Red Hat Server tc3100 User`s guide

Red Hat Server tc3100 User`s guide
user’s guide
hp StorageWorks
disk system 2300
Edition E0902
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contents
1
Product Description 11
General Description 11
Features 13
Status Indicators 15
Power/Standby Switch 16
High Availability 16
Clustering (NT) 16
Upgradability 16
Environmental Services 17
Hardware Event Monitoring 17
Components 18
Disk Modules and Disk Module Filler Panels 18
BCCs and BCC Filler Panels 19
Power Supply/Fan Module 22
Hardware/Software Requirements 24
Topologies 27
Definitions 33
High availability (HA) 33
Hot-pluggable 33
JBOD 33
LVD 33
PDU and PDRU 33
Ultra160 SCSI 34
2
Installation 35
Preparation 36
Electrical Requirements 36
Choosing PDUs 37
3
Installing PDUs 39
Software Requirements 42
Auto-Termination 43
Step 1: Gather Tools 44
Step 2: Unpack the Product 44
Step 3: Install the device 47
Installing the Storage Device into a Rack System/E 47
Installing the storage device into an HP Computer Cabinet 56
Installing the Storage Device into a Rittal-Style Rack 64
Install the Disk System 70
Step 4: Install BCCs 71
Step 5: Set DIP Switches 74
Step 6: Connect SCSI and Power Cables 75
Step 7: Install Disk Modules 78
Step 8: Turn on the Disk System 80
Step 9: Verify Devices on the Host 81
Sample IOSCAN 81
Where do you go from here? 82
3
Configuration 83
Viewing a Disk System in IOSCAN 84
Sample IOSCAN 84
Setting DIP Switches 85
Rationale 87
Disk Addressing 88
Disk Slots and Addressing 89
Setting Up the Hardware Event Monitor 90
Aliasing Devices (HP-Qualified Only) 90
Updating Firmware (HP-Qualified Only) 91
Command View SDM 91
Supported Operating Systems 92
Installing CommandView SDM 92
HP TopTools 93
Supported Operating Systems 93
Installing HP TopTools 5.0 93
4
4
Troubleshooting 95
Overview 96
Event Notification (HP-UX Systems) 97
HP Command View SDM 100
TopTools 100
Status LEDs 101
Isolating Faults 104
5
Removal and Replacement 107
Disk Module 110
Preparation (HP-UX 11.XX) 110
To Determine If a Volume Group or Physical Volume Group Is
Active 111
To Determine If the Physical Volume Is Attached 111
To Replace Attached Physical Volumes 112
To Replace Unattached Physical Volumes 114
NT 114
Windows 2000 115
Tools 115
Procedure 115
BCC 119
Tools 119
Procedure 119
BCC Filler Panel 122
Power Supply 123
Tools 123
Procedure 123
Disk System 125
Tools 125
Procedure 125
Top Cover (HP-Qualified Only) 128
Tools 128
Procedure 128
Midplane (HP-Qualified Only) 130
Tools 130
Procedure 130
5
Deskside Base/External Covers (HP-Qualified Only) 133
Powering Down the Disk System 133
Removing the deskside base and external covers from the disk system 133
Tools 133
Procedure 133
Reinstalling the deskside base and external covers on the disk system. 138
6
Reference 141
Product Models 141
Upgrade Products 142
PDU/PDRU Products 143
Replaceable Parts 144
Specifications 145
Dimensions 145
Weight 145
AC Power Input 146
DC Power Output 146
Heat Output 146
Environment 146
Acoustics 147
Safety Certifications 147
EMC Compliance 147
Regulatory Statements 148
A. FCC Statement (For U.S.A. Only) 148
B. IEC Statement (Worldwide) 148
C. Spécification ATI Classe A (France) 148
D. Product Noise Declaration (Germany) 149
E. VCCI Statement (Japan) 150
Harmonics Conformance (Japan)
150
F. BCIQ EMC Statement (Taiwan) 150
G. Declaration of Conformity 151
Product Web Site 152
Related Documents 152
6
figures
Figure 1
Figure 2
Figure 3
Figure 4
Figure 5
Figure 6
Figure 7
Figure 8
Figure 9
Figure 10
Figure 11
Figure 12
Figure 13
Figure 14
Figure 15
Figure 16
Figure 17
Figure 18
Figure 19
Figure 20
Figure 21
Figure 22
Figure 23
Figure 24
Figure 25
Figure 26
Figure 27
Figure 28
Figure 29
Disk System - Racked Views 14
Disk System Deskside Views 15
Disk Module 19
BCC 20
BCC Filler Panel 21
Power Supply/Fan Module 22
Basic Configuration - Single Host, Single Disk System 28
Single Host, Split Bus Configuration 29
Single Host PV-Links Configuration 30
Two Host Non-High Availability Configuration 31
Two Host High Availability Configuration 32
PDRU Placement in 1.6-Meter Rack 40
PDRU Placement in a 2.0-Meter Rack 41
Host Bus Adapter HP A5149A 43
Disk System Accessories 45
Disk System ContentsDisk System Contents 46
HP Rack System/E Rail Kit Contents 48
HP Rack System/E Installation Overview 49
Locating the site for the device installation in a System/E
Rack 51
Installing clipnuts for an HP Rack System/E 51
Installing rails in an HP Rack System/E 52
Installing the enclosure clipnut
53
Installing the storage device in the Rack System/E 54
Installing enclosure rail clamps in an HP Rack
System/E 55
HP Computer Cabinet Rail Kit Contents 56
HP Computer Cabinet Installation Overview 57
Locating the site for the device installation in an HP
Computer Cabinet 58
Installing rail clip nuts in the HP Computer Cabinet 59
Installing rails in the HP Computer Cabinet 60
7
Figure 30
Figure 31
Figure 32
Figure 33
Figure 34
Figure 35
Figure 36
Figure 37
Figure 38
Figure 39
Figure 40
Figure 41
Figure 42
Figure 43
Figure 44
Figure 45
Figure 46
Figure 47
Figure 48
Figure 49
Figure 50
Figure 51
Figure 52
Figure 53
Figure 54
Figure 55
Figure 56
Figure 57
Figure 58
Figure 59
Figure 60
Figure 61
Figure 62
Figure 63
Figure 64
Figure 65
Figure 66
Figure 67
8
Installing enclosure retention clipnuts in an HP Computer
Cabinet 61
Installing the storage device in an HP Computer Cabinet 62
Installing a filler panel in an HP Computer Cabinet 63
Rittal-Style Rail Kit Contents 64
Rail Alignment 65
Front Screw Installation 66
Rear Slide Extension 67
Center Nut Tightening 67
Installing a Disk System into the Rittal-Style Rack 68
Moving a Disk System Retention Bracket 69
Bolting the Disk System to the Front Column of the Rack 69
BCC Installation 72
BCC Filler Panel 73
BCC DIP Switches 74
Wiring Scheme for 1.6-Meter Rack 76
Wiring Scheme for 2.0-Meter Rack 77
Disk Module Installation 78
On/Off Switch and System LEDs 80
DIP Switches 86
Disk Module Slots and SCSI Addresses 89
Sample Hardware Event Notification 99
LED Status Indicators 101
Disk System Field Replaceable Units (FRUs) 108
Disk Module Removal 117
BCC Removal and Replacement 120
BCC DIP Switches 121
BCC Filler Panel Installation 122
Power Supply Removal and Replacement 124
Disk System Removal and Replacement 126
Top Cover Assembly 129
Midplane Assembly 132
End Cap Removal and Replacement 134
Base Removal and Replacement 135
Base Removal from Chassis 136
Removal from Cover 137
Installing Disk System into Cover 138
Installing Base to Cover and Chassis 139
End Cap Replacement 140
tables
Table 1
Table 2
Table 3
Table 4
Table 5
Table 6
Table 7
Table 8
Table 9
Table 10
Table 11
Table 12
Table 13
Table 14
Table 15
Table 16
Table 17
Inrush (Surge) Current and Duration 36
Maximum Operating Current 36
Recommended PDU/PDRUs for Multiple Disk Systems in
HP Computer Cabinets 38
Recommended PDU/PDRUs for Multiple Disk Systems in
HP System/E Racks 38
Disk System Accessories 44
Disk System Contents 46
Rail Positions for Sequential Disk Systems 50
DIP Switch Settings 85
DIP Switch Usage 87
Disk and BCC SCSI Addresses for Full and Split Bus
Modes 88
LED Functions 102
Troubleshooting Table 104
JBOD Enclosure Field Replaceable Units 109
Upgrade Products 142
PDU/PDRU Products 143
Replacement and Exchange Part Numbers 144
Product Weights 145
9
10
Product Description
1
General Description
Hewlett-Packard’s StorageWorks Disk System 2300 (referred to in this guide as
the disk system) is a high-availability Ultra160 SCSI storage product. Dual SCSI
ports on dual bus controllers provide LVD connections to the host. Fourteen slots
accept high-speed, high-capacity LVD SCSI disks connected to an LVD
midplane. Maximum data throughput is 160 Mbytes/sec. Thirteen disk systems
fill a 2-meter System/E rack. Filled with 18-Gbyte disks, the 2-meter Rack
System/E yields 3.3 Terabytes of storage; with 36-Gbyte disks, 6.6 Terabytes of
storage and with 73-Gbyte disks, 13.3 Terabytes.
Modular and redundant components are easy to upgrade and maintain. Disks,
power supply/fan modules, and bus control cards (BCCs) are replaceable parts
that plug into individual slots in the front and back of the disk system. Redundant
power supply/fan modules, and BCCs can be removed and replaced without
interrupting storage operations. Disks also can be replaced with the system on
and with only the affected file systems taken off-line. Hewlett-Packard technical
support is optional for these procedures.
Special electronics and HP-UX software enable remote monitoring and
diagnostics. Sensors on the BCCs monitor the disk system environment,
including temperature, voltage, fan speed, and component status. HewlettPackard’s Command View SDM reports any changes in environmental status to
user-defined locations. Standard HP-UX diagnostic utilities also report
environmental data for enhanced troubleshooting.
Product Description
11
HP Command View SDM (Software Device Manager) software is designed to
provide storage management for HP disk systems. This software, available on the
HP Command View SDM CD-ROM, provides simple, yet sophisticated device
management tools for the disk system. HP Command View SDM is supported on
the following:
■ HP-UX 11.00 (see Support Plus web site for the required patches)
■ HP-UX 11.11 (see Support Plus web site for the required patches)
■ Windows NT 4.0 (Service Pack 6a or greater)
■ Windows 2000 (Service Pack 1 or greater)
■ Linux Red Hat 7.2
HP TopTools is a web-based, device management tool that enables administrators
and MIS managers to use a web browser to obtain information about devices on
their network. It provides specific management to the following HP products:
■ HP Vectra and Brio Desktops
■ HP Kayak and Visualize Workstations
■ HP Omnibook Notebooks
■ HP Netservers
■ HP Procurve and AdvanceStack networking devices
■ HP LaserJet and JetDirect products
■ HP Jornada PC Companions
■ HP StorageWorks products
■ HP Network Attached Storage (NAS) products
■ HP-UX systems with EMS
■ Windows systems
12
Product Description
The disk system occupies 3 EIA units in a standard 19-inch rack. Disk drives
mount in the front of the system. Redundant power supplies, and BCCs mount in
the back. See Figure 1 and Figure 2 below. For disk slots and SCSI addressing,
see Figure 49.
Product Description
13
Product Description
Features
14
Product Description
Product Description
Status Indicators
LEDs on the disk system enable you to detect and replace failed components and
so prevent or minimize users’ downtime. For additional information about LEDs,
see Chapter 4, Troubleshooting.
On the front of the disk system, a pair of LEDs indicates the status of the disk
system, and an LED for each slot shows disk I/O activity:
■ The system power LED (B in Figure 1) indicates that power is on or off.
■ The system fault LED (C in Figure 1) indicates whether or not a fault has
occurred anywhere in the disk system.
■ At the bottom of each disk module, the left LED (F in Figure 1) indicates the
presence of I/O activity on the disk.
■ The second LED on each disk module (E in Figure 1) can be flashed to help a
customer engineer (CE) locate the disk for physical inspection or removal.
■ The second LED is also used as a fault indicator for that specific disk module.
LEDs (I and K in Figure 2) on the back of the disk system indicate the status of
replaceable components and the SCSI bus: See Chapter 4, Troubleshooting, for
specific LED information.
Product Description
15
Power/Standby Switch
Located at the upper right corner of the front of the disk system, the power switch
(D in Figure 1) interrupts DC power from the power supplies to the BCCs and
other internal components. Input AC power to the power supplies is controlled by
the power cords and the AC source.
High Availability
High availability is a general term describing computer systems that are designed
to minimize planned and unplanned downtime. The disk system supports current
systems’ high availability requirements through the following features:
■ Hot-pluggable, high-capacity, high-speed disks
■ Redundant, hot-pluggable, user-replaceable power supplies and BCCs
■ Online firmware upgrades
■ Hardware event monitoring and real-time error reporting
Clustering (NT)
The HP Disk System 2300 is Microsoft® Cluster certified for a variety of
solutions. For specific information about supported configurations, see the
Hewlett-Packard Company or Microsoft web pages:
http://hp.com
http://microsoft.com
Upgradability
You can increase disk system storage capacity by:
■ Replacing disk drives with higher-capacity disk drives
■ Adding disks in unused slots
None of these actions require shutting down the product, but some may require
the use of system utilities to manage file systems.
Upgrade BCC and disk firmware using an on-line download function. See
Chapter 3, Updating Firmware.
16
Product Description
Environmental Services
Product Description
Environmental services circuitry monitors the following elements:
■ Fan rotation
■ Power supply output
■ Power supply status (fan status)
■ Disk drive status, presence
■ BCC status
■ Temperature
■ Self-test results
Each BCC reports the status of all elements in the disk system, even if the BCC
does not have direct access to the element.
Additionally, the EEPROM on each BCC stores 2 Kbytes of configuration
information and user-defined data, including the manufacturer serial number, and
product number.
Hardware Event Monitoring
A hardware event monitor monitors the disk system and reports changes in
environmental status to Hewlett-Packard’s Event Monitoring System (EMS) for
HP-UX. Hardware event monitoring is an important tool for implementing high
availability. Using hardware event monitors, you can virtually eliminate
undetected hardware failures that interrupt system operation or cause data loss.
The EMS Hardware Monitors User’s Guide is available in Adobe® Acrobat®
format on the HP document web site, http://www.docs.hp.com/hpux/systems/.
Product Description
17
Components
User-replaceable components enable high availability and easy maintenance.
This section describes the following components:
■ Disks and disk fillers
■ BCCs and BCC fillers
■ Power supply/fan modules
Disk Modules and Disk Module Filler Panels
Disk modules, shown in Figure 3, contain 3.5-inch Low Profile Ultra 3 LVD
disks.
The disk module’s components are protected by a metal grill on the disk
module’s bottom side.
WARNING
Disks require careful handling and ESD precautions.
The plastic parts of the disk are safe to touch:
■ Extractor handle (A in Figure 3)
■ Latch tab (B)
You may also safely touch the top and bottom of the disk module without
damaging the disk module.
A metal grill protects exposed circuits against damage when the disk module is
laid circuit-side down on a flat surface.
The initial disk options for this product are 18-GByte, 36-GByte, and 73-Gbyte
10 K RPM disk drives. 18-GByte and 36-GByte 15 K RPM disk drives are also
supported. A label on the disk carrier shows the storage capacity and rotational
speed of the installed disk. Obtain information about the latest disk options from
HP sales representatives.
Caution
18
Product Description
Fillers must be installed in unused slots in order to maintain even
cooling for the installed disk modules.
Product Description
BCCs and BCC Filler Panels
BCCs (Bus Control Cards) plug into two slots in the back of the disk system.
Each BCC connects to both LVD (low voltage differential) buses inside the disk
system. In full bus mode (DIP switch 1 set to “|”), both BCCs have access to all
installed disks. The two SCSI buses are bridged. If either BCC fails and LVM
primary and alternate paths are defined, data can be accessed through the other
BCC. In split bus mode (DIP switch 1 set to “0”), the left BCC (as viewed from
the rear of the disk system), is on the high numbered bank (with disk slots 8, 9,
10, 11,12, 13, and 14) and the right BCC is on the low numbered bank (with disk
slots 0, 1, 2, 3,4, 5, and 6) of disk slots. See Figure 1.
Two SCSI ports (B in Figure 4) on each BCC provide dual LVD connections to
the same or separate hosts. If a host is connected to one of the BCC ports, an
LVD terminator must be connected to the other port on that BCC.
Product Description
19
Other features of the BCC are:
■ LEDs (C) indicating BCC status and bus configuration
■ DIP switches (D) on the rear panel:
1 Bus Mode (full or split bus)
2 Monitor Mode (SAF-TE or SES)
■ Locking thumbscrews (E)
■ Cam levers (F)
20
Product Description
BCC circuitry provides the following functions:
■ Bus expansion (LVD)
■ SCSI environmental services (see page 17)
■ System fault detection
A BCC filler panel (Figure 5) replaces the second BCC when redundancy is not
required.
Caution
The BCC filler panel maintains even cooling inside the disk
system when the second BCC is not present. A BCC filler panel
must be installed if the BCC is removed.
Product Description
21
Product Description
■ Bus configuration (see “Setting DIP Switches” in Chapter 3)
Power Supply/Fan Module
Redundant, hot-pluggable 340-watt power supplies convert wide-ranging AC
voltage from an external main to stable DC output and deliver it to the midplane.
Each power supply has an internal fan, an AC receptacle (A in Figure 6), two
ejector handles (D) with thumbscrews (C), and 2 LEDs (B). Internal control
prevents the rear DC output connector from becoming energized when the power
supply is removed from the disk system.
22
Product Description
Internal circuitry triggers a fault when the internal fan or other part fails. At the
same time, the power fault LED (amber) illuminates, and, if enabled, the
hardware event monitor sends an event message. The power supply fan remains
on if other parts fail in order to maintain cooling air flow through the system. If
the fan fails, the power supply shuts down. The fan in the other working power
supply will increase to full speed to compensate for the failed fan. The failed
power supply/fan module must be removed and the replacement power supply/
fan module installed within two minutes. In the event of a failure, if a
replacement fan module/power supply is not available, leave the failed power
supply/fan module installed until you are ready to replace it. This should be done
to maintain proper cooling for the disk system.
Internal circuitry senses fan motion and triggers a fault when the speed of the
power supply’s internal fan falls below a critical level. At the same time, the LED
turns amber, and, if enabled, the hardware event monitor sends an event message.
Product Description
23
Product Description
Power supplies share the load reciprocally; that is, each supply automatically
increases its output to compensate for reduced output from the other, and vice
versa. If one power supply fails, the other delivers the entire load.
Hardware/Software Requirements
The disk system is supported on the following operating systems:
■ HP-UX 11.00 with HWE 0302 (March 2002 Patch bundles) or greater
■ HP-UX 11.11 with HWE 0302 (March 2002 Patch bundles) or greater
■ Linux Red Hat 6.2, 7.0, 7.1
■ Windows NT 4.0 (Advanced Server, Enterprise Edition)
■ Windows 2000 (Server and Advanced Server)
■ Microsoft Windows.Net (Server and Advanced Server)
■ SCO UnixWare 7.11
■ SCO OpenServer 5.06
■ HP MPE/iX 7.0
The following SCSI host bus adapters (HBAs) support the Disk System 2300:
■ A4999A, Ultra2 Low Voltage Differential SCSI Host Bus Adapter for B-,
C-, J-, and X-Class systems
■ A5140A Single Port Ultra 2 SCSI HBA Host bus adapter for A-, L-, V-Class,
and Superdome.
■ A5149A, Single Port Ultra 2 SCSI HBA (PCI bus) Host bus adapter for
rp54X0, rp7400, rp7410, and rp8400 servers and A-, N-, L-, V-Class, and
Superdome systems (Full length card).
■ A5150A, Dual Port Ultra 2 SCSI (PCI bus) Host bus adapter for rx4610 and
rx9610 servers and A-, N-, L-, V-Class, and Superdome systems (Full length
card).
■ A5159A, Dual Part FWD SCSI PCI Host bus adapter for rx4610 and rx9610
servers
■ A5838A, Dual-Port 100Base-T/Dual-Port Wide Ultra2 Host bus adapter for
A-, N-, L-, V-Class, and Superdome systems.
■ A5856A, RAID 4Si - 4-Port Ultra2 LVD/SE RAID Host bus adapter for
rp54X0, rp7400, rp7410, and rp8400 servers, and A-, N-, L-, V-Class, and
Superdome systems.
■ A6828A, Single Port Ultra 160 SCSI HBA (PCI bus) Host bus adapter for
rp54X0, rp7400, rp7410, and rp8400 servers, and A-, N-, L-, V-Class, and
Superdome systems (Full length card).
24
Product Description
■ A6829A, Dual Port Ultra160 SCSI (PCI bus) adapter Host bus adapter for
The following host bus adapters are supported on HP Netservers:
■ C7430A, PCI Ultra2 wide Host bus adapter
■ D5025A, HP Ultra/Wide SCSI Host bus adapter for Netservers
■ D9161A, NetRAID 4M/64MB Cache Host bus adapter for HP Netservers
■ D9351A, NetRAID 4M/128MB Cache Host bus adapter for HP Netservers
■ P3413A, Single port Ultra160 SCSI Host bus adapter for HP Netservers
Product Description
25
Product Description
rp54X0, rp7400, rp7410, and rp8400 servers and A-, N-, L-, V-Class, and
Superdome systems (Full length card).
The following HP Netserver models are supported by the Disk System 2300:
■ rc7100
■ tc7100
■ tc 6100
■ tc4100
■ tc3100
■ rx4610
■ LXr8000
■ LXr8500
■ LH3/LH3r
■ LH4/LH4r
■ LH3000/LH3000r
■ LH6000/LH6000r
■ LC2000/LC2000r
■ LT6000
■ LPr
■ LP1000r
■ LP2000r
■ E45/E50
■ E55/E60
■ E200/E200se
■ E800
The following host bust adapters are not supported at this time:
■ D2140A, NetRAID 1Si Host bus adapter
■ D5955A, NetRAID 3Si Host bus adapter
■ P3410A, NetRAID 1M Ultra160 SCSI Host bus adapter with 64MB
■ P3411A/B, NetRAID 2M Ultra160 SCSI Host bus adapter with 64MB
■ P3475A/B, NetRAID 2M Ultra160 SCSI Host bus adapter with 128MB
26
Product Description
The disk system supports high availability through redundant components and
redundant connections to redundant hosts. Each SCSI port on a BCC can be
connected to a different host bus adapter in the same or different hosts. Internal
mirroring within the disk system is also possible.
Basic high availability topologies are described on the following pages. For
information about specific supported topologies, consult an HP sales
representative.
This disk system can hold up to 14 disk modules. The maximum number of disk
modules can be installed in either Full Bus Mode or Split Bus Mode. However,
host and disk drive addressing must be closely managed.
Full Bus Mode
The maximum of 14 disk modules can be supported in Full Bus Mode provided
there there is only one host bus adapter (HBA) connection and the HBA has the
SCSI address of 7.
If more than one host connection is required, the slot with the SCSI address
corresponding to the SCSI address of the additional host must not have a disk
module installed in it to avoid bus contention. For example, if two connections
are made to a Disk System 2300 with HBAs having SCSI addresses of 6 and 7,
then SCSI ID 6 (slot 7)must not have a disk module installed in it.
Note
SCSI address 15 should never be used by an HBA when
connecting to a Disk System 2300 because this address is reserved
on the SCSI bus for the enclosure services microprocessor.
Connecting one disk system to redundant hosts achieves system level high
availability. A single host bus adapter in each host is connected to a different port
in the disk system. With the disk system in full bus mode (switch 1 on), each host
can reach all the disks. If the right BCC (viewed from the rear of the disk system)
fails in this topology, there is still one path to the disks through BCC B. With the
disk system in split bus mode (two internal busses), the Disk System 2300
supports data mirroring between the two internal busses within the same disk
system. All connections from the host to the disk system are SCSI LVD cables.
Product Description
27
Product Description
Topologies
Another type of high availability topology connects mirrored disk systems to
redundant hosts. Dual host bus adapters in each host are connected to mirrored
disk systems. With the disk systems in full bus mode (switch 1 on), each host can
reach all disks in both disk systems. If one of the disk systems fails in this
topology, all hosts will still have access to the data on the mirrored disk system.
All connections from the host to the disk system are SCSI LVD cables.
Due to SCSI ID limitations, daisy chaining of the Disk System 2300 is not
supported. The maximum storage capacity with this type of configuration is
approximately one Terabyte. This configuration does not provide any redundant
paths to the data, however there is some hardware redundancy provided by the
disk system hardware (i.e. power supply/fan modules and BCCs). This
configuration can be used for boot, root, swap, or file system storage. Using
Mirror/UX software, one or more mirrors can be created on the same hardware
path to provide a basic level of data protection.
In figures 7 through 11, any BCC shown with only one cable connection should
be understood to have a terminator attached to the other SCSI connector.
28
Product Description
Product Description
The disk system can be connected to a single host with two host bus adapters
(HBAs) in a split bus configuration. See Figure 8. Each HBA will do reads and
writes to a maximum of seven disks. This configuration can provide a maximum
capacity of approximately 1.1 Terabytes. This configuration can also do basic
mirroring across different hardware paths, still providing a maximum data
capacity of approximately 0.5 Terabytes. This configuration can also yield a
maximum performance of 320 MB/s, since each BCC card is capable of 160MB/
s performance in a split bus mode.
Product Description
29
Data path redundancy can be secured with the configuration shown in Figure 9.
Using an additional host bus adapter (HBA) and the LVM software, alternate
links can be created, providing a redundant path to data for each disk system. In
addition, a separate mirror path can be created for data protection. This
configuration provides protection against any single component failure (i.e.,
cables, HBAs, disks). Figure 9 depicts connecting two disk systems to a single
host.
The only limit on the number of disk systems per system is the maximum number
of supported HBAs. For large configuration, it is recommended that multiple
CPUs have large amounts of memory to handle the system load. Each disk
system in this configuration is capable of 160MB/s performance. Due to SCSI ID
limitations, a maximum of 13 disks is supported per disk system (13 disks + 2
HBAs + 1 SES = 16 SCSI IDs).
30
Product Description
Product Description
For customers with small data storage needs, a single disk system can be
connected to two hosts in a split bus mode. Each host can do reads and writes to a
maximum of seven disk modules. Each BCC can provide disk system status to
the host it is connected to. Each host can operate independently of the other.
System reboots and shutdowns do not need to be coordinated between the hosts.
In a split bus configuration, the two SCSI buses are physically isolated. Problems
on one bus are transparent to the other bus.
Product Description
31
A two-host configuration could be constructed using the Disk System 2300. Each
disk system could still be configured using mirrors. High availability software
will protect against a system failure. See Figure 11, above.
32
Product Description
The following terms have specific meanings in the context of this guide:
High availability (HA)
HA describes hardware and software systems that are designed to
minimize planned and unplanned downtime. High availability is
measured at the system level and stated as the percentage of time the
system is in a state to do useful work; for example, 99.95% availability
translates to four hours of downtime per year.
Hot-pluggable
Hot-pluggable signifies the ability of a component to be installed or
replaced without interrupting storage operations and within the
restrictions of the operating environment. All customer-replaceable
disk system components can be replaced under power. Adding or
replacing disks or BCCs may require the use of HP-UX commands to
manage file systems.
JBOD
Pronounced jay-bod, a JBOD (Just a Bunch Of Disks) is an enclosed
group of disks.
LVD
LVD (Low Voltage Differential) is a type of SCSI signalling that filters
out common mode noise by taking the difference of two low-voltage
signals. LVD supports cable lengths up to 25 meters including SCSI
cable lengths inside devices on the bus. The disk system’s connection
to the host is LVD.
PDU and PDRU
PDUs (power distribution units) distribute power from a single inlet to
multiple outlets. PRUs (power relay units) connect one or more PDU
inlets to a single on/off switch, such as a cabinet power switch. Units
that both distribute and switch power are referred to as PDRUs.
Product Description
33
Product Description
Definitions
Ultra160 SCSI
Ultra160 is a SCSI interface that transfers 160 Mbytes/sec for wide
busses.
34
Product Description
Installation
2
Installation
35
Preparation
Before installing the disk system, make sure (1) electrical wiring, breakers, and
PDUs meet power needs, (2) the required support software is installed on the
host, and (3) if you are connecting the disk system to a V-class server, autotermination is enabled on the host bus adapter. This section covers all three of
these topics.
Electrical Requirements
All electrical wiring to the service point (plug) must be sized to carry the
appropriate inrush (20 amps per power supply) and steady state currents. See
Table 1 for examples.
Table 1 Inrush (Surge) Current and Duration
No. of Disk Systems
on Circuit (2 power
supplies per disk system)
Inrush Current and Duration
1
40 amps declining over 100 ms (5 cycles)
2
80 amps declining over 100 ms (5 cycles)
3
120 amps declining over 100 ms (5 cycles)
4
160 amps declining over 100 ms (5 cycles)
Table 2 Maximum Operating Current
Incoming Voltage
AC RMS
100 – 120 volts
4.8 amps
200 – 240 volts
2.0 amps
Caution
36
Installation
Maximum RMS Current Drawn by One Disk
System
Adding disk systems to 120V circuits rapidly increases amp
requirements. Always make sure that the total current drawn does
not exceed circuit capacity.
Circuit breakers must be adequately rated for inrush and operating currents.
Hewlett-Packard recommends magnetic-type circuit breakers, which are capable
of handling large inrush currents for short durations (10 to 12 cycles) and are
rated adequately for steady state currents.
Choosing PDUs
Peak power requirements and PDU capacity affect the number of disk systems
that can be installed in a rack. For example, to install more than four disk systems
in Hewlett-Packard Rack Systems/E (HP Models J1500A(1.96M),
J1501A(1.60M), or J1502 (1.25M)), you must upgrade to 19-inch PDUs.
Besides rack density, the following factors can help you choose PDUs:
■ Redundant power source. To connect redundant power supplies to separate
■ Number of cords to the AC source. Using 30-amp PDRUs instead of 16-amp
PDUs reduces the number of cords to the wall.
■ Future needs. Installing surplus PDU capacity allows you to add disk system
units later.
■ Inrush margins. For installations that require four or more 16-amp PDUs,
Hewlett-Packard recommends HP 30-amp PDRUs (E7681A, E7682A) for
their inherent inrush protection.
■ On/Off switch capability. Some PDU/PDRU options support the use of a
single-point on/off switch. See Figure 12 and Figure 13.
The following tables show how many and what kind of PDU/PDRUs are needed
to install one or more disk systems in an HP rack. Data assumes 220V AC
nominal power and redundant PDU/PDRUs. For nonredundant configurations,
divide the number of recommended PDU/PDRUs by 2.
Installation
37
Installation
PDUs, install redundant PDUs.
Table 3 Recommended PDU/PDRUs for Multiple Disk Systems in HP
Computer Cabinets
No. of
Disk
Systems
1.1 meter (21 U)
1.6 meter (32 U)
2.0 meter (41 U)
1–5
2 3-foot/16-amp
PDUs
or
2 19-inch/16-amp
PDUs
2 5-foot/16-amp or
PDUs*
6–8
NA**
4 19-inch/16-amp PDRUs or
2 19-inch/16-amp
PDUs
4 19-inch/30-amp PDRUs
9 – 10
NA**
NA**
4 19-inch/30-amp
PDRUs
* Supports cabinet on/off switch.
**Rack height does not allow additional disk systems.
Table 4 Recommended PDU/PDRUs for Multiple Disk Systems in HP System/
E Racks
No. of
Disk
Systems
1.25 meter (25 U)
1.6 meter (33 U)
2.0 meter (41 U)
1–4
2 19-inch/16-amp
PDUs
5–8
NA**
2 19-inch/30-amp PDRUs*
4 19-inch/30-amp PDRUs
9 – 11
NA**
NA**
4 19-inch/30-amp
PDRUs
12 - 13
NA**
NA**
4 19-inch/30-amp
PDRUs
or
2 19-inch/30-amp PDRUs*
* Supports the cabinet on/off switch option.
**Rack height does not allow additional disk systems.
38
Installation
Installing PDUs
The 19-inch PDUs and PDRUs can be installed vertically or horizontally in the
rack. Choose PDU/PDRU locations with the following guidelines in mind:
■ Place PDU/PDRUs within the reach of disk system cords.
■ Place PDU/PDRUs vertically whenever possible. See sample installations in
Figure 12 and Figure 13. Installing PDU/PDRUs horizontally interferes with
the ability to service disk systems that are behind the PDU/PDRU.
■ Place vertical PDU/PDRUs on each side of the disk system so that the cord
from either power supply does not cross over replaceable components in the
middle of the product.
■ To achieve maximum density in 2-meter racks, install 30-amp PDRUs on
Installation
Installation
hinged brackets directly behind disk systems. Hinges allow the PDRU (HP
E7681A and E7682A) to swing aside for servicing obscured components.
(See Figure 13.)
39
40
Installation
Installation
Installation
41
Software Requirements
Ensure that the minimum revisions of HP-UX extension software and online
diagnostics are installed. These release packages enable CommandView SDM
and EMS for the disk system.
1. At the host console, enter swlist | grep HWE and look for the following
extension software according to the installed HP-UX revision:
HP-UX 11.00 with HWE 0302
HP-UX 11.11 with HWE 0302
2. Enter swlist | grep Online and look for the following online diagnostics
according to the installed HP-UX revision:
- Online Diags B.11.00.20.09, or greater, on HP-UX
11.00
- Online Diags B.11.11.06.09, or greater, on HP-UX
11.11
If swlist does not report the specified releases, install them from the latest
CD-ROM in any of the following products:
— For HP-UX 11.00:
o B3920EA HP-UX OE Media for Servers
o B6261AA HP-UX 11.00 Extension Upgrade Media Kit
— For HP-UX 11.11:
o B3920EA HP-UX OE Media for Servers
o B6191AA HP 9000 Support Plus Media
o B6821AA HP-UX TCOE Media
o B6845AA HP-UX 11.11 Minimal Technical OE Media
o B7993AA HP-UX Enterprise OE Server Media
o B7994AA HP-UX Mission Critical OE Comm. Media
The external IT Resource Center web site is:
http://us-support3.external.hp.com/
42
Installation
Auto-Termination
Auto-termination is disabled when a shunt is installed over both pins on
the TP2 pinset. To enable auto-termination, remove the shunt entirely or
move it to only one of the pins. The result must be open pins, as shown
in Figure 14. Verify that auto-termination is enabled on the host system.
For other HBAs, check the documentation for your particular host bus
adapter.
Installation
Installation
43
Step 1: Gather Tools
Once the electrical, software, and special V-class preparations are complete,
collect the tools you need to install the disk system hardware:
■ Torx T25 screwdriver
■ Torx T15 screwdriver
■ Small flat-blade screwdriver
Step 2: Unpack the Product
1. Lift off the overcarton and verify the contents of the accessories (top) box.
See Table 5 and Figure 15.
Table 5 Disk System Accessories
Figure
Label
44
Installation
Part (part number)
A
User guide (A6490-96001)
B
Quick installation guide (A6490-96003)
C
Disk Modules and filler panels (A6198-60002)
D
BCC (A6491-60001)
E
BCC filler (A6490-67002)
F
LVD terminator (5021-1121)
-
Racking Kits not shown
Installation
2. Lift off the accessories box and the top of the under box, and verify
the contents shown in Table 6 and Figure 16.
Installation
45
Table 6 Disk System Contents
Figure
Label
Part (part number)
A
Installation Manual (A6490-96003)
B
Two power cords (8120-6514)
C
SCSI Cable (see Reference Section for part numbers)
D
Disk System Chassis (A6490-60100)
If a part is missing, contact an HP sales representative.
46
Installation
Step 3: Install the device
Follow the procedures in this section to install your storage device in one of the
following rack systems:
■ HP Rack System/E
■ HP Computer Cabinet
■ Rittal-Style Rack
Installing the Storage Device into a Rack System/E
Installation
Your storage device can be installed into any of these HP Rack System/E
Products:
■ A4902A HP Rack System/E41 (1.96 M; 41U)
■ A4901A HP Rack System/E33 (1.60 M; 33U)
■ A4900A HP Rack System/E25 (1.10 M; 25U)
1. Check the rail kit contents (see Figure 17). If any parts are missing, call your
nearest HP sales office.
Installation
47
48
Installation
2. Study the installation overview (see Figure 18).
Installation
The following tools are required for the installation of the storage device:
■ Flat-blade screwdriver
■ T25 nut driver
WARNING
To ensure cabinet or rack stability and avoid possible injury,
always install the storage devices in the rack or cabinet from the
bottom up.
Installation
49
3. Locate a place on the rack columns with the available space required
for the installation of the storage device. The storage device and the
rail kit require 3 EIA units of space.
Use the following table as a guide for placement of the rails in a Rack System/E
where multiple disk systems will be installed. You can rack multiple disk systems
without gaps installing rails every three EIA units. For example, starting at the
bottom of a 2-meter rack, set rails at the following unit/hole locations:
Table 7 Rail Positions for Sequential Disk Systems
Disk Systems
50
Installation
Hole from Rack Bottom
One
1
Two
4
Three
7
Four
10
Five
13
Six
16
Seven
19
Eight
22
Nine
25
Ten
28
Eleven
31
Installation
4. Install clipnuts as shown in Figure 20.
Figure 20. Installing clipnuts for an HP Rack System/E
Installation
51
5. Insert the rail tabs into the appropriate column holes (see Figure 21).
6. Secure the rail ends with one M5 screw each.
7. Install clipnuts on the front columns of the cabinet (see Figure 22).
These are used for the retention bracket screws.
52
Installation
Installation
8. Place the storage device on the rails and slide it into the cabinet until
the retention bracket comes in contact with the rack column (see
Figure 23).
WARNING
An empty storage device weighs more than 54 pounds (24.5 kg)
(without disk modules installed). To avoid personal injury, it is
recommended that two people install the storage device in the
rack.
Installation
53
9. Insert and tighten the storage device retention (M5) screws through
the retention bracket (see Figure 23).
54
Installation
10. Place a rail clamp on each rail and slide them to each bottom rear
corner of the storage device.(see Figure 24).
11. Secure the clamps to the rails. Use one 10-32 screw for each rail clamp.
Installation
Installation
55
Installing the storage device into an HP Computer Cabinet
Your storage device can be installed into the following Computer Cabinets:
■ C2785A Computer Cabinet (1.10M; 21U)
■ C2786A Computer Cabinet (1.60M; 32U)
■ C2787A Computer Cabinet (1.96M; 41U)
Caution
To ensure proper installation, only use the instructions in this
manual for installing the storage device in the HP Computer
Cabinet. Do not use the instructions enclosed in the rail kit box.
1. Check the rail kit contents (see Figure 25). If any parts are missing, call your
nearest HP sales office. The tie-down clamp is not used and may be discarded.
56
Installation
2. Study the installation overview (see Figure 26)
Installation
The following tools are required for the installation of the storage device:
■ Flat-blade screwdriver
■ T25 nut driver
WARNING
To ensure cabinet or rack stability and avoid possible injury,
always install storage devices in the rack or cabinet from the
bottom up.
3. Locate a place on the rack columns with the available space required
for the installation of the storage device. The storage device and the
rail kit require 4 EIA units of space, three units for the storage device
and one unit for the rails (see Figure 27).
Installation
57
58
Installation
4. Install clipnuts as shown in Figure 28
Installation
Installation
59
5. Insert the rail tabs into the appropriate holes on the HP Computer
Cabinet columns (see Figure 29).
6. Secure the rail ends with one M5 screw each.
Figure 29. Installing rails in the HP Computer Cabinet
B
A rail tab
B clip nut
A
60
Installation
7. Install clipnuts on the front columns of the cabinet (see Figure 30).
These are used for the device retention screws.
Installation
8. Place the storage device on the rails and slide it into the cabinet until
the retention bracket comes in contact with the rack column (see
Figure 31).
WARNING
An empty storage device weighs approximately 54 pounds
(without disk modules installed) (24.5 kg). To avoid personal
injury, it is recommended that two people install the storage device
in the rack.
Installation
61
9. Tighten the storage device retention (M5) screws through the retention
bracket (see Figure 31).
62
Installation
10. Install a filler panel in the space below the storage device.
If a filler panel is required, it must be ordered separately. Contact
your local HP sales representative for assistance.
Installation
Installation
63
Installing the Storage Device into a Rittal-Style Rack
Your storage device can be installed into the Rittal-Style Rack by doing the
following steps:
1. Inspect the contents of the rail kit. If any parts are missing, call your nearest
HP sales office. See Figure 33.
64
Installation
2. Align the front of rails to the inside of the front cabinet column.
Carefully observe the alignment of the groups of holes on the columns so
the holes in the rails align properly.
Installation
Installation
65
3. Insert and finger tighten the rail mounting screws.
Use the third and seventh holes from the top of rail to mount the rail to the
front column of the cabinet.
4. Extend the adjustable slide to the back column of the cabinet.
5. Insert the mounting screws and finger tighten them through the rear
column of the cabinet.
66
Installation
Installation
6. Tighten the center nuts to finger tightness.
Figure 37. Center Nut Tightening
7. Tighten all screws to their final tightness using a driver.
Tighten the screws that hold the rail to the columns first, before
tightening the center slide nuts to their final tightness.
Installation
67
8. Repeat the procedure above for the other rail.
9. Insert the disk system (with disk modules and power supplies
removed) onto the rails.
10. Move the disk system retention brackets to the frontmost set of
mounting holes.
This allows the disk system to install further back into the cabinet; and
so, allows the cabinet doors (if present) to close properly.
68
Installation
Installation
11. Push the disk system back into the rack until the disk system retaining
bracket is flush against the front column of the rack.
12. Bolt the disk system to the front column. Use the fifth hole from the
top of the front of the rail.
Figure 40. Bolting the Disk System to the Front Column of the Rack
Installation
69
Install the Disk System
1. Remove the power supply/fan modules to prepare the disk system for lifting:
a
Loosen the screws in each extractor handle of each power supply/fan
module with the chassis still in the box.
b Pull the extractor handles out from the center of the power supply to
disengage the it from the midplane. Pull each power supply/fan module
out of the chassis. Support the far end of the power supply/fan module
with your free hand as it clears the chassis.
c
Set the power supply/fan module aside, on an antistatic pad, to be
reinstalled later.
WARNING
Do not attempt to lift the disk system without the help of another
person or a lift device. Even without power supplies and disk
drives, the disk system weighs 54 pounds.
2. Remove the disk modules from the disk system. Place them aside on
the pink anti-static foam pad supplied with your disk system.
3. Carry the disk system to the front of the rack and slide the back end
onto the rails (Figure 38) with the help of another person or using a
lifting device. Push the disk system into the rack as far as it will go.
4. Secure the disk system as appropriate for the rail kit and cabinet at the
installation site.
70
Installation
Step 4: Install BCCs
The disk system comes with one or two BCCs, depending on the option
purchased. If you are installing only one BCC, you will install a BCC filler in the
open BCC slot.
1. Attach your ESD strap to ground.
2. Unpack the BCC from the accessories box and ESD bag.
WARNING
Do not touch the pins on the back of the BCC.
4. Open the BCC cam latches (C in Figure 41) by pulling them away
from the center.
5. Align the BCC alignment guides (E) with the slot, and insert the BCC
into the the left slot at the back of the disk system. Stop pushing when
the BCC meets the midplane.
6. Press the cam latches inward and flat against the center. The cam action
draws the BCC completely into the slot and seats the connector pins
on the midplane.
7. Tighten the locking screw (D).
Installation
71
Installation
3. Loosen the locking screws (D in Figure 41) if necessary on the BCC
cam latches.
8. If you have a second BCC, repeat steps 2 through 6, installing the
second BCC in the right slot.
72
Installation
9. If you do not have a second BCC, install the BCC filler as follows:
a
Unpack the BCC filler from the accessories box.
b Align the filler panel edges with the appropriate slot and insert the filler
into the open slot until the cam handles engage.
c
Press the cam handles toward the center of the BCC until they are against
the face of the filler panel.
d Tighten the locking thumbscrew (see Figure 42).
Installation
Installation
73
Step 5: Set DIP Switches
BCCs are shipped from the factory with all DIP switches (see Figure 43) in the
“|” position. The pull-out label on top of the disk system identifies each switch
position.
Caution
DIP Switch settings must be the same on both BCCs. If settings
differ, the disk system will fail its power-on self-test and the disks
will not be accessible through the second BCC.
Set dip switches as needed. See Chapter 3, Configuration, for switch definitions
and guidelines.
There is a switch bank that is recessed from the BCC bulkhead. Typically, they
do not need to be reset. The BCC must be removed from the disk system to
access this switch bank. See switch bank 2 in Chapter 3. Also see Tables 33 and
34 for switch settings and usage.
74
Installation
Step 6: Connect SCSI and Power Cables
1. Attach an LVD SCSI cable to SCSI port A or B, on one or both BCCs. (Sample
topologies appear in Chapter 1.)
2. Attach the other end of each SCSI cable to a host bus adapter. (See
bus configuration options in Chapter 3.)
3. Attach an LVD terminator to any empty SCSI port that is on a BCC
with a cable attached.
The terminators can be found in bags tethered to the BCC locking
thumbscrew(s).
5. Attach the other end of each power cord to a preinstalled PDU/PDRU.
Choose outlets according to the following guidelines:
— Redundancy. To extend the redundancy of the product, attach each cord to
a different PDU. This is represented in Figure 44 and Figure 45 by the
absence of duplicate letters in each disk system.
— Reliability. To avoid cascading faults for a group of disk systems that are
plugged into the same PDU, distribute redundant power cords to as many
different combinations of PDUs as possible. This is represented in
Figure 44 and Figure 45 by the least number of duplicate pairs of letters
among all disk systems. Cascading faults occur when a backup PDU is
overloaded with power surges after the primary PDU fails.
— Serviceability. Choose PDU locations that prevent power cords from
interfering with the removal and replacement of serviceable components.
Also leave a 6-inch service loop to allow for the rotation of PDRUs.
The letters A, B, C, D, E and F in the following diagrams represent independent
PDUs or PDU banks. The absence of duplicate letters in individual disk systems
indicates the products are using redundant PDUs. The minimal number of
duplicate letter pairs indicates the disk systems are protected against cascading
faults.
Installation
75
Installation
4. Plug a power cord into the AC receptacle of each power supply.
76
Installation
Installation
Installation
77
Step 7: Install Disk Modules
Caution
Touching exposed areas on the disk can cause electrical discharge
and disable the disk. Be sure you are grounded and be careful not
to touch exposed circuits.
Disk modules are fragile and ESD sensitive. Dropping one end of the disk just
two inches is enough to cause permanent damage. In addition, static electricity
can destroy the magnetic properties of recording surfaces. Grip disks only by
their handles (A in Figure 46) and carriers (D), and follow strict ESD procedures.
78
Installation
2. Put on the ESD strap and attach the other end to ground.
Caution
Disk modules are fragile. Handle carefully. Be careful to grasp the
disk module by its handle and avoid touching exposed circuitry.
3. Verify that the disk module extraction handle (A in Figure 46) is open
by placing a finger behind the extraction handle and pushing the latch
tab toward your finger.
4. Align and insert the disk module into its slot.
5. Push the disk module as far as it will go into the selected slot.
Note
Install disks left to right for easier insertion.
6. Close the cam latch by pushing the extraction handle toward the disk
until it clicks. The cam action draws the disk module completely into
the slot and seats the connecting pins on the midplane.
7. Repeat steps 4 through 7 to install additional disk modules.
8. Install disk fillers in the remaining slots.
Caution
Every slot must contain either a disk module or filler panel for
proper cooling.
Installation
79
Installation
1. Determine which slots, 1 through 14, will contain disk modules and which
will contain fillers.
— If DIP switch 1 is set to “|” (full bus mode), choose any slots for disk
modules or fillers. In full bus mode, the SCSI address 7 is reserved for the
host bus adapter. If more than one host bus adapter connects the disk
system to other hosts, then a disk module must be removed from the slot
whose SCSI address corresponds to the SCSI address of the additional
host bus adapter. The most host bus adapters supported on this disk
system is two.
— If DIP switch 1 is set to “0” (split bus mode), the left BCC is on the high
numbered bank (with disk slots 8, 9, 10, 11,12, 13, and 14) and the right
BCC is on the low numbered bank (with disk slots 0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, and 6)
of disk slots.
— At least one disk module must be installed.
Step 8: Turn on the Disk System
Caution
When starting up the disk system, do not override automatic spinup by issuing SCSI start commands to the drives. Doing so could
cause an overcurrent fault, requiring a power cycle to recover.
Press in the power/standby switch with the retracted tip of a pen or pencil to
power-on the array (see Figure 47). Allow 2 minutes for the disk drives and
controllers to complete their self-tests.
1. Press the power switch (A in Figure 47) to turn on the disk system.
2. Watch the system LEDs for confirmation that the disk system is
operational. The system power LED (B) should be green, and the fault
LED (C) should be off.
If the LEDs indicate a problem, refer to Chapter 4, Troubleshooting.
Note
80
Installation
An amber light that is on briefly when a component turns on is
normal. If this light remains on more than a couple of seconds, a
fault has been detected.
Step 9: Verify Devices on the Host
On an HP-UX host run IOSCAN (ioscan -f) and verify that the disks and BCC(s)
are listed in IOSCAN output. If the displayed “S/W State” is not “claimed,”
begin troubleshooting (see Chapter 4).
Sample IOSCAN
The example shows a fully loaded disk system. The BCC card is at hardware path
0/1/0/0.15.0
Installation
Installation
Class
I H/W Path
Driver
S/W State
H/W Type
Description
==============================================================================
ext_bus
5 0/3/0/0
c8xx
CLAIMED
INTERFACE
SCSI C1010 Ultra160
Wide LVD A6828-60001
target
22 0/3/0/0.0
tgt
CLAIMED
DEVICE
disk
51 0/3/0/0.0.0
sdisk
CLAIMED
DEVICE
HP 36.4GST336706LC
target
23 0/3/0/0.1
tgt
CLAIMED
DEVICE
disk
52 0/3/0/0.1.0
sdisk
CLAIMED
DEVICE
HP 36.4GST336706LC
target
24 0/3/0/0.2
tgt
CLAIMED
DEVICE
disk
53 0/3/0/0.2.0
sdisk
CLAIMED
DEVICE
HP 36.4GST336706LC
target
25 0/3/0/0.3
tgt
CLAIMED
DEVICE
disk
54 0/3/0/0.3.0
sdisk
CLAIMED
DEVICE
HP 36.4GST336706LC
target
26 0/3/0/0.4
tgt
CLAIMED
DEVICE
disk
55 0/3/0/0.4.0
sdisk
CLAIMED
DEVICE
HP 36.4GST336706LC
target
27 0/3/0/0.5
tgt
CLAIMED
DEVICE
disk
56 0/3/0/0.5.0
sdisk
CLAIMED
DEVICE
HP 36.4GST336706LC
target
28 0/3/0/0.6
tgt
CLAIMED
DEVICE
disk
57 0/3/0/0.6.0
sdisk
CLAIMED
DEVICE
HP 18.2GST318406LC
target
21 0/3/0/0.7
tgt
CLAIMED
DEVICE
ctl
25 0/3/0/0.7.0
sctl
CLAIMED
DEVICE
Initiator
target
29 0/3/0/0.15
tgt
CLAIMED
DEVICE
ctl
21 0/3/0/0.15.0
sctl
CLAIMED
DEVICE
HP
A6491A
ba
4 0/4
lba
CLAIMED
BUS_NEXUS
Local PCI Bus
Adapter (782)
ext_bus
9 0/4/2/0
c8xx
CLAIMED
INTERFACE
SCSI C1010 Ultra160
Wide LVD A6829-60001
target
30 0/4/2/0.7
tgt
CLAIMED
DEVICE
ctl
26 0/4/2/0.7.0
sctl
CLAIMED
DEVICE
Initiator
target
22 0/4/2/0.8
tgt
CLAIMED
DEVICE
disk
51 0/4/2/0.8.0
sdisk
CLAIMED
DEVICE
HP 36.4GST336706LC
target
23 0/4/2/0.9
tgt
CLAIMED
DEVICE
disk
52 0/4/2/0.9.0
sdisk
CLAIMED
DEVICE
HP 36.4GST336706LC
target
24 0/4/2/0.10
tgt
CLAIMED
DEVICE
disk
53 0/4/2/0.10.0
sdisk
CLAIMED
DEVICE
HP 36.4GST336706LC
target
25 0/4/2/0.11
tgt
CLAIMED
DEVICE
disk
54 0/4/2/0.11.0
sdisk
CLAIMED
DEVICE
HP 36.4GST336706LC
target
26 0/4/2/0.12
tgt
CLAIMED
DEVICE
disk
55 0/4/2/0.12.0
sdisk
CLAIMED
DEVICE
HP 36.4GST336706LC
target
27 0/4/2/0.13
tgt
CLAIMED
DEVICE
disk
56 0/4/2/0.13.0
sdisk
CLAIMED
DEVICE
HP 36.4GST336706LC
target
28 0/4/2/0.14
tgt
CLAIMED
DEVICE
disk
57 0/4/2/0.14.0
sdisk
CLAIMED
DEVICE
HP 18.2GST318406LC
target
29 0/4/2/0.15
tgt
CLAIMED
DEVICE
ctl
21 0/4/2/0.15.0
sctl
CLAIMED
DEVICE
HP
A6491A
81
The “descriptions” in this example represent some of the valid disk modules.
Valid disk descriptions include:
■ ST318404LC18-Gbyte 10K rpm LVD disk module
ST318406LC
■ ST336704LC36-Gbyte 10K rpm LVD disk module
ST336706LC
■ ST373405LC73-Gbyte 10K rpm LVD disk module
■ ST318452LC18-Gbyte 15K rpm LVD disk module
MAM3184MC
■ ST336752LC36-Gbyte 15K rpm LVD disk module
MAM3367MC
Where do you go from here?
For operating system and application configuration information, refer to the
documentation for your particular server’s operating system.
82
Installation
Configuration
3
Configuration
83
Viewing a Disk System in IOSCAN
An IOSCAN (example below) shows each BCC (0/1/0/0.15.0) and disk in the
disk system.
Sample IOSCAN
Type the command: ioscan -f
Class
I H/W Path
Driver
S/W State
H/W Type
Description
==============================================================================
ext_bus
4 0/1/0/0
c8xx
CLAIMED
INTERFACE
SCSI C1010 Ultra160
Wide LVD A6828-60001
target
6 0/1/0/0.0
tgt
CLAIMED
DEVICE
disk
34 0/1/0/0.0.0
sdisk
CLAIMED
DEVICE
HP 18.2GST318406LC
target
7 0/1/0/0.1
tgt
CLAIMED
DEVICE
disk
35 0/1/0/0.1.0
sdisk
CLAIMED
DEVICE
HP 18.2GST318406LC
target
8 0/1/0/0.2
tgt
CLAIMED
DEVICE
disk
36 0/1/0/0.2.0
sdisk
CLAIMED
DEVICE
HP 18.2GST318406LC
target
9 0/1/0/0.3
tgt
CLAIMED
DEVICE
disk
24 0/1/0/0.3.0
sdisk
CLAIMED
DEVICE
HP 18.2GST318406LC
target
10 0/1/0/0.4
tgt
CLAIMED
DEVICE
disk
37 0/1/0/0.4.0
sdisk
CLAIMED
DEVICE
HP 18.2GST318452LC
target
11 0/1/0/0.5
tgt
CLAIMED
DEVICE
disk
42 0/1/0/0.5.0
sdisk
CLAIMED
DEVICE
HP 18.2GST318452LC
target
11 0/1/0/0.6
tgt
CLAIMED
DEVICE
disk
42 0/1/0/0.6.0
sdisk
CLAIMED
DEVICE
HP 18.2GST318452LC
target
12 0/1/0/0.7
tgt
CLAIMED
DEVICE
ctl
24 0/1/0/0.7.0
sctl
CLAIMED
DEVICE
Initiator
target
13 0/1/0/0.8
tgt
CLAIMED
DEVICE
disk
8 0/1/0/0.8.0
sdisk
CLAIMED
DEVICE
HP 18.2GST318452LC
target
14 0/1/0/0.9
tgt
CLAIMED
DEVICE
disk
18 0/1/0/0.9.0
sdisk
CLAIMED
DEVICE
HP 18.2GST318452LC
target
15 0/1/0/0.10
tgt
CLAIMED
DEVICE
disk
19 0/1/0/0.10.0
sdisk
CLAIMED
DEVICE
HP 18.2GST318452LC
target
16 0/1/0/0.11
tgt
CLAIMED
DEVICE
disk
22 0/1/0/0.11.0
sdisk
CLAIMED
DEVICE
HP 18.2GST318452LC
target
17 0/1/0/0.12
tgt
CLAIMED
DEVICE
disk
20 0/1/0/0.12.0
sdisk
CLAIMED
DEVICE
HP 18.2GST318452LC
target
18 0/1/0/0.13
tgt
CLAIMED
DEVICE
disk
23 0/1/0/0.13.0
sdisk
CLAIMED
DEVICE
HP 18.2GST318452LC
target
19 0/1/0/0.14
tgt
CLAIMED
DEVICE
disk
21 0/1/0/0.14.0
sdisk
CLAIMED
DEVICE
HP 18.2GST318452LC
target
20 0/1/0/0.15
tgt
CLAIMED
DEVICE
ctl
18 0/1/0/0.15.0
sctl
CLAIMED
DEVICE
HP
A6491A
84
Configuration
Setting DIP Switches
Two DIP switches on left slot BCC determine bus architecture and some
bus behavior. If that BCC is removed, then the DIP switches on the
other BCC define the bus. See Table 8 for a description of switch
settings.
Table 8.
DIP Switch Settings
Switch Bank 1
Off - |
ON = 0
Creates a single bus of up
to 14 disk drives
Splits the bus into two
buses,
up to 7 disk drives each
2 SES/SAF-TE
SAF-TE Mode (SAF-TE
mode is the default. For
HP-UX using EMS, set
to SES)
SES mode
Switch Bank 2
Off - |
ON = 0
1 Bus Reset: Hot
Swap Disk
Automatically issues a
SCSI bus reset when a
disk is removed or
inserted
Lets the host detect
change and determine
action
2 Bus Reset:
Power Fail
Issues a SCSI reset
when the power
supply/fan module
indicates it will go
offline
3 Bus Reset:
Hot Swap BCC
Automatically issues a
SCSI bus reset when a
BCC is removed or
inserted
Note
Configuration
1 Full Bus
Lets the host detect
change and determine
action
The switch settings on both BCCs must match. If the disk
system is being connected to an HP-UX system, the
switch should be set to SES mode. If the disk system is
being connected to a Netserver, the switch should be set
to SAF-TE mode.
If the BCC self-test detects any discrepancy, the buzzer sounds 4 or 5
times, and the BCC fault and system fault LEDs flash. If the system is
starting up, the disks do not spin up. If the system is operating, the disks
and second BCC continue to operate.
Configuration
85
86
Configuration
Rationale
Sites choose DIP switch options according to their priorities and
preferences. High availability sites, for example, may want automatic
bus reset on whereas high performance sites may choose to turn it off.
The following table gives some of the typical reasons for choosing
specific DIP switch settings.
Table 9. DIP Switch Usage
Switch 1
1. Full Bus
Reasons to Set OFF
(|)
a. Split buses allow you to
mirror disks within the
disk system.
b. With two BCCs, full-bus
mode allows two external
connections to the bus.
b. Split-bus mode uses
fewer
IDs on the bus, improving
bus performance.
Switch 2
SAF-TE is required
for NT.
Reasons to Set OFF (|)
Configuration
a. Full-bus mode is the only
way to access all 14 disks
with one BCC.
c. Full-bus mode with two
BCCs gives redundant
environmental services.
2. SES/
SAF-TE
Reasons to Set ON
(0)
SES is required for
HP-UX .
Reasons to Set ON (0)
1. Bus ResetHot Swap
Disk
Automatic bus reset
reduces the chances of
data corruption and saves
the 30 to 60 seconds that
the host would spend
determining that a disk is
unavailable. Bus reset
signals the host to resend
outstanding I/O requests.
a. No bus reset reserves
bus control to the host.
2. Bus ResetPwr Fail
SCSI bus is held in reset
as power goes down, thus
avoiding data corruption
Bus control is restricted
to the host.
3. Bus ResetHot Swap
BCC
Automatic SCSI bus reset
reduces the chance of data
corruption when a BCC is
inserted or removed from
the disk system.
a. No bus reset reserves
bus control to the host.
b. No bus reset avoids
resetting the entire bus
for one disk.
b. No bus reset avoids
resetting the entire bus
for one disk.
Configuration
87
Disk Addressing
Each disk in the StorageWorks Disk System 2300 occupies a separate address
(SCSI ID) on the SCSI bus. Disk addresses range from 0 to 6 and 8 to 14 in fullbus mode (DIP switch 1 set to “|”). In split bus mode (DIP switch 1 set to “0”),
the left BCC (viewing the disk system from the rear) is on the high numbered
bank (with disk slots 8, 9, 10, 11,12, 13, and 14) and the right BCC is on the low
numbered bank (with disk slots 0, 1, 2, 3,4, 5, and 6) of disk slots. Address 7 is
reserved for host bust adapter(s). The BCCs take address 15.
Table 10 shows all target SCSI IDs for full bus and split bus modes.
Table 10.
Disk and BCC SCSI Addresses for Full and Split Bus Modes
SCSI ID
88
Configuration
Physical
Disk Slot
Full Bus
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
Right BCC
Left BCC B
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
See Note
Split Bus
(Right BCC)
Split Bus
(Left BCC)
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
15
Note
In split bus mode, the enclosure monitor circuitry on each BCC
utilizes SCSI address 15. This is allowable since each BCC is
connected to a separate SCSI bus. However, when the enclosure
configuration is in Full Bus mode, and the separate SCSI busses on
the midplane are connected together and there are two BCCs in the
enclosure, the secondary BCC does not connect to the SCSI bus.
Disk Slots and Addressing
In full bus mode, the SCSI address 7 is reserved for the host bus adapter. If more
than one host bus adapter connects the disk system to other hosts, then a disk
module must be removed from the slot whose SCSI address corresponds to the
SCSI address of the additional host bus adapter. The most host bus adapters
supported on this disk system is two.
In split bus mode, the loading sequence is from slot 1 to the right to slot 7 and
from slot 8 to the right to slot 14.
In full bus mode, begin loading the disk modules in slot 1 and continue installing
disk modules toward the right.
Configuration
89
Configuration
The disk system has 14 available disk slots, SCSI addressing
does not follow a “1-to-1” relationship between slot positions
and SCSI addresses. Slot assignments and SCSI addresses are
shown in Figure 49.
Setting Up the Hardware Event Monitor
Separate monitors watch over the disks and the disk system. You need to install
and configure the Disk Monitor (disk_em) and the High Availability Storage
System Monitor (dm_ses_enclosure) for complete event notification.
To install and configure the required monitors, refer to the EMS Hardware
Monitors User’s Guide, which is included in Adobe Acrobat format on IPR
Support Media. You can download a copy of Acrobat Reader without charge
from http://www.adobe.com/prodindex/acrobat/readstep.html.
For specific information about setting up hardware event monitoring using HP
CommandView SDM, see the HP Commandview SDM Disk System Installation
and User Guide, Version 1.04 (Part Number T1001-96006).
For specific information about setting up hardware event monitoring using HP
TopTools 5.5, see the HP TopTools 5.5 User Guide, Version 1.0 on the following
URL:
http://www.hp.com/toptools/doc/manuals.html.
Aliasing Devices (HP-Qualified Only)
Using host-based software, you can “label” each disk system with any
information that would be useful for the site. You might use this feature to assign
an inventory number or to indicate the location of the product. The maximum
length of the annotation is 256 characters. It appears in EMS event messages.
For specific information about annotating devices, see the HP Commandview
SDM Disk System Installation and User Guide.
For specific information about annotating devices using HP TopTools 5.5, see the
HP TopTools 5.5 User Guide.
90
Configuration
Updating Firmware (HP-Qualified Only)
Obtain the latest disk or BCC firmware release from the support site
before traveling to the customer site.
For specific information about updating firmware, see the HP
CommandView SDM Disk System Installation and User Guide, Version
1.04.
For specific information about updating firmware using HP TopTools
5.5, see the HP TopTools 5.5 User Guide.
Command View SDM
Configuration
This configuration tool is supported on three different operating
systems:
■ HP-UX
■ Windows
■ Linux Redhat
Installation varies depending on the chosen operating system. After
installation, Command View SDM operation is virtually identical for all
three operating systems.
The Command View SDM software provides both server and client
applications. If you are operating as a client (on a host not directly
connected to the array), you must be assigned access permission to the
array from the server (host directly connected to the array) to access the
array for Command View SDM management.
Note
Examples in this section occasionally identify a path.
When only one path is shown, either Windows path
separators “\” or UNIX/Linux path separators “/” will be
used. If you use an example, use the path separators
appropriate for your operating system.
Configuration
91
Supported Operating Systems
The HP Command View SDM software is supported on the operating systems
listed below. Both the HP Command View SDM software and the Upgrade
License software products are supported on these operating systems. Minimum
system requirements for each operating system are identified in this section, prior
to the installation instructions for each operating system.
■ HP-UX 11.00 (for most current Support Plus patches, see HP-UX
Installation)
■ HP-UX 11.11 (for most current Support Plus patches, see HP-UX
Installation)
■ Windows NT 4.0 (Service Pack 6a or greater)
■ Windows 2000 (Service Pack 1 or greater)
■ Linux Redhat 6.2 and 7.0
New product support is continually being added for HP disk systems, such as
new operating system support, hardware configurations (Hosts/HBAs), firmware
upgrades, plus additional software products. To obtain the most current support
and product information, access the HP web site.
Installing CommandView SDM
For specific installation instructions for your operating system, see HP Command
View SDM Disk System Installation and User Guide Version 1.04, part number
T1001-96006.
For Windows 2000 installation only:
After the disk system is properly connected and Windows has been started,
follow the procedure below after the “Found new Hardware” pop-up dialog
appears:
1 Select "Search for drivers" and click “Next”.
2 Check the specify location check box, and click “Next”.
3 Click on the “Browse” button.
4 Use the file browser to locate and select the DS2300.inf file on the Command
View SDM CD in the \drivers\win directory (i.e. d:\drivers\win\DS2300.inf).
Click “OK”.
5 Click the next button to install the .inf file.
92
Configuration
HP TopTools
HP TopTools is a web-based, device management tool that enables
administrators and MIS managers to use a web browser to obtain
information about devices on their network. It provides specific
management to the following HP products:
■ HP Vectra and Brio Desktops
■ HP Kayak and Visualize Workstations
■ HP Omnibook Notebooks
■ HP Netservers
■ HP Procurve and AdvanceStack networking devices
Configuration
■ HP LaserJet and JetDirect products
■ HP Jornada PC Companions
■ HP StorageWorks products
■ HP Network Attached Storage (NAS) products
■ Windows systems
Supported Operating Systems
HP TopTools is supported on the following operating systems:
■ Windows NT 4.0 Service Pack 4, 5, or 6a. If none of these are
installed, the TopTools installation will install Service Pack 6a.
■ Window 2000 Professional or Server Editions
Installing HP TopTools 5.0
For specific installation instructions for your operating system, see HP
TopTools 5.5 User Guide. It can be found on the following URL:
http://www.hp.com/toptools/doc/manuals.html
Configuration
93
94
Configuration
Troubleshooting
4
Troubleshooting
95
Overview
The following steps will help you identify and resolve disk system failures:
1 Gather information from all sources:
— Hardware event notifications (page 97)
— Disk system LED status (page 101)
— Online information tools (page 104)
2 Isolate the cause of the problem (page 104).
3 Correct the problem (chapter 5, Removal and Replacement).
4 Verify operational status with IOSCAN or other host utilities.
96
Troubleshooting
Event Notification (HP-UX Systems)
The EMS hardware event monitor polls
environmental services on the BCC and reports any
changes in the status of monitored components.
Depending on how the monitor is set up, you can
receive messages at the console, in e-mail, in a log
file, or through third-party applications. These
messages are likely to be the first indication of a
problem with a disk system.
Events are reported for changes in temperature,
voltage, and the status of replaceable components.
Messages identify five levels of severity:
An event that causes data loss, host system downtime, or
other loss of service. Host system operation will be affected if
the disk system continues to be used without correction.
Immediate action is required.
Serious
An event that may cause data loss, host system downtime, or
other loss of service if left uncorrected. Host system and
hardware operation may be adversely affected. The problem
needs repair as soon as possible.
Major Warning
An event that could escalate to a serious condition if not
corrected. Host system operation should not be affected and
normal use of the disk system can continue. Repair is needed
but at a convenient time.
Minor Warning
An event that will not likely escalate to a severe condition if
left uncorrected. Host system operation will not be
interrupted and normal use of the disk system can continue.
The problem can be repaired when convenient.
Information
An event that is expected as part of the normal operation of
the hardware. No action is required.
Troubleshooting
Troubleshooting
Critical
97
Event messages (see Figure 50) contain the following:
■ Message Data – Date and time the message was sent, the source and
destination of the message, and the severity level
■ Event Data – Date and time of the event, the host, event ID, name of the
monitor, event number, event class, severity level, hardware path, associated
OS error log entry ID
■ Error Description – Narrative information indicating the component that
experienced the event and the nature of the event
■ Probable Cause/Recommended Action – The cause of the event and
suggested steps toward a solution. This information should be the first step in
troubleshooting.
■ Annotation – The user-defined annotation associated with the specific disk
system
98
Troubleshooting
Figure 50. Sample Hardware Event Notification
Notification Time:
Wed Feb 3 11:27:15 1999
yourserver sent Event Monitor notification information:
/storage/events/enclosures/ses_enclosure/8_0_1_0.15.0 is >=1.
Its current value is MAJORWARNING(3)
Event data from monitor:
Event Time: Wed Feb 3 11:27:15 1999
Hostname: yourserver.rose.hp.com
Event ID: 0x0036b8a313000000002
Event # : 402
Severity : MAJOR WARNING
IP Address : 15.43.213.13
Monitor
: dm_ses_enclosure
Event Class: I/O
Enclosure at hardware path 8/0/1/0.15.0: Hardware failure
Associated OS error log entry id(s): None
Description of Error:
The enclosure services controllers have different versions of
firmware.
Probable Cause / Recommended Action:
The enclosure services controller cards have different versions
of firmware. Update the controllers to the same version of
firmware.
User Defined Annotation: Enclosure 37 BCC A.
Troubleshooting
Troubleshooting
99
HP Command View SDM
For specific information about using HP CommandView SDM for viewing the
disk logs and for other functions, see the HP CommandView SDM Disk System
Installation and User Guide. This document can be found at the following URL:
http://h200002.www2.hp.com/bc/docs/support/
SupportManual/lpg29284/lpg29284.pdf
TopTools
For specific information about using HP TopTools 5.5 for viewing disk logs and
for other functions, see the HP TopTools Version 5.5 User Guide. This document
can be found at the following URL:
http://www.hp.com/toptools/doc/manuals.pdf
100 Troubleshooting
Status LEDs
LEDs indicate the status of the disk system itself and each of its
components (see Table 11). Green and amber system LEDs are visible
on the front of the disk system. They show that power is on (green) and
a fault has occurred (amber). Disk activity (green) LEDs are on the front
of the disk modules at the bottom of each disk module. Other LEDs are
on individual components in the back of the disk system.
Troubleshooting
Troubleshooting 101
LED states are described in Table 11:
Table 11.
LED Functions
LED
System Power
System Fault
BCC Fault
Term. Pwr.
Full Bus
1
2
3
102 Troubleshooting
State
Indication
Green
Power is on
OFF
Power is off
Amber
Self-test1 / Problem2
OFF
Normal operation
Flashing
BCC A & B DIP switch settings
do not match.
Amber
Self-test1 / Fault
OFF
Normal operation
Flashing
Peer BCC DIP switch settings
do not match or BCC not installed properly
Green
Termination power is available
from the host.
Flashing
Activity on the bus
OFF
There is no termination power.
Green
Disks are on a single bus of 14
addresses.
OFF
Disks are split between two buses,
seven addresses each
Start-up and self-tests occur briefly when the unit is
powered on.
A component has failed; temperature or voltage is out of
normal range. See Isolating Faults on page 104
When a disk is installed with power on, its activity LED
blinks on momentarily indicating a SCSI bus reset. When
the disk is ready, the LED blinks once and turns off.
Thereafter, it flashes when there is I/O to the disk.
Table 11.
LED Functions (Continued)
LED
State
Power Supply/
Fan Module
3
Disk Activity
Indication
Amber
Power Supply/Fan fault
Amber
Flashing
Host is identifying the power supply
module.
Green
Operating normally
OFF
Power is off.
Green LED
ON
Disk module installed and operating
normally (Controlled by the disk drive)
Green Flashing Disk drive self-test in progress or I/O
activity to/from disk (Controlled by the
disk drive)
1
2
3
Amber LED
ON
Disk module fault (Controlled by host
software)
Amber LED
flashing
Host is identifying the disk module
(Controlled by host software)
OFF
Not installed or not operating
Start-up and self-tests occur briefly when the unit is
powered on.
A component has failed; temperature or voltage is out of
normal range. See Isolating Faults on page 104
When a disk is installed with power on, its activity LED
blinks on momentarily indicating a SCSI bus reset. When
the disk is ready, the LED blinks once and turns off.
Thereafter, it flashes when there is I/O to the disk.
Note
Troubleshooting 103
Troubleshooting
An amber LED that is on briefly when a component first comes on
is normal. If this light remains on more than a couple of seconds, a
fault has been detected.
Isolating Faults
Table 12 lists the probable causes and solutions for problems you may detect on
the disk system. When more than one problem applies to your situation,
investigate the first description that applies. The table lists the most basic
problems first and excludes them from subsequent problem descriptions.
Table 12.
Troubleshooting Table
Problem
Description
Installed
product does
not power on
HW Event
Category
none
LED
State
System
power
LED off
STM
Status
none
Probable Cause/Solution
Neither power cord is plugged in.
The power switch is not pressed.
AC breaker is tripped.
AC power source has failed.
The PDU/PDRU is defective.
Power switch is defective.
A faulty component is causing
power supplies to turn off. Remove
all components and reinsert one at
a time until the faulty component is
isolated.
System fault
LED is on
Audio alarm
when BCC
installed
none
Power
supply
LED off
Power
One power supply is not functional.
supply Not
The PDU/PDRU or primary power
Available
source has failed.
Critical
Part fault
LED on
Critical
none
BCC Fault Disk Not
flashing
Available
A component has failed. See
problem descriptions below.
BCC DIP switch settings do not
match peer BCC switch settings.
Reset switches.
Improper cable/terminator connections
BCC Fault
LED is on
104 Troubleshooting
Critical
BCC Fault Critical
on
BCC hardware is faulty.
Replace the BCC.
Table 12.
Troubleshooting Table (Continued)
Problem
Description
HW Event
Category
Power supply/ Critical
fan LED is
amber
LED
State
Amber
STM
Status
Critical
Probable Cause/Solution
An incompatible or defective
component caused a
temporary fault.
Power supply hardware is faulty.
Unplug the power cord and
wait for the LED to turn off.
Reinsert the power cord. If
fault persists, replace the
power supply.
IOSCAN lists Critical
BCC and
disks as
NO_HW
All normal none
SCSI cable is unplugged or loose at
either end.
SCSI cable is damaged. Replace with
another cable to test.
HBA is faulty. Check status and
correct any problem.
All off
none
Disk system is powered off.
Enclosure Monitor Switch is set on
SAF-TE mode.
IOSCAN lists none
disk as
NO_HW
On or off
(See STM Disk is faulty. Replace.
Disk Tool)
midplane is faulty. Replace.
Troubleshooting
Troubleshooting 105
Table 12.
Troubleshooting Table (Continued)
Problem
Description
HW Event
Category
Temperatur Critical
e is over
limit
Major
Warning
LED
State
none
STM
Status
Critical
Temp is
>54.5º
C
none
Noncritical
Temp is
>36º C
Probable Cause/Solution
A fan is faulty. Check status and
correct.
Airflow is obstructed; vents are
blocked.
One or more slots are empty.
Power supply is faulty. Check
status and correct.
Room temperature is too high. If
ambient temperature cannot be
reduced in a reasonable time, turn
off product to prevent shortened
life.
Temperature sensors are on the BCC and
are independent of power supplies.
Investigate temperature warnings
immediately, before power supplies sense
Temperature sensor is faulty.
critical temperature and turn off.
Compare temperature reported by
peer BCC.
Temperature Critical
is under limit
none
Critical
Temps
<9.5º C
Major
Warning
none
Noncritical
Temps
<15.5º C
Voltage is
over limit
Critical
none
Critical
Major
Warning
none
Noncritical
Voltage is
under limit
Critical
none
Critical
Major
Warning
none
Noncritical
Peer BCC
Major
status,
Warning
temperature
and voltage
are Not
Available
none
Both
BCCs:
Noncritical
Firmware on BCC A and BCC B are
different versions.
none
Not
Available
Internal bus is faulty. Contact HP
technical support to replace
midplane.
106 Troubleshooting
– Room temperature is too low.
– Temperature sensor is faulty.
Compare temperature reported by
peer BCC.
Power supply is faulty. Check
status and correct.
Either power supply is faulty.
Check status and correct.
Removal and Replacement
5
Caution
Do not remove hot-pluggable components until you have the
replacement parts and are ready to install them. An empty slot will
cause uneven cooling and eventual overheating.
Caution
Do not move the disk system with disks installed and power on.
Even a one-inch drop of the disk system can damage spinning
disks
Removal and Replacement 107
108 Removal and Replacement
Table 13.
Part No.
FRU Description
Exch/
Repl.
Part
FRU
Type
1
A6537-69001
18GB 10k rpm LVD disk module
E/R
CRU
1
A6538-69001
36GB 10k rpm LVD disk module
E/R
CRU
1
A6539-69001
73GB 10k rpm LVD disk module
E/R
CRU
1
A6540-69001
18GB 15k rpm LVD disk module
E/R
CRU
1
A6541-69001
36GB 15k rpm LVD disk module
E/R
CRU
2
A6198-67014
Disk Drive Filler Panel
R
CRU
3
A6214-67003
Enclosure Bezel
R
CRU
4
A6490-96002
Midplane Assembly (includes:
midplane PCA, T-15 driver,
ESD kit, 8 x T-15 x 6/32 x 7/16”
long screws, 3 x T-10 x 6mm
long screws, 1 x power/standby
switch shaft, 1 x lightpipe)
R
HP
5
A6250-69001
Power Supply/Fan Module
E
CRU
6
A6491-69001
Bus Controller Card
E/R
CRU
Removal and Replacement 109
Removal and Replacement
Fig.
24
Item
JBOD Enclosure Field Replaceable Units
Disk Module
Add or replace disks to increase storage capacity or eliminate faults. (See
Chapter 4 for troubleshooting procedures.) Disks must be Ultra-3 SCSI (LVD)
and 3.5 inches wide but can vary in capacity. For current information about
supported disks, consult an HP sales representative.
You do not need to turn off the disk system to replace a disk or filler.
Preparation (HP-UX 11.XX)
Removing or replacing a disk has consequences for the file systems and logical
volumes located on the disk. Before removing or replacing a disk, complete the
appropriate system administration for your environment and configuration.
Instructions for determining physical volume status and reducing and recreating
mirrored extents follow. For additional information, refer to your HP-UX guide,
How HP-UX Works: Concepts for the System Administrator.
The LVM commands in the following instructions assume the following:
■ All of the extents of the disk in use belong to mirrored logical volumes
created with the strict (-s) option.
■ The replacement disk is of the same or greater capacity as the disk being
replaced.
The correct set of instructions depends on whether the mirrored volume is active
and attached, or unattached. First, follow the instructions to determine the
volume status; then follow the instructions to replace the volume depending on
whether the volume is attached or unattached.
110 Removal and Replacement
At the host console, enter:
# vgdisplay <VG name>
For example:
#vgdisplay /dev/vg00
If the volume group is not active, the host will display:
# vgdisplay: volume group not activated.
# vgdisplay: cannot display volume group
/dev/vg00
The following messages will appear if the disk is defective:
VGDISPLAY: WARNING: COULDN’T QUERY PHYSICAL VOLUME “/dev/dsk/c2t4d0”
THE SPECIFIED PATH DOES NOT CORRESPOND TO PHYSICAL VOLUME ATTACHED TO THE VOLUME GROUP
VGDISPLAY: WARNING: COULDN’T QUERY ALL OF THE PHYSICAL VOLUMES
If either of the above messages appears, follow the replacement instructions for
unattached physical volumes (page 114).
Otherwise, follow the instructions to determine if the physical volume is
attached.
To Determine If the Physical Volume Is Attached
Enter the vgchange command to activate the volume group.
The physical volume is unattached if a message similar to the following appears:
VGCHANGE: WARNING: COULDN’T ATTACH TO THE VOLUME GROUP PHYSICAL VOLUME
“/dev/dsk/c2t4d0”
THE PATH OF THE PHYSICAL VOLUME REFERS TO A DEVICE THAT DOES NOT EXIST, OR IS
NOT CONFIGURED INTO THE KERNEL.
Continue with the appropriate replacement instructions as follows:
■ If the physical volume is unattached, follow the instructions for replacing
unattached physical volumes (page 114).
■ If the physical volume is attached, follow the instructions for replacing
attached physical volumes (page 112).
Removal and Replacement 111
Removal and Replacement
To Determine If a Volume Group or Physical Volume Group Is
Active
To Replace Attached Physical Volumes
Use the following commands to reduce any logical volumes that have mirror
copies on the faulty disk and to recreate the mirror extents once the disk has been
replaced. Commands to recover from a host failure are included with most steps.
Note
The way that mirrors span several disks may not be duplicated
exactly. For cases where the original mirror layout must be
preserved, consider deactivating the volume group with the
vgchange command and using the procedure for replacing
unattached physical volumes.
1 Enter the following command to reduce the mirror:
# lvreduce -m <mirror_copies> -A n <LV name> <physical volume path>
For example, to reduce a two-way mirror:
# lvreduce -m 0 -A n /dev/vg00/lvol4 /dev/dsk/c2t4d0
or, for a three-way mirror:
# lvreduce -m 1 -A n /dev/vg00/lvol5 /dev/dsk/c2t4d0
If the host fails during this step, execute an lvdisplay command to determine
if the lvreduce command succeeded. If the command did not succeed, execute
the command again. Perform any other lvreduce commands that were not
executed before the system failed. Then proceed.
Note
An important effect of the lvreduce command is that the LVM
configuration backup file used by the vgcfgrestore command is
updated. If this replacement procedure is being performed now on
another host system and there is no need to execute any lvreduce
commands, then the configuration file is not updated. The LVM
configuration is correct on the physical volumes, however, so the
configuration file can be updated with the vgcfbackup command.
2 Physically replace the disk (see page 115).
3 Execute ioscan to verify that the new disk drive is accessible and a proper
replacement.
4 Enter the following command to restore the LVM configuration/headers to
the replaced disks from the backup of the LVM configuration:
# vgcfgrestore -n <volume group name> <physical volume path>
112 Removal and Replacement
For example:
If the host fails, repeat the step to ensure all configuration data is written to
the new disk.
Note
If this replacement procedure is being performed now on another
host system and there is no need to execute any lvreduce
commands, then the configuration file can be updated with the
vgcfbackup command.
5 Enter the following command to attach the replaced disk to the active volume
group:
# vgchange -a y <volume group name>
For example:
# vgchange -a y /dev/vg00
6 Enter the lvextend command to transfer the mirrors onto the replaced disk. It
will take time to copy all of the original data to the mirrored extents. The
logical volumes are accessible to users’ applications for two-way mirroring
during this command.
# lvextend -m <mirror_copies> <LV name> physical volume path
For example, for two-way mirroring:
# lvextend -m 1 /dev/vg00/lvol4 /dev/dsk/c2t4d0
For three-way mirroring:
# lvextend -m 2 /dev/vg00/lvol5 /dev/dsk/c2t4d0
If the host fails during step 6, execute an lvdisplay command to determine if
the lvextend command was successful. If the command did not successfully
execute, reissue the command. Perform any other lvextend commands that
were not executed before the system failed.
At this point, the system should be fully functioning.
Removal and Replacement 113
Removal and Replacement
# vgcfgrestore -n /dev/vg00 /dev/rdsk/c2t4d0
To Replace Unattached Physical Volumes
Follow these instructions if the volume group is not active or if the physical
volume is unattached.
1 Replace the disk (see page 115).
2 Execute IOSCAN to verify that the replaced disk is accessible and a proper
replacement disk.
3 Enter the vgcfgrestore command to restore the LVM configuration/headers to
the replaced disk from the backup of the LVM configuration.
# vgcfgrestore -n <volume group name> character device file
For example:
# vgcfgrestore -n /dev/vg00 /dev/rdsk/c2t4d0
4 Enter the vgchange command to attach the new disk to the active volume
group:
# vgchange -a y <volume group name>
For example:
# vgchange -a y /dev/vg00
NT
1 After installing the disk module, execute the “Disk Administrator” utility to
configure the new disk module.
2 To execute select Start -> Programs -> Administrative Tools -> Disk
Administrator.
3 The new drive detection wizard will detect the new devices and will write a
signature to each device. Choose yes at the prompts questioning these actions.
4 From the list of drives, choose the first unconfigured drive by right clicking
on the free space. Choose create to create a new volume, then choose to use
the entire available disk space.
5 Then right-click on the unformatted volumes and select commit changes now
and press ok to the update emergency repair disk notice.
6 Right-click once again and choose format. Choose quick format and press ok
to continue.
7 Once formatted, repeat the process for each of the remaining drives.
114 Removal and Replacement
9 View the newly created drives and ensure all drives are shown.
Windows 2000
Note
The following instructions are for the configuration of a new disk
module. They should not be followed to add a disk module with
data to an existing disk system.
1 After installing the disk module, execute the “Disk Management” utility to
configure the disk module.
2 To execute the utility: select Start −> Programs −> Administrative Tools −>
Computer Management.
3 Select “Disk Management”.
4 Your new disk module should be seen by the “Disk Management” utility and
a Disk Configuration Wizard pop-up will appear on the screen. Follow the
wizard’s directions to write a signature to the disk module and to configure
the drive type.
5 Create partitions or physical volumes and specify the name, drive letter, and
size of each.
6 Specify the format type of the partition(s) or physical volume(s) and proceed
with the format.
7 After the format and wizard have completed, the disk module should be ready
for use.
Tools
ESD wrist strap (no hand tools are required to perform this procedure).
Whenever possible, follow ESD procedures.
Procedure
Caution
Whenever possible, follow standard ESD procedures
and avoid touching exposed circuitry.
Do not remove a disk or filler from an operating product until
you have the replacement part and are ready to install it. An
Removal and Replacement 115
Removal and Replacement
8 Exit the “Disk Administrator” utility and execute explorer (right-click start
and choose explorer).
empty slot will cause uneven cooling and eventual overheating.
1 Release the disk from the slot by squeezing the latch tab (B) and pulling it
toward you.
Caution
Spinning disks generate heat and gyroscopic force.
Wait for a spinning disk to slow down and cool off
before removing it from the product.
WARNING
High current available. Avoid touching the midplane or adjacent
drive electronics when removing and inserting disk modules.
2 Pull the disk out of the slot, using the latch until you can get your hand around
the handle (C). Support the disk module with your other hand around the
enclosed side.
Note
116 Removal and Replacement
Removing disk modules and fillers from right to left improves
access to successive disk modules.
Removal and Replacement
Caution
Replace the disk module or filler immediately (see next step).
Caution
Touching the disk circuit board can cause high energy
discharge and permanently damage the disk.
Disk modules are fragile. Handle carefully.
3 Remove the replacement disk module from its ESD bag, being careful to
grasp the disk module by its extraction handle (see Figure 53). (Fillers are not
in ESD bags.)
4 Press the cam latch (B) toward the end of the extraction handle to loosen the
extraction handle.
When you are installing a disk module filler, align the disk filler guides with
the chassis rails and insert the filler. Push the filler in until it stops. When it is
fully inserted, it will be flush with the rest of the disk modules/disk module
fillers.
5 Slide the disk module, capacity label up (C), into the empty slot.
Removal and Replacement 117
6 Press the extraction handle to seat the disk module firmly on the midplane.
An audible click indicates the disk module is fully seated.
7 If you are installing a disk module (as opposed to a filler), monitor the LED
(D). It should be on while the disk spins up and then turn off. The LED will
blink with I/O activity to the disk. If you observe different results, refer to
Chapter 4, Troubleshooting, for probable causes.
8 Run IOSCAN on the host and verify that the replacement disk module is
“claimed.”
9 Restore file systems and data as needed (see Preparation (HP-UX 11.XX) on
page 110).
118 Removal and Replacement
Replace a BCC when troubleshooting shows that the card is faulty (see “Isolating
Faults” in Chapter 4).
There is no need to turn off the disk system to remove and replace a BCC. In full
bus mode with two BCCs, there is also no need to stop I/O to the disks. In other
configurations, however, the host must be notified that all disks on the affected
bus will be unavailable for I/O. Refer to Preparation (HP-UX 11.XX) on
page 110.
Caution
Touching the BCC pins can cause high energy
discharge and permanently damage the BCC.
Tools
ESD wrist strap (no hand tools are required to perform this procedure).
Whenever possible, follow ESD procedures.
Procedure
Caution
Do not remove a BCC from an operating product until you have
the replacement BCC and are ready to install it. An empty slot will
cause uneven cooling and eventual overheating.
1 Remove the cables and/or terminators from the failed BCC.
2 Loosen the locking thumbscrew (A in Figure 54) until it clears the BCC
bulkhead. The screw stays in the ejector handle.
3 Open the cam levers (B) by pulling them away from the center of the card.
This disconnects the BCC pins from the midplane.
4 Pull the BCC out of the slot (C).
Replace the BCC immediately if the product is in use (see next step).
5 Attach the clip end of your ESD wrist strap to the ground stud at the top of the
rack.
Caution
Touching the BCC pins can cause high energy
discharge and permanently damage the BCC.
Removal and Replacement 119
Removal and Replacement
BCC
6 Remove the replacement BCC from its ESD bag.
Caution
Switches must have the same settings on both BCCs.
7 Open the cam levers (see Figure 54) of the replacement BCC by pulling them
away from the center of the card.
8 Insert the BCC in the empty slot.
9 Push the cam levers flat against the center of the card to seat the BCC pins
firmly on the midplane.
120 Removal and Replacement
11 Tighten the locking screws (B in Figure 54).
12 Reattach the SCSI cable and terminator.
Caution
The BCC must be replaced or a filler panel installed in the open
slot to ensure proper cooling for the disk system.
Removal and Replacement 121
Removal and Replacement
10 Watch the BCC Fault LED (B in Figure 55). It should come on briefly and
then turn off. If the LED stays on and a buzzer sounds, the switch settings do
not match the settings on the peer BCC. For other solutions to a BCC fault,
see “Isolating Causes” in Chapter 4.
BCC Filler Panel
If a BCC is removed and a new one is not available, the BCC slot must be filled
to ensure proper cooling for the disk system. This is done with a BCC filler
panel.
For removal instructions for the BCC, see page 119.
Caution
122 Removal and Replacement
Do not remove the malfunctioning BCC until you have available
either a BCC filler panel or a replacement BCC.
Replace a power supply as soon as possible when troubleshooting indicates a
power supply failure (see “Isolating Causes” in Chapter 4). If a power supply
fails, the remaining power supply provides proper voltage to the disk system.
However, if the remaining power supply fails before the first power supply is
replaced, the disk system will turn off.
The power supply fan may continue to operate even when a power supply fails.
You do not need to turn off the disk system to replace a power supply.
Follow ESD procedures whenever possible.
Tools
ESD wrist strap (no hand tools are required to perform this procedure).
Whenever possible, follow ESD procedures.
Procedure
Caution
Do not remove a power supply from an operating product
until you have the replacement and are ready to install it.
An empty slot will cause uneven cooling and eventual
overheating.
The power supply may be hot to touch.
1 Disconnect the power cord from the power supply.
2 Loosen the thumbscrews on the power supply handles (A and B in Figure 57).
3 Rotate the handles out to disengage the power supply from the midplane.
4 Pull the power supply out of the chassis. Support the far end of the supply
with your free hand as it clears the chassis.
Replace the power supply immediately if the product is in use (see next step).
Removal and Replacement 123
Removal and Replacement
Power Supply
5 Slide the replacement power supply into the empty slot (D in Figure 57). The
power supply begins to engage the midplane with 3/8 inch (8mm) still
exposed.
6 Rotate the handles back toward the center of the power supply module to
draw the power supply the last 3/8 inch into the chassis and firmly seat the
power supply on the midplane. The power supply should be flush with the
edge of the chassis.
7 Tighten the thumbscrews on the power supply handles (A and B). It is
recommended that you use a screwdriver to ensure proper seating.
8 Plug the power cord into the power supply and electrical source.
9 Monitor the power supply LED. It should turn green. If the LED is dark or
stays amber, see Chapter 4, Troubleshooting.
124 Removal and Replacement
Use this procedure if you need to move or remove and replace the disk system in
the rack. For example, you must remove the disk system from the rack in order to
replace the midplane or power switch assembly. 24 inches of vertical space is
required in the rack if these units are to be replaced without removing the disk
system from the rack.
The disk system must be turned off in this procedure.
Caution
Do not move the disk system with disks installed and power on.
Even a one-inch drop of the disk system can damage spinning
disks.
Tools
The tools you need to install the disk system hardware are:
■ Torx T25 screwdriver
■ Torx T15 screwdriver
■ Small flat-blade screwdriver
■ ESD wrist strap. Whenever possible, follow ESD procedures.
Procedure
1 Determine the file systems that will be inaccessible for I/O operations while
the disk system is turned off, and perform necessary system administration.
(See the HP-UX guide, How HP-UX Works: Concepts for the System
Administrator.)
2 Push and release the power button to turn off the disk system.
3 Remove the disk modules from the chassis and set them aside on an antistatic surface. Label the disk modules so they can be reinstalled in the same
disk slots from which they were removed.
4 Remove the power supply/fan modules and set them aside on an anti-static
surface.
5 Disconnect power and SCSI cables from the back of the disk system.
6 Remove the BCCs from the chassis and set them aside on an anti-static
surface.
Removal and Replacement 125
Removal and Replacement
Disk System
7 Remove screws from the mounting ears (see detail in Figure 58).
WARNING
An empty storage device weighs approximately 54 pounds
(without disk modules installed) (24.5 kg). To avoid personal
injury, it is recommended that two people install the storage device
in the rack.
8 Push the disconnected disk system forward or lift it completely out of the
rack, as needed.
9 When you are ready to replace the disk system, push the chassis back into the
rack.
126 Removal and Replacement
10 Insert and tighten the front mounting screws.
12 Reinstall the disk modules in the slots from which they were removed.
13 Reconnect SCSI cables and power cords.
14 Push the power button in to turn on the disk system.
15 Perform necessary system administration to return file systems to service.
Removal and Replacement 127
Removal and Replacement
11 Reinstall the power supply/fan module(s).
Top Cover (HP-Qualified Only)
The following procedure is for HP-qualified personnel only.
Remove and replace the top cover (not a replaceable part) in order to replace the
power switch assembly, light pipes, or the midplane.
You will need to turn the power off to perform this procedure.
Tools
■ Small flat-blade screwdriver
■ Torx T25 screwdriver
■ Torx T10 screwdriver
Procedure
Caution
Disk slots must be empty before removing the top cover.
1 Remove disk modules and fillers and place them on an appropriate anti-static
surface. See page 110.
2 Disconnect all power and SCSI cables.
3 Remove the power supply/fan modules. See page 123.
4 Remove the disk system retention screws. See page 126.
5 Remove the disk system from the rack and place it on an appropriate antistatic surface. See page 125.
Caution
Removing the top cover with the power switch in the ON (in)
position can damage the internal switch.
6 Remove the three flathead screws from the top of the top cover (A in
Figure 59).
7 Rotate the cover upward; then lift it away from the disk system.
128 Removal and Replacement
Removal and Replacement
To reinstall the top cover:
1 Insert the edge of the top cover under the outer sheet metal of the chassis.
2 Slide the cover toward the middle of the chassis, making sure to rotate the top
cover down to align with the edges of the chassis.
3 Insert the three Torx T10 screws through the holes as shown in Figure 59.
4 Tighten the three Torx T10 screws.
5 Reinstall the disk system in the rack. See page 125.
6 Reinstall the disk system retention screws to secure the disk system.
7 Reinstall the power supply/fan modules.
Removal and Replacement 129
8 Reinstall the power and SCSI cables.
9 Reinstall disks and fillers. See page 110.
Midplane (HP-Qualified Only)
The midplane board is replaceable by HP-qualified personnel only.
Replace the midplane based on troubleshooting results (see “Isolating Causes” in
Chapter 4). Disks, BCCs, fans, and power supplies connect to the midplane.
The power must be OFF (out) and the top cover removed in order to remove and
replace the midplane board.
Caution
Turning off a disk system isolates the enclosed disks from the host.
Perform recommended system administration to prevent loss of
pending I/Os to the disks.
Tools
■ Small flat-blade screwdriver
■ Torx T25 screwdriver
■ Torx T15 screwdriver
■ Torx T10 screwdriver
■ ESD strap
Procedure
1 Remove the top cover. See page 128.
2 Put on your ESD strap and attach the free end to the ESD plug on the disk
system.
Caution
130 Removal and Replacement
Static discharge can destroy functional
components on the midplane.
3 To remove the midplane:
Loosen the cam handle locking screws and pull power supplies free of the
midplane (see page 123).
b Loosen the cam handle locking screws and pull the BCCs free of the
midplane.
c
Remove the disk modules and fillers from the chassis.
d Remove the light pipes (see Figure 60 on page 132) from the chassis.
e
Remove the power switch extender arm.
f
Remove the eight Torx T15 screws along the top and bottom edges of the
midplane (see Figure 60).
g Pull the midplane forward to clear alignment pins and lift it up and out of
the disk system.
4 To replace the midplane:
a
Stand the new midplane inside the chassis and push it over the alignment
pins. Adjust the final position of the midplane as necessary for optimal
connections to power supply/fan modules, BCCs, and disk modules.
b Insert and tighten eight screws into the midplane and chassis.
c
Replace the light pipes.
d Replace the power switch extender arm.
5 Replace the top cover. See page 128.
6 Reseat and secure the BCCs (see page 119).
7 Reseat and secure the power supplies (see page 123).
8 Reinstall the disk modules and fillers.
Removal and Replacement 131
Removal and Replacement
a
The deskside base and external covers must be removed from the chassis before
the top cover, the midplane, the light pipes, or the power switch extender arm can
be replaced.
Follow the procedures below to remove and replace the deskside conversion kit:
Powering Down the Disk System
1 Complete the appropriate system administration tasks for taking this storage
device offline for your operating system.
2 Power down the disk system.
3 Disconnect the power cord(s) and SCSI cable(s).
4 Remove the power supplies and place them on an anti-static surface.
5 Remove the disk modules and carefully place them on an anti-static surface.
Be sure to note the slots from which the disk modules were removed to
replace them in the same slots.
Removing the deskside base and external covers from the disk system
Tools
■ Torx T25 driver
■ ESD strap
Procedure
1 Rotate the disk system and place it on its end with the end cap facing up.
2 Remove the two M5 end cap retaining screws from the bottom of the disk
system using a Torx T25 driver. See Figure 61.
3 Rotate the end cap off the bottom of the disk system.
4 Pull the end cap away from the disk system.
Removal and Replacement 133
Removal and Replacement
Deskside Base/External Covers (HP-Qualified Only)
5 Rotate the disk system and place it on its top.
Removal and Replacement 135
Removal and Replacement
6 Remove the four M5 screws from the array chassis using a Torx T25 driver.
They are the four screws that are closest to the center of the base. See
Figure 62.
7 Remove the four M5 screws from the cover using a Torx T25 driver. They are
the four screws that are closest to the edges of the base.
Figure 63.
Base Removal from Chassis
A
A base
136 Removal and Replacement
8 Lift the disk system chassis off the alignment pins and out of the cover.
Removal and Replacement
Removal and Replacement 137
Reinstalling the deskside base and external covers on the disk
system.
1 Place the deskside external cover on its top, on a sturdy surface.
2 Lift the disk system chassis into the cover, onto the alignment pins. The disk
system should be installed into the cover with the power switch down (toward
the closed part of the cover).
3 Secure the base to the cover using four M5 screws. Tighten the screws using a
Torx T25 driver. They are the four screws that are closest to the edges of the
base.
4 Secure the base to the chassis using four M5 screws. Tighten the screws using
a Torx T25 driver. They are the four screws that are closest to the edges of the
base.
138 Removal and Replacement
Removal and Replacement
5 Rotate the disk system and place it on the back end of the disk system. The
empty disk module slots should be facing up.
6 Align the end cap tabs into the appropriate slots at the top of the disk system.
7 Rotate the end cap down over the base, aligning the small tabs at the top of
the end cap with the end cap slots. Insert and tighten the M5 retaining screws
using the Torx T25 driver. Be sure the retaining screw holes are aligned (see
Figure 67).
Removal and Replacement 139
6
Reference
Product Models
Two models of the disk system are available:
■ A6490A and A6490AV field-racked (by HP-qualified service engineers)
■ A6490AE empty field rack disk system
■ A6490AD deskside disk system
■ A6490ED empty deskside disk system
■ A6490AZ factory-racked disk system
Reference 141
Upgrade Products
Order the following parts to expand or reconfigure your original purchase:
Table 14.
Upgrade Products
Order No.
142 Reference
Description
A6537A
18-Gbyte 10K rpm LVD disk module
A6538A
36-Gbyte 10K rpm LVD disk module
A6539A
73-Gbyte 10K rpm LVD disk module
A6540A
18-Gbyte 15K rpm LVD disk module
A6541A
36-Gbyte 15K rpm LVD disk module
A6491A
Bus Control Card
C2362B
2.5-meter SCSI VHDTS68/HDTS68 M/M Multimode Cable
(NT support only)
C2363B
10-meter SCSI VHDTS68/HDTS68 M/M Multimode Cable
(NT support only)
C2365B
5-meter SCSI VHDTS68/HDTS68 M/M Multimode Cable
(NT support only)
C2373A
2-meter VHDCI Ultra SCSI cable
C2374A
5-meter VHDCI Ultra SCSI cable
C2375A
10-meter VHDCI Ultra SCSI cable
A6244A
Rail kit for HP C2785A, C2786A, C2787A, A1896A, and
A1897A
A6209A
Rail kit for HP Rack Systems/E
A5672A
Rittal Rack Rail Kit
A6498A
2-Post Rack Kit
PDU/PDRU Products
Table 15.
PDU/PDRU Products
Order No.
Description
19-inch, 100-240 V, 16 Amp, 1 C20 inlet, 10 C13 outlets
E7671A
19-inch, 100-240 V, 16 Amp, 1 C20 inlet, 2 C19 & 6 C13 outlets
E7674A
19-inch, 100-240 V, 16 Amp, 1 C20 inlet, 1 C19 & 7 C13 outlets
E7679A
19-inch, 100-127 V, 16 Amp, 2 C20 inlets, 2 C19 outlets, switch
accessory
E7680A
19-inch, 200-240 V, 16 Amp, 2 C20 inlets, 2 C19 outlets, switch
accessory
E7681A
19-inch, 200-240 V, 30 Amp, L6-30P, 2 C19 & 8 C13 outlets,
switch accessory
E7682A
19-inch, 200-240 V, 30 Amp, IEC-309, 2 C19 & 8 C13 outlets,
switch accessory
E4452A
36-inch, 200-240 V, 16 Amp, L6-20P plug, 6 IEC-320 outlets
E4453A
36-inch, 200-240 V, 16 Amp, L6-20P plug, 6 IEC outlets
E5933A
36-inch, 110-240 V, 16 Amp, UPS, IEC-320, 6 IEC-320 outlets
E4456A/B
60-inch, 220 V, 16 Amp, power cord w/IEC-320 plug, 6 IEC
outlets
E4457A/B
60-inch, 200-240 V, 16 Amp, L6-20P plug, 10 IEC-320 outlets
E5930A
60-inch, 110-220 V, 16 Amp, UPS, IEC-320, 10 C-13 outlets
E5931A
60-inch, 220 V, 16 Amp, UPS, LP-30P, 10 C-13 outlets
E5932A
60-inch, 220 V, 16 Amp, UPS, no plug, 10 C-13 outlets
E7677A
Switch panel accessory for PRU
E7678A
Switch control jumper cord for PRU
Reference 143
Reference
E7676A
Replaceable Parts
Table 16.
Replacement and Exchange Part Numbers
Replacement
Part
Number
Exchange
Part
Number
8120-6514
Power cord
(North America Only)
5021-1121
Terminator
A6490-67001
Front Bezel
A6250-67001
A6250-69001
A6490-67005
A6491-67001
144 Reference
Description
Power supply/Fan module
Midplane Assembly
A6491-69001
Bus Control Card (BCC)
A6490-67002
BCC Filler Panel
A6198-67002
Disk Filler Panel
A6537-67001
A6537-69001
18 GB 10k rpm LVD disk module
A6538-67001
A6538-69001
36 GB 10k rpm LVD disk module
A6539-67001
A6539-69001
73 GB 10k rpm LVD disk module
A6540-67001
A6540-69001
18 GB 15k rpm LVD disk module
A6541-67001
A6541-69001
36 GB 15k rpm LVD disk module
Specifications
Dimensions
The maximum dimensions of the racked version of the disk system with the
power supply handles closed are as follows:
■ Height: 13.0 cm (5.10 in.)
■ Width: 44.8 cm (17.60 in.)
■ Depth: 50.5 cm (19.90 in.)
■ Weight: 27.3 - 36.4 kg (60 - 80 lbs) depending on configuration
Reference
The maximum dimensions of the deskside version are:
■ Height: 49.1 cm (19.3 in)
■ Width: 31.7 (base): cm (12.5 in)
■ Depth: 60.7 cm (23.9 in)
■ Weight: 37.3 - 46.4 kg (82 - 102 lbs) depending on configuration
Weight
A fully loaded disk system weighs approximately 77 pounds. Component
weights are shown in Table 17.
Table 17.
Product Weights
Component
Weight of
Each (lbs)
Quantity
Subtotal
(lbs)
Disk Module (LP)
1.6
14
Power Supply/Fan
Module
9.5
2
19
BCC
3
2
6
Midplane
6
1
6
23
1
23
Approx. Total
76.4 lbs
Chassis
22.4
Reference 145
AC Power Input
The disk system operates at 100-127 and 200-240 V AC, 50-60 Hz, single phase,
power factor corrected. Maximum current is 4.8 amps over the low voltage range
and 2.0 amps over the high voltage range. Average power consumption with
medium load (14 disks running idle) is 345 watts.
DC Power Output
■ Disk: +5 V and +12 V from power supply
■ BCC: +5 V and +3.3 V from power supply
Heat Output
1600 BTU/hr.
Environment
The following environmental specifications were type-tested under controlled
conditions. Hewlett-Packard maintains an active program of auditing production
products to make sure these specifications remain true when products are retested
under the same conditions. However, the limits of these specifications do not
represent the optimum for long, trouble-free operation and specifically are not
recommended for maximum satisfaction. The recommended conditions are
stated when appropriate.
■ Operating temperature: 5º C to 38º C (41º F to 100º F)
Recommended: 20º C to 25.5º C (68º F to 78º F)
■ Storage temperature: -40º C to 70º C (-40º F to 158º F)
■ Maximum gradient: 20º C per hour (36º F per hour)
■ Relative humidity:10% to 80% noncondensing, max. wetbulb at 28º C
Recommended:30% to 50% noncondensing
■ Altitude:3000 m (10,000 ft.)
Note
146 Reference
For continuous, trouble-free operation, the disk system should
NOT be operated at its maximum environmental limits for
extended periods of time. Operating within the recommended
operating range, a less stressful operating environment, ensures
maximum reliability.
The environmental limits in a nonoperating state (shipping and storage) are
wider:
■ Temperature: -40º C to 70º C (-40º F to 158º F)
■ Maximum gradient:24º C per hour (43.2º F per hour)
■ Relative humidity:15% to 90% noncondensing
■ Altitude:4600 m (15,000 ft.)
Acoustics
■ Sound power: 6.7 Bels
■ Sound pressure at operator’s position: 51.6 dB(A)
Reference
Safety Certifications
UL listed, UL 1950:1995 – 3rd Edition
CSA certified, C22.2 No. 950:1989
TUV certified with GS mark, EN 60950:1992 + A1:1993, A2:1993, A3:1995,
A4:1997
CE mark (see G. Declaration of Conformity on page 151)
EMC Compliance
Australia: AS/NZS 3548, Class A
Canada: ICES-003, Class A
China: CB9254-88
European Union: EN55022 Class A, EN50082-1
Japan: VCCI Class A
Taiwan: CNS 13438, Class A
US: 47 CFR Parts 2 & 15, Class A
Reference 147
Regulatory Statements
A. FCC Statement (For U.S.A. Only)
The Federal Communications Commission (in 47 CFR 15.105) has specified that
the following notice be brought to the attention of the users of this product.
This equipment has been tested and found to comply with the limits for a Class A
digital device, pursuant to Part 15 of the FCC Rules. These limits are designed to
provide reasonable protection against harmful interference when the equipment
is operated in a commercial environment. This equipment generates, uses, and
can radiate radio frequency energy and, if not installed and used in accordance
with the instruction manual, may cause harmful interference to radio
communications. Operation of this equipment in a residential area is likely to
cause harmful interference in which case the user will be required to correct the
interference at his own expense. The end user of this product should be aware
that any changes or modifications made to this equipment without the approval
of Hewlett-Packard could result in the product not meeting the Class A limits, in
which case the FCC could void the user's authority to operate the equipment.
B. IEC Statement (Worldwide)
This is a Class A product. In a domestic environment this product may cause
radio interference, in which case the user may be required to take adequate
measures.
C. Spécification ATI Classe A (France)
DECLARATION D’INSTALLATION ET DE MISE EN EXPLOITATION d’un
matériel de traitement de l’information (ATI), classé A en fonction des niveaux
de perturbations radioélectriques émis, définis dans la norme européenne EN
55022 concernant la Compatibilité Electromagnétique.
148 Reference
Cher Client,
Conformément à la Réglementation Française en vigueur l’installation ou le
transfert d’installation, et l’exploitation de cet appareil de classe A, doivent
faire l’objet d’une déclaration (en deux exemplaires) simultanément auprès
des services suivants:
— Comité de Coordination des Télécommunications 20, avenue de Ségur 75700 PARIS
— Préfecture du département du lieu d’exploitation
Le formulaire à utiliser est disponible auprès des préfectures.
La déclaration doit être faite dans les 30 jours suivant la mise en exploitation.
Arrêté du 27 Mars 1993, publié au J.O. du 28 Mars - ATI
D. Product Noise Declaration (Germany)
Schalldruckpegel Lp = 51.6 dB(A)
Am Arbeitsplatz (operator position)
Normaler Betrieb (normal operation)
Nach ISO 7779:1988 / EN 27779:1991 (Typprufung)
Reference 149
Reference
Le non respect de cette obligation peut être sanctionné par les peines prévues
au code des Postes et Télécommunications et celles indiquées dans la loi du
31 mai 1993 susvisée.
E. VCCI Statement (Japan)
Harmonics Conformance (Japan)
F. BCIQ EMC Statement (Taiwan)
150 Reference
G. Declaration of Conformity
Reference
Reference 151
Product Web Site
For the most current information about the HP StorageWorks Disk System 2300,
visit the support Web site located at http://www.hp.com.
Related Documents
The following manuals explain how to use the system software interfaces to the
StorageWorks Disk System 2300:
■ EMS Hardware Monitors User’s Guide, available at http://www.docs.hp.com/
hpux/systems/
■ Online Diagnostics (for HP 9000): Support Tools Manager Overview,
available at http://www.docs.hp.com/hpux/systems/
■ HP-UX System Administration Tasks Manual, HP Order No. B2355-90079
152 Reference
index
A
AC power 146
acoustics, product 147
Acrobat Reader
World Wide Web site 90
Address High switch 85
audio alarm 104
B
BCC
description of 19
environmental services 97
environmental services,
features of 17
Fault LED 121
installing 119
order number 44
removing 119
switch settings 74
troubleshooting 104
BCC filler panel
description of 19
Bus Reset - Hot Swap switch
85
Bus Reset - Pwr Fail switch
85
C
cables
See SCSI cables or power
cables
Cautions
damage to power switch
128
data loss 130
multiple disk systems 70
operating with empty slot
119, 123
permanent BCC damage
119
permanent disk damage
117, 119
removing
disk module 116
top cover 128
turning off the disk system
130
CommandView SDM 100
configuration
annotating devices 90
setting up Hardware Event
Monitor 90
updating firmware 91
cover
installing 128
153
removing 128
D
DC power 146
Declaration of Conformity 151
definitions 33
dimensions, product 145
disk
installing 78
disk filler 117
installing 115
removing 115
disk filler panel
description of 18
disk module
description of 18
installing 115
removing 110, 115
disk system
description 11–17
disconnecting 125
installing 70
reconnecting 125
status indicators 15
E
EMC compliance 147
environment, product 146
environmental services
event notification 97
environmental services, features
of 17
event messages, contents of 98
event monitor 97
EMS 17
setting up 90
154
user guide 152
event notification 90, 97–99
exchange part numbers 144
F
fan
troubleshooting 106
firmware
mismatch 104
obtaining latest release 91
troubleshooting 106
updating 91
FRUs
JBOD enclosure part numbers 109
Full Bus switch 85
H
hardware requirements 24
heat output 146
high availability
definition 33
features 16
host bus adapters
supported 24
hot-pluggable
definition 33
HP TopTools 100
I
inrush current 36
installing
BCC 71, 119
cover 128
disk filler 115
disk module 115
midplane 130
PDU/PDRU 39
power cable 75
power supply/fan module
123
SCSI cable 75
terminator 75
tools required 44
verifying operation 80
IOSCAN
example 81
troubleshooting
NO_HW
105
J
JBOD
definition 33
JBOD switch 85
L
LEDs 15
BCC Fault 121
components 15
disk 15
functions 102
power supply/fan module
124
status 101–102
system 15
logical volume 111
LVD
definition 33
LVD terminator
order number 44
M
midplane
installing 130
removing 130
model numbers 141
O
operating systems
supported 24
order number
BCC 44
LVD terminator 44
PDU/PDRU 143
upgrade products 142
User Guide 44
P
part numbers 144
JBOD enclosure FRUs 109
PDU/PDRU
definition 33
installing 39
order numbers 143
troubleshooting 104
physical volume group 111
physical volumes,attached 111,
112, 114
power cable
installing 75
power supply
troubleshooting 105, 106
power supply/fan module
description of 22
installing 123
LED 124
removing 123
155
power switch
and PDUs 33
troubleshooting 104
power up the disk system 80
power/standby switch
location and function 16
product
AC power 146
acoustics 147
DC power 146
dimensions 145
disconnecting 125
EMC compliance 147
environment 146
exchange part numbers 144
heat output 146
model numbers 141
reconnecting 125
replacement part numbers
144
safety certifications 147
weight 145
Q
Quick Installation Guide 44
R
removing
BCC 119
cover 128
disk filler 115
disk module 115
midplane 130
power supply/fan module
123
replaceable parts, descriptions
156
of 18–23
replacement part numbers 144
restoring operation 125
S
safety certifications 147
SCSI cable
installing 75
products 142
site preparation 36
electrical 36
PDU/PDRU 37
software requirements 24
verifying 42
status
LEDs 101–102
steady state current 36
STM
user guide 152
switch settings 85
switches 74
systems administration
Windows NT 114
T
temperature
troubleshooting 106
terminator
installing 75
topologies 27–32
troubleshooting
event notification 97
isolating faults 104
overview 96
status LEDs 101
table 104
turning on the disk system 80
U
Ultra 3 SCSI
definition 34
upgrade products
order numbers 142
User Guide
order number 44
V
verify connection to the host 81
voltage, troubleshooting 106
volume groups 111
W
web site
documents 152
weight, product 145
157
158
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