University Undergraduate Bulletin 2003-2004

University Undergraduate Bulletin 2003-2004
Undergraduate Bulletin 2003-2004
University
at Albany
STATE UNIVERSITY OF NEW YORK
General Information
Officers
President: Karen R. Hitchcock
Vice Presidents: Carlos Santiago, Provost and
Vice President for Academic Affairs; Jeryl L.
Mumpower, Interim Vice President for
Research; Kathryn Lowery, Vice President for
Finance and Business; James P. Doellefeld,
Vice President for Student Affairs; David
Gilbert, Vice President for Outreach; John
Wolff, Chief Advancement Officer.
University Council (2003-2004): Pierre L.
Alric, Albany, Kevin M. Bronner, Ph.D.,
Loudonville, John R. Fallon, Jr., Esq., New
York City, Frank T. Gargano, Esq., Melville,
Dr. Thomas J. Malesky, Schuylerville, Michael
A. Montario, Howes Cave, George M. Philip,
Esq., (Chair), Albany, Daniel C. Tomson,
Esq., New York City, Daniel Fingerman
(elected student representative), Brittany
Ekleberry (graduate student representative),
Professor Carolyn MacDonald (faculty
representative), Anthony Giardina, Esq.,
(alumni representative)
Undergraduate Education:
Dr. Sue R. Faerman, Dean of Undergraduate
Studies
Dr. Carson Carr, Jr., Associate Dean of
Academic Support Services and Associate Vice
President for Academic Affairs
Dr. Judith E. Johnson, Associate Dean of
Undergraduate Studies and Director of
Honors Programs
Dr. Judith Fetterley, Associate Dean of
Undergraduate Studies and Director of the
General Education Program
Mr. Richard L. Collier, Assistant Dean of
Undergraduate Studies and Editor,
UNDERGRADUATE BULLETIN
The University at Albany, State University of
New York, is the senior campus of the SUNY
system. One of SUNY’s four university centers,
UAlbany offers undergraduate and graduate
education in a broad range of academic fields
at the bachelor’s, master’s, and doctoral degree
levels.
Three traditional responsibilities guide
UAlbany: teaching, research, and service.
Instructional excellence is assured through the
quality of the faculty and a design of academic
programs that affords students the greatest
opportunity for intellectual growth. A
challenging curriculum also provides students
with thorough training for meeting career
objectives. Students are encouraged to
challenge themselves, to explore the world
about them, and then to accept the
responsibility that comes with scholarship and
freedom.
An active research program reflects aware-ness
of the responsibility of contributing to the
expansion of knowledge and understanding, and
to enhancing the economic vitality of the state and
region. The University assists and encourages
undergraduate students as well as faculty to
participate in scholarly and creative research and
to make their results widely available.
UAlbany enjoys a Carnegie Research Extensive
University rating. Last year, the campus received
approximately $99 million in external funding
through its Research Foundation and Health
Research, Inc.
The University also understands its special
role as an intellectual, economic and cultural
resource for the region. Faculty and student
scholars are encouraged to share their
intellectual expertise as speakers and
consultants, and the University regularly
invites the community to use its resources and
facilities, and to attend the many seminars,
exhibits and events that fill the UAlbany
calendar.
To meet each of these responsibilities,
UAlbany
maintains
a
wholehearted
commitment to excellence.
The University is ranked 17th in research and
scholarship among the nation's top public
universities. (Source: The Rise of American
Research Universities.)
Nationally ranked programs include:
Criminal Justice — # 4 (US News)
Information Technology — # 6 (US News)
Public Finance — # 14 (US News)
Public Administration — # 8 (US News)
Public Affairs — # 12 (US News)
Public Policy — # 17 (US News)
Clinical Psychology — # 36 (US News)
Social Welfare — # 19 (US News)
Sociology — # 24 (US News)
Education — # 42 (US News)
Library Science — # 15 (US News)
Management Information Systems — one of
the nation's top 10 (Computerworld)
Location: Located in the state capital,
UAlbany is within minutes of the State
Legislature, the courts, and headquarters for all
service agencies of the largest state
government in the nation. The city itself is a
vibrant center for culture and entertainment.
Its centerpiece is the Nelson A. Rockefeller
Empire State Plaza, a governmental center that
includes the New York State Museum and
Library and major performing arts and
convention facilities. Albany is also home to
the Pepsi Arena, a 15,000-seat venue for major
entertainment and sporting events.
The Capital Region (Albany, Schenectady, and
Troy), with a population of 750,000, is near
Saratoga, the Berkshires, the Catskills, and the
Adirondack Mountains, areas famed for
recreational and cultural opportunities.
The University is 150 miles from New York
City, 165 miles from Boston, and 242 miles
from Montreal. The main campus is located
near the intersection of the New York State
Thruway, the Adirondack Northway, and
Interstate 90. Within five miles of the campus
are an AMTRAK rail station, the Greyhound
and Trailways bus depots, and Albany
International Airport, served by several major
airlines.
Unless
otherwise
noted,
the
information provided in this bulletin
should be utilized in the following
manner:
Academic regulations are in effect for
all students during 2003-2004.
Courses are described as they will be
offered during 2003-2004.
The general degree requirements,
requirements for majors and minors
are effective for students who
matriculate during 2003-2004.
The University at Albany does not
discriminate on the basis of age, color,
creed, disability, marital status,
national origin, race, or sex. Inquiries
concerning this policy should be
directed to the Affirmative Action
Office.
The calendars, curricula, and fees
described in this bulletin are subject to
change at any time by official action of
the University at Albany.
1
University at Albany
Description: The University at Albany, the
largest of 15 colleges in the Capital Region,
enrolls approximately 17,000 students,
including more than 5,200 graduate students.
More than two-thirds of the University’s
undergraduate
students
pursue
postbaccalaureate study. The University now
awards more than 150 doctorates a year in
disciplines in the arts and sciences and
professions.
On the undergraduate level, the Office of the
Dean of Undergraduate Studies is responsible
for the coordination of the academic
experience of undergraduate students and
works closely with the deans and faculty of the
individual schools and colleges in developing,
coordinating, and implementing undergraduate
academic policy and curricula. Nondegree
study at the undergraduate level is coordinated
by the Office of General Studies.
Nationally and internationally renowned
scholars are among the more than 920 faculty
members who are committed to maintaining
the high academic standards which have
characterized Albany since its founding in
1844. A large number of our faculty have
earned the rank of Distinguished Professor, the
highest academic honor for a faculty member
in the State University of New York System.
Additionally, many of the academic
departments have gained national prominence.
Finally, many of the faculty are integrally
involved in meaningful community service
efforts in the Capital Region and throughout
the state.
The Campus: The Uptown Campus, designed
by noted architect Edward Durell Stone and
completed in the mid 1960s, is located on the
western side of the city. The setting is
highlighted by the “Academic Podium:” 13
academic buildings on a common platform, all
connected by a continuous roof and a lowerlevel corridor. In recent years, an aggressive
program of new construction has expanded the
Uptown Campus. An additional library and
new buildings for environmental science and
technology management, the life sciences, and
sculpture, as well as residence halls have
recently been completed or are under
construction.
Accreditation: The University is chartered by
the Board of Regents of New York State,
which has registered all of its degrees and
programs and fully approved its professional
programs through the State Education
Department. UAlbany is also a member of the
Council of Graduate Schools in the United
States. It is fully accredited by:
Several schools and departments are located
on the Downtown Campus, a classic Georgianstyle complex, recently renovated, that served
from 1909-66 as the main campus. In 1996,
UAlbany expanded to Rensselaer County with
the opening of the 58-acre East Campus. It is
home to the School of Public Health, the
Center for Comparative Functional Genomics,
and a burgeoning business incubator program.
The Middle States Association of Colleges
and Secondary Schools
American Psychological Association
Council on Rehabilitation Education
The Council on Social Work Education
The American Chemical Society
The American Library Association
The American Assembly of Collegiate
Schools of Business
The American Board on Counseling
Services, Inc.
Its graduates are recognized by the American
Association of University Women.
Organization: The University enrolls students
in eight degree-granting schools and colleges.
The College Arts and Sciences and the
Schools of Business, Criminal Justice,
Education, Information Science and Policy,
Public Affairs, and Social Welfare offer
undergraduate and graduate programs. The
School of Public Health offers graduate
programs only. Several opportunities exist for
joint degrees between schools and with other
graduate programs. In 2001, UAlbany
established its new School of Nanosciences
and Nanoengineering, which currently offers
courses and will introduce degree programs in
the near future.
The Office of the Provost and Vice President for
Academic Affairs and the Office of the Vice
President for Research jointly work with the
academic units in curricular and research areas.
2
In addition to the Uptown Campus’s
classrooms and laboratories, there are two
University Libraries and the Performing Arts
Center — boasting several theatres, recital
halls, and rehearsal instructional space. The
Fine Arts Building houses one of the finest
museums in the Northeast. The new sculpture
building opened in 2002.
Five residence quadrangles on the Uptown
Campus, each housing approximately 1,200
students, include eight three-story halls and a
23-story tower. Each quadrangle has lounges,
recreation areas, and dining facilities. Nearby
Freedom Quadrangle has apartment-style
living, and Empire Commons provides singleroom apartment-style living for 1,200 students.
Housing is also available on Alumni
Quadrangle, located near the Downtown
Campus.
Other special facilities on the campus include a
National Weather Service meteorological
laboratory, a Computing Center, and a linear
accelerator for physics research.
The hub of student activity is the Campus Center
and its new extension, opened in September 1994.
It includes lounges, meeting and dining rooms, a
ballroom, a cafeteria, a barbershop, banking
facilities, a convenience store, a Barnes & Noble
bookstore, a computer store, and a variety of fastfood eateries.
Outdoor recreation facilities include 24 tennis
courts (12 with lights), 4 basketball and 6
volleyball courts, an all-weather running track,
and several multipurpose playing areas.
Indoor athletic facilities are dominated the
Recreation and Convocation Center (RACC).
With an arena seating capacity of nearly 4,800,
the facility is home to NCAA Division I Great
Dane basketball, and also houses a running
track, a modern fitness center, a fully equipped
athletic training complex with whirlpools and
other
rehabilitative
equipment,
four
handball/racquetball courts, four squash
courts, two main locker rooms, and ten smaller
team locker rooms. All facilities are
handicapped accessible and have designated
seating areas for handicapped spectators. In the
Physical Education Center are a pool, locker
rooms, and several basketball, handball and
squash courts.
Libraries: The University maintains three
libraries. Two located on the Uptown Campus,
the University Library and the New Library
Building, and on the Downtown Campus, the
Dewey Graduate Library. All three libraries
offer orientations, instruction, study carrels
and study rooms. The libraries subscribe to
numerous electronic and hard copy journals
and texts, and has more than two million book
volumes. Access to electronic resources and
services, the book collection, and general
information is through the Libraries web page
http://library.albany.edu/.
The University Library contains the largest
collection of circulating volumes, the
Interactive Media Center, a collection of
computer hardware and software that support
the curriculum, and the Government
Documents Collection, a selective depository
for U.S. documents.
The New Library Building houses the M. E.
Grenander Department of Special Collections
and Archives and the Science Library.
The Dewey Graduate Library on the
Downtown Campus supports graduate research
in the fields of public affairs, public
administration and policy, criminal justice,
political science, social welfare and
information science and policy.
Undergraduate Bulletin 2003-2004
Information Technology Services (ITS)
provides technology systems and support for
the University community. Reporting to the
Office of the Chief Information Officer, ITS is
comprised of five units: Systems Management
and Operations, University Application
Development, Telecommunications and
Information Security, Client Support Services,
and Extended Learning.
ITS provides an extensive array of information
technology tools and services. To see an
overview of ITS supported services and
products available for faculty, staff and
students please refer to the ITS website at
www.albany.edu/its. On these pages you will
find information about email and LAN
services, ITS accounts, classroom facilities and
in general, technology services available to
members of the University community. Alerts
and notices of service interruptions, as well as
items of special interest are provided on the
web. From these pages you can also gather
more information about the ITS organization.
To learn more about our faculty and student
self-service web site MyUAlbany go to
www.albany.edu/myualbany. This is the
‘portal’ through which faculty and students
will access information in the student records
database. Students use MyUAlbany to enroll
in classes, add or drop classes, view their
academic record and update personal
information. Faculty can use MyUAlbany to
generate class roster, enter grades and view
advisee information.
The HelpDesk located in LC-27 is available to
assist with specific questions about
technology. The Help Desk can be contacted
by phone at 442-3700. Faculty and staff can
direct email questions to [email protected];
students can send email to Student HelpDesk
at [email protected]
U-Kids Child Care Center: U-Kids Child Care
Center is a satellite of Campus Children’s
Center, Inc. and is located on UAlbany’s
Uptown Campus. Its mission is to provide the
University community with the highest quality
care. The Center provides a diverse,
educational, friendly, nutritional, and safe
environment that meets the needs of its
children. The Center’s atmosphere encourages
children to learn through discovery, providing
care with concern for each individual child’s
needs, interests, and ability levels. Qualities of
independence and interdependence are
fostered as the children are guided through a
program rich with stimulating learning centers
and creative activities. A special emphasis is
made to foster these qualities in a culturally,
socially,
and
economically
diverse
environment.
The Center operates Monday through Friday
from 7:30 a.m. until 5:30 p.m. For further
information, please call 518-442-2660, or
write to U-Kids Child Care Center, 1400
Washington Avenue, Dutch Quad, Albany,
NY 12222.
“JUST COMMUNITY”
PRINCIPLES:
“The University at Albany, State University of
New York, is an academic community
dedicated to the ideals of justice. A university
is above all a place where intellectual life is
central and where faculty, staff, and students
strive together for excellence in the pursuit of
knowledge. It is a particular kind of
community with special purposes. Moreover,
this academic community, if it is to support
our broader ideals, must also be just.
“There is no definitive theory of justice. The
differences in these theories are to be
respected. However, among all democratic
theories of justice, the principles of equality
and liberty are basic. These principles are no
less central to a free university.
“In a just community, the dignity of the
individual and respect for diversity are
fundamental. Members of a just community
are committed to raising awareness of common
ground and to the principles of respect,
integrity, innovation, openness, justice and
responsibility.
“Equality is a necessary part of any university
that claims to be a democratic institution.
Distinctions based on irrelevant differences are
ruled out. Ascriptive characteristics including
but not limited to race, religion, gender, class,
disability, ethnic background, sexual orientation,
age or disability determine neither the value of
individuals nor the legitimacy of their views.
Only the merit of the individual as a participant
in the life of the academic community is worthy
of consideration. Bigotry in any form is
antithetical to the University’s ideals on
intellectual political, and moral grounds and
must be challenged and rejected.
“Liberty is an equally precious academic
principle because the free expression of ideas is
the central part of university life. To sustain the
advancement and dissemination of knowledge
and understanding, the University must allow
the free expression of ideas, no matter how
outrageous. Protecting speech in all its forms,
however, does not mean condoning all ideas or
actions. The University sets high standards for
itself and denounces the violation of these
standards in unequivocal terms. Harassment and
other behavior that intrudes upon the rights of
others is unacceptable and subject to action
under the guidelines of the institution.
“There is no guarantee that the principles of
justice, once stated, are realized. The
University must constantly remind itself that
its mission and ethos must evolve within the
context of justice. A just community is always
on guard against injustice, always struggling to
move closer to the ideals of justice, always
asserting its dedication to justice. The
3
University at Albany
assertion of justice takes place in every part of
the community: in the classroom, the lecture
hall, the library, the residence hall, wherever
members of the University come together. It is
the responsibility of all faculty, staff and
students to keep the ideals of justice
uppermost in the minds of the members of the
University so that they may be achieved.”
(Approved 1990; revised April 3, 2001 –
University Senate)
KEY DATES
1844 Founded as the New York State
Normal School
1909 Downtown campus opened
1935 First residence halls opened, Pierce
and Sayles
1962 Designated SUNY University Center
1967 Uptown campus opened
1976 Renamed University at Albany
1983 NYS Writers Institute established
1992 Recreation and Convocation Center
opened
1996 University Foundation acquires new
East Campus for School of Public Health,
biotechnology and high-tech start-up
businesses
For more information concerning the rich
history, traditions and achievements of the
University at Albany, please visit the
University’s web page:
www.albany.edu
UNDERGRADUATE
ADMISSIONS
Admission to the University is based on
evidence of high school graduation or the
equivalent, quality of high school program
record of achievement, and desirable personal
characteristics without regard to age, sex, race,
color, creed, disability, marital status, or
national origin. The University welcomes
inquiries from qualified high school students,
students interested in transferring from another
college or university, and adults who wish to
begin or resume their undergraduate program.
Students who wish to obtain additional
information about the University or the
admission processes and policies described
below should call 518-442-5435 or write the
Undergraduate Admissions Office,
Administration Building, Room 101,
University at Albany, State University of New
York, 1400 Washington Avenue, Albany, New
York 12222 or e-mail at
[email protected]
Group information sessions and tours are
available 7 days a week when classes are in
session. Please call (or e-mail) the Admissions
Office to make arrangements.
Application Procedure: Admission to most
programs is granted for the fall, spring, and
summer terms. Application materials are
available in the fall preceding any of these
admission dates. Application forms are
available in all New York State high schools
and State University of New York two- and
four-year colleges. The University at Albany’s
application is a two part process. Once a
candidate submits a completed Part I the
Admissions office will send a supplemental
form (Part II) to be completed by the
applicant. The Part II requests subjective
information and an essay which provides the
admissions committee with additional
information about the candidate.
Applications are also available by contacting
the Admissions Office.
Interviews: A personal interview is not
required as part of the admissions process. In
exceptional cases, those for whom the
interview is required will be notified by letter.
Admissions Requirements:
The following information relates to
the requirements for specific
applicants.
4
Freshman Admission
The undergraduate program is designed for
students with well-defined interests or career
objectives, as well as for those who wish to
explore a variety of fields before deciding on a
major. All accepted students are admitted to
the University and are enrolled in an open
major, (undeclared), or they can declare a
business major.
High School Preparation: Candidates for
admission must present a minimum of 18 units
from high school acceptable to the University.
A college preparatory program is required with
the following considerations: Two (2) units of
mathematics must be presented by all
candidates, including elementary algebra and
at least one (1) additional unit of academic
mathematics, or their equivalents. At least
three (3) units of academic mathematics,
including trigonometry, should be presented
by all candidates who plan to pursue a major
in mathematics, the sciences, business
administration, or public accounting. At least
two (2) units of laboratory science are
desirable for all candidates. Foreign language
study is desirable for all candidates. A
concentrated study in one foreign language is
particularly recommended for all students
planning to pursue a B.A. degree program.
Admission Decision: The decision on an
application for admission will be based on the
following:
High School Record Since academic
performance in high school is considered to be
the best predictor of academic success, the
high school record will be examined in light of
one’s overall high school average as reported
by the secondary school, courses taken, endof-course Regents Examination grades and
average (for New York State residents), and
rank in class. Acceptance is granted upon
satisfactory completion of three years of high
school. An acceptance is conditional upon
continued success in the fourth year, proof of
graduation, and the submission of a complete
and satisfactory medical form to the Student
Health Service. Standardized Test Scores. In
addition to an evaluation of an applicant’s
high school record, the University also uses
the SAT or ACT standardized test results.
(Special tests are available for handicapped
applicants. Also, Albany has alternate
admissions criteria for handicapped applicants
who are unable to take the required tests.)
Standardized Test Policy: In all categories of
admission, standardized test scores are
considered as merely one of several academic
variables used in the decision making process.
Standardized test scores are used in concert
with high school average, the quality of the
academic program, and the student’s rank in
class.
Undergraduate Bulletin 2003-2004
The University at Albany will use the highest
verbal and mathematics score from the SAT to
insure that these scores, in most cases, will
benefit the applicant in the admissions process.
The University realizes that standardized test
scores represent the results of a test battery
taken on a single day, while the high school
record of an applicant represents academic
commitment and achievement over a period of
three years. The Office of Undergraduate
Admissions is aware of this difference and
incorporates it into the decision making
process. Questions about the use of
standardized tests at the University may be
directed to the Office of Undergraduate
Admissions at 1-800-293-SUNY.
The University generally receives these scores
on computer tapes directly from the exam
sponsors, and matches them to other
application data. Each applicant is encouraged,
therefore, to have the results released to us by
the exam sponsors. These are to be received in
the admissions office generally by mid
February.
Recommendations of the applicant’s counselor,
teacher, and/or employer are welcome, but
generally are not required. However, counselor
comments that will assist the Admissions Office
in its review of the academic credentials should,
of course, be submitted.
Note: A decision as to admissibility cannot be
made until all required materials are submitted.
Although it is the responsibility of the
applicant to see that all required credentials are
submitted on time, the Admissions Office does
send a reminder concerning missing
credentials.
Non-Binding Early Action Policy:
The University at Albany no longer offers the
traditional Early Decision program but rather a
much more equitable early notification option
referred to as the non-binding Early Action
program.
This new option allows students to hear from
all the schools to which they apply as well as
receive their financial aid notices before
having to make a decision on which institution
to select for their undergraduate program.
Presidential Scholars Program:
The Presidential Scholars Program is designed
to recognize and nurture outstanding students;
it offers participants the chance to study with
other highly qualified undergraduates.
Scholars may participate in the Honors
Tutorials of the General Education Honors
Program during their freshman and sophomore
years.
To be considered for the program, students
must first apply for admission to the
University at Albany. Students with the
strongest academic credentials are then invited
to participate in the Presidential Scholars
program. Invitations are based on the
applicants’ high school performance and
combined SAT scores. For further information
regarding the program, contact the Director of
Undergraduate Admissions at 518-442-5435
or 1-800-293-7869.
Frederick Douglass
Scholars Program:
The Frederick Douglass Scholars Program is
designed to provide direct aid funding for
undergraduate students who have
demonstrated high academic achievement and
are from underrepresented minority groups.
Scholars may participate in the honors tutorials
of the General Education Honors Program
during their freshman and sophomore years.
The program is limited to undergraduates who
are members of historically underrepresented
minorities (African American/Black, Hispanic,
Native American, or Alaskan American)
including permanent resident aliens, enrolled
in a degree program who have demonstrated
high academic achievement.
The University at Albany’s non-binding Early
Action option allows students to apply to as
many institutions as they wish and students
admitted under this program need not finalize
their enrollment decision until May 1st. The
non-binding Early Action program has an
application deadline of November 15th, and
candidates meeting this deadline may expect
an admission decision before the first of the
year.
For further information, contact the Dean of
Undergraduate Studies, LC 30 (518-4423950).
Candidates who wish to receive an early
notification from the University at Albany must
submit a completed application along with their
$40.00 fee to the SUNY processing center and
indicate on the application their intent to participate
in the Early Action program at Albany. They must
submit an official high school transcript and their
SAT or ACT test scores. Further, it is recommended
they complete and return to the Admissions Office
Part II of the Undergraduate application as soon as
possible.
Talented Student Admission Program: A
limited number of the total new freshman
spaces are set aside for freshman applicants
possessing an exceptional talent and/or
extraordinary ability in a given area. The
minimum academic criteria for consideration
has been set at an eleventh-grade cumulative
average of 80 and rank in the top one-half of
one’s high school class at the end of grade 11,
as well as SAT/ACT results deemed acceptable
by the University. The quality of special talent
possessed by an applicant will be assessed and
established by the participating department,
Special Admission
Freshman applicants who do not meet the
traditional admissions requirements should be
aware that admission may be possible through
special admissions programs. Such programs
are outlined briefly here.
and admissibility will be determined through a
combined review by the department and the
Admissions Office. Information concerning
this option is sent to traditional freshman
applicants upon receipt of the formal
application.
Multicultural Student Admission Program:
Students may be eligible for admission to the
University through this special admissions
program. The minimum academic criteria for
consideration has been set at an eleventh-grade
cumulative average of 85 and/or rank in the
top one-half of one’s high school class at the
end of grade 11, as well as SAT/ACT results
deemed acceptable by the University.
Additionally, an autobiographical essay and
recommendations may be required to assess a
candidate’s background and life experiences
and to determine potential for success at the
University.
Interested students of color are urged to apply
early. Contact the Director of Admissions for
more detailed information on the multicultural
student admission program.
Educational Opportunities Program (EOP):
Freshman and transfer applicants judged to
have high capabilities and motivation for
college study, yet whose financial, cultural,
and social backgrounds have not allowed them
to compete effectively for regular admission to
the University, may be admitted into the EOP
program. All students must have earned a high
school diploma or its equivalent. Admission to
the program is based on high school
performance, recommendations, and a formal
assessment of financial eligibility according to
legislated guidelines.
Support services available to accepted EOP
students include developmental courses in the
basic skills areas, such as reading, study skills,
English, mathematics, and developmental
science; academic and personal counseling;
tutoring; and financial assistance. Students
carry a full load of regular and/or basic skill
courses and are considered full-time
University students.
The application procedure should begin as
early as possible so that academic and
financial evaluations, recommendations, and
other arrangements can be completed well
before the student wishes to begin study.
Transfers are eligible for EOP admission only
if they have been enrolled previously in an
EOP, HEOP, College Discovery, SEEK, or
EOP-type program elsewhere and meet all
other transfer requirements.
Other Special Admissions: In addition to the
special programs described previously, the
Director of Admissions is authorized, in the
limited number of cases of applicants judged
to possess unusual maturity or valuable life
experiences, to apply flexible subjective
standards of admission rather than the usual
objective, competitive standards.
5
University at Albany
Early Admission (Admission Prior to
High School Graduation)
The University is willing to enroll a limited
number of early admission students. The
guidelines for admission require the following:
Each applicant will be required to present a
minimum of 18 units of high school course
work acceptable to the University, including
laboratory science, mathematics, and foreign
language study. It is expected that these
students will have pursued both an enriched
and accelerated secondary school program and
will present courses in keeping with their
expressed goals in the college program.
Each applicant must have achieved at an
outstanding level, generally considered to be
in the area of a 90 percent or better high
school average, with a corresponding rank in
class within the top 10 percent. Those
applicants who do not meet these qualitative
guidelines must present convincing evidence
that they possess a special talent and/or
extraordinary ability in their chosen field of
study.
Each applicant must present standardized
admissions test results at or above the 90th
percentile.
The high school guidance counselor must
support the applicant’s request for “early
admission” and must certify to the school’s
willingness to grant the high school diploma
upon successful completion of the freshman
year. Courses necessary for fulfilling high
school graduation requirements must be so
designated by that counselor, and the student
must agree to pursue such course work during
the freshman year.
Transfer Admission
A sizable number of undergraduates transfer into
the University from other colleges and universities
each year. The University welcomes applications
from all students who are completing work at other
two- and four-year colleges. To be favorably
considered one should have at least an overall C+
(2.5) average for all college work attempted. The
cumulative average necessary for admission will
vary, depending on the program and the
quantitative background of the applicant.
Admission to certain programs (majors) is
competitive and is based not only on a required
grade point average (GPA) but also on completion
of a certain set of prerequisite core courses. The
required GPA varies from year to year but generally
a B is required for applicants to the accounting,
business administration, criminal justice, and social
welfare programs. GPA’s are computed using
grades earned in all courses attempted. Applicants
who lack in their high school program the
mathematics requirement and other
recommendations described in the section entitled
“High School Preparation” should ensure their
college course work has satisfied any deficiencies.
6
Undergraduate Bulletin 2003-2004
Students enrolled in EOP or EOP-type
programs at other colleges are encouraged to
apply for transfer admission to our EOP
program.
In addition to submitting the basic application
and supplement form, transfer applicants must
also submit official transcripts of all work
taken at any college or university since high
school graduation, whether or not they expect
to receive transfer credit. Where only one
transcript is offered, such a transcript should
include at least one year’s grades. Transfers
may be admitted also on the basis of one
semester of college course work, provided
their high school preparation meets the
quantitative and qualitative requirements for
freshman admission. The transfer applicant is
not expected to take an admissions
examination. A decision as to admissibility
cannot be made until the previously noted
items are submitted. If there are gaps in your
educational sequence, you will be asked to
provide a brief list of your activities during
that period.
Minority students (African-American,
Hispanics, and Native Americans) who wish to
transfer from other colleges and universities
are especially encouraged to apply. Contact the
Director of Admissions for more information.
An estimate of the total number of credits
accepted for transfer will be made when
admission is granted. When the student
registers for the first time, he or she will be
provided with a tentative evaluation of course
credits. The tentative evaluation is subject to
final approval and modification following the
initial advisement and programming session.
Transfer students are strongly urged to take
advantage of the Planning Conference where a
review of the evaluation of course work is
offered.
TRANSFER GRADES: Courses
are accepted for
transfer credit provided that a grade of C- or
higher has been achieved.
a) For students who matriculated before Fall
2000, credit earned with a grade of D or the
lowest passing grade will transfer only if
such credit is balanced by a B or A at the
same institution. D grades earned in courses
within the major/minor must be balanced by
grades of B or A earned within the
major/minor at the same institution.
b) For students who matriculate Fall 2000
through Summer 2001, prematriculation
credit earned with a grade of D or the lowest
passing grade will transfer only if such credit
is balanced by a B or A at the same
institution. D grades earned in courses
within the major/minor must be balanced by
grades of B or A earned within the
major/minor at the same institution.
Postmatriculation credit graded D will not
transfer.*
c) For students who matriculate Fall 2001 and
thereafter, no credit graded D from another
institution will transfer.*
* Except for the University’s writing
requirements, for which a grade of C or
higher or S is required, transfer work graded
D+, D or D- in a course that applies to one
or more of the University’s General
Education requirements may be applied
toward fulfilling the requirements, even if
the student receives no graduation credit for
the course.
All transfer applicants are strongly encouraged
to indicate the major they plan to pursue once
admitted to the University. Since Albany
students, with few exceptions, are required to
declare a major by the time they have
accumulated 42 graduation credits, and may
declare a major after accumulating 24
graduation credits, incoming transfer students
with 24 or more credits are usually assigned to
major departmental advisers for their initial
programming. The prospective transfer student
should consult the section of this bulletin
entitled “Declaration of Major” for a list of
those majors that have specific restrictions,
and then consult the departmental description
of the admission requirements for that
program.
The transfer student’s designated class
standing (class year) is determined by the
number of credits accepted for transfer (see the
“Class Standing” section of this bulletin).
However, for many majors (combined
major/minors in the sciences, for example)
over all class standing should not be construed
to mean that the student is necessarily on
schedule within the major/minor sequence.
This is especially true for students who
transfer to the University from technical and
applied programs, or for those who change
major interest and/or career goals at the time of
transfer, as well as for those who will apply to
a Teacher Education Program.
The prospective transfer student should
examine closely those sections of this bulletin
which deal with minor requirements, residence
requirements, the General Education
Requirements and with the Writing
Requirement. These are graduation
requirements in addition to those stipulated by
the major.
For the B.A. and B.S. degrees, a maximum of
64 transfer credits from two-year colleges or
schools may be applied toward the
baccalaureate degree requirements. The
maximum number of transfer credits from a
four year school or from a combination of twoand four-year schools is 90.
TRANSFER ARTICULATION
AGREEMENTS
The University at Albany has transfer
articulation agreements with a number of New
York State community colleges. Those
articulated programs provide the best possible
vehicle for transferring to the University
because they were designed to provide transfer
students with a course specific four semester
outline of courses, which not only best
prepares them for study on this campus, but
also serves to maximize their transferable
credits. Students attending the community
colleges where these agreements exist should
make early contact with their Transfer
Counseling Office for information and
guidance.
Please note that the University offers
prospective students the opportunity for joint
admissions with several SUNY community
colleges. Please see section on Joint
Admissions.
JOINT ADMISSIONS
Under the Joint Admissions Program, students
are admitted to the SUNY community college
and acknowledged by the University as first
year matriculants, with conditional acceptance
to the University after completion of their
Associate’s in Arts or Associate’s in Science
degree. Students are assured that if they
achieve the stipulated academic proficiency
and distribution requirements as detailed in the
Transfer Guide of the student’s first
institution, it will be possible to complete their
baccalaureate degree at the University at
Albany in four additional semesters (or
equivalent for part-time students). Candidates
selected for the program will receive a letter of
acknowledgement from the Director of
Admissions at the University at Albany.
Students accepted through the Joint
Admissions Program should work closely with
a transfer counselor at their community
college. The students in the Joint Admissions
Program are expected to enroll at the
University at Albany in the semester following
completion of the associate degree. Students
must confirm their intent to enroll at the
University by submitting a Joint Admissions
Supplemental Application and official
transcript to the transfer counselor at their
community college early in the semester
immediately prior to transfer to the University
at Albany. Students who enroll at a third
institution lose their automatic transfer and
must have their total academic record reviewed
for transfer consideration.
Requirements for the bachelor’s degree will be
those in effect at the time the student transfers
to the University.
7
University at Albany
Second Bachelor’s Degree:
The University encourages students who have
already earned a bachelor’s degree and/or an
advanced degree to pursue graduate studies in
virtually all instances. Occasionally, when
reasons can be demonstrated as to why a
second bachelor’s degree is preferred and
educationally sound, individuals could be
admitted as matriculated students to an
undergraduate program. In these limited cases,
such requests will be reviewed by the
Admissions Office in accordance with
regulations of the Undergraduate Policy
Manual.
Students who have been approved to obtain a
second bachelor’s degree from the University
at Albany must be admitted as a matriculated
student by the Office of Undergraduate
Admissions and must complete a minimum of
30 credit hours as a matriculated student in
residence at the University at Albany.
Admission as a
Nonmatriculated Student
The University at Albany may enroll
individuals who are not seeking admission into
an undergraduate degree program as
nonmatriculated. The minimum requirement
for non-degree admission is a high school
diploma. Visiting students from other colleges
as well as high school seniors may also apply
for non-degree study. All admissions falling
within this category are on a term-by-term
basis. Please refer to the Office of General
Studies section of this Bulletin for details.
College and University Students: see
next section, Office of General
Studies.
Admission of International
Students
Students who desire admission to the
undergraduate programs and are citizens of
other countries should begin the application
procedure as early as possible so that all
necessary arrangements can be completed
before the term begins. Special application
materials should be used by those who are
applying as international students. Early in the
preparation for admission, a careful
investigation of the financial requirements
should be made with the Admissions Office.
Students whose native language is other than
English are required to submit proof of
English language competency through
submission of the scores of the Test of English
as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) Exam
administered by the Educational Testing
Service, Princeton, New Jersey 08540.
It may be necessary to rescind an acceptance if
the University finds that a student is no longer
financially independent to the extent certified
on the formal application.
8
Medical Record
After acceptance and prior to registration, each
candidate will be required to file with the
Student Health Service a complete and
satisfactory medical record.
Credit by Examination
Students may be granted advanced placement
and/or credit at any time that they can
demonstrate the requisite proficiency. The
programs described here represent a variety of
opportunities for receiving credit for college
courses by examination prior to or while
enrolled at the University. Some of the testing
programs offer examinations in the same or
similar academic areas. Duplicating
examinations, like duplicating courses, should
be avoided. Credit for a course by examination
will be awarded only once, regardless of how
many different exams for the same course are
taken. As a matter of policy, the first
examination pursued takes precedence over
subsequent tests.
Advanced Placement Tests: The University
grants advanced placement and/or credit to
qualified participants in the College Entrance
Examination Board’s Advanced Placement
(AP) Examination Program. Current
University policy is to award advanced
placement with credit to those students with a
score of 5, 4, or 3 on the AP examination.
Information about AP can be obtained from a
student’s high school guidance counselor or by
writing to the Director, Advanced Placement
Program, College Entrance Examination
Board, 45 Columbus Avenue, New York, New
York 10023.
College-Level Examination Program: The
College Entrance Examination Board has
developed a program containing Subject
Examinations and General Examinations
known as the College-Level Examination
Program (CLEP). This program enables
individuals who have acquired their education
in nontraditional ways to demonstrate their
academic achievement.
The University at Albany participates in the
CLEP program and currently will award credit
and/or placement for Subject Examinations
and General Examinations
i. that are equivalent to courses currently
acceptable for transfer to the University at
Albany, and
ii. on which the student has scored at or
above the 50th percentile (i.e., equivalent to
the grade of C.)
Students seeking to gain CLEP credit should
be aware that the following three (3)
restrictions apply:
First, CLEP credit will not be awarded to
students who have satisfactorily completed a
course and then pass a CLEP examination
covering substantially the same material.
Second, CLEP credit will not be awarded for
CLEP examinations if the student has
satisfactorily completed more advanced
courses in the same field.
Third, since the General Examinations and
Subject Examinations are designed to test
lower-division study, students who have
completed either their sophomore year
and/or 56 credits of undergraduate study
cannot earn credits from either the General
Examinations or the Subject Examinations.
EXCEPTIONS:
A student seeking an exception
to this policy must petition the Dean of
Undergraduate Studies. In that petition, the
student must include an explicit
recommendation from the academic
department that grants the credits. In
addition, the student must provide a
compelling educational rationale detailing
the reasons why an exception should be
considered.
NOTE: This policy applies to all
students who matriculate at the
University at Albany in Fall 1999 and
thereafter.
Further information concerning CLEP can be
obtained either from the Admissions Office at
this University or by contacting the Program
Director, College-Level Examination Program,
Box 6600, Princeton, NJ 08541-6600.
The International
Baccalaureate
A secondary education program with origins in
Europe, the International Baccalaureate
Program now being offered in some American
high schools is an upper-secondary-level
program with a core curriculum and
distribution requirements leading to a diploma
or one or more certificates of examination.
Similar to the British “A Level” examinations
and the French Baccalaureate, the IB program
is a system of syllabuses, or course
descriptions, and examinations based on the
concept that general education at the uppersecondary-level should encompass the
development of all the main powers of the
mind through which a person interprets,
modifies, and enjoys the environment.
With these principles in mind, an international
group of educators has designed a program
which requires that each student become
proficient in language and mathematics, the
two most important tools of communication
and analysis; become familiar with at least one
subject that exemplifies the study of human
behavior and with another that involves
scientific inquiry; develop an acquaintance
with aesthetic and moral values; engage in
creative, aesthetic, social service, or physical
activities; and participate in a common course
that reflects upon the truth, criteria, values,
and inter-relations of the subjects under study.
Undergraduate Bulletin 2003-2004
The six areas studied at the eleventh- and
twelfth-grade level in the American high
schools which employ the program are
(1) Language A (first language);
(2) Language B (second language);
(3) Study of Man;
(4) Experimental Science;
(5) Mathematics;
(6) Art, Music, Classical Language.
A seventh course known as Theory of
Knowledge is also included, and through it
each student engages in creative, aesthetic, or
social activities.
Three of the six subjects have to be offered at
the Higher Level and three at the Subsidiary
Level. Courses are graded on a scale from 0 to
7. The University at Albany will consider for
credit and/or placement on a course-by-course
evaluation those IB subjects completed at the
Higher Level in which a score from 4
(satisfactory) to 7 (excellent) is earned.
Because of the comprehensive nature of the
courses in the IB program, and since it has
been the University’s experience that exact
course equivalents are difficult to identify,
credit is generally awarded on an elective
basis.
United States Armed Forces
Institute/Defense Activity for
Nontraditional Education
Support
The United States Armed Forces Institute
(USAFI), an educational division of the
Department of Defense, once provided
educational opportunities at various levels for
personnel on active duty with all branches of
the military. College-level courses culminated
in USAFI Subject Standardized Tests and
End-of-Course Tests.
In 1974, in an administrative move, the
Department of Defense discontinued the
USAFI program and created the DANTES
program, which is very similar in nature and
purpose to USAFI. The guidelines used for
USAFI courses are also used for the DANTES
program.
The University will award appropriate credit
for Subject Standardized Tests on which a
percentile score of 50 or higher was earned
and for End-of-Course Tests for which a rating
of S (Satisfactory) or D (with Distinction) was
assigned, provided the courses are considered
equivalent to courses currently acceptable for
transfer to this University. Information on
acceptable courses, score levels, and amounts
of credit can be obtained from the Admissions
Office.
Credit for Work Done at Noncollegiate
Institutions
In 1974, the New York State Education
Department (SED) began a systematic
evaluation of the formal learning experiences
sponsored by noncollegiate institutions; that is,
organizations whose primary focus is not
education. They include private industry,
professional associations, labor unions,
voluntary associations, and government
agencies. The publication A Guide to
Educational Programs in Noncollegiate
Organizations describes the available courses
offered by each organization and includes
SED’s credit recommendation.
The University will award transfer credit for
work done through noncollegiate institutions
if:
1. The course is listed in A Guide to
Educational Programs in Noncollegiate
Organizations
2. The course meets all present criteria and
standards for transferability, is comparable
to a University at Albany offering, and is
collegiate in nature
3. The course is approved by the appropriate
University academic department, school, or
college
Requests for transfer credit should be made
initially to the Office of Undergraduate
Admissions. The student making the request
must provide the Admissions Office with a
course syllabus, an extended course outline,
and any other supplementary material on the
course that might be required by the academic
department, school, or college. If a course
receives departmental approval, it will
generally be eligible for transfer credit in the
future, but will be subject to periodic review
by the approving department, college, or
school.
Readmission Procedure
A former student who wishes to be readmitted
as an undergraduate should refer to the section
on readmission policies and procedures under
“Undergraduate Academic Regulations.”
O FFICE OF
G ENERAL
S TUDI ES
Non-degree Status
The Office of General Studies offers
extraordinary educational value by allowing
admission into almost all undergraduate
courses offered at the University for academic
credit. General Studies applicants must be high
school graduates or hold a high school
equivalency diploma and must be in good
academic standing for any college work done
during the 12 months prior to registration.
General Studies applicants can also be degreeseeking students from a college or university
other than Albany. Finally, General Studies
applicants may be high school seniors who
excel in their high school coursework.
Any student who was formerly matriculated at
the University at Albany who has not received
a baccalaureate degree is not permitted to
register through General Studies and should
refer to the section in this bulletin on
Readmission Procedures.
Individuals who already have a baccalaureate
or higher degree may also register in
undergraduate credit courses as a non-degree
student through the Office of General Studies.
However, those wishing to obtain a second
bachelor’s degree must be admitted as a
matriculated student by Undergraduate
Admissions in order to comply with the 30
credit hour in-residence policy. Credit hours
earned in General Studies may not apply
towards this requirement.
Admission Information
The Office of General Studies normally
requires a campus visit to complete a simple
application and registration process each term.
Since non-degree applicants may be American
citizens, permanent residents or nonresident
aliens, this office requires that nonresident
aliens visit the Office of International
Education to obtain written authorization to be
admitted and registered prior to visiting our
office.
General Studies Students:
Those wishing to register for undergraduate
courses but who are not currently attending
school (high school or college) may apply for
admission through the Office of General
Studies. The applicant must possess at least a
high school diploma or the equivalent in order
to be admitted.
9
University at Albany
Visiting Students:
College students wishing to register for
undergraduate coursework and that are from
an institution other than the University at
Albany may apply for admission through the
Office of General Studies as a visiting student.
Visiting students are expected to return to their
home college or university to complete their
degree program. It is the visiting students’
responsibility to ensure that the coursework
taken at Albany will transfer back to their
home institution and be credited to their
degree program at their home school. The
Registrar’s Office will provide verification of
visitor status to officials at the students’ home
institution in order to assist them in the credit
approval and/or financial aid certification.
High School Students:
Students who attend school in the Albany area
and who are in good standing can undertake
University course work on a part-time,
nonmatriculated basis concurrent with their
grade 12 secondary school program. Summer
coursework between grades 11 and 12 is also
allowable. High school students should apply
for non-degree study through the Office of
General Studies.
To apply, the visiting high school
student must:
--obtain a Visiting High School Student
Application from the Office of General
Studies.
--attach to the application a current high
school transcript.
--attach written support from the guidance
counselor, who will be expected to:
attest to the student’s emotional and
intellectual readiness for college coursework
state rank within the student’s class
report standardized test results (preferably
PSAT or SAT scores, but Regents grades and
other testing results will suffice) which
indicate that the student can reasonably be
expected to compete academically with
university students.
--Meet any and all stated prerequisites for the
course(s) in question.
-- Home-schooled students are bound by the
same guidelines as visiting high school
students.
Registration Information
Upon admission, non-degree students can
review course selections with an academic
adviser who is available in the Office of
General Studies. The non-degree adviser may
guide students through general inquiries.
However, program specific questions or those
regarding possible matriculation criteria
should be directed to the appropriate offices.
10
All course prerequisites and any other special
criteria or restrictions for course registration
apply to General Studies students. Evidence of
previous college coursework may be required
for registration.
Upon completion of initial admission or
readmission, the University’s web-based
registration system will become available for
use for all non-degree students. This system
will enable students to register or perform any
schedule adjustments they may require. Prior
to using the registration system, students must
obtain an Advisement Verification Number
(AVN) from the Office of General Studies.
There are two academic semesters (fall and
spring) each year, and a summer session.
Students are encouraged to early register for
the coming term, which can occur as early as
March for the summer and fall terms and
October for the spring semester. Admission
and registration is done on a first-come, firstserved basis and enrollment is limited.
A General Studies student who fails to
complete the courses in which he/she is
enrolled and to maintain a 2.0 cumulative
grade point average each semester may be
subject to dismissal. After a student has
accrued or attempted nine or more credits as a
General Studies student, the University
reserves the right to rescind continued
enrollment privileges for failure to maintain
sufficient academic progress which shall be
defined as falling below a 2.0 cumulative
grade point average or not completing
coursework enrolled for. Continued enrollment
may be considered on the basis of submission
of an academic plan provided by the student
and approved by either the Director of General
Studies or the Dean of Undergraduate Studies.
Matriculation to Degree Status
Each year, many General Studies students
apply for admission to degree programs and
are accepted by the Undergraduate Admissions
Office. Credits earned as a nonmatriculated
student may be applied toward graduation
requirements for specific majors.
Requirements for admission to specific majors
vary from department to department (see
appropriate academic department listings in
this bulletin).
Applicants must apply to the University
formally through the Office of Undergraduate
Admissions in accordance with procedures
outlined in the Admissions section of this
bulletin. Applicants must submit official
transcripts from all other colleges previously
attended. Standardized admission test scores
are not required. Minimum requirements for
admission include a high school or
equivalency diploma and at least two units of
academic mathematics (see Transfer
Admissions section in this bulletin).
Services
The Office of General Studies staff admits and
registers students falling in the non-degree
status, offers basic advisement information,
assists students with withdrawals, conveys and
interprets University policies, regulations and
procedures, encourages and works with
nonmatriculated students in applying for
degree status and refers students to other
University offices and services. The General
Studies staff is strongly committed to the
needs and concerns of traditional as well as
nontraditional students and are available for
phone and in-person consultation at
convenient times throughout the year. Hours
and services are announced in the General
Studies newsletters and publications as well as
on the University website.
All General Studies students may obtain a
University identification card and are entitled
to many of the same privileges as other
University students, including use of the
libraries, athletic facilities and campus
services.
Location
The Office of General Studies is joined with
Summer Sessions and is called the Office of
General Studies and Summer Sessions. This
office is located on the University’s main
campus in LI 85. The office can be accessed
via the stairway between the Library and the
Business Administration Building or the
stairway in front of the Library’s main
entrance.
For more information on non-degree study,
visit, write or call the Office of General
Studies and Summer Sessions, LI 85, 1400
Washington Avenue, Albany, NY 12222;
phone: (518) 442-5140; fax: (518) 442-5149;
e-mail: [email protected]
Undergraduate Bulletin 2003-2004
F INANCI AL
AID
The University at Albany is committed to the
concept of helping students obtain the
resources necessary to meet their educational
expenses. A variety of grants, loans, and
student
employment
opportunities
are
available from various sources. The
application procedures and descriptions of the
various types of financial aid included in this
section were accurate at the time of
publication. It should be kept in mind that
financial aid programs are frequently modified
by legislation.
Most student financial assistance is awarded
on the basis of financial need. Simply stated,
financial need is:
Estimated Cost of Education (Student Expense
Budget)
-Expected Family Contribution (EFC)
=Financial Need
The total cost of attendance is called a student
expense budget, and is an estimate of the
student’s direct and indirect educational
expenses for an academic year. Direct
expenses are tuition, fees, room and meals for
students who live on campus and only tuition
for students living off campus. The budgets
also include allowances for estimated expenses
for books and supplies, personal items,
transportation, and living expenses for offcampus students. Several different budgets are
used to take differences among students into
consideration. The following are examples of
two budgets used to determine eligibility
during the 2003-2004 academic year:
Student Expense Budgets 2003-2004
Dependent Student Independent Student
Living On campus
Living Off campus
Tuition and Fees $ 4,820
$ 4,820
Room and Board* $ 6,923
NA
Living Expenses
NA
$10,280
Books
$800
$800
Personal/Travel
1,542
NA
Total
$14,085
$15,900
*Institutional charges subject to change every year.
Out-of-state tuition is an additional $4900 for
full-time undergraduate students.
The Expected Family Contribution (EFC)
towards educational expenses is computed
from the information students and, if
applicable, their families provided on the Free
Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA).
The EFC is shown on the Student Aid Report
(SAR) sent to applicants after the FAFSA has
been processed by the federal processor.
APPLICATION PROCEDURE
STUDY ABROAD
DEADLINES
Students who plan to participate in a SUNY
Study Abroad program are eligible to receive
financial aid. No special application is
required, but students are required to submit a
letter of acceptance into a Study Abroad
program along with an estimate of program
costs. Students who plan to participate in a
program at an institution outside the SUNY
system will be required to submit, in addition,
a consortium agreement (available from the
Office of Financial Aid) and a transfer credit
permission form (available from academic
advisers). These students will be eligible to
receive federal financial aid and may be
eligible to receive State of New York
assistance.
The University has established February 1,
2004, as the final deadline for the submission
of the 2003-2004 FAFSA information to the
federal processor for the 2003-2004 academic
year. In addition, the Office of Financial Aid
must receive a valid Student Aid Report by
March 15, 2004. The Office of Financial Aid
will not process FAFSA information received
after these deadlines.
NEW STUDENTS
New students must be accepted for admission
to the University prior to being considered for
financial aid. In order to receive priority
consideration for assistance administered by
the University, all information required by the
Admissions Office should be submitted on a
timely basis. In addition, students wishing to
apply for financial aid should submit the
following forms:
1. The FAFSA is the only form that initially
must be submitted to be considered for
financial assistance at the University. It should
be completed and submitted to the federal
processor as soon as possible after January 1
regardless of whether or not the applicant has
heard from the Admissions Office.
2. New York State residents will receive an
Express TAP Application (ETA) from the New
York State Higher Education Services
Corporation about one month after submitting
the FAFSA if a New York State institution was
listed on the FAFSA. The ETA should be
submitted after the student has determined the
institution he or she plans to attend in the fall.
3. Students who have been awarded a Federal
Stafford Loan and accepted it on the award
letter returned to the Office of Financial Aid
will receive a Master Promissory Note (MPN)
in the mail sometime early in the summer. This
form must be completed before borrowers can
receive the proceeds of the loan.
The Office of Financial Aid will begin making
awards to new students accepted for admission
beginning in January or February. Awards are
made on a rolling basis throughout the spring
and summer as financial aid files become
complete.
RETURNING STUDENTS
The FAFSA or Renewal FAFSA must be filed
each year a student wishes to be considered for
financial assistance. The Renewal FAFSA will
be sent in December or January each year to
any student who applied for aid the prior year.
The deadline for submitting the form in order
to receive priority consideration for aid is
usually in late April each year. New York State
residents who receive TAP may be required to
submit an ETA each year.
SUMMER STUDY
Students who plan to attend summer sessions
at the University at Albany are eligible to
receive financial aid. In order to be considered
for aid students must have filed the FAFSA for
the upcoming academic year and the
University at Albany Summer Information
Sheet, which is available from the Office of
Financial Aid.
VISITING STUDENTS
Visiting students not matriculated at the
University are not eligible for financial aid
from this institution.
CONDITIONS OF FINANCIAL
AID AWARDS
1. You should complete and return the original
of the award notice only if you plan to decline
any of the student financial aid offered to you.
2. Financial aid is awarded on an annual basis
and students must reapply each year by
submitting the Free Application for Federal
Student Aid (FAFSA) or renewal FAFSA or
by filing on line at www.fafsa.ed.gov. The
renewal form will be sent during the winter to
the address you put on last year’s form.
Regular FAFSA forms are available in this
office in January. The total amount of aid
offered may vary each year in relation to the
student’s financial need and available funds.
3. If requested, students, and, if dependent,
their families, should be prepared to submit
income and other documentation that may be
requested by the Office of Financial Aid.
Federal financial aid will not be credited to
your account until we receive the required
verification information. Do not send any
documentation unless it has been requested by
this office.
4. Typically, one-half of any financial aid
received by a student is credited to the
student’s account ten days prior to the
beginning of each semester or when funds
become available.
5. Students must make Satisfactory Academic
Progress towards their degrees in order to
continue receiving financial aid. Under certain
circumstances, students may be granted a
waiver of the progress requirements.
6. Amounts of aid from sources outside the
University are estimates, and are based on the
best information available to us. They do not
represent a guarantee of these funds by the
University.
7. Students must inform the University of any
student financial aid received from outside
sources that is not listed on the award letter.
This may result in an adjustment being made
to the financial aid package.
11
University at Albany
8. All students planning to receive Federal
Perkins Loans or Federal Stafford Loans must
have an entrance interview prior to the first
disbursement of loan proceeds. Stafford Loan
entrance interviews can be completed on the
Mapping Your Future website. Perkins Loan
recipients will be contacted by the Office of
Financial Aid or the Office of Student
Accounts regarding entrance interview
schedules.
9.
Students
whose
family financial
circumstances are adversely affected after
being awarded student financial aid should
visit with a financial aid counselor about the
situation. Depending on the circumstances, it
may be possible to increase the financial aid
award.
10. Students who wish to question a decision
made by the Office of Financial Aid should
send a letter of appeal to the Director of
Financial Aid.
INSTITUTIONAL AID
Institutional Scholarships
The Office of Financial Aid administers a
number
of
scholarships.
Eligibility
requirements and award amounts vary.
Scholarships offered by other departments are
listed elsewhere in this catalog.
University Honors Scholarships
The Admissions Office awards a number of
merit scholarships that are renewable for up to
four years of study. The maximum award is
currently $3,400 for in-state residents and
$5,500 for out-of-state residents, but is subject
to change each year. Recipients are selected on
the basis of high school grade point average
and SAT scores.
STATE FINANCIAL AID
Academic Criteria for State Awards
In order to retain eligibility for New York
State scholarship and grant awards, students
must be in “good academic standing”, which is
comprised of two components: “satisfactory
academic progress” and “pursuit of program”.
Satisfactory Academic Progress:
In order to make satisfactory progress towards
a degree, students must accrue graduation
credits each semester and have the cumulative
grade point average shown on the academic
progress chart in this section. Although the
academic progress standards allow ten
semesters for completion of a bachelor’s
degree, the maximum award period at the
undergraduate level is four years, except for
students enrolled in approved five-year degree
programs or the Educational Opportunity
Program.
12
Satisfactory Academic Progress Chart
New York State Grant and Scholarship
Programs
Before being certified for a semester’s
payment, a student must have accrued a certain
number of credits and have a minimum grade
point average at the end of the semester, as
shown in the following chart.
Payment
First
Second
Third
Fourth
Fifth
Sixth
Seventh
Eighth
Ninth
Tenth
Credits
0
3
9
18
30
45
60
75
90
105
Minimum GPA
0.00
0.50
0.75
1.20
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
Program Pursuit
In addition to meeting the criteria outlined on
the academic progress chart, State regulations
require students who receive New York State
awards to be enrolled on a full-time basis and
complete a minimum number of credits each
semester with grades of A, B, C, D, E, S, U, or
I. Students receiving a New York State award
for the first time must complete six credits
each semester the first year of receipt of an
award, nine credits each semester of the
second year, and a minimum of twelve credits
in semester of the third and fourth years.
Students who do not complete the minimum
number of credits in a given semester are
ineligible for New York State financial aid in
the following term or until additional credits
are completed to reach the minimum level.
Grades of “I” must be completed within one
semester to have the credits counted for New
York State grant and scholarship purposes.
Waivers of the Progress Standards
Students who fall below the minimum criteria
stated previously may be eligible to receive
one waiver of the satisfactory academic
progress or pursuit of program criteria during
their undergraduate career. In addition,
students who lose TAP eligibility because they
do not have a “C” average after receiving four
TAP payments may request a waiver of the
satisfactory academic progress standards.
Sufficient and documented reasons must be
presented for the student’s inability to meet the
minimum standards. Procedures for granting
waivers will follow University policies relating
to the appeals procedure for academic
dismissal from the University. If granted, the
waiver becomes part of the student’s financial
aid record and the student is expected to make
minimum progress thereafter.
New York State Grant and Scholarship
Programs
1. Tuition Assistance Program (TAP)
This grant program for New York State
residents who are full-time undergraduate
students currently provides for annual awards
ranging from $500 to $5,000 or tuition,
whichever is less. Awards are based on the
family’s New York State net taxable income. If
more than one member of the family is
attending an approved post secondary
educational institution on a full-time basis, the
net taxable income figure is reduced by $3,000
for the second person when the applicant’s
TAP award is computed and $2,000 for each
additional student.
Undergraduate students may receive TAP for
four years of full-time study. Students enrolled
in approved five-year programs or in State
sponsored opportunity programs may receive
undergraduate aid for five years. Graduate
students may receive awards for four years, but
no student may receive awards for more than a
total of eight years of undergraduate and
graduate study.
2. Vietnam Veterans/Persian Gulf
Veterans Tuition Awards
In order to be eligible for this award, a student
must have served in the United States armed
forces in Indochina between December 22,
1961 and May 7, 1975 or in the Persian Gulf
from August 2, 1990 to the end of such
hostilities as evidenced by the receipt of the
Southwest Asia Service Medal, been
discharged from the service under other than
dishonorable conditions, and be a New York
State residents. In addition, the recipient must
complete the appropriate award supplement,
which is available from the Office of Financial
Aid or the New York State Higher Education
Services Corporation, and apply for a Tuition
Assistance Program (TAP) award if a full-time
student or a Federal Pell Grant it a part-time
student. Full-time awards are $1,000 per
semester, and part-time awards are $500 per
semester or tuition, whichever is less. The total
of all awards received cannot exceed $10,000.
3. Regents Awards for Children of
Deceased and Disabled Veterans
New York State residents who are children of
certain deceased or disabled veterans will
receive $450 per year, regardless of need, to
attend institutions within New York State.
Applications are available from high schools
or the New York State Higher Education
Services Corporation. Questions should be
referred to your high school guidance
counselor.
4. Memorial Scholarships for children and
Spouses of Deceased Police Officers and
Firefighters
Undergraduate Bulletin 2003-2004
This award provides financial assistance to the
children and spouses of deceased police
officers, firefighters, and volunteer firefighters
who served in New York State and died of
injuries sustained in the line of duty.
Recipients must be full-time undergraduate
students. Those attending SUNY institutions
will receive scholarships that equal actual
tuition and room and board costs plus an
allowance
for
books,
supplies
and
transportation. The scholarship is reduced by
any federal Pell grant or other federal or statefunded scholarships or grants. Applications
and more information are available from the
New York State Higher Education Services
Corporation.
5. State Aid to Native Americans:
8. Aid for Part-Time Study (APTS)
This program provides tuition assistance to
undergraduate New York State residents
matriculated in a degree program and enrolled
for between three to eleven credits per
semester. The family New York State taxable
income cannot exceed $50,550 in the case of
dependent students and $34,250 if the student
is independent. Award amounts are determined
by the Office of Financial Aid and cannot
exceed tuition charges. Applications and
additional information are available from the
Office of Financial Aid.
9. New York National Guard Educational
Incentive Program
Applications and additional information about
this program are available from the Native
American Education Unit, New York State
Education Department, Albany, New York
12234. Applicants must be a member or the
child of a member of one of the Native
American Tribes in New York State, be a State
resident attending an institution within the
State, and have graduated from high school or
earned a General Equivalency Diploma. The
award is $1750 per year for up to five years of
full-time study. Students registered for less
than full-time study will receive approximately
$75 for each credit hour.
Members in good standing of the New York
State Army or Air National Guards or New
York State Naval Militia may receive
scholarships of up to the average SUNY
tuition rate to attend any SUNY or CUNY
institutions, any New York community
colleges or designated independent colleges.
The recipients must also be New York State
residents who are matriculated students in
good standing enrolled on at least a half-time
basis. All recipients must apply for Tuition
Assistance Program awards and federal Pell
grants. Additional information about the
program is available from National Guard unit
commanders.
6. Educational Opportunity Program
(EOP) Grant
10. Robert C. Byrd Honors Scholarship
New York State students who are educationally
and economically disadvantaged are admitted to
the University’s Educational Opportunity
Program (EOP) on the basis of their prospects for
academic success. The University’s program
enrolls more than 650 new and continuing
students each year. An applicant must be: (1) a
New York State resident; and (2) academically
disadvantaged
according
to
definitions
promulgated by the State University; and (3)
economically disadvantaged according to
guidelines approved by the Board of Regents and
the Director of the Budget. Selection of eligible
applicants is made by University at Albany
personnel in accordance with the New York State
regulations that govern the program. The amount
of financial assistance provided to eligible EOP
participants is dependent on financial need as
determined by the University and availability of
funds.
7. Regents Professional Opportunity
Scholarships
These scholarships provide up to $5,000 to
New York State residents studying in certain
fields leading to licensure in a profession
approved by the Regents of the State of New
York. Recipients must agree to practice their
profession in New York State for at least one
year. Preference is given to economically
disadvantaged students belonging to a
minority group underrepresented in the
professions. More information is available
from the New York State Education
Department, Bureau of Higher Education
Testing.
This competitive federal honors program
provides for scholarships of up to $1,500 per
year to academically talented high school
students who are New York residents. It is
renewable for up to four years. Minimum
eligibility criteria are a high school average of
95 and combined SAT scores of 1250 from the
same test administration.
11. New York State Scholarships for
Academic Excellence
This program provides renewable scholarship
assistance in the amount of $500 or $1,500 to
New York residents attending an institution
within the State. Awards are based on student
grades in certain Regents examinations.
12. Americorps Education Award
New York residents participating in an
Americorps program on a full-time basis (1700
hours of community service) will receive an
education award of $4,725 and may be eligible
to receive a living allowance, health insurance,
and child care. Part-time members who
complete 900 hours of service earn an
education award of $2,623 and in some cases
may receive a living allowance.
13. Leaders of Tomorrow Scholarship
This scholarship is sponsored by the New
York State Lottery and is applicable only to
tuition charges. It provides awards of $1,000
per year for four years of undergraduate study.
Potential recipients are nominated by their
high schools on the basis of academic
performance, participation in extracurricular
and community activities, and leadership
skills.
14. World Trade Center Memorial
Scholarships
This award provides financial assistance to the
children, spouses, and financial dependents of
deceased or severely and permanently disabled
victims of the September 11, 2001 terrorist
attacks or the subsequent rescue and recovery
operations. Undergraduates who are full-time
matriculated students enrolled in an approved
program in New York and meet requirements
for New York State grants and scholarships are
eligible. Recipients need not be New York
State residents or U.S. citizens to receive the
scholarship. The award covers up to four years
of full time undergraduate study and will pay
SUNY tuition and mandatory fees, actual room
and board charged to students living on
campus or an allowance for these items for
commuter students, and allowances for books,
supplies, and transportation. The scholarship is
reduced by any federal, state, or private
assistance awarded to the student to pay
educational expenses. Applications are
available at www.hesc.com.
FEDERAL FINANCIAL AID
Academic Eligibility Criteria for Federal
Awards
Federal regulations require students to make
satisfactory progress towards a degree in order
to receive any federal student aid, including
Federal Stafford Loans. Students may attempt
up to 150% of the credits normally required to
complete a baccalaureate degree and retain
eligibility for federal student aid. At the
University at Albany students must have
earned 120 graduation credits to receive a
Bachelor of Arts or Bachelor of Science
degree. Thus, student may attempt up to 180
credits and retain eligibility for federal student
aid; however, students must also complete a
percentage of credits attempted each year as
shown on the academic progress chart.
Transfer credits are considered to be attempted
credits for this purpose. Transfer students,
regardless of the number of transfer credits
accepted by the University, must complete a
minimum of 50% of credits attempted during
their first year at the university.
In addition, students must maintain a
satisfactory cumulative grade point average.
Academic retention standards are described in
the Undergraduate Academic Regulations
section of this bulletin. Students on probation
may be eligible to receive financial aid, but are
subject to the University’s policy regarding
review and dismissal for academic reasons.
Aid recipients on probation and those with less
than a “C” average at the end of their second
year of study or the equivalent will retain
eligibility for aid if they meet the requirements
shown on the academic progress chart and are
allowed to continue their studies at the
University.
Students who do not make satisfactory
progress will lose their eligibility for federal
student aid, but may appeal to the University
for a waiver if they feel there are special
circumstances that affected their ability to
make academic progress. Students receiving
waivers continue to be eligible for federal
financial aid for an additional semester or one
academic year, depending on individual
circumstances. Questions regarding academic
progress should be directed to the Office of
Financial Aid and/or the Office of the Dean of
Undergraduate Studies.
13
University at Albany
ACADEMIC PROGRESS CHART FOR
FEDERAL FINANCIAL AID
TITLE IV PROGRAMS
If Credits Attempted
Are Between:
3 - 30
31 - 60
61 - 90
91 - 120
120 – 150
151 – 180
Then the following
percentage of
Graduation Credits
Must Be Completed
30%
50%
60%
65%
70%
80%
Quantitative progress towards the degree will
be measured once each year, usually at the end
of the academic year. Students may restore
eligibility for federal aid when they meet the
standards shown on the chart.
3. Federal PLUS Loan
PLUS loans allow parents of dependent
students to borrow from participating banks or
other lenders up to the difference between the
student’s cost of education (the budget referred
to earlier) and any financial aid awarded to the
student. The loan is not automatic; a credit
check is required. Repayment of principal and
interest begins within 60 days of receipt of the
loan. The interest rate is variable on an annual
basis and may range from about 4% to 9.0%.
A 3.0% origination fee is deducted from the
loan proceeds. Applications are available from
your lender.
4. Federal Supplemental Educational
Opportunity Grant (FSEOG)
Students receiving this type of assistance must
have exceptional financial need. At the
University at Albany, this grant normally
ranges from $200 to $1,000 each year.
5. Federal Perkins Loans
This federal grant program provides assistance
to matriculated students attending college at
least half-time (6 credits) and is designed to
help those from lower and certain middleincome families. Eligibility is determined from
the information provided on the FAFSA.
Award amounts will range up to $4,050 for the
2003-2004 academic year.
This loan is awarded to students with
substantial financial need. Undergraduate
students may borrow up to $4,000 each year
depending on availability of funds, and a total
of $20,000 for undergraduate studies. Interest
does not accrue and payments are not due on
the loan during the in-school period.
Repayment begins nine months after the
student leaves school, and 5% simple interest
is charged on the unpaid balance of the loan.
Under certain conditions, all or part of amount
borrowed may be canceled.
2. Federal Stafford Loan
6. Federal Work Study Program
Any matriculated student aid applicant
enrolled at least half-time may obtain this loan.
Students with need may obtain the loan on a
subsidized basis, which means no interest
accrues on the loan while the borrower is in
school. Students who do not demonstrate
financial need may obtain the loan on an
unsubsidized basis, which means they must
pay interest while they are in school as well as
during repayment. This loan is made by banks,
credit unions, and other lending organizations.
First-year students may borrow up to $2,625,
sophomores up to $3,500 and junior and
seniors up to $5,500 each year. Independent
students who are first-year students or
sophomores may borrow an additional $4,000
each year on an unsubsidized basis, and an
additional $5,000 each year as juniors or
seniors The maximum that may be borrowed
for undergraduate study is $46,000. At the
time the loan is disbursed, an insurance fee
and origination fee (currently 3.0%) with have
been deducted by the lender from the amount
borrowed. The interest rate is variable on an
annual basis and may range from about 3% to
8.25%.
A Master Promissory Note (MPN) must be signed
in order to receive the loan proceeds and will be
sent by the New York State Higher Education
Services Corporation to students who have
accepted Federal Stafford Loans if they are firsttime borrowers. Students with an MPN on file do
not need to file another.
A work study award offers the recipient the
opportunity to work on campus. The standard
hourly rate varies from $5.50 to $6.00, but
may be higher depending on the type of work
performed and experience. Students are paid
by check every two weeks.
FEDERAL PROGRAMS
1. Federal Pell Grant
14
7. Bureau of Indian Affairs to Native
Americans Higher Education Assistance
Program
Eligibility is restricted to students with
financial need who are pursuing a four-year
degree, are at least one-fourth American
Indian, Eskimo, or Aleut and are enrolled
members of a tribe, band or group recognized
by the Bureau of Indian Affairs Office.
Application must be made each year. In
addition, first-time applicants must obtain
tribal certification from the appropriate bureau
agency or tribal office which records
enrollment for the tribe.
8. Veterans Education Assistance Program
(VEAP)
The Post-Vietnam Veteran’s Educational
Program (VEAP) is a benefit for veterans who
paid into VEAP while they were in the service.
In order to be eligible, veterans must have
been discharged under conditions other than
dishonorable, entered active duty after
December 31, 1976 but before July 1, 1985,
and completed twenty-four continuous months
of active duty. There are some exceptions to
the last requirement. Benefits are paid monthly
and are based on the veteran’s contributions and
Veteran’s Administration matching amounts in
relation to the number of months contributions
were made by the veteran, type of education
being pursued, and the length of the educational
program. Contact the Veterans Administration
for additional information.
9. Montgomery GI Bill-Active Duty
This program provides for up to thirty-six
months of educational benefits to eligible
veterans.
Basic eligibility criteria are an honorable
discharge and a high school diploma or GED.
In addition, the veteran must meet the criteria
set forth in one of three categories. These
criteria are based on dates of active duty,
length of service, and special requirements
specific to each particular category. Detailed
information is available from the Veterans
Administration.
10. Montgomery GI Bill-Selected Reserve
Selected Reserve educational benefits are
available to members of the Army, Navy, Air
Force, Marine Corps, and Coast Guard
Reserves as well as the Army National Guard
and the Air Guard. It is the first Veteran’s
Administration
program
that
makes
educational benefits available to reservists who
have never served on active duty. Additional
information about eligibility criteria and
monthly benefit amounts is available from
your Reserve or Guard unit.
Veteran’s Administration Survivor’s and
Dependents’ Educational Assistance
This education benefit is available to certain
veterans’ children who are at least eighteen
years old, veterans’ spouses, and surviving
spouses who have not remarried. The veteran
must be totally and permanently disabled from
a service-related disability or died because of a
service-related disability. Eligible persons can
receive benefits for up to forty-five months.
Additional information is available from the
Veterans Administration.
Undergraduate Bulletin 2003-2004
2003-2004
E STIMATED C OSTS
The following is a schedule of estimated expenses for
full-time undergraduate students for the 2003-2004
academic year. Tuition and fees are prorated for part
time students. Please note that tuition and fee charges
are subject to change by official action of the State
University of New York. Questions concerning these
charges should be referred to the Student Accounts
Office.
The amounts include direct expenses billed by the
Student Accounts Office (e.g., Tuition, Fees, Room,
Board) and also indirect expenses that are not billed by
Student Accounts (e.g., Books, Travel). Although
indirect costs do not appear on the Student Accounts
invoice, both direct and indirect costs are used by the
Financial Aid Office in developing a student’s budget
and in making financial aid commitments. The total cost
(direct and indirect) for one semester of full-time
undergraduate study for a typical New York State
Resident student living on campus is approximately
$7,000 of which approximately $6,000 will be billed by
the University.
Payment Policies
Following registration, students are billed by mail at
their permanent addresses. To avoid late payment fees,
payment should be made by return mail at least five
business days prior to the due date printed on the
invoice. Students must have proof of approved aid,
waivers, or scholarships in order to defer payment.
Without satisfactory evidence to defer, students are
expected to pay charges up front and wait for
reimbursement when the aid, waiver or scholarship
funds are actually received.
Students with unpaid financial obligations will have a
“hold” placed on their records, and will be unable to
receive grades or transcripts, register for future terms, or
receive diplomas. In addition, the University assesses a
Late Payment Fee of up to $30 each time an invoice is
issued and not paid or not covered by approved financial
aid by the invoice due date. Invoices are issued on a
monthly basis to students with outstanding balances.
Students with outstanding charges from any SUNY unit
are not permitted to register at the University at Albany.
Delinquent accounts are transferred to private collection
agencies and/or the New York State Attorney General’s
Office for collection. Delinquent accounts are subject to
interest and collection fee charges.
Students who wish to appeal their out-of-state
designation should contact the Student Accounts Office
for an application and copy of the Board of Trustees
Guidelines. Applications for New York State residency
status for tuition billing purposes must be received in the
Office of Student Accounts no later than the close of
business on the midterm date of a semester in order to be
considered for residency status for that semester.
Failure to submit an application by the midterm
date will result in full liability for tuition at the outof-state tuition rate.
Estimated Cost Information*
(A tuition increase, effective Fall 2003, is
anticipated.)
Fall``
2003
Spring
2004
Tuition
N.Y.S.
Residents
Out-of-State
Residents
$1,700.00
4,150.00
$1,700.00
4,150.00
Mandatory Fees
University Fee 12.50
12.50
Student
Activity Fee
80.00
80.00
Intercollegiate
Athletic Fee
150.00
150.00
Comprehensive
Service Fee
467.50
467.50
International Student
Insurance
258.25
258.25
(mandatory for international students only)
*Room Rental 2,210.00
2,210.00
*Board
1,382.00
1,382.00
(19 meals/week non Kosher)
Other Expenses
Class Dues
3.00
(optional)
Alumni Assoc. 40.00
Member (opt.)
Five Quad
5.00
Contribution (opt.)
Accident/Sickness
Insurance
470.00
(opt.)
Late Registration
Fee
30.00
Late Payment 30.00
Payment (per invoice)
Books
400.00
Personal,.
Travel, etc.
775.00
3.00
40.00
5.00
643.00
30.00
30.00
400.00
775.00
*Tuition and Fee Charges are Subject to Change by
Official Action of the State University of New York.
Residency for Tuition Rate Purposes
Tuition Charge Adjustments/Refunds
Students are charged in-state or out-of-state tuition rates
based on their residency status. The Student Accounts
Office follows SUNY Board of Trustees policies in
determining residency for tuition rate purposes.
Generally, students are not considered in-state until they
have completed 12 months of residency in New York.
Please note, however, that the domicile (permanent
home) of an unemancipated student is considered to be
that of the parent or other legal guardian regardless of the
length of the student’s residency in New York.
Students who officially depart from the University
or reduce the number of credits for which they are
registered may be entitled to a proportionate refund
of tuition paid or proportionate adjustment of tuition
charges according to the schedule below. Refunds or
adjustments of charges are based on the date the
departure form is officially received by the Office of
the Dean of Undergraduate Studies (LC 30) or the
date the drop is officially processed by the
Registrar’s Office, not on the date of the last class
attended.
Students who register for courses and who do not
file the appropriate form or do not drop before the
end of the fourth week of classes are liable for their
full charges. Please refer to the “Withdrawing from
the University” and “Dropping Courses” sections
of this bulletin for additional information.
For refund purposes, the first week of classes shall be
deemed to have ended when seven calendar days,
including the first day of scheduled classes, have
elapsed. The first day of classes as scheduled by the
campus shall be deemed to be the first day that any
classes are offered. Refund schedules are subject to
change by official action of State University of New
York.
Official Withdrawal
or Drop
Percent of Tuition
Adjustment/Refund
First Week
100%
Second Week
70%
Third Week
50%
Fourth Week
30%
Fifth Week
0%
Example of refund to a student whose program drops below 12 credits:
Tuition charge for student
taking13 credits
$1,700.00
Student drops a 3-credit
course during fourth week:
Tuition charge as a part-time
student for the remaining
10 credits (10 cr. at $137.00)
$1,370.00
Difference between amount
originally charged as a full-time
student and reevaluated charges
as a part-time student
$330.00
Adjustment/Refund percentage
as provided by schedule of
tuition during fourth week
30%
Adjustment/Refund
$99.00
Refund Policy for Recipients of Title IV
Financial Aid
Eligibility for aid earned is based on the date of the
student’s withdrawal from the University.
Withdrawing students with federal Title IV aid may
have a portion of their aid returned to the individual
aid program, thus reducing the original amount of
aid awarded. Federal regulations determine the
amount to be refunded and the order in which the
programs are repaid. As of the date of this
publication, federal regulations require that refunds
be made in the following order: Unsubsidized
Stafford, Subsidized Stafford, PLUS, Perkins, Pell,
and SEOG.
15
University at Albany
S TUDENT A FFAIRS
The Division of Student Affairs
The Division of Student Affairs provides a
critical component to the mission of the
University at Albany by providing the leadership
and direction to ensure a healthy, safe and quality
learning environment for all of our students. The
major programming areas within the Division of
Student Affairs include: Residential Life;
Financial Aid; Health Services; Counseling
Services; Career Development; Student Life;
Athletics and Recreation; University Police; and
Judicial Affairs.
Office of the Vice President for
Student Affairs
The Vice President for Student Affairs has the
responsibility for the leadership and
administration of all the departments within the
Division of Student Affairs. The Office of the
Vice President oversees all services, activities
and programs designed to promote a positive total
educational experience for every student. In
addition, the Vice President assists students and
parents with the resolution of matters of concern.
The Office of the Vice President is located in the
University Administration Building 419 and staff
in this office can be reached at (518) 437-4949.
Financial Aid
The Office of Financial Aid administers federal,
state, and certain institutional student financial
assistance programs for undergraduate and
graduate students. In addition to overall college
financing and financial aid advisement, the office
manages a variety of funds, including the Federal
Stafford and other federal loan programs, Federal
Pell Grants, Federal Supplemental Educational
Opportunity Grants, Federal Work-Study
employment, the New York State Tuition
Assistance Program and Educational Opportunity
Program, and University at Albany Benevolent
Association Scholarships. It also coordinates the
Emergency Loan Fund. Advisement services are
available to all members of the University
Community. The Office of Financial Aid is
located in the basement of the Campus Center,
Room B52, (518/442-5757, 442-5480).
Residential Life
The Department of Residential Life seeks to
fulfill two primary missions: to provide
reasonably-priced, well-maintained, safe housing
and to develop a positive living environment that
promotes the intellectual and academic growth of
students.
Students in the University’s Residence Halls have
access to a wide variety of services and
programs. Trained professional and
paraprofessional staff members live in the Halls
and provide services to help promote a secure and
positive environment. Security Assistants provide
evening safety patrols on every quadrangle.
Additionally, each quad has a faculty member
participating in the Faculty-In-Residence
program. This program offers students the
opportunity to be actively involved outside the
classroom with a member of the faculty living in
a Residence Hall.
16
Over 700 different types of programs, workshops
and seminars are offered in the Residence Halls
annually — study groups, movie nights, safety
seminars, resume writing, and language tables —
to list just a few. There are also several different
“special interest” living options offered to
students who wish to live with other students with
similar interests. All freshmen are assigned to
areas designed to enhance their first year
experience, for building a solid foundation is a
critical element for students to achieve in their
first year of college study. These living areas
offer an environment for first year students that
encourages community responsibility, positive
social interaction, solid academic preparation,
and support.
All students residing on campus have their own
phone jack, number and voice mail system. This
phone service also offers individualized billing.
All residence halls have been wired for cable
television, with student access to a wide variety
of cable programming, as well as 7 movie
channels. All residence halls are networked and
have the highest level of connectivity through an
ethernet connection. Students can explore and
take full advantage of global information via the
Internet. Additionally, the quads have a variety of
other amenities, including weight and fitness
rooms, recreation areas and movie rooms.
Freedom Quad, an apartment-style complex,
offers a quiet, convenient environment for
graduate and upper division students. Empire
Commons, our newest complex for graduate and
upper division students, offers apartment style
living with private bedrooms, central air
conditioning and washers and dryers in each
apartment. The community center offers private
meeting rooms, home theater, lounge space and
state of the art fitness center.
Parent Services: Parent services are offered
through the Department of Residential Life.
Parent involvement is fostered through the
coordination of parent programs and services.
These programs include individual parent
advisement and liaison services as well as Parents
Weekend. Parent Services is located in the
Department of Residential Life in the basement
of Eastman Tower on State Quadrangle,
(518/442-5875, or 1-800/4RESLIFE).
University Health Center
The University Health Center is the primary
health care facility for registered students.
Services include General Medical Clinic,
Women’s Health Clinic, Allergy Clinic, SelfHelp Cold Clinic, psychiatric services, and a
pharmacy. Staff members provide health
education workshops and, in coordination with
the Albany County Health Department, they
provide public health services to the campus
community. The center also offers clinical
rotations to senior medical students and Residents
from the Albany Medical College. Located in the
Health Services Building, the University Health
Center telephone number is 518/442-5454.
Five Quad Volunteer
Ambulance Service:
The Department of Residential Life is located in
the basement of Eastman Tower on State
Quadrangle, (518/442-5875.)
Five-Quad Volunteer Ambulance Service is a
student-operated, Student Association-funded
service consisting of more than 75 highly trained
volunteers who provide state-certified campus
ambulance service on a seven days a week, 24
hours a day basis, as well as coverage at major
campus programming and athletic events. In
addition, it sponsors extensive training and
educational programs in CPR, advanced First
Aid, and a variety of other topics. The phone
number is 518/442-5555.
New Student Orientation:
University Counseling Center
Orientation programs introduce new freshmen,
transfers, and their parents to the University and
assist students in making a smooth transition to
life at the University. Students entering the
University as newly matriculated freshmen or
transfers for the fall semester are invited to
participate in a Summer Planning Conference.
Transfers attend a one-day program, while
entering freshmen attend a two-day program that
includes a one-night stay in a Residence Hall.
Summer Planning Conference programs include
presentations by University administrators, small
group discussions, academic advisement and
registration for fall semester classes. Information
sessions for parents of new students are offered
concurrently with freshman programs and
transfer programs. Students who are unable to
attend a Summer Planning Conference attend an
orientation program prior to the start of classes in
the fall. All freshmen also attend the Fall
Orientation for Frosh Program in the fall prior
to the beginning of classes. For new students
enrolling in the spring semester, an orientation
program also occurs prior to the start of that
semester.
The University Counseling Center provides a
range of education, prevention, and clinical
services to assist students in adjusting to
university life and in meeting their educational
and personal goals. Services include
psychological counseling and short-term
psychotherapy for emotional, social and
academic concerns as well as psychological
testing of academically underachieving students.
Prevention education programs addressing a
broad range of health and mental health issues are
offered to the University community. University
personnel, parents, and students may also contact
psychologists by telephone or in person to consult
about issues or problems that are negatively
affecting University students. In addition, the
psychologists provide supervised training for
doctoral students in the University’s Clinical and
Counseling Psychology programs. The
Counseling Center, staffed by psychologists and a
health promotion specialist, is located on the
second floor of the Health and Counseling
Building, (518/442-5800). Office hours are 8:30
AM to 5:00 PM, Monday through Friday. Please
call with questions and/or to make an
appointment. There is no charge for Counseling
Center services.
The Orientation Office is located in the
Department of Residential Life in the basement
of Eastman Tower on State Quadrangle,
(518/442-5875, or 1-800/4RESLIFE).
Undergraduate Bulletin 2003-2004
MIDDLE EARTH PEER ASSISTANCE PROGRAM: A
service of the Counseling Center is Middle
Earth. This peer assistance program trains
student volunteers to help other students.
Middle Earth peers lend a listening ear, assist
with problem solving, and provide information
or referrals. Middle Earth is open from noon to
midnight, Monday through Thursday, and 24
hours a day from noon on Friday until
midnight on Sunday. Middle Earth also
provides training with the option of receiving
course credits. Students interested in
volunteering can pick up an application at
Middle Earth, or call the business line at 4425890.
PROJECT SHAPE (Sexual Health and Peer
Education): Project SHAPE is comprised of
student volunteers who assist the University’s
Coordinator for Health Promotion in
facilitating AIDS/HIV prevention programs for
the campus community. Project SHAPE
members complete an extensive training
program. Those interested in volunteering or
learning more about Project SHAPE should
call 442-5800.
Department of Student Life
The Department of Student Life serves students
through an array of programs and services
designed to provide assistance and support and to
enrich the quality of student life. The department
and its personnel are involved in organizing and
facilitating a variety of educational programs,
providing counseling and advice to students and
student group leaders, conducting special events,
sponsoring and co-sponsoring recreational and
social activities and providing clean, safe and
comfortable Campus Center facilities. Below are
brief descriptions of the individual Student Life
units. For more detailed information visit our web
site at www.albany.edu/studentlife or stop by our
Campus Center offices in Room 130 and 137.
Student Activities:
The Office of Student Activities supports the
University community’s programmatic,
educational, recreational and social needs by
sponsoring major events and programs while also
enhancing the efforts of all student groups and
Greek organizations by providing quality
advisement, assistance and effective leadership
development programs.
The primary responsibilities of the office include:
Advisement for recognized student groups
including the Student Association
Management of on-campus student events
Oversight for Greek Affairs including 39
fraternities and sororities
Offering effective student-leadership
development programs
Planning and coordinating major University
events including Opening Weekend,
Homecoming, Fountain Day, The President’s
Award for Undergraduate Leadership , Who’s
Who and Torch Night
Maintaining an up-to-date student events
calendar
Sponsoring Purple and Gold and the Class
Councils
The Office of Student Activities is dedicated to
student growth and development while diligently
working to ensure the success of each student
leader, organization and event. For more
information stop by Campus Center 130, call
(518) 442-5566 or visit the Student Life website
at www.albany.edu/studentlife/studentactivities
Campus Center
This facility is a hub of university activity.
Student service offices, meeting facilities, plus
the varied dining and retail operations make the
Campus Center a popular destination for most
members of the university community and is a
center of daily campus life. The Campus Center
also hosts and facilitates an extensive schedule of
meetings, programs and special events involving
both the university and local communities.
For more information, stop by Campus Center Room
137, call 442-5490 or visit the Student Life web site:
http://www.albany.edu/studentlife/cc/cc.html.
Disabled Student Services
Disabled Student Services provides a broad range
of personalized services to people with
disabilities, including pre-admission information,
orientation, assistance with registration, personal
attendant referral, assistance with alternative
testing, lending of tape recorders and adaptive
equipment, advocacy, and personal counseling.
The office also maintains a large multimedia
library of disability resources and organizes
learning strategy groups.
Disabled Student Services provides information
and referrals for disability-related questions and
issues. In addition, the office makes
recommendations to offices and departments
regarding reasonable accommodations. Particular
emphasis is placed on assisting students in
developing their talents and abilities in
preparation for professional and graduate training
and for employment. Disabled Student Services
also interacts with local, state and federal
agencies concerned with disability issues. The
office is located in the Campus Center, Room
137, (518/442-5490) (518-442-3366-TDD)
Learning Disabled Student Services
The Learning Disability Specialist is available to
work with students who have been diagnosed as
having a learning disability (LD) or attention
deficit/hyperactivity disorder (AD/HD). Students
may schedule appointments for assistance with
developing various study skills, receive coaching
in time management and setting goals, or test
taking skills. The Learning Disability Specialist
is also responsible for reviewing documentation
of the disability, insuring that it is complete and
current. Other services include assistance in
developing self-advocacy skills, presenting
workshops in various classroom and study skills
and campus outreach and education programs
about learning disabilities and attention deficit
/hyperactivity disorder. The Learning Disability
Specialist is also available to meet with
prospective students and their families who may
be considering attending the University of
Albany. The Office is located in Campus Center
110. For more information call (518) 442-5566.
Visit our web page at http://www.albany.edu/
studentlife/ld/LDPage.htm or by email:
[email protected]
Multicultural Student Affairs
This office provides special assistance and
support for students of African American, Latino,
Asian American and Native American descent.
The office also provides advice and guidance to
multicultural student groups, and sponsors and
cosponsors a number of cultural programs and
special events. Some of these include the Annual
Martin Luther King Jr./Black History Month
Luncheon, the National Latino Collegiate
Conference, Asian Occasion, Pan-Caribbean
Fashion Show and the Spellman Achievement
Awards. For more information stop by the
Campus Center room 137, call 442-5490 or visit
our website:
http://www.albany.edu/studentlife/omsa/omsa.html
Career Development Center (CDC)
The Career Development Center (CDC) is not
just a place to go to get a job after graduation.
The CDC exists to help undergraduate students of
all majors and class levels explore majors and
career options, make decisions about graduate
study, and identify internship and full-time
employment opportunities. CDC staff members
are available to assist students in specifying
career goals and expanding their knowledge of
career alternatives through individual
consultation sessions. Working closely with
academic departments, student organizations, and
other student affairs departments, the CDC
provides educational opportunities and
workshops related to career planning. Housed
within the CDC is a library containing numerous
resources for students to research major and
career information and graduate school programs,
as well as review part-time and full-time
employment and internship vacancies. The CDC
also offers an extensive internet-based on-campus
recruiting program for internships and full-time
employment. For more information, stop by or
contact the office at ULB 69, (518) 442-5515, or
visit www.albany.edu/cdc
University Police (UPD)
UPD is responsible for providing a safe and
secure campus environment, one in which
students, faculty and staff can pursue their
educational and career goals with a minimum of
distraction and disruption from crime. It works
closely with the departments of Residential Life,
Health and Counseling, Physical Plant, and
Campus Life to achieve the highest levels of
personal safety possible. UPD is staffed around
the clock with professional law enforcement
officers. They provide an extensive array of law
enforcement and security services to the
University community, including mobile and foot
patrols, crime prevention education, traffic
enforcement, crime reporting, and follow-up
criminal investigations. UPD is located in the
University Police Building, (518/442-3132).
17
University at Albany
Department of Athletics &
Recreation
This department focuses on academic and student
development in a program that features
intercollegiate athletics, club sports, intramural
and recreational opportunities for students,
faculty and staff.
The University has a long-standing reputation of
excellence in the athletic realm, producing
competitive varsity teams, successful coaches and
outstanding student-athletes recognized for their
accomplishments both on the field and in the
classroom. Nineteen intercollegiate sports are
offered for men and women. The list includes
basketball, football, baseball, track and field,
cross country, softball, field hockey, golf, soccer,
tennis, volleyball and lacrosse.
For information on intercollegiate, club sports
and intramurals, one may contact the UAlbany
Sportsline at 442-DANE or the Intramural Office
at -442-5640.
The indoor and outdoor physical education design
is among the most comprehensive in the
Northeast. The Recreation and Convocation
Center, a state-of-the-art facility; the Physical
Education Building, which houses University
Gym; an air-supported bubble ("Dane Dome");
and several athletic fields, which have been
fenced and undergone surface reconditioning, are
utilized for sporting and cultural activities. In
addition, there are 24 tennis courts (12 with
lighting), an in-line skating rink,
racquetball/squash/handball courts, a swimming
pool, a dance studio, and a comprehensive fitness
and weight training center.
The University began competing at the NCAA
Division I level in the 1999-2000 academic year.
UAlbany is affiliated with the America East
Conference and the football program competes in
the Northeast Conference.
The Department is located in both the Recreation
and Convocation Center and the Physical
Education Building, (518-442-DANE).
Men's Sports
Baseball
Basketball
Cross Country
Football
Indoor Track and Field
Lacrosse
Outdoor Track and Field
Soccer
Head Coach
Jon Mueller
Will Brown
Craig McVey
Bob Ford
Roberto Vives
Scott Marr
Roberto Vives
Johan Aarnio
Women's Sports
Basketball
Cross Country
Field Hockey
Golf
Indoor Track and Field
Lacrosse
Outdoor Track and Field
Soccer
Softball
Tennis
Volleyball
Head Coach
Trina Patterson
Craig McVey
Deborah Fiore
Richard Sauers
Roberto Vives
Dennis Short
Roberto Vives
Kalekeni Banda
Chris Cannata
Chrissy Short
Kelly Sheffield
18
INTENSIVE
E NGLISH
L ANGUAGE
P ROGRAM
Linda Leary, Coordinator
The Intensive English Language Program
(IELP) is designed for students who wish to
use more fluent English in their academic
professional lives. Classes are communicative,
integrating all language skills, and are taught
at the beginning, intermediate and advanced
levels.
In addition to a full-time intensive program,
elective classes are offered one day per week
and include TOEFL preparation, accent
reduction, computer instruction, idiomatic
English, and technical writing.
Esl 001 Oral Communication for
International Students.
For those who wish to improve their speaking and
pronunciation skills.
Esl 002 Academic Writing for
International Students.
Will provide students with essential skills needed to
develop greater fluency in classroom writing.
Esl 003 Oral Communication for International
Students of Business
A course designed for advanced international
students that focuses on oral and listening skills
necessary for the business classroom. [This course is
for matriculated international MBA students.
Esl 004 Oral Communication for International
Teaching/Research/Graduate Assistants
A course designed to improve functional spoken
English and communication skills necessary for
effective classroom teaching.
These classes are intended for University at
Albany matriculated undergraduate and
graduate international students. Off-campus
students may also participate if their spoken
English is at least at an intermediate level. The
offering of these courses is contingent upon
sufficient enrollment. All courses are noncredit, but offer 3-hour load equivalency for F1 status.
The IELP runs year round, concurrent with the
University’s fall and spring semesters, and
there is an 8-week summer session. Cultural
activities expand each student’s ability to use
English in a variety of situations.
For further information, contact the IELP by
phone at 518-442-3870 or by e-mail at
[email protected] The Internet address
is http://www.albany.edu/ielp
I NTERNATIONAL
S TUDENT
S ERVICES (ISS)
Chisato Tada, Coordinator
The Office of International Student Services
(ISS) provides a broad range of advising and
referral services to over 1000 international
students from nearly 100 countries. One of the
first contacts that undergraduate students have
with the University at Albany is receiving prearrival materials from ISS and participating in
its thorough orientation program.
ISS, in LI-84, is the primary contact office for
assistance regarding such issues as:
- Non-immigrant status
- Federal and State regulations
- Visa programs
- E-mail, web, listserv connection
- Workshops on special topics
- Health insurance and health care
- Host Family opportunities
- Social activities and trips
- Improving English proficiency
- Personal finances
- Income tax preparation
- Access to other agencies supporting
international studies
For further information, contact ISS by phone
at 518-442-5495 or by e-mail at:
[email protected]
Undergraduate Bulletin 2003-2004
UNDERGRADUATE
STUDY
Undergraduate study is offered through the
faculties of each of the separate schools and
colleges comprising the University.
The College of Arts and Sciences provides all
undergraduates with study in most of the
disciplines within the liberal arts and sciences.
Those students wishing to explore any of these
areas in depth may become majors within the
college. The college cooperates with the School
of Education in offering a program that prepares
students for certification as teachers of academic
subjects in the secondary schools. Programs in
the colleges lead to the degrees of Bachelor of
Arts and Bachelor of Science.
The School of Business offers programs in
accounting and business administration.
Admission to these programs is competitive,
open only to the best-qualified students who
have completed 56 or more credits, including
specific courses outlined in the School of
Business section of this bulletin.
The School of Criminal Justice offers a multidisciplinary degree program, focusing on the study
of criminal behavior and society’s response to it.
Students take courses in criminal justice, as well as
in a disciplinary field related to criminal justice.
Admission to this major is highly competitive, and
students must complete specific requirements
before applying for admission.
The School of Education provides the
professional education for students in the
College Arts and Science who plan to enter the
field of teaching in secondary schools. In
addition, the school offers courses of general
interest appropriate for undergraduates who
may not be preparing for teaching careers.
The School of Information Science and Policy
houses the Faculty-Initiated Interdisciplinary
Major with a Concentration in Information
Science. This program draws on faculty
expertise from across the University, offering
courses in Computer Science, Communication,
Linguistics and Cognitive Science, Philosophy
and Psychology. Students must obtain the
approval of the program director before they can
officially declare this program as their major.
The Nelson A. Rockefeller College of Public
Affairs and Policy offers undergraduate
degree programs in political science and public
policy. These programs focus on issues of
politics, public policy and management in the
public service in the local, state, federal and
international arena. The program in public
policy is a combined major and minor
sequence, where students design an area of
concentration.
The School of Public Health offers
undergraduate electives in public health and
medical informatics.
The School of Social Welfare offers a
combined major and minor sequence that
prepares students for beginning social work.
This program serves the liberal education needs
for students interested in the social sciences and
human services professions. Admission to this
major is competitive, and students have
complete specific requirements before applying
for admission.
The Interdisciplinary Studies Committee of
the Undergraduate Academic Council works
with the academic colleges and schools to
develop and approve Faculty-Initiated
Interdisciplinary Majors and Minors. The
approval of student-initiated majors and
minors is also under the jurisdiction of this
committee. In addition, the committee
recommends and monitors University-wide
independent study, internships, special
projects, and interdisciplinary topics courses.
Office of the Dean of
Undergraduate Studies
The Dean of Undergraduate Studies is
responsible for the coordination of the
academic experience of undergraduate students
at this University. The dean works closely with
the deans and faculty of the individual schools
and colleges and with the Undergraduate
Academic Council in developing,
coordinating, and implementing undergraduate
academic policy and curricula. The dean also
supervises the Advisement Services Center
/Undergraduate Studies. Project Renaissance,
The General Education Honors Program,
Faculty Mentor Program, and Tutoring
Program are some of the many programs that
the dean oversees.
The Office of Undergraduate Studies also
provides coordination of and advisement for
independent study, student-initiated
interdisciplinary majors and minors, and
interdisciplinary courses including Washington,
NYS Senate and Assembly and other
University-wide internships; implements
undergraduate academic policies; and edits and
publishes the Undergraduate Bulletin.
This office also provides assistance and
counseling to undergraduate students who are
contemplating leaving the University, who
seek to take a Leave for Approved Study at
another college or university, or who wish to
re-enter the University after having been away
from the University for a semester or more. It
also coordinates the degree in absentia
process.
We are eager to help all students who wish to
explore academic issues and concerns.
Students may contact the dean in LC 30 (518442-3950.
Advisement Services
Center/Undergraduate
Studies ( A S C / U S )
The Advisement Services Center/
Undergraduate Studies (ASC/US) serves
undergraduate students at the University
through direct advisement services and by
assisting faculty who work with students in
an advising relationship. The primary
responsibility of ASC/US is to provide for
the academic advisement of freshmen, all
students who have not yet declared a major,
and those undergraduates not yet accepted
into restricted majors.
In addition to providing individual
academic advisement, ASC/US currently
has the following responsibilities:
1. Serving as an academic advisement
resource center for all undergraduates,
faculty, and staff;
2. Providing preprofessional (law and health
careers) advisement and support services;
3. Coordinating the Hudson Mohawk
Association of Colleges and Universities’
Cross-Registration Program for
undergraduates who wish to study at other
schools in the association;
4. Coordination of 3+3 Albany Law program,
3+2 engineering programs, early assurance
medical program, and early admission
dental and optometry programs;
Students who need assistance regarding their
academic concerns are encouraged to contact the
Advisement Services Center/Undergraduate
Studies, LI-36 (518-442-3960), or visit their
web page at www.Albany.Edu/Advisement.
The Office of Academic
Support Services
The following nine programs support new
undergraduates as they make their transition into
the University at Albany community. These
comprehensive support services include the
study groups, academic early warning program,
University Tutors, independent tutoring
program, faculty mentoring programs, study
skills workshops, developmental courses, and
the Educational Opportunities Program.
Study Group Plan
In 29 freshman classes, the Office sponsors
study groups free of charge to all students. A
study group consists of several students in a
given course who decide to meet on a regular
basis for discussions, analysis, and reviewing of
course material. Participation in a study group
can be an excellent way to prepare for exams,
since participants must organize their thinking
about course topics and present, or defend, their
individual perspectives before the group. Study
groups emphasize the student’s active
involvement with course material.
19
University at Albany
Participants are encouraged to re-examine
concepts, to question or to challenge each other
with respect to course topics. Study groups can
also help to maintain a high level of interest and
enthusiasm towards course work and allow
students to examine ways in which the course is
personally meaningful or relevant to their
college goals.
Coordinated by a graduate student who
serves as a facilitator, the objectives of the
student group concept are: 1) to clarify
course material through restatement or
illustrations, using familiar terms and
concepts, and 2) to assist study group
members in learning course material and
achieving success in the course.
University Tutors
Each study group, in addition to the
facilitator, will have two University Tutors
on hand to assist with questions and
problems. These tutors, who are
undergraduate honors students, will at times
also offer individualized assistance to those
study group students who seek special
attention.
Academic Early Warning System
The main objective of this Academic Early
Warning System is to have professors
identity students experiencing problems and
to encourage them to utilize available
academic and advising supportive services
in order to overcome their difficulties. This
warning is in lieu of a mid-semester grade.
The designated university courses include the
following: A Bio 110, 111; A Chm 120, 121,
216A, 216B; A Phy 107, 108, 120, 124; A Csi
101, 201; A Psy 101, 210, 211; A Soc 115,
221; A Eco 110, 111; A Mat 100, 101, 106,
108, 111, 112, 113; and B Acc 211, 222.
During the fifth week of the semester, this
composite list of potential failures will be
circulated to the academic advisers of these
students so that they can encourage the
following help: 1) conference with faculty
member of particular course; 2) consultation
with academic/faculty adviser; 3) participation
in respective study group (all of the Academic
Early Warning System courses are an integral
part of the study group plan); and 4)
involvement with an independent tutor. Also, a
staff member from the Office of Academic
Support Services will contact the students,
advising them of their options.
20
Independent Tutoring Program
The Office of Academic Support Services
provides the student community with an
updated listing of academically successful
students who are available to tutor students
on a one to one basis. These independent
tutors have taken the course in which they
tutor and have received a B+ or higher.
These independent tutors must have at least
3.0 cumulative academic average, secure
faculty recommendations, pass the personal
interview, and complete a tutoring
orientation.
Faculty Mentoring Program
Matriculating students at the University at
Albany are eligible to participate in one of the
faculty mentoring programs. If enrolled in a
program, it is expected that the student be
willing to interact with a faculty or
professional staff member in a mentoring
partnership.
University mentoring programs take many
forms and address different groups including
the following: Presidential Scholars; academic
probationers; multicultural recruitment
students; special talent admits; and other
students, especially incoming freshmen
seeking support.
For a new freshman or a continuing student
with academic needs, family or personal
problems, the value of a trusted friend,
confidante, guide and role model is obvious.
For mentors, a one-to-one relationship can be
an opportunity to give another person the
guidance and support they once received from
their own mentors.
Mentoring is not an easy job; it is not a job
quickly accomplished. Yet helping and
guiding a young person may be the most
important work a volunteer will ever do.
Study Skills Workshops
Study skills workshops are offered free of
charge to all students, especially freshmen.
These one hour sessions provide an
opportunity to acquire skills vital to
achieving academic success. Titles of
workshops include time management,
textbook mastery, learning from lecture,
memory enhancement, listening skills,
examination preparation, examination
strategies, multiple choice examination
skills, and final exam preparation.
The Registrar’s Office
The Registrar’s Office manages the process by
which courses, classrooms, academic space,
and final examinations are scheduled; grades
are recorded; students are registered and
enrolled; degrees are cleared and diplomas are
prepared. Records are maintained with
accuracy and security and issued to internal
and external sources. The office is responsible
for assuring that academic policy is carried out
and that data concerning registration and
enrollment are collected and distributed to
appropriate campus offices. It works with
appropriate campus offices in the development
and implementation of student information
systems. Finally, it communicates with
clientele both on and off campus by clarifying
policy, verifying enrollment and status, and by
referring students and staff to the appropriate
person or office at the University or elsewhere.
The Registrar’s Office is located in the
Campus Center, Room B-25, (518-442-5540).
Academic Advisement
Academic advisement services for
undergraduate students are coordinated by the
Advisement Services Center/Undergraduate
Studies (ASC/US). Freshmen, students who
have not declared a major, and students
intending to pursue a restricted major are
advised either by the staff of ASC/US or by
the staff of the Educational Opportunities
Program (EOP). All students who are admitted
to the University through the Educational
Opportunities Program receive academic
advisement from EOP counselors until they
declare a major or are accepted in a restricted
major.
Freshmen and sophomores are encouraged to
work closely with their academic advisers.
ASC/US staff are in regular contact with the
University’s academic departments and
programs to insure that advisers have pertinent
and up-to-date information about school and
college offerings. The adviser is therefore able
to assist each student to plan and select a
course of study that is consistent with the
student’s abilities, interests, achievements, and
future plans. Information about courses,
academic study at other institutions,
interpretation of the University’s academic
policies, and referral to other University
Offices and persons for assistance with the
student’s concerns are part of the services
provided by academic advisers.
Undergraduate Bulletin 2003-2004
Normally, students are expected to declare their
intended major when they have earned 24
graduation credits. By the time they have
accumulated 42 graduation credits, students
must have officially declared a major. When
students have been accepted as a major, they are
enrolled in the school or college offering study
in the desired major field. Declaration of the
major is directly linked to the assignment of
academic advisers. When students are officially
enrolled in a specific major program, they
receive academic advisement from the faculty of
the department or school offering that major.
Pre-Law Advisement
To complement faculty advisement, ASC/US
serves as an advisement resource for both
faculty and students needing clarification or
interpretation of University academic policies,
procedures, and programs.
Students interested in law school should watch for
meetings of the Student Pre-Law Association and
on-campus visits of law schools.
Specialized advisement opportunities are
provided by ASC/US for students who plan
to apply to professional schools related to
allied health or law careers. Specific
information about preprofessional
advisement is presented during the
orientation programs for new students; and
advisement resource material is available in
ASC/US for student use. Students may also
visit the advisement web page at
www.Albany.Edu/Advisement.
Students are encouraged to meet with their
advisers on a regular basis and to review the
advisement information materials that are
provided by the staff of ASC/US.
Health Careers Advisement
Approximately 50 students from the University
apply annually for admission to medical,
osteopathic, dental, optometry, podiatry,
chiropractic, and veterinary schools. There is
little variation in the basic requirements for
admission to the professional schools. The
majority of these schools require the General
Biology sequence and one full year of study in
chemistry, organic chemistry, physics,
mathematics, and English. Many health
profession schools now strongly recommend
or require that students complete humanities
and/or social science courses as well. There is
no special major for preprofessional health
careers students, and the requirements for
admission can be met through a variety of
majors available at the University.
The Pre-Health Advisory Committee assists
students through formal meetings, counseling,
and a library of materials and by preparing the
Committee Evaluation during the spring
semester prior to application. Currently this
committee consists of four faculty members
and five professional staff members.
Resource materials, admission statistics,
admission test applications, and procedural
information are available for University
students in the Advisement Services
Center/Undergraduate Studies, LI-36.
There is no single “best” program of study in
preparation for law school, and students are
encouraged to consider a variety of alternatives.
The Association of American Law Schools
recommends a broad-based liberal arts curriculum
and considers the prescription of particular
courses unwise. Students seeking further
clarification of pre-legal education should read the
statement on this subject adopted by the
Association of American Law Schools or consult
with prelaw advisers.
Written information, such as law school catalogs,
The Official Guide to U.S. Law Schools, LSAT
applications, and admission statistics for Albany
students, is available in the Advisement Services
Center/
Undergraduate Studies, LI-36.
Special Opportunities
3 + 3 Program with Albany Law School of
Union University
This program offers a six-year bachelor’s and law
degree program. A limited number of freshmen
are selected for this program based primarily on
high school record. Students who are selected for
this program and maintain the required standards
are guaranteed a seat in the first-year class at
Albany Law after completing three years on this
campus. The bachelor’s degree is conferred upon
successful completion of the first year of study at
Albany Law School. Students are admitted to this
program either prior to beginning their freshman
year or at the end of their freshman year. Further
information regarding criteria for admission and
program requirements can be obtained from
Dawn Kakumba, Advisement Services
Center/Undergraduate Studies, LI-36.
3–2 Engineering Programs
In these programs, students complete three years
at the University at Albany and then transfer to
one of the participating Schools of Engineering.
Two years of carefully planned study complete the
requirements for the bachelor’s program at
Albany in physics or chemistry and the B.S.
degree with a major in engineering at the
engineering school. Students must apply to the
engineering school after their fifth semester of
study at Albany. Participating Schools of
Engineering are Binghamton University, SUNY
New Paltz, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, and
Clarkson University. Further information may be
obtained by contacting the Advisement Services
Center/Undergraduate Studies, LI-36.
Early Assurance of Admission to Albany
Medical College
The Early Assurance Program is a cooperative
program developed between the University at
Albany and the Albany Medical College. This
program provides an opportunity to submit an
early application for admission to Albany Medical
College. Applicants must have completed three
semesters of course work at the University at
Albany; receive the Pre-Health Committee
Evaluation and approval during the spring
semester of the sophomore year; and complete a
full two years of undergraduate study in order to
apply to Albany Medical College at the end of the
sophomore year. Students in this program must
maintain a minimum cumulative grade point
average of 3.5 and achieve grades no lower than a
B in each prerequisite science course.
Students selected for admission will matriculate at
Albany Medical College after completion of their
undergraduate degree and four years of study at
the University at Albany. Students pursuing this
program should contact the pre-health adviser
during their freshman year. For details regarding
criteria for admission and program requirements,
contact the Advisement Services
Center/Undergraduate Studies, LI-36.
Joint Seven-Year Biology/Optometry Program
The Joint Biology/Optometry Program is a
cooperative program developed between the
University at Albany and SUNY State College
of Optometry. In this program, students
complete three years at the University at
Albany and then attend the SUNY State
College of Optometry for four years. Credits
from the first year at SUNY State College of
Optometry will transfer back to the University
at Albany for completion of the B.S. degree in
Biology. After completion of the fourth year at
SUNY State College of Optometry, students
may earn the O.D. degree in Optometry.
Students apply for this program in the spring
semester of their freshman year. Any students
pursuing this program should request to be
advised by the pre-health adviser during their
freshman year. Further information may be
obtained by contacting the Advisement
Services Center /Undergraduate Studies, LI-36
Joint Seven-Year Biology/Dental Program
The Joint Biology/Dental Program is a
cooperative program developed between the
University at Albany and Boston University
Goldman School of Dental Medicine. In this
program, students complete three years at the
University at Albany and then attend Boston
University Goldman School of Dental
Medicine for four years. Credits from the
first year at Boston University Goldman
School of Dental Medicine will transfer back
to the University at Albany for completion of
the B.S. degree in Biology. After completion
of the fourth year at Boston University
Goldman School of Dental Medicine,
students may earn the D.M.D. Students apply
for this program in the spring of the
sophomore year. Any students pursuing this
program should request to be advised by the
pre-health adviser during the freshman year.
Further information may be obtained by
contacting the Advisement Services Center/
Undergraduate Studies, LI-36.
21
University at Albany
Combined Bachelor’s/Master’s
Degree Programs
Combined Bachelor’s/Master’s Degree
Programs: Undergraduate students of
recognized academic ability and educational
maturity have the opportunity of fulfilling
integrated requirements of bachelor’s and
master’s degree programs within a
rationally designed and effective framework
at the beginning of their junior year.
Combined programs require a minimum of
138 credits and up to 12 graduate credits
may be applied simultaneously to the
requirements for the baccalaureate.
Students may be admitted to these
combined programs at the beginning of
their junior year, or after the successful
completion of 56 credits.. A grade point
average of 3.20 or higher and three
supportive letters of recommendation from
faculty are required. Students are
considered undergraduates until they have
accumulated 120 credits, satisfied all degree
requirements and been awarded the
baccalaureate degree. At that point, they are
automatically considered as graduate
students. In some cases, with careful
planning, students may complete both their
bachelor’s and master’s degrees within nine
semesters.
The following programs are currently
registered by the State Education
Department: atmospheric science, biology,
chemistry, computer science, computer
science and applied mathematics/computer
science, computer science and applied
mathematics/mathematics, criminal justice,
economics/public administration, English,
French, geography, geology, history,
linguistics/teaching English to speakers of
other languages, mathematics, philosophy,
physics, political science, political
science/public administration,
psychology/counseling, psychology/
rehabilitation counseling, public policy,
rhetoric and communication, Russian,
sociology, sociology/public administration,
Spanish, theatre, women’s studies, and any
undergraduate major (except
accounting)/library science.
Students interested in further information
regarding the combined programs should
contact the appropriate program’s
department chair or the Office of
Undergraduate Studies, LC 30 (518-4423950).
Combined Bachelor’s/Master’s in
Business Administration Program
The early M.B.A. option is designed for
students majoring in selected areas of the
liberal arts and sciences who wish to obtain
the M.B.A. degree in five years.
Undergraduates at the University at Albany
may apply for early admission to the School
of Business M.B.A. program during their
junior year.
22
The following programs are currently
registered by the State Education Department
for the combined Bachelor’s/Master’s in
Business Administration:
College of Arts and Sciences: African/AfroAmerican Studies (General Program: B.A.),
Anthropology (General Program: B.A.), Art
(General and Departmental Programs: B.A.),
Asian Studies (General Program: B.A.),
Biology (General Program: B.A. degree only),
Chinese Studies (General Program: B.A.),
Economics (General Program: B.A. degree
only), English (General Program: B.A.),
French (General Program: B.A.), Geography
(General Program: B.A.), Greek and Roman
Civilization (General Program: B.A.), History
(General Program: B.A.), Interdisciplinary
Studies (General Program: B.A. or B.S.),
Italian (General Program: B.A.), Latin
American Studies (General Program: B.A.),
Linguistics (General Program: B.A.),
Mathematics (General Program: B.A.), Music
(General and Departmental Programs: B.A.),
Philosophy (General Program: B.A.),
Psychology (General Program: B.A.), Puerto
Rican Studies (General Program: B.A.),
Rhetoric and Communication (General
Program: B.A.), Russian (General Program:
B.A.), Russian and East European Studies
(General Program: B.A.), Sociology (General
Program: B.A.), Spanish (General Program:
B.A.), Theatre (General Program: B.A.),
Women’s Studies (General Program: B.A.).
School of Criminal Justice: Criminal Justice
(General Program: B.A.)
Nelson A. Rockefeller College: Political
Science (General Program: B.A.)
Students interested in this option are
encouraged to contact the School of Business,
BA-361, 442-4984 during their sophomore
year.
Combined Bachelor’s/Master’s in
Health Policy & Management
Economics/Health Policy & Management
(General Program: B.A./M.S.),
Economics/Health Policy & Management
(General Program: B.S./M.S.),
Psychology/Health Policy & Management
(General Program: B.A./M.S.),
Sociology/Health Policy & Management
(General Program: BA/MS)
Combined Bachelor’s in Political
Science/Master’s in Public
Administration and Policy
Department of Public Administration and
Policy: Public Policy/Public Administration
(General Program: B.A./M.P.A.)
Combined Bachelor’s/Master’s in
Public Administration and Policy
Department of Public Administration and
Policy: Public Policy/Public Administration
(General Program: B.A./M.P.A.) and
School of Criminal Justice (General
Program: B.A.)
Independent Study
Independent study and research is
considered advanced work which enables
undergraduates to go beyond existing
course work to investigate a topic or a
hypothesis or a relationship either in the
library or in the laboratory. The work is
supervised and evaluated by a faculty
member and culminates in a significant
paper or report. Most academic units offer
independent study courses with a variable
credit option dependent on the extent of the
intended project. If students have intended
projects not clearly falling within one
academic discipline, they may receive
independent study and research credit
through U Uni 397. This university-wide
offering requires approval of the
Interdisciplinary Studies Committee.
Students interested in doing independent
and creative study are encouraged to
discuss with faculty members their ideas
and the feasibility of earning credit.
Since the appropriateness and need for a
student to pursue independent study and
research is an individual matter, there are
no further guidelines on this study. At
times, U Uni 397 has encompassed crossdisciplinary work cosponsored by faculty
members from more than one academic
unit. At other times, the U Uni 397 course
has been used to enable a senior to pursue
an extensive, major research topic for which
the student’s academic department or
school independent study courses would not
carry sufficient academic credit.
Supervised Research
Supervised research for sophomores and
juniors enables undergraduates to work with
a member of the University faculty as a
research apprentice. The work is supervised
and evaluated by a member of the teaching
faculty and culminates in a research paper
or report. Information on U Uni 180,
“Supervised Research” is available from the
Office of the Dean of Undergraduate
Studies, LC 30.
See also the A Cas undergraduate research
and research methods courses in the
College of Arts and Sciences section of this
bulletin.
Undergraduate Bulletin 2003-2004
Internships
Internships give students an opportunity to
acquire practical “hands-on” experience in a
field or area that interests them. Internships
differ from independent study in that an
internship involves off-campus participation in
the work of an agency, institution, or corporate
body other than the University. The work is
supervised and evaluated by a designated
individual in the agency, institution, or
corporate body providing the internship. This
supervisor provides an evaluation of the
student’s work to the Albany faculty member
responsible for the final evaluation and
assignment of the appropriate academic grade.
Internships are open only to qualified
juniors and seniors who have an overall
grade point average of 2.50 or higher.
Students interested in correlating their
academic study with practical experience are
encouraged to explore the feasibility of
participating in an internship.
Some majors, such as social welfare, require
fieldwork as part of their major requirements,
and these opportunities are open only to
students who have been admitted in the major
program. In other cases, many academic
departments and schools offer internships
involving experiences related to the academic
focus of the unit. These courses include
opportunities in various aspects of the
performing arts (A Arh 490, A Art 490, A Mus
490, A Thr 415), anthropology (A Ant 400),
classics (A Cla 490), planning (A Pln 490A +
B), computing (A Csi 490), atmospheric science
(A Atm 490), business (B Bus 497, 498)
communication (A Com 390), sociology (A Soc
490), public affairs (R Pub 498; R Pos 338,
434), news writing for papers or radio or
television stations (A Jrl 400), archaeological
fieldwork (A Ant 338), etc.
The University also offers a total of 15 credits
for students participating in the following
special, formalized internships: Senate Session
Assistant Program (U Uni 391), Assembly
Session Intern Program (U Uni 392),
Operational and Applied Communication
Theory (A Com 392, 393), and the Empire
State Youth Theatre Institute (A Cas 390).
These latter established internships take
advantage of Albany’s location in the state’s
capital. Albany is also affiliated with the
Washington Center (see U Uni 393, WCLA
Internship) and American University’s
Washington semester program, both of which
provide opportunities in Washington, D.C.
Through U Uni 390 (1–15 credits), students
have obtained approval for full- or part-time
internships in a very wide variety of areas. For
these pursuits, it is assumed the student will
secure the opportunity on his or her own, find
appropriate faculty sponsorship, and then
apply to the Interdisciplinary Studies
Committee for approval of the desired credit.
The range of possible internship opportunities is
too great to list here. The more common
internships pursued by previous students
through U Uni 390 have included work with:
U.S. Congress, federal judiciary and numerous
federal executive agencies, various state
agencies (Lt. Governor’s Office, Attorney
General, Correctional Services, Division of
Criminal Justice, etc.), the New York Public
Interest Research Group, the Civil Liberties
Union, the Environmental Planning Lobby,
Albany Medical Center, stock brokerage firms,
law firms and media internships with local and
national television stations and corporations.
Further information and application forms for
U Uni 390 may be obtained from the Office of
Undergraduate Studies, LC 30.
In addition to the credit-bearing internships, there
are also many opportunities for noncredit
internships, mostly during the summer, some of
which pay the participants a stipend. Information
on many of these programs and their application
process is available through the Career
Development Center.
Community and Public Service
Through a community and public service
program offered by the School of Social
Welfare, undergraduates may earn up to 6
credits through enrollment in R Ssw 290 and
390. Through the program, students participate
in volunteer work for a minimum of 100 hours
per semester (about 7 ½ hours per week) in one
of many public or private agencies involving
different types of service to the community. A
community and public service component is
also a feature of the Project Renaissance
Program.
Study at Other Institutions
Since not all courses are acceptable for transfer
credit, matriculated students wishing to take
courses at other institutions for credit toward the
degree at this University should have prior
approval in writing from their academic
advisers. Such written approval must be filed
with the Office of the Registrar, and an official
transcript of work satisfactorily completed at the
other institution(s) must be received before
credit will be awarded.
Credit may be earned through one of the
following formally established programs.
Cross-Registration: University at Albany
undergraduate students may cross-register for
courses at other campuses within this area while
enrolled at this institution.
Cross-registration enrollments
elsewhere must be in courses not
available through the University at
Albany’s curriculum. This program is
available in fall and spring semesters
only.
Cross-registered students must be full-time
undergraduate, matriculated students, and at least
one-half of the credits for which a student is
registered during a cross-registration semester
must be from course work offered on the Albany
campus. No extra tuition charge is assessed, but
students are responsible for any fees that may be
required by the host institution for a particular
course. Credits earned through cross-registration
are recorded on the transcript with a crossregistration course entry and the appropriate
number of credits earned recorded in the
“graduation credit” column. Grades earned at the
other institutions are not recorded on the Albany
transcript.
Students seeking more information about the
participating institutions and the courses
available should contact the Advisement
Services Center/Undergraduate Studies, LI-36.
Office of International Education: Study
Abroad and Exchanges
Undergraduates may earn academic credit for a
semester, an academic year, or a summer in one of
many study abroad programs in most cultural or
geographic regions of the world. A description of
the programs currently offered by The University
at Albany are described in the section
“International Education”.
Study abroad and exchanges information is
available in LI-66, by phone at (518) 442-3525,
or by e-mail at intled.uamail.albany.edu (Web:
http://www.albany.edu.intled).
ROTC (Reserve Officers Training Corps)
Albany undergraduate students have the
opportunity to enroll in the Air Force ROTC
program at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute or
the Army ROTC program at Siena College
through the Hudson-Mohawk Association of
Colleges and Universities’ Cross-Registration
Program. Military Science classes may provide
valuable management and leadership instruction
applicable in both the military and civilian
environment. Leadership laboratory offers the
essential elements of physical fitness in the
context of dynamic and challenging leadership
training activities. Students should contact the
appropriate military science department on the
two campuses for precise information regarding
course content, sequencing and summer
expectations.
All Army ROTC classes are conducted on
campus in the Physical Education Building
where the Army ROTC offices are located.
Further information on the Army ROTC
Program is available in Room B74 of the
Physical Education Center.
Course Enrollment and Credit: The procedure for
obtaining University approval for enrollment in
Army or Air Force ROTC courses is the same as
for any other cross-registration enrollment except
that a faculty adviser’s approval is not required for
a ROTC course. The University permits students
to earn and apply up to a maximum of 12 degree
credits as “Applied Elective” toward their Albany
degree. This includes the Albany courses P Pad
110, 111, 210, and 211.
23
University at Albany
HONORS, AWARDS
AND PRIZES
Departmental/Major
Honors Programs
In an effort to provide challenging and
alternative curricular options to its best
undergraduates, the University has taken a
revitalized interest in encouraging its academic
departments and programs to offer highquality honors programs. The main focus of
the honors degree is the honors project, which
is conceived as an original piece of written
research or a creative project submitted in the
senior year. Currently, honors programs exist
in the following majors: anthropology, art
(departmental studio program), art history,
atmospheric science, biology, chemistry,
Chinese studies, computer science (all three
programs), East Asian studies
(interdisciplinary), economics, English,
French, geography, geology, Greek and
Roman civilization, history, Italian, Japanese
studies (interdisciplinary), Judaic studies,
Latin American studies, linguistics,
mathematics, philosophy, physics, political
science, psychology, public policy, Puerto
Rican studies, rhetoric and communication,
Russian, sociology, Spanish, theatre, and
women’s studies. Descriptions of these
programs may be found under the academic
unit offering the program.
Students who complete an honors program
may receive a special honors certificate upon
the recommendation of their major department.
Degree with Honors
University-wide honors are conferred at
graduation. A student will be graduated: Cum
Laude with an average equal to or greater than
3.25 but less than 3.50; Magna Cum Laude
with an average equal to or greater than 3.50
but less than 3.75; Summa Cum Laude with an
average equal to or greater than 3.75.
HONORS RESIDENCE CRITERIA: For
graduation
with honors, students must have completed a
minimum of 56 credits in courses for which
they registered at this University, including a
minimum of 40 University at Albany credits
graded on the A-E basis.
IMPLEMENTATION NOTE:
These criteria apply to
all undergraduates graduating in August 2000
and thereafter.
24
Dean’s List
For students matriculating Fall 1997 and
thereafter: A full-time student shall be placed
on the Dean’s List for a particular semester if
the following conditions are met: Within the
award semester matriculated students must
have completed at Albany a minimum of 12
graduation credits in courses graded A–E, and
must have registered for those credits before
the last day for adding semester courses.
The student’s semester average must be 3.5 or
higher for a sophomore, junior, or senior, and
at least 3.25 for a freshman*, with no grade
lower than a C, and with no incomplete (I)
grades.
* For the purposes of this policy “freshman” is
defined as a student whose admissions status is
freshman and who has completed no more than
two full time semesters of study in the fall or
spring semester at the University at Albany.
For students matriculating before Fall 1997:
A student shall be placed on the Dean’s List
for a particular semester if that student has met
all of the following criteria:
Within that semester the student must have
completed at Albany a minimum of 12
graduation credits in courses graded A–E, and
must have registered for those credits before
the last day for adding semester courses. The
student’s semester average must be 3.25 or
higher, with no grade lower than C-.
Dean’s Commendation for
Part-Time Students
For students matriculating Fall 1997 and
thereafter: A student shall receive the Dean’s
Commendation for Part-Time Students for a
particular semester if the student has met all of
the following criteria:
A matriculated student must have completed at
least 6 graduation credits at the University at
Albany within the given semester in courses
graded A–E and have been registered for fewer
than 12 credits on the last day for adding
semester courses.
The student’s semester average must be 3.5 or
higher for a sophomore, junior, or senior, and
at least 3.25 for a freshman*, with no grade
lower than C, and with no incomplete (I)
grades.
* For the purposes of this policy “freshman” is
defined as a student whose admissions status is
freshman and who has completed no more than
two full time semesters of study in the fall or
spring semester at the University at Albany.
For students matriculating before Fall 1997:
A student shall receive the Dean’s
Commendation for Part-Time Students for a
particular semester if the student has met all of
the following criteria:
A matriculated student must have completed at
least 6 graduation credits at the University at
Albany within the given semester in courses
graded A–E and have been registered for fewer
than 12 credits on the last day for adding
semester courses. The student’s semester
average must be 3.25 or higher, with no grade
lower than C-.
Phi Beta Kappa
Students compiling a distinguished academic
record at University at Albany, State
University of New York may be elected
members of the venerable (founded 1776)
honorary society, Phi Beta Kappa, in their
senior year; or, if they do especially well, in
their junior year. To be considered for
election, students must have the following:
A major in the liberal arts and sciences, with
not fewer than 90 credits of liberal work
among the 120 credits needed for graduation.
Completed at least 3 full semesters of work, or
45 credits, in residence at this University and
be pursuing a program toward graduation.
Students pursuing a double major with
courses combined from such fields as
business, social welfare, or other
professional schools may be considered for
election in their senior year, if their course
work includes at least 90 credits in the
liberal arts and sciences. Consideration will
be given to courses of a liberal nature, even
though they may be offered outside the
College of Arts and Sciences.
The breadth of a student’s program is
important, as shown by the number and
variety of courses taken outside the major.
Students are expected to have completed
some work in science and mathematics, the
social and behavioral sciences, and the
humanities, including a foreign language.
Every student is considered automatically.
Individual nomination is not necessary. The
final choices are decided on by the full
membership of the University at Albany,
State University of New York Chapter,
Alpha Alpha of New York
(e-mail: [email protected]).
Undergraduate Bulletin 2003-2004
Presidential Awards for
Undergraduate Research
To encourage undergraduate scholarship and
creative work, and to reward excellence and
individual initiative, the University has
established the Presidential Awards. The
nominees for the awards will be selected on
the basis of a major paper or project produced
by the student in conjunction with a course or
independent study, under the direction of an
Albany faculty member. The project’s
significance will be judged in terms of its
academic quality and originality.
Chancellor’s Award for Student
Excellence
Undergraduate and graduate students are
nominated for this distinction from across the
entire State University of New York. The
award is presented by the Chancellor to
students who have demonstrated outstanding
academic achievement and have received
national or international recognition for their
efforts. Recipients of this high honor have
typically distinguished themselves in their
academic work and in a variety of other
domains including athletics, service,
publication, conference presentation, or artistic
performance.
Endowed Presidential
Scholarships
University at Albany
Scholarships, Awards, Prizes
and Honors
Scholarships and awards are listed
alphabetically according to their affiliation:
College of Arts & Sciences
Academic Excellence in Mathematics:
Awarded annually to one or more graduating
seniors on the basis of scholastic achievement
in mathematics.
American Institute of Chemists Award:
A medal awarded to an outstanding graduating
chemistry major, based on demonstrated
record of leadership, ability, character, and
scholastic achievement.
Eleanor Rosalie Bazzoni 1906
Fellowship: Awarded for outstanding
achievement in English, French, or German.
B’nai Zion Award Medal: Awarded
annually to the graduating student having the
greatest proficiency in Hebrew.
Glenn Bumpus ’75 Memorial Award:
Awarded to senior students in the field of
biological sciences in recognition of
outstanding achievement in undergraduate
research and its communication.
For more information about the Presidential
Scholarships, please contact the Office of
Undergraduate Studies at 518-442-3950.
Certificate of Achievement: Awarded to
the junior who has maintained the highest
cumulative grade point average. The student
shall be a major in the Department of Africana
Studies.
Elena Rodrigues Anderson ’82
Presidential Scholarship: Awarded to a
Presidential Scholarship recipient who
maintains at least a 3.25 GPA. This
scholarship is renewable up to four years.
Chemistry Faculty Award: Awarded to an
outstanding graduating chemistry major who
has demonstrated high scholastic standing,
good character, and potential for advancement
in the chemical profession.
Edward Gallatin B. Hudson
Presidential Scholarship: Awarded to
full-time undergraduate students who has
demonstrated a strong academic record and
shows financial need.
Crippen Prize: Awarded to the outstanding
graduating senior in American History.
Candidates must have had at least 18 credits of
college level work in American Colonial and
United States history, at least 12 credits taken
on the University at Albany campus.
Erica ’86 and Michael Olin ’85
Presidential Scholarship Fund: Awarded
to an incoming freshman who has shown
extraordinary academic talent and who has
demonstrated a high degree of motivation.
Scholarship is intended to be applied to
tuition, room, rent, board and books in order to
relieve recipient of the costs of their education.
Renewable up to four years.
Evan Michael Zahn ‘82, M.D.
Presidential Scholarship: Awarded to
either a junior or senior who is a member of
the Presidential Honors program. This
scholarship is renewable. Recipient must be
committed to a health-related career, i.e.,
dentistry, medicine, etc.
Celebration of Undergraduate
Achievement Awards: Awarded annually
to honor the work of undergraduate students in
the College of Arts and Sciences who are
enrolled in a humanities or fine arts class.
CRC Press Freshman Chemistry
Achievement Award: Awarded annually at
the end of the spring semester to a freshman on
the basis of outstanding achievement in
chemistry.
Christopher DeCormier ’76 Memorial
Scholarship: Awarded annually to students
studying the Maya Language and/or culture
under the direction of the Institute for
Mesoamerican Studies, Department of
Anthropology.
Class of 1905 Bazzoni Fellowship:
Awarded for outstanding achievement in the
natural sciences.
Delta Omega Scholarship Endowment:
Honoring the memory of the Delta Omega
Sorority, this scholarship is awarded to an
outstanding female student enrolled in the
Teacher Education program.
Excellence in Scholarship Award
Awarded: to a major in African/AfroAmerican studies on the basis of scholarship,
outstanding service to the department, and
faculty support.
Robert Fairbanks Memorial Fund: Shortterm loans designed to provide assistance to
students in the field of economics.
Hazel English Ferris ’32 Scholarship:
Awarded in alternate years to upper division
students majoring in Business in memory of
Professor George Morell York and in Theatre
in memory of Professor Agnes Futterer, based
on academic achievement.
Francine W. Frank Award in
Linguistics: Awarded annually to an
outstanding graduating linguistics major.
French Embassy Book Prizes: Each year,
the Cultural Attaché of the French Embassy
awards prizes of books to the best students in
the Department of French.
Agnes E. Futterer Award: Awarded
annually to the graduating senior who has
made the most significant contribution to
theatre at the University.
Agnes E. Futterer Memorial
Fellowship: Awarded annually to an Albany
graduate or graduating senior who was in
residence at the University for at least two
undergraduate years. The fellowship may be
used for graduate study in theatre or theatrerelated fields at the University at Albany, at
any other accredited university, or in a
recognized theatre program.
Narayan Gokhale Award: Awarded
annually to the graduating atmospheric science
major with the highest academic average.
Andrea Hanan ’87 Music Scholarship:
Awarded annually to an undergraduate
entering the music program and/or a
continuing first year music major on the basis
of outstanding achievement.
Mayfred Dutton Lucas, ’24
Scholarship: Awarded to an outstanding
mathematics major committed to teaching at
the high school level.
Merlin W. Hathaway Memorial
Scholarship: Awarded for outstanding
academic and athletic achievement, leadership,
integrity, and commitment to the University.
Vivian C. Hopkins Scholarship Award:
Awarded annually to an English major who
has demonstrated outstanding scholastic ability
and character.
25
University at Albany
Husted Fellowship Award: Awarded to a
graduate student who holds a bachelor’s
degree from the University and has been in
residence at the University for at least two
years as an undergraduate. The fellowship may
be used for full-time graduate study at the
University at Albany or any other accredited
university. Priority is given to candidates with
a demonstrated aptitude and interest in
teaching.
Kappa Beta Scholarship: Based on merit,
the scholarship is awarded every other year to
a graduating senior selected by the Department
of Judaic Studies who will continue graduate
or professional studies in some aspect of
Judaic Studies.
Gordon Karp Award: Awarded to
undergraduate students in economics who best
exemplify the intelligence, dedication and
accomplishment that marked the promising
career of Gordon Karp, an undergraduate and
doctoral graduate of the University. Gordon
received his B.A. in 1977 and his Ph.D. in
1986.
Arthur Long Teaching Assistant
Award: Awarded annually to a teaching
assistant in the Department of Chemistry on
the basis or a genuine concern for the
intellectual growth of his/her students, high
moral and ethical character, and excellence in
scholarship.
Leah Lovenheim Award: Awarded
annually by the Department of English for the
best student short story.
Mayfred Dutton Lucas '24 Scholarship:
Awarded to a Math major committed to a
career as a high school teacher of mathematics.
Shields McIlwaine Award: Awarded
annually by the Department of English for the
best student poem.
Anna R. Oliver Memorial Scholarship:
Awarded annually by the Department of
Physics to outstanding juniors or seniors.
Gertrude Hunter Parlin ’17 Teacher's
Scholarship: Provides annual scholarships
for students preparing for careers in teaching.
William Reedy Prize: Awarded annually by
the History Department to an undergraduate
student for the best paper submitted in any
history course taken at the University during
the preceding calendar year.
William E. Rowley Award: Awarded
annually by the Journalism Program in the
Department of English for the best journalistic
writing by a student.
Ronald R. Schafer Scholarship Fund:
Awarded annually to a student demonstrating
notable achievement or future promise in
journalism.
Mildred Schmidt Award: Awarded to the
graduating senior with the best academic
record in Latin.
26
Arlene F. Steinberg ’71 Award: Awarded
to the junior or senior English major who best
shows evidence of scholarly or creative
contribution to the understanding of 20thcentury fiction, poetry, or drama.
Derk V. Tieszen Award: Awarded to a senior
chemistry major on the basis of demonstrated
achievement in chemistry, physics, and
mathematics plus potential as a research worker
and teacher of chemistry at an advanced level.
James Unger ’73 Memorial Award:
Awarded annually by the Department of
Political Science on the basis of the best
written work in political science submitted by
an undergraduate.
Katherine Vario Memorial Scholarship:
To recognize and promote academic
achievement in the areas of medicine for an
undergraduate student who plans a career in
medicine.
Richard Wilkie Award for the
Outstanding Undergraduate Student in
Communication: Awarded annually at the
end of the spring semester to a graduating
communication student who has achieved
academic excellence, especially in
argumentation and public discourse.
Women’s Studies Award: Awarded to a
senior women’s studies major who has
combined outstanding academic achievement
with contributions to the women’s community
on- or off-campus.
Women’s Studies Stoneman-Van
Vranken Scholarship: is awarded to the
Women’s Studies majors, minors, and/or those
who have completed at least four Women’s
Studies courses. The winner is selected on the
basis of outstanding performance in Women’s
Studies courses, significant contributions to
the University and larger communities,
dedication to feminist principles, and overall
academic performance. The award is named
for two Albany alumnae whose lives epitomize
feminist concerns.
School of Business
The Martha Bealler Altman
Scholarship: To provide assistance to full
time undergraduate students, demonstrating
academic merit and financial need, who are
enrolled in the University and are pursuing a
degree in Business. Established by Nolan T.
Altman ’77.
Harold L. Cannon Memorial Award for
Outstanding Academic Achievement
and Service: Awarded to a School of
Business student as selected by the faculty on
the basis of academic achievement and service
to the School of Business, the University,
and/or the community.
Milton and Mary M. Danko Golden Rule
Award: Awarded to a junior enrolled in
the School of Business who gives or
shares his/her most precious resource:
time. Special consideration given to those
who assist the impoverished, the alienated,
the hungry and/or homeless. Established
by William D. Danko, Ph.D. in memory of
his parents.
Dean’s Award for Distinguished
Academic Achievement by a Returning
Undergraduate Student: Awarded to a
School of Business graduating senior selected
by the faculty on the basis of overall grade
point, grade point average in the major, and
nonscholastic activities.
Deloitte and Touche /Accounting Club
Award for Academic Achievement:
Awarded to a School of Business junior
accounting major who has demonstrated high
academic achievement.
Delta Sigma Pi Scholarship Key:
Awarded by the Zeta Psi chapter of the
International Business Fraternity of Delta
Sigma Pi to the School of Business graduating
senior with the highest overall grade point
average.
Departmental Award for the
Outstanding Graduating Senior in
Accounting: Awarded by the Department of
Accounting to a graduating senior accounting
major in recognition of outstanding academic
achievement, professional activities, and
significant service to the School of Business
and the University.
Departmental Award for the
Outstanding Graduating Senior in
Finance: Awarded by the Department of
Finance to a graduating senior finance major
in recognition of outstanding academic
achievement, professional activities, and
significant service to the School of Business
and the University.
Departmental Award for the
Outstanding Graduating Senior in
Management Science and Information
Systems: Awarded by the Department of
Management Science to a graduating senior
management science major in recognition of
outstanding academic achievement,
professional activities, and significant service
to the School of Business and the University.
Departmental Award for the
Outstanding Graduating Senior in
Marketing: Awarded by the Department of
Marketing to a graduating senior marketing
major in recognition of outstanding academic
achievement, professional activities, and
significant service to the School of Business
and the University.
Margaret Yager Middleton ’29
Scholarship: Awarded annually to upper
division students admitted to the School of
Business based on high academic achievement.
Undergraduate Bulletin 2003-2004
Ernest and Florence Bensinger Milano
’36 Scholarship: Awarded to upper division
students in the School of Business based on
high academic achievement.
New York State Society of Certified
Public Accountants Award: Awarded to
the senior accounting major, as recommended
by the department, with the highest overall
accounting grade point average who is
planning to pursue a career in public
accounting.
Irving H. Sabgher Memorial Award: for
the Outstanding Graduating Senior in
Management Awarded by the Department of
Management to a graduating senior
management major in recognition of
outstanding academic achievement,
professional activities, and significant service
to the School of Business and the University.
Wall Street Journal Award: Awarded to a
School of Business graduating senior selected
by the faculty on the basis of overall grade
point, grade point average in the major, and
nonscholastic activities.
Harry Warshawsky ’80 Memorial
Award for Outstanding Academic
Achievement and Service: Awarded to a
School of Business student selected by the
Office of the Dean on the basis of scholastic
achievement and service to the School of
Business and the University and who
exemplifies the outstanding personal qualities
of Harry Warshawsky.
Kappa Beta Scholarship: Based on merit,
the scholarship is awarded every other year to
a graduating senior selected by the Department
of Judaic Studies who will continue graduate
or professional studies in some aspect of
Judaic Studies.
has demonstrated financial need.
Lambda Pi Eta: The Nu Alpha Chapter of
Lambda Pi Eta is the national honor society
committed to fostering academic and
professional excellence in communication.
Class of 1976 Scholarship: Awarded to an
undergraduate student who is in good
academic standing and actively participating in
athletics and/or other campus related extracurricular activity.
Phi Gamma Nu: Scholarship Key Awarded
by the National Professional Sorority in
Business to a School of Business graduating
senior woman selected by the faculty on the
basis of overall grade point average, grade
point average in the major, and nonscholastic
activities.
Pi Sigma Epsilon Scholarship Key:
Awarded to a graduating School of Business
senior who exemplifies academic and
professional excellence in the area of
marketing.
Memorial, Alumni and
General Scholarship Awards
Alumni Talented Student Scholarships:
Awarded annually to those students who
demonstrate a superior intellectual, artistic, or
performing talent in a single field of study.
Awards are limited and are restricted to
students entering the University for the first
time.
Martha Bealler Altman Scholarship:
Established by Nolan T. Altman, Class of 1977
in memory of his Mother. Awarded to a
School of Business sophomore or junior
student selected by Mr. Altman on the basis of
scholastic achievement, activities, and
community service.
Class of 1936 & 1941 Scholarship:
Awarded to an undergraduate who is enrolled
in the Academy of Initial Teacher Preparation
within the Department of Educational Theory
and Practice, in good academic standing and
who demonstrates financial need.
Fraternity and Sorority
Sponsored Scholarships &
Awards
Class of 1937 Memorial Scholarship:
Awarded to an undergraduate student who
exhibits outstanding academic performance
and potential, with consideration to financial
need, and a commitment to pursue education
in the field of teaching.
Alpha Pi Alpha Scholarships: Awarded
annually to offspring of University at Albany,
State University of New York Alpha Pi Alpha
members and other students who are full-time
matriculated students in attendance and who
are in good academic standing at the
University.
Delta Omega Scholarship Endowment:
Honoring the memory of the Delta Omega
Sorority, this scholarship is awarded to an
outstanding female student enrolled in the
Teacher Education program.
Delta Sigma Pi Scholarship Key:
Awarded by the Zeta Psi chapter of the
International Business Fraternity of Delta
Sigma Pi to the School of Business graduating
senior with the highest overall grade point
average.
Class of 1939 Scholarship: Awarded to an
undergraduate student who exhibits
outstanding academic performance and
potential, and breadth of accomplishment, with
consideration to financial need.
Class of 1952 Reunion Scholarship:
Awarded to a junior or senior University at
Albany student who is outstanding in academic
and extra-curricular activities. The award is issued
each year in the name of one or more
distinguished teaching faculty who were
associated with the College for Teachers during
some or all of the period from 1948 to 1952,
during the undergraduate years of the Class of
1952.
Class of 1956 Scholarship: Awarded to an
undergraduate student enrolled in the
Academy of Initial Teacher Preparation within
the Department of Educational Theory and
Practice, in good academic standing and who
Class of 1972 Scholarship Award:
Awarded to an Albany senior who, on the basis of
both need and merit, is judged most deserving to
pursue graduate study at this University.
Class of 1979 Scholarship: Awarded to an
undergraduate student who is in good
academic standing and who has demonstrated
extreme financial need.
Class of 1980 Scholarship: Awarded to an
undergraduate who is in good academic
standing (3.0+ GPA) and demonstrates
financial need.
Class of 1981 Scholarship: Awarded to an
undergraduate who possesses a 3.5+ GPA,
demonstrates financial need and is a New York
State resident.
Class of 1985 Scholarship: To provide an
annual scholarship to one or more undergraduate
students who possess a 3.0+ GPA and who have
demonstrated financial need.
Class of 1986 Scholarship: Awarded to a
sophomore, junior or senior who possesses a GPA
of 3.5+ and has demonstrated financial need.
Sesquicentennial Class Council
Scholarship (1994): To provide a merit
based scholarship to a member of the senior
class who has demonstrated leadership,
maintained a 3.0+ GPA, is commitment to
community service and has been a student at
the University at Albany during both junior
and senior years.
Edna Craig ’21 Memorial Award: Awarded
to members of the senior class and/or other
members of the student body to provide assistance
based on financial need and eligibility.
Stanley Fink Legislative Internship
Endowment: Awarded to juniors or seniors who
have completed at least 56 credits of academic work
at the University at Albany and who demonstrate
superior academic achievement with consideration
to financial need.
Robyn Fishelberg Memorial
Scholarship: Awarded to an undergraduate
woman who demonstrates outstanding
humanitarian qualities through involvement in
University activities and community service.
Florence Smith French ’33
Scholarship: In support of a full-time
undergraduate student.
Bruce B. and Louise Steen Gravitt ’38
Scholarship: Supports a full-time
undergraduate female student majoring in
Mathematics.
Howard & Rosalie Lefkowitz Memorial
Fund: Awarded to an incoming freshman
from one of the five boroughs of New York
City. This award is based primarily on
27
University at Albany
financial need.
28
Undergraduate Bulletin 2003-2004
Dr. Theodore H. Fossieck – Milne School
Scholarship: Awarded to newly admitted
undergraduate students who are descendants of
Milne School graduates or Milne School faculty.
Myskania Scholarship: To award full-time
undergraduate students in recognition of their
outstanding leadership and service to the
University.
National Honoraries
and Honor Societies
Membership in the following national
honoraries and honor societies is available to
qualified students. Interested students should
contact the appropriate dean or department
chair for further information.
Ralph Sidman Memorial Scholarship:
Provides a scholarship to an undergraduate
student from the Capital District who exhibits
outstanding academic performance and
potential with consideration to financial need.
Alpha Kappa Delta: Alpha Kappa Delta is a
national honorary society in sociology.
The University at Albany Alumni
Association Minerva Scholarship:
Awarded to an incoming freshman student who
demonstrates high academic standing, leadership
qualities and who has financial need.
Beta Gamma Sigma: Beta Gamma Sigma is the
national honor society for students of business
administration and accounting.
Ada Craig Walker Award: Awarded to the
senior woman who best typifies the ideals of
the University.
Gamma Theta Upsilon: Gamma Theta Upsilon
is the International Honor Society in
Geography.
Richard & Therese Wienecke Hudson
’32 Scholarship: In support of an incoming
undergraduate student based on financial need.
Established by Richard and Therese Wienecke
'32.
Kappa Delta Pi: is an international honor
society in education.
Rockefeller College of Public
Affairs & Policy
Phi Alpha Theta: The Chi Delta Chapter of Phi
Alpha Theta is an international honor society
in history.
Anna Boochever DeBeer ’12 Scholarship:
Awarded annually to graduate students at the
University in the fields of Criminal Justice, Public
Affairs, Social Welfare or other areas of human
relations, or to assist dedicated and committed
students who pursue academic careers in fields
which enable them to work for the betterment of
society.
Alpha Phi Sigma: Alpha Phi Sigma is the
national criminal justice honor society.
Dobro Slovo: Dobro Slovo is the national
Slavic honor society.
Phi Alpha: The Alpha Gamma Chapter of Phi
Alpha is an academic honorary society for
undergraduate social work/welfare majors.
Pi Delta Phi: Pi Delta Phi is a national honor
society in French. A series of scholarships are
offered to members of Pi Delta Phi in a
national competition.
Pi Sigma Alpha: Pi Sigma Alpha is a national
honorary society in political science.
Psi Chi: Psi Chi is the national honor society
for students in psychology.
Sigma Delta Pi: The Eta Psi Chapter of Sigma
Delta Pi is a national Spanish honorary
dedicated to promoting Spanish language and
culture in non-Spanish speaking countries.
Sigma Pi Sigma: Sigma Pi Sigma is a national
honor society associated with the American
Institute of Physics.
Sigma Tau Delta: Sigma Tau Delta is a national
academic honor society for students of English.
Sigma Xi: Sigma Xi, the Scientific Research
Society, is a national and international
honorary for those with research achievement.
Undergraduates who have completed a
research project or publication of note are
eligible.
S TUDENT
R ETENTION D ATA
Approximately 85 percent of matriculated
freshmen enroll for a second year of study.
Approximately 52 percent of matriculated fulltime freshmen receive a baccalaureate degree
within four years of study; approximately 63
percent within five years of study; and 64
percent within six years of study. An additional 28
percent transfer to another institution.
For full-time transfers, approximately 63
percent receive a baccalaureate degree within
four years of study at this University.
S TUDENT
C ONSUMER
I NFORMATION
Federal regulations require the University to
provide all prospective and enrolled students
with information on subjects with which you
should be familiar. This information can be
found at www.albany.edu/ir/rtk.
The subjects include student financial aid
(description of aid programs available,
eligibility criteria, how to apply, the method of
award and distribution, satisfactory progress
standards, loan terms and deferrals); tuition
and other costs; refund and withdrawal
policies; information about academic
programs, personnel and facilities; facilities
and services available to disabled students;
retention and graduation rates; and athletic
program participation rates and financial
support data. Also available is the University’s
Annual Security Report which includes
statistics for the previous three years
concerning reported crimes that occurred on
campus, in certain off-campus buildings or
property owned or controlled by the
University, and on public property within, or
immediately adjacent to and accessible from,
the campus. The report also includes
institutional policies concerning campus
security, such as policies concerning alcohol
and drug use, crime prevention, the reporting
of crimes, sexual assault, and other matters.
Information regarding parent and student
rights under the Family Educational Rights
and Privacy Act (FERPA) with respect to
access to and the release of student education
records is also available. Inquiries or paper
copies should be directed to RTK, Institutional
Research, UAB321, 1400 Washington
Avenue, Albany, NY 12222.
29
University at Albany
UNDERGRADUATE
A CADEMIC
R EGULATIONS
As one of the Councils of the University Senate,
the Undergraduate Academic Council
recommends policy concerning undergraduate
academic programs and regulations. To assist in
academic governance, individual schools and
colleges have collateral committees that can
recommend academic policy to this council. It is
the responsibility of each undergraduate student to
be knowledgeable concerning pertinent academic
policy. The University encourages students to
accept the widest responsibility for their academic
programs. For clarification and interpretation of
the regulations contained in this section, students
should contact the Office of Undergraduate
Studies, LC 30.
Policy Exceptions
In rare cases and for extraordinary reasons,
exceptions to University, college, school, and
department academic regulations may be
granted to individual students. A student who
wishes an exception to an existing regulation
should, in the case of a college, school or
department regulation, consult with the head of
the unit in question for the approved procedure
for submitting an appeal. For exceptions to
University regulations, students should contact
the Committee on Academic Standing through
the Office of Undergraduate Studies (LC 30).
Standards of Academic Integrity
Throughout their history, institutions of higher
learning have viewed themselves and have been
viewed by society as a community of persons
not only seeking truth and knowledge, but
seeking them in a truthful and ethical fashion.
Indeed, the institution traditionally trusted by
the public and the one to which it most often
turns when unbiased, factual information is
needed is the university. Thus, how a university
behaves is as important as what it explores and
learns.
The University at Albany expects all members
of its community to conduct themselves in a
manner befitting this tradition of honor and
integrity. They are expected to assist the
University by reporting suspected violations of
academic integrity to appropriate faculty and/or
administration offices. Behavior that is
detrimental to the University’s role as an
educational institution is unacceptable and
requires attention by all citizens of its
community.
These guidelines, designed especially for
students, define a context of values within which
individual and institutional decisions on
academic integrity can be made.
30
It is every student’s responsibility to
become familiar with the standards of
academic integrity at the University.
Claims of ignorance, of unintentional
error, or of academic or personal
pressures are not sufficient reasons for
violations of academic integrity.
The following is a list of the types of
behaviors that are defined as examples of
academic dishonesty and are therefore
unacceptable. Attempts to commit such acts
also fall under the term academic
dishonesty and are subject to penalty. No
set of guidelines can, of course, define all
possible types or degrees of academic
dishonesty; thus, the following descriptions
should be understood as examples of
infractions rather than an exhaustive list.
Individual faculty members and the judicial
boards of the University will continue to
judge each case according to its particular
merit.
Plagiarism
Presenting as one’s own work the work of
another person (for example, the words, ideas,
information, data, evidence, organizing
principles, or style of presentation of someone
else). Plagiarism includes paraphrasing or
summarizing without acknowledgment,
submission of another student’s work as one’s
own, the purchase of prepared research or
completed papers or projects, and the
unacknowledged use of research sources
gathered by someone else. Failure to indicate
accurately the extent and precise nature of
one’s reliance on other sources is also a form
of plagiarism. The student is responsible for
understanding the legitimate use of sources,
the appropriate ways of acknowledging
academic, scholarly, or creative indebtedness,
and the consequences for violating University
regulations.
EXAMPLES OF PLAGIARISM INCLUDE: failure to
acknowledge the source(s) of even a few
phrases, sentences, or paragraphs; failure to
acknowledge a quotation or paraphrase of
paragraph-length sections of a paper; failure to
acknowledge the source(s) of a major idea or
the source(s) for an ordering principle central
to the paper’s or project’s structure; failure to
acknowledge the source (quoted, paraphrased,
or summarized) of major sections or passages
in the paper or project; the unacknowledged
use of several major ideas or extensive reliance
on another person’s data, evidence, or critical
method; submitting as one’s own work, work
borrowed, stolen, or purchased from someone
else.
Cheating on Examinations
Giving or receiving unauthorized help
before, during, or after an examination.
Examples of unauthorized help include
collaboration of any sort during an
examination (unless specifically approved by
the instructor); collaboration before an
examination (when such collaboration is
specifically forbidden by the instructor); the
use of notes, books, or other aids during an
examination (unless permitted by the
instructor); arranging for another person to
take an examination in one’s place; looking
upon someone else’s examination during the
examination period; intentionally allowing
another student to look upon one’s exam; the
unauthorized discussing of test items during
the examination period; and the passing of
any examination information to students who
have not yet taken the examination. There
can be no conversation while an examination
is in progress unless specifically authorized
by the instructor.
Multiple Submission
Submitting substantial portions of the same
work for credit more than once, without the
prior explicit consent of the instructor(s) to
whom the material is being (or has in the past
been) submitted.
Forgery
Imitating another person’s signature on
academic or other official documents (e.g.,
the signing of an adviser’s name to an
academic advising form).
Sabotage
Destroying, damaging, or stealing of
another’s work or working materials
(including lab experiments, computer
programs, term papers, or projects).
Unauthorized Collaboration
Collaborating on projects, papers, or other
academic exercises which is regarded as
inappropriate by the instructor(s). Although
the usual faculty assumption is that work
submitted for credit is entirely one’s own,
standards on appropriate and inappropriate
collaboration vary widely among individual
faculty and the different disciplines.
Students who want to confer or collaborate
with one another on work receiving
academic credit should make certain of the
instructor’s expectations and standards.
Falsification
Misrepresenting material or fabricating
information in an academic exercise or
assignment (for example, the false or
misleading citation of sources, the falsification
of experimental or computer data, etc.).
Undergraduate Bulletin 2003-2004
Bribery
Offering or giving any article of value or service
to an instructor in an attempt to receive a grade
or other benefits not legitimately earned or not
available to other students in the class.
Theft, Damage, or Misuse of Library or
Computer Resources
Removing uncharged library materials from the
library, defacing or damaging library materials,
intentionally displacing or hoarding materials
within the library for one’s unauthorized private
use, or other abuse of reserve-book privileges.
Or, without authorization, using the University’s
or another person’s computer accounts, codes,
passwords, or facilities; damaging computer
equipment; or interfering with the operation of
the computing system of the University. The
Computing Center has established specific rules
governing the use of computing facilities. These
rules are available at the Center and it is every
student’s responsibility to become familiar with
them.
Penalties and Procedures for
Violations of Academic Integrity
When a faculty member has information that a
student has violated academic integrity in a
course or program for which he or she is
responsible and determines that a violation has
occurred, he or she will inform the student and
impose an appropriate sanction. A faculty
member may make any one or a combination of
the following responses to the infractions cited
above:
Warning without further penalty; requiring
rewriting of a paper containing plagiarized
material; lowering of a paper or project grade by
one full grade or more; giving a failing grade on
a paper containing plagiarized material; giving a
failing grade on any examination in which
cheating occurred; withholding permission to
withdraw from the course after a penalty has
been imposed; lowering a course grade by one
full grade or more; giving a failing grade in a
course; imposing a penalty uniquely designed
for the particular infraction.
If a faculty member announces a failing grade in
the course as a possible result of academic
dishonesty, the student receiving such a penalty
will not be permitted to withdraw from the
course unless the grievance or judicial system
rules in favor of the student.
Any faculty member encountering matters of
academic dishonesty in an academic program or
class for which he or she has responsibility may,
in addition to, or in lieu of, the actions cited
above, refer a case to the University Judicial
System. After considering the case under the
procedures provided by the University, the
appropriate University judicial body will
recommend the disposition of the case that can
include disciplinary probation, suspension, or
expulsion from the University.
Faculty members are expected to report in
writing to the Offices of Graduate or
Undergraduate Studies, as appropriate, all
sanctions they impose, along with a brief
description of the incident. A copy of the
report is to be given to the student. These
offices will maintain a copy of such reports for
the duration of a student’s enrollment at the
University. Upon graduation or separation of
the student from the University, these
confidential reports will be destroyed.
Violations of academic integrity by graduate
students are reported by faculty directly to the
Office of Graduate Admissions and Policy for
appropriate action. This office replaces the
Office of Undergraduate Studies in all matters
involving graduate student violations of
academic integrity.
Students who feel they have been erroneously
penalized for an academic integrity infraction
or think that a penalty is inappropriate may
grieve these issues through procedures
developed for each college, school, program,
or department of the University. Copies of the
procedures are maintained in Deans’ offices, in
the Office of Undergraduate Studies or
Graduate Studies, and in the Office of the Vice
President for Student Affairs. A copy of the
disposition of any grievance arising in matters
of academic dishonesty will be attached to the
faculty correspondence in the Offices of
Undergraduate or Graduate Studies.
When a student violates academic integrity in
more than one academic exercise, whether
those infractions occurred during the same or
different periods of time or in the same or
different courses, the University regards the
offense as an especially serious subversion of
academic integrity. The matter becomes
particularly severe when the student has been
confronted with the first infraction before the
second is committed. Whenever the Office of
Undergraduate or Graduate Studies receives a
second academic integrity report on a student,
the Dean will request a hearing before the
University Judicial System.
The Director of Libraries or the Computing
Center, upon a finding of theft, damage, or
misuse of facilities or resources, will forward
all such cases to the University Judicial
System for review and disposition, which can
include suspension or expulsion from the
University. The Director of the Library or the
Computing Center may, in individual cases,
limit access to the library or computing center
pending action by the University Judicial
System. In all other cases of academic
dishonesty that come to the attention of any
staff, faculty, or student, it is expected that the
Dean of Undergraduate Studies will be
notified of such infractions. The Dean of
Undergraduate Studies will process all such
alleged matters of academic dishonesty and
refer them to the University Judicial System.
The University Judicial System was
established by the governing bodies of this
campus and is administratively the
responsibility of the Vice President for Student
Affairs. Any questions about the procedures of
the University Judicial System may be secured
by inquiry to that office.
Policy for Freedom of Expression
The University reaffirms its commitment to
the principle that the widest possible scope
for freedom of expression is the foundation
of an institution dedicated to vigorous
inquiry, robust debate, and the continuous
search for a proper balance between
freedom and order. The University seeks to
foster an environment in which persons who
are on its campus legitimately may express
their views as widely and as passionately as
possible; at the same time, the University
pledges to provide the greatest protection
available for controversial, unpopular,
dissident, or minority opinions. The
University believes that censorship is
always suspect, that intimidation is always
repugnant, and that attempts to discourage
constitutionally protected expression may be
antithetical to the University’s essential
missions: to discover new knowledge and to
educate.
All persons on University-controlled
premises are bound by the Rules and
Regulations for Maintenance of Public
Order, which deal in part with freedom of
expression (adopted by the Board of
Trustees of the of the State University of
New York June 18,1969; amended
1969,1980). Members of the University
community should familiarize themselves
with those rules and regulations. In
addition, University faculty are protected by
and bound by Article XI, Title 1, Sec. I of
the Policies of the Board of Trustees
(adopted January 1987), entitled “Academic
Freedom.”
University officials or other members of the
University community in a position to review
posters, publications, speakers, performances, or
any other form of expression may establish
legitimate time, place, and manner regulations
for the maintenance of an orderly educational
environment; however, they may not prohibit
expression for any reason related to the content
of the expression, except as permitted in those
narrow areas of expression devoid of federal or
state constitutional protection.
Speakers invited to campus by University
groups or individuals, and other speakers who
may be legitimately present on campus, will be
given the utmost protection to communicate
their messages without disruptive harassment or
interference. Opponents to those speakers enjoy
the same protections for expressing their dissent.
31
University at Albany
All members of the University community
share the duty to support, protect, and extend
the commitment to the principle of freedom of
expression, and to discuss this commitment
with groups or individuals who seek to take
part in University life. While all persons may
seek to peacefully discourage speech that may
be unnecessarily offensive to particular
individuals or groups, speech that may be
antithetical to the University’s values, those
persons must support the legal right of free
speech.
Under Section 1.5 of its charge, the Council on
Academic Freedom and Ethics will serve as a
hearing body available to those members of
the University community who feel their
freedom of expression has been unfairly
suppressed. The Council will report its
findings to the President for further review and
action.
Notification of Rights under FERPA
The Family Educational Rights and Privacy
Act (FERPA) affords students certain rights
with respect to their education records. These
rights are:
1) The right to inspect and review the
student's education records within 45 days of
the day the University receives a request for
access. Students should submit to the
registrar, dean, or head of the academic
department [or appropriate official] written
requests that identify the record(s) they wish
to inspect. The University official will make
arrangements for access and notify the
student of the time and place where the
records may be inspected. If the records are
not maintained by the University official to
whom the request was submitted, that
official shall advise the student of the correct
official to whom the request should be
addressed.
2) The right to request the amendment of
the student's education records that the
student believes is inaccurate or misleading.
Students may ask the University to amend a
record that they believe is inaccurate or
misleading. They should write the
University official responsible for the record,
clearly identify the part of the record they
want changed, and specify why it is
inaccurate or misleading. If the University
decides not to amend the record as requested
by the student, the University will notify the
student of the decision and advise the
student of his or her right to a hearing
regarding the request for amendment.
Additional information regarding the hearing
procedures will be provided to the student
when notified of the right to a hearing.
32
3) The right to consent to disclosures of
personally identifiable information contained
in the student's education records, except to
the extent that FERPA authorizes disclosure
without consent. One exception, which
permits disclosure without consent, is
disclosure to school officials with legitimate
educational interests. A school official is
defined as a person employed by the
University in an administrative, supervisory,
academic, or support staff position
(including law enforcement unit and health
staff); a person or company with whom the
University has contracted (such as an
attorney, auditor, or collection agent); a
person serving on the Board of Trustees; or
assisting another school official in
performing his or her tasks. A school official
has a legitimate educational interest if the
official needs to review an education record
in order to fulfill his or her professional
responsibility.
4) Upon request, the University discloses
education records without consent to
officials of another school in which a student
seeks or intends to enroll.
5) The right to file a complaint with the
U.S. Department of Education concerning
alleged failures by the University to comply
with the requirements of FERPA. The name
and address of the Office that administers
FERPA is:
Family Policy Compliance Office
U.S. Department of Education
400 Maryland Avenue SW
Washington, DC 20202-4605
Release of Student Information by
Registrar
The following is the policy of control of
student academic information to released by
the Office of the Registrar:
1) Only the following information may be
released to any outside source not
officially connected to the State
University of New York or one of its
agents:
a) Any information listed as “directory
information” by the University.
b) Dates of attendance
c) If the student received a degree, and
if so, which degree.
2) Any office of the State University of New
York or its agent may have released to it
any information kept on a student on a
“need-to-know” basis
3) No further information will be released
without the written consent of the student.
Absolutely no transcript of students’
records will be released outside the
University without their signed
authorization.
Official Notifications to Students
Official University notifications to students
are sent to their permanent addresses on file
with the Registrar. Students are responsible
for insuring that their permanent addresses
are kept up-to-date by filing the appropriate
form with the Registrar’s Office, Campus
Center, Room B 25.
School or College Enrollment
Most students are advised in the Advisement
Services Center/
Undergraduate Studies during their freshman
year. When students have been accepted to a
major, they are enrolled in the school or
college offering study in the desired major
field, these are the College of Arts and
Sciences and the Schools of Business,
Criminal Justice, Public Affairs, and Social
Welfare. In line with policy developed by the
Committee on Academic Standing, a particular
department, school or college within the
University may permit a student to enroll as a
major who has not completed a minimum of
24 graduation credits. Upon approval of the
Committee on Academic Standing of the
Undergraduate Academic Council additional
conditions of initial and continued enrollment
as a major may be required by individual
departments, schools, or colleges.
Class Standing
Students are classified by the Registrar’s Office
on the basis of graduation credits, as follows:
Freshmen
Fewer than 24 crs
Sophomore
24–55 crs
Junior
56–87 crs
Senior
88 or more crs
Attendance
Class attendance is a matter between the
instructor and the student. Instructors are
obliged to announce and interpret specific
attendance policies to their classes at the
beginning of the term.
Absences from Examinations: Students are
expected to attend all examinations, except for a
compelling reason. A student who learns that
s/he will miss a full-class period, a mid-term
examination, or a final examination must notify
the instructor as soon as the conflict is noted.
1. If the cause of the absence is documented
hospitalization, a death in the immediate
family, a personal emergency, or a religious
observance, the professor must administer a
make-up examination or offer an alternative
mutually agreeable to the instructor and the
student. All documentation concerning
absences must be presented to the instructor
as soon as possible, and in any case before
the end of the academic semester in which
the absence occurs.
Undergraduate Bulletin 2003-2004
2. If the cause of the absence is a major
academic conference at which the student
has a significant participation, a varsity
athletic contest (excluding practice sessions
and intra-squad games), a field trip in
another course, or some other compelling
reason, the student must notify the professor
involved as soon as possible, providing
verification of the conflict. The instructor is
expected to provide, if at all possible, an
alternative by which the student will not be
penalized as a result of the conflict.
Any conflicts between student and faculty in
accepting the alternative may be presented for
resolution to the Chair of the department in
which the course is offered. The resolution
proposed by the chair is advisory, leaving the
final decision to the faculty member.
Fraudulent excuses from examinations are
considered violations of academic integrity and
are grounds for academic or disciplinary
penalties.
Attendance: Section 224-a. of the Education Law:
224-a. Students unable because of religious beliefs
to register or attend classes on certain days.
1. No person shall be expelled from or be
refused admission as a student to an
institution of higher education for the
reason that he or she is unable, because of
his or her religious beliefs, to register or
attend classes or to participate in any
examination, study, or work requirement
on a particular day or days.
2. Any student in an institution of higher
education who is unable, because of his or
her religious beliefs, to attend classes on a
particular day or days shall, because of
such absence on the particular day or days,
be excused from any examination or any
study or work requirements.
3. It shall be the responsibility of the faculty and
of the administrative officials of each
institution of higher education to make
available to each student who is absent from
school, because of his religious beliefs, an
equivalent opportunity to register for classes
or make up any examination, study, or work
requirements which he or she may have
missed because of such absence on any
particular day or days. No fees of any kind
shall be charged by the institution for making
available to the said student such equivalent
opportunity.
4. If registration, classes, examinations, study, or
work requirements are held on Friday after four
o’clock post meridian or on Saturday, similar or
makeup classes, examinations, study or work
requirements or opportunity to register shall be
made available on other days, where it is
possible and practicable to do so. No special
fees shall be charged for these classes,
examinations, study or work requirements or
registration held on other days.
5. In effectuating the provisions of this
section, it shall be the duty of the faculty
and of the administrative officials of each
institution of higher education to exercise
the fullest measure of good faith. No
adverse or prejudicial effects shall result to
any student because of his availing himself
of the provisions of this section.
6. Any student who is aggrieved by the
alleged failure of any faculty or
administrative official to comply in good
faith with the provisions of this section
shall be entitled to maintain an action or
proceeding in the supreme court of the
county in which such institution of higher
education is located for the enforcement of
his rights under this section.
6-a. It shall be the responsibility of the
administrative officials of each institution
of higher education to give written notice
to students of their rights under this
section, informing them that each student
who is absent from school, because of his
or her religious beliefs, must be given an
equivalent opportunity to register for
classes or make up any examination, study
or work requirements which he or she may
have missed because of such absence on
any particular day or days. No fees of any
kind shall be charged by the institution for
making available to such student such
equivalent opportunity.
7. As used in this section, the term
“institution of higher education” shall mean
any institution of higher education,
recognized and approved by the regents of
the University of the state of New York,
which provides a course of study leading to
the granting of a post-secondary degree or
diploma. Such term shall not include any
institution which is operated, supervised or
controlled by a church or by a religious or
denominational organization whose
educational programs are principally
designed for the purpose of training
ministers or other religious functionaries or
for the purpose of propagating religious
doctrines. As used in this section, the term
“religious belief” shall mean beliefs
associated with any corporation organized
and operated exclusively for religious
purposes, which is not disqualified for tax
exemption under section 501 of the United
States Code.
As amended by Laws of 1992, chapter 278
Syllabus Requirement
The instructor of every section of an
undergraduate class at the University at
Albany shall provide each student in the
section a printed or web-published copy of the
syllabus for that section distributed during the
first week of the class (preferably on the first
regularly scheduled day the section meets)
This syllabus must contain at least the
information defined below. Each instructor
retains the right to modify the syllabus and
give notice in class of any modifications in a
timely fashion. Students are responsible to
apprise themselves of such notices. This
requirement becomes effective with the fall
2002 semester.
M IN IM U M C O N T E N T S O F A
C LAS S S Y LLAB U S :
Catalog number and title of the course
Term and call number of the section
Location(s) and meeting times of the section
Instructor’s name and title
If applicable, name(s) of teaching assistants
in the class
Instructor’s contact information (e.g., e-mail
address, office phone number, office
location, fax)
Instructor’s office hours
Course description, overview and
objective(s)
If applicable, General Education
category/categories met by the course and
how the course fulfills those General
Education objectives
Prerequisites of the course
The instructor should specifically indicate
those prerequisites that are critical to
success in the class and that are
enforceable.
Grading scheme
Whether the course is A-E or. S/U graded
Overall method by which grades will be
determined (“weights” of exams, class
participation, etc.)
Course requirements, including but not
limited to:
Required textbooks
Other required materials, purchases; fees
(when applicable)
Projected date and time of class exams,
papers, projects, midterm, and final
Attendance policies for the class
General paper, project, and test requirements
Requirement of Internet for course work,
when applicable
Safety policies (when applicable)
The course syllabus may also include such
additional information as the instructor deems
appropriate or necessary.
33
University at Albany
Course Enrollment
Students ordinarily enroll in courses at the
level appropriate to their class.
Individual departments have the authority to
require a C or S grade in courses that are
prerequisite for advanced courses in that area.
Senior Enrollment in 100-Level Courses:
Students with senior status (credits completed
plus credits in progress equal to or exceeding
88) shall be allowed into courses at the 100
level only during the Program Adjustment
period as defined by the University Calendar.
This restriction does not apply to Music
Performance courses and any summer session
courses. Other exceptions may be granted by
the Office of Undergraduate Studies (LC 30).
Graduate Courses for Undergraduate Credit:
A senior with a superior academic record
may register for a 500-level course for
undergraduate credit with the approval of
the major department chair and the course
instructor. In exceptional circumstances,
seniors may be authorized to register for
600-level graduate courses provided they
have completed most of the upper division
undergraduate and other courses essential to
their major and require a graduate course to
strengthen it. To qualify for such
enrollment the senior must have a superior
record, particularly in his or her major field.
To register for a 600-level course, students
must have the approval of their adviser and
obtain the written consent of their
department chair and the instructor offering
the course. The department chair should
arrange for copies of these consents to be
distributed to the persons involved and to
be filed in the student’s official folder.
Graduate Courses for Graduate Credit:
Seniors of high academic standing in the
University may receive graduate credit for
graduate courses taken in excess of
undergraduate requirements in the last
semester of their senior year provided not
more than 6 credits are needed to complete the
student’s undergraduate program. Consent of
the Dean of Graduate Studies is required and
must be obtained in advance of registration to
receive such credit. Seniors who are
permitted to take courses for graduate credit
in their last semester also must make formal
application for admission to a graduate
program and be accepted as a graduate
student before registering for study in the
final semester.
Auditing Courses
Informal Audit: This category of audit permits
any student or resident of the state to visit any
course (except those listed here). The informal
auditor visits courses without tuition, fees,
examinations, grading, or credit; and no record
is maintained. The instructor determines the
level of participation of the informal auditor. A
student matriculated at Albany confers with
the instructor of the course and requests
consent to visit the course. An individual not
34
matriculated at this University must first
contact the Office of General Studies and then
obtain consent of the individual instructor of
the course. NOTE: Informal Audit is not
allowed during Summer Session.
Formal Audit: This category of audit allows
any student to formally audit any course
(except those listed here). The formal auditor
pays regular tuition and fees, and the course is
entered on the transcript of the student with
the grade of N (noncredit) or W (withdrawn)
according to 6. as follows.
Exceptions: Generally, the following types
of courses cannot be formally audited:
practica, internships, research and
independent study courses, field courses,
clinical courses, workshops, and foreign
study programs. Students who feel they
have an extraordinary need to audit these
courses must prepare a written rationale
and submit it to the chair of the
department in which the course is offered.
Formal audit of graduate-level courses is
restricted as outlined in 3. below. If a
course is filled and has auditors in it, a
student wishing to take the course for
credit may displace the auditor.
Formal Audit Policies
1. The student must register for the courses
during the program adjustment period.
2. Students must pay the regular tuition and
fees based on their academic status. Fees
and tuition will be based on the
student’s total load, including courses
formally audited. Credits taken by
formal audit will not count toward fulltime status for the purposes of academic
retention.
3. Registration for the formally audited course
must be approved by the student’s academic
adviser (for nonmatriculated students, either
the Office of General Studies or the Office of
Admissions) and the course instructor. A
senior with a superior academic record may
formally audit a 500-level course with the
approval of the academic adviser, the major
department chair, and the course instructor.
In exceptional circumstances, a senior may
be authorized to formally audit a 600-level
graduate course provided the student has
completed most of the upper-division
undergraduate and other courses essential to
the major field. To formally audit a 600-level
course, students must have the approval of
their adviser and obtain the written consent
of their department chair and the instructor
offering the course. The department chair
will arrange for copies of these consents to
be distributed to the persons involved and to
be filed in the student’s official folder.
4. A student may not change from credit to
audit or from audit to credit after the last
day to add a course.
5. The formal audit option is limited to a
maximum of two courses per term for
each student.
6. An individual who formally audits a course
must participate in appropriate ways as
determined by the instructor. It will be the
responsibility of the student to ascertain from
the instructor the degree of participation
required. The course will appear at the end of
the term on the transcript of the student with a
grade of N (noncredit). A formal auditor may
withdraw from a course not later than one
week after the mid-semester date as stated in
the academic calendar and be assigned a W. A
student failing to participate satisfactorily will
be withdrawn and assigned a W.
7. Although not recommended, formally audited
undergraduate courses may be taken for
graduation credit at a later date. Formally
audited graduate courses may not be taken
again for graduate credit.
Adding Courses
All students must drop and add courses on
the Web via www.albany.edu/myualbany.
From the first class day through the sixth
class day of the semester, enter myualbany
on the web and enter the call number of the
course. If the course is closed or restricted,
a Section Key Number from the instructor
is also necessary. From the seventh class
day through the tenth class day of the
semester, a Section Key Number (SKN)
from the instructor is required for all adds.
Enter myualbany on the web, enter the call
number and the Section Key Number for the
course.
Subject to the approval of the Dean of
Undergraduate Studies, after the tenth class
day of the semester, a Section Key Number
from the instructor must be obtained before
the Program Adjustment can be accepted by
the Registrar’s Office. After the tenth class
day of the semester, all late adds must be
done in person at the Registrar’s Office,
CC-B25. A fee will be charged for this
Program Adjustment.
In the event permission to late add a course
after the tenth day of class is denied, a
student may appeal that decision for any
reason to the Committee on Academic
Standing of the Undergraduate Academic
Council.
Undergraduate Bulletin 2003-2004
A “class day” is here defined to be any day
from Monday through Friday in which
classes are in session and the Registrar’s
Office is open. The above methods of
adding a course apply to quarter (“8 week”)
courses and summer session course work on
a prorated basis, determined by the length
of the course in question.
Dropping Courses
All students must drop and add courses on
the Web via www.albany.edu/myualbany.
From the first class day through the tenth
class day of the semester, enter myualbany
on the web and enter the call number of the
course. During this time, a dropped course
will be removed from the student’s record.
A “class day” is defined as in “Adding
Courses” above.
After the tenth class day through the “last
day to drop a course” (as specified in the
Academic Calendar) a student may drop a
course entering myualbany on the web and
entering the call number of the course.
During this time, a dropped course will
remain on the student’s record and an
indicator of W will be entered in the grade
column. The W will be entered regardless
of whether the student has ever attended a
class.
If a faculty member announces a failing
grade in the course as a possible result of
academic dishonesty, the student receiving
such a penalty will not be permitted to
withdraw from the course unless the
grievance or judicial system rules in favor
of the student.
A student still enrolled in a class after the
“last day to drop” is expected to fulfill the
course requirements. The grade recorded
for the course shall be determined on this
basis. A student who registers for a course
but never attends or ceases attendance
before the tenth class day, as reported by
the instructor, yet does not officially drop
the course shall have an indicator of Z
listed in the grade column on his/her
record. The above methods of dropping a
course apply to quarter (“8 week”) courses
and summer session course work on a
prorated basis, determined by the length of
the course in question.
Exceptions to this policy may be granted
by the Committee on Academic Standing
of the Undergraduate Academic Council.
Note: Students receiving financial
assistance through state awards should
refer to Academic Criteria for State
Awards in the Financial Aid and
Estimated Costs sections of this bulletin
before withdrawing from courses.
Policies to Deregister Students
Credit Load
Failure to Attend Class
A normal semester load is 15 credits. The
maximum number of credits for which a student
registers in a semester is an individual matter.
The maximum credit load for a student in a
given semester is determined with the advice
and consent of that student’s academic adviser.
It is incumbent upon students to present a
rationale to their academic adviser for
registration for more than 15 credits.
Beginning on the seventh class day, instructors
may deregister students who fail to attend
class, explain absence, or officially drop
within the first six days of classes of a term
unless prior arrangements have been made by
the student with the instructor. The policy to
deregister students is limited to the add period
at the beginning of the semester. For courses
that meet only once each week, including
laboratory courses, the instructor may
deregister students who do not attend the first
scheduled class.
The above policy also applies to quarter (“8
week”) courses and summer session courses on
a prorated basis, depending on the length of
the course in question. A “class day” is defined
as in “Adding a Course” above.
Beginning with the Spring 2000 semester: For
courses that meet only once each week,
including laboratory courses, the instructor
may deregister students who do not attend the
first scheduled class.
WARNING:
Not all faculty exercise this
prerogative. The fact that you didn’t attend
doesn’t guarantee that your professor dropped
you from the course. Students must take the
responsibility for dropping a course by using
the telephone registration system if they wish
to avoid an E or U in that course.
Lack of Prerequisite(s)
Students may be deregistered who lack the
prerequisite(s) of the course at any time within
the term or quarter the course is being taught.
The Registrar will assign students who have
been deregistered after the program adjustment
period a grade of W for the course.
Transfer of Credit After
Matriculation
Since not all courses are acceptable for transfer
credit, students wishing to take courses at other
institutions for credit toward the degree at this
University should have prior approval in writing
from their academic advisers. Such written
approval must be filed with The Registrar’s
Office, and an official transcript of work
satisfactorily completed at the other
institution(s) must be received by that office
before credit will be awarded. A maximum of 64
transfer credits from two-year colleges or
schools may be applied toward the baccalaureate
degree requirements.
Full-Time, Part-Time Defined
No undergraduate may register for more
than 19 credits.
The Office of the Dean of Undergraduate
Studies (LC 30) may authorize students to
register for more than 19 credits. Students
must present compelling academic
justification and have the approval of their
academic adviser or major department for a
request to exceed 19 credits to be
considered.
Repeating Courses
Courses that can be repeated for graduation
credit are so indicated within the course
descriptions contained in this bulletin.
The following shall apply to students who
enroll more than one time in a course that
cannot be repeated for credit:
1. Appropriate registrations in the course, as
of the last day to add a course in a term as
specified in the academic calendar, shall be
listed on the student’s Academic Record;
all A–E grades for such courses will be
computed in the average.
2. The total graduation credit applicable
toward the student’s degree shall only be
the credit for which that course has been
assigned; i.e., graduation credit for the
course can only be counted once.
Repeating Courses to Meet Program
Admission Requirements
For the purposes of calculating admissions
requirements into restricted majors or
programs, once a student has received the
grade of B- or higher in a course, no future
grade in that course or its equivalent will be
used in determining the student’s average
for admission to that major or program.
An “equivalent” course, for purposes of this
policy, is any course for which the student
cannot receive credit by virtue of his or her
having satisfactorily completed the original
course.
A student registered for a minimum of 12
credits within the semester is classified as a
full-time student. Students registered for
fewer than 12 credits are classified as parttime students for the semester.
35
University at Albany
Final Examinations
Grading
General Policy: In many courses, final examinations
are an integral part of the learning and evaluative
process. Some courses, by virtue of the structure,
material, or style of presentation, do not require a
final examination. The following policy in no way
requires an instructor to administer a final
examination.
The undergraduate grading system for the
University will include the following grades:
A, A-, B+, B, B-, C+, C, C-, D+, D, D-, E.
Final examinations in semester-long
undergraduate courses in the University are to
be given only during the scheduled final
examination period in accordance with the
official schedule of examinations as published
by the Registrar’s Office.
The term “final examination” as used here shall be
defined as any examination of more than one-half
hour’s duration that is given in the terminal phase of
a course. As defined, “final examinations” may be
either comprehensive, covering the majority of the
content of a course, or limited to only a portion of
the content of a course.
No examinations of more than one-half hour’s
duration are to be given during the last five
regularly scheduled class days of a semester.
Instructors seeking any exceptions to the above
policy must submit a written request through their
respective department chair to their college dean, or
directly to their dean in those schools with no
departmental structure. If the dean approves the
exceptions, the instructor must notify the class of
the new scheduled final examination date at least
three weeks before the last regularly scheduled class
day of the semester. At the end of each semester,
each college and school dean must submit to the
vice president for academic affairs a summary of all
exceptions granted to the final examination policy.
The above regulations notwithstanding, the
instructor in any course should always retain the
freedom to reschedule a final examination for an
individual student should such a student present a
case of unquestionable hardship in his or her
scheduled examinations. Such rescheduling
should, however, be done in the final examination
period if at all possible.
Three Finals on One Day: If a student has three
examinations in one day as a result of a
departmental exam or of the official rescheduling of
an examination after the initial final examination
schedule has been published, then that student has
the right to be given a makeup examination for the
departmental or rescheduled examination. The
request for such an exam must be made to the
instructor in the appropriate course no later than two
weeks before the last day of classes of the given
semester. If possible, the makeup examination
should be given within the final examination period.
Retention of Exams: Each instructor shall retain
the final examination papers in his/her courses for
one semester so those students wishing to see
their papers may do so. This regulation does not
apply in those instances in which the instructor
chooses to return the papers to the students at the
end of the course.
36
The normative grading pattern is A–E.
However, students may receive S/U grades
in two circumstances:
In sections and/or courses that have been
designated by departments or schools as
S/U graded.
In courses normally graded A–E in which
the student selects S*/U* grading.
Students who matriculated in Fall 1991 and
thereafter are limited to a maximum of 2 courses
of S* by student selection, and these courses must
be below the 300-level. These 2 courses of S* may
be in addition to all S grades received in
department or school designated S/U graded
sections or courses. Note: in specific courses
approved by the UAC Curriculum Committee, a
department, school, or program may require A–E
grading for majors. See also “Grading Option
Deadline” below.
A–E grades are defined as follows: A–
Excellent, B–Good, C–Fair, D–Poor, and
E–Failure. The grade of E is a failing grade
and cannot be used to fulfill graduation
requirements.
For students matriculating before Fall
1997: The grade of D can be used to fulfill
graduation requirements only if it is
balanced at the same institution by credit
with the grades of A or B. Note that, for
each credit of B one credit of D is balanced,
and for each credit of A two credits of D are
balanced. For balancing purposes, pluses
and minuses associated with a grade are
ignored.
Beginning with the Fall 1997 semester, the
grade of S is defined as equivalent to the
grade of C or higher and is acceptable to
fulfill graduation requirements. The grade
of U (C- or lower) is unsatisfactory and is
not acceptable to fulfill graduation
requirements.
Transfer D Grades:
1. Students matriculating before Fall 2000 can
transfer in D’s if they are balanced at the
same institution by a grade of B or better,
whether the transfer course was taken before
or after they matriculated.
2. Students matriculating in Fall 2000 through
Summer 2001 can transfer in balanced D’s
from prematriculation course work, but they
cannot transfer any D’s for postmatriculation
transfer courses.
3. Students matriculating in Fall 2001 and
thereafter cannot transfer in any grades of D.
4. However, except for the University’s
writing requirements, for which a grade of C
or higher or S is required, transfer work
graded D in a course that applies to one or
more of the University’s General Education
requirements may be applied toward
fulfilling the requirements, even if the
student receives no graduation credit for the
course.
Additionally, the following grades may be
assigned:
I Incomplete. No graduation credit. A
temporary grade requested by the student and
assigned by the instructor only when the
student has nearly completed the course
requirements but because of circumstances
beyond the student’s control the work is not
completed. The date for the completion of
the work is specified by the instructor, but
may not be longer than one month before the
end of the semester following that in which
the incomplete is received. The instructor
assigns the appropriate academic grade no
later than the stated deadline, or extends the
existing incomplete grade to the next
semester. Any grade of I existing after the
stated deadline shall be automatically
changed to E or U according to whether or
not the student is enrolled for A–E or S/U
grading. Except for extenuating
circumstances approved by the Office of
Undergraduate Studies, these converted
grades may not be later changed. (Students
receiving financial assistance through state
awards should refer to Academic Criteria for
State Awards in the expenses and financial
aid section of this bulletin before requesting
grades of I.)
N Noncredit.
W An indicator assigned by the appropriate
administrative officer indicating a student
withdrew from the University, withdrew
from an entire course load for a summer
session, or dropped a course after the last
day to add. For information and
completeness, the W is placed on the
permanent academic record. The W is not
used in any computation of quality point or
cumulative average totals.
Z An indicator assigned by the appropriate
administrative officer indicating a student
enrolled in a course, never attended or
failed to attend after the last day to add, and
took no official action to drop the course.
For information and completeness, the Z is
placed on the permanent academic record.
The Z is not used in any computation of
quality point or cumulative average totals.
Grade Changes
An instructor may not permit students in an
undergraduate course to submit additional
work or to be reexamined for the purpose of
improving their grades after the course has
been completed. Also, The Registrar’s
Office may not enter a change of grade
without the approval of the Dean of
Undergraduate Studies, except, of course,
for changes of I to a final grade.
Undergraduate Bulletin 2003-2004
A grade of A, A-, B+, B, B-, C+, C, C-, D+,
D, D-, E, S, or U may not be changed to a
grade of I. On a case-by-case basis and for
good cause, the Office of the Dean of
Undergraduate Studies continues to have
the power to allow grade changes for
reasons deemed legitimate.
Grading Option Deadline
Students may change their option (A–E or S/U)
for courses not departmentally designated for S/U
grading until two weeks after the last day to add
courses. Changes in grading selections cannot be
authorized beyond the date specified. The grading
option may be changed by filing the appropriate
form with The Registrar’s Office by the date
specified in the academic calendar. When
discussing with an instructor their progress in a
course, students should inform the instructor if
they are taking the course S/U.
Academic Average
The grades of A, A- B+, B, B-, C+, C, C-,
D+, D, D-, and E shall be the only grades
used to determine an average. Grades shall
be weighted as follows: A = 4.0, A- = 3.7,
B+ =3.3, B = 3.0, B- = 2.7, C+ = 2.3, C =
2.0, C- = 1.7, D+ = 1.3, D = 1.0, D- = 0.7,
and E = 0.0. The student’s academic
average is the result of the following
calculation:
1. The number of credits for courses
receiving A–E grades is totaled.
2. Each grade’s weight is multiplied by the
number of credits for the course
receiving that grade.
3. The results of these multiplications are
totaled to yield a weighted total.
4. The weighted total is divided by the total
number of credits receiving A–E grades
to yield an academic average.
Student Academic Record
A student’s official progress records are
maintained in the files of The Registrar’s
Office. A printed report of the student’s
grades for the semester is sent to each
student at the end of each term of
enrollment to the permanent address on file
with the Registrar’s Office.
Academic Retention
Standards
Since the University requires that students
have a cumulative grade point average of
2.0 and an average of 2.0 in the major and
the minor in order to earn a bachelor’s
degree, the grade point average is an
important indicator of the ability to achieve
a bachelor’s degree. Thus, the following
policies are in effect for students whose
performance indicates that they are in
danger of failing to meet the conditions
necessary to earn a degree.
IMPLEMENTATION NOTE :
Although these
revised policies have been implemented for
all undergraduates, entirely replacing the
former Academic Probation, Terminal
Academic Probation, and Academic
Dismissal standards for both non-EOP and
EOP students, no student who matriculated
prior to fall 2000 shall be dismissed or
deregistered under the new standards if
that student’s record under the former
standards would not have resulted in
dismissal or deregistration, respectively.
Academic Warning
A student whose semester grade point
average falls below a 2.0 (but above a 1.0)
will receive an Academic Warning from the
Dean of Undergraduate Studies, with a copy
sent to the academic adviser. This action
will not subject the student to any further
penalty but is intended to remind the
student of the University’s policies as well
as to inform the student of the resources
available to ensure good progress in
achieving an undergraduate degree.
Academic Probation
1) A student whose cumulative grade point
average falls below a 2.0 will be placed on
Academic Probation for the following
semester. A student placed on academic
probation will be notified by the Dean of
Undergraduate Studies, with a copy sent to
the academic adviser, and will be advised of
the resources available to assist students in
improving their academic standing.
2) Students on Academic Probation will be
expected to improve their academic
performance immediately. They must raise
the cumulative GPA to at least 2.0 to be
removed from academic probation. Students
who fail to meet this condition will be
placed on Terminal Probation in the
following semester.
Terminal Probation
1) A student will be placed on Terminal
Probation for the following semester if
either of the following occur:
the student’s semester GPA is below 1.0
the student has a cumulative GPA below
2.0 for a second semester
2) Students on Terminal Probation for a
semester are in danger of academic
dismissal at the end of that semester.
Therefore, as a condition of continuing
their enrollment at Albany, they must
complete an “Academic Improvement Plan”
to improve their academic performance in
consultation with their academic adviser,
and must file this plan with the Office of
the Dean of Undergraduate Studies by the
end of the Add/Drop period. (Failure to file
this form could result in immediate
deregistration from the University.)
3) If the student achieves a semester GPA
and cumulative GPA of at least 2.0, the
student will be removed from Terminal
Probation.
4) If the student’s semester GPA is at least
a 2.0 but the cumulative GPA remains
below 2.0, the student will remain on
Terminal Probation and must continue to
meet the conditions described in section 2)
above. The student must raise the
cumulative GPA to at least 2.0 to be
removed from Terminal Probation.
5) If the student earns a semester GPA
below a 2.0 while on Terminal Probation,
the student will be dismissed.
Academic Dismissal
Academic dismissal will occur only if a
student has been on Terminal Probation and
fails to earn a semester GPA of at least 2.0.
The student’s record will have the notation
“Academic Dismissal.” Students who have
been academically dismissed have the right
to seek reinstatement to the University by
submitting a written petition to the
Committee on Academic Standing through
the Office of the Dean of Undergraduate
Studies, LC 30.
Academic Dismissal Policy for
Educational Opportunities Program
Students
Students enrolled at the University through
the Educational Opportunities Program will
be granted an additional semester on
Academic Probation before they are subject
to Terminal Probation, even if their
cumulative GPA is below a 2.0.
37
University at Albany
Good Academic Standing
The term “in good academic standing”
(satisfactory academic standing) means
that a student is making satisfactory
progress toward a degree and is eligible or
has been allowed to register and take
academic course work at this campus for
the current term. Students placed on
“Academic Probation” or “Terminal
Academic Probation” are considered to be
in good academic standing since they are
making satisfactory progress toward a
degree and are still authorized to continue
studying toward their degrees. Academic
Probation only serves as an academic
warning that a student is in danger of not
meeting minimum academic retention
standards and being terminated from the
University. Only those students who are
officially terminated from the University
are considered not to be in good academic
standing.
(The above definition should not be
confused with the academic standing
criteria for eligibility for New York State
financial awards as detailed in the
Financial Aid section of this publication.)
Academic Grievances
The Committee on Academic Standing of
the Undergraduate Academic Council is
responsible for insuring and reviewing
procedures for individual student
academic grievances at the school and
college level. Most academic grievances
are expected to be resolved at the school
or college level. However, if (1) the
student feels due process was not followed
at the school or college level or if (2) the
student feels the decision rendered at the
school or college level warrants further
review, the student may address a petition
to the Committee on Academic Standing
of the UAC for a review of the case The
action of this committee is final except in
grievances arising out of grades assigned
due to violations of academic integrity.
CAS action on academic integrity
grievances will be reviewed by and must
be approved by the Vice President for
Academic Affairs before implementation.
If the case has also been submitted to the
student judicial system for University
action, the Vice President for Academic
Affairs will consult for the Vice President
for Student Affairs before rendering a final
decision.
38
Each school and college shall have
established procedures for considering
student academic grievances. Copies of
the established procedures shall be
available to students upon request.
Students should contact the office of the
dean of the academic unit involved if
further information is desired or the Office
of the Dean of Undergraduate Studies, LC
30.
7. A student who has satisfied the previous
conditions and whose University at Albany
cumulative average is less than 2.00 at the
time the proposed leave would begin has
the right to seek prior approval for a Leave
for Approved Study by written petition to
the Committee on Academic Standing.
Students challenging an academic grade
must first discuss their grievances with the
instructor involved. If not resolved to the
student’s satisfaction at this level, the
grievance must then be discussed with the
appropriate department chair. Failure to
obtain satisfactory resolution at this level
shall lead to the school or college review as
stated in its procedures. Any such requests
on the school or college level must be
appropriately reviewed and a decision
rendered.
Withdrawing from the University
Leave for Approved Study
1. Students may apply for permission to
pursue a Leave with the Office of the Dean
of Undergraduate Studies, LC 30, 518-4425821. That office shall ascertain that the
student has been informed of University
residency requirements, including major,
minor and senior residency minima.
Students interested in pursuing an
approved leave must submit an application
and other necessary paperwork prior to the
beginning of the semester following their
departure from the University. Completion
of the semester prior to the commencement
of the leave is required.
2. Study must be in an approved program at
another college or university.
3. A leave for approved study is granted for
only one semester and can be granted for a
maximum of two semesters. A request for a
leave implies an intent to return to the
University in the next successive semester
after completion of the leave.
4. Adviser approval is necessary for the
leave to be approved. If the student was
admitted through the EOP program,
approval of the EOP director is necessary.
5. A student may pursue part-time or fulltime course work during the leave.
6. A student who has satisfied the previous
conditions and whose University at Albany
cumulative average, as well as the GPA in
the major and minor, is at least 2.00 at the
time the proposed leave would begin will be
granted a Leave for Approved Study.
8. Academically dismissed students are not
eligible for leaves for approved study.
Students may voluntarily depart from the
University up to and including the last day
of classes in a semester as indicated by the
academic calendar.
The date of departure is generally defined
as the date the student signs a departure
form in the Office of the Dean for
Undergraduate Studies (LC 30). For
students seeking to depart due to medical/
psychological reasons, the date of departure
will be set by the Office of the Dean of
Undergraduate Studies, in consultation with
the University Health Center or University
Counseling Center, as appropriate.
Drops will be done for each currently
registered course reflecting the departure
date. After the last day of classes, the
appropriate academic grade will be assigned
by the instructor for each registered course,
regardless of class attendance. Academic
retention standards will be applied.
Departures due to medical/ psychological
reasons must be recommended by the
University Health Center or University
Counseling Center upon review of
documentation supplied by a licensed
health care practitioner or treatment facility.
In order for action to be taken on an
application for readmission submitted by a
student who departed for
medical/psychological reasons, clearance
must be granted by the University Health
Center or University Counseling Center.
POLICIES CONCERNING WITHDRAWING
FROM THE U NIVERSITY
The following are the withdrawal policies
and procedures currently in effect for
matriculated undergraduates:
a. A student withdrawing from an entire
semester’s course load must complete a
Departure Form in the Office of the Dean of
Undergraduate Studies.
b. Students who voluntarily leave the
University with a cumulative grade point
average of 2.00 or above may automatically
return within six semesters from the date of
departure.
Undergraduate Bulletin 2003-2004
c. Students who voluntarily leave the
University with a cumulative grade point
average of less than 2.00 will be
withdrawn effective with the date they
initiate their departure.
d. A student with a cumulative grade point
average of less than 2.0 who withdraws
from the University one week or more
after the mid-point of the semester is not
eligible for readmission for the following
semester. Should the student wish to
petition for readmission for the next term,
the petition must be submitted to the
Office of the Dean of Undergraduate
Studies no later than the last day of finals
as published in the Academic Calendar for
the semester in which the withdrawal was
initiated. (See Academic Calendar.)
e. Grade assignment will be based on the
following: If the departure drops occur by
the last date to drop without receiving
W’s, no grade will be recorded. If the
departure drops occur after that date, a
grade of W will be assigned for each
currently registered course through the last
day of classes for the semester. After the
last day of classes, the appropriate
academic grade will be assigned by the
instructor for each registered course,
regardless of class attendance. Academic
retention standards will be applied.
f. Retroactive departure/drop dates normally
will not be granted. Requests for exceptions
will be considered by the Undergraduate
Dean’s Office (LC 30) only for
extraordinary, fully documented
circumstances.
g. A student who registers and receives
grades of “Z” for all course work for the
semester will incur full financial liability.
h. Departures from the University due to
medical reasons, active military duty and
disciplinary suspensions or disciplinary
dismissals must be administered by the
Office of the Dean of Undergraduate
Studies (LC 30)
i. A student eligible for an automatic return
who fails to register after a period of six
semesters will be administratively
withdrawn by the University. Such action
will require submission of a readmission
application should the student wish to
return at a future time.
Questions regarding financial
obligations or refunds as a result
of leaving the University should
be directed to the Office of
Student Accounts in CC 26 or
by calling (518-442-3202).
Students living in residence
halls who find it necessary to
leave the University must
contact the Office of Residential
Life in State Quad, or call (518442-5875).
Return/Readmission Procedure
Formerly matriculated undergraduates who
left the University with a minimum
cumulative grade point average of 2.00
may automatically return within six
semesters from the date of departure.
Students who were academically dismissed
or whose University at Albany cumulative
grade point average is less than a 2.00
must petition the Committee on Academic
Standing as part of the readmission
process. Applications for readmission as
well as petition forms are available from
the Office of the Dean of Undergraduates
Studies, LC 30
(518-442-5821).
The appropriate subcommittee of the
Committee on Admissions and Academic
Standing will make a recommendation
concerning the readmission of any student
who was dismissed for academic reasons
and/or whose cumulative grade point
average at the University is less than 2.00.
The admitting officer of the University
may find it necessary to deny readmission
to a student for whom there has been a
positive recommendation, but the
admitting officer of the University shall
not readmit any student contrary to the
recommendation of the subcommittee of
the Committee on Admissions and
Academic Standing.
Students who resume study within a six
semester period of time will meet degree
requirements indicated in the
Undergraduate Bulletin in effect upon their
initial matriculation. Students who resume
study after a six-semester period of time
will meet degree requirements as indicated
by the Undergraduate Bulletin in effect
when they return.
Students with previous holds or obligations
to the University should take measures to
clear these obligations as soon as possible.
Returning students who have not been
dismissed and who left the University with
a cumulative grade point average of 2.00 or
better return to the same major being
pursued at the time of departure, unless a
change of major is initiated.
Formerly matriculated undergraduates who
have not yet completed a Baccalaureate
degree may only return to the University as
matriculated undergraduates. Any requests
for exception to this policy will be
considered by the Office of the Dean of
Undergraduate Studies.
Degrees in Absentia
Formerly matriculated undergraduates who
have almost completed their degree and
cannot return here to finish remaining
requirements may apply for permission to
finish their degree in absentia.
Their cumulative University at Albany
grade point average, as well as their GPA in
the major and minor, must be at least a
2.00. In addition, a waiver of residence
requirement(s) and departmental support
may be necessary.
An application as well as other necessary
forms for this process are available upon
request by calling 518-42-5821 or writing
the Office of the Dean of Undergraduate
Studies (LC 30).
Readmission is based upon the student’s
prior academic record as well as
recommendations from other involved
offices.
Returning students who left on academic
probation, terminal probation, or who
were on special conditions at the time of
departure will return to the University
under the same academic probationary
conditions.
39
University at Albany
R EQUIREMENTS FOR
THE B ACHELOR ’ S
D EGREE
The University awards the degree of
Bachelor of Arts (B.A.) or Bachelor of
Science (B.S.) to those matriculated students
who have completed an approved sequence
of courses and study totaling a minimum of
120 credits and who, by vote of the faculty,
are certified as having fulfilled all degree
requirements. Matriculated students may
fulfill their degree requirements while
classified as either full-time or part-time
students for individual academic semesters.
The following B.A. and B.S. degree
requirements must be fulfilled by all students
matriculating in 2003-2004.
Bachelor of Arts Requirements
1. A minimum of 120 credits.
2. At least 90 credits in the liberal arts and
sciences.
3. The completion of the general education
requirements. [The specific general
education requirements are determined by
the student’s matriculation date and basis
of admission to the University—see the
General Education section of this
bulletin.]
4. The completion of a writing requirement
whereby students must satisfactorily
complete with grades of C or higher [for
students matriculating Fall 1997 or
thereafter; otherwise C- or higher], or
S, two writing intensive courses,
including at least one at or above the
300 level (courses meeting this
requirement as identified in the course
description).
5. 30–36 credits in a major that has been
registered with the education department
of the state of New York.
Bachelor of Science
Requirements
1. A minimum of 120 credits.
2. At least 60 credits in the liberal arts and
sciences.
3. The completion of the general education
requirements. [The specific general
education requirements are determined by
the student’s matriculation date and basis
of admission to the University—see the
General Education section of this
bulletin.]
4. The completion of a writing requirement
whereby students must satisfactorily
complete with grades of C or higher [for
students matriculating Fall 1997 or
thereafter; otherwise C- or higher], or
S, two writing intensive courses,
including at least one at or above the
300 level (courses meeting this
requirement as identified in the course
description).
5. 30–42 credits, in a major which has been
registered with the education department
of the state of New York.
6. The completion of a minor consisting of
18–24 graduation credits which must
include a minimum of 9 graduation
credits in course work requiring one or
more prerequisite courses or courses at or
above the 300 level. The minor
requirements may be combined with the
major requirement but the total may not
exceed 66 graduation credits.
7. 24 credits in professional courses for the
candidate desiring state certification in
education.
Grade Point Average
Required for Degree
To be eligible for graduation from the
University, matriculated students must have
achieved a cumulative grade point average of
at least 2.00 in all course grades earned at the
University.
6. The completion of a minor consisting of
18–24 graduation credits which must
include a minimum of 9 graduation
credits in course work requiring one or
more prerequisite courses or courses at or
above the 300 level. The minor
requirements may be combined with the
major requirements but the total may not
exceed 60 graduation credits.
Grade Point Average in the Major
7. 24 credits in professional courses for the
candidate desiring state certification in
education.
Grade Point Average in the Minor
40
For students matriculating Fall 1997 and
thereafter: Students must achieve a minimum
grade point average of at least 2.0 in all
University at Albany course work used to fulfill
requirements in the major, combined
major/minor, or departmental major.
For students matriculating Fall 1997 and
thereafter: Students must achieve a minimum
grade point average of at least 2.0 in all
University at Albany course work used to fulfill
requirements in the minor(s).
Residence Requirements
The University requires degree candidates to
earn a minimum of 30 of their last 60
graduation credits in courses at the Albany
campus. Degree candidates who complete two
approved study abroad semesters during their
junior or senior year must earn a minimum of
30 of their last 69 credits in courses at the
Albany campus. An “approved” study abroad
program is any program from which the
University accepts credits.
Major and Minor Residence Credits
Major Residence
For the B.A. and B.S. degrees, a minimum of
18 graduation credits, including 12 credits at
or above the 300 level, must be completed in
the major on the Albany campus, or through a State
University of New York sponsored Study Abroad
Program sponsored by a university center or fouryear liberal arts college. Study abroad course work
completed at SUNY Community, Agriculture, or
Technology Colleges may not generally be used to
satisfy this requirement.
Minor Residence
For the B.A. and B.S. degrees, a minimum of 6
graduation credits of advanced courses (courses
at or above the 300 level or courses which
require a prerequisite) must be completed in the
minor on the Albany campus, or through a State
University of New York sponsored study abroad
program sponsored by a university center or
four-year liberal arts college. Study abroad
course work completed at SUNY Community,
Agriculture, or Technology Colleges may not
generally be used to satisfy this requirement.
Combined Major/Minor Residence
For the B.A. and B.S. degrees, a minimum of 24
graduation credits, including 12 credits at or
above the 300 level, must be completed in a
combined major and minor program on the
Albany campus, or through a State University of
New York sponsored study abroad program
sponsored by a university center or four-year
liberal arts college. Study abroad course work
completed at SUNY Community, Agriculture,
or Technology Colleges may not generally be
used to satisfy this requirement.
Graduation Application
Degrees are awarded during the fall, spring and
summer terms. The student must file a degree
application with the Registrar’s Office (CC B
25) in accordance with the date specified in the
official University academic calendar for the
term in which all degree requirements will be
completed. All incomplete grades and grades
not reported must be resolved before the degree
can be awarded. If reasonable attempts to
contact the instructor fail, the student with an
incomplete or “blank” (not reported) grade may
appeal to the Committee on Academic Standing
or, if that body is unable to meet to resolve the
issue in timely fashion, to the Dean of
Undergraduate Studies.
Undergraduate Bulletin 2003-2004
A degree review will be conducted at the end of
each term for those students who have properly
applied for graduation. The Registrar’s Office
will notify the student in writing if the degree is
not awarded because the degree requirements
have not been met. If the student has completed
all requirements for the degree, a confirming
postcard will be sent verifying the diploma has
been ordered.
3. Credit completed with the grades of A, A-,
B+, B, B-, C+, C, C-, D+, D, D- or S. An
academic unit may award credit with an A–E
or S/U grade only in a University at Albany
course for which the student was formally
registered in a fall or spring semester or
summer session in accordance with
established registration and program
adjustment procedures and deadlines.
Waiver of Requirements
4. Some transfer D grades, in accordance with
the following policies:
In rare and exceptional cases, a waiver of the
requirements listed in this section may be
granted to an individual student. Petitions for
waiver of major or minor requirements should
be addressed to the academic unit offering the
major or minor. Petitions for waiver of any
other requirements in this section should be
addressed to the Committee on Academic
Standing of the Undergraduate Academic
Council and submitted to the Office of
Undergraduate Studies, LC 30.
Degree Credits in
Physical Education
A maximum of 6 credits in physical education
activity courses below the 300 level may be applied
toward the minimum requirements for the
bachelor’s degree. The University no longer offers
physical education courses for academic credit.
Graduation Credits
A student must earn a minimum of 120
acceptable graduation credits to be eligible for
graduation from the University. Acceptable
graduation credit is as follows:
For students who matriculated before
Fall 2000, credit earned with a grade of
D or the lowest passing grade will
transfer only if such credit is balanced
by a B or A at the same institution. One
credit earned with the grade of B balances
one credit earned with the grade of D, and
one credit earned with the grade of A
balances two credits with the grade of D.
For students who matriculate Fall
2000 through Summer 2001,
prematriculation credit earned with a
grade of D or the lowest passing grade
will transfer only if such credit is
balanced by a B or A at the same
institution. D grades earned in courses
within the major/minor must be
balanced by grades of B or A earned
within the major/minor at the same
institution. Postmatriculation credit
graded D will not transfer.
For students who matriculate Fall
2001 and thereafter, no credit
graded D from another institution
will transfer.
1. Credit accepted by transfer.
Major and Minor Credits
2. Credit earned through approved proficiency
examinations. Such credit may be awarded on
the basis of a student’s performance on such
external examinations as CLEP, RCE, AP,
USAFI, etc., or an examination established for
this purpose by a University at Albany
department, school or program. Proficiency
examination credit shall be clearly
distinguished as such on a student’s academic
record, and shall have no bearing on a
student’s academic average. Proficiency
examination credits shall not count within a
semester load, hence shall not be counted
when determining whether a student is fulltime or part-time, and shall not be applied to
University, major or minor residence
requirements or semester retention standards.
Any academic unit at the University may
award proficiency credit by examination
provided it does so openly and applies
standards consistently to all students seeking
credit. In no case may award of credit be
contingent upon auditing a course (formally or
informally), private tutelage (paid or
otherwise), or participation in University or
extracurricular activities or productions;
however, the payment of a modest fee may be
charged for administering the examination.
For students matriculating Fall 1997 and
thereafter: A University at Albany grade of Dis minimally acceptable for graduation credit
in the major and minor. Note, however, that a
2.0 average within each major and minor is a
requirement for graduation.
For credits acquired at other institutions
and for University at Albany credits for
students matriculating before Fall 1997:
A student may fulfill the requirements of a
major or a minor or a combined major and
minor by earning graduation credit as
defined previously, except that credit with
the grade of D may be used to fulfill the
requirements of a major, minor, or
combined major/minor only if balanced at
the same institution by credit with grades
of A or B earned within the major, minor,
or combined major/minor respectively.
Students matriculating in Fall 2000
through Summer 2001 can transfer in
balanced D’s from prematriculation course
work, but they cannot transfer any D’s for
postmatriculation transfer courses.
L IBERAL A RTS
AND S CIENCES
C OURSES
The following undergraduate courses offered
by the specified school or college during 20032004 are considered liberal arts and sciences
courses for the purposes of degree
requirements for the B.A. and B.S. degrees.
College of Arts and Sciences:
All courses except A Csi 198, A Eaj 423,
A Eco 495, A Heb 450, A Mat 204, A Mus
315, A Thr 315
School of Business:
B Bus 250, B Law 200, B Law 220, B Mgt
341, B Mgt 481, B Mkt 351, B Msi 215,
B Msi 220
School of Criminal Justice:
All courses
School of Education:
E Edu 275, 375; E Est 120, 300, 301, 497;
E Psy 420, 460; E Tap 402, 455
School of Information Science and Policy:
R Isp 100, 301, 361, 499Z
School of Public Affairs:
All R Pad courses except R Pad 110, 111, 210,
211
All R Pos and R Pub courses
School of Social Welfare:
R Ssw 200, 210, 220, 299M, 301, 320, 322,
350, 408, 409, 421, 450, 499
Division of Physical Education, Athletics, and
Recreation:
no courses
School of Public Health:
H Epi 460; H Sph 201
General Education Honors Program Tutorials:
All courses
University-wide Courses:
All U Fsp courses; all U Uni courses except
U Uni 100; U Unl 205, U Unl 206
The chart on the following page
lists all University at Albany
majors and whether the major
leads to a B.A. or B.S. degree.
The charts on the page after that
list all the “BAMA” programs—
combined baccalaureate +
master’s programs that are
designed to assist students
interested in obtaining a
graduate degree as quickly as
possible.
Students matriculating in Fall 2001 and
thereafter cannot transfer in any grades of D.
41
University at Albany
UNDERGRADUATE MAJORS
School of Business:
Accounting
Business Administration
S c h o o l o f C r i mi n a l J u s t i c e :
Criminal Justice
College of Arts and Sciences:
Actuarial and Mathematical Sciences
African/Afro-American Studies
Anthropology
Art
Asian Studies
Atmospheric Science
Biology
Chemistry
Chinese Studies
Computer Science
Computer Science & Applied Mathematics
Economics
English
French
Geography
Geology
Greek & Roman Civilization
History
Interdisciplinary Majors
(Art History)
(Biochemistry & Molecular Biology)
(Broadcast Meteorology)
(Earth and Atmospheric Sciences)
(East Asian Studies)
(Environmental Science)
(Human Biology)
(Japanese Studies)
(Medieval & Renaissance Studies)
(Religious Studies)
(Urban Studies and Planning)
Italian
Judaic Studies
Latin American Studies
Linguistics
Mathematics
Music
Philosophy
Physics
Psychology
Puerto Rican Studies
Rhetoric and Communication
Russian
Russian & East European Studies
Sociology
Spanish
Theatre
Women’s Studies
School of Information Science & Policy:
Interdisciplinary Major
(Information Science)
Graduate School of Public Affairs:
Political Science
Public Policy
School of Social Welfare:
Social Welfare
University -Wide:
Interdisciplinary Studies
42
HEGIS Code
B.A. Deg
0502
0506
2105
1799
2211
2202
1002
0301
1913
0401
1905
1107
0701
0701
2204
1501
1102
2206
1914
2205
2205
B.S. Deg
General Prog
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
4901
4901
4901
4901
4901
4901
4901
4901
4901
4901
4901
1104
0399
0308
1505
1701
1005
1509
1902
2001
0399
1506
1106
0307
2208
1105
1007
4903
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
4901
X
X
2207
2102
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
2104
4901
X
X
X
X
X
X
Teaching Prog
Undergraduate Bulletin 2003-2004
Combined Bachelor’s/Master's in Business
Administration (M.B.A.) Programs
Combined Bachelor’s/Master’s Degree Programs
Majors
Atmos Sci/Atmos Sci
1913/1913
B.S./M.S.
Biology/Biology
0401/0401
B.S./M.S.
Chemistry/Chemistry
1905/1905
B.S./M.S.
Computer Science/
Computer Science
0701/0701
B.S./M.S.
Computer Science and
Applied Math/Mathematics
0701/1701
B.S./M.A.
Criminal Justice/
Criminal Justice
2105/2105
B.A./M.A.
Economics/Public
Administration
2204/2102
B.S./M.P.A.
English/English
1501/1501
B.A./M.A.
French/French
1102/1102
B.A./M.A.
Geography/Geography
2206/2206
B.A./M.A.
Geology/Geology
1914/1914
B.S./M.S.
History/History
2205/2205
B.A./M.A.
Linguistics/Teaching English to Speakers of
Other Languages
1505/1508
B.A./M.S.
Mathematics/Mathematics
1701/1701
B.A./M.A.
Mathematics/Mathematics
1701/1701
B.S./M.A.
Philosophy/Philosophy
1509/1509
B.A./M.A.
Physics/Physics
1902/1902
B.S./M.S.
Political Sci/Political Sci
2207/2207
B.A./M.A.
Political Sci/Public Admin
2207/2102
B.A./M.P.A.
Psychology/Counseling
2001/0826
B.A./M.S.
Psychology/Rehab Counseling 2001/2199
B.A./M.S.
Public Policy/Public Policy
2102/2102
B.A./M.A.
Rhetoric & Communication/
Rhetoric & Communication
1506/1506
B.A./M.A.
Russian/Russian
1106/1106
B.A./M.A.
Sociology/Public Admin
2208/2102
B.A./M.P.A.
Sociology/Sociology
2208/2208
B.A./M.A.
Spanish/Spanish
1105/1105
B.A./M.A.
Theatre/Theatre
1007/1007
B.A./M A.
Women’s St/Women’s St
4903/4903
B.A./M.A.
Any undergraduate B.A. major (except Accounting)/
Library Science
1/1601
B.A./M.A.
Any undergraduate B.S. major (except Accounting)/
Library Science
1/4901
B.A./M.S.
1 HEGIS code depends on undergraduate major.
HEGIS Codes
Degrees
2211/0506
2202/0506
1002/0506
0301/0506
0401/0506
1107/0506
2204/0506
1501/0506
1102/0506
2206/0506
2205/0506
2205/0506
4901/0506
4901/0506
1104/0506
0308/0506
1505/0506
1701/0506
1105/0506
1509/0506
2001/0506
0399/0506
1506/0506
1106/0506
0307/0506
2208/0506
1105/0506
1107/0506
4903/0506
B.A./M.B.A.
B.A./M.B.A.
B.A./M.B.A.
B.A./M.B.A.
B.A./M.B.A.
B.A./M.B.A.
B.A./M.B.A.
B.A./M.B.A.
B.A./M.B.A.
B.A./M.B.A.
B.A./M.B.A.
B.A./M.B.A.
B.A./M.B.A.
B.S./M.B.A.
B.A./M.B.A.
B.A./M.B.A.
B.A./M.B.A.
B.A./M.B.A.
B.A./M.B.A.
B.A./M.B.A.
B.A./M.B.A.
B.A./M.B.A.
B.A./M.B.A.
B.A./M.B.A.
B.A./M.B.A.
B.A./M.B.A.
B.A./M.B.A.
B.A./M.B.A.
B.A./M.B.A.
2105/0506
B.A./M.B.A
2207/0506
B.A./M.B.A.
College of Arts and Sciences
African/Afro-American Studies
Anthropology
Art
Asian Studies
Biology
Chinese Studies
Economics
English
French
Geography
Greek & Roman Civilization
History
Interdisciplinary Studies
Interdisciplinary Studies
Italian
Latin American Studies
Linguistics
Mathematics
Music
Philosophy
Psychology
Puerto Rican Studies
Rhetoric and Communication
Russian
Russian and East European St
Sociology
Spanish
Theatre
Women’s Studies
School of Criminal Justice
Criminal Justice
Nelson A. Rockefeller College
Political Science
Combined Bachelor’s/Master's in Health Policy
and Management Programs
Majors
HEGIS Codes
Degrees
2204/1214
B.A./M.S.
2204/1214
B.S./M.S.
2001/1214
B.A./M.S.
2208/1214
B.A./M.S.
Majors
HEGIS Codes
Degrees
College of Arts and Sciences
Economics/Health Policy and
Management
Economics/Health Policy and
Management
Psychology/Health Policy and
Management
Sociology/Health Policy and
Management
43
University at Albany
R EGULATIONS
C ONCERNING
M AJORS
The University offers majors in both a General
Program and a Teacher Education Program
through the schools and colleges indicated here.
In addition, there currently exist unique
departmental program majors in art, music, and
theatre that complement the regular University
major options in each of these areas.
Some majors are available through an honors
program or a combined bachelor’s/master’s
degree program.
Approved faculty-initiated interdisciplinary
majors are also included in the University’s
curricular offerings. In addition, students may
design their own interdisciplinary major in
accordance with procedures established by the
Interdisciplinary Studies Committee of the
Undergraduate Academic Council.
Declaration of Major
Freshmen and transfer students are admitted to the
University and not to a particular department,
college, or school. Normally, students are
expected to declare their intended major when
they have earned 24 graduation credits. By the
time they have accumulated 42 graduation credits,
students must have officially declared a major or
have applied for admission to a restricted major.
For most majors, students need only complete a
Declaration of Major form with their advisers and
a minimum of 24 graduation credits to be
officially enrolled in the school or college offering
their major. Other majors, however, are restricted
in the sense that students must be granted formal
departmental or school approval or satisfy stated
admissions criteria before being officially
classified as that major.
Currently, admission to the following majors is
restricted: accounting, business administration,
criminal justice, mathematics, psychology,
rhetoric and communication, and social welfare.
In addition, students must obtain approval to enter
the Teacher Education Program, Faculty-Initiated
Interdisciplinary Majors in Biochemistry and
Molecular Biology, Information Science, and the
special departmental program majors in art or
music.
Selection to these restricted majors will differ
depending on the degree of competition generated
by other applicants and/or the completion of
specific course requirements. For further details
on the specific requirements and selection
processes for each of these majors, please refer to
the appropriate department or school description
in this bulletin.
44
Multiple Majors
Students may elect more than one major,
designating which is to be considered the
“first major,” the “second major,” etc. The
first major listed shall be from the
department from which the student elects
to receive advisement. The faculty of the
school or college that offers the first
major shall recommend the student for the
appropriate degree. For example, a student
completing the three majors Geology,
History, and Philosophy would receive a
B.S. degree if the first major were
Geology or a B.A. degree if the first major
were History or Philosophy.
For each major, students must complete
the major requirements as outlined in this
bulletin. However, for a student with two
or more majors, a specific course that is
applicable to more than one of the majors
may be applied toward each of the majors
to which it is applicable. For example, a
student with two majors in Accounting
and Economics may “double count”
calculus and some economics courses,
applying the credits toward both majors; if
the student also had a third major in
Computer Science, the calculus course
A Mat 112 would “triple count,” applying
to all three majors.
NOTE: The display of more than the first
and second majors on the student’s official
transcript will not be possible before fall
2003. Until the full listing becomes
possible, students desiring to declare a
third or subsequent major must do so in
the Office of the Dean of Undergraduate
Studies, LC 30. Once satisfactory
completion of the third or additional
majors has been verified, a separate
official document will be issued by the
Dean of Undergraduate Studies verifying
which additional majors (beyond the first
two) have been completed.
The Student-Initiated
Interdisciplinary Major
In addition to existing majors offered by
the University’s departments, schools and
programs, a “Student-Initiated
Interdisciplinary Major” option is
available through the Undergraduate
Academic Council’s Interdisciplinary
Studies Committee. This option is
designed to allow highly motivated
students to meet special educational goals
not available from the many existing
majors at the University.
In the development of an Interdisciplinary
Major the student and prospective faculty
sponsors are asked to insure its intellectual
merit by considering the following questions:
Will the proposed major make it possible to
undertake future disciplined inquiry such as
that which is found in graduate or professional
study? Will the plan promote mastery of the
methodological tools relevant to the subject
matter? Are there sufficient bodies of scholarly
literature to allow for in-depth study in the
major’s disciplines” Will the plan allow for
gaining significant knowledge to read and
evaluate professional and scholarly literature
in the major’s disciplines?
The following information will assist in
the formulation of a major.
Non-Duplication of Existing Majors: The
proposed major must involve course work
in at least two different departments or
schools. Moreover, the proposal must not
duplicate or nearly duplicate opportunities
available to University at Albany students
through existing major programs.
Coherence: The proposed major must
consist of a coherent, integrated program
of studies. As with any other major, there
must be some relationship between
courses to be undertaken as well as
sufficient depth of study in the area under
consideration. It would also be helpful to
know if models exist on other campuses
for the proposed major. This information
will assist the student in constructing a
program of studies and the citation of an
existing program, will support the
application for such a major.
Credits: The proposed major must consist
of at least 36 but not more than 66 credits.
If the major includes fewer than 54
credits, the student will be applying for a
major only and will need a separate minor
to meet minimum graduation requirements.
If the major includes 54 or more credits,
the student will be applying for a
combined major and minor program and,
therefore, no separate minor will be
needed.
Upper Division Course Work: At least one
half of the credits in the proposed major
must be at the 300 level or above.
Independent Study: The proposed major
may include a maximum of 25% of
independent study course work.
B.A. or B.S. Degree: The course work in
the Interdisciplinary major, will normally
dictate the type of bachelor’s degree to be
earned by the student.
University at Albany
Faculty Sponsorship: The proposal must
have a primary and a secondary faculty
sponsor. The primary sponsor must also
agree to serve as the student’s major
adviser for the proposed program. The two
sponsors must be members of the teaching
faculty and must come from two different
academic units (departments or schools)
offering courses included in the major.
Student who believe they might like to
construct their own major should begin
plans as soon as possible, but the
application for the major cannot be filed
until the student has completed at least 30
graduation credits.
Once a student has tentatively decided on
the theme for the proposed study, the
Undergraduate Bulletin should be
reviewed to verify that no existing major
encompasses that theme. The Bulletin and
the Schedule of Classes should also be
used to identify possible courses which
might be included in the proposed major
and, based on the courses they teach,
possible faculty who might be willing to
serve as sponsors for the major.
Before deciding on all the details of the
proposed major, the student should speak
with several faculty for the following
reasons: (a) to determine the likelihood of
finding two faculty sponsors for the
program; (b) to solicit suggestions on how
to further refine, limit, or expand the
chosen theme; (c) to solicit further
suggestions of individual courses or
sequences of courses which might be
included in the major; and (d) to
determine whether or not the student’s
goals in creating the major are likely to be
met by the combination of course chosen.
Further information and application
procedures and forms may be obtained by
contacting Mr. Richard Collier in the
Office of the Dean of Undergraduate
Studies, LC 30 (518-437-3747).
REGULATIONS
CONCERNING
MINORS
Minors Defined, Titles
A minor consists of 18–24 graduation
credits which must include a minimum of
9 graduation credits of “advanced course
work” (defined as course work requiring at
least one prerequisite course and/or
courses at or above the 300 level.)
No student may use a minor title that is the
same as the title of the student’s major.
Only the following are acceptable minor titles
to appear on the academic record:
“Combined with Major” for approved
combined major and minor programs
Titles approved by the Curriculum
Committee or by the Interdisciplinary
Studies Committee of the Undergraduate
Academic Council
“Interdisciplinary” if approved by the
Interdisciplinary Studies Committee of the
Undergraduate Academic Council
Students Required to
Complete a Minor:
A student is required to complete a minor
if the student has only one major and that
major is neither an approved “combined
major and minor” nor an approved
“departmental major.”
If the student with a single, non-combined,
non-departmental major has only one
minor, the same course may not be used to
fulfill the requirements of both the major
and the discrete minor. I.e., no “double
counting” between the major and minor is
allowed.
However, if that student has two or more
minors, the same course may be “double
counted” toward the major and one of the
minors. (“Double counting” among minors
is never allowed.)
Students Not Required to
Complete a Minor:
A student with two or more majors or a
major that is either an approved
“combined major and minor” or an
approved “departmental major” is not
required to have a discrete minor, but the
student may elect to have one or more
minors listed on the academic record.
If the student does elect one or more minors,
the same course may be “double counted”
toward the major (or even more than one of
the majors) and toward one of the minors.
(“Double counting” among minors is never
allowed.)
Similarly, if the student in a “combined
major and minor program” elects one or more
minors, the same course may be “double
counted” toward the “minor” requirements of
the combined major and toward one of the
minors. Naturally, students in a combined
major and minor program who complete one
or more discrete minors nevertheless must
complete all requirements in the combined
major program.
NOTE: For students with two or more
majors, the display of more than the first and
second majors on the student’s official
transcript will not be possible before fall
2003. Until the full listing becomes possible,
students with multiple majors desiring to
declare one or more minors must do so in the
Office of the Dean of Undergraduate Studies,
LC 30. Once satisfactory completion of the
minor(s) has been verified, a separate official
document will be issued by the Dean of
Undergraduate Studies verifying which
minor or minors have been completed.
Multiple Minors
Students may declare two or more minors,
but the same course may not be applied to
more than one of the minors. (I.e., “double
counting” among minors is never
allowed.) However, the same course may
be applied to one of the minors and to one
(or more) of the applicable majors.
NOTE: For students with one major and
more than two minors, the display of more
than the first and second minors on the
student’s official transcript will not be
possible before fall 2003. Until the full
listing becomes possible, students with
one major desiring to declare a third or
subsequent minor must do so in the Office
of the Dean of Undergraduate Studies, LC
30. Once satisfactory completion of the
additional minor(s) has been verified, a
separate official document will be issued
by the Dean of Undergraduate Studies
verifying which additional minor or
minors have been completed. [For students
with multiple majors and multiple minors,
see the note at the end of in the preceding
section “Students Not Required to
Complete a Minor.”]
45
University at Albany
APPROVED MINORS
Listed here are the minor titles that have been
approved by the Undergraduate Academic
Council. Action of the Council also mandates
that the following may not be used as a minor
title: social welfare.
AFRICANA STUDIES A minimum of 18
graduation credits (9 or more of which must be
in course work at or above the 300 level)
including one course from among the
following: A Aas 142, 219 or 219Z, 286, 287
and 490.
ANTHROPOLOGY A minimum of 18 graduation
credits (9 or more of which must be in course
work at or above the 300 level). Students are
required to take A Ant 100 and one of the
following core courses: A Ant 110N, 104,
106M, 108M or 108G, or A Ant 220M.
ART A minimum of 18 graduation credits (9 or
more of which must be in course work at or
above the 300 level and/or in courses requiring
at least one prerequisite course) from course
work with an A Art prefix. Six (6) of the
required 18 credits may be from courses with
an A Arh prefix or from other courses that
have been approved for the faculty-initiated
interdisciplinary major in art history.
ART HISTORY A minimum of 18 graduation
credits (9 or more of which must be in course
work at or above the 300 level and/or in
courses requiring at least one prerequisite
course) including A Arh 170L and 171L, and 6
additional credits from course work with an
A Arh prefix. The remaining 6 credits may be
selected from: A Arh courses; A Ant 268L;
A Cas 240; A Cla 207L, A Cla 208L, 209L,
301, 302, 303 (or 303Z), 307, 310, 311, 401,
402, 403, 405, 406, 407, 490 and 497; A Eac
280L; A His 263E, 264E, 302Z, 303Z 364Z;
A Rel 200L; and A Thr 380L.
ASIAN STUDIES A minimum of 21 graduation
credits (9 or more of which must be in course
work at or above the 300 level and/or in
courses requiring at least one prerequisite
course) including A His 176, A His 177 or
177Z and one of the following courses: A His
381 or 381Z or 382 or 382Z. The remaining
12 credits to be selected from the following
courses, must include at least one course in at
least two of the following regions: South Asia,
East Asia, Southwest Asia.
South Asia: A His 377 or 377Z, 378 or 378Z,
A Phi 342, R Pos 358, (graduate courses:
A His 578, R Pos 558).
East Asia: A His 379 or 379Z, 380 or
380Z, A Eac 210L, A Eac 211L, A Eac 212L.
A Eac 220, A Phi 344, A Phi 346.
Southwest Asia: A His 383 or 383Z; R Pos
359; A Jst 341Z; A His 381 or 381Z and 382
or 382Z; A Ant 243.
Other: A Ant 332, colloquia, independent
study, or independent research courses as
appropriate, to be approved by the director of
Asian studies.
46
ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCE A minimum of 19
graduation credits from course work with an
A Atm prefix, including A Atm 210 or 210Z,
211; and at least 6 credits from all 300-level
and higher A Atm courses; A Atm 490, 497,
499 are excluded. Appropriate prerequisite
courses in mathematics and physics are
necessary to complete the required minor
courses.
BIOETHICS A
minimum of 18 graduation credits
including an introductory ethics course (A Phi
114L or 115L or 212L); an introductory
course in biology (A Bio 110F or 110N);
Moral Problems in Medicine (A Phi 338); 3
credits at 300-level or higher in ethical and/or
political theory (A Phi 320, 321, 326, 425, 474
or R Pos 301, 302, 306, 307, 308, 310); and 6
credits from advanced related courses,
Professor Bonnie Steinbock.
Advanced related courses include: A Ant 312,
360, 361, 364, 365, 418, 450; A Bio 205, 212,
214, 311N, 318, A Eco 381; A Gog 310N,
A Phi 417; A Psy 329, A Psy 385, 386, 387;
A Soc 359M; R Crj 405, 428; R Pos 328,
U Uni 310N.
Advanced related graduate courses include:
A Ant 511, 512, 516, 517, 518; A Bio 511,
519, A Eco 509, 511, 512, A Phi 505, 506,
517, H Epi 501, 502, H Hpm 501, 511, R Pos
502, R Pub 502. Students may use other
courses to fulfill the related courses
requirement at the discretion of the director of
the program.
BIOLOGY A minimum of 18 graduation credits,
including A Bio 110N or 110F, 111N, 212.
Additional credits are selected from biology
courses that yield biology credit toward the
biology major.
BUSINESS A minimum of 18 graduation credits
as follows: B Acc 211; B Msi 215 (or A Csi
101N, or A Csi 201N); A Mat108 (or A Eco
320, or B Msi 220); and any three of the
following courses: B Acc 222; B Bus 250; B Fin
300, B Law 321, B Mgt 341, B Mkt 310, and
B Msi 330.
Students majoring in criminal justice,
economics,
linguistics,
mathematics,
psychology, public affairs or sociology who
complete a statistics course in the major may
substitute either B Law 200 or 220 for the
statistics requirement in the Business minor.
Students majoring in computer science who
complete A Csi 201N in the major may
substitute either B Law 200 or B Law 220 for
the B Msi 215 basic programming requirement
in the Business minor.
Students
majoring
in
rhetoric
and
communication who complete B Msi 220,
A Mat 108, B Msi 215, A Csi 101N, or A Csi
201N in their major may substitute either B Law
200 or 220 in the Business minor. When both
the statistics and computer requirements are
involved, either B Law 200 or 220 may
substitute for statistics in the Business minor
and an additional major course may substitute
for computer science in the major.
CHEMISTRY A minimum of 22 graduation
credits as follows: A Chm 120N and 121N,
122A and B, 216A and B, 217A and B, 225
and an additional 3 credits from A Chm 320
441A, 342, 340A.
CHINESE STUDIES A minimum of 21 graduation
credits of which 15 must be A Eac 102L,
201L, and 202L. The remaining 6 credits may
be earned from any A Eac or A Eas course
except A Eac 101L and A Eas 220.
COGNITIVE SCIENCE A minimum of 18
graduation credits, (9 credits or more of which
must be in course work at or above the 300
level and/or in courses requiring a
prerequisite) to include: A Lin 301, 3 courses
from: A Csi 201N, A Lin 321, A Phi 210L,
A Psy 365; and 6 credits from the following
list: A Csi 101N, 201N, 210, 310, 409; A Lin
322, 421, or 421Z, 422; A Phi 332, 415, 418,
422, 432; A Psy 210, 211, 381, 382, or 382Z.
COMPUTER SCIENCE A minimum of 19
graduation credits of which at least 13 credits
must have an A Csi prefix. The courses taken
must include A Csi 201N, 310 and any other
A Csi course at the 300-level or higher; plus at
least 9 credits from the following list of
courses: one but not both of A Csi 101N and
B Msi 215 ; any other course with an A Csi
prefix; A Phy 353, 454; A Mat 220, 313, 367,
372 or 372Z, 374, 401; A Phi 432; any one of
A Atm 498, A Bio 440, A Chm 411.
CRIMINAL JUSTICE STUDIES A minimum of 18
graduation credits (9 credits or more of which
must be in course work at or above the 300
level and/or in courses requiring a
prerequisite) in course work from among the
following: any R Crj courses; A Soc 283M,
380, 381. Students are advised that only one of
R Crj 200 and A Soc 381 may be taken for
credit.
ECONOMICS A minimum of 18 graduation
credits (9 or more of which must be in course
work at or above the 300 level) from course
work with an A Eco prefix including: A Eco
110M and 111M and one of A Eco 300 or
301.
EDUCATIONAL STUDIES A minimum of 18
graduation credits from course work offered by
the School of Education, including a minimum of
12 graduation credits in course work at or above
the 300 level. For those interested in pursuing a
teaching career, the following are strongly
recommended: E Tap 201, E Psy 200, E Edu 390,
E Edu 375, E Spe 460. Additionally, students are
strongly urged to consider a second minor in an
areas appropriate to the NYS Learning Standards
and compatible with the student’s major. The
following courses are not acceptable for the
minor: E Cpy 301, 302, 303; and courses
designated as “methods” and “student teaching”.
ELECTRONICS A minimum of 20 graduation
credits as follows: A Phy 140N, 150N, 155,
240, 315, 316, and 353.
University at Albany
ENGLISH A minimum of 18 graduation credits
(9 or more of which must be in course work at
or above the 300 level from course work with
an A Eng prefix.
FILM STUDIES A minimum of 18 graduation
credits (9 or more of which must be in course
work at or above the 300 level and/or in courses
requiring at least one prerequisite course)
including A Arh 260 and 15 credits from the
following: A Arh 261; 262; 361, 362; 363, 460;
491; A Com 378 (when the topic focuses upon
film); A Eas 140L; A Eng 243 (when the topic
focuses upon film), 243Z; A Fre 338 or 415; A Ita
318; A Lcs314 or A Spn 318; A Lcs 315, A Rus
280, A Rus 380; A Thr 230L; A Wss 399 (when
the topic focuses upon film). Other courses,
transfer work, specific topics courses, etc. may
also be used if approved by the director of the
program. Advisement is conducted by the director
of the program in the Art Department.
FRENCH A minimum of 18 graduation credits
from course work with an A Fre prefix above
A Fre 101L including A Fre 241E. No more
than 3 credits of courses conducted in English
may be used to satisfy the requirements of the
minor. Students who begin their French
studies at or above the 200 level are
encouraged to meet with the coordinator of
advisement for French Studies, in constructing
a minor.
GEOGRAPHY A minimum of 18 graduation
credits (9 or more of which must be in course
work at or above the 300 level and/or in
courses requiring at least one prerequisite
course) from course work with an A Gog
prefix.
GEOLOGY A minimum of 20 graduation
credits. Required courses include A Geo 100N
or 100F, 106, 230 or 230Z, 250; and 9 credits
at or above the 300 level and/or in Geology
courses requiring at least one prerequisite
course.
GREEK AND ROMAN CIVILIZATION A minimum of
18 graduation credits (9 or more of which must be
in course work at or above the 300 level and/or in
courses requiring at least one prerequisite course)
from among the following: any course with an
A Cla, A Clc, A Clg, or A Cll prefix; A Phi 310.
HEBREW A minimum of 18 graduation credits
in course work with an A Heb prefix above the
102L level. Students who begin with A Heb
101L and/or 102L must complete 15
graduation credits above the 102L level. No
more than 4 credits of A Heb 450 may be
applied to the minor.
HISTORY A minimum of 18 graduation credits
(9 or more of which must be in course work at
or above the 300 level) in course work with an
A His prefix including no more than 12 credits
from any one of the four geographic areas of
concentration listed in the Undergraduate
Bulletin. A student may, on petition to the
Director of Undergraduate Studies in the
history department, count toward the minor
one relevant course of no more than 4 credits
taken in a department other than history.
INTERNATIONAL PERSPECTIVES A minimum of
18 graduation credits (9 or more of which must
be in course work at or above the 300 level
and/or in courses requiring at least one
prerequisite course). Approval of the Director
of International Education is required along
with satisfactory completion of one of the
following three tracks:
Third-World Track:
a) 3 credits from A Ant 108M or 108G, A Cas
150;
b) 3 credits from A Aas 150, A Aas 287or
A His 287, A Ant 145 or A His 145 or
A Lcs 145, A Ant 243 or A Jst 243, A Eco
361 or A Lcs 361, A Fre 208, A Fre 281,
A His 158 or 158Z, A His 177 or 177Z,
A Lcs 100 or 100Z;
c) 6 credits from Theory Courses: A Ant 361
or 361Z,, A Cas 141; A Eco 330 or 330Z;
A Gog 160 R Pos 350 or R Pub 350;
d) 6 credits from Geographic Region Courses:
A Aas 269 or A Ant 269 or A Lcs 269,
A Aas 270 or A Gog 270, A Aas 322,
A Aas 342 or A Ant 342, A Ant 146 or
146Z or A Lcs 150 or 150Z, A Lcs 250 or
250Z, A Ant 341M or 341G or A Lcs
341M or 341G; A Eac 470Z or A Gog
470Z; A Gog 250/250Z or 250,A His 170
or A Lcs 102, A His 367L or 367Z, A His
369/369Z or A Lcs 369, A His 371 or 371Z
or A Lcs 371; A Lcs 115 or A Por 115,
R Pos 355.
Appropriate courses, from SUNY overseas
academic programs, may be substituted for
some of the courses listed. NOTE: No more
than 6 credits with the same prefix may be
used in this track.
Social and Political Systems Track:
a) 6 credits in A Rus 162 or 162Z and R Pos
102M;
b) 12 credits from A Eco 313 or 313Z; A His
353 or 353Z, 355 or 355Z; A Jst 359 or
R Pos 359; R Pos 310, 350 or R Pub 350,
452Z.
Appropriate courses from the SUNY overseas
academic program in Denmark may be
substituted for some of the courses listed
above, such as Eastern Europe in
Transition, R Pos 30E, European Political
Philosophy and Ideologies, A Phi 30E or
R Pos 30E, The EEC: The Politics and
Economics of European Integration, A Eco
30E or R Pos 30E.
NOTE: Political Science majors should not
choose this track because of the excessive
concentration in Political Science courses.
Global Issues Track:
18 credits from A Aas 150, 240 or A Lcs 240
or A Wss 240; A Ant 100, 361 or 361Z,
363, 381 or 381Z or A Wss 381 or 381Z;
A Atm 102N, 300Z; A Bio 311N or A Gog
310N or U Uni 310N; A Eco 330 or 330Z;
A His 296, 366, or 366Z 454 or 454Z, 455
or 455Z, 456 or 456Z, , 460 or 460Z;
A Soc 344 or 344Z or A Wss 344 or 344Z;
A Wss 360, 433 or 433Z or R Pos 433Z;
E Edu 375; R Pos 472Z, 473Z; R Pub 395
or R Pos 395. NOTE: No more than 6
credits with the same prefix may be used in
this track.
ITALIAN A minimum of 18 graduation credits
from course work with an A Ita prefix above
A Ita 100L, including A Ita 206, 207, 301 or
301Z.
JAPANESE STUDIES A minimum of 21
graduation credits of which 15 must be A Eaj
102L, 201L, and 202L. The remaining 6
credits may be earned from any A Eaj or A Eas
course except A Eaj 101L, 130 and A Eas 220.
JOURNALISM A minimum of 18 graduation
credits, including A Jrl 300 or 300Z and an
advanced-level writing course to be selected
from the following: A Eng 300Z, 308Z, 309Z
(for students interested in scientific, political
or economic journalistic writing) or 400Z.
The remaining credits are to be selected from
other writing courses cited above and/or from
A Jrl 364, 365, 397, 400; R Pos 205, 365, 427Z;
A Com 238, 265, 336 (when the topic is
“Rhetoric of the New Journalism”); A Soc 255,
and independent study in various departments
when the subject involves journalism. Students
may include other courses to prepare themselves
for a specialized branch of journalism, but no
more than two courses in this category may be
included in the minimum 18 credits for the
minor.
Approval of the director is required for such
courses to be included. Skill in writing is a
specific requirement for the minor. This must
be demonstrated by the end of the junior year
through submission of a substantial sample of
the student’s writing to the director of the
journalism program. Therefore, the signature
of the director is required for students wishing
to declare this minor. On the basis of the
student’s previous experience and ability, the
requirement of A Jrl 300 may be waived by the
director of the program.
JUDAIC STUDIES A minimum of 18 graduation
credits (9 or more of which must be in course
work at or above the 300 level) from course
work in the Department of Judaic Studies or
other relevant departments. No more than 4
credits from among A Heb 450 or A Jst 450 or
490 may be applied to the minor.
KOREAN STUDIES A minimum of 21 graduation
credits of which 15 must be A Eak 102L, 201L
and 202L. The remaining 6 credits may be
earned from any A Eak or A Eas course except
A Eak 101L and A Eas 220.
LATIN AMERICAN AND CARIBBEAN STUDIES A
minimum of 18 graduation credits (9 or more
of which must be in course work at or above
the 300 level) to include A Lcs 100 or 100Z;
150 or 150Z, 201 or 302; A Lcs 102 or 269;
and 9 additional credits in course work with an
A Lcs prefix.
47
University at Albany
LIBRARY AND INFORMATION SCIENCE A minimum
of 18 graduation credits including A Csi 101 or
201 or B Msi 215; R Isp 523 (various suffixes);
R Isp 601; R Isp 602, and two additional R Isp
electives at the 500 level or higher, as advised.
LINGUISTICS A minimum of 18 graduation
credits, including A Lin 220M, A Lin 321 or
322, and 6 additional credits in courses with
an A Lin prefix. (A Lin 289 may not be used
to satisfy the requirements for the minor.)
The remaining credits may be selected from
courses with an A Lin prefix or from the
following courses which are approved
electives within the linguistics major: A Ant
424; A Clc 125; A Com 373, 465; A Csi
101N, 201N, or 310; A Eng 311L; A Fre
306, 406, 450; A Heb 203; A Phi 210L, 332,
415, 432; A Por 402; A Psy 365, 381; A Spn
401, 402, 405; one of the following: A Gog
396, A Psy 210, A Mat 108, or A Soc 221.
MATHEMATICS A minimum of 18 graduation
credits in courses with an A Mat prefix
numbered 105 or higher. These credits must
include a minimum of 12 credits at or above
the 200 level.
MEDICAL ANTHROPOLOGY A minimum of 18
graduation credits (9 or more of which must
be in course work at or above the 300 level
and/or in courses requiring at least one
prerequisite course) as follows: A Ant 110N;
at least 6 credits from the series A Ant 119N,
364, 365, 418 or 418Z, and 450Z; at least 3
credits from the series A Ant 311, 311Z, 319,
414, or 414Z; additional courses may include
the following: A Bio 117N, 209N, 308, 407;
and A Soc 359M.
MEDIEVAL & RENAISSANCE STUDIES A
minimum of 18 graduation credits (9 or more
of which must be in course work at or above
the 300 level and/or in courses requiring at
least one prerequisite course) including 3
credits from History courses, 3 credits from
Literature and Philosophy courses, 3 credits
from Art and Music courses. The remaining 9
credits are to be selected from any of the
approved courses listed below.
History Core Courses: A His 336, 337, 338,
391 (when appropriate).
History Elective Courses: A His 235 or
235Z; A Jst 343 or 343Z; A Spn 313.
Literature and Philosophy Courses: A Eng
289, 291, 341, 345, 348, 421, 422, 425;
A Fre 361, 362; A Ita 421, 441; A Jst 430;
A Phi 311, 312; A Spn 311, 482.
Art and Music Courses: A Arh 331, 332,
341, 342; A Mus 205L, 230, 287 (when
appropriate).
MUSIC A minimum of 20 graduation credits
to include A Mus 140, 141, 142, 143; one
course chosen from 185, 186, 187, or 287;
230L, 231L and one 3 credit elective chosen
from: A Mus 320, 321, 325, 326, 327, 328,
334L, 338L 350, 352, 360, 373, 398, 425,
432Z, 433Z, 435Z, 436, 455, 497. All
students registered for A Mus 140 must
satisfactorily pass a departmental aptitude
examination in music administered during
the first scheduled meeting of the course in
the fall semester. A noncredit piano
proficiency exam is given to all students
entering A Mus 140. Those deficient in this
area will be required to enroll in an
appropriate level of Functional Piano (A Mus
165 or 166). A grade of C- or higher in
A Mus 166 will satisfy this requirement.
Credit in A Mus 165 and/or 166 will not
apply toward the music minor.
P HILOSOPHY A minimum of 18 graduation
credits (9 or more of which must be in course
work at or above the 300 level and/or in
courses requiring at least one prerequisite
course) from course work with an A Phi
prefix, including at least two of the
following: A Phi 110L, 210L, 212L, 310,
312.
P HYSICS A minimum of 19 graduation credits
as follows: A Phy 140N, 150N, 240, and
250; and at least two courses with an A Phy
prefix at the 300-level or above.
P OLITICAL SCIENCE A minimum of 18
graduation credits (9 or more of which must
be in course work at or above the 300 level
and/or in courses requiring at least one
prerequisite course) from course work with
an R Pos prefix, including R Pos 101M.
P ORTUGUESE A minimum of 18 graduation
credits from course work with an A Por
prefix.
P SYCHOLOGY A minimum of 18 graduation
credits (9 or more of which must be in course
work at or above the 300 level and/or in
courses requiring at least one prerequisite
course) from course work with an A Psy
prefix, including A Psy 101M or 102M.
P UBLIC P OLICY 18 credits, including. R Pub
140, R Pad 303, R Pad 329, R Pub
340/R Pos 340, and two courses chosen from
the following courses: R Pad 204, R Pad 302,
R Pub 303/R Pad 304, R Pad 307, R Pub
316, R Pub 321, R Pad 324, R Pub 325 or
R Pos 325, R Pub 328 or R Pos 328, R Pub
330, R Pub 399, R Pad 414/R Pub 414,
R Pad 424.
RELIGIOUS STUDIES A minimum of 18
graduation credits (9 or more of which must
be in course work at or above the 300 level
and/or in courses requiring at least one
prerequisite course) including A Phi 214 and
one of the following methodological courses:
A Ant 363, A Phi 322. Of the remaining
credits, 6 credits must be chosen from core
courses, the remainder from either core or
supplementary courses or, with the approval
of the director of the program, other course
offerings. No more than 9 credits from any
one department may be included in the
minimum 18 credits required for the minor.
Core Courses A Rel 100L, 299, 397, 499;
A Aas 341; 363; A Clc 402; A Clc 403;
A Eac 344; A Eng 221; A Heb 203, 390;
A His 235 or 235Z, 324; A Jst 150, 280,
281Z, 335, 430; A Phi 216, 322, 342, 344,
346, 412; A Spn 313. In addition, special
topics courses (e.g., A Eng 378, A Jst 326,
A Jst 499, A Phi 340, A Psy 450 or 450Z)
may be included when the given topic
directly concerns religious studies.
Supplementary courses: A Ant 243, 364;
A Arh 303 (or 303Z); A Eac 199; A Cla
207E or 207L; A Clc 105E or 105L; A Clg
103L or A Rel 103L, A Clg 104L or A Rel
104L; A Cll 403; A Eng 289, 348; A Gog
402 or 402Z; A His 339, 381, 425A, 463;
A Cas 160Z, 222; A Ita 421; A Jst 251, 252,
253, 341Z, 342Z, 343 or 343Z; A Phy 201E
or 201L; A Rus 251L; R Ssw 220.
RHETORIC AND COMMUNICATION A minimum
of 18 graduation credits (9 or more of which
must be in course work at or above the 300
level and/or in courses requiring at least one
prerequisite course) from course work with
an A Com prefix.
RUSSIAN AND EAST EUROPEAN STUDIES A
minimum of 18 graduation credits from among
the following with no more than 6 credits from
any one prefix: A Gog 371; A His 352 or
352Z, 353 or 353Z, 354 or 354Z, 355 or 355Z;
R Pos 354, 356, 452Z; A Rus 161 or 161Z,
251L, 252L, 253L.
RUSSIAN A minimum of 18 graduation credits
in courses with A Rus prefix as advised with at
least 9 credits in course work at the 300 level
or above and/or in courses requiring at least
one prerequisite course.
SOCIOLOGY A minimum of 18 graduation
credits (9 or more of which must be in course
work at or above the 300 level) from course
work with an A Soc prefix, including A Soc
115M or 115G.
SPANISH A minimum of 18 graduation credits
from course work with an A Spn prefix above
A Spn 100L, including A Spn 205 or 206, 207,
and 301 or 301Z.
48
University at Albany
STATISTICS A minimum of 18 hours graduation
credits in courses with an A Mat prefix
numbered 105 or above, including either (1)
A Mat 367, 368, and 369 or (2) A Mat 367,
467, and 468. NOTE: This minor is not open
to students with a major in Mathematics.
URBAN EDUCATION A minimum of 21
graduation credits, including the 12-credit core
(E Edu 275 or A Rel 275; E Edu 375; E Edu
400 or E Edu 401; E Edu 427) and 9 elective
credits as advised by the minor adviser in the
Office of Urban Education (442-5250).
TEACHER EDUCATION As of the spring 2002
semester, the Teacher Education minor is no
longer accepting applications, Undergraduate
students are advised that to obtain teacher
certification at the University at Albany,
students must complete a BA/BS with an
appropriate academic major plus and
appropriate MA/MS in Education. These
changes are due to revisions in the New York
State Education Department regulations for
teacher certification, and a decision to provide
the best quality teacher education programs.
Students currently in the minor are advised
they must successfully complete all
requirements for their major and the Teacher
Education minor by December, 2003 if they
wish
to
obtain
provisional
teacher
certification.
The following are examples of some courses
that might be used as electives in this minor:
A Aas 221, 240, 331, 333, 370, 440; A Ant
119N, 146, 343, 351/351Z, 372/372Z, 424;
A Com 371; A Eas 321M; A Eco 341/341Z;
A Gog 125M, 220M, 321M; A His 300/300Z,
318/318Z, 325/325Z; A Lcs 201, 240, 282M,
302, 321M; A Pln 220M, 425; A Soc 282M,
371/371Z, 373, 375, 440Z; A Spn 322; A Wss
240. Other courses, transfer work, specific
topics courses, etc. may also be used if
approved by the minor adviser in the Office of
Urban Education (Ed B20).
Students interested in teaching as a profession
should contact the Academy for Initial Teacher
Preparation at 442-5144 to discuss their
options. See the section titled “Undergraduate
Certification Requirements” in this bulletin for
the teacher education minor requirements.
THEATRE A minimum of 18 graduation credits
from course work with an A Thr prefix, 9 or
more of which must be in courses at or above
the 300 level. Internship credits (A Thr 390
and 490) may not be used to satisfy minor
requirements.
Students are urged to seek departmental
advisement in planning their minors and in
selecting courses. General suggestions for
planning a minor follow:
Students interested in performance are advised
to take A Thr 130 or 135 or 235L, 221L or
222L, 240, and 9 credits from the following:
A Thr 300, 310, 320, 322 or 322Z, 340, 341,
343, 345, 350, 351, 406Z, 440, 446, 447, and
449.
Students interested in design and technical
theatre are advised to take A Thr 130 or 135,
and 15 credits from the following, 9 of which
must be at or above the 300 level: A Thr 210Z,
235L, 250, 260, 263, 270, 280, 315, 360, 365,
370, 371, 375, 380L, 385, 386, 448, 465and
470.
URBAN STUDIES AND PLANNING A minimum of
18 graduation credits (9 or more of which must
be in course work at or above the 300 level) as
follows: A Gog 125M, A Gog 225 or 225Z,
and either A Gog 220M or A Pln 220M; and 3
courses from A Ant 334, 372 or 372Z; A Eas
321M; A Eco 341 or 341Z, 456Z; E Edu 400,
401, 427; A Gog 321M, 324, 330, 480 495,
496; A His 303Z, 317 or 317Z, 318 or 318Z;
A Lcs 321M; A Pln 315Z, 320 or 320Z, 330,
425, 426, 430, 432, 436, 437, 443, 449, 451,
452 (formerly 450), 455, 456, 474, 475, 476,
485, 490a, 490b, 497; R Pos 321, 323, 424;
R Pub 321; A Soc 371, 373, 375, 473Z.
Student-Initiated
Interdisciplinary Minors
A student wishing a minor for which no
existing title is appropriate must submit a
proposed minor to the Interdisciplinary Studies
Committee. The subject area and the
combination
of
courses
must
be
interdisciplinary in nature and must have been
approved by the student’s major adviser before
consideration by the Interdisciplinary Studies
Committee. If approved, the minor will be
listed as “Interdisciplinary” on the Academic
Record.
The proposed minor must consist of 18-24
graduation credits which must include a
minimum of 9 credits in course work requiring
one or more prerequisite courses or courses at
or above the 300 level.
For an interdisciplinary minor, there must be
course work from at least two different
departments/programs/schools; it must have a
faculty sponsor who is familiar with the focus
of the minor.
Further information and application
procedures may be obtained by contacting
Mr. Richard Collier in the Office of the
Dean of Undergraduate Studies, LC 30,
518-437-3747.
WOMEN’S STUDIES A minimum of 18
graduation credits (9 or more of which must be
in course work at or above the 300 level),
including either A Wss 101/101Z or A Wss
220/220M or A Wss 240/240Z. In addition to
A Wss prefix courses, any course cross-listed
with
Wss
(from
Africana
Studies,
Anthropology, Art, Classics, East Asian
Studies, English, Judaic Studies, Latin
American and Caribbean Studies, Philosophy,
Political Science, or Sociology) will count
towards the requirement, as will A His 256 and
A His 293. Special Topics courses in other
departments that focus on women’s issues are
also acceptable with the approval of the Chair
of the Women’s Studies Department or when
offered as A Wss 299, 399, or 498.
Students interested in literature, history and
theory are advised to take A Thr 221L and
222L and 12 credits from the following, 9 of
which must be at or above the 300 level: A Thr
210Z, 225L, 320, 322 or 322Z, 406Z, 430,
455, and 456.
49
University at Albany
T HE N EW
G ENERAL
E DUCATION
P ROGRAM
The New General Education Program
applies to all students admitted to the
University with basis of admission
“FRESHMAN” in fall 2000 and thereafter
and with basis of admission “TRANSFER”
in fall 2002 and thereafter. Lists of
courses that meet each requirement will
be provided to students in the fall.
All other students should refer to the
section of the Undergraduate Bulletin
entitled “The Continuing (1992)
General Education Program.”
The New General Education Program at the
University at Albany proposes a set of
knowledge areas, perspectives, and
competencies considered by the University to
be central to the intellectual development of
every undergraduate. The Program is divided
into three areas–Disciplinary Perspectives,
Cultural and Historical Perspectives, and
Communication
and
Reasoning
Competencies. In addition, there are
requirements in Mathematics and Statistics and
in Foreign Language. The characteristics of
and the rationale and goals for the specific
requirements of the General Education
Program are discussed in greater detail below.
In conjunction with students’ majors and
minors, the General Education Program is
designed to develop capacities for critical
thinking and judgment. Whether selecting and
pursuing a major or choosing how to fulfill a
General Education category, students need to
think critically about why and how choices
contribute to one's education at the University.
As Albany continually seeks to improve its
programs, students are not discouraged from
questioning the value of any given
requirement, since developing the capacity for
such questioning is a key goal of general
education.
Students are also encouraged to reflect on their
general education program as a whole, to
explore the relation of requirements to each
other, to measure any given course against the
stated goals for its specific category and for the
program, and to use the experience of general
education to develop their own understanding
of what constitutes a meaningful university
education.
50
Characteristics of General
Education Courses
To be approved for inclusion in the General
Education P rogram, courses should
contribute to the following objectives to the
extent that they are applicable in the
different disciplines:
General education offers introductions to the
central
topics
of
disciplines
and
interdisciplinary fields. Approved courses also
may satisfy major or minor requirements, but
their primary purpose is to inform students
who do not plan to pursue more advanced
coursework in that field.
General education offers explicit rather
than
tacit
understandings
of
the
procedures, practices, methodology and
fundamental assumptions of disciplines
and interdisciplinary fields. Approved
courses seek to explain what it means to
be practitioners of disciplines and fields
by encouraging both faculty and students
to reflect about the nature of disciplinary
knowledge. This characteristic is
particularly relevant to courses within the
category of Disciplinary Perspectives.
Requirements of the Program
Disciplinary Perspectives:
Arts
Humanities
Natural Sciences
Social Sciences
(min. 3 crs)
(min. 3 crs)
(min. 6 crs)
(min. 6 crs)
Cultural and Historical Perspectives:
U.S. Historical Perspectives (min. 3 crs)
Europe
(min. 3 crs)
Regions beyond Europe
(min. 3 crs)
Global and Cross-Cultural
Studies
(min. 3 crs)
U.S. Diversity and
Pluralism
(min. 3 crs)
Communication & Reasoning Competencies:
Information Literacy
(1 course)
Oral Discourse
(1 course)
Written Discourse:
Lower-level Writing
(1 course)
Upper-level Writing
(1 course)
Mathematics and Statistics:
one semester of collegiate study, or the
equivalent, of mathematics at or above the
level of pre-calculus and/or probability,
statistics, and data analysis
General education recognizes multiple
p e r s p e c t i v e s o n t h e s u b j e c t ma t t e r ,
r e fl e c t i n g o u r p l u r a l i s t i c c u l t u r e
within and beyond the university.
Foreign Language:
two semesters of collegiate study, or the
equivalent, of a foreign language
General education emphasizes active
learning in an engaged environment that
enables students to be producers as well as
consumers
of
knowledge.
At
the
University at Albany, a public research
university, engaged learning may involve
student participation in cutting-edge
research, but all courses seek to engage
students in the active generation and
evaluation of knowledge."
While the majority of General Education courses are
at the 100 and 200 level, particularly in the category
of Disciplinary Perspectives, the General Education
Program at the University at Albany is conceived as
extending throughout the four years of undergraduate
study. Indeed, certain requirements, such as those in
U.S. History, Global and Cross-Cultural Studies, and
Oral Discourse, may be more appropriately
completed during the junior and senior year. Students
are encouraged, however, to complete the
requirements in the category of Disciplinary
Perspectives during their first two years. In addition,
the Information Literacy and the lower- level writing
requirement are expected to be completed within the
freshman or sophomore year.
General education promotes critical
inquiry into the assumptions, goals, and
methods of various fields of academic
study; it aims to develop the interpretive,
analytic, and evaluative competencies
characteristic of critical thinking.
The General Education Program at the
University at Albany consists of a
minimum of 30 credits of coursework
in the following areas: disciplinary
perspectives, cultural and historical
perspectives,
communication
and
reasoning competencies, mathematics and
statistics, and foreign language.
The General Education Program is
summarized
in
the
following
table:
Students may not use the same course to fulfill both
the Arts and the Humanities categories. Otherwise,
if a course fulfills more than one category, students
may use the course to fulfill all of those categories.
Although such “double counting” may reduce the
number of credits needed to fulfill General
Education, to graduate from the University each
student must have satisfactorily completed a
minimum of thirty (30) graduation credits in
courses designated as General Education
requirements. If a course fulfilling a General
Education category also meets a major or minor
requirement, there is no prohibition against
counting the course toward General Education and
the major or minor.
University at Albany
Overview
of
General
Education Categories
The humanities and arts, natural sciences, and
social sciences are commonly considered to be
the core of a liberal arts education. Courses in the
category of Disciplinary Perspectives are
designed to familiarize students with the
objectives, assumptions, subject matters,
methods, and boundaries of knowledge organized
in terms of academic disciplines. Requirements in
this category seek to introduce students to a broad
range
of
disciplinary
and
i n t e r d i s c i p l i n a r y perspectives and areas of
knowledge.
Equally central to a liberal arts education is an
understanding of history—the recognition that the
world we inhabit today had its origins in and has
been shaped by the events of the past, and that to
understand our current situation we must try as
best we can to understand the past. Of similar
importance is an understanding of the origins,
development and significance of human cultures,
and the recognition of cultural distinctiveness and
multiplicity. Courses in the category of Cultural
and Historical Perspectives are d e s i g n e d t o
i n c r e a s e s t u d e n t s ’ understanding of the
history of this nation (U.S.), of its cultural
diversity (U.S. Diversity and Pluralism), of
histories and cultures that have played a major
role in the development of the U.S. (Europe), and
of cultures and histories beyond those of the U.S.
and Europe (Regions beyond Europe).
In addition, these courses seek to introduce
students to the complex intersections of the
local and global, and to the different
perspectives that emerge from a focus on the
national, the regional, the global, and the
cross-cultural. 21 st century students will
inhabit
an
environment
increasingly
characterized by global dynamics in which
decisions made in the United States will
affect the lives of people elsewhere and
decisions made elsewhere will affect the
lives of people in the United States.
Moreover, they will inhabit an environment
increasingly shaped by forces that transcend
national borders and that are reconfiguring
the globe’s regions and cultures in the
service of various economic and political
interests. Courses approved for Global and
Cross-Cultural Studies provide students with
an opportunity to examine the global forces
that give rise to and shape nations, cultures
and regions, and to explore the larger
perspectives that emerge from cross-cultural
comparisons.
The
Foreign
Language
requirement is also designed to enhance
students' global awareness and to expand
their knowledge of different cultures.
The U.S. Diversity and Pluralism requirement
reflects the University at Albany’s long-standing
commitment to respect for difference, to civic
dialogue as a means of negotiating conflicts in
cultural and political values arising from human
diversity, to understanding the relation of
cultural pluralism to political democracy, and to
the development of socially responsible citizens.
Courses in this category are designed to
introduce students to the diversity of cultures
that make up the United States, as well as to the
historical, political, and economic forces that
have led these cultures to develop differently
and to be accorded different significance.
Approved courses frequently focus on key
issues of current concern (e.g., the gay rights
movement), setting these issues in the context of
how a democratic society defines majorities and
minorities and understands the rights and
responsibilities of each.
The General Education Program is designed to
provide students with a set of competencies
essential both for academic success and for
becoming effective citizens of the 21st century,
including the requirement in Mathematics and
Statistics, the Information Literacy requirement,
and the Written and Oral Discourse requirements.
Definition of Each
Education Category
General
DISCIPLINARY PERSPECTIVES
CATEGORIES
THE ARTS: Approved courses provide
instruction in or about a medium of creative
expression. Courses may focus on the physical
practice and techniques of the medium, on its
critical and theoretical interpretation, on its
historical development, or on a combination of
these approaches. Courses explicate the
methods used to study and critique the
medium as a vital element of personal or
cultural expression and exchange.
Approved courses generally fall into one of
four categories (for majors and/or non-majors):
Courses about the development and
interpretation of a medium:
(1) introductions to the disciplines;
(2) introductions to subfields in the
disciplines;
Courses on the physical practice of a
medium (studio art, creative writing, music
composition or performance, dance, and
theatre acting, directing or stagecraft):
(3) instructional courses on the skills and
methods required and their critical
evaluation;
(4) courses focussed upon performance.
Note: The requirement calls for three credits.
In the case of categories 3 and 4 (skills and
performance), where approved courses may
bear only one or two credits, the requirement
may be fulfilled through two or three courses
with a minimum total of three credits.
HUMANITIES: Approved courses are concerned
with defining and disputing that which is
understood to be quintessentially "human":
studying language, texts, thought, and culture;
their definition, interpretation, and historical
development; and their reflection of human
values, beliefs, and traditions. Courses in a
variety of disciplines explicate the underlying
assumptions, methods of study, practices,
theories, and disputes appropriate to those
disciplines.
Approved courses generally fall into one of
three categories (all open to majors and nonmajors):
(1) introductions to basic materials and
methods in the disciplines;
(2) introductions to subfields or groupings of
materials in the disciplines;
(3) literature and culture courses taught in a
foreign language higher than the thirdsemester level.
NATURAL SCIENCES: Approved courses show
how understandings of natural phenomena are
obtained using the scientific method, including
data collection, hypothesis development,
employment of mathematical analysis, and
critical evaluation of evidence. Courses
provide an overview of major principles and
concepts underpinning a discipline's current
base of knowledge and discuss major topics at
the current frontiers of disciplinary knowledge.
Courses show how answers to fundamental
questions in science can change the world in
which we live and often explore how social
issues can influence scientific research.
Opportunities for scientific inquiry within
laboratory and/or field settings may be
provided.
Approved courses generally fall into one of
three categories:
(1) introductions to scientific disciplines,
designed for majors, non-majors, or both;
(2) introductions to disciplinary subfields,
designed for majors, non-majors, or both;
(3) courses open to majors and non-majors
on broad topics that are addressed by one or
more scientific disciplines and which may
focus on the application of science to
practical issues.
SOCIAL SCIENCES: Approved courses provide
theory and instruction on the role of
institutions, groups and individuals in society.
The focus of these courses is on the interaction
of social, economic, political, geographic,
linguistic, religious, and/or cultural factors,
with emphasis on the ways humans understand
the complex nature of their existence. Courses
include discussion of skills and practices used
by the social sciences: data collection,
hypothesis development, employment of
mathematical analysis, and critical evaluation
of evidence. Opportunities to experience social
science methods in the field may be provided.
51
University at Albany
Approved courses generally fall into one of
three categories:
(1) introductions to the various disciplines of
the social sciences;
(2) introductions to disciplinary subfields,
designed for majors, non-majors, or both;
(3) courses open to majors and non-majors
on broad topics that are addressed by one or
more social scientific disciplines.
CULTURAL
AND
HISTORICAL
PERSPECTIVES CATEGORIES
U.S.: Approved courses focus on specific
narratives or themes in the historical
unfolding of the United States, including
political, economic, social, cultural and/or
intellectual dimensions. All courses will
feature
an
explicitly
historical
organization; deal with topics of national,
as opposed to regional or local, import;
and consider a topic of sufficient
specificity for the course to be coherent,
but over a period long enough to ensure
that the historical dynamic is clearly
visible.
Students
should
acquire
knowledge of substance and methods for
comprehending the narratives or themes
presented.
Certain of these courses will balance
topical focus and chronological breadth. A
student who has achieved a score of 85 or
above on the Regents Examination i n
“United
States
History
and
Government” will be considered to have
fulfilled
the
chronological
breadth
criterion. Therefore, such a student has the
choice of fulfilling the requirement by
completing a course chosen from the basic
list available to all students or from a list
of more specialized courses. Each of the
more specialized courses covers to some
extent
a
knowledge
of
common
institutions in American society and how
they have affected different groups,
provides an understanding of America's
evolving relationship with the rest of the
world, and deals substantially with issues
of American history.
E UROPE : Approved courses focus on the
development and distinctive features of
the institutions, economies, societies, and
cultures of Europe. Approved courses
offer either an explicitly historical
approach or emphasize the narratives
whereby European cultures have come to
gain their specific identity. Preferably,
approved courses will have a broad
cultural or historical perspective; c o u r s e s
with a more narrow chronological
f o c u s o r a m o r e specialized narrative
topic will relate these interests to larger
issues in the history and cultural
development of Europe.
52
R EGIONS BEYOND E UROPE : Approved
courses focus on specific cultures (other than
those of the United States and Europe) or the
world's regions. Courses emphasize the
features and processes whereby cultures and
regions gain their specific identity. Approved
courses will offer an explicitly historical
organization, and will balance topical focus
with chronological breadth. Courses may
also engage students in considerations of the
“local” as opposed to the “global.”
GLOBAL AND CROSS-CULTURAL STUDIES:
Approved courses engage students in
comparative and integrative analyses. Courses
offer global perspectives on historical or
contemporary events or comparisons between
societies or regions. Courses emphasize the
dynamic interaction between and among
cultures and regions and the global forces that
give rise to and define cultures and regions.
U.S. DIVERSITY AND PLURALISM: Approved
courses must meet each of the following six
criteria:
The course should relate directly to
contemporary United States experiences of
students or contain components that
compare, on a fairly regular basis, aspects of
other cultures to those experiences.
The course should compare and relate
aspects of racial and/or ethnic diversity,
including gender-related concerns, to the
topic of the course. In this context, the terms
“racial” and “ethnic” may include groups
that are self- and/or societally-defined on
such bases as nationality, religion, etc.
The course should provide substantial
knowledge of diversity as expressed
through sociopolitical, ideological,
aesthetic, or other aspects of
human endeavor. This criterion is
intentionally defined broadly to
accommodate a variety of approaches. It
is not a requirement or expectation that
the content will focus on controversy or
those aspects that result in conflict with
other persons, groups, or cultures; see,
however, the next criterion.
The course should provide sufficient
knowledge to permit the student to
understand better the sources and
manifestations of controversy and
conflicts in cultural values arising from
human diversity.
Opportunities for student writing and
discussion are central to the objectives of the
program. The course should include at least
one
writing
component.
For
discussions to be effective, classes of sixty or
more students should require discussion
sections, breakout sessions, in-class
groups or comparable mechanisms
permitting discussions within groups of
twenty students.
The course should focus on the
theories,
histories,
dynamics,
mechanisms, and results of human and
social diversity, drawing on the
experience of specific groups to
illustrate
those
principles.
Thus,
whatever specific cultural heritages the
students study should be placed in the
larger context of cultural diversity.
COMMUNICATION AND REASONING
COMPETENCIES CATEGORIES
INFORMATION
LITERACY:
Approved
courses introduce students to various ways
in which information is organized and
structured and to the process of finding,
using,
producing,
and
distributing
information in a variety of media formats,
including traditional print as well as
computer databases. Students acquire
experience with resources available on the
Internet and learn to evaluate the quality of
information, to use information ethically and
professionally, and to adjust to rapidly
changing technology tools. Students must
complete this requirement within the
freshman or sophomore year.
Approved Criteria for Information Literacy
Courses:
Courses that satisfy the
Information Literacy requirement will have
three characteristics:
Classroom activities on finding, evaluating,
citing, and using information in print and
electronic sources from the University
Libraries, World Wide Web, and other
sources. Courses should address questions
concerning the ethical use of information,
copyrights, and other related issues that
promote critical reflection.
Assignments, course work, or tutorials that
make extensive use of the University
Libraries, World Wide Web, and other
information sources. Assignments should
include finding, evaluating, and citing
information sources.
At least one research project that requires
students to find, evaluate, cite, and use
information presented in diverse formats
from multiple sources and to integrate this
information within a single textual, visual, or
digital document.
W RITTEN D ISCOURSE : Students must
satisfactorily complete with grades of C or higher
or S a lower division Writing Intensive
course, which is expected to be completed
within the freshman or sophomore year, and
a Writing Intensive course at or above the
300 level, normally completed within the
student’s major. These courses use writing as
an important tool in the discipline studied
and are not designed primarily to teach the
technical aspects of writing. The emphasis is
on using writing as a means of sharpening
critical thinking in and understanding of the
subject.
University at Albany
Approved courses must meet each of the
following four criteria:
A Substantial Body of Finished Work:
This is generally expected to be a total
of 20+ double-spaced pages in at least
two, preferably more, submissions. It
may be in a variety of forms—journal,
reports, essays, research papers, etc.—
not all of which need to be graded.
Opportunity for Students to Receive
Assistance in Progress: Such assistance
may take several forms, from visits to the
Writing Center (HU-140) to conferences
with the instructor.
Opportunity to Revise Some Pieces: As
revision is an essential characteristic of
good writing, students should be able to
revise some portion of their work.
Response to Student Writing: Such
response may take several forms—from
extended comments from the instructor
to peer evaluation in student groups. It
is
expected,
however,
that
the
instructor will respond in detail to
some extended work of the student.
Note: Transfer students who enter the
University with credit for an “English
Composition” course or a two-semester
combined literature and writing course
will be considered to have completed the
lower-level writing intensive requirement
at this University.
ORAL DISCOURSE: Approved courses provide
opportunities for students to develop the oral
communication skills they need to participate
more effectively in public and academic
debates and discussions. Courses offer
opportunities to participate in a variety of
communication contexts and to reflect on the
principles and theory relevant to specific oral
communication
activities.
Approved
courses
include
instruction
on
presentation, as well as feedback and
evaluation of oral performance.
Approved courses generally have a minimum
of two exercises in which oral performance is
required
and
graded.
An
oral
performance
exercise
can
be
accomplished in any of the following
activities, either live or in a crafted recording:
1)
A stand-up monologue presentation of a
minimum of 3-5 minutes
2)
A debate where each participant speaks
for a minimum of 3-5 minutes
3)
A question and answer dialogic process
where the student fields a succession of
questions or asks a succession of
questions that build on and comment
upon prior answers
4)
A discussion within a group, where each
member will be required to make 3-5
“paragraph-length” contributions in the
course of the discussion.
Students will be made aware of the criteria that
will be used for evaluation of these
performances, such as contact/ relationship
with the audience, vocal punctuation and
expressiveness, oral language style suited to
the exercise, appropriate volume and pace of
speech, poise and comfort, vocal fluency, eye
contact. The final grade in oral intensive
courses will include the grade for oral
performance as a key component.
MATHEMATICS
CATEGORY
AND
STATISTICS
Approved courses introduce students to or
extend their knowledge of pre-calculus,
calculus, discrete mathematics, probability,
statistics and/or data analysis. Courses may be
offered in the Department of Mathematics and
Statistics and in other departments that have
expertise in quantitative reasoning and data
analysis and that offer appropriate courses,
particularly in statistics or discrete structures.
A student who has achieved a score of 85
or above on the Regents Examination in
“Mathematics Course III” or on a
recognized standardized examination
indicating readiness to enter pre-calculus
will be considered to have fulfilled this
requirement.
FOREIGN LANGUAGE CATEGORY
Basic proficiency in the understanding
and use of an ancient or modern human
language
other
than
English
as
demonstrated by:
the satisfactory completion of the
second college semester (i.e., level
Elementary II) of foreign language
study or its equivalent; or
passing a Regents “Checkpoint B”
Examination or a Regents -approved
equivalent with a score of 85 or above;
or
demonstration of competency in a
language other than English,
including languages not currently
offered for formal instruction at this
university; or
satisfactory completion of at least one
college semester in a study abroad program
in a country where English is not the primary
language of instruction.
Transition and Implementation
A. Students admitted to the University whose
basis of admission is “FRESHMAN”:
The new requirements will apply to all
students whose basis of admission is
“freshman” who matriculate at the University
in Fall 2000 or thereafter.
B. Students admitted to the University whose
basis of admission is “TRANSFER”:
The new requirements do not apply to students
whose basis of admission is “transfer” who
matriculated at an accredited college or
university prior to Fall 2000; these students
instead are required to meet the “Continuing”
(1992) General Education requirements for
transfer students.
The new requirements will apply to all other
students whose basis of admission is
“transfer” and who matriculate at the
University in Fall 2002 or thereafter.
For at least the next four years, the Office
of Undergraduate Studies will provide
through the print and web v e r s i o n s o f
the
Undergraduate
Bulletin and
through other media as deemed necessary,
a full description for both the current and
the new general education requirements.
Students who feel their placement within
either system of general e d u c a t i o n
r e q u i r e m e n t s i s inappropriate to their
circumstances or may cause undue
hardship may appeal to the General
Education Committee through the Office
of Undergraduate Studies.
In accordance with the Trustees’ policies,
if a student from a SUNY s t a t e operated
campus
or
SUNY
community college has fulfilled, as
determined by the policies of the other
SUNY campus, one or more of the
Trustees-mandated general educational
categories, the University at Albany will
also consider the student to have
fulfilled that category or those
categories. This is true even if 1) Albany
requires more credits or courses for the
given category; 2) the requirement is
fulfilled by a course whose Albany
equivalent does not fulfill the same
requirement; 3) the student received a
non-transferable but minimally passing
grade in the course; 4) due to limits on
total transferable credits, the student is
unable to include that course among
those transferred to Albany; 5) the
student was waived from the requirement
based on high school achievement or
other standards different from those
employed by Albany; or 6) the student
was covered by a blanket waiver of the
requirement by the SUNY Provost
because the other SUNY campus was not
yet able to implement the given
requirement.
53
University at Albany
The same principle of reciprocity should
apply to students who transfer from non SUNY schools. If a course approved for
transfer from a non-SUNY school is
deemed to be equivalent to a University
at Albany course that meets a general
education requirement, the student shall
be considered to have fulfilled the
Albany general education category
represented by that course. This is true
even if 1) Albany requires more credits
or courses for the given category; 2) the
student receives a n o n - t r a n s f e r a b l e
b u t m i n i m a l l y passing grade in the
course; or 3) due to limits on total
transferable credits, the student is unable
to include that course among those
transferred to Albany.
The foregoing conditions only apply to
prematriculation credits.
The only exception to the policies
outlined above are the University’s
Global and Cross-Cultural Studies
requirement, the U.S. Diversity a n d
P luralism requirement, and the
upper division Writing Intensive
r e q u i r e m e n t . T h e s e requirements shall
be
considered
“local”
campus
requirements, independent of the SUNY
Trustees’ system of General Education,
and shall be required of all students
whose basis of admission is “transfer”
who matriculate at the University in fall
2002 or thereafter. Students may
continue to present credit for courses
the University d e e m s e q u i v a l e n t t o
t h e s e requirements, but for the transfer
course to fulfill the upper division
writing requirement it must be
completed with a grade of C or better or
a grade of S.
Students who feel they have not been
appropriately accorded equivalence for
any given course or courses are
encouraged to consult with their
academic adviser; if the academic
a d vi s e r d e t e r mi n e s t h a t t h e s t u d e n t
h a s not been awarded appropriate
equivalency, the student or the adviser
may then appeal the decision through
established procedures. Students who
believe their transfer work or academic
circumstances may justify a waiver or
substitution for part of the general
education requirements may appeal to
the General Education Committee
through the Office of Undergraduate
Studies (LC 30). As the new requirements
are implemented, the units considering
transfer equivalencies should, if there
is demonstrable ambiguity, decide in
favor of the tr ansfer student.
54
C. Transfer Credit D Grades:
E x c e p t f o r t h e U n i v e r s i t y’ s w r i t i n g
requirements, for which a grade of
C or higher or S is required, either
pre- or postmatriculation transfer
work graded D+, D or D- in a
course that applies to one or more
of
the
U n i v e r s i t y’ s
General
Education requirements may be
applied
toward
fulfilling
the
requirements, even if the student
receives no graduation credit for the
course.
Administration of the
Program
The Dean of Undergraduate Studies is
responsible for the administration of the
program, including interpretation of
legislation, assessing the number of
seats required and communicating that
information to Deans, evaluation of
courses,
faculty
development
and
program assessment. The Dean shall
also have the explicit authority to grant
waivers
and
make
appropriate
substitutions for individual students,
and to decertify courses that do not
meet the program’s standards. The Dean
shall have sufficient material and human
resources to meet these responsibilities.
The General Education Committee,
appointed by the Dean, will advise the
Dean on these matters. The General
Education
Committee
shall
have
between 12 and 15 members, with broad
representation across the University,
and shall be chaired by the Associate
Dean for Undergraduate Studies with
specific responsibility for the General
Education Program.
Course
proposals
originate
in
departments or programs, pass through
appropriate
College
curriculum
committees, and are reviewed by the
General Education Committee. It is th e
responsibility of the Dean and of the
General Education Committee to insure
that course proposals meet the values
and criteria of the general education
program. New course proposals must
also be approved by the Undergraduate
Academic Council of the University
Senate; revisions to existing courses
designed to qualify them for the general
education program will be reviewed
only
by
the
General
Education
Committee pursuant to the procedure
outline above.
The General Education Committee will
review approved courses on a regular
cycle of three years. At the end of the
review process, the committee will
continue the course for another threeyear cycle, suggest revisions necessary
for its continuance, or designate the
course to be discontinued as a general
education course, effective at the end of
the spring term of the next academic
year. Any decision to discontinue a
course
must
provide
sufficient
opportunity for appeal and revision.
University at Albany
New General Education: Course
Lists by Category:
A Thr 225L
A Thr 230L
A Thr 235L
Arts
A Thr 322L
A Ant 268L
A Arh 170L
A Arh 171L
A Arh 230
A Arh 260
A Arh 265
A Arh 266
A Arh 274
A Arh 280
A Cla 207L
A Cla 208L
A Cla 209
A Eas 140
A Eac 280
A Eng 102
A Eng 233
A Eng 325
A His 263E
A His 264E
A Lcs 216L
A Lcs 268L
A Lcs 315L
A Mus 100L
A Mus 102L
A Mus 115L
A Mus 170L
A Mus 178L
A Mus 180L
A Mus 182L
A Mus 184L
A Mus 185L
A Mus 186L
A Mus 187L
A Mus 208L
A Mus 211L
A Mus 212L
A Mus 213L
A Mus 214L
A Mus 216L
A Mus 230
A Mus 231
A Mus 270L
A Mus 278L
A Mus 287L
A Mus 289L
A Mus 320
A Mus 325
A Mus 334L
A Mus 338L
A Thr 107L
A Thr 120
A Thr 221L
A Thr 222L
A Thr 224L
Ethnology of Pre-Columbian Art
Survey of Art in the Western
World I
Survey of Art in the Western
World II
The Art of Medieval Knighthood
Introduction to Cinema
History of Photography
Photography from 1970 to
Present
Islamic Art and Architecture
Chinese Painting
Egyptian Archaeology
Greek Archaeology
Roman Archaeology
East Asian Cinema
Chinese Painting
Introduction to Creative Writing
Modern Drama
American Drama
Art, Music, and History A
Multimedia Approach I
Art, Music, and History A
Multimedia Approach II
Music and Society in Latin
America
Ethnology of Pre-Columbian Art
Latin America through Film
Introduction to Music
The Golden Age of Piano Music
Jazz: America's Music
Secondary Performance
Major Performance Study I
Chamber Ensembles
Percussion Ensemble
Jazz Ensemble
Univ-Community Symphony
Univ-Community Symphonic
Band
The University Chorale
Introduction to Opera
The Concerto
Chamber Music
Survey of Symphonic Music
American Music
Music and Society in Latin
America
Music History I
Music History II
Secondary Performance
Major Performance Study III
University Chamber Singers
Electronic Music Ensemble
Intro to Music Composition
Electronic Music
Survey of American Music
Survey of Opera
Introduction to Dramatic Art
Understanding Design for the
Performing Arts
Devlpmt of Theatre & Drama I
Devlpmt of Theatre & Drama II
Contemporary Issues in Modern
Drama
A Thr 380L
American Theatre History
Great Drama on Film & Video
Fundamentals of Theatrical
Design
Development of Theatre and
Drama III
History of Costume
Humanities
A Aas 142L
A Ant 175L
A Ant 268L
A Cla 207L
A Cla 208L
A Cla 209
A Clc 105L
A Clc 110L
A Clc 223L
A Eac 150L
A Eac 170
A Eac 210L
A Eac 211L
A Eac 212L
A Eaj 170
A Eaj 210L
A Eaj 212L
A Eas 103L
A Eas 104L
A Eng 121L
A Eng 122L
A Eng 123L
A Eng 124L
A Eng 144L
A Eng 215L
A Eng 222L
A Eng 223L
A Eng 226L
A Eng 232L
A Eng 233L
A Eng 234L
A Eng 241L
A Eng 242L
A Eng 260L
A Eng 261L
A Eng 291L
A Eng 292L
A Eng 295L
A Eng 296L
A Eng 325L
A Eng 362L
A Eng 368L
A Fre 201
A Fre 241L
A Fre 361
African/African-American
Literature
Anthropology and Folklore
Ethnology Pre-Columbian Art
Egyptian Archaeology
Greek Archaeology
Roman Archaeology
Myths of the Greek World
Classical Roots: Great Ideas of
Greece and Rome
Masterpieces of Greek Tragedy
and Comedy
China Through Western Eyes
China: Its Culture and Heritage
Survey of Classical Chinese Lit
in Translation I
Survey of Classical Chinese Lit
in Translation II
Modern Chinese Literature in
Translation
Japan: Its Culture and Heritage
Survey of Traditional Japanese
Literature
Modern Japanese Literature in
Translation
Sources of East Asian
Civilizations I
Sources of East Asian
Civilizations II
Reading Literature
Reading Prose Fiction
Reading Drama
Reading Poetry
Reading Shakespeare
Methods of Literary Criticism
Masterpieces of Literature
Short Story
Study of Literary Theme, Form,
or Mode
Modern Novel
Modern Drama
Modern Poetry
Popular Literature
Science Fiction
Forms of Poetry
American Poetic Tradition
The English Literary Tradition I
The English Literary Tradition II
Classics of Western Literature I:
Epic to Modern Drama
Classics of Western Literature
II: Epic to Modern Novel
American Drama
Critical Approaches to Women
in Literature
Women Writers
Perspectives on the Modern
World: Medieval Women
Introduction to French Studies
Readings in French Literature
A His 263E
A His 264E
A His 297
A Ita 223L
A Jst 231
A Jst 242
A Jst 272
A Jst 273
A Jst 274
A Jst 373/Z
A Jst 374/Z
A Lcs 216L
A Lcs 268L
A Lcs 315L
A Mus 216L
A Phi 110L
A Phi 111L
A Phi 112L
A Phi 114L
A Phi 115L
A Phi 116L
A Phi 210L
A Phi 212L
A Phi 218L
A Rel 100L
A Rel 116L
A Rel 175L
A Rel 200L
A Rel 231
A Rel 297L
A Rus 171L
A Rus 251L
A Rus 252L
A Rus 253L
A Rus 261L
A Rus 354L
A Spn 223L
A Spn 312
A Thr 221L
A Thr 222L
A Thr 224L
A Thr 225L
A Thr 230L
A Wss 362L
A Wss 368L
R Pos 103
R Pos 306
U Uni 101
U Uni 151L
U Uni 156L
Art, Music, and History a
Multimedia Approach I
Art, Music, and History a
Multimedia Approach II
Religion in Society and History
Introduction to Literary Methods
Modern Jewish Thought
The Bible as Literature
Modern Hebrew Literature in
Translation
The Arab in Israeli Literature
Love & Sex in Hebrew
Literature
The Arab in Israeli Literature
Love & Sex in Hebrew
Literature
Music & Society in Latin America
Ethnology Pre-Columbian Art
Latin America through Film
Music & Society in Latin America
Introduction to Philosophical
Problems
The Mind and the World
Introduction to Reasoning and
Analysis
Morals and Society
Moral Choices
World Views
Introduction to Logic
Introduction to Ethical Theory
Understanding Science
Introduction to Study of Religion
World Views
Anthropology and Folklore
Introduction to the Bible
Modern Jewish Thought
Religion and Society in History
Women in Russian Culture
Masterpieces of 19th-Century
Russian Literature
Masterpieces of 20th-Century
Russian Literature
Contemporary Russian Lit
Dostoevsky and Tolstoy in
English Translation
The Russian Novel in Its
Western Context
Intro to Literary Methods
Representative Spanish Authors
II
Development of Theatre and
Drama I
Development of Theatre and
Drama II
Issues Modern Drama
American Theatre History
Great Drama on Film & Video
Critical Approaches to Women
in Literature
Women Writers
Political Theory
Contemporary Democratic
Theory
Foundations of Great Ideas I
Human Identity and
Technology I
Human Identity and
Technology I
55
University at Albany
Natural Sciences
A Ant 110N
Introduction to Human
Evolution
A Ant 111N Introduction to the Primates
A Ant 119N The City and Human Health
A Atm 100N The Atmosphere
A Atm 101N The Upper Atmosphere
A Atm 102N Science and Major
Environmental Issues
A Atm 105N Oceanus and Gala
A Atm 107
The Oceans
A Bio 102N General Biological Sciences
A Bio 110F
General Biology I
A Bio 110N General Biology I
A Bio 111N General Biology II
A Bio 117N Nutrition
A Bio 208N Marine Biology
A Bio 209N The Human Organism
A Bio 230N People and Resources in
Ecological Perspective
A Bio 241N The Biology of Sex
A Chm 100N Chemical ABCs: Atoms, Bonds,
Citizen Consumers, Chemistry
of Cancer
A Chm 120N General Chemistry I
A Chm 121N General Chemistry II
A Geo 100F Planet Earth
A Geo 100N Planet Earth
A Geo 105N Environmental Geology
A Geo 190N Earth Resources: Problems and
Choices
A Geo 201N Environmental Analysis
A Gog 101N Introduction to the Physical
Environment
A Gog 201N Environmental Analysis
A Gog 304N Introduction to Climatology
A Phy 100N Contemporary Astronomy:
Cosmic Connection
A Phy 102N Applicatns Modern Physics in
Art History and Archaeology
A Phy 103N Exploration of Space
A Phy 104N Physical Science for Humanists
A Phy 105N General Physics I
A Phy 108N General Physics II
A Phy 140N Introductory Physics I
A Phy 150N Introductory Physics II
A Phy 202N Environmental Physics
U Uni 154N Human Identity and
Technology II
U Uni 158N Human Identity and
Technology II
A Wss 109N Women, Biology and Health
Social Sciences
A Ant 108M
A Ant 131M
A Ant 160M
A Ant 220M
A Ant 240M
A Ant 341M
A Cla 131M
A Com 100M
A Eac 160M
A Eas 321M
A Eco 110M
A Eco 111M
56
Cultural Anthropology
Ancient People of the World
Symbol and Human Nature
Introduction to Linguistics
The North American Indian
Ethnology of Mesoamerica
Ancient People of the World
Human Communication
China: People and Places in the
Land of One Billion
Exploring the Multicultural City
Principles of Economics I:
Microeconomics
Principles of Economics II:
Macroeconomics
A Eco 202M
The American Economy: Its
Structure and Institutions
A Eng 217M Introduction to Linguistics
A Gog 102M Introduction to Human
Geography
A Gog 160M China: People and Places in the
Land of One Billion
A Gog 220M Introduction to Urban
Geography
A Gog 321M Exploring the Multicultural City
A His 220M Public Policy in Modern
America
A Lcs 282M Race and Ethnicity
A Lcs 321M Exploring the Multicultural City
A Lin 220M Introduction to Linguistics
A Lcs 341M Ethnology of Mesoamerica
A Pln 220M Introductory Urban Planning
A Psy 101M Introduction to Psychology
A Psy 102M Advanced Introduction to
Psychology
A Soc 115M Introduction to Sociology
A Soc 180G Social Problems
A Soc 180M Social Problems
A Soc 210M Sociology of Culture
A Soc 262M Sociology of Gender
A Soc 282
Race and Ethnicity
A Soc 283
Juvenile Delinquency
A Soc 359G Medical Sociology
A Soc 359M Medical Sociology
A Wss 220G Perspectives on Women
A Wss 220M Perspectives on Women
A Wss 262M Sociology of Gender
E Aps 400
United States Educational
Governance, Policy, and
Administration
R Pos 101M American Politics
R Pos 102M Comparative and International
Politics
R Pos 103M Political Theory
R Pos 240M Introduction to Public Policy
R Pos 340M Introduction to Political
Analysis
U Uni 152M Human Identity and
Technology I
U Uni 157M Human Identity and
Technology II
United States Historical Perspectives
The following courses have been approved for
ALL students to fulfill the U.S. Historical
Perspectives General Education Requirement:
A His 100
A His 101
R Pos 101
A His 311
A His 312
A His 317
A His 318
American Political and Social
History I
American Political and Social
History II
American Politics
History of American Foreign
Policy I
History of American Foreign
Policy II
History of the American City to
1860
History of the American City
since 1860
A His 321
A His 322
A His 327
A His 328
American Social History to Civil
War
American Social History: Civil
War to Present
The Roles of Law in American
History
Lawyers in American Life, 1607
to Present
The following courses have been approved for
students who received an 85 or above on the
NYS Regents Exam to fulfill the U.S.
Historical Perspectives General Education
Requirement
A Aas 213
A Aas 220
A Ant 351
A Eas 180
A Gog 125
A Gog 180
A Gog 240
A Gog 356
A His 100
A His 101
A His 300
A His 311
A His 312
A His 313
A His 316
A His 317
A His 318
A His 321
A His 322
A His 325
A His 327
A His 328
A Jst 221
A Jst 260
A Jst 351
A Wss 106
A Wss 260
R Pos 101
R Pos 426
History of Civil Rights
Movement
Black and White in America
Ethnicity in North America
Asian America
The American City
Asian America
Patterns of American
Immigration
Geography of the United States
American Political and Social
History I
American Political and Social
History II
History of American Indians
History of American Foreign
Policy I
History of American Foreign
Policy II
Constitutional History of the
United States
Workers and Work in America:
1600-Present
History of the American City to
1860
History of the American City
since 1860
American Social History to Civil
War
American Social History: Civil
War to Present
The Quest for Equality in
American History
The Roles of Law in American
History
Lawyers in American Life, 1607
to Present
The American Jewish
Experience
Jews and the Immigrant
Experience in America
Ethnicity in North America
U.S. Women Who Changed Our
World
History of Women and Social
Change
American Politics
American Constitutional Law
University at Albany
Europe
A Arh 170
A Arh 171
A Clc 110
A Clc 133
A Clc 134
A Clc 301
A Clc 310
A Fre 201
A Fre 360
A His 130
A His 131
A His 235
A His 253
A His 263
A His 264
A His 275
A Jst 252
A Jst 253
A Jst 275
A Mus 230
A Mus 231
A Rel 252
A Rel 253
A Rus 161
A Thr 221
A Thr 222
A Wss 311
R Pos 301
R Pos 302
Survey of Art in Western World I
Survey of Art in Western World II
Great Ideas of Greece and Rome
History of Ancient Greece
History of Ancient Rome
Rome and Mediterranean World
Women in Antiquity (Wss 311)
Perspectives on the Modern
World: Medieval Women
Evolution of French Literature
and Civilization
History European Civilization I
History European Civilization II
Early Medieval Christianity
Medieval Jews Among Muslims
and Christians (Jst/Rel 253)
Art, Music, and History I
Art, Music, and History II
Anti-Semitism in Historical
Perspective (Jst 275)
Jews, Hellenism, and Early
Christianity (Rel 252)
Medieval Jews Among Muslims
and Christians (His/Rel 253)
Anti-Semitism in Historical
Perspective (His 275)
Music History I
Music History II
Jews Hellenism, and Early
Christianity (Jst 252)
Medieval Jews Among Muslims
and Christians (His/Jst 253)
Russian Civilization
Development of Theatre and
Drama I
Development of Theatre and
Drama II
Women in Antiquity
History of Political Theory I
History of Political Theory II
A His 364Z
A Jst 243
A Jst 251
A Jst 257
A His 258
A Jst 285
A Lcs 100/Z
A Lcs 102
A Lcs 233
A Lcs 269
A Lcs 341
A Rel 285
R Pos 373
Global and Cross-Cultural Perspectives
A Ant 108
A Cas 103
A Cas 141
A Cas 150
A Com 371
A Eco 130
A Gog 102
A Gog 225
A His 158
A His 255
A His 275
A His 291
A His 293
A His 297
Regions Beyond Europe
A Aas 269
A Aas 286
A Aas 287
A Ant 233
A Ant 236
A Ant 240
A Ant 243
A Ant 269
A Ant 341
A Eac 170
A Eaj 170
A Eas 103
A Eas 104
A His 170
A His 176
A His 177
A His 257
A His 258
A His 286
A His 287
Caribbean: Peoples, Histories,
Cultures (Lcs/Ant 269)
African Civilizations (His 286)
Africa in Modern World (His 287)
Aztec, Incas & Mayans (Lcs 233)
American Indian Archaeology
The North American Indian
Peoples and Cultures of the
Middle East (Jst 243)
Caribbean: Peoples, Histories,
Cultures (Lcs/Aas 269)
Ethnology of Mesoamerica (Lcs
341)
China: Its Culture and Heritage
Japan: Its Culture and Heritage
Sources of East Asian Civ I
Sources of East Asian Civ II
Intro Caribbean History (Lcs 102)
Cultures & Societies of Asia I
Cultures & Societies of Asia II
Jews, War and Revolution: West
European Jewry, 1770-1918
Jews, War and Revolution: East
European Jewry, 1772-1918
African Civilizations (Aas 286)
Africa in Modern World (Aas 287)
Culture and French Revolution
Peoples and Cultures of the
Middle East (Ant 243)
Early Israel & Biblical Civiliztn
Jews, War and Revolution: West
European Jewry, 1770-1918
Jews, War and Revolution: East
European Jewry, 1772-1918
Hero and Antihero in Scripture
Cultures of Latin America
Intro Caribbean History (His 170)
Aztec, Incas & Mayans (Ant 233)
Caribbean: Peoples, Histories,
Cultures (Aas/Ant 269)
Ethnology of Mesoamerica (Ant
341)
Hero and Antihero in Scripture
Government and Politics in the
Republic of China
A Jst 150
A Jst 254
A Jst 255
A Jst 275
A Jst 291
A Lcs 359
A Phi 214
A Pln 320
A Rel 214
A Rel 254
A Rel 291
A Rel 297
A Wss 308
R Pos 102
R Pos 355
R Pos 370
R Pos 371
R Pos 374
Cultural Anthropology
Perspectives on Globalization
Concepts of Race and Culture in
the Modern World
Cultural Diversity and the
Human Condition
Theories of Intercultural
Communication
Third World Economies: An
Interdisciplinary Profile
Introduction to Human Geography
World Cities
The World in the 20th Century
The Holocaust: Lessons in
Legacies (Jst 255)
Anti-Semitism in Historical
Perspective (Jst 275)
Messiah/Messianism in Judaism
and Christianity (Jst/Rel 291)
History of Women in the Americas
Religion and Society in History
(Rel 297)
Survey of Jewish Civilization
Jews in Modern World (Rel 254)
The Holocaust: Lessons in
Legacies (His 255)
Anti-Semitism in Historical
Perspective (His 275)
Messiah/Messianism in Judaism
and Christianity (His/Rel 291)
Globalization in the Americas
World Religions (Rel 214)
International & Urban Planning
World Religions (Phi 214)
Jews in Modern World (Jst 254)
Messiah/Messianism in Judaism
and Christianity (His/Jst 291)
Religion and Society in History
(His 297)
Global Perspectives on Women
Comparative and International
Politics
Government and Politics in SubSaharan Africa
International Relations: Theory
International Relations: Practice
America and Asia: Whose
Leadership?
R Pos 385
R Pos 461
R Pos 473
Vietnam: The Politics of
Intervention
Comparative Ethnicity
Economic Relations in the
Global System
U.S. Diversity and Pluralism
A Aas 142L
African/African-American
Literature
A Aas 213
History of the Civil Rights
Movement
A Aas 220
Black and White in America
A Aas 240
Classism, Racism & Sexism:
Issues
A Ant 100*
Culture, Society, and Biology
A Ant 172
Community and Self
A Ant 351
Ethnicity in North America
A Cas 125
Diversity of Voices in Literature
& the Arts
A Cas 131
Diversity and Equity in America
A Cas 141*
Concepts of Race and Culture in
the Modern World
A Cas 150*
Cultural Diversity and the
Human Condition
A Cas 240
Images & Issues of Diversity in
Visual Arts
A Com 371* Theories of Intercultural
Communication
A Eas 180
Asian America
A Eco 130*
The Third World Economies:
Interdisciplinary Profile
A Eng 240
Growing Up in America
A Fre 208
New World Cultural Diversity
A Fre 281
Francophone Cultures: New
World and Third World
A Gog 125M The American City
A Gog 180
Asian America
A Gog 240
Patterns of American Immigration
A His 158*
The World in the 20th Century
A His 225
Hollywood and the Jews
A His 275
Antisemitism in Historical
Perspective
A Jst 155
Judaism: Traditions & Practices
A Jst 221
The American Jewish Experience
A Jst 225
Hollywood and the Jews
A Jst 260
Jews and Immigrant Experience
in America
A Jst 270
Jewish-Christian Relations
A Jst 275
Antisemitism in Historical
Perspective
A Jst 351
Jewish American Ethnic Groups
A Lcs 201
Hispanic Cultures in the U.S.
A Lcs 216L* Music&Society in Latin Am
A Lcs 240
Classism, Racism, and Sexism :
Issues
A Lcs 282
Race and Ethnicity
A Lcs 302
Las Culturas Latinas en los
Estados Unidos
A Lcs 375
Latino Politics in the U.S.
A Mus 216L* Music&Society in Latin Am
A Phi 214*
World Religions
A Phi 328
Philosophy and Race
A Rel 100L* Intro to the Study of Religion
A Rel 155
Judaism: Traditions & Practices
A Rel 214*
World Religions
A Rel 270
Jewish-Christian Relations
A Rel 275
Social Morality and Citizenship
Educ in a Pluralistic Society
A Soc 262M Sociology of Gender
57
University at Albany
A Soc 282
A Soc 375
Race and Ethnicity
U.S. Urban Neighborhood
Diversity
A Spn 322
Las Culturas Latinas en los
Estados Unidos
R Ssw 220
Value Issues in Social Welfare
A Thr 228
Voices Diversity Contemp Amer
Theatre/Drama
A Wss 101
Introduction to Feminisms
A Wss 106
U.S. Women Who Changed the
World
A Wss 202
Intro to Lesbian and Gay Studies
A Wss 240
Classism, Racism and Sexism :
Issues
A Wss 262M Sociology of Gender
E Edu 275
Social Morality and Citizenship
Ed in a Pluralistic Society
E Edu 375
Social Responsibility & Citizenship
Ed in Pluralistic Society
E Spe 460
Intro Human Exceptionality
R Crj 210
Policies of Crime in
Heterogeneous Societies
U Uni 153
Human Identity and Tech II
U Uni 230
An Introduction to Disability
Studies
* Counts toward this requirement only if
taken before Fall 2004.
Information Literacy
A Com 265
A Csi 198T
Intro to Communication Theory
Microcomputer Consulting
Service in the University
Library
A Eac 160M/G China: People and Places in the
Land of One Billion
A Eas 205
East Asian Research and
Bibliographic Methods
A Gog 160M/G China: People and Places in the
Land of One Billion
A Lin 100M Understanding Language
R Isp 100
Internet and Information Access
R Isp 301
Intro to Information Science
U Uni 100
The Freshmen Year Experience
(U Uni 15_) Four-Course Project
Renaissance Sequence
U Unl 205
Information Literacy
Oral Discourse
A Aas 490
A Ant 423
A Arh 450
A Arh 499
A Art 305
A Atm 321
A Bio 212
A Com 203
A Com 212
A Eac 210L
A Eac 211L
A Eac 212L
A Eaj 301
A Eaj 302
A Eak 301
A Eak 302
A Eas 190
58
Senior Seminar
Linguistic Structures
Art/Soc Early Mod France
Research Seminar Art History
Intermediate Drawing
Physical Meteorology
Introductory Genetics
Speech Composition and
Presentation
Argumentation and Debate
Survey of Classical Chinese Lit
in Translation I
Survey of Classical Chinese Lit
in Translation II
Modern Chinese Literature in
Translation
Advanced Japanese I
Advanced Japanese II
Advanced Korean I
Advanced Korean II
Confucianism & Samurai Ethic
A Eas 321 M
A Eng 300 Z*
A Eng 301 Z*
A Eng 302 Z*
A Eng 303 Z*
Exploring the Multicultural City
Expository Writing
Critical Writing
Creative Writing
Forms of Argumentative and
Persuasive Writing (Rhetoric)
A Eng 304 Z* Forms of Creative Writing (Poetics)
A Fre 218
France Today
A Fre 221
Intermediate French I
A Fre 222
Intermediate French II
A Fre 270
Beginning French for Business
A Fre 350
Conversation and Writing
A Fre 460
Art/Soc Early Mod France
A Geo 350
Environmental Geochemistry
A Gog 321 M Exploring the Multicultural City
A Gog 330
Principles of Environmental Mgt
A Gog 344
World Population
A Ita 206
Intermediate Conversation and
Oral Grammar
A Jrl 350
Journalistic Interviewing
A Jst 285
Hero and Antihero in Scripture
A Lcs 321 M Exploring the Multicultural City
A Lin 423
Linguistic Structures
A Mus 320 L Music History
A Mus 455
Form & Analysis in Tonal Music
A Phi 425
Contemporary Ethical Theory
A Pln 320/Z International Urban Planning
A Pln 330/Z Principles of Environmental Mgt
A Rel 285
Hero and Antihero in Scripture
A Rus 311
Russian Conversation
A Rus 312
Russian Conversation: The Press
A Soc 359D Topics Sem Medical Sociology
A Soc 470D
Topics Sem Sociology of Families
A Spn 206
Intermediate Conversation and
Oral Grammar
A Thr 240
Acting I
A Thr 242
Voice I
A Thr 310
Reader's Theatre
A Thr 340
Acting II
A Thr 341
Acting III
A Thr 343
Voice II
A Thr 440
Acting IV
A Wss 322
Feminist Pedagogy in Practice
B Mgt 481
Strategic Management
R Isp 499Z
Senior Seminar Information Science
U Uni 153
Human Identity and Tech I
U Uni 157
Human Identity and Tech II
U Uni 301
Foundations of Great Ideas II
* If taken Fall 2003 or thereafter.
Writing Intensive
Writing Intensive courses are designated by the
suffix letters E, F, G, and Z. A 100- or 200-level
course with one of those suffixes may be used to
meet the lower division requirements; a 300-level or
above course with one of those suffixes, the upper
division requirement.
Mathematics and Statistics
R Crj 281
A Eco 210
A Mat 101
A Mat 105
A Mat 106
A Mat 108
A Mat 109
A Mat 111
Introduction to Statistics in
Criminal Justice
Tools of Economics
Algebra And Calculus
Finite Mathematics
Survey of Calculus
Elementary Statistics
Applied Matrix Algebra
Algebra and Calculus II
A Mat 112
A Mat 118
A Phi 210
A Psy 210
A Soc 221
B Msi 220
O Eop 13A
O Eop 13B
O Eop 13C
R Pos 416
Calculus
Honors Calculus
Introduction to Logic
Statistical Methods in
Psychology
Statistics for Sociologists
Introduction to Business
Statistics
Math I
Math II
Math III
Research Models in Political
Science I
Foreign Language
A Clg 102
A Cll 102
A Dch 102
A Eac 102
A Eaj 102
A Eak 102
A Fre 102
A Heb 102
A Ita 101
A Pol 102
A Por 101
A Por 102
A Rus 102
A Rus 104
A Rus 105
A Spn 101
A Spn 105
A Ukr 102
Elementary Greek II
Elementary Latin II
Elementary Dutch II
Elementary Chinese II
Elementary Japanese II
Elementary Korean II
Beginning French II
Elementary Hebrew II
Elementary Italian II
Elementary Polish II
Elementary Portuguese II
Intensive Elementary Portuguese
Elementary Russian II
Russian for Bilingual
Students II
Intensive Introduction to Russian
Elementary Spanish II
Intensive for Bilinguals I
Elementary Ukrainian II
NOTE: More than one printed and
electronic version of approved course
lists for the New General Education
Program appeared in the past year.
Students who believed they were fulfilling
a requirement by taking a course which
no longer appears on the list for that
requirement category should bring this to
the attention of the Dean of
Undergraduate Studies, LC 30.
The General Education Committee
continues to receive applications from
faculty who wish their courses to count
toward one or more of the New General
Education categories. Although the
printed copy of the Undergraduate
Bulletin only comes out once a year, as
new courses are approved for categories
they will be added to the University’s
New General Education web page:
http://www.albany.edu/gened/newgene
d.html
University at Albany
THE CONTINUING
(1992) GENERAL
E DUCATION
P ROGRAM
3. those intended to promote understanding
of the world’s cultural diversity and
historical change;
The Continuing (1992) General Education
Program applies to all students admitted
to the University with basis of
admission “FRESHMAN” before fall
2000 and with basis of admission
“TRANSFER”
before fall 2002.
A minimum of 24 graduation credits as
follows:
All other students should refer to the
section of the Undergraduate Bulletin
entitled “The New General Education
Program.”
An approved course in Cultural and Historical
Perspectives (3 credits)
The General Education Program at the
University at Albany promotes breadth,
coherence, critical inquiry, and public
responsibility in the intellectual life of
every undergraduate.
In addition, for students matriculating Fall
1997 and thereafter, a student must complete
two approved writing intensive courses, with
minimum grades of C or higher or S, at least
one of the courses must be at or above the 300
level. For students matriculating before Fall
1997, a student must complete two approved
writing intensive courses, with minimum
grades of C- or higher or S, at least one of the
courses must be at or above the 300 level.
It promotes breadth through a distribution
of courses in the humanities, the natural
sciences, and the social sciences.
It promotes coherence by emphasizing
historical, social, aesthetic, and
philosophical contexts that shape
knowledge and culture.
It promotes critical inquiry into the
assumptions, goals, and methods of various
academic fields of study.
It promotes public responsibility by
emphasizing cultural pluralism, human
diversity, a respect for difference, and a
commitment to civic dialogue.
In addition, general education aims to
develop the reasoning abilities, the writing,
reading, and computational abilities, the
interpretive, analytic, and synthesizing
abilities, central to the intellectual life of
the University.
The majority of General Education courses
are at the 100 and 200 level. Students are
encouraged to complete the requirements in
their first two years.
The program includes four interrelated
kinds of courses:
1. those intended to introduce the variety
of disciplines comprising a university;
2. those intended to promote understanding
of the diversity of social groups and
practices in American society;
4. those intended to develop writing
abilities as a means of composing,
learning, and sharing disciplinary
knowledge.
Requirements
Courses in the disciplines (18 credits)—
Students must complete two approved courses
(6 credits) in each of the following categories:
Humanities and the Arts, Natural Sciences,
Social Sciences.
An approved course in Human Diversity (3
credits)
If more than one category is listed for a
particular course, that course satisfies more
than one General Education requirement.
Continuing General Education:
Course Lists by Category:
NOTE: For some categories suffix letters were
intended to indicate that a course fulfills a
General Education requirement, but there have
been many exceptions. A course listed below
will satisfy the requirement indicated, without
regard to any suffix letters. Therefore, in the
lists that follow, all suffix letters have been
intentionally omitted.
*Italicized courses = former courses
or former course numbers.
CULTURAL AND HISTORICAL
PERSPECTIVES
A Aas 220
A Aas 269
A Aas 286
A Aas 287
A Ant 131
A Ant 146
A Ant 233
A Ant 236
A Ant 240
A Ant 243
Black & White in America
Caribbean: Peoples, History, &
Culture
African Civilizations
Africa in the Modern World
Ancient Peoples of the World
Puerto Rico: People, History,
Culture
Aztecs, Incas & Mayas
American Indian Archaeology
The North American Indian
Peoples & Cultures of Mid East
A Ant 269
A Ant 341
A Arh 280
A Bio 311
A Cas 220
A Cas 221
A Cas 348
A Cla 131
A Cla 207
A Cla 208
A Cla 209
*A Cla 210
A Clc 105
A Clc 110
A Clc 125
A Clc 133
A Clc 134
A Clc 300
A Clc 301
A Clc 310
A Clg 101
A Clg 102
A Clg 103
A Clg 104
*A Clg 203
*A Clg 204
A Cll 101
A Cll 102
*A Cll 200
A Cll 201
A Cll 202
A Dch 101
A Dch 102
A Dch 201
A Dch 202
A Eac 101
A Eac 102
A Eac 150
A Eac 160
A Eac 170
*A Eac 200
A Eac 201
A Eac 202
A Eac 210
A Eac 211
A Eac 212
A Eac 280
A Eaj 101
A Eaj 102
A Eaj 170
A Eaj 201
A Eaj 202
A Eaj 210
A Eaj 212
A Eak 101
A Eak 102
A Eak 201
A Eak 202
A Eas 103
A Eas 104
A Eas 140L
A Eas 177
Caribbean: People, History &
Culture
Ethnology of Mesoamerica
Chinese Painting
World Food Crisis
Literature of the World I
Literature of the World II
America’s Radical Past: 1848-77
Ancient Peoples of the World
Egyptian Archaeology
Greek Archaeology
Roman Archaeology
The Art & Archaeology of Cyprus
Myths of the Greek World
Classical Roots: Great Ideas of
Greece & Rome
Latin&Greek Elements in English
History of Ancient Greece
History of Ancient Rome
The Greeks & Their Neighbors
Rome & Mediterranean World
Women in Antiquity
Elementary Greek I
Elementary Greek II
Intro to New Testament Greek I
Intro to New Testament Greek II
Intro to Greek Literature I
Intro to Greek Literature II
Elementary Latin I
Elementary Latin II
Intermediate Latin I
Intro to Latin Literature I
Intro to Latin Literature II
Elementary Dutch I
Elementary Dutch II
Intermediate Dutch I
Intermediate Dutch II
Elementary Chinese I
Elementary Chinese II
China Through Western Eyes
China: People & Places in the
Land of One Billion
China: Its Culture & Heritage
Intermediate Chinese
Intermediate Chinese I
Intermediate Chinese II
Survey of Classical Chinese Lit
in Translation I
Survey of Classical Chinese Lit
in Translation II
Modern Chinese Lit in
Translation
Chinese Painting
Elementary Japanese I
Elementary Japanese II
Japan: Its Culture & Heritage
Intermediate Japanese II
Intermediate Japanese II
Survey of Traditional Japanese
Literature
Modern Japanese Lit in Trans
Elementary Korean I
Elementary Korean II
Intermediate Korean I
Intermediate Korean II
Sources of East Asian Civ I
Sources of East Asian Civ II
Introduction to East Asian Cinema
Cultures & Societies of Asia II
59
University at Albany
A Eas 180
A Eas 270
A Eas 321
A Eas 350
A Eng 221
A Fre 101
A Fre 102
*A Fre 200
*A Fre 210
A Fre 218
A Fre 221
A Fre 222
A Fre 238
A Fre 315
*A Ger 101
*A Ger 102
*A Ger 200
*A Ger 201
*A Ger 202
*A Ger 207
A Gog 102
*A Gog 120
A Gog 160
A Gog 180
A Gog 220
*A Gog 221
A Gog 225
A Gog 250
A Gog 310
A Gog 321
A Gog 350
A Heb 101
A Heb 102
A Heb 201
A Heb 202
*A Hfa 348
A His 100
A His 101
A His 130
A His 131
A His 170
A His 176
A His 177
A His 235
A His 253
A His 255
A His 275
A His 286
A His 287
A His 292
A His 293
A His 316
A Ita 100
A Ita 101
A Ita 103
A Ita 104
*A Ita 200
*A Ita 201
60
Asian America
Women in East Asian Lit
Exploring the Multicultural City
Geography & Development in
Pacific Asia
The Bible as Literature
Beginning French I
Beginning French II
Intermediate French I
Intermediate French II
French Culture in English
Intermediate French I
Intermediate French II
Classics of French Cinema in
English
Intro to French Cinema
Elementary German I
Elementary German II
Intermediate German I
Intermediate German I
Intermediate German II
Intermediate German II
Intro to Human Geography
World Cities
China: People & Places in the
Land of One Billion
Asian America
Introductory Urban Geography
Geographic Explorations in
Multicultural City
World Cities
Geography of Latin America
World Food Crisis
Exploring the Multicultural City
Geography & Development in
Pacific Asia
Elementary Hebrew I
Elementary Hebrew II
Intermediate Hebrew I
Intermediate Hebrew II
America’s Radical Past: 1848-77
American Political & Social
History I
American Political & Social
History II
History of European Civ I
History of European Civ II
Intro to Caribbean History
Cultures & Societies of Asia I
Cultures & Societies of Asia II
Early & Medieval Christianity
Medieval Jews Among Muslims
& Christians
The Holocaust: Lessons &
Legacies
Antisemitism in Historical
Perspective
African Civilizations
Africa in the Modern World
Trials in History
History of Women in the
Americas
Workers & Work in America:
1600-Present
Elementary Italian I
Elementary Italian II
Intermediate Italian I
Intermediate Italian II
Intermediate Italian
Intermediate Italian II
A Jst 150
A Jst 242
A Jst 243
A Jst 248
A Jst 251
A Jst 252
A Jst 253
A Jst 254
A Jst 255
A Jst 272
A Jst 275
A Jst 291
A Lcs 100
A Lcs 102
A Lcs 150
A Lcs 216
A Lcs 233
A Lcs 250
A Lcs 269
A Lcs 315
A Lcs 317
A Lcs 321
A Mus 216
A Phi 116
A Phi 214
A Pln 220
A Pol 101
A Pol 102
A Por 100
A Por 101
A Por 102
A Por 201
A Rel 100
A Rel 103
A Rel 104
A Rel 116
A Rel 214
A Rel 221
A Rel 252
A Rel 253
A Rel 254
A Rel 275
A Rel 291
A Rus 101
A Rus 102
A Rus 103
A Rus 104
A Rus 105
A Rus 161
A Rus 162
A Rus 171
*A Rus 200
A Rus 201
A Rus 202
*A Rus 203
A Soc 210
A Spn 100
Survey of Jewish Civilization
The Bible as Literature
Peoples & Cultures of Middle
East
Women in Jewish Life & Lit
Early Israel & Biblical Civ
Jews, Hellenism, & Early
Christianity
Medieval Jews Among Muslims
& Christians
The Jews in the Modern World
The Holocaust: Lessons &
Legacies
Modern Hebrew Lit in
Translation
Antisemitism in Historical
Perspective
Messiah and Messianism in
Judaism & Christianity
Cultures of Latin America
Intro to Caribbean History
Puerto Rico: People, History,
Culture
Music & Society in Latin America
Aztecs, Incas & Mayas
Geography of Latin America
Caribbean: Peoples, History, &
Culture
Latin America Through Film
Latin American Civilization
Exploring the Multicultural City
Music & Society in Latin America
World Views
World Religions
Introductory Urban Planning
Elementary Polish I
Elementary Polish II
Elementary Portuguese I
Elementary Portuguese II
Intensive Elementary Portuguese
Intermediate Portuguese
Intro to the Study of Religion
Intro to New Testament Greek I
Intro to New Testament Greek II
World Views
World Religions
The Bible as Literature
Jews, Hellenism, & Early
Christianity
Medieval Jews Among Muslims
& Christians
The Jews in the Modern World
Social Morality & Citizenship
Education in Plur Society
Messianism in Judaism &
Christianity
Elementary Russian I
Elementary Russian II
Russian for Bilingual Students I
Russian for Bilingual Students II
Intensive Introductory Russian
Russian Civilization
The Rise & Fall of Soviet Civ
Women in Russian Culture
Intermediate Russian I
Intermediate Russian I
Intermediate Russian II
Intermediate Russian II
Sociology of Culture
Elementary Spanish I
A Spn 101
A Spn 103
A Spn 104
A Spn 105
*A Spn 200
*A Spn 201
A Spn 314
A Spn 315
A Spn 317
A Thr 221
A Thr 222
A Thr 224
A Thr 225
A Ukr 101
A Ukr 102
A Wss 171
A Wss 248
A Wss 260
A Wss 270
A Wss 308
A Wss 311
E Edu 275
U Uni 101
U Uni 155
U Uni 310
Elementary Spanish II
Intermediate Spanish I
Intermediate Spanish II
Spanish for Bilinguals I
Intermediate Spanish I
Intermediate Spanish II
Rise & Fall of Spanish Empire
Conflict&Progress Mod Spain
Latin-American Civilization
Development of Theatre/Drama
I
Development of Theatre/Drama
II
Contemporary Issues in Modern
Drama
American Theatre History
Elementary Ukrainian I
Elementary Ukrainian II
Women in Russian Culture
Women in Jewish Life & Lit
History of Women & Social
Change
Women in East Asian Lit
Global Perspectives on Women
Women in Antiquity
Social Morality & Citizenship
Education in a Pluralistic Society
Foundations of Great Ideas I
Project Ren 1: Human Identity
World Food Crisis
HUMAN DIVERSITY
A Aas 142
A Aas 213
A Aas 220
A Aas 240
A Ant 100
A Ant 172
A Ant 351
*A Ant 371
A Cas 125
A Cas 131
A Cas 141
A Cas 150
A Cas 240
A Com 371
A Eas 180
A Eco 130
A Eng 240
A Fre 208
A Fre 281
A Gog 125
A Gog 180
*A Gog 221
A Gog 240
African/African-American Lit
History Civil Rights Movement
Black & White in America
Classism, Racism & Sexism:
Issues
Culture, Society, & Biology
Community & Self
Ethnicity in North America
Theories Intercultural
Communication
Diversity of Voices in Literature
& the Arts
Diversity & Equity in America
Concepts of Race & Culture in
the Modern World
Cultural Diversity & Human
Condition
Images & Issues of Diversity in
the Visual Arts
Theories of Intercultural
Communication
Asian America
The Third World Economies
Growing Up in America
New World Cultural Diversity
Francophone Cultures: New
World & Third World
The American City
Asian America
Geographic Explorations in
Multicultural City
Patterns of American
Immigration
University at Albany
*A Hfa 125
*A Hfa 150
*A Hfa 240
A His 158
A His 225
A His 275
A Jst 155
A Jst 221
A Jst 225
A Jst 260
A Jst 270
A Jst 275
A Jst 351
A Lcs 201
A Lcs 216
A Lcs 240
A Lcs 282
A Lcs 302
*A Lcs 383
A Mus 216
A Phi 214
A Phi 328
*A Psy 383
A Rel 100
A Rel 155
A Rel 214
A Rel 270
A Rel 275
*A Sbs 131
*A Sbs 141
A Soc 262
A Soc 282
A Soc 375
A Spn 322
A Thr 228
A Wss 101
A Wss 106
A Wss 202
*A Wss 210
A Wss 240
A Wss 262
E Edu 275
E Edu 375
R Crj 210
R Ssw 220
U Uni 153
U Uni 230
Diversity of Voices in Literature
& the Arts
Cultural Diversity & Human
Condition
Images & Issues of Diversity in
the Visual Arts
The World in the 20th Century
Hollywood and the Jews
Antisemitism in Historical
Perspective
Judaism: Traditions & Practices
The American Jewish Experience
Hollywood and the Jews
Jews & Immigrant Experience in
America
Jewish-Christian Relations
Antisemitism in Historical
Perspective
Jewish American Ethnic Groups
Hispanic Cultures in the United
States
Music & Society in Latin America
Classism, Racism, & Sexism:
Issues
Race & Ethnicity
Las Culturas Latinas en los
Estados Unidos
Social Psych of Ethnic Relations
Music & Society in Latin America
World Religions
Philosophy & Race
Social Psych of Ethnic Relations
Intro to the Study of Religion
Judaism: Traditions & Practices
World Religions
Jewish-Christian Relations
Social Morality & Citizenship
Education
Diversity & Equity in America
Concepts of Race & Culture in
the Modern World
Sociology of Gender
Race & Ethnicity
U.S. Urban Neighborhood
Diversity
Las Culturas Latinas en los
Estados Unidos
Voices Diversity Contemp Amer
Theatre/Drama
Intro to Feminisms
U.S. Women Who Changed Our
World
Intro to Lesbian & Gay Studies
Intro to Feminism
Classism, Racism, & Sexism:
Issues
Sociology of Gender
Social Morality & Citizenship
Education in a Pluralistic Society
Social Responsibility and
Citizenship Education in a
Pluralistic Society
Policies of Crime in
Heterogeneous Societies
Value Issues in Social Welfare
Project Ren 2: Human Identity
An Intro to Disability Studies
HUMANITIES AND THE ARTS
A Aas 142
A Ant 175
A Ant 268
A Arh 170
A Arh 171
A Arh 280
A Cas 202
A Cas 220
A Cas 221
A Cas 360
A Cla 207
A Cla 208
A Cla 209
*A Cla 210
A Clc 105
A Clc 110
A Clc 223
A Clg 101
A Clg 102
A Clg 103
A Clg 104
*A Clg 203
*A Clg 204
A Cll 101
A Cll 102
*A Cll 200
A Cll 201
A Cll 202
A Dch 101
A Dch 102
A Dch 201
A Dch 202
A Dch 308
A Eac 101
A Eac 102
A Eac 150
A Eac 170
*A Eac 200
A Eac 201
A Eac 202
A Eac 210
A Eac 211
A Eac 212
A Eac 280
A Eaj 101
A Eaj 102
A Eaj 170
A Eaj 201
A Eaj 202
A Eaj 210
A Eaj 212
A Eak 101
A Eak 102
A Eak 201
A Eak 202
A Eas 103
A Eas 104
A Eas 140L
A Eng 121
A Eng 122
A Eng 123
A Eng 124
A Eng 144
African/African-American Lit
Anthropology & Folklore
Ethnology of Pre-Columbian Art
Survey of Art in Western World I
Survey of Art in Western World II
Chinese Painting
Understanding the Arts
Literature of the World I
Literature of the World II
Passion & Choice
Egyptian Archaeology
Greek Archaeology
Roman Archaeology
The Art & Archaeology of Cyprus
Myths of the Greek World
Classical Roots: Great Ideas of
Greece & Rome
Masterpieces of Greek Tragedy &
Comedy
Elementary Greek I
Elementary Greek II
Intro to New Testament Greek I
Intro to New Testament Greek II
Intro to Greek Literature I
Intro to Greek Literature II
Elementary Latin I
Elementary Latin II
Intermediate Latin I
Intro to Latin Literature I
Intro to Latin Literature II
Elementary Dutch I
Elementary Dutch II
Intermediate Dutch I
Intermediate Dutch II
Into to Lit of Netherlands
Elementary Chinese I
Elementary Chinese II
China Through Western Eyes
China: Its Culture & Heritage
Intermediate Chinese
Intermediate Chinese I
Intermediate Chinese II
Survey of Classical Chinese Lit
in Translation I
Survey of Classical Chinese Lit
in Translation II
Modern Chinese Lit in
Translation
Chinese Painting
Elementary Japanese I
Elementary Japanese II
Japan: Its Culture & Heritage
Intermediate Japanese II
Intermediate Japanese II
Survey Trad Japanese Lit
Modern Japanese Lit in Trans
Elementary Korean I
Elementary Korean II
Intermediate Korean I
Intermediate Korean II
Sources of East Asian Civ I
Sources of East Asian Civ II
Introduction to East Asian Cinema
Reading Literature
Reading Prose Fiction
Reading Drama
Reading Poetry
Reading Shakespeare
A Eng 215
A Eng 222
A Eng 223
A Eng 226
A Eng 232
A Eng 233
A Eng 234
A Eng 241
A Eng 242
A Eng 260
A Eng 261
A Eng 291
A Eng 292
A Eng 295
A Eng 296
A Eng 311
A Eng 325
A Eng 362
A Eng 368
A Fre 101
A Fre 102
*A Fre 200
*A Fre 210
A Fre 221
A Fre 222
A Fre 241
*A Ger 101
*A Ger 102
*A Ger 200
*A Ger 201
*A Ger 202
*A Ger 207
*A Ger 225
*A Ger 240
*A Ger 247
A Heb 101
A Heb 102
A Heb 201
A Heb 202
*A Hfa 202
*A Hfa 250
*A Hfa 360
A His 263
A His 264
A His 297
A Ita 100
A Ita 101
A Ita 103
A Ita 104
*A Ita 200
*A Ita 201
A Ita 223
A Lcs 216
A Lcs 268
A Lcs 275
A Lcs 315
A Mus 100
A Mus 102
A Mus 115
A Mus 125
A Mus 208
A Mus 211
A Mus 212
Methods of Literary Criticism
Masterpieces of Literature
Short Story
Studies of a Literary Theme,
Form, or Mode
Modern Novel
Modern Drama
Modern Poetry
Popular Literature
Science Fiction
Forms of Poetry
American Poetic Tradition
The English Literary Tradition I
The English Literary Tradition II
Classics of Western Lit I: Epic
to Modern Drama
Classics of Western Lit II: Epic
to Modern Novel
History of the English Language
American Drama
Critical Approaches to Women in
Literature
Women Writers
Beginning French I
Beginning French II
Intermediate French I
Intermediate French II
Intermediate French I
Intermediate French II
Intro to French Studies
Elementary German I
Elementary German II
Intermediate German I
Intermediate German I
Intermediate German II
Intermediate German II
From Goethe to Thomas Mann
Hermann Hesse: Life & Work
Goethe’s Faust in Translation
Elementary Hebrew I
Elementary Hebrew II
Intermediate Hebrew I
Intermediate Hebrew II
Understanding the Arts
Creative Minds
Passion & Choice
Art, Music, & History: A
Multimedia Approach I
Art, Music, & History: A
Multimedia Approach II
Religion & Society in History
Elementary Italian I
Elementary Italian II
Intermediate Italian I
Intermediate Italian II
Intermediate Italian I
Intermediate Italian II
Intro to Literary Methods
Music & Society in Latin America
Ethnology of Pre-Columbian Art
Four Caribbean Writers
Latin America through Film
Intro to Music
“Golden Age” of Piano Music
Jazz: America’s Music
Russia: Its Music & Its People
Intro to Opera
The Concerto
Chamber Music
61
University at Albany
A Mus 213
A Mus 214
A Mus 216
A Mus 217
A Mus 230
A Mus 231
A Mus 334
A Mus 338
A Phi 110
A Phi 111
A Phi 112
A Phi 114
A Phi 115
A Phi 116
A Phi 210
A Phi 212
A Phi 218
A Phy 201
A Pol 101
A Pol 102
A Por 100
A Por 101
A Por 102
A Por 201
A Rel 100
A Rel 103
A Rel 104
A Rel 116
A Rel 175
A Rel 200
A Rel 201
A Rel 297
A Rus 101
A Rus 102
A Rus 103
A Rus 104
A Rus 105
A Rus 125
A Rus 171
*A Rus 200
A Rus 201
A Rus 202
*A Rus 203
A Rus 251
A Rus 252
A Rus 253
A Rus 261
A Rus 354
A Spn 100
A Spn 101
A Spn 103
A Spn 104
A Spn 105
*A Spn 200
*A Spn 201
A Spn 223
A Spn 312
A Thr 107
A Thr 120
A Thr 221
A Thr 222
A Thr 224
A Thr 225
62
Survey of Symphonic Music
American Music
Music & Society in Latin America
Women & Music
Music History I
Music History II
Survey of American Music
Survey of Opera
Intro to Philosophical Problems
The Mind and the World
Critical Thinking
Morals & Society
Moral Choices
World Views
Intro to Logic
Intro to Ethical Theory
Understanding Science
Physics & Buddhism
Elementary Polish I
Elementary Polish II
Elementary Portuguese I
Elementary Portuguese II
Intensive Elementary Portuguese
Intermediate Portuguese
Intro to the Study of Religion
Intro to New Testament Greek I
Intro to New Testament Greek II
World Views
Anthropology & Folklore
Intro to the Bible
Physics & Buddhism
Religion & Society in History
Elementary Russian I
Elementary Russian II
Russian for Bilingual Students I
Russian for Bilingual Students II
Intensive Introductory Russian
Russia: Its Music & Its People
Women in Russian Culture
Intermediate Russian I
Intermediate Russian I
Intermediate Russian II
Intermediate Russian II
Masterpieces of 19th-Century
Russian Literature
Masterpieces of 20th-Century
Russian Literature
Contemporary Russian Lit
Dostoevsky & Tolstoy in
English Translation
The Russian Novel in Its
Western Context
Elementary Spanish I
Elementary Spanish II
Intermediate Spanish I
Intermediate Spanish II
Spanish for Bilinguals I
Intermediate Spanish I
Intermediate Spanish II
Intro to Literary Methods
Representative Spanish Authors
II
Intro to Dramatic Art
Understanding Design for the
Performing Arts
Devlpmt Theatre & Drama I
Devlpmt Theatre & Drama II
Contemporary Issues in Modern
Drama
American Theatre History
*A Thr 227
A Thr 230
A Thr 235
*A Thr 241
A Thr 380
A Ukr 101
A Ukr 102
A Wss 171
A Wss 217
A Wss 362
A Wss 368
E Tap 233
*U Uni 102
U Uni 151
U Uni 156
U Uni 301
Comparative Genres Drama &
Theatre
Great Drama on Film & Video
Fundamentals of Theatrical
Design
Performance: Physicality of
Communication
History of Costume
Elementary Ukrainian I
Elementary Ukrainian II
Women in Russian Culture
Women & Music
Critical Approaches to Women in
Literature
Women Writers
Landmarks in Literacy
Foundations of Great Ideas II
Project Ren 1: Human Identity
Project Renaissance 1:
Technology
Foundations of Great Ideas II
A Phy 150
A Phy 202
A Wss 109
U Uni 154
U Uni 158
U Uni 160
U Uni 310
SOCIAL SCIENCES
A Ant 106
A Ant 108
A Ant 131
A Ant 160
*A Ant 200
A Ant 220
*A Ant 221
A Ant 240
A Ant 341
A Cla 131
A Com 100
A Eac 160
NATURAL SCIENCES
A Ant 110
A Ant 111
A Ant 119
A Atm 100
A Atm 101
A Atm 102
A Atm 105
A Atm 107
A Bio 102
A Bio 110
A Bio 111
A Bio 117
*A Bio 207
A Bio 208
A Bio 209
A Bio 230
A Bio 241
A Bio 311
A Chm 100
A Chm 110
A Chm 120
A Chm 121
A Csi 101
A Csi 120
A Csi 201
A Geo 100
A Geo 105
A Geo 190
A Gog 101
A Gog 310
A Mat 102
A Phy 100
A Phy 103
A Phy 104
A Phy 105
A Phy 108
*A Phy 120
*A Phy 124
A Phy 140
Intro to Human Evolution
Intro to the Primates
The City & Human Health
The Atmosphere
The Upper Atmosphere
Science & Major Environ Issues
Oceanus & Gaia
The Oceans
General Biological Sciences
General Biology I
General Biology II
Nutrition
Cells: Modern Cell Biology
Marine Biology
The Human Organism
People & Resources in
Ecological Perspective
The Biology of Sex
World Food Crisis
Chemical ABCs: Atoms, Bonds,
Citizen Consumers
The DNA Double Helix & the
Chemistry of Cancer
General Chemistry I
General Chemistry II
Elements of Computing
Computational Principles &
Issues
Intro to Computer Science
Planet Earth
Environmental Geology if taken
Fall 1997 or thereafter
Earth Resources: Problems &
Choices
Intro to the Physical Environment
World Food Crisis
Mathematics by Visualization
Contemporary Astronomy:
Cosmic Connection
Exploration of Space
Physical Science for Humanists
General Physics I
General Physics II
Introductory Physics I
Introductory Physics II
Introductory Physics I
Introductory Physics II
Environmental Physics
Women, Biology & Health
Project Renaissance 2
Project Renaissance 2
Math, Art, & the Creative Process
World Food Crisis
A Eas 321
*A Eco 102
A Eco 202
A Eco 110
A Eco 111
A Eng 217
A Gog 102
A Gog 125
A Gog 155
A Gog 160
A Gog 220
*A Gog 221
A Gog 321
A His 220
A Lcs 282
A Lcs 321
A Lcs 341
A Lin 100
A Lin 220
A Pln 220
A Psy 101
A Psy 102
A Soc 115
A Soc 180
A Soc 210
A Soc 262
A Soc 270
A Soc 282
A Soc 283
A Soc 359
A Wss 220
A Wss 262
R Pos 101
R Pos 102
R Pos 103
R Ssw 299
U Uni 152
U Uni 157
Linguistic Anthropology
Cultural Anthropology
Ancient Peoples of the World
Symbol & Human Nature
Cultural Anthropology
Intro to Linguistics
Linguistic Anthropology
The North American Indian
Ethnology of Mesoamerica
Ancient Peoples of the World
Human Communication:
Language & Social Action
China: People & Places in the
Land of One Billion
Exploring the Multicultural City
The American Economy
The American Economy: Its
Structure & Institutions
Principles of Eco I:
Microeconomics
Principles of Eco II:
Macroeconomics
Intro to Linguistics
Intro to Human Geography
The American City
Geography & Contemporary
Affairs
China: People & Places in the
Land of One Billion
Introductory Urban Geography
Geographic Explorations in
Multicultural City
Exploring the Multicultural City
Public Policy in Modern America
Race & Ethnicity
Exploring the Multicultural City
Ethnology of Mesoamerica
Understanding Language
Intro to Linguistics
Introductory Urban Planning
Intro to Psychology
Advanced Intro to Psychology
Intro to Sociology
Social Problems
Sociology of Culture
Sociology of Gender
Social & Demographic Change
Race & Ethnicity
Juvenile Delinquency
Medical Sociology
Perspectives on Women
Sociology of Gender
American Politics
Comparative & International
Politics
Political Theory
Families: Middle Age & Late
Life
Project Renaissance 1:
Technology
Project Ren 2: Human Identity
University at Albany
Approved courses for the
General Education requirements
have these features:
1. They offer general, non-specialized
introduction to central topics in a discipline
or interdisciplinary field; while they may
satisfy major or minor requirements, their
purpose is to serve students who do not
intend to pursue more advanced work;
2. They encourage reflectiveness about
disciplinary knowledge; they explain what
it means to be a practitioner of a discipline;
they convey explicit rather than tacit
understanding of the nature and importance
of a discipline;
3. They encourage active rather than passive
learning; they attend, as appropriate, to
reasoning and/or aesthetic aptitudes, and to
reading, writing, and computational
abilities;
4. They are sensitive to the multiple
perspectives of a pluralistic culture both
within and beyond the university.
Cultural and Historical Perspectives:
Approved courses in this category share the
features described above while also involving
students in the study of cultures, civilizations, or
geographic regions as they change through time,
providing students with knowledge of various
critical approaches to interpreting history and
with an understanding of diverse cultural
vantage points and world views.
Human Diversity Requirement:
All students entering the University in Fall
1990 semester and thereafter are required, as
part of their undergraduate degree
requirements, to complete a course from an
approved list of ‘Human Diversity’ courses.
Courses approved for this requirement may,
but need not, also be applicable to other
General Education requirements. Ideally,
students should satisfy the requirement with a
course that deals with a culture other than their
own. Students who are waived from the
General Education requirements, by virtue of
having completed an Associates of Arts (A.A.)
or Associates of Science (A.S.) at an
accredited institution are also waived from
Human Diversity. Students may still wish,
however, to take a human diversity course to
enhance and broaden their education.
A course shall be considered for designation as
“Human Diversity Requirement” by the
Curriculum Committee, subject to
Undergraduate Academic Council approval,
under the following criteria:
1. They should relate directly to
contemporary United States
experiences of students or contain
components that compare, on a fairly
regular basis, aspects of other cultures
to those experiences.
2. They should compare and relate aspects
of racial and/or ethnic diversity,
including gender-related concerns, to
the topic of the course. In this context,
the terms “racial” and “ethnic” may
include groups of self- and/or societally
defined on such bases as nationality,
religion, etc.
3. They should provide substantial
knowledge of diversity as expressed
through sociopolitical ideological,
aesthetic, or other aspects of human
endeavor. This criterion is intentionally
defined broadly to accommodate a
variety of approaches. It is not a
requirement or expectation that the
content will focus on controversy or
those aspects that result in conflict with
other persons, groups, or cultures; see,
however, the next criterion.
4. They should provide sufficient
knowledge to permit the student to
understand better the sources and
manifestations of controversy and
conflicts in cultural values arising from
human diversity.
5. Opportunities for student writing and
discussion are central to the objectives
of the program. Courses should include
at least one writing component. For
discussions to be effective, classes of
sixty or more students should require
discussion sections, breakout sessions,
in-class groups or comparable
mechanisms permitting discussions
within groups of twenty students.
6. Courses should focus on the theories,
histories, dynamics, mechanisms, and
results of human and social diversity,
drawing on the experience of specific
groups to illustrate those principles.
Thus, whatever specific cultural
heritages the students study should be
placed in the larger context of cultural
diversity.
Exceptions to the General
Education Requirements
Transfer students who are recipients of an
Associate of Arts (A.A.) or Associate of
Science (A.S.) degree from a State of New
York operated campus, a SUNY or CUNY
community college shall be considered to
have completed all lower division
University at Albany General Education
Requirements (this does not include the
upper-level writing requirement).
In addition, transfer students who are
recipients of an Associate of Applied
Science (A.A.S.) or an Associate in
Occupational Science (A.O.S.) degree
from a State of New York operated
campus, a SUNY or CUNY community
college shall be considered to have
completed all lower division University at
Albany General Education Requirements
(this does not include the upper-level
writing requirement) if all the following
conditions are met for the associate
degree:
• the student has satisfactorily completed
a minimum of 30 credits that are
acceptable to Albany as “liberal arts
and sciences” courses (consult the
section of this bulletin entitled Liberal
Arts and Science Courses);
• the associate program included a
writing requirement and the student
fulfilled the requirement;
• the student satisfactorily completed at
least one course in each the following
areas: literature or fine arts; social or
behavioral sciences; and physical or
life sciences.
By action of the Dean of Undergraduate
Studies, all transfer students shall be
exempted from all lower division General
Education requirements IF they have
satisfactorily completed PRIOR TO
MATRICULATION at Albany all of the
following:
at least 30 credits which are acceptable
to the University at Albany as “liberal arts
and sciences” courses;
one course in literature or in the fine
arts or in a humanities department or with
General Education suffix “L” or “E”;
one course in a social science or a
behavioral science or in a behavioral
science department or with General
Education suffix “M” or “G”;
63
University at Albany
one course in a physical science or a
life science or in a natural or physical
science department or with General
Education suffix “N” or “F”; and
a satisfactorily completed writing
course These exemptions DO NOT apply
to any upper division General Education
courses or categories of courses required
of all Albany undergraduates, currently the
requirement of a Writing Intensive course
at the 300 level or above.
Writing: Transfer students who enter the
University at Albany with credit for an
English Composition course or a twosemester sequence combined literature and
writing course will be considered to have
completed the lower level writing
intensive requirement at this University.
In exceptional circumstances, individual
exceptions to the general education
requirements may be granted by the
Curriculum and Honors Committee of the
Undergraduate Academic Council.
Students seeking additional information
regarding or requesting an exception to the
general education requirements, for
example, by virtue of having completed an
associates’ degree at a non-state operated
institution should contact the Office of the
Dean of Undergraduate Studies (LC 30).
Effective Date
The General Education requirements must
be satisfied by all students matriculating
in Fall 1993 and thereafter.
Writing Across the
Curriculum
All students matriculating Fall 1997 and
thereafter must satisfactorily complete
with grades of C or higher, or S, two
writing intensive courses, including at
least one at or above the 300 level. (All
students matriculating before Fall 1997
must satisfactorily complete with grades of
C- or higher, or S, two writing intensive
courses, including at least one at or above
the 300 level.)
A writing intensive course uses writing as an
important tool in the discipline studied, and is
not designed primarily to teach the technical
aspects of writing. The emphasis is on using
writing as a means of sharpening thinking in
and understanding of the subject.
2) Opportunity for Students to Receive
Assistance in Progress
Such assistance may take several forms,
from visits to the Writing Center (HU140) to conferences with the instructor.
3) Opportunity to Revise Some Pieces
As revision is an essential
characteristic of good writing, students
should be able to revise some portion
of their work.
4) Response to Student Writing
Such response may take several
forms—from extended comments from
the instructor to peer evaluation in
student groups. It is expected, however,
that the instructor will respond in detail
to some extended work of the student.
Transfer students who enter the University
with credit for an “English Composition”
course or a two-semester combined
literature and writing course will be
considered to have completed the lowerlevel writing intensive requirement at this
University.
P ROGRAMS
C OURSES
Information concerning specific programs of
study may be found by referring to the
sections in this bulletin headed UniversityWide Offerings, College of Arts and Science,
School of Business, School of Criminal
Justice, School of Education, Educational
Opportunities Program, Office of General
Studies, School of Information Science,
Office of International Programs, Nelson A.
Rockefeller College of Public Affairs and
Policy, School of Public Health, and School
of Social Welfare).
Unit of Academic Credit
Generally, one credit represents the
equivalent of one hour of lecture or recitation
or at least two hours of laboratory work each
week for one semester or the equivalent in
honors study.
The number following each course title;
e.g., (3), indicates the credits offered for
that course.
Significance of Course Number
Each course offered by the University is
assigned a designation and a number
according to a plan that is outlined here.
The specific course designation and
number appears in the bulletin directly in
front of the course title.
Each course designation consists of three
separate units: (1) the school designation; (2)
the subject or departmental designation; and
(3) the course number.
The school or college offering a course is
identified by a single letter as noted here.
A
College of Arts and Sciences
B
School of Business
D
former Division of Physical
Education, Athletics, and Recreation
E
School of Education
G
International Studies
H
School of Public Health
O
Educational Opportunities Program
R
School of Criminal Justice, School
of Information Science and Policy,
Rockefeller College of Public
Affairs and Policy, and School of
Social Welfare
T
former General Education Honors
Program Honors Tutorials
U
University-Wide Offerings
X
Regional Cross-Registration
Criteria
1) A Substantial Body of Finished Work
This is generally expected to be a total of
20+ double spaced pages in at least two,
preferably more submissions. It may be in a
variety of forms—journal, reports, essays,
research papers, etc.—not all of which need
to be graded.
64
AND
University at Albany
The subject or departmental designation
consists of three letters representing an
abbreviation for the subject or the
department offering the course.
Course Levels
Students ordinarily enroll in courses at the
level appropriate to their class. The course
number is a three-digit number assigned to
the course by the academic unit offering
the course. The first digit reflects the level
at which the course is taught.
Some courses are given the designation a
or b after the course number, indicating
the first and second half, respectively, of a
two-semester sequence. The level
designations are noted here.
000-099 Noncredit courses [Exception:
transfer courses having no counterpart at
the University are sometimes evaluated as
AHIS010, AENG030, etc., meaning 100level History elective, 300-level English
elective, and so on.]]
100-299 Lower-division courses, with
200-299 primarily for sophomores.
Courses designed to present a large body
of information without expecting a
mastery of detail (e.g., survey courses in
history or literature) or to present general
theoretical or methodological approaches
(e.g., foundation courses in the social,
natural and physical sciences) or to teach
skills or techniques at an introductory
level (e.g., general physical education) are
considered to be lower division. Lowerdivision courses may be expected to
include elementary and may include
intermediate levels of subject matter
competency but not advanced levels.
Letter Suffixes for
General Education Courses
For the “Continuing General Education
Program,” courses approved in some
general education categories and/or as
writing intensive courses are usually
identified by the following letter suffixes
after the course number.
L, I
Humanities and the Arts
M
Social Sciences
N
Natural Sciences
E
Humanities and the Arts
+ Writing
F
Natural Sciences
+ Writing
G
Social Sciences
+Writing
Z
Writing Intensive
The “New General Education Program”
also employs the suffixes E, F, G, and Z to
identify writing intensive courses. The
other suffixes are not used; instead,
students and advisers refer to lists for each
category.
At the end of course descriptions in this
bulletin, the following abbreviations are
used, within brackets, to indicate any of
the New General Education Requirement
categories met by the course:
[AR]
= Arts
[BE]
= Regions Beyond Europe
300-499 Upper-division courses, with
400-499 primarily for seniors. Courses
offered primarily for those who are in the
third and fourth years of their university
education. The content should go beyond
the introductory or survey level and, in the
judgment of the faculty, will require prior
academic achievement and experience.
[DP]
= U.S. Diversity and Pluralism
[EU]
= Europe
[FL]
= Foreign Language
[GC]
= Global/Cross-Cultural
[HU]
= Humanities
[IL]
= Information Literacy
500-599 First-year graduate courses
(open to seniors with appropriate
background and consent of major
department chairs and the course
instructors).
[MS]
= Mathematics/Statistics
[NS]
= Natural Sciences
[OD]
= Oral Discourse
[SS]
= Social Sciences
[US]
= U.S. History
[US*]
= U.S. History expanded list
[WI]
= Writing Intensive
600-699 First-year graduate courses
(open to superior seniors with the
approval of their advisers and the written
consent of their department chairs and the
course instructors).
Equivalent Courses
If a course is cross-listed (considered
equivalent) with a course from another
department or school, the equivalent
course is listed in parentheses after the
course number with an equals sign.
Therefore, if a course fulfills a
requirement for a major, minor, or general
education category, all courses crosslisted with that course shall be considered
to fulfill the same requirement.
Students who have received graduation
credit for a cross-listed course may not
also receive graduation credit for the
equivalent courses(s) listed in parentheses.
If a course has had its number changed
within the past four years, the prior number
is listed in parentheses after the current
course number. Unless expressly allowed to
do so in the course description, students
who have received graduation credit for a
course under a previous course number may
not also receive graduation credit for the
same course under a new course number.
Repeatable Courses
If a course may be repeated for graduation
credit, this will be indicated in the course
description. Sometimes the repeatability is
restricted and this is also indicated in the
course description: “may be repeated once
for credit,” “may be repeated if topic
differs,” etc.
If the description does not indicate the
course can be repeated for credit, then a
student who takes and passes the same
course more than once will only receive
graduation credit for that course once.
700+ Advanced graduate courses
ordinarily beyond the master’s degree and
open only to graduate students.
65
University at Albany
THE UNIVERSITY IN
THE
HIGH SCHOOL
PROGRAM
Gregory I. Stevens, Ph.D., Director
Grace D. Kelly, M.L.S., M.A. Associate
Director
The University in the High School
Program, under the direction and
sponsorship of the College of Arts and
Sciences, is a partnership program
between the University at Albany and
participating secondary schools
throughout New York State.
The Program allows qualified students to
earn college credit while still in high
school. By entering college with
previously earned credits, they can hasten
their graduation from college or explore a
wider range of academic areas during a
regular college sequence.
The following course work is currently
available to program participants (see
individual department, schools, or
programs for course descriptions).The “SU’ option is not available in UHS courses.
Other courses may be considered upon
request:
Department of Art
A Art 105 Beginning Drawing
A Art 110 Two Dimensional Design
A Art 115 Three Dimensional Design
Department of Earth and Atmospheric
Science
A Atm 100N The Atmosphere
A Geo 100N Planet Earth
A Geo 102N Planet Earth and Physical
Geology Laboratory
Department of Biological Sciences
A Bio 100 Contemporary Biology
A Bio 102N General Biological Sciences
A Bio 117N Nutrition
School of Business
B Acc 211 Financial Accounting
Department of Chemistry
A Chm 100N Chemical ABC’s: Atoms,
Bonds, and Citizen Consumers
A Chm 120N General Chemistry I
A Chm 121N General Chemistry II
Department of Classics
A Clc 110L Classical Roots: Great ideas
of Greece and Rome
A Cll 102L Elementary Latin II
A Cll 201L Introduction to Latin Literature I
66
Department of Communication
A Com 238 Introduction to Mass
Communication
Department of Computer Science
A Csi 101N Elements of Computing
A Csi 102 Microcomputer Software
A Csi 201N Introduction to Computer
Science
Department of East Asian Studies
A Eac 201L Intermediate Chinese
Department of Economics
A Eco 110M Principles of Economics I–
Microeconomics
A Eco 111M Principles of Economics II–
Macroeconomics
A Eco 202M The American Economy: Its
Structure and Institutions
Department of English
A Eng 121L Reading Literature
A Eng 122L Reading Prose Fiction
A Eng 123L Reading Drama
A Eng 124L Reading Poetry
A Eng 144L Reading Shakespeare
A Eng 222L Masterpieces of Literature
A Eng 226L Study of a Theme: Form or
Mode
A Eng 243 Literature and Film
A Eng 296 Classics of Western Literature
II: Ancient Epic to Modern Novel
Department of History
A His 100 American Political and Social
History I
A His 101 American Political and Social
History II
A His 130 History of European
Civilization I
Department of Judaic Studies
A Jst 221 The American Jewish
Experience
Department of Languages, Literatures
and Cultures
A Fre 221I or L Intermediate French I
A Fre 222I or L Intermediate French II
A Ita 103L Intermediate Italian I
A Ita 104L Intermediate Italian II
A Rus 201L Intermediate Russian I
A Rus 202L Intermediate Russian II
A Spn 103I or L Intermediate Spanish I
A Spn 104I or L Intermediate Spanish II
A Spn 105L Spanish for Bilinguals I
A Spn 205 Spanish for Bilinguals II
Department of Mathematics
and Statistics
A Mat 100 Precalculus Math
A Mat 101 Algebra and Calculus
A Mat 108 Elementary Statistics
A Mat 112 Calculus I
A Mat 113 Calculus II
A Mat 214 Calculus of Several Variables
A Mat 220 Linear Algebra
Department of Music
A Mus 100L Introduction to Music
A Mus 110 Basic Music Theory
A Mus 140 Theory I4
Department of Physics
A Phy 100N Contemporary Astronomythe Cosmic Connection
A Phy 105N General Physics I
A Phy 108N General Physics II
A Phy 140N Introductory Physics I
A Phy 150N Introductory Physics II
Department of Political Science
R Pos 101M American Politics
Department of Psychology
A Psy 101M Introduction to Psychology
A Psy 203 Psychology of Child
Development
Department of Sociology
A Soc 115M Introduction to Sociology
Department of Theatre
A Thr 107L
A Thr 140A Fundamentals of Acting
A Thr 201Z Play Analysis
Humanities Topics
A Cas 198 Special Topics in the
Humanities
School of Criminal Justice
R Crj 202 Introduction to Law and
Criminal Justice
School of Public Health
H Sph 201 Introduction to Public
Health
Science Research
A Cas 109 Intermediate Science Research
A Cas 110 Intermediate Methods of
Research
A Cas 209 Advanced Science Research
A Cas 210 Advanced Methods of
Research
University at Albany
T HE C OLLEGE
A RTS AND
S CIENCES
OF
Dean
Joan Wick- Pelletier
Associate Dean, Academics
Jeanette Altarriba
Associate Dean, Research
Lawrence Schell
Assistant Dean, Facilities Management
Elizabeth Gaffney
Assistant Dean, Administrative Services
Dona Parker
Assistant Dean, Budget and Personnel
Steven Galime
In addition, the college is responsible for
interdisciplinary majors with concentrations
in art history, biochemistry and molecular
biology, earth and atmospheric science,
East Asian studies, human biology,
Japanese studies, medieval and Renaissance
studies, and religious studies; and for minor
programs in cognitive science, film studies,
journalism, Hebrew, Japanese studies, and
Portuguese.
For purposes of degree requirements for the
B.A. and B.S. degrees, the following
undergraduate courses offered by the
college are defined as liberal arts and
sciences: all courses except A Csi 198,
A Eaj 423, A Eco 495, A Heb 450, A Mat
204, A Mus 315, A Rus 395, A Thr 315.
Courses in this section are preceded by the
prefix letter A.
Assistant Dean, Academic Program
Gregory Stevens
Foreign Language Study Placement
Policies
Director, CAS Computing Services
Brian Macherone
Foreign language placement is based on a
student’s current level of competence, as
determined by placement procedures
developed by the University’s foreign
language departments. Regulations covering
foreign language placement and credit may
be obtained from departmental offices
offering the language in question.
The College of Arts and Sciences comprises
the students and faculty of 25 departments
offering majors and minors, as well as those
working in a variety of cooperative
interdisciplinary programs. These include
the arts, computational sciences, humanistic
studies, physical sciences, and social
sciences. Study in the Arts and Sciences
provides students with a liberal education,
including knowledge and skills applicable
to further study and to occupations in a
great variety of fields.
The presence of research faculty and
graduate students in the programs of the
College affords undergraduate students the
opportunity to study with scholars and
researchers working at the cutting edge of
their disciplines. Qualified advanced
undergraduates, in accordance with
University policy, may enroll in
appropriate graduate courses.
Fields of study leading to majors in the College
are actuarial and mathematical sciences,
Africana studies, anthropology, art, Asian
studies, atmospheric science, biology, chemistry,
Chinese studies, computer science, computer
science and applied mathematics, economics,
English, French, geography, geology, Greek and
Roman civilization, history, Italian, Judaic
studies, Latin American studies, linguistics,
mathematics, music, philosophy, physics,
psychology, Puerto Rican studies, rhetoric and
communication, Russian, Russian and East
European studies, sociology, Spanish, theatre,
urban studies and planning, and women’s
studies.
The department, through a departmental
representative, will assess the active skills
in that language and will make a final
placement decision for each student no later
than the second class meeting of the course
being recommended. A student may not
earn graduation credit for a course in a
language sequence if it is a prerequisite to a
course for which graduation credit has
already been earned.
Students earning advanced placement
credits from high school will be expected to
register for the next course in the language
sequence. Those earning credit in
University in the High School course work
must consult with the appropriate
department chair for placement in the next
course in that language’s sequence.
A Cas 109 Intermediate Science
Research (2)
Students learn research methodology in the natural
and social sciences by accessing scientific
databases, by using on-line bibliographic search
techniques, consulting doctoral-level research
scholars, developing hypotheses and performing
experiments to test them, and by writing research
papers and making presentations at scientific
symposia. It is expected that the students will have
done many of these activities in the prerequisite high
school course, and in this course emphasis in placed
upon the formulation of hypotheses and initiation of
experiments in consultation with mentors.
Prerequisite(s): completion of one year of an
approved course in science research at the highschool level; permission of instructor; may not be
taken by students enrolled in college. Offered
summer session only.
A Cas 110 Intermediate Methods of Research (4)
Students learn research methodology in the natural
and social sciences by accessing scientific databases
by using on-line bibliographic search techniques,
consulting
doctoral-level
research
scholars,
developing hypotheses and performing experiments
to test them, and writing research papers and making
presentations at scientific symposia. It is expected
that the students will have done many of these
activities in the prerequisite high school course, and
in this course emphasis is placed upon performing
experiments in consultation with mentors. Students
are expected to spend at least three hours per week
outside of class. Prerequisite(s): Completion of one
year of an approved course in science research at the
high-school level; permission of instructor; may not
be taken by students enrolled in college; available
for year-long course of study only.
A Cas 111 Beginning Fundamentals of Research
(2)
Students learn research methodology in the natural
and social sciences. Students access scientific
databases by using on-line bibliographic search
techniques, consult doctoral level research scholars,
develop hypotheses and perform experiments to test
them, and write research papers and make
presentations at scientific symposia. This course
emphasizes the first group of these activities, up to
the actual performance of experiments, but some
students may go further. Students are expected to
spend at least three hours working on class work per
week outside of class. May be repeated once for
credit.
A Cas 125 A Diversity of Voices in Literature and
the Arts: Creating Ourselves and Our Cultures
(3)
Examines the emergence of American literary and
other creative endeavors from the diverse
experiences and heritages of the American peoples.
The course focuses on creative works that explore
and create representations of the self in relation to
individual and group identity, and on the ways that
cultural values and ideologies influence creative
expression. [DP]
A Cas 131 Diversity and Equity in
America (3)
Courses in Arts and Sciences
A Cas 101 Understanding Language (3)
Non-technical introduction to the nature and role of
human language in everyday life. Topics include
factors which give rise to regional and social
varieties, ways in which language is exploited (for
example, in advertising and government,) and
linguistic aspects of such fields as education,
literature and computer science. Enrollment limited
to freshmen and sophomores. May not be offered in
2003-2004.
What are the sources, extent, and consequences of
diversity in American society? Using various
approaches in the social and behavioral sciences,
this course compares the American beliefs about
equality with evidence of unequal treatment of
groups labeled on the basis of race, ethnicity,
gender, and religion. The course also considers how
group conformity, stereotyping, and prejudice affect
individuals in their everyday lives. [DP]
67
University at Albany
A Cas 103 Perspectives on Globalization (3)
A Cas 210 Advanced Methods of Research (2)
An introduction to multidisciplinary perspectives on
globalization processes including, among other
topics, the economic configuration of the world
economy, the changing nature of the state, the
transformation of home and households in
transnationalism,
biological constraints and
environmental problems, and the impact of and
responses to globalization throughout the world. The
course presents the perspectives of the social
sciences, humanities and natural sciences, and
encourages discussion and critical thinking. This is
a team-taught course. [GC]
Continuation of work undertaken in A Cas 110 or
equivalent with emphasis placed upon the
communication of results. Students are expected to
spend at least three hours per week outside of class.
Prerequisite(s): Satisfactory completion of A Cas
110 or completion of two years of an approved
science research course at the high school level;
permission of instructor; may not be taken by
students enrolled in college; students must be
enrolled throughout an entire academic year to
obtain credit.
A Cas 141 Concepts of Race and Culture in
the Modern World (3)
This course considers the complex dynamics of
global human diversity from the vantage point of the
various social sciences. It explores the use of race,
nationality, ethnicity, culture, and gender as focal
concepts in the critical analysis of human behavior
and interaction in the modern world. Cross-cultural
and cross-national aspects of these issues are of
central concern to the course. [DP if taken before
Fall 2004; GC]
A Cas 150 Cultural Diversity and the Human
Condition (3)
Interdisciplinary study of selected cultures or
societies focusing on six themes: family and social
structure; religion and cultural values and
traditions; art and nature; continuity; change and
their global implications; work and play; health,
ecology, science/technology. Each semester two or
more cultures, including at least one non-Western
culture, will be compared and contrasted with each
other and with contemporary U.S. experiences.
Examples will include Brazil, China, France,
India, Mexico, Peru, Russia and West Africa. May
be repeated once for credit when content differs.
May be taken only by freshmen and sophomores.
[DP, if taken before Fall 2004; GC]
. [WI]
A Cas 198 Special Topics in the Humanities (1–4)
Special group studies which provide students and
faculty with the opportunity to explore significant
themes, issues and problems from a broadly
humanistic and interdisciplinary perspective. May
be repeated for credit provided the subject matter is
not repeated.
A Cas 202L Understanding the Arts (3)
Interdisciplinary course designed to foster an
awareness and understanding of the significance of
great works of Western art, music and literature.
Students will study how to perceive and analyze works
of art drawn from various periods. Categories include:
architecture, sculpture, painting, music, drama, poetry
and fiction.
A Cas 209 Advanced Science Research (2)
Continuation of work undertaken in A Cas 109 or
equivalent with emphasis placed upon the
completion of experiments in consultation with
mentors. Students will consult with their teachers as
necessary, but will not meet in a formal classroom
period. Prerequisite(s): Satisfactory completion of
A Cas 109 or completion of two years of an
approved science research course at the high school
level; permission of instructor; may not be taken by
students enrolled in college; offered summer session
only.
68
A Cas 211 Intermediate Fundamentals of
Research (2)
Students learn research methodology in the natural
and social sciences. Students access scientific
databases by using on-line bibliographic search
techniques, consult doctoral level research scholars,
develop hypotheses and perform experiments to test
them, and write research papers and make
presentations at scientific symposia. In this course
emphasis is placed upon performing experiments
and the communication of results. Students are
expected to spend at least three hours per week
working on class work outside of class. May be
repeated once for credit. Prerequisite(s): completion
of A Cas 111.
A Cas 220L Literatures of the World I (3)
Major works in English translation from literatures of
ancient Mediterranean (Judaic, Graeco-Roman),
China, Italy, France, Germany, Spain, and
francophone world. The first-semester course feeds
into the second-semester course, but either semester
may be taken alone. The course is team taught by
faculty from the respective literature departments.
May not be offered during 2003-2004.
A Cas 221L Literatures of the World II (3)
Major works in English translation from more recent
literatures of Hebrew, China, Italy, France,
Germany, Spain, and francophone worlds. The first
semester course feeds into the second semester
course, but either semester may be taken alone. The
course is team taught by faculty from the respective
literature departments. May not be offered during
2003-2004.
A Cas 240 Images and Issues of Diversity in
the Visual Arts (3)
This course will look at the visual arts produced in
selected subcultures and will consider the ways in
which such social identities as race, class, gender
and age are represented. The course focuses on the
relationship of artists and their work to cultural and
critical history, on social conditions under which
these artists create, and the effect of these conditions
on the themes, content, forms and shape of the
reality in their art. [DP]
A Cas 360E Passion and Choice (3)
Through film drama, fiction and philosophy, this
team-taught course will focus generally on the inner
and outer dynamics of the individual as he/she
interacts with the world and culture, and will take up
such issues as the authority of reason versus the
authority of the passions; personal responsibility
versus allegiance to society; wealth as redemption
and corruption; finding one’s personal myth; and
gender identity and the quest for happiness. May not
be offered during 2003-2004.[WI]
A Cas 390 New York State Theatre Institute
Internship (1–15)
A full- or part-time program involving academic
study through classes, individualized instruction and
written projects, and supervised applied experiences
structured around the Institute’s theatrical
productions and its residencies in New York State
schools.
These
internships
emphasize
interdisciplinary learning about the arts in society, in
the education of children, and the arts’ aesthetic,
technical, and business aspects. Internships are
open only to qualified juniors and seniors who
have an overall grade point average of 2.50 or
higher. Open to qualified majors in diverse fields or
undeclared majors through a competitive selection
process. Applications should be made to the Arts
and Sciences faculty coordinator by November 1 or
April 1 for the following terms. Prerequisite(s):
permission of instructor. S/U graded.
A Cas 497 & 497Z Special Topics in the
Humanities (1–4)
Special group studies which provide students and
faculty with the opportunity to explore, on an
advanced level, significant themes, issues, and
problems from a broadly humanistic and
interdisciplinary perspective. A Cas 497Z is the
writing intensive version of 497; A Cas 497 and/or
497Z may be repeated for credit provided the topic
differs. Prerequisite(s): junior or senior class
standing or permission of instructor. [WI]
University at Albany
D EPARTMENT
A FRICANA
S TUDIES
OF
Faculty
Professors
Allen Ballard, Ph.D. (Collins Fellow)
Harvard University
Iris Berger, Ph.D.
University of Wisconsin
Leonard A. Slade, Jr., Ph.D., L.H.D.
University of Illinois
Jogindar S. Uppal, Ph.D.
University of Minnesota
Associate Professors
Helen R. Desfosses, Ph.D. (Collins Fellow)
Boston University
George A. Levesque, Ph.D.
State University of New York
at Binghamton
Kwadwo A. Sarfoh, Ph.D.
University of Cincinnati
Marcia E. Sutherland, Ph.D.
Howard University
Adjunct Associate Professor
Kirk Smith, M.A.
Shenandoah University
Assistant Professors
Sharon Parkinson, Ph.D.
Purdue University
Oscar Williams, Ph.D.
The Ohio State University
Adjuncts (estimated): 6
Graduate Assistants (estimated): 10
The objective of the department is to provide a
multi- and interdisciplinary education in
African/African-American studies and related
fields. Students are expected to possess the
knowledge and skills necessary to understand
the social, political, economic, psychological,
and historical consequences of institutional
arrangements as they affect the life experiences
of African/African-American people.
The department offers full programs leading
to the B.A. and M.A. degrees. Students may
specialize in African studies and AfricanAmerican studies. Sub-areas in African
studies are the history, economics, politics,
and culture of the following regions:
Eastern Africa, Central Africa, West Africa,
and Southern Africa. Sub-areas in AfricanAmerican studies include: AfricanAmerican history and culture, urban
economic development, central city politics
and institutions, African-American
literature and criticism, and urban planning.
Though the major concentrations are Africa
and the United States, students may design
programs that will enhance their knowledge
of other Black cultures; e.g., the Caribbean
and Haitian.
Students are prepared for careers in teaching,
counseling, state and local social welfare
programs, urban planning, administrative
program direction, and international relations.
Special Programs and Opportunities
Undergraduate students in the department
are provided an opportunity to apply theory
through community projects, both within
formal courses and other such special
programs that may be designed by the
department. Students participating in the latter
may work directly with New York legislators or
legislative committees. For further information
contact the Department. Students are also
provided an ongoing colloquium series
featuring locally and nationally known
African and African-American scholars. The
senior seminar enables students and faculty to
explore common research interests.
Degree Requirements for the
Major in African/Afro-American
Studies
General Program B.A: A minimum of 36
credits (at least 12 credits of which must be at
the 300 level or above) including A Aas 142,
219 or 219Z, 286 or 287, and 490. The
additional department courses, as advised,
must include 6 credits at the 200 level and 6
credits at the 300 level or above.
Courses
A Aas 110 (= A Thr 110) The Black Theatre in
America (3)
Study of the historic background of Black
involvement in the American theatre and of the role
and functioning of the Black theatre in
Contemporary American society. Only one of A Aas
110 and A Thr 110 may be taken for credit.
A Aas 142L African/African-American
Literature (3)
Survey of Black authors from diverse cultures and
an analysis of their relationship to Black thought.
[DP HU]
A Aas 150 Life in the Third World (3)
Introduction to cultural variation and fragmentation
among third-world developing communities. Some
lectures and discussions are led by third-world
graduate students. Whenever possible, distinguished
visitors from third-world countries are also involved
in the course.
A Aas 209 (= A Mus 209) Black American Music (3)
An introduction to Black American Music. Study
will include music from West Africa as well as
musical/social influences throughout American
history. Musical styles will include spirituals,
gospel, blues, jazz and classical.
A Aas 213 History of Civil Rights Movement (3)
This course is designed to introduce the student to
the historical development and maturation of the
movement for civil rights in the United States. It will
examine the development of resistance movements
and the philosophies of those involved within the
movements during the antebellum, Post Civil war
and contemporary times. [DP US*]
A Aas 219 Introduction to African/AfricanAmerican History (3)
Survey of the cultural and historical background of
African-American from their African heritage to
their present role in American society. A Aas 219Z
is the writing intensive version of A Aas 219; only
one may be taken for credit.
A Aas 219Z Introduction to African/AfricanAmerican History (3)
A Aas 219Z is the writing intensive version of
A Aas 219; only one may be taken for credit. [WI]
A Aas 220 Black and White in America (3)
In America Blacks and Whites have been
organically connected by the space of national
geography and centuries of time. With current
events an ever-present concern, this course
explores the cultural significance and the social
meaning of the long and ever-changing relations
between black and white Americans and its import
for the national welfare. [DP US*]
A Aas 220Z (formerly T Aas 220Z) Black and
White in America (4)
A Aas 220Z is the Writing Intensive version of
A Aas 220. Only one may be taken for graduation
credit. [WI]
A Aas 221 The Economic Structure of the Black
Community (3)
Analysis of old and contemporary models of Black
entrepreneurship and formal economic organization
and its effect in the community.
A Aas 224 Cities as People (3)
Survey of the human aspects of the urban
environment, historically and in practical terms today,
with an emphasis upon the central city’s opportunity
for field research in urban life.
A Aas 240 (= A Lcs 240 and A Wss 240)
Classism, Racism and Sexism: Issues (3)
Analysis of the connections between and among
classism, racism and sexism, their mutually
reinforcing nature, and the tensions arising from
their interrelations. Emphasizes the ideological and
personal aspects of these phenomena as well as the
institutional guises in American society. Only one of
A Aas 240, A Lcs 240, & A Wss 240 may be taken
for credit. [DP]
A Aas 267 (= A Arh 267) African-American Art of
the Twentieth & Twenty-First Centuries (3)
Study of paintings and drawings by African
American artists in the 20th and 21st centuries and of
the cultural context within which the art was
produced. A wide range of artistic styles and media
is explored. Consideration is also given to the
impact of European, African, and Asian visual arts
on the work of African American artists.
A Aas 269 (= A Lcs 269 and A Ant 269) The
Caribbean: Peoples, History, and Cultures (3)
Peoples, history and cultures of the 20th century
Caribbean. Special emphasis will be placed on
responses to colonialism and nationalism. Same as
A Lcs 269 and A Ant 269. Only one of A Aas 269,
A Lcs 269, & A Ant 269 may be taken for credit.
[BE]
A Aas 270 (= A Gog 270) Geography of
Africa (3)
Geographic analysis of the continent of Africa. The
diversity of the African continent is stressed by
examining its physical environment; resources;
social, cultural, economic and political systems.
Emphasizes the demographic as well as spatial
planning aspects of geography. Only one of A Aas
270 & A Gog 270 may be taken for credit.
69
University at Albany
A Aas 275 (= A Arh 275) African Art (3)
Study of art produced on the west coast and central
region of sub-Saharan Africa. Includes a wide range
of artistic styles, with particular attention given to
artifact designs and to their functional or ceremonial
use in particular societies. Also explores the impact
of African art on European and American
Modernism.
A Aas 286 (= A His 286) African Civilizations (3)
Africa from prehistoric times to 1800 with emphasis
on sub-Saharan Africa, the development of
indigenous states and their response to Western and
Eastern contacts. Only one of A Aas 286 & A His
286 may be taken for credit. [BE]
A Aas 287 (= A His 287) Africa in the Modern
World (3)
Africa since 1800: exploration. the end of the slave
trade, the development of interior states, European
partition, the colonial period, and the rise of
independent Africa. Only one of A Aas 287 & A His
287 may be taken for credit. [BE]
A Aas 311 History of Slavery in the Western
Hemisphere (3)
The institution of slavery and its effects in the
Western Hemisphere, its origins, bases of
continuance,
and
contemporary
residuals.
Prerequisite(s): A His 100 or 100Z, and 101 or
101Z.
A Aas 320 Black Nationalism: Political
Perspective in Africa (3)
Examination of selected freedom movements in
Black Africa with a focus upon one-party politics
and the continuing tensions between socialism and
democracy. Prerequisite(s): A Aas 219 or 219Z.
A Aas 322 Developing African Nations (3)
Systems analysis of the contemporary social,
political, cultural, and economic institutions crucial
to the economic maturation of developing African
nations. Prerequisite(s): A Aas 219 or 219Z; A Aas
286 and 287 recommended.
A Aas 325 Introduction to Research Methods
(3)
An introduction to paradigms, theories and models
on research and the Black community. Emphasis
will be placed on methodological concerns of
validity, reliability, instrument development, data
collection, data analysis and reporting of research
outcomes. The ethics of research on people of
African descent will be discussed.
A Aas 331 The African/African-American
Family (3)
In-depth study of the African/African-American
family as an institution, the dynamics of intra-family
relations and the effects of social institutions on
Black family life. Prerequisite(s): A Soc 115M.
A Aas 333 The Black Community: Continuity
& Change (3)
Overview of the socio-historic factors which impact
upon the current conditions of the African-American
community. Prerequisite(s): A Aas 219 or 219Z or
permission of instructor.
A Aas 340 The Black Essay (3)
Essays written by Black American writers in the
19th and 20th centuries. Prerequisite(s): A Aas 142.
A Aas 341 African/African-American Religion
(3)
Analysis of the relationship of the religion of Black
people to Black culture. Prerequisite(s): A Aas 219
or 219Z.
70
A Aas 342 (= A Ant 342) Sub-Saharan Africa:
Peoples and Cultures (3)
A Aas 416 (= A Wss 416) Contemporary Black
Women and Their Fiction (3)
Culture areas of Africa south of the Sahara.
Historical and geographic background studies of
selected societies. Culture change and contact
during the colonial and postcolonial periods. Only
one of A Aas 342 & A Ant 342 may be taken for
credit. Prerequisite(s): A Aas 286.
Evaluation of the style, technique, content, and nature
of the discourse in which contemporary Black women
writers are engaged. Readings include at least one
work by Toni Cade Bambara, Gloria Naylor, Toni
Morrison, Paule Marshall, Gayle Jones, and Alice
Walker. Only one of A Aas 416 & A Wss 416 may be
taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): senior class standing,
at least one literature course, and permission of
instructor.
A Aas 345 The Black Novel: Black
Perspectives (3)
Systematic study of the novel written by Black
Americans from the Harlem Renaissance to the
present. The novels studied express the cultural,
political, and socio-historical consciousness of the
writers to demonstrate their awareness of the
struggle of Black people. Prerequisite(s): A Aas 142.
A Aas 355Z Introduction to African and
African-American Poetry (3)
Intensive study of poetry drawn from the black
experience. Emphasis on aesthetic forms, meanings,
tone, diction, imagery, symbol, sentences, rhythm,
rhyme, allusion, etc. Common characteristics of
black poetry will also be discussed. [WI]
A Aas 370 The Psychology of the Black
Experience (3)
In-depth examination of the extant psychological
literature on blacks. Analyzes varying themes,
theories, perspectives, and research that relate to the
psychology of blacks. Focuses on the contemporary
work of black behavioral scientists involved in the
quest for scholarly self-determination and for
redefinition of the psychological fabric of the black
experience. Selected topics are identity, personality,
motivation, achievement, and mental health.
Prerequisite(s): junior or senior class standing.
A Aas 375 Black Popular Culture (3)
The course explores the historical and contemporary
constructions of “blackness” within the popular
realms of film, television, and popular music and the
relationship of those constructs to the realities of
African-American life and culture.
A Aas 386 (= A His 386) Race and Conflict in
South Africa (3)
Study of the historical origins and development of
racial conflict in South Africa with a concentration on
economic, political, social and religious change in the
20th century. Topics will include changing state
structures and ideologies, the impact of
industrialization, transformations of rural and urban
life, African religious movements, political and
religious connections with Black Americans, gender
relations, and changing forms of popular resistance
against white domination. Only one of A Aas 386 &
A His 386 may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): 3
credits of A His or A Aas course work, or junior or
senior class standing.
A Aas 393 Topics in African History (1-4)
Specific topics to be examined will be announced
during advance registration. May be repeated for
credit. Prerequisite(s): junior or senior class standing
or 3 credits in history.
A Aas 393Z Topics in African History (3-4)
Specific topics to be examined will be announced
during advance registration. May be repeated for
credit. Prerequisite(s): junior or senior class standing
or 3 credits in history. [WI]
A Aas 400 The Law and African-America (3)
The central city as a center of dominance, inner city
legal problems as an aspect of social control. Students
examine selected central city agencies related to law
enforcement. Alternate possibilities for reform and
improvement are explored. Term project required.
A Aas 430 Black Social and Political Thought in
the Americas (3)
Seminar on the social and political ideas and
strategies of selected African/African-Americans
from the late 18th century to the present.
Prerequisite(s): junior or senior class standing.
A Aas 432 The African-American Woman:
Contemporary Issues (3)
Socio-historic look at the American women of the
African diaspora with particular attention to: (1)
Black Liberation; (2) feminist movements; (3) sex
role socialization; and (4) issues of sexism and
racism. Prerequisite(s): A Aas 219 or 219Z, or
permission of instructor.
A Aas 435 Blacks and the American Political
Process (3)
An examination of the American political process as
it impacts upon the Black community in the United
States. Prerequisite(s): junior or senior class
standing.
A Aas 440 (= A His 440 and A Wss 440) Black
Women in United States History (3)
This seminar will examine the history of black
women in the United States from the slave era
through the post World War II reform movements. It
will focus upon the range of demands black women
faced during the Gilded and Progressive eras—their
participation in the suffrage movement, black
struggles for liberation, cultural expressions, labor
force, etc. Only one of A Aas 440, A Wss 440 and
A His 440 may be taken for credit.
A Aas 490 Senior Seminar for African/AfricanAmerican Studies Majors (3)
An extensive examination of critical issues
involving the experiences of Africans and African
Americans in historical, cultural, and social
contexts. A central theme will be selected for each
semester’s work. Students will synthesize and apply
knowledge acquired in the major and will discuss
their experiences. Attention will also be given to the
interrelationships of the values and ideas indigenous
to African/African-American Studies, with a
discussion of these with a senior faculty member.
Students will review basic research methodology
and will evaluate their experiences in a 20-page
research paper. Prerequisite(s): major in the
department and completion of 18 credit hours in the
major. [OD]
A Aas 498 Topics in African Studies (3)
Specific topics to be examined are announced
during advance registration. May be repeated for
credit. Prerequisite(s): junior or senior class
standing.
A Aas 499 Topics in African-American
Studies (3)
Specific topics to be examined are announced
during advance registration. May be repeated for
credit. Prerequisite(s): junior or senior class
standing.
University at Albany
DEPARTMENT OF
ANTHROPOLOGY
Faculty
Distinguished Research Professor Emeritus
William N. Fenton, Ph.D.
Yale University
Distinguished Teaching Professor Emeritus
Gary H. Gossen, Ph.D.
Harvard University
Professor Emeritae/i
Robert M. Carmach, Ph.D.
University of California, Los Angeles
Peter T. Furst, Ph.D.
University of California, Los Angeles
Gary A. Wright, Ph.D.
University of Michigan
Associate Professor Emeritae/i
George J. Klima, Ph.D.
University of California, Berkeley
Dwight T. Wallace, Ph.D.
University of California, Berkeley
Distinguished Service Professor
Ernest A. Scatton, Ph.D.
Harvard University
Lawrence M. Schell, Ph.D.
University of Pennsylvania
Professors
James P. Collins, Ph.D.
University of California, Berkeley
Timothy B. Gage, Ph.D.
Pennsylvania State University
Robert W. Jarvenpa, Ph.D.
University of Minnesota
John S. Justeson, Ph.D.
Stanford University
Michael E. Smith, Ph.D.
University of Illinois, Urbana
Richard G. Wilkinson, Ph.D.
University of Michigan
Associate Professors
Lee S. Bickmore, Ph.D.
University of California, Los Angeles
George Aaron Broadwell, Ph.D.
University of California, Los Angeles
Louise Burkhart, Ph.D.
Yale University
Liliana Goldin, Ph.D.
University at Albany
Gail H. Landsman, Ph.D.
Catholic University of America
Marilyn Masson, Ph.D.
University of Texas, Austin
James W. Wessman, Ph.D.
University of Connecticut
Assistant Professors
Tom D. Brutsaert, Ph.D.
Cornell University
Sean M. Rafferty, Ph.D.
Binghamton University
Associate Curator of Anthropology
Hetty Jo Brumbach, Ph.D.
University at Albany
Adjunct Faculty
Edward Fitzgerald, Ph.D.
Yale University
John P. Hart, Ph.D.
Northwestern University
Karen Hartgen, M.A.
University at Albany
Robert Kuhn, Ph.D.
University at Albany
Elizabeth Marshall, Ph.D.
University of North Carolina, Charlotte
Carolyn Lee Olsen, Ph.D.
University of Michigan
Carol Raemsch, Ph.D.
University at Albany
Brenda P. Rosenbaum
University at Albany
Alice D. Stark, Ph.D.
Yale University
Adjuncts (estimated): 9
Teaching Assistants (estimated): 18
Anthropology is the study of humankind, of
ancient and modern people and their ways of
living. From its first establishment as a
professional discipline, anthropology has
been defined in terms of its holistic, crosscultural, and evolutionary approaches. By
systematically analyzing differences and
similarities among human groups over time
and space, anthropologists achieve the fullest
possible understanding of human nature,
human diversity, and the forces that govern
change in cultural and biological
characteristics.
The Anthropology Department provides
undergraduates with a wide variety of
courses, field and laboratory experiences,
and guided research in each of the four
major subfields of the discipline:
archaeology, biological (physical)
anthropology, ethnology (cultural
anthropology), and linguistics.
The department offers two majors: a B.A. in
anthropology and a Faculty-Initiated
Interdisciplinary Major with a concentration
in human biology (in conjunction with the
department of Biological Sciences).
Students are offered special opportunities
for the study of past and present cultures in
Mesoamerica, North America, and
elsewhere through the research programs of
the anthropology faculty.
The major prepares students for graduate
studies in anthropology (the department has
M.A. and cognate M.A. programs, and a
doctoral program), as well as laying a broad
scientific and liberal foundation for
entering the professions, arts, or other
occupations in the modern world.
Many new career opportunities are developing
in addition to traditional anthropological
careers in college teaching, museum curation,
and public archaeology. For example, the
diverse ethnic composition of American
society is making cross-cultural awareness a
matter of increasing importance for careers in
business, law, journalism, medicine, public
policy, and primary and secondary education.
The B.A. degree in anthropology also
offers excellent preparation for careers in
international business, public health,
politics, and diplomacy. Moreover, many
local, state federal, and international
agencies are seeking personnel who have
sensitivity to cultural diversity.
Anthropology also provides a holistic
perspective of and systematic training in
the impact of human activity and values on
the environment. The study of crosscultural factors affecting the delivery of
health care can be important to a career in
health services.
Finally, a degree in biological
anthropology is a good foundation for
graduate work in genetic epidemiology
and other specialties within the field of
public health.
Special Programs or
Opportunities
Programs in archaeological, bioanthropological, and ethnological
fieldwork are available, with the Northeast
and Mesoamerica being the most frequent
locations. The archaeology program
provides intensive training and/or research
opportunities through research programs
in Mexico, Belize, and New York State.
Laboratory research experience, both in
formal courses and as independent
projects, is available in archaeology and
biological anthropology.
Degree Requirements for the Major in
Anthropology
General Program B.A.: A minimum of 36
credits in anthropology including A Ant
110N, 104, 108M or 108G, and 106M or
220M. Of the 24 additional credits in
anthropology, no more than 6 may be at
the 100 level and at least 12 must be at the
300 level or above.
Honors Program
Outstanding anthropology students are
encouraged to consider the department’s
honors program, which is designed to give
them the opportunity to work closely with
members of the faculty on research and
writing projects. Declared majors in
anthropology are eligible to apply, provided
that they have completed 12 or more credits
in the department with a grade point
average in the major of at least 3.50. They
must also have an overall grade point
average of at least 3.25. To participate in
the program, students should contact their
adviser during their junior year or at the
beginning of their senior year. Students
should plan their course work in
consultation with their faculty adviser.
71
University at Albany
Students in the honors program must fulfill the
requirements for the major plus the following
requirements:
1. Among the 36 credits of course work in
anthropology required for the major,
students in the honors program must
complete at least one course at the 300 or
400 level in each of three different
subdisciplines (archaeology, cultural
anthropology, biological anthropology,
linguistics), for a total of 12 credits:
Biological Anthropology: 310, 311,312,
313, 319, 414, 416, 418.
Linguistics: 321, 322, 325, 421, 422, 423,
424, 425, 434.
Archaeology: 330, 331, 332, 333, 334,
335, 338, 339, 430, 431, 433, 435, 438.
Ethnology: 340, 341, 343, 351, 355, 360,
361, 363, 364, 365, 372, 381, 390, 450,
480.
2. Students must write an honors thesis based
upon original research under the direction
of an anthropology faculty member. Any
anthropology faculty member
knowledgeable in your topic may
supervise a thesis project. A written
proposal for the intended project must be
formally approved by that faculty member
and the departmental Undergraduate
Affairs Committee during the semester
prior to the semester in which the thesis is
completed. Students will enroll in A Ant
482A and 482B, “Senior Honors Thesis
Seminar,” during the fall and spring of
their senior year. The six credits from
these courses can be counted toward the
36 credits required for the Anthropology
major.
3. Research skill. Students will complete 6
credits of coursework in a research skill
appropriate for anthropological research.
Examples include, but are not limited to,
foreign languages, statistics or other
quantitative courses, and anthropological
methods courses. The research skill
courses must be approved by the
Undergraduate Affairs Committee.
Courses
A Ant 100 Culture, Society, and Biology (3)
Introduction to the issue of human diversity, the
course poses the question of what it means to be
human. Through study of biological anthropology,
archaeology, linguistics, and ethnology, students
will explore the range of diversity within our shared
humanity, and seek explanations that might account
for it. The former A Ant 100M does not meet the
Human Diversity requirement. Only one of A Ant
100, 100M or 100P may be taken for credit. [DP if
taken before Fall 2004.]
A Ant 104 Archaeology (3)
Introduction to the methods used by archaeologists
to study ancient sites and artifacts. Topics include
archaeological fieldwork, laboratory analysis,
dating, interpretation of artifacts, and the
reconstruction of past cultural patterns. Examples
include studies of ancient and recent societies. Two
lectures, one laboratory period per week.
A Ant 106M Linguistic Anthropology (3)
The study of language and its relationship to human
culture, history and biology. Topics include the
nature of symbolic systems; the structure of
language; the relations of language to cognitive,
cultural and societal diversity; how languages
change; and how past languages and cultures can be
reconstructed from linguistic evidence. The course
covers Western and non-Western cases from
contemporary and historical periods.
A Ant 108G Cultural Anthropology (3)
A Ant 108G is the writing intensive version of
A Ant 108M; only one may be taken for credit. [GC
SS WI]
A Ant 108M Cultural Anthropology (3)
Survey of the theory, methods, and goals of cultural
anthropology, emphasizing the nature of culture and
the varied forms in which it is expressed among the
peoples of the world. Two lectures, one discussion
period per week. A Ant 108G is the writing
intensive version of A Ant 108M; only one may be
taken for credit. [GC SS]
A Ant 110N Introduction to Human Evolution
(3)
Introduction to human evolution. This course spans
the human fossil record from “Lucy” to CroMagnon. Topics include our primate past and the
evolution of upright walking. The steady increase in
our ancestors’ brain size is explored along with the
cultural correlates of biological evolution such as
stone tools, language origins and cave art. [NS]
A Ant 111N Introduction to the Primates (3)
Survey of the basic morphology and behavior
of nonhuman primates. Prosimian and
anthropoid primates are studied in terms of
their comparative morphology and behavior,
with reference to these same features among
humans. [NS]
To graduate with “honors in anthropology,”
students must achieve an overall grade point
average of 3.25 and a minimum grade point
average of 3.50 in the major, in addition to the
above requirements.
A Ant 119N The City and Human Health (3)
Degree Requirements for the FacultyInitiated Interdisciplinary Major with a
Concentration in Human Biology are
listed in the Human Biology Program
section of this bulletin.
A Ant 131M (= A Cla 131M) Ancient Peoples
of the World (3)
72
Survey of the history of health and disease from the
earliest humans before the development of
settlements to contemporary populations living in
industrialized cities. Emphasizes the role of culture
and behavior in disease. [NS]
Ancient cultures from around the world will be
presented and analyzed from the available
archaeological data. The gradual development of
civilization in both the Old and New Worlds will be
the focus of the course. Only one of A Ant 131M &
A Cla 131M may be taken for credit. [SS]
A Ant 140 Anthropological Survey of World
Cultures (3)
In-depth survey of selected ancient, historical, and
modern world cultures. Major themes include
production of goods and services, authority systems,
legal processes, and religious and ritual life. A Ant
140Z is the writing intensive version of A Ant 140;
only one may be taken for credit.
A Ant 140Z Anthropological Survey of World
Cultures (3)
A Ant 140Z is the writing intensive version of A Ant
140; only one may be taken for credit. Offered every
semester. [WI]
A Ant 145 (= A His 145 and A Lcs 145)
Continuity and Change in Latin America (3)
Introduction to the historical development of Latin
America’s diverse cultural heritage and to its
contemporary institutions and civilization. Broadly
interdisciplinary perspective reflecting diverse
approaches and fields. Only one of A Ant 145,
A His 145, & A Lcs 145 may be taken for credit.
A Ant 146 (= A Lcs 150) Puerto Rico: People,
History, and Culture (3)
Survey of Puerto Rican culture on the island from
the prehispanic era to the 20th century. Special
emphasis will be placed on the change of
sovereignty in 1898, the national question, class and
culture, and migration. A Ant 146Z and A Lcs 150Z
are writing intensive versions of A Ant 146 and
A Lcs 150; only one of the four courses may be
taken for credit.
A Ant 146Z (= A Lcs 150Z) Puerto Rico:
People, History, and Culture (3)
A Ant 146Z and A Lcs 150Z are writing intensive
versions of A Ant 146 and A Lcs 150; only one of
the four courses may be taken for credit. [WI]
A Ant 160G Symbol and Human Nature (3)
A Ant 160G is the writing intensive version of
A Ant 160M; only one may be taken for credit. [WI]
A Ant 160M Symbol and Human Nature (3)
Introduction to ideas in the social sciences and
humanities pertaining to the central place of
symbolic behavior in human evolution, human
nature, and contemporary human communities.
Comparative perspective, including both Western
and non-Western materials. Opportunity for
fieldwork in the local community. A Ant 160G is the
writing intensive version of A Ant 160M; only one
may be taken for credit. [SS]
A Ant 172 Community and Self (3)
What is the “self”? Individual and social diversity
are considered cross-culturally, in conjunction with
personal identity, class, nationality, and ethnicity.
Implications for the students’ own lives are
discussed, as well as questions of freedom and
authority in America. [DP]
A Ant 175L (= A Rel 175L) Anthropology and
Folklore (3)
Introduction to the study of folklore as an aspect of
culture, symbolically expressing people’s identity,
beliefs and values. The focus is on oral text
traditions—myths, folktales, and legends. Topics in
folk custom and ritual, folk music and folk art are
also included. Includes folklore from Western and
non-Western cultures. Only one of A Ant 175L and
A Rel 175L may be taken for credit. [HU]
A Ant 189Z Writing in Anthropology (Lower
Division) (1)
Students who are concurrently registered in any 100or 200-level anthropology course, may with
permission of the instructor of that course, enroll in
A Ant 189Z and fulfill a writing intensive version of
that other course. The writing intensive version will
involve: 1) a body of written work beyond that
normally required by the companion course, 2)
opportunities for students to receive assistance in
progress, and 3) an opportunity for students to revise
some pieces. [WI]
University at Albany
A Ant 197 Special Topics in Anthropology (1–
4)
A Ant 269 (= A Aas 269 and A Lcs 269) The
Caribbean: Peoples, History and Cultures (3)
Study of a selected topic in anthropology. May be
repeated for credit when topic differs. Consult class
schedule for specific topic.
Peoples, history and cultures of the 20th century
Caribbean. Special emphasis will be placed on
responses to colonialism and nationalism. Only one
of A Ant 269, A Aas 269, & A Lcs 269 may be
taken for credit. [BE]
A Ant 211 (formerly A Ant 411) Human
Population Biology (3)
Biological variation in human populations, with
emphasis on genetics, adaptability, demography and
related aspects of population dynamics. Two
lectures and one lab per week. Prerequisite(s): A Ant
110N or A Bio 110N or F.
A Ant 310 Human Paleontology (3)
Examination of the human fossil record and of the
major theories dealing with fossil record.
Prerequisite(s): A Ant 102 or A Geo 230 or A Geo
230Z or permission of the instructor.
A Ant 220M (= A Lin 220M and A Eng 217M)
Introduction to Linguistics (3)
A Ant 311 (formerly A Ant 413) Functional
Anatomy of the Human Skeleton (4)
Introduction to the study of language, including
examination of the characteristics and structural
principles of natural language. After exploring the
basic characteristics of sound, word formation and
sentence structure, these principles are applied to
such topics as: language variation, language change,
psycholinguistics,
pragmatics,
and
animal
communication. Only one of A Ant 220M, A Lin
220M, & A Eng 217M may be taken for credit. [SS]
A Ant 311Z (formerly A Ant 413Z) Functional
Anatomy of the Human Skeleton (4)
A Ant 233 (= A Lcs 233) Aztecs, Incas and
Mayas (3)
Introductory survey of the archaeology and
ethnohistory of the three best-known indigenous
civilizations of the New World. Each is presented in
terms of prehistoric background and evolution,
social organization, politics and economics, religion
and art. Consideration is given to the Spanish
conquest of these three groups and to their modern
legacies. Only one of A Ant 233 & A Lcs 233 may
be taken for credit. [BE]
A Ant 236 American Indian Archaeology (3)
Introductory survey of the prehistory of North
America and Mesoamerica. Emphasis on the
prehistoric developments in the Eastern Woodlands,
Plains, Southwest, Mexico, and the Arctic. An
introduction to current theoretical issues as applied
in these culture areas. [BE]
Laboratory course in skeletal and dental
identification and analysis, with emphasis on the
interaction of the muscular and skeletal systems.
A Ant 311Z is the writing intensive version of A Ant
311; only one may be taken for credit.
Prerequisite(s): A Ant 110N or A Bio 325.
A Ant 311Z is the writing intensive version of A Ant
311; only one may be taken for credit.
Prerequisite(s): junior or senior class standing. [WI]
A Ant 312 (= A Bio 318; formerly A Ant
412/A Bio419) Human Population Genetics (3)
Population genetics theory is the foundation of
evolutionary biology and contributes heavily to
modern ideas in ecology, systematics, and
agriculture. This course is an introduction to that
theory with special emphasis on evolution. Only one
of A Ant 312 and A Bio 318 may be taken for
credit. Prerequisite(s): A Ant 211 or A Bio 205 or
212.
A Ant 319 Physical Growth and Development
(3)
The nature and distribution of North American
Indian cultures from the pre-Columbian period to
the present. Prerequisite(s): A Ant 100, or A Ant
108G, or 108M. [BE SS]
Analysis of the pattern of human growth during the
prenatal and postnatal periods and their variation
around the world. The course focuses on the
influence of social factors, nutrition, alcohol and
cigarette use, race/ethnicity, pollution, and features
of the physical environment which modify growth
patterns. Prerequisite(s): A Ant 100, or A Ant 102,
or A Bio 110N/F and 111N, or A Bio 102N or
A Bio 103Z or 103.
A Ant 243 (= A Jst 243) Peoples and Cultures
of the Middle East (3)
A Ant 321 (= A Lin 321) Introduction to
Syntax (3)
A Ant 243Z (= A Jst 243) Peoples and
Cultures of the Middle East (3)
The main features of the “Middle Eastern culture
continent.” A comparison of selected societies in
Southwest Asia and North Africa. The impact of
modernization on preindustrial cities and peasantries
in the area. A Ant 243Z is the writing intensive
version of A Ant 243 and A Jst 243; only one of
these courses may be taken for credit. [BE WI]
The human ability to produce and understand an
infinite number of different sentences is one of the
most remarkable capabilities we have. The study of
the structure of sentences is called syntax, and this
course is an introduction to syntactic theory. The
particular approach we will be pursuing is called
generative grammar, the approach to syntax
pioneered by linguists such as Noam Chomsky.
Chomsky argues that all humans are born with an
unconscious knowledge of Universal Grammar, the
basis on which the grammars of all languages are
built. Through a detailed examination of English
sentence structure, we will investigate the
connections between English syntax and Universal
Grammar. Only one of A Lin 321 & A Ant 321 may
be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): A Ant 220M or
permission of instructor.
A Ant 268L (= A Lcs 268L) Ethnology of PreColumbian Art (3)
A Ant 322 (= A Lin 322) Introduction to
Phonology (3)
A Ant 240M The North American Indian (3)
The main features of the “Middle Eastern culture
continent.” A comparison of selected societies in
Southwest Asia and North Africa. The impact of
modernization on preindustrial cities and peasantries
in the area. A Ant 243Z is the writing intensive
version of A Ant 243 and A Jst 243; only one of
these courses may be taken for credit. [BE]
Survey of the art and architecture of the preColumbian Mesoamerican civilizations, from the
origins of the Olmec civilization (c. 1500 B.C.)
through the native art produced under Spanish
colonial rule in the 16th century. The objects are
viewed in relation to their cultural and historical
context. Issues of collection and exhibition are also
discussed. Only one of A Ant 268L & A Lcs 268L
may be taken for credit. [AR HU]
Introduction to the description and analysis of human
speech sounds and their organization. Introduction to
articulatory phonetics and the International Phonetic
Alphabet followed by examination and generative
phonological analysis of data from English and a wide
range of other languages. Only one of A Ant 322 &
A Lin 322 may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s):
A Ant 220M or permission of instructor.
A Ant 325 (= A Lin 325) Sociolinguistics (3)
Introduction to the study of language as a social
phenomenon. Includes basic sociolinguistic concepts,
interactional sociolinguistics, social dialects, Black
English, diglossia, bilingualism, and bilingual education.
Only one of A Ant 325 & A Lin 325 may be taken for
credit. Prerequisite(s): A Ant 220M or permission of
instructor.
A Ant 330 Topics in Archaeology (3)
Survey of a topic in archaeology or regional prehistory
for upper division students. May be repeated for credit
when topic differs. Consult class schedule for specific
topic. Prerequisite(s): A Ant 104.
A Ant 331 Early Civilization of the Old World (3)
The development of early complex societies in the Old
World, including the origins of agriculture, urbanism,
states, and empires. Examines the nature of the
archaeological evidence for these developments and its
interpretation, employing case studies drawn from the
Near East, the Indian Subcontinent, and China.
Prerequisite(s): junior or senior class standing.
A Ant 332 Ethnoarchaeology (3)
Ethnoarchaeology combines the archaeologist’s interest
in material culture with the cultural anthropologist’s
interest in ongoing behavior. Included are the
archaeology of living populations, action archaeology,
experimental and replication studies, formation
processes, and ethnographic analogy, among other
subjects. Prerequisite(s): A Ant 104 or permission of
instructor.
A Ant 333 Iroquois Archaeology and
Ethnohistory (3)
An intensive survey of the archaeology, history, and
ethnology of the Iroquois. Coverage begins with the
first appearance of the Iroquois in the region and
continues to modern reservation life. A Ant 333Z is
the writing intensive version of A Ant 333; only one
may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): A Ant 104.
A Ant 333Z Iroquois Archaeology and
Ethnohistory (3)
A Ant 333Z is the writing intensive version of A Ant
333; only one may be taken for credit.
Prerequisite(s): A Ant 104. [WI]
A Ant 334 The Earliest Cities (3)
Comparative treatment of the earliest urban settlements
around the world. Case studies include Mesopotamia,
Egypt, Sub-Saharan Africa, China, Southeast Asia,
Mesoamerica, and the Andes. Cities are compared in
terms of planning, political roles, religious features,
economic patterns, and their rise and fall. Also covers
archaeological methods for the study of early cities.
Prerequisite(s): A Ant 104
A Ant 335 Introduction to Archaeological
Field Techniques (3)
Introduction to data gathering techniques used by
archaeologists in the field. Taught prior to A Ant
338 as basic training for students concentrating in
archaeology. Prerequisite(s): A Ant 104 or
permission of instructor.
A Ant 338 Archaeological Field Research (6)
Directed archaeological excavation of selected sites,
including experience in site location, mapping,
excavation, preservation, analysis, classification, and
interpretation. A Ant 338Z is the writing intensive
version of A Ant 338; only one may be taken for
credit. Prerequisite(s): A Ant 335 or permission of
instructor.
A Ant 338Z Archaeological Field Research (6)
A Ant 338Z is the writing intensive version of A Ant
338; only one may be taken for credit.
Prerequisite(s): A Ant 335 or permission of
instructor. [WI]
73
University at Albany
A Ant 339 Archaeological Lab Techniques (3)
Survey and practical application of laboratory
techniques using materials from the University
collections. Emphasis on physical and chemical
analysis, classification, and specialized analysis.
A Ant 339Z is the writing intensive version of A Ant
339; only one may be taken for credit.
Prerequisite(s): A Ant 104.
A Ant 339Z Archaeological Lab Techniques (3)
A Ant 339Z is the writing intensive version of A Ant
339; only one may be taken for credit.
Prerequisite(s): A Ant 104. [WI]
A Ant 340 Topics in Ethnology (3)
Survey of the cultures of one of the major regions of
the world. May be repeated for credit when topic
differs. Consult class schedule for specific topic.
Prerequisite(s): A Ant 108G or 108M.
A Ant 341M (= A Lcs 341M) Ethnology of
Mesoamerica (3)
A Ant 355 Environment, Economy and
Culture (3)
Cross-cultural survey of the systematic relations
between environment, behavior and culture.
Analysis of production and exchange systems at
hunting and gathering, agricultural, and industrial
stages of social evolution. Environmental and
economic disruption, perception and management in
cultural perspective. A Ant 355Z is the writing
intensive version of A Ant 355; only one may be
taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): A Ant 108M or
108G or 102 or 104 or permission of instructor.
A Ant 355Z Environment, Economy and Culture
(3)
A Ant 355Z is the writing intensive version of A Ant
355; only one may be taken for credit.
Prerequisite(s): A Ant 108M or 108G or 102 or 104
or permission of instructor. [WI]
A Ant 360 Social Anthropology (3)
Survey of the cultures and history of the native
peoples of Mexico and Central America. Beginning
with the documents created by and about native
peoples around the time of the Spanish invasion, the
course follows the experiences of these societies
through the colonial period and up to the present.
A Ant 341G & A Lcs 341G are writing intensive
versions of A Ant 341M & A Lcs 341M; only one of
the four courses may be taken for credit.
Prerequisite(s): A Ant 100 or 108M or 108G. [BE
SS]
Comparative study of social systems, tribal,
traditional, and modern societies. Deals with
economic, kinship, political, and other aspects of
social structure. Social systems in functionalist,
evolutionary, and dialectic perspectives. Combines
in one course kinship, political, economic, and
stratificational anthropology. Prerequisite(s): A Ant
108M or 108G. A Ant 360Z is the writing intensive
version of A Ant 360; only one may be taken for
credit.
A Ant 341G (= A Lcs 341G) Ethnology of
Mesoamerica (3)
A Ant 360Z is the writing intensive version of A Ant
360; only one may be taken for credit. [WI]
A Ant 341G & A Lcs 341G are writing intensive
versions of A Ant 341M & A Lcs 341M; only one of
the four courses may be taken for credit.
Prerequisite(s): A Ant 100 or 108M or 108G. [BE
SS WI]
A Ant 343 Native American Literature (3)
Survey of the literature of the native peoples of
North America and Mesoamerica, from early
colonial times to the present. Readings include oral
narratives, songs, autobiography, and contemporary
poetry and fiction. Discussion focuses on the use of
texts for cultural analysis, Native American literary
aesthetics, and the survival of native literary
traditions. A Ant 343Z is the writing intensive
version of A Ant 343; only one may be taken for
credit. Prerequisite(s): junior or senior class
standing.
A Ant 343Z Native American Literature (3)
A Ant 343Z is the writing intensive version of A Ant
343; only one may be taken for credit.
Prerequisite(s): junior or senior class standing. [WI]
A Ant 351 Ethnicity in North America (3)
Analysis of ethnicity, assimilation and pluralism
with regard to one or more North American ethnic
group(s). Social, political, economic and symbolic
adaptations. Consideration of relative merits of
integration and separation in modern society. This
course is cross-listed with A Jst 351 & 351Z when
Jewish ethnicity and assimilation are a major focus
of those courses. When cross-listed, A Jst 351Z &
A Ant 351Z are writing intensive versions of A Jst
351 & A Ant 351; only one of the four courses may
be taken for credit. A Ant 351Z is the writing
intensive version of A Ant 351; only one may be
taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): junior or senior
class standing and permission of instructor. [DP
US*]
A Ant 351Z Ethnicity in North America (3)
This course is cross-listed with A Jst 351 & 351Z
when Jewish ethnicity and assimilation are a major
focus of those courses. When cross-listed, A Jst
351Z & A Ant 351Z are writing intensive versions
of A Jst 351 & A Ant 351; only one of the four
courses may be taken for credit. A Ant 351Z is the
writing intensive version of A Ant 351; only one
may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): junior or
senior class standing and permission of instructor.
[DP US* WI]
74
A Ant 360Z Social Anthropology (3)
A Ant 361 Anthropology and Public Policy (3)
The practical application of anthropological theory
and research to policy areas such as economic
development, environment, welfare, and mass
media. The ethics of applied anthropology. A Ant
361Z is the writing intensive version of A Ant 361;
only one may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): 3
credits in anthropology or political science or
sociology.
A Ant 361Z Anthropology and Public
Policy (3)
A Ant 361Z is the writing intensive version of A Ant
361; only one may be taken for credit.
Prerequisite(s): 3 credits in anthropology or political
science or sociology. [WI]
A Ant 363 (= A Rel 363) Ethnology of Religion (3)
Topical and theoretical survey of anthropological
approaches to understanding human religious
expression. Topics include myth, ritual, world view,
shamanism, gender, and religious change.
Emphasizes the religions of non-literate, nonWestern peoples but also includes examples from
major world religions and contemporary Western
societies. Prerequisite(s): A Ant 100 or 108M, or
A Phi 214.
A Ant 364 Anthropology of Health and Health
Care (3)
Introduction to medical anthropology. Cross-cultural
examination of different views of health, disease,
healing and curing, their effect on medical care and
maintenance of health of individuals and
communities. Analyses of interface of modern
medicine with traditional systems and dilemmas
caused by the application of recent medical
advances in our own culture. Prerequisite(s): 3
credits in anthropology or biology.
A Ant 365 (= A Wss 365) The Anthropology of
New Reproductive Technologies (3)
A cross-cultural perspective on how new
reproductive technologies (including invitrofertilization, surrogacy, ultrasound, prenatal
screening for disability, sex selection, fetal surgery,
and neonatal intensive care) are transforming the
experience of procreation and challenging cultural
notions of kinship, personhood, and what it means
to be human. Prerequisite(s): 3 credits in
anthropology, philosophy, or women studies.
A Ant 372 Urban Anthropology (3)
Introduction to urban anthropology. Emphasis on
rural-urban migrations, adjustment and assimilation
of urban migrants, urban kinship and family
structure, poverty culture, rural-urban typologies,
and the application of anthropological methods to
the study of urban societies. A Ant 372Z is the
writing intensive version of A Ant 372; only one
may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): one course
in anthropology, sociology, political science or
geography.
A Ant 372Z Urban Anthropology (3)
A Ant 372Z is the writing intensive version of A Ant
372; only one may be taken for credit.
Prerequisite(s): one course in anthropology,
sociology, political science or geography. [WI]
A Ant 381 (= A Wss 381) Anthropology of
Gender (3)
Cross-cultural analysis of gender roles. Focuses on
non-Western societies, using data from other
societies to better understand the gender system of
our own culture. Issues include status of women and
men, the meaning of “femaleness” and “maleness”,
and women and health care systems. A Ant 381Z
and A Wss 381Z are writing intensive versions of
A Ant 381 and A Wss 381; only one of the four
courses may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): one
course in anthropology or sociology.
A Ant 381Z (= A Wss 381Z) Anthropology of
Gender (4)
A Ant 381Z and A Wss 381Z are writing intensive
versions of A Ant 381 and A Wss 381; only one of
the four courses may be taken for credit.
Prerequisite(s): one course in anthropology or
sociology. [WI]
A Ant 389Z Writing in Anthropology (Upper
Division) (1)
Students who are concurrently registered in any 300or 400-level anthropology course, may with
permission of the instructor of that course, enroll in
A Ant 389Z and fulfill a writing intensive version of
that other course. The writing intensive version will
involve: 1) a body of written work beyond that
normally required by the companion course, 2)
opportunities for students to receive assistance in
progress, and 3) an opportunity for students to revise
some pieces. [WI]
A Ant 390 Ethnological Theory (3)
Historical survey of theoretical approaches to the
study of culture, with emphasis on contemporary
trends. Recommended for majors planning graduate
work. Content may vary with instructor.
Prerequisite(s): A Ant 108M or A Ant 108G.
A Ant 414 (formerly A Ant 313) Demographic
Anthropology (3)
Demographic theory as it applies to anthropological
populations, with emphases on birth, death and
growth rates, population size and dispersion, mating,
and migration. Aspects of historical and
paleodemography accompany analyses of living
populations. A Ant 414Z is the writing intensive
version of A Ant 414; only one may be taken for
credit. Prerequisite(s): A Ant 110N and 211.
A Ant 415 Nutritional Anthropology (3)
This course provides an introduction to the
biological, ecological, and social factors influencing
diet and nutrition. Basic nutritional physiology and
biochemistry are presented in the first part of the
course. Later topics include paleonutrition as well as
nutritional issues of contemporary human
population groups. The core focus is on the concept
of energy balance. Time is spent in the metabolic
laboratory learning how to measure metabolic
energy expenditure and assess nutritional status in
humans. Students participate in the collection and
analysis of individual and class data on nutritional
intake and energy expenditure, with an emphasis on
basic techniques of data presentations, analysis, and
interpretation. Prerequisite(s): A Ant 211
University at Albany
A Ant 414Z (formerly A Ant 313Z) Demographic
Anthropology (3)
A Ant 414Z is the writing intensive version of A Ant
414; only one may be taken for credit.
Prerequisite(s): A Ant 110N and 211. [WI]
A Ant 416 (=A Bio 416; formerly A Ant 315)
Topics in Human Biology (3)
Selected topics in biological anthropology. May be
repeated for credit when topic differs. Consult class
schedule for specific topic. Only one of A Ant 416
and A Bio 416 may be taken for credit.
Prerequisite(s): A Ant 110N and 211.
A Ant 418 Biomedical Anthropology (3)
Anthropological study of health and disease patterns
in human populations with emphasis on humanmade influences on the health of contemporary
societies. The effects of societal and cultural factors
on disease patterns, and the assessment of health
status through epidemiological and anthropological
methods are explored. A Ant 418Z is the writing
intensive version of A Ant 418; only one may be
taken for credit. Prerequisites: A Ant 102 or 119N.
A Ant 418Z Biomedical Anthropology (3)
A Ant 418Z is the writing intensive version of A Ant
418; only one may be taken for credit.
Prerequisite(s): A Ant 102 or 119N. [WI]
A Ant 421Z (formerly 421; = Lin 421Z) Advanced
Syntax (3)
This course continues the investigation of the
relationship between the grammars of particular
languages and Universal Grammar. We will examine
the syntax of several languages from around the
world asking ourselves the following questions: a.)
How do the principles that organize the grammars of
other languages around the world compare to
English? b.) What grammatical properties are true
for all languages? We will discuss the answers to
these questions in the light of generative grammar.
Only one of A Lin 421Z and A Ant 421Z may be
taken for credit. The former A Lin 421 & A Ant 421
do not yield writing intensive credit, Prerequisite(s):
A Lin 321 with grade of C or higher. [WI]
A Ant 422 (= A Lin 422) Advanced
Phonology (3)
Advanced studies in generative phonological theory,
with a focus on the analysis of prosodic phenomena
such as stress, tone, and accent. Discussion of recent
theoretical trends in phonology. Only one of A Ant
422 & A Lin 422 may be taken for credit.
Prerequisite(s): A Ant 322 with grade of C or higher.
A Ant 423 Linguistic Structures (3)
Investigation of the structure of a selected language,
language family, or language area. Prerequisite(s): a
prior course in linguistics or consent of instructor.
[OD]
A Ant 424 Language and Culture (3)
Study of the nature of the interrelationships that
exist between linguistic behavior and other aspects
of culture. Prerequisite(s): A Lin 220 or A Ant
221M or permission of instructor.
A Ant 425 (= A Lin 425) Comparative and
Historical Linguistics (3)
Language development and change. Language
classification,
linguistic
reconstruction.
Prerequisite(s): A Ant 220M or A Lin 220M or
consent of instructor.
A Ant 430 Archaeological Theory (3)
Advanced theory and method in archaeology,
emphasizing
topics
such
as
quantitative
applications, spatial analysis, cultural processes,
systems analysis, the application of dating
techniques, and the reconstruction of extinct
cultures. Prerequisite(s): A Ant 104.
A Ant 431 Seminar in Social Archaeology (3)
Seminar on selected topics in the archaeological
study of past social organization. Topics will vary.
Examples include settlement patterns, household
organization, economic processes, urbanism, and
world systems. Topics will be approached in terms
of methods, theories, and comparative analysis. May
be repeated for credit.
A Ant 433 Mesoamerican Archaeology (3)
Archaeological study of the ancient peoples and
cultures of Mesoamerica from the earliest
inhabitants to the Spanish conquest. Coverage is
chronological and evolutionary, with application of
anthropological models of cultural change.
Emphasis on the major transformation such as the
origin of agriculture, the rise of cities, and the
expansion of states and empires. Prerequisite(s):
A Ant 104 or equivalent or permission of instructor.
A Ant 434 Seminar in Mesoamerican Writing
Systems (3)
Seminar on selected Mesoamerican writing systems.
Focus varies, but Classic Mayan writing is usually
emphasized. Topics include the structure and
evolution of the scripts; relations between writing
and
other
communication
systems;
and
anthropological research using hieroglyphic
evidence.
May be
repeated
for
credit.
Prerequisite(s): course work in Mesoamerican
archaeology,
ethnology,
or
linguistics
is
recommended.
A Ant 435 Archaeological Surveys (3)
Survey of the archaeology of a selected region of the
world. Topics vary according to the regional
specialty of the professor in charge. May be repeated
for credit when topic differs. Prerequisite(s): A Ant
104.
A Ant 438 Museum Research and Curation (3)
The course emphasizes collections management and
research with existing collections, including
database management, basic museum methods for
anthropologists, and approaches to problems of
using data collected by other researchers. Students
design and complete projects using existing
collections. Prerequisite(s): A Ant 104.
A Ant 450 Medical Anthropology (3)
Advanced
medical
anthropology.
In-depth
examination of selected issues and conflicting
values pertaining to health care. Presentations,
frequently by outside speakers actively working in
their fields, on alternative medical belief systems as
well as moral and ethic dilemmas caused by
developments in modern medicine. Emphasizes
practical applications for health care providers.
A Ant 450Z is the writing intensive version of A Ant
450; only one may be taken for credit.
Prerequisite(s): junior or senior class standing and
permission of instructor.
A Ant 481 (= A Lcs 491) Research
Projects (3–6)
Introduction to basic research skills required to
answer questions on human behavior, with special
emphasis on cross-cultural communication and
learning and dynamics of cross-cultural interaction.
Specific research projects familiarize students with
the basic research methods including data collection,
processing, and analysis. Only one of A Ant 481
&A Lcs 491 may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s):
junior or senior class standing and permission of
instructor.
A Ant 482A & B Senior Honor Thesis Seminar (3)
Students in the honors program should enroll in both
A Ant 482A & B for a total of 6 credits during the
fall and spring of their senior year. Students will
write an honors thesis under the supervision of a
member of the Anthropology Department, present
periodic progress reports, and deliver an oral
summary of the completed thesis. Prerequisite(s):
admission to the Anthropology Department honors
program.
A Ant 490 (= A Cla 490) Internship in
Archaeological Conservation and
Documentation (3–9)
Supervised placement in an agency engaged in
conservation and documentation of archaeological
artifacts, such as the New York State Museum or
State Conservation Laboratory. Provides practical
experience and cannot be counted among the 9
elective credits above the 300 level required for
Mediterranean archaeology majors. Anthropology
majors may use up to 3 credits toward major elective
credit. May be taken by majors in Greek and Roman
civilization and anthropology only. Internships are
open only to qualified juniors and seniors who
have an overall grade point average of 2.50 or
higher. S/U graded. Prerequisite(s): permission of
instructor.
A Ant 497 Topics in Anthropology (3)
Advanced course on selected topic in anthropology.
May focus on geographic or theoretical area. May be
repeated for credit when topic differs.
Prerequisite(s): junior or senior class standing and
permission of instructor.
A Ant 498A & B Independent Study in
Anthropology (1–6), (1–6)
Independent reading or research on selected topics
under the direction of a faculty member. May be
repeated for credit. Prerequisite(s): junior or senior
class standing.
A Ant 499 Senior Seminar in Anthropology (3)
Seminar on selected topics in anthropology, Open to
seniors with permission of instructor. Recommended
for majors planning graduate work. May be repeated
for credit.
A Ant 450Z Medical Anthropology (3)
A Ant 450Z is the writing intensive version of A Ant
450; only one may be taken for credit.
Prerequisite(s): junior or senior class standing and
permission of instructor. [WI]
A Ant 480 Introduction to Ethnographic Field
Research (3)
Ethnographic fieldwork experience
undergraduates. Study of fieldwork
and principles together with actual
selected topics under faculty
Prerequisite(s): junior or senior class
permission of instructor.
for qualified
methodology
fieldwork on
supervision.
standing and
75
University at Albany
D EPARTMENT OF
A RT
Faculty
Professors Emeritae/i
Dennis Byng, M.S.
University of Wisconsin
Richard Callner, M.F.A.
Columbia University
Robert Cartmell, M.F.A.
University of Iowa
Edward P. Cowley, M.A.
Columbia University
Mojmir S. Frinta, Ph.D.
University of Michigan
Arthur G. Lennig, Ph.D.
University of Wisconsin
Thom O’Connor, M.F.A.
Cranbrook Academy
William H. Wilson, M.F.A.
Cranbrook Academy
Professors
Roberta M. Bernstein, Ph.D. (Collins Fellow)
Columbia University
Phyllis J. Galembo, M.F.A.
University of Wisconsin
Edward A. Mayer, M.F.A.
University of Wisconsin
Associate Professors
David Carbone, M.F.A.
Brooklyn College, CUNY
JoAnne Carson, M.F.A.
University of Chicago
Sarah R. Cohen, Ph.D.
Yale University
Rachel Dressler, Ph.D.
Columbia University
Mark A. Greenwold, M.F.A.
Indiana University
Marja Vallila, M.F.A.
Cornell University
Assistant Professors
Daniel Goodwin, M.F.A.
Hunter College
Sculpture Technician
Roger Bisbing, M.F.A.
Syracuse University
Adjuncts (estimated): 6
Teaching Assistants (estimated): 18
Art History Faculty in Mediterranean Archaeology
and Art
Distinguished Service Professor
Paul W. Wallace, Ph.D.
Indiana University
Professor
John C. Overbeck, Ph.D.
University of Cincinnati
Associate Professor
Michael R. Werner, Ph.D.
Stanford University
Visiting Associate Professor:
Stuart Swiny, Ph.D.
University of London
76
The Department of Art offers a 36 credit major
in art, a departmental art major of 60 credits,
and a 36 credit Faculty-initiated
interdisciplinary major in art history. In
addition students can minor in art or art
history; the department also directs the
interdisciplinary minor in Film Studies. The
foundation of the studio art majors is a core
curriculum in drawing, two- and threedimensional design, and art history; areas of
concentration are painting and drawing,
sculpture, printmaking, and photography. The
interdisciplinary major in art history offers a
range of courses drawn from offerings in art
history with the art department, and from other
departments and programs in the College of
Arts and Sciences, including classics, history,
and East Asian studies. The University Art
Museum offers a wide variety of exhibitions
that enhance and extend the art department’s
offerings.
Careers
In addition to the traditional careers in fine art,
commercial art, art history and criticism,
students who immerse themselves in our art
curriculum emerge with an understanding of
visual literacy at a time when our culture as a
whole is becoming increasingly dependent
upon visual communication. Career paths
include various positions in art museums and
galleries, art conservation, art therapy,
furniture design, industrial design, interior
design, stage and costume design, graphic
design, film production, TV production,
medical and anthropological illustration, and
animation.
Degree Requirements for the
Major in Art
General Program B.A.: 36 credits, including at
least 12 credits at the 300 level or above, to be
distributed as follows: 18 credits are core
requirements: A Art 105, 110, 115, 205 and
A Arh 170L and 171L; 18 credits are from
electives with an Art prefix; 3 of these credits
may be from any course that applies to the art
history major (see below).
Degree Requirements for the
Departmental Major in Art
General Program B.A.: 60 credits including a
27-credit core requirement consisting of A Art
105, 110, 115, 205, 220, 230, 240 or 242, 244
and 305; 12 credits in art history consisting of
A Arh170L and 17lL and 6 credits from
courses that apply to the art history major (see
below); 6 credits in studio art electives; and a
15-credit concentration in either painting and
drawing, sculpture, printmaking, or
photography.
Admission to Departmental Major in Art
The 60-credit art major is aimed at
encouraging students who demonstrate both an
unusual degree of accomplishment and
potential. In the second semester of their
sophomore year, or thereafter, students should
submit from 12 to 20 works of art, in a
portfolio or sheet of slides, to the Art
Department for review. The portfolio should
reflect a student’s intended area of focus:
painting and drawing, sculpture, printmaking
or photography. The portfolio review is
intended to give students an opportunity to
demonstrate a maturing level of visual culture
and the emergence of an artistic voice.
Ultimately, an exemplary portfolio will display
a high level of visual literacy and technical
ability at the service of individual expression.
This orientation will lead a student to further
study at art school or at graduate school.
Portfolios should be submitted to the art
department secretary during the seventh week
of the semester.
If a student is accepted as a 60-credit art
major, the student should seek advisement
from the undergraduate adviser and the faculty
member they work with most to determine a
set of personal goals within their remaining
course of study.
Honors Program in the
Departmental Major in Art
The Honors Program is designed for the
exceptionally talented and committed student
of art. Successful completion of the program is
excellent preparation for graduate work in the
Fine Arts. Studio space for Honors Students is
limited. Successful completion of the program
earns an Honors Certificate in Art and a
nomination for graduating with “Honors in
Art” from the University.
Students may present a portfolio for admission
to the Honors Program to the Undergraduate
Director in the second semester of their junior
year or the first semester of their senior year.
In order to be eligible for admission to the
Honors Program, a student must be accepted
as a 60-credit major and have completed at
least 12 credits of studio course work. An
applicant should have an overall grade point
average of 3.25 or higher and a 3.5 or higher
in all courses applicable toward the major.
Applicants must submit a portfolio of 10
works in their area of concentration. The
portfolio must demonstrate visual literacy,
technical mastery, creative potential, and the
drive and maturity to work independently in
order to cultivate a distinctive personal
direction. The Honors Committee may waive
the entry requirements where appropriate.
Decisions of the Honors Committee are final
and are not subject to review or appeal.
University at Albany
Students in the Honors Program are required
to complete a minimum of 60 credits,
meeting all the requirements of the major. In
addition, students must complete an Honors
Project for 6-12 credits of studio course work
and complete A Art 496, the Mentor Tutorial.
The Honors Project mentor will be a member
of the faculty who regularly works with the
student in the student’s area of concentration.
Critiques will be conducted during regular
course offerings. An overall grade point
average of 3.25 or higher and an average of
3.5 or higher in all courses applicable toward
the major must be maintained in each
semester of the program. Students dismissed
from the program cannot be readmitted
unless the grades on which dismissal is based
were in error and are officially changed.
Degree Requirements for the
Faculty-Initiated Interdisciplinary
Major with a Concentration in
Art History
The purpose of the interdisciplinary major
in Art History is to introduce students to the
principles and methods of art history, and to
encourage their intellectual exploration of
art and architecture in historical culture.
The faculty and curriculum for the Art
History major are drawn from the Art
Department and from the Classics
Department. Advisement and internship
supervision are conducted in the Art
Department.
General Program B.A.: A minimum of 36
credits: Within the requirements for the
major, a student must take a minimum of 6
credits in courses with an A Cla prefix.
Required core courses (9 credits): A Arh
170L, A Arh 17IL; 3 credits from: A Arh
450, 480, 499.
Lower Division Electives 9 credits from:
A Arh 260, 261; 262; 265, 266, 267; 273,
274, 275; 280L, 281, 298; A Ant 268L;
A Cas 240; A Cla 207E/L, 208E/L, 209L;
A His 263E, 264E; A Rel 200L.
Upper Division Electives 18 credits, of
which no more than 6 credits can be from
A Cla courses, from: A Arh 331, 332 or
332Z, 341, 342 or 342Z, 350 or 350Z, 351
or 351Z, 352 or 352Z, 361,362, 363, 364
365 or 365Z, 366 or 366Z, 432, 442, 450 or
450Z, 460, 466, 467 or 467Z, 468 or 468Z,
475 or 475Z, 480, 490, 491; 497, 498;
A Cla 301, 302, 303 or 303Z, 307, 310,
311, 401, 402, 403, 405, 406, 407, 490,
497; A His 302Z; 303Z; 364Z; A Thr 380L.
Honors Program in Art History
Honors students in Art History will take a
structured sequence of coursework focusing
upon the main areas of study offered in the Art
History curriculum. They must take at least
one three-credit course each in the following
areas of Western Art History: Ancient (A Cla
207, A Cla 208, A Cla 209, A Cla 301, A Cla
302, A Cla 303, A Cla 307, A Cla 310, A Cla
311, A Cla 401, A Cla 402, A Cla 403, A Cla
405, A Cla 406, A Cla 407); Medieval (A Arh
331, A Arh 332, A Arh 442); Early Modern
(Renaissance, Baroque, and Eighteenth
Century: A Arh 342, 350, A Arh 351, A Arh
352, A Arh 450); Modern and Contemporary
(A Arh 365, A Arh 366, A Arh 468); Film and
Photography (A Arh 260, A Arh 261, A Arh
265, A Arh 266, A Arh 361, A Arh 362, A Arh
363, A Arh 364. In addition, they must take at
least one three-credit course in non-Western
Art History (A Arh 267, A Arh 274, A Arh
275, A Arh 280, A Ant 268, A Arh 281, A Arh
480).
Honors students in Art History are required to
take a research seminar, in which they will
perform special work devoted to Honors:
A Arh 499 “Research Seminar: Special
Topics,” A Arh 450 “Art and Society in Early
Modern France,” A Arh 480 “Yűan and Sung
Painting,” or equivalent seminars as they are
developed. The special Honors work in the
seminar will entail at least two of the following
features: use primary sources; conduct
research in languages other than English; build
on an annotated bibliography to develop an
historiographic analysis; or conduct research
on a primary object in a museum or
archaeological setting, using archival
documentation when appropriate.
Honors students in Art History will also be
required to take six credits of intensive work
culminating in a major project or series of
projects. This will comprise two additional
Research Seminars with Honors level work or
one additional Research Seminar with Honors
level work plus three credits of Independent
Study or, in exceptional cases, six credits of
independent study. The Independent Study
credit will generally be developed from
research the student began in a Research
Seminar and will include Honors level
research (as defined above). An Internship
(A Arh 490 or 491 or A Cla 490) with a
particularly strong and focused research
component may count as three credits toward
this requirement.
When needed, Art History faculty may create a
special “honors track” in regular (non-seminar)
upper-level courses for a student who wishes
to pursue advance research in that area but
does not have the opportunity to take a
seminar in the area.
ADVISEMENT AND EVALUATION OF HONORS
STUDENTS
Selection: The students should have declared as
an Art History major and should have completed
at least 12 credits in the Art History program.
Their overall grade point average must be at
least 3.25, with a grade point average of at least
3.5 in the Art History major.
Project Evaluation: Honors students are
entitled to an evaluation at the beginning of
their last semester if the project has been in
progress for at least one semester, and must
receive a formal evaluation at the end of the
third quarter of their senior year through an
Evaluation Committee (composed of two
members of the Art History faculty in the Art
department and at least one member of the
Mediterranean Archaeology faculty). The
faculty member responsible for grading the
student’s Honors papers will explain the
strength of the student’s work and recommend
acceptance or denial. The committee is also
responsible for waiving program requirements
where warranted and for certifying the
candidate has finished all outstanding
“Incomplete” grades by the end of the third
quarter of the senior year.
Advisement: The student’s faculty adviser will
also serve as the Honors adviser and is
responsible for supervising the student’s
selection of coursework toward the Honors. If
the primary focus of the student’s research is
in the Ancient area, the student will be advised
by a member of the Mediterranean
Archaeology faculty.
Courses in Art
A Art 105 (formerly A Art 105A) Beginning
Drawing (3)
Drawing encompasses all the visual disciplines; it
will be taught as a way of thinking and planning for
other fields of creative endeavor. Drawing is a way
of seeing, thinking, and feeling through making
marks. Students will be exposed to objective
drawing techniques with an emphasis on twodimensional design.
A Art 110 (formerly A Art 110A) TwoDimensional Design (3)
The principles of two-dimensional design and
composition intended primarily as a preparatory
course for all other courses concerned with the twodimensional approach.
A Art 115 (formerly A Art 110B) ThreeDimensional Design (3)
A problem-solving introduction to the
principles and elements of three-dimensional
design. Demonstrations and implementations of
equipment, methods and materials encourage students
to develop their interpretive and technical facility,
while solving problems that deal with form, space,
structure, scale and volume.
A Art 205 (formerly A Art 105B) Life Drawing (3)
A studio course for students with one semester of
drawing experience. This course offers extended
opportunities to draw the human figure. Emphasis
will be placed on the underlying conceptual
structures of perceptual relationships. Students will
be asked to master the description of bodily forms
deployed in a coherent pictorial space.
Prerequisite(s): A Art 105.
77
University at Albany
A Art 220 Beginning Sculpture (3)
Modeling in clay from the figure. Projects include
building armatures, modeling portrait heads, doing
full figure studies and making a waste mold.
Prerequisite(s): A Art 115 or permission of
instructor.
A Art 230 (formerly A Art 230A) Beginning
Painting (3)
An introduction to the language of painting through
studio practice. Students will work toward mastering
the skills of color mixing as they apply to painting
from life. This course stresses the discipline of
perceiving the optical effects of light and color in
nature and translating them into a pictorial space.
Prerequisite(s): A Art 205 or permission of
instructor.
A Art 240 (formerly A Art 240A) Beginning
Etching (3)
Studio course using processes of graphic
reproduction with concentration on etching, both
linear and tonal. Prerequisite(s): A Art 105 or
permission of instructor.
A Art 242 (formerly A Art 242A) Beginning
Lithography (3)
Introduction to the materials and the process of
lithography. Emphasis is on plate printing.
Prerequisite(s): A Art 105 or permission of
instructor.
A Art 244 (formerly A Art 244A) Beginning
Photography (3)
Photography as fine art; covers basic black and
white processing techniques and darkroom skills.
Principles of photographic composition and
introduction of important work by photographers.
Prerequisite(s): one studio art class and permission
of instructor.
A Art 250 Introduction to Digital Imaging (3)
An introduction to the technical and theoretical
issues of the computer in the visual arts. The
convergence of photography and digital media is
explored through hands-on projects and readings
designed to increase students’ aesthetic and
technical vocabulary. Topics covered include basic
scanning and manipulation of photographic imagery
through raster-based graphics programs, and fine art
digital printmaking, as well as an introduction to
web graphics. Prerequisite(s): A Art 244 or one
studio art course and permission of instructor.
A Art 298 Topics in Art (3)
Introductory study of a special topic in fine arts not
otherwise covered in the curriculum. May be
repeated for credit when the topic varies.
A Art 300 Art and Psychology (3)
This course explores the influence of 20th Century
psychological thought on the contemporary creative
process. We will investigate the works of art and
explore creative processes that are directly related to
the mapping of the modern psyche. Readings will
include writings by both artists and psychologists,
including texts by Freud, Lacan, Jung, Breton, Miro,
etc. Students will be expected to make class
presentations and produce visual projects.
Prerequisite(s): A Arh 170L, 171L and A Art 205.
May not be offered in 2003-2004
A Art 305 (formerly A Art 305A) Intermediate
Drawing (3)
A studio course for students with two semesters of
drawing experience. This course offers extended
opportunities to draw from life combined with an
awareness of various pictorial traditions and
procedures. The development of a personal direction
is strongly encouraged through challenging projects.
May be repeated once for credit. Prerequisite(s):
A Art 205. [OD]
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A Art 310 (formerly A Art 310A) Studio
Experiments in Visual Thinking (3)
A Art 344 (formerly A Art 244B) Intermediate
Photography (3)
An idea-oriented course designed to help students
solve visual and artistic problems through invention
and interpretation. Emphasis will be placed on
imagination and experimentation with alternative
and traditional materials, and students will work
toward developing an expanded, personal, visual
vocabulary. May be repeated once for credit. May
not be offered in 2003-2004.
Advanced darkroom skills and introduction to nonsilver techniques and analysis of important work by
representative studio and photographic artists.
Prerequisite(s): A Art 244.
A Art 320 (formerly A Art 321) Intermediate
Sculpture (3)
An exploration of traditional and nontraditional
materials, processes and concepts of sculpture with
an emphasis on fabrication, assemblage and
installation ideas and actualization of finished
sculptural pieces. Prerequisite(s): A Art 115.
A Art 321 Sculpture Fabrication Techniques (3)
A sequence of workshops and demonstrations
exploring fabrication, additive processes and
assembly techniques used in sculpture. Instruction is
given on the materials and techniques used to cut,
form and join aluminum, steel, wood and plastics.
The student will become conversant with oxyacetylene and electric welding (stick, MIG and TIG)
equipment; woodworking tools, mechanical
fasteners and industrial materials. Prerequisite(s):
A Art 115 3-Dimensional Design or permission of
the instructor.
A Art 322 Sculpture Casting Techniques (3)
A sequence of workshops exploring techniques of
learning to make molds in plaster, flexible rubber
and classic investment, used in casting ceramic,
wax, plaster, concrete, plastic resins, aluminum,
bronze and other materials involved in generating
sculpture. Prerequisite(s): A Art 115 3-Dimensional
Design or permission of the instructor.
A Art 330 (formerly A Art 230B) Intermediate
Painting (3)
A studio course for students with one semester of oil
painting experience. This course offers extended
opportunities to paint from life combined with an
awareness of various pictorial traditions and
procedures. The development of a personal direction
is strongly encouraged through challenging projects.
Prerequisite(s): A Art 205 and A Art 230.
A Art 331 (formerly A Art 330A) Painting in
Water-Based Media (3)
A studio course for students with two semesters of
drawing experience. An introduction to the language
of painting through the use of a variety of waterbased media (ink, gouache, watercolor, egg
tempera). Students will be asked to master several
media-related procedures and develop coherent
pictorial constructions. Prerequisite(s): A Art 205.
A Art 335 Color Theory and Pictorial Tradition (3)
In this combined studio/lecture course, students will
examine a range of color theories and their
application to specific works of art. Emphasis will
be on the expressive role of color in various pictorial
traditions. Students will be given an extensive
vocabulary of color concepts and related studio
exercises. Prerequisite(s): A Art 110. May not be
offered in 2003-2004.
A Art 340 Intermediate Etching (3)
Studio course with concentration on color etching
collagraphs and other advanced techniques.
Prerequisite(s): A Art 240.
A Art 342 Intermediate Lithography (3)
Emphasis on combining ideas with the medium of
lithography both on plates and stones.
Prerequisite(s): A Art 242.
A Art 345 (formerly A Art 345A) The Monotype
(3)
Studio experience in most processes in the making
of monotypes. Emphasis is on water-based, nontoxic
materials. Prerequisite(s): A Art 105 or permission
of instructor.
A Art 346 Introductory Film Production (3)
Seeing and thinking in cinematic terms, with an
introduction to the process and equipment with
which the filmmaker works. Cameras, lenses, film
emulsions and editing procedures are studied in the
making of short silent films. Prerequisite(s): A Arh
260, or A Com 238 and permission of instructor.
May not be offered in 2003-2004.
A Art 347 (formerly A Art 246) Non-silver
Photography (3)
Exploration of the various methods of applying
light-sensitive emulsions to materials (cloth, paper)
and printing from them rather than from the
traditional silver-based photographic paper. This
method enables the student to work in a more
painterly printmaking manner. Prerequisite(s): A Art
344.
A Art 348 Color Photography (3)
Utilization of transparency and negative materials in
color photography with emphasis on color printing.
Prerequisite(s): A Art 344 and permission of
instructor. A Art 110 recommended.
A Art 350 Intermediate Digital Imaging (3)
An intensive exploration into the uses of the
computer in the fine arts. This course builds on
concepts introduced in A Art 250. Emphasis is
placed on correlating technical concerns with
theoretical, conceptual, and aesthetic content.
Students are expected to develop a portfolio through
challenging projects. Prerequisite(s) A Art 250 and
permission of the instructor.
A Art 390 Topics in Printmaking (3)
Special projects in print processes ranging from
relief printing to color viscosity etching. May be
repeated for credit when topic varies (up to 12
credits). Prerequisite(s): A Art 240 or 242.
A Art 405 Advanced Drawing (3)
A studio course for students with two or three
semesters of drawing experience. Individual
attention is combined with technical and formal
criticism in the development of a personal visual
idiom. In this course, stress will be placed on how
the history of drawing helps to reveal a student’s
potential. May be repeated once for credit.
Prerequisite(s): A Art 305.
A Art 420 (formerly A Art 420A) Advanced
Sculpture (3)
A focus on contemporary concerns and attitudes in
three-dimensional work and media requiring an
application of concepts and experience learned and
acquired in prerequisite courses and through
research, which results in finished sculptures. May
be repeated once for credit. Prerequisite(s): A Art
320 and A Art 321 or permission of instructor.
A Art 421 (formerly A Art 421A) Topics in
Sculpture (3)
Further exploration of sculptural concepts with a
focus on individual problems, covering a wide range
of media, methods and techniques. An emphasis is
on the development, interpretation, realization and
presentation of one’s ideas. May be repeated for
credit when topic varies (up to 12 credits).
Prerequisite(s): A Art 320 and A Art 321 or
permission of instructor.
University at Albany
A Art 430 (formerly A Art 430A) Advanced
Painting (3)
A studio course for students with two or three
semesters of oil painting experience. Individual
attention is combined with technical and formal
criticism in the development of a personal visual
idiom. In this course, stress will be placed on how
the history of painting helps to reveal a student’s
potential. May be repeated once for credit.
Prerequisite(s): A Art 330.
A Art 434 Topics in Drawing (3)
A studio course for students with at least two
semesters of drawing experience. In depth study of
selected topics in drawing not otherwise covered in
the curriculum. Students will be guided through
several pictorial models and procedures, seeking
both mastery and a pictorial persona. May be
repeated for credit when topic varies (up to 12
credits). Prerequisite(s): A Art 205.
A Art 435 (formerly A Art 435A) Topics in
Painting (3)
A studio course for students with two or three
semesters of oil painting experience. In-depth study
of selected topics in painting not otherwise covered
in the curriculum. Students will be guided through a
variety of pictorial paradigms, seeking both mastery
and a pictorial persona. May be repeated for credit
when topic varies (up to 12 credits). Prerequisite(s):
A Art 330.
A Art 440 (formerly A Art 440A) Advanced
Etching (3)
Studio course with concentration on advanced
etching techniques including photo work. May be
repeated once for credit. Prerequisite(s): A Art 340.
A Art 442 (formerly A Art 442A) Advanced
Lithography (3)
Advanced course in lithography. Emphasis on color
and stone process. May be repeated once for credit.
Prerequisite(s): A Art 342.
A Art 444 (formerly A Art 444A) Advanced
Photography (3)
Emphasis on aesthetics and archival processing for
exhibition-quality work. May be repeated once for
credit. Prerequisite(s): A Art 344.
A Art 445 Advanced Monotype (3)
Continuation of A Art 345. Emphasis will be on
individual approaches to ideas and various print
techniques. Prerequisite(s): A Art 345.
A Art 446 (formerly A Art 444B) Topics in
Photography (3)
Expansion of camera skills and photographic
techniques. Individual interests and abilities play a
major role in established course content. May be
repeated for credit when topic varies (up to 12
credits). Prerequisite(s): A Art 344.
A Art 447 Advanced Film Production (3)
This course builds on filmmaking skills acquired
in Introductory Film Production. Students explore
cinematic narrative structures, styles of editing,
and setting the mise en scène. Students will make
a fictional work on film or videotape that focuses
on their own life experience. Prerequisite(s): A Art
346. .May not be offered in 2003-2004.
A Art 450 Advanced Digital Imaging (3)
An exploration of some of the more sophisticated
concepts, processes, and software involved in
digital fine art. Students develop self-directed
projects that reflect not only a technical
proficiency with the media explored, but a
thoughtfully developed conceptual thread.
Weekly readings in current digital media theory
and criticism provide insight into the work of
emerging artists, and a wide range of techniques,
media, and software are covered, including:
advanced 2-D image manipulation, web
graphics,
and
high-resolution
fine
art
printmaking, as well as introductions to
interactive multimedia and digital video.
Emphasis is placed on finding the most
appropriate solutions for each student’s
individual project. Prerequisite(s): A Art 250 or
permission of instructor.
Courses in Art History
A Art 490 Internship in Studio Art (3)
Survey of art from prehistoric times through the
14th century focusing on architecture, sculpture and
painting of the ancient Near East and Europe. [AR
EU]
Designed for undergraduate students interested in
pursuing a career in the arts. Students work with art
professionals for one semester. Internships may
include the Times Union Photography Department,
the Center for Photography at Woodstock, or
assisting professional artists. Students complete an
academic component consisting of required
meetings with the faculty supervisor in the area of
focus, and may involve a journal and portfolio. Art
majors may use three credits toward course
requirements above the 300 level. Internships are
open only to qualified juniors and seniors who have
an overall grade point average of 2.5 or higher.
Consent for the internship must be obtained in the
preceding semester by the submission of a plan of
intent and a signed contract with a professional
organization or individual artist. Prerequisite(s):
Junior or senior class standing, 2.5 or higher GPA,
and permission of the instructor.
A Art 492 Internship in Art Museum Management
and Operation (3–4)
A Arh 170L (formerly A Arh 150L) Survey of
Art in the Western World I (3)
A Arh 171L (formerly A Arh 151L) Survey of
Art in the Western World II (3)
Survey of art from the 14th century to the present
focusing on painting, sculpture and architecture of
Europe and the Americas. [AR EU]
A Arh 230 The Art of Medieval Knighthood (3)
The art and culture of medieval European knighthood from
its beginnings in mounted soldiers of the eleventh century
to its role in elaborate tournaments and jousts of the
sixteenth. Attention will be given to the social expression
of the knightly class through visual and literary means.
Objects of study will include architecture, sculpture,
manuscript painting and ivory carvings. Literature will
include chivalric epics, romances, and manuals of war.
Among the topics to be addressed will be arms and armor,
castles and manor houses, the arts of courtly love and the
visual spectacle of chivalry. [AR]
Designed for undergraduate students interested in
pursuing a career in Arts Management or the
Gallery/Museum administrative field. Projects may
include computer database, archival records retrieval
and storage, media relations skills, collections
management, and exhibition organization and
documentation. A final project will be assigned.
Internships are open only to qualified juniors
and seniors who have an overall grade point
average of 2.50 or higher. Prerequisite(s):
interview by gallery administrative staff and
permission of Art Department Chair. S/U graded.
May not be offered in 2003-2004.
A Arh 260 (formerly A Art 290) Introduction to
Cinema (3)
A Art 496 Mentor Tutorial (3)
A Arh 262 (= A Fre 238) Great Classics of
French Cinema (3)
A tutorial in which readings, discussions, visits to
museums and galleries are assigned to build
awareness of the relevant traditions supporting an
Honors student’s development. This tutorial will
also include consultation on graduate school
applications and instruction on taking slides of
works of art. Prerequisite(s): admission into the
departmental Honors Program.
A Art 497 Independent Study (1–4)
Studio project in a selected art area. Prerequisite(s):
junior or senior class standing and permission of
instructor and department chair.
A Art 498 Honors Project I (3-6)
Studio project in a selected area of concentration.
Topics and issues vary according to the needs and
goals set by the students with their mentors. The
goal of this project is to allows students adequate
space and opportunity to cultivate a distinctive
personal direction and generate a significant body of
work to pursue graduate study. Students will attend
appropriate
MFA
critiques.
Prerequisite(s)
admission into the departmental Honors Program
and permission of instructor.
A Art 499 Honors Project II (3-6)
The continuation and completion of a studio project
set forth in A Art 498. Upon completion of the
project, the student will be required to make an oral
defense of the work before the Honors Committee.
Successful completion of the program earns an
Honors Certificate in Art and a nomination for
graduating with “Honors in Art” from the
University. Students will attend appropriate MFA
critiques. Prerequisite(s): A Art 498.
Survey of the silent and sound classics of the cinema
with emphasis on the changing conceptions of
cinematographic form and content. Screenings of
selected European and American films. [AR]
A Arh 261 Independent Cinema (3)
Introduction to the study of film as an artistic and
social practice through an examination of the
various genres of independent filmmaking pursued
in the United States during the twentieth and
twenty-first centuries.
An introduction with detailed analyses to a dozen of
the most well known French classic films as
contributions to the art of cinema and as reflections
of French society at various historical moments.
Taught in English. May not be used to fulfill the
requirements of the major in French. Only one of
A Arh 262/A Fre 238 and 315 may be taken for
credit.
A Arh 265 History of Photography (3)
A survey of photography from its invention in 1839
to recent trends. Emphasizes why it was developed,
the major19th century documentary and artistic
uses, and the extraordinary range of 20th century
explorations. An integrated approach tied to parallel
social and artistic events. [AR]
A Arh 266 Photography 1970 to the Present
(3)
A thorough survey of recent photography.
Emphasizes fine art photography and the use of
photography by artists working in other media,
including documentary and photojournalistic
work, photography books, mixed media and
digital work. The materials for study are drawn
from slide lectures, local exhibitions,
contemporary criticism, library materials, and
the media. No prior photography or art history
required. [AR]
A Arh 267 (= A Aas 267) African-American Art
of the Twentieth & Twenty-First Centuries (3)
Study of paintings and drawings by African
American artists in the 20th and 21st centuries and of
the cultural context within which the art was
produced. A wide range of artistic styles and media
is explored. Consideration is also given to the
impact of European, African, and Asian visual arts
on the work of African-American artists.
79
University at Albany
A Arh 273 History of Printmaking (3)
History of fine art techniques for reproducing
images from the 14th century to the present,
including woodcut, engraving, etching,
lithography, photography. .May not be offered
in 2003-2004.
A Arh 274 Islamic Art and Architecture (3)
This course focuses on the art and architecture of
the Islamic peoples in Europe, the Middle East
and North Africa from the seventh through the
sixteenth century. We will consider the
philosophical, political, religious and social
context of Islamic visual culture. May not be
offered in 2003-2004. [AR]
A Arh 275 (= A Aas 275) African Art (3)
Study of art produced on the west coast and central
region of sub-Saharan Africa. Includes a wide range
of artistic styles, with particular attention given to
artifact designs and to their functional or ceremonial
use in particular societies. Also explores the impact
of African art on European and American
Modernism.
A Arh 280L (= A Eac 280L) Chinese
Painting (3)
Introduces students to the major works of traditional
Chinese painting and analyzes those works to arrive
at an understanding of life in traditional China. The
major class activity will be viewing, discussing and
analyzing slides of Chinese paintings. Only one of
A Arh 280L and A Eac 280L may be taken for
credit. [AR]
A Arh 281 (= A Eac 180) Introduction to Chinese
Art and Culture (3)
The course combines a rapid survey of Chinese art
with selected readings in Chinese literature to
present an introduction to the visual and written
culture of traditional China. Evidence from
archaeology, sculpture, architecture, and painting
will be viewed and analyzed to illustrate such topics
as the origins and multiethnic character of Chinese
civilization, the nature of the Chinese writing
system, the growth of religious systems, and the
development of the bureaucratic state. No prior
knowledge of Chinese or Art History is required.
A Arh 298 Topics in Art History (3)
Introductory study of a special topic in Art History
not otherwise covered in the curriculum. May be
repeated for credit when the topic varies.
A Arh 303 (= A Cla 303) Early Christian Art and
Architecture (3)
An examination of early Christian art and
architecture from their beginnings in the third
century to the death of Justinian in 565.
Architecture, painting, mosaic and the minor arts are
examined in their historical setting. A Arh 303Z &
A Cla 303Z are the writing intensive versions of
A Arh 303 & A Cla 303; only one of the four
courses may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s):
A Cla 209, or A Clc 134, or A Arh 170L.
A Arh 303Z (= A Cla 303Z) Early Christian Art
and Architecture (3)
A Arh 303Z & A Cla 303Z are the writing intensive
versions of A Arh 303 & A Cla 303; only one of the four
courses may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): A Cla
209, or A Clc 134, or A Arh 170L. [WI]
A Arh 331 (formerly A Arh 361L) Early Medieval
And Romanesque Art (3)
An examination of European architecture, painting,
sculpture and minor arts from the 6th to the 12th
century. Course covers early Germanic and Celtic
art, Carolingian and Ottonian periods. French.
English, German, Italian Romanesque architecture
and sculpture of the Pilgrimage route of Santiago,
Monastic manuscript illumination, mural painting,
objects in bronze and precious metals.
Prerequisite(s): A Arh 170L or permission of
instructor.
80
A Arh 332 (formerly A Arh 362L) Gothic Art and
Architecture (3)
A Arh 352 Art in the Era of Rococo and
Enlightenment (3)
Examines Gothic Art of the 13th and 14th
Centuries in France and its spread throughout
Europe. Includes a study of religious and lay
architecture (cathedrals, castles, town halls);
cathedral sculpture; stained glass, murals and
mosaics; manuscript illumination, painted
altarpieces and art of precious metals.
Prerequisite(s): A Art 170L or 331 or
permission of instructor.
A study of painting, sculpture, architecture, garden
design, graphic and decorative arts produced in
Europe during the eighteenth century. Special
emphasis will be placed upon the original context,
use and significance of the art, as well as upon the
association between artmaking and philosophical
pursuits during this era of profound European
change. Prerequisite(s): A Arh 171L or permission
of instructor.
A Arh 332Z (formerly A Arh 362L) Gothic Art and
Architecture (3)
A Arh 352Z Art in the Era of Rococo and
Enlightenment (3)
A Arh 332Z is the writing intensive version of A Arh
332; only one may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s):
A Arh 170L or permission of instructor. [WI]
A Arh 341 (formerly A Arh 371L) Renaissance
Art of the 15th Century (3)
A Arh 352Z is the writing intensive version of
A Arh 352; only one may be taken for credit.
Prerequisite(s): A Arh 171L or permission of
instructor. [WI[
A Arh 361 European Screen Artists (3)
An examination of art and architecture produced in Italy
and Northern Europe during the 1400’s. Italian art will
concentrate on major architects, sculptors and painters,
chiefly in Florence and including Umbria, Marches and
North Italy. Art in Northern Europe will concentrate on the
Netherlands and Germany, and will cover primarily panel
painting and graphic art. Prerequisite(s): A Arh 170L or
171L or permission of instructor.
Study of the European cinema from the silent film
era to recent years. Consideration is given both to
the careers of prominent artists and to the social and
economical context in which they worked. Directors
to be examined include, among others, Sergei
Eisenstein, Ingmar Bergman, Leni Riefenstahl, and
Jean Renoir. Prerequisite(s): A Arh 260.
A Arh 342 Art in the Era of Renaissance and
Reformation (3)
Examination of the artistry and cultural significance
of films by selected directors, such as Charles
Chaplin, Stanley Kubrick, Dorothy Arzner, Ingmar
Bergman, or Ousmane Sembene. American and/or
international in scope. This course may be repeated
for credit as the content varies. Prerequisite(s):
A Arh 260
An examination of art and architecture produced in
Italy and Northern Europe during the sixteenth
century. Emphasis will be placed upon individual
artists such as Leonardo, Michelangelo, Dürer, and
Bruegel, as well as on specific artistic themes and
their relation to social, religious, and theoretical
concerns. Prerequisite(s): A Arh 171L or permission
of the instructor
A Arh 342Z Art in the Era of Renaissance and
Reformation (3)
A Arh 342Z is the Writing Intensive version of
A Arh 342; only one may be taken for credit.
Prerequisite(s) A Arh 171L or permission of the
instructor. [WI]
A Arh 350 Art in the Courts of SeventeenthCentury Europe (3)
A study of the painting, sculpture and architecture
produced in Italy, France and Spain during the 17th
Century. Attention will focus on the religious,
political and ceremonial demands of the Catholic
Church and the royal courts, as well as on the
careers of individual artists such as Bernini,
Borromini, Caravaggio, Poussin and Velasquez.
Prerequisite(s): A Arh 171L or permission of
instructor.
A Arh 350Z Art in the Courts of SeventeenthCentury Europe (3)
A Arh 350Z is the writing intensive version of
A Arh 350; only one may be taken for credit.
Prerequisite(s): A Arh 171L or permission of
instructor. [WI]
A Arh 351 Netherlandish Painting in the Age of
Rembrandt and Rubens (3)
An examination of the painting and graphic art produced
in the Netherlands during the seventeenth century. In
addition to studying artistic trends and individual artists
such as Rembrandt and Rubens, students will explore
the ways in which the art addressed the social needs and
concerns of Dutch and Flemish audiences.
Prerequisite(s): A Arh 171L or permission of instructor.
A Arh 351Z Netherlandish Painting in the Age of
Rembrandt and Rubens (3)
A Arh 351Z is the writing intensive version of
A Arh 351; only one may be taken for credit.
Prerequisite(s): A Arh 171L or permission of
instructor. [WI]
A Arh 362 Significant Cinema Directors (3)
A Arh 363 Art of American Silent Films (3)
Examination of the silent film in America, with an
emphasis upon Hollywood. Topics to be addressed
include: the studio and star systems; significant
personalities; the writing of silent film;
technological developments; and the various film
genres, such as epics, comedies, and melodramas.
Prerequisite(s): A Arh 260.
A Arh 365 (formerly A Arh 491) Modern
Art I (3)
Survey of the first phase of Modernism, focusing on
painting and sculpture in Europe and the USA from
circa 1780–1880. Movements covered include NeoClassicism,
Romanticism,
Realism,
and
Impressionism; artists include David, Goya, Manet,
Cassatt. A Arh 365Z is the writing intensive version
of A Arh 365; only one of the two courses may be
taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): A Arh 171L or
permission of instructor.
A Arh 365Z (formerly A Arh 491) Modern
Art I (3)
A Arh 365Z is the writing intensive version of
A Arh 365; only one of the two courses may be
taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): A Arh 171L or
permission of instructor. [WI]
A Arh 366 (formerly A Arh 492 ) Modern
Art II (3)
Survey of Modern art from circa 1880–1945,
focusing on painting and sculpture of Europe and
the Americas. Movements covered include Postimpressionism, Cubism, German Expressionism,
Dada, Surrealism; artists include Van Gogh,
Picasso, Kollwitz, Duchamp, O’Keeffe, Douglas,
Kahlo. A Arh 366Z is the writing intensive version
of A Arh 366; only one may be taken for credit.
Prerequisite(s): A Arh 171L or permission of
instructor.
A Arh 366Z (formerly A Arh 492Z) Modern
Art II (3)
A Arh 366Z is the writing intensive version of
A Arh 366; only one may be taken for credit.
Prerequisite(s): A Arh 171L or permission of
instructor. [WI]
University at Albany
A Arh 432 (formerly A Arh 462) Gothic
Painting (3)
A Arh 468 (formerly A Arh 490) Art Since
1945 (3)
Study of the style and technique of stained glass,
manuscript illumination, wall and panel painting in
the 13th and 14th centuries, with emphasis on
France and Italy. Prerequisite(s): A Arh 170L and
junior or senior class standing, or permission of
instructor.
Survey and critical analysis of art from circa 1945 to
the present. The course will cover directions in late
Modernism and Post-modernism, including Abstract
Expressionism, Pop Art, Minimalism, Feminist Art,
Graffiti Art and Political Art. A Arh 468Z is the
writing intensive version of A Arh 468; only one can
be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): A Arh 171L or
permission of instructor.
A Arh 442 (formerly A Arh 472) Early Painting of
the Netherlands (3)
Study of northern Renaissance panel and manuscript
painting from Jan van Eyck to Bruegel.
Prerequisite(s): A Arh 170L or A Arh 171L or
permission of instructor.
A Arh 450 (=A Fre 460) Art and Society in Early
Modern France (3)
Seminar examining selected topics in art and
architecture produced in France from the sixteenth
through eighteenth centuries. Special emphasis upon
the cultural significance of art in an era that saw the
rise and fall of monarchical power as well as
dramatic changes in understandings of social
hierarchy, gender, the natural world, and
philosophy. Prerequisite(s): Junior or Senior status
and at least nine credits of upper-level coursework in
Art History or French Studies. [OD]
A Arh 450Z Art and Society in Early Modern
France (3)
A Arh 450Z is the . [WI] version of A Arh 450; only
one may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): Junior
or Senior status and at least nine credits of upperlevel coursework in Art History or French Studies.
[WI]
A Arh 460 (formerly A Art 490) Special Topics in
Cinema (3)
In-depth study of selected topics in film not
otherwise covered in the curriculum. Can be
repeated for credit when the topic varies.
Prerequisite(s): A Arh 260.
A Arh 466 Art Criticism of the Modern
Period (3)
A study of the major European and American
critics of 20 th century art up to circa 1970. Student
essays in criticism of actual artworks will
emphasize
understanding
of
historically
significant critical perspectives, as well as the
development of personal approaches to criticism.
Prerequisite(s): A Arh 171L; permission of
instructor; junior or senior status.
A Arh 467 Art Criticism of the Post-Modern
Period (3)
Investigation of practice and theory of contemporary
art criticism. Readings will concentrate on critics and
writers from the 1970’s to the present. In writing about
works of art, students will practice basic critical skills
of description, formal analysis, interpretation, and
articulation of personal responses. Prerequisite(s):
A Arh 171L; permission of instructor; junior or senior
status.
A Arh 467Z Art Criticism of the Post-Modern
Period (3)
Investigation of practice and theory of contemporary
art criticism. Readings will concentrate on critics
and writers from the 1970’s to the present. In
writing about works of art, students will practice
basic critical skills of description, formal analysis,
interpretation, and articulation of personal
responses. A Arh 467Z is the writing intensive
version of A Arh 467; only one can be taken for
credit. Prerequisite(s): A Arh 171L; permission of
instructor; junior or senior status. [WI]
A Arh 468Z (formerly A Arh 490Z) Art Since 1945
(3)
A Arh 468Z is the writing intensive version of
A Arh 468; only one may be taken for credit.
Prerequisite(s): A Arh 171L or permission of
instructor. [WI]
A Arh 475 (formerly A Arh 455; = A Wss 475)
Women in Art (3)
Survey of women artists from 1550 to the present,
including Artemesia Gentileschi, Elizabeth VigeeLebrun, Mary Cassatt, Alice Neel. The course also
includes a feminist analysis of images of women
since the Renaissance. A Arh 475Z & A Wss 475Z
are the writing intensive versions of A Arh 475 &
A Wss 475Z; only one of the four courses may be
taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): A Arh 171L and
junior or senior class standing, or permission of
instructor.
A Arh 497 Independent Study (1–4)
Directed reading and/or research in a selected area.
May be repeated with approval of department chair.
Prerequisite(s): junior or senior class standing, and
permission of instructor and department chair.
A Arh 498 Topics in Art History (3)
In-depth study of selected topics in art history not
otherwise covered in the curriculum. Can be
repeated for credit when the topic varies.
Prerequisite(s): A Arh 170L or A Arh 171L or
permission of instructor.
A Arh 499 Research Seminar in Art History:
Selected Topics (3)
Seminar focusing upon selected topics in art
historical research. Students will study all aspects of
research in art history, including the formulation of
a topic; establishing the state of research on the
topic; preparing an annotated bibliography and
scholarly notes; and using library and web-based
catalogues, databases, museum archives, image
banks, and other research tools. The main focus of
the coursework will be an individual research
project. The course may be repeated for credit as the
topic varies. Prerequisite(s): Junior or senior statusArt History major or minor, or permission of the
instructor. [OD]
A Arh 475Z (formerly A Arh 455; = A Wss 475Z)
Women in Art (3)
A Arh 475Z & A Wss 475Z are the writing intensive
versions of A Arh 475 & A Wss 475Z; only one of
the four courses may be taken for credit.
Prerequisite(s): A Arh 171L and junior or senior
class standing, or permission of instructor. [WI]
A Arh 480 (= A Eac 471) Yüan and Sung Painting
(3)
A seminar on Chinese painting during the Sung and
Yüan Dynasties (960-1368) with research into
selected paintings. The course will combine a
detailed survey of painting during this period with
examination of selected topics such as the rise of
literati painting, Court painting as government art,
and painting as political expression during the SungYüan transition. Prerequisite(s): A Eac 180/A Arh
281 or A Eac/A Arh 280L and permission of
instructor.
A Arh 490 Internship in Art History (3)
Supervised placement in an institution devoted to
the collection, exhibition and/or conservation of
works of art, such as the Albany Institute of History
and Art or the State Conservation Laboratory.
Provides practical experience in working with
original works of art and includes research and
writing projects. Art History majors may use 3
credits toward course requirements above the 300
level. May be repeated for credit, with permission of
supervising instructor. Internships are open only
to qualified juniors and seniors who have an
overall grade point average of 2.50 or higher.
Prerequisite(s): A Arh 170L and A Arh 171L. S/U
graded.
A Arh 491 Internship in Film Studies (3)
Internship in the study of film or in film production.
Students are responsible for finding and securing the
internship with an organization or individual,
subject to approval by the director of the Film
Studies minor. May be repeated for credit. Three
credits may be applied to upper level coursework in
the Film Studies minor or the Art History major. S/U
graded. Prerequisite(s): Open only to Juniors or
Seniors with a Film Studies minor or with at least
six credits of film studies coursework, and an
overall grade point average of 2.5 or higher.
81
University at Albany
A SIAN S TUDIES
P ROGRAM
Director
Jogindar Uppal, Ph.D.
Department of Economics
The interdisciplinary major in Asian studies
offers students an opportunity to study various
facets of Asian societies and cultures (South
Asia, Southeast Asia, Southwest Asia/Middle
East as well as East Asia). Students primarily
interested in China, Japan and Korea are
encouraged to major in East Asian Studies.
While the East Asian Studies Major has
language requirements, language courses are
not required of majors in Asian Studies.
Careers
A good background in Asian Studies is
invaluable for work in journalism, government
service, intercultural activities, business
abroad, and academic professions.
Degree Requirements for the
Major in Asian Studies
General Program B.A.: A minimum of 36
credits distributed as follows:
Core Curriculum (9 credits) Six credits from
A Ant 172; A Cas 150; A Gog 160 or 160G;
A His 158 or 158Z, A His 176, A His 177 or
177Z and the completion of a senior essay (3
credits) taken either through a seminar or
topics course sponsored by the program, or
through an independent research or reading
course in a department.
Area Studies (15 credits) A minimum of 3
credits must be completed in two of the
following areas and a minimum of 9 credits
must be completed in the third area: South
Asia, Southeast Asia, Southwest Asia (Middle
East). Language study may not be used to
satisfy the area studies requirement.
Electives (12 credits) An additional 12 credits
must be completed in appropriate course work
related to Asian studies from the following
listed courses.
South Asian Area Courses
A Ant 351 or 351Z Ethnicity in North America
A Eco 480 or 480Z Economic Development of
South Asia
A His 378 History of South Asian Civilization II
A His 384Z Social Science Approaches to
History
A His 485 or 485Z Colloquium in Comparative
and Cross-Cultural History
A Phi 340 Topics in Philosophy (depending on
topic)
A Phi 342 Indian Philosophies
R Pos 358 Politics of India and Pakistan
82
South East Asian Area Courses
A Eco 330 or 330Z Economics of Development
A Eco 364 or 364Z Comparative Economic
Systems
A His 312 History of American Foreign Policy
II
A His 384 or 384Z History of Japan
Southwest Asian (Middle East) Area Courses
A Ant 243 Peoples and Cultures of the Middle
East
A Clc 133 History of Ancient Greece
A His 381 or 381Zand 382 or 382Z History of
the Middle East I & II
A His 383 or 383Z The Arab-Israeli Conflict in
Historical Perspective
A Jst 243 Peoples and Cultures of the Middle
East
A Jst 341Z Issues in Biblical Civilization
A Jst 342Z Issues in Hellenistic-Rabbinic
Judaism
R Pos 359 Israeli Politics
Other Courses
East Asia
A Eac 170L China: Its Culture and Heritage
A Eac 210L Survey of Chinese Classical
Literature in Translation I
A Eac 211L Survey of Chinese Classical
Literature in Translation II
A Eac 212L Modern Chinese Literature in
Translation
A Eac 290 Ideology and Reality in
Contemporary China
A Eac 389 Topics in Chinese Literature, History
and Culture
A Eco 362/A Eas 362 The Political Economy of
Japan & Korea
A Eco 363 Economic Development of Modern
China
A Gog 160M or 160G China: People and Places
in the of Land One Billion
A Gog 470Z China after Deng Xiaoping
A His 387 or 387Z Islam in the Middle East:
Religion and Culture I
A His 388 or 388Z Islam in the Middle East:
Religion and Culture II
A His 379 or 379Z History of China I
A His 380 or 380Z History of China II
A His 385 History of Japan
A His 485 Colloquium in Comparative and
Cross-Cultural History
A Jst 351 or 351Z Jewish American Ethnic
Groups
A Phi 344 Chinese Philosophies
A Phi 346 Japanese Religions and Philosophies
A Pln 570 Urbanization in China
R Pos 373 Government and Politics in the
People’s Republic of China
R Pos 376 The Foreign Policy of the People’s
Republic of China
Additional Non-Area Courses
A Ant 172 Community and Self
A Ant 331 Early Civilization of the Old World
A Ant 351 or 351Z Ethnicity in North America
A Eco 330 or 330Z Economics of Development
A Eco 364 or 364Z Comparative Economic
Systems
A Phi 214 World Religions
A Phi 340 Topics in Philosophy (depending
upon topic)
A Phy 201L & 201E Physics and Buddhism
A Rel 100L Introduction to the Study of
Religion
A Soc 282M Race and Ethnicity
R Crj 414Z Order and Disorder in Society
R Pos 353 Developing Political Systems
R Pos 461Z Comparative Ethnicity
Additional Course
Opportunities
Independent study and topical courses offered
in various departments may be considered for
the major when the topics are appropriate; e.g.,
courses in economics or sociology. Other
courses may be approved for the major when
their content is predominantly Asian.
Appropriate Asian studies courses at
neighboring institutions also may be applied to
the major.
Opportunities for Study Abroad
Several opportunities to study abroad are
available through various exchange programs.
The exchange programs in China and Japan
are administered through the East Asian
Studies Department. However, the exchange
program through Singapore is available to
majors in Asian Studies. Students interested
primarily in South East Asia are encouraged to
apply for the Singapore Program. Also, there is
a Consortium of Colleges in New York State
that arranges studies in India for a semester’s
credit.
University at Albany
DEPARTMENT OF
BIOLOGICAL
SCIENCES
Faculty
Distinguished Teaching Professors
Stephen C. Brown, Ph.D.
University of Michigan
Helmut V. B. Hirsch, Ph.D.
Stanford University
John S. Mackiewicz, Ph.D.
Cornell University
Professors
Richard P. Cunningham, Ph.D.
Johns Hopkins University
Helen T. Ghiradella, Ph.D.
University of California, Santa Barbara
Colin S. Izzard, Ph.D.
Cambridge University (England)
Jon W. Jacklet, Ph.D.
University of Oregon
Paulette McCormick, Ph.D.
University at Albany
Albert J. T. Millis, Ph.D.
University of Pennsylvania
John T. Schmidt, Ph.D.
University of Michigan
David A. Shub, Ph.D.
Massachusetts Institute of Technology
Daniel L. Wulff, Ph.D. (Collins Fellow)
California Institute of Technology
Richard S. Zitomer, Ph.D.
University of Pennsylvania
Associate Professors
Dmitry A. Belostotsky, Ph.D.
Ukraine Academy of Sciences
Thomas B. Caraco, Ph.D.
Syracuse University
Gary S. Kleppel, Ph.D.
Fordham University
Gregory Lnenicka, Ph.D.
University of Virginia, Charlottesville
Robert Osuna, Ph.D.
University of Michigan
George Robinson, Ph.D.
University of California, Davis
Caro-Beth Stewart, Ph.D.
University of California, Berkeley
Ben G. Szaro, Ph.D.
John Hopkins University
Sho-Ya Wang, Ph.D.
State University of New York
at Stony Brook
Assistant Professors
Ravindra Gupta
University of Bombay, Ph.D.
Ing-Nang Wang, Ph.D.
SUNY at Stony Brook
Affiliated Faculty
Jeffrey L. Travis, Ph.D.
Dartmouth College
Suzannah Bliss Tieman, Ph.D.
Stanford University
Adjuncts (estimated): 41
Teaching Assistants (estimated): 26
The objective of the department is to provide
the undergraduate student with a broad
background in the biological sciences and
adequate supporting strength in the physical
sciences. Accordingly, most of the B.S.
programs listed here are structured around a
combined major/minor sequence.
The department also offers programs leading
to the M.S. and the Ph.D. in which the
graduate student is able to obtain an in-depth
professional education in one of several more
restricted areas of biological sciences.
Careers
The B.A., which specifies the major only and
requires a separate minor sequence outside
science and mathematics, is designed with
the aims of the liberal or fine arts students in
mind and as such is not intended for the
professional biologist or teacher. The B.S.
programs provide a strong background for
further study either in graduate school or
medicine and prepare the student for
secondary school teaching and a variety of
careers in biology at the technical level.
Graduates with a B.S. degree often find
technical-level positions with pharmaceutical
companies or as research assistants in grantrelated positions. Those who go on to
graduate or professional school have a wide
array of career opportunities in research,
health fields, and business.
Degree Requirements for the
Major in Biology
General Program B.A.: Major sequence
consisting of a minimum of 36 credits.
Required courses are: A Bio 110F or 110N,
111N, 212; A Chm 120N, 121N, 122A,
122B; and 16 additional credits of biology
major electives including two courses which
are partially or exclusively laboratory
courses. A Bio 399, 399Z, 499, and 499Z
may contribute up to a total of 4 credits of
non-laboratory major elective credit. Courses
that do not yield credit toward the major are
indicated in the individual bulletin
descriptions. Major electives must be
selected so that a total of 12 credits at the
300 level or above is included in the major.
The minor sequence will consist of a
minimum of 18 credits. The student may not
have a minor in: atmospheric science,
biology, chemistry, computer science,
electronics, geology, mathematics, physics,
or statistics.
Bachelor of Arts in Biology Requirements
A Bio 110F& 111N
8
A Bio 212
4
Chemistry
8
Subtotal
20
Additional credits in biology
16
Total
36
Plus nonscience/math minor
18–24
General Program B.S.: Combined major and
minor sequence consisting of a minimum of
66 credits.
Required courses: A Bio 110F or 110N,
111N, 212, 365, 402; A Phy 105N, 106,
108N, 109; 6 credits in mathematics
exclusive of A Mat 100, 101, 102N, 103,
105, 110; and A Chm 120N, 121N, 122A,
122B, 216A, 216B, 217A, 217B.
18 additional credits in biology are also
required, and must include at least 3
laboratory courses. At least one course must
be selected from each of the following areas:

Molecular-Cell Biology: A Bio 214,
217, 312, 314, 366, 412

Development-Function: A Bio 303, 317,
335, 341, 406, 410, 420, 422, 441, 460

Ecology-Behavior-Diversity: A Bio 306,
308, 316, 319, 319Z, 320, 321, 325,
326, 409, 432, 436, 442, 443, 444, 445,
450, 455, and 468.
Credits in A Bio 399, 399Z, 499, and 499Z
may be used to fulfill the requirement for 1
laboratory course if the student completes at
least 4 credits over at least 2 semesters.
A Bio 399, 399Z, 499, and 499Z may
contribute a total of 4 credits towards the
major. Courses that do not yield credit
toward the major are so indicated in the
individual bulletin descriptions.
83
University at Albany
Courses in the combined major/minor
sequence must include at least six credits at
the 300-level and at least 6 credits at the 400level or above. Graduate courses are open to
qualified seniors with appropriate
departmental and instructor consent.
Bachelor of Science Requirements
A Bio 110F& 111N
8
A Bio 212
4
A Bio 365
3
A Bio 402
3
Biology major electives
18
A Bio ___ (Molecular-Cell)
A Bio ___ (Function-Development)
A Bio ___ (Ecology-Behavior-Diversity)
Chemistry
16
Mathematics
6
Physics
8
Total
66
Degree Requirements for the
Faculty-Initiated Interdisciplinary
Major with a Concentration in
Human Biology are listed in the
Human Biology Program section of
this bulletin.
Degree Requirements for the
Faculty-Initiated Interdisciplinary
Major with a Concentration in
Biochemistry and Molecular Biology
The Biochemistry and Molecular Biology
program is a Faculty-Initiated
Interdisciplinary major (Biology and
Chemistry) designed for students interested
in these rapidly developing fields of science.
Students with training in these fields can
pursue careers as researchers in academic or
industrial settings or they can pursue further
study in graduate or professional schools.
Students must complete 40 graduation credits
before application to the program, generally
in the spring of the sophomore year.
Admission : Students must obtain the approval
of the Program Director before officially
declaring this Faculty-Initiated
Interdisciplinary Program as a major.
General Program B.S. Combined major and
minor sequence consisting of a minimum of
65 credits.
Required Courses: A Bio 110F or 110N,
111N, 212, 312, 313, 365, 366, 367; A Chm
120N, 121N, 122A, 122B, 216A, 216B,
217A, 217B, 340A 441A, 340B or 441B;
A Phy 140, 150; A Mat 111 or 112 or 118,
113 or 119; and an additional laboratory
course in Biology or Chemistry at or above
the 300 level. Credits in A Bio 399, 399Z,
499, 499Z or A Chm 425, 426 maybe used to
fulfill this laboratory requirement if the
student completes at least 4 credits over 2
semesters.
Bachelor of Science Requirements:
A Bio 110F (or 110N) & 111N
A Bio 212
A Bio 312 & 313
A Bio 365, 366 & 367
A Chm 120N, 121N 122A, & 122B
A Chm 216A, 216B, 217A, & 217B
8
4
5
8
8
8
A Chm 441A (or 340A) & 441B (or 340B)6
A Phy 140 & 150
7
A Mat 111, 112, or 118 & 113 or 119 8
Additional laboratory and elective credits3
Total
65
Students in the program must maintain both a
minimum grade point average of 3.50 overall
and in biology courses taken to satisfy major
requirements during the junior and senior
years. The progress of participants in the
honors program will be reviewed at the end
of the sophomore and junior years by the
student’s adviser and the departmental
honors committee. Students not meeting
academic and independent research standards
may be precluded from continuing in the
program during their senior year. These
students may, of course, continue as majors.
After completion of the requirements above,
the departmental honors committee will make
its recommendation to the faculty to grant the
degree “with honors in biology” based upon
(1) overall academic record, (2) performance
and accomplishments of the independent
study project(s), (3) the quality of the Oral
Presentation (4) the evaluations of
departmental faculty members who have
supervised these activities.
Honors Program
Combined B.S./M.S. Program
The honors program in biology is designed
for outstanding students in the programs
leading to the B.S. degree. Students may
apply for admission to the honors program by
submitting a letter of request to the
departmental honors committee no later than
April 15 of the freshman or sophomore year
(for admission for the fall) or November 15
of the sophomore year (for admission in the
spring). Junior transfers may apply at the
time of their admission to the University.
Students found acceptable by the committee
must find a research adviser to supervise the
independent study leading to an HONORS
THESIS.
The combined B.S./M.S. program in biology
provides an opportunity for students of
recognized academic ability and educational
maturity to fulfill integrated requirements of
undergraduate and master’s degree programs
from the beginning of the junior year. A
carefully designed program can permit a
student to earn the B.S. and M.S. degrees
within nine semesters.
The requirements for admission include: (1)
the candidate must declare the major and
have completed (or have in progress at time
of application) 12 credits of course work
required for the biology major, including
A Bio 110F or 110N, and 111N; (2) an
overall grade point average of 3.50; (3) a
grade point average of 3.50 in courses
required for the major; and (4) a written
recommendation from an adviser, professor
or teaching assistant if possible. Primary
emphasis will be placed on indications of
academic ability and maturity sufficient for
applicants to complete with distinction a
program involving independent research.
Students in the program are required to
complete a minimum of 65 or 66 credits as
specified for the respective program for the
B.S. in biology and must include: (1) at least
6 credits of independent study (A Bio 399,
499); the independent study, or honors
research project, which will result in an
HONORS THESIS; (2) at least 3 credits of
course work at the 500 level or higher (not
84
including A Bio 515) in the student’s area of
interest; and (3) oral presentation of research
at a public seminar.
The combined program requires a minimum
of 138 credits, of which at least 30 must be
graduate credits. In qualifying for the B.S.,
students must meet all University and college
requirements, including the requirements of
the undergraduate major described
previously, the minimum 60-credit liberal
arts and sciences requirement, general
education requirements, and residency
requirements. In qualifying for the M.S.,
students must meet all University and college
requirements as outlined in the Graduate
Bulletin, including completion of a minimum
of 30 graduate credits and any other
conditions such as a research seminar, thesis,
comprehensive examination, professional
experience, and residency requirements. Up
to 12 graduate credits may be applied
simultaneously to both the B.S. and M.S.
programs.
While satisfying B.S. and M.S. requirements,
students must complete a coherent sequence
of courses in one of the two core areas:
ecology, evolution, and behavior (EEB); or,
molecular, cellular, developmental, and
neural biology (MCDN). This sequence of
courses begins with a 400-level course and
includes a minimum of three graduate
courses up to a total of at least 9 credits. In
University at Albany
addition, the sequence should include two
semesters involving a discussion of the
current literature in the field of biology
selected by the student (one of the following:
A Bio 650 or A Bio 633).
Students are considered as undergraduates
until completion of all B.S. requirements.
Upon meeting B.S. requirements, students
are automatically considered as graduate
students. Although the Graduate Record
Examinations are not required for this
program, students are encouraged to take the
examinations in their senior year with the
expectation that they will continue graduate
studies.
Students may be admitted to the program at
the beginning of the junior year or after the
completion of 56 credits. Normally an
application should be made at the completion
of the sophomore year. Those students who
are accepted into the program in their Junior
year must complete at least three (3)
semesters of research in the Bio 399-499
sequence. Seniors are not normally admitted
into this program. However, students may be
accepted if they have completed at least one
semester of Bio 399 (for admittance at the
beginning of first semester senior year) or
one semester each of Bio 399 and 499 (for
admittance at the beginning of second
semester senior year). A minimum grade
point average of 3.20 is required and the
application should be supported by a
minimum of three letters of recommendation
from faculty. The application should be
submitted to the department chair.
Joint Seven-Year Biology/
Optometry Program
This combined program sponsored by the
State College of Optometry, State University
of New York, and the University at Albany,
provides students an opportunity to earn a
Bachelor of Science (B.S.) degree in biology
and a Doctor of Optometry (D.O.) in seven
years. Participating students will matriculate
at the University at Albany for three years
and begin their Optometry studies in year
four of the program. Students will be
awarded the B.S. degree after completion of
their requirements at the end of the fourth
year.
At the end of the seventh year and
completion of all program requirements,
students will be awarded the D.O. degree.
Students interested in making application to
this program shall submit the necessary
materials to the Pre-Health adviser in the
University’s Advisement Services Center by
the stated deadline in the middle of the
spring semester of the freshman or
sophomore year (transfer students are
ineligible). Selection will be based on written
application materials, academic progress, and
a personal interview.
A minimum of a 3.2 grade point average on a
scale of 4.0 in undergraduate courses
completed at the time of application is
required.
Students will complete three years (90
credits) of study at the University at Albany
with a major in biology for a B.S. degree.
Students attend SUNY-Optometry (New
York, NY) for the fourth year of study (and
pay SUNY-Optometry tuition), beginning the
first year of the professional program. With
the completion of the fourth year of study,
the University at Albany will accept as
transfer credits twenty-four credits of biology
and six credits of physics electives, for a total
of 30 credits. Students in this program should
take the Optometry Admission Test (OAT) in
October or February of the third year at the
University at Albany.
A minimum of 90 credits must be taken at the
University at Albany. Summer course work
completed the first and second year or
between the second and third year at the
University at Albany is acceptable for this
program.
The following courses are required: A Bio
110F, 111N, 212, 16 credits of biology
electives* (of which twelve credits must be
the 300 or 400 level); A Chm 120N, 122a,
121N, 122b, 216a, 217a, 216b, 217b; A Mat
112, 108; A Phy 105N, 106, 108N, 109; and
A Psy 101M. In addition to the General
Education Program requirements, students
are required to enroll in ten credits of
electives.
*The biology electives MUST be 300-400
level courses in biology that are designated
as courses that count towards the biology
major. The following courses will not be
used as biology electives: A Bio 303, 325,
341, 342, 365, 406, 410, and 411.
Courses
A Bio 100 Contemporary Biology (3)
Topics in selected areas of the Biological
Sciences. May be repeated for credit when topic
varies. Does not yield credit toward the major
in biology.
A Bio 102N General Biological Sciences (3)
Introduction to the major concepts in biology and
a survey of the common structures of organisms,
including humans, and their functions at the
molecular, cellular, organismal and population
levels. Emphasis placed on principles of ecology,
inheritance, evolution and physiology relevant to
human society. May not be taken for credit by
students who have credit in A Bio 110N or A Bio
110F or A Bio 111N or other equivalent
introductory courses. Does not yield credit
toward the major in biology. [NS]
A Bio 110F General Biology I (4)
A Bio 110F is the writing intensive version of
A Bio 110N; only one may be taken for credit.
Offered fall semester only. [NS WI]
A Bio 110N General Biology I (4)
First course in a two semester sequence which
offers a comprehensive survey of the structures
and functions common to all living systems at the
molecular, cellular, organismal, and population
levels. This course emphasizes evolutionary
principles, ecology, and behavior. Three class
periods and one laboratory per week. A Bio 110F
is the writing intensive version of A Bio 110N;
only one may be taken for credit. Offered fall
semester only. .May not be offered in 2003-2004.
[NS]
A Bio 111N General Biology II (4)
Second course in a two-semester sequence which
offers a comprehensive survey of the structures
and functions common to all living systems at the
molecular. cellular, organismal, and population
levels. This course emphasizes structure and
function at the cellular level as a basis for
understanding function at the organismal level.
Offered spring semester only. Three class periods
and one laboratory per week. Prerequisite(s):
A Bio 110F or 110N. [NS WI]
A Bio 117N Nutrition (3)
The biological roles of energy, protein, vitamins,
and minerals; digestion, absorption, and storage of
nutrients, the chemical nature of foods and food
processing; assessment of nutritional status;
interactions of nutrients and disease; food
supplementation and community nutrition. Does
not yield credit toward the major in biology.
[NS]
A Bio 199 Contemporary Issues in Biological
Sciences (1–3)
Issues from the current literature in selected areas
of biological sciences. Particular areas of study to
be announced each semester. Intended for students
interested in exploring in depth themes covered in
large lecture classes. S/U or A-E graded. May be
repeated for credit when topic varies. May not be
offered in 2003-2004.
A Bio 205 Human Genetics (3)
Survey of human genetics emphasizing the
principles and mechanisms of inheritance and
including the analysis of the genetic material of
humans; the behavior of genes in individuals
families, and populations; and the implications for
human behavior and evolution, medicine, and
society. Prerequisite(s): A Bio 110F and 111N or
permission of instructor. Does not yield credit
toward the major in biology.
85
University at Albany
A Bio 209N The Human Organism (3)
An introduction to the biology of the human
organism from the perspective of its anatomy and
physiology, emphasizing applications to modern
life and human society. Does not yield credit
toward the major in biology. [NS]
A Bio 212 Introductory Genetics (4)
Genetics from the classical Mendelian Laws of
inheritance to molecular genetics. Topics will
include: DNA structure and replication; Mendelian
genetics and recombination; population, fungal,
somatic cell, and bacterial genetics; gene
organization; the genetic code; mechanisms of
gene expression and regulation; and applications
of genetic technology. Three class periods and one
discussion section. Prerequisite(s): A Bio 111N.
[OD]
A Bio 214 Genetics II (3)
A continuation of A Bio 212. Topics to be covered
will include viruses; genetics of organelles
(mitochondria and chloroplasts); genetic diseases;
mutagenesis and repair of DNA; RNA splicing;
gene regulation; transposition and other gene
arrangements; developmental genetics; and genetic
engineering. Prerequisite(s): A Bio 212. May not
be offered in 2003-2004.
A Bio 217 Cell Biology (3)
A Bio 299 Introduction to Methods for
Research ((2)
A Bio 311N (= A Gog 310N and U Uni 310N)
World Food Crisis (3)
This course helps to prepare students for
supervised undergraduate research in A Bio 399
and A Bio 499. It will provide basic, current
laboratory training applicable to various areas of
modern biology. Laboratory exercises are drawn
from the general areas of molecular, neural,
cellular and developmental, and behavioral
biology. Emphasis is placed on learning
fundamental laboratory techniques, interpreting
and presenting data, and designing simple
experiments. One laboratory per week and
additional
flexible
time
as
required.
Prerequisite(s): A Bio 212 and permission of
instructor.
Interdisciplinary approach to understanding world
food problems through analyses of social,
political, economic, nutritional, agricultural, and
environmental aspects of world hunger. Faculty
from several departments in the sciences,
humanities, and social and behavioral sciences
present views from various disciplines. Does not
yield credit toward the major in biology. Only
one of A Bio 311N & U Uni 310N may be taken
for credit. Prerequisite(s): junior or senior class
standing, or permission of instructor. May not be
offered in 2003-2004.
A Bio 302Z Cell Biology Laboratory (2)
Introduction to modern techniques in cell biology,
including advanced optical microscopy, DNA
extraction and analysis, protein electrophoresis
and western blotting, cell homogenization and
fractionation, and cell culture. These techniques
are used to investigate cell motility, membrane
structure
and
permeability,
mitochondrial
respiration, DNA replication, the cell cycle, and
cell adhesion. One laboratory period per week;
additional time as required. Prerequisite or
corequisite: A Bio 217 or 301; A Bio 365. [WI]
An introduction to modern cell biology. This
course will present the basic organization of
eukaryotic cells while stressing their elaborate
structural-functional integration. The cell’s
fundamental
properties
conserved
through
evolution will be stressed. May not be taken for
credit by students who have credit in A Bio 301 or
A Bio 304. Prerequisite(s): A Bio 212.
A Bio 303 (formerly A Bio 403) Developmental
Biology (3)
A Bio 230N People and Resources in
Ecological Perspective (3)
A Bio 305 Developmental Biology Laboratory
(2)
The development of form and function in animals
with emphasis on molecular analyses of
organismal and cellular events underlying
fertilization, early development, morphogenesis
and growth. Prerequisite(s): A Bio 212.
Introduction to environmental science from the
perspective of ecosystem dynamics: succession,
matter cycling, productivity, resource allocation
and biodiversity. Concepts and connections to
major problems of pollution, global warming,
resource exploitation and human overpopulation in
a historical and contemporary context. Does not
yield credit toward the major in biology. May
not be offered in 2003-2004. [NS]
This laboratory course examines the mechanisms
of animal and plant development at the molecular
and cellular level by modern and classical
techniques. Topics include gametogenesis,
fertilization, early and later development, cell
division and morphogenesis. One laboratory
period per week; additional time as required.
Prerequisite or corequisite(s): A Bio 303.
A Bio 241N The Biology of Sex (3)
Exploration of life in the sea; biological processes
in marine environments; structure and function of
marine biological communities; productivity and
food webs; diversity, evolution and adaptations of
marine organisms; and role of the oceans in global
cycles. Covers planktonic, soft-bottom, coral reef,
intertidal,
deep-sea
communities
and
environments; and the effects of human activity on
life in the sea. Prerequisite(s): A Bio 110F and
A Bio 111N; A Chm 120N and A Chm 122A.
This course, designed for nonmajors, examines sex
from a biological perspective in species from
bacteria to humans. Topics covered include sexual
and asexual reproduction, sexual selection, mate
choice, sex determination, sexual dimorphisms,
mating strategies, courtship, genetic and
environmental determinants of sexual behavior,
and genetic and neural bases of sexual orientation.
This course focuses on biological rather than
social or cultural constructions of sex and
reproduction. Prerequisite(s): high school biology.
Does not yield credit toward the major in
biology. [NS]
86
A Bio 306 Marine Biology (3)
A Bio 308 Parasitic Diseases and Human
Welfare (3)
Ecological, medical, and social interrelationships
of selected parasitic diseases of people and
domestic animals in temperate, semi-tropical, and
tropical climates; role of wild animals as reservoirs
or vectors of parasitic diseases in humans.
Prerequisite(s): 10 credits of biology or permission
of instructor.
A Bio 312 Molecular Biology (3)
Mechanisms of gene expression and regulation
will be studied, using examples from bacteria and
eukaryotes. Discussion will include experimental
approaches to gene cloning and sequencing,
analysis of DNA-protein interactions, and
structure and function of RNA. Prerequisite(s):
A Bio 212; prerequisite or corequisite: A Bio 365
or A Chm 342.
A Bio 313 Laboratory in Molecular Biology (2)
Experiments in the modern techniques of
recombinant molecular biology will be performed.
These may include restriction mapping of
plasmids, gene cloning, DNA blotting, DNA
sequence analysis, plasmid constructions, and
gene expression studies. One laboratory per week,
plus additional flexible time as required.
Prerequisite: A Bio 212. Prerequisite or
corequisite(s): A Bio 312.
A Bio 314 Microbiology (3)
Introduction to the morphology, physiology,
structure,
genetics,
and
metabolism
of
microorganisms, including the roles played by
microorganisms in medical, environmental,
agricultural, and biotechnological sciences.
Prerequisite(s): A Bio 212, or both A Bio 111N
and A Bio 205; and A Chm 342 or A Bio 365.
A Bio 315 Microbiology Laboratory (2)
Laboratory studies that deal with the culture and
study of microorganisms, the dynamics of microbial
growth, and the physiological basis of bacterial
identification. One laboratory per week; additional
flexible time as required. Prerequisite(s) or
corequisite:
A Bio 314A Bio 316 Biogeography (3)
Origin and differentiation of floras and faunas;
biotic regions of the world, principles of
distribution; migration, adaptation, evolution, and
extinction. Three class periods each week.
Prerequisite(s): A Bio 111N, or A Bio 102N
A Bio 317 Comparative Animal Physiology (3)
The physiological mechanisms employed by
animals in meeting the stresses imposed by
different environments. Considers strategies of
adaptive radiation including toleration, avoidance,
and regulation from an evolutionary perspective.
Prerequisite(s): A Bio 111N and junior status
A Bio 318 (= A Ant 312; former A Bio 419/A Ant
412) Human Population Genetics (3)
Population genetics theory is the foundation of
evolutionary biology and contributes heavily to
modern ideas in ecology, systematics, and
agriculture. This course is an introduction to that
theory with special emphasis on evolution. Only
one of A Ant 312 and A Bio 318 may be taken for
credit. Prerequisite(s): A Ant 211 or A Bio 205 or
212. .May not be offered in 2003-2004.
University at Albany
A Bio 319Z Field Biology (3)
A Bio 342 Neurobiology Laboratory (2)
A Bio 402 Evolution (3)
Introduction to those aspects of biology which are
based on field study; local flora and fauna from an
ecological viewpoint; selected field and laboratory
techniques and related literature. Students are
required to complete an independent field
investigation. Two class periods, one laboratory
period each week. Prerequisite(s): A Bio 111N, or
A Bio 102N. Not open to freshmen. [WI]
Experimental analyses of the morphology and
electrophysiology of nerve cells. Experiments
include the visualization of individual nerve cells
through selective staining, stimulation and
recording of electrical potentials in nerve cells;
and an examination of synaptic transmission.
Experiments will be performed on invertebrate
nervous systems. One laboratory period each
week. Prerequisite(s) or corequisite(s): A Bio 341.
The patterns and processes of biological change
with time from the origins of life, through major
evolutionary innovations, to the development of
human culture. Fundamental concepts in biology
will be stressed, including information, mutation,
selection, random drift, and adaptation.
Prerequisite(s): A Bio 212.
A Bio 320 Ecology (3)
Introduction to the study of organisms,
populations, and communities in relation to their
environments. Stresses an integrated approach at
all levels of biological organization. Topics
include: the niche concept, species diversity,
nutrient cycling, energy flow, population dynamics
and control, biological rhythms, and other
physiological mechanisms influenced by the
environment. Three class periods each week.
Prerequisite(s): A Bio 111N.
A Bio 321 The Insects (3)
A multilevel examination of the biology of insects,
with particular emphasis on those aspects of design,
physiology and behavior that make them so
distinctive and successful. Prerequisite(s): A Bio
111N or equivalent. May not be offered in 20032004.
A Bio 325 Comparative Anatomy of
Chordates (4)
Comparative study of embryonic development,
functional morphology, adaptive radiation, and
evolution of chordates. Three class periods, one
laboratory period each week. Prerequisite(s): 12
credits of biology or permission of instructor. Not
open to freshmen.
A Bio 326 Environmental Microbiology Lab (2)
Microorganisms are an essential part of many
environments. This course explores the role of
microbes in natural and human-impacted systems;
topics include nutrient cycling, waste degradation,
bioremediation, waterborne disease, and pollution
control. Some informal lectures and current events
discussions are incorporated into laboratory
exercises. Prerequisite(s): A Bio 314 or equivalent.
May not be offered in 2003-2004.
A Bio 335 Immunology (3)
The structure and function of the antibody
molecule and of reactions between antigen and
antibody. Also covers cellular interactions in the
immune response as well as both the beneficial
and harmful consequences of the response.
Prerequisite(s): A Bio 212; prerequisite(s) or
corequisite(s): A Chm 342 or A Bio 365.
A Bio 336Z (formerly A Bio 336) Laboratory in
Immunology (2)
Modern laboratory techniques will be performed to
study the cellular and humoral components of the
immune system; immune cells and cell markers,
immunoglobulin purification and characterization,
antibody and antigen identification assays
including
immunodiffusion
and
immunoelectrophoresis,
and
enzyme-based
immunoassays (ELISA). One laboratory per week,
plus additional flexible time as required. The
former A Bio 336 does not meet the writing
intensive requirement. Only one of A Bio 336 and
336Z may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s) or
corequisite(s): A Bio 335. [WI]
A Bio 341 Neurobiology (3)
The structure and function of the nervous system
examined at the cellular level. Topics include:
organization of nervous systems; morphology and
physiology of nerve cells; synaptic transmission;
sensory processing; cellular circuitry underlying
“simple” behaviors; cellular basis of learning; and
the development of neuronal connections.
Prerequisite(s): A Bio 111N; prerequisite(s) or
corequisite(s): A Phy 108N.
A Bio 365 Biological Chemistry (3)
The chemistry and biochemical interrelationship
of carbohydrates, lipids, proteins, and nucleic
acids; enzyme catalysis and introduction to
metabolism. Prerequisite(s): A Chm 216A and
217A.
A Bio 366 Biological Chemistry II (3)
Control and regulation of metabolic pathways,
expression
and
transmission
of
genetic
information, and a variety of selected current
topics. Prerequisite(s): A Bio 365.
A Bio 367 Biochemistry Laboratory (2)
This laboratory course is designed to provide basic
training in various procedures used in present day
biochemical research. These will include methods
for protein purification, enzyme kinetics, peptide
sequencing, and fractionation of intracellular
components. In addition, biochemical processes
such as glucose metabolism and photosynthesis
will be studied. One laboratory period each week.
Prerequisite(s) or corequisite(s): A Bio 365 or
equivalent and permission of instructor.
A Bio 389Z Writing in Biology (1)
Students who are concurrently registered in, or
have previously taken, any 300- or 400-level
biology course which yields credit toward the
major, may with permission of the instructor of
that course, enroll in A Bio 389Z and fulfill a
writing intensive version of that other course. One
additional meeting per week in which writing
techniques and experiences are stressed is
required. Written work that will be used for credit
in A Bio 389Z must be in addition to any writings
required for the companion course. Prerequisite(s)
or corequisite(s): a companion biology course at
the 300 or 400 level. S/U graded. [WI]
A Bio 399 Supervised Research for Juniors (1–
3)
Individual, independent research on selected
topics in biology. Critical analysis of selected
research papers. Junior majors in the department
of biological sciences apply for this course
through the prospective research advisor. Students
taking two or more semesters of A Bio 399, 399Z,
499, or 499Z will prepare a poster or make an oral
presentation at the Departmental Research
Symposium. A copy of the final written report of
each semester’s work, preferably typewritten in
journal format, is kept on permanent file in the
department. May be taken either semester. A
maximum of 6 credits may be earned in A Bio 399
and 399Z.
A Bio 399Z Supervised Research for Juniors
(2–3)
Writing intensive version of A Bio 399 open to
junior majors in biology who have completed a
minimum of one previous semester in A Bio 399
for at least two credits. Students taking two or
more semesters of A Bio 399, 399Z, 499, or 499Z
will prepare a poster or make an oral presentation
at the Departmental Research Symposium.
Requires permission of research advisor. A
maximum of 6 credits may be earned in A Bio 399
and 399Z. Prerequisite(s): A Bio 399. [WI]
A Bio 406 Vertebrate Histology (4)
Microanatomy and function of animal cells,
tissues and major vertebrate organs, excluding the
brain. Practical work with bright-field microscopy
and preparation of formalin-fixed, paraffinembedded, sectioned and stained tissues. Three
class periods, one laboratory period each week.
Extra time may be needed to complete individual
projects. Prerequisite(s): A Bio 212; A Bio 325
and/or A Bio 410 recommended but not required.
A Bio 409 Introduction to Biological
Materials (3)
Investigation of the structure, function, and
materials properties of non-living biological
products (e.g., insect and plant cuticles,
mineralized shell, bone, etc.). Particular attention
to developmental control on the cellular and other
levels. Prerequisite(s): One of the following
courses: A Bio 321, 324, 325, or 422, or
equivalent. May not be offered in 2003-2004
A Bio 410 Human Physiology (3)
The functions of organ systems and their
contributions to the functions of the human body
as a whole. Topics to include: nervous,
cardiovascular,
respiratory,
gastrointestinal
systems and energy metabolism and temperature
regulation. Two 1 1/2-hour lecture periods each
week. Prerequisite(s): A Bio 111N and A Chm
121N.
A Bio 411Z Human Physiology Laboratory (2)
Experimental
investigations
in
systemic
physiology with emphasis on membrane transport,
nerve excitability, muscle contraction, sensory
mechanisms, cardiac activity, and special
problems. Three hour laboratory and one hour
discussion per week. Emphasis will be placed on
writing of scientific laboratory reports. The former
A Bio 411 does not yield writing intensive credit.
Corequisite(s): A Bio 410. [WI]
A Bio 412 Biological Movement (3)
Biological movements at the level of molecules,
organelles, cells, and tissues examined in terms of
their contractile and/or other basis. Emphasizes
the role of molecular assembly, reorganization and
interaction in producing movement, and intrinsic
and extrinsic control of movement. Three class
periods each week. Prerequisite(s): a course in
biochemistry. May not be offered in 2003-2004.
A Bio 416 (=A Ant 416; former A Ant 315)
Topics in Human Biology (3)
Selected topics in biological anthropology. May be
repeated for credit when topic differs. Consult
class schedule for specific topic. Only one of
A Bio 416 and A Ant 416 may be taken for credit.
Prerequisite(s): A Ant 110N and 211. May not be
offered in 2003-2004
A Bio 420 Plant and Animal Morphogenesis (3)
Cellular basis and control of morphogenesis
during development of the embryo in animals and
plants, and in vegetative and reproductive growth
from plant meristems. Topics examined in terms
of cell division, motility and adhesion, cellular
rearrangements, matrices produced by cells,
hormonal
factors,
and
gene
expression.
Prerequisite(s): A Bio 212. May not be offered in
2003-2004
87
University at Albany
A Bio 422 (formerly A Bio 304) Biological
Architecture (3)
An analysis of the basic physical and architectural
principles underlying the design of biological
organisms. Topics to be covered include
architecture and materials of skeletons, biological
design for swimming and flight, structural colors,
patterns of branching and fractal growth. Three
lectures per week. Prerequisite(s): A Bio 110F or
110N, 6 credits of upper level biology or
permission of instructor.
A Bio 432 Animal Behavior (3)
The organization, causation, development, and
evolution of behavior in vertebrates and
invertebrates. Emphasizes a synthesis of
information from both field and laboratory. Topics
include stimuli and responsiveness, motivation,
conflict behavior, social behavior with emphasis
on ecological aspects, orientation and navigation,
rhythmicity, learning, and the neural organization
responsible for behavior. Three class periods each
week. Prerequisite(s): 15 credits in biology. May
not be offered in 2003-2004.
A Bio 436 Sensory Worlds (3)
A physical, physiological and evolutionary
perspective on how vertebrates and invertebrates
acquire and interpret information about the
surrounding
world
and
its
inhabitants.
Prerequisite(s): A Bio 111N and at least one of the
following: A Bio 422, A Bio 460, A Phy 105,
A Psy 214, A Psy 382 or consent of instructor.
May not be offered in 2003-2004.
A Bio 441 Molecular Neurobiology (3)
The molecular biology of learning, memory, neural
development and neurological disease. The course
will relate the structure and function of receptors,
second
messangers,
cytoskeletal
proteins,
transcription factors and gene structure to their
roles in the nervous system. Prerequisite(s): A Bio
312 or 341 or 301. May not be offered in 20032004
A Bio 442 Restoration Ecology (3)
Restoration ecology seeks to enhance natural
recovery of damaged ecosystems. Through lectures
and readings, we review the science and practice
of ecological restoration, with emphasis on
application
of
ecological
principles.
Prerequisite(s): 15 credits in Biology, including a
course in organismal biology or ecology. May not
be offered in 2003-2004.
A Bio 443 Restoration Ecology Laboratory (1)
Demonstrations and laboratory exercises will
explore tools for the design, implementation, and
assessment of restoration projects in a variety of
habitats. As the principal assignment, student
teams will prepare a design plan for a restoration
project. Prerequisite(s): concurrent enrollment
A Bio 442. May not be offered in 2003-2004.
A Bio 444 The Biology of Birds (3)
A broad survey of the biology of birds. Topics will
include the origin and evolution of birds, the
taxonomy and diversity of living birds,
biogeography, anatomy and physiology with an
emphasis on comparisons with other vertebrates
and adaptations for flight, communication,
behavior, ecology, and the importance of birds as
conservation indicators. Prerequisite(s): 15 credits
in biology. May not be offered in 2003-2004.
88
A Bio 445 Experimental Ecology (3)
Ecological concepts are demonstrated with
experimental manipulations and comparative
assessment techniques. Local wetlands are studied;
the focus is on the effects of invasive species.
Ecological assessment skills are developed in the
field and laboratory. Lectures couple fundamental
and applied topics, balancing understanding of
ecological principles with realistic environmental
problem solving. Students contribute to a report
that becomes part of the record for a municipal
wetland. Two lectures and one laboratory period
each week. Prerequisite(s): A Bio 320 or
equivalent, junior or senior standing or permission
of instructor.
A Bio 450 Biodiversity (3)
Lectures, readings, discussions, and students’
presentations examine theoretical and empirical
studies of the extent and distribution of faunal and
floral diversity; of patterns of relative abundance
of species in major ecosystems; and of the
significance of diversity loss. Approaches to
preserve, restore, and manage ecosystem structure
and function will be examined. Prerequisite(s):
Ecology or Field Biology. May not be offered in
2003-2004
A Bio 455 Plant Ecology (3)
Current research and theoretical background in
the field of plant ecology will be explored. Topics
will include population and community dynamics,
evolution of life history traits, physiological
responses to environmental stresses, plant-animal
interactions, and the role of vegetation in
ecosystem processes. Prerequisite(s): A Bio 319,
391Z, or A Bio 320 or permission of instructor.
May not be offered in 2003-2004
A Bio 456 Plant Ecology Laboratory (1)
Field and laboratory studies will explore
experimental and analytical technique used in
plant ecology. Topics include population
dynamics, community patterns, plant-animal
interactions, and vegetation mapping. Pre-requisite
or co-requisite(s): A Bio 455.
A Bio 460 Neural Basis of Behavior (3)
The neural basis of innate and learned behaviors in
vertebrates and invertebrates will be examined.
Emphasis will be placed on sensory processing,
reflexive behavior, fixed action patterns, rhythmic
behavior and simple learned behavior amenable to
analysis at the neuronal level including analysis of
membrane electrical activity, chemical synaptic
activity and neuromodulation. Prerequisite(s):
A Bio 341 or equivalent or permission of
instructor.
A Bio 468 Behavioral Ecology (3)
Recent theoretical models of the evolution of
behavior by natural selection applied to animals,
especially to social insects, birds, and mammals.
Includes sociobiology and optimal foraging. Three
class periods each week. Prerequisite(s): A Bio
320 (A Bio 402 and 432 recommended). May not
be offered in 2003-2004.
A Bio 497 Topics in Biology (1–3)
Issues from the current literature in selected areas
of biology. Particular areas of study to be
announced each semester. Yields credit toward the
major in biological sciences. May be repeated for
credit. Prerequisite(s): junior or senior class
standing, and permission of instructor. May not be
offered in 2003-2004.
A Bio 498 Topics in Biology, with Laboratory
(1–3)
Issues in selected areas of biology. Particular areas
of study to be announced each semester. Yields
laboratory credit toward the major in biological
sciences. May be repeated for credit.
Prerequisite(s): junior or senior class standing, and
permission of instructor. May not be offered in
2003-2004.
A Bio 499 Supervised Research for Seniors
(1–4)
Individual, independent research on selected
topics in biology. Critical analysis of selected
research papers. Senior majors in the department
of biological sciences apply for this course
through the prospective research advisor. A copy
of the final written report of each semester’s work,
preferably typewritten in journal format, is kept on
permanent file in the department. May be taken
either semester. Students taking two or more
semesters of A Bio 399, 399Z, 499, or 499Z will
prepare a poster or make an oral presentation at
the Departmental Research Symposium. A
maximum of 8 credits may be earned in A Bio 499
and 499Z.
A Bio 499Z Supervised Research for Seniors
(2–4)
Writing intensive version of A Bio 499 open to
senior majors in biology who have completed a
minimum of one previous semester in A Bio 399
or 499 for at least two credits. Requires permission
of research advisor. Students taking two or more
semesters of A Bio 399, 399Z, 499, or 499Z will
prepare a poster or make an oral presentation at
the Departmental Research Symposium. A
maximum of 8 credits may be earned in A Bio 499
and 499Z. Prerequisite(s): A Bio 399 or 499. [WI]
University at Albany
D EPARTMENT OF
C HEMISTRY
Faculty
Distinguished Professor Emeritus
Harry L. Frisch, Ph.D.
Polytechnic Institute of Brooklyn
Distinguished Professor
Eric Block, Ph.D.
Harvard University
Distinguished Teaching Professor of Earth and
Atmospheric Sciences and Chemistry
John W. Delano, Ph.D.
State University of New York at Stony Brook
Professors Emeritae/i
Shelton Bank, Ph.D.
Purdue University
Robert E. Frost, Ph.D.
Harvard University
Henry Kuivila, Ph.D.
Harvard University
Eugene Mclaren, Ph.D. (Collins Fellow)
Washington University
Yash P. Myer, Ph.D.
University of Oregon
Ramaswamy H. Sarma, Ph.D.
Brown University
Professors
Frank M. Hauser, Ph.D.
University of North Carolina
Bernard J. Laurenzi, Ph.D.
University of Pennsylvania
Charles P. Scholes, Ph.D.
Yale University
Lawrence C. Snyder, Ph.D.
Carnegie Institute of Technology
John T. Welch, Ph.D.
Case Western Reserve University
Andrew J. Yencha, Ph.D.
University of California, Los Angeles
Professor of Education and Chemistry
Audrey Champagne, Ph.D.
University of Pittsburgh
Associate Professors Emeritae/i
Arthur O. Long, Ph.D.
University of Wisconsin
Associate Professors
Lawrence H. Daly, Ph.D.
Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute
Paul J. Toscano, Ph.D.
Johns Hopkins University
Assistant Professors
Evgeny Dikarev, Ph.D.
Moscow State University
Igor Lednev, Ph.D.
Moscow Institute of Physics & Technology
Rabi A. Musah, Ph.D.
University of Arkansas
Li Niu, Ph.D.
University of Wisconsin
Marina Petrukhina, Ph.D.
Moscow State University
Adjuncts (estimated): 4
The objective of the department is to
provide students with a broad,
fundamental knowledge of modern
theoretical and experimental chemistry
enabling graduates to embark immediately
on professional careers in chemistry or to
continue study at an advanced level
toward higher degrees.
The general program in chemistry is
approved by the Committee on
Professional Training of the American
Chemical Society. For students interested
in engineering, 3–2 programs with
Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute and
Clarkson University are available.
Careers
Careers graduates have pursued include:
industrial production chemist, industrial
control chemist, analytical chemist
(industrial and governmental laboratories),
research assistant, technical sales and
service representative, secondary school
teacher, science writing and editing,
forensics, chemical business, patent law,
information science, toxicology, and even
investment counseling and public relations.
Special Programs
For students interested in engineering, there
are available 3-2 programs with Rensselaer
Polytechnic Institute, Clarkson University,
SUNY at New Paltz, and SUNY at
Binghamton. Students in these programs spend
their first three years at this campus and the
last two years at the other. The tuition is at the
University at Albany rate for the first three
years only. Upon successful completion of the
programs, students are awarded a B.S. in
Chemistry from the University at Albany, and
B.S. in Chemical Engineering from the other
institution.
A typical program, in the three years here,
includes all courses required for the B.S.,
Chemistry emphasis, degree except for A Chm
341B, 420A, and the 6 credits of advanced
chemistry. Equivalent work at the engineering
school is accepted for these last 12 credits. In
addition, students take more mathematics,
physics, and computer science, to prepare for
the engineering school. This includes A Mat
220 and 311, A Phy 321C and 462, A Csi 101
and 204.
Degree Requirements for the
Major in Chemistry
General Program B.A.: Combined major
and minor sequence consisting of a
minimum of 51 credits: A Chm 120N,
121N, 122A, 122B, 216A, 216B, 217A,
217B, 225, 320, 321, 420a, 430, and 6
credits in advanced chemistry including at
least 3 credits in courses other than A Chm
424, 425, or 426; A Mat 111 or 112 or 118
and 113 or 119; A Phy 105N, 106, 108N,
and 109.
Note: A Phy 140N and 150N will substitute
for A Phy 105 and 108 sequence.
General Program B.S.: Within this program,
a student has a choice of four tracks:
Chemistry Emphasis (66 credits);
Chemistry/Polymers Emphasis (67 credits);
Chemistry/Materials Emphasis (67 credits);
and Chemistry/Forensic Chemistry
Emphasis (69 credits). The specific
requirements for individual tracks are
outlined below.
Chemistry Emphasis: B.S.: (combined
major and minor sequence) 66 credits:
A Chm 120N, 121N, 122A, 122B, 216A,
216B, 217A, 217B, 225, 317, 340A, 340B,
341Z, 341B, 420A, 440A or 342, and 3
credits in advanced chemistry in courses
other than A Chm 424, 425, or 426; A Mat
111 or 112 or 118, 113 or 119, and 214;
A Phy 140N, 145, 150N, 155, 240.
Chemistry/Forensic Chemistry Emphasis:
B.S.: (combined major and minor sequence)
(69 credits): A Chm 120N, 121N, 122A,
122B, 216A, 216B, 217A, 217B, 225,
340A, 340B, 341Z, 417, 420A, 430, 440A
(or 342), 450A, 450B and A Mat 111 or
112 or 118, 113 or 119, and 214 and 108;
A Phy 140N, 145, 150N, 155.
Chemistry/Polymers Emphasis: B.S.:
(combined major and minor sequence) (67
credits): A Chm 120N, 121N, 122A, 122B,
216A, 216B, 217A, 217B, 225, 340A,
340B, 341Z, 408, 420A, and 496; A Mat
111 or 112 or 118, 113 or 119, and 214;
A Phy 140N, 145, 150N, 155 240, and 462;
X RPI 300 (RPI 72-464, Polymer Science
Laboratory—student cross-registers at
Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute for the
course).
Chemistry/Materials Emphasis: B.S.
(combined major and minor sequence) (67
credits): A Chm 120N, 121N, 122A, 122B,
216A, 216B, 217A, 217B, 225, 340A,
340B, 341Z, 408, 420A, and 495; A Mat
111 or 112 or 118,113 or 119 and 214;
A Phy 140N, 145, 150N, 155, 240, 462 and
464; X RPI 300 (RPI 72-464 Polymer
Science laboratory) may be substituted for
A Phy 464.
Teaching Assistants (estimated): 25
89
University at Albany
Honors Program
The honors program in chemistry is designed for
outstanding students enrolled in the general program
leading to the B.S. degree, chemistry emphasis.
Students may apply for admission to the honors
program by submitting a letter of request to the
department chair no later than April 15 of the
sophomore year (for admissions in the Fall) or
November 15 of the junior year (for admission in the
Spring). Junior transfers may apply at the time of
their admission to the University. Primary emphasis
will be placed on indications of academic ability and
maturity sufficient for applicants to pursue with
distinction a program involving independent
research.
The minimum requirements for admission include:
(1) Completion of A Chm 120N, 121N, 122A,
122B, 216A, 216B, 217A, 217B, 225 or their
equivalents; (2) An overall grade point average of
3.50; (3) A grade point average of 3.60 in chemistry
courses required for the major; and (4) Written
recommendations from at least three faculty
members, one of whom, preferably should be from
outside the Department of Chemistry.
Students in the program must maintain both a
minimum grade point average of 3.50 overall and of
3.60 in chemistry courses taken to satisfy major
requirements during the junior and senior years. The
progress of participants in the honors program will
be reviewed at the end of junior year by the
student’s adviser and the Departmental
Undergraduate Committee. Students not meeting
academic and independent research standards at that
time may be precluded from continuing in the
program during their senior year. These students
may, of course, continue as majors.
Students in the program are required to complete a
minimum of 72 credits as follows: in addition to the
19 credits listed above and mathematics and physics
requirements listed for the general B.S. program
with chemistry emphasis, A Chm 340A, 340B,
341Z, 341B, 420A, and six credits of advanced
chemistry, not including research courses (64
credits total); A Chm 424 (1 credit), 3 credits of
A Chm 426 (Undergraduate Research), and 4 credits
of A Chm 426T (Honors Undergraduate Research).
The independent study must include an honors
research project, culminating with a written honors
thesis and departmental seminar by the end of the
student’s last semester.
After completion of the requirements above, the
records of the candidates will be reviewed by the
Departmental Undergraduate Committee. After
consideration of overall academic record,
performance and accomplishments in the
independent study project, the quality of the Honors
Seminar and Thesis, and the evaluations of
departmental faculty members who have supervised
these activities, a recommendation for or against a
degree “with honors in chemistry” will be made by
the committee to the departmental faulty. The final
recommendation will be made by the departmental
faculty and transmitted to the departmental chair.
90
Combined B.S./M.S. Program
The combined B.S./M.S. program in chemistry
provides an opportunity for students of
recognized academic ability and educational
maturity to fulfill integrated requirements of
undergraduate and master’s degree programs
from the beginning of the junior year. A
carefully designed program can permit a
student to earn the B.S. and M.S. degrees
within nine semesters.
The combined program requires a minimum
of 138 credits, of which at least 30 must be
graduate credits. In qualifying for the B.S.,
students must meet all University and college
requirements, including the requirements of
the undergraduate major described previously,
the minimum 60-credit liberal arts and sciences
requirement, general education requirements,
and residency requirements. In qualifying for
the M.S., students must meet all University
and college requirements as outlined in the
Graduate Bulletin, including completion of a
minimum of 30 graduate credits and any other
conditions such as a research seminar, thesis,
comprehensive examination, professional
experience, and residency requirements. Up
to 12 graduate credits may be applied
simultaneously to both the B.S. and M.S.
programs.
The undergraduate requirement of 420A
may be satisfied by A Chm 520A. Likewise,
the requirement of 6 credits in advanced
chemistry may be satisfied by two 500-level
graduate courses.
Students are considered as undergraduates until
completion of 120 graduation credits and
satisfactory completion of all B.S. requirements.
Upon meeting B.S. requirements, students are
automatically considered as graduate students.
Students may apply for admission to the
combined degree program in chemistry after
the successful completion of 56 credits, but
no later than the accumulation of 100
credits, and after the satisfactory
completion of A Chm 340A. A cumulative
grade point average of 3.2 or higher and
three supportive letters of recommendation
from faculty are required for consideration.
A Chm 121N General Chemistry II (3)
Elementary principles of chemical equilibrium,
thermodynamics, and kinetics; electrochemistry;
descriptive chemistry of the elements and their
compounds. Prerequisite(s): A Chm 120N. [NS]
A Chm 122A and B General Chemistry
Laboratory (1, 1)
Introduction to laboratory techniques, experiments
demonstrating chemical principles and properties of
elements and compounds. Prerequisite(s) for A Chm
122B: A Chm 122A; corequisite(s) or prerequisite(s)
for A Chm 122A: A Chm 120N; for A Chm 122B:
A Chm 121N.
A Chm 216A and B Organic Chemistry (3, 3)
Structure, synthesis, and reactions of the principal
classes of organic compounds stressing the
underlying principles of reaction mechanisms,
stereochemistry, and spectroscopic techniques.
Prerequisite(s) for A Chm 216A: A Chm 121N and
A Chm 122B; for A Chm 216B: A Chm 216A.
A Chm 217A and B Organic Chemistry
Laboratory (1, 1)
Laboratory techniques in organic chemistry,
including extraction, crystallization, distillation, and
chromatography, exemplified by the application of
these techniques to the synthesis and qualitative
analysis of organic compounds. Applications of
infrared and NMR spectroscopy. Prerequisite(s) for
A Chm 217B: A Chm 217A; corequisite(s) or
prerequisite(s) for A Chm 217A: A Chm 215 or
216A; for A Chm 217B: A Chm 216B.
A Chm 225 Quantitative Analysis (3)
Theory of quantitative analysis based on modern
chemical principles. Practical application to typical
gravimetric, volumetric, and colorimetric analysis.
Two class periods, one laboratory period each week.
Prerequisite(s): A Chm 121N and A Chm 122B.
A Chm 307 (= Atm 307) Introduction to
Atmospheric Chemistry (3)
Chemical principles and concepts leading to
understanding the composition and change in the
chemical/atmospheric environment; sources and
sinks of chemical constituents; chemistry of the
troposphere and stratosphere; measurement and
theory; greenhouse gases; global pollution and ozone
depletion. A Atm 307Z is the writing intensive
version of A Atm 307 and A Chm 307; only one
may be taken for credit. Does not yield credit toward
the major in chemistry. Prerequisite(s): A Mat 113
or 119; A Phy150; and A Chm 121N.
A Chm 320 Introduction to Physical Chemistry (3)
Courses
Behavior of gases chemical thermodynamics
(including solution equilibria, phase equilibria and
electrochemistry), dynamics of chemical reactions
(reactions, mechanisms, theory) and fundamentals
of quantum chemistry with focus on chemical
bonding, molecular structure and spectroscopy.
Prerequisite(s): A Chm 121N; corequisite(s) or
prerequisite(s): A Mat 113 or 119 and A Phy 108N.
Does not yield credit toward the B.S. major in
chemistry.
A Chm 100N Chemical ABCs: Atoms, Bonds,
and Citizen Consumers (3)
A Chm 321 Introduction to Experimental
Physical Chemistry (1)
Introduction to chemistry emphasizing its
applications to problems in modern society,
consumer goods, and life-related topics. Lecture and
demonstration only. Does not yield credit toward the
major or minor in chemistry.[NS]
A Chm 120N General Chemistry I (3)
Atomic theory, quantitative relationships in
chemical change, electronic structure of atoms and
chemical periodicity, chemical bonding, and states
of matter. [NS]
Experimental illustration of physical principles and
introduction to instrumentation. Techniques of
physical measurements, treatment of experimental
data and generalization of results to illustrate the
fundamental
principles.
Corequisite(s)
or
prerequisite(s): A Chm 320. Does not yield credit
toward the B.S. major in chemistry.
University at Albany
A Chm 340A and B Physical Chemistry (3,3)
Mathematical description of physiochemical
systems and their interpretation in terms of
thermodynamics, kinetic theory, reaction rates and
statistical mechanics. Atomic and molecular
structure from the viewpoint of quantum theory with
special emphasis on bonding and spectra.
Prerequisite(s) for A Chm 340A: A Phy150N, A Mat
214, and A Chm 216B; for A Chm 340B: A Chm
340A or consent of instructor.
A Chm 341Z and B Physical Chemistry
Laboratory (3, 3)
The experimental understanding of the basic
principles of physical chemistry and development of
familiarity
with
instrumentation.
Includes
thermodynamics; chemical kinetics; hydrodynamic,
electrochemical, and optical properties; and searching
of the chemical literature, computer processing of
experimental data, and writing laboratory reports.
One lecture and two laboratory periods each week.
Prerequisite(s) for A Chm 341Z: A Chm 225; for
A Chm 341B: Chm 341Z. Corequisite(s) or
prerequisite(s) for Chm 341Z: Chm 340A; for Chm
341B: Chm 340B. [WI]
A Chm 342 Biological Chemistry (3)
The chemistry and biochemical interrelationship of
carbohydrates, lipids, and nucleic acids; enzyme
catalysis and introduction to metabolism.
Prerequisite(s): A Chm 215or 216B. .May not be
offered in 2003-2004.
A Chm 343 Introduction to Biochemistry
Laboratory (1)
Experiments illustrating the fundamentals of
biochemistry as discussed in A Chm 342.
Prerequisite(s): A Chm 217A; corequisite(s) or
prerequisite(s): A Chm 342. .May not be offered in
2003-2004.
A Chm 411A Computer Applications in
Chemistry (3)
An introduction to microcomputing in chemistry. An
introduction to the principles of microcomputers;
programming using BASIC/TURBOBASIC,
instrumental interfacing and the use of commercially
available microcomputer programs related to
chemistry. Prerequisite(s) or corequisite(s): A Chm
320 or 340A or permission or instructor.
A Chm 425 Introduction to Undergraduate
Research in Chemistry (2)
Original experimental and theoretical research
problems A printed or typewritten final report is
required. Laboratory and conference hours to be
arranged. May not be repeated for credit. Not more
than 3 credits of A Chm 425 and/or A Chm 426 may
be applied toward the advanced course
requirement of the chemistry major.
Prerequisite(s): junior or senior class standing, and
permission of instructor. Corequisite(s) or
prerequisite: A Chm 424. S/U graded.
A Chm 426 Undergraduate Research in
Chemistry (3)
Original experimental and theoretical research
problems. A printed or typewritten final report is
required. May be repeated for credit, but not more
than 3 credits of A Chm 425 and/or A Chm 426 may
be applied toward the advanced course requirement of
the chemistry major. Laboratory and conference hours
to be arranged. Prerequisite(s): junior or senior class
standing, and permission of instructor; corequisite(s)
or prerequisite(s): A Chm 424. S/U graded.
A Chm 426T Honors Undergraduate Research in
Chemistry (4)
Original experimental and theoretical research
problems in chemistry with the results reported in a
written Honors Thesis, as well as a public
Department Seminar.
A Chm 430 Instrumental Analysis (3)
Theoretical principles and chemical applications of
selected methods of instrumental analysis. Main
emphasis is on electroanalytical methods including
polarography, conductance, potentiometry, and
coulometric methods, and on trace methods of
analysis such as spectrograph emission, flame
emission, atomic absorption, and fluorometric
analysis. Two class periods, one laboratory period
each week. Prerequisite(s): A Chm 225;
prerequisite(s) or corequisite(s): A Chm 320 or 340B
or permission of the instructor.
A Chm 436 Advanced Organic Chemistry (3)
Organic chemistry at an advanced level, including
introduction of theoretical background and
application in synthesis. Prerequisite(s) or
corequisite(s): A Chm 320 or 340B.
A Chm 411B Computer Applications in
Chemistry (3)
A Chm 440A and B Comprehensive
Biochemistry (3, 3)
Introduction to work station operating systems with
emphasis on
UNIX. An overview of
computational chemistry and molecular modeling
methods. Applications to database searching, drug
design and structure-activity relations. Prerequisite(s)
or corequisite(s): A Chm 320 or 340A or permission
of instructor.
Chemical characteristics of living matter, amino
acids, polypeptides and proteins, supramolecular
assembly and membrane structure; enzyme
mechanisms and kinetics; bioenergetics and the
chemistry of metabolism; electron transport and
other transports across membranes; biosynthesis,
storage, and expression of genetic information.
Prerequisite(s): A Chm 216B or permission of
instructor
A Chm 417 Advanced Synthesis Laboratory (2)
Experimental investigation of advanced syntheses of
organic and inorganic compounds including their
separation and analysis. The development of skills
and understanding for the application of complex
procedures and methods common in current
practice. Prerequisite(s): A Chm 217B.
A Chm 420A and B Inorganic Chemistry (3, 3)
Bonding and reactivity in inorganic systems
including ionic solids, metals, covalent molecules,
and coordination complexes; acid-base chemistry;
descriptive chemistry of the elements and their
compounds. A Chm 420B includes main group
chemistry,
transition
metal
complexes,
organometallic chemistry, catalysis and bioinorganic
chemistry. Prerequisite(s) for A Chm 420A: A Chm
320 or 340B; for A Chm 420B: A Chm 420A.
A Chm 441A and B Physical Chemistry for
Biochemical Sciences (3, 3)
Foundations of the physical principles and their
application to biochemical systems. Topics include:
thermodynamics, general kinetics, enzyme kinetics,
transport
phenomena,
quantum
chemistry,
spectroscopy, and macromolecular conformation.
Does not yield credit toward the major in chemistry.
Prerequisite(s) for A Chm 441A: A Chm 121N,
A Phy150N, and A Mat 113 or 119 (A Chm 216A
or B, and A Chm 342 or A Bio 365 recommended);
for A Chm 441B: A Chm 441A.
A Chm 450A Forensic Chemistry I (3)
This introductory course combines a series of
seminars, lectures, and laboratories which focus on
current topics and analytical methods utilized in
today’s modern forensic laboratories. Seminars in
Forensic Chemistry will include topics such as:
Introduction to Criminalistics, Ethical Dilemmas,
and Computer-Assisted Data Analysis. Lecture and
laboratory courses will include: Microscopy, Drug
Chemistry, Questioned Documents, Toxicology,
Latent Prints, Trace- and Firearms/Tool-marks.
Various analytical methods currently being used in
modern forensic laboratories will be performed
utilizing chromatography (TLC, GC, CG/MSD, etc.)
and liquid/liquid extractions. One lecture and two
laboratory periods each week. Prerequisite(s):
A Chm 225, A Chm 430, and senior class standing
or consent of the instructor.
A Chm 450B Forensic Chemistry II (3)
Continuation of A Chm 450A. This course
combines a series of advanced seminars, lectures
and laboratories in Forensic Chemistry. Topics such
as: public speaking on technical and non-technical
subjects, as well as courtroom testimony, will be
covered. Lecture and laboratory topics will include:
DNA, Quantitative Methodologies in Drug
Chemistry and Toxicology, as well as Advanced
Statistical Methods such as: chi-square tests,
multiple regression and correlation, nonparametric
statistics and analytical variances. Prerequisite(s):
A Chm 450A, and senior class standing or consent
of the instructor.
A Chm 455 Forensic Chemistry Internship (3)
Students will have the opportunity to acquire
practical “hands-on” experience in forensic
chemistry by participating as an intern in the work
of an agency, institution, or corporation other than
the University. The student’s work will be
supervised and evaluated by a designated individual
at the internship site. This supervisor will provide an
evaluation of the student’s work to the University at
Albany faculty member who is the instructor of
record for final assessment and grading.
Students majoring in chemistry with a forensic
chemistry emphasis may apply to the Department of
Chemistry for permission to enroll in this course.
Admission to the Forensic Chemistry Internship
course will be dependent upon the acceptability of
the candidate to the Department of Chemistry and
the host institution or agency. Among the criteria
used by these agencies will be completion of A Chm
450A and a possible background check of the
applicant. Enrollment in the course is limited in
number in order to provide substantial individual
hands-on training, and therefore is determined on a
competitive basis. Application to the program must
be made six months in advance of the beginning of
the proposed internship. S/U graded.
A Chm 495 Materials Independent Study (3)
Individually selected topic of independent study in
materials science-(chemistry) culminating in a
comprehensive written report. The material covered
is to be beyond that offered in any other formal
undergraduate course. Prerequisite(s): junior or
senior class standing, and permission of instructor.
S/U graded.
A Chm 497 Independent Study (3)
Individual, independent study of selected topics
above or beyond those offered in formal
undergraduate courses. May be repeated for credit.
Prerequisite(s): junior or senior class standing, and
permission of instructor. S/U graded.
A Chm 424 Retrieval and Presentation of
Chemical Information (1)
Instruction and practice in modern methods of
searching the chemical literature. Students are
required to develop their skills in preparing written
presentations and speeches. Prerequisite(s): junior or
senior class standing. S/U graded.
91
University at Albany
D EPARTMENT
C LASSICS
OF
Faculty
Distinguished Service Professor
Paul W. Wallace, Ph.D.
Indiana University
Professors Emeritae/i
Hans A. Pohlsander, Ph.D.
University of Michigan
Professors
John C. Overbeck, Ph.D.
University of Cincinnati
Associate Professors
Sylvia Barnard, Ph.D.
Yale University
Michael R. Werner, Ph.D.
Stanford University
Visiting Associate Professor
Stuart Swiny, Ph.D.
University of London
Adjuncts :
Richard Gascoyne, M.A.
Columbia University
Adjunct Associate Professor
Gregory I Stevens, Ph.D.
University of Michigan
placement in summer or academic-year
programs in Greece or Italy (of which many
are available) or who wish to participate in
an archaeological excavation in Europe or
the Mediterranean.
All students in the Classical Art and
Archaeology concentration are strongly
urged to include archaeological fieldwork
in their course of studies. Such a program
is offered regularly during the summer
session by both the Departments of
Classics and Anthropology.
Internships in archaeological documentation
and conservation are also available at state
agencies in the Albany area.
Students who expect to enter a graduate
program in classical archaeology are urged
to pursue the study of Latin or ancient
Greek.
Degree Requirements for the
Major in Greek and Roman
Civilization
General Program B.A.: A minimum of 36
credits at least 18 of which must be at the 300
level or above, to be distributed as follows:
1. 9 credits from the following core
courses:
The Department of Classics offers courses
in Mediterranean archaeology and art,
Greek and Roman civilization, and the
classical Latin and Greek languages. A
major in Greek and Roman civilization (in
English) is available through the general
program with two concentrations:
Mediterranean Archaeology and Art or
Classical Literature and Culture. The
department also offers a minor in Greek
and Roman Civilization.
Careers
The major concentrations in the
department would be suitable preparation
for teaching and for master’s-level studies
in classics or for professional programs in
law, library science, theology, business
administration or public administration.
The department itself offers a master’s
degree with concentrations in Latin and
classical archaeology. In the case of
classical archaeology, several graduate
programs would follow from this
concentration, including conservation and
preservation, museology, and Old World
or classical archaeology.
Special Programs or
Opportunities
There is a combined bachelor’s/master’s
program which makes it possible to earn
both degrees in a total of only five years.
The department assists students who seek
92
A Clc 110L Classical Roots: Great Ideas
of Greece and Rome
A Clc 133 History of Ancient Greece
A Clc 134 History of Ancient Rome
2. 6 credits from the following
breadth courses:
A Cas 220L Literatures of the World
A Cla 131M Ancient Peoples of the
World
A Clc 105E/L Myths of the Greek World
A Clc 125 Latin and Greek Elements in
English
A Clc 220Z Roman Poets & Playwrights
A Clc 223E/L Masterpieces of Greek
Tragedy and Comedy
A Clc 225 Greek Literature in
Translation
A Clc 321 Fifth Century Athens
A Clc 322 Alexander and the
Hellenistic Age
A Clc 330 Rome: From Republic to
Empire
A Clc 331 The Age of Trajan and
Hadrian
A Clc 402 Greek and Roman Religion
A Clc 403 Roman Civilization and
Christianity
A Clc 497 Independent Study (2-4 crs)
A Clc 498 Topics in Classical Studies
(1-4 crs)
A Ant 131M Ancient Peoples of
the World
A Ant 243 Peoples and Cultures of the
Middle East
A Ant 331 Ancient Civilizations of the
Old World
A Eng 222E/L Masterpieces of
Literature
A Eng 295E/L Classics of Western
Literature I: Ancient Epic to Modern
Drama
A Eng 296E/L Classics of Western
Literature II: Homer, Vergil, Dante,
Cervantes and Joyce
A His 130 History of European
Civilization I
A His 263E Art, Music and History: A
Multimedia Approach I
A Jst 243 Peoples and Cultures of the
Middle East
A Phi 110L Introduction to
Philosophical Problems
A Phi 114L Morals and Society
A Phi 116L World Views
A Phi 212L Introduction to Ethical
Theory
A Phi 310 Ancient Philosophy
A Phi 311 History of Medieval
Philosophy
A Rel 100E/L Introduction to the Study
of Religion
3. 18 credits from one of the
concentrations:
M EDITERRANEAN ARCHAEOLOGY
AND A RT CONCENTRATION :
A
A
A
A
Cla 207E/L Egyptian Archaeology
Cla 208E/L Greek Archaeology
Cla 209L Roman Archaeology
Cla 240 Archaeology and Ancient
Israel I: Archaeology and the
Bible (2 crs)
A Cla 241 Archaeology and Ancient
Israel II: Greco-Roman Period (2 crs)
A Cla 290 Archaeological Graphic
Documentation I
A Cla 291 Archaeological Graphic
Documentation II
A Cla 301 Aegean Prehistory
A Cla 302 Villanovans, Etruscans, and
Early Rome
A Cla 303/Z Early Christian Art and
Architecture
A Cla 307 The Pyramid Age
A Cla 310 Art and Archaeology of
Cyprus I
A Cla 311 Art and Archaeology of
Cyprus II
A Cla 329 Archaeological Field
Research (2-4 crs)
A Cla 401 Greek Sculpture
A Cla 402 Roman Sculpture
A Cla 403 Greek Painting
A Cla 405 Greek Architecture
A Cla 406 Roman Architecture and
Town Planning
A Cla 407 The Egyptian Empire
A Cla 490 Internship in Archaeological
Conservation and Documentation
(3-15 crs)
University at Albany
A Cla 492 Internship in Archaeological
Field Methodology (3 crs only)
A Cla 497 Independent Study (2-4 crs)
A Ant 104 Archaeology
A Ant 330 Topics in Archaeology
A Ant 332 Ethnoarchaeology
A Ant 335 Introduction to
Archaeological Field Techniques
A Ant 338 Archaeological Field
Research (6 crs)
A Ant 339 Archaeological Lab
Techniques
A Ant 413 Functional Anatomy of the
Human Skeleton
A Ant 430 Archaeological Theory
A Ant 431 Seminar in Social
Archaeology
A Ant 435 Archaeological Surveys
A Ant 438 Museum Research and
Curation
A Ant 490 Internship in Archaeological
Conservation and Documentation
(3-15 crs)
A Ant 504 Proseminar in Archaeology
A Ant 539 Topics in Archaeology
A Arh 170L Survey of Art in the
Western World I
A Arh 303 Early Christian Art and
Architecture
A Bio 208N Marine Biology
A Bio 322 Plant Morphology
A Bio 324 Invertebrate Zoology
A Bio 325 Comparative Anatomy of
Chordates
A Bio 415Z Vertebrate Biology
A Bio 428 Mass Extinctions:
Catastrophes in Ancient Environments
A Csi 422 Introduction to Computer
Graphics
A Geo 210 Mineralogy
A Geo 222 Igneous and Metamorphic
Geology
A Geo 230 Introduction to Field
Methods and Stratigraphy
A Gog 120 World Cities
A Gog 220M Introductory Urban
Geography
A Gog 290 Introduction to Cartography
A Gog 390 Intermediate Cartography
A Gog 396 Introductory Statistical
Methods for Geography
A Gog 414 Computer Mapping
A Jst 240 Archaeology and Ancient
Israel I: Archaeology and the
Bible (2 crs)
A Jst 241 Archaeology and Ancient
Israel II: Greco-Roman Period (2 crs)
A Phy 462 Physics of Materials
A Phy 519 Experimental Techniques in
Physics
A Pln 220M Introductory Urban
Planning
CLASSICAL LITERATURE AND
CULTURE CONCENTRATION :
(Students are strongly encouraged to take
approved courses in languages of the
Mediterranean.)
A Clg 101L Elementary Greek I
A Clg 102L Elementary Greek II
A Clg 103L Introduction to New
Testament Greek I
A Clg 104L Introduction to New
Testament Greek II
A Clg 497 Independent Study (2-4 crs)
A Cll 101L Elementary Latin I
A Cll 102L Elementary Latin II
A Cll 201L Introduction to Latin
Literature I
A Cll 202L Introduction to Latin
Literature II
A Cll 410A Latin Prose Authors
A Cll 410B Latin Poetry
A Cll 497 Independent Study (2-4 crs)
A Clc 300 The Greeks and Their
Neighbors
A Clc 301 Rome and the Mediterranean
World
A Clc 310/Z Women in Antiquity
A Clc 311 Law in Antiquity
A Com 355 Introduction to Rhetorical
Theory
A Eng 421 Literature of the Middle Ages
A Eng 522 The History of Rhetoric
A His 235 Early and Medieval
Christianity
A His 336 History of the Early
Middle Ages
A His 337 History of the High
Middle Ages
A His 338 The Italian Renaissance
A His 339 Renaissance and Reformation
in 16 th C. Europe
A His 463 The Byzantine Empire
A Ita 315 Italian Civilization from the
Etruscans to Galileo
A Jst 252 Jews, Hellenism, and Early
Christianity
A Jst 342Z Issues in HellenisticRabbinic Judaism
A Phi 523 Ancient Ethical Theory
A Phi 550 Plato
A Phi 552 Aristotle
A Phi 553 Medieval Philosophy
A Rel 103L Introduction to New
Testament Greek I
A Rel 104L Introduction to New
Testament Greek II
A Thr 221L Development of Theatre and
Drama I
A Wss 311/Z Women in Antiquity
4. 3 credits from the senior seminar
A Clc 499
Honors Program in Greek and
Roman Civilization
The Honors Program in the Department of
Classics consists of a structured sequence
of at least 12 credits of course work
designed to insure that the honors student
receives a rigorous and thorough mastery
of the discipline. These courses may be
drawn from the department’s regular
offerings in “Mediterranean Archaeology
and Art” or “Classical Literature and
Culture,” depending on the student’s
concentration in the major.
In addition, the student must complete a
specifically designed three-credit junior- or
senior-level independent study/research
project under the close supervision of a
member of the faculty.
Finally, the student must complete at least
6 credits (but no more than 12) of
intensive work culminating in a major
project (or series of projects). This
“intensive work” may take place in an
independent study, a group tutorial, a
workshop, archaeological field experience,
special work in a seminar, and/or
undergraduate research.
The student must have written approval
for the project from the honors adviser in
the department at the outset of the project.
The project will be formally evaluated at
the end of the third quarter of the
student’s senior year and submitted in
final form by the end of the fourth quarter.
To be eligible for admission to the honors
program, the student must have declared
the Greek and Roman Civilization major
and selected either of the two
concentrations. The student must also have
completed at least 12 credits of course
work within the major. In the “Classical
Literature and Culture” concentration, this
would normally include two courses in
Latin or Greek. In addition, the student
must have an overall GPA of at least 3.25,
and 3.50 in the major, both of which must
be maintained in order to graduate with
honors.
Combined B.A/M.A. Program
The combined B.A./M.A. program in Greek,
Greek and Roman Civilization, Classical
Archaeology, or Latin provides an
opportunity for students of recognized
academic ability and educational maturity
to fulfill integrated requirements of the
undergraduate and master’s degree
programs from the beginning of their junior
year. A carefully designed program can
permit a student to earn the B.A. and M.A.
degrees within nine semesters.
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University at Albany
The combined program requires a minimum
of 138 credits, of which at least 30 must be
graduate credits. In qualifying for the B.A.,
students must meet all University and college
requirements, including the requirements for
the B.A. program described above, the minor
requirement, the minimum 90-credit liberal
arts and sciences requirements, general
education requirements, and residency
requirements. In qualifying for the M.A.,
students must meet all University and college
requirements as outlined in the Graduate
Bulletin, including completion of a minimum
of 30 graduate credits and any other
conditions such as a research seminar, thesis,
comprehensive examination, or other
professional experience where required, and
residency requirements. Up to 12 graduate
credits may be applied simultaneously to
both the B.A. and M.A. programs.
Students will be considered as undergraduates
until completion of 120 graduation credits and
satisfactory completion of all B.A. requirements.
Upon meeting B.A. requirements, students will
automatically be considered as graduate
students. Students may apply for admission
to the combined degree program at the
beginning of their junior year or after the
successful completion of 56 credits, but no
later than the accumulation of 100 credits. A
cumulative grade point average of 3.20 or
higher and three supportive letters of
recommendation from faculty are required
for consideration.
Courses in Classical
Archaeology/Mediterranean
Archaeology and Art
A Cla 208E Greek Archaeology (3)
A Cla 307 The Pyramid Age (3)
A Cla 208E is the writing intensive version of 208L;
only one may be taken for credit. [AR HU WI]
Archaeology of Egypt during the Old Kingdom and
the 1st Intermediate Period, from later predynastic
times to the end of the 10th dynasty (ca. 3100–2040
B.C.). Detailed study of pyramids and tombs,
together with art and literature of the period.
Prerequisite(s): A Cla 207L, 207E or permission of
instructor.
A Cla 209L Roman Archaeology (3)
Survey of the monuments of ancient Rome and her
empire in a cultural and evolutionary context,
including major works of sculpture, wall painting
and architecture. Roman towns and principles of
town planning also studied. Translated selections
from Roman literary and historical sources. [AR
HU]
A Cla 240 (= A Jst 240) Archaeology and
Ancient Israel I: Archaeology and the
Bible (2)
Important discoveries related to biblical history and
literature. Examination of sites, artifacts, texts and
scripts from the Bronze Age to the Babylonian exile.
Only one of A Jst 240 & A Cla 240 may be taken for
credit.
A Cla 290 Archaeological Graphic
Documentation I (3)
A Cla 329 (formerly A Cla 338) Archaeological
Field Research (2–6)
This course teaches how to graphically record a typical
range of archaeological artifacts, including stone tools,
pottery, metal objects and clay figurines from the
University’s collection of New and Old World
artifacts. Emphasis will be placed on the professional
standards of artifact illustration for publication in
research projects. Prerequisite(s): permission of
instructor.
Supervised participation in the excavation of
approved Old World prehistoric, classical or
medieval sites. Prerequisite(s): junior or senior class
standing and permission of the department chair.
A Cla 291 Archaeological Graphic
Documentation II (3)
This is a continuation of A Cla 290. This course
builds upon the skills developed in A Cla 290 and
provides the experience for critical interpretation of
the artifacts being documented. Prerequisite(s):
A Cla 290.
A Cla 301 Aegean Prehistory (3)
A Cla 131M (= A Ant 131M) Ancient Peoples
of the World (3)
A Cla 302 Villanovans, Etruscans, and Early
Rome (3)
Ancient cultures from around the world will be
presented and analyzed from the available
archaeological data. The gradual development of
civilization in both the Old and New Worlds will be
the focus of the course. Only one of A Cla 131M &
A Ant 131M may be taken for credit.
Archaeology of the Etruscans and of early Rome in
the context of the Iron Age cultures of the Italian
peninsula. Prerequisite(s): A Cla 209, or A Clc 134,
or junior or senior class standing. May not be
offered in 2003-2004.
A Cla 207L Egyptian Archaeology (3)
A Cla 303 (= A Arh 303) Early Christian Art
and Architecture (3)
A survey of the remains of ancient Egypt from the
earliest times to the Roman Empire. The pyramids,
temples, tombs, mummies and works of art will be
examined in an attempt to understand the unique
character of ancient Egypt. Selections from Egyptian
religious and historical texts will be read in
translation. A Cla 207E is the writing intensive
version of 207L; only one may be taken for credit.
[AR HU]
An examination of early Christian art and
architecture from their beginnings in the 3rd century
to the death of Justinian in 565. Architecture,
painting, mosaic and the minor arts are examined in
their historical setting. A Arh 303Z & A Cla 303Z
are the writing intensive versions of A Arh 303 &
A Cla 303; only one of the four courses may be
taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): A Cla 209, or A Clc
134, or A Arh 170L.
A Cla 207E Egyptian Archaeology (3)
A Cla 303Z (= A Arh 303Z) Early Christian Art
and Architecture (3)
Survey of the prehistoric and historical cultures of
ancient Greece, as revealed by archaeology, from the
Neolithic to the Hellenistic era, with emphasis on
the evolution of pottery style, painting, sculpture and
architecture. [AR HU]
94
A Cla 311 Art and Archaeology of
Cyprus ll (3)
Important discoveries related to postbiblical Jewish
life and history. Examination of relevant papyri, the
Dead Sea Scrolls, coins, Masada, Jerusalem, burial
caves, synagogue art and other topics. Only one of
A Jst 241 & A Cla 241 may be taken for credit.
No knowledge of Greek or Latin is required
for these courses.
A Cla 208L Greek Archaeology (3)
An examination of the art, architecture and changing
environmental setting of successive cultures on the
east Mediterranean island of Cyprus from the first
human occupation to the Roman period. The
island’s role as the main contact point between Near
Eastern and Western Mediterranean civilizations
will be emphasized.
An examination of the archaeology, art, architecture
and history of the island of Cyprus from the Roman
Period to its recently won independence. The wealth
of mosaics, Byzantine church painting and Gothic
ecclesiastical and military architecture emphasize
the significance of the Christian enclave in the
Moslem east under Latin, Venetian, Ottoman and
British colonial rule.
A Cla 241 (= A Jst 241) Archaeology and
Ancient Israel II: Greco-Roman Period (2)
Archaeology of the Aegean area from Paleolithic
times to the end of the Bronze Age, with emphasis
on Minoan Crete and Mycenaean Greece.
Prerequisite(s): A Cla 208L or A Cla 208E. May not
be offered in 2003-2004.
A Cla 207E is the writing intensive version of 207L;
only one may be taken for credit. [AR HU WI]
A Cla 310 Art and Archaeology of
Cyprus l (3)
A Arh 303Z & A Cla 303Z are the writing intensive
versions of A Arh 303 & A Cla 303; only one of the
four courses may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s):
A Cla 209, or A Clc 134, or A Arh 170L. [WI]
A Cla 401 (formerly A Cla 402) Greek
Sculpture (3)
Study of selected sculptural monuments from the
Archaic, Classical and Hellenistic eras, considered
in relation to their historical, intellectual and
religious context. Prerequisite(s): A Cla 208L or
A Cla 208E.
A Cla 402 (formerly A Cla 412) Roman
Sculpture (3)
Selected monuments representing the historical
development of Roman sculpture in its social and
religious context from the early Republic to the time
of the emperor Constantine. Prerequisite(s): A Cla
208L or A Cla 208E or A Cla 209 or A Arh 170L.
A Cla 403 (formerly A Cla 432) Greek Painting
(3)
A survey of ancient Greek painting from the
beginnings about 1000 B.C. through the Hellenistic
age; primarily painted vases, but also including the
limited evidence that exists for wall painting and
other forms. Prerequisite(s): A Cla 208L or A Cla
208E.
A Cla 405 (formerly A Cla 460) Greek
Architecture (3)
The development of Greek monumental
architecture from the earliest temples through the
Hellenistic Age. Prerequisite(s): A Cla 208L or
A Cla 208E.
A Cla 406 (formerly A Cla 461) Roman
Architecture and Town Planning (3)
The development of Roman public and private
architecture, with emphasis on its urban setting and
function, and the evolution of Roman towns in Italy
and the Empire from the early Republic to the time of
the emperor Constantine. Prerequisite(s): A Cla 208L
or A Cla 208E or A Cla 209 or A Arh 170L.
University at Albany
A Cla 407 The Egyptian Empire (3)
A Clc 301 Rome and the Mediterranean World
(3)
Concentrates on the Middle and New Kingdoms
(circa 2133–1085), when Egypt ruled the east.
Includes the art, literature, architecture, political and
military activity that created the beginnings of
western civilization in the Mediterranean.
Prerequisite(s): A Cla 207L, 207E or permission of
instructor.
Courses in Greek and Roman
Civilization
A Cla 490 (= A Ant 490) Internship in
Archaeological Conservation and
Documentation (3–15)
Survey of the origin and development of the major
myths of ancient Greece. [HU]
A Clc 310 (= A Wss 311) Women in
Antiquity (3)
A Clc 105E Myths of the Greek World (3)
Study of the literary, historical and archaeological
evidence concerning the lives and roles of women in
Greek and Roman society. A Clc 310Z & A Wss
311Z are writing intensive versions of A Clc 310 &
A Wss 311; only one of the four courses may be
taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): junior or senior
class standing. [EU]
Supervised placement in an agency engaged in
conservation and documentation of archaeological
artifacts, such as the New York State Museum or
State Conservation Laboratory. Provides practical
experience and cannot be counted among the 9
elective credits above the 300-level required for
Mediterranean archaeology majors. Anthropology
majors may use up to 3 credits toward major elective
credit. May be taken by majors in Greek and Roman
civilization and anthropology only. Internships are
open only to qualified juniors and seniors who
have an overall grade point average of 2.50 or
higher. S/U graded. Prerequisite(s): permission
of instructor.
A Cla 492 Internship in Archaeological Field
Methodology (3-9)
Supervised placement in cultural resource management
firms engaged in archaeological field research. This
course provides practical experience in the methods and
goals of archaeological field investigation in the context
of specific archaeological projects managed by
professional archaeologists. The experience will include
field testing and recording and preparation of field
records for reports. Only 3 credits can be used for the
Mediterranean Archaeology and Art concentration. May
be taken by majors in Greek and Roman Civilization
with a concentration in Mediterranean Archaeology and
Art and by majors in Anthropology and Art History.
Internships are open only to qualified juniors and
seniors who have an overall grade point average of
2.50 or higher. S/U graded.
A Cla 497 Independent Study (2–4)
Seniors may offer 2 to 4 credits of independent
study in place of regular course work in classical
archaeology. Projects must be approved by the
department chair. May be repeated once.
No knowledge of a classical language is required
for these courses.
A Clc 105L Myths of the Greek World (3)
Survey of the origin and development of the major
myths of ancient Greece. A Clc 105E is the writing
intensive version of 105L; only one may be taken for
credit. [HU WI]
A Clc 110L Classical Roots: Great Ideas of
Greece and Rome (3)
Greek and Roman literature in translation. Considers
such topics as human dignity and values, power and
pride, the hero, intelligence impaired by appetite,
and justice of the gods in such authors as Homer,
Aeschylus, Sophocles, Plato, Aristotle, Vergil and
selected historians. Prerequisite(s): freshman or
sophomore class standing. [EU HU]
A Clc 125 Latin and Greek Elements in
English (3)
Systematic study of those elements of the Latin and
Greek languages that have contributed to the
formation of English vocabulary, both general and
scientific. Designed for students with no knowledge
of a classical language. May not be offered in 20032004.
A Clc 133 History of Ancient Greece (3)
An examination of the antecedents of Greek culture
in the ancient Near East and the Aegean, followed
by the rise of Greece, the development of Athenian
democracy, the decline of Greece leading to
Macedonian domination, the conquests of Alexander
the Great, and the cosmopolitan Hellenistic world.
[EU]
A Clc 134 History of Ancient Rome (3)
Alexander the Great and the Hellenistic Age, the rise
of Rome, the Republic and the Empire. [EU]
A Clc 220Z Roman Poets and
Playwrights (3)
Study of various types of Roman poetry, including
lyric, epic and dramatic, with consideration of their
role in the development of the Western literary
tradition. [WI]
A Clc 223E Masterpieces of Greek Tragedy
and Comedy (3)
A Clc 223E is the writing intensive version of A Clc
223L; only one may be taken for credit. .May not be
offered in 2003-2004. [HU WI]
A Clc 223L Masterpieces of Greek Tragedy
and Comedy (3)
Selected plays of Aeschylus, Sophocles, Euripides,
Aristophanes and Menander. A Clc 223E is the
writing intensive version of A Clc 223L; only one
may be taken for credit. .May not be offered in
2003-2004. [HU]
A Clc 225 Greek Literature in Translation (3)
Reading (in English) and analysis of ancient Greek
literary masterpieces from Homer through the
Hellenistic era.
A Clc 300 The Greeks and Their
Neighbors (3)
The Romans’ view of their origin and destiny in the
Mediterranean world. Readings in English from the
works of five Roman historians: Livy, Sallust,
Caesar, Tacitus and Ammianus. Prerequisite(s):
A Clc 134 or A Cla 209. [EU]
A Clc 310Z (= A Wss 311Z) Women in
Antiquity (3)
A Clc 310Z & A Wss 311Z are writing intensive
versions of Clc 310 & Wss 311; only one of the four
courses may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s):
junior or senior class standing. [EU WI]
A Clc 311 Law in Antiquity (3)
Survey of ancient law from Sumerian times until the
end of the Roman Empire, with emphasis on Greek
and Roman legal practice; studied in relation to
social, economic, religious and political life.
Comparisons between ancient and modern concepts
of justice. Prerequisite(s): junior or senior class
standing, or 3 credits in Classics.
A Clc 321 Fifth-Century Athens (3)
An area study of 5th-century Athens using all
available resources of history, art and archaeology,
geography, and literature. Prerequisite(s): A Clc 133
or A Cla 208L.
A Clc 322 Alexander and the Hellenistic
Age (3)
An area study of Alexander the Great and the
Hellenistic Age to the Battle of Actium (31 B.C.),
using all available resources of history, art and
archaeology,
geography
and
literature.
Prerequisite(s): A Clc 133 or A Cla 208L or A Cla
208E.
A Clc 330 Rome: From Republic to
Empire (3)
An area study of the history, art and archaeology,
geography, and literature of Rome in the transition
from republic to empire using all available
resources. Prerequisite(s): A Clc 134 or A Cla 209L.
A Clc 331 The Age of Trajan and
Hadrian (3)
An area study of the history art and archaeology,
geography, and literature of the age of Trajan and
Hadrian using all available resources. Prerequisite(s):
A Clc 134 or A Cla 209.
A Clc 402 (= A Rel 402) Greek and Roman
Religion (3)
Survey of Greek and Roman religions at large
followed by a detailed examination of the so-called
mystery religions. Interdisciplinary in nature, it
employs not only religious but also philosophical,
especially ethical, literary, historical and
archaeological materials. Only one of A Clc 402 &
A Rel 402 may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s):
junior or senior class standing and some background
in either classical or religious studies. .May not be
offered in 2003-2004.
The relations of the Greeks with the Near East and
with Rome. Readings in English from the works of
five Greek historians: Herodotus, Thucydides,
Xenophon, Arrian and Polybius. Prerequisite(s):
junior or senior class standing.
95
University at Albany
A Clc 403 (= A Rel 403) Roman Civilization
and Christianity (3)
Roman civilization in the late Empire. The relation
between pagan and Christian culture based on a
study of literary and archaeological sources.
Prerequisite(s): A Clc 134 or A His 235Z. Only one
of A Clc 403 & A Rel 403 may be taken for credit.
.May not be offered in 2003-2004.
A Clc 497 Independent Study (2–4)
Seniors may offer 2 to 4 credits of independent
study in place of regular course work in Greek and
Roman civilization. Projects must be approved by
the department chair. May be repeated once.
A Clc 498 Topics in Classical Studies (1–4)
Selected topics in classical studies. May be repeated
for credit with a change of topic. Prerequisite(s):
junior or senior class standing, or permission of
instructor.
A Clc 499 Senior Seminar in Classical
Studies (3)
Seminar on selected topics in classical studies.
Preparation of a paper under the direction of a
faculty member. Open to seniors with permission of
director.
Courses in Ancient Greek
Courses in Latin
A Clg 101L Elementary Greek I (4)
A Cll 101L Elementary Latin I (4)
Introduction to Attic Greek Prose. .May not be
offered in 2003-2004.
Grammar, composition,
reading of Latin.
A Clg 102L Elementary Greek II (4)
A Cll 102L Elementary Latin II (4)
Introduction to Attic Greek Prose. Prerequisite(s):
A Clg 101L or permission of instructor. .May not be
offered in 2003-2004. [FL]
Continuation of A Cll 101L; grammar,
composition, conversation, and reading of Latin.
Prerequisite(s): A Cll 101L or permission of
instructor. [FL]
A Clg 103L (= A Rel 103L) Introduction to
New Testament Greek I (4)
Introduction to the fundamentals of the grammar
and vocabulary of the New Testament. Readings in
the gospel of John and the Book of Acts. No
previous knowledge of Greek required. Only one of
A Clg 103L & A Rel 103L may be taken for credit.
conversation,
and
A Cll 201L Introduction to Latin
Literature I (3)
Selected readings from prose authors, especially
Cicero, and from Latin poetry. Prerequisite(s): A Cll
102L or permission of instructor for students with
two years of high school Latin.
A Clg 104L (= A Rel 104L) Introduction to
New Testament Greek II (4)
A Cll 202L Introduction to Latin
Literature II (3)
Continuation of A Clg 103L. Only one of A Clg
104L & A Rel 104L may be taken for credit.
Prerequisite(s): A Clg 103L or permission of
instructor.
Continuation of A Cll 201L; selected readings from
prose authors, especially Cicero, and from Latin
poetry. Prerequisite(s): A Cll 201L or permission of
instructor.
A Clg 497 Independent Study (2–4)
A Cll 410A Latin Prose Authors (3)
Seniors may offer 2 to 4 credits of independent
study in place of regular course work in Greek.
Projects must be approved by the department chair.
May be repeated once.
Detailed study and criticism of one or more Latin
prose authors (historians, orators, novelists, etc.)
May be repeated with change in author(s).
Prerequisite(s): A Cll 202L or equivalent.
A Cll 410B Latin Poetry (3)
Detailed study and criticism of one or more Latin
epic, lyric or dramatic poets. May be repeated with
change or author(s). Prerequisite(s): A Cll 202L or
equivalent.
A Cll 497 Independent Study (2–4)
Seniors may offer 2 to 4 credits of independent
study in place of regular course work in Latin.
Projects must be approved by the department chair.
May be repeated once.
96
University at Albany
DEPARTMENT OF
COMMUNICATION
Faculty
Professor Emeritae/i
Donald P. Cushman, Ph.D.
University of Wisconsin
Kathleen E. Kendall, Ph.D.
Indiana University
Professors
Alan Chartock, Ph.D.
New York University
Teresa M. Harrison, Ph.D.
Bowling Green State University
Robert E. Sanders, Ph.D.
University of Iowa
Timothy D. Stephen, Ph.D.
Bowling Green State University
Associate Professors Emeritae/i
Richard Wilkie, Ph.D.
University of Michigan
Associate Professors
Françoís Cooren, Ph.D.
University of Montreal
Anita Pomerantz, Ph.D.
University of California, Irvine
Assistant Professors
Annis G. Golden, Ph.D.
Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute
Cherie Strachan, Ph.D.
University at Albany
Jennifer Stromer-Galley, Ph.D.
University of Pennsylvania
Lecturer
Michael W. Barberich, M.A.
University of Maine
Adjuncts (estimated): 6
Teaching Assistants (estimated): 12
The department specializes in studies of
communication in each of three particular
social contexts: first, communication on an
individual level, involving interpersonal or
intercultural relations; second, communication
at the societal level involving large scale
audiences, especially in regard to political
action and democratic processes; and third,
communication in organizations-whether
business, governmental, or grass roots
organizations--that affects either the
organization's internal processes or external
relations. All three of these areas have been
significantly affected by new communication
technologies, the study of which we
incorporate into department course work.
The undergraduate program in Communication
has two primary goals. One is to educate
students, and expose them to significant
writings, about communication processes and
media and the critical role they play in the
conduct of social life and its quality among
individuals, in organizations, and in the larger
society.
Our second goal grows out of the first; to help
students become able to analyze and improve
communication practices in particular settings
and instances. This involves developing a
basis for judging whether or not specific
communication processes are meeting the
needs of the people involved. It also involves
learning about ways to measure the
effectiveness of specific communication
practices, and gaining experience analyzing
and designing solutions to communication
problems.
Studies in the major are organized so that
students enrolled in 100- and 200-level
courses are exposed to foundational ideas and
research findings in the field of
Communication, as well as provided with
research methods and analytic tools. Students
are also required to become more practiced as
communicators, either through a public
speaking or debate course. Course work at the
advanced (300 and 400) level is intended to
provide students with in-depth knowledge of
current research and theory about
interpersonal/intercultural communication,
organizational communication or public
communication.
Careers in Communication
The program in Communication is intended to
help students become knowledgeable about
communication processes and their influences
on the interpersonal, intercultural,
organizational and political aspects of our
societies. By focusing on development of
analytical and critical skills, the program helps
students become able to analyze and
effectively participate in, and improve
communication practices in diverse settings
and instances. Having completed their degree
in communication, the students will have a
basis for judging whether or not specific
communication processes are meeting the
needs of the people involved. They will also be
able to evaluate the effectiveness of specific
communication practices, devise ways of
improving them, and provide solutions to
communication problems. These competencies
have recognized value in the workplace as well
as in one's personal life.
Graduates of the Communication program
have pursued careers in sales, media relations,
marketing, training, commercial production,
film, editing, media planning, publishing,
journalism, financial advisement, budget
analysis, legislative assistance, radio
programming, advertising, television
production, and internal communication in
not-for-profit, governmental, and business
organizations. Some have college teaching or
advisement positions. Others have gone on to
law school, or to work on their master's degree
or doctoral degrees in Communication and
related fields.
Special Programs and
Opportunities
The department provides research
opportunities for graduate and undergraduate
students, a rigorous honors program, and an
exceptional internship program. The
department also provides a combined
B.A./M.A. Program in Communication. We
encourage all students to become active
members of the local student club of the
National Communication Association. We
invite outstanding communication majors to be
inducted into Lambda Pi Eta, the local chapter
of the national honor society for
communication.
Internship Program
The Communication Internship Practicum,
which requires enrollment in both Com 392
for 9 cr. (these credits are general electives and
do not apply toward the major or minor) and
Com 393z for 6 cr., is a full-time internship
offered in fall and spring for juniors and
seniors who have an overall grade point
average of 2.50 or higher. It includes a weekly
seminar meeting, and places students in
communication related professional settings
including, but not limited to, radio, television,
public relations, the state legislature, and
corporate communication. If you are accepted
in this internship, you are not allowed to take
any other course work during the semester.
Acceptance into the program is competitive.
The part-time Internship in Communication
(COM 390, for 1-3 lower-level credits) is for
undergraduate majors and minors who wish to
develop on-site experience in one of the
communication professions. This part-time
internship may be taken in fall, spring, or
summer terms. There is no seminar component
in this course, and the minimum number of
hours at the host agency is proportionately less
than the fulltime Internship Practicum.
Admission
Admission to the program in Communication
is restricted. All students wishing to declare
the major must complete an application and be
formally admitted by the department.
Applications can be made each semester. The
deadline for submitting applications is the first
day of the add-drop period in the fall and
spring semesters. Notification of admission or
denial generally will be made within three
business days by a posted list outside the
department office, and afterwards by mail.
Any matriculated student can apply for
admission who has completed the following
two courses with grades of C- or higher or S in
each (See the section below for the policy on
admission of transfer students to the major):
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University at Albany
(a) A Com 100, and (b) either a course in
statistics (A Mat 108, B Msi 220, A Soc 221,
R Crj 281, or A Psy 210), or a course in formal
logic (A Phi 210 or equivalent). Students who
apply and are not accepted can reapply in
subsequent semesters.
Note: A Com 100 course required for
admission to the major must be taken on the
Albany campus if the student does not already
have credit for it prior to matriculation.
An applicant will be guaranteed admission to
the major whose grades in the two entry
courses average to B or higher (in A Com 100,
and either a statistics or logic course). Grades
of S are counted as the equivalent of C for the
purposes of this computation.
Applicants whose grades in the two entry
courses average between B and C- will be
admitted to the major on a space-available
basis. Applications in this group are rank
ordered each semester on the basis of a
Composite Grade Point Average. This
Composite Grade Point Average is computed
by adding together the student's overall grade
point average and the average of the grades in
the two entry courses (A Com 100 and a
statistics or logic course). Applicants in this
group are accepted in descending rank order
until all the spaces for new majors that
semester are filled. However, no two
applicants with the same Composite Grade
Point Average will be treated differently: if
one is accepted with that average, all others
will be accepted with that average even if the
total number accepted exceeds the available
spaces that semester.
Transfer students who have completed at least
3 credits in Communication courses, and a
total of at least 6 credits in courses that count
towards the major in Communication, will be
admitted to the major automatically if their
GPA in all transfer courses that count towards
the major is 2.0 or higher. All other transfer
students seeking admission to the major will
have to meet the admissions requirements for
matriculated students after they begin
coursework on the Albany campus.
Transfer students admitted to the major who
do not have credit for A Com 100 or an
approved statistics or logic course upon
matriculation are still required to complete
those courses with grades of C- or better.
Transfer students whose grades in those two
courses fall below that minimum are subject to
being withdrawn from the major, pending an
appeal and departmental review, but will
automatically be readmitted if and when they
meet the requirement.
Advisement
Majors in the Communication Department are
encouraged to seek advisement each semester.
Advisement is offered by appointment between
the end of the add-drop period and the
beginning of the advance registration period.
Majors who have been advised during that
period are given priority for enrollment for the
next semester's Communication classes. For
students newly admitted to the major,
attendance at an orientation meeting for new
majors is required in order to get an
advisement appointment.
Advisement is under the direction of the
Director of the Undergraduate Program.
Advisement each semester is generally
conducted by an advising staff composed of
graduate assistants. However, undergraduate
majors are encouraged to seek out a meeting
with a faculty member when they begin their
studies in the department to discuss their
goals, and devise an overall plan of study
supportive of those goals in the Department, in
their Minor or Second Major, and in their
General Education requirement courses and
electives.
Degree Requirements for the
Major in Rhetoric and
Communication
General Program B.A.: A minimum of 36
credits including: A Com 100; a computing
course [all minors but business: A Cas 200 or
B Msi 215 or A Csi 101 or A Csi 201 or R Isp
100 or R Isp 301] [business minors: B Msi
215 or A Csi 101 or A Csi 201]; a statistics
course (A Mat 108 or B Msi 220 or A Soc 221
or R Crj 281 or A Psy 210) or logic (A Phi
210); A Com 265; one course from either
A Com 203 or 212; and 15-18 additional
credits in the Department of Communication
as advised (of which at least 12 credits must be
at the 300-level or above); and 3-6 credits of
supporting courses (outside the Department of
Communication), as advised.
A Com 265 is restricted to A-E grading after
matriculation at Albany.
Course offerings are listed below in grouping
according to the following headings:
1.General Foundations,
2.Public Communication,
3.Interpersonal Interaction/Cultural
Practices,
4.Organizational Communication,
5.Applied Studies.
Courses in General Foundations offer students
an introduction to the practice and social
consequences of communication in a variety of
settings, and an overview of traditional and
contemporary thought on human
communication.
Courses in Public Communication create a
98
basic understanding of the process of
communication in the political process, and
public life more generally. This includes
attention to communication and media issues
in political participation, legislative processes,
social movements, and election campaigns.
This also includes attention to the speakeraudience setting typical of argumentation and
persuasion in social and political life.
Courses in Interpersonal Interaction/Cultural
Practices provide for a basic understanding of
the process of communication in face to face
interaction. These include attention to
language use and strategy in personal
relationships, health care, and work
relationships of various kinds. Other courses
include attention to cultural differences in face
to face and group communication practices,
and the role of communication in everyday
life.
Courses in Organizational Communication
address communication processes within and
between organizations that affect their internal
operations, development, climate, productivity,
and social acceptance. These courses include a
concern for the effect of new information
technologies on organizational
communication.
Applied Studies courses provide an
opportunity for students who have achieved a
grounding in the appropriate theoretical and
research literature of the field, to apply this
knowledge in independent projects or
internships.
Honors Program
The honors program in Communication is
designed to provide opportunities for the most
talented and motivated students to work
closely with each other and with the faculty.
Students may apply for admission at any point
during a semester and may reapply if rejected
after the close of that semester or thereafter.
Decisions of the Honors Committee on
admission are final and not subject to review
or appeal.
Applications for admission will be approved if
the student meets the following criteria:
The applicant is a major in the department,
with a 3.50 average in the required courses for
admission to the major.
The applicant has completed at least two fulltime semesters of college study at Albany, with
an overall average of at least 3.50, or the
equivalent in the case of transfer students.
Admission to the program will be on a
provisional basis for any student with fewer
than 12 credits in Communication. Upon
completion of 12 credits, admission will be
finalized.
Students in the honors program are required to
complete a minimum of 36 credits, meeting all
requirements of the major, except for a special
requirement among courses at the 300 level or
University at Albany
above as follows: instead of 6 credits of
electives at the 300 level or above, students in
the honors program must complete either an
honors project for 6 credits (A Com 499), or a
senior honors project for 3 credits (A Com
499) plus 3 credits in a graduate course in
Communication (for undergraduate credit)
with approval of the undergraduate director.
Students will be put on program probation by
the Honors Committee at the end of any
semester in which their cumulative average in
the major falls below 3.50 or their term
average that semester is below 3.30.
Students will be dismissed from the program if
they are placed on program probation in two
consecutive semesters, or if they receive a grade
below B in A Com 499. Students dismissed from
the program cannot be readmitted unless the
grades on which dismissal is based were in error
and are officially changed.
After completion of the requirements above,
the records of candidates will be reviewed by
the Departmental Honors Committee, who
shall recommend to the department candidates
for the degree with honors in Rhetoric and
Communication.
Combined B.A./M.A. Program
The combined B.A./M.A. program in Rhetoric
and Communication provides an opportunity
for students of recognized academic ability and
educational maturity to fulfill integrated
requirements of undergraduate and master's
degree programs from the beginning of the
junior year. The program provides an
integrated and focused curriculum in
Communication that allows the upper-level
student exposure to advanced knowledge in
theory and substantive areas and opportunities
for participation in research. A carefully
designed program can permit a student to earn
the B.A. and M.A. degrees within nine
semesters.
The combined program requires a minimum of
141 credits, of which at least 33 must be
graduate credits. In qualifying for the B.A.,
students must meet all University and college
requirements, including the requirements of
the undergraduate major described previously,
the minor requirement, the minimum 90 credit
liberal arts and sciences requirement, general
education requirements, and residency
requirements. In qualifying for the M.A.,
students must meet all University and college
requirements as outlined in the Graduate
Bulletin, including completion of a minimum
of 33 graduate credits and any other conditions
such as a research seminar or thesis,
comprehensive examination, professional
experience, and residency requirements. Up to
12 graduate credits may be applied
simultaneously to both the B.A. and M.A.
programs.
satisfactory completion of all B.A.
requirements. Upon meeting B.A.
requirements, students are automatically
considered as graduate students.
Students who have completed a minimum of 6
credits of course work in Rhetoric and
Communication may apply for admission to
the combined degree program in Rhetoric and
Communication at the beginning of their
junior year or after the successful completion
of 56 credits, but no later than the
accumulation of 100 credits. A cumulative
grade point average of 3.20 or higher and three
supportive letters of recommendation from
faculty are required for consideration.
General Foundations Courses
A Com 100M Human Communication:
Language and Social Action (3)
Introduction to human communication in terms
of an examination of the communication needs,
processes, and results that typically occur in
different social settings. [SS]
A Com 265 Introduction to Communication
Theory (3)
Approaches
to
the
study
of
human
communication. Consideration of major research
findings, methods and conceptualizations in
such areas as persuasion, interpersonal
communication,
group
communication,
organizational
communication,
and
mass
communication. For rhetoric and communication
majors completing their major requirements as
outlined in this bulletin or subsequent editions,
A Com 265 is restricted to A–E grading after
matriculation at Albany. Prerequisite(s): A Com
100M. [IL]
A Com 270 Methods of Communication
Research (3)
Intermediate-level study of research strategies,
design of experiments, and field methods in human
communication. For rhetoric and communication
majors completing their major requirements as
outlined in this bulletin or subsequent editions,
A Com 270 is restricted to A-E grading after
matriculation at Albany. Prerequisite(s): A Com
100. Statistics course recommended.
Courses in Public
Communication
A Com 203 Speech Composition and
Presentation (3)
Introduction to the composition and
presentation of speeches. Course includes
guided practice in topic development,
organization, and the oral presentation of
various kinds of speeches. [OD]
A Com 212 Argumentation and Debate (3)
Study of and practice in the methods of
argument. Special emphasis upon skills
needed in oral argumentation. [OD]
A Com 238 Introduction to Mass
Communication (3)
Survey of electronic and print media with
emphasis on structural analysis, content
analysis, and research.
A Com 345 Argumentative Methods (3)
Composition and criticism of argumentative
discourse stressing the nature of issue,
proposition, evidence, and form. Theory of
rhetorical and scientific argument is also
included. A Com 345Z is the writing
intensive version of A Com 345; only one
may be taken for credit.
A Com 345Z Argumentative Methods (3)
A Com 345Z is the writing intensive version of
A Com 345; only one may be taken for credit. [WI]
A Com 355 Introduction to Rhetorical
Theory (3)
The writings of major theorists, from
Aristotle to figures of the 20th century.
A Com 355Z is the writing inten sive version
of A Com 355; only one may be taken for
credit. Prerequisite(s): junior or senior class
standing, or permission of instructor.
A Com 355Z Introduction to Rhetorical
Theory (3)
A Com 355Z is the writing intensive version
of 355; only one may be taken for credit.
Prerequisite(s): junior or senior class
standing, or permission of instructor. [WI]
A Com 370 Theories of Mass Media (3)
The theories, research methods, and empirical
research findings related to the effects of mass
communication on individuals and society.
Prerequisite(s): A Com 238 and A Com 265, or
permission of instructor.
A Com 376 Empirical Studies of
Persuasion (3)
Empirical approaches to attitude and behavior
change brought about by communication.
Prerequisite(s): A Com 265 or permission of
instructor.
A Com 378 Studies in Public
Persuasion (3)
Application of the student’s critical skills to the
rhetoric of a particular public figure or movement;
or to the rhetorical practice of a particular
historical period or genre of public persuasion,
such as television advertising, propaganda in mass
movements, American campaign rhetoric. A Com
378Z is the writing intensive version of A Com
378. May be repeated for a total of 9 credits with
changes in topic. Prerequisite(s): junior or senior
class standing, or permission of instructor.
A Com 378Z Studies in Public
Persuasion (3)
A Com 378Z is the writing intensive version of
A Com 378; may be repeated for a total of 9
credits when topic differs. Prerequisite(s): junior
or senior class standing, or permission of
instructor. [WI]
A Com 380 Political Campaign
Communication (3)
This course examines from both a theoretical and a
practical standpoint the planning, execution, and
evaluation of campaign communication strategies. It
focuses mainly on modern presidential campaigns—
the organization, the candidate, the audience, and
the media. Forms examined include speeches,
debates, television commercials, polling, news
stories, and interpersonal contact. This course often
has a co-requirement of A Com 297 for 1 credit.
Prerequisite(s): junior or senior class standing or
permission of instructor.
Students are considered as undergraduates
until completion of 120 graduation credits and
99
University at Albany
A Com 465 Studies in Communication
Theory (3)
Study of a selected topic in communication
theory; e.g., nonverbal communication,
consistency theory, or mass communication.
May be repeated for a total of 9 credits with
changes in topic. Prerequisite(s): A Com 265,
and junior or senior class standing.
Courses in Interpersonal/
Intercultural Communication
A Com 201 Interpersonal
Communication (3)
Introduction to those aspects of communication
which typify interpersonal relationships. Included
are experientially acquired insights into, and
theoretical considerations of, interpersonal
communication.
A Com 204 Group Communication (3)
The theory and practice of small gro up
interaction. Examination of both group
dynamics and cognitive processes, as they
relate to group deliberation.
A Com 304 Conference and Group
Leadership (3)
Advanced study of small group deliberation,
with special emphasis upon theories of group
leadership as they apply in business and
professional group communication settings.
Prerequisite(s): A Com 204 or permission of
instructor. .May not be offered in 2003-2004.
A Com 367 Theories of Interpersonal
Communication (3)
The theories, research methods, and representative
research findings related to experimental and
observational
studies
of
interpersonal
communication. Prerequisite(s): A Com 201 and 265,
or permission of instructor.
A Com 371 Theories of Intercultural
Communication (3)
Communication between people from different
cultures and/or subcultures, including racial and
ethnic groups. Focus is upon appropriate theories,
concepts, research findings, and practice in
intercultural settings. Prerequisite(s): A Com 265,
or permission of instructor. [GC; DP, if taken
before Fall 2004.]
A Com 373 Communication Codes (3 or 6)
The patterns of communication behavior in
everyday life. Emphasizes both language and
nonlanguage behavior, and the various social
contexts in which interaction occurs. Topics
include social and cultural rules for
structuring messages and the basis for
interpreting behaviors. Course includes major
components in both theory and research on
this topic, including a research paper. Course
will be scheduled intensively during the
semester to reflect the number of credits to be
earned. Prerequisite(s): junior or senior class
standing. .May not be offered in 2003 -2004.
A Com 465 Studies in Communication
Theory (3)
Study of a selected topic in communication
theory; e.g., nonverbal communication,
consistency theory, or mass communication.
May be repeated for a total of 9 credits when
topic differs. Prerequisite(s): A Com 265, and
junior or senior class standing.
100
Courses in Organizational
Communication
A Com 369 Theories of Organizational
Communication (3)
Theoretical models and empirical studies of
communication within complex organizations. Indepth case study of one or more organizations.
Prerequisite(s): A Com 265 or permission of
instructor.
A Com 465 Studies in Communication
Theory (3)
Study of a selected topic in communication
theory; e.g., nonverbal communication,
consistency theory, or mass communication.
May be repeated for a total of 9 credits with
changes in topic. Prerequisite(s): A Com 265,
and junior or senior class standing.
Courses in Applied Studies
A Com 297 Research Practicum (1–3)
Supervised participation in established
research projects. Course may be repeated for
a total of 6 credits, but only a maximum of 3
credits may be applied toward major
requirements. Prerequisite(s): permi ssion of
instructor. S/U graded.
A Com 390 Internship in Communication
(1–3)
Supervised participation in rhetorical or
communicative practices. May be repeated for
a total of 3 credits. This course is meant to
provide practical experience and cannot be
counted among the 12 additional credits in
“A Com” courses at the 300 level required for
majors. Open only to majors and minors in
their junior or senior years with
cumulative averages of at least 2.50.
Prerequisite(s): A Com 265, and permission
of undergraduate director. S/U graded.
A Com 392 Internship in Operational and
Applied Communication Theory (9)
Supervised field placement in an approved
setting. Cumulative average of at least 2.50
required. (Open only to rhetoric and
communication majors and minors, except
with permission of instructor.) Student
attends a weekly seminar (A Com 393) and
prepares a major project and weekly reports
in conjunction with that seminar. Does not
satisfy major or minor requirements.
Internships are open only to qualified
juniors and seniors who have an overall
grade point average of 2.50 or higher.
Corequisite(s): A Com 393 or 393Z and
permission of instructor. S/U graded.
A Com 393Z Seminar in Operational and
Applied Communication Theory (6)
Advanced applications of rhetoric a nd
communication theory. Participants will
complete a major project describing in detail
each segment of their work. Each participant
will also complete five ten-page analytical
papers in addition to a series of weekly
seminar papers. (Open only to rhetori c and
communication majors and minors, except
with permission of instructor.) Yields credit
toward rhetoric and communication major or
minor. Corequisites: A Com 392 and
permission of instructor. [WI]
A Com 397 Independent Study and
Research in Communication (1–3)
Directed reading and conferences on selected
topics. Course may be repeated for a total of
6 credits. Prerequisite(s): A Com 265, and
permission of instructor and department
chair.
A Com 499 Senior Honors Project (3–6)
Design and implementation of an investigation of
some clearly defined problem in rhetoric and
communication, under faculty supervision. Students
may repeat this course once, for a maximum of 6
credits, for those projects requiring two consecutive
semesters of study. Prerequisite(s): admission to the
honors program in communication; enrollment by
permission of the director of undergraduate studies.
University at Albany
D EPARTMENT OF
C OMPUTER
S CIENCE
Students may elect a short sequence of
courses in a particular aspect of computer
science, complete a minor for broader
competence, or obtain a foundation in
both theory and practice by completing
either a major in computer science or in
computer science and applied
mathematics.
Faculty
Among the majors that combine well with
either elective course work or a minor in
computer science are mathematics, any
science major, economics, geography,
linguistics, rhetoric and communication,
psychology, and sociology. A major in
business administration (such as the
management science concentrations) would
also be appropriate, but students should be
aware that they will also have to satisfy the
School of Business admission requirements.
Distinguished Professor Emeritae/i
Richard E. Stearns, Ph.D.
Princeton University
Professors
Harry B. Hunt III, Ph.D.
Cornell University
Neil V. Murray, Ph.D.
Syracuse University
Paliath Narendran, Ph.D.
Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute
Sekharipuram S. Ravi, Ph.D.
University of Pittsburgh
Daniel J. Rosenkrantz, Ph.D.
Columbia University
Dan E. Willard, Ph.D.
Harvard University
Professor Emeritae/i
Dean N. Arden, Ph.D.
Purdue University
Associate Professors
George Berg, Ph.D.
Northwestern University
Peter A. Bloniarz, Ph.D. (Collins Fellow)
Massachusetts Institute of Technology
Seth D. Chaiken, Ph.D.
Massachusetts Institute of Technology
Mei-Hwa Chen, Ph.D.
Purdue University
Andrew R. Haas, Ph.D.
University of Rochester
Lenore M. Restifo Mullin, Ph.D.
Syracuse University
Tomasz Strzalkowski, Ph.D.
Simon Fraser University
Associate Professor Emeritae/i
Edwin D. Reilly, Ph.D.
Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute
Assistant Professors
Ian N. Davidson, Ph.D.
Monash University, Australia
Robert F. Erbacher, Sc.D.,
University of Massachusetts at Lowell
William A. Maniatty, Ph.D.
Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute
Adjuncts (estimated):3
Teaching Assistants (estimated): 21
Courses offered by the Department of
Computer Science provide an introduction
to the theory and practice of computing.
Familiarity with computer languages and
data structures is developed in appropriate
courses by the completion of programming
assignments related to course material.
A familiarity with computers and their
applications may also be obtained through
noncredit “Short Courses” offered by the
Computing Center and through computer
courses offered by the Departments of
Atmospheric Science, Biological Sciences,
Chemistry, Physics, and Teacher
Education, the School of Business, and the
College of Arts and Sciences.
Students with a strong interest in the
languages and programming techniques
commonly used in business may wish to
elect the sequence A Csi 101N, 203, 205,
and 410.
The computer science majors combine
advanced topics in computer practice with
introductory material on the mathematical
foundations of computer science including
abstract models of computers and
languages and the fundamental limits of
computing.
Students with a primary interest in the
applications of computing may combine
the major in computer science with a
major or minor in other disciplines. Since
the range of applications of computing
continues to increase, such combinations
may be attractive to prospective
employers.
The B.A. in computer science requires that
the student elect at least one minor from
the list of approved minors described in a
previous section of this bulletin. Students
considering a minor in either mathematics
or physics are advised instead to consider
one of the B.S. programs described below.
The interdisciplinary combined major and
minor program in computer science and
applied mathematics or the B.S. program
in computer science is recommended for
those students who intend to pursue
graduate programs in computer science or
who wish to qualify for positions
involving research or advanced
development in computer systems design.
The interdisciplinary program combines a
strong sequence in computer science with
those courses in mathematics particularly
relevant to advanced work in computer
science.
The B.S. in computer science encompasses
a two-course sequence in physics and a
second two-course sequence in either more
advanced physics or in a second science
elected by the student.
Degree Requirements for the
Majors in Computer Science
General Program B.A.:
A minimum of 41 credits including A Csi
201N, 310, 210, 333, 311, 402, 404; two
additional A Csi courses numbered in the
range 400–450 or 500–550; A Mat 111 or
112 or 118, 113 or 119, and 367; plus
completion of an approved minor whose
courses may not overlap with any of the
courses used to complete the major.
General Program B.S. (combined
major and minor sequence):
A minimum of 74 credits as follows: A Csi
201N 310, 210, 333, 311, 300Z, 401, 402,
403, 404, 409, plus two courses from
A Phy 353, A Phy 454, or any A Csi
course numbered 300–450 or 500–550 for
a total of 42 credits; A Mat 111 or 112 or
118, 113 or 119, 220, 367, plus three
credits from any A Mat course at the 300
level or above; A Phy 140N, 145, 150N,
and 155; A Phy 240 and 250, or A Phy
240 and 315, or a two-course sequence in
a second science as approved by the
department..
101
University at Albany
Program in Computer Science and
Applied Mathematics
The interdisciplinary combined major and
minor program in computer science and
applied mathematics is an integrated
program providing a strong background in
the theory and practice of computer
science combined with those courses in
mathematics which are most likely to be
needed for advanced work in computer
science, either in graduate study or
industrial research and development.
The program provides excellent
preparation for the advanced Graduate
Record Examination in computer science
and will provide an attractive background
for admission to high quality graduate
programs in computer science. The
mathematics portion of the program, with
the appropriate selection of one or two
electives, can provide a good mathematical
background for work in operations
research which is an important area of
computer application in business, or for
numerical computation in a variety of
areas related to the scientific and
engineering use of computers.
Degree Requirements for the Major in
Computer Science and Applied
Mathematics
General Program B.S. (combined major
and minor sequence): A minimum of 66
credits as follows: A Mat 111 or 112 or
118, 113 or 119, 214, 220, 367; A Csi
201N, 210, 310, 311, 333, 401, 402, 403,
404, 409; 15 additional credits, as
advised, from the following list of courses,
including at least 9 credits in mathematics:
any course with an A Mat prefix numbered
300 or above, any course with an A Csi
prefix numbered 300–450 or 500–550,
A Csi 499, A Phy 353, A Phy 454, A Phi
432.
Honors Program
The honors program is recommended for
students planning graduate study. To be
eligible for admission, the student must
declare one of the three Computer Science
majors and must have completed the
following courses: A Csi 201N, 210, 310,
333; A Mat 112 and 113. The student must
have a GPA of at least 3.5 in the above
courses and an overall GPA of at least
3.25. To complete the honors program, the
student must complete 12 credits of course
work (to be determined by the department
in consultation with each student)
designed to ensure a rigorous mastery of
the discipline, together with an Honors
seminar (A Csi 487/487Z), and an Honors
project of at least 6 credits, (A Csi 488Z).
Consult the department for further
information.
Combined B.S./M.A. and
B.S./M.S. Programs
Two combined bachelor’s/master’s degree
programs are available with the
undergraduate major in computer science
and applied mathematics. The combined
B.S./M.A. program combines the
undergraduate program in computer
science and applied mathematics with the
graduate program in mathematics. The
combined B.S./M.S. program combines the
undergraduate program in computer
science and applied mathematics with the
graduate program in computer science.
Both programs provide an opportunity for
students of recognized academic ability
and educational maturity to fulfill
integrated requirements of undergraduate
and master’s degree programs from the
beginning of the junior year. A carefully
designed program can permit a student to
earn the B.S. and M.S. or the B.S. and
M.A. degrees within nine or ten semesters.
The combined programs require a
minimum of 140 credits, of which at least
32 must be graduate credits. In qualifying
for the B.S., students must meet all
University and college requirements,
including the requirements of the
undergraduate major described previously,
the minimum 60-credit liberal arts and
sciences requirement, general education
requirements, and residency requirements.
102
In qualifying for the M.S. or M.A.,
students must meet all University and
college requirements as outlined in the
Graduate Bulletin, including completion
of a minimum of 32 graduate credits, and
any other conditions such as a research
seminar, thesis, comprehensive
examination, or other professional
experience and residency requirements. Up
to 12 graduate credits may be applied
simultaneously to both the B.S. and M.S.
or the B.S. and M.A. programs.
Students are considered as undergraduates
until completion of 120 graduation credits
and satisfactory completion of all B.S.
requirements. Upon meeting B.S.
requirements, students are automatically
considered as graduate students.
Students may apply for admission to either
combined degree program at the beginning
of their junior year or after the successful
completion of 56 credits, but no later than
the accumulation of 100 credits. A
cumulative grade point average of 3.20 or
higher and three supportive letters of
recommendation from faculty are required
for consideration, but admission of a
student who meets the minimum
requirements is not automatic.
Courses
A Csi 100 Computing and
Disability (3)
The relation between people with disabilities
and computers. Lectures, tutorials, and
laboratory will deal with topics such as how
computers may be used by persons with
disabilities, assistive devices, software, and
applications such as word processing, database
inquiries, spreadsheets, and telecommunications.
For students with disabilities and for professionals
who teach and assist people with disabilities.
A Csi 101N Elements of Computing (3)
Introduction to the principles and practice of
computer programming through the use of the
general purpose high level programming
language
VISUAL
BASIC.
Concepts
introduced include algorithms, arrays, files,
structured programming, and top-down design.
Course also includes a brief introduction to
computer technology and computer architecture
from both a historical and modern perspective.
Only one of A Csi 101N and B Msi 215 may be
taken for credit.
A Csi 102 Microcomputer Software (3)
Theory and practice of general purpose
microcomputer software systems such as
spreadsheet and relational database packages.
Query languages for database access. Word
processing with emphasis on spelling and
grammar checking. Normally offered spring
semester only.
University at Albany
A Csi 103 Topics in Computer Literacy (3)
A Csi 210 Discrete Structures (4)
Each offering of this course will address one or
more topics that are germane to the use of
computers in every day life. The main
emphasis of this course will be on the use of
available software packages.
Proofs by induction; mathematical reasoning,
propositions, predicates and quantifiers; sets;
relations, graphs, and trees; functions; counting,
permutations and combinations. Prerequisite(s) or
corequisite: A Csi 201N. Normally offered fall
semester only.
A Csi 120N Computational Principles and
Issues (3)
Principles and issues arising in a variety of
computational situations. Discussion of topics
from computation theory, artificial intelligence,
and systems design. From computation theory, an
emphasis on impediments to computation, such as
undecidability and NP-hardness. From artificial
intelligence, an emphasis on knowledge
representation. From systems, an emphasis on
computer design and on synchronization problems.
May not be offered in 2003-2004.
A Csi 198 (formerly A Csi 298) Consulting
Service (1–3)
Classroom instruction on the practical aspects of
computing on the campus personal, network and
mainframe computer environment, including
word processing, data communications, networking
and using various operating systems. Training is
followed by continuing consulting work
experience in the public user rooms. Work
schedules are determined on an individual basis
during the first two weeks of class. May be
repeated for credit. Total credits for A Csi 198,
A Csi 490, A Csi 497 and the former A Csi 298
and A Csi 498 may not exceed nine.
Prerequisite(s): permission of instructor. S/U
graded. [IL]
A Csi 201N Introduction to Computer
Science (4)
Computer algorithms and their representation. The
principle of information hiding and its relation
to program block structure. File structure and
access methods. The efficient use of
computational
resources.
Program
development and style.
A Csi 203 Data Processing
Principles (3)
Introduction to systems analysis and structured
programming techniques using COBOL (Common
Business Oriented Language). Basic COBOL, table
handling, sorting, file structures and maintenance,
storage media, and basic functions of a multiprogramming operating system. May not be taken
for credit by students with credit for A Csi 206 or
A Csi 306. Prerequisite(s): A Csi 101N or 201N or
B Msi 215. Normally offered spring semester only.
A Csi 204 Scientific Computing (3)
Programming in the scientific languages
Fortran 77 and APL. The effect of internal
storage representation on precision and
accuracy.
Symbolic
computation
using
Macsyma. Elementary numerical methods and
the graphical presentation of scientific data.
Software libraries of interest to scientists.
Prerequisite(s): A Csi 101N or A Csi 201N or
B Msi 215, and A Mat 113 or 119. Normally
offered spring semester only.
A Csi 205 Object Oriented Programming for
Data Processing Applications (3)
Introduction to object oriented programming,
abstraction and system analysis techniques using the
C++ and Java programming languages. Basic syntax
and semantics, classes, objects, arrays and pointers.
Modular software design using header or class files
and separate compilations and linking. Use of
standard class and function libraries and packages.
Introduction to memory management and
performance issues. Prerequisite(s): B Msi 215 or
A Csi 101N or 201N.
A Csi 221 (= A Mat 221) Introduction to Discrete
Mathematics (3)
Topics chosen from sets, relations, induction,
binomial theorem, permutations and combinations,
counting, and related topics in discrete mathematics.
Only one of A Mat 221 & A Csi 221 may be taken
for credit. Prerequisite(s) or corequisite: A Mat 113
or 119.
A Csi 300Z Social, Security, and Privacy
Implications of Computing (3)
The ethical and moral implications of using
computers to affect the lives of individual and
collective members of human society. Material
drawn from a variety of topics, including security
and privacy in computers, networks, security
measures, and human users, data banks vs. rights to
privacy, intellectual property, open vs. closed
software, software piracy, unauthorized access, and
other computer crimes. Prerequisite(s): A Csi 201N.
[WI]
A Csi 310 Data Structures (3)
Commonly used abstract data structures and their
implementation. The use of pointers and recursive
programming. Stacks, queues, lists and trees, and
their application to such problems as sorting and
searching. Analysis of algorithms for using these
structures. Prerequisite(s): A Csi 201N. Normally
offered spring semester only.
A Csi 311 Principles of Programming
Languages (3)
Fundamental concepts and general principles
underlying programming languages and their use as
illustrated by Prolog and Lisp. Analysis and
implementation of run-time environment including
scope rules, binding, and parameter passing
mechanism. Introduction to interpreters and
compilers. Prerequisite(s): Grade of C or better
required in A Csi 210 and 310. Majors who declare
prior to September 1, 2002 will have the grade
restriction waived. Normally offered spring semester
only.
A Csi 333 Programming at the Hardware
Software Interface (4)
Instruction set architecture of contemporary
computers; boolean logic, memory, registers,
instructions and interrupts. Assembly language
programming; assembler passes, symbols, macros,
function linkage and separate compilations. C
language programming; syntax, control, types,
abstractions, pointers and strings. dynamic memory,
standard and user written libraries. ANSI and C++
standards. Instruction set simulation. Prerequisite(s):
Grade of C or better required in A Csi 310. Majors
who declare prior to September 1, 2002 will have
the grade restriction waived. Normally offered fall
semester only.
A Csi 400 Operating Systems (3)
Historical overview; operating system services;
mass storage file organization; memory
management in multiprogrammed systems; virtual
memory; resource allocation; concurrent processes;
deadlock detection and prevention; security; the
design of contemporary operating systems such as
UNIX. Prerequisite(s): A Csi 333.
A Csi 401 Numerical Methods for Digital
Computers (3)
Study of practical methods for the numerical
solution of a variety of problems on a digital
computer. Topics covered will include roots of
equations, numerical interpolation, numerical
integration and differentiation; the evaluation of
mathematical functions, least squares curve fitting;
the solution of simultaneous linear equations, matrix
inversion and linear programming. Prerequisite(s):
A Mat 220 and A Csi 310. Normally offered fall
semester only.
A Csi 402 Systems Programming (3)
Programming aspects of operating systems. Topics
covered include implementation of storage
management, resource allocation, multi-processing,
scheduling,
synchronization,
inter-process
communication, and terminal I/O. Emphasis on
projects to enhance subject understanding, problem
solving, and programming skills. Prerequisite(s):
Grade of C or better required in A Csi 333. Majors
who declare prior to September 1, 2001 will have
this new restriction waived. Normally offered spring
semester only.
A Csi 403 Algorithms and Data
Structures (3)
Description of common data structures such as lists,
push-down stores, queues, trees, and graphs.
Definition of algorithm efficiency and efficient
algorithms for integer and polynomial arithmetic,
sorting, set manipulation, shortest paths, pattern
matching, and Fourier transforms. Prerequisite(s):
A Csi 210 and 310. Normally offered spring
semester only.
A Csi 404 Computer Organization (3)
An introduction to the logical organization of the
hardware components of computing systems. Topics
include logic design from a functional point of view,
data representation and processing, description of
major components such as the central processing
unit and memory, and control and communication
within the components and in the system.
Prerequisite(s): A Csi 333 and 210. Normally
offered spring semester only.
A Csi 407 User Interfaces (3)
The C programming language. Event-driven
systems. Aspects of the UNIX operating system that
support simulation of multi-tasking in a single
processor environment. Window-oriented user
interfaces. Pop-up/pull-down menus. Human factors
in software engineering. Prerequisite(s): A Csi 333.
.May not be offered in 2003-2004.
A Csi 409 Automata and Formal Languages
(3)
Introduction to the theory of computation.
Models of computation including Turing
machines and push-down automata will be
examined along with their formal language
counterparts such as context-free languages.
Additional
topics
include
unsolvability,
computational complexity, and applications to
computer science. Prerequisite(s): A Csi 210.
Normally offered fall semester only.
A Csi 410 Database Management
Systems (3)
Introduction to database management systems
(DBMS) with emphasis on the relational model.
Physical and logical database design, rollback and
recovery techniques, access methods and query
language concepts. The design and use of
microcomputer-based relational systems and
spreadsheets. The hierarchical and network DBMS
models. Prerequisite(s): A Csi 310. Normally offered
fall semester only.
103
University at Albany
A Csi 416 Computer Communication
Networks (3)
A Csi 430 Introduction to Mathematical
Logic (3)
Introduction
to computer communication
networks. Equal emphasis on all layers of the
ISO reference model and the TCP/IP protocol
suite. Topics include physical networks, sliding
window protocols, remote procedure call,
routing, naming and addressing, security,
authentication, performance, and applications.
Prerequisite(s): A Csi 402 and A Mat 367.
Topics include logical validity, logical consequence,
computerized theorem proving, compactness,
soundness,
consistency,
completeness
and
incompleteness in the context of propositional logic,
first order logic, Frege-Hilbert deduction and
computerized Semantic Tableaux deduction. This
course will survey Goedel’s Completeness and
Incompleteness Theorems along with decidability,
undecidabaility, and a classification of theoretically
computable
and
uncomputable
problems.
Prerequisite(s) A Csi 210 plus permission of
instructor.
A Csi 417 Compiler Construction (3)
Compilation vs. interpretation; lexical analysis
based on finite automata; parsing; syntax-directed
translation; symbol tables; run-time storage
allocation; error detection and recovery; code
generation and optimization. Prerequisite(s): A Csi
333 and 409.
A Csi 418 Software Engineering (3)
Software engineering principles, the role of
abstraction in programming, abstract data types,
modularization
and
module
interfaces,
specifications, and teamwork. Project work in
contemporary concurrent and object-oriented
languages. Prerequisite(s): A Csi 333. Normally
offered fall semester only.
A Csi 421 Discrete Mathematics with
Applications (3)
A deeper coverage of the content of A Csi 210.
Proofs by induction, recursive definitions, and
combinatorial analysis. Introduction to recurrence
equations, graph theory, and abstract algebra.
Applications to proofs of correctness and analysis of
combinatorial
and
algebraic
algorithms.
Prerequisite(s): A Csi 210. Normally offered fall
semester only. .May not be offered in 2003-2004.
A Csi 422 (formerly A Csi 302) Introduction to
Computer Graphics (3)
A Csi 435 Introduction to Artificial
Intelligence (3)
An introduction to the broad spectrum of approaches
and techniques of Artificial Intelligence. Emphasis on
how to represent knowledge in a computer and how to
process that knowledge to produce intelligent
behavior. Topics include expert systems, heuristic
search, natural language processing and logic-based
approaches. Programming assignments using
artificial intelligence languages. Prerequisite(s):
A Csi 311.
A Csi 440 High Performance Scientific
Computing I (3)
Introduction to distributed, shared memory, and
non-uniform memory advanced architectures,
advanced networks, advanced parallel and
distributed
languages
supporting
scientific
computing. Basic linear algebra algorithms and their
relation to decomposition, memory, access patterns,
and scalability. High-level prototyping languages,
experimental methods, performance analysis and
polyalgorithm design. Prerequisite(s): A Csi 310,
A Csi 401, A Mat 220 and knowledge of numerical
methods and Fortran; or permission of instructor.
Mathematics, data structures, algorithms, system
architecture and programming projects for
implementing two and three dimensional computer
graphics software. Rastorization, matrices, linear
and projective transformations; clipping, removal of
hidden lines and surfaces. Devices, event driven user
interaction, and an introduction to window systems
and visual programming tools. Prerequisite(s):
A Mat 113 and either A Csi 333 or permission of
instructor. A Mat 220 (Linear Algebra) is desirable
but not required.
A Csi 441 High Performance Scientific
Computing II (3)
A Csi 424 Information Security (3)
The contents of this course will vary from
semester to semester. Each offering will cover
an advanced senior-level topic in Computer
Science. Prerequisite(s): A Csi 333 (or A Csi
205 & 310) or permission of instructor. May be
repeated for credit when content varies./
This course covers the broad spectrum of technical
issues surrounding computer security and intrusion
detection. Topics considered include: viruses,
worms, host- and network-based vulnerabilities and
countermeasures, database security, intrusion
detection, and privacy and legal issues. Facilities for
securing hosts and limiting vulnerability are also
discussed. Unlike in a systems administration class,
detailed operational issues are not discussed.
Prerequisite(s): A Csi 402 or A Csi 400.
A Csi 426 Cryptography (3)
The making of ciphers to encode information is the
subject of cryptography. This course covers the field
from its origins in early historic times through its
most up-to-date implementations and uses in digital
computers. Various ciphers will be shown and their
security assessed. This latter is known as
cryptanalysis – the attempt to break a cipher in order
to read the underlying message. The course will
emphasize how cryptography and cryptanalysis are
intimately related, and how the arms race between
the two has motivated progress throughout their
history. Prerequisite(s): A Csi 333 and coregistration in A Csi 403.
104
Numerical methods for ODE’s, PDE’s and
transforms (FFT) suitable for advanced parallel and
distributed computing. Explicit versus implicit
message generation and processing in distributed
computing environments. Advanced experimental
methods. High Performance Fortran, F90 and MPI.
Prerequisite(s): A Csi 440.
A Csi 445 Topics in Computer Science (3)
A Csi 487 Honors Seminar (3)
Each student is required to carry out
independent study under the supervision of a
faculty member and present a departmental
colloquium on the chosen topic. Students may
also be required to complete a theoretical or an
experimental project, write reports or make
short presentations. Only one of A Csi 487 and
A Csi 487Z may be taken for credit.
Prerequisite(s): Admission to the honors
program.
A Csi 487Z Honors Seminar (3)
Each student is required to carry out
independent study under the supervision of a
faculty member and present a departmental
colloquium on the chosen topic. Students may
also be required to complete a theoretical or an
experimental project, write reports or make
short presentations. Only one of A Csi 487 and
A Csi 487Z may be taken for credit.
Prerequisite(s): Admission to the honors
program. [WI]
A Csi 488Z Honors Project (3-12)
Students are required to pursue research
supervised by a faculty member and submit final
reports describing their research. Outcomes of this
research may include software/hardware artifacts,
data collected through experiments, bibliographies
or research papers. Each student is evaluated by a
faculty committee during the second semester of
their senior year. Honors students must complete
at least 6 credits of this course. Prerequisite(s):
Admission to the honors program. [WI]
A Csi 490 Internships in Computer
Science (1–3)
Arrangements with external agencies or
companies requiring programming or design
assignments involving computer systems in a
practical environment. Interns are selected by
the department and are required to submit a
significant report upon completion of the
internship. Total credits for A Csi 198, A Csi
490, and A Csi 497 and the former 298 and
498 may not exceed nine. Internships are
open only to qualified juniors and seniors
who have an overall grade point average of
2.50 or higher. Prerequisite(s): A Csi 203 or
310, and permission of department. S/U
graded. For majors only.
A Csi 497 Independent Study in Computer
Science (1–3)
Independent study in computer science under the
guidance of faculty computer users. Students should
expect to spend approximately three hours per week
per credit solving real computer-related problems
and submit a significant paper or report upon
completion. May be repeated for credit. Total credits
for A Csi 198, A Csi 490, and A Csi 497 and the
former 298 and 498 may not exceed nine.
Prerequisite(s): A Csi 203 or 310, and permission of
department. S/U graded.
A Csi 499 Senior Project in Computer
Science (3)
Introduction to software engineering. Students will
participate in the design and production of a large,
modular program typical of those encountered in
business and industry. Prerequisite(s): A Csi 333 or
311, and permission of instructor.
University at Albany
D EPARTMENT OF
E ARTH AND
A TMOSPHERIC
S CIENCES
The Department of Earth and Atmospheric
Sciences offers students four distinct
undergraduate degrees within two programs:
[1] a Bachelor of Science degree (B.S.) in
Geological Sciences is offered within the
Geological Sciences Program; [2] a Bachelor
of Science (B.S.) in Atmospheric Science is
offered within the Atmospheric Science
Program; [3] a Bachelor of Science (B.S.) in
Environmental Science; and [4] a Bachelor of
Arts degree (B.A.) in Earth and Atmospheric
Sciences. Both the B.A. in Earth and
Atmospheric Sciences and the B.S. in
Environmental Science are offered within the
overall department, spanning both programs.
All four degrees are recognized as particularly
challenging and attract students of high caliber
who are interested in studying the fundamental
processes operating on-and-within the Earth
and its atmosphere.
(A detailed description of the Geological
Sciences Program follows below; descriptions
of the Atmospheric Science Program and the
Broadcast Meterorology and Environmental
Science Program follow on pages 108 and
110.)
P ROGRAM IN
G EOLOGICAL
S CIENCES
Faculty
Distinguished Teaching Professors
John W. Delano, Ph.D.
State University of New York at Stony Brook
Professors
William S. F. Kidd, Ph.D.
Cambridge University
Gregory D. Harper, Ph.D.
University of California, Berkeley
Professor Emeritae/i
Winthrop D. Means, Ph.D.
University of California, Berkeley
Akiho Miyashiro, D.O.C.
Tokyo University
Associate Professors
Andrei Lapenis, Ph.D.
State Hydrological Institute, St. Petersburg
(joint appointment in Geography and Planning)
Braddock K. Linsley, Ph.D.
University of New Mexico
Associate Professor Emeritae/i
George W. Putman, Ph.D.
Pennsylvania State University
Visiting Assistant Professors
John G. Arnason, Ph.D.
Stanford University
Adjuncts (estimated): 2
Teaching Assistants (estimated): 8
Careers
Graduates with a B.S. in geology or
environmental science have found satisfying
employment not only in jobs directly related to
these disciplines but also in a wide variety of
other activities. Students graduating with a
B.S. in geology who pursue advanced degrees
in geology, computer science, business
administration, or geophysics have a
competitive edge in the job market.
Professional opportunities in jobs using
geological expertise are much wider for
graduates with master’s degrees, in particular
for employment with environmental
service/consulting companies, oil and mineral
resource companies, and with state or federal
agencies having responsibilities involving
geological matters (geological surveys, water
supply, environmental conservation, transport,
etc.). Developing shortages of fossil fuels and
raw materials for industry, along with an
increasing need for professionals trained to
understand complex environmental problems
should provide a sustained demand for
professional geologists and environmental
scientists.
Special Programs or Opportunities
The Geology Program sponsors two weekly
seminar series that provide students with a
sampling of important topics in current
geological research: (1) informal talks given
by faculty and graduate students; and
(2) formal seminars presented by outside
speakers. The Program also sponsors field
trips in New York, New England, and the
Appalachians.
Degree Requirements for the
Major in Geology
General Program B.S.: A minimum of 66
credits for the combined major and minor
including: (Required) A Geo 100N or A Geo
100F, 106, 210, 212, 222, 230, 231 (or
231Z), 330, 350, 400, , 470 ; A Mat 111 or
112 or 118, 113 or 119; A Phy 105N, 106,
108N; 109, A Chm 120N, 121, 122A, 122B.
Elective Classes (choose at least 9 credits of
the following; A Geo 260, 211, 331, 332,
420, 435, 450, 466, 497. Students are
encouraged to take the following additional
courses: A Geo, 317; A Mat 108, 214, 220,
311; A Csi 101N or 201N; A Atm 100N.
Degree Requirements for the
Major in Earth and Atmospheric
Sciences
Bachelor of Arts (B.A.): A minimum of 5660 credits for the combined major and minor
including: A Phy 105, 106, 108, 109; A Mat
101, 108, 111; A Chm 120N; A Geo 100N or
100F, 106, 250 or A Gog 101N; A Atm 100N
or 102N, 210 or 210Z, 211; two courses from
A Gog 304, 385, 431, 496; a total of at least
12 credits from the following, including at
least one course from each discipline: A Geo
330, 350, 435, and A Atm 304 or 304Z, 305,
307 or 307Z, 311, 335, 390, 408B.
The B.A. in Earth and Atmospheric Sciences
is offered as an interdisciplinary study of
significant breadth spanning two classical
disciplines. Students electing this major have
the potential to realize new opportunities for
personal enrichment and career development.
However, those students committed to
seeking advanced degrees in geology or
atmospheric science should pursue the
corresponding B.S. degree instead. All
students contemplating any of the curricula
described here should thoroughly discuss
their options with personnel of the
Advisement Services Center (ASC) and a
department undergraduate adviser before
formal declaration of a specific major.
105
University at Albany
Departmental Honors Program
Students who have achieved a GPA of 3.5 in the
major, and an overall GPA of 3.25, may apply to
the Department Chairperson not later than the
end of their junior year to enter the Department
Honors Program. Interested students should
enroll in Geo 499, Seminar in Geology, in the
spring semester of their junior year. In order to
graduate with Honors, accepted students must
take A Geo 498, Independent Honors Research
(3 credits), and complete it with a grade of A or
A-, as well as maintaining superior academic
performance overall and in the major during
their senior year. Proposals for research to be
done in A Geo 498 must be approved in writing
by the supervising faculty member and the
Department Chairperson before the end of the
spring semester of the student’s junior year. The
other three required credits for Departmental
Honors will consist of a total of three credits of
A Geo 499 Seminar in Geology, one in each of
the last three semesters of the degree program.
Combined B.S./M.S. Program
The combined B.S./M.S. program in geology
provides an opportunity for students of
recognized academic ability and educational
maturity to fulfill integrated requirements of
undergraduate and master’s degree programs
from the beginning of the junior year. A
carefully designed program can permit a
student to earn the B.S. and M.S. degrees
within ten semesters.
The combined program requires a minimum of
138 credits, of which at least 30 must be
graduate credits. In qualifying for the B.S.,
students must meet all University and college
requirements, including the requirements of the
undergraduate major described previously, the
minimum 60-credit liberal arts and sciences
requirement, general educational requirements,
and residency requirements. In qualifying for the
M.S., students must meet all University and
college requirements as outlined in the Graduate
Bulletin, including completion of a minimum of
30 graduate credits and any other conditions
such as a research seminar, thesis,
comprehensive examination, professional
experience, and residency requirements. Up to
12 graduate credits may be applied
simultaneously to both the B.S. and M.S.
programs.
The following graduate courses may be
substituted for required undergraduate courses:
A Geo 517 for A Geo 470, A Geo 535 for
A Geo 435, A Geo 550 for A Geo 450, A Geo
566 for A Geo 466,. A reading knowledge of a
foreign language useful in the study of geology
(French, German, Russian, Spanish,
Portuguese, Chinese) must be demonstrated
before completion of the program, or
satisfactory proficiency in a research skill such
as computer programming may be substituted
for the language requirement at the discretion
of the department.
Students are considered as undergraduates until
106
completion of 120 graduation credits and
satisfactory completion of all B.S. requirements.
Upon meeting B.S. requirements, students
accepted into the combined B.S./M.S. program
are automatically considered as graduate
students.
Students may apply for admission to the
combined degree program in geology at the
beginning of their junior year or after the
successful completion of 56 credits, but no
later than the accumulation of 100 credits. A
cumulative grade point average of 3.20 or
higher and three supportive letters of
recommendation from faculty are required
for consideration.
Courses
A Geo 100N Planet Earth (3)
Introduction to the Geological Sciences, including
evidence for the major processes and significant
events in the origin, history and present condition of
the solid Earth. Major topics include geological
time, earthquakes, volcanism, plate tectonics and the
origin and movement of continents and oceans,
mountain building, evidence for past climate
change, including glaciation, formation of the earthmoon system, earth resources and geological
constraints and consequences of energy use.
Emphasis is placed on understanding why we think
we know things about the Earth, to enable the
student to understand common features of rocks and
minerals and the larger-scale solid Earth, and to
provide a lifetime background for making informed
judgments on increasing number of public issues
requiring geological knowledge. Fall and spring
semesters. [NS]
A Geo 100F Planet Earth (3)
A Geo 100F is the writing intensive version of
A Geo 100N; only one may be taken for credit.
Fall semester only. [NS WI]A Geo 102N Planet
Earth and Physical Geology Laboratory (4)
Introduction to the Geological Sciences, including
geological time, earthquakes, volcanism, plate
tectonics evidence for climate change in the past,
glaciation, earth resources, and origin of the EarthMoon system. The laboratory section introduces
geological maps, identification of rock and
mineral specimens, and making of geological
cross-sections.
A Geo 106 Physical Geology Laboratory (1)
Elementary classification of minerals and rocks,
and their identification in hand specimen.
Introduction to geological maps and sections, both
as sources of geological information and as aids in
the solution of practical problems. Guided and
self-guided field trips to building stones of
downtown Albany. This course is required for
majors in Geology and Earth Science. One lab
each week. Corequisite(s): A Geo 100N or 100F.
Fall and spring semesters.
A Geo 201 (= A Gog 201) Environmental
Analysis (3)
Uses laboratory work and local field excursions to
give students “hands-on” experience in physical
geography and environmental sciences. Focuses on
human impacts on the environment and on problems
of environmental contamination. Prerequisite or
corequisite: A Gog 101N. [NS]
A Geo 210 Earth Materials (3)
Crystal structures and crystal chemistry, with
emphasis on the major rock- and soil-forming
mineral groups. Selected minerals of commercial
importance.
Examples
of
mineral-forming
processes, and use of mineral properties as
indicators of geological conditions. Three lectures
each week. Prerequisite(s): A Geo 100N or 100F,
106; or permission of instructor. Fall semester
only.
A Geo 211 Optical Mineralogy Laboratory (1)
Introduction to the petrographic microscope.
Optical properties of minerals and their use for
mineral identification. One lab each week.
Corequisite(s): A Geo 210 or permission of
instructor.
A Geo 212 Earth Materials Laboratory (1)
An introduction to the study of minerals. Major
topics include the formation, physical properties,
structure, symmetry, and classification of minerals
with emphasis on rock-forming minerals. In
laboratory, students will gain hands-on experience
with mineral identification of hand samples and
mineral properties. The course also introduces more
advanced topics in mineral transformations, crystal
chemistry, and crystallography.
A Geo 222 Igneous and Metamorphic Geology
(4)
Description, classification, and occurrence of
igneous and metamorphic rocks. Introduction to
phase diagrams, metamorphic facies, and
petrogenetic grids. Laboratory section will involve
practical identification of mineralogy and textures in
hand specimens and thin sections. Three lectures
and one lab per week. Prerequisite(s): A Geo 100N
or 100F, 106, 210, 211; or permission of instructor.
Spring semester only.
A Geo 230 Stratigraphy, Sedimentology, and
the Fossil Record (3)
Stratigraphic principles and correlation,
identification and classification of sedimentary
rocks, introduction to paleontology and historical
geology. Three lectures and one lab each week.
Geology BS and Earth Science BS majors must also
register concurrently for either A Geo 231 or A Geo
231Z,
Field
Excursions
in
Stratigraphy.
Prerequisite(s): A Geo 100N or 100F, 106; or
permission of instructor. Fall semester only.
A Geo 231 Field Excursions for Stratigraphy (2)
One lab per week and five full-day weekend field
trips to be taken by Geology BS and Earth Science
BS majors concurrently with A Geo 230
Stratigraphy. Corequisite(s): A Geo 230 or
permission of instructor. Offered fall semester
only.
A Geo 231Z Field Excursions for Stratigraphy (2)
One lab per week and five full-day weekend field
trips to be taken by Geology and Earth Science BS
majors concurrently with A Geo 230 Stratigraphy.
Extended written and illustrated reports must be
submitted based on the observations made on each
trip. A Geo 231Z is the writing intensive version of
A Geo 231; only one may be taken for credit.
Corequisite(s): A Geo 230 or permission of
instructor. [WI]. Offered fall semester only.
A Geo 250 Energy and Resources (3)
Examination of energy production using nonrenewable (coal, oil, natural gas, uranium) versus
renewable resources (hydroelectric, solar, wind,
geothermal) relative to present and future
environmental and societal impacts. Fields trips to
energy producing facilities (e.g., Blenheim-Gilboa
Pumped Storage Power Plant). Prerequisites; A Geo
100 or Atm 100; Chm 120N or Phy 105N; Mat 111.
University at Albany
A Geo 260 Earth Surface Processes and
Hazards (3)
A Geo 420 Instrumental Analysis in
Environmental Science (3)
A Geo 498 Undergraduate Honors
Research (3)
An aspect of environmental science that includes
natural geologic processes potentially harmful to
people and human modifications of natural systems
that can make them harmful. Includes rivers and
flooding, groundwater, severe storms, landslides,
soil erosion, acid rain, greenhouse effect, pollution
and waste disposal, coastal problems, estuarine and
wetland problems, and hazards associated with
volcanoes and earthquakes. Prerequisites: A Geo
100N.
A hands-on introduction to instrumental analysis in
earth science. Lecture topics include basic principles
of
spectroscopy,
chromatography,
mass
spectrometry, sampling methods, and error
estimation
with
specific
applications
to
environmental science and geology. In laboratory,
students will gain hands-on experience with ion
chromatography, atomic absorption spectrometry,
carbon analysis, and other methods. Provides a
foundation for research projects in the senior year.
Two hours lecture/2 hours laboratory each week.
Prerequisite(s): A Mat 108 and A Geo 350 or
permission of the instructor. S/U graded
Supervised research for undergraduates admitted
to the Department Honors Program. To be taken
summer and/or fall semester at beginning of senior
year. Written proposal for research must be
approved no later than end of spring semester of
junior year. Prerequisite(s): Permission of
instructor and chair. Fall and spring semesters.
A Geo 317 (= A Gog 317) Geomorphology (3)
A systematic introduction to the study of
landforms and the processes that shape them.
Laboratory work and field trips are part of the
course. Prerequisite(s): A Gog 101N; A Geo 100N
or 100F; or permission of instructor. Fall semester
only. .May not be offered in 2003-2004.
A Geo 330 Structural Geology I (3)
Descriptive structural geology, with emphasis on
features seen at outcrop and map scales. Selected
examples of rock microstructures and their
interpretation. Three lectures each week.
Prerequisite(s): A Geo 100N or 100F, 106. Spring
semester only.
A Geo 331 Field Excursions for Structural
Geology I (1)
Five full-day weekend field trips to be taken by
Geology and Earth Science BS majors concurrently
with Structural Geology I. Several written and
illustrated reports must be submitted based on the
observations made. Prerequisite(s): permission of
instructor; corequisite: A Geo 330. Offered spring
semester only.
A Geo 332 Structural Geology Laboratory (1)
Structures on maps, on images, and in rock
specimens; computer-based presentation of data.
One lab each week. Corequisite(s): A Geo 330.
Spring semester only.
A Geo 350 Environmental Geochemistry (4)
Contemporary topics are used to develop concepts
of geochemical processes operating in Earth’s
environmental system. These topics (a) PCBs in the
Upper Hudson River, (b) biogeochemical cycles in
the global climate system, and (c) geochemical
constraints on long-term disposal of high-level,
nuclear wastes. 3 hours per week in classroom
setting + 2 hours per week of oral presentations by
students. [OD]
A Geo 435 Geohydrology (3)
Introduction to surface water hydrology and ground
water hydrogeology. Topics to be covered include,
stream hydrograph analysis, flood plain determination,
drainage basin analysis, aquifer characterization, pump
test analysis, groundwater chemistry and tracers,
contaminant hydrogeology, regulatory policy, and
introduction to groundwater modeling. . Prerequisite(s):
A Mat 112, A Chm 120N or permission of instructor.
Spring semester only.
Oral presentation by students of a research topic:
attendance at weekly seminar given by other
students in this course, and A Geo 500, and regular
attendance at geological science seminars given by
outside speakers [approximately once weekly in
semester]. Students admitted to the Departmental
Honors Program must take this course in the last
three semesters of their degree program. Fall and
spring semesters.
A Geo 450 Climate Change (4)
Introduction to the field of Paleoclimatology. Focus
will be on the use of sediments and other biological
and
geological
archives
to
reconstruct
environmental, climatic, and oceanographic change
over a range of time scales. Lecture will also provide
an introduction to the fields of climatology, age
dating techniques, climatic/ environmental proxies
(tracers), micro-paleontology, and time-series
analysis. In addition to lectures, the class will
involve review of current scientific studies, class
presentations by each student, and a review paper on
a relevant topic of choice. 3 lectures each week and
2 hours each week of oral presentations by students;
Prerequisites: A Chm 120N, A Mat 108, or
permission of the instructor. This course satisfies the
General Education requirement in Oral Discourse.
Fall semester only.
A Geo 455 Special Topics (2-3)
A structured program of reading and seminars
leading to an in-depth understanding of a chosen
topic in geology. Prerequisite(s) A Geo 210, 230, or
230Z; and permission of instructor. Students may
repeat course once for an additional two or three
credits. Fall or Spring semester.
A Geo 466 Marine/Estuary Systems (3)
May be taken with any Geo course at the 300 or 400
level to fulfill a writing intensive version of that
course. Students will have an opportunity for
assistance during writing and revision of written
material with the help of editorial assignments from
the instructor. Corequisite(s): any A Geo 300 or 400
level course. Fall and spring semesters. [WI]
Interdisciplinary study of marine and estuary
systems with a focus on marine/estuary
sedimentology and biogeochemistry. Additional
study of lacustrine systems will be integrated into
the class. In addition to lectures, the class will
involve review of current scientific studies, a class
presentation by each student, and a review paper on
a relevant topic of choice. 3 lectures each week.
Prerequisites: A Geo 100N, A Chm 120N, A
Geo210, or permission of the instructor
A Geo 400 Field Mapping (4)
A Geo 470 Tectonics (4)
Supervised geological mapping. Three weeks of
field work (off campus) followed by independent
study and laboratory sessions for preparation of
report (in Albany). Field work starts in early
August; laboratory sessions once a week in first
quarter of fall semester. Prerequisite(s): A Geo
230, 330; or permission of instructor.
Seismologic basis for plate tectonics, kinematics
of plate motions, paleomagnetism. Study of
modern mid-ocean ridges, magmatic arcs,
transforms, and collisional belts. Three lectures
and one lab per week. Prerequisite(s): A Geo 230,
330; or permission of instructor. Fall semester
only.
A Geo 395Z Writing in the Geological Sciences
(1)
A Geo 499 Seminar in Geology (1)
A Geo 497 Independent Study (1-3)
Field or laboratory investigation of a chosen
geologic problem, including the writing of a
research report to be undertaken during the senior
year. Prerequisite(s): permission of instructor.
Students may repeat this course once for additional
credits. Fall or spring semesters.
107
University at Albany
P ROGRAM IN
A TMOSPHERIC
S CIENCE
Faculty
Professor Emeritae/i
Duncan C. Blanchard, Ph.D.*
Massachusetts Institute of Technology
Ulrich Czapski, Ph.D.
Hamburg University
Jai S. Kim, Ph.D.
University of Saskatchewan
Volker A. Mohnen, Ph.D.
University of Munich
Jon T. Scott, Ph.D.
University of Wisconsin
Professors
Lance F. Bosart, Ph.D.
Massachusetts Institute of Technology
Kenneth L. Demerjian, Ph.D.
Ohio State University
Daniel Keyser, Ph.D.
Pennsylvania State University
Arthur Z. Loesch, Ph.D.
University of Chicago
John E. Molinari, Ph.D.
Florida State University
Associate Professors
Vincent P. Idone, Ph.D. (Chairperson)
University at Albany
Robert G. Keesee, Ph.D.
University of Colorado
Christopher Thorncroft, Ph.D.
University of Reading
Assistant Professor
Karen Mohr, Ph.D.
University of Texas, Austin
Associated Faculty
Julius Chang, Ph.D.*
State University of New York at Stony Brook
David R. Fitzjarrald, Ph.D.*
University of Virginia
Lee C. Harrison, Ph.D.*
University of Washington, Seattle
David Knight, Ph.D.
University of Washington, Seattle
G. Garland Lala, Ph.D.*
University at Albany
Michael Landin, M.S.
University at Albany
Joseph J. Michalsky, Ph.D.*
University of Kentucky
Qilong Min, Ph.D.*
University of Alaska, Fairbanks
Richard R. Perez, Ph.D.*
University at Albany
108
James J. Schwab, Ph.D.*
Harvard University
Christopher J. Walcek, Ph.D.*
University of California, Los Angles
Wei-Chyung Wang, D.E.S.*
Columbia University
Kevin Tyle, M.S.
University at Albany
Fangqun Yu, Ph.D.*
University of California, Los Angeles
Visiting Professors
Michael J. Reeder
Monash University
Morris Weisman
National Center for Atmospheric Research
W. James Steenburgh
University of Utah
* Primary appointment with the Atmospheric
Sciences Research Center as Research
Professors.
Adjuncts (estimated): 1
Teaching Assistants (estimated): 10
The Department of Earth and Atmospheric
Sciences and the Atmospheric Sciences
Research Center (ASRC) provide the
University with the state’s largest program
in atmospheric science and meteorology.
The undergraduate program provides a
broad background in three fundamental
areas of atmospheric science: synoptic
(observations and weather forecasting),
dynamic (theory and computer modeling),
and physical (lightning, acid rain, cloud
physics, atmospheric chemistry). Because
the department has a highly active research
program in these areas, many opportunities
exist for undergraduate research projects
and part-time jobs.
The first two years of the program provide
basic training in mathematics, physics,
chemistry, and introductory atmospheric
science. All students are encouraged to take
one or two 100-level courses for enjoyment
and experience (these count as electives but
not as courses for the major). In the junior
and senior years, requirements in the
fundamental areas of atmospheric science
are combined with electives, including
advanced courses on atmospheric physics,
atmospheric dynamics, weather forecasting,
tropical meteorology and hurricanes, solar
energy, air pollution, climatology, and
computer applications. Highly qualified
students are eligible to enter an accelerated
degree program in their junior year that
leads to a combined B.S./M.S. degree
Many opportunities exist for students to
become involved in department activities.
Each semester, several students take part in
an internship program with the on-campus
office of the National Weather Service
(NWS), gaining experience with weather
forecasting and familiarity with the
responsibilities of a NWS meteorologist.
In addition, a weather forecasting
competition is held in the department each
semester while classes are in session. The
forecasting, along with concurrent weather
discussions led by a faculty member, are
open to all undergraduate majors.
Undergraduates hired part-time and during
the summer through research grants have
the chance to work closely with a faculty
member while contributing to current
meteorological research. The Eastern New
York Chapter of the American
Meteorological Society (AMS) meets
regularly and provides speakers of general
interest on a variety of meteorological
topics. Through these and other activities,
the department offers exciting and varied
opportunities to any student curious about
the science of the atmosphere around us.
Careers
Graduates obtain employment in weather
forecasting, environmental engineering,
radio and TV broadcasting, scientific
consulting, and other private firms; in
university departments and research
laboratories; and in federal and state
agencies such as the National Weather
Service, U.S. Air Force, and State
Department of Energy Conservation. About
half our graduates choose to go on to
graduate school for an advanced degree.
(The department offers full financial
support and a complete tuition waiver to
most students accepted into our graduate
program.)
Degree Requirements for the
Major in Atmospheric Science
General Program B.S.: A combined major
and minor sequence including A Atm 210
(or 210Z), 211, 320, 321, 333, 410, 411; at
least 12 additional credits from A Atm 307
(or 307Z) and higher level courses as
advised; A Phy 140, 145, 150, 240; A Mat
111 or 112 or 118, 113 or 119, 214, 311;
A Chm 120N, 122A. No more than 6 credits
from A Atm 490, 497, 498 or 499 may be
applied toward the major requirements;
further, a maximum of 3 credits from A Atm
490 will apply.
A solid foundation in physics and
mathematics is recommended for all
students planning to major in atmospheric
science. It is recommended that all students
considering this major meet with a
representative of the department before
each of the freshman and sophomore
registration sessions.
University at Albany
Departmental Honors Program
Students who have by the end of their
fourth semester attained a cumulative grade
point average of at least 3.25 and a grade
point average of at least 3.5 in courses
required of the major in atmospheric
science may apply to the department chair
for the program leading to a B.S. degree
with honors in atmospheric science.
Applications must be submitted before the
end of the first semester of the student’s
junior year and must be accompanied by
letters of recommendation from at least two
faculty members.
To be admitted to the program, a student
must have completed three semesters of
physics (A Phy 140, 145, 150, 240, three
semesters of mathematics (A Mat 111 or
112 or 118, 113 or 119, 214), and must be
enrolled in or have completed A Atm 333.
These requirements may be altered, upon
request, for qualified transfer students. At
the end of the junior year, the student’s
program will be reviewed by the Honors
Committee to see if satisfactory progress is
being made.
To be eligible for a degree with honors,
students must complete a minimum of 74
credits specified as follows: (1) the physics,
mathematics, and chemistry requirements of
the major; (2) the core sequence in
atmospheric science (A Atm 210 or 210Z,
211, 320, 321, 333, 410 and 411) plus any
three A Atm courses at the 400 or 500
level; (3) a coherent core of three upperdivision courses in any discipline besides
atmospheric science; and (4) 6 credits of
A Atm 499 taken over at least two
semesters culminating in a significant
undergraduate thesis and an honors seminar
in the student’s final semester. Students in
the program must maintain both a minimum
grade point average of 3.25 overall and 3.5
in atmospheric science courses taken to
satisfy major requirements during the junior
and senior years.
Upon completion of the requirements, the
honors committee will make its
recommendation to the faculty to grant the
degree with honors in atmospheric science
based upon the candidate’s (1) academic
record, (2) research project report, (3)
honors seminar, and (4) faculty
recommendations.
Degree Requirements for the
Major in Earth and Atmospheric
Sciences
Bachelor of Arts (B.A.): A minimum of
56-60 credits for the combined major and
minor including: A Phy 105, 106, 108, 109;
A Mat 101, 108, 111; A Chm 120N; A Geo
100N or 100F, 106, 250 A Gog 101N;
A Atm 100N or 102N, 210 or 210Z, 211;
two courses from A Gog 304, 385, 431,
496; a total of at least 12 credits from the
following, including at least one course
from each discipline: A Geo 330, 350, 435;
A Atm 304 or 304Z, 305, 307 or 307Z, 311,
335, 390, 408B.
The B.A. in Earth and Atmospheric
Sciences is offered as an interdisciplinary
study of significant breadth spanning two
classical disciplines. Students electing this
major have the potential to realize new
opportunities for personal enrichment and
career development. However, those
students committed to seeking advanced
degrees in the geological or atmospheric
sciences should pursue the corresponding
B.S. degree instead. All students
contemplating any of the curricula
described here should thoroughly discuss
their options with personnel of the
Advisement Services Center (ASC) and a
department undergraduate adviser before
formal declaration of a specific major.
Combined B.S./M.S. Program
The combined B.S./M.S. program in
atmospheric science provides an
opportunity for students of recognized
academic ability and educational maturity
to fulfill simultaneously undergraduate and
graduate course requirements in their senior
year, thereby accelerating progress toward
the M.S. degree. A carefully designed
program can permit a student to complete
the B.S. and M.S. degrees one year sooner
than is otherwise possible.
Graduate Bulletin, including completion
of a minimum of 30 graduate credits and
any other conditions such as a research
seminar, thesis, comprehensive
examination, professional experience, and
residency requirements. Up to 9 graduate
credits may be applied simultaneously to
both the B.S. and M.S. programs.
In the summer following the senior year, the
student will begin work on his or her
graduate research. In preparation for this
accelerated research program, the student
will be required to take two semesters (6
credits) of A Atm 499, Undergraduate
Research, during the junior or senior year.
These 6 credits may be counted toward the
undergraduate elective requirement from
either of the following requirements: (1)
from any four additional A Atm courses at
the 400 or 500 level as advised or (2) from
6 additional credits in mathematics or
sciences as advised.
Students are considered as undergraduates
until completion of 120 graduation credits
and satisfactory completion of all B.S.
requirements. Upon meeting B.S.
requirements, students are automatically
considered as graduate students.
Students may apply for admission to the
combined degree program in atmospheric
science at the beginning of their junior year
or after the successful completion of 56
credits, but not later than the accumulation
of 100 credits. A cumulative grade point
average of 3.2 or higher and three
supportive letters of recommendation from
faculty are required for consideration.
The combined program requires a
minimum of 138 credits, of which at least
30 must be graduate credits. In qualifying
for the B.S., students must meet all
University and college requirements,
including the requirements of the
undergraduate major described previously,
the minimum 60-credit liberal arts and
sciences requirement, the general
education requirements, and residency
requirements. In qualifying for the M.S.,
students must meet all University and
college requirements as outlined in the
109
University at Albany
Courses
A Atm 100N The Atmosphere (3)
Non-technical survey of the atmosphere; the
physical environment of society and its
historical
development;
intentional
and
unintentional
modifications
of
the
environment; cloud types and structure; severe
storms; weather forecasting; air pollution;
major wind and weather systems. Does not
yield credit toward the major in atmospheric
science. Two lectures, one-two-hour discussion
each week. May not be taken for credit by
students with credit for A Atm 210 or 210Z or
320. Fall semester only. [NS]
A Atm 101N The Upper Atmosphere (3)
Elementary survey of the properties and geophysical
phenomena of the upper atmosphere; ionosphere,
magnetosphere,
and
interplanetary
space,
ionospheric and magnetic storms; aurora and
airglow; observational techniques including rockets
and satellites. Does not yield credit toward the B.S.
in atmospheric science. Two lectures, one two-hour
discussion each week. May not be offered in 20032004. [NS]
A Atm 102N Science and Major
Environmental Issues (3)
Study of the role of science in creating,
defining, evaluating, and resolving major
issues relating to energy production and its use
and impact on the physical environments; case
studies of such issues as change in climate, air
pollution, the fluorocarbon/ozone link, etc.
Three lectures each week. Does not yield credit
toward the B.S. in atmospheric science. Spring
semester only. [NS]
A Atm 107N The Oceans (3)
A Atm 211 Weather Analysis and
Forecasting (4)
A Atm 311 Severe and Unusual Weather
Analysis and Forecasting (4)
Physical principles and empirical methods of
weather analysis and forecasting, with emphasis on
synoptic, regional and local weather systems;
introduction to use and interpretation of observed
weather data, satellite imagery, temperature and
precipitation processes, soundings and stability; use
of computer forecast guidance models and products
of the National Centers for Environmental
Prediction. Prerequisite: A Atm 210 (or Atm 210Z)
or permission of instructor. Spring semester only.
Continuation of Atm 211, with emphasis on
severe and unusual weather a nalysis and
forecasting,
including
thunderstorms,
tornadoes, downbursts, derechoes, hail,
flash floods, hurricanes, winter storms,
blizzards, blocking weather patterns, floods
and drought; introduction to weather
analysis software and weather display
systems;
commercial
meteorology.
Prerequisite(s): A Atm 211. Fall semester
only.
A Atm 297 Independent Study I (1-3)
By advisement only and may be repeated once
for credit. S/U graded. Fall and Spring
semesters.
A Atm 300Z Solar Energy (3)
Discussion of solar energy technology, including
solar energy measurement and distribution; direct
use of the sun’s energy; solar architecture; energy
from wind, tides, waves, currents, and salinity
gradients; biomass and geothermal energy; energy
use, conservation, and other major environmental
issues. Prerequisite(s): 6 credits in mathematics
including one course in calculus; A Phy 108N or
150; junior or senior class standing. .May not be
offered in 2003-2004. [WI]
A Atm 304 Air Quality (3)
Designed for undergraduate students not
pursuing the B.S. in Atmospheric Science.
Topics include air pollution criteria standards
and regulations, basic air pollution monitoring
(including quality assurance), simple statistical
analysis of data, and pollutant transport,
transformation and deposition. Prerequisite(s):
A Mat 111 or 112 or 118; A Phy 108 or
150.Offered alternate Spring semester. Next
offered in Spring 2004.
Introductory survey of the physical, chemical,
geological, and biological processes in the marine
environment; promise and problems of the oceans as
a natural resource. Does not yield credit toward the
B.S. in atmospheric science. Three lectures each
week. Spring semester only. [NS]
A Atm 304Z Air Quality (3)
A Atm 199 Contemporary Issues in
Atmospheric Science (1)
A Atm 305 Global Physical Climatology (3)
Issues from the current literature in selected
areas of atmospheric science. Particular areas
of study to be announced each term. Intended
for students interested in exploring in depth
themes covered in large lecture courses.
Prerequisite(s): permission of instructor. S/U
graded. .May not be offered in 2003-2004.
A Atm 210 Atmospheric Structure and
Circulation (4)
Technical survey of the atmosphere with
application of elementary physical and
mathematical concepts to the horizontal and
vertical
structure of
the atmosphere;
planetary, regional and local circulations;
atmospheric radiation; precipitation physics
and thermodynamics. Three lectures and one
discussion/lab period per week. Prerequisites: A Mat
111 or 112 or 118; A Phy 108 or 150. Fall semester
only.
A Atm 210Z Atmospheric Structure and
Circulation (4)
A Atm 210Z is writing intensive version of
A Atm 210; only one may be taken for credit.
Fall semester only. Three lectures and one
discussion/lab period per week. [WI]
110
A Atm 304Z is writing intensive version of A Atm
304.; only one may be taken for credit. Offered
alternate spring semesters; will next be offered
in spring 2004. [WI]
The physical basis of climate and climate
variability from a coupled atmosphere-ocean
perspective. Emphasis will be placed on
understanding the causes of regional climate
differences and regional climate variability and
the role that the global atmosphere and oceans
play in the process Prerequisite(s): A Atm 210
(or 210Z). Offered alternate fall semesters; will
next be offered in fall 2003.
A Atm 307 (= A Chm 307) Introduction to
Atmospheric Chemistry (3)
Chemical principles and concepts leading to
understanding the composition and change in
the
chemical/atmospheric
environment;
sources and links of chemical constituents;
chemistry
of
the
troposphere
and
stratosphere; measurement and theory of
greenhouse gases; global pollution and ozone
depletion. Prerequisite(s): A Mat 111 or 112
or 118; A Phy 108 or 150; A Chm 121N.
Offered alternate Spring semesters. Will next
be offered Spring 2005.
A Atm 307Z (= A Chm 307) Introduction to
Atmospheric Chemistry (3)
A Atm 307Z is the writing intensive version of
A Atm 307; only one may be taken for credit.
Prerequisite(s): A Mat 111 or 112 or 118;
A Phy 108 or150N A Chm 120N. . Offered
alternate Spring semester. Will next be
offered Spring 2005. [WI]
A Atm 320 Atmospheric Thermodynamics
(3)
Equation
of
state;
principles
of
thermodynamics; water vapor and moist air
thermodynamics; changes of phase and
latent
heat;
hydrostatic
eq uilibrium;
atmospheric convection; thermodynamic
diagrams; atmospheric stability and severe
weather events. Prerequisite(s): A Atm 210
(or 210Z); A Mat 214; A Phy 150; corequisite: ATM 333. Fall semester only.
A Atm 321 Physical Meteorology (4)
Atmospheric physics, including radiation,
optics, and visibility; atmospheric electricity;
cloud and aerosol physics; acoustics; upper
atmospheric processes; radar meteorology.
Three lectures and one lab discussion per week.
Prerequisite(s): A Atm 320, 333; A Phy 240.
Spring semester only. [OD]
A Atm 333 Quantitative Methods in
Geophysics (3)
Important topics in atmospheric and
geophysical science studied using various
analytical
and
numerical
techniques.
Description and analysis of specific but
disparate geophysica l phenomena will
expose the student of the commonality of
application of certain classical and modern
mathematical approaches used to expound
the
underlying
physical
principles.
Prerequisite(s): A 210 (or 210Z); Mat 214;
Phy 150; Mat 311 (recommended as a prerequisite, acceptable as a co -requisite). Fall
semester only.
A Atm 335 Meteorological Remote Sensing
(3)
Satellite remote sensing from UV to microwave
including the principles of atmospheric radiative
transfer, descriptions of important satellite orbits
and sensors, the retrieval of atmospheric variables
from active and passive systems, and basic
principles of interpretation. Prerequisite(s): A Mat
111 or 112 or 118 and A Atm 211. Offered alternate
spring semesters; will next be offered in spring
2004.
A Atm 390 Commercial Meteorology (2)
Examination of the impact of weather and climate
forecasting on social and economic factors in our
society. Emphasis on severe weather prediction,
warnings, and disaster preparedness. Guest lectures
by private-sector professional meteorologists. Each
student will participate as a member of a mock
“company” providing weather services to a real
client in the community. One lecture each week.
Prerequisite(s): A Atm 311. Offered alternate spring
semesters; will next be offered in spring 2005.
University at Albany
A Atm 400 Synoptic Meteorology I (3)
A Atm 421 Tropical Meteorology (3)
A Atm 497 Independent Study II (1-3)
Electronic meteorological database description
and analysis procedures; use of meteorological
software packages and remote sensing
technologies
in
weather
analysis
and
forecasting; operational numerical weather
prediction model procedures; application of
fundamental thermodynamic and dynamic
principles to multiscale weather events;
scientific issues in weather forecasting. Two
joint lecture-laboratory periods each week.
Corequisites: A Atm 311; 410. Fall semester
only.
Tropical cyclone dynamics and thermodynamics;
tropical cyclone formation; monsoons; tropical
waves; El Niño. Prerequisite(s): A Atm 410 or
equivalent. Spring semester only. May not be
offered in 2003-2004.
May be repeated once for credit. No more than 6
credits from A Atm 490, 497, 498, and 499 may
be applied toward major requirements in
atmospheric science. Prerequisite(s): junior
senior class standing, and by advisement only.
Fall and spring semesters.
A Atm 401 Synoptic Meteorology II (3)
Application of more advanced thermodynamic and
dynamic concepts, laws and remote sensing
technologies to multiscale weather analysis and
prediction; structure of global scale temperature,
wind and precipitation regimes and their causes;
use of operational weather prediction models and
products for research and weather forecasting;
severe weather and heavy precipitation analysis
and forecasting. Two joint class/laboratory
periods each week. Prerequisite: A Atm 400;
corequisite(s): A Atm 411. Spring semester
only.
A Atm 408 Hydrometeorology (3)
The physical processes governing the continental
hydrologic cycle such as water vapor transport,
runoff, evapotranspiration, streamflow, sub-surface
recharge; land/atmosphere interaction; spatial/
temporal variability of hydrologic parameters.
Prerequisite(s): A Atm 320 and A Mat 311.
A Atm 408B Hydrometeorology (3)
The physical processes governing the continental
hydrologic cycle such as water vapor transport,
runoff, evapotranspiration, streamflow, sub-surface
recharge; land/atmosphere interaction; spatial/
temporal variability of hydrologic parameters.
Prerequisite(s): A Atm 211 or A Geo 260; will not
yield upper level credit for the atmospheric science
B.S. degree.
A Atm 409 Atmospheric Precipitation
Processes (3)
Fundamentals
of
atmospheric
precipitation
processes; atmospheric moisture budget; convective
and stratiform precipitation; application of satellite
and radar imagery to precipitation analysis and
forecasting;
mesoscale
convective
systems;
mesoscale precipitation structure in cyclones; flash
flood
forecasting;
quantitative precipitation
forecasting exercise. Prerequisite(s): A Atm 320;
A Mat 311. Corequisite: A Atm 410. Offered every
other year; will next be offered in fall 2003.
A Atm 410 Dynamic Meteorology I (3)
Forces and force balances in the atmosphere;
thermal wind, vorticity and circulation; structure
and dynamics of the middle latitudes and
tropical cyclones. Prerequisite(s): A Atm 320,
321, 333. Fall semester only.
A Atm 411 Dynamic Meteorology II (3)
Derivation and scaling of the equations of
atmospheric motion; major forces in the
atmosphere; dynamics of frontal cyclones;
mathematics
of
weather
prediction.
Prerequisite(s): A Atm 410. Spring semester only.
A Atm 414 Air Pollution (3)
Physical and chemical processes affecting air
suspensoids; pollutant dispersion; effects of
pollutants on materials, vegetation, and animal
life; environmental gas cycles; applications to
instruments and industrial removal processes.
Corequisite(s): A Atm 410 or permission of
instructor. Fall semester only.
A Atm 422 Meteorological Instrumentation
and Measurement (2)
Principles of meteorological measurement; error and
propagation of error; measurement of temperature,
pressure, windfield, water vapor and solar radiation;
basic photogrammetry; survey of measurement
systems: Doppler radar, lidar, profilers and ASOS.
One lecture and one demonstration/laboratory
session per week. Prerequisite(s): A Atm 321; A Phy
240. May not be offered in 2003-2004.
A Atm 424 Fundamentals of Atmospheric
Electricity (3)
An introduction to the basic electrical
processes operating in the atmosphere; fair
weather electricity and the global circuit;
electrical
properties
of
clouds
and
thunderstorms; thunderstorm electrification;
the lightning flash; observation and
measurement techniques. Prerequisite(s):
A Atm 321; A Mat 214; A Phy 240. Spring
semester only. May not be offered in 2003 2004.
A Atm 498 Computer Applications in
Meteorological Research (3)
Directed individual study of a particular
problem in atmospheric science that requires
use of the University Computing Center and/or
departmental computers. May be repeated once
for credit. No more than 6 credits from A Atm
490, 497, 498, and 499 may be applied toward
major requirements in atmospheric science.
Prerequisite(s): A Csi 201N or permission of
instructor. S/U graded.
A Atm 499 Undergraduate Research (3)
Guided research leading to a senior thesis. Oral
presentation of results required. May be
repeated for credit. No more than 6 credits
from A Atm 490, 497, 498, and 499 may be
applied toward major requirements in
atmospheric science. Prerequisite(s): junior or
senior class standing, and permission of
department chair. S/U graded.
A Atm 430 Solar Radiation and Applications
(3)
Definition of solar and terrestrial radiation
components;
basic
celestial
geometry;
introduction to the measurement of solar
radiation; principles of solar radiation transfer
through the Earth’s atmosphere; study of the
interrelationship between solar radiation
components; applied solar radiation examples.
Prerequisite(s): A Mat 113 or 119; A Phy 150.
May not be offered in 2003-2004
A Atm 433 Software-based Computational
Geophysics (3)
Computation of solutions of geophysical
problems using contemporary symbolic and
numerical mathematical software for PCs.
Problems will be drawn from a variety of
topics in atmospheric and geological
sciences. Emphasis will be placed on the use
of appropriate software to obtain, graphically
display and physically interpret the solutions.
Prerequisite(s): A Atm 333 or permission of
instructor. May not be offered in 2003-2004.
A Atm 450 Computer Applications in
Atmospheric Science (3)
Computer programming and numerical
methods for solving atmospheric science
problems; data handling and storage;
examination of currently used programs in
atmospheric science research; iterative
methods; numerical weather prediction.
Prerequisite(s): A Atm 333; A Csi 204 or
205 or permission of instructor. May not be
offered in 2003-2004.
A Atm 490 Internship in Atmospheric
Science (1-3)
Research or operational experience in
atmospheric-related activities with local
governmental agencies or private industry. No
more than 3 credits for A Atm 490 may be
applied toward major requirements in
atmospheric science. Internships are open
only to qualified juniors and seniors who
have an overall grade point average of 2.50
or higher. Prerequisite(s): junior or senior
standing in atmospheric science. S/U graded,
may be repeated for credit.
111
University at Albany
P ROGRAM IN
B ROADCAST
M ETEOROLOGY
Careers
The B.A. in Broadcast Meteorology is offered
as an interdisciplinary study of significant
breadth combining science and the arts. It is
intended for students focused on a career in
the media. Students electing this major will
have the opportunity to combine their passion
for meteorology with full development of their
personal communication skills, both written
and oral, appropriate to the intended career
path. However, those students desiring an
advanced, research-oriented degree in
Atmospheric Science should pursue the B.S.
degree instead. All students contemplating any
of the curricula described herein should
thoroughly discuss their options with the
personnel of the Advisement Services Center
(ASC) and an Atmospheric Science
undergraduate advisor in the DEAS, before
formal declaration of a specific major.
The Bachelor of Arts degree in Broadcast
Meteorology is a restricted major. For
advisement purposes, students should initially
declare the Earth and Atmospheric Sciences
B.A. as their major; they can subsequently
apply for the Broadcast Meteorology B.A. by
December 1st of a fall semester, while enrolled
in A Atm 210, or by May 1 st of a spring
semester, while enrolled in A Atm 211. A
minimum grade of B- is required in both
A Atm 211 and A Thr 240 for acceptance
into this major.
Degree Requirements for the
Major in Broadcast Meteorology
Bachelor of Arts (B.A.): A minimum of 60
credits for the combined major and minor
including: A Atm 107N, 210/Z, 211, 305 or
A Gog 304, A Atm 311, 335, 390, 408/B,
490, A Com 203, A Gog 290, 496, A Jrl
300/Z, either A Mat 101 and 111 or A Mat
112, A Phy 105N, 108N, A Thr 240, 242.
Non-required but Recommended Courses
A Atm 304, A Csi 101, 201N, A Gog 210,
385, 414, 485, A Jrl 364/Z, A Mat 108,
B Mgt 341, B Mkt 310, B Msi 215.
112
Class Key to the Broadcast
Meteorology Major
Broadcast Meteorology B.A. core curriculum:
A Atm 107N; The Oceans (3)
A Atm 210/Z; Atmospheric Structure (4)
A Atm 211; Weather Analysis and Forecasting (4)
A Atm 305; Global Phys. Climatology (3) (or A Gog
304)
A Atm 311; Severe & Unusual Weather Forecasting
(4)
A Atm 335; Meteorological Remote Sensing (3)
A Atm 390; Commercial Meteorology (2)
A Atm 408/B; Hydrometeorology (3)
A Atm 490; Internship in Atmospheric Science (2)
A Com 203; Speech Composition and Presentation
(3)
A Gog 290; Introduction to Cartography (4)
A Gog 304; Climatology (3) (or A Atm 305)
A Gog 496; Geographic Information Systems (3)
A Jrl 300/Z; Introduction to Journalism (3)
A Mat 101; Algebra and Calculus I (3) plus
A Mat 111; Algebra and Calculus II (4) or
A Mat 112. Calculus I (4)
A Phy 105N; General Physics I (3)
A Phy 108N; General Physics II (3)
A Thr 240, Acting I (3)
A Thr 242; Voice I (3)
Non-required but recommended courses:
A Atm 304; Air Quality (3)
A Csi 101; Elements of Computing (3)
A Csi 201N; Introduction to Computer Science
(4)
A Gog 201; Environmental Analysis (3)
A Gog 385; Introduction to Remote Sensing
Environ. (4)
A Gog 414; Computer Mapping (3)
A Gog 485; Advanced Remote Sensing of
Environ. (3)
A Jrl 364Z; Science Journalism (3)
A Mat 108; Elementary Statistics (3)
A Mgt 341; Behavioral Foundations of
Management (3)
A Mkt 310; Marketing Principles (3)
A Msi 215; Computer Applications in Business
(3)
P ROGRAM IN
E NVIRONMENTAL
S CIENCE
Careers
Graduates with a B.S. in Environmental
Science will be well qualified for a broad
range of positions within the highly interdisciplinary field of environmental science.
Consulting firms, industry, federal and state
government agencies all require employees
with this type of training. The demand for
individuals with such a degree is anticipated to
remain strong as our society attempts to cope
with and address myriad environmental
impacts that are occurring on local, regional,
national and global scales. Additionally,
graduates with this degree are well prepared to
consider advanced degrees in the sciences, or
other fields such as business administration
(M.B.A.) or law (J.D.).
Degree Requirements for the
Major in Environmental Science
Bachelor of Science (B.S.): A minimum of 64
credits for the combined major and minor
including: A Atm 100N, A Geo 100N, A
Geo/Gog 201, 210, 250, 350, A Gog/Pln 330,
A Mat 111 or 112, 113, and 108, A Bio
110N/F, A Chm 120N, A Phy 105N, 108N.
Additionally each student must choose one
concentration in Earth Science, Atmospheric
Science, Biology, or Geography (see below):
Earth Science Concentration (1921 credits)
A Geo 260; 420: Electives (any combination of
the following): A Bio 111N, 316, A Geo 330,
435, 450, 466, 497, 498, A Phy 202N.
Atmospheric Science
Concentration (19-21 credits)
A Atm 210/Z, A Geo 260; Electives (any
combination of the following);A Atm 211,
304/Z, 305, 307/Z , 311, 335, 422, 408B:
Additional electives (maximum of two):A Geo
420, 450, A Bio 316, A Phy 202N.
University at Albany
Biology Concentration (19-21
credits)
A Bio 111N, 320: Electives (any combination
of the following); A Bio 212, 314, 316, 319/Z,
325, 365, 366, 402, 422, 432, 436, 442/443,
444, 445, 455, 468, A Chm 440 A+B.
Geography Concentration (19-21
credits)
A Geo 260: Electives(any combination of the
following); A Gog 290, 293, 304, 385, 390,
404, 414, 431, 479, 485, A Gog/Pln 496, A
Geo 420, 435.
Class Key to Environmental
Science Major
Atmospheric Science Concentration (19-20
credits)
Required:
A Atm 210/Z; Atmospheric Structure (3)
A Geo 260N; Earth Surface Proc. & Hazards (3)
Electives (any combination):
A Atm 211; Weather Analysis and Forecasting (4)
A Atm 304/Z; Air Quality (3)
A Atm 305;Global Physical Climatology (3)
A Atm 307/Z; Atmospheric Chemistry (3)
A Atm 311; Severe and Unusual Weather and
Forecasting (3)
A Atm 335; Meteorological Remote Sensing (3)
A Atm 422; Meteorological. Instrumentation &
Measurement (2)
A Atm 408B; Hydrometeorology (3)
Additional electives ( maximum of two):
A Geo 420; Instrum. Anal. in Environ. Sci.(3)
A Geo 450; Paleoclimatology (4)
A Gog 304 Climatology (3)
A Bio 316; Biogeography (3)
A Phy 202N; Environmental Physics (3)
Environmental Science B.S. core curriculum:
Biology Concentration (19-20 credits)
A Atm 100N; The Atmosphere (3)
A Geo 100N; Planet Earth (3)
A Geo/Gog 201; Environmental Analysis (3)
A Geo 210; Earth Materials (3)
A Geo 250; Energy and Resources (3)
A Geo 350; Environmental Geochemistry (3)
A Gog 330; Principles of Environ. Manag. (3)
A Mat 111 or 112;Algebra and Calculus II or
Calculus I (4)
A Mat 113; Calculus II (4)
A Mat 108; Statistics (3)
A Bio 110N/F; General Biology I (4)
A Chm 120N;General Chemistry I (3)
A Phy 105N+108N; General Physics I and II (6)
Required:
A Bio 111N; General Biology II (4)
A Bio 320; Ecology (3)
Earth Science Concentration (19-20 credits)
Required:
A Geo 260N; Earth Surface Proc. & Hazards (3)
A Geo 420; Instrum. Anal. in Environ. Sci. (3)
Electives (any combination):
A Bio 111N; General Biology II (4)
A Bio 316; Biogeography (3)
A Geo 330; Structural Geology I (3)
A Geo 435; Geohydrology (3)
A Geo 450; Paleoclimatology (4)
A Geo 466; Marine/Estuary Systems (3)
A Geo 497; Independent Study (at USGS or other
local organization) (1-3)
A Geo 498; Honors Research (3)
A Phy 202N; Environmental Physics (3)
Geography Concentration (19-20 Credits)
Required:
A Geo 260N; Earth Surface Proc. & Hazards (3)
Electives(any combination):
A Gog 290; Introduction to Cartography (4)
A Gog 293; Use and Interpretation of Aerial
Photographs (3)
A Gog 304; Climatology (3)
A Gog 385; Introduction to Remote Sensing of the
Environment (4)
A Gog 390; Intermediate Cartography (3)
A Gog 404; Topics in Physical Geography (1-4)
A Gog 414; Computer Mapping (3)
A Gog 431; Climatic Change (3)
A Gog 479; Fundamentals of Applied GIS (3)
A Gog 485; Advanced Remote Sensing of the
Environment (3)
A Gog/Pln 496; Geographic Information Systems (3)
A Geo 420; Instrum. Anal. in Environ. Sci. (3)
A Geo 435; Geohydrology (3)
Electives (any combination):
A Bio 212; Introductory Genetics (4)
A Bio 314; General Bacteriology (3)
A Bio 316; Biogeography (3)
A Bio 319/Z; Field Biology (3)
A Bio 325; Comparative Anatomy of Chordates (4)
A Bio 365; Biological Chemistry (3)
A Bio 366; Biological Chemistry II (3)
A Bio 402; Evolution (3)
A Bio 422; Biological Architecture (3)
A Bio 432; Animal Behavior (3)
A Bio 436; Sensory Worlds (3)
A Bio 442/443; Restoration Ecology (3+1)
A Bio 444; Biology of Birds (3)
A Bio 445; Experimental Ecology (3)
A Bio 455; Plant Ecology (4)
A Bio 468; Behavioral Ecology (3)
A Chm 440 A; Comprehensive Biochemistry A (3)
A Chm 440 B; Comprehensive Biochemistry B (3)
113
University at Albany
D EPARTMENT
E AST A SIAN
S TUDIES
OF
Faculty
Professors
Charles M. Hartman, Ph.D.
Indiana University
Christopher J. Smith, Ph.D.
University of Michigan
Kwan Koo Yun, Ph.D. (associate faculty)
Stanford University
Associate Professors
Susanna Fessler, Ph.D. (Department Chair)
Yale University
Mark Blum, Ph.D.
University of California, Berkeley
Anthony DeBlasi, Ph.D.
Harvard University
James M. Hargett, Ph.D.
Indiana University
Assistant Professors
Andrew Sangpil Byon, Ph.D.,
University of Hawaii
Fan Pen Chen, Ph.D.
Columbia University
Jennifer Rudolph, Ph.D. (associate faculty)
University of Washington
Associate Professors
Angie Y. Chung, Ph.D.
University of California, Los Angeles
Youqin Huang, Ph.D.
University of California, Los Angeles
Lecturer
Michiyo Kaya Wojnovich, M.S.
University at Albany
Teaching Assistants: 4
The Department of East Asian Studies offers
courses in the languages and cultures of the
three major civilizations of East Asia: China,
Japan and Korea. The department provides
instruction in elementary, intermediate and
advanced Chinese and Japanese, and Korean.
There are also courses taught in English on
Chinese, Japanese, Korean literature,
philosophy, history, geography, economics
and political science.
Careers
Graduates of the Department traditionally
enter careers in teaching, international trade,
U.S. government security, and the travel
industry. The degree is also excellent
preparation for professional graduate
programs in business administration
(M.B.A.), law, librarianship, and Teaching
English as a Second Language. The
department strongly encourages students
interested in East Asian Studies to doublemajor. Combinations with particularly strong
employment potential are East Asian Studies
and economics, business, and political
science.
114
Special Programs or Opportunities
Major in Chinese Studies
The University maintains exchange programs
in China with Beijing University, Fudan
University, Nanjing University, and Nankai
University. These programs provide students
an opportunity to study Chinese language
and selected topics in the humanities and
social sciences in China for one academic
year. The university also maintains a similar
exchange program with Kansai University
and Tokyo University of Foreign Studies in
Japan and with Yonsei University in Seoul,
Korea. All departmental majors are strongly
encouraged to participate in these exchange
programs in order to gain first-hand
experience of life in contemporary East Asia.
One Introductory course-100 level:
(choose 1 from the following)
B.A. in Chinese/M.BA.
Degree Program
The Department of East Asian Studies and
the School of Business offer a five-year
B.A./M.B.A. Degree Program in Chinese and
Business Administration. Students in this
program fulfill requirements for the Chinese
major during their freshman, sophomore, and
junior years. The junior year is spent at
Fudan University in Shanghai, where
students receive additional language training
and participate in internship programs
arranged with international businesses. The
fourth and fifth years focus on completing
the requirements for the M.B.A. degree.
B.A. in Japanese/M.BA. Degree
Program
The Department of East Asian Studies and
the School of Business offer a five-year
B.A./M.B.A. Degree Program in Japanese
and Business Administration Students in this
program fulfill requirements for the Japanese
major during their freshman, sophomore, and
junior years. The junior year is spent at
Kansai Gaidai University in Osaka, where
students receive additional language training.
The fourth and fifth years focus on
completing the requirements for the M.B.A.
degree.
Degree Requirements
The Department of East Asian Studies offers
three concentrations or degree tracks. Each is
a separate and distinct course of study
leading to the B.A. degree. These are 1) the
Major in Chinese Studies, 2) the
Interdisciplinary Major in East Asian
Studies, and 3) the Interdisciplinary Major in
Japanese Studies. Requirements for these
programs are as follows:
A Eas 103; A Eac 170
Language: (the following are required)
A Eac 201, A Eac 202, A Eac 301, A Eac
302
Three intermediate prerequisites: (choose
3 from the following) A Eas 255, A Eas
205; A Eac 210, A Eac 211, A Eac 212,
A Eac 280, A Eac 281, A Eac 379, A Eac
380
One 300-level Seminar: (choose 1 of the
following) A Eac 390, A Eac 395, A Eac
398; A Eas 392, A Eas 393, A Eas 399
One upper level elective-300 or 400 level:
(choose 1 from the following) Any A Eac
300-level course or A Eas 495
Faculty-Initiated Interdisciplinary
Major with a Concentration in East
Asian Studies
One introductory course-100 level:
(choose 1 from the following) A Eas 103,
A Eas 104; A Eac 170; A Eaj 170; A Eak
170
Language: (any combination of 10 credits
from the following): A Eac 101, A Eac 102,
A Eac 201, A Eac 202, A Eac 301, A Eac
302, A Eac 310, A Eac 311; A Eaj 101,
A Eaj 102, A Eaj 201, A Eaj 202, A Eaj
301, A Eaj 302, A Eaj 410, A Eaj 411;
A Eak 101, A Eak 102, A Eak 201, A Eak
202, A Eak 301, A Eak 302
One Course history requirement: (choose
1 from the following) A Eaj 384, A Eaj
385; A Eac 379, A Eac 380
Two Intermediate prerequisites: (choose 2
from the following) A Eas 255, A Eas 261,
A Eas 265; A Eac 280, A Eac 281, A Eac
266, A Eac 210, A Eac 211, A Eac 212;
A Eaj 210, A Eaj 212; A Eas 205
Two 300-level Seminars: (choose 2 of the
following) A Eas 392, A Eas 393, A Eas
399; A Eac 390, A Eac 395, A Eac 398;
A Eaj 396, A Eaj 391; A Eas 394
Two Upper level electives-300 or 400
level: (choose 2 from the following) Any
two A Eas, A Eac, A Eaj and/or A Eak 300
level course or A Eas 495
University at Albany
Faculty Initiated Interdisciplinary
Major with a Concentration in
Japanese Studies
One Introductory course-100 level:
(choose 1 from the following) A Eas 103,
A Eas 104; A Eaj 170; A Eac 170; A Eak
170
Language: (the following are required)
A Eaj 201, A Eaj 202, A Eaj 301, A Eaj 302
Three Intermediate prerequisites:
(Choose 3 from the following) A Eas 255;
A Eaj 210, A Eaj 212, A Eaj 384, A Eaj
385; A Eas 261, A Eas 266, A Eas 205
One 300-level Seminar: (choose 1 of the
following) A Eaj 391, A Eaj 396; A Eas
394, A Eas 392, A Eas 393, A Eas 399
One upper level electives-300 or 400
level: (choose 1 from the following) Any
A Eaj 300-level course or A Eas 495
Honors Program in the Three East
Asian Studies Majors
Students in the Honors Program are required
to complete all requirements for the major in
Chinese Studies or the Faculty-Initiated
Interdisciplinary Major with a concentration
in Japanese Studies or the Faculty-Initiated
Interdisciplinary Major with a Concentration
in East Asian Studies. Students must also
complete the following requirements:
A structured sequence of 12 credits of 200-,
300-, or 400-level courses, drawn from the
department’s regular course offerings. This
sequence of courses will be designed to
ensure that the student follows a rigorous
training and thorough mastery of the
discipline.
During the fall semester (preferably of the
senior year), students will complete A Eas
495 (3 credits), Colloquium in East Asian
Studies (directed readings and conferences
involving appropriate members of the
faculty, to be offered only when requested
by students eligible for the honors program.
Six credits of intensive work culminating in
a major project (or series of projects). The
student’s project must be approved (in
writing) by the Department Honors
Committee at the outset of the project. The
project will be formally evaluated by the
Department Honors Committee no later
than the mid-term point in the second
semester of the senior year. The final
version of the project must be submitted by
the last day of classes during the second
semester of the senior year.
Students may file an application for
admission to the honors program in the
second semester of their sophomore year or
in the junior year. Junior transfers may
apply at the time of their admission to the
University. To be eligible for admission to
the honors program, the student must have
declared one of the three majors in the
department. The student must also have
completed at least 12 credits of course work
within that major. In addition, the student
must have an overall GPA of at least 3.25,
and 3.50 in the major, both of which must
be maintained in order to graduate with
honors.
A Eac 180 (= A Arh 281) Introduction to Chinese
Art and Culture (3)
Courses in Chinese Studies
A Eac 201L Intermediate Chinese I (5)
A Eac 101L Elementary Chinese I (5)
An introduction to modern Chinese (Mandarin)
with emphasis on speaking, reading and
writing. Basic fluency in the spoken language
is developed through intensive use and
repetition of fundamental sentence patterns and
vocabulary. Students learn both traditional
full-form characters and the simplified versions
in use on mainland China. May not be taken by
students with any previous knowledge of any
Chinese language.
A Eac 102L Elementary Chinese II (5)
Continuation of A Eac 101L. Prerequisite(s):
A Eac 101L. [FL]
A Eac 150L China Through Western Eyes (3)
American and European perceptions of China
from the 13th century to the present,
emphasizing the origin(s) and influence of
these Western perspectives. Readings range
from the travel journals of Marco Polo to
recent reports. [HU]
A Eac 160M (= A Gog 160M) China: People
and Places in the Land of One Billion (3)
The course combines a rapid survey of Chinese art
with selected readings in Chinese literature to
present an introduction to the visual and written
culture of traditional China. Evidence from
archaeology, sculpture, architecture, and painting
will be viewed and analyzed to illustrate such topics
as the origins and multiethnic character of Chinese
civilization, the nature of the Chinese writing
system, the growth of religious systems, and the
development of the bureaucratic state. No prior
knowledge of Chinese or Art History is required.
Speaking, reading, and writing modern
Chinese, including continued study of both
fu ll-form
and
s i m p li fi ed
c h a ra c t ers ,
introduction to dictionaries, principles of
character formation and classification, and the
phonetic writing system (chu-yin-fu-hao).
Prerequisite(s): A Eac 102L or equivalent.
A Eac 202L Intermediate Chinese II (5)
Continuation of A Eac 201L. Prerequisite(s):
A Eac 201L or equivalent.
A Eac 210L Survey of Classical Chinese
Literature in Translation I (3)
An introduction to the major works of Chinese
literature from The Book of Songs (1100–600
B.C.) to poetry and prose writings of the Sung
dynasty (960–1279). [HU OD]
A Eac 211L Survey of Classical Chinese
Literature in Translation II (3)
An introduction to the major works of Chinese
literature from the Yüan dynasty (1279–1368)
to the Ch’ing period (1644–1911), with
emphasis on plays, poems and fiction. [HU
OD]
An introduction to the human and physical
geography of China. After a brief survey of
China’s historical geography and development,
the course focuses on post-liberation China and
the urban, economic, social and demographic
problems associated with modernization. A Eac
160G & A Gog 160G are the writing intensive
versions of A Eac 160M & A Gog 160M; only
one of the four courses may be taken for credit.
[IL OD SS]
A Eac 212L Modern Chinese Literature in
Translation (3)
A Eac 160G (= A Gog 160G) China: People
and Places in the Land of One Billion (3)
A Eac 280L (= A Arh 280L) Chinese Painting
(3)
A Eac 160G & A Gog 160G are the writing
intensive versions of A Eac 160M & A Gog
160M; only one of the four courses may be
taken for credit. [OD IL SS WI]
A Eac 170L China: Its Culture and
Heritage (3)
Survey of the essential elements of traditional
Chinese civilization and their transformation in
the 20th century. Focus is on the development
of basic Chinese social, political and aesthetic
ideas. Conducted in English; no knowledge of
Chinese required. [BE HU]
A Eac 172 (= A Rus 172) Concepts of Self:
Chinese & Russian Women’s Autobiography (3)
The course examines Chinese and Russian women’s
autobiographies from a broad spectrum of classes,
ages, professions and periods. It examines and
compares how culture and history shaped the
women’s self-presentation. The works studied
include: Ding Ling, “Miss Sophie’s Diary,” Xiao
Hong, Market Street, Anchee Min, Red Azalea,
Nagrodskaia, The Wrath of Dionysus, and several
selection of autobiographies from Tsarist Russia.
Only one of A Each 172 and A Rus 172 may be
taken for credit.
Survey of literature in China from the May
Fourth Movement (1919) to the present,
including works written after the Cultural
Revolution in the 1960’s. Special attention is
called to the impact of the West on modern
Chinese writers in the 1920’s and 1930’s. [HU
OD]
Introduces students to the major works of
traditional Chinese painting and analyzes those
works to arrive at an understanding of life in
traditional China. The major class activity will
be viewing, discussing and analyzing slides of
Chinese paintings. Only one of A Arh 280L &
A Eac 280L may be taken for credit. [AR]
A Eac 290 Ideology and Reality in
Contemporary China (2–3)
The roles of literature and politics from the
Yenan Forum of 1942 to the present.
Ideological and social forces that have shaped
the literature of the period into a political and
moral weapon in national wars, class struggles,
and in effecting social reforms. Knowledge of
Chinese not required
A Eac 301 & 302 Advanced Chinese I & II (3, 3)
A survey of a wide variety of materials written in
modern Chinese, including selections from the
works of major 20th-century writers, newspaper
articles from both Taiwan and mainland China,
and readings from the Great Proletarian Cultural
Revolution. Students will view and study at least
one full-length Chinese movie. Equal emphasis is
placed on enhancing reading, writing and oral
communication skills. Class is conducted entirely
in Chinese. Prerequisite(s): A Eac 202L or
equivalent for A Eac 301; A Eac 301 or equivalent
for A Eac 302.
115
University at Albany
A Eac 310 Classical Chinese I (3)
Introduction to the literary Chinese language
and classical Chinese culture through readings
of simple texts selected from early classics,
including the Chuangtzu and Records of the
Grand Historian. Prerequisite(s): A Eac 202L or
permission of the instructor.
A Eac 311 Classical Chinese II (3)
Continuation of A Eac 310. Prerequisite(s):
A Eac 310 or permission of the instructor.
A Eac 350 (= A Gog 350) Urban
Development in China (3)
Provides a comprehensive understanding of urban
development in China. Reviews the history of urban
development in China and examines the
demographic, social, economic, and cultural
dimensions of the urbanization process. Analyzes
the emerging urban land and housing markets, and
the changing urban landscape.
A Eac 357 (= A His 357, A Wss 357) Chinese
Women and Modernity (3)
Chinese women and their search for and encounter
with modernity will be the focus of this class. What
have been the concerns of Chinese women? What
forms have women’s movements taken in the
Chinese context? What has been the role of women
in creating a modern Chinese state and society?
These and other questions will be examined over the
course of the semester.
A Eac 379 (= A His 379) History of
China I (3)
This course is a survey of China’s historical
development from prehistory to the founding of
the Ming Dynasty in the fourteenth century.
We will concern ourselves especially with the
transformation of Chinese social structure over
time, the relations between the state and the
social elite, and the relationship between
China’s intellectual, political, and social
histories. Prerequisite(s): junior or senior
standing, or 3 credits in East Asian Studies or
History. [BE]
A Eac 379Z (= A His 379Z) History of
China I (3)
A Eac 379Z is the writing intensive version of
A Eac 379; only one may be taken for credit.
[BE]
A Eac 398 (= A His 398) Change in Medieval
China (3)
This course focuses on the dramatic change that
China underwent between the eighth and the
fourteenth centuries. We will examine this
transformation from several historical perspectives:
political history, economic history, social history,
intellectual history, and cultural history in order to
better understand China’s shift from aristocratic to
literati society. Prerequisite(s) A Eac 379, A His
379, A His 177, or permission of instructor.
A Eac 380 (= A His 380) History of
China II (3)
This course is a survey of China’s history
during the late imperial and modern periods. It
begins in the late 14 th century and concludes
with the present day. Of particular interest is
China’s international position and the interplay
between political, social, and intellectual
history during this period. Prerequisite(s):
junior or senior standing, or 3 credits in East
Asian Studies or History.. [BE]
A Eac 380Z (= A His 380Z) History of
China II (3)
A Eac 380Z is the writing intensive version of
A Eac 380; only one may be taken for credit.
[WI] [BE]
116
A Eac 389 Topics in Chinese Literature,
History, and Culture (3)
Courses in Japanese Studies
This course will focus on a selected topic or
major work of traditional or modern Chinese
literature or history for intensive study. This
course is conducted solely in English;
knowledge of Chinese is not required. May be
repeated for credit when the topic varies.
Prerequisite(s): A Eas 103L or A Eac 170L or
A Eac 210L or A Eac 211L or A Eac 212L or
permission of the instructor.
Designed for the acquisition of a basic
competence in modern standard Japanese in the
areas of speaking, reading and writing. Format will
be lecture with drill and discussion. Five class hours
a week will be enhanced with a one-hour language
lab. Not open to students with previous knowledge
of the Japanese language.
A Eac 390 Classical Chinese Poetry (3)
This class surveys Chinese poetry written in
traditional verse forms, beginning with works from
the Book of Poetry (600 BC) and concluding in the
eighteenth century. Major poets will include Qu
Yuan, Du Fu, Li Bo, and Su Shi. The course will
begin with the major linguistic and rhetorical
elements of Chinese poetry and proceed to introduce
elements of traditional Chinese poetics. No
knowledge of Chinese is required. All readings and
discussions will be in English. Prerequisite(s): Any
one of the following courses: A Eac 103L, A Eac
170L, A Eac 210L, or A Eac 211L
A Eac 458 (= A His 458) New Orders in Asia (3)
This class examines the international orders in place
in Asia from the days of nineteenth-century
imperialism to the search for a twenty-first century
post-Cold War order. The focus will be on political,
cultural, and economic interactions among the three
main East Asian powers: China, Japan, and the US.
A Eac 470Z (= A Gog 470Z) China After
Deng Xiaoping (3)
This course examines some of the issues
associated with modernization and economic
development in Post-Deng Xiaoping China.
The course focuses on the era of economic
reform associated with Deng, and is
particularly concerned with the social, spatial
and political ramifications of China’s entry
into the global economy. Prerequisite(s): any of
the following: A Eac 160M/G or 170L, or
A Gog 102G/M or 220M [WI]
A Eac 471 (= A Arh 480) Yüan and Sung Painting
(3)
A seminar on Chinese painting during the Sung and
Yüan Dynasties (960-1368) with research into
selected paintings. The course will combine a
detailed survey of painting during this period with
examination of selected topics such as the rise of
literati painting, Court painting as government art,
and painting as political expression during the SungYüan transition. Prerequisite(s): A Eac 180/A Arh
281 or A Eac/A Arh 280L and permission of
instructor.
A Eac 497 Independent Study in
Chinese (1–6)
Projects in selected areas of Chinese
studies, with regular progress reports.
Supervised readings of texts in Chinese.
May be repeated once for credit when topics
differ.
Prerequisite(s):
two
300 -level
Chinese
courses
and
equivalent,
or
permission of instructor.
A Eaj 101L Elementary Japanese I (5)
A Eaj 102L Elementary Japanese II (5)
C on t i n u a t i on of A E a j 1 0 1 L. Au ra l
c om p reh en s i on , s p ea k i n g, rea d i n g a n d
writing will be emphasized. The format will
be lecture will drill and discussion, and one
hour in the language lab. Prerequisite(s):
A Eaj 101L or permission of instructor.[FL]
A Eaj 130 Beginning Business Japanese (3)
Introduction to the basics of spoken and
written Japanese, focusing on daily life and
office/business situations. Designed for
working professionals, students in business
and related fields, and those who plan to
work in Japanese companies.
A Eaj 170L Japan: its Culture and
Heritage (3)
Survey of the essential elements of traditional
Japanese civilization and their transformation
in the post-Meiji era and twentieth century.
Focus on the development of basic Japanese
social,
political,
and
aesthetic
ideas.
Conducted in English; no knowledge of
Japanese is required. [BE HU]
A Eaj 201L Intermediate Japanese I (5)
Concentrates on the reading and analysis of
language texts. A large amount of time is devoted
to the understanding of Japanese grammar and oral
practice. The format will be lecture with drill and
discussion. Prerequisite(s): A Eaj 102L or
permission of instructor.
A Eaj 202L Intermediate Japanese II (5)
Continuation of A Eaj 201L. The course will
concentrate on the reading and analysis of
language texts. A large amount of time is
devoted to the understanding of Japanese
grammar and oral practice. The format will be
lecture
with
drill
and
discussion.
Prerequisite(s): A Eaj 201L or permission of
instructor.
A Eaj 210L Survey of Traditional Japanese
Literature (3)
This course presents a survey of the major
works of traditional Japanese literature from
the 9 th to the 19 thcentury, including the Tosa
Journal, the Pillow Book, and Essays in
Idleness. The course is conducted solely in
English; knowledge of Japanese is not
required. [HU]
A Eaj 212L Modern Japanese Literature in
Translation (3)
Survey of prose literature in Japan from the
Meiji Restoration (1868) to the present.
Emphasis is placed on pre-war writers and their
quest for modernity. [HU]
A Eaj 301 & 302 Advanced Japanese I & II
(3,3)
Acquisition of complex structures through
intensive
oral/aural
and
reading/writing
practice. Discussion, authentic written
materials, videotapes and audio tapes are
incorporated. Prerequisite(s): A Eaj 202L or
equivalent for A Eaj 301; A Eaj 301 or
equivalent for A Eaj 302.[OD], [OD]
University at Albany
A Eaj 384 (= A His 384) History of Japan I (3)
This course is a survey of Japanese history from
prehistory to the beginning of the seventeenth
century. We will be especially concerned with the
relationship between Japanese culture and
continental civilization, the transformation of its
social structure, the relationship between civil and
military authority, and the interaction of intellectual,
political, and social history. Prerequisite(s): junior or
senior standing, or 3 credits in East Asian Studies or
History. [BE]
A Eaj 384Z (= A His 384Z) History of Japan I (3)
A Eaj 384Z is the writing intensive version of
A Eaj 384; only one may be taken for credit.
[WI] [BE]
A Eaj 385 (= A His 385) History of
Japan II (3)
This course is a survey of modern Japanese history.
It covers the period from the early seventeenth
century to the present day. The focus is on the
interconnections between political, social, and
intellectual history during Japan’s emergence as a
world power. Prerequisite(s): junior or senior
standing, or 3 credits in East Asian Studies or
History. [BE]
A Eaj 385Z (= A His 385Z) History of
Japan II (3)
A Eaj 385Z is the writing intensive version of A Eaj
385; only one may be taken for credit. [WI] [BE]
A Eaj 389 Topics in Japanese Literature, History,
and Culture (3)
This course will focus on a selected topic or major
work of traditional or modern Japanese literature or
history for intensive study. This course is conducted
solely in English; knowledge of Japanese is not
required. May be repeated for credit when the topic
varies. Prerequisite(s): A Eas 104L or A Eaj 170L or
A Eaj 210L or A Eas 212L or permission of the
instructor.
A Eaj 423 Practicum in Teaching
Japanese (2)
A Eas 103L Sources of East Asian
Civilizations I (3)
A Eaj 497 Independent Study in
Japanese (1–6)
A Eas 104L Sources of East Asian
Civilizations II (3)
Projects in selected areas of Japanese studies, with
regular progress reports; or supervised readings of
texts in Japanese. May be repeated once for credit
when topics differ. Prerequisite(s): A Eaj 302
permission of instructor.
A basic introduction to the primary texts that have
contributed to the formative cultural foundations of
Korean and Japanese civilizations. Readings will
include selections from the Tale of Genji and
Basho’s Narrow Road to the Deep North. [BE HU]
Courses in Korean
A Eak 101L Elementary Korean I (5)
An introduction to modern Korean, with
emphasis on speaking, reading and writing.
Format will include both lecture and drill
sessions. Not open to students with any
previous knowledge of the Korean language.
A Eak 102L Elementary Korean II (5)
Continuation of A Eak 101L. Prerequisite(s): A
Eak 101 or equivalent.. [FL]
A Eak 170 Korea: Its Culture and Heritage (3)
Survey of the essential elements of traditional
Korean civilization, early contacts with the West,
and modern development. Focus on the evolution of
basic Korean social, political, economic, and
aesthetic ideas. Conducted in English; no knowledge
of Korean is required. [BE]
A Eak 201L Intermediate Korean I (5)
This course will examine several works of Japanese
literature (in translation) written during and after
World War II. The works include and essay, novels,
short stories, a play, and poetry. Attention will be
given to the question of how the Japanese perceived
their role in the war, the nature of the war itself, and
if these changed with the passing of time.
Prerequisites(s): A Eaj 212 or permission of the
instructor.
Concentration on reading, writing, and speaking at
the intermediate level. Emphasis on vocabulary
drills, grammar exercises, and pattern practice.
Prerequisite(s): A Eak 102 or equivalent.
This course will examine several works of Japanese
prose literature (in translation) written during the
Meiji Period (1868-1912). The works include an
essay, novels, and short stories. Attention will be
given to the question of modernity, the nature of the
novel, and European influence on Japanese
literature. No knowledge of Japanese required.
Prerequisite(s): A Eaj 212 or permission of the
instructor.
A Eaj 410 Readings in Modern Japanese
Literature (3)
This is an advanced course in Japanese language for
students who have completed at least three years of
college Japanese. The class will read selected
passages from major works of modern Japanese
literature. Lecture and discussion will be in
Japanese. Prerequisite(s): A Eaj 302 or permission
of instructor.
A Eaj 411 Readings in Modern Japanese
Literature (3)
A basic introduction to the primary texts that have
contributed to the formative cultural foundations of
Chinese and Korean civilizations. Readings will
include the Analects of Confucius, the Tao te ching,
and the Journey to the West. [BE HU]
A Eas 140L Introduction to East Asian Cinema (3)
A Eaj 391 World War II: The Japanese View (3)
A Eaj 396 Meiji Literature in Translation (3)
Courses in East Asian Studies
This course is an introduction to the theory and
practice of teaching Japanese as a foreign language,
designed for those who contemplate a career
teaching Japanese at the secondary or college level.
Focus is on attaining practical experience through
class observation and a supervised classroom
practicum. Prerequisite(s): fluency in Japanese;
permission of instructor. S/U graded
A Eak 202L Intermediate Korean II (5)
Continuation of A Eak 201L. Enhancement of
reading, writing, and speaking skills will be
emphasized. Students will also master several
Korean proverbs. Prerequisite(s): A Eak 201 or
equivalent.
A Eak 301 Advanced Korean I (3)
Acquisition of complex structures through intensive
oral/aural and reading/writing practice. Discussion,
authentic written materials, videotapes and audio
tapes are incorporated. Prerequisite(s): Eak 202L or
equivalent. [OD]
A Eak 302 Advanced Korean II (3)
This course is a continuation of A Eak 301.
Prerequisite(s): A Eak 301 or equivalent. [OD]
A Eak 389 Topics in Korean Literature,
History, and Culture (3)
This course will focus on a selected topic or major
work of traditional or modern Korean literature or
history for intensive study. This course is conducted
solely in English; knowledge of Korean is not
required. May be repeated for credit when the topic
varies. Prerequisite(s): A Eak 101L, or A Eak 170L,
or permission of the instructor.
This course offers an introduction to East Asian
cinema, with emphasis on movies produced in
China and Japan. Lectures and class discussions will
focus on the interpretation of cinematic texts,
especially as they relate to cultural dynamics and
social change. [AR]
A Eas 177 (= A His 177) Cultures and Societies
of Asia: An Historical Survey II (3)
An introduction to the history and cultures of East
Asia (China, Japan, and Korea), their major
institutions and their religious and philosophical
traditions form ancient times to the present. A Eas
177Z is the writing intensive version of A Eas 177;
only one may be taken for credit.
A Eas 177Z (= A His 177Z) Cultures and
Societies of Asia: An Historical Survey II (4)
A Eas 177Z is the writing intensive version of A Eas
177; only one may be taken for credit. [WI]
A Eas 180 (= A Gog 180) Asian America (3)
This course examines the history of the Asian
experience in the United States (especially that of
the Chinese, Japanese, Korean, and Southeast Asian
communities). Topics include immigration, legal
status, the transformation of Asian-American
communities, their relationship with their native
lands, and Asian-American self-representation in
literature and film. [DP US*]
A Eas 190 Confucianism and the Samurai Ethics
(3)
This course will examine primary texts in translation
from Confucius’ Analects to 20th century political
propaganda in an effort to trace the origins and
evolution of the ideas that formed the samurai ethic
in Japan. Course taught in English; no knowledge of
Chinese or Japanese necessary. [Oral discourse]
A Eas 205 East Asian Research and Bibliographic
Methods (3)
This course will cover research and bibliographic
methods in East Asian studies. Students will learn
how to navigate library catalogs and the internet
with specific emphasis on East Asian databases and
resources. Students will also learn how to use East
Asian reference materials, such as character
dictionaries. Prerequisite(s): One year or equivalent
of Chinese, Japanese, or Korean [IL]
A Eas 220 Chinese and Japanese Calligraphy (3)
Practical instruction in the artistic design and the
different styles of written Chinese and Japanese with
the traditional implements: brush, rice paper, ink
plate and ink bar. Knowledge of Chinese or
Japanese is not required.
This is a continuation of A Eaj 410. Class will read
selected passages from major works of Japanese
literature. Lecture and discussion will be in
Japanese. Prerequisite(s): A Eaj 410 or permission
of instructor.
117
University at Albany
A Eas 260 (= A His 260) China in the Revolution (3)
A Eas 357 (= A Rel 357) Zen Buddhism (3)
A Eas 261 (=A Rel 261) Introduction to the
Religions of Japan (3)
An introduction to the religious, philosophical, and
artistic tradition of Zen Buddhism in China, Korea,
and Japan and the West. This course looks at the
birth and subsequent historical evolution of the Zen
or Ch’an school of Buddhism in East Asia. We will
look at the intersection of :Buddhist and Chinese
presumptions about spirituality that gave rise to this
unusual religious form, discussing precisely what is
and is not iconoclastic about its tenets. The
experience of American Zen communities will also
be considered.
This course examines China’s four great twentieth
century revolutions: the 1911 Revolution, the 1949
Communist Revolution, the Great Proletarian
Cultural Revolution, and the reforms of the 1980’s
and 1990’s. Topics include authority and dissent,
constituency mobilization, the relationship between
urban and rural regions, and the changing nature of
ideology in China.
An introduction to the major religious traditions of
Japan, particularly Shinto and Buddhism, this
course will cover the major forms of religious
expression in Japanese history from the earliest
historical records to the so-called New Religions
which arose in the twentieth century. Discussion
will include the philosophical, artistic, social, and
political dimensions of religion in Japanese society.
A Eas 265 (= A Rel 265) Introduction to Indian
Buddhism (3)
An introduction to the story of Buddhism in
South Asia. Focus is on the evolution of the
Buddhist view of sentient life during its first
1500 years on the subcontinent as expressed
primarily in doctrine, but cultural, artistic,
social, and political issues will also be
considered.
A Eas 266 (= A Rel 266) Introduction to the
Religions of Japan (3).
An introduction to the heritage of Buddhism in East
Asia. Focus is on the cultural interaction between
Indian Buddhist notions of the human condition and
the traditional religious and philosophical
assumptions of China and Japan. Discussion will
center on doctrine and the history of its transmission
and understanding, including issues in language,
artistic expression, and the establishment of the
monastic community.
A Eas 270 (= A Wss 270) Women in East Asian
Literature (3)
Female persona in East Asian literature will be
examined in relation to their cultural background as
well as the genres in which they appear. Women as
rulers and lovers; as goddesses and prostitutes;
exemplars and shrews. Conducted in English; no
knowledge of the East Asian languages or cultures is
required. Only one of A Eas 270 & A Wss 270 may
be taken for credit.
A Eas 321M (= A Lcs 321M and A Gog 321M)
Exploring the Multicultural City (3)
This course will explore the human dimensions and
implications of ethnic diversity in the United States,
focusing on New York City. The course utilizes a
variety of methods to introduce students to the
multicultural city, beginning in the classroom but
ending with fieldwork in a specific New York
neighborhood. A Eas 321M is equivalent in
content to A Lcs 321M and A Gog 321M; only one
of the three courses may be taken for credit.
Prerequisite(s): A Gog 102M or 102G; or A Gog
120Z, or A Gog 125M, A Gog 160M or 160G; or
A Gog 220M, or A Gog 240. [OD SS]
A Eas 345 (= A Rel 345) Ethical Issues in East
Asian Thought (3)
This is a discussion course that looks at ethical
issues of contemporary significance to the cultures
of Asia. Students read contemporary academic
discussions of how problems such as suicide,
euthanasia, abortion, sexuality, cloning, etc. have
been understood historically and in terms of
contemporary social morality in India, China, Tibet,
and Japan.
118
A Eas 362 (= A Eco 362) Economies of Japan
and Korea (3)
A study of the economic growth of Japan and Korea
and of current issues facing these economies. A Eco
362Z & A Eas 362Z are the writing intensive
versions of A Eco 362 & A Eas 362; only one of the
four courses may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s):
A Eco 110M and 111M or permission of instructor.
A Eas 362Z (= A Eco 362Z) Economies of Japan
and Korea (3)
A Eas 362Z & A Eco 362Z are the writing intensive
versions of A Eas 362 & A Eco 362; only one of the
four courses may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s):
A Eco 110M and 111M or permission of instructor.
[WI]
A Eas 392 East Asian Travel Literature (3)
This course will examine the traditions of travel
writing in China and Japan. Students will read
selections from both countries that cover a range
from the 9th century to the 18th century. Half of the
semester will focus on China and half on Japan. All
readings will be in English; no knowledge of
Chinese or Japanese is required. Prerequisite(s): Any
one of the following, or permission of the instructor:
A Eas 104, A Eaj 210; A Eas 104; A Eac 210,
A Eac 211
A Eas 393 (= A Rel 393) Readings in Buddhist
Texts (3)
This is an advanced course in the study of
Buddhism that will focus on the close reading of
Buddhist scriptures in English translation.
Prerequisite(s): A Eas 265/A Rel 265; A Eas
266/.A Rel 266, or permission of the instructor.
A Eas 394 (= E Rel 394) Readings in
Japanese Religious Studies (3)
This is an advanced course in the religious traditions
of Japan. We will read English translations of
religious texts native to the Japanese experience of
religion, specifically Buddhist, Shinto, Confucian,
and Folk. Prerequisite(s): One of the following:
A Eaj 261/A Rel 261; A Eas 266/A Rel 266, A Eas
190, A Eas 357 or permission of the instructor.
A Eas 397 The Silk Road (3)
The course examines the history of various land
links between China and India, which are known
collectively as “The Silk Road.” Special attention is
given to the transmission of ideas (Buddhism), art
forms, and commercial goods along this route,
especially during the heyday of the Silk Road from
about 600 to 1000 AD. The many discoveries made
by Western archeologists in Central Asia in the late
19th and early 20th centuries are also considered, as
well as issues related to their removal of Silk Road
treasures to museums in Europe and around the
world. Prerequisite(s): Any one of the following:
A Eac 170; A Eas 103; A Eac 210, or A Eac 211.
A Eas 399 (= A His 399) Confucius and
Confucianism (3)
This course surveys the main texts and themes in the
development of the Confucian tradition from its
origins in China through its spread in Japan and
Korea to its reemergence in contemporary East Asia.
The emphasis is on the way that the tradition has
responded to social conditions. Particular attention
will be paid to the relationship between Confucian
intellectuals and political power. The rivalry with
other traditions (e.g., Taoism, Buddhism, Marxism,
Liberalism, etc.) will also be considered.
Prerequisite(s): A His 177, A Eas 103, A Eas 190,
A Eac 379, or permission of the instructor.
A Eas 495 Colloquium in East Asian Studies (3)
Directed readings and conferences involving several
members of the faculty for students pursuing
undergraduate honors in the Department of East
Asian Studies. To be offered only when requested by
students eligible for the honors program.
Prerequisite(s): major in the department; junior or
senior class standing; acceptance into the Honors
Program.
University at Albany
D EPARTMENT OF
E CONOMICS
Faculty
Professors Emeritae/i
Jean Auclair, Ph.D.
University of Lille (France)
Melvin K. Bers, Ph.D.
University of California, Berkeley
Jack E. Gelfand, Ph.D.
New York University
Pong S. Lee, Ph.D.
Yale University
Richard J. Kalish, Ph.D.
University of Colorado
Donald J. Reeb, Ph.D. (Collins Fellow)
Syracuse University
Edward F. Renshaw, Ph.D.
University of Chicago
John H. Slocum, Ph.D.
Cornell University
Professors
Betty C. Daniel, Ph.D.
University of North Carolina
Michael Jerison, Ph.D.
University of Wisconsin
Terrence W. Kinal, Ph.D.
University of Minnesota
Kajal Lahiri, Ph.D.
University of Rochester
Hamilton Lankford, Ph.D.
University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill
Irene Lurie, Ph.D.
University of California, Berkeley
Carlos Santiago, Ph.D.
Cornell University
Michael J. Sattinger, Ph.D.
Carnegie Mellon University
Hany A. Shawky, Ph.D.
Ohio State University
Jogindar S. Uppal, Ph.D.
University of Minnesota
Kwan Koo Yun, Ph.D.
Stanford University
Associate Professors
Bruce C. Dieffenbach, Ph.D.
Harvard University
Jae-Young Kim, Ph.D.
University of Minnesota
Laurence J. Kranich, Ph.D.
University of Rochester
Thad W. Mirer, Ph.D.
Yale University
James H. Wyckoff, Ph.D.
University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill
Assistant Professors
Kenneth R. Beauchemin, Ph.D.
University of Iowa
Stacey Chen, Ph.D.
University of Rochester
Diane M. Dewar, Ph.D.
University at Albany
John B. Jones, Ph.D.
University of Wisconsin, Madison
Nadav Levy, Ph.D.
Northwestern University
Gerald Marschke, Ph.D.
University of Chicago
Adrian Mastors, Ph.D.
University of Pennsylvania
Rui Zhao, Ph.D.
University of Minnesota
Adjuncts (estimated): 16
Teaching Assistants (estimated): 5
The major in economics is useful as
training for employment in business,
government, and nonprofit agencies and as
preparation for further study at the
graduate level. It is also an excellent
undergraduate background for study in
professional schools of law, accounting,
business administration, public
administration, public policy, social work,
and others. The department also offers the
M.A. and Ph.D. degrees in economics.
Careers
Graduates of the undergraduate economics
program work as financial analysts,
finance and credit officers for insurance
companies and banks, economic analysts
for corporations, policy and legislative
fiscal analysts, and business officers for
nonprofit and government organizations,
as well as administrators and heads of
businesses and government agencies.
Degree Requirements for the
Major in Economics
General Program
B.A.: A minimum of 36 credits as
follows: A Eco 110M, 111M, 300, 301
and 320; 18 additional credits in
economics at the 300 level or above; and
A Eco 210 or A Mat 106, 111, 112 or
118.
B.S.: A minimum of 41 credits as
follows: A Eco 110M, 111M, 300, 301
and 320; 18 additional credits in
economics at the 300 level or above; as
well as A Mat 111 or 112 or 118 and
A Mat 113 or 119. A minor in one of the
natural sciences, mathematics or the
School of Business is also required.
Honors Program
The honors program in economics is
designed to provide capable and motivated
students with a greater understanding of
economics and to better prepare students
for graduate and professional schools.
To be accepted in the honors program and
to remain within that program, the student
must have an average of at least 3.50 in all
economics courses applicable to the major
and 3.25 in all courses taken at the
University. Interested students should file
an application with the departmental
Director of Undergraduate Studies, after
admission to the economics major, for
advisement on choosing elective courses
and meeting the other requirements of the
honors program.
The honors student must complete A Eco
499Z as part of the 36 credit hours of
courses required for the economics major
in the B.A. degree program, or the 41
hours required for the B.S. degree
program. An additional 6–8 credit hours in
economics and/or other disciplines, as
advised, is required to augment economic
research skills. Honors students must also
submit a senior honors thesis acceptable to
the Economics Honors Committee.
By no later than the second month of the
senior year, an honors student must submit
a thesis proposal to the Economics Honors
Committee. The proposal normally arises
from consultation with the faculty
concerning a suitable topic and method of
inquiry. The student, with advice and
consent of the Economics Honors
Committee, will choose a faculty adviser
who will assist the student in completing
the thesis. Work on the thesis may begin
in the junior year, but must be completed
while enrolled in A Eco 499Z, the Senior
Honors Research Seminar.
119
University at Albany
The records of the honors candidate will
be reviewed by the Economics Honors
Committee prior to the candidate’s
intended graduation date. If the Committee
finds that all requirements stated above
have been met, then it shall recommend to
the department that the candidate be
awarded the appropriate baccalaureate
degree with honors in economics.
Combined Bachelor’s/M.B.A. and
Bachelor’s/M.P.A. Programs
The combined bachelor’s degree in
Economics and Master’s of Business
Administration (MBA) and the combined
bachelor’s degree in Economics and
Master’s of Public Administration (MPA)
both provide students of recognized
academic ability and educational maturity
the opportunity to fulfill integrated
requirements for the undergraduate and
master’s degree programs. In addition to
benefiting from important educational
linkages between the programs, it is
possible to earn both degrees in five,
rather than six, years – thus saving one
year of time and tuition costs.
Students may be admitted to the combined
degree program at the beginning of their
junior year, or after the successful
completion of 56 credits, but no later than
the accumulation of 100 credits. A
cumulative grade point average of at least
3.2 (MPA) or 3.3 (MBA) and three
supportive letters of recommendation from
faculty are required. To qualify for the
bachelor’s degree (BA or BS), students
must meet all requirements for the
undergraduate major and minor described
previously, the minimum 60- or 90-credit
liberal arts and sciences requirement, the
general education requirements and the
residency requirements.
To qualify for the master’s degree (MBA)
or (MPA), students must meet all
requirements as outlined in the Graduate
Bulletin including the completion of
required graduate credits and any other
conditions such as a research seminar,
thesis, comprehensive examination,
professional experience, and residence
requirements. Up to 12 graduate credits
may be applied simultaneously to the
requirements for the baccalaureate.
Students interested in learning more about
these programs should contact the Director
of Undergraduate Studies in the
Department of Economics.
Courses
A Eco 110M Principles of Economics I:
Microeconomics (3)
A Eco 300 Intermediate Microeconomics
(3)
Analysis of supply and demand in markets
for goods and markets for the factors of
production. Study of various market
structures, price determination in perfectly
competitive and imperfectly competitive
markets. May not be taken for credit by
students with credit for A Eco 300.
Prerequisite(s):
plane
geometry
and
intermediate algebra, or A Mat 100. [SS]
Introduction to price theory, distribution
theory, and market structure analysis.
Relevance of economic theory in production
and consumption decisions. Prerequisite(s):
A Eco 110M and 111M; and A Eco 210
(formerly A Eco 180) or A Mat 106 or 111
or 112 or 118.
A Eco 111M Principles of Economics II:
Macroeconomics (3)
Examination of the institutional structure of
an economic system. Analysis of aggregate
economic activity, the determinants of the
level, stability, and growth of national
income, the role of monetary and fiscal
policy. May not be taken for credit by
students with credit for A Eco 301.
Prerequisite(s): A Eco 110M. [SS]
A Eco 130 The Third World Economies:
An Interdisciplinary Profile (3)
An interdisciplinary study of economic
disparities among nations. Focus on Third
World Countries: underdevelopment and
poverty, problems in agricultural and
industrial development. Population growth
and unemployment. Global interdependence
and role of the United States. Some global
issues facing the Third World: debt crisis;
privatization and deregulation; relationship
with developed countries including the
United States. [DP if taken before Fall
2004; GC]
A Eco 202M (formerly A Eco 102M) The
American Economy: Its Structure and
Institutions (3)
Discussion of the historical development
and current structure of the American
economy.
Using
an
interdisciplinary
approach
and
without
any
technical/mathematical
tools,
major
economic issues will be discussed , such as
federal budget deficit, unemployment,
poverty, family structure, welfare reforms,
America
in
the
world
economy,
immigration, and health reforms. May not
be taken for credit by students with credit
for A Eco 110M or 111M. [SS]
A Eco 210 (formerly A Eco 180) Tools of
Economics (3)
Introduction
to some of
the basic
mathematical tools used in economics,
including
the
construction
and
comprehension of simple graphs, as well as
some of the economist’s conceptual tools,
including
marginal
analysis,
natio nal
income analysis, supply and demand. May
not be taken for credit by students with
credit for A Mat 106 or 111 or 112 or 118,
or equivalent. May not be offered in 2003 2004. [MS]
A Eco 280 Current Topics in Economics
(3)
Examines current topics in econom ics;
topics vary from time to time. A Eco 280Z
is the writing intensive version of A Eco
280; only one may be taken for credit.
A Eco 280Z Current Topics in
Economics (3)
A Eco 280Z is the writing intensive version
of A Eco 280; only one may be taken for
credit. [WI]
120
A Eco 301 Intermediate Macroeconomics
(3)
Introduction to the measurement of national
income and the theories of aggregate
demand and supply; theoretical analysis of
growth and fluctuations in p roduction,
employment, and prices. Prerequisite(s):
A Eco 110M and 111M.
A Eco 312 Development of the American
Economy (3)
Study of American economic institutions
from the early 19th century to the present.
Employs statistical methods and both micro
and macro theoretical constructs. A Eco
312Z is the writing intensive version of
A Eco 312; only one may be taken for
credit. Prerequisite(s): A Eco 110M and
111M. May not be offered in 2003 -2004.
A Eco 312Z Development of the American
Economy (3)
A Eco 312Z is the writing intensive version
of A Eco 312; only one may be taken for
credit. Prerequisite(s): A Eco 110M and
111M. May not be offered in 2003 -2004.
[WI]
A Eco 313 Development of the European
Economy (3)
Economic change in modern European
societies. Comparative study of the growth
of various European countries emphasizing
the variables associated with development:
population, technology, capital formation,
output, resources, and income distribution.
A Eco 313Z is the writing intensive version
of A Eco 313; only one may be taken for
credit. Prerequisite(s): A Eco 110M and
111M. May not be offered in 2003 -2004.
A Eco 313Z Development of the European
Economy (3)
A Eco 313Z is the writing intensive version
of A Eco 313; only one may be taken for
credit. Prerequi site(s): A Eco 110M and
111M. May not be offered in 2003 -2004.
[WI]
A Eco 314 (formerly A Eco 414) History of
Economic Thought (3)
The evolution of modern economics with
emphasis on the contributions of such
writers as Smith, Malthus, Ricardo, Mill,
Marx, Marshall and Keynes. The turn of
events that motivated the construction of the
main body of economic knowledge is also
examined. A Eco 314Z is the writing
intensive version of A Eco 314. Only one
may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s):
A Eco 300
A Eco 314Z (formerly A Eco 414Z) History of
Economic Thought (3)
A Eco 314Z is the writing intensive version of
A Eco 314; only one may be taken for credit.
Prerequisite(s): A Eco 300. [WI]
University at Albany
A Eco 320 Economic Statistics (3)
Statistical techniques in economic anal ysis.
Topics include distribution theory and
statistical inference as applied to regression
models. Students gain experience in testing
economic theories using a computer
regression package. Prerequisite(s): A Eco
110M and 111M; A Eco 210 (formerly
A Eco 180) or A Mat 106 or 111 or 112 or
118.
A Eco 330 Economics of Development (3)
Introduction to the analysis of economic
growth
and
development.
Historical,
descriptive, and analytical approaches to the
problems of fostering economic growth.
Consideration of alternative theories of the
causes and problems of underdevelopment.
A Eco 330Z is the writing intensive version
of A Eco 330; only one may be taken for
credit. Prerequisite(s): A Eco 110M and
111M.
A Eco 330Z Economics of Development
(3)
A Eco 330Z is the writing intensive version
of A Eco 330; only one may be taken for
credit. Prerequisite(s): A Eco 110M and
111M. [WI]
A Eco 341 (= A Soc 371) Urban
Economics (3)
Analysis of the city-metropolis and the
economic forces which condition its growth
pattern and allocation of scarce resources.
The
public
sector,
especially
local
government, is examined in its role of
solving the problems of inadequate jobs,
housing, education, and other services.
A Eco 341Z is the writing intensive version
of A Eco 341 and A Soc 371; only one of
the three courses may be taken for credit.
Prerequisite(s): A Eco 110M and 111M.
A Eco 341Z (= A Soc 371) Urban
Economics (3)
A Eco 341Z is the writing intensive version
of A Eco 341 and A Soc 371; only one of
the three courses may be tak en for credit.
Prerequisite(s): A Eco 110M and 111M.
[WI]
A Eco 350 Money and Banking (3)
The principles of money, commercial
banking, and central banking; an elementary
consideration of issues of monetary policy
and financial markets. Prerequisite(s):
A Eco 110M and 111M.
A Eco 351 (= A Mat 301) Theory of
Interest (3)
The basic measures of interest, annuities,
sinking funds, amortization schedules,
bonds, and installment loans. Recommended
as preparation for Course Exam 140 of the
Society of Actuaries. Prerequisite(s): A Mat
113 or 119.
A Eco 355 Public Finance (3)
Introduction to the financial problems of
governments: public expenditures, basic
kinds of taxes and tax systems, grants -inaid, public borrowing, debt management,
and fiscal policy. Prerequisite(s): A Eco
110M and 111M.
A Eco 356 (formerly A Eco 456) State and
Local Finance (3)
Problems of financing state and local
government within the context of a federal
system. Relevance and limits of fiscal
theory for state and local government tax
and expenditure policy. A Eco 356Z is the
writing intensive version of A Eco 356; only
one may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s):
A Eco 110M and 111M.
A Eco 356Z (formerly A Eco 456Z) State
and Local Finance (3)
A Eco 374 (formerly A Eco 450) Industrial
Organization (3)
A Eco 356Z is the writing intensive version
of A Eco 356; only one may be taken for
credit. Prerequisite(s): A Eco 110M and
111M. [WI]
Relationship between market structure,
behavior of the firm, economic performance,
and analysis of U.S. antitrust a ctivities.
Prerequisite(s): A Eco 300.
A Eco 357 (formerly A Eco 455) Public
Microeconomics (3)
A Eco 377 Network Economics (3)
Microeconomic analysis of the role of the
public sector in resource allocation within a
market economy: theory of market failures,
alternative corrective measures for market
failures, public choice theory, partial and
general equilibrium analyses of major taxes,
and
welfare-based
public
investment
criteria. A Eco 357Z is the writing intensive
version of A Eco 357; only one may be
taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): A Eco 300;
and 355 or permission of instructor
A Eco 357Z (formerly A Eco 455Z) Public
Microeconomics (3)
A Eco 357Z is the writing intensive version
of A Eco 357; only one may be taken for
credit. Prerequisite(s): A Eco 300 and 355
or permission of instructor
A Eco 360 International Economic
Relations (3)
The development of international trade and
trade
theory
since
mercantilism;
international financial institutions, the
foreign exchange market, and the prob lems
of international balance of payments and
international
liquidity.
Prerequisite(s):
A Eco 110M and 111M.
A Eco 361 (= A Lcs 361) Development of
the Latin American Economy (3)
Economic change in Latin American
societies. Comparative study of the growth
of various Latin American countries
emphasizing the variables associated with
development:
population,
technology,
capital information, output, resources and
income distribution. Only one of A Eco 361
& A Lcs 361 may be taken for credit.
Prerequisite(s): A Eco 110M and 111M.
A Eco 362 (= A Eas 362) Economies of
Japan and Korea (3)
A study of the economic growth of Japan
and Korea and of current issues facing these
economies. A Eco 362Z & A Eas 362Z are
the writing intensive versions of A Eco 362
& A Eas 362; only one of the four courses
may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s):
A Eco 110M and 111M or permission of
instructor.
A Eco 362Z (= A Eas 362Z) Economies of
Japan and Korea (3)
A Eco 362Z & A Eas 362Z are the writing
intensive versions of A Eco 362 & A Eas
362; only one of the four courses may be
taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): A Eco
110M and 111M or permission of instructor.
[WI]
Introduction
to
network
economics,
information economics, and electronic
commerce. Markets such as publishing,
telecommunications,
electricity,
and
electronic commerce will be examined.
Prerequisite(s): A Eco 110M and 111M.
May not be offered in 2003 -2004.
A Eco 380 Contemporary Economic
Issues (3)
An introductory discussion of selected
economic issues of current importance. The
course will focus on different economic
problems each term. May be repeated for
credit when topics differ, up to a maximum
of 6 credits in A Eco 380 and 380Z.
Prerequisite(s): A Eco 110M and 111M
A Eco 380Z Contemporary Economic
Issues (3)
A Eco 380Z is the writing intensive version
of A Eco 380. May be repeated f or credit
when topics differ, up to a maximum of 6
credits
in
A Eco
380
and
380Z.
Prerequisite(s): A Eco 110M and 111M.
[WI]
A Eco 381 (formerly A Eco 430)
Economics of Health Care (3)
Economics concepts are used to explain the
nature of demand and supply in the health
care field. The behavior of consumers and
health care providers is examined from an
economic perspective. Areas of market
failures and the rationale for government
intervention
are
also
described.
Prerequisite(s): A Eco 300 or permission of
the instructor.
A Eco 383 (formerly A Eco 452)
Economics of Law (3)
The application of economic concepts such
as efficiency, externalities, and trade -offs to
the analysis of common law, crime and
punishment, product safety laws, and other
legal interventions in market and nonmarket
behavior. Prerequisite(s): A Eco 300.
A Eco 385 (formerly A Eco 481)
Environmental Economics (3)
Environmental pollution; social costs;
population control; zoning; economics of
public health; conservation of endangered
species, natural wonders, and artifacts;
natural resource exhaustion; and the end of
progress hypothesis are examined and
analyzed. A Eco 385Z is a writing intensive
version of A Eco 385; only one may be
taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): A Eco
110M and 111M.
A Eco 370 Economics of Labor (3)
A Eco 385Z (formerly A Eco 481Z)
Environmental Economics (3)
Study of wage theories and wage structures;
wage-cost-price interaction; and wage,
supply, and employment relationships.
Prerequisite(s): A Eco 110M and 111M.
A Eco 385Z is a writing intensive version of
A Eco 385; only one may be taken for
credit. Prerequisite(s): A Eco 110M and
111M. [WI]
A Eco 371 (formerly A Eco 462) The
Distribution of Income and Wealth (3)
Theoretical, empirical, and institutional
analysis of the distribution of income and
wealth, including policies and programs
designed to affect these distributions.
Prerequisite(s): A Eco 300.
121
University at Albany
A Eco 401 Macroeconomic Modeling,
Forecasting and Policy Analysis (3)
A Eco 466 Financial Economics (3)
Introduction to the construction and use of
econometric
macro
models,
including
theoretical
specification,
statistical
estimation and validation; the structure of
large-scale macro models; forecasting and
policy analysis; critiques of current
macroeconomic modeling. Prerequisite(s):
A Eco 300, 301, and 320.
Financial markets, efficient-market theory,
financial panics, choice under uncertainty, risk
aversion, portfolio choice, capital-asset pricing
model, futures, options, flow of funds, saving
and
investment,
financing
economic
development, government debt, international
debt, term structure of interest rates, interest
rate forecasting. Prerequisite(s): A Eco 301 or
350.
A Eco 405 Game Theory (3)
A Eco 475 Managerial Economics (3)
Study of the strategic interaction among
rational agents. Development of the basic
analytical tools of game theory, including
simultaneous and sequential move games,
games with incomplete information, and
alternative equilibrium concepts. Applications
in fields such as industrial organization. public
economics, international trade, and voting:
Prerequisite(s): A Eco 300; A Eco 320 (or
B Msi 220 or A Mat 108) or permission of the
instructor.
A Eco 410 Mathematics for Economists
(3)
Techniques of differentiation, integration,
differential equations, difference equations,
and linear algebra as used in economic
analysis. Prerequisite(s): A Eco 300 and
301.
A Eco 420 Applied Econom etrics (3)
Application of regression to a problem
chosen by the student. Some general
discussion of data sources, the derivation of
index numbers and other problems that
might
be
encountered
in
estimating
economic relations. Emphasis is on class
presentation and analysis of student
projects. Prerequisite(s): A Eco 320.
A Eco 420Z Applied Econometrics (3)
A Eco 420Z is a writing intensive version of
A Eco 420. Only one may be taken for
credit. Prerequisite(s): A Eco 320. [WI]
A Eco 427 Computer Applications in
Economics (3)
Introduction
to
computer
use
and
applications in economics, econometrics,
and data analysis. Applications may include
spreadsheet software such as Excel and
statistical
software
such
as
SAS.
Prerequisite(s): A Eco 320.
A Eco 445 International Trade (3)
Theoretical, institutional, and empirical
characteristics
of
trade
and
capital
movements between nations. Review of the
pure theories of comparative advantage,
gains from trade, commercial policy, and
resource transfers. Brief review of moder n
balance of payments theory and policy
question. Prerequisite(s): A Eco 300 and
301.
A Eco 446 International Finance (3)
The
foreign
exchange
market
and
international payments are described and
analyzed. Emphasis is placed on analyzing
the implications of price levels and
employment in small and large countries.
Proposals for exchange management and
reform of the international monetary system
are evaluated. Prerequisite(s): A Eco 110M,
111M, and 301.
122
Application of economic concepts to the
decision making of the firm. Topics may
include market and demand analysis, risk
and
uncertainty,
pricing,
production,
investment decisions, and capital budgeting.
Prerequisite(s): A Eco 300 and 320, or
permission of the instructor.
A Eco 480 Topics in Economics (3)
Detailed analysis of specific topics in
economics. Topics may vary from seme ster
to semester. May be repeated for credit if
topics differ, up to a maximum 6 credits.
A Eco 480Z is the writing intensive version
of A Eco 480; only one may be taken for
credit. Prerequisite(s): A Eco 300, 301 and
320; permission of instructor.
A Eco 480Z Topics in Economics (3)
A Eco 480Z is the writing intensive version
of A Eco 480; only one may be taken for
credit. Prerequisite(s): A Eco 300, 301 and
320; permission of the instructor. [WI]
A Eco 495 Economics Practicum (3)
This course provides under graduate majors
in economics the opportunity to work as a
teaching aide and facilitator to faculty
teaching the introductory courses in
economics. Meetings with students enrolled
in the Introductory course are scheduled
weekly. Prerequisite(s): major in ec onomics;
a grade of B or higher in A Eco 300 and
301; and permission of instructor. S/U
graded. May not be offered in 2003 -2004.
A Eco 496 Economics Internship (3)
Economics
Internship
requires
active
participation in economic research outside
the University, together with senior class
standing as an economics major. May be
taken only once for credit. Internships are
open only to qualified seniors who have
an overall grade point average of 2.50 or
higher. Permission of instructor is required.
S/U graded.
A Eco 497 Independent Study and
Research (3)
Student-initiated research project under
faculty guidance. May be repeated for credit
up to a total of 6 credits with permission of
department. A Eco 497Z is the writing
intensive version of A Eco 497. Only one
may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s):
A Eco 300, 301 and 320; a B average or
higher in all economic courses attempted.
A Eco 497Z Independent Study and
Research (3)
A Eco 497Z is the writing intensive version
of A Eco 497. Only one may be taken for
credit. Prerequisite(s): A Eco 300, 301 and
320; a B average or higher in all economic
courses attempted. [WI]
A Eco 499Z (formerly A Eco 499) Senior
Honors Research Seminar (3)
Senior seminar, in which a substantial
“senior thesis” is prepared by an honors
candidate under the supervision of a faculty
adviser. Students present oral and/or written
progress reports on their ongoing research
and read, discuss, and criticize each other’s
work. The former A Eco 499 does not yield
writing intensive credit. Prerequisi te(s):
admission to the honors program and A Eco
420 or 420Z. [WI]
University at Albany
D EPARTMENT OF
E NGLISH
Faculty
Distinguished Teaching Professor Emeritae/i
Eugene K. Garber, Ph.D.
University of Iowa
Distinguished Service Professor
Ronald A. Bosco, Ph.D. (Collins Fellow)
University of Maryland
Distinguished Teaching Professor
Judith Fetterley, Ph.D. (Collins Fellow)
Indiana University
Stephen North D.A.
University at Albany
Professors Emeritae/i
Frances Colby Allee, Ph.D.
Johns Hopkins University
Stanley K. Coffman Jr., Ph.D.
Ohio State University
Sarah Blacher Cohen, Ph.D.
Northwestern University
Arthur N. Collins, Ph.D. (Collins Fellow)
University of Minnesota
Robert A. Donovan, Ph.D.
Washington University
William A. Dumbleton, Ph.D.
University of Pennsylvania
John C. Gerber, Ph.D.
University of Chicago
Walter Knotts, Ph.D.
Harvard University
Edward S. Lecomte, Ph.D.
Columbia University
Eugene Mirabelli, Ph.D.
Harvard University
Daniel W. Odell, Ph.D.
Cornell University
Townsend Rich, Ph.D.
Yale University
Harry C. Staley, Ph.D.
University of Pennsylvania
Professors
Judith E. Barlow, Ph.D. (Collins Fellow)
University of Pennsylvania
Jeffrey Berman, Ph.D.
Cornell University
Donald J. Byrd, Ph.D.
University of Kansas
Thomas D. Cohen, Ph.D.
Yale University
Randall T. Craig, Ph.D.
University of Wisconsin, Madison
Gareth Griffiths, Ph.D.
University of Wales (Cardiff)
Judith E. Johnson, B.A.
Barnard College
Pierre Joris, Ph.D.
University at Binghamton
William Kennedy, B.A.
Siena College
Marjorie Pryse, Ph.D.
University of California, Santa Cruz
Martha T. Rozett, Ph.D. (Collins Fellow)
University of Michigan
Charles Shepherdson, Ph.D.
Vanderbilt University
Cary Wolfe, Ph.D.
Duke University
Associate Professors Emeritae/i
Theodore Adams, Ph.D.
Ohio University
Diva Daims, Ph.D.
University of Virginia
Deborah Dorfman, Ph.D.
Yale University
Richard M. Goldman, Ph.D.
Indiana University
Edward M. Jennings, Ph.D.
University of Wisconsin
Charles Koban, Ph.D.
University of Illinois
Thomson Littlefield, Ph.D.
Columbia University
Rudolph L. Nelson, Ph.D.
Brown University
David C. Redding, Ph.D.
University of Pennsylvania
Barbara Rotundo, Ph.D.
Syracuse University
William Rowley, Ph.D.
Harvard University
Joan E. Schulz, Ph.D. (Collins Fellow)
University of Illinois
Frederick E. Silva, Ph.D.
Indiana University
Donald B. Stauffer, Ph.D.
Indiana University
Robert E. Thorstensen, M.A.
University of Chicago
Associate Professors
Richard A. Barney, Ph.D.
University of Virginia
Lana Cable, Ph.D.
Johns Hopkins University
Lydia Davis, B.A. (Writer in Residence)
Barnard College
Teresa Ebert, Ph.D.
University of Minnesota
Helen Regueiro Elam, Ph.D.
Brown University
Donald Faulkner, M.Phil
Yale University
Rosemary Hennessey, Ph.D.
Syracuse University
Lynne Tillman, B.A. (Writer in Residence)
Hunter College
Carolyn Yalkut, Ph.D.
University of Denver
Assistant Professors Emeritae/i
George S. Hastings, Ph.D.
University of Pennsylvania
Assistant Professors
Branka Arsic, Ph.D.
University of Belgrade
Bret Benjamin, Ph.D.
University of Texas at Austin
Michael Hill, Ph.D.
SUNY at Stony Brook
Paul A. Kottman, Ph.D.
University of California at Berkeley
Mark A. Neal, Ph.D.
University at Buffalo, SUNY
Helene E. Scheck, Ph.D.
State University of New York at Binghamton
Edward L. Schwarzschild, Ph.D.
Washington University
Lisa Thompson, Ph.D.
Stanford University
McKenzie Wark, Ph.D.
Murdoch University Australia
Full-Time Lecturers
Jill Hanifan, D.A.
University at Albany
Anne Sullivan, Ph.D.
University at Albany
Kathleen Thornton, D.A.
University at Albany, SUNY
Mary Valentis, Ph.D.
University at Albany
Kate Winter, D.A.
University at Albany
Teaching Assistants (estimated): 20
Careers for English Majors
The major in English prepares students for
any field of work that requires a broad
liberal education with special strength in
language, critical analysis and research.
English graduates find careers in theatre
and film, government, counseling,
broadcasting, public policy and
administration, banking, and retailing and
manufacturing as well as writing, editing,
publishing, teaching, advertising and public
relations. The English major is also
excellent preparation for advanced study in
such professional graduate programs as law,
medicine, librarianship, social welfare and
theology.
Curriculum
The curriculum of the Department of
English is designed to aid students to write
effectively, to read critically, and to acquire
a sense of the development of literature
written in English and of its relation to
society. Within the English major, students
may choose to concentrate in the General
Sequence or in the Writing Sequence.
English majors also have the option of
applying for admission to the Honors
Program. Students planning to take the
GRE for graduate study in English are
strongly urged to include course work in
pre-1800 generic surveys (e.g., 251, 252,
291, 292, 295, 296). Students may also
count up to 6 credits toward their English
electives of literature in translation when
such courses have received approval by the
English department.
123
University at Albany
Degree Requirements for the
Major in English
General and Teacher Education Programs
B.A. General Sequence: 36 credits in
English, at least 18 of them in courses at
the 300 level or above, including the
following in recommended order of study:
3 credits from the following Reading
Courses.:
A
A
A
A
Eng
Eng
Eng
Eng
121E/L
122E/L
123E/L
124E/L
Reading
Reading
Reading
Reading
Literature
Prose Fiction
Drama
Poetry
3 credits of:
A Eng 210 Introduction to Literary Study
3 credits from the following Generic
Survey Courses:
A Eng 251 British Poetic Tradition I
A Eng 252 British Poetic Tradition II
A Eng 260L Forms of Poetry
A Eng 261 American Poetic Tradition
A Eng 291L English Literary Tradition I
A Eng 292L English Literary Tradition II
A Eng 295L Classics of Western Literature I:
Ancient Epic to Modern Drama
A Eng 296L Classics of Western Literature
II; Ancient Epic to Modern Novel
A Eng 320 British Novel I
A Eng 321 British Novel II
A Eng 322 British Drama
A Eng 323 Nineteenth-Century
American Novel
A Eng 324 Twentieth-Century
American Novel
A Eng 325L American Drama
3 credits from the following Author
Courses:
A Eng 341 Chaucer
A Eng 344 Early Works of Shakespeare
A Eng 345 Later Works of Shakespeare
A Eng 348 Milton
A Eng 352 Study of a British Author
A Eng 353 Study of an American
Author
A Eng 354 Comparative Study of
Authors
3 credits from Writing Courses on the 300
level or above:
A Eng 300Z Expository Writing
A Eng 301Z Critical Writing
A Eng 302Z Creative Writing
A Eng 303Z Forms of Argumentative
and Persuasive Writing (Rhetoric)
A Eng 304Z Forms of Creative Writing
(Poetics)
A Eng 308Z Journalistic Writing
A Eng 403Z Writing Prose Fiction
A Eng 404Z Writing Drama
A Eng 405Z Writing Poetry
3 credits from the following courses in
Literature of a Subculture or Cultural
Studies:
A Eng 240 Growing Up in America
124
A Eng 362L Critical Approaches to
Women in Literature
A Eng 365 Comparative Study of
Minority Literatures
A Eng 366 Minority Writers
A Eng 367 Jewish-American Literature
A Eng 368L Women Writers
A Eng 371 Regional Studies in British
Literature
A Eng 374 Regional Studies in
American Literature
A Eng 385 Topics in Cultural Studies
(subject to approval for major
requirement)
6 credits from Period Courses:
A Eng 421 Literature of the Middle
Ages
A Eng 422 Literature of the Earlier
Renaissance
A Eng 423 Literature of the Later
Renaissance
A Eng 425 Literature of the Restoration
and the 18th-Century Enlightenment
A Eng 426 The Romantic Period
A Eng 427 The Victorian Period
A Eng 432 American Literature to 1815
A Eng 433 American Literature 1815–
1865
A Eng 434 American Literature 1865–
1920
A Eng 447 This Historical Imagination
The remaining 12 credits required for the
English Major may be selected either from
courses not taken in the above list or from
the following:
Electives
Writing
A Eng 102Z Introduction to Creative
Writing
A Eng 105Z Introduction to Writing in
English Studies
Introductory Literature: Reading
A Eng 144L Reading Shakespeare
Criticism and Theory
A Eng 215L Methods of Literary Criticism
A Eng 310 Studies in Contemporary Theory
Linguistics and Language
(3 credits from this group required for
Teacher Ed):
A Eng 216 Traditional Grammar and
Usage
A Eng 217M Introduction to Linguistics
A Eng 311L History of the English
Language
Literature Electives of General Interest
A Eng 221 The Bible as Literature
A Eng 222L Masterpieces of Literature
A Eng 223L Short Story
A Eng 224 Satire
A Eng 226L Study of a Literary Theme,
Form or Mode
A Eng 227 Literature and Technology
A Eng 232L Modern Novel
A Eng 233L Modern Drama
A Eng 234L Modern Poetry
A Eng 241L Popular Literature
A Eng 242L Science Fiction
A Eng 243 Literature and Film
A Eng 243Z Four American Directors
A Eng 289 Topics in English
A Eng 375 The Literature of New York
State
A Eng 378 Mythic Concepts in Literature
A Eng 382 Literature and Other Disciplines
A Eng 428 Twentieth-Century British
and Irish Literature
A Eng 435 American Literature 1920 to
Present
A Eng 439 Contemporary American
Novel
A Eng 442 Modern Drama
A Eng 461 Forms of Modern Fiction
A Eng 462 Study of a Literary Movement
A Eng 487 Studies in Literature
(special topics)
A Eng 489 Advanced Topics in English
A Eng 490 Internship in English
A Eng 494 Seminar in English
A Eng 497 Independent Study and
Research in English
The Writing Sequence
Admission: the Writing Sequence is open
to freshmen and sophomores: 50 students
per year, on a first-come, first-served
basis. A number of places in the sequence
are also reserved for transfer students.
Interested students should contact the
English Undergraduate Advisement Office
(HU 381). Students must be enrolled in
English 202Z before applying for formal
admission to the Writing Sequence.
B.A. Writing Sequence: 36 credits in
English, including the following 21 credits
in this recommended order of study:
3 credits selected from one of the
following reading courses, preferably the
Writing Intensive version (catalog number
with “E” suffix):
A
A
A
A
Eng
Eng
Eng
Eng
121E/L
122E/L
123E/L
124E/L
Reading
Reading
Reading
Reading
Literature
Prose Fiction
Drama
Poetry
A Eng 202Z Introduction to Writing:
Creative and Persuasive (Poetics &
Rhetoric)
A Eng 210 Introduction to Literary Study
May be taken concurrently with
A Eng 202Z.
A Eng 303Z Forms of Argumentative and
Persuasive Writing
A Eng 304Z Forms of Creative Writing
A Eng 350 Contemporary Writers at Work
A Eng 450 Special Topics in Rhetoric
and Poetics
The remaining 15 credits must be taken
from English course work outside the
writing sequence, including at least 6
credits at or above the 300-level.
University at Albany
Honors Program
The honors program in English is designed
to promote intellectual exchange and
community among able English majors
and to prepare them to do independent
work. Successful completion of the
Program earns an Honors Certificate in
English and nomination for graduation
with “Honors in English” from the
University.
Admission to the honors program can
occur any time after the sophomore year.
For admission, students should have
completed 12 credits in English, including
A Eng 210 and one 300-level course.
Students should have an overall average of
at least 3.25 and 3.50 in English. The
honors coordinator and thesis committee
will evaluate students based upon written
work, preferably from an English course
taken at University at Albany. The honors
coordinator/thesis committee may waive
the entry requirements where appropriate.
Students in the honors program complete
37 credits as follows:
English 210, English 301Z or 398Z,
English 399 or a 500 or 600 level course
relevant to the thesis topic to be taken as
advised during the senior year; English
498 and 499, and 21 additional credits
distributed along the lines laid down for
the major. Fulfillment of the honors
program waives the regular requirements
of the English major. To remain in the
honors program students are required to
maintain a minimum cumulative grade
point average of 3.50 in English courses
and a minimum 3.25 overall. Any student
who leaves the honors program is held
responsible for the English major
requirements.
The Departmental Honors Committee
reviews applications and admissions,
monitors the progress of honors students,
and evaluates the honors thesis. Upon
students’ completion of the requirements,
the honors committee recommends
candidates for the degree with honors in
English.
Honors Seminars
A
A
A
A
Eng
Eng
Eng
Eng
398
399
498
499
Honors
Honors
Honors
Honors
Seminar
Seminar
Seminar
Seminar
I
II
III
IV
Combined B.A./M.A. Program
The combined B.A./M.A. program in
English provides an opportunity for
students of recognized academic ability
and educational maturity to fulfill
integrated requirements of undergraduate
and master’s degree programs from the
beginning of their junior year. A carefully
designed program can permit a student to
earn the B.A. and M.A. degrees within
nine semesters.
The combined program requires a
minimum of 141 credits, of which at least
32 must be graduate credits. In qualifying
for the B.A., students must meet all
University and college requirements,
including the requirements of the
undergraduate major described previously,
the minor requirement, the minimum 90credit liberal arts and sciences
requirement, the general education
requirements, and residency requirements.
In qualifying for the M.A., students must
meet all University and college
requirements as outlined in the Graduate
Bulletin, including completion of a
minimum of 32 graduate credits and any
other conditions such as a research
seminar, thesis, comprehensive
examination, professional experience, and
residency requirements. Up to 9 graduate
credits may be applied simultaneously to
both the B.A. and M.A. programs.
Students are considered as undergraduates
until completion of 120 graduation credits
and satisfactory completion of all B.A.
requirements. Upon meeting B.A.
requirements, students are automatically
considered graduate students.
Students may be admitted to the combined
degree program at the beginning of their
junior year, or after the successful
completion of 56 credits, but no later than
the accumulation of 100 credits. A
cumulative grade point average of 3.20 or
higher and three supportive letters of
recommendation from faculty are required
for consideration. Students will be
admitted upon the recommendation of the
Graduate Admissions Committee of the
department.
English Courses Descriptions
NOTE: Courses that can be used to
fulfill the English major category
requirements are indicated by an
asterisk (*). Courses without an
asterisk can be used to meet the
remaining number of credits in
English required for the major.
A Eng 102Z Introduction to Creative
Writing (3)
Introductory course for students with little or
no experience in creative writing. Practice in
the writing of poetry, fiction, autobiography,
and other literary or personal forms.
Consideration of such elements of composition
as rhythm, imagery, poetic conventions,
narrative, tone, point of view, and atmosphere.
May be taken only by freshmen and
sophomores. [AR WI]
A Eng 105Z Introduction to Writing in English
Studies (3)
Introduction to the opportunities for and demands of
writing in the English major. Particular emphasis on
strategies of writing and thinking, the relationship
between writing and context (concepts of genre,
audience, evidence, etc.) and writing as a discipline
in English studies. For first- and second-year
students intending to major in English. [WI]
A Eng 121L *Reading Literature (3)
Development of the critical skills for
interpreting and evaluating literature in the
major genres—fiction, drama and poetry—with
a focus on significant representative works
from a variety of cultures and historical
periods. A Eng 121E is the writing intensive
version of A Eng 121L; only one may be taken
for credit. [HU]
A Eng 121E *Reading Literature (3)
A Eng 121E is the writing intensive version of
A Eng 121L; only one may be taken for credit.
May not be offered in 2003-2004. [HU WI]
A Eng 122E *Reading Prose Fiction (3)
A Eng 122E is the writing intensive version of
A Eng 122L; only one may be taken for credit.
May not be offered in 2003-2004. [HU WI]
A Eng 122L *Reading Prose Fiction (3)
Introduction to methods of analyzing fiction:
plot, character, theme, point of view,
symbolism, setting, etc. Readings consist of
short stories and novels from a variety of
cultures and historical periods. A Eng 122E is
the writing intensive version of A Eng 122L;
only one may be taken for credit. May not be
offered in 2003-2004. [HU]
A Eng 123L *Reading Drama (3)
Introduction to the study of dramatic literature
from ancient Greece to the present. Primary
focus on dramatic structure, plot, character,
theme, setting, dialogue—but attention also
given to the relationship between the plays and
the cultures that produced them. A Eng 123E is
the writing intensive version of A Eng 123L;
only one may be taken for credit. May not be
offered in 2003-2004. [HU]
A Eng 123E *Reading Drama (3)
A Eng 123E is the writing intensive version of
A Eng 123L; only one may be taken for credit.
May not be offered in 2003-2004.. [HU WI]
A Eng 124L *Reading Poetry (3)
Introduction to the analysis of poetry. The course
considers a range of modes through readings from
various periods of English and American poetry,
examining such elements as voice, figures of speech,
diction, tone and poetic form. A Eng 124E is the
writing intensive version of A Eng 124L; only one
may be taken for credit. May not be offered in 20032004. [HU]
A Eng 124E *Reading Poetry (3)
A Eng 124E is the writing intensive version of A Eng
124L; only one may be taken for credit. May not be
offered in 2003-2004. [HU WI]
A Eng 144L Reading Shakespeare (3)
Introduction to the variety of Shakespearean
genres—comedy, history, tragedy, romance,
tragicomedy and sonnets—in light of both their
Renaissance context and their relevance to
contemporary issues. (Intended for nonmajors.)
A Eng 144E is the writing intensive version of
A Eng 144L; only one may be taken for credit.
[HU]
A Eng 144E Reading Shakespeare (3)
A Eng 144E is the writing intensive version of
A Eng 144L; only one may be taken for credit.
May not be offered in 2003-2004. [HU WI]
125
University at Albany
A Eng 202Z Introduction to Creative
Writing: Creative & Persuasive (Poetics &
Rhetoric) (3)
An introduction to writing as it is informed by
rhetoric and poetics. Features extensive student
writing. Emphasis on key concepts and basic
terminology, analysis of both literary and
student texts, and workshop pedagogy. May be
taken only by freshmen and sophomores. [WI]
A Eng 210 *Introduction to Literary
Study (3)
A study of relationships among writer, text and
reader as they bear upon literary interpretation
and theory. Primary focus will be on the basic
issues and assumptions underlying literary study
and on varying approaches to practical criticism.
Readings: selected literary texts, essays in
practical
criticism
and
critical
theory.
Prerequisite(s): completion of or current
enrollment in a 100-level English literature
course.
A Eng 215L Methods of Literary
Criticism (3)
This course involves investigation and application of
a particular critical method such as Freudian,
Marxist, historical, structural or mythic criticism. By
focusing on only one critical method among many in
the discipline, nonspecialist students gain
experience with an important tool of literary
analysis, using it to discover new dimensions in a
variety of literary texts. May be repeated once for
credit when content varies. May not be offered in
2003-2004. [HU]
A Eng 216 (= A Lin 216) Traditional
Grammar and Usage (3)
Thorough coverage of traditional grammar and
usage with an introduction to the principles of
structural and transformational grammar. Brief
exploration into recent advances in linguistic
thought. Practice in stylistic analysis using
such grammatical elements as syntax, voice,
subordination and sentence structure.
A Eng 217M (= A Ant 220M & A Lin 220M)
Introduction to Linguistics (3)
The
principles
of
modern
structural,
transformational, and historical linguistics,
with English as the prime example in the
examination of language and languages. Only
one of A Eng 217M, A Ant 220M & A Lin
220M may be taken for credit.
A Eng 221 (= A Jst 242 & A Rel 221) The
Bible as Literature (3)
Literary genres of the Hebrew Bible (Old
Testament) and the cultures from which they
emerged. Attention to parallel developments in
other literatures and to the influence of the
Hebrew Bible on Western life and letters. Only
one of Eng 221, Jst 242, and Rel 221 may be
taken for credit
A Eng 222L Masterpieces of Literature (3)
Major works of world literature in a variety of
forms, including epic, dramatic and narrative
as they provide a context of literary tradition
and a foundation for literary study and
intellectual history. A Eng 222E is the writing
intensive version of 222L; may be repeated
once for credit when content varies. [HU]
A Eng 222E Masterpieces of Literature (3)
A Eng 222E is the writing intensive version of
222L; may be repeated once for credit when
content varies. May not be offered in 20032004. [HU WI]
A Eng 223L Short Story (3)
Analysis and interpretation of the short story as
it occurs in one or more periods or places.
A Eng 223E is the writing intensive version of
A Eng 223L; only one may be taken for credit.
[HU]
126
A Eng 223E Short Story (3)
A Eng 243Z Four American Directors (3)
A Eng 223E is the writing intensive version of
A Eng 223L; only one may be taken for credit.
May not be offered in 2003-2004. [HU WI]
Representative films of Orson Welles, John
Ford, Alfred Hitchcock and Billy Wilder from
several perspectives. Analyzed as examples of
film art, expressions of an individual’ s
personal vision, products of a complex
industrial organization (Hollywood,) and texts
to help explain a society’s complex cultural
condition. May not be offered in 2003-2004.
[WI]
A Eng 224 Satire (3)
Exploration of the mode of satire: the view of
the human estate which informs it and the
characteristic actions and images by which this
view is realized in prose fiction, drama and
poetry and in the visual arts. Studies Roman,
medieval, 17th and 18th century, modern and
contemporary works. May not be offered in
2003-2004.
A Eng 226L Study of a Literary Theme,
Form or Mode (3)
Exploration of a single common theme, form or
mode using varied texts to promote fresh
inquiry by unexpected juxtapositions of subject
matter and ways of treating it. Sample themes
might include Slavery, Radicalism, or the Old
West. Sample forms might include the sonnet
or lyric. May be repeated once for credit when
content varies. [HU]
A Eng 227 Literature and Technology (3)
An examination of the relations between
technology and literature. Topics to be
addressed may include the presentation of
science and technology in fiction, drama and
poetry as well as the impact of technological
innovation on literary production and
consumption.
A Eng 232L Modern Novel (3)
Consideration of the forms, techniques and
themes of the modern American, British and
Continental novel. [HU]
A Eng 233L Modern Drama (3)
Survey of modern European and American
drama from naturalistic theatre to post-modern
theater. Dramatists include Ibsen, Chekhov,
Shaw, O’Neill, Brecht, Ionesco, Williams,
Pinter and others. [AR HU]
A Eng 234L Modern Poetry (3)
The forms, techniques and themes of modern
British
and
American
poetry,
with
concentration on such major figures as Yeats,
Eliot, Williams, Bishop and Stevens. [HU]
A Eng 240 *Growing Up in America (3)
A reading of novels, autobiographies and other
literary works in which authors, both men and
women, of various ethnic and racial backgrounds
describe the experience of growing up in a multiethnic society. Discussions will be aimed at
increasing an understanding of the problems and
pleasures of diversity. [DP]
A Eng 241L Popular Literature (3)
Examines aspects of popular literary culture
such as the best-seller, song lyrics, popular
romances, detective and mystery fiction, or
books that have been in vogue on the campus
during the last 20 years. The course explores
the power of cultural ephemera and gives
insight into the nature of popular appeal. May
be repeated once for credit when content
varies. [HU]
A Eng 242L Science Fiction (3)
The development of science fiction and the
issues raised by it. Authors include such
writers as Asimov, Clarke, Heinlein, Huxley
and LeGuin. [HU]
A Eng 243 Literature and Film (3)
Both films and literary works as outgrowths of
their culture. From term to term the course
focuses on different periods or themes. May be
repeated once for credit when content varies.
A Eng 251 *British Poetic Tradition I (3)
A study of the British poetic tradition, focusing
on representative works of a small number of
authors. Readings will include works from the
Middle Ages, Renaissance and 17th century
(e.g., Chaucer, Spenser, Donne). May not be
offered in 2003-2004.
A Eng 252 *British Poetic Tradition II (3)
A continuation of British Poetic Tradition 1,
which, however, may be taken independently.
Readings will include works from the 17th to
20th centuries (e.g., Milton, Pope, a Romantic
or Victorian poet, a poet of the 20th century).
May not be offered in 2003-2004.
A Eng 260L *Forms of Poetry (3)
A study of the forms of poetry, such as the
ballad, sonnet and dramatic monologue, and
poetic modes, such as meditative, lyrical and
satiric. Students will examine why certain
forms are popular at certain times, and how
British and American poets adopt or change the
forms they inherit. [HU]
A Eng 261L *American Poetic Tradition (3)
A study of American poetry from the 17th
century through the modern period, stressing
the richness of the early poetic tradition and
the resulting varied spectrum of 20th century
poetry. Emphasis on close reading of
individual texts and theoretical issues that arise
in the reading of poetry. [HU]
A Eng 289 Topics in English (1–6)
Topics in literature with a university-wide
appeal. May be repeated once for credit when
content varies.
A Eng 291L *English Literary Tradition I:
From the Anglo-Saxon Period through
Milton (3)
Representative works by major authors from
the Anglo-Saxon period through Milton, with
some attention to necessary historical,
biographical and intellectual background
information. Provides a sense of continuity and
change in the English tradition, offering broad
overviews of extended chronological periods.
[HU]
A Eng 292L *English Literary Tradition II:
From the Restoration through the Modern
Period (3)
Representative works by major authors from
the Restoration through the Modern period,
with some attention to necessary historical,
biographical and intellectual background
information. Provides a sense of continuity and
change in the English literary tradition,
offering broad
overviews of extended
chronological periods. HU]
A Eng 295L *Classics of Western Literature
I: Ancient Epic to Modern Drama (3)
Classics of Western Literature I and II offer a
foundation for literary study by tracing the evolution
of modern literary genres from Homeric epics.
A Eng 295L/E examines the relationship of The
Iliad to the Western dramatic tradition.
Representative authors include Homer, Aeschylus,
Sophocles, Euripides, Shakespeare, Molière, Racine,
Goethe, Ibsen, Chekhov, Brecht. Critical writing is
emphasized. A Eng 295E is the writing intensive
version of 295L; only one may be taken for credit.
[HU]
University at Albany
A Eng 295E *Classics of Western Literature
I: Ancient Epic to Modern
Drama (3)
A Eng 295E is the writing intensive version of
295L; only one may be taken for credit. May
not be offered in 2003-2004. [HU WI]
A Eng 296L *Classics of Western Literature
II: Ancient Epic to Modern
Novel (3)
Classics of Western Literature I and II offer a
foundation for literary study by tracing the
evolution of modern literary genres from Homeric
epics. A Eng 296L/E examines the emergence of
the modern novel from the epic tradition.
Representative authors include Homer, Virgil,
Dante, Cervantes, Joyce. Critical writing is
emphasized. Prior completion of A Eng 295L or
295E is recommended but not required. A Eng
296E is the writing intensive version of 296L; only
one may be taken for credit. [HU]
A Eng 305Z Studies in Writing About Texts (3)
A Eng 341 *Chaucer (3)
Intensive study of the forms and strategies of
writing in English studies. Students will
engage with a variety of literary, critical, and
theoretical texts. The course emphasizes
students’ own analytical writing. Required of
all English majors. Prerequisite(s): English
205Z. Satisfies the general education oral
discourse requirements.
The medieval background and the ideas and
narrative art in the poet’s major works. No
previous knowledge of Middle English is
required. Intended primarily for juniors and
seniors. Prerequisite(s): a 100-level English
literature course or permission of instructor.
A Eng 308Z (= A Jrl 308Z) *Narrative and
Descriptive Journalism (3)
The development of Shakespeare’s dramatic
art, with emphasis on character, language,
theme, form and structure in comedies,
histories and tragedies of the 16th century.
Intended primarily for juniors and seniors.
Prerequisite(s): a 100-level English literature
course or permission of instructor.
A Eng 296E *Classics of Western Literature
II: Ancient Epic to Modern
Novel (3)
Students will explore a variety of journalistic writing
styles, with an emphasis on good narrative and
description, combined with the skillful use of quotes
and dialogue. The class features intensive critiques
of students' work. A variety of formats will be
studied: newspapers, magazines, non-fiction books,
and online publications. Class discussion and
reading will help students improve their skills in
observing, interviewing, and organizing material for
longer articles. Students will have five writing
assignments, including a short research paper,
several in-class writing exercises, and a final project
consisting of a major feature story of publishable
quality.
A Eng 296E is the writing intensive version of
296L; only one may be taken for credit. May
not be offered in 2003-2004. [HU WI]
A Eng 310 Studies in Contemporary
Theory (3)
A Eng 300Z *Expository Writing (3)
Intensive study of a particular issue or nucleus
of issues in critical/cultural theory. Individual
semesters may concentrate on feminist theory,
gay and lesbian theory, theories of the
imagination, or other topics. The course may
be repeated once for credit when the content
varies.
For the experienced writers who wish to work
on such skills as style, organization, logic, and
tone. Practice in a variety of forms: editorials,
letters, travel accounts, film reviews, position
papers, and autobiographical narrative. Classes
devoted to discussions of the composing
process and to critiques of student essays.
Intended primarily for juniors and senior
English minors. A-E grading. Satisfies the
general education oral discourse requirements.
[OD if taken Fall 2003 or thereafter; WI]
A Eng 301Z *Critical Writing (3)
Exercises in literary description and literary
criticism; attention to various critical tasks and
approaches to the major resources of literary
bibliography. Intended primarily for juniors
and seniors [OD if taken Fall 2003 or
thereafter; WI]
A Eng 302Z *Creative Writing (3)
For the student who wishes to experiment with
a variety of kinds of writing . Admission is by
permission, and those seeking to enroll should
submit a sample of their creative work to the
instructor. Intended primarily for juniors and
seniors.
Prerequisite(s):
permission
of
instructor. Satisfies the general education oral
discourse requirements. [OD if taken Fall 2003
or thereafter; WI]
A Eng 303Z *Forms of Argumentative and
Persuasive Writing (Rhetoric) (3)
Concentrated study of writing with an
emphasis on rhetoric as a disciplinary context.
Features extensive practice in one or more of a
variety of forms (argument, narration,
exposition). Focuses on detailed analysis of
both literary and student texts, with special
attention to generic conventions, rhetorical
context,
textual
logics,
and
style.
Prerequisite(s): A Eng 202Z [OD if taken Fall
2003 or thereafter; WI]
A Eng 304Z *Forms of Creative Writing
(Poetics) (3)
Concentrated study on writing with an
emphasis on poetics as a disciplinary context.
Features extensive practice in one or more of a
variety of forms (e.g., drama, fiction, poetry).
Focuses on detailed analysis of both literary
and student texts, with special attention to
generic conventions, authorial voice, textual
logics, and style. Prerequisite(s): A Eng 202Z
[OD if taken Fall 2003 or thereafter; WI]
A Eng 311L History of the English
Language (3)
A broad tracing of the history, development
and structure of the language from the
beginnings to modern English, including
foreign influences on English, basic tendencies
of the language, grammatical constructs, and
regional usages, especially American. Intended
primarily for juniors and seniors. May not be
offered in 2003-2004.
A Eng 320 *British Novel I (3)
Origins and development of the British novel
from its beginnings to 1850. Representative
novelists may include Defoe, Richardson,
Fielding, Austen, the Brontes and Dickens.
A Eng 321 *British Novel II (3)
Development of the British novel from 1850
through the modern period. Representative
novelists may include George Eliot, Hardy,
Conrad, Lawrence, Joyce and Woolf.
A Eng 322 *British Drama (3)
A chronological study of representative plays
of major dramatists, periods and movements
from the Middle Ages through the 20th
century.
A Eng 323 *Nineteenth-Century American
Novel (3)
A study of the American novel in the 19th century,
emphasizing its development in form and theme, its
intersections with American history and culture,
and/or the context of literary movements such as
Romanticism, Realism and Naturalism.
A Eng 324 *Twentieth-Century American
Novel (3)
A study of the 20th century American novel,
emphasizing the shifts and developments in form
and theme in this century.
A Eng 344 (= A Thr 324) Early Works of
Shakespeare (3)
A Eng 345 (= A Thr 325) Later Works of
Shakespeare (3)
The development of Shakespeare’s dramatic art,
focusing on works from the 17th century—the
mature tragedies (including Hamlet,) the “dark”
comedies, and the dramatic romances—with
emphasis on character, language, theme, form and
structure, as well as dramatic history. Intended
primarily for juniors and seniors. Prerequisite(s): a
100-level English literature course or permission of
instructor.
A Eng 348 *Milton (3)
Milton’s poetry and selected prose in the
intellectual context of his time. Major emphasis
on Paradise Lost, with appropriately detailed
study of Comus, Lycidas, Samson Agonistes and
significant minor poems. In prose, emphasis on
Of Education and Areopagitica. Intended
primarily for juniors and seniors. Prerequisite(s):
a 100-level English literature course or
permission of instructor.
A Eng 350 *Contemporary Writers at
Work (3)
Rhetoric and poetics as practiced by
contemporary writers across a range of genres
and media. Particular attention to social,
intellectual, and aesthetic contexts out of
which such work emerges. Prerequisite(s):
junior or senior class standing.
A Eng 352 *Study of a British Author (3)
The major British author to be studied in depth
varies from section to section and from term to
term. May be repeated once for credit when
content varies. Intended primarily for juniors
and seniors. Prerequisite(s): a 100-level
English literature course or permission of
instructor
A Eng 353 *Study of an American
Author (3)
The major American author to be studied in depth
varies from section to section and from term to term.
May be repeated once for credit when content
varies. Intended primarily for juniors and seniors.
Prerequisite(s): a 100-level English literature course
or permission of instructor.
A Eng 354 *Comparative Study of
Authors (3)
Study of two authors whose works illuminate each
other in terms of style, theme and their relationship
to particular historical eras. May be repeated more
than once for credit when content varies. Intended
primarily for juniors and seniors. Prerequisite(s): a
100-level English literature course or permission of
instructor.
A Eng 325L *American Drama (3)
A survey of the American drama. The primary focus
will be on representative works by 20th century
playwrights as well as on major theatrical movements
in this country. [AR HU]
127
University at Albany
A Eng 362L (= A Wss 362L) *Critical Approaches
to Women in Literature (3)
A Eng 374 *Regional Studies in American
Literature (3)
A Eng 404Z (= A Thr 406Z) *Writing
Drama (3)
An examination of the relations among gender,
text and literary study. The course analyzes
different images of women in texts, the
relationship of these images to the form and
content of the works studied, and the
connections between individual works and
cultural or critical history. Intended primarily
for juniors and seniors. Prerequisite(s): a 100 level English literature course or permission of
instructor. Only one of A Eng 362L & A Wss
362L may be taken for credit. [HU]
The literature of various regions of the United
States. Topics to be discussed include how the
literature reflects the political and cultural
experiences of inhabitants of a region and to what
extent these regional writers have developed
distinctive voices, literary languages, forms and/or
themes. Intended primarily for juniors and seniors.
May be repeated once for credit when content varies.
Prerequisite(s): a 100-level English literature course
or permission of instructor.
Advanced workshop in writing for the stage.
Admission is limited, and those seeking to
enroll should submit a sample of their work to
the instructor. May be repeated once for credit.
Intended primarily for juniors and seniors.
Only one of A Eng 404Z & A Thr 406Z may be
taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): permission of
instructor. [WI]
A Eng 365 *Comparative Study of Minority
Literatures (3)
Readings from authors, whether native New Yorkers
or not, who deal with New York settings, themes
and subjects. Writers may include Irving, Cooper,
Melville, Whitman, James, Wharton, Dos Passos
and more recent authors. Attention will be given to
the cultural and social backgrounds of the literature.
Intended primarily for juniors and seniors.
Prerequisite(s): a 100-level English literature course
or permission of instructor.
A comparative study of works from the
literature of different minorities. The course
focuses on the relationships of writers and
works to cultural and critical history, on the
conditions under which these groups write, and
the effect of these conditions on the moods,
themes, language and shape of reality in
literature. Intended primarily for juniors and
seniors. Prerequisite(s): a 100-level English
literature course or permission of instructor.
A Eng 366 (= A Wss 366) *Minority
Writers (3)
A study of the literature of a given subculture
and the ways in which such factors as sex, age,
class and race are presented in literature. The
course focuses also on the relationship of
minority works to cultural and critical history,
on the effects of writing outside the cultural
mainstream, and on the questions of technique,
voice and tradition for minority writers.
Intended primarily for juniors and seniors. May
be repeated once for credit when content
varies. Prerequisite(s): a 100-level English
literature course or permission of instructor.
Only one of A Eng 366L & A Wss 366L may
be taken for credit.
A Eng 367 *(= A Jst 367) Jewish-American
Literature (3)
Literature written by American Jews of the
20th century. Among the topics offered are
Jewish fiction writers, Jewish-American
Drama, Jewish-American Women Writers,
Jewish Humor, and Jewish-American Literature
and Film. Intended primarily for juniors and
seniors. May be repeated once for credit.
Prerequisite(s): a 100-level English literature
course or permission of instructor.
A Eng 368L (= A Wss 368L) *Women
Writers (3)
Selected works of English and/or American women
writers in the context of the literary and cultural
conditions confronting them. The course focuses on
the development of a female tradition in literature
and on the narrative, poetic, and/or dramatic styles
of expression, voice and values of women writers.
May be repeated for credit with change in topic.
Prerequisite(s): a 100-level English literature course
or permission of instructor. Only one of A Eng 368L
& A Wss 368L may be taken for credit. [HU]
A Eng 371 *Regional Studies in British Literature
(3)
The regional literature of Great Britain and the
literature written in English in the Commonwealth
and former British possessions. Topics to be
discussed may include how the literature reflects the
political and cultural experiences of inhabitants of a
region and to what extent these regional writers have
developed distinctive voices, literary languages,
forms and/or themes. Intended primarily for juniors
and seniors. May be repeated once for credit when
content varies. Prerequisite(s): a 100-level English
literature course or permission of instructor.
128
A Eng 375 The Literature of New York State (3)
A Eng 378 Mythic Concepts in
Literature (3)
Individual sections concentrate on a particular
mythic concept that recurs in literature such as the
hero, the monster, the ideal society, the fantastic
voyage. Intended primarily for juniors and seniors.
May be repeated once for credit when content varies.
Prerequisite(s): a 100-level English literature course
or permission of instructor.
A Eng 382 Literature and Other
Disciplines (3–6)
Carefully focused study of literature in relation to
one or more of the other subject-matter fields (e.g.,
the literature and history of a period, literature and
art, literature and philosophy, literature and
psychology or psychoanalysis, or even literature as
part of the total culture of a period). Intended
primarily for juniors and seniors. May be repeated
once for credit when content varies. Prerequisite(s): a
100-level English literature course or permission of
instructor.
A Eng 385 *Topics in Cultural Studies (3)
This course will deal with a particular subject or
issue in the study of culture. Individual courses may
deal with post-coloniality, the impact of social
institutions on the production of subjectivities,
and similar topics. This course may be used to fulfill
the English major subculture requirement only if so
approved by the English Academic Adviser.
A Eng 398Z Honors Seminar I (4)
First course in the English Honors sequence of
four seminars offered over a two-year period.
Topics vary with each sequence. The seminars
explore special topics in literary history, literary
theory and critical methodology. May be repeated
for credit when topic varies. Prerequisite(s):
admission to Honors Program or permission of the
Director of Undergraduate Studies. [WI]
A Eng 399 Honors Seminar II (4)
Second course in the English Honors sequence
of four seminars offered over a two-year
period. Topics vary with each sequence. The
seminars explore special topics in literary
history,
literary
theory
and
critical
methodology. May be repeated for credit when
topic varies. Prerequisite(s): A Eng 398Z or
permission of the Director of Undergraduate
Studies.
A Eng 403Z *Writing Prose Fiction (3)
Advanced workshop in writing fiction.
Admission is limited, and those seeking to
enroll should submit a sample of their work to
the instructor. May be repeated once for credit.
Intended primarily for juniors and seniors.
Prerequisite(s): permission of instructor. May
not be offered in 2003-2004.[WI]
A Eng 405Z *Writing Poetry (3)
Advanced workshop in writing poetry.
Admission is limited, and those seeking to
enroll should submit a sample of their work to
the instructor. May be repeated once for credit.
Intended primarily for juniors and seniors.
Prerequisite(s): permission of instructor. May
not be offered in 2003-2004.[WI]
A Eng 416 (=A Wss 416) Topics in Gender,
Sexuality, Race, or Class (3)
Focused examination of topics in the study of
gender, sexuality, race and/or class, as they are
positioned and defined in literary or other texts from
any period(s) or geographic region(s). Individual
semesters may focus on, among other areas: a
particular historical period, genre, or theme; theories
of gender, sexuality, race, and/or class as related to
literary or other forms of representation; a particular
cultural problem. May be repeated once for credit
when content varies. Prerequisite(s): senior class
standing, at least one literature course, and
permission of instructor. May not be offered in
2003-2004.
A Eng 421 *Literature of the Middle Ages (3)
Students
will
examine
a
number
of
representative works of the Middle Ages, read in
translation. Additional readings in, for example,
the classics and religious literature will help to
situate each work in time and place. Intended
primarily for juniors and seniors. Prerequisite(s):
a 100-level English literature course or
permission of instructor.
A Eng 422 *Literature of the Earlier
Renaissance (3)
The various forms that developed and flourished
in England during the 16th century: prose,
narrative and lyric poetry, and drama (exclusive
of Shakespeare.) Attention to classical and
continental
influences,
the
historical
background, the legitimization of English, and
the power of individual texts. Major figures may
include More, Wyatt and Surrey, Sidney,
Marlowe, Spenser and Jonson. Intended
primarily for juniors and seniors. Prerequisite(s):
a 100-level English literature course or
permission of instructor.
A Eng 423 *Literature of the Later
Renaissance (3)
The poetry, prose and drama of England from
1600 to 1660 (exclusive of Milton). Major
figures may include Bacon, Donne, Hobbes,
Herbert, Marvell and Webster. Attention to
political issues intellectual issues and religion
as they bear upon the poetry of wit, the prose
of conviction, and the drama of power and
intrigue. Intended primarily for juniors and
seniors. Prerequisite(s): a 100-level English
literature course or permission of instructor.
A Eng 425 *Literature of the Restoration
and the 18th-Century Enlightenment (3)
In poetry, the range and variety achieved
within the ordered, urbane, civil style of
Dryden and Pope and the later development of
the innovative, exploratory style of Gray,
Collins and Cowper. In prose, the achievement
of Swift, Addison and Steele, and its extension
in Johnson, Goldsmith, Gibbon and Burke.
Intended primarily for juniors and seniors.
Prerequisite(s): a 100-level English literature
course or permission of instructor
University at Albany
A Eng 426 *The Romantic Period (3)
A Eng 446 Modern American Poetry (3)
A Eng 490 Internship in English (3)
Literature of the early 19th century in England,
especially the poetry of Blake, Wordsworth,
Coleridge, Byron, Shelley and Keats, studied
particularly as it reflects the developing
concepts of romantic imagination and romantic
individualism, concepts basic to modern
literature. Intended primarily for juniors and
seniors. Prerequisite(s): a 100-level English
literature course or permission of instructor.
Selected poets from Robinson to the present
with emphasis on analysis. Intended primarily
for juniors and seniors. Prerequisite(s): a 100 level English literature course or permission of
the instructor. May not be offered in 20032004.
Supervised practical apprenticeship of 10–15 hours
of work per week in a position requiring the use of
skills pertaining to the discipline of English, such as
reading and critical analysis, writing, research,
tutoring, etc., with an academic component
consisting of the internship colloquium. Written
work and report required. Selection is competitive
and based on early application, recommendations,
interviews and placement with an appropriate
internship sponsor. Open only to junior or senior
English majors with a minimum overall grade
point average of 2.50 and a minimum 3.00
average in English. S/U graded.
A Eng 427 *The Victorian Period (3)
Prose and poetry of Tennyson, Carlyle,
Browning, Ruskin, Arnold and others, studied
in relation to the broad social, intellectual and
artistic movements of the latter part of the 19th
century in England. Intended primarily for
juniors and seniors. Prerequisite(s): a 100 -level
English literature course or permission of
instructor
A Eng 428 Twentieth-Century British and
Irish Literature (3)
Major works in prose, poetry, and drama, and
major literary movements in British and Irish
literature in the modern period. Intended
primarily
for
juniors
and
seniors.
Prerequisite(s): a 100-level English literature
course or permission of instructor.
A Eng 432 *American Literature to 1815 (3)
Major poetry and prose of the colonial and federal
periods, with some attention to the theological and
political backgrounds. Intended primarily for juniors
and seniors. Prerequisite(s): a 100-level English
literature course or permission of instructor.
A Eng 447 *The Historical Imagination I (3)
An investigation of the relationship between
history and literature and the meaning of the
concept of “literary history.” Work from two or
more eras will be discussed and compared with
attention to such questions as the connection
between history and literary production, what
constitutes a literary period, the influence of its
literature on that of subsequent eras, and the
decline and reemergence of particular literary
forms, themes or approaches. May be repeated
once for credit when content varies. This
course may be used to fulfill the English major
period requirement.. Intended primarily for
juniors and seniors. Prerequisite(s): a 100 -level
English literature course or permission of the
instructor.
A Eng 450 *Special Topics in Rhetoric and
Poetics (3)
Carefully focused study in the history, theory,
or practice of rhetoric and/or poetics (e.g.,
narrative theory; poetic movements; twentieth
century rhetorical theory). May be repeated
once for credit with permission of the Director
of Undergraduate Studies.
A Eng 461 Forms of Modern Fiction (3)
The works of the major writers of the romantic
period. Particular attention to the transcendental
writers and to the development of the American
novel. Intended primarily for juniors and seniors.
Prerequisite(s): a 100-level English literature
course or permission of instructor.
A study of the major narrative modes in modern
British, American, and Continental fiction. Special
attention to the problem of how experimentation in
fictional forms relates to the social realities and
philosophical attitudes of the contemporary world.
Intended primarily for juniors and seniors.
Prerequisite(s): a 100-level English literature course
or permission of instructor. May not be offered in
2003-2004.
A Eng 434 *American Literature
1865–1920 (3)
A Eng 462 Study of a Literary
Movement (3)
The major writings of the great period of
American realism. Special attention to the
development of critical theory, the local color
writers, the psychological novel. Intended
primarily
for
juniors
and
seniors.
Prerequisite(s): a 100-level English literature
course or permission of instructor.
Study of an international literary movement or
movements, their aesthetic philosophy,
representative works, and their passages from one
culture to another. May be repeated once for credit
when content varies. Intended primarily for juniors
and seniors. Prerequisite(s): a 100-level English
literature course or permission of instructor. May
not be offered in 2003-2004.
A Eng 433 *American Literature
1815–1865 (3)
A Eng 435 American Literature 1920 to
Present (3)
Special topics in literature. Intended primarily
for juniors and seniors. May be repeated once for
credit when content varies. Prerequisite(s): a 100level English literature course or permission of
instructor.
A Eng 439 Contemporary American
Novel (3)
A Eng 489 Advanced Topics in
English (1–2)
A Eng 442 Modern Drama (3)
A seminar for qualified upper-division
students; the topic for each term varies and is
announced in advance. Prerequisite(s): a 100level English literature course or permission of
instructor. May be repeated once for credit
when content varies.
A Eng 497 Independent Study and Research
in English (1–4)
May be taken for a maximum of 8 credits.
Intended primarily for juniors and seniors.
Prerequisite(s): permission of a faculty member
in the department and of the appropriate
departmental committee.
A Eng 498 Senior Thesis I (3)
Independent
senior
thesis
individually
formulated and written under the direction of a
thesis adviser. Students writing theses will
meet in a seminar devoted to thesis research
and writing strategies and to sharing work in
progress. Students will be admitted by
permission of the coordinating committee, and
must enlist a faculty adviser before enrolling.
S/U graded.
A Eng 499 Senior Thesis II (3)
Continuation and completion of thesis begun in
A Eng 498. The thesis will be reviewed and
evaluated
by
the
thesis
committee.
Prerequisite(s): A Eng 498 and permission of
the thesis coordinating committee..
A Eng 487 Studies in Literature (1–6)
Selections from American literature from the modern
and contemporary periods, emphasizing the novel.
Intended primarily for juniors and seniors.
Prerequisite(s): a 100-level English literature course or
permission of instructor.
The major formal and thematic developments in the
American novel of the past 25 years, with particular
attention to contemporary fictional experiments
and aesthetic preoccupations. Intended primarily
for juniors and seniors. Prerequisite(s): a 100-level
English literature course or permission of instructor.
May not be offered in 2003-2004.
A Eng 494 Seminar in English (3)
A short course devoted to the intensive study
of limited materials—a particular work or
works, a particular author or authors, a limited
theme or topic, a minor genre. Directed to the
special interests of upper-division students.
May be repeated for credit when content varies.
Prerequisite(s): a 100-level English literature
course.
The growth of naturalism, realism and
expressionism.
Selected
European
and
American playwrights from Ibsen to O’Neill.
Intended
for
juniors
and
seniors.
Prerequisite(s): a 100-level English literature
course or permission of instructor. May not be
offered in 2003-2004.
129
University at Albany
D EPARTMENT OF
G EOGRAPHY AND
P LANNING
Faculty
Distinguished Service Professors
John S. Pipkin, Ph.D. (Collins Fellow)
Northwestern University
Professors
Ray Bromley, Ph.D.
Cambridge University
Thomas L. Daniels, Ph.D.
Oregon State University
Floyd M. Henderson, Ph.D.
University of Kansas
Christopher J. Smith, Ph.D.
University of Michigan
Roger W. Stump, Ph.D.
University of Kansas
Associate Professors
Andrei Lapenis, Ph.D.
State Hydrological Institute, Saint Petersburg
James E. Mower, Ph.D.
State University of New York at Buffalo
Kwadwo A. Sarfoh, Ph.D.
University of Cincinnati
Assistant Professors
Youqin Huang, Ph.D.
University of California, Los Angeles
Catherine T. Lawson, Ph.D.
Portland State University
Adjuncts (estimated): 5
Teaching Assistants (estimated): 9.5
Russia, Australia, and various countries in
Africa, Latin America and Western Europe.
Careers
The undergraduate programs provide
background suitable for entry into a wide variety
of business, educational and government
occupations, as well for graduate or professional
study in geography, planning, business, public
administration, forestry, landscape architecture
and other environmentally oriented programs.
Career possibilities include: cartographers,
remote sensing, and geographic information
systems (G.I.S.) specialists; location and market
area analysts; urban, regional, economic, and
transportation planners; environmental scientists;
international development specialists; urban
design professionals; industrial and real estate
developers; soil scientists; marketing and
distribution managers; journalists; and travel
and recreation specialists.
Degree Requirements for the
Major in Geography
General Program B.A.: A minimum of 36
credits, including, A Gog 101N; 102G or
102M; A Mat 108 (or an approved
equivalent); A Gog 496; one course from
A Gog 290, 293 or 385; and 20–21 credits of
elective course work in Geography which must
include: (1) a minimum of 9 credits at or above
the 300 level; and (2)at least one course from
the following: A Gog 160, (or 160G) 225 (or
225Z), 250, 270, 350, 354, (or 354Z) 356, and
365 (or 365Z).
The Department of Geography and Planning
offers programs leading to the B.A., M.A., and
M.R.P. degrees, a combined B.A./M.A.
program, and an Undergraduate/Graduate
Certificate in Geographic Information Systems
and Spatial Analysis. Undergraduate students
can major or minor in geography and the
department also offers a major and minor in
urban studies and planning. Geographers study
the characteristics of space, location and place in
the broader context of how people interact with
both physical and human environments.
Geography can be classified as both a natural
science and a social science as it examines
people and their environment and serves as a
bridge between the physical and cultural worlds.
Planning is a discipline and professional
practice that deals with the form, organization,
and orderly development of cities, suburbs, and
rural areas.
Honors Program
Teaching and research in the department
emphasize urban, social, physical, and cultural
geography; city and regional planning; urban
design; remote sensing; cartography and
geographic information systems;
environmental studies; climatology; computer
and statistical models; area (regional) studies;
urban and regional planning methods;
economic development; small town and rural
land-use planning. Members of the faculty
have strong international links with China,
A minimum of 42 credits in geography,
including:
130
The department’s honors program in
geography is intended to recognize the
academic excellence of its best students, to
give them the opportunity to work more
closely with the faculty, and to enhance their
understanding of geographical theory and
research.
Students may apply for admission to the program
during their junior year or at the beginning of their
senior year. To gain admission. students must
have formally declared a major in geography and
completed at least 12 credits of course work in the
department. In addition, at the time of admission
students must have an overall grade point average
of at least 3.25, and of 3.50 in geography.
Students must complete a minimum of 48
credits, as follows:
15–16 credits of required course work,
including A Gog 101N, 102G or 102M, 396,
400 and one course from A Gog 290, 293 and
385.
6 credits of Senior Honors Thesis, A Gog
499A and 499B. During this two-semester
sequence, the student will prepare an honors
thesis based on original library and/or field
research, under the supervision of a member of
the department. Any faculty member
knowledgeable in the topic may supervise an
honors thesis. A written proposal describing
the project must be approved by the adviser
and the departmental Honors Committee by
the beginning of the student’s senior year. The
thesis will be submitted for formal evaluation
in the spring semester of the student’s senior
year, and must be approved by both the adviser
and the Honors Committee.
20–21 credits of elective course work in
geography which must include a) a minimum
of 12 credits at or above the 300 level and b) at
least one course of a regional nature from the
following: A Gog 160M (or 160G), 225 (or
225Z) 250, 270, 350, 354, (or 354Z) 356, and
365 (or 365Z).
A minimum of 6 credits of foreign language or
of an appropriate research skill, such as
computing, statistics, or social research
methodology as approved by the adviser and
the Honors Committee.
If this requirement is met using a foreign
language, the student must complete one year
of college-level study of the language or
achieve placement beyond the first year of that
language.
For a research skill other than a foreign
language, the student must complete 6 credits
of relevant course work outside the
department.
The departmental Honors Committee will
review each student’s progress at the end of
each semester. Students whose work has not
been satisfactory will be warned and, if
warranted, dismissed from the program.
Unsatisfactory work in a semester would
include failing to maintain a satisfactory grade
point average, having unjustified incomplete
grades, or failing to make satisfactory progress
toward completion of the honors program
requirements. Upon completion of all honors
program requirements with a grade point
average of 3.50 in geography and 3.25 overall,
students will be recommended by the Honors
Committee for graduation with Honors in
Geography.
Combined B.A./M.A. Program
The combined B.A./M.A. program in
geography provides an opportunity for
students of recognized academic ability
and educational maturity to fulfill
integrated requirements of undergraduate
and master’s degree programs from the
beginning of their junior year. A carefully
designed program can permit a student to
earn the B.A. and M.A. degrees within
nine semesters.
The combined program requires a minimum of
138 credits, of which at least 30 must be
graduate credits. In qualifying for the B.A.,
students must meet all University and college
requirements, including the requirements of
the undergraduate major described previously,
University at Albany
the minor requirement, the minimum 90-credit
liberal arts and sciences requirement, the
general education requirements, and residency
requirements. In qualifying for the M.A.,
students must meet all University and college
requirements as outlined in the Graduate
Bulletin, including completion of a minimum
of 30 graduate credits and any other conditions
such as a research seminar, thesis,
comprehensive examination, professional
experience, and residency requirements. Up to
12 graduate credits may be applied
simultaneously to both the B.A. and M.A.
programs.
Students are considered as undergraduates
until completion of 120 graduation credits
and satisfactory completion of all B.A.
requirements. Upon meeting B.A.
requirements, students are automatically
considered as graduate students.
Students may be admitted to the combined
degree program at the beginning of their
junior year, or after the successful
completion of 56 credits, but no later than
the accumulation of 100 credits. A
cumulative grade point average of 3.20 or
higher and three supportive letters of
recommendation from faculty are required
for consideration. Students will be
admitted upon the recommendation of the
Graduate Admissions Committee of the
department.
Undergraduate Certificate
Program in Geographic
Information Systems and Spatial
Analysis
This certificate program provides
undergraduates with professional and
technical training in geographic information
systems (GIS) and associated techniques of
spatial analysis. Geographic information
systems are computer-based systems for
storage, analysis, and display of spatial data.
The disciplines of cartography, remote
sensing and computer graphics are closely
linked to the study of GIS. In conjunction
with GIS, methods of spatial analysis may be
used to study a wide range of problems,
including resource management, land
management for agriculture and forestry,
urban planning, land use mapping, market
area analysis, urban social analysis and a host
of other applications.
The certificate requires 20 credit hours of
undergraduate course work:
20 credits of core course work, including
A Gog 290, 385, 414, 485, 496, and A Mat
108 (or an approved equivalent).
Faculty-Initiated Interdisciplinary
Major with a Concentration in
Urban Studies and Planning
The Urban Studies and Planning Major is
designed for students interested in a liberal arts
education focusing on urban and suburban
environments, and on urban, community and
neighborhood development. The program of
study mixes conventional classes with fieldwork
and computer-based learning, and it requires
considerable awareness of international,
multicultural and policy issues. Students with
training in Urban Studies and Planning may enter
careers in housing and community development,
real estate, local and state government, local
economic development, or local planning. They
can pursue further study in graduate or
professional schools to specialize in city and
regional planning, public policy, real estate,
architecture, or landscape architecture.
General Program B.A.: A minimum of 36
credits including:
A Gog 125M The American City (3)
Reviews social, economic, political and physical
characteristics of American cities resulting from key
events (e.g. industrial development, European
immigration, suburbanization, the Civil Rights
Movement). Examines the relationship between
these events and current urban issues. Specific
topics include: de-industrialization, women in the
workforce, homelessness, poverty, environmental
degradation, health care, and AIDS. Considers the
influence of race, ethnicity, class and gender factors
on the character of cities. [DP US*]
A Gog 160M (= A Eac 160M) China: People and
Places in the Land of One Billion (3)
An introductory course dealing with the human and
physical geography of China. After a brief survey of
China’s historical geography and development, the
course focuses on post-liberation China and the
urban, economic, social, and demographic problems
associated with modernization. A Gog 160Z &
A Eac 160Z are writing intensive versions of A Gog
160 & A Eac 160; only one of the four courses may
be taken for credit. [IL OD SS]
A Gog 160G (= A Eac 160G) China: People and
Places in the Land of One Billion (3)
A Gog 160G & A Eac 160G are writing intensive
versions of A Gog 160 & A Eac 160; only one of the
four courses may be taken for credit. [OD IL SS WI]
18-19 credits of required core courses:
A Gog 125M, 225 or 225Z (formerly 120 or
120Z) A Pln 220 and any three from: A Gog
220, A Gog 321M/A Eas 321M/ A Lcs
321M, A Gog 324, A Gog 328/A Pln
328/A Wss 328, A Gog 330/A Pln 330,
A Gog 480, A Pln 315Z, A Pln 320Z
A Gog 180 (= A Eas 180) Asian America (3)
Four planning courses at the 400 or 500 level.
Registration in 500-level courses is limited to
seniors who obtain the permission of the
program director and of the course instructor.
A Gog 201 (= A Geo 201) Environmental
Analysis (3)
Two courses in one cognate discipline:
Anthropology (A Ant 119N, 334, 372 or
372Z), or Economics (A Eco 341 or 341Z,
and 456Z), or Education (E Edu 427, and
either 400 or 401), or History (A His
303Z, 317 or 317Z, 318 or 318Z), or
Political Science (R Pos 321/R Pub 321,
R Pos 323, R Pos 424), or Sociology
(A Soc 373 and 375).
Geography Courses
A Gog 101N Introduction to the Physical
Environment (3)
Introduction to the three main fields of physical
geography (climatology,
biogeography,
and
geomorphology) from an integrated earth systems
viewpoint. The major world climate, vegetation, soil
and landform regions are treated as process-response
systems
whose
physical
patterns
and
interrelationships, causes, and significance are
examined. Includes assessments of the role of
human impacts for global and regional change. [NS]
A Gog 102M Place, Space, and Landscape (3)
Introduction to the main fields of human geography,
(including population, cultural, economic, urban,
and political geography), focusing on the
disciplinary themes of place, space and landscape.
The themes are applied at a variety of scales, from
local to global. A Gog 102G is a writing intensive
version of A Gog 102M; only one may be taken for
credit. [GC SS]
A Gog 102G Place, Space, and Landscape (4)
A Gog 102G is a writing intensive version of A Gog
102M; only one may be taken for credit. [GC SS
WI]
This course examines the history of the Asian
experience in the United States (especially that of
the Chinese, Japanese, Korean, and Southeast Asian
communities). Topics include immigration, legal
status, the transformation of Asian-American
communities, their relationship with their native
lands, and Asian-American self-representation in
literature and film. [DP US*]
Uses laboratory work and local field excursions to
give students “hands-on” experience in physical
geography and environmental sciences. Focuses on
human impacts on the environment and on
problems
of
environmental
contamination.
Prerequisite or corequisite: A Gog 101N. [NS]
A Gog 220M Introductory Urban
Geography (3)
Introductory survey of findings and theory of
urban geography, which deals with the form and
function of cities. Major themes include: history of
urban form; spatial structure of modern urban
systems; and the internal structure of the city,
emphasizing social and economic patterns. [SS]
A Gog 225 (formerly A Gog 120) World
Cities (3)
Introduction to the geography of cities around the
world and to the role of cities in the world system.
Covers: origins and spread of urbanism in different
cultural settings; levels of urbanization in space and
time; urban form and land-use; rural-urban
interaction; city systems and megacities; distinctive
features of contemporary American cities. A Gog
225Z is the writing intensive version of A Gog 225;
only one of the two courses may be taken for credit.
[GC]
A Gog 225Z (formerly A Gog 120Z) World
Cities (4)
A Gog 225Z is the writing intensive version of A Gog 225;
only one of the two courses may be taken for credit. [GC
WI]
A Gog 240 Patterns of American
Immigration (3)
This course provides a survey of immigration to the
United States, focusing on key characteristics of
immigrant groups and their cultures, in relation to
both their places of origin and their destinations in
this country. [DP US*]
131
University at Albany
A Gog 250 (= A Lcs 250) Geography of Latin
America (3)
An introduction to the geographical diversity of
Latin America, reviewing the Continent’s physical
features, natural resources, societies, economies and
politics, and relating them to its history and cultural
traditions. Particular attention will be given to rural
and urban living conditions, social and regional
inequalities, population distribution, internal and
international migration, and socioeconomic
development issues. A Gog 250Z & A Lcs 250Z are
writing intensive versions of A Gog 250 & A Lcs
250; only one of the four courses may be taken for
credit. May not be offered in 2003-2004.
A Gog 250Z (= A Lcs 250Z) Geography of Latin
America (4)
A Gog 250Z & A Lcs 250Z are writing intensive
versions of A Gog 250 & A Lcs 250; only one of the
four courses may be taken for credit. May not be
offered in 2003-2004. [WI]
A Gog 270 (= A Aas 270) Geography of Africa
(3)
Geographic analysis of the continent of Africa. the
diversity of the African continent will be stressed by
examining its physical environment, resources,
social, cultural, economic, and political systems.
Emphasis upon the demographic as well as spatial
planning aspects of geography. Only one of A Gog
270 & A Aas 270 may be taken for credit.
A Gog 290 Introduction to Cartography (4)
An introductory course in the theory and techniques
of map production. Reviews and discusses the
elements of cartographic theory including the
relationships between human perception and map
symbology. Students will produce a series of handdrafted maps over the duration of the course.
A Gog 293 Use and Interpretation of Aerial
Photographs (3)
Interpretation and examination of air photos for
geographic investigations. Topics include the
development of the evaluation of photo keys,
thematic mapping, and analysis of landscape
elements. May not be offered in 2003-2004.
A Gog 304 Climatology (3)
Survey of the fundamentals of climate system.
Particular attention is paid to the explanation rather
than the description of atmospheric and oceanic
processes. Emphasis is given to the application of
concepts of environmental physics to selected natural
objects: terrestrial planets, the World Ocean,
continents, cities, vegetation, animals and humans.
Energy balance study at different temporal and spatial
scales is used as a methodological tool to provide a
better understanding of such concepts as the
“greenhouse”
effect,
climate
sensitivity,
photosynthesis, the metabolism of animals, survival of
humans in different climates, etc. Work on the Internet
with remote weather stations and climate related
resources is a part of the course project.
Prerequisite(s): A Gog 101N or A Atm 103 or
permission of instructor. [NS]
A Gog 310N (= A Bio 311N and U Uni 310N)
World Food Crisis (3)
Interdisciplinary approach to understanding world
food problems through analyses of social, political,
economic,
nutritional,
agricultural,
and
environmental aspects of world hunger. Faculty
from several departments in the sciences,
humanities, and social and behavioral sciences
present views from various disciplines. A Gog
310N, A Bio 311N, and U Uni 310N are equivalent
courses; only one of the three courses may be taken
for credit. Prerequisite(s): junior or senior class
standing or permission of instructor.
132
A Gog 317 (= A Geo 317) Geomorphology (3)
A systematic introduction to the study of landforms
and the processes that shape them. Laboratory work
and field trips are part of the course. Prerequisite(s):
A Gog 101N; A Geo 100N or 100F or 105N; or
permission of instructor. May not be offered in
2003-2004.
A Gog 321M (= A Lcs 321M and A Eas 321M)
Exploring the Multicultural City (3)
This course will explore the human dimensions and
implications of ethnic diversity in the United States,
focusing on New York City. The course utilizes a
variety of methods to introduce students to the
multicultural city, beginning in the classroom but
ending with fieldwork in a specific New York
neighborhood. A Gog 321M is equivalent in content
to A Lcs 321M and A Eas 321M; only one of the
three courses may be taken for credit.
Prerequisite(s): A Gog 102M or 102G or 120Z or
125M or 160M or 160G or 220M,or 240. May not
be offered in 2003-2004. [OD SS]
A Gog 324 The City on Computer (3)
An introduction to the use of geographic technology
in studying urban features and patterns. The course
provides a conceptual bridge between introductory
courses in urban geography and specialized courses
in geographic techniques. Students will acquire
familiarity with relevant software, data sources and
methods of analysis through regular computing
laboratory assignments. Prerequisite(s): any two of
the following: A Gog 125M, 220M, 225/225Z,
A Pln 220M.
A Gog 328 (= A Pln 328 and A Wss 328) Gender,
Space, and Place(3)
Power relations and categories of social difference are
reflected by dramatic inequalities in local
environments, and in the quantity and quality of
available space. This course examines, through the
lenses of feminist geography and planning, how space
is invested with social meaning. It discusses how the
built environment affects and reflects relations of
gender, sexuality and ethnicity, and considers how
these social classifications produce “geographies of
difference.” Gender is also related to nationalism,
colonialism, “geographic skills,” and feminist research
methodologies. Prerequisite(s): A Gog 125 or A Pln
220 or permission of instructor. May not be offered in
2003-2004.
A Gog 330 (=A Pln 330) Principles of
Environmental Management (3)
Examines issues and problems arising from the
interactions between humans and their physical
environment. Explores the degradation of
environmental systems resulting from human use
and modification, as well as the impact of
environmental processes on human systems. The
policy options for dealing with environmental
issues and problems are investigated.
Prerequisite(s): A Gog 101N and either A Gog 201
or A Pln 220; or permission of instructor. [OD]
A Gog 344 World Populations: Past, Present and
Future (3)
Geographical perspectives on human populations.
Uses the main organizing ideas of geography to
understand the past, present and future distribution
of population. Prerequisite(s): junior or senior class
standing, or permission of instructor. [OD]
A Gog 345 Economic Geography (3)
Examines the spatial patterns of economic activity,
including agriculture, manufacturing retail and
wholesale trade, transportation, and the service
sector. Location theory, models and empirical case
studies are used to assess the spatial processes
“explaining” the distribution patterns of economic
activity. Economic development strategies at the
state and regional levels are also investigated.
.
A Gog 350 (= A Eac 350) Urban Development in
China (3)
Provides a comprehensive understanding of urban
development in China. Reviews the history of urban
development in China and examines the
demographic, social, economic, and cultural
dimensions of the urbanization process. Analyzes
the emerging urban land and housing markets, and
the changing urban landscape.
A Gog 354 (= A Lcs 354) Environment &
Development (3)
A survey of international development issues,
focusing on the impact of economic growth,
population growth, and increased consumption of
natural resources on global and local environments.
This course focuses primarily on the poorer
countries of the world, and particularly on tropical
environments. It discusses issues of deforestation,
desertification, and increased vulnerability to manmade and natural hazards. Prerequisite(s): A Gog
101N or 102M or 102G, , or permission of
instructor.
A Gog 356 Geography of the United States (3)
A systematic treatment of the physical, economic and
cultural geography of the United States; selected
regional problems of land utilization and of
geographic adjustments. Prerequisite(s): junior or
senior class standing. or permission of instructor. May
not be offered in 2003-2004. [US*]
A Gog 365 Geography of Europe (3)
Overview of the physical and human geography of
Europe considered as a whole, followed by a more
intensive discussion of selected topics on the
Mediterranean countries, the British Isles, France,
Germany, and the countries of east-central Europe
from Scandinavia to the Balkans. Cultural, political,
and economic issues will be emphasized, with
analysis of contemporary matters in their historical
context. A Gog 365Z is the writing intensive version
of A Gog 365; only one may be taken for credit.
Prerequisite(s): junior or senior class standing or
permission of instructor. May not be offered in
2003-2004.
A Gog 365Z Geography of Europe (3)
A Gog 365Z is the writing intensive version of
A Gog 365; only one may be taken for credit.
Prerequisite(s): junior or senior class standing or
permission of instructor. May not be offered in
2003-2004. [WI]
A Gog 385 Introduction to Remote Sensing of
Environment (4)
Introduction to the concepts and interdisciplinary
applications of remote sensing. The basic principles of
theory and practice are presented for earth resource
management. Photographic and nonphotographic sensors
are examined. Visual and digital image analysis techniques
are introduced. Students will interpret color infrared,
multispectral, radar, and other sensor imagery for a variety
of purposes. Prerequisite(s): junior or senior class standing,
or permission of instructor.
A Gog 390 Intermediate Cartography (3)
Techniques of reproduction graphics with emphasis
on map planning and construction. Utilization of
half-tone, color-key, and other production processes
as
models
of
cartographic
expression.
Prerequisite(s): A Gog290. May not be offered in
2003-2004.
A Gog 404 Topics in Physical Geography (1–4)
In-depth examination of a significant topic in
Physical Geography. May be repeated up to a limit
of 9 credits when topics differ. Prerequisite(s):
A Gog101N or permission of instructor.
A Gog 405 Topics in Human Geography (1–4)
In-depth examination of a significant topic in
Human Geography. May be repeated up to a limit of
9 credits when topics differ. Prerequisite(s):
A Gog102M or 102G or permission of instructor.
University at Albany
A Gog 406 Topics in Geographic Information
Systems (1–4)
A Gog 470Z (= A Eac 470Z) China After Deng
Xiaoping (3)
In-depth examination of a significant topic in
Geographic Information Systems (cartography, GIS,
remote sensing, global positioning, etc.) May be
repeated up to a limit of 9 credits when topics differ.
Prerequisite(s): A Gog290 for cartography topics; A Gog
496/A Pln 456 for GIS topics; A Gog 385 for remote
sensing topics; or permission of instructor.
This course examines some of the issues associated with
modernization and economic development in Post-Deng
Xiaoping China. The course focuses on the era of
economic reform associated with Deng, and is particularly
concerned with the social, spatial and political
ramifications of China’s entry into the global economy.
Prerequisite(s): any of the following: A Eac 170, or A Gog
102G/M or A Gog 160/160Z or A Gog 220M. [WI]
A Gog 414 Computer Mapping (3)
Introduces the student to the fundamental techniques
and applications of automated map production. Lectures
include discussions of algorithm and program
development as well as existing software packages.
Students will also be introduced to current problems and
research in automated map production. Covers a wide
range of topics including but not limited to automated
drafting, computer generated projections, coordinate
systems and transformations, data structures and
discussions of algorithms for specific applications.
Prerequisite(s): A Gog 290 or permission of instructor.
A Gog 479 Fundamentals of Applied Global
Positioning Systems (GPS) (3)
A Gog 417 Geography Internships (3–6)
Explores some of the theoretical debates and empirical
research conducted by geographers and planners
interested in the contemporary city. Adopts a
political/economy approach to the investigation of social
problems currently pervasive in the capitalist city,
including: inner city poverty and the underclass,
homelessness, gender-related issues, racial segregation;
and crime problems. Prerequisite(s): A Gog 102G or
102M or A Gog 210 or A Gog 220M. May not be
offered in 2003-2004.
Work in cartography, remote sensing,
environmental, or other offices to gain
preprofessional experience in applied geography.
Carried out under the joint supervision of faculty and
the host office. Internships are open only to
qualified juniors and seniors who have an overall
grade point average of 2.50 or higher.
Prerequisite(s): permission of instructor. S/U graded.
A Gog 431 Climatic Change (3)
The evolution of the global climate is explained through
the analysis of feedback loops between different
components of the climate system; atmosphere, oceans,
living organisms, the carbon cycle, volcanic activity and
changes in solar luminosity. Emphasis is placed on the
study of climate sensitivity to global factors, and
application of this knowledge to the forecast of future
human-produced climatic changes. Prerequisite(s):
A Gog 101N or A Atm 103 or permission of instructor.
A Gog 440 Political Geography (3)
Examines the spatial character of political processes
at the local, national and global scales. Major
themes include: territory, identity and the state;
localism, regionalism and separatism; colonialism
and decolonization; geopolitics; and, internal and
international political conflicts.
A Gog 442Z Cultural Geography (3)
Examination of current concepts and research in cultural
geography through a detailed survey of one of its regional
or thematic subfields. Examples of the latter include: the
cultural geography of North America, the cultural
landscape, the geography of religion. May be repeated
once for credit. Prerequisite(s): A Gog102G or 102M or
permission of instructor. [WI]
A Gog 447 Geography of Development and
Underdevelopment (3)
An analytical survey of “Third World” development
theories and the development strategies they inspire.
Topics covered include traditional concepts of natural and
human resources identification and use, geographic
diffusion, modernization, and economic growth, as well as
challenges to the prevailing ideas and practices such as
dependency, sustainable development, and community
empowerment. Prerequisite(s): junior or senior standing, or
permission of instructor. May not be offered in 2003-2004.
A Gog 450 Independent Study in Geography (16)
The student will work independently on a directed reading,
field survey, or individual research project in geography. A
member of the faculty will authorize and advise the project,
which will be dimensioned in proportion to the number of
credits being taken. The student will submit a final report
for assessment. May be repeated for credit to a total of 6
credits. Prerequisite(s): 9 credits in Geography, Junior or
Senior class standing and permission of instructor.
This course introduces students to the fundamentals of
Global positioning system technology as applied to the
geosciences. Topics include background and history,
signal structure, resolution, accuracy, data collection
techniques, basic geodesy, projections and data, and
applications. Field work and lab exercises complement
lecture material.
A Gog 480 Advanced Urban Geography (3)
A Gog 485 Advanced Remote Sensing of
Environment (3)
A variety of remote sensing applications and techniques
are discussed with reference to geography, planning, and
related disciplines. Natural resource classification
systems, mapping strategies, and data collection steps
are analyzed through empirical exercises. Fundamental
concepts of digital image analysis including theory,
processing, enhancement, and information extraction are
given particular attention. Prerequisite(s): A Gog 385.
A Gog 495 (= A Pln 455) Introductory MapInfo
(1)
Provides students who have, or are developing, a
knowledge of Geographic Information Systems
(GIS) fundamentals, and who have, or are
developing, a knowledge of ArcView software, with
a comparable knowledge of MapInfo software.
Enables students to use and apply MapInfo to the
solution of a wide range of data management,
cartographic and public policy programs.
A Gog 496 (= A Pln 456) Geographic Information
Systems (3)
Introduction to the structure, design, and application
of data base management systems designed to accept
large volumes of spatial data derived from various
sources. The student will learn how to efficiently
store, retrieve, manipulate, analyze, and display
these data according to a va ri et y of u s er d efi n ed
s p ec i fi c a t i on s .
Prerequisite(s):
Familiarity with maps and coordinate systems.
A Gog 498 GIS Management (3)
This course provides students with the fundamentals
of GIS diffusion theory, organizational theory and
management, GIS implementation, spatial date sharing
and trends in national data structures. Lectures are
complemented by case studies chosen by the student
to test ideas discussed in class. Prerequisite(s): A Gog
496 or A Pln 456. May not be offered in 2003-2004.
A Gog 499A & B Senior Honors Thesis (3,3)
Preparation of an honors thesis under the direction
of a member of the Department of Geography and
Planning. The student must submit a formal
proposal describing the project, and the final thesis
must be approved by both the adviser and the
Honor’s Committee. Prerequisite(s): admission to
the honors program.
Planning Courses
Planning is a broad function of the public and
private sectors directed at guiding urban and
regional development, analyzing physical,
social, economic, and environmental issues, and
preparing policy alternatives. Many planners
work in the public sector, evaluating problems
and suggesting solutions in the domains of
transportation, housing, economic and
community development, urban design,
neighborhood revitalization, environmental
issues, and policy analysis. Others work in the
private and nonprofit sectors, serving as
consultants, researchers, real estate developers,
community development promoters, and
specialists in local economic development. The
department administers an interdisciplinary
undergraduate minor program in urban studies
and planning, and offers undergraduate courses
in planning. These courses provide students
with insights on urban and regional
development from a broad, liberal arts
viewpoint, as well as providing background and
tools for further study and the professional
practice of planning.
A Pln 220M Introductory Urban Planning (3)
Introduces the basic concepts and techniques of
urban planning and provides an overview of
planning history. Covers land use, transportation,
environment, urban design, economic development
and social issues. Explores the connections between
planning and politics, economic restructuring, social
change, and competing ideologies of urban form.
[SS]
A Pln 315Z State and Regional Planning (3)
Reviews the theory and practice of state and regional
planning in the United States, evaluating a range of
contemporary examples. Covers metropolitan
regional planning, river basin planning, regional
water resource management, state planning and
growth management, and environmental impact
assessment. Prerequisite(s): A Pln 220M.
A Pln 320 International Urban Planning (3)
Provides a general introduction to urban planning as it
is practiced in various countries around the world.. For
each of the countries covered there will be a
discussion of the changing context of urbanization
and economic development within which
contemporary urban planning has emerged. A Pln
320Z is the writing intensive version of A Pln 320;
only one of the two courses may be taken for credit.
Prerequisite(s): Either A Gog 220M or A Pln 220M or
permission of instructor. [GC OD]
A Pln 320Z International Urban Planning (3)
A Pln 320Z is the writing intensive version of A Pln
320; only of the two courses may be taken for credit.
Prerequisite(s): junior or senior class standing, or
permission of instructor. [GC OD WI]
A Pln 328 (= A Gog 328 and A Wss 328) Gender,
Space and Place (3)
Power relations and categories of social difference are
reflected by dramatic inequalities in local
environments, and in the quantity and quality of
available space. This course examines, through the
lenses of feminist geography and planning, how space
is invested with social meaning. It discusses how the
built environment affects and reflects relations of
gender, sexuality and ethnicity, and considers how
these social classifications produce “geographies of
difference.” Gender is also related to nationalism,
colonialism, “geographic skills,” and feminist research
methodologies. Prerequisite(s): A Gog 125 or A Pln
220 or permission of instructor. May not be offered in
2003-2004.
133
University at Albany
A Pln 330 (=A Gog 330) Principles of
Environmental Management (3)
Examines issues and problems arising from the
interactions between humans and their physical
environment. Explores the degradation of
environmental systems resulting from human
use and modification, as well as the impact of
environmental processes on human systems. The
policy options for dealing with environmental issues
and problems are investigated. Prerequisite(s): A Gog
101N and either A Gog 201 or A Pln 220; or
permission of instructor. May not be offered in 20032004. [OD]
A Pln 420 Introduction to Real Estate
Development (3)
A general introduction to real estate development as
an important element in the urban economy and as a
field of urban planning activity. Covers legal,
economic, and financial perspectives. Emphasis is
placed on market analysis and mortgage finance for
residential real estate. Prerequisite(s): A Pln 220M,
or permission of instructor.
A Pln 425 Community Development and
Neighborhood Planning (3)
Examines housing needs of households in urban
areas. Assesses the relationship between housing
and other major challenges to urban households (e.g.
poverty, unemployment, infant mortality and
neighborhood decline). Considers both traditional
and more innovative strategies that seek to address
housing needs. Prerequisite(s): A Gog 125M or
A Pln 220M.
A Pln 426 Community Development and
Neighborhood Planning Workshop (1–4)
Provides students an opportunity to obtain “real
world” experience assisting a local community or
neighborhood group. Students work under
supervision on both team and individual projects
that address specific needs of communities (e.g.
housing, education, public safety, transportation,
health) in the Capital District. Prerequisite(s): A Pln
425. May not be offered in 2003-2004.
A Pln 430 Environmental Planning (3)
Explores the theory and practice of environmental
planning and examines larger issues of human use,
exploitation, and protection of the landscape. Draws
from the practice of landscape architecture and
community planning and outlines the principles of
environmentally-based
land-use
planning.
Prerequisite(s): A Pln 220M or permission of
instructor.
A Pln 432 Parks, Preservation, and Heritage
Planning (3)
Explains the rise of heritage planning as a unifying
theme to link environmental, land-use, and community
planning. Integrates parks, greenways, historic
preservation, and cultural resources as means to
develop and preserve the distinctive character of local
communities, to foster local pride, and to promote
tourism. Discusses the origins, organization and
management of heritage programs, and the special
problems of heritage planning for minority groups and
bygone cultures. Prerequisite(s): A Pln 220M, or
permission of instructor.
A Pln 436 Landscape Planning (3)
Explores the theory and practice of large-scale
landscape planning and examines issues of human
use, exploitation, and protection of the landscape.
Draws from the practice of landscape architecture
and community planning and outlines the principles
of environmentally-based land-use planning.
Prerequisite(s): junior or senior class standing, and
A Pln 220M and A Gog 101N, or equivalent
courses. May not be offered in 2003-2004.
134
A Pln 437 Landscape Planning Workshop (3-4)
A Pln 475 Urban Design (3)
Creation of a landscape plan for a local or regional
agency or nonprofit. Plan will balance protection of
the natural and cultural environment with the need
for human uses of the landscape including
community growth and development. Draws from
the practice of landscape architecture and
community planning, and includes field research,
community consultation, report writing and
mapping. Students serve as team members in the
preparation of the plan. Prerequisite(s): junior or
senior class standing, A Pln 220M and Gog 101N or
equivalents, and GIS (A Gog 496/A Pln 456 or
proficient ArcView or MapInfo user skills. May not
be offered in 2003-2004.
Introduction to the theory, rationale and practice of
urban design. Covers design and layout criteria,
regulation and review, and case studies of the urban
design process. Prerequisite(s): A Pln 220M or
permission of instructor.
A Pln 443 Transportation History and Policy (3)
A Pln 485 Topics in Planning (1-4)
Examines the history of transportation systems and
policy in the United States. Emphasis on
understanding the political and social forces that
influence decision-making at the federal, state, and
local levels. The roles of corporate investment, and
of citizen interests and participation are examined.
Prerequisite(s): A Pln 220M or permission of the
instructor.
Selected topics in specific sub-fields of planning.
Topics will be indicated in the course schedule and
in departmental announcements. May be repeated
once for credit. Prerequisite(s): A Pln 220M and
junior or senior class standing.
A Pln 476 Urban Design and Site Planning
Workshop (1-4)
Involves students in supervised team projects doing
practical urban design and/or site planning work.
Through investigation, fieldwork and discussion,
student groups prepare proposals for the design and
layout of a specific site or axis. Prerequisite(s):
A Pln 220M.
A Pln 490A & B Planning Internship (3, 3)
Covers planning, design, implementation and
management of systems of non-motorized
transportation, particularly the ‘human-powered’
modes of bicycling and walking. Involves students
in the design of bikeways, walkways, intersections
and parking facilities, and in the evaluation of
alternative
transportation
technologies.
Prerequisite(s): A Pln 220M or permission of
instructor.
Provides students with practical work experience in
the general field of urban and regional planning.
Internship placements are typically with federal,
state, or local government agencies, consultancy
firms, community development corporations, or
private, voluntary or political action groups
specializing in a specific sub-field relating to
planning. Supervisor’s reference and final report
required. Internships are open only to qualified
juniors and seniors who have an overall grade
point average of 2.50 or higher. Prerequisite(s):
A Pln 220M and permission of instructor. S/U
graded.
A Pln 451 Introductory Computer Aided
Design (1)
A Pln 497 Independent Study in
Planning (2–4)
A Pln 449 Bicycle and Pedestrian Transportation
Planning (3)
Provides an introduction to Computer Aided Design
and Drafting (CADD), enabling students to
understand the basic principles of CADD and to use
CADD software.
A Pln 452 (formerly A Pln 450) CADD in Planning
(3)
Applies the concepts and theories underlying
Computer Aided Design and Drafting (CADD) to
site planning, urban design and land-use mapping,
including 2D concept diagrams, site plan detail and
3D perspectives. Also reviews rendering, 4D
applications, visualization, and CADD management.
A Pln 455 (A Gog 495) Introductory MapInfo (1)
Provides students who have, or are developing, a
knowledge of Geographic Information Systems
(GIS) fundamentals, and who have, or are
developing, a knowledge of ArcView software, with
a comparable knowledge of MapInfo software.
Enables students to use and apply MapInfo to the
solution of a wide range of data management,
cartographic and public policy programs.
A Pln 456 (= A Gog 496) Geographic Information
Systems (3)
Introduction to the structure, design, and application
of data base management systems designed to accept
large volumes of spatial data derived from various
sources. The student will learn how to efficiently
store, retrieve, manipulate, analyze, and display
these data according to a variety of userdefined
specifications.
Prerequisite(s):
familiarity with maps and coordinate systems.
A Pln 474 Site Planning (2)
Introduction to the theory, rationale and practice of
site planning. Traces the design process from
p rogra m t o c on s t ru c t i o n d et a i li n g a n d
specification. The review and regulatory context are
considered. Ramifications of design choices are
explored including effects on ambiance, perception
of space and form, human comfort, function of
materials, and effects on costs. Prerequisite(s): A Pln
220M or permission of instructor. May not be
offered in 2003-2004.
Provides an opportunity for students with a strong
interest in a specific topic or sub-field in urban and
regional planning to do directed reading,
independent study or research with faculty
supervision. May be repeated once, but not for more
than a total of 6 credit hours. Prerequisite(s): A Pln
220M and junior or senior class standing.
University at Albany
D EPARTMENT OF
H ISTORY
Faculty
Distinguished Teaching Professor
Warren E. Roberts, Ph.D. (Collins Fellow)
University of California, Berkeley
Distinguished Service Professor
Sung Bok Kim, Ph.D. (Collins Fellow)
Michigan State University
Professors Emeritae/i
Thomas Barker, Ph.D.
University of Minnesota
Kendall A. Birr, Ph.D. (Collins Fellow)
University of Wisconsin
Robert R. Dykstra, Ph.D.
University of Iowa
Matthew H. Elbow, Ph.D.
Columbia University
June E. Hahner, Ph.D.
Cornell University
Donald E. Liedel, Ph.D.
University of Michigan
William T. Reedy, Ph.D.
Johns Hopkins University
Robert F. Wesser, Ph.D.
University of Rochester
Joseph F. Zacek, Ph.D.
University of Illinois
Professors
Allen B. Ballard, Ph.D. (Collins Fellow)
Harvard University
Graham J. Barker-Benfield, Ph.D.
University of California, Los Angeles
Iris Berger, Ph.D.
University of Wisconsin
Ronald M. Berger, Ph.D.
University of Wisconsin
H. Peter Krosby, Ph.D.
Columbia University
John Monfasani, Ph.D.
Columbia University
Bruce B. Solnick, Ph.D.
New York University
Dan S. White, Ph.D.
Harvard University
Lawrence S. Wittner, Ph.D.
Columbia University
Gerald Zahavi, Ph.D.
Syracuse University
Associate Professor Emeritae/i
Dewitt C. Ellinwood, Ph.D.
Washington University
Associate Professors
Donald Birn, Ph.D.
Columbia University
Richard Hamm, Ph.D.
University of Virginia
Richard H. Kendall, Ph.D.
Yale University
Nadieszda Kizenko, Ph.D.
Columbia University
Ivan D. Steen, Ph.D.
New York University
Ann F. Withington, Ph.D.
Yale University
Associate Professors Emeritae/i
Clara J. Tucker, Ph.D.
Syracuse University
Assistant Professors
Charlotte J. Brooks, Ph.D.
Northwestern University
Amy E. Murrell, Ph.D.
University of Virginia
Jennifer M. Rudolph, Ph.D.
University of Washington
Adjuncts: 6
Teaching Assistants: 23
The objective of the Department is to provide
its students with a thorough grounding in the
past, seen from both social scientific and
humanistic perspectives, and in the nature of
history and historical analysis. The Department
prepares undergraduates for a variety of career
options which rely upon a sound liberal arts
education, as well as for graduate study in both
academic and professional fields.
To accomplish its objectives, the Department
offers programs leading to the B.A., the M.A.,
the Certificate of Advanced Study in Public
History, and the Ph.D. An honors program and
a combined B.A./M.A. program are also
available to qualified students. In addition, the
Department participates in several
interdepartmental programs, including
Africana Studies, Asian Studies, Social
Studies, Women’s Studies, Judaic Studies,
Latin American and Caribbean Studies,
Medieval and Renaissance Studies, and
Russian and East European Studies. Students
interested in ancient history or are referred to
the Department of Classics.
Careers
The study of history prepares students for a
variety of career paths, extending from
fields such as law, education, and religion,
to journalism and media ventures, and to
business and government service. The
Department maintains a Career Advisory
Network, which is designed to link History
majors to graduates who have gone on to
employment in a broad range of
professions.
Special Programs or
Opportunities
The department encourages its majors to
participate in those international programs
relevant to their particular historical
interests. For more detailed information, see
the section on the Office of International
Programs. The department also offers its
undergraduate students opportunities for
internships in local museums and historical
agencies through A His 499.
Degree Requirements for the
Major in History
General Program
B.A.: A minimum of 36 credits in history
including a minimum of 18 credits at or above
the 300 level from course work listed under one
of the designated fields of concentration: United
States, Asian, Ibero-American, or European
history; a minimum of 6 credits in courses at the
300 level or above outside the field of
concentration. Alternatively, a World History
concentration is available with 24 credits of
course work at or above the 300 level (which
may include A His 286 and A His 287). Of these
24 credits, a minimum of 6 credits and a
maximum of 9 credits are allowed from courses
in United States and/or European history.
Honors Program
Each semester the Department of History
admits qualified students into the honors
program in history. The purpose of the honors
program is to provide well-qualified students
with close contact with faculty and fuller
training in research and writing than are
normally possible.
Students may be admitted to the program in
the second semester of their sophomore year or
during their junior year after formally declaring a
major in history. To be admitted, students must
have completed 12 credits of course work from
the Department of History with at least 3 credits
of this work completed above the 100 level. In
addition, students must have a cumulative grade
point average of at least 3.25 overall and an
average in history of 3.50. Students must submit
evidence of their written work, preferably a paper
written for a history course.
A departmental director administers the
program, admitting students and evaluating
their work.
Students are required to complete a minimum
of 42 credits as follows:
A His 497Z Independent Research and Writing
in History (4 credits), to be taken in the second
semester of the student’s junior year.
A His 495Z and 496Z Senior Honors Thesis
Seminar (8 credits). In connection with this
seminar, each student writes an honors thesis
of 50–70 pages. The student must secure a
thesis supervisor and second reader. The thesis
must be approved by the supervisor and the
second reader. The student makes an oral
presentation of the topic in the seminar or in
an appropriate class.
A minimum of 18 credits at or above the 300
level from course work listed under one of the
following fields of concentration: American,
Asian, Ibero-American, or European history; a
minimum of 6 credits in courses at the 300 level
or above outside the field of concentration;
alternatively, a total of 24 credits of course work
at or above the 300 level (which may also
135
University at Albany
include A His 259, 286, and 287) in the World
History field of concentration, including a
minimum of 6 credits and maximum of 9 credits
from courses in American and/or European
history.
Additional history courses (6 credits).
The honors director reviews the progress of
each student at the end of each semester. If a
student is not doing satisfactory work, the
student is warned and, if appropriate,
dismissed from the program. Unsatisfactory
work in a semester would be failing to
maintain a cumulative average of 3.10 overall
or 3.30 in history, having unjustified
incomplete grades, or otherwise performing
below the honors level.
Students are graduated “with honors in
history” upon satisfactory completion of the
curricular requirements with a grade point
average of 3.50 in history and 3.25 overall.
Combined B.A./M.A. Program
The combined B.A./M.A. program in history
provides an opportunity for students of
recognized academic ability and educational
maturity to fulfill integrated requirements of
undergraduate and master’s degree programs
from the beginning of their junior year.
The combined program requires a minimum of
138 credits, of which at least 30 must be
graduate credits. In qualifying for the B.A.,
students must meet all University and college
requirements, including the requirements of
the major program in history described
previously, the minor requirement, the
minimum 90-credit liberal arts and sciences
requirement, General Education, and residency
requirements. In qualifying for the M.A.,
students must meet all University and college
requirements as outlined in the Graduate
Bulletin, including completion of a minimum
of 30 graduate credits and any other
conditions, such as a research seminar, thesis,
comprehensive examination, other
professional experience, and residency
requirements. Up to 12 graduate credits may
be applied simultaneously to both the B.A. and
M.A. programs.
Students are considered as undergraduates
until completion of 120 graduation credits and
satisfactory completion of all B.A.
requirements. Upon meeting B.A.
requirements, students are automatically
considered as graduate students. A cumulative
grade point average of 3.20 or higher and three
supportive letters of recommendation from
faculty, one of whom must be from the
Department of History, are required for
consideration. Students are admitted to the
combined program upon the recommendation
of the department’s Graduate Committee.
136
Introductory and General Courses
A His 100 American Political and Social
History I (3)
Survey of American history from early times to the
Civil War, with emphasis on the development of our
political, constitutional, economic, social, and
cultural institutions. A His 100Z is the writing
intensive version of A His 100; only one may be
taken for credit. [US]
A His 100Z American Political and Social
History I (3)
A His 100Z is the writing intensive version of A His
100; only one may be taken for credit. [US WI]
A His 101 American Political and Social
History II (3)
Survey of American history from the Civil War to
the present, with emphasis on the development of
our political, constitutional, economic, social, and
cultural institutions. A His 101Z is the writing
intensive version of A His 101; only one may be
taken for credit. [US]
A His 101Z American Political and Social
History II (3)
A His 101Z is the writing intensive version of A His
101; only one may be taken for credit. [US WI]
A His 130 History of European
Civilization I (3)
Survey of the political, economic, social, and
cultural history of the West from its origins to the
18th century. A His 130Z is the writing intensive
version of A His 130; only one may be taken for
credit. [EU]
A His 130Z History of European
Civilization I (3)
A His 130Z is the writing intensive version of A His
130; only one may be taken for credit. [EU WI]
A His 131 History of European
Civilization II (3)
Survey of the political, economic, social, and
cultural history of the West from the 18th century to
the present. A His 131Z is the writing intensive
version of A His 131; only one may be taken for
credit.
A His 131Z History of European
Civilization II (3)
A His 131Z is the writing intensive version of A His
131; only one may be taken for credit. [EU WI]
A His 145 (= A Ant 145 and A Lcs 145)
Continuity and Change in Latin America (3)
Introduction to the historical development of Latin
America’s diverse cultural heritage and to its
contemporary institutions and civilization. The
perspective will be broadly interdisciplinary and will
reflect diverse approaches and fields. Only one of
A His 145, A Ant 145, & A Lcs 145 may be taken
for credit. [BE]
A His 158 The World in the 20th
Century (3)
This course will look at the ethnic and racial
diversity of the contemporary United States and
provide a historical context for understanding this
diversity. By providing an understanding of the
history and culture of the formerly colonized world,
and the ideologies of domination used to justify
colonization, the course will attempt to sensitize
students to the diverse history of Americans. The
course will introduce segments on recent American
immigration such as Asian and Hispanic
immigration. The course will also seek to provide a
framework that places the United States within a
global context of culture, politics, and economics.
The course will also examine how American social
movements such as the women’s movement, and the
Civil Rights movement have affected similar
movements elsewhere, and to what extent these
struggles in turn have reverberated and shaped
contemporary American social movements. A His
158Z is the writing intensive version of A His 158;
only one may be taken for credit. [DP if taken
before Fall 2004; GC]
A His 158Z The World in the 20th
Century (3)
A His 158Z is the writing intensive version of A His
158; only one may be taken for credit. [DP GC WI]
A His 170 (= A Lcs 102) Introduction to
Caribbean History (3)
An introduction to the history of culture contact in
the Caribbean from the pre-Columbian Arawaks and
Caribs, through the infusion of European and
African cultures, to the emergence of the leadership
of the United States in 1898. Special emphasis on
the social and economic development of the
plantation system, the intercontinental trade system,
slavery, and the struggle for abolition and selfdetermination. Only one of A Lcs 102 and A His
170 may be taken for credit. [BE]
A His 176 Cultures and Societies of Asia: An
Historical Survey I (3)
Introduction to the cultures of South Asia (Indian
subcontinent), and Southwest Asia. The story of the
development of their major institutions and cultural
and social patterns, along with the examination of
the interactions among cultures. A survey of the
history of these areas from their historical
beginnings to the present. [BE]
A His 177 (= A Eas 177) Cultures and
Societies of Asia: An Historical Survey II (3)
An introduction to the history and cultures of East
Asia (China, Japan, and Korea), their major
institutions and their religious and philosophical
traditions from ancient times to the present. A His
177Z is the writing intensive version of A His 177;
only one may be taken for credit. [BE]
A His 177Z (= A Eas 177Z) Cultures and
Societies of Asia: An Historical Survey II (4)
A His 177Z is the writing intensive version of A His
177; only one may be taken for credit. [BE WI]
A His 220M Public Policy in Modern America
(3)
This course focuses on the history of four major
domestic policies: welfare, civil rights, economic
policy, and health policy. Students assess the
relevance of history to current political debates and
analysis of public policy. Group workshops and
debates will enable students to engage in active
learning while grappling with these larger questions.
[SS]
A His 225 (= A Jst 225) Hollywood and the
Jews (3)
An examination of the history of Hollywood and the
Jewish relationship to the American motion picture
industry. Investigates a representative sample of
films and movies and explores the impact of the
fictionalized landscape of the Jewish mind on
American culture and values. [DP]
A His 235 Early and Medieval Christianity (3)
Survey of the intellectual, ritual, and institutional
development of Christianity from the apostles to the
later Middle Ages. A His 235Z is the writing
intensive version of A His 235; only one may be
taken for credit. [EU]
A His 235Z Early and Medieval
Christianity (4)
A His 235Z is the writing intensive version of A His
235; only one may be taken for credit. [EU WI]
A His 250 (= A Jst 250) The Holocaust in
History (3)
An examination of the Jewish experience in the
Second World War in the broader context of
twentieth century history. Topics surveyed include
anti-Semitism, Nazism, the role of the witness and
the issue of collective guilt. Only one of A His 250
& A Jst 250 may be taken for credit.
University at Albany
A His 253 (= A Jst & Rel 253) Medieval Jews
Among Muslims and Christians (3)
Studies Jewish history, life and culture in the contexts
of the Muslim and Christian civilizations of the
Middle Ages. Discusses differences among Jews,
Muslims and Christians; emphasizes reactions to
persecution, Jewish autonomy and social life as a
minority group in a majority culture, and the
development of Jewish law, literature, philosophy and
mysticism. Only one of A His 253 & A Jst 253, 343,
343Z & A Rel 253 may be taken for credit. [EU]
A His 255 (= A Jst 255) The Holocaust: Lessons
and Legacies (3)
Offers a general, nonspecialized cultural studies
approach to the Holocaust, the destruction of
European Jewry by Nazi Germany during World War
II. Examines European Jewish life as well as the
history, cultural significance and public importance of
the Holocaust through multiple perspectives. Utilizes
historical studies, a film series, literary works and
guest lecturers. Only one of A His 255 & A Jst 255
may be taken for credit. [GC]
A His 256 Women in European History (3)
Survey of the role and position of women in European
society from antiquity to the present, concentrating on
social, economic, political, and intellectual aspects of
women’s lives and on cultural attitudes and ideologies
concerning women. May not be offered in 2003-2004.
A His 257 (= A Jst 257) Jews, War & Revolution:
West European Jewry, 1770–1918 (3)
An examination of Jewish history in Central and West
Europe that highlights the transformation and
politicization of Jewish life in the modern era. Onethird of the course is devoted to the impact of
“German” Jewish immigrants on American Jewish life
and American society. [EU]
A His 258 (= A Jst 258) Jews, War & Revolution:
East European Jewry, 1772-1918 (3)
An examination of Jewish history in Poland and
Imperial Russia and the era of mass Jewish migration
to the USA. Highlights the modernization,
emancipation, and politicization of Jewish life in
Eastern Europe. One-third of the course is devoted to
the impact of East European Jewish immigrants on
American Jewish life and American society. [EU]
A His 260 (= A Eas 260) China in Revolution (3)
This course examines China’s four great twentieth century
revolutions: the 1911 Revolution, the 1949 Communist
Revolution, the Great Proletarian Cultural Revolution, and
the reforms of the 1980’s and 1990’s. Topics include
authority and dissent, constituency mobilization, the
relationship between urban and rural regions, and the
changing nature of ideology in China. [BE]
A His 263E Art, Music, and History: A Multimedia
Approach I (4)
Survey of Western art and music from the Middle
Ages to about 1750. Art and music will be used to
illuminate history, and history will be used to further
an understanding of art and music. [AR EU HU WI]
A His 264E Art, Music, and History: A Multimedia
Approach II (4)
Survey of Western art and music from about 1750 to
the present. Art and music will be used to illuminate
history, and history will be used to further an
understanding of art and music. [AR EU HU WI]
A His 275 (= A Jst 275) Antisemitism in Historical
Perspective (3)
This course studies the development and varying
forms of antisemitism in Western history. The course
is divided into three segments: 1) the anti-Judaism of
early Christianity and the rise of medieval
antisemitism in Christian Europe; 2) the
modernization of antisemitism in European society up
to World War II; 3) the impact of antisemitism in
American history. Learning materials include analytic
texts, fiction, films and guest lecturers. Only one of
A His 275 & A Jst 275 may be taken for credit. [DP
EU GC]
A His 286 (= A Aas 286) African Civilizations (3)
Africa from prehistoric times to 1800 with emphasis
on sub-Saharan Africa, the development of indigenous
states and their response to Western and Eastern
contacts. Only one of A Aas 286 & A His 286 may be
taken for credit. [BE]
A His 287 (= A Aas 287) Africa in the Modern
World (3)
Africa since 1800: exploration, the end of the slave
trade, the development of interior states, European
partition, the colonial period, and the rise of
independent Africa. Only one of A Aas 287 & A His
287 may be taken for credit. [BE].
A His 291 (=A Jst 291 and A Rel 291) Messiah and
Messianism in Judaism and Christianity (3)
Origins of Jewish and Christian messianism in the Old
and New Testaments and related literature. Topics
include the projection of a society’s ultimate values,
and the tension caused by the actual attempts to realize
those values; i.e., to achieve salvation through
messianic movements. Only one of A His/Jst/Rel 291
may be taken for credit. May not be offered in 20032004. [GC]
A His 292 Trials in United States History (3)
This course examines various historic AngloAmerican criminal trials. To introduce the discipline
of history, trials are explored in their legal and social
settings so students can learn the purposes of trials in
past cultures. Course topics can include insanity
defense, free speech, racism, press coverage, honor,
and gender relations.
A His 293 History of Women in the Americas (3)
An historical survey of the role of women in the United
States, Canada, and Latin America from colonial times
to the present with emphasis on social, intellectual, and
political developments and feminist movements. May
not be offered during 2003-2204. [GC]
A His 386Z (= A Aas 386) Race and Conflict in
South Africa (4)
A His 386Z is the writing intensive version of A His
386 & A Aas 386; only one may be taken for credit.
Prerequisite(s): 3 credits of A His or A Aas course
work, or junior or senior class standing. [WI]
A His 476 Colloquium in African History (3)
Specific topic to be examined in the colloquium will
be announced at the time the course is offered, and
students may obtain a course description from the
department at the time of advance registration.
Prerequisite(s): junior or senior class standing.
Permission of instructor may be required. A His 476Z
is the writing intensive version of A His 476. May not
be offered in 2003-2004.
A His 476Z Colloquium in African History (4)
A His 476 is the writing intensive version of A His
476. Only one may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s):
junior or senior class standing. Permission of
Instructor may be required. May not be offered in
2003-2004. [WI]
A His 490Z Senior Thesis Colloquium (4)
This class grants students an opportunity to research
and write individual senior history theses. Topics will
be chosen with the help of the instructor. While much
of the class will involve individual research and
writing, occasional colloquia will be held for sharing
research insights and discussing research problems.
Prerequisite(s): senior status, history major; instructor
permission.
A His 493Z Research Intensive Option for Upperlevel History Classes (1)
This one-credit course is to be taken in conjunction
with a 300-level history course that does not already
require a research paper. By enrolling in the researchintensive option, students will be able to write a
research paper on a topic related to the course.
Prerequisite(s): history major; permission of instructor.
A His 296 Peace in the Nuclear Age (3)
An historical approach to peace studies. This course
examines the background of the contemporary
international arms race. Twentieth century peace
movements and efforts at disarmament and armaments
control are emphasized.
Concentration in the History of
the United States
A His 297L (= A Rel 297L) Religion and Society in
History (3)
A His 300 The History of American Indians
and the United States (3)
This course will focus on the role religion has played
in societies from antiquity to the present. Our
examination will include the anointed kings of ancient
Israel, the idealized unity of emperor and patriarch in
Byzantium, the universal claims of the Holy Roman
Empire, the role of the prophet in Islam, the divinity of
the Emperor in China and Japan, the conception of the
monarchy in Western and Eastern Europe, the antireligious rhetoric of European revolutions, the
separation of church and state in contemporary secular
societies, the current revival of fundamentalism, and
the persistence of wars based on religion. Architecture,
music, iconography, and rituals will be examined for
the information they provide. [GC HU]
A His 300Z The History of American Indians
and the United States (4)
A His 297E (= A Rel 297E) Religion and Society in
History (4)
A His 297E is the writing intensive version of A His
297L; only one maybe taken for credit. [GC HU WI]
A His 386 (= A Aas 386) Race and Conflict in
South Africa (3)
Study of the historical origins and development of
racial conflict in South Africa with a concentration on
economic. political, social and religious change in the
20th century. Topics will include: changing state
structures and ideologies, the impact of
industrialization, transformations of rural and urban
life, African religious movements, political and
religious connections with Black Americans, gender
relations, and changing forms of popular resistance
against white domination. A His 386Z is the writing
intensive version of A His 386 & A Aas 386; only one
may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): 3 credits of
A His or A Aas course work, or junior or senior class
standing.
A detailed survey of the history of the North
American Indians, particularly those now within the
territory of the United States, as communities and
nations, from the period of first contact to the
present. Only one may be taken for credit.
Prerequisite(s): A His 100 or A His 100Z. [US*]
A detailed survey of the history of the North
American Indians, particularly those now within the
territory of the United States, as communities and
nations, from the period of first contact to the
present. Only one may be taken for credit.
Prerequisite(s): A His 100 or A His 100Z. [US* WI]
A His 301 Approaches to the History of
American Indian Peoples (3)
This course provides an in-depth exploration of
specific Tribal Nations and major cultural themes in
American Indian history, such as political relations,
economic relations, and religious relations. Only one
may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): A His 300
or A His 300Z. May not be offered in 2003-2004.
A His 301Z Approaches to the History of
American Indian Peoples (3)
This course provides an in-depth exploration of
specific Tribal Nations and major cultural themes in
American Indian history, such as political relations,
economic relations, and religious relations. Only one
may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): A His 300
or A His 300Z. May not be offered in 2003-2004.
[WI]
137
University at Albany
A His 302Z American Art and the Western
Tradition (4)
A His 308 Division and Reunion,
1848–77 (3)
A His 314 The Progressive Generation: 1900–
1932 (3)
By focusing on types of art (the portrait, history
painting, genre painting, landscape art, etc.) and
artistic styles (Neoclassicism, Romanticism,
Realism, Impressionism, Abstract Expressionism,
etc.) the course will examine the development of
American art from its European origins. The main
focus of the course is how American art—even with
its European origins—becomes distinctively
American. Particular attention will be given to
American art that can be seen locally, from the
Hudson River Collection in the Albany Institute of
Art and History to the Tiffany windows in Albany
and Schenectady. [WI]
Causes of the American Civil War, the war on
military and civilian fronts, and Reconstruction and
its aftermath. A His 308Z is the writing intensive
version of A His 308; only one may be taken for
credit. Prerequisite(s): junior or senior class
standing, or 3 credits in history.
Intensive examination of society and politics in the
United States in an age of reform and reaction.
Special emphasis on important personalities, such as
Theodore Roosevelt, Woodrow Wilson, and Herbert
Hoover; also consideration of major themes, such as
progressivism, World War I, and the business
civilization of the Twenties. Prerequisite(s): junior
or senior class standing, or 3 credits in history.
A His 314Z is the writing intensive version of A His
314; only one may be taken for credit.
A His 303Z American Architecture and the
Western Tradition (4)
A His 309 The Gilded Age, 1877–1900 (3)
The various styles of American architecture will be
examined in connection with their European
antecedents, from Colonial times to the present. One
theme of the course will be how styles derived from
Europe-Gothic Revival, Romanesque Revival, and
so on, take on distinctive American characteristics.
Another theme will be the connection between
nineteenth-century historicist architecture and the
pioneers of modern architecture such as Louis
Sullivan and Frank Lloyd Wright. Particular
importance will be given to the architecture of
Albany, Troy, and Schenectady. [WI]
A His 305 Colonial America to 1763 (3)
Survey of major aspects and events in the colonial
period, with particular emphasis on the growth of
uniquely American culture and institutions. A His
305Z is the writing intensive version of A His 305;
only one may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s):
junior or senior class standing, or 3 credits in
history.
A His 305Z Colonial America to 1763 (4)
A His 305Z is the writing intensive version of A His
305; only one may be taken for credit.
Prerequisite(s): junior or senior class standing, or 3
credits in history. [WI]
A His 306 The Era of the American
Revolution, 1763–1815 (3)
Detailed survey of the American Revolution, the
making of the Constitution, and the historic
experiment in federal-republicanism; the clash of
ideas and interests on the rapidly changing domestic
and foreign scenes; the search for unity in the new
nation. A His 306Z is the writing intensive version
of A His 306; only one may be taken for credit.
Prerequisite(s): junior or senior class standing, or 3
credits in history.
A His 306Z The Era of the American
Revolution, 1763–1815 (4)
A His 306Z is the writing intensive version of A His
306; only one may be taken for credit.
Prerequisite(s): junior or senior class standing, or 3
credits in history. [WI]
A His 307 Nationalism and Reform,
1815–48 (3)
Survey of the growth of nationalism, the emergence
of a reform impulse, the age of individualism and
egalitarianism, the development of the second
American party system, and technological, cultural,
and social change. A His 307Z is the writing
intensive version of A His 307; only one may be
taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): junior or senior
class standing, or 3 credits in history.
A His 307Z Nationalism and Reform,
1815–48 (4)
A His 307Z is the writing intensive version of A His
307; only one may be taken for credit.
Prerequisite(s): junior or senior class standing, or 3
credits in history. [WI]
138
A His 308Z Division and Reunion,
1848–77 (3)
A His 308Z is the writing intensive version of A His
308; only one may be taken for credit.
Prerequisite(s): junior or senior class standing, or 3
credits in history. [WI]
Detailed survey of the complexity and diversity of
the period, emphasizing the impact of
industrialization, urbanization, and mass
immigration upon politics, diplomacy, agriculture,
labor, religion, and thought. A His 309Z is the
writing intensive version of A His 309; only one
may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): junior or
senior class standing, or 3 credits in history.
A His 309Z The Gilded Age, 1877–1900 (4)
A His 309Z is the writing intensive version of A His
309; only one may be taken for credit.
Prerequisite(s): junior or senior class standing, or 3
credits in history. [WI]
A His 311 History of American Foreign Policy
I (3)
Historical survey of United States relations with
other countries emphasizing the interplay of
domestic and international issues and covering the
period from the American Revolution to 1920.
A His 311Z is the writing intensive version of A His
311; only one may be taken for credit.
Prerequisite(s): junior or senior class standing, or 3
credits in history. [US]
A His 311Z History of American Foreign
Policy I (4)
A His 311Z is the writing intensive version of A His
311; only one may be taken for credit.
Prerequisite(s): junior or senior class standing, or 3
credits in history. [US WI[
A His 312 History of American Foreign Policy
II (3)
Historical survey of United States relations with
other countries emphasizing the interplay of
domestic and international issues and covering the
period from 1920 to the present. A His 312Z is the
writing intensive version of A His 312; only one
may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): junior or
senior class standing, or 3 credits in history. [US]
A His 312Z History of American Foreign
Policy II (4)
A His 312Z is the writing intensive version of A His
312; only one may be taken for credit.
Prerequisite(s): junior or senior class standing, or 3
credits in history. [US WI]
A His 313 Constitutional History of the United
States (3)
Survey and analysis of the impact of the federal
Constitution with its changing interpretations on the
political, social, and economic life of the nation.
Special emphasis is given to the role of the President
and of the Supreme Court in effecting constitutional
change. A His 313Z is the writing intensive version
of A His 313; only one may be taken for credit.
Prerequisite(s): junior or senior class standing or 3
credits in history . [US*]
A His 313Z Constitutional History of the
United States (3)
A His 313Z is the writing intensive version of A His
313; only one may be taken for credit.
Prerequisite(s): junior or senior class standing or 3
credits in history .[US* WI]
A His 314Z The Progressive Generation:
1900–1932 (4)
Prerequisite(s): junior or senior class standing, or 3
credits in history. A His 314Z is the writing
intensive version of A His 314; only one may be
taken for credit. [WI]
A His 315 Roosevelt to Reagan,
1933–1988 (3)
Intensive examination of United States political
history from the Great Depression to the 1980’s.
Special emphasis on the welfare state, the Cold War,
the President and Congress, and the relationship
between citizens, public policy, and the political
process. Prerequisite(s): junior or senior class
standing, or 3 credits in history. A His 315Z is the
writing intensive version of A His 315; only one
may be taken for credit.
A His 315Z Roosevelt to Reagan,
1933–1988 (4)
Prerequisite(s): junior or senior class standing, or 3
credits in history. A His 315Z is the writing
intensive version of A His 315; only one may be
taken for credit. [WI]
A His 316 Workers and Work in America,
1600–Present (3)
A survey of the transformation of work and workers
in America from the years of the first white
settlement to the present. Topics will include:
indentured servants; artisan work and culture;
household production and the revolutionizing role of
merchant capitalism; slave labor; industrialization;
race, gender, ethnicity and the segmentation of work
and workers; the rise of the labor movement; labor
radicalism. A His 316Z is the writing intensive
version of A His 316; only one may be taken for
credit. Prerequisite(s): junior or senior class
standing, or 3 credits in history. [US*]
A His 316Z Workers and Work in America,
1600–Present (4)
A His 316Z is the writing intensive version of A His
316; only one may be taken for credit.
Prerequisite(s): junior or senior class standing, or 3
credits in history. [US* WI]
A His 317 History of the American City to
1860 (3)
Chronological and topical survey of the American
urban scene, with emphasis on the causes and
consequences of urban growth, the similarities and
differences among various cities, and the attempts to
fulfill the needs of an urban environment. This
session begins in the colonial period and traces
development to the second half of the 19th century.
Prerequisite(s): junior or senior class standing, or 3
credits in history. A His 317Z is the writing
intensive version of A His 317; only one may be
taken for credit. [US]
A His 317Z History of the American City to
1860 (3)
Prerequisite(s): junior or senior class standing, or 3
credits in history. A His 317Z is the writing
intensive version of A His 317; only one may be
taken for credit. [US WI]
University at Albany
A His 318 History of the American City Since
1860 (3)
A His 325Z The Quest for Equality in United
States History (4)
Chronological and topical survey of the American
urban scene, with emphasis on the causes and
consequences of urban growth, the similarities and
differences among various cities, and the attempts to
fulfill the needs of an urban environment. This
session examines the urban scene from the late 19th
century to the present. Prerequisite(s): junior or
senior class standing, or 3 credits in history. A His
318Z is the writing intensive version of A His 318;
only one may be taken for credit. [US]
A His 325Z is the writing intensive version of A His
325; only one may be taken for credit.
Prerequisite(s): junior or senior class standing, or 3
credits in history. [US* WI]
A His 318Z History of the American City
Since 1860 (3)
Prerequisite(s): junior or senior class standing, or 3
credits in history. A His 318Z is the writing
intensive version of A His 318; only one may be
taken for credit. [US WI]
A His 321 American Social History: European
Settlement to Civil War (3)
Historical survey and analysis of American society
with attention to immigration, ethnic groups, labor
problems, changing class and family structure,
population, and mobility patterns. A His 321Z is the
writing intensive version of A His 321; only one may
be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): junior or senior
class standing, or 3 credits in history. [US]
A His 321Z American Social History:
European Settlement to Civil War (4)
A His 321Z is the writing intensive version of A His
321; only one may be taken for credit.
Prerequisite(s): junior or senior class standing, or 3
credits in history. [US WI]
A His 322 American Social History: Civil War
to Present (3)
Historical survey and analysis of American society
with attention to immigration, ethnic groups, labor
problems, changing class and family structure,
population, and mobility patterns. A His 322Z is the
writing intensive version of A His 322; only one
may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): junior or
senior class standing, or 3 credits in history.[US]
A His 322Z American Social History: Civil
War to Present (4)
A His 322Z is the writing intensive version of A His
322; only one may be taken for credit.
Prerequisite(s): junior or senior class standing, or 3
credits in history. [US WI]
A His 324 Religion in American Life and
Thought (3)
The development of religious thought and
institutions in this country from colonial
Puritanism and Anglicanism to the pluralistic
religious/secular American society of today.
Emphasis on the relationships among religious
thought, religious institutions, and society.
A His 324Z is the writing intensive version of
A His 324; only one may be taken for credit.
Prerequisite(s): junior or senior class standing, or
3 credits in history. May not be offered in 20032004.
A His 326 History of New York State (3)
The social, economic, and political development of
New York from the Dutch colonial period to the
present. A His 326Z is the writing intensive version
of A His 326; only one may be taken for credit.
Prerequisite(s): junior or senior class standing, or 3
credits in history. May not be offered in 2003-2004.
A His 326Z History of New York State (3)
A His 326Z is the writing intensive version of A His
326; only one may be taken for credit.
Prerequisite(s): junior or senior class standing, or 3
credits in history. May not be offered in 2003-2004.
[WI]
A His 327 The Roles of Law in American
History (3)
This course explores law in the American social and
political context, focusing on the use of law by
various groups in the American past for different
purposes. It is composed of topical units in which
students read mostly primary materials (cases, laws,
and treatises), as well as monographs, and meet to
discuss them. A His 327Z is the writing intensive
version of A His 327; only one may be taken for
credit. Prerequisite(s): junior or senior class
standing. [US]
A His 327Z The Roles of Law in American
History (3)
A His 327Z is the writing intensive version of A His
327; only one may be taken for credit.
Prerequisite(s): junior or senior class standing. [US
WI]
A His 328 Lawyers in American Life, 1607 to
Present (3)
A His 394Z Workshop in Oral History (4)
A His 394Z is the writing intensive version of A His
394; only one may be taken for credit. [WI]
A His 424 American Intellectual & Cultural
History to 1860 (3)
Key ideas and significant patterns of thought in
American life: Puritanism, the American
Enlightenment, nationalism, transcendentalism,
democracy, and reform. Prerequisite(s): junior or
senior class standing, or 3 credits in history. A His
424Z is the writing intensive version of A His 424;
only one may be taken for credit. May not be
offered in 2003-2004.
A His 424Z American Intellectual & Cultural
History to 1860 (4)
Prerequisite(s): junior or senior class standing, or 3
credits in history. A His 424Z is the writing
intensive version of A His 424; only one may be
taken for credit. May not be offered in 2003-2004.
[WI]
A His 425 American Intellectual History Since
1860 (3)
Key ideas and significant patterns of thought in
American life: the impact of economic expansion,
Darwinian evolution, pragmatism, war and changing
ideologies of liberalism, progressivism, and
conservatism. Prerequisite(s): junior or senior class
standing, or 3 credits in history. A His 425Z is the
writing intensive version of A His 425; only one
may be taken for credit. May not be offered in 20032004.
A His 425Z American Intellectual History Since
1860 (4)
A His 328Z Lawyers in American Life, 1607 to
Present (3)
This seminar will examine the history of black
women in the United States form the slave era
through the post World War II reform movements. It
will focus upon the range of demands black women
faced during the Gilded and Progressive erastheir
participation in the suffrage movement, black
struggles for liberation, cultural expressions, labor
force, etc. Only one of A Aas 440, A His 440 and
A Wss 440 may be taken for credit.
A His 328Z is the writing intensive version of A His
328; only one may be taken for credit.
Prerequisite(s): junior or senior class standing. [US
WI]
A His 356 The World at War, 1939–45 (3)
For description, see listing under Concentration in
European History. A His 356Z is the writing
intensive version of A His 356; only one may be
taken for credit.
A His 356Z The World at War, 1939–45 (4)
A His 324Z is the writing intensive version of A His
324; only one may be taken for credit.
Prerequisite(s): junior or senior class standing, or 3
credits in history. May not be offered in 2003-2004.
[WI]
A His 390 Topics in American History (1–4)
Examination of social and political movements
seeking a more egalitarian social order, including
abolitionism, communitarianism, trade unionism,
p op u li s m , a n a rc h i s m , s oc i a li s m , ra c i a l
egalitarianism, and feminism. A His 325Z is the
writing intensive version of A His 325; only one
may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): junior or
senior class standing, or 3 credits in history. [US*]
Study of the preservation of history through the
spoken word. An introduction to the methods of oral
history in local history. Lectures, readings,
discussions, and interviews comprise the focus of
the course. Prerequisite(s): junior or senior class
standing and permission of instructor. A His 394Z is
the writing intensive version of A His 394; only one
may be taken for credit.
This course examines the legal profession, showing
how law, through lawyers, has operated in American
history. It is interdisciplinary in focus and utilizes a
multimedia methodology. Topics to be covered will
include: legal education, lawyers as heroes, lawyers
as reformers and radicals, development of the
business of lawyering, and emergence of women and
minority lawyers. A His 328Z is the writing
intensive version of A His 328; only one may be
taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): junior or senior
class standing. [US]
A His 324Z Religion in American Life and
Thought (3)
A His 325 The Quest for Equality in United
States History (3)
A His 394 Workshop in Oral History (3)
A His 356Z is the writing intensive version of A His
356; only one may be taken for credit. [WI]
Specific topics to be examined will be announced
during advance registration periods. May be repeated
for credit. A His 390Z is the writing intensive version
of A His 390; only one may be taken for credit.
Prerequisite(s): permission of instructor; junior or
senior class standing, or 3 credits in history.
Prerequisite(s): junior or senior class standing, or 3
credits in history. A His 425Z is the writing
intensive version of A His 425; only one may be
taken for credit. May not be offered in 2003-2004.
[WI]
A His 440 (= A Aas 440 and A Wss 440) Black
Women in United States History (3)
Colloquia, Independent Study,
and Projects in United States
History
The following colloquia are limited to undergraduate
students and may be taken only with the permission
of the instructor. Specific topics to be examined in
the colloquia will be announced at the time the
courses are offered, and students may obtain a list of
topics from the Department of History at the time of
advance registration. Colloquia may be repeated for
credit.
A His 390Z Topics in American History (3–4)
A His 390Z is the writing intensive version of A His
390; only one may be taken for credit.
Prerequisite(s): permission of instructor; junior or
senior class standing, or 3 credits in history. [WI]
139
University at Albany
A His 478 & 478Z Colloquium in U.S. History,
19th Century (3)
A His 479 & 479Z Colloquium in U.S. History,
20th Century (3) [WI (479Z ONLY)]
A His 480 & 480Z Colloquium in U.S. History:
Topics (3) [WI (480Z ONLY)]
A His 485 & 485Z Colloquium in Comparative
and Cross-Cultural History (3) [WI (485Z
ONLY)]
A His 490Z Senior Thesis Colloquium (4)
This class grants students an opportunity to research
and write individual senior history theses. Topics
will be chosen with the help of the instructor. While
much of the class will involve individual research
and writing, occasional colloquia will be held for
sharing research insights and discussing research
problems. Prerequisite(s): senior status, history
major; instructor permission.
A His 492 Group Research Project (4)
This course will provide students with the
opportunity to participate in an original group
research project. The subject of the project will
reflect the active research interests of the instructor.
Participation will involve students in the active
process of researching history, bringing to light
greater historical understanding of our selves, our
city, region, school, environment, or perhaps a topic
beyond our immediate locality. Students, with the
assistance of the instructor, will dissect the
complexities of the selected research project and
then tackle different aspects of it. By the end of the
semester, the class’s collective research effort should
be in a public presentation or publication ready
form. Prerequisite(s): history major; permission of
instructor.
A His 493Z Research Intensive Option for Upperlevel History Classes (1)
This one-credit course is to be taken in conjunction
with a 300-level history course that does not already
require a research paper. By enrolling in the
research-intensive option, students will be able to
write a research paper on a topic related to the
course. Prerequisite(s): history major; permission of
instructor.
A His 495Z and 496Z Senior Honors Thesis
Seminar (4, 4)
Preparation of a substantial honors thesis under the
supervision of a member of the Department of
History. Students present periodic progress reports,
criticize each other’s work, and deliver an oral
summary of the completed thesis. Students in the
honors program must satisfactorily complete both
A His 495Z and 496Z. Prerequisite(s): admission to
the history honors program. [WI]
A His 497 Independent Study in
History (2–4)
Directed reading and conferences on selected topics
in history. May be repeated for credit.
Prerequisite(s): permission of instructor and director
of undergraduate studies; junior or senior class
standing, or 3 credits in history.
A His 497Z Independent Research and
Writing in History (4)
Directed reading and conferences on selected topics
in history. Prerequisite(s): permission of instructor
and director of honors program; admission to the
history honors program; junior or senior class
standing; S/U graded. [WI]
A His 499 Special Projects in History (3)
Supervised work on projects in coordination with
local museums and historical agencies. May be
repeated for credit. Prerequisite(s): permission of
instructor and department chair. S/U graded.
Concentration in European
History
A His 336 History of the Early Middle
Ages (3)
The history of Western Europe during the early
Middle Ages, from ca. 500 to ca. 1050, in all major
aspects. A His 336Z is the writing intensive version
of A His 336; only one may be taken for credit.
Prerequisite(s): junior or senior class standing, or 3
credits in history. May not be offered in 20032004.[EU]
A His 336Z History of the Early Middle
Ages (4)
A His 336Z is the writing intensive version of A His
336; only one may be taken for credit.
Prerequisite(s): junior or senior class standing, or 3
credits in history. May not be offered in 2003-2004.
[EU WI]
A His 337 The High Middle Ages (3)
The history of Western Europe during the High
Middle Ages, ca. 1050 to 1300, in all major aspects.
A His 337Z is the writing intensive version of A His
337; only one may be taken for credit.
Prerequisite(s): junior or senior class standing, or 3
credits in history. May not be offered in 2003-2004.
[EU]
A His 337Z The High Middle Ages (4)
A His 337Z is the writing intensive version of A His
337; only one may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s):
junior or senior class standing, or 3 credits in history.
May not be offered in 2003-2004. [EU WI]
A His 338 The Italian Renaissance, 1300–1530
(3)
Detailed study of Italian Renaissance culture and
society up to about 1530 with special emphasis on
humanism and other cultural developments. A His
338Z is the writing intensive version of A His 338;
only one may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s):
junior or senior class standing, or 3 credits in
history. [EU]
A His 338Z The Italian Renaissance, 1300–
1530 (4)
A His 338Z is the writing intensive version of A His
338; only one may be taken for credit.
Prerequisite(s): junior or senior class standing, or 3
credits in history. [EU WI]
A His 339 Renaissance and Reformation in
16th-Century Europe (3)
Survey of continental European history in the early
modern period with special emphasis on theological
and intellectual developments. A His 339Z is the
writing intensive version of A His 339; only one
may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): junior or
senior class standing, or 3 credits in history. [EU]
A His 339Z Renaissance and Reformation in
16th-Century Europe (4)
A His 339Z is the writing intensive version of A His
339; only one may be taken for credit.
Prerequisite(s): junior or senior class standing, or 3
credits in history. [EU WI]
A His 340 (formerly A His 449) The French
Revolution and Napoleon (3)
A study of the French Revolution, its causes and
aftermath in the Napoleonic period. Attention will
be given to the social, political and cultural forces
from the late 18th century to 1815 as they relate to
the French Revolution. A His 340Z is the writing
intensive version of A His 340; only one may be
taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): junior or senior
class standing or 3 credits in history .
A His 340Z (formerly A His 449) The French
Revolution and Napoleon (4)
A His 340Z is the writing intensive version of A His
340; only one may be taken for credit.
Prerequisite(s): junior or senior class standing or 3
credits in history. [WI]
140
A His 342 Europe in the Age of Romanticism
and Revolution (3)
The history of Europe during the early 19th century
with emphasis on the struggle against the Metternich
system and the part played by the romantic
movement in this struggle. A His 342Z is the writing
intensive version of A His 342; only one may be
taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): junior or senior
class standing, or 3 credits in history. [EU]
A His 342Z Europe in the Age of Romanticism
and Revolution (4)
A His 342Z is the writing intensive version of A His
342; only one may be taken for credit.
Prerequisite(s): junior or senior class standing, or 3
credits in history. [EU WI]
A His 343 Europe 1848–1914 (3)
Europe in the era of its greatest power and influence;
focus on consolidation of the nation state, domestic
social conflicts, imperialist expansion, and the
origins of World War I. A His 343Z is the writing
intensive version of A His 343; only one may be
taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): junior or senior
class standing, or 3 credits in history. [EU]
A His 343Z Europe 1848–1914 (4)
A His 343Z is the writing intensive version of A His
343; only one may be taken for credit.
Prerequisite(s): junior or senior class standing, or 3
credits in history. [EU WI]
A His 344 Europe, 1914–45 (3)
Europe in an age of war and revolution. The origin
and course of two world wars, the Russian
revolution. The nature of fascism and communism
and the international crises of the inter-war years.
A His 344Z is the writing intensive version of A His
344; only one may be taken for credit.
Prerequisite(s): junior or senior class standing, or 3
credits in history. [EU]
A His 344Z Europe, 1914–45 (4)
A His 344Z is the writing intensive version of A His
344; only one may be taken for credit.
Prerequisite(s): junior or senior class standing, or 3
credits in history. [EU WI]
A His 345 Europe Since World War Two (3)
The impact of World War Two and the Cold War.
Current social, economic, political and security
problems. A His 345Z is the writing intensive
version of A His 345; only one may be taken for
credit. Prerequisite(s): junior or senior class
standing, or 3 credits in history. [EU]
A His 345Z Europe Since World War Two (4)
A His 345Z is the writing intensive version of A His
345; only one may be taken for credit.
Prerequisite(s): junior or senior class standing, or 3
credits in history. [EU WI]
A His 346 The History of England I (3)
The historical development of English society and
government from early times to the 17th century.
A His 346Z is the writing intensive version of A His
346; only one may be taken for credit.
Prerequisite(s): junior or senior class standing, or 3
credits in history. [EU]
A His 346Z The History of England I (4)
A His 346Z is the writing intensive version of A His
346; only one may be taken for credit.
Prerequisite(s): junior or senior class standing, or 3
credits in history. [EU WI]
A His 347 The History of England II (3)
The history of the United Kingdom and of the
British Empire and Commonwealth from the 17th
century to the present. A His 347Z is the writing
intensive version of A His 347; only one may be
taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): junior or senior
class standing, or 3 credits in history. [EU]
A His 347Z The History of England II (4)
A His 347Z is the writing intensive version of A His
347; only one may be taken for credit.
Prerequisite(s): junior or senior class standing, or 3
credits in history. [EU WI]
University at Albany
A His 349 History of France since 1815 (3)
A His 354 History of Russia I (3)
A survey of the history of France from 1815 to the
Fifth Republic, with attention to the political, social,
economic, and cultural developments within France
during this period. A His 349Z is the writing
intensive version of A His 349; only one may be
taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): junior or senior
class standing, or 3 credits in history. May not be
offered in 2003-2004.
The evolution of Russia from Kievan origins, Tatar
conquests and emergence of Muscovy to the
development of the Russian Empire in the 18th and
19th centuries. A His 354Z is the writing intensive
version of A His 354; only one may be taken for
credit. Prerequisite(s): junior or senior class
standing, or 3 credits in history. [EU]
A His 349Z History of France since 1815 (4)
A His 354Z is the writing intensive version of A His
354; only one may be taken for credit.
Prerequisite(s): junior or senior class standing, or 3
credits in history. [EU WI]
A His 349Z is the writing intensive version of A His
349; only one may be taken for credit.
Prerequisite(s): junior or senior class standing, or 3
credits in history. May not be offered in 2003-2004.
[WI]
A His 350 Iberia and Latin America to
1810 (3)
Iberian backgrounds; the age of exploration and
discovery; the conquest and settlement of America
by the Spanish and the Portuguese; Iberia and
America in the 16th, 17th, and 18th centuries. A His
350Z is the writing intensive version of A His 350;
only one may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s):
junior or senior class standing, or 3 credits in
history. May not be offered in 2003-2004.
A His 350Z Iberia and Latin America to
1810 (3)
A His 350Z is the writing intensive version of A His
350; only one may be taken for credit.
Prerequisite(s): junior or senior class standing, or 3
credits in history. May not be offered in 2003-2004.
[WI]
A His 351 History of Germany (3)
Germany since 1806. The wars of national
liberation; Bismarck, unification, and the
Wilhelminian Reich; World War l; the Weimar
Republic; the Third Reich and totalitarianism; the
German Federal and German Democratic Republics.
A His 351Z is the writing intensive version of A His
351; only one may be taken for credit.
Prerequisite(s): junior or senior class standing, or 3
credits in history. [EU]
A His 351Z History of Germany (4)
A His 351Z is the writing intensive version of A His
351; only one may be taken for credit.
Prerequisite(s): junior or senior class standing, or 3
credits in history. [EU WI]
A His 352 History of Eastern Europe I (3)
The history, culture, and contemporary affairs of the
people of the Baltic, Danubian, and Balkan regions
from earliest times to the early 19th century. A His
352Z is the writing intensive version of A His 352;
only one may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s):
junior or senior class standing, or 3 credits in
history. [EU]
A His 352Z History of Eastern Europe I (4)
A His 352Z is the writing intensive version of A His
352; only one may be taken for credit.
Prerequisite(s): junior or senior class standing, or 3
credits in history. [EU WI]
A His 354Z History of Russia I (4)
A His 355 History of Russia II (3)
Russia from the emancipation of the serfs to the
present, including the Revolutions of 1905 and 1917
and the foundations, development and expansion of
the Soviet Union. A His 355Z is the writing
intensive version of A His 355; only one may be
taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): junior or senior
class standing, or 3 credits in history. [EU]
A His 355Z History of Russia II (4)
A His 355Z is the writing intensive version of A His
355; only one may be taken for credit.
Prerequisite(s): junior or senior class standing, or 3
credits in history. [EU WI]
A His 356 The World at War, 1939–45 (3)
A political, diplomatic, military, economic, and
social history of the Second World War. Among the
topics covered will be war and peace plans, the
military campaigns in the European, Pacific, and
North African theaters of war, the plight of
conquered nations, the concentration camps, and the
war crimes trials. A His 356Z is the writing
intensive version of A His 356; only one may be
taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): junior or senior
class standing, or 3 credits in history. [EU]
A His 356Z The World at War, 1939–45 (4)
A His 356Z is the writing intensive version of A His
356; only one may be taken for credit.
Prerequisite(s): junior or senior class standing, or 3
credits in history. [EU WI]
A His 363 Weimar Germany (3)
The Weimar Republic (1918–1933) encompassed an
epoch of almost legendary cultural and intellectual
brilliance; yet it was also the most disastrous venture
in liberal democracy in this century, ending with the
triumph of Hitler. How one society could nourish
such creative and destructive extremes is the central
question of the course. A His 363Z is the writing
intensive version of A His 363; only one may be
taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): junior or senior
class standing, or 3 credits in history.
A His 363Z Weimar Germany (4)
A His 363Z is the writing intensive version of A His
363; only one may be taken for credit.
Prerequisite(s): junior or senior class standing, or 3
credits in history. [WI]
A His 353 History of Eastern Europe II (3)
A His 364Z Culture and the French
Revolution (4)
The history, culture, and contemporary affairs of the
people of the Baltic, Danubian, and Balkan regions
from the early 19th century to the present. A His
353Z is the writing intensive version of A His 353;
only one may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s):
junior or senior class standing, or 3 credits in
history. [EU]
The emotional, ideological, and artistic response of
such figures as Goya, Beethoven, and Austen to the
stresses and strains of the revolutionary era. Changes
in art, music, and literature as the world of the
ancien regime gave way to the modern era.
Prerequisite(s): junior or senior class standing, or 3
credits in history. [EU WI]
A His 353Z History of Eastern Europe II (4)
A His 365 (formerly A His 365A) War and
Society I (3)
A His 353Z is the writing intensive version of A His
353; only one may be taken for credit.
Prerequisite(s): junior or senior class standing, or 3
credits in history. [EU WI]
This session will cover the military history of the West
from antiquity to the death of Frederick the Great.
Among topics studied will be: socioeconomic
developments in relationship to war, technological
change, causation of collective violence, tactics and
strategy, fortifications, and selected campaigns and
battles. A His 365Z is the writing intensive version of
A His 365; only one may be taken for credit.
Prerequisite(s): junior or senior class standing, or 3
credits in history.
A His 365Z (formerly A His 365A) War and
Society I (3)
A His 365Z is the writing intensive version of A His
365; only one may be taken for credit.
Prerequisite(s): junior or senior class standing, or 3
credits in history. [WI]
A His 366 (formerly A His 365B) War and
Society II (3)
This session will reach from 1786 to 1918. Among
topics studied will be: socioeconomic developments in
relationship to war, technological change, causation of
collective violence, tactics and strategy, fortifications,
and selected campaigns and battles. A His 366Z is the
writing intensive version of A His 366; only one of
these courses may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s):
junior or senior class standing, or 3 credits in history.
A His 366Z (formerly A His 365B) War and
Society II (3)
A His 366Z is the writing intensive version of A His
366; only one of these courses may be taken for
credit. Prerequisite(s): junior or senior class
standing, or 3 credits in history. [WI]
A His 391 Topics in European History (1–4)
Specific topics to be examined will be announced
during advance registration. May be repeated for
credit. A His 391Z is the writing intensive version of
A His 391. Prerequisite(s): permission of instructor;
junior or senior class standing, or 3 credits in
history.
A His 391Z Topics in European History (3–4)
A His 391Z is the writing intensive version of A His
391. Prerequisite(s): permission of instructor; junior or
senior class standing, or 3 credits in history. [WI]
A His 416Z European Economic History (4)
The history of capitalism in Europe from the
reintroduction of money in circulation to the post1970 crisis. Readings and discussions will focus upon
industrialization, managerialism, labor agitation,
political economy, and the economics of war.
Prerequisite(s): junior or senior class standing, or
permission of instructor. May not be offered in 20032004. [WI]
A His 454 The Diplomacy of National Power,
1815–1890 (3)
Great power relations from the post-Napoleonic
search for stability through concert to the victory of
nationalism in Italy and Germany and the rise and
fall of the Bismarckian alliance system. A His 454Z
is the writing intensive version of A His 454; only
one of these courses may be taken for credit.
Prerequisite(s): junior or senior class standing.
A His 454Z The Diplomacy of National Power,
1815–1890 (3)
A His 454Z is the writing intensive version of A His
454; only one of these courses may be taken for
credit. Prerequisite(s): junior or senior class
standing. [WI]
A His 455 The Diplomacy of Global Conflict,
1890–1945 (3)
Great power relations during the era of the two
World Wars, emphasizing underlying forces and
rivalries that led to war and attempts to defuse
tensions and prevent aggression. A His 455Z is the
writing intensive version of A His 455; only one
may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): junior or
senior class standing.
A His 455Z The Diplomacy of Global Conflict,
1890–1945 (4)
A His 455Z is the writing intensive version of A His
455; only one may be taken for credit.
Prerequisite(s): junior or senior class standing. [WI]
141
University at Albany
A His 456 The Diplomacy of the Nuclear
Age (3)
Great power relations since the end of World War II,
emphasizing the origins of the Cold War,
superpower confrontations, attempts at détente, arms
control, the dissolution of the Soviet empire,
experiments in regional economic integration, and
current national issues and crises. A His 456Z is the
writing intensive version of A His 456; only one
may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): junior or
senior class standing.
A His 456Z The Diplomacy of the Nuclear Age
(4)
A His 456Z is the writing intensive version of A His
456; only one may be taken for credit.
Prerequisite(s): junior or senior class standing. [WI]
A His 460 History of Nationalism (3)
The nature and development of nationalism; a study
of the meaning of nationalism, nationalist theorists,
nationalist leaders, and nationalist movements from
the 18th century to the present. A His 460Z is the
writing intensive version of A His 460; only one
may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): junior or
senior class standing, or 3 credits in history.
A His 492 Group Research Project (4)
This course will provide students with the
opportunity to participate in an original group
research project. The subject of the project will
reflect the active research interests of the instructor.
Participation will involve students in the active
process of researching history, bringing to light
greater historical understanding of our selves, our
city, region, school, environment, or perhaps a topic
beyond our immediate locality. Students, with the
assistance of the instructor, will dissect the
complexities of the selected research project and
then tackle different aspects of it. By the end of the
semester, the class’s collective research effort should
be in a public presentation or publication ready
form. Prerequisite(s): history major; permission of
instructor. [WI]
A His 493Z Research Intensive Option for Upperlevel History Classes (1)
This one-credit course is to be taken in conjunction
with a 300-level history course that does not already
require a research paper. By enrolling in the
research-intensive option, students will be able to
write a research paper on a topic related to the
course. Prerequisite(s): history major; permission of
instructor.
A His 369 (= A Lcs 369) Mexico, Central America,
and the West Indies Since 1810 (3)
The circum-Caribbean lands and islands in the 19th
and 20th centuries; independence; independent
nations and colonies; foreign intrusions and
interventions; social and economic change;
revolutions; comparative Caribbean studies. A His
369Z is the writing intensive version of A His 369 &
A Lcs 369; only one of the three courses may be
taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): junior or senior
class standing, or 3 credits in history.
A His 369Z (= A Lcs 369) Mexico, Central
America, and the West Indies Since 1810 (3)
A His 369Z is the writing intensive version of A His
369 & Lcs 369; only one of the three courses may be
taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): junior or senior
class standing, or 3 credits in history. [WI]
A His 371 (= A Lcs 371) South America Since
1810 (3)
A His 460Z is the writing intensive version of A His
460; only one may be taken for credit.
Prerequisite(s): junior or senior class standing, or 3
credits in history. [WI]
A His 495Z and 496Z Senior Honors Thesis
Seminar (4, 4)
For description, see listing under Concentration in
the History of the United States. [WI]
A His 463 The Byzantine Empire,
300–1453 (3)
The political, economic, social, and cultural evolution
of the South American nations from the winning of
independence to the present, with emphasis on
Argentina, Brazil, and Chile. Among topics studied
will be dictatorship, democratic government,
economic change, modern revolution, and social
trends. A His 371Z is the writing intensive version of
A His 371 and A Lcs 371; only one of the three
courses may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): junior
or senior class standing. or 3 credits in history. May
not be offered in 2003-2004. [BE]
A His 497 Independent Study in
History (2–4)
A His 371Z (= A Lcs 371) South America Since
1810 (3)
A His 460Z History of Nationalism (4)
Survey of the socioeconomic, ethnic, political,
religious, intellectual, and artistic history of
Byzantine civilization from late antiquity to the 15th
century. A His 463Z is the writing intensive version
of A His 463; only one may be taken for credit.
Prerequisite(s): junior or senior class standing.
A His 463Z The Byzantine Empire,
300–1453 (4)
A His 463Z is the writing intensive version of A His
463; only one may be taken for credit.
Prerequisite(s): junior or senior class standing. [WI]
Colloquia and Independent Study
in European History
The following colloquia are limited to undergraduate
students and may be taken only with the permission
of the instructor. Specific topics to be examined in
the colloquia will be announced at the time the
courses are offered, and students may obtain a list of
topics from the Department of History at the time of
advance registration. Colloquia may be repeated for
credit.
A His 481 & 481Z Colloquium in European
History (3) [WI (481Z ONLY)
A His 483 & 483Z Colloquium in Russian and
East European History (3) [WI (483Z ONLY)]
A His 485 & 485Z Colloquium in Comparative
and Cross-Cultural History (3) [WI (485Z
ONLY)]
A His 490Z Senior Thesis Colloquium (4)
This class grants students an opportunity to research
and write individual senior history theses. Topics
will be chosen with the help of the instructor. While
much of the class will involve individual research
and writing, occasional colloquia will be held for
sharing research insights and discussing research
problems. Prerequisite(s): senior status, history
major; instructor permission.
For description, see listing under Concentration in the
History of the United States. S/U graded.
A His 497Z Independent Research and
Writing in History (4)
Open only to students in the history honors program.
S/U graded. [WI]
Concentration in Ibero-American
History
A His 350 Iberia and Latin America to
1810 (3)
Iberian backgrounds; the age of exploration and
discovery; the conquest and settlement of America
by the Spanish and the Portuguese; Iberia and
America in the 16th, 17th, and 18th centuries. A His
350Z is the writing intensive version of A His 350;
only one may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s):
junior or senior class standing, or 3 credits in
history. May not be offered in 2003-2004.
A His 350Z Iberia and Latin America to
1810 (3)
A His 350Z is the writing intensive version of A His
350; only one may be taken for credit.
Prerequisite(s): junior or senior class standing, or 3
credits in history. May not be offered in 2003-2004.
[WI]
A His 367 Contemporary Latin America (3)
Survey of Latin American backgrounds followed by
study of the social, economic, and political problems
of Latin America since World War II. Particular
attention to the phenomena of social change,
economic nationalism, and revolution. A His 367Z
is the writing intensive version of A His 367; only
one may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): junior
or senior class standing, or 3 credits in history. May
not be offered in 2003-2004.
A His 367Z Contemporary Latin America (3)
A His 367Z is the writing intensive version of A His
367; only one may be taken for credit.
Prerequisite(s): junior or senior class standing, or 3
credits in history. May not be offered in 2003-2004.
[WI]
142
A His 371Z is the version of A His 371 and A Lcs 371;
only one of the three courses may be taken for credit.
Prerequisite(s): junior or senior class standing. or 3
credits in history. May not be offered in 2003-2004. [BE
WI]
A His 392 Topics in Latin American History (3)
Specific topics to be examined will be announced
during advance registration. May be repeated for
credit. Prerequisite(s): permission of instructor,
junior or senior class standing, or 3 credits in
history. A His 392Z is the writing intensive version
of A His 392; only one may be taken for credit.
A His 392Z Topics in Latin American
History (3–4)
Specific topics to be examined will be announced
during advance registration. May be repeated for
credit. Prerequisite(s): permission of instructor,
junior or senior class standing, or 3 credits in
history. A His 392Z is the writing intensive version
of A His 392; only one may be taken for credit. [WI]
A His 472 History of Brazil (3)
The development of Latin America’s largest and
most important nation from discovery to the present,
with attention to social, cultural, economic,
intellectual, and political trends and developments.
A His 472Z is the writing intensive version of A His
472; only one may be taken for credit. May not be
offered in 2003-2004.
A His 472Z History of Brazil (3)
A His 472Z is the writing intensive version of A His
472; only one may be taken for credit. May not be
offered in 2003-2004. [WI]
Colloquia and Independent Study
in Ibero-American History
The following colloquia are limited to undergraduate
students and may be taken only with the permission
of the instructor. Specific topics to be examined in
the colloquia will be announced at the time the
courses are offered, and students may obtain a list of
topics from the Department of History at the time of
advance registration. Colloquia may be repeated for
credit.
University at Albany
A His 482 & 482Z Colloquium in Latin-American
History (3) [WI (482Z ONLY)
A His 485 & 485Z Colloquium in Comparative
and Cross-Cultural History (3) [WI (485Z ONLY)]
A His 490Z Senior Thesis Colloquium (4)
This class grants students an opportunity to research
and write individual senior history theses. Topics
will be chosen with the help of the instructor. While
much of the class will involve individual research
and writing, occasional colloquia will be held for
sharing research insights and discussing research
problems. Prerequisite(s): senior status, history
major; instructor permission.
A His 492 Group Research Project (4)
This course will provide students with the
opportunity to participate in an original group
research project. The subject of the project will
reflect the active research interests of the instructor.
Participation will involve students in the active
process of researching history, bringing to light
greater historical understanding of our selves, our
city, region, school, environment, or perhaps a topic
beyond our immediate locality. Students, with the
assistance of the instructor, will dissect the
complexities of the selected research project and
then tackle different aspects of it. By the end of the
semester, the class’s collective research effort should
be in a public presentation or publication ready
form. Prerequisite(s): history major; permission of
instructor. [WI]
A His 493Z Research Intensive Option for Upperlevel History Classes (1)
This one-credit course is to be taken in conjunction
with a 300-level history course that does not already
require a research paper. By enrolling in the
research-intensive option, students will be able to
write a research paper on a topic related to the
course. Prerequisite(s): history major; permission of
instructor.
A His 495Z and 496Z Senior Honors Thesis
Seminar (4, 4)
For description, see listing under Concentration in
the History of the United States. [WI (496Z ONLY)]
A His 497 Independent Study in History (2–4)
For description, see listing under Concentration in
the History of the United States. S/U graded.
A His 497Z Independent Research and Writing in
History (4)
Open only to students in the history honors program.
S/U graded. [WI]
Concentration in Asian History
A His 341 (=A Jst 341) Issues in Biblical
Civilization (3)
Covers same period as A Jst 251 but on an advanced
level. Students attend two A Jst 251 lectures each
week but have a separate, more sophisticated reading
list, a research paper, and a separate recitation session.
Only one of A Jst 251, 341 & 341Z may be taken for
credit. Prerequisite(s): A Jst 150 or 240, or permission
of instructor. May not be offered in 2003-2004.
A His 356 The World at War, 1939–45 (3)
For description, see listing