Yamaha | MEP4 | Owner's Manual | Yamaha MEP4 Owner's manual

Yamaha MEP4 Owner's manual
YAMAHA
OWNERS MANUAL
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EE ————————
Most owner's manuals tell you how to use the product. We will explain how to operate
the MEP4, and give some of examples of how it can be used. But there is no wrong
way to use the MEP4. it is totally up to your creativity to use this amazingly flexible tool
to the fullest extent. The separately included “MEP4 Example Book” will give further
detailed setups that you will want to try out.
——— CONTENTS
ABOUT THIS MANUAL... 1 UTILITY MODE (Various useful
INTRODUCTIÓN.......... nan 2 FUNCTIONS) ove, 3b
PRECAUTIONS 0 ancarenneneees 3 MEMORY PROTECT ................. mmm. 35
FRONT/REAR PANEL... 4 MEMORY NAME INPUT cco 35
HOW DOES THE MEP4 WORK?.................. 6 EDIT BUFFER INITIALIZATION............... 36
OPERATION (RUN mode)... 9 PROGRAM CHANGE RECEIVE ................ 37
SHORT OUTLINE OF EDIT MODE... 11 FOOT SWITCH ASSIGN coco, 40
SIMPLE SETUP EXAMPLE MIDE MONITOR... eee, 41
(Echo Effect) ..........cooeeiiii 12 MIDI BULK DUMP ci, 42
STORE ooo, 18 EXAMPLE SETUP A
A CLOSER LOOK AT EDIT MODE............... 20 (MEP4 + DX7 + TX7) ..................0000 e... 44
DATA PRESETTER,............e enemies 21 EXAMPLE SETUP B (MEP4 + KX88 +
CHANNEL FILTER ieee, 23 TX816 + RX1T) oer, 50
MESSAGE FILTER... 24 IDEAS AND SUGGESTIONS ......................... 56
DATA MODIFIER...............enn eme 26 SPECIFICATIONS....................0 00 nineaonereenes 58
DELAY PROCESSOR.................... 00m 33 ADDITIONAL INFORMATION... 59
OUTPUT ASSIGNER .....................m.......... 33 CHARACTER TABLE ...............................—.. 60
ALL NOTE OFEF............. menea aneees 34 WHAT'S HEXADECIMAL? ................—... 61
BINARY, DECIMAL AND
HEXADECIMAL CONVERSION................ 63
WHAT'S MIDI?..........c e... 64
MIDI FORMAT TABLE .................... e... 66
SYSTEM EXCLUSIVE DATA FORMAT.. 69
MEP4 PROCESS PARAMETER CHART 70
MIDI IMPLEMENTATION CHART
Thank you for purchasing the MEP4 MIDI Event Processor. The MEP4 is a totally new type of device that gives
you complete control over MIDI signals. You can use it to change, ignore, filter and delay any type or types of
MIDI signals.
“What can | do with the MEP4?" The answer is “just about anything,” but here are a few examples.
Double-tracking: By setting the MEP4 to send a slightly delayed duplicate Note Ón signal for each
one it receives, you can get the sound of two instruments played in unison. You
can also set the delayed note to be sent on a different MID! channel, which will
give you two different instruments in unison.
Echo: You can delay the MEP4 output, which will give you an echo effect. You can set
the MEP4 to send out a note (or notes) a set interval higher or lower than the note
it receives, producing an echo of a different note!
Keyboard split: Using the MEP4, you can split any MIDI keyboard into up to 4 sections (overlapping
sections if you wish), and send Note On messages on a different MIDI channel
from each section.
Turn your MIDI You can set the MEP4 to change incoming Modulation Wheel messages into
keyboard into a MIDI outgoing Portamento Time messages. Or change Data Entry +1/—1 messages into
master controller: Mono On/Poly On messages.
Increase or decrease Do you play with a heavy hand? Set the MEP4 to cut in half (or a quarter or an
Aftertouch or Velocity eighth) all Aftertouch or Velocity information. Or do the same with the Pitch Bend
Sensitivity: Wheel or Breath Controller
Accent notes with Set the MEP4 to send an additional Note On message to a different tone generator
another sound: whenever you play a note especially strongly.
The uses mentioned above show just a small fraction of the MEP4's possibilities. The MEP4 will multiply the
flexibility and power of any MIDI keyboard setup.
STOP! When we refer to MIDI bytes in this manual, we will always use Hexadecimal
numbers. If you do not know what these are, go and read p.61 "What's Hexade-
cimal?”
STOP! If you are a little unsure about your knowledge of MIDI, go and read p.64 “What's
MIDI?”
2
LOCATION
HANDLING
POWER CORD
CLEANING
ELECTRICAL
STORMS (LIGHTNING)
ELECTROMAGNETIC
FIELDS
PRECAUTIONS __
Avoid placing the MEP4 in direct sunlight or close to a source of heat. Also, avoid
locations in which the device is likely to be subjected to vibration, excessive dust,
cold or moisture.
Avoid applying excessive force to the switches, dropping or rough handling. While
the internal circuitry is of reliable integrated circuit design, the MEP4 should be
treated with care.
Always grip the plug directly when removing it from an AC receptacle. Removing
the plug from the AC receptacle by pulling the cord can result in damage to the
cord, and possibly a short circuit. It is also a good idea to disconnect the MEP4
from the AC receptacle if you don’t plan to use it for an extended period of time.
Use only a mild detergent on a cloth, and dry with a soft cloth.
Never use solvents (such as benzine or thinner) since they can melt or discolor
the finish.
Computer circuitry, including that in the MEP4, is sensitive to voltage spikes. For
this reason, the MEP4 should be turned off and unplugged from the AC receptacle
in the event of an electrical storm.
This precaution will avoid the chance that a high voltage spike caused by lightning
will damage the device.
Computer circuitry is also sensitive to electromagnetic radiation.
Television set, as well as radio receivers, transmitters and transceivers, and wireless
microphone or intercom system are all potential! sources of such radiation, and
should be kept as far away as possible.
MEM эру
С | POWER PASE CANCEL STORE =
|| YAMAHA | onan GROUP [<>
a == Cele ee ela el TL WL Le eee Le T
REE mA) PEER teen |
за ОМ/ЩОРЕ Lo 1 рАвАм TT
ep CURSOR |
D @ ® @
D POWER SWITCH ® GROUP SELECT “
The LCD indicates power on, so there is no separate In RUN mode use this together with the cursor
power indicator. switches to select memories by program number. In
EDIT and UTILITY modes use it with the cursor
@ LCD switches to select parameter groups.
16-character Liquid Crystal Display, backlit for high
visibility. In RUN mode this shows the memory and @® CURSOR
name. In EDIT and UTILITY modes it shows the pa- In RUN mode this operates the Store function, and
rameter or operation. in EDIT and UTILITY modes it selects parameters.
FOOT SW
O FOOT SWITCH JACK
An optional foot switch such as the FC-4 or FC-5
can be used to select MEP4 memories, programs. or
program change mode.
IN THRU OUT 4 OUT 3
OUT 2 E)
Gy
® °C (eel
J +r |
MIDI —
9 10 A
O MIDI IN
MIDI messages coming in to this terminal can be
processed by the MEP4. -
= a ATi
He
OO
RY MODE PROCESSOR SELECT
mm SELECT
DEC INC RUN | UTILITY P2 P3 P4 BYPASS
—1 +1 A E || a È
NOIOFF YES/ON CO
|
® ® 7 (8)
-
O DEC/INC
In RUN mode use these to select memories. In EDIT
and UTILITY use these to change parameter settings.
6) MODE
Switch between the three operation modes.
LEDs indicate the current mode of operation.
In RUN mode the RUN LED will flash to indicate a
modified memory.
7) PROCESSOR SELECT
In all modes, these turn each processor on or off. in
EDIT mode, you can switch to editing another pro-
cessor by pressing a Processor Select switch while
holding down “EDIT”.
LEDs indicate which processors are on. In EDIT mode,
a flashing Processor Select LED indicates which
processor 1s being edited.
BYPASS
Bypasses the MEP4, stopping all operation and in
effect turning it into a MIDI THRU box. No other
switches will function when the MPE4 is bypassed.
The LED indicates that the MEP4 is bypassed.
YAMAHA
CO
Ve
(D MIDI THRU
All MIDI messages received at MIDI IN are sent un-
changed from this terminal.
Ш
(2 MIDI OUT 1-4
The output of each processor can be assigned to any
MID! OUT 1-4 (Outports 1-4).
Before you attempt to use the MEP4, let us give a general explanation of how it works. As we mentioned already,
the MEP4 is a device for filtering, modifying and delaying MIDI messages.
The MEP4 has 4 independent processors. Each processor can be set to accept one
4 Processors or more different types of MIDI message, modify the status or data byte(s) of a
selected type of message, delay it for up to 3 seconds, and send it out of any one
of all 4 output ports (MIDI OUT 1-4 jacks).
MIDI IN PROCESSOR ">> MIDI OUT 1
Wo
\
— PROCESSOR 2 |-- \ MIDI OUT 2
TA
a
mal PROCESSOR 3 — 1 MIDI OUT 3
\
\
PROCESSOR 4 — o. MIDI QUT 4
- |HRU
Each Processor looks like this inside.
CHANNEL > MESSAGE > DATA DELAY | _ | OUTPUT
FILTER FILTER MODIFIER Y PROCESSOR| “ | ASSIGNER |
DATA
PRESETTER
Let's follow how a MIDI message goes through a processor.
-
Channel Filter
Message Filter
Data Modifier
Delay Processor
A MIDI message has been received. First the Channel Filter checks to see whether
or not it has an acceptable MIDI channel number. The Channel Filter can be set
to accept any one, several, or all MIDI channels. If the incoming MIDI message
does not have an acceptable channel number, it is rejected and goes no further.
For example, if a Note On message for middle C with channel number 1 is received.
90. 3C. 5D
The Channel Filter checks the channel! number.
Next the MIDI message must pass the Message Filter. Here it is checked to see if
it is an acceptable type (status) of message. The Message Filter can be set to accept
or reject each status independently. For instance, you can set it to accept Note
On messages and reject Program Change messages.
90. 3C. 5D
9
The Message Filter checks the status.
This lets you modify MIDI messages that have made it this far. Here you choose
which type of message will be modified and how it will be modified. For instance,
you can set it to modify all Note On messages by adding 12 to the first data byte.
This would have the effect of sending out a MIDI Note On message an octave higher
than the one that was received. (The rest of the messages that got past the Channel
Filter and message filter are passed on unchanged to the Delay Processor.)
90. 3C. 5D
7
The Data Modifier can change any part(s) of the message.
Here you can specify a time delay from O to 3 seconds (in 1 msec steps). All MID!
messages that make it past the Channel Filter and Message Filter are sent out after
this delay time.
The Delay Processor delays all outgoing MIDI messages except System Exclusive
messages.
Output Assigner
Data Presetter
The MEP4 has four output ports (MIDI OUT 1-4). The output of each processor
can be sent out of any one of these output ports. You can assign the output of
all four processors to be sent out of one port, or assign each processor to have its
own output port. Also, this is where you can specify the channel of all outgoing
MIDI messages. You may leave the channel numbers just the way they came in,
move all channel numbers up or down by a certain value, or send out all the MIDI
messages from that processor on one channel no matter what the original channel
was.
90. 3C. 5D
9
The Output Assigner can determine the channel number.
This way, you can use the MEP4 to filter, modify and delay any type of MIDI
message.
In addition to the above functions, there is a “one time” function called the Data
Presetter. Using this, you can automatically send certain messages each time a
MEP4 memory is selected. For instance, you can automatically set a tone generator
to voice number 25, the volume to full and the modulation wheel to zero every time
you select a certain MEP4 memory. This function is very useful in initializing your
setup at the beginning of a song.
The Data Presetter lets you send one Program Change, one Pitch Bender position,
and two control change messages of your choice from each processor. (Control
Changes include Volume, Modulation Wheel, Poly/Mono, Portamento Time,
Sustain On/Off, etc.)
=
In RUN mode you can select and store memories, and turn each processor on and off. To become familiar with
the MEP4, connect the AC power and turn it on. For now, don’t bother connecting any MIDI cables. When you
turn the power on, the MEP4 will be in RUN mode. You will normally use the MEP4 in this mode. The LCD
will be displaying a memory number and a 9 character memory name (whatever was last selected before the
power was turned off).
No. 60__Whatever_
Memory number Memory name
- In RUN mode, press or to select MEP4 memories. Holding down
Selecting Memories either one will move you quickly up or down.
Memory 1 «-—— DEC INC | — Memory 60
There are other ways of selecting MEP4 memories from a MIDI keyboard or using
the footswitch (p.37 and p.40), but don't worry about them now. The MEP4 stores
one complete setup (the settings of all 4 processors) in one memory. You can
make your own setting, give it a name, and store it. The MEP4 has 60 memories.
Each memory also remembers whether each processor is on or off, and as you cycie
through the memories you will notice that the Processor LEDs turn on or off de-
pending on the setup in that memory.
While in RUN mode, you can turn the output of each processor on or off by pressing
Processor Select its Processor Select switch.
==] = |
P1
Bypass
Other RUN Mode
Functions
Store
MIDI Program Change
No matter what mode you are in, pressing will completely defeat the
МЕР4. (le. it will behave just like an ordinary MIDI THRU box.) All input signals
will be sent unchanged to ail four output ports (MIDI OUT 1-4). WHEN THE
BYPASS SWITCH IS ON, NO OTHER SWITCHES WILL OPERATE. Press
again to return to normal operation. (When is pressed to
return to normal operation, the Data Presetter for each module will send out its
specified messsages. See p.21)
[ TT 1
MIDI IN | | » MIDI OUT 1
[PROCESSOR |
o |
| PROCESSOR 2 1 > MIDI OUT?
Г 7
| | > MIDI QUT 3
| | » MIDI OUT 4
|
]
|
ss > MIDI THRU
In RUN mode you can also store your own settings in memory (p.18) and select
MEP4 memories by the MIDI Program Change numbers they are linked to (p.39),
but we will explain these functions later.
See p.18
See p.39
10
SHORT OUTLINE OF EDIT MODE
EDIT mode is where you decide how the MEP4 will modify incoming MiDI messages. To enter EDIT mode, press
EDIT]. You edit one processor at a time, and the Processor Select LED will blink to let you know which one
you are now editing.
| FFE] CECE]
- Any time your are in EDIT mode, you can switch to editing another processor.
Changing Processors Hold down [EDITland press the switch of the processor you want to edit. The
in EDIT Mode LED of the newly select processor will begin blinking.
- EL]
|
|
Using this, you can quickly compare the settings of a certain parameter for the 4
|
a
|] E
P3 P4
—
pie ной
Processors.
As we explained on p.6-8, there are 6 “blocks” or groups of functions which you
EDIT GROUPS can set in EDIT mode. Hold down [GROUP SELECT] and use [S] >] to move
through the groups. As long as you are pressing [GROUP SELECT|.the LCD
display will show the group names.
ze] - SID]
a D 2 ®
" [ DATA PRESETTER ]-—[ CHANNEL FILTER )-—[ MESSAGE FILTER ]--
© O
| DATA MODIFIER |~—=| DELAY PROCESSOR |=— QUTPUT ASSIGNER |
Specify an initialization message to be sent whenever that MEP4 program is
selected.
Specify which channels are to be accepted.
Specify which messages are to be accepted.
Change the Status Byte or Data Byte of selected MIDI messages.
Delay the output of the module from 0-3,000 milliseconds.
®@ © ® © ® ©
Specify the MIDI channel of the outgoing messages and send the output to
MIDI QUT 1-4.
11
SIMPLE SETUP
In oder to give you an idea of how to operate the MEP4, we will set it up to send out a delayed Note On message
an Remember that this is just a simple example to familiarize you with the MEP4. There may be some LCD displays
we have not explained, but we will cover all EDIT mode functions in detail starting on p.20.
- Depending on the MIDI equipment you have, connect the MEP4 in one of the setups
Connections shown below. Any MIDI keyboard and tone generator may be used.
DX7 + MEP4
DX7 | MEP4 |
DX7 + MEP4 + TX7
DX7 — MEP4 |
| |
(In example setup A and B or p.44 and p.50 we will discuss some more complicated
setups.)
Whenever you select an MEP4 memory, data is copied into a temporary space called
the Edit Buffer, and this data tells the Processors how to behave. All changes we
make in the settings affect this Edit Buffer, and will NOT change the memory. When
you select another memory, the newly selected data is copied into the Edit Buffer
and any changes you have made are lost. If you want to keep the changes you
have made, you must save the Edit Buffer into a memory (any memory 1-60).
The Edit Buffer
—— - There is a handy function which lets you set all data in the Edit Buffer to a basic
Initialize the Edit setting (described fully on p.36). USE IT WITHOUT FEAR! Any changes you make
Buffer will not affect the 60 memories unless you Store them there. (See p.18 for how
to Store your new settings.) Press [UTILITY]. The Utility Mode LED will light.
(It doesn't matter what happens to be displayed in the LCD.) Hold down
[GROUP SELECT] and use [<j] >] to get the “ED-BUFFER INIT” displav
12
[eee] + [> |— ED-BUFFER_INIT__
Release [GROUP SELECT] and the LCD will change to
Init_ED-BUFFER_?
Now press [INC]. The MEP4 will ask you
_Are_you Sure ?_
so press [INC] again. The LCD will read
_% Completed! _ *
for a second and will then return to the “Init ED-BUFFER?” display.
- Let's set up the MEP4 to produce an echo effect. We will use only one processor,
MM A Simple Echo Setup nd set it up to accept all channels (Channel Filter), accept Note On and Off
messages (Message Filter), add 12 to the first data byte (note number) of the Note
On message so as to move it up an octave (Data Modifier), wait 400 msec before
sending the message (Delay Processor), and send it out of MIDI OUT 1 on the
same channel as it was received (Output Assigner).
CHANNEL | [MESSAGE |__| DATA DELAY | | OUTPUT
| FILTER FILTER MODIFIER Î PROCESSOR[™ | ASSIGNER |
DATA
PRESETTER
Since the initialized setting is to accept all channels and accept Note On and Off
messages, we don't need to change the Channel Filter or Message Filter. We will
start by setting the Data Modifier.
13
Begin Editing
Press and the Processor Select LED #1 will begin to blink, indicating that
we are editing Processor 1.
The LCD will briefly show a message (we don’t know what; it depends on which
Edit Group was last selected),
277227777277777?7?
VW EN + FW oR RR ER HA вай
и я + ия иен нива вая.
Select What We
Will Modify
(depending on which Edit Parameter was last selected). Hold down [GROUP
SELECT] and use the X [5] keys to get the "DATA MODIFIER" display. (If you
lose track of where you are, take a look at the Edit mode chart on p.20)
= RE -
DATA_MODIFIER___
Release {GROUP SELECT] and the LCD will show
O:MSG: * *
This is where you select the message you want to modify. We want to change
Note On messages (see MIDI data format table on p.66), so press twice to
make the LCD read
0:MSG:9n.xx.yy
This indicates that this processor (P1, as indicated by the blinking LED) will be
modifying all Note On messages. Press [>] 4 times and the display will show
with the cursor blinking on the “xx”
14
+ ee my
Select How We Will
Modity It
Adding Delay
Selecting the
output channel
This is where we select how we are going to modify the message we selected in
the previous step. We want to add 12 to the note number (first data byte) to shift
it up an octave. Press [INC] 3 times to make the LCD show.
1:0FS:xx,V=__0
Here we will Offset (OFS) the first data byte by +12. (The “xx” in the LCD already
indicates that the first data byte will be modified, so we don't have to change this.)
To select the offset value, press [>] to move the blinking cursor to “V= 0” and
press [INC] untit it reads “V=+ 12" (positive 12).
1:0FS:xx,V=+ 12
We have set the Data Modifier to modify Note On messages by adding 12 to their
first byte (note number). ("V=..." is a decimal number.)
Now we will add a delay to make an Echo effect. Hold down [GROUP
SELECT] and press [>] once to enter the Delay Processor.
= + > | — DELAY PROCESSOR
When you release [GROUP SELECT] the LCD will show
DELAY TIME_=__0
Press Until the LCD shows
DELAY _TIME_= 400
(It will go quicker if you use [<)] [>] to move to the 100's column and move up
directly by 100.)
Now we set the output channel. Hold down [GROUP SELECT] and press [©]
once to enter the Output Assigner.
GROUF || + >] — OUTPUT ASSIGNER
15
When vou release [GROUP SELECT] the LCD will. show
OUT-CH_ASSIGN_=1 |
indicating that all outgoing messages will be sent with MIDI channel number 1.
Press to make the LCD read
OUT-CH ASSIGN = %
Selecting the
Output Port
When the Qut-Ch. Assign is “ *+ ”, outgoing messages will be sent out with the
same MIDI channel number they had when they came in. “N
The MEP4 has 4 MIDI QUT jacks on the rear panel, and the output of each processor
can be sent to any one of these. In the initialized setting, processors P1-P4 are
assigned to Outports 1-4. Since the receiving MIDI device (TX7 or DX7) is con-
nected to MIDI QUT 1 (in this example), we don't have to change the outport setting,
but you can see for yourself by pressing [>] twice to display
OUTPORT _ASSIGN=1
Try It Out
indicating that this processor is sending its output to MIDI OUT 1.
With your equipment connected as shown on p.12, play a note. You will get an
echo of the same note an octave higher. !f you are using the setup with the TX7,
the echo will come from the TX7.
Channel Filter Message Filter Data Modifier
Accept all Accept Note Add 12 to
channels on/off Note Number
Delay Processor Output Assigner
Add 400 msec | Send to Qutport 1 on |
delay Original Channel
If it doesn’t work, check the MIDI reception channel of the receiving device to see
that it matches the tranmitting channel. If you are using a single DX7 to transmit
and receive, the DX7 reception channel must be set to ch.1. (The DX7 transmits
only on MIDI channel 1.)
16
Memory-Name Input
Now you can name your new program. Press [UTILITY!. The last time we used
Utility mode was to initialize the Edit Buffer, so the LCD will still read
Init ED-BUFFER ?
Hold down [GROUP SELECT! and press XI to reach
E + — MEM-NAME INPUT_.
When you release [GROUP SELECT] the LCD will read
Memory Protect
or whatever Program No. was last selected before you initialized the Edit Buffer.
(Don’t worry. The actual Program No. 1 is still safely in memory.) Now select a
name character by character. Use [<Í] [>] to move from space to space and use
[INC] to select a character. (There is a complete character table on p.60.)
— [SE]
No. 1
ABCDEF,....... U,V,W,X,Y,Z
When you have finished entering the new name, you can store the setup you have
just made in a memory. But before you can store your newly created setup, you
must turn the Memory Protect off. (We are still in Utility mode.) Hold down
[GROUP SELECT] and press [<)] once. The LCD will read
MEMORY _PROTECT __
17
Store
When you release [GROUP SELECT | the LCD will change to
Protect. (ON) __
Turn the Memory Protect off by pressing .
DEC —_— Protect. (OFF)
Store is a function in RUN mode, so press [RUN]. BE CAREFUL. IF YOU SELECT
ANOTHER MEMORY NOW BY PRESSING OR [INC], THAT DATA WILL
BE CALLED INTO THE EDIT BUFFER AND YOUR NEW SETUP WILL BE LOST.
Notice that the Run LED is blinking. This warns that the current data has been edited.
Press [>]. The LCD will read
Store 1to_1_>
or whatever Memory No. was last selected before you initialized the Edit Buffer.
BE CAREFUL. The usual roles of the switches are reversed here. Pressing [5]
will store the contents of the Edit Buffer (your setup) into the memory number )
displayed, wiping out the setup that was there before. To change the store desti- -
nation, use [INC]. in this example, let's store our new setup in memory 31.
(When the MEP4 is shipped, memories 1-30 contain the setups listed in the separate
booklet, and memories 31-60 contain initialized data.)
Press until the LCD reads
DEC | INC |— Store__1_to_31_> |
|
Now press [>] to store your program in memory #31. The MEP4 will ask
— Are You Sure ?.
18
Possible Problems
press to answer “yes.” The LCD will show
INC — _% Completed!_% _
for a second and then return to normal RUN mode. Notice that the RUN LED has
stopped blinking, since your edited program has been safely stored in memory.
Now you can use [INC] to select any other program.
No._31__Echo
le zn kn zn
(It would be a good idea to turn Memory Protect back on again when you have
finished storing.)
The setup described above may not be working quite the way you expected. Here
are some problems you may already have noticed, and the reasons for them.
® The Sustain Pedal does not affect the echoed note (if you are using a TX7).
This is because the Message Filter was set to accept only Note On and Note
Off messages. You will have to set it to accept MIDI Control Changes. Page
24 describes the full operation and effect of the Message Filter. (For the same
reason, Program Change messages will not be passed on to the TX7. You will
have to set the Message Filter to accept Program Changes.)
e When you press a DX7 program select switch, the MEP4 changes to another
memory, and behaves in some unexpected way. If this happens, it is because
the MEP4 has been set to receive program changes.(See p.37.)
In later chapters we will explain how to create a more useful setup, using all 4
processors. Since this example was meant to introduce you to the MEP4, we kept
it simple. By now you should have a fairly good idea of how it works. Now go
on and read through the next two chapters “Edit Mode” and “Utility Mode” to learn
the full range of functions the MEP4 offers.
19
CLOSER LOOK AT
Any time you are in EDIT mode, you can switch to editing another processor. Hold
Changing Processors down [EDIT] and press the switch of the processor you want to edit [PT]-[P4]
in Edit Mode The LED of the processor you selected will start blinking. This is useful when you >
want to compare the settings of a certain parameter for each processor.
- It is sometimes helpful to work with only one processor active. You can turn off
Turning Each the unneeded processors by pressing [P1]-[P4]. The LED indicates that the pro-
Processor on/off cessor is active. The processor being edited cannot be turned off.
= - As long as you hold down the GROUP SELECT switch, only the names of the groups
Looking Inside Each will be displayed. But if you release the Group Select switch, you will see that each
Edit Group edit group has several parameters (things you can set or change). Use the [<)]
[>] keys to move back and forth between the parameters inside each group, and
use to change the setting of each parameter. =.
- GROUP | ——
PRGRM(OFF): OMNI ON NOTE OFF = ОМ O.MSG:" DELAY TI OUT CH ASSIGN =1
PITCH(ON):00,40 NOTE ON =ON 1: OUT CH OFFSET =0
CNTL1 (0N):01,00 POLY A. TOUCH = OFF | 2: QUTPORT ASSIGN =1
CNTL2(ON):07,7F CNTL#=—->.;*;"" 3:
PRGRM CHANGE = OFF| 4
CHA. TOUCH =OFF
PITCH BEND =OFF
CH MODE MSG =OFF
SYSTEM MSG =OFF
— Ÿ
20
DATA PRESETTER
Editing the Data
Presetter
This is where you can preset 4 messages to be sent whenever that MEP4 memory
is selected. You have the option of sending a Program Change message, a Pitch
Bender message, and any two Control Change messages. These messages will
be sent out on whatever output channel has been specified in the Output Channel
Assigner (see p.33). If the Output Channel Assigner has been set to “x”, the Data
Presetter will do nothing.
DATA PRESETTER
— IS] —
D (2) (8) (4)
LPRGM(OFF): 1 |] [PITCH(ON ):00.40 | ([ENTL1(ON )-0100 | LCNTL2(ON ):07.7F |
PROGRAM CHANGE PITCH BENDER CONTROL CHANGE CONTROL CHANGE
The above is the initialized setting of the Data Presetter. When a MEP4 memory
with the above setting is selected,...
© PROGRAM CHANGE for the specified program number will NOT be sent.
PITCH BEND with a value of 00.40 (middle position) will be sent.
@
© CONROL CHANGE 01 (Modulation wheel) with a value of 0 (lowest position)
will be sent.
(4)
CONTROL CHANGE 07 (Volume) with a value of 7F (full) will be sent. (For
a complete list of MIDI messages, see p.66)
Use [I] [©] to move to the parameter you want to set and use [INC] to
change setting. The “ON” “OFF” for each message determines whether it will be
sent or not.
21
Examples
® Program Change: You can use this to automatically select a different voice
number for several different tone generators. For instance, set processors 1-4
to output on MIDI channels 1-4, and set different program numbers in each
Data Presetter 1-4.
Pitch Bender: By specifying 00.40 as the data bytes of this message, you can
“reset” the pitch bender to normal position. If you had switched MIDI channels
with the Pitch Bender still up or down, the tone generator would still think
you were “up in the air”, and would be out of tune with the rest of the tone
generators. Sending a Pitch Bend message with data bytes of 00.40 would tell
the tone generator to normalize the pitch.
Control Changes 1 and 2: As with the Pitch Bender, these are useful to bring
the tone generator “back to normal.” For instance, you could make sure that
the tone generator was set to poly mode by setting.
CNTL2(ON_):7F,00
When is the Preset
Data sent?
Note:
If the Delay Processor (p.33) is set above 0, the Preset data will be sent out
after the delay time has elapsed.
Control Change 7F.00 (Poly On)
The Data Presetter sends its messages whenever
an MEP4 memory is selected
a processor is turned on
the preset data is changed
the delay time is changed
the output channel or outport is changed
the Bypass is turned off
there has been an input or output overflow error
© но Во со
22
{x
CHANNEL FILTER
You can set the Channel Filter to accept all channels (OMNI ON) or any one or
more channels (OMNI OFF).
CHANNEL FILTER
— BIE]
OMNI OFF -2--56--9
For example, when the Channel Filter is set as above, it will accept MIDI channels
2, 5,6 and 9. Turn each channel on or off by moving the blinking cursor to the
appropriate space and pressing the Off/On switch.
Note:
When the Channel Filter is set to “OMNI ON", it will accept all MIDI channels,
and individual channel on/off will have no effect. (You will not be able to
reach the individual on/off display.)
23
MESSAGE FILTER
This is where you select which types of message to accept. You can set it to accept
or reject each type of message separately. Move through the choices using [<]
[>] and turn each one on or off using [INC].
MESSAGE _FILTER__
— IS] —
2
| NOTEOFF =ON ]-—[ NOTEON =ON ]-—~[ POLY ATOUCH=OFF I
@ (5)
| СМТ = --.:15," ]-—[ PRGRM CHANGE=OFF ]-—[ CH ATOUCH =OFF ha
@ (9)
L PITCH BEND =OFF |--[ CH MODE MSA =OFF ]-——[ SYSTEM MSG =OFF |
Note Off messages? (8n. xx. yy)
Note On messages? (9n. xx. yy)
Polyphonic Aftertouch messages? (An. xx. yy)
Contro! Changes 00-79? (Bn. xx. yy) (See note on p.25)
Program Changes? (Cn. xx.)
Channel Aftertouch? (Dn. xx)
Pitch Bend messages? (En. xx. yy)
® о © © ® ® © ©
Channel Mode messages? (Bn. 7A-7F. yy)
©
System messages? (FO-FF)
The setting above is the initialized setting of the Message Filter. Set as shown,
only Note Off and Note On messages will be accepted.
24
IN
Note:
“CNTL#= “ is a special case. You can choose to accept ail, none, one or two
control change messages 00-79. (Control Changes 7A-7F are covered in
Mode Messages.)
- DEC | INC — — =
CNTL#= 1-—>:% *,*% * CNTL#= ALL
Zo wm ow
None accepted All accepted
When the cursor is blinking on the arrow, press [INC]to accept all Control Changes.
Move the cursor to the “++” and use [DEC] [INC] to select the control number
you want to accept. For instance, tf the display reads “xx, 01”, only Modulation
Wheel Control Changes will be accepted. (See p.66 for a table of all MID! messages.)
When both are set to “++”, no Control Change messages will be accepted.
Example: Modulation Wheel and Main Volume control changes accepted
CNTL#=-->:07,01
System Exclusive
Reception
When the MEP4 receives a System Exclusive message (FO,...) it will send it un-
changed out from all processors that have their message filter set to accept system
messages. The Delay Processor will not apply to this.
The MEP4 itself will accept two types of System Exclusive message: Memory Bulk
data and Memory Bulk Dump Request. These are described on p.69. If the device
number of the above two messages does not match that of the MEP4, the message
will be passed through unchanged. If the device number matches, the MEP4 will
take appropriate action as described on p. 42 ~ 43.
25
DATA MODIFIER
This is where the real action takes place. The Data Modifier has 5 steps, 0-4. in
step O you decide what kind of message you want to modify. You can modify any
one type of message in a total of 4 ways (steps 1-4). Pressing the [<)] [>] switches
will take you through steps 0-4.
DATA_MODIFIER...
— SID] —
| O:MSG: x x J 1% x x:
Select The Message to
be Modified
e EEE e taxa: EEE |
When the LCD display is showing “0: MSG:" you can use the /
switches to select the message you want to modify. When the dispiay shows
“0: MSG:x+”, no messages will be modified, and all messages that have come this
far will be sent unchanged to the next step, the Delay Processor.
Each processor will modify only one type of message at a time. If you want to
modify Note On messages in a certain way, and modify Channel Aftertouch mes-
sages in another, you will need to use two separate processors. (The MEP4 has
four processors, which should be enough for most purposes.)
Choose one type of message to modify
O:MSG: x *
= = Ar = = =
0:MSG:8n.xx.yy__
0:MSG:9n.xx.yy__
No messages will be modified
Note Off ”
Note On "
0:MSG:An.xx.yy__
fi
Poiyphonic Aftertouch
0:MSG:Bn.xx.yy__
Control Change
0:MSG:Cn.xx
Program Change
0:MSG:Dn.xx
Channel Aftertouch и
O:MSG:En.xx.yy__
Pitch Bender v
(You cannot modify System messages (FO-FF) using the MEP4.)
26
em
+
Specify Messages of
only Certain Data
Bytes
6 Possible
Modifications
When the display shows xx (and/or yy) for the data bytes, it means that the selected
message will be modified no matter what the first (and/or second) data byte is.
By moving the cursor to the xx and yy, and pressing [INC] / [DEC] to select a
number, you can “narrow the selection.” Messages will be modified only if they
have the first (and/or second) data byte you specified. (Channel number “n” cannot
be changed. Use the channel filter to screen out unwanted Channels.)
Example 1. 0:MSG:9n.xx.00
Example 2. 0:MSG:9n.3C.00
Example 3. 0:MSG:9n.xx.yy
Note On messages with a second
data byte (velocity) of O will be
modified.
Note On messages with a first data
byte (note number) of 3C and a
second data byte of 00 will be
modified.
All Note On messages will be
modified no matter what the data
bytes are.
At each step (1-4) you can choose any one of 6 ways to modify the data (or choose
not to modify it at all). Pressing the [G] [©] switch will take you through the 7
choices. Where you have a choice between modifying the first or second data bytes
(xx or yy), select by moving the cursor to xx and pressing either or
[INC].
1:EXP:xx,R=1
4 4 + +
— JJ |
Step # Modification
Data Byte
+ |= || = | —
or EXP STP OFS
No effect Expand Step Offset
NO EFFECT
27
First / Second
ок ох *: No effect
Parameter
LIM CNV
Limit Convert
EXPAND EXPxx R=1_
You can multiply the first (xx) or second (yy) data byte of the message by R=1/16,
1/8,1/4,1/2,1, 2, 4, 8, 16. Select whether to modify the first or second data byte
by moving the cursor to the “xx” and pressing or [INC]. If the resulting
data is over 7F, it will be sent as 7F, and if less than 00, it will be sent as 00.
Example 1. If 0:MSG:Dn.xx. (modify Channel Aftertouch)
1:ЕХР:хх, В = 2 (multiply the first data byte by 2) e
and a message of D2.20 comes in, D2.40 will be sent out.
Example 2. If 0:MSG:9n.xx.yy__ (modify Note On)
1:EXP:yy,R=1/2 (multiply the second data byte by
1/2) |
and a message of 93.43.60 comes in, 93. 43. 30 will be sent out.
Example 3. If 0:MSG:9n.xx.40__ (modify Note On messages which
have a velocity of 40)
1:EXP:yy, R=1/2
the “EXP” will be ignored, because “yy” does not appear in “O:
MSG:
STEP STP:xx,S=1
Only messages with a data byte (first data byte if xx, second if yy) that is a multiple
of the Step will be allowed through. You can select a step between 1 and 16
(decimal). If the step S=1, messages will be allowed through no matter what the
data byte is. If the step S=2, only messages with even data bytes will be allowed
through.
Example If O:MSG:Dn.xx
(modify Channel Aftertouch)
1:STP:xx,S=2 (Step=2)
and a message of D1.31 comes in, nothing will be sent out. If a
message of D1.30 comes in, it will be sent on unchanged.
OFFSET :OFS:xx V= 0
You can add a fixed value (-127 to +127) to the first (xx) or second (yy) data
byte. This offset value (V=value) is displayed in DECIMAL numbers. If the resulting
data is over 7F, it will be sent as 7F. If less than OO, it will be sent as 00.
Example 1. If 0:MSG:9n.xx.yy (modify Note On)
1:0FS:xxV=+ 12 (add 12 to the first data byte)
and 93.30.5D comes in, 93.3C.5D will be sent out.
(This would have the effect of sending out a Note On one octave
higher than the incoming note.)
Example 2. If O:MSG:Bn.01.yy
(modify Modulation Wheel)
1:0FS:yy, V=- 16 (substract 16 from the Modulation
Wheel data)
and B5. 01. 09 comes in, B5. 01. 00 will be sent out, since the re-
sulting data was less than 00.
29
REVERSE :REV:xx, FIX = 40
You can reverse the data around a selected Fixed middle point. Actually since 00-7F
is an even number (80 hex. or 128 decimal), there is no middle point. Instead, the
Fix point and Fix point-1 switch places.
00 40 7F
00 40 /F
+
Fix Point om
> Cu FIX
Ge 40 FIX-1, FIX
Example If 0:MSG:9n.xx.yy (modify Note On)
1:REV:xx, FIX=40 (reverse the Key number around
the center)
and 92. 05. 6A comes in, 92. 7A. 6A will be sent out.
This would have the effect of reversing the keyboard around E3. om
LIMIT LIM:xx, 00< D <7F
Only messages with data falling within the limit will be allowed through. (lt is
impossible to set the lower limit higher than the upper limit.)
Example if O:MSG:9n.xx.yy__ (modify Note On)
1:LIM:xx, 3C<D<48 (limit)
only notes between middle C and an octave above middle C would
get through.
This is the basis for the many amazing keyboard splits you can do with the MEP4.
30
CONVERT
CNV:_—8n.xx.yy
This is different from the other 5 data modifications. It lets you change the Status
as well as data of the message being modified. You can select statuses 8n-En, and
specify the first and/or second data byte to be a constant number (00-7F) or either
the first (xx) or second (yy) data byte of the incoming message. Use
to select xx, yy, 00,....7F.
Example 1. If 0:MSG:9n.xx.00__ (Note On, velocity 0)
1:CNV: —8n.xx.40 (Note Off, velocity 40)
all incoming Note On messages with a velocity of 0 would be Converted into Note
Off messages with a velocity of 40. (Notice that the first data byte xx would remain
unchanged.)
Example 2. If 0:MSG:Bn.O1.yy__ (Control Change ‘Modulation
Wheel’)
1:CNV:-—Dn.yy__ (Channel Aftertouch)
the second data byte of the Modulation Wheel Control Change message would
be sent out as the data byte of a Channel Aftertouch message.
Note:
All modifications coming after a Convert will be ignored, so it is best to place
Convert last (in the 4th step). This also means that you cannot have two
Converts in one processor (not that there is any reason for wanting to do this).
Example If 0:MSG:Dn.xx____. (Channel Aftertouch)
1:EXP:xx,R=1/2_. (cut the Channel Aftertouch data
by a half)
31
2:CNV:_—Bn.07.xx (convert Control Change
‘Volume’ messages with the ori-
ginal Channel Pressure data as the
new Volume data)
3:0FS:xx, V=+ 30 (add 30 to the Control Change
‘Volume’ data)
The Offset in step 3 will have no effect because of the Convert in
step 2.
= The Data Modifier of each processor has 4 steps in which data can be modified.
Sequence of These modification are carried out sequentially (one after the other). Changing the
Modification order may sometimes change the end result.
For example, after you have already set modifications for steps 1, 2 and 4, you decide
to insert another modification in step 1. There is no need to redo all your work.
With the cursor on step number 1, press [INC].
Moving a modification
Data A Data B
COSTO 7 с — = от тесте тототот ет у
1 t
| [ OMSG:9n.xx.yy | [ O:MSG:9n.xxyy | |
| |
; [o:11Mxx 00<D<3C ) | Vx xx ]
1
! | 2:0FS:xx V= + 12 | 1 [ O:LIM:xx, 00 <D <3C | '
I I
f | { |
1 1 { 1
: | 3% % %; | | | | 3:0FSxxV=+ 12 | '
| 0 I
I i
| ; I i
| [4CNV: эВо.01х ] ! | [ACNV: —BnOlxx] |
aaron J nora J
The settings of steps 1 and 2 will roll forward, leaving you room to insert another
modification in step 1. Now the Data Modifier will look like Data B, and the cursor
will be on step number 2. This lets you insert a modification in step 1.
Notice that this was possible only because step 3 was empty. If you press
[INC]again while in the condition of Data B, the LCD will warn you
Modifier_ Full!
32
т
DELAY PROCESSOR
OUTPUT ASSIGNER
Output Channel Assign
Output Channel Offset
for about one second.
You can also do the reverse. Suppose in the condition of diagram B. you wanted
to insert a step between 3 and 4. Move the cursor to step number 3 and press
[DEC]. The Data Modifier will return to the condition of Data A. If there had not
been an empty space in step 1, the LCD would have warned you
Modifier Exist _!
for about one second.
This is where you can delay the entire output of the processor. All messages that
have gotten this far (not only the modified ones) will be delayed. Select the delay
time from 0-3000 msec by pressing the / [INC]. (You can quickly set long
delay times by moving the cursor to the 1000's or 100's place.) System Exclusive
messages will not be delayed.
DELAY TIME =__O
“— | DEC | INC | ——*
O msec 3000 msec
If the Data Presetter is used (see p.21), messages from it will be delayed in the
same way.
This is where you set the MIDI channel of the processor output, and send it to
one of the 4 Outports (MIDI OUT 1-4).
OUT _CH_ASSIGN-=1
Use the [INC] / [DEC] to select the MIDI channel for all output; « , 1, 2,...16. If
you select “x”, messages will be sent out with the same channel number they or-
iginally had. (If “+”, the Data Presetter will not function.) If you select a number,
all outgoing messages will be sent with that channel number.
OUT.CH.OFFSET=_0
The channel number of all outgoing messages will be moved up or down depending
on the Offset. (An Offset of 0 has no effect.) For instance, if an incoming message
has channel number 2 and the offset is 4, the message will be sent out with a channel
number of 6.
91.3C.40 -. Offset 4 - 95.3C.40
33
Outport Assi
utport Assign OUTPORT ASSIGN =1
The output of each processor can be sent to any one of Outports 1-4 (MIDI OUT
1-4). You can send the output of each processor to a different outport, or all to +
the same outport.
Caution:
Though not likely, it is possible to make the MIDI output overflow by assigning
all processor outputs to one outport and sending very frequent messages (eg.
a continuous controller such as Pitch Bend or Modulation Wheel). After all,
if the MEP4 is sending out 4 messages for every 1 that it receives, the output
will not be able to keep up. MID! is allowed to send only (!) 3000 bytes (about
1000 average messages) in one second. If there is an input or output overflow, m
Note Off messages for all notes currently on will be sent (see below), and
the MEP4 will display
RX buffer full! (receive buffer full)
TX_buffer full_! (transmit buffer full)
depending on what the problem is. Pressing a Mode switch will return you
to normal operation.
When one of the following events occurs, the MEP4 will send Sustain Off (Bn.
ALL NOTE OFF 40.00) and Note Off (8n.xx.40) messages for all notes that are currently on. MON
a. a memory change
b. a processor is turned off
C. a parameter (aside from the Data Presetter) has been modified
d. Edit Buffer has been initialized
e. Bypass is turned on
f. input or output buffer has overflowed
34
UTILITY MODE (Various
There are 7 functions in UTILITY mode.
Protect (OFF)
Protect (ON)
Init ED BUFFER RCV (No.) ,Ch{1} Func(MEMORY-INC) (Р1}р = 1: 90.3С.40 DEVICE# =
RCV-Mode (PRG #) Func(PRGRM-INC) Cut F8/FE (No) MEM Bulk Dump
128&as.60 Abcdefghi Func(RCV. MD-SEL)
Init ASSIGN # ?
MEMORY PROTECT
MEMORY NAME
INPUT
When Memory Protect is on, you will not be able to store programs. Even if MIDI
Bulk Data of MEP4 memory is received, it will be ignored, and the existing memory
will be preserved. (See bulk data, p.42) For safety's sake, leave Memory Protect on
except when you want to store a program you have just edited.
Use ING]to turn Memory Protect on and off.
MEMORY_PROTECT.. |
Protect _(OFF)__ Protect. (ON_)_.
This is how you name programs you have edited.
MEM-NAME_INPUT__
There are 9 spaces for the program name. Use E) [>] to move the cursor to the space
you want to change and use to run through the characters. Characters
are in alphabetical order, capital and lower case. There is a complete character table
on p.60.
35
EDIT BUFFER
ED-BUFFER_INIT
INITIALIZATION
Use this when you want to create a setup from scratch. It will set the Edit Buffer to
the initial values shown below. (This will not affect anything in the memory, so don't
worry. Memory is affected only when you Store. See p.18)
Init_ED-BUFFER ?
Now press INC]. (If you press nothing will happen. If you don't want to
initialize, use the [GROUP SELECT] + [<j] [5] switches to move to another func-
tion.) The MEP4 will ask you
_Are_You Sure ?_
so if you are, press . (Pressing will take you back to the previous display.)
T
he LCD will read
.* Completed! *
for a second and will then return to the “Init ED-BUFFER?" display.
DATA PRESSETTER
PROGRAM (ON Æ FD) 1
PITCH (ONY OFF) 00
CONTROL 1( ONV OFF ) 01
CONTROL 2 (ON/OFF) | 07
40
00
7F
CHANNEL FILTER
OMN! :ÓNY OFF
1 2 3 4 5 6 7
9 10 11 12 13 14 15
MESSAGE FILTER
NOTE OFF
NOTE ON
POLY A. TOUCH
CONTROL NO.
PROGRAM CHANGE
CH A. TOUCH
PITCH BEND
CH MODE MES.
SYSTEM MES.
36
DATA MODIFIER |
O | MSG: *+
1 | **+* :
2 | xxx.
3 | xx.
4 | %%%
DELAY PROCESSOR —
DELAY TIME e
— OUTPUT ASSIGNER
OUT-CH ASSIGN
OUT-CH OFFSET
OUTPORT ASSIGN
— |
All four processors will contain the same data. How-
ever the outport assign will be the same as the pro-
cessor number. (Eg. processor 3 will be initialized to
outport=3.)
PROGRAM PRGRM-CHANGE_RCV
— [SID] —
| RCV-Mode (PRG $4) |--—— | 128:60 Abcdefghi | =! Init ASSIGN #? |
LRCV(No) , Ch(1) |
MEP Program Name
No/ Yes PRG/MEM MIDI Program No. MEP Program No. Initialize all
assignments?
MEP4 Program Change
MIDI Channel No. 1-16
On p.9, we learned how to select MEP4 memories using the [DEC] / | INC|switches
while in RUN mode. There are two other ways to select MEP4 memories. One of
them is to set the MEP4 to respond to incoming MID! Program Change messages.
(The other way is with a footswitch. See p.40) This lets you select MEP4 memories
at the touch of a program change switch on a MIDI keyboard, instead of holding
the / switch down and waiting for the right number.
Enable Program PRGRM-CHANGE_RCV
Change
— Г —
|
-
| RCV(Yes),Ch(n) | RCV(No ),Ch(n) |
When set to "RCV (YES)", the MEP4 will change its own program when it receives
” Select MEP4 Program a MIDI Program Change message on channel “n”. Select the channel number by
Change Reception moving the cursor to “Ch(n)” and using the / [INC|switches to choose
Channel MIDI channel 1-16.
RCV(Yes),Ch(n)__
Select channel “n” = 1-16 by pressing
There are two ways the MEP4 can respond to incomina MIDI Proaram ch
Program Change у ) 9 dram changes
Receive Mode
By Memory #
(Direct select)
RCV-Mode (MEM #)
37
By Program #
(Indirect select)
When the MEP4 is set to "RCV-Mode (MEM #)” and "RCV (Yes)”, it will switch
memories to match incoming MIDI Program Change messages on the channel
“Ch(n).” For example if the MEP4 has been set to
RCV(Yes) Ch(9)__ RCV-Mode. (MEM _#)
and receives a MIDI message “C8.05” (Program Change on channel 9, program
number 6), it will switch to memory #6. MIDI Program Changes can be 1-128, but
the MEP4 has only 60 memories. So, when the incoming program number was 65,
MEP4 memory #5 would be selected.
RCV-Mode_(PRG_#)
There is a Program Change table in memory that holds a MEP4 memory number for
each MIDI Program Change 1-128. This lets you assign any MEP4 memory to each
incoming MIDI Program Change. For example you can have the MEP4 switch to
MEP4 memory #15 whenever it receives a MIDI Program Change #32. Using
select the MIDI Program Change number to respond to.
128:60_Abcdefghi
128
Select MIDI Program Change 1-128
Move the cursor to the MEP4 memory number and select the memory that you want
to assign to that MIDI Program Change.
128:60 Abcdefghi
I
Select MEP Memory 1-60
In the example below, when the MEP4 receives a MIDI Program Change #1, it will
switch to MEP4 memory #15. When it receives MIDI Program Change #2, it will
switch to MEP4 memory #60.
38
i
LJ
h
Selecting MEP4
Memories by Program
in RUN Mode
Initialize Program
Assignment Table
A sample program change table
Incoming MIDI Program Number : MEP4 Memory Number & Name
1 : 15 Echoes
2 : 60 Doubletrk
3 : 15 Echoes
128 : 2 Trnsp. 5th
You can make use of this program change table while in RUN mode. By holding
down [GROUP SELECT], you can use ] [©] to step through the program change
table.
Teo [= [FE]
The LCD will display the program number, memory number and memory name, like
this.
I 128:60_Echoes |
(See also p.40 on how to use a footswitch to select memories by program number.)
Using this function will set the program assignment table to 1:1, 2:2 3:3, 4:4, ...
60:60, 61:1, ... etc. Use the [J] [5] switches to get the
Init_ ASSIGN _# ? |
display and press [INC]. The MEP4 will ask you
| _Are_You_Sure ?_
so replay “Yes” again. The LCD will read
. * Completed! %*
for about a second and then return to the previous display.
39
FOOT SWITCH
ASSIGN
FOOT-SW_ASSIGN __
-— DEC INC —
[ Func(MEMORY-INC) -— Func(PRGRM-INC) »—- Func(REV.MD-SEL) |
You can use a footswitch plugged into the jack on the back panel in three ways.
Memory Increment
Func(MEMORY-INC)
Each time you press the footswitch, the next MEP4 memory will be selected. When
you get to memory 60, it will wrap around again to 1.
Program Increment
Func(PRGRAM-INC)
Each time you press the footswitch, the next MEP4 memory in the Program As-
signment Table (see p.39) will be selected. When the program number reaches
128, it will wrap around again to 1. When this mode is selected, the LCD will display
the memory name like this,
No: 1 Echoes _
with "No." instead of the usual “No.” This indicates that you are selecting MEP4
memories by Program Assignment Table. By pressing [GROUP SELECT] you can
see what program number you have come to. Of course, you can still select memories
in the usual way using INC].
40
Receive Mode Select
Func(RCV.MD-SEL)
MIDI MONITOR
This lets you select the Program Change Receive Mode at any time. When this
mode has been set and you are in RUN mode, everytime the footswitch is pressed
the LCD will alternate between
| No._1__Echoes _ and No:_1__Echoes__.
When the LCD shows “No.”, incoming MIDI Program Change messages will select
the MEP4 memory number, and when it shows “No:”, they will select the MEP4
memory number in the Program Assignment Table. (A footswitch is not included
with the MEP4. Use an on/off switch such as the FC-4 or FC-5)
This function lets you monitor the output of each processor.
MIDI_MONITOR___
|
(P1)p=1:90.3C.40 Cut_F8/FE__(No_)
Outport
Processor # Outgoing message Display Timing Clock / Active
Sensing?
Select the processor (P1-P4) you want to monitor. The "p=" indicates the Output
Port that the processor is assigned to. If the processor is turned off, the LCD will
show “p= « ". |
By selecting “Cut F8/FE (Yes)”, you can ignore Timing Clock messages (F8) and
Active Sensing messages (FE). These messages come so fast and so frequently
that you will not be able to read anything else. (See p.68)
Note:
The MIDI Monitor will not display System Exclusive messages (FO …F7).
a1
MIDI BULK DUMP
Reception Conditions
Device Number
This function lets you dump the entire contents of the MEP4 memory via the MIDI
OUT 1-4. The same bulk data is sent from each MIDI OUT.
MIDI_BULK_DUMP__
— SID] —
DEVICE # = 1 MEM _Bulk_ Dump ?.
When the receiving MEP4 has finished taking in the bulk data, it will display
BULK_DATA_RCVD |
no matter what mode it is in. Then, when it receives a Program Change message,
it will return to the normal display.
If the bulk data was received incorrectly, it will display
MIDI_DATA_ ERROR!
and if Memory Protect in on
Memory Protected
When it receives a Program Change message (or a Mode switch or Foot switch is
pressed) it will return to the normal display. (When bulk data with a different device
number is received, it is sent on unchanged and nothing is displayed.)
You can select Device # to be ALL or 1-16. Device number is a kind of channel
number inside Yamaha System Exclusive messages. The MEP4 will receive bulk
data only if it has a matching Device number. When “ALL” is selected, the MEP4
will receive bulk data of any Device number.
42
Memory Bulk Dump
Transmission
Conditions
Contents of Bulk Dump
This can be used to copy the memory of one MEP4 to the memory of another
MEP4. Connect the MIDI OUT of the transmitting MEP4 to the MIDI IN of the
receiving MEP4, and turn the receiving MEP4's memory protect off (p.35). Make
sure the Device # for each MEP4 matches, or is set to “ALL.” (When the Device
# is “ALL”, bulk data is sent as Device # 1.)
Get the "MEM Bulk Dump?” display on the transmitting MEP4 and press
[INC].The LCD will read
Now_Transmitting
for a second or two and then return to the “MEM Bulk Dump?” display. (Bulk
data is also dumped when a MIDI Dump Request is received. See p.69) Remember
that the dumped data does not “disappear” from the transmitting MEP4, but is rather
“copied” out.
This bulk data is sent out of all processors who's Message Filter is set to pass system
messages.
If no processors are set to pass system messages, the LCD will warn “Assign
Outport!” and not send anything.
The bulk data consists of the following:
Data of all 60 memories
Assign table for program changes 1-128
Program receive yes/no and channel
Program change receive mode
Foot switch function
о ео со
For the MIDI format of the bulk data, see p.69.
MEP4 bulk data includes the MID! reception channel. This means that the MEP4
program change receive channel may change as a result of receiving a bulk dump.
See p. 37.
43
EXAMPLE SETUP A (MEP4
Here are some more complicated setups. We will assume that you have read through the manual to this point,
tried out the simple setup example, and that you understand the basic operation of the MEP4. If you have problems
setting up the examples, refer back to EDIT mode (p.19).
As shown in the diagram, connect the DX7 MIDI OUT to the MEP4 MIDI IN, the MEP4 MIDI OUT 1 to the
TX7 MIDI IN, and the MEP4 MIDI OUT2 to the DX7 MIDI IN. Set the DX7 to receive and transmit on channel
1 and set the TX7 to receive on channel 1 also. (Refer to the owner's manuals for each device.)
Example A1
НО 1 en ETT: da
a
Harp Arp
Harp Arp
2
ONY OFF
ON AGFD
Each note produces a harp arpeggio
1 DATAPRESETTER. ~~
PROGRAM — (
PITCH
CONTROL 1 (
/ OFF)
/ OFF)
/ OFF)
/ OFF)
PROGRAM (ON
PITCH (ON
CONTROL1 (ON
CONTROL2 (ON
PROGRAM
( ON
PITCH ( ON
CONTROL 1 (ON
CONTROL 2 (ON
CONTROL 2 (
CHANNEL FILTER ec pes |
OMNI ÓN / OFF
‘омм! :©® / OFF
OMNI : OR) / OFF
5
13
1 2 3
9 10 11
4
12
6 7
14 15
4
12
5
13
1 2
9 10
3
11
6
14
4
12
5
13
1 2 3
9 10 NM
6
14 15
Ci. MESSAGE FILTER: -
NOTE OFF
NOTE ON
POLY A. TOUCH
CONTROL NO.
PROGRAM CHANGE
CHA. TOUCH
PITCH BEND
CH MODE MES.
3
ON /
/
ON /
/
ой
ON /
ON /
OFF
CD
OFF
OFF
OFF
NOTE OFF
NOTE ON
POLY A. TOUCH
CONTROL NO.
PROGRAM CHANGE
CH A. TOUCH
PITCH BEND
CH MODE MES.
me
ON / GFD
ALL / x*x.x*x
/ OFF
NOTE OFF
NOTE ON
POLY À. TOUCH
CONTROL NO.
PROGRAM CHANGE
CH A. TOUCH
PITCH BEND
CH MODE MES.
/ OFF
SYSTEM MES.
SYSTEM MES.
SYSTEM MES.
TT DATA MODIFIER © -;
MSG In, xx, yy
MSG
Эп, хх, уу
OFS
xx, V= +7
OFS
xx, V= +12
12 | ю |= | ©
42 | ©2 | 5 | —* | © |
5
DELAY PROCE
{pr | | | > | ©
DELAY TIME
150
DELAY TIME
300
DELAY TIME
450
~~ DUTPUTASSIGNER
OUT-CH ASSIGN
QUT-CH OFFSET
1
0
OUTPORT ASSIGN
1
QUT-CH ASSIGN
QUT-CH OFFSET
OUTPORT ASSIGN
OUT-CH ASSIGN
QUT-CH OFFSET
OUTPORT ASSIGN
1
0
1
ha
PROGRAM N / OFF)
(0
PITCH (ON / OFF)
CONTROL 1 (ON / OFF)
CONTROL 2 (ON /OFF)
OMNI: ON / OFF
1 2 3 4 5
9 10 11 12 13
NOTE OFF
NOTE ON
POLY A. TOUCH
CONTROL NO.
PROGRAM CHANGE
CH A. TOUCH
PITCH BEND
CH MODE MES.
ON ON ON ON a NN NN
OFF
OFF
OFF
OFF
OFF
OFF
OFF
OFF
SYSTEM
a
MES.
"
E RE DEC
E. ERE .
EEE TUNE ha a NIN i“
E BERNE a Te р TE
; CULE ai RE CR pis O Mea DE
; : gui a A :
Ta SEE] EA HG -
E 3. TAF E YA
. - PERTE he ea PU ETE ето : dort
OUT-CH ASSIGN
OUT-CH OFFSET
OUTPORT ASSIGN
Each note you play on the DX7 will produce three delayed notes from the TX7.
Processor 1:
Processor 2:
Processor 3:
Processor 4:
Along with the usual Pitch Bender, Modulation Wheel and Volume
initialization messages, the Data Presetter will send a Program
Change to select a Harp voice for the TX7. Naturally, you will have
to specify a program number (nn) that contains a harp-like voice
(or whatever you want). All Note On messages are modified by
adding 7 to the note number. Then the modified Note On messages
along with the unchanged controller messages are delayed for 150
msec and sent on channel 1 out of outport 1. Since the Channel
Filter is set to reject Program Changes, you can select programs
on the DX7 and still have the same Harp arpeggio.
Since we have already sent initialization messages from processor
1, we don't need to do it again. This time we will accept only
Note On/Off messages. The Note On messages are modified by
adding 10 to the note number and sent out after a 300 msec delay.
The same as processor 2, but with a 450 msec delay, and adding
12 to the note number.
This has been left open for you to experiment with, perhaps by
adding an additional delayed note.
45
Example A2 Fat Synth
Fat Synth EA ER Hd Ea na As
9 3 A Below middle C — Octa > dopo т)
nchanged (outpo
©R/ OFF [ON/OFF | ONAQED | Middle C and above — Octave up (Outport 1)
A PRESETTEF
CHANNEL FILTER.
HANNEL FILTER
PROGRAM (ON / 7 GE, PROGRAM (ON / ÓFD) PROGRAM (ON / QFP
PITCH (ON / OFF) 00 | 40 | PITCH ( / OFF) 00 | 40 | PITCH (ON / GED)
CONTROL 1 (ON) / OFF) 01 | 00 | CONTROL 1 ( / OFF) 01 | 00 | CONTROL1 (ON / OFD)
CONTROL 2 (ON / OFF) 07 | 7F | CONTROL 2 ( / OFF) 07 | 7F | CONTROL 2 Con / E
OMNI - 7 OFF
OMNI : ON) / OFF
OMNI : ÓN / OFF
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8
9 10 11 12° 13 14 15 16 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16
NOTE OFF о / OFF NOTE OFF / OFF NOTE OFF “>
NOTE ON ÓN / OFF | NOTE ON / OFF | NOTE ON ÓN
POLY A. TOUCH ON / GFD | POLY A. TOUCH ON / ÓFD | POLY A. TOUCH ON /
CONTROL NO. ALL / x x.x% | CONTROL NO. / CONTROL NO. ALL / %%,%%
PROGRAM CHANGE ON / PROGRAM CHANGE / OFF | PROGRAM CHANGE ON
CH A. TOUCH ON / CH A. TOUCH CH A. TOUCH ON
PITCH BEND ON / PITCH BEND PITCH BEND ON
CH MODE MES. ON / CH MODE MES. CH MODE MES. ON
SYSTEM MES. ON / SYSTEM MES. SYSTEM MES. ON
E “DATA MODIFIER" | DATA MOI “DATA MODIFIER“
0 MSG In, xx, yy 0 MSG X X % 0 MSG Эп, хх, уу
1 | LIM xx, OO<D<3B 1 1 | LIM xx, 3C<D<7F - `
2 | OFS xx, V=+12 2 2 | OFS xx, V= +12 5
3 3 3
4 4 4
ВЕ - DELAY PROCESSOR Se BELAY PROCESSOR ;
DELAY TIME 0 DELAY TIME 0
OUTPUT ASSIGNER | -QUTPUT ASSIGNER-.. *. | : OUTPU
OUT-CH ASSIGN 1 OUT-CH ASSIGN 1 OUT-CH ASSIGN 1
OUT-CH OFFSET 0 QUT-CH OFFSET 0 OUT-CH OFFSET 0
OUTPORT ASSIGN 2 OUTPORT ASSIGN 1 OUTPORT ASSIGN 1
46
FOR ve EERE RNR EEE
ааа с The a ak i + =
“DATA PRESETTER
Ma E a mo Dm ННа ha
PROGRAM (ON / OFF)
PITCH (ON / OFF)
CONTROL1 (ON / OFF)
CONTROL 2 (ON / OFF)
A es
OMNI :
15 16
NOTE OFF
” -: DATAMO
/
NOTE ON / OFF
POLY A. TOUCH ON / OFF
CONTROL NO. ALL /
PROGRAM CHANGE ON / OFF
CH A. TOUCH ON / OFF
PITCH BEND ON / OFF
CH MODE MES. ON / OFF
SYSTEM MES. ON / OFF
MU
|
3
4 -
Ll DELAY PROCESSOR EL
DELAY TIME
E.
LS: DUTPUTASSIGNER (7020)
QUT-CH ASSIGN
OUT-CH OFFSET
OUTPORT ASSIGN
for strings.
Processor 1:
Processor 2:
Processor 3:
Processor 4:
| This example produces an especially thick, octave-doubled sound that is excellent
This processor will send an octave lower note back to the DX7.
We will also send the usual initialization message (Data Presetter).
Since the DX7 already has “received” its own controller messages,
we don't need to re-send them via MIDI. All we will send is Note
On/Off. So as not to make the sound too bottom-heavy, we will
restrict the octave doubling to notes below middle C (LIM). Then
we will subtract 12 from the note number, and send it from outport
2 (to which the DX7 is connected).
This processor will send the unchanged note and controller mes-
sages unchanged to the TX7, providing a simple doubling effect.
(Data Modifier “O: MSG: = xx" indicates no modification.)
This processor will send an octave higher note to the TX7 (OFS).
Again, in order to keep the sound from getting too muddy, we
will restrict the octave doubling to notes above middle C (LIM).
This has been left for you to experiment with. Remember that the
DX7 and TX7 can each produce up to 16 notes simultaneously.
If for every incoming Note On messages you send 4 outgoing
Note On messages, you will have, in effect, only 4-note polyphony.
47
Example A3 Bend UP Dn
PROGRAM
(
PITCH (
CONTROL 1 |
CONTROL? (
OMNI : OFF
1 2 3 4
ON / GrD)
/ OFF)
/ OFF)
/ OFF)
5 6 7
g 10 11 12 13 14 15
NOTE OFF
NOTE ON
POLY A. TOUCH
CONTROL NO.
PROGRAM CHANGE
CH A. TOUCH
PITCH BEND
CH MODE MES.
SYSTEM MES.
rhe
MSG : Dn, xx
ON /
ON /
ON /
ALL / x %. % %
ON / GD
ON / OFF
ON / QF
ON /
ON /
OFS : xx, V= +64
CNV © - — En, 00, xx
DELAY TIME
эн
PER RS
OUT-CH ASSIGN
OUT-CH OFFSET
OUTPORT ASSIGN
Bend Up Dn [REE
2 3 Aftertouch — Bend up (Outport 2)
©Ry OFF | ON AQFP| ON AQFD Bend down (Outport 1)
PROGRAM — (
PITCH
CONTROL 1 (
CONTROL 2 (
ON / GD)
/ OFF)
/ OFF)
/ OFF)
OMNI : OFF
1 2 3 4 5 6 7
9 10 11 12 13 14 15
NOTE OFF
NOTE ON
POLY A. TOUCH
CONTROL NO.
PROGRAM CHANGE
CH A. TOUCH
PITCH BEND
CH MODE MES.
SYSTEM MES.
MSG ; Dn, xx
OFS о xx, V= +64
REV : xx, FIX=40
CNV : — — En, 00, хх
DELAY TIME
OUT-CH ASSIGN
OUT-CH OFFSET
OUTPORT ASSIGN
48
PROGRAM
PITCH
CONTROL 1
CONTROL 2
OMNI : ON/OFF
1 2 3 4 5 6 7
9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16
30
ON / OFF
ON / OFF
ON / OFF
ALL /
ON / OFF
ON / OFF
ON / OFF
ON / OFF
ON / OFF
NOTE OFF
NOTE ON
POLY À. TOUCH
CONTROL NO.
PROGRAM CHANGE
CH A. TOUCH
PITCH BEND
CH MODE MES.
SYSTEM MES.
MSG
DELAY TIME
OUT-CH ASSIGN
QUT-CH OFFSET
QUTPORT ASSIGN
EH
(ON / OFF)
PITCH (ON / OFF)
CONTROL1 (ON /OFF)
PROGRA
CONTROL 2 (ON / OFF)
ON / OFF
OMNI :
NOTE OFF ON
NOTE ON ON
POLY A. TOUCH ON
CONTROL NO. ALL
PROGRAM CHANGE ON
CH A. TOUCH ON
PITCH BEND ON
CH MODE MES. ON
OFF
NN NN осоки
SYSTEM MES. ON
ci DATA MODIFIER.
OFF
DELAY TIME |
1 OUTPUT ASSIGNER (27°
QUT-CH ASSIGN
QUT-CH OFFSET
QUTPORT ASSIGN
When you press down on the DX7 keyboard, the DX7 will pitch-bend up and the
TX7 will pitch-bend down. (You will have to set the Pitch Bend range to a non-zero
value. See the DX7 and TX7 manuals.)
Processor 1:
Processor 2:
This will send Pitch Bend messages back to the DX7. We will accept
only Channel Aftertouch messages and convert these into Pitch
Bend messages with the original Aftertouch data (first byte) sent
out as the Pitch Bend second byte (MSB : most significant byte).
Yamaha synthesizers ignore the LSB (least significant byte) of Pitch
Bend messages, so we will send 00 for all Pitch Bend LSBs. Notice
that we must add 64 (decimal) to the Aftertouch data in order to
bring the Pitch Bender to center position.
This will send the DX7's note and controller messages unchanged
to the TX7, and also send the “created” Pitch Bend messages. This
time however, we will reverse (REV) the pitch bend data byte to
make it bend down.
Processor 3 and 4 : Not used.
Note:
By adjusting the pitch bend range of the TX7 and DX7 you can set the width
of the effect.
49
+ RX11)
Here are some examples of how the MEP4 can be used in a larger setup. As shown in the diagram, connect the
KX88 MIDI OUT to the MEP4 MIDI IN, the MEP4 MIDI OUT 1 to the TX816 MIDI IN, and the MEP4 MIDI
OUT 2 to the RX11 MIDI IN.
Drum
Example B1
Kit
2 3 4 Sustain Pedal = Bass Drum
Keyboard left side = Snare
ONY OFF |©N OFF | GRY OFF Keyboard right side = High Hat
PROGRAM PROGRAM (ON / GFD) PROGRAM (ON. / OD
PITCH (ON / ÓFD) PITCH (ON / PITCH (ON / QFP)
CONTROL1 (ON / ) CONTROL 1 (ON / OFD) CONTROL 1 (ON / OFD)
CONTROL 2 (ON / QFD) CONTROL 2 (ON / CFD) CONTROL 2 (ON / QFP)
LOC CHANNEL FILTER: 511 | о CHANNEL FILTER { _ CHANNEL FILTER
OMNI = / OFF OMNI 1-6 / OFF OMNI - "© / OFF
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8
9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16
DT MESSAGE FILTER... fo io MESSAGE FILTER: o MESSAGE FILTER | ©
NOTE OFF ON / O NOTE OFF / OFF NOTE OFF on
NOTE ON ON / OFF) | NOTE ON / OFF NOTE ON ON
POLY A. TOUCH ON / ÓFD | POLY A. TOUCH ON / POLY A. TOUCH
CONTROL NO. ALL / 40,4 x | CONTROL NO. ALL / x*x,x*x | CONTROL NO. ALL / xx,**
PROGRAM CHANGE PROGRAM CHANGE PROGRAM CHANGE ON / QFB
CH A. TOUCH CH A. TOUCH CH A. TOUCH ON
PITCH BEND PITCH BEND PITCH BEND ON
CH MODE MES. CH MODE MES. CH MODE MES. ON
SYSTEM MES. SYSTEM | MES. SYSTEM MES. ON
son - DATA MODIFIER - |... DATA MODIFIER | DATA MODIFIER ©
0 MSG Bn, 40, yy 0 MSG On, xx, yy 0 MSG Эп, хх, уу
1 | CNV - — 9n, 2, yy 1 | LIM xx, 00<0<3B 1 | LIM xx, 3C<D<7F an
2 2 | CNV — On, 31, yy 2 | LIM yy, 00<D <63 с
3 3 3 CNV —9n, 39, yy
4 4 4
a “DELAY PROCESSOR E —DRLÁY PROCESSOR. e DELAY PROCESSOR ‘
DELAY TIME 0 DELAY TIME 0 DELAY TIME 0
OUTPUT ASSIGNER | “ OUTPUT ASSIGNER |<. OUTPUT ASSIGNER
OUT- CH ASSIGN à OUT. CH ASSIGN 1 OÙT- CH ASSIGN 1
OUT-CH OFFSET 0 OUT-CH OFFSET 0 OUT-CH OFFSET 0
OUTPORT ASSIGN 2 OUTPORT ASSIGN 2 OUTPORT ASSIGN 2
50
(Play strongly for Open High Hat)
PROGRAM
PITCH
CONTROL 1
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8
10 11 12 13 14 15 16
MESSAGE FILTER oo
NOTE OFF / OFF
NOTE ON / OFF
POLY A. TOUCH ON / GFD
CONTROL NO. ALL / %%*j#**
PROGRAM CHANGE ON
CH A. TOUCH ON
PITCH BEND ON
CH MODE MES. ON
SYSTEM MES. ON
« DATA MODIFIER |
In, xx, yy
KX88
| | MEP4
xao | JN 1 —
«че [111] eo |ooncoanearno |
J | | ] |
RX11
X11 y TX816 |
[ FI o 3 3 a 3 a a a a J
г [ о _ 2 J J a J d |
1 131350007 Ca а ЭДС СН 8 Са os
25 222921199 ¡009 | |
« J = =
This will let you play the RX instruments from the KX keyboard. We assume that
the RX is set to receive Note On/Off information on channel 1, and that the MIDI
key number for each instrument is as follows; Bass Drum = 2C, Snare = 31, High
Hat = 39, and High Hat Open = 3B. (If the key numbers on your rhythm machine
are fixed and cannot be changed, substitute the appropriate key numbers xx for
Data Modifier CNV — 9n. xx. yy.)
Processor 1: This accepts only Control Change # 40 (Sustain On/Off) and
converts it into a Note On message for note number 2C, which
corresponds to the RX Bass Drum. When the sustain pedal is
pressed, the KX sends a Control Change message 440 with data
of 7F (sustain pedal on), which is sent out as a velocity of 7F (Note
On). When the sustain pedal is released, the velocity will be O (Note
Off).
This accepts Note On/Off messages below middle C (limit the note
number), and converts them into Note On messages for note number
31, which corresponds to the RX Snare. The velocity will be passed
on unchanged, so if you play a note strongly, the Snare will be loud.
Processor 2:
This accepts notes from above middle C and converts them into
Note On messages for note number 39, which corresponds to the
RX High Hat. Notice that in Data Modifier step 2 we limit the notes
Processor 3:
IM хх, 3JC<D<7E
LIM yy, 64<D<7F
CNV — 9n, 3B, 7F
РН
A D я
ri
DELAY TIME O
QUT-CH ASSIGN
QUT-CH OFFSET
QUTPQORT ASSIGN
1
О
2
Processor 4:
to those with velocity of 63 and below. Notes played strongly (ie.
velocity of above 63 ) will not make the High Hat sound.
This is the same as processor 3 except that it will process only
strongly played notes (ie. velocity of above 63), and converts them
into Note On messages for note number 3B (Open High Hat). This
means that by playing softly or strongly above middle C, you can
play Closed or Open High Hat.
91
Example B2 4-way Vol
KX in Dual mode, CS1, CS2 = Volume A, B
{Channel À, B = 1, 2) CS3, CS4 = Control
CS1 ~ 4 Control Volume for Channels 1 ~
PROGRAM т ON / OD PROGRAM (ec ON / @FD 765 PROGRAM (ON / GFP)
PITCH ( / OFF) 40 | PITCH ( / OFF) 00 | 40 | PITCH (ÓN / OFF) 00 | 40
CONTROL1 | / OFF) 00 | CONTROL 1 ( / OFF) 01 | 00 | CONTROL1 (ON / OFF) 01 | 00
CONTROL 2 { / OFF) 7F | CONTROL 2 | / OFF) | 07 | 7F | CONTROL 2 (ÓN / OFF) 07 | 7F
= CHANNEL FILTER He CHANNEL FILTER | CHANNEL FILTER :
OMNI : e / OFF
Sa ON / ÓFD
Г омм!: ом / ©ЕР
SYSTE M M ES.
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 M) 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 1 (2) 3 4 5 6 7 8
9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16
MESSAGE FILTER: ~~ © “| ~~ °° MESSAGE FILTER Ce MESSAGE FILTER ......
NOTE OFF NOTE OFF / OFF | NOTE OFF ) / OFF
NOTE ON NOTE ON / OFF | NOTE ON
POLY A. TOUCH POLY A. TOUCH ON / ÓFP | POLY A. TOUCH
CONTROL NO.
PROGRAM CHANGE
CH A. TOUCH
PITCH BEND
CH MODE MES.
CONTROL NO.
PROGRAM CHANGE
CH A. TOUCH
PITCH BEND
CH MODE MES.
ALL / 40,41
CONTROL NO.
PROGRAM CHANGE
CH A. TOUCH
PITCH BEND
CH MODE MES.
SYSTEM MES.
SYSTEM MES.
0 MSG : xxx 0 MSG © 9n, xx, yy
1 1 LIM . xx 00£D<3B
2 2
3 3
4 4
pe DELAY PROCESSOR. PT DRATAROGESSOR fre, bay PROCESSOR
DELAY TIME O DELAY TIME 0 DELAY TIME 0
a OUTPUT ASSIGNER - | “OUTPUT ASSIGNER | Cl OUTPUTASSIGNER - ——.
OUT- CH ASSIGN * OUT- CH ASSIGN 3 OUT-CH ASSIGN 4
OUT-CH OFFSET 0 QUT-CH OFFSET 0 QUT-CH OFFSET 0
OUTPORT ASSIGN 1 OUTPORT ASSIGN 1 OUTPORT ASSIGN 1
52
PT
epi Ai
PROGRAM (ON / )
PITCH (ON / )
CONTROL 1 (ON / )
CONTROL 2 (ON / OFD)
>. CHANNEL FILTER...
OMNI : ÓN) / OFF
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8
9 10
11 12 13 14 15 16
| MESSAGE FILTER
NOTE OFF
NOTE ON
POLY A. TOUCH
CONTROL NO.
PROGRAM CHANGE
CH A. TOUCH
PITCH BEND
CH MODE MES,
ON / ФЕВ
ON / QFF
ON / OFPR
SYSTEM MES.
1 Nv
2
3
4
DELAY TIME |
ES. OUTPUT ASSIGNER
OUT-CH ASSIGN *
| |0UT-CH OFFSET 2
| OUTPORT ASSIGN 1
This setup makes use of the KX front panel sliders CS 1-4 to independently control
the volume of four separate tone generators. Set the KX in Dual mode, and make
sure that CS1 and 2 are sending volume change messages for banks A and B
(channels 1 and 2). Using CA mode of the KX (see the owner's manual), set CS3
and CS4 to send Controll Change 410 on banks A and B. (Control Change #10
is unused, but we will convert it to Control Change #7 later). Set the TX816 modules
1-4 to accept channels 1-4. The entire KX keyboard will play modules 1 and 2,
the upper part of the KX keyboard will play module 3 and the lower part will play
module 4.
Processor 1:
Processor 2:
Processor 3:
Processor 4:
Note:
This will send the unchanged note and controller information (Data
Моатег О: +++) оп (№ same channel it was received on. (The
KX is transmitting on channels 1 and 2.)
This will accept note messages (below middle C) received on
channel 1, and send them to module 3 on channel 3. We don't
want to accept volume messages from channel 1, so specify only
controllers 40 and 41 (sustain and portamento). Volume messages
for channels 3 and 4 will be “created” in processor 4.
This will accept note messages (above middle C) received on
channel 2, and send them to module 4 on channel 4. The rest is
the same as processor 2.
This will convert the Control Change #10 messages received on
channels 1 and 2 into Control Change #7 messages (volume) on
channels 3 and 4 (output channel offset = 2). In this way, we can
“get around” the limitation that the KX can send messages on only
two channels at once.
By using two MEP4s in parallel (connect the MIDI THRU to the MIDI IN
of the second MEP4), we could have a complete 4-way split keyboard as
well as 4-way volume control. Use two processors for each split; one to convert
controller messages into volume and the other to limit the note area.
Sending continuous controller messages (aftertouch, volume, etc.) on many
channels from a single outport may cause an out-put overflow. (See p.34)
When using setups like the one described above, it may be a good idea to
assign each processor to its own outport and connect it directly to the in-
dividual MIDI [IN of each tone generator.
53
"о. ——r — — О
Example B3 Eko & Accnt
EE
DATA PRESETTER ~~ =
Eko & Accnt
2 3
ORY OFF | ÉNVOFF
ÓN OFF
A muted echo with Brass on accented notes
PROGRAM
PITCH
CONTROL 1 (
(ON / GFD)
/ OFF)
/ OFF)
/ OFF)
00
01
07
40
00
7F
CONTROL 2
PROGRAM (
PITCH
CONTROL 1 (
(
/ OFF)
/ OFF)
00
01
7
JF
40
00
OFF ) n
OFF)
OFF }
OFF)
PROGRAM
PITCH
CONTROL 1
CONTROL 2 |
CHANNEL FILTER 5 11010
ANNEL FILTER :
CONTROL 2
; FETT Ee DT po EEL
e FILTER: dan В
> a tT Ena
OMNI | wy OFF
OMNI : GR) / OFF
Fv = / OFF
1 2 3 4 5 6
9 10 11 12 13 14
1 2 3 4 5 6
9 10 11 12 3 19
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8
MESSAGE FILTER: ©. ~~)
9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16
ru. MESSAGE FILTER Zn
NOTE OFF
NOTE ON
POLY A. TOUCH
CH A. TOUCH
PITCH BEND
CH MODE MES.
SYSTEM MES.
CONTROL NO.
PROGRAM CHANGE
POLY A. TOUCH
CONTROL NO.
PROGRAM CHANGE
CH A. TOUCH
PITCH BEND
CH MODE MES.
NOTE OFF
NOTE ON
NOTE OFF
NOTE ON
POLY A. TOUCH
CONTROL NO.
PROGRAM CHANGE
CH A. TOUCH
PITCH BEND
CH MODE MES.
“DATA MODIFIER
SYSTEM MES-
fr DATA MODIFIER:
SYSTEM MES-
MSG : xxx
0 | MSG
In, хх, уу
MSG: 9n, xx, yy
1 | EXP YY, R= 1/2
LIM . YY, AASDS<7F
15 |0 || [O |
bl isle)
“DE LAY PROC ESSOR НЕ
DELAY TIME 400
DELAY TIME 0
DELAY TIME О
QUTPUT ASSIGNER
- . DUTPUT ASSIGNER
OUT-CH ASSIGN
OUT-CH OFFSET
OUTPORT ASSIGN
OUT- CH ASSIGN
OUT-CH OFFSET
OUTPORT ASSIGN
OUT- CH ASSIGN 3
QUT-CH OFFSET 0
OUTPORT ASSIGN 1
54
DATA PRESETTER |
PROGRAM (ON / QFD)
PITCH (ON / QFD)
CONTROL1 {ON / @FP)
CONTROL 2 (ON / CFB
CHANNEL FILTER. 00)
OMNI : ON) / OFF
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8
Е 9
CU MESSAGE FILTER QT
10 11 12 13 14 15 16
NOTE OFF / OFF
NOTE ON / OFF
ON / QFD
POLY A. TOUCH
CONTROL NO.
PROGRAM CHANGE
CH A. TOUCH
PITCH BEND
CH MODE MES.
SYSTEM MES.
— DATAMODIFIER. ко
Эп, хх, уу
3 MSG
“7 LIM
00 < D 500
NPN
© DELAY PROCESSOR
DELAY TIME 0
Fe — QUTPUT ASSIGNER
OUT-CH ASSIGN 3
OUT-CH OFFSET 0
QUTPORT ASSIGN
—
For each note received, this setup will produce a muted echo (decreased velocity),
and for strongly played notes will produce an additional accent.
Processor 1:
Processor 2:
Processor 3:
Processor 4:
Here is used to send the unchanged note and controller messages.
Here we decrease the Note On velocity by 1/2 and send it out after
a 400 msec delay.
Here we accept note and controller messages, and allow only
strongly played notes (velocity above 4A) to pass. The Data Pre-
setter can be used to preset this tone generator to whatever voice
(program "n”) you want to use as an accent.
Processor 3 will only produce Note On messages (velocity above
4A). So, here we will pass on the Note Off messages (velocity 0).
55
IDEAS AND
When synchronizing two or more MIDI sequencers or rhythm programmers,
it may be useful to delay one of them. You can do this by setting a processor
to accept only System Messages and delaying the output. This will delay Start,
Stop, Continue and Timing Clock.
You recorded a great solo onto a MIDI sequencer using a lot of Pitch Bend,
but decide that the Pitch Bend was overdone. You can remove it by setting a
processor to accept everything except Pitch Bend, and then feeding the MEP4
output back into the sequencer.
You are used to playing on a stiff action piano, and when you use a light touch
keyboard such as the DX7, the velocity and aftertouch often “bottom out”.
Simply cut the velocity and/or aftertouch data byte in 1/2 using the Expand
modification,
Super 4-way keyboard split. Using the Limit modification, set each processor
to accept a different range of notes. Qutput each processor on different channels
to separate tone generators.
Turn the DX7 data entry switches (-1/+1) into another type of control change,
such as Poly/Mono or Portamento On/Off. (Use the Convert modification.)
If you don’t need a Portamento footswitch, set Portamento Time to 0 and convert
the MIDI Portamento On/Off to something else, such as Poly/Mono.
Convert Channel Aftertouch to Pitch Bend. (But add 40 to the data so you
will start from normal pitch.)
Use the top octave of your keyboard to send Program Change messages! Limit
the note number of Note On messages and Convert them into Program Change
messages with the original note number as the Program number. If you connect
a MIDI cable from a MEP4 OUT back to the MIDI IN of your KX 88, you can
even change MEP4 memories by playing a note on your KX88 keyboard. (The
KX88 MIDI IN is a MID! “mixer”.)
Keyboard training game. Notes played too soft or too loud will ring a gong.
Use two processors and limit the key velocity.
Controlling Portamento Time using Channe! Aftertouch is effective especially
when using fingered portamento. (See DX7 manual.)
56
O Use the Modulation Wheel to send a drum roll (or any repeated note). Convert
Modulation Wheel messages into Note On messages for the instrument you
want to play. You will need to send one Note Off for each Note On, so use
the Step function to convert messages with even numbered data bytes into
Off, and odd numbers to On.
MIDI Feedback! If you have a device such as the KX88 that will “mix” MIDI
messages, you can try feedback echo. Use another MIDI THRU box after the
MEP4 output, and send a delayed note back into the MEP4 via the KX88. (THRU
box output: one going to the tone generator and one going back to the KX88
MIDI IN.) Decrease the velocity, delay it some more, and send it out again.
Set It up so that the loop will continue until the velocity reaches O. This will
require some tricky programming. The fed-back note will have to be on a dif-
ferent channel than the original note, and you will also have to ensure that
an equal number of delayed Note Off messages are sent..
There are several possible variants of this technique.
By offsetting the note number, you could create an upward arpeggio for each
note played. (When the note number reaches 127 it is no longer fed back).
57
Memories .....................ereriiicrererceerceeee ene 60 (8K byte)
Switches ....................ee.eeierecieirrr ceca eee GROUP SELECT
CURSOR [6]
CURSOR [|<]
DEC
INC
RUN
UTILITY
EDIT
PROCESSOR SELECT 1-4
BYPASS
DISPIAY eee 16 character backlit LCD
Terminals...............e...ereecerececerezace ocean RDA MIDI IN
MIDI OUT (x 4)
MIDI THRU
FOOT SWITCH
Power Consumption................e-_...=.e erecciones 10 W
Dimensions ................e..er.eeeiniee DD IA 480 (W) x 282 (D) x 45.2 (H) mm
(18-15/16" x 11-1/8" x 1-3/4")
Weight... DDD 3.3 kg (7 lbs 4 oz.)
58
ADDITIONAL
INFORMATION
€ €
— OO — O AH RN J Hl
— v|u ON с E RN {| Be
w| O| > Е | ® | М Хх HA
её а | z x — HH PN XD
2 о | о |= |= x DD KX JO
X ol ml 1 > .— = N Her] N
w+ nf xo] || - NR RD
6 @ > + < Nina + |=
_ DS O о >| SIR EIN
«| A Te 4 MN NN M
CHARACTER TABLE o aaa
60
ka
WHAT'S HEXADECIMAL?
Computers are made up of a huge number of electronic circuits, and an electronic circuit can be in one of two
conditions; on or off. This means that computers deal with numbers in a different form than humans normally
deal with them.
The Decimal System
The Binary System
The Hexadecimal
System
The way of counting that we use everyday is called the decimal system, because
It has ten numerals, O through 9, and is based on the number ten. When we count
past 9, we move one place to the left and start over from 1 again, but this “1” means
something different than the first “1”. You can think of this second numeral as
“how many tens”, and the third number as “how many hundreds.” In other words,
each place from right to left represents the number of 10% (ones), 10' (tens), 10?
(hundreds), 10° (thousands) and so on.
As we mentioned, computers can recognize only two conditions (numerals); on
or off(1 or 0). This means that numbers coming into a computer must be made
up of ones and zeros. However, if we put enough ones and zeros together, we
can express any number we want. This way of counting is called the binary system.
27? 25 25 24 2 2 2 2
BINARY 1 О 1 O 1 1 0 1
DECIMAL [128 + 0 +32 + 0+ 8+ 4+ 0 +1 =173
To find what the binary number 10101101 means in decimal, add up the values
of each place.
Binary numbers are easy for a computer to understand, but troublesome for humans
to deal with. So, we use an easy “middle way” called Hexadecimal {often abbreviated
“Hex"). This is a number system based on the number sixteen, with sixteen numerals.
Since we only have numerals 0 to 9, we will use letters of the alphabet, like this.
0,1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9.A,B,C,D,E,F (Hex "F” = Decimal 15”)
Then, when we want to go beyond F, we move one place to the left and start with
O again.
61
8,9,A,B,C,D,E,F,10,11,...19,1A,18,1C,1D,1E,1F,20,21....
(So as not to confuse hexadecimal and decimal numbers, a dollar sign “$” is often
added in front of hex numbers. Eg. SAD)
Here is an example of how to convert a hex number into decimal.
16' 169
HEX A D
DECIMAL 16 x 10 1x13 = 173
®
The method 15 the same as when we converted a binary number into decimal.
There is a special reason for using hex when dealing with computers. Computers
deal with binary information in groups of 8 bits. (Each 0 or 1 is called a “bit”, for
Binary digit.) Each group of 8 bits is called a byte. (8 bits = 1 byte) Notice that
the left four bits of the binary number in the illustration make the same number
as the left digit of the hex number, and the right four bits of the binary number
make the same number as the right digit of the hex number.
22 2 2 2 23 2 2! 2°
BINARY 1 0 1 0 1 1 01
HEX SA $D = $ AD
a,
MIDI sends and receives information using binary computer signals. It is quite --
easy to convert binary numbers to hex, and hex is easy for us to deal with (only
two digits), so in this manual when we refer to MIDI data, we will use hexadecimal
numbers.
62
CONVERSION
o-grO-O-O-O-O-O-O-O-O-O-O-O-Or-O-O-OrO-O-Or-O-Or-O-O-O-O-O-O-O-0O0T-0-
oo--00O0-—-06--O0OG+-—-0O00--00—-—-0O00—-—-0600-—-00+#-—-6CO0C--O0C0C-+-0O0C--0O00O0C--0OO--0O0O-+-0C0+-+-
© © ОО т к © © © © «= == == «= © © © © «= = «= == © © © © = тт от= HFOOOG--=-F=-OO00O0--F-<-OOOO-TE- «= © © © © += «= «= «—
ООО ОСОСО ОС «= = = «= «= «= = = © © © © © © © © ж= жо то т ож = т = © © © © © © © © ж= тт тт тт == «= rr © © © © © © © © «= кт «= т= = к т к
ООО С О С © © ж- «= «= «= т ок к т к т то «= к- те те т- © © © © © © © © © © © © © © © © же жет к ж- кт ож к к к к ож = ке окт ок от
©) © © © © © © © © © © © © © © С О © О О С © © С © © © © ©) ©) ©) ©) жт ож ож кт тт т же отт тт те от т Ж= ж= т т т = те тео ож ож ож же ож о че же кот отт отт к
чет отт o == — == се ее с с стос = == = = тт = = чт = = = = = т тео = т = чт = = = т = = те о SO = «= = = чт O YO = = т т = = = т = т Что тт «= т «=
© < сч (9 = ню © го 00 С) «С 0 О О
© © © © © CO 00 CO © © 00 © © ©
o+-O-590+-60+=-O-60+-0OG-0O9-0G-60+-6O60-O-0O—=-O-0C+-O0O+-0O0O+-O+-O-GC-O-O-O-O-O-O-O-O-O-O-0O0O+-C0+-
© © «= = © © = = © © «= == © © «= == © © «== == © © «== т= © © == = © © «= «= © © «= «== © © == < © © == = © © = = © © «= «== © © «= == © © «+ = © © = «<
ООО = = = © © © © = «- == «== О © © © «== «= = «= © © © © ж= «= == == © © © © «= «= т= = © © © © ж= = == «= © © © © к «= <= «= О © © © = «= TT
© © © © © © © © «= = «== += = = = = © © © © © © © © rr = = rr тт те т = © © © © © © © © «= «= = тт тт = «= т" © © © © © © © © к же ож ке «= к к к
осо О О ОС С С © ж- «= ж= «= ж= «= «= «= «= к = т т = то +- ©) ©) © © © © © © © О © © © © © © ж= к ж- rrr к= к же к ке хо ко ке «= к к
©) ©) © С) © © © © © С ©) © © © ©) © © © ©) © © © ©) СО СО © ©) ©) ©) СО © ©) тт кт тт ттт ттт ттт отт чт т ож ож тж о тт жо Жо жт отт ож ож же тож ож то TTT TTT
осо О ОО ос о о ооо ею о ооо осо 0©©
© «= © «= © «= © «- © «= © == © «= © «= © «== © «== © «= © = © == © т- © ж- © += © += © «== © == © ж= © == © «- © += © «= © к- © += © «= © «= © «== © к © «- © «—
© © «= «== © © «== «= © © «= = © © «= == © © «== «= © © = OR OOO © © = «= О © ж= == © © «= «= © © к == © © < += © © = к= © © == =
© © © © = «<= == «== © © © © «== к= == == © © © © == «== == == © © © © «= = = == © © © © «= = = = © © © © = к = т- © © © © = = = «< © © © © += «< < «=
© © © © © © © © «== «== = == = = == = © © © © © © © © кт «= = «= «= «= = «= © © © © © © © © = «= rrr rrr rr += © © © © © © © © r—r——— — —
© © © © © © © © © © © © © © © © «= = = о тт тт тт = тт «= к ож ктото око то © © © © © © © © © © © © © © © © к «= ж= тт те «= «= кт ке «= же то чт к т к
ООО С О © © © © © О О С О © © © О © © © © © © ©) © © «= к к т «= rr = то к «тот кт отт отт чт же же ож что ктото о же кт Жо Жо ож отт отт отт чт от т
== == т т к т т те от отт тт ет т т точ т кот ок т ЖЗ чт т ож ож отт отт отно T= T= t= r= тт т ттт оч чтож оч чтото хто то же о тт= fT тт тт CCE
SOOGCGOOOOOOGOGOOCOOGOCOOGOOGOGOOOOOOOOOGOOOOOGOOGOCOOOOOOOOGOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO
O-NOTVWONOOIMOQULO-NOTLON OICMOQuu QO
== == = т тот ож ок от т т т СУ
© < © += © == © «= © == © == © = © «= © «к= © == © «== © = © == © == © = © «= © «== © == © == © = © к- © < © «== © к= © = © == © «= © < © = © < © «< © «<
О © = == © © = =- © © == == © © «= «= О © «== = © © «= += © © «= = © © == == © © «= == © © «= «== © © «== = © © «= «= © © == т= © © к= = © © «= «= © © < +
© © © © «= += «= == © © © © «= «= == = © © © © «= «= = «= © © © © тт отт == == © © © © rr кт т к © © © © «= «= == т © © © © к хто то «= © © © © же «= «= +
ООО ООО = = = = == «= == «= © © © СО © © © © «= = = ж- «= тт от= т= © © © © © © © © «= «= «= т «= = то = © © © © © © © © же = к к т ко == т
©) ©) © © © © © © © © © © © © © © кт ч= тт отт rrr rrr rr т к т «= = «= СО © © © © © © © © © © © © © © © к кт кт то ко OO
O0600006060°00560©00006000009000©0000006006000600©00909°0©000009©0©0900©000©0© 0°. 0©090000©0000©0°©00©090
6G0O000960GOOG0O0C0O9OGOOOCGCOOOOGOOOOGOOGOOGSGOOOOOOOOGOOOOOOOOOOQOOOOOOOCOOOOOOOOO
63
WHATS MIDE ee
Musical Instrument Digital Interface (MIDI) is a way for keyboards, synthesizers,
sequencers, rhythm machines, and computers to communicate with each other.
Devices that have a MIDI jack can be connected together to send and receive in -
formation. Since most musical instrument manufacturers have agreed on MIDI,
you can connect devices of various manufacturers.
Each piece of information is called a MIDI MESSAGE. Each MIDI message is made
up of 1 to 3 bytes (numbers); a Status Byte and 0,1 or 2 Data Bytes.
The typical MID! message is in the following form.
Sn. xx. yy
s = Status (8—E)
n = Channel number (0-F indicates channel 1-16)
= First data byte (00-7F)
= Second data byte (00-7F)
XX
YY
Let's look at a sample 3-byte MIDI message.
93. 3C. 15
IT TT
| |
Status (Note On) Channel 44 Note # Velocity
For example, if a DX7 synthesizer receives this message, it does the following.
1.
Checks the channel number to see if it is acceptable. If the DX7 has been set
to receive that channel, it goes on to the next step.lf not, the message is ignored.
In the example above, the channel number is 4. (We count O-F as 1 to 16.)
Checks the status. In this case, the status is Note On, so the DX7 knows to
expect two more data bytes; note number (what note) and velocity (how hard
it was hit).
Reads the data bytes and produces the correct note with the correct velocity.
(Keep in mind that all this takes only a very short time. It takes about 1/1000
second to send a MIDI message. To us, it seems that the sound was produced
at the same time we pressed the key.)
64
Some MIDI messages have only two bytes; a status byte and a data byte.
For example,
C3. 05
is a Program Change message on channel! 4, telling the receiving device to switch
to program number 6.
MIDI messages with a status byte from FO to FF have no channel number. They
are called System messages, and are received by all devices regardless of their
channel setting.
For an explanation of each type of message, see the MIDI Format Table on p.67.
65
Note Off Note Number Velocity
Note On 7 ”
Polyphonic " Pressure
Aftertouch
Control Change
(Control Number)
01 Modulation Wheel
02 Breath Controller
04 Foot Controller
05 Portamento Time
06 Data Entry Slider
07 Main Volume
40 Sustain
41 Portamento
42 Sostenuto 7F: On
43 Soft
60 Data Increment 7F
61 Data Decrement 7F
7A Local 00: Off, 7F:On
7B All Note Off 00
7C Omni Off 00
7D Omni On 00
7E Mono On 00-OA (Number of channels)
7F Poly On 00
Program Change Program number
Channel Aftertouch Pressure
Pitch Wheel LSB
System Exclusive Migr. ID code
Song Position LSB
Pointer
Song Select Song number
Tune Request
End Of Exclusive
Timing Clock
‘COMMON MESSAGE
Start
Continue
Stop
Active Sensing
REALTIME MESSAGE |
System Reset
66
8n Note Off:
In Note On:
An Polyphonic
Aftertouch:
~~
Bn Control Change:
Cn Program Change:
Dn Channel
Aftertouch:
7 En Pitch Wheel :
F0 System Exclusive:
F7 End Of Exclusive:
(EOX)
The note number indicates which key was released, and velocity indicates how
quickly it was released. Very few keyboards have Release Velocity Sensitivity (The
Sequential Circuits Prophet T8 is one). Most other keyboards (such as the Yamaha
DX series) send a Note On message with a velocity of O to indicate a Note Off.
The note number indicates which key was pressed, and velocity indicates how
hard it was hit. On keyboards which do not have a velocity sensitive keyboard (such
as the DX21), a medium value of 40 is sent. A Note On message with a velocity
of 0 is the same as a Note Off message.
The note number indicates which key is being pressed, and pressure indicates how
hard that key is being pressed. (le. each key can send independent aftertouch
messages.)
The control number indicates which controller is being moved, and the data indicates
the position of the controller. In this chart, control changes 01-07 are “continuous
controllers.” (Slider or wheel-type controllers) They carry data in the range of 00-7F.
Control changes 40-43 are on/off switch-type controllers, and carry data of either
0 or 7F.
Control changes 7A-7F are a special type of control change called Mode Messages,
and usualiy carry a fixed data byte. They tell the recelving tone generator how to
behave. The way in which these message are interpreted will depend on the device.
(See the MIDI Implementation Chart for your tone generator or synthesizer.)
This tells the receiving device to switch programs (memories).
Also called “Common Aftertouch”, this is found on the DX7.
To provide finer resolution, this data is sent in two bytes, first the Least Significant
Byte (LSB) and then the Most Significant Byte (MSB). Yamaha tone generators
and synthesizers ignore the LSB.
After FO must come an identification number which has been assigned to each
manufacturer. Yamaha's number is 43. What comes between this message and F7
(End of Exclusive )is completely up to each manufacturer (but each byte must be
between O and 7F). Yamaha uses System Exclusive messages to transmit voice
data, sequence data, rhythm pattern data, bulk memory data of all kinds, and many
other useful things. See the System Exclusive format chart for your device.
This marks the end of a System Exclusive message.
67
F2,F3,F8,F A,FB,FC,FF: Song Position Pointer, Song Select, Timing Clock, Start, Stop, Continue, System
Reset are all for controlling sequencers and rhythm machines. See the MIDI Im-
plementation Chart for your device.
FE Active Sensing: If there are no MIDI messages that have to be sent, one of these is sent every 300
msec just to let the receiving devices know that there is still someone out there.
If there have not been any MIDI messages for a long time (like 1/2 a second), the
receiving device assumes that some error has taken place (eg. a MIDI cable was
pulled out by mistake) and will stop all notes.
F1, F4, F5, F9, FD: These are unused, and reserved for future expansion.
~
RECEPTION DATA
TRANSMISSION DATA
In addition to MID! messages to be processed, the MEP4 receives two types of
System Exclusive message.
1. 60 Memory Butk Data
Status FO
ID 43
Sub-status/ Device no. On (n=device number 0-F)
Format no. 7E
2Kbyte data blocks x 8 (see below)
EOX F7
The MEP4 has 8 Kbytes of memory. When this is converted into ASCII, it takes
up 16 Kbytes, so the above data is sent in eight 2 Kbyte blocks. The format is the
same as above except that the byte count is 10 0A (2058 byte decimal). There
must be an interval of at least 100 msec between each block of “header. ASCII
data, check sum”. After 8 of these blocks have been sent, F7 (EOX) is sent. Each
block of data has the following format;
Byte count 10 OA (2 bytes 14 bits)
Header ‘L'M’-'-78'9'6°9-"- (ASCII data)
ASCI data ~~ ... (2058 bytes)
Check sum ?? (one byte)
100 msec interval (to allow the MEP to process the data)
2. Dump Request |
Status FO
ID 43
Sub-status/Device no. 2n (n = device number 0-F)
Format no. 7E
EOX F7
When the MEP4 receives a dump request as above with the appropriate device
number, it will transmit Memory Bulk data as in the same format described in 1.
The dump request message itself will not be sent.
69
€
e
NDISSV LHOdLNO
135430 H3-1N0
NOISSY HI- 1no
NDISSYV 1HOd1NO
135440 H9-1n0
N9ISSY HI- 1n0
NDISSYV LHOJdLNO
135440 HO-1NO
NSISSY HO-LNO
NOISSV LYOdLNO
135440 HO-1NO
NDISSY H3-1N0
H3LLISIHd Viva
- BALI3SIHd VIVO
H3NDISSY INdINO | HINDISSV indino | | HINDISSY indino — | | H3NDISSY INdiNO
| iL AVTJO JWIL AY130 JW AVTAG 3WIL AV13Q
боб MOSSI90HdAVIJO : 4OSSIJOHd AVIIO. HOSSIJOUd AYIIO ВЕ HOSSIIOkd AV130
$ v v v
€ € € £
Zz с с с
| | | |
OSW | O SW 0 OSW 0 OS | 0
— — vIMIdON VIVO. - -—. —WEHICON viva. — “HZISIOOW Viva — |. 4aHIGON viva —_
440 / NO SIN WILSAS 140 7 NO SIN W31SAS 110 7 NO SIN W31SAS 440 / NO SIN WILSAS
440 / NO ‘SAW IAOW HD 440 / NO SIN ICON HO 440 / NO SIN 300N HO 440 / NO ‘SIN IA0OW HD
440 / NO амая ноша 440 / NO ON39 HILId 440 / NO ON39 HOLId 440 / NO ON39 HILId
+10 / NO HONOL \ HO 110 / NO HONOL ‘V HD 440 / NO HINOL 'Y HD 440 / NO HONOL Y HO
440 / NO IINYHI WYY450H4d 440 / NO ЗОМУНО WVHOOHd 440 / NO IONYHD WYHDOHd 440 / NO 19INVYHI WYH5OYd
7 TY "ON 10H1NO9 7 TlY ‘ON TOH1N023 7 TY ‘ON TOHLNOD 7 TY ‘ON TOHLNO9
440 / NO HOINOL 'Y ATOd 440 / NO HONOL "Vv AlOd 440 / NO HINOL Y A10d 440 / NO HONOL ‘V A10d
440 / NO NO 3LON 440 / NO NO 3.LON 440 / NO NO 31LON 440 / NO NO 3LON
440 / NO 440 JLON 440 / NO 340 31ON 440 / NO 340 310N 440 / NO 440 3LON
4 a 83114: ADVSSIN x ох | - MiS 3OVSSIN 5 HILT 39VSSIM | Ш o — HI 39VSSIW oo
gl Si vL EL ZL ll oL 6 91 SL EY EL Zi I OL 6 aL SI vi EL zL 14 o 6 91 SL tL EL ZL LL OL 6
8 4. 9 G Vv E TZ | 8 L 9 SS 2 ес L 8 Lí 9 SS Y E YT | 8 £Ñ 9 SS Vv £ Z L
140/N0: INWO 340/NO INWO 440 / NO : INWO 440 / NO : INWO
© 2 WIEN 1ANNVHD | > USAS TINNVHO. ‘HILT TANNVHO | MAL 1INNVHD
(440 / NO) Z T0HLNOD (440 / NO) 7 1081N02 (440 / NO ) z 1041N05 | (430 / NO) ZT0H1N09
(440 / NO) t170HLN09 (340 / NO) LTOHLN03 (430 / NO) | TOHINOD (440 / NO) | T0HINOD
(440 / NO) ноша (440 / NO) HOLId (440 / NO) HOLId (440 / NO) HOLId
(430 / NO) MWVH9OHd (440 / NO) WYYDOYd (440 / NO) WVHOOHd (440 / NO) IMYY90H4d
43135344 viva
Y3113SI4d VIVO
430/NO
440/NO | 440/NO | 430/NO
У
€ с |
/ "ON E
LAVHI YILINVAVd SSIIOUd PdIN
70
[ MIDI Event Processor ] Date : 10/16, 1985
. Model MEP4 MIDI Implementation Chart Version : 1.0
— a nk ak аня ны ka ak та таня a ню оны та а a a i om mm pn ¡E e a e pin THA. ae ее ее rk AS A FAR ATE i A BA HE AA A Heth fei ml тн не = — — +
: Transmitted Transmitted by :Recognized as :
: Function ... : after received memory change message for MEP4:
8------------------- + +---------------- +---------------- :
:Basic Default : 1- 16 X1,X2:1-16 X1 : 1 - 16 Xl
:Channel Changed : 1 —-— 16 : 1 - 16 : 1 - 16 :
poo tee bene An += a
Default ох :
: Mode Messages 11 POLY, MONO XG : POLY, MONO o Xx
: OMNIon,OMNIoff : OMNIon,OMNIoff : x :
fmm mmm tom mmm ome += meme
: Note : 0 - 127 : x E
:Number : True voice: XXXXXXXXXXXXXX -: XXXXXXXXXXXXXX : x
press ss ses Ee == te +=
:Velocity Note ON : O XA : x : X
: Note OFF : o XB : x : x :
:8------------------- фене +---------------- +----------- :
After Key's о XC : x : X :
Touch Ch's о XD X X
a TTT TTT TT TTT TT ee se me +--------------- == — = — = == == те = == ео = — ЧЕ == == тет стон ет ен тн еее т ен = = ==};
Pitch Bender О XE : © X
{mm mm mmm btn mm +
Q - 121 : © XF : © x
: Control
‚Change
5 ------------s----- +-——— + tene +m ee +
: Prog : 0 0 - 127 XH : o 00-127 : 0 8 - 127
:Change : True # 11509000099909909090 0 0000000090000 0 0 - 59
mmm +---------------- +---------------- A
- System Exclusive : O XI : o X3 o memory data
iio +---------------- +---------------- +----------------:
System : Song Pos : o XI : x Xx
: : Song Sel : o XI : x :ox
:Common : Tune : O XI : x Xx
AA нет т = = —= = == еее $e SAS фене;
System :Clock о XI X x
:Real Time :Commands: o XI x x
:Aux ¡Local ON/OFF : o
: :All Notes OFF: o XG
:Mes- :Active Sense : o
:sages: Reset : O : : :
§ a aaa nebenan hen Frm mm AJA a a in $ :
: Notes: Received messages are processed and transmitted to MIDI OUT,
: The message XA - XI can be individually enabled to transmit.
: X1 = memorized
: A2 = multi channel may be assigned for receive and transmit.
: X3 = memory data transmitted by panel switch or dump request.
mm me +
Mode 1 : OMNI ON, POLY Mode 2 : OMNI ON, MONO o : Yes
Mode 3 : OMNI OFF, POLY Mode 4 : OMNI OFF, MONO x : No
ss
IMPORTANT
SAFETY AND INSTALLATION INSTRUCTIONS
INFORMATION RELATING TO POSSIBLE PERSONAL INJURY, ELECTRIC SHOCK AND
FIRE HAZARD POSSIBILITIES HAS BEEN INCLUDED IN THIS LIST.
WARNING — When using electronic products, basic prec-
autions should always be followed, including the following:
1.
Read all Safety and Installation Instructions, Supple-
mental Marking and Special Message Section data, and
any applicable assembly instructions BEFORE using
this product.
Check unit weight specifications BEFORE you attempt
to move this product.
Main power supply verification. Yamaha Digital Musical
instrument products are manufactured specifically for
use with the main supply voltage used in the area where
they are to be soid. The main supply voltage required
by these products is printed onthe name plate. For name
piate location please refer to the graphic in the Special
Message section. If any doubt exists please contact the
nearest Yamaha Digital Musical Instrument retailer.
Some Yamaha Digital Musical Instrument products
utilize external power supplies or adapters. Do NOT
connect products of this type to any power supply or
adapter other than the type described in the owners
manual or as marked on the unit.
This product may be equipped with a piug having three
prongs or a polarized tine plug (one blade wider than
the other). If you are unable to insert the plug into the
outlet, contact an electrician to have the obsolete outlet
replaced. Do NOT defeat the safety purpose of the plug.
Yamaha products not having three prong or polarized
line plugs incorporate construction methods and de-
signs that do not require line plug polarization.
WARNING — Do NOT place objects on the power cord
or piace the unit in a position where any one could walk
on, trip over, or roll anything over cords of any kind.
An improper installation of this type can create the
possibility of a fire hazard and/or personal injury.
Environment: Your Yamaha Digital Musical Instrument
should be installed away from heat sources such as
heat registers and/or other products that produce heat.
Ventilation: This product should be installed or posi-
tioned in a way that its placement or location does not
interfere with proper ventilation.
Yamaha Digital Musical Instrument products are fre-
guently incorporated into “Systems” which are as-
sembled on carts, stands or in racks. Utilize only those
carts, stands, or racks that have been designed for this
10.
11.
12.
13.
14.
15.
16.
purpose and observe all safety precautions supplied
with the products. Pay special attention to cautions that
relate to proper assembly, heavier units being mounted
at the lower levels, load limits, moving instructions,
maximum usable height and ventilation.
Yamaha Digital Musica! Instrument products, either
alone or incombination with amplification, headphones,
or speakers, may be capable of producing sound levels
that could cause permanent hearing loss. Do NOT op-
erate at high volume levels or at a level that is un-
comfortable. If you experience any discomfort, ringing
in the ears, or suspect any hearing loss, you should
consult an audiologist.
Do NOT use this product near water or in wet environ-
ments. For example, near a swimming pool, spa, in the
rain, or in a wet basement.
Care should be taken so that objects do not fail, and
liquids are not spilled into the enclosure.
Yamaha Digital Musical Instrument products should be
serviced by a qualified service person when:
a. The power supply/power adapter cord or plug has
been damaged; or
b. Objects have fallen, or liquid has been spilled into
the products; or
c. The unit has been exposed to rain; or
d. The product does not operate, exhibits a marked
change in performance; or
e. The product has been dropped, or the enclosure of
the product has been damaged.
When not in use, always turn your Yamaha Digital Mu-
sical Instrument equipment “OFF”. The power supply
cord shouid be unplugged from the outlet when the
equipment is to be {eft unused for a long period of time.
NOTE: In this case, some units may lose some user
programmed data. Factory programmed memories
will not be affected.
Electromagnetic Interference (RFI). Yamaha Digital
Musical Instruments utilize digital {high frequency
pulse) technology that may adversely affect Radio/TV
reception. Please read FCC Information (inside back
cover) for additional information.
Do NOT attempt to service this product beyond that
described inthe user maintenance section ofthe owners
manual. All other servicing shouid be referred to qua-
lified service personnel.
PLEASE KEEP THIS MANUAL
FOR FUTURE REFERENCE!
This information on safety is provided to comply with U.S.A. laws, but should be observed by users in all countries.
FCC INFORMATION
While the following statements are provided to comply
with FCC Regulations in the United States, the cor-
rective measures listed below are applicable world-
wide.
This series of Yamaha professional music equipment
uses frequencies that appear in the radio frequency
range and if installed in the immediate proximity of
some types of audio or video devices (within three
meters), interference may occur. This series of Yamaha
combo equipment have been type tested and found
to comply with the specifications set for a class B
computing device in accordance with those specifi-
cations listed in subpart J of part 15 of the FCC rules.
These rules are designed to provide a reasonable
measure of protection against such interference.
However, this does not guarantee that interference
will not occur. If your professional music equipment
should be suspected of causing interference with other
electronic devices, verification can be made by turning
your combo equipment off and on. if the interference
continues when your equipment is off, the equipment
is not the source of interference. If your equipment
does appear to be the source of the interference, you
should try to correct the situation by using one or
more of the following measures:
Relocate either the equipment or the electronic device
that is being affected by the interference. Utilize power
outlets for the professional music equipment and the
device being affected that are on different branch
{circuit breaker or fuse) circuits, or install AC line
filters.
in the case of radio or TV interference, relocate the
antenna or, if the antenna lead-in is 300 ohm ribbon
lead, change the lead-in to co-axial type cable.
If these corrective measures do not produce satisfac-
tory results, please contact your authorized Yamaha
professional products dealer for suggestions and/or
corrective measures.
If you cannot locate a franchised Yamaha professional
products dealer in your general area contact the pro-
fessional products Service Department, Yamaha Music
Corporation, 6600 Orangethorpe Ave., Buena Park,
CA 90620, U.S.A.
If for any reason, you should need additional infor-
mation relating to radio or TV interference, you may
find a booklet prepared by the Federal Communi-
cations Commission helpful:
“How to Identify and Resolve Radio — TV Interference
Problems”. This booklet is available from the U.S.
Government Printing Office, Washington D.C. 20402
— Stock No, 004-000-00345-4.
i mmm a a
CL ey eign,
YAMAHA
- my
YAMAHA CORPORATION
PO Box 1, Hamamatsu, Japan
VD68760| 880401 R2 CR Printed in Japa
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