TELEMECANIQUE MOTOR CONTROLLER

TELEMECANIQUE MOTOR CONTROLLER

TELEMECANIQUE MOTOR CONTROLLER

Use and Instructions

Bachelor’s thesis

Degree Program in Automation Engineering

Valkeakoski 20th June 2012

Yaw Adjei

Valkeakoski

Degree Programme in Automation Engineering

Author

Subject of Bachelor’s thesis

Yaw Adjei

ABSTRACT

2012

Telemecanique motor controller – use and instructions

ABSTRACT

Electric motors are versatile electrical machines used in the industry and in many domestic appliances. They convert electrical energy into mechanical (rotational) energy. Following the advent of Induction motors, which are simple, rugged, reliable, low cost and highly efficient, they need no extra starting motor or brushes, much of the modern day motor controllers are geared induction motors.

Telemecanique Motors Controllers Te Sys LUCM1XBL and Te Sys

LUCBX6BL are Direct On-Line (DOL) motor starters which could be used to:

give protection and control to 3-phase motors; o breaking function, o overload and short-circuit protection, o thermal overload protection and power switching.

LUCM1XBL can also be used for single-phase motors and offers the following added advantage:

control the application; o protection function alarms, o application monitoring (running time, number of faults, motor current values, ...), o logs (last 5 faults saved, together with motor parameter values).

This project seeks to provide electrical connection diagrams for the motor controller and instruction manual so that people with only the basic knowledge in electrical could safely connect, program/set and use the controllers thus, offering the possibility for the controllers to be used for student laboratory works. With this information, users could decide with which abnormal condition(s) the controller should give a warning signal and when to turn/switch the motor off.

Keywords Motor control, protection and monitoring.

28 p. + appendices 7 p.

Pages

CONTENTS

1 INTRODUCTION ....................................................................................................... 1

2 MOTORS .................................................................................................................... 2

2.1

Squirrel Cage Motor ............................................................................................ 3

2.1.1

Voltage .................................................................................................... 4

2.1.2

Power Factor (p.f.) ................................................................................... 5

2.1.3

Speed ....................................................................................................... 6

2.1.4

Torque ...................................................................................................... 7

2.2

Starting Methods ................................................................................................. 7

2.2.1

Direct-on-line (D.O.L.) ............................................................................ 7

2.2.2

Star-Delta (Y-Δ) Starting ......................................................................... 8

2.2.3

Frequency Converter ............................................................................. 10

2.2.4

Softstarter .............................................................................................. 11

3 TELEMECANIQUE MOTOR CONTROLLERS .................................................... 13

3.1

Te Sys LUCBX6BL .......................................................................................... 13

3.1.1

LUB12 ................................................................................................... 13

3.1.2

Te Sys LUCBX6BL Installation ........................................................... 17

3.2

Te Sys LUCM1XBL ......................................................................................... 19

3.2.1

Te Sys LUCM1XBL Installation ........................................................... 20

3.2.2

Service Temperature .............................................................................. 21

3.2.3

Te Sys LUCM1XBL Connection .......................................................... 21

3.2.4

Setting/Programming of the Te Sys LUCM1XBL ................................ 22

3.2.5

Power up and operating modes .............................................................. 23

3.2.6

Configuration (Config) Menu Programme ............................................ 23

3.2.7

Main Menu Programme ......................................................................... 24

CONCLUSION .............................................................................................................. 27

SOURCES ...................................................................................................................... 28

Appendix 1 DEFAULT SETTINGS AND OPTIONAL VALUES FO THE

LUCM1XBL

Appendix 2 REMOTE MONITORING AND CONFIGURATION OF THE TE SYS

CONTROL UNITS

Telemecanique motor controller – use and instructions

1 INTRODUCTION

This project was made at HAMK AutoMaint Lab, that is owned and run by Hämeen Ammattikorkeakoulu (HAMK University of Applied Sciences). In this project, the uses of Telemecanique motor controllers Te Sys

LUCM1XBL and Te Sys LUCBX6BL were explained and the instructions for its use provided.

The monitoring and controlling of three (3) phase induction motors has become the priority of most motor control designers and manufacturers with induction motors becoming the most used motors in the industry due to their comparable advantages. Hence, the controlling and monitoring of three (3) phase induction motors has become an indispensable objective in most industries.

This project seeks to provide connection diagrams, user’s manuals for the

Telemecanique Controllers Te Sys LUCM1XBL and Te Sys LUCBX6BL.

I wish to thank HAMK AutoMaint Unit for giving me this opportunity to undertake this thesis project as well as the whole HAMK institution. My profound gratitude also goes to Osmo Leiniäinen, my project supervisor and Hannu Pohjasto for their immense contribution and support.

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Telemecanique motor controller – use and instructions

2 MOTORS

Electrical Motors are generally referred to as electrical machines in that, well designed electric motors at times operate as generators. Rotating electrical machines could be used as a motor or a generator.

There are basically, AC and DC electric motors, based on the type of operating power supply. In AC motors, there are single phase (1-φ) and three phase (3- φ) motors. AC motors are usually either synchronous or asynchronous (induction) motors. The induction machine has gained popularity in the market due to its simple construction, durability, robustness, high efficiency and ease of starting.

Motors vibrate mechanically when in use. Motors are also used to drive different systems such as conveyors, pumps, fans and so on, hence motors need to be securely fixed to a place, usually referred to as mounting, to ensure good mechanical performance during use. Motor mounting may be implemented as foot or flange mount or as both.

Structurally, motors are usually semi-enclosed or at times totally enclosed.

Semi-enclosed motors usually have fans fitted at the non-drive end (Nend) to cool the motor during operation. For totally enclosed motors, airwater cooling with an interchangeable cassette cooler method is employed.

Exploded view of an induction machine is shown in figure 1

Motors need to be kept at the correct degree of protection to ensure long lifetime when operated under heavy duty conditions in severe environments. Two letters IP (International Protection) state the degree of protection. The first IP letter indicates the degree of protection against contact and penetration of solid objects whilst the second digit states the motor’s degree of protection against water.

The ends of a motor, as illustrated in figure 1, are as defined in the International Electrotechnical Committee (IEC) Standard as follows:

The D-end, which is the drive end of the motor.

The N-end, which is the non-drive end of the motor.

Figure 1 Exploded view of an induction machine

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Telemecanique motor controller – use and instructions

2.1 Squirrel cage motor

The Squirrel cage motor is the focus here because of its de-facto market dominance. The squirrel cage motor consists of a stationary stator and rotating rotor. The stator is firmly fixed into the motor casing known as the yoke or core. The stator is made of laminated iron plates to reduce eddy current effects from ac operation. The stator has axial grooves known as slots to accommodate the stator windings needed in the creation of a magnetic field for operation. Power supplied to the motor is connected to the stator.

The rotor of a squirrel cage motor is comprised of a cylindrical laminated core with parallel slots for carrying the rotor conductors (which are heavy bars of copper, aluminium, or alloys). The rotor bars are electrically connected by brazing, welding or bolting to two (2) heavy short- circuiting end-rings, which create permanently short-circuited rotor bars, hence the name ‘squirrel cage’.

Three-phase induction motors are self starting due to the presence of rotating magnetic field created by the three-phase supply which are out of phase. In single phase motors some form of starting is required. Common mechanisms of starting are through the use of starting winding or a capacitor. In using winding for starting, the main stator winding and the starting windings are made to be electrically out-of-phase leading to the creation of torque on the rotor. Capacitor start methods create an out-of-phase field with the stator winding’s field leading to the creation of torque. In most situations, the starting mechanism is removed when the motor gains speed.

Figures 2 and 3 shows the current-speed and torque-characteristics of an induction motor. (Thereja & Theraja 2007, 1244–1246.)

I(A)

Maximum starting current

Rated current, I n n(rpm)

Figure 2 Current-speed characteristics of an induction motor

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Telemecanique motor controller – use and instructions

T(Nm)

T start

T max

Pull-up

Torque

Full Load n (rpm) n s n s

Figure 3 Torque-speed characteristics of an induction motor

2.1.1 Voltage

Single phase induction motors can normally be connected to one (stated) voltage level, which depends on the market manufactured for. In most European countries, the normal single phase voltage supply is 230V.

Three phase motors (with a fixed number of poles) can normally be operated from two (2) different levels, depending on the connection of the stator windings. The stator windings are either connected in star (Y) or delta

(D).

In star connection, all the ends of the three (3) stator windings are connected at a common (star) point, with the coil starts (the other end) connected to the supply lines. In such a situation, the voltage across each coil

(between a line and the star point) is

1

/√

3

of the supply line voltage. So if the line voltage is 415V, the phase voltage is 230V.

In delta connection, the end (or the finish) of the first coil is connected to the start of the second coil, the second coil’s end is connected to the start of the third coil and the end of the third coil is connected to the start of the first coil. Thus, a loop is formed.

In delta connected motor, the electrical power input (and mechanical output power) is three (3) times that of a star connected motor.

Circuit symbols and terminal block connections on a motor for star and delta connections are shown in figures 4 and 5. (ABB. Softstarter Handbook, 2010,7.)

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Telemecanique motor controller – use and instructions

L1

U1

U2

L3

W1

W2 a. Circuit diagram

V2

V1

L2

W2

U1

L1

U2

V1

L2

V2

W1

L3

b. Motor terminal block

Figure 4 Star (Y) connection circuit diagram and on motor terminal block

L1

W2

W1

L3

V2

2 a. Circuit diagram

U1

V1

U2

L2

W2

U1

U2

V1

V2

W1

L1 L2

L3

b. Motor Terminal block

Figure 5 Delta (Δ) connection circuit diagram and on motor terminal block

2.1.2 Power Factor (p.f.)

AC devices make use of three (3) forms of power – active (P), reactive (Q) and apparent power (S). The active power is the one consumed by the motor and which it converts to mechanical power (action). The reactive power is needed for the magnetization of the motor (field). The phasor representation of various powers is as shown below in Figure 6.

φ

P

Q

S

Figure 6 Power triangle

The various powers are given by;

( ) ( )

(1)

( ) (2)

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Telemecanique motor controller – use and instructions

( )

( ) (3) where,

I is the circuit current

X

L

is the circuit’s inductive reactance

R is the circuit’s resistance

Z is the circuit’s total impedance.

The ratio of the active power (W) to the reactive (VA) is known as the power factor (p.f.). The power factor is also the cosine of the angle (φ) the current lags or leads the voltage. The power factor is usually between 0.7 and 0.9 for running motors. Usually large motors have large power factors and small motors have lower p.f. values. (ABB. Softstarter Handbook,

2010, 8; Thereja & Theraja 2007, 510–511.)

2.1.3 Speed

The synchronous speed of AC motor is determined by the number of poles of the stator windings and the frequency of the supply. The synchronous speed, n s

is given by; n s

(4) where, f is the supply frequency p is the number of poles.

Example

For a 4-pole motor running on a 50Hz supply, the synchronous speed is n s

= 1500 rpm

In practice, the rotor speed of an induction motor will never reach the synchronous speed. The motor’s speed is very close to the synchronous speed when not loaded but drops when the motor is loaded. Figure 7 shows the variations in speed of a motor with different loads.

T(Nm)

T start

T max

Rated speed, n r slip

Full Load n s n (rpm)

Figure 7 Induction motor torque-speed characteristics (slip shown)

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Telemecanique motor controller – use and instructions

The difference between the synchronous speed (n s

) and the rotor speed

(n r

), expressed a percentage of the synchronous speed is known as the slip

(s). The slip is usually between 1 and 3%.

Slip, s = n s

– n

n s r

(5)

(ABB. Softstarter Handbook, 2010, 6; Thereja & Theraja 2007, 1254—

1256.)

2.1.4 Torque

The torque developed by a three phase (3-φ) induction motor depends on the speed (refer to figure 7). The starting torque of an induction motor is usually about 1.5 times the rated torque. The maximum torque that could be developed an induction motor is about 2.5 times the rated torque. Motors with powers less than 30kW could have high maximum torque, up to about 3 times the rated torque. The maximum torque usually occurs at a rotor speed of about 80% of the synchronous speed.

The rated torque M r

of a motor could be calculated using the following formula;

M r

=

9.55 x P

n r out

(6)

M r

is the rated torque (Nm)

P out

is the rated motor output (W) n r

is the rated speed of the motor (rpm)

(ABB. Softstarter Handbook, 2010, 9; Thereja & Theraja 2007, 1280—

1281.)

2.2 Starting Methods

The most common starting methods are; i. Direct-on-line ii. Star-delta iii. Frequency converter iv. Soft starter

2.2.1 Direct-on-line (D.O.L.)

This happens to be the most common and simple starting method. This starting method employs the use of a main contactor and a thermal or electronic overload relay. In this method, the motor is connected in star or delta throughout its use. The starting current of this method is the short circuit current and is higher, about seven (7) times the rated motor current. With the motor not being energised at the first instant of starting, there exists also a current peak that can rise to about fourteen (14) times the motor’s rated current. Generally, smaller motors tend to have higher values of starting currents when used on D.O.L. starting. This is a major setback with this starting method.

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Telemecanique motor controller – use and instructions

Direct-on-line starting generally has higher torque, which is usually more than the necessary torque for most applications. This high torque leads to the creation of high stress on the couplings and the driven applications. Interestingly, there are situations in which this starting method works perfectly which make it the ideal starting method comparatively.

Figures 8 and 9 shows the circuit diagrams and picture of direct-on-line starter.

L1

L2

F1

F2

Q1

S1

F1 = Fuse

F2 = Thermal Overload

Q1 = Contactor

S1 = OFF Push Button

S2 = On Push Button

F2

S2

Q1

3-φ

M a. Power diagram

Q1 b. Control diagram

Figure 8 Direct-on-line starting; a. Power diagram and b. Control diagram

Contactor (Q1)

Miniature Circuit Breaker (MCB)

Thermal Overload (F2)

Figure 9 Picture of Direct-on-line starter

2.2.2 Star-Delta (Y-Δ) Starting

Star-delta starting has the starting torque and starting current reduced.

Starting equipment is normally made of three (3) contactors, an overload relay and a timer. The timer is used to set the time the motor remains in

8

Telemecanique motor controller – use and instructions the star position after start. Motors used for star-delta must be connected in delta during normal run, in order to use this starting arrangement.

With the motor connected in star during starting, the starting current is about 33% of the starting current if it was connected with D.O.L. starting and the starting torque too is about 25% of the available torque at D.O.L. starting.

Star-delta only works if the application has a light starting load. If the motor is too heavily loaded, the torque developed will not be enough to accelerate the motor up to speed before changing over to the delta position.

This method is suited for loads like pumps and fans where the starting torque is low. To reach the rated speed, a switch over to delta is a must.

Switching to delta results in high torques and peak currents. Such current peaks could be even higher than for D.O.L. starting.

At delta, the motor accelerates till the rated speed is reached, which is usually about 80-85% of the synchronous speed. The motor will finally settle at the speed where the load torque equals the motor torque and acceleration ceases. Applications with load torques higher than 50% of the motor rated torque will not be able to start using star-delta starting. Figures 10, 11 and 12 show the circuit diagrams and picture of star-delta connected starter.

L1

L3

F1

Q1

F2

Q3

Q2

3-φ

M

Figure 10 Star-delta power diagram

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Telemecanique motor controller – use and instructions

F1

S1

F2

S2

Q1

Q1

Q1

K1

K1

Q2

Q3

Q3

Q2

K1

F1 = Fuse

F2 = Thermal Overload

Q1 = Main Contactor

Q2 = Star Contactor

Q3 = Delta Contactor

K1 = Timer

S1 = OFF Push Button

S2 = On Push Button

Figure 11 Star-delta control diagram

Timer (Pneumatic), K1

Auxilliaries

(K1, Q1, Q2, Q3, Q4)

Main Contactor (Q1)

Delta Contactor (Q3)

Star Contactor (Q2)

Figure 12 Picture of star-delta starter

(ABB. Softstarter Handbook, 2010, 9—15; Thereja & Theraja 2007,

1329–1338.)

2.2.3 Frequency Converter

The frequency converter, also known as variable frequency drive (VFD), variable speed drive (VSD) or drive converts the usual supply AC voltage of constant frequency to AC voltage whose frequency could be varied.

The drive consists of mainly two parts – a rectifier and an inverter. The rectifier converts the AC (50 or 60Hz) to DC and the inverter converts the

DC back to AC of variable frequency (usually 0-250Hz). The drive helps to control the speed of an induction motor easily as the speed of an induction motor depends on the supply frequency (refer to equation 4).

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Telemecanique motor controller – use and instructions

Through the control of the frequency, the rated motor torque is available at low speed and the starting current too, is low, between 0.5 and 1.0 times the motor rated current. The highest current would be 1.5 times the rated current (I n

).

Another useful feature of the drive is its softstop function. A drive system could be brought to a stop gradually and avoid jerking. The softstop function is very useful, for instance when transporting fragile items, the conveyor carrying the items could be brought to a stop gradually to reduce the incidence of breakage when stopping. Circuit diagram and a picture of a frequency drive is shown in Figure 13.

L1

L2

L3

AC

DC

DC

AC

3-φ

M a. Circuit diagram b. Picture of drive

Figure 13 Frequency converter a. Circuit diagram and b. Picture

(ABB. Softstarter Handbook, 2010, 16—17; Thereja & Theraja 2007,

1824–1828.)

2.2.4 Softstarter

The softstarter regulates a motor’s voltage with printed circuit board made mainly of thyristors. Softstarters produce low starting voltage thus, motor’s starting current and starting torque are also low. Low voltage starting prevents jerks, produced starting torque just play between gear wheels or stretching of driving belts (or chains). Voltage is then increased gradually so, the motor starts to accelerate.

One advantage of the softstarter is the ability to adjust the torque to the exact need of the motor, either loaded or unloaded. Even though the full torque is achieved during running but, the low starting torque reduces strain on the drive system which leads to low maintenance on the drive.

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Telemecanique motor controller – use and instructions

Softstarters also have softstop function which is very useful when momentary stops are not required in a drive system, for instance, to prevent water hammering in a pipe system and protecting of fragile materials on a conveyor. Figure 14(a and b) shows the circuit diagram and picture of a softstarter.

L1

L2

L3

3-φ

M a. Circuit diagram b. Picture

Figure 14 Softstarter a. Circuit diagram and b. Picture

(ABB. Softstarter Handbook, 2010, 18—19; Thereja & Theraja 2007,

1825.)

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Telemecanique motor controller – use and instructions

3 TELEMECANIQUE MOTOR CONTROLLERS

Telemecanique Motors Controllers Te Sys LUCM1XBL and Te Sys

LUCBX6BL are Direct On-Line (DOL) motor starters which could be used to:

give protection and control of a 3-phase motors; o breaking function, o overload and short-circuit protection, o thermal overload protection and power switching.

LUCM1XBL can also be used for single-phase motors and offers the following added advantage;

control the application; o protection function alarms, o application monitoring (running time, number of faults, motor current values, ...), o logs (last 5 faults saved, together with motor parameter values).

3.1 Te Sys LUCBX6BL

Telemecanique Motor Controller Te Sys LUCBX6BL is used in conjunction with Motor Starter Power Base LUB12 for light loads (12A up to

600VAC) or LUB32 for heavy loads (32A, 600VAC), both from Telemecanique. In this Thesis, the LUB12 Motor Starter Power Base was used.

3.1.1 LUB12

LUB 12 is a Non-reversing motor starter base from Telemecanique.

Table 1 gives the technical details of the LUB 12.

Table 1 LUB12 Starter technical specifications

Horse Power/Wattage Rating (3-Phase)

3HP/2238W @200/240VAC;

7.5HP/[email protected];

10HP/[email protected]/600VAC:

(1-Phase)

0.5HP/[email protected];

2HP/[email protected]

Screw Clamp Terminals

Yes

12A

1NO/1NC

Non-Reversing

Screw Clamp

1.98Pounds/0.9kg

Control Connection

Self Protected

Ampere Rating

Auxiliary Contacts

Action

Terminal Type

Weight

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Telemecanique motor controller – use and instructions

Figure 15 shows the parts of the LUB12 motor starter together with its blanking covers.

Rotary knob

LUB12

Coil terminals A1 and A2

LU9C1 in place for auxiliary contact, communication or function modules

LU9C2 in place for add-on contact blocks

Figure 15 LUB12 and blanking covers

Note: In order to use the starter LUB12, voltage (24V DC) must be supplied to the coil terminals A1 and A2.

The blanking covers could be replaced with the following modules, in table 2, for additional features.

Table 2 Blanking covers replacement modules

Cover

LU9C2

LU9C1

Replacement Module

LU9BC11

LU9BC20

LUFN02 (Auxiliary contact module)

LUFN11 (Auxiliary contact module)

14

Function(s)

To give additional 1NC (95-96) – fault signalling and 1NO (17-18) contact – indicating rotary knob in position

To give additional 2NO contacts.

1NO (97-98) for fault signalling and 1NO (17-18) for indicating rotary knob in ready position

For additional 2NC contacts (31-32 and 41-42)

For additional 1NC contact (31-32) and 1 NO contacts (43-44)

Telemecanique motor controller – use and instructions

LUFN20 (Auxiliary contact module)

LUFDA01/LUFDA10

(Function module)

LUFW10 (Function module)

LUFV2 (Function module)

LUFC00 (Communication module – Parallel bus)

ASILUFC5 (Communication module – Serial bus)

LULC07 (Communication module – Serial bus)

LULC031 (Communication module – Serial bus)

For additional 2NO contacts (33-34 and 43-44)

Thermal fault and automatic or remote reset

Thermal overload alarm module

Motor load indication module

Parallel wiring module

AS-Interface communication module

Profibus DP communication module

Modbus communication module

The following modules are used with Telemecanique

LUCB/LUCC/LUCD control units only (here Te Sys LUCBX6BL):

LUFDA01/LUFDA10

LUFDH11

LUFW10

LUFV2

All other modules could be used with both Telemecanique

LUCB/LUCC/LUCD and LUCM (here Te Sys LUCM1XBL – discussed later) control units. Figure 16(a and b) below show pictures of LU9BC11 and LU9BC20

LUA1C200

LUA1C110

LU9BC20

LU9BC11 a. LU9BC11 b. LU9BC20

Figure 16 Picture of a. LU9BC11 and b. LU9BC20 with their bases

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Telemecanique motor controller – use and instructions

The pictures below in Figure 17 shows the replacement modules for LU9C1 a. LUFN02 c. LUFN20 b. LUFN11 d. LUFDA10

f. LUFV2 e. LUFW10 g. LUFC00 h. ASILUFC5 i. LULC07

Figure 17 Replacement modules for LU9C1

16 j. LULC031

Telemecanique motor controller – use and instructions

3.1.2 Te Sys LUCBX6BL Installation

The Te Sys LUCBX6BL is installed in the unit LUB12 in conjunction with LU9C1 and LU9C2 or their replacement modules. Before use, the current settings on the device must be set to conform to the load it is to protect. The Te Sys LUCBX6BL has the following technical specifications given in table 3:

Table 3 Te Sys LUCBX6BL technical specifications

Motor power

Thermal protection adjustment range

Control circuit voltage

(Uc)

Overload tripping class

Main functions

Mounting mode

Current consumption

Operating time

Load type

Tripping threshold

Tripping class

Rated insulation voltage

(Ui)

Rated impulse withstand voltage (Uimp)

92W at 400 ... 440V AC 50/60Hz

0.15 ... 0.6A

24V DC (20 ... 27V for DC 24V circuit in operation)

Class 10 – frequency limit: 40 ... 60Hz, -25 ... 70 o

C

Earth fault protection

Manual Reset

Protection against overload and short-circuit

Protection against phase failure and phase imbalance

Plug-in

130mA at 24V DC I maximum while closing with

LUB12; 602mA at 24V DC Irms sealed with

LUB12

35ms opening with LUB12 for control circuit;

70ms closing with LUB12 for control circuit

3-phase motor – self cooled

14.2 x Ir +/- 20%

10 (time out, in seconds, prior to trigger)

690V conforming to IEC 60947-1

6kV conforming to IEC 60947-6-2

Mass 0.140kg

Figure 18 below shows parts of the LUCBX6BL parts.

Extraction and locking handle

Sealing of locking handle

Locking of setting

Figure 18 LUCBX6BL control unit parts

17

Ir adjustment dial Test button

Telemecanique motor controller – use and instructions

I r

, denotes the trip current and is the current above which the controller will trip the motor circuit. Figures 19 and 20 show the mounting procedure of LUCBX6BL and its connection and equivalent scheme respectively.

LUCBX6BL

LUB12

Blanking covers

Coil terminals

Figure 19 Mounting of LUCBX6BL into LUB12

L1 L2 L3

Auxiliaries

L1 L2 L3

C.U.

3-φ

M

3-φ

M

Figure 20 Connection and equivalent scheme of the motor control unit (C.U.)

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Telemecanique motor controller – use and instructions

The Telemecanique Te Sys LUCBX6BL has the following built in functions:

Thermal overload protection

Over current protection (14.2 x the setting current)

Short circuit protection (14.2 x the maximum current)

Protection against phase loss

Protection against phase imbalance

Earth fault detection

Thermal overload test function

Manual reset

Thermal overload alarm (with module LUFW10)

Thermal overload signalling and manual reset ( with module

LUFDH11)

Thermal overload signalling and automatic or remote reset (with modules LUFDA01 and LUFDA10)

Indication of motor load (with module LUFV)

(Schneider Electric. TeSys U Starter-controllers Catalogue, 2008, 1—10,

19.)

3.2 Te Sys LUCM1XBL

Telemecanique Te Sys LUCM1XBL is a multi function motor controller used in conjunction with Telemecanique LUB12 together with the blank covers LU9C1 and LU9C2 or replacement modules for the blank covers. It is a plug-in module for the LUB12 starter. The Te Sys LUCM1XBL is digital motor controller with two (2) line digital display to show the various circuit parameters being controlled and monitored. It also has keypads for the setting of the various configurable parameters. Modules for functional enhancement of the control unit are given in Table 2 above. Figure

21 shows parts of the LUCM1XBL control unit.

Sealing of locking handle

Extracting and locking handle

Built-in display window

(2 lines, 12 characters)

4-button keypad

Modbus RS485 communication port (connection by

RJ45 connector)

24V DC auxiliary power supply

Figure 21 Te Sys LUCM1XBL parts

The Te Sys LUCM1XBL technical specifications are given in table 4.

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Telemecanique motor controller – use and instructions

Table 4 Technical specifications of Te Sys LUCM1XBL

Operating Voltage

Power

415V AC @ 3-phase; 240V AC @ 1-phase

250W (3-phase)

Current setting 0.35 ... 1.4A

Overload Tripping Class 5 ... 30s

Mass 0.175kg

The Te Sys LUCM1XBL has the following built functions

Thermal overload protection (with choice trip class from 5 ... 30)

Overcurrent protection 3 to 17 x the setting current

Short-circuit protection

Protection against phase loss

Protection against phase imbalance

Earth fault protection

Thermal overload test function

Overtorque protection/Mechanical jams

Protection against no-load running/idling

Protection against long starting time

Manual or automatic reset

Fault indication alarm

Log function (log of the last 5 trips)

Monitoring function (display of main motor parameters)

3.2.1 Te Sys LUCM1XBL Installation

Figure 22 below describes the installation procedure of LUCM1XBL

LUCM1XBL

LUB12

Blanking covers

Coil terminals

Figure 22 Installation of Te Sys LUCM1XBL

20

Telemecanique motor controller – use and instructions

(Schneider Electric. TeSys U Starter-controllers Catalogue, 2008, 11—18,

20.)

3.2.2 Service Temperature

The Te Sys LUCM1XBL control unit has internal temperature monitoring function that cannot be disabled.

The warning message ‘Warm-IntTmp’ is displayed on the display window o as soon as the internal temperature exceeds 80

At a temperature of 90 o

C.

C the control unit triggers the starter and the message ‘Internet Trip’ appears on the display window.

After tripping due to high temperature, the value of the internal temperature is stored in register 472. The value may be monitored via the RS485 communication port:

locally using the PowerSuite programme

remotely via the Modbus link.

Some level of clearance is required between adjacent mounted control units, which depend on the ambient temperature of the unit. Figure 23 below highlights the clearance distance required between adjacent control units as given in Table 5. d d

Figure 23 Clearance distance between adjacent control units

Table 5 Recommended distances for various ambient temperatures

Distance to be maintained d = 0mm d ≥ 9mm d ≥ 20mm

Ambient temperature

45 o

C

55 o

C

60 o

C

3.2.3 Te Sys LUCM1XBL Connection

The Te Sys LUCM1XBL has two (2) 24V DC power supply options:

The supply for the control circuit, accessible only through the

A1/A2 terminals on the power base

The auxiliary power supply, on the unit’s front panel.

The auxiliary power supply is used in the following situations:

21

Telemecanique motor controller – use and instructions

Initial configuration and adjustment before installing the power base or before connecting the power supply of the control circuit to the A1/A2 terminals (here, of LUB12).

During ‘Off’ or ‘LastTrip’ modes and making changes to the settings.

During ‘Off’ or ‘LastTrip’ modes and when displaying fault types or statistics.

During ‘Off’ or ‘LastTrip’ modes and communicating with the multifunction control unit.

When using a function module (communication or application)

Note: Input A2 of the LUB12 control circuit is internally connected the negative (-) input terminal of the auxiliary power supply. If the polarity of the LUB12 A1/A2 terminal is inverted, the control unit triggers an internal fault.

3.2.4 Setting/Programming of the Te Sys LUCM1XBL

ESC

The Te Sys LUCM1XBL has four buttons for programming/setting the various configurable parameters. It has a 2-line, 12-character digital display to facilitate the programming of the device. Table 6 below gives a snap shot of the use of the various keys in navigating through the

LUCM1XBL configurable parameters.

Table 6 Keypad functions

ENT

Move up one level in the menu.

The ESC button does not save any settings.

Browse in:

-

-

- a programme => sub-programmes a sub-programme => functions a function => settings

Browse available settings.

Increase or decrease the value of the displayed setting.

1. Move down one level in the programme.

2. Confirm and save the displayed setting.

This key may need to be pressed several times to return to the program.

Some sub-programmes include only functions and their settings.

Others include functions with several parameters and the settings

The ‘=’ sign precedes a factory setting.

The ‘?’ sign precedes available settings.

To quickly increase or decrease the value of a setting, hold down the corresponding key.

Once you have saved the setting o

The ‘?’ sign is replaced by ‘=’ o The setting is displayed for 2 seconds, then the display returns automatically to the next highest

22

Telemecanique motor controller – use and instructions level.

3.2.5 Power up and operating modes

The operating mode depends on the system’s status. Table 7 below contains the system modes of the LUCM1XBL

Table 7 Te Sys LUCM1XBL System modes

Start-up phase

Initial power up

Next power-ups

‘Configuration’ mode

‘Pause’ mode (with power supply to the to the control circuit A1/A2 of LUB 12)

‘Off’ mode (with no power supply to the to the control circuit A1/A2 of

LUB 12)

‘Run’ mode

After start-up phase

Initial Power up: The first time the multifunction control unit

(Te Sys LUCM1XBL) is powered up, after leaving the factory, the unit is in the ‘Configuration’ mode. The interface automatically displays the ‘Config Menu’ programme.

The LUCM1XBL control unit must be configured before authorising the power poles to be closed.

The LUCM1XBL interface consists of two (2) programme: Config Menu and Main Menu.

The Config Menu programme can be accessed:

either during the commissioning,

or from the Main programme, by performing a reset using the

84_RstToDfts function.

3.2.6 Configuration (Config) Menu Programme

Configuration settings for the LUCM1XBL consist of the following program:

23

Telemecanique motor controller – use and instructions

Config Menu

Language

<ESC

ENT>

Language

= English

Configure

LoadType

<ESC

ENT> LoadType

= 3PhMotor

Configure

Base

<ESC

ENT>

Base

To choose the language for the dialogues.

To choose the load type

(single- or three-phase).

To choose power base type used.

Configure

AuxFan

<ESC

ENT>

= SelfProStr

AuxFan

= No

To choose the motor’s thermal protection.

Configure

LR Conf

<ESC

ENT>

LR Conf

= Remote

? Local

To choose the type of access to the configuration.

Configure

End Config

<ESC

ENT>

Configure

= No

To confirm the configuration and exit.

? Yes

Note: All subsequent users do not have automatic access to the configuration menu, automatic access is possible only on the first power-up from factory. Default value settings are given in the appendix. Configuration is done with the 4 button/key of the controller.

3.2.7 Main Menu Program

Main menu settings for the LUCM1XBL consist of the following programme:

24

Telemecanique motor controller – use and instructions

Main Menu

1_Reference

<ESC

ENT>

1_Reference

11_Catalog

Main Menu

2_Display

<ESC

ENT> 2_Display

21_AvCurrent

Main Menu

3_Setup

<ESC

ENT>

3_Setup

31_FLASet

Main Menu

<ESC

ENT>

4_AdvSetup 4_AdvSetup

41_TripClass

Main Menu

5_CommSetup

<ESC

ENT>

5_CommSetup

51_Drop

To view the configuration data.

To choose the setting to display in ‘Run’ mode.

To adjust the basic parameter.

To configure the protection functions and the associated warnings.

To configure the Modbus RS

485 communication port.

Main Menu

6_Module

<ESC

ENT>

5_CommSetup To configure the function module.

61_ID Clear

Main Menu

7_Statistics

<ESC

ENT>

7_Statistics

71_Trip0

To view the statistics on the

‘LastTrip’ and ‘Run’ information.

Main menu

8_Password

<ESC

ENT>

8_Password

81_Unlock

To activate the password or reset the parameters and statistics.

The LUCM1XBL has default settings, which it maintains even if the main menu programme has not being set-up. Default values are available at the appendix. Navigating through the main menu programme for set-up is mainly done with the four (4) buttons keypad on the front panel of the control unit: ESC, ▲, ▼, and ENT.

To have access to most of the Sub-programmes, Functions, Parameters and Settings of the LUCM1XBL, it must be programmed when it is in the

‘Pause’ mode.

It must be noted that, 1_Referenc and 7_Statistics sub-programmes are not alterable in the Main Menu.

25

Telemecanique motor controller – use and instructions

Programming in the ‘Run’ mode permits only the 2_Display and 3_Setup functions to be modified.

When in the Main Menu program, if no key is pressed in 30 seconds period, the system returns to the current mode (Run or Pause).

When in the ‘Pause’ or ‘Off’ mode, pressing the ENT key, takes you to the first sub-program (here 1_Reference).

Press ENT again to move to the functions available in the 1_Reference sub-program (11_Catalog), in the function menu, use ▼▲ keys to navigate through available functions or, in the first sub-program (here 1_Reference) use the ▼▲ keys to move to the next sub-program, pressing the ▼ button takes you to the second sunprogram (here 2_Display).

Detailed values for the sub-programs, functions, parameters, factory settings and available optional values are available at the appendix.

(Schneider Electric. LUCM and LUCMT Multifunction Control Unit User

Guide, 2008)

26

Telemecanique motor controller – use and instructions

CONCLUSION

The objectives set to this project were successfully achieved. The Telemecanique Motor Controllers could be installed, tested and commissioned successfully.

The controllers are to be used in the students’ laboratory after the successful commissioning at the AutoMaint Laboratory, which was also realised here, thus the controllers are ready for use by students when the next year starts.

The appendix contains detailed main menu settings options and default values of the various parameters which can help students use the controller

(LUCM1XBL) upon a brief orientation.

There are options for the improvement in the use of the controllers. Remote monitoring and configuration can be conducted through the use of the appropriate modules, for which the various communication protocols available are provided in Appendix 2.

27

Telemecanique motor controller – use and instructions

SOURCES

ABB. Softstarter Handbook, November 2010, pdf-file. Accessed 3 January

2012. http://www05.abb.com/global/scot/scot209.nsf/veritydisplay/6b4e1a35308

14df0c12579bb0030e58b/$file/1sfc132060m0201.pdf

Schneider Electric. LUCM and LUCMT Multifunction Control Unit User

Guide 03/2008, pdf-file. Accessed 12 December 2011. http://www.engineering.schneiderelecric.dk/Attachments/ia/use_main/tesys_lucm_lucmt_multifunction_con trol_unit_user_guide.pdf

Schneider Electric. TeSys U Starter-controllers Catalogue, October 2008, pdf-file. Accessed 10 December 2011. http://www.global-download.schneiderelecric.com/8525797C002E49F6/all/8CD39D211B51E77A852579DD006

B9A76/$File/cat.%20tesys%20u%20-%20en.pdf

Theraja, B.L. & Theraja, A.K. 2007. A Textbook of Electrical Technology. 24th edition. New Delhi, India: S. Chand.

28

Telemecanique motor controller – use and instructions

DEFAULT SETTINGS AND OPTIONAL VALUES FO THE LUCM1XBL

Appendix 1

Programme Subprogramme

Config

Menu

3_Setup

-

Main Menu

1_Reference

2_Display

4_AdvSetup

Function Parameter Factory settings or

Language - profile

= English

Load type

Base

AuxFan

LR Conf (from version V3.x onwards)

End Config

11_Catalog

12_Firmware

13_FLA Range

14_LoadType

15_AuxFan

16_Base

21_AvCurrent

22_ThermCap

23_L1Current

24_L2Current

25_L3Current

26_GFCurrent

27_LastTrip

28_PhaseImb

31_FLASet

32_TestTrip

33_Pause

34_Language

41_TripClass

42_ResetMode

43_RstAdjust

44_MagTrip

45_OLWarning

46_GroundFlt

47_PhaseImb

48_Jam

49_UndrLd

5_CommSetup 51_Drop

-

-

-

-

= 3PhMotor

= SelfProStr

= No

= Remote

Optional values

? Francais

? Espanol

? Deutsch

? Italiano

? 1 PhMotor

? Starter

? Yes

? Local

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

= No

LUCM1XBL

? Yes

Rev: 1.11

0.35 ... 1.4A

= 3 PhMotor

= No

= SelfProtStr

Read only

(configured in

Config Menu)

= Yes

= No

= No

= No

= No

= No

= No

= No

LUCM1XBL = 0.35

? No

? Yes

? Yes

? Yes

? Yes

? Yes

? Yes

? Yes

? 0.35 ... 1.4

-

-

-

= No

= No

= English

? Yes

? Yes

? Francais

? Espanol

? Deutsch

? Italiano

-

-

= 5

= Manual

? 5 ... 30

? Remote/Ent

? Auto

ResetTime

-

Warning

Warm Level

= 120s ? 1...1000

= 1420%FLA ? 300...1700

= On

= 85%

(Capacity)

? Off

? 10...100

Trip

Trip Time

TripLevel

Warning

= On

= 1.0s

= 30%FLA

= On

Warning Level = 30%FLA

Trip = On

TripTimeStrt = 0.7s

TripTimeRun = 5s

? Off

? 0.1 ...1.2

? 20...500

? Off

? 20...500

? Off

? 0.2...20

? 0.2...20

TripLevel

Warning

= 10%IMB

= On

Warn Level = 10IMB

Trip

TripTime

TripLevel

Warning

= On

= 5s

= 200%FLA

= On

Warn Level = 200%FLA

Trip = On

TripTime 10s

TripLevel

Warning

= 50%FLA

= On

Warn Level = 50%FLA

- = 1

? 10...30

? Off

? 10...30

? Off

? 1...30

? 100... 800

? Off

? 100...800

? Off

? 1...200

? 30...100

? Off

? 30...100

? 1...247

(Drop address

Telemecanique motor controller – use and instructions

6_Module

7_Statistics

8_Password

52_Baud

53_Parity

54_Control

55_CommLoss

61_ID Clear

62_Reference

-

-

-

-

-

Module

Catalog

127 is reserved for point-topoint with configuration software such as PowerSuite

?1200...19200 = 19200bps

None

= On

= Ignore

? Even

? Off

= Yes

ID = 0

LUCM1XBL

-

? Dropout

? Trip

? Warning

? No

63_ID Set

Firmware

-

64_Param dec Parameter 1-10 = 00000

65_Param hex Parameter 1-10 = 00000

71_Default 0 -

Rev: 1.11

= 0

72_Trip1

73_Trip2

-

-

? 0....149

?00000...65535

?00000...FFFF

In case of a return to factory settings, the statistical data is erased.

74_Trip3

75_Trip4

76_Totals

81_Unlock

82_Lock

83_Rst Stats

84_RstToDFTS

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

Passwd?

NewPSD?

= No

= No

0000...9999

0000...9999

? Yes

? Yes

Telemecanique motor controller – use and instructions

Appendix 2

REMOTE MONITORING AND CONFIGURATION OF THE

TE SYS CONTROL UNITS

Telemecanique motor controller – use and instructions

Appendix 2/1

1 Te Sys LUCM1XBL

The Telemecanique control unit Te Sys LUCM1XBL has an RJ-45 communication port through which the control unit can be monitored and configured remotely. When used, it is possible to remotely programme and monitor all functions.

The following modules also allows for the stated functions to be remotely monitored/configured on the LUCM1XBL:

Starter status monitoring (ready, running, fault) – with any communication module (modules ASILUC5, LUFC00,

LULC07, LULC031)

Alarms monitoring – modules LULC031, LULC07

Remote reset through a bus – modules LULC031, LULC07

Fault signalling and differentiation – modules LULC031,

LULC07

Log function – modules LULC031, LULC07

2 Te Sys LUCBX6BL

It is also possible to configure/monitor the control unit LUCBX6BL, through the attachment of the appropriate module. The following modules also allows for the stated functions to be remotely monitored/configured on the LUCBX6BL:

Thermal overload alarm monitoring – module LUFW10

Thermal overload signalling and manual reset – module

LUFDH11

Thermal overload signalling and automatic or remote reset – module LUFDA10

Indication of motor load (analogue) – module LUFV2

Starter status (ready, running, fault) – any communication module (modules ASILUC5, LUFC00, LULC07, LULC031)

Reset through a bus – modules LULC031, LULC07

Alarms monitoring – modules LULC031, LULC07

Indication of motor load – modules LULC031, LULC07

Fault signalling and differentiation – modules LULC031,

LULC07

3 PowerSuite Software

The PowerSuite Software workshop is a user-friendly tool designed for setting up the motor control units.

It contains various functions designed for setup phases such as:

Telemecanique motor controller – use and instructions

Appendix 2/2

Preparing configuration

Start-up

Maintenance

The PowerSuite software workshop is compatible with Bluetooth wireless link to facilitate start-up and maintenance.

The PowerSuite Software version designed for this controller is the

VW3A8104, both for PCs and pocket PCs. Newer versions may be compatible as well.

In order to connect the PC to the control units or modules, the VW3

A8 106 cable is needed.

VW3 A8 106 Cable

3.1 Functions

3.1.1 Preparing and configurations

The PowerSuite software workshop can be used to generate the device configuration, which can be saved, printed and exported to office automation software on its own.

3.1.2 Start-up

When the PC is connected to the device, the PowerSuite software workshop can be used to:

Transfer the generated configuration

Adjust

Monitor. This option has been enhanced with new functions such as: o The oscilloscope o The high-speed oscilloscope (minimum time base: 2 ms) o The FFT (Fast Fourier Transform) oscilloscope o Display of communication parameters

Telemecanique motor controller – use and instructions

Appendix 2/3

Control

Save the final configuration

3.1.3 Maintenance

To facilitate maintenance operations, the PowerSuite software workshop can be used to:

Compare the configuration of a device currently being used with a saved configuration

Manage the user’s installed equipment base, in particular: o Organize the installed base into folders (electrical equipment, machinery, workshops, and so.) o Store maintenance messages o Facilitate Modbus TCP connection by storing the IP address

3.1.4 User interface

The PowerSuite software workshop can be used to:

Present the device parameters (arranged by function) in the form of illustrated views of diagrams or simple tables

Customize the parameter names

Create: o A user menu (choice of particular parameters) o Monitoring control panels with graphic elements

(cursors, gauges, bar charts)

Perform sort operations on the parameters

Display text in five languages (English, French, German,

Italian and Spanish). The language changes immediately and there is no need to restart the programme.

It also features online contextual help:

On the PowerSuite tool

On the device functions by direct access to the user manuals.

3.2 Connections

3.2.1 Modbus and serial link

The PowerSuite software workshop can be connected directly to the device terminal port or Modbus network port via the serial port on the PC.

Telemecanique motor controller – use and instructions

Appendix 2/4

Two types of connection are possible:

With a single device (point-to-point connection), use a VW3 A8 106 PC serial port connection kit.

With a number of devices (multidrop connection), use the XGS Z24 interface.

3.2.2 Modbus TCP communication network

The PowerSuite software workshop can be connected to a Modbus TCP network.

In this case, the devices can be accessed:

Using a TSX ETG 100 Modbus TCP/Modbus gateway

3.2.3 Bluetooth wireless link

The PowerSuite software workshop can communicate via a Bluetooth® radio link if the device is equipped with a Bluetooth® Modbus VW3 A8 11 4. The adapter plugs into the device connector terminal port or Modbus network port and has a range of

10 m (class 2).

If the PC does not feature Bluetooth® technology, use the VW3 A8 11 5 USB -Bluetooth® adapter.

3.2.4 Remote maintenance

A simple Modbus TCP connection is all that is required for the PowerSuite software workshop to support remote monitoring and diagnostics.

When devices are not connected to the Modbus TCP network, or it is not directly accessible, various remote transmission solutions may be used instead (modem, teleprocessing gateway, and so on).

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