United States Stove 1261 Operator`s manual

United States Stove 1261 Operator`s manual
USSC
E
U
STATES STO
TED
V
I
N
COMPANY
Installation/Operator’s Manual
Model: 1602M
Wood or Coal Gravity Style (Up-Flow) Supplemental Furnace
SAFETY NOTICE:
If this furnace is not properly installed, a house fire may result! For your safety, follow these installation
instructions. Contact local building or fire officials about restrictions and installation requirements in your
area. This furnace must be installed by a qualified technician. Keep these instructions for future reference.
Safety Tested to UL 391
United States Stove Company • 227 Industrial Park Road, P.O. Box 151 • South Pittsburg, TN 37380 • www.usstove.com
USSC
851767 rev 0
1
Thank You for your purchase of a U.S. Stove Wood/Coal
Burning Gravity Style (Up-Flow) Furnace. Your decision to
buy our Clayton Furnace was undoubtedly reached after much careful thought and consideration. We are very
proud you chose this furnace and trust you will receive
the comfort and economy that others realize when heating with a U.S. Stove product.
Your dealer is important in your experience with the furnace not only with the purchase, but for recommendations for professional installation in your home. The
qualified professional installer has been expertly trained
in solid-fuel furnace installation to assure the safety and
comfort for your family while saving you money. Trust your
experienced installer. He is a specialist in this field.
IMPORTANT
Before installing and using your Clayton furnace, please
read the following pages thoroughly and carefully. If you
follow the instructions, your Clayton furnace will give you
safe and more dependable service for years to come.
• First step: Check your local codes. This installation must
comply with their rulings.
Do not place the furnace directly on a combustible floor.
If you are placing it on a combustible floor, an approved
fire retardant material, equivalent to 3/8” UL Listed millboard, should be placed under the unit. The material must
extend at least 16 inches beyond the front of the unit and
8 inches on either side of the fuel loading door opening.
It must also extend underneath the chimney connector
and to each side of the connector by at least 2 inches.
CLEARANCES
COMBUSTIBLE WALL
20”
COMBUSTIBLE WALL
INTRODUCTION
(TOP VIEW)
22”
FLUE
CAUTION:
12”
• Always have a smoke or ionization detector and a CO
detector installed in your home.
REDUCED CLEARANCES
• NEVER INSTALL outside the home.
NFPA guidelines and most codes permit reduced clearances to combustible walls and ceilings if adequate
protection is added. A common mistake is to assume
that sheet metal, masonry, or millboard placed directly
against a wall protects it. Materials installed in this manner actually provides very little protection. These materials
are good heat conductors, so they will be almost as hot
on their back side as they are on the exposed side. Therefore, the combustible wall behind is still a fire hazard.
• Spend adequate time with your furnace to become
well acquainted with the different settings and how
each will affect its burning patterns. It is impossible to
state just how each setting will affect your furnace because of the variations in each installation.
A wall can be kept cool using these items but only if they
are mounted and spaced out from the wall by an inch
or two to allow free air circulation behind the protective
panel. The protective panel should also have a gap between the floor and ceiling.
• This furnace must be installed ONLY in the prescribed
manner shown in illustrations 1, 2, or 3 under the Installation Examples in this manual. It is NEVER to be
installed as a counter-flow or down-draft furnace, or
in any manner wherein the heated air is directed in a
downward flow into the home or toward to an existing
central furnace.
DISCLAIMER NOTICE
The BTU ranges and heating capacity specifications are
provided as a guide and in no way guarantee the output
or capacity of this unit. The actual BTU output depends
on the type of fuel being burned and its conditions, the
thermostat setting, the draft adjustment and the chimney
to which the unit is attached. The actual area that this
unit will heat depends on factors such as the conditions
of the building, heat loss, type of construction, amount of
insulation, type of air movement, the location of the unit
and more importantly the duct work and return air facility.
Warning:
Do not alter this appliance in any way other than specified in these instructions. Doing so may void your warranty.
LOCATING YOUR FURNACE
The furnace is to be installed maintaining the clearances
specified in the following illustrations.
2
MINIMUM CLEARANCES
TO A COMBUSTIBLE
WALL
DO NOT store
combustible or
flammable materials or
liquids near the
furnace.
• Do Not install this furnace in a mobile home or trailer
• To prevent injury or damage, do not allow anyone
who is unfamiliar with the furnace to operate it.
15”
Three rules to follow when constructing wall protectors:
1. Non-combustibility of all materials including mounting and supporting.
2. A well ventilated air space between protector and wall.
3. Sufficient strength and rigidity so that the protector
and air space will be durable.
2” FROM CEILING
CONSTRUCTING
NON-COMBUSTIBLE
WALLS
PROTECTIVE COVERING
AND ALL SUPPORTS MUST
BE NON-COMBUSTIBLE
1” AIR SPACE
2” FROM FLOOR
USSC
CHIMNEY REQUIREMENTS
A fireclay lined masonry or Class A 103HT All-Fuel Metal
Insulated Chimney must be used in all airtight wood furnace installations. The minimum recommended flue size
for the model 1602 is 6 inches, inside diameter. When making new chimney installations, always follow the chimney
manufacturer’s instructions.
If at all possible, use the factory built, class A 103HT chimney mentioned above. They are safer and perform better
than traditional masonry chimneys. If a masonry chimney
is a must, be certain it has a fire clay liner and that it is
intact, clean and recently inspected. And remember,
masonry chimneys are far more prone to the formation of
hazardous creosote.
CREOSOTE - FORMATION AND NEED
FOR REMOVAL
When wood is burned slowly, it produces tar and other
organic vapors, which combine with expelled moisture to
form creosote. The creosote vapors condense in the relatively cool chimney flue of a slow-burning fire. As a result,
creosote residue accumulates on the flue lining. When
ignited, this creosote makes an extremely hot fire.
The chimney connector and chimney should be inspected
at least twice monthly during the heating season to determine if a creosote build-up has occurred. If creosote has
accumulated, it should be removed to reduce the risk of
a chimney fire.
SMOKE PIPE INSTALLATION
Clearances to combustible materials (i.e. paneling, ceiling tile, sheet rock, plaster, draperies, casements or wood
trim, etc.) will vary with the type of flue connection used.
Be sure to maintain the specified clearances for your type
of installation.
TYPE OF FLUE REQUIRED
CONNECTION CLEARANCE
24 Gauge or Heavier ...................................18”
Single Wall Stainless Steel
or Black Pipe
Double Wall, Stainless Steel or.....................6”
Double Wall, Black Pipe w/
Stainless Steel Inner wall
Class A 103HT All-Fuel or Equivalent . .........2”
1. The furnace should be the only heating using the
chimney flue. One furnace per flue outlet.
2. A masonry chimney should have a tile or stainless steel
liner.
According to NFPA standards, single wall stove pipes
can be within 9” of combustibles provided an approved
fire retardant material covered with 28 gauge sheet
metal, spaced out 1” on non-combustible spacers, is
utilized. See illustration.
3. The masonry chimney should not have any missing
mortar or loose bricks.
4. There should be no mortar or parts of the chimney
blocking the chimney flue.
5. There should be a two inch clearance between any
chimney (masonry or metal) and combustibles. (such
as the house)
6. The chimney should extend at least 2 foot above the
highest point of the house, or 2 foot above the point at
which the chimney is 10 foot from the roof.
7. The chimney should be relatively straight and vertical.
8. The portion of an all-fuel metal chimney that extends
above the roof should be well secured.
9. A masonry chimney should be built on footings and
not attached to the house.
10.A rain cap, complete with an animal or bird screen,
should be installed on top of the chimney.
USSC
When using a Class A or double wall flue pipe connection,
follow the manufacturer’s instructions.
When constructing a single wall smoke pipe, the following
guidelines must be observed.
1. The connector pipe should be 24 gauge or heavier stainless steel or black pipe.
2. Secure all joints with three #8 screws.
3. If the connector pipe must pass through a wall, an approved insulated or ventilated thimble, at least three
times the diameter of the smoke pipe must be used.
(i.e. a 6” diameter smoke pipe needs an 18” thimble).
4. The connector pipe should never be used as a chimney.
3
IMPORTANT INFORMATION FOR ALL
CONNECTOR PIPES
The connector pipe must be constructed and installed
so that it maintains clearances, keeps condensation and
creosote within the pipe, and is capable of withstanding
a 2100°F degree chimney fire.
1. The connector pipe should slant down toward the furnace a minimum of 1/4” to the foot. At no time should
the pipe turn downward toward the chimney or run
horizontal.
2. There should be no more than two 90 degree elbows.
3. The connector pipe should never be longer than six
feet. If it is absolutely necessary to make a run of more
than six feet (not recommended) use extra support
brackets every 3 feet.
4. The connector pipe should never be reduced to a
smaller size than flue opening on the furnace.
5. The connector pipe should not block the flue of the
chimney or extend into it in any way.
6. A good airtight thimble should be used to hold the connector pipe in the chimney. It should be constructed
so the connector pipe can be removed for cleaning.
7. The connector pipe should not leave the heated portion of the building to reach the chimney.
8. The connector pipe should not pass from one story to
the next before entering the chimney, nor should it pass
through any closed or enclosed space.
9. The connector pipe and any elbows must be of 24
gauge or greater.
10.The connector pipe should not be located near or in
a walk way or well traveled area.
11. All male ends of connector pipe should run or point
towards the furnace.
12.Install a cast iron adjustable damper in the first joint of
the connector pipe, nearest to the flue collar.
DAMPERS ON STOVE PIPES
When burning coal, we recommend a Barometric Draft
Damper be installed at a safe convenient place between
chimney and your furnace preferably less than 3’ from the
flue collar.
When you have installed the connector pipe between
your furnace and the chimney, tap the pipe hard with
your fingernail. Remember the sound it makes - it will be a
“ting” echoing inside the stove pipe. If later you tap and
hear a muffled thud, you are building up soot in the pipe
and should clean it. This pipe should be cleaned at least
once or twice during the heating season.
DO NOT CONNECT TWO HEATERS TO THE SAME CHIMNEY
FLUE. The National Fire Prevention Association recommends
that wood burning appliances vent into a separate flue from
gas or oil furnaces. If such an installation is contemplated,
first check with a local building inspector to find out if a
separate flue for a wood burner is required.
Use of a Barometric Draft Control (when burning wood) is
recommended ONLY in the event your chimney creates
excessive draft leading to an over-firing condition.
Though United States Stove Company expressly Does Not
recommend the use of its furnaces to be installed and/or
used as a free-standing heater, it is possible to achieve a
reasonably safe and functional installation IF certain standard procedures are followed. The following are guidelines
only and are intended to enable the furnace user to obtain
reasonable efficiency from his furnace, and with due respect to safety when installing as a “free-standing heater”.
If installed correctly, and in accordance with the instructions
found in this manual, your warm air furnace may be installed
as a “space heater” within living quarters, cabins, garage,
or workshop. Please adhere to the following:
1. The use of a cold air return and/or filter box is mandatory.
This will not only increase your blower life and provide
filtered air, it will also help prevent the blower or blowers
from “capturing” heated air exiting from the top of the
furnace heat outlets.
2. If installed as purchased , without directing the heat
away from the furnace itself, it will simply sit and cycle,
turning the blowers off and on. The thermostat may not
function properly.
3. All larger furnaces (or those with multi-speed blowers)
absolutely require BACK PRESSURE to prevent premature
motor winding failure. If allowed to operate at high RPM
(As in “FREE AIR” mode - no duct work or flow restrictions)
the windings overheat, insulation melts and the motor
simply burns up - not covered under warranty.
CONNECTING HOT AIR DUCT
TO FURNACE
We strongly recommend that the hot air duct work be
installed by a home heating specialist. If doing the installation yourself, before you decide which installation will
best suit your needs, consult a qualified heating technician
and follow his recommendations as to the safest and most
efficient method of installation.
The following illustrations are the ONLY acceptable configurations when installed with existing oil or gas furnaces.
INSTALLATION EXAMPLES
INSTALLATION #1
With this installation, a back draft damper (optional) is inserted into the heat run before the plenum of the existing
furnace to prevent air from the existing furnace to blow
back into the furnace when it is not in use. When a back
damper is employed, it should be located as close to the
existing furnace plenum as practical.
HEATED AIR DISCHARGE
The Clayton furnace is designed for use as a supplemental
heating source. When used as a supplementary furnace,
it is connected in conjunction with an oil, gas, or electric
furnace to the existing duct work which distributes the
heated air into several rooms and/or areas.
4
USSC
INSTALLATION #2
Extending the hot air duct from the furnace into the existing
plenum will help direct the flow of air from the furnace as
well as the flow in the existing furnace. Ducting entering
the existing plenum at an angle (approximately 45 degrees)
will facilitate air flow from the furnace while diverting air
from the existing furnace.
INSTALLATION #3
The baffle on this system should be made the full width of
the furnace plenum in order to properly direct the air into
the distribution ducts.
THE PLENUM OPENINGS DIFFER
BETWEEN THE 1602 AND 1802
PLENUM OPENING
MODEL 1602 - 13” x 18” Rectangular
MODEL 1802 - 18” x 18” Rectangular
RETURN AIR IS VERY IMPORTANT
When installing a Clayton Furnace, return air MUST BE incorporated into the system. Return air can be provided
by installing a separate duct system or by tying into the
cold air return of an existing gas or oil furnace. The cold
air return duct can be connected to the furnace with either a factory manufactured U. S. Stove filter box, model
UFB908 or an equivalent fabricated from sheet metal.
When installing a cold air return, the minimum size shall
be a 16” x 20” or equivalent (320 sq. in.) in order to insure
proper furnace performance. Failure to provide return air
ducts of the specified size will void your warranty.
NEGATIVE
PRESSURE IN
BASEMENT
A filter should be installed in the cold air return. Furnace filters should be checked and cleaned/replaced regularly.
COMBUSTION AIR
If return air is not provided, the warm air distributed into
your home will be restricted and the efficiency of the
furnace is decreased. Without a return air system, warm
air will be drawn into your basement, unnecessarily heating unused areas of the home. In extreme cases, if your
basement or utility room is fairly airtight, the blowers on
the furnace could depressurize the room and pull toxic
flue gases from the furnace, a gas water heater, or gas
furnace. The fumes could then be distributed throughout
the house.
All fires need air (specifically oxygen) to burn. Furnaces,
fireplaces, and wood burning furnaces need enough oxygen for complete combustion of their fuels. The incomplete combustion that takes place when a furnace is “air
starved” causes carbon monoxide (CO) to be formed
in quantities that can be dangerous inside a well sealed
house. Having a source of combustion air from outside
the home will prevent “air starvation” of the furnace. A
simple positive air supply can be constructed using dryer
vent and a modified termination.
USSC
5
FURNACE ASSEMBLY INSTRUCTIONS
Unpack your Furnace and insure that there is no shipping
damage. If damage exist, please contact your dealer immediately.
Your Clayton Furnace will require some assembly before
operation. All needed hardware and components for the
following assemblies are included within the parts boxes
inside the furnace and in the ash pan. Read and follow
these instructions for proper furnace assembly.
DOOR HANDLES
Insert door handle into door. From rear side of door, place
a 1/2” washer over the threaded part of the handle, then
attach the lock nut. Tighten the nut, then back off 1/4
turn to allow free operation of the handle.
Follow these same directions for the ash door handle assembly.
SHAKER GRATE HANDLE
Insert the Shaker Rod into the hole on the ash door frame
as shown. Then attach the Shaker Bracket to the front of
the furnace using two 1/4-20 x 3/4” Hex Bolts and two 1/420 Lock Nuts. Next, insert the shaker Rod into the bracket
and attach to the shaker grate bar using the 1/4-20 x 1”
Hex Bolt and a 1/4-20 Lock Nut. The bolt and nut retaining
the shaker bar and rod should be left loose to allow free
movement of the grates.
(1) Shaker Rod
(1) Shaker Bracket
(1) 1/4-20 x 1” Hex Bolt
(2) 1/4-20 x 3/4” Hex Bolt
(3) 1/4-20 Lock Nut
BRACKET
(2) Door Handle
(2) 1/2” Washer
(2) 1/2” Lock Nut
ASH DOOR SPIN DRAFT
Screw the spin draft onto the 3/8” x 2-1/2” carriage bolt.
Then screw the spin draft and bolt into the ash door allowing approximately 1/2” of the bolt to stick through the
back side of the ash door. Secure the bolt in place with
the 3/8”-16 lock nut.
(1) Spin Draft
(1) 3/8-16 Carriage Bolt
(1) 3/8-16 Lock Nut
FUEL & ASH DOOR LATCH
With two 1/4-20 x 3/4 hex bolts each, attach the door
latches to the door latch mounting brackets on the left
side of the door frames as illustrated. The slots in the brackets and latches are for door seal adjustment. Make the
proper adjustments, then tighten the nuts. The door’s gasket should be snug against the door frame on the furnace.
(1) Feed Door Latch
(1) Ash Door Latch
(4) 1/4-20 x 3/4 Hex Bolt
(4) 1/4-20 Kep Nut
Feed Door
Illustration
Ash Door
Illustration
SMOKE CURTAIN
Using two 1/4-20 x 1-1/4” Carriage bolts, the smoke curtain clips and two nuts, attach the smoke curtain in place
above the Fuel Feed Door as shown below. After installation, the smoke curtain should swing freely back into the
furnace.
(1) Smoke Curtain
(2) 1/4-20 x 1-1/4 Carriage Bolt
(2) Smoke Curtain Clips
(2) 1/4-20 Kep Nut
1/4-20 NUT
SMOKE CURTAIN
CLIP
1/4-20 x 1-1/4
CARRIAGE BOLT
SMOKE CURTAIN
NUT
BOLT
SMOKE CURTAIN
CLIP
SMOKE CURTAIN
FRONT
6
USSC
SPIN DAMPER
Screw the spin draft onto the 3/8” x 2-1/2” carriage bolt
followed by the 3/8”-16 lock nut. Then screw the spin draft
and bolt into the Combustion Air Inlet allowing approximately 1/2” of the bolt to stick through into the threaded
part of the tube. Secure the bolt in place with the 3/8”-16
lock nut by tightening it against the tube bracket.
(1) Spin Draft
(1) 3/8-16 Carriage Bolt
(1) 3/8-16 Lock Nut
SPRING HANDLES
Attach the four(4) spring handles to the Feed/Ash Doors,
Baffle Rod, and Shaker Rod by twisting the springs counterclockwise while applying pressure until you have screwed
them approximately 3/4”-1” onto the rods.
7. If not already installed, snap the rocker switch into the
top of the junction box.
8. Attach the two longer conduit assemblies to the junction box and to each blower.
9. Provide a 110v power supply and secure it with the
cable clamp to the right side of the box. Make all
wire connections per the wiring schematic in these
instructions using the supplied hardware. Mount the
junction box cover.
(2)
(2)
(8)
(8)
(2)
(1)
(1)
(1)
(1)
(1)
(1)
(1)
(3)
(1)
(1)
(1)
(8)
800 CFM Blower
Gasket, Blower
Tinnerman Clip, 1/4-20
1/4-20 x 3/4 Bolt
Conduit Assembly (5ft)
Honeywell Limit Control
Conduit Assembly (1ft)
Junction Box
Insulation (5” x 5”)
Rocker Switch
Romex Cable Clamp
Fan Center Control
73B Wire Nut
74B Wire Nut
Female Term. (blue)
Female Term. (red)
#10 x 1/2 Screw
(4) Spring Handles
DISTRIBUTION BLOWER & ACC.
1. Remove all contents and insure that all components
are present for assembly. See the part list below
2. Begin by attaching the blowers to the unit. Insert a
clip into each mounting hole in the furnace’s cabinet
back. Be sure to install the gasket between the blower and cabinet back. Insert the eight bolts provided
and tighten.
3. Insert the adjustable snap-disc into the hole in the
upper-left hand corner of the cabinet back. Attach
using two of the #10 x 1/2 screws provided.
4. Find the Snap-Disc box, the small black box shown on
the left side in the illustration. Attach the shorter conduit assembly to the bottom of the box, securing it
with the nut on the fitting.
5. Plug the wires onto the snap-disc (see wiring schematic) and then attach the box to the back of the
unit using four of the #10 x 1/2 screws provided.
6. Next, mount the junction box and insulation using two
of the #10 x 1/2 screws provided. Install the 5 x 5 insulation between the cabinet back and junction box,
with the foil side to the cabinet back. Attach the conduit assembly from the snap-disc box to the junction
box as shown.
USSC
7
WIRING DIAGRAM
All electrical connections should be
done by a qualified electrician.
NOTE: The extra brown wire on the fan
center has no use. It should be capped
off or removed.
The conduit may be cut shorter to provide a
cleaner installation
FIREBRICK AND BAFFLE REPLACEMENT
FIREBOX BRICK REPLACEMENT
BAFFLE/BRICK REPLACEMENT
This furnace comes from the factory with the firebrick installed. However, if brick replacement is necessary, follow
these instructions. Before furnace operation, remove the
brick retaining strip. This piece is used during shipping to
reduce brick damage.
If baffle replacement is necessary, slide the baffle out until
you can access the nuts thru the flue outlet. Once the
nuts have been removed, slide the baffle off the rod and
thru the opening in the firebrick. You may have to remove
one of the firebrick to make baffle removal easier.
There are 6 full brick and 1 half brick per side. Install the
half brick first by putting the bottom of the brick in first and
let it rest against the firebox side and fire grates. Then slide
it to the rear. After that, install the #2, #3, #4, #5 & #6 brick,
sliding the 6th brick forward to allow for the 7th brick. Repeat for opposite side.
There are 4 full brick and 1 half brick in the top of the furnace. Install the brick by inserting one end of the brick angled upward and then allowing the opposite end to rest
on the firebox lip. Lay the brick between the spacer and
firebox back. Slide the baffle to the rear and let it rest on
that half brick. After installing brick #2 in the front, install #3
and slide it under the baffle. Finally install bricks #4 and #5.
NOTE: Prior to operation, be sure to remove the brick
retaining strips.
8
USSC
TESTING AND OPERATING PROCEDURES
GENERAL FURNACE OPERATION
STARTING A WOOD FIRE
When you start a fire in the furnace and it reaches operating temperature, the blower(s) will come on automatically. The snap-disc is adjustable from 100°F(A) to
140°F(E), Each click on the switch is approximately 5°F. It
comes from the factory, set at 120°F, setting C. The rocker
switch on the top of the junction box gives you the option
to run one blower or two. If the switch is ON, both blowers will come on when the snap-disc reaches the set temperature. If the swithc is OFF, only one blower will operate.
When the furnace temperature drops approximately 20°F
below the snap-disc setting, the blower(s) will shut off.
Using Forced Air Draft (optional)
Shut off FAD when fuel door is open
1. Start a fire inside the firebox as described above.
2.The forced air draft cycles on demand from the wall
thermostat. Setting the U.S. Stove thermostat four degrees
higher than your existing thermostat is recommended. In
operation, the power draft blower will run until the U.S.
Stove thermostat temperature setting is reached. The
draft regulator on the forced air draft is preset at the
factory and should require no adjustment.
FACTORY SETTING
120°F
125°F
115°F
CAUTION: To avoid excessive temperatures, do not operate with fuel door or ash pan open.
STARTING A COAL FIRE
If you burn coal, a forced air draft is required
110°F
130°F
105°F
135°F
100°F
140°F
STARTING A WOOD FIRE
CAUTION: Never use gasoline, gasoline-type lantern fuel,
kerosene, charcoal lighter fluid, or similar liquids to start or
“freshen up” a fire in the furnace. Keep all such liquids well
away from the furnace while it is in use.
CAUTION: To prevent flame and smoke spillage, the slide
baffle must be pulled out and the fuel door must be cracked
for ten seconds before being fully opened.
Do not over fire your furnace! After you have become
familiar with its operating, you should know how much
wood to use.
1. Open spin draft cap on ash door.
2. Pull the slide baffle rod to the front position.
3. Open the fuel load door and light fire using kindling and
several sheets of newspaper, then close the furnace door.
The furnace door should remain closed for 5 to 10 minutes
in order to establish the fire. If the fire has established, you
are ready to load the furnace.
4. Load the furnace, close the load door and push the slide
Baffle rod to rear.
5. Close the spin draft cap on ash door, leaving it cracked
about the diameter of a dime.
6.Adjust the spin draft cap on the intake just below the feed
door to allow sufficient combustion air into the firebox.
This setting may increase or decrease depending on the
fuel being used and it’s moisture content.
7.The blower(s) will being to distribute warm air when the
snap-disc reached set-point.
USSC
Shut off FAD when fuel door is open
 Open smoke pipe damper all the way. Open all draft
controls on your furnace. Pull the slide baffle forward.
 Place about 10-15 lb. of coal in on the shaker grates. It
should come up to about half of the first firebrick level.
 Place crumpled paper over the coal and crisscross a
couple handfuls of dry kindling wood 3/4” in thickness
on top of paper.
 Ignite the paper and close loading door. Wait about 30
minutes until coal fire is established before adding more
coal. NOTE: NEVER load coal over the level of firebrick.
 Close by-pass damper and set all draft controls to your
own needs. It may take 3 to 4 coal fires to determine
how your local coal and the Clayton Furnace reacts
together. Adjusts drafts accordingly.
 Loading with a good bed of coals in the morning - Open
by-pass damper.
1. In normal shaking, only rock the grates a small amount
to sift ash through. Do not agitate the fire bed too
often. This practice will waste coal. If glowing coal is
visible in the ash pan, you have shaken to much.
2. Remove all ashes every day from ash pit.
CAUTION: Ashes should be placed in a metal container with
a tight fitting lid. The closed container of ashes should be
placed on a non-combustible floor or on the ground well
away from all combustible materials pending final disposal.
If the ashes are disposed of by burial in soil or otherwise
locally dispersed, they should be retained in the closed
container until all coals have thoroughly cooled.
3. With your poker, push hot burning embers to the rear
of the unit and add green coal in front. NEVER load
over height of firebrick. This can result in damage to
your furnace and home.
4. Close by-pass damper.
 Too much draft air will cause clinkering of coal and will
waste heat up the chimney. Shut draft down to as low
a point as you can and still heat your home.
1. NOTE: Never stand in front of loading door when
opening it. Stand to the side.
2. NEVER completely cover the live fire with fresh coal.
Always leave a generous area of glowing coal at the
top of the fire and at the rear.
3. Always keep the ash pit clean.
9
 If the fire goes out or does not hold overnight, look for:
1. Poor draft.
2. Incorrect damper settings.
3. Improper firing methods for coal being used.
4. More combustion air needed.
5. Coal not sized to the furnace. We recommend 1” to
3” diameter pieces of coal.
6. Ashes, if allowed to accumulate in the ash pit, will
not allow the passage of required air for combustion.
Keep ash pit clean.
7. This furnace is not to be used with an automatic stoker
unless so certified.
 There are ONLY two types of coal allowed for use in this
furnace: Bituminous Coal (soft coal) and Anthracite
Coal (hard coal). NEVER USE Cannel (or Channel) coal
or Brown (Lignite) Coal.
 See our Bulletin RC454 at the rear of this manual for the
best information available on burning coal.
OPERATING NOTES
 Do not over draft the furnace! It is designed to operate
at .06 inches of water column and must be set with a
draft gauge to maintain a steady draft. (Barometric
Damper recommended.)
 Inspect and clean your chimney and stove pipe regularly.
 In event of chimney fire, shut all draft controls and call
your fire department immediately. Alert everyone in the
house. If the fire is still burning vigorously, throw baking
soda into firebox or discharge a fire extinguisher into the
firebox. After chimney fire is over, completely inspect
system for damage before further use.
NEVER throw water on the fire or at the furnace, as rapidly
expanding steam could result in a severe scalding.
 Slow fires: It is not recommended burning the Clayton
furnace any more than necessary early in the fall and
late spring, as you cannot keep the firebox hot enough
(without overheating your home) to burn gases. Slow
fires can cause excessive creosote build-up in smoke
pipe, chimney and firebox.
 Wood should be placed directly onto the cast iron shaker
grate of the Clayton furnace. Do not use additional
grates and/or irons.
In the event of a power failure, you may operate the
furnace, provided the following instructions are followed:
1. Any air filter should be removed.
2. Observe the furnace operation closely and often till
power is restored.
 Never allow the ashes in the ash pan touch the grate
section. REMOVE ASHES FREQUENTLY!
Do not burn garbage, plastics, gasoline, drain oil or
other flammable liquids. Plastics, when burned, form
hydrofluoric and hydrochloric acids which will damage and destroy your furnace pipe and chimney. The
burning of trash or oil can result in an extremely hot fire
and is sometimes a cause of chimney fires. NEVER BURN
GREEN WOOD OR TIRES.
 Be extremely careful when removing furnace ash pan;
it can get very hot.
 Do not store fuel or other combustible material within
marked installation clearances.
 With new steel, there is a small amount of oil or dirt on the
metal. You may smell an odor. This is normal during the
first operation. You may want to assemble the furnace
out of doors and build a small fire in it to “burn off” this
dirt and oil before installing the unit.
NOTE: For further information on using your furnace safely,
obtain a copy of the National Fire Protection Association
publication “Using Coal and Wood Stoves Safely.” NFPA
NO. NW-8-1974. The address of the NFPA is 470 Atlantic
Ave., Boston, Massachusetts 02210.
 The furnace is designed to burn air dried wood and coal
at a predetermined firing rate. Over firing could result
in damage to the heat exchanger and cause dangerous operation. Over firing occurs when the ash door is
left open during operation or a highly volatile fuel, i.e.
large amounts of small kindling, is used. If any portion of
the connector pipe glows orange or red, you are in an
over-firing situation. Close all dampers.
THIS IS A WOOD AND COAL BURNING FURNACE AND SHOULD NOT BE
ALTERED IN ANY WAY! DOING SO
WILL VOID YOUR WARRANTY!
 Do not allow ashes to build up higher than 2” above
grates.
 When tending the firebox always pull the baffle slide rod
out prior to opening load door. Open load door slowly
to avoid a “flash back”. After closing load door, push
the baffle slide rod to the rear.
 Equip your home with fire extinguishers and smoke detectors appropriately located.
 Inspect air filters regularly. The air filter in the filter box
should be changed at least every 30 days.
Oil motor on forced air draft every 90 days with a few
drops of 30 wt. oil.
 The distribution blower motors may be one of two types.
If the motor has sealed bearings, no oiling is required.
If the motor is equipped with fill holes, the motor should
be oiled every 90 days with several drops of 30 wt. oil.
 Check the fit on the load door. It must fit tightly. If it does
not, check for deterioration or wear of the ceramic rope
seal. Replace defective seals.
10
USSC
TROUBLE SHOOTING AND PROBLEM SOLVING
1. Problem:
4. Problem:
Smoke puffs from furnace
Distribution blower vibrating
Solution:
Solution:
A. Check chimney draft. Check for blocked chimney
or flue pipe. Use mirror to check chimney clearance.
A. Tighten blower wheel to motor shaft.
B. Check for bad fan bearings.
B. Check ash pit — if it is too full, empty.
5. Problem:
C. Make sure furnace room is not too airtight.
Distribution blower continues to run or will not run
D. Make sure all of chimney mortar connections are
airtight.
Solution:
E. Check ash drawer. Make sure it’s airtight.
F. Check chimney for possible down-draft caused
by taller surrounding trees or objects. Correct with
proper chimney vent cap.
G. Check the possibility of a cold chimney forcing cool
gases backward. Remedied by properly insulating
chimney with non-combustible liner — non-combustible insulation.
H. Fuel may be too green.
I. Make sure no other fuel burning devices are connected to the chimney impairing the draft.
J. Check chimney draft, it should be .06 inches of
water column. This service is provided by a certified
chimney sweep.
2. Problem:
Inadequate heat being delivered to your home
Solution:
A. Check home insulation — is it adequate?
B. Check hook-up to furnace — is it installed correctly?
C. Cool air inlet may be inadequate or furnace room
too airtight.
D. Your wood fuel may be too low grade. Hardwoods
are recommended.
E. Make sure your hot air duct (and other duct work)
is airtight.
F. If furnace room is warm but your home isn’t, check
back draft dampers.
G. Is air to the blower available?
3. Problem:
Excess smoke or flames coming out door when refueling
Solution:
A. Wait 15 seconds and open door SLOWLY — then
refuel.
A. Check fan limit or heat sensor and cable.
B. Check to see that blower is properly wired.
(See Wiring and Assembly Instructions).
C. Check fuse box or power source.
D. Check power supply.
6. Problem:
Draft blower continues to run or will not run
Solution:
A. Check wiring.
B. Check thermostat or thermostat wire for short.
C. Make sure temperature is calling for heat.
7. Problem:
Odor from first fire
Solution:
A. The odor from new steel should disappear in a few
hours.
B. If the odor remains, call you dealer immediately. A
bad weld can cause a fume leak.
8. Problem:
Excessive Creosote
Solution:
A. Check the grade of wood you are burning.
B. Make sure your unit is serviced by its own proper
chimney.
C. Check length of flue pipe and its connections.
D. Make sure you are burning the smallest, hottest fire
to adequately heat your home.
E. Also see Solutions to Problem one.
9. Problem:
If the fire goes out or does not hold over night
Solution:
A. Poor Draft.
B. Check length of flue pipe to chimney. Your unit
should be within six (6) feet of your chimney.
B. Incorrect damper settings.
C. Make sure chimney cap is not too close to the top
of the chimney.
D. More combustion air needed.
D. Check chimney draft — make sure chimney flue
pipe is clean and chimney is of adequate height.
C. Improper firing methods if burning coal.
E. Coal not sized to the furnace. We recommend 1”
to 3” diameter pieces of coal.
E. Make sure you’re not suffocating the fire with excessive amounts of unburned wood.
F. Ashes, if allowed to accumulate in the ash pit, will
not allow passage of the required air for combustion.
Keep ash pit clean.
F. Slide baffle should be pulled out prior to load door
opening.
G. This furnace is not to be used with an automatic
stoker unless so certified.
USSC
11
PARTS DIAGRAM
23
33
32
28
22
34
31
21
20
3
18
19
16
4
17
3
2
1
27
25
26
35
24
9
3
8
7
10
6
14
15
16
17
2
5
3
30
29
13
12
11
12
USSC
PARTS DIAGRAM AND LIST
Key
Description
Part #
Qty
Key
Description
Part #
Qty
1
Feed Door Assy. (w/Rope Gasket)
69091
1
42
Snap-disc Box
68234
1
2
Door Handle
24179
2
43
Conduit Assembly (1.5ft)
68231
1
N/S
Lock Nut, 1/2-13
83444
2
44
Junction Box
25625
1
N/S
Washer
83835
2
45
Insulation (5” x 5”)
25626
1
3
Spring Handle
89574
4
46
Junction Box Cover
4
Feed Door Latch
23786
1
47
Rocker Switch
5
Ash Door Assy. (w/Rope Gasket)
68880
1
48
6
Draft Cap
23859
2
49
Carriage Bolt, 3/8-16 x 2-1/2”
83835
2
Ash Door Latch
23823
1
N/S
7
N/S
C21399
4
8
Shaker Handle
Hinge Pin, 5/16” x 1”
69005
1
9
Bracket, Shaker Handle
24204
1
10
Ash Pan
68882
1
11
Grate Retainer
40312
2
12
Shaker Bar
891341
1
13
Shaker Grate Section
40314
5
14
Back Liner
40313
1
15
Front Liner
40344
1
16
Full Firebrick (4-1/2 wide x 9 tall x 1-1/4 thick)
89066
16
17
Half Firebrick (2-1/4 wide x 9 tall x 1-1/4 thick)
891414
3
18
Slide Baffle
24231
1
19
Baffle Rod
86603
1
20
Lock Nut, 1/2-13
83444
2
21
Gasket, Flue Collar
88032
1
22
Flue Collar
40246
1
23
Flue Collar Ring
22761
1
24
Smoke Curtain
23800
1
25
Smoke Door Clip
23787
2
26
Carriage Bolt, 1/4-20 x 1-1/4 Long
83445
2
27
Kep Nut, 1/4-20
83250
2
28
Cabinet Side, Left
69452
1
29
Cabinet Side, Right
69453
1
30
Blank Receptacle, Snap-In
891127
1
31
Cabinet Back
32
Insulation, Panel
N/S
25624
1
C98871
1
Insulation Retainer
83884
12
33
Cabinet Top
69088
1
34
Front Filler
23817
1
35
Draft Cover
23818
1
36
Room Blower - 800 CFM
80530
2
37
Blower Gasket
88127
2
38
Tinnerman Clip, 1/4-20
83340
8
39
Bolt, 1/4-20 x 3/4
83339
8
40
Conduit Assembly (5ft)
69578
2
41
Snap-disc, 140°F Adjustable
80388
1
80231
1
C42373
1
Romex Cable Clamp
80362
1
Water Coil Access Cover
23819
1
IMPORTANT NOTE:
When ordering repair parts, a color code (G) should be placed
after the part number of any part that is painted.
45
41
42
46
44
48
47
49
43
38
40
37
36
39
N/S = Not Shown
USSC
13
16DIKL FORCED DRAFT BLOWER - OPTIONAL KIT
USSC offers a forced induced draft blower kit as an option
to upgrade your Clayton furnace. Advantages of the
forced draft are quicker recovery and greater turbulence
inside the firebox for better mixing of fuel and oxygen.
And, it also allows you the furnace to be thermostatically
controlled.
You may purchase a forced draft kit from your local dealer or direct from U.S. Stove. If installing a 16DIKL, follow the
instructions supplied with the kit.
Key
Description
Part #
Qty
1
Drqft Blower Assembly
69190
1
2
FAD Bracket
69192
1
3
Bolt, 1/4-20 x 1”
83379
2
4
Lock Nut, 1/4-20
83261
2
5
Kep Nut, 10-24
83244
3
6
Honeywell Limit Control
80145
1
7
Fan Center
80130
1
8
Thermostat
80129
1
6
7
8
1
2
4
3
5
UFB908 COLD AIR RETURN / FILTER BOX - OPTIONAL KIT
As mentioned earlier in this manual, a cold air return and/
or filter box should be incorporated into your furnace installation. A cold air return or filter box will increase the life
of your blowers and offer filtered distribution air for your
home. U.S. Stove offers the model UFB908 as an option
and can be purchased from your local dealer.
The UFB908 utilizes a standard 16” x 20” filter that can be
purchased from your local dealer or any hardware/duct
work supply store. When installing a UFB908, follow the installation instructions supplied with the kit.
14
USSC
DOMESTIC HOT WATER COIL - OPTIONAL KIT
This Furnace will accept the installation of a Domestic Hot
Water Coil Kit. The U.S. Stove kit is a 1124 Water Coil and it
may be purchased from your local dealer.
2
1. Remove the access panel on the rear of the furnace
enclosure.
2. With a utility knife, cut away a section of the insulation
(if equipped) directly behind the access panel.
1
3. Remove the cover plate from the rear of the furnace
firebox.
ACCESS
PANEL
4. Place one nut on each end of the water coil and
thread each nut up to the end of the threads on the
coil.
5. Insert the coil through the holes from the inside of the
firebox. Install a gasket, washer and nut onto each end
of the water coil. Tighten the nuts down securely to insure an air tight seal.
3
The installation is now ready to be plumbed to your existing hot water system. Choose one of the three methods
described in the Hot Water Coil instructions.
6. Remove knockouts from the access panel and re-attach
to the furnace enclosure.
REAR WALL OF
FIREBOX
5
Have a qualified plumber connect your domestic hot water
pipe to the coil with the appropriate fittings.
4
DOMESTIC HOT WATER
COIL
1. NUT
2. WASHER
3. GASKET
TURN INSIDE NUTS UP
TO END OF THREADS
6
DR6 - 6” DRAFT REGULATOR - OPTIONAL KIT
In the unlikely event that your furnace “overfires” (a condition evidenced by elbows, stove pipes, and connectors glowing red in appearance or otherwise discoloring),
then your installation is subject to excessive draft created
by either a chimney too tall or too great in diameter in
conjunction with its height, or some other factor of an
indeterminate cause. In this event, you should install a
barometric draft regulator. Such installation will preclude
any over-firing and/or any hazardous consequences of
potential overfiring.
Barometric draft regulators are generally available where
you purchased your stove or may be ordered directly
from United States Stove Company at a nominal charge.
USSC
15
BULLETIN RC454
A GUIDE TO BURNING COAL IN YOUR FURNACE
Furnaces that are capable of burning coal usually
will burn both Bituminous and Anthracite coal. Anthracite is perhaps the best coal fuel because of its
long even burn time, high heat output, and cleanliness which make it a good choice for the home.
However, keep in mind it is a much more difficult
fuel to use, requires more care and patience, is not
so widely available, and is usually much more expensive than Bituminous.
SIZE OF COAL:
Most sizes of Bituminous Coal will work in a coal furnace; for best results we recommend large “nut”
coal to small “egg” coal (1-3/4” diameter to 4” diameter). When burning Anthracite, use “egg” or
“broken” with sizes between 2-5/16” thru 4-3/8”.
Note that it is important to the long life of your stove
to buy coal which has been sized and cleaned.
Cleaning insures removal of rocks and other minerals. Never use coal smaller than 1” or larger than
5” in diameter. Small sized coal will smother the fire.
Too large a size of coal will not burn well.
STOVE OPERATION:
All coal fires should be started with wood which will
allow the fire to get hot enough to ignite the coal.
The best ignition fires utilize dry pine or other resinous
soft woods as kindling, with hard wood (oak, hickory, ash) added to increase the heat prior to addition
of the coal.
Before starting the fire, open the stove pipe damper (if epuipped), turn the thermostat to high, open
the ash pit door and feed door, place newspaper
and finely split kindling on the grate, light the paper,
add larger hard wood after the kindling is burning
brightly. CAUTION: Never use gasoline, lantern fuel,
kerosene, charcoal lighter fluid, or other flammable
liquids to start or freshen up a fire in any heater.
Place the larger pieces of wood on the fire so that
they are slightly separated and form a level for the
addition of coal. It will take 10 to 20 minutes before
this wood is thoroughly ignited. Adding coal too
soon will cut the air supply and smother the fire.
orange or yellow and produce quite a bit of smoke.
As the gases burn off the flames become shorter,
change color and produce less smoke.
Once the fire is WELL ESTABLISHED add coal to the
center of the firebox forming the cone. Burning in
this fashion allows heat to drive off the volatile gases,
and turbulence created increases the burn efficiency. There will have to be some experimenting with
the individual setup as no two chimney’s or installations are going to be the same. Just remember to
allow enough air to enter the firebox and keep the
stove pipe damper open so that volatiles are properly burned. Before refueling, take the time to break
up the cone a little with a poker, especially if it has
caked over or formed a crust. But, be careful not to
mix the coal as this increases the chances of forming clinkers. When shaking the grate(s) be gentle.
Just a few short movements - a couple of “cranks”
- is better than a lot of agitation. The objective is to
remove a small amount of the ashes without disturbing the fire. Stop when you see a glow in the ashes
or the first red coals fall into the ash pan. Excessive
shaking wastes fuel and can expose the grate(s) to
very high temperatures which can cause warpage
or burnout.
For overnight operation (long duration burn time)
shake the fire and add coal, retaining the center
cone. Once the volatiles are burned off, close the
feed door and adjust the stove pipe damper, if
epuipped. Then adjust the thermostat to the desired
heat level.
More MAINTENANCE will be needed with bituminous
coal than with anthracite coal as more soot will
collect on heating surfaces and in pipes, requiring
more frequent cleaning.
ANTHRACITE:
BURNING BITUMINOUS:
Add a thin layer of coal (preferably smaller chunks)
to the wood fire, being careful not to disturb it too
much or cut off the draft. Then, add a second
heavier layer after the coal is ignited and burning
well. If necessary, add a third layer to bring the coal
up to the top of the front liner (not above!). Be sure
to close the ash door.
Once your kindling and wood fire has produced a
bed of well established coals, start adding coal in
layers allowing each to ignite before adding more.
Bituminous has a high volatile content and, as a result, should be fired with the “conical method” - with
the highest portion of your fire bed in the center of
the firebox. The first flames will be long and generally
Before adding further fuel, be sure to leave a red
spot of glowing coals in the center of the firebox to
insure that the fire has not been smothered and to
help ignite the gases given off by the new charge.
A deep charge will give a more even heat and a
longer fire, but it may take one to two hours before
the whole bed is fully ignited.
16
USSC
BULLETIN RC454
A GUIDE TO BURNING COAL IN YOUR FURNACE
When the fire is well established and the room is becoming warm, partially close the dampers. Some
experimenting will have to take place with each
particular setting of all dampers and controls as the
chimney provides the draft necessary to not only
exhaust the smoke, but to pull combustion air into
the heater as well - and no two chimney’s perform
the same. Under ideal draft conditions, one should
be able to turn the secondary air supply below the
feed door (some models) to a near closed position but leave the ash pit damper at least partially open
to prevent the fire from going out. Adjust the stove
pipe damper to reduce the draft on the fire. With
anthracite there will be short blue flames above
the coal, except when the fire is started or a new
charge is added. If, however, there is no flame then
the fire needs more air from the bottom (unless it is
near the end of its burn cycle and needs to be recharged).
Only when the coal is burned down to half its original depth it is time to add fresh coal. When doing so,
open the stove pipe damper and turn the thermostat damper to high, which will allow the fire to burn
off any accumulated gases. Open the feed door,
and with a small rake, hoe, or hooked poker pull the
glowing coals to the front of the firebox. Try not to
disturb the fire too much. Next, add a fresh charge
to the back being careful not to seal off the top.
Close the feed door, but leave the spin damper (or
thermostat) open for a few minutes until the volatile
gases have burned off. It is not necessary to shake
down the ashes each time you refuel the furnace.
Experience will be your best teacher.
USSC
BANKING THE FIRE:
For extended operation, such as overnight, the fire
will need to be banked. To do so heap coal up
along the sides and back of the firebox so that the
fire gradually burns it over a longer period of time.
The intensity of the fire will also be reduced without
letting it go out. Follow the same procedure as for
refueling. If possible, avoid shaking, as a heavier
layer of ash will help reduce the intensity of the fire
during this time. After loading, let the fire establish
itself for about 30 minutes. Then close your damper
and automatic control to the point where the house
does not become too cold. It is important that you
begin banking early enough before retiring or leaving that you can make necessary adjustments after
the fire is well established.
To revive a coal fire that is almost out, (1) open the
ash door and stove pipe damper and close the spin
damper under the door to get a good draft through
the grate. (2) place a thin layer of dry coal over the
entire top of the fire. DO NOT POKE OR SHAKE THE
FIRE AT THIS TIME! (3) after the fresh coal has become
well ignited shake the grate (just a little), refuel.
DO NOT burn coke, charcoal, high volatile bituminous coal, sub bituminous, lignite or cannel coal
(sometimes called channel coal or candle coal).
NEVER burn wax or chemically impregnated sawdust logs - their intended use is for fireplaces only.
NEVER fill the stove or furnace above the firebrick or
cast iron liner.
17
NOTES
18
USSC
NOTES
USSC
19
HOW TO ORDER REPAIR PARTS
This manual will help you obtain efficient, dependable service from the furnace, and enable you to order repair parts correctly.
Keep this manual in a safe place for future reference.
When placing an order or for warranty claims, please provide the following
information found on the Certification Plate located below the ash door.
PART NUMBER
PART DESCRIPTION
MODEL NUMBER - 1602M
SERIAL NUMBER______________
United States Stove Company
227 Industrial Park Road
P.O. Box 151
South Pittsburg, TN 37380
(423) 837-2100
Customer Service: (800)-750-2723 • Repair Parts: (888) 299-1440
20
USSC
Was this manual useful for you? yes no
Thank you for your participation!

* Your assessment is very important for improving the work of artificial intelligence, which forms the content of this project

Download PDF

advertisement