Simplicity 888 Specifications

Simplicity 888 Specifications
AN888: EZR32 Simple TRX Application
Quick Start Guide
The EZR32LG and EZR32WG Wireless MCUs are the latest in Silicon Labs family of
wireless MCUs delivering a high performance, low energy wireless solution integrated into a small form factor package. By combining a high performance sub-GHz RF transceiver with an energy efficient 32-bit MCU, the EZR32LG family provides designers the ultimate in flexibility with a family of pin-compatible devices that scale with 64/128/256 kB of
flash and support Silicon Labs EZRadio or EZRadioPRO transceivers. The ultra-low
power operating modes and fast wake-up times of the Silicon Labs energy friendly 32-bit
MCUs, combined with the low transmit and receive power consumption of the sub-GHz
radio, result in a solution optimized for battery powered applications.
The EZR32LG and EZR32WG Wireless Starter Kit (WSTK) is a low-cost, fully featured
starter kit that allows designers to evaluate the performance and features of the
EZR32LG/WG device family. The kit will provide all hardware and software tools needed
to develop and debug applications using the EZR32LG or WG low-energy Wireless
MCUs. Hardware tools include an on-board debugger, advanced energy monitoring and
integrated packet trace, which are all available either over USB or Ethernet interfaces.
The kit is fully supported by Silicon Labs’ software libraries and the kit board support
package (BSP).
silabs.com | Smart. Connected. Energy-friendly.
KIT CONTENTS
• 2 WSTK boards
• 2 Radio cards either EZR32LG or WG for
the requested frequency as listed in the
doc.
• 2 USB cables to attach the WSTK to your
computer.
• 2 CR2032 coin cell batteries.
• 1 card with instructions direction them to
the website for Simplicity Studio and other
documentation
Rev. 0.2
Quick Start Guide
Getting Started
1. Getting Started
Hardware
• BRD4001A - Wireless Starter Kit Mainboard
• One set of the following:
• BRD4502A - EZR32LG 330 Direct Tie WSTK Radio Board; Si4460; 868 MHz +13 dBm
• BRD4502B – EZR32LG 330 Switched WSTK Radio Board; Si4455; 434 MHz +20 dBm
• BRD4502C - EZR32WG 330 Direct Tie WSTK Radio Board; Si4460; 868 MHz +13 dBm
• BRD4502D – EZR32WG 330 Switched WSTK Radio Board; Si4455; 434 MHz +20 dBm
• BRD4503A - EZR32LG 330 Switched WSTK Radio Board; Si4463; 915 MHz +20 dBm
• BRD4503B - EZR32WG 330 Switched WSTK Radio Board; Si4463; 915 MHz +20 dBm
• BRD4505B - EZR32WG 330 Switched WSTK Radio Board; Si4463; 490 MHz +20 dBm
Software:
• Simplicity Studio 3.0 + EFM and Wireless Packages.
• WSTK Firmware Version 2.4 or later. (Update available within Simplicity Studio through the Kit Manager)
Software Dependencies
• Simplicity Studio v3
Installing All Required Software
Install all of the above listed software. All of the EZR32 development kit software and prerequisite software must be installed on your
machine for the development kit software to work correctly. The order in which the software is installed is not important but you will want
to make sure that you have it all installed before you launch Simplicity Studio and begin working on your first project.
silabs.com | Smart. Connected. Energy-friendly.
Rev. 0.2 | 1
Quick Start Guide
Getting Started
Connecting Your Hardware
Once you have installed all the required software you can connect your EZR32LG/WG development kit hardware to your PC. It is simply connected using a USB cable as shown below:
Figure 1.1. WSTK Board Connected to PC with USB
Note: For best performance in Simplicity Studio please be sure that the power switch on your WSTK is in the Advanced Energy Monitoring or “AEM” position.
silabs.com | Smart. Connected. Energy-friendly.
Rev. 0.2 | 2
Quick Start Guide
Running Simplicity Studio for the First Time
2. Running Simplicity Studio for the First Time
Navigation in Simplicity Studio
Simplicity Studio is built on the Eclipse platform. As such, it is broken up into different “perspectives” each of which allow access to a
specific set of functionality. Simplicity Studio starts up in the “Simplicity Perspective,” sometimes referred to as the “Home Screen.”
Figure 2.1. Simplicity Studio's Simplicity Perspective
From the Simplicity Perspective, you can discover devices, configure Simplicity Studio, or navigate to another perspective for application development.
The Simplicity Perspective shows large tile icons that represent the various pieces of functionality within Simplicity Studio. When you
are in a different perspective you will see smaller tile icons in the top right-hand corner of your screen. You can always navigate back to
the Simplicity Perspective or any other perspective at any time by clicking on one of the tile icons in the top right-hand corner of your
screen.
Figure 2.2. Navigation Tile Icons
silabs.com | Smart. Connected. Energy-friendly.
Rev. 0.2 | 3
Quick Start Guide
Running Simplicity Studio for the First Time
Downloading Packages for Simplicity Studio
By default Simplicity Studio comes with some core components necessary for development. The real substance of the Simplicity Studio
application is provided in the “Packages” available from the Simplicity Studio update site. Before you begin working with Simplicity Studio, you will want to make sure that you have all of the packages installed that you need for your development platform. In particular, for
the EZR32 family of products, you will need both the “Wireless” and “EFM Product” packages.
To download packages for Simplicity Studio, [click] on the Package Management icon in the top right-hand corner of the Simplicity
Perspective.
Figure 2.3. Packages Management
The Add/Remove Packages window opens and will guide you through the process of updating Simplicity Studio’s packages. You will
need both the wireless package and the EFM SDK package for development on the EZR32 product.
Figure 2.4. Add/Remove Packages Window
silabs.com | Smart. Connected. Energy-friendly.
Rev. 0.2 | 4
Quick Start Guide
Running Simplicity Studio for the First Time
Updating Simplicity Studio
In addition to downloading packages, you can also update the Simplicity Studio core software at any time by clicking on the [Update
Software] icon in the top right-hand corner of the Simplicity Perspective.
Figure 2.5. Updating Simplicity Studio
Discovering Your Development Kit Hardware in Simplicity Studio
When you launch Simplicity Studio, it should automatically discover your USB connected Wireless Starter Kit (WSTK) hardware and
display it in the Simplicity Perspective as shown below:
Figure 2.6. Detected Hardware
The WSTK board will come up with an identifier that includes the serial number of the WSTK connected. The serial number displayed in
Simplicity Studio should match the number displayed on the WSTK board’s LCD.
silabs.com | Smart. Connected. Energy-friendly.
Rev. 0.2 | 5
Quick Start Guide
Running Simplicity Studio for the First Time
Configuring Your WSTK for an Ethernet Connection
You can also connect to your WSTK boards to be connect and discovered via Ethernet. You can configure the IP address of your device through the Simplicity Studio Home Screen by clicking on the arrow to the right of your device and selecting [Configure Adapter].
Figure 2.7. Select Configure Adapter
The Configure Adapter dialog window will allow you to set the J-Link Speed, Addressing Mode, and IP configuration for your WSTK
board.
Figure 2.8. Configure Adapter Dialog Window
silabs.com | Smart. Connected. Energy-friendly.
Rev. 0.2 | 6
Quick Start Guide
Running Simplicity Studio for the First Time
Discovering your WSTKs via Ethernet
In order to discover your WSTKs via the Ethernet connection you must first configure Simplicity Studio to search for and discover your
devices. You can do this by clicking on the arrow at the top of the Adapters View in the Simplicity Perspective and selecting [Configure
Device Scanning].
Figure 2.9. Configure Device Scanning
Figure 2.10. InSight Adapters
The Configuration interface located in [Preferences > Device Manger > InSight Adapters] allows you to configure the scanning that
Simplicity Studio will do to discover adapters on the network. In the case above, there is a WSTK connected with an IP address of
10.4.178.121. In order to scan for all devices on that subnet of the test network, set the subnet IP address at 10.4.178.0 with a mask of
255.255.255.0. This will scan for all WSTKs on the subnet 10.4.178 and should return my device.
silabs.com | Smart. Connected. Energy-friendly.
Rev. 0.2 | 7
Quick Start Guide
Running Simplicity Studio for the First Time
Upgrading the WSTK Boards to the Latest Firmware
Once you have connected the WSTK boards to the computer, make sure that the boards have the latest WSTK firmware loaded. This is
important in order to ensure that they will communicate with the Simplicity Studio software correctly.
Simplicity Studio includes a bundled Kit Manager that can be used to upgrade your WSTK boards. To access the Kit Manager within
Simplicity Studio, click on the WSTK board that needs to be upgraded so that it shows as selected, and then click on the [Kit Manager]
Tile on the right-hand side of the Simplicity Perspective.
Figure 2.11. Kit Manager
Clicking on the Kit Manager tile will open the Kit Manager dialog window, through which you can load a new firmware image onto your
WSTK main board. The Kit Manager has a bundled version of the latest WSTK software that it will ask to load onto your device.
silabs.com | Smart. Connected. Energy-friendly.
Rev. 0.2 | 8
Quick Start Guide
Running Simplicity Studio for the First Time
Figure 2.12. Kit Manager Dialog
silabs.com | Smart. Connected. Energy-friendly.
Rev. 0.2 | 9
Quick Start Guide
Running Simplicity Studio for the First Time
Configuring Your Preferred IDE
Simplicity Studio is an Integrated Development Environment (IDE). However, you are not limited to using only Simplicity Studio as your
IDE, you have the option of configuring Simplicity Studio to launch your preferred IDE for the development of software samples. For
instance, if you would prefer to use IAR or Keil, you can configure this option within Simplicity Studio by clicking on the “Settings” icon in
the top right corner of the Simplicity Perspective and going to [Simplicity Studio > Preferred IDE].
Figure 2.13. Settings Icon
Figure 2.14. Preferences/Preferred IDE
The “Preferred IDE” will be used when launching sample applications from within Simplicity Studio.
Note: IAR and GCC are supported as compiler toolchains within Simplicity Studio, meaning that the IAR or GCC compiler can be used
within the Simplicity Studio IDE. Keil and other compilers are only supported as “Preferred IDEs,” meaning that a project file is provided
in the sample applications but the Keil compiler is not integrated into Simplicity Studio. So if you want to use the Keil compiler, you must
use it within the Keil uVision IDE.
silabs.com | Smart. Connected. Energy-friendly.
Rev. 0.2 | 10
Quick Start Guide
RF Evaluation Using Nodetest
3. RF Evaluation Using Nodetest
Testing the EZR32 Using the "Nodetest" Application
The “nodetest” application provides a Command Line Interface (CLI) to Simplicity Studio for RF Evaluation of a device. In order to load
the nodetest application, do the following:
1. In the Simplicity Studio Perspective, select one of the RF devices you would like to load nodetest onto.
2. With the device selected, select the [Network Analyzer] tile on the right-hand side.
Figure 3.1. Network Analyser Tile
3. The Network Analyzer Perspective opens. In this perspective you will see the Adapters View on the left-hand side of the screen.
4. Rightclick on the device to which you would like to load the nodetest application, and select [Connect] to connect to the device.
5. Right-click on the WSTK board in the Adapter’s menu again and select [Flash / Upload].
Figure 3.2. Flash/Upload
6. Choose from the list of applications the nodetest application that is appropriate for your device and click [OK]. You will notice that
there several nodetest images available depending on your frequency band: 900 covering 915 and 800 covering 868, 490, and
434. Be sure to select the image that supports the radio card on your WSTK board.
silabs.com | Smart. Connected. Energy-friendly.
Rev. 0.2 | 11
Quick Start Guide
RF Evaluation Using Nodetest
Figure 3.3. Choose Nodetest
7. The nodetest application will load onto your EZR32LG or WG wireless MCU. You will see a progress indicator on the adapter indicating that the device is being loaded. Once the application load is complete, the name of the application loaded (nodetest) will
appear to the right of the adapter.
silabs.com | Smart. Connected. Energy-friendly.
Rev. 0.2 | 12
Quick Start Guide
RF Evaluation Using Nodetest
Running Console for Command Line Interface to Nodetest Application
Once the Nodetest application is loaded onto the EZR32LG/WG, you must first [Connect] to the device through the Adapters view, and
then you can interact with the nodetest application using the Command Line Interface within the Console view in Simplicity Studio.
Right-click on the [Adapter] in the Adapter’s View and select [Connect] and then [Launch Console].
Figure 3.4. Launch Console
The Console View will give you a CLI interface in Simplicity Studio’s Network Analyzer Perspective so that you can interact directly with
the nodetest application.
Figure 3.5. Nodetest CLI: Help
Typing help on the command line gives you the complete list of commands available in the nodetest application.
silabs.com | Smart. Connected. Energy-friendly.
Rev. 0.2 | 13
Quick Start Guide
RF Evaluation Using Nodetest
Running a Packet Error Test from the CLI
A typical usage scenario for the nodetest application is the measurement of Packet Error Rate (PER). PER is defined in 802.15.4 as the
percentage of transmitted packets that are not detected correctly. The Nodetest application provides two commands rx and tx that are
designed to interoperate with each other across two nodes running this application.
PER measurement procedure:
1. Load the nodetest application on two EZR32LG nodes.
2. Set the radio to the desired channel on both nodes with the setchannel n command where "n" is the desired channel number in
hex.
3. Issue the rx command on the first node.
4. Issue the tx <hex value> command on the second node. (This command will transmit 10 (hex a) packets of the form required for
PER analysis. For actual PER analysis, send 1000 or more packets.)
5. Observe the PER result in the third column of the rx command output, for example:
Figure 3.6. PER Measurement
silabs.com | Smart. Connected. Energy-friendly.
Rev. 0.2 | 14
Quick Start Guide
RF Evaluation Using Nodetest
Running the TX Test from the Simplicity Studio GUI
The Simplicity Studio RF Evaluation interface allows you to configure the radio prior to running a test via a Graphical User Interface
(GUI). To run the TX portion of your test using the GUI in Simplicity Studio you may either click on the [Radio Evaluation] Tile on the
Simplicity Studio Home Screen or go to [Window > Show View > Other… >InSight RF Evaluation > Tests].
Click on the [Radio Evaluation] Tile in the Simplicity Perspective to launch the Radio Evaluation tools.
Figure 3.7. Radio Evaluation Tile
Figure 3.8. Radio Evaluation Test View
The nodetest application must be loaded onto your device before you can run and interact with the Radio Evaluation interface in Simplicity Studio. Either of the above access methods will pop up a dialog in which you can select the radio test you wish to run. Once you
select the test, click [OK].
silabs.com | Smart. Connected. Energy-friendly.
Rev. 0.2 | 15
Quick Start Guide
RF Evaluation Using Nodetest
Figure 3.9. Radio TX Test Selection
This will launch a Radio Tx Test View from which you can configure and run your Tx Test. From the Test View, you may run your test at
any time by clicking on the [green arrow].
Figure 3.10. Radio TX Test Start
silabs.com | Smart. Connected. Energy-friendly.
Rev. 0.2 | 16
Quick Start Guide
RF Evaluation Using Nodetest
Underneath the run button and progress bar, you will see four tabs:
Adapter Tab
The Adapter Tab presents a list of all adapters that are currently running the Nodetest application and can be used for testing.
Figure 3.11. Adapter Tab
Define and Send Data Tab
In this tab you may define the type of test you would like to run. For a Tx test one can send either a raw stream or packets.
silabs.com | Smart. Connected. Energy-friendly.
Rev. 0.2 | 17
Quick Start Guide
RF Evaluation Using Nodetest
Figure 3.12. Define and Send Data Tab
Radio Configuration Tab
The radio configuration tab sets the parameters for the radio that will be configured before the test is run. This includes settings such as
the frequency, crystal, power amplifier, etc.
silabs.com | Smart. Connected. Energy-friendly.
Rev. 0.2 | 18
Quick Start Guide
RF Evaluation Using Nodetest
Figure 3.13. Radio Configuration Tab
Results Tab
The results tab displays a console view of the results for your test, including the output from the radio configuration process that precedes the test.
silabs.com | Smart. Connected. Energy-friendly.
Rev. 0.2 | 19
Quick Start Guide
RF Evaluation Using Nodetest
Figure 3.14. Results Tab
You may also see the individual commands sent down to the device during the radio configuration process. To do this, re-open the
Console view:
Figure 3.15. Console View
silabs.com | Smart. Connected. Energy-friendly.
Rev. 0.2 | 20
Quick Start Guide
The Simple RTx Sample Application
4. The Simple RTx Sample Application
Simplicity Studio comes bundled with an SDK for the EZR32 as part of the EFM packaged sample applications. One of the sample
applications, “Simple RTx” can be used to test and work with the radio on the EZR32.
To access the samples available for the EZR32, first select your USB connected device on the left-hand side under discovered devices
in the Simplicity Perspective. With the device selected, click on the [Software Examples] tile.
Figure 4.1. Software Example Tiles
This will launch the Example Project dialog window. If you have downloaded the EFM32 SDK, you should see it as an option in the
Example Project window.
The Example Project dialog allows you to find the available sample applications for your connected part.
Figure 4.2. Example Project Window
Note: Make sure that you have a Kit selected based on the type of EZR32 you are using. For instance if you are using a Wonder Gecko
EZR32 you will want to select one of the Wonder Gecko Wireless starter kits. The sample applications are associated with a specific kit,
so a real kit must be selected in order for the sample applications to appear as options.
silabs.com | Smart. Connected. Energy-friendly.
Rev. 0.2 | 21
Quick Start Guide
The Simple RTx Sample Application
Click the [Next] button. In the next screen you should see all of the sample applications available for your part. Choose the [simple_rtx]
sample and click [Next].
Figure 4.3. Select Simple RTx Sample Application
The next screen will allow you to select a name for your application. Choose the name you want and select [Next] again. The next
screen allows you to configure your Build Configurations for this project. For the Simple Rx/Tx sample you have the option of building
with IAR (if you have IAR installed) or GCC. Select all the build configuration options you want and click [Finish].
Figure 4.4. Build Configurations
The Simple Rx/Tx sample is developed in the Development Perspective. Clicking on the [Finish] button will automatically launch the
Development Perspective in which you can edit and build your application. For more information on how to build, load, and interact with
your application, please see the “Building Your Sample Application” section.
For more information on how to use the Simple Rx/Tx sample application, please see the readme.txt included with the sample and
available in your generated application.
All sample applications include a readme.txt file that explains the sample and its operation.
silabs.com | Smart. Connected. Energy-friendly.
Rev. 0.2 | 22
Quick Start Guide
The Simple RTx Sample Application
Figure 4.5. Readme.txt File
For more information on how to load and operate the Simple Rx/Tx sample application, continue to the “Building Your Sample Application” and “Loading Your Sample Application” sections of this Quick Start Guide.
silabs.com | Smart. Connected. Energy-friendly.
Rev. 0.2 | 23
Quick Start Guide
Building Your Sample Application
5. Building Your Sample Application
Using Simplicity Studio to Build Your Sample Application
Once your application is generated, you have the ability to compile it using Simplicity Studio. In order to compile your application, simply
click on the [build] icon in the top tool bar.
Figure 5.1. Build Button
Your sample application will compile based on its build configuration. You may change the build configuration at any time in the Project
Explorer View by right clicking on the [project] and going to [Build Configurations > Set Active]
Figure 5.2. Change Build Configuration
silabs.com | Smart. Connected. Energy-friendly.
Rev. 0.2 | 24
Quick Start Guide
Building Your Sample Application
Using IAR to Build Your Sample Application
You may also build your application directly in IAR by launching IAR and opening the generated project file inside IAR.
Figure 5.3. Build Sample Application
silabs.com | Smart. Connected. Energy-friendly.
Rev. 0.2 | 25
Quick Start Guide
Loading Sample Application
6. Loading Sample Application
Loading Sample Application onto EZR32 with Simplicity Studio
Once your sample application is built, you can load it onto your device using Simplicity Studio. There are several ways to do this. If you
have compiled your application in Simplicity Studio, you will notice some images listed under the Binaries menu item in the Project Explorer View. You can flash your image to a device by right-clicking on the image you wish to load in the Project Explorer View and
selecting the [Flash to device] option.
Figure 6.1. Flash Selected Image to Device
You can also upload your image to a device through the Adapters View. To do this go to the Adapters View in Simplicity Studio, which
is visible in either the AppBuilder Perspective or in the Network Analyzer Perspective. Right-click on your device of choice, select [Connect] and then [Upload]. Navigate to the .bin or .hex image you wish to upload and click [OK].
Figure 6.2. Uploading .bin or .hex Image
Note: Please make sure that the power switch on your WSTK board is set in the “AEM” position when attempting to flash your device.
silabs.com | Smart. Connected. Energy-friendly.
Rev. 0.2 | 26
Simpilcity Studio
One-click access to MCU tools,
documentation, software, source
code libraries & more. Available
for Windows, Mac and Linux!
www.silabs.com/simplicity
MCU Portfolio
www.silabs.com/mcu
SW/HW
www.silabs.com/simplicity
Quality
www.silabs.com/quality
Support and Community
community.silabs.com
Disclaimer
Silicon Laboratories intends to provide customers with the latest, accurate, and in-depth documentation of all peripherals and modules available for system and software implementers
using or intending to use the Silicon Laboratories products. Characterization data, available modules and peripherals, memory sizes and memory addresses refer to each specific
device, and "Typical" parameters provided can and do vary in different applications. Application examples described herein are for illustrative purposes only. Silicon Laboratories
reserves the right to make changes without further notice and limitation to product information, specifications, and descriptions herein, and does not give warranties as to the accuracy
or completeness of the included information. Silicon Laboratories shall have no liability for the consequences of use of the information supplied herein. This document does not imply
or express copyright licenses granted hereunder to design or fabricate any integrated circuits. The products must not be used within any Life Support System without the specific
written consent of Silicon Laboratories. A "Life Support System" is any product or system intended to support or sustain life and/or health, which, if it fails, can be reasonably expected
to result in significant personal injury or death. Silicon Laboratories products are generally not intended for military applications. Silicon Laboratories products shall under no
circumstances be used in weapons of mass destruction including (but not limited to) nuclear, biological or chemical weapons, or missiles capable of delivering such weapons.
Trademark Information
Silicon Laboratories Inc., Silicon Laboratories, Silicon Labs, SiLabs and the Silicon Labs logo, CMEMS®, EFM, EFM32, EFR, Energy Micro, Energy Micro logo and combinations
thereof, "the world’s most energy friendly microcontrollers", Ember®, EZLink®, EZMac®, EZRadio®, EZRadioPRO®, DSPLL®, ISOmodem ®, Precision32®, ProSLIC®, SiPHY®,
USBXpress® and others are trademarks or registered trademarks of Silicon Laboratories Inc. ARM, CORTEX, Cortex-M3 and THUMB are trademarks or registered trademarks of
ARM Holdings. Keil is a registered trademark of ARM Limited. All other products or brand names mentioned herein are trademarks of their respective holders.
Silicon Laboratories Inc.
400 West Cesar Chavez
Austin, TX 78701
USA
http://www.silabs.com
27
Was this manual useful for you? yes no
Thank you for your participation!

* Your assessment is very important for improving the work of artificial intelligence, which forms the content of this project

Download PDF

advertisement