Please cite as: 

SETAC Australasia (2012). Proceedings of the 2 nd

 SETAC Australasia 

Conference. Leusch FDL, Prochazka E and Escher BI (Eds). 4‐6 July 2012, 

Brisbane QLD Australia.  

 

 

4‐6 July 2012, Brisbane, Australia

 

  http://www.setac.org/sapau/brisbane2012

 

 

 

We are delighted to welcome you to Brisbane for the 2 nd

 SETAC Australasia 

Conference.  

This meeting brings together environmental toxicologists and chemists to  promote knowledge sharing to achieve a healthier environment. As an  acknowledgment to the 2010/11 summer floods and cyclones, which affected  many parts of Australia including the host city Brisbane, the special  conference theme this year is on the impacts of extreme weather events and  climate change in our fields. 

Of course all the usual suspects are also on the agenda. Your contributions  have enabled us to create what we hope will be a great scientific programme  over the next three days, and we have planned a social programme to match! 

We hope you will thoroughly benefit from your time in Brisbane and wish you  a productive and enjoyable conference. 

 

 

On behalf of the Organising Committee, 

 

 

 

Dr Frederic Leusch 

Chair 

 

Prof Beate Escher 

Co‐Chair 

About SETAC Australasia 

SETAC‐AU is a Regional Chapter of the Society of Environmental Toxicology and 

Chemistry (SETAC) Asia‐Pacific geographic unit, established to promote and  undertake activities of SETAC in Australasia. SETAC‐AU is dedicated to the use of  multidisciplinary approaches to examine the impacts of chemicals and technology on  the environment. The Society also provides and open forum for scientists and  institutions engaged in the study of environmental problems, management and  regulation of natural resources, education, research and development, and  manufacturing and distribution to exchange information and share opinion accross  nations and disciplines. The primary goals of SETAC‐AU are: 

1. To support the development of principles and practices for protection,  enhancement and management of sustainable environmental quality and  ecosystem integrity of the region. 

2. To encourage interactions among environmental scientists and disseminate  information on environmental toxicology and chemistry. 

3. To provide a forum for communication among professionals in government,  business, academia, and other segments of the environmental science community  and for the protection and welfare of the general public. 

SETAC AU was established in 2011 after members of the Australasian Society for 

Ecotoxicology (ASE) voted to merge their society with SETAC. SETAC‐AU has around 

300 members which include a vibrant mix of industry practitioners, consultants,  academics, regulators and students. Indeed, SETAC‐AU sees itself as a training  ground for current and future scientists and prides itself on providing a strong and  supportive environment for student researchers and scientists from developing  nations in the region. 

SETAC‐AU publishes a regular online bulletin covering regionally important scientific  research and issues. The life of the Society has also been documented in the regular  newsletter, ‘Endpoint’, with regular contributions and updates from members on local  and global issues and events. For more information, visit the Society’s webpage at  www.setac.org/sapau . 

Page | 2  SETAC Australasia Brisbane 2012 Conference 

Table of Contents 

About SETAC Australasia ............................................................................... 2 

Conference Organising Committee ................................................................ 4 

Session Chairs ................................................................................................ 6 

Conference Sponsors ...................................................................................... 7 

Local Area Map .............................................................................................. 8 

Dinner Venue ................................................................................................. 9 

Conference Venue Floor Plan ........................................................................ 10 

Conference Programme at a Glance .............................................................. 11 

Full Programme ............................................................................................ 12 

Keynotes Biographies ................................................................................... 18 

Abstracts ...................................................................................................... 20 

 

Author Index ............................................................................................... 183 

SETAC Australasia Brisbane 2012 Conference  Page | 3  

 

Conference Organising Committee 

Dr Frederic Leusch 

Griffith University 

Smart Water Research Centre 

 

Prof Beate Escher 

The University of Queensland ‐ Entox 

 

Erik Prochazka 

Griffith University 

Smart Water Research Centre 

 

Dr Munro Mortimer 

The University of Queensland – Entox 

 

 

Dr Maud Achard 

The University of Queensland 

School of Chemistry and Molecular 

Biosciences 

Dr Ross Smith 

Hydrobiology 

 

 

Dr Dianne Jolley 

University of Wollongong 

Chair 

Co‐Chair 

Secretariat 

Finance 

Venue & 

Catering 

Sponsorship 

Membership & 

Student Awards 

Page | 4  SETAC Australasia Brisbane 2012 Conference 

 

Conference Organising Committee 

 

 

Dr Reinier Mann 

Department of Science, Information 

Technology, Innovation and the Arts, 

Queensland Government 

Dr Scott Wilson 

Central Queensland University  

Smart Water Research Centre 

 

 

David Everett 

Department of Science, Information 

Technology, Innovation and the Arts, 

Queensland Government 

Phil Scott 

Griffith University 

Smart Water Research Centre 

Logistics 

Social Events & 

Student Awards 

Social Events 

Student Activities 

SETAC Australasia Brisbane 2012 Conference  Page | 5  

Session Chairs 

1. Impact of Extreme 

Weather Events 

2. Statistics and 

Computational Techniques 

3. Metals 

4. Passive Sampling 

5. Environmental Impacts  of Coal Seam Gas 

6. Environmental 

Monitoring 

7. Risk Assessment and 

Environmental Guidelines 

8. Mixtures and Multiple 

Stressors 

Prof Beate Escher 

Prof David Fox 

Dr Jenny Stauber 

Prof Jochen Mueller 

Dr Simon Apte 

Dr John Chapman 

Dr Ross Smith 

Dr Michael Warne 

Dr Frederic Leusch 

Dr Grant Hose 

Dr Dianne Jolley 

Dr Ross Hyne 

Dr Sue Vink 

Dr David Everett 

Dr Rick van Dam 

Prof Martin Holmstrup 

9. ET&C in Extreme 

Environments 

10. Micropollutants and 

Emerging Contaminants 

11. Water Quality 

12. Salinity 

Dr Cath King 

Dr Vin Pettigrove 

Dr Susan Bengtson‐

Nash 

Dr Louis Tremblay 

A/Prof Jeff Charois  Dr Mayumi Allinson 

Dr Reinier Mann  Dr Jason Dunlop 

13. Soil and Sediments 

Dr Mike Williams  Dr Grant Northcott 

14. Biomarkers and 

Biosensors 

Dr Scott Wilson  Dr Anu Kumar 

 

We are also grateful to Margaret Harlow, Dr Peta Neale, Dr Janet Tang, Dr 

Marcella Card, Dr Noel Takeuchi, Sophie Day, Nat Ling Jin, Amie Anastasi, 

Eva Glenn, Mriga Dutt and Dr Daniel Stalter for the time they contributed to  the smooth running of this conference. 

Page | 6  SETAC Australasia Brisbane 2012 Conference 

Conference Sponsors 

The 2 nd

 SETAC Australasia Brisbane 2012 Conference is proudly sponsored by  www.visionenvironment.com.au 

  capim.com.au 

  www.hydrobiology.biz 

  www.ecotox.com.au 

  www.advancedanalytical.com.au 

 

 

 

 

This conference is jointly organized by  www.smartwateresearchcentre.com 

 

 

 

 

SETAC Australasia Brisbane 2012 Conference  Page | 7  

 

Local Area Map 

W Conference venue; X Bus stop; Y Go‐Card recharge; Z CityCat pier;  

[ Merlo Coffee; \ The Red Room; ] UQ Connect; ^ Colleges 

 

Page | 8  SETAC Australasia Brisbane 2012 Conference 

Dinner Venue 

Customs House, 399 Queen St, Brisbane QLD 4001. Please refer to the back  of your dinner coupon for more detailed information on transport options. 

X Customs House (Dinner Venue); Y Riverside CityCat stop; Z Southbank 

 

CityCat stop; [ Bus stops #29 and #33; \ Cultural Centre bus station 

SETAC Australasia Brisbane 2012 Conference  Page | 9  

Conference Venue Floor Plan 

Registration  on 3/7 

Registration  from 4/7 – 6/7

Tea breaks  and lunch 

Page | 10  SETAC Australasia Brisbane 2012 Conference 

Programme at a Glance 

 

Tuesday, 3 July 2012 

16:00 – 19:00   Registration and welcome reception [The Terrace, room 14‐613, Building 14, UQ St Lucia] 

Wednesday, 4 July 2012 

9:00 – 9:20  Welcome ceremony [room 14‐212] 

9:20 – 10:10 

10:15 – 11:05 

11:05 – 11:40 

11:40 – 12:40 

Tony Roach Memorial Keynote Address (Robert Letcher) [room 14‐212] 

1. Impact of extreme weather  events [14‐212] 

Morning Tea [Level 2 Foyer] 

1. Impact of extreme weather  events [14‐212] 

3. Metals  [14‐116] 

3. Metals [14‐116] 

4. Passive sampling [14‐217] 

4. Passive sampling [14‐217] 

12:40 – 13:30 

13:30 – 15:00 

Lunch [Level 2 Foyer] 

2. Stats  and computational  techniques [14‐115] 

3. Metals  [14‐116] 

15:00 – 15:40 

15:40 – 17:00 

17:00 – 19:00 

19:00 – late 

Afternoon Tea [14‐613] 

Poster session [14‐613] 

SETAC AU AGM [14‐116] 

Pub crawl (not included in conference registration) 

Thursday, 5 July 2012 

5. Environmental impacts of  coal seam gas [14‐217] 

7:30 – 8:45 

9:00 – 9:50 

9:55 – 11:05 

Student breakfast [The Terrace, room 14‐613] 

Keynote Address (Martin Holmstrup) [room 14‐212] 

6. Environmental monitoring 

[14‐212] 

Morning Tea [Level 2 Foyer] 

7. Risk assessment and env.  guidelines [14‐116] 

11:05 – 11:40 

11:40 – 12:40 

6. Environmental monitoring 

[14‐212] 

Lunch [Level 2 Foyer] 

7. Risk assessment and env.  guidelines [14‐116] 

12:40 – 13:30 

13:30 – 15:00 

6. Environmental monitoring 

[14‐212] 

Afternoon Tea [Level 2 Foyer] 

7. Risk assessment and env.  guidelines [14‐116] 

15:00 – 15:40 

15:40 – 17:00 

6. Environmental monitoring 

[14‐212] 

7. Risk assessment and env.  guidelines [14‐116] 

19:00 – late 

Friday, 6 July 2012 

Conference dinner [Customs House, Brisbane CBD] 

9:00 – 9:50 

9:55 – 11:05 

11:05 – 11:40 

11:40 – 12:40 

12:40 – 13:30 

13:30 – 15:00 

Keynote Address (Jenny Webster‐Brown) [room 14‐212] 

10. Micropollutants and  emerging contam. [14‐212] 

11. Water quality [14‐116] 

Morning Tea [Level 2 Foyer] 

10. Micropollutants and  emerging contam. [14‐212] 

Lunch [Level 2 Foyer] 

10. Micropollutants and  emerging contam. [14‐212] 

11. Water quality [14‐116] 

12. Salinity [14‐116] 

15:00 – 15:40 

15:40 – 17:00 

17:00 – 17:15 

17:15 – late 

8. Mixtures and multiple  stressors [14‐217] 

8. Mixtures and multiple  stressors [14‐217] 

9. ET&C in extreme  environments [14‐217] 

9. ET&C in extreme  environments [14‐217] 

13. Soil and sediments 

[14‐217] 

13. Soil and sediments 

[14‐217] 

14. Biomarkers and  biosensors [14‐217] 

Afternoon Tea [Level 2 Foyer] 

10. Micropollutants and  emerging contam. [14‐212] 

12. Salinity [14‐116]  14. Biomarkers and  biosensors [14‐217] 

Closing ceremony [room 14‐212] 

Post conference drinks (The Red Room, informal, not included in conference registration) 

SETAC Australasia Brisbane 2012 Conference  Page | 11  

 

 

 

 

Wednesday, 4 July 2012 – Morning sessions 

Session 1 – Impact of extreme weather  events [room 14‐212] 

10:15 – 

10:45 

Stauber ‐ Ecological risk  assessment and climate change: a  case study  

Session 3 – Metals [room 14‐116] 

10:15 – 

10:45 

Campbell ‐ Metal ecotoxicology –  importance of metal speciation 

 

10:45 – 

11:05 

Thomson ‐ Estimates of suspended  solids loads from the January 2011  floods from major catchments  flowing into Moreton Bay 

Session 1 – Impact of extreme weather  events [room 14‐212] 

11:40 – 

12:20 

Boxall ‐ Impacts of climate change  on the health risks of chemicals 

12:20 – 

12:40 

Kennedy (Mueller*)‐ The  implications of extreme weather  events for exposure of the World 

Heritage Area Great Barrier Reef to  pesticides 

10:45 – 

11:05 

Shephard ‐ Why are there  perceptions that tissue quality  benchmarks for betals cannot work  for aquatic biota? 

Session 3 – Metals [room 14‐116] 

11:40 – 

12:00 

12:00 – 

12:20 

Mueller (Campbell*) ‐ Improving  speciation predictions for Cd, Cu, Ni  and Zn in natural freshwater systems  by taking into account dissolved  organic matter (DOM) spectroscopic  quality   

Golding ‐ Factors influencing dietary  cadmium bioavailability in the  freshwater amphipod Hyalella azteca 

12:20 – 

12:40 

Campana (Simpson*) ‐ Linking sub‐ cellular metal partitioning to the  particulate and dissolved exposure  pathways and chronic effect of  copper in two deposit feeder  organisms 

Session 4 – Passive sampling [room 14‐217] 

10:15 – 

10:45 

10:45 – 

11:05 

O’Brien and Kaserzon ‐ Calibration of  aquatic passive samplers: accounting for  changes in chemical uptake rates when  exposed to variations in environmental  flow conditions 

Hyne ‐ Calibration and field application of  passive sampling devices for detection of  ionic herbicide residues in water 

Session 4 – Passive sampling [room 14‐217] 

11:40 – 

12:00 

Komarova – Use of an integrated passive  sampling approach to identify  contaminants from multiple agro‐based  activities in a tropical freshwater river  system 

12:00 – 

12:20 

12:20 – 

12:40 

Bennett – In situ, passive samplers for  measuring inorganic arsenic speciation  and investigating arsenic sediment  biogeochemistry 

Shahpoury – Concentration pulses of  atmospherically transported polycyclic  aromatic hydrocarbons in snowmelt from 

Southern Alps, New Zealand 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Wednesday, 4 July 2012 – Afternoon sessions 

Session 2 – Statistics and computational  techniques [14‐115] 

13:30 – 

14:00 

14:00 – 

14:20 

14:20 – 

14:40 

14:40 – 

15:00 

15:40 – 

 

17:00 

Fox ‐ Statistical ecotoxicology: the  good, the bad, and the ugly 

Landis ‐ Way past time to stop using 

NOEL/LOELs 

Hose ‐ A Bayesian approach to  integrating laboratory toxicity data  with field observations 

Colombo ‐ Reducing Type I and II  errors in multispecies outdoor  microcosms  

Session 3 – Metals [room 14‐116] 

13:40 – 

14:00 

14:00 – 

14:20 

14:20 – 

14:40 

14:40 – 

15:00 

Smith – Phytochelatin response over  time in cadmium‐exposed freshwater  algae 

Adams – Toxicity of cyanide and  copper cyanide to a freshwater  microalga 

Binet – Use of ecotoxicology to assess  the potential for the re‐use of mineral  processing residues as environmental  amendments 

Bidwell ‐ Metal‐resistance and  associated biological characteristics of  marine and freshwater invertebrates  from two contaminated sites 

 

 

Poster session [Terrace, 6 th

 Floor, 14‐613] 

Session 5 – Environmental impacts of coal seam  gas [room 14‐217] 

13:30 – 

14:00 

Parrish – Technical considerations in  regulating CSG discharge waters in the 

U.S. 

14:00 – 

14:20 

14:20 – 

14:40 

Kookana – Chemicals associated with  coal seam gas exploration:  towards  understanding their ecological risks 

Baker – Water, water everywhere but  how much can i drink? 

14:40 – 

15:00 

Ramsay – Management of salinity  impacts from mine discharges in Central 

Queensland 

 

 

 

 

 

Thursday, 5 July 2012 – Morning sessions 

Session 6 – Environmental monitoring [room 

14‐212] 

9:55 – 

10:25 

Manning ‐ Making it real and  relevant: Turning what you do into  useful action. 

10:25 – 

10:45 

Andersen ‐ Moving towards a light  based approach for monitoring  dredging impacts in Gladstone, 

Queensland 

10:45 – 

11:05 

Nava ‐ The national program for  environmental monitoring and  assessment in México. 

Session 6 – Environmental monitoring [room 

14‐212] 

11:40 – 

12:00 

12:00 – 

12:20 

12:20 – 

12:40 

Sharp ‐ Monitoring sediment bound  contaminants in urban waterways  of Melbourne 

Young ‐ Establishment of methods  and measurement of hormones in  river source water and its derived  potable water supply 

Scott ‐ What is the significance of  endocrine disruption in the 

Australian aquatic environment –  findings from Stage 1 

Session 7 – Risk assessment and environmental  guidelines [room 14‐116] 

11:40 – 

12:00 

12:00 – 

12:20 

12:20 – 

12:40 

Hagen ‐ Appropriateness of the 

ANZECC sulphate stock water quality  guideline for cattle 

Taga ‐ Metal and metalloid  contaminant bioaccessibility  reliability and prediction 

Merrington (Schlekat*) ‐ The  derivation and implementation of an  environmental quality standard for 

Nickel: The application of a  bioavailability‐based approach in 

Europe 

 

Session 7 – Risk assessment and environmental  guidelines [room 14‐116] 

9:55 – 

10:25 

Jeffree ‐ Improving Radiological 

Protection of the Environment in 

Australasia 

10:25 – 

10:45 

10:45 – 

11:05  van Dam ‐ Updating water quality  guidelines for uranium – 

Standardising measures of toxicity  and incorporating the influence of  dissolved organic carbon 

Simpson (Spadaro*) ‐ Consideration  of metal bioavailability is essential for  managing metal contaminated  sediments: a case study of antifouling  paint. 

Session 8 – Mixtures and multiple stressors [room 

14‐217] 

9:55 – 

10:25 

Smith ‐ A new method using toxic  equivalency factors and species  sensitivity distributions to assess the risk  of mixtures 

10:25 – 

10:45 

10:45 – 

11:05 

Landis ‐ The calculation of risks due to  mercury, other stressors, and climate  change to multiple endpoints at a  regional scale for the South River and 

Upper Shenandoah River, Virginia USA 

Nugegoda ‐ Acetylcholinesterase activity  as a biomarker of exposure to  organophosphate insecticides in three 

Australian species Tandanus Tandanus

Paratya australiensis and Daphnia 

carinata 

Session 8 – Mixtures and multiple stressors [room 

14‐217] 

11:40 – 

12:00 

12:00 – 

12:20 

Pease ‐ Deadly diet: Interaction between  diet quality and metals in a marine  herbivore 

Bain ‐ Cytotoxicity evaluation of mixtures  of human pharmaceuticals using fish cell  lines 

12:20 – 

12:40 

Jones ‐ Metabolite biomarkers of effect  following exposure to single or mixtures  of pesticides 

 

 

 

 

Thursday, 5 July 2012 – Afternoon sessions 

Session 6 – Environmental Monitoring  

[room 14‐212] 

13:40 – 

14:00 

Dafforn ‐ The differential effects of  anthropogenic nutrient enrichment  and contamination on estuarine  communities 

14:00 – 

14:20 

14:20 – 

14:40 

Stephenson ‐ Changes in prokaryote  and eukaryote assemblages along a  gradient of hydrocarbon 

Grant ‐ Surfactant facilitated transport  of super‐hydrophobic contaminants:  polymer based methods to investigate  partitioning to monomers and micelles 

14:40 – 

15:00 

Herron ‐ A novel biological method for  monitoring herbicides 

Session 6 – Environmental Monitoring 

[room 14‐212] 

15:40 – 

16:00 

16:00 – 

16:20 

16:20 – 

16:40 

16:40 – 

17:00 

Smith ‐ Detection of cyanotoxins in 

New Zealand benthic cyanobacteria 

Jafari ‐ Study of municipal solid waste  landfields impacts on terrestrial  habitats (Gilan province) 

Schneider ‐ Historical inputs and  mobilization pathways of selenium in 

Lake Macquarie 

Srinivasan (Sarmah*) ‐ Hydrophobic  pH‐partitioning model to investigate  the sorption of sulfamethoxazole in 

New Zealand dairy farm soils 

Session 7 – Risk Assessment and Environmental 

Guidelines [room 14‐116] 

13:40 – 

14:00 

Connell ‐ Health risk due to use of the  organophosphate insecticide,  chlorpyrifos, by rice farmers in Vietnam 

14:00 – 

14:20 

14:20 – 

14:40 

14:40 – 

15:00 

Harford ‐ Stuck in the goop! Difficulties  in assessing the environmental risk of  organic flocculants 

Phyu ‐ Assessing the biological relevance  of exposing freshwater organisms to  atrazine, chlorothalonil and permethrin  in environmentally realistic artificial  stream systems 

Sanchez‐Bayo ‐ Time‐dependent toxicity  of pesticides and other toxicants:  implications for a new approach to risk  assessment 

Session 7 – Risk Assessment and Environmental 

Guidelines [room 14‐116] 

15:40 – 

16:00 

Geoghegan ‐ Accounting for plant and  soil characteristics when estimating 

16:00 – 

16:20  pesticide vapour drift potential for  regulatory evaluation and product  development 

Lussier (Wood*) ‐ Development of site‐ specific marine water quality screening  level for agrochemicals 

16:20 – 

16:40 

16:40 – 

17:00 

Felice ‐ The use of macroinvertebrate  recruitment to derive local contaminant  trigger values: A manipulative field study 

Woodworth ‐ Teething troubles with  consulting in ecotoxicology 

Session 9 – ET&C in Extreme Environments 

[room 14‐217] 

13:30 – 

14:00 

14:00 – 

14:20 

14:20 – 

14:40 

14:40 – 

15:00 

King ‐ Antarctic ecotoxicology, risk  assessment and remediation: an Australian  perspective 

Brown ‐ Assessing toxicity of diesel and fuel  oil on early life stages of Antarctic marine  invertebrates 

Emnet ‐ Emerging contaminants in the 

Antarctic: Sources and distribution in sewage  and coastal waters from McMurdo and Scott 

Base, Ross Island, Antarctica 

McLagan ‐ Atmospheric monitoring for  persistent organic pollutants in Antarctica 

Session 9 – ET&C in Extreme Environments 

[room 14‐217] 

15:40 – 

16:00 

Letcher – Food web influence on spatial  variation of mercury and other selected trace 

16:00 – 

16:20  elements in polar bears (Ursus maritimus)  from Arctic subpopulations in Alaska, 

Canada and East Greenland 

Gissi ‐ Optimization and application of an  acute toxicity test with the tropical marine  copepod, Acartia sinjiensis 

16:20 – 

16:40 

16:40 – 

17:00 

Waugh (Bengtson Nash*) ‐ Toxicokinetics of  persistent organic pollutants in Southern 

Ocean Humpback Whales 

Smith ‐ Ecotox in the extremes: a few things  we don’t know 

 

 

 

 

 

Friday, 6 July 2012 – Morning sessions 

Session 10 – Micropollutants and emerging  contaminants [room 14‐212] 

9:55 – 

10:25 

10:25 – 

10:45 

Gallagher ‐ Integrated approaches  to understand the biochemical  mechanisms and risks of emerging  contaminants: Case study of  polybrominated diphenyl ethers 

Jensen ‐ Hexabromocyclododecane 

(HBCDD) emissions, exposures and  impacts 

10:45 – 

11:05 

Jamting ‐ Review of relevant  toxicological developments and  metrological practises concerning  nanoparticles in wastewater 

Session 10 – Micropollutants and emerging  contaminants [room 14‐212] 

11:40 – 

12:00 

Apte ‐ Why is nanoparticulate CeO2  toxic to aquatic algae ? 

12:00 – 

12:20 

12:20 – 

12:40 

Angel ‐ Factors affecting the  toxicity of silver nanoparticles to  algae 

Navarro ‐ Behavior of water‐ dispersible cadmium selenide  quantum dots in the terrestrial  environment: soil column leaching  and plant uptake studies 

 

Session 11 – Water quality [room 14‐116] 

9:55 – 

10:25 

10:25 – 

10:45 

10:45 – 

11:05 

Linge ‐ A pilot‐scale study of  disinfection by‐product formation  during MF/RO treatment 

Stalter ‐ Ozone and activated carbon  treatment of sewage effluents:  toxicity removal vs. toxicity increase 

Session 11 ‐ Water quality [room 14‐116] 

11:40 – 

12:00 

12:00 – 

12:20 

12:20 – 

12:40 

Charois ‐ Disinfection by‐products  and human health risks: 38 years of  research without converging on  answers 

Warne ‐ Floods, contaminants and  fish illness at Gladstone, Queensland 

Turner ‐ Water quality threats in the 

Great Barrier Reef catchments 

Tang – Toxicity characterization of  urban stormwater using bioanalytical  tools 

Session 13 – Soil and sediments [room 14‐217] 

9:55 – 

10:25 

Chariton ‐ Molecular approaches for  assessing the ecotoxicological and  ecological impacts of soil and sediment  contaminants 

10:25 – 

10:45 

10:45 – 

11:05 

Karlsson (Boxall*) ‐ Uptake of  pharmaceuticals and personal care  products from sediments 

Williams ‐ A novel technique to measure  the bioavailable fraction of  pharmaceuticals in sediments and soils 

Session 13 ‐ Soil and sediments [room 14‐217] 

11:40 – 

12:00 

12:00 – 

12:20 

12:20 – 

12:40 

Settimio ‐ Determining bioavailability of  silver in soils by isotope dilution 

Dowsett ‐ Sediment metal concentrations  within an estuary: the influence of  seagrass 

Gardham ‐ Effects of copper  contamination on ecosystem health:  assessment at different levels of  biological complexity 

 

 

 

Friday, 6 July 2012 – Afternoon sessions 

Session 10 – Micropollutants and emerging  contaminants [room 14‐212] 

13:40 – 

14:00 

14:00 – 

14:20 

Boyle – Impacts of sediment‐ bound synthetic pyrethroids on  non‐target aquatic  macroinvertebrates 

Allinson ‐ Occurrence of UV  screens and preservatives in four 

Victorian waterways 

14:20 – 

14:40 

14:40 – 

15:00 

Kumar ‐ Does tertiary treated  effluent exposure result in  endocrine disruption in Murray  rainbowfish (Melanotaenia 

fluviatilis)? 

Session 10 – Micropollutants and emerging  contaminants [room 14‐212] 

15:40 – 

16:00 

Coleman (Stuetz*) ‐ Removal of  trace organic chemical  contaminants by a membrane  bioreactor for water reuse 

16:00 – 

16:20 

16:20 – 

16:40 

Hook ‐ Potential endocrine  disruption in fish from the Great 

Barrier Reef region 

Gaw ‐ Understanding the role of  photolysis in the degradation of  emerging contaminants 

Thai ‐ Degradation of illicit drugs  and their metabolites in  laboratory‐scale sewer reactors 

16:40 – 

17:00 

Le Corre ‐ To what extent do  hospital discharges contribute to  the pharmaceutical load in  municipal wastewater? 

Session 12 ‐ Salinity [room 14‐116] 

13:30 – 

14:00 

Kefford ‐ A review of 15 years of  research into the effect of salinity on  freshwater organisms in Australia 

14:00 – 

14:20 

14:20 – 

14:40 

14:40 – 

15:00 

Palmer ‐ Salinity guidelines and  aquatic ecosystem protection: a  southern hemisphere perspective on  salt tolerance and  macroinvertebrate distributions 

Prasad ‐ Impact of Salinity on  freshwater macroinvertebrates in  the Fitzroy catchment 

Dogra ‐ Effect of salinity changes on  the marine communities in the Gulf 

St Vincent 

Session 14 – Biomarkers and biosensors [room 14‐217] 

13:30 – 

14:00 

Wilson ‐ Can canaries sing under water? 

The pros and cons of aquatic biosensors  and early warning systems 

14:00 – 

14:20 

Gale – The development of a blue mussel 

(Mytilus galloprovincialis) embryo  bioassay 

14:20 – 

14:40 

14:40 – 

15:00 

Long ‐ Using biological effects to  determine the impact of exposure to  contaminated sediment upon benthic  macroinvertebrates 

Howe ‐ Development of sublethal  ecotoxicological endpoints for the  tropical sea anemone Aiptasia pulchella 

Session 12 ‐ Salinity [room 14‐116] 

15:40 – 

16:00 

16:00 – 

16:20 

16:20 – 

16:40 

16:40 – 

17:00 

Blockwell ‐ Environmental  assessment and the monitoring of  potential impacts of the Sydney  desalination plant discharge on  rocky reef assemblages 

Mondon ‐ Assessing environmental  impact of SWRO outfalls on key  benthic marine organisms 

Dunlop ‐ Development of ecosystem  protection trigger values for sodium  sulfate in seasonally flowing streams  of the Fitzroy River Basin 

Beyer‐Robson ‐ Saline mine  discharge effects on microbial  communities and biogeochemical  cycling in ephemeral streams 

Session 14 – Biomarkers and biosensors [room 14‐217] 

15:40 – 

16:00 

16:00 – 

16:20 

16:20 – 

16:40 

16:40 – 

17:00 

Lategan ‐ Developing microbial  indicators for assessment of groundwater  quality 

Reichelt‐Brushett ‐ A potential test  species to represent a new ecosystem – deep ocean ecotoxciology 

Osborn ‐ Transcriptomic profile  responses to common stressors in the  diatom Phaeodactylum tricorntum 

Iwai ‐ Potential of Earthworms as 

Ecotoxicological Assessment Tool and 

Agro‐waste Management in Thailand 

Keynote Biographies 

Dr Robert Letcher, Research Scientist, Environment 

Canada, Ottawa, ON, Canada 

Dr Letcher leads a multidisciplinary research team and,  along with national and international collaborators,  conducts research in environmental and analytical  chemistry, biochemistry, and ecotoxicology and effects  studies in a wide array of chemical pollutants, especially those of an emerging  nature, in higher trophic levels (aquatic) wildlife and their food webs. Dr 

Letcher has received several research awards including a Canada Research 

Chair, and he and his group have published > 180 research papers as well as  numerous review and book chapter articles, with many in high‐ranking, peer‐ reviewed scientific journals such as ES&T. 

 

Dr Letcher will present the inaugural Tony Roach Memorial Lecture at the  conference entitled "Emerging contaminants and the influence of 

biotransformation and degradation on bioaccumulation, fate and effects in 

model wildlife and fish". 

Prof Martin Holmstrup, Research Professor, Aarhus 

University, Aarhus, Denmark 

Martin Holmstrup is professor of ecophysiology and  ecotoxicology at Aarhus University, Denmark. He has  studied the ecology, ecophysiology and ecotoxicology of  terrestrial invertebrates with emphasis on earthworms and 

Collembola. The main questions of his research have included effects of  climate change and soil pollution on soil invertebrates and in particular how  climatic stressors such as cold, heat and desiccation interact with the effects  of pollution. 

 

Prof Holmstrup will present a plenary entitled "Interactions between natural 

stressors and chemicals". 

 

Page | 18  SETAC Australasia Brisbane 2012 Conference 

Keynote Biographies 

Prof Jenny Webster‐Brown, Director of the Waterways 

Centre for Freshwater Management, University of 

Canterbury and Lincoln University, Christchurch, New 

Zealand 

Prof Webster‐Brown is an environmental geochemist, with  an interest in trace elements and factors affecting their  behaviour and toxicity in a variety of freshwater environments, including  geothermal, mining and polar systems. She is currently the Director of the 

Waterways Centre for Freshwater Management, a joint University of 

Canterbury/Lincoln University teaching and research centre focussed on  developing a better understanding of the limitations of the freshwater  resource, and better management options.  

 

Prof Webster‐Brown will present a plenary entitled "Environmental chemistry 

in the freezer: Antarctic meltwaters and their ability to support life". 

SETAC Australasia Brisbane 2012 Conference  Page | 19  

Abstracts 

Abstracts of Keynote Presentations .............................................................. 21 

Session 1: Impact of Extreme Weather Events ............................................. 24 

Session 2: Statistics and Computational Techniques .................................... 28 

Session 3: Metals ........................................................................................... 32 

Session 4: Passive Sampling .......................................................................... 41 

Session 5: Environmental Impacts of Coal Seam Gas ................................... 46 

Session 6: Environmental Monitoring ........................................................... 50 

Session 7: Risk Assessment and Environmental Guidelines .......................... 64 

Session 8: Mixtures and Multiple Stressors .................................................... 78 

Session 9: ET&C in Extreme Environments .................................................. 84 

Session 10: Micropollutants and Emerging Contaminants ............................ 92 

Session 11: Water Quality ............................................................................ 106 

Session 12: Salinity ...................................................................................... 112 

Session 13: Soil and Sediments ................................................................... 120 

Session 14: Biomarkers and Biosensors ....................................................... 126 

 

Poster Session ............................................................................................. 134 

Page | 20  SETAC Australasia Brisbane 2012 Conference 

Abstracts of Keynote Presentations 

Keynote 1 (Wed, 14‐212, 9:20‐10:05) 

Emerging contaminants and the influence of biotransformation and  degradation on bioaccumulation, fate and effects in model wildlife and  fish 

Robert J. Letcher 

Wildlife Toxicology Research Section, Science and Technology Branch, Environment Canada, 

National Wildlife Research Centre, Carleton University, Ottawa, ON, Canada; Department of 

Chemistry, Carleton University, Ottawa, ON, Canada 

Abstract:  The  number  of  “new”  organic  contaminants  identified  as  persistent  and  bioaccumulative  (P&B)  in  environmental  compartments  has  grown  considerably  in  recent  years, and encompass a range of chemical structures and physical‐chemical properties. These  emerging  P&B  contaminants  include  those  classified  as  chlorinated  and  brominated  flame  retardant (FR) substances and their isomers and degradation products and metabolites, as well  as perfluoroalkyl acids and their precursors. As a consequence of food web accumulation and  direct  exposure  largely  via  the  diet,  exposure  to  P&B  contaminants  of  emerging  concern  continue  to  become  increasingly  relevant  in  a  growing  number  of  terrestrial  and  aquatic  wildlife  species  (e.g.  mammalian,  avian,  reptilian  and  amphibian)  from  global  locations  and  populations.  However,  predicting  the  new  substances  that  are  P&B  in  the  environment  generally  does  not  fully  consider  the  chemical  stability  and/or  biological  half‐lives  of  such  substances.  For  example,  for  several  of  the  approximately  75  new  (known)  brominated  FRs  currently  in  use,  a  weight  of  evidence  is  showing  that  they  are  environmentally  unstable  despite  industry  claims  that  they  are  stable.  Predictable  (and  rapid)  abiotic  and  biotic  degradation  pathways  e.g.  via  loss  of  bromine  and  via  enzyme‐mediated  metabolism,  have  been  reported  and  to  (potentially)  more  bioaccumulative  degradation  products.  Conversely,  numerous fluorinated products in use are being shown to be unstable precursors to highly P&B  perfluorinated contaminants. Overall, the degradation of substantial environmental reservoirs  of “unstable” contaminants indicates an underestimation of the ecosystem burden, which has  implications for environmental bioaccumulation, monitoring and the effects in exposed biota 

(and humans). Recently and using wildlife and fish species models, a small but growing number  of  studies  are  demonstrating  that  degradation  and  metabolite  products  of  emerging  brominated  and  fluorinated  contaminants  affect  e.g.,  enzyme,  endocrine,  immune  and  neurological expression, function and processes, and reproduction and behaviour at different  levels of biological organization (i.e., organelle, cellular and whole organism).  

Keywords:  halogenated  pollutants;  chemical  stability;  metabolism;  bioaccumulation;  model  species   

SETAC Australasia Brisbane 2012 Conference  Page | 21  

Abstracts of Keynote Presentations 

Keynote 2 (Thu, 14‐212, 9:00‐9:45) 

Interactions between adverse climatic conditions and environmental  chemicals 

Martin Holmstrup 

 

Aarhus University, Department of Bioscience, Vejlsøvej 25, 8600 Silkeborg, Denmark 

Abstract: The potential impacts of interactions between multiple climatic and anthropogenic  stress  factors  have  received  little  attention  in  the  past,  but  this  topic  has  now  become  an  

(re‐)emerging research area. Predicted climate changes are likely to encompass more frequent  extreme  weather  events  and  thus  create  a  higher  frequency  of  stressful  situations  for  organisms  in  the  environment.  This  is  important  for  risk  assessment  since  it  may  be  hypothesized  that  organisms  under  the  influence  of  one  type  of  stressor  become  more  vulnerable  to  additional  stressors.  However,  such  effects  are  generally  not  quantified  in  risk  assessment  procedures,  or  in  research  forming  the  basis  of  risk  assessments.  In  ecotoxicological  effect  studies  test  organisms  are  in  most  cases  exposed  to  chemicals  under  optimal  environmental  conditions  despite  the  fact  that  organisms  in  their  natural  settings  rarely experience optimal conditions. On the contrary, during most of their lifetime they must  cope  with  sub‐optimal  conditions  and  occasionally  with  severe  environmental  stress. 

Interactions  between  the  effects  of  a  natural  stressor  and  a  toxicant  can  sometimes  result  in  greater  effects  than  expected  from  either  of  the  stress  types  alone.  In  this  presentation  examples  of  such  non‐additive  interactions  between  effects  of  “natural”  and  chemical 

(anthropogenic)  stressors  are  demonstrated  and  discussed.  The  examples  will  elucidate  methodological  considerations  associated  with  this  problem  and  also  dive  into  physiological  mechanisms  underlying  synergistic  interactions  between  effects  of  climatic  and  chemical  stressors. These examples use soil invertebrates as model organisms but the conclusions may  well be generally applicable to other organisms. 

Keywords: cellular membranes; desiccation; heavy metals; PAH; thermal stress 

 

Page | 22  SETAC Australasia Brisbane 2012 Conference 

Abstracts of Keynote Presentations 

Keynote 3 (Fri, 14‐212, 9:00‐9:45) 

Environmental chemistry in the freezer; Antarctic meltwaters and their  ability to support life 

Jenny Webster‐Brown 

Waterways Centre for Freshwater Management, University of Canterbury & Lincoln University, 

Private Bag 8140, Christchurch, New Zealand  

Abstract:  Antarctica  is  the  coldest,  driest  continent  on  earth;  it  is  permanent  example  of  extreme  weather  and  of  how  this shapes  environments  capable  of  supporting life.  Terrestrial  life in Antarctica is critically dependent on the presence of liquid water, and seasonal meltwater  ponds,  lakes  and  streams  form  aquatic  habitats  for  various  microorganisms  including  cyanobacterial  mats,  phytoplankton  and  rotifers.  Understanding  the  range  of  chemical  conditions  that  the  organisms  experience  during  the  seasonal  freeze/thaw  cycle,  is  critical  to  understanding how they may respond to future environmental change.  

At  77 o

S  (Wright/Victoria  Valleys)  and  at  80 o

S  (Darwin  Glacier)  in  Victoria  Land,  nitrate‐rich,  saline  brines  develop  in  inland  ponds  as  a  consequence  of  evaporation  and  freeze  concentration.  Closer  to  the  coast,  ponds  can  also  become  saline,  but  tend  to  be  more  biologically  productive  and  are  nitrate‐depleted.    If  trace  elements  were  to  behave  as  conservatively  as  sodium  or  chloride  during  brine  formation,  their  concentrations  would  become elevated and potentially toxic to aquatic organisms. However, this is rarely observed  and  dissolved  trace  element  and  particulate  analysis  of  representative  saline  brines  and  their  source  meltwaters,  has  been  used  to  identify  mechanism  of  element  removal  during  brine  formation. The analytical difficulties presented by the highly saline matrix were minimized by  using  matrix  modified  standards,  and  undertaking  analysis  in  triplicate  (at  various  sample  dilutions) using both graphite furnace AAS (or hydride generation AAS for As) and ICP‐MS.  

 

Geochemical  modeling  and  elemental  associations  confirm  the  principal  mechanisms  of  removal as the formation of trace element sulphides during periods of anoxia and H

2

S genesis  by sulphate‐reducing bacteria in productive ponds, and by adsorption onto Fe‐oxide surfaces in  oxic brines. Manganese was the only trace element to consistently experience a similar degree  of enrichment to that observed for conservative major ions, with concentrations of up to 6500 

μg/kg in some basal pond waters.  

Keywords: brine; cyanobacteria; freezing; ponds; trace elements

 

SETAC Australasia Brisbane 2012 Conference  Page | 23  

Session 1 (Wed AM, 14‐212)  Impact of Extreme Weather Events 

Session 1.1 (Wed, 14‐212, 10:15‐10:45) [Session Highlight] 

Ecological risk assessment and climate change: A case study  

Jenny Stauber*, Anthony Chariton, Monique Binet and Stuart Simspon 

CSIRO Land and Water, Locked Bag 2007, Kirrawee NSW 2232, Australia 

*presenting author 

Abstract:  Chemical  contaminants,  together  with  physicochemical  stressors  from  climate  change,  land  use  changes  and  altered  water  availability,  have  the  potential  to  have  a  major  impact  on  our  aquatic  communities.  The  complexity,  uncertainty  and  variability  of  climate  drivers  pose  major  challenges  for  the  prediction  of  effects  and  implementation  of  environmental  management  programs.    Existing  risk  assessment  methods  need  to  include  considerations  of  ecosystem  services,  changing  baselines,  greater  uncertainties  and  adaptive  management. 

The River Murray, adjacent wetlands below Wellington and the Lower Lakes (Alexandrina and 

Albert) in South Australia have been classified as wetlands of international importance under  the  Ramsar  Convention,  due  to  their  unique  ecological  and  hydrological  significance. 

Prolonged  drought,  compounded  by  over  allocation  of  water  upstream,  had  resulted  in  very  low  water  flows  from  2005‐2010.    Consequently,  the  Lower  Murray  River  system  was  being  seriously impacted by a combination of low water levels and the presence of acid sulfate soils 

(ASS).  

To better understand the risks associated with rewetting of ASS, a screening level ecological  risk assessment (SERA) was undertaken. The aim was to protect ecosystem services from the  risks of ASS that may alter a balanced community of aquatic biota. 

Risks  to  aquatic  biota  from  stressors  including  metals,  acidity,  major  ions  and  nutrients  released from Murray River dried soils that had been rewetted via rainwater or river water were  determined.    Predicted  environmental  concentrations,  with  correction  for  background  water  quality  data,  were  calculated  from  metal  release  data  for  the  soils  in  laboratory  leachate  experiments for current water levels (then ‐0.5 AHD) for four geographical areas using a range  of  exposure  scenarios.  These  were  compared  to  predicted  no  effect  concentrations  derived  from hardness‐corrected water quality guidelines, both acute and chronic. This SERA provided  the  first  semi‐quantitative  assessment  of  risks  to  aquatic  biota  associated  with  rewetting  of 

ASS following climate change‐induced drought. 

Keywords: acid sulfate soils, Murray River, contaminants, stressors 

Page | 24  SETAC Australasia Brisbane 2012 Conference 

Session 1 (Wed AM, 14‐212)  Impact of Extreme Weather Events 

Session 1.2 (Wed, 14‐212, 10:45‐11:05) 

Estimates of suspended solids loads from the January 2011 floods from  major catchments flowing into Moreton Bay  

Belinda Thomson

1

*, Jason Dunlop

1

, Bill Mead

1

, Britt Rogers

1

, Ben Ferguson

1

, Susi 

Vardy

1

, and Michael Warne

 

 

1

Catchment Water Science Unit, Water Quality and Aquatic Ecosystem Health Division, 

Department of Environment and Resource Management, Brisbane, QLD. 

Department of 

Science, Information Technology, Innovation and the Arts, Dutton Park, Qld, Australia 

*presenting author 

Abstract:  After  experiencing  the  wettest  spring  on  record,  South  East  Queensland  received  further  widespread  rainfall  during  December  2010.  Following  this,  two  significant  rainfall  events  occurred  between  the  6 th

  and  16 th

January  2011.  As  this  rain  fell  on  already  wet  catchments, it resulted in a high rate of run‐off and lead to widespread flooding of many river  systems.  Flash  flooding  occurred  in  areas  south  west  of  Brisbane  on  Monday  10 th

  and  river  flooding occurred in the Brisbane area later in the same week. High flow events continued in all 

SEQ rivers from the 6 th

 to the 16 th

 January 2011. The South East Queensland Event Monitoring 

Program (SEQEM) includes 19 sites spread across the SEQ region with the aim of estimating  nutrient and total suspended solid (TSS) loads exported to Moreton Bay. During this extreme  rainfall  event,  suspended  solids  and  nutrient  samples  were  collected  manually  and  from  automatic  samplers  over  the  10  day  period.  During  the  heavy  rainfall  events  in  January,  discharge  from  Laidley  Creek  at  Warrego  Highway  (Lockyer  Catchment)  exceeded  the  maximum historical flow records making it one of the most significant flow events recorded in  the  Lockyer  Catchment.  A  summary  of  the  load  estimates  are  provides  with  Event  Mean 

Concentrations (EMC) for TSS, and TSS and discharge relationships for the period of event flow  during the 6

6 th th

 to the 16 th

  to  the  16 th

 January 2011.During the extreme weather events observed from the 

  of  January,  approximately  greater  than  1,000,000  tonnes  of  sediment  was  discharged into Moreton Bay. This represents more than 3 times the average annual sediment  loads in 10 days. 

Keywords: floods; loads; water quality; event monitoring; Southeast Queensland 

 

SETAC Australasia Brisbane 2012 Conference  Page | 25  

Session 1 (Wed AM, 14‐212)  Impact of Extreme Weather Events 

Session 1.3 (Wed, 14‐212, 11:40‐12:20) [Session Keynote] 

Impacts of climate change on the health risks of chemicals  

Alistair Boxall

1

*, Anthony Hardy

2

, Sabine Beulke

2

, Sari Kovats

3

, John Balbus

4

, Richard 

Fenske

5

, Tom McKone

6

, Lauren Zeise

7

 

 

1

University of York, Heslington, York, UK; 

2

 Food and Environment Research Agency, York, UK; 

3

London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, London, UK; 

4

NIEHS, Bethesda, USA; 

5

University of Washington, Seattle, USA; 

6

Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, 

USA; 

7

California Environmental Protection Agency, Sacramento, USA 

*presenting author 

Abstract:  Global  climate  change  is  predicted  to  alter  long‐term  weather  characteristics  in  different  regions.  These  changes,  including  increased  temperature,  greater  precipitation  extremes, and loss of glacial and polar ice, have implications for human exposure to chemical  contaminants.    Climate  change  may  also  directly  and  indirectly  affect  the  vulnerability  of  humans  to  chemical  exposures.    Changes  in  human  exposure  may  arise  from  altered  use,  inputs, fate and transport of chemicals due to climatic and other drivers.  This presentation will  provide  an  overview  of  conclusions  of  recent  research  into  the  evidence  that  climate  change  will alter the health risks of chemical contaminants and the implications of these changes for  the assessment and management of chemicals risks. 

Human vulnerability may be affected directly by heat and other weather‐related stressors, or  indirectly  through  altered  co‐exposures  or  disease  patterns.   Climate  change  is  likely  to  both  increase and decrease human exposures, depending on the specific contaminant and specific  region.  There is limited evidence that climate change will increase the sensitivity of humans to  chemical  exposures.    But  small  changes  in  exposure  variability  or  human  vulnerability  can  translate into significant changes in population risk profiles.  

To  assess  and  manage  chemical  risks  effectively,  exposure  data  sources  will  need  to  be  regularly  updated  and  defaults  and  assumptions  used  in  exposure  assessment  evaluated  in  a  context  of  changing  climate.    Monitoring  and  sampling  should  be  done  with  frequency  sufficient  to  capture  variability,  which  is  likely  to  increase  in  many  places.    There  are  many  research gaps in interactions between climate and weather parameters and human responses  to chemical exposures.   These factors will all exacerbate gaps in chemical protection between  developed and developing countries. 

Keywords: fate and transport, human vulnerability, land use, decision contexts 

 

Page | 26  SETAC Australasia Brisbane 2012 Conference 

Session 1 (Wed AM, 14‐212)  Impact of Extreme Weather Events 

Session 1.4 (Wed, 14‐212, 12:20‐12:40) 

The implications of extreme weather events for exposure of the World 

Heritage Area Great Barrier Reef to pesticides 

Karen Kennedy

1,2

, Michelle Devlin

3

, Ellia Guy

1

, Suzanne Vardy

2

, Christie Bentley

1

Kristie Lee Chue

1

, Chris Paxman

1

, Stephen Lewis

3

, Jon Brodie

3

, Jochen Mueller

1

1

The University of Queensland, The National Research Centre for Environmental Toxicology 

(Entox), 39 Kessels Rd., Coopers Plains, Brisbane QLD 4108; 

2

The Department of Environment  and Resource Management, Dutton Park, Brisbane, QLD 4102, Australia; 

3

Australian Centre for 

Tropical Freshwater Research, James Cook University, Townsville, QLD 4811, Australia 

*presenting author 

Abstract: 2010‐2011 was one of extreme weather for the State of Queensland, Australia and  included the wettest year on record. Major rivers in Queensland which discharge directly into  inshore  waters  of  the  Great  Barrier  Reef  (GBR)  had  flow  rates  of  between  1.5  to  >  3  times  higher than the long term median discharge. Increased discharge and freshwater extent during  flood plume events have been shown to be correlated with exposure to photosystem II (PSII)  herbicides on the GBR. If there is an increase in the frequency of extreme weather events this  may have consequences for exposure and the continued resilience of the GBR. Characterising  exposure  under these scenarios is  crucial  to  predicting  the impacts  of  an  increase  in  extreme  weather  events  on  this  World  Heritage  ecosystem.  Exposure  to  PSII  herbicides  has  been  characterised  over  a  period  of  up  to  five  years  at  12  routine  monitoring  sites.      This  work  examines  the  influence  of  this  extreme  wet  season  on  exposure  to  PSII  herbicides  in  the  context of this long‐term monitoring record and during flood plume events in specific regions. 

Exposure  to PSII  herbicides  was  expressed  as  a PSII herbicide  equivalent  concentration  (PSII‐

HEq). The median PSII‐HEq in 2010‐2011 were an average of 2.2 times higher but mostly not  significantly different (p < 0.05) to the median for the long term monitoring record at each site. 

This  is  largely  due  to  the  level  of  variation  within  the  profiles  with  coefficients  of  variation  averaging 113 %. The most notable change was the increased frequency of detection of specific 

PSII herbicides, several of which were previously only detected infrequently if at all, across all  sites.  The  herbicides  metolachlor  and  tebuthiuron  were  frequently  detected  in  flood  plume  waters  at  concentrations  which  were  up  to  or  exceeded  (by  up  to  4.5  times)  relevant  water  quality guidelines.  

 

Keywords: discharge; flood plumes; passive sampling; photosystem II herbicides; wet season  

 

SETAC Australasia Brisbane 2012 Conference  Page | 27  

Session 2 (Wed PM, 14‐115)  Statistics and Computational Techniques 

Session 2.1 (Wed, 14‐115, 13:30‐14:00) [Session Highlight] 

Statistical ecotoxicology: The good, the bad, and the ugly 

David R. Fox

1

*, Elise Billoir

2

, Sandrine Charles

3

, and Marie Laure Delignette‐

Muller

3

 

1

Environmetrics Australia, Templestowe Victoria 3106 and University of Melbourne, Parkville 

Victoria 3010.; 

2

Plateforme de Recherche en Toxicologie Environnementale et Ecotoxicologie  de ROVALTAIN, Bâtiment Rhovalparc, 1 avenue de la gare, BP 15173, F‐26958, Valence, 

France; 

3

Université de Lyon, F‐69000, Lyon; Université Lyon 1; CNRS, UMR5558, Laboratoire  de Biométrie et Biologie Évolutive, F‐69622, Villeurbanne, France 

*presenting author 

Abstract:  It  could  be  argued  that  statistics  and  ecotoxicology  have  been  uncomfortable  bedfellows.  While  early  problems  of  estimation  and  inference  in  ecotoxicology  attracted  the  attention of eminent statsticians such as Fisher, Berkson, and Bliss there appears to have been  a protacted hiatus ever since. Over the past 20 to 30 years, the introduction of statistical tools  that  define  standard  practice  in  concentration‐response  (C‐R)  modelling  and  SSD‐fitting  appears to have occurred by ‘organic’ growth rather than planned development and these have  both  benefited  and  suffered  from  varying  levels  of  statistical  input.  For  example,  the  use  of 

ANOVA‐based techniques no doubt helped put C‐R modelling on a more rigorous footing but  the  adoption  of  the  companion  tools  of  multiple  comparison  procedures  has  not  served  the  ecotox. community particularly well – hence the renewed calls to ban such practices.  

Given the prominence and importance of statistics as a critical element of the scientific process  in ecotoxicological practice it is both timely and necessary to ask “how well are we doing?”. 

In  this  talk  we  provide  an  overview  of  the  ‘State  of  Statistics’  (SoS)  in  ecotoxicology ‐ briefly  tracing the history of involvement of statistics and statisticians. We reflect on what has worked  well,  what  has  let  us  down,  and  opportunities  for  future  development  including  options  for  achieving a paradigm shift. 

 

Keywords: estimation; inference; modeling 

 

Page | 28  SETAC Australasia Brisbane 2012 Conference 

Session 2 (Wed PM, 14‐115)  Statistics and Computational Techniques 

Session 2.2 (Wed, 14‐115, 14:00‐14:20) 

Way Past Time to Stop Using NOEL/LOELs 

Wayne G. Landis

1

*, and Peter M. Chapman

2

 

 

1

Institute of Environmental Toxicology, Western Washington University, Bellingham, 

Washington, USA; 

2

Golder Associates Ltd., Burnaby, BC, Canada 

*presenting author 

Abstract: In this talk we convey the fundamental error of the use of no observed effect levels 

(NOELs) and lowest observed effect levels (LOELs), alert the ecotoxicology community to the  flaws inherent in this practice and insist for this error to cease. The problem with NOELs and 

LOELs  is  basic.  The  fundamental  model  of  environmental  toxicology  is  the  exposure‐  (or  concentration‐  or  dose‐)  response  curve  describing  the  relationship  between  exposure  and  effect.  It is a given that the curve is the best possible description of this relationship must be  the keystone of the field of toxicology. NOEL and LOELs do not meet the criterion.  After all, 

NOELs  and  LOELs  are  not  data,  they  are  not  direct  observations,  but  simple  labels  for  experimental treatments.  A clear alternative is curve fitting.  Straightforward methods for the  calculation  of  such  models  have  existed  since  Wilcoxon  1949.  GraphPad,  SPSS  and  other  software  can  perform  the  calculations.    Bayesian  techniques  developed  by  Fox  can  be  employed  using  WinBUGS.  Process  model  approaches  have  been  developed  as  well.    In  all  cases  curve‐fitting  can  produce estimates  of  the  exposure‐response  curve  with  confidence  or  credibility  limits.      We  propose  three  simple  guidelines.  (1)  Curve‐fitting  is  the  preferred  method for estimating cause‐effect relationships. (2) Confidence or credibility limits have to be  reported along with the archived raw data. (3) Work that treats LOELs, NOELs, NOECs, LOECs  as  data  should  be  subject  to  intense  statistical  and  scientific  scrutiny.    Finally,  we  call  on  journals  and  regulatory  agencies  to  ban  the  use  of  hypothesis  tests  for  the  reporting  of  exposure‐effect relationships.  These technically indefensible practices must end. 

Keywords: Bayesian statistics; curve fitting; process models; regulation 

 

SETAC Australasia Brisbane 2012 Conference  Page | 29  

Session 2 (Wed PM, 14‐115)  Statistics and Computational Techniques 

Session 2.3 (Wed, 14‐115, 14:20‐14:40) 

A Bayesian approach to integrating laboratory toxicity data with field  observations 

Grant Hose

1

*, Marcus Lincoln Smith

2

, David Fox

3

 

1

Department of Biological Sciences, Macquarie University, NSW, Australia; 

Lab, 4 Green Street, Brookvale, NSW, 2100, Australia; 

3

2

Cardno Ecology 

The University of Melbourne, Victoria 

3010, Australia 

*presenting author 

Abstract:  Risk  assessments  based  on  species  sensitivity  distributions  (ssds)  are  criticized  for  their  reliance  on  a  (usually)  small  number  of  taxa,  chosen  from  the  limited  number  that  are  amenable  to  or  developed  for  laboratory  testing.  Often  the  taxa  used  do  not  include  the  important or relevant species inhabiting a target ecosystem. 

 

In  the  assessment  of  risk  posed  by  industrial  discharges,  laboratory  toxicity  testing  is  often  accompanied  by  field  surveys  of  biota  above  and  below  the  point  of  discharge.  From  field  surveys we gain knowledge of the tolerance of a large number of taxa to discharges within the  receiving  environment.  Both  field  surveys  and  laboratory  toxicity  tests  provide  useful  but  usually  independent  lines  of  evidence  of  ecological  risk,  but  to  date  there  have  been  few  attempts to integrate these two sources of information. 

Using a Bayesian approach, we incorporated field tolerance data for invertebrates and diatoms  derived from field surveys with the laboratory toxicity data within the SSD framework. In doing  so, we effectively increase the number and range of taxa in the SDD (and including local taxa),  thereby  increasing  its  relevance  and  robustness.  We  apply  and  discuss  the  approach  with  examples from three locations where saline waters are discharged. 

Keywords: ERA, SSD, Bayesian statistics, combining lab and field data 

 

Page | 30  SETAC Australasia Brisbane 2012 Conference 

Session 2 (Wed PM, 14‐115)  Statistics and Computational Techniques 

Session 2.4 (Wed, 14‐115, 14:40‐15:00) 

Reducing Type I and II errors in multispecies outdoor microcosms  

Valentina Colombo*, Stephen Marshall, Ary Hoffmann

  and Vincent 

Pettigrove 

Centre for Aquatic Pollution Identification and Management (CAPIM) and Department of 

Zoology, The University of Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria 3025 Australia 

*presenting author 

Abstract:  Outdoor  microcosm  studies  have  become  popular  in  ecotoxicology  as  a  means  to  improve the ecological relevance of toxicity bioassays.  Although outdoor microcosms aim to  reduce  the  uncertainty  caused  by  extrapolations  from  standard  laboratory  bioassays,  the  numbers  of  organisms  colonizing  microcosms ‐and  therefore  available  for  evaluating  toxicity  effects‐  can  vary  substantially  for  reasons  unconnected  to  toxicity.  This  variability  decreases  the  statistical  power  of  the  bioassay,  potentially  leading  to  failure  to  detect  toxicity  effects  where they are present (Type II error), or the false detection of toxicity effects where they are  absent (Type I error). 

The increased variability of outdoor microcosms is caused by the same factors that make them  more relevant to field ecology: for example, a plethora of abiotic and biotic factors, ecological  interactions, the spatial distribution of the replicates, and patchiness in colonization.  

Therefore,  the  aim  of  this  study  was  to  reduce  variability  among  microcosms  and  improve  experimental  power  by  careful  manipulation  of  the  experimental  design.  We  used  the  field‐ based microcosm method by Pettigrove & Hoffmann (2005) as a starting point. The choice of  suitable  endpoints,  alternative  scales  and  number  of  replicate  were  considered,  and  methodological  changes  were  proposed  to  increase  statistical  power  but  maintain  ecological  relevance.  This  study  contributes  to  countering  criticisms  about  the  inadequacy  of  multispecies,  field‐based  microcosm  experiments  for  toxicological  assessments  and  risk  management. 

Keywords:  microcosms  design;  mower  analysis;  sample  size;  uncertainty

SETAC Australasia Brisbane 2012 Conference  Page | 31  

Session 3 (Wed AM, 14‐116)  Metals 

Session 3.1 (Wed, 14‐116, 10:15‐10:45) [Session Highlight] 

Metal Ecotoxicology – Importance of Metal Speciation 

Peter G.C. Campbell* and Claude Fortin

 

INRS Eau, Terre et Environnement, 490 de la Couronne, Québec (Québec), Canada G1K 9A9 

*presenting author 

Abstract: The most common metal species in natural waters are hydrophilic in nature, whereas  the biological barriers that these metals must cross if they are to enter living cells are lipophilic  in character. It follows that, with few exceptions, these strongly hydrated cationic metals and  their complexes cannot cross biological membranes by simple diffusion. Instead, the handling 

("uptake") of metals usually involves facilitated transport, normally passive (i.e., not against a  concentration  gradient).  Three  uptake  mechanisms  have  been  identified:  (i)  facilitated  transport of the cation, necessarily involving either membrane carriers or channels embedded  in the cell membrane; (ii) facilitated transport of anionic metal complexes, involving relatively  unselective  anion  transporters  (uptake  of  the  anion  and  “accidental”  transport  of  the  metal  associated  with  it);  and  (iii)  passive  transport  by  simple  diffusion  of  neutral,  lipophilic  metal  complexes  (e.g.,  HgCl

2

0

).  Normally  mechanism  (i)  predominates,  and  in  such  cases  the  Biotic 

Ligand Model (BLM) applies; the biological response elicited by the metal will be proportional  to its internalization flux, and this flux will vary as a function of the concentration of free metal  ion in solution, [M z+

], and the concentrations of other cations that may compete with M z+ the biotic ligand (Ca

2+

, Mg

2+

 and H

+

). 

 for 

This presentation will focus on the application of these concepts in experiments that attempt  to  mimic  the  complexity  of  natural  fresh  waters.  Interactions  between  metals  and  aquatic  organisms will be explored, with particular emphasis on the roles of pH and dissolved natural  organic matter (DOM). 

 

Keywords:  dissolved  organic  matter;  hydrophilic  complexes;  lipophilic  complexes;  metal  uptake; pH 

 

Page | 32  SETAC Australasia Brisbane 2012 Conference 

Session 3 (Wed AM, 14‐116)  Metals 

Session 3.2 (Wed, 14‐116, 10:45‐11:05) 

Why are there perceptions that tissue quality benchmarks for metals  cannot work for aquatic biota? 

Burt Shephard 

U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, 1200 6 th

 Avenue, Seattle, Washington 98101 USA 

Abstract:  Tissue  screening  benchmarks,  calculated  as  the  product  of  a  USEPA  chronic  water  quality  criterion  and  a  bioaccumulation  factor,  are  increasingly  utilized  in  ecological  risk  assessments  to  define  tissue  residues  of  chemicals  potentially  posing  unacceptable  risks  to  aquatic life.  While the utility of tissue screening benchmarks is generally accepted for organics,  there is a reluctance to accept their utility for evaluating risks from bioaccumulated metals.  A  review of the available residue‐effects literature for bioaccumulated chemicals indicates that as  a group, tissue benchmarks for metals perform marginally better (97% accuracy) than organic  chemical  benchmarks  (94%  accuracy)  in  identifying  tissue  residues  which,  if  exceeded,  may  pose  unacceptable  risks  on  survival,  reproduction  and  growth  of  aquatic  species.    The  reluctance  to  accept  metal  tissue  benchmarks  is  due  in  large  part  to  the  success  of  organic  tissue benchmarks that define a relatively constant tissue residue associated with toxicity (e.g. 

LR

50

 of 2 – 8 mmol/kg for nonpolar organics).  This success has led to an expectation that metal  benchmarks  should  also  define  relatively  constant  tissue  residues  associated  with  toxicity.  

However, for reasons to be discussed, including metals having multiple sites and mechanisms  of  toxic  action,  a  single  metal  residue  is  unlikely  to  be  associated  with  all  possible  toxic  endpoints in all species.  In this regard, metal residue benchmarks are no different than water  or  sediment  benchmarks,  for  which  there  is  no  expectation  that  a  single  water  or  sediment  concentration  affects  all species  equally.   Thus,  as  is  the case for  water  and  sediment  quality  benchmarks,  a  reasonable  expectation  for  metal  tissue  benchmarks  is  that  they  represent  residues  that,  if  not  exceeded,  are  protective  of  a  large  proportion  (i.e.  90  or  95%)  of  the  aquatic  species  present  in  a  community.    Available  literature  also  indicates  that,  as  a  group, 

Australasian biota are neither more or less sensitive to bioaccumulated chemicals than are the  more extensively studied North American and European species.  

Keywords: critical body residue; toxicity reference values; ecological risk assessment 

SETAC Australasia Brisbane 2012 Conference  Page | 33  

Session 3 (Wed AM, 14‐116)  Metals 

Session 3.3 (Wed, 14‐116, 11:40‐12:00) 

Improving speciation predictions for Cd, Cu, Ni and Zn in natural  freshwater systems by taking into account dissolved organic matter 

(DOM) spectroscopic quality 

Kristin K. Mueller

1,2

, Peter G.C. Campbell

1

* and Claude Fortin

1

INRS Eau, Terre et Environnement, 490 de la Couronne, Québec (Québec), Canada G1K 9A9; 

2

Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Ontario, 

Canada N2L 3G1 

*presenting author 

Abstract: Current metal speciation models that include dissolved organic matter (DOM), such  as  the  Windermere  Humic  Aqueous  Model  (WHAM),  incorporate  the  measured  quantity  of 

DOM. However, for a given water sample, modellers must choose the proportion of dissolved  organic matter (DOM) that is actively involved in metal complexation. To be able to estimate  this  “percent  active”  DOM  spectroscopically  would  be  very  useful.  We  determined  the  free 

Cd

2+

,  Cu

2+

,  Ni

2+

  and  Zn

2+

  concentrations  in  eight  Canadian  Shield  lakes  and  compared  these  measured  concentrations  to  those  predicted  by  WHAM  (Model  VI).  For  seven  of  the  eight  lakes, the measured proportions of Cd

2+

 and Zn

2+

WHAM;  the  measured  proportion  of  Cu

2+

 fell within the range of values predicted by 

  fell  within  this  range  for  only  half  of  the  lakes  sampled, whereas for Ni, WHAM systematically overestimated the proportion of Ni

2+

. With the  aim of ascribing the differences between measured and modeled metal speciation to variations  in  DOM  quality,  the  percent  active  DOM  needed  to  fit  modeled  to  measured  free  metal  concentrations  (%  active  DOM  optimized)  was  compared  to  the  lake‐to‐lake  variation  in  the  spectroscopic  quality of  the  DOM,  as  determined  by  absorbance  and  fluorescence  measurements.  Relationships  between  “%  active  DOM  optimized”  and  DOM  quality  were  apparent  for  Cd,  Ni  and  Zn,  suggesting  the  possibility  of  estimating  the  %  active  DOM  spectroscopically and then using this information to refine model predictions. With an increase  in  the  allochthonous  signature  of  the  DOM  in  the  lakewater  samples,  the  proportion  of  the 

DOM involved in Cd and Zn complexation decreased; the opposite trend was observed for Ni,  suggesting  that  the  DOM  binding  sites  active  in  Cd  and  Zn  complexation  are  different  from  those  involved  in  Ni  complexation.  To  our  knowledge,  this  is  the  first  time  that  such  a  distinction has been resolved in natural freshwater samples.   

 

Keywords: absorbance; equilibrium modeling; fluorescence; free metal ion; lake 

 

Page | 34  SETAC Australasia Brisbane 2012 Conference 

Session 3 (Wed AM, 14‐116)  Metals 

Session 3.4 (Wed, 14‐116, 12:00‐12:20) 

Factors influencing dietary cadmium bioavailability in the freshwater  amphipod Hyalella azteca 

Lisa Golding

1

*, Uwe Borgmann

2

 and D. George Dixon

3

 

1

CSIRO, Land and Water, Locked Bag 2007, Kirrawee, NSW 2232, Australia; 

2

Environment 

Canada, PO Box 5050, Burlington, ON L7R 4A6, Canada; 

3

University of Waterloo, 200 

University of Avenue West, Waterloo, ON N2L 3G1, Canada 

*presenting author 

Abstract: The bioavailability of  non‐essential metals such as cadmium (Cd) in  dietary form is  poorly  understood,  yet  is  critical  to  determining  the  dietary  contribution  to  bioaccumulation  and  toxicity.  This  research  compares  the  bioavailability  to  Hyalella  azteca  of  Cd  in  an  ecologically  relevant  periphyton  diet  with  Cd  in  an  artificial  fish  flake  diet  (TetraMin

®

)  commonly provided in toxicity testing protocols. Adult H. azteca were fed radiolabelled Cd‐109  diets  to  determine  assimilation  efficiencies  (AEs),  ingestion  rates  (IRs),  and  depuration  rates. 

The  AEs  were  compared  for  diets  having  high  and  low  Cd  concentrations,  in  fresh  and  dry  forms,  and  in  the  case  of  periphyton,  internally‐bioincorporated  Cd  versus  bioincorporated  +  externally adsorbed Cd. The AE of Cd from periphyton (AE = 3 – 14 %) was lower than that for 

TetraMin

®

 (AE = 44 – 86 %) regardless of the Cd concentration or food form. The IR was lower  for  dry  than  fresh  food  for  both  periphyton  (0.042  and  0.16  g  AFDM/g  H.  azteca/day  respectively)  and  TetraMin

®

  (0.19  and  0.87  AFDM/g  H.  azteca/day  respectively)  and  the  depuration rate (k e

) did not differ statistically with food type, form or Cd concentration. When  these  parameters  were  incorporated  into  a  biokinetic  model  to  predict  the  long‐term  bioaccumulation  of  Cd  in  H.  azteca  from  food  versus  water,  the  model  was  found  to  underpredict Cd bioaccumulation from periphyton. A sensitivity analysis showed that AE and 

IR were the main drivers of model predictions and it was hypothesized that the AE for Cd from  periphyton  was  underestimated  in  laboratory‐cultured  H.  azteca  due  to  a  non‐adapted  gut  enzyme  system.  These  findings  have  important  implications  for  bioassays  using  natural  food  sources  to  determine  dietary  metal  contributions  and  for  extrapolating  models  based  on  parameters  from  short‐term  exposures  to  long‐term  environmental  exposures  when  conducting risk assessments. 

 

Keywords: assimilation efficiency; bioaccumulation; biokinetic model; metals; periphyton 

 

SETAC Australasia Brisbane 2012 Conference  Page | 35  

Session 3 (Wed AM, 14‐116)  Metals 

Session 3.5 (Wed, 14‐116, 12:20‐12:40) 

Linking sub‐cellular metal partitioning to the particulate and dissolved  exposure pathways and chronic effect of copper in two deposit feeder  organisms 

Olivia Campana

1,2

, Stuart Simpson

1

*, Anne Taylor

3

 and Julián Blasco

2

  

 

1

CSIRO Land and Water, Locked Bag 2007, Kirrawee NSW 2232, Australia; 

2

Institute of Marine 

Sciences of Andalucía, CSIC, Puerto Real, Cádiz, Spain; 

3

Institute for Applied Ecology, 

University of Canberra ‐ ACT 2601, Australia 

*presenting author 

Abstract: Metal toxicity occurs when organisms cannot cope with an overwhelming influx and  the subsequent accumulation rates of metals.  To predict the effects of metals it is necessary to  understand  the  factors  that  influence  the  rate  of  uptake  from  the  various  exposure  routes. 

Particularly  in  the  case  of  chronic  toxicity,  it  is  useful  to  also  understand  the  sub‐cellular  partitioning  of  metals.  Following  uptake,  metals  may  partition  within  different  sub‐cellular  tissues,  be  detoxified  or  excreted,  but  only  the  metabolically  active  fraction  of  metal  contributes  to  toxicity.  Toxicity  is  elicited  when  the  metabolically  active  fraction  reaches  a  critical  level  in  one  or  more  sensitive  compartments  of  the  organism.  The  present  study  investigated the links between the sub‐cellular metal exposure and toxic effect to reproduction  of  the  epibenthic  amphipod  Melita  plumulosa  and  growth  of  the  bivalve  Tellina  deltoidalis  exposed  to  copper‐contaminated  sediments  with  varying  properties  (particulate  organic  carbon (POC) content and/or fraction of fine particles). The sub‐cellular partitioning of copper  was  determined  for  both  organisms  and  residue‐effect  relationships  investigated.  Strong  correlations  existed  between  (i)  total  copper  bioaccumulation  and  both  POC‐normalization  copper concentration of the <63 µm sediment fraction and copper concentration in overlying  water  for  both  organisms;  (ii)  the  compartment  of  copper  biologically  detoxified  within  T. 

deltoidalis  and  both  the  %‐POC/silt  normalized  sediment  copper  concentration  and  copper  concentration  in  the  water  phase;  and  (iii)  the  sublethal  effect  and  metabolically  available  fraction  for  M.  plumulosa.  Copper  associated  with  the  particulate  phase  has  been  demonstrated  to  be  the  major  exposure  route  and  potential  cause  of  the  toxicity  for  M. 

plumulosa.  However,  in  T.  deltoidalis,  particulate  and  dissolved  exposure  routes  seem  to  play  both an important role in copper uptake. These sub‐cellular copper partitioning results provide  further insight into the interaction between tissue residues and chronic effects. 

Keywords: bioaccumulation, sub‐cellular distribution, sediment properties, chronic toxicity  

Page | 36  SETAC Australasia Brisbane 2012 Conference 

Session 3 (Wed PM, 14‐116)  Metals 

Session 3.6 (Wed, 14‐116, 13:40‐14:00) 

Phytochelatin response over time in cadmium‐exposed freshwater algae 

Cassandra L. Smith

1

*, Jennifer L. Stauber

2

 Mark R. Wilson,

1

 Peter G. C. 

Campbell,

3

 Claude Fortin,

3

 Dianne F. Jolley

1

 

1

University of Wollongong, Wollongong 2522, Australia; 

2

CSIRO Land and Water, Lucas 

Heights 2234, NSW Australia; 

3

INRS‐ETE, Université du Québec, Québec City G1K 9A9, Canada 

*presenting author 

Abstract:  Metals  are  problematic  contaminants  in  the  aquatic  environment  as  even  low  concentrations  can  have  detrimental  effects  on  the  ecosystem,  particularly  on  primary  producers. Primary producers form the basis of the foodweb, and species such as microalgae  and cyanobacteria are responsible for half of the photosynthesis on the planet. Microalgae are  excellent  bioaccumulators  of  metals  hence  these  organisms  act  as  vehicles  to  transfer  these  contaminants higher up the food chain. For these reasons microalgae are important indicator  species for assessing the impact of metal contamination on the aquatic environment. 

Phytochelatins are a family of compounds that are involved in the detoxification of metals in  plants, algae, yeasts and some fungi. Phytochelatins contain a high proportion of sulfur and are  produced exclusively in response to metal exposure. Phytochelatins are essentially a polymer  chain of repeating γ‐Glu‐Cys (γEC) units terminated by a Gly (G) residue at the C‐terminus. The  quantity, type and chain length of the phytochelatins produced are influenced by the specific  metal, concentration of the metal, exposure time and biological species. 

This  research  investigated  the  production  of  phytochelatin  in  two  freshwater  algal  species 

(Chlamydomonas  reinhardtii  and  Pseudokirchneriella  subcapitata)  when  exposed  to  the  toxic  metal  cadmium.  The  algae  were  known  to  have  differing  tolerances  to  cadmium  (i.e.  concentrations  that  inhibited  population  growth  by  50%  were  225  and  150  nM  (Cd

2+

)  for  C. 

reinhardtii  and  P.  subcapitata  respectively).  Cells  were  exposed  to  cadmium  over  a  variety  of  time  frames  (3,  6,  24  hours)  and  phytochelatin  production  was  analysed.  The  method  development and preliminary results will be presented. 

 

Keywords: ecotoxicology, freshwater phytoplankton, metal toxicity 

 

SETAC Australasia Brisbane 2012 Conference  Page | 37  

Session 3 (Wed PM, 14‐116)  Metals 

Session 3.7 (Wed, 14‐116, 14:00‐14:20) 

Toxicity of cyanide and copper cyanide to a freshwater microalga 

Merrin Adams*, Loren Bardwell, David Spadaro, Sharon Hook, Chad 

Jarolimek and Simon Apte 

CSIRO Land and Water, Locked Bag 2007, Kirrawee, NSW 2232, Australia 

*presenting author 

Abstract: Cyanide has been used in the mining industry for over a century to extract gold from  its  ores  by  dissolution  as  a  stable  gold‐cyanide  complex.  However,  cyanide  dissolves  other  metals such as copper, zinc and iron, in preference to gold, as metal‐cyanide complexes. As a  result,  waste  mine‐tailings  liquor  comprises  free  cyanide,  weak‐acid  dissociable  cyanide  complexes and total cyanide. Cyanide is toxic to aquatic biota and the release of cyanide into  the aquatic environment can be reduced by the introduction of a cyanide destruct process (e.g.  oxidation  of  cyanide  by  sulfur  dioxide).  Dissolved  metal  concentrations  in  receiving  waters  have also been observed to be reduced after introduction of the destruct process, however, the  fate,  bioavailability  and  toxicity  of  cyanide  and  metal‐cyanide  complexes  are  poorly  understood.  

This study investigates the toxicity of cyanide and copper in the form of free cyanide, dissolved  copper and a copper (I) cyanide complex to the tropical freshwater microalga, Chlorella sp. Test  solutions were prepared by spiking sodium cyanide, copper sulfate or copper (I) cyanide into a  synthetic soft water and a natural river water (receiving water) and the toxicity to Chlorella sp.  determined  as  the  inhibition  of  algal  growth.  Throughout  the  toxicity  tests,  copper  was  measured  using  inductively  coupled  plasma  atomic  emission  spectrometry  and  free  cyanide  was measured using the colorimetric method with pyridine‐barbituric acid.   

Free  cyanide  was  toxic  to  Chlorella  sp.  with  IC10  values  of  19  µg  CN/L  in  both  synthetic  soft  water and river water, close to the water quality guideline trigger value of 7 µg CN/L. Copper is  also toxic to Chlorella sp. however, complexation with cyanide significantly reduces its toxicity. 

The  fate,  bioavailability  and  toxicity  of  cyanide  and  its  copper  complexes  in  the  receiving  environment will be discussed.  

 

Keywords: bioavailability; Chlorella; metals; mine tailings  

 

Page | 38  SETAC Australasia Brisbane 2012 Conference 

Session 3 (Wed PM, 14‐116)  Metals 

Session 3.8 (Wed, 14‐116, 14:20‐14:40) 

Use of ecotoxicology to assess the potential for the re‐use of mineral  processing residues as environmental amendments 

Monique Binet

1

*, Laura Wendling

2

, Zheng Yuan

2

, Francesca Gissi

1

, Darren 

Koppel

1

, Grant Douglas

2 and Merrin Adams

1

 

1

Centre for Environmental Contaminants Research CSIRO Land and Water, Locked Bag 2007, 

Kirrawee, NSW 2232; 

2

Centre for Environment and Life Sciences, CSIRO Land and Water, , 

Private Bag 5, Wembley, WA 6913 

*presenting author 

Abstract:  Mineral  processing  industries,  both  in  Australia  and  overseas,  produce  large  quantities of by‐products that may have the potential for re‐use in a wide range of applications,  including  road‐building  materials,  media  for  nutrient  removal,  wastewater  treatment,  and  agricultural soil amendments to alter nutrient and metal leaching processes.  

Based on a mineralogical characterization of 13 mineral‐processing residues from Australia and 

China, five steel‐ and two titanium‐production residues were selected for further investigation  of  their  potential  for  environmental  re‐use.  Geochemical  analyses  showed  that  several  elemental constituents within the residues (Ba, Se, V, Cr, TI, Sb, As, Pb, Zn, and Cu) exceeded 

Australian and/or international guideline values for soils and/or sediments.  

The  bioavailability  of  these  elements  was  not  known,  and  previous  testing  has  shown  that  trace  elements  in  mineral‐processing  residues  are  generally  not  readily  leachable.  Therefore,  the  chemical  composition  (trace  elements)  and  toxicity  (using  Vibrio  fisheri  bacterial  light  inhibition, Chlorella sp. growth inhibition and Ceriodaphnia dubia immobilization) of synthetic  softwater leachates prepared from the each of the seven residues was assessed.  

Three  steel‐making  residue  leachates  and  one  titanium  residue  leachate  were  of  low  or  no  toxicity (EC10s of 47‐>100%). The remaining leachates were toxic to one or more test species 

(EC10s  of  0.8‐7.1%).  Trace  elements  showing  enrichment  in  leachates  compared  to  synthetic  soft‐water controls included Al, Ba, Ca, Ce, K, Rb, Sb, Si, Sr and U (for steel‐making residues)  and Ba, Ca, Ce, Co, Cr, La, K, Mg, Mo, Rb, SO

4

, Ab, Si, Sr, Y and U (titanium‐making residues).  

The  implications  of  these  results,  together  with  those  of  an  environmental  radioactivity  assessment  of  the  residues  and  geochemical  characterization  of  the  leachates  will  be  discussed.  

Keywords: steel, titanium, by‐products, leachate   

SETAC Australasia Brisbane 2012 Conference  Page | 39  

Session 3 (Wed PM, 14‐116)  Metals 

Session 3.9 (Wed, 14‐116, 14:40‐15:00) 

Metal‐resistance and associated biological characteristics of marine and  freshwater invertebrates from two contaminated sites  

Joseph R. Bidwell* and Naomi L. Cooper 

Discipline of Environmental Science and Management, The University of Newcastle, 

Callaghan, Australia 

*presenting author 

Abstract:  Organisms  resident  in  sites  that  have  been  subjected  to  long‐term  metal  contamination may exhibit greater tolerance to metals than con‐specifics from reference sites. 

However,  this  resistance  often  comes  with  an  energetic  cost  that  may  affect  key  life  history  traits such as survival, growth and reproduction. There is also the potential for population‐level  genetic effects due to bottleneck events or selective pressures that alter allele frequencies. We  report  on  two  separate  studies  that  evaluated  these  issues  in  marine  and  freshwater  aquatic  invertebrate populations. The marine study compared populations of the isopod, Platynympha 

longicaudata, from a metal‐contaminated location at Port Pirie, South Australia, and reference  sites.  P.  longicaudata  from  Port  Pirie  were  more  tolerant  of  acute  exposure  to  a  mixture  of  cadmium,  lead,  and  zinc  and  had  significantly  lower  genetic  diversity  than  reference  organisms.  No  difference  in  whole‐body  metabolic  rate  was  observed  between  any  populations.    The  freshwater  study  compared  populations  of  the  amphipod,  Hyalella  azteca,  from  a  metal‐contaminated  stream  in  Oklahoma,  USA,  with  those  from  reference  sites.  H. 

azteca from the metal‐ contaminated site were more tolerant to acute and chronic exposures  to  cadmium,  lead  and  zinc,  and  had  higher  whole  body  metabolic  rates  than  any  of  the  reference  amphipods.    However,  the  contaminated  amphipods  had  lower  survival  and  reproductive output when compared with reference animals in metal‐free laboratory water. H. 

azteca from the metal contaminated stream had similar genetic diversity as reference animals,  but amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) indicated qualitative genetic differences  between  the  populations.  A  hypothesis  regarding  observed  differences  in  the  metabolic  rate  response of the marine and freshwater organisms will be discussed as will the implications of  exposure to additional stressors in metal‐acclimated or adapted populations.  

Keywords:  survival;  reproduction;  genetic;  tolerance

Page | 40  SETAC Australasia Brisbane 2012 Conference 

Session 4 (Wed AM, 14‐217)  Passive Sampling 

Session 4.1 (Wed, 14‐217, 10:15‐10:45) [Session Highlight] 

Calibration of aquatic passive samplers: Accounting for changes in  chemical uptake rates when exposed to variations in environmental flow  conditions 

Dominique O’Brien

1

*, Sarit L. Kaserzon

1

*, Etienne L.M. Vermeirssen

2

, Darryl W. 

Hawker

3

, Karen Kennedy

4

, Jack Thompson

5

, Christie C. Bentley

1

, Kees Booij

6

 and 

Jochen F. Mueller

1

 

1

The University of Queensland, National Research Centre for Environmental Toxicology (Entox), Coopers Plains 

QLD 4108, Australia; 

2

Eawag, Swiss Federal Institute of Aquatic Science and Technology, 8600 Dubendorf, 

Switzerland; 

3

Griffith University, School of Environment, Nathan QLD 4111, Australia; 

4

Department  of Environment and Resource Management, Ecosciences Precinct, Dutton Park QLD 4102; 

5

Queensland Health 

Forensic and Scientific Services, Coopers Plains QLD 4108, Australia; 

6

NIOZ Royal Netherlands Institute for Sea 

Research, 1790 AB Texel, The Netherlands 

*presenting authors 

Abstract:  Passive  sampling  techniques  facilitate  the  time‐integrated  measurement  of  pollutant  concentrations  through the use of a selective receiving phase. Accurate quantification using passive sampling devices rely on the  implementation  of  methods  that  will  negate  the  effects  of  environmental  factors  such  as  flow,  salinity  and  temperature.  Work undertaken at the  National Research  Centre for Environmental Toxicology (Entox) includes: 

Calibration and deployment of various passive sampling devices in routine monitoring of water borne pollutants 

(including:  herbicides,  pesticides,  pharmaceuticals  &  personal  care  products);  Development  of  a  method  for  monitoring water flow velocity (i.e. the passive flow monitor abbreviated as PFM); Evaluation of flow and salinity  effects on the uptake kinetics of phosphate by an adsorbent passive sampler and whether the PFM can be used to  accurately  predict  time  averaged  phosphate  concentrations  under  various  (and  varying)  flow  and  salinity  conditions. 

Entox  has  developed  and  implemented  a  range  of  passive  sampling  techniques  that  can  be  employed  in  the  detection  and  quantification  of  a  range  of  pollutants.  We  endeavor  to  extend  upon  the  techniques  currently  employed to develop new approaches for emerging pollutants. 

To  demonstrate  novel  applications  we  will  present  a  case  study  where  a  modified  and  validated  Polar  Organic 

Chemical Integrative Sampler (POCIS) with a weak anion exchange sorbent is employed for passive sampling of  perfluorinated compounds (PFCs) in water. The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of water flow rate  and calibration conditions on the uptake of PFCs by the POCIS. The sampling rates derived (0.08 – 0.28 L day

‐1

)  are  comparable  to  sampling  rates  determined  in  a  previous  study  under  different  conditions.  The  results  presented  provide  a  further  example  of  advances  in  passive  sampling  techniques  that  can  help  researchers  elucidate potential aquatic exposure routes of emerging pollutants. 

Keywords:  passive  sampling  devices,  passive  flow  monitor,  emerging  pollutants,  Polar  Organic  Chemical 

Integrative Sampler (POCIS)

   

SETAC Australasia Brisbane 2012 Conference  Page | 41  

Session 4 (Wed AM, 14‐217)  Passive Sampling 

Session 4.2 (Wed, 14‐217, 10:45‐11:05) 

Calibration and field application of passive sampling devices for detection  of ionic herbicide residues in water  

Ross V. Hyne

1

* and Francisco Sánchez‐Bayo

2

 

1

 Centre for Ecotoxicology, Office of Environment & Heritage, Lidcombe NSW 1825, 

AUSTRALIA; 

2

 Centre for Ecotoxicology, University of Technology Sydney, PO Box 29, 

Lidcombe NSW 1825, AUSTRALIA 

*presenting author 

Abstract:  Passive  sampler  devices  selective  for  the  hydrophilic  ionic  herbicides  amitrole  and  glyphosate that are suitable for routine monitoring of pesticide residues in irrigation channels  and  rivers  are  being  investigated.  Development  of  new  passive  sampling  devices  for  such  herbicides first requires the development of a suitable analytical method for detection of their  residual  amounts  in  environmental  samples.  An  electro‐chemical  detector  fitted  to  a  HPLC  system  detected  with  accuracy  and  sensitivity  these  and  other  common  herbicides  found  in  agricultural  waters. Uptake  of  amitrole  in  a passive  sampling  device constructed  with  a  SDB‐

RPS Empore® disk membrane as the receiving phase was found to be linear proportional to the  water concentration for up to 17 days with a sampling rate of 25.3 mL/d under laboratory flow‐ through  conditions.  Whilst  SDB‐XC  Empore  disk  membranes  could  be  used  to  retain  and  extract  glyphosate  from  spiked  water  samples  filtered  through  them,  this  membrane  was  unable  to  accumulate  this  herbicide  in  a  flow‐through  system.  Amitrole  could  be  extracted  from  the  SDB‐RPS  membrane  using  0.3  mM  NaOH  with  95%  to  105  %  efficiency,  which  facilitated  the  processing  and  direct  amperometric  analysis  of  this  herbicide  taken  up  by  the  passive samplers.  A field trial to test the performance of the SDB‐RPS Empore‐based sampling  device when deployed in an agricultural irrigation drain was carried out. Results from the field  trial  showed  that  the  mean  time‐integrated  amitrole  concentrations  taken  up  by  the  passive  samplers compared well with the cumulative mean water concentrations calculated from daily  extractions using the Empore disk membranes. Glyphosate accumulation in a passive sampler  device  constructed  with  an  anion  exchange‐SR  Empore®  disk  membrane  is  currently  being  evaluated. 

Keywords: amitrole; Empore

®

 extraction disk; glyphosate    

Page | 42  SETAC Australasia Brisbane 2012 Conference 

Session 4 (Wed AM, 14‐217)  Passive Sampling 

Session 4.3 (Wed, 14‐217, 11:40‐12:00) 

Use of an integrated passive sampling approach to identify contaminants  from multiple agro‐based activities in a tropical freshwater river system  

Tatiana Komarova

1

*, Chuleemas Boonthai Iwai

2

, Atcharaporn Somparn

2

Natsima Tokhun

2

 and Barry Noller

3

 

 

1

 Queensland Health Forensic and Scientific Services (QHFSS), Inorganic Chemistry Division, 

Coopers Plains, QLD 4108, Australia; 

2

 Department of Plant Sciences and Agricultural 

Resources, Land Resources and Environment section, Faculty of Agriculture, Khon Kaen 

University, Khon Kaen, Thailand; 

3

 The University of Queensland, Centre for Mined Land 

Rehabilitation (CMLR), Brisbane, 4072 Australia 

*presenting author 

Abstract:  The  Namphong  River  is  a  sub  catchment  of  the  Mekong  River  in  Northeast  of 

Thailand.  This  catchment  has  a  diverse  range  of  agro‐based  activities  that  include  rice  and  mixed  vegetable  cultivation,  pulp  and  paper  manufacturing  utilising  local  eucalyptus  tree  cultivation  and  sugar  cane  for  molasses  and  ethanol  production.  In  addition  the  Namphong 

River has extensive in‐river cage aquaculture for Tilapia production. These activities potentially  add a diverse range of contaminants to the river flow including heavy metals, nutrients, salinity  and  pesticides  that  may  affect  the  aquatic  ecosystem.  An  integrated  sampling  program  was  designed  to  identify  the  range  of  potential  contaminants  in  the  Namphong  River  by  incorporating  soil  analyses,  diffuse  gradients  in  thin  films  technique  (DGTs)  for  bioavailable  toxic  heavy  metals,  field  measurements  of  pH,  electrical  conductivity,  temperature  and  dissolved oxygen together with water samples for general parameters, heavy metals (total and  filtered < 0.45 µm) and nutrients. The DGTs were deployed at 10 different river sites for 3 days  to enable sufficient integration of heavy metals. 1 litre water samples were collected from the  sites at the deployment and retrieval of DGTs. Sediment samples from 4 of the 10

  sites were  analyzed prior to DGT deployment. Subsequently the data has been evaluated to identify toxic  metals  of  significance  with  respect  to  potential effects  on  the  aquatic  ecosystem  and  uptake  via the food chain. These are ranked by using the hazard index. The outcome of this study will  enable  the  development  of  more  focused  monitoring  for  specific  toxic  heavy  metals  at  particular locations on the Namphong River. Biomonitoring techniques together with passive  sampling  are  also  identified  as  useful  monitoring  tools  to  assess  and  monitor  the  potential  effect of effluents on the aquatic freshwater ecosystem in the Namphong River catchment. 

Keywords: active sampling; aquatic ecosystem; DGT; heavy metals; sediments. 

 

SETAC Australasia Brisbane 2012 Conference  Page | 43  

Session 4 (Wed AM, 14‐217)  Passive Sampling 

Session 4.4 (Wed, 14‐217, 12:00‐12:20) 

In situ, passive samplers for measuring inorganic arsenic speciation and  investigating arsenic sediment biogeochemistry 

William Bennett

1

*, Peter Teasdale

1

, Dianne Jolley

2

, Jared Panther

1

, David 

Welsh

1

 and Huijun Zhao

1

 

1

Environmental Futures Centre, Griffith University, Gold Coast campus, QLD, Australia; 

2

School of Chemistry, University of Wollongong, NSW, Australia 

*presenting author 

Abstract:  Arsenic  is  a  toxic  element  that  is  widely  distributed  in  waters,  soils and  sediments. 

The mobility and toxicity of arsenic in the environment is strongly controlled by speciation; the  reduced  inorganic  species  (As

III

)  is  typically  more  toxic  and  mobile  compared  to  the  oxidized  inorganic  species  (As

V

).  Existing  approaches  for  measuring  arsenic  speciation  in  the  environment  are  ex  situ  techniques,  which  are  subject  to  issues  of  species  transformation  during  transport  and  storage,  and  in  the  case  of  soils  and  sediments,  also  fail  to  provide  adequate  spatial  resolution  to  determine  mechanistic  links  between  arsenic  and  important  associated  chemical  species  such  as  iron.  Here  we  report  the  development  and  evaluation  of  novel diffusive sampling techniques that are capable of in situ, high‐resolution measurement of  inorganic arsenic speciation and iron(II) in waters, soils and sediments. A diffusive gradients in  thin  films  (DGT)  technique  has  been  developed  that  selectively  measures  As

III

  by  using  a  3‐ mercaptopropyl functionalized silica gel as an adsorbent, which when used in conjunction with  a  separate  DGT  technique  for  total  inorganic  arsenic,  can  be  used  to  determine  As

V

  as  well. 

Additionally, a diffusive equilibration in thin films (DET) technique, based on the colorimetric  reaction of iron(II) with ferrozine and analysis using computer imaging densitometry (CID), was  optimized to allow the simultaneous measurement of As

III

 and iron(II) at the same location in  the  soil  or  sediment  at  high‐resolution  (1‐3  mm),  thus  permitting  mechanistic  interactions  between iron and arsenic to be investigated and interpreted. This approach to understanding  arsenic mobilisation processes was applied to investigating the mobility of arsenic and iron in  freshwater and marine sediments during anoxic events. Tight coupling between the release of  iron(II)  and  As

III

  was  observed  in  both  freshwater  and  marine  sediments,  consistent  with  reductive  dissolution  of  arsenic‐bearing  iron(III)  (hydr)oxide  minerals  and  consequent  mobilisation of arsenic to the porewaters. 

 

Keywords: arsenic; biogeochemistry; DGT; DET; mobilization 

 

Page | 44  SETAC Australasia Brisbane 2012 Conference 

Session 4 (Wed AM, 14‐217)  Passive Sampling 

Session 4.5 (Wed, 14‐217, 12:20‐12:40) 

Concentration pulses of atmospherically transported polycyclic aromatic  hydrocarbons in snowmelt from Southern Alps, New Zealand 

Pourya Shahpoury

1

*, Kimberly J. Hageman

1

, Christoph D. Matthaei

2

, Robert 

E. Alumbaugh

1

Department of Chemistry, University of Otago, Dunedin, New Zealand; 

2

Department of 

Zoology, University of Otago, Dunedin, New Zealand; 

3

Department of Pharmacology, 

University of Otago, Dunedin, New Zealand 

*presenting author 

Abstract: Semi‐volatile organic contaminants can travel through the atmosphere to locations  distant from where they originated.  In cold regions, the contaminants may then be scavenged  by  dry  or  wet  deposition  processes  and  transferred  to  the  ground  or  water  bodies.  If  the  scavenging  process  happens  by  snowfall  in  the  winter,  the  contaminants  accumulate  in  the  snowpack and may remain there as long as the ambient temperature allows them. When the  temperature  increases  and  the  snow  begin  to  melt,  the  contaminants  accumulated  in  the  snowpack  may  be  released  to  the  environment  and  specifically  to  the  surrounding  streams. 

This  process  can  create  pulses  in  concentrations  of  contaminants  in  the  water  and  adversely  affect the biological communities living in the streams.  

The  present  study  aimed  to  assess  if  the  annual  snowmelt  phenomenon  affects  the  concentrations of atmospherically transported organic contaminants in streams, at three sites  located  in  Arthur’s  Pass  National  Park,  New  Zealand.  We  investigated  the  water  concentrations  of  polycyclic  aromatic  hydrocarbons  (PAHs)  at  the  sites  before,  during,  and  after annual snowmelt period from July to December 2010. We used silicon passive samplers  which  enabled  us  to  measure  the  time‐averaged  water  concentrations  for  analytes  in  the  uptake  phase  at  the  end  of  field  exposure.  The  samplers  were  extracted  using  accelerated  solvent  extraction  system,  and  extracts  were  purified  using  gel  permeation  chromatography. 

The  final  extracts  were  analyzed  for  PAHs  using  gas  chromatography  with  mass  selective  detection in electron impact mode. Fluorene, phenanthrene, fluoranthene, pyrene, and retene  were detected in all samples. Overall, the results indicate that the total concentrations of PAHs  significantly  increased  during  the  period  from  28  September  through  to  21  October  in  connection with changes in weather conditions. 

Keywords:  cold  condensation;  passive  samplers;  snowpack;  streams;  semi‐volatile  organic  contaminants

SETAC Australasia Brisbane 2012 Conference  Page | 45  

 

Session 5 (Wed PM, 14‐217)  Environmental Impacts of Coal Seam Gas 

Session 5.1 (Wed, 14‐217, 13:30‐14:00) [Session Highlight] 

Technical considerations in regulating CSG discharge waters in the U.S. 

George Parrish 

US Environmental Protection Agency, Denver, CO, USA 

Abstract: The United States is experiencing rapid growth in the development and production  of  Coal  Seam  Gas  (aka  Coal  Bed  Methane,  or  CBM)  to  help  meet  existing  and  future  energy  needs.  Some  locations  require  dewatering  and  disposal  of  large  volumes  of  coal  seam  groundwater.  This  water  is  typically  reinjected  back  into  available  proximal  aquifers,  evaporated in surface ponds, or released to surface waterbodies for consumptive use such as  irrigated  agriculture.  The  Clean  Water  Act  directs  much  of  the  U.S.  surface  water  regulatory  activities, such as implementing state and tribal narrative and numeric water quality standards. 

Technical considerations include identifying pollutants of concern (e.g., salinity, sodicity, pH);  the  most  sensitive  endpoints  for  use  of  the  produced  water  (e.g.,  aquatic  communities,  commercial  agricultural  crops,  or  soils);  and  documenting  existing  water  quality  conditions. 

Additional  research  is  needed  on  post‐discharge  changes  in  product  water  chemistry,  and  identifying sensitive macroinvertebrate communities, crops and soils. 

 

Keywords: Coal Seam Water; salinity; soils; US regulation 

 

Page | 46  SETAC Australasia Brisbane 2012 Conference 

Session 5 (Wed PM, 14‐217)  Environmental Impacts of Coal Seam Gas 

Session 5.2 (Wed, 14‐217, 14:00‐14:20) 

Chemicals associated with coal seam gas exploration:  Towards  understanding their ecological risks 

Rai Kookana

1

*, Graeme Batley

2  and Simon Apte

2

  

1

Centre for Environmental Contaminants Research, CSIRO Land and Water, Waite Campus, 

Urrbrae, SA, Australia; 

2

Centre for Environmental Contaminants Research, CSIRO Land and 

Water, Lucas Heights, NSW, Australia 

*presenting author 

Abstract:  To  reduce  dependence  on  fossil  fuels  and  as  a  clean  energy  source,  there  is  unprecedented interest worldwide in exploring the reserves of natural gas (e.g. coal seam gas  and  shale  gas).    In  Australia,  major  expansions  in  natural  gas  exploration  are  currently  occurring, for example in the Bowen and Surat Basins of Queensland.  Technological advances  now  allow  the  industry  to  source  gas  reservoirs  economically  and  efficiently  through  techniques  such  as  horizontal  drilling  and  hydraulic  fracturing,  commonly  referred  to  as 

‘fraccing’.  The  hydraulic  fracturing  technique  requires  high  pressure  pumping  of  specially  engineered fluids containing chemical additives and proppants into the exploration well. There  is growing community concern about the potential environmental impact of such exploration  activities,  in  particular  the  impacts  of  fraccing  chemicals  on  surface  and  groundwater  resources. 

This  presentation  will  present  data  from  a  review  of  the  available  published  literature  on  fraccing chemicals and attempt a screening level risk assessment of their potential ecological  impacts  on  aquatic  ecosystems,  especially  surface  water  receiving  environments.    There  is  a  dearth  of  reliable  data  on  what  fraccing  chemicals  are  being  used  in  Australia,  as  well  as  on  their ecotoxicity, fate and environmental concentrations.  For chemicals already listed as being  used in Australia and internationally, those that are likely to pose the greatest environmental  concerns have been identified. The presentation will highlight the current knowledge gaps that  must be addressed to allow a sound understanding of the ecological risks of fraccing chemicals  in Australian environment.  

 

Keywords: Coal Seam Gas; ecological risk; fraccing chemicals  

 

SETAC Australasia Brisbane 2012 Conference  Page | 47  

 

Session 5 (Wed PM, 14‐217)  Environmental Impacts of Coal Seam Gas 

Session 5.3 (Wed, 14‐217, 14:20‐14:40) 

Water, water everywhere but how much can i drink?

 

Peter Baker 

Office of Water Science ‐ Department of Sustainability, Environment, Water, Population and 

Communities; John Gorton Building ‐ King Edward Terrace, Parkes ACT; GPO Box 787, 

Canberra ACT 2601 

Abstract:  The  rapid  expansion  of  the  Coal  Seam  Gas  industry  has  raised  numerous  environmental concerns, some founded, some unfounded. Two major concerns are the volume  of co‐produced water and fraccing. 

Large volumes of water, called co‐produced water, are produced as part of the gas production. 

Whilst this water can be treated via reverse osmosis, what of the salt, and heavy metals, that  are  left  behind?    Current  estimates  put  this  volume  of  salt  for  the  three  Commonwealth 

Government  approved  Coal  Seam  Gas  developments  in  south  east  Queensland  at  over  two 

Melbourne Cricket Grounds.  

Fraccing is widely used, not only in Coal Seam Gas production, but throughout the petroleum  industry. Concerns have also been raised in regards to fraccing. The fraccing process involves  the  use  of,  primarily  water,  but  also  a  range  of  chemicals.  Whilst  banned  in  Australia  the  so‐ called  BTEX  chemicals  have  been  widely  talked  about  by  various  communities. 

Notwithstanding  this,  some  of  the  chemicals  used  would  have  serious  health,  if  not  fatal,  impacts if they were drunk. The question therefore is how dangerous are these chemicals once  under the ground? Much of the fraccing fluid is recovered as part of production testing which  raises questions as to how it is disposed. International experience suggests that most common  environmental impact of fraccing fluid is spillage, especially of the produced fraccing fluid.  

 

This paper will investigate concerns raised in regards to co‐produced water and fraccing as well  as some of the other environmental issues surrounding Coal Seam Gas production and try to  separate, where possible, fact from the fiction.  

Keywords: Coal Seam Gas; co‐produced water; fraccing; salt  

 

Page | 48  SETAC Australasia Brisbane 2012 Conference 

Session 5 (Wed PM, 14‐217)  Environmental Impacts of Coal Seam Gas 

Session 5.4 (Wed, 14‐217, 14:40‐15:00) 

Management of salinity impacts from mine discharges in Central 

Queensland 

Ian Ramsay

1

*, Eva Holt

1

, Andrew Connor

2

 and Louise Jordan

2

 

1

Environment and Resource Sciences, Department of Science, Information Technology, Innovation and the 

Arts, Dutton Park, Queensland, Australia; 

2

Department of Environment and Heritage Protection (EHP), 

Queensland, Australia 

*presenting author 

Abstract: In the Fitzroy River Basin and Murray Darling Basin in Queensland, Australia, the greatest risk to  water quality from mine discharges is increased salinity levels. Aquatic ecosystems and drinking water are  the  most  sensitive  downstream  values  to  be  protected.  Mining  companies  are  permitted  to  discharge  water mainly under approvals issued under the Environmental Protection Act 1994 (EP Act). The flooding  of  coal  mines  in  the  Fitzroy  River  Basin  in  early  2008  and  subsequent  discharge  of  saline  wastewater  resulted  in  several  major  initiatives  by  government  and  others.  One  key  initiative  was  the  cumulative  impact  assessment  of  mine  discharges  in  the  Fitzroy  and  subsequent  development  of  model  water  conditions for regulation. These changes have formed the basis of how all mines including Coal Seam Gas  companies are currently regulated in Queensland. The Healthy Headwaters program is a further initiative  that is intended to enhance the assessment of water discharges from Coal Seam Gas activities, including  cumulative impacts. 

This  presentation  will  describe  the  scientific  information  and  process  undertaken  by  the  former 

Queensland Department of Environment and Resource Management to review and manage saline water  discharges for mines and CSG associated waters in the Fitzroy and Murray Darling basins. Some of the key  features of the latest approaches to regulation include: 

Adopting most‐recent toxicity information, reference‐based aquatic ecosystem guidelines and water  quality objectives for electrical conductivity to derive discharge limits. 

Linking discharges to periods of stream flow to minimise the ecological risks to ephemeral streams. 

Clear identification and impact assessment of local and regional features that need protecting, such  as water holes in ephemeral streams and drinking reservoirs.  

Comprehensive  and  routine  receiving  environment  monitoring  to  better  assess  local  condition  and  background concentrations and help address a major lack of monitoring data. 

More  effective  data  management  and  submission  of  electronic  monitoring  data  to  the  regulator  to  enable faster assessment, reporting and feedback. 

Keywords: salinity; mines; monitoring; wastewater; management 

SETAC Australasia Brisbane 2012 Conference  Page | 49  

Session 6 (Thu AM, 14‐212)  Environmental Monitoring 

Session 6.1 (Thurs, 14‐212, 9:55‐10:25) [Session Highlight] 

Making it real and relevant: Turning what you do into useful action 

Therese M Manning*, John C Chapman and Peter Lawson 

 

Office of Environment & Heritage, NSW, PO Box A290, Sydney South, NSW 1232, Australia 

*presenting author 

Abstract: Chemicals management frameworks and processes in Australia are an ever evolving  beast.  But having some idea about how the whole system fits together can highlight ways and  means of making research more useful and more used.  A range of opportunities exist to feed  into government processes for setting priorities and managing individual chemicals or types of  activities.   Enabling  better  communication  between  those  who  do  research  and  those  who  ensure  effective  chemicals  management  is  critical  at  this  time  given  the  challenges  ahead  of  us.  The push for sustainability in how we use resources is just one area that will need excellent  information to ensure good outcomes for people and the environment.  A brief description of  the  framework  in  Australia  will  be  presented  along  with  information  on  new  areas  on  the  horizon  to  address  existing  gaps  and  ideas  about  good  places  and  ways  to  feed  information  into the system. 

Keywords: chemicals management; research; government; knowledge gaps; Australia 

 

Page | 50  SETAC Australasia Brisbane 2012 Conference 

Session 6 (Thu AM, 14‐212)  Environmental Monitoring 

Session 6.2 (Thurs, 14‐212, 10:25‐10:45) 

Moving towards a light based approach for monitoring dredging impacts  in Gladstone, Queensland  

Leonie Andersen

1

*, Felicity Melville

1

, Michael Rasheed

2

, Katie Chartrand

2

 and 

David Fox

3

 

1

Vision Environment (QLD), PO Box 1267, Gladstone, Qld, Australia; 

2

Marine Ecology Group, 

Fisheries Queensland, DEEDI, PO Box 5396, Cairns, Qld, Australia; 

3

Environmetrics Australia, 

PO Box 607, Templestowe, Vic, Australia 

*presenting author 

Abstract: Dredging for the Western Basin Dredging and Disposal Project, currently the largest  capital works dredge project in Australia, began in Gladstone in May 2011. The project involves  the dredging of over 42 Mm

3

 of dredged material to provide safe and efficient harbor access to  service  the  emerging  liquefied  natural  gas  (LNG)  industry  in  the  Gladstone  region.  The  area  contains  some  of  the  most  significant  seagrass  meadows  on  the  central  Queensland  coast,  supporting  a  large  recreational  and  commercial  fishing  industry.  Over  6000  ha  of  benthic  habitat,  most  of  which  has  already  been  decimated  by  the  2011  Queensland  floods,  was  predicted to be impacted as a result of the project. Traditional licensed monitoring for dredge  projects  has  involved  the  establishment  of  trigger  values  based  on  background  turbidity. 

However this approach does not necessarily ensure the protection of sensitive habitats such as  seagrass.  A  comprehensive  reactive  monitoring  program  was  instigated  which  aligns  water  quality  (water  clarity  and  chemistry)  with  seagrass  monitoring.  The  program  includes  determining the light (photosynthetically active radiation (PAR)) requirements for seagrass by  undertaking  a  series  of  shading  studies  and  the  integration  of  light  based  triggers  with  measures  of  turbidity  and  TSS.  In  order  to  move  towards  a  light  based  approach  to  manage  dredge  impacts  as  per  the  Coordinator‐General’s  conditions  for  the  project,  it  has  also  encompassed the development of new techniques to measure real time PAR via telemetry and  to  determine  thresholds  of  seagrass  resilience  to  low  light  conditions.  Additionally  it  has  involved developing new statistical approaches to further understand the relationship between  water clarity and seagrass condition. 

 

Keywords: photosynthetically active radiation (PAR); seagrass; trigger values; turbidity; water  quality 

 

SETAC Australasia Brisbane 2012 Conference  Page | 51  

Session 6 (Thu AM, 14‐212)  Environmental Monitoring 

Session 6.3 (Thurs, 14‐212, 10:45‐11:05) 

The national program for environmental monitoring and assessment in 

México 

Alma Delia Nava*, Víctor J. Gutierrez and Ana Patricia Martínez 

 

Instituto Nacional de Ecología, Periférico 5000, Insurgentes Cuicuilco, D.F., México 

*presenting author 

Abstract:  The  National  Program  for  Environmental  Monitoring  and  assessment  (PRONAME)  has the objective to reduce or eliminate the toxic, persistent and bioaccumulative substances 

(STPB) in Mexican ecosystems through its implementation in sites impacted by anthropogenic  activities  (industry,  agricultural,  urban  and  indigenous)  and  other  sites  not  impacted  like  natural  protected  areas  in  order  to  design  Mexico’s  environmental  policies.  It  is  a  long‐term 

(25‐30 years) program integrated by a network of sites previously selected according to some  criteria  located  within  the  national  territory.  Currently  this  Program  has  five  sites  with  monitoring  programs  of  STPB  in  different  environmental  media  (water,  air,  soil,  sediments,  animal  and  vegetal  biota  and,  human).  The  main  results  include  the  presence  of  some  persistent  organic  compounds  (POPs)  and  polychlorinated  biphenyls  (PCBs)  in  soils  and  sediments from agricultural sites; PCBs, POPs, metals and polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) in  animal  tissues  and,  the  presence  of  some  STPB  in  low  concentrations  or  undetectable  concentrations  in  pristine  sites  as  natural  protected  areas.  These  preliminary  results  were  obtained  during  a  period  of  three  years  of  monitoring  and  they  are  the  first  baseline  data  of 

STPB  in  Mexico.  It  is  important  to  have  a  program  of  environmental  monitoring  such  as  this  because it contributes to design strategies for the reduction of these kinds of substances in the  environment to improve the health of ecosystems and human population. 

Keywords: POPs; PCBs; HAPs; metals 

 

Page | 52  SETAC Australasia Brisbane 2012 Conference 

Session 6 (Thu AM, 14‐212)  Environmental Monitoring 

Session 6.4 (Thurs, 14‐212, 11:40‐12:00) 

Monitoring sediment bound contaminants in urban waterways of 

Melbourne 

Simon Sharp

1

*, Trish Grant

2  and Vincent Pettigrove

1,2

 

1

Victorian Centre of Aquatic Pollution Identification and Management, Bio21 Institute, 30 

Flemmington Road Parkville, Victoria, 3052, Australia; 

2

Melbourne Water, PO Box 4342, 

Melbourne, Victoria, 3001, Australia 

*presenting author 

Abstract:  Monitoring  sediments  is  ideal  for  hydrophobic  pollutants  such  as  metals,  as  sediments accumulate these types of contaminants. In 2010, Melbourne Water commissioned 

CAPIM  to  develop  a  sediment  quality  monitoring  program  to  assess  temporal  change  in  toxicants  in  Melbourne’s  urban  waterways.  Sampling  involves  collection  of  fine  (<63µm)  surface sediments from the greater Melbourne area. This research aims a) to determine long  term  trends  for  toxicants  in  sediments  ,  b)  to  identify  contamination  ‘hot  spots’,  where  concentrations  of  toxicants  exceed  pollution  threshold  (e.g.  Interim  Sediment  Quality 

Guideline (ISQG) trigger values (ANZECC/ARMCANZ 2000), and c) to prioritise waterways for  further  investigation,  remediation  and  management.  Results  show  the  majority  of  urban  waterways  in  Melbourne  contain  levels  of  heavy  metals  in  sediments  which  exceed  current  guidelines.  Of  55  sites,  31%  had  zinc  concentrations  in  sediments  that  exceeded  ISQG‐high  trigger  value,  while  lead  exceeded  upper  trigger  values  in  4%  of  sites  in  2010  ‐  2011. 

Comparisons  of  annual  mean  sediment  concentrations  with  historic  data  show  a  significant  decrease in lead between 1981 and 2011, following the introduction of unleaded petrol in 1985. 

Over the same period water quality data, in comparison, are variable and in some cases unable  to  detect  significant  changes.  These  results  suggest  sediment  monitoring  as  a  more  informative  expenditure  of  resources  than  surface  water  monitoring,  particularly  for  heavy  metal  contamination.  CAPIM  are  working  with  Melbourne  Water  and  community  groups  to  integrate  monitoring  at  different  spatial  scales  to  determine  pollution  sources  at  the  catchment, waterway and sub‐catchment level. We present the results of long term sediment  quality data from the EPA in the 1980’s, Melbourne Water from 1990’s and CAPIM from 2010‐

2011. 

 

Keywords: heavy metals; pollution; sediments; urbanization 

 

SETAC Australasia Brisbane 2012 Conference  Page | 53  

Session 6 (Thu AM, 14‐212)  Environmental Monitoring 

Session 6.5 (Thurs, 14‐212, 12:00‐12:20) 

Establishment of methods and measurement of hormones in river source 

water and its derived potable water supply 

Fiona Young

1

*, Katherine Scaffidi

2

, Vicki Edwards

1

, Josh Makepeace

3

Danielle Glynn

4

, Alison Bleaney

5

 

1

Dept Medical Biotechnology, Flinders University, Bedford Park, South Australia 5042; 

2

SA 

Water, 250 Victoria Square, Adelaide, South Australia 5000; 

University, Oxford, England; 

4

3

Dept of Chemistry, Oxford 

Dept of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Adelaide University, 

Adelaide, South Australia 5000; 

5

Georges Bay Medical Practice Service Company Pty Ltd, 

Tasmania, Australia 

*presenting author 

Abstract: Concerns that PET bottle lids may contaminate water samples 

1

 led to the collection  of water samples into surgical grade plasma bags. Testosterone (T), progesterone (P), estradiol 

17 beta (E2) and estrone (E1) in 15 mid‐column grab samples from an Australian river, and 13  grab  samples  from  a  domestic  tap  (this  potable  water  was  DAFF‐treated  river  water),  were  collected  over  a  7  month  period  (Sept  –  March)  and  compared  to  two  synthetic  freshwater  control samples ‘collected’ in Oct and Feb.  

Initially a sensitive E‐screen (EC50: 10

‐14

M) with T47D cells (n=3) demonstrated the absence of  estrogenic  activity  in  the  synthetic  freshwater  (control)  after  storage  in  the  plasma  bags.  In‐ house  ELISAs  were  used  to  determine  hormone  recovery  from  a  different  sample  of  DAFF‐ treated chlorinated water (approximates to tap water) spiked with 1ng/L of E2 or P4, or 10ng/L 

E1,  and  from  synthetic  freshwater  spiked  with  a  mixture  of  1ng/L  each  of  P,  E1,  E2,  EE2  and 

BPA.  Samples  were  subjected  to  solid  phase  extraction  (SPE),  then  dried  down  and  re‐ suspended in 10% methanol in ELISA buffer. The same matrix was used for ELISA standards. 

Recoveries  from  the  DAFF‐water  sample  were  103%,  139%  and  31%  for  E2,  E1  and  P  respectively  (n=3),  whereas  recoveries  from  the  synthetic  freshwater  were  123%  for  E2,  and 

20% for P (n=3, other hormones were not examined). 

Samples were stored at ‐18

0

C until transported to Adelaide where they were subjected to SPE  and ELISA using the same methods applied to spike recovery experiments. Data presented as  mean±stdev  ng/L  of  water  before  SPE.  T  was  found  in  4  river  (1.04±0.14)  and  3  tap  samples 

(1.02±0.05),  P  in  7  river  (0.48±0.04)  and  5  tap  (0.56±0.09)  samples,  E1  in  2  river  samples 

(0.87±0.07),  and  E2  in  4  river  (1.05±0.05)  and  4  tap  (1.47±0.6)  samples.  Possible  effects  on  human health will be discussed. 

Keywords: E‐screen; EDC; SPE‐ELISA; testosterone, progesterone, estrogens 

Page | 54  SETAC Australasia Brisbane 2012 Conference 

Session 6 (Thu AM, 14‐212)  Environmental Monitoring 

Session 6.6 (Thurs, 14‐212, 12:20‐12:40) 

What is the significance of endocrine disruption in the Australian aquatic  environment – findings from Stage 1 

Philip D. Scott

1

*, Heather Coleman

2

, James McDonald

2

, Richard Lim

3

Dayanthi Nugegoda

4

, Louis A. Tremblay

5

, Vincent Pettigrove

6

, Heather F. 

Chapman

1

, Stephen Blockwell

7

, Brendan Harper

7

, Tarren Reitsema

8

Bartkow

9

 and Frederic D.L. Leusch

, Michael 

1

Smart Water Research Centre, Griffith University, Southport, Qld 4222, Australia; 

2

Water Research 

Centre, University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW 2052, Australia; 

Sydney, NSW 2007, Australia; 

4

3

University of Technology Sydney, 

RMIT University, Melbourne, VIC 3000, Australia; 

5

Cawthron Institute, 

Nelson 7010, New Zealand; 

6

Melbourne Water, Melbourne, VIC 3000, Australia; 

7

Sydney Water, Sydney, 

NSW 2150, Australia; 

8

Department of Water, Perth, WA 6000, Australia; 

9

Seqwater, Brisbane, Qld 4000, 

Australia 

*presenting author 

Abstract: This project uses an integrated approach consisting of multiple in vitro and in vivo bioassays, in 

situ sampling and trace chemical analysis to compare endocrine disruption at 73 sites in mainland Australia. 

Sample  sites  were  selected  to  include  waterways  impacted  by  a  variety  of  sources  such  as  wastewater  discharge,  agricultural  run‐off,  industrial  effluent,  urban  drains  and  pristine  reference  sites.  Duplicate  1  L  discrete  water  samples  were  taken  quarterly  over  a  one‐year  period.  Samples  were  concentrated  using  solid‐phase extraction (SPE) and split into two aliquots, one for in vitro bioassay analysis and the other for  chemical  analysis.  A  battery  of  CALUX  assays  (estrogen  receptor,  ER;  androgen  receptor,  AR;  progesterone  receptor,  PR;  and  glucocorticoid  receptor,  GR)  was  used  to  determine  the  classes  of  EDCs  present in water extracts. Chemical analysis was used to identify causative compounds as well as for point  source  confirmation.  Preliminary  results  have  identified  at  least  11  sites  that  have  estrogenic  (or  anti‐ androgenic)  EDCs.  Analysis  with  the  AR‐,  PR‐,  and  GR‐CALUX  assays  is  currently  underway.  Chemical  analysis  has  confirmed  estrogen  mimics  (such  as  bisphenol  A,  t‐octylphenol),  the  pesticide  atrazine,  an  industrial  compound  tris(2‐carboxyethyl)phosphine  (TCEP),  and  numerous  pharmaceuticals  and  personal  care products (e.g., atenolol, dilantin, triclosan, carbamazepine, ibuprofen). Hormone analysis is currently  underway.  Based  on  in  vitro  and  chemical  data,  several  stock  solutions  representative  of  a  selection  of  exposure  concentrations  found  in  the  environment  will  be  created  for  in  vivo  laboratory  fish  exposures  using  a  native  species  (rainbowfish,  Melanotaenia  fluviatilis)  and  a  widespread  exotic  pest  species 

(mosquitofish,  Gambusia  holbrooki)  in  stage  2.  An  estrogenic  biomarker  (vitellogenin)  and  an  androgenic  biomarker  (in  development)  will  be  used  to  assess  whole  organism  endocrine  disruption.  The  same  endpoints  will  be  utilized  with  in  situ  techniques  by  sampling  fish  from  polluted  aquatic  environments  identified  in  stage  1  to  assess  the  amount  of  endocrine  disruption  present  in  the  most  impacted  natural  aquatic  environments.  Finally,  in  stage  3,  a  risk  assessment  will  be  generated  using  in  vitro,  chemical,  in 

vivo, and in situ data to assess the potential risk to aquatic ecosystem health. 

Keywords: bioassay‐directed analysis, integrated testing strategy, in vitroin vivoin situ 

SETAC Australasia Brisbane 2012 Conference  Page | 55  

Session 6 (Thu PM, 14‐212)  Environmental Monitoring 

Session 6.7 (Thurs, 14‐212, 13:40‐14:00) 

The differential effects of anthropogenic nutrient enrichment and  contamination on estuarine communities 

Katherine A. Dafforn

1

*, Brendan P. Kelaher

2

, Stuart L. Simpson

3

, Valeriya 

Komyakova

1

, James Lavender

1

 and Emma L. Johnston

1

Evolution and Ecology Research Centre, School of Biological, Earth and Environmental 

Sciences, University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW, Australia; 

2

School of the 

Environment, University of Technology, PO box 123, Broadway, NSW, Australia; 

3

CSIRO Land  and Water, Locked Bag 2007, Kirrawee, NSW, Australia 

*presenting author 

Abstract:  Estuaries  are  diverse  and  productive  ecosystems  that  are  subject  to  high  levels  of  disturbance from multiple human stressors.  Chemical contaminants and nutrients from urban  and industrial activities are released into estuaries and accumulate in benthic sediments where  they may impact biota. To assess the ecological health of benthic communities, the common  chemical contaminant stressors are usually targeted (e.g. the metals, PAHs and pesticides with  guideline  values),  but  fewer  studies  consider  the  influence  of  nutrient  enrichment  as  well  as  contaminants.  To  develop  targeted  sampling  programs,  it  is  important  to  compare  the  ecological  relevance  of  different  stressors  to  distinguish  meaningful  anthropogenic  impacts. 

For five heavily modified and five relatively ‘pristine’ estuaries, seven sites were sampled in the  sheltered  lower  estuary  region.    Benthic  sediments  were  collected  from  5  m  depth  and  sub‐ sampled  for  anthropogenic  contaminants  (metals  and  PAHs)  and  indicators  of  nutrient  enrichment (Chl‐a, N, P, TOC). The differing ability of these anthropogenic measures to explain  the  variances  observed  in  infaunal  invertebrate  communities  was  compared.  Multivariate  analyses  were  used  to  contrast  the  relationships  between  anthropogenic  stressors 

(contamination  and  nutrient  enrichment)  and  ecological  measures  (infauna)  with  the  aim  to  distinguish important drivers of impacts.  The results have implications for future management  practices  in  estuaries  and  increase  our  understanding  of  the  relative  impacts  on  benthic  estuarine communities of nutrients from terrestrial run‐off and contamination from industrial  practices. 

 

Keywords: estuary; infauna; metals; PAHs; sediments 

 

Page | 56  SETAC Australasia Brisbane 2012 Conference 

 

Session 6 (Thu PM, 14‐212)  Environmental Monitoring 

Session 6.8 (Thurs, 14‐212, 14:00‐14:20) 

Changes in prokaryote and eukaryote assemblages along a gradient of  hydrocarbon contamination in groundwater 

S Stephenson

1,2

*, AA Chariton

2

 

, MP Holley

1

, M O’Sullivan

3

, MR Gillings

1

, and 

GC Hose

1,4

 

 

1

Department of Biological Sciences, Macquarie University, NSW 2109, Australia; 

2

Centre for 

Environmental Contaminants Research, CSIRO Land and Water, Locked Bag 2007, Kirrawee 

NSW 2232, Australia; 

3

Mathematics, Informatics and Statistics, CSIRO, Locked Bag 17, North 

Ryde, NSW 1670, Australia; 

4

Department of Environment and Geography, Macquarie 

University, NSW 2109, Australia 

*presenting author 

Abstract: Groundwater biota  are particularly sensitive to environmental perturbations such as  groundwater  contamination.  The  diversity  of  prokaryotic  and  eukaryotic  biota  have  been  examined  along  a  gradient  of  chlorinated  hydrocarbon  (CHC)  contamination  in  the  Botany 

Sands, an urban coastal sand‐bed aquifer (Sydney, Australia). Molecular techniques were used  to analyse the richness and composition of prokaryote and eukaryote assemblages using 16S  and 18S rDNA, respectively. Biotic richness did not change significantly along the gradient for  either prokaryotes or eukaryotes, however, significant shifts in assemblage composition were  evident for both groups. 

Assemblage  changes  were  most  strongly  correlated  with  concentrations  of  CHC,  cis‐1,2‐ dichloroethene,  however,  the  large  number  of  correlative  relationships  between  the  contaminants  and  the  compositions  of  the  prokaryotic  and  eukaryotic  assemblages  made  it  difficult  to  infer  that  the  observed  effects  were  due  to  any  particular  contaminant(s).  The  current  focus  of  management  of  the  Botany  aquifer  is  to  protect  adjoining  estuarine  ecosystems is clearly justified given the changes in groundwater biota as a likely consequence  of the contamination. 

Keywords: aquifer, organics, molecular tools 

 

SETAC Australasia Brisbane 2012 Conference  Page | 57  

Session 6 (Thu PM, 14‐212)  Environmental Monitoring 

Session 6.9 (Thurs, 14‐212, 14:20‐14:40) 

Surfactant facilitated transport of super‐hydrophobic contaminants:  polymer based methods to investigate partitioning to monomers and  micelles 

Sharon Grant*, C. Alexander Villa, Beate Escher and Caroline Gaus 

University of Queensland, Entox, 39 Kessels Road, Coopers Plains, Qld, Australia 

*presenting author 

Abstract:  Super‐hydrophobic  organic  contaminants  (SHOCs)  can  partition  to  surfactants  and  thus  be  mobilised  with  soil‐water.  This  may  result  in  unexpected  groundwater  contamination  and  associated offsite transfer, posing risks for environmental and human exposure to toxic compounds. 

To  predict  surfactant  facilitated  transport  of  SHOCs,  and  thereby  assess  potential  exposure  risks,  partitioning behavior between soil‐water and surfactant phases must be understood and quantified. 

Empirical determination of partitioning coefficients is, however, challenging for SHOCs and because  surfactants  are  dissolved,  classical  separation  based  approaches  to  determine  these  coefficients  cannot be used. 

This study aimed to adapt and validate a novel approach to determine SHOC partition coefficients to  surfactant monomers (K

MO

) and micelles (K

MI

), by measuring depletion of SHOC‐loaded polymers to  surfactant  solutions.  A  model  surfactant,  sodium  dodecyl  sulfate  (SDS),  and  five  polychlorinated  dibenzo‐p‐dioxins (PCDDs) covering a range of hydrophobicities (octanol‐water partition coefficient 

K

OW

10

6.9

–10

8.3

) were used. The polymer poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) was selected as preliminary  experiments indicated that SDS does not sorb (in)to it. 

For the least hydrophobic PCDDs, partitioning to monomers (K

MO

 ~10

4.0

 L/kg for 2,3,7,8‐TCDD and 

1,2,3,7,8‐PnCDD) was lower than to micelles (K

MI

 ~10

5.7

 L/kg,) by a factor of fifty. SDS‐water partition  coefficients  have  not  been  reported  previously  for  PCDDs;  however,  K

MI

  values  are  comparable  to  those  reported  for  polychlorinated  biphenyls  of  similar  hydrophobicity.  For  the  more  hydrophobic 

PCDDs,  however,  robust  determination  of  K

MO

  and  K

MI

  was  not  possible  due  to  relatively  high  replicate variability resulting from inconsistencies in the PDMS loading method and slow kinetics of  equilibration. Subsequent experiments indicate that PCDD loading in solvents that swell PDMS can  improve reproducibility. 

The initial results from these experiments suggest high transport potential of PCDDs with surfactant  monomers  and  micelles;  overall,  the  PDMS‐based  method  represents  a  feasible  approach  to  understand  such  processes,  and  has  the  potential  to  provide  a  simple,  cost‐effective  and  robust  method for quantifying partitioning of SHOCs in surfactant‐water systems. 

Keywords:  absorption; polychlorinated dibenzo‐p‐dioxins; PDMS; sodium dodecyl sulfate; soil

 

Page | 58  SETAC Australasia Brisbane 2012 Conference 

 

Session 6 (Thu PM, 14‐212)  Environmental Monitoring 

Session 6.10 (Thurs, 14‐212, 14:40‐15:00) 

A novel biological method for monitoring herbicides 

Rebecca Herron

1

*, Perceval Depresle

1

, Simon Mitrovic

1

, Rajesh Prasad

2

Satish Choy

2

, Ben Kefford

1

 

 

1

Centre for Environmental Sustainability, University of Technology, Sydney, Australia; 

2

Department of Environment and Resource Management, Brisbane, Australia 

*presenting author 

Abstract: Herbicides are a common pollutant of aquatic ecosystems, leading to the exposure  of  non‐target  organisms.  Photosynthetic  organisms  such  as  benthic  algae  are  at  high  risk  of  toxic impacts from herbicides, especially photosystem II inhibitors, which have been identified  as  a  pollutant  of  concern  in  the  Great  Barrier  Reef  (GBR)  catchments.  Agricultural  land  use  covers more than 75% of the GBR catchments and extensive pesticide usage in agriculture has  been linked to the herbicide contamination of various waterways flowing to the GBR. Despite  the  importance  of  benthic  algae  as  primary  producers  and  their  potential  to  be  used  as  a  bioindicator,  there  have  been  few  studies  on  their  sensitivity  to  herbicides.  This  study  will  address  the  current  knowledge  gap,  by  examining  the  sensitivity  of  diatoms  to  herbicide  exposure  through  rapid  toxicity  testing.  We  will  present  new  data  showing  the  sensitivity  of  diatom communities from north Queensland to the herbicides: Atrazine, Diuron, Hexazinone, 

Simazine, Tebuthiuron, MCPA and Glyphosate. The sensitivity data presented will be used to  establish  a  new  trait‐based  biomonitoring  index,  the  SPEcies  At  Risk  (SPEAR)  index,  which  uses  this  toxicity  data  to  determine  the  fraction  of  the  abundance  of  sensitive  taxa  in  a  community.  Trait‐based  biomonitoring  indices  have  the  advantage  of  being  stressor  specific  and  have  been  shown  to  be  effective  at  determining  pesticide  toxicity  with  macroinvertebrates. There is currently no routine biological monitoring taking place in the GBR  catchments,  despite  concentrations  of  herbicides  over  the  recommended  trigger  values  for  ecological  protection  regularly  being  detected.  The  results  of  this  project  to  date  will  be  assessed in terms of developing a new trait‐based SPEAR index, using diatoms as an indicator  that  will  provide  a  cost  effective  and  ecologically  relevant  method  for  the  detection  and  assessment of herbicide impacts in rivers flowing into the GBR. 

Keywords: diatoms; toxicity; benthic algae; pesticide; streams 

 

SETAC Australasia Brisbane 2012 Conference  Page | 59  

Session 6 (Thu PM, 14‐212)  Environmental Monitoring 

Session 6.11 (Thurs, 14‐212, 15:40‐16:00) 

Detection of cyanotoxins in New Zealand benthic cyanobacteria 

Francine Smith

1

*, Susie Wood

2,3

, Paul Broady

1

, Sally Gaw

1

, Wendy 

Williamson

4

, John Blunt

1

 and Murray Munro

1

 

1

University of Canterbury, Private Bag 4800, Christchurch, New Zealand; 

2

Cawthron Institute, 

Private Bag 2, Nelson, New Zealand; 

3

University of Waikato, Private Bag 3015, Hamilton, New 

Zealand; 

4

Environmental Science and Research Ltd, P O Box 29‐181, Christchurch, New 

Zealand 

*presenting author 

Abstract:  Toxic  cyanobacteria  can  be  a  health  hazard  in  water  bodies  used  for  recreational  activities  and  drinking  water.  Planktonic  cyanotoxin  poisoning  events  are  well‐documented. 

More recently, benthic cyanobacteria have also been associated with bird and dog fatalities. In 

New  Zealand,  little  is  known  about  the  distribution  and  potential  risk  that  benthic  cyanobacteria  pose  to  human  health.  Benthic  cyanobacteria  were  sampled  from  33  lakes  or  reservoirs  and  7  rivers  or  streams  in  the  South  Island  (New  Zealand).  Thirty‐five  strains  were  isolated into culture and identified based on morphology and molecular genetic analysis (16S  rRNA).  These  cultures  included  14  Nostocales,  30  Oscillatoriales  and  1  Chroococcales.  Ten 

Phormidium  strains  were  isolated  from  a  single  sample  of  a  mat  to  assess  diversity  and  cyanotoxin production within a single sample. All strains were screened for genes involved in  the  biosynthesis  of  common  cyanotoxins.  Positive  results  were  confirmed  and  cyanotoxin  concentrations quantified using biochemical and physicochemical techniques. 

No genes involved in the production of cylindrospermopsins, microcystins, or nodularins were  identified.  Genes  associated  with  anatoxin‐a/homoanatoxin‐a  biosynthesis  were  identified  in  nine  Phormidium  strains  isolated  from  the  single  mat  sample.  Anatoxin‐a  concentrations  in  these strains ranged between 0.3 and 6.4 mg kg

‐1

. These variable results may explain the wide  range  in  anatoxin‐a  concentrations  previously  measured  in  environmental  samples  in  New 

Zealand.  One  strain  also  produced  homoanatoxin‐a  (1 mg  kg

‐1

).  Five  strains  of  Scytonema  cf. 

crispum contained a saxitoxin biosynthesis gene. These strains tested positive for saxitoxin and  saxitoxin analogues including gonyautoxins, neosaxitoxin and decarbamoyl derivatives. This is  the  first  identification  of  these  compounds  in  New  Zealand  cyanobacterial  strains. 

Identification of toxic benthic cyanobacteria from water bodies used for recreation and a pre‐ treatment  drinking  water  reservoir,  highlights  the  risk  benthic  cyanobacteria  pose  to  human  and  animal  health.  Cyanobacterial  monitoring  programmes  should  include  sampling  and  assessments of benthic environments. 

Keywords: anatoxin‐a; lakes, rivers, saxitoxins   

Page | 60  SETAC Australasia Brisbane 2012 Conference 

 

Session 6 (Thu PM, 14‐212)  Environmental Monitoring 

Session 6.12 (Thurs, 14‐212, 16:00‐16:20) 

Study of municipal solid waste landfields impacts on terrestrial habitats 

(case study: Gilan province) 

Shaghayegh Jafari

1

*, Masoud Monavari

2

  

 

1

Science and Research Branch, Azad University, Tehran, Tehran, Iran; 

2

Shaghayegh Jafari, 9 

Adnamira Cl, Wyoming, NSW, Australia 

*presenting author 

Abstract:  The population growth in Gilan province has brought about increasing solid waste in  spite of having very small area, this country enjoys ecologic features (being neighbors of mount  and  sea)  and  due  to  different  land  usages  it  has  faced  with  the  problem  of  the  shortage  of  appropriate place for landfills of solid wastes. 

At  present  time  many  landfills  of  urban  solid  wastes  are  evacuated  in  sensitive  ecological  terrestrial places like protected areas and wildlife sanctuaries that the result of such unhygienic  burial is the destruction of terrestrial ecosystem. 

The method used in this research is Monavari method ,which is based on the influences of the  landfills of solid wastes on the biological environment, and also broaden the landfills’ effects on  terrestrial ecosystems was specified by using the software GIS. 

According to the studies performed from thirteen landfills located in terrestrial ecosystem, just  three  landfill  had  the  acceptable  conditions  which  were  about  23.07  %  and  the  rest  of  them  were in the bad and unacceptable conditions, and there must be a fast move to transfer or to  close these places up. 

Keywords: leachate; Monavari method; protected area; terrestrial ecosystem 

 

SETAC Australasia Brisbane 2012 Conference  Page | 61  

Session 6 (Thu PM, 14‐212)  Environmental Monitoring 

Session 6.13 (Thurs, 14‐212, 16:20‐16:40) 

Historical inputs and mobilization pathways of selenium in Lake 

Macquarie 

Larissa Schneider

1

*, Bill Maher

1

, Frank Krikowa

1

, Jaimie Potts

2

, Bernd Gruber

1

  and Anthony Chariton

3

 

1

University of Canberra, Kirinari St. Bruce.  Canberra, ACT, Australia; 

2

NSW Office of 

Environment and Heritage. 59‐61 Goulburn Street, Sydney South. NSW. Australia; 

3

CSIRO 

Land and Water. New Illawarra Road. Lucas Heights, NSW, Australia. 

*presenting author 

Abstract:  Release  of  trace  elements,  especially  selenium,  from  coal  power  plant  fly  ash  is  of  concern due to the potential for environmental contamination and accumulation in food webs.  

Lake Macquarie has two power stations located on its shore and has been contaminated with  selenium  (Se),  cadmium  (Cd),  lead  (Pb)  and  zinc  (Zn).    The  presence  of  these  elements  is  a  direct  result  of  runoff  from  nearby  coal  power  plant  fly  ash.    This  project  investigated  the  history of trace metal contamination in sediments in Lake Macquarie using Pb210 analysis to  evaluate  whether  selenium  concentrations  have  decreased  after  improved  fly‐ash  handling  procedures  have  been  implemented  at  the  power  stations.  Selenium  accumulation  and  biomagnification  in  the  seagrass  food  webs  were  examined  by  using  C  and  N  isotopes  to  establish  food  chains.  As  well  the  volatilization  of  selenium  from  sediments  was  measured.  

This work clarifies the current and historical inputs of selenium and characterizes how selenium  may be lost from sediments by volatilization or remobilization into marine food webs.  

Keywords: Pb

210

 dating; carbon isotopes; nitrogen isotopes; biomagnifications 

Page | 62  SETAC Australasia Brisbane 2012 Conference 

 

Session 6 (Thu PM, 14‐212)  Environmental Monitoring 

Session 6.14 (Thurs, 14‐212, 16:40‐17:00) 

Hydrophobic pH‐partitioning model to investigate the sorption of  sulfamethoxazole in New Zealand dairy farm soils 

Prakash Srinivasan

1,2

, Ajit K Sarmah

3

* and Merilyn Manly‐Harris

2

 

1

Landcare Research, Private Bag 3127, Hamilton, New Zealand; 

2

Chemistry Department, 

Waikato University, Private Bag 3105, Hamilton, New Zealand; 

3

Department of Civil & 

Environmental Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, The University of Auckland, Private Bag 

92019, Auckland, New Zealand 

*presenting author 

 

Abstract:    Batch  sorption  studies  were  conducted  to  investigate  the  effect  of  pH  on  the  sorption  of  sulfamethoxazole  antibiotic  to  three  soils  representative  of  New  Zealand  dairy  farming regions. The organic carbon content for the three soils under study ranged from 2.1%  to 8.2% and the mediator solution (CaCl

2

) pH ranged from 2‐8.5. The sorption isotherms were  best  described  by  a  modified  Freundlich  model  (0.98  ≤  R

2

  ≤  1.0).  In  general,  all  isotherms  observed  for  Matawhero  and  Horotiu  soils  over  the  pH  range  studied  were  found  to  be  non‐ linear, with N values ranging anywhere from 0.83–0.94 and, > unity (at pH 5.5) for Matawhero  soil, and 0.82–0.96 in case of Horotiu soil. However, for Te Kowhai soil deviation from linearity  was less as evident in the obtained N values which were close to unity, except at pH 2, 3 and 

6.75.  A  hydrophobic  pH‐partitioning  model  linking  sorbate  speciation  with  species‐specific  sorption coefficients describing the pH dependence of the apparent sorption coefficients was  used to derive the fraction of each species of sulfamethoxazole that are likely to be present in  the  environment.  All  three  soils  displayed  a  decrease  in  sorption  when  the  pH  was  increased  and SMO sorption was the highest at pH 2 for all the three soils. An increase in pH from 2 to 8.5  for Matawhero soil resulted in more than one magnitude lower (from 5.84 to 0.4) K f

 values for  sulfamethoxazole.  The  increased  sulfamethoxazole  sorption  with  decreasing  pH  can  be  explained by the formation of positively charged sulfamethoxazole cations, which are electro  statically attracted to negatively charged soils surfaces. The cationic form of sulfamethoxazole  appeared  to  sorb  more  close  to  pH ≥  pK a1

  and,  when  pH ≥  pK a2

  (6.5,  7.5  and  8.5)  the  anionic  species seems to dominate, however, its sorption affinity to all soils was low. 

 

Keywords: pasture soil, pH‐partitioning; sulfonamides; speciation; veterinary antibiotics 

 

SETAC Australasia Brisbane 2012 Conference  Page | 63  

 

Session 7 (Thu AM, 14‐116)  Risk Assessment and Environmental Guidelines 

Session 7.1 (Thurs, 14‐116, 9:55‐10:25) [Session Highlight] 

Improving radiological protection of the environment in Australasia 

Ross Jeffree 

 School of the Environment, C3, Faculty of Science, University of Technology, Sydney, PO Box 

123, Broadway, NSW, Australia 

Abstract:  This  presentation  will  give  an  overview  of  the  philosophy  and  science  of  environmental  protection  from  radionuclides,  as  currently  proposed  by  the  International 

Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP).  Fundamental to the ICRP’s advice has been the  selection and recommendation of a set of Reference Animals and Plants (RAPS) with which to  estimate  radiological  exposure,  dose  and  ecological  consequences.  This  process  is  supported  by  data  on  environmental  transfer  factors  and  radiological  impacts  for  various  naturally  occurring  and  artificial  radionuclides,  as  well  as  the  provision  of  assessment  tools.  It  is  acknowledged that there are limitations in international applicability due to most data being of 

European and North America origin and also limited in phylogenetic scope and coverage of life  stages. However, the conceptual framework is pragmatic and a valuable beginning. The IAEA  has recently coordinated international efforts to address some of these shortcomings and the  work  and  conclusions  of  the  EMRAS  (Environmental  Modelling  for  Radiation  Safety  II 

Reference  Approaches  for  Biota  Assessment)  will  be  summarized.  With  regard  to  the 

Australian context the guidance provided by the Australian Radiation Protection and Nuclear 

Safety Agency (ARPANSA) will also be summarized.  Its recommendations for future research  to improve our ability to more accurately assess radiological risk to Australian biota highlights  the  need  to  identify  appropriate  Australian  RAPS.  The  scale  of  the  existing  uncertainties  in  marine radioprotection will be illustrated with results of an experimental program conducted at  the IAEA Marine Radioecology Laboratory in Monaco. 

 

Keywords: biota; protection; radioactivity; radiological risk  

 

Page | 64  SETAC Australasia Brisbane 2012 Conference 

 

Session 7 (Thu AM, 14‐116)  Risk Assessment and Environmental Guidelines 

Session 7.2 (Thurs, 14‐116, 10:25‐10:45) 

Updating water quality guidelines for uranium – Standardising measures  of toxicity and incorporating the influence of dissolved organic carbon 

Rick van Dam

1

*, Andrew Harford

1

, Melanie Trenfield 1 , Scott Markich 2 , Chris 

Humphrey 1 , Alicia Hogan 1  and Jenny Stauber 3  

1

Environmental Research Institute of the Supervising Scientist, GPO Box 461, Darwin, NT, 

0801, Australia; 

2

Aquatic Solutions International, 5 Perry St, Dundas Valley, NSW, 2117, 

Australia; 

3

CSIRO Land and Water, Locked Bag 2007, Kirrawee, NSW, 2232, Australia 

*presenting author 

Abstract:  Uranium  (U)  chronic  toxicity  data  for  freshwater  species  published  over  the  past  decade should enable the derivation of more reliable water quality guidelines. However, there  has been little consistency in the reporting of no/low effect toxicity measures, with at least five  types of measures (NOECs, LOECs, BEC10s, MDECs, low ECxs) reported for U in the literature. 

While  some  jurisdictions  allow  the  use  of  multiple  types  of  toxicity  measures  for  deriving  guidelines,  standardisation  of  data  is  clearly  preferred.  Moreover,  to  date  there  has  been  no  attempt  to  quantitatively  incorporate  the  influence  of  key  physico‐chemical  variables  on  U  toxicity into guideline derivation.  

Forty six existing toxicity datasets for four freshwater species were re‐analysed to derive IC10  and  IC50  values,  and  to  explore  relationships  between  U  toxicity  and  key  physico‐chemical  variables. Dissolved  organic  carbon  (DOC)  was the  best  predictor  of  U  toxicity based  on  IC10  and IC50 values, with water hardness also being a significant co‐predictor (with DOC) of IC50  concentrations.  The  influence  of  DOC  on  U  toxicity  was  further  characterised  using  existing  data for five species, and was found to vary depending on species, DOC source and exposure  duration.  The  slopes  of  the  relationships  between  DOC  and  (normalised)  U  toxicity  were  modelled  using  cumulative  probability  distributions  to  derive  a  slope  for  which  U  toxicity  or  guideline  values  may  be  corrected,  based  on  the  DOC  concentration.  Values  for  the  5 th

  percentiles  of  the  cumulative  probability  distributions  for  acute  and  chronic  exposure  data  corresponded  to  6.4%  and  9.0%  reductions  in  U  toxicity  per  mg/L  of  DOC,  respectively. 

Algorithms  were  developed  to enable  the  adjustment  of U  toxicity  or water  quality  guideline  values depending upon DOC concentrations. The above information and additional published  data  on  U  chronic  toxicity  will  be  used  to  revise  the  Magela  Creek  site‐specific  and 

Australia/New Zealand water quality guidelines for U. 

Keywords: ecotoxicology, hazard estimates, risk assessment, site‐specific 

SETAC Australasia Brisbane 2012 Conference  Page | 65  

 

Session 7 (Thu AM, 14‐116)  Risk Assessment and Environmental Guidelines 

Session 7.3 (Thurs, 14‐116, 10:45‐11:05) 

Consideration of metal bioavailability is essential for managing metal  contaminated sediments: a case study of antifouling paint 

Stuart Simspon and David Spadaro* 

CSIRO Land and Water, Locked Bag 2007, Kirrawee NSW 2232, Australia 

*presenting author 

Abstract:  Although  now  well  embedded  within  the  risk‐based  sediment  quality  guidelines  framework,  contaminant  bioavailability  is  still  often  overlooked  in  assessment  and  management of contaminated sediments. This is partly due to some limitations of the existing  approaches. For example, porewater analyses only provide snap‐shots of concentrations that  change rapidly upon sediment disturbance, and binding of metals by acid‐volatile sulfide varies  considerably  in  environments  where  oxygen  penetrates,  e.g.  surface  sediments  and  burrows  created  by  benthic  organisms.    However,  in  many  situations  such  measurements  greatly  improve the assessment outcomes. 

In this presentation we consider a case of sediments contaminated with particles of antifouling  paints; sparing soluble solids. This is particularly an issue for fish aquaculture industry that use  painted  nets  to  for  antifouling  and  to  increase  the  rigidity.    Sediments  with  copper  concentrations  greatly  exceeding  guidelines  frequently  occur  within  leases  or  locations  with  high  net  handing.    We  demonstrate  that  copper  present  in  antifouling  paint  particles  within  sediments  is  significantly  less  bioavailable  than  copper  that  has  originated  from  aqueous  sources.  However,  transformations  of  paint‐associated  copper  into  more  bioavailable  forms  may occur and potentially cause toxicity to benthic invertebrates. 

The impairment of ecosystem health due to elevated metal concentrations is dictated not by  the  total  metal  concentration,  but  by  the  concentration  of  bioavailable  metals  in  the  sediments.    For  the  purposes  of  managing  the  risks  posed  by  sediments  contaminated  with  copper‐based  anti‐fouling  paints,  it  is  necessary  to  determine  which  measure  of  metal  bioavailability  is  the  best  for  assessment  and  monitoring  purposes.    Using  chronic  responses  and  bioaccumulation  of  benthic  invertebrates  we  demonstrate  that  the  most  suitable  management  approach  is  to  use  the  simple  measure  of  dilute  acid‐extractable  copper.    We  describe how management‐specific guideline values can be developed using this approach and  compare these to existing guidelines and other possible approaches. 

 

Keywords: sediment quality guidelines, chronic toxicity, bioaccumulation, copper‐based  paints, aquaculture 

 

Page | 66  SETAC Australasia Brisbane 2012 Conference 

 

Session 7 (Thu AM, 14‐116)  Risk Assessment and Environmental Guidelines 

Session 7.4 (Thurs, 14‐116, 11:40‐12:00) 

Appropriateness of the ANZECC sulphate stock water quality guideline for  cattle 

Tarah Hagen* and Roger Drew 

Toxikos Pty Ltd, Suite 62/63 Turner Street, Port Melbourne, Vic, Australia 

*presenting author 

Abstract: The current ANZECC stock watering guideline for sulphates is 1,000 mg/L but is based on  limited information and supporting documentation. A literature review on the effects and mode of  toxicological action of sulphates in cattle was undertaken to determine dose response relationships,  and  hence  the  appropriateness  of  the  existing  guideline.  There  are  many  published  instances  of  adverse effects arising from dietary sulphur with or without concomitant intake of water containing  sulphate. Depending on dose and timing of exposure the effects include diarrhoea, loss of condition, 

CNS  effects  and  death.    Consequently  a  sulphate  water  guideline  requires  consideration  of  total  sulphur intake. However identifying thresholds at which effects occur, and apportionment to water  is  complicated  because  many  investigations  only  consider  a  few  factors  that  influence  sulphur  toxicity.  

Observations from the dose‐response relationship are: 

Sulphate in water (≥1,200 mg/L) or sulphur in feed (>0.3% dry wt) can cause loss of condition  depending on physiological/nutritional status. 

Acute effects (diarrhoea) can occur when naive cattle are introduced to water containing >1,500  mg/L  sulphate.  Symptoms  subside  as  gastrointestinal  microflora  adjust  to  the  increased  sulphate  load,  providing  the  overall  dose  is  not  large  enough  to  produce  neurological  symptoms.  

Acute  high  intake  of  dietary  sulphur  (>0.6%  dry  wt),  or  high  sulphate  water  (3,500  mg/L),  or  chronic  intake  of  moderate  sulphate  in  water  (~  2,200  mg/L)  with  moderate  sulphur  diet 

(~0.35%) can cause neurological effects (polioencephalomalacia) and death.  

The above are not ‘bright line’ cut‐offs; effects may result from various combinations of water and  dietary sulphur.   

We conclude the current sulphate stock water guideline (1,000 mg/L), depending on overall exposure  circumstances, is close to a low effect level for non‐severe effects (decreased productivity) for cattle. 

Nonetheless it is a reasonable screening value for gauging the probability of adverse health effects if  cognisance is also given to total sulphur intake.  

Keywords: cattle; condition; diarrhoea; polioencephalomalacia; sulphur  

SETAC Australasia Brisbane 2012 Conference  Page | 67  

 

Session 7 (Thu AM, 14‐116)  Risk Assessment and Environmental Guidelines 

Session 7.5 (Thurs, 14‐116, 12:00‐12:20) 

Metal and metalloid contaminant bioaccessibility reliability and prediction 

Raijeli Taga

1

*, Jack Ng

1

, Hugh Harris

2

 Jade Aitken

3

, Jiajia Zheng

4

, Trang 

Huynh

4

 and Barry Noller

4

 

1

The University of Queensland, National Research Centre for Environmental Toxicology, 

Coopers Plains, 4008 Australia; 

2

Adelaide, SA, Australia; 

3

School of  Chemistry and Physics, University of Adelaide, 

ANBF, KEK, Tsukuba, Ibaraki, Japan; 

4

The University of Queensland, 

Centre for Mined Land Rehabilitation (CMLR), Brisbane, 4072 Australia 

*presenting author 

Abstract:  The  Australian  National  Environment  Protection  Measure  (NEPM)  guidelines  give  advice  on  how  to  deal  with  soil  contamination.  NEPM  recommends  further  assessment  if  elevated metal or metalloid concentrations such as lead, arsenic and cadmium in contaminated  soils  exceed  the  Health  Investigation  Levels  (HIL)  which  may  imply  potential  adverse  health  implications. In the absence of site specific data, bioavailability is usually assumed to be 100%  for risk assessment purposes. A risk assessment was conducted on metal and metalloid levels  in surface soils representing different categories of mine wastes using the following tools: (i) in‐ vivo  (animal)  bioavailability  measurement  of  composite  wastes;  and  (ii)  the  in‐vitro  PBET 

(physiologically based extraction test) determination of bioaccessibility of individual soils. The  in‐vitro  PBET  to  determine  the  bioaccessibility  of  individual  soils  is  more  practical  than  absolute  bioavailability  measurement  via  animal  uptake  which  is  more  expensive  and  time  consuming.  The  bioaccessibility  approach  provides  a  practical and  effective  means  to  predict  metal  and  metalloid  contaminant  bioavailability  for  risk  assessment  of  rehabilitated  mined  land and to develop site specific guidelines. This study compared different techniques for the  measurement of bioaccessibility for lead, arsenic and cadmium, copper and zinc to identify if  there  were  any  marked  differences.  In  addition,  techniques  to  give  a  prediction  of  bioaccessibility were explored accounting for chemical properties. Synchrotron‐induced X‐ray  absorption  spectroscopy  was  used  to  determine  contributions  of  chemical  species  to  bioaccessibility based on percent composition from XANES analysis. Such approaches provide  the means to make bioaccessibility a more robust measure of human health risk for metals and  metalloids. 

 

Keywords: bioavailability; chemical speciation; human health; rehabilitation; risk assessment 

 

Page | 68  SETAC Australasia Brisbane 2012 Conference 

 

Session 7 (Thu AM, 14‐116)  Risk Assessment and Environmental Guidelines 

Session 7.6 (Thurs, 14‐116, 12:20‐12:40) 

The derivation and implementation of an EQS for NICKEL: The application  of a bioavailability‐based approach in Europe 

Graham Merrington

1  and Christian E. Schlekat

2*

 

1

Wca Environment, Brunel House, Volunteer Way, Faringdon, Oxfordshire, SN7 7YR, UK; 

2

Nickel Producers Environmental Research Association, Inc. 2525 Meridian Parkway, Suite 

240, Durham, NC 27713 USA 

*presenting author 

Abstract: The Water Framework Directive requires European Union countries to ensure that all  inland waters achieve ‘good’ water quality status by 2015. This will be achieved through a range  of measures, including the use of environmental quality standards (EQS) for chemicals in the  water column.  

Nickel  is  included  in  the  list  of  chemicals  for  which  an  EQS  must  be  set.  Metals  can  present  some unique regulatory challenges in relation to the derivation and practical implementation  of  an  aquatic  EQS.  These  challenges  are  due  to  fact  that  metals  are  naturally  occurring  and  that  their  ecotoxicological  potency  is  a  function  of  physico‐chemical  parameters  like  pH,  concentrations of major cations and dissolved organic carbon, which exhibit substantial natural  spatial variability.   

Nickel  has  the  most  comprehensive  dataset  used  for  deriving  an  EQS,  including  193  chronic  laboratory  toxicity  tests,  a  4‐month  mesocosm  study  and  a  field  data  set.  An  integrated  chronic  biotic  ligand  model  (BLM)  has  also  been  developed  to  take  account  of  the  effects  of  nickel in freshwaters.  

This presentation describes the EU accepted methodology for deriving an EQS bioavailable

 that is  applicable across all European waters. This methodology uses the BLM to derive a value that is  protective  of  95%  of  waters  under  the  most  sensitive  physico‐chemical  conditions.  The  implementation of the EQS bioavailable

 is through the use of a tiered, risk‐based approach using a  user‐friendly  BLM  as  an  early  tier.  This  user‐friendly  BLM  has  been  developed  to  fit  with  regulatory  needs  for  compliance  assessment  and  classification.  Data  needs  for  validating  the  currently available Ni bioavailability models for the geochemical and ecological specificities of 

Australian waters will be discussed. 

Keywords: nickel, environmental guidelines, bioavailability, BLM, freshwater 

SETAC Australasia Brisbane 2012 Conference  Page | 69  

Session 7 (Thu PM, 14‐116)  Risk Assessment and Environmental Guidelines 

Session 7.7 (Thurs, 14‐116, 13:40‐14:00) 

Health risk due to use of the organophosphate insecticide,  chlorpyrifos, by rice farmers in Vietnam 

Des Connell*, Dung Tri Phung and Greg Miller 

Griffith School of Environment, Griffith University, QLD 4111 

*presenting author 

Abstract:  In  common  with  other  developing  countries  Vietnamese  farmers  use  back‐pack  reservoirs  with  hand  pumps  to  apply  chlorpyrifos  pesticide  resulting  in  high  exposure. 

Hospitalisation  and  a  range  of  adverse  effects  are  currently  observed  in  Vietnam  and  other  developing countries. 

The  objective  of  this  study  was  to  evaluate  the  health  risk  of  chlorpyrifos  exposure  with  a  typical  group  of  rice  farmers  in  Vietnam,  using  a  probabilistic  approach  for  exposure  assessment, dose‐response and risk characterisation. 

Biological  monitoring  was  used  to  estimate  chlorpyrifos  exposure  during  application.  Urine  samples  were  collected  from  1  day  prior  to  application  to  over  5  days  post‐application,  and  then analysed for TCP, the main metabolite of chlorpyrifos. TCP levels were converted into an  absorbed daily dose (ADD) of chlorpyrifos for each farmer. The health risk for the rice farmers  was characterised by comparing exposure doses (ADD) with acute and chronic guideline doses  for chlorpyrifos and a new human health dose‐response evaluation. 

Post‐application  chlorpyrifos  ADD  of  farmers  was  about  80‐fold  higher  than  the  baseline  exposure  level.  In  comparison  with  acute  guideline  the  post‐application  exposure  among  the  rice  farmers  was  over  2  times  higher  than  the  acute  MRL  of  chlorpyrifos  recommended  by 

ATSDR and 1.5 times higher than that of US EPA, The 95 th

 percentile for the ADD values of the  farmers exceeded the acute dose guidelines by a factor of 10 or more. 

This  case  study  in  Vietnam  has  shown  that  rice  farmers  are  at  a  high  risk  of  chlorpyrifos  exposure and resultant adverse health effects, mostly neurotoxicity. 

 

Keywords: toxic effects; probabilistic techniques; pesticides; neurotoxicity; health guidelines 

 

Page | 70  SETAC Australasia Brisbane 2012 Conference 

 

Session 7 (Thu PM, 14‐116)  Risk Assessment and Environmental Guidelines 

Session 7.8 (Thurs, 14‐116, 14:00‐14:20) 

Stuck in the goop! Difficulties in assessing the environmental risk of  organic flocculants 

Andrew J Harford*, Alicia C Hogan, David R Jones and Rick A van Dam 

Environmental Research Institute of the Supervising Scientist, Department of Sustainability, 

Environment, Water, Population and Communities, GPO Box 461, Darwin NT 0801 

*presenting author 

Abstract: Organic flocculants are commonly used as a component of water treatment systems  to  reduce  suspended  sediment  loads  in  the  water  column.  Some  are  perceived  as  being  innocuous,  but  the  environmental  risk  of  these  products  has  received  little  attention  from  ecotoxicologists  since  they  were  “grandfathered”  during  the  establishment  of  national  and  international  regulatory  agencies.  We  conducted  an  ecotoxicological  assessment  on  a  flocculant block formulation that contained an anionic polyacrylamide (PAM) active ingredient  and  a  polyethylene  glycol  (PEG)  based  carrier.  The  concentration  of  Total  Organic  Carbon 

(TOC) in solution was used to provide a measure of the total concentration of PAM and PEG  present.  However,  there  were  noteworthy  issues  in  producing  and/or  quantifying  accurate  concentrations of PAM without the PEG carrier. Such issues have not been previously raised in  the literature and may have repercussions for the accuracy of toxicity estimates. An extremely  wide  range  of  toxic  responses  was  found,  with  the  flocculant  blocks  being  toxic  to  the  cladoceran at concentrations of potential environmental concern (IC10 = 4 mg L‐1 TOC). Data  from this study were combined with literature values to derive Protective Concentrations (PCs)  for the flocculant and PAM, expressed as equivalent TOC concentrations, and were found to be  lower  than  typically  measured  natural  environmental  concentrations  of  TOC,  i.e.  low  mg  L‐1  range. The need for measuring chronic, sub‐lethal responses to properly quantify the effects of  these  substances  was  highlighted  by  the  sensitive  reproductive  effect  on  the  cladoceran  species.  Previous  risk  assessments  have  combined  toxicity  estimates  from  different  PAM  products  that  may  vary  in  toxicity  due  to  variations  in  molecular  size.  More  importantly,  environmental monitoring data for PAM flocculants is practically non‐existent due to technical  challenges  in  measuring  these  products  in  natural  waters.  This  does  not  allow  for  an  appropriate risk assessment of these products using current techniques. 

 

Keywords: mining; flocculants; polyacrylamide; polyethylene glycol; tropical ecotoxicology 

 

SETAC Australasia Brisbane 2012 Conference  Page | 71  

Session 7 (Thu PM, 14‐116)  Risk Assessment and Environmental Guidelines 

Session 7.9 (Thurs, 14‐116, 14:20‐14:40) 

Assessing the biological relevance of exposing freshwater organisms to  atrazine, chlorothalonil and permethrin in environmentally realistic  artificial stream systems 

YL Phyu

1

*

,

, CG Palmer

1,#

, MStJ Warne

2

, GC Hose

3

, JC Chapman

4

, RP Lim

1

Centre for Environmental Sustainability (CENS), School of the Environment, University of 

Technology, Sydney (UTS) PO Box 123, Broadway, NSW 2007, Australia; 

2

Catchment Water 

Science, Department of Environment and Resource Management (DERM), QLD 4001, 

Australia; 

3

Departments of Biological Sciences and Environment and Geography, Macquarie 

University, NSW 2109, Australia; 

4

Ecotoxicology & Environmental Contaminants Section, 

Office of Environment & Heritage, NSW, PO Box 29, Lidcombe  NSW  1825, Australia; 

4

Institute for water Research,Rhodes University,PO Box 94, Grahamstown 6139, South Africa 

*presenting author 

Abstract: The chronic toxicity of the three commonly used pesticides; atrazine, chlorothalonil  and permethrin was examined to evaluate their potential hazards in aquatic systems. Most of  the available toxicity data for these pesticides are laboratory‐based acute studies, which were  not  conducted  under  environmentally  realistic  conditions.  This  study  aimed  to  derive  ecologically relevant trigger values (TVs) based on chronic toxicity data of the three pesticides  for five freshwater species representing four different taxonomic groups and trophic levels. The  study also evaluated whether it is more ecologically significant to use chronic toxicity data in  deriving  WQGs.  Atrazine  is  classed  as  moderately  to  highly  toxic,  while  chlorothalonil  and  permethrin  are  moderately  and  highly  toxic,  respectively    (depending  on  the  toxicity  values  used for the chronic end point) to the tested species. The five native Australian species used in  the  toxicity  tests  were  the  green  alga  Pseudokirchneriella  subcapitata,  the  mayfly 

Atalophlebioides  sp.,  the  freshwater  cladoceran  Ceriodaphnia  dubia,  the  freshwater  shrimp 

Paratya australiensis and the freshwater fish Melanotenia duboulayi. Three new trigger values  were  calculated  using  chronic  data  generated  by  this  study  (site‐specific  data),  and  were  compared to those derived using non‐site specific data.  This study reports whether adequate  protections of Australian freshwater ecosystems to atrazine, chlorothalonil and permethrin are  being  offered  by  the  current  Australian  and  New  Zealand  water  quality  guidelines 

(ANZECC/ARMCANZ, 2000). This study contributes to better prediction and assessment of the  hazard  and  risk  that  atrazine  may  pose  to  aquatic  environments,  and  refinement  of  water  quality guidelines. 

Keywords: water quality guidelines; hazard assessment; trigger values; artificial stream  systems   

Page | 72  SETAC Australasia Brisbane 2012 Conference 

 

Session 7 (Thu PM, 14‐116)  Risk Assessment and Environmental Guidelines 

Session 7.10 (Thurs, 14‐116, 14:40‐15:00) 

Time‐dependent toxicity of pesticides and other toxicants: implications  for a new approach to risk assessment  

Francisco Sánchez‐Bayo

1

* and Henk A. Tennekes

2

 

1

Centre for Ecotoxicology, University of Technology Sydney, Lidcombe, NSW, Australia; 

2

Experimental Toxicology Services (ETS) Nederland BV, Frankensteeg 4, Zutphen, The 

Netherlands 

*presenting author 

Abstract:  A  fundamental  goal  of  toxicology  is  to  determine  safe  levels  of  exposure  to  potentially poisonous substances for humans and the environment. Traditionally, safe levels of  a  chemical  have  been  derived  from  the  non‐observable  effect  level  (NOEL),  an  outdated  concept that should be replaced by the no‐effect concentration (NEC) level, if we assume that  toxic  chemicals  have  no  effect  on  populations  of  organisms  at  very  low  concentrations. 

However,  recent  developments  in  ecotoxicology  suggest  that  some  toxicants  can  produce  effects  at  any  concentration  level  provided  their  exposure  time  is  sufficiently  long. 

Consequently,  risk  assessment  of  these  chemicals,  which  includes  neonicotinoid  insecticides,  some  carcinogenic  substances  and  certain  metallic  compounds,  may  require  entirely  new  approaches.  Indeed,  the  traditional  approach  to  toxicity  testing  considers  dose  or  concentration‐effect  relationships  only  at  arbitrarily  fixed  exposure  durations  which  are  supposed  to  reflect  ‘acute’  or  ‘chronic’  time  scales.  Unfortunately,  the  endpoint  values  obtained this way cannot be linked to make predictions for the wide range of exposure times  encountered  by  humans  or  in  the  environment,  thus  leading  to  serious  underestimates  of  actual risk. In order to overcome this handicap, an increasing number of researchers are using a  variant of the traditional toxicity testing protocol which includes time‐to‐event (TTE) methods. 

This  TTE  approach  measures  the  times  to  respond  for  all  individuals  in  a  population,  and  provides  information  on  the  acquired  doses  as  well  as  the  exposure  times  needed  for  a  toxic  compound  to  produce  any  level  of  effect  on  the  organisms  tested.  Consequently,  extrapolations and predictions of toxic effects for any combination of concentration and time  are now made possible. Examples will be shown to demonstrate that this approach is superior  to current toxicological testing procedures, and has important implications for risk assessment  of  chemicals,  particularly  when  the  chemical  has  delayed  toxic  effects  in  a  time‐dependent  manner. 

 

Keywords: time‐dose relationship; predictive toxicology; exposure; delayed effects 

 

SETAC Australasia Brisbane 2012 Conference  Page | 73  

Session 7 (Thu PM, 14‐116)  Risk Assessment and Environmental Guidelines 

Session 7.11 (Thurs, 14‐116, 15:40‐16:00) 

Accounting for plant and soil characteristics when estimating pesticide  vapour drift potential for regulatory evaluation and product development 

Trudy S. Geoghegan*, Cleo L. Davie‐Martin and Kimberly J. Hageman 

Department of Chemistry, University of Otago, 65 Union Place; Dunedin 9016 New Zealand 

*presenting author 

Abstract:  Pesticide  vapour  drift  is  increasingly  recognised  as  an  environmental  problem  because it can damage non‐target crops downwind, affect natural ecosystems, and contribute  to  pesticide  impacts  on  human  health.  Field  measurements  are  complex  and  expensive;  therefore,  industry  and  regulators  need  tools  for  estimating  vapour  drift  potential  before  a  pesticide  is  used  in  the  field.  This  research  introduces  a  model  for  estimating  vapour  drift  potential that accounts for soil and crop characteristics and is based on easily obtainable input  parameters  such  as  water‐air  and  octanol‐air  partition  coefficients.  Current  estimation  methods do not account for pesticide interactions with plants and have been shown to over or  underestimate  vapour  drift  potential  when  compared  to  field  studies.  The  aims  of  this  work  were  to  evaluate  methods  for  estimating  plant‐air  partition  coefficients,  add  plants  to  a  currently existing volatilization model for agricultural soils, and estimate vapour drift over 24  hours under different scenarios. Chemical space diagrams and variability analysis were used to  evaluate  cuticle‐air  and  whole  plant‐air  partition  coefficient  estimation  methods  from  the  literature and identify the best equations for current‐use pesticides. This analysis showed that  the interspecies variability in plant‐air partition coefficients was substantial for polar pesticides 

(log  octanol‐water  partition  coefficient<2),  but  minimal  for  very  non‐polar  pesticides. 

Volatilisation  losses  over  24  hours  showed  a  similar  but  less  pronounced  trend.  Initial  evaluations indicated that canopy size influenced the amount of pesticide that volatilised from  a field, emphasising the need to include plants in such models. Further analysis will compare  this model to other approaches currently used for estimating a pesticide’s potential to undergo  vapour  drift.  This  model  could  be  used  by  industry  and  regulators  to  make  decisions  about  pesticide  development,  registration,  and  controls.  It  could  also  be  developed  as  a  decision‐ making tool to help farmers identify the best times to spray. 

 

Keywords: chemical‐space diagram; modelling; partition‐coefficient; pesticide volatilisation;  regulatory screening tool 

 

Page | 74  SETAC Australasia Brisbane 2012 Conference 

 

Session 7 (Thu PM, 14‐116)  Risk Assessment and Environmental Guidelines 

Session 7.12 (Thurs, 14‐116, 16:00‐16:20) 

Development of Site‐specific Marine Water Quality Screening Level for 

Agrochemicals 

Christine Lussier

1

, Sophie Wood

1

* and Belinda Goldsworthy

2

 

1

ERM, 33 Saunders Street, Pyrmont, NSW, Australia; 

2

ERM, 53 Bonville Avenue, Thornton, 

NSW, Australia 

*presenting author 

Abstract: A phased approach was used to derive marine screening levels for over 60 chemicals  at  an  agrochemical  production  facility  in  New  Zealand.  The  majority  of  the  contaminants  of  potential  concern  at  the  site  were  herbicides,  pesticides,  or  chemicals  used  in  manufacturing  them.  A  limited  number  of  Australia  New  Zealand  Environment  and  Conservation  Council 

(ANZECC) water quality guidelines are available for agrochemicals, particularly for the marine  environment.  The  first  phase  of  work,  documented  in  this  presentation,  focused  on  the  23  chemicals for which no ANZECC water quality guidelines were available. For these chemicals,  site‐specific  screening  levels  were  developed  following  the  approach  used  to  derive  the 

ANZECC  guidelines.  When  possible,  marine  toxicity  data  relevant  to  species  present  in  the  adjacent marine environment were used. The resulting site‐specific screening levels were used  to guide further investigation at the site. 

 

Keywords: water quality, screening level, site‐specific, marine, agrochemicals 

 

SETAC Australasia Brisbane 2012 Conference  Page | 75  

Session 7 (Thu PM, 14‐116)  Risk Assessment and Environmental Guidelines 

Session 7.13 (Thurs, 14‐116, 16:20‐16:40) 

The use of macroinvertebrate recruitment to derive local contaminant  trigger values: A manipulative field study 

Ashleigh Felice

1

*, Ralph Alquezar

2

 and Larelle Fabbro

1

 

1

CQ University, Bryan Jordan Drive, Gladstone, QLD, Australia; 

2

Vision Environment 

Queensland, PO Box 1267, Gladstone, QLD, Australia 

*presenting author 

Abstract:  The  impact  of  industry  on  the  environment  is  a  growing  concern.  One  aspect  of  concern is the contaminants produced by industry. A number of contaminants occur naturally,  however,  a  number  of  contaminants  enter  the  environment  as  a  result  of  human  activity.  

Sediment quality guidelines have been derived in order to regulate the release of contaminants  into  a  number  of  receiving  environments.  Guidelines  used  are  usually  developed  under  laboratory  conditions  consisting  of  one  stressor  and  don’t  consider  multiple  stressors  or  varying  conditions,  which  resident  biota  would  naturally  be  exposed  to.  In  this  study,  we  carried out a manipulative field experiment to determine local sediment quality trigger values  and  identify  any  bioaccumulation  in  resident  biota.  The  study  was  conducted  at  two  geographically similar intertidal sites; an industrial receiving site and a reference site. Sediment  plots  were  established  with  varying  contaminant  concentrations  by  sediment  translocation. 

Plots  were  left  for  a  period  of  two  months  to  determine  short  term  macroinvertebrate  recruitment.  Sediment  samples  were  collected  from  the  plots  at  each  site  (five  replicates)  during  plot  establishment  and  collection.  Samples  were  analysed  for  particle  size,  carbon  content  and  metal  contaminants,  including;  Nickel,  Cobalt,  Chromium,  Manganese, Zinc  and 

Lead.  Intertidal  macroinvertebrate  biodiversity,  including  total  abundance,  species  richness,  diversity, evenness and assemblage composition, were used as endpoints. Biodiversity indecies  were  then  used  to  calculate  local  trigger  values.  A  number  of  different  organisms  were  also  collected  to  determine  potential  bioaccumulation  ANZECC  guidelines  state  that  local  biological  effects  data  is  most  preferable  and  would  therefore  be  available  to  industries  if  a  replicated localised study was conducted. 

 

Keywords: local biological effects data; sediment quality, metal contamination,  bioaccumulation 

 

Page | 76  SETAC Australasia Brisbane 2012 Conference 

 

Session 7 (Thu PM, 14‐116)  Risk Assessment and Environmental Guidelines 

Session 7.14 (Thurs, 14‐116, 16:40‐17:00) 

Teething troubles with consulting in ecotoxicology 

Jill Woodworth

1

*, Lisa Hack 

2

, Rick van Dam

3

 and David Fox

4

 

1

GHD, 102 Cameron St, Launceston, Tas, Australia; 

2

GHD, Level 16, ASB Bank Centre, 135 

Albert Street, Auckland, NZ; 

3

Environmental Research Institute of the Supervising Scientist, 

PO Box 461, Darwin, NT, Australia; 

4

Environmentrics Australia PO Box 607, Templestowe Vic 

3106 

*presenting author 

Abstract:  Around  Australia,  government  departments  are  incorporating  requirements  for  ecotoxicological  testing  in  environmental  impact  assessments,  waste  discharge  licenses  and  environmental protection notices. In comparison, requirements for ecotoxicological testing in 

New  Zealand  are  limited.    However,  this  does  have  the  benefit  of  helping  develop  management  frameworks  for  the  protection  of  environmental  values  and  supporting  monitoring regimes associated with environmental regulations (e.g. National Policy Statement  for Freshwater Management).  

Many industries that have been served with these regulatory requirements are not in a position  to put together an appropriate ecotoxicological testing regime to meet the requirements or to  provide  correct  interpretation  of  the  results.  Many  organisations  hire  consultants  to  provide  advice  so  that  these  licence  requirements  can  be  met.  However,  the  ability  of  consultants  to  develop a scope of work that will meet both the regulatory requirements and provide the client  with  useful  information  that  can  be  used  to  drive  management  actions  is  variable.  An  inappropriate  scope  of  work  can  result  in  information  that  is  not  useful  for  management  or  regulatory  purposes.    Further,  incorrect  interpretation  and  application  of  the  laboratory  data  can also result in poor management and regulatory outcomes, and subsequent additional costs  for the client to resolve the issue.  

As an example, the incorrect interpretation and application of ecotoxicity testing has resulted  in  an  organisation  relying  exclusively  on  the  ecotoxicity  data  without  also  integrating  other  important  lines  of  evidence  such  as  in‐situ  water  quality  and  field  biological  data.  This  has  resulted  in  the  industry  conducting  many  years  of  ecotoxicity  testing  for  no  environmental  benefit.  However,  the  correct  application  of  ecotoxicity  testing  can  reduce  much  of  the  risk  from  ecosystem  exposure  to  a  discharge  and  also  provide  the  client  with  useful  data  for  management  actions  to  maximise  ecosystem  protection.  Other  case  studies,  and  recommendations proposed to rectify the above‐mentioned problems, will be discussed.  

Keywords: discharge licenses; interpretation; licence obligations; management actions;  environmental values; monitoring 

SETAC Australasia Brisbane 2012 Conference  Page | 77  

Session 8 (Thu AM, 14‐217)  Mixtures and Multiple Stressors 

Session 8.1 (Thurs, 14‐217, 9:55‐10:25) [Session Highlight] 

Determining the pesticide toxicity load: a multi‐species, toxic equivalency  approach  

Rachael Smith*, Ryan Turner, Suzanne Vardy and Michael Warne  

 

Department of Science, Information Technology, Innovation and the Arts, 41 Boggo Road, 

Dutton Park, Qld, Australia 

*presenting author 

Abstract:  Determining  reductions  in  the  loads  of  pesticides  transported  from  catchments  to  receiving  waterways  is  a  useful  measure  of  the  success  of  land‐based  management  actions  implemented  to  reduce  the  toxic  impact  of  the  pesticides  to  the  receiving  waterways. 

However,  in  agricultural  runoff,  mixtures  of  pesticides  with  varying  degrees  of  toxicity  commonly  occur.  Therefore,  from  a  toxicological  and  environmental  impact  point  of  view,  pesticide  load  reduction  targets  should  be  expressed  in  terms  of  the  toxicity  of  pesticide  mixtures rather than in terms of their mass. The mixture toxicology literature was examined to  determine  the  best  approach  for  aggregating  individual  pesticide  loads  that  accounted  for  differences in pesticide toxicities to multiple species, such that a total pesticide toxic load could  be  established.  In  this  presentation  we  demonstrate  a  method  that  uses  a  species  sensitivity  distribution of toxic equivalency factors (TEF) for individual species to derive a multiple species 

TEF  (ms‐TEF)  that  will  protect  95%  of  species.  The  proposed  method  was  applied  to  photosystem  II  (PSII)  herbicide  data  collected  by  the  Great  Barrier  Reef  Catchments  Loads 

Monitoring  Program  (GBRCLMP)  as  part  of  Reef  Plan  (2009)  to  determine  the  PSII  herbicide  toxic  load  being  transported  to  the  Great  Barrier  Reef.  The  results  were  evaluated  in  light  of  the  Reef  Plan’s  (2009)  review  of  load  reduction  targets  and  illustrate  the  usefulness  of  the  approach  to  maximize  environmental  benefit  by  having  more  targeted  land  management  actions.  

Keywords: mixtures, multiple species, pesticides, photosystem II herbicides 

 

Page | 78  SETAC Australasia Brisbane 2012 Conference 

 

Session 8 (Thu AM, 14‐217)  Mixtures and Multiple Stressors 

Session 8.2 (Thurs, 14‐217, 10:25‐10:45) 

The calculation of risks due to mercury, other stressors, and climate  change to multiple endpoints at a regional scale for the South River and 

Upper Shenandoah River, Virginia USA. 

Wayne G. Landis*, Kim K. Ayre, Mariana G. Cains, April J. Markiewicz, Jonah 

Stinson and Heather M. Summers 

Institute of Environmental Toxicology, Western Washington University, Bellingham WA USA 

*presenting author 

Abstract:  A  cumulative  integrated  risk  assessment  has  been  performed  for  the  South  River  from  the  area  upstream  of  Waynesboro  VA  to  the  uppermost  part  of  the  Shenandoah  River. 

The  area  is  a  site  of  historic  mercury  contamination  from  synthetic  fiber  production  in 

Waynesboro.  Six  risk  regions  have  been  delineated.  Other  sources  of  other  stressors  include  urban and agricultural run‐off, channelization, erosion, and contaminated sediments and biota. 

Because of the large scale of the site and the temporal scale climate change was determined to  be  an  important  consideration  as well.  The  current  iteration  of  the  relative  risk  model  (RRM)  incorporating  was  used  to  construct  a  conceptual  model,  designate  risk  regions,  create  a  ranking system and calculating risks to the stakeholder derived impacts. The Bayesian network 

(BN) derivative of the RRM has also been used and is reported.   Atypically, the current source  of  the  Hg  contamination  is  the  environment  itself.  The  warm  water  fish  species  have  been  found  to  have  consistently  higher  tissue  concentrations  downstream  of  the  original  source. 

Nutrients  from  upstream  of  Waynesboro  also  may  be  contributing  to  risk  to  a  variety  of  endpoints. Our results demonstrate that the risk is unevenly distributed along the course of the  watersheds.  Ecological  services  are  the  endpoints  at  highest  risk  throughout  the  study  area. 

Mercury is the stressor contributing the highest risk but other stressors are large contributors.  

Explorations  of  management  scenarios  that  reduce  nutrients  or  remove  Hg  are  being  conducted. A nutrient reduction of 50 percent does reduce risk is the higher risk areas, but only  in  the  range  of  15‐20  percent.    Lower  risk  areas  are  minimally  affected.  Alterations  in  water  flow and temperature due to climate change will also alter the pattern of risk in the study area. 

The  RRM  has  proven  to  be  a  useful  approach  to  evaluating  management  scenarios  and  incorporate climate change and their effects on risk in the watershed.

 

 

Keywords: adaptive management; Bayesian networks; relative risk model; scenarios 

 

SETAC Australasia Brisbane 2012 Conference  Page | 79  

Session 8 (Thu AM, 14‐217)  Mixtures and Multiple Stressors 

Session 8.3 (Thurs, 14‐217, 10:45‐11:05) 

Acetylcholinesterase activity as a biomarker of exposure to  organophosphate insecticides in three Australian species Tandanus 

TandanusParatya australiensis and Daphnia carinata  

Dayanthi Nugegoda*, Huy P.V. Huynh, Saikrithika A. Gandhi and Liliana 

Zalizniak

 

Ecotoxicology Research Group, School of Applied Sciences, RMIT University, PO Box 71, 

Bundoora, Victoria 3083, Australia 

*presenting author 

Abstract:  Acetylcholinesterase  (AChE)  activity  is  often  used  as  a  biomarker  of  exposure  to  organophospate (OP) pesticticides in aquatic biota. However there are limited studies on Australian  native fish and invertebrates especially on pulse exposures to OPs and the effects of mixtures. This  paper reviews the effect of the chlorpyrifos and/or fenitrothion on AChE activity in 3 native species  using  different  exposure  scenarios.    Australian  catfish,  T.  tandanus  were  exposed  to  a  short  term  pulse  of  chlorpyrifos  and  grown  in  clean  water  in  optimal  conditions  for  6  weeks.  The  AChE  activities  of  fish  after  the  pulse exposure were  significantly  different  from  that  of  the  control  fish  however AChE activity of fish recovered at the end of the experiment. AChE activity in the daphnid 

Daphnia carinata and the shrimp Paratya australiensis  were evaluated after continuous exposure to  chlorpyrifos and fenitrothion for  48 and 96 hours respectively. Exposure to chlorpyrifos resulted in  a slow and steady decrease in AChE activity in both species with increase in pesticide concentration  and  time  of  exposure.  Exposure  to  fenitrothion  resulted  in  an  immediate  dose‐dependent  depression in AChE activity of both species, and then remained unchanged with further exposure. 

AChE  activity  of  the  two  test  species  was  very  sensitive  to  these  two  pesticides  and  could  be  estimated  accurately  even  at  low  environmentally  realistic  concentrations  when  exposure  is  continuous.  However  when  both  test  species  were  exposed  to  mixtures  of  the  two  pesticides,  results  indicated  an  antagonistic  effect  of  chlorpyrifos  and  fenitrothion  compared  to  individual  exposures; and depression in AChE activity was significantly less evident. It is recommended that 

AChE activity as a biomarker of exposure to OPs in field situations be used with caution. 

 

Keywords: catfish; chlorpyrifos; daphnid; fenitrothion; shrimp  

 

Page | 80  SETAC Australasia Brisbane 2012 Conference 

 

Session 8 (Thu AM, 14‐217)  Mixtures and Multiple Stressors 

Session 8.4 (Thurs, 14‐217, 11:40‐12:00) 

Deadly diet: Interaction between diet quality and metals in a marine  herbivore 

Ceiwen J. Pease

1

*, Alistair G. B. Poore

1

 and Emma L. Johnston

1

 

1

Evolution and Ecology Research Centre, School of Biological, Earth and Environmental 

Sciences, University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW, Australia 

*presenting author 

Abstract: Metal contamination can have profound ecological impacts on marine ecosystems. 

In  order  to  survive  exposure  to  metal  contamination  in  their  environment,  individuals  must  develop  tolerance  via  acclimation,  or  species  must  adapt  via  differential  survival  of  tolerant  genotypes. Metal contamination is not uniform in the environment and is taken up at varying  rates by different species of algae. This is problematic for herbivorous species, which consume  algae, as they may be exposed to a range of metal contamination levels in their diet. Different  species of algae also represent diets of varying quality for herbivorous species and few studies  have looked at the interaction between diet quality and metal toxicity. When consuming a diet  of lower quality an organism may not have the energetic ability to deal with the metal in their  diet, hence we would see reduced survival. In this study we look at variation in survival between  different genotypes from an herbivorous amphipod population sourced from a clean site within 

Sydney  Harbour.  Three  different  levels  of  diet  quality  and  four  copper  concentrations  were  used to detect whether diet quality affects the toxicity of copper to Peramphithoe parmerong

There was a significant decrease in the survival of P. parmerong as the algae copper exposure  level increased and this was particularly prominent in the Sargassum algae species.  

 

Keywords: metal contamination; diet quality; amphipod 

 

SETAC Australasia Brisbane 2012 Conference  Page | 81  

Session 8 (Thu AM, 14‐217)  Mixtures and Multiple Stressors 

Session 8.5 (Thurs, 14‐217, 12:00‐12:20) 

Cytotoxicity evaluation of mixtures of human pharmaceuticals using fish  cell lines 

Peter A. Bain*, Niels Zaagman and Anu Kumar 

CSIRO Land and Water, Waite Road, Urrbrae, South Australia 5064, Australia 

*presenting author 

Abstract:  The  presence  of  human  pharmaceuticals  in  wastewater  treatment  plant  effluents  has  prompted  research  into  possible  health  effects  in  aquatic  organisms.  Since  these  contaminants are rarely present as single compounds, focus has shifted towards investigating  the toxicity of mixtures of pharmaceuticals. We have recently developed laboratory capabilities  for in vitro cytotoxicity testing using fish cell lines, which are well suited to the initial screening  of the acute cytotoxicity of mixtures as they facilitate the rapid and cost‐effective testing of a  large range of concentrations and combinations of compounds with different modes of action. 

We  investigated  the  toxicity  of  human  pharmaceuticals  in  the  EPC  cell  line  (derived  from  fathead  minnow,  Pimephales  promelas)  using  the  neutral  red  uptake  assay.  The  compounds  tested included carbamazepine, diclofenac, fluoxetine, methotrexate, propranolol, metoprolol,  pindolol,  venlafaxine,  17α‐ethinylestradiol,  estrone,  dexamethasone  and  rosiglitazone. 

Individual  compounds  exhibiting  cytotoxicity  were  selected  for  further  analysis,  involving  cytotoxicity evaluation of all possible binary combinations of five compounds at three exposure  periods  (24,  48 and  72  hours). Concentration‐response  relationships  were compared  to  those  predicted by response addition models. Because parameters such as source species, cell type,  growth  characteristics,  and  cytotoxicity  assay  method  are  reported  to  affect  apparent  EC50  values, a thorough evaluation of the combined in vitro effects of different compounds requires  multiple  cell  lines  and  more  than  one  endpoint.  We  describe  our  current  approaches  and  outline  our  strategies  towards  the  development  of  a  comprehensive  test  battery  for  in  vitro  cytotoxicity screening using fish cell cultures. 

 

Keywords: contaminants; toxicity; fish 

 

Page | 82  SETAC Australasia Brisbane 2012 Conference 

 

Session 8 (Thu AM, 14‐217)  Mixtures and Multiple Stressors 

Session 8.6 (Thurs, 14‐217, 12:20‐12:40) 

Metabolite biomarkers of effect following exposure to single or mixtures  of pesticides 

Oliver A.H. Jones

1*

, Sara M. Long

2

, Steven Murfitt

3

, Claus Svendsen

4

, David J. 

Spurgeon

4

, Lee A. Walker

5

, Richard F. Shore

5

, and Julian L. Griffin

3

 

1

School of Applied Sciences, RMIT University, GPO Box 2476V, Melbourne, VIC 3001, Australia; 

2

Victorian Centre for Aquatic Pollution Identification and Management, Department of 

Zoology, Bio 21 Institute, University of Melbourne, 30 Flemington Road, Parkville, VIC 3052, 

Australia; 

3

Department of Biochemistry, University of Cambridge, 80 Tennis Court Road, 

Cambridge, CB2 1GA, UK; 

4

Centre for Ecology and Hydrology, Maclean Building, Crowmarsh 

Gifford, Wallingford, Oxon, OX10 8BB, UK; 

5

Centre for Centre for Ecology and Hydrology, 

Library Avenue, Bailrigg, Lancaster, LA1 4AP, UK 

*presenting author 

Abstract: 

1

H  Nuclear  Magnetic  Resonance  Spectroscopy  was  used  to  profile  urinary  metabolites in male Fischer F344 rats  (Rattus norvegicus)  in order to assess the effects of two  benzimidazole  fungicides  (carbendazim  and  thiabendazole)  and  two  bipyridyllium  herbicides 

(chlormequat  and  mepiquat).  Separate  acute  and  repeat  dose  exposure  experiments  were  conducted for each pesticide singly. One quaternary and three binary (using pesticides with a  similar and dissimilar modes of action) mixture studies were also conducted. The doses ranged  from the acceptable daily intake for each compound, to maximum doses, which based on pilot  studies,  were  expected  to  induce  changes  in  metabolism  but  not  cause  overt  toxicity. 

Metabolite profiles were obtained from urine collected for the 24 hours pre‐dose and at 0‐8, 8‐

24,  and  96  ‐120  hours  after  dosing.  Physiological  data  such  as  drinking,  feeding,  and  growth  rats  were  also  collected.  The  results  identified  clear  metabolic  changes  associated  with  both  mixture  and  single  pesticide  exposures,  with  these  effects  being  dose  dependent.  Changes  identified in the binary mixture were composed of the single pesticide responses. This meant  that  one  of  the  fundamental  requirements  for  using  the  classical  mixture  toxicity  models  of  concentration  addition  (CA)  or  independent  action  (IA),  namely  the  ability  to  get  single  chemical dose response curves, could not be met. However, novel signals were identified in the  quaternary  mixture.  There  were  no  observed  gross  physiological  changes  during  the  study,  although a slight drop in testes weight index values were detected following exposure to the  quaternary mixture (at individual NOEL dose levels) which was not predicted by either CA or 

IA. The results show that joint effects must be taken into account when considering mixtures  and  that  while  the  CA  and  IA  models  may  work  at  higher  dose  levels,  there  are  grounds  for  concern with their application to low dose exposures. 

Keywords: Food safety; metabolomics; metabonomics; toxicology; time course 

SETAC Australasia Brisbane 2012 Conference  Page | 83  

 

Session 9 (Thu PM, 14‐217)  ET&C in Extreme Environments 

Session 9.1 (Thurs, 14‐217, 13:30‐14:00) [Session Highlight] 

Antarctic ecotoxicology, risk assessment and remediation: an Australian  perspective 

Catherine K. King*, Jonathan S. Stark, Ian Snape, Martin J. Riddle

 

 

Australian Antarctic Division, Kingston, Tasmania 7050, Australia 

*presenting author 

Abstract:  There  are  a  range  of  chemical  contaminants  of  concern  in  Antarctic  and  sub‐

Antarctic marine and terrestrial environments as a result of the activities of humans, including  past  waste  disposal  practices,  accidental  fuel  spills,  and  ongoing  sewage  discharge  from  research stations. Australia’s Antarctic science program led by the Australian Antarctic Division  includes  a  program  dedicated  to  research  on  environmental  change  and  the  protection  and  conservation  of  Antarctica’s  terrestrial  and  nearshore  ecosystems.  An  overview  of  Australia’s  research over the past 15 years within this program, including ecotoxicological assessments of  the  effects  of  key  contaminants,  the  use  of  in  situ  biomonitors,  benthic  surveys  and  manipulative  field  experiments  as  part  of  environmental  monitoring  and  assessment  programs, and the development of remediation technologies will be presented. Information on  the  response  and  sensitivity  of  Antarctic  species  and  communities  will  form  the  basis  of  ecological  risk  assessment  procedures  and  appropriate  environmental  guidelines  and  remediation targets for Antarctic and sub‐Antarctic regions. 

Keywords: Antarctica; environmental guidelines; metals; petroleum hydrocarbons 

 

Page | 84  SETAC Australasia Brisbane 2012 Conference 

Session 9 (Thu PM, 14‐217)  ET&C in Extreme Environments 

Session 9.2 (Thurs, 14‐217, 14:00‐14:20) 

Assessing toxicity of diesel and fuel oil on early life stages of Antarctic 

marine invertebrates 

Kathryn E. Brown

1

*, Catherine K. King

2

, Simon C. George

3

, Alison Lane

1

 and 

Peter L. Harrison

1

Marine Ecology Research Centre, Southern Cross University, PO Box 157, Lismore, NSW, 

Australia; 

2

Australian Antarctic Division, 203 Channel Highway, Kingston, Tas. Australia; 

3

Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences, Macquarie University, North Ryde, NSW, 

Australia 

*presenting author 

Abstract: One of the most serious threats to the Antarctic marine ecosystem is the accidental  release  of  petroleum  fuel.  The  risks  of  a  major  spill  occurring  have  been  highlighted  by  the  continuing  expansion  of  human  activity  and  repeated  incidents  in  Antarctic  waters  including  the  grounding  and  sinking  of  ships.  Little  is  known  of  the  sensitivities  of  Antarctic  marine  organisms  to  hydrocarbon  contaminants.  Hydrocarbon  levels  that  may  affect  marine  species  cannot  be  determined  without  extensive  toxicity  testing.  Accordingly,  replicated  bioassays  were  completed  at  Davis  Station,  East  Antarctica  in  the  summers  of  2010  and  2011  to  determine lethal and sub‐lethal effects of fuels on reproduction and early life history stages of  a  range  of  marine  invertebrates.  Developmental  stages  are  often  the  most  sensitive  to  pollution  and  effects  at  this  level  impact  recruitment  and  may  result  in  population  level  impacts.  Three  fuel  types  were  investigated  and  mixed  with  seawater  to  generate  water  accommodated  fractions  (WAF):  Special  Antarctic  Blend  (SAB)  diesel;  Marine  Gas  Oil  (MGO)  diesel;  and  an  intermediate  fuel  oil  (IFO  180).  WAFs  of  all  three  fuels  were  toxic  to  biota,  resulting  in  decreased  reproductive  success,  altered  behaviour  and  mortality  of  a  range  of  marine invertebrates including amphipods, sea urchins and a bivalve. SAB was the most toxic  fuel,  while  MGO  and  IFO  WAFs  tended  to  show  increased  toxicity  to  early  life  stages  during  longer‐term exposures. The response of the sea urchin Sterechinus neumayeri at key stages of  development  showed  decreased  fertilization  success,  increased  abnormal  embryo  development, decreased larval development success and increased mortalities. Juveniles of the  amphipod  Paramoera  walkeri  were  more  sensitive  than  adults  of  the  same  species.  These  results  provide  important  data  to  be  used  in  the  development  of  water  quality  guidelines  for 

Antarctic marine ecosystems and remediation targets for hydrocarbon contaminated areas. 

 

Keywords: bioassay; fuel spill; hydrocarbon; larval development; water accommodated  fraction 

 

SETAC Australasia Brisbane 2012 Conference  Page | 85  

 

Session 9 (Thu PM, 14‐217)  ET&C in Extreme Environments 

Session 9.3 (Thurs, 14‐217, 14:20‐14:40) 

Emerging contaminants in the Antarctic: Sources and distribution in  sewage and coastal waters from McMurdo and Scott Base, Ross Island, 

Antarctica 

Phil Emnet

1

*, Sally Gaw

1

, Grant Northcott

2

, Bryan Storey

3

 

1

University of Canterbury, Department of Chemistry, Christchurch, New Zealand; 

2

Plant and 

Food Research, Hamilton, New Zealand; 

3

Gateway Antarctica, University of Canterbury, 

Christchurch, New Zealand  

*presenting author 

Abstract:  Emerging  contaminants  (ECs)  are  of  increasing  concern  with  respect  to  the  environment  and  human  health.  A  wide  range  of  effects  have  been  reported  in  aquatic  organisms,  including  endocrine  disruption.  Many  chemicals  used  in  everyday  personal  care  products  (PCPs)  are  amongst  the  most  commonly  detected  compounds  in  surface  water  throughout the world.  

Compared  to  polar  regions  the  presence  and  environmental  fate  of  ECs  in  temperate  environments  is  better  understood.  There  is  no  data  on  many  ECs  in  the  Antarctic  environment.  Data  on  the  presence, fate  and  behaviour  of  those  that  have  been  identified  is  limited. The vast majority of Antarctic research stations are located along the coast, into which  many  release  industrial  and  household  sewage.  A  recent  survey  has  found  almost  40%  of  permanent  research  stations  and  almost  70%  of  summer  stations  do  not  treat  their  sewage. 

Given  the  unique  environmental  conditions found  in  Antarctica  it  is  likely  that many  removal  processes,  including  sorption  to  sludge  and  sediments,  calcification,  photo‐degradation,  and  microbial degradation are likely to be inhibited compared with temperate regions. 

 

Wastewater samples from two Antarctic research stations, McMurdo Station (USA) and Scott 

Base (New Zealand) and seawater samples from the surrounding coastline were analyzed for a  range  of  ECs.  Target  analytes  were  detected  in  both  wastewater  and  seawater  at  concentrations  similar  to  those  reported  in  other  parts  of  the  world.  Detected  compounds  include  paraben  preservatives,  triclosan,  octylphenol,  BPA,  UV‐filters,  and  the  hormone  estrone. The environmental fate of these compounds will be discussed in terms of the unique  environmental conditions of the receiving environment.  

Keywords: preservatives; triclosan; UV‐filters, PCPs, estrone 

 

Page | 86  SETAC Australasia Brisbane 2012 Conference 

Session 9 (Thu PM, 14‐217)  ET&C in Extreme Environments 

Session 9.4 (Thurs, 14‐217, 14:40‐15:00) 

Atmospheric monitoring for persistent organic pollutants in Antarctica 

David McLagan*; Darryl Hawker; Roger Cropp; Susan Bengtson Nash 

Atmospheric Environment Research Centre; Griffith University, 170 Kessels Road, Nathan, 

QLD, 4111 

*presenting author 

Abstract:  Antarctica  is  the  most  uninhabited,  most  isolated  and  coldest  continent  on  Earth. 

Thus,  there  is  a  significant  requirement  to  preserve  this  unique,  remote  environment  from  anthropogenic contaminants. However, certain persistent organic pollutants (POPs) have been  measured  on  and  around  Antarctica,  with  long‐range  environmental  transport  (LRET)  from  sources  at  lower  latitude  sites  and  local  sources  of  emissions  from  research  stations  and  shipping  being  the  causes.  The  current  study  has  been  implemented  in  accordance  with  the 

Global  Monitoring  Plan  for  POPs  set  out  by  the  Stockholm  Convention  on  POPs  to  monitor 

POPs  at  Casey  Station  in  the  Australian  Antarctic  Territory.  Samples  were  taken  using  a  passive  flow‐through  air  sampler  that  has  been  designed  to  continually  align  with  the  downwind  direction.  Chlorinated  benzenes  (especially  HCB),  PBDEs  and  endosulphan  I  dominated the contaminant profile of the current study, with only trace levels of PCBs, DDTs  and  other  OCs  detected.  Heavy  congeners,  BDE‐206  and  ‐209  dominated  the  PBDEs  profile. 

This was unanticipated as heavier congeners are less volatile and are expected to be less prone  to undergo LRET. The results suggest a local source of BDE‐209 that is perhaps augmented by  an  increase  in  activity  at  the  research  station  after  the  winter  period.  The  relatively  low  concentrations  (fg/m

3

)  of  all  contaminants  in  comparison  to  other  atmospheric  research  in  both polar regions is in general reflective of a reduction in the production of many POPs, the  isolation  of  the  Casey  Station  from  both  human  populations  outside  Antarctica  and  other  research  stations  on  the  continent  and  chemical  breakthrough  associated  with  the  large  air  volumes sampled. Analysis of the Casey Station air‐shed proved to be relatively ineffectual at  linking  potential  source  regions  outside  Antarctic  to  contaminant  concentrations  at  the  site. 

This  has  however  highlighted  the  limited  application  of  back‐trajectory  based  analysis  in  the  majority  of  Antarctica  given  their  limited  effective  duration  and  the  overall  isolation  of  the  continent. 

 

Keywords: long‐range atmospheric transport; passive, flow‐through air sampler; air‐sheds; air‐ mass back trajectories 

 

SETAC Australasia Brisbane 2012 Conference  Page | 87  

 

Session 9 (Thu PM, 14‐217)  ET&C in Extreme Environments 

Session 9.5 (Thurs, 14‐217, 15:40‐16:00) 

Food web influence on spatial variation of mercury and other selected  trace elements in polar bears (Ursus maritimus) from Arctic  subpopulations in Alaska, Canada and East Greenland 

Robert J. Letcher

1

*, Heli Routti

2

, Erik W. Born

3

, Marsha Branigan

4

, Rune 

Dietz

5

, Thomas J. Evans

6

, Melissa A. McKinney

1

, Elizabeth Peacock

7

 and 

Christian Sonne

5

 

1

Wildlife Toxicology Research Section, Science and Technology Branch, Environment Canada, National 

Wildlife Research Centre, Carleton University, Ottawa, ON, Canada; 

Centre, Tromsø, Norway; 

3

2

Norwegian Polar Institute, Fram 

Greenland Institute of Natural Resources, Nuuk, Greenland; 

4

Department of 

Environment and Natural Resources, Government of the Northwest Territories, Inuvik, Northwest 

Territories, Canada; 

Roskilde, Denmark; 

6

5

Department of Bioscience, Faculty of Science and Technology, Aarhus University, 

United States Fish and Wildlife Service, Anchorage, Alaska, U.S.A.; 

7

Department of 

Environment, Government of Nunavut, Igloolik, Nunavut, Canada 

*presenting author 

Abstract: For polar bears (Ursus maritimus) (n=121) from ten subpopulations from Alaska, the 

Canadian Arctic and Greenland, and using chemical tracers (i.e., δ

15

N, δ

13

C and fatty acid (FA)  profiles)  determined  in  muscle,  we  investigated  the  influence  of  the  spatial  variation  in  the  food  web  structure  on  regional  differences  in  the  liver  concentrations  of  trace  elements  including  As,  Cd,  Cu,  total  Hg,  Mn,  Pb,  Rb,  Se  and  Zn.  Regardless  of  subpopulation,  concentrations of total Hg were positively related to δ

15

N indicating that polar bears feeding at  higher  trophic  levels  accumulate  more  total  Hg  compared  to  polar  bears  feeding  at  lower  trophic  levels.  A  negative  relationship  between  total  Hg  and  δ

13

C  suggested  polar  bears  feeding  in  areas  with  higher  riverine  inputs  of  terrestrial  carbon  accumulate  more  Hg  than  bears  feeding  in  areas  with  lower  freshwater  input.  Hg  concentrations  were  also  positively  related to the FA 20:1n‐9, which is biosynthesized in large amounts in Calanus copepods. This  result raises the hypothesis that Calanus are an important link in the uptake of Hg in the food  web  and  ultimately  in  polar  bears.  For  total  Hg,  Se  and  As,  compared  to  concentrations  adjusted  for  food  web,  unadjusted  concentrations  showed  greater  geographical  variation  among polar bear subpopulations. However, food web adjusted Hg concentrations in the livers  of  Bering‐Chukchi  Sea  polar  bears  remained  the  lowest  among  subpopulations  despite  few  significant spatial differences. Regardless, polar bear food web structure and dietary exposure  are important factors when assessing spatial and temporal trends of trace elements, and may  be influenced by factors related to arctic climate change.  

Keywords: polar bear subpopulation; trace elements; spatial trends; diet influence; climate  change

   

Page | 88  SETAC Australasia Brisbane 2012 Conference 

Session 9 (Thu PM, 14‐217)  ET&C in Extreme Environments 

Session 9.6 (Thurs, 14‐217, 16:00‐16:20) 

Optimization and application of an acute toxicity test with the tropical  marine copepod, Acartia sinjiensis 

Francesca Gissi*, Monique Binet and Merrin Adams 

CSIRO Land and Water, Locked Bag 2007, Kirrawee, NSW 2232, Australia 

*presenting author 

Abstract: Currently, there are few toxicity testing protocols in Australia that use native tropical  marine  invertebrates.  Copepods  are  a  diverse  group  of  zooplankton  that  are  major  components  of  marine  food  webs,  and  are  an  important  food  source  to  larger  invertebrates,  fish and mammals.  The calanoid copepod Acartia sinjiensis is widely distributed across tropical  and  sub‐tropical  brackish  to  marine  waters  of  Australia  and  was  identified  in  a  recent  comprehensive  review  of  marine  tropical  toxicity  testing  in  Australia  as  a  suitable  test  organism.  

This  study  focuses  on  the  optimization  of  an  acute  toxicity  test  with  A.  sinjiensis,  and  its  application  in  ecological  risk  assessments  of  a  variety  of  industrial  effluents.    Prior  to  optimization,  cultures  produced  lower  numbers  of  animals  for  use  in  toxicity  tests,  and  tests  had a 50% failure rate due to high mortality in controls.  Through refinement of culture and test  conditions,  including  temperature,  light  and  feeding  regimes,  the  robustness  and  reproducibility  of  the  protocol  was  greatly  improved,  with  no  change  in  sensitivity.    After  optimization,  the  EC50  ±  1SD  for  exposure  of  A.  sinjiensis  to  copper  was  33  ±  8  µg  Cu/L  compared to 35 ± 15µg Cu/L before. A. sinjiensis is also sensitive to other contaminants such as  ammonia and phenol. 

 

This toxicity test has been used to assess the toxicity of produced formation waters (PFW) and  mine tailing liquor.  In PFW testing, A. sinjiensis was the most sensitive among a suite of test  organisms including a tropical alga, sea urchins, oysters, prawns, and fish. The optimized test  was found to be a valuable tool in the toxicity assessment of a range of anthropogenic inputs to  tropical marine waters. 

Keywords: Calanoid; culture; effluents; ecotoxicology 

 

SETAC Australasia Brisbane 2012 Conference  Page | 89  

 

Session 9 (Thu PM, 14‐217)  ET&C in Extreme Environments 

Session 9.7 (Thurs, 14‐217, 16:20‐16:40) 

Toxicokinetics of persistent organic pollutants in Southern Ocean  humpback whales 

Courtney Waugh

1

, Michael Noad

1

, Martin Schlbach

2

, and Susan Bengtson 

Nash

3

1

The University of Queensland, 39 Kessels Road, Coopers Plain 4108, QLD Australia; 

2

National 

Centre for Air Research (NILU), Kjeller, Norway; 

3

Griffith University Nathan Campus, 170 

Kessels Road, Nathan, 4111, QLD Australia 

*presenting author 

Abstract: Southern Ocean (SO) humpback whales are exposed to an increased risk of adverse  effects  from  Persistent  Organic  Pollutants  (POPs)  due  to  their  extreme  life  history  of  annual  migration (~10 000kms), the longest in any mammal, corresponding with a sustained period of  fasting (~7 months).  POPs are known to be significantly affected by nutritional condition, and,  in other mammals it has been shown that at a time of energy deficit, such as fasting, dieting, or  lactation, POPs are concentrated in, and mobilized from the adipose stores and into the blood  stream  and  reach  sites  of  toxicity.    Here,  we  show  a  concentration  effect  of  the  most  highly  lipophilc  compounds,  such  as  DDT  and  HCB,  in  the  blubber  of  fasted  animals,  alongside  a  decrease  in  the  less  lipophilic  PCBs,  indicating  that  the  more  lipophilic  compounds  are  partitioning  back  into  the  lipid‐rich  blubber  layer,  whereas,  the  less  lipophilc  compounds  are  likely reaching sites of toxicity with potential adverse effects.  Further, we show that stranded  animals  have  significantly  more  pollutants  in  the  blubber  layer  than  their  free‐swimming  counterparts, and that levels in some individuals are above thresholds known to cause effects,  such as immunosuppression, in Arctic mammals. 

 

Keywords: Blubber; Cetacean; Pollutant burdens 

 

Page | 90  SETAC Australasia Brisbane 2012 Conference 

Session 9 (Thu PM, 14‐217)  ET&C in Extreme Environments 

Session 9.8 (Thurs, 14‐217, 16:40‐17:00) 

Ecotox in the extremes: A few things we don’t know 

Ross Smith*, Dustin Hobbs and Reinier Mann 

Hydrobiology PO Box 2151 Toowong QLD 4066 

*presenting author 

Abstract: The practice of ecotoxicology in Australasia requires application of the principles of  our science in a wide range of environments, few of which approximate the near steady‐state  conditions of laboratory testing. Although the ANZECC/ARMCANZ framework provides a solid  foundation for application of laboratory test data to setting site specific water quality trigger  values, there are many instances where in practice this is conceptually difficult and practically  challenging.  This presentation may not provide the answers but does present some challenges  that  have  been  experienced  in  real‐world  application  of  ecotoxicology  to  problems  faced  by  businesses in this region. 

The issues that will be discussed include:  

Difficulties  in  selecting  test  species  and  diluents  for  both  ultra‐soft  waters  and  saline  inland waters with salt mixtures that depart from that of seawater;  

Selection  of  the  appropriate  life  stages  to  use  for  testing  for  temporary  inland  waters  where  effluent  releases  are  most  likely  to  occur  in  the  wet  season  (when  most  reproduction  occurs,  but  dilution  of  any  toxicants  is  maximal),  but  where  maximum  evapoconcentration of toxicants would occur late in the dry season (when reproduction is  negligible but population survival critical);  

Separating  toxicant  stress  from  extreme  physic‐chemical  conditions  such  as  suspended  solids  concentrations  in  the  ppt  range  to  inform  environmental  management  decisions;  and  

Selection of test taxa and acclimation periods for hypersaline marine systems.  

These  examples  will  demonstrate  that  even  when  not  dealing  with  extreme  climatic  events,  ecotoxicology has to adapt to unusual environmental conditions to provide practical guidance  to Australasian industry. 

Keywords: super‐soft waters, salt mixtures, mixed stressors, hypersalinity

SETAC Australasia Brisbane 2012 Conference  Page | 91  

 

Session 10 (Fri AM, 14‐212)  Micropollutants and Emerging Contaminants 

Session 10.1 (Fri, 14‐212, 9:55‐10:25) [Session Highlight] 

Integrated approaches to understand the biochemical mechanisms and  risks of emerging contaminants: Case study of polybrominated diphenyl  ethers 

Evan P. Gallagher 

 

Abstract: Emerging Contaminants constitute a broad category of environmental chemicals for  which  little  toxicity  information  is  available,  but  that  are  under  increasing  scientific  concern. 

Because many of these contaminants are not regulated in the context of ecological and human  health, there are significant data gaps regarding their risks and toxicities. The fact that many  emerging contaminants have few point sources of release, multiple sources of exposure, and  often  serve  useful  function  in  consumer  products  confounds  assessing  the  tradeoffs  among  their  societal  risks  versus  benefits.  Our  laboratory  has  used  integrated  approaches  to  understand the comparative toxicity of historical emerging (i.e. “emerged”) contaminants, the  polybrominated  diphenyl  ethers  (PBDEs).    We  have  focused  several  studies  on  congeners  of  concern  in  salmon  in  the  Pacific  Northwest,  US,  including  BDE  47,  the  predominant  PBDE  congener often detected in humans and aquatic species. We use primary hematopoietic cells  isolated from human fetal liver, HepG2 cells, and rainbow trout epithelial cells to understand  the  comparative  toxicity  and  identify  mechanisms  of  PBDE cell  injury.   Biochemical  and  flow  cytometry approaches have enabled us to determine that mitochondrial injury associated with  oxidative  stress  and  the  induction  of  apoptosis  are  common  mechanisms  of  BDE  47  toxicity,  whereas  in  vivo  developmental  studies  in  zebrafish  have  identified  other  understudied  PBDE  congeners  with  developmental  toxicity  and  have  strengthened  the  association  among  oxidative  stress  and  developmental  toxicity.  In  summary,  our  studies  have  revealed  mechanisms  of  PBDE  toxicity  that  involve  oxidative  damage  which  may  contribute  to  developmental  toxicity,  and  are  generating  molecular  and  biochemical  markers  of  PBDE  toxicity that can be used to evaluate emerging replacement fire retardants. 

  

Department of Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences, University of Washington, 

Seattle, WA USA 

 

Page | 92  SETAC Australasia Brisbane 2012 Conference 

Session 10 (Fri AM, 14‐212)  Micropollutants and Emerging Contaminants 

Session 10.2 (Fri, 14‐212, 10:25‐10:45) 

Hexabromocyclododecane (HBCDD) emissions, exposures and impacts 

Allan Astrup Jensen 

Nordic Institute of Product Sustainability, Environmental Chemistry and Toxicology, Denmark 

Abstract:  Hexabromocyclododecane  (HBCDD  or  HBCD)  is  a  brominated  flame  retardant  mainly used in polystyrene‐based building insulation products (EPS and XPS) but is also used in  electronics as a substitute for banned flame retardants.  

This lipophilic and persistent organic pollutant accumulates in natural organisms and magnifies  in the food chain, leading to progressively increasing background levels in human tissues and in  wildlife,  especially  of  the  most  stable  α‐isomer.  The  extent  of  this  accumulation  correlates  directly with its ever‐more prevalent use. 

Limited toxicological information is available to assess the long‐term implications for health or  the environment of the HBCDD contamination. HBCDD is an endocrine disruptor in animals. 

In 2008 The European Chemicals Agency identified HBCDD as 1 of 14 substances of “Very High 

Concern”,  and  in  September  2010  HBCDD  was  added  to  REACH’s  Authorization  List.  In 

February 2011 HBCDD was selected to be phased out by EU REACH Regulation before 2015.  

In October 2010 and October 2011 POP Review Committee under the Stockholm Convention  has assessed the risks from HBCDD, and it was concluded that HBCDD fulfills the criteria of a  persistent organic pollutant (POP), and the committee recommended a global ban of HBCDD  use.  

In  January  2012  HBCDD  it  was  among  15  new  priority  substances  proposed  by  the  European 

Commission to be regulated by the EU Water Framework Directive 

 

This presentation  will  provide  a  succinct  up‐to  date  overview  of  HBCDD’s  properties,  uses,  regulation and discusses the risks associated with its prevalence in our homes and immediate  environment. 

Keywords: emerging contaminant; persistent organic pollutant, priority substance 

 

SETAC Australasia Brisbane 2012 Conference  Page | 93  

 

Session 10 (Fri AM, 14‐212)  Micropollutants and Emerging Contaminants 

Session 10.3 (Fri, 14‐212, 10:45‐11:05) 

Review of relevant toxicological developments and metrological practises  concerning nanoparticles in wastewater 

Åsa K. Jämting

1

*, Peta A. Neale

2

, Jan Herrmann

1

 and Beate I. Escher

2

 

1

National Measurement Institute, PO Box 264, Lindfield, NSW, Australia; 

2

The University of 

Queensland, National Research Centre for Environmental Toxicology (Entox), 39 Kessels Rd, 

Coopers Plains, QLD, Australia 

*presenting author 

Abstract:  The  impact  of  engineered  and  naturally  occurring  nanoparticles  (NPs)  on  environmental  health  is  presently  unclear,  but  is  of  increasing  interest  to  regulators,  researchers, consumers and utilities. To date, the work in this area has been hampered by the  difficulties  in  accurately  quantifying  and  characterising  NPs  in  aquatic,  terrestrial  and  atmospheric environments, in analysing their environmental and mammalian  toxicology, and  in determining the particles’ life cycle and environmental fate. 

In  recent  years,  there  have  been  significant  developments  in  the  fields  of  NP  detection  and  measurement,  which  are  potentially  relevant  to  this  area,  although  the  characterisation  of  particles  in  complex  matrices  such  as  water,  soil  and  food  remains  a  challenge.    Further,  the  effect  of  NPs  on  a  range  of  aquatic  and  soil  organisms  have  been  studied,  though  proper  assessment  of  exposure  conditions  is  generally  lacking  in  the  literature.  In  addition,  any  observed effects on biota only occurred at concentrations several orders of magnitude higher  than expected environmental concentrations.  

This  up‐to‐date  review  of  relevant  NP  materials,  NP  characteristics  and  measurement  techniques focuses on the fate of engineered NPs in wastewater treatment plants (WWTP), as  well as the potential impact of NPs discharged from WWTPs on aquatic and soil organisms, in  addition to any risks for human health. This review provides a critical evaluation of issues such  as  dosing  regimes,  and  the  qualification  and  quantification  of  exposure  concentrations  commonly used in biological test systems for the reviewed toxicological studies. 

 

Keywords: characterisation; environmental; measurements; nanotoxicology 

 

Page | 94  SETAC Australasia Brisbane 2012 Conference 

Session 10 (Fri AM, 14‐212)  Micropollutants and Emerging Contaminants 

Session 10.4 (Fri, 14‐212, 11:40‐12:00) 

Why is nanoparticulate CeO

2

 toxic to aquatic algae ? 

S.C. Apte*,  B.M. Angel, N.J. Rogers and L.A. Golding 

Centre for Environmental Contaminants Research, CSIRO Land and Water, Lucas Heights, 

NSW 2234, Australia 

*presenting author 

Abstract:  The  growing  use  of  manufactured  nanomaterials  in  consumer  products  is  raising  questions  as  to  whether  nanosized  materials  should  be  regulated  differently  to  macroscopic  forms of the same compounds in terms of the risks they pose both to human and ecosystem  health.    Nanoparticulate  cerium  oxide  (CeO

2

)  has  wide  potential  usage,  particularly  as  an  additive to diesel fuels where it improves the combustion efficiency of engine carbon deposits,  reducing particulate emissions and improving fuel efficiency. 

In this study, the toxicity of nanoparticulate CeO

2

 (nominally 10 ‐ 20 nm) to the freshwater alga 

Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata was investigated. Growth inhibition experiments revealed that  the nanoparticulate form was significantly more toxic than micron sized CeO

2

 with 72‐h IC50  values of 10.3 ± 1.7 and 66 ± 22 mg/L for the nanoparticles and bulk materials respectively. The 

IC50 for dissolved cerium (III) was 0.63 mg/L. 

Solubility  measurements  showed  that  the  dissolved  cerium  concentration  in  algal  growth  medium  was  very  low  (<  3  µg/L)  indicating  that  dissolved  cerium  was  not  responsible  for  the  observed  toxicity.  Algal  cells  exposed  to  CeO

2

  particles  were  permeable  to  the  DNA‐binding  dye SYTOX® Green in a concentration‐dependent manner. These data indicate that damage to  the cell membrane contributes to the toxic mechanism of action of the particles. 

Screening  assays  to  assess  the  oxidative  activity  of  the  particles  showed  that  the  light  illumination  conditions  used  during  standard  algal  bioassays  are  sufficient  to  stimulate  photocatalytic  activity  of  CeO

2

  particles,  causing  the  generation  of  hydroxyl  radicals  and  peroxidation  of  a  model  plant  fatty  acid.    No  oxidative  activity  or  lipid  peroxidation  was  observed in the dark. Subsequent experiments investigated the role of free radical production  in  toxicity.  These  experiments  indicated  that  algal  growth  inhibition  is  most  likely  caused  by  unidentified cell‐particle interactions which cause membrane damage rather than free radical  damage. 

 

Keywords: nanomaterials; algae; toxicity; cerium oxide 

 

SETAC Australasia Brisbane 2012 Conference  Page | 95  

 

Session 10 (Fri AM, 14‐212)  Micropollutants and Emerging Contaminants 

Session 10.5 (Fri, 14‐212, 12:00‐12:20) 

Factors affecting the toxicity of silver nanoparticles to algae 

Brad M. Angel

1

*,

 

Nicola J. Rogers

1

, Simon C. Apte

1

, Chad Jarolimek

1

, Graeme 

E. Batley

1

 

1

CSIRO Land and Water, Locked Bag 2007, Kirrawee, NSW 2232, Australia

 

 

Abstract:  Silver  is  highly  toxic  to  aquatic  organisms  and  the  increased  use  of  silver  nanoparticles  leads  to  concerns  over  the  potential  for  adverse  effects  resulting  from  silver  release  into  the  environment.  The  toxicity  of  silver  nanoparticles  was  investigated  for  the  freshwater  alga,  Pseudokirchneriella  subcapitata  and  the  marine  alga,  Phaeodactylum 

tricornutum  using  growth  inhibition  bioassaysThe  bioassays  tested  the  toxicity  of  in‐house  synthesised  and  purchased  citrate‐coated,  and  PVP‐coated  silver  nanoparticles,  with  diameters  of  14±7,  14±6,  and  15±5  nm,  respectively.  Equilibrium  dialysis  and/or  ultrafiltration  were  used  to  measure  the  dissolution  of  the  particles  in  synthetic  freshwater  and  natural  seawater. For P. subcapitata, the 72‐h IC50 values following exposure to in‐house synthesised  and purchased citrate‐coated, and PVP‐coated silver nanoparticles were 1.6, 2.9 and 20 µg/L,  respectively,  compared  to  650  µg/L  for  micron‐sized  silver  and  1.0  µg/L  for  AgNO

3

.  For  P. 

tricornutum,  the  72‐h  IC50  values  following  exposure  to  citrate‐coated  and  PVP‐coated  silver  nanoparticles were 3500 and 850 µg/L, respectively. The addition of dissolved organic matter  stabilised  the  nanoparticles  in  solution  and  decreased  the  toxicity  of  silver  to  P.  tricornutum

There  was  approximately  20‐fold  higher  dissolution  of  silver  nanoparticles  in  seawater  than  freshwater. The toxicological results and dissolution studies indicated that the type of particle  surface  coating  and  the  solution  matrix  affected  silver  dissolution  and  algal  toxicity.  The  toxicity of the nanoparticles will be discussed with reference to the role of silver speciation in  the bioassays. 

 

Keywords: algae; dissolution; aggregation; complexation, speciation 

 

Page | 96  SETAC Australasia Brisbane 2012 Conference 

Session 10 (Fri AM, 14‐212)  Micropollutants and Emerging Contaminants 

Session 10.6 (Fri, 14‐212, 12:20‐12:40) 

Behavior of water‐dispersible cadmium selenide quantum dots in  the terrestrial environment: soil column leaching and plant uptake  studies 

Divina Angela Navarro

1,3

*, Diana Aga

1

, Sarbajit Banerjee

1

, David Watson

1

, and 

Mary Bisson

2

 

1

Department of Chemistry, University at Buffalo, The State University of New York, 

Buffalo,NY, 14260‐3000 USA; 

2

Department of Biology, University at Buffalo, The State 

University of New York, Buffalo, NY, 14260‐3000 USA; 

3

CSIRO Land and Water, Advanced 

Materials Transformational Capability Platform, Nanosafety, Biogeochemistry Program, Waite 

Campus, Waite Rd, SA 5155, Australia 

*presenting author 

Abstract:  Interest  on  the  environmental  impacts  of  engineered  nanomaterials  has  rapidly  increased over the past 5 years. With the extensive work being done on developing materials in  the  “nano‐scale”,  these  materials  will  eventually  be  released  into  the  environment.  Fate  and  transport  studies  on  QDs  (or  nanomaterials  in  general)    involving  solid  matrices  are  still  very  limited.  The  present  work  provides  information  on  the  potential  of  QDs  to  leach  into  the  groundwater  or  be  taken  up  by  plants  when  these  types  of  materials  are  discharged  into  the  terrestrial  environment.  Differences  in  the  partitioning  and  mobility  of  CdSe  and  CdSe/ZnS 

QDs  were  examined  using  small‐scale  soil  columns.  Potential  for  QD  plant  uptake  were  investigated  using  Arabidopsis  thaliana  as  model  organism.  Our  results  suggest  that  though 

QDs may exhibit limited soil mobility, the presence of chelating acids in soil can enhance the  leaching potential of intact QDs. Longer incubation (15 days) of QDs in soil also indicated some 

QD degradation. Indeed, retention of intact QD in soil could be a concern for terrestrial plants. 

Plant uptake experiments revealed that Arabidopsis exposed to nanoparticle suspensions for 1‐

7 days did not show any internalization of intact QDs. QDs remained adsorbed onto the root  surfaces with or without humic acid addition. Despite no evidence for uptake, plant glutathione  levels (GSH/GSSG) decreased, in the presence of QDs (with HA); this could have been caused  by the nanoparticle or the probable leaching of toxic Cd

2+

 or SeO

3

2‐

Keywords: Arabidopsis thaliana; engineered nanomaterials; environmental implications of  nanomaterials; oxidative stress; phytotoxicity

SETAC Australasia Brisbane 2012 Conference  Page | 97  

 

Session 10 (Fri PM, 14‐212)  Micropollutants and Emerging Contaminants 

Session 10.7 (Fri, 14‐212, 13:40‐14:00) 

Impacts of sediment‐bound synthetic pyrethroids on non‐target aquatic  macroinvertebrates. 

Rhianna Boyle

1

*, Sara Long

1

, Steve Marshall

1

, Maria Ballesteros

Pettigrove

1

, Ary Hoffmann

1

 

1,2

, Vincent 

1

Victorian Centre for Aquatic Pollution Identification and Management (CAPIM), Bio 21 

Institute, The University of Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria 3052, Australia; 

2

Faculty of Natural  and Exact Sciences, Universidad Nacional de Mar del Plata, Funes 3350, 7600 Mar del Plata, 

Argentina 

*presenting author 

Abstract:  Synthetic  pyrethroid  pesticides  enter  waterways  through  drift  or  in  runoff,  and  rapidly bind to sediment, where they potentially threaten macroinvertebrates through chronic  exposure. While these pesticides are highly acutely toxic to macroinvertebrates, the effects of  chronic  exposure  are  less  well  understood.  There  is  also  a  need  for  biomonitoring  tools  that  identify  synthetic  pyrethroid  contamination,  especially  subcellular  biomarkers  that  can  be  linked to organism and community level effects. The aim of the study is to identify and link the  effects  of  two  synthetic  pyrethroids  at  these  three  organizational  levels.  Laboratory  toxicity  tests and field microcosms examined the effects of sediment‐bound bifenthrin and permethrin  on  survival  and  life  cycle  parameters  of  aquatic  macroinvertebrates.  This  dual‐pronged  approach  incorporates  exposure  in  both  controlled  and  natural  conditions.  In  laboratory  toxicity  tests,  clean  field‐collected  sediment  was  spiked  with  bifenthrin  or  permethrin  at  nominal  concentrations  of  12.5  ‐  50  μg/kg.  Second  instar  Chironomus  tepperi  larvae  were  exposed to the spiked sediment. At 50 μg/kg of bifenthrin, the number of larvae surviving after  five days was lower than that of the controls, however the body length of surviving larvae was  not  affected.  Two  weeks  of  exposure  to  bifenthrin  did  not  affect  the  number  or  sex  ratio  of  emerged  adults.  Results  for  permethrin  will  be  discussed,  as  will  results  of  lab  exposures  to  contaminated  field‐collected  sediment  with  comparable  concentrations  of  pesticides.  In  the  microcosm experiments, clean sediment was spiked with permethrin/bifenthrin at 8.9 μg/kg to 

500  μg/kg.  This  sediment  was  placed  in  wetland  microcosms  and  colonised  by  macroinvertebrates.  Emerged  adults  were  collected  over  several  weeks  and  identified  to  species level. The chironomid Paratanytarsus grimmii showed significantly reduced emergence  at concentrations of permethrin above 35.5 μg/kg. Results for bifenthrin will be discussed, as  will the links between subcellular biomarkers and effects on whole organism parameters and  community composition.  

Keywords: bifenthrin; chironomidae; laboratory‐bioassay; microcosms; permethrin 

Page | 98  SETAC Australasia Brisbane 2012 Conference 

Session 10 (Fri PM, 14‐212)  Micropollutants and Emerging Contaminants 

Session 10.8 (Fri, 14‐212, 14:00‐14:20) 

Occurrence of UV screens and preservatives in four Victorian waterways 

Mayumi Allinson

1

*, Yutaka Kameda

2

, Kumiko Kimura

3

, Graeme Allinson

1,4

 

1

CAPIM, The University of Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria 3025 Australia; 

2

Centre for 

Environmental Science in Saitama, 914 Kamitanadare, Kazo 347‐0115 Japan; 

3

Saitama City 

Institute for Health Science and Research, 7‐5‐12 Suzuya, Chuo‐ku, Saitama 338‐0013 Japan; 

4

Future Farming Systems Research, DPI Queenscliff Centre, Queenscliff, Victoria 3225, 

Australia 

*presenting author 

Abstract:  The  southern  hemisphere’s  elevated  UV  light  exposure  encourages  the  year‐round  use  of  UV  protective  chemicals  in  personal  care  and  plastic  products.  This  study  is  the  first  investigation  of  UV  protective  chemicals  in  Victorian  environmental  waters.  Screened  compounds included 11 UV filters, 10 UV stabilizers, and 12 preservatives, including commonly  used  compounds  in  Australia  such  as  4‐MBC,  EHMC,  octocrylene,  UV‐328,  HHCB,  2‐phenoxy  ethanol,  methyl  paraben,  and  propyl  paraben.  Water  samples  were  extracted  using  two  different  types  of  solid  phase  extraction  methods:  Oasis  HLB  (Waters  Corp.)  for  polar  compounds, Empore C18FF (3M) for relatively non‐polar compounds, then analyzed by GC‐MS,  after  derivatization  for  polar  compounds.  Samples  from  Sites  A,  B,  and  C  had  low  concentrations  of  the  screened  chemicals  with  similar  compound  profiles.  Site  D  had  a  very  different  contaminant  profile,  with  very  high  concentrations  of  many  of  the  screened  compounds. Sites A, B, C are both at the mouth of creeks and rivers flowing into Port Phillip 

Bay; Site D is about 5 km upstream of site C in Melbourne on the second biggest river entering 

Port  Philip  Bay.  Although  there  are  several  small  wastewater  treatment  plants  located  up  stream  of  site  D,  the  levels  of  HHCB  (an  indicator  of  domestic  and  municipal  wastewater  plants) measured at Site D were similar to the levels observed at Sites A, B and C, suggesting  that the chemicals observed at site D do not originate from a wastewater treatment plant but a  different  source.  The  detection  of  common  UV  filters,  such  as  4MBC,  EHMC,  OC  and  the  common  preservatives  2‐PE,  MP,  and  PB  in  a  Victorian  estuary  proves  that  the  existence  of  personal  care  products  in  the  environment  is  not  just  an  issue  for  more  densely  populated  countries in the northern hemisphere, but also potentially of concern in Australia. 

 

Keywords: personal care products; plastic products; UV protective chemicals; Port Philip Bay  catchment 

 

SETAC Australasia Brisbane 2012 Conference  Page | 99  

 

Session 10 (Fri PM, 14‐212)  Micropollutants and Emerging Contaminants 

Session 10.9 (Fri, 14‐212, 14:20‐14:40) 

Potential endocrine disruption in fish from the Great Barrier Reef region 

Sharon E. Hook

1

*, Frederieke J. Kroon

2

, David A. Westcott

 

1

CSIRO Land and Water, Private Bag 2007, Kirrawee, NSW 2232 Australia; 

2

CSIRO Ecosystem 

Sciences, PO Box 780, Atherton, Queensland 4883, Australia 

*presenting author 

Abstract:  The  potential  impacts  of  endocrine  disrupting  compounds,  including  triazine  herbicides,  on  wild  fisheries  populations  have  not  been  assessed.  In  the  catchments  surrounding the Great Barrier Reef (GBR) region such impacts are plausible given that: (i) low  chronic  levels  of  herbicide  residues  are  present  in  the  GBR  throughout  the  year  (ii)  triazine  concentrations  exceed  GBR  and  national  water  quality  guidelines  in  some  freshwater  and  marine  locations,  and  (iii)  labile  sex  determination  is  common  amongst  tropical  fish.    We  hypothesize that exposure to atrazine, an estrogen mimic, may result in endocrine disruption  in native fisheries species, particularly in species that are sequential hermaphrodites. Here, we  test  the  prediction  that  such  exposure  in  the  wild  may  result  in  altered  patterns  of  gene  expression.  We  collected  juvenile  (putatively  male)  barramundi  (Lates  calcarifer)  and  juvenile 

(putatively female) coral trout (Plectropomus leopardus) across the GBR region during the 2011  wet  season.   Expression  levels of  two  genes,  vitellogenin  (egg yolk  protein  which  is  normally  expressed only in sexually mature females) and aromatase (converts testosterone to estrogen  and is linked to sex change), were measured on liver, gonadal, and brain samples via qPCR. Our  initial results do not indicate altered gene expression in juvenile coral trout collected from the  reef.    However,  we  see  frequent  up  regulation  of  vitellogenin  in  barramundi  collected  from  freshwater  and  estuarine  wetlands,  suggesting  the  potential  for  wide  spread  exposure  to  endocrine active compounds. These initial results will be compared to levels obtained following  controlled laboratory exposures.  We discuss our results in the context of potential implications  for wild barramundi fisheries, and make recommendations for future research. 

Keywords: aromatase; atrazine; barramundi; gene expression; vitellogenin 

 

Page | 100  SETAC Australasia Brisbane 2012 Conference 

Session 10 (Fri PM, 14‐212)  Micropollutants and Emerging Contaminants 

Session 10.10 (Fri, 14‐212, 14:40‐15:00) 

Does tertiary treated effluent exposure result in endocrine disruption in 

Murray rainbowfish (Melanotaenia fluviatilis)? 

Anu Kumar*, Hai Doan, Adrienne Gregg, Deb Gonzago, Mike Williams and 

Rai Kookana 

CSIRO Land and Water, Waite Road, Urrbrae, SA 5064, Australia 

*presenting author

 

Abstract: Evidence of reproductive disruption, such as gonadal intersex, has been observed in  fishes collected downstream from wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) outfalls in the United 

Kingdom, Europe, Asia, and North America. However, endocrine disruption in fishes native to 

Australia has not been extensively investigated. In Australia, treated effluent discharged from 

WWTPs  can  make  a  large  contribution  to  the  flows  in  rivers  and  creeks  particularly  during  periods of low rainfall (ranging up to 100% of the flow in many locations). While the increased  volume of water is desirable, the ecological implications of the WWTP effluents discharges into  freshwater  environment  need  to  be  fully  understood.  To  determine  whether  effluent  from 

WWTPs  can  induce  reproductive  disruption  in  fish,  adult  male  Murray  rainbowfish 

(Melanotaenia  fluviatilis)  were  exposed  to  tertiary  treated  effluent  from  Wetalla  WWTP,  near 

Toowoomba in south‐east Queensland. Sexually mature male rainbowfish were exposed to the  effluent  at  concentrations  of  25,  50,  and  100%  effluent.  Major  endpoints  examined  included  induction  of  vitellogenin  (VTG)  protein  and  mRNA,  hepato‐  and  gonadosomatic  indices  (HSI  and GSI), and gonadal histology. Tertiary‐treated effluent from Wetalla WWTP was not acutely  toxic  to  Murray  rainbowfish  during  the  35  day  exposure  period.  No  intersex  condition  was  observed  in  sexually  mature  male  fish  exposed  to  the  tertiary  treated  effluent  over  35  days. 

Based  on  the  molecular  and  histopathoplogical  endpoints,  it  was  concluded  that  the  effluent  from  the  Wetalla  WWTP  posed  a  low  hazard  to  the  reproductive  health  status  in  adult  male 

Murray  rainbowfish.  Although  the  results  of  this  investigation  suggested  a  low  level  of  anti‐ androgenic effects occurred in effluent‐exposed fish, it is not clear what implications this may  have  for  the  long  term  reproductive  success  of  the  fish.  Also,  these  findings  should  not  be  extrapolated  to  freshwater  environments  receiving  effluent  produced  from  less  advanced  treatment technologies.  

 

Keywords: anti‐androgen, gonado‐somatic index, histology, vitellogenin  

 

SETAC Australasia Brisbane 2012 Conference  Page | 101  

 

Session 10 (Fri PM, 14‐212)  Micropollutants and Emerging Contaminants 

Session 10.11 (Fri, 14‐212, 15:40‐16:00) 

Removal of trace organic chemical contaminants by a membrane  bioreactor for water reuse 

H. M. Coleman

1

, T. Trinh

1

, B. van den Akker

1

R. Stuetz

1*

, P. Le‐Clech

2

, J. 

Drewes

3

 and S. Khan

1

 

1

UNSW Water Research Centre, the University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW 2052, Australia; 

2

UNESCO Centre for Membrane Science and Technology, the University of New South Wales, 

Sydney,  NSW 2052, Australia; 

3

Advanced Water Technology Center, Colorado School of Mines, 

Golden, CO 80401, USA 

*presenting author 

Abstract: The presence of trace chemical contaminants such as steroidal hormones, xenoestrogens,  pesticides,  pharmaceuticals  and  personal  care  products  in  municipal  wastewater  has  been  the  subject  of  increasing  concern  throughout  the  last  decade.  Some  of  these  trace  chemical  contaminants  are  known  to  have  endocrine  disrupting  effects  on  aquatic  organisms  at  low  concentrations and others have been linked to ecological impacts due to acute and chronic toxicity  mechanisms.  Recently,  emerging  wastewater  treatment  processes  such  as  membrane  bioreactors 

(MBRs) have attracted a significant amount of interest internationally due to their ability to produce  high  quality  effluent,  even  for  relatively  small  decentralised  systems.  However,  in  order  to  fully  validate the performance of MBR systems, it is necessary to evaluate their performance in terms of a  range of parameters including the removal of trace organic chemical contaminants.  

This  research  investigated  the  fate  and  removal  of  a  wide  range  of  trace  chemical  contaminants  including 12 steroidal hormones, 1 xenoestrogen, 2 pesticides and 32 pharmaceuticals and personal  care  products  through a  decentralised  package  MBR  plant  treating  municipal  wastewater  in NSW, 

Australia.  Samples  were  collected  along  the  entire  treatment  train  (i.e.  raw,  mixed  liquor  and  membrane  permeate).  Both  aqueous  and  biomass  samples  were  analysed  to  establish  a  full  mass  balance  for  the  trace  chemical  contaminants  removal  through  the  MBR.  Composite  samples  were  taken  every  day  during  a  6‐day‐period  in  September  2011.  All  sample  analyses  were  performed  in  triplicates. The chemicals analysed included the 64 trace chemical contaminants and key operational  parameters such as flow, pH, DO, TOC, TSS, VSS, TN, NH

3

, TP, TMP were also monitored. 

Full  results  will  be  presented  to  indicate  the  fate  and  removal  mechanisms  of  47  trace  chemicals  contaminants  through  the  MBR.  In  addition,  results  of  key  operational  parameters  will  also  be  presented  to  illustrate  the  performance  of  the  MBR.  This  knowledge  can  be  used  to  optimise  the  performance of MBRs in removing trace organic chemical contaminants to achieve the best possible  effluent quality for specific water reuse applications. 

Keywords: pesticides; pharmaceuticals and personal care products; steroidal hormones;  xenoestrogens.

   

Page | 102  SETAC Australasia Brisbane 2012 Conference 

Session 10 (Fri PM, 14‐212)  Micropollutants and Emerging Contaminants 

Session 10.12 (Fri, 14‐212, 16:00‐16:20) 

Understanding the role of photolysis in the degradation of emerging 

contaminants 

Sally Gaw

1

*, Phil Emnet

1

,

 

Rai Kookana

2

, Ali Shareef

Northcott

3

, Bryan Storey

2

, Mike Williams

2

, Grant 

 

1

Department of Chemistry, University of Canterbury, Christchurch, New Zealand; 

2

CSIRO 

Adelaide, Australia; 

3

Plant and Food Research, Hamilton, New Zealand; 

4

Gateway Antarctica, 

University of Canterbury, Christchurch, New Zealand  

*presenting author 

Abstract:  Internationally  emerging  contaminants  (ECs)  including  pharmaceuticals  and  personal  care  products  are  increasingly  being  reported  in  both  sewage  discharges  and  waterways.  Photochemical  degradation  is  a  potentially  significant  removal  mechanism  for  these  contaminants.  There  has  been  limited  research  on  the  influence  of  environmental  parameters on the photolysis of ECs. This lack of data can make it difficult to reliably predict  the environmental fate of these compounds.  The effects of temperature and irradiance levels  on the degradation rates of bisphenol A (BPA), ethinylestradiol (EE2), benzophenone‐3 (BP‐3),  triclosan,  and  octylphenol  (OP)  in  milli‐Q  and  an  environmental  water  were  assessed  in  the  laboratory using a series of experiments performed in a solar simulator.  BPA, BP‐3, and EE2  showed significant photo‐stability with less than 20% degradation over a seven hour exposure  period.  In comparison up to 100% of triclosan and 97% of OP were degraded over the same  time period.  Photolysis rates for triclosan ranged from 0.9 x 10

‐3

 to 1.7 x 10

‐2

  min

‐1

 and were  dependent on the irradiance level (p < 0.05), and independent of the temperature.  In contrast  photolysis rates for OP were temperature dependent (p < 0.05) and ranged from 0.9 x 10

1.7  x  10

‐2

  min

‐1

‐3

 to 

.  The  degradation  of  triclosan  was  enhanced  in  the  environmental  water.  This  trend  was  not  observed  for  OP.  These  results  indicate  that  photolysis  rates  for  emerging  contaminants  are  likely  to  be  both  compound  and  matrix  specific.  The  implications  of  these  results  for  risk  assessment  of  emerging  contaminants  will  be  discussed.    Given  the  large  number  of  ECs  being  detected  in  a  wide  variety  of  aquatic  environments  there  is  a  need  to  develop tools to enable assessment of the environmental persistence of these compounds and  treatment options. 

Keywords: aquatic chemistry, environmental fate; risk assessment  

 

SETAC Australasia Brisbane 2012 Conference  Page | 103  

 

Session 10 (Fri PM, 14‐212)  Micropollutants and Emerging Contaminants 

Session 10.13 (Fri, 14‐212, 16:20‐16:40) 

Degradation of illicit drugs and their metabolites in laboratory‐scale sewer  reactors 

Phong K. Thai

1,2*

, Foon Yin Lai

1

, Guangming Jiang

3

, Wolfgang Gernjak

3

Zhiguo Yuan

3

 and Jochen F. Mueller

1

 

 

1

The University of Queensland, The National Research Centre for Environmental Toxicology, 

Coopers Plains, QLD 4108, Australia; 

2

Bond University, Gold Coast, QLD 4229, Australia; 

3

The 

University of Queensland, Advanced Water Management Centre, St Lucia, QLD 4072, Australia 

*presenting author 

Abstract:  It  is  essential  to  have  accurate  data  about  the  consumption  of  illicit  drugs  in  the  population  to  plan  any  drug  control  policy.  Conventional  methods  of  obtaining  this  data  are  survey, criminal reports and medical reports, which are time‐consuming and may be subject to  biased  self‐reporting.  Wastewater  analysis  (or  sewage/forensic  epidemiology)  is  a  relatively  novel approach to monitor illicit drug use in the population through quantifying excreted drugs  and  their  metabolites  (as  markers)  in  raw  wastewater.  This  approach  promises  to  overcome  limitations raised by the traditional methods and at the same time it is less laborious and can  provide  near  real‐time  data  as  demonstrated  in  several  studies  around  the  world.  However,  recent research showed that drugs may be subject to degradation in sewers and therefore, is  required in order to further improve the accuracy of the drug use estimation. 

Experiments  to  assess  the  fate  of  major  illicit  drugs  or  their  metabolites,  including  cocaine,  amphetamines,  heroin,  were  conducted  in  laboratory‐scale  reactors  fed  with  real  sewage  to  simulate  the  conditions  of  gravity  and  rising  main  sewers  with  or  without  biofilm  on  the  reactors’  wall.  Deuterated  standards  were  used  to  eliminate  the  interference  of  residual  background in the real wastewater. Initial results showed that cocaine degraded steadily while  producing its key metabolite benzyl ecgonine. Methamphetamine was relatively stable under  all  conditions  while  6‐acetylmorphine,  the  unique  metabolite  of  heroin,  exponentially  degraded  during  the  test.  Degradation  rates  in  reactors  with  biofilm  (for  cocaine  and  6‐ acetylmorphine)  are  greater  than  those  without  biofilm,  indicating  that  microbial  transformation  in  biofilm  may  play  an  important  role  in  the  fate  of  drugs  in  sewers.  More  detailed  experiments  are  required  to  determine  the  contribution  of  each  process  to  the  degradation of those drugs and to estimate the total degradation coefficient for each drug in  the sewage epidemiology equation.  

Keywords: sewage/forensic epidemiology; illicit drug; LC‐MSMS; sewer degradation; biofilm 

 

Page | 104  SETAC Australasia Brisbane 2012 Conference 

Session 10 (Fri PM, 14‐212)  Micropollutants and Emerging Contaminants 

Session 10.14 (Fri, 14‐212, 16:40‐17:00) 

To what extent do hospital discharges contribute to the pharmaceutical  load in municipal wastewater? 

Kristell S. Le Corre

1

*, Christoph Ort

1,2

 and Jurg Keller

1

 

1

The University of Queensland, Advanced Water Management Centre (AWMC), Brisbane, QLD 

4072, Australia; 

2

Swiss Federal Institute of Aquatic Science and Technology (Eawag), CH‐8600 

Duebendorf, Switzerland 

*presenting author 

Abstract:  Hospitals  are  known  to  be  among  the  sources  contributing  to  the  presence  of  pharmaceuticals  in  the  environment.  However,  the  extent  of  their  contribution,  and  consequently,  the  efficacy  of  a  decentralised  treatment  of  hospital  wastewater  to  limit  the  discharge  of  pharmaceuticals  into  the  aquatic  environment  have  been  the  object  of  contradictory discussions. 

Therefore, the current project has investigated the contribution of hospitals located in South 

East  Queensland  to  the  loads  of  pharmaceuticals  in  municipal  wastewater  through  both  experimental  and  predictive  approaches.  Measurements  in  municipal  wastewater  of  a  catchment  with  45,000  inhabitants  showed  for  many  of  the  59  pharmaceutically  active  ingredients  (AIs)  that  only  small  fractions  originated  from  the  190‐bed  public  hospital. 

However, results obtained from such a narrow selection of compounds at a single site may not  be generalisable for a broader range of compounds at this or other sites.  

To  overcome  this  limitation,  a  new  consumption‐based  approach  was  investigated.  This  predictive method is based on data for hospital and national pharmaceutical consumption. The  results of this predictive study confirmed the limited impact of six public hospitals to the loads  of 589 AIs in municipal wastewater: individual hospitals contributions were below 15% for 371  to 524 compounds. In addition, the possibility for hospital‐specific AIs of being present at levels  that  may  present  a  risk  for  human  health  was  investigated.  Overall,  only  12  potential  compounds  of  concerns  were  identified, including  the  antineoplastic  vincristine  sulphate,  the  antibiotics piperacillin and tazobactam. These findings warrant more detailed investigations on  environmental  and  human  toxicity,  biodegradation  and  source  control  options.  To  confirm  outcomes  from  both  approaches,  the  contribution  of  a  296‐bed  hospital  to  a  STP  serving  a  population of 75,000 people will be investigated. 

Keywords: contribution; consumption; pharmaceutically active ingredients; prioritisation;  source control

SETAC Australasia Brisbane 2012 Conference  Page | 105  

Session 11 (Fri AM, 14‐116)  Water Quality 

Session 11.1 (Fri, 14‐116, 9:55‐10:25) [Session Highlight] 

Disinfection by‐products and human health risks: 38 years of research  without converging on answers 

Jeffrey W.A. Charrois

1

* and Steve E. Hrudey

2

  

1

Curtin Water Quality Research Centre (CWQRC), Curtin University, Perth, Australia; 

2

Analytical & Environmental Toxicology Division, Faculty of Medicine & Dentistry, University of 

Alberta, Canada 

*presenting author 

Abstract: Disinfection by‐products (DBPs) were detected in drinking water over 38 years ago. 

Since then identification of DBP species has closely paralleled advances in analytical chemistry. 

In  addition  to  a  number  of  regulated  DBPs  (such  as  trihalomethanes  and  haloacetic  acids),  notable DBP classes of current interest include: halonitromethanes, haloamides, halogenated  furanones,  haloaldehydes,  haloquinones,  as  well  as  N‐nitrosamines  and  iodo‐DBPs. 

Improvements in extraction, separation, and detection technologies have improved our ability  to  identify  DBP  species  that  were  once  difficult,  if  not  impossible,  to  detect  by  gas  chromatography methods. Moreover, liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry applications  are  providing  new  insights  into  the  monitoring  of  nonvolatile,  high‐molecular‐weight,  highly  polar, hydrophilic, and thermally labile target compounds in drinking water. However, that fact  that over 600 individual DBP species have been identified in drinking water to date, does not  necessarily constitute a health risk in and of itself. 

Public  concerns  regarding  exposure  to  DBPs  and  adverse  health  outcomes  stem  from  toxicology  and  epidemiology  studies,  which  have  suggested  elevated  risks  of  developing  certain  cancers  as  well  as  ongoing  speculation  about  potentially  adverse  reproductive  outcomes  with  increased  exposure  to  DBPs  in  drinking  water.  Minimizing  DBPs  capable  of  causing  the  adverse  human  outcomes  identified  in  epidemiology  studies,  such  as  bladder  cancer, should be a priority for public health and a focus for DBP researchers. This presentation  offers  an  overview  of  nearly  four  decades  of  research,  regulation,  and  water  treatment  advances in the area of DBPs. A frank assessment of the epidemiology and toxicology evidence  is  very  informative  when  put  in  quantitative  terms.  It  is  now  prudent  to  reflect  on  where  the 

DBP  agenda  has  been  and  more  importantly  consider  where  it  should  be.  There  are  tangible  answers  to  be  found  in  Australia  if  we  want  to  determine  if  chlorination  DBPs  truly  increase  bladder cancer risk. 

Keywords: Analytical Chemistry; Epidemiology; Regulations; Risk Management; Toxicology 

Page | 106  SETAC Australasia Brisbane 2012 Conference 

Session 11 (Fri AM, 14‐116)  Water Quality 

Session 11.2 (Fri, 14‐116, 10:25‐10:45) 

A pilot‐scale study of disinfection by‐product formation during MF/RO  treatment  

Kathryn Linge

1

*, Deborah Liew

1

, Charline Touliou

1

, Sebastien Allard

1

, Anna 

Heitz

1

, Cynthia Joll

1

, Nicholas Sheehy

2

, Mark Handyside

2

, Bradley Evans

2

Jeffrey Charrois

1

 

 

1

Curtin Water Quality Research Centre, Curtin University, GPO Box U1987, Perth, Australia; 

2

Water Corporation of Western Australia, 629 Newcastle Street, Leederville, Perth, Australia 

* presenting author 

Abstract:  Microfiltration  (MF)  and  reverse  osmosis  (RO)  are  key  treatment  barriers  in  many  potable water recycling schemes. However, some disinfection by‐products (DBPs), including N‐ nitrosamines,  can  form  during  MF/RO  membrane  treatment  resulting  from  the  need  to  chloraminate feed water to prevent excessive biofouling of the RO membrane. Here we report  results from experiments using a pilot‐scale MF/RO water recycling plant, which investigated  the impact of residence time within the pilot plant and pH on formation of a suite of DBPs (N‐ nitrosamines,  trihalomethanes  (THMs)  including  iodinated  THMs,  haloacetic  acids,  haloacetonitriles,  haloacetamides  and  halonitromethanes).  Sampling  was  undertaken  throughout  the pilot‐plant,  using  two  different contact  times,  the  typical  contact  time  of  the  pilot‐plant  (30‐40  mins),  and  a  contact  time  similar  to  a  full‐scale  water  recycling  plant  (3‐4  hours).  Additionally,  two  different  sets  of  pH  conditions  (6.5  and  7.0)  were  chosen,  primarily  because of the potential impact of pH on chloramine speciation  In addition to DBPs, a suite of  water  quality  parameters  were  also  measured,  including  chloramine  speciation,  DOC,  N  characterisation,  pH,  and  total  N‐nitrosamine  precursors.  Results  confirmed  that  DBPs  form  during  MF/RO  treatment,  in  agreement  with  previous  fieldwork  at  full‐scale  plants,  and  also  indicated  that  pH  had  a  greater  impact  on  DBP  formation  than  contact  time.  The  most  significant  finding  was  that  chloramine  speciation  in  the  pilot  plant  differed  considerably  to  speciation in full‐scale plants. This has particular implications for the translation of outcomes  from  pilot‐  to  full‐scale,  particularly  in  relation  to  DBP  formation  and  the  expected  rate  of  biofouling on RO membranes. 

Keywords: N‐nitrosamines; water recycling; formation potential; chloramine speciation 

 

SETAC Australasia Brisbane 2012 Conference  Page | 107  

Session 11 (Fri AM, 14‐116)  Water Quality 

Session 11.3 (Fri, 14‐116, 10:45‐11:05) 

Ozone and activated carbon treatment of sewage effluents: Toxicity  removal vs. toxicity increase 

Daniel Stalter

1

*, Axel Magdeburg

2

 and Joerg Oehlmann

1

National Research Centre for Environmental Toxicology, The University of Queensland, 39 

Kessels Road, Coopers Plains QLD 4108, Australia; 

2

Department Aquatic Ecotoxicology, 

Goethe University Frankfurt/Main, Siesmayerstraße 70, 60054 Frankfurt, Germany 

*presenting author 

Abstract: Ozonation and activated carbon filtration provide effective barriers to a wide range  of organic pollutants and can thus reduce the emission of hazardous contaminants via sewage  treatment  plant  effluents.  However,  concerns  arose  about  potential  hazardous  oxidation  products  occurring  as  a  result  of  ozonation.  Consequently,  for  a  risk‐benefit  analysis,  an  extensive  ecotoxicological  evaluation  of  advanced  treated  wastewaters  is  essential.  The  presented work  is part  of  a  comprehensive  study  within  the Neptune project  (www.neptune‐ eu.org),  covering  in  vivo  tests  with  six  different  test  organisms  and  a  variety  of  in  vitro  bioassays. 

For  a  comparative  in  vivo  toxicity  analysis,  test  organisms  were  exposed  to  raw  wastewater  from  different  sampling  points onsite  at  two  treatment  plants  in  a  flow  through  test system. 

Test  organisms:  Lemna  minorChironomus  ripariusLumbriculus  variegatusPotamopyrgus 

antipodarum,  Dreissena  polymorpha  and  Oncorryhnchus  mykiss.  For  the  in  vitro  analysis,  WW  was  solid  phase  extracted  before  toxicity  testing.  Toxicity  endpoints  using  yeast  based  bioassays: (anti‐) estrogenicity, (anti‐) androgenicity, AhR agonistic (dioxin like) activity; tests  on  genotoxicity/mutagenicity:  SOS/umu  test,  Ames  fluctuation  assay  using  different  tester  strains; test on non‐specific toxicity: cytotoxicity assay using a rat pituitary cell line. 

In vivo toxicity is increased after ozonation due to byproduct formation, whereas sand filtration  appeared as an appropriate post treatment for byproduct removal/degradation. Solely activate  carbon treatment revealed a significant reduction of in vivo non‐specific toxicity compared to  conventional  treatment.  Endocrine  activity,  genotoxicity  and  cytotoxicity  of  wastewater  are  effectively  reduced  with  ozonation  and  activated  carbon  filtration,  indicating  the  removal/degradation  of  causative  contaminants.  A  consistent  mutagenicity  increase  after  ozonation  and  sand  filtration  confirms  the  formation  of  toxic  oxidation  products  in  vitro  and  hence further research on byproduct formation and removal effectiveness of post treatments is  desirable. 

Keywords: advanced oxidation; oxidation products; wastewater   

Page | 108  SETAC Australasia Brisbane 2012 Conference 

Session 11 (Fri AM, 14‐116)  Water Quality 

Session 11.4 (Fri, 14‐116, 11:40‐12:00) 

Floods, contaminants and fish illness at Gladstone, Queensland  

Michael Warne

1

*, Julia Playford

1

, Susi Vardy

1

, Mike Holmes

1

, Jason Shen

1

John Ferris

1

, Mark Davidson

1

, Jacob Gruythuysen

1

, Brad Mayger

1

, Andrew 

Moss

1

, Darren Renouf

1

, Charmaine Wickings

1

, Ray Williams

1

, Christine 

Williams

1

, Nicole Blackett

2

 and Rae Huggins

1

 

1

Environment and Resource Sciences, Department of Environment and Resource 

Management, Dutton Park, Queensland; 

2

Office of the Director General, Department of 

Environment and Resource Management, Brisbane, Queensland 

*presenting author 

Abstract:  During  the  latter  half  of  2011  concerns  over  the  health  of  fish  in  waterways  of 

Gladstone were raised with the Queensland Government. The Department of Environment and 

Resource  Management  (DERM),  as  part  of  the  Queensland  Government  response  to  the  situation,  has  been  investigating  whether  there  have  been  changes  in  water  quality  in 

Gladstone  waterways,  whether  any  spatial  pattern  exists  in  water  quality  which  could  be  explained by dredging, and also whether water quality could be the cause or contribute to the  cause of the fish ill‐health. The investigation undertaken to date has included: 

• monthly  water  quality  monitoring  at  up  to  34  sites  in  the  Gladstone  region  and  the  samples analysed for metals;  

• two  rounds  of  sediment  samples  have  been  collected  and  analysed  for  metals  and  the  second round of samples was analysed for a broad range of organic chemicals; and 

• analysis of fish tissue for metal and organic contaminants.  

The  dissolved  metal  concentrations  are  highly  variable  both  spatially  and  temporally,  and  indicate  that  there  are  multiple  sources  of  metals  in  the  region.  Comparisons  of  measured  aqueous  and  sediment  contaminant  concentrations  and  the  appropriate  Australian  environmental  quality  guidelines  and  international  literature  will  be  made.  Potential  links  between  contaminants  and  changes  in  water  health  and  fish  illness  will  be  examined  and  discussed. Keywords: contaminants, dredging, fish‐health; water quality; sediment quality. 

Keywords: contaminants, dredging, fish illness, sediment quality, water quality 

SETAC Australasia Brisbane 2012 Conference  Page | 109  

Session 11 (Fri AM, 14‐116)  Water Quality 

Session 11.5 (Fri, 14‐116, 12:00‐12:20) 

Water quality threats in the Great Barrier Reef catchments  

R.D.R. Turner*, R.A. Smith, R.L. Huggins, R.M. Wallace, S. Vardy and  

M.St.J. Warne 

 

Environment and Resource Sciences, Department of Science, Information Technology, 

Innovation and Arts, Dutton Park, Queensland, Australia 

*presenting author 

Abstract:  The  ecological  health  of  the  Great  Barrier  Reef  (GBR)  is  under  threat  from  land‐ based  pollutants  delivered  from  35  catchments  with intensive  agricultural  land‐use.  The  Reef 

Water  Quality  Protection  Plan  2009  (Reef  Plan)  has  a  primary  goal  to  halt  and  reverse  the  decline in water quality entering the Great Barrier Reef lagoon by 2013. A key element of Reef 

Plan  is  the  Paddock  to  Reef  Program,  which  monitors  and  models  water  quality  at  the  paddock,  catchment  and  receiving  environment  scales  to  assess  the  impact  of  improved  agricultural management practices. The Queensland Government has funded the Great Barrier 

Reef  Catchments  Loads  Monitoring  Program  (GBRCLMP),  a  large‐scale  monitoring  program  that assesses the concentrations and loads of suspended solids, nutrients and pesticides being  discharged from high risk catchments. The data collected has been used to derive annual and  event‐based loads to compare anthropogenic to pre‐European loads and  assess loads exiting  each  catchment.  Data  has  also  been  used  to  assess  pollutant  concentrations  in  some  of 

Queensland’s  major  rivers  against  the  Australian  and  New  Zealand  Guidelines  for  Fresh  and 

Marine Water Quality trigger values for ecosystem protection and to derive catchment‐specific  dissipation  half‐lives  for  pesticides.  Since  2006,  it  has  been  estimate  that  134 million  ML  of  water  was  discharged  into  the  GBR  lagoon  from  the  monitored  catchments,  along  with 

46 million  tonnes  (1 tonne  =  1000 kg)  of  total  suspended  solids,  144 000 tonnes  of  total  nitrogen,  42 000 tonnes  of  total  phosphorus,  22 000 tonnes  of  dissolved  inorganic  nitrogen,  and  11 000 tonnes  of  phosphate.  Since  2009  approximately  50 tonnes  of  photosystem  II  herbicides  have  been  discharged  to  the  GBR  from  the  monitored  catchments.  Results  have:  provided assistance with government policy direction and targeting resources; increased public  awareness of water quality issues through national media coverage; allowed the assessment of  impacts  of  the  2011  Queensland  floods;  and  improved  monitoring  i.e.  groundwater  water  quality monitoring and in‐situ real‐time monitoring.  

Keywords: agriculture; loads; nutrient; pesticides; sediment  

 

Page | 110  SETAC Australasia Brisbane 2012 Conference 

Session 11 (Fri AM, 14‐116)  Water Quality 

Session 11.6 (Fri, 14‐116, 12:20‐12:40) 

Toxicity characterization of urban stormwater using bioanalytical tools 

Janet Tang

1

*, Eva Glenn

1

, Rupak Aryal

2

, Wolfgang Gernjak

2

, Meng Chong

3

Jatinder Sidhu

3

, Simon Toze

3

, David McCarthy

4

 and Beate Escher

1

 

1

The University of Queensland, National Research Centre for Environmental Toxicology (Entox), Brisbane 

Qld 4108, Australia; 

2

The University of Queensland, Advanced Water Management Centre (AWMC), 

Brisbane Qld 4072, Australia; 

Australia; 

4

3

CSIRO Land and Water, Ecosciences Precinct, Dutton Park Qld 4102, 

Monash University, Centre for Water Sensitive Cities, Clayton Vic 3800, Australia 

*presenting author 

Abstract: The growing demand of urban water supply due to limited water sources and population  growth  is  a  pressing  issue  in  Australia.  Thus,  stormwater  harvesting  and  reuse  has  become  an  attractive  alternative  strategy  to  address  this  shortage.  However,  urban  stormwater  has  been  considered  as  a  major  source  of  surface  water  pollution  traditionally.  Runoff  from  different  urban  catchments  (i.e.  source  contributions  from  anthropogenic  activities  and  land  uses)  causes  variable  contaminant  profiles  and  this  poses  a  challenging  task  for  environmental  monitoring  and  risk  assessment.  The  current  Australian  Guidelines  for  Water  Recycling:  Stormwater  Harvesting  and 

Reuse only encompass a limited number of stormwater quality parameters. Surprisingly, only scarce  data  is  available  on  stormwater  toxicity.  A  good  understanding  on  raw  stormwater  is  essential  to  develop treatment facilities for potential direct or indirect potable reuse. This study is part of the first  comprehensive  assessment  on  chemical,  microbiological  and  toxicological  profiles  of  urban  stormwater in Australia. Toxicity testing results from Brisbane, Sydney and Melbourne are presented  in this paper. Seven bioassay endpoints targeting the groups of chemicals with modes of toxic action  of  particular  relevance  for  human  and  environmental  health  are  investigated:  non‐specific  toxicity 

(Microtox),  the  specific  modes  of  action  of  phytotoxicity  (Imaging‐PAM),  dioxin‐like  activity 

(CAFLUX),  and  estrogenicity  (E‐Screen),  as  well  as  reactive  toxicity  encompassing  genotoxicity 

(umuC), protein damage (GSH) and oxidative stress (AREc32). Microtox results demonstrated high  variability  in  non‐specific  toxicity  and  the  baseline  toxicity  equivalent  concentration  (TEQ)  of  the  highest  contaminated  samples  was  similar  to  wastewater  treatment  plant  effluent.  Phytotoxicity  results  among  three  sampling  sites  were  very  similar  indicating  that  urban  runoff  contains  trace  amounts  of  herbicides.  Genotoxicity  was  also  observed  at  all  three  sites  suggesting  that  polyaromatic  hydrocarbons  (PAHs)  from  road  runoff  may  be  a  potential  source  of  contaminants  because the observed genotoxic effects were higher in the metabolic activated fraction and the toxic  equivalent  concentrations  were  generally  higher  than  raw  sewage.  Only  low  levels  or  no  toxicity  were found in the other endpoints. This study demonstrates the utilisation of bioanalytical tools for  stormwater  quality  assessment  and  forms  the  basis  for  future  treatment  facilities  design  in  stormwater reuse schemes. 

Keywords: alternative water source, in vitro bioassay; reactive modes of toxic action; stormwater  harvest, water recycling.

SETAC Australasia Brisbane 2012 Conference  Page | 111  

Session 12 (Fri PM, 14‐116)  Salinity 

Session 12.1 (Fri, 14‐116, 13:30‐14:00) [Session Highlight] 

A review of 15 years of research into the effect of salinity on freshwater  organisms in Australia. 

Ben J. Kefford 

 

Centre for Environmental Sustainability, School of the Environment, University of Technology 

Sydney (UTS), PO Box 123, Broadway, 2007, NSW, Australia 

*presenting author 

Abstract: Salinisation, the process of increasing salinity, is both natural and affected by human  activities.  In  Australia  anthropogenic  or  secondary  salinisation  is  predominately  the  result  of  clearing of deep rooted native vegetation and replacement with crops and pastures leading to  rises  in  the  height  of  (natural)  saline  ground  water.  As  this  saline  watertable  approaches  the  surface the salinity of soils, rivers and wetlands increases which in turn have detrimental effects  on agriculture and natural biodiversity. Since the mid‐1990’s, I have been involved in a number  of projects on the effect of increasing salinity on stream macroinvertebrates in Victoria, NSW  and  Queensland.  Over  this  time  others  (e.g.  Bailey,  Blinn,  Brock,  Dassanayke,  Davis,  Halse, 

James, Nielsen, Pinder and Sims) have also published on the topic of effect of salinity on inland  aquatic  biota  in  Australia.  As  with  studies  on  other  chemical  stressors,  this  literature  is  somewhat  split  between  those  using  laboratory  experiments  and  those  conducting  field 

(experimental  and  correlative)  studies.  I  suggest  that  this  is  unfortunate,  as  much  can  be  gained by comparing the results of both study types. In this review, I present a synthesis of the  state of current knowledge on impact of salinity on inland aquatic biota in Australia. I find some  inconsistencies in the findings of various studies and speculate on whether these are the result  of  biogeographic  differences  (western  vs.  eastern  Australia),  salinisation  history,  the  biota  studied  (plants, invertebrates,  etc.  and  from  streams  or  wetlands),  methods or  study  designs  used. I finish by presenting what I suggest are critical knowledge gaps and future directions. 

Keywords: major ions; salinization; dryland salinity; study design; state of knowledge 

 

Page | 112  SETAC Australasia Brisbane 2012 Conference 

Session 12 (Fri PM, 14‐116)  Salinity 

Session 12.2 (Fri, 14‐116, 14:00‐14:20) 

Salinity guidelines and aquatic ecosystem protection: a southern  hemisphere perspective on salt tolerance and macroinvertebrate  distributions 

CG Palmer

1*

, B Kefford

2

, MStJ Warne

3

, S Jooste

4

, N Muller

5

, N Rossouw

6

, R 

Dowse

2

, and AR Palmer

7

 

1

Rhodes University, PO Box 94, Grahamstown, 6140, South Africa; 

2

UTS, PO Box 123, 

Broadway, NSW 2007; 

3

DERM, Brisbane, Qld 4001, Australia; 

Pretoria 0001, South Africa; 

5

Town, South Africa; 

7

4

Department of Water Affairs, 

Amatola Water, East London, South Africa; 

6

Aurecon, Cape 

ARC, PO Box 101, Grahamstown, 6140, South Africa 

*presenting author 

Abstract: Surface water salinisation has emerged as a serious global issue that is likely to be  exacerbated  under  current  climate  change  scenarios.  There  have  been  major  efforts  to  monitor, measure and combine bio‐assessment and salt ecotoxicity data in both Australia and 

South  Africa  in  order  to  develop  guidelines  and  management  processes  that  protect  aquatic  ecosystems from salinity impacts. In South Africa a national chemical monitoring programme  and  data  provided  the  anchor  data  source,  with  macroinvertebrate  biomonitoring  offering  time‐integrated response insights, augmented by  experimental exposures to sodium chloride 

(to  model  agricultural  salinisation)  and  sodium  sulphate  (to  model  industrial/mining  salinisation).  In  Australia  the  national  biomonitoring  programme  provided  the  anchor  data,  with  chemical  data  being  spatially  and  temporally  patchy.  Tolerance  data  focused  on  exposures  to  a  marine  salt  mixture.    Ecotoxicity  approaches  also  differed,  with  Australian  research focusing on ascertaining the tolerances of as many species as possible, including rare  species  and  so  using  rapid  toxicity  testing  (RTT)  protocols.  In  South  Africa  the  focus  was  on  testing  fewer  species  with  more  accuracy  (>  test  individuals,  >exposure)  using  conventional  toxicity  test  (CTT)  protocols.  A  comparison  of  these  provides  several  new  insights:  1)  the  marine  salt  mixture  is  less  toxic  that  any  single  salt  (giving  rise  to  the  possibility  of  over‐  or  under‐ protection  depending  on  which  salt  exposures  are  used  to  derive  guidelines); 2)  there  are  demonstrable  correlations  between  distribution  and  tolerance  to  both  the  marine  salt  mixture,  and  single  salt  exposures.  3)  it  is  possible  to  derive  general  guidelines  from  both  detailed southern hemisphere data‐sets that are endorsed by additional northern hemisphere  data. However site specific studies are indicated where magnesium and sulphate ions are likely  to be influential in the salinity profile.  Salinity guideline values are presented in the context of  adaptive integrated water resource management. 

 

Keywords: ecotoxicity; integrated water resource management; salinisation 

 

SETAC Australasia Brisbane 2012 Conference  Page | 113  

Session 12 (Fri PM, 14‐116)  Salinity 

Session 12.3 (Fri, 14‐116, 14:20‐14:40) 

Impact of salinity on freshwater macroinvertebrates in the Fitzroy  catchment 

Rajesh Prasad

1*

 and Sue Vink

2

 

 

1

Water Planning Ecology, Water Planning Sciences, Department of Environment and Resource 

Management, Brisbane, QLD; 

2

Centre for Water in the Minerals Industry, Sustainable Minerals 

Institute (SMI), The University of Queensland, St Lucia, Qld, Australia 

*presenting author 

Abstract: Excess water accumulated in Queensland coal mines during extremely high rainfall  events associated with La Niña conditions. Storage of this water increases the salinity due to  evaporation  and  ongoing  input  of  salts  from  the  surrounding  landscape  during  small  rainfall/runoff  events  and  from  groundwater.  Release  to  streams  is  one  of  the  most  effective  disposal  options  as  water  can  be  released  quickly  avoiding  long  term  accumulation  of  saline  water.  However,  the  coal  industry,  environmental  regulatory  authorities  and  governments  need  information  related  to  the  potential  impacts  of  salinity  on  the  environment  and  guidelines  representing  safe  salinity  levels  to  ensure  that  impacts  of  environmental  releases  would be minimal. The environment areas that face most risk from salinised water disposal are  freshwater environments, including streams and rivers. 

In this study, selected macroinvertebrates from the Fitzroy catchment, where many coal mines  are  situated,  were  tested  for  their  sensitivity  (tolerance)  to  salinity.  The  test  solutions  were  comprised of simulated mine effluent diluted with simulated creek water. The simulated mine  water  and  simulated  creek  water  were  prepared  on  the  basis  of  the  ion  composition  of  mine  water  and  a  typical  creek  respectively,  in  the  region.  Results  showed  that  Caenidae  and 

Baetidae  (Order:  Ephemeroptera),  the  two  families  that  were  tested,  were  less  tolerant  of  simulated mine water in comparison with their tolerance to marine salts. 

Past research has shown that ionic composition can have ameliorating or confounding effects  on  electrical  conductivity  and  consequently  on  toxicity  of  saline  waters.  Further  research  on  ionic  composition  of  coal  mine  effluent  may  derive  solutions  for  management  of  effluent  discharge. 

Keywords: salinity; macroinvertebrate sensitivity; Ephemeroptera; ionic composition; toxicity  

 

Page | 114  SETAC Australasia Brisbane 2012 Conference 

Session 12 (Fri PM, 14‐116)  Salinity 

Session 12.4 (Fri, 14‐116, 14:40‐15:00) 

Effect of salinity changes on the marine communities in the Gulf St 

Vincent 

Satish Dogra

1

*, John Hayles

1

, Jan Jendyk

1

, Martin Johnston

2

, Melissa Brown

1

Amanda Ellis

2

 and Sophie Leterme

1

School of Biological Sciences and 

2

School of Chemistry, Physics and Earth Sciences, Flinders 

University, GPO Box 2100, Adelaide, SA 5001, Australia 

Abstract:  Desalination  of  sea  water  is  emerging  as  a  promising  technology  for  the  efficient  production of fresh water. However, effects of desalination plants on the marine environment  need to be assessed carefully to ensure long‐term environmental sustainability. The upcoming  desalination  plant  at  Port  Stanvac  (SA)  is  being  used  as  a  case  study  to  understand  the  changes, adverse or otherwise, caused by brine on the aquatic phytoplankton communities. In  particular,  we  focus  on  diatoms,  which  are  very  sensitive  to  environmental  pollution  and  changes in salinity. Our monitoring suggests that the changes in salinity observed over seven  months were minimal and had little impact on the composition of phytoplankton communities. 

Four diatom species Navicula sp., Skeletonema sp., Striatella sp. and Amphora sp. were isolated  at  the  water  intake  and  outfall  sites  of  desalination  plant.  Salinity  trials  on  these  species  indicate  species‐specific  response  to  salinity  change  at  levels  far  above  than  salinity  change  that  was  recorded  during  our  trial  at  these  sampling  sites.  Two  diatoms  species  Navicula  sp.  and Striatella sp. which adapt differently to the salinity conditions were chosen for NMR  and 

SEM analysis. Navicula sp. adapts well to the change in salinity from 36psu to 50psu. Contrary  to  this,  the  growth  of  Striatella  sp.  is  affected  severely  when  grown  in  50psu.  The 

29

Si  NMR  analysis of the Navicula sp. growing at 50psu showed the existence of intracellular pool of Silica  which is in more condensed form as compared to cells grown at 36 psu. Compared to Navicula 

sp., Striatella sp. which grows poorly at 50 psu  had reduced Si  content as compared to when  cultured  at  36  psu.    Results  on  NMR  and  Scanning  Electron  Micrographs  will  be  discussed  in  relation to the growth of these species in different salinities. 

 

Keywords: desalination; environmental impact; diatoms 

 

SETAC Australasia Brisbane 2012 Conference  Page | 115  

Session 12 (Fri PM, 14‐116)  Salinity 

Session 12.5 (Fri, 14‐116, 15:40‐16:00) 

Environmental assessment and the monitoring of potential impacts of the 

Sydney desalination plant discharge on rocky reef assemblages 

Stephen J Blockwell

1

*, Susan Trousdale

1

, Brendan Kelaher

2

, Melinda 

Coleman

2

 Graeme Clark

3

, Nathan Knott

3

 and Emma Johnston

3

 

1

Sydney Water Corporation, 1 Smith Street, Parramatta , NSW, Australia; 

2

University 

Technology Sydney, Ultimo, NSW, Australia; 

3

University of New South Wales, NSW, Australia 

*presenting author 

Abstract:  The  Environmental  Assessment  of  Sydney’s  desalination  plant  predicted  that  impacts  on  the  marine  environment  as  a  result  of  the  plant’s  operation  were  likely  to  be  minimal. The focus of this paper is a probabilistic assessment of the effects of treated seawater  concentrate,  which  is  a  by‐product  of  the  reverse  osmosis  production  process,  on  aquatic  organisms;  and  monitoring  potential  toxicity‐induced  effects  in  the  receiving  marine  environment i.e. rocky reef habitat assemblages.  

During the Environmental Assessment stage of the desalination project ecotoxicity tests were  conducted  with  seawater  concentrate  and  a  range  of  aquatic  species.  The  results  of  these  studies  were  analysed  using  a  species  sensitivity  distribution  approach  to  identify  a  95%  species  protection  level  and  a  dilution  factor  for  the  seawater  concentrate  that  would  have  minimum impact on the marine ecosystem.  

The desalination plant environmental monitoring program quantitatively assesses the marine  assemblages of rocky reefs adjacent to the high velocity outlet diffuser system. This study was  initiated  in  2007  and  has  a  M‐BACI  experimental  design  comprised  of  locations  close  to  the  outlet (ca 50 – 100 m) as well as numerous reference locations (spread over a range of 2‐8km  from  the  diffuser).  The  MBACI  design  is  one  of  the  most  comprehensive  for  investigating  desalination  discharge  effects  anywhere  in  the  world.    The  effectiveness  of  the  sampling  methods  for  testing  hypotheses  based  on  spatial  and  temporal  variation  in  rocky  reef  assemblages as well as early trends in the post commissioning data will be discussed. Specific  hypotheses  will  be  tested  in  2013  following  the  completion  of  the  experimental  design  comprised of 3 years pre‐commissioning data and 3 years post‐commissioning.  

 

Keywords: M‐BACI; ecotoxicology 

 

Page | 116  SETAC Australasia Brisbane 2012 Conference 

Session 12 (Fri PM, 14‐116)  Salinity 

Session 12.6 (Fri, 14‐116, 16:00‐16:20) 

Assessing environmental impact of SWRO outfalls on key benthic marine  organisms 

Julie Mondon

1

*, Gary Kendrick

2

, Marion Cambridge

2

 and Alecia Bellgrove

1

 

1

Deakin University, Princess Highway, Warrnambool, Vic, Australia; 

2

Oceans Institute, 

University of Western Australia, Crawley, WA, Australia 

*presenting author  

Abstract:  This  study  addresses  the  impact  of  hypersaline  discharge  from  SWRO  plants  on  recipient marine ecosystems in Western Australian coastal systems. The paper will discuss the  difficulties associated with the  identification of critical thresholds for key marine species to the  physical and chemical characteristics of desalination waste brine discharge, and the suitability  of biomarkers of exposure and effect for use as bio‐monitoring tools to measure environmental  impacts  for  currently  operating  and  planned  desalination  plants.  The  principal  objective  is  to  develop a detailed  understanding  of  tolerances  of  marine  species  to  brine  wastewater  in  the  vicinity  of  SWRO  outfalls  to  mitigate  environmental  impacts,  and  to  identify  sensitive  in‐situ  bio‐monitoring  indicators. The primary aims of such a project are to measure the environmental tolerances of  regional benthic communities, develop biomarkers relevant to key species, and to develop risk  assessment  tools  applicable  to  the  release  of  desalination  waste  brine  into  the  receiving  environment. 

 

Keywords: biomarkers; bio‐monitoring; desalination; risk assessment; seawater reverse  osmosis 

 

SETAC Australasia Brisbane 2012 Conference  Page | 117  

Session 12 (Fri PM, 14‐116)  Salinity 

Session 12.7 (Fri, 14‐116, 16:20‐16:40) 

Development of ecosystem protection trigger values for sodium sulfate in  seasonally flowing streams of the Fitzroy River Basin 

Jason Dunlop

1

*, Dustin Hobbs

2

, Reinier Mann

2

, Vinitha Nanjappa

3

, Ross 

Smith

2

, Susi Vardy

1

, and SueVink

3

 

 

1

Catchment Water Science Unit, Water Quality and Aquatic Ecosystem Health Division, 

Department of Environment and Resource Management, Brisbane, QLD; 

Pty Ltd; 

3

2

Hydrobiology QLD 

Centre for Water in the Minerals Industry, Sustainable Minerals Institute, The 

University of Queensland 

*presenting author 

Abstract:  Coal  mines  in  the  Bowen  Basin  have  reduced  freshwater  consumption  by  implementing water re‐use in operations. This has resulted in overall increased salinity of water  stored on sites. Sulfate is often associated with this water but few studies have elucidated the  impacts  of  sulfate  on  aquatic  organisms  making  it  difficult  to  set  criteria  for  mine  water  discharge. There are currently no ecosystem protection trigger values for sulfate in Queensland  or  elsewhere  in  Australia.  This  study  has  developed  the  first  locally  relevant  ecosystem  protection  trigger  values  for  sulfate  in  the  Fitzroy  River  Basin.  The  surface  water  chemistry  present  in  the  Fitzroy  River  Basin  was  analysed  to  define  a  representative  water  type  for  toxicity assessment. A standard suite of toxicity tests was used to assess the potential toxicity  of sulfate and a species sensitivity distribution was derived from these data to define protective  concentrations. The concentration of sulfate that should theoretically be protective of 95% of  species  in  the  receiving  ecosystem  was  estimated  to  be  770  mg/L  and  the  concentration  of  sulfate  that  should  theoretically  protect  99%  of  species  in  the  receiving  ecosystem  was  estimated to be 620 mg/L. This study provides a significant advance in scientific understanding  of  the  potential  environmental  impacts  of  sulfate  in  the  Fitzroy  River  Basin  and  will  help  improve licensing and water quality management. 

Keywords: guidelines; impacts; mining; salinity; sulfate 

 

Page | 118  SETAC Australasia Brisbane 2012 Conference 

Session 12 (Fri PM, 14‐116)  Salinity 

Session 12.8 (Fri, 14‐116, 16:40‐17:00) 

Saline mine discharge effects on microbial communities and  biogeochemical cycling in ephemeral streams 

Janina Beyer‐Robson* and Sue Vink  

Centre for Water in the Minerals Industry, Sustainable Minerals Institute, The University of 

Queensland, Qld, Australia 

*presenting author 

Abstract:  Ephemeral river systems are a major part of the Australian river landscape. In such  systems  major  biogeochemical  cycling  occurs  in  the  river  sediments  of  the  hyporheic  zone  where  the  surface  and  groundwater  mix.  Microorganisms  play  a  key  role  in  driving  these  biogeochemical reactions which are vital in maintaining the function and food webs of riverine  ecosystems. 

In  Australia,  these  river  systems  are  increasingly  subjected  to  salinization  due  to  agriculture  and  industrial  growth.  In  particular,  concerns  in  regards  to  coal  mining  and  saline  mine  discharge  impacts  on  aquatic  ecosystems  have  been  highlighted  in  the  Bowen  Basin, 

Queensland. However, salinity impacts on biogeochemical processes in ephemeral systems are  poorly understood.  

This  study  investigates  the  effect  of  salinity  on  major  river  ecosystem  process  rates  and  the  microbial  communities  from  hyporheic  sediments  in  the  Isaac  Catchment,  Queensland. 

Process rates are measured using sediment incubations. Additionally, molecular tools are used  to examine microbial community composition and distribution. Results of field and laboratory  experiments conducted will be presented. 

 

Examining  how  salinity  influences  nutrient  dynamics  and  microbial  mediated  ecosystem  processes will provide insights for managing such ephemeral rivers. The outcomes will support  environmental  management  positions,  in  particular  towards  the  implications  of  saline  discharge from coal mining and coal seam gas activities in the region.  

SETAC Australasia Brisbane 2012 Conference  Page | 119  

Session 13 (Fri AM, 14‐217)  Soil and Sediments 

Session 13.1 (Fri, 14‐217, 9:55‐10:25) [Session Highlight] 

Molecular approaches for assessing the ecotoxicological and ecological  impacts of soil and sediment contaminants 

Anthony Chariton 

CSIRO Land and Water, Locked Bag 2007, Kirrawee, NSW 2232  

Abstract: The use of molecular tools is by no means new, however, recent analytical advances,  most notably the advent of high‐throughput sequencing (HTS), have created a paradigm shift  in the way biological systems can be examined. Such advances now make it routinely possible  to simultaneously examine massive numbers of molecular products, encompassing biological  levels from sub‐cellular to whole ecosystem. The growth in potential applications is only being  exceeded by the creation of new ‘omic’ terms. In this presentation, insight will be provided into  some of the less esoteric molecular approaches and their value to ecotoxicologists examining  the chronic responses of organisms and communities to contaminated substrates.  These will  include recent examples that use transcriptomics to examine the responses to contaminants of  model  and  non‐model  organisms,  together  with  HTS  and  microarray‐based  approaches  for  examining  sediment  biological  diversity  and  composition.  The  strengths  and  limitations  of  these  approaches  will  be  discussed,  while  emphasising  the  need  to  integrate  rather  than  replace  traditional  approaches  with  molecular  endpoints.    Finally,  some  of  the  new  technologies currently being beta‐tested will be reviewed with respect to their potential use in  ecotoxicology.  

 

Keywords: ecogenomics; high‐throughput sequencing; ‐omics; molecular ecology 

 

Page | 120  SETAC Australasia Brisbane 2012 Conference 

Session 13 (Fri AM, 14‐217)  Soil and Sediments 

Session 13.2 (Fri, 14‐217, 10:25‐10:45) 

Uptake of pharmaceuticals and personal care products from sediments 

Maja Karlsson

1

, Alistair Boxall

1

*, Todd Gouin

2

, Stuart Marshall

2

, Mike 

Williams

3

 

1

University of York, Heslington, York, UK; 

2

Unilever, Colworth, UK; 

3

CSIRO, Adelaide, Australia 

* presenting author 

Abstract:  Following  release  to  aquatic  systems,  Pharmaceuticals  and  personal  care  products  may  associate  with  the  sediment  compartment  where  they  may  be  taken  up  by  benthic  organisms.  In  order  to  establishthe  risks  of  PPCPs  to  benthic  organisms,  it  is  important  to  understand  the  uptake  of  the  compounds  from  sediment  into  organisms  and  the  effects  of  environmental conditions on uptake.  

This  presentation  will  present  the  results  of  work  to  explore  those  factors  and  processes  affecting the uptake of PPCPs from aquatic sediments into the oligochaete worm Lumbriculus 

variegatus.  Studies  were  performed  on  a  range  of  PPCPs  (including  fluoxetine,  caffeine,  triclosan, diclofenac, chloramphenicol, salicylic acid and naproxen) covering a range of modes  of  action  and  physicochemical  properties  and  assessed  the  uptake  and  depuration  of  compounds from the pore water phase and from whole sediment. Manipulation studies were  done  to  assess  the  impacts  of  sediment‐pH  on  PPCP  uptake.  LC‐MS  analysis  was  used  to  determine the extent of metabolism of the study compounds in the worms. 

Results showed that the major pathway of uptake of the PPCPs was from the sediment pore  water and the feeding only made a small contribution to body residues. The degree of uptake  of the study compounds from pore water could be explained using information on pore water  and organism pH, the octanol‐water partition coefficient and the dissociation coefficient of a  compound  using  an  ion‐trap  model  with  a  correction  for  metabolism.  The  modelling  approaches  developed  in  this  study  will  be  invaluable  in  the  future  in  assessing  the  risks  of 

PPCPs in the sediment compartment. 

 

Keywords: Lumbriculus variegatus, pH, uptake, depuration, ion trap model 

 

SETAC Australasia Brisbane 2012 Conference  Page | 121  

Session 13 (Fri AM, 14‐217)  Soil and Sediments 

Session 13.3 (Fri, 14‐217, 10:45‐11:05) 

A novel technique to measure the bioavailable fraction of pharmaceuticals  in sediments and soils 

Mike Williams* and Rai Kookana 

 

Centre for Environmental Contaminants Research, CSIRO Land and Water, Waite Campus, 

Urrbrae, SA, Australia 

* presenting author 

Abstract:  Numerous  studies  have  documented  the  presence  of  pharmaceuticals  in  aquatic  systems and, to a lesser extent, on agricultural land. The solid phase, being either sediments or  soils,  in  either  system  can  have  an  important  impact  on  the  fate  and,  therefore,  extent  of  exposure to organisms living within aquatic or terrestrial systems. Isotopic exchangeability is a  robust  technique  that  has  so  far  been  applied  to  the  assessment  of  bioavailable  fractions  of  nutrients and trace elements only, particularly in agricultural settings. This technique is used to  determine the fraction of a sorbed contaminant that is able to exchange back into solution. We  applied this technique was applied to determine the isotopically exchangeable fraction, or E‐ value, of a number of pharmaceuticals in a range of sediments. Treatments included the effect  of extended contact with sediments (“ageing”) and also the effect of sediment organic carbon  quality, through addition of biochar, on the E‐value of the pharmaceuticals. Ageing was found  to have an important influence on the E‐value of the pharmaceuticals, with an overall reduction  in  the  E‐value  occurring  over  time,  even for  the  pharmaceuticals with  a  lower  affinity  for  the  sediments. For example, the anti‐epileptic drug carbamazepine had an E‐value 80% of its initial 

E‐value after only 28 days of contact with the sediment, despite having a log K d

 value of 1 or  less.  The  application  of  this  technique  to  estimate  the  biologically  important  fraction  of  pharmaceuticals,  and  other  emerging  organic  contaminants  of  concern,  sorbed  to  soils  or  sediments will be discussed together with the implications of the findings from this study. 

Keywords: Exchangeable value; hysteresis; isotope exchange; organic contaminant; sorption 

 

Page | 122  SETAC Australasia Brisbane 2012 Conference 

Session 13 (Fri AM, 14‐217)  Soil and Sediments 

Session 13.4 (Fri, 14‐217, 11:40‐12:00) 

Determining bioavailability of silver in soils by isotope dilution 

Lara Settimio

1,2

*, Mike J. McLaughlin

1, 2

 and Jason K. Kirby

2

 

1

University of Adelaide, School of Agriculture, Food and Wine, Waite Campus, Waite Rd, SA, 

Australia; 

2

CSIRO Land and Water, Minerals Down Under Flagship, Waite Campus, Waite Rd, 

SA, Australia 

*presenting author 

 

Abstract:  Silver  (Ag),  a  precious  metal  with  highly  desirable  attributes  is  actively  mined  worldwide  and  used  in  many  consumer  and  industrial  products.  Silver  pollution  can  occur  during  the  mining  process,  from  waste  water  treatment  plants  (WWTP)  via  effluents  and  sewage sludge and readily available consumer products that contain Ag and Ag nanoparticles 

(AgNPs).  The  singly  charged  cation  (Ag

+

)  is  strongly  antibacterial  and  known  to  be  toxic  to  bacteria  and  microorganisms.  The  isotope  dilution  technique  is  useful  in  assessing  metal  availability  in  complex  solid  matrices  and  in  particular  can  be  applied  in  the  soil environment  with minimal disturbance to metal equilibria. Both the solid‐solution partitioning (K d  value) and  the isotopically exchangeable or potentially available metal pool (E‐value) can be determined. 

The  aim  of  this  study  was  to  develop  an  isotope  dilution  method  to  characterise  Ag  bioavailability in soil. A total of 20 soils were used, consisting of 10 soils with background Ag  concentrations (0.91 – 3.95 mg Ag kg experimental K d

‐1

) and 10 soils covering a range of chemical and physical  properties  spiked  with  varying  concentrations  of  AgNO

3

  (0.1  –  1000  mg  Ag  kg

‐1

 and E‐values for Ag were determined using a carrier‐free radioisotope (

).  The 

110m

Ag  nitrate) spike equilibrated with soil suspensions for 72 h. Total Ag concentrations in solutions  were  determined  by  inductively  coupled  plasma  optical  emission  or  mass  spectrometry  and 

110m

Ag  activities  by  gamma‐spectroscopy.  High  K d

  values  for  Ag,  an  indication  of  strong  partitioning of metals to the solid phase, were found for soils with high clay content and high  pH.  Sandy  and  acidic  soils  were  found  to  have  the  largest  potentially  available  pool  of  Ag  (E  values).  The  influence  of  soil  properties  on  the  solid‐solution  partitioning  of  Ag  indicates  the  potential  for  making  corrections  for  Ag  bioavailability  across  soils  and  therefore  better  predictions of toxicity in the soil environment. 

Keywords: 

110m

Ag; E‐value; K d

‐value; toxicity 

 

SETAC Australasia Brisbane 2012 Conference  Page | 123  

Session 13 (Fri AM, 14‐217)  Soil and Sediments 

Session 13.5 (Fri, 14‐217, 12:00‐12:20) 

Sediment metal concentrations within an estuary: The influence of  seagrass  

Noni Dowsett

1

*, Scott Rayburg

2

 and Ben Kefford

1

 

1

Centre for Environmental Sustainability (CEnS), School of the Environment (SoE) University of 

Technology, Sydney, PO Box 123 Broadway, NSW 2007,Australia; 

2

Swinburne University of 

Technology, PO Box 218 Hawthorn, Victoria 3122, Australia  

*presenting author 

Abstract: Seagrasses are of key importance to the estuarine environment. They support many  environmental  functions,  such  as  primary  production  and  habitat  for  fisheries  resources. 

However,  seagrass  ecosystems  are  highly  threatened  worldwide.  Along  the  NSW  coast,  seagrasses are almost entirely restricted to estuaries. Estuaries and surrounds are often heavily  developed, and as a result pollution from within a catchment often ends up in the associated  estuary.  These pollutants  include  sediment,  nutrients,  organics  and  heavy  metals.  Metals  are  persistent in the environment and can remain stored in the sediment indefinitely. Seagrass bed  sediment  (compared  with  bare  sediment)  has  been  established  as  sinks  for  nutrients.  Less  is  known about their role as a sink for metals. Seagrass beds growing in developed estuaries are  often  scarred  and/or  fragmented.  How  the  concentration  of  metals  in  sediment  differs  between  seagrass  bed  and  bare  sediment  within  the  seagrass  bed  is  not  established. 

Understanding  how  sediment  metal  concentrations  differ  between  seagrass  and  bare  sediment  is  key  to  understanding  the  dynamics  of  metal  cycling  within  the  estuarine  environment, as well as potential impacts of seagrass fragmentation and loss. The aims of this  paper are to: 1) compare the concentrations of a range of metals, including Cd, Cu, Pb, and Zn,  between seagrass bed sediment and bare sediment patches within the seagrass beds; and 2)  determine  potential  causes  for  any  difference  in  metal  concentrations.  The  surface  10  cm  of  sediment were sampled by hand core from subtidal seagrass and associated bare patches from  sites  throughout  Lake  Macquarie,  NSW.  Particle  size,  organic  matter,  physco‐chemical  properties and metal concentrations of the sediments were determined. Metals were analysed  using  inductively  coupled  plasma  mass  spectroscopy  (ICP‐MS).  This  paper  presents  the  concentrations of metals in seagrass bed sediment and bare sediment, and discusses potential  causes for differences, as well as the biological implications of these differences. 

 

Keywords: bare sediment; contamination; Lake Macquarie; particle size distribution; Zostera 

capricorni 

 

Page | 124  SETAC Australasia Brisbane 2012 Conference 

Session 13 (Fri AM, 14‐217)  Soil and Sediments 

Session 13.6 (Fri, 14‐217, 12:20‐12:40) 

Effects of copper contamination on ecosystem health: assessment at  different levels of biological complexity 

Stephanie Gardham

1

*, Grant Hose

1

 and Anthony Chariton

2

 

 

1

Environment and Geography, Faculty of Science, Macquarie University, NSW, Australia; 

2

CSIRO Land and Water, Kirrawee, NSW, Australia 

* presenting author 

Abstract:  Copper  contamination  of  aquatic  sediments  can  have  a  deleterious  effect  on  the  biodiversity and functioning of aquatic ecosystems. Although an essential metal, when present  at  elevated  bioavailable  concentrations,  copper  has  been  shown  to  have  reproductive,  biochemical, physiological and behavioural effects on aquatic organisms.  

The aim of our research is to develop and compare a number of approaches for assessing the  biological  and  ecological  effects  of  copper  contaminated  sediments.  Here  we  used  a  manipulative  approach,  creating  twenty  1500 L  copper  contaminated  mesocosms.  The 

Australia and New Zealand Guidelines for Fresh and Marine Water Quality – Interim Sediment 

Quality  Guidelines  were  used  to  define  nominal  treatments  with  target  concentrations  of 

0 mg/kg  (control),  32 mg/kg,  65 mg/kg,  270 mg/kg  and  540 mg/kg.  Sediments  were  contaminated  with  copper  in  situ  between  Setpember  and  October  2010.  Over  time,  environmentally relevant partitioning was achieved. The majority of copper partitioned to the  particulate  phase  with  low  µg/L  concentrations  measured  in  the  porewaters  and  overlying  waters. The mesocosms have been open to biotic colonisation since November 2010.  

Here we present results from different elements of the ecosystem that have responded to the  contamination gradient. These include effects on ecosystem function, community, population  and  sub‐lethal  endpoints.  Elevated  concentrations  of  particulate  copper  affected  both  the  structural  and  functional  characteristics  of  the  mesocosms.  For  example,  above  270  mg/kg  significant  differences  in  the  benthic  macroinvertebrate  community  composition  were  found  and microbial degradation was reduced. When combined with the toxicity data, this approach  further  aids  our  understanding  of  how  elevated  concentrations  of  particulate  copper  impact  lentic freshwater systems.  

Keywords: sub‐lethal, population, community, function, mesocosm 

 

SETAC Australasia Brisbane 2012 Conference  Page | 125  

 

Session 14 (Fri PM, 14‐217)  Biomarkers and Biosensors 

Session 14.1 (Fri, 14‐217, 13:30‐14:00) [Session Highlight] 

Can canaries sing under water? The pros and cons of aquatic biosensors  and early warning systems 

Scott Wilson

 

 

Centre for Environmental Management, CQUniversity, Gladstone, Queensland 4680, Australia  

Abstract:  The  idea  of  using  the  equivalent  of  the  canary  in  the  coal  mine  for  aquatic  environments is not a new one. The benefits of a rapid, cost effective and sensitive biosensor  system that may provide an early warning for contaminant detection have been espoused for  years,  at  least  by  their  manufacturers.  However,  if  the  benefits  of  their  use  are  so  widely  claimed then why haven’t they become a common tool in water management and toxicological  assessment?  The  problem  is  that  most  suffer  from  some  of  the  same  criticisms  as  standard  toxicity  tests  and  that  is  no  single  sensor  or  species  will  respond  to  all  contaminants  or  be  suitable  for  all  water  types.  Hence,  the  need  to  develop  appropriate  sensors  for  specific  geographic regions, climatic conditions and for contaminants of concern. Further, the reliance  on  non‐standard  behavioural  endpoints  for  whole  organism  systems  is  subject  to  greater  variation and the chance of false positives. Despite these, the real time exposure of mixtures of  contaminants  through  inline  systems  plus  the  general  sensitive  nature  of  behavioural  responses  provide  the  potential  for  an  early  warning  detection.  These  tools  continue  to  be  modified  and  advances  made  allowing  for  potentially  greater  application  in  the  future.  The  pros  and  cons  in  the  use  of  these  ‘aquatic  canaries’  and  their  likely  future  directions  will  be  discussed. 

Keywords: BEWS; behavioural responses; sensors 

 

Page | 126  SETAC Australasia Brisbane 2012 Conference 

Session 14 (Fri PM, 14‐217)  Biomarkers and Biosensors 

Session 14.2 (Fri, 14‐217, 14:00‐14:20) 

The development of a blue mussel (Mytilus galloprovincialis) embryo  bioassay  

Samantha Gale

1

* and Estefania Parades

2

 

 

1

Cawthron Institute, Private Bag 2, 98 Halifax Street East, Nelson, New Zealand; 

2

Departamento de Ecoloxía e Bioloxía Animal, Universidade de Vigo, Estrada Colwxio 

Universitario s/n, 36310 Vigo, Galicia, Spain 

*presenting author 

Abstract: There is a great need for a mussel bioassay in New Zealand both for environmental  health assessments and to help regional councils implement the ANZECC (Australia and New 

Zealand  Environmental  and  Conservation  Council)  water  quality  guidelines.  In  the  embryo‐ bioassay,  fertilized  eggs  are  developed  for  48  hours  to  an  easily  assessable  ‘D‐larvae’  stage. 

This  is  typically  conducted  in  a  3‐10  ml  static  assay  vessel  under  ambient  temperature  conditions.  Reference  toxicants  such  as  Copper  or  Zinc  at  a  critical  concentration  will  reduce  the  percentage  of  embryos  that  develop  to  D‐larvae.  Combined  with  the  potential  for  year  round  gamete  availability,  this  makes  mussel  embryos  a  good  indicator  for  monitoring  and  assessment  of  coastal  pollution.  Towards  this  goal,  a  joint  collaboration  was  undertaken  between the Cawthron Institute, New Zealand and ECIMAT , Spain to develop and standardize  an  assay  for  use  in  New  Zealand.  Assay  development  involved  assessing  various  artificial  seawater  recipes,  standardizing  natural  seawater,  range‐finding  reference  toxicants,  defining  salinity, temperature and pH optimals, standardizing the origin of broodstock, and broodstock  holding  conditions  to  maintain  a  consistent  supply  of  quality  gametes.  This  paper  discusses  issues arising in assay development and standardization of this assay to better suit our needs.  

It is hoped that ultimately this assay can be adapted for New Zealand’s endemic Greenlipped 

Mussel (Perna canaliculus). 

Keywords: Artificial seawater; reference toxicants; origin of broodstock 

 

SETAC Australasia Brisbane 2012 Conference  Page | 127  

 

Session 14 (Fri PM, 14‐217)  Biomarkers and Biosensors 

Session 14.3 (Fri, 14‐217, 14:20‐14:40) 

Using biological effects to determine the impact of exposure to  contaminated sediment upon benthic macroinvertebrates  

Sara Long

1

*, Claudette Kellar

1

, Maria Ballesteros

1,2

, Gavin Rose

3

, Lisa 

Golding

1

, Bryant Gagliardi

1 and Vincent Pettigrove

1

Victorian Centre for Aquatic Pollution Identification and Management (CAPIM), Bio 21 

Institute, The University of Melbourne, 30 Flemington Road, Parkville, Victoria 3052, Australia; 

2

Faculty of Natural and Exact Sciences, Universidad Nacional de Mar del Plata, Funes 3350, 

7600 Mar del Plata, Argentina; 

3

Future Farming Systems Research Division, Department of 

Primary Industries, DPI Centre Macleod, Ernest Jones Drive, Macleod, Victoria 3085, Australia 

*presenting author 

Abstract: Human activities are a threat to the ecological integrity of many aquatic ecosystems.  

It  is  often  difficult  to  isolate  the  effects  of  pollutants  from  other  causative  factors,  and  to  identify  the  primary  pollutants  causing  ecosystem  stress.  Biomarkers  can  be  used  to  demonstrate that chemicals have been taken up by organisms and exerted a biological effect. 

The  study  was  undertaken  at  Lake  Hawthorn  in  northwestern  Victoria.  Previous  surveys  showed  the  presence  of  pesticides  in  the  sediment  at  toxic  concentrations.    The  aim  of  the  study was to a) quantify the chemicals present within the lake and b) determine the effects of  exposure  to  sediment‐bound  chemicals  upon  benthic  macroinvertebrates  using  a  range  of  exposure  scenarios.  The  lake  was  divided  into  six  sampling  locations  and  between  three  and  five  sites  selected  at  each  location,  where  sediment  and  surface  water  was  collected  and  a  range  of  chemicals  were  measured  (including  metals  and  pesticides).  Benthic  macroinvertebrates were sampled at each location for species diversity and also for changes at  the  sub‐organism  level  for  several  biomarkers.  Sediments  were  also  assessed  for  effects  on  survival, growth and emergence of Chironomus tepperi using a laboratory‐based bioassay and  impacts  on  indigenous  macroinvertebrates  using  field‐based  microcosms.  Chironomid  larvae  were  retained  from  the  laboratory‐based  bioassay  and  microcosms  for  biomarker  measurements. There were elevated concentrations of pesticides, copper and total petroleum  hydrocarbons in sediment at an urban inlet drain within the lake. No in situ chironomids were  collected at this location; furthermore there were also effects on C. tepperi survival. Biomarker  analyses  on  the  chironomid  Tanytarsus  semibarbitarsus  collected  in  situ  showed  that  chironomids  are  responding  differently  within  the  lake.  Our  results  show  that  the  pollutants  present in Lake Hawthorn are toxic to aquatic life.  The usefulness of biomarkers in a multiple  lines of evidence approach for aquatic biomonitoring will be discussed. 

Keywords: biomonitoring; laboratory‐bioassays; metals; microcosms; pesticides 

Page | 128  SETAC Australasia Brisbane 2012 Conference 

Session 14 (Fri PM, 14‐217)  Biomarkers and Biosensors 

Session 14.4 (Fri, 14‐217, 14:40‐15:00) 

Development of sublethal ecotoxicological endpoints for the tropical sea  anemone Aiptasia pulchella 

P.L. Howe*, A.J. Reichelt‐Brushett and M.W. Clark 

 

School of Environmental Science and Management, Southern Cross University, Lismore, NSW, 

Australia 

*presenting author 

Abstract: Aiptasia pulchella is a tropical symbiotic sea anemone, which has been identified as a  promising species for tropical marine ecotoxicology. This species has a wide distribution across  the  tropics,  is  readily  cultured  in  large  numbers  in  the  laboratory,  and  like  corals,  hosts  intracellular  dinoflagellates  of  the  genus  Symbiodinium  sp..  Prior  research  shows  that  A. 

pulchella is acutely sensitive to a range of trace metals in lethal tests relative to other species. 

This includes corals, for which this species may be a valuable proxy in toxicity testing. Repeated  tests show the toxicity effects to be highly reproducible, and a 96‐h reference toxicant test has  been developed using copper.  

Current  work  responds  to  the  need  for  the  development  of  routine,  sublethal,  and  commercially  viable  ecotoxicological  test  methods,  and  newly  developed  sub‐lethal  test  methods using A. pulchella are presented. Test methods and endpoints show a high sensitivity  to  a  range  of  trace  metals  and  a  herbicide,  and  include  96‐h  and  7‐d  pedal  lacerate  development, and 28‐d reproduction tests. These tests allow estimations of acute and chronic 

EC50  values  for  A.  pulchella,  and  direct  comparison  with  other  tropical  species;  these  show  effective concentrations to be comparable to many species. These newly developed sub‐lethal  and  chronic  test  methods  may  be  utilised  for  other  stressors,  and  may  provide  an  invaluable  contribution to much needed reliability improvements in toxicity estimates to protect tropical  marine species and ecosystems.   

Keywords: phylum cnidarian; toxicity; trace metals; diuron 

 

SETAC Australasia Brisbane 2012 Conference  Page | 129  

 

Session 14 (Fri PM, 14‐217)  Biomarkers and Biosensors 

Session 14.5 (Fri, 14‐217, 15:40‐16:00) 

Developing microbial indicators for assessment of groundwater quality 

M. Josie Lategan

1

*, Grant C. Hose 

2

 and Richard Lim

3

 

1

Dept of Chemistry & Biomolecular Sciences; 

2

Dept of Biology, Macquarie University, Australia 

2109; 

3

Centre for Environmental Sustainability, University of Technology Sydney 2007, 

Australia 

*presenting author 

Abstract:  The  derivation  of  water  quality  guidelines  is  most  valued  when  founded  on  the  toxicity response of ecosystem‐specific organisms. Risk assessment of unique ecosystems such  as  aquifers  is  based  solely  on  data  acquired  from  field‐collected  macroinvertebrates  since  indicators  from  the  ecologically  relevant  dominant  communities  in  such  systems  ‐  the  microbial communities‐ are yet to be developed. We assessed the sensitivity of two ubiquitous  groundwater  fungal  taxa  (RO1  –  a  yeast  and  PE1  ‐  a  hyphomycete)  against  a  range  of  heavy  metals  as  well  as    a  petroleum  mix  using  a  variety  of  structural  (live/dead,  growth)  and  functional (enzyme activity) endpoints to determine the potential of groundwater fungal taxa  as tools for ecological risk assessment. 

For  RO1,  the  effective  concentration  values  for  a  96  hour  exposure  test  differed  across  the  various  endpoints  tested,  with  conventional  viable  culture  methods  yielding  the  lowest  EC  values.  However, the order of sensitivity to the various heavy metals was retained irrespective  of endpoint and/or detection system used. RO1 was most sensitive to Cr, followed by Cu, Zn  and  As  (EC

10/50

:  0.0018/0.014;  0.08/0.12;  1.62/2.04;  2.27/4.06  mg  /L  respectively).  For  PE1,  a  novel  structural  endpoint  that  allowed  the  assessment  of  the  hyphal  component  of  the  indicator  was  developed.  PE1  was  most  sensitive  to  Cr  followed  by  Cu,  As  and  Zn  (EC

10/50

0.46/27.54;  16.5/37.13;  982.47/1285.6;  1966.8/3804.7  mg/L  respectively).    For  this  indicator  increased  exposure  (21  days)  lowered  the  effective  concentration  values  for  the  same  heavy  metal. Both indicators were very sensitive to the petroleum mix, EC

10/50

: 0.0033/0.0093; 0.0054/ 

0.0355 % dilution of neat petroleum for RO1 and PE1 respectively.  

With  existing  microbial  based  kits  demonstrating  some  insensitivity  to  heavy  metals,  fungal  indicators may offer an alternative as laboratory organisms for toxicity assessment as well as  increase the range of species that can be tested in risk assessment programs.  

 

Keywords: bioindicators; fungi; heavy metals 

 

Page | 130  SETAC Australasia Brisbane 2012 Conference 

Session 14 (Fri PM, 14‐217)  Biomarkers and Biosensors 

Session 14.6 (Fri, 14‐217, 16:00‐16:20) 

A potential test species to represent a new ecosystem –deep ocean  ecotoxciology 

Amanda Reichelt‐Brushett*, Harino Shiroma and Pelli Howe 

School of Environmental Science and Management, Southern Cross University, Lismore, NSW, 

Australia 

* presenting author 

Abstract:  Marine  pollution  is  of  growing  concern  to  the  global  community,  and  at  the  same  time  the  risk  of  pollution  from  Submarine  Tailings  Disposal  (STD)  and  developing  deep  sea  mining  activities  in  the  Coral  Triangle  region  is  unprecedented.  Standard  ecotoxicological  methods  using  relevant  tropical  marine  test  species  are  currently  limited  and  no  tests  using  deep sea species are currently available. These deficiencies reduce the ecological relevance of  the  ecotoxicological  methods  currently  available  for  tropical  regions  and  deep  water  environments.    Further,  there  are  significant  challenges  associated  with  developing  toxicity  tests  and  risk  assessment  associated  with  impacts  on  ecosystems  in  deeper  water  (i.e.  those  beyond current SCUBA capabilities). 

 

In  a  response  to  the  deficiency  in  ecotoxicological  test  methods  we  have  collected  and  maintained a reproductive population of the brittle star Amphipholis squamata.  This species is  found  worldwide  (except  polar  regions)  from  the  surface  to  around  1000  m  deep,  however,  taxonomists  suggest  that  is  possibly  a  complex  of  sympatric  species.    Static  renewal  toxicity  tests using copper were conducted to determine initial sensitivity of this species.  Initial 96 hr 

LC50 values were around 39µg/L copper.  There was100% survival of individuals in control test  conditions after 10 days (total time tested), suggesting the further suitability of this species for  laboratory study.  This is a brooding species and during test procedures juvenile offspring were  observed  leaving  their  parent.  Reproduction  success  is  a  potential  future  target  endpoint.  

Another  potential  endpoint  for  study  is  variations  in  bioluminescence  which  has  direct  relevance to deeper water environments. 

Keywords: novel species; deep ocean; ecotoxicology; copper 

 

SETAC Australasia Brisbane 2012 Conference  Page | 131  

 

Session 14 (Fri PM, 14‐217)  Biomarkers and Biosensors 

Session 14.7 (Fri, 14‐217, 16:20‐16:40) 

Transcriptomic profile responses to common stressors in the diatom 

Phaeodactylum tricorntum 

Hannah L. Osborn* and Sharon E. Hook 

CSIRO Land and Water, Lucas Heights, NSW Australia 

*presenting author 

Abstract:  This  study  examined  changes  in  the gene  expression  profile  of  the marine  diatom, 

Phaeodactylum tricornutum, resulting from exposure to several ecologically relevant stressors.

 

Algal growth inhibition was measured by flow cytometry to determine IC

10

 concentrations and 

P.  tricornutum  exposed  to  the  observed  IC

(copper, 2 µg L

‐1

; cadmium, 5 µg L

‐1

10  concentrations  of  the  following  contaminants 

; silver, 20 µg L

‐1

; simazine 75 µg L

‐1

; weathered crude oil 5  mg  L

‐1

)  were  used  for  microarray  analysis.  In  addition,  gene  expression  profiles  were  also  generated  for  diatoms  exposed  to  low  salinity,  15  ppt  and  ammonia,  50  µg  L stressor  scenario  of  ammonia  (50  µg  L

‐1

‐1

.  A  multiple 

),  low  salinity  (15  ppt),  and  cadmium  (10  µg  L

‐1

),  was  also  investigated.  Analysis  of  the  gene  expression  via  microarray  indicated  that  unique  transcriptomic signals were generated for each of the individual treatments. Copper and silver  had few altered transcripts, whilst exposure to cadmium resulted in 55 altered transcripts. As  expected,  transcripts  altered  after  exposure  to  the  herbicide  simazine  were  predominately  associated  with  photosynthesis  and  localised  to  the  chloroplast.  There  was  up  regulation  of  transporters involved in osmotic tolerance in the salinity treatment. A strong overlap in gene  expression profiles between ammonia and the mixture treatment was observed; 385 out of 509  transcripts altered were due to the presence of the ammonia stressor. Glutamine sythetase, a  marker  for  ammonia  assimilation  was  up  regulated  in  both  treatments,  as  were  nitrate  transporters and nitrate reductase. Overall, the changes in transcript responses in the different  treatments  were  associated  with  stress  responses,  membrane  transport,  transcription  and  translation. This new approach has potential to enhance traditional toxicology bioassays and to  identify biologically relevant stressors within a contaminated ecosystem based on changes in  the transcriptomic profile. 

 

Keywords: algae, gene expression, genomics, metals, microarray, oil, pesticides 

 

Page | 132  SETAC Australasia Brisbane 2012 Conference 

Session 14 (Fri PM, 14‐217)  Biomarkers and Biosensors 

Session 14.8 (Fri, 14‐217, 16:40‐17:00) 

Potential of earthworms as ecotoxicological assessment tool and agro‐waste  management in Thailand  

Chuleemas Boonthai Iwai 

Department of Plant Sciences and Agricultural Resources, Land Resources and Environment 

Section, Faculty of Agriculture, Khon Kaen University, Khon Kaen, Thailand 

Abstract:  The  aim  of  this  paper  is  to  review  the  role  of  the  earthworm  as  an ecotoxicological  assessment tool for agro‐waste management in Thailand. Agro‐waste is a significant  environmental  concern in Thailand. However, the assessment of the effects agro‐waste on the environment  and  its  management  in  Thailand  is  still  not  well  developed.  Laboratory  and  field  research  studies of the utility of earthworms for assessing ecological impacts associated with toxicants  and  agro‐waste  itself  were  conducted.  Ecotoxicological  studies  (acute  and  chronic  toxicity,  growth, reproduction and earthworm avoidance test) were conducted with contaminants and  waste  from  different  sources  of  activities  including  waste  and  wastewater  from  agriculture,  swine  farm,  cassava  industry,  rubber  sheet  production  and  domestic  organic  waste  from  municipality market. The result showed that the growth rates and reproduction of earthworm 

(the numbers of cocoons), and their avoidance behavior were significantly different among the  contaminant sources. Therefore, the earthworm could be considered as a bioindicator and test  organism  to  assess  to  impact  of  agro‐waste  contamination  in  Thailand.  Cassava  industrial  wastes  and  organic  waste  from  the  market  in  Khon  Kaen  Municipality,  Khon  Kaen  Province  were managed  by utilizing vermicompost technology. This study also examined the effect of  different  industrial  and  domestic  wastes  on  changing  nutrient  (total  nitrogen,  available  phosphorus  exchangeable  potassium,  cation  exchange  capacity,  organic  carbon  and  carbon‐ nitrogen  ratio) and  the  growth and  reproduction  of  the  earthworm.  The  degradation  of  toxic  substances in waste such as cyanide from cassava and pesticide residues was monitored. The  results found  that  the  application  of  domestic and  industrial  wastes  by  using earthworm  and  vermicompost  technology  could  increase  the  nutrient  content and  to  reduce  soil  toxicity  and  thus provide a sustainable way to manage agro‐waste and land resource. 

Keywords: earthworm; ecotoxicological assessment; agro‐waste

SETAC Australasia Brisbane 2012 Conference  Page | 133  

 

Posters (Wed PM, 12‐613)  Mixtures and Multiple Stressors 

Poster #01 (Wed, 12‐613, 15:40‐17:00) 

Interaction of atrazine and salinity to the developing cane toad, Rhinella 

marina 

Khurshida Akter Siddiqua

1

*, Scott Wilson

1

, and Ralph Alquezar

1

Centre for Environmental Management, CQUniversity, Gladstone, Queensland 4680, 

Australia; 

2

Vision Environment Queensland, PO Box 1267, Gladstone, Qld 4680, Australia 

*

Presenting author 

Abstract: In order to determine the interactive effects of atrazine and elevated salinity to the  introduced cane toads, Rhinella marina, both acute and chronic tests were explored. Tadpoles  of Gosner stages 25‐26 were exposed to atrazine and salinity alone and in combination for 96  hours. Results showed that there were no acute effects of elevated salinity, up to 8% seawater  equivalent,  to  the  cane  toads,  but  the  toads  showed  greater  sensitivity  to  the  integrated  effects of atrazine and increased salinity. The EC50 for the cane toads after 96‐hours exposure  to  atrazine  alone  was  24.35mg/L  whereas  it  was  9.45mg/L  for  the  mixture  of  atrazine  and  salinity.  To  determine  the  interaction  of  chronic  level  atrazine  and  salinity  effects  on  the  survival,  growth  and  development,  Gosner  stages  28‐29  were  exposed  to  environmentally  relevant  concentrations  of  both  contaminants,  singularly  and  in  combination,  for  21  days. 

There  were  no  significant  differences  in  endpoints  across  the  treatments  in  all  chronic  tests,  although there was a small percentage of tadpoles that exhibited kinky tail and absence of hind  limbs  in  atrazine  treatments.  Results  suggest  that  low  concentrations  of  atrazine  may  not  negatively impact the survival, growth or development of R. marina.  

Keywords: acute; chronic; interactive effects; sensitivity

 

Page | 134  SETAC Australasia Brisbane 2012 Conference 

Posters (Wed PM, 12‐613)  ET&C in Extreme Environments 

Poster #02 (Wed,12‐613, 15:40‐17:00) 

Temporal changes in the coastal zooplankton community off Davis 

Station, East Antarctica, and its response to diesel fuel contamination 

Sarah J. Payne

1

*, Catherine K. King

2

, Patti Virtue

Harrison

1

, Kerrie Swadling

1

 Peter 

 

1

Institute of Marine and Antarctic Science, University of Tasmania, Hobart, Tasmania; 

2

Australian Antarctic Division, Kingston, Tasmania; 

3

Southern Cross University, Lismore, NSW 

* presenting author 

Abstract:  As  zooplankton  is  an  important  food  source  for  consumers,  and  a  major  source  of  recruits  to  the  benthic  community,  impacts  on  sensitive  zooplankton  communities  have  the  potential  to  significantly  alter  nearshore  marine  ecosystems  in  Antarctica.  With  increasing  human  activity  in  coastal  regions  of  Antarctica,  it  is  important  to  determine  the  effects  of  petroleum  fuels  on  the  zooplankton  community  as  a  whole,  and  not  only  single  component  species.  This study takes a community based approach to testing the effects of a commonly  used  diesel  fuel on  the zooplankton  community,  using  both  multi‐species   and  single‐species  acute  toxicity  tests.  Multi  species  tests  were  conducted  between  December  and  February 

2010/11 at Davis Station to determine the response of the changing zooplankton community,  to  exposure  to  water  accommodated  fraction  (WAF)  of  Special  Antarctic  Blend  (SAB)  Diesel  fuel.  In  addition,  single‐species  tests  were  done  with  three  of  the  most  abundant  copepod  species  from  within  the  community.  SAB  WAF  was  acutely  toxic  to  the  zooplantkon  community  at  concentrations  between  54‐103µ/L  TPH.  Significant  mortality  was  observed  within 1‐4d in response to undiluted WAF (608‐2855µ/L TPH) and within 2‐7d in response to a 

50% WAF dilution (148‐248µ/L TPH). The sensitivity of the community varied between tests as  the  species  composition  of  the  community  changed.  The  three  most  abundant  species  had  very  similar  sensitivities  when  tested  in  single  species  tests,  however  all  three  species  were  more  sensitive  when  exposed  within  the  single‐species  tests  than  within  the  multi‐species  tests.  Our results highlight the importance of determining  critical hydrocarbon thresholds at  both the species and community level. Results from this research will be used in remediation   and  environmental  guidelines,  and  methods  develop  with  whole  communities will  be  used  in  risk assessment procedures  for coastal Antarctic waters.  

Keywords: copepod; diesel; hydrocarbon; multi‐species; toxicity 

 

SETAC Australasia Brisbane 2012 Conference  Page | 135  

 

Posters (Wed PM, 12‐613)  ET&C in Extreme Environments 

Poster #03 (Wed,12‐613, 15:40‐17:00) 

Development of appropriate bioassay and statistical methods for  determining survival sensitivities of Antarctic marine biota to metal  exposure 

Bianca J. Sfiligoj

1,2

, Catherine K. King

*1

, Steven G. Candy

1

 and Julie A. 

Mondon

1

Australian Antarctic Division, 203 Channel Highway, Kingston, Tasmania 7050, Australia; 

2

Deakin University, PO Box 423, Warnambool, Victoria 3280, Australia  

*presenting author 

Abstract:  Chemical  contamination  resulting  from  human  activities  has  been  identified  in  nearshore  marine  environments  in  the  vicinity  of  Antarctic  Research  Stations.  To  better  manage and remediate contaminated sites, and to assess the risks of ongoing activities, Water 

Quality Guidelines incorporating sensitivities of Antarctic species and specific characteristics of  their environment are required. Previous toxicity tests with Antarctic invertebrates have shown  that responses to metal exposure are far slower than in traditional tests. The slow metabolism  of Antarctic organisms may result in longer response times, yet does not mean these species  are  less  sensitive  to  contaminants  than  their  tropical  or  temperate  counterparts.  We  investigated  the  effects  of  five  metals  on  behaviour  and  survival  of  the  Antarctic  amphipod 

Orchomenella pinguides over 30 days. Multiple observations were made through time to assess  mortality  rate  response.  A  new  statistical  model  that  combines  the  bioassay  model  with  a  survival time model was developed as an alternative to traditional Probit Analysis for individual  time  endpoints  which  are  treated  independently.  Interval‐censored  survival  times  were  modeled  using  a  generalised  additive  model  (GAM)  with  multiplicative  effects  for  concentration  level.  The  time  period  by  concentration  level  interaction  was  included  as  a  random effect term with this mixed model version (GAMM). This approach is advantageous as  it smoothes through noisy periodic mortality data, providing a more powerful tool by using all  data  simultaneously  and  estimating  trends  across  multiple  observation  periods.  It  also  improves  models  of  uncertainty  in  estimates  of  lethal  concentrations.  Response  times  of  amphipods  varied  between  metals,  with  behavioural  changes  and  mortality  occurring  at  a  faster  rate  in  copper  than  in  other  metals  (cadmium,  lead,  zinc  or  nickel).  Results  from  comparisons  of  both  approaches  indicate  that  these  modified  statistical  methods  provide  improved  estimates  of  sensitivity  of  Antarctic  species  which  will  inform  more  accurate  site  specific Water Quality Guidelines.  

Key words: amphipod; survival through time; environmental guidelines

Page | 136  SETAC Australasia Brisbane 2012 Conference 

Posters (Wed PM, 12‐613)  Passive Sampling 

Poster #04 (Wed,12‐613, 15:40‐17:00) 

Towards developing a rapid technique for assessing the bioavailability of  metals in sediments 

Elvio Amato

1,2

*, Stuart Simpson

1

 and Dianne Jolley

2

 

 

1

CSIRO Land and Water, Centre of Environmental Contaminants Research, New Illawara Rd, 

Lucas Heights, NSW, Australia; 

2

Department of Chemistry, University of Wollongong, NSW, 

Australia 

*presenting author 

Abstract:  The  assessment  of  trace  metal  bioavailability  in  sediments  most  commonly  uses  measurements  of  acid‐extractable  metals  (AEM),  acid  volatile  sulfides  (AVS)  and  pore  water  concentrations. Although these chemical analyses have improved the prediction of toxicity to  benthic invertebrates in some studies, in many cases they resulted in incorrect conclusions, e.g.  no impact was predicted when marked effects were occurring, which is clearly an inadequate  outcome  for  sediment  quality  assessments.  Porewater  concentrations  are  snapshot  measurements  which  often  poorly  represent  dynamic  systems  such  as  sediments,  and  AVS  measurements  may  over‐emphasise  the  role  of  sulfides  in  trace  metals  availability  to  many  organisms. The technique known as diffusive gradients in thin films (DGT) employs a simple in 

situ device which contains a diffusive gel (polyacrylamide) overlapping a second gel embedded  with a chelating resin (e.g. Chelex). Once deployed in the sediment, the DGT resin accumulates  metals  present  in  pore  waters  and  labile‐weakly  bound  metals  released  from  the  sediment. 

DGT provides a time‐integrated metal flux measurement making it ideal for in situ testing. We  propose that this metal flux can be used to represent the majority of the available metals. This  project aims to establish the strengths and limitations of using the DGT technique as a robust  and  reliable  tool  for  assessing  metal  bioavailability  in  sediments.    For  a  range  of  marine  sediments,  we  explore  relationships  between  DGT‐metal  fluxes  with  sublethal  effects  to  the  amphipod  Melita  plumulosa.  The  benefits  gained  in  relation  to  sediment  quality  assessments  will be discussed. 

Keywords: amphipod; bioassay; DGT; in situ 

 

SETAC Australasia Brisbane 2012 Conference  Page | 137  

 

Posters (Wed PM, 12‐613) 

Poster #05 (Wed,12‐613, 15:40‐17:00) 

Passive Sampling 

Passive sampling of hydrophobic chemicals from lipid‐rich tissue for in 

vitro bioassays 

Ling Jin

1

*, Louise van Mourik

1,2

, Ben Mewburn

1

, Caroline Gaus

1

, Beate Escher

1

 

1

National Research Centre for Environmental Toxicology (Entox), The University of 

Queensland, 39 Kessels Road, Coopers Plains, QLD, Australia; 

2

Institute for Risk Assessment 

Sciences (IRAS), Utrecht University, P.O Box 80125, 3508 TC Utrecht, The Netherlands 

*presenting author 

Abstract: Marine wildlife is encountering multiple threats of natural and anthropogenic origins,  including chemical pollution. Species with long life spans and high lipid content are especially  susceptible  to  contaminant  exposure,  including  a  group  of  chemicals  classed  as  persistent  bioaccumulative  and  toxic  (PBT)  compounds.  In  some  locations,  PBTs  in  such  wildlife  reach  concentrations  where  adverse  health  effects  occur  in  laboratory  animals.  However,  little  is  known about the effects of PBT mixtures accumulated over their life span. Key challenges lay  with traditional extraction and chemical cleanup methods for PBTs in lipid‐rich matrices, and  their  subsequent  instrumental  analysis.  These  methods  are  time  and  cost  intensive,  typically  resulting in limited sample numbers.  

To  address  these  limitations,  this  study  investigated  if  passive  sampling  using  polymethylsiloxane  (PDMS)  polymer  is  suitable  to  extract  chemical  mixtures  from  lipid‐rich  tissue. PDMS has previously been shown to have matrix‐independent absorptive capacity for 

PCBs when exposed to moderately lipid‐rich fish tissue. In the present study, polychlorinated  dibenzodioxins  (PCDDs)  were  used  as  test  chemicals  validate  the  PDMS‐based  approach  in  dugong  blubber.  The  CAFLUX  (chemically‐activated  fluorescent  expression)  assay,  which  is  indicative  of  arylhydrocarbon  receptor  activation,  and  responds  highly  specifically  to  dioxins  and their analogues, was used to evaluate the biological response of sample extracts.  

Results  showed  that  PDMS  was  applicable  to  sampling  of  PCDDs  in  dugong  blubber. 

Equilibrium  was  rapidly  reached  (<24  hours),  and  preliminary  partition  coefficients  between 

PDMS  and  lipid  (K

PDMS‐lipid

~0.04)  were  generally  constant  across  the  hydrophobicity  range  of  dioxins (octanol‐water partition coefficients log K ow

 6‐8). The observed bioanalytical response  further demonstrated that the required method detection limit can be reached. However, toxic  equivalent concentrations varied between instrumental and bioassay quantifications, and the  dose‐response  curves  was  quenched  at  lower  dilutions  of  sample  extract  indicating  some  interference  by  the  co‐extracted  lipid  matrix.  Further  research  for  method  fine‐tuning  is  therefore required to address these issues. 

Keywords: dioxins;, PDMS; blubber; partition coefficient; CAFLUX

Page | 138  SETAC Australasia Brisbane 2012 Conference 

Posters (Wed PM, 12‐613)  Environmental Monitoring 

Poster #06 (Wed,12‐613, 15:40‐17:00) 

Pesticide contamination in QLD catchments 

Rachael Smith*, Ryan Turner, Suzanne Vardy and Michael Warne 

Environment and Resource Sciences, Department of Science, Information Technology, 

Innovation and the Arts, Dutton Park, Queensland 

*presenting author 

Abstract:  It  has  been  well  established  that  mixtures  of  pesticides  in  agricultural  runoff  are  transported  through  Queensland  catchments,  and  threaten  the  health  of  the  Great  Barrier 

Reef (GBR). In 2009, a pesticide monitoring program was established as part of the Australian  and QLD Governments’ Reef Plan (2009) to calculate loads of Photosystem II (PSII) herbicides  entering the GBR. The pesticide monitoring for 2010 encompassed nine catchment (above the  tidal  zone)  and  three  sub‐catchment  sites.  While  the  focus  was  on  Reef  Plan’s  (2009)  five  priority (PSII) herbicides (diuron, atrazine, hexazinone, tebuthiuron and ametryn), a number of  other  pesticides  were  also  commonly  detected.  Australian  and  New  Zealand  water  quality  guideline  trigger  values  (TVs)  were  exceeded  at  nine  sites  by  diuron  and/or  metolachlor. 

Accounting  for  PSII  herbicide  mixtures  increased  the  estimated  toxicity  and  led  to  larger  exceedances  of  the  TVs.  Loads  of  pesticides  transported  through  the  catchments  are  also  presented.  This  study  demonstrates  the  widespread  contamination  of  pesticides,  particularly 

PSII herbicides, across the GBR catchment area that discharges to the GBR. 

 

Keywords: Great Barrier Reef; loads; mixtures; photosystem II herbicides; Reef Plan 

 

SETAC Australasia Brisbane 2012 Conference  Page | 139  

 

Posters (Wed PM, 12‐613)  Environmental Monitoring 

Poster #07 (Wed,12‐613, 15:40‐17:00) 

Effect of farm management practices on concentrations of halogenated  pesticides in New Zealand streams 

Pourya Shahpoury

1

*, Kimberly J. Hageman

1

, Christoph D. Matthaei

2

, Francis 

S. Magbanua

2

 

1

Department of Chemistry, University of Otago, Dunedin, New Zealand; 

2

Department of 

Zoology, University of Otago, Dunedin, New Zealand 

*presenting author 

Abstract:  Halogenated  pesticides,  especially  organochlorine  pesticides  (OCPs),  have  raised  global  concern  due  to  their  long  persistence,  low  biodegradability,  wide  distribution  in  the  environment, and chronic adverse effects on wildlife and humans. In New Zealand, pesticides  have  brought  considerable  financial  benefit  and  no  other  method  of  weed  and  pest  management has been as cost‐effective. Most OCPs are banned in New Zealand; nevertheless,  their  persistence  means  that  residues  continue  to  be  detected  in  sediments  and  other  environmental  matrices.  A  number  of  studies  have  been  published  that  compare  the  environmental  impacts  of  different  farm  management  systems.  However,  to  the  best  of  our  knowledge,  no  studies  have  compared  the  concentrations  of  pesticides  in  stream  sediments  from conventional, integrated, and organic farms. Hence, the present study aims to determine  if different farm management programs affect pesticides concentrations in streams that pass  through farms.  

The sediment samples being used in this study were collected from farms at five locations on  the  South  Island,  New  Zealand.  The  samples  were  mixed  with  diatomaceous  earth  (DE)  and  then  extracted  with  n‐hexane‐acetone  (1:1  v/v)  using  accelerated  solvent  extraction.  The  extraction  cells  were  loaded  with  additional  DE  and  Florisil  to  remove  excess  moisture  and  macromolecules,  respectively.  The  final  extracts  were  analyzed  for  dieldrin,  endrin,  endrin  aldehyde,  α‐HCH,  γ‐HCH,  trans‐chlordane,  cis‐chlordane,  trans‐nanochlor,  cis‐nanochlor,  endosulfan  I,  endosulfan  II,  endosulfan  sulfate,  chlorpyrifos,  DDE,  p,p´‐DDD,  o,p´‐DDD  using  gas  chromatography  with  mass  selective  detection.  The  data  was  analyzed  using  SPSS  software. The results indicated that the concentrations of dieldrin, γ‐HCH, the sum of endrins,  and  the  sum  of  endosulfans  were  higher  in  the  streams  passing  through  conventional  farms  compared  to  integrated  and  organic  farms.  Interestingly,  the  concentration  of  α‐HCH  was  higher  in  streams  passing  through  organic  farms  compared  to  integrated  farms  and  no  significant  relationships  were  found  for  chlorpyrifos,  the  sum  of  DDTs,  and  the  sum  of  chlordanes.  

Keywords: conventional; integrated; organic; organochlorine; sediment 

Page | 140  SETAC Australasia Brisbane 2012 Conference 

Posters (Wed PM, 12‐613)  Environmental Monitoring 

Poster #08 (Wed,12‐613, 15:40‐17:00) 

Use of wild European carp, Cyprinus carpio, to assess endocrine disruption  in an Australian riverine environment 

Anu Kumar

1

*, Kathryn Hassel

2

, Hai Doan

1

 and Vincent Pettigrove

1

CSIRO Land and Water, Waite Road, Urrbrae, South Australia 5064, Australia; 

2

Victorian 

Centre for Aquatic Pollution Identification and Management (CAPIM), Bio 21 Institute, The 

University of Melbourne, 30 Flemington Road, Parkville, Victoria 3052, Australia 

*Presenting author 

Abstract:  The  majority  of  chemicals  shown  to  interact  with  the  endocrine  system  have  been  found  in  wastewater  treatment  plant  (WWTP)  effluents  and  in  untreated  industrial  and  domestic  waste.  Thus,  fish  living  in  these  riverine  and  estuarine  environments  can  be  considered  as  sentinel  species  for  assessing  the  impact  of  endocrine  disrupting  chemicals 

(EDCs) on the environment. A survey of feral European carp, Cyprinus carpio, in the Yarra River  was  designed  to  investigate  the  possibility  that  Australian  freshwaters  contain  estrogenic  chemicals  at  levels  capable  of  affecting  the  reproductive  health  and  success  of  exposed  fish  populations. The Yarra River receives treated wastewater from six WWTPs. This study focused  on  the  section  of  the  Yarra  River  between  Yarra  Glen  and  Warrandyte,  throughout  which  several creeks and tributaries enter the river and the degree of urbanisation increases. To date,  the  majority  of  reports  concerning  the  effects  of  EDCs  in  wildlife  populations  have  described  feminisation  of  male  animals  and  thus,  bioindicators  of  estrogen  exposure  (such  as  raised  plasma vitellogenin levels in male fish and the presence of intersex) and general indicators of  fish  health  (hepatosomatic  index,  length,  weight  and  condition)  were  chosen  as  the  parameters  of  interest  for  the  current  investigation.  River  water  samples  did  not  show  any  detectable estrogenic or anti‐androgenic responses. However, strong anti‐estrogenic and weak  androgenic  responses  were  observed  in  all  samples  collected  during  the  field  surveys. 

Vitellogenin concentrations above background concentrations (0.01 mg/L) were not detected  in all male fish collected during the two surveys. Female fish exhibited significantly higher VTG  protein than the males, ranging from 1.7‐8.6 mg/mL. There was no evidence of intersex in any  of the male European carp obtained at any of the sites on the Yarra River. This indicates that  the feral carp population of these water bodies have not been exposed, during critical periods  of  development,  to  concentrations  of  estrogens  that  can  affect  gonadal  development. 

Furthermore, it suggests that WWTP inputs in this river did not result in repeated exposure of  fish  to  estrogenic  EDCs  during  their  life  cycle.  This  may  be  due  to  the  relatively  low  human  population  density  and  low  number  of  WWTP  inputs  into  the  Yarra  River  in  comparison  to  rivers in the US and Europe where intersex fish have been reported. 

Keywords: gonad histology; the Yarra River; vitellogenin; wastewater treatment effluent 

SETAC Australasia Brisbane 2012 Conference  Page | 141  

 

Posters (Wed PM, 12‐613)  Environmental Monitoring 

Poster #09 (Wed,12‐613, 15:40‐17:00) 

Isolation and identification of ligands for the goldfish testicular androgen  receptor in chemical recovery condensates from a Canadian bleached kraft  pulp and paper mill 

Philip Scott

1,2

*, Craig Milestone

1,3

, Scott Smith

1

, Deborah MacLatchy

1

 and 

Mark Hewitt

1

Wilfrid Laurier University, Waterloo, Ontario, Canada; 

2

Smart Water Research Centre, Griffith 

University, Queensland, Australia; 

3

Environment Canada, Burlington, Ontario, Canada 

*presenting author 

Abstract: This study builds on a series of investigations characterizing substances in kraft mill  chemical recovery condensates that depress sex steroids in fish. Here, incubations of goldfish  testis androgen receptors (AR) with condensate extracts were used to investigate the potential  role  of  androgens  in  hormone  depressions.  Condensates  contained  variable  levels  of  AR  ligands,  with  the  highest  amounts  in  nonpolar  extracts  of  filtered  solids  prior  to  solid  phase  extraction  (SPE).  High  pressure  liquid  chromatography  (HPLC)  fractionation  recovered  the  majority  of  activity  in  one  fraction,  with  ligands  detected  in  three  additional  fractions.  Gas  chromatography  mass  spectrometry  analysis  of  the  most  active  fraction  confirmed  the  two  most abundant components as the diterpenes manool and geranyl linalool. Manool exhibited a  relative affinity for the AR that was 300 fold less than testosterone and accounted for 26% of  total filtered solids activity.  Geranyl linalool exhibited no affinity for the AR. Three additional  diterpenoid  families  were  tentatively  identified  as  principal  components  of  the  three  other  androgenic  HPLC  fractions.  Compared  to  condensates,  final  effluent  had  3000  fold  less  androgenic  activity,  with  <1%  attributable  to  manool.  Putative  androgens  previously  associated  with  mill  effluents  (androstenedione  and  androstadienedione)  and  progesterone  were  not  detected;  however,  additional condensate  diterpenes suspected  as  androgens  were  identified  in  final  effluent.  This  study  is  the  first  to  confirm  nonsteroidal  cyclic  diterpenes  as  androgenic at pulp mills. A major in‐mill source of these substances was identified, and the role  of androgens in mill effluents affecting fish reproduction was reinforced.  

 

Keywords: androgenic activity; condensates; endocrine disruption; investigation of cause 

 

Page | 142  SETAC Australasia Brisbane 2012 Conference 

Posters (Wed PM, 12‐613)  Environmental Monitoring 

Poster #10 (Wed,12‐613, 15:40‐17:00) 

Evaluation of illicit drug prevalence among attendees at a music festival  via wastewater analysis 

Foon Yin Lai

1

, Phong K. Thai

1,2

*, Jake O’Brien

1

, Ben Kele

3

, Christoph Ort

4,5

Coral Gartner

6

, Steve Carter

7

, Wayne Hall

6

, Jeremy Prichard

8

, Raimondo 

Bruno

9

, Paul Kirkbride

10

, Geoff Eaglesham

1

 and Jochen F. Mueller

1

 

1

The University of Queensland, The National Research Centre for Environmental Toxicology, 39 Kessels 

Road, Coopers Plains, QLD 4108, Australia; 

2

Bond University, Gold Coast, QLD 4229, Australia; 

3

Institute  for Resource and Industries and Sustainability, Central Queensland University, Bruce Highway 

Rockhampton, QLD 4700, Australia; 

QLD 4072, Australia; 

5

Duebendorf, Switzerland; 

4

The University of Queensland, Advanced Water Management Centre, 

Eawag, Swiss Federal Institute of Aquatic Science and Technology, CH 8600 

6

The University of Queensland, Centre for Clinical Research, Royal Brisbane and 

Women's Hospital, Herston QLD 4029, Australia; 

Kessels Road, Coopers Plains, QLD 4108, Australia; 

7

8

Queensland Health Forensic Scientific Services, 39 

Faculty of Law, University of Tasmania, Private Bag 

89, Hobart,TAS 7001, Australia; 

9

School of Psychology, University of Tasmania, Private Bag 30, Hobart, 

TAS 7001, Australia; 

10

Australian Federal Police, Forensic and Data Centres, GPO Box 401, Canberra, ACT 

2601, Australia 

*presenting author 

Abstract: Attendees at musical events are potentially more likely to consume illicit drugs than the general  public. Surveys have been traditionally conducted to understand this population’s drug use behavior. But  these  only  reach  a  proportion  of  attendees  and  may  be  biased  since  users  might  not  know  the  exact  identity  of  the  substances  that  they  have  consumed  or  may  be  reluctant  to  disclose  their  drug  use.  This  study  aimed  to  investigate  the  prevalence  of  illicit  drug  use  at  music  festivals.  To  this  end,  we  assessed  illicit  drug  profiles  in  two  consecutive  years  at  the  same  music  festival  via  wastewater  analysis.  Raw  wastewater samples were collected at the inlet of the wastewater treatment plant that is exclusive to the  music  festival.  Illicit  drug  residues  were  measured  by  liquid  chromatography  coupled  with  tandem  mass  spectrometry.  Of  the  traditional  illicit  drug  residues,  MDMA  loads  on  average  were  the  greatest  and  remained stable in both years (~2500–2700 mg/day). Similarly, the average load of cocaine (~50 mg/day)  and its key metabolite benzoylecgonine (~530 mg/day) was steady between the two years. Changes by a  factor  of  two  to  four  in  the  average  loads  were  found  for  methamphetamine  (1 st

  year:  1800  mg/day;  2 nd

  year:  500  mg/day)  and  its  metabolite  amphetamine  (250  mg/day;  130  mg/day)  and  the  cannabis  metabolite, cannabinol (330 mg/day; 120 mg/day). Emerging psychoactive substances were also found in  the  samples  with  declines  observed  in  the  average  load  measured  between  years  for  mephedrone  (16  mg/day;  10  mg/day)  and  benzyl  piperazine  (150  mg/day;  90  mg/day),  but  an  increase  for  methylone  (35  mg/day; 75 mg/day). This study used wastewater analysis to objectively capture the temporal trend of drug  use  at  a  music  festival.  The  results  contribute  to  monitoring  population  use  of  these  substances  and  to  planning potential intervention strategies. 

Keywords: Australia; drug epidemiology; substance abuse; LC‐MSMS; temporal trend

 

SETAC Australasia Brisbane 2012 Conference  Page | 143  

 

Posters (Wed PM, 12‐613)  Environmental Monitoring 

Poster #11 (Wed,12‐613, 15:40‐17:00) 

Use of bioassay‐based whole effluent toxicity (WET) tests to assessthe 

Nile tilapia juvenile response to a pulp and paper effluent

 

Natsima Tokhun

1

* Chuleemas Boonthai Iwai

1

 and Barry Noller

2

 

1

Department of Plant Sciences and Agricultural Resources, Land Resources and Environment  section, Faculty of Agriculture, Khon Kaen University, Khon Kaen, Thailand; 

2

The University of 

Queensland, Centre for Mined Land Rehabilitation (CMLR), Brisbane, 4072 Australia 

*presenting author 

Abstract:  The  Namphong  river  in  Northeast  Thailand  is  an  important  location  of  freshwater  cage aquaculture within the river itself. Tilapia production in Thailand is about 38 percent of the  total  freshwater  aquaculture  activity.  The  number  of  Tilapia  cage  cultures  in  the  Namphong  river is about 209 cages producing 1536 tons of fish and worth US$ 2.2 million per year. This  river  catchment  is  also  the  location  of  agro‐based  paper  production  and  sugar  refining.  The  pulp  and  paper  industrial  facility  in  particular  is  one  of  the  largest  industrial  plants  located  in  the Namphong catchment. Some cases of fish and aquatic life mortality were observed in the 

Namphong river as a result of industrial pollution to the riverThe purpose of this study was to  use  bioassay‐based  whole  effluent  toxicity  (WET)  tests  to  assess  the  Nile  tilapia  Juvenile 

(Oreochromis  nileticus)  response  to  the  pulp  and  paper  mill  effluent.  The  concentrations  of  effluent  tested  were  100,  75,  50,  25,  12.5,  6.25%  that  were  diluted  in  tap  water  as  control  at 

25+1 o

C to assess the survival and growth of Tilapia exposure for 96, 168 and 360 hr. The results  showed  no  significant  difference  (P<0.05)  of  the  percent  survival  of  fish  was  observed  in  all  combinations  of  treatment  and  exposure  time.  However,  the  pulp  and  paper  effluent  had  an  effect  on  the  growth  (fresh  weight)  of  Nile  tilapia.    This  study  suggested  that  whole  effluent  toxicity  (WET)  tests  are  a  useful  monitoring  tool  to  assess  and  monitor  the  potential  ecotoxicological effect of effluents for the environmental management of the Namphong river  aquatic freshwater ecosystem and elsewhere in Thailand. 

 

Keywords: WET testing; effluent; toxicity; Tilapia; freshwater 

 

Page | 144  SETAC Australasia Brisbane 2012 Conference 

Posters (Wed PM, 12‐613)  Environmental Monitoring 

Poster #12 (Wed,12‐613, 15:40‐17:00) 

Ecotoxicological assessment of chlorpyrifos and cadmium on a tropical  chironomid under the influence of water and sediment characteristics  

Atcharaporn Somparn

1

*, Chuleemas Boonthai Iwai

1

 and Barry Noller

2

 

1

Department of Plant Sciences and Agricultural Resources, Land Resources and Environment 

Section, Faculty of Agriculture, Khon Kaen University, Khon Kaen, Thailand; 

2

The University of 

Queensland, Centre for Mined Land Rehabilitation (CMLR), Brisbane, 4072 Australia. 

*presenting author 

Abstract: The ecotoxicology of chlorpyrifos and cadmium on a tropical chironomid was studied  under  the  influence  of  tropical  water  and  sediment  characteristics.  This  study  evaluated  the  survival  of  the  tropical  chironomid  Chironomus  javanus  (Kieffer)  following  96  hr  exposure  to  sediment  spiked  with  a  range  of  chlorpyrifos  (0.001‐10  µg/kg)  and  cadmium  (0.1‐100  mg/kg)  concentrations. The mortality of the tropical chironomid was tested under different water and  sediment characteristics conditions by varying temperature (20 o

C and 25 o

C), pH (4, 7 and 10),  organic matter content (0.5%, 2.5% and 5%) and clay content (1%, 10% and 20%). The results  showed  that  the  higher of  temperature,  organic  matter,  clay  content  in  sediment  and  the  lower of pH in sediment caused increasing toxicity of chlorpyrifos and cadmium to C. javanus. 

Therefore,  water  and  sediment  characteristics  should  be  considered  when  conducting  ecotoxicological  assessment  and  biomonitoring  of  sediment  contamination  for  an  accurate  reflection e of the impact for the real situation. 

 

Keywords: sediment toxicity; midge; ecotoxicological assessment 

 

SETAC Australasia Brisbane 2012 Conference  Page | 145  

 

Posters (Wed PM, 12‐613)  Environmental Monitoring 

Poster #13 (Wed,12‐613, 15:40‐17:00) 

Humic acid increases survivorship of the freshwater shrimp Caridina sp. D  to acid mine drainage 

Aleicia Holland*, Leo J. Duivenvoorden, Susan H. W. Kinnear

 

Centre for Environmental Management, CQUniversity, Rockhampton, QLD, Australia 

*presenting author 

Abstract:  Humic  acids  (HA)  are  known  to  decrease  the  toxicity  of  heavy  metals  to  aquatic  organisms, and it has also been suggested that they can provide buffering protection in low pH  conditions. Despite this, little is known about the ability for HAs to increase survivorship to acid  mine drainage (AMD). In this study, the ability of HA to increase survivorship of the freshwater  shrimp (Caridina sp. D) to acid mine drainage was investigated, using test waters collected from  the Mount Morgan open pit in Central Queensland. The AMD water from Mount Morgan open  pit is highly acidic (pH 2.67) as well as being contaminated with heavy metals  (1780 mg/L Al; 

101 mg/L Cu; 173 mg/L Mn; 51.8 mg/L Zn and Fe). Freshwater shrimp were exposed to dilutions  in  the  range  of  0.5  ‐  5  %  AMD  water,  with  and  without  the  addition  of  10  or  20  mg/L  HA  treatments.  In  the  absence  of  HA,  all  shrimp  died  in  the  2.5%  AMD  treatment.  By  contrast,  addition of HA increased survivorship in the 2.5% AMD by up to 66%, as well as significantly  decreasing the concentration of dissolved Cu, Co, Cd and Zn. The decreased toxicity of AMD in  the presence of HA is likely to be due to the complexation of heavy metals with the HA; it is  also  possible  that  HA  caused  changes  to  the  physiological  condition  of  the  shrimp,  thus  increasing  their  survival.  These  results  are  valuable  in  contributing  to  an  improved  understanding of potential role of HA in ameliorating the toxicity of AMD environments. 

 

Keywords: Dissolved organic carbon; metals; DOC; toxicity; Mount Morgan; passive treatment 

 

Page | 146  SETAC Australasia Brisbane 2012 Conference 

Posters (Wed PM, 12‐613)  Environmental Monitoring 

Poster #14 (Wed,12‐613, 15:40‐17:00) 

Contaminant survey of wetlands used to store either tertiary treated  effluent or stormwater runoff: potential for endocrine disruption in 

wildlife? 

Andrew Norris

1

*, Gary Dennis

1

 and Shelley Burgin

1

School of Science and Health, University of Western Sydney. Locked Bag 1797, Penrith, New 

South Wales, 2751 Australia; 

2

Bond University, Gold Coast, Queensland, 4229, Australia 

*presenting author 

Abstract: Endocrine disrupting compounds may include natural and synthetic estrogens, and  several  phenols  (particularly  alkyl  phenols),  PAHs,  and  phthalates.  Both  treated  sewage  effluent and stormwater may carry a cocktail of endocrine disrupting contaminants, and with  current  water  reuse  practices,  these  waters  are  often  stored  in  wetlands  prior  to  reuse. 

Wetlands  also  have  the  ecosystem  function  of  providing  a  hub  for  biodiversity  of  wildlife. 

Building on research of biomarker indications of apparent loss of endocrine disruptors, water  and  sediment  samples  from  a  series  of  wetlands  that  store  either  tertiary  treated  sewage  effluent  or  stormwater  runoff  were  analysed  for  a  suite  of  endocrine  disrupting  contaminant  groups. It was found that 4‐nonylphenol was the main contaminant found in water across all  wetlands. A diverse array of contaminants, including phthalates, phenol and PAH groups were  found in sediment of the first in the sequence of treated effluent wetlands however none were  found in the second wetland of the system. Expanding these results from existing knowledge,  we examine the individual and cumulative potential for endocrine disruption in wildlife in these  wetlands. 

SETAC Australasia Brisbane 2012 Conference  Page | 147  

 

Posters (Wed PM, 12‐613) 

Poster #15 (Wed,12‐613, 15:40‐17:00) 

Metals 

Dissolved organic carbon reduces the bioavailability and toxicity of  uranium to the unicellular eukaryote Euglena gracilis 

Melanie Trenfield1,2, Jack Ng2, Barry Noller

3

, Scott Markich

4

, Rick van Dam

1

 

1

Environmental Research Institute of the Supervising Scientist, Darwin, NT, 0801, AUS; 

2

National Research Centre for Environmental Toxicology, The University of Queensland, 

Coopers Plains, 4108, QLD, AUS; 

3

Centre for Mined Land Rehabilitation, The University of 

Queensland, St Lucia, 4067, QLD, AUS; 

4

Aquatic Solutions International, Dundas, 2117, NSW, 

AUS 

*presenting author 

Abstract: Strong global demand for uranium (U) has necessitated a greater understanding of  its  potential  environmental  risks.  Natural  dissolved  organic  carbon  (DOC)  is  known  to  ameliorate U toxicity to freshwater organisms through complexation of toxic forms of U, and is  a  key  modifying  factor  to  consider  in  risk  assessments.  Euglena  gracilis  is  a  ubiquitous  unicellular freshwater species known to be sensitive to metal contaminants. However, existing  toxicity data for Euglena are typically not useful for predicting environmental effects in natural  waters  as  they  have  been  produced  using  nutrient‐enriched  growth  media,  often  with  DOC  concentrations >1000 mg L‐1. 

The  influence  of  DOC,  in  the  form  of  Suwannee  River  Fulvic  Acid  (SRFA),  on  U  toxicity  to  E. 

gracilis (Z strain; 96‐h cell division rate), was investigated at pH 6 using a low‐nutrient medium  developed during the study. The medium had an environmentally relevant DOC concentration  of  10  mg  L‐1  (as  aspartic  acid).  The  IC10 and IC50 for U in the background medium without 

SRFA were 5 µg L

‐1

 and 57 µg L

‐1

, respectively, and for the medium with an additional 20 mg L‐

1 DOC (as SRFA), were 17 µg L ‐1

 and 254 µg L

‐1

, respectively. Thus, DOC (as SRFA) reduced U  toxicity  3  to  5‐fold.  The  amelioration  of  toxicity  with  the  addition  of  SRFA  was  linked  to  a  decrease in the bioavailability of U, with geochemical speciation modelling predicting 84% of U  would  be  complexed  by  SRFA.  This  was  supported  by  an  11‐14  fold  reduction  in  the  cellular  concentration of U compared to E. gracilis cells in the background medium. The free uranyl ion, 

UO

2

2+

, explained 51% of the variation in measured U toxicity to E. gracilis. Uranium exposures  to E. gracilis in the presence of a reactive oxygen species probe, suggest exposure to ≥ 60 µg L

‐1

 

U may induce oxidative stress. 

Keywords: organic matter, fulvic acid, freshwater, bioavailability, metals 

 

Page | 148  SETAC Australasia Brisbane 2012 Conference 

Posters (Wed PM, 12‐613)  Metals 

Poster #16 (Wed,12‐613, 15:40‐17:00) 

Physiological responses of New Zealand green mussels, Perna canaliculus  to subchronic cadmium exposure 

Rathishri Chandurvelan

1

*, Sally Gaw

2

, Islay Marsden

1

, Chris Glover

1

 

 

1

 School of Biological Sciences, University of Canterbury, Christchurch, New Zealand; 

2

Department of Chemistry, University of Canterbury, New Zealand 

*presenting author 

Abstract:  Trace  metal  pollution  is  a  major  threat  to  coastal  and  marine  ecosystems.  In  NZ  settings,  cadmium  (Cd),  which  is  elevated  owing  to  the  use  of  phosphatic  fertilisers,  storm  water run‐off, and natural volcanic inputs, is of particular concern. For biomonitoring purposes,  it  is  essential  to  identify  an  endemic  species  that  could  provide  early  warning  of  elevated  environmental Cd, symptomatic of a deteriorating coastal ecosystem. Laboratory experiments  were  conducted  to  study  subchronic  (28  days–  control,  200  &  2000  µg  L

‐1

)  effects  of  waterborne Cd exposure on physiology of NZ green mussels, Perna canaliculus. The clearance  rate showed an immediate decrease in response to Cd exposure (2000 µg L

‐1

), and by the end  of  the  exposure  had  fallen  to  7%  of  the  control  value.    A  similar  trend  was  observed  for  absorption efficiency, although this effect took longer to develop (only present at day 25), and  was  of  a  lesser  magnitude  (31%  of  control).    Oxygen  consumption  levels  also  followed  a  declining  pattern,  although  there  were  signs  of  a  recovery  in  this  physiological  function  midway  through  the  exposure.  An  increase  in  nitrogen  excretion  rate  was  also  noted,  and  combined these changes resulted in a significantly impaired O:N ratio. This suggested use of  body protein stores as a fuel, indicative of a starvation effect. A linear relationship between Cd  exposure  level  and  gill  Cd  accumulation  existed  throughout  the  exposure,  and  accumulation  was  in  turn  significantly  correlated  with  the  inhibition  in  clearance  rate.    In  conclusion,  our  results  support  the  utility  of  clearance  rate  as  a  marker  of  waterborne  Cd  exposure  in  green  mussels,  and  illustrate  the  feasibility  of  employing  green  mussels  as  bioindicators  to  assess  pollution  levels  in  the  NZ  coastal  environment.  As  Perna  is  an  important  edible  species,  our  data  may  also  have  relevance  for  human  risk  assessment  associated  with  shellfish  consumption. 

Keywords: accumulation; bioindicator; biomarkers; clearance rate; toxicity 

 

SETAC Australasia Brisbane 2012 Conference  Page | 149  

 

Posters (Wed PM, 12‐613) 

Poster #17 (Wed,12‐613, 15:40‐17:00) 

Metals 

Sensitivities and response time of three Antarctic marine copepods to  metal exposure 

Lara Marcus Zamora1, Catherine K. King2*, Kerrie M. Swadling1, Patti 

Virtue1 

1

Institute for Marine and Antarctic Studies (IMAS), University of Tasmania, Hobart 7001, 

Tasmania, Australia; 

2

Australian Antarctic Division (AAD), Channel Highway, Kingston 7050, 

Tasmania, Australia 

*presenting author 

Abstract: Understanding the sensitivity of Antarctic organisms to metal exposure is essential  for developing Antarctic specific Environmental Guidelines to manage contamination risks. For  the first time, acute effects of copper and cadmium were determined in three common coastal 

Antarctic  copepod  species:  Paralabidocera  antarctica,  Oncaea  curvata  and  Stephos  longipes  over  a  7  d  exposure  period.  Copper  was  more  toxic  than  cadmium  for  all  copepod  species. 

Paralabidocera antarctica was the most sensitive species for both metals with 7 d LC50 values  for  copper  and  cadmium  of  20  µg/l  and  237  µg/l  respectively.  Sensitivities  to  copper  were  similar for both  O. curvata (LC50 = 64 µg/l) and S. longipes (LC50 = 56 µg/l). Oncaea curvata  was slightly more sensitive to cadmium exposure than S. longipes with LC50 values of 901 µg/l  and  1250  µg/l  respectively.  The  response  time  to  metal  contamination  was  delayed  in  these 

Antarctic copepods compared to temperate and tropical species. Direct comparison of 1 to 4 d 

LC50 values, widely used in toxicity tests with related species from lower latitudes, to 7 d LC50  values used in this study, showed that the Antarctic copepods were more sensitive to copper  and of similar sensitivity to cadmium. The study highlights the need for ecotoxicology studies  with  more  relevant  longer  exposure  periods  for  polar  species  to  derive  site  specific 

Environmental  Guidelines  for  Antarctic  biota.  Copepods  are  recommended  as  sensitive  indicators of contaminant impacts in acute exposure toxicity tests as part of Risk Assessment  procedures and for Guideline derivation. 

 

Keywords: cadmium; copper; polar; toxicity; zooplankton 

 

Page | 150  SETAC Australasia Brisbane 2012 Conference 

Posters (Wed PM, 12‐613)  Metals 

Poster #18 (Wed,12‐613, 15:40‐17:00) 

Effect of physicochemical parameters on Mn(II) oxidation in a subtropical  estuarine system 

Amie Anastasi 

 

Centre for Environmental Management, CQUniversity Australia, Gladstone Qld 4680, Australia 

Abstract:  The  rate  of  dissolved  Mn(II)  oxidation  and  corresponding  half‐life  of  Mn(II)  in  the  saline  waters  of  Port  Curtis,  a  subtropical  estuary  in  Central  Queensland,  Australia,  was  determined  in  a  series  of  laboratory  incubation  experiments  conducted  under  controlled  conditions. In initial experiments, when bulk whole seawater samples were incubated at 26 o

C  and  standard  local  physicochemical  parameters,  the  complete  oxidation  of  spiked  dissolved  manganese  (3mg/L  initial  concentration)  occurred  within  21  days.  The  estimated  half‐life  of  dissolved  Mn(II)  from  this  study  was  between  8  and  10  days.  However,  similar  studies  subsequently  conducted  using  filtered  seawater  samples  (<5μm)  spiked  with  varying  concentrations  of  Mn(II)  suggest  that  the  oxidative  rate  of  Mn(II)  in  clean  seawater  is  much  slower,  with  a  half‐life  longer  than  28  days.  Preliminary  results  suggest  that  water  quality  parameters may play an important role in the rate of oxidation of Mn(II) in subtropical marine  and estuarine systems. Results indicate that the rate of oxidation differed dependant on initial 

Mn(II) concentration and variations in temperature, salinity and turbidity away from standard  physicochemical  levels.  The  rate  of  oxidation  of  Mn(II)  in  subtropical  marine  and  estuarine  systems,  and  the  effect  of  physicochemical  parameter  variability  on  Mn(II)  oxidation  will  be  discussed. 

Keywords: half‐life; manganese; marine; Port Curtis 

 

SETAC Australasia Brisbane 2012 Conference  Page | 151  

 

Posters (Wed PM, 12‐613) 

Poster #19 (Wed,12‐613, 15:40‐17:00) 

Metals 

Dissolved organic carbon: the water flea’s   remedy   against U toxicity!

 

Claire Costello*, Melanie Trenfield, Andrew Harford and Rick van Dam 

Environmental Research Institute of the Supervising Scientist (eriss), Department of 

Sustainability, Environment, Water, Population and Communities, GPO Box 461, Darwin NT 

0801 

*presenting author 

Abstract:  Increasing  global  demand  for  uranium  (U)  has  necessitated  an  increased  understanding  of  its  potential  environmental  risks.  The  cladoceran,  Moinodaphnia  macleayi,  has  proven  to  be  one  of  the  more  sensitive  species  to  U  exposureStudies  with  other  freshwater  species  have  shown  dissolved  organic  carbon  (DOC)  reduces  the  toxicity  of  U  by  reducing its bioavailability.  This study investigated the influence of DOC on the speciation and  chronic toxicity of U to M. macleayi. Organisms were exposed to a range of U concentrations (0 

– 750 µg L‐1) at three concentrations of DOC (5 mg L‐1 [background], 10 mg L‐1and 20 mg L‐1 

DOC) using Suwannee River Fulvic Acid Standard. Cladocerans were exposed for 8‐9 days and  fed a diet of filtered (0.45 µm) fermented food with vitamins and algae (Chlorella sp.) in water  that  was  changed  daily.  The  total  number  of  neonates  produced  from  three  broods  was  measured  as  the  endpoint.  Three  separate  tests  were  conducted,  with  results  pooled  and  presented  as  a  function  of  the  control  response.  Uranium  concentration‐response  curves  for  each  DOC  concentration  were  generated  and  ICxs obtained from the sigmoidal curve fits. In  the  presence  of  20  mg  L‐1  DOC,  the  toxicity  of  U  was  reduced  4‐fold  (IC50  =  313  µg  L‐1  U)  compared  to  that  at  background  DOC  (IC50  =  78  µg  L‐1).  In  the  presence  of  10  mg  L‐1  DOC,  toxicity  of  U  was  halved  (IC50  =  210  µg  L‐1)  compared  to  at  background  DOC.  Speciation  modelling  confirmed  the  reduction  in  U  toxicity  was  due  to  a  decrease  in  toxic  bioavailable  species of U through complexation with SRFA. 

These results support those found for other freshwater species, highlighting the importance of  considering DOC when assessing U toxicity to freshwater organisms. The data will be used to  inform algorithms that have been developed to adjust U water quality guidelines.  

 

Keywords: dissolved organic carbon; uranium; cladoceran; speciation  

 

Page | 152  SETAC Australasia Brisbane 2012 Conference 

Posters (Wed PM, 12‐613)  Metals 

Poster #20 (Wed,12‐613, 15:40‐17:00) 

Bioconcentration of Copper and Zinc in the Upside‐down Jellyfish, 

Cassiopea sp. 

Shelley Templeman* and Michael Kingsford

 

School of Marine & Tropical Biology and ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies, 

James Cook University, Townsville 4811, Australia 

*presenting author 

Abstract:  Jellyfish  have  the  capacity  to  form  large  population  blooms  under  ideal  conditions  and as such can have a major influence on the turnover of nutrients and metals in the marine  waters.  Despite this, there have been few studies on the accumulative capacity of jellyfish to  absorb  metals  from  the  marine  environment.    We  conducted  a  bioconcentration  study  to  investigate the ability of jellyfish to accumulate trace metals from seawater. The Upside‐down  jellyfish  (Cassiopea  sp.)  was  exposed  to  either  aqueous  copper  (17 µg/L)  or  zinc  (60  µg/L)  for  fourteen  (14)  days  followed  by  a  fourteen  (14)  day  clearance  phase  to  assess  their  ability  to  bioconcentrate  and  retain  copper  or  zinc  within  their  tissues.    The  result  for  the  two  metals  varied,  with  Cassiopea  sp.  rapidly  accumulating  copper  from  the  water  to  1689  µg/kg  (wet  weight) within 14 days, however, retention times were short with a biological half‐life of only 

1.7  days.    In  contrast,  both  the  uptake  and  clearance  rates  for  zinc  were  slower.    Tissue  concentrations of zinc at the end of the uptake phase were 7046 µg/kg (wet weight) and the  biological  half‐life  was  9.1  days.      The  results  demonstrated  that  Cassiopea  sp.  readily  bioconcentrated copper and zinc from low ambient concentrations, and suggest that jellyfish  play an important role in cycling trace metals in the marine environment. 

 

Keywords: bioaccumulation; biological half‐life; marine; trace metals 

 

SETAC Australasia Brisbane 2012 Conference  Page | 153  

 

Posters (Wed PM, 12‐613) 

Poster #21 (Wed,12‐613, 15:40‐17:00) 

Metals 

Trace element concentrations in the Avon River and Avon‐Heathcote 

Estuary following post‐earthquake sewage discharges 

Sally Gaw

1

*, Lauren Raffensperger

1

, Marlese Fairgray

1

, Grant Northcott

2

 and 

Louis Tremblay

3

 

1

University of Canterbury, Private Bag 4800, Christchurch, NZ; 

2

Plant & Food Research, Private 

Bag 3123, Hamilton, NZ; 

3

Cawthron Institute, 98 Halifax East St, Nelson, NZ 

*presenting author 

Abstract:  The  6.3  magnitude  earthquake  in  Christchurch,  New  Zealand  on  the  22 nd

  February 

2011 caused significant damage to sewage infrastructure. Raw sewage was discharged directly  into  the  city’s  urban  waterways  from  February  until  October  2011.  The  Avon  River  flows  through the central and eastern areas of Christchurch, two of the most severely damaged areas  and  discharges  into  the  Avon‐Heathcote  Estuary.    This  significant  urban  river  has  high  biodiversity  value  and  provides  habitats  for  fish  (including  trout  and  whitebait  spawning  grounds),  native  and  exotic  birds,  and  invertebrates.  Water  and  sediment  samples  were  collected  to  determine  if  the  release  of  untreated  raw  effluent  increased  the  levels  of  trace  elements  in  water  and  sediment  of  the  Avon  River  and  estuary.  The  samples  were  collected  from  September  2011  until  February  2012  following  the  cessation  of  the  majority  of  sewer  overflows  into  the  Avon  River  catchment.  Water  grab  samples  were  collected  from  three  locations  on  the  Avon  River.  Sediment  samples  were  collected  from  the  same  Avon  River  sampling sites and three additional sites located in the Avon‐Heathcote Estuary. The water and  sediment  samples  were  analysed  for  potentially  toxic  trace  elements  typically  present  in  wastewater including cadmium, copper, lead, nickel and zinc. The results for the trace element  concentrations in both water and sediment will be presented along with an assessment of the  likely impacts on aquatic organisms.   

 

Keywords: sediments, water, potentially toxic trace elements 

 

Page | 154  SETAC Australasia Brisbane 2012 Conference 

Posters (Wed PM, 12‐613)  Metals 

Poster #22 (Wed,12‐613, 15:40‐17:00) 

Trace metal concentrations and phylogeny of metallothionein cDNA in 

Paenungulata species  

Noel Takeuchi

1

*, Ramiro Isaza

2

, Robert Bonde

3

, David Barber

1

University of Florida, College of Veterinary Medicine, Center for Environmental and Human 

Toxicology, Gainesville, Florida, USA; 

2

University of Florida, College of Veterinary Medicine, Small 

Animal Clinical Sciences, Gainesville, Florida, USA; 

3

United States Geological Survey, Southeast 

Ecological Science Center, Gainesville, Florida, USA 

*presenting author 

Abstract: Members of the clade Paenungulata include animals from around the world, such as the  manatee, elephant and dugong.  Under the supervision of USGS Sirenia Project and Florida Fish and 

Wildlife  Conservation  Commission,  whole  blood  samples  from  115  free‐ranging  manatees  were  collected during health assessments at 4 different sites in Florida (Crystal River, Lemon Bay, Indian 

River  Lagoon,  and  Everglades)  and  Belize.  Whole  blood  samples  were  analyzed  by  ICP‐MS  and  indicated zinc (11.2±4.5 ppm) was of special interest, as levels were higher in manatees than in other  marine mammal species, including Tursiops truncatus, Kogia breviceps, and Pseudorca crassidens.  We  are interested in how manatees maintain these zinc levels without any apparent adverse effects and  if these levels are unique amongst Paenungulata species.  We also obtained 33 whole blood samples  from captive Asian elephants (Elephas maximus) in Florida and found zinc levels to be comparable to  other  mammalian  species  (6.1±4.5  ppm).  Dugong  (Dugong  dugon)  samples  are  currently  being  explored  at  the  University  of  Queensland.    These  results  suggest  that  high  levels  of  zinc  are  not  found in all Paenungulata species and may have evolved within the order Sirenia. 

To  further  examine  the  evolution  of  trace  metal  homeostasis,  sequences  for  metallothionein  (MT)  were  examined  in  members  of  Paenungulata.    MT  is  a  small  metal‐  binding  protein  involved  in  divalent metal homeostasis that is induced by exposure to elevated levels of metals, including zinc,  and has not been examined in Paenungulata species.  We successfully cloned and sequenced MT 1 

(381  bp)  from  isolated  peripheral blood  mononuclear  cells  of  the  Florida  manatee,  which  was  83%  identical  to  rhesus  macque  (Macaca  mulatta)  MT  1E  and  84%  identical  to  chimpanzee  (Pan 

troglodytes)  MT  1x.    Moreover,  the  Asian  elephant  MT1  (376  bp)  was  also  cloned  and  sequenced.  

Phylogenetic analysis revealed a maximum likelihood of 74% to manatee MT 1, supporting grouping  of  species  in  Paenungulata  in  regards  to  MT  sequence.    Dugong  MT  will  be  examined  at  the 

University of Queensland in order to examine our hypothesis that metallothionein cDNA sequences  in Paenungulata species will be related. 

Keywords: trace metal, zinc, metallothionein, leukocytes, Belize, Florida, manatee, elephant,  dugong

SETAC Australasia Brisbane 2012 Conference  Page | 155  

 

Posters (Wed PM, 12‐613) 

Poster #23 (Wed,12‐613, 15:40‐17:00) 

Water Quality 

Bioanalytical assessment of the formation of disinfection by‐products in a  drinking water plant 

Peta Neale

1

*, Janet Tang

1

, Ina Kristiana

2

, Suzanne McDonald

2

, Jace Tan

2

,

 

Alice Antony

3

, Maria José Farré

4

, Michael Bartkow

5

, Beate Escher

1

 

1

The University of Queensland, National Research Centre for Environmental Toxicology (Entox), Brisbane 

Qld 4108, Australia; 

2

Curtin Water Quality Centre, Curtin University of Technology, Perth WA, 6845; 

3

The 

University of New South Wales, Sydney, Australia  

4

The University of Queensland, Advanced Water Management Centre (AWMC), Brisbane Qld 4108, 

Australia; 

5

Seqwater, Brisbane Qld 4000, Australia 

*presenting author 

Abstract:  Disinfection  of  drinking  water  is  the  most  successful  measure  to  reduce  water‐borne  diseases  and  protect  health.  However,  disinfection  by‐products  (DBPs)  formed  from  natural  organic  matter  and  disinfectants  like  chlorine  and  chloramine  may  cause  bladder  cancer  and  other  adverse  health  effects. 

Despite  epidemiological  evidence  and  identification  of  more  than  600  individual  DBPs,  not  all  of  the  causative agents have been identified. We report on a pilot study that uses bioanalytical tools to evaluate  the  water  quality  and  the  formation  of  DBPs  through  a  full‐scale  water  treatment  plant  serving  a  metropolitan  area,  which  employs  coagulation  and  sand  filtration,  followed  by  chlorination  and  chloramination. Water quality changes through the treatment process were investigated were investigated  using in vitro bioassays (focusing on nonspecific and reactive toxicity), quantification of adsorbable organic  halogens  (AOX),  characterization  of  organic  matter  as  well  as  analytical  quantification  of  selected  DBPs. 

Non‐specific toxicity quantified with the Microtox assay peaked mid‐way in samples after the chlorination  and storage steps. Algal growth inhibition confirmed the non‐specific toxicity pattern seen with Microtox. 

While  the  content  of  dissolved  organic  matter  decreased  in  the  coagulation  step  and  then  essentially  remained constant during further steps, the concentrations of AOX increased with every treatment step. 

The  general  trend  of  all  the  quantified  DBPs  followed  a  pattern  similar  to  the  one  seen  for  AOX  with  maximum  concentrations  observed  in  the  final  treated  water.  The  mostly  chlorinated  and  brominated 

DBPs  formed  during  treatment  also  caused  reactive  toxicity  to  increase  throughout  treatment.  Both  genotoxicity with and without metabolic activation showed the same pattern as the non‐specific toxicity  with  a  maximum  activity  mid‐way  during  the  treatment  train.  The  E.  coli  biosensors  strains  indicative  of  protein  damage  and  glutathione  depletion  responded  strongly  to  the  samples  from  chlorination.  Also  a  bioassay indicative of the oxidative stress response did show some, albeit very small activity. Despite the  fact that bioassays were not optimized yet for volatile DBPs, the bioassays indicated an increase in toxicity  associated with the formation of DBPs at the various stages of the treatment chain in this drinking water  plant. It must be noted, though that cell‐based bioassays are early warning indicators of an onset of effect  or of repair and defense mechanisms. Thus their effect cannot be directly translated to an adverse health  outcome but rather to the presence of groups of chemicals that exhibit reactive modes of toxic action.  

Keywords: in vitro bioassay, cytotoxicity, reactive modes of toxic action, genotoxicity, total organic  halogen

   

Page | 156  SETAC Australasia Brisbane 2012 Conference 

Posters (Wed PM, 12‐613)  Water Quality 

Poster #24 (Wed,12‐613, 15:40‐17:00) 

Application of a reporter gene assay indicative of the oxidative stress  response pathway for water quality assessment 

Mriga Dutt*, Erin Maylin, Beate I. Escher

 

The University of Queensland, National Research Centre for Environmental Toxicology (Entox), 

Brisbane Qld 4108, Australia 

*presenting author 

Abstract:  The  development  of  high‐throughput  in‐vitro  toxicity  testing  of  cellular  toxicity  pathways  as  advocated  by  the  Tox21  program  in  the  US  has  revolutionised  environmental  health  risk  assessment. 

Tox21 brings a paradigm shift in toxicity testing as in vitro methods are used to elucidate toxicity pathways  and  to  prioritize  chemicals  for  further  testing.  The  idea  behind  is  simple.  Instead  of  assessing  apical  endpoints,  e.g.  cell  viability  or  organ’s  or  system’s  malfunction,  the  activation  or  suppression  of  cellular  pathways  is  assessed,  which  constitutes  a  very  early  stage  in  the  toxicity  pathway.  These  effects  are  triggered at lower concentrations that those that cause apical endpoints or higher level effects, thus test  systems  targeting  cellular  pathways  are  more  sensitive  than  those  quantifying  cytotoxicity  and  may  therefore  serves  as  early  warning  signals  of  chemical  exposure.  Especially  cellular  pathways  that  are  transcriptionally  activated  lend  themselves  to  testing  because  it  is  fairly  straightforward  to  develop  reporter  gene  assays  for  high  throughput  testing.  Adaptive  stress  response  pathways  are  signal  transduction pathways that are activated by various chemical and physical stressors and whose activation  results  in  the  production  of  cytoprotective  enzymes.  Amongst  them,  oxidative  stress  response  is  considered to be the most central pathway since it responds to many different electrophilic chemicals and  cellular reactions that produce reactive oxygen species. There are a wide range of reporter gene assays for  the  oxidative  stress  response  available  but  none  of  them  has  been  applied  for  water  quality  assessment. 

After a literature review we selected the AREc32 cell line for validation.  

It  was  the  goal  of  this  study  to  adopt  the  AREc32  cell  line  for  use  with  water  samples  and  evaluate  the  oxidative stress response of chemicals in water samples taken from the entire water cycle from sewage to  drinking  water.  The  implementation  of  the  AREc32  assay  for  water  quality  assessment  started  with  the  establishment of concentration‐effect curves for positive and negative controls as well as carrier solvents.  t‐Butylhydroquinone  (tBHQ)  served  as  reference  compound  for  the  derivation  of  the  toxic  equivalencies. 

After the establishment of concentration‐effect curves for all compounds, a benchmark value was derived  for  reporting  and  QA/QC  parameters  (e.g.,  limit  of  quantification  and  limit  of  detection,  repeatability,  reproducibility, robustness) were assessed. The newly established protocol was then applied to solid‐phase  extracts  from  a  wide  range  of  water  samples  including  wastewater,  effluent  from  various  biological  and  oxidation processes, surface water, drinking water.  

Keywords: in vitro bioassay, cytotoxicity, reactive modes of toxic action, oxidative stress

 

SETAC Australasia Brisbane 2012 Conference  Page | 157  

 

Posters (Wed PM, 12‐613) 

Poster #25 (Wed,12‐613, 15:40‐17:00) 

Water Quality 

Risk‐based water quality assessment through bioanalytical tools 

Anita Poulsen

1

,

 

Frederic Leusch

2

, Heather Chapman

2

 and Beate Escher

1

1

The University of Queensland, National Research Centre for Environmental Toxicology, 

Brisbane, Qld, Australia; 

2

Griffith University, Smart Water Research Centre, Gold Coast, Qld, 

Australia; 

*

Present address: University of California, Davis, Department of Environmental 

Toxicology, Davis, California, USA 

 

Abstract: A multitude of organic contaminants including agricultural and industrial chemicals,  as well as, pharmaceuticals and personal care products enter the aquatic environment to form  complex mixtures. The ever‐increasing number of chemicals circulating in the environment and  the  increasingly  limited  water  resources  have  increased  demands  to  assess  the  quality  of  waters  used  for  human  consumption  and  recreation.  Target  chemical  analysis  efficiently  identifies  selected  pollutants  but  may  overlook  non‐target  compounds  including  potentially  toxic  metabolites,  emerging  and  unknown  chemicals.  Furthermore,  while  individual  compounds  may  be  present  at  levels  below  the  method  detection  limit  or  the  biologically  effective  concentration,  the  combined  effect  of  chemical  mixtures  may  result  in  toxicity. 

Bioanalytical  tools  are  cell‐based  assays  designed  to  detect  early  cellular  triggers  that  are  prerequisites  for,  but  may  or  may  not  result  in  adverse  effects.  The  response  measured  in  a  cell‐based  assay  for  a  given  mode  of  toxic  action  (MOA;  e.g.,  genotoxicity)  reflects  the  total  effect caused by all chemicals exhibiting that particular MOA. Bioanalytical tools thus have the  ability to capture mixture effects, although causal relationships for single chemicals cannot be  elucidated. Bioassays are selective, however, in that similarly structured chemicals tend to act  via similar toxicological mechanisms leading to expression of similar MOAs. A given bioassay  thus  characterises  the  response  of  a  particular  compound  group(s)  that  may  be  useful  to  establish  source  (e.g.,  photosynthesis  inhibition  by  herbicides).  The  endpoints  detected  in  bioassays  can  be  grouped  into  non‐specific  (cytotoxic),  specific  (e.g.,  estrogenic,  neurotoxic)  and  reactive  (carcinogenic,  mutagenic)  MOAs.  A  comprehensive  assessment  will  include  a  battery of bioassays covering a range of MOAs from all three main groups, preferably targeting  non‐specific  toxicity,  genotoxicity,  mutagenicity  and  several  different  specific  endpoints. 

Bioassays  cannot  replace  chemical  analysis  but  are  valuable  complementary  tools  for  integrative  water  quality  assessment  and  can  be  used  as  a  screening  tier  to  prioritise  non‐ target analysis for toxicological relevance. This poster reviews the application of bioanalytical  tools in water quality assessment to date, with recommendations for the future.  

Page | 158  SETAC Australasia Brisbane 2012 Conference 

Posters (Wed PM, 12‐613)  Salinity 

Poster #26 (Wed,12‐613, 15:40‐17:00) 

Effect of ionic proportions of salinity on macro‐invertebrates in the Fitzroy 

Basin, Central Queensland 

Vini Nanjappa

1

*, Sue Vink

1

, Jason Dunlop

2

, D. Hobbs

3

, R. Mann

3

, R. Smith

3

 

 

1

Centre for Water in the Minerals Industry, Sustainable Minerals Institute, The University of 

Queensland, St Lucia,Qld, Australia; 

2

Catchment Water Science Unit, Water Quality and 

Aquatic Ecosystem Health Division, Department of Environment and Resource Management, 

Brisbane; 

3

Hydrobiology QLD Pty Ltd, QLD 

*presenting author 

Abstract: Salinity is a growing concern in Australia and around the world due to anthropogenic  causes.  There  have  been  a  number  of  studies  evaluating  the  effect  of  salinity  on  macro‐ invertebrates using either marine salts or single salts.  It has been observed that the effect of  salinity is affected by the ionic proportions of major cations (Ca, K, Mg, Na) and anions (SO

4

HCO

3

,  CO

3

,  Cl).  This  study  tested  the  toxicity  of  saline  solutions  with  an  ionic  composition  typical  of  that  observed  in  the  Fitzroy  Basin.  The  toxicity  of  this  solution  was  tested  using  standard  96h  acute  toxicity  tests  with  organisms  collected  from  South  East  Queensland  and 

Fitzroy Basin. The test organisms were from the order Ephemeroptera (Mayflies), Leptoceridae 

(Caddisflies),  Coleoptera  (Beetles).    The  test  water  was  found  to  be  more  toxic  than  the  composition of the marine salts. The 96h LC

(FC)  was  6.24  mScm

‐1

50

 value for Baetidae for the Fitzroy Composition 

  compared  to  8.7  to  13.2  mScm

‐1

  for  marine  salt,  Caenidae  was  <4.97  mScm

‐1  for FC and 13.1 mScm

‐1

 for marine salt. This study illustrates that the ionic composition  of a particular water type can influence the toxic effect on macro‐invertebrates and should be  considered when deriving site specific water quality guidelines. 

Keywords: ionic composition; Baetidae; acute toxicity tests 

 

SETAC Australasia Brisbane 2012 Conference  Page | 159  

Posters (Wed PM, 12‐613)  Salinity 

Poster #27 (Wed,12‐613, 15:40‐17:00) 

Sweet or savoury: Overcoming logistical problems associated with routine  toxicity testing of saline waters 

Reinier M. Mann

1,2

*, Sue Vink

3

, Tina Micevska

4

, Dustin Hobbs

1

 and Ross E.W. 

Smith

1

  

1

Hydrobiology, PO Box 2151 Toowong, Qld Australia; 

2

Centre for Environmental Sustainability 

(CEnS), University of Technology, Sydney (UTS), Broadway, NSW, Australia; 

3

Sustainable 

Minerals Institute (SMI), University of Queensland, St Lucia, Qld, Australia; 

4

Ecotox Services 

Australasia Pty Ltd, 27 / 2 Chaplin Drive, Lane Cove, NSW, Australia 

*presenting author 

Abstract:  Standardisation  of  test  procedures  and  protocols  allows  for  inter‐laboratory  comparison  and  validation  of  chemical  toxicity  for  a  suite  of  standard  test  species.    This  standardisation is prescriptive, and dictates that diluent waters have specific ionic and nutrient  profiles to ensure optimal conditions for test species.  For example, standard test procedures  for  the  Australian  cladoceran,  Ceriodaphnia  cf.  dubia,  require  an  aquatic  environment  that  includes  a  commercial  mineral  water  in  order  to  provide  optimal  conditions  for  survival  and  reproduction.    Where  toxicity  testing  seeks  to  estimate  the  toxicity  of  discrete  dissolved  contaminants,  the  ionic  and  nutrient  profile  of  test  waters  rarely  presents  an  obstacle  to  testing.  However, where the ionic profile of the test water is the parameter being tested, then  logistic problems arise.  The discharge of saline waters that accumulate in mine pits following  seasonal  rain,  presents  a  toxicity  testing  challenge,  because  it  is  the  salt  profile  of  the  water  that is of concern for release to natural waterways.  Recent studies designed to establish site  specific electrical conductivity (EC) trigger values through the generation of species sensitivity  distributions  (SSD)  have  addressed  this  challenge.    Test  water  representing  coal‐mine  pit‐ water  was  formulated  with  chemical  salts  based  on  median  concentrations  of  various  ions 

(Ca

2+

, Mg

2+

, Na

+

, K

+

, HCO

3

, SO

4

2‐

, Cl

).  Similarly, diluent waters were formulated based on the  salinity  profile  of  receiving  waters.    In  the  case  of  C.  cf.  dubia,  it  was  necessary  to  amend  a  commercial  mineral  water  so  as  to  ensure  optimal  conditions  for  the  species.    Because  the  commercial  mineral  water  is  high  in  Ca

2+

  and  HCO

3

,  some  minor  adjustments  in  other  components were necessary in order to achieve the desired EC.  By formulating each test water  and  diluent  to  suit  the  individual  test  species  (Pseudokirchneriella  subcapitataC.  cf.  dubia; 

Melanotaenia  splendida;  Macrobrachium  australiense;  Chironomus  tepperi),  consistent  salinity  profiles could be maintained across all tests, providing increased reliability of SSD and trigger  values obtained by this method. 

Keywords:  coal‐mine  discharge;  direct  toxicity  assessment;  salinity  trigger  value;  species  sensitivity distribution; test standardisation 

Page | 160  SETAC Australasia Brisbane 2012 Conference 

Posters (Wed PM, 12‐613)  Micropollutants and Emerging Contaminants 

Poster #28 (Wed,12‐613, 15:40‐17:00) 

Predicting adverse health effects of transformation products formed from  organic micropollutants during water treatment 

Marcella L. Card* and Beate I. Escher 

National Research Centre for Environmental Toxicology, The University of Queensland, 

Coopers Plains, Qld, Australia 

*presenting author 

Abstract:  In  water  treatment  plants  (WTPs),  micropollutants  are  transformed  via  biotic  and  abiotic  processes,  resulting  in  transformation  products  that  may  be  as  toxic  as  or  more  toxic  than the parent compound.  This presents a significant uncertainty for risk assessment where  water is recycled for human consumption or where such use is pending implementation.  With  more  than  100,000  chemicals  in  daily  use,  there  is  a  need  for  an  efficient,  reliable  way  to  identify  chemicals  of  concern,  which  may  lead  to  toxic  transformation  products  in  WTPs.  

Therefore  we  have  developed  a  scheme  to  predict  parent  compounds,  which  may  be  transformed  into  toxic  transformation  products  and  the  predictions  will  be  validated  by  quantifying the toxicity of predicted parent compounds and transformation products using in 

vitro  bioassays.    Known  toxicophores  (functional  groups  which  cause  reactive  or  specific  toxicity) were identified from the literature for each of several modes of toxic action relevant to  human  health.    Moieties,  which  may  be  transformed  into  toxicophores,  were  then  predicted  based on microbially‐mediated transformations which occur in activated sludge and/or abiotic  transformations  which  occur  during  UV  or  advanced  oxidation  treatments.    Micropollutants  carrying  the  putative  precursor moieties were  then  identified  from  among  those  listed  in  the 

Australian  Guidelines  for  Water  Recycling  and  the  U.S.  Environmental  Protection  Agency 

Candidate  Contaminant  Lists.    Micropollutants  and  predicted  transformation  products  were  removed from consideration when calculated physicochemical properties (e.g., hydrophobicity  and volatility) indicated low biological relevance.  To validate the predictive scheme, identified  micropollutants of concern will be subjected to bench‐scale activated sludge and/or advanced  oxidation  treatments.    As  the  transformations  progress,  toxicity  of  the  parent‐product  mixtures will be quantified using bioassays.  If, as predicted, the transformation products are  more toxic than the parent compounds, then the measured toxicity will not decrease relative to  decreases in the ratio of parent concentration to product concentration. 

Keywords: bioassay; recycled water; toxicophore 

SETAC Australasia Brisbane 2012 Conference  Page | 161  

Posters (Wed PM, 12‐613)  Micropollutants and Emerging Contaminants 

Poster #29 (Wed,12‐613, 15:40‐17:00) 

In vitro bioassay for reactive toxicity towards proteins implemented for  water quality monitoring 

Janet Tang, Eva Glenn*, Hanne Thoen and Beate Escher 

The University of Queensland, National Research Centre for Environmental Toxicology (Entox), 

Brisbane Qld 4108, Australia 

* presenting author 

Abstract:  An  in vitro  test system  was  developed  to  evaluate  the  hazards  and  mode  of  action  classification  of  reactive  chemicals  for  environmental  risk  assessment.  Current  bioanalytical  tools  on  reactive  toxicity  focus  mainly  on  DNA  damage  however  protein  damage  is  also  an  important  endpoint  for  toxicity  caused  by  reactive  chemicals.  Reactive  toxicity  results  from  covalent  binding  of  electrophilic  organic  pollutants  to  proteins  have  the  potential  to  initiate  severe adverse biological effects such as skin sensitization, respiratory allergy, organ toxicity,  genotoxicity and mutagenicity. A number of in chemico assays targeting soft electrophiles have  been  used  to  evaluate  the  toxic  potential  of  a  substance,  so  far  there  is  only  one  in  vitro  bioassay using E. coli to measure the reactivity of soft electrophiles. We successfully adopted  the  E.  coli  assay  from  a  closed  glass  tube  system  to  a  96‐well  microtitre  plate  system.  This  bioassay  is  based  on  genetically  modified  E.  coli  strains  to  quantify  the  specific  reactivity  towards glutathione. Glutathione (GSH) is a small tripeptide whose cysteine moiety serves as a  model  for  nucleophilic  sites  on  proteins,  and  also  is  an  important  indicator  of  detoxification  processes as well as the redox status of the cells. The significance of GSH for detoxification was  assessed by comparing the growth inhibition of the GSH‐deficient strain to its fully functional  parent  strain.  Seven  reference  compounds  serving  as  positive  and  negative  controls  were  investigated.  The  E.  coli  strain  that  lacks  GSH  was  four  times  more  sensitive  towards  the  positive  control  Sea‐Nine,  while  negative  controls  benzo[a]pyrene,  2‐aminoanthracene,  phenol,  t‐butylhydroquinone,  methyl  methane  sulfonate  and  4‐nitroquinoline  oxide  showed  equal effect concentrations in both strains. Water samples collected across an indirect potable  reuse scheme representing the complete water cycle from sewage to drinking water in South 

East Queensland were used to evaluate the applicability of the E. coli assay for reactive toxicity. 

While  the  effect  concentrations  showed  similar  trends  as  in  other  biological  endpoints,  the  specific response was only observed in samples that had undergone chlorination as disinfection  process.  High  natural  organic  matter  or  other  matrix  components  disturbed  the  bioassay  so 

  much that we recommend it for future routine testing only in tertiary treated water or drinking  water. 

Keywords: E. coli; glutathione; protein damage; reactive modes of toxic action; soft  electrophile   

Page | 162  SETAC Australasia Brisbane 2012 Conference 

Posters (Wed PM, 12‐613)  Micropollutants and Emerging Contaminants 

Poster #30 (Wed,12‐613, 15:40‐17:00) 

Sub‐acute toxicity of dibutyl phthalate in Murray rainbowfish 

(Melanotaenia fluviatilis

Harpreet Bhatia

1,2

*, Anupama Kumar

1

, Mike McLaughlin

1,2

 and John 

Chapman

3

 

1

CSIRO (Land and Water), Waite Road, Urrbrae, SA 5064, Australia; 

Food and Wine, University of Adelaide, SA 5005, Australia; 

3

2

School of Agriculture, 

Ecotoxicology and Environmental 

Contaminants Section, Environment and Heritage, NSW 1825, Australia 

*presenting author 

Abstract: Effluents from the wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) are a complex mixture of  contaminants  with  different  modes  of  action.  Based  on  in‐vitro  screens,  treated  wastewaters  from Australia have been reported to exhibit estrogenic, anti‐estrogenic, androgenic and anti‐ androgenic activities. While in vitro bioassays represent rapid, cheap and convenient screening  tools,  the  development  and  use  of  in  vivo  biomarkers  in  native  fish  is  critical  for  future  monitoring  programmes  in  Australia.  Dibutyl phthalate  (DBP)  is  an  anti‐androgen  compound  and it has been detected in the aquatic environment at concentrations ranging from 0.1 – 18.5 

µg/L.  In  utero  exposure  of  male  rodents  to  DBP  has  been  reported  to  cause  abnormal  development  of  genitalia  and  infertility  in  some  cases.  Given  the  fact  that  vertebrates  share  similar  reproductive  axis  homology,  it  is  hypothesised  that  DBP  can  cause  reproductive  impairments in fish. Adult male and female Murray rainbowfish (Melanotaenia fluviatilis) were  exposed  to  125,  250,  500  and  1000  µg/L  in  a  semi‐static  system  for  7  days  and  analysed  for  changes in plasma vitellogenin and gonadal histology. Test solutions were renewed every 24 hr  and  DBP  in  water  was  quantified  on  gas  chromatography‐mass  spectroscopy.  100%  survival  and  no  significant  change  in  the  vital  indices  were  observed  in  all  treated  fish  after  7  days. 

There  was  an  increase  in  the  proportion  of  spawning  follicles  in  the  females  exposed  to  125 

µg/L of  DBP. Ovarian follicles developed fibrosis, cysts, shrunken ooplasm, chorion folding and  vaculolated nuclei in all treatments. Treated males were found to have vacuolated testes with  decreased  germinal  epithelium  thickness  after  exposure  to  1000  µg/L.  Preliminary  results  suggest that a short‐term exposure at sub‐acute concentrations of DBP can cause reproductive  impairments  in  adult  Murray  rainbowfish.  Further  study  is  warranted  to  establish  the  chronic  effects of DBP on reproduction and elucidate mechanism of its action in Murray rainbowfish. 

 

Keywords: phthalates; vitellogenin; histology, gonads, Murray rainbowfish 

 

SETAC Australasia Brisbane 2012 Conference  Page | 163  

Posters (Wed PM, 12‐613)  Micropollutants and Emerging Contaminants 

Poster #31 (Wed,12‐613, 15:40‐17:00) 

Effect assessment of pharmaceuticals using the aquatic plant, Lemna 

minor 

Bhanu Nidumolu and Anu Kumar*

 

 

CSIRO Land and Water, Waite Road, Urrbrae, South Australia 5064, Australia 

*presenting author 

Abstract: Overseas research has shown that many pharmaceutical and personal care products 

(PPCPs) are not completely removed during wastewater treatment, and as a result, have been  detected  in  waste  water  treatment  plant  (WWTP)  effluents  as  well  as  rivers  and  lakes,  groundwater  and  in  drinking  water.  Therefore,  the  environmental  fate  and  potential  toxic  effects  of  PPCPs  have  become  an  emerging  community,  scientific  &  regulatory  concern. 

Current  data  on  acute  and  chronic  toxicity  of  pharmaceuticals  support  the  conclusion  that  more target or biomolecule‐oriented, or mode‐of action‐ based investigations, will allow more  relevant  insights  into  effects  on  survival,  growth  and  reproduction  than  traditional  standard  ecotoxicity  testing.  The  aim  of  the  present  study  was  to  evaluate  the  phytotoxicity  of  six  pharmaceuticals  to  Lemna  minor,  under  controlled  laboratory  conditions.  A  representative  drug  from  different  classes  of  PPCPs  with  different  modes  of  action  such  as  synthetic  estrogens, ß‐adrenergic blockers, serotonin reuptake inhibitors, analgesics  and  non‐steroidal  anti‐inflammatory drugs and chemotherapy drugs was selected for testing. In addition to the  standard ecotoxicological endpoints, oxidative stress was also quantified in L. minor based on  the  analyses  of  catalase,  glutathione  reductase  and  glutathione  S‐transferase  activity. 

Preliminary results indicated that phytotoxicity of the PPCPs was correlated with a decrease in  chlorophyll‐a,  b  and  a+b  content,  and  reduction  in  frond  numbers.  Methotrexate  was  highly  toxic  to  L.  minor  with  an  EC

50  value  of  20  µg/L.  Fluoxetine  and  17α‐ethinyestradiol  showed  phytotoxic  effects  in  L.  minor  with  EC

50

  values  ranging  between  6‐8  mg/L.  Given  that  pharmaceuticals, like other organic waste contaminants, are largely found as mixtures and that  the  likelihood  of  encountering  significant  effects  increases  with  the  increasing  number  of  compounds  present  (through  both  response  and  concentration  addition),  further  mixture  toxicity testing is required. 

Keywords: mode of action; endpoint sensitivity; oxidative stress; toxicity 

 

Page | 164  SETAC Australasia Brisbane 2012 Conference 

Posters (Wed PM, 12‐613)  Micropollutants and Emerging Contaminants 

Poster #32 (Wed,12‐613, 15:40‐17:00) 

Developing protocols for measuring mercury species in environmental  matrices by HPLC‐ICPMS 

Rajani Jagtap

1

*, Frank Krikowa

1

, William Maher

1

, Simon Foster

1

 and Michael 

Ellwood

1

Ecochemistry Laboratory, Institute for Applied Ecology, University of Canberra, Bruce, ACT 

2601, Australia; 

2

Research School of Earth Sciences, Australian National, ACT 0200, Australia 

*presenting author 

Abstract:  Mercury  is  considered  to  be  a  major  environmental  contaminant  on  a  global  scale  and  therefore  has  inspired  the  development  of  methods  for  the  determination  of  mercury  species in the wide range of environmental matrices.   

Environmental  and  health  risks  for  mercury  derive  from  methyl  mercury  that  is  formed  by  biomethylation of inorganic mercury by microorganisms in sediment and soil.  Methyl mercury  is  a  neurotoxin  that  readily  crosses  biological  membranes  which  accumulates  to  harmful  concentrations in exposed organisms and biomagnifies in aquatic food webs to concentrations  of toxicological concern. 

Developing  a  sensitive,  reliable  and  cost  effective  method  to  measure  mercury  species  is  important for monitoring mercury concentrations in environmental matrices in order to avoid  ecotoxicological risk and to understand the biogeochemical cycling of mercury species in the  environment.  Since methyl mercury is the most toxic species, routine analysis of this species is  increasingly in demand.   

 

This project describes a procedure for the extraction and determination of methyl mercury and  inorganic  mercury  in  sediments  and  fish  muscle  tissues  using  HPLC‐ICPMS  after  extraction  using 2‐mercaptoethanol.  A Perkin‐Elmer 3 µm C8 (30 mm x 3 mm) HPLC column and mobile  phase containing 0.5% v/v 2‐mercaptoethanol and 5% v/v methanol (pH 5.5) at a flow rate of 

1.5 ml min

‐1

, 25

0

C was used for the separation of mercury species.  The developed extraction  procedure  of  mercury  species  from  the  fish  tissues  was  compared  against  an  enzymatic  extraction  using  Protease  type  XIV  and  similar  results  were  obtained  for  both  extraction  procedures.    The  methyl  mercury  concentration  of  sediment  reference  material  ERM  CC  580  and  biological  certified  reference  materials,  NRCC  DORM‐2  Dogfish  muscle,  NRCC  Dolt‐3 

Dogfish liver, NIST RM Albacore tuna and IRMM IMEP‐20 tuna fish were in agreement with the  certified values. 

Keywords: contaminant; mercaptoethanol extraction; methyl mercury 

 

SETAC Australasia Brisbane 2012 Conference  Page | 165  

Posters (Wed PM, 12‐613)  Micropollutants and Emerging Contaminants 

Poster #33 (Wed,12‐613, 15:40‐17:00) 

Measurement of selenoaminoacids in fish tissues by HPLC‐ICPMS 

Rajani Jagtap

1

*, William Maher

1

, Frank Krikowa

1

, Simon Foster

1

 and Michael 

Ellwood

 

1

Ecochemistry Laboratory, Institute for Applied Ecology, University of Canberra, ACT 2601, 

Australia; 

2

Research School of Earth Sciences, Australian National University, ACT 0200, 

Australia 

*presenting author 

Abstract:  Se  plays  a  major  nutritional  role  in  humans  and  animals  as  it  is  an  essential  component  of  a  number  of  enzymes  including  glutathione  peroxidase.    The  narrow  margin  between the beneficial and toxic levels of Se has important implications on human health.    Due  to its dual role, Se has been widely studied.  

Se is present in many chemical forms in the environment: from inorganic Se (IV) and Se (VI) to  the  organic  amino  acids  such  as  selenocysteine  and  selenomethionine.    Many  enzymes  and  other  proteins  require  Se  for  their  activity  and  the  forms  required  by  animals  are  the 

Selenoaminoacids  or  Se  containing  proteins.    Since,  selenoaminoacids  are  mainly  associated  with proteins in the living organism, to release the Se species incorporated into proteins, the  peptide bond needs to be broken in a way that releases the intact Se containing amino acids or  their derivatives.   

Although,  the measurement  of  total  Se  is  essential  to  provide  elemental  concentrations,  it  is  insufficient  information  as  the  biological  actions  of  Se  are  dependent  on  the  physical  properties of its various chemical forms.  Speciation information is therefore required to gain  an understanding of its biogeochemical cycling and metabolism.   

This project investigates the extraction and determination of Se species by HPLC‐ICPMS after  proteolytic digestion and the derivatisation of selenoaminoacids.  Low efficiency of proteolytic  extractions reported in the literature could be a consequence of incomplete digestion of tissue  due to insufficient unfolding of proteins, hence the inaccessibility of the enzymes to the target  peptide bonds.

   Fish tissues are extracted using urea to denature proteins followed by reaction  with  dithiothretol  to  break  the  Se‐Se  and  S‐Se  bonds  and  alkylation  with  iodoacetamide  to  derivatize  selenomethionine  and  selenocysteine  to  more  stable  carboxymethylated  forms.  

This  allows  for  the  enzymatic  digestion  of  the  stabilised  carbamidomethyled  selenocysteine  and selenomethionine allowing proteolytic digestion to extract Se species. 

Keywords: dual role; proteolytic digestion; selenium 

 

Page | 166  SETAC Australasia Brisbane 2012 Conference 

Posters (Wed PM, 12‐613)  Micropollutants and Emerging Contaminants 

Poster #34 (Wed,12‐613, 15:40‐17:00) 

Retrospective temporal trends of methoxylated polybrominated  diphenoxybenzenes and dietary isotope tracers in the eggs of herring gulls  from the North American Great Lakes 

Da Chen

1,2

, Robert J. Letcher

1,2

*, Lewis T. Gauthier

1

, Shaogang Chu

1

 and 

Robert McCrindle

3

 

1

Wildlife Toxicology Research Section, Science and Technology Branch, Environment Canada, 

National Wildlife Research Centre, Carleton University, Ottawa, ON, Canada; 

2

Department of 

Chemistry, Carleton University, Ottawa, ON, Canada; 

3

Department of Chemistry, University of 

Guelph and Wellington Laboratories, Guelph, ON, Canada 

* presenting author 

Abstract: Brominated flame retardants (BFRs) are used to protect the public from fires by reducing  the flammability of combustible materials including plastics, foams, textiles, furniture and electronic  products. At least 75 different BFRs have been commercially produced, but for a majority of these  substances  there  is  a  dearth  of  environmental  studies.  Furthermore,  extremely  limited  knowledge  exists  on  the  environmental/biological  degradation  of  commercial  BFRs.  Very  recently,  we  discovered  and  identified  a  novel  class  of  brominated  contaminants,  the  methoxylated  polybrominated diphenoxybenzenes (MeO‐PBDPBs), in eggs of herring gull (Larus argentatus), used  as a bioindicator species of contaminants in the Laurentian Great Lakes of North America. Prior to  this  study,  absolutely  nothing  had  been  published  or  known  with  respect  to  MeO‐PBDPBs  in  the  environment.  We  have  hypothesized  that  these  MeO‐PBDPBs  are  degradation  products  of  the  polybrominated  diphenoxybenzenes,  e.g.,  tetradecabromodiphenoxybenzene  (currently  marketed  as  SAYTEX  120)  or  polybromo  3P2E.  As  part  of  the  on‐going  efforts  to  comprehensively  elucidate  the sources, bioaccumulation and fate of MeO‐PBDPBs in Great Lakes gulls and their food webs and  ecosystems,  we examined  temporal  concentration  and  congener  pattern  changes  (1982  –  2010)  in  egg  pool  homogenates  from  selected  Great  Lakes  gull  colonies.  In  the  most  contaminated  Lake 

Huron  colony,  MeO‐PBDPB  concentrations  increased  from  1982  (31.4  ng/g  wet  weight),  peaked  around the late 1990s, and then generally declined until 2010. Over the study period concentrations  generally increased for colony sites in Lakes Erie, Ontario and Michigan, whereas the levels in Lake 

Superior declined. The ratio of Br

6

‐ to Br

5

‐MeO‐PBDPB congeners significantly decreased over time  in some colonies. Our study suggested that over time the diet of gulls had shifted more to terrestrial  versus aquatic  origins,  as  indicated  by  dietary  tracers of  stable  carbon and nitrogen  isotope. Thus,  increased reliance on more terrestrial‐sourced diets may have contributed to elevated ( Br

5

‐ versus 

Br

6

‐) MeO‐PBDPB exposure.  

Keywords: brominated contaminants; Herring gulls; North America Great Lakes; sources; temporal  trends

SETAC Australasia Brisbane 2012 Conference  Page | 167  

Posters (Wed PM, 12‐613)  Risk Assessment and Environmental Guidelines 

Poster #35 (Wed,12‐613, 15:40‐17:00) 

The comparative effects of a biological (Metarhizium acridum) and a  chemical (Fipronil) pesticide on arid‐zone grassland ecosystems 

Grant Hose

1

*, Kris French

2

, Paul Story

3

, Michael Bull

4

, and Kim Maute

2

 

1

Department of Biological Sciences, Macquarie University, North Ryde, NSW 2109, Australia; 

2

School of Biological Sciences, University of Wollongong, Wollongong, NSW 2522, Australia;  

3

Australian Plague Locust Commission, Canberra, ACT 2609, Australia; 

4

School of Biological 

Sciences, Flinders University, Adelaide, SA 5001, Australia  

*presenting author 

Abstract:  The  use  of  pesticides  in  arid  and  semi‐arid  agricultural  regions  is  commonplace  globally but despite this there is a general dearth of long‐term ecological data on which to base  risk assessment and best management practice. 

This project will examine the comparative toxicology of a biological (Metarhizium acridum) and  a  chemical  (Fipronil)  pesticide  that  are  both  used  for  locust  control  in  Australia.  We  have  established large‐scale experimental plots at Fowlers Gap, NW NSW. Assemblages of ground‐ dwelling  invertebrates  and  reptiles,  as  well  as  soil  microbial  functional  assemblages,  termite  activity, litter decomposition rates and soil nutrients will be monitored for 12 months prior to  pesticide application and for 2 years following.  

The pesticide application will create a pulse disturbance after which we will examine possible  trophic cascades through invertebrate assemblage and reptile predators. Superimposed on this  study will be the dynamics of the arid‐zone boom and bust cycles, which at the time of project  initiation was in a boom cycle following above average summer rains. 

Here we outline our experimental design and methods for this project. Further, we discuss the  likely outcomes and management implications for broad scale pest control in arid regions and  consider how our findings will lead to improved management and risk assessment of pesticide  use in these ecosystems. 

Keywords: Arid zone, invertebrates, reptiles, pesticides

Page | 168  SETAC Australasia Brisbane 2012 Conference 

Posters (Wed PM, 12‐613)  Statistics and Computational Techniques 

Poster #36 (Wed,12‐613, 15:40‐17:00) 

Analysis of bioassay data using non‐linear regression in Excel 

Frederic DL Leusch* and Erik Prochazka 

Smart Water Research Centre, Griffith University, Southport Qld 4222, Australia 

Abstract:  Some  of  the  discrepancy  in  bioassay  results  between  different  studies  and  laboratories  is  simply  an  artefact  of  the  way  raw  bioassay  data  is  analysed.  This  poster  will  present  a  simple  method  to  express  bioassay  data  as  a  toxic  equivalent  based  on  the  concentration‐effect curve of a reference compound using Microsoft Excel with the Solver add‐ in.  An  excel  template  can  be  downloaded  from  http://fredleusch.swifthost.net/research/bioassaydata. 

Keywords: bioassay; concentration‐effect curve; NLR; solver

SETAC Australasia Brisbane 2012 Conference  Page | 169  

 

Posters (Wed PM, 12‐613)  Biomarkers and Biosensors 

Poster #37 (Wed,12‐613, 15:40‐17:00) 

Understanding and controlling bioavailability: Passive dosing of persistent  organic pollutants into recombinant cell bioassays 

Ben R. Mewburn

1

, Joop L.M. Hermens

2

, Michael S. Denison

3

, Beate I. Escher

1

1

The University of Queensland, National Research Centre for Environmental Toxicology 

(Entox), Brisbane QLD 4108, Australia; 

2

IRAS, Utrecht University, The Netherlands 

3

Department of Environmental Toxicology, University of California, Davis, USA 

*presenting author 

Abstract:  Persistent  organic  pollutants  are  ubiquitous  environmental  contaminants  and  pose  health  risks.  Cell‐based  bioassays  could  be  cost‐efficient  and  ethical  alternatives  to  animal  testing  in  the  chemical  risk  assessment  of  these  pollutants.  Dosing  of  hydrophobic  organic  chemicals  is  usually  achieved  via  carrier  solvents  such  as  dimethyl  sulfoxide.  This  can  be  problematic  as,  upon  dosing,  the  chemicals  readily  partition  to  growth  medium  components  and plastic assay consumables. Uncertainty in the dose can result in chemicals appearing less  potent than they really are. To overcome this limitation a passive dosing technique has been  developed  where  chemicals  are  desorbed  from  a  polymer  reservoir  ensuring  a  constant  and  more  reliable  dose.  Using  a  recombinant  cell  assay  that  detects  chemicals  with  dioxin‐like  activity  we  have  assessed  bioavailability  using  mass  balance  models  for  both  regular  dosing  and  passive  dosing  and  validated  this  passive  dosing  technique  using  several  individual  polychlorinated dibenzo‐p‐dioxin congeners. 

 

Keywords: CAFLUX; dioxin; polydimethylsiloxane 

 

Page | 170  SETAC Australasia Brisbane 2012 Conference 

Posters (Wed PM, 12‐613)  Biomarkers and Biosensors 

Poster #38 (Wed,12‐613, 15:40‐17:00) 

Do eastern mosquitofish male harass less when exposed to 

environmentally relevant levels of 17β‐estradiol? 

Minna Saaristo

1

, Edmund Ling

2

, Rowan Jacques‐Hamilton

1

, Mayumi Allinson

3

Graeme Allinson

3,4

*, Vincent Pettigrove

3

, Bob Wong

1

 

1

School of Biological Sciences, Monash University, Clayton, VIC, AU; 

2

School of Agriculture and 

Food Sciences, University of Queensland, St Lucia, QLD, AU; 

3

CAPIM, University of Melbourne, 

Parkville, VIC, AU; 

4

Future Farming Systems Research, Department of Primary Industries, 

Queenscliff, VIC, AU 

*presenting author 

Abstract: Behaviour is the outcome of many complex physiological and biochemical reactions. 

Animals  adapt  to  changes  in  their  environment  through  their  behaviour  and  thus  behaviour  provides a sensitive early warning signal for the presence of human‐induced compounds, such  as  endocrine  disrupting  chemicals  (EDCs).  Our  study  species,  eastern  mosquitofish,  is  widespread  in  Australia  and  found  in  sites  that  may  be  polluted  by  EDCs.  The  mosquitofish  mating  system  is  male  driven  and  males  force  females  to  copulate.  Male  use  a  modified  fin  known as a gonapodium in copulation, which makes it important to male reproductive success. 

Females  associate  with  males  with  longer  gonapodiums.  In  this  study,  we  exposed  male  mosquitofish  to  environmentally  relevant  concentrations  (3ng/L)  of  17β‐estradiol  (E2)  for  24  days and examined how exposure effects the reproductive behaviour of the males and females. 

Specifically,  we  asked  if  E2  exposure  decreases  the  copulation  attempts  and  gonopodial  display,  hence  making  exposed  males  more  attractive  among  females.  If  exposure  decreases  harassment  rate,  females  might  prefer  exposed  males  over  the  control  males.  We  set  up  a  preference test, where a male could first observe females behaviour (exposed and unexposed)  and  then  mate  with  the  prefered  female.  We  measured  the  time  and  frequency  of  male  behaviours:  orientation,  chasing,  gonopodial  display  and  copulation  attempts,  and  the  time  female spent in a close proximity of preferred male. In addition, we preserved tissue samples 

(liver,  gonopodium,  brain)  for  later  measurement  of  RNA  in  a  genomics  component  of  the  study. We will also investigate how the gene expression of exposed and unexposed individuals  differ,  and  explore  if  certain  candidate  genes  are  linked  to  suppressed  morphological  and  behavioural responses The genes will be investigated using next generation sequencing (NGS)  platform. This presentation will present our results within the context of male and female mate  choice and sexual selection.   

Keywords: endocrine disrupting chemicals, mate choice, mosquitofish, sexual selection,  behavior   

SETAC Australasia Brisbane 2012 Conference  Page | 171  

 

Posters (Wed PM, 12‐613)  Biomarkers and Biosensors 

Poster #39 (Wed,12‐613, 15:40‐17:00) 

Comparison of the toxicity and transcriptomic profiles in the diatom, 

Phaedactulym tricornutum, exposed to oil, dispersants, or dispersed oil 

Sharon E. Hook*, Hannah L. Osborn

 

CSIRO Land and Water, Private bag 2007, Kirrawee, NSW 2232 Australia. 

*presenting author 

Abstract: Dispersants are commonly used to mitigate the impact of oil spills on coastlines and  on marine mammals. However, the use of these chemicals to break up oil slicks may come at a  significant  ecological  cost  if  either  1)  the  dispersants  are  toxic  to  marine  organisms  at  environmentally realistic concentrations or 2) dispersing oil into the water column increases its  bioavailability and consequently its toxic effects.  Despite their ecological importance, virtually  no  published  work  has  been  done  investigating  the  toxicity  of  dispersants  to  phytoplankton,  and very little recent work has been done examining the toxicity of dispersed oil. To address  these  shortcomings,  we  examined  the  toxicity  of  weathered  oil,  dispersed  weathered  oil  and  the dispersant Slickgone, which is kerosene based, to the diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum  via  standardized  toxicity  tests.  We  also  tested  the  assumption  that  most  toxicity  occurs  via  narcosis by measuring membrane damage in diatoms after exposure to one of the petroleum  products.    Finally,  the  mode  of  toxic  action  was  determined  using  microarray  based  gene  expression profiling in diatoms after exposure to one of the petroleum products. Diatoms were  much  more  sensitive  to  dispersants  than  they  were  to  weathered  oil,  and  more  sensitive  to  dispersed weathered oil than they were to either the weathered oil itself or to the dispersants. 

The  toxicity  observed  beared  no  relationship  to  PAH  concentrations  in  the  water  column,  suggesting  another  component  of  the  oil  was  causing  toxicity.  Exposure  to  dispersants  and  dispersed weathered oil caused membrane damage, while exposure to weathered crude oil did  not. Finally, gene expression profiles following exposure to all three petroleum mixtures were  highly similar, suggesting a similar mode of action for these compounds. This finding is in stark  contrast  to  other  work  performed  with  this  algae,  in  which  different  exposure  to  different  stressors generated distinctly different gene expression profiles. 

 

Keywords: algae; gene expression; microarray; narcosis; petroleum 

 

Page | 172  SETAC Australasia Brisbane 2012 Conference 

Posters (Wed PM, 12‐613)  Biomarkers and Biosensors 

Poster #40 (Wed,12‐613, 15:40‐17:00) 

Thyroid hormones in Silver perch , and Brown trout 

Roocha Shah*

1

, Samantha Richardson

2

, Vincent Pettigrove

Nugegoda

1,3 

3

, Dayanthi 

 

1

Ecotoxicology Research Group, School of Applied Sciences, RMIT University; 

2

School of 

Medical Sciences, RMIT University; 

3

CAPIM, Bio 21 Institute, University of Melbourne 

*presenting author 

Abstract: The thyroid hormones, Triiodothyronine (T3) and Thyroxine (T4) play a vital role in  the early development metamorphosis and metabolism of all vertebrates. This study evaluates  thyroid  hormones  in  silver  perch  and  brown  trout  and  the  effects  of  pollutants  and  environmental  stressors  on  the  thyroid  hormone  profile  of  two  selected  fish.  Silver  perch, Bidyanus  bidyanus is  a  threatened  Australian  native  freshwater  species  found  in  the 

Murray‐Darling river system. Despite the proven huge potential for aquaculture of this edible  species,  the  silver  perch  aquaculture  industry  is  very  limited  and  their  thyroid  profile  has  not  been investigated. It is important to understand their basic hormone profile in order to ensure  their health and as a baseline for assessing the effects of pollutants on their physiology in field  conditions.  Brown  trout, Salmo  trutta is  of  European  origin  and  have  been  successfully  introduced  to  Australian  waters  since  the  19 th

  century;  and  will  be  used  as  a  comparative  species.  The  second  part  of  this  project  is  the  analysis  of  the  effects  of  known  toxicant  and  thyroid  disrupters  in  the  laboratory  and  the  field.  Mercury  (Hg)  contamination  and  accumulation is a major threat to the Australian environment due to gold mining operations. 

Thyroid hormones will be analyzed in Brown trout field samples from Hg contaminated sites,  which will generate information on whether these Hg levels have affected the thyroid system. 

We  will  also  study  the  effect  of  other  potential  thyroid  disruptors  detected  in  the  Australian  aquatic  environment  including  Polybromo  diphenyl  ethers  (PBDEs)  and  congeners  of 

Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) on early developmental stages of the lifecycle of silver perch  and brown trout. 

Keywords: thyroid hormones; Silver perch; Brown trout; PCBs; PBDEs 

 

SETAC Australasia Brisbane 2012 Conference  Page | 173  

 

Posters (Wed PM, 12‐613)  Biomarkers and Biosensors 

Poster #41 (Wed,12‐613, 15:40‐17:00) 

And the winner is: Filtration, for successfully isolating unicellular algae from  pulsed waters 

Alicia Hogan

1

, Melanie Trenfield

1

, Kim Cheng*

1

, Andrew Harford

Costello

1

 and Rick van Dam

1

, Claire 

1

Environmental Research Institute of the Supervising Scientist (eriss), Department of 

Sustainability, Environment, Water, Population and Communities, GPO Box 461, Darwin NT 

0801 

* presenting author 

Abstract:  As  environmental  contaminants  are  rarely  present  at  constant  concentrations,  toxicity test methods need to have the flexibility to assess more realistic exposure scenarios,  such  as  pulse  exposures.  Whilst  this  is  straightforward  for  some  species,  pulse  exposure  experiments  for  unicellular  algae  represent  a  greater  challenge.  This  study  assessed  various  methods  for  optimising  the  extraction  and  recovery  of  the  green  alga,  Chlorella  sp.  from  magnesium  (Mg)  pulse  exposure  solutions.  Three  cell  recovery  methods  were  trialled:  centrifugation, dialysis and microfiltration. Cell recovery using centrifugation at various speeds 

(1310g,  1890g  and  3360g)  was  low  and  variable  between  Mg  concentrations  with  as  little  as 

50%  and  30%  cell  recovery  in  control  and  treated  groups.  Rupturing  and  clumping  of  cells  treated  with  high  concentrations  of  Mg  resulted  in  a  greater  loss  compared  to  lower  Mg  concentrations  and  control  groups.  The  use  of  dialysis  to  separate  and  rinse  cells  was  unacceptably slow and took >12h per replicate to reduce Mg concentrations to control levels. 

Microfiltration  of  the  algae  using  1.2  µm  polycarbonate  filters  resulted  in  good  cell  recovery  and rinsing of the cells to remove Mg. The process was quick (~10 min per sample) and vacuum  filtration  pressure  was  moderated  using  an  adjustable  valve,  which  aided  cell  recovery.  Cells  were triple rinsed in a natural soft water prior to resuspension in clean control water. Pre‐ and  post‐filtration cell counts showed 87‐120% recovery for control groups and 70‐120% for treated  groups. Filtration did not appear to affect cell health, as growth for the remainder of the test  period  was  acceptable.  Results  confirmed  that  the  method  of  pulsing  unicellular  algae  needs  careful consideration and the loss of cells following rinsing should be quantified. Microfiltration  enabled  the  toxicity  of  pulse  exposures  of  Mg  to  Chlorella  sp.  to  be  reliably  assessed,  and  represents a useful technique for algal pulse exposure experiments. 

 

Keywords: cell recovery; filtration; method development; toxicity 

 

Page | 174  SETAC Australasia Brisbane 2012 Conference 

Posters (Wed PM, 12‐613)  Biomarkers and Biosensors 

Poster #42 (Wed,12‐613, 15:40‐17:00) 

Endocrine disruptive effects of the feedlot contaminant 17α trenbolone on  the Australian native fish flathead gudgeon: Comparison with Murray 

River rainbowfish (Melanotaenia fluviatilis) 

Ana F Miranda*

1,2

, Jose Rodrigues

1

, Vin Pettigrove

2

, Dayanthi Nugegoda

1,2 

 

1

School of Applied Sciences, RMIT University, PO Box 71, Bundoora, Victoria 3083, Australia; 

2

Victorian Centre for Aquatic Pollution Identification and Management, CAPIM, Department of 

Zoology, The University of Melbourne, Parkville, VIC, 3052, Australia 

*presenting author 

Abstract:  The  effects  of  Endocrine  Disrupting  Chemicals  (EDCs)  are  of  global  concern;  however in Australia their potential effects are largely unknown particularly on native species. 

In  Australia,  Trenbolone  acetate  (TBA),  a  synthetic  steroid,  is  used  as  a  growth  promoter  in  feedlot  beef  cattle.  Within  the  animal’s  body  the  administered  acetate  is  hydrolysed  to  17β  trenbolone and part of this one epimerized to 17α trenbolone. In animal wastes the proportion  of the isomeric form α is estimated to be 10 fold higher than β, where these metabolites are  known to be very stable. The aquatic environment is potentially exposed via direct discharge,  runoff,  or  both.  This  study  evaluated  the  androgenicity  of  17α  trenbolone  on  the  native 

Australian  Murray  River  rainbowfish,  Melanotaenia  fluviatilis.  Four  adult  female  fish  and  two  male fish per tank were exposed for 21 d to three different concentrations of 17 α trenbolone. 

Cumulative egg production, hatchability, larval fitness as well as adult VTG concentrations and  histopathology of gonads were assessed. In vivo exposures at the tested concentrations lead to  the masculinisation of the female fish at the highest concentration tested. Fecundity of the fish  seems  to  be  reduced  as  well  as  larval  fitness,  leading  to  deformities  in  new  hatched  larvae. 

Gonadal morphology of adult female fish also seems to be affected by the exposures. 

Keywords: EDCs; native Australian fish; 17 α trenbolone 

 

SETAC Australasia Brisbane 2012 Conference  Page | 175  

 

Posters (Wed PM, 12‐613)  Biomarkers and Biosensors 

Poster #43 (Wed,12‐613, 15:40‐17:00) 

Validating the use of otoliths from embryos of native fish to detect  exposure to copper in estuarine sediments 

Nicole Barbee* and Stephen Swearer 

Centre for Aquatic Pollution Identification and Management and Department of Zoology, 

University of Melbourne, Parkville, VIC, Australia 

*presenting author 

Abstract: While many toxicological tests exist that assess the impacts of pollutants on aquatic  organisms,  most  of  these  tests  measure  lethal  effects  or  rely  on  soft  tissues  that  do  not  represent a permanent record of the exposure history of an animal. Calcified structures that are  metabolically  stable  and  incorporate  chemical  impurities  during  growth,  such  as  otoliths 

(‘earbones’) of fish, have the potential to provide more accurate details of contamination and  may allow us to track the history of exposure of individual animals. We are exploring the use of  fish  otoliths  as a  tool  for  detecting  exposure  to  heavy  metal  pollution  in  estuarine  sediments  during  the  vulnerable  early  developmental  stages  of  a  fish’s  life.  To  test  the  viability  of  this  technique  we  cultured  embryos  of  a  native  fish  species,  the  common  Galaxias  (Galaxias 

maculatus), in the laboratory on sediments spiked with copper in a gradient of concentrations. 

Our aims were to test whether exposure to copper contaminated sediments is recorded in the  otoliths  of  hatchlings  and  determine  over  what  range  in  concentration  we  can  detect  differences  in  exposure.  We  found  that  G.  maculatus  embryos  do  uptake  and  incorporate  copper into their otoliths. Elevated copper levels in otoliths reflect the exposure of embryos to  high copper concentrations in sediment porewaters, suggesting that otoliths can be used as a  tool to track a history of exposure to elevated copper levels in the environment. However, our  results  to  date  suggest  that  otolith  chemistry  may  not  be  a  sensitive  tool  for  looking  at  fine  scale differences in copper exposure, as differences were not detectable among treatments at  the  lower  end  of  the  copper  gradient.  This  tool  holds  great  promise  as  it  provides  a  way  of  linking  the  history  of  metal  exposure  during  embryogenesis  to  growth  and  reproductive  performance later in life. 

 

Keywords: copper gradient; Galaxias maculatus; heavy metals; sublethal effects 

 

Page | 176  SETAC Australasia Brisbane 2012 Conference 

Posters (Wed PM, 12‐613)  Biomarkers and Biosensors 

Poster #44 (Wed,12‐613, 15:40‐17:00) 

Aromatase as a prospective biomarker for EDCs in the Murray river  rainbowfish 

A.H. Shanthanagouda

1

, J.G. Patil

2

 and D. Nugegoda

1

1

RMIT University, Bundoora West Campus, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia; 

2

National Centre for 

Marine conservation and resource sustainability, Locked bag, 1370, Launceston, 7250, Australia 

*presenting author 

Abstract: Aromatase is a key steroidogenic enzyme that converts androgens to estrogens by  aromatization  of  C19  androgens  to  C18  estrogens.  Estrogens  are  essential  for  gonad  development  and  other  physiological  processes  including      growth,  neurogenesis  and  reproductive behaviour. This enzyme has been used as a biomarker of exposure and effect to  various chemicals using model fish in the Northern Hemisphere. To investigate the importance  of aromatase from an ecotoxicological perspective in Australian waters, we isolated aromatase  gene  isoforms  in  the  Australian  native,  Murray  River  rainbowfish.  We  also  studied  the  basal  level expression of aromatase mRNA during early developmental stages and in adult fish using  quantitative  Real‐Time  PCR  (qPCR).  Our  results  suggested  that  only  cyp19a1b  (brain  aromatase) mRNA is maternally inherited, suggesting its role in early development and growth  in the species. In contrast to reports in many teleosts, the cyp19a1a (ovarian aromatase) mRNA  was exclusively expressed in the ovarian tissue and completely absent in developmental stages  and in other tissues examined, including testis in the adults. The cyp19a1b like in most teleosts  was predominantly expressed in the brain of both males and females with low level expression  in  other  tissues  including  gonads  of  both  sexes.  Exposure  of  fish  to  endocrine  disrupting  chemicals (EDCs) and other environmental stressors could lead to changes in sex ratios and sex  differentiation  by  altering  estrogen  levels  from  the  disruption  of  aromatase  and  its  function. 

Hence, quantifying aromatase genes in this species could serve as a biomarker of exposure and  effect. 

Keywords: biomarkers; cyp19a; rainbowfish; qPCR

SETAC Australasia Brisbane 2012 Conference  Page | 177  

Posters (Wed PM, 12‐613)  Soil and Sediments 

Poster #45 (Wed,12‐613, 15:40‐17:00) 

If it’s not the baby, then what goes out with the bathwater? The  implications of Greywater irrigation within an urban development ‐ 

Phosphorus 

R.D.R. Turner*

1

, G. Will

2

, L. Dawes

2

 

Catchment Water Science, Queensland Department of Environment and Resource 

Management, Dutton Park Queensland, Australia; 

 2

School of Physical and Chemical Sciences, 

Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane Queensland, Australia;  

*presenting author 

Abstract: Water reuse through greywater irrigation has been adopted worldwide.  This type of  water reuse has been proposed as a sustainable solution to the increased pressures on water  demands.    Domestically  holistic  knowledge  of  greywater  reuse  is  limited,  furthermore  the  commercial  drive  to  produce  low‐level  phosphorus  products  is  still  lacking.    Additionally  guidelines  and  legislation  are  inadequate  due  to  the  lack  of  data  and  relevance.    Research  clearly identifies phosphorus as a potential risk with many forms of irrigation.  To assess this  question of greywater irrigation sustainability, this study focused on four residential lots that  had  been  irrigated  with  greywater  for  four  years.    Adjacent  non‐irrigated  lots  were  also  assessed  as  controls.    Each  lot  was  monitored  for  irrigation  volumes  and  water  quality.  

Multiple soil chemistry profiles were analysed for all the non‐irrigated and irrigated sites.  The  non‐irrigated  profiles  showed  low  levels  of  phosphorus  and  were  used  as  baseline  results.  A 

Mechlich3 Phosphorus ratio was used to determine environmental risk of phosphorus leaching  from  the  irrigated  soils.  Two  lots  displayed  significant  phosphorus  leaching  risks  to  the  surrounding environment, one lot showed a ratio that was of environmental concern, whereas  another  lot  displayed  similar  results  to  the  non‐irrigated  control  soils.  Further  analyses  using 

Colwell‐P  and  phosphorus  buffing  index  ratio  confirmed  the  previous  findings.  Reported  soil  phosphorus results were also compared to theoretical greywater irrigation loadings. Both the  reported  phosphorus  soil  concentrations  and  the  estimated  greywater  loadings  were  of  the  same  magnitude.  Sustainable  greywater  re‐use  is  possible  and  has  been  demonstrated,  however incorrect use or the lack of understanding about how household products impact the  water  quality  of  greywater,  can  result  in  significant  risks  of  phosphorus  impacting  the  environment.  Furthermore  these  results  demonstrate  that  with  the  responsible  use  of  greywater as well as appropriate household product use, sustainable greywater irrigation can  significantly reduce the phosphorus load thus significantly reducing environmental risk. 

 

Keywords: greywater; irrigation; phosphorus; soil; sustainability; water reuse 

 

Page | 178  SETAC Australasia Brisbane 2012 Conference 

Posters (Wed PM, 12‐613)  Soil and Sediments 

Poster #46 (Wed,12‐613, 15:40‐17:00) 

Effects of temperature, pH, soil moisture and salinity on heavy metal  accumulation by the earthworm Eisenia andrei: a climate change  perspective 

José M L Rodrigues

*

1

, Ana F Miranda

1  and Dayanthi Nugegoda

 

1

 School of Applied Sciences, RMIT University, PO Box 71, Bundoora, Victoria 3083, Australia 

*presenting author 

Abstract:  Annual  and  seasonal  fluctuations  in  earthworm  populations  are  a  natural  phenomenon.  The amplitude and duration of these fluctuations depend first of all on variation  in the soil environment conditions such as: soil temperature, pH, salinity and humidity.  Heavy  metals have been shown to cause significant reductions in earthworm populations. However,  few  studies  have  emphasized  the  combined  effects  of  metal  pollution  and  climatic  stress  on  earthworms.  This  study  investigated  the  influence  of  soil  humidity,  pH,  temperature  and  salinity on partitioning, uptake and toxicity of heavy metals (Pb, Cd and Zn) to the earthworm 

Eisenia andrei in separate laboratory trials.  Partitioning of the metals was evaluated with 0.01 

M CaCl

DTPA. The metal content of worms was determined by acid digestion, while growth,  cocoon production, behaviour and mortality were used as endpoints showing toxicity to metals  and/or the other four measured parameters. Four different laboratory trials were conducted. In  each  trial  a  population  of  earthworms  was  exposed  to  natural  contaminated  soil  with  metals  having  different  levels  of:  humidity,  salinity,  pH  and  temperature.  Natural  contaminated  soil  was placed in cylindrical plastic vessels of (12cm*10 Ø) and allowed to equilibrate for five days  before  earthworms  were      introduced.  Ten  earthworms  per  container  were  used  in  each  exposure regime and were introduced into the relevant test soil by placing them on the surface  and  allowing  them  to  burrow  in.  The  experiments  run  for  28  days.  This  study  showed  that  salinity,  temperature  and  soil  moisture  can  have  detrimental  effects  on  earthworms.  Results  showed  also  that  metal  bioavalability  in  soils  is  highly  affected  by  the  soil  parameters  measured  thereby  affecting  metal  accumulation  by  earthworms.  The  results  help  to  understand and predict changes in the soil environment associated with climate changes. 

Keywords: Eisenia andrei; heavy metals; contaminated soil; mixture toxicity 

 

SETAC Australasia Brisbane 2012 Conference  Page | 179  

Posters (Wed PM, 12‐613)  Soil and Sediments 

Poster #47 (Wed,12‐613, 15:40‐17:00) 

Development of whole‐sediment toxicity identification evaluation  procedures using Chironomus tepperi (Diptera: Chironomidae) 

Anu Kumar

1

, Hai Doan

1

*, Deb Gonzago

1

 and Vincent Pettigrove

1

CSIRO Land and Water, Waite Road, Urrbrae, South Australia 5064, Australia; 

2

Victorian 

Centre for Aquatic Pollution Identification and Management (CAPIM), Bio 21 Institute, The 

University of Melbourne, 30 Flemington Road, Parkville, Victoria 3052, Australia 

*presenting author 

Abstract:  Increased  use  of  pyrethroid  insecticides  has  raised  concern  regarding  the  potential  effects  on  aquatic  ecosystems.  Methods  for  the  detection  of  pyrethroids  in  receiving  environments are required to monitor environmental levels of these insecticides. One method  for  the  identification  of  causes  of  toxicity  in  aquatic  samples  is  the  toxicity  identification  evaluation  (TIE),  however,  current  protocols  do  not  include  specific  methods  for  pyrethroid  detection.  Piperonyl  butoxide  (PBO)  is  a  synergist  used  in  some  pyrethroids  and  pyrethrin  pesticide  products  and  has  been  used  in  toxicity  identification  evaluation  (TIE)  of  water  samples  to  indicate  organophosphorus‐  and  pyrethroid‐related  toxicity.  In  the  current  study,  methods  were  developed  and  validated  for  the  use  of  PBO  as  a  TIE  tool  in  whole‐sediment  testing  to  establish  if  pyrethroids  and  OPs  are  the  cause  of  toxicity  observed  in  the  field‐ collected sediments. The present study was intended to provide more extensive evaluation of  its merits through three lines of investigation. First, the acutely toxic concentration of PBO in a  midge bioassay (Chironomus tepperi) was determined to ensure that subsequent application in 

TIE  remained  well  below  this  level.  Second,  the  effects  of  PBO  on  the  toxicity  of  two  representative  pyrethroid  pesticides,  cypermenthrin  and  bifenthrin,  and  on  OP  pesticide,  chlorpyrifos,  were  determined.  Finally,  the  effects  of  PBO  were  evaluated  in  the  presence  of  pyrethroids and an OP pesticide. No effect of PBO on C. teperri was observed at concentrations  up to 1000 µg/L. Pyrethroid toxicity was increased three‐fold to C. tepperi, in the presence of 

100 µg/L PBO. This concentration was found to be effective for sediment TIE use. Emergence  was  the  most  sensitive  indicator  than  the  survival  of  the  larvae  during  whole‐sediment  bioassays. The toxicity of chlorpyrifos to C. tepperi was significantly reduced by PBO addition  to  the  overlying  water.  In  contrast,  the  toxicity  cypermentin  and  bifentrin  to  C.  tepperi  was  increased  in  presence  of  PBO.  These  results  indicate  that  the  addition  of  PBO  to  TIE  procedures  can  be  used  to  detect  both,  pyrethroids  and  Ops,  in  the  environmental  sediment  samples.  

 

Keywords: bifenthrin; chlorpyrifos; cypermethrin; piperonyl butoxide; pyrethroid 

 

Page | 180  SETAC Australasia Brisbane 2012 Conference 

Posters (Wed PM, 12‐613)  Soil and Sediments 

Poster #48 (Wed,12‐613, 15:40‐17:00) 

Do spiking experiments produce realistic degradation data for organic  compounds in biosolids amended soils? 

Kate Langdon

1,2

*, Michael Warne

3

, Ronald Smernik

1

, Ali Shareef

1

 and Rai 

Kookana

1

 

1

School of Agriculture, Food and Wine, University of Adelaide, South Australia, Australia; 

2

Centre for Environmental Contaminants Research, Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial 

Research Organisation, South Australia, Australia; 

3

Water Quality and Aquatic Ecosystem 

Health Division, Department of Environment and Resource Management, Queensland, 

Australia 

*presenting author 

Abstract: Studies on degradation of organic compounds in soils are often conducted by spiking  soils  with  compound(s)  to  higher  than  normal  concentrations  to  facilitate  detection.  This  approach may not be suitable when considering degradation of compounds that are added to  soils via biosolids application. This is because spiked compounds may sorb differently to solid  particles  compared  to  indigenous  forms  of  compounds  present  in  biosolids.  The  aim  of  this  study was to compare degradation rates and patterns of bisphenol A (BPA) and triclosan (TCS),  indigenous to two biosolids, to that of labeled surrogates of the compounds (BPA‐d

16

 and TCS‐

13

C

12

)  spiked  into  the  biosolids‐amended  soil.  Clear  differences were  observed  in  degradation  rates  and  patterns  between  the  indigenous  and  spiked  BPA  compounds.  The  degradation  of  indigenous  BPA  in  both  biosolids  treatments  followed  a  biphasic pattern  with  the compound  still detected at the completion of the experiment. In comparison, the spiked BPA‐d

16

 followed  a  standard  first  order  degradation  pattern  and  its  concentration  decreased  to  below  the  detection  limit  by  the  completion  of  the  experiment.  The  rate  of  degradation  for  the  indigenous BPA was 3‐ to 5‐times slower than that of the spiked BPA‐d

16

. The indigenous TCS  and spiked TCS‐

13

C

12

 behaved differently in the two biosolids treatments and both compounds  remained  above  the  detection  limit.  In  one  biosolids  treatment,  both  the  indigenous  and  spiked compound showed a biphasic degradation pattern, however, a higher proportion of the  spiked compound degraded. In the other biosolids treatment, both the indigenous and spiked  compound  showed  a  standard  first  order  degradation  pattern,  however,  the  rate  of  degradation  of  the  indigenous  compound  was  1.6‐times  slower  than  that  of  the  spiked  compound. This study shows that spiking experiments may not be suitable when assessing the  persistence of organic compounds following land application of biosolids.  

Keywords: biphasic degradation; bisphenol A; first‐order degradation; labelled isotope;  triclosan 

SETAC Australasia Brisbane 2012 Conference  Page | 181  

Posters (Wed PM, 12‐613)  Erratum 

Poster #49 (Wed,12‐613, 15:40‐17:00) 

Fish accumulate trace metals from ingested hooks 

Shane P. McGrath

1

, Amanda. J. Reichelt‐Brushett

2

* and Paul A. Butcher

3

 

1

National Marine Science Centre, Southern Cross University, Coffs Harbour, NSW, Australia; 

2

School of Environmental Science and Management, Southern Cross University, 

Lismore, NSW, Australia; 

3

Industry and Investment, NSW, Fisheries Conservation 

Technology Unit, Coffs Harbour, NSW, Australia 

*presenting author 

Abstract: Previous research on angled‐and‐released mulloway (Argyrosomus japonicus)  identified a significant positive relationship between the depth of hooking and mortality. This  result warranted further investigation and subsequently led to experiments to quantify: (1) the  effects of wire material and modifications to hooks on their breakage and ejection after  ingestion; and (2) the absorption of metals by fish during the oxidation of ingested nickel‐ plated hooks. Experiment one involved six treatment groups comprising fish that were allowed  to ingest conventional or modified J‐hooks made from three materials (stainless steel and  nickel‐plated and red‐lacquer carbon steel). Hook‐ingested fish were placed into the tanks in  pairs and monitored for up to 61 days. The total mortality among angled fish was 35% (no  controls died). Of the survivors, 28% ejected their hooks. In experiment two, 25 treatment fish  were allowed to ingest nickel‐plated hooks and were monitored along with 25 controls for 42  days for hook ejection and mortality. Treatment fish that ejected their hooks were euthanized 

(along with control fish) before being removed from their tanks and had blood and tissue  samples taken, which were assessed for the concentrations of metals. The results from these  experiments showed, due to increased oxidation, nickel‐plated hooks were ejected at a greater  rate than the remaining two hook types; however, they resulted in elevated levels of nickel in  fish and increased mortalities. 

 

 

Page | 182  SETAC Australasia Brisbane 2012 Conference 

Author Index 

 

Author index – the number refers to page number. 

A 

Adams M, 38, 39, 89 

Aga D, 97 

Aitken J, 68 

Allard S, 107 

Allinson G, 99, 171 

Allinson M, 99, 171 

Alquezar R, 76, 134 

Alumbaugh R, 45 

Amato E, 137 

Anastasi A, 151 

Andersen L, 51 

Angel B, 95, 96 

Antony A, 156 

Apte S, 38, 47, 95, 96 

Aryal R, 111 

Ayre K, 79 

B 

Bain P, 82 

Baker P, 48 

Balbus J, 26 

Ballesteros M, 98, 128 

Banerjee S, 97 

Barbee N, 176 

Barber D, 155 

Bardwell L, 38 

Bartkow M, 55, 156 

Batley G, 47, 96 

Bellgrove A, 117 

Bengtson Nash S, 87, 90 

Bennett W, 44 

Bentley C, 27, 41 

Beulke S, 26 

Beyer‐Robson J, 119 

Bhatia H, 163 

Bidwell J, 40 

Billoir E, 28 

Binet M, 24, 39, 89 

Bisson M, 97 

Blackett N, 109 

Blasco J, 36 

Bleaney A, 54 

Blockwell S, 55, 116 

Blunt J, 60 

Bonde R, 155 

Booij K, 41 

Boonthai Iwai C, 43, 133, 

144, 145 

Borgmann U, 35 

Born E, 88 

Boxall A, 26, 121 

Boyle R, 98 

Branigan M, 88 

Broady P, 60 

Brodie J, 27 

Brown K, 85 

Brown M, 115 

Bruno R, 143 

Bull M, 168 

Burgin S, 147 

Butcher P, 182 

Cains M, 79 

C 

SETAC Australasia Brisbane 2012 Conference 

Cambridge M, 117 

Campana O, 36 

Campbell P, 32, 34, 37 

Candy S, 136 

Card M, 161 

Carter S, 143 

Chandurvelan R, 149 

Chapman H, 55, 158 

Chapman J, 50, 72, 163 

Chapman PM, 29 

Chariton A, 24, 57, 62, 

120, 125 

Charles S, 28 

Charrois J, 106, 107 

Chartrand K, 51 

Chen D, 167 

Cheng K, 174 

Chong M, 111 

Choy S, 59 

Chu S, 167 

Chue KL, 27 

Clark G, 116 

Clark M, 129 

Coleman H, 55, 102 

Coleman M, 116 

Colombo V, 31 

Connell D, 70 

Connor A, 49 

Cooper N, 40 

Costello C, 152, 174 

Cropp R, 87 

Page | 183  

D 

Dafforn K, 56 

Davidson M, 109 

Davie‐Martin C, 74 

Dawes L, 178 

Delignette‐Muller ML, 

28 

Denison M, 170 

Dennis G, 147 

Depresle P, 59 

Devlin M, 27 

Dietz R, 88 

Dixon D, 35 

Doan H, 101, 141, 180 

Dogra S, 115 

Douglas G, 39 

Dowse R, 113 

Dowsett N, 124 

Drew R, 67 

Drewes J, 102 

Duivenvoorden L, 146 

Dunlop J, 25, 118, 159 

Dutt M, 157 

E 

Eaglesham G, 143 

Edwards V, 54 

Ellis A, 115 

Ellwood M, 165, 166 

Emnet P, 86, 103 

Escher B, 58, 94, 111, 

138, 156, 157, 158, 

161, 162, 170 

Evans B, 107 

Page | 184 

Author Index 

Evans T, 88 

F 

Fabbro L, 76 

Fairgray M, 154 

Farré M, 156 

Felice A, 76 

Fenske R, 26 

Ferguson B, 25 

Ferris J, 109 

Fortin C, 32, 34, 37 

Foster S, 165, 166 

Fox D, 30, 51, 77 

Fox DR, 28 

French K, 168 

G 

Gagliardi B, 128 

Gale S, 127 

Gallagher E, 92 

Gandhi S, 80 

Gardham S, 125 

Gartner C, 143 

Gaus C, 58, 138 

Gauthier L, 167 

Gaw S, 60, 86, 103, 149, 

154 

Geoghegan T, 74 

George S, 85 

Gernjak W, 104, 111 

Gillings M, 57 

Gissi F, 39, 89 

Glenn E, 111, 162 

Glover C, 149 

Glynn D, 54 

Golding L, 35, 95, 128 

Goldsworthy B, 75 

Gonzago D, 101, 180 

Gouin T, 121 

Grant S, 58 

Grant T, 53 

Gregg A, 101 

Griffin J, 83 

Gruber B, 62 

Gruythuysen J, 109 

Gutierrez V, 52 

Guy E, 27 

H 

Hack L, 77 

Hageman K, 45, 74, 140 

Hagen T, 67 

Hall W, 143 

Hamilton R, 171 

Handyside M, 107 

Hardy A, 26 

Harford A, 65, 71, 152, 

174 

Harper B, 55 

Harris H, 68 

Harrison P, 85, 135 

Hassel K, 141 

Hawker D, 41, 87 

Hayles J, 115 

Heitz A, 107 

Hermens J, 170 

Herrmann J, 94 

Herron R, 59 

Hewitt M, 142 

SETAC Australasia Brisbane 2012 Conference 

 

Hobbs D, 91, 118, 159, 

160 

Hoffmann A, 31, 98 

Hogan A, 65, 71, 174 

Holland A, 146 

Holley M, 57 

Holmes M, 109 

Holmstrup M, 22 

Holt E, 49 

Hook S, 38, 100, 132, 

172 

Hose G, 30, 57, 72, 125, 

130, 168 

Howe P, 129, 131 

Hrudey S, 106 

Huggins R, 109, 110 

Humphrey C, 65 

Huynh H, 80 

Huynh T, 68 

Hyne R, 42 

Isaza R, 155 

I 

J 

Jafari S, 61 

Jagtap R, 165, 166 

Jämting A, 94 

Jarolimek C, 38, 96 

Jeffree R, 64 

Jendyk J, 115 

Jensen A, 93 

Jiang G, 104 

Jin L, 138 

Author Index 

Johnston E, 56, 81, 116 

Johnston M, 115 

Joll C, 107 

Jolley D, 37, 44, 137 

Jones D, 71 

Jones O, 83 

Jooste S, 113 

Jordan L, 49 

K 

Kameda Y, 99 

Karlsson M, 121 

Kaserzon S, 41 

Kefford B, 59, 112, 113, 

124 

Kelaher B, 56, 116 

Kele B, 143 

Kellar C, 128 

Keller J, 105 

Kendrick G, 117 

Kennedy K, 27, 41 

Khan S, 102 

Kimura K, 99 

King C, 84, 85, 135, 136, 

150 

Kingsford M, 153 

Kinnear S, 146 

Kirby J, 123 

Kirkbride P, 143 

Knott N, 116 

Komarova T, 43 

Komyakova V, 56 

Kookana R, 47, 101, 103, 

122, 181 

Koppel D, 39 

SETAC Australasia Brisbane 2012 Conference 

Kovats S, 26 

Krikowa F, 62, 165, 166 

Kristiana I, 156 

Kroon F, 100 

Kumar A, 82, 101, 141, 

163, 164, 180 

L 

Lai F, 104, 143 

Landis W, 79 

Landis WG, 29 

Lane A, 85 

Langdon K, 181 

Lategan M, 130 

Lavender J, 56 

Lawson P, 50 

Le Corre K, 105 

Le‐Clech P, 102 

Letcher R, 21, 88, 167 

Leterme S, 115 

Leusch F, 55, 158, 169 

Lewis S, 27 

Liew D, 107 

Lim R, 55, 72, 130 

Ling E, 171 

Linge K, 107 

Long S, 83, 98, 128 

Lussier C, 75 

M 

MacLatchy D, 142 

Magbanua F, 140 

Magdeburg A, 108 

Maher B, 62 

Page | 185  

Maher W, 165, 166 

Makepeace J, 54 

Manly‐Harris M, 63 

Mann R, 91, 118, 159, 

160 

Manning T, 50 

Marcus Zamora L, 150 

Markich S, 65, 148 

Markiewicz A, 79 

Marsden I, 149 

Marshall S, 31, 98, 121 

Martínez A, 52 

Matthaei C, 45, 140 

Maute K, 168 

Mayger B, 109 

Maylin E, 157 

McCarthy D, 111 

McCrindle R, 167 

McDonald J, 55 

McDonald S, 156 

McGrath S, 182 

McKinney M, 88 

McKone T, 26 

McLagan D, 87 

McLaughlin M, 123, 163 

Mead B, 25 

Melville F, 51 

Merrington G, 69 

Mewburn B, 138, 170 

Micevska T, 160 

Milestone C, 142 

Miller G, 70 

Miranda A, 175, 179 

Mitrovic S, 59 

Monavari M, 61 

Mondon J, 117, 136 

Page | 186 

Author Index 

Moss A, 109 

Mueller J, 27, 41, 104, 

143 

Mueller K, 34 

Muller N, 113 

Munro M, 60 

Murfitt S, 83 

N 

Nanjappa V, 118, 159 

Nava A, 52 

Navarro D, 97 

Neale P, 94, 156 

Ng J, 68, 148 

Nidumolu B, 164 

Noad M, 90 

Noller B, 43, 68, 144, 

145, 148 

Norris A, 147 

Northcott G, 86, 103, 

154 

Nugegoda D, 55, 80, 

173, 175, 177, 179 

O 

O’Brien D, 41 

O’Brien J, 143 

O’Sullivan M, 57 

Oehlmann J, 108 

Ort C, 105, 143 

Osborn H, 172 

Osborn S, 132 

P 

Palmer A, 113 

Palmer C, 72, 113 

Panther J, 44 

Parades E, 127 

Parrish G, 46 

Patil J, 177 

Paxman C, 27 

Payne S, 135 

Peacock E, 88 

Pease C, 81 

Pettigrove V, 31, 53, 55, 

98, 128, 141, 171, 

173, 175, 180 

Phung D, 70 

Phyu Y, 72 

Playford J, 109 

Poore A, 81 

Potts J, 62 

Poulsen A, 158 

Prasad R, 59, 114 

Prichard J, 143 

Prochazka E, 169 

R 

Raffensperger L, 154 

Ramsay I, 49 

Rasheed M, 51 

Rayburg S, 124 

Reichelt‐Brushett A, 

129, 131, 182 

Reitsema T, 55 

Renouf D, 109 

Richardson S, 173 

SETAC Australasia Brisbane 2012 Conference 

 

Riddle M, 84 

Rodrigues J, 175, 179 

Rogers B, 25 

Rogers N, 95, 96 

Rose G, 128 

Rossouw N, 113 

Routti H, 88 

S 

Saaristo M, 171 

Sánchez‐Bayo F, 42, 73 

Sarmah A, 63 

Scaffidi K, 54 

Schlbach M, 90 

Schlekat C, 69 

Schneider L, 62 

Scott P, 55, 142 

Settimio L, 123 

Sfiligoj B, 136 

Shah R, 173 

Shahpoury P, 45, 140 

Shanthanagouda A, 177 

Shareef A, 103, 181 

Sharp S, 53 

Sheehy N, 107 

Shen J, 109 

Shephard B, 33 

Shiroma H, 131 

Shore R, 83 

Siddiqua K, 134 

Sidhu J, 111 

Simpson S, 36, 56, 137 

Simspon S, 24, 66 

Smernik R, 181 

Smith C, 37 

SETAC Australasia Brisbane 2012 Conference 

Author Index 

Smith F, 60 

Smith ML, 30 

Smith R, 78, 91, 110, 

118, 139, 159, 160 

Smith S, 142 

Snape I, 84 

Somparn A, 43, 145 

Sonne C, 88 

Spadaro D, 38, 66 

Spurgeon D, 83 

Srinivasan P, 63 

Stalter D, 108 

Stark J, 84 

Stauber J, 24, 37, 65 

Stephenson S, 57 

Stinson J, 79 

Storey B, 86, 103 

Story P, 168 

Stuetz R, 102 

Summers H, 79 

Svendsen C, 83 

Swadling K, 135, 150 

Swearer S, 176 

T 

Taga R, 68 

Takeuchi N, 155 

Tan J, 156 

Tang J, 111, 156, 162 

Taylor A, 36 

Teasdale P, 44 

Templeman S, 153 

Tennekes H, 73 

Thai P, 104, 143 

Thoen H, 162 

Thompson J, 41 

Thomson B, 25 

Tokhun N, 43, 144 

Touliou C, 107 

Toze S, 111 

Tremblay L, 55, 154 

Trenfield M, 65, 148, 

152, 174 

Trinh T, 102 

Trousdale S, 116 

Turner R, 78, 110, 139, 

178 

V  van Dam R, 65, 71, 77, 

148, 152, 174  van den Akker B, 102  van Mourik L, 138 

Vardy S, 25, 27, 78, 109, 

110, 118, 139 

Vermeirssen E, 41 

Villa C, 58 

Vink S, 114, 118, 119, 

159, 160 

Virtue P, 135, 150 

W 

Walker L, 83 

Wallace R, 110 

Warne M, 25, 72, 78, 

109, 110, 113, 139, 

181 

Watson D, 97 

Waugh C, 90 

Page | 187  

 

Webster‐Brown J, 23 

Welsh D, 44 

Wendling L, 39 

Westcott D, 100 

Wickings C, 109 

Will G, 178 

Williams C, 109 

Williams M, 101, 103, 

121, 122 

Williams R, 109 

Author Index 

Williamson W, 60 

Wilson M, 37 

Wilson S, 126, 134 

Wong B, 171 

Wood S, 60, 75 

Woodworth J, 77 

Y 

Young F, 54 

Yuan Z, 39, 104 

Z 

Zaagman N, 82 

Zalizniak L, 80 

Zeise L, 26 

Zhao H, 44 

Zheng J, 68 

Page | 188  SETAC Australasia Brisbane 2012 Conference 

Was this manual useful for you? yes no
Thank you for your participation!

* Your assessment is very important for improving the work of artificial intelligence, which forms the content of this project

Download PDF

advertisement