Book of abstracts Exploring interfaces 18th International Annual EurOMA Conference

Book of abstracts Exploring interfaces 18th International Annual EurOMA Conference
18th International Annual EurOMA Conference
Exploring interfaces
3-6 July 2011, Cambridge, UK
Book of abstracts
EurOMA 2011 Sponsors
Cambridge University Press
Emerald Publishing Group Ltd
Palgrave MacMillan
Pearson Education
Routledge Books
Routledge Journals
Book of abstracts
18th International Annual EurOMA Conference
Exploring interfaces
ISBN 978-1-902546-93-3
First published in Great Britain in 2011 by University of Cambridge Institute for Manufacturing.
Copyright © 2011 University of Cambridge, Institute for Manufacturing. All rights reserved.
University of Cambridge
Institute for Manufacturing
Department of Engineering
17 Charles Babbage Road
Cambridge CB3 0FS, UK
www.ifm.eng.cam.ac.uk
Contents
Committees
6
Programme overview
8
Index of abstracts
9
Abstracts
Index of authors
35
151
Committees
Conference chairmen
Matthias Holweg - University of Cambridge, Judge
Business School
Jagjit Singh Srai - University of Cambridge, Institute for
Manufacturing
Local organising committee
Jane Davies - University of Cambridge, Judge Business
School
Tomas Harrington - University of Cambridge, Institute
for Manufacturing
David Kirkwood - University of Cambridge, Institute for
Manufacturing
Benn Lawson - University of Cambridge, Judge Business
School
Roger Schmenner - University of Cambridge, Judge
Business School
Yongjiang Shi - University of Cambridge, Institute for
Manufacturing
Scientific committee
Nuran Acur - University of Strathclyde
Pär Åhlström - Stockholm School of Economics
Jannis Angelis - University of Warwick
Lars Bengtsson - University of Gävle
David Bennet - Aston University
Ran Bhamra - Loughborough University
Joe Blackburn - Vanderbilt University
Harry Boer - Aalborg University
Laird Burns - University of Alabama in Huntsville
Raffaella Cagliano - Politecnico di Milano
Nigel Caldwell - University of Bath
Sinead Carey - University of Bath
Kai Cheng - Brunel University
Daniel Chicksand - Warwick Business School
Paul Childerhouse - Waikato University
Paul Coughlan - Trinity College, Dublin
Paul Cousins - Manchester Business School
Giovanni Da Silveira - University of Calgary
Jane Davies - University of Cambridge
Krisztina Demeter - Corvinus University of Budapest
Steve Disney - Cardiff University
Don Fleet - University of Cambridge
6
Afonso Carlos Correa Fleury - Universidade de Sao Paul
Helena Forslund - Linnaeus University
Cipriano Forza - University of Padova
Brian Fynes - University College Dublin
Cristina Giménez - ESADE Business School
Mike Gregory - University of Cambridge
Andreas Größler - Radboud University Nijmegen
Martin Grunow - Technische Universität München
Arni Halldorsson - Chalmers University of Technology
Silvio Hamacher - Pontifícia Universidade Católica do Rio
de Janeiro
Tomas Harrington - University of Cambridge
Linda Hendry - Lancaster University
Olli-Pekka Hilmola - Lappeenranta University of
Technology
Jan Holmström - Aalto University
Matthias Holweg - University of Cambridge
Mickey Howard - University of Exeter
Juliana Hsuan - Copenhagen Business School
Maria Huge-Brodin - Linköping University
Robert Jacobs - University of Indiana
Mats Johansson - Chalmers University of Technology
Patrik Jonsson - Chalmers University of Technology
Matteo Kalchschmidt - Universita degli Studi di Bergamo
Christer Karlsson - Copenhagen Business School
David Kirkwood - University of Cambridge
Robert Klassen - University of Western Ontario
Marie Koulikoff-Souviron - SKEMA Business School
Dan Krause - University of Victoria
Murat Kristal - York University
Maneesh Kumar - Edinburgh Napier University
Björge Laugen - University of Stavanger
Benn Lawson - University of Cambridge
Mike Lewis - University of Bath
Bart MacCarthy - University of Nottingham
José A. Domínguez Machuca - University of Sevilla
Angel Martinez-Lorente - Polytechnic University of
Cartagena
Harvey Maylor - Cranfield University
Joe Miemczyk - Audencia Nantes
John Mills - University of Cambridge
Andy Neely - University of Cambridge
Jan Olhager - Linköping University
Committees
Nektarios Oraiopoulos - University of Cambridge
Mark Pagell - York University
Kul Pawar - University of Nottingham
Ken Platts - University of Cambridge
Antony Potter - Queen’s University Belfast
Zoe Radnor - University of Warwick
Peter Rayson - Birmingham City University
Jaume Ribera - IESE Business School
Jens Roehrich - University of Bath
Martin Rudberg - Linköping University
Macarena Sacristan Diaz - University of Seville
Annibal Scavarda - Brigham Young University
Sofia Salgado Pinto - Catholic University of Portugal
Felipe Scarvada - Pontifícia Universidade Católica do Rio
de Janeiro
Roger Schmenner - University of Cambridge
Stephan Schramm - University of Cambridge
Stefan Seuring - University of Kassel
Yongjiang Shi - University of Cambridge
Andi Smart - University of Exeter
Rui Sousa - Catholic University of Portugal
Martin Spring - Lancaster University
Brian Squire - University of Bath
Jag Srai - University of Cambridge
Harm Jan Steenhuis - Eastern Washington University
Mark Stevenson - Lancaster University
Jürgen Strohhecker - Frankfurt School of Finance and
Management
Margaret Taylor - University of Bradford
Andrew Taylor - University of Bradford
Anders Thorstenson - Aarhus University
Lars Trygg - Chalmers University of Technology
Taco Van der Vaart - University of Groningen
Dirk Pieter Van Donk - University of Groningen
Francisco Veloso - Carnegie Mellon University
Ann Vereecke - University of Gent
Andrea Vinelli - Università di Padova
Carl Wanstrom - Chalmers University of Technology
Urban Wemmerlöv - University of Wisconson-Madison
Special tracks
A number of special session tracks are organised as part of
the programme, as listed below.
Capability and the resource-based view in practice and
theory: An operations management perspective - John
Mills, Mike Lewis, Ran Bamrah
Empirical modelling and simulation - Andreas Größler
and Jürgen Strohhecker
Managing global operations: Perspectives from
emerging economies - Jagjit Sing Srai
Practice and theory building for managing complex
performance - Nigel Caldwell, Jens Roehrich and Mickey
Howard
Theory in Operations Management research - Matthias
Holweg
Conference organisers
IfM Education and Consultancy Services Ltd
Contact: Jo Griffiths and Ella Davey
Institute for Manufacturing,
17 Charles Babbage Road, Cambridge CB3 0FS, UK
Tel: +44 1223 766141
Fax: +44 1223 464217
Email: [email protected]
7
Programme overview
Monday 4 July
Tuesday 5 July
08.00 Registration
08.45 Parallel sessions
09.00 Opening session
10.15 Refreshment break
10.45 Parallel sessions
Dr Jag Srai and Dr Matthias Holweg
Conference co-chairmen
University of Cambridge
Welcome to EurOMA 2011
Professor Raffaella Cagliano
EurOMA President
Politecnico di Milano
09.30 Keynote presentation
Dr Ralf Speth
Chief Executive Officer
Jaguar Land Rover
Nick Fell, Director & Head,
Tata Motors European Technical
Centre
12.15Lunch
13.15 Parallel sessions
14.45 Refreshment break
15.15 Keynote presentation
Professor David Upton
University of Oxford
Kell Ryan
Co-founder, Ryanair
16.30 Closing session
Chaired by Dr Jag Srai and
Dr Matthias Holweg
Harry Boer Award
Chris Voss Award
10.45 Parallel sessions
EurOMA 2012 – an introduction
12.15Lunch
17.00Close
10.15 Refreshment Break
13.15 Parallel sessions
14.45 Refreshment break
Wednesday 6 July
15.15 Parallel sessions
09.00 – 13.00 Company visits
16.50 EurOMA 2011 Annual General
Meeting
17.50Close
19.00 EurOMA Gala Evening
King’s College, Cambridge
8
Index of abstracts
9
Index of abstracts
EMP Empirical modelling and simulation
EMP1 Automotive crash repair reverse logistics operations: An analysis of the
inventory-service trade-off
Aitken James, Wong Hartanto
EMP2 The assumption of exponential interarrival times in hospital emergency departments:
right or wrong?
Aguado-Correa Francisco, Padilla-Garrido Nuria, Rengel-Domínguez Maria Isabel, Leal-Linares Teresa
EMP3 Airport services to passengers with reduced mobility: a case for adoption of Auto
ID technologies?
Tomasella Maurizio, Thorne Alan, McFarlane Duncan, Febvay Guillaume, Usserau Laetitia
EMP4 Intelligence, personality, and interests – Determinants of Individual Inventory
Management Performance?
Strohhecker Jürgen, Größler Andreas
EMP5 Operations Strategy under Environmental Uncertainty
Yalabik Baris, Lewis Mike, Nakiboglu Gulsun
ENV 34
34
35
35
Operations and the environment
ENV1 Sustainable Supply chains: New Challenges, New Governance
Dani Samir
ENV2 Sustainable Supply Chain Management: Towards a Holistic Understanding of the
Triple Bottom Line?
Ashby Alison, Leat Mike, Hudson-Smith Melanie
ENV3 A Study on Sustainability Common Topics in Operations Management and
Industrial Ecology publication
Barros Marcos Cesar Lopes, Amato Neto João
ENV4 Environmental sustainability: drivers, practices and performance within the
German third-party logistics industry
Maas Steffen, Schuster Tassilo
ENV5 Logistics strategy, transportation and environmental impacts - a causal
systematic approach
Aschauer Gerald, Gronalt Manfred
ENV6 Environmental performance in transport contracts
Björklund Maria, Forslund Helena
ENV7 Green Supply Chain Management in Italy: Pressures, Practices and Performance
Micheli Guido J. L., Cagno Enrico, Zorzini Marta, Sarkis Joseph, Perotti Sara
ENV8 Improving sustainability performance in the supply chain: drivers and barriers
to engaging SME suppliers
Meqdadi Osama, Johnsen Rhona, Johnsen Thomas, Miemczyk Joe, Sauvage Thierry
10
34
36
36
36
37
37
37
38
38
Index of abstracts
ENV9 Understanding sustainable supply chains – Locally and globally
Meckenstock Johann, Barbosa-Póvoa Ana Paula
ENV10 Challenges and Opportunities for Reverse Logistics Initiatives in the
Automotive Industry
Nunes Breno, Bennett David, Shaw Duncan, Quariguasi Frota Neto João
ENV11 Reverse logistics systems for waste generated throughout vehicles life-cycle
Carrasco-Gallego Ruth, Delgado-Hipolito Joaquin, Ponce-Cueto Eva
ENV12 Restructuring service areas and vehicle routes in a recyclable waste
collection system
Ramos Tânia Rodrigues Pereira, Gomes Maria Isabel, Barbosa-Póvoa Ana Paula
ENV13 Greening the construction industry supply chain using - system
dynamics approach
Sundarakani Balan, Sikdar Arijit, Balasubramanian Sreejith, Wagner Stephan
ENV14 Supply chain planning with sustainability considerations:
an integrative framework
Wang Yang, Akkerman Renzo, Birkved Morten, Grunow Martin
ENV15 Using Causal Loop Diagrams (CLD) as an organizational learning tool to raise
management awareness of the eco-sustainability challenge and to facilitate
operational problem solving
Hinz Andreas, Scherrer-Rathje Maike, Guetter Saskia
ENV16 Manufacturer-retailer collaboration on sustainability: An emerging agenda
Rossi Silvia, Koulikoff-Souviron Marie
ENV17 Sustainable purchasing through inter and intra-firm collaboration
Luzzini Davide, Spina Gianluca, Almici Raffaele
ENV18 Assessment or collaboration? An empirical study on Green Supply
Chain Management
Tachizawa Elcio, Gimenez Cristina, Montes-Sancho Maria José
ENV19 Low carbon emission global supply networks: From measurement to redesign a case study in ICT industry
Hu Jialun, Shi Yongjiang, Lewis Dennis
ENV20 Sustainability and mass customization: can they be integrated in a new
production paradigm? Empirical test of a reference framework.
Corti Donatella, Taisch Marco, Pourabdollahian Golboo, Canetta Luca, Bettoni Andrea, Pedrazzoli Paolo
ENV21 The Carbon Credits Market in Brazil: Supplying CDM Project Solutions
Zilber Silvia
ENV22 Sustainability initiatives in fashion firms and their supply chains:
a risk/ reward framework
Brandon-Jones Emma
38
39
39
39
40
40
40
41
41
41
42
42
42
43
11
Index of abstracts
ENV23 Drivers and competitive priorities: implications for environmental strategies
Galeazzo Ambra, Klassen Robert
ENV24 Sustainable Operations: The impact of environmental and social practices
Gimenez Cristina, Sierra Vicenta, Rodon Joan
ENV25 Conceptualizing Climate Change: Constructed Practices in Operations Networks
Jaskari Johanna K.
ENV26 Using multiple case studies to determine company attitudes to carbon
emissions reduction in logistics operations
Castro Boluarte Jimmy, Bentley Yongmei, Crabbe James, Christopher Martin
ENV27 National Innovation System Framework for Sustainable Development of the
Canadian Oil Sands
Luciuk Michael, Jagoda Kalinga, Johnson Nathanial
ENV28 Researching sustainability in OM community
Pinheiro de Lima Edson, Gouvea da Costa Sergio E., Mocelin Manfrin Pamela
ENV29 The Impact of Carbon Emission Considerations on Manufacturing Value
Chain Relocation
Wu Peng, Jin Ying, Shi Yongjiang
ENV30 Sustainability in supply chain relationships: Managing relational risk
Carey Sinéad, Brandon-Jones Emma
ENV31 The moderating role of operations efficiency on the link between environmental
performance and financial performance: Evidence from the UK using three
independent datasets
Ramanathan Ramakrishnan, Akanni Adewole
ENV32 Achieving competitive advantage by addressing the dimensions of eco-sustainability
and innovation in manufacturing processes
Hinz Andreas, Scherrer-Rathje Maike, Neumann Michèle
ENV33 Perceived environmental uncertainty, environmental management and firm
performance in the hotel sector
López-Gamero María D., Claver-Cortés Enrique, Molina-Azorín José F.
ENV34 Social Indicators for Supply Chain Analysis
Carvalho Ana, Barbosa-Póvoa Ana Paula
ENV35 Sustainable services: A conceptual framework
Brandon-Jones Emma, Brandon-Jones Alistair, Walker Helen
ENV36 Environmental management programmes in the UK information technology
(IT) industry
Thirlaway Kate
ENV37 Product Carbon Footprint - A case of measuring in a food supply chain
Kronborg Jensen Jesper
12
43
43
44
44
44
45
45
45
46
46
46
47
47
47
48
Index of abstracts
ENV38 The Potential of Inter-organisational Product Tracking Systems in a
“Sustainable” Supply Chain - Observations from the Wild Seafood Supply Network
Bø Ola
ENV39 ISO14001 certification in an emerging economy: a taxonomy proposal
Gavronski Iuri, Paiva Ely, Teixeira Rafael
FIN 48
Managing the operations-finance interface
FIN1 Implications of e-Purchasing systems for managing the Operations-Finance
interface: a survey of finance and accounting managers
Done Adrian, Liao Ching, Maedler Markus
FIN2 An Approach to Evaluate a Portfolio of Technologies for Licensing Out
Santiago Leonardo, Eloi-Santos Daniel, Martinelli Marcela, Hashiba Horta Luciana
FIN3 Challenges of implementing lean principles in product development –
the case of visual planning
Söderberg Björn, Alfredson Ludvig
FIN4 Managing the Operations-Risks interface: A Proposal for Protocol Analysis
of the Operational Risk Management
Di Serio Luiz Carlos, de Oliveira Luciel Henrique, Schuch Luiz Marcelo Siegert
FIN5 Servitization of manufacturing;An event study to examine how public
announcements of differenttypes of offerings affect shareholder value
Karatzas Antonios, Johnson Mark, Bastl Marko
GO 48
49
49
49
50
50
Managing global operations: Perspectives from emerging economies
GO1 The Internationalization Process of Foreign Automotive Part Suppliers in China:
Toward an Adaptive Capability Evolution Model
Oh Joongsan, Kim Kyung-Tae, Rhee Seung-Kyu
GO2 Exploring the Interface between Foreign InvestedManufacturing and
R&D in Emerging Markets
Soeberg Peder Veng, Waehrens Brian Vejrum
GO3 Effects from implementing advanced planning & scheduling systems for
supply chain planning
Jonsson Patrik, Rudberg Martin
GO4 Internationalization among emerging economies: insights from
Brazilian-Russian beef network
Thomé Karim Marini, Machado Rosa Teresa M., Vieira Luciana Marques
GO5 Adjusting Process Implementation Activities to context-specific
Requirements in Low-Cost-Countries
Mundhenke Hans-Georg, Platts Ken
GO6 Outsourcing in the global pharmaceutical industry: Collaborative value delivery
Pawar Kulwant, Shah Janat, Cheepirishetti Ashrit, Mehta Peeyush, Zhang Min, Riedel Johann
51
51
51
52
52
52
13
Index of abstracts
GOV Governing inter-firm relationships
GOV1 Improved Collaboration to link manufacturing strategies with order winners in
Thai industries
Banchuen Pongpak, Sadler Ian, Shee Himanshu
GOV2 Configure the service network managing inter-firm relationships
Resta Barbara, Gaiardelli Paolo, Pezzotta Giuditta, Songini Lucrezia
GSCN 53
53
Global supply chain networks
GSCN1 Processes of global sourcing decision-making practices
Busse Christian, Stanczyk Alina, Blome Constantin
GSCN2 Offshoring and nearshoring success: the importance of strategic reasons
Caniato Federico, Golini Ruggero, Kalchschmidt Matteo
54
54
GSCN3 Strategic outsourcing? The Philips’ case in the LCD TV Market
Di Serio Luiz Carlos, Dantas Bento Robson, Silveira Martins Guilherme,
Castro Duarte André Luis de Moura
GSCN4 Plant Roles in High Cost Countries - A Survey Analysis of Manufacturing Networks
in the Northern Europe
Turkulainen Virpi, Blomqvist Marja
GSCN5 Factors affecting the execution of supply chain management - an international view
Kotzab Herbert, Teller Christoph, Grant David
GSCN6 Capability Requirements in Evolving Manufacturing Networks
Stentoft Arlbjørn Jan, Laiho Aki, Eloranta Eero, Kessels Mareike
GSCN7 Advances in Augmented reality for Operating Global manufacturing Value Chains
Khan Wasim A., Hussain Amir
GSCN8 Governance and transformation of clusters: theoretical models and the
case of the maritime cluster in Mid-West Norway
Halse Lise Lillebrygfjeld
GSCN9 Managing global manufacturing networks - Uncovered plant roles of
global manufacturing companies
Blomqvist Marja, Turkulainen Virpi
GSCN10 The Configuration of the Outbound Supply Chain for the International
Growth of Italian Fashion Companies
Moretto Antonella, Sianesi Andrea, Spina Gianluca
GSCN11 Competing in the Global Aerospace Supply Chain: The Case of the
Canadian Aerospace Industry
Dostaler Isabelle
GSCN12 Global supply networks and responsiveness in the international clothing
industry: Differences across different retailer types
MacCarthy Bart, Jayarathne Amila
14
54
55
55
55
56
56
56
57
57
57
Index of abstracts
GSCN13 Interactions between R&D and production in globalisation:
The implications for the Operations Management community
Cheng Yang, Johansen John, Shi Yongjiang
GSCN14 Changing patterns of R&D relocation activities in the course of the
global economic crisis
Kinkel Steffen
GSCN15 Confidence issue on network companies managing: an empirical study
Tálamo José Roberto
GSCN16 Improvement programs in multinational manufacturing enterprises:
A proposed theoretical framework and literature review
Netland Torbjorn
GSCN17 Adoption of global spare parts management practices within a network
of local autonomous units
Kauremaa Jouni
GSCN18 Enhancing supplier performance in buyer - supplier relationships:
The roles of supplier assessment, buyer assistance, and supplier involvement in
product development
Inemek Aydin, Matthyssens Paul
GSCN19 An empirical study on the container terminals integration in supply chains:
insights from the Italian scenario
Palmieri Antonio, Baglieri Enzo
GSCN20 Socially Responsible Supplier Development and Organizational Performance
Lu Xiaoang, Lee Peter K C, Cheng T.C. Edwin, Yeung Andy C.L.
GSCN21 Evaluation of logistic performance indicators of Brazil in the international trade
Faria Rosane N, Souza Caio S, Vieira Jose GV
HRM 58
58
58
59
59
59
60
60
60
Human resource management aspects in operations
HRM1 Evaluating the relation between worker-oriented lean practices and operational
performance using meta-analysis and path-analysis
Ziengs Nick, Riezebos Jan, van Donk Dirk Pieter
HRM2 Fit of technical and socio subsystems in lean context, and its impact on
operational performance indicators
Losonci Dávid
HRM3 Analysis and validation of HRM and TQM scales in a multiple informant
international sample
Medina-López Carmen, Alfalla-Luque Rafaela, Marín-García Juan A.
HRM4 Human resource issues in the New Zealand pipfruit industry:
some findings from a quality management study
Grigg Nigel, Doevendans Hans
61
61
61
62
15
Index of abstracts
HRM5 Team results and team members’ competence development in virtual
and face-to-face teams
Garcia Cristina, Oltra Maria J., Flor M. Luisa, Boronat Montserrat
HRM6 Over-confidence in inventory management: insights from a human experiment
Ancarani Alessandro, Di Mauro Carmela, D’Urso Diego
HRM7 “Organisational agility” – A critical success factor in the introduction
of High Performance Work Systems?
Menrad Martin, Wallner Thomas
HRM8 Developing a causal model of factors affecting labor productivity of
construction operations: the case of Iran
Mohammadpour Omran Mohammad, Jamali Gholamreza
HRM9 Teamworking and Flexibility. Two Cases from the Australian Automotive Industry
Cooney Richard
HRM10 Behavioural Dynamics in High-Performing Continuous Improvement Teams
Van Dun Desiree, Van Eck Tim, Van Vuuren Mark, Wilderom Celeste
HRM11 The joint effect of HRM and TQM practices on business competitive advantage
Alfalla-Luque Rafaela, Medina-López Carmen, Marín-García Juan A.
HRM12 Re-constructing Organisational Cultures of Continuous Improvement:
Findings from International Case Studies
Wagner Jürgen Phil, Grigg Nigel, Mann Robin, Mohammad Musli, Harvie Warwick
HRM13 Relationship between safety climate and safety compliance in hospitals
Ancarani Alessandro, Di Mauro Carmela, Giammanco Maria Daniela, Giammanco Giuseppe
HRM14 Recognition and reward partices in employee participation systems.
An empirical study in Spanish companies
Fernandez-Gonzalez Arturo J., Garcia-Arca Jesus, Prado-Prado Jose Carlos, Mejias-Sacaluga Ana
HRM15 Building capability for Employee-Driven Innovation
Poksinska Bozena, Swartling Dag
INN 62
63
63
63
64
64
64
65
65
65
Innovation in inter-firm relationships
INN1 An Empirical Investigation of Business Model Innovation on
Inter- and Intra-Organisational Relationships
Cakkol Mehmet, Johnson Mark
INN2 Managing inter-firm relationships in open service innovation
de Blok Carolien, van der Aa Wietze, den Hertog Pim
INN3 Leveraging supplier innovativeness through knowledge integration
Bengtsson Lars, Lakemond Nicolette, Dabhilkar Mandar
16
62
66
66
66
Index of abstracts
INN4 The Effect of Product Complexity and Modularity on New Product
Development and Supply Chain Management Integration
Caniato Federico, Crippa Luca, Größler Andreas
INN5 The effects of supplier-buyer integration on collaborations in sustainable
environmental innovations: the case of automobile industry
De Stefano Maria Cristina
INN6 A Network Configuration Framework for the Transition of Nascent
Technologies into Emerging Industries
Kirkwood David, Harrington Tomas, Srai Jagjit Singh
INTER 67
67
Managing inter-firm relationships
INTER1 Classification of Retailer-Supplier Partnerships with Different
Levels of Partnership Performance
Kocabasoglu-Hillmer Canan, Sodhi ManMohan, Son Byung-Gak
INTER2 The relationship between trust and supply chain partnership with
operational performance: a cross-regional analysis
Finger Andrew, Paiva Ely, Vieira Luciana
INTER3 Electronic purchasing tools and purchasing absorptive capacity as
antecedents of purchasing category performance
Karjalainen Katri, Brandon-Jones Alistair, Ronchi Stefano, van Raaij Erik
INTER4 Supply Chain Rationality in Engineering-To-Order companies:
similarities and differences in two cases
Bakker Frans, Van Donk Dirk Pieter
INTER5 The Impact of Information Visibility on the Bullwhip Effect
Goncalves Paulo, Moshtari Mohammad
INTER6 A Case Study of Management Control in a large Back-office BPO Arrangement
McKittrick Alan, Wiengarten Frank
INTER7 The role of scenario planning in developing supply network configuration options:
A case study of the pharmaceutical value chain
Alinaghian Leila, Srai Jagjit Singh
INTER8 From Transaction Cost Economics to Food Webs: A Multi-disciplinary Discussion
on the Length of Supply Chains
Brintrup Alexandra, Kito Tomomi, New Steve, Reed-Tsochas Felix
INTER9 Fresh food supply chains; characteristics and supply chain requirements
Romsdal Anita, Thomassen Maria Kollberg, Dreyer Heidi Carin, Strandhagen Jan Ola
INV 67
68
68
68
69
69
69
70
70
70
Inventory management, planning and scheduling
INV1 A theoretical and empirical investigation of inventory practices
Diaz Angel, Lorenzo Oswaldo, Claes Bjorn
71
17
Index of abstracts
INV2 Inventory Management in Closed Loop Supply Chains: a heuristic approach
with safety stock on demand
Buccini Andrea, Schiraldi Massimiliano, Segel Erica
INV3 Influence of joint decisions and cognitive dissonance on newsvendor results
Castañeda Jaime, Gonçalves Paulo
INV4 The volatility of the airline industry and its effects on an aircraft manufacturer’s
purchasing function
Lopes Guerra João Henrique, Domingues Fernandes Ferreira Luís Miguel, Gomes Alves Filho Alceu
INV5 Investigating the Applicability and Impact of Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP)
Systems: The Effect of Production Strategy
Aslan Bulut, Stevenson Mark, Hendry Linda
INV6 A New Algorithm for Product Mix Problems for Job Shop Systems based on
Theory of Constraints
Golmohammadi Davood, Mansouri Afshin
LEAN LEAN2 Lean implementation within SMEs: a literature review
Hu Qing, Williams Sharon, Mason Robert, Found Pauline
LEAN3 The ‘Formula of Lean’: Notes on the Kingman equation
Holweg Matthias, Bicheno John
72
72
72
73
73
73
Practice and theory building for managing complex performance
MCP1 Complex Service Systems - Identifying Drivers, Characteristics and
Success Factors
Neely Andy, McFarlane Duncan, Visnjic Ivanka
MCP2 Patient safety and Operational Complexity: a systemic approach
Kapsali Maria, Bessant John
MCP3 A sales and operations planning configuration framework
Jonsson Patrik
MCP4 Procurement of complex performance in public infrastructure:
A process perspective
Hartmann Andreas, Roehrich Jens, Davies Andrew, Frederiksen Lars
MCP5 Delivering integrated solutions: the unbundling paradox
Roehrich Jens, Caldwell Nigel
MCP6 Materials flow mapping: a tool for describing and assessing performance
of material flows in supply chains
Finnsgård Christian, Johansson Mats I., Medbo Lars, Wänström Carl
18
71
Lean/Process improvement
LEAN1 Kaizen implementation: A “best case” analysis
Yokozawa Kodo, Steenhuis Harm-Jan
MCP 71
74
74
74
75
75
75
Index of abstracts
MCP7 Seeing the forest and the trees: Managing ramp-ups in complex, IT-enabled
service supply chains
Akkermans Henk, Buijs Annelore, Voss Chris
MCP8 Project Management Methodologies in SMEs: Are they relevant?
Scott Kurt, Vogt Oliver, Tsinopoulos Christos
MCP9 How to audit a Business Process Excellence Implementation ?
Malý Rytter Niels Gorm, Knudby Torben, Vestergaard Matthiesen Rikke, Hua Tan Kim, Voss Chris
MCP10 Lean: insights into SMEs ability to sustain improvement
Goodyer Jane, Murti Yashwant, Grigg Nigel, Shekar Aruna
MCP11 Visualisation of service performance information: insights for
management decisions
Al-Kassab Jasser, Ouertani Zied, Schiuma Giovanni, Neely Andy
MKT 76
76
76
77
77
Managing the operations-marketing interface
MKT1 The application and evaluation of a framework for the sustainable alignment of
operations strategy: exploring the marketing interface
Zanon Celeste, Alves Filho Alceu
MKT2 Inter-functional integration between Marketing and Logistics: case study insights
Pimenta Marcio L., Brigante Cinthia S., Da Silva Andrea L., Tate Wendy L.
MKT3 The supply chain management - marketing interface in dynamic contexts:
an exploratory study
Pero Margherita, Lamberti Lucio
MKT4 External product variety, mass customization and order fulfilment in the
automotive industry: A comparison between German and Japanese cases
Staeblein Thomas, Aoki Katsuki, Tomino Takahiro
MKT5 Product Diversity Management within a supply chain perspective:
lessons from an empirical study
Klingebiel Katja, da C. Reis Augusto, Scavarda Luiz Felipe, Schaffer Jens, Brafman Silvia
MKT6 Changing Patterns of Leanness: Stock Turns in the Japanese and Western
Auto Industries 1975-2008
Oliver Nick, Cuckow Nina
MKT7 The strategic alignment of operations: case studies in the interface
with marketing
Zanon Celeste, Alves Filho Alceu
MKT8 Market Orientation, Performance Management and Strategic Integration
of Purchasing and Supply Management - An Embedded Multiple Case Study
Goellner Matthias, Blome Constantin, Henke Michael
78
78
78
79
79
79
80
80
19
Index of abstracts
MKT9 Product modularity, supplier integration and operational performance:
evidence from the high performance manufacturing project
Danese Pamela, Romano Pietro, Bortolotti Thomas
MKT10 Collaborative supply chain pricing: insights from a case study
Formentini Marco, Romano Pietro, Bortolotti Thomas
MKT11 E-Quality, Service Recovery and Loyalty relationship:
the e-banking case
Marimon Frederic, Petnji Yaya Luc Honore, Casadesus Fa Marti
MKT12 Service Delivery across Multiple Direct Channels: Is More Better?
Sousa Rui, Amorim Marlene, Rabinovich Elliot
MKT13 Models on interval lead time quotation: analysis and insights
Yuksel-Ozkaya Banu
MKT14 Optimizing the Services and Lifetime of Complex Capital Equipment
Moehring Monika, Finch John, Gitzel Ralf
MKT15 Linking master production scheduling performance to planning methods
Kjellsdotter Ivert Linea, Jonsson Patrik
NETSTR NETSTR2 Integrating interfaces with logistics service providers:
a literature review and future research
Wong Chee Yew, Cao Ran
NETSTR3 The Identification of Critical Supply Network Segments in Theory and Practice
Wallner Thomas, Gerschberger Markus
NEWOP2 Managing Production Ramp-up: The Impact of Co-operation
Szwejczewski Marek, Cousens Alan
81
82
82
82
83
83
83
84
84
NPD with suppliers
NPD1 Managing internal interactions in new product development operations
Felekoglu Burcu, Moultrie James
NPD2 Relationships between supplier involvement, absorptive capacity and product
innovation; a study of manufacturing industry in the UK
Najafi Tavani Saeed, Sharifi Hossein, Ismail Hossam
20
81
New operations management
NEWOP1 The Future of Supply Chain Security - A Delphi Consensus
Markmann Christoph, Gnatzy Tobias, von der Gracht Heiko, Darkow Inga-Lena
NPD 81
Network strategy
NETSTR1 Networking strategy as a strategic management tool
Riccobono Francesca, Bruccoleri Manfredi, Perrone Giovanni
NEWOP 80
85
85
Index of abstracts
NPD3 The antecedents and consequences of glitches when suppliers are involved
in new product development: the moderating effect of environmental turbulence
Potter Antony, Lawson Benn, Krause Daniel
OMT OM theory
OMT1 Theory Borrowing in Operations Management: are scholars aligning
theory and measures?
Martin Pinar, Johnson Mark, Godsell Janet
OMT2 Unpacking operations activities; process, practice and routine perspectives
Kelly Stephen, Spring Martin
OMT3 A knowledge-based view of process improvement: Examining the role of
networks and knowledge acquisition
Marzec Peter, Tan Kim
PERF 86
86
86
Performance management in inter-firm relationships
PERF1 Virtuality of organizations and performance: a quantitative study in
Brazilian manufacturing firms
Mattos Claudia, Laurindo Fernando
PERF2 The giant’s dilemma: to dance or wrestle? Interdependence between
large organisations and the effect on relationship performance
Marshall Donna, Goh Mark, Lynch Daniel, Ambrose Eamonn
PERF3 Supply chain collaboration, inter-firm trust and logistics performance:
Evidence from the tourism sector
Piboonrungroj Pairach, Disney Stephen
PI 85
87
87
87
Process improvement
PI1 A Systematic approach for prioritizing lean practices using AHP
Khalaf Magdy, El Mokadem Mohamed
PI2 Financial Performance indicators used in the analysis of the TQM,TPM, and JIT/Lean
Manufacturing advanced productions practices: literature review and proposal
Perez Bernabé Escobar, Garcia Darkys Edith Lujan, Machuca José Antonio Domínguez
PI3 Value streams, effectiveness and the achievement of balance
Welch Christine, Sinha Tammi
PI4 Randomness in processing times and its impact on a serial production
process performance
Khojasteh-Ghamari Yaghoub
PI5 A Matrix for identification and selection of appropriate quality
improvement techniques for food SMEs: findings from empirical reserach
Dora Manoj, Kumar Maneesh, Van Goubergen Dirk, Molnar Adrienn, Gellynck Xavier
88
88
88
89
89
21
Index of abstracts
PI6 Organizational Learning mechanisms in Six Sigma Projects:
An empirical study
Velaayudan Arumugam, Antony Jiju, Kumar Maneesh
PTNR Partnership development
PTNR1 Mutual dependence and supplier innovation, the moderating role of
power asymmetry: An empirical study from the Arabian Gulf Countries
Al-Balushi Zainab, Power Damien
PTNR2 Opposites attract: Organisational culture influences on high and low
performing supply chains
Cadden Trevor, Marshall Donna
PUB 89
90
90
Operations in the public sector
PUB1 Adapting to the Future: The application of new approaches to business
process improvement -initial findings from a study of five UK police forces.
Barton Harry
PUB2 The implications of maturity of Improvement Methodologies in UK
Public Services: A pilot study
Esain Ann, Lethbridge Sarah, Elias Simon, Evans Barry, Davies Ceri
PUB3 Process Capability - towards an empirical basis for support of lean operations
Coughlan Paul, Fynes Brian, Wiengarten Frank, Fränken Bastian
PUB4 What is lean culture - and how to measure it?
Imre Noémi, Jenei István, Losonci Dávid
PUB5 The Impact of EMR Capability on Hospital Performance
Bichescu Bogdan, Bradley Randy, Wu Wei, Byrd Terry
PUB6 Readiness for Lean in Healthcare: Views from the Executive
Radnor Zoe, Sohal Amrik, Burgess Nicola, O’Neill Peter
PUB7 Collaborative sourcing of complex technologies in healthcare system:
implications for strategies
Gobbi Chiara, Hsuan Juliana
PUB8 Performance measurement utilisation in public organizations:
the influence of political, cultural and rational factors.
Sole Francesco, Carlucci Daniela, Schiuma Giovanni
PUB9 The content and process of a successful whole system improvement programme
Walley Paul
PUB10 Trajectory of Lean implementation: the case of English hospitals
Burgess Nicola, Radnor Zoe
91
91
91
92
92
92
93
93
93
94
PUB11 Lessons from using the A3 structure in a multi-site lean healthcare experiment
Faull Norman, Mupure Chipo, Grutter Anton, Booysen Tony, Brey Zameer,
Chigwedere Ruzivo, Heathcote Rose
22
94
Index of abstracts
PUB12 Lean and Safety in Healthcare: Methodologies for Practice and Research
New Steve, Kreckler Simon, Cathpole Ken, McCulloch Peter
PUB13 Lean Business Schools - A case study of Lean Implementation in
Higher Education
Sinha Tammi, Seymour Jackie, De Greef Eric
PUB14 Total quality management in developing countries: a model for
Pakistani Universities
Awan Muhammad Usman, Khan Muhammad Khalid, Ahmad Niaz
PUB15 Assessing the Impact of Lean Implementation within a UK University
Business School : A Case Study in Action.
Barton Harry, Yazdani Baback, Tivey Colin
PUB16 Innovating operations in healthcare: the (un)solved quest for making
telemedicine-based services work
Segato Federica, Bartoli Laura, Lettieri Emanuele, Masella Cristina
PUB17 The development and evaluation of an Innovation Engine for empowerment
and change in healthcare
Siverbo Kristian, Eriksson Henrik, Wijk Helle
PUB18 The role of individual and group innovativeness to support the diffusion of
a new Operations practice in Healthcare
Radaelli Giovanni, Lettieri Emanuele, Masella Cristina
PUB19 Developing operational understanding of multi-channel service delivery
systems through computer simulation.
Porcelli Isabella, Rapaccini Mario, Visintin Filippo
PUB20 Long-Term Care services: A simulation model to predict future demand and
utilization
Cardoso Teresa, Oliveira Mónica, Póvoa Ana, Nickel Stefan
PUB2 Task division and coordination in multi-channel healthcare system designs
Broekhuis Manda, van Offenbeek Marjolein
PUB22 The role of physicians in the implementation of process flow solutions in healthcare
Jacobsson Torbjörn, Åhlström Pär
PUB23 Decision support by process-oriented cost accounting for the healthcare
industry, PFC - patient flow costing
Wiger Malin, Aronsson Håkan
PUB24 Leveraging Boundary Objects to Enable Knowledge Management:
a Case Study on Operating and Hosting Planning Centralisation in Health Care
Lancini Agnès, Sampieri Teissier Nathalie
94
95
95
95
96
96
96
97
97
97
98
98
98
23
Index of abstracts
PUB25 Process orientation in healthcare services: tracking the patient’s journey
through the healthcare system
Elg Mattias, Lindmark Jan, Hellström Andreas
PUB26 Front/back office considerations in improving patient orientation:
Empirical findings on the operational access to long-term care
Schipper Lisette, Meijboom Bert, Luijkx Katrien, Schols Jos
PUB27 Organisation level drivers that promote innovative work behaviour in
healthcare delivery: a micro-level perspective
Spiller Nicola, Radaelli Giovanni, Lettieri Emanuele, Mura Matteo
PUB28 Identification of key operational factors and barriers in supply chain
integration for New Zealand public hospitals
Wright Nevan, Ahsan Kamrul, Msimangira Kabossa
PUB29 The English Patient Experience: Does Healthcare Quality Matter?
Hudson Smith Mel, Smith Dave, Phippen Andy
PUB30 Organising a maternity care network
Venesmaa Julia, Lillrank Paul
PUB31 Examining the applicability of demand and capacity management strategies
to an NHS Urology department
Guinery Jane, Kok Emrah
PUB32 A Universal Appointment Rule for Different Patient-Types,
No-Shows and Walk-ins
Cayirli Tugba, Yang Kum Khiong
PUB33 Integrative practices in hospitals and their impact on patient flow
Drupsteen Justin, Van der Vaart Taco, Van Donk Dirk Pieter
PUB34 Is Organisational Culture the Answer to Performance Improvement in
Healthcare? A Case Study of New Zealand’s District Health Boards (DHBs)
Looi Evelyn S. Y., Greatbanks Richard, Everett André M.
PUB35 Transforming a healthcare organization so that it is capable of continual
improvement - the integration of improvement knowledge
Hellström Andreas, Lifvergren Svante, Gustavsson Susanne
PURCH 99
99
100
100
100
101
101
101
102
102
Purchasing management
PURCH1 Aligning operations strategy and purchasing strategy
Wikner Joakim, Bäckstrand Jenny
PURCH2 Outsourcing Practices in Canadian Organizations:
The Experience of Purchasing Professionals
Millar Harvey, Russell Suzana
24
99
103
103
Index of abstracts
PURCH3 Institutional decoupling across the supply chain: The case of
Information Technology implementation
Bhakoo Vikram, Choi Thomas
RBV Capability and the resource-based view in practice and theory
RBV1 Capabilities and Competencies in Humanitarian Operations
Apte Aruna, Yoho Keenan
RBV2 The roles of resource coordination in the development of manufacturing
competence: an exploratory case study
Zhao Yue, Mills John, Platts Ken
RBV3 Performance Improvement and Resource Co-ordination
Mills John, Platts Ken
RBV4 Configuring Competitive Advantages: Resources and Capabilities in
Operations Networks
Jaskari Johanna K.
RBV5 Dynamic Capabilities in Sustainable Supply Chain Management a conceptual framework and insights from the literature
Beske Philip, Seuring Stefan, Freise Matthias
RBV6 Developing a Process for Identifying “Make Competences” in Small and
Medium Manufacturers
Khater Mohamed, Platts Ken
RISK 103
104
104
104
105
105
105
Risk management
RISK1 Managing risk in Complex and Business Critical Outsourcing of Services
Malmgren Mikael, Andersson Dan, Abrahamsson Mats
RISK2 Risk Management Parity in Energy Industry Service Relationships
Ritchie Ross, Angelis Jannis
RISK3 Managing Risk in Individual Supply Relationships and in the Complete
Supply Network -A case study from the maritime industry
Engelseth Per, Græsdal Terje
RISK4 The importance of risk for the success of outsourcing contracts: Identifying
the complementary role of enforcement practicess
Wiengarten Frank, Pagell Mark, Fynes Brian
RISK5 Supply chain integration under uncertainty: The role of asset specific
investment with suppliers
Van der Vaart Taco, Power Damien, Van Donk Dirk Pieter
106
106
106
107
107
25
Index of abstracts
SCD Supply chain design
SCD1 Company types between flexibility and stability strategies and their impact
on innovativeness and performance - Evidence from a large-scale survey in
German manufacturing industry
Kinkel Steffen
SCD2 Logistics as a framework for examining historical phenomena:
The case of triangular trade
Pache Gilles, Fulconis François, Merminod Nathalie, Godbile Thierry
SCD3 The strategic management of demand uncertainty - a longitudinal study
Stratton Roy
SCD4 Supply Chain Agility and Supply Chain Adaptability: Antecedents,
Moderators and Performance Effects
Eckstein Dominik, Blome Constantin, Henke Michael
SCD5 Key factors for implementing postponement: case studies from the Brazilian
food industry
Araújo Ferreira Karine, Chicarelli Alcântara Rosane Lucia, Marqui Angela Cristina
SCD6 An integrated model for enhancing supply chain visibility: an extended
resource-based view
Nassar Shereen, Brandon-Jones Alistair, Caldwell Nigel, Lewis Michael
SCD7 A supply chain resilience assessment model
Carvalho Helena, Cruz-Machado Virgílio
SCD8 Escaping the inescapable: inevitable disruptions and risk mitigation in
supply networks
Greening Philip, Godsell Janet, Rutherford Christine
SCD9 Modelling and managing systemic risks in supply chains
Leerojanaprapa Kanogkan, Walls Lesley, van der Meer Robert
SCD10 Low Cost Country Sourcing Complexities and Supply Chain Strategies
Subramanian Nachiappan, Rahman Shams, Lalwani Chandra
SCD11 The Role of Functional Interdependencies in Global Operations Networks:
From Delinking to Organizing Interfaces
Slepniov Dmitrij, Waehrens Brian Vejrum
SCD12 Managing the interface between physical and financial supply chains:
implications for banks’ payment services
Silvestro Rhian, Lustrato Paola
SCD13 A meta-model for choosing a supplier selection technique within an EPC company
Masi Donato, Micheli Guido Jacopo Luca, Cagno Enrico
SCD14 Modelling supply networks: a structural analysis of the Toyota supply chain
Kito Tomomi, Brintrup Alexandra, New Steve, Reed-Tsochas Felix
26
108
108
108
109
109
109
110
110
110
111
111
111
112
112
Index of abstracts
SCD15 A simulation based approach to evaluate customer-specific volume flexibility
of a manufacturing company
Reinhart Gunther, Schellmann Hendrik
SCD16 The Contribution of Supply Chain Management to Face the World Crisis
in the Fashion Luxury Industry
Caniato Federico, Caridi Maria, Moretto Antonella
SCD17 The impact of experience on total cycle time reduction in supply chains
Gosling Jonathan, Naim Mohamed, Towill Denis, Moone Brian
SCD18 Relationship Exploration between Products and Outsourcings in Mobile
Handset Industry
Li Karen, Shi Yongjiang
SERV 112
113
113
113
The manufacturing-service interface
SERV1 New service development in capital goods manufacturers: empirical
evidence from an Italian sample and proposal of a conceptual framework
Roscio Sylvie, Corti Donatella
SERV2 Organizing servitization: A contingency perspective
Turunen Taija
SERV3 The Servitization of Manufacturing: Further Evidence
Neely Andy, Benedettini Ornella, Visnjic Ivanka
SERV4 Change Drivers for Transformation towards Product-Service Systems
Vladimirova Doroteya, Evans Stephen, Martinez Veronica
SERV5 Organising for Servitization across Multiple Operating Environments:
the constraining and enabling effects of path dependency
Raja Jawwad, Beltagui Ahmad, Cakkol Mehmet
SERV6 Successfully Implementing Service Business Model in a Manufacturing Firm
Visnjic Ivanka, Van Looy Bart
SERV7 New Industrial Product-Service Systems Development:
The interface between innovation and operations
Santos Juliana, Spring Martin
SERV8 Untangling the emerging concept of service platforms:
what are they? what do they consist of?
Skold Martin, Schmidt Malin
SERV9 Process modularity in service offerings - Conceptual analysis
Brax Saara, Isotalus Maija
SERV10 A location model proposal for collecting used batteries in Spain
Ponce-Cueto Eva, González-Manteca José A., Carrasco-Gallego Ruth
114
114
114
115
115
115
116
116
116
117
27
Index of abstracts
SERV11 The importance of dynamic assembly for the management of operations
in service supply chains
Pellegrin-Romeggio Frederic, Vega Diego, Kacioui-Maurin Elodie
SERV12 An exploration of vertical integrations and facilities practices within
servitized operations
Baines Tim, Lightfoot Howard, Smart Palie
SERV13 A process model for developing integrated product-service offerings
Clayton Richard, Backhouse Chris, Dani Samir, Lovell Jeremy
SERV14 Service Transition: A Path Dependence Approach
Finne Max, Heikkilä Mari
SERV15 Applying the Ferdows’s model ‘the strategic role of plant’ in service environment
Kuula Markku, Putkiranta Antero
SERV16 Manufacturers becoming service providers - developing service business
in an industrial context
Raikisto Pasi, Kiukkonen Jaakko, Shah Ameer, Holmström Jan
SERV17 Services in Manufacturing - A Study of Product Orientation in the
Product-service systems
Pereira Veridiana Rotondaro, Carvalho Marly Monteiro de, Rotondaro Roberto Gilioli
SERV18 Servitization as a strategy for survival: evidence from a small European country
Prester Jasna
SERV19 Quality of service and operating efficiency in service industries:
an analysis of Korean service driving industry
Talluri Srinivas, Kim Myung Kyo, Schoenherr Tobias
SERV20 A holistic approach for building productivity metrics in services:
two reports of using the adapted “house-of-quality metrics matrix”
Torres Júnior Noel, Gelape Cláudio, Braga Mirian, Mello Fernanda, Souza Junio Wesley, Azevedo Mateus
SERV21 Understanding System Uncertainty in Healthcare Supplies
Böhme Tillmann, Williams Sharon, Childerhouse Paul, Deakins Eric, Towill Denis
SERV22 A framework for understanding governance and location distance choice
in the services outsourcing decision
Gerbl Martina, McIvor Ronan, Humphreys Paul
SERV23 An operations strategy formulation methodology for manufacturing
organisations seeking adopt informated product servitized solutions
Redding Louis, Baines Tim, Ball Peter
SERV24 Defining Engineering Service Network Location Roles in Global Operations
Harrington Tomas, Srai Jagjit Singh
SERV25 An Indicator-based Management Model for Service Levels in Shared Services Centers
Coelho Renata, Martins Ricardo, Lobo Débora
28
117
117
118
118
118
119
119
119
120
120
120
121
121
121
122
Index of abstracts
SERV26 Analysis of the interface among Knowledge, Competence and Leadership
for improving organizations
Santos Osmildo, Costa Neto Pedro, Vendrametto Oduvaldo, Okano Marcelo
SERV27 The influence of quality and frequency of use on e-services performance.
An analysis of the information service in a university.
Oltra Maria J., Flor M. Luisa, Belloso Mariola
SERV28 Servitisation and Value Co-production in the UK Music Industry
Parry Glenn C., Bustinza Oscar F., Vendrell-Herrero Ferran
SERV29 Servitization in action: findings from a study of the extended Caterpillar enterprise
Baines Tim, Lightfoot Howard, Swink Morgan
SERV30 The importance of loyalty on online airplane tickets’ purchase
Llach Josep, Alonso-Almeida María del Mar, Marimon Frederic, Bernardo Mercè
SERV31 E-business Service in the UK Telecommunication industry
Yang Ying, Humphreys Paul, McIvor Ronan, Yang Biao
SSC 122
123
123
124
124
Service supply chains
SSC1 The seven customer roles in service supply chains
Sampson Scott
STR 122
125
Managing the operations-strategy interface
STR1 Make to Order Manufacturing and Operational Management Strategies A Case Study at Priorclave Ltd.
Pillai Sreejit, Bhatti Raj, Arokiam Alan, Collins Tony
STR2 Integration themes in mergers and acquisitions in the Medical Technology
Industry from a resource-based view
Wei Tian, Gregory Mike
STR3 Exploring the influence of contractual and relational governance on the
relationship between capability and collaboration
Kumar Niraj, Howard Mickey, Lewis Mike, Carey Sinéad
STR4 Network configuration of global R&D networks: Extending OM
configuration concepts
Lee Hansen Zaza Nadja, Singh Srai Jagjit
STR5 Managing the Operations-Strategy Interface through Programme Management
Jensen Peter Meulengracht, Johansen John, Waehrens Brian Vejrum
STR6 Risk Management in Global Manufacturing Investment: Dimensions and Process
Kumar Mukesh, Gregory Mike
STR7 Cumulative capabilities of three industries in a developing economy
Wong Chee Yew, Boon-itt Sakun
126
126
126
127
127
127
128
29
Index of abstracts
STR8 The capabilities trade-off debate in operations strategy: An initial assessment
of the airline industry in Australia.
Singh Alka, Singh Prakash, Power Damien
STR9 Sustainability strategies: the impact on manufacturing capabilities trade-offs
Cagliano Raffaella, Golini Ruggero, Longoni Annachiara
STR10 Reflections on operations strategy development and execution
Hill Alex, Hill Terry
STR11 Supply chain integration under resource dependence; How powerful buyers
and suppliers shape integration as the value of the relationship rises
Petkova Boyana, Van der Vaart Taco, Molleman Eric
STR12 Utilizing constraints to identify opportunities for innovation: Findings
from Indian industries and future research directions
Chaudhuri Atanu
STR13 Developing a framework for servitization decision
Lertsaksereekun Jassada, Thawesaengskulthai Natcha
STR14 An exploratory study of the dynamic manufacturing strategy in
start-up companies
Lim Sirirat, Platts Ken, Minshall Tim
STR15 Lost in Translation: bridging the gap between strategic management and
operations strategy
MacBryde Jill, Paton Steve, Burt George
STR16 Business models in fashion industry: an empirical analysis
Macchion Laura, Danese Pamela, Vinelli Andrea, Cappellari Romano
STR17 Configuration of a global manufacturing system - a longitudinal case study.
Poulsen René Taudal, Nielsen Anders Paarup, Wæhrens Brian Vejrum
STR18 Supplier selection criteria and techniques: a case research on the
automotive supply chain
Pela Vania, Carpinetti Luiz
STR19 Market Made: Manufacturing Capabilities and Export Markets for
Developing Country Firms
Williams Nigel, Bentley Yongmei, Owen David, Philpott Elly
STR20 The Causal Relationships between Manufacturing Strategy Process,
Manufacturing- Marketing Integration and Plant Performance
Oh Joongsan, Lee Wonhee, Rhee Seung-Kyu
STR21 Dynamics of SKU classification: the production strategy in a dairy company
Van Kampen Tim, Van Donk Dirk Pieter
30
128
128
129
129
129
130
130
130
131
131
131
132
132
132
Index of abstracts
STR22 Dynamic abilities in performance measurement system: a case study on
practice and strategies
Salloum Mohammed, Wiktorsson Magnus
STR23 The role of continuous improvement programmes beyond operational excellence
O’Reilly Seamus, Dooley Lawrence
STR24 The influence of single lean principles on lean bundles
Gutter Saskia
STR25 Investigating the Effects of New Product Development Techniques on
Mass Customisation Capability
Al-Zu’bi Zu’bi, Tsinopoulos Christos
STR26 Organisational antecedents of mass customisation capability
Trentin Alessio, Forza Cipriano, Perin Elisa
STR27 Decision-making on manufacturing flexibility for the management of
operational risks in the productive process of Brazilian automotive industries
Dalcol Paulo Roberto, Oliveira Ualison Rebula de, Marins Fernando Augusto
STR28 Viewing engineering offshoring in a network perspective: Challenges and key patterns
Hansen Zaza, Zhang Yufeng, Ahmed-Kristensen Saeema
STR29 Developing a SWOT roadmapping technique for managing strategy, operations, and technology interfaces
Yee Choy Leong, Teoh Kenny Guan Cheng, Liaw Winnie Wei Yu
STR30 Engineering Strategies: An analytical framework and implementation guidance
Zhang Yufeng
STR31 Manufacturing supporting strategies in SMME
Säfsten Kristina, Winroth Mats
STR32 Sustaining local manufacturing: A longitudinal study of Swedish companies
Winroth Mats, Abid Muhammad, Almgren Bengt, Bennett David, Nunes Breno
STR33 Enabling Factors of Adaptive Capability in Small and Medium Enterprises
Ates Aylin, Assarlind Marcus, Maguire Catherine, Bititci Umit, MacBryde Jillian
STR34 Linking supplier relationship with postponement: an empirical analysis
Saghiri Soroosh, Hill Alex
STR35 Using manufacturing focus portfolios to assess product mix complexity in
manufacturing footprint design
Schilling Robert, Schwartze Joerg
STR36 Manufacturing competitive priorities and business performance an importance-performance analysis approach
Szász Levente, Demeter Krisztina
133
133
133
134
134
134
135
135
135
136
136
136
137
137
137
31
Index of abstracts
STR37 The interface between “strategy-as-practice” theory in strategy and
operations management: Towards a “practice-as-strategy” theory
Blackmon Kate
STR38 Visual management and shopfloor teams - linking action to strategy
Bateman Nicola, Philp Lee, Warrender Harry
STR39 Distribution of Manufacturing Strategy Decision-Making in
Manufacturing Networks
Feldmann Andreas, Olhager Jan
STR40 The ‘Reduction-Retention conundrum’: Managing organisational
capabilities at times of large-scale economic crises
Holweg Matthias, Johansson Mats, Jonsson Patrik
STR41 The effect of contingencies on manufacturing strategy and operations
performance
Matyusz Zsolt, Demeter Krisztina
STR42 Manpower planning strategies in times of financial crisis: evidence from
logistics service providers and retailers in the Netherlands.
de Leeuw Sander, Wiers Vincent, Smits Maartje, Couwenberg Celine
STR43 The Effect of Culture, Process and Structure on Exploration and
Exploitation in Traditional Manufacturing Networks versus Lead Factory Networks
Deflorin Patricia, Scherrer-Rathje Maike, Walliman Philippe, Dietl Helmut
STR44 Coordination in intra-company manufacturing networks a multidimensional perspective
Mundt Andreas
STR45 Establishing a Lead Factory - when can an intra-firm network benefit the most?
Scherrer-Rathje Maike, Deflorin Patricia, Friedli Thomas
STR46 A Risk Management Approach to Improving Information Quality for
Operational and Strategic Management
Borek Alexander, Woodall Philip, Parlikad Ajith
STR47 Multiple stakeholder Performance Measurement and Management in third
sector organisations:An exploratory study of the implementation of an IT system
Hajnassiri Sara, Taylor Margaret, Taylor Andrew
STR48 Contextual Ambidexterity and Just-in-Time as nurtures of Continuous
Improvement and Innovation
Furlan Andrea, Vinelli Andrea
SUPPLY 138
138
139
139
139
140
140
140
141
141
141
Supplier relationships: developing a country’s perspective
SUPPLY1 Buyer-supplier relationships in a Sustainable Supply Chain:
the Organic chain in Brazil
Vieira Luciana, Barcellos Marcia, Silva Silvio, Hoppe Alexia
32
138
142
Index of abstracts
SUPPLY2 A process for the prequalification of suppliers for a service organisation
in a developing economy
Ojadi Frank, Adebanjo Dotun
SUPPLY3 Supply chain management relationship structures: Chinese evidence
compared to traditional frameworks
ONeill Peter, Scavarda Annibal, Gao Sisi, Kam Booi
SUPPLY4 Patterns of supply chain integration: cluster analyses of three Thai industries
Boon-itt Sakun, Wong Chee Yew, Wong Christina W.Y.
SUPPLY5 Exploring the Client-Vendor Interface in Offshore Outsourcing:
A Longitudinal Study of a Project’s Transition to India
Williams Christopher
TOM 142
143
143
Teaching operations management
TOM1 Assessing the Service Quality of Higher Education in Operations Management:
Two Servqual Gap Analyses.
Foropon Cyril, Seiple Ruth, Kerbache Laoucine
TOM2 The design of a research methods module for a course in Major Programme
Management
Blackmon Kate
TOM3 Thirty Years of OM Research Published in IJOPM: Insights Using Latent
Semantic Analysis
Kulkarni Shailesh, Apte Uday, Evangelopoulos Nicholas
TOM4 International operations management: a bibliometric analysis of published
research 1998 to 2008
Barnes David, Pilkington Alan
TOM5 System Dynamics Course at University Level: Review of Student Simulation Models
Hilmola Olli-Pekka, Lättilä Lauri
UIFR 142
144
144
145
145
145
Understanding inter-firm relationships
UIFR1 Understanding inter-organizational relationships in programme management:
a social network analysis study
Li Qing, Shaw Nicky, Burgess Tom
UIFR2 Reconceptualising inter-organisational supply chain behaviours
Wilson Mark M.J., Smallman Clive, Dean David L.
UIFR3 Domains and contextual factors of e-business systems utilization in
inter-firm relationships: a case study
Vuori Mervi, Kauremaa Jouni, Laiho Aki
UIFR4 Assessing the influence of information sharing and information quality
on customer integration
Chavez Roberto, Gimenez Cristina, Fynes Brian, Wiengarten Frank
146
146
146
147
33
Index of abstracts
UIFR5 How strategic needs influence alliance formation and their governance modes:
An empirical study in the Italian biopharmaceutical industry
Mazzola Erica, Perrone Giovanni
UIFR6 Antecedents and impacts of social capital in buyer supplier relationship:
A study of Australian manufacturing industry
Chowdhury Mesbahuddin, Prajogo Daniel, Alam Quamrul
UIFR7 Increasing buyer’s absorptive capacity by creating social capital in
inter-organizational relationships
Whipple Judith, Vanpoucke Evelyne, Boyer Kenneth
UIFR8 Exploring the effect of lean manufacturing on collaborative
relations sustainability
El Mokadem Mohamed, Khalaf Magdy
34
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147
148
148
abstracts
35
Empirical modelling and simulation
EMP1
Automotive crash repair reverse logistics operations: An analysis of the
inventory-service trade-off
James Aitken(1), Hartanto Wong(2)
(1)University of Surrey, Guildford, UK, (2)Aarhus University, Aarhus, Denmark
Companies have recognised that used products can represent a valuable economic resource as well as an opportunity to
reduce the environmental impact of the repair process. Realising the value-add inherent in used products requires the
establishment and operation of a reverse logistics (RL) system. RL systems are typically characterised as being the return
journey within a closed-loop supply chain from the consumer back to the original product producer. The objective of the
research was to develop an evaluation model of introducing an RL system without involving the producer.
EMP2
The assumption of exponential interarrival times in hospital emergency
departments: right or wrong?
Francisco Aguado-Correa(1), Nuria Padilla-Garrido(1), Maria Isabel RengelDomínguez(2), Teresa Leal-Linares(1)
(1)University of Huelva, Huelva, Spain, (2)Hospital Juan Ramon Jimenez, Huelva, Spain
In the last year 6 out of 10 people visited the Spanish Hospital Emergency Departments (ED) for cases that could be
solved in the Primary Health Care Service, causing congestion, long length of stays and even episodes of violence to
health personnel. The aim of this paper is to analyze the probability distributions of time between the arrival of two
consecutive patients in order to design realistic scenarios and to demonstrate if the usual hypothesis of exponential
distributions in Discrete Event Simulation models (DES) is fulfilled.
EMP3
Airport services to passengers with reduced mobility: a case for adoption of auto
ID technologies?
Maurizio Tomasella, Alan Thorne, Duncan McFarlane, Guillaume Febvay, Laetitia
Usserau
University of Cambridge, Cambridge, UK
In 2006, the European Parliament and Council adopted a new regulation (No. 1107/2006) that considerably improved
the rights of passengers with reduced mobility, when travelling by air. Airport authorities were given the full
responsibility to provide this assistance at their premises and in their terminals. A number of operational issues then
arose in many airports, particularly regarding the management of the assets involved in such services (e.g. wheelchairs).
This paper presents a case study at one major airport in the UK, which was focused on enhancing the current processes,
more precisely by using automated identification technologies.
36
Empirical modelling and simulation
EMP4
Intelligence, personality, and interests – Determinants of Individual Inventory
Management Performance?
Jürgen Strohhecker(1), Andreas Grössler(2)
(1)Frankfurt School of Finance & Management, Frankfurt am Main, Germany, (2)Radboud University Nijmegen,
Nijmegen, The Netherlands
The purpose of this study is to investigate the influence of four personal traits (intelligence, knowledge, personality
and interests) on performance in an inventory management task. We base our model on PPIK theory from cognitive
psychology and ground the experiment we conduct on the tradition of dynamic decision making research. Findings are
that intelligence and knowledge are good predictors of inventory management performance, while the analysis shows no
relation or only partial relations between personality and interests, and performance. The value of this paper lies in the
adaptation and the application of psychological theory on inventory management.
EMP5
Operations strategy under environmental uncertainty
Baris Yalabik(1), Mike Lewis(1), Gulsun Nakiboglu(2)
(1)University of Bath, Bath, UK, (2)Cukurova University, Adana, Turkey
We utilise a simulation model motivated by the example of the European iron and steel industry to examine the timing
and magnitude of process improvements in response to the uncertain nature of carbon prices and the trajectory of best
available technology over time. We model these uncertainties to create several future scenarios and to investigate the
success of different process improvement strategies in dealing with these scenarios. Our preliminary results suggest that
gradual increases in carbon prices induce firms to pursue environmental investment strategies while rapid increases in
carbon prices induce firms to pursue production reduction strategies.
37
Operations and the environment
ENV1
Sustainable supply chains: New challenges, new governance
Samir Dani
Loughborough University, Loughborough, UK
The global nature of today’s supply chains have been facilitated by new business models within the supply chain and
logistics environment and better transportation facilities. Traditionally, inventory management, cost and lead times
have been the important variables that have influenced supply chain design and governance. These variables are still
important, however sustainability (economic stability), green and ethical purchasing are portrayed to be the important
factors affecting next generation supply chains (Vachon and Klassen, 2006). This research conducted qualitatively,
provides insight into the research questions and also to identify sustainability criteria which influences operations and
subsequently supply chain design and governance.
ENV2
Sustainable supply chain management: Towards a holistic understanding of the
triple bottom line?
Alison Ashby, Mike Leat, Melanie Hudson-Smith
University of Plymouth, Plymouth, UK
There is increased focus on sustainability within academia, society and business, the latter evidenced by expectations
for firms to be fully responsible for ethical and environmental behaviour along their supply chains. Building on Supply
Chain Management (SCM) and sustainability theory this research aims to understand how complex global supply
chains can become sustainable, via analysis of the UK clothing industry. A Triple Bottom Line (3BL) framework is used
to evaluate the environmental, social and economic components of sustainability within supply chains and examines
whether a true balance can be achieved.
ENV3
a study on sustainability common topics in operations management and
industrial ecology publication
Marcos Cesar Lopes Barros, João Amato Neto
University of São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil
The exhaustion of the current paradigm of organizing operation in open chains, or cradle to grave sequence,
suggesting that only interventions that adopt the whole operation-consumption system perspective, or the cradle to
cradle sequence, are effective to face the challenges of today´s major environmental issues. Considering this broader
perspective, this paper aims to identify complementarities and interface approaches for the Operations Management and
Industrial Ecology on topics related to sustainability. For that, a bibliometric analysis was done for the topics production,
supply chains and sustainability with a satisfactory result
38
Operations and the environment
ENV4
Environmental sustainability: drivers, practices and performance within the
German third-party logistics industry
Steffen Maas(1),(2), Tassilo Schuster(2)
(1)Fraunhofer IIS, Nuremberg, Germany, (2)Friedrich-Alexander-University, Erlangen-Nuremberg, Germany
Recently, third-party logistics (3PL) providers have reported an increasing amount of interest from their stakeholders
regarding their environmental sustainability efforts. However, research on environmental sustainability within the 3PL
industry has been scarce, even though 3PL providers constitute the connecting interface within global supply chains
and play an important role for their environmental impact. In order to advance research, a questionnaire-based survey
resting on institutional theory was conducted within the German 3PL industry. Multivariate analysis was used to
measure the effects of external and internal drivers on 3PL providers’ environmental practice adoption and the effect on
performance outcomes.
ENV5
Logistics strategy, transportation and environmental impacts - a causal
systematic approach
Gerald Aschauer(1), Manfred Gronalt(2)
(1)Upper Austria University of Applied Sciences, Steyr, Austria, (2)University of Natural Ressources and Life Sciences,
Vienna, Austria
This papers purpose is to describe how logistics strategy, transportation and environmental impacts do interrelate with
each other. The definition of a logistics strategy is essential for gaining advantages and being able to differentiate from
competitors in the market. The logistics strategy developed by a company has huge effects on the operative logistical
level of the company and deeply interrelates with transport decisions as transport mode, frequency, utilization etc.
are affected. Therefore a new approach based on a causal loop diagram trying to picture the interrelationships from a
systemic point of view with the overall goal of sustainable and environmental friendly movement of goods.
ENV6
Environmental performance in transport contracts
Maria Björklund(1), Helena Forslund(2)
(1)Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden, (2)Linnaeus University, Växjö, Sweden
This study investigates the inclusion of environmental performance in transport contracts, and studies if differences
in inclusion can be explained by intra-organizational involvement. Findings from a survey study targeting logistics
service providers and shippers suggest that those who include environmental performance in contracts, not necessarily
consider how to measure the environmental performance and how to handle non-compliance. A higher degree of
intra-organizational involvement is related to larger inclusion of environmental performance in contracts. Findings
also indicate that transportation managers play a more important role for inclusion of environmental performance in
contracts, as compared to top management and environmental managers.
39
Operations and the environment
ENV7
green supply chain management in Italy: pressures, practices and performance
Guido J L Micheli(2), Enrico Cagno(2), Marta Zorzini(1), Joseph Sarkis(3), Sara Perotti(2)
(1)Lancaster University, Lancaster, UK, (2)Politecnico di Milano, Milano, Italy, (3)Clark University, Worcester, MA, USA
This paper investigates the adoption of green supply chain management practices by Italian manufacturing companies.
Relationships between pressures to the adoption, level of adoption, and performance are analysed through survey
research. Results show that the level of adoption is still relatively low when compared to previous findings relating to
different contexts. Similarly to previous results, regulatory factors have emerged as the most relevant pressure; supply
chain-related factors are also important motivators. Greater practice adoption is associated with better environmental
performance with some negative and some positive financial outcome. Results have implications for a variety of
stakeholders including Italian policy makers and industrial organisations.
ENV8
Improving sustainability performance in the supply chain: drivers and barriers to
engaging SME suppliers
Osama Meqdadi, Rhona Johnsen, Thomas Johnsen, Joe Miemczyk, Thierry Sauvage
Audencia Nantes School of Management, Nantes, France
This paper explores sustainability in supply chain management (SCM) from the perspective of the relationships between
larger customers and small and medium-sized (SME) suppliers. The paper provides a literature review of sustainable
SCM, identifying the role of SME suppliers in enhancing supply chain sustainability and the drivers and barriers that face
SMEs when they engage in sustainability initiatives with larger customers. The literature review provides the foundation
for an empirical study that will investigate the role of SMEs in improving sustainability performance in supply chains.
ENV9
Understanding sustainable supply chains – locally and globally
Johann Meckenstock, Ana Paula Barbosa-Póvoa
Instituto Superior Técnico, UTL, Lisboa, Portugal
A conceptual framework is introduced in this article, which systematizes five configurations of sustainable supply chains.
These result from combinations of actor dominance, relationship characteristics, and operations as well as transactions
governance. Aiming to facilitate creating a shared understanding between stakeholders of sustainable supply chains, the
framework provides guidance about situation and arising difficulties. As an underlying methodology we propose first
a reconceptualization of sustainability by tracing it to its roots of perpetuation of opportunities and resources; then we
address the inevitability of incorporating new stakeholders and relationships in sustainable supply chains.
40
Operations and the environment
ENV10
challenges and opportunities for reverse logistics initiatives in the automotive
industry
Breno Nunes(1), David Bennett(1), Duncan Shaw(1), João Quariguasi Frota Neto(2)
(1)Aston University, Birmingham, UK, (2)The University of Manchester, Manchester, UK
This paper investigates the main strategies automotive companies adopt to address the issue of dealing with end-oflife vehicles and spare parts. Furthermore, it investigates the reasons behind take-back strategies, i.e how and why
automotive companies undertake initiatives in reverse logistics. The research findings indicate that companies are
trying to respond to the end-of-life legislation based on cost-effective approaches as well as corporate environmental
responsibility. Outsourcing is used when expertise is found to extract value from scrap and there is cooperation with
suppliers and vendors to facilitate the dismantling of cars and recycling of parts.
ENV11
Reverse logistics systems for waste generated throughout vehicles life-cycle
Ruth Carrasco-Gallego, Joaquin Delgado-Hipolito, Eva Ponce-Cueto
Technical University of Madrid (UPM), Madrid, Spain
Waste produced during the service life of automobiles has received much less attention than end-of-life vehicles
themselves. In this paper, we deal with the set up of a reverse logistics system for the collection and treatment of
use-phase residues. First, the type of waste arising during vehicles’ service life is characterized. Data were collected
in collaboration with SIGRAUTO, the product stewardship organization in charge of vehicles’ recovery in Spain.
Next, three organizational models are proposed. The three alternatives are benchmarked and assessed from a double
organizational and operational perspective for the particular case of the Madrid region in Spain.
ENV12
Restructuring service areas and vehicle routes in a recyclable waste collection
system
Tânia Rodrigues Pereira Ramos(1),(3), Maria Isabel Gomes(2), Ana Paula Barbosa-Póvoa(3)
(1)Instituto Universitário de Lisboa (ISCTE-IUL), Lisbon, Portugal, (2)CMA - FCT - Universidade Nova de Lisboa,
Lisbon, Portugal, (3)CEG - IST - Universidade Técnica de Lisboa, Lisbon, Portugal
The present work aims to develop a decision supporting tool to help the decision making process related to the planning
of waste collection systems. Such systems involve more than one depot and the objective is to define the delimitation
of service areas and the vehicles routes. The problem is modelled as a multi-product, multi-depot vehicle routing
problem. A hybrid method that combines exact formulations with heuristic procedures is developed and applied to a real
recyclable collection system whose managers want to restructure the current service areas as well as the vehicle routes
used to collect three types of recyclable materials.
41
Operations and the environment
ENV13
Greening the construction industry supply chain using - system dynamics
approach
Balan Sundarakani(1), Arijit Sikdar(2), Sreejith Balasubramanian(2), Stephan Wagner(4)
(1)University of Wollongong, Dubai, United Arab Emirates, (2)University of Wollongong, Dubai, United Arab Emirates,
(3)ETH Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland
The rapid growth of construction sector has a significant environmental impact with increase in carbon footprints. This
paper analyses the environmental implications of the rapidly growing construction industry in United Arab Emirates
(UAE) using system dynamics approach. Quantitative modeling of the construction industry supply chain helps to
measure the dynamic interaction between its various factors under multiple realistic scenarios. The potential carbon
savings and the impact of each factors are calculated using scenarios development. The paper has addressed in detail the
various drivers and inhibitors of carbon emission in the construction industry supply chain and ways to optimize the
carbon savings.
ENV14
Supply chain planning with sustainability considerations: an integrative
framework
Yang Wang(1), Renzo Akkerman(1), Morten Birkved(1), Martin Grunow(2)
(1)Technical University of Denmark, Kgs. Lyngby, Denmark, (2)Technische Universität München, Munich, Germany
This paper proposes a modelling framework for combining supply chain planning and sustainability assessment,
illustrating how sustainability assessments can be improved by supply chain planning input, and supply chain planning
can in turn make use of the results from sustainability assessments. We use mathematical programming for the supply
chain planning and life cycle assessment for the modelling and quantification of the environmental impacts. We illustrate
the benefits of our integrated framework for a case of production, distribution and storage of food products produced
on industrial scale, studying several important planning decisions like temperature treatments and choice of packaging
materials.
ENV15
Using Causal Loop Diagrams (CLD) as an organizational learning tool to raise
management awareness of the eco-sustainability challenge and to facilitate
operational problem solving
Andreas Hinz, Maike Scherrer-Rathje, Saskia Guetter
University of St Gallen, Institute of Technology Management, St Gallen, Switzerland
This paper introduces Causal Loop Diagrams (CLD) as an organisational learning tool which should help managers of
manufacturing firms to build awareness and understanding of the eco-sustainability challenge. In order to achieve that,
the literature and case studies are used to analyse the drivers of the eco-sustainability challenge as well as their impact on
innovation in the form of eco-efficiency and eco-effectiveness. Better understanding supports management to deal with
this challenge and to sustain competitive advantage. CLD are a useful tool to structure and visualise components of the
sustainability challenge and to highlight important cause-effect relations between components.
42
Operations and the environment
ENV16
Manufacturer-retailer collaboration on sustainability: An emerging agenda
Silvia Rossi(1), Marie Koulikoff-Souviron(2)
(1)Cranfield School of Management, Cranfield, UK, (2)SKEMA Business School, Sophia Antipolis, France
The aim of this paper is to present the initial findings from a study explorng how manufacturers and retailers collaborate
on sustainability. The study takes a large FMCG manufacturer’s perspective on its relationship with five retailers. We
examine the factors influencing joint implementation of sustainable practices in the supply chain. Our findings show
that sustainability is starting to appear on the agenda of manufacturer-retailer collaboration, mainly associated with cost
reduction initiatives. Viewed as a ‘young’ concept, its implications and measurement systems are not yet well understood.
This research seeks to contribute to better understanding sustainability within downstream relationships.
ENV17
Sustainable purchasing through inter and intra-firm collaboration
Davide Luzzini, Gianluca Spina, Raffaele Almici
Politecnico di Milano, Milan, Italy
Recent years have seen sustainability developing rapidly as a key business issue. The objective of this paper is to study
how to integrate sustainability criteria into strategic purchasing practices (focusing on inter-firm and intra-firm
collaboration) and which could be the impact of these actions on sustainability and cost performances. Results of a
cross-country survey show that a sustainable purchasing strategy is actually followed up by concrete actions in term of
long-term collaboration with suppliers and knowledge sharing with other company functions. The former do lead to
benefits for the buying firm sustainability and cost performance, the latter not.
ENV18
Assessment or collaboration? An empirical study on Green Supply Chain
Management
Elcio Tachizawa(1), Cristina Gimenez(2), Maria José Montes-Sancho(1)
(1)Universidad Carlos III de Madrid, Getafe, Madrid, Spain, (2)Universidat Ramon Llull, Sant Cugat del Valles,
Catalunya, Spain
Although there is an increasing interest in Green Supply Chan Management (GSCM), researchers continue to struggle
with identifying a clear, unified framework. In this paper, we posit the idea that GSCM practices can be combined to
form diverse strategies. More specifically, the following research questions are proposed: (1) How do firms combine
managerial practices to form GSCM strategies? (2) Which are the variables that affect that decision? (3) Which are the
results of the different GSCM strategies? Using cluster analysis, we identified three main GSCM strategies, which were
contrasted using environmental drivers, context and performance variables.
43
Operations and the environment
ENV19
Low carbon emission global supply networks: from measurement to redesign – a
case study in ICT industry
Jialun Hu, Yongjiang Shi, Dennis Lewis
Institute for Manufacturing, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, UK
This paper presents a preliminary framework for researching the low carbon emission global supply networks. With
external pressures and internal drivers,consumer goods industry faces more obvious pressures than others, for example,
ICT (Information, Communication and Technology) industry, food and drinks manufacturing. Although there is an
extensive literature on sustainable supply chain, carbon footprint reduction issue in global supply networks (GSN)
operation is not adequately addressed. This paper aims to propose a preliminary framework to analyze different aspects
in low carbon emission supply network, supporting by a detailed case in carbon emission measurement, improvement
and redesign.
ENV20
Sustainability and mass customization: can they be integrated in a new
production paradigm? Empirical test of a reference framework.
Donatella Corti(1), Marco Taisch(1), Golboo Pourabdollahian(1), Luca Canetta(2),
Andrea Bettoni(2), Paolo Pedrazzoli(2)
(1)Politecnico di Milano, Milan, Italy, (2)Scuola Universitaria Professionale della Svizzera Italian, Lugano, Switzerland
In today highly competitive environments firms need to choose a proper strategy that can bring them competitive
advantage. Mass customization and sustainability are two paradigms becoming more and more important and being
used by companies operating in different sectors to increase their competitiveness. This paper reports results achieved
in one research step of a European-funded project, whose aim is the development of a sustainable and mass customized
paradigm.Objective of the paper is analyzing the practical applicability of a framework depicting a sustainable mass
customized design process developed as a reference tool within the project. Two case studies are investigated.
ENV21
The carbon credits market in Brazil: Supplying CDM project solutions
Silvia Zilber
UNINOVE University, Sao Paulo, Brazil
The objective of this article was identifying the role of intermediary agents in the development of Clean Development
Mechanism (CDM) projects in Brazil related to the market for negotiating carbon credits. In this research we used an
exploratory strategy, using two case studies. The companies studied are developing CDM projects for third parties.
We observed that the companies that hire these projects in Brazil use intermediary companies as outsourced labor
for developing them because of their greater expertise in the subject, or they even set up joint ventures when the
opportunity for future financial results proves to be advantageous.
44
Operations and the environment
ENV22
Sustainability initiatives in fashion firms and their supply chains: a risk/ reward
framework
Emma Brandon-Jones
University of Bath, Bath, UK
This paper explores environmental and ethical performance in the clothing industry using a risk/ reward framework
to analyse the behaviour of firms. Both environmental and ethical initiatives are considered with regards to whether
they are driven by risk mitigation or by pursuit of competitive advantage (reward). In relation to this, two theoretical
perspectives are used: Institutional Theory which asserts that firms follow similar patterns of behaviour due to coercive,
mimetic and normative pressures; and the Resource-Based View, where resources which are scarce, imperfectly mobile,
imperfectly imitable and imperfectly substitutable are attributed to differential competitive advantage.
ENV23
Drivers and competitive priorities: implications for environmental strategies
Ambra Galeazzo(1), Robert Klassen(2)
(1)Università degli Studi di Padova, Padova, Italy, (2)University of Western Ontario, London (On), Canada
We draw on contingency and stakeholder theories to explore how plant- and supply chain-related characteristics
influence competitive priorities within manufacturing strategy. Drawing from large-scale Canadian survey, plants
clustered into three groups: environmental-oriented, balanced set, or cost-oriented competitive priority. A multinomial
logit model found that internationally owned plants and an increasingly optimistic production outlook were positively
related to plant-level manufacturing strategy that emphasized an environmental/safety priority. Moreover, evidence was
found that relying to a greater extent on suppliers located in Asia and Africa was positively related to emphasizing either
a balance set or cost-oriented priority, instead of an environmental-oriented priority.
ENV24
Sustainable operations: The impact of environmental and social practices
Cristina Gimenez, Vicenta Sierra, Joan Rodon
ESADE Business School - Universitat Ramon Llull, Barcelona, Spain
Understanding the effects of environmentally-friendly production systems and socially-oriented practices on
environmental, social and economic performance is essential, and this is the aim of this study. A structural model
explaining environmental, social and economic performance was analysed with SmartPLS 2.0 using data collected
among Spanish firms. The results suggest that the implementation of environmental and social practices pays off in terms
of impact on the triple bottom line (environmental, social and economic performance).
45
Operations and the environment
ENV25
conceptualizing climate change: constructed practices in operations networks
Johanna K. Jaskari(1),(2)
(1)Aalto University School of Science and Technology, Espoo, Finland, (2)BIT Research Centre, Espoo, Finland
Climate change is an emergent issue for operations networks. By using statistico-organizational theory, I analyze in a
two-case study how operations networks can be managed despite uncertain and even unknowable concepts. The results
indicate that at managerial level, climate change provides supported but not fully understood business opportunities,
whereas at the operational level, the firms are learning to explicitly measure indicators related to climate change.
ENV26
Using multiple case studies to determine company attitudes to carbon emissions
reduction in logistics operations
Jimmy Castro Boluarte(1), Yongmei Bentley(1), James Crabbe(1), Martin Christopher(2)
(1)University of Bedfordshire, Luton, Bedfordshire, UK, (2)Cranfield University, Cranfield, UK
This paper reports on the initial findings of a case-study approach to identifying and analysing changes in the logistics
operations of five large UK-based companies in response to increasing concerns about carbon emissions in business
operations. The study sheds light on the current state of UK logistics operations regarding carbon emissions. It also
contributes to the understanding of how strategy is formed within logistics operations in response to the increased
concern to reduce the carbon emissions from business operations. The study is relevant to practice, as it will assist
logistics managers in the adoption of carbon emissions logistics initiatives.
ENV27
national innovation system framework for sustainable development of the
Canadian oil sands
Michael Luciuk, Kalinga Jagoda, Nathanial Johnson
Mount Royal University, Calgary, Alberta, Canada
Increased environmental awareness has created challenges for the oil and gas industry while producing unique
opportunities for environmental innovation driven by social, administrative and economic forces. As a result there is
the potential for strategic partnerships between the oil and gas industry with environmental firms for the sustainable
development of Canadian oil sands. This article proposes an integrated framework examining the driving factors in
legitimizing environmental innovation and its impact on the industry. The framework will be applied to a small Calgary
based environmental services firm.
46
Operations and the environment
ENV28
Researching sustainability in OM community
Edson Pinheiro de Lima(1),(2), Sergio E. Gouvea da Costa(1),(2), Pamela Mocelin
Manfrin(1)
(1)Pontifical Catholic University of Parana, Curitiba, Parana, Brazil, (2)Federal University of Technology - Parana,
Curitiba, Parana, Brazil
A high demanding business environment is constantly challenging OM models. A sustainable global agenda is
being forged by supranational agencies. In order to understand this scenario through OM lens, a literature review is
conducted to identify sustainability issues in OM research. The main goal of this paper is to figure how OM researchers
are approaching sustainability themes. The study is fundamentally based in social network diagrams and relationship
indicators generated through a bibliometric research involving 472 papers. Based on information generated by the
descriptive analysis, it could be stated that sustainability is not a consolidated topic in OM academic community.
ENV29
The impact of carbon emission considerations on manufacturing value chain
relocation
Peng Wu(2),(1), Ying Jin(1), Yongjiang Shi(1)
(1)University of Cambridge, Cambridge, UK, (2)South China University of Technology, Guangzhou, China
As manufacturers concern more on the carbon emissions, we investigate how the increasing carbon emission cost
affects the operations strategy and relocation decisions for a manufacturer. Specifically, we develop a theoretical model
which explicitly accounts carbon emission cost and compares total operations costs in different regions under various
cost structures and emission structures. The results show that the carbon emission cost has significant influence on the
relocation decisions under certain circumstances. As carbon emission cost increases, manufactures may first off-shore
and then near-shore. High demand rate could favor production in high cost region as emission cost becomes significant.
ENV30
Sustainability in supply chain relationships: Managing relational risk
Sinéad Carey, Emma Brandon-Jones
University of Bath, Bath, UK
The establishment of effective relationships has been identified as an important way to mitigate potential risk in
supply chains. We argue that the on-going monitoring of supplier relationships is central to ensuring the minimisation
of relational risk, and accrual of relational capital. This study is motivated by the lack of attention paid to risk that
organisations may be exposed to when developing their ethical and/or environmental practice. We examine how
organisations can manage their supplier relationships to address relational risk using outcome and behavioural
monitoring.
47
Operations and the environment
ENV31
The moderating role of operations efficiency on the link between environmental
performance and financial performance: Evidence from the UK using three
independent datasets
Ramakrishnan Ramanathan, Adewole Akanni
Nottingham University Business School, Nottingham, UK
We investigate the moderating role of operations efficiency on the link between environmental and financial
performance in this study. Extant literature has highlighted that operations efficiency is closely associated with the
environmental/financial performance of firms, but no empirical study has investigated how operations efficiency affects
the link between environmental and financial performance. We have found strong evidence for the moderating impact
of operations efficiency using three independent data sets. Our results are useful to managers in that they show that
improvements in operations efficiency in a company can also help improve environmental/ financial performance and
vice versa.
ENV32
Achieving competitive advantage by addressing the dimensions of ecosustainability and innovation in manufacturing processes
Andreas Hinz, Maike Scherrer-Rathje, Michèle Neumann
University of St Gallen, St Gallen, Switzerland
This paper explores how firms can generate competitive advantage by simultaneously addressing the dimensions of ecosustainability and innovation in manufacturing processes. The eco-sustainability dimension is divided into eco-efficiency
and eco-effectiveness while the innovation dimension is divided into incremental and radical innovation. These two
dimensions are combined in an eco-sustainability & innovation matrix which allows to build clusters of studied firms. In
order to shed more light into the connectedness of these two dimensions and the impact on competitive advantage, case
studies are conducted with firms that are actively engaged in eco-sustainability and innovation initiatives.
ENV33
Perceived environmental uncertainty, environmental management and firm
performance in the hotel sector
María D. López-Gamero, Enrique Claver-Cortés, José F. Molina-Azorín
University of Alicante, Alicante, Spain
This paper evaluates the impact of environmental uncertainty on managerial perceptions and the development
of more proactive environmental management, and examines the two-way relationship between environmental
practices and firm performance. Empirical research on this topic is inconclusive. This paper addresses some of these
limitations. Structural equation modelling is used, and reveals significant influences of size, environmental uncertainty
and managerial perceptions of practice on more aggressive environmental goals. Moreover, investment in proactive
environmental management contributes to increasing the competitiveness of a firm, which has a positive impact on
financial performance. Finally, financial performance also influences proactive environmental management.
48
Operations and the environment
ENV34
Social Indicators for supply chain analysis
Ana Carvalho, Ana Paula Barbosa-Póvoa
Instituto Superior Técnico, Lisbon, Portugal
Recently, the society has been recognizing that the world economy cannot be based only in economical goals.
Environmental and social aspects need also to be included into the companies’ strategy. This paper explores these
concerns and presents an analysis of possible social indicators that can be used to evaluate the social responsibility
performance in global supply chains. A methodology for the selection of the possible most representative social
indicators is presented. An analysis of sustainability reports of several companies was performed. The indicators
utilization is illustrated through the identification of the social performance of two food supply chains.
ENV35
Sustainable services: A conceptual framework
Emma Brandon-Jones(1), Alistair Brandon-Jones(1), Helen Walker(2)
(1)University of Bath, Bath, UK, (2)Cardiff Business School, Cardiff, UK
This paper provides a conceptual exploration of sustainable services. The burgeoning interest in sustainability in OM
and sustainable SCM has to date been focused on the manufacture and supply of sustainable products, and services
have been under-researched. We develop a conceptual framework and propositions, drawing on the unified service
theory of services (Sampson & Froehle, 2006) and the triple bottom line perspective of sustainability (Elkington, 1998).
We outline different types of services that are either goods, information or person-dominated, and consider the social,
environmental and economic sustainability aspects that may be appropriate for them.
ENV36
Environmental management programmes in the UK information technology (IT)
industry
Kate Thirlaway
University of Bath, Bath, UK
Environmental management programmes (EMP) can significantly improve organisational environmental performance
through encouraging environmental activities, facilitating knowledge sharing and collaboration. However, improvement
is contingent on employee adoption of the programme. Thus, understanding what influences employees’ environmental
behaviour adoption is an issue of significant concern to management and academic researchers. This paper theoretically
combines two distinct perspectives: environmental management and social psychology to develop a model that offers an
integrative view capturing both high-level organisational and individual/employee issues of EMP adoption. This model
has found support from an in-depth case study of an EMP at a leading information technology company.
49
Operations and the environment
ENV37
Product carbon footprint - A case of measuring in a food supply chain
Jesper Kronborg Jensen(1),(2)
(1)Entrepreneurship and Relationship Management, Kolding, Denmark, (2)Kohberg Bakery Group A/S, Bolderslev,
Denmark
A case study was performed modelling the environmental performance of a food supply chain producing rye bread on
an industrial scale. The purpose was to estimate the global warming potential and illuminate impacts from different
stages in the supply chain. The bakery was found as the main contributor, but with agriculture as second and nearly equal
impact. Production of one kg of rye bread emits 714 g CO2 equivalent and is highly dependent upon fossil fuel sources.
As a result this paper provides insight of the environmental performance of a food supply chain.
ENV38
The potential of inter-organisational product tracking systems in a “sustainable”
supply chain - observations from the wild seafood supply network
Ola Bø
Molde University College, Molde, Norway
For industries using common pool natural resources, sustainable sourcing is crucial for long time viability. Fisheries
constitute a case in point as world catch peaked in the early nineties. Currently we can observe a change in behaviour
in the seafood industry in large parts of the western world, as the industry is implementing various sustainable supply
chain management strategies. This paper discusses the potential and limitation of electronic inter-organisational product
tracking systems to support these changes. The discussion builds upon case research in the supply network for wild
caught seafood in Northern Europe.
ENV39
ISO14001 certification in an emerging economy: a taxonomy proposal
Iuri Gavronski(2), Ely Paiva(1), Rafael Teixeira(2)
(1)Fundacao Getulio Vargas, Sao Paulo - SP, Brazil, (2)UNISINOS, Sao Leopoldo - RS, Brazil
This study proposes a taxonomy of environmental management with regards to the motivations for adopting ISO 14001
certification of their environmental management system and describing the differences for each strategic group for a
set of key variables. For this purpose, we conducted a survey of ISO 14001-certified manufacturing plants in Brazil, in
three industries: chemical, manufactured metal products, and electronics. A sample of 99 plants was analyzed using
multivariate data analysis techniques. We have identified three clusters: internal orientation, external orientation, and
holistic. Companies in the third group present high performance in variables regardless if they are internal or external.
50
Managing the operations-finance interface
FIN1
Implications of e-purchasing systems for managing the operations-finance
interface: a survey of finance and accounting managers
Adrian Done, Ching Liao, Markus Maedler
IESE Business School, Barcelona, Spain
This study investigates how top finance and accounting managers perceive the performance implications of
e-Purchasing. Based on a large-sample (454) survey, we employ multivariate data analysis techniques to provide
insights into how e-Purchasing impacts organizational performance. We model a theoretical construct of e-Purchasing
and empirically confirm our literature-based hypotheses that e-Purchasing strongly and positively correlates with the
integration between the finance and purchasing departments, improves the operational performance within these
departments, and positively affects the confidence of managers in future organizational performance. We discuss
implications for operations researchers and practitioners as well as areas for further research.
FIN2
An approach to evaluate a portfolio of technologies for licensing out
Leonardo Santiago(1), Daniel Eloi-Santos(2), Marcela Martinelli(3), Luciana Hashiba Horta(3)
(1)Federal Univeristy of Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte, MG, Brazil, (2)Pris Tecnologia, Belo Horizonte, MG, Brazil, (3)
Natura Inovação e Tecnologia de Produtos, Cajamar, SP, Brazil
In this paper, we investigate how to assess technologies to be licensed out. To this end, we propose an approach that
enables large corporations to scrutinize their portfolio of technologies in order to establish values ranges to support a
negotiation process. In addition, we offer a rationale for negotiating licensing agreements which relies upon market data
and/or economic assessment to couch the valuation. We conclude by highlighting pros and cons of our approach, its
potential generalization to other companies, and how it can be used to indicate value drivers to gear the R&D strategy.
FIN3
Challenges of implementing lean principles in product development – the case of
visual planning
Björn Söderberg, Ludvig Alfredson
Chalmers University of Technology, Gothenburg, Sweden
The methods proposed by Lean product development are considered to dramatically improve companies’ competitive
position. However, few studies have been made on the implementation of these methods. This paper explores the factors
that influence the implementation of the Lean method Visual planning in four product development organisations. This
method promises improved communication and coordination in product development teams, and is often a first step of
a Lean implementation. The results show that the role of management, team characteristics and team culture are three
important factors that can make or break a successful implementation of this method.
51
Managing the operations-finance interface
FIN4
Managing the operations-risks interface: a proposal for protocol analysis of the
operational risk management
Luiz Carlos Di Serio, Luciel Henrique de Oliveira, Luiz Marcelo Siegert Schuch
EAESP - Fundação Getúlio Vargas - FGV, São Paulo / SP, Brazil
This work aims at contributing to operating risk evaluation methodology by introducing an analyses instrument that
combines the benefits of risk management with organizational transformation. The protocol consists of an analysis of the
implementation process, current stage, facilitating and complicating factors and impact of risk management. We have
analyzed internal documentation from three world-class companies that won the Brazilian Quality Award Prize (PNQ)
and examined the results of interviews conducted with their risk managers. This study’s main contributions are the
systematization of concepts and the organization of a risk analysis protocol based on the experiences of these companies.
FIN5
Servitization of manufacturing: An event study to examine how public
announcements of different types of offerings affect shareholder value
Antonios Karatzas, Mark Johnson, Marko Bastl
Cranfield University, Cranfield,, UK
There has been a lot of discussion around the beneficial financial implications of servitization but a paucity of relevant
empirical inquiry. We suggest that one way to evaluate the financial impact of service-based manufacturing strategies
is by determining the short-term effect of public announcements of service and integrated product-service offerings
on shareholder value, a key firm performance indicator. Although a work in progress, an event study confirms our
hypotheses that due to the risk inherent in such deals, shareholder value is positively and significantly affected only when
pure product sales are announced.
52
Managing global operations: perspectives from emerging economies
GO1
The internationalization process of foreign automotive part suppliers in China:
Toward an adaptive capability evolution model
Joongsan Oh(1), Kyung-Tae Kim(2), Seung-Kyu Rhee(3)
(1)Sookmyung Women’s University, Seoul, Republic of Korea, (2)SK China Research Institute, Beijing, China, (3)KAIST
Graduate School of Management, Seoul, Republic of Korea
This study examines the internationalization process of foreign manufacturing subsidiaries in China from the
perspective of capabilities evolution. This study conducted analysis of capability at the functional level (manufacturing,
purchasing, marketing, and R&D). By synthesizing the existing stage theory and dynamic capability view, we suggest a
three-stage model of capabilities evolution in the internationalization of automotive part manufacturers: the capabilitiestransfer stage, the capabilities-development stage, and the capabilities-exploitation stage. Using this three-stage model,
we find that subsidiaries evolve in the course of interactions with internal and external network actors, the roles and
contributions of which change with the stage of development.
GO2
Exploring the interface between foreign invested manufacturing and R&D in
emerging markets
Peder Veng Soeberg, Brian Vejrum Waehrens
Aalborg University, Aalborg, Denmark
The paper investigates what makes it more or less relevant to co-locate manufacturing activities and R&D activities in
emerging markets within multinational companies. A framework to this end is developed and illustrated in relation
to four cases from multinational companies, which have established R&D and manufacturing in China or India. The
findings point to the importance of contingencies such as clockspeed, technological complexity, as well as the extent to
which local adaptation is needed.
GO3
Effects from implementing advanced planning and scheduling systems for supply
chain planning
Patrik Jonsson(1), Martin Rudberg(2)
(1)Chalmers University of Technology, Gothenburg, Sweden, (2)Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden
The purpose is to analyze the effects from Advanced Planning and Scheduling (APS) systems for supply chain planning,
both in terms of experienced benefits and problems, and the impact of the planning context and implementation
approach. The research is based on a multiple case study of five manufacturing firms. It is concluded that the APS
implementation focus and APS use impact three effect types differently if applying a process or system focus and more
positively if applying an APS lead, compared to lag, approach. It also shows that the organisation, individuals, technology
impact the effects, no matter APS implementation focus.
53
Managing global operations: perspectives from emerging economies
GO4
Internationalization among emerging economies: insights from Brazilian-Russian
beef network
Karim Marini Thomé(1),(3), Rosa Teresa M. Machado(1), Luciana Vieira(2)
(1)Universidade Federal de Lavras, Lavras - Minas Gerais, Brazil, (2)Universidade do Vale do Rio dos Sinos, São
Leopoldo - Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil, (3)University of Brasília, Brasília - DF, Brazil
This paper describes the internationalization of operations from Brazilian firms towards the Russian market. The paper
begins with a short review of International Operations Management and the recent literature on Internationalization and
Emerging Economies. The data was obtained through in-depth interviews, annual reports and direct observation with
the Brazilian beef processors in the Russian beef market. Our findings suggest that the configuration of the international
operations is determined by the business network of the host country (or market). Institutions can be used as barriers
and/or facilitators of operation management decisions among emerging economies.
GO5
Adjusting process implementation activities to context-specific requirements in
low-cost countries
Hans-Georg Mundhenke, Ken Platts
Institute for Manufacturing, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, UK
International operating manufacturing firms struggle to decide whether to apply universally-standardized or locationspecific manufacturing concepts. This study reveals how and why Quality Management Practices, often referred to
as world-class manufacturing practices, are adapted due to specific influences associated with economic and social
development of a country. Focusing on differences in process implementation, this study summarises insights from six
in-depth case studies of production plants at a global automotive supplier. Applying the concept of contingency theory,
this paper shows how country-development dependent factors influence process implementation activities on the shopfloor while maintaining a similar product quality performance.
GO6
Outsourcing in the global pharmaceutical industry: Collaborative value delivery
Kulwant Pawar(1), Janat Shah(2), Ashrit Cheepirishetti(1), Peeyush Mehta(3), Min
Zhang(1), Johann Riedel(1)
(1)Nottingham University Business School, Nottingham, UK, (2)Indian Institute of Management, Bangalore, India, (3)
Indian Institute of Technology, Kanpur, India
In the pharmaceutical industry, many companies seek the transition to a collaborative business model through
outsourcing operations to emerging low wage and high skill locations. However, research on outsourcing has largely
overlooked how to manage knowledge suppliers for value co-creation. We argue that the big pharmaceutical companies
will manage outsourcing relationships according to their partners’ dynamic capabilities. A qualitative comparative case
analysis is conducted to empirically investigate the causal conditions for collaborative value delivery. The results show
that knowledge suppliers’ past experience, resources, market capability, and communication are the key factors for
developing an integrative relationship in outsourcing.
54
Governing inter-firm relationships
GOV1
Improved collaboration to link manufacturing strategies with order winners in
Thai industries
Pongpak Banchuen, Ian Sadler, Himanshu Shee
Victoria University, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia
Examines the effect of order-winning strategy on collaboration type and business outcomes. Previous research on supply
chain collaboration is based on either the Transaction Cost Theory or the Resource Based View. In contrast, this work
studies the influence of strategic decisions on type of manufacturer-supplier collaboration. Questionnaire Data from
manufacturing firms in Thailand was assessed by structural equation modelling. Four order winners are significantly
linked to either strategic or operational collaboration. Model shows that firms focused on flexibility, quality and delivery
will develop strategic collaboration with suppliers leading to long term development of relationships, hence, market and
innovation improvement.
GOV2
Configure the service network managing inter-firm relationships
Barbara Resta(1), Paolo Gaiardelli(1), Giuditta Pezzotta(1), Lucrezia Songini(2)
(1)University of Bergamo, Dalmine, Italy, (2)Università Commerciale Luigi Bocconi, Milano, Italy
Manufacturing companies that pursue a servitization strategy through the implementation of product-service system
(PSS) business models need to face different challenges. Among others, changes of inter-organisational relationships are
required in order to create, capture and deliver new value. In such a context, this paper investigates how the servitization
level of a PSS offering impacts on the value-creation network of a company. A theoretical conceptual model, derived
from a literature analysis, linking different value propositions and the main PSS network features, is refined through a
case study. Evidence from the empirical investigation are then discussed and summarised into two final propositions.
55
Global supply chain networks
GSCN1
Processes of global sourcing decision-making practices
Christian Busse, Alina Stanczyk, Constantin Blome
EBS Business School, Supply Chain Managment Institute, Wiesbaden, Germany
Global sourcing decision-making had not yet been analyzed from a decision process perspective, although the decision is
characterized by multi-functionality, multi-dimensionality and frequently high strategic importance to firms, so that the
global sourcing decision process is clearly extraordinary. This research gap can be addressed by means of a multiple case
study approach. The paper depicts a suitable research framework and a methodology to close this gap.
GSCN2
Offshoring and nearshoring success: the importance of strategic reasons
Federico Caniato(1), Ruggero Golini(2), Matteo Kalchschmidt(2)
(1)Politecnico di Milano, Milano, Italy, (2)Università degli Studi di Bergamo, Dalmine (BG), Italy
Moving the production abroad has become a common practice for companies willing to take the opportunity of
localization advantages in other countries. However, the business performance may not always be positive and it can
depend on the target country and the underlying strategic reasons. By means of a sample of 227 Western European
companies we analyze the relationship between the strategic reasons to move production abroad and the performance
achieved, separately for offshoring and nearshoring contexts. Results show that strategic reasons are actually associated
to higher or lower business performance, but the relationships change in nearshoring or offshoring contexts.
GSCN3
Strategic outsourcing? The Philips’ case in the LCD TV market
Luiz Carlos Di Serio(1), Robson Dantas Bento(1), Guilherme Silveira Martins(1), André
Luis de Moura Castro Duarte(2)
(1)Getulio Vargas Foundation (FGV-EAESP), Brazil, Brazil, (2)INSPER – Education and Research Institute, Brazil, Brazil
This work seeks to assess the outsourcing process adopted by Philips for producing LCD televisions. The authors
used the Resource-based Theory and the Transaction Cost Theory for analyzing the case. Based on industry
data and interviews with ten of the company’s senior executives, this study pointed out that the LCD panel is an
important resource and that its supply by third parties represented a high transaction cost. The results illustrate the
complementarity that exists between the RBT and TCT theories in a competitive environment that has few players.
56
Global supply chain networks
GSCN4
Plant roles in high cost countries: A survey analysis of manufacturing networks in
the Northern Europe
Virpi Turkulainen, Marja Blomqvist
Aalto University, Espoo, Finland
This paper discusses manufacturing competitiveness through the analysis of the roles of manufacturing plants located
in Finland. We build on Ferdows’ framework (1989, 1997) for plant roles. We analyze survey data collected in roughly
hundred Finnish plants. The results show significant variance in plant roles, giving support to Ferdows’ model especially
in terms of plant competence. However, the reasons for plant location are found to be more complex. Enhancements are
suggested to the model.
GSCN5
Factors affecting the execution of supply chain management - an international
view
Herbert Kotzab(1),(2), Christoph Teller(3), David Grant(4)
(1)University of Bremen, Bremen, Germany, (2)Glasgow Caledonian University, Glasgow, UK, (3)University of Stirling,
Stirling, UK, (4)Heriot-Watt University, Edinburg, UK
This paper discusses factors affecting the execution of supply chain management and presents a conceptual model and
six hypotheses based on such factors identified in the literature. The model was tested in two European country-specific
cases using structural equation modelling. Findings in both cases confirm the hypothesized hierarchical order of three
proposed antecedents: ‘internal SCM conditions’ affect ‘joint SCM conditions’ which in turn influences collaborative
‘SCM-related processes’. Managerial implications are that firms in both countries should adopt these hierarchical steps to
ensure a rigorous and appropriate approach to achieving full and integrative SCM.
GSCN6
capability requirements in evolving manufacturing networks
Jan Stentoft Arlbjørn(1), Aki Laiho(2), Eero Eloranta(1), Mareike Kessels(3)
(1)University of Southern Denmark, Kolding, Denmark, (2)Aalto University, Espoo, Finland, (3)RWTH Aachen
University, Aachen, Germany
The objective of this paper is to report on exploratory research conducted in Danish and Finnish companies based on
four case studies. A capability perspective is introduced to the discourse of production networks with the intention of
providing a basis for analysis of changing requirements in different operational models. The paper develops different
configurations of capability requirements for different setups of manufacturing networks.
57
Global supply chain networks
GSCN7
Advances in augmented reality for operating global manufacturing value chains
Wasim A. Khan, Amir Hussain
Institute of Business Administration, Karachi, Pakistan
Michael Porter’s [1985] Value chain encompasses all activities of the chain through which the product gains some value.
Production value chains are consist of tangible and intangible activities required to produce and market a product.
These value chains utilize flow of material, flow of energy and flow of information linked with the particular value chain.
Automation based on augmented reality provides micro to macro level control over these value chains and a manager
has higher level of control of the decision parameters. This paper demonstrate use of augmented reality complementing
decision making processes in operating global value chains.
GSCN8
Governance and transformation of clusters: theoretical models and the case of
the maritime cluster in mid-west Norway
Lise Lillebrygfjeld Halse
Molde University College, Molde, Norway
Building on a global supply chain perspective the paper seeks to develop a conceptual model which describes and
explains the transformation of industrial clusters over time under the duress of globalization with particular emphasis
on changing governance dynamics. The model incorporates the cluster ‘macroculture’ which links the macro and
transaction levels in the cluster, in order to explain cluster changes and transformations. The maritime cluster in MidWest Norway is used to demonstrate the applicability of the model.
GSCN9
Managing global manufacturing networks: Uncovered plant roles of global
manufacturing companies
Marja Blomqvist, Virpi Turkulainen
Aalto University, Espoo, Finland
Our aim is to increase the understanding about plant roles in global manufacturing networks. The paper builds on two
established plant role frameworks: Ferdows (1989, 1997) and Johansen and Riis (2005, 2007). The paper engages in
assessing of these frameworks as well as in elaborating them with case studies of four global manufacturing networks.
Our analysis indicates that the previous frameworks are partly overlapping but complementary. Furthermore, our
findings indicate that the plants may have several strategic reasons for their location thus implicating a need to revise the
frameworks. We also suggest three new roles.
58
Global supply chain networks
GSCN10
The configuration of the outbound supply chain for the international growth of
Italian fashion companies
Antonella Moretto, Andrea Sianesi, Gianluca Spina
Politecnico di Milano, Milan, Italy
Fashion companies have been facing the necessity of competing in new markets to remain competitive. In these markets
the final part of the supply chain is crucial for the company success, being the contact point with the final market. This
paper aims at understanding the configuration of the outbound supply to adopt in foreign markets considering on the
one hand the characteristics of the firm and of the market, on the other hand the characteristics of the foreign country.
The goal is to identify common patterns among countries able to explain the successful configuration choice.
GSCN11
Competing in the global aerospace supply chain: The case of the Canadian
aerospace industry
Isabelle Dostaler
Concordia University, Montreal, Quebec, Canada
In light of this vertical disintegration of the global aerospace industry, this paper reports a study that was commissioned
by Industry Canada to evaluate whether Canadian aerospace firms have been able to develop the new set of
manufacturing and managerial capabilities required to compete in the global aerospace supply chain. A strategic
management framework was used to assess the fit between the key success factors of the external environment and the
resources and capabilities possessed by the firms studied.
GSCN12
Global supply networks and responsiveness in the international clothing
industry: Differences across different retailer types
Bart MacCarthy, Amila Jayarathne
University of Nottingham, Nottingham, UK
Clothing supply networks are both retailer-driven and international in character. Here the supply networks of three
different types of clothing retailer - ‘established leading brands’, ‘value brands’, and ‘supermarket brands’ are described
and analysed. Typical network configurations for each retailer type are presented. Differences are noted in the
relationships between retailers and prime manufacturers, in the levels of network integration, and in the functional
authority for fabric sourcing and quality assurance. Responsiveness characteristics also show differences, particularly in
postponement in planning. Leading brand retailers commit later in the planning cycle than value brand or supermarket
retailers, enhancing their responsiveness.
59
Global supply chain networks
GSCN13
Interactions between R&D and production in globalisation: The implications for
the operations management community
Yang Cheng(1), John Johansen(1), Yongjiang Shi(2)
(1)Aalborg University, Aalborg, Denmark, (2)University of Cambridge, Cambridge, UK
This paper attempts to explore how R&D and production interact with each other in their globalisation. Based on two
case studies, this paper identifies two approaches for the globalisation of R&D and production. Furthermore, this paper
suggests that the interfaces between R&D and production are significant with regard to understanding the selection
of these two globalisation approaches. Additionally, this paper indicates that research and development may need
to be treated separately with regard to their globalisation processes. We conclude this paper with suggestions for the
management and possible directions for future research.
GSCN14
Changing patterns of R&D relocation activities in the course of the global
economic crisis
Steffen Kinkel
Fraunhofer Institute for Systems and Innovation Research ISI, Karlsruhe, Germany
Offshoring of R&D activities to low-wage countries in Asia and Eastern Europe has become more and more important.
Recently, the global search for highly-qualified workers and lower-cost personnel in developing countries emerged as
the major drivers for the relocation of knowledge-intensive activities. Our paper focuses on the change of patterns of
R&D relocation activities in the course of the global economic crisis, comparing evidence of firms which have been
active before 2007 with companies being active in the period from 2007 to mid 2009, using data of 1,484 German
manufacturing companies.
GSCN15
Confidence issue on network companies managing: an empirical study
José Roberto Tálamo
Universidade Federal do ABC, Santo André, Brazil
Collaborative networks arise with the establishment of links between companies, resulting in business groups identified
under a sort of taxonomies and characterized by transactions of products, services and information. The members of
a network of cooperation have heterogeneity of knowledge and size, demanding interacted management processes to
maximize the business value of their transactions, increasing their earnings. Establishing cooperation, the companies
set ways of synergy, leveling or reverse negative impacts. However, the absence of confidence or fear of opportunistic
behavior, despite inherent in all networks companies, may impair the proper functioning of the processes management.
60
Global supply chain networks
GSCN16
Improvement programs in multinational manufacturing enterprises: A proposed
theoretical framework and literature review
Torbjorn Netland
NTNU, Trondheim, Norway
The purpose of the research is to review the emerging literature on multi-plant improvement programs. To increase
competitiveness, companies leverage production know-how in their intra-firm production networks by developing
and deploying global improvement programs. Despite the indisputable trend and importance in industry, there is
no coherent stream of research that addresses multi-plant improvement programs. We reviewed 15 journals within
operations management, general management, and international business, from 1998 to 2010, and identified 21
core empirical articles. This paper synthesizes and categorizes the empirical research on improvement programs in
multinational enterprises. A theoretical framework is proposed, and a research agenda suggested.
GSCN17
Adoption of global spare parts management practices within a network of local
autonomous units
Jouni Kauremaa
Aalto University, Aalto, Finland
This paper studies the adoption of a central spare parts management body as a supplier and supply chain management
service provider within a network of local autonomous business units of a multinational capital goods manufacturer. In
particular, the paper investigates reasons and benefits of the use of a central service within high and low adopter local
units. We find evidence on global and local benefits, observe that while perceived benefits are mainly shared by both low
and high adopters, utilization of an administrative local unit enforcing process discipline makes a difference. Central
unit/local unit relationships play also an important role.
GSCN18
Enhancing supplier performance in buyer-supplier relationships: The roles of
supplier assessment, buyer assistance, and supplier involvement in product
development
Aydin Inemek, Paul Matthyssens
University of Antwerp, Antwerp, Belgium
Drawing on the interorganizational network perspective and supply chain management literature, this paper investigates
the relationships between supplier assessment, buyer assistance, supplier involvement in product development, and
supplier performance. The data come from 189 parts and components manufacturers (suppliers) in Turkey; the authors
analyze them using structural equation modeling. The findings indicate that supplier assessment and buyer assistance
contribute significantly to supplier involvement in product development. Supplier involvement in return helps suppliers
enhance the operational and economic performance. We also found that supplier involvement mediates the relationships
between antecedent variables (supplier assessment and buyer assistance) and supplier performance.
61
Global supply chain networks
GSCN19
An empirical study on the container terminals integration in supply chains:
insights from the Italian scenario
Antonio Palmieri(1), Enzo Baglieri(2)
(1)University of Bergamo, Bergamo, Italy, (2)Bocconi University and SDA Bocconi School of Management, Milan, Italy
This paper investigates how the container terminals can reach a high degree of integration in supply chains. The results of
our analysis suggest that a container terminal achieves a high degree of integration in supply chains when its investments
are driven by integration aim are combined with a high degree of openness to the integration. Reaching a high level of
integration for a container terminal is complex because of two main factors. The former is linked to the port governance
model. The latter is due to the difficulty in establishing close and cooperative relationships between the terminal and its
users.
GSCN20
Socially responsible supplier development and organizational performance
Xiaoang Lu, Peter K C Lee, T.C. Edwin Cheng, Andy C.L. Yeung
Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hong Kong, Hong Kong
Some recent product safety scandals such as melamine-tainted milk have revealed that suppliers’ unethical behaviours
not only badly affect their own businesses but also damage their buyers’ organizational performance and reputation.
Although the literature of business ethics suggests that the adoption of corporate social responsibility (CSR) enhances
ethical performance in organizations, how to develop CSR adoption capabilities through practices related to interorganizational learning has been scantly addressed. Based on the literature of supplier development and CSR, this study
proposes a new and proactive approach to manage suppliers’ ethical performance by improving their CSR adoption
capabilities.
GSCN21
Evaluation of logistic performance indicators of Brazil in the international trade
Rosane N Faria, Caio S Souza, Jose GV Vieira
Federal University of São Carlos, Sorocaba/São Paulo, Brazil
This research aims to assess Brazil logistics performance in relation to its major competitors in international market. It
has been used international trade database from SECEX, COMTRADE and World Bank. In order to analyse the data, it
has been applied cluster analysis and multiple comparison tests of means. The results indicate the bureaucracies as major
obstacles to the logistic performance of the country. Timeliness of Brazil is close to the High Logistics Performance
Group while Customs is close to Low Logistics Performance Group. Despite Brazil has failed in their customs operations
there seems to be more credibility in Brazilian dealings.
62
Human resource management aspects in operations
HRM1
Evaluating the relation between worker-oriented lean practices and operational
performance using meta-analysis and path-analysis
Nick Ziengs, Jan Riezebos, Dirk Pieter Van Donk
University of Groningen, Groningen, The Netherlands
Lean emphasizes both worker-oriented and operational practices. This paper focuses on the performance contribution
of these practices and their relation to each other. Previous studies provide alternative explanations for the relation
between worker-oriented practices and operational performance. Some suggest worker-oriented practices directly relate
to operational performance, others argue that the relation is indirect. We evaluate both alternatives using meta-analysis
and path-analysis with a sample of 67 studies. We found greater support for the indirect relation. However, the data also
suggest that whether worker-oriented practices are directly or indirectly related depends on the operational practice
involved.
HRM2
Fit of technical and socio subsystems in lean context, and its impact on
operational performance indicators
Dávid Losonci
Corvinus University of Budapest, Budapest, Hungary
This study following socio-technical approach of lean production seeks to clarify (1) how the use of lean production
practices influences socio subsystem, and (2) how different matches of work organization and production organization
(i.e., production systems) influence operational performances. According to the results, implementation of lean
production practices enhances the extension of HRM best practices. However, this association is quite weak.
Considering (2) the study presents clear evidences that ‘lean’ production organization and ‘formalized’/’empowered’
work organization lead to superior performance. However, their excellence is not unique: same work organizations
integrated with process-focus production organization leads to the same operational outcomes.
HRM3
Analysis and validation of HRM and TQM scales in a multiple informant
international sample
Carmen Medina-López(1), Rafaela Alfalla-Luque(1), Juan A. Marín-García(2)
(1)University of Seville, Seville, Spain, (2)Universidad Politécnica de Valencia, Valencia, Spain
Two major improvement programmes in the OM field are Total Quality Management (TQM) and Human Resources
Management (HRM). A variety of measures have been proposed in the literature for their measurement. Some that are
especially interesting are those used in the High Performance Manufacturing (HPM) project. Starting with a multiple
informant international sample of 266 plants across ten countries, the present paper aims to validate the HRM and TQM
scales proposed in the third round of the HPM project by means of confirmatory factor analysis with calibration and
validation samples.
63
Human resource management aspects in operations
HRM4
Human resource issues in the New Zealand pipfruit industry: some findings from
a quality management study
Nigel Grigg, Hans Doevendans
Massey University, Palmerston North, Manwatu, New Zealand
This paper presents findings from a research project that investigated Quality Management (QM) in the New Zealand
pipfruit industry. The paper focuses on the human resource (HR) management aspects from the wider project. A
number of industry stakeholders were interviewed to understand what QM aspects they use in the running of their
organisations. An additional survey of a wider group of stakeholders added to understanding of the HR approach
applied in the industry. Results indicate that organisations typically have short-term results focus rather than strategic
QM positions. The seasonality of the industry hinders investment into employees, particularly seasonal employees.
HRM5
Team results and team members’ competence development in virtual and face-toface teams
Cristina Garcia, Maria J. Oltra, M. Luisa Flor, Montserrat Boronat
Jaume I University, Castellon, Spain
The objective of this research is to study the influence of the communication channel in team’s results by comparing the
results and the team member’s competences development in two different work environments: traditional teams which
work face-to-face and virtual teams. In doing so, we carry out our research in an educational setting as teams can be
an important tool in achieving part of the required competences associated to operations management education. In
addition, the educational sector provides significant opportunities to study virtual team processes.
HRM6
Over-confidence in inventory management: insights from a human experiment
Alessandro Ancarani(1), Carmela Di Mauro(2), Diego D’Urso(3)
(1)DICA - University of Catania, Catania, Italy, (2)DAPPSI - University of Catania, Catania, Italy, (3)DIIM - University
of Catania, Catania, Italy
Overconfident individuals tend to believe that their information or their estimates are more accurate than they
actually are or that they hold superior skills. Overconfidence has been shown to be a significant explanation of traders’
behaviour in stock markets and in diverse managerial settings. We aim at contributing to the study of overconfidence
in SCM by running a series of human experiments that explore the role and determinants of overconfidence in
inventory management. Such experiments are run within the framework of the classic Beer Game. Results show that
overconfidence affects behaviour especially when the uncertainty related to performance is high.
64
Human resource management aspects in operations
HRM7
“Organisational agility” – a critical success factor in the introduction of high
performance work systems?
Martin Menrad, Thomas Wallner
Upper Austria University of Applied Sciences, Steyr, Austria
This paper aims to contribute to the on-going discussion on factors that enable companies to achieve a sustained
competitive advantage. Preliminary research indicates a connection between innovative approaches on the topic of work
policies (e.g. high performance work systems) and the agility of an organisation. These approaches promise not only
increases in economic efficiency and sustainable competitiveness, but are also able to improve working and workers
conditions – they are based on mutual gains.
HRM8
Developing a causal model of factors affecting labor productivity of construction
operations: the case of Iran
Mohammad Mohammadpour Omran(1), Gholamreza Jamali(2)
(1)Iran University of Science & Technology, Tehran,Tehran, Iran, (2)Persian Gulf University, Bushehr, Iran
Since construction operations are mostly labor based, labor productivity gets a double significance in construction
industry. This paper attempts to identify and analyze a set factors affecting labor productivity for Iran’s construction
projects. Using a DEMATEL methodology the causal relationships between factors are explored and a causal model
is developed, which classifies factors into two groups of driver and dependent factors. The results indicate that “top
management commitment”, “strategic planning” and “training” are driver factors, which support the others. Therefore,
these are the critical factors required for any labor productivity improvement program.
HRM9
Teamworking and flexibility. Two cases from the Australian automotive industry
Richard Cooney
Monash University, Victoria, Australia
This paper compares work teams at Toyota Motor Corporation Australia (TMCA) and Ford Motor Company of
Australia (FoA). The paper examines the diversity in the use of teams by studying management preferences for flexibility
in the organization of work, allied to management preferences for flexibility in the organization of production. The paper
finds that not all forms of team work are functionally equivalent and that diversity in the use of teams can be explained
by management’s approach to flexibility.
65
Human resource management aspects in operations
HRM10
Behavioural dynamics in high-performing continuous improvement teams
Desiree Van Dun(1),(2), Tim Van Eck(1), Mark Van Vuuren(1), Celeste Wilderom(1)
(1)University of Twente, Enschede, The Netherlands, (2)House of Performance, Utrecht, The Netherlands
We have explored from an Organisational-Behavioural perspective, why a Continuous Improvement (CI) team
performs well. We report on the first part of a longitudinal study on intra-team behaviour of five, carefully selected,
high-performing CI teams in five major Dutch organizations. Not only did we conduct a survey among team members
and leaders, we also conducted informal interviews and analysed extensively the field notes. Preliminary results show
the importance of five dynamics, such as ‘social talk’ within those teams. Team results were validated during subsequent
team feedback sessions. A follow-up study will illuminate how these and related behaviours evolve over time.
HRM11
The joint effect of HRM and TQM practices on business competitive advantage
Rafaela Alfalla-Luque(1), Carmen Medina-López(1), Juan A. Marín-García(2)
(1)University of Seville, Seville, Spain, (2)ROGLE-Universidad Politecnica de Valencia, Valencia, Spain
There is mounting interest in both theory and practice regarding the relationship between HRM/TQM,as well as the
relationship between HRM/TQM and organisational performance.This paper focuses on the empirical explanation of
the role of commitment as a form of mediation between the HRM/TQM practices and the company’s competitiveness
(competitive advantage and customer satisfaction).Light is also shed on the interrelationship between HRM/TQM
practices by providing a weighted classification of those that provide a greater contribution to competitive advantage, as
well as checking the scope of influence of each HRM practice on TQM implementation, including the effect of HRM on
individual TQM practices.
HRM12
Re-constructing organisational cultures of continuous improvement: Findings
from international case studies
Jürgen Phil Wagner(1), Nigel Grigg(1), Robin Mann(1), Musli Mohammad(1), Warwick
Harvie(2)
(1)Massey University, Palmerston North, New Zealand, (2)Toyota Global Knowledge Center, Torrance, CA, USA
Despite substantial research, the understanding of organisational cultures conducive to continuous improvement (CI)
is still limited. Prevalent research practice is characterised by reductionist, decontextualising methods and pre-defined
models. To address these shortcomings, we developed a research design that explores group cultures of CI in terms of the
meanings shared by the workforce. We found that – consistent with cultural theory – practices of CI were experienced as
meaningful if they contributed to the individual’s sense efficacy, enhancement or consistency. Four distinct mechanisms
were identified through which meanings become shared in a group; namely self-selection, staff selection, behavioural
embedding and socialisation.
66
Human resource management aspects in operations
HRM13
Relationship between safety climate and safety compliance in hospitals
Alessandro Ancarani(1), Carmela Di Mauro(2), Maria Daniela Giammanco(2), Giuseppe
Giammanco(3)
(1)DICA - University of Catania, Catania, Italy, (2)DAPPSI - University of Catania, Catania, Italy, (3)A.R.N.A.S
Garibaldi, Catania, Italy
We validate a questionnaire for the measurement of Safety Climate (SC) inside hospitals using the ward as the decision
making unit. Next, we study the relationships between validated scales of SC and employees’ safety compliance by means
of a hierarchical structural equation model. The model separates the effect of first level variables concerning employees’
characteristics (role, age, gender, and seniority) on safety compliance from that of organizational or second level
variables (SC). Results show that seniority is negatively and significantly related to safety compliance. SC is positively and
significantly related to one measure of compliance.
HRM14
Recognition and reward partices in employee participation systems. An empirical
study in Spanish companies
Arturo J. Fernandez-Gonzalez, Jesus Garcia-Arca, Jose Carlos Prado-Prado, Ana MejiasSacaluga
University of Vigo, Vigo (Pontevedra), Spain
This article presents the results of an empirical study in which 40 Spanish companies have taken part, all being
committed to implementing continuous improvement applying structured employee participation systems (SEPS),
regarding recognition and/or reward systems (R&R) established by the companies for participants (individuals or
groups) in said systems, for their participation and achievement of improvements.
HRM15
Building capability for employee-driven Innovation
Bozena Poksinska, Dag Swartling
Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden
Employee-Driven Innovation (EDI) is a companywide approach where ideas are generated and implemented by a
single employee or by the joint efforts of two or more employees who have not been deliberately assigned to carry out
innovative work. This paper aims to contribute to knowledge about the underlying mechanisms necessary for building
EDI capability in an organisation. Two types of organisational structures supporting EDI were identified: participation
through suggesting improvements, and participation through teams. The key managerial approaches for enabling EDI
are: creating motivation, empowerment and autonomy; collaboration and teamwork; open climate and communication;
management support; and organisational learning.
67
Innovation in inter-firm relationships
INN1
An empirical investigation of business model innovation on inter- and intraorganisational relationships
Mehmet Cakkol, Mark Johnson
Cranfield School of Management, Cranfield, UK
To date, the link between business model innovation and organisational relationships has been neglected in the
literature. This paper contributes to the literature by empirically investigating the implementation process of a business
model innovation, through the network of a manufacturing firm using a multi-organisational perspective. The case study
reported, reveals the reasons and conditions under which extant relationships are affected by the new business model as
well as how these relationships have evolved over time.
Keywords: relationships, business model innovation, servitization
INN2
Managing inter-firm relationships in open service innovation
Carolien de Blok, Wietze van der Aa, Pim den Hertog
University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, The Netherlands
In addition to the many advantages of open innovation, challenges also have been identified in the collaborative
exploration and exploitation of innovations. Literature offers only partial explanations on how to overcome these
challenges in daily practice, especially in service context. Our case research on open service innovation shows that
three practices, being the synthesis approach in innovation creation, maximization of value generation, and playing the
launching role, enable innovation partners to overcome open innovation challenges. Thereby, this research contributes to
both theory and practice in the upcoming field of open service innovation.
INN3
Leveraging supplier innovativeness through knowledge integration
Lars Bengtsson(1), Nicolette Lakemond(2), Mandar Dabhilkar(3)
(1)University of Gävle, Gävle, Sweden, (2)Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden, (3)KTH, Stockholm, Sweden
Competitive innovation processes are increasingly based on networks of suppliers providing unique competencies to the
focal firm. The main purpose of this study is to analyse how supplier innovativeness may be leveraged through internal
knowledge integration capabilities in involving suppliers. The analysis is based on a survey of 675 firms in Europe and
North America. The study confirms that innovative suppliers contribute to a firm’s innovation performance in terms of
time-to-market and level of innovation in products/services. The main result is that purchasing proficiency and crossfunctional decisions in involving suppliers boosts innovation performance, specifically when technological uncertainty is
high.
68
Innovation in inter-firm relationships
INN4
The effect of product complexity and modularity on new product development
and supply chain management integration
Federico Caniato(1), Luca Crippa(1), Andreas Grössler(2)
(1)Politecnico di Milano, Milano, Italy, (2)Radboud University, Nijmegen, The Netherlands
The purpose of this paper is to explore whether product complexity and product modularity influence the integration
of objectives and procedures in new product development and supply chain management. Results are based on
statistical analyses of data collected from an international sample of manufacturing firms through the last edition of the
International Manufacturing Strategy Survey (IMSS 5). The main findings are that with an increase of the complexity of
products, activities to integrate product development and supply chains are more likely to happen. Practical implications
concern the necessity to integrate the two functional areas, in case of high product complexity.
INN5
The effects of supplier-buyer integration on collaborations in sustainable
environmental innovations: the case of automobile industry
Maria Cristina De Stefano
Universidad Carlos III De Madrid, Getafe, Madrid, Spain
This paper examines whether supply chain integration affects buyer-supplier collaboration in sustainable environmental
innovations. By combining the Natural Resource Based View and Transaction Cost Theory, I suggest that logistics and
product integrations can be critical to understand whether buyers collaborate with some of their suppliers in sustainable
environmental innovations. Following an inter-firm perspective, I argue that logistics and product integrations reduce
transaction costs, favouring collaborations in projects that are characterized by high technological uncertainty such
as projects in sustainable environmental innovations. I meet support to my hypotheses analysing 111 buyer-supplier
relationships in the automobile industry during the period 2003-2008.
INN6
A network configuration framework for the transition of nascent technologies
into emerging industries
David Kirkwood, Tomas Harrington, Jagjit Singh Srai
Institute for Manufacturing, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, UK
The sustainable translation of scientific ideas and innovation into global products and services is critical to capturing
value from emerging industries. For practitioners, choosing an entry mode appropriate to the level of industrial maturity
will often determine their ability to capture value. It has been shown that the configuration of the supply network plays
a pivotal role in this process. In this study network descriptors are used as a means of assessing the maturity of an
emerging industry, and that the appropriate configuration adopted is a function of the stage of industrial emergence.
69
Managing inter-firm relationships
INTER1
Classification of retailer-supplier partnerships with different levels of partnership
performance
Canan Kocabasoglu-Hillmer, ManMohan Sodhi, Byung-Gak Son
Cass Business School, London, UK
Retailers may wish to classify their numerous suppliers with a view to upgrade some of the partnerships. We propose
a way using cluster analysis to classify these partnerships in terms of five partnership factors: (1) IT systems and
information exchange; (2) trust; (3) joint partnership management system; (4) relationship specific assets, and
(5) partner asymmetry. We obtain four classes and find that these have statistically different levels of partnership
performance (as perceived by the two partners). Moreover, adjacent levels are significantly different for different
partnership factors, thus suggesting that improving partnership performance depends on the current level.
INTER2
The relationship between trust and supply chain partnership with operational
performance: a cross-regional analysis
Andrew Finger(2), Ely Paiva(1), Luciana Vieira(2)
(1)Fundacao Getulio Vargas, Sao Paulo, Brazil, (2)Unisinos, Sao Leipoldo, Brazil
This paper investigates if the level of trust existent on supply chain partnerships relates to operational performance in
two different groups of countries (Western and Asia). It presents the results of a survey of 317 processing plants analyzed
using a structural equation modeling. Findings suggest that Western Countries develop supply chain partnerships
searching for more integrated supply chain, while Asian countries develop more trust based relationships to improve
performance. Results show that different institutional contexts affect the way SCP are built. The main aspect is the
differences levels of trust bringing implications for managers dealing with international supply chains.
INTER3
Electronic purchasing tools and purchasing absorptive capacity as antecedents of
purchasing category performance
Katri Karjalainen(2), Alistair Brandon-Jones(1), Stefano Ronchi(3), Erik van Raaij(4)
(1)University of Bath, Bath, UK, (2)The University of Manchester, Manchester, UK, (3)Politecnico di Milano, Milano,
Italy, (4)Erasmus University, Rotterdam, The Netherlands
This paper examines the moderating role of a purchasing function’s absorptive capacity on the relationship between the
use of e-purchasing tools and category performance. We argue that the implementation of an e-purchasing tool may not
in itself positively influence performance unless combined with other distinctive capabilities like absorptive capacity.
Based on a survey of 298 procurement executives in ten countries, findings demonstrate that absorptive capacity seems
essential in increasing performance from the use of e-purchasing tools. In many cases, absorptive capacity itself appears
to increase performance, suggesting that the human elements in purchasing are crucial to improve performance.
70
Managing inter-firm relationships
INTER4
Supply chain rationality in engineering-to-order companies: Similarities and
differences in two cases
Frans Bakker, Dirk Pieter Van Donk
RijksUniversiteit Groningen, Groningen, The Netherlands
Supply Chain Integration and Contingency Theory appear to be complementary approaches to the problem of
uncertainty reduction. Whereas SCI has little regard for contingency factors but provides detailed guidelines for the
structuring of a supply chain, CT is quite the opposite in that this approach regards supply chain integration as one of
many ways to achieve fit within the environment but insists that integration of the supply chain be dependent on the
contingency factors of the supply chain. The question that is addressed in the research is whether contingency factors
matter to SCI.
INTER5
The impact of information visibility on the bullwhip effect
Paulo Goncalves, Mohammad Moshtari
University of Lugano, Lugano, Switzerland
Previous research on the Bullwhip Effect shows that information visibility (supply chain partners’ inventory information
or Point-Of-Sale (POS) data) can reduce the amplification of orders in a supply chain. Our research compiles and
analyzes the data on previous experiments to get insight on the specific mechanisms that decrease order amplification.
By structuring the data as a panel and using a Poisson fixed-effect model we find that forecasting power progressively
increases with additional information (Point-Of-Sale data and supply chain partners’ inventory information. In addition,
the aggressiveness of the response to own inventory decreases when members have access to more information.
INTER6
A case study of management control in a large back-office BPO arrangement
Alan McKittrick(1), Frank Wiengarten(2)
(1)University of Ulster, Newtownabbey, UK, (2)ESADE School of Business, Barcelona, Spain
The aim was to evaluate the influence of formal and informal control in a large BPO arrangement. A case study
methodology collected data from both the client and supplier on the use of outcome metrics, coordination,
communication, conflict resolution and trust. Findings indicate that; (1) behavioural control appears to play as
important a role as outcome control, thus challenging the use of contracts as a proxy for formal control; (2) informal
control appears to be relatively unimportant suggesting that relational exchange theory has perhaps less to contribute
than previous quantitative studies have posited.
71
Managing inter-firm relationships
INTER7
The role of scenario planning in developing supply network configuration
options: A case study of the pharmaceutical value chain
Leila Alinaghian, Jagjit Singh Srai
Intitute for Manufacturing, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, UK
While technology road mapping has been successfully used to capture future product development scenarios, within
operations management supply network configuration approaches are applied to analyse potential future state network
configurations. This paper seeks to explore the role of the scenario planning technique in designing the potential
evolution paths using a supply network configuration perspective. The pharmaceutical value chain is chosen to
exhibit the key features of an industry undergoing fast and complex changes. The research involves exploring different
stakeholders in the value chain, and mapping current and potential configurations that might better address the
challenges faced by the industry.
INTER8
From transaction cost economics to food webs: A multi-disciplinary discussion on
the length of supply chains
Alexandra Brintrup, Tomomi Kito, Steve New, Felix Reed-Tsochas
University of Oxford, Oxford, UK
We use a map of the interconnections between Toyota’s extended supply base to review the concept of ‘length’ in supply
chains, and show that the chain is significantly shorter than expected. To explore why, we draw on ideas from network
science and develop an alternative theoretical frame to the conventional ‘transaction cost economics’ approach. Using
particular inspiration from the domain of food webs we discuss whether additional explanations such as supplier
selection bias, product complexity, size and dynamical constraints, and a common lean culture can help explain the
dimensions of the Toyota chain.
INTER9
Fresh food supply chains; characteristics and supply chain requirements
Anita Romsdal(1), Maria Kollberg Thomassen(1), Heidi Carin Dreyer(2), Jan Ola
Strandhagen(1)
(1)Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway, (2)SINTEF Technology & Society, Trondheim,
Norway
This paper provides a description of the key characteristics of fresh food supply chains’ products, markets, and
manufacturing system and investigates the impact these have on supply chain requirements. The study shows that
while the sector’s product and market characteristics currently push for more responsive and flexible supply chains,
the manufacturing system is mainly designed for efficiency, limiting the chain’s ability to adapt to changes in the
marketplace. The paper goes beyond the dyadic level by considering multiple supply chain stages and includes aspects
related to logistics, SCM, production and marketing.
72
Inventory management, planning and scheduling
INV1
A theoretical and empirical investigation of inventory practices
Angel Diaz(1), Oswaldo Lorenzo(1), Bjorn Claes(2)
(1)IE Business School, Madrid, Spain, (2)Cranfield School of Management, Cranfield, UK
While most academic literature on inventories focuses on modeling issues, managerial inventory practices have received
much less attention. In this paper we address this gap in the literature by exploring these practices using survey data that
was collected to measure logistics and supply chain competitiveness in Spain. Using a theory based categorization we
extract several constructs that operationalize the various aspects of inventory practices. We envision that the results of
our analysis are used in further research on the relation between managing inventory practices, supply chain integration
and overall business performance.
INV2
Inventory management in closed loop supply chains: a heuristic approach with
safety stock on demand
Andrea Buccini, Massimiliano Schiraldi, Erica Segel
Tor Vergata University of Rome, Rome, Italy
Inventory management is one of the most important aspect in Closed Loop Supply Chain. This paper introduces a
strategy for managing the return flow in order to increase service level in a stochastic scenario. We analyse a singleproduct hybrid system where inventory level is under continuous review and remanufacturing is used as a recovery
option to protect from stockout. The aim is to exploit the opportunity of relocating safety stocks from a serviceable
inventory to a remanufacturable inventory, in order to reduce stockholding costs.
INV3
Influence of joint decisions and cognitive dissonance on newsvendor results
Jaime Castañeda, Paulo Gonçalves
University of Lugano, Lugano, Switzerland
Prepositioning of emergency supplies is a critical task for the success of relief responses. However, little is known about
how individuals actually preposition emergency supplies. Related laboratory experiments in newsvendor settings have
shown that inventory decisions differ from the prescribed optimum. In an experimental design based on joint decisions
and cognitive dissonance theory, we argue that the perceived importance of emergency items in joint decisions may
influence prepositioning decisions. Analyses show that consonant and dissonant prepositioning decisions partially
de-bias and worsen results respectively. Our results suggest that stressing cognitive dissonance on joint prepositioning
decisions may influence such decisions.
73
Inventory management, planning and scheduling
INV4
The volatility of the airline industry and its effects on an aircraft manufacturer’s
purchasing function
João Henrique Lopes Guerra(1), Luís Miguel Domingues Fernandes Ferreira(2), Alceu
Gomes Alves Filho(1)
(1)Universidade Federal de São Carlos, São Carlos, São Paulo, Brazil, (2)Universidade de Aveiro, Aveiro, Portugal
The purchasing function is gaining a strategic role in manufacturing companies. This article is an account of a study
carried out with the purpose of trying to ascertain, based on the information gathered through an exploratory case study
about Embraer, how the economic volatility in airline industry affects the aircraft manufacturer’s purchasing function.
That volatility passes uncertainties to the purchasing function and the supply chain. As a response, the supply chain has
to be flexible. Particularly important is the development of flexibility dimensions related to production operations.
INV5
Investigating the applicability and impact of enterprise resource planning (ERP)
systems: The effect of production strategy
Bulut Aslan, Mark Stevenson, Linda Hendry
Lancaster University, Lancaster, UK
The effect of production strategy on the applicability and impact of ERP systems is investigated through a mixed method
study. Survey results indicate, for example, that system selection is more difficult for Make-To-Order (MTO) than for
Make-To-Stock (MTS) companies and that MTO companies utilise ERP planning tools less than MTS companies. Thus,
production strategy is an important contextual factor which does affect both applicability and impact. Follow-up case
studies with three MTO respondents developed a deeper understanding of the survey results. In one case, a system was
rented to minimise the consequences of making a poor system selection decision.
INV6
A new algorithm for product mix problems for job shop systems based on theory
of constraints
Davood Golmohammadi(1), Afshin Mansouri(1),(2)
(1)University of Massachusetts Boston, Boston,MA, USA, (2)Brunel University, Uxbridge, UK
Several algorithms have been developed based on the Theory of Constraints (TOC) approach to determine an optimized
Master Production Schedule (MPS). In this study, we investigate inefficiency of the recent algorithms, and demonstrate
some of the fundamental factors that have not been considered in current algorithms. We develop an algorithm under
TOC approach to create MPS. In this unique method, identification of constraints is explicitly different from the current
procedure within all algorithms. We demonstrate that constraints are not just those resources that do not have adequate
capacity to meet the demand.
74
Lean/process improvement
LEAN1
Kaizen implementation: A “best case” analysis
Kodo Yokozawa(1), Harm-Jan Steenhuis(2)
(1)University of Twente, Enschede, The Netherlands, (2)Eastern Washington University, Spkane/WA, USA
This study add insights to the concept on kaizen and its implementation process based upon an in-depth case study at
OMN, a Japanese manufacturer in the Netherlands which has successfully adopted kaizen concepts. It was found that
employee discipline and personal-initiatives are the two critical organisational capabilities for kaizen. Additionally, this
study provides an insight that kaizen implementation process can be abstracted to two cycles which gives a different
perspective to the existing models. Furthermore, this study suggests that a new area of improvement (e.g. quality, cost,
and delivery-time) can be a regenerative input to keep kaizen life cycle alive.
LEAN2
Lean implementation within SMEs: a literature review
Qing Hu, Sharon Williams, Robert Mason, Pauline Found
Cardiff University, Cardiff, UK
This paper reports on a literature review which examines lean implementation in Small and Medium-sized enterprises
(SMEs). The results identify trends related to lean approaches and concepts employed by SMEs. Other key discussion
points from this review include definitions of lean, geographic coverage, sectors and research methods. The paper
concludes with potential areas of further research.
LEAN3
The ‘formula of Lean’: Notes on the Kingman equation
Matthias Holweg(1), John Bicheno(2)
(1)Judge Business School, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, UK, (2)Cardiff Business School, Cardiff, UK
Despite its prominence, conceptualising Lean Thinking remains a challenge: commonly the 5 Lean Principles and/or
The 7 Wastes are used, but these largely fail to provide any deeper insights into the role of the different types of variation
on the process, nor do these offer any guidance into managing the interaction between Lean Production, Six Sigma and
Service System Thinking when attempting to improve a process. In this note we will be revisiting Sir John Kingman’s
equation of 1966 on single-server queues, and argue that many additional insights on Lean, its application across
manufacturing and service operations, as well as its relation to Six Sigma can be learnt from this one equation. The note
concludes with a set of key lessons to be learnt from Kingman’s equation how to improve waiting times in a general
process.
75
Practice and theory building for managing complex performance
MCP1
Complex service systems - identifying drivers, characteristics and success factors
Andy Neely, Duncan McFarlane, Ivanka Visnjic
University of Cambridge, Cambridge, UK
Many manufacturing firms are shifting towards services (Davies et al 2006; Neely, 2009; Vandermerwe and Rada, 1988).
While the shift to services is not a new competitive strategy for manufacturing, there appears to be a new context for
this shift. And increasingly the shift to services encompasses the design and delivery of complex services. Loosely, this
involves services oriented around the provision of complex systems. However complexity in the context of services
is rarely characterised. The aim of this paper is hence to examine drivers for complex services and identify important
characteristics of these services, as part of a long term activity examining the multiple perspectives that can be taken
when considering complexity of services.
MCP2
Patient safety and operational complexity: a systemic approach
Maria Kapsali(1), John Bessant(1)
(1)Imperial College Business School, London, UK, (2)University of Exeter Business School, Exeter, UK
Complexity in healthcare processes stems from the diversity of the components of the service in terms of activities,
people, resources, organizational practices, diseases, complications and types of services. Complexity however is not
tackled adequately, allowing for unacceptable levels of error leading to patient harm. Our study analyses 5 healthcare
processes from the surgical ward of a UK hospital as complex adaptive systems by using the Healthcare Error
Proliferation Model. We use FMEAs, Root Cause Analysis and expert interviews, we identify and map the problematic
interfaces between the processes and we raise ideas about reconfiguring the processes.
MCP3
A sales and operations planning configuration framework
Patrik Jonsson
Chalmers University of Technology, Gothenburg, Sweden
A multiple case study of six manufacturing firms is used to identify the main design dimensions of an S&OP process
and to generate a framework for the characterization of S&OP configurations. An S&OP configuration framework of six
variables and 17 configuration dimensions is generated. Configuration dimensions, which are important no matter aim
and scope, and of specific importance when ambitious aims and wider scope, are identified. Nine propositions of how
configuration variables are facilitating and hurdling S&OP transition are generated.
76
Practice and theory building for managing complex performance
MCP4
Procurement of complex performance in public infrastructure: A process
perspective
Andreas Hartmann(1), Jens Roehrich(2), Andrew Davies(2), Lars Frederiksen(3)
(1)University of Twente, Enschede, The Netherlands, (2)Imperial College, London, UK, (3)Aarhus University, Aarhus,
Denmark
The paper analyzes the process of transitioning from procuring single products and services to procuring complex
performance in public infrastructure. The aim is to examine the change in the interactions between buyer and
supplier, the emergence of value co-creation and the capability development during the transition process. Based on a
multiple, longitudinal case study the paper proposes three generic transition stages towards increased performance and
infrastructural complexity. These stages may help managers of public agencies to identify the current procurement level
and the contractual and relational challenges they need to master when moving towards the procurement of complex
performance.
MCP5
Delivering integrated solutions: the unbundling paradox
Jens Roehrich, Nigel Caldwell
University of Bath, Bath, UK
The paper analyzes changes in suppliers’ organizational structures to deliver integrated solutions by examining the
bundling across different project phases with a focus of realizing risk transfer and through-life innovation. The study
deploys rich data sets by combining 108 government reports with a multiple, longitudinal case study method is used to
examine changes in integrated solution provision in Public Private Partnerships over a 15-year period. Findings suggest
that as a response to the need to be competitive the solutions provider ‘unbundles’ the bundle of integrated solutions by
creating sub-units to handle distinct phases.
MCP6
Materials flow mapping: a tool for describing and assessing performance of
material flows in supply chains
Christian Finnsgård, Mats Johansson, Lars Medbo, Carl Wänström
Chalmers University of Technology, Göteborg, Sweden
Value stream mapping is a standard methodology for describing and assessing value streams, but has to be adapted
in order to be effective in the analysis if the materials supply systems. The purpose of this paper is to develop a tool
aiming at describing and assessing performance of material flows in supply chains, as part of a comprehensive design
and improvement methodology. A case study in the Swedish automotive industry proved the usefulness of the tool in
describing the material flow to the assembly line. Great cost and time reduction potentials were revealed and quantified
by means of the methodology.
77
Practice and theory building for managing complex performance
MCP7
Seeing the forest and the trees: Managing ramp-ups in complex, IT-enabled
service supply chains
Henk Akkermans(1), Annelore Buijs(2), Chris Voss(3)
(1)Tilburg University, Tilburg, The Netherlands, (2)KPN Telecom, The Hague, The Netherlands, (3)London Business
School, London, UK
In IT-enabled service supply chains, offering services through a mix of manual and automated activities, volume rampups are notoriously difficult. This paper presents finding from a longitudinal case study of a service supply chain at a
European telecom operator. The research suggests typical dysfunctional ramp-up behavior of IT-enabled service supply
chains, plausible root causes for this dysfunctional behavior, and managerial policies to improve performance, both
apparently ineffective policies and potentially effective ones.
MCP8
Project management methodologies in SMEs: Are they relevant?
Kurt Scott(2),(1), Oliver Vogt(2), Christos Tsinopoulos(2)
(1)Microbac ltd, County Durham, UK, (2)Durham Business School, County Durham, UK
Project management as a tool in business has gained widespread use among large companies. Over time, project
management theory has been collated into methodologies such as PMBOK and PRINCE2. This paper identifies the
relevance of these methodologies in project based SMEs, highlighting the barriers that stop them from implementing
such techniques. We conclude that to make project management more relevant for SMEs it is necessary to consider many
project management processes in their strategic, tactical and operational context and assign a timeframe according to the
company specifics.
MCP9
How to audit a Business Process Excellence Implementation ?
Niels Gorm Malý Rytter(1), Torben Knudby(2), Rikke Vestergaard Matthiesen(3), Kim Hua
Tan(4), Chris Voss(5)
(1)Aalborg University, Ballerup, Denmark, (2)Copenhagen University College of Engineering, Ballerup, Denmark,
(3)Aalborg University, Aalborg, Denmark, (4)Nottingham University, Business School, Nottingham, UK, (5)London
Busines School, London, UK
Adopting Business Process Excellence (BPEX) practices successfully might appear straight forward, but studies report
that few firms achieve the desired objectives. They produce islands of improvements, but fail to sustain the more long
term effort and reap the full benefits of their investments. To address the gap, this paper presents a new, integrative BPEX
audit method which organizations can use to benchmark their ongoing implementation efforts and results, evaluate
progress, and identify specific actions to be done with the aim of developing not only a short term impact, but also long
term sustainability of results and improvements.
78
Practice and theory building for managing complex performance
MCP10
Lean: insights into SMEs ability to sustain improvement
Jane Goodyer(1), Yashwant Murti(1), Nigel Grigg(1), Aruna Shekar(2)
(1)Massey University, Palmerston North, New Zealand, (2)Massey University, Albany, New Zealand
The New Zealand Government requires manufacturers to boost productivity and growth. New Zealand Trade and
Enterprise (NZTE) are driving a national scheme to implement lean to improve productivity. This research investigates
how effectively organisations implemented and sustained their lean transformations. This study extracted qualitative
data from nine manufacturers involved in NZTE lean programme. All organisations faced some level of difficulty
in sustaining lean. Insufficient leadership was the single biggest problem. Greater work needs to be done by the
Government, the education sector and manufacturers in ensuring that leadership capability is developed to ensure
sustained growth in the economy.
MCP11
Visualisation of service performance information: insights for management
decisions
Jasser Al-Kassab(1), Zied Ouertani(1), Giovanni Schiuma(1)(2), Andy Neely(1)
(1)University of Cambridge, Cambridge, UK, (2)Università degli studi di Basilicata, Potenza, Italy
A critical dimension of PMSs is the visualisation of performance information. In this paper, we propose an interpretative
framework for information visualisation and address three fundamental managerial functions. A case example of a
major European apparel retailer is presented in order to illustrate how the visualisation of performance information
represents a communication medium, a knowledge management means, and a decision-support instrument. We find
that, depending on the way performance information is shaped, communicated, and made interactive, it not only helps
decision-making, but also offers a means of knowledge creation, and a route to influence behaviour through appropriate
communication.
79
Managing the operations-marketing interface
MKT1
The application and evaluation of a framework for the sustainable alignment of
operations strategy: exploring the marketing interface
Celeste Zanon, Alceu Alves Filho
Federal University of Sao Carlos, Sao Carlos, Sao Paulo, Brazil
The aim of this paper is to assess the results of a framework application developed to improve the strategic alignment of
operations. Considering the importance of interface processes for alignment, we seek to identify factors related to the
application of the framework that affect the strategic alignment of operations interfacing with marketing. The balance
between cross-functional trade-offs, joint research on the competitive context, reflections on the understanding of
customer needs and operational performance, and understanding of cross-functional trade-offs were the main factors
verified.
MKT2
Inter-functional integration between Marketing and Logistics: case study insights
Marcio L. Pimenta(1),(2), Cinthia S. Brigante(2), Andrea L. Da Silva(2), Wendy L. Tate(3)
(1)Uberlandia Federal University, Uberlândia, Brazil, (2)Federal University of Sao Carlos, São Carlos, Brazil, (3)
University of Tennessee, Knoxville, USA
Inter-functional integration dynamics between Marketing and Logistics are not well understood in terms of: contact
points, integration factors, formality/formality, integration level and integration impacts. The purpose of this research
is to characterize the Marketing-Logistics integration dynamics in two different companies, based on the results of
in-depth case studies. The results demonstrate that integration between Marketing and Logistics can help companies to
reach its main goals and also to bridge the great divide between forecasting demand and operational execution. At the
same time it can make employees feel themselves as part of the whole process.
MKT3
The supply chain management – marketing interface in dynamic contexts: an
exploratory study
Margherita Pero, Lucio Lamberti
Politecnico di Milano, Milano, Italy
The paper explores the marketing-supply chain management (SCM) interface in New Product Development (NPD)
processes according to some contextual factors drawn by literature. NPD processes of two divisions of the Italian branch
of a MNC operating in the electric devices industry have been studied. Different configurations of the MarketingResearch & Development (R&D)-SCM integration have been observed. Results suggest that supply- and demand-side
uncertainty, product innovativeness, market orientation, trust and absorptive capacity influence the way through
which Marketing, R&D and SCM departments interact. These outcomes suggested implications for both managers and
academicians.
80
Managing the operations-marketing interface
MKT4
External product variety, mass customization and order fulfilment in the
automotive industry: A comparison between German and Japanese cases
Thomas Staeblein(1), Katsuki Aoki(2), Takahiro Tomino(3)
(1)Technical University, Munich, Germany, (2)Meiji University, Tokyo, Japan, (3)Meiji University, Tokyo, Japan
Mass customization as a strategy to cope up with increasing product proliferation has been viewed as desirable but
difficult to achieve in the automotive sector. We focus our study on the distribution side to investigate how and to what
extent German and Japanese OEMs offer product variety to the market and how such activities are linked to orderfulfilment and manufacturing operations. In Germany, fewer models are assembled on one production line, but the
option content and variability for a single model is about six times higher than in Japan. Further mass customization in
Japan is achieved through option bundling.
MKT5
Product Diversity Management within a supply chain perspective: lessons from
an empirical study
Katja Klingebiel(1),(4), Augusto da C. Reis(2),(3), Luiz Felipe Scavarda(2), Jens
Schaffer(6),(5), Silvia Brafman(2)
(1)TU Dortmund, Dortmund, Germany, (2)DEI / Pontifícia Universidade Católica do Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro,
Brazil, (3)CEFET-Rio, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, (4)Fraunhofer IML, Dormund, Germany, (5)University of Applied
Sciences-Emden-Leer, Emden, Germany, (6)YesCon Consulting, Bielefeld, Germany
Product Diversity Management (PDM) has become relevant for both academics and practitioners and marks a key tradeoff at the operations-marketing interface. Thus, PDM becomes a challenge for industries with a high level of diversity
such as cosmetics. This paper conducts an empirical study in Brazil to analyze the PDM in the cosmetic industry. The
findings highlight the need for integration, both internally, within the company’s internal corporate areas, and externally
with the company’s main suppliers and customers. This integration is associated to Supply Chain Management (SCM),
mainly in the downstream links, with intense use of Efficient Consumer Response (ECR).
MKT6
Changing patterns of leanness: Stock turns in the Japanese and western auto
industries 1975-2008
Nick Oliver, Nina Cuckow
University of Edinburgh Business School, Edinburgh, UK
In the 1980 and 1990s the Japanese auto industry was feted, but since then Japan has suffered two decades of stagnation
and interest in Japan has waned. Meanwhile, Western auto firms have undergone two decades of manufacturing reform.
Has the West caught up, or even overtaken Japan? This paper examines the stock turn ratios (STRs) of Japanese and
Western auto assemblers and suppliers betwen 1975-2008. Japanese auto assembers show consistently higher average
STRs than their Western counterparts until 1997 after which the pattern is reversed. Western suppliers also show higher
STRs from 1997 onwards
81
Managing the operations-marketing interface
MKT7
The strategic alignment of operations: case studies in the interface with
marketing
Celeste Zanon, Alceu Alves Filho
Federal University of Sao Carlos, Sao Carlos, Sao Paulo, Brazil
The objective of this article is to understand how a strategy of operations is established in the interface with marketing
in three multinational companies located in Brazil. The strategic processes of interfacing involve managerial attributes
that are subject to the influence of human aspects and, therefore, the case study method used a qualitative approach. It
was shown that the strategic alignment of operations is established from the analysis of the problems of introducing new
products and of meeting demand. The choice of technology demands a particular alignment, especially in relation to the
role of operations managers.
MKT8
Market orientation, performance management and strategic integration of
purchasing and supply management – an embedded multiple case study
Matthias Goellner, Constantin Blome, Michael Henke
EBS Business School, Wiesbaden, Germany
This research contributes to the body of knowledge at the interface between purchasing and supply management (PSM),
marketing, and management accounting. First, we extend the understanding of an organization’s market orientation
(MO) by relating MO to the actual management and control of organizational performance. In particular, we investigate
within the context of PSM how and why companies employ approaches in performance management systems that reflect
the companies’ MO. Building on that, we widen the understanding of PSM strategic integration. In particular, we explore
how and why market-oriented performance management systems in PSM have an impact on PSM strategic integration.
MKT9
Product modularity, supplier integration and operational performance: evidence
from the high performance manufacturing project
Pamela Danese(2), Pietro Romano(1), Thomas Bortolotti(1)
(1)University of Udine/DIEGM, Udine, Italy, (2)University of Padova/DTG, Vicenza, Italy
In the literature, several studies empirically investigate product modularity effect on some dimensions of performance,
such as quality, efficiency, flexibility, manufacturing cycle time and customer service. This study intends to contribute
to this research stream, by investigating the mechanisms by which modularity affects these performance dimensions,
and thus how companies can obtain a better performance by developing modular products. Basing on a sample of 266
manufacturing firms, this research empirically proves that the effect of product modularity on operational performance
is positive and significant, and that this effect is mediated by the integration with suppliers.
82
Managing the operations-marketing interface
MKT10
Collaborative supply chain pricing: insights from a case study
Marco Formentini, Pietro Romano, Thomas Bortolotti
University of Udine, Udine, Italy
Recently scholars started to investigate the development across supply chains of new collaborative approaches which
involve the pricing process. These contributions underline a new perspective on price definition, as a result of the
interaction between several supply chain members through the adoption of cost transparency and information sharing.
On the basis of extant research on the evolution of the pricing process and the analysis of retrospective case studies, we
propose a conceptual framework to analyze collaborative pricing and its implementation mechanisms in supply chains.
This framework is then applied to interpret a case study of a high-quality agri-food supply chain.
MKT11
E-quality, service recovery and loyalty relationship: the e-banking case
Frederic Marimon(1), Luc Honore Petnji Yaya(2), Marti Casadesus Fa(2)
(1)Universitat International de Catalunya, Barcelona, Spain, (2)University of Girona, Girona, Spain
The paper examines the impact of electronic service quality and service recovery on loyalty in the setting of e-banking
services. This is the first attempt to gauge relative importance of both constructs on loyalty. It’s important for
practitioners in order to establish their priorities (investing on recovery or in e-quality). The results provide definitive
empirical evidence of the presumed link between: (i) the e-quality and e-recovery dimensions proposed in the E-SQUAL and E-RecS-QUAL scales; and (ii) the construct of loyalty. Furthermore, it provides empirical evidence that
efficiency of a website and responsiveness to complaints have a positive influence on e-loyalty.
MKT12
Service delivery across multiple direct channels: Is more better?
Rui Sousa(1), Marlene Amorim(2), Elliot Rabinovich(3)
(1)Catholic University of Portugal, Porto, Portugal, (2)University of Aveiro/IESE Business School, Aveiro/Barcelona,
Portugal, (3)Arizona State University, Arizona, USA
Direct channels exhibit different capabilities in delivering services. Phone-based channels, for instance, provide
customers with a more personal level of contact with service providers, relative to the level of contact available through
Internet-based channels. When relying on phone-based or Internet-based channels, service providers need to decide
which interactive activities will be offered in each channel and whether for each activity a single or a multichannel
strategy will be adopted. We develop and discuss several hypotheses about the conditions supporting the convergence of
customer preferences for one direct channel over another and the implementation of a single-channel strategy.
83
Managing the operations-marketing interface
MKT13
Models on interval lead time quotation: analysis and insights
Banu Yuksel-Ozkaya
Hacettepe University, Ankara, Turkey
the lead times are usually quoted in singletons in theory, many firms may prefer to quote the lead time as an interval
since it obviously gives them higher flexibility. The goal in this study is to investigate the performance and the behavior
of the interval lead time quotation strategies in different settings. In particular, the impact of interval lead time
quotations is examined in a multi-period, dynamic and stochastic environment for both make-to-order and make-tostock systems. The systems are analyzed under different customer responses to interval lead time and price quotes made
by production and marketing departments.
MKT14
Optimizing the services and lifetime of complex capital equipment
Monika Moehring(1), John Finch(1), Ralf Gitzel(2)
(1)Strathclyde University, Glasgow, UK, (2)ABB AG, Ladenberg, Germany
Every member of an industrial network marked by complex product and service delivery has their own “co-development
history” associated with an innovation. A balanced individual “relationship scorecard” reflects the need for relationship
and success justice among industrial partners. Non-chargeable innovation services simplify the “calculation” of such a
justice by leaving out monetary buying costs. Strategic research and development initiatives where the cost is covered
by other than the directly cooperating departments help mitigate the potential failure of innovation and foster readiness
for co-creation. “Success” in terms of the supplier’s development and the customer’s perception may be considerably
different.
MKT15
Linking master production scheduling performance to planning methods
Linea Kjellsdotter Ivert, Patrik Jonsson
Chalmers University of Technology, Gothenburg, Sweden
The purpose is to explain how the planning environment, process maturity and data quality affect the capability of the
planning method to provide high MPS performance. The analysis conducted with survey data from a sample of Swedish
manufacturing companies shows that the process maturity and data quality are very important for successfully using
planning methods. The data quality is shown especially important for simple planning methods whereas the MPS
process maturity was particular important when using advanced planning methods. The complexity in the planning
environment did not seem to influence the successful use of planning methods and MPS performance.
84
Network strategy
NETSTR1 Networking strategy as a strategic management tool
Francesca Riccobono, Manfredi Bruccoleri, Giovanni Perrone
University of Palermo, Palermo, Italy
Many research studies in operations management have investigated how different kinds of decisions regarding business
relationships can positively affect firm’s operations performance, resources endowment, and competitive position. Very
few studies exist trying to illuminate the actual behavior of managers when making strategic decisions concerning
their company relationships with other companies as opposed to normative theory. By collecting data from 13 business
agreements from 3 firms, the purpose of this paper is explore linkages between the “set” of strategic objectives that
managers are willing to pursue and the “set” of networking decisions that they actually consider when signing a business
agreement.
NETSTR2 Integrating interfaces with logistics service providers: a literature review and
future research
Chee Yew Wong, Ran Cao
University of Hull Business School, Hull, UK
This paper systematically reviews literature from logistics, purchasing, supply chain, operations and production
management to evaluate the state of research on the importance and integration roles of logistics service providers
(LSPs), configuration theory of shipper-LSP integration, and approaches to integrate with LSPs. The literature identifies
five factors affecting the roles of LSPs and levels of shipper-LSP integration. LSPs may act as a tool for achieving costsaving or a strategic partner for SCI. Theories for a configuration theory of shipper-LSPs integration is proposed but
need more research. This paper further provides direction for future research.
NETSTR3 The identification of critical supply network segments in theory and practice
Thomas Wallner, Markus Gerschberger
Upper Austrian University of Applied Sciences, Steyr, Upper Austria, Austria
Due to the tremendous increase in complexity and uncertainty in highly dynamic supply networks the identification of
critical supply chain partners becomes a key topic. Existing models to solve this problem are highly quantitative, have a
static and far too narrow focus - and they are not applied in day-to-day practice. This paper discusses new approaches of
network segmentation but also investigates in a series of expert interviews how “real” supply chain professionals handle
this task. It turns out, that this is done in a continuous process including all kinds of information such as soft facts and
implicit knowledge.
85
New operations management
NEWOP1 The future of supply chain security - a Delphi consensus
Christoph Markmann, Tobias Gnatzy, Heiko von der Gracht, Inga-Lena Darkow
EBS Business School, Supply Chain Management Institue, Wiesbaden, Germany
Recent incidents like parcel bombs from Yemen or piracy attacks in Somalia have drawn government’s and management’s
attention to the necessity to increase supply chain security. Supply chains have to be secured against various types of
attacks in order to guarantee the stability and reliability of global supply chains and economies. Therefore, we conducted
a global real-time Delphi survey with security experts from business, politics and academia from 25 countries to
discuss future developments and challenges in the field of supply chain security until 2030. We noticed different experts’
attitudes to particular topics while other topics received high consensus.
NEWOP2 Managing production ramp-up: the impact of co-operation
Marek Szwejczewski(1), Alan Cousens(2)
(1)Cranfield School of Management, Cranfield, UK, (2)IfM Education and Consultancy Services, Cambridge, UK
To maximise the return on their investment in new product development, companies strive to reduce the time taken to
bring a new idea to the market. A critical stage in the development process is production ramp-up - when the product
design is handed over to production to start the process of manufacture. During ramp-up the rate of production
gradually increases as production problems are resolved and the factory personnel become confident in their ability
to produce the product in ever greater volumes. Time can be lost through problem solving, resulting in the company
missing early market entry opportunities.
86
NPD with suppliers
NPD1
Managing internal interactions in new product development operations
Burcu Felekoglu, James Moultrie
Institute for Manufacturing, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, UK
New product development (NPD) is an inherently multi-functional and multi-stakeholder activity. This
multidisciplinary nature of NPD operations requires interaction of many people from different functions as well as
hierarchies within the firm. This study takes a step towards understanding the operational dynamics behind these
internal interactions through case studies of four technology-driven manufacturing companies differing in size (medium
vs large) and NPD process structure (highly-structured vs loosely-structured). Findings indicated that different
NPD process structures required different interaction mechanisms to be used and different key people to be involved.
Theoretical and practical implications of these findings are discussed.
NPD2
Relationships between supplier involvement, absorptive capacity and product
innovation; a study of manufacturing industry in the UK
Saeed Najafi Tavani, Hossein Sharifi, Hossam Ismail
University of Liverpool, Liverpool, UK
New product innovation (NPI) in the increasingly uncertain business environment requires agile capabilities, well
managed relationship with suppliers, and capabilities for absorbing external knowledge, absorptive capacity. This
research is investigating the relationship between product innovation, supplier involvement and absorptive capacity of
the firm in the light of agile supply chain strategy, where firm’s agility is entered as one aspect of the firm’s performance.
The results shed light on the issues and the emerging landscape of innovation and suppliers’ involvement. Absorptive
capacity is found not only to influence company’s performance but moderates the impact from supplier involvement in
product innovation.
NPD3
The antecedents and consequences of glitches when suppliers are involved in
new product development: the moderating effect of environmental turbulence
Antony Potter(1), Benn Lawson(2), Daniel Krause(3)
(1)Queen’s University, Belfast, UK, (2)University of Cambridge, Cambridge, UK, (3)Colorado State University, Fort
Collins, USA
Research in operations management has identified that glitches adversely affect operating performance, especially
when they originate during New Product Development (NPD). Our model investigates the relationships among causal
ambiguity, glitches, environmental turbulence, and project performance. A sample of 153 inter-organizational NPD
projects is used to test the model. We find that causal ambiguity increases the prevalence of glitches during the later
stages of the NPD cycle. Environmental turbulence, such as input uncertainty and market competition, positively
moderate the relationship between causal ambiguity and glitches. Glitches also diminish project performance and
mediate the relationship between causal ambiguity and performance.
87
OM theory
OMT1
Theory borrowing in Operations Management: are scholars aligning theory and
measures?
Pinar Martin, Mark Johnson, Janet Godsell
Cranfield School of Management, Cranfield, UK
In an attempt to increase the legitimacy of Operations Management as an academic discipline researchers have sought
to develop and test theory. This has led to academics in the domain developing their own mid-level theories in addition
to ‘borrowing’ theory from the broader management domain. In this research we examine whether this theory has been
‘borrowed’ correctly. We find that in many cases the theory has been used correctly in the research. Additional analysis
indicates that we are using a limited number of theories suggesting that there is scope for more theory driven research in
the Operations Management field.
OMT2
Unpacking operations activities; process, practice and routine perspectives.
Stephen Kelly(1), Martin Spring(2)
(1)Staffordshire University, Stoke-on-Trent, UK, (2)Lancaster University Management School, Lancaster, UK
The task of the operations manager is to create and operate an effective system and this has influenced Operations
Management analysis taking a transformation process perspective on sequences of activities to create results. Different,
yet complementary, perspectives on purposeful organizational activity would treat these same activities as practices
or routines. The three perspectives of process, practice, routine are similar, but have potentially interesting differences
of emphasis. Using an illustrative empirical example, this paper considers what insight can be generated if we adopt a
practice or routine perspective, in addition to - or instead of - the more normal process perspective.
OMT3
A knowledge-based view of process improvement: Examining the role of
networks and knowledge acquisition
Peter Marzec, Kim Tan
Nottingham University Business School, Nottingham, UK
This paper seeks to understand how networks and knowledge acquisition effect process improvement activities. Using
absorptive capacity to underpin the intersection between knowledge acquisition and networks, this study addresses two
research questions: (1) what role do networks play in solving process improvement problems?; and (2) can networking
ultimately lead to enhanced process improvement? Results from seven exploratory case studies were analysed using a
triple coding framework. The findings suggests networking may assist in problem definition and solution development,
however an expansion of network size may not directly correspond to greater problem solving ability.
88
Performance management in inter-firm relationships
PERF1
Virtuality of organizations and performance: a quantitative study in Brazilian
manufacturing firms
Claudia Mattos(2), Fernando Laurindo(1)
(1)USP, São Paulo, Brazil, (2)Centro Universitario FEI, São Paulo, Brazil
The aim of this research consist in analyzing the virtuality as a measurable construct along dimensions (internal
integration, customer and suppliers) and studying the relationship between virtuality degree and the perception of
performance by managers, through a quantitative study performed in Brazilian manufacturing companies
PERF2
The giant’s dilemma: to dance or wrestle? Interdependence between large
organisations and the effect on relationship performance
Donna Marshall(1), Mark Goh(2), Daniel Lynch(3), Eamonn Ambrose(1)
(1)University College Dublin, Dublin, Ireland, (2)National University of Singapore, Singapore, Singapore, (3)Dalhousie
University, Nova Scotia, Canada
This paper attempts to build theory on dependence in buyer-supplier relationships. It brings together previous theory
and research on dependence and its effect on supplier relationships. Ten global case studies are used to understand the
effect of dependence on strategic relationship success. Our findings suggest that not only the structure of dependence
affects the relationship but also the relationship mechanisms used in the relationship and we find three new dependence
relationships: reciprocal, competitor and subordinate as well as two new relationship mechanisms: personnel change and
humility.
PERF3
Supply chain collaboration, inter-firm trust and logistics performance: Evidence
from the tourism sector
Pairach Piboonrungroj(1),(2), Stephen Disney(1),(3)
(1)Cardiff Business School, Cardiff University, Cardiff, UK, (2)Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai, Thailand, (3)
Metropolitan College, Boston University, Boston, USA
Whether supply chain collaboration and inter-firm trust has a positive impact on logistics performance is still a
subject of debate in the literature. This ambiguity has raised concerns among academics and practitioners. Therefore,
we empirically examine the impact of supply chain collaboration and inter-firm trust on logistics performance. We
first explore a real tourism supply chain to specify main factors and propose hypotheses. We then statistically test the
hypotheses using data from six cases and a survey of 109 firms. The results show that, by establishing joint activities with
their partners, firms could significantly improve their logistics performance.
89
Process improvement
PI1
A systematic approach for prioritizing lean practices using AHP
Magdy Khalaf, Mohamed El Mokadem
Arab Academy for Science and Technology, Alexandria, Egypt
This paper explores some criteria for selecting the appropriate lean implementation approach. In addition, it proposes
using analytic hierarchy process (AHP) methodology to prioritize and select the appropriate lean program to be
implemented. A case study is used to tryout the AHP model. The research findings identified that the main selection
criteria are cost, productivity, quality and lead time. In addition, it revealed that AHP can play an important role in
reaching a consensus about the ranking of lean bundles of practices in accordance to the selection criteria.
PI2
Financial performance indicators used in the analysis of the TQM,TPM, and JIT/
Lean Manufacturing advanced productions practices: literature review and
proposal
BernabÉ Escobar Perez, Jose Antonio Domínguez Machuca, Darkys Edith Lujan Garcia
Universidad de Sevilla, Seville, Spain
The aim of this paper is to contribute with a study on financial indicators with a view to improving the performance
measurement system used in empirical studies that take the manufacturing plant, and not the company, as their unit
of analysis. Such is the case of the International High Performance Manufacturing Project which is currently about to
begin the launch of its 4th Round. Basically focusing on publications in high impact journals in Operations Management
and Management Accounting, an in-depth bibliographical review has been done of financial indicators used to assess
performance in organisations where Advanced Production Practices have been implemented, particularly the practices
of TQM, JIT/LM and TPM, given the major role that they play in organisations’ value chains. The findings have been
used as the basis for differentiated financial indicators being proposed depending on the characteristics of the unit of
analysis to be studied.
PI3
Value streams, effectiveness and the achievement of balance
Christine Welch, Tammi Sinha
University of Portsmouth, Portsmouth, UK
This paper considers the interconnected nature of business processes and the high incidence of failure in change projects,
including those based in Lean principles. The need for teams to adopt a systemic philosophy is emphasised, rather than
naively applying tactical ‘toolkits’. The need to balance internal and external complexities is recognised, taking into
account particular difficulties this poses for service industries. The authors suggest that the Viable Systems Model (Beer,
1985) may be a useful approach. This model attempts to balance variety between organizations and their environments,
and between operational units and management, through recursive levels of autonomy.
90
Process improvement
PI4
Randomness in processing times and its impact on a serial production process
performance
Yaghoub Khojasteh-Ghamari
Temple University, Japan Campus, Tokyo, Japan
In this paper, we consider a serial production line consists of four workstations controlled by pull production control
systems, Kanban, CONWIP and Base-stock. Through simulation experiments, we study the effect of randomness in
processing times on the system performance. The system performance under each control mechanism is evaluated with
respect to the average work-in-process (WIP) and the system throughput. The theory of token transaction systems is
employed to calculate the performance measures.
PI5
A matrix for identification and selection of appropriate quality improvement
techniques for food SMEs: findings from empirical reserach
Manoj Dora(1), Maneesh Kumar(2), Dirk Van Goubergen(1), Adrienn Molnar(1), Xavier
Gellynck(1)
(1)Ghent University, Ghent, Belgium, (2)Edinburgh Napier University, Edinburgh, UK
This study provides an insight into the quality improvement (QI) tools and techniques used in Belgian food SMEs. The
originality of this study is the identification and selection of appropriate quality improvement techniques for food SMEs
based on their strategy, need, resources and competencies. This paper also proposes a matrix that will facilitate managers
in organizations to embark on a QI journey based on their quality maturity level, resource availability and statistical
knowledge. Future research will be conducted to test the proposed matrix within food SMEs across the European
Continent.
PI6
Organizational learning mechanisms in Six Sigma Projects: An empirical study
Arumugam Velaayudan(1), Jiju Antony(1), Maneesh Kumar(2)
(1)University of Strathclyde, Glasgow, UK, (2)Edinburgh Napier University, Edinburgh, UK
This study empirically investigates the impact of two organizational antecedents (resources and team psychological
safety) on learning behaviour and in turn performance of Six Sigma process improvement teams. Drawing on both
Team Learning and Operations Management research, the paper proposes an integrated model to explain process
improvement implementation success through two types of specific learning activities undertaken by Six Sigma project
teams (Knowing-what and Knowing-how). Three hypotheses were proposed and tested with the data collected from
52 Six Sigma project teams and the results of regression analysis supported all. Finally, theoretical contributions and
practical implications are discussed.
91
Partnership development
PTNR1
Mutual dependence and supplier innovation, the moderating role of power
asymmetry: An empirical study from the Arabian Gulf Countries
Zainab Al-Balushi, Damien Power
The University of Melbourne, Melbourne/Victoria, Australia
This paper examines mutual dependence between firms and their key suppliers and the subsequent effects on the
supplier’s innovation. Resource dependence theory lens (Pfeffer & Salancik, 1978) was used to in developing the
framework that examines the effect of focal firm’s and supplier’s dependence on supplier innovation and how power
asymmetry moderates this relationship. Structural equation modeling was used to test the model on a sample of 400
firms from the Arabian Gulf Countries. Results provide a broad support for our model.
PTNR2
Opposites attract: Organisational culture influences on high and low performing
supply chains
Trevor Cadden(1), Donna Marshall(2)
(1)University of Ulster, Jordanstown, UK, (2)University College Dublin, Dublin, Ireland
This paper explores the effect of organisational culture on buyer-supplier relationship performance. Current theory
proposes that cultural fit is essential to high performing supply chains. Using a mixed methodology, a structured
survey and semi-structured interviews, the researchers examined two supply chains in the fast moving consumer goods
(FMCG) industry: One high performing and the other low performing. We find that cultural differences are significant
in the high performing supply chain and there are no significant differences in the low-performing supply chain.
We propose that cultural fit leading to high performing supply chains does not mean cultural similarity but cultural
compatibility.
92
Operations in the public sector
PUB1
Adapting to the future: The application of new approaches to business process
improvement -initial findings from a study of five UK police forces.
Harry Barton
Nottingham Business School, Nottingham, UK
This paper outlines the usefulness of adopting an interdisciplinary and yet operations centred approach to policing.
Specifically the impact of budgetary constraints and the need to reform the police service are identified as precursors
for change and the utility of introducing new business process methodologies is introduced as a mechanism to facilitate
aspects of this change agenda. In order to inform the current position initial observations from five police forces are used
to illustrate the variety and diversity of approaches to the implementation of such new ways of working.
PUB2
The implications of maturity of improvement methodologies in UK public
services: A pilot study
Ann Esain, Sarah Lethbridge, Simon Elias, Barry Evans, Ceri Davies
Cardiff University, Cardiff, UK
The implementation of improvement methodologies in not for profit public services are increasing to combat the
pressure for better customer service and lower costs. Implementations are often portrayed as successful or not successful
through performance analysis alone yet there is increasing evidence that implementation and performance gains are
time dependent. Maturity of implementation is the subject of analysis in this paper through the piloting of an evaluation
framework with fourteen public organisations and an in depth review of healthcare. Results show the importance of staff
involvement alongside four factors identified from literature in achieving whole organisational improvement.
PUB3
Process capability – towards an empirical basis for support of lean operations
Paul Coughlan(1), Brian Fynes(2), Frank Wiengarten(3), Bastian Fränken(1)
(1)Trinity College Dublin, Dublin, Ireland, (2)UCD Dublin, Dublin, Ireland, (3)ESADE, Barcelona, Spain
Improving process capability means that the proportion of the sample population within tighter performance limits has
increased. The purpose of this paper is to explore the empirical fit between process capability and operations practice
and performance - particularly in the areas of lean and quality. The research question is: to what extent does a company’s
process capability impact upon lean and quality practices and performance? The paper presents an empirical analysis,
leading to a model which may assist in supporting lean operations. The paper draws upon a multi-country dataset based
upon the Microscope instrument.
93
Operations in the public sector
PUB4
What is lean culture - and how to measure it?
Noémi Imre, István Jenei, Dávid Losonci
Corvinus University of Budapest, Budapest, Hungary
The use of lean management in healthcare sector is extensively spreading just like the academic interest toward the
topic. Although many authors emphasize cultural receptiveness as a prerequisite to successful lean transformation in
healthcare, there has been little effort taken to understand what the “ideal lean culture” is like, and to provide a tool to
measure the “leanness” of existing cultures. In our work we provide deeper understanding of how the intended “lean
culture” can be captured and the existing culture measured. Trough the case of an outpatient clinic the elaborated
measurement system is tested.
PUB5
The impact of EMR capability on hospital performance.
Bogdan Bichescu(1), Randy Bradley(1), Wei Wu(1), Terry Byrd(2)
(1)The University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN, USA, (2)Auburn University, Auburn, AL, USA
Driven by intense pressure to control costs, improve patient care quality, and a governmental mandate (i.e., the HITECH
act), numerous hospitals have recently embarked on a journey to adopt electronic medical records (EMR) systems,
which enable the paperless recording of a patient’s encounter with a care delivery organization. Using a sample of 80
hospitals that are in advanced stages of their EMR implementation, we perform an event study to determine the impact
of EMR on several clinical and operational measures of hospital performance. EMR capability is associated with higher
throughput and labor productivity but, surprisingly, with higher adjusted mortality rates.
PUB6
Readiness for lean in healthcare: Views from the executive
Zoe Radnor(3), Amrik Sohal(2), Nicola Burgess(2), Peter O’Neill(1)
(1)Warwick Business School, Coventry, UK, (2)Monash University, Victoria, Australia, (3)Cardiff Business School,
Cardiff, UK
This paper aims to reflect the degree to which success factors and organisational readiness are recognised by Executive
Board members of healthcare organisations both in the UK and Australia. Based on evaluative research which
considered how Lean is being implemented within four healthcare organisations - two in the UK and two in Australia,
we assessed Lean implementation using a framework comprising of four dimensions: (1) the definition of Lean, (2) the
activities undertaken, (3) the organisational readiness, and (4), the sustainability of process improvements.
94
Operations in the public sector
PUB7
Collaborative sourcing of complex technologies in healthcare system:
implications for strategies
Chiara Gobbi, Juliana Hsuan
CBS, Copenhagen, Denmark
The paper represents an exploratory study aimed at developing a theoretical framework that supports the elaboration of
efficient collaborative purchasing (CP) strategies in the healthcare system. We identify prerequisites for developing an
efficient CP approach in the healthcare system and we address how to pursue alignment between vendors and customers
in the sourcing process. A case study of Danish National Healthcare system is presented. The case indicates that trust,
stakeholders’ commitment and motivation are key elements for successful CP initiatives. Moreover, achieving alignment
between vendors offering set and customers’ needs is crucial in sourcing of complex medical equipment.
PUB8
Performance measurement utilisation in public organizations: the influence of
political, cultural and rational factors
Francesco Sole, Daniela Carlucci, Giovanni Schiuma
Università degli studi della Basilicata, Potenza, Italy
The paper investigates the factors affecting the adoption and implementation of performance measures in public
organizations. For this purpose, based on survey data, the study tests a model, drawn upon the framework proposed by
De Lancer Julnes (2009), within a panel of Italian public organizations. The model is tested using structural equation
modelling and empirical data from executive heads of Italian public organization’s departments. The empirical results
show that the adoption of performance measures is influenced mainly by the rational factors while the role of external
stakeholders, such as citizens, is important to achieve an effective use of performance information.
PUB9
The content and process of a successful whole system improvement programme
Paul Walley
Warwick University, Coventry, UK
Whole system redesign projects are frequently attempted in healthcare, but they experience mixed levels of success. A
key challenge is to truly achieve change across the whole system rather than in isolated pockets. This paper shows how a
capacity and demand-based methodology is able to identify redesign opportunities across the entire system and balance
work flow. This had advantages over other redesign methods as it focused attention where it was needed most. The
programme also developed an improvement capability within the workforce, avoiding a multiplicity of methods. The
paper discusses these and other critical success factors.
95
Operations in the public sector
PUB10
Trajectory of lean implementation: the case of English hospitals
Nicola Burgess(1), Zoe Radnor(2)
(1)University of Warwick, Coventry, UK, (2)University of Cardiff, Cardiff, UK
This paper presents evidence of a shifting trend towards a systemic approach to Lean implementation in English
hospitals. Preliminary data analysis finds that whilst 52% of hospital Trusts in England articulate the use of Lean
methods in their Annual Reports for the operating year 2007/08, most of these hospital Trusts were doing so from a
pragmatic standpoint. This paper presents a second content analysis of annual relating to the operating year 2009/10
and finds evidence of a change in approach along a trajectory of a ‘few projects’ towards an organisation wide systemic
approach.
PUB11
Lessons from using the A3 structure in a multi-site lean healthcare experiment
Norman Faull(1),(2), Chipo Mupure(2),(1), Anton Grutter(3),(2), Tony Booysen(4), Zameer
Brey(1), Ruzivo Chigwedere(2), Rose Heathcote(5)
(1)University of Cape Town, Cape Town, South Africa, (2)Lean Institute Africa, Cape Town, South Africa, (3)University
of the Western Cape, Bellville, South Africa, (4)Lean Sigma Consulting, Cape Town, South Africa, (5)ThinkingPeople,
Johannesburg, South Africa
The A3 management tool of the Toyota Production System (TPS) embraces the P-D-C-A (Plan-Do-Check-Act) process
at the heart of TPS. Furthermore, the P-D-C-A process is very similar to that of the action research methodology. This
paper describes lessons learnt in an action research project in which the A3 structure was used for the overall project,
19 five-day workshops, and the 56 projects within the workshops as an improvment approach taught to practicing
healthcare mangers in 18 needy health districts.
PUB12
Lean and safety in healthcare: Methodologies for practice and research
Steve New(1), Simon Kreckler(2), Ken Cathpole(2), Peter McCulloch(2)
(1)University of Oxford, Oxford, UK, (2)University of Oxford, Oxford, UK
This paper presents a discussion of an intervention, before-and-after study on the impact of introducing some elements
of lean into the surgical emergency unit of a major UK hospital. It shows how the intervention yielded some significant
improvements in specific processes, but did not yield measurable improvements in patient safety. The paper examines
some of the reasons which might explain this, and we consider issues of evidence, participation and the constitution of
lean interventions. It concludes by presenting proposals for future research.
96
Operations in the public sector
PUB13
Lean business schools - A case study of lean implementation in higher education
Tammi Sinha, Jackie Seymour, Eric De Greef
University of Portsmouth, Portsmouth, UK
Following the recent UK spending review (20/10/10), public sector funding is coming under immense pressure, and
all public services have been targeted for cuts. The sense of urgency for evaluating and developing appropriate models
for improvement in public services has reached all of the sector. The efficiency agenda will need new applications of
operations management models, concepts and theories, and for them to be made more accessible to the culture and
language of the public sector. The transfer of best practice in the guise of ‘knowledge transfer’ and benchmarking have
been successful in developing and assisting in the transition of these models, concepts and theories from the private to
public sector. This paper aims to develop a framework for the implementation of lean concepts in Higher Education,
and asks ‘What are the key enablers and challenges for implementing lean in Higher Education Institutions? This will be
explored using empirical studies in a large HE institution.
PUB14
Total quality management in developing countries: a model for Pakistani
universities
Muhammad Usman Awan(1), Muhammad Khalid Khan(1), Niaz Ahmad(2)
(1)University of the Punjab, Lahore, Pakistan, (2)National Textile University, Faisalabad, Pakistan
Critical success factors of TQM have been well researched. However, most TQM studies have focused on developed
countries. This study seeks to identify the factors contributing successfully to the implementation of TQM in Pakistani
Universities. 6 critical success factors are identified. Questionnaire was distributed in 547 faculty members of 10
Universities in Pakistan. The respondents were asked to rate the importance of each item on 5 point Likert scale. Factors
identified are Leadership, Vision, program design and resources, Measurement and Evaluation, process control &
improvement and Other stakeholders.
PUB15
Assessing the impact of lean implementation within a UK university business
school : A case study in action
Harry Barton, Baback Yazdani, Colin Tivey
Nottingham Business School, Nottingham, UK
This paper seeks to evidence the impact that the implementation of a ‘lean thinking’ approach to managing a UK
Business School has had on internal operations both in terms of output measures and staff satisfaction. The rationale for
its introduction is discussed and the logic behind this would appear timely given the challenges facing HE Institutions as
highlighted in the Browne Review (2010) and announcements made in the UK Government’s Comprehensive Spending
Review in October 2010.
97
Operations in the public sector
PUB16
Innovating operations in healthcare: the (un)solved quest for making
telemedicine-based services work
Federica Segato, Laura Bartoli, Emanuele Lettieri, Cristina Masella
Politecnico di Milano, Milan, Italy
Healthcare is facing changes in structure, organization, operations, according to the need for delivering more with less
resources. Telemedicine offers hospital operations managers the opportunity to perform these changes, by innovating
the current paradigm of healthcare delivery, overcoming spatial constraints. Despite its potential, little is understood
about how to make telemedicine-based innovations work and therefore few telemedicine-based services achieve wide
scale adoption. Our research, based on 9 case studies settled within the Italian Healthcare scenario, tries to clarify
factors - springing from interfaces among different knowledge backgrounds - that hospital operations managers should
concentrate on to make telemedicine services work.
PUB17
The development and evaluation of an Innovation Engine for empowerment and
change in healthcare
Kristian Siverbo(1),(2), Henrik Eriksson(1), Helle Wijk(3)
(1)Chalmers University of Technology, Göteborg, Sweden, (2)Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Göteborg, Sweden, (3)
Göteborg University Institute of Health and Care Sciences, Göteborg, Sweden
This article describes how an Innovation Engine was developed and used at Sahlgrenska University Hospital to stimulate
change and what experience and results it generated. The principles behind the methodology were incremental change,
self-assessment, everyone’s involvement and learning. The data were collected in interviews and analyzed using a content
analysis approach. The strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats were analyzed and mapped to context, content,
process and output. The evaluation shows that the methodology has advantages concerning involvement and dialogue
but needs improvement in terms of information about the project. Examples of how the Innovation Engine can be
applied are discussed.
PUB18
The role of individual and group innovativeness to support the diffusion of a new
operations practice in healthcare
Giovanni Radaelli, Emanuele Lettieri, Cristina Masella
Politecnico di Milano, Milano, Italy
This study investigates the factors that explain the different diffusion of a new telesurveillance system in 10 hospitals.
Results from case studies indicate two major causes: (i) different structural constraints in the workgroup design and (ii)
different workgroup innovative behaviours in the form of idea promotion to administrators and external units.
98
Operations in the public sector
PUB19
Developing operational understanding of multi-channel service delivery systems
through computer simulation.
Isabella Porcelli, Mario Rapaccini, Filippo Visintin
Florence University, FIRENZE, Italy
The paper aims to investigate the effects of different queue management policies in service delivery through computer
simulation. The effects are evaluated both on objective performance (i.e. throughput time) as well on performance
perceived by customers (i.e. customers’ satisfaction and perceived waiting times). The importance of establishing an
integrated approach to take into account not only the management logics, but also how people interact with these
systems according to their individual behaviours and attitudes, is then emphasized.
PUB20
Long-Term Care services: A simulation model to predict future demand and
utilization
Teresa Cardoso(1), Mónica Oliveira(1), Ana Póvoa(1), Stefan Nickel(2)
(1)Technical University of Lisbon, Lisboa, Portugal, (2)Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Karlsruhe, Germany
Developing a network of Long-Term Care (LTC) services is currently a health policy priority in many countries. This
development requires proper planning, which demands for information regarding future LTC demand. Unfortunately,
this information is often not available and the development of methods to predict demand and utilization is mandatory.
This study proposes a simulation model based on a Markov cycle tree to predict yearly the number of individuals
requiring different types of LTC services (domiciliary, inpatient and outpatient) and the resources to be provided for
these individuals. Results from applying the model at the Lisbon civil parish level are presented.
PUB21
Task division and coordination in multi-channel healthcare system designs
Manda Broekhuis, Marjolein van Offenbeek
Faculty of Economics and Business, Groningen, The Netherlands
The increasing complexity of service companies’ channel systems raises new design issues. This paper provides a
coherent overview of the complexities and uncertainties inherent in a multi-channel delivery system within services, and
more specifically in healthcare. These complexities and uncertainties need to be answered in the design. A framework
is provided, focusing on the design choices in two interrelated service system parts; the ‘multi-channel’ and the ‘service
delivery process’, i.e. task structure and coordination practices. Based on this framework, two experimental multichannel projects in healthcare are described and analyzed. The results throw light on the intriguing trade offs involved.
99
Operations in the public sector
PUB22
The role of physicians in the implementation of process flow solutions in
healthcare
Torbjörn Jacobsson(1), Pär Åhlström(2)
(1)Chalmers University of Technology, Gothenburg, Sweden, (2)Stockholm School of Economics, Stockholm, Sweden
This paper identifies physician-related factors that influence the implementation of process flow solutions in healthcare.
Based on qualitative research at four A&E departments, we identify three factors that negatively influenced the
implementation. First, standardized process flow solutions are perceived to limit physician’s traditionally high level of
autonomy. Second, there were also perceived difficulties when combining the medical responsibility and process flow
solutions. Finally, physicians were more interested in developing their medical skills, rather than skills in improving the
process of care production.
PUB23
Decision support by process-oriented cost accounting for the healthcare industry,
PFC - patient flow costing
Malin Wiger, Håkan Aronsson
Dept. of Management and Engineering, Linköping, Sweden
This paper presents a cost accounting model with the aim to facilitate process owners in decision-making and to keep
track of the patient flow by combining Total cost analysis, Activity based costing and systemic approach. The patient
flow costing (PFC) model has been developed through an iterative process with a Swedish hospital. Costs not tied
to the patient flows are by the model collected to a residual, which makes them visible and therefore approachable.
Furthermore, the PFC-model is a tool to help analyze the cost of logistic decisions as a means to increase the efficiency in
the flow of patients.
PUB24
Leveraging boundary objects to enable knowledge management: a case study on
operating and hosting planning centralisation in health care
Agnès Lancini, Nathalie Sampieri Teissier
University Aix Marseille II, Aix en Provence, France
The contribution of this paper is to build up a framework that spans across the literature about boundary objects (BO),
coordination and knowledge management (KM). It aims at identifying the different BO the actors can create, and
to observe what specific knowledge emerges from boundaries. The framework is confronted to a case study that has
been set in a medium-sized French hospital, about a changing process in operating block scheduling. Through an indepth case study, we put forward the following proposal: there is a link between the type of chosen BO and the type of
coordination or knowledge activities.
100
Operations in the public sector
PUB25
Process orientation in healthcare services: tracking the patient’s journey through
the healthcare system
Mattias Elg(1), Jan Lindmark(2), Andreas Hellström(3)
(1)Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden, (2)Swedish Association of County Councils and Regions, Stockholm,
Sweden, (3)Chalmers University of Technology, Gothenburg, Sweden
The purpose of this paper is to present and discuss the potential benefits of a process oriented model for identification
and description of the various activities and decision points made as a patient undertakes a process for a single
healthcare problem. The results from the present study are based on a multiple case study design and the work of an
expert group, teams of healthcare practitioners, and researchers. The developed process oriented model identifies
important steps from the first contact between the patient and the healthcare system to the closing of the case.
PUB26
Front/back office considerations in improving patient orientation: Empirical
findings on the operational access to long-term care
Lisette Schipper(1),(4), Bert Meijboom(1), Katrien Luijkx(1), Jos Schols(1),(3)
(1)Tilburg University, Tilburg, The Netherlands, (2)Maastricht University, Maastricht, The Netherlands, (3)Surplus,
Zevenbergen, The Netherlands
The present paper aims to advance theory on front/back office design for operational access to care and related service
provision to independently living elderly. Based on literature on front/back office configurations and access to care we
developed a theoretical framework. The empirical research comprised a multiple case study based on this framework.
The cases provide insight in the particularities of front/back office considerations in operational access to long-term care.
The case study suggests how deliberate front/back office design may help providers arrange their entrance unit to receive,
clarify and fulfill the requirements of their clients effectively and efficiently.
PUB27
Organisation level drivers that promote innovative work behaviour in healthcare
delivery: a micro-level perspective
Nicola Spiller(1), Giovanni Radaelli(1), Emanuele Lettieri(1), Matteo Mura(2)
(1)Politecnico di Milano, Milan, Italy, (2)Università di Bologna, Bologna, Italy
This paper investigates organisational factors that might promote or inhibit knowledge sharing and innovative work
behaviours among healthcare professionals. The study has been set in hospice and palliative care organisations. Results
indicate that seeking feedbacks, sharing best practices and psychological safety are major enablers of idea promotion,
while idea generation is affected by sharing best practices. Results also indicate that knowledge assets are relevant
for knowledge sharing, with social capital affecting sharing mistakes and seeking feedbacks, with the mediation of
psychological safety, while organizational capital affects sharing best practices.
101
Operations in the public sector
PUB28
Identification of key operational factors and barriers in supply chain integration
for New Zealand public hospitals
Nevan Wright, Kamrul Ahsan, Kabossa Msimangira
Auckland University of Technology, Auckland, New Zealand
A review of the literature found little is known of how Supply Chain Integration (SCI) influences or impacts on supplier
commercial relationships (SCR) and order fulfilment in public hospitals. Furthermore in the context of New Zealand
there is little research on SCI and in particular none apparent on SCI factors and the impact on supplier commercial
relationships and order fulfilment. This paper addresses this gap through empirical research to identify critical SCI
operational factors, and their impact on SCR and order fulfilment in New Zealand public hospitals. A process-based
management approach as proposed by Lambert (2004) was used.
PUB29
The English patient experience: Does healthcare quality matter?
Mel Hudson Smith(1), Dave Smith(2), Andy Phippen(1)
(1)University of Plymouth, Plymouth, UK, (2)Unversity of Exeter, Exeter, UK
Understanding the interaction between performance measurement, quality of care and patient satisfaction is important
in managing healthcare. The family doctor is typically the first point of contact for patients and the gatekeeper for most
treatments. Doctor’s surgeries are extensively measured but little researched, however. A measurement framework
which aims to improve quality of care has been adopted by most English surgeries, with patient satisfaction measured
independently. This paper aims to determine whether achievement in the measurement system can predict patient
satisfaction. Although literature suggests that quality care positively impacts on patient satisfaction, the results of this
study do not support this.
PUB30
Organising a maternity care network
Julia Venesmaa, Paul Lillrank
Aalto University, Helsinki, Finland
This paper studies the organizing of maternity care as an equity-efficiency trade-off problem. Using data from Finland
equity of access is studied as average travel distances. Efficiency is defined as cost-efficiency, the minimising of healthcare
spending while maintaining (or improving) the required service level. Organizing maternity care is difficult, as it
contains elements, such as antenatal care, where geographic access is important, and emergencies, where centralized
and specialized assets are necessary. A location algorithm is used to find out the maximum reasonable number of birth
hospitals and after that a trade-off model is used to evaluate the regional hospital network.
102
Operations in the public sector
PUB31
Examining the applicability of demand and capacity management strategies to
an NHS Urology department
Jane Guinery, Emrah Kok
University of Nottingham, Nottingham, UK
The National Health Service is under increasing pressure to achieve efficiency gains while maintaining quality services.
Demand and capacity management strategies provide an opportunity to deliver a service efficiently by managing
variations in demand and capacity more effectively. The research analyses existing literature, and issues identified in a
Urology department, to identify improvement opportunities and develop an approach to help practitioners select and
employ appropriate initiatives. Findings suggest that an holistic perspective needs to be taken. Representations of the
influence of different factors and how they are addressed have been developed to support the visualisation of issues and
initiative selection.
PUB32
A Universal appointment rule for different patient-types, no-shows and walk-ins
Tugba Cayirli(1), Kum Khiong Yang(2)
(1)Ozyegin University, Istanbul, Turkey, (2)Singapore Management University, Singapore, Singapore
This study addresses appointment system design at three decision levels: appointment rules, use of patient classification,
and adjustments for no-shows and walk-ins. A universal dome appointment rule is tested in combination with
alternative patient classification schemes. The resulting appointment systems consistently perform better than the
traditional appointment systems in terms of the total system cost calculated as a weighted sum of the patients’ waiting
time, doctor’s idle time and doctor’s overtime. Simulation results indicate that the final choice depends primarily on the
mean and variability of service times of different patient classes.
PUB33
Integrative practices in hospitals and their impact on patient flow
Justin Drupsteen, Taco Van der Vaart, Dirk Pieter Van Donk
University of Groningen, Groningen, The Netherlands
A discontinuous patient flow negatively affects both hospital productivity and patient satisfaction. Internal supply
chain integration concerning planning and control seems promising in improving patient flow. In a multi-case study consisting out of three hospitals with each three patient groups - we investigate integrative practices concerning planning
and control in an orthopedic supply chain. Contrary to most studies we assess the effects on a patient’s total throughput
time performance, rather than performance for a single stage. Our results indicate positive effects on patient flow due to
information sharing, capacity commitment and integrative planning, both within and between care stages.
103
Operations in the public sector
PUB34
Is organisational culture the answer to performance improvement in healthcare?
A case study of New Zealand’s District Health Boards (DHBs)
Evelyn S. Y. Looi, Richard Greatbanks, André M. Everett
University of Otago, Dunedin, New Zealand
Organisational culture is considered a fundamental element within organisational performance improvement. Therefore,
this paper aimed at examining the role and impact of organisational culture on the performance of New Zealand’s
DHBs. A representative sample of seven DHBs participated in semi-structured interviews. This research suggests that
whilst organisational culture is an important element in performance improvement, the ability of a DHB to influence
organisational culture is limited to working through the CEO and DHB Chair relationship. A critical aspect of this
relationship is therefore the Key Performance Indicators (KPIs) established and agreed with the CEO.
PUB35
Transforming a healthcare organization so that it is capable of continual
improvement - the integration of improvement knowledge
Andreas Hellström(1), Svante Lifvergren(1),(2), Susanne Gustavsson(1),(2)
(1)Chalmers University of Technology, Gothenburg, Sweden, (2)Skaraborg Hospital Group, Skövde, Sweden
The purpose of this article is to describe the transformation that takes place when a healthcare organization integrates
improvement knowledge in order to strengthen the organization’s improvement capabilities. We present the experiences
from a Swedish hospital, and analyze it by using Donabedian’s (2003) structure-process-outcome (SPO) model. The case
highlights e.g. the importance of focusing on the organization’s own knowledge development.
104
Purchasing management
PURCH1
Aligning operations strategy and purchasing strategy
Joakim Wikner, Jenny Bäckstrand
Jönköping University, Jönköping, Sweden
The possible advantages gained by outsourcing non-core competences and utilizing the globalization of the market
will be diminished if inter-firm relationships are not designed and managed properly. Hence, extended support for
purchasing decisions based on market requirements in terms of order winners and delivery lead times is needed. We
provide a framework that combines the strategic implications from a well-known purchasing framework (Kraljic, 1983)
with a decoupling based framework that emphasizes the balance between efficiency and responsiveness, and the level of
controllability in the supply chain.
PURCH2
Outsourcing practices in Canadian organizations: The experience of purchasing
professionals
Harvey Millar(1), Suzana Russell(2)
(1)Saint Mary’s University, Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada, (2)University of Trinidad and Tobago, Arima, Trinidad and
Tobago
This study reports on the experience of purchasing managers with outsourcing practices in Canadian organizations.
The objective is to explore the role that purchasing professionals have played in outsourcing, and how that role needs
to be improved in order for purchasing professional to add greater value to their company’s outsourcing arrangements.
While purchasing professionals have played a role in outsourcing initiatives, their impact appears to have been somewhat
limited. Consequently, a major challenge facing the purchasing and supply management profession is to develop an
effective strategy for increasing the perceived value of purchasing professionals in planning and executing outsourcing
initiatives.
PURCH3
Institutional decoupling across the supply chain: The case of Information
Technology implementation
Vikram Bhakoo(1), Thomas Choi(2)
(1)University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Australia, (2)Arizona State University, Arizona, USA
This study seeks to address the existing theoretical tension in the literature whether information technology decisions
are guided by their technical rationale or institutional factors. We employ a theory building approach using ten case
studies of organizations embedded within the health care supply chain. Results illustrate how a differential mix of
internal and institutional pressures lead to mixed organizational responses across the different tiers of the supply chain.
We develop working propositions that articulate contributions to neo institutional theory.
105
Capability and the resource-based view in practice and theory
RBV1
Capabilities and competencies in humanitarian operations
Aruna Apte, Keenan Yoho
Naval Postgraduate School, Monterey, California, USA
This research will explore the core capabilities of the U.S. military as well as non-military organizations through the
lens of the disaster response life cycle. Both the U.S. military and non-military organizations bring assets, skills and
capabilities to a humanitarian crisis however the competencies and capacities of each are far from homogeneous.
Identification of the specific competencies and capabilities that are core to the types of organizations bringing logistics
and support to a crisis can enable better planning by both military and non-military organizations such that greater
effectiveness and efficiency in the humanitarian response is achieved.
RBV2
The roles of resource coordination in the development of manufacturing
competence: an exploratory case study
Yue Zhao, John Mills, Ken Platts
University of Cambridge, Cambridge, UK
This paper aims to draw attentions from both OM researcher and practitioner towards a better understanding of
coordination in the management of continuous improvement process. Theoretically our research addresses the
development process of manufacturing competence in the resource-based view of the firm and in particular how
coordination study can be applied to understand the detailed micro-foundations of dynamic capabilities through
continuous improvement. This paper presents a participant observation based case study carried out at a world-leading
manufacturing company of baby feeding product. We also discuss the research findings and limitations through the case
study.
RBV3
Performance improvement and resource co-ordination
John Mills, Ken Platts
Institute for Manufacturing, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, UK
This conceptual paper explores the under-researched area of resource co-ordination by developing and testing literaturebased frameworks for factors that motivate co-ordination, and categories of co-ordination action. The paper focuses
on performance improvement in operations management and analyses the co-ordination actions and types used in
the improvement of the Toyota production system using the wide literature on Toyota and the TPS. The findings are
preliminary but show the width and richness of co-ordination action in Toyota and suggest that these developing
frameworks may provide a useful perspective for organizations seeking performance improvement through alternative
methods of co-ordination.
106
Capability and the resource-based view in practice and theory
RBV4
Configuring competitive advantages: Resources and capabilities in operations
networks
Johanna K. Jaskari(1),(2)
(1)Aalto University School of Science and Technology, Espoo, Finland, (2)BIT Research Centre, Espoo, Finland
In this two-case explorative study, I analyze resources and capabilities as configurations in operations networks. By using
a set-theory approach and Bayesian logic, this study empirically contextualizes the resource based view and the dynamic
capabilities theory. The explicit characteristics of resources and capabilities, and their implications on competitive
advantages, as specified by managers, are analyzed. The results show that resource bundles are more contextualized (or
firm-specific), whereas competitive advantages (in relation to superior performance) are more global (between firms).
RBV5
Dynamic capabilities in sustainable supply chain management - a conceptual
framework and insights from the literature
Philip Beske, Stefan Seuring, Matthias Freise
University of Kassel, Kassel, Germany
In this paper we develop a conceptual framework linking Sustainable Supply Chain Management and related practices
with the DCs Concept. The framework is grounded in relevant literature and based on three existing conceptualizations,
two for SSCM and one for DC in SCM. It merges these three inputs and ads new criteria. This framework is currently
pre-tested by means of a literature review, taking up publications in the field of Corporate Social Responsibility and
Organic Cotton in the textile industry. First results from this review are presented in the extant paper as well.
RBV6
Developing a process for identifying “make competences” in small and medium
manufacturers
Mohamed Khater, Ken Platts
University of Cambridge, Cambridge, UK
The concept of competence is one of importance for companies seeking a competitive edge. For companies to leverage
their competences an essential step is to identify these competences and understand their structure, strengths,
weaknesses, and sustainability. This paper describes the development of a process for identifying “make competences” in
small and medium-sized manufacturers. The identification process discussed adopts a business process approach to the
problem of competence identification, and employs visual tools for expressing findings. A process that traces competence
from order winning criteria to activities, resources, and coordination mechanisms is delivered by the research, and its
application discussed.
107
Risk management
RISK1
Managing risk in Complex and Business Critical Outsourcing of Services
Mikael Malmgren(1), Dan Andersson(2), Mats Abrahamsson(3)
(1)Ashridge Business School, Berkhamsted, Herts, UK, (2)Chalmers University of Techology, Gothenburg, Sweden, (3)
Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden
Over the past two decades the phenomenon of outsourcing of resources and activities has emerged as an important
trend in a range of organizations and many companies are today outsourcing complex and business critical resources
and activities. This increase in business criticality also increases the risk of substantial and negative impact on the
financial and strategic performance. The proposition is that business critical outsourcing is approached with a joint risk
perspective and that an understanding of the decision process is essential for success. Further, it is important to view
outsourcing as an ongoing process with a number of stages.
RISK2
Risk Management Parity in Energy Industry Service Relationships
Ross Ritchie, Jannis Angelis
Warwick Business School, Coventry, UK
This paper exposes the disparity of risk perception and prioritization in an operation between client and supplier. It
identifies the commonly used risk classifications as a basis to this analysis. An inductive study based on three supply
relationships with increasing levels of process and knowledge integration. The research indicates that clients in the
relationship have greater breadth of awareness of risks and prioritize safety risks more than their suppliers in the same
operation. It shows that practitioner classification of risks does not reflect the conceptual models in literature.
RISK3
Managing Risk in Individual Supply Relationships and in the Complete Supply
Network -A case study from the maritime industry
Per Engelseth(1), Terje Græsdal(2)
(1)Aalesund University College, Aalesund, Norway, (2)Admit AS, Aalesund, Norway
This study provides a detailed case narrative of a small Norwegian machine parts supplier’s focal supply network and
how this network is embedded in a wider maritime industrial network. Based on these empirical findings conceptions of
risk are discussed in relation to this case narrative evoking empirically founded perceptions regarding risk management
of a relatively simple product supplied through a complex global industrial network.
108
Risk management
RISK4
The importance of risk for the success of outsourcing contracts: Identifying the
complementary role of enforcement practicess
Frank Wiengarten(1), Mark Pagell(2), Brian Fynes(3)
(1)ESADE School of Business, Ramon Llull Univeristy, Barcelona, Spain, (2)Schulich School of Business, York University,
Toronto, Canada, (3)Smurfit Graduate School of Business, University College Dublin, Dublin, Ireland
Although outsourcing has emerged as a key business practice in global supply chain management it has not always
been successfully implemented. Reasons for the success and failure of outsourcing initiatives are still underexplored.
This research tries to further analyse what makes outsourcing initiatives successful by investigating the effectiveness of
outsourcing contract completeness and complementary enforcement practices under varying contextual environments.
Specifically, this research assesses the effectiveness of the completeness of outsourcing contracts and complementary
practices such as cooperation and legal enforcement in low and high-risk environments, using data from a large-scale
multinational survey.
RISK5
Supply chain integration under uncertainty: The role of asset specific investment
with suppliers
Taco Van der Vaart(1), Damien Power(2), Dirk Pieter Van Donk(1)
(1)The University of Groningen, Groningen, The Netherlands, (2)The University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Australia
This study uses data from the 2009 round of the International Manufacturing Strategy Survey (IMSS-V). Transaction
Cost Economics (TCE) is the theoretical framework. The results show that under low uncertainty managers have
a wider set of options in pursuing integration. Specifically they are free to use multiple contractors and to be more
aggressive in their pursuit of outsourcing. Under high uncertainty integration takes the form of a higher level of asset
specific investment with fewer trading partners. Results indicate that the effectiveness of combinations of asset specific
investment, outsourcing and control mechanisms will change significantly contingent on specific environmental
conditions.
109
Supply chain design
SCD1
Company types between flexibility and stability strategies and their impact on
innovativeness and performance - Evidence from a large-scale survey in German
manufacturing industry
Steffen Kinkel
Fraunhofer Institute for Systems and Innovation Research ISI, Karlsruhe, Germany
With the onset of the global economic crisis it became clear that flexibility can be a decisive competitive advantage. But
also stability is necessary to maintain the employees’ motivation and creativity. However, flexibility and stability do not
have to be contradictory, but can also be complementary. Appropriate routines can support continuous learning in the
company and stimulate its adaptability. Based on data from 1,484 German manufacturing companies we employ a cluster
analysis to identify five company types ranging from flexibility to stability. Two company types with flexibility focus, two
with a stability focus and one diffuse type can be identified.
SCD2
Logistics as a framework for examining historical phenomena: The case of
triangular trade
Gilles Pache(1), François Fulconis(3), Nathalie Merminod(2), Thierry Godbile(1)
(1)Aix-Marseille University, Aix-en-Provence, France, (2)Grenoble University, Grenoble, France, (3)Avignon University,
Avignon, France
Trans-Atlantic slave trading is an example of triangular trade that linked the economies of Europe, Africa and the
Americas. It dramatically expanded between the XVI and XIX centuries and involved a large number of stakeholders,
particularly for flows management. This paper draws on studies conducted by specialists in economic history that stress
the key roles played by different actors, but without explicit reference to the logistical process. Thus, we propose an
analysis of the case of triangular trade from a supply chain perspective, focusing on those links established between the
three principle actors: the European continent, West Africa, and the Americas.
SCD3
The strategic management of demand uncertainty - a longitudinal study
Roy Stratton
Nottingham Trent University, Notts, UK
The need for focused and aligned supply chain strategies is widely acknowledged, however, in changing business
environments realignment tends to be reactive and slow. The purpose of this paper is to use a longitudinal case study to
better understand the strategic management issues in such situations before exploring means of proactively supporting
the process. The study highlights the importance of the trade-off concept in acknowledging and addressing management
conflicts that block strategic realignment. The paper focuses on Fisher’s (1997) conceptual model and proposes
modifications to Fisher’s coordinated strategies, identifying how they can be practically developed using hybrid conflict
resolution diagrams.
110
Supply chain design
SCD4
Supply chain agility and supply chain adaptability: Antecedents, moderators and
performance effects
Dominik Eckstein, Constantin Blome, Michael Henke
EBS Business School, Wiesbaden, Germany
As the environment is becoming increasingly unstable, firms have to react faster and anticipate future trends better
than their competitors in order to defend their sustainable competitive advantage. This study examines the effect of a
firm’s boundary spanning capabilities on supply chain agility and supply chain adaptability. Furthermore, the study will
examine the moderating capability of internal integration influencing firm performance. Currently, we are in the data
collection phase, a split survey has been sent out to 2,500 cross industry sample addressing one VP in SCM, logistics or
procurement and another VP from marketing or finance.
SCD5
Key factors for implementing postponement: case studies from the Brazilian food
industry
Karine Araújo Ferreira(2), Rosane Lucia Chicarelli Alcântara(1), Angela Cristina
Marqui(1)
(1)Federal University of São Carlos, São Carlos, SP, Brazil, (2)Federal University of Ouro Preto, João Monlevade, MG,
Brazil
Postponement strategy has been increasingly used by companies concerned with managing the growing complexity and
variety of products, currently required by the market. In this context, this article aims to answer the research questions:
what types of postponement are implemented by Brazilian food processing companies? and what are the key factors
that promote/facilitate the implementation of postponement in these companies? The results show that the companies
have implemented form postponement and time postponement. Also, the key factors that promoted its adoption were
grouped in seven dimensions: market, product, process, logistics, supply chain management, leadership and technology.
SCD6
An integrated model for enhancing supply chain visibility: an extended resourcebased view
Shereen Nassar, Alistair Brandon-Jones, Nigel Caldwell, Mike Lewis
University of Bath, Bath, UK
Visibility is the crux of supply chain performance and competitiveness. Visibility under supply chain complexity requires
collaboration and integration between partners. Information technology is the mechanism for information sharing and
visibility is its outcome. Our study is interested in visibility of physical assets (e.g. boxes, containers) that flow through
supply chains but do no exit them. Taking an extended resource-based perspective, our study develops an integrated
model for capabilities associated with asset visibility that considers technological and non-technological dimensions.
In particular, we examine the significant impact of asset visibility on supply chain visibility that may lead to better
performance.
111
Supply chain design
SCD7
A supply chain resilience assessment model
Helena Carvalho, Virgílio Cruz-Machado
UNIDEMI, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, Caparica, Portugal
This paper aims to propose a supply chain resilience assessment framework. An inductive research approach was used
being performed an exploratory case study in the Portuguese automotive supply chain. The study investigates the
main effects of supply chain disturbance and how companies can increase supply chain resilience. Empirical findings
were used to develop a resilience assessment model with two perspectives, an “ex post” analysis, where it measures the
performance loss after a disturbance occurrence, and in an “ex ante” analysis, measuring the characteristics that confer
resilience properties to the supply chain.
SCD8
Escaping the inescapable: inevitable disruptions and risk mitigation in supply
networks
Philip Greening(1), Janet Godsell(1), Christine Rutherford(2)
(1)Cranfield University, Cranfield, UK, (2)Heriot Watt University, Edinburgh, UK
Theories describing systemic supply chain risk (SSCR) are notoriously difficult to support empirically. Data is often
commercially sensitive and access to all the supply chain participants is difficult to secure. This problem is compounded
when the level of analysis is extended from the supply chain to the supply network (incorporating adjacent and
connected supply chains). This paper describes a methodological framework for the building of theories concerned with
SSCR using computer simulation and specifically agent-based modelling. Initial results are presented which support the
notion that disruptions are an inevitable consequence of normal operations in complex tightly coupled supply networks.
SCD9
Modelling and managing systemic risks in supply chains
Kanogkan Leerojanaprapa, Lesley Walls, Robert van der Meer
University of Strathclyde, Glasgow, UK
A structured review of the supply chain and risk management literature supports an analysis of the sources and types of
risks anticipated in supply chains and networks. We discuss alternative modelling approaches, such as Bayesian Belief
Nets (BBN), System Dynamics, Fault and Event Trees, which are evaluated against the criteria characterizing systemic
risks that emerge from the literature review. Finally, we briefly present an empirical pilot case study is conducted with
a public sector organization in charge of a pharmaceutical distribution network to explore the feasibility of a BBN
modelling approach.
112
Supply chain design
SCD10
Low cost country sourcing complexities and supply chain strategies
Nachiappan Subramanian(1), Shams Rahman(1), Chandra Lalwani(2)
(1)RMIT University, Melbourne, Australia, (2)University of Hull, Hull, UK
This paper analyses Low Cost Country Sourcing (LCCS) complexities and examines how firms manage to overcome
these complexities through supply chain strategies. The purpose of this research is to suggest appropriate supply chain
strategies based on material flow and contractual relationships, to align product and process complexities. The findings
of this research are useful to supply chain practitioners for leveraging product and process complexities into competitive
advantage.
SCD11
The role of functional interdependencies in global operations networks: From
delinking to organizing interfaces
Dmitrij Slepniov, Brian Vejrum Waehrens
Aalborg University, Aalborg, Denmark
The existing studies do not adequately address the complex interplay between co-evolving production, innovation
and service networks. The widening geographical and cognitive gap between these networks means that managing
their interfaces in global operations context is becoming strategically important. Therefore, the purpose of this paper
is to develop a number of propositions about organization and management of these interfaces. The propositions
are developed by employing the design science approach based on a literature study and industrial co-development
workshops with twelve Danish industrial companies. The paper closes with suggestions for how the tentative results of
this work can be unraveled further.
SCD12
Managing the interface between physical and financial supply chains:
implications for banks’ payment services
Rhian Silvestro(1), Paola Lustrato(2)
(1)University of Warwick, Coventry, UK, (2)IBM Financial Services, Turin, Italy
The challenge of physical and financial supply chain (P/FSC) integration is recognised in the financial service industry
and heightened by the recession; yet it is largely overlooked in the OM literature. This paper delineates the competitive
pressures and opportunities for banks to facilitate corporate clients’ requirements for P/FSC integration. The paper
presents a case study based on a European bank which has responded to this challenge with a mass customisation
strategy. The study demonstrates that responding to the challenge of P/FSC integration has implications not only for
service design but also organisational infrastructures and individual roles and responsibilities throughout the company.
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Supply chain design
SCD13
A meta-model for choosing a supplier selection technique within an EPC company
Donato Masi, Guido J L Micheli, Enrico Cagno
Politecnico di Milano, Milano, Italy
A description of the link between the buying situation and the most appropriate selection technique is missing in
literature. The proposed meta-model allows for the choice of the most appropriate supplier selection technique in
relation to a specific buying situation within an Engineering, Procurement & Construction (EPC) environment. In order
to develop the meta-model, the various buying situations have been classified on the basis of the degree of difficulty in
managing the purchase and the impact of the purchase on the project. Based on the analysis of the main features of each
situation, the optimum selection technique has been identified.
SCD14
Modelling supply networks: a structural analysis of the Toyota supply chain
Tomomi Kito, Alexandra Brintrup, Steve New, Felix Reed-Tsochas
University of Oxford, Oxford, UK
This paper presents new data that characterizes Toyota’s supply chain, exploring in particular questions relating to the
nature of the tiers in the structure of the supply base, and the links of Toyota’s suppliers to other manufacturers. We
discuss the way in which the accepted model of Toyota’s approach to supply chain management is largely based on rather
dated empirical sources. The findings presented here are the first stage of a more detailed analysis which we hope will
throw light on important questions for supply chain management practice and theory.
SCD15
A simulation based approach to evaluate customer-specific volume flexibility of a
manufacturing company
Gunther Reinhart, Hendrik Schellmann
Technische Universität München, Munich, Germany
Volume flexibility is a crucial factor to keep up performance in modern supply chains. In order to align volume flexibility
requirements along the supply chains, contracts defining flexibility ranges are set up increasingly in customer-supplierrelationships. However, numerous suppliers lack suitable methods to evaluate the limits of volume flexibility that they
can guarantee, especially if they are members of several cross-linked supply chains. Hence, this paper presents an
approach to evaluate customer-specific volume flexibility. Therefore, factors influencing volume flexibility are identified
and modelled mathematically. Subsequently, a dedicated simulation system is introduced and the interpretation of
simulation results is demonstrated.
114
Supply chain design
SCD16
The contribution of supply chain management to face the world crisis in the
fashion luxury industry
Federico Caniato, Maria Caridi, Antonella Moretto
Politecnico di Milano, Milano, Italy
The Fashion Luxury industry has attracted the attention of researchers mainly with a sociological, marketing and
branding aspects. Some authors have addressed the importance of supply chain management for fashion luxury
companies, but with a tactical and operational perspective. But the world crisis has completely shocked the traditional
mechanisms and fashion luxury companies assisted to a strong decrease of their turnover, contrarily to what happened
in the previous years. This paper aims at understanding if and how supply chain redesign could become a strategic factor
in determining the success or failure of fashion luxury companies in a period of crisis.
SCD17
The impact of experience on total cycle time reduction in supply chains
Jonathan Gosling(1), Mohamed Naim(1), Denis Towill(1), Brian Moone(2)
(1)Cardiff University, Cardiff, UK, (2)Mace Group, London, UK
Total Cycle Time (TCT) compression has been proposed as an effective way of gaining a competitive edge. The purpose
of this paper is to empirically investigate collaborative working and total cycle time reduction in construction supply
chains. A mixed methods approach is adopted to analyse data from archival records. Results show that aggregate TCT
has decreased over an 8 year period for the 16 suppliers in the study, which are further analysed by relationship type. A
force field analysis identifies 7 forces that increase TCT and 7 that decrease TCT. It contributes to knowledge in the field
of TCT in project based production.
SCD18
Relationship exploration between products and outsourcings in mobile handset
industry
Karen Li(1), Yongjiang Shi(2)
(1)Centrica, Slough, UK, (2)University of Cambridge, Cambridge, UK
The vertical disintegration of the industrial value chain in mobile handset industry has challenged many companies how
to manage supply chain effectively and efficiently. This research proposes to classify and define the different outsourcing
arrangements through the product related outsourcing scopes. The product architectural levels (PAL) and the product
life cycle (PLC) stages are identified as two main characteristics of the product, which lead to three types of outsourcing
arrangements: Manufacturing Task Outsourcing, Package Outsourcing, and Full Outsourcing.
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The manufacturing-service interface
SERV1
New service development in capital goods manufacturers: empirical evidence
from an Italian sample and proposal of a conceptual framework
Sylvie Roscio, Donatella Corti
Politecnico di Milano, Milano, Italy
The aim of the research is to evaluate the state-of-the-art of the development of the New Service Development (NSD)
process in the capital goods sector, both through a literature review and trough the analysis of qualitative case studies of
a sample of 23 Italian companies.
Starting from this analysis, a conceptual framework has been developed to support practitioners to improve the
effectiveness and the efficiency of the innovation process taking into consideration the peculiarities of the reference
sector. The research is still at its first steps, so further work is called for.
SERV2
Organizing servitization: A contingency perspective
Taija Turunen
Aalto University, Espoo, Finland
Servitization is a concept describing a phenomenon where manufacturers transform their business towards greater
service provision. Previous literature suggests that a strategy that supports service infusion serves as a mean to
differentiate and therefore gives a competitive edge for manufacturers in global, highly competitive markets. This case
study conducted in a manufacturing organization performing in both- product and service businesses- focuses on
identifying the organizational design characteristics that explains some of the concerns associated with the problematic
nature of combining product and service businesses within one organization.
SERV3
The servitization of manufacturing: Further evidence
Andy Neely, Ornella Benedettini, Ivanka Visnjic
University of Cambridge, Cambridge, UK
There is clear evidence that manufacturing firms are servitizing – either adding services to or integrating services in
their core products (Davies et al 2006; Neely, 2009; Vandermerwe and Rada, 1988). This paper provides an update to
an earlier study (Neely, 2009) covering the global trends in the servitization of manufacturing. Using longitudinal data
collected at three separate time periods - 2007, 2009 and 2011 - the paper explores the changing nature of servitization
in manufacturing industries. In particular the paper looks at the issue of whether the growth of servitization in China,
witnessed between 2007 and 2009, has continued.
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The manufacturing-service interface
SERV4
Change Drivers for Transformation towards Product-Service Systems
Doroteya Vladimirova, Stephen Evans, Veronica Martinez
Cranfield University, Cranfield, UK
This paper presents a set of change drivers for the transformation of a traditional manufacturer into a servitized
organisation. Multiple concepts from organisational change and transformation theory, and servitization and productservice systems literature are combined to inform an in-depth case study. The change drivers derived from the case study
are categorised as triggers, conditions and facilitators for transformation towards product-service systems. The paper
forms part of the development of a transformation model for servitization and advances prior conceptual research.
Industry practitioners can use the set of change drivers to assess and develop their plans for servitization.
SERV5
Organising for Servitization across Multiple Operating Environments: the
constraining and enabling effects of path dependency
Jawwad Raja(1), Ahmad Beltagui(2), Mehmet Cakkol(1)
(1)Cranfield University, Cranfield, UK, (2)Nottingham University, Nottingham, UK
This paper investigates the organisational implications of servitization in different environments. We present a
quasi-longitudinal study of three divisions of a large engineering firm in order to explore how they differ in the way
they organise for servitization. In particular, we highlight how a firm’s internal and external environment and path
dependency shape the way a servitization strategy is enacted, challenging simplistic prescriptions described in the extant
literature. In so doing, we describe how the case firm continuously attempts to configure itself to deliver integrated
offerings in complex and dynamic environments.
SERV6
Successfully Implementing Service Business Model in a Manufacturing Firm
Ivanka Visnjic(2),(3), Bart Van Looy(1)
(1)Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Leuven, Belgium, (2)ESADE Business School, Barcelona, Spain, (3)University of
Cambridge, Cambridge, UK
Expected economic benefits of servitization have been recently. Research of 10 sales-and-service subsidiaries of a
successfully servitized manufacturer suggests that success is a function of three capabilities. First, a manufacturer has to
possess a skill set necessary to extend the relationships with its clients towards services. At the same time, the capabilities
to extend service offering is needed to grow. This turns out to be a challenging balance, as skills for the former may
hamper the later. Finally, to enact synchronised development to both businesses, manufacturer has to employ solutionoriented managers, proportional incentive schemes and integrative mechanisms.
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The manufacturing-service interface
SERV7
New Industrial Product-Service Systems Development: The interface between
innovation and operations
Juliana Santos, Martin Spring
Lancaster University Management School, Lancaster, UK
This research focuses on how operations resources and capabilities shape and, are shaped by, the development of new
offerings. A single case study of the development of an industrial product-service system was used to answer what points
of the process of reconfiguration of resources and capabilities are important for the development of the new offering? and
how does the operations resources and capabilities influence the new offering? Our results show the role of operations
in supporting and fomenting innovation and growth. They also offer insights on the importance of managers´ cognition
and on the challenges of developing capabilities.
SERV8
Untangling the emerging concept of service platforms: what are they? what do
they consist of?
Martin Skold, Malin Schmidt
Stockholm School of Economics, Centre for Innovation and Operations Management, Stockholm, Sweden
Literature on platforms emanates from products as the unit of analysis, therefore are several questions unclear: What
constitutes service platforms? What does service platforms consist of? Can we use dichotomies from product platform
research? Using data from a pre-study in a global B2B Service Company, the concept of platforms is explored and
discussed. Findings suggest service platforms varying whether services are repetitive in its nature, versus services that
requires various degrees of tailoring or customization. Repetitive service platforms entail a higher degree of process
components whereas for customized services the degree of product components is proposed to be higher.
SERV9
Process modularity in service offerings - Conceptual analysis
Saara Brax, Maija Isotalus
Aalto University, Espoo, Finland
The core aspect of the exchange in a service offering is essentially a process provided for the customer. Interest in service
modularity has increased, but modularity in the process level has been discussed from the perspective of modular
production of physical goods. We develop a perspective of modular service offerings and identify themes that need to be
further developed. Product modularity definitions are based on the relationship between form and function, and as such
do not apply to processes that lack physical form.
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The manufacturing-service interface
SERV10
A location model proposal for collecting used batteries in Spain
Eva Ponce-Cueto, José A. González-Manteca, Ruth Carrasco-Gallego
Technical University of Madrid, Madrid, Spain
The main objective of this paper is to propose a model for helping logistics managers to choose the appropriate location
points in order to situate the collection points for used portable batteries. The proposed model has two parts: a static part
and a dynamic part. We can conclude that this model helps managers in the decision of locating/modifying collection
points in two ways: to add new collection points to a reverse logistics network that needs more points or to delete
collection points from a network that has more points than those recommended.
SERV11
The importance of dynamic assembly for the management of operations in
service supply chains
Frederic Pellegrin-Romeggio(1), Diego Vega(1), Elodie Kacioui-Maurin(1),(2)
(1)Université de la Méditerranée, Aix-en-Provence, France, (2)Université Jean Monnet, St-Etienne, France
Many service activities can be overall comparable with the operation of a supply chain, mobilizing a number of actors
and requiring the management of a multitude of interfaces at different moments and on different levels. The literature
qualifies them as Service Supply Chains. The management of these supply chains can be considered as complex, as most
SSC are temporary arrangements of resources built to respond to a specific need. This study highlights the importance of
the pivot organization in SSC and proposes the ‘dynamic assembly’ as a key competence for the management of SSC.
SERV12
An exploration of vertical integrations and facilities practices within servitized
operations
Tim Baines(1), Howard Lightfoot(2), Palie Smart(2)
(1)Aston Business School, Birmingham, UK, (2)Cranfield University, Cranfield, UK
The debate about services-led competitive strategies continues with much interest emerging around the differences
between leading production and servitized operations. This paper contributes to this discussion by presenting the
vertical integration and facilities practices that are common to four leading manufacturers. Furthermore, we present
the rationale that is emerging as to why these practices are being adopted, and so why they differ to those of productioncentric manufacturers. Hence, in this paper we seek to both contribute to the debate within the research community and
make practitioners better aware of the consequences of servitization.
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The manufacturing-service interface
SERV13
A process model for developing integrated product-service offerings
Richard Clayton(1),(2), Chris Backhouse(1), Samir Dani(1), Jeremy Lovell(2)
(1)Loughborough University, Loughborough, UK, (2)RailCo, UK, UK
Manufacturers are increasingly seeing the benefits of adopting a servitization strategy, however, literature reports that
they face challenges developing new product-service offerings. Although a number of approaches have been proposed,
they fail to distinguish the characteristics of products and service, they are typically sequential and exhibit variations
in the level of detail proposed. Overcoming these knowledge gaps, a new development process model is proposed,
consisting of 19 distinct processes. The process model was tested and recommendations for improvements are reported.
SERV14
Service Transition: A Path Dependence Approach
Max Finne, Mari Heikkilä
Aalto University, Helsinki, Finland
This paper focuses on the service transition process through a comparative case study of an investment good
manufacturer and a financial solutions provider. The empirical research on the companies’ historical paths revealed
challenges that the current service transition literature could not explain. Our findings show a clear resemblance between
the development paths. In lock-in, however, different factors hinder adopting alternatives. Our conclusion is that early
success and little competitive pressures can impede service-oriented culture and hinder adding services to broaden the
offering. Thus, we argue that the ability of companies to undergo the transition depends on their historical paths.
SERV15
Applying the Ferdows’s model ‘the strategic role of plant’ in service environment
Markku Kuula(1), Antero Putkiranta(2),(3)
(1)Aalto University, Helsinki, Finland, (2)Metropolia Unversity of Applied Sciences, Espoo, Finland, (3)Lappeenranta
University of Technology, Lapeenranta, Finland
The purpose of this paper is to apply the Ferdows’s ‘the strategic role of the plant’ model in service/solutions
environment. The findings show, that the model is easy to use in service context but some changes and interpretations
have to be made to make the application more understandable. This is the first attempt to apply the Ferdows’s model in
service environment. The results are promising which gives courage and reason to continue. This paper gives guidance
how and why services should be categorized in order to make best use of the resources and money spent.
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The manufacturing-service interface
SERV16
Manufacturers becoming service providers - developing service business in an
industrial context
Pasi Raikisto(2), Jaakko Kiukkonen(2), Ameer Shah(1), Jan Holmström(1)
(1)Aalto University, Espoo, Finland, (2)Management Systems, Savonlinna, Finland
The paper describes the concrete management actions needed and the mechanisms through which management achieves
its intended outcome of transitioning from product business to profitable service business. The method is a multiple case
study involving five OEMs. The research was conducted by interviewing senior management with in-depth experience of
the actions taken to develop the service operations. The results suggest a sequence of managerial interventions to obtain
desirable subgoals and reveal further challenges that more advanced service oriented manufacturers must resolve before
proceeding.
SERV17
Services in Manufacturing - A Study of Product Orientation in the Product-service
systems
Veridiana Rotondaro Pereira, Marly Monteiro de Carvalho, Roberto Gilioli Rotondaro
University of São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil
The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the different product use orientations in the product-service system. The
approach is to summarize the existing product-service transition propositions available in the literature, and to suggest
a model tested in a case study conducted in two business units of multinational companies from different industries,
classified according to their product use orientation. The paper finds that product use orientation can be different for
companies according to the solution provided. The proposed model showed to be an initial analysis tool, but it requires
the establishment of metrics.
SERV18
Servitization as a strategy for survival: evidence from a small European country
Jasna Prester
University of Zagreb, Zagreb, Croatia
It has been shown in the literature that manufacturers offer more services. One reason is to stay competitive. Even
though returns from services amount to 10% of revenues, while margins in manufacturing are decreasing and are now
around 1%, returns from product related services are low. Neeley (2008) argues that unlike manufacturing, product
related services need a skilled workforce which is no longer cheap. In this work we want to investigate what is the current
state of product related services in a small European country, which mostly manufactures components and does not
enjoy cheap labor force.
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The manufacturing-service interface
SERV19
Quality of service and operating efficiency in service industries: an analysis of
Korean service driving industry
Srinivas Talluri, Myung Kyo Kim, Tobias Schoenherr
Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan, USA
This paper examines the compatibility of operating efficiency and service quality.
Specifically, our research focuses on: (1) Do operating efficiency and service quality have to
be traded-off, or can they exist in unison (are they compatible)? and (2) What aspects of
service quality have a stronger association with operating efficiency? In disentangling these
important issues, we utilize a combination of Data Envelopment Analysis (DEA) and survey
based empirical research methods. Specifically, we consider the South Korean service driving
industry, which has experienced a rapid growth in recent years.
SERV20
A holistic approach for building productivity metrics in services: two reports of
using the adapted “house-of-quality metrics matrix”
Noel Torres Júnior, Cláudio Gelape, Mirian Braga, Fernanda Mello, Wesley Souza Junio,
Mateus Azevedo
UFMG, Belo Horizonte/MG, Brazil
Given the complexity of measuring the productivity of services and considering the literature on performance
measurement in services and the “House-of-Quality Metrics Matrix” proposed by Hauser and Katz (1998) this paper
presents a holistic approach to measuring productivity in services. This approach takes into account the main processes
of the organization and the different needs of their stakeholders involved. It was implemented by two organizations of
health services. These organizations are evaluated in this study. On view of their managers, the main difficulties and
advantages of the proposed approach are reported.
SERV21
Understanding System Uncertainty in Healthcare Supplies
Tillmann Böhme(3), Sharon Williams(2), Paul Childerhouse(1), Eric Deakins(1), Denis
Towill(2)
(1)University of Waikato, Hamilton, New Zealand, (2)Cardiff University, Cardiff, UK, (3)University of Wollongong,
Wollongong, Australia
Managing healthcare supply chains is claimed to be complex due to the imperative of assuring accurate medical supply
for patient wellbeing. The fieldwork described herein involves investigation of a variety of supply value streams in eight
Australasian hospitals using a rigorous, multi-method audit methodology. In the majority of cases poor management
practice is evidenced by high levels of system uncertainty (often self-induced). Particularly noted is that the root cause
of many supply chain performance issues is failure by senior management to recognise the strategic value of supplies
management. Healthcare supply chain performance enablers and best management practices are also described.
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The manufacturing-service interface
SERV22
A framework for understanding governance and location distance choice in the
services outsourcing decision
Martina Gerbl(1), Ronan McIvor(1), Paul Humphreys(2)
(1)University of Ulster, Derry, UK, (2)University of Ulster, Newtownabbey, UK
Services outsourcing has gained increasing importance in today’s global economy. However, services outsourcing has
received little attention in the operations management field. This paper focuses on the factors influencing governance
and location distance choice in services outsourcing. Governance choice refers to the level of ownership in an
outsourcing arrangement (i.e. outsourcing to an independent vendor; captive). Location distance choice refers to the
distance between the customer’s home nation and location of the outsourced operation (i.e. local, nearshore, offshore).
Based upon a study of German companies, this paper presents a framework that outlines key influences on governance
and location distance choice.
SERV23
An operations strategy formulation methodology for manufacturing
organisations seeking adopt informated product servitized solutions
Louis Redding(1), Tim Baines(2), Peter Ball(1)
(1)Cranfield University, Cranfield, UK, (2)Aston Business School, Birmingham, UK
Manufacturing organisations seek innovative operation strategies when aiming to maintain and improve their
competitive position. The tool is offered as an operations strategy formulation methodology to manufacturing
organisations seeking to adopt servitized solutions. It considers solutions driven by informated products whilst
responding to needs identified in a recent survey of UK based practitioners, and gaps discovered in a review of the
literature relating to informated products and operational strategy. This paper introduces the ServiceStrat tool and its
proposed pilot evaluation.
SERV24
Defining Engineering Service Network Location Roles in Global Operations
Tomas Harrington, Jagjit Singh Srai
Insitute of Manufacturing, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, UK
Many manufacturing firms have developed a service dimension to their product portfolio. A key challenge for such
organisations is how to ‘redistribute’ and optimise the service operation of increasingly dispersed global networks,
in response to changes in industrial context e.g. growth of (new) export markets serving an increasing diversity of
customers. Drawing on parallel concepts in ‘production’ networks, the idea of ‘location role’ now becomes increasingly
complex, in terms of service delivery. The purpose of this paper is to advance understanding of how best to design such
complex multi-organisational service networks, through extension of the ‘production’ network location role concept.
123
The manufacturing-service interface
SERV25
An Indicator-based Management Model for Service Levels in Shared Services
Centers
Renata Coelho(1), Ricardo Martins(1), Débora Lobo(2)
(1)School of Business Administration/Federal University of Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte/MG, Brazil, (2)State
University of Western Paraná (Unioeste), Toledo/PR, Brazil
The focus on frameworks for service design and management still requires considerable further development, in a
special way to service operations. This study has tried to assist in rectifying this omission, developing a management
model for Shared Services Centers (SSC). The case study method was adopted using non-probability sampling according
to accessibility. Data collection was carried out by means of interviews using a semi-structured questionnaire. In order
to select indicators which were relevant from the customer`s point of view, the interviewees were presented with 21
indicators related to three categories which had some degree of significance for them.
SERV26
Analysis of the interface among Knowledge, Competence and Leadership for
improving organizations
Osmildo Santos(1), Pedro Costa Neto(1), Oduvaldo Vendrametto(1), Marcelo Okano(3)
(1)Paulista University, Sao Paulo, SP, Brazil, (2)CEETEPS-FATEC, Barueri, SP, Brazil, (3)IFSP, Suzano, SP, Brazil
An application is made of the proposed model to support activities the f Production offered by Materials Management
and Logistics, evaluating its importance to the industrial sector of medium and large, establishing a comparison between
the performance levels (low, medium and high) of these companies and the benefits of this application. With the
results, it is expected to contribute to a better understanding of the processes of Knowledge Management, Competence
and Leadership and its interfaces and use that information to organizations, as well as offering subsidies for further
discussion and analysis on the subject and the model by other researchers.
SERV27
The influence of quality and frequency of use on e-services performance. An
analysis of the information service in a university.
Maria J. Oltra, M. Luisa Flor, Mariola Belloso
Jaume I University, Castellón, Spain
In this work we identify main dimensions of information e-services quality and analyse their influence on service
performance. The moderating effect of frequency of use on the above relationship is studied. e-Service quality
dimensions are expressed in terms of efficiency, system availability, fulfilment and privacy. The empirical research was
conducted at an on-line university service. The sample was formed by 420 evaluations. Results show the positive effect of
fulfilment and, more specifically, of the quality information subdimension, on service results. Also, information quality
effect on service result is lower in high frequent users than in medium- and low- frequent users.
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The manufacturing-service interface
SERV28
Servitisation and Value Co-production in the UK Music Industry
Glenn C. Parry(1), Oscar F. Bustinza(2), Ferran Vendrell-Herrero(1)
(1)UWE, Bristol, UK, (2)University of Granada, Granada, Spain
As the music industry has moved from a product to a service business model, has the loss of sales meant they have
not taken their customers with them? This paper provides a description of different music consumers based upon
quantitative analysis of consumer characteristics. The paper then undertakes an exploration of the relationship between
the consumer groups and their purchasing preference in relation to intangible ‘service’ purchase such as downloaded
music and the purchase of a tangible physical product such as CDs or vinyl. We find a significant population who would
engage with a contracted monthly music subscription service.
SERV29
Servitization in action: findings from a study of the extended Caterpillar
enterprise
Tim Baines(1), Howard Lightfoot(2), Morgan Swink(3)
(1)Aston Business School, Birmingham, UK, (2)Cranfield University, Cranfield, UK, (3)Neeley School of Business,
Forthworth, USA
There is much to be learnt from the practices of those manufacturers that have demonstrated sustained success through
services. This paper therefore presents insights gained from an in-depth study of the extended Caterpillar enterprise.
Nine case studies have been conducted spanning the Original Equipment Manufacturer (Caterpillar Inc), through
six strategically important dealerships, to two large and substantial customers. Through this study we establish key
dimensions and categorisation of service offerings, relationships between risks and revenue, and associated motivations
and enablers.
125
The manufacturing-service interface
SERV30
The importance of loyalty on online airplane tickets’ purchase
Josep Llach(1), María del Mar Alonso-Almeida(2), Frederic Marimon(3), Mercè
Bernardo(4)
(1)Universitat de Girona, Girona, Spain, (2)Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, Madrid, Spain, (3)Universitat
Internacional de Catalunya, Barcelona, Spain, (4)Universitat de Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain
The aim of this paper is twofold. On one hand, developing and assessing a scale to measure e-quality and, on the other
hand, assessing its impact on loyalty, through perceived value. For this purpose, e-quality is divided in two dimensions:
functional and hedonic quality. The sample is composed by 617 travellers that have purchased at least one airplane
ticket via airplane website in Spain. The results show that the functional and hedonic quality are positive significant for
perceived value. Another important result is the validation of the chain: service e-quality - perceived value - loyalty.
SERV31
E-business Service in the UK Telecommunication industry
Ying Yang(1), Paul Humphreys(3), Ronan McIvor(4), Biao Yang(2)
(1)Newcastle University, Newcastle, UK, (2)University of York, York, UK, (3)University of Ulster, Belfast, UK, (4)
University of Ulster, Belfast, UK
Due to the complex features of business service and the applications of information and communication technologies
(ICTs), business organisations are facing significant challenges to provide e-business service (EBS) effectively or
maintain long-term relationships. In this paper, we attempt to investigate buyers’ different EBS requirements and the
impact of these requirements on business relationship development. A survey was sent to 500 UK Telecommunication
manufacturers and various data analysis methods have been applied. Our findings from the survey not only help the
supplier to understand buyers’ EBS requirements, also help the buyer to develop their supplier selection criteria.
126
Service supply chains
SSC
The seven customer roles in service supply chains
Scott Sampson
Brigham Young University, Provo, Utah, USA
Although the study of product supply chains is well developed, the study of service supply chains is embryonic. This
article defines service supply chains and shows how service supply chains have unique operating characteristics. We
establish how seven traditional roles in manufacturing supply chains are assumed by customers in service settings. Those
service customer roles include supplier, labor, design engineer, production manager, product quality assurance, and
inventory. We show how these seven customer roles are particular to services and define the fundamental managerial
issues of service supply chains.
127
Managing the operations-strategy interface
STR1
Make to Order Manufacturing and Operational Management Strategies - A Case
Study at Priorclave Ltd.
Sreejit Pillai(1),(2), Raj Bhatti(2), Alan Arokiam(2), Tony Collins(1)
(1)Priroclave Ltd, London, UK, (2)University of Greenwich, Kent, UK
Accurate due date setting and lead time management are difficult tasks for Make to Order (MTO) manufacturing firms
and require effective capacity management. To remain competitive accurate due date prediction and shorter lead times
are key. Within a backdrop of a Small and Medium Enterprise (SME) the development of a Prototype Planning and
Scheduling System (PPSS) and the subsequent implementation of an Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP) System are
explained. Proposed work and trials to integrate the ERP system to the PPSS is detailed. Thus PPSS becomes a secondary
level of control, with its inputs from the ERP system.
STR2
Integration themes in mergers and acquisitions in the Medical Technology
Industry from a resource-based view
Tian Wei, Mike Gregory
Institute for Manufacturing, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, UK
This paper explores the integration themes in mergers and acquisitions (M&As) in the Medical Technology (MT)
industry. Integration has been accepted as one of the primary sources of failures in capturing value for the acquirers.
The research approach is essentially exploratory and six case studies were conducted in the research. After cross-case
analysis, four integration themes are identified: Capacity building, Capacity maintaining, R&D focus, and Product focus.
The conclusions include a novel presentation of how the acquirers choose from these themes in integration to obtain
sustainable capabilities and restructure their business to maintain and improve their competitive advantages.
STR3
Exploring the influence of contractual and relational governance on the
relationship between capability and collaboration
Niraj Kumar(1), Mickey Howard(2), Mike Lewis(1), Sinéad Carey(1)
(1)University of Bath, Bath, UK, (2)University of Exeter Business School, Exeter, UK
This study aims to investigate the relationship between supplier capability, inter-firm governance and buyer supplier
collaboration. Three types of functional capabilities: R&D, Production and Support services capability; and two forms
of governance: contractual and relational are considered in this study. The buyer supplier collaboration is measured
in terms of the extent of collaboratively solving the problems related to cost, quality, delivery schedule and uncertain
demand pattern. A survey based research methodology is adopted in this study to empirically examine the hypotheses
related to the multiple mediation effect of contractual and relational governance on the relation between supplier
capabilities and collaboration.
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Managing the operations-strategy interface
STR4
Network configuration of global R&D networks: Extending OM configuration
concepts
Zaza Nadja Lee Hansen(1), Jagjit Singh Srai(2)
(1)The Technical University of Denmark, Denmark, Denmark, (2)Institute for Manufacturing, University of Cambridge,
Cambridge, UK
Companies are increasingly globalising their R&D activities, both within the firms and with external partners, with
consequent implications for their interaction with manufacturing operations. Previous research in R&D networks
has focused on coordination, governance and support elements. However, network configuration of global R&D
has tended to focus on strategic elements with limited attention given operational effectiveness, or to interfaces with
downstream manufacturing operations. Within OM literature, the drivers of configuration of global networks within,
engineering, production, supply, and services have been extensively developed in recent years. This paper extends
these OM configuration concepts to the configuration of R&D networks, to provide a more comprehensive strategic
and operational analysis for this domain, and to also consider potential interfaces with manufacturing operations. The
methodology involved developing a framework for R&D network configuration drawing on the approaches used in OM,
followed by multiple case-studies to map R&D configuration elements.
STR5
Managing the Operations-Strategy Interface through Programme Management
Peter Meulengracht Jensen, John Johansen, Brian Vejrum Waehrens
Aalborg University, Aalborg, Denmark
This paper explores how one company with globally distributed operations, strive to manage the operations-strategy
interface through programme management. The paper focuses on how the organizational context affects the
programme configuration and raises a number of propositions as to how programmes can be configured depending
on organizational context. The propositions are meant as objects for further research and tentative managerial
recommendations.
STR6
Risk Management in Global Manufacturing Investment: Dimensions and Process
Mukesh Kumar, Mike Gregory
Institute for Manufacturing, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, UK
Investment risk management is a growing concern as companies seek to reassure investors about the robustness of
their strategies. Little attention has been paid however to the systematic evaluation of manufacturing investment risks.
Operational risk assessment is a relatively unexplored area which has been thrown into sharp relief by recent tragic
events in Japan. This paper explores risk management practices in global manufacturing investment decisions. It
identifies key dimensions of manufacturing investment risk and proposes an initial framework and process by which
these dimensions might be evaluated more systematically.
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Managing the operations-strategy interface
STR7
Cumulative capabilities of three industries in a developing economy
Chee Yew Wong(1), Sakun Boon-itt(2)
(1)Hull University Business School, Hull, UK, (2)Thammasat Business School, Bangkok, Thailand
This paper contributes to the ongoing research which examines and explains differences of cumulative capability
models among different industries. Based on regression analyses of the relationships between four manufacturing
capabilities (quality, delivery, cost, and flexibility) from three industries in Thailand, the paper concludes that all three
industries operated with different patterns of cumulative capabilities. The foundation for cumulative capability was
cost for automotive industry and quality/flexibility for food industry; no apparent foundation for cumulative capability
for electronics industry was found. These results indicate study of cumulative capabilities should consider industrial
differences and avoid using cross-sectional data.
STR8
The capabilities trade-off debate in operations strategy: An initial assessment of
the airline industry in Australia
Alka Singh, Prakash Singh, Damien Power
University of Melbourne, Melbourne,Victoria, Australia
A major stream of research in the operations management area relates to how firms develop and treat their operations
capabilities. Two models have been presented: ‘trade-off ’ and ‘cumulative capabilities’. Despite numerous studies, it is
unclear as to which is more effective for achieving superior firm performance. In this paper, we propose an integrated
theoretical perspective involving the dynamic capabilities view and the performance frontiers theory. Longitudinal
secondary data from the Australian airline industry show that firms that are some distance away from their performance
frontier accumulate capabilities, and those that are close to the frontier trade these off.
STR9
Sustainability strategies: the impact on manufacturing capabilities trade-offs
Raffaella Cagliano(1), Ruggero Golini(2), Annachiara Longoni(1)
(1)Politecnico di Milano, Milano, Italy, (2)Università di Bergamo, Bergamo, Italy
Sustainability is considered a new strategic capability in OM. Some authors suggested that environmental and social
sustainability capabilities may be in trade-off with the traditional strategic capabilities (cost, delivery, quality and
flexibility). Other authors, instead, denied this trade-off effect and suggested the existence of a positive link. This paper
aims to understand if high level of commitment to sustainability can mitigate possible trade-offs between sustainability
and traditional capabilities. Evidences supporting this hypothesis are provided using data from the fifth edition of the
International Manufacturing Strategy Survey, an international database of companies belonging to the assembly industry.
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Managing the operations-strategy interface
STR10
Reflections on operations strategy development and execution
Alex Hill(1), Terry Hill(2)
(1)Kingston University, Kingston-upon-Thames, UK, (2)Oxford University, Oxford, UK
This paper reflects on how organisations should develop and implement an operations strategy. It concludes that the
standard set of ‘competitive priorities’ proposed by many authors are misleading. Markets are more complex than
this and often all these priorities are not important while other factors are more significant. Therefore, the first step
in strategy development is to identify the order-winners and qualifiers for each type of customer order. These initial
executive opinions need to be tested with data to give more accurate insights and markets must be continually reviewed
as their requirements will change over time.
STR11
Supply chain integration under resource dependence; How powerful buyers and
suppliers shape integration as the value of the relationship rises
Boyana Petkova, Taco Van der Vaart, Eric Molleman
University of Groningen, Groningen, The Netherlands
This paper investigates how the two central tenets of resource dependence theory (Pfeffer and Salancik, 1978) influence
supply chain integration. While literature is clear that total dependence acts as a driver for integration, the effects of
power imbalance are less straightforward. Our study explains when power imbalance acts as a driver or a barrier to
integrative actions by the supplier and buyer respectively. Results strongly indicate that firms exhibit integration patterns
that can be predicted from their resource dependence setting. Our paper thus contributes to the understanding of
practitioners and researchers under which conditions integration is appropriate.
STR12
Utilizing constraints to identify opportunities for innovation: Findings from
Indian industries and future research directions
Atanu Chaudhuri
Indian Institute of Management, Lucknow, Uttar Pradesh, India
Companies operating in emerging markets face multiple external constraints like lack of quality power supply and
infrastructural bottlenecks while customers suffer from lack of access to products and services at the right place and
at the desired price points. The objective of this paper is to suggest an approach for researching the phenomena of
constraint driven innovation. We develop a preliminary framework to explain how companies have attempted to
innovate while facing constraints identify capabilities and competencies required to excel in constraint driven innovation
and provide directions for future research.
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Managing the operations-strategy interface
STR13
Developing a framework for servitization decision
Jassada Lertsaksereekun, Natcha Thawesaengskulthai
Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok, Thailand
This paper describes the development of a servitization decision framework to assist companies’ decision making.
First, case studies in Thailand were conducted to investigate servitization status. The possibility, necessity, benefits, and
difficulties of servitization in Thailand are presented. Second, factors that influenced the servitization decision based on
dynamic capability theory and multiple case studies are explained. Finally, a framework consisting of factors involved in
the servitization decision is proposed from two perspectives: servitization concern and servitization readiness.
STR14
An exploratory study of the dynamic manufacturing strategy in start-up
companies
Sirirat Lim, Ken Platts, Tim Minshall
University of Cambridge, Cambridge, UK
This paper reports the findings of an exploratory study involving six UK manufacturing start-up companies. A novel
manufacturing strategy content framework is proposed. The paper also examines the business orientation (technologypush or market-pull) adopted by the case companies, and investigates how business orientations influenced the
development of manufacturing strategies. This leads to two business orientation mobility models. This paper concludes
by discussing the use of the frameworks and suggesting how they might be put into practice to provide assistance to
operational managers in start-up companies.
STR15
Lost in Translation: bridging the gap between strategic management and
operations strategy
Jill MacBryde, Steve Paton, George Burt
University of Strathclyde, Glasgow, UK
This paper considers the evolution, development and current thinking in strategic management and operations strategy,
with a view to “exploring the interfaces”. The authors put forward the propositions that: in practice there is no longer a
significant gap between operations and business strategy; but in the context of academic research there is a widening gap
between the fields of strategic management and operations strategy.
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Managing the operations-strategy interface
STR16
Business models in fashion industry: an empirical analysis
Laura Macchion, Pamela Danese, Andrea Vinelli, Romano Cappellari
University of Padova, Vicenza, Italy
Nowadays fashion companies have to face the challenges posed by demand unpredictability and economic crisis.
Competition from low-wage countries is increasing and consumers’ behaviours are radically changed, being more price
sensitive. This research aims at studying Italian fashion companies to evaluate managerial and organizational models
that can support business development. 16 in-depth case studies have been conducted and then a survey has been run
to assess case study findings. Research provides fresh knowledge on fashion industry “successful” business models,
by revealing the existence of different clusters of firms that have found alternative ways to compete in the new global
context.
STR17
Configuration of a global manufacturing system - a longitudinal case study.
René Taudal Poulsen(3), Anders Paarup Nielsen(1), Brian Vejrum Waehrens(2)
(1)Aalborg University, Copenhagen, Denmark, (2)Aalborg University, Aalborg, Denmark, (3)University of Southern
Denmark, Esbjerg, Denmark
This paper tracks the trajectories of globalization of the manufacturing function within a Danish company for more
than 50 years. Based on a historical archival methodology, the case illustrates the challenges faced by the case company
through five phases characterized by diverse strategic trajectories. In each of the phases the company has struggled with
adapting the configuration of its global manufacturing network to the changing industrial context and strategic goals.
The paper then analyzes the development path taken by the case company along three dimensions. The paper concludes
by a discussion of the effect of historical trajectories on corporate adaptation
STR18
Supplier selection criteria and techniques: a case research on the automotive
supply chain
Vania Pela, Luiz Carpinetti
University of São Paulo, São Carlos, São Paulo, Brazil
Supplier selection is an important issue in the context of supply chain. Literature on this subject explores mainly
selection criteria and techniques but does not present studies on the application of these techniques, particularly in the
automotive industry. It presents the results of multiple case research in the process of supply selection in the automotive
industry in Brazil and India. Its main purpose is to investigate whether the criteria and techniques proposed in the
literature are adopted in practice. Although it is not possible to generalize, the study indicates that analytical techniques
are still not used for supplier selection.
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STR19
Market Made: Manufacturing Capabilities and Export Markets for Developing
Country Firms
Nigel Williams, Yongmei Bentley, David Owen, Elly Philpott
University of Bedfordshire, Luton, UK
Empirical work examining the international activities of developing-country firms has concentrated on the contribution
of export marketing activities to their international performance. However, despite the significant volume of company
resources dedicated to manufacturing activities in some firms, little research to-date has examined the relationship
between manufacturing strategy and export market served in such organizations. Using case studies of 11 firms from
Trinidad and Tobago (TT), market/production configurations in exporters were identified: Natural Resource, Production
Capability and Experience Based. They suggest particular development trajectories that may support both firm and
export sector growth.
STR20
The Causal Relationships between Manufacturing Strategy Process,
Manufacturing- Marketing Integration and Plant Performance
Joongsan Oh(1), Wonhee Lee(2), Seung-Kyu Rhee(3)
(1)Sookmyung Women’s University, Seoul, Republic of Korea, (2)Ecofrontier, Inc., Seoul, Republic of Korea, (3)Korea
Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (KAIST), Seoul, Republic of Korea
Through the development of a framework treating manufacturing strategy process and manufacturing-marketing
integration simultaneously, this study has found that enhanced manufacturing strategy formulation positively
influences plant performance through vitalized manufacturing-marketing integration and manufacturing strategy
implementation. In addition, this research identified that manufacturing-marketing integration and manufacturing
strategy implementation can affect plant performance directly. Consequently, in order to improve plant performance,
manufacturing firms need to institute a well-structured, formalized manufacturing strategic planning and implementing
system; enhance manufacturing-marketing collaboration on strategy formulation and implementation; and make it
obligatory for managers at manufacturing and marketing departments to participate in the corporate strategic planning
process.
STR21
Dynamics of SKU classification: the production strategy in a dairy company
Tim Van Kampen, Dirk Pieter Van Donk
University of Groningen, Groningen, The Netherlands
Classifications of SKUs are often snapshots at a moment in time where it is unclear how often these classification should
be revised and which factors influence the timing of the revision. In this paper we combine a case study approach with
data analysis. We show that while time passes reclassification is needed to increase the competitive strength of the
company or to reduce risks. However, customer wishes, operational decisions and commercial motives cause that the
classification and reclassification process is less strict than initially expected.
134
Managing the operations-strategy interface
STR22
Dynamic abilities in performance measurement system: a case study on practice
and strategies
Mohammed Salloum(1),(2), Magnus Wiktorsson(1)
(1)Mälardalen University, Eskilstuna, Sweden, (2)Volvo Construction Equipment, Eskilstuna, Sweden
This paper analyse the key factors for creating a dynamic ability in the performance measurement system, in order to
manage the operations/strategy interface. A case study was conducted at a heavy vehicle manufacturing site with two
data collection components: archival data and an interview study. The study details five factors that need to be fulfilled in
order to realise dynamic abilities in a PMS: review process, IT system, management, culture and employee involvement.
Moreover, in order to realise the factors in practice the PMS design and context need to be considered.
STR23
The role of continuous improvement programmes beyond operational excellence
Seamus O’Reilly, Lawrence Dooley
University College Cork, Cork, Ireland
Continuous improvement (CI) has become the norm for organisations in their drive to remain competitive. Many
of the CI approaches have their roots in the doctrine of manufacturing/operations management. This paper explores
if CI portfolios are constrained to an operational excellence (OE) remit and whether emerging internal capabilities
are being leveraged to determine strategic trajectory. The research adopts a case study approach, where the nature of
the CI programme of two distinct organisations is explored. The findings demonstrate that CI has spread beyond the
boundaries of OE and has the potential to impact how internal resources are configured for advantage.
STR24
The influence of single lean principles on lean bundles
Saskia Gutter
University of St Gallen, St Gallen, Switzerland
A number of publications exists which investigate the influence from the lean bundles TPM, TQM, JIT and EMS on
manufacturing performance on an abstract level. This paper examines the relations between these lean bundles on a
single element level to support the decision which lean principles to focus on. The result is that different lean principles
have a diverging degree of interlinkage and thus influence other single principles directly or indirectly. Eight single
principles could be identified which are likely to have the biggest influence on the overall manufacturing performance.
135
Managing the operations-strategy interface
STR25
Investigating the Effects of New Product Development Techniques on Mass
Customisation Capability
Zu’bi Al-Zu’bi(1), Christos Tsinopoulos(1)
(1)University of Jordan, Amman, Jordan, (2)Durham University, Durham, UK
This paper investigates the effect of contemporary NPD techniques on the improvement of mass customisation
capability. Analysis of data collected from manufacturing companies across Europe revealed a significant relationship
between the manufacturing NPD techniques and improved capability of mass customisation. It also revealed a much
weaker relationship between designing NPD techniques and the mass customisation capability as well as between
information NPD techniques and mass customisation capability. These results indicate the importance of manufacturing
NPD techniques over design and information techniques in improving the company’s mass customisation capability.
STR26
Organisational antecedents of mass customisation capability
Alessio Trentin, Cipriano Forza, Elisa Perin
Università di Padova, Vicenza, Italy
The need to transform the organisation for mass customisation has long been recognized in literature, but the discussion
has largely relied on anecdotal evidence or case studies and has limitedly taken advantage of insights from organisation
theory. We draw on organisational information-processing theory to relate mass customisation capability (MCC) to
four organisation-design strategies aimed at either increasing the organisation’s information-processing capacity or
decreasing its information-processing need. We test the hypothesized relationships using a sample of 238 manufacturing
plants from three industries and eight countries and find that MCC is positively related to task self-containment,
environmental management, and lateral relations use.
STR27
Decision-making on manufacturing flexibility for the management of operational
risks in the productive process of Brazilian automotive industries
Paulo Roberto Dalcol(1), Ualison Rebula de Oliveira(2), Fernando Augusto Marins(2)
(1)Pontifical Catholic University of Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, (2)Sao Paulo State University (UNESP),
Guaratingueta, Brazil
Many authors recommend the use of manufacturing flexibility to minimize the harmful effects that risks cause to
manufacturing companies. However, its multidimensional characteristic makes the task of adjusting the flexibility degree
to be adopted very difficult. Therefore, it becomes crucial to provide operations management with results that allow the
selection of different types of flexibility according to the company needs. An empirical research in four automotive plants
in Brazil provided information on which are the worst problems for this industrial sector, suggested new uses of some
types of manufacturing flexibility, and offered useful information for decision-making about flexibility.
136
Managing the operations-strategy interface
STR28
Viewing engineering offshoring in a network perspective: Challenges and key
patterns
Zaza Hansen(1), Yufeng Zhang(2), Saeema Ahmed-Kristensen(1)
(1)Technical University of Denmark, Lyngby, Denmark, (2)Birmingham Business School, Birmingham, UK
Companies are increasingly engaging with global engineering networks through offshoring of product development
activities. This presents companies with many new challenges. The global engineering network (GEN) framework
has been created to address the increasing dispersion of engineering activities across geographical and ownership
boundaries. By using the GEN framework in studying engineering offshoring issues, the challenges faced by companies
can be explained as a mismatch between the required capabilities and the companies’ ability to deliver these capabilities.
This paper provides new theoretical insight into both engineering offshoring and global engineering networks theories
by extending the GEN framework.
STR29
Developing a SWOT roadmapping technique for managing strategy, operations,
and technology interfaces
Choy Leong Yee, Kenny Guan Cheng Teoh, Winnie Wei Yu Liaw
Universiti Putra Malaysia, Serdang, Selangor, Malaysia
This paper reports a research on developing a SWOT roadmapping technique for managing strategy, operations, and
technology of a firm. The technique has incorporated the concepts of technology roadmapping, strategic charting, and
SWOT to help managers in developing strategic plans and capabilities that support business requirement. In order to
operationalise the technique, it was tested in two laboratory experiments and four companies. The results show mixed
opinions of positive and negative feedbacks from the respondents. The findings of this research are of interest of many
academics and managers. The implications of the findings to both theory and practice are discussed.
STR30
Engineering Strategies: An analytical framework and implementation guidance
Yufeng Zhang(1),(2)
(1)University of Birmingham, Birmingham, UK, (2)University of Cambridge, Cambridge, UK
A strategic view of engineering operations is missing in theory and in practice. This has led to visibility, clarity and
contingency problems across sectors. This paper develops an analytical framework to address the above problems
through case studies of over 30 UK-based engineering organizations. The framework suggests three essential elements
of engineering strategies as (i) a coherent vision of how to compete through engineering, (ii) a consistent pattern of
decision making, and (iii) a contingent fit with the contextual environment. The findings can help managers to analyse
their current engineering strategies or formulate new engineering strategies in a systematic manner.
137
Managing the operations-strategy interface
STR31
Manufacturing supporting strategies in SMME
Kristina Säfsten(1), Mats Winroth(1),(2)
(1)Jönköping university, Jönköping, Sweden, (2)Chalmers Institute of Technology, Göteborg, Sweden
Small and medium sized manufacturing enterprises (SMMEs) constitute the backbone of European industry, employing
several times the number of people compared with larger companies. It is necessary that these smaller companies
continuously work actively in developing their understanding about how they can compete on the market and how they
in the best possible way can develop and utilize their major investments in manufacturing resources. Manufacturing
strategies describe companies’ roadmaps in doing that. The manufacturing strategy maturity among Swedish SMMEs
varies but there is a strong will to learn and to develop. There are however some obstacles on the way.
STR32
Sustaining local manufacturing: A longitudinal study of Swedish companies
Mats Winroth(1), Muhammad Abid(1), Bengt Almgren(2), David Bennett(3),(4), Breno
Nunes(3)
(1)Chalmers University, Gothenburg, Sweden, (2)SolvingEfeso AB, Gothenburg, Sweden, (3)Aston University,
Birmingham, UK, (4)University of South Australia, Adelaide, Australia
This paper reports an investigation of local sustainable production in Sweden aimed at exploring the factors contributing
to survival and competitiveness of manufacturing. Eight companies were studied on two occasions 30 years apart;
in 1980 and 2010. To provide a valid longitudinal, perspective a common format for data collection was used. As
a framework for data collection and analysis the DRAMA methodology was employed (Bennett and Forrester,
1990). There are a number of results reported in detail concerning long term competitiveness and sustainability of
manufacturing companies.
STR33
Enabling Factors of Adaptive Capability in Small and Medium Enterprises
Aylin Ates(1), Marcus Assarlind(2), Catherine Maguire(1), Umit Bititci(1), Jill
MacBryde(1)
(1)University of Strathclyde, Glasgow, UK, (2)Chalmers University of Technology, Gothenburg, Sweden
This paper aims to define organisational adaptability and explain the conditions and factors affecting SMEs’ (Small and
Medium Enterprises) ability to adapt to the environment rather than fire fighting. The results are based on an ongoing
R&D work as part of a European FP7 project called ‘FutureSME’. We identified that a combination of factors contributes
to adaptability that encompasses interfaces between resilience, agile operations and strategy. This paper contributes to
theory and practice by taking vastly diverse literature into a single framework to explain the organisational adaptability
concept as demonstrating its use in understanding adaptive behaviour in manufacturing SMEs.
138
Managing the operations-strategy interface
STR34
Linking supplier relationship with postponement: an empirical analysis
Soroosh Saghiri, Alex Hill
Kingston Business School, London, UK
The main purpose of this paper is to focus on the impact of external factors on postponement, and relate various
aspects of supplier relationship to different types of postponement. Three constructs for supplier relationship and
three constructs for postponement, each with multiple measured items are identified and validated. Based on the links
between the constructs, the research hypotheses are formalised. The hypotheses are tested through a structural model
using empirical data of a sample of 219 manufacturing firms. This research enhances the postponement knowledge by
providing a precise, specific analysis (rather than a general review) of the external impacts on postponement.
STR35
Using manufacturing focus portfolios to assess product mix complexity in
manufacturing footprint design
Robert Schilling(1),(2), Joerg Schwartze(2)
(1)Katholische Universitat Eichstatt-Ingolstadt, Hamburg, Germany, (2)Beiersdorf AG, Hamburg, Germany
This paper presents a methodology that supports manufacturing footprint design considering the complexity of a
product portfolio stemming from market requirements. The required manufacturing capabilities are identified and
linked to plant roles that build on the concept of focused factories.
STR36
Manufacturing competitive priorities and business performance - an importanceperformance analysis approach
Levente Szász(1), Krisztina Demeter(2)
(1)Babes-Bolyai University, Cluj-Napoca, Romania, (2)Corvinus University of Budapest, Budapest, Hungary
A key area of operations management research has always been to determine how manufacturing strategy and practice
can contribute to the firm’s operational and business performance. After reviewing relevant literature we argue that in
improving manufacturing performance both the importance for the customer of a particular manufacturing capability
and the current performance against competitors has to be taken into the consideration. Consequently, our research
builds upon an importance-performance analysis approach, adopting Slack’s (1994) importance-performance matrix.
Using an international sample of manufacturing companies we investigate if improvement decisions that follow the
importance-performance logic can contribute to company-level business performance.
139
Managing the operations-strategy interface
STR37
The interface between “strategy-as-practice” theory in strategy and operations
management: Towards a “practice-as-strategy” theory
Kate Blackmon
University of Oxford, Oxford, UK
This paper examines the interface between strategy and operations management (OM) using the “strategy-as-practice”
view from strategic management. Various practice-based views have become influential in organisational studies,
in particular the strategy-as-practice perspective in strategic management, yet they have had hardly any impact on
operations strategy, despite the potential to illuminate the enigmatic relationship between operational practices and
performance. We argue that the strategy-as-practice perspective could illuminate three problems of the practiceperformance link. Furthermore, we highlight a theoretical gap in strategic management that operations management
could fill as a “practice-as-strategy” view.
STR38
Visual management and shopfloor teams - linking action to strategy
Nicola Bateman(1), Lee Philp(2), Harry Warrender(3)
(1)Loughborough University, Loughborough, UK, (2)Assa Abloy, Willenhall, UK, (3)SMMT Industry Forum,
Birmingham, UK
This paper examines the use of Visual Management at shopfloor level, particularly looking at a specific design of
communication board across cells. The use of graphs and performance measures on the boards is examined and how
Team Leaders use the board for Continuous Improvement is examined. Results indicate that most Team Leaders use
the boards for Continuous Improvement and the board design is supported by Team Leaders, however not all the
Team Leaders use the board fully. In addition problems with communicating strategy at cell level mean the link from
operations strategy to shopfloor action is not fully made.
STR39
Distribution of Manufacturing Strategy Decision-Making in Manufacturing
Networks
Andreas Feldmann, Jan Olhager
Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden
This paper is concerned with manufacturing strategy decision-making. In particular, we study how strategic decisions
are distributed between the network level and manufacturing plants in manufacturing networks. We use data from 107
manufacturing plants. This research shows that manufacturing strategy decision-making (in terms of decision categories
and policy areas) can be divided into three difference types: centralized at the network level, decentralized at the plant
level, and integrated between central headquarter and local plants. All decision categories follow the same structure, i.e.
one of the three types is applied to all decision areas.
140
Managing the operations-strategy interface
STR40
The ‘Reduction-Retention conundrum’: Managing organisational capabilities at
times of large-scale economic crises
Matthias Holweg(1), Mats Johansson(2), Patrik Jonsson(2)
(1)Judge Business School, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, UK, (2)Chalmers University of Technology,
Gothenburg, Sweden
Large-scale crises, such as the global financial crisis or ‘credit crunch’ that unfolded during 2008 pose major challenge
for any firm; empirical evidence suggests that durable goods manufacturers in particular suffer sooner and deeper
depressions in demand during downturns, as purchases for these products can generally be postponed. Such crises
pose a major, and at times existential, challenge to all functions of the firm, including operations. The key managerial
challenge that develops is essentially a conflict between the need to reduce cost on the one hand, and the need to identify
and retain organisational capabilities on the other, which we refer to as the ‘reduction-retention conundrum’. In this
paper we are reporting on an exploratory case study of a vehicle manufacturer, and discuss how this particular company
managed this conundrum, to what degree proactively capabilities were identified and protected, as opposed to reactively
cutting cost in response to financial pressures. The paper concludes with initial observations and preliminary findings, as
well as a course of action for future research currently underway.
STR41
The effect of contingencies on manufacturing strategy and operations
performance
Zsolt Matyusz, Krisztina Demeter
Corvinus University of Budapest, Budapest, Hungary
There is a lot of space for contingency research in operations management (OM). Most papers did not investigate
contingencies on a system-level either and there is a long list of contingencies considered by different authors and an
inconsistent operationalization of these contingencies. After identifying the most important contingencies we propose a
theoretical model to test their effects on manufacturing strategy and on the relationship between manufacturing strategy
and operations performance. We also hypothesize that there are different contingency-strategy configurations that can
lead to better operations performance. For the empirical validation of the model we use IMSS-V survey data.
STR42
Manpower planning strategies in times of financial crisis: evidence from logistics
service providers and retailers in the Netherlands.
Sander de Leeuw(1), Vincent Wiers(2),(3), Maartje Smits(1), Celine Couwenberg(1)
(1)VU University, Amsterdam, The Netherlands, (2)Eindhoven University of Technology, Eindhoven, The Netherlands,
(3)Twinlog, Eindhoven, The Netherlands
In this research we focus on understanding manpower planning measures that companies take in warehouses during
a financial crisis and their expected effects on performance. We report a survey in two labour-intensive sectors: retail
and Logistics Service Providers (LSPs). Our results provide insight into the effect of four types of manpower planning
strategies and their application during times of crisis. We find that a decrease in turnover has led to a variety of strategies
in manpower planning both among retailers and LSPs. However, the effect of these strategies on key warehouse
performance indicators differed between the two sectors.
141
Managing the operations-strategy interface
STR43
The Effect of Culture, Process and Structure on Exploration and Exploitation in
Traditional Manufacturing Networks versus Lead Factory Networks
Patricia Deflorin(1), Maike Scherrer-Rathje(2), Philippe Walliman(1), Helmut Dietl(1)
(1)University of Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland, (2)University of St Gallen, Zurich, Switzerland
Based on an empirical analysis of 52 manufacturing companies from the German-speaking part of Europe, we show that
exploration and exploitation can be achieved independently and simultaneously in traditional and lead factory networks.
Although in both networks culture influences exploitation, the effects of process and structure on exploration and
exploitation are network specific. The results show that the underlying influencing factors differ in both networks, which
makes specific investments necessary to achieve exploration and exploitation.
STR44
Coordination in intra-company manufacturing networks - a multidimensional
perspective
Andreas Mundt
University of St Gallen, St Gallen, Switzerland
Research on coordination in manufacturing networks is mostly focused on single aspects lacking an integral
understanding of its underlying decisions and their linkages. This paper proposes a holistic framework modeling
intra-network coordination as multidimensional decision space setting the basis to study coordination from a
network manager’s perspective. We further demonstrate the application of our framework by exemplarily linking its
distinct elements to derive propositions on two selected, idiosyncratic network phenomena, i.e. (1) autonomy and (2)
coopetition.
STR45
Establishing a Lead Factory - when can an intra-firm network benefit the most?
Maike Scherrer-Rathje(1), Patricia Deflorin(2), Thomas Friedli(1)
(1)Unisity of St Gallen, St Gallen, Switzerland, (2)University of Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland
The lead factory acts as a knowledge incubator for an intra-firm manufacturing network. In order to understand the
benefits of a lead factory network, research has to move on from the solely description of the concept to the analysis if
a manufacturing network can benefit from the existence of a lead factory per se or if the lead factory is only preferable
in certain circumstances. The study at hand derives five dimensions which support, depending on their characteristics,
higher performance achievements when having a lead factory integrated in the manufacturing network.
142
Managing the operations-strategy interface
STR46
A Risk Management Approach to Improving Information Quality for Operational
and Strategic Management
Alexander Borek, Philip Woodall, Ajith Parlikad
University of Cambridge, Cambridge, UK
Information has long been recognized as a key resource for every organisation. As it influences organisational success
on every level of an organisation, its effects on objectives in operations and strategy need to be assessed and mitigated
following a best-practice risk management approach. This paper extends a process for Total Information Risk
Management (TIRM) for managing risk that arises from poor quality information resources by incorporating a Ten
Step approach for improving information quality. This approach guides managers through an effective information
quality improvement programme that integrates best practices from the risk management and the information quality
disciplines.
STR47
Multiple stakeholder Performance Measurement and Management in third sector
organisations:An exploratory study of the implementation of an IT system
Sara Hajnassiri, Margaret Taylor, Andrew Taylor
University of Bradford, Bradford, West Yorkshire, UK
This paper reports on the results of an exploratory study of a third sector organisation with respect to the specification,
selection and implementation of an IT system in support of its performance measurement and management in a multiple
stakeholder context. The implementation of such systems in the third sector is comparatively rare. An ethnographic
research methodology is utilised to study of ‘Foundation’, a medium sized UK charity that provides housing-related
support services to a range of customers. Initial results list the perceived benefits of implementation and indicate some of
the key challenges which may be encountered during the implementation process.
STR48
Contextual Ambidexterity and Just-in-Time as nurtures of Continuous
Improvement and Innovation
Andrea Furlan, Andrea Vinelli
University of Padova, Padova, Italy
This paper sheds some light on the relationship between continuous improvement and innovation in lean manufacturing
settings. Drawing on the literature on organizational ambidexterity and lean management, we propose a model where
contextual ambidexterity and JIT simultaneously balance innovation and continuous improvement within the same
plant. We test the model on an international database using structural equation modeling. Results show that continuous
improvement and innovation can coexist within those plants that simultaneously nurture organizational ambidexterity
and implement JIT techniques. We also show the positive performance implications of such a strategy.
143
Supplier relationships: developing a country’s perspective
SUPPLY1 Buyer-supplier relationships in a Sustainable Supply Chain: the Organic chain in
Brazil
Luciana Vieira(1), Marcia Barcellos(2), Silvio Silva(1), Alexia Hoppe(1)
(1)UNISINOS, Sao Leopoldo, RS, Brazil, (2)EA/PPGA/UFRGS, Porto Alegre, RS, Brazil
This study investigates the relationship between a large retail and small organic producers in a dedicated supply chain in
Brazil. It also address on how Brazilian consumers perceive organic products. Qualitative (case study) and quantitative
(survey) techniques were used. Results suggest that the retail strategically associates organic products to its Corporate
Social Responsibility (CSR), but the operation is very complex and there are difficulties to select organic suppliers. Yet,
consumers present very positive attitude towards organic food. Those interested in sustainability issues can use the
results to support managerial strategies to deal with the growing demand for organic food.
SUPPLY2 A process for the prequalification of suppliers for a service organisation in a
developing economy
Frank Ojadi(1), Dotun Adebanjo(2)
(1)Lagos Business School, Lagos, Nigeria, (2)University of Liverpool, Liverpool, UK
This paper presents findings of a study of the prequalification of suppliers for a major service industry organisation
in a developing country. The aim of the exercise was to centralise the purchasing activities of the organisation and
consequently leverage its purchasing power. The analysis focuses on one item and it indicates a significant difference in
capabilities between the high performing and low performing suppliers. The significance of the study is the ability of
organisations to impact the corporate behaviour of other organisations in their supply chain.
SUPPLY3 Supply chain management relationship structures: Chinese evidence compared
to traditional frameworks
Peter ONeill(1), Annibal Scavarda(2), Sisi Gao(3), Booi Kam(4)
(1)Monash University, Melbourne, Australia, (2)American University of Sharjah, Sharjah, United Arab Emirates, (3)
RMIT University, Melbourne, Australia, (4)RMIT University, Melbourne, Australia
The world’s second largest economy and third largest trader motivates this research. It analyses Chinese functional
supply chains through a relational capital lens. It is a qualitative study with interviews from informants across three tiers
of the functional supply chains in each of four manufacturing industries; clothing, automobile, electronic, and food.
Compared to Western models of functional supply chains, the findings suggest that in China, relational capital is not
only manifest in buyer dominated, adversarial, close partnerships, but can also be supplier dominated, adversarial and
arm’s length, depending on the focal industry, and nature of upstream or downstream relational dependency.
144
Supplier relationships: developing a country’s perspective
SUPPLY4 Patterns of supply chain integration: cluster analyses of three Thai industries
Sakun Boon-itt(1), Chee Yew Wong(2), Christina W.Y. Wong(3)
(1)Thammasat University, Bangkok, Thailand, (2)University of Hull Business School, Hull, UK, (3)The Hong Kong
Polytechnic University, Hong Kong, Hong Kong
Based on three dimensions of supply chain integration (SCI), i.e., internal integration (II), supplier integration (SI) and
customer integration (CI), this paper develops a typology of SCI patterns and a theory of SCI configuration. Cluster
analyses of survey data from three industries (automotive, electronics, and food) in Thailand found clusters of firms
with low-uniform and high-uniform SCI, each with distinctive II-SI-CI profiles, leading to enhanced understanding of
SCI profiles for each industry. The operational performance dimensions in terms of delivery, quality, cost, flexibility, and
innovation are found to significantly different between the two clusters by further ANOVA analyses.
SUPPLY5 Exploring the Client-Vendor Interface in Offshore Outsourcing: A Longitudinal
Study of a Project’s Transition to India
Christopher Williams
Richard Ivey School of Business, London, Canada
This study tracks activity in a software development team of an Indian offshore outsourcing vendor during the time
period in which project work was transitioned from one of its clients based in Europe. Using longitudinal analysis of
team composition and project status data, the study provides insight into how offshore team learning and performance
change during the transition period. The findings indicate: (1) four distinct phases of the transition: offshore penetration,
offshore embedment, offshore ramp-up and end-state stabilization, (2) the rate of learning varies considerably across
these phases, (3) performance of the team also varies considerably across these phases.
145
Teaching operations management
TOM1
Assessing the Service Quality of Higher Education in Operations Management:
Two Servqual Gap Analyses.
Cyril Foropon(1), Ruth Seiple(2), Laoucine Kerbache(3)
(1)University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Canada, (2)University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, USA, (3)HEC Paris, Paris, France
Based on two Servqual gap analyses, this paper aims at assessing the service quality of higher education programs
focusing on operations management (OM). Firstly, at the low end of the higher education spectrum, we assess the service
quality of an undergraduate program in OM. Secondly, at the highest end of this spectrum, we assess the service quality
of an executive education program in OM. Finally, both Servqual gap analyses deepen our understanding of key service
quality dimensions along the spectrum of higher education in OM.
TOM2
The design of a research methods module for a course in Major Programme
Management
Kate Blackmon
University of Oxford, Oxford, Oxfordshire, UK
This paper describes the design of a research methods module for a master’s degree in Major Programme Management,
an emerging scholarly and practitioner discipline that draws not only on project management but a wide range of
other topics related to the temporary organisation. A major programme, sometimes called mega-project, comprises
multiple, high-cost, high-involvement interrelated projects. The students studied research methods to prepare for
their dissertations, entailing an introduction to key research ideas and practices such as quantitative and qualitative
approaches, research ethics, project reporting, and research project management as well as critical thinking and
teamwork.
146
Teaching operations management
TOM3
Thirty Years of OM Research Published in IJOPM: Insights Using Latent Semantic
Analysis
Shailesh Kulkarni(1), Uday Apte(2), Nicholas Evangelopoulos(1)
(1)University of North Texas, Texas, USA, (2)Naval Postgraduate School, Monterey, USA
In this paper we use Latent Semantic Analysis, an emerging quantitative method for content analysis, to examine the
trends in Operations Management (OM) research as reflected in three decades of articles published in IJOPM. Our
findings are indicative of trends in research methodology and perhaps more important, of significant trends of topical
emphasis and emerging research areas. Overall, we believe that our work aids OM scholars in examining OM research at
varying levels of granularity and thereby lends itself to their scrutiny, critique, and action.
TOM4
International operations management: a bibliometric analysis of published
research 1998 to 2008
David Barnes(1), Alan Pilkington(1)
(1)University of Westminster, London, UK, (2)Royal Holloway, University of London, London, UK
The paper analyses all research articles on the subject of international operations management (IOM) published in
the three most important operations management (OM) journals from 1998 to 2008. It does so using the quantitative
bibliometric techniques of citation and co-citation analysis; the first time that these techniques have been applied to
this literature. As such, it provides a much overdue review of this rapidly growing subject area within OM. The study
identifies some major themes and foundations of the subject area that have emerged over the last decade and compares
these to the last published IOM literature review.
TOM5
System Dynamics Course at University Level: Review of Student Simulation
Models
Olli-Pekka Hilmola, Lauri Lättilä
Lappeenranta University of Technology, Kouvola, Finland
Systems Dynamics (SD) simulation is a mature discipline. However, still very rarely entire course is being devoted
in Europe for this topic (M.Sc. and/or Ph.D.). The purpose of this research is to report experiences of giving system
dynamics course in the wider area of industrial engineering/management; course which is tailored for both M.Sc. and
Ph.D. students. We review the most innovative and interesting student works from last five years. Typically SD approach
fits well on company level logistics problems, among some macro level experiences. Also innovation and technology
management, and even environmental management, show their potential in student projects.
147
Understanding inter-firm relationships
UIFR1
Understanding inter-organizational relationships in programme management: a
social network analysis study
Qing Li, Nicky Shaw, Tom Burgess
Leeds University Business School, Leeds, UK
The paper explores inter-organisational relationships during a multi-project, multi-organisation programme run by a
regional utility company. Social network analysis is adopted to analyze the relationships between the utility company and
eight contractor companies. The preliminary findings indicate that programme tenure is positively related with network
centrality. Degree centrality measures and sociograms are provided to support the findings.
UIFR2
Reconceptualising inter-organisational supply chain behaviours
Mark M.J. Wilson(1), Clive Smallman(2), David L. Dean(1)
(1)Lincoln University, Canterbury, New Zealand, (2)University of Western Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
Inter-organizational exchange archetypes represent groupings of exchange behaviours, often the unidimensionality of
the behaviours is assumed. We suggest two major thematic domains can be found in supply chain literature, relational
with socio-political motivations and rational with economic self interest, that give rise to two dominant behaviours:
collaboration and opportunism. However, little research has examined the operation of these behaviours within different
exchange archetypes. Based on observations of 189 manufacturer/supplier dyads, we discriminate two common
exchange relationship archetypes based on these behaviours.
UIFR3
Domains and contextual factors of e-business systems utilization in inter-firm
relationships: a case study
Mervi Vuori, Jouni Kauremaa, Aki Laiho
Aalto University, Espoo, Finland
We study the uses of e-business systems in inter-firm context through a case study of 6 manufacturing companies in
Finland. In particular, we investigate the purposes for e-business system use and related contextual factors from a focal
buyer company point of view. As a result we find that e-business systems are mainly used for operative supply chain
and purchasing transactions and less for collaboration purposes. Contrary to previous suggestions, we find no explicit
relationship between e-business system use and supplier categorization. Instead, a set of buyer company internal and
external factors are found.
148
Understanding inter-firm relationships
UIFR4
Assessing the influence of information sharing and information quality on
customer integration
Roberto Chavez(1), Cristina Gimenez(1), Brian Fynes(1), Frank Wiengarten(1)
(1)ESADE Business School, Barcelona, Spain, (2)UCD Graduate Business School, Dublin, Ireland
Information sharing has been treated as one component of the overall supply chain integration strategy, with most of the
research overlooking its individual impact. Furthermore, studies investigating the value of information sharing practices
have produced mixed results, which may be associated to contingency factors. Finally, few papers have analysed these
information mechanisms from the supplier’s view. This paper contributes to the supply chain management literature by
testing the individual impact of information sharing practices on customer integration using the supplier’s perspective,
and by developing the contingency view in the area. The relationships between the constructs are analysed through
regression analysis.
UIFR5
How strategic needs influence alliance formation and their governance modes:
An empirical study in the Italian biopharmaceutical industry
Erica Mazzola, Giovanni Perrone
Università di Palermo, Palermo, Italy
The large literature on strategic alliances has highlighted how alliances answer to a strategic need to improve competitive
strength through collaboration agreements. In this paper, we question what kind of competitive strengths firms aim at
acquiring through inter-firm relationships. We argue that alliances respond to three principal strategic needs: Efficiency/
effectiveness, Knowledge and learning, and Global market access need. We hypothesize that these needs represent
a motivation to enter alliances and, furthermore, they influence the governance mode of the agreement. In order to
empirically test the theoretical framework a survey investigating the Italian biopharmaceutical industry is carried out.
UIFR6
Antecedents and impacts of social capital in buyer supplier relationship: A study
of Australian manufacturing industry
Mesbahuddin Chowdhury, Daniel Prajogo, Quamrul Alam
Monash University, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia
Drawing on the social capital theory, this study explore the social capital-performance relationship by linking the
antecedents, dimensions and impact of social capital and their consequence on buying firm’s performance. A sample
size of 204 is used from Australian manufacturing firms to test the model. The result of structural equation modelling
suggest that rationale perspective drives buying firms to develop social capital which in turn lead to develop supply chain
collaboration and quality of knowledge and their overall impact improve the buying firm’s performance.
149
Understanding inter-firm relationships
UIFR7
Increasing buyer’s absorptive capacity by creating social capital in interorganizational relationships
Judith Whipple(1), Evelyne Vanpoucke(2), Kenneth Boyer(3)
(1)Michigan State University, Michigan, USA, (2)Maastricht University, Maastricht, The Netherlands, (3)Ohio State
University, Ohio, USA
This paper posits a model of social capital and its influence on inter-organizational knowledge-sharing routines. The
final outcome of the model is the buyer’s ability to create and utilize knowledge as a result of joint supplier/buyer
activities. This research uses dyadic data obtained from 107 pairs of buyers and their suppliers to ensure that both
buyer and supplier perspectives are included. The results illustrate that social capital elements positively influence
the absorptive capacity of the buyer when reciprocal knowledge-sharing routines between buyers and suppliers are
developed.
UIFR8
Exploring the effect of lean manufacturing on collaborative relations
sustainability
Mohamed El Mokadem, Magdy Khalaf
Arab Academy for Science and Technology, Alexandria, Egypt
This research argues that the benefits of implementing lean manufacturing at a supplier organization could improve
supplier-manufacturer collaborative business relations. Through exploring the relevant literature and performing a case
study research, this paper reveals that lean practices provide suppliers with a competitive advantage which manipulates
market dynamics effect over their relation with manufacturers. This, in turn, enhances the manufacturer commitment to
collaborate. Thus, it could be concluded that lean manufacturing influence collaborative relations sustainability.
150
Index of authors
Abid, Muhammad.................................................... STR32.
Antony, Jiju.................................................................... PI6.
Abrahamsson, Mats.................................................. RISK1.
Aoki, Katsuki............................................................ MKT4.
Adebanjo, Dotun................................................. SUPPLY2.
Apte, Aruna............................................................... RBV1.
Aguado-Correa, Francisco........................................ EMP2.
Apte, Uday................................................................ TOM3.
Åhlström, Pär.......................................................... PUB22.
Araújo Ferreira, Karine............................................. SCD5.
Ahmad, Niaz............................................................ PUB14.
Arokiam, Alan............................................................ STR1.
Ahmed-Kristensen, Saeema..................................... STR28.
Aronsson, Håkan..................................................... PUB23.
Ahsan, Kamrul........................................................ PUB28.
Aschauer, Gerald....................................................... ENV5.
Aitken, James............................................................. EMP1.
Ashby, Alison............................................................. ENV2.
Akanni, Adewole..................................................... ENV31.
Aslan, Bulut................................................................ INV5.
Akkerman, Renzo.................................................... ENV14.
Assarlind, Marcus..................................................... STR33.
Akkermans, Henk..................................................... MCP7.
Ates, Aylin................................................................. STR33.
Alam, Quamrul........................................................ UIFR6.
Awan, Muhammad Usman...................................... PUB14.
Al-Balushi, Zainab................................................. PTNR1.
Azevedo, Mateus.................................................... SERV20.
Alfalla-Luque, Rafaela............................... HRM11, HRM3.
Backhouse, Chris................................................... SERV13.
Alfredson, Ludvig....................................................... FIN3.
Bäckstrand, Jenny................................................ PURCH1.
Alinaghian, Leila................................................... INTER7.
Baglieri, Enzo....................................................... GSCN19.
Al-Kassab, Jasser.................................................... MCP11.
Baines, Tim.............................. SERV12, SERV23, SERV29.
Almgren, Bengt........................................................ STR32.
Bakker, Frans......................................................... INTER4.
Almici, Raffaele....................................................... ENV17.
Balasubramanian, Sreejith...................................... ENV13.
Alonso-Almeida, María del Mar........................... SERV30.
Ball, Peter............................................................... SERV23.
Alves Filho, Alceu........................................ MKT1, MKT7.
Banchuen, Pongpak.................................................. GOV1.
Al-Zu’bi, Zu’bi.......................................................... STR25.
Barbosa-Póvoa, Ana Paula............ ENV12, ENV34, ENV9.
Amato Neto, João...................................................... ENV3.
Barcellos, Marcia................................................. SUPPLY1.
Ambrose, Eamonn................................................... PERF2.
Barnes, David........................................................... TOM4.
Amorim, Marlene................................................... MKT12.
Barros, Marcos Cesar Lopes...................................... ENV3.
Ancarani, Alessandro................................ HRM13, HRM6.
Bartoli, Laura.......................................................... PUB16.
Andersson, Dan........................................................ RISK1.
Barton, Harry............................................... PUB1, PUB15.
Angelis, Jannis.......................................................... RISK2.
Bastl, Marko............................................................... FIN5.
151
Index of authors
Bateman, Nicola....................................................... STR38.
Bradley, Randy.......................................................... PUB5.
Belloso, Mariola..................................................... SERV27.
Brafman, Silvia......................................................... MKT5.
Beltagui, Ahmad...................................................... SERV5.
Braga, Mirian........................................................ SERV20.
Benedettini, Ornella................................................ SERV3.
Brandon-Jones, Alistair................ ENV35, INTER3, SCD6.
Bengtsson, Lars......................................................... INN3.
Brandon-Jones, Emma................ ENV22, ENV30, ENV35.
Bennett, David............................................ ENV10, STR32.
Brax, Saara............................................................... SERV9.
Bentley, Yongmei........................................ ENV26, STR19.
Brey, Zameer............................................................ PUB11.
Bernardo, Mercè.................................................... SERV30.
Brigante, Cinthia S................................................... MKT2.
Beske, Philip.............................................................. RBV5.
Brintrup, Alexandra................................. INTER8, SCD14.
Bessant, John............................................................ MCP2.
Broekhuis, Manda................................................... PUB21.
Bettoni, Andrea....................................................... ENV20.
Bruccoleri, Manfredi.......................................... NETSTR1.
Bhakoo, Vikram.................................................. PURCH3.
Buccini, Andrea.......................................................... INV2.
Bhatti, Raj................................................................... STR1.
Buijs, Annelore......................................................... MCP7.
Bicheno, John........................................................... LEAN3.
Burgess, Nicola............................................. PUB10, PUB6.
Bichescu, Bogdan...................................................... PUB5.
Burgess, Tom............................................................ UIFR1.
Birkved, Morten...................................................... ENV14.
Burt, George............................................................. STR15.
Bititci, Umit.............................................................. STR33.
Busse, Christian...................................................... GSCN1.
Björklund, Maria....................................................... ENV6.
Bustinza, Oscar F................................................... SERV28.
Blackmon, Kate........................................... STR37, TOM2.
Byrd, Terry................................................................. PUB5.
Blome, Constantin......................... GSCN1, MKT8, SCD4.
Cadden, Trevor....................................................... PTNR2.
Blomqvist, Marja...................................... GSCN4, GSCN9.
Cagliano, Raffaella..................................................... STR9.
Böhme, Tillmann.................................................. SERV21.
Cagno, Enrico.............................................. ENV7, SCD13.
Bø, Ola..................................................................... ENV38.
Cakkol, Mehmet........................................... INN1, SERV5.
Boon-itt, Sakun........................................ STR7, SUPPLY4.
Caldwell, Nigel.............................................. MCP5, SCD6.
Booysen, Tony.......................................................... PUB11.
Canetta, Luca........................................................... ENV20.
Borek, Alexander...................................................... STR46.
Caniato, Federico........................... GSCN2, INN4, SCD16.
Boronat, Montserrat................................................. HRM5.
Cao, Ran............................................................. NETSTR2.
Bortolotti, Thomas.................................... MKT10, MKT9.
Cappellari, Romano................................................. STR16.
Boyer, Kenneth......................................................... UIFR7.
Cardoso, Teresa....................................................... PUB20.
152
Index of authors
Carey, Sinéad................................................ ENV30, STR3.
Collins, Tony............................................................... STR1.
Caridi, Maria........................................................... SCD16.
Cooney, Richard....................................................... HRM9.
Carlucci, Daniela....................................................... PUB8.
Corti, Donatella.......................................... ENV20, SERV1.
Carpinetti, Luiz........................................................ STR18.
Costa Neto, Pedro.................................................. SERV26.
Carrasco-Gallego, Ruth............................ ENV11, SERV10.
Coughlan, Paul.......................................................... PUB3.
Carvalho, Ana.......................................................... ENV34.
Cousens, Alan...................................................... NEWOP2.
Carvalho, Helena....................................................... SCD7.
Couwenberg, Celine................................................. STR42.
Carvalho, Marly Monteiro de................................ SERV17.
Crabbe, James.......................................................... ENV26.
Casadesus Fa, Marti............................................... MKT11.
Crippa, Luca.............................................................. INN4.
Castañeda, Jaime........................................................ INV3.
Cruz-Machado, Virgílio............................................ SCD7.
Castro Boluarte, Jimmy........................................... ENV26.
Cuckow, Nina............................................................ MKT6.
Castro Duarte, André Luis de Moura.................... GSCN3.
Dabhilkar, Mandar.................................................... INN3.
Cathpole, Ken.......................................................... PUB12.
da C. Reis, Augusto................................................... MKT5.
Cayirli, Tugba.......................................................... PUB32.
Dalcol, Paulo Roberto.............................................. STR27.
Chaudhuri, Atanu.................................................... STR12.
Danese, Pamela............................................ MKT9, STR16.
Chavez, Roberto....................................................... UIFR4.
Dani, Samir................................................. ENV1, SERV13.
Cheepirishetti, Ashrit.................................................. GO6.
Dantas Bento, Robson............................................ GSCN3.
Cheng, TC Edwin................................................. GSCN20.
Darkow, Inga-Lena.............................................. NEWOP1.
Cheng, Yang.......................................................... GSCN13.
Da Silva, Andrea L.................................................... MKT2.
Chicarelli Alcântara, Rosane Lucia........................... SCD5.
Davies, Andrew........................................................ MCP4.
Chigwedere, Ruzivo................................................. PUB11.
Davies, Ceri............................................................... PUB2.
Childerhouse, Paul................................................ SERV21.
Deakins, Eric......................................................... SERV21.
Choi, Thomas....................................................... PURCH3.
Dean, David L........................................................... UIFR2.
Chowdhury, Mesbahuddin....................................... UIFR6.
de Blok, Carolien....................................................... INN2.
Christopher, Martin................................................ ENV26.
Deflorin, Patricia......................................... STR43, STR45.
Claes, Bjorn................................................................ INV1.
De Greef, Eric.......................................................... PUB13.
Claver-Cortés, Enrique........................................... ENV33.
de Leeuw, Sander...................................................... STR42.
Clayton, Richard................................................... SERV13.
Delgado-Hipolito, Joaquin...................................... ENV11.
Coelho, Renata...................................................... SERV25.
Demeter, Krisztina...................................... STR36, STR41.
153
Index of authors
den Hertog, Pim........................................................ INN2.
Everett, André M..................................................... PUB34.
de Oliveira, Luciel Henrique...................................... FIN4.
Faria, Rosane N.................................................... GSCN21.
De Stefano, Maria Cristina........................................ INN5.
Faull, Norman......................................................... PUB11.
Diaz, Angel................................................................. INV1.
Febvay, Guillaume..................................................... EMP3.
Dietl, Helmut............................................................ STR43.
Feldmann, Andreas.................................................. STR39.
Di Mauro, Carmela.................................... HRM13, HRM6.
Felekoglu, Burcu........................................................ NPD1.
Di Serio, Luiz Carlos.................................... FIN4, GSCN3.
Fernandez-Gonzalez, Arturo J............................... HRM14.
Disney, Stephen....................................................... PERF3.
Finch, John............................................................. MKT14.
Doevendans, Hans.................................................... HRM4.
Finger, Andrew...................................................... INTER2.
Domingues Fernandes Ferreira, Luís Miguel............ INV4.
Finne, Max............................................................. SERV14.
Done, Adrian.............................................................. FIN1.
Finnsgård, Christian................................................ MCP6.
Dooley, Lawrence..................................................... STR23.
Flor, M Luisa............................................. HRM5, SERV27.
Dora, Manoj.................................................................. PI5.
Formentini, Marco................................................. MKT10.
Dostaler, Isabelle.................................................. GSCN11.
Foropon, Cyril.......................................................... TOM1.
Dreyer, Heidi Carin............................................... INTER9.
Forslund, Helena....................................................... ENV6.
Drupsteen, Justin..................................................... PUB33.
Forza, Cipriano......................................................... STR26.
D’Urso, Diego........................................................... HRM6.
Found, Pauline........................................................ LEAN2.
Eckstein, Dominik..................................................... SCD4.
Fränken, Bastian........................................................ PUB3.
Elg, Mattias.............................................................. PUB25.
Frederiksen, Lars...................................................... MCP4.
Elias, Simon............................................................... PUB2.
Freise, Matthias......................................................... RBV5.
El Mokadem, Mohamed................................... PI1, UIFR8.
Friedli, Thomas......................................................... STR45.
Eloi-Santos, Daniel..................................................... FIN2.
Fulconis, François..................................................... SCD2.
Eloranta, Eero......................................................... GSCN6.
Furlan, Andrea......................................................... STR48.
Engelseth, Per........................................................... RISK3.
Fynes, Brian..................................... PUB3, RISK4, UIFR4.
Eriksson, Henrik..................................................... PUB17.
Gaiardelli, Paolo....................................................... GOV2.
Esain, Ann................................................................. PUB2.
Galeazzo, Ambra..................................................... ENV23.
Evangelopoulos, Nicholas........................................ TOM3.
Gao, Sisi............................................................... SUPPLY3.
Evans, Barry............................................................... PUB2.
Garcia-Arca, Jesus.................................................. HRM14.
Evans, Stephen......................................................... SERV4.
Garcia, Cristina........................................................ HRM5.
154
Index of authors
Garcia, Darkys Edith Lujan........................................... PI2.
Greening, Philip........................................................ SCD8.
Gavronski, Iuri........................................................ ENV39.
Gregory, Mike.................................................. STR2, STR6.
Gelape, Cláudio..................................................... SERV20.
Grigg, Nigel................................ HRM12, HRM4, MCP10.
Gellynck, Xavier............................................................ PI5.
Gronalt, Manfred...................................................... ENV5.
Gerbl, Martina....................................................... SERV22.
Größler, Andreas........................................... EMP4, INN4.
Gerschberger, Markus........................................ NETSTR3.
Grunow, Martin....................................................... ENV14.
Giammanco, Giuseppe........................................... HRM13.
Grutter, Anton......................................................... PUB11.
Giammanco, Maria Daniela................................... HRM13.
Guetter, Saskia......................................................... ENV15.
Gimenez, Cristina........................ ENV18, ENV24, UIFR4.
Guinery, Jane........................................................... PUB31.
Gitzel, Ralf.............................................................. MKT14.
Gustavsson, Susanne............................................... PUB35.
Gnatzy, Tobias..................................................... NEWOP1.
Gutter, Saskia............................................................ STR24.
Gobbi, Chiara............................................................ PUB7.
Hajnassiri, Sara........................................................ STR47.
Godbile, Thierry........................................................ SCD2.
Halse, Lise Lillebrygfjeld........................................ GSCN8.
Godsell, Janet................................................ OMT1, SCD8.
Hansen, Zaza............................................................ STR28.
Goellner, Matthias.................................................... MKT8.
Harrington, Tomas..................................... INN6, SERV24.
Goh, Mark................................................................ PERF2.
Hartmann, Andreas.................................................. MCP4.
Golini, Ruggero........................................... GSCN2, STR9.
Harvie, Warwick..................................................... HRM12.
Golmohammadi, Davood.......................................... INV6.
Hashiba Horta, Luciana............................................. FIN2.
Gomes Alves Filho, Alceu.......................................... INV4.
Heathcote, Rose....................................................... PUB11.
Gomes, Maria Isabel................................................ ENV12.
Heikkilä, Mari....................................................... SERV14.
Goncalves, Paulo................................................... INTER5.
Hellström, Andreas.................................... PUB25, PUB35.
Gonçalves, Paulo........................................................ INV3.
Hendry, Linda............................................................. INV5.
González-Manteca, José A..................................... SERV10.
Henke, Michael.............................................. MKT8, SCD4.
Goodyer, Jane......................................................... MCP10.
Hill, Alex...................................................... STR10, STR34.
Gosling, Jonathan.................................................... SCD17.
Hill, Terry................................................................. STR10.
Gouvea da Costa, Sergio E...................................... ENV28.
Hilmola, Olli-Pekka................................................. TOM5.
Græsdal, Terje........................................................... RISK3.
Hinz, Andreas............................................ ENV15, ENV32.
Grant, David........................................................... GSCN5.
Holmström, Jan..................................................... SERV16.
Greatbanks, Richard................................................ PUB34.
Holweg, Matthias........................................ LEAN3, STR40.
155
Index of authors
Hoppe, Alexia...................................................... SUPPLY1.
Kacioui-Maurin, Elodie........................................ SERV11.
Howard, Mickey......................................................... STR3.
Kalchschmidt, Matteo............................................ GSCN2.
Hsuan, Juliana........................................................... PUB7.
Kam, Booi............................................................ SUPPLY3.
Hua Tan, Kim........................................................... MCP9.
Kapsali, Maria.......................................................... MCP2.
Hudson Smith, Mel.................................................. PUB29.
Karatzas, Antonios..................................................... FIN5.
Hudson-Smith, Melanie............................................ ENV2.
Karjalainen, Katri.................................................. INTER3.
Hu, Jialun................................................................. ENV19.
Kauremaa, Jouni...................................... GSCN17, UIFR3.
Humphreys, Paul.................................... SERV22, SERV31.
Kelly, Stephen........................................................... OMT2.
Hu, Qing.................................................................. LEAN2.
Kerbache, Laoucine.................................................. TOM1.
Hussain, Amir........................................................ GSCN7.
Kessels, Mareike..................................................... GSCN6.
Imre, Noémi............................................................... PUB4.
Khalaf, Magdy.................................................. PI1, UIFR8.
Inemek, Aydin...................................................... GSCN18.
Khan, Muhammad Khalid...................................... PUB14.
Ismail, Hossam.......................................................... NPD2.
Khan, Wasim A....................................................... GSCN7.
Isotalus, Maija......................................................... SERV9.
Khater, Mohamed...................................................... RBV6.
Jacobsson, Torbjörn................................................. PUB22.
Khojasteh-Ghamari, Yaghoub....................................... PI4.
Jagoda, Kalinga........................................................ ENV27.
Kim, Kyung-Tae........................................................... GO1.
Jamali, Gholamreza.................................................. HRM8.
Kim, Myung Kyo.................................................... SERV19.
Jaskari, Johanna K....................................... ENV25, RBV4.
Kinkel, Steffen........................................... GSCN14, SCD1.
Jayarathne, Amila................................................. GSCN12.
Kirkwood, David....................................................... INN6.
Jenei, István............................................................... PUB4.
Kito, Tomomi............................................ INTER8, SCD14.
Jensen, Peter Meulengracht........................................ STR5.
Kiukkonen, Jaakko................................................ SERV16.
Jin, Ying................................................................... ENV29.
Kjellsdotter Ivert, Linea......................................... MKT15.
Johansen, John........................................... GSCN13, STR5.
Klassen, Robert....................................................... ENV23.
Johansson, Mats........................................... MCP6, STR40.
Klingebiel, Katja....................................................... MKT5.
Johnsen, Rhona......................................................... ENV8.
Knudby, Torben........................................................ MCP9.
Johnsen, Thomas....................................................... ENV8.
Kocabasoglu-Hillmer, Canan................................ INTER1.
Johnson, Mark.................................... FIN5, INN1, OMT1.
Kok, Emrah.............................................................. PUB31.
Johnson, Nathanial.................................................. ENV27.
Kotzab, Herbert...................................................... GSCN5.
Jonsson, Patrik..................... GO3, MCP3, MKT15, STR40.
Koulikoff-Souviron, Marie...................................... ENV16.
156
Index of authors
Krause, Daniel........................................................... NPD3.
Lifvergren, Svante.................................................... PUB35.
Kreckler, Simon....................................................... PUB12.
Lightfoot, Howard.................................. SERV12, SERV29.
Kronborg Jensen, Jesper.......................................... ENV37.
Li, Karen.................................................................. SCD18.
Kulkarni, Shailesh.................................................... TOM3.
Lillrank, Paul........................................................... PUB30.
Kumar, Maneesh.................................................... PI5, PI6.
Lim, Sirirat............................................................... STR14.
Kumar, Mukesh.......................................................... STR6.
Lindmark, Jan.......................................................... PUB25.
Kumar, Niraj............................................................... STR3.
Li, Qing..................................................................... UIFR1.
Kuula, Markku....................................................... SERV15.
Llach, Josep............................................................ SERV30.
Laiho, Aki.................................................. GSCN6, UIFR3.
Lobo, Débora......................................................... SERV25.
Lakemond, Nicolette................................................. INN3.
Longoni, Annachiara................................................. STR9.
Lalwani, Chandra.................................................... SCD10.
Looi, Evelyn S Y....................................................... PUB34.
Lamberti, Lucio........................................................ MKT3.
Lopes Guerra, João Henrique.................................... INV4.
Lancini, Agnès......................................................... PUB24.
López-Gamero, María D......................................... ENV33.
Lättilä, Lauri............................................................. TOM5.
Lorenzo, Oswaldo....................................................... INV1.
Laurindo, Fernando................................................ PERF1.
Losonci, Dávid.............................................. HRM2, PUB4.
Lawson, Benn............................................................ NPD3.
Lovell, Jeremy........................................................ SERV13.
Leal-Linares, Teresa................................................... EMP2.
Luciuk, Michael....................................................... ENV27.
Leat, Mike.................................................................. ENV2.
Luijkx, Katrien......................................................... PUB26.
Lee Hansen, Zaza Nadja............................................. STR4.
Lustrato, Paola......................................................... SCD12.
Lee, Peter K C....................................................... GSCN20.
Lu, Xiaoang.......................................................... GSCN20.
Leerojanaprapa, Kanogkan....................................... SCD9.
Luzzini, Davide........................................................ ENV17.
Lee, Wonhee............................................................. STR20.
Lynch, Daniel........................................................... PERF2.
Lertsaksereekun, Jassada.......................................... STR13.
Maas, Steffen.............................................................. ENV4.
Lethbridge, Sarah...................................................... PUB2.
MacBryde, Jill.............................................. STR15, STR33.
Lettieri, Emanuele........................ PUB16, PUB18, PUB27.
MacCarthy, Bart................................................... GSCN12.
Lewis, Dennis.......................................................... ENV19.
Macchion, Laura....................................................... STR16.
Lewis, Mike......................................... EMP5, SCD6, STR3.
Machado, Rosa Teresa M............................................. GO4.
Liao, Ching................................................................. FIN1.
Machuca, José Antonio Domínguez Machuca.............. PI2.
Liaw, Winnie Wei Yu................................................ STR29.
Maedler, Markus......................................................... FIN1.
157
Index of authors
Maguire, Catherine.................................................. STR33.
Medina-López, Carmen............................ HRM11, HRM3.
Malmgren, Mikael.................................................... RISK1.
Mehta, Peeyush............................................................ GO6.
Malý Rytter, Niels Gorm........................................... MCP9.
Meijboom, Bert....................................................... PUB26.
Mann, Robin........................................................... HRM12.
Mejias-Sacaluga, Ana............................................. HRM14.
Mansouri, Afshin........................................................ INV6.
Mello, Fernanda..................................................... SERV20.
Marimon, Frederic.................................. MKT11, SERV30.
Menrad, Martin........................................................ HRM7.
Marín-García, Juan A................................ HRM11, HRM3.
Meqdadi, Osama........................................................ ENV8.
Marins, Fernando Augusto...................................... STR27.
Merminod, Nathalie.................................................. SCD2.
Markmann, Christoph........................................ NEWOP1.
Micheli, Guido J L....................................... ENV7, SCD13.
Marqui, Angela Cristina............................................ SCD5.
Miemczyk, Joe........................................................... ENV8.
Marshall, Donna........................................ PERF2, PTNR2.
Millar, Harvey...................................................... PURCH2.
Martinelli, Marcela..................................................... FIN2.
Mills, John..................................................... RBV2, RBV3.
Martinez, Veronica.................................................. SERV4.
Minshall, Tim........................................................... STR14.
Martin, Pinar............................................................ OMT1.
Mocelin Manfrin, Pamela........................................ ENV28.
Martins, Ricardo................................................... SERV25.
Moehring, Monika.................................................. MKT14.
Marzec, Peter............................................................ OMT3.
Mohammad, Musli................................................. HRM12.
Masella, Cristina......................................... PUB16, PUB18.
Mohammadpour Omran, Mohammad.................... HRM8.
Masi, Donato........................................................... SCD13.
Molina-Azorín, José F............................................. ENV33.
Mason, Robert......................................................... LEAN2.
Molleman, Eric......................................................... STR11.
Matthyssens, Paul................................................. GSCN18.
Molnar, Adrienn............................................................ PI5.
Mattos, Claudia....................................................... PERF1.
Montes-Sancho, Maria José..................................... ENV18.
Matyusz, Zsolt.......................................................... STR41.
Moone, Brian........................................................... SCD17.
Mazzola, Erica.......................................................... UIFR5.
Moretto, Antonella.................................. GSCN10, SCD16.
McCulloch, Peter..................................................... PUB12.
Moshtari, Mohammad........................................... INTER5.
McFarlane, Duncan...................................... EMP3, MCP1.
Moultrie, James......................................................... NPD1.
McIvor, Ronan........................................ SERV22, SERV31.
Msimangira, Kabossa.............................................. PUB28.
McKittrick, Alan.................................................... INTER6.
Mundhenke, Hans-Georg............................................ GO5.
Meckenstock, Johann................................................ ENV9.
Mundt, Andreas........................................................ STR44.
Medbo, Lars.............................................................. MCP6.
Mupure, Chipo........................................................ PUB11.
158
Index of authors
Mura, Matteo........................................................... PUB27.
Palmieri, Antonio................................................. GSCN19.
Murti, Yashwant..................................................... MCP10.
Parlikad, Ajith.......................................................... STR46.
Naim, Mohamed...................................................... SCD17.
Parry, Glenn C....................................................... SERV28.
Najafi Tavani, Saeed.................................................. NPD2.
Paton, Steve.............................................................. STR15.
Nakiboglu, Gulsun.................................................... EMP5.
Pawar, Kulwant............................................................ GO6.
Nassar, Shereen.......................................................... SCD6.
Pedrazzoli, Paolo..................................................... ENV20.
Neely, Andy.................................... MCP1, MCP11, SERV3.
Pela, Vania................................................................ STR18.
Netland, Torbjorn................................................. GSCN16.
Pellegrin-Romeggio, Frederic............................... SERV11.
Neumann, Michèle.................................................. ENV32.
Perez, Bernabé Escobar..................................................PI2
New, Steve................................... INTER8, PUB12, SCD14.
Pereira, Veridiana Rotondaro............................... SERV17.
Nickel, Stefan........................................................... PUB20.
Perin, Elisa................................................................ STR26.
Nielsen, Anders Paarup............................................ STR17.
Pero, Margherita....................................................... MKT3.
Nunes, Breno.............................................. ENV10, STR32.
Perotti, Sara............................................................... ENV7.
Oh, Joongsan.................................................. GO1, STR20.
Perrone, Giovanni................................. NETSTR1, UIFR5.
Ojadi, Frank......................................................... SUPPLY2.
Petkova, Boyana....................................................... STR11.
Okano, Marcelo..................................................... SERV26.
Petnji Yaya, Luc Honore......................................... MKT11.
Olhager, Jan.............................................................. STR39.
Pezzotta, Giuditta..................................................... GOV2.
Oliveira, Mónica...................................................... PUB20.
Philp, Lee.................................................................. STR38.
Oliveira, Ualison Rebula de..................................... STR27.
Philpott, Elly............................................................. STR19.
Oliver, Nick............................................................... MKT6.
Phippen, Andy......................................................... PUB29.
Oltra, Maria J............................................ HRM5, SERV27.
Piboonrungroj, Pairach.......................................... PERF3.
O’Neill, Peter........................................... PUB6, SUPPLY3.
Pilkington, Alan....................................................... TOM4.
O’Reilly, Seamus....................................................... STR23.
Pillai, Sreejit............................................................... STR1.
Ouertani, Zied........................................................ MCP11.
Pimenta, Marcio L.................................................... MKT2.
Owen, David............................................................. STR19.
Pinheiro de Lima, Edson......................................... ENV28.
Pache, Gilles............................................................... SCD2.
Platts, Ken.................... GO5, RBV2, RBV3, RBV6, STR14.
Padilla-Garrido, Nuria.............................................. EMP2.
Poksinska, Bozena.................................................. HRM15.
Pagell, Mark.............................................................. RISK4.
Ponce-Cueto, Eva...................................... ENV11, SERV10.
Paiva, Ely................................................. ENV39, INTER2.
Porcelli, Isabella...................................................... PUB19.
159
Index of authors
Potter, Antony............................................................ NPD3.
Rodon, Joan............................................................. ENV24.
Poulsen, René Taudal............................................... STR17.
Roehrich, Jens............................................... MCP4, MCP5.
Pourabdollahian, Golboo........................................ ENV20.
Romano, Pietro.......................................... MKT10, MKT9.
Póvoa, Ana............................................................... PUB20.
Romsdal, Anita...................................................... INTER9.
Power, Damien................................ PTNR1, RISK5, STR8.
Ronchi, Stefano..................................................... INTER3.
Prado-Prado, Jose Carlos....................................... HRM14.
Roscio, Sylvie........................................................... SERV1.
Prajogo, Daniel......................................................... UIFR6.
Rossi, Silvia.............................................................. ENV16.
Prester, Jasna.......................................................... SERV18.
Rotondaro, Roberto Gilioli................................... SERV17.
Putkiranta, Antero................................................ SERV15.
Rudberg, Martin.......................................................... GO3.
Quariguasi Frota Neto, João.................................... ENV10.
Russell, Suzana.................................................... PURCH2.
Rabinovich, Elliot................................................... MKT12.
Rutherford, Christine................................................ SCD8.
Radaelli, Giovanni...................................... PUB18, PUB27.
Sadler, Ian................................................................. GOV1.
Radnor, Zoe.................................................. PUB10, PUB6.
Säfsten, Kristina....................................................... STR31.
Rahman, Shams....................................................... SCD10.
Saghiri, Soroosh....................................................... STR34.
Raikisto, Pasi......................................................... SERV16.
Salloum, Mohammed............................................... STR22.
Raja, Jawwad............................................................ SERV5.
Sampieri Teissier, Nathalie...................................... PUB24.
Ramanathan, Ramakrishnan.................................. ENV31.
Sampson, Scott............................................................. SSC.
Ramos, Tânia Rodrigues Pereira............................. ENV12.
Santiago, Leonardo.................................................... FIN2.
Rapaccini, Mario..................................................... PUB19.
Santos, Juliana......................................................... SERV7.
Redding, Louis....................................................... SERV23.
Santos, Osmildo.................................................... SERV26.
Reed-Tsochas, Felix.................................. INTER8, SCD14.
Sarkis, Joseph............................................................. ENV7.
Reinhart, Gunther................................................... SCD15.
Sauvage, Thierry........................................................ ENV8.
Rengel-Domínguez, Maria Isabel............................. EMP2.
Scavarda, Annibal............................................... SUPPLY3.
Resta, Barbara.......................................................... GOV2.
Scavarda, Luiz Felipe................................................ MKT5.
Rhee, Seung-Kyu............................................ GO1, STR20.
Schaffer, Jens............................................................. MKT5.
Riccobono, Francesca......................................... NETSTR1.
Schellmann, Hendrik.............................................. SCD15.
Riedel, Johann............................................................. GO6.
Scherrer-Rathje, Maike... ENV15, ENV32, STR43, STR45.
Riezebos, Jan............................................................ HRM1.
Schilling, Robert....................................................... STR35.
Ritchie, Ross............................................................. RISK2.
Schipper, Lisette...................................................... PUB26.
160
Index of authors
Schiraldi, Massimiliano............................................. INV2.
Singh, Prakash............................................................ STR8.
Schiuma, Giovanni...................................... MCP11, PUB8.
Singh Srai, Jagjit......................................................... STR4.
Schmidt, Malin........................................................ SERV8.
Sinha, Tammi.................................................. PI3, PUB13.
Schoenherr, Tobias................................................ SERV19.
Siverbo, Kristian...................................................... PUB17.
Schols, Jos................................................................ PUB26.
Skold, Martin........................................................... SERV8.
Schuch, Luiz Marcelo Siegert..................................... FIN4.
Slepniov, Dmitrij..................................................... SCD11.
Schuster, Tassilo........................................................ ENV4.
Smallman, Clive....................................................... UIFR2.
Schwartze, Joerg....................................................... STR35.
Smart, Palie........................................................... SERV12.
Scott, Kurt................................................................. MCP8.
Smith, Dave............................................................. PUB29.
Segato, Federica....................................................... PUB16.
Smits, Maartje........................................................... STR42.
Segel, Erica.................................................................. INV2.
Söderberg, Björn........................................................ FIN3.
Seiple, Ruth............................................................... TOM1.
Sodhi, ManMohan................................................. INTER1.
Seuring, Stefan........................................................... RBV5.
Soeberg, Peder Veng.................................................... GO2.
Seymour, Jackie....................................................... PUB13.
Sohal, Amrik.............................................................. PUB6.
Shah, Ameer.......................................................... SERV16.
Sole, Francesco.......................................................... PUB8.
Shah, Janat................................................................... GO6.
Son, Byung-Gak..................................................... INTER1.
Sharifi, Hossein......................................................... NPD2.
Songini, Lucrezia...................................................... GOV2.
Shaw, Duncan.......................................................... ENV10.
Sousa, Rui............................................................... MKT12.
Shaw, Nicky............................................................... UIFR1.
Souza, Caio S........................................................ GSCN21.
Shee, Himanshu........................................................ GOV1.
Souza Junio, Wesley............................................... SERV20.
Shekar, Aruna......................................................... MCP10.
Spiller, Nicola.......................................................... PUB27.
Shi, Yongjiang.............. ENV19, ENV29, GSCN13, SCD18.
Spina, Gianluca....................................... ENV17, GSCN10.
Sianesi, Andrea..................................................... GSCN10.
Spring, Martin............................................. OMT2, SERV7.
Sierra, Vicenta......................................................... ENV24.
Srai, Jagjit Singh.......................... INN6, INTER7, SERV24.
Sikdar, Arijit............................................................ ENV13.
Staeblein, Thomas.................................................... MKT4.
Silva, Silvio.......................................................... SUPPLY1.
Stanczyk, Alina....................................................... GSCN1.
Silveira Martins, Guilherme.................................. GSCN3.
Steenhuis, Harm-Jan............................................... LEAN1.
Silvestro, Rhian....................................................... SCD12.
Stentoft Arlbjørn, Jan............................................. GSCN6.
Singh, Alka................................................................. STR8.
Stevenson, Mark......................................................... INV5.
161
Index of authors
Strandhagen, Jan Ola............................................ INTER9.
Towill, Denis............................................. SCD17, SERV21.
Stratton, Roy.............................................................. SCD3.
Trentin, Alessio........................................................ STR26.
Strohhecker, Jürgen................................................... EMP4.
Tsinopoulos, Christos................................. MCP8, STR25.
Subramanian, Nachiappan...................................... SCD10.
Turkulainen, Virpi.................................... GSCN4, GSCN9.
Sundarakani, Balan................................................. ENV13.
Turunen, Taija......................................................... SERV2.
Swartling, Dag........................................................ HRM15.
Usserau, Laetitia........................................................ EMP3.
Swink, Morgan....................................................... SERV29.
van der Aa, Wietze..................................................... INN2.
Szász, Levente........................................................... STR36.
van der Meer, Robert................................................. SCD9.
Szwejczewski, Marek........................................... NEWOP2.
Van der Vaart, Taco........................ PUB33, RISK5, STR11.
Tachizawa, Elcio...................................................... ENV18.
Van Donk, Dirk Pieter................ HRM1, INTER4, PUB33,
RISK5, STR21
Taisch, Marco........................................................... ENV20.
Tálamo, José Roberto........................................... GSCN15.
Talluri, Srinivas..................................................... SERV19.
Tan, Kim................................................................... OMT3.
Tate, Wendy L........................................................... MKT2.
Taylor, Andrew......................................................... STR47.
Taylor, Margaret....................................................... STR47.
Teixeira, Rafael........................................................ ENV39.
Teller, Christoph..................................................... GSCN5.
Teoh, Kenny Guan Cheng........................................ STR29.
Thawesaengskulthai, Natcha.................................... STR13.
Thirlaway, Kate........................................................ ENV36.
Thomassen, Maria Kollberg.................................. INTER9.
Thomé, Karim Marini................................................. GO4.
Thorne, Alan.............................................................. EMP3.
Tivey, Colin.............................................................. PUB15.
Tomasella, Maurizio.................................................. EMP3.
Tomino, Takahiro..................................................... MKT4.
Torres Júnior, Noel................................................ SERV20.
162
Van Dun, Desiree................................................... HRM10
Van Eck, Tim.......................................................... HRM10
Van Goubergen, Dirk.................................................... PI5.
Van Kampen, Tim.................................................... STR21.
Van Looy, Bart......................................................... SERV6.
van Offenbeek, Marjolein........................................ PUB21.
Vanpoucke, Evelyne.................................................. UIFR7.
van Raaij, Erik....................................................... INTER3.
Van Vuuren, Mark.................................................. HRM10.
Vega, Diego............................................................ SERV11.
Velaayudan, Arumugam............................................... PI6.
Vendrametto, Oduvaldo........................................ SERV26.
Vendrell-Herrero, Ferran...................................... SERV28.
Venesmaa, Julia....................................................... PUB30.
Vestergaard Matthiesen, Rikke................................ MCP9.
Vieira, Jose GV..................................................... GSCN21.
Vieira, Luciana.......................... GO4, INTER2, SUPPLY1.
Vinelli, Andrea............................................ STR16, STR48.
Visintin, Filippo...................................................... PUB19.
Index of authors
Visnjic, Ivanka................................ MCP1, SERV3, SERV6.
Williams, Sharon..................................... LEAN2, SERV21.
Vladimirova, Doroteya........................................... SERV4.
Wilson, Mark MJ...................................................... UIFR2.
Vogt, Oliver.............................................................. MCP8.
Winroth, Mats............................................. STR31, STR32.
von der Gracht, Heiko......................................... NEWOP1.
Wong, Chee Yew.................... NETSTR2, STR7, SUPPLY4.
Voss, Chris.................................................... MCP7, MCP9.
Wong, Christina WY........................................... SUPPLY4.
Vuori, Mervi............................................................. UIFR3.
Wong, Hartanto......................................................... EMP1.
Waehrens, Brian Vejrum........ GO2, SCD11, STR17, STR5.
Woodall, Philip......................................................... STR46.
Wagner, Jürgen Phil................................................ HRM12.
Wright, Nevan......................................................... PUB28.
Wagner, Stephan...................................................... ENV13.
Wu, Peng.................................................................. ENV29.
Walker, Helen.......................................................... ENV35.
Wu, Wei...................................................................... PUB5.
Walley, Paul............................................................... PUB9.
Yalabik, Baris............................................................. EMP5.
Walliman, Philippe................................................... STR43.
Yang, Biao.............................................................. SERV31.
Wallner, Thomas.................................... HRM7, NETSTR3.
Yang, Kum Khiong.................................................. PUB32.
Walls, Lesley.............................................................. SCD9.
Yang, Ying.............................................................. SERV31.
Wang, Yang.............................................................. ENV14.
Yazdani, Baback....................................................... PUB15.
Wänström, Carl........................................................ MCP6.
Yee, Choy Leong....................................................... STR29.
Warrender, Harry..................................................... STR38.
Yeung, Andy CL.................................................... GSCN20.
Wei, Tian..................................................................... STR2.
Yoho, Keenan............................................................. RBV1.
Welch, Christine............................................................ PI3.
Yokozawa, Kodo...................................................... LEAN1.
Whipple, Judith........................................................ UIFR7.
Yuksel-Ozkaya, Banu.............................................. MKT13.
Wiengarten, Frank........... INTER6, PUB3, RISK4, UIFR4.
Zanon, Celeste............................................. MKT1, MKT7.
Wiers, Vincent.......................................................... STR42.
Zhang, Min.................................................................. GO6.
Wiger, Malin............................................................ PUB23.
Zhang, Yufeng.............................................. STR28, STR30.
Wijk, Helle............................................................... PUB17.
Zhao, Yue................................................................... RBV2.
Wikner, Joakim.................................................... PURCH1.
Ziengs, Nick.............................................................. HRM1.
Wiktorsson, Magnus................................................ STR23.
Zilber, Silvia............................................................. ENV21.
Wilderom, Celeste.................................................. HRM10.
Zorzini, Marta........................................................... ENV7
Williams, Christopher......................................... SUPPLY5.
Wiktorsson, Magnus................................................ STR22.
Williams, Nigel......................................................... STR19.
Wilderom, Celeste.................................................. HRM10.
163
Index of authors
Williams, Christopher......................................... SUPPLY5.
Williams, Nigel......................................................... STR19.
Williams, Sharon..................................... LEAN2, SERV21.
Wilson, Mark MJ...................................................... UIFR2.
Winroth, Mats............................................. STR31, STR32.
Wong, Chee Yew.................... NETSTR2, STR7, SUPPLY4.
Wong, Christina WY........................................... SUPPLY4.
Wong, Hartanto......................................................... EMP1.
Woodall, Philip......................................................... STR46.
Wright, Nevan......................................................... PUB28.
Wu, Peng.................................................................. ENV29.
Wu, Wei...................................................................... PUB5.
Yalabik, Baris............................................................. EMP5.
Yang, Biao.............................................................. SERV31.
Yang, Kum Khiong.................................................. PUB32.
Yang, Ying.............................................................. SERV31.
Yazdani, Baback....................................................... PUB15.
Yee, Choy Leong....................................................... STR29.
Yeung, Andy CL.................................................... GSCN20.
Yoho, Keenan............................................................. RBV1.
Yokozawa, Kodo...................................................... LEAN1.
Yuksel-Ozkaya, Banu.............................................. MKT13.
Zanon, Celeste............................................. MKT1, MKT7.
Zhang, Min.................................................................. GO6.
Zhang, Yufeng.............................................. STR28, STR30.
Zhao, Yue................................................................... RBV2.
Ziengs, Nick.............................................................. HRM1.
Zilber, Silvia............................................................. ENV21.
Zorzini, Marta........................................................... ENV7.
164
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