Mitel 3100 User guide
3100 Hand.bk Page i Monday, August 19, 2002 8:49 PM
TECHNICIAN’S HANDBOOK
3100 Hand.bk Page ii Monday, August 19, 2002 8:49 PM
NOTICE
The information contained in this document is believed to be accurate
in all respects but is not warranted by Mitel Networks Corporation
(MITEL®). The information is subject to change without notice and
should not be construed in any way as a commitment by Mitel or any of
its affiliates or subsidiaries. Mitel and its affiliates and subsidiaries
assume no responsibility for any errors or omissions in this document.
Revisions of this document or new editions of it may be issued to
incorporate such changes.
No part of this document can be reproduced or transmitted in any form
or by any means - electronic or mechanical - for any purpose without
written permission from Mitel Networks Corporation.
Mitel Networks is a trademark of Mitel Networks Corporation.
Windows is a trademark of Microsoft Corporation.
SonicWALL is a trademark of SonicWall, Inc.
Other product names mentioned in this document may be trademarks of their
respective companies and are hereby acknowledged.
Mitel Networks 3100 Integrated Communications Platform
Technician’s Handbook
Release 3
50002911, Revision B
August 2002
 ,
Trademark of MITEL Networks Corporation
©Copyright 2002, MITEL Networks Corporation
All rights reserved
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Table of Contents
Chapter 1 : Introduction
About this handbook . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
Purpose of this handbook . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
Who this handbook is written for . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
Where you can find more information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
Symbols used in this handbook . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
Important safety instructions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
About the 3100 ICP system . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7
Description . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7
Basic system configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7
A fully expanded system . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8
Voice functionality . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8
Data functionality. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8
What telephone features are supported? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9
Chapter 2 : Installation
Before you begin. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19
Hardware ports and connectors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19
Controller components . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20
Identify the required components . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21
Installation checklist . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22
Installation overview. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24
Installing the system components . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25
Configuring the PC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26
Windows 95/98 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26
Windows NT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26
Windows 2000. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27
Windows ME . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27
Windows XP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28
Launching the tools . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29
Running the quick installation tool . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30
About the system quick installation tool . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30
Key system, PBX, or other? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30
Using the system quick installation tool . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31
Connect the phones and lines . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34
Verify the system . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35
Installation tips . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36
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Technician’s Handbook
Chapter 3 : Programming
Programming overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
About the programming tools . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Tools are password protected . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Enable your options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Programming the system parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Set system date and time. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Review the numbering plan . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Set the login attributes for users. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Changing the system-wide settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Identify the power source of the IP phones . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Program the online services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Programming the extensions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Program the extensions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Program the extension groups . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Program the extension voice mailboxes. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Program the extension personal keys . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Programming the voice parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Modify the extensions and system directory. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Program the incoming access (ring maps) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Program external access (line and hunt groups) . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Programming BRI ISDN access (UK only) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Restrict external access (toll restriction/call barring) . . . . . . . . . .
Program the voice management parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Programming the voice mail settings. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Setting up the auto attendant . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Log in to the administrator station . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Record the system greetings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Record the bilingual welcome greeting. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Configuring call logging (SMDR) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Commit your changes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Perform a database backup. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Programming tips. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
39
40
41
41
42
42
42
43
45
45
46
47
47
47
48
48
50
50
51
52
53
58
60
61
62
62
63
64
65
67
67
68
Chapter 4 : Configuring the IP network
About IP networking. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 71
Network capabilities. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 72
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Table of Contents
Planning your LAN . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 73
Default controller IP addresses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 74
IP programming sequence . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 75
Connecting directly to the Internet . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 76
Using Static IP addressing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 78
Using DHCP Client . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 78
Using Broadband Access (PPPoE). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 79
Commit your changes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 80
Connecting to the Internet through
an existing LAN . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 81
Through the WAN port . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 81
Through a layer-2 switch port (custom configuration) . . . . . . . . . . 83
Using a remote DHCP server . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 85
What you need . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 85
Configuring the 3100 ICP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 85
Configuring the external DHCP server . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 86
Changing the assigned DHCP IP address range . . . . . . . . . . . 88
Configuring Domain Name Service . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 91
Assigning a gateway. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 93
Programming dial-up access to an ISP. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 95
Restricting LAN access (firewall) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 97
Connecting the 6000 SBAP to the layer-2 switch port . . . . . . . . . 97
Connecting the 6000 SBAP to the WAN port . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 100
SonicWALL SOHO2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 102
IP networking tips . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 106
Chapter 5 : Routine maintenance
Is the system healthy? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 109
System health checklist. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 109
Is the system secure?. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 110
Checking the system . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 111
Launching the tools . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 113
Enabling your licensed options. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 114
Obtain your MOSS option code . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 114
Rebooting the system. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 116
Powering down the system . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 117
Powering up the system. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 118
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Upgrading the system . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Installing option modules . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Adding an expansion unit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Performing a software upgrade . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Applying a software patch . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Replacing a flash card . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Performing backups. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Creating backup directories . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Backing up the software and/or database . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Backing up the voice mail data. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Saving call (SMDR) logs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Using a remote access session . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Setting up remote access. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Launching the tools from a remote session . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Changing extensions or set types . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Changing an extension number or set type . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Reset the phone . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Creating a user guide. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Using a database template . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Maintenance tips . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
119
119
120
121
123
123
128
128
128
129
130
131
131
133
135
135
135
136
137
138
Chapter 6 : Troubleshooting and repair
Checking the system LEDs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Checking the logs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Viewing diagnostics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Starting a diagnostic session . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Checking the bootup script . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Line troubleshooting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
IP phone troubleshooting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Analog phone troubleshooting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
System troubleshooting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Network troubleshooting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Using Windows networking commands. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Using VxWorks networking commands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Fixing database or software corruption . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Restoring the database/software and database . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Restoring the system with previous software . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
vi
141
142
143
143
144
145
146
147
148
149
150
152
153
154
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Restoring the system with the factory software. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 156
Restoring voice mail data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 157
Replacing faulty components . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 158
Replacing the flash card . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 158
Replacing a faulty hard disk . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 160
Field replaceable units . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 162
Troubleshooting tips . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 163
Appendix A : Default database
Default Database . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 167
Numbering plan. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 168
Numbering assignment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 168
Analog set configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 169
Analog line configuration (NA) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 169
Restriction groups (extensions). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 169
Timers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 170
Feature access codes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 172
Appendix B : Reference
Call logging (SMDR) details . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 177
Ring Map handling . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 179
Controller card connectors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 189
Port pinouts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 190
Line protocols . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 194
Cable pinouts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 195
Appendix C : Planning
Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 199
System parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 200
Voice parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 201
Toll restriction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 208
Voice mail . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 209
IP networking. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 210
Index
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viii
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Chapter 1
Introduction
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Technician’s Handbook
2
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Introduction
Introduction
About this handbook
Purpose of this handbook
This handbook provides
•
an overview of the system capabilities
•
installation steps
•
programming procedures
•
maintenance checklists
•
troubleshooting information
Who this handbook is written for
This handbook is for a certified technician.
Where you can find more information
Technical manual and extension guides
On the system software CD-ROM
1. Insert the system software CD-ROM in the CD-ROM
drive of your PC.
2. If the CD-ROM does not start automatically, open
Windows® Explorer and navigate to the CD-ROM
directory. Click Autorun.exe.
3. In the Welcome screen, click Online Help at the top of
the list.
From the tools
1. After initial installation, launch your browser and go to
the following URL: http://192.168.1.2
2. Click Help.
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Technician’s Handbook
From the internet
1. Go to the following URL: http://www.mitel.com
2. Access Mitel OnLine from the Online Services
selection menu.
3. Click Technical Support and then click Customer
Documentation (edocs).
User Guides through Manual Maker
Manual Maker is a web-base application that allows you
to generate customized user guides
1. Go to the following URL: http://www.mitel.com
2. Access Mitel OnLine from the Online Services
selection menu.
3. Click Technical Support and then click Manual
Maker.
You can also launch Manual Maker from the group
administration tool.
Field change instructions
Every software release is accompanied by a Field
Change Instruction (FCI). The FCI describes software
changes, bug fixes, outstanding issues, and hardware
compatibility considerations for the new software
release. Read the FCI before you begin a software
upgrade.
The FCI is included on the system software CD-ROM.
You can also obtain the latest FCI from Mitel OnLine at
www.mitel.com. Note that you must be a registered user
to access Mitel OnLine.
Technical Service/Information Bulletins
Technical Service Bulletins (TSBs) and Technical
Information Bulletins (TIBs) are issued by Mitel Technical
4
Introduction
Helpful websites
For definitions of technical terms
•
http://www.techweb.com/encyclopedia
•
http://www.whatis.com
For networking information
•
http://www.practicallynetworked.com
•
http://www.networktroubleshooting.com
Terminology
Glossaries are provided in the Technical Manual and in
the Installation and Maintenance Course Student
Manual.
Symbols used in this handbook
A stop symbol indicates a hazardous situation which, if
not avoided, could result in injury or death.
A yield symbol with an exclamation mark indicates a
situation which, if not avoided, could result in damage to
the equipment.
A light bulb identifies an important note or a useful tip.
%]Y^
A clock indicates the amount of time that is required to
perform the associated step.
A pointer symbol identifies an important cross reference.
5
Introduction
Support to address frequently asked questions regarding
software and hardware problems. Obtain the latest TSBs
from Mitel OnLine.
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Technician’s Handbook
Important safety instructions
Failure to follow all instructions may result in improper
equipment operation and/or risk of electrical shock.
See the Safety Instructions in the 3100 ICP Technical
Manual for complete safety information. Safety Instructions
are also provided with the system in paper format.
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Introduction
Introduction
About the 3100 ICP system
Description
The Mitel Networks™ 3100 Integrated Communications
Platform (ICP) provides a complete voice and data
solution in one easy-to-manage unit.
The 3100 ICP controller contains the call control
software, a router, a layer-2 switch, embedded voice mail
with an auto attendant, and a hard-drive for storing voice
mail messages and the management tool web pages.
Figure 1: 3100 ICP controller, option modules, and expansion unit
Basic system configuration
The basic system supports
•
8 Mitel Networks IP (Internet Protocol) Phones
•
2 ONS (on premise station) analog telephones
•
1 wide area network (WAN) Ethernet port for
connections to WAN services such as cable or Digital
Subscriber Line (DSL)
•
4 LS/CLASS interfaces
•
100 IP devices.
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Technician’s Handbook
A fully expanded system
A fully expanded system consists of the controller, fitted
with three optional modules, and the expansion unit. It
provides
•
up to 24 Mitel Networks IP (Internet Protocol) phones
•
up to 10 analog telephones with Calling Line
Identification (CLI) capability
•
up to 8 LS/CLASS lines or 8 ISDN BRI lines (UK only)
The system supports a maximum of 8 lines. In the UK,
these can be a combination of LS/CLASS lines and
ISDN BRI lines.
•
1 Wide Area Network (WAN) Ethernet port for
connections to WAN services such as cable or DSL
•
100 IP devices.
The system supports a maximum of two ONS interface
modules and one LS/CLASS module.
Voice functionality
•
Full set of voice features
•
Key System, PBX, or customized system
•
Fully featured voice mail and auto attendant.
Data functionality
8
•
Integrated 10/100 Mbs layer-2 switch
•
Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol (DHCP) server
that supports up to 100 IP addresses
•
IP Routing / WAN router, Domain Naming System
(DNS) and Network Address Translation (NAT)
3100 Hand.bk Page 9 Monday, August 19, 2002 8:49 PM
Introduction
Remote WAN locations supported through Ethernet
WAN interface or dial-up Point-to-Point Protocol
(PPP) connections.
•
Built-in modem
•
IP set powering.
What telephone features are supported?
Note that the Mitel Networks 5001 and 5005 IP phones
are not available in Release 2.3 or earlier.
Table 1: Functions and features available on sets
5TPcdaTb
$
$$
$ $!
$'!!
$ #
Number of fixed function/application/telephony keys
3
2
6
8
8
13
Number of personal/quick keys
--
20
7
14
14
9
Number of pre-assigned personal/quick keys
--
3
1
1
1
1
Dual or single-colored personal
keys
--
single
dual
dual
dual
--
Number of soft command keys
--
--
--
3
3
6
Number of system speed call numbers (short codes) available
1000 system-wide
LCD display
N
1 line
2 line
2 line
2 line
320x
240
VGA
Headset operation
N
N
Y
Y
Y
Y
Message waiting indicator
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Account codes - allocate to incoming or outgoing calls
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Adjust display contrast
N
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Adjust handset receiver volume
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
9
Introduction
•
3100 Hand.bk Page 10 Monday, August 19, 2002 8:49 PM
Technician’s Handbook
Table 1: Functions and features available on sets (continued)
5TPcdaTb
$
$$
$ $!
$'!!
$ #
Adjust ringer pitch
N
N
Y
Y
Y
Y
Adjust volume of the speaker
N
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Administrator extension
N
N
N
Y
Y
Y
Alarm calls - setup for other extension users
N
N
N
Admin Admin Admin
only
only
only
Alarm calls - setup on own extension
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Answer external call via personal/quick key
N
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Answer next call via personal/quick
key
N
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Auto attendant access
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Automatically answer incoming
external calls (auto answer)
N
N
N
Y
Y
Y
Automatically answer a call and
define the type of response to give
N
N
N
N
Y
N
Automatic hold
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Bookmarks - enables the extension
user to access a list of user-defined
URLs.
N
N
N
N
N
Y
Call status information - LCD provides information about status of
extension and current call
N
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Callback when free
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Calls For - identifies diverting extenN
sion number
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Cancel a message waiting request
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Cancel call forwarding
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
10
3100 Hand.bk Page 11 Monday, August 19, 2002 8:49 PM
Introduction
5TPcdaTb
$
$$
$ $!
$'!!
$ #
Conference call - enable an extension user to set-up a call between
three parties
N
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Direct Station Select/Busy Lamp
Field (DSS/BLF) keys - setup at
extension
N
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Directed Message Waiting - leave a
message for another extension user Y
without calling the extension first
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Display caller’s number and name
N
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Do Not Disturb
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Doorphone operation
N
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Dual Tone Multi-Frequency Tone
Dialing
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Exclusive Hold - place a call on hold
which can only be retrieved by the
N
extension that placed the call on
hold
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Extension Groups - extension can
be associated with a group
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Extension Paging - broadcast a
message to a single, group or all
extensions on the system
N
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Extension Status Announcement
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
N
Extension-to-extension dialing user can dial another extension
directly
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
External Call Waiting - indicates that
an external call has arrived when an
Y
extension user is busy on another
call
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
11
Introduction
Table 1: Functions and features available on sets (continued)
3100 Hand.bk Page 12 Monday, August 19, 2002 8:49 PM
Technician’s Handbook
Table 1: Functions and features available on sets (continued)
5TPcdaTb
$
$$
$ $!
$'!!
$ #
Follow Me - enables calls to follow
an extension user to another exten- Y
sion within the office
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Follow Me (I’m Here) - enables an
extension user to direct calls from
Y
their usual extension to their current
extension
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Forward/Divert all incoming calls to
another extension or extension
group
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Forward/Divert calls to an external
destination
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Forward/Divert incoming calls to
another extension or extension
group if extension is busy
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Group Listen - enables others
nearby to listen to a call while allowN
ing only the extension user to speak
to the other party
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Handsfree operation (full) - enables
extension users to make and
answer calls, and listen and
respond to broadcast messages
without lifting the handset
N
N
N
Y
Y
Y
Handsfree operation (partial) enables extension users to make
calls and listen to broadcast messages without lifting handset
N
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Hotline
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Identify Next Call Announcement
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Intrude into an established call
N
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Last Call Duration Announcement
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
N
Last Call Duration Display
N
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
12
3100 Hand.bk Page 13 Monday, August 19, 2002 8:49 PM
Introduction
5TPcdaTb
$
$$
$ $!
$'!!
$ #
Last Number Redial
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
List of Calls - display the 10 most
recent, different external calls to an
extension
N
N
Y
Y
Y
Y
Message Waiting - leave indicator
for another extension user
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Messaging - enables an extension
user to display a message at the
calling extension, for example,
GONE TO LUNCH
N
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Monitor a call between two external
parties
N
N
N
Admin Admin Admin
only
only
only
Night Service - place a call in night
service mode 1 or 2
N
N
N
Admin Admin Admin
only
only
only
Online Services - enables the
extension user to access a list of
URLs programmed by the administrator.
N
N
N
N
N
Y
Page via the loudspeaker system
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Park an external call for another
extension user to retrieve
N
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Personal Digital Assistant (PDA)
support
N
N
N
Y1
N
Y
Personal Directory - create entries
specific to extension
N
N
N
Y
Y
Y
Personal speed calls - store under
personal, quick keys, or keypad
keys
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Phonebook
N
N
N
Y
Y
Y
Pick up a call ringing at a colleague’s extension
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
13
Introduction
Table 1: Functions and features available on sets (continued)
3100 Hand.bk Page 14 Monday, August 19, 2002 8:49 PM
Technician’s Handbook
Table 1: Functions and features available on sets (continued)
5TPcdaTb
$
$$
$ $!
$'!!
$ #
Pick up a call ringing at another
extension in the user’s extension
group
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Pick up an incoming call when the
system is in Night Service mode 1
or 2
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Pick up a parked call
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
PIN Codes - prevent unauthorised
users from making external calls
from an extension
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Prime Line
N
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Recall on lines
N
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Redial List - enables an extension
user to save and prioritize ten exter- N
nally-dialled numbers
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Re-establish a reverted call attempts to re-connect the reverted
call
N
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Ringer On/Off - enables an extension user to turn off the ringer for all
incoming calls that arrive under a
personal/quick key
N
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Selective Ringer - enables an
extension user to selectively turn off
N
the ringer for calls that arrive under
specific personal/quick key(s)
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Store a call under a personal/quick
key
N
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Swap (Broker’s Call)
N
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
System Directory - enables extension users to dial from directory
setup by the Administrator
N
N
N
Y
Y
Y
14
3100 Hand.bk Page 15 Monday, August 19, 2002 8:49 PM
Introduction
5TPcdaTb
$
$$
$ $!
$'!!
$ #
System Hold - place a call on hold
which can be retrieved by any
extension on the system
N
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Time and date announcement
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
N
Time and date change
N
N
N
Admin Admin Admin
only
only
only
Transfer a call
N
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Visual Voice Mail (VVM) - allows the
extension user to visually interact
with their voice mailbox.
N
N
N
N
N
Y
Who Am I? - indicates the extension
Y
number
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
1. If a Mitel Networks 5423 IRDA Module is attached.
15
Introduction
Table 1: Functions and features available on sets (continued)
3100 Hand.bk Page 16 Monday, August 19, 2002 8:49 PM
Technician’s Handbook
16
3100 Hand.bk Page 17 Monday, August 19, 2002 8:49 PM
Chapter 2
Installation
3100 Hand.bk Page 18 Monday, August 19, 2002 8:49 PM
Technician’s Handbook
18
3100 Hand.bk Page 19 Monday, August 19, 2002 8:49 PM
Installation
Before you begin
Hardware ports and connectors
Installation
Figure 2: Controller front panel
Figure 3: Controller rear panel
19
3100 Hand.bk Page 20 Monday, August 19, 2002 8:49 PM
Technician’s Handbook
Figure 4: Expansion unit front panel
Controller components
Figure 5: Controller components
20
3100 Hand.bk Page 21 Monday, August 19, 2002 8:49 PM
Installation
Identify the required components
The system size is determined by the type and number of
components.
Table 2: System components
Controller
(basic configuration)
2P_PQX[XcXTb
Installation
BhbcT\R^\_^]T]cb
8 Mitel Networks IP Phones
2 ONS analog telephones
1 wide area network Ethernet or xDSL interface
4 LS/CLASS interfaces
100 IP devices.
Plus up to three of the following modules (maximum of one LS/CLASS module; two BRI
modules)
4-circuit ONS module
Provides connection for four analog phones
LS/CLASS module
Provides connections to four LS/CLASS circuits
BRI module (UK only)
Provides two 2B+D SIT interfaces
Analog service module
Provides overhead paging capability
Plus one of the following
8-port expansion unit
Provides an additional 8 layer-2 switch ports for the
connection of LAN devices (IP phones and PCs)
16-port expansion unit
Provides an additional 16 layer-2 switch ports
Up to eight lines are supported. In the UK, the eight lines
can be a combination of LS/CLASS lines and ISDN BRI
lines.
See A fully expanded system (p. 8) for system
maximums. Refer to the technical manual for examples
of system configurations.
21
3100 Hand.bk Page 22 Monday, August 19, 2002 8:49 PM
Technician’s Handbook
Installation checklist
Tools
ã Static strap
ã Phillips screwdriver
Cables and connectors
ã Category 5 (CAT5) cable for all LAN devices
(IP phones, computers, servers and so forth)
ã CAT3 or CAT5 cable for analog phones
connected to the system
ã RJ-45 cable and connectors
ã RJ-45 crossover (patch) cable. See
Cable pinouts (p. 195)
ã RS-232 cable for printer.
PC requirements
ã Windows 95/NT/98/2000/ME/XP PC or laptop
ã Internet Explorer 5.5 with Service Pack 2 or later,
and 128 bit encryption
ã Administrator login privileges for Windows operating
system.
Trunk requirements
ã LS/CLASS or ISDN BRI (UK only) trunks.
22
3100 Hand.bk Page 23 Monday, August 19, 2002 8:49 PM
Installation
LAN requirements
ã Pre-installation questionnaire complete
ã Internet Service Provider (ISP)
ã Refer to Planning your LAN (p. 73) for additional
requirements.
ã @_gUbRQbgYdXcebWU`b_dUSdY_^
ã Music on hold source (radio, tape player, or .wav file)
ã Call logging printer, call accounting package, or call
management application.
23
Installation
Other
3100 Hand.bk Page 24 Monday, August 19, 2002 8:49 PM
Technician’s Handbook
Installation overview
24
ã
Install system components
ã
Configure the PC
ã
Power up the system
ã
Launch the tools
ã
Run the quick install tool
ã
Connect the phones and lines
ã
Verify the system
ã
Program the system.
3100 Hand.bk Page 25 Monday, August 19, 2002 8:49 PM
Installation
Installing the system components
The 3100 ICP system is shipped with the system
software installed and includes a default database.
Option modules are shipped uninstalled.
2. If your system includes an expansion unit, install the
uplink card in the controller. See Adding an
expansion unit (p. 120).
3. Wall mount the units, rack mount them, or place them
on a desk or shelf. Instructions are provided on the
installation sheets that are included with the units.
9Vi_eQbUgQ\\]_e^dY^WQe^Yd`_cYdY_^YdgYdXdXUVb_^d
`Q^U\VQSY^Wd__^UcYTUc_dXQddXU`_bdcQ^T
S_^^USd_bcQbUQSSUccYR\U
4. Connect the controller to the expansion unit with the
uplink cable and Y-power cord (see Figure 17).
5. Connect the ground stud on the rear panel of the
controller to a hard-wired ground using 18 AWG
(0.75mm 2/) gauge wire. The wire must have green or
yellow insulation. Crimp the wire to the ground
source.
6. Connect a PC to the layer-2 switch port on the
controller.
Do not connect the sets to the controller at this
time.
7. Power up the system. See Powering up the system
(p. 118).
25
Installation
1. If your system includes option modules, install them
in the controller. See Installing option modules (p.
119).
3100 Hand.bk Page 26 Monday, August 19, 2002 8:49 PM
Technician’s Handbook
Configuring the PC
Configure your PC to connect to the 3100 ICP system.
Windows 95/98
1. From the Start menu, click Settings and then click
Control Panel.
2. In the Control Panel window, double click the
Network icon.
3. Click Configuration.
4. Click the TCP/IP component and then click
Properties.
5. Select “Obtain an IP address automatically”.
6. Click OK.
7. Restart your PC. You are now set up to connect to the
3100 ICP system.
Windows NT
1. Login to the PC with administrator privileges.
2. In the Control Panel window, double click the
Network icon.
3. Click Protocols.
4. Click TCP/IP Protocols and then click Properties.
5. From the Adapter drop down list, highlight the device
that is being used to connect to the 3100 ICP system,
then click Obtain an IP address from a DHCP
server.
6. Click OK.
26
3100 Hand.bk Page 27 Monday, August 19, 2002 8:49 PM
Installation
7. Click Yes and then restart your PC. You are now set
up to connect to the 3100 ICP system.
Windows 2000
1. Login to the PC with administrator privileges.
3. In the Control Panel window, double click the
Network and Dial Up Connections icon. Double click
on the Local Area Connection. In the Local Area
Connection Status Page, click Properties.
4. Click Obtain an IP address automatically.
5. From the Adapter drop down list, highlight the device
that is being used to connect to the 3100 ICP system,
then click Obtain an IP address from a DHCP
server.
6. Click OK. You are now set up to connect to the 3100
ICP system.
Windows ME
1. From the Start menu, select the Settings tab and
then Control Panel.
2. In the Control Panel window, double click the
Network icon.
3. Select the Configuration tab in the Network window.
This window displays a list of installed network
components. Highlight the TCP/IP component and
click Properties.
4. Select the radio button marked Obtain an IP
address automatically.
5. Click OK then restart your PC. You are now set up to
connect to the 3100 ICP system.
27
Installation
2. In the Control Panel window, double click the
Network icon.
3100 Hand.bk Page 28 Monday, August 19, 2002 8:49 PM
Technician’s Handbook
Windows XP
1. Login to the PC with administrator privileges.
2. From the Start menu, select the Settings tab and
then Control Panel.
3. In the Control Panel window, double click the
Network and Internet Connection icon. Double click
on the Local Area Connection (LAN or High Speed
Internet).
4. Click General in the Local Area Connection Status
page and choose Properties.
5. Click General tab in the Local Area Connection
Properties window. This displays a list of installed
components. Highlight Internet Protocol (TCP/IP)
and choose Properties.
6. Select Obtain an IP address automatically.
7. Click OK. You are now set up to connect to the 3100
ICP system.
28
3100 Hand.bk Page 29 Monday, August 19, 2002 8:49 PM
Installation
Launching the tools
You can connect a PC or laptop to the 3100 ICP system
through
a LAN drop
•
the Ethernet port on the back of the IP Phone
•
directly to a layer-2 switch port on the Mitel Networks
3100 ICP controller or expansion unit.
You must configure the PC to accept an IP address from
the 3100 ICP system. See Configuring the PC (p. 26).
You can also access the 3100 ICP system remotely by
dialing into the Mitel Networks 3100 ICP system through
a trunk (using the installed V.90 modem) or through the
Internet. See Using a remote access session (p. 131) for
more details.
To launch a tool
1. Launch your browser and go to the following URL:
http://192.168.1.2
2. Enter your username and password
Login: system (default)
Password: mnet (default)
3. Click
–
Group Administration Tool
–
System Tool, or
–
System Quick Installation Tool
4. Proceed to Programming the voice parameters (p.
50).
You can only have one system tool session or one Telnet
tool session open at any time. The system quick
installation tool is only used during the initial
configuration of the system.
29
Installation
•
3100 Hand.bk Page 30 Monday, August 19, 2002 8:49 PM
Technician’s Handbook
Running the quick installation tool
About the system quick installation tool
Use the system quick installation tool to get the system
up and running. All further programming is performed
from the group administration tool or system tool.
The system quick installation tool automatically
discovers the addresses of the IP phones and assigns
them extension numbers. After you exit the quick
installation tool, auto-discovery is disabled. Any phone
that you add later, must be programmed through the
system tool.
If you install systems frequently, or if you plan to program
the system at a dealer site, you should create a database
template and apply it when you run the quick install tool.
Using a template reduces the amount of programming
required. See Using a database template (p. 137).
Key system, PBX, or other?
When you run the quick configuration tool, you are
prompted to select one of the following modes
Key System Mode - Incoming calls ring all extensions at
the same time
PBX Mode - Incoming calls ring one extension
Other - Allows you to load a database template into the
system.
The default is PBX Mode. If you choose to change the
mode to Key System or Other, you will have to reboot the
system and then restart the quick installation tool. If you
change the mode, after you reboot the system,
remember to click Next the second time that the
configuration tool prompts you to select the mode.
30
3100 Hand.bk Page 31 Monday, August 19, 2002 8:49 PM
Installation
Using the system quick installation tool
Do not close your browser window during the
quick installation wizard. If you do not complete
the wizard, the system configuration will be
invalid. If you accidently close your browser,
restart the quick installation tool and enter your
information again.
1. Review the system defaults; see (p. 166).
2. Complete the pre-configuration questionnaire that
was shipped with the system.
3. If you plan to change the number of digits in the
extension numbering plan (for example, from the
default 3-digit extension numbers to 4-digit numbers),
you should set up the voice mailboxes through the
administration mailbox before you run the quick
installation tool.
D_cUde`dXUf_YSU]QY\R_hUc
–
Connect an IP phone to a layer-2 switch port on
the controller.
–
Program the mailboxes through the
administration set. See Log in to the administrator
station (p. 62).
4. Open the Internet Explorer browser on your PC.
5. Enter the following URL: http://192.168.1.2
2__[]Qb[dXU=YdU\#! 93@\_WY^`QWUDXU=YdU\
>Udg_b[c#! 93@\_WY^`QWU_`U^c
31
Installation
You should only use the system quick installation
tool once during initial installation.
3100 Hand.bk Page 32 Monday, August 19, 2002 8:49 PM
Technician’s Handbook
6. In the Mitel Networks 3100 ICP login page, enter
Login: system (default)
Password: mnet (default)
DXU\_WY^^Q]UQ^T`Qccg_bTYcSQcUcU^cYdYfU
7. Click OK. The tools page opens.
32
3100 Hand.bk Page 33 Monday, August 19, 2002 8:49 PM
Installation
8. Click System Quick Installation Tool. The initial
page opens.
Installation
9. Follow the prompts. When you are prompted to set
the management tool accounts, ensure that you
change the default password. When you are
prompted to connect the phones, refer to Connect the
phones and lines (p. 34) for additional information.
33
3100 Hand.bk Page 34 Monday, August 19, 2002 8:49 PM
Technician’s Handbook
Connect the phones and lines
When you run the system quick installation script, you will
be prompted to connect the IP phones, analog phones
and lines to the system. The system will not automatically
recognize any IP phone that you connect after the
system quick installation tool is finished.
1. Plug the RJ-45 connectors from the IP phones into
the layer-2 switch ports on the controller (see Figure
2) and expansion unit (see Figure 4). The first IP
phone that you connect to the system is assigned as
the administrator station (extension 1000). It’s recommended that you connect a Mitel Networks 5020 IP
phone or 5140 IP Appliance into port 1 of the
controller.
DXUTUVQe\dUhdU^cY_^^e]RUbcV_bdXU9@`X_^UcQbU
QccYW^UTY^dXU_bTUbdXQdi_eS_^^USddXU`X_^Uc
2. Plug the RJ-11 connectors from the analog phones
into the ONS ports on the ONS modules.
3. Plug the RJ-11 connectors from the LS/CLASS lines
into the line ports.
9Vi_e^UUTd_QTTc_]U9@`X_^Uc\QdUbi_eSQ^
bUU^QR\UdXUQed_bUWYcdbQdY_^_`dY_^dXb_eWXdXU
CicdU]D__\3X__cUBhbcT\S\YS[BhbcT\fXST
bTccX]VbS\YS[2WP]VTQ^TdXU^cUd8?bTc
Pdc^aTVXbcaPcX^]T]PQ[TSd_CadT
?^fTaUPX[caP]bUTa)9V`_gUbd_dXUcicdU]VQY\cdXU
?>CcUdS_^^USdUTd_`_bd"UhdU^cY_^!! !Yc
Qed_]QdYSQ\\iS_^^USdUTd_\Y^U!
4. If the system supports Basic Rate Interface (UK only),
plug the RJ-45 connectors from the Basic Rate
Interface (BRI) lines into the BRI modules.
34
3100 Hand.bk Page 35 Monday, August 19, 2002 8:49 PM
Installation
Verify the system
Complete the following procedure to verify that the
system is working properly.
1. Dial 675 on each IP phone. The extension number
appears in the phone display. Record the extension
numbers. The 5140 IP Appliances display their extension number automatically.
2. Verify that you can make calls between the IP
phones.
3. Connect an analog phone into the first ONS port on
the controller.
4. Verify that you make a call from an IP phone to the
analog phone (extension 1100).
5. If your system includes LS/CLASS lines, connect an
LS/CLASS line to the first LS/CLASS port on the
controller.
6. Place a call into the system and verify that the call
rings either the first IP phone (PBX mode) or all IP
phones (key system mode).
7. Verify that you can place an external call. Dial 9 to
access an external line.
8. If you cannot perform all of the above tasks, check
your cable connections. If the problem persists, see
Checking the system LEDs (p. 141)
9. Proceed to Programming (p. 37).
35
Installation
The system is shipped from the factory with your licensed
options enabled.
3100 Hand.bk Page 36 Monday, August 19, 2002 8:49 PM
Technician’s Handbook
Installation tips
36
•
The first IP phone that you connect to the system is
assigned as the administrator extension (1000).
•
The default extension numbers for the IP phones
(1000 to 1023) are assigned in the order that you
connect the phones, starting with the administrator
extension (1000).
•
The default extension numbers for the analog phones
(1100 to 1109) are assigned to ONS ports (1 to 10).
•
If you do not want the extension numbers to start with
the digit 1, you will have to change the numbering
plan first.
•
If you reinstall a Mitel Networks 5822 softphone on a
different computer, you must delete its Medium
Access Control (MAC) address from system
programming before you can reassign it to another
computer.
•
The default IP address of the WAN port is
192.168.0.1.
•
You can connect loud speaker paging units that
support 24 V dc analog connectivity to the system
ONS ports.
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Chapter 3
Programming
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Technician’s Handbook
38
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Programming
Programming overview
This chapter provides the key procedures for
programming the system. Refer to the Technical Manual
for complete programming information.
Before you begin programming, ensure that you have
•
completed the pre-configuration questionnaire that
was shipped with the system
•
reviewed the default database settings. See (p. 166).
The key steps to programming the system are
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ã Set up the auto attendant
ã Configure call logging (SMDR)
ã Commit your changes
ã Perform backups.
39
Programming
If this is a new installation, typically you will run the quick
installation tool first. The quick installation tool guides you
through basic programming. See Using the system quick
installation tool (p. 31).
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Technician’s Handbook
About the programming tools
The 3100 ICP system has the following programming
tools:
System quick installation tool - Use this tool once
during initial system installation. Perform all further
programming from the other tools.
Group administration tool - Use this tool to
•
set basic system parameters
•
create the system telephone directory
•
manage extension and group parameters
•
set group parameters
•
add, edit, or delete users from the system directory
•
configure voice mailboxes
•
program a user’s personal keys with features
•
create customized user guides
System tool - Use this tool to program the
•
system-wide parameters
•
voice parameters (lines, extensions, management,
system directory, and voice mail)
•
IP networking parameters.
Desktop Tool - Allows users to
•
assign features to personal keys
•
manage personal contact lists
•
manage internet bookmarks on 5140 IP Appliances.
To use the tools, you need a Windows-based computer
with Internet Explorer 5.5 with Service Pack 2, or later,
and 128 bit encryption.
40
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Programming
Before launching a new tool, you must first exit the
current tool and then log in again.
If you restart or reboot the system without committing
your saved changes to the database first, your changes
will be lost. See Commit your changes (p. 67).
When using the system tool, always click the Exit button
to leave the tool.
Tools are password protected
Enable your options
If this is a new system and you have purchased options,
such as bilingual voice mail or additional IP set licenses,
you must enable them. See Enabling your licensed
options (p. 114).
41
Programming
If you enter an incorrect password three times in
succession (independent of time or re-starting the
system) you will be locked out for 15 minutes. You can
disable this lock-out option. See Changing the
system-wide settings (p. 45).
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Technician’s Handbook
Programming the system parameters
Set system date and time
You can change the system date and time through the
system quick installation tool, the administration tool, the
administrator extension, or through the system tool. The
system tool, however, allows you to set the time using
either a 12-hour or 24-hour clock.
1. Launch the system tool. See Launching the tools (p.
113).
2. Choose System, from the Selection menu.
3. Click Date and Time and then click Change.
4. Enter the date in the format dd/mm/yyyy.
5. Enter the time in either 12 or 24-hour clock in the
format hh:mm:ss.
6. Specify either 12 or 24-hour clock.
7. Click Save.
Review the numbering plan
The numbering plan is flexible. However, if you choose to
modify the numbering plan, the programming
requirements increase significantly.
See Numbering plan (p. 168) for the default numbering
plan.
To modify the numbering plan
1. Choose Voice from the Selection menu.
2. Click Management and then click Number Plan.
3. From the list of Leading Digits, click the leading digit
that you want to change. Click Change.
42
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Programming
4. Select the meaning (for example:
Attendant/Operator) that you want to assign to the
leading digit.
5. Click Save.
To change the leading digit of the extension numbers,
you must
1. Click Management and then click Number Plan. Set
the number plan to allow a different Secondary entry,
such as digit 4. The default is leading digit 1.
3. Change entries in the Number Assignment form to
correspond with the new number scheme (for
example, 4360).
4. Do not delete the default Secondary entry-leading
digit 1 until you have changed all the numbers in the
Number Assignment form (including numbers for
entries with no MAC addresses) to the new leading
digit.
5. Commit your changes.
Set the login attributes for users
Create user login accounts and assign the users access
to the programming tools: system tool, group
administration tool, and the desktop tool as required.
It is highly recommended that you change the
default usernames and passwords, especially if
you are connected to the Internet and do not have
a firewall in place.
43
Programming
2. Choose Voice from the Selection menu, click
Extensions and then click Number Assignment.
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Technician’s Handbook
Create a user login account
1. Choose System, from the Selection menu.
2. Click Login Attributes and then click Add.
3. Enter the login attributes and select the tools access.
4. Click Save.
5. After you have created the user accounts, you need
to give the 3100 ICP system users their login
information for the desktop tool. Send an e-mail to
each user which
–
provides the URL to the tools login page
–
identifies the desktop user tool login username
and default password
–
instructs the user to change the default password.
Changing login access
1. Choose System from the Selection menu.
2. Click Login Attributes.
3. Select the user’s name and click Change.
4. Modify the users tools access privileges.
5. Click Save.
6. Click Exit.
7. Verify the new account by logging in as the new user.
44
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Programming
Changing the system-wide settings
1. Choose System from the Selection menu.
2. Click System Wide Setting and then click Change.
3. Set the following:
Enable or disable authorization failure lockout
–
Leave IP set registration enabled (only applies to
quick install tool)
–
Enter the name for the system
–
Select either internal or external Music On Hold
source.
4. Click Save.
Identify the power source of the IP phones
IP phones that can either receive their power from the
controller power supply or from a power adaptor that
connects to the phone. Only the following phones require
a power adapter:
•
5140 IP Appliances that are connected to an
expansion unit
•
IP phones that have an IRDA module or PKM
attached.
Identify if the sets will receive power from an adaptor or
from the controller.
1. Choose System, and then click IP Sets Powering.
2. Select the port of the phone and click Change.
3. Check the Phantom Feed box if the set will be
powered from the controller (default).
4. Click Save.
5. Proceed to Program the online services (p. 46).
45
Programming
–
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Technician’s Handbook
Program the online services
Users of 5140 IP Appliances can press their Online
Services key to display a list of internet bookmarks. You
can add, change, or delete bookmarks from this list.
1. Choose System, click Online Services Configuration and then click Add.
2. Enter an Item Number. The Item Number (1 to 9)
corresponds to the keys located along the right side
of the set display. Key 1 is at the top.
3. Enter the label for the bookmark that you want to
appear in the display (for example: Mitel Networks).
Keep the number of characters in the label under 25.
4. Enter the URL of the site (for example:
http:\\www.mitel.com).
5. Click Save. You do not need to commit the database
for these changes to take effect.
6. Press the Online Services key on a 5140 IP
Appliance. Verify that the label appears correctly.
Press the associated key and verify the internet site
appears in the display.
46
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Programming
Programming the extensions
Program the extensions
1. Launch the group administration tool. See Launching
the tools (p. 113).
2. Click I want to Manage Extensions. Click Add to
add extension users, or select an extension and then
click Edit.
4. Program each extension.
Program the extension groups
After programming the extensions, add them to
extension groups. The group administration tool allows
you to define the
–
Pickup Groups
–
Night Service Groups
–
Extension Groups.
The default extension group pilot numbers start at 200.
You can put an extension in more than one group.
1. Click I want to Manage Groups.
2. Click Pickup Groups, select a pickup group number
and then click Edit. Use the up and down arrow keys
to move extensions in or out of the selected group.
3. Click OK. Repeat the above step for each pickup
group.
4. Program the Night Service Groups. Follow the
prompts to configure the night service groups.
47
Programming
3. Follow the prompts to complete the programming for
an extension. Help on the fields is provided in the
lower right bubble.
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Technician’s Handbook
5. Program the Extension Groups. Follow the prompts
to configure the extension groups.
6. Click Done.
Program the extension voice mailboxes
Next, program the voice mailboxes for each extension.
1. Choose I want to Manage Extensions.
2. Select the first extension and click Edit.
3. Click Modify Voice Mailbox settings.
4. Follow the prompts to configure the user’s voice
mailbox.
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5. Click Done.
6. Repeat the above procedure for each extension that
requires a mailbox.
Program the extension personal keys
The group administration tool also allows you to program
an extension user’s personal keys with features.
Typically, this task is performed by the user from the
desktop user tool.
On the 5140 IP Appliance, this feature also assigns
labels to the personal keys. The labels appear in the
display next to the personal key.
To program a feature on a personal key
1. In the group administration tool, choose I want to
Manage Extensions.
2. Click an extension and then click Edit.
48
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Programming
3. Click Set Up/Edit Desktop.
4. Click a personal key on the phone display.
5. Select a feature from the list.
6. Click Assign to key in the lower right corner of the
screen. Follow the prompts to assign the key.
7. After adding all the required features to the personal
keys, choose I want to Return to Group
Administrator Tool.
8. Repeat step 2 to step 7 for each extension.
10. Go to Programming the voice parameters (p. 50).
You can also assign features to personal keys by using
the Superkey on the IP phone.
49
Programming
9. After programming the personal keys on the required
extensions, choose I want to ... Exit.
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Technician’s Handbook
Programming the voice parameters
For descriptions of the voice parameters, click Help, and
then click Programming.
Modify the extensions and system directory
You set up the extensions from the group administration
tool. You can use the system tool to make any required
modifications.
To modify an extension from the system tool.
1. Launch the system tool. See Launching the tools (p.
113).
2. Choose Voice from the Selection menu.
3. Click Extensions.
4. Program the required parameters for the first
extension into the following web pages in the order
listed below:
–
Number Assignment
–
Directory Name and Allocation
–
Call Pickup Groups
–
Extension Groups.
5. Repeat step 4. for each extension.
6. The remaining parameters, for example, Hunt Map,
Class of Service, Prime Line, and so forth, default to
typical values. Change them as required.
7. Click System Directory, click External Entries.
Follow the prompts to add the external numbers that
you want all system extension users to be able to call.
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Programming
Program the incoming access (ring maps)
After programming the extensions and extension groups
through the group administration tool, program the lines
from the system tool.
Ring maps determine which extensions or extension
groups receive the incoming calls from a line. Ring maps
are configured on a per-line basis. Every line requires a
ring map.
To program incoming line access you must configure the
line parameters
•
ring maps
•
ring map types.
Programming
•
Configure the analog line parameters
1. Choose Voice from the Selection menu.
2. Click Lines and then click Analog Configuration.
3. Select the line and click Change.
4. Set the required line parameters.
5. Click Save.
Configure the ring maps
1. Click Lines and then click Ring Map.
2. Select the line and click Change.
3. Configure the Day and Night Entries for the line.
4. Click Save.
Configure the ring map type
1. Click Lines and then click Ring Map Type.
2. Select the line and click Change.
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3. Select either Standard or Cyclic.
If you have programmed more than one extension
group in the Ring Map form, you should set the Ring
Type to Cyclic.
4. Click Save.
Program external access (line and hunt groups)
To set up the outgoing lines, you need to program
•
line groups
•
hunt maps
•
outgoing line access.
Assign lines to groups
1. Click Lines and then click Groups.
2. Select the line and click Change.
3. Select the line group that you want the line to belong
to. Only lines of identical type and mode can be
grouped together (that is, you can’t mix analog and
digital lines).
Each line can be assigned to only one line group.
By default all lines are in Line Group 1.
4. Select the line access type. On a system with only a
few lines, you would typically place all the lines in one
group and define the group with Both access.
5. Click Save.
Program the hunt maps
Hunt maps allow extensions to access lines. Hunt maps
define which line groups each extension can access. The
system “hunts” for an available line in the order that the
line groups are programmed into the extension’s Hunt
map.
52
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Programming
1. Click Extensions and then click Hunt Map.
2. Select the extension and click Change.
3. Select the line groups that you want this extension to
have access to.
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Define the outgoing line access digit
By default users dial 9 to access an external line. If you
want to change the leading digit for accessing an
outgoing line, you must change it in the Numbering Plan.
See Review the numbering plan (p. 42).
Programming BRI ISDN access (UK only)
The following sections apply to systems in the UK that
support BRI ISDN access. If your system does not have
BRI modules, proceed to Restrict external access (toll
restriction/call barring) (p. 58).
BRI lines for Release 3.1 are numbered as follows:
•
Option module slot 1 - lines 1 to 4
•
Option module slot 2 - lines 5 to 8
•
ISDN system - lines 13 to 20
Configure the network response for the extensions
1. From the Selection menu, choose Voice, and then
click Network Response.
53
Programming
4. Click Save.
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Technician’s Handbook
2. Select the first extension, click Change and select
the required network response to a Direct Dial In
(DDI) call. The options are
–
Queue: camp incoming calls on the extension
until answered
–
Busy: send busy tone to calling party
–
Redirect (default): redirect caller to attendant
3. Click Save.
4. Repeat the above steps for each extension.
Configure the Non-DDI BRI lines
You configure Non-Direct Dial-In (DDI) lines by using
Ring Maps (similar to LS/CLASS lines).
1. Click Lines and then click Digital Configuration.
2. Select the line and then click Change.
3. Set the line type to Not Direct Inward Line.
4. Click Save.
5. Click Lines and then click Ring Map.
6. Select the line and click Change.
7. Configure the Day and Night Entries for the line
8. Click Save.
9. Click Lines and then click Ring Map Type.
10. Select the line and click Change
11. Select either Standard or Cyclic.
If you have programmed more than one extension
group in the Ring Map form, set the Ring Type to
Cyclic.
12. Click Save.
13. Assign the lines to groups. See Assign lines to groups
(p. 52).
54
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Programming
Configure the DDI BRI lines
You configure DDI and MSN lines by mapping the
incoming digits to any extension or extension group.
1. Click Lines and then click Digital Configuration.
2. Select the line and then click Change.
3. Set the line type to Direct Dial Inwards Line or Multi
Subscriber Line.
4. Enter the Terminal Endpoint Identifier and other
options as required.
5. Click Save.
–
Select the Multi Subscriber Line number in the top
part of the form.
–
Click Add Member.
–
Enter the Multiple Subscriber Number.
–
Select the Destination Type.
–
Select the Destination Parameter.
7. Click Save.
8. Assign the lines to groups. See Assign lines to groups
(p. 52).
Next, program the DDI mappings
1. Click Management, click DDI Mapping, and then
click Add.
2. Enter the DDI digits required to call the DDI Target
(maximum of 6 digits).
3. Select the target type (Short Code, Extension,
Extension Group, or VPN).
55
Programming
6. For Multi Subscriber Lines, add the destinations for
each Multi Subscriber Number (MSN) as required
(maximum of 10 entries per number).
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4. Enter the number of the DDI target (maximum of 6
digits).
5. Set the Day and Night Service options.
6. Select Global CLI if you want outgoing calls from a
target extension to display the Calling Line Identifier
(CLI) number.
7. Click Save.
Lastly, set the DDI Digit conversion for outgoing calls
1. Click Management and then click Outgoing DDI
Digit Conversion.
2. Select the DDI Digit (index number) of the line.
3. Click Change.
4. Select the Converted Digit Parameter to change the
extension numbers back to the correct DDI range.
5. Click Save.
Enable least cost call routing (LCCR)
PrNet is more flexible than LCCR and allows multiple
alternate routes and least cost call routing on local calls.
1. In the system tool, choose Voice from the Selection
menu.
2. Click Management, click Least Cost Routing and
then click Change.
3. Enter the LCCR access digits, authorization code,
and override code (supplied by the Service Provider)
and then click Save.
4. Click Least Cost Routing Exceptions and then click
Add.
5. Program any exception numbers that you do not want
routed over LCCR and then click Save.
6. Click Lines and then click Least Call Routing.
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Programming
7. For each BRI line, set the Enable Least Cost Routing
option to Yes and click Save.
Configuring PR.Net configuration
With PrNet the default outgoing line access digit (9) must
be set to Secondary in the Number Plan. When a user
dials 9, the request is then routed based on the PrNet
programming.
Any numbers that a user will dial must be in the
VPN/PrNet form. For example, if local calls are 4 and 6,
all other digits must be covered as well, for example 1
through 9, and 0.
1. Choose Voice from the Selection menu.
2. Click Number Plan, select the Leading Digit 9 and
then click Add.
3. Set the Leading Digit Meaning to Secondary and
then click Save.
4. Click VPN/PR.Net and then click Add.
5. Enter the following information:
–
Access digits:
–
Network Type
–
repeat Access digits
–
Access Type:
6. Click Save.
57
Programming
If local calls are to be sent over an alternative carrier you
may have to include the full STD code for the local area
in the Repeat Digits. For example, if local numbers begin
with digit 4, and if the STD code for the local area is
01291 and the alternative carrier code is 1690, then the
repeat digits could be 16904 if the carrier supports local
codes or 1690012914 if the carrier does not support local
codes.
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Restrict external access (toll restriction/call
barring)
You use restriction group levels to restrict the external
numbers that extension users can call. Using class of
service levels, you can control which extensions have
access to external lines, local, national, and international
calls. You can also program up to 20 exceptions for each
group in the Global Exception form.
Set up restriction groups
Restrictions are applied from the highest restriction
number to the lowest. The highest number being the
least restricted; the lowest being the most restricted. See
Restriction groups (extensions) (p. 169). You can only
modify restriction groups 1 to 5.
1. In the system tool, choose Voice from the Selection
menu.
2. Click Management, click Toll Restriction, and then
click Restriction Groups.
3. Select the Restriction Group Number and then click
Change.
4. Enter the restricted digits. Extension users will be
unable to dial numbers that begin with the restricted
digits. For example, if you enter the digit 1, then
extensions assigned to this group will be prevented
from making long distance calls.
5. Enter the maximum number of digits that users are
allowed to dial. Any digit dialed beyond the maximum
number will terminate the call. The default setting (0)
is unlimited number of digits.
You can also specify number strings that are exempted
from the restriction group.
1. Click Add Member.
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Programming
2. Enter the number (digit string) that you want
extension users in the restriction group to be able to
call.
3. Click Save.
Assign class of service (restriction groups) to users
1. Choose Voice from the Selection menu.
2. Click Extensions and then click Class of Service.
3. Select the extension and then click Change.
5. Click Save.
Program the global exception/restriction strings
Global exception strings and global restriction strings
bypass all other toll restriction settings.
To program global exceptions
1. Choose Voice from the Selection menu.
2. Click Management, click Toll Restriction, and then
click Global Exception Strings.
3. Click Add.
4. Enter the global exception string. For example, you
should program emergency numbers (911 or 999) as
global exception strings to ensure that all extensions
are allowed to call them.
5. Click Save.
To program global restrictions
1. Choose Voice from the Selection menu.
2. Click Management, click Toll Restriction, and then
click Global Restriction Strings.
59
Programming
4. Select the Class of Service (Restriction Group
number) that you want to assign to the extension.
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Technician’s Handbook
3. Click Add.
4. Enter the global restriction string. You can enter up to
eight digit strings that no extension can dial (for
example 1900).
5. Click Save.
Set the Toll Restriction Matrix
You can either allow or prevent
•
Line to line routing (default is no)
•
Line to line transfer (default is no)
•
Line to line three-party conference (default is yes)
1. Choose Voice from the Selection menu.
2. Click Management, click Toll Restriction, and then
click Toll Restriction Matrix.
3. Click Change.
4. Configure the Toll Restriction Matrix settings. These
settings are system-wide.
5. Click Save.
Program the voice management parameters
1. Choose Voice from the Selection menu.
2. Click Management.
3. Program the required parameters into the following
web pages in the order listed below:
–
Out Access
–
Timers (see page 170 for defaults)
–
Least Cost Routeing (BRI - UK only).
4. The remaining parameters, default to typical values.
Change them as desired.
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Programming the voice mail settings
The 3100 ICP system includes an imbedded voice mail
system. To set up the voice mail system
1. Choose Voice from the Selection menu
2. Click Voicemail.
3. Program the following forms in the order listed below
System Settings -> Voicemail Prompt Language
•
Voice Mailboxes
•
System Greetings -> Greetings Definition
•
System Greetings -> Greetings Assignment
•
System Settings -> Voicemail Options
•
System Settings -> Business Hours.
Programming
•
For descriptions of the parameters, click Help, click
Voice Mail, click Voice Mail, and then click
Programming (CDE) Procedures. Click Programming
(Procedures) for detailed information.
If you have purchased the bilingual voice mail option, you
can change the language played by the voice mail
system. If you change the language, you must commit
the database, and then reboot the switch before the new
language will take affect.
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Setting up the auto attendant
The embedded voice mail system includes an auto
attendant. Setting up the auto attendant involves logging
in as the administrator and then recording the greetings.
Log in to the administrator station
You must log in to the system administrator’s mailbox to
record system greetings.
1. From any internal telephone, lift the handset and obtain dial tone.
2. Dial the auto attendant number (default 232). The
system answers and plays the greeting.
3. If there is no mailbox associated with the extension,
you will be prompted for a mailbox number. Enter the
system administrator mailbox number (default 99,
999, or 9999 depending on the number of digits in
your extension numbers).
If there is a mailbox associated with the extension,
you will be prompted for the mailbox passcode. Press
∗ and then enter the system administrator mailbox
number.
The system prompts you for a passcode.
4. Enter the passcode for the System Administrator’s
mailbox (default 1234).
I_eQbU^_g\_WWUTY^d_dXUcicdU]QT]Y^YcdbQd_bc
]QY\R_h6_\\_gdXUf_YSU`b_]`dcV_bY^cdbeSdY_^c_b
bUVUbd_BUS_bTdXUcicdU]WbUUdY^Wc`&#
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Programming
Record the system greetings
Greetings are recorded by accessing the administrator’s
mailbox from any internal telephone. Access to the
mailbox requires a passcode.
1. Log in to the system administrator’s mailbox.
2. Press [4] for the System Greetings menu.
3. Press [1] to set the primary greeting
- orJ!LdXb_eWXJ(LV_bQ^Q\dUb^QdUWbUUdY^WcUd
Programming
4. If prompted, press [1] to assign greetings in the
default system language or [2] for the alternate
language.
5. Press [1] for an Open greeting (during business
hours).
-or@bUccJ!LV_bQ3\_cUTWbUUdY^WQVdUbRecY^Ucc
X_ebc
6. If prompted, press [1] to assign greetings in the
default system language or [2] for the alternate
language.
7. Record the greeting speaking clearly into the
handset, not a speaker phone. Use the following
example as a guide.
"Thank you for calling ABC Industries. If you know the
number of the person you are calling, enter it now.
For a company directory, press 9. For assistance,
press 0 or hold for the operator. To repeat the menu
options press, 3"
8. Press any key to stop recording.
9. After recording, select one of the following options:
J L1SSU`d
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Technician’s Handbook
[2] Review
[3] Re-record
[∗] Cancel
10. If you are recording additional alternate greetings,
repeat the above procedure beginning at step 2. Do
likewise to record greetings in the other language for
bilingual systems.
Record the bilingual welcome greeting
If you have the bilingual voice mail option enabled, the
auto attendant plays a bilingual welcome greeting when
it answers an outside call. You record the greeting in the
two languages selected in Voice Mail Prompt Language
Form. Include in the greeting an instruction to callers to
dial the Language Change Mailbox number (as specified
in for service in the alternate language). The default
Language Change Mailbox number is 8.
The Bilingual Welcome Greeting is only available if the
Bilingual Voice Prompts Option is enabled in the Voice
Mail Prompt Language form.
1. Log in to the system administrator’s mailbox. See Log
in to the administrator station (p. 62).
2. Press [4] for the system greetings menu.
3. Press [1] to set the primary greeting.
4. Press [4] to set the bilingual welcome greeting.
5. Record the greeting, speaking clearly into a handset,
not a speaker phone. The following, is a typical
bilingual in English and French:
“Thank you for calling ABC Industries. Merci
d’appeler les Industries ABC. Pour le service en
francais, composez 8.”
6. Press any key to stop recording.
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Programming
7. After finishing, select one of the following options:
[1] Accept
[2] Review
[3] Re-record
[∗] Cancel
Configuring call logging (SMDR)
You can also save call logs to a file on your PC. See
Saving call (SMDR) logs (p. 130).
1. Using an RS-232 cable, connect the printer or PC to
the call logging (SMDR) port on the front of the controller (see Figure 6).
Refer to Port pinouts (p. 190) for the pinouts. The port
settings are 9600 baud, 8 bits, No Parity and 1 stop
bit (9600 8N1).
Figure 6: Call logging port
2. Launch the system tool.
3. Choose Voice from the Selection menu.
65
Programming
You can connect a printer to the system to obtain basic
call recording, or connect a PC that is running a call
accounting/management application to obtain more
sophisticated reports.
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Technician’s Handbook
4. Click Management, click Call Logging, and then
click Change.
5. Set the following parameters:
–
Set the cost per minute (00 to 999.9). This
functionality is not supported in NA systems
–
Set the minimum call duration to be recorded
(00.00.00 to 23:59:59)
–
Select the type of calls that you want recorded
–
Set the minimum page length (between 10 and
225 lines) for the report. The default is 66 lines
–
Enable call logging.
6. Click Save.
6_bTUcSbY`dY_^c_VdXUSQ\\\_WcbUVUbd_`!'&
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Programming
Commit your changes
You must commit the programming changes that you
have made through the system tool to the database.
Some of your saved changes (for example, changing
extension numbers) are not applied to the system until
you commit them.
1. Choose System from the Selection menu.
2. Click Commit Databases.
3. Read the instructions and click Proceed.
The system displays “Operation Successful” when
the database is updated.
Perform a database backup
At the end of your programming session backup the
database; see Backing up the software and/or database
(p. 128).
67
Programming
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%]Y^
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Technician’s Handbook
Programming tips
68
•
For programming considerations related to phone
features, click Help, click Features in the Table of
Contents, and then click Feature Descriptions.
•
At the end your programming session, remember to
commit your changes before your exit the system tool.
•
If you change the extension’s number or set type of an
IP phone, you must reset the phone before your
change will take effect. See Changing extensions or
set types (p. 135).
•
When you are programming MAC addresses into the
system you must separate the HEX numbers with a
colon (:).
•
Increase the number of IP phone licenses before you
add more phones to the system. If you connect new
IP phones to the system before you add the licenses,
they will display “(C) Mitel Networks Unlicensed”.
•
For instructions on how to operate features from an IP
phone, click Help, then click the extension user guide
for the set.
•
After you finish a programming session with any of the
tools, close all the associated IE windows, by using
the “EXIT” button. Do not use the
button (except
from the main login screen).
•
Netscape browsers are not supported.
•
If a set is in busy state, with no call forward turned on,
the caller will hear ring no answer until the extension
goes on hook or until the caller hangs up. To
determine if call forwarding has been set on an
extension, lift the receiver and listen to the dial tone.
A stutter dial tone at the start of regular dial tone
indicates that call forward is set up.
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Chapter 4
Configuring the IP
Network
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Configuring the IP Network
About IP networking
The 3100 ICP system provides small and medium-sized
businesses with a Local Area Network (LAN) and Internet
connectivity. This chapter provides step-by-step
procedures for
•
•
connecting the system directly to the Internet through
a cable or DSL modem using
–
static IP addressing
–
a DHCP client (typically used with a cable
modem)
–
PPPoE (typically used with a DSL modem)
connecting the system to an existing LAN through
–
the WAN Ethernet port
–
through a layer-2 switch port
using a remote DHCP server
•
changing the assigned DHCP IP address range
•
configuring Domain Naming Service (DNS)
•
assigning a gateway
•
programming dial-up access to an ISP
•
restricting external access with a firewall.
Configuring the
IP Network
•
Only qualified Network Engineers should install the 3100
ICP system into an existing LAN.
Refer to the IP Routing section of the Technical Manual
for detailed IP networking information. From the system
tool, click Help, click IP Networking.
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Technician’s Handbook
Network capabilities
The 3100 ICP system provides
•
a layer-2 switch that allows LAN devices such as IP
phones and computers to connect to each other
•
a built-in router that allows LAN users to connect to
the Internet
•
Network Address Translation (NAT) capabilities
•
Domain Name Service (DNS) that resolves local
names and forwards other requests
•
a Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol (DHCP)
server that automatically assigns LAN devices with IP
addresses.
Figure 7: Standalone network application
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Configuring the IP Network
Planning your LAN
Table 3: Planning information
@dTbcX^]
0]bfTa
Will you connect to a private network or virtual
private network (VPN)?
What are the IP addresses, gateway address,
and subnet mask required for the 3100 ICP
sub network?
or
Will you use a remote DHCP server?
Internal configuration questions
How many IP phones are you going to connect to the system?
How many computers are you going to connect to the system?
Configuring the
IP Network
Will these computers use the DHCP server in
the system controller?
Will you connect to the internet through the
WAN or through a layer-2 switch port?
What are the IP addresses, gateway
addresses, and subnet masks used in the
network?
External configuration questions
What type of external connection will you
use?
Dial-up, xDLS, cable, or other?
Will you connect the system to an existing
LAN?
Will you use the WAN port or a layer-2 switch
port?
What type of authentication is required?
Username
Password
PPP security type
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Technician’s Handbook
In configurations where you are using the DHCP services
of the 3100 ICP controller and Network Address
Translation (NAT) on the WAN port, you should not need
to modify the 3100 ICP DHCP settings. The default IP
addressing on the 3100 ICP system works for 90% of all
installations.
Ensure that your DSL service provider does not
block the use of other outgoing e-mail services
(Simple Mail Transfer Protocol). Some DSL service
providers block other outgoing e-mail services to
prevent network users from using their service for
e-mail spamming.
Default controller IP addresses
Figure 8: Default IP controller addresses
74
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Configuring the IP Network
IP programming sequence
For most installations the default IP networking settings
are acceptable for NET3. However, for those sites that
require modifications to the defaults, the recommended
programming sequence for the networking forms is
–
DHCP/DHCP Server/DHCP Subnet
–
DHCP/DHCP Server/DHCP IP Address Range
–
DHCP/DHCP Server/DHCP Options
–
Router/Destinations
–
Router/Network Interface/IP Routing Table
–
DNS/DNS Host.
Configuring the
IP Network
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Technician’s Handbook
Connecting directly to the Internet
You can connect the system directly to the Internet
through a high-speed cable modem or DSL modem. The
modem connects to the WAN port (NET2) on the 3100
ICP controller.
For a static IP configuration, obtain the following
destination information from the Internet Service
Provider (ISP)
•
IP address
•
Subnet Mask
•
Default ISP Gateway address
•
DNS addresses.
For DSL using PPPoE dynamic addressing, obtain the
following information
76
•
username
•
password.
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Configuring the IP Network
Figure 9: Direct internet connection using WAN port
1. Connect a straight-through CAT 5 cable from the
WAN port on the controller to the modem.
2. Launch the system tool. See Launching the tools (p.
113).
3. Choose IP Networking from the Selection menu.
4. Click Router and then click WAN Ethernet.
5. Click Change.
6. Proceed to one of the following procedures
–
Using Static IP addressing (p. 78)
–
Using DHCP Client (p. 78)
–
Using Broadband Access (PPPoE) (p. 79).
77
Configuring the
IP Network
To connect directly to the Internet through a DSL or cable
modem
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Technician’s Handbook
After you select one of the above connection
methods, the “IP Address Source” fields in the other
two methods are ignored by the system.
Using Static IP addressing
The following procedure is continued from page 77.
7. In the WAN Ethernet form, choose Static from the IP
Address Source menu.
8. Scroll down to the Static IP section.
9. Enter the addresses that you obtained from the ISP
–
IP Address:
–
Subnet Mask:
–
Default Gateway:
10. Click Save.
11. To enable NAT on Net 2
–
Click Network Interface and NAT General.
–
Click the IP address of the Net 2 destination at the
top of the page.
–
Click Change.
–
Check the Enable NAT box.
–
Click Save.
12. Configure DNS with the ISP DNS addresses. See
Configuring Domain Name Service (p. 91).
13. Proceed to Commit your changes (p. 80).
Using DHCP Client
The following procedure is continued from page 77.
1. In the WAN Ethernet form, select DHCP from the IP
Address Source menu.
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Configuring the IP Network
2. Scroll down the screen to the DHCP section.
3. In the Client Name field, enter the Client Name.
Note that some ISPs and DHCP servers do not
require you to provide a ClientName or ClientID.
4. Click Save.
5. To enable NAT on Net 2
–
Click Network Interface and NAT General.
–
Click the IP address of the Net 2 destination at the
top of the page.
–
Click Change.
–
Check the Enable NAT box.
–
Click Save.
6. Proceed to Commit your changes (p. 80).
Using Broadband Access (PPPoE)
1. In the WAN Ethernet form, choose PPPoE from the
IP Address Source.
2. Scroll down the screen to the PPPoE section.
3. Click Enable WAN Link.
4. Under the PPPoE header, enter your User name and
Password.
5. Enter your Service Name and Access
Concentrator, if applicable.
6. Click Save.
NAT is enabled automatically on Net 2. To enable
NAT on a different Net interface:
–
Click Network Interface and NAT General.
79
Configuring the
IP Network
The following procedure is continued from page 77.
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Technician’s Handbook
–
Click the IP address of the Net destination at the
top of the page.
–
Click Change.
–
Check Enable NAT box.
–
Click Save.
7. Under Router, click Global PPP.
8. Click Change.
9. Complete the following fields if required. Typically,
you do not need to complete these fields for internet
access
–
Primary WINS IP:
–
Secondary WINS IP:
–
Negotiate First:
10. Click Save.
11. Configure DNS. See Configuring Domain Name
Service (p. 91). Note that the DNS Server IP
addresses will be learned automatically from the ISP
if “Accept DNS from Remote PPP” is enabled in the
DNS Server screen.
12. Proceed to Commit your changes (p. 80).
Commit your changes
1. Choose System from the Selection menu.
2. Click Commit Databases and then click Proceed.
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!]Y^
“Operation Successful” is displayed when the commit
database is complete.
3. Launch a browser on any PC that is connected to the
system LAN and verify that you can access the
Internet.
4. Backup the database. See Backing up the software
and/or database (p. 128).
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Configuring the IP Network
Connecting to the Internet through
an existing LAN
You can connect to the Internet through an existing LAN
by using the WAN port or a layer-2 switch port.
Only qualified network engineers should install the
3100 ICP system into an existing LAN.
The 3100 ICP must be physically connected to the
existing network with the correct type of cable before
you begin either of the following procedures.
Through the WAN port
This configuration allows you to connect the 3100 ICP
through the WAN port to a layer-2 switch that is
connected to a router that is directly connected to the
Internet.
–
a static IP address fro the WAN port
–
DNS addresses
–
subnet mask
–
default gateway IP address.
81
Configuring the
IP Network
Before you begin this procedure, obtain the following
information from the network administrator
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Technician’s Handbook
Figure 10: Internet connection through router (WAN port)
1. Connect a cable from the WAN port on the controller
to the port on the router or layer-2 switch of the customer’s existing LAN.
2. Connect your laptop to a layer-2 switch port on the
controller.
3. Launch the system tool. See Launching the tools (p.
113).
4. Choose IP Networking from the Selection menu.
5. Click Router and then click WAN Ethernet.
6. Click Change.
7. Check the Enable WAN Link box.
8. Choose Static from the IP Address Source menu.
9. Scroll down to the Static IP section.
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Configuring the IP Network
10. Configure the WAN port of the 3100 ICP system with
the following static addresses
–
IP Address: Enter the IP address of the 3100 ICP
WAN port
–
Subnet Mask: Enter subnet mask of 3100 ICP
WAN port
–
Default Gateway Address: Enter IP address of
the router that the system goes through to
connect to the internet.
11. Click Save.
The IP Address used for the default gateway will
generate a Default Route in the routing table.
12. Click Save.
13. Configure DNS. See Configuring Domain Name
Service (p. 91) for instructions.
15. Click Commit Databases and then click Proceed.
!%cUSd_
!]Y^
“Operation Successful” is displayed when the commit
database is complete.
16. Launch a browser on any PC that is connected to the
system LAN and verify that you can access the
Internet.
17. Backup the database. See Backing up the software
and/or database (p. 128).
Through a layer-2 switch port (custom
configuration)
This configuration allows you to connect the 3100 ICP
through a layer-2 switch port to a router or layer-2 switch
that is connected directly to the Internet.
This configuration uses the 3100 ICP as the DHCP
83
Configuring the
IP Network
14. After configuring the DNS server, choose System
from the Selection menu.
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Technician’s Handbook
server. For instruction on how to use the DHCP services
of a remote server, see Using a remote DHCP server (p.
85) .
Figure 11: Internet connection through router (layer-2 switch port)
1. Connect a crossover cable from a layer-2 port on the
controller to a layer-2 switch port on the customer’s
LAN.
2. Choose IP Networking from the Selection menu.
3. Click Router and then click IP Routing Table.
4. Click Add.
5. Enter the following information
84
–
IP address: 0.0.0.0
–
Bit Mask: 0.0.0.0
–
Destination Next Hop Address: Router
(gateway) IP address
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Configuring the IP Network
6. Click Save.
7. Commit the database.
8. Launch a browser on any PC that is a DHCP client
that is connected to the system LAN. Verify that you
can access the Internet.
9. Backup the database. See Backing up the software
and/or database (p. 128).
Using a remote DHCP server
What you need
•
Static IP address and subnet mask from your existing
LAN
•
Layer 2-switch connected to the Existing DHCP LAN
•
CAT 5 (Ethernet) crossover cable.
Configuring the 3100 ICP
1. Launch the system tool. See Launching the tools (p.
113).
2. Choose IP Networking from the Selection menu.
3. Click DHCP and then click DHCP Server.
85
Configuring the
IP Network
To configure the 3100 ICP system to use an external
DHCP server (for example, Windows NT server or
Windows 2000 server) through the layer-2 switch port,
you must disable the DHCP server that is built into the
3100 ICP system. The local phones and PCs on the 3100
ICP LAN will then be able to receive IP addresses from
the external server.
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Technician’s Handbook
4. Click Change. In the DHCP Server field, choose
Disable.
5. From the Advertise as Default Gateway menu,
choose Not this system.
6. Click Save.
7. Click Router, click Network Interface, and then
select the IP address of the Net 3 destination at the
top of the right page.
8. Click Change.
9. Complete the following
Destination: Net 3
IP Address source: Static
IP Address: (enter the static IP address)
Bitmask: (enter the Subnet Mask)
10. Click Save
After you save your database, you will lose your
connection to the network. You will need to
reconnect with the new static IP addresses.
If you connected to the 3100 ICP system through the
WAN port, you will need to change your computer’s
IP address.
11. Commit the database.
12. Go to Configuring the external DHCP server (p. 86).
Configuring the external DHCP server
You perform the following steps on the external server
that is providing the DHCP services for your LAN.
1. Launch the system tool. See Launching the tools (p.
113).
2. Choose IP Networking from the Selection menu.
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Configuring the IP Network
3. Click DHCP, click DHCP Server and then click DHCP
Options.
4. Add the following DHCP options to the external
DHCP server:
ID: 6
Name: DNS Server
Data Type: IP Address
Identifier: 6
Value: (static IP address assigned to the 3100 ICP or
the IP address of an existing DNS server)
Scope: Global
ID: 128
Name: TFTP Server
Data Type: IP Address
Identifier: 128
Value: (static IP address assigned to the 3100 ICP)
Scope: Global
ID: 130
Name: MITEL IP PHONE
Data Type: String
Identifier: 130
Value: MITEL IP PHONE
Scope: Global or select the subnet IP address range
5. Click Save.
6. Connect the crossover cable between a layer-2 port
on the 3100 ICP system to a router or switch port on
the existing LAN.
7. Commit your database.
!%cUSd_
!]Y^
“Operation Successful” is displayed when the commit
database is complete.
87
Configuring the
IP Network
ID: 129
Name: (IP PHONE SERVICE PROVIDER)
Data Type: IP Address
Identifier: 6
Value: (static IP address assigned to the 3100 ICP)
Scope: Global
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Technician’s Handbook
Changing the assigned DHCP IP
address range
Use this procedure to program the layer-2 switch (NET 3)
of the 3100 ICP system to support a different DHCP IP
address range. This procedure changes the default
layer-2 switch IP address (192.168.1.2) to match the
customer’s required LAN subnet addressing. In this
example, the phones and PC’s use the DHCP service on
the 3100 ICP system and all devices are plugged into the
3100 ICP system. The programming must be performed
though the WAN port through a crossover cable.
Configure the IP address of the NET 3 destination
1. Launch the system tool. Launching the tools (p. 113).
2. Choose IP Networking from the Selection menu.
3. Click Router and then click Network Interface.
4. Click Net 3 in the right pane.
5. Click Delete to delete the existing settings
6. Click Add.
7. For the IP Address source
–
select DHCP and enter the DCHP Client Name
and Client ID if applicable, or
–
select Static and enter a valid IP address and
subnet mask from the existing LAN.
8. Click Save.
Add the DHCP Server entries to match the new IP
address
1. Click DHCP, DHCP Server, DHCP Subnet, and then
click Add.
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Configuring the IP Network
2. Add the Name, IP address, and Bit Mask to fit your
existing LAN subnet.
3. Ensure that the Advertise as Default Gateway field is
set to This System First.
4. Click Save.
Add the DHCP IP Address range
1. Click DHCP IP Address Range.
2. Click Add.
3. Enter a name for the IP Range.
4. Enter valid Start and End addresses of the IP range.
5. Leave the other parameters at the defaults and then
click Save.
Change the DHCP Options
2. Select DNS Server from the list of options.
3. Click Change.
4. Change the Value setting to the new IP address that
was configured on NET 3 (from the procedure on
page 88).
5. Click Save.
6. Repeat the above steps to change the DHCP options
for any other servers and IP phones that are defined.
Configure the DNS Server
1. Click DNS and then click DNS Server.
2. Click Change.
3. Enter the Primary and Secondary DNS IP addresses
as supplied by the network administrator.
89
Configuring the
IP Network
1. Click DHCP Options in the DHCP Server folder.
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Technician’s Handbook
4. Click Save.
5. Commit the database.
!%cUSd_
!]Y^
“Operation Successful” is displayed when the commit
database is complete.
6. Connect a crossover cable from a layer-2 switch port
on the controller to the existing LAN.
7. Launch a DOS command window and ensure that
you can ping computers that are located on the
existing LAN. Ping the DNS names of the computers.
You must set the PC to use the 3100 ICP system as
its DNS server.
8. Open a browser and ensure that you can surf to a site
on the Internet.
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Configuring the IP Network
Configuring Domain Name Service
The 3100 ICP controller includes a Domain Name
Service (DNS). You should configure this service to help
users resolve local and remote web queries.
Users will not be able to browse the Internet unless
you have configured DNS to forward user’s requests
to the DNS sever of the Internet Service Provider
(ISP).
1. Launch the system tool. See Launching the tools (p.
113).
2. Choose IP Networking from the Selection menu.
3. Click DNS, click DNS Server, and then click Change.
4. Enter the following information.
Domain Name: Local
–
Primary DNS IP Address: Enter the address of
your ISPs DNS server
–
Secondary DNS IP Address: Enter the
Secondary address of your ISPs DNS server. If
unavailable, enter Primary again
–
Group Query Order: Local First
–
Accept DNS from Remote PPP: Enable
5. Click Save.
Next, add the static IP addresses and host names of
routers, gateways, and any other devices on the LAN that
have fixed IP addresses to the DNS Host form.
1. Click DNS and then click DNS Host.
2. Click Add.
3. Enter the Host Name and IP Address of the first
computer on the LAN and click Save.
91
Configuring the
IP Network
–
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Technician’s Handbook
4. Repeat step 2 and step 3 for each computer and IP
phone on the LAN.
5. Choose System from the Selection menu.
6. Click Commit Databases and then click Proceed.
!%cUSd_
!]Y^
92
“Operation Successful” is displayed when the commit
database is complete.
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Configuring the IP Network
Assigning a gateway
Most configurations have either a gateway server or a
DSL router. You can set up the 3100 ICP system to direct
all traffic bound for the Internet through a gateway server
or through a router instead of going through the system’s
WAN port.
If your router or firewall is positioned between your DSL
modem and the 3100 system, connect the system to the
Internet through a layer-2 switch port.
Use the WAN port to connect the system directly to the
Internet through a DSL modem.
1. Launch the system tool.
2. Choose IP Networking from the Selection menu.
3. Click Router, click IP Routing Table, and then click
Add.
–
IP Address: (leave as 000.000.000.000)
–
Bit Mask Destination: 0.0.0.0
–
Next Hop Address: The Next Hop Address is the
IP address of your DSl router or local server that
is connected to the layer-2 switch port on the
controller.
5. Click Save.
6. Click DNS, click DNS Server and then click Change.
7. Enter the following:
–
Domain Name: (enter your domain name or
leave it as mitel.com)
–
Primary DNS IP Address: (enter the IP address
of your ISP’s primary server or your own DNS
93
Configuring the
IP Network
4. Enter the following:
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Technician’s Handbook
Server IP address if you have one on your
network)
–
Leave the other fields at their defaults.
8. Click Save.
9. Commit your changes.
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Configuring the IP Network
Programming dial-up access to an ISP
To connect a modem to an ISP
1. Launch the system tool.
2. Choose IP Networking from the Selection menu.
3. Click Router, click Destinations and then select an
available destination (from Net 5 to Net 13).
4. Click Change and change the destination name to
ISP_LINK.
5. Click Save.
6. Click Remote Connection and then click Add.
7. Add a new entry for destination ISP_LINK. Set the
Call Type to outgoing and put in your dial string.
Enable the entry.
9. Click Remote Security and then click Add.
10. Add a new entry for the destination ISP_LINK.
–
Set Protocol to “none” and fill in your Local Name
and Local Secret name.
–
For Compression, select either “none” or “STAC”
(STAC Compression may not always work. If it
does become an issue disable it from the remote
client) for compression.
–
In the Connect As section, select “client” for the
mode, select “accept IP from remote”.
11. Click Save.
12. Click Destinations, select the ISP_LINK destination,
and then click Change.
13. Click Enable Destination and then click Save.
95
Configuring the
IP Network
8. Click Save.
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14. Notice that a default route entry will show up in the
routing table (via NextHop 10.122.122.122). When
stimulus is received and is forwarded through the
default route, either through a browse action or a
ping, the ISP will be dialed and a connection will be
established. Once the connection is established, the
IP address of the interface and entries in the routing
table will automatically be updated with the info
learned from the ISP. NAT will automatically be
added to the interface and is enabled.
You cannot use the special destination ISP_LINK and
the DSL at the same time.
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Configuring the IP Network
Restricting LAN access (firewall)
You can use Mitel Networks 6000 Small Business
Applications Platform (SBAP) or the SonicWALL™
SOHO2 Internet security appliance to create a secure
barrier (firewall) between the 3100 ICP local network and
the public Internet. A firewall keeps a network secure
from external intruders.
This section provides instructions on how to
•
connect the 6000 SBAP to a layer-2 switch port on the
3100 ICP system (recommended setup)
•
connect the 6000 SBAP to the WAN port on the 3100
ICP system
•
connect the SonicWall SOHO2 to a layer-2 switch
port on the 3100 ICP system
Connecting the 6000 SBAP to the layer-2 switch
port
This configuration uses a port on the 3100 ICP system.
All 6000 SBAP services are supported.
Configuring the 6000 SBAP for connection to a layer-2
switch port
1. Connect the 6000 SBAP to the 3100 ICP as show in
the following diagram.
97
Configuring the
IP Network
You can also use other firewall products, if desired; they
would be configured in a similar manner.
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Figure 12: Connecting the 6000 SBAP to layer-2 switch port
2. When you install the 6000 SBAP, set the console
settings in the following order:
Primary domain name: (choose a domain)
System name: mitel6000
Local network ethernet adapter: (choose a device)
Local IP address: 192.168.1.251
Local subnet mask: 255.255.255.0
Operation mode: server and gateway
External access mode: (choose an access mode)
Ethernet network ethernet adapter: (choose the
other device)
External interface configuration: (obtain from ISP)
DHCP Server configuration: ON
Master DNS server: (leave blank)
Proxy server: No
3. After installing the 6000 SBAP, log in to the server
manager from your browser at the following URL:
http://192.168.1.251/server-manager
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Configuring the IP Network
4. Enter your username and password
User: admin
Password: (as set during installation)
5. In the Workgroup pane, set “Workgroup and Domain
Controller to “Yes”
6. From the “Servicelink -> Status” panel, enter the
Service Account and click Register.
7. From the “Administration ->Blades” panel, install the
“IP-Phone-Support” blade.
8. Refresh the browser window to display the
“Administration ->IP phone” support panel.
9. Open the “Administration->IP phone” page and then
set “IP phone support for 3100” to “enabled” and then
click Save.
10. Next configure the 3100 ICP
Configure the 3100 ICP
2. Choose IP Networking from the Selection menu.
3. Click Router, click IP Routing Table, and click Add.
4. In the IP Address field, enter the default route
address of 0.0.0.0
5. Enter a Bit Mask of 0.0.0.0
6. In Next Hop, enter the 6000 SBAP local IP
(192.168.1.251).
7. Leave the other parameters unchanged and click
Save.
8. Click DHCP and then click DHCP Server.
9. Click Change and set DHCP Server to “disable”.
10. Click Save.
99
Configuring the
IP Network
1. Launch the system tool.
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Connecting the 6000 SBAP to the WAN port
This configuration is not recommended. Although this
configuration does not use up a layer-2 switch port, it
prevents some of the 6000 SBAP services from
functioning correctly and also impacts the network
throughput because the 3100 ICP system will perform
Network Address Translation (NAT) on all outbound data
traffic.
Configuring the 6000 SBAP for connection to WAN port
1. Connect the 6000 SBAP to the 3100 ICP as show in
the following diagram.
Figure 13: Connecting the 6000 SBAP to WAN port
2. When you install the 6000 SBAP, set the console
settings in the following order:
Primary domain name: (choose a domain)
System name: mitel6000
Local network ethernet adapter: (choose a device)
Local IP address: 192.168.0.2
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Configuring the IP Network
Local subnet mask: 255.255.255.0
Operation mode: server and gateway
External access mode: dedicated
Ethernet network ethernet adapter: (choose the
other device)
External interface configuration: (obtain from ISP)
DHCP server configuration: Off
Master DNS server: (leave blank)
Proxy server: No
3. After installing the 6000 SBAP, log in to the server
manager from your browser at the following URL:
http://192.168.0.2/server-manager
4. Enter your username and password
User: admin
Password: (as set during installation)
5. In the Workgroup pane, set “Workgroup and Domain
Controller to “Yes”
7. From the “Administration ->Blades” panel, install the
“IP-Phone-Support” blade.
8. Refresh the browser window to display the
“Administration ->IP phone” support panel.
9. Open the “Administration->IP phone” page and then
set “IP phone support for 3100” to “enabled” and then
click Save.
10. In the “Workgroup” panel. set “Workgroup and
Domain Controller” to “yes”.
11. In the “Local Networks” panel, add the following new
local network:
Network Address: 192.168.1.0
Subnet Mask: 255.255.255.0
Router: 192.168.0.1
12. Next, configure the 3100 ICP.
101
Configuring the
IP Network
6. From the “Servicelink -> Status” panel, enter the
Service Account and click Register.
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Appletalk filesharing will not work between the 6000
SBAP and computers that are connected to the 3100 ICP
system. The ServiceLink IPSEC VPN service for
server-to-server connections will not work with this
configuration. Client-to-server VPN connections that use
PPTP will, however, operate normally.
Configure the 3100 ICP
1. Launch the system tool.
2. Choose IP Networking from the Selection menu.
3. Click Router, click IP Routing Table, and click Add.
4. In the IP Address field, enter the default route
address of 0.0.0.0
5. Enter a Bit Mask of 0.0.0.0
6. In Next Hop, enter the 6000 SBAP local IP
(192.168.0.2).
7. Leave the other parameters unchanged and click
Save.
SonicWALL SOHO2
The following instructions refer to the SonicWALL
SOHO2 Internet security appliance only.
Install the SonicWALL SOHO2
Refer to SonicWALL technical documentation for
instructions.
Configure the SonicWall SOHO2
1. Setup and configure your DSL modem.
2. Using a crossover cable, connect the DSL line to the
WAN port on SonicWall SOHO2.
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Configuring the IP Network
3. Configure your PC to use IP address 192.168.168.2,
Subnet 255.255.255.0, and Gateway
192.168.168.168.
4. Connect the PC to the LAN port on the SonicWall
SOHO2, using either a CAT 5 crossover cable or via
a hub or switch.
5. Start Internet Explorer 5.5 and go to the following
address 192.168.168.168.
6. If necessary, download new firmware to SonicWall
SOHO2 and wait for it to restart. Exit the browser
window and start up a new browser and go to address
192.168.168.168 again.
7. The SonicWall configuration wizard should start
automatically. Click Next.
8. If desired, change the password and click Next.
9. Set the correct Time zone and click Next.
10. Click Next.
12. Leave the default IP Address and Netmask on this
screen (should be 192.168.168.1/255.255.255.0.)
Click Next.
13. Ensure that DHCP server is disabled. Click Next.
14. Click Next.
15. Click Restart.
16. Close all browser windows.
17. Start a new browser and browse to the SonicWall
console at address 192.168.168.1
18. Login to the console.
19. Click the Advanced button on the left side of the
screen.
20. Click the Routes tab near the top of the screen.
103
Configuring the
IP Network
11. Enter the Name and Password supplied by your ISP.
Click Next.
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21. Click in the Dest Network field in Add Route.
22. Enter address 192.168.1.0 (3100 ICP LAN network).
23. Tab to the Subnet Mask field and enter
255.255.255.0
24. Tab to the Gateway field and enter 192.168.168.2
(address of the 3100 ICP WAN Ethernet interface).
25. Click Update at bottom of window.
26. Restart the SonicWall SOHO2 appliance.
27. Close all browser windows.
Configure the 3100 ICP system with the SonicWALL
SOHO2
1. Configure the monitoring computer’s network settings
to Get Address automatically. Then in the DHCP Client, add the DNS addresses that were supplied by
your ISP.
2. Connect the computer to a 3100 ICP LAN port. It may
be necessary to open an MS-DOS command window
and type the command ipconfig /renew.
3. Initiate the Internet Explorer browser and click on the
Stop button to prevent it from automatically
connecting to the default web site.
4. Launch the system tool. See Launching the tools (p.
113).
5. Choose IP Networking from the Selection menu.
Click Router and then click Network Interface.
6. Click the IP address of the Net 2 interface and then
click Change.
7. Change the IP Address to 192.168.168.2.
8. Click Save.
9. Click WAN Ethernet.
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Configuring the IP Network
10. Ensure that the IP Address Source is set to Static
and the Bit Mask is defined as 255.255.255.0 and the
IP address is 192.168.168.2.
11. Click Save.
12. From the IP Networking list on the left-hand side of
the screen, click IP Routing Table and then click
Add.
13. In the IP Routing Table dialog box, change the Next
Hop Address field to 192.168.168.1 (the address of
the SonicWALL firewall). The IP address and Bit
Mask must be set to 0.0.0.0.
14. Click Save.
15. In the IP Networking folder, click DNS, click DNS
Server and then click Change.
16. Enter the Primary and Secondary DNS Server IP
addresses provided by your ISP.
17. Click Save.
Configuring the
IP Network
18. Exit and commit your changes.
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IP networking tips
•
After you perform a database restore, the DNS Host
name for the system reverts to the default “mn3100”.
Therefore, if you have changed the default DNS Host
name of the system, you must reprogram it after a
database restore.
•
The WAN Link Idle timeout is set to 5 minutes. You
cannot change this setting through the system tool.
•
For IP phones, you must configure the following
options:
Option 6 -- DNS Server (192.168.1.2)
Option 128 -- TFTP Server (192.168.1.2)
Option 129 -- IP Phone Service Provider Address
(192.168.1.2)
Option 130 -- IP Phone Identifier option (MITEL IP
PHONE)
106
•
By default, the IP range for the LAN devices is
192.168.1.10 to 192.168.1.250. The DHCP server,
distributes addresses on a first come, first server
basis starting with 192.168.1.10.
•
The default range of dynamic IP addresses for the
LAN devices is 192.168.1.10 to 192.168.1.250). If
there are other devices on the LAN that configured
with static IP addresses, ensure that these addresses
do not overlap the dynamic range.
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Chapter 5
Routine maintenance
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108
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Routine maintenance
Is the system healthy?
System health checklist
ã Light indicators on controller and expansion unit
are correct color
ã You can make internal and external calls from IP
phones and ONS sets as required
ã Internet access is available to PC users on the
3100 ICP system LAN
ã Voice mailboxes are accessible
ã Users have URL, usernames, and passcodes to
the desktop tool
ã Set users have user guides and quick reference
cards
ã Remote system access is set up
ã 5140 IP Phones online services are set up
ã Database is backed up
ã Voice mail data is backed up.
Routine
Maintenance
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Technician’s Handbook
Is the system secure?
ã Firewall is installed
ã Passwords and usernames for tools have been
changed
ã Passwords and usernames are recorded
and stored securely
ã Call logging records have been checked for
irregularities
ã Toll restriction and classes of service are set up
correctly
ã Toll restriction matrix is set up to prevent
unauthorized routing and line to line transfers
ã Account codes are programmed
ã Voice mailboxes are set up to prevent access to
external lines
ã Call forwarding is secure.
110
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Routine maintenance
Checking the system
1. Check the controller and expansion unit. Ensure all
Light Emitting Diodes (LEDs) are displaying correctly.
See Checking the system LEDs (p. 141).
2. Make internal and external calls from the IP phones
and analog sets.
3. Call into the system and ensure that incoming calls
ring the required extension (attendant) or extensions.
4. Log on to a PC on the network and ensure that you
can access the Internet.
5. Ensure that you can log into the system, group
administration and desktop tools.
6. Review voice mail programming. Ensure that
incoming callers cannot access an external line
through voice mail. In the System tool, choose Voice,
click Voicemail, click System Settings, and then
click Voicemail Options. Set the “Restrict #’s that
Begin with” field to include the outgoing line access
digits (default 9).
7. Ensure the external call forwarding permissions are
set correctly. In the System tool, choose Voice, click
Extensions, and then click Remote Call Forward.
Users access the desktop tool by launching the login
page, entering their username (defaults to their
extension number), and their passcode (defaults to
their extension number).
9. Ensure that Toll Restriction, Restriction Groups,
Class of Service, and Toll Restriction Matrix settings
are set correctly. See Restrict external access (toll
restriction/call barring) (p. 58).
111
Routine
Maintenance
8. Ensure that users have the URL, username and
passcode to the desktop user tool. Send each user
an e-mail with this information.
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Technician’s Handbook
10. Ensure that end users have user guides. See
Creating a user guide (p. 136).
11. Ensure that remote system access is set up if you
plan to perform remote programming. See Using a
remote access session (p. 131).
12. Ensure that you have made recent backups. See
Performing backups (p. 128).
13. Ensure that a firewall is in place to protect the network
from intruders. See Restricting LAN access (firewall)
(p. 97).
112
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Routine maintenance
Launching the tools
You can connect a PC or laptop to the 3100 ICP system
through
•
a LAN drop
•
the Ethernet port on the back of the IP Phone
•
directly to a layer-2 switch port on the Mitel Networks
3100 ICP controller or expansion unit.
You must configure the PC to accept an IP address from
the 3100 ICP system. See Configuring the PC (p. 26).
You can also access the 3100 ICP system remotely by
dialing into the Mitel Networks 3100 ICP system through
a trunk (using the installed V.90 modem) or through the
Internet. See Using a remote access session (p. 131) for
more details.
To launch a tool
1. Launch your browser and go to the following URL:
http://192.168.1.2
2. Enter your username and password
Login: system (default)
Password: mnet (default)
Routine
Maintenance
3. Click
–
Group Administration Tool
–
System Tool, or
–
System Quick Installation Tool
4. Proceed to Programming the voice parameters (p.
50).
You can only have one system tool session or one Telnet
tool session open at any time. The system quick
installation tool is only used during the initial
configuration of the system.
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Technician’s Handbook
Enabling your licensed options
Your Mitel Options System Selection (MOSS) passcode
determines your licensed system options. It corresponds
to a unique System Identification (SYSID) code that is
assigned to your system. You must enter your MOSS
option code into the system to enable purchased options.
Obtain your MOSS option code
1. Launch your browser and go to the following URL:
www.mitel.com
2. Access Mitel Online from the Online Services
selection menu.
You require a username and password to access
Mitel Online.
3. Click Sales Tools or Technical Support, and then
click Mitel Networks ICP Password Inquiry.
4. Click Mitel Networks 3100 ICP Password Inquiry
and then accept the terms and conditions.
5. Click View Password for Specific ID.
6. Enter your 12-digit SYSID code. Your SYSID code is
printed on a label that is affixed to the back of the
controller underneath the serial number.
7. The service displays your MOSS option code.
8. Click the SYSID code to view the options and
licenses you have purchased.
9. Record or print the information.
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Routine maintenance
Enable your options
1. Launch the system tool. See Launching the tools (p.
113).
2. Choose System from the Selection menu.
3. Click License and then click Change.
4. Enter your licensed options and license passcode
(MOSS code).
5. Click Save. Your system is updated with the new
options automatically. You do not need to reboot the
system.
6. Commit the database.
Routine
Maintenance
115
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Technician’s Handbook
Rebooting the system
I_e`UbV_b]QbUR__dQVdUbi_eXQfU
•
upgraded the system software
•
applied a software patch
•
installed voice mail software
•
if the system is not functioning
•
after changing languages
CWTU^[[^fX]V_a^RTSdaTcPZTbcWTbhbcT\^dc^U
bTaeXRTU^aP__a^gX\PcT[h $\X]dcTbFWX[TcWT
bhbcT\XbaTQ^^cX]VcWTSPcP]Tcf^aZfX[[]^cQT
PePX[PQ[TP]SP[[RP[[bX]_a^VaTbbfX[[QTcTa\X]PcTS
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To reboot the system
1. Launch the system tool. See Launching the tools (p.
113).
2. Choose System from the Selection menu
3. Click Reboot the 3100 ICP.
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116
4. Read the instructions and then click Proceed.
3100 Hand.bk Page 117 Monday, August 19, 2002 8:49 PM
Routine maintenance
Powering down the system
Do not disconnect the system power if the LED is
flashing red and amber.
1. Ensure that you have current backups. See Performing backups (p. 128).
2. Ensure that there are no database backups or
restores in progress.
3. Ensure that the Power LED on the controller front
panel is steady green.
4. Straighten out a paper clip.
5. Using the paper clip, press and release the CONFIG
button.
6. The Power LED flashes red for 30 seconds and is
then lit steady red.
7. After the Power LED is steady red, unplug the system
power cord from the power supply.
8. Disconnect the power cord from the power bar.
117
Routine
Maintenance
Figure 14: CONFIG and RESET switches
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Technician’s Handbook
Powering up the system
1. Connect the power cord to the rear panel of the controller unit and plug the power cord into a power bar.
2. Connect the power bar to a power outlet.
3. Check the Power LED. During the power up
sequence the Power LED will display the following
states:
–
initially flashes red
–
flashes green/off while the system is
booting
–
steady amber while running startup
diagnostics
–
flashes amber while running bootrom
VxWorks
–
steady green when bootup is complete.
Never disconnect the system power if the LED is
flashing red and amber.
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Routine maintenance
Upgrading the system
Installing option modules
1. Power down the controller and disconnect all connections to the public telecommunications network.
2. Attach an anti-static strap.
3. Remove the top cover.
4. Locate the option module slots (see Figure 5). Note
that BRI modules (UK only) can be installed in option
module slots 1 and 2.
5. Remove the four screws from the standoffs. The
locations of the screws are shown in Figure 15.
Routine
Maintenance
Figure 15: Removing the screws
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Technician’s Handbook
6. Insert the two standoffs supplied with the options
module.
Figure 16: Inserting the standoffs (option module 1)
7. Secure the options module with the four screws.
8. Replace the metal plate and top cover.
9. Connect the lines or phones and power up the
system.
10. To program additional lines, see Program the
incoming access (ring maps) (p. 51). To program new
sets, see Modify the extensions and system directory
(p. 50).
Adding an expansion unit
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SQR\UQ^TQIQS`_gUbSQR\U
1. Power down the controller and disconnect all connections to the public telecommunications network.
2. Attach an anti-static strap.
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Routine maintenance
3. Remove the top cover of the controller.
4. Install the Uplink card (see Figure 17) on the two
standoffs.
5. Secure the Uplink card with the supplied screws.
Figure 17: Installing the expansion unit
7. Power up the system.
Performing a software upgrade
You perform a software upgrade to install a new software
load within the same release. Software upgrades are
distributed either on a software CD-ROM or you can
download them from the Mitel Online website.
121
Routine
Maintenance
6. Connect the uplink cable and Y-ac power cord from
the Controller to the expansion unit
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Technician’s Handbook
Not all software upgrades require a voice mail software
upgrade. Read the Field Change Instruction (FCI)
document first. ONLY upgrade voice mail software when
required.
If a software upgrade fails, you can restore the previous
software version and database (N-1 version) that is
stored on the system hard drive. See Restoring the
system with the factory software (p. 156).
The following procedure takes the system out of
service for approximately 45 minutes.
To perform a software upgrade
1. Perform backups (including a full voice mail backup).
2. Ensure that you have the MOSS option passcode for
your licensed options.
3. Insert the upgrade software CD-ROM in your PC.
or
Download the software upgrade file (.maz) from Mitel
Online to a PC that is on the 3100 ICP system LAN.
4. Launch the system tool on the PC.
5. Choose System from the Selection menu.
6. Click System and then click Upgrade Software.
7. Read the instructions and then click Proceed.
8. Click Browse and navigate to the upgrade file (.maz)
on the CD-ROM or PC.
9. Select the file and click Open.
10. Click Upgrade. The upgrade file is transferred to the
system. Note that the system is functional while the
file is being transferred.
Do not power down the 3100 ICP system during an
upgrade.
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122
11. When “Operation Successful” appears, click Reboot
the 3100 ICP.
3100 Hand.bk Page 123 Monday, August 19, 2002 8:49 PM
Routine maintenance
$%]Y^
12. After you click Reboot the 3100 ICP, the power
indicator turns red for about 30 seconds.
13. Restore your database. Restoring the
database/software and database (p. 154).
Applying a software patch
A software patch is used to fix a problem in the software.
Software patches are posted on the Mitel Online site.
To apply a software patch
1. Download the patch from Mitel Online to a PC on the
LAN.
2. Launch the system tool.
3. Choose System from the Selection menu.
4. Click Apply Patch.
5. Read the instructions and then click Proceed.
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6. Click Browse and then navigate to the patch file
(.maz) on your PC
7. Select the file, click Open and then click OK.
8. After the files have been copied to the system the
message “Operation Successful” is displayed
Replacing a flash card
Do not proceed with this procedure until you have
obtained the Mitel Option System Selection
password for the system. This procedure takes the
system out of service for approximately 60 minutes.
You replace a flash card to install a new release of
software (for example: from Release 2.3 to Release 3.0)
onto the system. Note that the flash card does not include
the voice mail prompts.
123
Routine
Maintenance
9. Reboot the system. See Rebooting the system (p.
116).
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Technician’s Handbook
To perform a flash upgrade you require
•
Laptop or PC with Hyperterminal or equivalent
communication package
•
System software CD-ROM (for the voice mail
software)
•
Adapter cable.
You can build an adapter cable using a DB9 to RJ45
connector and a straight RJ45 patch cable. See
Cable pinouts (p. 195).
To perform a flash upgrade
1. Perform backups (including a voice mail data
backup).
2. On the laptop or PC, start up the Hyperterminal
application (click Start, click Programs, click
Accessories, click Hyperterminal and then click
Hyperterminal again).
3. Enter a name for the New Connection and click OK.
4. Ensure that the Connect Using field is set to the port
that you are going to use (COM1 or COM2) and then
click OK.
5. Set the port settings to
–
Bits per second: 9600
–
Data bits: 8
–
Parity: None
–
Stop bits: 1
–
Flow Control: None.
6. Power down the 3100 ICP system.
7. Attach an anti-static strap.
8. Remove the top cover of the controller.
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Routine maintenance
9. Locate dipswitch S1. It’s positioned next to the round
SysID module (see Figure 18).
Figure 18: Location of dipswitch (S1)
11. Connect the lower DB9 male connector on the front
panel of the controller to the female COM port on the
laptop using a CAT5 patch cord.
12. Remove the existing flash card and replace it with the
new flash card. If the flash card does not install easily,
you may have it upside down. See Figure 5 for the
location of the flash card.
13. Launch Hyperterminal and connect to the 3100 ICP
system. See Viewing diagnostics (p. 143).
125
Routine
Maintenance
10. Set switch 1 (located closest to the printed circuit
card) to ON to allow diagnostic information to be sent
through the lower DB9 console connector.
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Technician’s Handbook
14. Power up the 3100 ICP system.
15. Diagnostic information will be displayed on the
screen. When the following text appears:
Recovery Lite Begin
Looking for valid software
Verifying image /ata0/vxWorks
Recovery Lite Success
Press any key to stop auto-boot. .
7
6
5
16. Press any key.
17. Hyperterminal displays “MN3100 ICP->”.
18. Type “syshd” and press the Enter key.
The following prompt is displayed “This will destroy
the contents of your Hard Disk. Do you with to abort
this operation?”
19. Type “N” and press the Enter key to reformat the
system hard drive.
This step destroys the contents of the hard drive.
20. The system begins reformatting the hard disk.
Diagnostics appear on the screen. When the hard
disk is reformatted “MN3100 ICP->” is displayed.
21. Power down the controller and power it back up again
to reboot the system.
& ]Y^
The system takes approximately 60 minutes to boot
up with the new flash. After the system has is fully
loaded, the green power LED will be on steady.
22. Launch the system tool and enable your licensed
options. See Enabling your licensed options (p. 114).
23. Re-install the voice mail prompts from your system
software CD-ROM. You must install them from your
126
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Routine maintenance
CD-ROM because they are not included on the flash
card
–
Insert the software CD-ROM in the PC CD-ROM
drive
–
In the system tool, choose System from the
Selection menu.
–
Click System, click Install Voicemail and then
click Proceed.
–
Click Browse and navigate to file
vmail_<load>_<country>.maz and then click
Open.
–
When the software has finished loading, click
Reboot the system.
24. Restore your system database and your voice mail
database. See Restoring the database/software and
database (p. 154).
Routine
Maintenance
127
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Technician’s Handbook
Performing backups
During a backup operation, do not navigate off the
backup page and do not close your browser until the
backup is complete.
Creating backup directories
3bUQdURQS[e`TYbUSd_bYUc_^i_eb\Q`d_`_b@3gXUbU
i_eSQ^cd_bURQS[e`VY\Uc
Figure 19: Backup directories
Backing up the software and/or database
Create backups of the
•
software and database
•
database only
A “software and database” backup allows you to restore
your system to service after a failed upgrade. A
“database only” backup allows you to restore your
database if it becomes corrupted.
To create software and database backups
1. Launch the system tool. See Launching the tools (p.
113).
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Routine maintenance
2. Choose System from the Selection menu.
3. Click Backup/Restore, click Database and
Software and then click Backup.
4. Read the instructions and then click Proceed.
5. Check the database option or both the database and
software option.
4QdQRQcU
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6. Click Save As and navigate to a folder on your PC.
7. Select a file or enter a filename and click Save.
It’s good practice to include the date in the filename.
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8. Click Do Backup.
“Operation Successful” appears when complete.
Backing up the voice mail data
This procedure creates a back up of the current voice
mail configuration that you save to your PC or laptop.
1. Launch the system tool. Launching the tools (p. 113).
2. Choose System from the Selection menu.
3. Click Backup/Restore, click Voice Mail and then
click Backup.
4. Read the instructions and then click Proceed.
6. Click Save As, navigate to a folder on your PC.
7. Select a file or enter a filename and click Save.
8. Click Do Backup.
!%cUS
d_"]Y^
“Operation Successful” appears when the backup is
complete.
129
Routine
Maintenance
5. Click March 3100 Full Voicemail. A full backup will
allow you to restore the voice mailbox programming,
greetings, and messages. A medium backup only
allows you to restore the voice mailbox programming
and greetings.
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Technician’s Handbook
Saving call (SMDR) logs
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\_WWY^WCUU3_^VYWebY^WSQ\\\_WWY^WC=4B`&%
1. Launch the system tool. Launching the tools (p. 113).
2. Choose System from the Selection menu.
3. Click Save Call Logs.
4. Read the instructions and then click Proceed.
5. Click Save As, navigate to a folder on your PC.
6. Select a file or enter a filename and click Save.
7. Click Save
8. Click Save Call Logs.
!%cUS
d_!]Y^
130
“Operation Successful” appears when the save is
complete.
3100 Hand.bk Page 131 Monday, August 19, 2002 8:49 PM
Routine maintenance
Using a remote access session
You can access the system tool, group administration
tool, and desktop user tools from a remote PC.
To set up the 3100 ICP system to support remote access,
you must set up remote access on the 3100 ICP system
and then set up dial-up access from the remote PC.
Setting up remote access
You cannot perform this setup remotely (that is, you must
perform this procedure on the 3100 ICP system, on site,
before you can gain remote access).
1. Launch the system tool. See Launching the tools (p.
113).
2. Choose IP Networking from the Selection menu.
3. Click Router, click Destinations, and then select
Net5 in the right pane.
4. Click Change.
5. In the Name field, enter “RAS” and click Save.
6. Click Network Interface and then click Add.
–
Destination: RAS
–
IP Address Source: Static
–
IP Address: Enter an IP address that will be used
by the modem interface of 134.22.11.250
–
Bitmask: 255.255.255.000
8. Click Save.
9. Under Network Interface, click IP Routing Table and
then click Add.
131
Routine
Maintenance
7. In the Network Interface page set the following:
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Technician’s Handbook
10. In IP Routing Table page, set the following
–
IP Address: 000.000.000.000
–
Bit Mask: 0.0.0.0
–
Next Hop Address: enter the IP address of the
gateway device (router, gateway, firewall)
11. Click Save.
12. Under Destination, click Remote Security and then
click Add.
13. In the Remote Security page, set the following
–
Destination: RAS
–
Protocol: PAP
–
Remote Name: enter “mn3100” as dial up
username
–
Remote Secret: enter “mn3100” as dial up
password
–
IP Address: select Override Address With:
–
Override Address With: enter 134.22.11.249
–
Connect As: select Server
14. Click Save.
15. In the Destinations folder, click Remote Connection
and then click Add.
16. In the Remote Connection page, set the following:
–
Destination: RAS
–
Enable Link: Select check box
–
Call Type: Incoming
17. Click Save.
18. Click Destinations, select RAS in the right pane, and
then click Change.
19. Check the Enable Destination option box.
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Routine maintenance
20. Click Save.
21. Commit your changes to the database.
Launching the tools from a remote session
To connect to the 3100 ICP modem using Windows
Client Dialup Networking, you must use the Operator
Assisted Dialing option. This option allows you to initiate
the call using a standard phone attached to your modem.
Setting up Client Dialup Networking
1. In Windows 95/98/2000, open the My Computer
folder.
2. Double-click Dial-up Networking.
3. Click Next or double-click the Make New
Connection icon.
4. Enter the name of the 3100 ICP system, select your
modem type and click Configure.
5. Click Connection and set the connection
preferences to
Data bits: 8
Parity: None
Stop bits: 1
7. Click Apply.
The procedure for setting up Client Dialup Networking
from Windows 2000 is similar except that the
Operator-Assisted Dialing option must be selected from
the Advanced menu in the Network and Dial-up
Connections window.
133
Routine
Maintenance
6. Click Options and check the Operator assisted or
manual dial box.
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Technician’s Handbook
Setting up the remote connection
1. In the Dial-up Connections window, double-click the
icon for the 3100 ICP system connection.
2. Place a call to the 3100 ICP system attendant
through a standard phone that is connected to the
modem.
3. When the voice mail auto attendant answers, transfer
your call to extension 1200 (system modem).
4. After your call has been transferred, click Connect.
5. Launch the required tool from the login page.
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Routine maintenance
Changing extensions or set types
Changing an extension number or set type
If you change the extension number of an IP phone or
change the set type, you must commit the database and
then reset the phone for the change to take immediate
effect. Otherwise, the system will automatically update
the phone with the new extension number or set type
within approximately 10 minutes.
Reset the phone
To reset the IP phone manually, disconnect the LAN
cable (and the power adapter, if present) from the IP
phone. Then reconnect.
To reset an IP phone from the system tool.
1. Choose System, click IP Sets Powering and then
click Change.
2. Change the power source for the IP phone.
3. Click Save.
4. Click Change again and return the IP phone to the
original setting
Routine
Maintenance
5. Click Save.
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Technician’s Handbook
Creating a user guide
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<1>
To create user guides
1. Launch the group administration tool. See Launching
the tools (p. 113).
2. Choose I want to Create User Guide.
3. Follow the onscreen instructions.
136
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Routine maintenance
Using a database template
You can use database templates to reduce the amount of
time that it takes to program a system. A database
template is simply a copy of an existing database that
you can load into a new system through the quick
installation tool.
If you are installing multiple systems that have similar
settings you can program a system with these settings
and save it as a template for other systems.
Database templates are hardware independent.
Save a database template
1. Identify the common characteristics that you want to
save in the template (for example, numbering plan,
extension group programming, or line configuration
settings).
2. Program a system database with these common
characteristics.
3. In the system tool, choose System from the Selection
menu.
4. Click Database Template and then click Save.
6. Click Save As, navigate to a folder on your PC, and
designate a file. Click Save.
7. Click Make Template.
“Operation Successful” appears when the template
has been copied to the specified folder.
137
Routine
Maintenance
5. Read the instructions and click Proceed.
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Technician’s Handbook
Loading a database template
1. Take the database template to site on your laptop.
2. When you run the quick configuration tool during the
installation procedure, choose to replace the existing
default database with your template database.
3. Complete programming as required.
Maintenance tips
138
•
Keep regular backups.
•
Ensure that you record your SysID module number
and your MOSS number.
•
Record all passwords.
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Chapter 6
Troubleshooting and
Repair
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Technician’s Handbook
140
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Troubleshooting and Repair
Checking the system LEDs
Table 4: System LEDs states
;43
Power
ONS
2^[^da
Green
System is powered up and running
Running bootrom VX Works
On steady
Running diagnostics
Red
On steady
Error condition with diagnostics
Red and
Amber
Alternating
Red and
Amber
System is updating the bootrom and MMC
firmware and IP expansion unit
DO NOT POWER DOWN WHILE POWER
LED IS ALTERNATING RED AND AMBER.
Green
Green
Green
Green
Green
Off
Idle
On
In use
Flashing
Incoming call
Off
Idle
On
Busy
Off
Line inactive
On
Line active
Off
Circuit is idle
On
Circuit is busy
Off
Link inactive
Flashing
Transmitting data
Off
Link speed 10 MB/s
Flashing
Link speed 100 MB/s
Off
Link inactive
Flashing
Transmitting data
Off
Link speed 10 MB/s
Flashing
Link speed 100 MB/s
Troubleshooting
and Repair
Amber
BRI
(UK only)
System is starting up Board Support Package (BSP)
On steady
Amber
Ethernet
Flashing
Flashing
Amber
Ethernet
WAN
<TP]X]V
System is powered off
Amber
Amber
LS/CLASS
BcPcT
Off
Off
Flashing
Amber
Off
Flashing
141
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Technician’s Handbook
Checking the logs
You can view maintenance and software logs through the
system tool.
1. Launch the system tool. See Launching the tools (p.
113).
2. Choose Diagnostics from the Selection menu.
3. Click Logs and then click All Logs.
4. Go to the very last page to view the most recent log
messages.
–
In the Go to: field, select Page #
–
In the Value field, enter the last page number
–
Click Go.
5. Check the list for Error or Warning logs.
142
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Troubleshooting and Repair
Viewing diagnostics
Starting a diagnostic session
To start up a local diagnostic session, you need
•
one Male “DB9 to RJ45” connector
•
one Female “DB9 to RJ45” connector
•
one CAT5 patch cord
•
communication application (such as Hyperterminal)
•
a computer or laptop.
Since you are running a local diagnostic session you do
not require a modem. In the following procedure,
Hyperterminal is the communications application.
1. Connect an RS-232 cable between the lower DB9
port on the front panel of the controller and a COM
port on a laptop or computer.
2. From the Start menu, click Programming, click
Accessories, click Communications, and then click
Hyperterminal.
3. In the Hyperterminal folder, double-click
Hypertrm.exe.
4. Enter a name for the connection (for example,
MN3100) and click OK. The Connect To window
opens.
6. Set the port settings to
Bits per second: 9600
Data Bits: 8
Priority: None
143
Troubleshooting
and Repair
5. In the Connect using field, select the COM port of the
PC that you have connected to the 3100 ICP system
(for example, “Direct to COM1). Click OK.
3100 Hand.bk Page 144 Monday, August 19, 2002 8:49 PM
Technician’s Handbook
Stop Bits: 1
Flow Control: None
7. Click OK.
8. Type the Enter key to display the Hyperterminal
prompt.
Checking the bootup script
To check the bootup script
1. With the Hyperterminal application connected and
running, power down the 3100 ICP system and then
power it on again.
2. Watch the data that appears in the Hyperterminal
window during bootup
144
–
Database errors in the bootup script indicate that
you need to perform a database restore. See
Restoring the database/software and database
(p. 154).
–
Errors referencing ATA1 indicate a faulty hard
drive. See Replacing a faulty hard disk (p. 160).
–
Errors referencing ATA0 indicate a faulty flash.
See Replacing the flash card (p. 158).
3100 Hand.bk Page 145 Monday, August 19, 2002 8:49 PM
Troubleshooting and Repair
Line troubleshooting
Table 5: Line troubleshooting
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2^aaTRcXeTPRcX^]b
Unable to make any
external calls or frequently unable to access
an external line.
Service provider has
not connected lines.
Unplug the cable that connects the
line service to line port on the system.
Connect a standard analog phone
or telephone test phone and plug it
directly into the service providers
line socket.
Listen for dial tone. Check each
line. If dial tone isn’t present on all
lines contact your service provider.
Faulty programming.
Verify that your line groups (outgoing lines), hunt maps (outgoing
lines), and ring maps (incoming
lines) are programmed correctly.
See Program the incoming access
(ring maps) (p. 51).
Faulty line module.
Power down the system. Remove
and replace the suspect line module.
See Installing option modules (p.
119).
Troubleshooting
and Repair
145
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Technician’s Handbook
IP phone troubleshooting
Table 6: IP phone troubleshooting
Bh\_c^\
Unable to place calls
from an IP phone.
Phone is unresponsive.
?a^QPQ[TRPdbT
2^aaTRcXeTPRcX^]
Phone is locked up.
If an IP phone appears to be
locked up and is displaying “Mitel
Networks”, reset the phone by
disconnecting it and then reconnecting it.
Faulty programming.
Verify that your number plan,
extension groups, and secondary
number plan are programmed
correctly.
See Modify the extensions and
system directory (p. 50).
146
Faulty phone.
Replace the phone with a known
working phone of the same
model to determine if the phone
is faulty.
Faulty connection through
the network.
Verify that you can ping the set. If
not, check the connections
between the 3100 ICP
layer-switch 2 port and the desktop drop including patch panel
connections.
Incorrect NIC card settings.
Check the LAN devices (PC NIC
cards, switches, 3100 ICP switch
settings and Ethernet ports all
have the same Ethernet settings
(auto-sensing, 10BaseT or
100BaseT).
3100 Hand.bk Page 147 Monday, August 19, 2002 8:49 PM
Troubleshooting and Repair
Analog phone troubleshooting
Table 7: Analog phone troubleshooting
Bh\_c^\
Unable to place calls
from an analog phone.
?a^QPQ[TRPdbT
2^aaTRcXeTPRcX^]
Faulty connection at the
extension.
Ensure that the line cord is properly connected to the wall and
phone sockets.
Replace the line cord.
Faulty programming.
Verify that your number plan,
extension groups, and secondary number plan are programmed correctly.
See Modify the extensions and
system directory (p. 50).
Replace the phone with a known
working phone of the same
model to determine if the phone
is faulty.
Faulty connections at
patch panel.
Check the cable that connects
the 3100 ICP ONS port to the
patch panel. Check the terminations.
Faulty wiring between
system and phone.
Disconnect the extension cable
from the ONS port on the system and plug a phone directly
into the ONS port.
If the phone works when it is
connected directly to the ONS
port, check the building wiring,
especially for loose connections
at terminations.
Faulty ONS module or
faulty controller (two
ONS ports are provided
by the control board in
the system controller)
Power down the system. If the
faulty ports are on an ONS module, remove and replace the
suspect ONS module. See
Installing option modules (p.
119).
If the ONS ports are on the controller, replace the controller.
147
Troubleshooting
and Repair
Faulty phone.
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Technician’s Handbook
System troubleshooting
Table 8: System troubleshooting
Bh\_c^\
?a^QPQ[TRPdbT
2^aaTRcXeTPRcX^]
You receive Database Error
messages while entering data
in the system tool.
Incorrect version of
Internet Explorer.
Obtain required version of
Internet Explorer. See PC
requirements (p. 22).
Data that you know you have
saved in a page of the system
tool disappears. Data in the
tools is not appearing correctly.
Corrupted database.
See Fixing database or software corruption (p. 153).
You cannot enter data in a
field.
The user interface of the tool
behaves erratically.
Data element already
exists (for example,
MAC address already
in form).
Database errors appear in the
bootup script. See Viewing
diagnostics (p. 143).
Read/Write errors to ATA1
(hard disk) appear in the
bootup script. See Viewing
diagnostics (p. 143) and
Checking the bootup script (p.
144).
Hard disk failure.
Voice mail isn’t working
Voice mail ports are
locked up.
Dial the voice mail ports
directly (1048 to 1051).
Reboot the system. See
Rebooting the system (p.
116).
Improper programming.
Check voice mail programming. See Programming the
voice mail settings (p. 61)
Replace the hard disk. See
Replacing a faulty hard disk
(p. 160).
Hard disk failure.
Software upgrade to the next
version fails.
148
Reformat the hard disk.
Software problem.
Replace the hard disk. See
Replacing a faulty hard disk
(p. 160).
See Restoring the system with
previous software (p. 155).
3100 Hand.bk Page 149 Monday, August 19, 2002 8:49 PM
Troubleshooting and Repair
Network troubleshooting
Check network connectivity after each corrective action.
Table 9: Network troubleshooting
Bh\_c^\
Layer-2 switch port LED
is off.
?a^QPQ[TRPdbT
2^aaTRcXeTPRcX^]
Faulty connection
between 3100 ICP
layer-2 switch port and
the patch panel
Check connection
Faulty connections
between PC and IP
phone.
Ensure cables are connected correctly. Refer to the installation
guide that was shipped with the IP
Phone.
Faulty cable.
Ensure that you are using a
straight through Ethernet cable
and not a cross-over cable.
Incorrect NIC card settings.
Check the LAN devices (PC NIC
cards, switches, 3100 ICP switch
settings and Ethernet ports all
have the same Ethernet settings
(auto-sensing, 10BaseT or
100BaseT).
Layer-2 switch port LED The computer has not
is on but there is no con- been assigned an IP
nectivity between the
address.
system and a computer
Set the network parameters of the
computer to “Automatically get an
IP address assigned” or to DHCP.
Layer-2 switch port LED Incorrect IP address
is on but there is no con- assigned to the comnectivity between the
puter.
system and a computer.
Run the winipcfg command
(WIN95/98) or the Ipconfig command (NT and Windows 2000) to
verify the IP address that is
assigned to your network interface
card (NIC) card.
Proxy settings for
Browser are incorrect.
Verify that your Browser has the
proper Proxy settings for your network.
Physical path to destination is faulty.
Check physical path using the
“tracert” command.
149
Troubleshooting
and Repair
Verify that you can ping the 3100
ICP and other devices that are on
the LAN from your PC.
3100 Hand.bk Page 150 Monday, August 19, 2002 8:49 PM
Technician’s Handbook
Using Windows networking commands
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•
IPConfig (WinNT only): Displays the TCP/IP-related
configuration of a host. Use the /all option with this
command to list a configuration report for all the host’s
interfaces, including any configured serial ports
(RAS).
•
Winipcfg (WIN 95/98): Provides the same function as
the IPConfig command for Windows 95/98
computers.
•
Ping: Allows you to verify IP-level connectivity. It
sends an echo request to a target IP address or host
name. You should first try pinging the IP address first.
If that succeeds, then try pinging the host name.
If pinging by address succeeds, but pinging by name
fails, the problem lies in name resolution, not network
connectivity.
•
150
Arp: Allows you to view the Address Resolution
Protocol cache. If two hosts on the same subnet
cannot ping each other successfully, run the
command Arp -a command on each computer to see
if the computers have the correct MAC addresses
listed for each other. You can use IPConfig to
determine a host's MAC address. If another host with
a duplicate IP address exists on the network, the ARP
cache may have had the MAC address for the other
computer placed in it. Use the Arp -d command to
delete an entry that may be incorrect. You can then
add the correct entry using the Arp -s command.
3100 Hand.bk Page 151 Monday, August 19, 2002 8:49 PM
Troubleshooting and Repair
•
Tracert: Allows you to view or modify the route table.
Tracert uses the IP TTL field and ICMP error
messages to determine the route from one host to
another through a network.
•
Route print: Displays a list of current routes known
by IP for the host.
•
Route add: Adds routes to the table.
•
Route delete: Removes routes from the table.
•
Netstat: displays protocol statistics and current
TCP/IP connections. Netstat -a displays all
connections. Netstat -r displays the route table and
any active connections. Netstat -e displays Ethernet
statistics.
Troubleshooting
and Repair
151
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Technician’s Handbook
Using VxWorks networking commands
I_eSQ^Q\c_ecUFhG_b[c^Udg_b[Y^WS_]]Q^Tcd_
XU\`i_eWQdXUb^Udg_b[Y^V_b]QdY_^Q^Tdb_eR\UcX__d
`b_R\U]cI_eSQ^U^dUbdXUV_\\_gY^WS_]]Q^Tc
dXb_eWXQTYQW^_cdYScUccY_^CUUCdQbdY^WQTYQW^_cdYS
cUccY_^`!$#
152
•
versionShow: Displays system software information
•
ifShow: Shows information about network interfaces
•
arpShow: Lists the ARP cache
•
arpFlush: Clears the ARP cache
•
routeShow: Lists the routing table
•
hostShow: Lists the DNS host table
•
reboot: Reboots the 3100 ICP system
•
ppp_tune “idle_timeout 180”: Changes the default
WAN line idle timeout (in seconds)
•
inetstatShow: Shows all Internet protocol sockets
•
tcpstatShow: Shows statistics for IP
•
icmpstatShow: Shows statistics for ICMP
•
arptabShow: Shows a list of known ARP entries
•
dhcp_server_debug=1: Enables debug port that is
located on the 3100 ICP front panel.
•
dhcp_server_debug=0: Disables debug port that is
located on the 3100 ICP front panel.
3100 Hand.bk Page 153 Monday, August 19, 2002 8:49 PM
Troubleshooting and Repair
Fixing database or software corruption
Software or database corruption can occur due to user
error, hardware failure, or software problems. Use the
following procedures to fix database or software
corruption.
Database restore: If the database is faulty and the
information that is programmed in the database is
corrupted, restore the database from the latest database
backup.
Software and database restore: If a database restore
does not return the system to normal operation, perform
a software and database restore from the latest software
and database backup. You would also perform a
software and database restore after replacing a faulty
hard drive.
Previous software and database restore: During an
upgrade, the system automatically takes a backup of the
system software and database and places it on the hard
drive. If a software upgrade fails, you can go back to the
previous version of software and database by using the
CONFIG and RESET switches. See Restoring the
system with previous software (p. 155).
Factory software and database restore: You can
restore the factory version of the software and database
using the CONFIG and RESET switches. See Restoring
the system with the factory software (p. 156).
Voice mail data restore: If you need to recover a voice
mail database, perform a voice mail data restore.
153
Troubleshooting
and Repair
If you have changed the default DNS Host name of the
system, you must reprogram it after a database restore.
3100 Hand.bk Page 154 Monday, August 19, 2002 8:49 PM
Technician’s Handbook
Restoring the database/software and database
1. Launch the system tool. See Launching the tools (p.
113).
2. Choose System from the Selection menu.
3. Click Backup/Restore, click Database and
Software, and then click Restore.
4. Read the instructions and click Proceed.
5. Click Browse, navigate to the latest database backup
file (.maz) and click Open.
6. In the Restore table,
–
To restore a database select “Mitel Networks
3100 Databases”.
–
To restore both the software and database, select
“Mitel Networks 3100 Databases and Software”.
7. Click Do Restore.
8. The restore begins automatically and “Operation
Successful” appears when the restore is complete. A
“database” restore takes approximately 2 to 5
minutes to complete. A “software and database”
restore takes approximately 1 to 2.5 hours to
complete. During the restore the system is
operational.
9. Click Reboot the 3100 ICP.
1VdUbQTQdQRQcUbUcd_bUdXUcicdU]dQ[Uc
Q``b_hY]QdU\i(]Y^edUcd_bUR__d1VdUbQ²c_VdgQbU
Q^TTQdQRQcU³bUcd_bUdXUcicdU]dQ[Uc
Q``b_hY]QdU\i$ ]Y^edUcd_bUR__d4ebY^WdXU
bUR__ddXUcicdU]Yc_ed_VcUbfYSU
10. After you perform a database restore, the DNS Host
name for the system reverts to the default “mn3100”.
Therefore, if you have changed the default DNS Host
name of the system, you must reprogram it.
154
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Troubleshooting and Repair
11. Through the system tool, check the corruption has
been corrected.
Restoring the system with previous software
This procedure overwrites the current version of the
database and software with a previous software version
and database. If you have not performed an upgrade of
the system since the initial installation, this procedure will
simply reboot the system. Before proceeding, ensure
that you have recent database backups available.
If you perform a software upgrade, and you experience
problems with the upgraded software, you can use this
procedure to restore the previous version.
1. Locate the CONFIG switch and RESET switch on the
front panel of the controller (see Figure 14).
2. Straighten out two paper clips.
3. While the Power LED is on solid green, press and
release the CONFIG switch once. The Power LED
begins flashing and then turns solid red.
4. After the Power LED is solid red, press and hold down
the CONFIG switch. Then, press and release the
RESET switch. The Power LED begins flashing red.
5. Release the CONFIG switch. (Do not press the
CONFIG switch again).
" ]Y^
DXUcicdU]bUR__dc9VQ^e`WbQTUXQcRUU^T_^U_^
dXUcicdU]YdR__dcgYdXdXU`bUfY_ecfUbcY_^_V
c_VdgQbUQ^TTQdQRQcU
7. Restore your latest database and software backup.
See Restoring the database/software and database
(p. 154).
155
Troubleshooting
and Repair
6. If you have purchased options since the initial install,
you must re-enable your options. See Enabling your
licensed options (p. 114).
3100 Hand.bk Page 156 Monday, August 19, 2002 8:49 PM
Technician’s Handbook
8. Restore your voice mail database. See Restoring
voice mail data (p. 157).
Restoring the system with the factory software
This procedure overwrites the current version of the
database and software with the factory version (Golden
image) of the software and database. Before proceeding,
ensure that you have recent database backups available.
1. Locate the CONFIG switch and the RESET switch on
the front panel of the controller (see Figure 14).
2. Straighten out two paper clips.
3. While the Power LED is on solid green, press and
release the CONFIG switch once. The Power LED
begins flashing and then turns solid red.
4. After the Power LED turns solid red, press and hold
down the CONFIG switch. Then, press and release
the RESET switch. The Power LED begins flashing
red.
5. Release the CONFIG switch. The Power LED begins
flashing amber.
6. Press and release the CONFIG switch again within 6
seconds.
" ]Y^
DXUcicdU]cXedcT_g^Q^TbUR__dcgYdXdXUVQSd_bi
fUbcY_^7_\TU^Y]QWU_Vc_VdgQbUQ^TTQdQRQcU
7. If you have purchased options since the initial install,
you must re-enable your options. See Enabling your
licensed options (p. 114).
8. Restore your latest database and software backup.
See Restoring the database/software and database
(p. 154).
9. Restore your voice mail database. See Restoring the
system with the factory software (p. 156)
156
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Troubleshooting and Repair
Restoring voice mail data
1. Launch the system tool. See Launching the tools (p.
113).
2. Choose System from the Selection menu.
3. Click Backup/Restore, click Voice Mail, and then
click Restore.
4. Read the instructions and click Proceed.
5. Click Browse, navigate to the latest voice mail
database backup file (.maz).
6. Select Restore Mitel 3100 Full Voicemail.
7. Click Do Restore. The voice mailbox programming,
greetings and messages are restored.
!%cUSc
%]Y^
DXUbUcd_bURUWY^cQed_]QdYSQ\\iQ^T²?`UbQdY_^
CeSSUccVe\³Q``UQbcgXU^dXUbUcd_bUYcS_]`\UdU
8. Call into the auto attendant and the voice mailboxes
to ensure that they are responding correctly.
Troubleshooting
and Repair
157
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Technician’s Handbook
Replacing faulty components
This section covers replacing the flash card and hard
disk. Refer to the Technical Manual for instructions on
how to replace other components.
Replacing the flash card
Obtain a replacement flash card from Mitel Networks
Corporation.
1. Ensure that you have a flash card backup available.
2. Power down the system. Powering down the system
(p. 117).
3. Attach an anti-static strap.
4. If your system has an expansion unit, disconnect the
up-link cable from the up-link card connector.
5. Remove the retaining screws and lift the top cover off
the controller.
6. Remove the existing compact flash card by carefully
pulling it from its socket on the controller board. The
location of the flash card is shown in the following
illustration.
158
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Troubleshooting and Repair
Figure 20: Flash card
7. Insert the replacement card. Ensure that the small lip
on the edge furthest from the connector faces down
towards the rear of the main unit, so that the card
mates correctly with the socket. Push it fully into the
socket.
8. Replace the controller cover.
9. Reconnect the uplink cable to the expansion unit.
10. Reconnect the power cord and switch the unit on.
11. Restore the database and software. See Restoring
the database/software and database (p. 154).
Troubleshooting
and Repair
159
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Technician’s Handbook
Replacing a faulty hard disk
Obtain a formatted hard disk from Mitel Networks
Corporation.
1. Ensure that you have a software and database backup available.
2. Power down the system. Powering down the system
(p. 117).
3. Attach an anti-static strap.
4. If your system has an expansion unit, disconnect the
up-link cable from the up-link card connector.
5. Remove the retaining screws and lift the cover away
from the controller.
6. If your system has an expansion unit, remove the
screws holding the up-link card. The position of the
up-link card is shown Figure 21.
Figure 21: Uplink card
160
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Troubleshooting and Repair
7. Carefully lift the up-link card away from the control
unit, disconnecting the connectors on the underside,
and at the same time guiding the connectors at the
rear through the opening in the casing.
8. Disconnect the power supply connector and the
ribbon cable from the hard disk.
Figure 22: Hard disk
9. Remove the hard disk mounting screws, two at the
top of the disk and two at the rear of the control unit
casing, and lift the hard disk away.
11. Refit the up-link card and connect the uplink cable, if
required.
12. Replace the cover.
161
Troubleshooting
and Repair
10. Install the new hard disk with the hard disk mounting
screws.
3100 Hand.bk Page 162 Monday, August 19, 2002 8:49 PM
Technician’s Handbook
13. Power up the system and restore your software and
database to the hard disk. See Restoring the
database/software and database (p. 154).
Field replaceable units
Table 10: FRU list
3TbRaX_cX^]
<PaZTcX]V?Pac=d\QTa
3100 ICP Controller
50000962
3100 ICP Expansion Up-link Card
50000965
3100 ICP Expansion Uplink Cable
50000966
3100 ICP SYSID Module
50000977
3100 ICP Hard Disk
50000978
3100 ICP Dual Modem
50000979
3100 ICP Quad Modem
50000980
NA-Specific Parts
3100 ICP Controller Power Cord (NA version)
50000967
3100 ICP Expansion Y-Power Cord (NA version)
50000968
3100 ICP 128 Mb Compact Flash, Release 2.3 (NA version)
50000969
UK- Specific Parts
3100 ICP Controller Power Cord (UK version)
50000990
3100 ICP Expansion Y-Power Cord (UK version)
50000991
3100 ICP 128 Mb Compact Flash, Release 2.3 (UK version)
162
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Troubleshooting and Repair
Troubleshooting tips
•
Always check the physical components, such as the
cables, NIC cards, wall jacks, hubs and switches
before you begin troubleshooting the network settings
(IP addresses, router configuration, gateway settings
and so forth).
•
Ensure that you have a physical connection between
the IP phone and/or computer and the layer-2 switch
port on the system before you begin troubleshooting
the network settings. If there is a physical connection
between the port and the network device, the LED for
the layer-2 switch port will be solid green.
Troubleshooting
and Repair
163
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Technician’s Handbook
164
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Appendix A
Default Database
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Technician’s Handbook
166
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Default Database
Default Database
•
Numbering plan
•
Numbering assignment
•
Analog set configuration
•
Analog line configuration
•
Class of service
•
Class of restriction
•
Timers
•
Feature access codes.
Refer to the Programming section of the Technical
Manual for descriptions of all the available parameters
and their defaults.
167
Default
Database
This appendix provides the defaults for the following
parameters
3100 Hand.bk Page 168 Monday, August 19, 2002 8:49 PM
Technician’s Handbook
Numbering plan
Table 11: Default numbering plan
3XVXc
=05d]RcX^]
D:5d]RcX^]
0
Attendant
Operator
1
Secondary: Extensions
Secondary: Extensions
2
Secondary: Groups
Secondary: Groups
3
Three-Party (Conference)
Three-Party (Conference)
4
Speed Call (Short Code)
Speed Call (Short Code)
5
Ring Back (when free)
Ring Back (when free)
6
User (Feature) Code
User (Feature) Code
7
Unpark
Unpark
8
Call Pickup (extension group)
Call Pickup (extension group)
9
Out Access (hunt lines)
Out Access (hunt lines)
*
Supervisor
Not applicable
Numbering assignment
The default number assignment is as follows:
•
1000 - 1023 for IP phones
•
1056 - 1059 for voice mail
•
1100 - 1109 for analog
•
1200 and 1210 for modem
•
1400 - 1449 for voice mail virtual extensions
•
1600 for analog services card pager
The default extension numbers for the IP phones are
assigned in the order that you connect the phones to the
system. The first IP phone that you connect to the system
is assigned as the administrator extension (ext 1000).
168
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Default Database
Analog set configuration
Device type:
Phone
•
Analog recall type:
Calibrated flash
•
Analog recall event:
Hold
•
External voice mail
No
•
Ext voice mail pre-dial digit No
•
Door intercom unit
No
•
Line length
SHORT (less
than 400 m)
Default
Database
•
Analog line configuration (NA)
•
Line protocol:
North American
•
Ring bridge period:
5.6 seconds
•
Dial tone detect:
Yes
•
Meter pulse detection
Disabled
•
Loop detection:
Enabled
•
Reverse polarity detection:
Disabled
•
DISA
No
•
Line flash type
Time break
recall 66 ms
•
Line flash digits
None
•
Impedance coefficient set
600 ohms
Restriction groups (extensions)
The extension restriction group determines the types of
external calls that an extension can make. The higher the
restriction group number, the lower the number of
restrictions:
169
3100 Hand.bk Page 170 Monday, August 19, 2002 8:49 PM
Technician’s Handbook
•
the default is Class of Service (COS) 6, that is, no
restrictions
•
an extension set at COS 0 cannot make outgoing
calls, except for Global Exceptions (for example,
emergency numbers).
•
The system can have five groups each with a
maximum of twenty exception strings per COS.
Table 12: Restriction groups
4gcT]bX^]2[Pbb^UBTaeXRT
ATbcaXRcX^]6a^d_b
4gcT]bX^]2>B
ATbcaXRcTSATbcaXRcX^]6a^d_b
0[[^fTS6a^d_
4gRT_cX^]b
6
No Restriction
5
5
5, 4, 3, 2, 1
4
5, 4
4, 3, 2, 1
3
5, 4, 3
3, 2, 1
2
5, 4, 3, 2
2, 1
1
5, 4, 3, 2, 1
1
0
Total Restriction except Global Exceptions
Timers
The Timers form consists of three pages. You must press
Next to see the next page of timers.
Table 13: Timer defaults
CX\Ta
3TUPd[c
<X]
<Pg
cUS_^Tc
cUS_^Tc
cUS_^Tc
Administrator
60
20
180
Abandon
60
10
600
Alarm Ring
60
10
255
Alarm Snooze
120
30
255
ALS70 DDI
8
1
20
170
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Default Database
Table 13: Timer defaults (continued)
3TUPd[c
<X]
<Pg
cUS_^Tc
cUS_^Tc
cUS_^Tc
Call Duration
10
1
60
Cyclic Ring
6 (NA)
20 (UK)
6
255
DID Group (NA)
DDI Group (UK)
120
10
255
DDI Answer (UK only)
30
10
255
Delay Hotline
10
0
255
Digit Timeout
5
5
30
DISA Answer
2
0
10
Disconnect Delay
2
1
10
Door Answer
30
20
180
Dummy DT (Limit Wait for Dial
Tone)
1
1
10
External Disconnect
120 minutes
10 minutes
240 minutes
ISDN Tone
1
0
30
LCCR DT (UK only)
4
1
10
Line DDI
1
1
20
Message Waiting
28 days
1 day
99 days
MF (DTMF) Blocking
5
1
30
No Answer
15
5
120
Revert (Recall)
60
20
255
Select (Ringer) Sound
10
10
30
Short Camp
23
20
180
Speech Connection
3
1
13
Store Abandon
255 (NA)
10 (UK)
60 (NA)
1 (UK)
255
System Abandon Timeout (Hold
Recall)
60
10
600
Transfer COS
60
20
255
Voice Mail
2
1
10
171
Default
Database
CX\Ta
3100 Hand.bk Page 172 Monday, August 19, 2002 8:49 PM
Technician’s Handbook
Feature access codes
The digit 6 is assigned in the flexible number plan as the
leading digit for feature access codes. To modify the
leading digit, see Review the numbering plan (p. 42).
Table 14: Default feature access codes
5TPcdaT
3TUPd[c
Account Codes
665
Alarm Calls
668
Alarm Call Cancel
669
Call Forward/Divert All (CFA) to an Extension
616
Call Forward/Divert All (CFA) to an Extension Group
607
Call Forward/Divert on No Answer or Busy (CFN/CFB) to an
Extension
620
Call Forward/Divert on No Answer or Busy (CFN/CFB) to an
Extension Group
605
Call Park Pick-up
660
Cancel Forwarding/Divert
617
Cancel Message Waiting
628
Date Change
656
Directed Call Pick-up
677
Directed Message Waiting
673
Do Not Disturb (DND)
619
Extension/Directed Paging
613
Extension Status Announcement
683
External Call Waiting
687
Follow Me
622
Follow Me (I’m Here)
626
Group Call Pick-Up
666
Identify Next Call Announcement
685
Last Call Cost Display/Announcement (UK only)
664
Last Call Duration Display
663
172
3100 Hand.bk Page 173 Monday, August 19, 2002 8:49 PM
Default Database
Table 14: Default feature access codes (continued)
Default
Database
5TPcdaT
3TUPd[c
Last Number Redial
600
Message Waiting
643
Night Service Pick-Up
633
PIN (Personal Identification Number) Codes
634
Recall on Lines
602
Remote Call Forward/External Divert
688
Ringing Pitch
651
Time and Date Announcement
684
Time Change
655
Who Am I? Indication
675
173
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Technician’s Handbook
174
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Appendix B
Reference
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Technician’s Handbook
176
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Reference
Call logging (SMDR) details
Table 15: Call logging definitions
Heading
Definition
Displays the record number for each log -- the Sequence
Number resets to 0 when record 998 is reached.
CODE
Displays a four-character code, which identifies the logged
event. Refer to Table for a list of these events.
EXT NO (Extension
Number)
The number of the extension, or the line in the case of a
tandem-switched calls that originated the call.
For tandem switching, the line number is preceded with:
L for analog line.
ACC COD (Account
Code)
The Account Code, if any, assigned to the call by the
extension user. If Account Code 000 is selected, the last four
digits of the external number (in the Dialed Digits column) are
replaced with xxxx. Refer to Account Codes (in the Technical
Manual) for more information.
TIME
The time, in 24-hour format, that the record was printed.
RX FROM (Received
From)
The extension that the call was transferred from.
TX TO (Transferred
To)
The extension that the call was transferred to.
DURATION:
Displays the duration of the call. If the duration is less than 100
hours, the time is given in hours, minutes and seconds. If the
duration is in excess of 100 hours, the time is given in hours
and minutes. If the call is in excess of 10,000 hours or if the
system clock was reset during the call, "RANGE " is displayed
in the column.
LN NO (Line Number)
Displays the line number used during the call.
The line number is preceded with 0 for an unallocated line; a
space for an analog line.
DIALED DIGITS
Displays the digits dialed for a line or the target extension
number for an internal call. If Account Code 000 is selected,
the last four digits of the external number are replaced with
"xxxx". Refer to Account Codes (in the Technical
Documentation) for more information.
177
Reference
SEQ No. (Sequence
Number)
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Technician’s Handbook
Table 16: Event Codes
Code
Event type
ABND
Incoming external call abandoned before being answered
ALRM
Alarm call set, cancelled, answered or unanswered
ANSW
Answered incoming external call
BARR
Barred outgoing external call
CCLK
The system’s internal time was changed during the call
CDCL
Cyclic data call cleared
DATE
The system’s internal date was changed during the call
DTIN
Data call initiated
DTTR
Data call terminated
EXIC
Incoming external call
EXOG
Outgoing external call
HDIN
External call put on hold
HREC
External call recovered from hold
ICIN
Incoming external call ringing initiated
ININ
Internal call initiated
INTR
Internal call
NSER
Night Service 1 or 2 enabled or disabled
OGIN
Outgoing call initiated
RING
Extension or Extension Group is ringing
SELT
A selective logging message
SERV
Service access
STOP
Extension user abandoned a call attempt
TDEM
Tandem switched call
178
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Reference
Ring Map handling
For systems installed in the UK
•
LS/Class lines are non-DDI only
•
BRI lines can be DDI or non-DDI.
Reference
Table 17: Standard ring map operation
Standard ringmap operation for
DID (NA) and non-DDI only lines (UK)
Entry 1
Entry 2
Entry 3
Overflow
Ext
-
-
N/A
Rings the single extension and never goes to
the attendant (backstop).
Stan
-
-
-
Rings all members of the Standard Group and
never goes to the attendant (backstop).
-
1) Rings the first element of the group.
2) Cyclic ring timer causes the call to move to
next member of group (until all members have
been rung).
3) Cyclic Ring Timer expires when ringing last
member and call rings ALL members of the
group.
4) Cyclic Ring Timer expires when ringing ALL
members so the call goes to the backstop until
backstop timer expires.
Ext
Rings the All members of the Standard Group
Cyclic Ring Timer Expires Call moves to the
Overflow Extension
Cyclic Ring Timer Expires Call Moves to
backstop
Stan
Rings the All members of the Standard Group
Cyclic Ring Timer Expires Call moves to ring
All members of Overflow Standard Group
Cyclic Ring Timer Expires Call Moves to
backstop
Mov
Stan
Stan
-
-
-
-
-
-
Call progression
179
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Technician’s Handbook
Table 17: Standard ring map operation (continued)
Standard ringmap operation for
DID (NA) and non-DDI only lines (UK)
Entry 1
Mov
Stan
Mov
180
Entry 2
-
-
-
Entry 3
-
-
-
Overflow
Call progression
Stan
Rings the first member of the Moving Group
Cyclic Ring Timer Expires Call moves to next
element in Group. This repeats till reaches the
last element in Group.
Cyclic Ring Timer Expires; Rings all elements
in group.
Cyclic Ring Timer Expires; Rings all members
of Standard Overflow Group
Cyclic Ring Timer Expires; Rings backstop.
Mov
Rings the All members of the Standard Group
Cyclic Ring Timer Expires Call moves to ring
first member of Overflow Group
Cyclic Ring Timer Expires; Call moves to next
element of Overflow Group. This repeats till
the last element is reached.
Cyclic ring Timer Expires; All elements of
Overflow Group are rung.
Cyclic Ring Timer Expires. Rings backstop.
Mov
Rings the First member of the Moving Group
Cyclic Ring Timer Expires; Call moves to next
element of Group. This repeats till the last
element is reached.
Cyclic Ring Timer Expires; All elements in
Group are rung.
Cyclic Ring Timer Expires; Call moves to first
element of the Overflow Group.
Cyclic Ring Timer Expires; Call moves to next
element of Overflow Group. This repeats till
the last element is reached.
Cyclic ring Timer Expires; All elements of
Overflow Group are rung.
Cyclic Ring Timer Expires. Rings backstop.
3100 Hand.bk Page 181 Monday, August 19, 2002 8:49 PM
Reference
Table 17: Standard ring map operation (continued)
Standard ringmap operation for
DID (NA) and non-DDI only lines (UK)
Entry 1
Entry 2
Entry 3
Overflow
Call progression
-
-
Ext
Ext
Stan
-
N/A
Call Rings Single Extension and All members
of the Standard Group. The Call will never go
to the attendant (backstop).
Ext
Mov
-
N/A
Call rings the Extension plus the first element
of the Group
Cyclic Ring Timer Expires; Single Extension
continues to ring plus the next element in the
Group. This continues till the last element in
the Group is rung.
Cyclic Ring Timer Expires; Call Rings Single
Extension and All members of the Group.
Cyclic ring Timer Expires; Call moves to
attendant (backstop).
Ext
Ext
-
N/A
Call Rings both Extensions and will never go
to the attendant (backstop).
Ext
Stan
Ext
N/A
Call Rings both extensions and all elements in
the Standard Group. Call will never go to the
attendant (backstop).
Stan
Ext
Stan
N/A
Call Rings All elements in both groups and
Extension. The call will never go to the
attendant (backstop).
Stan
Stan
Stan
N/A
All elements in all three groups ring. Call will
never go to the attendant (backstop).
Ext
Ext
Ext
N/A
All Three Extensions will ring. Call will never
go to the attendant (backstop).
181
Reference
Mov
Rings the First member of the Moving Group
Cyclic Ring Timer Expires; Call moves to next
element of Group. This repeats till the last
element is reached.
Cyclic Ring Timer Expires; All elements in
Group are rung.
Cyclic Ring Timer Expires; Call moves to
Overflow Extension.
Cyclic Ring Timer Expires Call moves to
attendant (backstop).
3100 Hand.bk Page 182 Monday, August 19, 2002 8:49 PM
Technician’s Handbook
Table 17: Standard ring map operation (continued)
Standard ringmap operation for
DID (NA) and non-DDI only lines (UK)
Entry 1
Ext
Mov
Mov
Mov
182
Entry 2
Mov
Ext
Stan
Mov
Entry 3
Ext
Mov
Mov
Mov
Overflow
Call progression
N/A
Call rings both Extensions and the first
element of the moving group.
Cyclic Ring Timer Expires; Both extensions
continue to Ring while next element of the
moving group starts to ring. This continues
until the last element of the group rings.
Cyclic Ring Timer Expires; Both Extensions
ring as well as all the elements of the group.
Cyclic Ring Timer Expires; Call moves to
attendant (backstop).
N/A
The first extension of both groups and the
single extension ring.
Cyclic Ring Timer Expires; Single Extension
continues to ring and next element of Groups
ring. This continues till last member of Groups
ring. (NOTE IF groups are different size the
smaller Group will wait at the ring all state until
the larger group completes its cycle)
Cyclic Ring Timer Expires; Single Extension
and All elements of both Groups Ring.
Cyclic Ring Timer Expires Call moves to
(attendant) backstop.
N/A
The first element of both Moving Groups and
All members of the Standard Group Ring.
Cyclic Ring Timer Expires; Standard Group
Continues to Ring. Moving Groups move to
next element; This continues till the last
element is rung
Cyclic Ring Timers Expires; All elements of All
Groups Ring.
Cyclic Ring Timer Expires; Call moves to
attendant (backstop).
N/A
First Element of all groups Ring.
Moving Groups move to next element; This
continues till the last element is rung.
Cyclic Ring Timers Expires; All elements of All
Groups Ring.
Cyclic Ring Timer Expires; Call moves to
attendant (backstop).
3100 Hand.bk Page 183 Monday, August 19, 2002 8:49 PM
Reference
The Overflow Element of a Group will only be activated if
it is the only element in the ring map, otherwise it will only
ring the normal elements of the group. Moving Groups
(MOV) refer to both Cyclic and Moving as the only
difference in behavior is the selection of the start point.
Table 18: Cyclic ring map operation
Entry 1
Entry 2
Entry 3
Overflow
Ext
-
-
N/A
Rings the single extension until the Cyclic ring
Timer Expires when the call goes to attendant
(backstop).
Stan
-
-
-
Rings all members of the Standard Group.
When the Cyclic Ring Timer Expires the call
goes to attendant (backstop).
Mov
-
-
-
As Described for Standard Ring Map
Stan
-
-
Ext
As Described for Standard Ring Map
Stan
-
-
Stan
As Described for Standard Ring Map
Mov
-
-
Stan
As Described for Standard Ring Map
Stan
-
-
Mov
As Described for Standard Ring Map
Mov
-
-
Mov
As Described for Standard Ring Map
Mov
-
-
Ext
As Described for Standard Ring Map
N/A
Call Rings Single Extension
Cyclic ring Timer Expires : Call moves to ring
All members of the Standard Group.
Cyclic ring Timer Expires; Call moves to
attendant (backstop).
Ext
Stan
-
Call progression
183
Reference
Cyclic ring map operation for
DID (NA) and non-DDI only lines (UK)
3100 Hand.bk Page 184 Monday, August 19, 2002 8:49 PM
Technician’s Handbook
Table 18: Cyclic ring map operation (continued)
Cyclic ring map operation for
DID (NA) and non-DDI only lines (UK)
Entry 1
Ext
Ext
Ext
Stan
Stan
184
Entry 2
Mov
Ext
Stan
Ext
Stan
Entry 3
-
-
Ext
Stan
Stan
Overflow
Call progression
N/A
Call rings the Single Extension
Cyclic Ring Timer Expires; Call moves to first
element of Moving Group
Cyclic Ring Timer Expires; Call moves to Next
element in the Group. This continues till the
last element in the Group is rung.
Cyclic Ring Timer Expires; Call Rings All
members of the Group.
Cyclic ring Timer Expires; Call moves to
attendant (backstop).
N/A
Call Rings First Extension
Cyclic Ring Timer Expires; Call moves to
Second Extension
Cyclic Ring Timer Expires; Call moves to
attendant (backstop).
N/A
Call Rings First Extension
Cyclic Ring Timer Expires; Call moves to Ring
All members of Standard Group.
Cyclic Ring Timer Expires; Call moves to
Second Extension
Cyclic Ring Timer Expires; Call moves to
attendant (backstop).
N/A
Call Rings All elements in first group
Cyclic Ring Timer Expires; Call moves to
Single Extension
Cyclic Ring Timer Expires; Call moves to ring
All members of Second Group
Cyclic Ring Timer Expires; Call moves to
attendant (backstop).
N/A
Call Rings All elements of First Group
Cyclic Ring Timer Expires; Call moves to All
members of Second Group
Cyclic Ring Timer Expires; Call moves to All
members of Third Group
Cyclic Ring Timer Expires; Call goes to
attendant (backstop).
3100 Hand.bk Page 185 Monday, August 19, 2002 8:49 PM
Reference
Table 18: Cyclic ring map operation (continued)
Cyclic ring map operation for
DID (NA) and non-DDI only lines (UK)
Entry 1
Ext
Mov
Ext
Mov
Ext
Entry 3
Ext
Ext
Mov
Overflow
Call progression
N/A
Call Rings First Extension
Cyclic Ring Timer Expires; Call moves to
Second Extension
Cyclic Ring Timer Expires; Call moves to
Third Extension
Cyclic Ring Timer Expires; Call goes to
attendant (backstop).
N/A
Call Rings first Extension
Cyclic Ring Timer Expires; Call moves to First
member of moving group.
Cyclic Ring Timer Expires; Call moves to Next
element in the moving group This repeats until
the last element in the group is found.
Cyclic Ring Timer Expires; Call rings All
members of the Group
Cyclic Ring Timer Expires; Call rings second
extension
Cyclic Ring Timer Expires; Call Rings
attendant (backstop).
N/A
Call rings first element of first moving group
Cyclic Ring Timer Expires; Call moves to Next
element in the moving group This repeats until
the last element in the group is found.
Cyclic Ring Timer Expires; Call Rings All
members of Group
Cyclic Ring Timer Expires; Call moves to
Extension
Cyclic Ring Timer Expires; Call moves to first
element of second moving group.
Cyclic Ring Timer Expires; Call moves to Next
element in the moving group This repeats until
the last element in the group is found.
Cyclic Ring Timer Expires; Call Rings All
members of Group
Cyclic Ring Timer Expires; Call Rings
attendant (backstop).
185
Reference
Ext
Entry 2
3100 Hand.bk Page 186 Monday, August 19, 2002 8:49 PM
Technician’s Handbook
Table 18: Cyclic ring map operation (continued)
Cyclic ring map operation for
DID (NA) and non-DDI only lines (UK)
Entry 1
Mov
Mov
186
Entry 2
Stan
Mov
Entry 3
Mov
Mov
Overflow
Call progression
N/A
Call rings first element of first moving group
Cyclic Ring Timer Expires; Call moves to Next
element in the moving group This repeats until
the last element in the group is found.
Cyclic Ring Timer Expires; Call Rings All
members of Group
Cyclic Ring Timer Expires; Call rings All
members of Standard Group
Cyclic Ring Timer Expires; Call moves to first
element of second moving group.
Cyclic Ring Timer Expires; Call moves to Next
element in the moving group This repeats until
the last element in the group is found.
Cyclic Ring Timer Expires; Call Rings All
members of Group
Cyclic Ring Timer Expires; Call Rings
attendant (backstop).
N/A
Call rings first element of first moving group
Cyclic Ring Timer Expires; Call moves to Next
element in the moving group This repeats until
the last element in the group is found.
Cyclic Ring Timer Expires; Call Rings All
members of Group
Cyclic Ring Timer Expires; Call moves to first
element of second moving group.
Cyclic Ring Timer Expires; Call moves to Next
element in the moving group This repeats until
the last element in the group is found.
Cyclic Ring Timer Expires; Call Rings All
members of Second Group
Cyclic Ring Timer Expires; Call moves to first
element of Third moving group.
Cyclic Ring Timer Expires; Call moves to Next
element in the moving group This repeats until
the last element in the group is found.
Cyclic Ring Timer Expires; Call Rings All
members of Group
Cyclic Ring Timer Expires; Call Rings
attendant (backstop).
3100 Hand.bk Page 187 Monday, August 19, 2002 8:49 PM
Reference
Table 19: DID (NA) and DDI (UK) operation
Target
Overflow
Call progression
N/A
Stan
None
Call Presented to All elements in Group.
DDI Group Timer Expires Call goes to Extension Group 0.
Stan
Ext
Call Presented to All Elements in Group
Cyclic Ring Timer Expires; Call moves to Overflow Extension
Cyclic Ring Timer Expires; Call moves to Extension Group 0
Stan
Call presented to All Elements in Group
Cyclic Ring Timer Expires; Call moves to All elements of Overflow
Group
Cyclic Ring Timer Expires; Call moves to Extension Group 0
Mov
Call presented to All elements in Group
Cyclic Ring Timer Expires; Call moves to first element in Overflow
Group
Cyclic Ring Timer Expires; Call moves to next element in Group.
This is repeated till the last element in the group is rung.
Cyclic Ring Timer Expires; Call rings all elements in Group
Cyclic Ring Timer Expires; Call moves to Extension Group 0
None
Call rings first element in Group
Cyclic Ring Timer Expires; Call moves to next element in Group.
This is repeated till the last element in the group is rung.
Cyclic Ring Timer Expires; Call rings all elements in Group
Cyclic Ring Timer Expires; Call moves to Extension Group 0
Ext
Call rings first element in Group
Cyclic Ring Timer Expires; Call moves to next element in Group.
This is repeated till the last element in the group is rung.
Cyclic Ring Timer Expires; Call rings all elements in Group
Cyclic Ring Timer Expires; Call moves to Overflow Extension
Cyclic Ring Timer Expires; Call moves to Extension Group 0
Stan
Call rings first element in Group
Cyclic Ring Timer Expires; Call moves to next element in Group.
This is repeated till the last element in the group is rung.
Cyclic Ring Timer Expires; Call rings all elements in Group
Cyclic Ring Timer Expires; Call moves to ring All elements of
Overflow Group
Cyclic Ring Timer Expires; Call moves to Extension Group 0
Stan
Stan
Mov
Mov
Mov
187
Reference
Ext
Call Presented to Extension;
DDI Answer Timer expires Call goes to Extension Group 0.
3100 Hand.bk Page 188 Monday, August 19, 2002 8:49 PM
Technician’s Handbook
Table 19: DID (NA) and DDI (UK) operation (continued)
Target
Mov
Overflow
Mov
Call progression
Call rings first element in Group
Cyclic Ring Timer Expires; Call moves to next element in Group.
This is repeated till the last element in the group is rung.
Cyclic Ring Timer Expires; Call rings all elements in Group
Cyclic Ring Timer Expires; Call moves to first element in Overflow
Group
Cyclic Ring Timer Expires; Call moves to next element in Group.
This is repeated till the last element in the group is rung.
Cyclic Ring Timer Expires; Call rings all elements in Group
Cyclic Ring Timer Expires; Call moves to Extension Group 0
For all the situations where Extension Group 0 is used
the call should go to the attendant (backstop) if there is
no Extension Group 0 defined.
188
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Reference
Controller card connectors
Reference
Figure 23: Controller card components and connectors
189
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Technician’s Handbook
Port pinouts
Table 20: Serial port pinouts
Pin number
Signal name
Abbreviation
1
Data Carrier Detect
DCD
2
Receive Data
RXD
3
Transmit Data
TXD
4
Data Terminal Ready
DTR
5
Ground
GND
6
Data Set Ready
DSR
7
Request to Send
RTS
8
Clear to Send
CTS
9
Ring Indication
RI
The upper controller serial port supports call logging
(SMDR); the lower serial port supports and diagnostics
and maintenance functions. The ports default to
190
•
9600 bits/s
•
8 data bits
•
no parity bit
•
1 stop bit.
3100 Hand.bk Page 191 Monday, August 19, 2002 8:49 PM
Reference
Table 21: ONS ports
External signal
Interface position
Port 1, Pin 5
Ring (B-wire) 1
Port 1, Pin 4
Tip 2 (A-wire)
Port 2, Pin 5
Ring (B-wire) 2
Port 2, Pin 4
Reference
Tip (A-wire) 1
Table 22: Ethernet ports
Signal
Pin number
Tx+
3
Tx-
6
Rx+
1
Rx-
2
Table 23: Ethernet WAN port
Signal
Pin number
Tx+
1
Tx-
2
Rx+
3
Rx-
6
Table 24: Quad LS/CLASS Line Interface (on controller card)
Signal
Pin number
Tip (A-wire)
3
Ring (B-wire)
4
191
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Technician’s Handbook
Table 25: Analog services module
Port
Port 1
(ONS)
Port 2
(ONS)
Port 3
(ONS)
Port 4
(ONS or Door Relay)
192
Pin number
Signal
1 and 2
Isolated relay contacts for controlling external
equipment
3
Not used
4 and 5
Bi-directional speech pair
6
Not used
7 and 8
Unassigned input - normally open circuit
1-3
Not used
4
Ring (B-wire)
5
Tip (A-wire)
6-8
Not used
1-3
Not used
4
Ring (B-wire)
5
Tip (A-wire)
6-8
Not used
1 and 2
Isolated relay contacts for controlling a door
lock solenoid
3
Not used
4
Ring (B-wire)
5
Tip (A-wire)
6
Not used
7 and 8
Isolated relay contacts for controlling an
externally-powered door phone
3100 Hand.bk Page 193 Monday, August 19, 2002 8:49 PM
Reference
Table 26: ONS module pinouts
Signal
Pin number
Ring (B-wire)
4
Tip (A-wire)
5
Reference
Table 27: LS/CLASS module
Pin number
Signal
1 to 3
No connection
4
Ring (B-wire)
5
Tip (A-wire)
6 to 8
No connection
The Tip (A-wire) and Ring (B-wire) pair carry speech
signals at voltages between 0 and -120 V dc.
193
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Technician’s Handbook
Line protocols
Line protocols have the following behaviors:
Unguarded Clear: Similar to a standard home telephone
where the person handling the call is expected to either
•
hang up before the other party does, or
•
hang up after hearing dial tone or reorder tone (after
the other party hangs up).
Guarded Clear: Not supported on the current hardware.
CTR.21: Same as Guarded Clear, but allows for spurious
line breaks on initial connection.
North American: Release if a break of at least 500 ms
occurs in the line current.
Disconnect Clear: Release if a line break of at least 455
ms occurs in the line current.
The main difference between the North American line
protocol and the Disconnect Clear line protocol is the
behavior when a line break occurs.
North American protocol does not break the loop and
waits to see if the current returns. Disconnect Clear
protocol waits 60 ms before breaking the outgoing loop to
acknowledge the clear attempt. After a further 395 ms, it
reconnects the loop to check if the current has returned.
If not, it clears the loop.
194
3100 Hand.bk Page 195 Monday, August 19, 2002 8:49 PM
Reference
Cable pinouts
A9#$c^31(0SP_cTa
(
6B?>DF95G?6B:$%@?BD
NORMAL MALE OR
FEMALE
RJ45 - DB9
1
2
ORANGE
3
4
5
Reference
!
BLUE
BLACK
RED
GREEN
Figure 24: RS-232 serial cable adapter
!
2?DD?=F95G
?63?>>53D?B
(
NORMAL RJ45 CAT 5
1
WHT/GRN
2
GRN/WHT
3
WHT/OR
CROSS OVER AT ONE
END OF CABLE
1
WHT/OR
2
OR/WHT
3
WHT/GRN
Figure 25: CAT 5 RJ45 patch cable
195
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Technician’s Handbook
196
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Appendix C
Planning
3100 Hand.bk Page 198 Monday, August 19, 2002 8:49 PM
Technician’s Handbook
198
3100 Hand.bk Page 199 Monday, August 19, 2002 8:49 PM
Planning
Introduction
Photocopy the tables in this chapter and complete them
before you program the system.
Tables are provided for planning
system login attributes
•
voice parameters (extensions and lines)
•
toll restriction
•
voice mailbox programming
•
network information.
Planning
•
199
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Technician’s Handbook
System parameters
Table 28: Numbering plan
Digit
200
NA Function
UK Function
Attendant
Operator
Secondary: Extensions
Secondary: Extensions
Secondary: Groups
Secondary: Groups
Three-Party (Conference)
Three-Party (Conference)
Speed Call (Short Code)
Speed Call (Short Code)
Ring Back (when free)
Ring Back (when free)
User (Feature) Code
User (Feature) Code
Unpark
Unpark
Call Pickup (extension group)
Call Pickup (extension group)
Out Access (hunt lines)
Out Access (hunt lines)
Supervisor
Not applicable
3100 Hand.bk Page 201 Monday, August 19, 2002 8:49 PM
Planning
Voice parameters
Table 29: Login attributes
Username
System
Tool
System
Quick
Installation
Tool
Group
Administration
Tool
Desktop
Tool
Extension
number
Planning
201
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Technician’s Handbook
Table 30: Extensions
Name
(First, Last)
202
Extension
Number
Hunt
Map
COS
Personal
directory
allocation
PIN
3100 Hand.bk Page 203 Monday, August 19, 2002 8:49 PM
Planning
Table 31: Extension groups
Extension
Groups
Extension Group Members
Extension 1
Extension 2
Extension 3
Extension 4
200
201
202
203
204
205
Planning
206
207
208
Table 32: Call Pickup groups
Extension
Extension numbers
203
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Technician’s Handbook
Table 33: Ring Maps
Lines
Day Entry
Entry 1 Type
Entry 1
Entry 2 Type
Entry 2
Entry 1
Entry 2 Type
Entry 2
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
Lines
Night Entry
Entry 1 Type
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
204
Entry 3 Type
Entry 3
3100 Hand.bk Page 205 Monday, August 19, 2002 8:49 PM
Planning
Table 34: Night Service groups
Extension
Night Service Group 1
Night Service Group 2
(Yes/No)
(Yes/No)
Planning
Table 35: Line groups
Line
Number
Line Group
Number
Department
(e.g. Sales)
Trunk Type
Line
Access
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
205
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Technician’s Handbook
Table 36: Hunt maps
Extension Number
206
Entry 1
Entry 2
Entry 3
3100 Hand.bk Page 207 Monday, August 19, 2002 8:49 PM
Planning
Table 37: PR.net planning (BRI - UK only)
Index
Access
(Line group
or all lines)
Digit String
(Dialed digits must be 7 digits;
pad with ∗ if
required; all digits
are absorbed)
Network
(PR.Net or
VPN)
Repeat
(Digits to
repeat)
Group
Number
(Line group
number)
Planning
207
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Technician’s Handbook
Toll restriction
Table 38: Restriction groups
Restriction
Grp Number
Restriciton Digits
Restricted Max
Digit Count
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
Table 39: Restriction group exceptions
Restricted Group Number
Restricted Group Exceptions
1
2
3
4
5
Table 40: Global strings
Global Restricted Strings
(Prevent all users from dialling)
208
Global Exception
(Allow all users to dial)
3100 Hand.bk Page 209 Monday, August 19, 2002 8:49 PM
Planning
Voice mail
Table 41: Voice mailboxes
Mailbox
Number
Name
Extension
Number
Passcode
Operator
Extension
Mailbox
Type
Planning
209
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Technician’s Handbook
IP networking
Table 42: Network information
High speed internet access using static IP networking
IP address
Subnet mask
Default gateway IP address
Web server IP address
High speed internet access using DHCP client
Client name
Web server IP address
User name
Password
Protocol (PAP, CHAP, MSCHAP)
DNS Configuration
Primary DNS address
Secondary DNS address
Host name
IP address
210
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Index
Numerics
3100 ICP system
components 20
controller front and rear panels 19
data functionality 8
default IP addresses 74
description 6
health checklist 109
illustration of 7
installation overview 24
installing the components 25
powering down 117
powering up 118
rebooting the system 116
security checklist 110
software upgrade 121
troubleshooting 148
upgrading 119
verifying system installation 35
voice functionality 8
5822 softphone 36
default range 106
matching to subnet 88
Addresses, default 74
Administration tool 40
Administrator login privileges 22
Administrator station 36
Amber LEDs, meaning of 141
Analog line configuration, defaults
169
Analog phone troubleshooting 147
Analog services module pinouts 192
Analog set configuration, defaults
169
Applications, used for programming
40
Arp 150
Assigning
a gateway 93
ATA1 148
A
About
3100 ICP system 6
IP networking 71
quick installation tool 30
Audience, of handbook 3
Auto-sensing 146
B
Accessing
a remote session 131
internet, using broadband 79
preventing external access 95
programming tools 113
Backups
creating directories 128
performing 128
voice mail 129
Account, user login 44
Bookmark
for online services key 46
main page 21, 25, 31
on 5140 IP appliances 40
Adapter, for IP phones 45
Adding
an expansion unit 120
option modules 119
phones 68
Address
Board support package 141
Bootup script 144
BRI
configuring network response 53
installing modules 119
211
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Technician’s Handbook
line configuration 54
lines, planning table 207
programming 53
Broadband access 79
Checklist
for installation 22
security of system 110
system health 109
Browser
Netscape 68
requirements 22
Class of Service 50
Business hours 61
Clock, meaning of, 5
C
Cables 22
pinouts for CAT5 crossover 195
uplink 120
Class of service, defaults 169
Client dialup networking 133
Code, for SysID 114
COM port 143
Call logging
configuring 65
event codes 177, 178
heading definitions 176
port, figure of 65
printer 23
saving log files 130
saving to file 65
Commands
arp 150
for VxWorks 152
IPConfig 150, 152
Ipconfig 149
netstat 151
ping 150, 152
tracert 149, 151
using Windows commands 150
Winipcfg 150
winipcfg 149
Call pickup groups 50
Committing your changes 67
Call recording 65
Compact flash card 158
Capabilities
IP networking 72
of basic system 7
of expanded system 7
of system 21
Components
identifying required components
21
installing 25
replacing flash 158
Card
controller 189
replacing flash 158
Computer
configuring for connection 26
requirements 22
CAT5
crossover cable pinouts 195
Config switch 117, 153
Changes
committing your programming 67
Checking
the bootup script 144
the logs 142
the system LEDs 141
212
Configuring
call logging 65
domain name service 91
PC for connection to system 26
PR.Net, configuring 57
SMDR 65
system with SonicWALL 104
3100 Hand.bk Page 213 Monday, August 19, 2002 8:49 PM
Index
TCP/IP properties of PC 26
Connecting
directly to internet 76
phones and lines 34
Connection, make new 133
DHCP
client 78
matching IP range to subnet 88
options 87, 89
server entries 88
using a remote server 85
Connectors 22
on controller card 189
on controller front panel 19
on expansion unit 20
Diagnostics, viewing 143
Controller
card connectors 189
default addresses 74
illustration of 7
illustration of components 20
Dipswitch, S1 125
Dial tone 145
Dial-up networking 133
Directories, for backups 128
Directory name and allocation 50
Directory, modifying 50
Disconnecting, the power 117
D
Data, restoring voice mail 157
Data, system capabilities 8
Database
default settings 166, 199
N-1 version 122
using a template 30
using templates 137
Default database 166, 199
Disk, replacing hard disk 160
DNS
changing Host name 106
configuring 91
server configuration 89
Documentation
accessing from the internet 4
obtaining user guides 4
other sources 3
technical service bulletins 4
Defaults
analog line configuration 169
analog set configuration 169
class of service 169
feature access codes 172, 208
IP addresses 74
IP range for devices 106
numbering assignment 168, 201,
202, 207, 209
numbering plan 168
timers 170
Domain name service
configuring 91
Desktop
user tool 48
E
Desktop tool
launching 113
DOS command window 150
Drop, desktop 146
DSL
router or gateway 93
service provider 74
Dynamic IP address range 106
Edocs site, accessing 4
E-mail spamming 74
213
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Technician’s Handbook
Engineers, networking 71, 81
Forms, for planning 199
Error messages 148
Forms, planning
BRI lines 207
extension groups 203
extensions 202
global strings 208
hunt maps 206
line groups 205
login attributes 201
network 210
night service groups 205
restriction groups 208
ring maps 204
voice mail 209
Expanded system capabilities 7
Expansion unit
adding 120
front panel 20
Extension groups
planning 203
Extensions
changing numbers 135
finding user guides 3
groups 47, 50
modifying 50
planning table 202
FRUs 162
External
DHCP server 85
preventing access from internet 95
Functionality
data capabilities 8
voice capabilities 8
F
G
Factory software
about 153
restoring 156
Gateway, assigning 93
Failure of power 34
Faulty components, replacing 158
FCI 4, 122
Feature access codes, defaults 172,
208
Features, list of voice features 9
Field change instructions 4, 122
Field replaceable units 162
Finding more information 3
Firewall
position 93
restricting access 95
Flash
replacing 158
upgrading 123
214
Global strings, planning table 208
Glossaries, where to find 5
Green LEDs, meaning of 141
Greetings assignment 61
Greetings definition 61
Ground stud 25
Group administration tool
description of 40
programming personal keys 48
Groups
extension 50
Guides, for users 136
H
Hard disk, replacing 160
Hardware ports and connectors 19
3100 Hand.bk Page 215 Monday, August 19, 2002 8:49 PM
Index
Heading definitions, for call logs 176
Health, of system 109
HEX numbers 68
Hubs 163
Hunt map 50
Hunt maps, planning table 206
Hyperterminal 125, 143
I
Indicators, descriptions of 141
Information, finding more 3
Installation
before you begin 19
checklist 22
overview 24
quick installation tool 29
tips 36
verifying installation 35
Installing
an expansion unit 120
new software release 123
option modules 119
system components 25
Internet
connecting directly to 76
connection through router 82
connection via LAN 81
connection via layer-2 port 83
connection via WAN port 81
Internet explorer 5.5 22
Internet service provider 76
IP networking
broadband access 79
capabilities 72
configuration questions 73
DHCP client 78
overview 71
planning 73
programming sequence 75
troubleshooting 149
IP phone
changing set type 135
licenses 68
options 106
power source 45
troubleshooting 146
IP range, matching to subnet 88
IPConfig 150, 152
ISDN access, programming 53
ISP 76, 91
K
Key system 8, 30
L
LAN
connect existing to Internet 81
drop 29, 113
requirements 23
using Windows commands 150
Launching
docs on software CD-ROM 3
Internet service provider 91
Launching the tools 113
IP addresses
default 74
default range 106
static 78
Layer-2 switch
connection to internet 83
IP Networking
planning table 210
LCCR, enabling 56
Leading digits, changing 43
Least cost call routing, enabling 56
215
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Technician’s Handbook
LEDs, meaning 141
Licensed options, enabling 114
Light bulb, meaning of 5
Lights, on front panel 141
Line groups, planning table 205
Lines
BRI, configuring 54
connecting 34
port pinouts 191
PR.Net configuration 57
programming 51
troubleshooting 145
Management application, for call logging 65
Management parameters, programming 60
Manual Maker
creating user guides 136
obtaining user guides 4
Medium-sized businesses 71
Mitel Networks, login page 32
Mitel Online
accessing user guides 4
MOSS code 114
Link idle timeout 106
Mitel options system selection 114
List, of installation requirements 22
Mode, key system or PBX 35
Local area network, requirements 23
Module
installing option modules 119
ONS port pinouts 193
replacing flash 158
upgrading the flash 123
Locating
controller components 20
Login
attributes, setting 43
Login attributes 201
Login page 32
Logs, saving call logs 130
Loud speaker paging units 36
LS/CLASS
installing modules 119
pinouts on module 193
port pinouts 191
M
MAC address 68
Mailboxes, programming 48
Maintenance
health checklist 109
logs 142
tips 138
Make new connection 133
216
MOSS 114
Music on hold 23
N
N-1 version 122
Netstat 151
Network engineers 81
Networking
broadband access 79
capabilities 72
configuration questions 73
DHCP client 78
engineers 71
overview 71
planning 73
planning table 210
programming sequence 75
requirements 23
troubleshooting 149
3100 Hand.bk Page 217 Monday, August 19, 2002 8:49 PM
Index
websites 5
NIC cards 163
Night service groups 47, 205
60
programming system parameters
50
programming voice 50
Number assignment 50
Parameters, for voice mail 48
numbering assignment, defaults 168,
201, 202, 207, 209
Parts, list of FRUs 162
Numbering plan, defaults 168
O
Online help
launching from the internet 4
starting from CD-ROM 3
Passwords
for login to system tools 32
for security 110
for tools 41
lockout on failure 41
PBX 8, 30
Online services key 46
PC
configuring for connection 26
requirements 22
ONS
installing modules 119
port pinouts 190
Performing
backups 128
software upgrade 121
Operator assisted dialing 133
Personal keys
programming 49
Option modules 25
Options
DHCP 87, 89
enabling licensed options 114
for IP phones 106
installing option modules 119
operator assisted dialing 133
Ordering parts 162
Overview
of installation 24
of system 6
P
Page
login 32
Paging, for loud speakers 36
Panel indicators 141
Parameters
program management parameters
Phones
changing set type 135
connecting 34
IP options 106
licenses 68
power source 45
troubleshooting, analog 147
Pickup groups 47, 50
Ping 150, 152
Pinouts
CAT5 crossover cable 195
Ethernet WAN port 191
LS/CLASS lines 191
on analog services module 192
ONS module 193
ONS ports 190
ports 190
serial 190
Planning
217
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Technician’s Handbook
BRI lines 207
extension groups 203
extensions 202
global strings 208
hunt maps 206
line groups 205
login attributes 201
network info 210
night service groups 205
restriction groups 208
ring maps 204
voice mail 209
planning table 201
Planning, the LAN 73
Pointer, meaning of 5
Port
analog services mod pinouts 192
call logging 65
COM 143
layer-2 to internet 83
LS/CLASS module pinouts 193
LS/CLASS pinouts 191
on controller front panel 19
ONS module pinouts 193
ONS pinouts 190
pinouts 190
serial pinouts 190
SMDR 65
WAN connection 81
WAN pinouts 191
Power
cable for expansion unit 120
LED meaning 141
LED states 118
powering down the system 117
powering up system 118
source for IP phones 45
Power fail transfer 34
PPPoE 79
Pre-configuration questionnaire 39
218
Prime Line 50
Printer, for call logging 65
Programming
a gateway 93
BRI 53
committing your changes 67
domain name service 91
enabling LCCR 56
from system tool 40
IP networking, sequence 75
ISDN 53
lines 51
login attributes 43
MAC addresses 68
management parameters 60
online services key 46
personal keys 48
planning tables 199
tips 68
tools, descriptions of 40
voice mail settings 61
voice mailboxes 48
voice parameters 50
with database templates 137
Prompts, installing voice mail 126
Proxy settings 149
Q
Quad LS/Class line port pinouts 191
Queries, remote web 91
Questionnaire, pre-configuration 39
Questions, network planning 73
Quick installation tool
description of 40
launching 113
running 29
using 31
using templates 137
3100 Hand.bk Page 219 Monday, August 19, 2002 8:49 PM
Index
R
Rack mounting 25
Radio, for music on hold 23
Range, of default IP addresses 106
Rebooting, the system 116
Red LED, meaning of 141
Remote
DHCP server 85
using remote access 131
web queries 91
Replacing
faulty components 158
faulty hard disk 160
Requirements, for installation 22
Reset switch 117, 153
Resetting, IP phone 135
Restoring
database 154
factory software 156
previous version of software 155
software and database 154
voice mail 157
Restricting external access 95
Restriction groups, planning table
208
Ring maps, planning table 204
Ring type 52
Ringmap handling 179
Route print, add, delete 151
Router, connection to internet 82
Script, bootup 144
Security, internet ii, 97
Security, of system 110
Serial port pinouts 190
Server
DNS configuration 89
using a remote DHCP server 85
Service provider 76
Set
changing type 135
programming keys 48
Settings
changing system-wide settings 45
login attributes 43
Shutting down the system 117
SMDR 65
configuring 65
event codes 177, 178
heading definitions 176
printer 23
saving logs 130
SMTP 74
Softphone 5822 36
Software
factory 153
logs 142
restoring 154
restoring factory software 156
restoring previous version 155
Software CD-ROM
for upgrades 121
launching documentation 3
SonicWall ii, 97
S
S1 dipswitch 125
Safety instructions, important 6
Saving to file 65
spamming 74
Spare parts 162
Standalone network application 72
Starting, up the system 118
219
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Technician’s Handbook
States, of LEDs 141
voice functionality 8
Static IP addressing 78
System directory, modifying 50
Station message detail recording
printer 23
System identification code 114
Station, administrator 36
Status LEDs 141
Stop symbol, meaning of 5
System tool
accessing remotely 131
committing changes 67
launching 113
number of sessions 29, 113
Stud, for grounding 25
Subnet, matching IP range 88
Surge protection 23
Switches
config 153
config and reset 117
dipswitch S1 125
reset 153
T
Tables, for system planning 199
Tape deck, for music on hold 23
Technical manual
finding more information 3
for safety instructions 6
Symbols, meaning of 5
Technical service bulletins 4
SysID 114
Technician, requirements 3
System
basic capabilities 7
components 20
data capabilities 8
default IP addresses 74
description 6
health checklist 109
illustration of 7
installation overview 24
installing option modules 119
installing the components 25
power fail transfer 34
powering down 117
powering up 118
rebooting the system 116
security 110
setting system parameters 50
size 21
software upgrade 121
troubleshooting 148
upgrading 119
verifying installation 35
Telephone, supported features 9
220
Template, for quick installation 30
Templates
for mounting units 25
for programming 137
Terminations 147
Terminology 5
Timers, defaults 170
Tips
for installation 36
maintenance 138
programming 68
Toll restriction, defaults 169
Tools
accessing tools remotely 131
description of 40
for programming 113
launching online documentation 3
required for installation 22
running the quick installation tool
3100 Hand.bk Page 221 Monday, August 19, 2002 8:49 PM
Index
29
system programming tool 40
language change 61
planning table 209
programming 48
programming the settings 61
prompt language 61
restoring data 157
Tracert 151
Troubleshooting
analog phones 147
IP networking 149
IP phones 146
lines 145
system 148
using Windows commands 150
TSBs 4
Voice mail options 61
Voice mailboxes 61
VX works 141
VxWorks, commands 152
Turning off the system 117
W
U
Wall jacks 163
Upgrading
system software 121
the flash module 123
the system 119
Uplink
card 161
User guides
creating 136
from Manual Maker 4
Using Windows networking commands 150
WAN
link idle timeout 106
port pinouts 191
port, connection to internet 81
Warning
during backups 128
during upgrades 122
power LED 118
Websites, helpful 5
Windows 2000 22, 27, 28
Windows 95 26
Windows 98 26
V
Verifying, system installation 35
Viewing, diagnostics 143
Voice
programming the parameters 50
supported telephone features 9
Voice mail
backups 129
installing prompts 126
Windows commands 150
Windows NT 22, 26
Winipcfg 150
Y
Yield symbol, meaning of 5
Y-power cord 25
221
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Technician’s Handbook
Notes:
222
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