zone controls and
interface with the room audio/visual systems.
Exterior building and campus lighting is controlled via photo cells. The exception is
Seminar II which uses the low voltage programmable lighting control relay system
with photo cell input for control of exterior lighting.
Fire Alarm Systems
The campus standard is EST (Edwards System Technology) that has been installed
in newer building and older buildings that have been renovated or have additions.
There is a campus fire alarm communication loop in the utility tunnel that provide
campus wide monitoring. Several buildings such as the Campus Activities Building
have older Simplex/Autocall systems. These systems were installed before ADA
requirements for audio/visual and mounting height restrictions were mandated.
Access Control/CCTV Systems
Access control and CCTV systems have been added to many of the buildings on
campus. The access control system is the Millennium system. CCTV camera systems
have been added to cover selected entries and spaces, including the CAB building .
Clock
There are two clock systems in use on campus. The original hard wired, 120 volt
pulse clock system is operating in most of the original buildings. There have been
problems with this system and as a result a second system is being phased in. This
is the Primex wireless clock system. This uses battery operated clock with GPS
receiver and transmitters for automatic time correction.
2014 Update text is bold and italicized.
THE EVERGREEN STATE COLLEGE CAMPUS MASTER PLAN | 2014 Update
47
EXISTING CONDITIONS
Volume I - Site Specific Recommendations
Telecommunications Campus Cable Distribution Infrastructure
Campus Distribution
Buildings located near the central Core are served by an underground system
of utility tunnels that contain cable trays used in the routing of electrical and
telecommunications cables.
The tunnel system is sufficiently large enough for pedestrian traffic and small
motorized carts to be driven through them to deliver tools and equipment to
strategic locations. Separate cable trays for low voltage communications and
primary power campus loop are provided throughout the tunnel system.
Cables exit the tunnel system to reach out lying buildings and at these points the
cables enter a system of direct buried underground conduits and cast concrete vaults.
Examples of these buildings are the Longhouse, Residence Units, and the Shops.
Within this system of underground conduits, plastic innerduct conduits are placed
inside of larger metallic or PVC conduits to facilitate the installation of the fiber
optic cables.
Data/Communication System
The campus’ main telephone switching system (PBX) is located in the basement
level B-wing of the Library building. From this location, acting as a hub, all copper
cables radiate in a star topology out to all other buildings on campus distributing
telephone and other miscellaneous services to those buildings. Telephone tie lines
connect the Olympia campus system to the Tacoma branch campus PBX. Qwest
provides telephone service to the housing residents.
The campus’ main data networking system is located in the Library A-wing of the
basement level. This room is referred to as the Machine Room and all campus fiber
optic cables radiate outward in a star topology to all other buildings also.
Emergency ‘blue’ telephone stanchions are located through out the main campus
that are routed back to the Police Services dispatch.
Cellular Communication
Cellular phone service on campus from some service providers is intermittent.
Currently, there is no cell tower located on campus.
Data/Communication Cabling
The inter-building, or backbone, telecommunications cables used on this campus
are made up of large pair count, shielded, twisted pair, (STP), copper cables and
fiber optic cables in three types, and coaxial cables. The first type of fiber cable
is singlemode (SM) fiber; the second type is 62.5/125 micron multimode (MM)
(legacy fiber cables); the third type is 50/125 micron laser optimized multimode
(MM) fiber optic cable to support 10 Gbps transmission speeds between buildings.
The backbone fiber and copper cables run through the basement level of the
Library until they enter the tunnel system then on to other parts of the campus.
Most buildings are area cabled with Category 5E type cables that are being
upgraded to Category 6(t) as buildings are renovated.
2014 Update text is bold and italicized.
48
THE EVERGREEN STATE COLLEGE CAMPUS MASTER PLAN | 2014 Update
Volume I - Site Specific Recommendations
EXISTING CONDITIONS
Many of the existing communication equipment rooms were carved out of existing
closets or storage rooms. These rooms are cramped and do not provide proper
clearances, HVAC systems and have no room for expansion. As buildings are
being renovated (such as recent renovations to the Library) these rooms are being
replaced per College standard.
Lightning protection devices are provided and grounded on both ends of the
copper cables that extend beyond the tunnel system into the underground
conduits. The College must continue its current practice of installing lightning
protection devices and grounding on both ends of the copper cables. This
installation is a requirement of the NEC, Article 800.
Cable Television
A television satellite dish is located on top of the Library, this dish down-links a
signal that can be inserted into the campus-wide cable distribution system. The
coaxial cable distributes CATV signals to locations throughout the campus. The
system also has the capacity for distribution of up to three locally originated
channels.
Civil
Water and Wastewater Utilities
With the exception of Geoduck House which is currently occupied by the Olympia
Community School and located near the shoreline, the campus buildings are
connected to the City of Olympia water and wastewater systems. The City of
Olympia and Evergreen have agreements for these services and the City will
continue to provide water and wastewater service to the campus. The Olympia
Community School is currently served by a septic tank and drain field. This on-site
wastewater treatment system should be evaluated to verify that it is functioning
properly, and is sized correctly for the school population and soil conditions.
Existing wastewater and water utilities were originally designed to serve a student
population of 12,000 students. Discussions with campus staff indicate that the
system is in good working order.
Storm Water Management
The Evergreen campus lies within four different drainage basins. Portions of the
campus drain to the following creeks: Snyder Cove Creek, Green Cove Creek,
Unnamed (Evergreen faculty name: Barking Dog) Creek, and Houston Creek.
Figure 4.17. Snyder Cove Creek outlet.
Snyder Cove Creek
The Snyder Cove Creek Drainage Basin lies within the Evergreen campus property.
The creek has been degraded over the last 30 years since the campus Core drains
into it. A majority of the campus roadways and parking areas also discharge
to Snyder Cove Creek. The campus Core is located in the upper portion of the
basin, and during large storm events, high flows off the impervious surfaces can
cause erosion and carry sediment downstream. Discharge from the campus is not
currently monitored. In the past, the United States Geological Survey monitored
Snyder Cove Creek just upstream of the culvert and Evergreen faculty used to
monitor the discharge location from the campus Core.
2014 Update text is bold and italicized.
THE EVERGREEN STATE COLLEGE CAMPUS MASTER PLAN | 2014 Update
49
EXISTING CONDITIONS
Volume I - Site Specific Recommendations
Eld Inlet
Unnamed Creek
Snyder Cove Creek
Huston Creek
Green Cove Creek
Not to Scale
Legend
Wetland
Wetland Buffer, 300’
Approximate Campus
Boundary
Figure 4.18. Campus Hydrology Diagram.
2014 Update text is bold and italicized.
50
THE EVERGREEN STATE COLLEGE CAMPUS MASTER PLAN | 2014 Update
Volume I - Site Specific Recommendations
EXISTING CONDITIONS
Snyder Cove Creek discharges into Eld Inlet in Puget Sound. There is a culvert
where Sunset Beach Drive NW crosses over Snyder Cove Creek. This culvert is not
designed to let fish pass since the invert of the inlet is only submerged during high
tides. The College is currently working with environmental groups to make Snyder
Cove Creek fish friendly by installing a box culvert at its confluence with Eld Inlet.
Green Cove Creek
An eastern portion of the campus drains to Green Cove Creek. This area includes
the ball fields, modular housing, and portions of the perimeter road. Green Cove
Creek discharges to Budd Inlet in Puget Sound.
Unnamed Creek (Evergreen faculty name: Barking Dog)
This creek is completely contained within the campus Reserve. This creek is fed by
groundwater through seeps in the basin. The Master Plan recommends seeking
adoption of the name Barking Dog.
Houston Creek
The Evergreen Campus Parkway drains into wetlands that feed into Houston
Creek. Houston Creek drains into Mud Bay.
Evergreen Campus Stormwater System
Evergreen is in the process of completing a Stormwater Plan for the campus. In
addition to mapping the stormwater collection and treatment system, Evergreen is
verifying the connections to the system. It is uncertain if the existing core buildings
discharge into the existing stormwater pipes.
Evergreen must meet the Washington State Department of Ecology Non-Point
Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) Permit as a secondary MS4 permittee. As
part of the permit requirements, all new construction at Evergreen that affects
more than 2,000 sf must meet current stormwater management requirements
as listed in the 2005 Ecology Stormwater Management Manual for Western
Washington. This includes any activities to update existing campus buildings,
roadways, and classrooms. The permit and manual encourages best management
practices, including low impact development elements, erosion and sediment
control, and community education.
Opportunities for Low Impact Development
Evergreen is taking steps to be a sustainable campus by implementing strategies
that mimic the natural hydrologic processes that occurred prior to the campus
development. Evergreen is a leader in this type of stormwater management. The
Seminar II building contains green roofs, rain gardens and bioswales that attenuate
stormwater prior to entering the campus system and discharging into Snyder
Cove Creek. The Library was also retrofitted with a green roof that is visible and
accessible from the fourth floor. Pervious asphalt was installed at ADA parking
stalls near campus housing.
2014 Update text is bold and italicized.
THE EVERGREEN STATE COLLEGE CAMPUS MASTER PLAN | 2014 Update
51
52
05
GOALS AND OBJECTIVES
53
54
Volume I - Site Specific Recommendations
GOALS AND OBJECTIVES
05 GOALS AND OBJECTIVES
‘The Evergreen State College will be a laboratory for sustainability as demonstrated in its operations, curriculum, and quality of life for
employees and students. We will nurture values and practical skills that motivate a lifetime commitment to a sustainable, inter-generational,
just way of living on a healthy planet.’
- The Evergreen State College Sustainability Task Force
From the beginning of this Campus Master Plan process, the Planning Committee and
consultant team understood that past master planning in 1998 and again in 2005
developed very strong foundations from which to build. Both the mission for this
Master Plan and the goals listed below represent direct developments and refinements
from these earlier processes. To avoid repeating much of the very thorough and
descriptive documentation of both campus features and ambitions, the intent of this
document and plan is to work in conjunction with the previous documents.
MISSION
Figure 5.1. Community.
The mission of this Master Plan is to build on past efforts and focus on developing
diagrams, programs and descriptive statements of ideas and projects that represent
physical manifestations of the evolving vision for the campus.
Specifically, this document aims to develop a comprehensive long term capital
plan for College facilities and grounds both on and off campus, establish priorities
consistent with the College’s mission and strategic plan, ensure that the plan
reflects the unique qualities of the College and campus and builds upon the
philosophical basis of past planning efforts.
The plan will help provide support for future capital budget requests, a particular
focus has been placed on identifying:
- Renovations and additions
- Infrastructure improvements
Figure 5.2. Learning.
- Sites for potential new facilities
- Land use/landscape policies
GOALS
The following five goals represent a refinement of previously stated goals from
prior master planning efforts:
Figure 5.3. Sustainability.
•
Develop state-of-the-art learning facilities and housing options that
advance the mission of the College.
•
Provide an open and supportive environment for those who study,
work and live on campus.
•
Create a visibly sustainable campus through educationally rich,
proactive design, planning and goal-setting.
•
Provide educational opportunities in the delivery of campus planning,
operations and services.
•
Integrate College educational activities with cultural, social, civic and
business activities of the surrounding community.
2014 Update text is bold and italicized.
THE EVERGREEN STATE COLLEGE CAMPUS MASTER PLAN | 2014 Update
55
56
06
R E C O M M E N D AT I O N S
57
58
Volume I - Site Specific Recommendations
RECOMMENDATIONS
0 6 R E C O M M E N D AT I O N S
This Master Plan has been developed as a tool to understand the impact of the
projected growth in enrollment and the interrelationship of the various planning
objectives established by the College through this and past master planning
processes. This Master Plan proposes a pattern of development that is based on
both the established building pattern that reinforces the Core of the campus and
a new direction that aims to integrate the entire campus into the community,
sustainable and educational goals of the College. At the campus Core, proposed
renovations and additions are focused on developing and enhancing a sense of place
that is sensitively scaled, provides good solar access and forms a connectedness
among adjacent buildings. New facility locations also build upon the existing
development patterns at the campus Core and reinforce the ideas related to creating
appropriately scaled outdoor spaces, establishing visual connections between inside
and outside and limiting the sprawl of the campus. Circulation improvements – both
vehicular and pedestrian – build on existing patterns and develop a comprehensive
network of connections among the various proposed and existing educational
centers, upper and lower campus and the community.
Air Travel
(5%)
Other
(2%)
Commuting
(24%)
Electricity
(41%)
Space Heating
(28%)
Figure 6.1. Sources of Evergreen’s 2006 carbon
emissions.
Source: “Carbon Neutrality by 2020: The Evergreen
State Colleges Comprehensive Greenhouse Gas
Inventory,” John F. Pumilio, June 2007.
As part of the campus master planning effort, the College established the goal
of achieving a balance in the production of both carbon and waste by the year
2020. This net zero carbon and waste focus has informed the planning process
and allowed rethinking of campus operations and facilities planning at the College.
Meeting the challenge of carbon neutrality at Evergreen by 2020 will require bold
measures. Preserving and expanding the wooded areas of the campus will off-set
a small portion of Evergreen’s current carbon footprint and represents a unique
resource for carbon sequestration. Additionally, fundamental changes are needed to
encourage alternative transportation and energy (see Figure 6.1).
Although the College was initially planned to accommodate as many as 12,000
students, the evolving mission as a liberal arts institution as well as the current
and planned facilities reflect a ‘right sized’ capacity of the campus in 2020 of
approximately 5,000 students. With a systems infrastructure constructed to support
a significantly larger campus, the current land and facility use patterns require careful
evaluation and planning in order to achieve the overall sustainable vision. This plan
considers a wide range of opportunities that will set the stage for making significant
contributions towards balancing both carbon use and waste production and include:
•
transportation modes and patterns
•
energy production and use
•
campus biome protection, use and enrichment
•
food production research and training
•
construction practices
•
waste stream management
•
student life and housing
All of the investigations under taken during the planning process used sustainability as
a touchstone and integrate opportunities for hands-on student learning, participation,
engagement and community involvement. Three general organizing categories
emerged that focused on notions of Community, Sustainability and Learning.
2014 Update text is bold and italicized.
THE EVERGREEN STATE COLLEGE CAMPUS MASTER PLAN | 2014 Update
59
RECOMMENDATIONS
Volume I - Site Specific Recommendations
LEARNING
•
Develop on-campus Education Centers in Clusters within the Reserve
(forest and marine ecologies, organic farming, sustainable practices,
environmental stewardship, waste stream, etc.).
•Use Red Square as a stage to showcase College’s unique educational
mission and student life.
•
Create outdoor laboratories and classrooms – field study emphasis.
•
Support faculty research.
•
Improve interdisciplinary learning environments – classroom
environments that support Evergreen teaching paradigms
SUSTAINABILITY
Figure 6.2. The Master Plan focuses on
opportunities to enhance community,
sustainability, and learning.
•
Increase use of alternative transportation
(walking, biking, transit, car pool)
•
Increase and encourage use of self-sustaining resources
(recycling, composting, stormwater harvesting).
•
Support and utilize Green building practices.
•
Maintain and expand multi-cultural resources.
•
Develop and explore alternative power sources
(geo-thermal, solar, wind).
COMMUNITY
•
Support campus as community resource - Invite community
and neighborhood to use campus as a learning environment
(Extended Ed, cultural events, interpretive trails, Organic Farm tours,
conferences and sport camps, sustainability tours, teaching gardens,
beach walks, nature walks, cultural walks, bicycle loops, volunteer
opportunities)
•
Increased desirability of living on campus
•
Provide facilities that support leadership in innovative programs Use the campus as a global venue (sustainability innovations, Native
American culture, innovative programs, environmental conservation
and demonstration)
2014 Update text is bold and italicized.
60
THE EVERGREEN STATE COLLEGE CAMPUS MASTER PLAN | 2014 Update
Volume I - Site Specific Recommendations
RECOMMENDATIONS
LAND USE
One of the primary missions of this master planning process has been to develop
and use strategies that focus on preserving, supporting and enhancing the Reserve
areas of the campus. The approach proposed is categorized into four primary
groups conceptualized as Identity, Education, Circulation and Stewardship.
IDENTITY
Earlier master plans divided the Reserve into four quadrants – north, south, east,
and west. This naming convention does not convey the ecological, educational, or
recreational significance of the Reserve areas. This planning effort recommends the
identification of place and amenity names within the Reserve. The place naming
is intended to allow research areas to be protected and to formalize the identities
of areas and amenities in the Reserve. The Board of Trustees of the College must
approve all campus facility and place names.
Students in the Community Activism/Community Design program have developed
a set of sample place names for the broad regions of the Reserve as an initial step
in a process of formally renaming areas of campus and include:
•
Ecoforestry/Ecoagriculture Area
This portion of the Reserve is dedicated to providing learning
opportunities as they relate to sustainable farming and forestry. This
portion of the Reserve is anchored by the existing Organic Farm, but
also encompasses the proposed Organic Farm expansion and a stand
of Big Leaf Maple and Red Alder that lies north of the farm. This
portion of the Ecoforestry/Ecoagriculture Area is set aside for a future
sustainable logging and undercropping curriculum.
•
Old Forest Area
This name denotes the portion of the Reserve that extends from the
campus’ southern boundary northward to the bluff above Geoduck
Beach, between the campus Core and the Ecoforestry/Ecoagriculture
Area. Many of the Reserve’s most significant stands of second
growth forest lie within this portion of the Reserve, as does most of
the campus trail system.
•
Geoduck Beach
This is simply the formalization of the colloquial name for the
College’s beach on Eld Inlet.
•
Grass Lake Wetland Area
This portion of the Reserve lies between the athletic fields and the
eastern edge of campus. This is currently the most remote part
of the Reserve and sees the least amount of recreational use. It is
contiguous with a larger wetland system southeast of campus.
2014 Update text is bold and italicized.
THE EVERGREEN STATE COLLEGE CAMPUS MASTER PLAN | 2014 Update
61
RECOMMENDATIONS
Volume I - Site Specific Recommendations
These place names are especially important because they convey an ecological,
educational or research significance to the place they describe.
A similar convention is envisioned for major trails within the Reserve, as well
as discrete places such as meadows and forest stands. These names can be
developed on an ongoing basis and submitted to the College’s Board of Trustees
for approval. The student developed naming recommendations are found in the
Appendix.
These place and amenity names can be used on campus maps, signage, and other
Reserve related documents. The names suggested here are intended to initiate
a broader discussion on the campus to develop names that will ultimately be
formally adopted by the College.
Geoduck Beach
Old Forest
Area
Ecoforestry
Ecoagriculture
Area
Grass Lake
Wetland Area
Approximate
Campus
Boundary
Not to Scale
Figure 6.3. Naming Reserve areas emphasizes their relationship to learning, sustainability, and community.
2014 Update text is bold and italicized.
62
THE EVERGREEN STATE COLLEGE CAMPUS MASTER PLAN | 2014 Update
Volume I - Site Specific Recommendations
RECOMMENDATIONS
EDUCATION
The College has established a set of sustainability goals which include waste and
carbon neutrality by 2020. The technologies and practices that will help achieve
these goals may also provide educational opportunities. This plan proposes the
creation of Education Centers located at various locations within the Reserve,
as well as enhancements to existing educational centers such as the Organic
Farm. The proposed and enhanced Education Centers are envisioned to create a
greater sense of presence in the Reserve areas by the College that is intended to
be consistent with the educational mission of the College. In many cases, these
centers are located in existing Clusters within the Reserve. The centers are not
generally envisioned to require the development of significant buildings but rather
create discrete, stand alone facilities that provide instructional support, signage
and program staging spaces not significant additional buildings. By integrating
the Reserve into the activities of the College, the biomes can be more deliberately
and comprehensively monitored, studied and restored so that the value of the
Reserve areas can continue to serve as a unique regional environmental asset.
Education center opportunities are identified in Figure 6.4 and serve as examples of
the sort of Reserve activities that can be envisioned.
Terrascope
Interdisciplinary
Education Center
Storm and Waste Water
Education Center
Waste Stream and
Renewable Fuels
Education Center
Teaching Gardens
Art Walk/
Reforestation
Field Lab
Wetland
Restoration
Field Lab
Sustainable Farming
Education Center
• Organic Farm
Legend
Wetland
Approximate Campus Boundary
• Sustainable Logging
• Undercropping
Not To Scale
Figure 6.4. Education centers within the Reserve create resources for learning, sustainablility and community.
2014 Update text is bold and italicized.
THE EVERGREEN STATE COLLEGE CAMPUS MASTER PLAN | 2014 Update
63
RECOMMENDATIONS
Volume I - Site Specific Recommendations
Sustainable Design Programs
Sustainable Design, as a responsive and responsible process of addressing
constructed environments, has been central to the implementation of
planning for sustainability at Evergreen. It’s also been a prominent
focus for teaching and learning. Sustainable Design programs have
been a regular, and very popular part of the Evergreen Curriculum since
1999-2000. These full time, studio-based, design/build programs of
50-75 students always fill, and have waiting lists that equal or exceed
the number of available seats. The numbers attest to the popularity of
Sustainable Design as a regular full-time offering at Evergreen, and its
importance to the recruiting and retention of students, as well as to the
Curriculum as a whole. Other sustainable design-related offerings across
the full time curriculum and in Evening and Weekend Studies attest to the
depth of interest in sustainable design and construction across campus.
The design and construction of a Sustainable Building Lab – a space where
students could learn different construction processes, experiment with
different construction types, and build and assemble components for
projects on and off campus, would provide a center for sustainable design/
build construction on campus, and relieve demands on the existing wood
and metals shops and studio spaces, and their staff. In their current review
of the Campus Master Plan, the Campus Land Use Committee discussed
several options for accommodating the development of a Sustainable
Building Lab identified. Ideally, the site for this facility, with access,
electrical service, and other amenities and within easy walking distance
of other facilities and existing shops and studios in the Arts Annex. The
new facility could serve other programs that wish to build larger-scaled 3D
work – agriculture-related projects, sculpture and installation projects, etc.
The appendix section of the Master Plan contains additional text that
represents early thinking about the location, staff needs and additional
supporting elements that would help support the program development.
2014 Update text is bold and italicized.
64
THE EVERGREEN STATE COLLEGE CAMPUS MASTER PLAN | 2014 Update
Volume I - Site Specific Recommendations
RECOMMENDATIONS
Organic Farm Education Center
The 2007 Evergreen Organic Farm Plan outlines facility needs for the continued
development and operation of the farm (the report is included in the Appendix).
The College currently dedicates 24 acres to the Organic Farm Education Center.
Today, only a portion of this acreage is being used. The fields themselves cover
about four acres, and no other land is cleared at present for crop rotation. Because
the soil in the three acre plot has been continuously farmed for about three decades,
soil-born pathogens have had time to establish and proliferate, and currently the
farm is not a sustainable enterprise. The farm needs to be able to rotate its crops
off the existing plots onto new arable land. The earlier Master Plan identifies land
to the east of the current farm as area for expansion, but this would cut into one
of the Reserve’s prime stands of second-growth Douglas Fir forest. Additionally,
this land slopes up onto a ridge and would be more difficult to cultivate. This plan
recommends that the farm’s allotment of 24 acres be reoriented toQthe north on level
ground into stands of Big Leaf Maple and Red Alder.
Figure 6.5. Arable land allows for increased
educational experiences for students.
Q
Q to maintain
Any remodeled or new facilities should be designed and constructed
the unique character of the Organic Farm and do not need to reflect the
architectural characteristic of the campus Core.
Q
Q
Q
Q
Figure 6.6. Diagram of organic farm configuration and additions. UPDATED
2014 Update text is bold and italicized.
THE EVERGREEN STATE COLLEGE CAMPUS MASTER PLAN | 2014 Update
Q
65
RECOMMENDATIONS
Volume I - Site Specific Recommendations
Building on the success of the current Organic Farm and as outlined in the detailed
farm plan prepared in 2006 and 2007 and included in the appendix volume of
the Master Plan, the evolution of this Education Center includes adding a food
production and sciences lab, animal barn, a green house and general storage
facilities. Increasing arable land from about 4 to 9 acres is also critical to ensure the
continued soil health of the farm. Although produce from the farm will continue to
supplement the food needs of the campus and farmers markets, partnerships with
area and regional farmers will be required to achieve greater food independence.
Composting (excluding limited farm generated materials) and bio-diesel activities
should be relocated to the Renewable Fuels and Waste Stream Education Centers as
these activities are not directly related to the activities of the farm.
Geoduck House
Figure 6.7. Existing Geoduck House
The existing Geoduck House sits on a sensitive coastal site that will not easily
accommodate increased activity. Envisioned as a retreat facility for small gatherings
of faculty and students or other similar low impact groups, the renovated facility
will focus on special uses and perhaps support recreational activities such as
student-run kayak and canoe rental activities by providing storage and staging
space. The facility renovation will incorporate sustainable features targeting
carbon and waste neutrality and consist of only minor additions.
P
P
P
P
Q
Figure 6.8. Diagram of Geoduck House. UPDATED
Q
2014 Update text is bold and italicized.
66
THE EVERGREEN STATE COLLEGE CAMPUS MASTER PLAN | 2014 Update
Volume I - Site Specific Recommendations
RECOMMENDATIONS
Terrascope Interdisciplinary Education Center
The “Terrascope” (a structure with which to see the world) will augment the
curricular needs of our environmental studies, visual arts, and creative writing
programs. It will provide classroom, laboratory, and studio space surrounded
by forest and other natural habitats. This structure will also provide access to
the forest canopy in safe and non-destructive ways. An open pavilion, located
at the beginning of the canopy walk, and descriptive panels provide a place for
the community, student groups and other visitors to learn about the campus
biomes and share in the experience of the continued monitoring of the forest.
The minimal shelter and an adjoining flexible lab space is envisioned to support
interpretive materials and be carefully integrated into its site to minimize the
impact of the project from both a visual and environmental standpoint.
Loop Trail
ELD INLET
Suspension Bridge
Approximate
Location of
Neighbor
Terrascope
Parking
Trail
Head
undary
rty Bo
Prope
Marine Drive
t
Sunse
Trail
Drive
Loop Trail
Figure 6.9. Proposed Terrascope education center.
Grass Lake Art Walk/Forest Reestablishment Field Laboratory
The Grass Lake Wetland Reserve is currently cut in two places by road corridors.
This plan recommends further study to confirm that the closure of
Overhulse Place will have minimal to no impact for the campus and
surrounding neighborhoods. The pedestrianized Overhulse Place corridor could
become a field laboratory for both the study of forest reestablishment and an
alternative venue for the display of art. The corridor could be divided into control
and study parcels comparing managed and natural reestablishment processes.
The proposed trail would allow art to be displayed in landscape in contrast to the
natural environment.
2014 Update text is bold and italicized.
THE EVERGREEN STATE COLLEGE CAMPUS MASTER PLAN | 2014 Update
67
RECOMMENDATIONS
Volume I - Site Specific Recommendations
Storm and Waste Water Monitoring Education Center
Building on the existing campus system for treating storm water, this Education
Center will allow for the monitoring of the flows and quality of water by
developing the infrastructure into a visible system that exposes the way that storm
water is managed on campus. Development of the center at the existing oil/water
separators located adjacent to Driftwood Lane and between the ’soil farm’ and
parking lot ‘F’ will minimize the facilities needed and provide a location near the
campus Core. This center will focus on exposing and describing existing systems
and providing a platform for monitoring, measuring and testing strategies to
address collected water run-off. This center could incorporate bioswales and living
machine technology as a means of storm and waste purification and infiltration.
Alternative Energy Education Center
Located at the Central Utility Plant and building on the extensive utility tunnel
infrastructure, the Energy Education Center will allow the campus to innovate,
monitor and evaluate how the campus heating and cooling needs are met. Replacing
aging boilers with new technologies and system options provides the opportunity to
implement forward looking solutions that student and faculty can monitor, measure
and test to evaluate the effectiveness of different strategies and systems.
Solid Waste Stream and Renewable Fuels Education Center
•
Locate a Central Composting/Recycling facility at the current Maintenance
Shops site. Limited composting at the Organic Farm will focus on the
agricultural program, rather than on the campus-wide effort.
•
Develop a Central Archive/Storage Facility at the existing
Maintenance Shops site. This facility will provide space for long-term
storage and the storage of large, bulky items, such as, furniture,
equipment, projects, etc. The intention is to remove long-term
storage functions from the campus Core to provide additional space
for Core related functions.
•
Develop a Central Distribution Center at the existing Maintenance
Shops site. This will allow low-volume, non-bulky goods (e.g.,
vending machine stock, paper products, cleaning supplies, etc.) to be
transferred to small, non-polluting vehicles for use within the campus.
•
Create a Solar Farm at the current Maintenance Shops site to be
used to power that site and charge small, electric vehicles used to
distribute goods within the campus.
•
As the College explores new fuel technologies for its fleet of
vehicles, educational opportunities may present themselves. This
center could feature a biodiesel production center, as well as a
photovoltaic cell farm, and could support research as it pertains to
efficiency and cost analysis.
CIRCULATION
Facilitating easy, accessible and safe campus mobility is a priority of the planning
effort. As the campus evolves, the ability to move easily among the Core facilities
and around the campus Reserve areas must be better accommodated. A revised
network of roads, paths and trails are proposed to support and link areas of the
campus and connect to off campus networks.
2014 Update text is bold and italicized.
68
THE EVERGREEN STATE COLLEGE CAMPUS MASTER PLAN | 2014 Update
Volume I - Site Specific Recommendations
RECOMMENDATIONS
Road Management and Revisions
The character and natural environment of the Reserve will be enhanced by
redirecting automobiles to the perimeter of campus. The vehicular rights-of-way
within the campus are owned and managed by the College. These rights-of-way
include: Evergreen Parkway, Driftwood Road, Overhulse Place, and Marine Drive.
The following revisions are recommended:
•
Convert Overhulse Place to a bicycle/pedestrian path. Three quarters
of the traffic using Overhulse Place are College-related. Trips
from the neighborhood for US 101 access are limited. The extra
vehicle miles related to those trips are offset by the reduction in
College-related trips. This road closure will reconnect the eastern
portions of the Reserve with the rest of the campus and create an
additional area of habitat restoration and reforestation. Overhulse
is valued community connector. Before converting the
entire right of way to an alternative use, it is recommended
that a comprehensive analysis is conducted to ensure that
the removal of the route does not have significant adverse
impacts on the community and campus travel times.
•
Limit traffic on Driftwood Road and Marine Drive west of Overhulse
Road to campus related services and maintenance traffic, emergency
vehicles and ADA parking access.
•
Retain current public access to private waterfront homes via Lewis Road.
Paths and Trails
A comprehensive network of paths and trails are envisioned as a way to connect all
areas of the campus for pedestrians and bike users. As illustrated in the diagram,
several types of trails are proposed. Most of the trails are proposed as being
similar to the current McLane Trail and are intended to knit through the wooded
landscape in a manner that minimizes impact to the forest ecology and landscape.
The paths would provide a loop that builds upon existing trail components along
Evergreen Parkway and adds connections to the campus Core and out to the
Geoduck House and other Education Centers. Existing trails to the shore and farm
within the Reserve areas would be enhanced but remain primarily earthen trails.
The majority of the campus was constructed prior to the adoption of current
accessibility requirements. As a result it is recommended that particular attention
be paid to resolving universal access challenges as buildings are remodeled and
constructed. It will be important to focus on campus wide connection paths that may
not be considered part of one project or another but rather link overall areas of the
campus. More appropriate paving choices and attention to issues related to universal
access on the campus will increase access to the College for people of all abilities.
Signage improvements combined with the creation of clear departure points from
the campus Core to the Reserve trail systems are envisioned to aid in the visibility
of the connections to campus features outside the campus Core.
2014 Update text is bold and italicized.
THE EVERGREEN STATE COLLEGE CAMPUS MASTER PLAN | 2014 Update
69
RECOMMENDATIONS
Volume I - Site Specific Recommendations
Interpretative
Canopy Walk
Shoreline Trail
Geoduck Spur Trail
Interpretative/
Medicine Trail
Gateway to Geoduck Beach
Gateway to
Sustainable Farming
Education Center
Grasslake
Wetland
Art Walk
Farm Trail
Parkway Trail
Legend
Trail Head
Multi-Use Loop Trail, 8’ wide asphalt
pavement
Multi-Use Loop Trail, 8’ wide permeable
asphalt pavement
Connect to
Munro
Conservation
Easement
Paved Pedestrian Trail, 5’ wide dry-pack
pavement with edge restraints
Unpaved Pedestrian Trail, 4’ wide
earthen path
Approximate Campus Boundary
Not to Scale
Connect to McLane Trail
Figure 6.10. Existing and proposed paths and trails.
2014 Update text is bold and italicized.
70
THE EVERGREEN STATE COLLEGE CAMPUS MASTER PLAN | 2014 Update
Volume I - Site Specific Recommendations
RECOMMENDATIONS
Public participation in restoration
and maintenance projects.
Connect biomes across campus
boundaries.
12. Interpretative Canopy Walk
1. Teaching Gardens
8. Overhulse Wetland Preserve
13. Interpretative/ Medicine Trail
2. Reforestation
9. Kaiser Preserve (Green Cove Wetland)
14. Community Gardens.
3. Wetland Restoration
10. Paul-Leigh Conservation Easement
4. Connect to McLane Trail
11. Munro Conservation Easement
Public use of the campus features.
Legend
Unpaved
Paved Pe
dry-pack
Paved Pe
asphalt
Trail Hea
15. Grasslake Wetland Art Walk
(Unpaved Pedestrian Trail.)
Wetland
Biome co
5. Connect to Munro Conservation Easement
Approxim
6. Huston Creek Salmon Habitat Restoration
7. Snyder Cove Creek Salmon Restoration
n in restoration
projects.
Connect biomes across campus
boundaries.
12. Interpretative Canopy Walk
8. Overhulse Wetland Preserve
13. Interpretative/ Medicine Trail
9. Kaiser Preserve (Green Cove Wetland)
14. Community Gardens.
Public use of the campus features.
Legend
Unpaved Pedestrian Trail, 4’ wide earthen path
Paved Pedestrian Trail, 5’ wide
dry-pack pavement with edge restraints
Paved Pedestrian Trail, 8’ wide permeable
asphalt pavement
Trail Head
10. Paul-Leigh Conservation Easement
15. Grasslake Wetland Art Walk
(Unpaved Pedestrian Trail.)7.
11. Munro Conservation Easement
Wetland
Biome connections
Approximate campus boundary
ation Easement
tat Restoration
12.
Restoration
13.
lish w
Estab
15.
rs
rrido
co
ildlife
1.
2.
3.
14.
8.
5.
9.
6.
4.
10.
Not to Scale
11.
Figure 6.11. Environmental stewardship: encouraging sustainability and community partnerships.
2014 Update text is bold and italicized.
THE EVERGREEN STATE COLLEGE CAMPUS MASTER PLAN | 2014 Update
71
RECOMMENDATIONS
Volume I - Site Specific Recommendations
STEWARDSHIP
Figure 6.12. Trails provide recreational and
educational amenities to the College and the
community.
Engendering a sense of stewardship by the students, faculty, staff and surrounding
community is seen as a powerful way to ensure that the unique environmental
assets of the campus are preserved, managed, maintained and treasured for
future generations. Currently, the large contiguous land area that makes up the
Reserve areas of the campus represents a forest system that is being surrounded by
suburban development as the City of Olympia and Thurston County populations
grow. Through partnerships with state, county, community, and environmental
organizations there may be opportunities to address regional trail, wildlife and
environmental initiatives that leverage campus assets and connect the College to a
larger set of regional goals.
Connecting to or creating initiatives that link the College and community allows
the campus to play a greater community role and allows the creation of programs
that encourage participation in the development and preservation of the ecological
resources of the campus. Trail and wildlife corridor development and maintenance
could be achieved through community volunteer programs not unlike the
continuing and successful evolution of the neighboring McLane Trail.
The Reserve trail system and teaching gardens within the Core of the campus are
utilized as educational and recreational resources by the College and community.
Currently, the College’s Grounds Crew manages all campus landscapes including
the Reserve. Opportunities for the use of student and community volunteers to
supplement campus crews encourages participation in the active management of
the campus and establishes partnerships to outside organizations and non-profits
interested in restoration, native planting and other related projects. A designated
Reserve outreach role could be created to coordinate community involvement and
help establish opportunities for desirable partnerships.
Research and evaluation are needed to compile data on regional biodiversity and
regional planning goals to identify the College’s potential conservation goals.
Partnerships and collaboration with regional planning efforts, land trusts and
existing corridors could help to develop ways to connect these potential corridor
areas to the campus ecologies. Connections to the campus loop trail system and
the McLane Trail would open a valuable community corridor that would facilitate
alternate modes of transportation. Partnerships with existing land trusts, land
conservation easements and preserves located near the College could forge
educational opportunities for students and develop environmental solutions to
increased development in the area.
Specific Master Plan concepts and recommendations are described below and
are grouped based upon generalized campus locations. A prioritized list of the
projects is included at the end of this section.
PROJECTED NEEDS AND RATIONALE
The recent addition of the Seminar II Building in the campus Core was originally
envisioned to accommodate the current and projected classroom needs in
conjunction with a series of renovations to existing facilities. The subsequent
renovations have not yielded all of the projected spaces and specific needs remain
unfulfilled. This section documents spaces and features that have emerged as stated
needs during the initial phase of the Master Plan process. The following generalized
space categories briefly describe the understanding of stated needs.
2014 Update text is bold and italicized.
72
THE EVERGREEN STATE COLLEGE CAMPUS MASTER PLAN | 2014 Update
Volume I - Site Specific Recommendations
RECOMMENDATIONS
Faculty Offices
All existing faculty office space on campus is occupied. To support projected
student growth of approximately 600 FTE and maintain a 1:20 faculty to student
ratio, the College will need to plan for approximately 30 additional faculty
offices to meet the need of the increased faculty. Faculty offices are currently
distributed around the campus often with a purposeful mixing of disciplines. Due
to the distributed nature of the offices on campus, additional offices could be
accommodated as existing buildings are renovated, modernized and expanded.
Additionally, new facilities should be programmed to include faculty office space.
Administrative Support Spaces
Additional administrative space will also be required to support the growth in
both students and faculty. To maintain the current 1:2 faculty to staff ratio, 60
additional staff will be required. At 250 gross square feet per person, 15,000
additional gross square feet will be required. Not unlike the faculty offices, staff
space is anticipated to be distributed in both new and renovated spaces.
Faculty/Student Research Space
A shift towards more research by faculty and students is creating a need for
additional research focused space. Confirming effective use of existing research
space will continue to be critical. Research space needs should be evaluated on a
project by project basis.
Science Labs
Science programs anticipate a continued growth in a ‘field oriented and hands-on
future’. This emerging focus requires more storage and set-up space specifically
designed to provide easy access for the loading and unloading of field equipment
and instruments. Existing labs are in high demand and expansion will be
needed as related programs grow to meet demand. Facilities at the farm do not
adequately support program needs. Addressing and improving the variety and
flexibility of the lab types provided on campus has been a primary focus of the
planning process and facilities to support these program needs are described later
in the document.
Theater and Media Storage
Focused on needs related to the Communications Building and anticipated to be
addressed as the facility is renovated, the needs include provisions for adequate
equipment storage and infrastructure improvements to accommodate increasing
technology, performance lighting, and power demands. Performance continues to
be a vital part of many programs on campus and is seen as a continued strength
of Evergreen programs. Improving and providing adequate space for performance
emerged as a top priority during the planning process and is reflected in the
prioritization of the Communications Building Renovation project.
2014 Update text is bold and italicized.
THE EVERGREEN STATE COLLEGE CAMPUS MASTER PLAN | 2014 Update
73
RECOMMENDATIONS
Volume I - Site Specific Recommendations
Design Labs (Homerooms)
The number of large multipurpose, interdisciplinary, flexible spaces that provide
students with project space is limited. With an increasing number of programs
occurring over multiple quarters and that require 24 hour student access, the
campus has struggled to find appropriate spaces to support this important need.
These project focused classroom lab spaces include:
•
Painting studios – current number not adequate to meet demand
•
Interdisciplinary studio labs providing project and lecture support
space – ‘homeroom classrooms’ like the one added to the top of the
Communications Building
•
3D studios for visual arts, environmental studies
Student Hang-out Spaces
Creating attractive places for students to gather and meet is critical. Renovation
of the CAB is anticipated to address some of this need at upper campus. Every
effort should be make to ensure that student lounge spaces are included in all
newly renovated or expanded facilities. This is an important element of creating an
overall campus atmosphere that encourages students and faculty to interact and
remain on campus beyond the set class times. Comfortable, technology connected
and dispersed informal gathering spaces will contribute to the sense that the
campus is an active, learning community setting. Essential to the improvements to
hangout spaces will be a focus on improvements to Red Square and the creation of
additional outdoor gathering spaces.
Causal Learning Spaces
Opportunities on campus for quiet, solitary study are limited. Likewise, spaces for
small group work sessions represent a growing need that is not accommodated as
class assignments focus on team oriented projects and assignments. Both sorts of
spaces should be included in the programming of all new buildings, renovations or
additions. Emphasis should be placed on ensuring that there is adequate access to
technology to create useful and highly functional spaces for study and interaction.
Figure 6.13. The Longhouse and the adjacent ethno-cultural garden are campus landmarks and focal
points for Reservation-based programs.
2014 Update text is bold and italicized.
74
THE EVERGREEN STATE COLLEGE CAMPUS MASTER PLAN | 2014 Update
Volume I - Site Specific Recommendations
RECOMMENDATIONS
UPPER CAMPUS RECOMMENDATIONS
Past campus planning principles encouraged compact development and
preservation of the natural environment. Development has been ordered around
a primary visual and pedestrian axis at McCann Plaza and a cross axis in front of
the Library connecting the Longhouse with Lower Campus. Seminar II introduced
a diagonal axis in the Core campus as a pedestrian spine. The Master Plan
recommends a mirror of this diagonal axis and spine be extended into the west
side of the campus terminating in a gateway space and creating an intimately
scaled new plaza space.
The notion of making great exterior spaces that connect directly with interior
spaces and functions – we call this ‘placemaking’ - is central to the concepts
utilized in the plan. The master plan recommends the creation of a series of new
and enhanced ‘places’ linked by visual and pedestrian axes. Three campus places
are recommended for enhancement as pedestrian activity hubs: Red Square, East
Campus Square, and West Campus Square. Under the Master Plan, new buildings
are proposed to enhance each of these places.
See Figure 6.16.
Evans Library
CAB
Sem I
Sem II
CRC
Comm
Lecture
Long
House
Lab II
Lab I
Art
Annex
Future Project Sites
Identifies ‘Place Making’ Opportunities
Circulation Routes
Figure 6.14. Upper and lower campus with proposed projects.
2014 Update text is bold and italicized.
THE EVERGREEN STATE COLLEGE CAMPUS MASTER PLAN | 2014 Update
75
RECOMMENDATIONS
Volume I - Site Specific Recommendations
PROPOSED ACTIONS, NEW BUILDINGS AND ADDITIONS
Red Square
As defined in the original master plan, Red Square is the central gathering place
for the College. In this role Red Square functions as a ‘great stage’ for campus
activities and major graduation venue. However, Red Square was scaled for
an institution expected to reach 12,000 students, rather than a 5,000 student
liberal arts college. Red Square should be scaled down, made more accessible
and integrated with surrounding land uses. Uses surrounding Red Square should
reflect the Mission and Strategic Plan of the College and interact with the public
open space. Flexible, indoor/outdoor space should front on the square. Library
and CAB activities should be encouraged to have greater transparency - visual
connection - from and to Red Square.
PROPOSED PROJECTS
A Longhouse Addition (Completed)
G Communication Building Expansion
B Interdisciplinary Lab Building -Alternate Site 1
H CRC Renovation/Expansion
(Predesign 2014)
C Interdisciplinary Lab Building -Alternate Site 2
D Lecture Halls Renovation/Expansion
(Design 2014)
E IAC Building Projects
I
Future Building Site
J
Energy Efficiency Projects
K
Lab I & II Projects
F Seminar I Building Renovation
Renovation
New/Addition
Existing
Figure 6.15. Upper campus proposed projects. UPDATED
2014 Update text is bold and italicized.
76
THE EVERGREEN STATE COLLEGE CAMPUS MASTER PLAN | 2014 Update
Volume I - Site Specific Recommendations
RECOMMENDATIONS
•
Lecture Halls Addition: Wrap the Lecture Halls with a flexible
and highly transparent addition housing adaptable space for an
interdisciplinary studio lab, campus environmental resource center,
student display and break out spaces. Incorporate large glass
doors and large covered outdoor spaces that allow spaces to be
opened up for the sale of organic farm produce and to provide
weather-protection during graduation. Reconcile the grade changes
between the east and west portions of Red Square and provide ADA
accessibility for the Lecture Halls.
•
Red Square Repaving: Repave Red Square with new paving materials
to create a pervious surface that is slip-resistant and sustainable.
East Campus Square
The Seminar II café illustrates the potential of East Campus Square to be a popular
gathering place on campus.
•
CRC (Campus Recreation Center) Addition: Add an addition to the
CRC that enhances the accessibility and wayfinding from the East
Campus Square and lower campus. Inviting new entries fronting
on East Campus Square and the athletic fields will be created as
part of the addition. The addition will provide space for expanded
recreation and wellness facilities and programs.
•
CAB renovations and additions will be encouraged to add to the
activity and vitality of East Campus Square. Potential improvements
include expanded indoor/outdoor dining and the removal of the
pedestrian bridge to open-up views, light and air to the square.
•
Communications Building Performing Arts Center Addition: The
Performing Arts Center Addition will provide and opportunity to
enhance the relationship of the Communications to the East Campus
Square and create a gateway to the campus from the parking on Lot C.
The location of the addition to the Communications Building should be
carefully studied to ensure issues related to access and campus proximity
are addressed.
West Campus Square
Mirroring the Seminar II axis on the west side of the campus Core creates and
opportunity to create West Campus Square, a new gathering place on campus.
New buildings developed west of Laboratory II and the Arts Annex will enclose and
activate the square and create a gateway to the Organic Farm trail.
•
Interdisciplinary Lab Building I: A classroom lab building will be
added west of Lab II to accommodate classroom and multiple lab
needs. Lab space will accommodate additional wet labs and a dirty
lab that has a direct connection to an adjacent plaza area and easy
loading access. This building will also include an interdisciplinary
studio lab space and café fronting the square and an adjoining
faculty lounge oriented to the west.
•
Interdisciplinary Lab Building II: As the second interdisciplinary
building and forming an integral part of the new West Campus
Square, this facility will provide much needed 3D and art studio
space. This building will also include an interdisciplinary studio lab,
art display space, and space for faculty and staff.
2014 Update text is bold and italicized.
THE EVERGREEN STATE COLLEGE CAMPUS MASTER PLAN | 2014 Update
77
RECOMMENDATIONS
Volume I - Site Specific Recommendations
Campus Gateways
Gateways to upper campus should be created and enhanced at the following
locations: 1) McCann Plaza (campus front door), 2) the Longhouse, 3) plaza at
the new entry to the CRC on lower campus, 4) plaza at the new Interdisciplinary
Lab Building on the west edge of campus, and 5) plaza at the Performing Arts
Center addition to the Communications Building. New wayfinding systems should
be developed to direct visitors to campus facilities including the Organic Farm,
Geoduck House, the various Education Centers, gardens and trails.
The following is a summary of proposed new buildings and additions on upper
campus. These facilities respond to the wish list of needs compiled from our
meetings with the PUCs. This list should be reviewed and prioritized by the
College community before becoming a final Master Plan recommendation.
Combined Maintenance Facility (Driftwood House)
Consolidation of campus and Residential Services maintenance facilities closer to
the campus Core in a Combined Maintenance Facility will enhance efficiency and
sustainability. Possible additional Educational component to support the
development of a Sustainable Lab. Relocation and consolidation will reduce
vehicle miles traveled, improve access to campus service docks and loading facilities
and allow facilities and equipment to be shared. The following is recommended:
•
Relocate campus and Residential Services maintenance facilities to
the Driftwood House site and develop shared maintenance shop,
service and repair facilities. The Driftwood House site is proximate to
both upper and lower campus.
•
Relocate motor pool and maintenance equipment yard to the Driftwood
House site and co-locate with Residential Services maintenance facilities.
•
Enhance connections and wayfinding between the campus Core and
the Driftwood House site to encourage pedestrian and bicycle access
to the motor pool.
•
Consider including Sustainable Lab components to leverage
site location, access.
PROPOSED NEW BUILDINGS, RENOVATIONS AND ADDITIONS
Longhouse Expansion (Project A)
Completed
Interdisciplinary Lab Building – Alternative Site 1 (Project B)
Floor Plate: 16,500 gsf
Total Square Footage: 2.5 floors = 41,250 gsf
Projected Uses:
• Studios/Labs/Dirty Labs
• Flexible Interdisciplinary Labs
• Faculty Offices
• Informal Learning/Meeting Spaces
2014 Update text is bold and italicized.
78
THE EVERGREEN STATE COLLEGE CAMPUS MASTER PLAN | 2014 Update
Volume I - Site Specific Recommendations
RECOMMENDATIONS
Interdisciplinary Lab Building – Alternative Site 2 (Project C)
Floor Plate: 16,500 gsf
Total Square Footage: 2.5 floors = 41,250 gsf
Projected Uses:
• Studios/Labs/Dirty Labs
• Flexible Interdisciplinary Labs
• Faculty Offices
• Informal Learning/Meeting Spaces
Lecture Halls Renovation/Expansion (Project D)
Design 2014
IAC Building Projects (Project E)
Floor Plate: varies
Total Square Footage: varies
Projected Uses:
• Fiber arts studio
• Carving arts studio
• Painting arts studio
• Glass arts studio
Seminar I Building Renovation/Addition (Project F)
Floor Plate: 11,227 gsf
Total Square Footage: 4 floors = Approximately 44,909 gsf (5,000-7,000 gsf
addition)
Projected Uses:
• Campus Police Services Offices
• Campus Health Services Offices
• Renovated Classrooms
• Fiber arts studio
• Fiber arts studio
• Faculty Offices
• General Campus Administrative Offices
• International Student Education First Center for International Education and
Exchange
Communication Building Expansion (Project G)
Total Square Footage: 60,000 gsf (addition only)
Projected Uses:
• Performance/Lecture Space
• Conference Programs and Receptions
• Flexible Interdisciplinary Labs
• Faculty Offices
CRC Renovation/Expansion (Project H)
Predesign 2014
Future Building Site (Project I)
Identified site for possible new facility TBD
• Alternate site for projects B or C
2014 Update text is bold and italicized.
THE EVERGREEN STATE COLLEGE CAMPUS MASTER PLAN | 2014 Update
79
RECOMMENDATIONS
Volume I - Site Specific Recommendations
Energy Efficiency Projects (Project J)
Lab I & II Projects (Project K)
Continues updating cycle for the Lab facilities
Projected Uses:
• renovated lab and lab support
LOWER CAMPUS RECOMMENDATIONS
The goal of making The Evergreen State College a residential liberal arts college
adds new opportunities and potential for lower campus. Notions related to
‘placemaking’ and community building are central to the long term strategy.
Making the campus an attractive place to live and where there is easy access to
basic amenities emerged as primary goals in shaping the thinking about the vision
for the lower campus. The goal is to add housing to achieve the goal of providing
on-campus housing for 33% of the students and some faculty housing.
Working with the assumption that the projected 2020 enrollment will equal 5,000
FTEs and with an on-campus residential student population target of 33% of
the total student population, the campus needs to plan for approximately 1,650
beds. Assuming demolition of the modular housing, the existing bed count totals
approximately 907 beds. Therefore, new housing will be needed to provide
approximately 743 beds by 2020.
The student population and housing demand have decreased since 2008.
Despite softening demand, the existing housing stock likely some plays
a role in the reduction of demand as alternatives are seen by students as
more attractive and cost effective. Developing improved options offer an
opportunity to explore public/private development opportunities.
Concepts
•
Create a suite-style, eco-village housing option attractive to students
desiring to live an outwardly sustainable life-style.
•
Develop unique and attractive rental housing for faculty to assist in
recruiting national and international instructors to meet the Mission
and Strategic Plan of the College.
•
Create retail opportunities within convenient walking distance to
student housing, adding to the 24/7 activity and vitality of campus.
•
Focus retail at a location visible from the Overhulse Road and
Driftwood Road intersection, the “side door” of the campus and
connection to off-campus housing.
•
Expand the CRC to create an inviting entry oriented to campus
housing and add easily accessible recreational options.
•
Develop a Fieldhouse Pavilion Expansion to provide additional
recreation and conferencing opportunities.
•
Convert offices on the third floor of Residential Building A back to
dorm rooms and add Quad-style housing to expand the number of
rooms available for freshmen.
•
Replace the Modular housing with apartments or suite-style
residential options to create a more compact campus community.
2014 Update text is bold and italicized.
80
THE EVERGREEN STATE COLLEGE CAMPUS MASTER PLAN | 2014 Update
Volume I - Site Specific Recommendations
RECOMMENDATIONS
•
Strengthen the east/west connections between upper and lower
campus, providing a wide, well lit, accessible pedestrian and bicycle
path.
•
Emphasize the development of sheltered outdoor gathering spaces
that connect directly with renovated, expanded or new facility
developments.
•
Create gathering place at the proposed entry to the expanded CRC
as a gateway to upper campus.
•
Reactivate student-operated food services in the HCC.
The following specific projects are proposed to address the needs of the lower
campus area:
Quad Dorm Expansion (Project L)
Total Square Footage: varies
Projected Uses:
• First and Second Year Housing
Driftwood Suites Housing (Project M)
Total Square Footage: varies
Projected Uses:
• Local retail space
• Student/Married Student Housing
• Potential Faculty Housing
• Visiting Scholar Housing
Modular Replacement Housing (Project N)
Total Square Footage: varies
Projected Uses:
• Replaces Modular Housing
• Higher Density Housing
• Eco Village Location
Fieldhouse Pavilion Expansion (Project O)
Total Square Footage: 13,000 gsf
Projected Uses:
• Field House activities – lockers and team rooms
• Sport Camp and Conference Services
• Light catering and flexible meeting spaces
Playing Field Upgrades
• Supports enhanced student life
• Supports summer programs
2014 Update text is bold and italicized.
THE EVERGREEN STATE COLLEGE CAMPUS MASTER PLAN | 2014 Update
81
RECOMMENDATIONS
Volume I - Site Specific Recommendations
Housing Options
The following three options illustrate opportunities to meet future on-campus
housing needs. All three options replace the existing Modular housing and add
to the Fieldhouse to provide expanded recreation and convention facilities. In all
cases parking demand is accommodated through the use of the modified Lot F
supplemented by remote parking that utilize excess capacity located in the existing
little ‘B’ portion of Lot B. The options are as follows:
Option 1
Additional quad-style housing, retail/married student/faculty housing; new suitestyle and more “Soup” housing (the existing apartment-style units named for
alphabet soup).
Option 1 will add two additional Quad-style buildings (100 beds each) enclosing a
courtyard to accommodate additional freshmen. Suite-style and “Soup”-style units
(408 beds) will be developed on the Modular housing site. Retail, married student
housing (135 beds) and faculty housing (18 units) will be built on Lot F at the
intersection of Overhulse Road and Driftwood Road. Lot F will be reconfigured to
maintain current capacity and screened from the housing by landscaping.
PROPOSED PROJECTS
L Quad Dorm Expansion
M Driftwood Suites Housing
N Modular Replacement Housing
O Fieldhouse Pavilion Expansion
New/Addition
Existing
M
N
L
O
Figure 6.16. Housing option 1. UPDATED
2014 Update text is bold and italicized.
82
THE EVERGREEN STATE COLLEGE CAMPUS MASTER PLAN | 2014 Update
Volume I - Site Specific Recommendations
RECOMMENDATIONS
Option 2
Additional Quad-style housing; retail/faculty cottage housing; new suite style
housing (Eco-Village).
Option 2 will add four additional Quad-style buildings (400 beds) enclosing
courtyards to accommodate underclassmen. New suite-style housing (Eco-Village)
will be developed on the Modular housing site to appeal to students seeking a
sustainable life-style (343 beds). Retail with cottage-style faculty housing (18
units) will be built on a portion of Lot F at the intersection of Overhulse Road
and Driftwood Road. Lot F will be reconfigured to maintain current capacity and
screened from the housing by landscaping.
PROPOSED PROJECTS
L Quad Dorm Expansion
M Driftwood Suites Housing
N Modular Replacement Housing
O Fieldhouse Pavilion Expansion
New/Addition
M
Existing
N
L
O
Figure 6.17. Housing option 2. UPDATED
2014 Update text is bold and italicized.
THE EVERGREEN STATE COLLEGE CAMPUS MASTER PLAN | 2014 Update
83
RECOMMENDATIONS
Volume I - Site Specific Recommendations
Option 3
Additional Quad-style housing; retail/married student/faculty housing; new suite
style housing (Eco-Village).
Option 3 will add two additional Quad-style buildings (100 beds each) enclosing
a courtyard to accommodate additional freshmen. New suite-style housing (EcoVillage) will be developed on the Modular housing site to appeal students seeking
a sustainable life-style (408 beds). Retail, married student housing (135 beds) and
faculty housing (18 units) will be built on F Lot at the intersection of Overhulse
Road and Driftwood Road. Lot F will be reconfigured to maintain current parking
capacity and screened from the housing by landscaping.
PROPOSED PROJECTS
L Quad Dorm Expansion
M Driftwood Suites Housing
N Modular Replacement Housing
O Fieldhouse Pavilion Expansion
New/Addition
Existing
M
N
L
O
Figure 6.18. Housing option 3. UPDATED
2014 Update text is bold and italicized.
84
THE EVERGREEN STATE COLLEGE CAMPUS MASTER PLAN | 2014 Update
Volume I - Site Specific Recommendations
RECOMMENDATIONS
OTHER RECOMMENDATIONS
In addition to the projects located at the campus Core, there are several additional
projects that round out the recommendations. Listed below are the projects
intended to support several of the educations centers located outside the campus
Core. These projects are equally as important to the continued success of the
campus and support the variety of programs and needs that add to the diversity of
experiences offered by the College and include:
Goeduck House Renovation (Project P)
Total Square Footage: 5,000 gsf
• Renovation/Updating of existing facility for small retreats
• Limit uses to minimize environmental impact
Organic Farm Lab Facility (Project Q)
Total Square Footage: 12,000 gsf
• Food Grade Teaching Lab
•Greenhouse
• Equipment Storage
Terrascope Interdisciplinary Education Center (Project R)
Total Square Footage: 12,000 gsf
• Flexible Interdisciplinary Labs
• Forest Canopy Studies Lab
• Marine Studies Lab
• Equipment Storage
• Community Education Resource Center
Combined Housing and Campus Facilities Maintenance Building
(Project S)
Total Square Footage: 12,000 gsf
• Housing Maintenance Offices
• Campus Maintenance Offices
• Maintenance Vehicle Parking
• Maintenance Shop Space
• Maintenance Material Storage
Faculty Housing
Strong support for on-campus faculty housing was expressed during the master
planning process. Faculty housing provides the following opportunities:
• Provides a recruitment tool for new and visiting faculty
• Encourages faculty and student interaction
• Supports sustainability goals by reducing commuting trips
• Adds to the walk-in market for on-campus retail
• Allows faculty to experience Evergreen’s unique environment
• Expands the inventory of affordable housing for faculty
• Provides transitional housing for newcomers to the community
• Provides temporary housing for visiting faculty and scholars
2014 Update text is bold and italicized.
THE EVERGREEN STATE COLLEGE CAMPUS MASTER PLAN | 2014 Update
85
RECOMMENDATIONS
Volume I - Site Specific Recommendations
As the land for the housing would be state-owned, it was assumed that the
housing would be rental, rather than owner-occupied. A small quantity
(approximately 18) of detached units (cottage-style) or townhouses was
envisioned. A number of potential locations were identified, including:
• Lot F (northwest corner of the intersection of Driftwood and Overhulse Road)
• Kifer Homestead site (west of the Organic Farm)
• Fireweed Lot (south of the Athletic Fields)
• Driftwood and Evergreen Parkway (northeast corner of the intersection of
Driftwood and Evergreen Parkway)
Some faculty preferred faculty housing sites close to the campus Core, while other
faculty preferred sites that were remote. It is assumed that one or two sites might
be developed.
Developing faculty housing continues to be a priority and highly
desirable as a result of an increasing demonstrable demand from visiting,
international faculty specifically related to the Indigenous Arts Campus
programs.
The faculty housing need may offer an opportunity to explore public/
private partnerships as a way to develop new facilities to address the
continued interest in this project type.
TRANSPORTATION ENGINEERING RECOMMENDATIONS
Transit Service Improvements
Centralizing access to the existing 41 and 48 bus routes at McCann Plaza will
reduce transit vehicle miles traveled and increase transit service hours. Expanding
jitney service and late night and weekend public transportation options serving
lower campus, will reduce automobile usage. The following revisions are
recommended:
•
Consolidate the transit stops for the 41 and 48 routes at McCann
Plaza. Eliminate Driftwood/Overhulse Place loop, while retaining
stops on Evergreen Parkway.
•
Vans to provide jitney service and expanded late night and weekend
public transportation options at the Driftwood Road transit stop
proximate to student housing.
Opportunities to Reduce Vehicle Use and Carbon Emissions
While the campus can physically accommodate parking and traffic increases
associated with enrollment targets, its goal to achieve carbon neutrality
necessitates new measures to reduce transportation related energy use. A
comprehensive, campus-wide Transportation Management Plan will be essential to
realizing energy and carbon reductions. Components of the plan would include:
Figure 6.20. Existing parking on campus.
Existing campus parking can support an increased
student population.
1. Reducing the number of autos used for commuting. Suggested targets for
reducing single-occupancy vehicle are a 10% reduction in use by faculty and staff
and a 20% reduction by commuting students. To do this requires:
2014 Update text is bold and italicized.
86
THE EVERGREEN STATE COLLEGE CAMPUS MASTER PLAN | 2014 Update
Volume I - Site Specific Recommendations
RECOMMENDATIONS
a.
Raising the cost to park on campus. Significant increases would be
needed. Experience at a variety of universities indicates that demand
will drop about 1% for each 10% increase in parking price. To achieve
a 10% reduction in demand would require Evergreen to raise its rates to
$225 per academic year (up from $90 now for fall/winter/spring). Even
at this amount, parking would cost staff no more than a transit pass. To
be most effective, parking should cost more than a transit pass.
b.
Increasing transit service to reach more potential riders and simplifying
routes to reduce travel time. For example, preliminary information
indicates a number of staff living in the Lacey area who might benefit
from direct bus service instead of transferring downtown as is currently
required to reach campus. A direct route could reduce total travel time
from just over 1 hour to approximately 30 minutes. Also, demand for
service from areas not currently served by public transit such as the
Steamboat Island Peninsula should be investigated for appropriate types
of service. One option would be for Evergreen to operate vans, also
called jitneys, on key roads that could be hailed by students, staff or
faculty for rides to and from campus during designated hours. Such
custom van service could also provide student employment. This type of
service would broaden transit options for resident students and faculty.
c.
Maximizing rideshare services with ridematching for carpools and
vanpools. Ridesharing already occurs at fairly high levels but it may be
possible to assist more people to form a car or vanpool with targeted
ride-matching.
d.
Ensuring the availability of fuel-efficient on-campus College vehicles for
non-commuting trips.
e.
Encouraging on-campus bicycle use by exploring pilot programs for bike
sharing.
f.
Promoting bicycle commuting by partnering with suppliers to provide
major discounts on bicycle purchases by College students, faculty and
staff.
g.
Improving bicycle access to campus. Filling in gaps in the bike trail
network would increase cycling safety and convenience for more
people. Important segment include completing connections to the
McLane trail, and creating better connections along Mud Bay Road,
Harrison, Division and Cooper Point Road.
Figure 6.19. An Evergreen double decker bus could
increase efficiency of trips to and from campus.
2. Use more fuel efficient vehicles and encourage use of alternative fuels.
Evergreen’s drivers already use a fleet more efficiently than the national average
(according to findings by the Sustainability Task Force), yet additional efficiencies
can be encouraged through incentives either to acquire or use vehicles with
greater fuel efficiency and those that allow use of alternative fuels. A goal would
be to encourage a 10% increase in efficiency.
3. Use More Efficient Fleet Vehicles. The current but limited use of smaller,
electric vehicles for maintenance and security functions should be expanded to
serve the majority of those trips on campus. Police vehicles could be downsized
and supplemented by hybrids for off-campus trips. Greater use of bicycles and
electric carts and scooters for patrols is also recommended. Smaller, quieter
vehicles are also more compatible in primarily pedestrian areas such as Red Square
and on main walkways.
2014 Update text is bold and italicized.
THE EVERGREEN STATE COLLEGE CAMPUS MASTER PLAN | 2014 Update
87
RECOMMENDATIONS
Volume I - Site Specific Recommendations
4. Investigate central receiving and distribution for vendors’ products. As
with maintenance and security vehicles, too many large trucks and vans now enter
pedestrian areas to deliver beverages and other goods. By consolidating truck
deliveries at existing loading docks and then distributing goods using electric carts,
the delivery system can better maintain a pedestrian atmosphere, reduce noise and
minimize fuel consumption.
5. Shorten the distance each auto travels. Creating park and ride lots for
campus commuters would reduce the number of vehicle miles traveled for each
trip to and from campus. Remote lots need to be located near major travel
corridors such as US 101, I-5 and major arterial streets. Potential locations for park
and ride lots include the west end of Mud Bay Road near Madrona Beach Road,
the vicinity of the Westfield Capital Mall, and potentially the existing Lacey Park
and Ride lot (assuming its expansion). Such locations allow a convenient point
to park commuter vehicles from the west, south and east. Based on available
information, it is estimated that from 925 to 1,000 remote spaces in total would
be appropriate, assuming that some staff and students would still need to park on
campus occasionally, as would visitors and resident students. Each location would
need approximately 250 – 400 spaces (more precise figures would be determined
through more detailed surveys of travel patterns). These locations would
reduce daily vehicle miles of travel by about 40% (currently, commuters drive an
average of 13 miles each day, and these locations would shorten the trip total
by approximately 6 miles). Dedicated buses such as a double-decker bus would
shuttle commuters between the remote parking lot and the campus. Buses should
arrive frequently, at a minimum every 10 minutes and preferably every 5 minutes.
Such buses could operate on bio-fuels or natural gas to reduce carbon and other
emissions. It is estimated that 6 buses would be needed to serve three park and
ride sites.
Table 6.1 shows the range of emission reductions possible with the implementation
of the above transportation management actions. Significant reductions could be
achieved through aggressive action, but such results can only be realized through a
coordinated set of policies addressing the cost of parking, the provision of convenient
commuting options, and greater fuel efficiency and fuel flexibility in the vehicles used.
TABLE 6.1 ESTIMATED ANNUAL CARBON EMISSIONS (MTCDE)
FROM COMMUTING TO THE EVERGREEN STATE COLLEGE
 
EXISTING
FUTURE
(5,000
ENROLLMENT)
CHANGE OVER
EXISTING
5,027
5,258
4.6%
4,519
-10.1%
4,108
-18.3%
3,540
-29.6%
2,989
-40.5%
Current Policy
Minimal Action
SOV Reductions: -10% Staff; -20% Students
Moderate Action
Above, plus 10% More Efficient Vehicles
Maximum Action
Above, plus Park & Ride
Maximum Action – with Biodiesel
2014 Update text is bold and italicized.
88
THE EVERGREEN STATE COLLEGE CAMPUS MASTER PLAN | 2014 Update
Volume I - Site Specific Recommendations
RECOMMENDATIONS
Parking Can Help Pay for New Transportation Services
Increases in parking fees not only reduce parking demand but they can generate
substantial new revenue to pay for additional transit services. As previously noted,
the current parking system operates at a deficit considering its debt obligations.
Even with the proposed 25% fee increase, revenue will only just meet the total
obligation, leaving little surplus. The increase, while necessary, barely lifts parking
rates to a level that would influence demand. Table 6.2 presents the range of
revenue that could be generated from parking rates that equal or exceed the
monthly cost of a transit pass.
TABLE 6.2 POTENTIAL PARKING REVENUE
2006
REVENUE
ACTUAL
2008
2008 OPTION
A
2008 OPTION
B
PROJECTED
PARKING
PERMIT
EQUALS
TRANSIT PASS
COST
PARKING
PERMIT
EQUALS
TRANSIT PASS
COST + 25%
Permits Sold
$165,663
$214,000
$378,647
$ 447,709
Daily Revenue
$142,846
$237,200
$325,689
$ 485,676
Infractions
$ 96,351
$115,000
$104,000
$
Total Revenue
$404,860
$566,200
$808,335
$1,031,760
Expenses
$416,467
$451,000
$451,000
$ 451,000
$ (11,607)
$115,200
$357,335
$ 580,760
$ (7,000)
$ (7,000)
$
$ (72,299)
$ (72,299)
$ (72,299)
$ 35,901
$278,036
$ 501,461
Net Revenue
Debt Service Interest
(on Deficit Balance)
Debt Service Principal & Interest
Funds Available for Other Uses
98,375
(7,000)
Notes:
1. Higher parking rates expected to reduce demand by 5% & 15% for Options A and B, respectively.
2. Repayment of Interfund loan created an account deficit for which additional monies were borrowed
accruing additional interest.
Subsequent Planning and Analysis
As Evergreen pursues its goals of carbon neutrality and evaluates options to meet
those goals, the College will need to develop its own internal surveys to get
reliable and sufficiently detailed information to plan for and monitor the effect
of new transportation services. For example, it will become extremely helpful to
map the residential locations of bus riders, carpoolers, bike riders and drivers to
identify new service opportunities tailored to their needs. Basic patterns can be
identified while protecting individual privacy and the confidentiality of personal
information. Also, greater specificity can be achieved in determining the mode
of travel by asking for the mode used on specific days rather than asking for the
mode ‘typically’ used.
2014 Update text is bold and italicized.
THE EVERGREEN STATE COLLEGE CAMPUS MASTER PLAN | 2014 Update
89
RECOMMENDATIONS
Volume I - Site Specific Recommendations
ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING RECOMMENDATIONS
Power Distribution System
The existing campus 12.5kV power system cables have been tested and are in
good condition. The system also has capacity to handle the expected future
growth of the campus for the next ten years.
Original switchgear and panel boards in the 1970’s era buildings are at or beyond
their expected usable life. Evergreen has periodically tested and maintained this
equipment but has experienced problems finding replacement breakers and parts
for this equipment. Additionally this equipment was installed prior to AIC (Ampere
Interrupting Capacity) ratings for gear. Recommend replacing electrical distribution
equipment as a part of building addition and renovation projects.
Part of the sustainability energy savings recommendation would be to replace
existing dry type transformers (480 volt to 120/208 volt) with new energy efficient
type transformers as a part of building additions or renovations.
Monitoring of the power system would provide valuable information on energy
usage. Metering of loads such as large mechanical units and lighting would allow
the college to identify problems with mechanical and lighting control system,
maximize energy savings and prioritize system improvements.
On-site power generation such as co-generation, wind and solar are currently not
cost effective. These systems are in a period of major development and in the
next few years the payback period will make some or all of these systems feasible.
In the mean time small scale demonstration projects are useful for educational
purposes and could make sense for the College.
Interior Lighting
Lighting in many of the buildings on campus is very inefficient and does not create
a comfortable environment. The replacement of existing recessed acrylic and
parabolic lens type fixtures with pendant direct/indirect fixtures with electronic
ballasts and T5 type lamp would greatly reduce energy consumption and provide a
much better working environment. Newer light fixture reflectors designed around
the T5 lamps allow for greater distance between fixtures and reduction in the
number of fixtures and lamps. Note many local power companies have payback
incentive programs to help offset the cost of fixture replacements (for example
Puget Sound Energy).
New lamp technologies such as the development of an array of fixtures using
LED (Light Emitting Diode) lamps have potential of greater energy efficiency and
reduced maintenance. Recommend that these technologies be evaluated for use
in replacement or future projects.
Exterior Lighting
The campus standard area lighting pole fixtures do not meet LEED (Leadership in
Energy and Environmental Design) dark sky cut off requirements. Replacement
of these fixtures with high cut off type light distribution is recommended.
Fixtures installed as part of the Seminar II project should be reviewed for use
as replacement fixtures. Additionally many of the building or canopy mounted
fixtures are not energy efficient. Replacement of these fixtures with lower
wattage, better light distribution fixtures works with sustainability goals.
2014 Update text is bold and italicized.
90
THE EVERGREEN STATE COLLEGE CAMPUS MASTER PLAN | 2014 Update
Volume I - Site Specific Recommendations
RECOMMENDATIONS
Interior Lighting Controls
On average, lighting loads make-up 25 to 30 percent of a building’s energy
consumption. More energy efficient lighting fixtures are part of the overall
strategy to reduce energy use. In addition, lighting controls such as motion
sensors and zoned switching can double the potential energy savings.
Currently much of the existing lighting system on campus is controlled by local
switch controls. This means lighting in toilet rooms, classrooms and offices are
generally left on for hours when the rooms are unoccupied. Providing automatic
on/off controls such as occupancy sensors ensure lights are not left on when a
room or space is not occupied. Public areas where it is not desirable to have
fixtures going on and off via motion sensor such as corridors would benefit from a
programmable lighting control system to automatically turn on and off the fixtures
on a daily schedule.
Using natural daylighting strategies provides the greatest opportunity for energy
savings. Many new daylighting control systems are on the market. Typically these use
photo cells to control dimming ballasts in the light fixtures. Dimming the lights is much
less disrupting to users than turning on and off lamps. Dimming also gives the user
much greater control of lighting in a space. Savings can be as high as 50 percent.
Exterior Lighting Controls
Photo cells currently turn on the campus exterior fixtures at dusk and off at dawn.
There are many hours where the lights are on with few or no one in many of the
areas. Control systems that time the fixtures to 50% at a set hour and use motion
sensors to bring fixtures back up to 100% would save energy and provide for
personal safety.
Although many of the listed strategies are common energy saving approaches
today, it often takes careful coordination and a continued focus to ensure that the
systems are not only ultimately included in a project but also are fully realized in
workable solutions.
TELECOM/DATA RECOMMENDATIONS
Existing telecommunication equipment rooms in much of the campus are too small
and should be replaced with dedicated rooms that meet ANSI/TIA/EIA standards.
Adequate equipment rooms should be incorporated into the programs as facilities
are renovated.
Wireless LAN (Local Area Network) system coverage has been installed to the B&C
wings of Library. Currently the A wing of the Library is under renovation and wireless
LAN coverage is being added. The pre-design for the CAB renovation has wireless
coverage identified. It is recommended that the wireless network be expanded to
cover exterior spaces around buildings, plaza area and all existing and new buildings.
Existing telephone exchange (Private Branch Exchange (PBX)) equipment can not
support changing to a VOIP (Voice over Internet Protocol) type telephone system.
It is recommended that the benefits of a VOIP system be explored when it is
determined that the existing PBX system needs replacement.
2014 Update text is bold and italicized.
THE EVERGREEN STATE COLLEGE CAMPUS MASTER PLAN | 2014 Update
91
RECOMMENDATIONS
Volume I - Site Specific Recommendations
MECHANICAL ENGINEERING RECOMMENDATIONS
The Evergreen campus has an excellent infrastructure consisting of the Central
Utility Plant (CUP) and main utility tunnels that connect to the 11 main campus
buildings. Both the CUP and the tunnels were built to serve a campus of
approximately 12,000 students. The current campus population is in the low
4,000’s. It therefore makes economic and logistical sense to continue to utilize
this infrastructure, as it has plenty of space for growth and change, with very little
capital investment in the infrastructure itself.
The service life of the equipment varies throughout the campus. In general, the
mechanical systems have been well maintained and are in good condition. Much
of the existing HVAC equipment has gone beyond its expected service life, as
defined by ASHRAE and technically should be replaced. Service life for the type of
equipment found in these buildings is generally in the 20-25 year range. However,
many pieces of equipment are still in excellent condition and have had service
upgrades to extend their life. The main air handlers in the buildings are generally in
good condition and should remain. These units are built-up systems and can have
pieces replaced as they wear out. The piping in the tunnels appears in excellent
condition as well and can be retained depending upon its particular service. The
chillers in the CUP are new or near-new and have had control and service upgrades
in the recent past.
The major exception to the above observations is the boiler system. The main,
large boilers have exceeded their life expectancy, and have control components
that are extremely difficult to replace and maintain. However, the smaller boiler
used in the summer is in excellent condition and could be retained.
Figure 6.21. Wind turbines, solar panels,
green roofs and other sustainable features are
learning opportunities and help support campus
sustainability initiatives.
The other primary factor when evaluating the equipment is efficiency. The existing
heating equipment, at its most efficient when new, was approximately 80%. This
is at the peak of the heating season with the boiler running at 100% capacity.
This type of boiler does not operate very well at part-load, which accounts for
the majority of our heating season. In addition, as noted in the boiler section
above, these boilers are run at lower than designed for pressures, further limiting
their efficiency. The inefficiencies of the steam system were previously outlined.
Nearly all of the existing air handlers currently have hot water coils, to convert
the steam at each building into hot water for heating purposes. Converting the
existing steam to hot water system into an all hot water system, with new, more
appropriately sized, high efficiency boilers with modern controls located in the CUP
would greatly improve the overall energy efficiency of the building heating systems.
Concurrently, converting the domestic hot water system from a central plant
supported function into a distributed, point of use type hot water heater network
will also greatly improve the efficiency of this campus system. This type of system
could also be tied into rooftop solar thermal systems on each building that could
provide some or all of the domestic hot water heating needs. The exception to this
recommendation is the CRC and CAB, which have high domestic hot water loads.
Further investigation would be required to determine what would be the most
efficient domestic hot water system replacement for those particular buildings.
The chillers and chilled water piping appears to be in very good condition, and well
insulated. This system also appears to be adequately sized, and does not suffer
from gross inefficiencies. Some savings can be seen through certain control and
piping revisions that have been identified in previous studies.
2014 Update text is bold and italicized.
92
THE EVERGREEN STATE COLLEGE CAMPUS MASTER PLAN | 2014 Update
Volume I - Site Specific Recommendations
RECOMMENDATIONS
The existing controls are in generally good condition and can adequately control
the majority of the campus systems. However, a more thorough evaluation of the
controls would be necessary to fully determine what measures would be required
in order to maximize the efficiency of the current mechanical systems.
Heating and Cooling Recommendations
•
Continue to utilize a central plant and utility tunnel approach –
provides potential economies and builds on the more than adequate
tunnel infrastructure.
•
Replace existing boilers with multiple smaller boilers connected in series
– boilers are either on at full capacity (most efficient mode) or off.
•
Change the heat delivery method of the system from steam to
looped hot water.
•
With the exception of the CAB and CRC, remove the heating of
domestic hot water from the central plant and localize into instanton systems. The pool, shower and kitchen functions of the CAB and
CRC could still be efficiently handled by the central plant.
•
As facilities (Education Centers) develop outside the Core, focus on
renewable and localized systems targeted as carbon neutral and
combine solar, photovoltaic and wind options.
•
Explore partnerships with GE, Westinghouse and others to use the
campus as a test facility for innovative power plant initiatives, such
as the use of multi-fuel energy generation plants.
•
Study the viability of ground source geothermal heat pump systems
that utilize well fields under the athletic fields.
Most plumbing fixtures could be retained, but with new faucets and flush valves. Some
fixtures would need to be replaced due to age, lack of ADA units and inefficiency. If
bathrooms are to be re-configured or updated, we recommend replacing all plumbing
fixtures with more water efficient or waterless type units. Existing domestic water
piping would need to be further evaluated. It is most likely that the majority of water
pipe is copper pipe and does not need replacement in the near future.
The fire protection system will most likely only need revisions to accommodate
any new space configuration. Existing heads would need to be replaced with fast
action heads. The buildings would need to be evaluated to determine if there are
any areas that are currently not sprinklered that need to be under today’s code,
such as in ceiling plenums and tunnels. These areas would most likely need to be
fully sprinklered and could occur on a building-by-building basis.
Many of the sustainability goals for the campus, such as improved envelope and
maximizing daylighting, can be achieved on a building-by-building basis. Overall
campus energy goals and strategies should mainly focus on efficient delivery of
building utilities from the central plant and/or campus. As previously indicated, a
more efficient heating system at the central plant would greatly improve the overall
campus energy use. Strategies such as the use of bio-fuels for the main heating
system could be incorporated with that strategy. Domestic hot water production
was also previously addressed. Overall, potable water consumption could be
reduced through rainwater catchment and on-site treatment/retention.
2014 Update text is bold and italicized.
THE EVERGREEN STATE COLLEGE CAMPUS MASTER PLAN | 2014 Update
93
RECOMMENDATIONS
Volume I - Site Specific Recommendations
The campus cooling system could possibly be supplemented by the use of
ground-source heat pumps. Further study would be required to determine if this is
a viable option.
Photovoltaics could provide some of the campus electrical needs, but are unlikely
to replace the current grid-fed system due to the high cost of these types of
systems. These could, however, be evaluated and possibly used on a smaller,
building-by-building, or system-by-system basis.
Large-scale solar thermal systems are similar in that they make environmental
sense, but face first cost concerns and thus today make less economic sense in this
application. As energy costs rise and alternative energy source costs decline, the
campus could begin to implement alternative energy strategies.
Wind generators also do not currently make economic sense in this location.
Most wind generators require average wind speeds of 12 mph and greater to
achieve any sort of reasonable power generation, and the Puget Sound region has
average wind speeds in the 7-9 mph range. Specific data and/or testing would
be required to determine if this particular location has applicable wind speeds.
However, recent advancements in low-wind-speed technology have created a new
genre of wind generators that work well in the 7-9 mph range, and could provide
supplementary power generation on a case-by-case basis.
The current infrastructure and CUP facilities lends themselves well to a Co-Gen or
Tri-Gen type facility due to the central location, large amount of free space and
distributed network. These types of facilities generally produce heat, electricity
and possibly chilled water from a single source. However, an economically and
environmentally sensible fuel source (such as bio-gas, crop waste, bio-diesel, etc.)
must be available for these types of systems to be viable. Currently, there is not an
identified source on this campus.
The outlying campus buildings do, however, lend themselves well to many of the
above mentioned strategies. A combination strategy of PV Panels, Solar Thermal,
Low Wind Speed Generators, Rainwater Catchments, and Bio-fuels could be
utilized to meet most, if not all, of these small buildings’ needs. This could occur
on a demonstration type level, which could then be applied on a larger scale as the
economics change due to higher energy costs from conventional energy sources,
and reduced production costs of sustainable technologies. Students currently pay
$1 per credit hour towards a clean energy fee.
CIVIL ENGINEERING RECOMMENDATIONS
As part of this master planning effort, Evergreen intends to become a “zero”
carbon and “zero” waste campus by 2020. Continuing to effectively manage the
infrastructure will help achieve this goal. Evergreen is actively using low impact
development/green infrastructure elements around the campus and is committed
to including them in future development.
Consistent with other efforts to become more sustainable, it is recommended that
Evergreen complete a functional analysis of all resources on campus and in the
surrounding areas. This analysis would help to determine what natural systems
are degraded and how to target resources to improve them. This functional
analysis will allow Evergreen to catalog the existing ecological functions and green
infrastructure connections within and around the campus. For example, Evergreen
2014 Update text is bold and italicized.
94
THE EVERGREEN STATE COLLEGE CAMPUS MASTER PLAN | 2014 Update
Volume I - Site Specific Recommendations
RECOMMENDATIONS
can take advantage of the existing ecological functions and green infrastructure
connections of the adjacent forest preserves, the regional bike and pedestrian trail
system, Puget Sound, and the habitat and wetland areas surrounding the campus.
Continued preservation of the forest Reserve and encouraging alternative modes
of transportation will reduce the need for pollution generating impervious surfaces
and maintain the quality of the adjacent creek basins. Any new development
should limit the clearing of trees and dense vegetation to reduce the impacts of
increased runoff from the campus. Low impact development should be required
for all new and redeveloped facilities on campus including buildings, roadways,
parking areas, and related construction activities.
Evergreen may want to explore retrofitting the existing Core buildings to include
low impact development elements. These opportunities include stormwater
planters around the campus Core buildings, pervious pavements and permeable
pavers for the walkways and outdoor gathering spaces, swales and bioswales
along the parking areas and walkways, rain gardens at the campus housing and
outlying buildings.
Students and the faculty provide maintenance, monitoring, and research resource
for the campus. These elements can be applied at varying scales based on
demonstration and sustainability goals of Evergreen Currently, depending on
programs, monitoring includes the following:
•
Biodiversity of plants and animals over time
•
Examining substrate types, freshwater sources and predation
patterns that impact biodiversity
•
Stream water quality measures should be taken to institutionalize
this resource
Figure 6.22. Living Machines provide learning opportunities and eliminate waste water.
2014 Update text is bold and italicized.
THE EVERGREEN STATE COLLEGE CAMPUS MASTER PLAN | 2014 Update
95
RECOMMENDATIONS
Volume I - Site Specific Recommendations
Water and wastewater management will be controlled by installing low flow
fixtures in campus buildings and housing, and controlling and maintaining
the wastewater system to prevent inflow and infiltration into the wastewater
system. Using native plantings that require less irrigation or considering rainwater
catchment systems to water vegetation and plants throughout the campus will also
help. In addition, incorporating pervious surface materials and strategies when
maintaining, renovating or expanding existing parking facilities will also reduce
run-off and help the campus meet evolving storm water standards.
CAPITAL PLAN
The current capital plan indicates numerous projects and renovations over the next
several biennia (see Table 6.3).
The Master Plan is intended to initiate discussion to establish a prioritized list of
projects that will inform the development of revised 2007 – 2020 Capital Budget
Plan Vision. The list below in Table 6.3 continues to evolve and will be informed
by order of magnitude costs to be applied to the proposed projects. Bold type
indicates new capital projects.
The Capital Plan duration has been extended to address planning
objectives until the 2023-2025 biennium. Table 6.3 has been updated in its
entirety to reflect current priorities as established with the CLUC during
the update process.
2014 Update text is bold and italicized.
96
THE EVERGREEN STATE COLLEGE CAMPUS MASTER PLAN | 2014 Update
Volume I - Site Specific Recommendations
RECOMMENDATIONS
The Evergreen State College
2014 Master Plan Update
May 2014
PROJECTS AND RENOVATIONS
2023-2025
2021-2023
2019-2021
2017-2019
2015-2017
2013-2015
BIENNIA
Proposed Capital Projects
Maintenance Projects
Special Projects
Lecture Hall (Design)
Currently in Design
Minor Works Program Projects
Various Small Projects
Fiber Arts Studio (Design)
IAC - Grant Funded
Lab II Renovation (Design and Construction)
2nd floor
Preservation/Infrastructure Projects
Various Small Projects
CRC Renovation (Predesign)
Student Fee Funded
Lab I Renovation (Design)
Basement
Longhouse MP (Planning)
Indigenous Arts Campus (IAC)
Playing Fields Upgrades
Residence Halls Renovation/Expansion
Lecture Hall (Construction)
Currently in design
Minor Works Program Projects
Various Small Projects
Student Life Enhancements
Projects TBD
Seminar I Renovation (Predesign)
Provides space or MFA in Indigenous Arts
Preservation/Infrastructure Projects
Various Small Projects
CRC Renovation (Design and Construction)
Student Fee Funded
Lab I Renovation (Construction)
Basement
Safety and Security - Phase I
Fiber Arts Studio (Construction)
IAC - Grant Funded
Purchase of Tacoma Campus Facility
Residence Halls Renovation/Expansion
Seminar I Renovation (Design)
Minor Works Program Projects
Various Small Projects
Student Life Enhancements
Projects TBD
Interdisciplinary Lab Building (Predesign)
Studio Lab Spaces
Preservation/Infrastructure Projects
Various Small Projects
Visiting Faculty Housing
Central Plant/Alt. Energy System (Design)
Safety and Security - Phase II
Glass Arts Studio (Design)
IAC
Lab I Upgrade Phase I (Design and Construction)
Seismic and HVAC
Sustainable Building Sciences Lab
Geoduck House
Residence Halls Renovation/Expansion
Seminar I Renovation (Construction)
Minor Works Program Projects
Various Small Projects
Student Life Enhancements
Projects TBD
Interdisciplinary Lab Building (Design)
Studio Lab Spaces
Preservation/Infrastructure Projects
Various Small Projects
Glass Arts Studio (Construction)
IAC
Central Plant/Alt. Energy System (Construction)
Safety and Security - Phase III
Athletic Fields Pavilion Renovation
Lab II Upgrade Phase I (Design and Construction)
Seismic and HVAC
Consolidated Maintenance Facility
Design
Residence Halls Renovation/Expansion
Communications Building Expansion (Predesign)
Provides Theater Space
Minor Works Program Projects
Various Small Projects
Student Life Enhancements
Projects TBD
Interdisciplinary Lab Building (Construction)
Studio Lab Spaces
Preservation/Infrastructure Projects
Various Small Projects
Residence Halls Renovation/Expansion
Lab I Upgrade Phase II (Design and Construction)
Seismic and HVAC
Consolidated Maintenance Facility
Construction
Communications Building Expansion (Design)
Provides Theater Space
Minor Works Program Projects
Various Small Projects
Student Life Enhancements
Projects TBD
Lab II Upgrade Phase II (Design and Construction)
Seismic and HVAC
Preservation/Infrastructure Projects
Various Small Projects
Residence Halls Renovation/Expansion
Seminar II Renovation
Predesign
Campus Children's Center Renovation
Indicates added projects as part of the 2014 Master Plan Update
Indicates
added projects as part of the Campus Master Plan - 2014 Update
Table 6.3 Capital Budget Plan Vision UPDATED
2014 Update text is bold and italicized.
THE EVERGREEN STATE COLLEGE CAMPUS MASTER PLAN | 2014 Update
97
RECOMMENDATIONS
Volume I - Site Specific Recommendations
Renovation/Addition
2007-2009
Pre-design
Design/Construction
Evans Library
CAB
Sem I
Lecture
Halls
Longhouse
Sem II
CRC
Comm
Lab II
Lab I
Arts
Annex
Figure 6.23. Capital Plan biennium diagram showing 2007 – 2009 projects.
2009-2011
Pre-design
Design/Construction
CRC
Evans Library
CAB
CRC
Evans Library
Sem I
CAB II
Sem
Comm
Long
House
LabI I
Sem
LongHouse
Lecture
HallsII
Lab
Sem II
Comm
Lab II
Lab I
Figure 6.24. Capital Plan biennium diagram showing 2009 – 2011 projects.
2014 Update text is bold and italicized.
98
THE EVERGREEN STATE COLLEGE CAMPUS MASTER PLAN | 2014 Update
Volume I - Site Specific Recommendations
RECOMMENDATIONS
2011-2013
Pre-design
Design/Construction
CRC
Evans Library
Sem I
Sem I
Lecture
Halls
CAB
Sem II
Comm
Longhouse
Lab II
Arts
Annex
Figure 6.25. Capital Plan biennium diagram showing 2011 – 2013 projects.
UPDATED
2013-2015 UPDATED
Pre-design
Design/Construction
CRC
Evans Library
IAC
Sem I
Lecture
Halls
CAB
Sem II
Comm
Longhouse
Lab II
Lab I
Arts
Annex
Figure 6.26. Capital Plan biennium diagram showing 2013 – 2015 projects. UPDATED
2014 Update text is bold and italicized.
THE EVERGREEN STATE COLLEGE CAMPUS MASTER PLAN | 2014 Update
99
RECOMMENDATIONS
Volume I - Site Specific Recommendations
2015-2017 UPDATED
Pre-design
Design/Construction
CRC
Evans Library
CAB
IAC
Sem I
Lecture
Halls
Sem II
Comm
Longhouse
Lab II
Lab I
Lab I
Arts
Annex
Figure 6.27. Capital Plan biennium diagram showing 2015 – 2017 projects. UPDATED
2017-2019 UPDATED
Pre-design
Design/Construction
CRC
Evans Library
CAB
IAC
Sem I
Lecture Halls
Plant
Sem II
Comm
Longhouse
Lab II
Lab
Lab II
Interdisciplinary
Lab Building I
Arts
Annex
Figure 6.28. Capital Plan biennium diagram showing 2017 – 2019 projects. UPDATED
2014 Update text is bold and italicized.
100
THE EVERGREEN STATE COLLEGE CAMPUS MASTER PLAN | 2014 Update
Volume I - Site Specific Recommendations
RECOMMENDATIONS
2019-2021 UPDATED
Pre-design
Design/Construction
CRC
Evans Library
CAB
IAC
Sem II
Sem
Lecture Halls
Plant
Sem II
Comm
Longhouse
Lab II
Lab II
Lab I
Arts
Annex
Interdisciplinary
Lab Building I
Figure 6.29. Capital Plan biennium diagram showing 2019 – 2021 projects. UPDATED
2021-2023 UPDATED
Pre-design
Design/Construction
CRC
Evans Library
CAB
IAC
Lecture Halls
Sem II
Comm
Longhouse
Lab II
Lab I
Lab I
Interdisciplinary
Lab Building I
Arts
Annex
Figure 6.30. Capital Plan biennium diagram showing 2021 – 2023 projects. UPDATED
2014 Update text is bold and italicized.
THE EVERGREEN STATE COLLEGE CAMPUS MASTER PLAN | 2014 Update
101
RECOMMENDATIONS
Volume I - Site Specific Recommendations
2023-2025 UPDATED
Pre-design
Design/Construction
CRC
Evans Library
CAB
IAC
Lecture Halls
Sem II
Comm
Longhouse
Lab II
Lab I
Interdisciplinary
Lab Building I
Arts
Annex
Figure 6.31. Capital Plan biennium diagram showing 2023 – 2025 projects. UPDATED
2014 Update text is bold and italicized.
102
THE EVERGREEN STATE COLLEGE CAMPUS MASTER PLAN | 2014 Update
Volume I - Site Specific Recommendations
RECOMMENDATIONS
OFF-CAMPUS FACILITIES RECOMMENDATIONS
Tacoma Campus
The Tacoma program is committed to providing an interdisciplinary, reality-based,
community-responsive liberal arts education. It is preparatory for careers and
future studies in community development, organizational development, law
and public policy, education, social and human services, public administration,
communication and media arts, environmental studies and public health.
Figure 6.29. Murals by African artists reflect ethnic
and cultural diversity at the Tacoma campus.
Current enrollment is 225 students. Enrollment is exclusively third and fourth
year students who have completed two years at community college (Tacoma
Community College Bridge Program) or vocational schools, such as Bates and
Clover Park Technical Colleges. Currently, three quarters of the students are
women. The faculty has grown from four to seven plus two adjunct faculty.
The College is actively seeking faculty of color. Minority students make up a
significant percentage of the demographics. The décor of the Tacoma campus
reflects its cultural diversity. A mural by African artists graces the main entry. The
College at its current location is contributing to the revitalization of the Hilltop
neighborhood, a predominantly Afro-American neighborhood.
The existing Tacoma program is located on a full block site in a two story brick
and stucco building of recent construction. The facility is accessible and contains
the following facilities: lobby, four seminar rooms, wet lab, a large multipurpose room with four adjacent faculty offices, central administration offices
and conference room, work room and storage space. Parking and public transit
facilities are adequate.
The existing facility has been designed to allow for the addition of a third floor.
Given current enrollment levels, expansion of the facility is not anticipated at this
time. Currently the College is negotiating an extension to the current 10 year lease.
The Tacoma Campus building is anticipatedto be acquired by the College in
near future.
Reservation Based/Community Determined Program
The Reservation Based/Community Determined Program began in 1989. Classes
are only for third and fourth year students with the Grays Harbor Community
College Bridge program preparing the majority of the students.
Currently six tribes participate in the program (Makah, Muckleshoot, Nisqually,
Port Gamble S’Kallam, Quinault and Skokomish). Classes are taught at the
following locations: Quinault, Muckleshoot, Nisqually, Lower Elway, Port Gamble
and Skokomish. Four Saturdays per quarter all the students in the program
(TESC/Grays Harbor interface) attend classes in the Longhouse on The Evergreen
State College main campus. Four classrooms (20 students each) are used in the
Longhouse at this time. The kitchen at the Longhouse is used extensively during
Saturday classes and traditional tribal meals are served to students and faculty.
2014 Update text is bold and italicized.
THE EVERGREEN STATE COLLEGE CAMPUS MASTER PLAN | 2014 Update
103
RECOMMENDATIONS
Volume I - Site Specific Recommendations
The Tribal Councils are actively involved in overseeing the program and classes
taught and have a ‘government to government’ agreement with Evergreen on the
respective responsibilities of the program.
The Longhouse and adjacent Ethnobotanical Garden on Evergreen main campus
are central to the program. The design and construction timbers used in the
Longhouse were donated by the tribes. There is a cleansing ceremony at the
Longhouse at the beginning of each Saturday program. A separate graduation
ceremony for the program with active participation of alumni of the program
occurs each year at the Longhouse.
Currently there are 80 students in the program (35 Evergreen and 45 Grays
Harbor). The program is expected to double in size, at which point, the Longhouse
might be used eight Saturdays per quarter.
An expansion is currently planned for the Longhouse to provide additional
classrooms, offices, storage and student display space.
The Longhouse programs continue to experience growth and are evolving
into a campus created through the gathering of new buildings adjacent
to the Longhouse and Seminar I facilities. The programs are now part of
the Indigenous Arts Campus (IAC) and the updated Master Plan includes
several anticipated projects that are being supported through grant
funding opportunities.
Continued development and support of the programs related to the IAC
are anticipated to occur as part of the re-envisioned Seminar I Renovation
project. The renovation of Seminar I offers the opportunity to leverage the
existing building to develop IAC supporting spaces adjacent to the studio
structures currently being added. Additionally, the new program activities
provide an added use to the Seminar I building offering enhanced activity
in this area of campus.
2014 Update text is bold and italicized.
104
THE EVERGREEN STATE COLLEGE CAMPUS MASTER PLAN | 2014 Update
07
DESIGN GUIDELINES
105
106
Volume I - Site Specific Recommendations
DESIGN GUIDELINES
07 DESIGN GUIDELINES
DESIGN GUIDELINES
Purpose
The intent of the design guidelines is to provide guidance for the development and
enhancement of existing and planned campus landscape and architectural features
under the Master Plan. The design guidelines support the goals and objectives of
the Master Plan including:
Reflect mission, strategic plan and pedagogy of the College by:
•
Providing interdisciplinary, collaborative learning environments
•
Encouraging stewardship of natural resources
•
Building community partnerships
•
Improving the quality of faculty and staff work life
•
Creating a residential liberal arts college by accommodating thirty
percent of the students in campus housing and enhancing
student life
•
Becoming a national model of sustainable design and practices
•
Supporting the campus Core and Reserve areas as a teaching and
learning environment for students, faculty, staff and community
•
Developing memorable places within the campus by harmonizing
with nature and clustering activities to foster socialization and
gathering in settings of various scales
•
Encouraging the integration of students, faculty, administration and staff
In response to these goals and objectives, the design guidelines have been grouped
into the following categories: Campus Form, Sustainable Design and Learning
Environment. References to areas of the campus follow previous Master Plans
including: Core (“urban” area of the campus including the main academic,
administrative, residential, social and recreational facilities—commonly referred
to as upper and lower campus); central Core (Red Square and the major, multiuse buildings that surround it—commonly referred to as upper campus); Clusters
(group of facilities outside the Core, including Organic Farm, Geoduck House
and Maintenance Shops, serving a specific function) and Reserve (substantially
undeveloped areas surrounding the Core and Clusters where natural ecosystems
are the predominant feature).
2014 Update text is bold and italicized.
THE EVERGREEN STATE COLLEGE CAMPUS MASTER PLAN | 2014 Update
107
DESIGN GUIDELINES
Volume I - Site Specific Recommendations
LANDSCAPE DESIGN GUIDELINES
Campus Form
Figure 7.1. Seminar II is integrated into the
landscaping which softens and complements the
buildings material choices.
•
Establish transition in the landscape between the more formal
landscapes of the Core, to the less formal Education Centers and the
natural landscapes on campus.
•
Preserve vegetative buffers around the campus boundaries to
maintain the site’s character and define the relationship with
neighboring land uses.
•
Provide contrast, color and softening of architectural features with
surrounding landscaping.
•
Support the integration of parking lots into the natural environment
by providing planting strips within parking areas to break up visual
effects of cars.
•
Establish long range planting designs for planting strips on roadways
and parking lots.
•
Integrate existing mature plant material into proposed design
schemes when possible.
Sustainable Design
Figure 7.2. The Ethnobotanical garden and other
teaching gardens use the landscape as a teaching
resource.
•
Preserve, restore and enhance campus landscapes as a carbon off-set.
•
Remove invasive plant species such as English Ivy, English Holly and
Scot’s Broom from campus Core, Clusters and the Reserve areas
whenever possible.
•
Characterize roadways with low maintenance native vegetation.
•
Promote sustainable landscapes with low maintenance native plants
and xeriscaping techniques to reduce energy and water usage (see
Appendix for list of recommended plants with these qualities).
•
Improve wildlife habitat in the Core and Reserve areas.
•
Invite faculty to inform projects involving potential land use changes
to consider use of native plants and ecological restoration methods
in proposed plans.
•
Minimize development impact to surrounding landscape
when establishing new trails or improving existing ones and in
development of buildings, renovations and additions.
•
Facilitate access for potential volunteers helping to maintain campus
landscapes.
•
Establish physical links between campus ecological biomes and
surrounding ecologies.
•
Establish an extensive trail system and amenities to expand
campus pedestrian and bicycle access and encourage alternative
transportation modes.
Figure 7.3. Native plants used in campus teaching
gardens enhance the sustainablity of campus
landscapes.
2014 Update text is bold and italicized.
108
THE EVERGREEN STATE COLLEGE CAMPUS MASTER PLAN | 2014 Update
Volume I - Site Specific Recommendations
DESIGN GUIDELINES
Learning Environment
•
Create opportunities for learning from the landscape.
•
Animate the campus landscapes with public art where feasible and
appropriate.
•
Improve wayfinding and user experience of campus landscapes.
•
Implement signage and interpretative amenities in the Core, Clusters
and Reserve areas indicating trail systems and recreational and
educational opportunities.
•
Increase universal access in the Core, Clusters and Reserve areas.
ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN GUIDELINES
Campus Form
Figure 7.4. Flexible gathering space in the
Longhouse is used in interdisciplinary ways.
Figure 7.5. Sem II cafe uses it’s strong solar
orientation to activate the space.
•
Maintain aesthetic continuity by selectively incorporating exposed
concrete within the Core in new development.
•
Enhance the transparency of buildings and the activities within them
(the Sem II building is valued in its extensive use of glass to reveal the
activities within the building and to create inviting entrances).
•
Utilize materials and forms that complement existing structures while
enlivening them though innovative and sustainable design.
•
Limit the height of buildings in the Core to the height of the Library,
excluding the clock tower.
•
Encourage integration of campus populations with buildings
incorporating academic, administrative and interdisciplinary uses.
•
Develop buildings to incorporate spaces providing interdisciplinary,
collaborative learning environments and informal breakout spaces
(Sem II is a model of such development).
•
Harmonize the development of Clusters with the natural
environment and preserve the rural quality of the Organic Farm.
•
Emphasize primary pedestrian malls, plazas and pedestrian pathways
in the Core.
•
Bring campus life and Evergreen ideals to the forefront of design.
•
Create a variety of special places on campus by developing indoor/
outdoor multipurpose and flexible spaces for socialization.
•
Activate places between buildings and provide connections to
adjacent buildings.
•
Establish new gathering places and activity centers along pedestrian axes.
2014 Update text is bold and italicized.
THE EVERGREEN STATE COLLEGE CAMPUS MASTER PLAN | 2014 Update
109
DESIGN GUIDELINES
Volume I - Site Specific Recommendations
Sustainable Design
Figure 7.6. Interpretive amenities animates learning
experiences.
•
Apply LEED® and other sustainable strategies in campus renovation
and development.
•
Utilize solar access when designing outdoor and indoor public
spaces.
•
Encourage design and development that preserves the natural
environment.
•
Centralize major development close to the Core.
Learning Environment
•
Consider opportunities for learning with interpretive amenities.
•
Create opportunities for learning for the campus and community by
incorporating interpretive information on the sustainable features for
new buildings and renovations.
2014 Update text is bold and italicized.
110
THE EVERGREEN STATE COLLEGE CAMPUS MASTER PLAN | 2014 Update
08
ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS
Volume I - Site Specific Recommendations
ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS
08 ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS
Campus meetings, informal sessions, open discussions, one-on-one meetings,
facility and campus tours, community presentations and focused charrettes were
held in order to engage the campus community in a dialog about the future of the
College. Evergreen administration, staff, faculty, students and community members
participated in these events. We apologize to those we have not included here
who have been equally important to the process.
THE EVERGREEN STATE COLLEGE
The Evergreen State College Foundation Board of Governors
Board of Trustees
Thomas L. “Les” Purce, President
Arthur Costantino, Vice-president for Student Affairs
Don Bantz, Academic Vice-president and Provost
John Hurley, Vice-president for Finance and Administration
Lee Hoemann, Vice-president for Advancement
Academic Deans
Campus Land Use Committee
Cooper Point Association
Master Plan Coordinating Committee
Planning Units and Planning Unit Coordinators
Sustainability Task Force
Jeff Antonelis-Lapp
Clarissa Dirks
Sara Apler
Carolyn Dobbs
Nathaniel Ashlock
Stephen Engle
Melissa Barker
Dylan Fischer
Marty Beagle
Vauhn Foster-Grahler
Frederica Bowcutt
Russ Fox
Troy Brenner
Kevin Francis
Wyatt Cates
Judith Gabriele
Gerardo Chin-Leo
Karen Gaul
Rob Cole
Ariel Goldberger
Holly Colbert Joseph
Rishel Gordham
Rich Davis
Walter Grodzik
Stacey Davis
Jeanne Hahn
Hirsh Diamant
W. Joye Hardiman
2014 Update text is bold and italicized.
THE EVERGREEN STATE COLLEGE CAMPUS MASTER PLAN | 2014 Update
113
ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS
Volume I - Site Specific Recommendations
Blake Harmann
Collin Orr
Lucia Harrison
Isaac Overcast
Kathleen Haskett
Nancy Parks
Rachel Hastings
Sherry Parsons
Ruth Hayes
Sarah Pedersen
Martha Henderson
John Pumilio
Steven Hendricks
Dan Ralph
Heather Heying
Peter Randlette
Azeem Hoosein
Bill Ransom
Peter Impara
Rick Reichert
Trevor Kinahan
Dean Rimerman
Rob Knapp
Martha Rosemeyer
Mark Kormondy
Ray Ruiz
Stephanie Kozick
Steve Scheuerell
Derek Lathrope
Paul Smith
John Lauer
Todd Sprague
Carri LeRoy
Randy Stilson
Bob Leverich
Jim Stroh
Jack Longino
Alison Styring
Lee Lyttle
Fred Swift
Jean MacGregor
Ken Tabbutt
Claude Mahmood
The Wood Shop Crew
Maintenance and Facilities Staff
Erik V. Thuesen
David McAvity
Steve Trotter
Henry Moyarga
Bruce Van de Walker
Donald Morisato
Robert Worley
Greg Mullins
Artee Young
Nalini Nadkarni
Patti Zimmerman
James Neitzel
Erik Ordway
Countless other Evergreen students,
faculty and staff.
2014 Update text is bold and italicized.
114
THE EVERGREEN STATE COLLEGE CAMPUS MASTER PLAN | 2014 Update
Volume I - Site Specific Recommendations
ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS
CONSULTANT AND OTHER CONTRIBUTORS
Susan Andrews, Thurston Regional
Planning Council
Nolan Lienhart, ZGF
Emily Angell, ZGF
Kathy McCormick, Thurston Regional
Planning Council
Thera Black, Thurston Regional
Planning Council
Greg Matto, ZGF
Dennis Bloom, Intercity Transit
Chuck Mckinney, Cooper Point
Association
John Breshears, ZGF
Don Miles, ZGF
Paul Brewster, Thurston Regional
Planning Council
Ralph Munro
Johanna Brickman, ZGF
Patricia Pyle, Olympia Public Works
G. Z. Brown, University of Oregon
Melanie Rabaglia, Thurston
County Department of Roads and
Transportation Services
Jennifer Burke, ZGF
Debbie Chow, ZGF
Naomi Cole, ZGF
Otto Condon, ZGF
Carolyn Cook, ZGF
Crystal Passi, ZGF
Casey Richart, Washington Department
of Fish and Wildlife
Felix Schein, ZGF
Roger Dean, Intercity Transit
Tom von Schrader, SvR Design
Company
Jeff Dunn, ZGF
Troy Thrun, Sparling
Dan Edleson-Stein, Evergreen Alumnus
Ross Tilghman, Tilghman Group
Mark Foster, ZGF
Paddy Tillett, ZGF
Dave Grant, ZGF
Joe D. Virnig, Sparling
Brian D. Griffith, Stantec
Analisa Gunnell, EcoTrust
Michael Welter, Thurston County
Development Services
Mike Harbour, Intercity Transit
Jan Weydemeyer, City of Olympia
Kim Isaacson, ZGF
Tim Williams, ZGF
Marc Jones, Intercity Transit
Lon Wyrick, Thurston Regional Planning
Council
Michael Kain, Thurston County
Development Services
Gil Kelley, Evergreen Alumnus/
City of Portland
Gayle Zeller, Thurston County
Development Services
Amalia Leighton, SvR Design Company
2014 Update text is bold and italicized.
THE EVERGREEN STATE COLLEGE CAMPUS MASTER PLAN | 2014 Update
115
ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS
Volume I - Site Specific Recommendations
2014 UPDATE - CAMPUS LAND USE COMMITTEE (CLUC)
Azeem Hoosein
Andrew Beattie
Jeanne Rynne
Mark Kormondy
David McAvity
Richard Davis
John Hurley
Robyn Herring
Bob Leverich
Douglas Ridley
Anthony Tindill
Mark Lacina
Mike Paros
2014 UPDATE - CONSULTANT AND OTHER CONTRIBUTORS
Tim Williams, ZGF
Nolan Lienhart, ZGF
Elizabeth Schultz, ZGF
2014 Update text is bold and italicized.
116
THE EVERGREEN STATE COLLEGE CAMPUS MASTER PLAN | 2014 Update
Was this manual useful for you? yes no
Thank you for your participation!

* Your assessment is very important for improving the work of artificial intelligence, which forms the content of this project

Download PDF

advertisement