Web Mountain Technologies RUC-01 User`s guide

Web Mountain Technologies RUC-01 User`s guide
Remote
Universal
Controller
(RUC)
Web Mountain Technologies
Page i
User’s Guide
Revision 4.0 6/14/2013
Web Mountain Technologies
Customer Support Line
303-627-1856
[email protected]
6/14/2013
Add changes to support Version 4.0
RUC Changes from 3.20.33 to 4.0.14
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
Added support for SMTP email as an alternative to using the WMT mail servers.
Support wild cards in receive and send triggers for UPB commands.
Changed bootloader to bootload web pages to flash instead of EEPROM.
Added PUT option to POST send trigger.
Added checksum to Trig header to avoid hangs when starting with garbage in Trig
header fields.
Moved all web pages to flash.
Moved locations of triggers and other local data structures in EEPROM.
Make selected HTTPPrint routines re-entrant.
Adjusted UPB PIM timings.
NOTE: Version 4 firmware will not run on V3 hardware. V3 hardware must be updated with
additional memory in order to use V4 firmware.
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Copyright
This manual is copyrighted by Web Mountain Technologies, LLC with all rights
reserved. Under copyright laws, this manual may not be reproduced in any
form, in whole or part, without prior written consent of Web Mountain
Technologies, LLC.
 2012 Web Mountain Technologies, LLC
Disclaimer
Web Mountain Technologies, LLC has reviewed this guide thoroughly. All
statements, technical information and recommendations in this manual and in
any guides or related documents are believed to be reliable, but the accuracy
and completeness thereof are not guaranteed or warranted, and are not
intended to be, nor should they be understood to be, representations or
warranties concerning the products described. The information contained in
this document is subject to change without notice. Web Mountain Technologies
shall not be liable for errors contained herein or for consequential damages in
connection with the furnishing, performance or use of this material.
Web Mountain Technologies reserves the right to make changes in the
specifications of the products described in this manual at any time without
notice and without obligation to notify any person of such changes.
If you have any questions regarding your product or the information in this
manual, please call the Web Mountain Technologies Customer Support Line at
303-627-1856.
Trademarks
Web Mountain Technologies® and the Web Mountain Technologies logo are
either trademarks or registered trademarks of Web Mountain Technologies, LLC
in the United States and/or other countries.
Microsoft® and Microsoft® Windows® are either trademarks or registered
trademarks of Microsoft Corporation in the United States and/or other
countries.
In this manual, Microsoft®, Microsoft® Windows®. Microsoft® Internet Explorer
and Microsoft® Outlook are referred to as Microsoft, Microsoft Windows,
Microsoft Internet Explorer and Microsoft Outlook respectively. Netscape®,
Netscape Navigator® and Netscape Messenger® are referred to as Netscape,
Netscape Navigator and Netscape Messenger respectively.
Other company, brand and product names mentioned herein may be the
trademarks of their respective owners.
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Contents
REMOTE UNIVERSAL CONTROLLER (RUC) .................................................................... I
CHAPTER 1 INTRODUCTION.............................................................................................. 1
RUC OVERVIEW .................................................................................................... 1
WHERE TO FIND INFORMATION ................................................................................. 3
CHAPTER 2 SETTING UP THE RUC .................................................................................... 4
INSTALLING THE RUC ............................................................................................. 4
Unpacking the RUC ................................................................................................. 4
Choosing a Location for the RUC ............................................................................. 4
Mounting the RUC .................................................................................................... 5
SETTING UP THE LAN.............................................................................................. 5
Connecting the RUC to an Ethernet Switch ............................................................. 5
ACCESSING YOUR RUC ........................................................................................... 6
Accessing your RUC from a web browser ............................................................... 6
RESETS ................................................................................................................ 7
SETTING UP HOME AUTOMATION .............................................................................. 7
CHAPTER 3 BECOMING FAMILIAR WITH THE RUC WEBPAGES ......................................... 8
HOME PAGE .......................................................................................................... 9
NETWORKING CONFIGURATION ............................................................................... 11
DEVICE CONFIGURATION ....................................................................................... 14
ADMIN ............................................................................................................... 16
UPB TRANSMISSION ............................................................................................. 18
DYNAMIC DNS .................................................................................................... 22
RECEIVE ............................................................................................................ 25
TRIGGERS ........................................................................................................... 26
CONTROL PANEL .................................................................................................. 47
BACKUP / RESTORE ............................................................................................. 56
CHAPTER 4 REMOTE UPSTART ....................................................................................... 60
ACQUIRING UPSTART ............................................................................................ 61
USING A VIRTUAL SERIAL PORT ............................................................................... 61
CONNECTING THE PIM .......................................................................................... 62
RUNNING REMOTE UPSTART OVER A LAN ................................................................. 62
RUNNING REMOTE UPSTART OVER THE INTERNET (WAN) ............................................. 66
UPB INTERFACE MODULES .................................................................................... 66
CHAPTER 5 HOME AUTOMATION .................................................................................... 68
CHAPTER 6 FIRMWARE UPDATING ................................................................................. 69
CHAPTER 7 SERIAL PORTS ............................................................................................. 74
CHAPTER 8 WARRANTY .................................................................................................. 77
CHAPTER 9 ADDITIONAL TRIGGER EXAMPLES .............................................................. 78
CHAPTER 10 TROUBLESHOOTING ................................................................................... 96
APPENDIX A GENERAL INFORMATION........................................................................... 97
APPENDIX B MORE GENERAL INFORMATION ................................................................ 98
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Safety Information
Always follow basic safety precautions when using this product to reduce the
risk of injury from fire or electric shock.
1
Read and understand all the instructions in the User’s Guide.
2
Observe all warnings and instructions marked on the product.
3
Install the product securely on a stable surface.
4
Install the product in an area that is not readily accessible by children.
5
If the product does not operate normally, see Troubleshooting
6
No operator serviceable parts inside. Refer servicing to qualified service
personnel.
7
The product is not intended for use in life critical situations.
Notice
This product has been tested and passed FCC Part 15, Class B requirements.
For more information, contact Web Mountain.
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Chapter 1
Introduction
RUC Overview
Congratulations on your purchase of the Web Mountain Technologies Remote
Universal Controller (RUC). We appreciate you choosing the RUC to provide
your home / office with a rich set of communications / control capabilities.
The Web Mountain Technologies Remote Universal Controller (RUC) is intended
to be used as a network appliance for the control of a home automation network.
Control signals can be sent over Ethernet, either remotely over the Internet or on
a local network. One example of such use are commands sent over the Internet
that are then converted into serial commands that are sent to an externally
connected WMT SPIM UPB powerline Interface module for transmission onto the
local powerline.
In addition, the unit contains a second serial port, which allows for the
conversion of one automation protocol to other home automation protocols, such
as Zwave, X10, or the ESI drapery control system.
RUC Basic
The RUC Basic unit (RUC-01) provides this basic feature set:
- One Ethernet 10 / 100 Mb/s RJ-45 interface
- Two Serial interfaces (DB9 connectors) – COM 1 & 2
- One power jack
- Internal webserver
- Internal Flash and RAM memory
RUC Wireless
Future
RUC Plus
Future
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Wall
wart
power
supply
Regulator
120 VAC
Product Block Diagram
Serial
Port #1
Wireless
DTE
Processor
Serial
Port #2
DTE
D
B
9
D
B
9
Ethernet
RJ
45
Note: The wireless interface is a future option.
Product Photos
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Where to Find Information
The following resources are supplied to you to help you get the most out of your
RUC. Please read the guide.
Quick Start Guide
This short form guide summarizes the steps required to set up your RUC unit on
your local area network (LAN). If you are an advanced user familiar with
computers and networking, you can follow the steps in this guide to quickly get
started using the powerful features of the RUC unit.
User’s Guide
This guide offers detailed information on how to set up your RUC and LAN. It
includes setting up the hardware, connecting your RUC to your LAN, how to
access the webserver on the RUC using your browser, configuring the network
parameters and serial port parameters, Dynamic DNS for remote access, admin
information, and your automation capabilities.
Conventions
This User’s Guide uses the following conventions to alert you to information that
will help you use your RUC device correctly and safely:
Note
Notes provide advice or recommendations regarding the use of RUC.
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Chapter 2
Setting Up the RUC
This chapter describes how to set up your Remote UPB Controller and connect to it from a
web browser. It includes:

Installing the RUC and connecting power

Setting up the LAN

Connecting the RUC to your Home Automation Devices

Accessing the RUC over your LAN
If you have already set up your RUC using the information in the Quick Start Guide, you may
want to look through this chapter to find any additional information you may need.
Installing the RUC
The installation procedure describes unpacking your RUC unit, determining a
location to install the RUC and mounting suggestions.
Unpacking the RUC
1. Carefully remove all items from the box.
2. Check to see that you have the following items.

RUC

Power Supply / cord

Documentation – Quick Start Guide (Full Manual available at
http://www.webmtn.com/RUC/RUC-information.php
If any item was damaged in shipping or if any items are missing, notify your shipper and/or
WMT immediately.
In addition, you will need to provide an Ethernet patch cable for connection to your LAN (not
provided).
Choosing a Location for the RUC
There are two recommended locations for your RUC unit, depending upon your
particular situation. If you are going to use the home automation features of the
RUC with a powerline carrier technology, we recommend locating the RUC as
close to your main breaker box as possible. This will improve the powerline
signal strengths. If you do not have an Ethernet cable running to this location,
or if it will be too hard to do, or you are not going to be using the home
automation features, then we recommend locating the RUC unit close to your
Ethernet switch.
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Mounting the RUC
There is nothing special needed to mount the RUC unit. It will sit nicely on any
flat surface. Do not allow the unit to dangle in the air on one of the connecting
cords, as this can lead to fatigue not only on the cord, but to the onboard
connectors.
Plug the included power supply into an available power outlet, then plug the
circular jack on the end of the power cord into the PWR jack on the RUC. After
a second or two, you will see the LED closest to S1 on the unit start to flash in a
constant pattern of a second on, then a second off, a second on, then a second
off, etc.
Note on the Power Supply:
It is important that the user use the provided power supply with the unit. This
power supply provides the correct voltage and current for the unit, plus has the
right matching plug. In addition, this is the power supply that was used when
the RUC passed the appropriate FCC EMI testing.
Specs on the included power supply:
Input
100 VAC to 240 VAC
Output
5VDC, 1A
Output connector
2.1x5.5mm connector
IMPORTANT: If you do not use the recommended power supply, you must
ensure that the output voltage of the power supply does not exceed 5.5VDC. If
this voltage is exceeded, it could cause damage to the unit. Damage caused by
applying a voltage higher than 5.5VDC is not covered under the Warranty.
Setting up the LAN
Standard Ethernet LANs can be built to provide 10, 100 or 1000 megabit per
second (Mb/s) data rates. The RUC supports 10 Base-T (10 Mb/s) and 100
Base-T (100 Mb/s) networks over cable of Category 5 (CAT 5) or better. You
need to decide the data rate you want your LAN to support. Your decision will
influence the type of Ethernet network adapters and Ethernet switches you will
need to purchase or install. 100 Base-T installations will be slightly more
expensive than 10 Base-T. Nowadays you can purchase reasonably priced
10/100 Base-T adapters and switches that support both speeds.
Connecting the RUC to an Ethernet Switch
Obtain a patch cable long enough to reach from your RUC to the Ethernet
switch. Connect one end of the cable to the jack labeled “LAN” on your RUC.
Connect the other end of the cable to any numbered jack on your Ethernet
switch. You should see the Link Connect LED on your switch go solid indicating
a good connection.
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Accessing your RUC
Accessing your RUC from a web browser
Find the unit’s IP address by using the Ethernet Discoverer application available
for download from our website. In the ED app window, double click on the IP
address for the RUC (or re-enter the IP address into your web browser). At this
point, you should be challenged with a user name / password popup window.
Enter wmtruc as the user name and password as the password. The Home page
should now display like this:
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A NOTE about networks without a DHCP server. By default, the RUC powers up the
first time out of the box in DHCP mode. If there is no DHCP server to provide an address, after
a few seconds, the RUC will give itself a fixed IP address of 192.168.1.241. If you are on a
network with the 192.168.1.x address space, merely type in 192.168.1.241 to access the RUC.
However, if your network uses a different address space, such as 10.0.0.x or 192.168.2.x, in
order to change the IP address of the RUC, you will need to connect the RUC first to a PC
(using an ethernet crossover cable) that has been set to the 192.168.1.x address space, change
the address of the RUC to an address in the desired address space, and then repower the RUC.
Now you can connect the RUC to your network and access it using the new IP address. Don’t
forget to change the IP address of your PC back to its desired IP address.
Resets
S1 – Reboot (Press and hold until LED stops flashing, then release)
S2 – hold 3 seconds, go back to factory default IP settings (DHCP is selected)
Hold 6 seconds, go back to all factory defaults
For a complete reset to get back to factory defaults, press both switches at the
same time, then release S1. The LED will do nothing for a few seconds, then
flash 3 times, then do nothing for a few more seconds, then flash 6 times. Reset
back to factory defaults is now complete. If you just want to reset to factory
default IP settings, press both switches at the same time, then release S1. After
both LEDs flash 3 times, release S2.
Alternative method to reset board to factory defaults:
Remove power to board.
Press in S2 and hold
Reapply power to board
Wait 6 seconds until you see the LEDs flash 6 times in succession
Reset is complete
Setting Up Home Automation
If you are going to use the RUC with UPB, then connect a Web Mountain SPIM01 to COM1 on the unit using the serial cable included with the PIM. Plug the
SPIM-01 into a power outlet. Recognize that the COM ports on the RUC look
like the serial ports on PCs – they are DTE ports, meaning that they will provide
a positive voltage on pin 4 of the DB9. You can use other manufacturer’s PIMs
with the RUC, however, there are special functions built into the WMT SPIM-01
that will improve performance, especially when accessing Upstart over the
Internet.
If you are going to use another home automation protocol, connect that
protocol’s serial interface unit to COM2. Make sure you go to the Device
Configuration page and configure the serial port parameters as required.
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Chapter 3
Becoming Familiar with the RUC
Webpages
The RUC includes a built in webserver. All of the configuration and setup for
the RUC is done from webpages. This chapter describes in detail how to use the
webpages to setup your RUC. These are the current webpages, however, more
may be added in the future:

Home

Networking Config

Device Config

Admin

UPB Transmission

Dynamic DNS

Receive

Triggers

Control Panel

Backup / Restore
Every page is easily accessible from any page through the use of a button menu
conveniently located on the left hand side of each page.
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Home Page
From the Home Page, you will see a summary of several pieces of information.
Refer to the example page shown here:
The information displayed on the Home Page is as such:



The RUC’s serial # - you will need to provide this # if you ever call for
tech support
The current firmware version number
The current time when you opened this page – this does not refresh, but
rather is a snapshot of the moment in time when you opened the Home
Page
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





Today’s sunrise and sunset times, calculated based upon the Latitude,
Longitude, and Time Zone entered into the Device Configuration page.
The time and date when the RUC was powered up or rebooted. This will
give you an indication of how long the RUC has been running.
Your login user name
A button to take you to a page where you can manage users / passwords
for the base user (not the admin user).
Contact information for Support (initially will be blank)
If you click on the Logout button, your browser session will be closed and
you would have to open it again in order to access the RUC
Very little is actually done from the Home Page, but you can get to everything
you need from here.
If you click on the User Settings button, you get this webpage. You can change
the base username and password from this page.
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Networking Configuration
From here you can configure the network parameters for your RUC unit.
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




The MAC Address shown cannot be changed – this is the MAC address
presented to the LAN and hard coded within the unit. The last three
octets match the last part of the serial number on the home page and are
shown on the unit’s product label, located on the back of the unit.
However, the Host Name can be changed. This is the name you enter
into your browser URL bar so that you can access the webpages. You
can change this to something else. In fact, if you want to install more
than one RUC unit on a network, you need each unit to have a unique
Host Name. Otherwise, you will have flaky behavior and trouble
accessing the correct RUC unit. However, if you change the host name,
recognize that it will take the network several minutes to learn the new
host name and during that time you won’t be able to access the unit by
typing in its host name. You can still get to the unit using its IP address,
but not with the host name until the network learns the new host name.
In some instances, the unit will acquire a new IP address, so you might
have to determine the unit’s IP address before connecting to it.
Select whether you want a Fixed IP Address for the RUC or whether you
want it assigned an address from a DHCP server on your LAN. Uncheck
the Enable DHCP selection in order to give the unit a FIXED address. If
you change any of the parameters in this block, you will need to click on
the Save Config button, which will cause a reboot of the unit. Remember
the new IP address or Host Name, so that you can access the unit once it
has rebooted. If you plan to access the RUC from outside your own LAN,
it is recommended that you give the RUC a fixed IP address. If you do
assign a fixed IP address, make sure it is outside the range that your
DHCP server can assign.
The Ports assigned to COM ports under Remote Access Ports could have
many uses. However, one big reason for this capability is to run Upstart
remotely. In order to do this, you need to setup a socket using the
desired port, which by default is set to port 9761. You can change this
port from 9761 but in most cases, there is no reason to change it. This
port # will be required as an entry into the Virtual Serial Port software
you will use for Remote Access. In addition, you can setup the second
serial port to remotely control another piece of equipment or a system.
For example, if you have an ESI Drapery control system, you could use
the second serial port and its remote connection to remotely run the ESI
software. By default, this second serial port is set to port 9762. Note –
we have on rare occasions seen that the local ISP is blocking higher
numbered ports. If you have issues connecting, try changing this to a
lower numbered port, i.e., 3761 / 3762.
The web server port by default is port 80, the industry accepted port
number for webservers. Like Internet servers, you do not have to enter
port 80 into your URL string when you type in the URL, as the web
browser will assume that it is port 80 if nothing is entered. However,
there are some very likely scenarios where port 80 will not work for
remote access. For instance, what happens if you have another device
on the network running a webserver and it is already using port 80? So,
it might be appropriate in this instance to change port 80 to port 9760.
Now, to access the RUC’s webserver, you will type in
http://IP_Address:9760 if you are on the local LAN or
http://WANIPaddress:9760 or DYNDNSaddress:9760 if you are coming
in from the Internet. If you are coming in from the Internet and outside
the local LAN, you will need to punch holes in your firewall to allow this
access. With this example above, you will need to open holes in your
router for ports 9760 and 9761 in order to remotely access the RUCs
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

webserver or to run Remote Upstart using the local SPIM, and you would
have to open port 9762 if you want to run the ESI software remotely.
Each router is different, so check your router documentation for
information on how to do this.
An example of where you might need to change the remote access port is
where an ISP blocks port 80. The ISP does not want you running a full
blown general purpose webserver on your premises, so they block port
80 to prevent this type of use. We’ve also seen port 8080 blocked.
If you make a change to the Remote Webserver or Remote Access port,
make sure you click on the Update button. In fact, we recommend that
you reboot the unit (pull power and reapply power) after changing any of
the default values for ports.
NOTE – after changing the IP address, if you are unable to access the webpages,
exit your browser, then restart the browser. If you still have problems, use the
Ethernet Discoverer application to determine the IP address.
Email Configuration
The Networking Configuration page has an added option on the screen – Email
Configuration. In earlier versions of the RUC, when you wanted to send an
Email from a trigger, the system was setup to send a command to a Web
Mountain server, which then sent the email for you. One of the reasons to do
this is the continuing complexity created by ISPs trying to reduce or eliminate
spam. For example, networking port 25 has historically been used for SMTP
email sending. However, this port has been compromised so often that many
ISPs block port 25 and instead require you to use a more custom port, such as
port 587 or 465. By using the Web Mountain method, we just removed that
complexity.
However, due to customer requests, we are providing an option to allow the use
of a customer designated SMTP server. Be advised that this option is not
working completely. We have successfully sent email using port 587, but have
had problems, apparently with authentication, sending to port 25 on various
SMTP servers. So, there is no guarantee at the current time that this will work
going to port 25.
By default, the checkbox for Use WMT Email servers is checked. To use servers
other than WMT servers, go to the bottom of the Networking Configuration page
and enter in the appropriate information as shown below:
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Device Configuration
The Device Configuration page allows the user to setup the two serial ports and
to setup other parameters.

Under General Configuration, enter in your latitude and longitude. To
find these details, visit www.zipinfo.com and enter your zip code. Notice
also that the lat and long need to be entered as a number with a decimal
point, not in minutes and seconds.
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







Also, select your particular time zone, then select your Daylight Savings
Time function. If your locale observes DST, then set this to Enable. If
not, such as Arizona, select Disable.
You can also set the # of UPB Transmits – the # of times a UPB
transmission is sent. This information is used to determine how many
times a UPB transmission is sent from the UPB Send page and from the
Trigger Event page. The recommended setting is 2, however if the UPB
network is experiencing lost commands, increasing this number will
improve the reliability by increasing the probability that a particular
command will get through. This can be set anywhere from 1 to 4.
Notice that there are two buttons labeled Home and Vacation. This tells
the Home Automation features of the RUC what mode you want to be in.
For example, you’re at home and there are certain programs you want to
run. Or, you’re on vacation and there are different programs you want to
run. So, normally, this would be set to Home, and you would only
change to Vacation when you leave for an extended period of time.
You can adjust the parameters for both serial ports. If you use the drop
down, you will get choices for the specific protocol you wish to use:
Use RAW protocol for types not listed. However, for the types listed, the
RUC has been setup to work with these specific hardware interfaces:
o ESI – RQ Bridge
o UPB – any PIM / CIM from any UPB manufacturer
o UPB v5.56+ - any PIM / CIM with Gen2 firmware version greater
than V5.56
o Zwave – Leviton Vizia RZCOP
o Insteon / X10 – Smarthome 2413S
For the selection “Echo Back to RUC”, use this function if you want the
RUC to be able to trigger on commands it has sent out itself.
Notice the comment “Remote connection to COM1 is not active”. This
tells the user that there is no remote access session in process. NOTE:
If the Remote connection is Active, you will not be able to run another
application remotely to that socket connection, such as, UPB Remote.
After making any changes, don’t forget to click the Save Config button.
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Admin
There are two user names / passwords for the RUC:
o The Normal user is wmtruc / password
o The Admin user is admin / broncos
To access the Admin page, you must be logged in as the Admin user.
If you change the Admin password, and then forget it, you can get back to the
default Admin password by doing a factory reset on the unit. Recognize that
this means you will reset all other parameters as well, however.
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





To change the Admin password (you can’t change the user name), enter
the old password, then your new desired password twice. Then, click the
Set New Password button.
If you as the administrator want to reset the base user parameters back
to default, click on the Reset Base User Credentials button. This sets the
base user back to wmtruc/password.
You will notice that there is a Reboot Device button on this page. If for
some reason, the user believes they need to reboot the device, but they
aren’t local to the device, then the user can access this webpage remotely
and reboot the device. This will act just like a power cycle. NOTE – if the
unit is configured for DHCP, with some routers, the device might acquire
a new IP address.
Enter in the Owner’s contact information. Once entered, this
information will only be visible to the Admin user on the Admin page (not
shown on any other page), and provides confirmation to a user accessing
the unit remotely as to what unit is actually being accessed.
An installer can enter in his contact information in the Installer fields
and this information will show up on the Home Page as the contact for
Support.
Once you have made all of your changes, click on the Register button.
At the moment, this information is only stored locally on the RUC unit,
however, at some point in the future, this will be sent to Web Mountain
for registration purposes.
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UPB Transmission
This page is mainly intended for test purposes and to allow a user to send a
UPB link remotely to control lights and appliances within a home.
Web Mountain has provided a simple way of generating the necessary command
to insert in this text box. You will need to know your NID, the Link # to be sent,
and the command to be sent. Once you know that, click on the link “Open UPB
Command Wizard”. This will open a new browser window and take you to
www.webmtn.com and the UPB Command wizard as seen below:
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




Enter in your NID – for this case let’s say 66
Enter in your Link ID – let’s use 12
By default the source ID should always be set to 255
Then, select the command you want to send – currently, only Activate or
Deactivate (let’s use Activate for this example)
Then click on the Generate button
You will get this page.
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Now, highlight and copy the command only – don’t capture the <ctrl-T> or the <cr> part of the
line. All you want is 8700420CFF200c.
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Now paste this into the text box on the Send UPB Command text box like this and click on
Send Command. Your command should be sent out onto the powerline to the UPB network.
As you can also see, you select the COM port you want the UPB signal to be sent from, using
the drop down – either COM1 or COM2.
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Dynamic DNS
One problem that exists with accessing a device at a home is the possibility that
the ISP has changed your WAN IP Address. Depending upon the ISP, this IP
address might stay the same for months, or it might change every few days. If
the IP address does change regularly, it becomes a hassle, as someone has to
access a browser local to the RUC, use some mechanism such as
www.ipchicken.com to determine the current WAN IP Address, and provide this
to the party trying to do remote access. Obviously, this becomes a major
problem if no one is home.
One way to solve this issue is to use a Dynamic DNS service. With this service, a
small client application runs on the remote device and regularly checks in with
the service’s servers located on the Internet to constantly keep this IP address
updated. The DDNS server will constantly match the WAN IP address with a
consistent URL, such as www.ruc1.com. So, now the party trying to do remote
access doesn’t type in the WAN IP address as shown before, but types in
www.ruc1.com. The DDNS server knows what WAN IP address this corresponds
to and routes the remote user to this particular RUC.
In order to use this service, you must first create an account with one of the
DDNS service providers. The RUC lists several providers in the drop down box.
DYNDNS is one of the larger ones. When you create the account, remember
your user name, your password, and the URL you use to access the account
(Host). Enter this information into this screen and then click on Set DDNS
Configuration.
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NOTE: MAKE SURE you do not put the http:// in front of your host name!
The WAN IP address box will show your WAN IP address if you have registered a Dynamic DNS
name with one of the DDNS Services. You will need this WAN IP address if you want to run
Upstart remotely.
Here is a screenshot for setting up a host name with www.dyndns.com.
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Use the drop down to select pre-existing names. These names are free – if you want to create
your own host names, DYNDNS offers this service for a small fee.
In the above case, the host name would be entered as webmtn.is-a-geek.net on the RUC page,
along with the appropriate user name and password. Now, just click on Set DDNS
Configuration.
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Receive
This particular webpage will display the last 15 commands received by the RUC
on either of the COM ports.
NOTE: The RUC Receive screen will not record commands sent from the same
channel of the RUC unless the Echo box for the COM port on the Device
Configuration page is checked.
This screen can be used as a simple logger. All commands received from either COM port are
logged and time-stamped. For example, you could use this to easily confirm that a button
transmitter is working properly.
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Triggers
This page allows the user to setup simple IF – THEN actions based upon
receiving a particular command, serial string, time of day, or other events. Some
examples would be IF <UPB received> THEN send another UPB command with
or without a delay, or IF <UPB received> THEN send an email.
In addition, the user can setup a Scheduled event from this page or cause a
received signal from one protocol to trigger sending a command to another
protocol. This is also how you setup Buttons for the embedded Control Panel.
NOTE: IF-THEN type UPB Triggers will not function if there is a Remote session
(using UPStart or some other remote access software) in progress. Scheduled
events will function at all times, even if a Remote session is in progress.
NOTE: The RUC will not trigger on a command it has sent unless the Echo
selection on that COM port is set to YES on the Device Configuration page.
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Notice that this page has three main parts – the Received command, the Send command, and
the trigger listing. To use the trigger page, you first enter in the trigger event that will cause
the desired action to occur.
The following is a list of devices that were tested for the protocol interfaces:
UPB
Zwave
Insteon/X10
ESI RP
ESI RQ
Schedule and
Web Mountain SPIM-01
Leviton RZCOP
Smarthome 2413S
ESI R2D7 Serial Interface (uses RAW protocol)
ESI RQ Bridge
Email require Internet access
Receive Trigger Command
Under Received command, there are these choices:









ESI
Sched
UPB Direct
UPB Link
Zwave
Raw
Button
Insteon
X10
Also, notice that you can select which port to listen on for the received command. Also, notice
that you can choose to have this trigger active only during the day, during the night, or both. If
you want the trigger to only be active during the day, check the box “Day”. Or select “Night”, if
you want the trigger to only be active during the night, or check “Both” (default) if you want the
trigger to always be active.
Different Protocols as the Receive Trigger
ESI is a sophisticated drapery control system. ESI has two protocols – their original RP
protocol (one way) and their newer RQ protocol (2 way). This selection is for the RQ protocol
and the RUC will automatically look for the start character (!) and terminating character (;).
You won’t need to add these to the text box. The RP protocol will be handled under the RAW
selection. So, for the RQ protocol, the text that would be entered into the text box would look
something like this:
A scheduled command means that you can choose to cause an action to occur based upon a
time of day function. The time of day is entered as a 24 hour, military style, time, or it can be
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based upon sunrise or sunset. Notice that you can setup an event based upon some amount of
time before or after sunrise or sunset. If you select Actual time, then enter the actual time in a
24 hour format. If you select time before or after Sunrise, or Sunset, then you can enter up to
4 hours, 59 minutes as the offset. Here’s an example:
1. If you want to send out a command at a specific time, then enter the hour and minutes.
Notice that this is in a 24 hour format. So, if you want to send a command at 9:15 AM,
enter 9 for the hours and 15 for the minutes, and have Actual Time selected. If you
want to send a signal at 9:15 PM, then enter 21 for the hours and 15 for the minutes.
2. If you want to send a signal at sunrise, merely select Time before Sunrise and leave the
Hours and Minutes at 0. Or, if you want to send the signal 15 minutes before Sunrise,
set Hours to 0 and minutes to 15. With Time before Sunrise selected, the UPB signal
will be sent 15 minutes before sunrise.
3. Alternatively, if you want to send a signal sometime after sunrise, select Time after
Sunrise and enter in the hours and minutes you want.
4. Do the same thing if you want to send the signal at Sunset, before Sunset, or after
Sunset by selecting the appropriate item.
5. While you can’t see it from this screen, when Schedule is selected as the Receive
command type, you will get a three more options on the SEND command screen –
Home, Vacation, or Both. If you select Home on the Send screen, this trigger will only
run when the RUC is in the Home mode (as selected on the Device Configuration
screen). If Vacation is selected, this trigger will only run when the RUC is in the
Vacation mode, and likewise, if Both is selected, the trigger will run all the time.
NOTE: Sunrise and Sunset are calculated based upon the Latitude, Longitude, and
Time Zone entered in the Device Configuration page. You need to make sure these are
correct for your location in order for the correct sunrise and sunset to be calculated.
To setup a UPB Direct command as the trigger event, select UPB Direct from the dropdown,
then either enter in the serial string command as generated by the UPB command wizard, or
enter in your desired NID, DID (Device ID), and select your command from the dropdown, as
shown below. Do not enter in the start character (Control-T) or the terminating character (CR).
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To setup a UPB Link as the trigger event, select UPB Link from the dropdown selection, then
either enter in the serial string command as generated by the UPB command wizard, or enter
in your desired NID, LID (Link ID), and select your command from the dropdown, as shown
below. Again, do not enter in the start character (Control-T) or the terminating character (CR).
Notice that UPB Direct Commands and UPB Link Commands are the same – the only difference
is the DID vs the LID. DIDs operate on one unit while LIDs operate on all devices associated
with that link.
To setup a Zwave command as the trigger event, select Zwave from the dropdown, then enter in
the serial string command as desired, as shown below. Do not enter in the start character (<)
or the terminating character (Carriage Return).
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We have tried to setup the RUC Receive commands to include the most common home
automation protocols as simple selections. However, we recognize that there will be other
protocols that will be used. The RAW selection allows a user to setup a trigger from other
protocols. On the RAW selection, since we don’t know what protocol is being used, we don’t
handle the Start and terminating characters automatically – the user will need to add them in,
except that by default we treat an incoming carriage return as a terminator. For example, we
have tested the RAW capability with X10 using the Smarthome 1132B serial interface unit.
Here’s how you will setup an X10 command as the trigger event using the RAW selection.
The terminating character is a Carriage Return. However, we need two X10 commands from the
1132B in order to trigger – the XFL1 represents A1 while the XFE1 represents AON. There is a
Carriage return in between the two commands and we want to ignore it. The double bars (||typically found as the superset on the \ key on a Windows keyboard) tell the RUC to ignore the
next carriage return it sees and concatenate two commands.
For the RAW command, the RUC looks at all characters between Carriage Returns. The
protocol to be used to trigger an action based upon a Raw Receive Command must have a
Carriage Return as the terminating character or the RUC will be unable to trigger on it.
The next supported protocol on the RUC Receive trigger is a Button. This button is the button
on the RUC Control Panel, found on the left hand menu. When, you click on Control Panel,
you will get a page that has buttons on it, if the buttons were setup from the Trigger page. The
Control Panel has 4 pages, each with up to 10 buttons. When you setup the Button from the
Trigger page, you must tell it what page and what button you are setting up, and provide a
label for the button, as seen here.
Now, on the Control Panel, button 2 on Page 1 will be visible and have the text on it as entered
in the Display text box. The action that will occur when this button is pressed from the user
interface will be defined in the Send command.
Notice that there are now three checkboxes below the Command type dropdown – Status,
Toggle, and Show Level. With these three buttons, the user can customize the presentation
and functionality of the user interface significantly.
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First, implementing Status will show you whether the load device is on or off. It does this
through button colors. A red button will indicate the device is off, while yellow will indicate the
device is on.
Secondly, the Toggle function will allow a button to be used to turn on a device or turn it off,
thereby saving a button (in the past, one button would be used for the ON action while another
button would be used for the OFF action).
NOTE: if you want to declare a button to be a toggle, we strongly urge you to define the action to be an
On-type action. Otherwise, you might see confusing status results.
And, lastly, the Show Level check box will show the actual intensity of the device, not just
whether it is on or off, in a text format. Here is an example showing the load device (lamp) OFF
and at 0% (this is also a toggle button):
And similarly, here is an example showing the load device (Lamp) ON and at 100%:
NOTE: Be aware that Status can get out of synch with the device if the device was controlled
from another transmitter other than the RUC Control Panel. Do a web page refresh in order to
get the Status updated (there might be a several second delay while the RUC queries the device
/ devices for its / their status).
To setup an Insteon command as the trigger event (uses the Smarthome 2413S interface unit),
select Insteon from the dropdown, then enter in the serial string command as desired, as
shown below. Do not enter in the start character (?) or the terminating character (Carriage
Return?). In order to work with Insteon, enter in the serial string as hex commands using the
^ character to tell the RUC this is a hex value.
Notice that there are two special parameters entered above – the ^02 and the ^00. In some
instances, it will be very difficult to enter in the ASCII characters – it would be much nicer to be
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able to enter raw hex values. To enter a raw hex value, put a “^” in front of it. In this case, the
entry is telling the RUC to look for a hex 0x02. The ^00 hex null character is a special string –
if it is the last character in a string, it tells the RUC to not look for a Carriage Return after the
string entered into the text box. So, in this case, the RUC will look for a hex 0x02, followed by
the ASCII characters, but it won’t look for a carriage return after the serial string.
To setup an X10 command as the trigger event (uses the Smarthome 2413S interface unit),
select X10 from the dropdown box. Then, select your House Code, Unit code, and command
type from the dropdowns or you can enter in a serial string in the X10 command text box:
Different Protocols being Sent from the Trigger
Now, for the Send commands. Once you have setup your Receive triggers, then the user can
determine what action will occur for that trigger. The following is the list of all the actions that
can occur:











Send an Email
Send an ESI RQ command
Send a UPB Direct Command
Send a UPB Link Command
Send a Zwave Command
Send a Raw Command
Change the RUC’s operating Mode to Home
Change the RUC’s operating Mode to Vacation
Send an Insteon command
Send an X10 command
Send a POST / PUT command
Notice that many of the Send Commands allow you to add a delay – the amount of time to
delay before sending the command after the Receive trigger is received. The maximum amount
of delay time available is 17 hours, 59 minutes, and 59 seconds.
To Send an Email, the user must enter the To address, enter a subject line, and enter the body
of the email. All three of these fields are limited to 40 characters each. If you try to enter more
characters, the entry will be truncated and only the first 40 characters will be submitted. The
image below shows an Email entry for a Send Command:
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Note that the Send Email type is not available for Schedule or Button Triggers.
To Send an ESI RQ command, enter in the command into the text box as shown below. The
start and terminating characters are automatically added to the command, so it is not
necessary to add them from the keyboard.
Setting up to Send a UPB Direct Command is very similar to setting up a UPB Direct Command
for the Receive trigger. Either enter the serial string from the UPB command wizard, or enter
the NID, DID, and command. The following is an example of setting up to Send a UPB Direct
command (Notice that this Send command is setup with a 30 second delay from the time the
receive trigger (whatever it is) was received:
And setting up to send a UPB Link command is very similar also:
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To setup to send a Zwave command, merely enter in the serial Zwave string to be sent. Again,
the start (>) and terminating characters (Carriage Return) are automatically taken care of, so
they don’t need to be entered:
Like with the Receive trigger, the RAW command on the Send side also requires that the start
and end terminating characters be added. For example, to send an X10 command using the
1132B, setup the Send Command as below:
Notice that there are two special parameters entered above – the ^02 and the ^00. In some
instances, it will be very difficult to enter in the ASCII characters – it would be much nicer to be
able to enter raw hex values. To enter a raw hex value, put a “^” in front of it. In this case, the
entry is telling the RUC to send a hex 0x02. The ^00 hex null character is a special string – if
it is the last character in a string, it tells the RUC to not send a Carriage Return after the string
entered into the text box. So, in this case, the RUC will send a hex 0x02, followed by the ASCII
characters, but it won’t send a carriage return after the serial string.
The RUC’s automation control has three operating modes – Home, Vacation, and Both. This is
selected on the Device Configuration page. However, it would be nice if the RUC could have the
mode changed through an external trigger. For example, it would be very useful to have a
button labeled Home/Vacation on one button on a UPB 8 button controller. Now, when you
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press the button once, the RUC is put into Home mode. Press it twice and the RUC goes into
Vacation mode. Now, when you are ready to leave home for a long weekend, press the button
twice and the unit goes into Vacation mode. When you get home from the weekend, merely
press the button once, and the RUC goes back to the Home mode. This is a very convenient
way to change modes without having to start up a computer to access the Device Configuration
page. To setup the Send Command to allow this, select either Home or Vacation as the Send
Command type as seen here:
Or:
To send an Insteon command (requires the 2413S), select Insteon from the dropdown and then
enter in the serial string you wish to send:
To send an X10 command, select X10 from the dropdown, then select the desired House code,
Unit Code, and command (or enter in the appropriate serial string).
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To send a POST command over Ethernet to control another Ethernet appliance, select POST
from the Send Command Type drop down and fill out the text boxes as shown. This particular
example will tell a second RUC with the IP address of 192.168.1.59 to run the button on it’s
control panel on page 1, button #5 (the button parameter in the command is one less than the
actual button on the Control Panel).
This screen can also support a PUT command. Notice the checkbox above to send a PUT
rather than a POST.
Obviously, in order to use this POST capability with another device, you will need to know the
appropriate command to send to the other device.
Completed Trigger Events
Ok, now that we’ve shown the individual entries for each protocol type for Receive and Send
commands, let’s put them together and show a few examples of completed triggers and their
results. Remember that each trigger event requires a Receive Trigger Command and a Send
Command.
NOTE: Recognize that there are some protocol conversions that are not allowed. For instance,
you cannot send an email from a button. In these instances, the Send Command type will be
“grayed” out, meaning that this particular conversion cannot be selected.
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For the first example, let’s trigger one UPB command to be sent upon receipt of a different UPB
command. To setup this page to send out another UPB command when a UPB trigger
command is received, follow these steps:






Under Receive Command, determine the type of command you want to
trigger on, whether that is a link or a direct command, and select it from
the drop down by Command Type. In most cases, this will be a Link
command. If you’re not sure, use Link.
Enter your NID
Enter the Link ID or the Direct ID of the module you wish to trigger on,
i.e., Link 12 or Unit 24
Then, select the trigger command from the dropdown, i.e., Activate,
Deactivate, Goto Off, etc.
Now, under Send Command, select “Send UPB” from the drop down on
the left, then select your NID and Link ID. Then, select your command –
i.e., Activate, Deactivate, etc. – from the dropdown. Make sure you do
not enter the <ctrl-T> or <cr>.
Next, if you want a delay, enter in the delay in hours (max of 17 hours),
minutes (max of 59), and seconds (max of 59). In the following example,
we put in a 15 second delay. This is a good example of the secure entry
application. The garage door opens. There is a proximity sensor
connected to a UPB IO module that causes a UPB command to be sent.
The RUC recognizes this signal, then starts a countdown timer. After 15
seconds, it sends a signal to turn off the lights that had been turned on
by the door opening.
Before you click on Add Trigger, the screen will look like this:
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When the Trigger is completed by clicking on Add Trigger, the screen will
display the new added trigger in its list below the Add Trigger button. Notice
that the new trigger we added is trigger line #0.
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When triggers are added to the trigger list, they are sorted as follows:
The first sort criterion is type of trigger, with Send first, Email second, Schedule
third and Button fourth. Within Send and Email, the sort order is based on the
character string of the received command. Because UPB commands are stored
starting with PU, some non-UPB receive strings will sort before UPB and others
will sort after. The send string is not checked to determine sort order, but for
any triggers that have identical receive strings, the delay time is checked, with
lesser delay times sorting before greater delay times. If delay times are the
same, then the sort order is which trigger was entered first. Note that editing a
trigger is identical to deleting it and then adding it back, so triggers with
identical receive strings can change sort order if they are edited.
Within the Schedule type, triggers are sorted by scheduled time, with sunrise
related ones sorting first, then sunset related ones then actual scheduled time.
Triggers with identical schedule time are ordered by which is entered first,
noting the same caveat as above for edited triggers.
Within Buttons, they are sorted first by page number, then by button number.
Triggers with identical page and button numbers are ordered by which is
entered first, noting the same caveat as above for edited triggers.
Note that you can have one button trigger multiple actions. These actions will
run sequentially, not at the same time. Once the first command is sent, it will
run the second one etc. However, the labeling for the button will be from the
one that runs last.
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Notice that on the trigger listing, there are three buttons on the far right –
Delete, Edit, and Run.
When you click on Delete, you will delete the trigger from the list and the trigger
will no longer be available, and it will not operate.
When you click on Edit, the trigger entry screen will be shown with the
parameters as originally entered for this trigger already populated in the fields.
Edit the parameters as you desire, then click on the button labeled Save Edits.
If you click on the button labeled Run, it will “RUN’ the Send Command part of
the trigger. For example, if you have a trigger setup that would send an email, if
you click on Run, that email will be sent. Similarly, if a trigger will send out a
UPB link 26 Activate on NID 56 based upon its receive trigger, if you click Run,
the RUC will send out a UPB command for NID = 56, Link 26 Activate.
NOTE: A maximum of 40 queued up delay or scheduled triggers is possible. Any more than
this can lead to unpredictable behavior. Normally, you will not have to worry about this.
To setup a trigger to send out an email when a UPB trigger command is received, follow these
steps:
Under UPB Receive Command, determine the type of command you want
to trigger on, whether that is a link or a direct command, and select it
from the drop down by Command Type. In most cases, this will be a
Link command. If you’re not sure, use Link.
 Enter your NID
 Enter the Link ID or the Direct ID of the module you wish to trigger on,
i.e., Link 12 or Unit 24
 Then, select the trigger command from the dropdown, i.e., Activate,
Deactivate, Goto Off, etc.
Now, under Send Command, select “Send Email” from the drop down on the left, then fill in the
TO, Subject, and Body text fields as such:

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Click on Add Trigger Command and you see the completed page:
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Notice that trigger 12 is the trigger we just added. When the trigger list becomes large enough
to not display on one screen, a scroll bar will automatically show up to allow for easier
navigation.
Also, note that “Email” is in Blue text, indicating it is a link. If you click on the word Email, it
will bring up a popup window showing you the email parameters as shown here:
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NOTE: When sending email, the total number of characters – To email address, Subject, and
Body – must be at least 3 characters and cannot exceed 40 characters. If this is exceeded, the
field is truncated.
NOTE: The number of delayed trigger responses that are queued up cannot exceed 40 –
more than this might result in unpredictable behavior.
NOTE: You can only trigger on a command sent from the RUC if you have selected Echo
Back on the Device Configuration page for that interface.
NOTE: These triggered emails are not intended to be used for life critical situations.
There is no guarantee that these emails can be delivered.
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Setting up a Scheduled Event
Let’s create a scheduled event that will send a UPB command at 9:15 PM on the weekdays, but
not on the weekend. First, select Sched as the command type under Receive Command.
In the top box, on the right hand side, you will see that you have multiple options on when you
want to send out a UPB Command.
1.
If you want to send out a command at a specific time, then enter the hour and
minutes. Notice that this is in a 24 hour format. So, if you want to send a command at
9:15 AM, enter 9 for the hours and 15 for the minutes, and have Actual Time selected.
If you want to send a signal at 9:15 PM, then enter 21 for the hours and 15 for the
minutes.
2. If you want to send a signal at sunrise, merely select Time before Sunrise and leave the
Hours and Minutes at 0. Or, if you want to send the signal 15 minutes before Sunrise,
set Hours to 0 and minutes to 15. With Time before Sunrise selected, the UPB signal
will be sent 15 minutes before sunrise.
3. Alternatively, if you want to send a signal sometime after sunrise, select Time after
Sunrise and enter in the hours and minutes you want.
4. Do the same thing if you want to send the signal at Sunset, before Sunset, or after
Sunset by selecting the appropriate item.
NOTE: Sunrise and Sunset are calculated based upon the Latitude, Longitude, and
Time Zone entered in the Device Configuration page. You need to make sure these are
correct for the correct sunrise and sunset to be calculated.
Ok, now that you’ve determined when you’re going to send the UPB signal, go to the lower half
of this window and determine what UPB command you’re going to send and how.
1.
First, from the left hand side, select UPB Link and the port number where the SPIM is
located (normally COM1). Then, below that, select the days of the week you want the
signal to be sent, in our case Monday - Friday. Make sure there is a check mark in
each day you want enabled.
2. Now, on the right hand of this lower screen, enter in the command you want to send
(determined as before).
3. Now, determine if you want the command to be sent at the scheduled time, or do you
want to randomize it? Select the appropriate selection. If you randomize the command,
the command will be sent anytime within + / - 30 minutes from the nominal time. In
this example, we want to Send on Schedule.
4. And, finally, determine if you want this command sent during the HOME mode, or the
Vacation Mode, or Both. The Home / Vacation mode is set on the Device Configuration
Page. So, if you program this Scheduled event to be only active in the HOME mode, if
the Home mode is selected on the Device Configuration page, then the scheduled event
will run as programmed. However, if the Device is in the Vacation mode, then any
Home scheduled events will not run. Obviously, if Both is selected, the scheduled event
will run all the time.
Before we click on Add Trigger, the screen will look like this:
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Now, click on Add Trigger. The trigger in our example was added as trigger # 13 and the listing
looks like this:
For more examples of protocol conversions using the WMT RUC Trigger capabilities, please see
Chapter 9 of this document or go to the RUC information page on our website:
http://www.webmtn.com/RUC/RUC-information.php
Special characters used for Trigger Events:
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^ - used to enter raw hex codes, for example ^02 means hex code 0x02.
^00 – don’t send a Carriage Return if this is the last “character” in the string. If not the last
character in the string, send 0x00.
|| Ignore a carriage return in between two commands
+ - at the start of a serial string tells the RUC to add a small intracharacter delay between each
character of a serial string (needed to send Insteon commands through a 2412 or 2413S
Insteon powerline interface module).
Sending a text message from a trigger.
You can cause a text message to be sent from a trigger by using the Send Email function. To
send a text, use these email addresses (you will need to know the carrier of the recipients cell
phone service):
Carrier
email Address
AT&T
[email protected]
Verizon
[email protected]
Sprint
T-Mobile
Nextel
Cingular
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
Alltel
[email protected] OR
[email protected]
CellularOne
[email protected]
Virgin Mobile
Omnipoint
Qwest
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
New Feature only in V4 devices - Allow wild cards in UPB triggers.
1. Allow wild cards in UPB triggers. In NID, DID/LID and command fields for both receive
and send sides, allow * as an option. Proceed as follows:
a. If the Receive trigger is a Direct type, only match incoming commands that are
direct types. If the Receive trigger definition is a Link type, only match incoming
commands that are link types.
b. If Receive NID = xx and Send NID=yy, then send with a NID of yy.
c. If Receive NID=xx and Send NID=*, then send the NID (xx) for any incoming
command that is matched.
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d. If Receive NID=* and Send NID = yy, then send with a NID of yy.
e. If Receive NID=* and Send NID=*, then send the NID for any incoming command
that is matched.
f. If Receive DID = xx and Send DID=yy, then send with a DID of yy.
g. If Receive DID=xx and Send DID=*, then send the DID (xx) for any incoming
command that is matched.
h. If Receive DID=* and Send DID = yy, then send with a DID of yy.
i. If Receive DID=* and Send DID=*, then send the DID for any incoming command
that is matched.
j. If Receive DID = xx and Send LID=yy, then send with a LID of yy.
k. If Receive DID=xx and Send LID=*, then send a LID that is the same as the DID
(xx) for any incoming command that is matched.
l. If Receive DID=* and Send LID = yy, then send with a LID of yy.
m. If Receive DID=* and Send LID=*, then send a LID that is the same as the DID
for any incoming command that is matched.
n. If Receive LID = xx and Send LID=yy, then send with a LID of yy.
o. If Receive LID=xx and Send LID=*, then send a LID that is the same as the LID
(xx) for any incoming command that is matched.
p. If Receive LID=* and Send LID = yy, then send with a LID of yy.
q. If Receive LID=* and Send LID=*, then send a LID that is the same as the LID for
any incoming command that is matched.
r. If Receive LID = xx and Send DID=yy, then send with a DID of yy.
s. If Receive LID=xx and Send DID=*, then send a DID that is the same as the LID
(xx) for any incoming command that is matched.
t. If Receive LID=* and Send DID = yy, then send with a DID of yy.
u. If Receive LID=* and Send DID=*, then send a DID that is the same as the LID
for any incoming command that is matched.
v. If Receive CMD = xx and Send CMD=yy, then send with a CMD of yy.
w. If Receive CMD=xx and Send CMD=*, then send the CMD (xx) for any incoming
command that is matched.
x. If Receive CMD=* and Send CMD = yy, then send with a CMD of yy.
y. If Receive CMD=* and Send CMD=*, then send the CMD for any incoming
command that is matched.
Using wild cards will allow a user to do several things that are very difficult to do today. For
example:
- If you have enough UPB devices to go over 250 devices – one network – so that an
installation has two networks, now you can tie the two networks together. An All ON command
generated on one of the networks, could also control all the devices on the second network.
- One controller could now control two UPB networks, even if the controller’s software
only allows one NID.
- The opportunities for creative use of this function are unlimited!
Control Panel
This webpage allows the user to have a simple touchpanel like screen to easily control
automation functions. When you click on the page for the first time, you will see the following:
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To add buttons to this screen, you will use the Trigger screen, select Button as the Receive
Command type, then use the Send Command box to determine what action will occur when the
button is pressed.
Let’s add a button that will Close the drapes associated with the ESI RQ motor that has an
address of WBT.
On the Trigger page, select Button as the Receive command type. Select the page number (in
this case, page 1). Select the button # (in this case, let’s use button #1). Then, enter the text
you want displayed on the button (in this case “Close Blinds”).
Buttons are in two columns of 5 with button 1 being upper left, button 5 being lower left,
button 6 being upper right, and button 10 being lower right. Buttons will only display once
they are added using the Triggers page.
Now, select ESI in the Send command box. Select the port the ESI controller is connected to
(normally this will be COM2). Then, in the ESI command box, enter WBTc (don’t need the start
or end characters). Before the Add Trigger button is clicked, the screen will look like this:
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Click on the Add Trigger button and the trigger now shows up in the trigger listing like this:
Now, click on the Control Panel page from the left menu, and the page looks like this:
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Now, if the button is clicked from a browser accessing this page, the RUC will send out the ESI
command WBTc on COM2, causing the blinds to close.
Up to 10 buttons can be added on each of the four pages.
Notice that the page is labeled “1”. This can be changed. Left click on the “1” on this screen,
and a popup window will appear. In the text box in this popup, you can enter in the desired
text for this page, for example, Kitchen, or Living Room, or Exterior. Here’s a screenshot of the
text box with the selected label of Living Room.
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After clicking OK, here is the revised Control Panel page (the browser page will need to be
refreshed in order to see the changed label):
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Notice that the label also changed on the bottom of the page while the other pages are still
shown with their page numbers.
Just repeat the procedure above and add buttons wherever desired. To navigate among pages,
just click on the labels on the bottom. For example, to go to page 3, click on the “3”.
Chumby / Dash app
By using the Control Panel, there is a way to make the RUC work with a Chumby / Sony Dash
Personal Internet Station / Insignia Infocast Internet Media Display or personal network
appliance (PNA). The Chumby / Dash / Infocast units will act as simple user interfaces, and
when buttons are pressed on their screens, a signal is sent to the RUC which tells the RUC
that a button has been pressed and to take a specific action, such as turning on a light.
Ok, now that you have the RUC’s Control Panel configured, we can setup the PNA device. If
you have a new PNA, go through the process of setting it up using its instructions. Register the
device, create a channel, and add any apps that you want. For example, I have an app that
displays the daily Dilbert cartoon, the daily photo of the day from NASA, a weather app, a
baseball score app (so I can keep up with my Colorado Rockies), and one or two more. Get
everything else working the way you want it to before you add the Web Mountain UPB control
app.
Now, you’re ready to add the Web Mountain UPB app. Click on Add App. Then, either search
for “UPB” or go to the category “Lifestyle, then scroll down to UPB Home Automation Control as
shown here:
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Click on Add App. You will now see this screen:
So, now you need to provide the desired information. First, you might want to change the
amount of time the app is displayed (Play app for). I typically use 15 seconds.
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In the text box for host / IP, we highly recommend using the IP address of the RUC rather than
the host name (we also highly recommend that the RUC have a fixed IP address in order to take
advantage of the Chumby / Dash app). We have found that some networks struggle with host
names, and the actual IP address eliminates any confusion. This is the IP address of your RUC
unit.
In most cases, you can leave the username and password. These are the default values for the
RUC. If you have changed those, then you will need to change this configuration to match your
new values.
Then, you will see the box checked for Auto-load text from RUC? If this box is checked, then
the App pulls the labeling for buttons from the RUC, saving the effort of labeling the buttons.
All you need to do at this point is click on Submit. If it’s not checked, then click NEXT so that
you can enter in text for the buttons and the page.
Your screen will look like this:
To move to page 2, 3, or 4, as desired, click NEXT. Create your labels. Once you’re done, then
click Submit. Your app is now configured.
Now, when you click on any button, it will cause the same action to occur as if you clicked on
that button on the RUC.
One thing – before you download this onto your PNA, go to the customize button on each app
and set the amount of time you want each app to show for – I typically use 15 seconds.
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Once you have everything configured, power down your PNA, wait a few seconds, then power it
back up. It will download your changes and additions and you’re up and running.
To control your lights just press the desired button.
Have fun!
Android App
Similarly, if you have an Android smartphone or tablet, you can download a free Android app
that is configured and used very much like the Chumby / Dash app. This app can be
downloaded from the Android App Market, either directly from the phone or from the website.
iOS / iPhone App
If you have an iPhone or iPad, you can also download an app from the Apple store, UPB
Remote, that uses the RUC to create a full blown automation network. This app is $20 to
download and install and can be found here:
http://upbremote.tpboyce.com/.
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Backup / Restore
This webpage allows the user to backup the various configuration settings used on their RUC,
and then restore them at a later date in the event that the RUC is reset. You will also use this
function when you are doing a firmware update on your RUC. Backup / Restore was
implemented in V27 firmware. You will be unable to use this feature if your firmware is earlier
than V27. Update your firmware first to the latest version on the Web Mountain website, and
manually reenter your configuration settings. After doing this update, you can now use this
feature.
NOTE: If updating to the newest release (V57) on an existing unit from Revision 200, follow
these steps:
1. Just to be extra careful, print out copies of all UI screens so that everything can be
manually recreated if something goes wrong.
2. If older than v 2.00.28, first update to 2.00.28 without doing a reset, then backup the
RUC using v28. If at 2.00.28 or later, go ahead and backup the RUC.
3. Then update to 3.00.xx. Do a factory reset and then do a restore from the saved
backup.
When you click on the Backup / Restore button from the left menu, you will now get this
webpage:
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To create a backup of your RUC’s settings, merely click on the link below “Backup” that says
“csv file”. In some cases, a new window will popup giving you the choice of where you want to
store this csv file. In other cases, some users might have to right click on the link and choose
“Save Target As:”. Remember where you have saved it on your PC.
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In some cases, your browser might allow you to save the file as a .txt file. While you can do
this, it is recommended that you save the file in a .csv format.
Now, to Restore your backup file, decide if you want to restore passwords and IP settings. If
these boxes are not checked, then the RUC will continue to use its current values. If these
boxes are checked, then the settings from the csv backup file will be used. Make sure you
know your password before restoring with the “Restore passwords” box checked, or you might
not be able to access your RUC after the Restore.
Note: You must restore from a .csv file.
Next, click on the box to “Choose File”. This will bring up a Windows box where you can
navigate to the location of the csv backup file. Select this file, then click OK. Now, you will see
your file name in the Choose File box as seen here:
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Now, merely click Restore and wait for the process to finish.
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Chapter 4
Remote Upstart
This chapter provides information about how to use your RUC unit with Upstart
remotely over your LAN or over the Internet. It includes:

How to get the necessary components

Configure the RUC and Upstart to run over your LAN
CAUTION: It should be noted that UPStart operation over a network will naturally be
slower than with a hard-wired PIM. If you are having problems, a retry or two of the test
you are trying to run should get you accurate results. It is strongly encouraged that the
user configure Upstart slightly differently than normal - select “Ask if verify should be
performed” or “Never perform verify at startup” on the Tools | Options | Upstart File tab
rather than “Always perform verify at startup”. It is also strongly suggested that the user
do individual device verifies rather than network verifies whenever possible. Smaller
chunks of testing will perform better than larger chunks, especially in the situation where
there is some congestion on the network.
Also, to shut off Idle Reports, use the RUC command code under Tools | Options | Extra
Features.
NOTE:
If you have a Remote Upstart session running on COMx (1 or 2), you cannot
simultaneously run another application to that port. For example, if you have
Remote Upstart running on socket port 9761 to COM1, you cannot run the iOS
app, UPB Remote, on your iPhone or iPad using these same sockets and ports.
UPB Remote will not run and Remote Upstart will gradually deteriorate and
become unusable.
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Introduction to Upstart
In case you are not familiar with the UPB setup and programming tool, Upstart,
Upstart is a Windows based program that is used to setup your initial UPB
network, then program and add devices to that network. In order to use
Upstart, you must connect a serial or USB PIM (PC Interface Module) to the PC
running Upstart. This PIM must be plugged into a power outlet so that it can be
used to transmit and receive signals from the PC to and from the powerline
network.
UPB is a powerline home automation protocol. Signals are sent over the
powerline to control lights and appliances. However, the devices that are used
to control these lights and appliances must be programmed to behave in the
fashion you desire. That’s the purpose of Upstart.
In addition, Upstart provides some of the best, if not the best, diagnostic tools as
compared to other home automation technologies.
The most common way of using Upstart is with a local PC connected to either a
serial or USB PIM which is plugged into an outlet in the house. In many cases,
this is inconvenient, in that the location where you are plugged in with the PIM
in order to program devices might not be the final location or the best location
for the PIM, in terms of signal strength, and if you are programming a large
number of units, you are constantly moving your laptop, causing you to
constantly reconnect to the PIM, thereby dramatically reducing your
productivity.
The RUC unit, used as an Ethernet PIM with Upstart, can greatly improve your
productivity and performance.
Acquiring Upstart
Upstart is a freely downloadable program from the Web Mountain website. Just
go to www.webmtn.com, click on Support, then click on Downloads. Register
with your email address, then download the file. This file is a compressed zip
file, so you will need to decompress the file somewhere on your PC, then double
click on the icon for the program to start the installation process on your PC.
It is recommended that you be running at least V5.1, Build 45 of Upstart.
Using a Virtual Serial Port
When using Upstart locally, you merely connect the serial or USB PIM to the PC
you are running Upstart on. Then, within Upstart, you tell the software if you
are using USB, or what COM port the PIM is connected to. Since there is no
local connection when using the RUC, we want to “fool” Upstart into thinking
there is.
We’re going to use a piece of software that creates a virtual serial port. The
recommended software is HW-VSP from The Hardware Group, freeware that can
be downloaded from this site:
http://www.hw-group.com/products/hw_vsp/index_en.html
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Download the latest version and install it on the computer that will run Upstart.
When installing HW VSP, make sure you select Standalone installation (not
client server) and when it asks you if you want to add these applications to your
firewall, say No. Also, tell HW VSP to place an icon on your Desktop.
Connecting the PIM
Now that we have all of the necessary software components, let’s get the
hardware connected. Take your WMT SPIM-01 and connect the supplied serial
cable to the DB9 connector on the bottom of the unit. Then, take the other end
of the serial cable and connect it to the DB9 connector on the RUC unit labeled
COM1. Plug the SPIM-01 into a wall socket before attempting to run Upstart.
Running Remote Upstart over a LAN
Now, double click on the icon on your desktop for HW-VSP. It will bring up a
pop-up window that looks like this:
Click on the tab marked Settings and make this page look like this:
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Make sure the NVT Enabled box is NOT checked. Click on Save Settings to INI
file. Then, click on the tab for Virtual Serial Port.
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Select a COM port you want to use. Make sure it is high enough that it doesn’t
interfere with one of the hardware COM ports on your PC. Notice that we used
COM10.
Enter in the IP address of the RUC device (the local address on your LAN). You
can find this from the Networking Configuration webpage on your RUC.
Then, you need the port # that the RUC will be using to convert serial traffic
onto the TCPIP network. By default, the RUC is set to 9761. You can change
this, but in most cases, 9761 will work for you.
Now, click on the CREATE COM button. You will see this:
Now, open Upstart. Upstart will probably give you an error message that it can’t
communicate with the PIM. Click out of these pop ups and get to the main
screen of Upstart. Click on Tools, UPB Interface Device, Select. You will see this
screen. In the Interface box select Powerline Interface Module, then select the
COM port that matches the COM port you selected above in HW-VSP. Then,
click on CONNECT.
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If Upstart connects to the PIM correctly, you will see blue checkmarks on the left
and a message that says “Selected Powerline Interface is Operational”.
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Now, you can start using Upstart as normal.
Running Remote Upstart over the Internet (WAN)
To setup running Upstart over the Internet (WAN), follow the same steps as above, except in
HW-VSP, rather than entering the local IP Address of the RUC, enter in the WAN IP address of
the network router used at the location where the RUC is installed. You can get this address
easily by merely typing in the URL line in your browser, www.ipchicken.com from any PC on
the LAN. Type this number in the HW-VSP text box for IP address. Other than this, perform
all of the other setup steps as above. You will probably have to open a port on your router
before you will be able to connect over the Internet. Please refer to your router documentation
for instructions on opening a port.
Once the PIM is connected, just use Upstart as normal.
UPB Interface Modules
There are UPB interface modules made by a number of different companies. Any UPB interface
module that can be connected to the DB9 on the RUC should work fine, however, there is one
issue that you should consider. In the normal Upstart mode, the PIM is put into Pulse mode,
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and when sitting idle doing nothing else, it is sending constant idle reports back to Upstart.
What this means is that if you are running Upstart over the Internet, then the PIM is sending
constant traffic over the Internet to Upstart. This constant traffic can impact Upstart
performance, especially on slower broadband networks. In addition, some ISPs will not like
that, especially if you leave it running for an extended test or happen to be interrupted and
forget to disconnect Upstart. In fact, you might get a “nastygram” from your ISP reminding you
of your service terms that you are not supposed to be running a webserver over your service.
We have provided a way to deal with this situation if you are using a Web Mountain SPIM.
With a Web Mountain SPIM connected, go to |Tools | Options | Extra Features in Upstart and
enter in the code RUC in one of the lines. Upstart will recognize this and to the right will
automatically show the text “Enable Use of Web Mountain RUC”. Restart Upstart and now the
PIM will no longer be sending Idle Reports to Upstart.
Recognize that there are some Upstart tasks that require the use of Idle Reports in order to
function properly, including some noise testing. So, you might lose a little functionality of
Upstart by turning off Idle Reports, but you will gain performance improvement for many other
tasks.
More Tips on Running Upstart over a network or the Internet
Occasionally, on a congested network, Upstart will run sluggishly. In those cases, it can be
advantageous to change some of the default parameters within Upstart. Go to, Tools, Options
and you will see the following screen. Click on “Timeout and Retry” and try increasing the
Timeout when using a Serial PIM to 6000 or even 8000 ms. Also, make sure the retries are set
to 4 times. These settings could improve operation
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Chapter 5
Home Automation
The RUC can also be used as an Ethernet PIM for intelligent controller
applications. In order to do this, UPB commands will need to be
sent over the LAN. There are multiple ways of doing this – here
are three examples:
I.
HTTP POST Command
The controller will need to issue a HTTP POST command.
process is described in this URL:
This
http://souptonuts.sourceforge.net/code/http_post.c.html
In this process, in the main(void) function, you will need to
change:
char *hname = "wmtruc"
char *page = "upbtrans.htm"
char *poststr = "command=87000101FF2058"
This is a C++ example. Your language might be different, but
most languages will have a mechanism to generate a HTTP POST
command.
II.
Use telnet.
telnet <IP Address:9761> <Control-T> 87000101FF2058<CR>
III.
Create a client based program in C or other language that
will “talk” to the RUC on port 9761. For examples of this,
contact Web Mountain Tech Support.
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Chapter 6
Firmware Updating
This chapter provides information about updating your RUC with new firmware.
From time to time, WMT will provide new, enhanced firmware that will offer new
features and bug fixes for your RUC. This new firmware will be provided
through our website, or on a CD, or via email.
Before attempting to upgrade your firmware, make sure you look at all your
settings and record them so that you can reenter them once the firmware update
is complete. If your RUC is at version 2.00.28 or later, please use the
Backup/Restore button to create a backup of your settings before proceeding.
To start, first download the RUC_Updater zip file from our website or load it from
the CD or email. Extract it to a location on your local PC – a PC connected to
the same LAN as the RUC. Here is what you should see in the folder once it’s
extracted. (If you look at this folder after the update process, you will see that
there is one more file, an ini file, that the process created. This is normal and
nothing to worry about).
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Now, double click on Updater_Starter.exe to run the program. This window will
pop up. Change the Host Name in the above window to the actual IP device of
the RUC. If you don’t know the IP address of the RUC, run the enclosed
program, Microchip Ethernet Discoverer. This program will give you the IP
address of the RUC on the local LAN.
Click OK.
Now the application will start and first connect to the RUC. You will see this
screen:
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Notice that it says Programming from Ruc_Updater.cry. The unit has connected
and is now programming. Also, see the very last line. This gives you an
indication that the programming is occurring. Here is an updated screenshot
showing progress:
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Notice that this screen only shows Sending part: 12. As more functionality is
added to the unit, the “parts” will increase. The most current update file will go
to about 29 parts.
Notice that it tells you that programming is complete. Here is the final
screenshot showing final results:
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Now, you’re done and have successfully programmed your RUC with the
updated firmware. Merely click on the “X” in the right hand corner to shut down
the application.
Depending on the version you are upgrading from and to, you may need to do a
factory reset. If you have backed up your RUC settings prior to performing the
firmware upgrade, you will be able to use the Backup/Restore button to restore
all these settings.
If a factory reset is recommended, hold both S1 and S2 down, then after a few
seconds release S1. One of the LEDs will flash quickly. After a few seconds,
both LEDs will flash 3 times. After a few more seconds, both LEDs will flash 6
times. Now, you can release S2. The process is complete. At this point, you
can restore any settings that you had before.
NOTE: If you are updating a unit that was previously at V57 or higher, it may
not be necessary to do a factory reset on the unit. – the unit will retain its
settings properly.
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Chapter 7
Serial Ports
This chapter provides information about the type and usage of the two serial
ports on the RUC.
Background
There are two types of serial interfaces. The first type is the type used in PCs,
which is called a DTE interface. The block diagram of this interface is shown
below:
1
RUC
RX
2
DB9
TX
TXD
100
100
+V
3
Serial Cable
RXD
4
+
470 uF
DTE
Computer End
Ethernet Board
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Notice that this interface provides a positive voltage on pin 4 of the DB9 connector. Also notice
that pin 5 should be grounded, but it is run through a low value resistor for protection.
This is the interface type provided for both COM1 and COM2 on the RUC board.
The second type of serial interface is called a DCE interface and is the type of interface used
with peripheral equipment. Recognize that pin 4 needs a voltage on it in order for this circuit to
work.
1
N/C
2
DB9
RX
3
DTR
4
GND
Serial Cable
Device -i.e., PIM
TX
5
DCE
Peripheral End
PPIM Board
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This is the type of serial interface used on a UPB serial PIM (WMT SPIM-01) and many other
automation interface devices. In this case, the unit is expecting to talk to a PC (which has the
DTE interface).
Also notice that the DTE interface has its Receive interface on pin 2 while the DCE interface
has it’s transmit interface on pin 2. That means that in order for a DTE interface to talk to a
DCE interface, the cable needs to be straight through, not reversed on pins 2 & 3. The DTE
transmit needs to talk to the DCE receive and the DCE transmit needs to connect to the DTE
receive.
The DB9 connector pinouts are shown as follows (pins 1, & 6 – 9 are not used):
2
3
1
4
5
Front View
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Chapter 8
Warranty
The Web Mountain RUC unit is warranted for a period of 1 year after purchase
of product. If you are having problems with your RUC unit, please contact Web
Mountain support at [email protected] or 303-627-1856 for support. If it is
determined that the unit is defective and needs to be replaced within the
warranty, first contact Web Mountain for an RMA (Returned Material
Authorization) number.
Units without an RMA # can be returned to the sender, at the discretion of
WMT, with no action taken.
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Chapter 9
Additional Trigger Examples
Conversion Examples
Receive -- Send
ESI RQ ----------- Email
Schedule - Email
(FUTURE)
UPB Direct ----------- Email
UPB Link ------------- Email
Zwave ------------- Email
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X10 --------------- Email
Insteon ----------- Email
Button --------- Email
(FUTURE)
ESI RQ ------------ ESI RQ
ESI RQ ------------- ESI RP
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Schedule ------------ ESI RQ
Schedule ------------ ESI RP
UPB Direct --------- ESI RQ
UPB Direct ----------- ESI RP
UPB Link ----------- ESI RQ
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UPB Link ---------- ESI RP
Multiple examples
\
Zwave ------------ ESI RQ
Zwave --------- ESI RP
X10 ------------ ESI RQ
X10 ----------- ESI RP
Insteon -------- ESI RQ
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Insteon ------ ESI RP
Button ----- ESI RQ
Button --- ESI RP
Buttons 1 & 6 (Labeled Raise Blinds and Lower Blinds)
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ESI RQ -------- UPB Direct
Schedule ----- UPB Direct
UPB Direct ------ UPB Direct
UPB Link ------- UPB Direct
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Zwave ----------- UPB Direct
X10 ------------ UPB Direct
Insteon ------- UPB Direct
Button -------- UPB Direct
ESI RQ -------- UPB Link
Schedule ------- UPB Link
UPB Direct ----- UPB Link
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UPB Link ------- UPB Link
Zwave -------- UPB Link
X10 ------------ UPB Link
Insteon ------------ UPB Link
Button ------------- UPB Link
ESI RQ ----------- Zwave
Schedule -------- Zwave
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UPB Direct ------- Zwave
UPB Link ------- Zwave
Zwave --------- Zwave
X10 ---------- Zwave
Insteon ------- Zwave
Button -------- Zwave
ESI RQ ----------- X10
Schedule --------- X10
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UPB Direct -------- X10
UPB Link --------- X10
Zwave ----------- X10
X10 ------------- X10
Insteon ------- X10
Button ------ X10
ESI RQ ------- Insteon
Schedule -------- Insteon
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UPB Direct --------- Insteon
UPB Link ---------- Insteon
Zwave ------------- Insteon
X10 -------------- Insteon
Insteon -------- Insteon
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Button ----------- Insteon
Schedule ------- HOME
UPB Direct ------- HOME
UPB Link ------- HOME
Zwave ------- HOME
X10 ------- HOME
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Button ------- HOME
Schedule ------- VACATION
UPB Direct ------- VACATION
UPB Link ------- VACATION
Zwave ------- VACATION
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X10 ------- VACATION
Button ------- VACATION
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ESI RQ ---------- POST
Run button #6 on page 4 of RUC at 192.168.1.15
Schedule -------- POST
Run Trigger 11 on RUC at 192.168.1.15
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UPB Direct --------- POST
Button 6, Page 4 on RUC at 192.168.1.15
UPB Link ---------- POST
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Zwave ------------- POST
X10 ------------ POST
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Insteon -------- POST
Button ------- POST
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Chapter 10
Troubleshooting
To be determined.
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Appendix A
General Information
For future use.
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Appendix B
More General Information
For Future Use
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