Health Canada 2006-2007 REPORT ON PLANS AND PRIORITIES

Health Canada 2006-2007 REPORT ON PLANS AND PRIORITIES
Health Canada
2006-2007
REPORT ON PLANS
AND PRIORITIES
Table of Contents
Section 1: Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1
1.1 Minister’s Message . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3
1.2 Management Representation Statement . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5
1.3 Summary Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
6
Part A: Departmental Overview and Priorities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
8
About Health Canada . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
8
Health Canada Planning Framework for 2006-2007 Report on Plans and Priorities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
9
Health Canada’s Operational Roles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10
Our Mission and Objectives . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10
Health Canada and partners helping Canadians to make independent, informed choices . . . . . . . . . . 10
Health Canada’s Corporate Priorities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11
Key Areas of Focus for Planning Period . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12
Operating Principles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13
Contributing to Government of Canada Strategic Outcomes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14
Part B: Internal Areas of Interest for the Planning Period . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15
Health Canada’s Operating Environment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15
Health Canada: Collaboration at Work . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16
Responding to Human Resources Risks and Challenges . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17
Incorporating Sustainable Development Principles into Practice . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18
Endnotes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18
Section 2: Analysis of Program Activities by Strategic Outcome . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19
Strategic Outcome: Strengthened Knowledge Base to Address Health and Health Care Priorities . . . . . . . . 21
Program Activity Description . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21
Performance Measurement Strategy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27
Key Programs and Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28
Health Care System Policy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28
Intergovernmental . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29
International . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30
Assisted Human Reproduction Implementation Office . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30
i
Legislation Renewal . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31
Women’s Health and Gender Analysis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31
Applied Research, Dissemination and Accountability . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32
Endnotes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32
Strategic Outcome: Access to Safe and Effective Health Products and Food and
Information for Healthy Choices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33
Program Activity Description . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33
Performance Measurement Strategy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35
Key Programs and Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36
Pre-market evaluation and regulatory process improvement . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36
Information, education and outreach on health products, food and nutrition . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37
Monitoring safety and therapeutic effectiveness and risk management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38
Transparency, public accountability and stakeholder relationships . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40
Endnotes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41
Strategic Outcome: Reduced Health and Environmental Risks from Products and
Substances, and Safer Living and Working Environments . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42
Program Activity Description – Healthy Environments and Consumer Safety . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42
Performance Measurement Strategy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44
Key Programs and Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 45
Tobacco Control . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 45
Drug Strategy and Controlled Substances . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46
Safe Environments . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 48
Product Safety . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50
Workplace Health & Public Safety . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 52
Web Links . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 53
Program Activity Description – Pest Control Product Regulation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 54
Performance Measurement Strategy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57
Web Links . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57
Strategic Outcome: Better Health Outcomes and Reduction of Health Inequalities Between
First Nations and Inuit and Other Canadians. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 58
Program Activity Description . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 58
Performance Measurement Strategy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 62
Key Programs and Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 62
Children and Youth Programs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 62
Mental Health and Addictions Programs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 63
Chronic Disease and Injury Prevention Programs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 63
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Environmental Health and Research Programs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 64
Communicable Disease Control Programs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 64
Primary Health Care Programs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 65
Web Links . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 65
Section 3: Supplementary Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 67
Table 1: Departmental Planned Spending and Full Time Equivalents . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 69
Table 2: Program Activities for 2006-2007 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 71
Table 3: Voted and Statutory Items listed in Main Estimates . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 71
Table 4: Services Received Without Charge . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 72
Table 5: Sources of Respendable and Non-Respendable Revenues . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 72
Table 6: Resource Requirements by Branch and by Program Activity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 73
Table 7: Major Regulatory Initiatives . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 74
Table 8: Details on Transfer Payments Programs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 78
Table 9: Conditional Grants (Foundations) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 80
Table 10: Horizontal Initiatives . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 80
Table 11: Sustainable Development Strategy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 81
Table 12: Internal Audits and Evaluations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 84
Section 4: Other Items of Interest . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 87
Health Canada’s Regional Operations – An Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 89
Supporting Health Canada’s Programs and Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 92
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Overview
1
1.1 Minister’s Message
I am very pleased to present
Health Canada’s 2006-2007
Report on Plans and Priorities,
which illustrates the initiatives
the Department will implement
over the next three years to
address key government
priorities in the area of health.
I am honoured to be given the opportunity to work on
behalf of Canadians towards ensuring an effective,
cost-efficient and high quality health system.
Canadians collectively contribute to our public
health care system, and all governments have the
responsibility to ensure that it is readily available
to all Canadians across the country.
Since we were elected to govern in January 2006, our
government has adopted six operating principles in its
approach to managing the Health Portfolio: putting
the patient first in disease prevention and early
detection initiatives; making strategic and evidencebased investments; ensuring alignment of policies
and programs across the Health Portfolio; building
relationships with partners based on trust and
inclusiveness; improving performance and ensuring
value for money; and strengthening accountability
to Parliament and the public. We have already
demonstrated our commitment to these principles by
agreeing to compensate Canadians who contracted
hepatitis C from the blood system before January 1,
1986 and after July 1, 1990.
As Minister of Health, I have a wide array of
responsibilities and priorities. As Canadians have
made access to health care one of their top priorities,
our government has made the Patient Wait Times
Guarantee one of its top priorities. The federal
government will deliver on this priority in concert with
provinces, territories, stakeholders and other partners.
I am encouraged by the desire expressed among my
provincial and territorial colleagues for innovative and
creative ideas to reduce the wait times faced too
often by Canadians.
For this reason, Health Canada will work with
provinces, territories and other stakeholders to:
1. establish further evidence-based benchmarks for
wait times in the areas of cancer, heart, diagnostic
imaging procedures, joint replacements and sight
restoration;
2. encourage provincial wait-reduction targets for
priority procedures; and
3. provide regular reports to Canadians on progress
on wait times.
A Patient Wait Times Guarantee will complement these
efforts and build on current and future accomplishments
by assuring Canadians that they will receive needed care
within appropriate time frames.
Directly linked to reducing wait times, we will make
strides on preventing illness and improving disease
management across Canada. To this end, we will work
with the Public Health Agency of Canada as well as the
provinces and territories to implement the Canadian
Strategy for Cancer Control to improve cancer screening,
prevention and coordination through work with major
cancer organizations and stakeholders in Canada. We
will also focus efforts in the areas of cardiovascular
disease, mental illness and mental health, to name
but a few. We will also take action on active living and
nutrition, starting with the release later this year of the
updated Canada’s Food Guide. Work will continue to
help ensure safer living and working environments and
access to and regulation of pharmaceutical products.
With the SARS outbreak in 2003, we have seen
how the health threats that arise outside our borders
can quickly pose serious threats to the health of
Canadians. These threats are of particular concern
because they are nearly impossible to predict and
have potentially catastrophic consequences. In
partnership with the provinces and territories, First
Nations organizations, technical experts and other
federal and international partners, I am working to
3
ensure the Government of Canada has an Avian
Influenza Plan and a Human Pandemic Influenza Plan
in place to mitigate the effects on Canadians in the
event of a pandemic. Areas of focus will include avian
and pandemic planning, enhanced surveillance
capacity, updated quarantine and biosecurity
legislation, and infectious disease prevention
and control.
In addition to these important areas, we will work
on an array of issues fundamental to the health of
Canadians. We will strengthen our understanding of
the linkages between health and environment, a key
concern to Canadians. Health Canada, in partnership
with First Nations and Inuit groups, will continue to
support sustainable health care services for First
Nations on reserve and Inuit people. We will also work
with health partners and other federal departments to
find new and innovative ways to reduce the health
disparities between Aboriginal people and other
Canadians. Health research will support the causes
and prevention of disease, screening, diagnosis,
treatment, support systems and palliative care for
a wide range of conditions. For this research, our
priority populations are children and youth, seniors
and First Nations and Inuit people. We will also
improve partnerships and dialogues with international
organizations and other countries to help strengthen
the Canadian health system.
As our government is determined to provide clear
accountability and demonstrate tangible results to
Canadians, I have instructed Health Canada to focus
on result-based management. While the 2006-2007
Report on Plans and Priorities includes, for the first
time, performance indicators for our programs and
services to help measure and report on our progress
and value for money, I am looking forward to next
year’s Report to demonstrate further advances on
results-based reporting. We will review investments in
priority areas to ensure our efforts yield real results
that translate into improvements to health for
Canadians.
We have established a bold and ambitious agenda
but it is no less than what Canadians expect and
deserve from their federal government. Through
these comprehensive initiatives I am confident that
Canada’s health system will provide better access to
the care one needs and make Canadians among the
healthiest people in the world.
Tony Clement
Minister of Health, and Minister for the Federal
Economic Development Initiative for Northern Ontario
4
1.2 Management Representation Statement
I submit for tabling in Parliament, the 2006-2007
Report on Plans and Priorities (RPP) for Health
Canada.
This document has been prepared based on the
reporting principles contained in Guide for the
Preparation of Part III of the 2006-2007 Estimates:
Reports on Plans and Priorities and Departmental
Performance Reports:
It presents consistent, comprehensive, balanced
and reliable information;
It provides a basis of accountability for the results
achieved with the resources and authorities
entrusted to it; and
It reports finances based on approved planned
spending numbers from the Treasury Board
Secretariat in the RPP.
It adheres to the specific reporting requirements
outlined in the TBS guidelines;
It is based on the Department’s approved
Program Activity Architecture as reflected in its
Management, Resources and Results Structures
(MRRS);
Morris Rosenberg
Deputy Minister of Health
5
1.3 Summary Information
Raison d’être: Health Canada was established to help the people of Canada maintain and improve their health.
We are committed to improving the lives of all Canadians and making this country’s population among the
healthiest in the world as measured by longevity, lifestyle and effective use of the public health care system.
Financial Resources (in millions of dollars)
2006-2007
2007-2008
2008-2009
3,011.1
2,949.1
2,950.3
Human Resources
2006-2007
2007-2008
2008-2009
8,711
8,773
8,671
Departmental Priorities by Strategic Outcome
Strategic Outcome #1: Strengthened Knowledge Base to Address Health and Health Care Priorities
Program Activity: Health Policy, Planning and Information
Planned Spending
(in millions of dollars)
Corporate Priority
Working with others to strengthen the
efficiency and effectiveness of the publiclyfunded health care system (ongoing)
Contributing to the improvement of the
health of Canadians (ongoing)
Reducing the risks to the health of the
people of Canada (ongoing)
Strengthening accountability to Parliament
and the public (ongoing)
Expected Results
2006-2007
217.3
2007-2008
146.1
2008-2009
144.5
20.7
20.6
20.5
31.7
33.6
32.3
18.7
17.9
17.7
Goals and objectives identified
for specific strategies and
initiatives
Knowledge development and
transfer of specific health policy
issues
Strategic Outcome #2: Access to Safe and Effective Health Products and Food and Information for Healthy Choices
Program Activity: Health Products and Food
Planned Spending
(in millions of dollars)
Corporate Priority
Working with others to strengthen the
efficiency and effectiveness of the publiclyfunded health care system (ongoing)
Contributing to the improvement of the
health of Canadians (ongoing)
Reducing the risks to the health of the
people of Canada (ongoing)
Strengthening accountability to Parliament
and the public (ongoing)
6
Expected Results
2006-2007
102.4
2007-2008
102.4
2008-2009
97.1
7.3
7.3
6.9
94.7
94.7
89.8
57.7
54.8
54.3
Access to Safe and Effective
Health Products and Food and
Information for Healthy Choices
Departmental Priorities by Strategic Outcome (cont’d)
Strategic Outcome #3: Reduced Health and Environmental Risks from Products and Substances, and Safer Living and
Working Environments
Program Activity: Healthy Environments and Consumer Safety
Planned Spending
(in millions of dollars)
Corporate Priority
Working with others to strengthen the
efficiency and effectiveness of the publiclyfunded health care system (ongoing)
Contributing to the improvement of the
health of Canadians (ongoing)
Reducing the risks to the health of the
people of Canada (ongoing)
Strengthening accountability to Parliament
and the public (ongoing)
Expected Results
2006-2007
33.2
2007-2008
33.0
2008-2009
33.1
112.1
111.6
117.2
92.2
91.8
86.7
52.4
49.8
49.2
Reduced risks to health and
safety, and improved protection
against harm associated with
workplace and environmental
hazards and consumer products
(including cosmetics)
Reduced health and safety risks
associated with tobacco
consumption and the abuse of
drugs, alcohol and other
substances
Strategic Outcome #3: Reduced Health and Environmental Risks from Products and Substances, and Safer Living and
Working Environments
Program Activity: Pest Control Product Regulation
Planned Spending
(in millions of dollars)
Corporate Priority
Reducing the risks to the health of the
people of Canada (ongoing)
Strengthening accountability to Parliament
and the public (ongoing)
Expected Results
2006-2007
40.2
2007-2008
40.2
2008-2009
36.3
11.4
11.0
10.8
Access to safer pesticides
Strengthened compliance with
PCPA and Regulations
Users informed of reduced risk
practices
Transparency of pesticide
regulation
Improved regulatory efficiencies
and cost effectiveness
Informed public and stakeholders
Strategic Outcome #4: Better Health Outcomes and Reduction of Health Inequalities Between First Nations and Inuit and
Other Canadians
Program Activity: First Nations and Inuit Health
Planned Spending
(in millions of dollars)
Corporate Priority
Working with others to strengthen the
efficiency and effectiveness of the publiclyfunded health care system (ongoing)
Contributing to the improvement of the
health of Canadians (ongoing)
Reducing the risks to the health of the
people of Canada (ongoing)
Strengthening accountability to Parliament
and the public (ongoing)
Expected Results
2006-2007
49.6
2007-2008
50.1
2008-2009
50.5
1,901.4
1,920.4
1,940.0
46.9
47.4
47.9
121.2
116.3
115.3
Strengthened community
programs; better health
protection; improved primary
health care; and access to
non-insured health benefits
contribute to improved health
status of First Nations and Inuit
individuals, families and
communities.
Note: Figures include amounts for other departmental and regional infrastructure costs supporting program delivery.
7
PART A:
Departmental Overview and Priorities
About Health Canada
We provide policy leadership and portfolio
coordination among our partners in the Government
of Canada’s Health Portfolio, each of which produces
its own Report on Plans and Priorities, namely:
Health Canada develops, implements and enforces
regulations, legislation, policies, programs, services
and initiatives and works with other federal partners,
the provinces and territories to maintain and improve
the overall health of Canadians. As administrator of
the Canada Health Act, we ensure that the principles
of Canada’s universal health care are respected,
allowing Canadians to be confident in the services
they receive from the public health care system. The
Minister of Health is also responsible for the direct
administration of another 18 statutes including the
Food and Drugs Act, the Pest Control Products Act
and the Controlled Drugs and Substance Act.1
the Public Health Agency of Canada;2
the Canadian Institutes of Health Research;3
the Hazardous Materials Information Review
Commission;4
the Patented Medicine Prices Review Board;5 and
the new Assisted Human Reproduction Agency
of Canada, which came into being January 12,
2006.6
Minister of Health
Health Canada
Audit and
Accountability Bureau
Public Health
Agency of Canada
Deputy Minister/Associate
Deputy Minister
Health Policy Branch
Health Products
and Food Branch
First Nations and
Inuit Health Branch
Pest Management
Regulatory Agency
Healthy Environments
and Consumer
Safety Branch
Public Affairs,
Consultation and
Regions Branch
Chief Financial
Officer Branch
Office of the
Chief Scientist
Legal Services
Corporate
Services Branch
Canadian Institutes
of Health Research
Hazardous Material
Information Review
Commission
Patented Medicine
Prices Review Board
Assisted Human
Reproduction
Agency of Canada
Health Canada also contributes grants and contributions to several health organizations such as Infoway, Canadian Institute
for Health Information and Canadian Health Services Research Foundations.
8
Health Canada Planning Framework for
2006-2007 Report on Plans and Priorities
Mission
To help the people of Canada maintain and improve their health
Enhance the
sustainability of
the health system
Corporate
Priorities
Sustain health
protection and
regulations
Contribute to safe
environments and
products
Facilitate healthy
lifestyle choices
among Canadians
w Working with others to strengthen the efficiency and effectiveness of the publicly-funded
health care system
w Contributing to the improvement of the health of Canadians
w Reducing the risks to the health of the people of Canada
w Strengthening accountability to Parliament and the public
Operating
Principles
w Sound, informed decision-making based on leading edge science
w Efficient and sustainable resource utilization within legal, ethical and operational
frameworks
w Transparency
w Cooperation and engagement with provinces, territories, partners and stakeholders
w Engagement in international health issues
Key Areas of
Focus for
Planning Period
w Develop the building blocks for establishing a Patient Wait Times Guarantee
w Develop a Pandemic Response Plan
w Implement the Canadian Strategy for Cancer Control
Strategic
Outcomes
Strengthened
Knowledge Base
to Address Health
and Health Care
Priorities
Access to Safe and
Effective Health
Products and Food
and Information
for Healthy Choices
Reduced Health
and Environmental
Risks From
Products and
Substances,
and Safer Living
and Working
Environments
Better Health
Outcomes and
Reduction of
Health Inequalities
Between First
Nations and
Inuit and Other
Canadians
9
Health Canada’s Operational Roles
Proponents of Transparency
Health Canada employees play key roles in the areas
of promoting, protecting and improving the health
of Canadians, roles that assist other stakeholders
working in the area.
All work at Health Canada, from the assessment
of products under the Canadian Environmental
Protection Act to the regulation and approval of
thousands of products, is conducted transparently.
Health Canada has committed to be accountable in
delivering results to Canadians. The public had an
opportunity to be involved in consultations on major
regulatory initiatives such as the new Pest Control
Products Act and will continue to be consulted in
other areas as part of the Department’s consultations
framework.
Innovators
As a science-based department, Health Canada
employees are innovators, providing leading-edge
science, sound policy research, and effective program
and service development. Keeping abreast of global
developments on diseases enabled Health Canada to
play a leading role in Canada’s response to the SARS,
BSE and West Nile Virus outbreaks.
Knowledge Brokers
Through research, risk assessments and surveillance,
Health Canada provides knowledge to Canadians
and others working in the health care field to enable
them to make sound choices to protect health. The
Department also monitors and researches the health
threats from environmental factors such as toxic
substances, air and water pollution, climate change
and other threats. This work fosters sound decisionmaking and policy-development at all levels to help
reduce health risks.
Enablers
In all program areas, Health Canada brings
stakeholders together, as well as provides information,
research and education. The work of Health Canada
enables Canadians to be up-to-date and informed
about the issues that can impact their health.
Trustees/Stewards
Health Canada, through the administration of the
Canada Health Act, aims to ensure that all eligible
residents of Canada have reasonable access to
medically necessary insured services. The Department’s
broad regulatory responsibilities to protect Canadians
and promote health and safety range from prescription
drugs and vaccines to toxic substances, from cardiac
pacemakers to natural health products and food, from
consumer goods to pesticides.
10
Our Mission and Objectives
Health Canada’s mission is to help the people of
Canada maintain and improve their health. We strive
to accomplish this by promoting and protecting the
health of Canadians. In order to achieve this, we will:
Enhance the sustainability, innovation and
integration of the health system;
Sustain health protection and regulations;
Contribute to safe environments and products; and
Facilitate healthy lifestyle choices among
Canadians.
Health Canada and partners helping
Canadians make independent,
informed choices
The responsibility for promoting, protecting and
improving the health of Canadians does not rest with
a specific level of government, the medical profession
or Canadians themselves. The responsibility is found
in an interwoven community of collaborating
stakeholders that each contributes to this goal.
Canadians make choices everyday that affect their
health and well-being. Environmental, economic and
social factors also affect health. Municipal, provincial
and territorial governments, health service providers
and not-for-profit organizations help ensure
community health services are available and provide
the heath care system that Canadians rely on to
protect and improve their health. The private sector
helps develop pharmaceuticals and other health
products for Canadians.
In addition to overseeing the Canada Health Act, the
federal government helps assess risks to human
health, sustains health protection efforts, regulates and
approves products, and funds health services. Health
Canada provides national leadership and expertise in
the development of health science and policy. The
federal government provides assistance to provincial
and territorial governments in the provision of health
care services through the Canada Health Transfer.
With respect to health programming and services for First
Nations and Inuit, Health Canada supports public health
and community health programs on-reserve and in Inuit
communities, provides non-insured health benefits
coverage regardless of residence, and delivers primary
care services in remote and isolated communities to
supplement and support the services that provincial,
territorial and regional health authorities provide.
Health Canada’s Corporate Priorities
Given the environment in which we operate, Health
Canada has identified four corporate priorities to
respond to the key challenges and opportunities
facing the health of Canadians.
These priorities reflect the Government of Canada’s
direction and commitments as well as our objectives
and planned strategic outcomes, which are long-term
benefits to Canadians that stem from our overall
mission of helping Canadians maintain and improve
their health. They represent the differences we wish
to make for Canadians. For more information on
Health Canada’s strategic outcomes, please refer to
Section II of this report.
1. Working with others to strengthen the efficiency
and effectiveness of the publicly-funded health
care system
An efficient and effective health care system is
consistently identified as a priority for Canadians.
Health Canada will work closely with provincial and
territorial governments, as well as health organizations
and other stakeholder groups to examine new and
innovative ways to strengthen the efficiency and
effectiveness of a universally accessible and equitable
publicly funded health care system. We will work with the
provinces and territories to develop the building blocks
for a Patient Wait Times Guarantee to ensure that
Canadians receive the care they need, when they need it.
2. Reducing the risks to the health of the people
of Canada
The Department plays a core role in protecting and
promoting the health and safety of Canadians.
A potential pandemic such as the Avian Flu presents
a great risk to Canadians and global health in general.
That is why pandemic preparedness is a priority for
Health Canada and why we will continue to work with
the Public Health Agency of Canada, other countries
and the World Health Organization to increase
international cooperation efforts. We are already
active in contributing to pandemic readiness by
working in the areas of vaccines, multilateral
contributions, workplace health and safety, and in
emergency preparedness within First Nations and
Inuit communities.
The health of Canadians is linked to the health of the
environment. We are actively developing integrated
approaches to better assess impacts on health and
to develop strategies to mitigate known and emerging
risks from pollutants and toxic chemicals in air, water,
food and products, for example. Protecting and
improving the health of vulnerable populations, such
as children, seniors, and Aboriginal peoples, from
pollutants and chemicals will benefit all Canadians.
We are also active in developing regulations, which
contribute to protecting the health of Canadians as
well as managing the risks and benefits of health
products and devices. We continue to strengthen
scientific capacity to inform our regulatory
responsibilities and monitor new developments.
3. Contributing to the improvement of the health
of Canadians
While the majority of Canadians enjoy a high quality of
life, there are areas for improvement. Health Canada will
11
examine and implement new ways to contribute to the
improved health of Canadians through collaborative work
with other organizations in the Health Portfolio and with
other departments towards the Government of Canada’s
goal of improving the quality of life of Canadians. We
are working with the Public Health Agency of Canada to
advance efforts on cancer, to support the efforts of
stakeholders and to improve screening and prevention.
Health is more than just physical health. Mental
health is an integral part of overall well-being and we
are working to address mental health and mental
illness issues.
A major area of concern continues to be Aboriginal
health. While Aboriginal Canadians are living longer,
the status of their health continues to lag behind that
of other Canadians. Our goal, in collaboration with
Aboriginal organizations, Health Portfolio partners,
other departments and the provinces and territories, is
to deliver efficient and effective health programs,
services and initiatives to help improve health
outcomes for First Nations and Inuit people.
4. Strengthening accountability to Parliament and
the public
Our ability to effectively respond to the health needs
of Canadians depends on rigourous management
practices to achieve results and ensure value for
money. We are reinforcing our commitment to
accountability, transparency and sound management
of resources by continuing to integrate the principles
of modern comptrollership, introducing improved
systems and processes for departmental operations
and addressing human resource priorities. As part of
our continued effort to strengthen our management
practices, we will:
fortify our management of grants and contributions
by ensuring that solid governance structures and
administrative processes are in place;
improve governance and control of contracts using
a Contract Management Framework established on
the basic principles of responsibility, accountability,
monitoring, oversight and audit;
12
strengthen accountability and stewardship by
improving performance measurement and renewing
our program evaluation functions;
continue to initiate reviews of existing systems and
processes in line with Government-wide initiatives;
continue the implementation of “The Way Forward”,
an information technology (IT) project that will
consolidate and realign IT resources and position
the Department to align with Government of
Canada common services initiatives and generate
savings;
continue the implementation of the new Chief
Financial Officer Branch to support the effective
management of resources and improve our ability
to achieve results across programs through a
strengthened Financial Management and Control
Framework; and
establish a work program to continuously review
and improve measurable expected results and
performance indicators for the 2007-2008 RPP
and beyond.
Health Canada is considered to be a leader within
the Government of Canada in implementing the
Management Accountability Framework (MAF), a
framework that establishes the standards for
management accountability in the Government of
Canada. Health Canada will continue to build upon
this solid foundation by integrating MAF requirements
into the management culture of the Department
including enhancing a risk-based approach to
programs and activities.
Key Areas of Focus for Planning Period
Taking into account the current operating context, the
emerging risks to the health of Canadians and the
trends in Canadian society, Health Canada will focus
on the following key strategic areas for the 20062009 planning period:
1- Develop the building blocks for establishing a
Patient Wait Times Guarantee – Reach a shared
understanding on ensuring that the health care
needs of Canadians are met within a universally
accessible and equitable health care system.
Continue working with provinces, territories and
other stakeholders to share best practices and
innovative initiatives to develop the building blocks
for establishing a Patient Wait Times Guarantee.
2- Advance efforts to prepare for a Global
Pandemic Outbreak – Collaborating with other
international organizations, departments,
provinces, territories and stakeholders to ensure
that Canada is well positioned to prepare for and
respond to a possible pandemic influenza
outbreak.
3- Implement the Canadian Strategy for Cancer
Control – Cancer prevention is a priority for the
Government of Canada and Health Canada. To this
end, we will collaborate with the Public Health
Agency of Canada and other organizations to
improve cancer screening, prevention and
coordination through the Implementation of
the Canadian Strategy for Cancer Control. The
Strategy’s main objectives are to reduce the
number of new cases of cancer in Canada, to
enhance the quality of life of those living with the
disease and to reduce the number of premature
deaths attributable to cancer.
Operating principles
We are guided by several operating principles in the
delivery of our programs and services that help us
maximize efficiency in reaching our objective of
improving and maintaining the health of Canadians.
These operating principles cover the broad spectrum
of Health Canada’s activities, which range from indepth policy analysis to scientific research.
Sound, informed decision-making based on
leading edge science
To bring leadership, coherence and expertise to the
overall strategic direction of Health Canada’s
scientific responsibilities and activities, Health
Canada has established the Office of the Chief
Scientist (OCS). The OCS will continue to champion
science throughout the Department by coordinating
involvement in research and regulatory science
within Health Canada and within the federal
science and technology community, providing
scientific expertise on Health Canada priorities,
fostering and facilitating partnerships, promoting
and communicating Health Canada science and
research, and protecting intellectual property.
Efficient and sustainable resource utilization
within legal, ethical and operational frameworks
We are committed to sound financial management
and delivering value for money for Canadians.
Through the newly established Chief Financial
Officer Branch, we will continue to review processes
to optimize the effectiveness and efficiency of the
use of our resources and follow central agency
direction to ensure management accountability.
Transparency
We strive to develop and deliver our programs and
services in an open and transparent manner by
ensuring stakeholders and the public have tangible
input to our work through vehicles such as public
and stakeholder consultation.
Cooperation and engagement with provinces,
territories, partners and stakeholders
We are committed to working with our partners
including provincial and territorial governments,
First Nations, Inuit and other Aboriginal
organizations, communities, professional
associations, consumer groups, universities and
research institutes, international organizations,
not-for-profit organizations, volunteers and other
federal departments and agencies.
Engagement in international health issues
Increased global mobility enhances the quick
spread of disease throughout the world and
necessitates our active involvement in the
international health community. We are committed
to learning from the experiences of other countries
and their best practices to minimize the risks to
Canadians from global health threats.
13
Contributing to Government of Canada Strategic Outcomes
The following chart shows how Health Canada’s Program Activities align with the Government of Canada’s Strategic
Outcomes, which were developed by Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat.
Canada’s Social Foundations
Theme
Government of Canada
Strategic Outcome
Health Canada
Strategic Outcomes
Program Activities
Healthy Canadians with access to quality health care
Strengthened
Knowledge Base
to Address Health
and Health Care
Priorities
Access to Safe
and Effective
Health Products
and Food and
Information on
Healthy Choices
Health Policy,
Planning and
Information
Health Products
and Food
Reduced Health
and Environmental
Risks From
Products and
Substances,
and Safer Living
and Working
Environments
Healthy
Environments
and Consumer
Safety
Pest Control
Product
Regulation
14
Better Health
Outcomes and
Reduction
of Health
Inequalities
Between First
Nations and
Inuit and Other
Canadians
First Nations and
Inuit Health
PART B:
Internal Areas of Interest for the Planning Period
Health Canada’s Operating
Environment
Taking stock of domestic and international trends on
a variety of aspects and monitoring emerging risks to
the health of Canadians help us gain greater insight
into Health Canada’s operating environment and
develop appropriate policies and initiatives. The
description of health risks, opportunities and priorities
in Canada five years ago does not match today’s
description and may be very different from what we
will face 5 or 10 years from now.
The Changing Face of Canada
Several changes are taking place in Canadian society
that affect policy and program development at Health
Canada. It is well known that seniors in Canada are
growing in number and living longer, posing new
challenges for all aspects of health care. The average
Canadian child will have an older mother and fewer
siblings. A growing proportion of children are living
only with single parents and many face low-income.
The health system will continue with a growing
proportion of them living only with single parents and
many still in poverty, especially those living with only
their mother. The health system will continue to face
the challenges of compromised health and poor living
habits among a significant portion of children living in
a level of poverty. Over the coming decade, Canadians
are more likely to be living in an urban centre. Onefifth will be a visible minority with roots in Asia or the
Middle East and speaking languages other than
French or English. A more culturally and ethnically
diverse society will continue to increase the demand
for alternative therapies and service providers.
Technology Pervasive in Daily Life
Non-traditional disciplines such as biotechnology,
artificial transplants and nanotechnology provide
exciting potential to address health issues in new
ways and dramatically improve the health of many
Canadians in the coming decades. These new
technologies will continue to challenge us to have
the appropriate regulatory science to input into
decision-making.
Ethical and social issues will continue to challenge us
in new areas including cloning, DNA manipulation and
genomics. As advances in science and technology
provide more pervasive solutions in the area of health,
it will be imperative to continue to integrate science
into decision-making by government, industry and
individuals.
The market for pharmaceuticals is expanding at an
incredible rate and an efficient and effective health
system must respond to this by ensuring that
Canadians have timely access to safe and effective
health products, drugs, food and information.
Evolving Attitudes and Values towards Health
There has been a significant shift in the Canadian
public’s perception of health care delivery as they are
moving from patients to consumers. Because health
information is readily available from a number of
different avenues, Canadians are more informed than
ever about their health and are more willing to discuss
sensitive health issues. Canadians are also seeking
new ways to have their health concerns addressed
and are influenced by factors, which include religion
and culture. They are also more engaged in the
review of the public health care system and expect
governments to discuss these issues in an open and
transparent manner.
15
Deteriorating Physical Environment
The relationship between human health, the
environment and the economy is one of the most
complex health areas facing governments in Canada.
The health of many Canadians will continue to be
threatened by air, water and land pollution, climate
change and the thinning ozone layer. The health
impacts of many environmental risks are not fully
understood. The increasing incidence of respiratory
illness from poor air quality could grow with the
expansion of urban areas and with the advancement of
climate change. The health of Aboriginal communities
in the North is especially vulnerable to threats posed
by significant changes associated with climate change.
Health Canada must be prepared to address the
public expectation for protection as well as provide
more developed information on the adverse health
impacts and enforcement that may be required.
childhood health along with disease prevention,
vaccinations, and access to safe water, to name
a few areas.
Emerging Illnesses, Injuries and Diseases
in Canada
While the threat of diseases outside our borders are
of particular concern, just as alarming is the growing
rate of chronic diseases and injuries in Canada. It is
estimated that over 60,000 Canadians will die of
cancer this year alone and another 79,000 will die
from heart disease. Injuries are the leading cause of
death for Canadians aged 1 to 44. What makes these
figures particularly alarming is that many of these
deaths could be prevented. A more informed
population is a healthier one and Health Canada with
its partners must work to address these issues and
provide Canadians with the information they need to
make healthy, independent choices.
Toward Full Globalization
All departments including Health Canada must
acknowledge the increasing unrestricted movement of
people, goods and services across the globe and the
potential consequences that may arise. Governments
and the health community are moving beyond the
“what if” to a “when” regarding the possible outbreak
of a pandemic. The speed with which a pandemic
outbreak can spread internationally is alarming.
In order to address this potential disaster, Health
Canada is actively participating in and leading many
international activities such as the Global Health
Security Initiative and the APEC Health Task Force.
Health Canada: Collaboration at Work
Canada’s social responsibility to continue to help
address the growing health problems faced by the
world’s poorer nations will only increase as the
life-expectancy gap between developed and less
developed countries is increased by HIV-AIDS and
other new and re-emerging diseases, poverty, child
mortality, injuries, and non-communicable diseases.
Departmentally
At Health Canada, we are organized to respond
to the various health needs of Canadians. We
collaborate internally to provide the best possible
services and programs to Canadians. By doing so,
we draw upon not only our strengths but our
experiences in any given situation. Examples of
departmental horizontal initiatives include tobacco
and substance abuse programs, environmental
health programs, and research on pesticide
residues.
There are opportunities to help the international
community benefit from our experience in many areas
including healthy living, tobacco cessation, early
16
At Health Canada, we understand the importance of
working collaboratively in order to deliver effective
programs and services to Canadians. Working with an
integrative and horizontal approach allows us to draw
on our strengths and provide effective policy and
scientific analysis across our many fields of expertise.
For this reason, Health Canada is committed to
continuing horizontal collaboration for this planning
period. There are many ways in which Health Canada
collaborates horizontally with partners to improve and
maintain the health of Canadians.
Across the Health Portfolio
Providing health policy leadership and coordination
within the Health Portfolio gives Health Canada an
important role in the development and
implementation of programs and services to
Canadians. We collaborate horizontally on a
number of health initiatives such as our work with
the Public Health Agency of Canada (PHAC) on the
Healthy Living and Chronic Diseases Strategy as
well as on emergency preparedness and response
issues. We obtain much of our health and
surveillance data from PHAC. Other examples of
cross-cutting initiatives include the alcohol strategy,
First Nations and Inuit programs, pandemic
preparedness and health benchmarks and
indicators.
Across the Government of Canada
Health Canada recognizes the importance of
horizontal initiatives across the Government of
Canada. Health Canada is one of the largest
departments within the federal government and
health is a key consideration in the majority of the
government’s programs and services. Some of the
interdepartmental programs we contribute to include
the Canadian Environmental Protection Act and
Pesticide Regulation, as well as the Service
Improvement Initiative and the Sustainable
Development Strategy.
Provincial, Territorial and Aboriginal
Health Canada works in collaboration with
provincial, territorial and Aboriginal organizations on
priority areas such as implementing the First
Ministers’ commitments of the 10-Year Plan to
Strengthen Health Care. Ongoing collaborative
efforts will include closing the gap in health
outcomes between the general Canadian
population and First Nations and Inuit; making
timely access to quality care a reality for all
Canadians; furthering the development and
implementation of the National Pharmaceuticals
Strategy; and ongoing efforts in public health and
pandemic preparedness. We will also undertake a
review of commitments of the 2005 Meeting of
First Ministers and Aboriginal Leaders.
Internationally
Health Canada is exploring ways to strengthen the
regulatory capacity of developing countries, especially
as it relates to imported products, through
organizations such as the World Health Organization.
We will complete the implementation of the
International Regulatory Cooperation Strategic
Framework, which will ensure effective prioritization
and evaluation of regulatory activities. We will
establish a Memorandum of Understanding with
the Australian Pesticides and Veterinary Medicines
Authority in order to increase international
cooperation and information sharing. We will
implement regulatory cooperation initiatives
under Memoranda of Understanding and Mutual
Recognition Agreements on information and technical
exchanges with Switzerland, U.S., China and Australia,
amongst others. Health Canada is also developing
an arrangement with the Therapeutic Goods
Administration in the Department of Health and
Ageing of Australia that allows for the recognition of
quality management systems certificates issued for
medical devices.
Responding to Human Resources Risks
and Challenges
Health Canada’s human resources planning process
supports the Department’s business objectives.
The Department’s Annual Report on Human Resources
Indicators identifies human resource management
issues, risks and challenges and identifies activities
that can be taken to address them. For example, the
number of employees who are eligible to retire is
rising every year. Therefore, managers have been
asked, in their Human Resources planning, to identify
succession and knowledge transfer strategies to
ensure that the Department can continue to manage
staff turnover and deliver results for Canadians.
Given the unique human resources issues at the
branch level, each Branch human resources plan
identifies the risks and activities to address them.
An example of this would be that each Branch has
developed a strategy to address the gap in the
17
linguistic capacity of their key feeder groups. As well,
given the strong need for renewal in the human
resources community the Department is participating
in an interdepartmental initiative to recruit and
develop qualified human resources professionals.
Health Canada is developing a departmental strategic
human resources plan that will respond to Branch
and Corporate risks, and provide direction for the
integrated Human Resources Planning process for
2007-2008.
As a science-based department, Health Canada hires
scientists as researchers and regulators, in healthrelated fields and in pure and applied science. The
Department has identified several science specialties
as ‘shortage areas’, and has developed a recruitment
strategy and an employment inventory to ensure
there is a pool of candidates available to fill vacant
positions.
In addition, the Department performs a regular
workforce analysis to identify gaps in employment
equity representation (women, Aboriginal people,
persons with disabilities and members of visible
minority groups) and to identify measures that can
be taken to address those gaps. As a result, since
April 2, 2004, the representation of employees from
employment equity groups has met or exceeded the
proportion of such individuals available from the
labour force.
Finally, in 2006-2007, we will continue to support the
implementation of the Public Service Modernization
Act (PSMA), a major building block in the Government
of Canada’s overall strategy to modernize human
resources management through training and
communication activities, the review of staffing
policies and guidelines, the piloting of new staffing
tools and approaches, and the implementation of a
Staffing Monitoring Action Plan. The PSMA and the
strengthening of corporate services through the
human resources planning process will help ensure
that the Department has the human resources it
requires to deliver on its mission.
18
Incorporating Sustainable Development
Principles into Practice
Health Canada will continue to work towards fulfilling
departmental commitments outlined in its Sustainable
Development Strategy 2004-2007, Becoming the
Change We Wish to See, in which programs and
services identify how they will incorporate sustainable
development principles into practice.
Further exploration of the social dimension and its
impact on health will be undertaken to better
integrate this pillar with environmental and economic
pillars within the context of the development of the
Sustainable Development Strategy 2007-2010.
In the upcoming year, efforts will be made to
work across federal departments and create
interdepartmental targets, where appropriate, to
facilitate better linkages of activities fostering a
sustainable development approach in areas of
mutual interest. Health Canada will also do its part
to contribute towards government-wide initiatives,
including integrating green procurement policy into
the Department.
Endnotes:
1. For more information on Legislative Acts, please
visit the Department of Justice Canada’s website
at: laws.justice.gc.ca/en/index.html
2. www.phac-aspc.gc.ca/new_e.html
3. www.cihr-irsc.gc.ca/
4. www.hmirc-ccrmd.gc.ca/
5. www.pmprb-cepmb.gc.ca/
6. www.hc-sc.gc.ca/hl-vs/reprod/agenc/
index_e.html
Analysis of Program Activities
by Strategic Outcome
2
STRATEGIC OUTCOME:
Strengthened Knowledge Base to Address Health
and Health Care Priorities
Program Activity: Health Policy, Planning and Information
This program activity contributes to the Government of Canada Strategic Outcome: Healthy Canadians with Access to Quality
Health Care.
Planned Spending and Full-Time Equivalents (FTEs)
($ millions)
Net expenditures
FTEs
Forecast
Spending
2005-2006
Planned
Spending
2006-2007
Planned
Spending
2007-2008
Planned
Spending
2008-2009
375.1
288.4
218.2
215.0
717
627
604
588
Notes: The decrease in expenditures from 2005-2006 to 2006-2007 is mainly due to a decrease in the level of funding of the Primary Health Care
Transition Fund, the sunset of the Northern Health Supplement to the 2003 Health Accord, and the Expenditure Review Committee (ERC) reduction.
The decrease in expenditures from 2006-2007 to 2007-2008 is mainly due to the sunset of the Primary Health Care Transition Fund. The decrease in
expenditures from 2007-2008 to 2008-2009 is mainly due to a decrease in funding for the Implementation of Health Canada’s Therapeutic Access
Strategy.
Figures include an amount for other departmental and regional infrastructure costs supporting program delivery.
Program Activity Description
The objective of this program activity is to provide
policy advice and support to the Minister in making
decisions to protect and improve the health of
Canadians. Health Canada supports the delivery of
programs and services to Canadians by developing
policies and building and maintaining linkages with
other partners to support health care system reform.
We also work with international organizations to
advance a global health agenda and contribute
Canadian expertise. This helps to ensure the health,
safety and security of Canadians in a healthier world.
We provide a leadership role in strategic planning for
the Department. We administer the Canada Health
Act, and work with provinces and territories on health
care renewal and support. We work with others to
provide access to health care services for official
language minority communities, and the interface
between different sectors of the health care system.
To ensure that all Canadians have access to health
services when and where they need them, that the
quality of those services is continually improved, and
that the system can provide the necessary care today
and has the capacity to identify and adapt to the
emerging needs and challenges of tomorrow, we are
focussing renewal efforts, amongst other things, on
the health human resources.
Another type of renewal effort is in the legislative
and regulatory arenas. Legislation and Regulatory
Renewal is an opportunity to deliver a much
anticipated, significant and modernized legislative
framework for the Health Portfolio. Much of the health
protection legislation that forms Health Canada’s
regulatory base is out of date and not in line with
modern technological advancements or public
expectations, leading to gaps in what is covered,
inconsistencies in addressing health risks and
inadequate enforcement/compliance powers.
21
We provide policy advice and lead initiatives to
advance women’s health and to increase
understanding of how gender interacts with the other
determinants of health to affect health outcomes of
women, men, boys and girls over their lifespan.
We undertake research and analysis to improve the
availability, quality and use of evidence in health
policy decision-making. We reach our goal by
identifying future policy research needs, conducting
extramural peer-reviewed policy research to meet
these needs, communicating the results within Health
Canada and externally, and by providing the expertise
and tools needed for a sound and rigorous analysis of
health policy options.
Our priorities
In addition to tracking emerging issues on an ongoing
basis, we continue to actively participate in and
collect invaluable information from various scanning
activities to help identify future risks to Canadians and
challenges to Health Canada. It is important to note
that numerous external factors can influence our
ability to focus exclusively on our priorities (e.g., the
increased attention to global preparedness and
response to a possible pandemic influenza outbreak
or coordinating relief efforts for natural disasters).
We intend to focus on the following priorities in
2006-2007:
Partner in health reform
In the 2004 Health Accord, federal, provincial and
territorial governments committed to health system
reforms that will improve timely access to quality
care. To support the Accord, the federal government
is flowing $41 billion to provinces and territories
over ten years, including $5.5 billion to augment
provincial/territorial existing investments and efforts in
wait times reduction. In December 2005, provincial
and territorial governments announced a first set of
ten common evidence-based benchmarks in the areas
such as cancer screening and care, cardiac surgery,
hip and knee replacements and cataracts. Health
Canada will work with the provinces and territories on
22
the development of a Patient Wait Times Guarantee.
Care guarantees have been suggested by many
experts as one of the measures to reduce wait times.
We have made progress on all initiatives in the Accord
and all governments are moving forward with their health
system reforms. Work is also continuing to implement
2004 Health Accord initiatives in the following areas:
implementing the Internationally Educated Health
Care Professionals (IEHP) Initiative, which will
provide additional funds to accelerate and expand
the assessment and integration of IEHPs for
participating governments;
monitoring the commitment to provide first-dollar
coverage by 2006 for certain home care services,
based on assessed need, including: two week
provision of case management and intravenous
medications related to discharge diagnosis, nursing
and personal care for short-term acute home care;
two-week provision of case management and crisis
response services for short-term acute community
mental health home care; and case management,
nursing, palliative-specific pharmaceuticals and
personal services for end-of-life care;
working to ensure that the populations served by
federal departments (specifically First Nations, Inuit
and veterans) will have access to the home care
services specified in the Accord;
continuing to support the Best Practices Network
for primary health care, which is facilitating
information sharing and addressing common
barriers to progress; and
working with the Health Council whose mandate is
to monitor and make annual public reports on the
implementation of the 2003 First Ministers’ Accord
on Health Care Renewal and to report on progress
of the elements set out in the 2004 Health Accord.
In 2006-2007, we will continue to collaborate with our
provincial and territorial counterparts as we implement
commitments to health care system reform.1
The Primary Health Care Transition Fund (PHCTF)
($800 million over six years) is providing funding to
the provinces and territories to support their efforts in
reforming their primary health care systems. One of
the objectives of the primary health care reform is to
strengthen health promotion and prevention activities
(both primary and secondary) within the sector so it
can help Canadians make healthy lifestyles choices
and thereby reduce the incidence of conditions such
as diabetes and cancer. With PHCTF-funded initiatives
concluding in 2006-2007, dissemination activities
are planned to promote the uptake of knowledge and
results. In turn, these knowledge transfer activities will
support ongoing reform activities.
In concert with other departments involved in the
Action Plan on Official Languages, we will work
towards implementing administrative practices and
policies to ensure that the enhanced accountability
provisions of the Official Languages Act, which were
introduced in November 2005, will be reflected in
the provision of health services to official language
minority communities across Canada.
Hepatitis C
The Government of Canada is committed to helping
all those infected with hepatitis C. On July 25, 2006,
the Prime Minister announced that the government
reached an agreement on the elements of a
settlement for those Canadians who contracted
hepatitis C from the blood system before January 1,
1986 and after July 1, 1990.
Under the terms of the agreement, the Government of
Canada will set aside nearly $1 billion in a special
settlement fund. The level of compensation will be
based on the principle of parity with compensation
already provided by the federal government for those
who were infected between 1986 and 1990.
Benefits will be paid on a present-value basis,
meaning that class members will receive the entire
sum of their compensation up front, based on such
factors as current disease level and probability of
disease progression. This will also serve to minimize
administrative costs.
The Government of Canada will be working as quickly
as possible to complete the steps needed before
compensation is provided to the class. A final detailed
agreement needs to be completed, and must be
approved by Courts in four jurisdictions. Furthermore,
an administrative structure must be set up to evaluate
applications and forward payments. The federal
government cannot control the timing of every
remaining step, however, all efforts will be made to
ensure that this proceeds as quickly and as effectively
as possible.
Pandemic Influenza
Health security is a critical component of Canada’s
objectives for health policy, foreign policy and national
security. The most pressing challenge for health
security at the current time is the threat of an
influenza pandemic. As such, it is critical that the
Government of Canada is prepared for an influenza
pandemic, and that work is undertaken with partners
in the public and private sectors domestically and
internationally to strengthen preparedness throughout
Canada.
The potential severity and impacts have resulted in
unprecedented co-operation and collaboration on
a global health issue. We will continue to play an
active role in preventing and preparing for avian
and human pandemic influenza. This involves close
collaboration with the Public Health Agency of
Canada, which is the public health lead for pandemic
influenza preparedness in the Government of Canada.
We will strengthen preparedness in the Department’s
key areas of responsibility, such as First Nations
and Inuit health, the regulation of vaccines, and
occupational health services for federal employees.
We will also complete a business continuity plan in
the event of an influenza pandemic to ensure that
support is provided for employees and that critical
services can continue to be delivered in the event of
large-scale worker absenteeism.
We will also focus on international collaboration for
avian and human pandemic influenza preparedness
and response, which is a critical element of Canada’s
domestic preparedness. Governments across the
23
world have declared avian influenza to be a “global
threat”, and have recognized that international
collaboration is necessary in order to control the
H5N1 avian influenza outbreak, and to prepare for an
influenza pandemic. Intensive efforts are underway
through multilateral organizations (e.g., World Health
Organization, Food and Agricultural Organization,
World Organization for Animal Health) and through
regional organizations (e.g., Asia Pacific Economic
Cooperation, the Security and Prosperity Partnership
in North America) and other fora such as G8 to
collaborate in preparedness efforts.
Pharmaceuticals Management Strategy
Mental Health
Health Canada has a number of roles with respect to
pharmaceuticals at different points in the drug life
cycle, including at the research and development,
market approval, prescribing, access, utilization and
reimbursement stages. In support of improved health
outcomes for Canadians and system sustainability, we
will work to optimize these roles using available policy,
regulatory and program instruments to better integrate
pharmaceuticals into a seamless, robust health care
system. We will seek to capitalize on opportunities
in areas such as post-market drug safety and
effectiveness, appropriate drug prescribing and
use, and the drug pricing and research role of the
Patented Medicine Prices Review Board.
Mental health and well-being are fundamental to
Canadian’s quality of life, as well as our social and
economic development. At the same time, mental
illnesses such as depression, anxiety disorders,
schizophrenia and bi-polar disorders represent a
significant public health challenge, impacting as many
as 1 in 5 Canadians and resulting in significant costs
to the health care system, society and the economy.
In May 2006, the Standing Senate Committee on
Social Affairs, Science and Technology released a
report on mental health, mental illness and addiction
in Canada. Entitled Out of the Shadows at Last, the
report underscored the breadth of the challenge
associated with mental health, mental illness and
addiction, as well as the need for governments to work
together in addressing this important issue. Canada
is currently the only G7 country without a national
strategy or action plan on mental health. The federal
government will work with its partners to build the
foundation for a national approach to mental health
and mental illness in Canada.
Health Canada will also continue to support the
development of sound mental health policies and
programs within the federal government, and among
the provinces and territories. This includes ongoing
improvements to the mental health programs, services
and support to First Nations and Inuit, as well as broader
efforts to improve the mental health and well-being of all
Canadians, in areas such as research, information and
knowledge exchange, and best practices.
24
Drug therapy is an increasingly important component
of modern health care. Appropriately prescribed and
used, pharmaceuticals can improve health outcomes
for individuals and reduce costs in other health care
sectors, e.g., hospitals. The development of new drugs
has the potential for even greater benefits in the
future. Despite their benefits, prescription drugs pose
a number of challenges related to equitable and
affordable drug access, drug safety and effectiveness,
optimal drug therapy, and health care system
sustainability.2
We will also continue to work with the provinces and
territories on pharmaceutical activities initiated as
part of the 2004 Health Accord under the National
Pharmaceuticals Strategy — an integrated,
collaborative, multi-pronged approach to addressing
pharmaceutical challenges that builds on
governments’ shared roles in the pharmaceuticals
sector and previous collaborative pharmaceutical
initiatives. These activities will be linked, where
appropriate, to federal initiatives to modernize the
regulatory system for therapeutic products and to
integrated pharmaceuticals management among
federal jurisdiction drug plans.
Legislative Renewal and Regulatory Reform
Under the Health Protection Legislative Renewal
exercise, which responds to shortcomings in Health
Canada's legislative basis for health protection,
Health Canada, with the Public Health Agency of
Canada, continues to review its health protection
legislation. The review is intended to modernize and
reinforce key existing legislation, namely the Food and
Drugs Act (1953), the Hazardous Products Act (1969)
and the Radiation Emitting Devices Act (1969)
through the development of enhanced health
protection legislation. The resulting legislative
framework will serve to modernize and strengthen the
existing federal laws dealing with health protection
and provide clear policy direction. As part of this
exercise, the Department is also engaged in reviewing
the proposed legislation to determine whether to
proceed with a single piece of legislation or to
continue with a phased approach as started by the
expediting of the new Quarantine Act (2005).
Under the auspices of the Government of Canada’s
Smart Regulation initiative, Health Canada has been
actively contributing to the development of a series of
policies, frameworks and tools aimed at modernizing
the Canadian regulatory system so that it can better
respond to the challenges it currently faces (e.g.,
rapid scientific developments, globalization, or
cross-boundary health risks, etc.) The goal of the
initiative is to build a robust and flexible regulatory
system that not only maximizes health, safety and
environmental protection but also promotes an
innovative economy.
This year, we will continue to coordinate the
Department’s input into a proposed Government
Directive on Regulating (GDR), which is intended to
build on the existing Federal Regulatory Policy by
promoting increased regulatory transparency, the
alignment of legislative and regulatory planning,
and strategic coordination and collaboration with
provincial, territorial and international partners.3
Establishment of the new Assisted Human
Reproduction Agency of Canada and new
regulations
We will continue to work toward the implementation
of the Assisted Human Reproduction Act, including
support to the Assisted Human Reproduction Agency’s
successful establishment in Vancouver, B.C. in
2006–2007. The Agency will license and inspect
activities controlled under the Act. The recruitment
process leading to Governor in Council appointments
to the Agency’s new board of directors will be
completed.
We are proceeding concurrently with the development
of the components of the regulatory framework, which
are required before the Agency can implement the
licensing and regulatory regime for activities
controlled under the Act. The fact that very little
currently exists in terms of established guidelines,
standards or regulations necessitates careful and
comprehensive consultations, to ensure that
regulatory objectives are met while at the same time
minimizing the regulatory burden on Canadians.
Regulations are expected to be promulgated in
2006-2007 to bring the last outstanding prohibition
into effect and work will continue to develop the
remaining components of the regulatory framework
to implement the Act.
Health Human Resources
The health care sector is labour intensive. Between 60
and 80 cents of every health care dollar in Canada is
spent on health human resources (HHR), and this does
not include the costs of education. Currently, there are
reported shortages for physicians, nurses and other
health care providers. HHR is one of the four
cornerstones to support real health system change.
Therefore, building capacity in the system and providing
adequate supply, distribution, and appropriate use of
HHR is critical to reducing wait times and improving
timely access to health care.
Building on health human resource activities that
support the 2003 Accord and the 2004 Ten-Year Plan,
we will continue with the implementation of the Health
Human Resource Strategy through three broad
initiatives (Pan-Canadian Health Human Resource
Planning; Interprofessional Education for Collaborative
Patient-Centred Practice; and Recruitment and
Retention) and the Internationally Educated Health
Care Professionals (IEHP) Initiative, which will provide
25
additional funds to increase health care professional
supply through the acceleration and expansion of the
assessment and integration of IEHPs for participating
governments.
Role of science
It is through scientific discoveries and innovations
that the greatest potential benefits for the health of
Canadians lie. Science also provides a foundation of
evidence for policies and programs to improve the
health of Canadians. In addition to work in many
health sciences policy areas, we will focus on the
following areas in 2006-2007:
The dramatic increase in the development and use
of genetic technologies in the health system has
clear implications for the sustainability of Canada’s
health care system in terms of potential new ways
to prevent, diagnose, treat and cure thousands of
conditions. The development of new genomic-based
drugs (pharmacogenomics) and diagnostics will
also affect health care delivery. We will undertake
policy research and analysis to support federal
discussions and action in both domestic
and international fora on issues such as
pharmacogenomics, patent pooling in medical
genetics, intellectual property issues related to
stem cell research, and the development and
uptake of OECD guidelines on quality assurance
in genetic testing. We will also explore approaches
to stimulate innovation and undertake analysis of
various incentive mechanisms to spur research and
development to address health needs, including
vaccine development.
We continue to be committed to working with our
partners on early issue identification and the
monitoring of emerging technologies that impact
the health of individuals, vulnerable populations
and the overall health system. We will support the
development of evidence-based recommendations
and strategies through continued collaborative work to
support excellence in the ethical conduct of human
research in areas such as: research ethics education,
quality improvement, the examination of models
26
of accreditation and the development of process
standards for research ethics boards; policy
development on good research practices related to
biobanking of human biological material samples;
and the identification of potential societal impacts
of nanotechnology.4
Human resources risks and challenges
The human resources challenges are very similar to
those faced in other areas of the Department and
even across the federal government including staff
turnover, retention and the recruitment of skilled and
knowledgeable policy analysts. Given the extent of
our involvement in policy work and the importance
of a viable policy capacity, these issues must be
addressed to ensure we maintain an adequate
capacity to address future policy issues. Though
we are heavily involved in recruitment programs
(e.g., Economist and Sociologist Development
Program), we continue to face challenges in recruiting
and retaining policy analysts, given the competitive
labour market in this area.
Horizontal linkages
We continue to manage and collaborate on horizontal
files for the Department and build linkages within and
outside of Health Canada. For example, we manage and
coordinate the Federal Inter-departmental Task Force on
Mental Health. We also work across the Health Portfolio
to ensure that public health is integrated within our
advice and support to the Minister.
Continuing on the horizontal policy research themes
(Health Innovation, Research on Regulation, Healthy
Communities and First Nations and Inuit Health
Sustainability) that resulted from the policy research
priority setting exercise completed in 2004-2005,
cross Portfolio steering committees pertaining to
each of the four priority themes were established
under Memoranda of Understanding (MOUs) among
our branches and the Public Health Agency of
Canada. These MOUs will guide our research efforts
over the next two to four years.
Since February 2004, the federal Interdepartmental
Working Group on Trafficking in Persons, including
organs and tissues (IWG TIP), with 14 federal
departments and co-chaired by the Departments
of Foreign Affairs and Justice, was mandated to
coordinate federal efforts to address TIP and develop a
federal strategy. We are the lead for the Health Portfolio
and we continue to coordinate the Portfolio’s input
while promoting a holistic approach to the inclusion
of health, gender and diversity considerations.
Health Canada is an active member of the Ontario
Federal Council’s Ontario Information Technology
Network. The objective of the OFC/OITN is to
identify and promote areas for collaboration and
the sharing of IT resources and strategic planning
information among federal government IT
managers in the Region. Two significant areas of
collaboration are in remote locations IT support
and connectivity and integrated IT infrastructure
planning.
Performance Measurement Strategy
We continue to enhance our performance
measurement to provide information on our activities.
To streamline the numerous reporting mechanisms, we
adopted a new strategy, linking our activities directly
to outcomes over the immediate (one to three years),
intermediate (three to five years) and long term for
outcomes five years and beyond. This approach will
support all of our public reporting requirements
including the Program Activity Architecture and the
Departmental Performance Report. During this
reporting cycle, we will work towards collecting
performance information to report on the period
over the next three years.
Expected Results
Goals and objectives identified for specific strategies and
initiatives
Performance Indicators
Knowledge development and transfer of specific health
policy issues
Dissemination of research (e.g, number and type of
studies completed, number of requests for input,
number of links added to websites)
The intermediate outcomes planned for the policy
planning and research program activity identified
below will be addressed in various areas. As a result,
a wide spectrum of activities across the Portfolio will
be directed towards the same goal.
Reflection of goals and objectives identified in
workplans and priorities
Assessment of knowledge development and transfer
among governments and stakeholders
27
Key Programs and Services
Health Care System Policy
In September 2000, First Ministers agreed to continue to make primary health care reform a priority and indicated that
improvements to primary health care are crucial to the renewal of health services. In response to this commitment, the
Government of Canada announced the Primary Health Care Transition Fund (PHCTF), an $800 million investment from
2000-2001 to 2006-2007. The Fund is supporting provinces, territories and various health care system stakeholders, via
contribution agreements, in their efforts to reform the primary health care system. More specifically, it will support the
transitional costs of implementing sustainable, large-scale primary health care renewal initiatives which will improve access,
quality of care, accountability, and integration of services. Although the PHCTF itself is time-limited, the main goal of the
Fund is to bring about permanent and sustainable changes to the organization, funding and delivery of primary health care
services. The fund is supported by a federal, provincial and territorial advisory group and Health Canada plays an active
facilitation role to foster dialogue and knowledge sharing between and among recipients (government and non-government).
With PHCTF-funded initiatives concluding in 2006-2007, all recipients will be submitting final reports including their
evaluation reports, and dissemination activities are planned to promote the uptake of knowledge and results. In 2004-2005
a mid-term evaluation of the PHCTF was conducted to assess program structure and effectiveness. The final, or summative
evaluation, will be conducted in 2006-2007 and will focus on the results and impact of the PHCTF; it will be available in
early 2007-2008.
Health Canada is also supporting knowledge transfer and the uptake of successful strategies the Best Practices Network
(FMM 2004). The Primary Health Care Transition Fund will ensure the results and lessons learned of the program are shared
for continued progress in primary health care renewal. Planned activities include:
a series of synthesis papers highlighting the evidence in areas such as chronic disease management, information
management, collaborative care (i.e. teams) and evaluation methodology;
a series of fact sheets on the results and evidence of each initiative;
a national conference in February 2007; and
a database, accessible via Health Canada website, to be an ongoing resource for provinces/territories, stakeholders and
the public.
Several provincial and territorial governments have publicly committed to continuing the primary health care reforms begun
under the PHCTF.
Recognizing the evidence gap for quantitative data on primary health care in Canada, the PHCTF funded the Canadian
Institute of Health Information to develop a set of consensus-based national indicators. A legacy of the PHCTF will be the
improved capacity for evaluating primary health care. As well, the Health Council of Canada’s monitors and reports publicly
on primary health care progress.
Note: With the exception of Quebec, all provinces and territories (and in fact all recipients) are required to submit regular
reports to Health Canada including narrative progress reports, financial reports, final reports on results and final evaluation
reports. These requirements are consistent with the Treasury Board Transfer Payment Policy and related accountability
requirements associated with contribution agreements.
Expected Results
Knowledge development and transfer of specific health
policy issues
Performance Indicators
Dissemination of research (e.g, number/type of studies
completed, number of requests for input, number of
links added to websites)
Assessment of knowledge development and transfer
among governments and stakeholders
2006-2007
2007-2008
$
FTEs
$
FTEs
$
FTEs
66.1
20
0.1
0
0.1
0
*All financial figures in millions of dollars
28
2008-2009
Intergovernmental
Health Canada is responsible for the administration of the Canada Health Act (CHA), which involves monitoring a broad range
of sources to assess provincial and territorial compliance with the criteria and conditions of the Act, working in partnership
with provinces and territories to investigate and resolve CHA compliance issues, pursuing activities to encourage provincial
and territorial compliance with the CHA, providing policy advice and informing the Minister of possible non-compliance with
the Act, and recommending appropriate action.
The Department also provides strategic advice and coordination on a full range of Health Portfolio policy issues involving
collaboration with provincial and territorial partners, while ensuring that federal priorities are advanced.
Under the Official Languages Act and the Action Plan for Official Languages, we manage health contribution programs to
support the vitality of official language minority communities across Canada and ensure ongoing consultations with these
communities.
Expected Results
Performance Indicators
Knowledge development and transfer of specific health
Dissemination of research (e.g, number and type of
policy issues
studies complete, number of requests for input, number
of links added to websites)
Assessment of knowledge development and transfer
among governments and stakeholders
2006-2007
2007-2008
2008-2009
$
FTEs
$
FTEs
$
FTEs
44.0
64
29.8
64
29.8
64
*All financial figures in millions of dollars
29
International
Public health risks and threats originating beyond Canada’s borders increasingly influence the health of Canadians. International
collaboration on global health policies and developments is of growing importance to the sustainability and responsiveness of
Canada’s health system. Health Canada positions itself internationally to: anticipate and respond to international health
developments and their impact on Canadians and the health system; influence international health events and fora to improve
health globally; provide leadership on selected health issues such as pandemic preparedness, HIV/AIDS and tobacco; and work
with the multiplicity of players on the global health scene to advance health and health security.
In order to shape and strengthen the international agenda on health and health care issues, consistent with Canada’s priorities
and values, we will continue to work in close cooperation with multilateral agencies such as the World Health Organization (WHO)
and the Pan American Health Organization (PAHO).
Expected Results
Knowledge development and transfer of specific health
policy issues
Performance Indicators
Dissemination of research (e.g, number and type of
studies complete, number of requests for input, number
of links added to websites)
Assessment of knowledge development and transfer
among governments and stakeholders
2006-2007
2007-2008
2008-2009
$
FTEs
$
FTEs
$
FTEs
21.8
26
21.6
26
22.0
26
*All financial figures in millions of dollars
Assisted Human Reproduction Implementation Office
Description: Set-up of Assisted Human Reproduction Agency of Canada
Expected Results
Performance Indicators
The Assisted Human Reproduction (AHR) Agency begins
Governor-in-Council appointments of candidates to
operations in 2006-2007.
board of directors completed.
Regulatory development – Consultations to continue on all
remaining sections of the AHR Act in 2006-2007 to be
followed by drafting of regulations in preparation for
prepublication in Canada Gazette Part I.
Progress towards the development of the Personal Health
Information Registry.
2006-2007
Consultations in support of regulatory development.
Draft regulations in preparation to be prepublished in
Canada Gazette Part I.
Performance will be measured by state of approval of
plans and assessments, and the stage of a test version
of the Registry.
2007-2008
2008-2009
$
FTEs
$
FTEs
$
FTEs
4.9
29.8
3.3
22
1.6
8
*All financial figures in millions of dollars
30
Timely policy development papers and reports.
Legislation Renewal
Health Canada will continue the development of a proposal to replace the Food and Drugs Act (1953), parts of the Hazardous
Products Act (1969/safety of consumer and industrial products) and the Radiation Emitting Devices Act (1970), with a new
Health Protection Legislative framework. The objective of the new framework is to update, strengthen, and integrate federal health
protection legislation to be more responsive to present and future social and technological realities and provide the tools needed
to better protect the health and safety of Canadians.
Expected Results
Goals and objectives identified for specific strategies and
initiatives
2006-2007
Performance Indicators
Reflection of goals and objectives identified in work
plans and priorities
2007-2008
2008-2009
$
FTEs
$
FTEs
$
FTEs
1.3
0
1.3
0
1.3
0
*All financial figures in millions of dollars
Women’s Health and Gender Analysis
Health Canada works horizontally to promote equitable health outcomes across the lifespan for women, men, boys and girls.
It provides leadership and oversight to: women’s health; women’s health research and information; gender based analysis;
and, with a diversity overlay, in policy development within the Health Portfolio. It funds the Centres of Excellence for Women’s
Health, Canadian Women’s Health Network as well as Research Working Groups, and collaborates with an expansive network of
women’s health organizations and other stakeholders at the international, provincial and regional levels to engage the public in
the policy development process.
Expected Results
Knowledge development and transfer for specific health
policy issues
Performance Indicators
Dissemination of research (e.g., number and type
of studies completed, number of requests for input,
number of links added to websites)
Assessment of knowledge development and transfer
among governments and stakeholders
Number of hits to website
Enhanced health policy research capacity (ongoing)
2006-2007
Assessment of health policy research capacity among
governments and key stakeholders
2007-2008
2008-2009
$
FTEs
$
FTEs
$
FTEs
4.9
19
4.9
19
4.9
19
*All financial figures in millions of dollars
31
Applied Research, Dissemination and Accountability
In the area of applied research and analysis, we support policy decision-making by developing and implementing a strategic
policy research agenda for medium and long-term issues, helping co-ordinate internal and external policy research activities,
and funding extramural research under the Health Policy Research Program. This fosters a performance-based and outcomeoriented culture by developing the tools and information base for better accountability. It plays a key role in knowledge
management by managing a policy research dissemination program, including publication of the Health Policy Research
Bulletin, and by making core data sets and the informatics tools to access them available.
Expected Results
Target audiences accessing data, analysis and information
that is useful for evidence-based policy and program
development
Performance Indicators
Demonstrated impact of analytical and performance
information and tools on policy and program
development
Percentage of target population rating analytical and
performance information and tools as useful
Percentage of new Statistics Canada and the Canadian
Institute for Health Information (CIHI) releases made
available on time within Health Canada
Number of data files and publication made available on
the Department’s electronic data and information
system
2006-2007
2007-2008
2008-2009
$
FTEs
$
FTEs
$
FTEs
4.9
60
36.6
60
36.6
60
*All financial figures in millions of dollars
Endnotes
1. www.hc-sc.gc.ca/hcs-sss/delivery-prestation/
fptcollab/2004-fmm-rpm/index_e.html
2. For more information on these challenges, see
the National Pharmaceuticals Strategy Progress
Report, summer 2006.
3. www.regulation.gc.ca/default.asp?Language=E&
Page=thegovernementdirectiveon
32
4. Nanotechnology is defined as the application of
science to develop new materials and products,
where at least one dimension is smaller than
100 nm, and involves the manipulation of matter
at the nanometre scale – a nanometre (nm) is a
billionth of a metre (10-9m), or a hundred times
smaller than a virus.
Other programs and services that contribute to this
program activity total $140.5 million for 2006-2007.
STRATEGIC OUTCOME:
Access to Safe and Effective Health Products and
Food and Information for Healthy Choices
Program Activity – Health Products and Food
This program activity contributes to the Government of Canada Strategic Outcome: Healthy Canadians with Access to Quality
Health Care.
PLANNED SPENDING AND FULL-TIME EQUIVALENTS (FTEs)
Forecast
Spending
2005-2006
Planned
Spending
2006-2007
Planned
Spending
2007-2008
Planned
Spending
2008-2009
Gross expenditures
294.6
303.3
300.4
289.3
Less: Expected respendable revenues
37.7
41.2
41.2
41.2
Net expenditures
256.9
262.1
259.2
248.1
FTEs
2,503
2,592
2,667
2,656
($ millions)
Notes: The increase in expenditures from 2005-2006 to 2006-2007 is mainly due to an increase in the level of funding for Strengthening the Safety of
Drugs, and is partially offset by a decrease in funding for the Implementation of Health Canada’s Therapeutic Access Strategy and the Expenditure Review
Committee (ERC) reduction.
The decrease in expenditures from 2006-2007 to 2007-2008 is mainly due to the sunset of funding for Health Canada’s Response to Bovine Spongiform
Encephalopathy in Areas of Risk Management and Targeted Research. The decrease in expenditures from 2007-2008 to 2008-2009 is mainly due to
decrease in funding for the Implementation of Health Canada’s Therapeutic Access Strategy, and the sunset of a transfer from Agri-Food and Agriculture
Canada for the Agriculture Policy Framework.
The change in the FTEs is due to the increase of the salary component of the operating budget.
Figures include an amount for other departmental and regional infrastructure costs supporting program delivery.
Program Activity Description
As Canada’s federal authority responsible for the
regulation of health products and food, Health
Canada evaluates and monitors the safety, quality
and effectiveness of the thousands of drugs, vaccines,
medical devices, natural health products and other
therapeutic products available to Canadians, as well
as the safety and nutritional quality of their food.
Under this program activity we also review veterinary
drugs sold in Canada for safety and effectiveness for
animals, and for the safety of foods derived from
animals treated with these drugs. Finally, we promote
the health and well being of Canadians through a
broad range of activities related to health products
and food, including developing nutrition policies and
standards such as Canada’s Food Guide to Healthy
Eating.
A core federal health protection responsibility is the
regulation of therapeutic products under the legislative
framework of the Food and Drugs Act. The federal
government’s role in protecting health and safety
is well recognized and supported by Canadians.
However, the regulatory system for drugs and other
therapeutic products is facing a number of challenges,
including: rapidly advancing science and technology;
public expectations for access, safety and
transparency; improving linkages to health system
decision-making regarding coverage for, and cost of,
pharmaceuticals and related products in current
systems; and meeting industry demands for faster
approvals and increased intellectual property
protection.
33
There is strong evidence of rising rates of acute and
chronic disease directly associated with diet (e.g.,
diabetes among Canadians). While Canadians are
increasingly aware of the threats to their health from
factors like poor diet, physical inactivity and excessive
weights, work and leisure patterns in our society have
changed, making us less active and more reliant
on foods high in energy which is contributing to
increasing rates of chronic disease. With respect to
food safety, emergence of new foodborne pathogens
and emerging infectious diseases (e.g., avian
influenza), and the threat of bioterrorism (e.g., linked
to botulism), have increased consumer expectations
in Canada and abroad for the role of governments
in ensuring the quality and safety of Canada’s food
supply.
In moving forward, there is a need to continue to
modernize legislative and regulatory frameworks
to keep pace with changing science, consumer
expectations, international developments and other
pressures for change. To ensure an integrated
approach, it is suggested that a long-term plan to
modernize the regulatory system for therapeutic
products be developed, based on a vision to improve
access to safe, effective and affordable drugs and
other therapeutic products. To strengthen collaboration
with provincial and territorial governments in their
health system and drug plan management roles, this
plan needs to be strongly linked to the National
Pharmaceuticals Strategy. From the perspective of
food and nutrition, Health Canada will continue to
work with Health Portfolio partners, the Canadian Food
Inspection Agency and other partners to provide
leadership on food policy issues in order to improve
health outcomes for Canadians and reduce the
burden on the health care system.
34
Health Canada relies heavily on science and risk
management in making our regulatory and policy
decisions. As scientific knowledge and technical
expertise are critical inputs into the development of
our regulations, policies and advice, we will continue
to conduct laboratory-based research. We will focus
on the human health implications of potentially
hazardous chemicals in the food supply, including
effects on behaviour and the immune system;
conditions leading to the survival, growth and toxin
production of infectious and toxigenic bacteria;
awareness of hazard-prone foods; establishment of
safe levels to prevent human injury; and risks and
benefits associated with nutrients in the diet. We will
also continue to conduct research in areas related to
the safety and effectiveness of biotherapeutics, blood
and blood products, and vaccines.
Health Canada faces a pressing challenge in sustaining
our human resources. It is estimated that within the
next five years a significant number of our employees
in the specialized and technical fields, which includes
biologists, chemists and medical officers, will be eligible
for retirement. We will continue to address this through
our human resources planning.
We are working with federal science and technology
partners to promote and protect the health and
safety of Canadians. Some of our work includes
collaborating directly with Agriculture and Agri-Food
Canada, Environment Canada, the Canadian Food
Inspection Agency (CFIA) and the Public Health
Agency of Canada (PHAC) to develop responsive food
policies and regulations, such as Canada’s Strategy
for Safe Food. We are also working with CFIA to
promote food safety as a science priority for Canada.
Our ongoing work with Statistics Canada and PHAC
is enabling us to collaborate on public health data
surveys as well as to share information that is
important in our ongoing analysis of and preparation
for potential health risks associated with emerging
diseases.
Internationally, Health Canada is working with
the World Health Organization (WHO) and other
multilateral organizations on health product and
food safety issues. We are also working with other
governments to strengthen and promote broader
regulatory cooperation and encourage technical
information exchange. We will continue to implement
the commitments in the Security and Prosperity
Partnership of North America, including hosting
discussions on pharmaceutical review processes,
food safety regulatory coordination, assessment and
enhanced surveillance research with related agencies
in Canada, the U.S. and Mexico. Bilaterally, we will
work with the U.S. Food and Drug Administration
through our memorandum of understanding, and on
initiatives such as the development of a single set of
reference values for nutrition labelling and improving
the compatibility between our approaches to food
fortification.
the importation, sale and manufacture of health
products. Working directly with regional stakeholders
and provincial and municipal governments, regional
offices promote and facilitate consultation and
collaboration.1 These partnerships are allowing our
regional offices to participate in the monitoring of
adverse reactions and assist in developing policy
responses on food safety, nutrition, natural health
products, antimicrobial resistance, and the efficacy of
health products. Further, regional laboratories are
increasing our science capacity to develop and
manage food safety research and surveillance projects
on natural toxins, genetically modified food, food
allergen detection, method development and
nutrition as part of the national laboratory network.
Two of these laboratories are also supporting our
responsibilities to ensure manufacturer compliance
with regulatory requirements for health products.
Health Canada’s regional offices contribute to the
delivery of our mandate by developing and delivering
key programs and services, including monitoring risks,
and the investigation and inspection associated with
Performance Measurement Strategy
The Performance Measurement Strategy for this
strategic outcome will help us measure our expected
results over time, and determine if our current
program activity is appropriate to ensure Canadians
have access to safe and effective health products
and food, as well as to provide useful information
for healthy choices.
Expected Results
Access to Safe and Effective Health Products and Food
and Information for Healthy Choices
Performance Indicators
Level of satisfaction of Canadians and health
professionals with the information disseminated for
healthy choices and informed decision-making
Incidence of foodborne illnesses (where food is the
causative agent)
35
Key Programs and Services
Pre-market evaluation and regulatory process improvement
Description: Making regulatory functions more efficient, effective, and responsive to Canadians by streamlining processes
and collaborating more closely with other organizations to ensure Canada continues to have a world class regulatory
environment.
Expected Results
Performance Indicators
Improved timeliness, transparency and predictability of the
Percentage of overall workload in backlog and percentage
regulatory process
of decisions issued within target for submission reviews
of:
– pharmaceuticals
– biologics
– food additives, packaging, chemical contaminants,
novel foods and nutritional submission processing*
2006-2007
2007-2008
$
FTEs
125.8
1,164.3
$
124.4
2008-2009
FTEs
1,198.0
$
119.1
FTEs
1,193.1
* Data is collected and reported quarterly. Our commitment is to meet 90% of performance targets for new pharmaceutical drug submission reviews by
March 2006, and for new biologic drug submissions by March 2007. Baseline data for expected performance results is available within current tracking
systems and internal records.
** All financial figures in millions of dollars
Health Canada will contribute to regulatory renewal
through improving regulatory performance and
modernizing the regulatory system.2 For example,
given the increasing number and complexity of drug
submissions, the initiatives under the Therapeutics
Access Strategy will continue to reduce and eliminate
submission backlogs, enabling us to meet our
performance targets for pharmaceuticals in
March 2006 and biologics and genetic therapies by
March 2007.3 In addition, we are reducing submission
times for veterinary drugs and have set service
standards dependent on submission type. These
milestones will be met by enhancing human resources
capacity and increasing international collaboration
and cooperation as well as adopting and applying
project management techniques. The Community
of Federal Regulators, a partnership of all federal
departments and agencies that have a regulatory role,
is working to meet the requirements of the proposed
new Government Directive on Regulating and Smart
Regulations.4
36
We will continue to develop and apply innovative
approaches to the regulation of health products and
food to improve and sustain the timeliness and
efficiency of the regulatory process to address the
concerns of Canadians regarding safety, effectiveness
and access. We will develop new regulatory
approaches for radio-pharmaceuticals used for
diagnosis and radiation therapy; for product-specific
health claims for foods; for drug product licensing to
support early access to promising drug therapies; and
for a national approach to clinical trials. As well, a
new external charging regime will be developed as
part of a long term funding strategy to ensure
adequate resources to sustain regulatory performance
for human and veterinary drugs and other therapeutic
products. We will begin to review regulations that
require the pre-market safety assessment and
authorization of foods and food products before they
can be offered for sale.
As part of Health Canada’s initiative to strengthen
the safety system for therapeutic products, we will
strengthen the oversight of clinical trials and
investigational testing of medical devices conducted
in Canada, access points for patients to new and
innovative therapies. The trials and investigational
testing provide the evidence of safety and efficacy
required by the Regulations before a product may
receive a general market authorization from Health
Canada. The Department will increase capacity in
2006-2007 to allow the continued assessment of an
increased number of applications within targeted
time-frames; strengthen capacity to assess clinical
trial and investigational testing of adverse reaction
reports in order to detect, communicate and act on
safety signals; and engage sponsors earlier in the
clinical trials process. Moreover, through the safety
initiative, Health Canada will update the national
standards for blood and for cells, tissues and
organs, while continuing to develop and implement
an appropriate regulatory framework for these
components. A program for compliance inspections
of establishments will also be implemented.
Health Canada will work with the federal, provincial
and territorial health and agriculture agencies involved
in administering the national food safety system to
better respond to current and emerging food safety
issues. A major initiative will be Canada’s Strategy for
Safe Food. It engages federal, provincial and territorial
governments, industry, academia and consumer
groups to improve the overall management of the food
safety system in Canada by developing a common
vision and national priorities, and national public
health outcomes, targets and indicators.
We will continue to lead development of a federal
Biotechnology Stewardship Framework to encourage
an integrated approach to managing the risks and
benefits of biotechnology products and services
in the public interest.
Information, education and outreach on health products, food and nutrition
Description: Responding to the growth of Canadian public interest in health issues by disseminating more information,
written in language that is easy to understand, on how Canadians can maintain and improve their health.
Expected Results
Improved adoption in making safe and healthy choices for
health products, food and nutrition
2006-2007
Performance Indicators
Percentage of target populations using information in
their decision-making*
2007-2008
2008-2009
$
FTEs
$
FTEs
$
FTEs
13.1
93.6
13.0
96.3
12.4
95.9
* Data is analysed and reported every two years. Health Canada will conduct a survey to assess the rate at which people use information to make health
related choices. The target and actual rate will be determined in 2006-2007. The date to achieve the target is April 2008.
*All financial figures in millions of dollars
Health Canada will continue to provide useful
information about the risks and benefits related to
health products and food in order to help Canadians
make informed decisions about their health. For
example, we will develop food labelling policies as
part of an integrated health and food safety policy
tool kit that will be capable of responding more
quickly and effectively to current and emerging health
and food safety challenges. MedEffect, part of the
initiative to strengthen the therapeutic products safety
system, will enable us to maintain a website for
posting safety alerts, public health advisories, press
releases and notices for health professionals,
consumers and other interested parties.5 A similar
website has been developed for veterinary drugs.6
Also, as part of the overall effort to better inform
37
Canadians, Health Canada will continue to provide
balanced information on newer technologies and
their applications, including biotechnology and
nano-technology.
Promoting and supporting healthy eating and
informing Canadians about risks related to the food
supply are key in helping them to maintain and
improve their health. For instance, Canada’s Food
Guide to Healthy Eating plays an important role
in communicating healthy eating to Canadians. In
2006, a revised Food Guide will be completed and
disseminated along with supporting materials,
including a resource for intermediaries and a
web-based interactive component. The Food Guide
is being revised to ensure the guidance it offers
continues to promote a pattern of eating that meets
nutrient needs, promotes health, and minimizes the
risk of nutrition-related chronic diseases. At the same
time, the revision will strive to improve Canadians’
understanding and application of the Food Guide.
Health Canada is working with the Public Health
Agency of Canada to advance the healthy eating
component of the Integrated Strategy on Healthy
Living and Chronic Disease with a focus on multisectoral leadership and collaboration nationally and
internationally. In addition, through this initiative
Health Canada will develop nationally agreed upon
nutrition indicators and targets, enhance efforts in
knowledge development, synthesis and exchange, as
well as develop and enhance nutrition surveillance
capacity.
In 2006, an interactive Nutrition Label tool on the
Health Canada website will be launched to help
Canadians make informed choices about the foods
they eat.7 The tool will explain how the information on
the new food label, which became mandatory on most
prepackaged foods in December 2005, can be used
to make healthy food choices. Enhancing awareness
of nutrition labelling will also be accomplished
through related initiatives such as the launch of the
revised Canada’s Food Guide.
Monitoring safety and therapeutic effectiveness and risk management
Description: Increasing the responsiveness to specific public health issues through the development of monitoring and
surveillance systems and stronger compliance and enforcement activities.
Expected Results
Strengthened vigilance over safety and therapeutic
effectiveness for health products and food on the market
2006-2007
Performance Indicators
Overall rating of Health Canada’s post-market safety
and therapeutic effectiveness activities*
2007-2008
$
FTEs
104.8
1,171.3
$
103.7
2008-2009
FTEs
1,205
$
99.2
FTEs
1,200.3
* Health Canada’s performance will be assessed through surveys, compliance rates and statistical analysis of adverse reaction data. Results from surveys
such as those conducted by the Canadian Hemophilia Society will be reviewed as they are available.8 Target of 95% compliance from inspections based
on internal records has been set for health products. Implementation of new technologies will be used to meet internally harmonized standards for
adverse reaction reports by 2007.
*All financial figures in millions of dollars
Recognizing the cross cutting nature of nutritionrelated surveillance activities, we will continue to
transfer knowledge and build capacity needed for
creating and improving evidence-based policies,
programs and community interventions in collaboration
with the following partners: Statistics Canada, the
38
Public Health Agency of Canada, the Canadian
Institutes of Health Research, and stakeholder
organizations such as the Federal/Provincial/Territorial
Group on Nutrition, the Network on Healthy Eating and
the Canadian Community Health Survey (CCHS) User’s
Group. Specific activities in 2006-2007 will include
the approval of national nutrition indicators, the
dissemination of a user’s guide to assist nutrition
stakeholders with the interpretation of the CCHS
nutrition data, and the dissemination of a themed
report on Food Security using CCHS data.9
The 2006-2007 Canadian Health Measures Survey
conducted by Statistics Canada will help increase
Health Canada’s capacity to monitor determinants of
healthy eating. For example, the results of the survey
will help decision-making related to the fortification
of foods and the assessment of the prevalence of
nutrition-related risk factors for cardiovascular disease
and diabetes.
Health Canada will implement new safety measures
to strengthen post-market surveillance activities
designed to improve real world safety and
effectiveness that are linked to the National
Pharmaceutical Strategy. We have developed and
used the Canadian Adverse Drug Reaction Information
System to monitor suspected adverse reactions to
health products. With significant advancements in
technology and the establishment of international
standards for data transmission, we will obtain and
begin the implementation of a new and advanced
adverse reaction monitoring system. The system will
enable the collection and assessment of adverse
reaction reports which span the entire life-cycle of
health products, from pre-market testing to postmarket use, and will improve the overall efficiency of
processing, managing and assessing adverse reaction
reports. The system will comply with international
standards recommended by the International
Conference on Harmonization. For veterinary drugs,
we have developed an adverse drug reaction reporting
system and plan to develop a closer link between
pre-market and post-market activities. In addition,
Health Canada will consult with stakeholders and
Environment Canada to develop environmental
assessment regulations to help minimize the effects
of therapeutic products on the environment.
Clinical trials require compliance inspections to protect
people enrolled in them as well as the integrity and
accuracy of the data that supports the application for
Health Canada’s Inspectorate Information
Quality Management team is managed
nationally from within the Quebec Region. One of
its responsibilities are the international mutual
recognition agreements covering drug/medicinal
products good manufacturing practices. Through
this program, four evaluations of such mutual
recognition agreements were conducted with the
Czech Republic and Hungary.
new drugs bound for market. Through the initiative to
strengthen the safety system, the number of clinical
trial inspections in 2006-2007 will be increased to
60, equivalent to 1.5% of all clinical trials, with a view
to achieving the international level of 2% in future
years. This objective was recommended by the
Standing Committee on Health in 2004.10
The 2004 Office of the Auditor General’s Report noted
the need to take action concerning unapproved
medical devices on the Canadian market.11 Health
Canada had already implemented an inspection
program for medical devices establishments in 2004
with limited funds. For 2006-2007, the Therapeutic
Product Safety Initiative is increasing the program’s
funding to $1.8 million to conduct an estimated 170
inspections and associated follow up activities on
medical devices establishments. This will increase our
presence in the field and will encourage greater
compliance with the Medical Devices Regulations.12
Health Canada will continue to work with PHAC to
implement the Canadian Pandemic Influenza Plan and
to support the WHO’s Global Agenda for Influenza
Surveillance and Control. The Department will spend
$6.2 million over 5 years, as well as $1.2 million
ongoing, for planning and preparedness activities,
providing regulatory guidance during the development
of a prototype vaccine, developing a regulator’s
emergency implementation plan and designing an
accelerated approval process.
39
Transparency, public accountability and stakeholder relationships
Description: Bringing more transparency to our decision-making processes by providing more accessible information about
the science underpinning our decisions. Health Canada is also strengthening its capacity to involve the public in decisionmaking that in the past have been limited to scientific experts.
Expected Results
Improved public confidence and trust in the safety of
health products, food and the regulatory system
Performance Indicators
Level of public confidence of safety of health products,
food, and nutrition
Percentage of stakeholders who hold a positive view on
2006-2007
Level of public confidence of safety of health products,
food, and nutrition
HPFB’s transparency and openness regarding regulation
of health products and food
2007-2008
$
FTEs
18.3
163.0
$
18.1
2008-2009
FTEs
167.7
$
17.4
FTEs
167.0
The progress of public confidence will be monitored with the aim of maintaining or increasing this level. The goal is to attain 85% of stakeholders holding
a positive view on transparency and openness initiatives related to health products and food. Feedback from stakeholders will be sought as part of
consultation activities to learn and improve over time.
*All financial figures in millions of dollars
Incorporating the views of citizens and stakeholders is
critical for effective regulation in the public interest.
Maintaining and strengthening public confidence is
especially important in a world where the accelerating
rate of scientific and technological advances carries
both benefits and risks. Public confidence in the
regulatory system, particularly as it applies to healthrelated products and services, is a prerequisite for
ensuring that new and sustainable health innovations
are available to and used by Canadians. As such,
Health Canada is developing new tools to improve the
transparency and openness of our regulatory system
including convening national consultations and public
forums on therapeutic health product and food safety
issues important to Canadians, as well as developing
and updating food safety guidelines, and assuring that
new substances used in health products meet
Canada’s environmental assessment requirements.
Health Canada’s Office of Paediatric Initiatives will
serve as a focal point for an integrated approach to
child health and safety issues across a number of
regulatory areas, including food and nutrition and the
safety and effectiveness of health products. The Office
will bring together internal and external stakeholders
40
to focus on these issues. The intended result for
Canadians is improved, accessible information on the
safety and effectiveness of health products used in
children and on safe and nutritious food for them
to consume.
In its April 2004 report, the Standing Committee
on Health recommended that Canada introduce
measures to ensure public confidence in the clinical
trial process, starting with the disclosure of
information about clinical trials through a public
database. An External Working Group was formed
to develop options for the registration and disclosure
of clinical trial information. Further consultations will
be held over the next year and will be informed by
international efforts to create a harmonized approach
to clinical trial registration and disclosure.13 This
process will allow for improved public access to
meaningful clinical trial information while respecting
the need for patient privacy and commercial
confidentiality.
Endnotes
1.
The Ayurvedic Medicine Information Session, Dietary Guidance Regional Consultations, MedEffect Information
Session, and Regional Stakeholder Food Forum.
2.
www.pco-bcp.gc.ca/smartreg-regint/en/08/rpt_fnl.pdf
3.
Numbers of Health Canada clinical trial applications and medical device investigational testing applications
Clinical Trial Applications (30-day)
Clinical Trial Applications (7-day)
Clinical Trial Application – Total
Investigational Testing
2001
642
129
771
89
2002
614
677
1,291
94
2003
691
796
1,487
100
2004
707
1,026
1,733
123
2005(Q1-2)
628
1,066
1,694
131
4.
www.cfr-crf.gc.ca
5.
www.hc-sc.gc.ca/dhp-mps/medeff/index_e.html;
www.hc-sc.gc.ca/ahc-asc/branch-dirgen/hpfb-dgpsa/mhpd-dpsc/pediat_e.html
6.
www.hc-sc.gc.ca/dhp-mps/vet/index_e.html
7.
www.hc-sc.gc.ca/fn-an/surveill/index_e.html
www.hc-sc.gc.ca/fn-an/label-etiquet/nutrition/index_e.html
8.
www.hemophilia.ca/en/10.1.4.php
9.
www.hc-sc.gc.ca/fn-an/surveill/index_e.html
www.hc-sc.gc.ca/fn-an/surveill/nutrition/commun/index_e.html
10. www.hc-sc.gc.ca/dhp-mps/compli-conform/clini-pract-prat/report-rapport/2003-2004_tc-tm_e.html
11. www.oag-bvg.gc.ca/domino/reports.nsf/html/20040302ce.html
12. www.hc-sc.gc.ca/dhp-mps/compli-conform/info-prod/md-im/insp_strat_md-strat_insp_im_tc-tm_e.html
13. www.hc-sc.gc.ca/dhp-mps/prodpharma/activit/proj/enreg-clini-info/index_e.html
41
STRATEGIC OUTCOME:
Reduced Health and Environmental Risks from
Products and Substances, and Safer Living and
Working Environments
Program Activity – Healthy Environments & Consumer Safety
This program activity contributes to the Government of Canada Strategic Outcome: Healthy Canadians with Access to Quality
Health Care.
PLANNED SPENDING AND FULL-TIME EQUIVALENTS (FTEs)
Forecast
Spending
2005-2006
Planned
Spending
2006-2007
Planned
Spending
2007-2008
Planned
Spending
2008-2009
Gross expenditures
289.9
305.4
301.9
302.3
Less: Expected respendable revenues
12.0
15.4
15.7
16.0
Net expenditures
277.9
289.9
286.2
286.3
FTEs
1,927
1,956
1,963
1,966
($ millions)
Notes: The increase in expenditures from 2005-2006 to 2006-2007 is mainly due to an increase in the level of funding for the Canadian Environmental
Protection Act, which is partially offset by the Expenditure Review Committee (ERC) reduction.
The decrease in expenditures from 2006-2007 to 2007-2008 is mainly due to a sunset of funding for Implementing the Border Air Quality Strategy and
Related Air Quality Measures initiative. This decrease is partially offset by an increase in the level of funding for the Canadian Environmental Protection Act.
Figures include an amount for other departmental and regional infrastructure costs supporting program delivery.
Program Activity Description
This program activity touches many elements of
day-to-day living that have an impact on the health
of Canadians. These include drinking water safety, air
quality, radiation exposure, substance use and abuse
(including alcohol), consumer product safety, tobacco
and secondhand smoke, workplace health, and
chemicals in the workplace and in the environment.
We are also engaged in other health and safety
related activities including the Government’s public
safety and anti-terrorism initiatives; chemical and
nuclear emergency preparedness; inspection of food
and potable water for the travelling public; and health
contingency planning for visiting dignitaries. Much
of this work is governed through legislation including
the Food and Drugs Act, the Controlled Drugs and
Substances Act, the Hazardous Products Act, the
42
Radiation Emitting Devices Act, the Canadian
Environmental Protection Act, the Tobacco Act,
the Quarantine Act and others.
The Canadian public and governments are increasingly
recognizing the critical link between human health,
the physical environment and the economy. There
is growing evidence that environmental factors,
hazardous products, tobacco, alcohol and controlled
substances contribute to a number of health problems
including cancer, asthma and other illnesses and
injuries which ultimately will have an impact on our
health care system and society as a whole.
Building on our work to help protect the health of
Canadians and in accordance with the principles
of sustainable development, we will generate new
research, partnerships and increased federal
leadership to improve health outcomes, particularly
for vulnerable populations such as children and
young adults by:
Reducing health and safety risks associated with
tobacco consumption and the abuse of drugs,
alcohol and other controlled substances; and
Reducing risks to health and safety, and improving
protection against harm associated with workplace
and environmental hazards, consumer products
(including cosmetics), radiation-emitting devices,
new chemical substances and products of
biotechnology.
From a health protection perspective, the Department
will continue to focus on regulatory priorities such as
Legislation Renewal and its impacts on the Hazardous
Products Act, and we will also address regulations in
the area of tobacco and other controlled substances.
We will continue to improve national compliance and
enforcement programs so they are effective, riskbased, and harmonized with provincial, territorial
and international partners and stakeholders.
To protect the health of Canadians, we will continue
to advance science and use evidence-based
research to formulate our health promotion and harm
prevention programs and policies. Health Canada will
conduct research and use the science conducted
by a network of external science organizations to
respond to emerging health and safety challenges to
Canadians. We will create a science plan which will
outline the strategic scientific directions for our five
key program areas for the coming years and we will
continue to work closely with a number of other
federal departments and agencies on common
science-based issues, such as water.
We rely on professionals with expertise in applied
sciences (e.g., toxicology, epidemiology, biology) and
in both occupational and public health (e.g., nurses,
medicine, psychologists, industrial hygienists) to
achieve our key results for Canadians. The Healthy
Environments and Consumer Safety Branch must
compete with other organizations to attract highly
qualified scientists and health professionals.
To address this risk, we will develop and implement
a Human Resources Strategy focussed on succession
planning, learning, recruitment and retention in order
to ensure we have the human resources to support
our activities under this strategic outcome.
The broad mandate under this strategic outcome
requires sustained partnerships that have a significant
impact on the health of Canadians. For example,
Health Canada is the lead on horizontal files that
require significant interdepartmental collaboration,
such as Canada’s Drug Strategy. We contribute
significantly to the Government of Canada’s efforts
on health and environment issues. For example, we
share responsibility for the Canadian Environmental
Protection Act with Environment Canada. We also work
closely with Environment Canada on files such as
climate change.
Internationally, we will continue to advance some of
our key work with the U.S. on a range of issues such
as children’s health and the environment, sound
risk-management of chemicals and the Canada-U.S.
Memorandum of Understanding on Consumer Product
Safety.
Within the Health Portfolio, the Healthy Environments
and Consumer Safety Branch works in partnership
with the Public Health Agency of Canada, First Nations
and Inuit Health Branch, and Health Products and
Food Branch to achieve integrated approaches to
health. We also collaborate with the provinces and
territories through various committees to develop
guidelines on issues such as safe drinking water
and to coordinate nuclear emergency preparedness
actvities.
43
Performance Measurement Strategy
Expected Results Branch PAA
Reduced risks to health and safety, and improved
protection against harm associated with workplace and
environmental hazards and consumer products (including
cosmetics)
Performance Indicators
Percentage of federal public employees remaining at
work through and following an injury, illness or
traumatic incident
Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat Statistics on
leave, accommodation and injury in the workplace
Level of client satisfaction with occupational health and
contingency planning services
Client satisfaction surveys
Percentage of Canadians who are aware that their
health can be affected by environmental factors
Level of reported incidences of product related deaths
and injuries associated with: Consumer Products;
Cosmetics; Workplace Chemicals; New Chemical
Substances; Products of Biotechnology; RadiationEmitting Devices; Environmental Noise; Solar UV
Radiation.
Reduced health and safety risks associated with tobacco
consumption and the abuse of drugs, alcohol and other
substances
Prevalence of drug and substance abuse in Canada
Canadian Alcohol and Drug Use Monitoring Survey
Smoking prevalence in Canada
Reduce smoking prevalence from 25% to 20%,
Canadian Tobacco Use Monitoring Survey
44
Key Programs and Services
Tobacco Control
Description: As lead department for the Federal Tobacco Control Strategy, Health Canada supports the four pillars of
prevention, cessation, protection and harm reduction. Health Canada works with partners to pilot and evaluate a range of stop
smoking approaches. For instance, the Department develops and implements national and regional education campaigns that
inform Canadians about the health impacts of smoking and that provide information and referrals to help more Canadians
quit smoking, and reduce exposure to second hand smoke in public and private spaces. On the international front, Health
Canada, through its International Affairs Directorate, supports tobacco control initiatives around the globe.
Expected Results
Reduce smoking prevalence among the Canadian
population to 20%
Performance Indicators
Smoking prevalence rate
Measured by Canadian Tobacco Use Monitoring Survey
(CTUMS)
Reduce number of cigarettes sold in Canada by 30%
Consumption rates – number of cigarettes sold in Canada
Measured by industry reports
2006-2007*
2007-2008
2008-2009
$
FTEs
$
FTEs
$
FTEs
53.8
282
53.6
282
53.7
282
*All financial figures in millions of dollars
In Manitoba and Saskatchewan, the Tobacco
Control Programme will continue to ensure that
the nationally-recognized Retailer Toolkit
developed in Saskatchewan (preventing sales
to minors, etc.) will be adapted for use with
First Nations retailers on reserves. Tobacco
Enforcement Officers work hand-in-glove with
Prevention, Cessation and Education Program
managers and community based organizations.
Innovation and partnerships account for
consistently high Tobacco Act compliance rates
among retailers in the Region.
Key Initiatives
As part of our commitment to monitor and report
on the progress and success of the tobacco control
initiative, Health Canada will conduct an evaluation
of the first five years of the Federal Tobacco Control
Strategy. In order to determine the direction for
tobacco control over the next five years, the
Department will analyse the outcomes from strategic
planning sessions and consultations held with
partners during the previous fiscal year. The knowledge
derived from this evaluation will help us to most
effectively focus Tobacco Control resources and
activities for the future.
While considerable inroads have been made in
reaching our targets and reducing smoking prevalence
to 20% of the population, certain segments of the
Canadian population continue to experience
persistently high tobacco use, and further improvements
to the smoking prevalence rate will depend upon
addressing tobacco use among this population.
Historically, young adults aged 20 to 24 have had the
highest rates of smoking as compared with rates for all
other age groups in the Canadian population, and this
trend continues. For the first half of 2005, the smoking
prevalence for those aged 20 to 24 was 27% as
compared to 20% for the entire population 15 years
of age and older (CTUMS). Therefore, the Department
will focus its attention on youth and young adults who
are most at risk of smoking, and will work with the
45
provinces and territories to identify appropriate
interventions and future directions for this important
demographic. We will also provide support for targeted
prevention and cessation activities of the no-smoking
message through youth engagement initiatives, such
as Health Canada’s “Youth Action Committee on
Tobacco”, which will engage youth from across the
country to help young people in their schools and
communities live smoke-free.
Drug Strategy and Controlled Substances
Description: Health Canada administers the Controlled Drugs and Substances Act (CDSA) and its regulations, develops harm
reduction and promotion strategies to combat alcohol and drug abuse (including health promotion activities targeted at
youth), and provides expert scientific advice and drug analysis services to law enforcement agencies. Health Canada leads
Canada’s Drug Strategy, which was renewed in 2003. The Strategy is designed to coordinate and enhance substance abuse
programs across the country, and strengthen knowledge and partnerships in the areas of prevention, treatment, harm
reduction and enforcement to create healthier Canadians and communities.
Health Canada uses a variety of partnerships and funding vehicles to fulfill its mandate in this area. The Drug Strategy
Community Initiatives Fund (DSCIF) was recently established to fund initiatives at the national, regional, provincial/territorial
and local levels in two broad areas: health promotion and prevention, and harm reduction. DSCIF is delivered through Health
Canada’s national and regional offices and Northern Secretariat, with an overall aim to address problematic substance use
and to promote public awareness of alcohol and other drug issues. The Alcohol and Drug Treatment and Rehabilitation
Program (ADTR) aims to improve treatment for women and youth who are dealing with substance abuse problems. Health
Canada also provides funding for the treatment component of Drug Treatment Courts.
Expected Results
Reduced health and safety risks associated with the abuse
of drugs, alcohol and other controlled substances by
managing the Controlled Drugs and Substances Act and
its Regulations, and providing national leadership for
Canada’s Drug Strategy.
Performance Indicators
Reduced prevalence rate of substance use/abuse in
Canada and among target populations such as youth
Level of misuse/abuse of controlled substances
Change in the type and level of health-related, at-risk
behaviours
Change in the nature and level of the social, health and
economic costs associated with substance use and
abuse in Canada
2006-2007*
2007-2008
2008-2009
$
FTEs
$
FTEs
$
FTEs
65.1
347
64.8
347
65.0
347
*All financial figures in millions of dollars
Key Initiatives
Advancing the National Framework for Action to
Reduce the Harms Associated with Alcohol and Other
Drugs and Substances in Canada continues. Key
planned components include the initiation of the
Canadian Alcohol and Drug Use Monitoring Survey;
the development of a National Alcohol Strategy; the
implementation of the National Strategy to Combat
the Production and Distribution of Marihuana and
Synthetic Drugs and the Diversion of Precursor
46
Chemicals; the development of a national and
integrated approach to psychotropic pharmaceuticals;
and the establishment of single website access to
information about Canada’s Drug Strategy. There will
be an increase in research done in Canada on drug
and alcohol abuse, and a detailed analysis of the
Canadian Addiction Survey (CAS) of unique
components (e.g., alcohol, youth, etc.) in order to
support sound, evidence-based decision-making.
We will develop a strategy to enhance our inspection
capacity for compliance with the Controlled Drugs
and Substances Act (CDSA) and its regulations, in
particular the Precursor Control Regulations. From a
regional perspective, we will work on the provincial
Alberta Methamphetamine Partnership Strategy
Committee on Illicit Drug Use.
Marihuana is categorized as a controlled substance.
The Marihuana Medical Access Regulations allow
people who are suffering from grave and debilitating
illnesses access to marihuana. It is important to note
that the Regulations deal exclusively with the medical
use of marihuana. Through authority of the Marihuana
Medical Access Regulations, we will proceed with the
development of a pilot project to assess the feasibility
of distributing marihuana for medical purposes
through the conventional pharmacy-based drug
distribution system.
Health Canada will continue to operate four
regional Drug Analysis Service (DAS) laboratories
located in British Columbia, Manitoba, Ontario
and Quebec. The DAS programme has three
principal business lines: Drug Analysis, which
includes regular identification of seized police
exhibits; support in clandestine laboratory
investigations (illicit drug manufacturing); and
training to our clients (police, crown attorneys).
We assess approximately 100,000 samples per
year in the four facilities for law enforcement.
Such work helps to support the Enforcement
element of Canada’s Drug Strategy, along with
Prevention, Harm Reduction and Treatment. The
Ontario laboratory also provides drug standards
for the four DAS laboratories across Canada, and,
in 2005, was the first to make an application for
accreditation to the International Organization for
Standardization (ISO) 17025 standard.
47
Safe Environments
Description: The environment continues to be a key determinant of health for all Canadians. Recent studies demonstrate that
environmental factors contribute to a number of health problems. Air pollution, for example, is a factor in 5,900 deaths per
year in Ontario and is responsible for 30% of asthma and 5% of cancers in children. Improving the health of Canadians by
addressing environmental factors will strengthen their quality of life. The Safe Environments Programme promotes and protects
the health of Canadians by identifying, assessing and managing health risks posed by environmental factors in living, working
and recreational environments. The scope of activities encompassed within this area includes research on drinking water, air
quality, contaminated sites, climate change, and vulnerable populations assessment of risks from environmental impacts, as
well as preparedness for environmental emergencies. Health Canada is also the lead for coordinating Canada’s preparedness
for nuclear emergencies under the Federal Nuclear Emergency Plan.
Expected Results
Availability and Canada-wide adoption of measures to
control the risks to human health posed by environmental
contaminants
Performance Indicators
Percentage of completion of legislated obligations and
other commitments
Percentage of Canadians who are aware that their
health can be affected by environmental factors
Increased knowledge, understanding and involvement by
Canadians in environmental health issues
**
Science-based decision-making within Canada regarding
health risks of environmental contaminants**
Please Note: Work is in progress to develop a better set
of indicators for these expected results by Fall 2006
Improved scientific knowledge and capacity within the
Canadian scientific community and international
collaboration on environmental health issues to ensure
that Canadians have increased confidence in
environmental health information and protection
mechanisms*
2006-2007*
2007-2008
2008-2009
$
FTEs
$
FTEs
$
FTEs
68.4
576
68.1
582
68.3
584
*All financial figures in millions of dollars
Key Initiatives
Health Canada’s Sustainable Development Strategy
(2004-2007) reflects our commitment to protect
the health of Canadians from environmental threats.
Under this strategy, the department will advance the
development of the Guidelines for Canadian Drinking
Water Quality, and an integrated source-to-tap
approach to drinking water quality in Canada.
In collaboration with other federal departments,
Health Canada will develop a “Federal Waterborne
Contamination and Illness Response Protocol” to
ensure a coordinated and systematic federal
approach to dealing with outbreaks of waterborne
illness and contamination of drinking water. Health
48
Canada is also partnering with all three levels of
government on the Technical Advisory Committee on
Safe Drinking Water (TACSDW) to effectively address
public health issues pertaining to drinking water in
Alberta.
To assist in monitoring health risks attributable to
changes in air quality, the Department will continue
to build on its recently completed collaborative
international research to develop an Air Health
Indicator and will release the Air Quality Benefits
Assessment Tool to help quantify the health impacts
of changes in air pollution. In particular, the Safe
Environments Programme in Ontario and Region is
working to support the Canada-United States Border
Air Quality Strategy, and will examine the impacts
of air pollution on the health of children and other
vulnerable populations, such as pregnant women and
diabetics, in the Great Lakes Basin region. Health
Canada will also complete and disseminate the
Canadian Climate Change and Health Vulnerability
Assessment in 2007, which will assess climate
change impacts on human health and well-being.
To protect the health of Canadians from environmental
contaminants, Health Canada will make additional
progress under the Canadian Environmental Protection
Act, 1999 (CEPA) by completing the identification and
prioritization (“categorization”) of the 23,000 Existing
Substances on the Domestic Substances List. The
Domestic Substances List (DSL) is a compilation
of about 23,000 substances used, imported or
manufactured in Canada for commercial use.
In partnership with the Public Health Agency of
Canada and working through the joint Emergency
Preparedness Sub-Committee on Chemical
Emergencies, we will develop a joint Health Portfolio
response plan for chemical emergencies in 2006 –
2007. Health Canada is also working with its
provincial counterparts to strengthen guidelines to
protect the health of Canadians in the event of a
nuclear emergency, and will be participating in
international nuclear emergency exercises to assess
the implications of implementing radiation
contamination counter-measures.
In the Alberta Region, Health Canada, with the
support of the Health Innovation Fund, is
addressing the impact and influence of the state
of the environment on children’s health in the
region. A one-day symposium presently under
development with participation from federal,
provincial, territorial and other partners, will
provide a forum to exchange knowledge related to
research, policy and best practices in the area of
children’s health and the environment.
49
Product Safety
Description: As part of our legislative mandate, Health Canada identifies, assesses, manages and communicates to Canadians
the health and safety hazards and health risks associated with: consumer products; hazardous workplace materials; cosmetics;
new chemical substances; products of biotechnology; radiation produced by radiation emitting devices; environmental noise;
and solar UV radiation.
To carry out this mandate, we advance critical research, carry out needed risk assessments and develop risk management
strategies to minimize the exposure of Canadians to toxic substances in consumer, commercial, personal care and
pharmaceutical products. The Department annually carries out health risk assessments of approximately 800 new chemicals
and products of biotechnology notified under the New Substances Notification Regulations of the Canadian Environmental
Protection Act, 1999. When a significant risk is identified, control measures are imposed. We identify which of the Food and
Drugs Act substances in Canadian commerce between 1987 and September 2001 require priority assessment, and work with
stakeholders on the process for notification of these substances. The Department also carries out screening level health risk
assessments on existing micro-organisms, and both environmental and health risk assessments on new Food and Drugs Act
substances, including risk management when necessary.
Health Canada’s National Office of Workplace Hazardous Materials Information System (WHMIS) provides leadership to its
federal, provincial and territorial MOU partners regarding effective hazard communication of workplace chemicals, including the
delivery of training for WHMIS inspectors across the country. In addition, the Department will continue its involvement and
participation in standardization work to ensure continued improvement of radiation emitting equipment safety.
Expected Results **
Reduced risk of death and injury from exposure to
hazardous products and substances associated with:
Consumer products; cosmetics; workplace chemicals;
new chemical substances; products of biotechnology;
radiation-emitting devices; environmental noise;
solar UV radiation.
2006-2007*
Level of reported incidences of product related deaths
and injuries;
Level of exposure to hazardous products and substances
associated with: consumer products; cosmetics;
workplace chemicals; new chemical substances;
products of biotechnology; radiation-emitting devices;
environmental noise; and solar UV radiation.
2007-2008
2008-2009
$
FTEs
$
FTEs
$
FTEs
25.6
334
25.5
334
25.5
334
*All financial figures in millions of dollars
50
Performance Indicators
Key Initiatives
In support of the government’s commitment to
the health of children, we will proceed with the
implementation of the Lead Risk Reduction Strategy
(LRRS) for Consumer Products. These measures will
protect the health of Canadians by reducing health
risks related to lead exposure. Lead is hazardous to
health and is particularly dangerous for infants and
young children because they are more susceptible to
its harmful effects. The LRRS proposes maximum lead
content limits for four categories of consumer
products with which children are likely to interact.
Regulations for each category will be developed
separately, moving first on product groups where the
risk to children is greatest. We will also check for
compliance rates for products already regulated for
lead content. Performance will be based on the
removal of such hazardous products from the
Canadian marketplace and the level of public
awareness of risks.
Other regulatory and educational activities will also
support the commitment to the protection of
children’s health. For example, to protect the health
of children and reduce strangulation hazards that
are associated with flexible loops employed in the
manufacture and use of window covering products
(mini-blinds and curtains), regulations will be
developed to require mandatory adherence by
importers, advertisers and retailers to safety standards
for these corded window covering products.
To effectively manage the continuing incidence of
skin cancer, we need to ensure that children develop
healthy behaviours with regards to their outdoor
activities. The best time to influence or change
behaviours is at the time the behaviour is being
established. This is the fundamental driver for the Sun
Awareness Project, a school-based outreach program
to teach primary school children and teenagers of
both the benefits of sun exposure and the risks
associated with excessive sun exposure. The Sun
Awareness Project involves learning elements and
exercises integrated into the regular teaching schedule
at both primary and secondary schools.
At the World Summit on Sustainable Development
in 2002, Canada made a commitment to fully
implement the Globally Harmonized System (GHS) of
Classification and Labelling of Chemicals by 2008.
The GHS is viewed globally as the basis for the
sound management of chemicals, and enhances the
protection of human health and the environment by
harmonizing chemical hazard classification and
communication internationally. Building on
stakeholder consultations on the GHS, Health Canada
will make further progress toward carrying out the
legislative and regulatory changes needed for full
implementation by 2008.
In carrying out our responsibilities under the Canadian
Environmental Protection Act, 1999, a priority will
be placed on working with Environment Canada
to develop regulatory amendments to the New
Substances Notification Regulations (Organisms)
that reflect changes in the regulatory, policy and
science environment, such as the production of
transgenic, chimeric and cloned animals (e.g.,
livestock). In addition, we will work to develop
appropriate environmental regulations for substances
in products that are regulated under the Food and
Drugs Act.
51
Workplace Health & Public Safety
Description: The Workplace Health and Public Safety Programme (WHPSP) provides services to protect the health and safety
of the federal public sector, the travelling public, dignitaries visiting Canada, and others. It also establishes and promotes
national workplace health and safety policies.
Health Canada will continue to provide occupational health services to nearly 200,000 federal employees working in Canada
and overseas for approximately 100 departments and agencies. Health Canada delivers Employee Assistance Program
services on a cost recovery basis to approximately 143 Canadian public and para-public sector organizations. Through the
International Health Bureau, Health Canada provides emergency health services to Internationally Protected Persons and
their families while they are on official visits to Canada.
The health of those who travel within Canada is protected through voluntary inspection programs for passenger conveyances
to address public health risks relating to food, water and sanitation. Potable water regulations provide some authorities for
inspection and enforcement of water quality on conveyances. As well, under the Quarantine Act and in fulfilment of WHO
International Health Regulations, WHPSP Environmental Health Officers are responsible for inspecting and assessing
conveyances, goods and cargo, and ordering the detention, remediation, removal and destruction when necessary to protect
against the transmission of communicable quarantinable diseases.
Expected Results
Healthy Public Service
Performance Indicators
Percentage of federal public employees remaining at
work through/and following an injury, illness and/or
traumatic incident (Treasury Board of Canada
Secretariat Statistics on leave, accommodation and
injury in the workplace)
Improved Public Health for the Travelling Public
Client satisfaction with occupational health and
contingency planning services (client satisfaction
surveys)
Percentage occurrence of incidents of gastrointestinal
diseases on cruise-ships with a target of less than 2%
of passengers and crew
2006-2007*
2007-2008
2008-2009
$
FTEs
$
FTEs
$
FTEs
24.5
417
24.4
418
24.5
419
*All financial figures in millions of dollars
Key Initiatives
In light of newly emerging health threats, Health
Canada works with the Public Health Agency of
Canada (PHAC), Public Security and Emergency
Preparedness Canada, and other organizations to
plan, prepare and implement physical and psychosocial emergency responses to national health
emergencies such as pandemic influenza and terrorist
or suspected terrorist attacks. Health Canada supports
departments and agencies in their emergency
52
preparedness and response activities through the
provision of advice, guidance, training, health
evaluations, prophylaxis and immunizations and
will continue to support PHAC with environmental
quarantine services. We will also continue to offer
psycho-social services in support of federalized
emergency responders and federal public employees
who provide essential services during and
immediately following critical incidents.
We will develop approaches to better identify and
manage mental health and addictions in the
workplace. Areas of activity will focus on: preventing
and mitigating mental disorders and addictions
among federal employees through mental health
promotion, early identification and referral; a disability
case management program; and the development and
implementation of a comprehensive federal workplace
health strategy.
Web Links
National Research Agenda
www.hc-sc.gc.ca/ahc-asc/activit/strateg/
drugs-drogues/nat-res-rech/index_e.html
Drug Strategy Community Initiatives Fund
www.hc-sc.gc.ca/dhp-mps/substan/
fond-comm-fund/index_e.html
Canada’s Drug Strategy Campaign publications
www.hc-sc.gc.ca/ahc-asc/pubs/drugs-drogues/
index_e.html
Tobacco
www.hc-sc.gc.ca/hl-vs/tobac-tabac/index_e.html
Climate Change
www.hc-sc.gc.ca/ewh-semt/climat/index_e.html
Canada’s Drug Strategy
www.hc-sc.gc.ca/ahc-asc/activit/strateg/
drugs-drogues/index_e.html
Air
www.hc-sc.gc.ca/ewh-semt/air/index_e.html
Marihuana Medical Access Regulations
www.hc-sc.gc.ca/dhp-mps/marihuana/index_e.html
Scheduling of a number of controlled substances and
development of other proposed amendments to the
Precursor Control Regulations
www.hc-sc.gc.ca/dhp-mps/substancontrol/
index_e.html
Reducing the supply of and demand for drugs through
prevention, harm reduction, treatment and
enforcement programming.
www.hc-sc.gc.ca/ahc-asc/activit/strateg/
drugs-drogues/index_e.html
National Framework for Action on Substance Use
and Abuse.
www.hc-sc.gc.ca/ahc-asc/activit/strateg/
drugs-drogues/nfa-can/index_e.html
Water
www.hc-sc.gc.ca/ewh-semt/water-eau/index_e.html
Canadian Environmental Protection Act
www.hc-sc.gc.ca/iyh-vsv/environ/
cepa-lcpe_e.html
Healthy Living Initiative
www.msc-smc.ec.gc.ca/education/uvindex/
index_e.html
Globally Harmonized System
www.hc-sc.gc.ca/ahc-asc/intactiv/ghs-sgh/
index_e.html
Lead Risk Reduction Strategy
http://hc-sc.gc.ca/ewh-semt/contaminants/
lead-plomb/risk-reduction-risques_e.html
Workplace Health
www.hc-sc.gc.ca/ahc-asc/branch-dirgen/
hecs-dgsesc/whpsp-psstsp/index_e.html
* Other programs and services that contribute to this
program activity total $52.5 million for 2006-2007
53
Program Activity – Pest Control Product Regulation
This program activity contributes to the Government of Canada Strategic Outcome: Healthy Canadians with Access to Quality
Health Care.
PLANNED SPENDING AND FULL-TIME EQUIVALENTS (FTEs)
Forecast
Spending
2005-2006
Planned
Spending
2006-2007
Planned
Spending
2007-2008
Planned
Spending
2008-2009
Gross expenditures
60.5
58.6
58.2
54.1
Less: Expected respendable revenues
5.9
7.0
7.0
7.0
Net expenditures
54.6
51.6
51.2
47.1
FTEs
675
652
656
604
($ millions)
Notes: The decrease in expenditures from 2005-2006 to 2006-2007 is mainly due to the Expenditure Review Committee (ERC) reduction.
The decrease in expenditures from 2006-2007 to 2008-2009 is mainly due to a decrease in the level of funding for Building Public and Stakeholder
Confidence in Pesticide Regulation initiative.
Figures include an amount for other departmental and regional infrastructure costs supporting program delivery.
Program Activity Description
Health Canada’s program activity, Pest Control
Product Regulation, protects human health and the
environment by minimizing risks associated with
pesticides imported, sold, or used in Canada. The
activity is strengthened through the use of sound,
progressive science, modern risk assessment, risk
management approaches and innovative approaches
to sustainable pest management.
Science is the foundation for Health Canada’s
activities related to Pest Control Product Regulations.
We conduct assessments of risk to human health and
the environment arising from exposure to chemical
and biological pesticides as well as assessments of
the value of these products. In support of this work,
we develop assessment methodologies, pesticide
testing protocols, risk reduction strategies and risk
management tools. Scientific expertise is in place
in the following areas: toxicology, environmental
toxicology, analytical chemistry, environmental fate
and chemistry, biochemistry, endocrinology, ecology,
crop science, plant pathology, entomology,
occupational and bystander assessment, and
aggregate and cumulative assessment.
54
To meet the primary objective of this program
activity “to protect the health of Canadians and the
environment from unacceptable risks associated with
pest control products”, we collaborate with experts in
a variety of disciplines throughout the Health Portfolio
and with the five natural resource departments. We
also work with: the Canadian Food Inspection Agency
and provincial governments on compliance activities;
with Agriculture and Agri-food Canada to develop risk
reduction strategies and improve access to specialized
pest control; and with a federal interdepartmental
working group on pesticide research and monitoring.
This working group provides the opportunity for us to
discuss our research and monitoring needs, as well as
obtain information on the levels of pesticides in the
environment, effects on human health and the
environment, testing protocols, risk reduction
practices, pest control alternatives, and pesticides for
minor use. It also gives our partners the opportunity to
effectively link their research results to regulatory
decisions, and, at the same time, it will improve our
regulatory decision making process for pesticides.
Advisory groups play an important role in decisionmaking at Health Canada. The Minister’s Pest
Management Advisory Council allows for dialogue
between stakeholders and Health Canada. The
Economic Management Advisory Committee provides
strategic advice on improving efficiency and cost
effectiveness, and the Federal, Provincial, Territorial
Committee on Pest Management and Pesticides
helps strengthen federal, provincial and territorial
relationships in the area of pest management and
pesticides. The Committee also provides advice and
direction to federal, provincial, and territorial
governments on programs, policies and issues.
The major human resource challenge for this program
activity is to keep up with the pace of growing
scientific knowledge and industry innovation. We will
need to continue to recruit additional resources that
have the appropriate knowledge base, and develop
and train staff in a number of scientific disciplines.
This program activity has three main objectives:
protected health and environment; increased use
of reduced risk pest management practices and
products; and increased public and stakeholder
confidence in pesticide regulation. To achieve these
objectives we focus on five main activities that
respond to a number of challenges facing Health
Canada such as consumer demands, globalization,
and rapid scientific and technological change.
They are:
1. Regulatory Improvement
The new Pest Control Products Act, which came into
force June 28, 2006, will strengthen health and
environmental protection by enshrining in legislation
modern risk assessment and risk management
approaches that are currently applied as a policy
matter. These include specific protection for infants
and children, accounting for pesticide exposure
from all sources (including food and water), and
considering cumulative effects of pesticides that act
in the same way. It will also continue to support
pesticide risk reduction by ensuring that only
pesticides that make a useful contribution to pest
management are registered and by expediting the
registration of lower-risk products. The registration
system will be made more transparent by
establishing a public registry to allow access to
test data detailed evaluation reports on registered
pesticides. Health Canada will continue to share
scientific results on pesticides with provincial,
territorial and international regulators to enhance
the process for international joint reviews of
pesticides. We will share sustainable pest
management practices with provinces and territories
to enhance agricultural stewardship. As a result,
Canadian growers will have improved access to
newer and safer pesticides so they can be more
competitive in the marketplace.
In addition, the new PCPA will strengthen postregistration controls for all products. These
requirements include: reporting by pesticide
companies of adverse effects related to their
pesticide products; re-evaluation of older
chemicals on a cyclical basis; public transparency
regarding the basis of regulatory decisions; and
ensuring in legislation the special review program
to address potential identified specific concerns
for registered products.
To support the need to provide Canadians with a
transparent and participatory regulatory process,
we will transform our work from traditional
business interfaces and information delivery
practices to interactive, web-based practices.
This transformation will allow information to be
delivered, stored, accessed, retrieved, exchanged
and used more effectively and efficiently, and
will lead to more efficient and cost-effective
management of the regulatory process.
2. New Pest Control Product Registration
New pesticides undergo an extensive pre-market
assessment by Health Canada to ensure their use
poses no unacceptable risks. This includes an
assessment of human health risk (including
worker and bystander exposure), food residues,
environmental risk (including environmental
fate and potential effects on wildlife), and an
assessment of value. Assessments are carried
out using the most modern scientific methods
available and meet international best practices.
55
To provide for continual updating of our
assessments, we are participating in a joint review
program with the United States through NAFTA
that is being expanded globally through the
Organisation for Economic Co-operation and
Development (OECD). This furthers the goals of
timely registrations, harmonization and work sharing
efforts to ensure pesticide risk assessments are
efficient and benefit from the best science available
internationally. Public consultation will continue to
be used routinely for the development of major
science policies and for registration decisions.
3. Registered Pest Control Product Evaluation
We re-evaluate older pesticides currently on the
market to determine if their continued use is
acceptable in consideration of modern data and
current scientific approaches. Significant public
consultation is undertaken on risk assessments
and risk management proposals to engage
stakeholders, including registrants, other
government departments, growers and their
associations, other non-governmental
organizations, as well as the general public.
Risk mitigation measures will continue to be
implemented where required to address concerns
regarding risks that could emerge during the
re-evaluation of a chemical. As required, under
the PCPA, we will continue to work with the
Environmental Protection Agency in the United
States on a proposed approach to re-evaluation
and develop a plan to work cooperatively on future
re-evaluations.
4. National Pesticide Compliance Program
We have the ongoing responsibility to help protect
the health of Canadians and their environment
by facilitating, encouraging and maximizing
compliance with the PCPA and its regulations.
Where non-compliance is detected, we apply the
appropriate enforcement (e.g., education,
monetary penalties or prosecution). Health
Canada promotes and monitors compliance with
the Act and Regulations principally through its
National Pesticide Compliance Program (NPCP).
56
The NPCP includes programs that address
regional, multi-regional or national compliance
and enforcement problems and issues. Much of
this work is accomplished through a regional
network of designated officials who inspect and
investigate those who manufacture, distribute
and use pesticides. An example of compliance
activities is the monitoring of pesticide use in
grape and blueberry production that will be done
this coming year. Other pesticides will be
monitored as issues arise.
In addition, we will continue to work in partnership
with provincial and other federal regulators and will
explore further opportunities for coordination and
collaboration with international organizations.
Specifically, in 2006-2007 Health Canada plans,
through an OECD workshop, to continue to develop
performance indicators for the compliance area.
5. Pesticide Risk Reduction in Agriculture
The Pesticide Risk Reduction Program supports the
objectives of the new Pest Control Products Act to
facilitate access to reduced risk products and
enhance sustainability in agriculture. It is a growerled, commodity-based program that is jointly
facilitated by the Sustainable Pest Management
Section of the Pest Management Regulatory Agency
and the Pest Management Centre of Agriculture and
Agri-Food Canada (AAFC). The goal of the program is
to improve the sustainability of Canadian agricultural
commodities through the development and
implementation of commodity-based risk reduction
strategies. Benefits resulting from this program will
include the development and adoption of alternative
pest management practices through applied
research into reduced risk alternative tools and
biopesticides.
AAFC and Health Canada will continue working with
stakeholders to develop commodity-specific
pesticide strategies for twenty priority crops including
apples, potatoes, dry beans and greenhouse
vegetables. Active stakeholder participation in
building and implementing strategies is critical to
the success of the program.
Performance Measurement Strategy
Expected Results
Access to safer pesticides
Performance Indicators
Number of new reduced risk active ingredients available
for use in Canada
Percentage of reduced risk chemicals and percentage
of biopesticide active ingredients registered/pending
registration in the U.S. that are registered/pending
registration in Canada
Number of new active ingredients registered through
the PMRA/U.S. EPA Joint Review or work share program
Number of active ingredients addressed through
re-evaluation
Strengthened compliance with PCPA and Regulations
Feedback from public and stakeholders
Users informed of reduced risk practices
Number of proposed and final regulatory decisions
Transparency of pesticide regulation
posted on the website
Implementation of reading rooms and adverse effects
reporting
Improved regulatory efficiencies and cost effectiveness
Efficiency gains achieved through electronic processes
and harmonization permit the integration of new
science policies and methodologies
Feedback from public/stakeholders
Informed public and stakeholders
Number of web hits
Number of responses provided to the public through
the Pest Management Information Service
Web Links
Pest Management Regulatory Agency (PMRA)
home page: www.pmra-arla.gc.ca
PMRA Strategic Plan 2003-2008
www.pmra-arla.gc.ca/english/pdf/plansandreports/
pmra_strategicplan2003-2008-e.pdf
57
STRATEGIC OUTCOME:
Better Health Outcomes and Reduction of Health
Inequalities Between First Nations and Inuit and
Other Canadians
Program Activity – First Nations and Inuit Health
This program activity contributes to the Government of Canada Strategic Outcome: Healthy Canadians with Access to Quality
Health Care.
PLANNED SPENDING AND FULL-TIME EQUIVALENTS (FTEs)
($ millions)
Gross expenditures
Less: Expected respendable revenues
Net expenditures
FTEs
Forecast
Spending
2005-2006
Planned
Spending
2006-2007
Planned
Spending
2007-2008
Planned
Spending
2008-2009
1,930.8
2,124.6
2,139.7
2,159.2
3.4
5.5
5.5
5.5
1,927.5
2,119.1
2,134.2
2,153.7
2,722
2,884
2,883
2,857
Notes: The increase in expenditures from 2005-2006 to 2006-2007 is mainly due to the yearly growth of the Indian Envelope and an increase in the
funding level for the Follow-Up to the Special Meeting of First Ministers and Aboriginal Leaders (September 12, 2004). This increase is partially offset by
the Expenditure Review Committee (ERC) reduction.
The increase in the expenditures from 2006-2007 to 2007-2008 is mainly due to the yearly growth of the Indian Envelope and an increase in the funding
level for the Follow-Up to the Special Meeting of First Ministers and Aboriginal Leaders (September 12, 2004). This increase is partially offset by the
Expenditure Review Committee (ERC) reduction.
The increase in expenditures from 2007-2008 to 2008-2009 is mainly due to the yearly growth of the Indian Envelope. This increase is partially offset by a
decrease in funding for the sunset of the Implementation of the First Nation Water Management Systems initiative.
The change in the FTEs is due to the increase of the salary component of the operating budget.
Figures include an amount for other departmental and regional infrastructure costs supporting program delivery.
Program Activity Description
The objectives of Health Canada’s First Nations and
Inuit health program activity are improving health
outcomes, ensuring the availability of and access to
quality health services, and supporting greater control
of the health system by First Nations and Inuit.
To achieve these goals, the Department must face
many of the same challenges as other Canadian
health care providers such as increasing costs, health
human resource shortages and an aging population.
The First Nations and Inuit health system has
additional challenges due to rapidly growing
populations with a higher than national average rate
of injuries and disease burden, and a population
living largely in remote and rural areas.
58
Within this context, Health Canada will focus on four
key priority areas in 2006-2007: continuing to provide
health-related programs and services; improving
quality and access to health-related programs and
services; promoting healthy living and disease
prevention; and improving accountability and
performance measurement. These priorities recognize
the importance that determinants of health such as
education and family income play in improving health
outcomes, as well as the need for innovation in
the field of health. They will also be informed by a
government review of the health commitments of
the 2005 Meeting of First Ministers and Aboriginal
Leaders.
Continued health-related programs and services
Health Canada provides a range of First Nations and
Inuit health programs and services that will continue
into 2006-2007. In partnership with First Nations and
Inuit, we will continue to provide primary health care
services in approximately 200 remote communities
by approximately 600 nurses through nursing stations
and community health centres in remote and/or
isolated communities. Through our regional offices,
we also deliver programs focussed on children and
youth, mental health and addictions, chronic diseases,
environmental health, and communicable and noncommunicable disease prevention. These services
supplement and support the services that provincial,
territorial and regional health authorities provide.
The Non-Insured Health Benefits (NIHB) coverage of
drugs, dental care, vision care, medical supplies and
equipment, short-term crisis intervention mental
health services, and medical transportation will
continue to be available to all 765,000 registered
Indians and recognized Inuit in Canada, regardless
of residency.
Health Canada works closely with our health partners
and other federal departments. We support the Public
Health Agency of Canada in its delivery of Children
and Youth programming through the Aboriginal Head
Start in Urban and Northern Communities program as
well as a number of pan-Aboriginal programs. We also
work closely with Indian and Northern Affairs Canada
through the First Nations Water Management Strategy
to ensure that all First Nations communities across
Canada have access to a safe and reliable water
supply.
Improving quality of and access to health-related
programs and services
The key elements of this priority include: working
towards seamless integration of services; increasing
the number of Aboriginal health professionals;
support for accreditation; improved community dental
capacity; and capital improvements and investments.
We will work to make progress towards better
integration of federal, provincial and territorial health
programming and services to First Nations and Inuit
and to ensure that services meet the needs of
Aboriginal peoples. This will include implementation
of the Aboriginal Health Transition Fund, which was
designed to enable federal, provincial and territorial
governments, First Nations governments who deliver
health care services, and Aboriginal communities to
devise new ways to integrate and adapt existing health
services. Attention will also be given to implementation
of best practices and lessons learned from a series of
Health Integration Initiative pilot projects.
Health Canada in the Atlantic Region is assisting
the Innu communities of Labrador to develop
their capacity to manage and control health
programs. In an effort to strengthen communitybased health services and to reduce health
status inequities, Labrador-based Health
Canada staff are working with the Mushuau Innu
First Nation in the planning of a healing lodge
and wellnes centre, and with the Sheshatshiu
Innu First Nation in the development of a
community health survey and a training plan for
addictions treatment staff.
Health Canada will continue to fund the Aboriginal
Health Human Resources Initiative to increase the
long-term supply of First Nations, Inuit and Métis
health professionals. In order to focus on Aboriginal
youth, scholarship and bursary funds will be made
available to eligible youth who pursue post-secondary
studies in health support. To meet the continuing
challenge of recruitment and retention of nurses to
support health services in communities, we will
provide ongoing professional development and
continuing education opportunities. In partnership
with the Canadian Nurses Association, we will launch
a National Nursing Portal to provide critical support to
nurses in rural and remote areas.
59
Health Canada will also continue to support the
development and implementation of First Nations and
Inuit accreditation and quality improvement activities.
This will increase the number of accredited health
care services in First Nations communities and ensure
that the health care provided is responsive to the
needs of the communities. We will also continue to
implement, in selected communities, the Children’s
Oral Health Initiative to improve the oral health of First
Nations children. This will focus on increasing the
awareness of preventive oral health care and positive
self-care practices for parents and caregivers, and will
serve to increase the capacity of communities to
deliver and maintain dental public health initiatives.
Finally, Health Canada supports the construction,
operation, maintenance and environmental
management of on-reserve health facilities and staff
residences. In 2006-2007, fifteen health facilities
will be constructed or expanded, and recapitalization
initiatives (repairs, replacements, upgrades) will
improve the working environment of clients and staff,
and enhance the quality of health care services
offered at the community level. In 2006-2007, Health
Canada will also invest $1.2 million in environmental
remediation and assessment to ensure operations of
health facilities in First Nations communities meet
environmental codes and requirements and are
consistent with the Department’s commitments to
sustainable development.
Promoting healthy living and disease prevention
This priority focuses on maternal and child health,
mental wellness, suicide prevention, prevention of
chronic disease, communicable disease readiness,
and safe drinking water. Initiatives have been put in
place, such as a Maternal and Child Health (MCH)
program to further expand and enhance the
continuum of services provided and to improve health
and social outcomes for pregnant women and families
with infants and young children within a targeted
number of First Nations and Inuit communities.
In 2006-2007, Health Canada will continue to
expand the number of sites and spaces available for
Aboriginal Head Start On Reserve (AHSOR) children
and will provide training to AHSOR workers.
60
Health Canada will oversee the development of a
strategic action plan in 2006-2007 to improve mental
wellness outcomes for First Nations and Inuit. Among
other issues, the strategic action plan will guide
Health Canada’s efforts to more effectively position its
current programming so that they are better able to
serve the diverse needs of Aboriginal communities.
We will also continue to implement the National
Aboriginal Youth Suicide Prevention Strategy
(NAYSPS). This new strategy will establish projects in a
targeted number of Aboriginal communities, where it
will focus on building a solid foundation for effective
approaches for preventing youth suicide. The activities
supported by NAYSPS will include: skills training; tool
and resource development; and primary prevention
and awareness initiatives that promote mental
wellness and youth resiliency. The strategy will also
develop protocols to respond to communities in crisis
and support various research projects. In addition to
these new activities, Health Canada will continue to
offer a continuum of mental health and emotional
support services to former students of residential
schools and their families as Canada renews its
efforts to resolve Indian Residential School legal
claims more expeditiously in 2006-2007.
Health Canada will continue its efforts to address
high rates of chronic disease within the Aboriginal
community. In particular, the Department will enhance
the Aboriginal Diabetes Initiative by increasing the
level of community-based funding that communities
can access to expand promotion, prevention and care
activities. Beyond our efforts to address diabetes, we
will develop a First Nations and Inuit Chronic Disease
Prevention Strategic Plan that will be developed in
partnership with key stakeholders and experts and
will inform the development of future chronic disease
prevention approaches.
In light of federal responsibilities to protect First Nations
communities against health risks associated with
communicable diseases, Health Canada will begin
to implement Communicable Disease Emergencies
Plans. Efforts will be focussed on increasing emergency
planning and response capacity at the regional
and community levels, strengthening collaborative
relationships with provinces, territories and stakeholders
and ensuring that emergency supplies are purchased
and readily available to First Nations and Inuit
communities. Health Canada will develop and pilot test
Pandemic Influenza Plans in First Nations and Inuit
communities by the end of 2006-2007.
Health Canada’s Northern Secretariat, working in
partnership with the Government of Nunavut and
Nunavut Tunngavik Incorporated (NTI), will build
on Nunavut’s 2005-2006 Health Integration
project to increase integration between federal
and territorial health promotion programs at the
community and territorial level and develop
initiatives to strengthen community involvement in
planning and delivery of wellness programming.
This partnership also fulfils the intent of Article 32
of the Nunavut Land Claim Agreement to provide
for Inuit participation in the development, design
and delivery of programs.
Finally, through the Water Management Strategy,
Health Canada will work in partnership with First
Nations communities (except the Yukon and the
Territories), to implement drinking water monitoring
as per the Guidelines for Canadian Drinking Water
Quality. This will involve the development of options
and an action plan for the implementation of a
regulatory regime for drinking water in First Nations
communities. Health Canada will investigate potential
drinking water problems and provide advice and
recommendations to First Nations communities and
federal partners such as Indian and Northern Affairs
Canada. Health Canada is also actively involved in the
development of community-based education and
awareness activities on drinking water quality issues.
Improving accountability and performance
measurement
Health Canada has developed a strategy to
monitor, measure progress and report on program
performance results. This includes establishing
In the B.C. Region, Health Canada will expand
and accelerate the “Drinking Water Safety
Program”. The Program will focus on capacity
building and certified training for community
members responsible for water quality, and
enhancing the surveillance, water quality
analysis, and data management components of
the program. Results of the program will include
an increase in the number of trained and
certified water quality operators; community
water analysis programs that meet national
guidelines; and a consistent, accurate and timely
reporting system on water quality.
performance measurement strategies in consultation
with the organizations delivering the services at the
community level.
We will undertake efforts to improve health
surveillance and information analysis, including data
development, data analysis, research evidence to
support priority-setting and decision-making on
health-related investments. For example, as a further
enhancement to the Aboriginal Diabetes Initiative,
Health Canada will begin to support the development
of an Aboriginal-specific diabetes research agenda
and will increase the Department’s surveillance
activities in an effort to identify research priorities
that will inform future diabetes programming.
Health Canada also draws information from evaluation
and review studies on areas for improvement. In
2006-2007, we will conduct a joint evaluation with
Indian and Northern Affairs Canada on the First
Nations Water Management Strategy. The Department
will also develop processes and tools and collect
information for evaluating primary health care,
immunization and mental health programs. It will
finalize the evaluation of the Home and Community
Care program.
61
Performance Measurement Strategy
The First Nations and Inuit Health program has
established expected results and performance
indicators to assess progress towards the achievement
Expected Results
Strengthened community programs; better health
protection; improved primary health care; and access to
non-insured health benefits contribute to improved health
status of First Nations and Inuit individuals, families and
communities.
of the strategic outcome. Use of the information below
will contribute to providing a snapshot of the health
status of First Nations and Inuit.
Performance Indicators
Life expectancy (at birth, on and off reserve)
Infant Mortality Rates
Birth weight
NIHB Client utilization rates
Key Programs and Services
The following describes six key program areas that
Health Canada will continue to be engaged in
throughout 2006-2007: children and youth; mental
health and addictions; chronic disease and injury
prevention; environmental health and research;
communicable disease control; and primary
health care.
Children and Youth Programs
Description: These programs are designed to collectively improve the cultural, emotional, intellectual and physical growth
and development of First Nations and Inuit infants, children and youth. Programs targeting maternal, infant and child
health, increasing children’s knowledge of language and culture, and increasing children’s readiness for school are the main
priorities of the Department’s children and youth programming. These programs include: Aboriginal Head Start on Reserve;
the Canada Prenatal Nutrition Program; the Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder program; and the Maternal Child Health
program.
Expected Results
Improved continuum of programs and supports in First
Nations and Inuit communities
Performance Indicators
Number and percentage of communities with programs
Number and type of participants in programs by
Increased participation of First Nations and Inuit
individuals, families, and communities in programs and
supports
2006-2007*
program type
2007-2008*
2008-2009*
$
Salary $
$
Salary $
$
Salary $
102.2
6.1
109.8
6.1
115.7
6.1
* Based on the PAA with adjustments for approved Treasury Board submissions. It was assumed that no growth would be applied to new funding and
non-envelope funding. It was also assumed that 3% growth would be applicable to envelope funding. Only salary dollars was provided because the
information on the number of FTEs is not available at this level.
** All financial figures in millions of dollars
62
Mental Health and Addictions Programs
Description: These programs provide culturally appropriate counseling services, addiction prevention and promotion services
and mental wellness services that are largely delivered by Aboriginal people. These programs include: Building Healthy
Communities; the Brighter Futures program; the National Native Alcohol and Drug Abuse Program (NNADAP) – Residential
Treatment; the National Native Alcohol and Drug Abuse Program – Community based; the Youth Solvent Abuse Program; the
First Nations and Inuit Tobacco Control Strategy; the National Aboriginal Youth Suicide Prevention Strategy; the Labrador Innu
Comprehensive Healing Strategy; and the Indian Residential Schools-Mental Health Support Program.
Expected Results
Improved continuum of programs and services in First
Nations and Inuit communities
Performance Indicators
Increased participation of First Nations and Inuit
individuals, families and communities in programs and
services
Number and type of participants in programs by
2006-2007*
Number of communities with programs (percentage of
communities with programs)
program type
Number of community health facilities by type
2007-2008*
2008-2009*
$
Salary $
$
Salary $
$
Salary $
139.1
5.8
130.7
4.3
133.3
4.4
* Based on the PAA with adjustments for approved Treasury Board submissions. It was assumed that no growth would be applied to new funding and
non-envelope funding. It was also assumed that 3% growth would be applicable to envelope funding. Only salary dollars was provided because the
information on the number of FTEs is not available at this level.
** All financial figures in millions of dollars
Chronic Disease and Injury Prevention Programs
Description: These programs support the development and implementation of community-based activities that promote
healthy lifestyle choices and support healthy and active living. Over the long term, these programs will contribute to the
prevention of chronic disease and injuries within First Nations and Inuit communities across Canada. These programs
include: the Aboriginal Diabetes Initiative; Nutrition and Physical Activity Promotion; and Injury Prevention.
Expected Results
Performance Indicators
Improved continuum of programs and supports in First
Number and percentage of communities with programs
Nations and Inuit communities
2006-2007*
2007-2008*
2008-2009*
$
Salary $
$
Salary $
$
Salary $
34.9
2.8
45.1
2.8
50.1
2.8
* Based on the PAA with adjustments for approved Treasury Board submissions. It was assumed that no growth would be applied to new funding and
non-envelope funding. It was also assumed that 3% growth would be applicable to envelope funding. Only salary dollars was provided because the
information on the number of FTEs is not available at this level.
** All financial figures in millions of dollars
63
Environmental Health and Research Programs
Description: These programs are designed to reduce the risk of exposure to environmental health hazards by improving the
capacity of communities to implement measures to manage, contain and control them. They also create and maintain
healthy and safe community environments through: the investigation of potential environmental health-related outbreaks;
raising awareness of environmental health hazards such as waterborne, foodborne and vector borne illnesses including
health problems associated with poor indoor air quality, such as mould in housing. They provide for pest control and build
community human resource capacity to adapt to environmental conditions, to maintain safe environments and to deal
safely with environmental hazards. These programs include: First Nations Water Management Strategy; West Nile Virus;
Contaminated Sites; Transportation of Dangerous Goods; Food Safety, Facilities Health Inspections; housing; and research.
Expected Results
Improved environmental health risk management
Performance Indicators
Number of communities with environmental health
officers/trained community-based water quality
monitors
Number of communities equipped with water
testing/sampling kits
2006-2007*
2007-2008*
2008-2009*
$
Salary $
$
Salary $
$
Salary $
46.1
11.9
46.7
11.9
22.2
9.1
* Based on the PAA with adjustments for approved Treasury Board submissions. It was assumed that no growth would be applied to new funding and
non-envelope funding. It was also assumed that 3% growth would be applicable to envelope funding. Only salary dollars was provided because the
information on the number of FTEs is not available at this level.
** All financial figures in millions of dollars
Communicable Disease Control Programs
Description: These programs support public health needs and priorities in the design, implementation, management and
delivery of programs to protect First Nations and Inuit communities from communicable diseases, and to implement
measures to manage, contain and control risks of outbreak. These programs include: Tuberculosis; Immunization; HIV/AID;
and Communicable Disease Emergencies.
Expected Results
Improved access to communicable disease prevention and
control programs for First Nations and Inuit individuals,
families, and communities
2006-2007*
Performance Indicators
Number and percentage of communities with programs
2007-2008*
2008-2009*
$
Salary $
$
Salary $
$
Salary $
26.0
6.1
26.8
6.4
28.0
6.4
* Based on the PAA with adjustments for approved Treasury Board submissions. It was assumed that no growth would be applied to new funding and
non-envelope funding. It was also assumed that 3% growth would be applicable to envelope funding. Only salary dollars was provided because the
information on the number of FTEs is not available at this level.
** All financial figures in millions of dollars
64
Primary Health Care Programs
Description: Comprehensive health care services are provided to remote and/or isolated First Nations and Inuit settlements
to supplement and support primary care services provided by provincial, territorial and/or regional health authorities. These
include emergency and acute care health services. Health Canada ensures links to appropriate care by other health care
providers and/or institutions as required by the client condition. The continuum of community health care and primary care
services includes illness and injury prevention and health promotion activities. This includes the Home and Community Care
Program and the Oral Health Strategy, for example.
Expected Results
Improved access to primary health care programs and
services for First Nations and Inuit individuals, families
and communities
Performance Indicators
Number and percentage of communities with programs
Number of treatment centres by type, in the
communities
Eligible client utilization rates of NIHB – Dental Benefits
2006-2007*
2007-2008*
2008-2009*
$
Salary $
$
Salary $
$
Salary $
232.9
66.7
233.7
66.4
237.8
65.7
* Based on the PAA with adjustments for approved Treasury Board submissions. It was assumed that no growth would be applied to new funding and
non-envelope funding. It was also assumed that 3% growth would be applicable to envelope funding. Only salary dollars was provided because the
information on the number of FTEs is not available at this level.
** All financial figures in millions of dollars
Web Links
Other programs and services that contribute to this
program activity total $1,539.9 million; for further
information on those programs and services please
see the following web links.
Aboriginal Head Start On Reserve
www.hc-sc.gc.ca/fnih-spni/famil/develop/
ahsor-papa_intro_e.html
Fetal Alcohol Syndrome and Fetal Alcohol Effects
www.hc-sc.gc.ca/fnih-spni/famil/preg-gros/
intro_e.html
Aboriginal Diabetes Initiative
www.hc-sc.gc.ca/fnih-spni/diseases-maladies/
diabete/index_e.html
Injury Prevention
www.hc-sc.gc.ca/fnih-spni/promotion/
injury-bless/index_e.html
Indian Residential Schools
www.hc-sc.gc.ca/fnih-spni/services/
indiresident/index_e.html
National Native Alcohol and Drug Addictions Program
www.hc-sc.gc.ca/fnih-spni/substan/ads/
nnadap-pnlaada_e.html
Tobacco Control Strategy
www.hc-sc.gc.ca/fnih-spni/substan/
tobac-tabac/index_e.html
NIHB
www.hc-sc.gc.ca/ahc-asc/branch-dirgen/
fnihb-dgspni/nihbd-dssna/index_e.html
Communicable Disease Control
www.hc-sc.gc.ca/ahc-asc/branch-dirgen/
fnihb-dgspni/phcphd-dsspsp/cdcd-dcmt/
index_e.html
65
Children’s Oral Health Initiative
www.hc-sc.gc.ca/ahc-asc/activit/strateg/
fnih-spni/cohi-isbde_e.html
Home and Community Care
www.hc-sc.gc.ca/fnih-spni/services/
home-domicile/index_e.html
Environmental Health
www.hc-sc.gc.ca/ahc-asc/branch-dirgen/
fnihb-dgspni/phcphd-dsspsp/ehd-dse/index_e.html
E-Health
www.hc-sc.gc.ca/fnih-spni/services/
ehealth-esante/index_e.html
Drinking Water Quality
www.hc-sc.gc.ca/fnih-spni/promotion/
water-eau/index_e.html
Aboriginal Health Human Resource Initiative
www.hc-sc.gc.ca/ahc-asc/activit/strateg/
fnih-spni/ahhri-irrhs_e.html
66
Supplementary
Information
3
Table 1: Departmental Planned Spending and Full Time Equivalents
Planned
Spending
2006-2007
Planned
Spending
2007-2008
Planned
Spending
2008-2009
448.4
288.6
218.2
214.9
Health Products and Food
262.4
303.2
298.4
283.1
Healthy Environments and Consumer Safety
287.8
306.1
301.7
301.3
Pest Control Product Regulation
58.3
58.7
58.2
54.1
First Nations and Inuit Health
1,867.7
2,087.9
2,126.9
2,138.8
Budgetary Main Estimates (gross)
2,924.6
3,044.5
3,003.4
2,992.2
68.9
69.1
69.4
69.7
2,855.7
2,975.4
2,934.0
2,922.5
($ millions)
Health Policy, Planning and Information
Less: Respendable Revenues
Total Main Estimates
Forecast
Spending
2005-2006
Adjustments: (1)
Governor General Special Warrants:
Operating Budget Carry Forward (horizontal item)
14.1
Additional funding in support of Aboriginal health further to the Special Meeting of First
Ministers and Aboriginal Leaders on September 13, 2004
25.5
Additional funding to territories for medical travel costs and health systems reform
(TB vote 5)
30.0
Additional funding for initiatives related to the 10-Year Plan to Strengthen Health Care,
such as wait times reduction, internationally educated health care professionals, and
improved reporting to Canadians on the progress made in strengthening health care
($15.0 million from TB Vote 5)
25.7
Funding to ensure the safety of therapeutic products, including enhanced clinical trials
oversight, monitoring of drugs and medical devices in the marketplace, and the
implementation of new regulations for blood transfusion and organ transplantation
(horizontal item)
2.6
Funding to enhance early learning and childcare programs for First Nations on reserve
(horizontal item)
6.1
Additional funding for health risk assessments and protection measures related to the
Canadian Environmental Protection Act
1.7
Activities to mitigate the impact of the Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy (BSE) crisis
(horizontal item)
1.1
Funding to deliver federal programs and services, including health in two Labrador Innu
communities (Labrador Innu Comprehensive Healing Strategy) (horizontal item)
3.9
Funding to continue the Government’s plan to establish core genomics research and
development capacity (horizontal item)
0.2
Additional funding for the Access to Medicines Program which provides affordable access
to Canadian patented pharmaceuticals for the treatment of HIV/AIDS, malaria, tuberculosis
and other epidemics, in the least developed and developing countries
0.7
Funding related to the assessment, management and remediation of federal contaminated
sites (horizontal item)
0.6
Funding to strengthen initiatives in support of the Canadian Strategy on HIV/AIDS in Canada
(horizontal item) ($0.8 million from TB Vote 5)
1.2
Funding to improve the capacity to detect and the readiness to respond to a potential
pandemic influenza outbreak including emergency preparedness, antiviral stockpiling and
rapid vaccine development technology (horizontal item)
0.4
Funding for the environmental clean-up of the Sydney Tar Ponds and Coke Oven Sites in the
Muggah Creek Watershed (horizontal item)
0.1
Funding to launch an integrated public health strategy to reduce the impact of chronic
disease by promoting healthy living including specific initiatives to combat diabetes, cancer
and cardiovascular disease (horizontal item)
0.2
Funding to undertake projects related to the development and application of biotechnology
(Canadian Biotechnology Strategy) (horizontal item)
0.2
69
Table 1: Departmental Planned Spending and Full Time Equivalents (cont’d)
Forecast
Spending
2005-2006
($ millions)
Funding for the development of and reporting on environmental indicators related to clean
air, clean water and greenhouse gas emissions (horizontal item)
0.2
Funding for the delivery of federal programs and services, including health, to the
O-Pipon-Na-Piwin Cree Nation (horizontal item)
0.1
Less: Spending authorities available
Planned
Spending
2006-2007
Planned
Spending
2007-2008
Planned
Spending
2008-2009
1.5
1.6
0.4
-61.0
Other adjustments:
Collective Agreements
41.4
Joint Career Transition Committee (TB Vote 10)
0.1
Adjustment – Statutory Items
0.4
EBP Adjustment
7.9
Funding for the Genomics Research and Development Initiative, under the auspices of
the Canadian Biotechnology Strategy
4.0
Funding to Recognize a Landless Band and for the Registration of Newfoundland Indians
7.3
7.5
Funding for the Winter Olympics
0.6
One year extension of funding authority for First Nations and Inuit Non-Insured Health
Benefits Program Review
30.0
Funding for the Settlement Agreement for Indian Residential Schools
Funding for Avian and Pandemic Influenza Preparedness, with a Focus on Animal and
Human Health
1.5
Government Wide Efficiencies – Procurement Savings
-4.6
Year End Lapse
(2)
2.0
11.0
4.0
4.0
-66.9
Total Adjustments
Total Planned Spending
7.8
(3)
Less: Non-respendable Revenue
Plus: Cost of services received without charge
(4)
36.3
35.7
15.1
27.8
2,892.0
3,011.1
2,949.1
2,950.3
8.9
8.9
8.9
8.9
85.6
84.7
84.6
84.6
Total Departmental Spending
2,968.7
3,086.9
3,024.8
3,026.0
Full-Time Equivalents (5)
8,544.0
8,711.0
8,773.0
8,671.0
(1) Adjustments reflect Governor General Special Warrants and TB Vote 5 Access for 2005-2006.
(2) Year-end Lapse as per the 2005-2006 Public Accounts.
(3) Refer to Section 2 for an explanation by program activity of year-over-year fluctuations.
(4) Includes the following services received without charge: accommodation charges (Public Works and Government Services Canada); contributions covering employers’ share of
employees’ insurance premiums and expenditures (Treasury Board Secretariat); Workers’ Compensation (Human Resources and Skills Development Canada); and Legal Services
(Department of Justice Canada).
(5) Full-time equivalents reflect the human resources that the Department uses to deliver its programs and services. This number is based on a calculation that considers full-time,
term, casual employment, and other factors such as job sharing.
70
Table 2: Program Activities for 2006-2007 (in millions of dollars)
Program Activity
Operating Capital Grants Contributions
Health Policy, Planning
and Information
95.6
Health Products
and Food
291.9
Healthy Environments
and Consumer Safety
260.4
Pest Control Product
Regulation
58.7
Gross
57.1
135.9
288.6
1.4
5.9
4.0
303.2
1.0
5.1
39.6
Respendable
Revenue
Total Adjustments Total
Main
(planned Planned
Estimates spending Spending
not in Main
Estimates)
288.6
-0.2
288.4
-41.2
262.0
0.1
262.1
306.1
-15.4
290.7
-0.8
289.9
58.7
-7.0
51.7
-0.1
51.6
First Nations and
Inuit Health
1,144.7
1.5
30.0
911.7
2,087.9
-5.5
2,082.4
36.7
2,119.1
Total
1,851.3
3.9
98.1
1,091.2
3,044.5
-69.1
2,975.4
35.7
3,011.1
Table 3: Voted and Statutory Items listed in Main Estimates (in millions of dollars)
2006-2007
Vote or
Statutory Item
Truncated Vote or Statutory Wording
Current Main
Estimates
Previous Main
Estimates
1
Operating expenditures
1,674.4
1,552.6
5
Grants and contributions
1,189.4
1,201.8
(S)
Minister of Health– Salary and motor car allowance
0.1
0.1
(S)
Contributions to employee benefit plans
111.5
101.2
2,975.4
2,855.7
Total Department
The difference between the current and previous year is due to various increases and decreases to the reference levels, of which some of the major
increases are related to: the Special Meeting of the First Ministers and Aboriginal Leaders, the Strengthening the Safety of Drug Strategy, the Canadian
Environmental Protection Act, and the yearly growth of the Indian Envelope.
The major increases are partially offset by the major decrease in the level of funding for the Primary Health Care Transition Fund.
71
Table 4: Services Received Without Charge
($ millions)
2006-2007
Accommodation provided by Public Works and Government Services Canada (PWGSC)
36.6
Contributions covering employers’ share of employees’ insurance premiums and expenditures paid by
Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat Employers’ contribution to employees’ insured benefits plans and
expenditures paid by TBS
44.1
Worker’s compensation coverage provided by Human Resources and Skills Development Canada
0.8
Salary and associated expenditures of legal services provided by the Department of Justice Canada
3.2
2006-2007 Services received without charge
84.7
Table 5: Sources of Respendable and Non-Respendable Revenues
RESPENDABLE REVENUES (millions of dollars)
Program Activity
Forecast
Revenue
2005-2006
Planned
Revenue
2006-2007
Planned
Revenue
2007-2008
Planned
Revenue
2008-2009
Health Products and Food
37.7
41.2
41.2
41.2
Healthy Environments and Consumer Safety
12.0
15.4
15.7
16.0
Pest Control Product Regulation
5.9
7.0
7.0
7.0
First Nations and Inuit Health
3.4
5.5
5.5
5.5
Total Respendable Revenues
59.0
69.1
69.4
69.7
NON-RESPENDABLE REVENUES (millions of dollars)
Program Activity
Forecast
Revenue
2005-2006
3.9
Planned
Revenue
2006-2007
3.9
Planned
Revenue
2007-2008
3.9
Planned
Revenue
2008-2009
3.9
Healthy Environments and Consumer Safety
1.7
1.7
1.7
1.7
Pest Control Product Regulation
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
First Nations and Inuit Health
2.3
2.3
2.3
2.3
Total Non-Respendable Revenues
8.9
8.9
8.9
8.9
Total Respendable and
Non-Respendable Revenues
67.9
78.0
78.3
78.6
Health Products and Food
72
Table 6: Resource Requirements by Branch and by Program Activity (in millions of dollars)
2006-2007
($ millions)
Health Policy Branch
Health
Policy,
Planning and
Information
Health
Products
and Food
Healthy
Environments
and Consumer
Safety
Pest
Control
Product
Regulation
First
Nations
and Inuit
Health
269.6
Health Products and Food Branch
Total
Planned
Spending
269.6
204.4
Healthy Environments and Consumer
Safety Branch
204.4
237.5
Pest Management Regulatory Agency
237.5
40.1
First Nations and Inuit Health Branch
40.1
1,997.9
1,997.9
Chief Financial Officer Branch
3.2
9.2
8.6
2.0
16.7
39.7
Corporate Services Branch
7.9
24.3
21.9
4.8
41.3
100.2
Departmental Executive Branch*
7.7
24.2
21.9
4.7
63.2
121.7
288.4
262.1
289.9
51.6
2,119.1
3,011.1
Total
Note:
* Includes such areas as Communications, Legal Services, Office of the Chief Scientist, Audit and Accountability Bureau, Executive Offices and Offices of
Regional Directors General.
73
Table 7: Major Regulatory Initiatives
PART A – NEW INITIATIVES
PROGRAM ACTIVITY: HEALTH POLICY, PLANNING AND INFORMATION
Regulations
Regulations under the Assisted
Human Reproduction Act
Expected Results
New regulations will protect the health and safety of Canadians who use assisted
human reproduction (AHR) procedures and ensure that AHR-related research, which
may help find treatments for infertility and diseases, takes place in a controlled
environment. Regulated activities include embryo research, clinical and laboratory
practices and pre-implantation genetic diagnosis. The regulatory framework will
also include a licensing framework for AHR activities, and provisions governing the
reimbursement of expenditures, counselling, and the reporting of health information.
PROGRAM ACTIVITY: HEALTH PRODUCTS AND FOOD
Regulations
Food and Drug Regulations
(Amendments to Division 3
respecting Positron Emitting
Radiopharmaceuticals)
Expected Results
Amendment to Part C, Division 3 of the Food and Drug Regulations to provide
for an exemption for the requirement to file Clinical Trial applications for certain
radiopharmaceutical studies. The amended regulations will eliminate regulatory
burden for certain limited basic research studies, while helping to ensure that
patient safety is not compromised.
Food and Drug Regulations
(Introduction of Emergency Use New
Drug Regulations in Division 8)
Division 8 of the Food and Drug Regulations requires manufacturers of new drugs
intended for sale in Canada to provide substantial evidence of clinical effectiveness
in humans. This initiative will provide Health Canada with a formal mechanism to
approve products which only contain substantial evidence of clinical effectiveness
in animal or in-vitro studies for use in emergency situations and meet emergency
preparedness measures, such as the approval and distribution of a vaccine for the
treatment and prevention of a pandemic influenza virus.
Food and Drug Regulations
(Prohibition of Importation for
Personal Use)
Increase the scope of the prohibition on importation of veterinary drugs to include
the personal importation of drugs intended to be used in food-producing animals to
avoid potentially harmful residues in food products from animals treated with these
drugs.
Food and Drug Regulations
(Carbadox)
Prohibition of sale of products containing carbadox for sale in Canada to avoid
potentially harmful residues in food products from animals treated with this drug.
Medical Device Regulations
(Introduce additional requirements
for investigational testing for medical
devices)
Further address risks to health associated with investigational testing by requiring
conformity to Good Clinical Practices, reporting to Health Canada for reviewing/
monitoring, and introducing an inspection program.
Medical Device Regulations
(Amendment to regulate the
reprocessing of single-use devices)
The amended regulations will mitigate the risks associated with the reprocessing of
single-use devices by requiring reprocessors of single-use devices to operate under
a standards-based licencing program administered by Health Canada.
Food and Drug Regulations
(Regulations amending Divisions 1
and 8, Progressive Licensing Project)
A new regulatory framework that is based on sound science and risk management
is being developed, including revised requirements for initial licensing of new
products, provisions allowing for conditions of licensing (e.g., post-market
commitments), regulations for the content and revisions of product monographs,
provisions for continual evaluation and re-evaluation of licenses, new enforcement
and compliance tools, regulations for the issuance of risk communication tools,
and provisions for public involvement in the regulatory process.
74
Table 7: Major Regulatory Initiatives (cont’d)
PROGRAM ACTIVITY: PEST CONTROL PRODUCT REGULATION
Regulations
Pest Control Products Act
(Sales Information Reporting
Regulations)
Expected Results
New regulations will specify how pest control product sales information will be
collected by specifying the requirements for recording, retaining and reporting sales
of pest control products.
PART B – ONGOING INITIATIVES
PROGRAM ACTIVITY: HEALTH PRODUCTS AND FOOD
Regulations
Food and Drugs Act
(New regulatory framework for cells,
tissues and organs intended for use
in transplantation)
Expected Results
The new regulations will aim to balance the need for safe cells, tissues, and organs
of high quality with the need to ensure the availability of cells, tissues and organs
for transplantation. Phase I regulations will focus on the basic safety requirements
for human cells, tissues and organs. Phase II regulations will include adverse event
reporting requirements and a compliance and enforcement strategy.
Food and Drugs Act
(New Regulations Respecting Blood
and Blood Components)
The new regulations will aim to balance the need for safe blood and blood
components with the need to ensure their availability for transfusion. They will
include basic safety requirements, adverse event reporting requirements and a
compliance and enforcement strategy.
Food and Drug Regulations
(Amendment to provisions respecting
plasmapheresis in Division 4 of
Part C)
The amended regulations will reflect current methods and practices used to collect
human plasma as well as the list of transmissible diseases for which tests must be
performed in order to maximize the safety of plasma and plasma donors.
Food and Drugs Act
(Amendment to the Processing and
Distribution of Semen for Assisted
Conception Regulations)
The amended regulations will reflect current safety standards for semen used in
assisted conception.
Food and Drug Regulations
(Addition of Vitamins and Minerals
to Foods)
Facilitation of greater consumer choice and industry innovation by revision of
regulations on the addition of vitamins and mineral nutrients to foods taking into
account the role of nutrient addition to foods, consumer needs and expectations,
and industry requests.
Food and Drug Regulations
(Enhanced Labelling)
Enhanced protection of allergic consumers through mandatory labelling of specific
food allergens, gluten sources and sulphites when present at 10 parts per million or
more on the labels of prepackaged food products, whether they have been added
directly or indirectly.
Food and Drug Regulations
(Mandatory Labelling of Raw Ground
Meat and Ground Poultry)
Reduction of foodborne illness as a result of providing safe handling information on
the labels of these products which, due to their raw state, can introduce diseasecausing bacteria to the food preparation environment.
Food and Drug Regulations
(Health Claims)
Addition of two diet-related health claims to the list of claims manufacturers can
use to promote healthy foods (e.g., fruits, vegetables and whole grains and reduced
risk of heart disease, folic acid and reduced risk of neural tube defects).
Food and Drug Regulations
(Saccharin)
Availability of an additional intense sweetener to allow a wider range of low sugar or
sugar free food products for the benefit of consumers who wish to consume these
products.
Food and Drug Regulations
(Caffeine)
Additional label information on levels of caffeine in prepackaged beverages,
including caffeine containing energy drinks, to allow consumers to make an
informed choice about their caffeine intake.
75
Table 7: Major Regulatory Initiatives (cont’d)
Regulations
Food and Drug Regulations
(Labelling of Unpasteurized Juice)
Expected Results
Reduction of foodborne illness related to the consumption of prepackaged
unpasteurized juice products by providing additional information on the labels of
these products.
Food and Drug Regulations
(Revisions to Division 12 –
Prepackaged Water and Ice)
Modernization and expansion of the safety and labelling requirements for
prepackaged water and ice products.
Food and Drug Regulations
(Regulations amending the Special
Access Program)
The current Special Access Program allows for the use of unauthorized drugs
prescribed to patients on an individual basis. The amendment will allow for the
block release of unauthorized drugs to a population and/or for stockpiling to
address public health emergencies.
Food and Drug Regulations
(Regulations amending the data
protection provisions)
The data protection provisions are being amended to provide effective data
protection for a period of eight years for innovator drugs that contain medicinal
ingredients not previously approved for sale in Canada. Submissions including
pediatric studies that were designed and conducted with the purpose of increasing
knowledge about the drug in pediatric age groups will be protected for an additional
six months.
PROGRAM ACTIVITY: HEALTHY ENVIRONMENTS AND CONSUMER SAFETY
Regulations
Controlled Drugs and Substances Act
(Regulations to expand the authority
for regulated health professionals to
prescribe controlled substances
where appropriate)
Expected Results
Federal legislation will not unnecessarily restrict the professional practice of any
health profession regulated by provincial or territorial (P/T) authorities, including
practitioners of medicine, dentistry, veterinary medicine, podiatric medicine,
midwifery, and nurse practitioners, with respect to the use of controlled substances
in the treatment of their patients. This result will be achieved over the next 2 to
3 years as federal and P/T regulations are amended to allow health professionals
to prescribe controlled substances in accordance with the standards of professional
practice defined by their regulatory authorities. Achievement will be measured
by improved alignment of federal and P/T regulatory frameworks governing the
appropriate use of controlled substances for medical purposes.
Tobacco Advertising Regulations
Increased awareness of tobacco-related health hazards through mandating of new
health warnings in advertising. Awareness will be measured through surveys.
Tobacco Act
(Amendment to the Tobacco
Labelling Regulations)
Increased awareness of tobacco-related hazards through the introduction of new
health warnings on packaging. Awareness will be measured though surveys.
Tobacco Regulations
(Amendments regarding “Light” and
“Mild” Descriptors)
Reduced confusion among smokers regarding these descriptors. Greater awareness
that no class of cigarettes is a “safer” alternative. Achievements will be measured
through surveys.
Tobacco Retail Promotion
Regulations
Reduced visibility of tobacco promotion at retail. Achievements will be measured
through surveys at retail
PROGRAM ACTIVITY: PEST CONTROL PRODUCT REGULATION
Regulations
Pest Control Products Regulations
76
Expected Results
Revised regulations will include changes to clarify and modernize the Pest Control
Product Regulations (PCPR) to make the PCPR coherent with the new Pest Control
Products Act, and to formalize current procedures and practices for better
compliance.
Table 7: Major Regulatory Initiatives (cont’d)
Regulations
Pest Control Products Act
(Amendments to the Agriculture and
Agri-Food Administrative Monetary
Penalties Regulations)
Expected Results
Revised regulations will address violations under the new Pest Control Products Act
and regulations.
Pest Control Products Act
(New regulations on review panels)
The new Pest Control Product Act includes a process for the reconsideration of
major registration decisions by a review panel. New regulations will specify the
parameters for establishing review panels and for the selection and remuneration
of panel members. This will contribute to better public participation in the regulatory
process, increased transparency and increased public and stakeholder confidence
in pesticide regulation.
Pest Control Products Act
(New regulations on the reporting of
adverse effects from the use of pest
control products)
New regulations will specify the prescribed information and time frames for
reporting adverse effects of pest control products. This will contribute to
strengthened health and environmental protection.
77
Table 8: Details on Transfer Payments Programs
Over the next three years, Health Canada will manage the following transfer payment programs in excess of $5 million:
2006-2007
Organization for the Advancement of Aboriginal People’s Health (OAAPH)
Payments to Indian bands, associations or groups for the control and provision of health services
First Nations and Inuit Health Governance and Infrastructure Support (HG/IS)
First Nations and Inuit Community Programs
First Nations and Inuit Health Facilities and Capital Program
First Nations and Inuit Health Benefits
First Nations and Inuit Health Protection
First Nations and Inuit Primary Health Care
Bigstone Non-Insured Health Benefits Pilot Project
Grant for Nunavut Medical Travel Fund
Named Grant to the Health Council of Canada
Grant to the Canadian Patient Safety Institute (CPSI)
Grant to the Canadian Coordinating Office for Health Technology Assessment (CCOHTA)
Contributions for the Primary Health Care Transition Fund (PHCTF)
Health Care Strategies and Policy Contribution Program
Contributions Program to Improve Access to Health Services for Official Language Minority Communities
Grant to the Canadian Blood Services
Contributions in support of the Federal Tobacco Control Strategy (FTCS)
Alcohol and Drug Treatment and Rehabilitation Contribution Program
Drug Strategy Community Initiatives Fund
2007-2008
78
Organization for the Advancement of Aboriginal People’s Health (OAAPH)
Payments to Indian bands, associations or groups for the control and provision of health services
First Nations and Inuit Health Governance and Infrastructure Support (HG/IS)
First Nations and Inuit Community Programs
First Nations and Inuit Health Facilities and Capital Program
First Nations and Inuit Health Benefits
First Nations and Inuit Health Protection
First Nations and Inuit Primary Health Care
Bigstone Non-Insured Health Benefits Pilot Project
Grant for Nunavut Medical Travel Fund
Named Grant to the Health Council of Canada
Grant to the Canadian Patient Safety Institute (CPSI)
Grant to the Canadian Coordinating Office for Health Technology Assessment (CCOHTA)
Health Care Strategies and Policy Contribution Program
Contributions Program to Improve Access to Health Services for Official Language Minority Communities
Grant to the Canadian Blood Services
Contributions in support of the Federal Tobacco Control Strategy (FTCS)
Alcohol and Drug Treatment and Rehabilitation Contribution Program
Drug Strategy Community Initiatives Fund
Table 8: Details on Transfer Payments Programs (cont’d)
2008-2009
Organization for the Advancement of Aboriginal People’s Health (OAAPH)
Payments to Indian bands, associations or groups for the control and provision of health services
First Nations and Inuit Health Governance and Infrastructure Support (HG/IS)
First Nations and Inuit Community Programs
First Nations and Inuit Health Facilities and Capital Program
First Nations and Inuit Health Benefits
First Nations and Inuit Health Protection
First Nations and Inuit Primary Health Care
Bigstone Non-Insured Health Benefits Pilot Project
Grant for Nunavut Medical Travel Fund
Named Grant to the Health Council of Canada
Grant to the Canadian Patient Safety Institute (CPSI)
Grant to the Canadian Coordinating Office for Health Technology Assessment (CCOHTA)
Health Care Strategies and Policy Contribution Program
Contributions Program to Improve Access to Health Services for Official Language Minority Communities
Grant to the Canadian Blood Services
Contributions in support of the Federal Tobacco Control Strategy (FTCS)
Alcohol and Drug Treatment and Rehabilitation Contribution Program
Drug Strategy Community Initiatives Fund
For further information on the above-mentioned transfer payments programs see www.tbs-sct.gc.ca/est-pre/estime.asp
79
Table 9: Conditional Grants (Foundations)
Over the next three years, Health Canada will contribute to the following foundations using conditional grants:
2006-07
1. Canada Health Infoway Inc. (Infoway)
2. Canadian Institute for Health Information
3. Canadian Health Services Research Foundation
2007-08
1. Canada Health Infoway Inc. (Infoway)
2. Canadian Institute for Health Information
3. Canadian Health Services Research Foundation
2008-09
1. Canada Health Infoway Inc. (Infoway)
2. Canadian Institute for Health Information
3. Canadian Health Services Research Foundation
For further information on the above-mentioned foundations see http://www.tbs-sct.gc.ca/est-pre/estime.asp
Table 10: Horizontal Initiatives
Over the next three years, Health Canada will be involved in the following horizontal initiatives as either the lead or as
a partner:
2006-07
1. Canada’s Drug Strategy (lead)
2. Building Public Confidence in Pesticide Regulation and Improving Access to Management Products (lead)
3. Federal Early Childhood Development (ECD) Strategy for First Nations and Other Aboriginal Children (lead)
Further information on the above-mentioned horizontal initiatives see http://www.tbs-sct.gc.ca/est-pre/estime.asp
80
Table 11: Sustainable Development Strategy
Health Canada’s current Sustainable Development
Strategy entitled Becoming the Change We Wish to See
is a three year strategic plan that tells Canadians and
Parliament what general and specific commitments
Health Canada has made to sustainable development
(SD). To build on the success of the previous strategy,
the Department’s third strategy continues with the
themes identified in the previous one. These key
themes are:
Helping to create healthy social and physical
environments.
Integrating sustainable development into
departmental decision-making and management
processes.
Minimizing the environmental and health effects of
the Department’s physical operations and activities.
Whereas the Department’s first strategy contained
over 100 commitments, this Strategy focuses on
20 commitments, highlights how employees are
an integral part of the overall plan, and identifies
a number of practical tools to help incorporate
sustainable development at work and at home.
SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT STRATEGY COMMITMENTS
1.1.1:
In partnership with federal, provincial and territorial departments of health and environment, Health Canada will develop an
integrated, source-to-tap approach to drinking water quality in Canada.
1.1.2:
Health Canada will work with other federal departments to develop a compliance framework for drinking water quality in
areas of federal jurisdiction.
1.1.3:
Health Canada, in conjunction with other federal departments, will reduce cross-border air pollution by undertaking pilot
projects that enable greater opportunities for coordinated air quality management between Canada and the United States.
1.1.4
Health Canada will collaborate with partners and other federal departments to assess climate change impacts on human
health and well-being, and research and develop approaches to adaptation planning and implementation as part of the
Climate Change Plan for Canada.
1.1.5:
Health Canada will work in consultation with stakeholders to develop and/or update science-based guidelines and standards
to improve the safety of the food supply and reduce foodborne illness.
1.1.6:
Health Canada will help prevent the exploitation of flora and fauna used for medicinal purposes.
1.1.7:
Health Canada will improve its process for making regulatory decisions for pest control products, including providing access
to safer products, and will provide information on pest control products and on sustainable pest management practices.
1.2.1:
Health Canada will work in collaboration with First Nations and Inuit and provinces and territories to better integrate health
services for a sustainable, seamless system of health services for First Nations and Inuit.
81
Table 11: Sustainable Development Strategy (cont’d)
SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT STRATEGY COMMITMENTS (cont’d)
2.1.1:
Health Canada will improve the integration of SD considerations within the Department by developing a framework to identify key
planning, reporting activities and modern management practices that could incorporate SD considerations, and will integrate
sustainable development into these areas where appropriate by March 31, 2007.
2.1.2:
Health Canada will improve the integration of SD considerations within the Department by effectively integrating SD into
key departmental policies, legislation and contracts where appropriate, and establishing a formal process to evaluate this
integration by March 31, 2007.
2.1.3:
Health Canada will increase employee awareness about sustainable development by developing and implementing a social
marketing campaign for March 31, 2007.
2.1.4:
Health Canada will increase employee awareness about sustainable development by developing and implementing a
departmental training curriculum on sustainable development to be provided to at least 1,000 Health Canada employees
by March 31, 2007.
2.1.5:
Health Canada will contribute to increase federal employee awareness of sustainable development through partnering with
other government departments, federal committees and networks to design and deliver an interdepartmental course about
sustainable development by March 31, 2007.
3.1.2:
By March 2007, Health Canada commits to providing facility managers and other managers with authorities over facilities
with training on the sustainable operation and management of Health Canada facilities. The training will be based on the
departmental guidebook.
3.2.3:
By January 2007, Health Canada will begin implementing and reporting the recommendations outlined in the departmental
pollution prevention guidebook and action plan.
82
Table 11: Sustainable Development Strategy (cont’d)
Since the first strategy, Health Canada has worked to
create a culture that recognizes the importance of
sustainable development in its operations. Approval
of a Sustainable Development Policy in December
2000 enabled the integration of five key principles
(shared responsibility, integrated approaches, equity,
accountability, and continuous improvement) into the
Department’s third Sustainable Development Strategy.
They will act as guiding principles for the development
of the next strategy covering 2007 to 2010, to be
tabled in Parliament in December 2006. The
Department will continue to report annually on
progress made on SD Strategy commitments.
Strategic Environmental Assessment (SEA) is a
systematic and comprehensive process for evaluating
the environmental effects of a policy, plan or program
and its alternatives, at the earliest stage in planning.
Health Canada has a requirement to complete SEAs in
conformance with the 2004 Cabinet Directive on the
Environmental Assessment of Policy, Plan and Program
Proposals. Health Canada has developed a policy and
guidelines for strategic environmental assessment to
support departmental efforts to ensure proposals with
important positive or negative environmental effects are
identified and enhancement or mitigation measures are
identified. The Department is committed to providing
training on this initiative to policy staff as required and
will continue to consider the environmental impacts of
our activities.
Additionally, use of an environmental management
system, or EMS, is another way to promote sustainable
development. Two of the priorities of the EMS Division
are the review of the EMS to reflect the multiple changes
within the federal government and the revamping of the
EMS database (the primary resource for environmental
information). Some preliminary work on the EMS
database has already started and will continue in
2006-2007. Other databases in the Health Portfolio
used to capture environmental information include a
fleet database for tracking vehicle operations and a
hazardous waste database for some hazardous streams.
Building on previous experiences and incorporating
best practices in our work will help to achieve
sustainable development in the long term.
83
Table 12: Internal Audits and Evaluations
Project Title
Recently Completed Internal Audits
Review of the Administration of the Health Canada Contract with First Canadian Health
Management Corporation Inc.
Follow-up of the Directed Audit of Société Santé en Français Inc.
Upcoming Internal Audits
Audit of the Handling of Controlled Drug Substances (CDS) in FNIHB Health Facilities within
Two Selected Regions
Audit of Primary Health Care Transition Fund (PHCTF) Contributions to the Ministry of Health
and Long Term Care of the Province of Ontario
Audit of Selected Administrative Areas
Audit of Health Canada Initiatives for GOL
Audit of IT Security in Health Canada
Audit of the Implementation of Corrective Measures Ordered by the Public Service
Commission
Selected Results-Based Management Accountability Frameworks
Audit of Mental Health and Addictions Programs
Audit of the Drug Strategy and Controlled Substances Programme
Recently Completed Evaluations
Evaluation of the Memorandum of Understanding between the Assistant Deputy Ministers
and Regional Directors General
Approved by the DA&EC on
April 7, 2005
Approved by the DA&EC on
November 1, 2005
Approved by the DA&EC
April 2006
Fall 2006
Summer 2006
Approved by the DA&EC
June 2006
Fall 2006
Fall 2006
January 2007
January 2007
January 2007
Approved by the DA&EC
November 2005
Evaluation of the Health Canada Innovation Fund
Approved by the DA&EC
November 2005
Evaluation of the Canada Health Infostructure Partnership Program
Approved by the DA&EC
November 2005
Impact Evaluation of the Health Transition Fund
Approved by the DA&EC
November 2005
Approved by the DA&EC
November 2005
Formative Review of the Research Management and Dissemination Division
Health Transfer Policy – FNIHB
Brighter Futures and Building Healthy Communities Program – FNIHB
1
Estimated
Completion Date1
Approved by the DA&EC
April 2006
Approved by the DA&EC
April 2006
Non-Insured Health Benefits Pilot Projects – FNIHB
Approved by the DA&EC
April 2006
Primary Health Care Transition Fund – interim evaluation – Health Policy Branch (HPB)
Approved by the DA&EC
April 2006
Cost Recovery in the Pest Management Regulatory Agency
Approved by the DA&EC
April 2006
Health Care Strategies and Policy Grant and Contribution programs – Performance
Measurement System Review – HPB
Approved by the DA&EC
June 2006
The ‘Estimated Completion Date’ is the date the internal audit or evaluation report is expected to be tabled for approval by Health Canada’s Departmental
Audit and Evaluation Committee (DA&EC).
84
Table 12: Internal Audits and Evaluations (cont’d)
Project Title
Upcoming Evaluations
Review of Evaluation and Performance Measurement at Health Canada – CFOB
Estimated
Completion Date1
Fall 2006
First Nations and Inuit Home and Community Care Program – FNIHB
Canada Prenatal Nutrition Program – FNIHB
Aboriginal Diabetes Initiative – FNIHB
Augmenting Health Canada’s Response to Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy (BSE) – BSE
I phase II of Health Canada’s and the PHAC’s response to BSE in the areas of Risk
Assessment and Targeted Research – BSE II
Fall 2006
Fall 2006
Winter 2006-2007
Fall 2006
Federal Drinking Water Compliance Program (HECS)
Federal Tobacco Control Strategy
Contribution Program for Improving Access to Health Services for Official Languages
Minority Communities – HPB
Canadian Regulatory System for Biotechnology – HPFB
Therapeutics Access Strategy – HPFB
Winter 2006-2007
March 2007
Winter 2006-2007
Natural Health Products Research Program – HPFB
Fall 2006
Fall 2006
Fall 2006
Drug Strategy and Controlled Substances Program, Canada’s Drug Strategy Renewed Year 2 Fall 2006
– HECSB
Canadian Environmental Protection Act – HECSB
Fall 2006
Building Public Confidence in Pesticide Regulation and Improving Access to Pest
Management Products – PMRA
Expenditure Review Reductions and the Impact on Health Canada – DAEC/DPMED
Contracting for Professional and Special Services in Health Canada – DAEC/DPMED
1
Fall 2006
Winter 2006-2007
Winter 2006-2007
The ‘Estimated Completion Date’ is the date the internal audit or evaluation report is expected to be tabled for approval by Health Canada’s Departmental
Audit and Evaluation Committee (DA&EC).
85
Other Items
of Interest
4
HEALTH CANADA’S REGIONAL OPERATIONS
An Overview
On January 6, 2006, the Deputy Minister of Health
and the Associate Deputy Minster of Health
announced the establishment of the Public Affairs,
Consultation and Regions Branch. This new Branch
incorporates the Communications, Marketing and
Consultation Directorate; the external and internal
ombudsman services; and the regions. The Branch
affords Health Canada an opportunity to better
integrate national and regional perspectives in all
policies and strategies, communications and
consultation functions, and is key to a commitment
of transparency on the part of the Department.
Over the course of the last year, an initiative has been
underway that aims to improve service to Canadians by
strengthening the Department’s programs and regional
role, and enhancing communication and collaboration.
As such, the role of the Regional Directors General has
been enhanced in order to fully realize their integral
role as Health Canada’s senior representatives in the
regions, responsible for the management of all of
Health Canada’s regional operations and personnel. The
creation of the new Branch complements this ongoing
work and will enable the Department to continue to
evolve in the context of a changing environment. It also
fulfills Health Canada’s continuing commitment to
ensure both greater coherence and a consistent
presence for the Department nationally and in each
region across the country.
In recognition of the unique program and service
delivery challenges and opportunities among a diverse
and often remote northern population, responsibility
for all Health Canada activities in the Northwest
Territories, Yukon and Nunavut is now overseen by
the Northern Secretariat component of Regional
Operations. This consolidation of responsibility for the
North, under the Northern Secretariat, will provide a
consistent Territorial lens for Health Canada’s policy
and program development, and greater coherence to
Health Canada programs and services in northern
communities. Further, in consideration of the needs
and priorities identified within the community and
among stakeholders, the Manitoba and Saskatchewan
Region has been re-organized so that Manitoba
and Saskatchewan each now assume status as
an individual region. This will serve to enhance
communications and consultations within the
Department and with Health Canada’s numerous
stakeholders, partners and the public.
Health Canada’s presence across the country will
continue to be reflected through program and service
delivery tailored to meet the varied needs of each
of the geographic regions it serves. This includes the
British Columbia, Alberta, Saskatchewan, Manitoba,
Ontario, Quebec and Atlantic regions, as well as
the Northern Secretariat. Over one third of Health
Canada’s employees work in communities outside of
the National Capital Region. This regional proximity
to clients provides the Department with specialized
knowledge and capacity to assist in furthering
departmental goals and priorities. Health Canada’s
Regions offer local intelligence and a community
connection which serves to bring regional perspective
and coherence into the design and delivery of health
protection and promotion programs as well as national
policy development. Such citizen-centred engagement
helps to ensure that program delivery in the regions is
representative of and responsive to local issues and
priorities, while respecting national program integrity
and accountability.
The close ties between regional offices and their
counterparts in other federal departments provide
frequent opportunities for collaboration and
partnership. Representation by Health Canada’s
Regions on regional Federal Councils serves to
support the broader federal government agenda.
In addition, it allows Health Canada to play a key role
in reflecting regional views in the development of
national cross-departmental policy and in the design
of program delivery.
89
Health Canada’s Regions foster and strengthen
effective, long standing relationships and associations
with provincial, territorial and municipal governments
and key stakeholders. These relationships serve to
advance horizontal collaboration and facilitate multipartnered and inter-governmental initiatives. They also
improve the Department’s understanding of challenges
and opportunities which cross program boundaries as
provincial and territorial approaches to managing the
health care agenda evolve.
Reduced health and environmental risks from
products and substances, and safer living and
working environments:
Strategic and targeted use of the Health Canada
Innovation Fund continues to provide Health Canada’s
Regions with the ability to create and leverage
partnership opportunities in response to local issues
and concerns. Whether in partnership with academic
institutions, non-governmental community based
organizations or health research foundations, Health
Canada Innovation Fund initiatives seek to identify
and answer the specific needs and priorities within
local groups and communities.
Conduct risk assessments and evaluations and
provide health advice to federal employees,
provinces and municipalities related to chemical
contaminates and exposure levels, drinking water
standards, and work environments.
Providing Support to Departmental
Strategic Outcomes and Corporate
Objectives
Strengthened knowledge base to address health
priorities:
Manage intergovernmental affairs; and
Foster communication, consultation and
stakeholder engagement within the Regions.
Safe and effective health products and food and
information for healthy choices:
Conduct surveillance, enforcement and compliance
activities for health-related products;
Assist in ensuring safe and effective health
products and food and information for healthy
choices through regional contributions to national
policies, programs, and regulations; and
Engage in consultation to build stakeholder
relations and provide information for making
healthy choices.
90
Conduct inspection and surveillance activities
as well as health promotion activities related to
consumer products, tobacco, controlled drugs and
substances, and the environment;
Establish marketplace and user inspection
programs as well as compliance and promotional
activities for pesticides;
Better health outcomes and reduction of health
inequalities between Aboriginals and other
Canadians:
Direct provision of Non-Insured Health Benefits to
First Nations and Inuit clients;
Delivery of community-based health promotion and
disease prevention programs for First Nations and
Inuit populations;
Delivery of Home and Community Care Program
and addictions treatment services for First Nations
and Inuit populations;
Development and delivery of health protection
programs and services for First Nations and Inuit
populations;
Capacity building in the areas of health information
management and analysis for First Nations and
Inuit populations;
Provision of management capacity support and
capital investments in First Nations and Inuit
communities; and
Collaborate in emergency preparedness and
response and pandemic planning.
Corporate Management – Leadership and
infrastructure to support the Department’s
Regional Operations:
Ensure sound stewardship of both the human and
financial resources of the Department through
effective and accountable management and
administration of assets, human resources,
information technology, policy, planning, security
and business continuity services.
91
Supporting Health Canada’s Programs and Services
Health Canada requires efficient and effective corporate
services to ensure that it has the capacity and
capability to undertake its main activities of promoting,
protecting and improving the health of Canadians. The
following examples demonstrate the Department’s
ongoing efforts and commitment to strengthen its
corporate services and management practices
Our human resources planning process responds
to the human resources risks and challenges we
encounter in support of our business objectives.
As well as consolidating and realigning IT resources
and positioning the Department to align with the
Government of Canada common services initiatives
and generate savings, The Way Forward information
technology project will ensure that service levels are
maintained for all clients and that our IT infrastructure
is sustainable in support of Health Canada’s programs.
Health Canada was an early adopter of the
Government’s Management Accountability Framework
(MAF) and will continue its efforts to not only promote
the MAF throughout the Department but to implement
management improvement initiatives to strengthen
stewardship and accountability including the Financial
Management Control Framework, the Contract
Management Framework, the Contract Requisitions
and Reporting System, the Asset Management
Framework and the Departmental Real Property
Management Framework. We will use the results
of our MAF Assessment and other management or
government priorities to determine areas requiring
further attention or action. In addition, the Department
will continue to share information and, as required,
coordinate efforts with other Portfolio members.
We have also recently begun a department-wide
operational planning process and we will continue our
efforts to enhance and improve this process. Not only
does operational planning link expected results to the
allocation of resources, it will assist in identifying key
priority pressures within the Department as well as
reviewing opportunities for reallocation of resources
from lower to higher priorities.
92
We will continue to implement an Integrated Risk
Management (IRM) Framework and to update the
Department’s Corporate Risk Profile and Internal
Scan on a regular basis. As well, we will continue to
systematically manage risk in key functional areas
and decision-making processes through such tools as
the risk-based audit plan, the risk communications
framework, risk-based disposition of records, an
information technology enterprise approach
predicated on risk management and a risk-based
approached to human resources classification and
staffing. We will also complete the development of an
internal Departmental Business Continuity Plan in the
Event of a Pandemic Influenza Outbreak that will allow
us to maintain operations to the extent possible while
protecting the health and safety of employees.
Initiatives are also underway to review, improve and
update privacy policies and practices to ensure that
personal information is protected within Health
Canada. For example, a Departmental Information
Management Awareness campaign is reinforced by
more in-depth courses on both access to information
and privacy offered to employees throughout Health
Canada. We also conduct Privacy Impact Assessments
on an on-going basis to identify and address privacy
risks related to Departmental programs or services
that handle personal information.
We foster an ethical culture that best embodies the
core values of Health Canada and the Public Service
through our Centre for Workplace Ethics. The Centre
collaborates as appropriate with the services of
Internal Ombudsman and Informal Conflict
Management System (ICMS) to assist staff or teams
with specific and pressing ethical challenges or conflict
related issues. Regular reporting on trends by these
three services provides the Deputy Minister with a
department-wide perspective on progress as well as an
early identification mechanism for areas of concern.
Details on Transfer Payments Programs Template
Name of Transfer Payment Program: Contributions to the Organization for the Advancement of Aboriginal People’s Health
(OAAPH)
Start Date: April 2005
End Date: March 2010
Description: to support the Organization for the Advancement of Aboriginal People’s Health
Strategic outcomes: Improved knowledge-based activities (including research) related to the health of Aboriginal people and
communities
Expected Results: Continued empowerment of Aboriginal peoples through advancements in knowledge and sharing of
knowledge on aboriginal health
Forecast
Spending
2005-2006
Planned
Spending
2006-2007
Planned
Spending
2007-2008
Planned
Spending
2008-2009
First Nations and Inuit Health
0
0
0
0
Total Grants
0
0
0
0
Total Contributions
0
5.0
5.0
5.0
Total Other Types of Transfer Payments
0
0
0
0
0
5.0
5.0
5.0
Program Activity (PA)
Program Activity (PA)
First Nations and Inuit Health
Planned Audits and Evaluations: N/A
1
Details on Transfer Payments Programs Template
Name of Transfer Payment Program: Payments to Indian bands, associations or groups for the control and provision of
health services
Start Date: 1989
End Date: 2006
Description: To increase responsibility and control by Indian communities of their own health care and to effect improvement
in the health conditions of Indian people.
Strategic outcomes: Strengthened and enhanced accountability of community leaders to community members in transferred
communities regarding the management and the delivery of health programs and services
Expected Results: Increased control or accountability by First Nations communities of health care services.
Forecast
Spending
2005-2006
Planned
Spending
2006-2007
Planned
Spending
2007-2008
Planned
Spending
2008-2009
209.6
217.9
227.9
233.9
209.6
217.9
227.9
233.9
Program Activity (PA)
First Nations and Inuit Health
Total Grants
Total Contributions
Total Other Types of Transfer Payments
Total PA
First Nations and Inuit Health
Planned *Audits and Evaluations: N/A
*Recipients are required to provide year end financial audited statements. Contribution compliance audits are conducted every year for a sample of
recipients.
2
Details on Transfer Payments Programs Template
Name of Transfer Payment Program: Contributions for First Nations and Inuit Health Governance and Infrastructure
Support (HG/IS)
Start Date: April, 2005
End Date: March 2010
Description: Governance and Infrastructure Support to the First Nations and Inuit Health System
Strategic outcomes: Contributes to the improved health status of First Nations and Inuit individuals, families and
communities through strengthened governance and infrastructure support.
Expected Results: Improved health status of FNI through strengthened governance and infrastructure
Forecast
Spending
2005-2006
Planned
Spending
2006-2007
Planned
Spending
2007-2008
Planned
Spending
2008-2009
0
167.6
188.3
179.1
0
167.6
188.3
179.1
Program Activity (PA)
First Nations and Inuit Health
Total Grants
Total Contributions
Total Other Types of Transfer Payments
Program Activity (PA)
First Nations and Inuit Health
Planned *Audits and Evaluations:
Initiatives for the adaptation and integration of health services for Aboriginal peoples
*Contribution compliance audits are completed every year for a sample of recipients.
3
Details on Transfer Payments Programs Template
Name of Transfer Payment Program: Contributions for First Nations and Inuit Community Programs
Start Date: April 1, 2005
End Date: March 2010
Description: community programs support child and maternal-child health; mental health promotion; addictions prevention
and treatment; chronic disease prevention and health promotion services.
Strategic outcomes: Contributes to the improved health status of First Nations and Inuit individuals, families and
communities through strengthened community programs and supports.
Expected Results:
Increased participation of First Nations and Inuit individuals, families, and communities in programs and supports
Improved continuum of programs and services in First Nations and Inuit communities
Forecast
Spending
2005-2006
Planned
Spending
2006-2007
Planned
Spending
2007-2008
Planned
Spending
2008-2009
0
211.3
228.6
243.5
0
211.3
228.6
243.5
Program Activity (PA)
First Nations and Inuit Health
Total Grants
Total Contributions
Total Other Types of Transfer Payments
Program Activity (PA)
First Nations and Inuit Health
Planned *Audits and Evaluations:
NNADAP – residential
Tobacco Control Strategy (FN/I)
*Recipients are required to provide year end financial audited statements. Contribution compliance audits are conducted every year for a sample of
recipients.
4
Details on Transfer Payments Programs Template
Name of Transfer Payment Program: Contributions for First Nations and Inuit Health Facilities and Capital Program
Start Date: April, 2005
End Date: March 2010
Description: Provides funding to eligible recipients for the construction acquisition, leasing, operation and maintenance of
nursing stations, health centres, health stations, health offices, treatment centres, staff residences, and operational support
buildings.
Strategic outcomes: Modern and well maintained health care facilities and residences that support effective health program
delivery.
Expected Results:
Increase availability of health facilities, equipment and other moveable assets in First Nations and Inuit communities that
support the provision of health services
Forecast
Spending
2005-2006
Planned
Spending
2006-2007
Planned
Spending
2007-2008
Planned
Spending
2008-2009
0
53.1
51.2
48.6
0
53.1
51.2
48.6
Program Activity (PA)
First Nations and Inuit Health
Total Grants
Total Contributions
Total Other Types of Transfer Payments
Program Activity (PA)
First Nations and Inuit Health
Planned *Audits and Evaluations: N/A
*Contribution compliance audits are conducted every year for a sample of recipients.
5
Details on Transfer Payments Programs Template
Name of Transfer Payment Program: Contributions for First Nations and Inuit Health Benefits
Start Date: April, 2005
End Date: March 2010
Description: A limited range of medically necessary health-related goods and services which supplement those provided
through other private or provincial/territorial health insurance plans is provided to registered Indians and recognized Inuit.
Benefits include drugs, dental care, vision care, medical supplies and equipment, short-term crisis intervention mental health
services, and transportation to access medical services not available on reserve or in the community of residence.
Strategic outcomes: Access to non-insured health benefits contributes to improved health status of First Nations and Inuit
eligible clients
Expected Results:
Access by eligible clients to Non-Insured Health benefits
Forecast
Spending
2005-2006
Planned
Spending
2006-2007
Planned
Spending
2007-2008
Planned
Spending
2008-2009
0
123.3
120.7
124.2
0
123.3
120.7
124.2
Program Activity (PA)
First Nations and Inuit Health
Total Grants
Total Contributions
Total Other Types of Transfer Payments
Program Activity (PA)
First Nations and Inuit Health
Planned *Audits and Evaluations: N/A
*Recipients are required to provide year end financial audited statements. Contribution compliance audits are conducted every year for a sample of
recipients.
6
Details on Transfer Payments Programs Template
Name of Transfer Payment Program: Contributions for First Nations and Inuit Health Protection
Start Date: April, 2005
End Date: March 2010
Description: Communicable Disease and Environmental Health and Research programs facilitate preparedness to implement
measures in the control, management and containment of outbreaks of preventable diseases and improve management and
control of environmental hazards.
Strategic outcomes: Health protection interventions contribute to improved health status of First Nations and Inuit
individuals, families and communities.
Expected Results:
Environmental health risk management contributes to improved health status of First Nations individuals, families and
communities
Improved access to quality well- coordinated communicable disease prevention and control programs for First Nations and
Inuit individuals, families, and communities
Forecast
Spending
2005-2006
Planned
Spending
2006-2007
Planned
Spending
2007-2008
Planned
Spending
2008-2009
0
9.7
10.3
9.2
0
9.7
10.3
9.2
Program Activity (PA)
First Nations and Inuit Health
Total Grants
Total Contributions
Total Other Types of Transfer Payments
Program Activity (PA)
First Nations and Inuit Health
Planned *Audits and Evaluations:
Water Management Strategy
*Recipients are required to provide year end financial audited statements. Contribution compliance audits are conducted every year for a sample of
recipients.
7
Details on Transfer Payments Programs Template
Name of Transfer Payment Program: Contributions for First Nations and Inuit Primary Health Care
Start Date: April, 2005
End Date: March 2010
Description: Primary Health Care services include emergency and acute care health services, Community primary health
care services which include illness and injury prevention and health promotion activities. These programs also include: the
First Nations and Inuit Home and Community Care; and the Oral Health Strategy.
Strategic outcomes: Primary health care contributes to improved health status of First Nations and Inuit individuals, families
and communities
Expected Results:
Improved access to quality well-coordinated culturally appropriate primary health care programs and services for First
Nations and Inuit individuals, families and communities
Forecast
Spending
2005-2006
Planned
Spending
2006-2007
Planned
Spending
2007-2008
Planned
Spending
2008-2009
0
119.7
121.2
123.0
0
119.7
121.2
123.0
Program Activity (PA)
First Nations and Inuit Health
Total Grants
Total Contributions
Total Other Types of Transfer Payments
Program Activity (PA)
First Nations and Inuit Health
Planned *Audits and Evaluations:
Home and Community Care
Primary Health Care Program
*Recipients are required to provide year end financial audited statements. Contribution compliance audits are conducted every year for a sample of
recipients.
8
Details on Transfer Payments Programs Template
Name of Transfer Payment Program: Contributions for Bigstone Non-Insured Health Benefits Pilot Project
Start Date: April, 2005
End Date: March 2010
Description: Administration and delivery of benefits with Bigstone Health Commission to registered Indians and recognized
Inuit.
Strategic outcomes: Access to non-insured health benefits contributes to improved health status of First Nations and Inuit
eligible clients
Expected Results:
Provide registered Indians and recognized Inuit with a limited range of medically necessary health related goods and
services not provided through private or federal/provincial/territorial health insurance plans.
Forecast
Spending
2005-2006
Planned
Spending
2006-2007
Planned
Spending
2007-2008
Planned
Spending
2008-2009
0
8.2
8.5
8.8
0
8.2
8.5
8.8
Program Activity (PA)
First Nations and Inuit Health
Total Grants
Total Contributions
Total Other Types of Transfer Payments
Program Activity (PA)
First Nations and Inuit Health
Planned Audits and Evaluations: 1 including a contribution audit
9
Details on Transfer Payments Programs Template
Name of Transfer Payment Program: Grant for Nunavut Medical Travel Fund
Start Date: April 2005
End Date: March 2010
Description: To support the Nunavut medical travel fund
Strategic outcomes: To Improve Health System Sustainability in the Territories
Expected Results:
address the significant and immediate pressures facing the Yukon, Northwest Territories and Nunavut (the territories) in the
area of medical travel expenditures
offset a portion of the territories’ medical travel costs; and
enable the territories to redirect resources to alternative sustainable health reform initiatives.
Forecast
Spending
2005-2006
Planned
Spending
2006-2007
Planned
Spending
2007-2008
Planned
Spending
2008-2009
0
10.2
10.2
10.2
0
10.2
10.2
10.2
Program Activity (PA)
First Nations and Inuit Health
Total Grants
Total Contributions
Total Other Types of Transfer Payments
Program Activity (PA)
First Nations and Inuit Health
Planned Audits and Evaluations: N/A
10
Health Policy Branch
2006-07 RPP Grants/Contribution Programs
Details on Transfer Payments Programs Template
Name of Transfer Payment Program: Named Grant to the Health Council of Canada
Start Date: September 1, 2004
End Date: March 31, 2008
Description: The mandate of the Health Council of Canada is to monitor and make annual public reports on the
implementation of the 2003 First Ministers’ Accord on Health Care Renewal and the 2004 Health Accord.
PAA Strategic Outcome #1: Strengthen knowledge base to address health and health care priorities.
Expected Results:
Through monitoring and the annual public reporting on the progress achieved in implementing the 2003 First Ministers’
Accord and the 2004 Health Accord, the Health Council of Canada will contribute to enhancing accountability and
transparency in health system care reform.
Forecast
Spending
2005-2006
Planned
Spending
2006-2007
Planned
Spending
2007-2008
Planned
Spending
2008-2009
10.0
10.0
10.0
10.0
10.0
10.0
10.0
10.0
Program Activity (PA)
Health Policy, Planning and Information
Total Grants
Total Contributions
Total Other Types of Transfer Payments
Total PA
Planned Audits and Evaluations: The Health Council of Canada publishes annual audited financial statements.
11
Details on Transfer Payments Programs Template
Name of Transfer Payment Program: Grant to the Canadian Patient Safety Institute (CPSI)
Start Date: December 10, 2003
End Date: March 31, 2008
Description: Establishment of a class grant program to support the federal government’s interest in a federal/provincial/
territorial partnership context, in achieving an accessible, high quality, sustainable and accountable health system adaptable to
the needs of Canadians.
Strategic outcomes:
Strengthen knowledge base to address health and health care priorities.
To improve the quality of health care services by strengthening system coordination related to patient safety, including
promoting national collaboration among key players
Expected Results:
Provide advice to governments, stakeholders and the public on effective strategies to improve patient safety;
Perform a coordinating role across sectors and systems;
Promote best practices related to patient safety; and
Raise awareness of patient safety issues with patients and the general public through public education and reporting.
Forecast
Spending
2005-2006
Planned
Spending
2006-2007
Planned
Spending
2007-2008
Planned
Spending
2008-2009
8.0
8.0
8.0
8.0
8.0
8.0
8.0
8.0
Program Activity (PA)
Health Policy, Planning and Information
Total Grants
Total Contributions
Total Other Types of Transfer Payments
Total PA
Planned Audits and Evaluations: The CPSI will undertake an initial program evaluation 3 years after the start date of the
grant and once every 5 years thereafter. A full independent audit and auditor’s report are required on an annual basis.
12
Details on Transfer Payments Programs Template
Name of Transfer Payment Program: Grant to the Canadian Coordinating Office for Health Technology Assessment
(CCOHTA)
Start Date: April 1, 2005
End Date: March 31, 2008
Description: CCOHTA is an independent not-for-profit corporation established under the Canada Corporations Act, Part II, whose
purpose is to co-ordinate, perform and facilitate the collection, analysis, creation and dissemination of information concerning
the effectiveness and cost of technologies and drugs and their impact on health and the appropriateness of their use.
The purpose of the Named Grant is to provide financial assistance to support CCOHTA’s core business activities namely,
Common Drug Review (“CDR”), Health Technology Assessment (“HTA”) and Canadian Optimal Medication Prescribing and
Utilization Service (“COMPUS”).
Strategic outcomes:
Strengthen knowledge base to address health and health care priorities.
The evidenced-based adoption, diffusion, management and utilization of health technologies within the Canadian health
care system.
Expected Results:
Increased capacity building in jurisdictions for the assessment and analysis of information on health technologies as well
as the receptor capacity relating to policy analysis in accordance with the priorities of the Federal/Provincial/Territorial
health systems/Ministries of Health.
Increased relevance of Canadian health technology assessment products and services, produced by CCOHTA and its
partners.
Implementation of the Canada’s Health Technology Strategy including the establishment of structures and a transparent
process to allow jurisdictions to share information and, where appropriate, work together for the better management of
health technology.
Promoting and facilitating the adoption of best practices in drug prescribing services.
Implementation of the Federal Provincial Territorial Common Drug Review Program, which provides participating federal,
provincial and territorial publicly funded drug plans with a systematic review of the available clinical evidence, a review of
pharmacoeconomic data and formulary listing recommendations for new drugs.
Forecast
Spending
2005-2006
Planned
Spending
2006-2007
Planned
Spending
2007-2008
Planned
Spending
2008-2009
16.9
17.4
17.4
16.9
16.9
17.4
17.4
16.9
Program Activity (PA)
Health Policy, Planning and Information
Total Grants
Total Contributions
Total Other Types of Transfer Payments
Total PA
Planned Audits and Evaluations: CCOHTA is to carry out and submit to the Minister, no later than June 30, 2007, an
independent evaluation of CCOHTA’s core business activities for the period of March 31st, 2003 to March 31, 2007.
13
Details on Transfer Payments Programs Template
Name of Transfer Payment Program: Contributions for the Primary Health Care Transition Fund (PHCTF)
Start Date: June 13, 2001
End Date: September 30, 2006
Description: $800 million PHCTF established in response to FMM 2000 commitment that improvements to primary health care
are crucial to the renewal of the health care system overall.
Strategic outcomes:
Strengthened knowledge base to address health and health care priorities
Program Strategic outcomes: Effect quality improvement and cost-effectiveness of primary health care service delivery
across Canada; knowledge development and translation initiatives to facilitate continuous improvement of primary health
care service delivery; fund initiatives supporting primary health care renewal; support and coordinate the analysis and
sharing of information on primary health care renewal; and, provide national leadership of primary health care service
transformation in collaboration with provincial/territorial counterparts, stakeholder groups and other mechanisms.
Expected Results:
Immediate Outcomes:
1) Acceleration of PHC renewal
2) Increased emphasis on PHC renewal
3) Increased collaboration on PHC renewal
Intermediate Outcomes:
4) Improved infrastructure and systems to deliver PHC
Intermediate Outcomes:
5) Enhanced knowledge and capacity to deliver PHC
6) A more integrated approach to the delivery of PHC
Long-term Outcome:
7) Fundamental change in support of sustainable PHC systems
* This outcome is not expected to happen within the life of the PHCTF; expected time frame is five to ten years.
Forecast
Spending
2005-2006
Planned
Spending
2006-2007
Planned
Spending
2007-2008
Planned
Spending
2008-2009
248.9
75.6
0
0
248.9
75.6
0
0
Program Activity (PA)
Health Policy, Planning and Information
Total Grants
Total Contributions
Total Other Types of Transfer Payments
Total PA
Planned Audits and Evaluations: The formative evaluation report has been completed and the PHCTF response and action
plan to the report is expected to be approved by the end of fiscal year 05/06. The initiation of the summative evaluation of
the PHCTF will also take place in fiscal year 05/06 with a completion in 06/07. Audits are currently being conducted on two
initiative recipients funded by the PHCTF, these include the Bigstone Health Commission and the Northern and Aboriginal
Population Health and Wellness Institute (NAPHWI). A management audit of the Ontario Per Capita file is also underway. All
audits will be completed in fiscal year 05/06.
14
Details on Transfer Payments Programs Template
Name of Transfer Payment Program: Health Care Strategies and Policy Contribution Program
Start Date: September 24, 2002
End Date: March 31, 2007
Description: To support the federal government’s interests in achieving an accessible, high quality, sustainable and accountable
health system adaptable to the needs of Canadians.
Strategic outcomes:
Strengthened knowledge base to address health and health care priorities
Increased evidence & knowledge base for decision-making in health care
Increased collaboration/coordination on identified health care system issues/priorities
Expected Results: Reports, consultations, research and evaluation; educational models/tools and resources for health
providers, health system managers and decision makers; innovative models for funding and delivery; innovative
collaborations and/or coalitions; case studies and best practices; policy research documents; environmental scans, system
and technology assessments; increased evidence and knowledge base for decision-making in health care; Performance
Measurement System; evaluation framework; annual audits & ongoing monitoring.
Forecast
Spending
2005-2006
Planned
Spending
2006-2007
Planned
Spending
2007-2008
Planned
Spending
2008-2009
21.0
29.1
38.4
36.6
21.0
29.1
38.4
36.6
Program Activity (PA)
Health Policy, Planning and Information
Total Grants
Total Contributions
Total Other Types of Transfer Payments
Total PA
Planned Audits and Evaluations: Overall Health Care Strategies, Policy Grant and Contribution Programs formative evaluation
due on March 31, 2007.
15
Details on Transfer Payments Programs Template
Name of Transfer Payment Program: Contributions Program to improve access to health services for Official Language
Minority Communities
Start Date: April 1, 2003
End Date: June 30, 2008
Description: Contribution program to improve access to health services to official language minority communities. This initiative
is part of the federal Action Plan for Official Languages.
Strategic outcomes: (a) improve access to health services for official language minority communities; (b) meet the needs
and improve health services in official language minority communities, thereby enhancing the health of these communities;
(c) improve the efficiency of the health system as a whole by improving health services for official language minority
communities.
These objectives are commensurate with Health Canada’s mission to help people of Canada maintain and improve their
health. More specifically, they relate to two of the departmental objectives namely ensuring high-quality health services that
are efficient and accessible and reduce health inequalities in Canadian society.
Expected Results: Expected key program results have been developed with the Consultative Committees and are integrated
into the Results-Based Management and Accountability Framework (RMAF) which have been developed for the Program. For
both official language community there is two majors components: Component networking: the networking component is to
mobilize the capacity of institutions, professionals and communities to foster the commitment to health services in both
official languages for official language minority communities. Component training and retention of health professionnel:
this component is to increase capacity for basic training, improve professional development and research, and promote the
retention of health professionals in official language minority communities.
NETWORKING COMPONENT
A) French-speaking minority communities
The expected results are to:
promote the establishment of strong, durable links among health sector stakeholders (health professionals, communities,
policy makers, health care institutions, training institutions);
mitigate the geographic dispersal of Francophone and Anglophone minority communities and the isolation experienced by
professionals;
promote communities ownership (in terms of the planning, development, strengthening or pursuit and promotion of
improved access to health care in French);
maximize the use of existing resources and share best practices;
make health sector stakeholders more aware of the importance of language in health service delivery;
improve services to French-speaking minority communities by delivering high-quality health care and increasing their use;
and
build capacity to provide health services in French through professional networking, and promote research capacity in
French.
B) English-speaking minority communities
The expected results are:
promote the establishment of strong, durable links among health sector stakeholders (health professionals, communities,
policy makers, health facilities, training institutions);
mitigate the geographic dispersal of Anglophone minority communities and the isolation experienced by professionals;
promote communities ownership (in terms of the planning, development, strengthening or pursuit and promotion of
improved access to health services in English);
maximize the use of existing resources and share best practices;
build capacity to provide health services in English through professional networking, and the participation of researchers in
the minority language.
16
Details on Transfer Payments Programs Template (cont’d)
TRAINING AND RETENTION OF HEALTH PROFESSIONNEL
A) Francophone minority communities
The expected results are:
more Francophone professional health training through partnerships with the universities, colleges, etc.;
more incentives for recruitment and retention of health professionals able to serve Francophones, including greater
motivation to remain in home regions after completing studies or professional training;
greater research capacity and better understanding of the needs of French-speaking minority communities;
more professionals to meet the needs of French-speaking minority communities; and
greater satisfaction on the part of professionals and patients.
B) English-speaking minority communities
The expected results are:
creation of mechanisms for promoting the professional training of health professionals to ensure that they can deliver
health services to the Anglophone communities in the province;
improvement in the range and quality of services available to Anglophone minority communities in the Province of Quebec;
increase in the number of professionals to meet the needs of Anglophone minority communities;
a greater role for the Anglophone education sector in training and support for professionals who are working or intend to
work in remote regions; and
greater satisfaction on the part of professionals and clients.
Forecast
Spending
2005-2006
Planned
Spending
2006-2007
Planned
Spending
2007-2008
Planned
Spending
2008-2009
18.0
23.0
23.0
23.0
18.0
23.0
23.0
23.0
Program Activity (PA)
Health Policy, Planning and Information
Total Grants
Total Contributions
Total Other Types of Transfer Payments
Total PA
Planned Audits and Evaluations: The Program’s Risk-based Audit Framework adopts an auditing approach, which assesses
risk in proportion to the level of funds upon which contribution agreements are based. The Program will be audited by the
Audit and Accountability Bureau Health Canada. The Program works in partnership among organizations created by official
language communities themselves and Health Canada considers the risk associated with undesirable results to be low. The
Department adopted monitoring practices and ongoing performance measures. The 2006 mid-term formative evaluation
(on-going) will evaluate issues related to Program implementation and administration, including those that would apply to a
partnership. The 2008 evaluation will evaluate the issues relating to Program relevance, attainment of results and costeffectiveness ratio.
17
Details on Transfer Payments Programs Template
Name of Transfer Payment Program: Grant to the Canadian Blood Services (TB #826394)
Start Date: April 2000
End Date: Ongoing
Description: To support basic, applied and clinical research on blood safety and effectiveness issues through the auspices of
Canadian blood services.
Strategic outcomes: Access to Safe and Effective Health Products and Food and Information for Healthy Choices.
Expected Results: Continued improvements to basic applied and clinical research on blood safety and effectiveness.
Forecast
Spending
2005-2006
Planned
Spending
2006-2007
Planned
Spending
2007-2008
Planned
Spending
2008-2009
5.0
5.0
5.0
5.0
5.0
5.0
5.0
5.0
Program Activity (PA)
Total Grants
Total Contributions
Total Other Types of Transfer Payments
Total PA
Planned Audits and Evaluations: N/A
18
Details on Transfer Payments Programs Template
Attachment “B”
Name of Transfer Payment Program: Contributions in support of the Federal Tobacco Control Strategy (FTCS)
Start Date: 2001-2002
End Date: 2006-2007
Description: The purpose of the Federal Tobacco Control Strategy (FTCS) Contribution Program is to contribute to the
achievement of FTCS objectives through assistance to provinces or other bodies. In doing this, the Program supports the
implementation of the four components of the Federal Tobacco Control Strategy, namely: Protection (to reduce access to
tobacco and to regulate the product); Prevention (to reduce the uptake of tobacco and to create barriers to smoking);
Cessation (to increase the number of quitters and reduce barriers to quitting); and Harm Reduction (to reduce harm to
smokers and those exposed to tobacco).
Contributions are provided to support the provinces and territories as well as key national and regional non-governmental
organizations and others in order to build ongoing capacity for delivering effective tobacco prevention and cessation programs.
Contributions are also used to advance tobacco control initiatives to reduce harm to smokers and those exposed to tobacco.
In addition, as part of the FTCS Mass Media program, contributions are also used to fund regionally-based mass media
initiatives in support of the four components.
Contributions are required as Health Canada’s efforts need to be coordinated and integrated with the efforts of its partners to
achieve a sustained reduction in tobacco use. In addition, many of Health Canada’s partners are in a better position, because
of their particular expertise, to deliver certain FTCS activities or can deliver them in a more cost-effective manner.
Strategic outcomes: Reduces the health and safety risks associated with tobacco consumption by: regulating tobacco;
developing and implementing initiatives to reduce or prevent the harm associated with tobacco use. The goal of the Federal
Tobacco Control Strategy is to:
Reduce smoking prevalence rate to 20%
decrease number of cigarettes sold annually by 30%
increase compliance with sales to youth laws to 80%
reduce second-hand smoke in public places
explore ways to reduce tobacco toxicity
Expected Results: The goal of the Federal Tobacco Control Strategy is to:
Reduce smoking prevalence rate to 20%
decrease number of cigarettes sold annually by 30%
increase compliance with sales to youth laws to 80%
reduce second-hand smoke in public places
explore ways to reduce tobacco toxicity
Forecast
Spending
2005-2006
Planned
Spending
2006-2007
Planned
Spending
2007-2008
Planned
Spending
2008-2009
27.1
31.4
0
0
Total Contributions
19.2
15.8
15.8
15.8
Total Other Types of Transfer Payments
0
0
Total PA
46.3
47.2
15.8
15.8
Program Activity (PA)
Total Grants
Planned Audits and Evaluations: The Federal Tobacco Control Strategy (FTCS) is currently being evaluated at its five-year
mark. The evaluation is a full summative evaluation. It will examine the overall success of the strategy, cost-effectiveness,
continued relevance as well as a review of management practices. The evaluation will be completed in the summer of 2006.
* based on P9 programme forecast
**one year extension using Minister’s authority – not yet approved
*** no authorities – Treasury Board Submission yet to be submitted
19
Details on Transfer Payments Programs Template
Name of Transfer Payment Program: Alcohol and Drug Treatment and Rehabilitation (ADTR) Contribution Program
Start Date: April 1, 1997
End Date: A-Base
Description: A cost-sharing program to provide payments to provinces and territories to support access to alcohol and drug
treatment and rehabilitation programs.
Strategic outcomes: To assist in ensuring access for Canadians to effective alcohol and drug treatment and rehabilitation
programs and services. Increased access to services by women and youth. Changes to provision of services for women and
youth. Discussions began in 2004-2005 with the provinces and territories regarding the implementation of a performance
measurement strategy.
Expected Results: Increased access to and utilization of alcohol and drug treatment and rehabilitation services by women
and youth.
Forecast
Spending
2005-2006
Program Activity (PA)
—
Total Grants
—
Total Contributions
14.0
Total Other Types of Transfer Payments
—
Total PA
14.0
Planned
Spending
2006-2007
Planned
Spending
2007-2008
Planned
Spending
2008-2009
14.0
14.0
14.0
14.0
14.0
14.0
Planned Audits and Evaluations: The Drug Strategy and Controlled Substances Programme (DSCSP) anticipates completing
its review of literature and varying data sources in building and supporting emerging evidence on the continued relevancy of
the target population, women and youth by end of June 2006.
20
Details on Transfer Payments Programs Template
Name of Transfer Payment Program: Drug Strategy Community Initiatives Fund (DSCIF)
Start Date: April 2004
End Date: A-Base
Description: A contributions funding program under Canada’s Drug Strategy to support community-based initiatives at the
national, regional, provincial/territorial and local levels in two broad areas: health promotion and prevention, and harm
reduction. It is delivered through Health Canada’s national and regional offices and Northern Secretariat.
Strategic outcomes: The overall aim of the DSCIF is to address problematic substance use and to promote public
awareness of alcohol and other drug issues
Expected Results:
increased public awareness of existing and emerging drug issues in Canada;
increased availability of effective national and community-based promotion and prevention initiatives to address substance
use and abuse;
increased access to, and utilization of, harm reduction initiatives to respond to problematic substance use;
improved capacity of community organizations to address current and emerging needs of Canadians; and
greater awareness and availability of effective models of intervention.
Forecast
Spending
2005-2006
Planned
Spending
2006-2007
Planned
Spending
2007-2008
Planned
Spending
2008-2009
Total Contributions
10.8
9.9
10.8
10.5
Total Other Types of Transfer Payments
—
Total PA
10.8
9.9
10.8
10.5
Program Activity (PA)
Total Grants
Planned Audits and Evaluations: Audit and evaluation activities regarding the Drug Strategy Community Initiatives Fund are
reflected in the overall audit and evaluation plans of Canada’s Drug Strategy (CDS). As such, DSCIF is a key component of
the Interim Year Two Risk-Based Evaluation that is currently underway, and the Interim Year Five Outcome-Based Evaluation to
take place in 2007-2008.
21
Conditional Grants (Foundations) for Health Canada
Name of Recipient: Canada Health Infoway Inc. (Infoway)
Start Date: March 9, 2001
End Date: not applicable
Total Funding: 1.2 Billion
Description: Canada Health Infoway is a federally-funded independent not-for-profit organization with a mandate to foster
and accelerate the development and adoption of electronic health information systems with compatible standards and
communications technologies on a pan-Canadian basis.
It is widely accepted that health information and communications technologies such as electronic health records (EHRs),
telehealth and public health surveillance systems will significantly improve access to health care services, patient safety,
quality of care and productivity. A recent study estimated that potential savings from a Canada-wide electronic health record
similar to Infoway’s model would be $6.1 billion annually.
Infoway collaborates with the federal, provincial and territorial governments towards a common goal of modernizing Canada’s
health information systems. This collaborative approach reduces overall costs by coordinating efforts, avoiding duplication,
taking advantage of economies of scale, replicating successful initiatives across the country, and sharing best practices.
For example, Infoway’s EHR Blueprint Architecture is being adopted across Canada by jurisdictions and vendors, saving time,
effort, and dollars, and helping to ensure all systems will be interoperable; as well, some jurisdictions have saved both time
and money by acquiring vendor solutions together, rather than individually.
While Infoway provides advice and some funding to them, the provinces and territories are responsible for the actual system
development, implementation and overall funding, including on-going operational costs.
Electronic Health Record – Infoway’s goal, endorsed by all jurisdictions, is to put in place the basic elements – i.e. patient
and health professional registries; drug, laboratory and diagnotic imaging systems – of an interoperable EHR for 50% of
Canadians by the end of 2009. Over 140 projects are completed or underway across Canada and it is expected that an
active pace will continue to be maintained in 2006/07. The following provides examples of such projects: the Registries
program comprises 10 completed and 14 active projects in 10 of 13 jurisdictions; approximately 30% of physicians have
now been uniquely identified, a prerequisite for EHR use; with respect to Diagnostic Imaging, there are 4 completed and
9 active projects in 7 jurisdictions; the British Columbia Fraser Health Authority plans to have all of its twelve hospitals
connected to its shared diagnostic imaging system by the end of 2005/06; in Southwestern Ontario, The Thames Valley
Hospital Planning and Partnership is making significant headway as seven of its eight hospitals are now able to share
diagnostic images; late in the summer of 2005, the Alberta government and Infoway announced a $189 million initiative
to allow hospitals and clinics throughout Alberta to electronically capture and share patient X-rays and CT and MRI scans.
Telehealth – Infoway is investing in projects to expand and sustain telehealth initiatives, particularly in rural and remote
communities, including Aboriginal and official language minority communities. It is also working on linkages between
telehealth and the EHR and increasing the integration of telemedicine activities into mainstream healthcare service delivery.
Telehealth strategic plans have been put in place with most jurisdictions and telehealth solutions will be implemented in all
jurisdictions by December 31, 2009.
Health Surveillance Systems – Infoway conducted a comprehensive needs assessment and developed an implementation
strategy. Based on this, they will invest in the implementation of a pan-Canadian health surveillance system focussed on
infectious diseases, in particular on case, outbreak, immunization, and alerts management, building upon surveillance
systems already in place in Canada. A national steering committee, made up of experts in both information technologies
and public health representing all FPT jurisdictions, has completed the solution planning work and three streams of work
are underway: solution procurement and integration, to be completed end of February 2006; public health surveillance
standards review and development; and jurisdiction implementation planning sessions.
Strategic Outcome(s): Strengthened knowledge base to address health and health care priorities.
1
Conditional Grants (Foundations) for Health Canada (cont’d)
Summary of Annual Plans of Recipient: In 2005/06, Infoway updated three-year joint technology and investment plans
with the jurisdictions, providing a consolidated long-term ‘road map’ that aligns national and provincial e-health strategies.
This national three-year plan will be updated annually by Infoway and the Deputy Ministers, and will serve to more tightly
align the joint investments made by Infoway with the provinces and territories.
As of March 31, 2006, it is expected that Infoway will have approved approximately $650 million in project investments,
with additional downstream commitments of approximately $420 million.
Planned Audit(s) and Evaluation(s): In 2005/06, independent third parties completed a financial audit, a compliance
audit, and an evaluation to measure performance against outcomes set out in the Infoway Funding Agreement. In addition,
Infoway prepared a Progress Report on surveillance systems.
In 2006/07, independent third party financial and compliance audits will be undertaken. Independent performance
evaluations are scheduled every five years.
Infoway initiatives must generate value – measurable benefits – for the patients, providers and health care system. Therefore,
Infoway’s EHR solutions will be evaluated in the field to determine benefits, as well as utilization and satisfaction levels. The
benefits evaluation framework is being enhanced and primary research will be stimulated in this area.
URL to Recipient site: http://www.infoway-inforoute.ca/
2
Conditional Grants (Foundations) for Health Canada
Name of Foundation: Canadian Institute for Health Information (CIHI)
Start Date:
Roadmap I March 31, 1999
Roadmap II April 1, 2002
Roadmap II+ March 31, 2002
Roadmap III April 1, 2005
End Date:
Roadmap I March 31, 2003
Roadmap II March 31, 2007
Roadmap II+ March 31, 2007
Roadmap III, March 31, 2010
Total Funding:
Roadmap I $95M
Roadmap II $95M
Roadmap II+ $70M
Roadmap III $110M
Description: The Roadmap Initiative provides the financial support for the Canadian Institute for Health Information to:
to serve as the national mechanism to coordinate the development and maintenance of a comprehensive and
integrated health information system for Canada; and,
to provide and coordinate the provision of accurate and timely information required for the establishment of sound
health policy, the effective management of the Canadian health system and generating public awareness about factors
affecting good health.
Strategic outcomes: CIHI plays a major role in supporting the reporting commitments of various First Ministers Meetings and
the First Ministers Accords on Health Care Reform.
The key areas identified for action under the original Health Information Roadmap were:
Consulting with stakeholders to confirm priority health information needs;
Developing health information standards to ensure the consistent collection, sharing and interpretation of health
information;
Filling in gaps in information on health services and related costs and outcomes;
Filling in gaps in information on population health and factors that affect our health
Creating a Canadian Population Health Initiative (CPHI) to provide new information and insights on health and the
health system; and,
Producing and disseminating regular, easy-to-understand public reports and conducting special studies on the health
of Canadians and the health system.
Summary of Annual Plans: The 2005-06 Operational Plan and Budget was presented for approval to the Board of Directors
at the June 2005 meeting, and then submitted to the Minister of Health. Some of the key projects include:
Releasing the document Health Care in Canada 2005 and developing the 2006 edition
Expanding the range of collaborative and analytical activities including the release of special reports on the Cost of
Maternity Care (the 3rd part of the series Giving Birth in Canada), funding of health services in Canada, and the
burden of neurological disorders in Canada
Implement year 2 of the CPHI Action Plan 2004-2007 including the release of 2 sections of the 3-part report series
on Improving the health of Canadians 2005-2006.
Further develop and implement the long-range analytical strategy/plan, including early-start projects approved by the
Board in June 2004.
Continue to develop, compile, and disseminate new and existing health indicators to address priority information
needs, with a special focus on quality of care
Complete development of CIHI’s acute care inpatient grouping methodology (and related resource indicators), using
ICD-10-CA and CCl activity and patient-specific cost data, and release new ICD-10-CA/CCl-based grouping
methodologies for day-surgery (i.e., DPG) and ambulatory care (i.e., CACS) patients. Also, produce first-ever French
versions of Day Procedure Groups (DPG) (New), Comprehensive Ambulatory Classification System (CACS) (New), and
Continuing Care (RUGS-III) (New) Directories and supporting documentation.
3
Conditional Grants (Foundations) for Health Canada (cont’d)
Continue to produce and disseminate policy-relevant analytical reports in the areas of health expenditures (National
Health Expenditures Trends 2005, Preliminary Provincial/Territorial Government Health Expenditures), health human
resources (e.g. workforce trends of physicians, registered nurses, registered psychiatric nurses, licensed practical
nurses, provincial/territorial profile of the Evolving Role of Canada’s Family Physicians (New), Geographic Distribution
of Physicians in Canada (New), and health services (e.g. annual reports on mental health, continuing care,
rehabilitation services, trauma, joint and organ replacements).
Increase the scope, relevance and usefulness of our existing Health Human Resources products, including
implementation (in collaboration with Statistics Canada and Health Canada) of a national survey on the nursing
workforce, continued development of new data collection/reporting reporting systems for three more health
professional groups (i.e., physiotherapists, occupational therapists, pharmacists) (New).
Continue phased-in implementation of the new National Prescription Drug Utilization Information System (NPDUIS),
based on claims-level data for publicly funded drug programs, and initiate expansion to include data from privately
funded drug programs.
Continue development of a Canadian Medication Incident Reporting and Prevention System (CMIRPS) designed to
further enhance the safety of medication use in Canada.
Continue to promote the adoption, and support implementation, of the National Rehabilitation Reporting System
(NRS), the Continuing Care Reporting System (CCRS), the Home Care Reporting System (HCRS), and the Ontario
Mental Health Reporting System (OMHRS).
Continue to implement strategies and plans to further strengthen CIHI’s presence at the provincial/territorial, regional
and local levels, and identify opportunities to align existing CIHI products and services to address emerging regional
needs (New).
Planned audit(s) and evaluation (s): CIHI will be conducted a complete third-party evaluation within one year of the
completion of the project (i.e., 2008).
URL to Foundation site: http://secure.cihi.ca/cihiweb/splash.html
4
Conditional Grants (Foundations) for Health Canada
Name of Recipient: Canadian Health Services Research Foundation
Start Date: 1996-97
End Date:
Total Funding: approx $151.5 M
Description: Total federal funding for the CHSRF is as follows (CHSRF’s programs also receive funding from other sources):
1996-2001 – $66.5 M to set up the foundation and another $35 M to support its participation with the Canadian
Institutes of Health Research
1999 – $25 M grant to support a ten-year program to develop capacity for research on nursing recruitment, retention,
management, leadership and the issues emerging from health-system restructuring (Nursing Research Fund or NRF)
2003 – $25 M grant to enhance the skills of health system managers in the use of research to increase evidencebased decision making (Executive Training for Research Application or EXTRA) over a thirteen year period.
Strategic Outcome(s): The NRF will support research personnel, research dissemination, and research projects on nursing
management, organization, and policy at a level of $2.5 million per year for 10 years. The aim is to create high quality new
knowledge; increase knowledge exchange between researchers and decision makers; and increase the capacity for evidencebased decisions.
EXTRA aims to equip health service professionals and their organizations with the skills to find, assess, interpret and use
research to better manage the Canadian health care system. CHSRF will continue to enrol 24 senior fellows annually in the
two-year EXTRA training program designed to achieve: knowledge of research evidence; capacity to draw on system thinking;
development of collaborative professional relationships; and the ability to introduce and manage evidence-based change.
CHSRF’s work contributes to Health Canada’s aim of strengthening the knowledge base to address health and health care
priorities. CHSRF’s programs further the development of health human resources, provide health managers with tools to
improve primary and continuing care, and support research on nursing issues from a health system perspective.
Summary of Annual Plans of Recipient: CHSRF will continue its efforts on its four strategic objectives:
1. To create high quality new research that is useful for health service managers and policy makers (especially in the
foundation’s priority theme areas).
2. To increase the number and nature of applied health services and nursing researchers.
3. To get needed research into the hands of health system managers and policymakers in the right format, at the right time,
through the right channels.
4. To help health system managers, policymakers and their organizations to routinely acquire, appraise, adapt and apply
relevant research in their work.
CHSRF will move to consolidate and add value to its research funding activity; this will include positioning more activities in
relation to its four “flagship” programs:
Research production and dissemination:
(i) Research Exchange and Impact for System Support (REISS)
(ii) Capacity for Applied and Developmental Research and Evaluation (CADRE) in Health Services and Nursing
Research use and implementation:
(iii) Knowledge Brokering
(iv) Executive Training for Research Application (EXTRA)
Emphasis will be placed on creative knowledge transfer and providing increased support to decision makers, as well as on
organizational excellence. CHSRF’s partnership work is expected to change due to the increasing number of national healthrelated knowledge agencies and the drive to identify opportunities and common objectives; and the provision of more direct
assistance to grant and award applicants to help acquire matching co-sponsorship funding.
5
Conditional Grants (Foundations) for Health Canada (cont’d)
Planned Audit and Evaluation: Financial statements are audited annually. CHSRF commissioned an International Review
Panel Report in 2002 and is currently preparing the background work and the process for the 2nd international review in
2007. As part of the preparations for this international review in 2007, CHSRF created a comprehensive logic model in
2004/05 for its overall impact on evidence-based decision-making in the health sector. This model will guide the overall
evaluation and has already been used, in adapted form, by other organizations in Canada to guide their activities and
evaluations in the area of evidence-based decision-making in health systems. A compliance audit of funded research
projects was conducted in 1999 and another compliance audit will be conducted in 2006. The foundation also
commissioned an internal controls review in April 2005 with the implementation of the recommendations occurring in 2005
and 2006. Finally, the foundation drafted an enterprise risk management framework in 2005 with the final version being
completed in 2006.
URL to Recipient site: www.chsrf.ca
6
Horizontal Initiatives
Horizontal Initiative: Canada’s Drug Strategy
Start Date: CDS started in 1987;
CDS Renewed 2003-2004*
End Date: Ongoing
Lead Department(s): Health Canada
Total Funding Allocated: $752.2M*
Description: Canada’s Drug Strategy (CDS) was first introduced in 1987 to address substance use and abuse issues in
Canada through coordinated activities by various federal departments, governments and non-governmental organizations. In
1992, following some initial successes in the areas of prevention and treatment, Phase II was launched with an emphasis on
Driving While Impaired. During Phase II of the CDS, changing government priorities resulted in less than half of the funding
being applied to the Strategy making it difficult to fully address complex issues related to both supply and demand
reduction.
Under Canada’s Drug Strategy Renewed (approved by Cabinet in May 2003), the CDS will continue to be a comprehensive
inter-Departmental federal initiative designed to coordinate and enhance substance abuse programs, knowledge and
partnerships in the areas of prevention, treatment, harm reduction and enforcement. For more information, please refer to
http://www.hc-sc.gc.ca/ahc-asc/activit/strateg/drugs-drogues/index_e.html.
Shared Outcome(s):
Improved Leadership—Setting directions and creating environments that support local action through community-based
initiatives integrally linked to national objectives and targets
Enhanced knowledge generation and management—Providing strengthened capacity to improve evidence-based policy
and decision making by promoting leading-edge research, statistical monitoring of drug trends and evaluation of program
effectiveness
Enhanced partnerships and interventions—Discouraging substance abuse, targeting illegal conduct that threatens the
safety and security of Canadians, and assisting those at risk from the effects of drugs by supporting partnerships and
programs that focus on prevention, harm reduction, treatment and enforcement activities
Improved modernization of relevant legislation and drug policies—Ensuring that legal and policy approaches underpinning
CDS are coherent with and support the Strategy, by reviewing legislation and regulations for responsiveness to current
requirements
Governance Structure(s):
Health Canada (HC)
Health Canada is the federal lead for Canada’s Drug Strategy. The Minister of Health is responsible for coordination across
federal departments. Health Canada also partners with provinces and territories to provide national leadership and
coordination and manages programs that reduce and prevent harm associated with controlled substances and participates
in various international fora in support of health-related supply and demand reduction activities.
An Assistant Deputy Minister Interdepartmental Steering Committee exists and is chaired by Health Canada. Working groups
focussing on Communications, Research and Surveillance, Evaluation and Risk Management, and Emerging Issues have been
established to support decision-making by the ADM Steering Committee and Health Canada provides secretariat to support
these structures. In addition, small coordination units will be implemented in core federal departments and Health Canada’s
regional offices.
Public Health Agency of Canada (PHAC)
The Public Health Agency of Canada, through its Centre for Infectious Disease Prevention and Control (CIDPC) and its Fetal
Alcohol Syndrome Team, is responsible for conducting and dissemination of research and surveillance information on public
health indicators and illness related to substance use/abuse and injection drug use, as well as on the linkages between
substance abuse and fetal alcohol spectrum disorder.
* CDS was initiated in 1987 and has undergone a number of reiterations in the past 17 years. CDS Renewed was approved in May of 2003. The financials
presented reflect a start date of May 2003 and an end date of the 2004-2005 fiscal year. The funding allocation during this two year period is inclusive of
both the enhanced funding received under CDS Renewed and a-base funding pertaining to activities undertaken in the area of demand and supply reduction.
1
Horizontal Initiatives (cont’d)
Department of Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness Canada (PSEPC)
The Department of Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness Canada is responsible for: a) coordinating the Public Safety
and Emergency Preparedness Portfolio’s drug control policies and initiatives to ensure that they are consistent with and
complimentary to the broader goals and objectives of CDS; and b) providing strategic advice to the Minister in fulfillment of
the Minister’s policy leadership role in policing and corrections. The Department also participates in various international fora
in support of law enforcement-related supply and demand reduction activities.
Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP)
The RCMP offers a balanced approach addressing both supply and demand issues. They investigate illegal drug activities and
organized crime groups. They disrupt criminal activities and networks related to the supply of illicit drugs. They also deliver a
number of drug awareness and prevention programs targeted at youth, Aboriginal communities, drug endangered children,
parents and the Canadian workplace. Additionally, they coordinate specialized training of police officers in Drug Recognition
Expertise to detect drug impaired driving.
Correctional Services Canada (CSC)
CSC provides substance abuse treatment programs to federal offenders with substance abuse problems and controls the
supply of illicit drugs in correctional facilities through various security measures.
Canada Border Services Agency (CBSA)
The CBSA contributes to reducing the supply of illicit drugs through the interception of controlled substances and illegal
drugs at Canadian ports/borders of entry.
Department of Justice(DOJ)
The Federal Prosecution Service of the Department of Justice prosecutes drug cases. The prosecution of drug cases
comprises a significant part of the Prosecution’s workload. The Programs Branch of the Department of Justice in collaboration
with the Office of Demand Reduction of Health Canada, administers funding and monitors the implementation and
evaluation of drug treatment courts in Canada. Drug treatment courts are implemented as alternatives to traditional
prosecution through special courts that integrate both criminal justice and drug treatment responses.
Department of Foreign Affairs Canada (FAC)
The Department of Foreign Affairs Canada (FAC) represents Canada, in cooperation and coordination with other interested
federal partners, on the international aspects of Canada’s Drug Strategy. The Department manages contributions to the
United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime (UNODC) and the Organization of American States’ Inter-American Drug Abuse
Control Commission (CICAD).
Federal Partners Names of Programs
Involved in each
program
1. Health Canada Promotion /
Prevention & Public
RCMP
and Professional
Education /
Training Programs /
Activities
2. Health Canada Treatment and
Rehabilitation
Correctional
Programs / Activities
Services Canada
(CSC)
Department of
Justice
2
Total Allocation Planned
Expected Results for 2006-2007
Spending for
2006-2007
$4.87M
$5.85M
$8.27M
$5.26M
$2.8M
$15.94M
$11.11M
$173.68M
$87.58M
$31.60M
$19.10M
$2.60M
$3.80M
$207.88M
$110.48M
Increased awareness of the nature, extent and
consequences of substance use/abuse within
the school, workplace and Aboriginal
communities and among youth, professionals
and the general public
Improved skills/competencies in the delivery of
programs
Enhanced access and motivation to participate
in treatment for substance abuse
Reduction in risk behaviours/decisions and
overall assessed substance abuse treatment
needs
Horizontal Initiatives (cont’d)
Federal Partners Names of Programs
Involved in each
program
3. Health Canada Research and
Surveillance
PHAC
Programs / Activities
CSC
Total Allocation Planned
Expected Results for 2006-2007
Spending for
2006-2007
$20.38M
$11.04M
$2.90M
$ 1.0M
$1.50M
$ 2.0M
More evidence-based responses to substance
use/abuse
$4.10M
4. Health Canada Grants &
Contributions
Foreign Affairs
Program
Canada
PSEPC
5. Health Canada Coordination and
Collaboration
PSEPC
Programs / Activities
Increased knowledge and understanding of
emerging trends and related consequences in
the area of substance abuse and what works in
preventing and treating substance use/abuse
$28.88M
$11.11M
$4.20M
$15.75M
$5.00M
$2.90M
$.31M
$.10M
$9.51M
$18.75M
$6.42M
$2.96M
$1.25M
$.63M
$9.51M
$3.59M
Increased capacity/ability to identify, understand
and address issues pertaining to the demand for
and supply of illicit drugs and harmful
substances
Increased collaboration/ involvement of
stakeholders
Improved coordination/direction of efforts
among CDS partners/stakeholders
Enhanced credibility/influence of CDS in setting
directions/policies in the area of supply and
demand reduction
6. Health Canada Policy and
Legislative Review
and Development
Programs / Activities
$2.6M
7. Health Canada Enforcement
Programs / Activities
RCMP
$27.22M
Canada Border
Services
CSC
Department of
Justice
Total
$150.17M
$163.80M
$1.55M
Improved policy and regulatory responses to the
demand for and the supply of illicit drugs and
harmful substances
$14.26M Improved understanding and knowledge of
drugs, related trends, and production and
$79.07M diversion methods
$81.90M Enhanced ability to detect and respond to the
supply of illicit drugs and harmful substances
$12.10M
$ 5.90M
$126.44M
$64.50M
$479.73M
$235.63M
$752.21M
$396.15M
Contact: Colleen Ryan, Manager, CDS Evaluation, Risk Management and Reporting, (613) 957-2867,
[email protected]
Approved by: Beth Pieterson
Date Approved: Beth Pieterson
3
Horizontal Initiatives (cont’d)
Horizontal Initiative: Federal Tobacco Control Strategy
Start Date: 2001/02
Lead Department(s): Health Canada
End Date: 2005/06 & ongoing
Total Funding Allocated: $560M
(See note about Health Canada
total funding in section 11)
Description: The Federal Tobacco Control Strategy (FCTS) establishes a framework for a comprehensive, fully integrated,
and multi-faceted approach to tobacco control. The FTCS is the federal contribution to the national tobacco control plan
endorsed in 1999 by all Ministers of Health. It focuses on four mutually reinforcing components: protection, prevention,
cessation and harm reduction, supplemented by effective use of public education campaigns to reach all Canadians.
Shared Outcome(s): The FTCS has five 10-year objectives (2001-2011):
Reduce smoking prevalence to 20% from 25% (level in 1999).
Reduce the number of cigarettes sold by 30%.
Increase retailer compliance regarding youth access to tobacco from 69% to 80%.
Reduce the number of people exposed to environmental tobacco smoke in enclosed public places.
Explore how to mandate changes to tobacco products to reduce health hazards.
Governance Structure(s): Resources for the implementation of the FTCS were allocated to a number of departments and
agencies. Health Canada (HC) is the lead department in the FTCS and is responsible for regulating the manufacture, sale,
labelling and promotion of tobacco products as well as developing, implementing and promoting initiatives that reduce or
prevent the negative health impacts associated with smoking.
The partner departments and agencies are:
The Department of Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness Canada (PSEPC) (formerly the Department of the
Solicitor General) – administers contribution funding for monitoring activities in connection with determining levels of
contraband tobacco activity. The Department also provides policy advice and support on smuggling issues.
The Department of Justice – prosecutes smuggling offences, as well as offences concerning unlawful manufacture,
distribution and possession of contraband tobacco products.
The Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP) – is responsible for the enforcement of laws in relation to the
international movement of tobacco products (including the illicit manufacture, distribution or possession of contraband
tobacco products).
The Canada Revenue Agency (CRA) (formerly the Canada Customs and Revenue Agency (CCRA)) – is responsible for
ensuring the assessment and collection of tobacco taxes and monitoring tobacco exports.
The Canada Border Services Agency (CBSA) (previously part of the former Canada Customs and Revenue Agency) –
is responsible for monitoring the impact of tax changes on the illegal international movement of tobacco and the
national contraband market.
4
Horizontal Initiatives (cont’d)
Federal
Names of
Partners
Programs
Involved in
each program
Total Allocation
Planned
Spending for
2006-2007
1. HC
$482.5M
$58.7M
FTCS
(Note: this original
allocation has been
affected by several cuts
since the FTCS began.
The reductions went
towards funding other
departmental and
government priorities,
i.e. $47M to CEPA,
$32.5M held back as
part of the Government
Advertising Plan, and
$3M, starting in 05/06,
reallocated as part the
Expenditure Review
exercise.)
Expected Results for 2006-2007
1) Work with the University of Waterloo and the
provincial governments of Prince Edward Island
(TCP: $49M)
and British Columbia to evaluate a coordinated
approach to cessation.
(FNIHB: $9.7M)
2) Monitor the impact of tobacco control initiatives
through the Canadian Tobacco Use Monitoring
Survey.
3) Pursue regulations that would mandate changes
to cigarettes that would decrease the number of
cigarette-lit fires and their associated harm and
deaths.
4) Ratification of the Framework Convention on
Tobacco Control
5) Work with 8 regional offices and partner with
several National Aboriginal Organizations across
Canada for program delivery and development
6) Survey on current daily smokers (15+ years) in
First Nations and Inuit communities.
2. PSEPC
FTCS
$3.2M
$45,000
Enhanced Partnership Arrangement with Akwesasne
Mohawk Police
3. Justice
FTCS
$10.0M
$1,326,445
1) The number of contraband and cigarette related
fines has been reduced from 1920 files in 2002
to 920 files as of March 2005 – a reduction of
over 76%.
2) The number of fines that were satisfied as
of March 2005 was 571 as compared to
March 2004 of 303, an increase of over 88%.
3) Analyses of statistics have demonstrated that
the most cost efficient methods of recovery are
demand letters and phone calls which include
negotiations.
At year end 2005, demand letters generated
over 920 payments totaling $641,9001 and
negotiations resulted in 584 payments totaling
$318,141*.
4) Incarceration for non payment of fines has
decreased from 47 in 2004 to 34 in 2005,
a reduction of over 37%.
5) Directives were given to Fine Recovery units
to oppose all motions for payment extensions
heard at court resulting in a decrease in counsel
fees to client departments for said hearings.
* Note that Québecs statistics are not included in these figures which would be substantially higher. This province was not yet integrated into the Department of
Justice’s Icase system when the March 2005 statistics were consolidated. As of June/05, Québec has been integrated in Icase.
5
Horizontal Initiatives (cont’d)
Federal
Names of
Partners
Programs
Involved in
each program
Total Allocation
Planned
Spending for
2006-2007
Expected Results for 2006-2007
4. RCMP
$10.5M
$1,500,000
1) Regular reports on tobacco situation were
provided to Finance and Health Canada.
Tobacco analysts attended regular meetings
to brief Finance.
FTCS
2) Improving border security through border alarm
which are being monitored regularly.
5. CRA
FTCS
$53.8M
(total allotment to the
former CCRA)
6. CBSA
FTCS
(see row above)
$5.1M
1) Attended monthly meetings with Dept of Finance
and partners to discuss and serve as a
reference for questions on tobacco issues.
2) Provided monthly analysis of the national
contraband situation by compiling reports
received from the Regions. Partnered with RCMP
to annual risk assessment of the nature and
extent of the tobacco contraband activity.
Coordinated the development of tobacco
intelligence in the regions.
3) Actively participated in 50 Joint Force Operations
with law enforcement partners across the
Regions. Co-hosted the Joint US/Canada
Tobacco Diversion Workshop 2004 with
American and Canadian Agencies. Provided
input into the World Customs Organization report
on the global analysis – Customs and Tobacco
2004.
6
Horizontal Initiative
Horizontal Initiative: Building Public Confidence in
Pesticide Regulation and Improving Access to
Pest ManagementProducts
Start Date: 2002–2003
Lead Department(s): Pest Management Regulatory
Agency (PMRA)—Health Canada (HC)
End Date: 2008–2009
Total Funding Allocated:
Description: The initiative is a part of the federal government’s commitments as outlined in the Treasury Board submission
Building Public Confidence in Pesticide Regulation and Improving Access to Pest Management Products. The Treasury Board
submission and its associated Results-based Management and Accountability Framework (RMAF) describe the integrated
approach by which initiatives will be measured, managed and reported throughout their life cycle. An important element of
the commitments made through the Treasury Board submission is that stakeholders and public will be kept informed through
a transparent management system. The participating departments will work together for shared outcomes; measure
performance on delivery; and review progress achieved. This initiative incorporates efforts of six federal government partners
to increase public and stakeholder confidence in the pesticide regulatory system, to protect health and environment, and to
increase the competitiveness of the agri-food and forestry sectors. Research and monitoring in the area of pesticides is being
coordinated with their regulation.
Under this initiative, the presence and effects of pesticides in the environment, in marine and freshwater ecosystems, and in
the forest environment are being monitored. The initiative enhances monitoring and enforcement of pesticide residue limits in
foods, in feed, of pesticide residues in fertilizers, and pesticide guarantee verification for fertilizer-pesticide combinations.
Reduced-risk pesticides and biological pesticides for forestry are being developed and their use facilitated. Commoditybased risk reduction strategies for the agriculture and agri-food sector are being developed and implemented. Programs
improving access to agricultural minor-use pesticides and reduced-risk pesticides for agricultural use are being established.
Research to support the introduction of minor-use pesticides that pose a reduced risk to the environment is being
conducted. A reporting system to track adverse effects of pesticides has been developed, and information on these effects
will be collected and recorded. Collectively, this work is being conducted to achieve public confidence in increased
conservation and protection of human health and the environment while contributing to the competitiveness of Canada’s
agricultural sector.
The information presented in this table has been organized along the following three main themes of this initiative:
1. Research and Monitoring, carried out by Agriculture and Agri-food Canada (AAFC), the Canadian Food Inspection Agency
(CFIA), the Department of Fisheries and Ocean (DFO), Environment Canada (EC), Health Canada’s PMRA, and Natural
Resources Canada (NRCan)
2. Developing and Implementing of Commodity Specific Risk Reduction Strategies, carried out by AAFC and HC’s PMRA
3. Generation of Data to Support the Registration of Reduced Risk and Minor Use Pesticides for the Agricultural and Agri-food
Sector and Reduced Risk Pesticides and Biopesticides for Forestry, carried out by AAFC, HC’s PMRA and NRCan
Shared Outcomes:
Immediate Outcomes:
Increased knowledge by the PMRA about pesticides and alternatives
Registration of reduced-risk and minor-use pesticides
Access to safer pest management practices and products
Compliance for safer food, feed, fertilizers and fertilizer-pesticide combinations
Intermediate Outcomes:
A regulatory system that better protects health and environment and contributes to the competitiveness of the agrifood and forestry sectors
Use of safer pest management practices and products
Increased transparency of pesticide regulation
Final Outcome: Increased public and stakeholder confidence in pesticide regulation, protected health and environment as
well as increased competitiveness of the agri-food and forestry sectors
7
Horizontal Initiative (cont’d)
Governance Structures:
PMRA (HC)—Executive Director
EC—Director General, Conservation Strategies Directorate and Director General, National Programs Directorate
DFO—Director General, Fisheries, Environment and Biodiversity Science
NRCan—Director General, Science Branch, Canadian Forest Service
AAFC—Assistant Deputy Minister of the Farm Financial Programs Branch and Assistant Deputy Minister of Research Branch,
Executive Director, Pest Management Centre
CFIA—Vice President, Programs
Deputy Minister Committee—Deputy Minister from Health and AAFC
AAFC/PMRA Joint Management Committee: Assistant Deputy Minister of the Farm Financial Programs Branch, AAFC, Assistant
Deputy Minister of Research Branch, AAFC, Executive Director, PMRA, Health Canada, Treasury Board Secretariat (ex-officio
member)
Federal Partners Names of Programs
Involved in each
program
AAFC, CFIA, DFO,
EC, HC (PMRA),
NRCan
1. AAFC
Total
Allocation
Planned
Expected Results for 2006-2007
Spending for
2006-2007
I. RESEARCH AND
MONITORING
(a) Conducting
$8.0M
research to support
the introduction
of minor-use
pesticides that
pose a reduced risk
to the environment.
$2.0M
Following evaluation of research projects,
continued funding for some as appropriate. Final
reports and next steps for implementation of
research results underway for projects
completed in March, 2006.
Initiation (in April, 2006)of approximately
20 new projects in Minor Use Research and
Biopesticide Initiatives as a result of the
November, 2005 Project Call. Results of 1 year
of research work on these projects to be
reported upon (April, 2007)
Research planning, coordination continues with
MOU Research Working Group
2. CFIA
(b) Enhanced
monitoring and
enforcement of
pesticide residue
limits in food and
feed.
$0.25M
Identify food commodities consumed by targeted
subgroup (children).
Lab testing of an approximate 1500 samples
per year.
Follow-up inspections for non-compliant test
sample results.
Publish annual report of the findings of the
National Chemical Residues Monitoring Program
(NCRMP).
Food recalls, as required, for risk mitigation and
removal of hazardous foods from marketplace.
8
Horizontal Initiative (cont’d)
Federal Partners Names of Programs
Involved in each
program
2. CFIA
Total
Allocation
$2.15M
(c) Enhanced
monitoring and
enforcement of
pesticide residues
in fertilizers and
pesticide guarantee
verification in
fertilizer-pesticide
combinations.
Planned
Expected Results for 2006-2007
Spending for
2006-2007
$0.25M
Develop monitoring and surveillance policies
and processes to guide and advise operational
staff on fertilizer-pesticide combinations and
pesticide contaminated fertilizers.
Increase interaction with the PMRA to obtain the
most up-to-date pesticide safety and labelling
information.
Update the Compendium of Fertilizer-Use
Pesticides, which contains information regarding
registration, guarantees and proper labelling.
Work to develop regulatory changes to facilitate
updating of the Compendium more regularly,
and, if successful, provide Compendium updates
more regularly to the producers of mixtures and
to the CFIA’s inspection staff.
Advise CFIA Operations on appropriate follow-up
procedures and recommendations regarding the
significance of sample analytical results.
Sample fertilizer-pesticide combinations to verify
guarantees.
Sample fertilizers suspected to be contaminated
with pesticides.
Verify fertilizer-pesticide labels.
Conduct investigation and compliance activities
(anticipated based on sampling and inspection
frequencies).
Analyze samples submitted by inspectors.
3. DFO
(d) Monitor and
$7.9M
research the
presence and
effects of pesticides
in marine and
freshwater
ecosystems.
$1.0M
DFO will provide the PMRA with final reports on
four regional National Fund projects:
1) Impacts of forest spray programs on
trout/salmon, Newfoundland-Labrador
2) Effects of pesticides on fish reproduction,
Quebec
3) Impacts of pesticides on salmon habitat and
on neurological development, Pacific
4) Potential for biological effects from episodic
release of pesticides into the aquatic
environment, Gulf and Maritimes.
DFO will provide the PMRA with a status report
from DFO’s Centre for Environmental Research
on Pesticides (CERP).
9
Horizontal Initiative (cont’d)
Federal Partners Names of Programs
Involved in each
program
Total
Allocation
Planned
Expected Results for 2006-2007
Spending for
2006-2007
3. DFO (cont’d)
CERP will conduct studies to quantify impacts
of exposure to pesticide residues in 2 model
systems in Canada; one representative of prairie
land use and another indicative of southern
Ontario land use pattern. Impacts will be
quantified in terms of reproductive success of
the native fish populations as well as overall
population numbers.
After consultation with the PMRA, DFO will
design and initiate new research projects related
to the theme “Population Level Impacts of
Pesticides on Fisheries Resources”.
Contribute to the Formative Evaluation of the
Building Public Confidence in Pesticide
Regulation and Improving Access to Pest
Management Products Horizontal Initiative.
4. EC
(e) Monitor and
$7.0M
research on
presence and
effects of pesticides
in the environment.
$1.0M
EC will:
start a new cycle of research and monitoring
projects at Environment Canada
support up to 6 new research and monitoring
project themes to determine the
environmental concentrations and impacts of
in-use pesticides in the environment;
produce a summary document on highlights
of research and monitoring investigations
covering the first cycle of work (2003-2006)
at Environment Canada
produce an annual report and make it
available to the PMRA;
provide science advice to meet regulatory
data gaps and knowledge deficiency as well
as to improve risk assessment methods
EC Leads in specific research and monitoring
themes have provided EC’s Pesticide Program
Coordinating Committee with a document
highlighting each of their theme’s results for the
first three year cycle of work Themes include air
and water surveillance; fish, amphibian and
multitrophic aquatic effects; and, plant, mammal
and bird terrestrial effects. Following three years
of research we will obtain answers to questions
regarding knowledge generation with highlights
of findings, contribution to the initial Pesticide
Science Fund (PSF) objectives (e.g., national in
scope and linked to regulatory decision-making
priority, advanced knowledge of pesticide fate
10
Horizontal Initiative (cont’d)
Federal Partners Names of Programs
Involved in each
program
4. EC (cont’d)
Total
Allocation
Planned
Expected Results for 2006-2007
Spending for
2006-2007
and effects, etc.), contribution to future
departmental priorities, links within EC and to
other interdepartmental research/monitoring
activities, leverage of complementary work and
building of partnerships, scientific (or other)
publications procuded and finally the theme’s
top five priorities for PSF (incl. research,
monitoring, methods development, risk
assessment and modelling).
These documents were used by the Committee
to prioritize research and monitoring activities for
a second cycle of work beginning fiscal year
2006-07. Environmental priorities will be set
according to the fundamentals of detecting
change, understanding why it is changing, better
understanding of what we can do about it, and
using this information to inform decision makers
and Canadians. Collected knowledge will be
used in the context of EC’s Competitiveness and
Environmental Sustainability Framework (CESF)
and applied to pesticides. This will support
decisions related to national competitiveness,
to the protection of the health and safety of
Canadians as well as to the conservation of
ecosystem functions.
In order to better integrate and coordinate EC
research with regulation, EC will continue to work
with the PMRA in the implementation of the
EC/PMRA MOU. The MOU has four components,
Science Policy, Knowledge Generation, Issue
Management and Compliance Promotion and
Enforcement include many initiatives and
activities not listed herein. EC will continue
working on providing leadership in the
development and implementation of a federal,
co-ordinated pesticides science strategy for
research and monitoring. As well EC will continue
to contribute to PMRA’s pesticide assessments
where appropriate and will continue to provide
science/policy advice on key Government of
Canada policies as they relate to pesticide
management and use in Canada.
11
Horizontal Initiative (cont’d)
Federal Partners Names of Programs
Involved in each
program
Total
Allocation
Planned
Expected Results for 2006-2007
Spending for
2006-2007
5. HC (PMRA)
$4.2M
$0.8M
(f) Linking pesticide
regulation and
research.
Identify PMRA’s research and monitoring
priorities annually and communicate to 5NR
partners through regular meetings and other
avenues as needed. Facilitate discussion among
the 5NR on identifying actions to address
specific priorities, including collaborative
research.
Discuss with the 5NR how the results of their
research and monitoring are used in regulatory
decisions to build better linkages between
research and regulation.
Facilitate the two-way communication and
coordination between regulation and research
between governments within Canada (through
PMRA’s FPT Committee) and internationally as
well as with the private and academic sectors,
through presentations linking research and
regulation at regional, national and international
meetings.(e.g., through SETAC, CSA, IUPAC).
To strengthen the framework in linking pesticide
research and monitoring, develop a MOU
amongst the 5NR on linking research to
regulation.
Improve risk assessment procedures particularly
in the area of environmental fate prediction
(e.g., water modelling and exposure
assessment). Continue to improve and expand
the use of probabilistic risk assessments.
5. HC (PMRA)
(g) Conducting
$3.5M
research to support
the introduction
of minor-use
pesticides that
pose a reduced risk
to the environment.
$0.9M
Advance the risk assessment methodologies
through:
1) Further refinement and application of
environmental protection goals;
2) Publication of draft guidance on
environmental risk assessment methods;
3) Research to support the harmonization
of risk assessment methodology with
international partners (e.g., occupational
exposure assessment, groundwater modelling,
pesticide degradation kinetics).
Facilitate access to reduced risk products,
specifically low risk products, through
developing, and publishing for external
comment, guidance on registration of low
risk products.
12
Horizontal Initiative (cont’d)
Federal Partners Names of Programs
Involved in each
program
Total
Allocation
Planned
Expected Results for 2006-2007
Spending for
2006-2007
5. HC (PMRA)
Continue to develop a database on
environmental toxicology and fate to guide
decisions, internally and externally, on
comparative risk and reduced risk products.
(cont’d)
Finalize and publish a Best Management
Practices guide to reduce spray drift by
applicators. Publish for public comment a
document identifying various options to better
communicate buffer zones on labels to
applicators.
6. NRCan
(h) Research and
monitor pesticides
in the forest
environment.
$3.5M
$0.4M
Third and final year of research work for four
projects will be completed and results reported
in final reports and publications. Provide results
to clients/stakeholders and PMRA. The research
projects are:
1) Environmental fate and ecological effects of a
systemic insecticide for control of exotic wood
boring insect pests, completion of second
year field research program (GLP study
comparing fate of imidacloprid following soil
and stem injections);
2) Development of a biological treatment for
control of root rot pathogen and impact on
microbial biodiversity;
3) Advanced methods for monitoring impacts
of pest control products on key microbial
communities of forest soils, publish
guidelines that demonstrate the use of
cutting edge molecular methods to study
environmental fate of microbes;
4) Monitoring status of spruce budworm
population to improve forest protection
programs, integration of information on
mortality agents in infestation forecasting and
spray decision making for spruce budworm.
Refine research priorities and plan for request
for new proposals, January 2007.
13
Horizontal Initiative (cont’d)
Federal Partners Names of Programs
Involved in each
program
AAFC
HC (PMRA)
II. DEVELOPING AND
IMPLEMENTING
COMMODITY
SPECIFIC RISK
REDUCTION
STRATEGIES
1. AAFC
(a) Commodity based
risk reduction
strategies.
Total
Allocation
Planned
Expected Results for 2006-2007
Spending for
2006-2007
$19.3
$2.5
Process to engage stakeholders in crop
prioritization based on risk and needs
assessments developed.
Next wave of about 10 crop profiles to be
finalized and published.
Develop up to 5 risk reduction strategies and
support implementation of priority projects as
established with Technical Working
Group/stakeholders.
Fund research and implementation projects from
November 2005 call for proposals.
Follow-up from workshop on barriers to grower
adoption of IPM practices
Analysis of data from pilot pesticide use survey.
Continued implementation of AAFC/PMRA joint
communication plan.
2. HC (PMRA)
(a) Commodity based
risk reduction
strategies (RR).
$25.7M
$4.0M
(2.0 for
commodity
strategies /
2.0 for RR
product
review)
Planned staffing actions in 2006–2007,
indeterminate positions.
Ongoing consultations with stakeholders, Work
share with other government departments and
5NRs.
Work on pesticide risk indicator: consult, build
and validate database.
Refine, together with AAFC, prioritization criteria
for determining priority crops for the program.
Workshare with AAFC on crop profiles.
Risk reduction strategies have been developed
for pulse crops and canola. A long term fireblight
management strategy has been developed for
apples. Steering committee and working groups
have been meeting to develop solutions to the
identified priorities and implement steps to
resolve these issues. Substantial progress has
been made in developing strategies and forming
steering committees to lead the strategies for a
number of other crops, particularly, greenhouse
vegetables, grape, peach, potato, strawberry and
14
Horizontal Initiative (cont’d)
Federal Partners Names of Programs
Involved in each
program
Total
Allocation
Planned
Expected Results for 2006-2007
Spending for
2006-2007
2. HC (PMRA)
apple. Pursue risk reduction program for honey,
Richardson ground squirrel and develop a work
plan for forestry uses and needs.
(cont’d)
Consolidate and integrate all information
collected with this program into the registration
stream of the PMRA.
Continue review of reduced-risk pesticides
submitted for registration.
AAFC
HC (PMRA)
NRCan
1. AAFC
III. GENERATION OF
$33.7M
DATA TO SUPPORT
THE REGISTRATION $12.0M
OF REDUCED-RISK Abase
AND MINOR-USE
PESTICIDES
FOR THE
AGRICULTURAL
AND AGRI-FOOD
SECTOR AND
REDUCED-RISK
PESTICIDES AND
BIOPESTICIDES
FOR FORESTRY
(a) Improving access
to agricultural
minor-use
pesticides, and
reduced-risk
pesticides for
agricultural use.
$6.5M
$2.0M Abase
Thirty-six pest-crop combinations will be
identified at annual national stakeholder
meeting hosted by AAFC.
Manufacturer (registrant) written support will be
obtained by July 2006 for each pest-crop pair,
then sent to the PMRA for review by October
with the majority by August (PSCR 3.1).
Subsequently, data requirements (DACO) for
each pest-crop pair will be issued by the PMRA
to AAFC according to PMRA-established timeline
(97 days from receipt)
AAFC will convert DACOs to study plans by
January 2007 and assign trials that complete
the study plans, to contractors and collaborating
AAFC personnel across Canada. Good laboratory
practice trials require quality assurance oversight
that is provided by contractors and AAFC
Headquarters staff.
Data generation from field trials in 2006 and
laboratory analysis of residues proceeds to final
report stage in the spring–summer of 2007 and
are submitted to the PMRA. The PMRA provides
a decision on use 247 days later. Total process
takes about 36 months.
15
Horizontal Initiative (cont’d)
Federal Partners Names of Programs
Involved in each
program
Total
Allocation
Planned
Expected Results for 2006-2007
Spending for
2006-2007
2. HC (PMRA)
$20.8M
$4.0M
(a) Improving access
to agricultural
minor-use
pesticides, and
reduced-risk
pesticides for
agricultural use.
Product evaluation work—review presubmission
proposals from AAFC and provincial coordinators
and issue data requirements.
Register new minor crop uses, including minor
use and reduced-risk products and uses.
Harmonization work and regulatory projects—
Joint Reviews in collaboration with the U.S. EPA,
AAFC and U.S. Department of Agriculture IR-4
Program, further work on crop groupings and on
Maximum Residue Levels (MRL) promulgation.
Increase communication and provide feedback
to AAFC, to improve the quality and use of
scientific rationales.
3. NRCan
(b) Develop and
facilitate the use
of reduced-risk
pesticides and
biological
pesticides for
forestry.
$4.1
$0.3
Review final reports of nine projects funded for
three years and plan strategy and priorities for
future funding.
NRCan will continue work to integrate and
coordinate activities with the other 5NR partners
and stakeholders.
The NRCan-CFS Minor Use Advisor hired under
this fund will continue to work in collaboration
with AAFC to facilitate registration of reduced
risk/minor use pest control products against
pest on outdoor woody ornamentals and forests.
Coordinate and report on six projects for minor
use pesticides in Canada.
Support for the 2006 National Forest Pest
Management Forum.
Support for forest projects on reduce risk pest
control products.
Results to be Achieved by Non-federal Partners: n/a
Contact Information: Executive Director, PMRA
Approved by:
16
Date Approved:
Horizontal Initiatives for Health Canada,
First Nations Inuit Health Branch, Early Childhood Development
Horizontal Initiative: Federal Early Childhood
Development (ECD) Strategy for First Nations
and Other Aboriginal Children
Lead Department(s): Health Canada, First Nations
Inuit Health Branch
Start Date: October 2002
End Date: 2006-2007 and ongoing
Total Funding Allocated: As a result of an ECD Strategy announced in October 2002, $320 million over five years will be
dedicated to enhancing various federal ECD programs.
Description: The ECD Strategy for First Nations and Other Aboriginal Children was announced on October 31, 2002. The
strategy provides $320 million over five years to: improve and expand existing ECD programs and services for Aboriginal
children; expand ECD capacity and networks; introduce new research initiatives to improve understanding of how Aboriginal
children are doing; and work towards the development of a “single window” approach to ensure better integration and
coordination of federal Aboriginal ECD programming.
Shared Outcome(s): The federal ECD Strategy complements the September 2000 First Ministers F/P/T ECD Agreement.
It seeks to address the gap in life chances between Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal children by improving the developmental
opportunities that Aboriginal children and their families are exposed to at an early age (0-6 years). These outcomes are
shared by the following federal departments: Health Canada – First Nations Inuit Health Branch, Public Health Agency of
Canada, Human Resources Development Canada, Social Development Canada, and Indian and Northern Affairs Canada.
Governance Structure(s): Interdepartmental ECD ADM Steering Committee; Interdepartmental ECD Working Group.
Federal Partners
Involved in each
program
Planned
Spending for
2005-2006
Expected Results for 2005-2006
1. Health Canada
(a) Aboriginal Head $107,595
Start on Reserve from 2002 MC
Electronic Link:
(AHSOR)
(total for 2002-03
http://www.hc-sc.gc.ca/
thru to 2006-07)
fnihb-dgspni/fnihb/
cp/ahsor/index.htm
$21,519 (and
ongoing) –
committed in
2002
Program expansion and
enhancement
Electronic Link:
$70,000 (total for
(b) Fetal Alcohol
http://www.hc-sc.gc.ca/
Spectrum
2002-03 thru to
fnihb/cp/fas_fae/
Disorder – First
2006-07)
index.ht
Nations and Inuit
Component
(FASD-FNIC)
$15,000 (and
ongoing) –
committed in
2002
Program expansion and
enhancement
(c) Capacity building $7,575 (total for
2002-03 thru to
2006-07)
$1,515 (and
ongoing) –
committed in
2002
Program expansion and
enhancement
(a) Aboriginal Head
Start Urban
and Northern
(AHSUN)
$12,576 (and
ongoing) –
committed in
2002
Public Health Agency of
Canada
Electronic Link:
http://www.phac-aspc.
gc.ca/dca-dea/
programs-mes/ahs_
main_e.html
Names of Programs Total Allocation
over 5 years
($ in Thousands)
$62,880 (total for
2002-03 thru to
2006-07)
17
Horizontal Initiatives for Health Canada,
First Nations Inuit Health Branch, Early Childhood Development (cont’d)
Federal Partners
Involved in each
program
Names of Programs Total Allocation
over 5 years
($ in Thousands)
Planned
Spending for
2005-2006
Expected Results for 2005-2006
2. Human Resources
(a) First Nations and $45,700 (total for
Development Canada
Inuit Child Care 2002-03 thru to
Initiative (FNICCI) 2006-07)
$9,140 (and
ongoing) –
committed in
2002
Program expansion and
enhancement
$4,240 (and
ongoing) –
committed in
2002
Program expansion and
enhancement
(b) Research and
knowledge
$21,200 (total for
2002-03 thru to
2006-07)
3. Indian Affairs
and Northern
Development
(a) Capacity Building ($5,050 – total for $1,010 (and
and Indian
2002-03 thru to
ongoing) –
Children Survey 2006-07)
committed in
2002
4. Social Development
Canada
(a) Non-applicable
Total
$320,000
Increased capacity
$65,000
Results to be achieved by Non-Federal Partners (if applicable):
Contact: Nicki Sims-Jones, Manager, ECD Strategy Unit, First Nations and Inuit Health Branch, Health Canada Postal Locator
1919B Tunney’s Pasture, Ottawa Telephone: (613) 948-2589 Fax: (613) 946-4625
Approved by: Carolyn Harrison, Director, Children and Youth
Directorate, First Nations and Inuit Health Branch, Health
Canada, Postal Locator 1919B, Tunney’s Pasture, Ottawa
Telephone: (613) 948-5445 Fax: (613) 946-4625
18
Date Approved: 01/10/05
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