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Front cover
PowerVM
Migration from Physical
to Virtual Storage
Moving to a Virtual I/O Server managed
environment
Ready-to-use scenarios
included
AIX operating system
based examples
Abid Khwaja
Dominic Lancaster
ibm.com/redbooks
International Technical Support Organization
PowerVM Migration from Physical to Virtual Storage
January 2010
SG24-7825-00
Note: Before using this information and the product it supports, read the information in
“Notices” on page vii.
First Edition (January 2010)
This edition applies to Version Virtual I/O Server 2.1.2.10, AIX 6.1.3, and HMC 7.3.4-SP3.
© Copyright International Business Machines Corporation 2010. All rights reserved.
Note to U.S. Government Users Restricted Rights -- Use, duplication or disclosure restricted by GSA ADP
Schedule Contract with IBM Corp.
Contents
Figures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . v
Notices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . vii
Trademarks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . viii
Preface . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ix
The team who wrote this book . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . x
Become a published author . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . x
Comments welcome. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xi
Chapter 1. Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1
1.1 Definitions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
1.2 Audience . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
1.3 Test environment. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
1.4 Storage device compatibility in a Virtual I/O Server environment . . . . . . . . 4
1.5 Overview of the physical-to-virtual migration process . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
Chapter 2. Core procedures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9
2.1 File-backed optical for restoration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10
2.2 Checking unique disk identification . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13
2.2.1 The physical volume identifier (PVID) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14
2.2.2 The IEEE volume identifier . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14
2.2.3 The unique device identifier (UDID) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15
2.2.4 The chkdev command . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17
2.3 Creating a virtual SCSI device . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18
2.4 Virtual Fibre Channel and N_Port ID virtualization . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26
Chapter 3. Standalone SCSI rootvg to virtual SCSI . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43
3.1 Back up to CD and restore . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46
3.2 Moving rootvg disks to SAN . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 53
3.3 Cloning rootvg to external disk . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 65
3.4 Other methods. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 74
3.4.1 NIM . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 74
3.4.2 Backup and restore . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 75
3.4.3 SAS-attached tape devices. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 75
Chapter 4. Standalone SCSI data to virtual SCSI . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 77
4.1 Migration using a virtual media repository . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 79
4.2 Migrating data using savevg . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 84
© Copyright IBM Corp. 2010. All rights reserved.
iii
4.3 Transition raw data disk . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 85
Chapter 5. Logical partition migrations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 89
5.1 Direct-attached SCSI partition to virtual SCSI . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 90
5.2 Direct-attached SAN rootvg and data partition to SAN virtual SCSI . . . . 100
5.3 Direct-attached SAN rootvg and data partition to virtual Fibre Channel . 113
5.4 Virtual SCSI rootvg and data to virtual Fibre Channel. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 137
Chapter 6. Standalone SAN rootvg to virtual Fibre Channel . . . . . . . . . 145
Chapter 7. Direct attached Fibre Channel devices partition to virtual Fibre
Channel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 153
Abbreviations and acronyms . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 169
Related publications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 171
IBM Redbooks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 171
Online resources . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 171
How to get Redbooks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 171
Help from IBM . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 172
Index . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 173
iv
PowerVM Migration from Physical to Virtual Storage
Figures
1-1 Test environment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
2-1 Relationship between physical and virtual SCSI on Virtual I/O Server . . . 19
2-2 Relationship between physical and Virtual SCSI on client partition . . . . . 20
2-3 HMC Virtual I/O Server Physical Adapters panel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21
2-4 Create Virtual SCSI Server Adapter panel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22
2-5 Virtual SCSI server adapter created on Virtual I/O Server . . . . . . . . . . . . 23
2-6 Matching virtual SCSI client adapter created in client profile . . . . . . . . . . 24
2-7 Virtual Fibre Channel server adapter created on Virtual I/O Server . . . . . 28
2-8 Virtual Fibre Channel client adapter created in client partition profile . . . . 29
2-9 Virtual Fibre Channel Adapter Properties . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30
2-10 Virtual Fibre Channel concepts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34
2-11 SAN Switch panel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35
2-12 SAN port details . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36
2-13 SAN port device details. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37
3-1 Migration from standalone rootvg on local disk to a logical partition . . . . . 44
3-2 Cloning using mirrorvg to a SAN disk . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 54
3-3 Virtual Storage Management functions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 61
3-4 Physical Volumes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 62
3-5 Hard Disk Selection. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 63
3-6 Selection of the client virtual slot. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 64
3-7 Virtual Storage Management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 64
3-8 alt_disk_copy using SAN disk . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 66
3-9 Virtual Storage Management Functions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 72
4-1 Transition direct-attached storage to Virtual I/O Server managed storage 78
4-2 Client logical partition virtual adapter mapping in WebSM . . . . . . . . . . . . 82
4-3 Client logical partition mapping for access to SAN disk . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 87
5-1 Local disk to Virtual I/O Server migration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 90
5-2 Logical Partition Profile Properties panel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 94
5-3 Create Virtual SCSI Server Adapter panel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 95
5-4 Logical Partition Profile Properties panel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 96
5-5 Create Virtual SCSI Adapter Panel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 97
5-6 SAN direct attach rootvg and data partition migration to SAN vSCSI . . . 101
5-7 Physical Fibre Channel Adapter to remove from source partition . . . . . . 105
5-8 Fibre Channel adapter added to Virtual I/O Server. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 106
5-9 Virtual SCSI Server Adapter Add Panel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 107
5-10 Virtual SCSI server adapters added . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 108
5-11 Virtual SCSI Client Adapters Added . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 109
5-12 Migration from direct-attached SAN to Virtual Fibre Channel . . . . . . . . 114
© Copyright IBM Corp. 2010. All rights reserved.
v
5-13 Add a Fibre Channel adapter to the Virtual I/O Server . . . . . . . . . . . . . 120
5-14 Create Virtual Fibre Channel Adapter panel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 121
5-15 Virtual Adapters panel. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 122
5-16 Edit a managed profile . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 123
5-17 Virtual Adapters tab. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 124
5-18 Resource Creation panel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 125
5-19 Fibre Channel Adapter resources . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 126
5-20 Client Fibre Channel Adapter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 127
5-21 Adapter properties. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 128
5-22 Virtual Fibre Channel Adapter Properties . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 129
5-23 World wide port names . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 133
5-24 Virtual SCSI migration to virtual Fibre Channel. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 137
5-25 Virtual Fibre Channel adapter added to client profile . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 141
6-1 Migrate standalone SAN rootvg to client partition SAN rootvg over Virtual
Fibre Channel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 146
6-2 Virtual Fibre Channel Server Adapter on Virtual I/O Server . . . . . . . . . . 148
6-3 Virtual Fibre Channel client adapter defined in client logical partition profile
149
7-1 Migration of direct-attached tape to virtualized tape . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 154
7-2 Dynamically add virtual adapter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 157
7-3 Create Fibre Channel server adapter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 158
7-4 Set virtual adapter ID . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 159
7-5 Save the Virtual I/O Server partition configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 160
7-6 Change profile to add virtual Fibre Channel client adapter . . . . . . . . . . . 161
7-7 Create Fibre Channel client adapter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 162
7-8 Define virtual adapter ID Values . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 163
7-9 Select virtual Fibre Channel client adapter properties . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 165
7-10 Virtual Fibre Channel client adapter properties . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 166
vi
PowerVM Migration from Physical to Virtual Storage
Notices
This information was developed for products and services offered in the U.S.A.
IBM may not offer the products, services, or features discussed in this document in other countries. Consult
your local IBM representative for information on the products and services currently available in your area.
Any reference to an IBM product, program, or service is not intended to state or imply that only that IBM
product, program, or service may be used. Any functionally equivalent product, program, or service that
does not infringe any IBM intellectual property right may be used instead. However, it is the user's
responsibility to evaluate and verify the operation of any non-IBM product, program, or service.
IBM may have patents or pending patent applications covering subject matter described in this document.
The furnishing of this document does not give you any license to these patents. You can send license
inquiries, in writing, to:
IBM Director of Licensing, IBM Corporation, North Castle Drive, Armonk, NY 10504-1785 U.S.A.
The following paragraph does not apply to the United Kingdom or any other country where such
provisions are inconsistent with local law: INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS MACHINES CORPORATION
PROVIDES THIS PUBLICATION "AS IS" WITHOUT WARRANTY OF ANY KIND, EITHER EXPRESS OR
IMPLIED, INCLUDING, BUT NOT LIMITED TO, THE IMPLIED WARRANTIES OF NON-INFRINGEMENT,
MERCHANTABILITY OR FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE. Some states do not allow disclaimer
of express or implied warranties in certain transactions, therefore, this statement may not apply to you.
This information could include technical inaccuracies or typographical errors. Changes are periodically made
to the information herein; these changes will be incorporated in new editions of the publication. IBM may
make improvements and/or changes in the product(s) and/or the program(s) described in this publication at
any time without notice.
Any references in this information to non-IBM Web sites are provided for convenience only and do not in any
manner serve as an endorsement of those Web sites. The materials at those Web sites are not part of the
materials for this IBM product and use of those Web sites is at your own risk.
IBM may use or distribute any of the information you supply in any way it believes appropriate without
incurring any obligation to you.
Any performance data contained herein was determined in a controlled environment. Therefore, the results
obtained in other operating environments may vary significantly. Some measurements may have been made
on development-level systems and there is no guarantee that these measurements will be the same on
generally available systems. Furthermore, some measurement may have been estimated through
extrapolation. Actual results may vary. Users of this document should verify the applicable data for their
specific environment.
Information concerning non-IBM products was obtained from the suppliers of those products, their published
announcements or other publicly available sources. IBM has not tested those products and cannot confirm
the accuracy of performance, compatibility or any other claims related to non-IBM products. Questions on
the capabilities of non-IBM products should be addressed to the suppliers of those products.
This information contains examples of data and reports used in daily business operations. To illustrate them
as completely as possible, the examples include the names of individuals, companies, brands, and products.
All of these names are fictitious and any similarity to the names and addresses used by an actual business
enterprise is entirely coincidental.
COPYRIGHT LICENSE:
This information contains sample application programs in source language, which illustrate programming
© Copyright IBM Corp. 2010. All rights reserved.
vii
techniques on various operating platforms. You may copy, modify, and distribute these sample programs in
any form without payment to IBM, for the purposes of developing, using, marketing or distributing application
programs conforming to the application programming interface for the operating platform for which the
sample programs are written. These examples have not been thoroughly tested under all conditions. IBM,
therefore, cannot guarantee or imply reliability, serviceability, or function of these programs.
Trademarks
IBM, the IBM logo, and ibm.com are trademarks or registered trademarks of International Business
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The following terms are trademarks of the International Business Machines Corporation in the United States,
other countries, or both:
AIX®
DS4000®
HACMP™
IBM®
POWER Hypervisor™
Power Systems™
POWER6®
PowerVM™
POWER®
Redbooks®
Redpaper™
Redbooks (logo)
Tivoli®
®
The following terms are trademarks of other companies:
Emulex, and the Emulex logo are trademarks or registered trademarks of Emulex Corporation.
QLogic, and the QLogic logo are registered trademarks of QLogic Corporation. SANblade is a registered
trademark in the United States.
UNIX is a registered trademark of The Open Group in the United States and other countries.
Linux is a trademark of Linus Torvalds in the United States, other countries, or both.
Other company, product, or service names may be trademarks or service marks of others.
viii
PowerVM Migration from Physical to Virtual Storage
Preface
IT environments in organizations today face more challenges than ever before.
Server rooms are crowded, infrastructure costs are climbing, and right-sizing
systems is often problematic. In order to contain costs there is a push to use
resources more wisely by minimizing waste and maximizing the return on
investment. Virtualization technology was developed to answer these objectives.
More and more organizations will deploy (or are in the process of deploying)
some form of virtualization. However, parts of an organization's systems may use
earlier storage equipment. In these contexts, knowing how to migrate from
physical, often direct-attached storage, to a virtual storage environment becomes
valuable.
This IBM® Redbooks® publication introduces techniques to use for the migration
of storage from physical to virtual environments and introduces several new
features in POWER6® technology-based systems. These features include:
򐂰 The chkdev command, added in Virtual I/O Server 2.1.2 FP22 to assist in
identifying physical-to-virtual candidates and to ensure that device
identification is consistent
򐂰 Extensive use of NPIV technology for both disk and tape devices
򐂰 The use of file-backed optical technology to present virtual CD media as a
means of restoration
This publication is organized into the following chapters:
򐂰 Chapter 1, “Introduction” on page 1, provides an introduction into the material
that will be presented.
򐂰 Chapter 2, “Core procedures” on page 9, provides detailed core procedures
that will be used throughout the remaining chapters. By examining and
learning the core procedures, more experienced users can proceed directly to
any of the fully documented migration cases without needing to read all the
chapters. Newer users can learn the core procedures and then examine the
different migration techniques and choose the appropriate ones that apply to
their organizations.
򐂰 Chapter 3, “Standalone SCSI rootvg to virtual SCSI” on page 43, through
Chapter 7, “Direct attached Fibre Channel devices partition to virtual Fibre
Channel” on page 153, provide lab-tested migration examples that build on
the core procedures learned in Chapter 2, “Core procedures” on page 9.
Detailed figures and output listings take the users through the migrations
© Copyright IBM Corp. 2010. All rights reserved.
ix
step-by-step and allow the reader to determine which migration techniques
will work best for them based on their skills and available resources.
The procedures detailed cover migrations on AIX® operating-system-based
hosts. Linux® operating-system-based migrations are not covered in this
publication.
The team who wrote this book
This book was produced by a team of specialists from around the world working
at the International Technical Support Organization, Poughkeepsie Center.
Abid Khwaja is an independent Consultant with over 16 years of cross-UNIX
and UNIX® systems experience. Most recently, he has focused on designing and
building consolidated PowerVM™ virtualized environments for companies
seeking to reduce cost and complexity. He is also experienced in supporting
Oracle Weblogic application server clusters.
Dominic Lancaster is a Systems Architect and IBM Certified Specialist - Power
Systems™ technical support for AIX and Linux, working in IBM Australia
Systems and Technology Group in Canberra. He provides support for Federal
Government clients and Business Partners, has worked for IBM for more than
nine years, and was previously an IBM customer. His areas of expertise include
AIX, Linux, storage area networks, and PowerVM virtualization.
The project that produced this publication was managed by:
Scott Vetter, PMP
Thanks to the following people for their contributions to this project:
David Bennin, Rich Conway, Octavian Lascu, Ann Lund
International Technical Support Organization, Poughkeepsie Center
Garius Bias, Ping Chen, Matthew Cronk, David Nevarez, Jim Pafumi,
Jacob Rosales, Vasu Vallabhaneni
IBM US
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PowerVM Migration from Physical to Virtual Storage
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Preface
xi
xii
PowerVM Migration from Physical to Virtual Storage
1
Chapter 1.
Introduction
This publication provides instructions on how to transition from direct-attached
storage on a standalone IBM server or IBM logical partition to an IBM logical
partition with its storage virtualized through a Virtual I/O Server. This transition is
referred to as a physical-to-virtual migration. Since the focus of this publication is
on migrations, it only briefly covers the creation and configuration of logical
partitions. Refer to the publications PowerVM Virtualization on IBM System p:
Introduction and Configuration Fourth Edition, SG24-7940, and IBM PowerVM
Virtualization Managing and Monitoring, SG24-7590, for a more thorough
discussion of these topics. Furthermore, the tools and technologies used in the
migrations are what you will find on standard AIX install media. The use of open
source and other third-party tools is not covered.
Note: All examples in this publication were tested on lab systems. However, it
is important that you validate these procedures on test systems before putting
them into production.
© Copyright IBM Corp. 2010. All rights reserved.
1
1.1 Definitions
The following definitions will assist you in understanding the material located
within this publication:
Standalone servers
Standalone servers are typically systems that do not
contain multiple logical partitions or any Virtual I/O
Servers.
Client or logical partition This is a partition on POWER®-based hardware that
has some level of virtualization. For example, CPU
and memory and may have some direct-attached I/O
hardware or I/O hardware virtualized by the Virtual
I/O Server, or both.
Local disks
These are direct-attached SCSI or SAN disks.
Storage
This is categorized as local or storage area network
(SAN) storage. The hardware disks comprising the
storage are descibed as either rootvg.
rootvg, data, and datavg rootvg is used to describe content that is used as the
base operating system necessary to boot the server.
All other disk contents will be given the generic label
of data disk and sometimes will also be referred to in
this publication as datavg.
1.2 Audience
This publication targets architects and solution designers who may be required to
design migration strategies that use physical-to-virtual migration techniques and
system administrators who may be required to perform such migrations.
Knowledge of the Virtual I/O Server and AIX is assumed, as well as intermediate
to advanced skills in storage systems.
2
PowerVM Migration from Physical to Virtual Storage
1.3 Test environment
The environment in which testing of the migration scenarios was performed is
depicted in Figure 1-1.
fc
eth
eth
Virtual
SCSI
server
adapter
Virtual
SCSI
client
adapter
fc
VIOS
AIX Server
Physical
Volumes
Client LPAR
Physical
Volumes
IBM Dedicated
IBM System p
P6 550
SAN Switch
Disk A
Disk B
Physical
Volume LUNs
Physical
Volume LUNs
Storage Device
DS4800
Storage Device
ESS800
SAN Switch
Figure 1-1 Test environment
The environment was run at the following software release levels:
򐂰
򐂰
򐂰
򐂰
򐂰
HMC: Version 7, Release 3.4.0, Service Pack 3
VIOS: 2.1.2.10-FP-22
Source and Target AIX: 6100-03
DS4800 Storage System Firmware 7.36.17
IBM B2005-B16 SAN Switches with v5.3.0 Fabric OS
Chapter 1. Introduction
3
1.4 Storage device compatibility in a Virtual I/O Server
environment
Physical-to-virtual (p2v) device compatibility refers only to the data on the device,
not necessarily to the capabilities of the device. A device is p2v compatible when
the data retrieved from that device is identical regardless of whether it is
accessed directly through a physical attachment or virtually (for example, through
the Virtual I/O Server). That is, every logical block (for example, LBA 0 through
LBA n-1) returns identical data for both physical and virtual devices. Device
capacity must also be equal in order to claim p2v compliance. You can use the
Virtual I/O Server chkdev command to determine whether a device is p2v
compatible. The chkdev command is available in Virtual I/O Server Version 2.1.2
FP22 or later.
Virtual disk devices exported by the Virtual I/O Server are referred to as virtual
SCSI disks. A virtual SCSI disk device may be backed by an entire physical
volume, a logical volume, a multi-path device, or a file.
Data replication functions such as copy services and device movement between
physical and virtual environments are common operations in today's data center.
These operations, involving devices in a virtualized environment, often have a
dependency on p2v compliance.
Copy services refer to various solutions that provide data replication functions
including data migration, flashcopy, point-in-time copy, and remote mirror and
copy solutions. These capabilities are commonly used for disaster recovery,
cloning, backup/restore, and more.
Device migration from physical environments to client partitions refers to the
ability to migrate a physical storage device to a Virtual I/O Server client partition
without the need for a backup and restore operation. The storage device may be
a direct-attached SCSI or SAN disk or tape device. This capability is very useful
for server consolidation.
The operations above may work if the device is p2v compatible. However, not all
device combinations and data replication solutions have been tested by IBM. See
claims by your copy services vendor for support claims for devices managed by a
Virtual I/O Server. See also PowerVM and SAN Copy Services, REDP-4610
(available 1Q, 2010).
4
PowerVM Migration from Physical to Virtual Storage
A device is considered to be p2v compatible if it meets the following criteria:
򐂰 It is an entire physical volume (for example, a LUN).
򐂰 Device capacity is identical in both physical and virtual environments.
򐂰 The Virtual I/O Server is able to manage this physical volume using a UDID or
IEEE ID. For more information about determining whether a physical volume
has a UDID or IEEE identification field see 2.2, “Checking unique disk
identification” on page 13.
Devices managed by the following multipathing solutions within the Virtual I/O
Server are expected to be UDID devices:
򐂰 All multipath I/O (MPIO) versions, including Subsystem Device Driver Path
Control Module (SDDPCM), EMC PCM, and Hitachi Dynamic Link Manager
(HDLM) PCM
򐂰 EMC PowerPath 4.4.2.2 and later
򐂰 IBM Subsystem Device Driver (SDD) 1.6.2.3 and later
򐂰 Hitachi HDLM 5.6.1 and later
Virtual SCSI devices created with earlier versions of PowerPath, HDLM, and
SDD are not managed by UDID format and are not expected to be p2v compliant.
The operations mentioned previously (for example, data replication and
movement between Virtual I/O Server and non-Virtual I/O Server environments)
are not likely to work in these cases.
Note: If there is any doubt about device compatibility you should contact IBM
and your storage vendor before attempting physical-to-virtual migration. For
additional information refer to the InfoCenter POWER Systems Web site:
http://publib.boulder.ibm.com/infocenter/powersys/v3r1m5/index.jsp?
topic=/iphb1_vios_device_compat.htm
1.5 Overview of the physical-to-virtual migration
process
This section provides an overall set of instructions about how to transition the
various storage configurations in order to utilize Virtual I/O Server storage
functionality. These instructions point users to information that they should use
for their particular situations.
Chapter 1. Introduction
5
In Table 1-1 a number of migrations are presented from a source host
configuration through to the destination host configuration. The table is not
exclusive of any other forms of migration. However, the procedures and thus the
lab-tested methods detailed in subsequent chapters in this book are derived from
this table. You may find methods that work better in your particular environments
especially since this book exclusively discusses IBM-specific technologies. The
Destination Host Configuration Column presents what has been tested as the
primary target, with alternative targets in parentheses.
Table 1-1 Migration procedures table
6
Migration
objective
Volume group
to migrate
Migration
procedure
Destination host
configuration
Chapter 3,
“Standalone SCSI
rootvg to virtual
SCSI” on page 43
rootvg
fbo, migratepv,
alt_clone
Partition with virtual
SCSI (virtual Fibre
Channel also possible)
Chapter 4,
“Standalone SCSI
data to virtual
SCSI” on page 77
datavg,
raw datavg
dd
Partition with virtual
SCSI (virtual Fibre
Channel also possible)
5.1,
“Direct-attached
SCSI partition to
virtual SCSI” on
page 90
rootvg
Remap physical
adapter
Partition with virtual
SCSI
5.2,
“Direct-attached
SAN rootvg and
data partition to
SAN virtual SCSI”
on page 100
rootvg, datavg
Remap physical
adapter
Partition with virtual
SCSI
5.3,
“Direct-attached
SAN rootvg and
data partition to
virtual Fibre
Channel” on
page 113
rootvg, datavg
Access same SAN
disk with adapter on
destination
Partition with virtual
Fibre Channel (virtual
SCSI also possible)
5.4, “Virtual SCSI
rootvg and data to
virtual Fibre
Channel” on
page 137
rootvg, datavg
Access same SAN
disk with adapter on
destination
Partition with virtual
Fibre Channel (virtual
SCSI also possible)
PowerVM Migration from Physical to Virtual Storage
Migration
objective
Volume group
to migrate
Migration
procedure
Destination host
configuration
Chapter 6,
“Standalone SAN
rootvg to virtual
Fibre Channel” on
page 145
rootvg
Access same SAN
disk with adapter on
destination
Partition with virtual
Fibre Channel (virtual
SCSI also possible)
Chapter 7, “Direct
attached Fibre
Channel devices
partition to virtual
Fibre Channel” on
page 153
N/A
Access same tape
with adapter on
destination
Partition with virtual
Fibre Channel
The following is a suggested flow for using Table 1-1 on page 6:
1. Learn how to use the virtual SCSI and virtual Fibre Channel methods as
described in Chapter 2, “Core procedures” on page 9.
2. Choose from what configuration you are migrating (Migration Objective
column). The cells in this column are linked to the actual procedures. Thus,
clicking the cells is another way to quickly move through this publication.
3. Choose what you are migrating (Volume Group to Migrate column).
4. Choose which procedure (Migration Procedure column) suits your
environment and your administrator skills.
As with any data migration, we first recommend:
1. Back up the client system. Prior to making any changes, we recommend that
the source standalone and dedicated partition be backed up. Some of the
migration procedures can be used to perform this backup. All backups require
validation to ensure that they are restorable.
2. Back up the configuration of the Virtual I/O Server that you will be modifying.
The viosbr command has been introduced to the Virtual I/O Server
commands for this purpose.
3. It is always a best practice to perform the migration procedure on test systems
and data before applying to a production environment.
Chapter 1. Introduction
7
8
PowerVM Migration from Physical to Virtual Storage
2
Chapter 2.
Core procedures
There are a number of core procedures that are used in multiple scenarios of the
accompanying chapters. These procedures are documented fully in this chapter
and additional notes are provided about the procedures that will not be found in
the fully worked-through examples in subsequent chapters. Some of the
additional notes are about issues such as best practices, and some are
additional diagnostic methods that may be used.
Some of the procedures in this book rely on being able to reconfigure a Virtual
I/O Server’s devices and mappings and the procedures could become complex if
many migrations resulting in many changes to the configuration occur. For this
reason, you may consider backing up the Virtual I/O Server configuration using
the Virtual I/O Server viosbr command, which creates compressed files from the
Virtual I/O Server configuration without having to perform a full Virtual I/O Server
backup. For further information, use the Virtual I/O Server man viosbr command
or refer to InfoCenter documentation.
The core procedures are:
򐂰
򐂰
򐂰
򐂰
Using file-backed optical devices to perform a restoration
Checking unique disk identification: IEEE, PVID, and UDID
Creating a virtual SCSI device
Using virtual Fibre Channel and NPIV
Each of these procedures is detailed in the sections that follow.
© Copyright IBM Corp. 2010. All rights reserved.
9
2.1 File-backed optical for restoration
File-backed optical devices provide a clean, easy-to-use mechanism to take a
backup of either a root or data volume group and restore it to a target device. The
target device could be a LUN presented as virtual SCSI or virtual Fibre Channel.
In this example the terms source system and target system are used:
Source system
May be a standalone system or a logical partition
Target system
A logical partition
The mkcd command produces a set of ISO files that were used to migrate data.
Ensure that there is sufficient space in the chosen file system to store files that
will add up to the size of the volume group being migrated.
On the source system
To make image files, there are two methods that will be detailed:
򐂰 Using the AIX smitty mkcd command
򐂰 The mkcd command line from an AIX shell
Choose whichever method is appropriate for your environment.
Using smitty to make the required images
The following steps detail the use of smitty to create the required images:
1. Run the smitty mkcd command as follows:
# smitty mkcd
2. Select No from the Use an existing mksysb image menu. Selecting No allows
you to create a new system backup that reflects your current running
environment.
3. Select the options that are appropriate to your environment from the Back Up
This System to CD menu. you can also leave the default options as they are.
4. For the File system to store final CD images question, you can leave it blank
or chose to use an option such as an NFS file system.
5. Select Yes for the Do you want the CD to be bootable option.
6. Select No for the Remove final images after creating CD option.
7. Select No for the Create the CD now option.
8. Press Enter to begin the system backup creation.
9. Exit smitty when the OF status appears.
10
PowerVM Migration from Physical to Virtual Storage
Using the AIX mkcd command-line method
To use the AIX mkcd command-line method, use the following procedures:
1. Run the mkcd command with the flags shown below. If you would like to use a
non-default location to store the images, such as an NFS file share, you can
include a -I /<location flag> at the end of the options, where <location> is the
path for the final images. If you require a bootable copy of the volume group
(for example, rootvg), omit the -v rootvg that is shown in the example
command below:
# mkcd -v rootvg -V rootvg -R -S -A
Initializing mkcd log: /var/adm/ras/mkcd.log...
Verifying command parameters...
Creating information file for volume group datasrcvg.
Creating temporary file system: /mkcd/mksysb_image...
Creating savevg image...
Creating list of files to back up.
Backing up 9 files
9 of 9 files (100%)0512-038 savevg: Backup Completed Successfully.
Creating temporary file system: /mkcd/cd_fs...
Copying backup to the CD or DVD file system...
Creating Rock Ridge format image: /mkcd/cd_images/cd_image_401446
Running mkisofs ...
mkrr_fs was successful.
Removing temporary file system: /mkcd/cd_fs...
Removing temporary file system: /mkcd/mksysb_image...
2. To check which files where created, change the directory to the
/mkcd/cd_images directory or the directory that you specified.
3. Issue the ls command. In this example, the default location to store the files
was accepted.
$ cd /mkcd/cd_images
$ ls
$ cd_image_15364.vol1 cd_image_15364.vol2
4. Transfer the files from the images directory to the target Virtual I/O Server
using a file transfer technology that best suits your environment.
Chapter 2. Core procedures
11
On the Virtual I/O Server
A media repository and a virtual optical device must now be created. The media
repository does not have to be on the rootvg. Any volume group accessible to the
Virtual I/O Server will be acceptable, but there can only be one repository per
Virtual I/O Server.
5. Make a media repository on the Virtual I/O Server rootvg as in the following
command:
$ mkrep -sp rootvg -size 10G
A repository should be large enough to hold any and all images that you may
have created for this migration. If additional space is required, you may resize
the repository using the Virtual I/O Server chrep command with the size flag.
6. Create virtual optical media using the first volume of the files that you copied
from the source dedicated system:
$ mkvopt -name cd_image_15364.vol1 -file
/home/padmin/cd_image_15364.vol1 -ro
If your repository is large enough, you may load the rest of the media images
into it at this stage by repeating the mkvopt command.
In the previous mkvopt command, the -name parameter represents a logical
unique name for you to refer to the object referenced with the -file parameter.
cd_image_15364.vol1 could have been shortened to cd15364.1.
If you have limited space available for the media repository, you can delete the
image after you have used it with the rmvopt command, and then load the
next image with the mkvopt command, as shown previously.
7. Create a file-backed virtual optical device that uses a virtual adapter on your
target logical partition using the mkvdev command. You can assign a name
using the -dev option. In this example the host already has a SCSI vhost
adapter called vhost1 in use. There is no need to create a separate vhost for
use by file-backed optical devices.
$ mkvdev -fbo -vadapter vhost1 -dev vcd1
vcd1 Available
$
8. Load the virtual optical media file that was created earlier using the mkvopt
command against the virtual optical device that you created in step 7 (vcd1 in
this example):
$ loadopt -disk cd_image_15364.vol1 -vtd vcd1
9. Use the lsmap command to ensure that the correct media is loaded as the
backing device:
lsmap -vadpater vhost1
12
PowerVM Migration from Physical to Virtual Storage
10.If you have multiple media created and the procedure that you are running
asks for the next CD in the sequence, use the Virtual I/O Server unloadopt
command to unload the current virtual media and repeat step 8 on page 12 to
load the next image.
$ unloadopt -vtd vcd1
$ loadopt -disk cd_image_15364.vol2 -vtd vcd1
If your repository size was not able to store all the images, repeat step 6 on
page 12 to remove unneeded images with the rmvopt command and add the
next image with the mkvopt command before using the unloadopt command in
this step.
11.Run a final Virtual I/O Server unloadopt command at the end of the procedure
to ensure that the virtual media is cleaned up.
12.Depending on your requirements, you may keep the current media repository
or remove the virtual media objects using the Virtual I/O Server rmvopt
command:
rmvopt cd_image_15364.vol1
On the target system
13.On the target system, look for a CD drive in the list of devices and use it as
any other CD drive. The restore/recovery will read your virtual media image
rather than physical media to complete the task.
2.2 Checking unique disk identification
Recognition of the correct disks is paramount in the physical-to-virtual migration
processes regardless of the type of disk. SAN volumes and SCSI/SAS disks will
be referred to with the generic term disk in this section.
There are three signatures that a disk may have written to it in the AIX/VIOS
environment, which allow identification of that disk when it is migrated:
򐂰 Physical volume identifier (PVID)
򐂰 IEEE volume identifier
򐂰 Unique device identifier (UDID)
Chapter 2. Core procedures
13
2.2.1 The physical volume identifier (PVID)
The PVID is written to a disk when the disk has been made a member of an AIX
volume group and may be retained on the disk when the disk is removed from a
volume group.
The quickest way of determining whether a disk has a PVID is to use the
AIX/VIOS lspv command:
# lspv
hdisk0
active
hdisk1
hdisk2
hdisk3
hdisk4
hdisk5
hdisk6
hdisk7
000fe4012a8f0920
rootvg
none
000fe4012913f4bd
none
000fe401106cfc0c
000fe4012b5361f2
none
none
None
None
None
None
None
None
None
From the previous example of lspv command output:
򐂰 hdisk0 is a current member of the root volume group (rootvg).
򐂰 hdisk1 has never been in a volume group.
򐂰 hdisk2 has been in a volume group but is no longer a member.
Some of the commands used in this publication display a PVID as 32 digits, while
many of the other commands only display 16 digits. At the time of writing, only
the left-most 16 digits of a PVID are significant. Thus, for our purposes both of
the following PVIDs displayed are equivalent:
002631cd31ad04f5
002631cd31ad04f50000000000000000
2.2.2 The IEEE volume identifier
A disk may have an IEEE volume identifier assigned.
On a Virtual I/O Server, the lsdev command may be used to display the IEEE ID
(or ieee_volname, as it will be shown):
$ lsdev -dev hdisk2 -attr
attribute
value
user_settable
PR_key_value
none
True
cache_method
fast_write
False
14
PowerVM Migration from Physical to Virtual Storage
description
Persistant Reserve Key Value
Write Caching method
ieee_volname
False
lun_id
False
max_transfer
True
prefetch_mult
on read False
pvid
False
q_type
False
queue_depth
True
raid_level
False
reassign_to
True
reserve_policy
True
rw_timeout
True
scsi_id
False
size
False
write_cache
600A0B8000110D0E0000000E47436859
0x0003000000000000
0x100000
IEEE Unique volume name
Logical Unit Number
Maximum TRANSFER Size
1
Multiple of blocks to prefetch
none
Physical volume identifier
simple
Queuing Type
10
Queue Depth
5
RAID Level
120
Reassign Timeout value
no_reserve
Reserve Policy
30
Read/Write Timeout value
0x660a00
SCSI ID
20480
Size in Mbytes
yes Write Caching enabled False
From an AIX system, the lsattr -El diskX command will display the same
information as shown in the preceding example.
2.2.3 The unique device identifier (UDID)
The UDID may be assigned to a disk if the disk is being managed by a multi path
I/O (MPIO) driver.
On a Virtual I/O Server, the lsdev command can be used to display the UDID
value, which appears in the command output as unique_id:
$ lsdev -dev hdisk6 -attr
attribute
value
description
user_settable
PCM
PCM/friend/otherapdisk
Control Module
False
PR_key_value
none
Persistant Reserve Key Value
True
algorithm
fail_over
True
autorecovery
no
Path/Ownership Autorecovery
True
Path
Algorithm
Chapter 2. Core procedures
15
clr_q
no
CLEARS its Queue on error True
cntl_delay_time 0
Controller Delay Time
cntl_hcheck_int 0
Controller Health Check Interval
dist_err_pcnt
0
Distributed Error Percentage
dist_tw_width
50
Distributed Error Sample Time
hcheck_cmd
inquiry
Device
True
True
True
True
Health Check Command
True
hcheck_interval 60
Check Interval
True
hcheck_mode
nonactive
Check Mode
True
location
Label
True
lun_id
0x0
Unit Number ID
False
lun_reset_spt
yes
Supported
True
max_retry_delay 60
Quiesce Time
True
max_transfer
0x40000
TRANSFER Size
True
node_name
0x200200a0b811a662
Name
False
pvid
000fe4017e0037d70000000000000000
volume identifier
False
q_err
yes
bit
True
q_type
simple
TYPE
True
queue_depth
10
DEPTH
True
reassign_to
120
time out value
True
reserve_policy single_path
Policy
True
rw_timeout
30
READ/WRITE time out value
True
scsi_id
0x11000
False
start_timeout
60
unit time out value
True
unique_id
3E213600A0B8000291B0800009D760401BBB80F1815
device identifier
False
ww_name
0x201300a0b811a662
Wide Name
False
$
16
PowerVM Migration from Physical to Virtual Storage
Health
Health
Location
Logical
LUN Reset
Maximum
Maximum
FC Node
Physical
Use QERR
Queuing
Queue
REASSIGN
Reserve
SCSI ID
START
FAStT03IBMfcp Unique
FC World
2.2.4 The chkdev command
As of Virtual I/O Server Fix Pack 22, a new command has been introduced to
assist with the identification of disks and their capabilities. The Virtual I/O Server
chkdev command is capable of displaying the same values as mentioned
previously (IEEE, UDID, and PVID), but provides some additional information:
$ chkdev -dev hdisk6
NAME:
IDENTIFIER:
PHYS2VIRT_CAPABLE:
VIRT2NPIV_CAPABLE:
VIRT2PHYS_CAPABLE:
PVID:
UDID:
IEEE:
VTD:
-verbose
hdisk6
3E213600A0B8000291B0800009D760401BBB80F1815
YES
NA
NA
000fe4017e0037d70000000000000000
3E213600A0B8000291B0800009D760401BBB80F1815
FAStT03IBMfcp
FAStT03IBMfcp
$
In the command output you can see the PVID and UDID of the volume that the
Virtual I/O Server will identify as the IDENTIFIER field. In addition, there are
three capability fields:
PHYS2VIRT_CAPABLE
This disk may be virtualized to a logical partition.
Once this is performed, this field will change to a
value of NA if the mapping is successful. A value
of NO indicates that this volume may not be
virtualized.
VIRT2NPIV_CAPABLE
If the disk is capable of moving from a virtual SCSI
environment to an N_Port ID Virtualization (NPIV)
environment, this field will be set to YES.
Otherwise, it will be set to NO. A value of NA
means that this disk has already been moved and
the Virtual Target Device (or VTD as it is
abbreviated in the command output) will indicate
the mapping.
VIRT2PHYS_CAPABLE
If the device is capable of moving from a virtual
environment to a physical environment and is
currently mapped to a VTD then the value here will
be YES. A value of NA means the disk is not in
use by a VTD, while a value of NO means the disk
is not capable of such a move.
For further information refer to the Virtual I/O Server chkdev manual page.
Chapter 2. Core procedures
17
2.3 Creating a virtual SCSI device
In a virtual SCSI storage environment, the Virtual I/O Server owns the physical
SCSI cards and disks. The disks are then configured as backing devices on the
Virtual I/O Server so that client partitions can access these backing storage
devices. Physical disks owned by the Virtual I/O Server can be assigned to client
partitions in several different ways:
򐂰 The entire disk may be presented to the client partition.
򐂰 The disk may be carved up into multiple logical volumes and each logical
volume can be presented to the client partition.
򐂰 Files can be created on the disks on the Virtual I/O Server and these files can
be presented to the client partition as file-backed storage.
Thus, virtual SCSI enables the sharing of both SCSI adapters and disks.
To make a physical disk, logical volume, or file-backed storage device available to
a client partition:
1. Create one or more virtual SCSI server adapters on the Virtual I/O Server.
Assign server adapter IDs and also specify the adapter IDs that will be used
on the client partition. For additional information see also:
– PowerVM Virtualization on IBM System p: Introduction and Configuration
Fourth Edition, SG24-7940
– IBM PowerVM Virtualization Managing and Monitoring, SG24-7590
2. Create virtual SCSI client adapters on the client partition. Specify the same
adapter IDs selected on the Virtual I/O Server.
3. Create the virtual target mappings on the Virtual I/O Server such that the
client is connected to the correct server-side resources.
Virtual SCSI server adapters appear as vhost virtual devices on the Virtual I/O
Server, as shown in the following command output:
$ lsdev -dev vhost*
name
status
vhost0
Available
description
Virtual SCSI Server Adapter
In the same way that a physical SCSI adapter allows access to multiple disks, a
virtual SCSI host adapter allows many disks to be mapped to it. The following
command is an example of how to map a disk—hdisk6 to a virtual SCSI host
adapter vhost5:
$ mkvdev -vdev hdisk6 -vadapter vhost5
vtscsi2 Available
18
PowerVM Migration from Physical to Virtual Storage
Figure 2-1 shows the relationship between physical SCSI disk and the target
SCSI device on the Virtual I/O Server.
Figure 2-1 Relationship between physical and virtual SCSI on Virtual I/O Server
As mentioned earlier, client partitions access their assigned storage through a
virtual SCSI client adapter. While the Virtual I/O Server may be presenting entire
disks, logical volumes, or file-backed devices from physical SCSI or Fibre
Channel adapters to a client through the vhost adapters, the client sees them all
as virtual SCSI disk devices. The following command shows how a client partition
sees the virtual SCSI device:
# lsdev -c disk -s vscsi
hdisk0 Available Virtual SCSI Disk Drive
Chapter 2. Core procedures
19
Figure 2-2 shows the relationship between physical SCSI disk and the virtual
SCSI devices on a client partition.
Figure 2-2 Relationship between physical and Virtual SCSI on client partition
Detailing the actual procedure of creating virtual SCSI devices follows. It is
assumed that you have:
򐂰 A running Virtual I/O Server
򐂰 A physical SCSI or a Fibre Channel adapter that is presenting disk to the
Virtual I/O Server, or both
20
PowerVM Migration from Physical to Virtual Storage
On the HMC
The objective is to create the server and client adapters that will allow the disks
being presented from a physical Fibre Channel adapter to be visible to a client
partition.
1. On the HMC, you will see a panel similar to Figure 2-3 if you display the
physical adapters attached to the Virtual I/O Server. In our example, the
highlighted Fibre Channel adapter in slot C1 will be used.
Figure 2-3 HMC Virtual I/O Server Physical Adapters panel
2. Select the client partition and display the Virtual Adapters panel. Make a note
of a free slot number. This slot number will be needed in the following step.
3. Select the Virtual I/O Server and add a virtual SCSI server adapter. You will
choose a free slot number on the Virtual I/O Server and map it to the slot
number that you made a note of in the previous step. In our case, the server
slot number is 17 and the client slot number is 9. In our example, the adapter
Chapter 2. Core procedures
21
will be available to only a single partition since a specific partition was
specified. This is the best practice, as we do not recommend making the
adapter available to all clients. Figure 2-4 shows the panel to create the
server adapter.
Figure 2-4 Create Virtual SCSI Server Adapter panel
22
PowerVM Migration from Physical to Virtual Storage
For this example, the adapter was dynamically added. If you want your
configuration to be permanent, add the adapter to the Virtual I/O Server
profile in addition to dynamically adding it. Your display of the Virtual I/O
Server virtual adapters panel will look similar to Figure 2-5 when this step is
complete. The server adapter that was created is highlighted.
Figure 2-5 Virtual SCSI server adapter created on Virtual I/O Server
Chapter 2. Core procedures
23
4. Create the virtual client adapter. You must use the same slot numbers that
you selected in the previous step. In addition, select the check box This
adapter is required for partition activation check box. Your display of the
Client Virtual Adapters Properties panel should yield something similar to
Figure 2-6 when this step is complete. Note from the figure that the adapter
was added to the client partition profile and not dynamically added. This is
required in our case because our client is not activated and will use the virtual
SCSI device as its boot disk.
Figure 2-6 Matching virtual SCSI client adapter created in client profile
On the Virtual I/O Server
With the server and client adapters created on the HMC, mapping the storage to
the adapters on the Virtual I/O Server must be completed.
5. Within the padmin restricted shell, run the cfgdev command to create the
virtual SCSI server adapter defined in the previous steps on the HMC. In our
case, this will create a new vhost6 virtual SCSI server adapter.
24
PowerVM Migration from Physical to Virtual Storage
The first lsmap command in the following command output shows us that
vhost6 is mapped to server slot C17 (as previously defined on the HMC) and
currently has no virtual target device mapped to it. Noting the slot number is a
good way to verify that you have selected the correct server adapter before
proceeding. For the purpose of this example, the physical hdisk6 is the disk
that the client partition should eventually use. To achieve this, run the mkvdev
command, as shown below, to map hdisk6 to the client partition. The second
lsmap command shows us that vhost6 now has hdisk6 as its backing device.
$ lsmap -vadapter vhost6
SVSA
Physloc
Client Partition ID
--------------- -------------------------------------------- -----------------vhost6
U8204.E8A.10FE411-V2-C17
0x00000000
VTD
NO VIRTUAL TARGET DEVICE FOUND
$ mkvdev -vdev hdisk6 -vadapter vhost6
vtscsi2 Available
$
$ lsmap -vadapter vhost6
SVSA
Physloc
Client Partition ID
--------------- -------------------------------------------- -----------------vhost6
U8204.E8A.10FE411-V2-C17
0x00000004
VTD
Status
LUN
Backing device
Physloc
vtscsi2
Available
0x8100000000000000
hdisk6
U78A0.001.DNWGCV7-P1-C4-T1-W201300A0B811A662-L0
On the client partition
6. Once activated, the client partition will now have available to it a virtual boot
disk. (Note that in certain situations, a SCSI reserve will prevent the
destination client partition from using the migrated disk. In this case, the SCSI
reserve must be released before attempting to use the SCSI device on the
destination client partition.) Once the partition has booted up, the lscfg
command may be used if required for final validation as in the command
output below.
# lscfg -vl hdisk1
hdisk1
U8204.E8A.10FE401-V2-C9-T1-L8100000000000000 Virtual
SCSI Disk Drive
#
In the previous output, C9 is our client slot number and 8100000000000000
matches the value of the LUN field in the lsmap command performed on the
Virtual I/O Server. This serves as additional confirmation that the mapping of
physical disk to virtual disk on the client was successful.
Chapter 2. Core procedures
25
2.4 Virtual Fibre Channel and N_Port ID virtualization
N_Port ID virtualization (NPIV) is a technology that allows multiple logical
partitions to access independent physical storage through the same physical
Fibre Channel adapter. Each partition is identified by a pair of unique worldwide
port names, enabling you to connect each partition to independent physical
storage on a SAN. Unlike virtual SCSI, only the client partitions see the disk. The
Virtual I/O Server acts only as a pass-through managing the data transfer
through the POWER Hypervisor™.
NPIV is supported at certain minimum hardware configurations and software
levels. Refer to the requirements that follow; the publication IBM PowerVM
Virtualization Managing and Monitoring, SG24-7590; and the latest Virtual I/O
Server documentation for more information.
NPIV is supported in PowerVM Express, Standard, and Enterprise Editions.
POWER6 processor-based servers require a minimum of one of the following
items:
򐂰 8 GB Fibre Channel adapter Feature Code 5735
򐂰 An NPIV capable SAN switch:
– A Brocade SAN switch at firmware level 5.3.0 or later
– A CISCO MDS 9000 SAN with the optional NPIV licensed feature installed
POWER6 Blade systems require a minimum of one of the following I/O cards:
򐂰 Emulex 8 Gigabit Fibre Card Feature Code 8240
򐂰 QLogic 8 Gigabit Fibre Card Feature Code 8271
򐂰 QLogic 8 Gigabit Fibre Card + 1 Gigabit Ethernet Feature Code 8242
JS12 and JS22 Blades support only the CFFh adapter, and JS23 and JS43
support the CIOv adapters.
In addition, there are some restrictions on SAN switches and firmware levels.
Check with your IBM support representative for the currently supported levels.
To enable NPIV, assign the physical NPIV-capable Fibre Channel adapter to a
Virtual I/O Server and connect virtual Fibre Channel adapters on the client
partition to virtual Fibre Channel adapters on the Virtual I/O Server.
26
PowerVM Migration from Physical to Virtual Storage
Detailing the procedure to use NPIV follows. In the scenario described, it is
assumed that you have:
򐂰 A running standalone source host with rootvg on a SAN LUN
򐂰 A Virtual I/O Server with a physical NPIV-capable Fibre Channel adapter
allocated to it
򐂰 A destination client partition that is currently running with rootvg on virtual
SCSI disk
The client partition will be reconfigured such that it boots using the migrated SAN
LUN using virtual Fibre Channel.
Note: Be sure to have the virtual Fibre Channel client file set installed on the
standalone SAN rootvg before shutting down your standalone host for
migration. This is required for virtual Fibre Channel when rootvg is started on
the client partition.
Chapter 2. Core procedures
27
On the HMC
Create the virtual Fibre Channel mappings that will allow the destination client
partition to see what was previously the source standalone server’s rootvg SAN
LUN.
1. Create the virtual Fibre Channel server adapter on the Virtual I/O Server.
Something similar to the highlighted portion in Figure 2-7 is what you should
see when this step is complete.
Figure 2-7 Virtual Fibre Channel server adapter created on Virtual I/O Server
28
PowerVM Migration from Physical to Virtual Storage
2. Create the virtual Fibre Channel client adapter in the client partition profile. If
you want the adapter and storage to be visible after a partition shutdown,
save the configuration to a new profile and use the new profile when starting
up the partition. You should see something similar to the highlighted portion in
Figure 2-8 when this step is complete.
Figure 2-8 Virtual Fibre Channel client adapter created in client partition profile
Note: A POWER Hypervisor has a limit of 32,000 pairs of WWPNs. If you
run out of WWPNs, you must obtain an activation code for an additional set
of 32,000 pairs.
Chapter 2. Core procedures
29
Note: Each time that you configure a virtual Fibre Channel adapter,
whether dynamically or by adding to a partition profile, the HMC obtains a
new, non-reusable, pair of WWPNs from the POWER Hypervisor.
Therefore, the correct procedure for dynamically allocating a virtual Fibre
Channel adapter to an active partition that must keep the configuration
across a partition shutdown is to first dynamically allocate the adapter to
the partition and then use the HMC Save Current Configuration feature to
save the configuration to a new profile. This new profile then must be used
to start the partition after a shutdown. This ensures that the WWPNs that
were allocated during the dynamic operation will be the same ones in the
profile. If instead you dynamically add an adapter and then add an adapter
to the partition profile, the partition will come up with a different pair of
WWPNs after a partition shutdown and access to the storage will be lost.
On the standalone source host
3. Shut down the standalone host and remap the SAN rootvg LUN on the Fibre
Channel switches from the standalone host’s physical Fibre Channel adapter
to the client partition virtual Fibre Channel adapter. The WWPNs will be found
in the client virtual Fibre Channel adapter properties and will look similar to
Figure 2-9.
Figure 2-9 Virtual Fibre Channel Adapter Properties
30
PowerVM Migration from Physical to Virtual Storage
To get to the above panel, on the HMC select the client partition, click Properties
from the Tasks menu. Select the Virtual Adapters tab on the panel that appears.
Select the Client Fibre Channel adapter line. From Actions, select Properties.
On the Virtual I/O Server
You will now activate the virtual adapters defined in the previous step and map
the virtual adapter to the physical Fibre Channel adapter.
4. Log in to the Virtual I/O Server as the padmin user and run the cfgdev
command to get the virtual Fibre Channel adapter configured.
5. Get the list of all available virtual Fibre Channel server adapters using the
lsdev command:
$ lsdev -dev vfchost*
name
status
vfchost0
Available
description
Virtual FC Server Adapter
6. Get the list of all available physical Fibre Channel server adapters. As you can
see from the lsdev command output, our NPIV-supported dual-port Fibre
Channel card is at fcs0 and fcs1. Since only the second port is cabled on the
card in this test environment, fcs1 must be selected.
$ lsdev -dev fcs*
name
status
fcs0
Available
fcs1
Available
fcs2
Defined
fcs3
Defined
fcs4
Available
fcs5
Available
description
8Gb PCI Express Dual Port FC Adapter (df1000f114108a03)
8Gb PCI Express Dual Port FC Adapter (df1000f114108a03)
4Gb FC PCI Express Adapter (df1000fe)
4Gb FC PCI Express Adapter (df1000fe)
FC Adapter
FC Adapter
7. Run the lsnports command to check the Fibre Channel adapter NPIV
readiness of the adapter and the SAN switch. Since the fabric attribute is set
to 1, the configuration is NPIV ready so the migration can proceed. If you see
a state of 0, check the configuration of your adapter or SAN switch, or both.
$ lsnports
name
fcs1
physloc
U78A0.001.DNWGCV7-P1-C1-T2
fabric tports aports swwpns
1
64
64
2048
awwpns
2048
8. Use the vfcmap command to map the virtual adapter to the physical adapter.
The lsmap command lists out the mapping created by the vfcmap command:
$ vfcmap -vadapter vfchost0 -fcp fcs1
$
$ lsmap -npiv -vadapter vfchost0
Name
Physloc
ClntID ClntName
ClntOS
------------- ---------------------------------- ------ -------------- ------vfchost0
U8204.E8A.10FE411-V2-C17
4 p2_411
AIX
Status:LOGGED_IN
FC name:fcs1
FC loc code:U78A0.001.DNWGCV7-P1-C1-T2
Chapter 2. Core procedures
31
Ports logged in:7
Flags:a<LOGGED_IN,STRIP_MERGE>
VFC client name:fcs0
VFC client DRC:U8204.E8A.10FE411-V4-C9-T1
In your lsmap output, you may not see the Status as LOGGED_IN if you had
not already mapped the SAN LUN to the Virtual I/O Server.
On the SAN and storage devices
You can do the SAN mapping now by proceeding with the following steps:
9. There are two scenarios that you should be aware of: dynamically creating a
virtual Fibre Channel and non-dynamic mode, that is, when you configure the
profile of a logical partition that is not currently running.
a. If you dynamically configure the virtual Fibre Channel client adapter into
the logical partition, the world wide port names (WWPNs) that get created
are immediately presented to the SAN fabric.
This has the benefit of allowing you to immediately change the SAN
zoning and storage mapping to the new WWPNs.
b. if you do not use the dynamic partition tools, and edit the profile of the
logical partition, you must use a slightly longer process to perform the
mapping if your target storage does not allow you to directly type in the
new WWPNs. Boot the logical partition using the SMS mode, then use the
following steps to force the vfc-client device to log in to the SAN fabric:
i. Type 5 and press Enter to access the Select Boot Options panel.
ii. Type 1 and press Enter to access the Select Device Type panel.
iii. Type 5 and press Enter to access the Hard Drive Panel.
iv. Type 3 and press Enter to use SAN media.
32
PowerVM Migration from Physical to Virtual Storage
At this point, the following SMS panel is displayed:
------------------------------------------------------------------------------Select Media Adapter
1.
U8204.E8A.10FE411-V2-C9-T1
/vdevice/vfc-client@30000008
2.
List all devices
------------------------------------------------------------------------------Navigation keys:
M = return to Main Menu
ESC key = return to previous screen
X = eXit System Management Services
------------------------------------------------------------------------------Type menu item number and press Enter or select Navigation key:
c. Type 1 and press Enter. At this stage the WWPNs are presented to the
SAN Fabric.
Tip: You do not have to leave this screen. Leave it open so that you can
complete the procedure.
d. Now have your SAN team perform the zone changes and any storage
device mapping.
If you think that your system has not shut down cleanly or you are
performing a live migration, you may be required to break any SCSI 2
reserves using the SAN GUI or CLI appropriate to your storage
subsystem.
Note: If your SAN or storage people cannot see the WWPNs on the
storage device, you may be required to complete another scan by
following steps b and c again.
Chapter 2. Core procedures
33
In Figure 2-10, the relationship between the virtual Fibre Channel
components and what the SAN switch sees is shown.
WWPN
10000000c98723af
WWPN
c05076004faa001b
virtual
server
adapter
WWPN
c05076004faa001a
physical
adapter
vfc fc
vfc
virtual Fibre Channel (POWER Hypervisor)
Client
Logical
Partition
virtual
client
adapter
POWER 6
System
Enclosure
Virtual
I/O
Server
NPIV/Virtual Fibre Channel Setup
SAN
Switch
The SAN Switch sees both
10000000c98723af and
c05076004faa001a
WWPNS
Only ZONE Storage to
c05076004faa001a
Figure 2-10 Virtual Fibre Channel concepts
10.In some cases you may be required to verify that WWPNs can be seen on the
SAN. In the examples used here, we use an IBM 2005-B16 SAN switch. The
commands will work on any IBM B Series or Brocade switch with firmware
equal to or greater than FOS 5.3.0. Two methods are presented:
– Using the Web-based SwitchExplorer interface
– Using telnet
34
PowerVM Migration from Physical to Virtual Storage
Method 1: the SwitchExplorer Web Interface
a. Use your Web browser to point to the URL of your SAN switches’ IP
address, then log in to the SAN switch with a user login with at least read
access. You should see a panel similar to the one shown in Figure 2-11.
Figure 2-11 SAN Switch panel
Chapter 2. Core procedures
35
b. In Figure 2-11 on page 35, port 6 has been highlighted since this is our
physical port from our cabling diagram. Click the port to bring up the port
details. You will see a panel similar to that shown in Figure 2-12.
Figure 2-12 SAN port details
c. Note that the port selected has the entry NPIV Enabled set to a value of
True. This is highlighted in Figure 2-12. If the value is set to false then this
should be rectified before continuing this procedure.
Next select the Device Details tab, which is in the upper right-most area of
the panel.
36
PowerVM Migration from Physical to Virtual Storage
d. The panel shown in Figure 2-13 is displayed.
Figure 2-13 SAN port device details
The highlighted device port WWN is one that would be expected to be
seen. This means our virtual Fibre Channel connection has correctly
presented the virtual Fibre Channel to the SAN Switch. Some disk storage
devices may take a few seconds before the WWPN is presented to them.
Method 2: using telnet
a. telnet to the SAN switches’ management IP address and log in to the
SAN switch with a user login with at least read access. You should see a
prompt similar to the following:
itso-aus-san-01:admin>
In the prompt, itso-aus-san-01 is the name of the example SAN switch and
admin is the login user account. Your switch name and possibly your user
ID will be different.
b. Use the portcfgshow command to determine whether the port that you are
using has the NPIV capability value set to ON:
itso-aus-san-01:admin> portcfgshow
Ports of Slot 0
0 1 2 3
4 5 6 7
8 9 10 11
12 13 14 15
-----------------+--+--+--+--+----+--+--+--+----+--+--+--+----+--+--+-Speed
AN AN AN AN
AN AN AN AN AN AN AN AN
AN AN AN AN
Trunk Port
ON ON ON ON
ON ON ON ON ON ON ON ON
ON ON ON ON
Long Distance
.. .. .. ..
.. .. .. .. .. .. .. ..
.. .. .. ..
Chapter 2. Core procedures
37
VC Link Init
..
Locked L_Port
..
Locked G_Port
..
Disabled E_Port
..
ISL R_RDY Mode
..
RSCN Suppressed
..
Persistent Disable..
NPIV capability
ON
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
ON
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
ON
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
ON
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
ON
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
ON
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
ON
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
ON
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
ON
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
ON
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
ON
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
ON
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
ON
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
ON
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
ON
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
ON
where AN:AutoNegotiate, ..:OFF, ??:INVALID,
SN:Software controlled AutoNegotiation.
itso-aus-san-01:admin>
c. Issue a portshow command against the number of the port that you are
interested in (port 6 in our case). The output is long, but you must look for
two pieces of information:
i. The portFlags field should show a keyword of NPIV in the output.
ii. The lines that start with portWwn should show that your client virtual
Fibre Adapter WWPN is listed. This has been highlighted for clarity in
the following example:
itso-aus-san-01:admin> portshow 6
portName:
portHealth: No Fabric Watch License
Authentication: None
portDisableReason: None
portCFlags: 0x1
portFlags: 0x1024b03
LOGICAL_ONLINE
PRESENT ACTIVE F_PORT G_PORT U_PORT NPIV
LOGIN NOELP LED ACCEPT FLOGI
portType: 11.0
POD Port: Port is licensed
portState: 1
Online
portPhys: 6
In_Sync
portScn:
32
F_Port
port generation number:
64
portId:
011600
portIfId:
43020006
portWwn:
20:06:00:05:1e:02:aa:c1
portWwn of device(s) connected:
c0:50:76:00:4f:aa:00:1c
10:00:00:00:c9:87:23:af
Distance: normal
portSpeed: N4Gbps
LE domain: 0
FC Fastwrite: OFF
Interrupts:
Unknown:
38
121
23
PowerVM Migration from Physical to Virtual Storage
Link_failure: 1
Loss_of_sync: 7
Frjt:
Fbsy:
0
0
Lli:
Proc_rqrd:
Timed_out:
Rx_flushed:
Tx_unavail:
Free_buffer:
Overrun:
Suspended:
Parity_err:
2_parity_err:
CMI_bus_err:
109
2422
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
Loss_of_sig:
Protocol_err:
Invalid_word:
Invalid_crc:
Delim_err:
Address_err:
Lr_in:
Lr_out:
Ols_in:
Ols_out:
7
0
0
0
0
0
5
2
1
5
Port part of other ADs: No
itso-aus-san-01:admin>
d. From the portshow command output, note that the WWPN has been
presented to the SAN switch. You can also check to see whether the
virtual WWPN has a valid login status using the portLoginShow command.
The presence of the WWPN with a PID value greater than 0 indicates a
valid login state:
itso-aus-san-01:admin> portloginshow 6
Type PID
World Wide Name
credit df_sz cos
=====================================================
fe 011601 c0:50:76:00:4f:aa:00:1c
40 2048
c
fe 011600 10:00:00:00:c9:87:23:af
40 2048
c
ff 011601 c0:50:76:00:4f:aa:00:1c
12 2048
c
ff 011600 10:00:00:00:c9:87:23:af
12 2048
c
itso-aus-san-01:admin>
scr=3
scr=3
d_id=FFFFFC
d_id=FFFFFC
The command output indicates that the virtual Fibre Channel WWPNs are
correctly registered with the SAN switch.
Note: If your output does not show your expected WWPNs as detailed
in either the SwitchExplorer or telnet sections above, you should
consult with your SAN specialist before proceeding.
On the destination client partition
Boot the client partition using the virtual Fibre Channel drive that was mapped in
the previous steps. Keep in mind that since you are coming from a standalone
server with physical Ethernet interfaces, you may have to reconfigure the
Ethernet on the destination client partition to get network access.
11.If not already in the SMS menu, shut down the client partition and reactivate
the partition into SMS.
12.Select option number 5 from the menu (Select Boot Options), find the Fibre
Channel drive, and initiate a boot from this device. The device should look like
the one shown in the following SMS example:
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Chapter 2. Core procedures
39
Select Device
Device Current Device
Number Position Name
1.
SCSI 14 GB FC Harddisk, part=2 (AIX 6.1.0)
( loc=U8204.E8A.10FE411-V4-C9-T1-W201300a0b811a662-L0 )
------------------------------------------------------------------------------Navigation keys:
M = return to Main Menu
ESC key = return to previous screen
X = eXit System Management Services
------------------------------------------------------------------------------Type menu item number and press Enter or select Navigation key:1
13.Type 1 and press Enter in the SMS menu, then perform a Normal Mode Boot,
as shown here:
------------------------------------------------------------------------------Select Task
SCSI 14 GB FC Harddisk, part=2 (AIX 6.1.0)
( loc=U8204.E8A.10FE411-V4-C9-T1-W201300a0b811a662-L0 )
1.
2.
3.
Information
Normal Mode Boot
Service Mode Boot
------------------------------------------------------------------------------Navigation keys:
M = return to Main Menu
ESC key = return to previous screen
X = eXit System Management Services
------------------------------------------------------------------------------Type menu item number and press Enter or select Navigation key: 2
40
PowerVM Migration from Physical to Virtual Storage
14.Enter option 1 to exit the SMS menu, as shown here:
------------------------------------------------------------------------------Are you sure you want to exit System Management Services?
1.
Yes
2.
No
------------------------------------------------------------------------------Navigation Keys:
X = eXit System Management Services
------------------------------------------------------------------------------Type menu item number and press Enter or select Navigation key:1
15.Verify that the client has booted with the same LUN that was on the
standalone machine via the virtual Fibre Channel adapter. The getconf
command is another way to discover the boot device. The lspv command
gives us added confirmation that rootvg is on hdisk8, and the lsdev and lscfg
commands show us that hdisk8 is a SAN disk.
# getconf BOOT_DEVICE
hdisk8
# lspv | grep hdisk8
hdisk8
000fe401727b47c5
rootvg
active
#
# lsdev -c disk | grep hdisk8
hdisk8 Available C9-T1-01 MPIO Other DS4K Array Disk
#
# lscfg -vl hdisk8
hdisk8
U8204.E8A.10FE411-V4-C9-T1-W201300A0B811A662-L0 MPIO
Other DS4K Array Disk
Manufacturer................IBM
Machine Type and Model......1815
FAStT
ROS Level and ID............30393134
Serial Number...............
Device Specific.(Z0)........0000053245005032
Device Specific.(Z1)........
Chapter 2. Core procedures
41
The remaining lsdev commands list out all Fibre Channel adapters and show
how hdisk8 maps back to the virtual Fibre Channel adapter fcs2:
# lsdev|grep fcs
fcs0
Defined 07-00
fcs1
Defined 07-01
fcs2
Available C9-T1
4Gb FC PCI Express Adapter (df1000fe)
4Gb FC PCI Express Adapter (df1000fe)
Virtual Fibre Channel Client Adapter
#
# lsdev -l hdisk8 -F parent
fscsi2
# lsdev -l fscsi2 -F parent
fcs2
The migration is now complete.
42
PowerVM Migration from Physical to Virtual Storage
3
Chapter 3.
Standalone SCSI rootvg to
virtual SCSI
This chapter details the migration of a standalone client with a rootvg on local
disk to a logical partition with a disk presented via a Virtual I/O Server using
virtual SCSI.
© Copyright IBM Corp. 2010. All rights reserved.
43
Figure 3-1 shows an overview of the process.
Standalone
Client
eth
Migrated to
VIOS vSCSI
fc
fc
eth
VIOS
vsa
AIX Server
Physical
Volumes
vca
Client LPAR
Physical
Volumes
IBM Dedicated
IBM System p
Figure 3-1 Migration from standalone rootvg on local disk to a logical partition
Local disks on standalone machines are not accessible to a Virtual I/O Server.
Therefore, the data on the disks comprising rootvg must be transferred to disks
accessible by the target Virtual I/O Server or the physical standalone disk must
be moved to a location that the Virtual I/O Server can access.
Note that instructions to physically move a standalone hard disk to a Virtual I/O
Server are not covered by this guide since the required instructions are hardware
specific. If you have the capability to move the standalone disk to the virtualized
system enclosure/CEC containing the target Virtual I/O Server then you can:
򐂰 Physically move the disks to the new location.
򐂰 Follow the instructions in 2.3, “Creating a virtual SCSI device” on page 18, to
map your disks to the logical partition.
44
PowerVM Migration from Physical to Virtual Storage
As with any migration, planning is essential. Our instructions generally refer to a
single disk rootvg environment. If you have multiple disks in your rootvg then:
򐂰 If the rootvg is mirrored across the disks, you may want to break the mirror
first. This gives you a recovery point if any problem occurs.
򐂰 If the rootvg is striped across a number of disks then our recommendation is
that you use the method in 3.1, “Back up to CD and restore” on page 46.
There are four methods provided in this chapter to migrate the data from a
standalone disk to a Virtual I/O Server virtual SCSI-managed disk. Different
methods will appeal to each systems administrator depending on the skill level
and availability of other team personnel such as SAN administrators and backup
operators. Our suggestion is to choose the method that gives you the best
flexibility with as little risk as possible based on your service-level requirements.
The methods are listed below in no significant order:
򐂰
򐂰
򐂰
򐂰
Back up to CD/Tape and restore on Virtual I/O Server managed disk.
Mirror rootvg disks to SAN disks.
Clone rootvg to an external disk.
Other methods such as NIM.
Each method is discussed in the following sections in detail.
Chapter 3. Standalone SCSI rootvg to virtual SCSI
45
3.1 Back up to CD and restore
This migration uses the file backed optical feature of the Virtual I/O Server to
present a number of previously made ISO images to the target logical partition as
though these images where physical CD media. The advantage of this method is
that it could be used to provision logical partitions very quickly from a master
image copy, for example, in a development environment or if performing any form
of diagnostics.
The steps for the migration follow.
On the standalone server: part 1
The first step is to determine how big the destination disk must be.
1. Determine the required size of a destination disk for the migration by using
the AIX lsvg command on the rootvg:
# lsvg rootvg
VOLUME GROUP:
rootvg
000fe4010000d9000000012478906561
VG STATE:
active
VG PERMISSION:
read/write
MAX LVs:
256
LVs:
13
OPEN LVs:
11
TOTAL PVs:
1
STALE PVs:
0
ACTIVE PVs:
1
MAX PPs per VG:
32512
MAX PPs per PV:
1016
LTG size (Dynamic): 1024 kilobyte(s)
HOT SPARE:
no
VG IDENTIFIER:
PP SIZE:
TOTAL PPs:
FREE PPs:
USED PPs:
QUORUM:
VG DESCRIPTORS:
STALE PPs:
AUTO ON:
256 megabyte(s)
546 (139776 megabytes)
508 (130048 megabytes)
38 (9728 megabytes)
2 (Enabled)
2
0
yes
MAX PVs:
AUTO SYNC:
BB POLICY:
32
no
relocatable
2. Calculate the size from the number of physical partitions and the physical
partition size. You only need the USED PPs and a small margin and do not
have to allocate a full disk if the rootvg is not required to grow.
3. Back up the rootvg to CD images using the mkcd command:
a. Run the smitty mkcd command as follows:
# smitty mkcd
b. Select No from the Use an existing mksysb image menu. Selecting No
allows you to create a new system backup that reflects your currently
running environment.
c. Select the options that are appropriate to your environment from the Back
Up This System to CD menu. You can also leave the default options as
they are.
46
PowerVM Migration from Physical to Virtual Storage
d. For the File system to store final CD images question, you can leave it
blank or chose to use options such as an NFS file system. An NFS file
system was used in this example (the /mnt/cdiso NFS file system that was
previously created).
e. Select Yes for the Do you want the CD to be bootable option.
f. Select No for the Remove final images after creating CD option.
g. Select No for the Create the CD now option.
h. Press Enter to begin the system backup creation. When the operation
completes successfully, there is a file or files located in the default
/mkcd/cd_images directory or the location that you specified if you modified
the input in step 3 on page 46d.
i. To check which files where created, exit smitty and change the directory
to the directory that you provided at step d above. Issue the ls command.
In this example an NFS file system was used to store the files:
# ls /mnt/cdiso/cd_*
/mnt/cdiso/cd_image_82472.vol1
/mnt/cdiso/cd_image_82472.vol2
#
/mnt/cdiso/cd_image_82472.vol3
/mnt/cdiso/cd_image_82472.vol4
On the Virtual I/O Server: part 1
On the Virtual I/O Server, create the disk and map to the required logical
partition:
4. Allocate a destination disk and verify that it meets the allocated size of the
standalone client’s rootvg as determined from the previous steps. The disk
may be a LUN presented by a virtual SCSI, or from a storage pool on the
Virtual I/O Server.
5. Create a mapping using the allocated disk from the Virtual I/O Server to the
client logical partition using the Virtual I/O Server mkvdev command:
$ mkvdev -vdev vp1rootvg -vadapter vhost0
6. Ensure that you have already created at least one virtual SCSI adapter
between the target Virtual I/O Server and the logical partition. Use the lsdev
-virtual command for verification:
$ lsdev -virtual
name
status
ent4
Available
ent5
Available
ent6
Available
ent7
Available
description
Virtual I/O
Virtual I/O
Virtual I/O
Virtual I/O
Ethernet
Ethernet
Ethernet
Ethernet
Adapter
Adapter
Adapter
Adapter
(l-lan)
(l-lan)
(l-lan)
(l-lan)
Chapter 3. Standalone SCSI rootvg to virtual SCSI
47
vasi0
(VASI)
vbsd0
vhost0
vhost1
vhost2
vhost3
vhost4
vhost5
vhost6
vsa0
vcd1
Optical
vp1rootvg
vp2rootvg
vp3rootvg
vp4rootvg
vtopt0
Optical
vtscsi0
vtscsi1
vtscsi2
name
ent8
Available
Virtual Asynchronous Services Interface
Available
Available
Available
Available
Available
Available
Available
Available
Available
Available
Virtual Block Storage Device (VBSD)
Virtual SCSI Server Adapter
Virtual SCSI Server Adapter
Virtual SCSI Server Adapter
Virtual SCSI Server Adapter
Virtual SCSI Server Adapter
Virtual SCSI Server Adapter
Virtual SCSI Server Adapter
LPAR Virtual Serial Adapter
Virtual Target Device - File-backed
Available
Available
Available
Available
Available
Virtual
Virtual
Virtual
Virtual
Virtual
Available
Available
Available
status
Available
Virtual Target Device - Logical Volume
Virtual Target Device - Disk
Virtual Target Device - Disk
description
Shared Ethernet Adapter
Target
Target
Target
Target
Target
Device
Device
Device
Device
Device
-
Logical Volume
Logical Volume
Logical Volume
Logical Volume
File-backed
7. The Virtual I/O Server lsmap command can be used to check that the correct
disk is mapped to the client logical partition. For clarity only the required entry
has been shown below:
$ lsmap -all | more
SVSA
Physloc
Client Partition ID
--------------- -------------------------------------------- -----------------vhost0
U8204.E8A.10FE411-V2-C11
0x00000003
VTD
Status
LUN
Backing device
Physloc
vtscsi0
Available
0x8100000000000000
p1rootvg
8. Create the virtual optical device using the mkvdev command. In this example
the same vhost that is assigned to the disk volume is used. There is no need
to create a separate vhost for use by file-backed optical devices:
$ mkvdev -fbo -vadapter vhost0
vtopt1 Available
$
48
PowerVM Migration from Physical to Virtual Storage
9. Use the Virtual I/O Server lsmap command to verify that the device has been
created:
$ lsmap -all | more
SVSA
Physloc
Client Partition ID
--------------- -------------------------------------------- -----------------vhost0
U8204.E8A.10FE411-V2-C11
0x00000003
VTD
Status
LUN
Backing device
Physloc
vtopt1
Available
0x8200000000000000
VTD
Status
LUN
Backing device
Physloc
<output truncated>
vtscsi0
Available
0x8100000000000000
p1rootvg
10.Make a media repository on the Virtual I/O Server rootvg. It must be big
enough to hold any and all images that you may have created for this
migration. However, you may resize the repository using the Virtual I/O Server
chrep command with the size flag if you run out of space.
a. Use the mkrep command to create the repository:
$ mkrep -sp rootvg -size 10G
b. The lsrep command confirms that the repository has been created:
$ lsrep
Size(mb) Free(mb) Parent Pool
10198
10198 rootvg
$
Parent Size
139776
Parent Free
81920
c. You now load the first of the required images into the repository using the
mkvopt command:
$ mkvopt -name cd_image_82472.1 -file /updates/cd_image_82472.vol1 -ro
Chapter 3. Standalone SCSI rootvg to virtual SCSI
49
d. The lsrep command can be used to show which images you have loaded
into the repository:
$ lsrep
Size(mb) Free(mb) Parent Pool
10198
9595 rootvg
Parent Size
139776
Name
cd_image_82472.1
Parent Free
81920
File Size Optical
603 None
Access
ro
11.Load the virtual optical media file that was created earlier using the mkvopt
command against the virtual optical device that you created in step 6 on
page 47 above (vtopt1 in this example) using the loadopt command:
$ loadopt -disk cd_image_82472.1 -vtd vtopt1
12.A final Virtual I/O Server lsmap command can be used to ensure that you have
the correct media loaded:
$ lsmap -all | more
SVSA
Physloc
Client Partition ID
--------------- -------------------------------------------- -----------------vhost0
U8204.E8A.10FE411-V2-C11
0x00000003
VTD
Status
LUN
Backing device
Physloc
vtopt1
Available
0x8200000000000000
/var/vio/VMLibrary/cd_image_82472.1
VTD
Status
LUN
Backing device
Physloc
<output truncated>
vtscsi0
Available
0x8100000000000000
p1rootvg
On the HMC
Using the HMC, activate the client logical partition and restore the backup. The
method is the same as though you were using a CD-ROM from the Virtual I/O
Server with the CD media, except that there is a copy of the media on disk:
13.Activate the client partition using the HMC.
14.Open a terminal window or console session.
15.Click Advanced to open the Advanced options menu.
16.Click SMS for the boot mode.
17.Click OK to close the Advanced options menu.
18.Click OK again. A vterm window opens for the partition. The client logical
partition should now boot to the SMS menu.
50
PowerVM Migration from Physical to Virtual Storage
19.Type the 5, as shown in Example 3-1.
Example 3-1 Main SMS Entry Panel
------------------------------------------------------------------------------Main Menu
1.
Select Language
2.
Setup Remote IPL (Initial Program Load)
3.
Change SCSI Settings
4.
Select Console
5.
Select Boot Options
------------------------------------------------------------------------------Navigation Keys:
X = eXit System Management
Services
------------------------------------------------------------------------------Type menu item number and press Enter or select Navigation key:
20.Type the 2 key and press Enter to enter the Configure Boot Device Order
panel.
21.Type the 1 key and press Enter to access the Select the 1st Boot Device
panel.
22.Type the number that corresponds to the CD/DVD device and press Enter.
23.You can type 1 for the SCSI panel and press Enter or type 10 for the List All
Devices and press Enter.
Chapter 3. Standalone SCSI rootvg to virtual SCSI
51
24.In response to the Select Media Adapter panel, type the number that
represents the virtual SCSI device that is mapped to the CD/ROM. In
Example 3-2 there is only a single device.
Example 3-2 Select Media Adapter
------------------------------------------------------------------------------Select Media Adapter
1.
U8204.E8A.10FE411-V3-C7-T1
/vdevice/v-scsi@30000007
2.
None
3.
List all devices
------------------------------------------------------------------------------Navigation keys:
M = return to Main Menu
ESC key = return to previous screen
X = eXit System Management Services
------------------------------------------------------------------------------Type menu item number and press Enter or select Navigation key:
Navigate through the menus to exit from SMS mode, which now starts a
normal install from the virtual media device that was loaded
(cd_image_82472.1).
Tip: When the first volume starts to restore, you may get an error on the
screen to the effect that the hard disk device is different from what was
recorded when the CD image was created. This is to be expected and you
can enter 1 to continue the install.
During the install you may be prompted for other volumes. This example has four
in total. Each time that this happens eject/unload the current volume and load the
new media.
The next three steps show this cycle which you will repeat for each requested
volume:
25.Unload the current volume using the unloadopt command:
$ unloadopt -vtd vtopt1
26.Create virtual optical media using the next volume of the files that you copied
from the source dedicated system. If you have enough space in your
52
PowerVM Migration from Physical to Virtual Storage
repository you can also create all the media up front and not revisit this step
again:
$ mkvopt -name cd_image_82472.vol2 -file
/updates/cd_image_82572.vol2 -ro
27.Load the next virtual optical media file that was created earlier using the
Virtual I/O Server loadopt command:
$ loadopt -disk cd_image_82472.vol2 -vtd vtopt1
On the target partition
28.From the logical partition terminal session or console, you can now press
Enter to continue the restore process.
Once all your media files have been processed, you will be presented with the
AIX login panel. You should now be able to log into the logical partition and
correct any issues such as IP addresses.
On the Virtual I/O Server: cleanup stage
29.Once the restore is finished you can unload the last of your virtual media files
using the Virtual I/O Server unloadopt command:
$ unloadopt -vtd vtopt1
Cleanup any images not required in the repository using the rmvopt
command.
Your migration is now complete.
3.2 Moving rootvg disks to SAN
This method uses the AIX migratepv command to move the rootvg onto a
SAN-attached disk. The local SCSI disk is then removed from the root volume
group and the volume group now containing the SAN disk is presented to the
Virtual I/O Server where it is mapped to the target logical partition.
Note: No instructions are provided in this book for SAN functions such as
modifying zones or mapping storage to hosts from SAN disk platforms. Users
should be familiar with these operations before starting the migration task or
have appropriately trained people who can perform those tasks.
In this example, both the standalone client and the Virtual I/O Server require
access to a Fibre Channel adapter. You may therefore be required to relocate the
Fibre Channel adapter from the standalone client to the Virtual I/O Server once
Chapter 3. Standalone SCSI rootvg to virtual SCSI
53
the mirroring procedure is complete to allow the target client logical partition to
access the SAN.
Standalone
Client
Migrated to
VIOS vSCSI
eth
fc
fc
eth
VIOS
vsa
ate
gr
mi
pv
to
N
SA
k
dis
SAN
Switch
Step
2 - ma
p as
1–
IBM Dedicated
ep
St
Physical
Volumes
a volu
me to
the cli
ent lo
gical
part
ition
AIX Server
Disk A
Physical
Volume LUNs
Storage Device
DS4800
Figure 3-2 Cloning using mirrorvg to a SAN disk
The steps for the migration follow.
54
PowerVM Migration from Physical to Virtual Storage
Physical
Volumes
vca
Client LPAR
IBM System p
P6 550
SAN
Switch
On the standalone server
Start by determining the size of the root volume group, then use the migratepv
command to move to a new disk.
1. Obtain the size of the rootvg using the AIX lsvg rootvg command if the
rootvg spans several volumes.
# lsvg rootvg
VOLUME GROUP:
rootvg
000fe4010000d9000000012459f83d51
VG STATE:
active
VG PERMISSION:
read/write
MAX LVs:
256
LVs:
12
OPEN LVs:
11
TOTAL PVs:
1
STALE PVs:
0
ACTIVE PVs:
1
MAX PPs per VG:
32512
MAX PPs per PV:
1016
LTG size (Dynamic): 1024 kilobyte(s)
HOT SPARE:
no
#
VG IDENTIFIER:
PP SIZE:
TOTAL PPs:
FREE PPs:
USED PPs:
QUORUM:
VG DESCRIPTORS:
STALE PPs:
AUTO ON:
256 megabyte(s)
546 (139776 megabytes)
509 (130304 megabytes)
37 (9472 megabytes)
2 (Enabled)
2
0
yes
MAX PVs:
AUTO SYNC:
BB POLICY:
32
no
relocatable
2. Using the size of the rootvg, create a SAN volume on SAN storage that can
be made accessible to both the standalone client and to the target Virtual I/O
Server. Remember that you only have to use the actual amount of used space
and not the entire allocated amount, which may allow you to reduce the
amount of SAN disk that you provision. Thin Provisioning technologies may
also be beneficial for this purpose.
3. Perform a discovery using the AIX cfgmgr command to ensure that the target
SAN disk becomes available. If you know which fiber port the SAN disk device
is plugged into you can limit the discovery time using the -vl options of the AIX
cfgmgr command:
# cfgmgr -vl fcs0
---------------attempting to configure device 'fcs0'
Time: 0 LEDS: 0x2603
invoking /usr/lib/methods/cfgefc -l fcs0
Number of running methods: 1
---------------Completed method for: fcs0, Elapsed time = 0
return code = 0
****************** stdout ***********
fscsi0
****************** no stderr ***********
---------------Time: 0 LEDS: 0x539
Chapter 3. Standalone SCSI rootvg to virtual SCSI
55
Number of running methods: 0
---------------attempting to configure device 'fscsi0'
Time: 0 LEDS: 0x569
invoking /usr/lib/methods/cfgefscsi -l fscsi0
Number of running methods: 1
---------------Completed method for: fscsi0, Elapsed time = 1
return code = 0
****************** stdout ***********
hdisk8
****************** no stderr ***********
---------------Time: 1 LEDS: 0x539
Number of running methods: 0
---------------attempting to configure device 'hdisk8'
Time: 1 LEDS: 0x626
invoking /usr/lib/methods/cfgscsidisk -l hdisk8
Number of running methods: 1
---------------Completed method for: hdisk8, Elapsed time = 0
return code = 0
****************** no stdout ***********
****************** no stderr ***********
---------------Time: 1 LEDS: 0x539
Number of running methods: 0
---------------calling savebase
return code = 0
****************** no stdout ***********
****************** no stderr ***********
Configuration time: 1 seconds
56
PowerVM Migration from Physical to Virtual Storage
4. List the disks using the AIX lsdev command to ensure that the SAN disk is
presented correctly to AIX:
# lsdev -Cc disk
hdisk0 Available
hdisk1 Available
hdisk2 Available
hdisk3 Available
hdisk4 Available
hdisk5 Available
hdisk6 Available
hdisk7 Available
hdisk8 Available
#
00-08-00
00-08-00
00-08-00
00-08-00
00-08-00
00-08-00
00-08-00
00-08-00
06-00-02
SAS Disk Drive
SAS Disk Drive
SAS Disk Drive
SAS Disk Drive
SAS Disk Drive
SAS Disk Drive
SAS Disk Drive
SAS Disk Drive
MPIO Other DS4K Array Disk
5. Now is a good time to ensure that you can correctly identify a unique ID on
the SAN disk so that you can track it through the migration. Use the AIX
lsattr command:
# lsattr -El hdisk8
PCM
PCM/friend/otherapdisk
Control Module
False
PR_key_value
none
Persistant Reserve Key Value
True
algorithm
fail_over
Algorithm
True
autorecovery
no
Path/Ownership Autorecovery
True
clr_q
no
CLEARS its Queue on error True
cntl_delay_time 0
Controller Delay Time
True
cntl_hcheck_int 0
Controller Health Check Interval True
dist_err_pcnt
0
Distributed Error Percentage
True
dist_tw_width
50
Distributed Error Sample Time
True
hcheck_cmd
inquiry
Check Command
True
hcheck_interval 60
Check Interval
True
hcheck_mode
nonactive
Check Mode
True
location
Location Label
True
lun_id
0x0
Logical Unit Number ID
False
lun_reset_spt
yes
Reset Supported
True
max_retry_delay 60
Maximum Quiesce Time
True
Path
Device
Health
Health
Health
Chapter 3. Standalone SCSI rootvg to virtual SCSI
LUN
57
max_transfer
0x40000
Maximum TRANSFER Size
True
node_name
0x200200a0b811a662
Node Name
False
pvid
none
Physical volume identifier
False
q_err
yes
QERR bit
True
q_type
simple
Queuing TYPE
True
queue_depth
10
DEPTH
True
reassign_to
120
REASSIGN time out value
True
reserve_policy single_path
Reserve Policy
True
rw_timeout
30
READ/WRITE time out value
True
scsi_id
0x11000
ID
False
start_timeout
60
unit time out value
True
unique_id
3E213600A0B8000291B0800009AE303FEFAE10F1815
device identifier
False
ww_name
0x201300a0b811a662
World Wide Name
False
#
FC
Use
Queue
SCSI
START
FAStT03IBMfcp Unique
FC
Note the unique_id as highled in the previous output. For additional
information refer to 2.2, “Checking unique disk identification” on page 13.
6. Use the AIX extendvg command to add the SAN disk to the root volume
group:
$ extendvg rootvg hdisk8
Note: Do not proceed if the extendvg returns an error. The IBM InfoCenter
has detailed instructions for the most common scenarios. Use the following
URL to look for suggestions:
http://publib.boulder.ibm.com/infocenter/aix/v6r1/index.jsp?topic
=/com.ibm.aix.baseadmn/doc/baseadmndita/mirrorootvg.htm
58
PowerVM Migration from Physical to Virtual Storage
7. Use the AIX migratepv command to move the contents of the local SAS/SCSI
disk to the SAN disk. If you are migrating disks on a one-for-one basis, the
command shown below works well. If you have multiple local hard disks in
use then it is best to use the migratepv command with the -l option and
migrate each logical volume in turn:
# migratepv hdisk0 hdisk8
0516-1011 migratepv: Logical volume hd5 is labeled as a boot logical
volume.
0516-1246 migratepv: If hd5 is the boot logical volume, please run 'chpv -c
hdisk0'
as root user to clear the boot record and avoid a potential boot
off an old boot image that may reside on the disk from which this
logical volume is moved/removed.
migratepv: boot logical volume hd5 migrated. Please remember to run
bosboot, specifying /dev/hdisk8 as the target physical boot device.
Also, run bootlist command to modify bootlist to include
/dev/hdisk8.
8. You can use the AIX lspv command to ensure that every logical volume has
moved off the source disk and is now located on the SAN disk:
# lspv -l hdisk0
#
# lspv -l hdisk8
hdisk8:
LV NAME
lg_dumplv
livedump
hd11admin
hd8
hd6
hd2
hd4
hd3
hd9var
hd10opt
hd1
hd5
#
LPs
16
1
1
1
2
8
1
1
2
2
1
1
PPs
16
1
1
1
2
8
1
1
2
2
1
1
DISTRIBUTION
00..16..00..00..00
00..01..00..00..00
00..00..01..00..00
00..00..01..00..00
00..02..00..00..00
00..00..08..00..00
00..00..01..00..00
00..00..01..00..00
00..00..02..00..00
00..00..02..00..00
00..00..01..00..00
01..00..00..00..00
MOUNT POINT
N/A
/var/adm/ras/livedump
/admin
N/A
N/A
/usr
/
/tmp
/var
/opt
/home
N/A
Note: At this stage in the migration the original hdisk is no longer bootable.
If you decide to cancel the migration you can perform the migratepv
command with the original hdisk as the target disk and your SAN disk as
the source.
Chapter 3. Standalone SCSI rootvg to virtual SCSI
59
9. Update the boot partition and reset the bootlist on the source standalone
system using the AIX bosboot and bootlist commands:
# bosboot -a -d hdisk8
bosboot: Boot image is 40810 512 byte blocks.
# bootlist -m normal hdisk8
#
10.Shut down the standalone client using the AIX shutdown command.
On the SAN disk storage controller
11.Using your SAN disk management software, you should now un-map the SAN
disk from the standalone server and present it to the Virtual I/O Server which
hosts the connections for your client logical partition.
It is important even while you are testing this procedure that an un-map and
re-map is performed. If there is a SCSI reserve on the rootvg in the SAN disk
at the SAN disk controller level then the Virtual I/O Server may not be able to
present the SAN disk correctly to the client logical partition. Any SCSI 2
reservation can be removed by using the appropriate SAN GUI or CLI.
On the Virtual I/O Server
Use the Virtual I/O Server to discover the correct disk:
12.Using the Virtual I/O Server, log in as the padmin user and use the cfgdev
command to ensure that the Virtual I/O Server re-scans for the newly
attached SAN disk.
13.Using the Virtual I/O Server chkdev command will also display the pvid and
unique ID that should match what you wrote down from a previous step:
$ chkdev -dev hdisk6 -verbose
NAME:
hdisk6
IDENTIFIER:
3E213600A0B8000291B0800009AE303FEFAE10F1815
FAStT03IBMfcp
PHYS2VIRT_CAPABLE:
NA
VIRT2NPIV_CAPABLE:
YES
VIRT2PHYS_CAPABLE:
YES
PVID:
000fe4016e0bb6e90000000000000000
UDID:
3E213600A0B8000291B0800009AE303FEFAE10F1815
FAStT03IBMfcp
IEEE:
VTD:
vtscsi0
$
60
PowerVM Migration from Physical to Virtual Storage
Ensure that the UUID in this step matches that from step 5. This will confirm
the same disk is mapped.
14.Map the SAN disk device to the client logical partition.
In this instance the Virtual Resource  Virtual Storage Management task
was used from the HMC rather than typing commands on the Virtual I/O
Server.
Figure 3-3 shows the HMC panel from which this task is accessed.
Figure 3-3 Virtual Storage Management functions
Chapter 3. Standalone SCSI rootvg to virtual SCSI
61
15.Because there is a physical disk in use here, you must navigate to the
Physical Volumes tab, as shown in to Figure 3-4.
Figure 3-4 Physical Volumes
62
PowerVM Migration from Physical to Virtual Storage
16.Select the required hard disk, such as hdisk6, to map to the client partition
and click Modify Assignment, as shown in Figure 3-5.
Figure 3-5 Hard Disk Selection
Chapter 3. Standalone SCSI rootvg to virtual SCSI
63
17.Select the new partition assignment and click OK to accept that you are
assigning this volume, as shown in Figure 3-6.
Figure 3-6 Selection of the client virtual slot
The last screen after a number of updating panels shows that the assignment
was correct. Click Close to exit the Virtual Storage Assignment function, as
shown in Figure 3-7.
Figure 3-7 Virtual Storage Management
64
PowerVM Migration from Physical to Virtual Storage
On the client partition
18.You can now boot the client logical partition using the SMS option and
discover the newly presented virtual SCSI disk that maps to your SAN disk.
The migration is almost complete.
Remember to set up the Ethernet addresses on the virtual Ethernet interfaces
since they were last used on physical Ethernet cards and may not be correct
in this virtual environment.
3.3 Cloning rootvg to external disk
This method uses the AIX alt_disk_copy command to clone the operating
system to a separate disk that has been presented from a SAN. The SAN disk is
then used as a virtual SCSI device from the Virtual I/O Server and presented to a
logical partition.
In this example, both the standalone client and the Virtual I/O Server require
access to a Fibre Channel adapter. You may be required to relocate the Fibre
Channel adapter from the standalone client to the Virtual I/O Server once the
alt_disk_copy procedure is complete to allow the target client logical partition to
access the SAN.
Chapter 3. Standalone SCSI rootvg to virtual SCSI
65
Figure 3-8 provides an overview of this process.
Standalone
Client
Migrated to
VIOS vSCSI
eth
fc
fc
eth
VIOS
vsa
Physical
Volumes
as a v
olum
e to th
e clie
nt log
ical p
art
ition
AIX Server
Physical
Volumes
ep
St
1-
IBM Dedicated
vca
Client LPAR
_c
i sk
_d
al t
y
op
Step
2
- map
IBM System p
SAN
Switch
P6 550
SAN
Switch
Disk A
Physical
Volume LUNs
Storage Device
DS4800
Figure 3-8 alt_disk_copy using SAN disk
The steps for the migration follow.
On the standalone server
The first part of the method requires a SAN disk and then use of the AIX
alt_disk_copy command to clone the root volume group:
1. First obtain the size of the root volume group - this can be done using the AIX
lsvg command:
# lsvg rootvg
VOLUME GROUP:
rootvg
000fe4010000d9000000012478906561
VG STATE:
active
66
PowerVM Migration from Physical to Virtual Storage
VG IDENTIFIER:
PP SIZE:
256 megabyte(s)
VG PERMISSION:
MAX LVs:
LVs:
OPEN LVs:
TOTAL PVs:
STALE PVs:
ACTIVE PVs:
MAX PPs per VG:
MAX PPs per PV:
LTG size (Dynamic):
HOT SPARE:
read/write
256
12
11
1
0
1
32512
1016
1024 kilobyte(s)
no
TOTAL PPs:
FREE PPs:
USED PPs:
QUORUM:
VG DESCRIPTORS:
STALE PPs:
AUTO ON:
546 (139776 megabytes)
509 (130304 megabytes)
37 (9472 megabytes)
2 (Enabled)
2
0
yes
MAX PVs:
AUTO SYNC:
BB POLICY:
32
no
relocatable
2. Ensure that the disk that you are going to clone the rootvg to has:
a. Enough space available using the size of the rootvg obtained from step 1
on page 66. You can see that a disk of about 140 GB has been allocated
but 9472 MBs (9.5 GB) has been used. A SAN volume of about 10 or
15 GB is adequate in this case.
b. The target disk for the alt_clone operation should not be a member of the
rootvg that you are cloning. If it is a member, you must remove it from the
volume group (reducevg). Use the AIX lspv command to check the disks’
volume group membership:
# lspv
hdisk0
hdisk8
#
000fe4012a8f0920
none
rootvg
None
active
3. It is useful to make a note of the unique disk identification using the AIX
lsattr command. At this stage record the unique_id attribute:
# lsattr -El hdisk8
PCM
PCM/friend/otherapdisk
Control Module
False
PR_key_value
none
Persistant Reserve Key Value
True
algorithm
fail_over
Algorithm
True
autorecovery
no
Path/Ownership Autorecovery
True
clr_q
no
CLEARS its Queue on error True
cntl_delay_time 0
Controller Delay Time
True
cntl_hcheck_int 0
Controller Health Check Interval True
dist_err_pcnt
0
Distributed Error Percentage
True
dist_tw_width
50
Distributed Error Sample Time
True
hcheck_cmd
inquiry
Check Command
True
hcheck_interval 60
Check Interval
True
Path
Device
Health
Health
Chapter 3. Standalone SCSI rootvg to virtual SCSI
67
hcheck_mode
nonactive
Check Mode
True
location
Location Label
True
lun_id
0x0
Logical Unit Number ID
False
lun_reset_spt
yes
Reset Supported
True
max_retry_delay 60
Maximum Quiesce Time
True
max_transfer
0x40000
Maximum TRANSFER Size
True
node_name
0x200200a0b811a662
Node Name
False
pvid
none
Physical volume identifier
False
q_err
yes
QERR bit
True
q_type
simple
Queuing TYPE
True
queue_depth
10
DEPTH
True
reassign_to
120
REASSIGN time out value
True
reserve_policy single_path
Reserve Policy
True
rw_timeout
30
READ/WRITE time out value
True
scsi_id
0x11000
ID
False
start_timeout
60
unit time out value
True
unique_id
3E213600A0B8000291B0800009D760401BBB80F1815
device identifier
False
ww_name
0x201300a0b811a662
World Wide Name
False
#
Health
LUN
FC
Use
Queue
SCSI
START
FAStT03IBMfcp Unique
FC
Note in the above command output that there is no pvid assigned at this point
since hdisk8 is not a member of a volume group.
4. Use the AIX alt_disk_copy command to copy the rootvg to the external SAN
disk, hdisk8 in this example:
# alt_disk_copy -O -d hdisk8
Calling mkszfile to create new /image.data file.
Checking disk sizes.
Creating cloned rootvg volume group and associated logical volumes.
Creating logical volume alt_hd5
Creating logical volume alt_hd6
Creating logical volume alt_hd8
Creating logical volume alt_hd4
Creating logical volume alt_hd2
68
PowerVM Migration from Physical to Virtual Storage
Creating logical volume alt_hd9var
Creating logical volume alt_hd3
Creating logical volume alt_hd1
Creating logical volume alt_hd10opt
Creating logical volume alt_hd11admin
Creating logical volume alt_lg_dumplv
Creating logical volume alt_livedump
Creating logical volume alt_loglv00
Creating /alt_inst/ file system.
/alt_inst filesystem not converted.
Small inode extents are already enabled.
Creating /alt_inst/admin file system.
/alt_inst/admin filesystem not converted.
Small inode extents are already enabled.
Creating /alt_inst/home file system.
/alt_inst/home filesystem not converted.
Small inode extents are already enabled.
Creating /alt_inst/opt file system.
/alt_inst/opt filesystem not converted.
Small inode extents are already enabled.
Creating /alt_inst/tmp file system.
/alt_inst/tmp filesystem not converted.
Small inode extents are already enabled.
Creating /alt_inst/usr file system.
/alt_inst/usr filesystem not converted.
Small inode extents are already enabled.
Creating /alt_inst/var file system.
/alt_inst/var filesystem not converted.
Small inode extents are already enabled.
Creating /alt_inst/var/adm/ras/livedump file system.
/alt_inst/var/adm/ras/livedump filesystem not converted.
Small inode extents are already enabled.
Generating a list of files
for backup and restore into the alternate file system...
Backing-up the rootvg files and restoring them to the
alternate file system...
Modifying ODM on cloned disk.
Building boot image on cloned disk.
Resetting all device attributes.
NOTE: The first boot from altinst_rootvg will prompt to define the
new
system console.
Resetting all device attributes.
NOTE: The first boot from altinst_rootvg will prompt to define the
new
Chapter 3. Standalone SCSI rootvg to virtual SCSI
69
system console.
forced unmount of /alt_inst/var/adm/ras/livedump
forced unmount of /alt_inst/var/adm/ras/livedump
forced unmount of /alt_inst/var
forced unmount of /alt_inst/var
forced unmount of /alt_inst/usr
forced unmount of /alt_inst/usr
forced unmount of /alt_inst/tmp
forced unmount of /alt_inst/tmp
forced unmount of /alt_inst/opt
forced unmount of /alt_inst/opt
forced unmount of /alt_inst/home
forced unmount of /alt_inst/home
forced unmount of /alt_inst/admin
forced unmount of /alt_inst/admin
forced unmount of /alt_inst
forced unmount of /alt_inst
Changing logical volume names in volume group descriptor area.
Fixing LV control blocks...
Fixing file system superblocks...
Bootlist is set to the boot disk: hdisk8 blv=hd5
5. The output from the AIX lspv command shows that the disk volume now has
a pvid and is a member of the altinst_rootvg volume group:
# lspv
hdisk0
active
hdisk1
hdisk2
hdisk3
hdisk4
hdisk5
hdisk6
hdisk7
hdisk8
000fe4012a8f0920
rootvg
none
000fe4012913f4bd
none
000fe401106cfc0c
000fe4012b5361f2
none
none
000fe4017e0037d7
None
None
None
None
None
None
None
altinst_rootvg
6. Remove the SAN volume hdisk8 from the standalone system using the AIX
rmdev command:
# rmdev -dl hdisk8
hdisk8 deleted
Note: At this point you must re-zone and present the SAN disk that was the
target of the clone to the client logical partition. Instructions are not
provided here for this task.
70
PowerVM Migration from Physical to Virtual Storage
7. One of the final actions of the alt_disk_copy command is to set the bootlist to
the newly created altinst_rootvg. Since the aim is to preserve the rootvg,
ensure that the bootlist is set back to the correct volume. Reset the bootlist on
the source standalone system using the AIX bosboot and bootlist
commands:
# bosboot -a -d hdisk0
bosboot: Boot image is 40810 512 byte blocks.
# bootlist -m normal hdisk0
#
# bootlist -m normal -o
hdisk0 blv=hd5
#
On the Virtual I/O Server
Now discover, verify, and map the SAN disk to the correct client logical partition:
8. Perform a discovery using oem_setup_env and the AIX cfgmgr command to
make the target SAN disk available:
# cfgmgr -vl fcs4
9. You can identify the disk using the Virtual I/O Server chkdev command:
$ chkdev -dev hdisk6 -verbose
NAME:
hdisk6
IDENTIFIER:
3E213600A0B8000291B0800009D760401BBB80F1815
FAStT03IBMfcp
PHYS2VIRT_CAPABLE:
YES
VIRT2NPIV_CAPABLE:
NA
VIRT2PHYS_CAPABLE:
NA
PVID:
000fe4017e0037d70000000000000000
UDID:
3E213600A0B8000291B0800009D760401BBB80F1815
FAStT03IBMfcp
IEEE:
VTD:
$
In this case the PVID and UDID match the values from the previous steps
where you noted down the unique identification values.
Note: If the values do not match then you should stop at this step and
ensure that you have presented the correct SAN disk to the partition.
Failure to do so may result in you overwriting data.
Chapter 3. Standalone SCSI rootvg to virtual SCSI
71
The other important output from the chkdev command is the
PHYS2VIRT_CAPABLE field. In this example it has YES as a value. A value
of YES means that at this point in time, this disk volume can be mapped to a
virtual device and presented to a logical partition. A value of NO would mean
that the disk cannot be mapped. A value of NA means that the disk has
already been mapped as a virtual target device (VTD).
More information about the chkdev command can be found by reading its man
page.
10.Create a mapping from the Virtual I/O Server to the client logical partition for
the SAN disk that has been discovered. This can be done using the Virtual I/O
Server command-line tools or by using the Configuration  Virtual
Resource  Virtual Storage Management panels as shown in Figure 3-9.
Figure 3-9 Virtual Storage Management Functions
11.Once you have made the mapping, you can verify the status by again using
the Virtual I/O Server chkdev command:
$ chkdev -dev hdisk6 -verbose
NAME:
hdisk6
IDENTIFIER:
3E213600A0B8000291B0800009D760401BBB80F1815
FAStT03IBMfcp
PHYS2VIRT_CAPABLE:
NA
72
PowerVM Migration from Physical to Virtual Storage
VIRT2NPIV_CAPABLE:
YES
VIRT2PHYS_CAPABLE:
YES
PVID:
000fe4017e0037d70000000000000000
UDID:
3E213600A0B8000291B0800009D760401BBB80F1815
FAStT03IBMfcp
IEEE:
VTD:
vtscsi0
$
Note that the PHYS2VIRT_CAPABLE field in the above command output is
now set to a value of NA, which indicates that this disk is now mapped to a
VTD, vtscsi0 in this example.
On the client partition
Using the SMS menu, now boot the client partition and perform cleanup tasks:
12.Boot the client using the HMC and verify that the cloned disk boots
successfully.
13.Using the AIX lspv, lsvg, and lsattr commands you can verify that the
correct disk has been used:
# lspv
hdisk0
000fe4017e0037d7
rootvg
active
#
# lsvg rootvg -p
rootvg:
PV_NAME
PV STATE
TOTAL PPs
FREE PPs
FREE DISTRIBUTION
hdisk0
active
559
521
111..92..94..112..112
# lsattr -El hdisk0
PCM
PCM/friend/vscsi
Path Control Module
False
algorithm
fail_over
Algorithm
True
hcheck_cmd
test_unit_rdy
Health Check Command
True
hcheck_interval 0
Health Check Interval
True
hcheck_mode
nonactive
Health Check Mode
True
max_transfer
0x40000
Maximum TRANSFER Size
True
pvid
000fe4017e0037d70000000000000000 Physical volume identifier False
queue_depth
3
Queue DEPTH
True
reserve_policy no_reserve
Reserve Policy
True
#
14.You must verify that the IP connections are set up correctly on the correct
Ethernet interfaces.
Chapter 3. Standalone SCSI rootvg to virtual SCSI
73
On the standalone system
You have now migrated this system to a logical partition. If you wish to revert the
current disk configuration back to a pre alt_disk_copy scenario:
15.On the local system an AIX lsvg command shows that the ODM is unaware
that you have removed the SAN disk that was the target of the alt_disk_copy:
# lsvg
rootvg
altinst_rootvg
#
16.To clean up the system, use the AIX alt_rootvg_op command with the -X
flag:
# alt_rootvg_op -X
Bootlist is set to the boot disk: hdisk0 blv=hd5
17.An AIX lsvg command confirms that the clean up is successful:
# lsvg
rootvg
#
3.4 Other methods
There are a number of accepted methods that can also be used to perform the
migration. These methods include:
򐂰 NIM
򐂰 Backup and restore
򐂰 SAS-attached tape devices
An overview of these methods follows.
3.4.1 NIM
If you are familiar with the AIX Network Installation Manager (NIM) subsystem
then it is feasible to make a mksysb to a NIM storage area (normally an NFS
mount) and perform a NIM install in much the same way that 3.1, “Back up to CD
and restore” on page 46, performs an SMS boot from media. The difference is
that you load from the source through the network using the Ethernet card, and
not from virtual CD media.
74
PowerVM Migration from Physical to Virtual Storage
NIM also allows you to perform functions such as:
򐂰 Installation of system patch bundles
򐂰 Installation of user-defined software packages
򐂰 Upgrades of the operating system on the fly
While you generally must install NIM on a separate server or logical partition
(and it could reside on the Tivoli® Storage Manager Server if required), the
benefits of NIM outweigh the expense:
򐂰 Multiple restorations can be performed simultaneously in a NIM environment.
򐂰 Provisioning of on demand resources or major projects is simplified through
the ability to easily manage the required bundles of chosen operating system
level, patches, and additional software during a deployment.
3.4.2 Backup and restore
IBM markets the Tivoli Storage Manager (TSM) software, which allows backups
of the AIX file systems, including both the root and data volume groups. In
addition, there are various additions to TSM that allow databases and data from
a wide variety of third-party vendors to be backed up and more importantly
restored.
When it comes to the root volume group of AIX, extra care is needed. Simply
backing up the volume group and restoring it once a fresh install of AIX has been
performed can be problematic. The Tivoli Storage Manager for System Backup
and Recovery (SYSBACK) or Cristie Bare Metal packages resolve the issues
and provide a full bare metal recovery of the AIX root volume group. Once either
of these packages has been used to recover the bootable section of AIX, data in
other volume groups can be restored using either TSM file-based or agent-based
recovery of databases.
3.4.3 SAS-attached tape devices
If you have a Power System server with a SAS tape drive attached to your Virtual
I/O Server you can use the tape device to back up from one client logical
partition, then re-map or present the new disk storage and restore using the tape
drive. The tape is also transportable to another system with an SAS-connected
tape drive. The Virtual I/O Server command mkvdev is used to map a tape drive to
a virtual host adapter.
Chapter 3. Standalone SCSI rootvg to virtual SCSI
75
The following notes apply to the use of a SAS-connected tape drive:
򐂰 At the time of writing, only an IBM SAS-attached tape drive is supported.
򐂰 It is preferable to create a separate virtual SCSI host adapter than to use one
already in service for disks or optical storage. This is because of the different
block sizes used to transfer data for tape operations and a separate virtual
SCSI adapter is more portable.
򐂰 The tape drive is not a shared device. It can only be in use by one partition at
a time.
򐂰 The Virtual I/O Server does not support functions to move media, even if the
backup tape device supports them. You must manually load the media.
To use a SAS configured tape drive:
1. Create a separate virtual SCSI server adapter. This example shows vhost4 as
a server SCSI adapter that has no other mappings.
2. Use the Virtual I/O Server mkvdev command to map the tape drive:
mkvdev -vdev rmt0 -vadapter vhost4
The system displays a message similar to the following:
vttape0 available
Further information can be found at the following IBM InfoCenter links:
http://publib.boulder.ibm.com/infocenter/powersys/v3r1m5/topic/iphb2/ip
hatvirtualadapters.htm
http://publib.boulder.ibm.com/infocenter/powersys/v3r1m5/index.jsp?topic
=/iphb1/iphb1_vios_tape.htm
76
PowerVM Migration from Physical to Virtual Storage
4
Chapter 4.
Standalone SCSI data to
virtual SCSI
This chapter provides instructions for migrating a client’s data on direct-attached
disk to a logical partition with the data disks being virtualized by a Virtual I/O
Server using virtual SCSI. The instructions outlined assume that both the source
and destination hosts already exist.
Data disks can be in two forms:
򐂰 Disks that belong to a volume group other than rootvg, referred to as user
volume groups
򐂰 Disks with raw data in which case they are not part of any volume group
The instructions that follow are for both types of data disks.
Since direct-attached disks on standalone machines are not accessible to a
Virtual I/O Server, the data on the disks must be transferred to disks accessible
by the targeted Virtual I/O Server or the disk must be physically moved to a
location that is accessible by the targeted Virtual I/O Server. The instructions to
physically move the disks are not covered by this guide since those instructions
are hardware specific.
The source server comprises a standalone machine with multiple direct-attached
SCSI and SAN disks. The first of those disks (hdisk0) contains rootvg, while the
© Copyright IBM Corp. 2010. All rights reserved.
77
remaining disks are used as data disks. The SAN storage is provided by a
DS4800. The destination server is a client logical partition that has no physical
disk of its own. The physical disks are attached to the Virtual I/O Server. See
Figure 4-1 for a graphical representation.
VIOS
vsa
AIX Server
Physical Data
Volume
vca
Client LPAR
Physical Data
Volume
IBM Dedicated
IBM System p
Figure 4-1 Transition direct-attached storage to Virtual I/O Server managed storage
78
PowerVM Migration from Physical to Virtual Storage
4.1 Migration using a virtual media repository
The goal of this section is to make a backup of a user volume group to a file,
create a media repository on the Virtual I/O Server, and give the client logical
partition virtualized access to the media repository. Keep in mind that
applications should be shut down prior to performing the backup since files that
are open cannot be backed up.
On the standalone source host
Begin by backing up the user volume data:
1. Ensure that the destination disk will be large enough to hold the user volume
data that you will be backing up.
2. Save the user volume group to a file. In the example below, a text file named
datafile will be transitioned and the file system containing datafile is in the
datasrcvg volume group. The ls and cat commands show the data file and its
contents before the migration so that a recheck of the contents of the file
post-migration will confirm success.
# ls -l
total 8
-rw-r--r-1 root
staff
21 Oct 12 09:58 datafile
drwxr-xr-x
2 root
system
256 Oct 12 09:57 lost+found
# cat datafile
This is a test file.
#
# mkcd -v datasrcvg -V rootvg -R -S -A
Initializing mkcd log: /var/adm/ras/mkcd.log...
Verifying command parameters...
Creating information file for volume group datasrcvg.
Creating temporary file system: /mkcd/mksysb_image...
Creating savevg image...
Creating list of files to back up.
Backing up 9 files
9 of 9 files (100%)0512-038 savevg: Backup Completed Successfully.
Creating temporary file system: /mkcd/cd_fs...
Copying backup to the CD or DVD file system...
Creating Rock Ridge format image: /mkcd/cd_images/cd_image_401446
Running mkisofs ...
Chapter 4. Standalone SCSI data to virtual SCSI
79
mkrr_fs was successful.
Removing temporary file system: /mkcd/cd_fs...
Removing temporary file system: /mkcd/mksysb_image...
The mkcd command creates the backup file in /mkcd/cd_images by default. In
this case, the file created is cd_image_401446. Transfer the file to the Virtual
I/O Server using the file transfer program of your choice.
On the Virtual I/O Server
Create the media repository and make it ready for access by the client partition:
3. Check to see whether a media repository already exists using the lsrep
command. You will see the following if it does not exist:
$ lsrep
The DVD repository has not been created yet.
4. Create the media repository in the volume group and size of your choice if it
does not already exist using the Virtual I/O Server mkrep command. For the
purposes of this example, it will be created in rootvg.
$ mkrep -sp rootvg -size 100M
Virtual Media Repository Created
Repository created within "VMLibrary_LV" logical volume
5. Create the virtual optical media using the mkvopt command. The following
command assumes that the backup file that was transferred to the Virtual I/O
Server is in the current directory:
$ pwd
/home/padmin
$ ls -l cd_image_401446
-rw-r--r-1 padmin
staff
258048 Oct 12 10:10
cd_image_401446
$ mkvopt -name cd_image_401446 -file cd_image_401446 -ro
$
6. Use mkvdev to create the file-backed virtual optical device if it does not exist.
You must find a free vhost adapter to bind to or allocate one using the HMC if
there are none free. A free adapter can be identified as below:
$ lsmap -vadapter vhost4
SVSA
Physloc
Client Partition ID
--------------- -------------------------------------------- -----------------vhost4
U8204.E8A.10FE411-V2-C15
0x00000000
VTD
80
NO VIRTUAL TARGET DEVICE FOUND
PowerVM Migration from Physical to Virtual Storage
$ mkvdev -fbo -vadapter vhost4 -dev vcd1
vcd1 Available
The virtual optical device will appear as Virtual Target Device File-backed Optical in a virtual device listing.
7. Load the virtual optical media file that you created earlier with the loadopt
command. Once loaded, the image file will be copied into the repository
(/var/vio/VMLibrary) and you will see a backing device for vhost4.
$ loadopt -disk cd_image_401446 -vtd vcd1
$ lsmap -vadapter vhost4
SVSA
Physloc
Client Partition ID
--------------- -------------------------------------------- -----------------vhost4
U8204.E8A.10FE411-V2-C15
0x00000000
VTD
Status
LUN
Backing device
Physloc
vcd1
Available
0x8100000000000000
/var/vio/VMLibrary/cd_image_401446
Chapter 4. Standalone SCSI data to virtual SCSI
81
On the HMC
8. Map the vhost adapter from the previous step to a SCSI adapter on the client
logical partition if the mapping does not already exist. Something similar to
the highlighted line in Figure 4-2 is what you should see.
Figure 4-2 Client logical partition virtual adapter mapping in WebSM
This will map vcd1, which has vhost4 as its backing device, on the Virtual I/O
Server to a virtual SCSI optical device in slot 9 on the client logical partition.
On the destination partition
On the destination partition:
9. Select an unused logical disk device and restore the user volume group. The
AIX restvg command will restore the volume group, mount points, and all
data just as they were on the source system.
# restvg -f /dev/cd1 hdisk2
Will create the Volume Group:
Target Disks:
hdisk2
Allocation Policy:
Shrink Filesystems:
82
PowerVM Migration from Physical to Virtual Storage
datasrcvg
no
Preserve Physical Partitions for each Logical Volume:
no
Enter y to continue: y
0516-1254 /usr/sbin/mkvg: Changing the PVID in the ODM.
datasrcvg
datasrclv
/dev/datadestlv: A file or directory in the path name does not
exist.
New volume on
/tmp/vgdata.249948/cdmount/usr/sys/inst.images/savevg_image:
Cluster size is 51200 bytes (100 blocks).
The volume number is 1.
The backup date is: Mon Oct 12 11:10:23 EDT 2009
Files are backed up by name.
The user is root.
x
14 ./tmp/vgdata/datasrcvg/image.info
x
142 ./tmp/vgdata/vgdata.files372862
x
142 ./tmp/vgdata/vgdata.files
x
2746 ./tmp/vgdata/datasrcvg/filesystems
x
1803 ./tmp/vgdata/datasrcvg/datasrcvg.data
x
282 ./tmp/vgdata/datasrcvg/backup.data
x
0 ./mnt
x
0 ./mnt/lost+found
x
21 ./mnt/datafile
The total size is 5150 bytes.
The number of restored files is 9.
Note that there was a warning message generated in the previous command
output regarding a nonexistent /dev/datadestlv. This warning was generated
because a logical volume with that specific name did not exist on the target
host. This warning can be ignored. The restore will complete successfully, as
will be shown next.
10.Verify the restore once completed. The following lsvg commands show us the
new volume group and mount point. The cat command lists out the contents
of the data file that was originally created, which confirms that the migration
was successful.
# lsvg
rootvg
datasrcvg
# lsvg -l datasrcvg
datasrcvg:
LV NAME
TYPE
MOUNT POINT
LPs
PPs
PVs
LV STATE
Chapter 4. Standalone SCSI data to virtual SCSI
83
datasrclv
jfs2
1
/mnt
# cd /mnt
# ls -l
total 8
-rw-r--r-1 root
staff
drwxr-xr-x
2 root
system
# cat datafile
This is a test file.
1
1
open/syncd
21 Oct 12 10:58 datafile
256 Oct 12 17:06 lost+found
4.2 Migrating data using savevg
If it is not required to have a media repository, savevg may be used instead.
1. On the standalone source host, specify to savevg the name of the backup file
to save the data to and the volume group to be backed up:
# savevg -f /tmp/dataimage datasrcvg
Creating list of files to back up.
Backing up 9 files
yes
9 of 9 files (100%)0512-038 savevg: Backup Completed Successfully.
2. After you have a running destination partition with virtual SCSI drives, transfer
the backup file to a temporary area on one of the drives.
3. Select an unused virtual disk and restore the backup. As above, the output of
cat shows us that the datafile was migrated successfully.
# restvg -f /tmp/dataimage hdisk2
Will create the Volume Group:
datasrcvg
Target Disks:
hdisk2
Allocation Policy:
Shrink Filesystems:
no
Preserve Physical Partitions for each Logical Volume:
Enter y to continue: y
datasrcvg
datasrclv
New volume on /tmp/dataimage:
Cluster size is 51200 bytes (100 blocks).
The volume number is 1.
The backup date is: Mon Oct 12 17:53:35 EDT 2009
84
PowerVM Migration from Physical to Virtual Storage
no
Files are backed up by name.
The user is root.
x
14 ./tmp/vgdata/datasrcvg/image.info
x
142 ./tmp/vgdata/vgdata.files405658
x
142 ./tmp/vgdata/vgdata.files
x
2746 ./tmp/vgdata/datasrcvg/filesystems
x
1803 ./tmp/vgdata/datasrcvg/datasrcvg.data
x
272 ./tmp/vgdata/datasrcvg/backup.data
x
0 ./mnt
x
21 ./mnt/datafile
x
0 ./mnt/lost+found
The total size is 5140 bytes.
The number of restored files is 9.
# cd /mnt
# ls -l
total 8
-rw-r--r-1 root
system
21 Oct 12 17:53 datafile
drwxr-xr-x
2 root
system
256 Oct 12 17:59 lost+found
# cat datafile
This is a test file.
4.3 Transition raw data disk
In this section a migration of raw disk attached to a standalone AIX server to a
Virtual I/O Server managed partition is described. The migrated disk must be a
SAN disk since as was stated earlier. A physical move of a SCSI disk is hardware
specific. As per this procedure, you must map one or more (depending on how
much data there is and how it is organized on the source storage) of the same
SAN LUNs to both the standalone machine and the Virtual I/O Server.
On the standalone source host
On the standalone source host:
1. Select the raw SAN disk that will be migrated. The lscfg command output
below shows us that hdisk8 is a SAN disk. The file pattern.txt was then
created as test data and was written to the raw disk using the dd command:
# lscfg -vl hdisk8
hdisk8
U78A0.001.DNWG9AD-P1-C3-T1-W201300A0B811A662-L0
MPIO Other DS4K Array Disk
Manufacturer................IBM
Machine Type and Model......1815
ROS Level and ID............30393134
FAStT
Chapter 4. Standalone SCSI data to virtual SCSI
85
Serial Number...............
Device Specific.(Z0)........0000053245005032
Device Specific.(Z1)........
# ls -l pattern.txt
-rw-r--r-1 root
system
30 Oct 16 12:24
pattern.txt
# cat pattern.txt
This is a raw disk test file.
# dd if=./pattern.txt of=/dev/hdisk8 seek=20 count=1
0+1 records in.
0+1 records out.
2. Get the unique_id of the SAN LUN. While the odmget command has been
used below, the lsattr command is also useful for this task.
# odmget CuAt | grep -p unique_id | grep -p hdisk8
CuAt:
name = "hdisk8"
attribute = "unique_id"
value = "3E213600A0B8000291B0800009A8103FAF5B50F1815
FAStT03IBMfcp"
type = "R"
generic = "D"
rep = "nl"
nls_index = 79
On the Virtual I/O Server
3. Set up zoning on the SAN switch such that the LUN from the previous step is
visible to the Virtual I/O Server. Verify that the disk that you are seeing on the
Virtual I/O Server is the same as the standalone machine disk. If they are the
same disk, the values of the unique_id will match:
# odmget CuAt|grep -p unique_id|grep -p hdisk6
CuAt:
name = "hdisk6"
attribute = "unique_id"
value = "3E213600A0B8000291B0800009A8103FAF5B50F1815
FAStT03IBMfcp"
type = "R"
generic = "D"
rep = "nl"
nls_index = 79
86
PowerVM Migration from Physical to Virtual Storage
On the HMC
4. Map a virtual SCSI adapter from the Virtual I/O Server to the client logical
partition if the mapping does not already exist. You should see something
similar to the highlighted line in Figure 4-3.
Figure 4-3 Client logical partition mapping for access to SAN disk
On the Virtual I/O Server
5. Map the vhost created from the step above to the SAN disk and present it to
the client partition using the mkvdev command:
$ mkvdev -vdev hdisk6 -vadapter vhost4
vtscsi0 Available
Chapter 4. Standalone SCSI data to virtual SCSI
87
On the client partition
The SAN LUN will be visible to the client as a SCSI disk.
6. Verify that the data is available to the client. Running the lspv command after
the cfgmgr command makes the new disk visible on the client. Our test data
was extracted from the raw disk using the dd command as a confirmation that
the migration was successful:
# lspv
hdisk0
000fe41120532faf
active
# cfgmgr
# lspv
hdisk0
000fe41120532faf
active
hdisk1
none
#
# dd if=/dev/hdisk1 count=21
This is a raw disk test file.
2814+0 records in.
2814+0 records out.
This migration is now complete.
88
PowerVM Migration from Physical to Virtual Storage
rootvg
rootvg
None
5
Chapter 5.
Logical partition migrations
In this chapter we describe the methods for moving data from a logical partition
with direct-attached disk to a logical partition using disk presented through a
Virtual I/O Server.
© Copyright IBM Corp. 2010. All rights reserved.
89
5.1 Direct-attached SCSI partition to virtual SCSI
This migration method describes a scenario where a logical partition with local
direct-attached disk is migrated to a Virtual I/O Server in the same systems
enclosure or CEC, as shown in Figure 5-1.
fc
eth
VIOS
Client LPAR
vsa
LPAR becomes
VIOS client
ta
g/da
ro o t v
vg m
ig
to V
ra t e s
i
I/O
rt u a l
Serv
er
Physical
Volumes
vca
Client LPAR
Physical
Volumes
Power6 systems enclosure (CEC)
Figure 5-1 Local disk to Virtual I/O Server migration
On the client partition: part 1
The client tasks to be performed involve the identification of the resources to be
migrated. While not mentioned as a step in this example, your local procedures
may also require that a valid backup is taken before performing the migration.
1. The first step is to perform identification tasks to ensure that the correct disks
are migrated. In this example a single disk root volume group is migrated.
These same procedures apply regardless of how many disks and volume
groups one is required to migrate:
a. List the physical disks using the lspv command:
# lspv
hdisk0
active
#
002631cd31ad04f5
rootvg
b. Identify the disks that will be migrated using the lsdev command:
# lsdev -Cc disk
hdisk0 Available 00-08-01-1,0
90
PowerVM Migration from Physical to Virtual Storage
16 Bit LVD SCSI Disk Drive
c. Check whether the disks to be migrated have a unique ID using the lsattr
command:
# lsattr -El hdisk0
PCM
PCM/friend/scsiscsd
Path Control Module
False
algorithm
fail_over
Algorithm
True
dist_err_pcnt
0
Distributed Error Percentage
True
dist_tw_width
50
Distributed Error Sample Time
True
hcheck_interval 0
Health Check Interval
True
hcheck_mode
nonactive
Health Check Mode
True
max_transfer
0x40000
Maximum TRANSFER Size
True
pvid
002631cd31ad04f50000000000000000
Physical volume identifier
False
queue_depth
3
Queue DEPTH
False
reserve_policy
single_path
Reserve Policy
True
size_in_mb
146800
Size in Megabytes
False
unique_id
22080004B9710BST3146807LC03IBMscsi Unique device identifier
False
#
In the previous output, both the pvid and unique_id values have been
highlighted for clarity. These values will be required at later stages to verify
that the migration is proceeding correctly.
Chapter 5. Logical partition migrations
91
2. Identify the parent device to which hdisk0 is connected. This is done using the
lsdev command in two steps:
# lsdev -l hdisk0 -F parent
scsi1
# lsdev -l scsi1 -F parent
sisscsia0
#
3. The output from step 2 shows us that in this example, hdisk0 is attached to
the SCSI device scsi1, which has a parent device of sisscsia0. Determine
what the sisscsia0 device is using the lsdev command:
# lsdev -C | grep sisscsia0
sisscsia0 Available 00-08
#
PCI-X Dual Channel Ultra320 SCSI Adapter
4. The next step is to identify any other resources attached to the SCSI
controller sisscsia0. Use the lsdev command with the location code 00-08,
which is given from the output:
# lsdev -C
hdisk0
scsi0
scsi1
ses0
ses1
ses2
ses3
sisscsia0
| grep 00-08
Available 00-08-01-1,0
Available 00-08-00
Available 00-08-01
Available 00-08-00-14,0
Available 00-08-00-15,0
Available 00-08-01-14,0
Available 00-08-01-15,0
Available 00-08
16 Bit LVD SCSI Disk Drive
PCI-X Dual Channel Ultra320 SCSI Adapter bus
PCI-X Dual Channel Ultra320 SCSI Adapter bus
SCSI Enclosure Services Device
SCSI Enclosure Services Device
SCSI Enclosure Services Device
SCSI Enclosure Services Device
PCI-X Dual Channel Ultra320 SCSI Adapter
The previous output shows that:
– There is only one hdisk device attached to the SCSI controller.
– There are two scsi devices, scsi0 and scsi1, one for each port on the
sisscsia0 SCSI controller.
– There are four ses units, ses0 through ses3, which belong to the SCSI
enclosure that our hdisk is located in.
Since there are no other hard disks or devices such as CD-ROM drives
attached, migrating the sisscsia0 SCSI controller card can now be performed.
5. Obtain the physical location code for the SCSI adapter card using the lscfg
command:
# lscfg -vl sisscsia0
sisscsia0
U78A0.001.0000000-P1-C4
PCI-X Dual Channel Ultra320 SCSI
Adapter
PCI-X Dual Channel Ultra320 SCSI Adapter:
Part Number.................97P3359
FRU Number..................97P3359
92
PowerVM Migration from Physical to Virtual Storage
Serial Number...............YL10C4061142
Manufacture ID..............000C
EC Level....................0
ROM Level.(alterable).......05080092
Product Specific.(Z0).......5702
Hardware Location Code......U78A0.001.0000000-P1-C4
#
In the previous output the hardware location code is highlighted and provides
the physical location code of slot C4 for the sisscsia0 SCSI adapter. Write
down the location code for use in future steps.
6. Shut down the client logical partition with the shutdown command and ensure
that it is fully shutdown before continuing the migration.
Chapter 5. Logical partition migrations
93
On the HMC
The HMC is now used to create client and server virtual SCSI adapters and
migrate the SCSI Storage controller to the correct profile.
7. Modify the client logical partition profile by removing the SCSI adapter with
the local attached disks. The physical location code that was noted from the
previous step 6 on page 93 was slot C4. Figure 5-2 shows the logical partition
profile properties.
Figure 5-2 Logical Partition Profile Properties panel
Select the correct storage controller, as shown in Figure 5-2, using slot C4.
Click the Remove tab, click OK, then click Close to remove the adapter from
the profile.
8. Select the client partition and display the virtual adapters list. Make a note of
a free slot number. This slot number will be required in a future step.
9. Select the Virtual I/O Server and add a virtual SCSI server adapter. You will
choose a free slot number on the Virtual I/O Server and map it to the slot
number that you made a note of in the previous step. In our case, the server
94
PowerVM Migration from Physical to Virtual Storage
slot number is 15 and the free client slot number is 5. Figure 5-3 shows the
required properties to create the server adapter.
If you perform this task using the Dynamic Logical Partition  Virtual
Adapters function to add the virtual SCSI server adapter, be sure that you
save the current profile using the Configuration  Save Current
Configuration function. You can rename this newly created profile later if
required.
Figure 5-3 Create Virtual SCSI Server Adapter panel
Chapter 5. Logical partition migrations
95
10.Modify the Virtual I/O Server to add the SCSI adapter to the profile.
Figure 5-4 shows the storage controller in slot C4, which has been
highlighted, for addition to the profile.
Figure 5-4 Logical Partition Profile Properties panel
Click the Add as required tab, click OK, then click Close and return to the
HMC management server panel.
11.Now you must make the Virtual I/O Server use the newly added SCSI Storage
controller. There are two choices to make the Virtual I/O Server see the SCSI
Storage controller, which depend on the environment that are running in:
a. Use the Dynamic Logical Partition  Physical adapters  Add
function on the HMC Server Tasks panel to add the SCSI Storage
controller to the operating Virtual I/O Server.
If you use the dynamic method, once the HMC panel returns with no
errors, you must log in to the Virtual I/O Server as the padmin user and
issue the cfgdev command to configure the devices.
b. Reboot the Virtual I/O Server if it is practical to do so.
96
PowerVM Migration from Physical to Virtual Storage
12.Create a client virtual SCSI adapter. Select your client partition and navigate
through, selecting your profile for the Create  Virtual Adapters task. You
can fill the panel in with the required information, similar to the panel shown in
Figure 5-5.
Figure 5-5 Create Virtual SCSI Adapter Panel
Ensure that the Virtual SCSI adapter number is the same as the free client
slot number that you identified previously and that the server adapter ID
matches the slot number used when you created the virtual SCSI server
adapter.
On the Virtual I/O Server
Verify that the correct devices have been created and perform the mapping of the
physical disk to the client logical partition.
13.Log in to the Virtual I/O Server as the padmin user ID.
a. To check that the creation of the new virtual SCSI server adapter has been
successful, use the lsdev command and notice that a new vhost has been
created, vhost4 in the example:
$ lsdev | grep vhost
vhost0
Available
vhost1
Available
vhost2
Available
vhost3
Available
vhost4
Available
Virtual
Virtual
Virtual
Virtual
Virtual
SCSI
SCSI
SCSI
SCSI
SCSI
Server
Server
Server
Server
Server
Adapter
Adapter
Adapter
Adapter
Adapter
Chapter 5. Logical partition migrations
97
b. Use the lsmap command to ensure that vhost4 is the correct virtual
adapter:
$ lsmap -all | grep vhost4
vhost4
U8204.E8A.10FE401-V1-C15
0x00000000
$
The previous output confirms that vhost4 is our required virtual SCSI
server adapter. The location code of C15 matches the slot that was used
when it was created.
14.Now look for new disks that have been defined.
a. Use the lsdev command to look at the hard drives:
$ lsdev -type disk
name
status
hdisk0
Available
hdisk1
Available
hdisk2
Available
hdisk3
Available
hdisk4
Available
hdisk5
Available
hdisk6
Available
hdisk7
Available
hdisk8
Available
$
description
SAS Disk Drive
SAS Disk Drive
SAS Disk Drive
SAS Disk Drive
SAS Disk Drive
SAS Disk Drive
SAS Disk Drive
SAS Disk Drive
16 Bit LVD SCSI Disk Drive
In the previous output, hdisk8 has been added and is a SCSI disk.
b. Confirm that this disk is correct using the chkdev command:
$ chkdev -dev hdisk8
NAME:
IDENTIFIER:
PHYS2VIRT_CAPABLE:
VIRT2NPIV_CAPABLE:
VIRT2PHYS_CAPABLE:
PVID:
UDID:
IEEE:
VTD:
-verbose
hdisk8
22080004B9710BST3146807LC03IBMscsi
YES
NA
NA
002631cd31ad04f50000000000000000
22080004B9710BST3146807LC03IBMscsi
$
In the previous output, the PVID and UDID fields match the values noted
from the client logical partitions PVID and unique_id, respectively.
The PHYS2VIRT_CAPABLE field is also set to YES, an indication that this
disk is acceptable to virtualize to a client partition.
98
PowerVM Migration from Physical to Virtual Storage
15.Create a mapping from the physical disk and verify that the mapping is
correct:
a. Use the mkvdev command to map hdisk8 to the new virtual Server SCSI
adapter, which is vhost4:
$ mkvdev -vdev hdisk8 -vadapter vhost4
vtscsi0 Available
$
b. Use the lsmap command to verify that the correct disk is now mapped to
vhost4:
$ lsmap -vadapter vhost4
SVSA
Physloc
Client Partition ID
--------------- -------------------------------------------- -----------------vhost4
U8204.E8A.10FE401-V1-C15
0x00000000
VTD
Status
LUN
Backing device
Physloc
vtscsi0
Available
0x8100000000000000
hdisk8
U78A0.001.0000000-P1-C4-T2-L1-L0
$
On the client partition: part 2
Now boot the client partition and perform the post-migration steps:
1. Re-verify that the disks that are now presented are correct:
a. Use the lspv command and check the PVID:
# lspv
hdisk1
active
#
002631cd31ad04f5
rootvg
b. Use the lsdev command. Notice in the output below that the disk is now a
Virtual SCSI Disk Drive.
# lsdev -Cc disk
hdisk0 Defined
00-08-01-1,0
hdisk1 Available
16 Bit LVD SCSI Disk Drive
Virtual SCSI Disk Drive
c. Use the lscfg command if required for final validation:
# lscfg -vl hdisk1
hdisk1
U8204.E8A.10FE401-V2-C5-T1-L8100000000000000
Virtual SCSI Disk Drive
#
Chapter 5. Logical partition migrations
99
In the previous output the C5 is the client slot number and
8100000000000000 matches the value of the LUN field in the output from
the lsmap command that was performed on the Virtual I/O Server. These
values are all correct.
2. If the disks that you migrated contain a boot volume, check and update the
boot information if required.
a. Use the bosboot command to set up the disk correctly for the next boot:
# bosboot -ad /dev/hdisk1
bosboot: Boot image is 40810 512 byte blocks.
Ensure that the /dev/ipldevice is linked to the correct hard disk.
b. Use the bootlist command to first set the hdisk and the correct media:
# bootlist -m normal hdisk1
c. Use the bootlist command to verify that the disk is set correctly to boot:
# bootlist -m normal -o
hdisk1 blv=hd5
#
Your migration is now complete.
5.2 Direct-attached SAN rootvg and data partition to
SAN virtual SCSI
In this section a logical partition's direct-attached SAN rootvg and data volumes
will be migrated to another partition that will have the same volumes available as
a virtual SCSI disk. The migration method used will be to remap the physical
Fibre Channel adapter from the source partition to the Virtual I/O Server. If you
100
PowerVM Migration from Physical to Virtual Storage
already have a physical Fibre Channel adapter on the Virtual I/O Server, you may
do the migration by mapping the SAN storage to the Virtual I/O Server instead of
remapping the adapter. Figure 1-2 provides a graphical representation of the
procedure that you are about to follow.
eth
fc
VIOS
VIOS
vsa
Remap
Adapter
to
3
2
New client gets SAN
rootvg & data from
vSCSI
vca
Client LPAR
Client LPAR
fc
IBM System p
1
Direct attached SAN
rootvg & data
P6 550
SAN
Switch
Disk A
SAN
Switch
Physical
Volume LUNs
Storage Device
DS4800
Figure 5-6 SAN direct attach rootvg and data partition migration to SAN vSCSI
In the scenario described below, it is assumed that you have:
򐂰 A running source client partition with direct-attached rootvg and a data
volume on SAN LUNs
򐂰 A Virtual I/O Server that has access to the same SAN as the direct-attached
source client
򐂰 A destination client partition that is currently shut down
Chapter 5. Logical partition migrations
101
On the source partition
The following series of commands show us the pre-migration state of the source
partition and allow us to collect the information that will be needed later on in the
migration.
The first lspv command displays only the disks that are relevant for this exercise
and shows us that the partition was booted from rootvg on hdisk4 and the data
volume group is datasrcvg on hdisk5. The remaining lsattr commands retrieve
the unique_id for each disk. These IDs will be needed when the Fibre Channel
adapter has been remapped to the Virtual I/O Server.
Use the lsdev command with the parent flag to verify the type of disk as done in
the example 2 on page 92. For additional information about the type of disk, use
the lsattr command, as shown below. Since the command lists the string FASt
in its output, this must be IBM DS4000® Fibre Channel storage. You will see
different identification strings unique to the type of storage that you are using.
# lspv | grep active
hdisk4
000fe4117e88efc0
rootvg
active
hdisk5
000fe41181e1734c
datasrcvg
active
# lsattr -El hdisk4 | grep unique_id
unique_id
3E213600A0B8000291B0800009DCB0402FC540F1815
FAStT03IBMfcp Unique device identifier
False
# lsattr -El hdisk5 | grep unique_id
unique_id
3E213600A0B8000291B0800009DCC0402FC6C0F1815
FAStT03IBMfcp Unique device identifier
False
The first two lsdev commands that follow provide further confirmation that hdisk4
and hdisk5 are SAN disks. The next lsdev command shows us all devices that
are on the 00-08 logical location code. This tells us that since our rootvg and data
disks are at logical location 00-08, the Fibre Channel adapter that is mapped to
the same logical location code will be the Fibre Channel adapter that is serving
hdisk4 and hdisk5. As is shown in the output, the Fibre Channel adapter is fcs0.
The lscfg command gives us the hardware location code of fcs0 that must be
moved to the destination partition.
# lsdev -l hdisk4
hdisk4 Available 00-08-02 MPIO Other DS4K Array Disk
# lsdev -l hdisk5
hdisk5 Available 00-08-02 MPIO Other DS4K Array Disk
# lsdev | grep 00-08
fcnet0
Defined
00-08-01 Fibre Channel Network Protocol Device
fcs0
Available 00-08
FC Adapter
fscsi0
Available 00-08-02 FC SCSI I/O Controller Protocol Device
102
PowerVM Migration from Physical to Virtual Storage
hdisk1
Available 00-08-02 MPIO Other FC SCSI Disk Drive
hdisk2
Available 00-08-02 MPIO Other FC SCSI Disk Drive
hdisk4
Available 00-08-02 MPIO Other DS4K Array Disk
hdisk5
Available 00-08-02 MPIO Other DS4K Array Disk
hdisk6
Available 00-08-02 MPIO Other FC SCSI Disk Drive
hdisk7
Available 00-08-02 MPIO Other FC SCSI Disk Drive
# lscfg -vl fcs0
fcs0
U78A0.001.DNWGCV7-P1-C4-T1 FC Adapter
Part Number.................10N8620
Serial Number...............1B80904DC3
Manufacturer................001B
EC Level....................A
Customer Card ID Number.....5759
FRU Number.................. 10N8620
Device Specific.(ZM)........3
Network Address.............10000000C9738E84
ROS Level and ID............02C82774
Device Specific.(Z0)........1036406D
Device Specific.(Z1)........00000000
Device Specific.(Z2)........00000000
Device Specific.(Z3)........03000909
Device Specific.(Z4)........FFC01231
Device Specific.(Z5)........02C82774
Device Specific.(Z6)........06C12715
Device Specific.(Z7)........07C12774
Device Specific.(Z8)........20000000C9738E84
Device Specific.(Z9)........BS2.71X4
Device Specific.(ZA)........B1F2.70A5
Device Specific.(ZB)........B2F2.71X4
Device Specific.(ZC)........00000000
Hardware Location Code......U78A0.001.DNWGCV7-P1-C4-T1
The remaining commands gather data that will be compared with the
post-migration state to validate that the disks on the source system are in fact the
same disks as on the destination partition.
The tail command lists out the last two lines of the /etc/hosts file and the df
command shows us that the partition has a /data file system mounted. Finally,
the ls command shows us a data file that was created for this exercise to validate
the post-migration data disk.
# tail -2 /etc/hosts
192.168.100.92 p2_411
192.168.100.91 p1_411
# df -k
Chapter 5. Logical partition migrations
103
Filesystem
1024-blocks
Free %Used
/dev/hd4
196608
31000
85%
/dev/hd2
1966080
128204
94%
/dev/hd9var
376832
128428
66%
/dev/hd3
147456
130732
12%
/dev/hd1
16384
16032
3%
/dev/hd11admin
131072
130708
1%
/proc
/dev/hd10opt
409600
122912
70%
/dev/livedump
262144
261776
1%
/var/adm/ras/livedump
/dev/fslv00
2097152
2096504
1%
# cd /data
# ls -l
total 0
drwxr-xr-x
2 root
system
256
-rw-r--r-1 root
system
0
migrate_FC_to_vSCSI.sig
Iused %Iused Mounted on
13317
62% /
38267
54% /usr
7128
20% /var
40
1% /tmp
5
1% /home
5
1% /admin
- /proc
8450
24% /opt
4
1%
5
1% /data
Oct 23 09:53 lost+found
Nov 28 2010
The required data collection from the source partition is now complete. Shut
down the source partition.
104
PowerVM Migration from Physical to Virtual Storage
On the HMC
The Fibre Channel adapter must now be remapped from the source partition to
the Virtual I/O Server so that the LUNs may be made available to the destination
partition as virtual SCSI disk.
1. Using the hardware location code for fcs0 from the previous step, open the
source partition’s profile panel and locate the physical Fibre Channel adapter.
In Figure 5-7, the correct Fibre Channel adapter in slot C4 has been
highlighted. Remove this Fibre Channel adapter from the partition profile.
Figure 5-7 Physical Fibre Channel Adapter to remove from source partition
Chapter 5. Logical partition migrations
105
2. Dynamically add the physical Fibre Channel adapter removed from the
source partition profile in the previous step to the Virtual I/O Server. The
partition Properties Panel will show something similar to the highlighted
portion in Figure 5-8 when this step is complete.
Figure 5-8 Fibre Channel adapter added to Virtual I/O Server
106
PowerVM Migration from Physical to Virtual Storage
3. Dynamically add two virtual SCSI server adapters to the Virtual I/O Server,
one for rootvg and the other for the data disk. An example of the panel in
which you create a virtual adapter is displayed in Figure 5-9.
Figure 5-9 Virtual SCSI Server Adapter Add Panel
Chapter 5. Logical partition migrations
107
Figure 5-10 shows the Virtual Adapters panel with our two server SCSI
adapters added.
Figure 5-10 Virtual SCSI server adapters added
108
PowerVM Migration from Physical to Virtual Storage
4. Since our destination partition is currently shut down, add two virtual SCSI
client adapters to the destination partition’s profile. The client partition’s
Profile Properties panel is displayed in Figure 5-11 with the added client
adapters highlighted.
Figure 5-11 Virtual SCSI Client Adapters Added
On the Virtual I/O Server
In the following steps, the adapters defined in the previous steps will be
configured and the mappings of the disk from the Virtual I/O Server to the
destination client partition created.
5. Run the cfgdev command to get the virtual SCSI server adapters configured.
6. Locate the disks that were previously on the source partition that are now
visible to the Virtual I/O Server. In the command output below, the chkdev
command is used to validate that the correct disk from the available disks on
the Virtual I/O Server was selected. Match the unique IDs noted for the disks
on the source partition in an earlier step to the UDIDs from the chkdev
command. If they are the same, you have chosen the correct disk. The chkdev
command is also used to validate whether mapping hdisk6 and hdisk7 to the
destination client partition will destroy any data on those disks. In the example
Chapter 5. Logical partition migrations
109
below, the PHYS2VIRT_CAPABLE field for both disks show a state of YES.
This tells us that it is safe to use these disks for our physical-to-virtual
migration.
$ chkdev -dev hdisk6 -verbose
NAME:
hdisk6
IDENTIFIER:
3E213600A0B8000291B0800009DCB0402FC540F1815
FAStT03IBMfcp
PHYS2VIRT_CAPABLE:
YES
VIRT2NPIV_CAPABLE:
NA
VIRT2PHYS_CAPABLE:
NA
PVID:
000fe4117e88efc00000000000000000
UDID:
3E213600A0B8000291B0800009DCB0402FC540F1815
FAStT03IBMfcp
IEEE:
VTD:
$ chkdev -dev hdisk7 -verbose
NAME:
hdisk7
IDENTIFIER:
3E213600A0B8000291B0800009DCC0402FC6C0F1815
FAStT03IBMfcp
PHYS2VIRT_CAPABLE:
YES
VIRT2NPIV_CAPABLE:
NA
VIRT2PHYS_CAPABLE:
NA
PVID:
000fe41181e1734c0000000000000000
UDID:
3E213600A0B8000291B0800009DCC0402FC6C0F1815
FAStT03IBMfcp
IEEE:
VTD:
7. Locate the vhost server adapters and map the disks to the destination client
partition using the mkvdev command, as in the example that follows. To
validate that you have chosen the correct vhost adapters, look at the slot
numbers from the lsmap command. As you can see from the lsmap output
below, the slot number for vhost6 is C17 and the slot number for vhost7 is
C18. These slot numbers match the IDs that were used when creating the
adapters on the HMC.
$ lsmap -vadapter vhost6
SVSA
Physloc
Client Partition ID
--------------- -------------------------------------------- -----------------vhost6
U8204.E8A.10FE411-V2-C17
0x00000000
VTD
NO VIRTUAL TARGET DEVICE FOUND
$ lsmap -vadapter vhost7
SVSA
Physloc
Client Partition ID
--------------- -------------------------------------------- ------------------
110
PowerVM Migration from Physical to Virtual Storage
vhost7
U8204.E8A.10FE411-V2-C18
VTD
0x00000000
NO VIRTUAL TARGET DEVICE FOUND
$ mkvdev -vdev hdisk6 -vadapter vhost6
vtscsi2 Available
$ mkvdev -vdev hdisk7 -vadapter vhost7
vtscsi3 Available
As shown in the following command output, running chkdev again after
running the mkvdev command will show you the mapped VTDs. In addition,
the PHYS2VIRT_CAPABLE field now has a state of NA and the
VIRT2NPIV_CAPABLE and VIRT2PHYS_CAPABLE fields have a state of
YES. This tells us that hdisk6 and hdisk7 are no longer available for a
physical-to-virtual mapping operation, since with the mkvdev commands that
were just run, physical-to-virtual mapping has already been performed. But
both disks are available to be mapped to virtual Fibre Channel or to be
remapped back to physical disk.
$ chkdev -dev hdisk6
NAME:
IDENTIFIER:
PHYS2VIRT_CAPABLE:
VIRT2NPIV_CAPABLE:
VIRT2PHYS_CAPABLE:
PVID:
UDID:
IEEE:
VTD:
-verbose
hdisk6
3E213600A0B8000291B0800009DCB0402FC540F1815
NA
YES
YES
000fe4117e88efc00000000000000000
3E213600A0B8000291B0800009DCB0402FC540F1815
$ chkdev -dev hdisk7
NAME:
IDENTIFIER:
PHYS2VIRT_CAPABLE:
VIRT2NPIV_CAPABLE:
VIRT2PHYS_CAPABLE:
PVID:
UDID:
IEEE:
VTD:
-verbose
hdisk7
3E213600A0B8000291B0800009DCC0402FC6C0F1815
NA
YES
YES
000fe41181e1734c0000000000000000
3E213600A0B8000291B0800009DCC0402FC6C0F1815
FAStT03IBMfcp
FAStT03IBMfcp
vtscsi2
FAStT03IBMfcp
FAStT03IBMfcp
vtscsi3
Chapter 5. Logical partition migrations
111
8. Activate the destination client partition in SMS mode and select the disk to
boot from that was originally on the source partition. The output below shows
the available SCSI devices from SMS from our example. The disk in slot C9 is
our original rootvg disk.
------------------------------------------------------------------------------Select Media Adapter
1.
U8204.E8A.10FE411-V4-C7-T1
/vdevice/v-scsi@30000007
2.
U8204.E8A.10FE411-V4-C9-T1
/vdevice/v-scsi@30000009
3.
U8204.E8A.10FE411-V4-C10-T1
/vdevice/v-scsi@3000000a
4.
List all devices
------------------------------------------------------------------------------Navigation keys:
M = return to Main Menu
ESC key = return to previous screen
X = eXit System Management Services
------------------------------------------------------------------------------Type menu item number and press Enter or select Navigation key:2
9. When the destination partition has completed its boot, verify that the disks
that are visible are in fact the original disks from the source partition and that
the data is intact. In our example below, our destination client sees the
original disks as hdisk8 and hdisk9 as is seen from the following lspv
command output. The remaining lsdev commands show that they appear as
virtual SCSI disks and they map to the virtual SCSI adapters vscsi2 and
vscsi3.
# lspv | grep active
hdisk8
000fe4117e88efc0
hdisk9
000fe41181e1734c
# lsdev -l hdisk8
hdisk8 Available Virtual SCSI Disk Drive
# lsdev -l hdisk9
hdisk9 Available Virtual SCSI Disk Drive
# lsdev -l hdisk8 -F parent
vscsi2
# lsdev -l hdisk9 -F parent
vscsi3
rootvg
datasrcvg
active
active
The remaining commands provide additional evidence that hdisk8 and hdisk9
are in fact the same disks that were visible on the original client partition.
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PowerVM Migration from Physical to Virtual Storage
Compare the output below to the output gathered from the pre-migration
source partition.
The tail command lists out the last two lines of the /etc/hosts file, which
looks the same as on the original host, and the df command shows us that
the partition booted with /data already mounted just as on the original host.
Finally, the ls command shows us that the data on the data disk is intact and
that it is the same data disk that was on the original host.
# tail -2 /etc/hosts
192.168.100.92 p2_411
192.168.100.91 p1_411
# df -k
Filesystem
1024-blocks
Free %Used
/dev/hd4
196608
31000
85%
/dev/hd2
1966080
128204
94%
/dev/hd9var
376832
128428
66%
/dev/hd3
147456
130732
12%
/dev/hd1
16384
16032
3%
/dev/hd11admin
131072
130708
1%
/proc
/dev/hd10opt
409600
122912
70%
/dev/livedump
262144
261776
1%
/dev/fslv00
2097152
2096504
1%
# cd /data
# ls -l
total 0
drwxr-xr-x
2 root
system
256
-rw-r--r-1 root
system
0
Iused %Iused Mounted on
13317
62% /
38267
54% /usr
7128
20% /var
40
1% /tmp
5
1% /home
5
1% /admin
- /proc
8450
24% /opt
4
1% /var/adm/ras/livedump
5
1% /data
Oct 23 09:53 lost+found
Nov 28 2010 migrate_FC_to_vSCSI.sig
The migration is now complete.
5.3 Direct-attached SAN rootvg and data partition to
virtual Fibre Channel
This method describes a scenario where a logical partition with SAN-attached
disks are migrated to a Virtual I/O Server in the same systems enclosure and
uses the virtual Fibre Channel function to present the disks.
Chapter 5. Logical partition migrations
113
In Figure 5-12, a direct-attached Fibre Channel adapter is shown with SAN disks
for the client logical partition, which is then migrated to the Virtual I/O Server with
virtual Fibre Channel installed.
fc
eth
VIOS
Client LPAR
vfc
fc
LPAR becomes
VIOS client
Serv
er
Physical
Volumes
vfc
Client LPAR
ro
otv
g/d
ata
vg
mi
g ra
tes
I/O
rtual
to Vi
POWER7 systems enclosure (CEC)
SAN
Volumes
Figure 5-12 Migration from direct-attached SAN to Virtual Fibre Channel
In this example the source client logical partition will be migrated such that the
Fibre Channel will be managed by the Virtual I/O Server. For your migration, you
may prefer to pre-commission a new logical partition and establish the virtual
Fibre Channel connection prior to any change window and then perform the
re-mapping phase of the migration at the appropriate time. While the
pre-allocation of a new logical partition method depends on having CPU and
memory resources available, it saves time because you do not need to be
concerned with the direct-attached Fibre Channel adapter until it is required
elsewhere.
In addition, the client logical partition’s direct-attached Fibre Channel card may
not be a supported model for the NPIV function (required for virtual Fibre
Channel), requiring you to migrate to a virtual Fibre Channel capable adapter,
which may already be installed in a Virtual I/O Server.
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PowerVM Migration from Physical to Virtual Storage
On the client partition
On the client logical partition first capture details of the resources that are going
to migrate. These may include the details of the root volume group (rootvg), any
data volume groups, and the details of the Fibre Channel card if you are going to
migrate the Fibre Channel card from the client partition to the Virtual I/O Server:
1. List the physical hard disks available using the lspv command:
# lspv
hdisk3
hdisk4
hdisk5
000fe411201305c3
000fe4117e88efc0
000fe41181e1734c
None
rootvg
datasrcvg
active
active
The output from the lspv command shows that there are three disks installed
and the physical volume identifiers (PVIDs), as well as the disks volume group
membership. For this migration, both the rootvg and datasrcvg will be
migrated.
2. At this stage, identify which disk the system is using as a boot disk using
either of two AIX commands, bootlist or getconf:
# bootlist -m normal -o
hdisk4 blv=hd5
or
# getconf BOOT_DEVICE
hdisk4
The previous output confirms that hdisk4 in rootvg is the boot disk.
3. Now capture information about where the disk is sourced from, which could
be local SCSI, virtual SCSI, or SAN-attached disks.
a. List the physical volume information using the AIX lsdev command with
the list disk subtype option. This provides us with:
# lsdev -Cc disk
hdisk3 Available
Virtual SCSI Disk Drive
hdisk4 Available 00-08-02 MPIO Other DS4K Array Disk
hdisk5 Available 00-08-02 MPIO Other DS4K Array Disk
The previous output shows that there are three disks, of which hdisk3 is
presented from a virtual SCSI mapping, and disks hdisk4 and hdisk5 are
presented from a multi path IO driver (MPIO).
b. In addition, the MPIO type from the above output is from a DS4000 device
which allows us to query the MPIO characteristics using the AIX
mpio_get_config command:
# mpio_get_config -A
Storage Subsystem worldwide name: 60ab800114632000048ed17e
Storage Subsystem Name = 'ITSO_DS4800'
Chapter 5. Logical partition migrations
115
hdisk
hdisk4
hdisk5
LUN #
1
2
Ownership
B (preferred)
B (preferred)
User Label
PW9405-17-1
PW9405-17-2
The previous output describes where the hard disks that are SAN
connected are sourced from (in this case the Storage Subsystem
ITSO_DS4800) and how the disks are named in the storage array
(PW9405-17-1 and PW9405-17-2, respectively). If you are using EMC
storage then the powermt display command may be used or the lspath
command for other MPIO-capable storage to display details.
4. Gather information for any data volume groups that are going to migrate. This
includes:
a. The physical volumes contained in the volume group. Use the lsvg
command with the -p flag:
# lsvg datasrcvg -p
datasrcvg:
PV_NAME
PV STATE
DISTRIBUTION
hdisk5 active
119
#
TOTAL PPs
FREE PPs
102
FREE
24..07..23..24..24
b. The logical volumes in the data volume groups. Use the lsvg command
with the -l flag:
# lsvg datasrcvg -l
datasrcvg:
LV NAME
TYPE
POINT
loglv00
jfs2log
fslv00
jfs2
LPs
PPs
PVs
LV STATE
MOUNT
1
16
1
16
1
1
open/syncd
open/syncd
N/A
/data
From the previous output you have determined that the datasrcvg has a single
jfs2 file system that is mounted at the /data mount point. To assist in the
context of performing migration tests, we wrote a signature to the /data
directory using the AIX touch command and verified that the file was created
using the AIX ls command:
# ls /data
lost+found
# touch /data/migrate_FC_to_VFC.sig
# ls /data
lost+found
migrate_FC_to_VFC.sig
#
5. The last piece of disk identification information required is the unique
identification string for each disk that will migrate. Use the AIX lsattr
command to obtain this information. For further information about disk
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PowerVM Migration from Physical to Virtual Storage
identification refer to 2.2, “Checking unique disk identification” on page 13.
The key values to record from the lsattr command are:
– The PVID
– The unique_id or ieee_volname, which depends on the type of disk and
MPIO driver that you have installed
Example command output for both hdisk4 and hdisk5 follows:
# lsattr -El hdisk4
PCM
PCM/friend/otherapdisk
Path Control Module
PR_key_value
none
False
<output truncated>
node_name
0x200200a0b811a662
FC Node Name
pvid
False
000fe4117e88efc00000000000000000
<output truncated>
unique_id
3E213600A0B8000291B0800009DCB0402FC540F1815
FAStT03IBMfcp
Unique device identifier
False
ww_name
0x201300a0b811a662
FC World Wide Name
#
False
and for hdisk5
# lsattr -El hdisk5
PCM
PCM/friend/otherapdisk
Path Control Module
PR_key_value
none
False
<output truncated>
node_name
0x200200a0b811a662
FC Node Name
pvid
False
000fe41181e1734c0000000000000000
<output truncated>
unique_id
3E213600A0B8000291B0800009DCC0402FC6C0F1815
FAStT03IBMfcp
Unique device identifier
False
ww_name
0x201300a0b811a662
Chapter 5. Logical partition migrations
117
FC World Wide Name
#
False
6. Now capture details about the Fibre Channel card if you are going to migrate
it. If you are not migrating the Fibre Channel cards then you can omit this
step. At the time of writing, only the 8 GB Fibre Channel adapter Feature
Code 5735 supports the virtual Fibre Channel (or NPIV) function on a
POWER6-technology-based system.
a. Determine which fiber card would be the candidate for migration by listing
the installed adapters and then tracing the SAN-connected hard disks to
the source Fibre Channel. List the installed Fibre Channel adapters using
the AIX lsdev command:
# lsdev -C | grep ^fc
fcnet0
Defined
00-08-01
fcnet1
Defined
00-09-01
fcs0
Available 00-08
fcs1
Available 00-09
Fibre Channel Network Protocol Device
Fibre Channel Network Protocol Device
FC Adapter
FC Adapter
b. Use the AIX lsdev command to trace back from one of the hard disks and
find the owner:
# lsdev -l hdisk4 -F parent
fscsi0
# lsdev -l fscsi0 -F parent
fcs0
You can now be sure that the Fibre Channel card fcs0 is the correct card if
you were going to migrate it to the Virtual I/O Server partition.
Note: In the example above the Fibre Channel card fcs0 is not capable of
supporting the virtual Fibre Channel (NPIV) function. The steps provided
here are still the correct steps for identification of the Fibre Channel card.
c. Use the AIX lscfg command to obtain the Fibre Channel details. The
WWPN will be shown as the network address of the Fibre Channel
adapter.
# lscfg -vl fcs0
fcs0
U78A0.001.DNWGCV7-P1-C4-T1
Part Number.................10N8620
Serial Number...............1B80904DC3
Manufacturer................001B
EC Level....................A
Customer Card ID Number.....5759
FRU Number.................. 10N8620
118
PowerVM Migration from Physical to Virtual Storage
FC Adapter
Device Specific.(ZM)........3
Network Address.............10000000C9738E84
ROS Level and ID............02C82774
Device Specific.(Z0)........1036406D
Device Specific.(Z1)........00000000
Device Specific.(Z2)........00000000
Device Specific.(Z3)........03000909
Device Specific.(Z4)........FFC01231
Device Specific.(Z5)........02C82774
Device Specific.(Z6)........06C12715
Device Specific.(Z7)........07C12774
Device Specific.(Z8)........20000000C9738E84
Device Specific.(Z9)........BS2.71X4
Device Specific.(ZA)........B1F2.70A5
Device Specific.(ZB)........B2F2.71X4
Device Specific.(ZC)........00000000
Hardware Location Code......U78A0.001.DNWGCV7-P1-C4-T1
Ensure that you make a note of the network address of the card to verify that
it is the correct card if you relocate the card to the Virtual I/O Server.
7. Shut down the client logical partition using the shutdown command.
On the HMC: part 1
Use the HMC to dynamically reassign the Fibre Channel card to the Virtual I/O
Server and create the virtual Fibre Channel adapter in the client logical partition
and Virtual I/O Server’s profiles. Finally, use SAN tools to map the required SAN
volumes to the newly created virtual Fibre Channel resource.
8. If your Fibre Channel card in the client logical partition is NPIV capable, now
is the time to use the HMC to move the card from the client logical partition to
the Virtual I/O Server.
The Fibre Channel card to move is identified by the slot number. Using the
Fibre Channel card from the client partition from step 6 on page 118 above,
the location of the card is presented as part of the lscfg output:
fcs0
U78A0.001.DNWGCV7-P1-C4-T1
FC Adapter
The above output show us that the fcs0 adapter is located in slot C4.
9. Because you have shut down the client logical partition you can dynamically
move the card to the Virtual I/O Server. First edit the client logical partition
and remove the Fibre Channel card from the profile.
You now dynamically assign the card in slot C4 to the Virtual I/O Server using
the dynamic logical partitioning tools from the HMC Server Tasks menu. Once
the Fibre Channel adapter is configured into the profile remember to save the
Chapter 5. Logical partition migrations
119
profile of the running Virtual I/O Server immediately so that on a restart, the
Fibre Channel resource is available for use.
10.Use the HMC to determine a free slot number on the client logical partition.
Performing this action now reduces switching between the client logical
partition and Virtual I/O Server configurations a number of times.
11.Now create the virtual Fibre Channel resource on the Virtual I/O Server and
then the client logical partition. Edit the Virtual I/O Server’s running client
logical partitions profile by adding a virtual Fibre Channel client adapter.
From the HMC Systems Management panel, select the server, then the
Configuration  Manage Profiles option. Select the profile by clicking in the
check box, then click OK. Now use the Create  Fibre Channel option from
the Actions menu, as in Figure 5-13.
Figure 5-13 Add a Fibre Channel adapter to the Virtual I/O Server
120
PowerVM Migration from Physical to Virtual Storage
a. Enter the required slot numbers into the Create Virtual Fibre Channel
Adapter panel, as in Figure 5-14.
Figure 5-14 Create Virtual Fibre Channel Adapter panel
On the page shown in Figure 5-14 it is also possible to select the client
partition, p2_411. Click OK once the slot number is entered that was
recorded in step 10 on page 120.
Chapter 5. Logical partition migrations
121
b. The HMC panel that is displayed is to the panel in Figure 5-15 and shows
that the virtual Fibre Channel is defined for creation. You must exit this
panel by clicking the OK button for the definition to be saved.
Figure 5-15 Virtual Adapters panel
122
PowerVM Migration from Physical to Virtual Storage
12.Modify the profile of the client logical partition and create a virtual Fibre
Channel client adapter. Select the required client partition, and then edit the
profile by using the Action  Edit function, as in Figure 5-16.
Figure 5-16 Edit a managed profile
Chapter 5. Logical partition migrations
123
a. Select the Virtual Adapters tab, as in Figure 5-17.
Figure 5-17 Virtual Adapters tab
124
PowerVM Migration from Physical to Virtual Storage
b. Using the Actions drop-down box, as in Figure 5-18, select Create 
Fibre Channel Adapter.
Figure 5-18 Resource Creation panel
Chapter 5. Logical partition migrations
125
c. In the Fibre Channel resource panel (Figure 5-19) enter the slot numbers
that match the numbers that you used when you defined the Fibre
Channel Adapter on the Virtual I/O Server endpoint in step 12a on
page 124. Click OK when complete.
Figure 5-19 Fibre Channel Adapter resources
Note: On the panel shown in Figure 5-19, the “This adapter is required
for partition activation” check box was not selected during the test
migration. In production this option should be selected.
126
PowerVM Migration from Physical to Virtual Storage
As shown in Figure 5-20, you can now see that a Client Fibre Channel
Adapter has been created.
Figure 5-20 Client Fibre Channel Adapter
Note: You must exit the previous panel (Figure 5-20 on page 127) by
clicking OK for the resource to be saved correctly in the profile.
Exiting without clicking OK means that the POWER Hypervisor will not
assign world wide port names (WWPNs) to the client Fibre Channel
adapter and you will not be able to continue this migration. For further
details refer to 2.4, “Virtual Fibre Channel and N_Port ID virtualization”
on page 26.
Chapter 5. Logical partition migrations
127
d. Once you have clicked OK on the above panel, reselect the Virtual
Adapters tab and select the newly created client Fibre Channel adapter.
Use the Actions  Properties selection in the drop-down box
(Figure 5-21) to display the WWPNs of the client Fibre Channel adapter.
Figure 5-21 Adapter properties
128
PowerVM Migration from Physical to Virtual Storage
The resulting panel displays the assigned WWPNs, as shown in
Figure 5-22.
Figure 5-22 Virtual Fibre Channel Adapter Properties
e. Make a note of the WWPNs that are displayed (Figure 5-22), as they will
be needed shortly. If you want the adapter and storage to be visible after
the partition shutdown, save the configuration to a new profile and use the
new profile when starting up the partition.
On the Virtual I/O Server
Now log in to the Virtual I/O Server and map the Fibre Channel card to the virtual
Fibre Channel adapter.
13.Log in to the Virtual I/O Server and use the cfgdev command to configure the
virtual Fibre Channel server adapter. Use the lsdev command to ensure that
a vfchost device has been created:
$ lsdev -type adapter -virtual
name
status
description
ent4
Available
Virtual I/O Ethernet Adapter (l-lan)
ent5
Available
Virtual I/O Ethernet Adapter (l-lan)
ent6
Available
Virtual I/O Ethernet Adapter (l-lan)
ent7
Available
Virtual I/O Ethernet Adapter (l-lan)
vasi0
Available
Virtual Asynchronous Services Interface (VASI)
vbsd0
Available
Virtual Block Storage Device (VBSD)
vfchost0
Available
Virtual FC Server Adapter
vhost0
Available
Virtual SCSI Server Adapter
vhost1
Available
Virtual SCSI Server Adapter
vhost2
Available
Virtual SCSI Server Adapter
Chapter 5. Logical partition migrations
129
vhost3
vhost4
vhost5
vhost6
vhost7
vsa0
name
ent8
$
Available
Available
Available
Available
Available
Available
status
Available
Virtual SCSI Server Adapter
Virtual SCSI Server Adapter
Virtual SCSI Server Adapter
Virtual SCSI Server Adapter
Virtual SCSI Server Adapter
LPAR Virtual Serial Adapter
description
Shared Ethernet Adapter
Or use the shorter form of the lsdev command if you prefer:
$ lsdev -dev vfchost*
name
status
vfchost0
Available
description
Virtual FC Server Adapter
14.Use the Virtual I/O Server lsdev command to display the Fibre Channel cards
in the Virtual I/O Server partition:
$ lsdev -type adapter | grep
fcs0
Available
fcs1
Available
fcs2
Available
fcs3
Available
$
^fc
8Gb PCI Express Dual Port FC Adapter (df1000f114108a03)
8Gb PCI Express Dual Port FC Adapter (df1000f114108a03)
FC Adapter
FC Adapter
15.If you relocated a virtual Fibre Channel compliant (NPIV) Fibre Channel card
to the Virtual I/O Server, use the lsdev command as the padmin user against
the Fibre Channel (fcs) devices to locate the corresponding WWPN that you
noted from the client logical partition:
$ lsdev -dev fcs0 -vpd | grep 'Network Address'
Network Address.............10000000C98723AE
$ lsdev -dev fcs1 -vpd | grep 'Network Address'
Network Address.............10000000C98723AF
In the previous example output the highlighted network address matches the
address that is expected to be visible.
16.It has now been established that:
– There is a Virtual Fibre Channel Server adapter.
– The physical Fibre Channel card is presented correctly to the Virtual I/O
Server.
– The correct WWPN/Network Address can be identified.
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PowerVM Migration from Physical to Virtual Storage
Create the mapping between the resources:
a. Use the lsmap command to view the newly added virtual Fibre Channel
server adapter. Note that the physical location code of the virtual Fibre
Channel server adapter will display the slot number:
$ lsmap -all -npiv
Name
Physloc
ClntID ClntName
ClntOS
------------- ---------------------------------- ------ -------------- ------vfchost0
U8204.E8A.10FE411-V2-C17
4
Status:NOT_LOGGED_IN
FC name:
FC loc code:
Ports logged in:0
Flags:1<NOT_MAPPED,NOT_CONNECTED>
VFC client name:
VFC client DRC:
$
b. Now use the Virtual I/O Server vfcmap command to establish the
relationship between your virtual Fibre Channel server adapter and the
physical fcs Fibre Channel card:
$ vfcmap -vadapter vfchost0 -fcp fcs1
c. The lsmap command should now show the correct mapping from physical
Fibre Channel card fcs1 to virtual Fibre Channel server adapter vfchost0:
$ lsmap -all -npiv
Name
Physloc
ClntID ClntName
ClntOS
------------- ---------------------------------- ------ -------------- ------vfchost0
U8204.E8A.10FE411-V2-C17
4
Status:NOT_LOGGED_IN
FC name:fcs1
Ports logged in:0
Flags:4<NOT_LOGGED>
VFC client name:
FC loc code:U78A0.001.DNWGCV7-P1-C1-T2
VFC client DRC:
$
The above output from the lsmap command is correct for this stage of the
migration. For further details see 2.4, “Virtual Fibre Channel and N_Port ID
virtualization” on page 26.
On the client partition: part 1
If you did not shut down the client partition cleanly, you may have a SCSI 2
reservation on the disks. This can be removed using the SAN GUI or CLI
appropriate to the storage platform. Now force the client logical partition to
present the WWPNs to the SAN fabric. This is required because the WWPNs are
not presented until the client logical partition is activated (so the SAN fabric
Chapter 5. Logical partition migrations
131
cannot see them at this stage). For further information refer to 2.4, “Virtual Fibre
Channel and N_Port ID virtualization” on page 26.
17.Boot to the SMS menu:
a. Type 5 and press Enter to access the Select Boot Options panel.
b. Type 1 and press Enter to access the Select Device Type panel.
c. Type 5 and press Enter to access the Hard Drive Panel.
d. Type 3 and press Enter to use SAN media.
18.At this point, the following screen is displayed:
------------------------------------------------------------------------------Select Media Adapter
1.
U8204.E8A.10FE411-V4-C8-T1
/vdevice/vfc-client@30000008
2.
List all devices
------------------------------------------------------------------------------Navigation keys:
M = return to Main Menu
ESC key = return to previous screen
X = eXit System Management Services
------------------------------------------------------------------------------Type menu item number and press Enter or select Navigation key:
19.Type 1 and press Enter. At this stage the world wide port numbers are
presented to the SAN Fabric.
Tip: You do not have to leave this screen. Leave it open so that you can
complete the procedure.
On the SAN switch and storage device
You have now:
򐂰 Created a client virtual Fibre Channel adapter
򐂰 Created a Virtual I/O Server Fibre Channel Adapter
132
PowerVM Migration from Physical to Virtual Storage
򐂰 Mapped a physical Fibre Channel port to the virtual Fibre Channel host with
the vfcmap command
򐂰 Started the client logical partition that should present the WWPNs to the SAN
fabric
20.Correct the SAN zoning in the SAN switch and the storage device
mapping/masking to the new WWPNs.
21.Break the reserve if required. If you did not shut down the client partition
cleanly, you may have a SCSI 2 reservation on the disks. This can be
removed using the SAN GUI or CLI appropriate to the storage platform.
22.Obtain the WWPNs to be used from the Client Properties panel (Figure 5-22
on page 129). The lowest numbered port name is usually the WWPN that is
presented to the SAN devices. Figure 5-23 highlights this number.
Figure 5-23 World wide port names
On the client partition: part 2
Complete the process of SAN disk discovery using the SMS menu and boot the
logical partition:
23.Return to the entry SMS menu by typing M and pressing Enter to return to the
Main menu and then re-scan for the SAN disk volumes by taking the following
steps:
a. Type 5 and press Enter to access the Select Boot Options panel.
b. Type 1 and press Enter to access the Select Device Type panel.
c. Type 5 and press Enter to access the Hard Drive Panel.
Chapter 5. Logical partition migrations
133
d. Type 3 and press Enter to use SAN media.
At this point, the following screen is displayed:
------------------------------------------------------------------------------Select Media Adapter
1.
U8204.E8A.10FE411-V4-C8-T1
/vdevice/vfc-client@30000008
2.
List all devices
24.At the Select Media Adapter panel, type 1 and press Enter, which should
correspond to a vfc-client device. The slot number will be the client slot
number that was used when the client Virtual Fibre Channel adapter was
created:
U8204.E8A.10FE411-V4-C8-T1
/vdevice/vfc-client@30000008
a. You should now see a disk device presented. Select this device by typing
the number next to it. In this case type 1 and press Enter.
--------------------------------------------------------------------------Select Device
Device Current Device
Number Position Name
1.
SCSI 14 GB FC Harddisk, part=2 (AIX 6.1.0)
( loc=U8204.E8A.10FE411-V4-C8-T1-W201300a0b811a662-L0 )
-------------------------------------------------------------------------Navigation keys:
M = return to Main Menu
ESC key = return to previous screen
X = eXit System Management Services
-------------------------------------------------------------------------Type menu item number and press Enter or select Navigation key:1
b. Select the Normal Mode Boot task by typing 2, pressing Enter, typing 1,
and then pressing Enter again to exit the SMS menus.
The system has now booted the Virtual Fibre Channel disk.
25.There are a few last tasks to perform, which are orientated around proving
that the correct disks mapped:
a. Use the AIX lspv command to ensure that the disks have the correct
PVIDs on them:
# lspv
hdisk4
hdisk5
134
000fe4117e88efc0
000fe41181e1734c
PowerVM Migration from Physical to Virtual Storage
rootvg
datasrcvg
active
active
These PVIDs match the values that were recorded prior to the migration.
b. The AIX lsvg command also shows that the two volume groups are
present as expected:
# lsvg
rootvg
datasrcvg
c. Now list the Fibre Channel devices. Note that there are no physical Fibre
Channel cards, but there is a virtual Fibre Channel Client adapter:
# lsdev -C | grep ^f
fcnet0
Defined
Device
fcnet1
Defined
Device
fcs0
Defined
fcs1
Defined
fcs2
Available
Adapter
fscsi0
Defined
Device
fscsi1
Defined
Device
fscsi2
Available
Device
fslv00
Defined
00-08-01 Fibre Channel Network Protocol
00-09-01 Fibre Channel Network Protocol
00-08
00-09
C8-T1
FC Adapter
FC Adapter
Virtual Fibre Channel Client
00-08-02 FC SCSI I/O Controller Protocol
00-09-02 FC SCSI I/O Controller Protocol
C8-T1-01 FC SCSI I/O Controller Protocol
Logical volume
d. Trace hdisk4 back to find the parent device:
# lsdev -l hdisk4 -F parent
fscsi2
# lsdev -l fscsi2 -F parent
fcs2
This proves that the disks are presented using the correct type of Fibre
Channel attachment.
e. Also check that the disks are correct with the AIX mpio_get_config
command:
# mpio_get_config -A
Storage Subsystem worldwide name: 60ab800114632000048ed17e
Storage Subsystem Name = 'ITSO_DS4800'
hdisk
LUN #
Ownership
User Label
hdisk4
0
B (preferred)
PW9405-17-1
hdisk5
1
B (preferred)
PW9405-17-2
Chapter 5. Logical partition migrations
135
The previous steps prove conclusively that the migration from a logical
partition with a direct-attached Fibre Channel card to a logical partition with a
Virtual Fibre Channel card has been successful.
26.The last steps are to:
a. Ensure that the bootlist still correctly points to the correct hard disk.
b. Clean up un-needed references to Fibre Channel cards that have been
removed from the operating system.
This migration is now complete.
136
PowerVM Migration from Physical to Virtual Storage
5.4 Virtual SCSI rootvg and data to virtual Fibre Channel
In this section a logical partition's virtual SCSI rootvg and data volumes will be
migrated to another partition that will have the same volumes presented as the
virtual Fibre Channel disk. Figure 5-24 provides a graphical representation of the
procedure that we detail.
fc
eth
fc
VIOS
vfc
vsa
Migrate to VFC
vca
vfc
Client LPAR
Client LPAR
IBM System p
P6 550
SAN
Switch
Disk A
SAN
Switch
Physical
Volume LUNs
Storage Device
DS4800
Figure 5-24 Virtual SCSI migration to virtual Fibre Channel
In the scenario described below, it is assumed that you have:
򐂰 A running source client partition with virtual SCSI rootvg and data that will
become the destination client partition
򐂰 A Virtual I/O Server that is serving the source partition with SAN LUNs and
has allocated to it a NPIV-capable Fibre Channel adapter
Chapter 5. Logical partition migrations
137
On the source partition
The following series of commands show us the pre-migration state of the source
virtual SCSI partition.
1. The first lspv command displays only the disks that are relevant for this
exercise and shows us that the partition was booted from rootvg on hdisk8
and the data volume group is datasrcvg on hdisk9.
# lspv | grep active
hdisk8
000fe4117e88efc0
hdisk9
000fe41181e1734c
rootvg
datasrcvg
active
active
2. The lsdev commands show us that the parent adapter for our two disks are
both virtual SCSI adapters and that our disks are virtual SCSI disks:
# lsdev -l hdisk8
vscsi2
# lsdev -l hdisk9
vscsi3
# lsdev -l hdisk8
hdisk8 Available
# lsdev -l hdisk9
hdisk9 Available
-F parent
-F parent
Virtual SCSI Disk Drive
Virtual SCSI Disk Drive
The commands that follow are used to gather information about the source
partition’s disks that will be needed when the migration is complete for
validation of the migration.
3. The df command shows us that /data should be mounted on this host and the
ls command shows us a data file on this source host. Finally, the tail
command shows us the last two lines of the /etc/hosts file.
# df -k
Filesystem
1024-blocks
Free %Used
/dev/hd4
196608
29468
86%
/dev/hd2
1966080
128204
94%
/dev/hd9var
376832
128272
66%
/dev/hd3
147456
130732
12%
/dev/hd1
16384
16032
3%
/dev/hd11admin
131072
130708
1%
/proc
/dev/hd10opt
409600
122912
70%
/dev/livedump
262144
261776
1%
/var/adm/ras/livedump
/dev/fslv00
2097152
2096504
1%
# cd /data
# ls -l
total 0
drwxr-xr-x
2 root
system
256
-rw-r--r-1 root
system
0
migrate_vSCSI_to_vFC.sig
138
PowerVM Migration from Physical to Virtual Storage
Iused %Iused Mounted on
13315
63% /
38267
54% /usr
7128
20% /var
40
1% /tmp
5
1% /home
5
1% /admin
- /proc
8450
24% /opt
4
1%
5
1% /data
Oct 23 09:53 lost+found
Nov 28 2010
# tail -2 /etc/hosts
192.168.100.92 p2_411
192.168.100.91 p1_411
Having gathered the configuration and validation data from the source partition,
shut down the source partition.
On the Virtual I/O Server
On the Virtual I/O Server:
4. Find the virtual SCSI server mappings for the source partition and remove
them. The lsmap commands in the following example show us the mappings
of the virtual SCSI server adapters and the following rmvdev commands
remove these mappings.
$ lsmap -vadapter vhost6
SVSA
Physloc
Client Partition ID
--------------- -------------------------------------------- -----------------vhost6
U8204.E8A.10FE411-V2-C17
0x00000004
VTD
Status
LUN
Backing device
Physloc
vtscsi2
Available
0x8100000000000000
hdisk6
U78A0.001.DNWGCV7-P1-C4-T1-W201300A0B811A662-L0
$ lsmap -vadapter vhost7
SVSA
Physloc
Client Partition ID
--------------- -------------------------------------------- -----------------vhost7
U8204.E8A.10FE411-V2-C18
0x00000004
VTD
Status
LUN
Backing device
Physloc
vtscsi3
Available
0x8100000000000000
hdisk7
U78A0.001.DNWGCV7-P1-C4-T1-W201300A0B811A662-L1000000000000
$ rmvdev -vtd vtscsi2
$ rmvdev -vtd vtscsi3
The lsmap commands are run again to confirm that the mappings were
deleted:
$ lsmap -vadapter vhost6
SVSA
Physloc
Client Partition ID
--------------- -------------------------------------------- -----------------vhost6
U8204.E8A.10FE411-V2-C17
0x00000004
VTD
NO VIRTUAL TARGET DEVICE FOUND
$ lsmap -vadapter vhost7
SVSA
Physloc
Client Partition ID
--------------- -------------------------------------------- ------------------
Chapter 5. Logical partition migrations
139
vhost7
U8204.E8A.10FE411-V2-C18
VTD
0x00000004
NO VIRTUAL TARGET DEVICE FOUND
Finally, the vhost server adapters are deleted using rmdev commands. Use
the -recursive option for the rmdev command to remove both the vhost adapter
and vtscsi targets with a single command:
$ rmdev -dev vhost6
vhost6 deleted
$ rmdev -dev vhost7
vhost7 deleted
On the HMC
The virtual SCSI adapters will be removed from the source partition and the
Virtual I/O Server and the source partition will be reconfigured to receive its disk
through the virtual Fibre Channel.
5. In the profile of the source partition that was shut down previously, remove the
virtual SCSI client adapters from the partition profile and add a virtual Fibre
Channel adapter. You will see something similar to the highlighted line in
Figure 5-25 on page 141 when this step is complete.
140
PowerVM Migration from Physical to Virtual Storage
Figure 5-25 Virtual Fibre Channel adapter added to client profile
6. Dynamically remove the virtual SCSI server adapters from the Virtual I/O
Server and add a virtual Fibre Channel adapter.
On the Virtual I/O Server
In the following steps, the adapters defined in the previous steps will be
configured and the mappings to the disk from the Virtual I/O Server to the client
partition created:
7. Run the cfgdev command to remove the virtual SCSI server vhost adapters
removed earlier and to configure the virtual Fibre Channel adapter. The
following lsdev command shows us the virtual Fibre Channel adapter that
was configured.
$ lsdev -virtual | grep vfc
vfchost0
Available
Virtual FC Server Adapter
8. Map the physical Fibre Channel adapter to the virtual Fibre Channel adapter.
The lsdev command that follows shows us all the Fibre Channel adapters on
the Virtual I/O Server. The dual-ported 8 GB Fibre Channel adapter shown is
our NPIV capable adapter. Thus, this is the one that must be used. Our cables
Chapter 5. Logical partition migrations
141
are ported to the second port on the adapter, so fcs1 is the correct adapter to
use.
$ lsdev | grep fcs
fcs0
Available
fcs1
Available
fcs2
Available
fcs3
Available
8Gb PCI Express Dual Port FC Adapter (df1000f114108a03)
8Gb PCI Express Dual Port FC Adapter (df1000f114108a03)
FC Adapter
FC Adapter
The vfcmap command is used to create the virtual Fibre Channel mappings.
The lsmap command shows a NOT_LOGGED_IN state because our client is
currently shut down.
$ vfcmap -vadapter vfchost0 -fcp fcs1
$ lsmap -all -npiv
Name
Physloc
ClntID ClntName
ClntOS
------------- ---------------------------------- ------ -------------- ------vfchost0
U8204.E8A.10FE411-V2-C17
4
Status:NOT_LOGGED_IN
FC name:fcs1
Ports logged in:0
Flags:4<NOT_LOGGED>
VFC client name:
FC loc code:U78A0.001.DNWGCV7-P1-C1-T2
VFC client DRC:
On the SAN
9. Locate the WWPNs for the destination client Fibre Channel adapter from the
HMC and remap the SAN storage that was originally being mapped for the
source partition to the WWPNs for the destination partition.
On the destination partition
The client partition that was the source partition with virtual SCSI storage, which
now is the destination partition with virtual Fibre Channel storage, will now be
started in SMS mode so that the correct boot disk may be selected and the
migration verified.
10.When the destination partition has completed its boot, verify that the disks
that are visible are in fact the original disks from the source partition and that
the data is intact. In our example below, our destination client sees the disks
as hdisk1 and hdisk2, as seen in the following lspv command output. The
remaining lsdev commands show that they appear as Fibre Channel disks.
# lspv | grep active
hdisk1
000fe4117e88efc0
hdisk2
000fe41181e1734c
# lsdev -l hdisk1 -F parent
fscsi0
# lsdev -l hdisk2 -F parent
fscsi0
# lsdev -l hdisk1
142
PowerVM Migration from Physical to Virtual Storage
rootvg
datasrcvg
active
active
hdisk1 Available C8-T1-01 MPIO Other DS4K Array Disk
# lsdev -l hdisk2
hdisk2 Available C8-T1-01 MPIO Other DS4K Array Disk
The remaining commands provide additional evidence that hdisk1 and hdisk2
are in fact the same disks that were visible on the original client partition.
Compare the output below to the output gathered from the pre-migration
source partition.
The tail command lists out the last two lines of the /etc/hosts file, which
looks the same as on the original host, and the df command shows us that
the partition booted with /data already mounted, just as on the original host.
Finally, the ls command shows us that the data on the data disk is intact and
that it is the same data disk that was on the original host.
# tail -2 /etc/hosts
192.168.100.92 p2_411
192.168.100.91 p1_411
# df -k
Filesystem
1024-blocks
Free %Used
/dev/hd4
196608
29400
86%
/dev/hd2
1966080
128204
94%
/dev/hd9var
376832
128236
66%
/dev/hd3
147456
130732
12%
/dev/hd1
16384
16032
3%
/dev/hd11admin
131072
130708
1%
/proc
/dev/hd10opt
409600
122908
70%
/dev/livedump
262144
261776
1%
/dev/fslv00
2097152
2096504
1%
# cd /data
# ls -l
total 0
drwxr-xr-x
2 root
system
256
-rw-r--r-1 root
system
0
Iused %Iused Mounted on
13322
63% /
38267
54% /usr
7131
20% /var
40
1% /tmp
5
1% /home
5
1% /admin
- /proc
8450
24% /opt
4
1% /var/adm/ras/livedump
5
1% /data
Oct 23 09:53 lost+found
Nov 28 2010 migrate_vSCSI_to_vFC.sig
This migration is now complete.
Chapter 5. Logical partition migrations
143
144
PowerVM Migration from Physical to Virtual Storage
6
Chapter 6.
Standalone SAN rootvg to
virtual Fibre Channel
In this chapter we show you how to migrate a standalone machine’s rootvg on
storage area network (SAN) LUNs to a Virtual I/O Server client partition that will
have its rootvg on SAN LUNs mapped using virtual Fibre Channel (using NPIV).
Figure 6-1 on page 146 provides a graphical representation of the procedure to
perform.
© Copyright IBM Corp. 2010. All rights reserved.
145
Standalone
Client
Migrated to
VIOS VFC
eth
fc
fc
eth
VIOS
vfc
VIOS
AIX Server
Move
zonin
g for
LUN
to
IBM Dedicated
Physical
Volumes
vfc
Client LPAR
IBM System p
P6 550
SAN Switch
SAN Switch
rootvg
Storage Device
DS4800
Figure 6-1 Migrate standalone SAN rootvg to client partition SAN rootvg over Virtual
Fibre Channel
In the scenario described below, it is assumed that you already have:
򐂰 A running standalone host with rootvg on a SAN LUN
򐂰 A Virtual I/O Server with a physical NPIV-capable Fibre Channel adapter
allocated to it
򐂰 A destination client partition that is currently running with rootvg on virtual
SCSI disk
The client partition will be reconfigured so that it boots using the migrated SAN
LUN. NPIV is supported at certain minimum hardware configurations and
software levels. Refer to IBM PowerVM Virtualization Managing and Monitoring,
SG24-7590, for more information before proceeding.
146
PowerVM Migration from Physical to Virtual Storage
On the standalone source host
The lspv command below shows us that rootvg is on hdisk8. Thus, our machine
was booted from hdisk8.
# lspv
hdisk0
hdisk1
hdisk2
hdisk3
hdisk4
hdisk5
hdisk6
hdisk7
hdisk8
active
000fe4012a8f0920
none
000fe4012913f4bd
none
000fe401106cfc0c
000fe4012b5361f2
none
none
000fe401727b47c5
None
None
None
None
None
None
None
None
rootvg
The following lsdev commands confirm that hdisk8 is a LUN on a storage array
that is mapped to the client through a Fibre Channel adapter. The tail command
output will be used at the end of the migration as additional evidence that the
client partition has in fact booted off the standalone host’s original disk.
# lsdev -c disk
hdisk0 Available 00-08-00 SAS Disk Drive
hdisk1 Available 00-08-00 SAS Disk Drive
hdisk2 Available 00-08-00 SAS Disk Drive
hdisk3 Available 00-08-00 SAS Disk Drive
hdisk4 Available 00-08-00 SAS Disk Drive
hdisk5 Available 00-08-00 SAS Disk Drive
hdisk6 Available 00-08-00 SAS Disk Drive
hdisk7 Available 00-08-00 SAS Disk Drive
hdisk8 Available 07-00-01 MPIO Other DS4K Array Disk
# lsdev | grep 07-00
fcnet0
Defined
07-00-02
Fibre Channel Network Protocol
Device
fcs0
Available 07-00
4Gb Fibre Channel PCI Express
Adapter (df1000fe)
fscsi0
Available 07-00-01
Fibre Channel SCSI I/O Controller
Protocol Device
hdisk8
Available 07-00-01
MPIO Other DS4K Array Disk
# tail -1 /etc/hosts
192.168.100.50 standalone
1. Shut down the standalone machine and remap the SAN rootvg LUN on the
Fibre Channel switches to the NPIV-supported Fibre Channel card on the
Virtual I/O Server.
Chapter 6. Standalone SAN rootvg to virtual Fibre Channel
147
Note: Be sure to have the virtual Fibre Channel client file set installed on the
standalone SAN rootvg before shutting down your standalone machine for
migration. This will be required for the virtual Fibre Channel when rootvg is
started on the client partition.
On the HMC
Create the virtual Fibre Channel mappings that will allow the client partition to
see what was previously the standalone server’s rootvg SAN LUN.
2. Create the virtual Fibre Channel server adapter on the Virtual I/O Server.
Something similar to the highlighted portion of Figure 6-2 is what you should
see when this step is complete.
Figure 6-2 Virtual Fibre Channel Server Adapter on Virtual I/O Server
3. Create the virtual Fibre Channel client adapter on the client partition. If you
want the adapter and storage to be visible after the partition shutdown, save
the configuration to a new profile and use the new profile when starting up the
148
PowerVM Migration from Physical to Virtual Storage
partition. Something similar to the highlighted portion in Figure 6-3 is what
you should see when this step is complete.
Figure 6-3 Virtual Fibre Channel client adapter defined in client logical partition profile
On the Virtual I/O Server
You will now activate the virtual adapters defined in the previous step and map
the virtual adapter to the physical Fibre Channel adapter.
4. Run the cfgdev command to configure the virtual Fibre Channel adapter.
5. Get the list of all available virtual Fibre Channel server adapters using the
lsdev command:
$ lsdev -dev vfchost*
name
status
vfchost0
Available
description
Virtual FC Server Adapter
Chapter 6. Standalone SAN rootvg to virtual Fibre Channel
149
6. Get the list of all available physical Fibre Channel server adapters. As you can
see from the lsdev command output, our NPIV-supported dual-port Fibre
Channel card is at fcs0 and fcs1. Since only the second port is cabled on the
card in this test environment, fcs1 must be selected.
$ lsdev -dev fcs*
name
status
fcs0
Available
fcs1
Available
fcs2
Defined
fcs3
Defined
fcs4
Available
fcs5
Available
description
8Gb PCI Express Dual Port FC Adapter (df1000f114108a03)
8Gb PCI Express Dual Port FC Adapter (df1000f114108a03)
4Gb FC PCI Express Adapter (df1000fe)
4Gb FC PCI Express Adapter (df1000fe)
FC Adapter
FC Adapter
7. Run the lsnports command to check the Fibre Channel adapter NPIV
readiness of the adapter and the SAN switch. Since the fabric attribute is set
to 1, the configuration is NPIV ready, so the migration can proceed. If you see
a state of 0, check the configuration of your adapter and SAN switch.
$ lsnports
name
fcs1
physloc
U78A0.001.DNWGCV7-P1-C1-T2
fabric tports aports swwpns
1
64
64
2048
awwpns
2048
8. Use the vfcmap command to map the virtual adapter to the physical adapter.
The lsmap command lists the mapping created by the vfcmap command:
$ vfcmap -vadapter vfchost0 -fcp fcs1
$ lsmap -npiv -vadapter vfchost0
Name
Physloc
ClntID ClntName
ClntOS
------------- ---------------------------------- ------ -------------- ------vfchost0
U8204.E8A.10FE411-V2-C17
4 p2_411
AIX
Status:LOGGED_IN
FC name:fcs1
Ports logged in:7
Flags:a<LOGGED_IN,STRIP_MERGE>
VFC client name:fcs0
FC loc code:U78A0.001.DNWGCV7-P1-C1-T2
VFC client DRC:U8204.E8A.10FE411-V4-C9-T1
In your lsmap output, you may not see the Status as LOGGED_IN if you had not
already mapped the SAN LUN to the Virtual I/O Server. You can do the SAN
mapping now if that is the case and proceed with the following steps.
On the destination client partition
You will now boot the client partition using the virtual Fibre Channel drive that
was mapped in the previous steps. Keep in mind that since you are coming from
a standalone server with physical Ethernet interfaces, you may have to
reconfigure the Ethernet on the destination client partition to get network access.
9. Shut down the client partition and reactivate the partition into SMS.
10.Select option number 5 from the menu (Select Boot Options), find the Fibre
Channel drive, and initiate a boot from this device.
150
PowerVM Migration from Physical to Virtual Storage
11.Verify that the client has booted with the same LUN that was on the
standalone machine via the virtual Fibre Channel adapter. The getconf
command is another way to discover the boot device. The lspv command
gives us added confirmation that rootvg is on hdisk8 and the lsdev and lscfg
commands show us that hdisk8 is a SAN disk.
# getconf BOOT_DEVICE
hdisk8
# lspv | grep hdisk8
hdisk8
000fe401727b47c5
rootvg
# lsdev -c disk | grep hdisk8
hdisk8 Available C9-T1-01 MPIO Other DS4K Array Disk
# lscfg -vl hdisk8
hdisk8
U8204.E8A.10FE411-V4-C9-T1-W201300A0B811A662-L0
Array Disk
active
MPIO Other DS4K
Manufacturer................IBM
Machine Type and Model......1815
FAStT
ROS Level and ID............30393134
Serial Number...............
Device Specific.(Z0)........0000053245005032
Device Specific.(Z1)........
The remaining lsdev commands list all Fibre Channel adapters and show
how hdisk8 maps back to the virtual Fibre Channel adapter fcs2. Finally, the
tail command shows us the last line of the /etc/hosts file, which is the
same as was on the standalone host.
# lsdev|grep fcs
fcs0
Defined 07-00
fcs1
Defined 07-01
fcs2
Available C9-T1
# lsdev -l hdisk8 -F parent
fscsi2
# lsdev -l fscsi2 -F parent
fcs2
# tail -1 /etc/hosts
192.168.100.50 standalone
4Gb FC PCI Express Adapter (df1000fe)
4Gb FC PCI Express Adapter (df1000fe)
Virtual Fibre Channel Client Adapter
The migration is now complete.
Chapter 6. Standalone SAN rootvg to virtual Fibre Channel
151
152
PowerVM Migration from Physical to Virtual Storage
7
Chapter 7.
Direct attached Fibre
Channel devices partition to
virtual Fibre Channel
This section provides instructions for the migration of a logical partition that uses
direct-attached Fibre Channel resources (such as a tape drive) to a logical
partition with the Fibre Channel devices being virtualized using the Virtual I/O
Server and a virtual Fibre Channel capable Fibre Channel card.
Using Virtual Fibre Channel allows much more practical use of
Fibre-Channel-attached devices and releases dependencies on having
dedicated cards for functions such as tape access.
© Copyright IBM Corp. 2010. All rights reserved.
153
In Figure 7-1, LPAR1 and the Virtual I/O Server can both access the LTO4 tape
drive since both have a dedicated adapter with SAN zoning in place. The
migration process removes the dedicated tape access from LPAR1 and
re-presents the tape drive using the virtual Fibre Channel capability of the VIOS.
Tape Access
without VFC
fc
eth
Tape Access
with VFC
fc
eth
VIOS
fc
VIOS
vfc
LPAR 1
LPAR 1
IBM System p
IBM System p
SAN Switch
SAN Switch
LTO4
Storage Device
TS3200
LTO4
Storage Device
TS3200
Figure 7-1 Migration of direct-attached tape to virtualized tape
Note: IBM PowerVM Virtualization Managing and Monitoring, SG24-7590,
details the requirements for SAN switches, AIX levels, and Virtual I/O Server
levels to support NPIV (virtual Fibre Channel). Ensure that these requirements
are met before attempting the migration.
In addition, the AIX file set devices.vdevice.IBM.vfc-client.rte must be installed
on the client logical partition for the VFC function to work.
154
PowerVM Migration from Physical to Virtual Storage
The steps required to accomplish this are covered in the following section.
On the client partition: part 1
On the client logical partition, perform the following steps:
1. Identify which Fibre Channel card and port is being used by the tape device.
The following AIX commands show how to trace from the rmt0 device back to
the parent adapter using the lsdev command:
# lsdev -C | grep fcs
fcs0
Available 00-08
fcs1
Available 00-09
FC Adapter
FC Adapter
# lsdev -l rmt0 -F parent
fscsi1
# lsdev -l fscsi1 -F parent
fcs1
#
2. On the client logical partition, ensure that no processes are using the tape
drive. Stop applications such as Tivoli Storage Manager since they will
prevent removal of the devices.
3. Make a note of the tape drives and possibly the tape library’s serial numbers.
This can be accomplished using the AIX tapeutil utility (which is installed
when the AIX Atape device driver is installed and is available for download
from the IBM Storage support Web site www.storage.ibm.com. Select
Enterprise or Midrange tape category  Product Details  Product
Support  Download  Device Drivers).
After opening the tape device using tapeutil, issue an inquiry and select
inquiry page 83 as follows:
Enter Selection for /dev/rmt0: 5
Enter page code in hex or <enter> for standard inquiry: 83
Issuing inquiry for page 0x83...
Inquiry Page 0x83,
0000
0010
0020
0030
0040
-
0 1
0183
554C
3133
000E
0008
2 3
0046
5433
3130
1110
2002
Length 74
4 5
0201
3538
3032
E588
000E
6 7
0022
302D
3535
0194
1110
8 9
4942
5444
3138
0004
E588
A B
4D20
3420
0183
0000
C D
2020
2020
0008
0001
E F
2020
2020
2001
0193
0123456789ABCDEF
[..F..."IBM
]
[ULT3580-TD4
]
[1310025518... .]
[....å........]
[.. .....å
]
Chapter 7. Direct attached Fibre Channel devices partition to virtual Fibre Channel
155
4. Remove the tape devices and library device, if present, from the system. The
AIX rmdev command can be used for this purpose:
rmdev -dl rmt0
rmdev -dl smc0
5. Remove the Fibre Channel device from AIX. The -R flag used with the rmdev
command removes the fcnet and fscsi devices at the same time. Be careful if
you are using a dual-ported Fibre Channel card. You must migrate the
devices attached to both ports:
rmdev -Rdl fcs0
rmdev -Rdl fcs1
On the HMC: part 1
On the HMC, use the following steps to create the Virtual Fibre Channel
attachment:
6. Remove the assigned Fibre Channel card from the client logical partition.
Ensure that any profiles are updated if you perform this operation as a
dynamic logical partitioning process.
7. Create a virtual Fibre Channel server adapter in the Virtual I/O Server
partition.
a. Select the Virtual I/O partition to be configured using Systems
Management  Servers  <servername>.
156
PowerVM Migration from Physical to Virtual Storage
b. Select the Virtual I/O Server partition on which the virtual Fibre Channel is
to be configured. Then select Tasks  Dynamic Logical Partitioning 
Virtual Adapters, as in Figure 7-2.
Figure 7-2 Dynamically add virtual adapter
Chapter 7. Direct attached Fibre Channel devices partition to virtual Fibre Channel
157
c. Create a virtual Fibre Channel server adapter. Select Actions  Create 
Fibre Channel Adapter, as in Figure 7-3.
Figure 7-3 Create Fibre Channel server adapter
158
PowerVM Migration from Physical to Virtual Storage
d. Enter the virtual slot number for the Virtual Fibre Channel server adapter,
then select the client partition to which the adapter may be assigned and
enter the client adapter ID, as in Figure 7-4. Click OK.
Figure 7-4 Set virtual adapter ID
Click OK.
Chapter 7. Direct attached Fibre Channel devices partition to virtual Fibre Channel
159
e. Remember to update the profile of the Virtual I/O Server partition so that
the change is reflected across restarts of the partitions. As an alternative,
you may use the Configuration  Save Current Configuration option to
save the changes to the new profile. See Figure 7-5, which shows the
location of the panel similar to what your HMC will present.
Figure 7-5 Save the Virtual I/O Server partition configuration
f. Change the name of the profile if required and click OK.
160
PowerVM Migration from Physical to Virtual Storage
8. To create the virtual Fibre Channel client adapter in the client partition:
a. Select the client partition on which the virtual Fibre Channel adapter is to
be configured. Then select Tasks  Configuration  Manage Profiles,
as in Figure 7-6.
Figure 7-6 Change profile to add virtual Fibre Channel client adapter
Chapter 7. Direct attached Fibre Channel devices partition to virtual Fibre Channel
161
b. To create the virtual Fibre Channel client adapter select the profile, then
select Actions  Edit. Expand the Virtual Adapters tab and select
Actions  Create  Fibre Channel Adapter, as in Figure 7-7.
Figure 7-7 Create Fibre Channel client adapter
162
PowerVM Migration from Physical to Virtual Storage
c. Enter the virtual slot number for the Virtual Fibre Channel client adapter.
Then select the Virtual I/O Server partition to which the adapter may be
assigned and enter the server adapter ID, as in Figure 7-8. Click OK.
Figure 7-8 Define virtual adapter ID Values
d. Click OK  OK  Close.
On the Virtual I/O Server
On the Virtual I/O Server, ensure the correct setup for virtual Fibre Channel:
9. Log in to the Virtual I/O Server partition as user padmin.
10.Run the cfgdev command to configure the virtual Fibre Channel server
adapter.
11.The command lsdev -dev vfchost* lists all available virtual Fibre Channel
server adapters in the Virtual I/O Server partition:
$ lsdev -dev vfchost*
name
status
vfchost0
Available
$
description
Virtual FC Server Adapter
Chapter 7. Direct attached Fibre Channel devices partition to virtual Fibre Channel
163
12.Run the lsnports command to check the Fibre Channel adapter NPIV
readiness of the adapter and the SAN switch. In the example below, the fabric
attribute is set to a value of 1, which confirms that the adapter and the SAN
switch are NPIV enabled. If the fabric attribute is equal to 0, then the adapter
or the SAN switch (or both) are not NPIV ready and you must check the
configuration:
$ lsnports
name
swwpns awwpns
fcs1
2048
2048
physloc
fabric tports aports
U78A0.001.DNWGCV7-P1-C1-T2
1
64
64
13.To map the virtual adapter’s vfchost to the physical Fibre Channel Adapter,
the vfcmap command is used as shown:
$ vfcmap -vadapter vfchost0 -fcp fcs1
vfchost0 changed
14.It is then a good idea to list the mappings using the lsmap command. In the
example below you will see that FC name is set to fcs1, which is the desired
result:
$ lsmap -npiv
Name
------------vfchost0
-vadapter vfchost0
Physloc
ClntID ClntName
ClntOS
---------------------------------- ------ -------------- ------U8204.E8A.10FE411-V2-C17
3
Status:NOT_LOGGED_IN
FC name:fcs1
Ports logged in:0
Flags:4<NOT_LOGGED>
VFC client name:
164
FC loc code:U78A0.001.DNWGCV7-P1-C1-T2
VFC client DRC:
PowerVM Migration from Physical to Virtual Storage
On the HMC: part 2
Now you have created the virtual Fibre Channel adapters for both the server on
the Virtual I/O Server and on the client partition. You must correct the SAN
zoning in the SAN switch. Use the HMC to get the correct port details:
15.To determine the world wide port numbers to be used in the new SAN zoning,
perform the following steps:
a. On the HMC select the appropriate virtual I/O client partition, then click
Task  Properties. Expand the Virtual Adapters tab, select the Client
Fibre Channel client adapter, then select Actions  Properties to list the
properties of the virtual Client Fibre Channel client adapter, as in
Figure 7-9.
Figure 7-9 Select virtual Fibre Channel client adapter properties
Chapter 7. Direct attached Fibre Channel devices partition to virtual Fibre Channel
165
b. Figure 7-10 shows the properties of the virtual Fibre Channel client
adapter. Here you can get the WWPN that is required for the SAN zoning.
Figure 7-10 Virtual Fibre Channel client adapter properties
c. You can now log on to the SAN switch and use these values to fix the zone
members.
Note: The steps to perform SAN zoning are not shown. Refer to other
IBM Redbooks publications and SAN Implementation manuals for
guidelines and advice.
On the client partition: part 2
Log in to the client partition and verify the accessibility of the tape devices:
16.Log in to the AIX client partition. Use the AIX cfgmgr command to have AIX
scan for new devices. You can then check that the newly created virtual Fibre
Channel Client and the tape drive appears using the lsdev command:
# lsdev -C | grep fcs
fcs0
Available 17-T1
#
# lsdev -l rmt0 -F parent
fscsi0
# lsdev -l fscsi0 -F parent
fcs0
Virtual Fibre Channel Client Adapter
Note: In the above example the device type is now Virtual Fibre Channel
Client Adapter, where previously it was listed as FC Adapter.
17.Confirm that the tape device matches what was previously presented using
the direct Fibre Channel connection. The tapeutil command with the inquiry
166
PowerVM Migration from Physical to Virtual Storage
sub-command can be shortened from the prior example and typed on one
line:
# tapeutil -f /dev/rmt0 inquiry 83
Issuing inquiry for page 0x83...
Inquiry Page 0x83,
0000
0010
0020
0030
0040
-
0 1
0183
554C
3133
000E
0008
2 3
0046
5433
3130
1110
2002
Length 74
4 5
0201
3538
3032
E588
000E
6 7
0022
302D
3535
0194
1110
8 9
4942
5444
3138
0004
E588
A B
4D20
3420
0183
0000
C D
2020
2020
0008
0001
E F
2020
2020
2001
0193
0123456789ABCDEF
[..F..."IBM
]
[ULT3580-TD4
]
[1310025518... .]
[....å........]
[.. .....å
]
#
As one would expect in a successful migration, the tape device serial number
matches what was previously recorded. There are other methods to obtain
the serial numbers such as using the Web-based management panel for the
Tape Library.
18.Additionally, an inventory of the attached library using the AIX tapeutil
command confirms that the media is what we expected to see. In this
abbreviated listing, the tape volume 569AAAL4 in the tape drive in element
position 256 is just as it was before the migration began.
# tapeutil -f /dev/smc0 inventory
Reading element status...
Robot Address 1
Robot State ....................
ASC/ASCQ .......................
Media Present ..................
Source Element Address Valid ...
Media Inverted .................
Volume Tag .....................
Normal
0000
No
No
No
Import/Export Station Address 16
Import/Export State ............
ASC/ASCQ .......................
Media Present ..................
Import Enabled .................
Export Enabled .................
Robot Access Allowed ...........
Source Element Address Valid ...
Media Inverted .................
Volume Tag .....................
Normal
0000
No
Yes
Yes
Yes
No
No
Chapter 7. Direct attached Fibre Channel devices partition to virtual Fibre Channel
167
Drive Address 256
Drive State ....................
ASC/ASCQ .......................
Media Present ..................
Robot Access Allowed ...........
Source Element Address .........
Media Inverted .................
Same Bus as Medium Changer .....
SCSI Bus Address Vaild .........
Logical Unit Number Valid ......
Volume Tag .....................
Drive Address 257
Drive State ....................
ASC/ASCQ .......................
Media Present ..................
Robot Access Allowed ...........
Source Element Address Valid ...
Media Inverted .................
Same Bus as Medium Changer .....
SCSI Bus Address Vaild .........
Logical Unit Number Valid ......
Volume Tag .....................
#<output truncated>
This migration is now complete.
168
PowerVM Migration from Physical to Virtual Storage
Normal
0000
Yes
No
4096
No
Yes
No
No
569AAAL4
Normal
0000
No
Yes
No
No
Yes
No
No
Abbreviations and acronyms
AIX
Advanced Interactive
Executive
ISO
International Organization for
Standards
APAR
Authorized Program Analysis
Report
ITSO
International Technical
Support Organization
API
Application Programming
Interface
LAN
Local Area Network
LPAR
Logical Partition
BLV
Boot Logical Volume
LPP
Licensed Program Product
CD
Compact Disk
LUN
Logical Unit Number
CD-R
CD Recordable
LV
Logical Volume
CD-ROM
Compact Disk-Read Only
Memory
LVCB
Logical Volume Control Block
CEC
Central Electronics Complex
LVM
Logical Volume Manager
CLI
Command Line Interface
Mbps
Megabits Per Second
CLVM
Concurrent LVM
MBps
Megabytes Per Second
CPU
Central Processing Unit
MPIO
Multipath I/O
DLPAR
Dynamic LPAR
NFS
Network File System
DVD
Digital Versatile Disk
NIM
Network Installation
Management
EC
EtherChannel
NIMOL
NIM on Linux
F/C
Feature Code
NPIV
N_Port ID Virtualization
FC
Fibre Channel
ODM
Object Data Manager
FTP
File Transfer Protocol
P2V
Physical to Virtual
HACMP™
High Availability Cluster
Multiprocessing
PCI
Peripheral Component
Interconnect
HBA
Host Bus Adapters
POWER
HMC
Hardware Management
Console
Performance Optimization
with Enhanced Risc
(Architecture)
HTML
Hypertext Markup Language
PV
Physical Volume
IBM
International Business
Machines
PVID
Physical Volume Identifier
QoS
Quality of Service
ID
Identification
RAID
IDE
Integrated Device Electronics
Redundant Array of
Independent Disks
IEEE
Institute of Electrical and
Electronic Engineers
SAN
Storage Area Network
SCSI
Small Computer System
Interface
© Copyright IBM Corp. 2010. All rights reserved.
169
SDD
Subsystem Device Driver
SMIT
System Management
Interface Tool
SMS
System Management
Services
SP
Service Processor
SPOT
Shared Product Object Tree
SRC
System Resource Controller
SRN
Service Request Number
SSA
Serial Storage Architecture
SSH
Secure Shell
SSL
Secure Socket Layer
SUID
Set User ID
SVC
SAN Virtualization Controller
TCP/IP
Transmission Control
Protocol/Internet Protocol
TSM
Tivoli Storage Manager
UDF
Universal Disk Format
UDID
Universal Disk Identification
VG
Volume Group
VGDA
Volume Group Descriptor
Area
VGSA
Volume Group Status Area
VP
Virtual Processor
VPD
Vital Product Data
170
PowerVM Migration from Physical to Virtual Storage
Related publications
The publications listed in this section are considered particularly suitable for a
more detailed discussion of the topics covered in this book.
IBM Redbooks
For information about ordering these publications, see “How to get Redbooks” on
page 171. Note that some of the documents referenced here may be available in
softcopy only.
򐂰 IBM PowerVM Virtualization Managing and Monitoring, SG24-7590
򐂰 PowerVM Virtualization on IBM System p: Introduction and Configuration
Fourth Edition, SG24-7940
Online resources
These Web sites are also relevant as further information sources:
򐂰 IBM System p and AIX Information Center
http://publib16.boulder.ibm.com/pseries/index.htm
򐂰 IBM System p Tape Device Drivers
http://www.storage.ibm.com/
How to get Redbooks
You can search for, view, or download Redbooks, Redpapers, Technotes, draft
publications and Additional materials, as well as order hardcopy Redbooks
publications, at this Web site:
ibm.com/redbooks
© Copyright IBM Corp. 2010. All rights reserved.
171
Help from IBM
IBM Support and downloads
ibm.com/support
IBM Global Services
ibm.com/services
172
PowerVM Migration from Physical to Virtual Storage
Index
A
AIX
alt_disk_copy 68
alt_rootvg_op 74
bootlist 60, 71, 100, 115
bosboot 60, 71, 100
cfgdev 129
cfgmgr 55, 71, 166
dd 85
extendvg 58
getconf 41, 115, 151
ls 11
lsattr 57, 67, 86, 91, 117
lscfg 85, 102, 118
lsdev 14, 57, 90, 102, 118, 138, 147, 155
lspv 14, 59, 67, 90, 115, 138, 147
lsvg 46, 55, 66, 83, 116
migratepv 59
mkcd 11, 80
mpio_get_config 115, 135
NIM 74
restvg 82
rmdev 70, 156
savevg 84
shutdown 93, 119
smitty mkcd 10
tail 103, 113, 138, 147, 151
tapeutil 155
telnet 37
touch 116
alt_disk_copy 68
alt_rootvg_op 74
altinst_rootvg volume group 70
B
backing device 81
backing up VIOS configuration
viosbr 9
backup the Virtual I/O Server
viosbr 7
boot partition 60
bootlist 60, 71, 100, 115
bosboot 60, 71, 100
© Copyright IBM Corp. 2010. All rights reserved.
C
CEC
Central Electonics Complex 113
cfgdev 24, 60, 96, 109, 129, 149, 163
cfgmgr 55, 71, 166
chkdev 17, 60, 71, 98, 109
PVID 98
UDID 98, 109
chkdev command 4
chrep 12
Christie Bare Metal Restore 75
client or logical partition 2
clone the operating system 65
commands
AIX
alt_disk_copy 68
alt_rootvg_op 74
bootlist 60, 71, 100, 115
bosboot 60, 71, 100
cfgdev 129
cfgmgr 55, 71, 166
dd 85
extendvg 58
getconf 41, 115, 151
ls 11
lsatter 57
lsattr 67, 86, 91, 117
lscfg 85, 102, 118
lsdev 14, 57, 90, 102, 118, 138, 147, 155
lspv 14, 59, 67, 90, 115, 138, 147
lsvg 46, 55, 66, 83, 116
migratepv 59
mkcd 11, 80
mpio_get_config 115, 135
NIM 74
restvg 82
rmdev 70, 156
savevg 84
shutdown 93, 119
smitty mkcd 10
tail 103, 113, 138, 147, 151
tapeutil 155
telnet 37
touch 116
173
Brocade
portcfgshow 37
portLoginShow 39
portshow 38
telnet 37
smitty
mkcd 46
VIOS
cfgdev 24, 60, 96, 109, 149, 163
chkdev 4, 17, 60, 71, 98, 109
PHYS2VIRT_CAPABLE 17, 110
VIRT2NPIV_CAPABLE 17, 111
VIRT2PHYS_CAPABLE 17, 111
chrep 12
loadopt 12, 50, 81
lsdev 47, 130
lsmap 12, 48, 98, 110, 131, 139, 164
lsnports 31, 150, 164
fabric attribute 31
lsrep 49, 80
mkrep 12, 49, 80
mkvdev 12, 47, 76, 80, 87, 99, 111
mkvopt 12
mkvopy 49
oem_setup_env 71
rmdev 140
rmvdev 139
rmvopt 12
unloadopt 13, 52
vfcmap 31, 131, 150, 164
viosbr 7, 9
common definitions 2
copy services vendor 4
G
getconf 41, 115, 151
H
hardware location code 105
HDLM 5
I
IBM InfoCenter 76
identify the parent device 92
ieee 14
ieee volume identifier 14
ieee_volname 117
inquiry page 83 155
Introduction to publication 1, 43
L
loadopt 12, 50, 81
location code 92
LOGGED_IN 150
ls 11
lsattr 57, 67, 86, 91, 117
lscfg 85, 102, 118
lsdev 14, 47, 57, 90, 102, 118, 130, 138, 147, 155
lsmap 12, 48, 98, 110, 131, 139, 164
lsnports 31, 150, 164
fabric attribute 31
lspv 14, 59, 67, 90, 115, 138, 147
lsrep 49, 80
lsvg 46, 55, 66, 83, 116
M
D
dd 85
default images directory 47
devices.vdevice.IBM.vfc-client.rte 154
E
extendvg 58
F
Feature Code 5735 118
file backed optical 46
file backed optical next CD 13
file transfer program 80
174
media repository 49, 79
migratepv 59
mkcd 11, 46, 80
mkrep 12, 49, 80
mkvdev 12, 47, 76, 80, 87, 99, 111
mkvdev -dev option 12
mkvopt 12, 49
move the rootvg onto SAN disk 53
mpio_get_config 115, 135
multi path IO driver 115
N
N_Port ID virtualization 26
NIM 74
PowerVM Migration from Physical to Virtual Storage
NOT_LOGGED_IN 142
NPIV 26, 147
enabling 26
requirements 26
O
oem_setup_env 71
P
padmin 97
PHYS2VIRT_CAPABLE 17, 72, 98, 110–111
physical location code 92
physical partition size 46
physical to virtual compliance 4
physical volume identifier 14
portcfgshow 37
portLoginShow 39
portshow 38
PowerPath 5
pvid 14, 98
smitty mkcd 10
SMS boot mode 65, 112
source system 10
standalone server 2
storage 2
System Backup and Recovery 75
systems enclosure 113
T
tail 103, 113, 138, 147, 151
tapeuti inventory command 167
tapeutil 155
tapeutil inquiry command 166
target system 10
telnet 37
Thin Provisioning technologies 55
Tivoli Storage Manager 75, 155
touch 116
transitioning direct attached storage 78
U
R
Redbooks Web site 171
Contact us xi
remdev -R flag 156
repository limit 12
restvg 82
rmdev 70, 140, 156
rmt0 device 155
rmvdev 139
rmvopt 12
rootvg 2
S
SAS tape drive 75
savevg 84
SCSI 92
sisscsia0 92
ses0,ses1,ses2,ses3 92
SDD 5
SDDPCM 5
service level requirements 45
shutdown 93, 119
sisscsia0
SCSI controller 92
smitty
mkcd 46
UDID 98, 109
udid 15
unique device identifier 15
unique_id 15, 117
unloadopt 13, 52
V
vfcmap 31, 131, 150, 164
vg 82
VIOS 140
cfgdev 24, 60, 96, 109, 149, 163
chkdev 17, 60, 71, 98, 109
chrep 12
loadopt 12, 50, 81
lsdev 47, 130
lsmap 12, 48, 98, 110, 131, 139, 164
lsnports 31, 150, 164
fabric attribute 31
lsrep 49, 80
mkrep 12, 49, 80
mkvdev 12, 47, 76, 80, 87, 99, 111
mkvopt 12, 49
oem_setup_env 71
padmin user 97
partition activation 126
rmvdev 139
Index
175
rmvopt 12
slot number 110
unloadopt 13, 52
vfcmap 31, 131, 150, 164
viosbr 9
viosbr 7, 9
VIRT2NPIV_CAPABLE 17, 111
VIRT2PHYS_CAPABLE 17, 111
virtual fibre channel 26, 114
client fileset required
devices.vdevice.IBM.vfc-client.rte 27
loss of storage if WWPNs discarded 30
running out of WWPNs
limit of 32,000 pairs 29
unlike virtual SCSI 26
virtual SCSI 18
adding adapter to profile 23
client adapter 19
concepts 18
creating 20
relationship to physical 19
server adapter 18
vhost adapter 18
which clients can connect 21
virtual target device (VTD) 72
W
world wide port name 129
176
PowerVM Migration from Physical to Virtual Storage
PowerVM Migration from Physical to Virtual Storage
Back cover
®
PowerVM
Migration from Physical
to Virtual Storage
Moving to a Virtual
I/O Server managed
environment
Ready-to-use
scenarios included
AIX operating system
based examples
®
IT environments in organizations today face more challenges
than ever before. Server rooms are crowded, infrastructure
costs are climbing, and right-sizing systems is often
problematic. In order to contain costs there is a push to use
resources more wisely to minimize waste and maximize the
return on investment. Virtualization technology was
developed to answer these objectives.
INTERNATIONAL
TECHNICAL
SUPPORT
ORGANIZATION
More and more organizations will deploy (or are in the
process of deploying) some form of virtualization. However,
parts of an organization's systems may use legacy storage
equipment. In these contexts, knowing how to migrate from
physical, often direct-attached storage, to a virtual storage
environment becomes valuable.
BUILDING TECHNICAL
INFORMATION BASED ON
PRACTICAL EXPERIENCE
This IBM Redbooks publication introduces techniques to use
for the migration of storage from physical to virtual
environments and introduces several new features in
POWER6 systems. These features include:
򐂰 The chkdev command, added in Virtual I/O Server 2.1.2
FP22 to assist in identifying p2v candidates and to
ensure that device identification is consistent
򐂰 Extensive use of NPIV technology for both disk and tape
򐂰 The use of file-backed optical technology to present
virtual CD media as a means of restoration
IBM Redbooks are developed by
the IBM International Technical
Support Organization. Experts
from IBM, Customers and
Partners from around the world
create timely technical
information based on realistic
scenarios. Specific
recommendations are provided
to help you implement IT
solutions more effectively in
your environment.
For more information:
ibm.com/redbooks
SG24-7825-00
ISBN 0738433888
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