Mackie M 1200 Owner`s manual

Mackie M 1200 Owner`s manual
120 VAC 50/60 Hz
1500 WATTS
(MONO BRIDGE)
1200 WATTS
4 OHM LOAD MIN.
600 WATTS CH
2 OHMS LOAD MIN.
8
SENSITIVITY
14
16
28
26
24
2v
SIG
–20
–20
SIG
14
–9
–9
–
–
SPEAKER OUTPUTS
+
+
CH
2
–
UTILISE UN FUSIBLE DE RECHANGE DE MÊME TYPE.
DEBRANCHER AVANT DE REMPLACER LE FUSIBLE
CH
MONO
BRIDGE
TO REDUCE THE RISK OF FIRE OR ELECTRIC SHOCK, DO NOT
EXPOSE THIS EQUIPMENT TO RAIN OR MOISTURE. DO NOT REMOVE COVER.
NO USER SERVICEABLE PARTS INSIDE. REFER SERVICING TO QUALIFIED PERSONNEL.
AVIS: RISCQUE DE CHOC ÉLECTRIQUE — NE PAS OUVRIR
WARNING:
28
26
1.23v (+4dBu)
30
1v
1
+
REPLACE WITH THE SAME TYPE FUSE AND RATING.
DISCONNECT SUPPLY CORD BEFORE CHANGING FUSE
RISK OF ELECTRIC SHOCK
DO NOT OPEN
24
CH
2v
2
22
3v
20
GAIN/dB
18
SENSITIVITY
8
16
–6
–3
OL
–6
–3
OL
CAUTION
1.23v (+4dBu)
30
1v
22
3v
20
GAIN/dB
18
CH
1
0
0
CH
2
1
COLD
HOT
MANUFACTURING DATE
CH
1& 2
TEMP STATUS
SHORT
PROTECT
INTERNAL STATUS
CH
CONCEIVED, DESIGNED, AND MANUFACTURED
BY MACKIE DESIGNS INC • WOODINVILLE • WA
98072 • USA • MADE IN USA • PATENTS PENDING
SERIAL NUMBER
FULL SYMMETRY DUAL DIFFERENTIAL HIGH CURRENT DESIGN
0
0
AIR EQ
EQ
5.6k Hz
OFF
TYPICAL
ON
CONSTANT DIRECTIVITY
HORN EQ /AIR EQ
100 Hz
BALANCED
OR
UNBALANCED
/ BRIDGE / MONO
STAGE
MONITOR
170 Hz
4.5 kHz
2k Hz
OFF
TYPICAL
35 Hz
LOW CUT
FILTER
1 CHANNEL
INPUT
THRU
MONO
AMP MODE
BRIDGE
ON OFF
STEREO
TYPICAL
LIMITER (CH1 & CH2)
FULL
RANGE
63Hz
125Hz
FREQUENCY
SUB
WOOFER
OUTPUT APPLICATION
STEREO
TYPICAL
THRU
INPUT
OFF
2k Hz
AIR EQ
AIR
5.6k Hz
4.5k Hz
2
100 Hz
STAGE
MONITOR
170 Hz
TYPICAL
35 Hz
LOW CUT
FILTER
CHANNEL
CONSTANT DIRECTIVITY
HORN EQ /AIR EQ
OFF
TYPICAL
ON
BALANCED
OR
UNBALANCED
POWER
OFF
ON
PROFESSIONAL POWER AMPLIFIER
™
M•1200/M•1400
OWNER’S MANUAL
™
HIGH-CURRENT POWER AMPLIFIERS
CAUTION
AVIS
RISK OF ELECTRIC SHOCK
DO NOT OPEN
RISQUE DE CHOC ELECTRIQUE
NE PAS OUVRIR
CAUTION: TO REDUCE THE RISK OF ELECTRIC SHOCK
DO NOT REMOVE COVER (OR BACK)
NO USER-SERVICEABLE PARTS INSIDE
REFER SERVICING TO QUALIFIED PERSONNEL
ATTENTION: POUR EVITER LES RISQUES DE CHOC
ELECTRIQUE, NE PAS ENLEVER LE COUVERCLE. AUCUN
ENTRETIEN DE PIECES INTERIEURES PAR L'USAGER. CONFIER
L'ENTRETIEN AU PERSONNEL QUALIFIE.
AVIS: POUR EVITER LES RISQUES D'INCENDIE OU
D'ELECTROCUTION, N'EXPOSEZ PAS CET ARTICLE
A LA PLUIE OU A L'HUMIDITE
The lightning flash with arrowhead symbol within an equilateral
triangle is intended to alert the user to the presence of uninsulated
"dangerous voltage" within the product's enclosure, that may be
of sufficient magnitude to constitute a risk of electric shock to persons.
Le symbole éclair avec point de flèche à l'intérieur d'un triangle
équilatéral est utilisé pour alerter l'utilisateur de la présence à
l'intérieur du coffret de "voltage dangereux" non isolé d'ampleur
suffisante pour constituer un risque d'éléctrocution.
The exclamation point within an equilateral triangle is intended to
alert the user of the presence of important operating and maintenance
(servicing) instructions in the literature accompanying the appliance.
Le point d'exclamation à l'intérieur d'un triangle équilatéral est
employé pour alerter les utilisateurs de la présence d'instructions
importantes pour le fonctionnement et l'entretien (service) dans le
livret d'instruction accompagnant l'appareil.
SAFETY INSTRUCTIONS
1. Read Instructions — All the safety and operation
instructions should be read before this Mackie product is
operated.
2. Retain Instructions — The safety and operating
instructions should be kept for future reference.
3. Heed Warnings — All warnings on this Mackie product and
in these operating instructions should be followed.
4. Follow Instructions — All operating and other instructions
should be followed.
5. Water and Moisture — This Mackie product should not be
used near water – for example, near a bathtub, washbowl,
kitchen sink, laundry tub, in a wet basement, near a
swimming pool, swamp or salivating St. Bernard dog, etc.
6. Heat — This Mackie product should be situated away
from heat sources such as radiators, or other devices which
produce heat.
PORTABLE CART WARNING
Carts and stands - The
Component should be used
only with a cart or stand
that is recommended by
the manufacturer.
A Component and cart
combination should be
moved with care. Quick
stops, excessive force, and
uneven surfaces may cause
the Component and cart
combination to overturn.
7. Power Sources — This Mackie product should be
connected to a power supply only of the type described in
these operation instructions or as marked on this Mackie
product.
8. Power Cord Protection — Power supply cords should be
routed so that they are not likely to be walked upon or
pinched by items placed upon or against them, paying
particular attention to cords at plugs, convenience receptacles,
and the point where they exit this Mackie product.
9. Object and Liquid Entry — Care should be taken so that
objects do not fall into and liquids are not spilled into this
Mackie product.
10. Damage Requiring Service — This Mackie product
should be serviced only by qualified service personnel when:
A. The power-supply cord or the plug has been
damaged; or
B. Objects have fallen, or liquid has spilled into
this Mackie product; or
C. This Mackie product has been exposed to rain;
or
D. This Mackie product does not appear to operate
normally or exhibits a marked change in
performance; or
E. This Mackie product has been dropped, or its
chassis damaged.
11. Servicing — The user should not attempt to service this
Mackie product beyond those means described in this
operating manual. All other servicing should be referred to the
Mackie Service Department.
12. To prevent electric shock, do not use this polarized plug
with an extension cord, receptacle or other outlet unless the
blades can be fully inserted to prevent blade exposure.
Pour préevenir les chocs électriques ne pas utiliser cette fiche
polariseé avec un prolongateur, un prise de courant ou une
autre sortie de courant, sauf si les lames peuvent être insérées
à fond sans laisser aucune pariie à découvert.
13. Grounding or Polarization — Precautions should be
taken so that the grounding or polarization means of this
Mackie product is not defeated.
14. This apparatus does not exceed the Class A/Class B
(whichever is applicable) limits for radio noise emissions from
digital apparatus as set out in the radio interference
regulations of the Canadian Department of Communications.
ATTENTION —Le présent appareil numérique n’émet pas de
bruits radioélectriques dépassant las limites applicables aux
appareils numériques de class A/de class B (selon le cas)
prescrites dans le règlement sur le brouillage radioélectrique
édicté par les ministere des communications du Canada.
WARNING — To reduce the risk of fire or electric shock, do
not expose this appliance to rain or moisture.
Lend Me Your Ears
Exposure to extremely high
noise levels may cause permanent hearing loss.
Individuals vary considerably
in susceptibility to noise-induced hearing loss, but
nearly everyone will lose some hearing if exposed
to sufficiently
Duration Per Day Sound Level dBA,
In Hours
Slow Response
intense
8
90
noise for a
6
92
period of
4
95
time. The
3
97
U.S.
2
100
Government’s
1.5
102
Occupa1
105
0.5
110
tional
0.25 or less
115
Safety and
Health Administration (OSHA) has specified the permissible
noise level exposures shown in this chart.
According to OSHA, any exposure in excess of
these permissible limits could result in some hearing loss. To ensure against potentially dangerous
exposure to high sound pressure levels, it is recommended that all persons exposed to equipment
capable of producing high sound pressure levels
(such as this amplification system) use hearing
protectors
while this
Typical
Example
unit is in
Duo in small club
operation.
Ear plugs
Subway Train
or protectors in the
Very loud classical music
ear canals
Lori screaming at Ron about deadlines or over the
ears must
Loudest parts at a rock concert
be worn
when operating this amplification system in order to prevent
a permanent hearing loss if exposure is in excess of
the limits set forth here.
INTRODUCTION
Thank you for choosing a Mackie Designs
power amplifier! We appreciate your vote of
confidence for the folks in Woodinville who
specialize in awesome and affordable audio.
The Mackie Designs M•1200/M•1400 Power
Amplifiers are designed to fulfill the amplification needs of almost any type of application.
They boast a wealth of features you’d expect to
pay extra for — like subwoofer filtering, constant directivity equalization, speaker-protecting
limiter, and gobs of ultra-clean power, to name
a few.
Perhaps the most important feature of the
FR Series™ Power Amplifiers is the attention
to detail in every aspect of the design. At Mackie,
we know what it takes to be roadworthy. After
all, our mixers have traveled all over the world
under the worst of conditions, and we’ve applied
what we’ve learned to the mechanical design of
our amplifiers.
Roadworthiness is only part of the picture.
We know that reliability is paramount to sound
reinforcement. That’s why we use double-sided
thru-hole-plated fiberglass printed circuit
boards. That’s why our engineers have subjected the amplifier to the most rigorous and
punishing tests imaginable, to fine-tune the
design and extend its limits beyond those of
ordinary amplifiers.
Fast Recovery — where the “FR” comes
from — is more than a buzzword. It is based on
real, proven design principles. The result is an
amplifier that performs better than conventional designs when presented with adverse
conditions. One of the most difficult things for
a power amplifier to handle is clipping. Conventional designs use lots of negative feedback
to provide stability and lower distortion. When
clipping occurs, this “feedback” causes highfrequency sticking, keeping the amplifier
“latched” in the clipping state longer than necessary. This results in painfully audible
distortion. Our Fast Recovery design eliminates
this high-frequency sticking and allows the amplifier to remain stable when powering highly
reactive loads at high volume levels.
You may wonder why a power amp even
needs an owner’s manual. After all, you just
plug in a few cables and power it up. Well, it’s
almost that simple. There’s just a few things
that we’d like you to be aware of, and we’ll discuss those right away — please see the Quick
Start
on the next page.
Then go ahead and read the entire manual.
The M•1200/M•1400 amplifiers have a wealth
of useful features, and each of them is explained
in detail.
Please write your serial number here for
future reference (i.e., insurance claims,
tech support, return authorization, etc.):
TM
Part No. 820-062-00 Rev. A 12/96
©1996 Mackie Designs, All Rights Reserved. Printed in the U.S.A.
3
READ THIS PAGE!
QUICK START
I got ants in my pants and I got to dance!
INSTALLATION
The M•1200/M•1400
amps can be mounted in
any standard rack system
(see ), or placed horizontally on a floor or table. The heavier internal
components are located towards the front of
the chassis to make it easier to hold the amp
by its front handles.
IMPORTANT: The
M•1200/M•1400 amps
draw their ventilation air
in from the front and out
through the side panels.
They need plenty of fresh air to stay cool.
DO NOT BLOCK THE VENTILATION PORTS
(see ).
CONNECTIONS AND SETTINGS
1. Be sure the POWER
switch is off before
making connections.
controls fully down
2. Turn the GAIN
(counterclockwise) for now.
controls to
3. Set both LOW CUT FILTER
their TYPICAL marks (35Hz).
4. Set both CONSTANT DIRECTIVITY
switches OFF (unless you’re using constant
directivity horns with compression drivers).
switch on.
5. Set the LIMITER
Note: If you’re using the M•1200/M•1400 to
power a subwoofer, you probably do not need
an external crossover. Please see for details.
PROFESSIONAL POWER AMPLIFIER
FULL SYMMETRY DUAL DIFFERENTIAL HIGH CURRENT DESIGN
GAIN/dB
CH
1
3v
18
20
22
OL
OL
–3
–3
–6
–6
–9
–9
–20
–20
GAIN/dB
CH
2
3v
18
20
22
2v
16
24
14
26
28
4
30
1v
1.23v (+4dBu)
CH
CH
2
1
ON
INTERNAL STATUS
2v
16
24
14
SIG
SIG
PROTECT
26
28
8
0
0
0
0
8
SENSITIVITY
6. Determine which AMP MODE
is best
for your application:
• STEREO mode (separate left and right
inputs, separate left and right outputs) is
the typical setup for amplifying stereo
signals.
• MONO mode (sometimes called DualMono mode – one mono input, two mono
outputs) is for sending a mono signal to
two different speaker sets, with separatelyadjustable level controls.
• BRIDGE mode (sometimes called
Bridged-Mono – one mono input, one mono
output) uses both sides of the amp to
double the power to one speaker set. An
M•1200 power amplifier, set to BRIDGE
mode, delivers 1200 watts (into 4 ohms).
The M•1400 delivers 1260 watts. Garsh!
Note: 4 ohms is the minimum impedance
you should connect to the amplifier in BRIDGE
mode. If you connect a lower impedance load
LEDs may
in BRIDGE mode, the SHORT
light, putting the amplifier into PROTECT
mode.
switch accordingly.
Set the AMP MODE
7. In STEREO mode, connect line-level cables
from your signal source to the M•1200/
jacks, either XLR or
M•1400’s INPUT
TRS:
• The XLR and TRS inputs for each
channel are wired in parallel.
• The balanced XLR inputs are wired
pin 2 = hot (+), pin 3 = cold (–) and
pin 1 = shield (ground).
SENSITIVITY
30
1v
1.23v (+4dBu)
SHORT
OFF
TEMP STATUS
CH
1& 2
COLD
HOT
POWER
• The 1/4" TRS inputs are wired
tip = hot (+), ring = cold (–) and
sleeve = shield (ground), and can accept
either balanced (TRS) or unbalanced (TS)
cables.
8. In MONO and BRIDGE modes, connect an
input cable to CHANNEL 1’s INPUT only,
and nothing into CHANNEL 2’s INPUT.
(You could plug into CHANNEL 2’s input,
it just won’t do anything.)
9. In STEREO and MONO modes, connect
speaker cables to the SPEAKER OUTPUTS
, either binding post or 1/4" TS for the
M•1200, or binding post or Speakon® for
the M•1400:
• The binding post connectors are wired
red = hot (+) and black = cold (–).
• The 1/4" TS connectors are wired
tip = hot (+) and sleeve = cold (–).
10. In BRIDGE mode, connect the binding post
cable like this: the hot (+) side goes in the
CHANNEL 1 SPEAKER OUTPUTS
red
post and the cold (–) side goes in CHANNEL 2’s red post. Plug nothing into the
black posts, 1/4" TS jacks, or Speakon jacks.
11. Connect the other ends of the speaker
cables to your loudspeakers.
into a
12. Plug the amp’s power cord
3-prong AC outlet capable of delivering at
least 15 amps.
13. Make sure your signal source (the cables
feeding the M•1200/M•1400’s inputs)
is powered up and delivering signal to
the amp.
14. Turn the M•1200/M•1400’s POWER
switch on and verify that the signal present
(SIG) LEDs are blinking.
CAUTION
WARNING: TO REDUCE THE RISK OF FIRE OR ELECTRIC SHOCK, DO NOT
RISK OF ELECTRIC SHOCK
DO NOT OPEN
SERIAL NUMBER
Things You Must Remember:
• Never plug amplifier
outputs into anything
except speakers (unless
you have an outboard box
specifically designed to
handle speaker-level
signals).
• Before making connections to an amp or
reconfiguring an amp’s routing, turn the
amp’s level (GAIN) controls down, turn
the power off, make the changes, turn
the power back on, and then turn the
level controls back up.
• If you shut down your equipment, turn
off the amplifiers first. When powering
up, turn on the amplifiers last.
• Save the shipping boxes! You may need
them someday, and you probably don’t
want to have to pay for them again.
MANUFACTURING DATE
EXPOSE THIS EQUIPMENT TO RAIN OR MOISTURE. DO NOT REMOVE COVER.
NO USER SERVICEABLE PARTS INSIDE. REFER SERVICING TO QUALIFIED PERSONNEL.
1 CHANNEL
/ BRIDGE / MONO
UTILISE UN FUSIBLE DE RECHANGE DE MÊME TYPE.
DEBRANCHER AVANT DE REMPLACER LE FUSIBLE
MONO
STEREO
TYPICAL
BALANCED
OR
UNBALANCED
TYPICAL
35 Hz
CHANNEL
AMP MODE
INPUT
LOW CUT
FILTER
AVIS: RISCQUE DE CHOC ÉLECTRIQUE — NE PAS OUVRIR
REPLACE WITH THE SAME TYPE FUSE AND RATING.
DISCONNECT SUPPLY CORD BEFORE CHANGING FUSE
(MONO BRIDGE)
1200 WATTS
4 OHM LOAD MIN.
600 WATTS CH
2 OHMS LOAD MIN.
controls up:
15. Slowly turn both GAIN
You should hear the music and see the SIG
and meter
LEDs flashing. If the
topmost LEDs (named OL, for OverLoad)
are flashing, turn down either the GAIN
controls on the amp or the source signal’s
output level controls (i.e., master faders).
The point is: The OL LEDs should never
light up.
16. For quieter listening, it is preferable to
adjust the amp’s GAIN controls rather
than the source signal’s output level
(unless you have the source’s control all
the way up!).
17. Start dancing, but don’t let the ants out of
your pants.
INPUT
BRIDGE
LOW CUT
FILTER
BALANCED
OR
UNBALANCED
STAGE
MONITOR
STAGE
MONITOR
+
MONO
BRIDGE
–
CH
CH
1
2
+
+
–
–
120 VAC 50/60 Hz
1500 WATTS
CONCEIVED, DESIGNED, AND MANUFACTURED
BY MACKIE DESIGNS INC • WOODINVILLE • WA
98072 • USA • MADE IN USA • PATENTS PENDING
FULL
RANGE
LIMITER (CH1 & CH2)
CONSTANT DIRECTIVITY
HORN EQ /AIR EQ
4.5 kHz
2k Hz
5.6k Hz
AIR EQ
EQ
SPEAKER OUTPUTS
OUTPUT APPLICATION
100 Hz
170 Hz
OFF
2
TYPICAL
35 Hz
STEREO
TYPICAL
ON
ON OFF
OFF
TYPICAL
THRU
100 Hz
170 Hz
OFF
SUB
WOOFER
CONSTANT DIRECTIVITY
HORN EQ /AIR EQ
FREQUENCY
125Hz
ON
4.5k Hz
2k Hz
63Hz
OFF
TYPICAL
THRU
5
5.6k Hz
AIR EQ
AIR
HOW TO USE THIS MANUAL
APPLICATION DIAGRAMS
Mackie’s gang of illustrators have created
easy-to-understand diagrams of popular studio
and live-sound setups. Your setup will probably
be different in some way, but these diagrams
will help you see the big picture so you can add
your own finishing touches.
FEATURE DESCRIPTIONS: MIND
BOGGLING DETAILS
Each and every knob, switch, and connector
on the M•1200/M•1400 Power Amplifiers is
explained in depth here. Throughout this section you’ll find illustrations, with each feature
numbered like this . If you’re curious about
a feature, simply locate it on the appropriate
illustration, note the number attached to it,
and find that number in the nearby paragraphs.
This icon marks information that is critically important or unique to the M•1200/
M•1400. For your own good, read them and remember them. We may call you someday and
quiz you.
THE GLOSSARY: A HAVEN OF NONTECHINESS FOR THE NEOPHYTE
Just in case you’re new to the audio world,
we’ve included a fairly comprehensive dictionary of pro audio terms. If terms like “clipping,”
“noise floor,” or “unbalanced” leave you blank,
flip to the glossary at the back of this manual
for a quick explanation.
A PLUG FOR THE CONNECTORS
SECTION
Also at the back of this manual is a section
on connectors: XLR, TRS, Binding Post and
Speakon connectors, balanced connectors,
unbalanced connectors, and special hybrid
connectors. If you plan on wiring your own
cables, please visit this section before you start.
ARCANE MYSTERIES ILLUMINATED
Almost last but not least, we’ve included
an appendix entitled Arcane Mysteries Illuminated. This section discusses some of the down
’n’ dirty practical realities of signal transmission,
balancing a sound system, grounding, and balanced versus unbalanced lines. It’s a gold mine
for the neophyte and even the seasoned pro
might learn a thing or two.
TECHNICAL INFO
This section is for you tech-heads who like
to use a calculator and read specifications.
You’ll find it all here.
This icon leads you to in-depth explanations
of features and practical tips. While not mandatory, they’ll have some valuable information.
GENERAL PRECAUTIONS AND
CONSIDERATIONS
This section discusses important things to
keep in mind when installing and using the
M•1200/M•1400, including rack mounting, AC
power, and wiring.
6
CONTENTS
QUICK START .......................................................... 4
APPLICATION DIAGRAMS ......................................... 8
FEATURE DESCRIPTIONS .............................................. 11
GAIN ............................................................. 11
METERS ......................................................... 12
SIG ............................................................... 13
PROTECT ........................................................ 13
SHORT ........................................................... 13
TEMP STATUS ................................................. 14
POWER ......................................................... 14
POWER CORD ................................................ 15
SPEAKER OUTPUTS ......................................... 15
INPUT ........................................................... 16
THRU ............................................................ 18
LOW CUT FILTER ............................................. 18
CONSTANT DIRECTIVITY .................................. 18
CD FREQUENCY ........................................ 19
AMP MODE .................................................... 19
STEREO ................................................... 20
MONO .................................................... 20
BRIDGE ................................................... 20
OUTPUT APPLICATION ..................................... 20
LIMITER ................................................... 20
SUBWOOFER ............................................ 21
FREQUENCY ............................................. 21
GENERAL PRECAUTIONS AND CONSIDERATIONS............. 23
RACK MOUNTING ........................................... 23
THERMAL CONSIDERATIONS ............................ 23
AC POWER CONSIDERATIONS ........................... 23
INPUT WIRING ............................................... 24
OUTPUT WIRING ............................................ 24
70V DISTRIBUTION SYSTEMS ........................... 25
APPENDIX A: Service Info ............................................ 26
TROUBLESHOOTING ............................................. 26
REPAIR ............................................................... 27
APPENDIX B: Glossary ................................................. 28
APPENDIX C: Connectors .............................................. 33
APPENDIX D: Arcane Mysteries Illuminated .................... 35
Balanced Lines ...................................................... 35
“Do’s” and “Don’ts” of Fixed Installations ............... 35
Grounding ............................................................ 36
Optimizing Sound System Levels ............................. 36
Biamplified and Triamplified Systems ....................... 38
APPENDIX E: Technical Info ........................................... 39
DO THE MATH: OHMS, LOADS AND SUCH ................ 39
SPECIFICATIONS ................................................... 40
BLOCK DIAGRAM ................................................. 42
COLOPHON ................................................................ 43
7
8
TWO M•1200S: MAIN SPEAKERS AND STAGE MONITORS
120 VAC 50/60 Hz
1500 WATTS
(MONO BRIDGE)
1200 WATTS
4 OHM LOAD MIN.
600 WATTS CH
2 OHMS LOAD MIN.
120 VAC 50/60 Hz
1500 WATTS
(MONO BRIDGE)
1200 WATTS
4 OHM LOAD MIN.
600 WATTS CH
2 OHMS LOAD MIN.
CAUTION
–
–
SPEAKER OUTPUTS
+
+
2
1
–
UTILISE UN FUSIBLE DE RECHANGE DE MÊME TYPE.
DEBRANCHER AVANT DE REMPLACER LE FUSIBLE
CH
MONO
BRIDGE
EXPOSE THIS EQUIPMENT TO RAIN OR MOISTURE. DO NOT REMOVE COVER.
NO USER SERVICEABLE PARTS INSIDE. REFER SERVICING TO QUALIFIED PERSONNEL.
WARNING: TO REDUCE THE RISK OF FIRE OR ELECTRIC SHOCK, DO NOT
AVIS: RISCQUE DE CHOC ÉLECTRIQUE — NE PAS OUVRIR
CH
+
REPLACE WITH THE SAME TYPE FUSE AND RATING.
DISCONNECT SUPPLY CORD BEFORE CHANGING FUSE
RISK OF ELECTRIC SHOCK
DO NOT OPEN
CAUTION
–
–
SPEAKER OUTPUTS
+
+
CH
2
–
UTILISE UN FUSIBLE DE RECHANGE DE MÊME TYPE.
DEBRANCHER AVANT DE REMPLACER LE FUSIBLE
CH
MONO
BRIDGE
EXPOSE THIS EQUIPMENT TO RAIN OR MOISTURE. DO NOT REMOVE COVER.
NO USER SERVICEABLE PARTS INSIDE. REFER SERVICING TO QUALIFIED PERSONNEL.
WARNING: TO REDUCE THE RISK OF FIRE OR ELECTRIC SHOCK, DO NOT
AVIS: RISCQUE DE CHOC ÉLECTRIQUE — NE PAS OUVRIR
1
+
REPLACE WITH THE SAME TYPE FUSE AND RATING.
DISCONNECT SUPPLY CORD BEFORE CHANGING FUSE
RISK OF ELECTRIC SHOCK
DO NOT OPEN
MANUFACTURING DATE
MANUFACTURING DATE
CONCEIVED, DESIGNED, AND MANUFACTURED
BY MACKIE DESIGNS INC • WOODINVILLE • WA
98072 • USA • MADE IN USA • PATENTS PENDING
SERIAL NUMBER
LOW CUT
FILTER
AIR EQ
5.6k Hz
BALANCED
OR
UNBALANCED
AIR EQ
5.6k Hz
INPUT
CD OFF
OFF
TYPICAL
ON
CONSTANT DIRECTIVITY
HORN EQ /AIR EQ
100 Hz
THRU
THRU
MONO
AMP MODE
BRIDGE
MONO
BRIDGE
63Hz
125Hz
FREQUENCY
SUB
WOOFER
LIMITER ON
ON OFF
STEREO
TYPICAL
LIMITER (CH1 & CH2)
FULL
RANGE
OUTPUT APPLICATION
STEREO
TYPICAL
AMP MODE
STEREO/TYPICAL
63Hz
125Hz
FREQUENCY
SUB
WOOFER
LIMITER ON
ON OFF
STEREO
TYPICAL
LIMITER (CH1 & CH2)
FULL
RANGE
OUTPUT APPLICATION
STEREO
TYPICAL
STEREO/TYPICAL
FROM MIXING
CONSOLE
AUX 1 OUT
/ BRIDGE / MONO
STAGE
MONITOR
170 Hz
4.5 kHz
2k Hz
OFF
TYPICAL
35 Hz
LOW CUT
FILTER
1 CHANNEL
INPUT
CD OFF
OFF
TYPICAL
ON
CONSTANT DIRECTIVITY
HORN EQ /AIR EQ
100 Hz
BALANCED
OR
UNBALANCED
/ BRIDGE / MONO
STAGE
MONITOR
170 Hz
4.5 kHz
2k Hz
OFF
TYPICAL
35 Hz
1 CHANNEL
STAGE MONITOR 100Hz
CONCEIVED, DESIGNED, AND MANUFACTURED
BY MACKIE DESIGNS INC • WOODINVILLE • WA
98072 • USA • MADE IN USA • PATENTS PENDING
SERIAL NUMBER
TYPICAL 35Hz
THRU
THRU
AIR EQ
5.6k Hz
OFF
TYPICAL
100 Hz
STAGE MONITOR 100Hz
2k Hz
4.5k Hz
OFF
2k Hz
AIR EQ
5.6k Hz
4.5k Hz
2
100 Hz
STAGE
MONITOR
170 Hz
TYPICAL
35 Hz
LOW CUT
FILTER
CHANNEL
CONSTANT DIRECTIVITY
HORN EQ /AIR EQ
BALANCED
OR
UNBALANCED
ON
170 Hz
STAGE
MONITOR
FROM MIXING
CONSOLE
AUX 2 OUT
CD OFF
INPUT
OFF
TYPICAL
35 Hz
LOW CUT
FILTER
2
TYPICAL 35Hz
CHANNEL
CONSTANT DIRECTIVITY
HORN EQ /AIR EQ
OFF
TYPICAL
ON
BALANCED
OR
UNBALANCED
CD OFF
INPUT
FROM MIXING CONSOLE MAIN OUT L/R
APPLICATION DIAGRAMS
FROM MIXING CONSOLE
MAIN OUT
TYPICAL 35Hz
CAUTION
WARNING: TO REDUCE THE RISK OF FIRE OR ELECTRIC SHOCK, DO NOT
SERIAL NUMBER
MANUFACTURING DATE
EXPOSE THIS EQUIPMENT TO RAIN OR MOISTURE. DO NOT REMOVE COVER.
NO USER SERVICEABLE PARTS INSIDE. REFER SERVICING TO QUALIFIED PERSONNEL.
RISK OF ELECTRIC SHOCK
DO NOT OPEN
(MONO BRIDGE)
1400 WATTS
4 OHM LOAD MIN.
700 WATTS CH
2 OHMS LOAD MIN.
STEREO/TYPICAL
1 CHANNEL
/ BRIDGE / MONO
UTILISE UN FUSIBLE DE RECHANGE DE MÊME TYPE.
DEBRANCHER AVANT DE REMPLACER LE FUSIBLE
MONO
STEREO
TYPICAL
BALANCED
OR
UNBALANCED
TYPICAL
35 Hz
STAGE MONITOR 100Hz
CHANNEL
AMP MODE
INPUT
LOW CUT
FILTER
AVIS: RISCQUE DE CHOC ÉLECTRIQUE — NE PAS OUVRIR
REPLACE WITH THE SAME TYPE FUSE AND RATING.
DISCONNECT SUPPLY CORD BEFORE CHANGING FUSE
FROM MIXING CONSOLE
MONITOR OUT
INPUT
BRIDGE
LOW CUT
FILTER
BALANCED
OR
UNBALANCED
CH
MONO
BRIDGE
+
1
CH
–
2
+
+
–
–
CONCEIVED, DESIGNED, AND MANUFACTURED
BY MACKIE DESIGNS INC • WOODINVILLE • WA
98072 • USA • MADE IN USA • PATENTS PENDING
STAGE
MONITOR
OUTPUT APPLICATION
100 Hz
170 Hz
OFF
4.5 kHz
120 VAC 50/60 Hz
1500 WATTS
5.6k Hz
125Hz
THRU
CD OFF
4.5k Hz
ON
2k Hz
63Hz
ON OFF
OFF
TYPICAL
AIR EQ
SPEAKER OUTPUTS
CONSTANT DIRECTIVITY
HORN EQ /AIR EQ
FREQUENCY
STEREO
TYPICAL
ON
100 Hz
170 Hz
OFF
SUB
WOOFER
FULL
RANGE
LIMITER (CH1 & CH2)
CONSTANT DIRECTIVITY
HORN EQ /AIR EQ
2k Hz
2
TYPICAL
35 Hz
STAGE
MONITOR
5.6k Hz
AIR EQ
OFF
TYPICAL
THRU
LIMITER ON
CD OFF
M•1400: MAIN SPEAKERS AND STAGE MONITORS WITH ONE AMPLIFIER
* SEE NOTE BELOW
FROM MIXING CONSOLE
MONITOR OUT
STAGE MONITOR 100Hz
CAUTION
WARNING: TO REDUCE THE RISK OF FIRE OR ELECTRIC SHOCK, DO NOT
RISK OF ELECTRIC SHOCK
DO NOT OPEN
(MONO BRIDGE)
1400 WATTS
4 OHM LOAD MIN.
700 WATTS CH
2 OHMS LOAD MIN.
SERIAL NUMBER
MANUFACTURING DATE
EXPOSE THIS EQUIPMENT TO RAIN OR MOISTURE. DO NOT REMOVE COVER.
NO USER SERVICEABLE PARTS INSIDE. REFER SERVICING TO QUALIFIED PERSONNEL.
1 CHANNEL
/ BRIDGE / MONO
UTILISE UN FUSIBLE DE RECHANGE DE MÊME TYPE.
DEBRANCHER AVANT DE REMPLACER LE FUSIBLE
MONO
STEREO
TYPICAL
BALANCED
OR
UNBALANCED
TYPICAL
35 Hz
STAGE MONITOR 100Hz
CHANNEL
AMP MODE
INPUT
LOW CUT
FILTER
AVIS: RISCQUE DE CHOC ÉLECTRIQUE — NE PAS OUVRIR
REPLACE WITH THE SAME TYPE FUSE AND RATING.
DISCONNECT SUPPLY CORD BEFORE CHANGING FUSE
MONO MODE
INPUT
BRIDGE
LOW CUT
FILTER
BALANCED
OR
UNBALANCED
CH
+
1
MONO
BRIDGE
CH
–
2
+
+
–
–
120 VAC 50/60 Hz
1500 WATTS
CONCEIVED, DESIGNED, AND MANUFACTURED
BY MACKIE DESIGNS INC • WOODINVILLE • WA
98072 • USA • MADE IN USA • PATENTS PENDING
STAGE
MONITOR
OUTPUT APPLICATION
100 Hz
170 Hz
OFF
FULL
RANGE
2k Hz
5.6k Hz
AIR EQ
ON OFF
OFF
TYPICAL
SPEAKER OUTPUTS
* NOTE: TOTAL IMPEDANCE MUST BE GREATER
THAN 2 OHMS PER CHANNEL
STEREO
TYPICAL
ON
THRU
CD OFF
100 Hz
170 Hz
OFF
SUB
WOOFER
LIMITER (CH1 & CH2)
CONSTANT DIRECTIVITY
HORN EQ /AIR EQ
4.5 kHz
2
TYPICAL
35 Hz
STAGE
MONITOR
CONSTANT DIRECTIVITY
HORN EQ /AIR EQ
FREQUENCY
125Hz
ON
4.5k Hz
2k Hz
63Hz
OFF
TYPICAL
5.6k Hz
AIR EQ
THRU
LIMITER ON
CD OFF
M•1400: EIGHT MONITOR SPEAKERS
9
FROM ACTIVE CROSSOVER: HIGH-FREQUENCY L/R
CONSTANT DIRECTIVITY HORNS
170Hz
CAUTION
WARNING: TO REDUCE THE RISK OF FIRE OR ELECTRIC SHOCK, DO NOT
RISK OF ELECTRIC SHOCK
DO NOT OPEN
SERIAL NUMBER
MANUFACTURING DATE
EXPOSE THIS EQUIPMENT TO RAIN OR MOISTURE. DO NOT REMOVE COVER.
NO USER SERVICEABLE PARTS INSIDE. REFER SERVICING TO QUALIFIED PERSONNEL.
1 CHANNEL
/ BRIDGE / MONO
UTILISE UN FUSIBLE DE RECHANGE DE MÊME TYPE.
DEBRANCHER AVANT DE REMPLACER LE FUSIBLE
MONO
BRIDGE
+
–
CH
CH
2
+
+
–
–
CONCEIVED, DESIGNED, AND MANUFACTURED
BY MACKIE DESIGNS INC • WOODINVILLE • WA
98072 • USA • MADE IN USA • PATENTS PENDING
LOW CUT
FILTER
BALANCED
OR
UNBALANCED
TYPICAL
35 Hz
STAGE
MONITOR
OUTPUT APPLICATION
100 Hz
170 Hz
OFF
4.5 kHz
2k Hz
OFF
TYPICAL
AIR EQ
125Hz
THRU
2k Hz
5.6k Hz
AIR EQ
OFF
TYPICAL
THRU
LIMITER ON
CD ON
*3.5KHz
4.5k Hz
ON
63Hz
ON OFF
SPEAKER OUTPUTS
CONSTANT DIRECTIVITY
HORN EQ /AIR EQ
FREQUENCY
STEREO
TYPICAL
ON
5.6k Hz
100 Hz
170 Hz
OFF
SUB
WOOFER
FULL
RANGE
LIMITER (CH1 & CH2)
CONSTANT DIRECTIVITY
HORN EQ /AIR EQ
120 VAC 50/60 Hz
1500 WATTS
CD ON *3.5KHz
FROM ACTIVE CROSSOVER: LOW-FREQUENCY L/R
LOW-FREQUENCY
CABINETS
TYPICAL 35Hz
CAUTION
WARNING: TO REDUCE THE RISK OF FIRE OR ELECTRIC SHOCK, DO NOT
SERIAL NUMBER
MANUFACTURING DATE
EXPOSE THIS EQUIPMENT TO RAIN OR MOISTURE. DO NOT REMOVE COVER.
NO USER SERVICEABLE PARTS INSIDE. REFER SERVICING TO QUALIFIED PERSONNEL.
RISK OF ELECTRIC SHOCK
DO NOT OPEN
(MONO BRIDGE)
1400 WATTS
4 OHM LOAD MIN.
700 WATTS CH
2 OHMS LOAD MIN.
INPUT
BRIDGE
STAGE
MONITOR
1
2
CHANNEL
MONO
STEREO
TYPICAL
BALANCED
OR
UNBALANCED
TYPICAL
35 Hz
170Hz
AMP MODE
INPUT
LOW CUT
FILTER
AVIS: RISCQUE DE CHOC ÉLECTRIQUE — NE PAS OUVRIR
REPLACE WITH THE SAME TYPE FUSE AND RATING.
DISCONNECT SUPPLY CORD BEFORE CHANGING FUSE
(MONO BRIDGE)
1200 WATTS
4 OHM LOAD MIN.
600 WATTS CH
2 OHMS LOAD MIN.
STEREO/TYPICAL
STEREO/TYPICAL
1 CHANNEL
/ BRIDGE / MONO
UTILISE UN FUSIBLE DE RECHANGE DE MÊME TYPE.
DEBRANCHER AVANT DE REMPLACER LE FUSIBLE
MONO
STEREO
TYPICAL
BALANCED
OR
UNBALANCED
TYPICAL
35 Hz
CHANNEL
AMP MODE
INPUT
LOW CUT
FILTER
AVIS: RISCQUE DE CHOC ÉLECTRIQUE — NE PAS OUVRIR
REPLACE WITH THE SAME TYPE FUSE AND RATING.
DISCONNECT SUPPLY CORD BEFORE CHANGING FUSE
TYPICAL 35Hz
INPUT
BRIDGE
LOW CUT
FILTER
BALANCED
OR
UNBALANCED
CH
MONO
BRIDGE
+
1
CH
–
2
+
+
–
–
CONCEIVED, DESIGNED, AND MANUFACTURED
BY MACKIE DESIGNS INC • WOODINVILLE • WA
98072 • USA • MADE IN USA • PATENTS PENDING
STAGE
MONITOR
OUTPUT APPLICATION
100 Hz
170 Hz
OFF
4.5 kHz
2k Hz
125Hz
SPEAKER OUTPUTS
THRU
* CD HORN EQ FREQUENCY SETTING DEPENDS
ON COMPRESSION DRIVER/CD HORN COMBINATION
CD OFF
4.5k Hz
ON
2k Hz
63Hz
ON OFF
OFF
TYPICAL
AIR EQ
CONSTANT DIRECTIVITY
HORN EQ /AIR EQ
FREQUENCY
STEREO
TYPICAL
ON
5.6k Hz
100 Hz
170 Hz
OFF
SUB
WOOFER
FULL
RANGE
LIMITER (CH1 & CH2)
CONSTANT DIRECTIVITY
HORN EQ /AIR EQ
120 VAC 50/60 Hz
1500 WATTS
2
TYPICAL
35 Hz
STAGE
MONITOR
5.6k Hz
AIR EQ
OFF
TYPICAL
THRU
LIMITER ON
CD OFF
M•1200/M•1400: STEREO SYSTEM WITH CD HORNS
FROM MIXING CONSOLE MAIN OUT L/R
FULL
RANGE
130Hz
CAUTION
WARNING: TO REDUCE THE RISK OF FIRE OR ELECTRIC SHOCK, DO NOT
RISK OF ELECTRIC SHOCK
DO NOT OPEN
SERIAL NUMBER
MANUFACTURING DATE
EXPOSE THIS EQUIPMENT TO RAIN OR MOISTURE. DO NOT REMOVE COVER.
NO USER SERVICEABLE PARTS INSIDE. REFER SERVICING TO QUALIFIED PERSONNEL.
1 CHANNEL
/ BRIDGE / MONO
UTILISE UN FUSIBLE DE RECHANGE DE MÊME TYPE.
DEBRANCHER AVANT DE REMPLACER LE FUSIBLE
INPUT
BRIDGE
LOW CUT
FILTER
BALANCED
OR
UNBALANCED
MONO
BRIDGE
+
–
CH
CH
1
2
+
+
–
–
CONCEIVED, DESIGNED, AND MANUFACTURED
BY MACKIE DESIGNS INC • WOODINVILLE • WA
98072 • USA • MADE IN USA • PATENTS PENDING
STAGE
MONITOR
OUTPUT APPLICATION
100 Hz
170 Hz
OFF
4.5 kHz
SPEAKER OUTPUTS
SUBWOOFERS
CAUTION
WARNING: TO REDUCE THE RISK OF FIRE OR ELECTRIC SHOCK, DO NOT
SERIAL NUMBER
MANUFACTURING DATE
EXPOSE THIS EQUIPMENT TO RAIN OR MOISTURE. DO NOT REMOVE COVER.
NO USER SERVICEABLE PARTS INSIDE. REFER SERVICING TO QUALIFIED PERSONNEL.
5.6k Hz
AIR EQ
THRU
CD OFF
BRIDGE MODE
1 CHANNEL
/ BRIDGE / MONO
UTILISE UN FUSIBLE DE RECHANGE DE MÊME TYPE.
DEBRANCHER AVANT DE REMPLACER LE FUSIBLE
MONO
STEREO
TYPICAL
BALANCED
OR
UNBALANCED
TYPICAL
35 Hz
20Hz
CHANNEL
AMP MODE
INPUT
LOW CUT
FILTER
AVIS: RISCQUE DE CHOC ÉLECTRIQUE — NE PAS OUVRIR
REPLACE WITH THE SAME TYPE FUSE AND RATING.
DISCONNECT SUPPLY CORD BEFORE CHANGING FUSE
2k Hz
OFF
TYPICAL
LIMITER ON
20Hz
4.5k Hz
ON
63Hz
THRU
CD OFF
RISK OF ELECTRIC SHOCK
DO NOT OPEN
125Hz
ON OFF
OFF
TYPICAL
AIR EQ
CONSTANT DIRECTIVITY
HORN EQ /AIR EQ
FREQUENCY
STEREO
TYPICAL
ON
5.6k Hz
100 Hz
170 Hz
OFF
SUB
WOOFER
FULL
RANGE
LIMITER (CH1 & CH2)
CONSTANT DIRECTIVITY
HORN EQ /AIR EQ
2k Hz
INPUT
BRIDGE
LOW CUT
FILTER
BALANCED
OR
UNBALANCED
CH
+
MONO
BRIDGE
CH
–
2
+
+
–
–
120 VAC 50/60 Hz
1500 WATTS
CONCEIVED, DESIGNED, AND MANUFACTURED
BY MACKIE DESIGNS INC • WOODINVILLE • WA
98072 • USA • MADE IN USA • PATENTS PENDING
STAGE
MONITOR
OUTPUT APPLICATION
100 Hz
170 Hz
OFF
FULL
RANGE
LIMITER (CH1 & CH2)
CONSTANT DIRECTIVITY
HORN EQ /AIR EQ
4.5 kHz
2k Hz
5.6k Hz
AIR EQ
2
TYPICAL
35 Hz
STAGE
MONITOR
1
2
TYPICAL
35 Hz
STAGE
MONITOR
120 VAC 50/60 Hz
1500 WATTS
(MONO BRIDGE)
1400 WATTS
4 OHM LOAD MIN.
700 WATTS CH
2 OHMS LOAD MIN.
CHANNEL
MONO
STEREO
TYPICAL
BALANCED
OR
UNBALANCED
TYPICAL
35 Hz
130Hz
AMP MODE
INPUT
LOW CUT
FILTER
AVIS: RISCQUE DE CHOC ÉLECTRIQUE — NE PAS OUVRIR
REPLACE WITH THE SAME TYPE FUSE AND RATING.
DISCONNECT SUPPLY CORD BEFORE CHANGING FUSE
(MONO BRIDGE)
1200 WATTS
4 OHM LOAD MIN.
600 WATTS CH
2 OHMS LOAD MIN.
STEREO/TYPICAL
STEREO
TYPICAL
ON
ON OFF
OFF
TYPICAL
SPEAKER OUTPUTS
CONSTANT DIRECTIVITY
HORN EQ /AIR EQ
FREQUENCY
125Hz
ON
4.5k Hz
2k Hz
63Hz
THRU
CD OFF
100 Hz
170 Hz
OFF
SUB
WOOFER
OFF
TYPICAL
5.6k Hz
AIR EQ
THRU
SUBWOOFER MODE
@ 125Hz
CD OFF
M•1200/M•1400: STEREO SYSTEM WITH BRIDGED SUBWOOFER
10
FEATURE DESCRIPTIONS
GAIN
These giant knobs control the levels to the
output section of the M•1200/M•1400 amplifiers. You’ll notice that their travel is detented,
meaning there are 40 built-in “resting points”
so you can easily set both controls to the same
level. Usually, these controls are set all the
way up.
The gain structure of the amplifier is designed so that a +4 dBu (1.23V rms) input
signal drives the amplifier to full rated power
into 4 ohms (40V rms @ 4 ohms = 400 watts for
the M•1200). This is how the sensitivity
of an amplifier is defined. In this case, it
equates to a voltage gain of about 30 dB (okay,
30.24 dB for those of you sittin’ there with your
calculator!).
The graphics around the knob depict two
different methods for setting the gain. The inner circle is marked in dB, calibrated from off
(∞) to 30. This represents the amount of voltage gain from input to output. When using
professional equipment with +4 dBu output
levels, set the GAIN control all the way up to 30.
The outer circle is labeled in volts, with indications of 1V, 2V, and 3V. These correspond to
the input sensitivity of the amplifier. With the
GAIN control all the way up (fully clockwise),
the input sensitivity is 1.23V, which works well
with professional equipment operating at a
nominal +4 dBu level.
On the other hand, you may want your listening level to be quieter than the M•1200/
M•1400’s maximum level. For instance, if
you’re using the M•1200/M•1400 as a control
room amp, and your control room is the size of
a telephone booth, you’ll probably never want
to hear the amp at its maximum level.
You can set the GAIN controls as low as you like.
However, reducing the
GAIN controls requires an
increased input level to
reach full power at the amplifier’s output.
See the sidebar “Constant Gain vs. Constant
Sensitivity” for a better understanding of how
this works.
Like all amplifier controls, you’ll typically
determine the optimal settings during installa-
Constant Gain vs. Constant Sensitivity
There are two viewpoints, or philosophies,
regarding the gain structure of power amplifiers — constant gain and constant sensitivity.
Constant gain means that regardless of the
output power of the amplifier, the gain from input to output remains the same. (By the way,
this refers to the full gain of the amplifier, with
the gain or level controls all the way up.)
Within a product line of constant gain power
amplifiers, as the output power rating of an
amplifier increases, the level of the input voltage must also increase.
For example, if an amplifier is rated at
100W into an 8-ohm load, and it has 26 dB of
gain, it requires an input signal of 1.4V rms to
drive it to full power. This is about +5 dBu, a
reasonable operating point for professional
gear.
Now take an amplifier rated at 200W into an
8-ohm load. If it also has a gain of 26 dB, it requires an input signal of 2.0V rms to drive it to
full power, or +8 dBu.
This can become problematic as the power
of the amplifier increases. What if you have a
power amp rated at 800W into 8 ohms? This
will require an input signal of 4.0V rms to drive
it to full power. This equates to a whopping
+14.3 dBu!! You’ve just robbed your mixer of
10 dB of headroom. You’ll either have to have a
good limiter to keep the transient peaks down,
or turn down the level from the mixer and not
use all the power available from the amplifier.
Constant sensitivity means that regardless
of the output power of the amplifier, the input
sensitivity of the amplifier (the input voltage
required to attain full output power) remains
the same. As the output power of an amplifier
increases, the gain of the amplifier must also
increase.
Referring back to the previous example, an
amplifier rated at 100W into 8 ohms with a
gain of 26 dB requires an input signal of 1.4V
rms to drive it to full power. It has an input
sensitivity of 1.4V rms. In order for the 200W
amplifier to reach full power into 8 ohms with
a 1.4V rms input signal, it must have a gain of
29 dB. And the 800W amplifier will require a
gain of 35 dB to reach full power with a 1.4V
input signal.
Continued on page 12
11
tion or sound check, then leave them alone,
using your signal source (usually a mixer) to
control listening levels as you work. Or play.
So what are the pros and cons of these two
approaches? The reason some amplifier
manufacturers use the constant gain approach is because the noise specification
looks better. It’s a fact of physics that as the
gain of the amplifier increases, the circuit
noise is amplified and increases too. By maintaining a constant gain, the noise spec for an
800W amplifier can look as good as the noise
spec for a 100W amplifier. The downside to
this is that you have to crank up your mixer
level feeding the input of the amplifier, losing
headroom and possibly increasing the noise
level from the mixer (unless you have a
Mackie mixer with low-noise VLZ circuitry!).
Conversely, constant sensitivity demands
that as the power increases, so must the gain.
Yes, the output noise of the amplifier will
increase, but you maintain the critical headroom available from your mixer. The additional noise is generally not a problem in live
sound reinforcement situations. If it is, you
can turn down the GAIN control a few clicks
to find a happy compromise between noise
floor and headroom available (see “Optimizing Sound System Levels” in Appendix D).
As an added benefit, you can drive multiple
amplifiers with the same signal and get the
maximum power available from all of them.
Mackie subscribes to the philosophy of
constant sensitivity. Our amplifiers can be
driven to full power with an input level of
+4 dBu (1.23V rms).
You may wonder why we
didn’t use just one stereo
control to control both sides.
That’s in case your application requires a left/right
imbalance (due to an irregularly shaped room)
or if you’re using the two sides for completely
different purposes (monitor in channel 1 and
side-fill in channel 2, for instance). Besides,
they look cool.
METERS
The M•1200/M•1400’s meters indicate the
relative output level of the amplifier referenced to full power. The numbers next to the
meter’s LEDs are in dB below full power.
Ideally, the M•1200/M•1400’s –20, –9,
–6, and –3 LEDs will flicker at normal signal
levels, while the OL LED may flicker occasionally during peak moments.
OL is short for Overload. Overloading, or
clipping, occurs when the output voltage no
longer linearly follows the input voltage and
simply stops. This causes a sine wave to
“square off,” or get “clipped off.” Thus, the term
clipping. Fear not — this scenario is quite unlikely. Even with the GAIN controls fully up,
the M•1200/M•1400 amplifiers easily accept
professional “+4 dBu” operating levels.
FULL SYMMETRY DUAL DIFFERENTIAL HIGH CURRENT DESIGN
GAIN/dB
CH
1
18
3v
OL
OL
20
–3
–3
22
GAIN/dB
CH
3v
2
18
20
22
2v
16
24
14
26
28
SENSITIVITY
12
–6
–6
–9
–9
–20
–20
30
1v
1.23v (+4dBu)
CH
1
2
INTERNAL STATUS
2v
16
24
14
SIG
SIG
PROTECT
26
28
8
0
0
0
0
8
CH
SENSITIVITY
30
1v
1.23v (+4dBu)
SHORT
TEMP STATUS
CH
1& 2
COLD
HOT
If the OL (Overload) LED
is blinking frequently or
continuously, turn down
the source signal (i.e. the
mixer’s master faders).
SIG
SIG (short for “signal present”) is the lowest
step in the meters’ ladder. It senses the signal
prior to the GAIN control, so when SIG is lit,
you know the M•1200/M•1400 is receiving signal.
If it’s the only meter LED lit (meaning the other
meter LEDs are not lit), the M•1200/M•1400 is
receiving a very weak signal (below –20 dB).
PROTECT
If the PROTECT LEDs are on, the M•1200/
M•1400’s output section has shut down. That,
of course, means you won’t hear anything until
you rectify the situation. Three things can
cause the PROTECT circuit to engage:
1. Powering up the M•1200/M•1400. A builtin delay circuit saves your speakers (and
ears) from the thumps or pops that can
sometimes occur when powering up a
system. During this 3 second delay, the
PROTECT LEDs light up.
2. A short circuit (or near short) in either of
the outputs. Both the PROTECT and the
SHORT
LEDs light up.
3. The temperature in the M•1200/M•1400
has risen to an unsafe level. The PROTECT
and the TEMP STATUS LEDs
light up.
The M•1200/M•1400
amps draw their ventilation air in from the front
and out through the side
panels. The amp needs
plenty of fresh air to stay cool. DO NOT BLOCK
THE VENTILATION PORTS. See “Thermal
Considerations” .
SHORT
If this LED comes on, the M•1200 or
M•1400 has detected a short circuit in either
of the outputs, meaning that the hot (+) and
cold (–) speaker wires are touching, or a
speaker itself is shorted out. Such a condition
causes the M•1200/M•1400 to engage its
PROTECT
mode (when a signal is present),
muting all signals at the amp’s outputs.
This short-circuit LED is a Mackie exclusive
(until the other guys “borrow” the idea) and
can save precious minutes of your troubleshooting time. Without it, you’d still have
speaker and amp protection (via the PROTECT
circuit), but you wouldn’t be able to determine
the source of the problem. But with the SHORT
LED, the M•1200/M•1400 comes right out and
tells you!
WARNING: The SHORT LEDs indicate an
unsafe condition for the power amplifier. Once
the SHORT LED is lit, you must turn the power
off, wait for the indicator to extinguish, and
turn the power back on again to reset the amplifier.
Typical causes for a “short” indication would
be either a shorted speaker cable or too many
speaker cabinets connected to the amplifier
(i.e., the load impedance is too low). If a “short”
is indicated, please check your cables. If the
cabling is OK, then reduce the number of cabinets driven by the amplifier.
PROFESSIONAL POWER AMPLIFIER
ON
OFF
POWER
13
Note: When using the amplifier in BRIDGE
mode, one or both SHORT LEDs may light
under shorted or low impedance conditions.
Regardless of whether one or both LEDs light,
it’s an indication of a problem that requires
further investigation.
TEMP STATUS
TEMP (short for temperature) is another
feature designed to keep your mind at ease.
Normally the COLD LED is lit, indicating that
the M•1200/M•1400 is working normally.
Under extreme conditions the amplifier may
overheat. You may ask, “What kind of extreme
conditions?”
Overheating problems are usually caused by
one of the following situations: improper ventilation, high ambient temperatures, overdriving
the amplifier into clipping, driving the amplifier hard into low impedance loads, frayed or
partially shorted speaker cables, or defective
or internally shorted speakers.
The heaviest load the M•1200/M•1400 can
tolerate is 2 ohms per channel (4 ohms in
bridged mode). If you’ve got a set of speakers
wired in parallel, be sure the load isn’t adding
up to less than 2 ohms. Anything below 2 ohms
LED to light and trigcan cause the SHORT
ger the PROTECT mode.
Remember: As the load gets
“heavier,” its value in ohms
goes down. For instance, a
2-ohm speaker load is twice
as “heavy” as a 4-ohm load.
Please see “Do The Math: Ohms, Loads and
Such” in Appendix E to learn about speaker
loads.
As the internal temperature of the amplifier
rises, the fan kicks into high speed. This occurs
at 60°C (140°F). More air moves through the
CAUTION
What’s that? Why doesn’t the
fan just go fast all the time?
Well, if it did, you might actually hear it whirring during
your quiet moments (there
are quiet moments in your life, aren’t there?).
While this whirring would be of no concern in
most live-sound situations, it could become
annoying in a control room environment. So,
when the M•1200/M•1400 is not working hard,
the fan goes slow; when the music gets loud
and puts the amp to work, the fan goes fast.
POWER
To make the amp operate, push the top half
of the POWER switch. It clicks into place and a
MONO
BRIDGE
–
CH
1
2
+
+
–
–
120 VAC 50/60 Hz
1500 WATTS
SPEAKER OUTPUTS
14
MANUFACTURING DATE
UTILISE UN FUSIBLE DE RECHANGE DE MÊME TYPE.
DEBRANCHER AVANT DE REMPLACER LE FUSIBLE
CH
M•1200 Rear Panel
SERIAL NUMBER
EXPOSE THIS EQUIPMENT TO RAIN OR MOISTURE. DO NOT REMOVE COVER.
NO USER SERVICEABLE PARTS INSIDE. REFER SERVICING TO QUALIFIED PERSONNEL.
AVIS: RISCQUE DE CHOC ÉLECTRIQUE — NE PAS OUVRIR
REPLACE WITH THE SAME TYPE FUSE AND RATING.
DISCONNECT SUPPLY CORD BEFORE CHANGING FUSE
+
Be Aware: If the HOT LED
comes on frequently, something is overworking the
M•1200/M•1400 or it’s not
properly ventilated. Look
at each of the “extreme conditions” described
above and try to determine what is causing the
amplifier to overheat. Refer to the “Troubleshooting” section in Appendix A for more help.
WARNING: TO REDUCE THE RISK OF FIRE OR ELECTRIC SHOCK, DO NOT
RISK OF ELECTRIC SHOCK
DO NOT OPEN
(MONO BRIDGE)
1200 WATTS
4 OHM LOAD MIN.
600 WATTS CH
2 OHMS LOAD MIN.
constant temperature gradient cooling tunnel
to remove additional heat from the output
transistors. However, if the internal temperature of the amplifier should exceed 80°C
(176°F), the COLD LED turns off, the HOT
LED turns on, and both PROTECT LEDs shine.
The output of the amplifier is muted — at this
point the amplifier is in Standby mode and
remains there until the internal temperature
cools off to a safe level (55°C or 131°F). When
this occurs, the HOT LED and PROTECT LEDs
turn off, the COLD LED turns on and normal
operation resumes.
CONCEIVED, DESIGNED, AND MANUFACTURED
BY MACKIE DESIGNS INC • WOODINVILLE • WA
98072 • USA • MADE IN USA • PATENTS PENDING
SPEAKER OUTPUTS
soothing green light adjacent to it glows. To
turn the amp off, push the lower half. It’ll click
again and the green light will extinguish.
When you power up the M•1200/M•1400,
a built-in delay circuit prevents any pops or
thumps from being transmitted to the speakers
due to turn-on instability in the system. Be sure
the signal driving the amplifier is turned
down when you first power up the system.
There are few things as rude as 3 seconds of
silence followed by 225 watts of full-blast
stereo sound! (Well, maybe 225 kilowatts of
accordian music...)
Some call them “GR” jacks, others call them
“Banana” jacks, but we prefer to call them
“Binding Posts.” You can call them whatever
you like (except late for supper). These terminals are your standard fare.
To use the binding post outputs, you can
terminate your speaker cables with single or
double banana plugs, spade lugs, or leave them
unterminated: Unscrew the amp’s binding
posts enough to reveal the holes on their sides,
then insert your stripped wires (stripped about
3/8" back) into the holes and retighten the
posts (finger tight is fine — please don’t reef
on them with a wrench!). Be careful that no
runaway strands touch the chassis or other
terminals.
The red posts are labeled “+,” which means
positive. The black posts are labeled “–” for
negative. You probably know the importance of
getting these terms correct — if one side is
hooked up “in phase” and the other side is “out
of phase,” you’ll be “out of work.” (By the way,
although everyone says “phase” in this situation, the correct word is “polarity”... but it’s not
as much fun to say.)
Using high-quality stranded speaker cable
(16 gauge or thicker), connect the positive
outputs of the M•1200/M•1400 to the positive
inputs of your speakers, and the negative outputs to the negative inputs. The exception: If
you’re using the M•1200/M•1400 in BRIDGE
mode, this does not apply. Please read on.
Note (M•1200 only): In addition to the
binding posts, the M•1200 also has 1/4" TS
(tip-sleeve) SPEAKER OUTPUTS, so you can
use speaker cables with 1/4" TS plugs. The tip
is positive (+) and the shield is negative (–).
They’re wired in parallel with the binding posts
and behave exactly the same (except they
mode).
can’t be used in BRIDGE
If you shut down your
system, turn off your amplifiers first. When powering
up, turn on your amplifiers
last. This way, equipment
feeding the amp won’t “pop” or “thud” when it’s
powered up or down.
POWER CORD
We all know what a power cord is. The
M•1200 and M•1400 have big beefy cords built
in. Plug the power cord into a 3-prong outlet
that is capable of delivering 120VAC at 15 amps.
For current-delivery
purposes, the M•1200/
M•1400’s voltage source
(wall outlet, extension
cords, or power strips)
must be capable of continuously delivering 15
amps. And for safety reasons, that source must
be a “3-prong” outlet with hot, neutral, and
ground terminals. We’re dealing with some bigtime electricity here — don’t mess with it. See
“AC Power Considerations” .
1 CHANNEL
/ BRIDGE / MONO
MONO
STEREO
TYPICAL
BALANCED
OR
UNBALANCED
TYPICAL
35 Hz
CHANNEL
AMP MODE
INPUT
LOW CUT
FILTER
INPUT
BRIDGE
LOW CUT
FILTER
BALANCED
OR
UNBALANCED
TYPICAL
35 Hz
STAGE
MONITOR
STAGE
MONITOR
OUTPUT APPLICATION
100 Hz
170 Hz
OFF
FULL
RANGE
LIMITER (CH1 & CH2)
CONSTANT DIRECTIVITY
HORN EQ /AIR EQ
4.5 kHz
2k Hz
5.6k Hz
AIR EQ
EQ
2
STEREO
TYPICAL
ON
ON OFF
OFF
TYPICAL
THRU
100 Hz
170 Hz
OFF
SUB
WOOFER
CONSTANT DIRECTIVITY
HORN EQ /AIR EQ
FREQUENCY
125Hz
ON
4.5k Hz
2k Hz
63Hz
OFF
TYPICAL
5.6k Hz
AIR EQ
AIR
THRU
15
In fact, you can use both the 1/4" jacks and
the binding posts simultaneously. Just remember that doing so creates two parallel loads.
Please see “Do The Math: Ohms, Loads and Such”
in Appendix E to learn about speaker loads.
and “shorts” (positive and negative signal lines
in direct contact), you don’t want the speaker
ends of live cables to zap every piece of equipment they touch as they’re being dragged
across the stage.
Be Aware: Should you
choose to terminate your
speaker cables with the
1/4" TS plugs, make sure
nobody confuses these
cables with line-level cables, (i.e., guitar
cables). Guitar cords are not designed to
handle the high current output of power amplifiers. And line-level inputs (like the signal
input on a mixer) are not designed to handle
speaker-level voltages.
If you’re using low impedance loads at high
power levels, we recommend that you use the
binding post speaker outputs rather than the
1/4" TS jacks. Although 1/4" jacks are convenient and easy to use, they were not designed
to handle high-level currents.
Note (M•1400 only): In addition to the
binding posts, the M•1400 also has Speakon®
connectors for connecting the speakers to the
amplifier. These are locking connectors that
are easy to attach and are designed to handle
high power levels into low-impedance loads.
Pin 1+ is positive (+) and Pin 1– is negative (–).
Ordinarily, applying a positive voltage to a speaker’s
positive input and negative
voltage to the negative input
results in an outward excursion of the woofer. But some woofers are built
with reverse polarity, meaning that the above
conditions result in an inward excursion.
If you’re not sure which type of speakers you
have, take a look at their literature. If you’re
still not sure, here is a simple test: take a 1.5V
flashlight battery and connect the positive
terminal of the battery to the positive (+) input of the speaker, and connect the negative
terminal of the battery to the negative (–) input of the speaker. Observe the motion of the
speaker cone. It should move out when voltage
is applied, and return to rest when voltage is
removed. Make sure all the speakers in the
system move in the same direction (there are a
few exceptions — some speakers are deliberately designed with reverse-polarity woofers).
INPUT
Before making connections
to an amp or reconfiguring
an amp’s signal routing,
turn the amp’s GAIN
controls down, turn the
POWER
off, make the changes, turn the
POWER back on, and then turn the GAIN controls back up. Although the M•1200/M•1400
amplifiers can handle “opens” (no connection)
CAUTION
WARNING: TO REDUCE THE RISK OF FIRE OR ELECTRIC SHOCK, DO NOT
RISK OF ELECTRIC SHOCK
DO NOT OPEN
(MONO BRIDGE)
1400 WATTS
4 OHM LOAD MIN.
700 WATTS CH
2 OHMS LOAD MIN.
+
1
MONO
BRIDGE
CH
–
2
+
+
–
–
SPEAKER OUTPUTS
16
MANUFACTURING DATE
UTILISE UN FUSIBLE DE RECHANGE DE MÊME TYPE.
DEBRANCHER AVANT DE REMPLACER LE FUSIBLE
120 VAC 50/60 Hz
1500 WATTS
M•1400 Rear Panel
SERIAL NUMBER
EXPOSE THIS EQUIPMENT TO RAIN OR MOISTURE. DO NOT REMOVE COVER.
NO USER SERVICEABLE PARTS INSIDE. REFER SERVICING TO QUALIFIED PERSONNEL.
AVIS: RISCQUE DE CHOC ÉLECTRIQUE — NE PAS OUVRIR
REPLACE WITH THE SAME TYPE FUSE AND RATING.
DISCONNECT SUPPLY CORD BEFORE CHANGING FUSE
CH
The M•1200/M•1400 amplifiers give you a
choice — they have the traditional XLR inputs,
as well as 1/4" TRS (tip-ring-sleeve) input jacks.
Sonically (and electrically) they’re identical,
so choose either one. Since these two inputs
jacks are in
are in parallel (the THRU
parallel with the inputs as well), you shouldn’t
connect more than one source to the SIGNAL
INPUT jacks. Each can be used with either
balanced or unbalanced signals.
CONCEIVED, DESIGNED, AND MANUFACTURED
BY MACKIE DESIGNS INC • WOODINVILLE • WA
98072 • USA • MADE IN USA • PATENTS PENDING
When connecting a balanced signal using
the XLR or 1/4" jacks, they’re wired thusly, per
AES (Audio Engineering Society) standards:
XLR
Pin 2
Pin 3
Pin 1
Hot (+)
Cold (–)
Shield (Ground)
Unbalanced TS (tip-sleeve) lines can be accommodated via the TRS jack. Make sure the
cord terminates with a TS plug (like a guitar
plug), or if it’s a TRS plug (like a headphone
plug), make sure the ring is tied to the shield,
preferably at the source.
TRS
Tip
Ring
Shield
SLEEVE
SLEEVE
TIP
TIP
2
SHIELD
RING (COLD)
HOT
TIP (HOT)
COLD
SHIELD
COLD 3
HOT
SLEEVE (SHIELD)
1
3
Unbalanced 1/4" TS plug
1
You can connect an unbalanced XLR cable
to the M•1200/M•1400, although this would be
unusual — as unusual as an unbalanced XLR
output. However, if you have an unbalanced
XLR connection to make, refer to the “Connectors” section (Appendix C) at the back of this
manual for more information.
The M•1200/M•1400 amps expect to see
a nominal signal level anywhere between the
–10dBV “semipro” and +4 dBu “pro” standards,
meaning almost any line-level mixer or other
device can be plugged into the amp’s INPUTs.
controls to adjust the gain of
Use the GAIN
the amplifier to match the signal level you’re using.
2
SHIELD
1
3
COLD
2
HOT
Balanced XLR Connectors
RING SLEEVE
SLEEVE RING TIP
TIP
RING (COLD)
TIP (HOT)
SLEEVE (SHIELD)
Balanced 1⁄4" TRS Plugs
If you set the AMP MODE
switch in MONO or
BRIDGE, use the CHANNEL 1 inputs only — the
CHANNEL 2 inputs are
disabled in this case.
1 CHANNEL
/ BRIDGE / MONO
MONO
STEREO
TYPICAL
BALANCED
OR
UNBALANCED
TYPICAL
35 Hz
CHANNEL
AMP MODE
INPUT
LOW CUT
FILTER
INPUT
BRIDGE
LOW CUT
FILTER
BALANCED
OR
UNBALANCED
TYPICAL
35 Hz
STAGE
MONITOR
STAGE
MONITOR
OUTPUT APPLICATION
100 Hz
170 Hz
OFF
FULL
RANGE
LIMITER (CH1 & CH2)
CONSTANT DIRECTIVITY
HORN EQ /AIR EQ
4.5 kHz
2k Hz
5.6k Hz
AIR EQ
EQ
2
STEREO
TYPICAL
ON
ON OFF
OFF
TYPICAL
THRU
100 Hz
170 Hz
OFF
SUB
WOOFER
CONSTANT DIRECTIVITY
HORN EQ /AIR EQ
FREQUENCY
125Hz
ON
4.5k Hz
2k Hz
63Hz
OFF
TYPICAL
5.6k Hz
AIR EQ
AIR
THRU
17
THRU
Someday you’ll do a show at Carnegie Hall
and realize that one M•1200 or M•1400 amplifier is just not going to do the job — you’ll need
a six-foot-high rack full of ’em. That’s what the
THRU jack is for. Simply plug the signal source
outputs into the first amp’s INPUTs , patch
from that amp’s THRU jacks to the next amp’s
INPUTs, and so on, daisy-chaining as many
amps as you can afford (assuming your console
has low-impedance outputs).
A general rule of thumb is to
maintain a load impedance
10 times or more than the
source impedance to prevent
excessive loading. If your
console has an output impedance of 100 ohms,
then you can daisy-chain up to twenty M•1200/
M•1400 amplifiers, which presents a load of
1000 ohms to the console (input impedance of
20 kohms divided by 20 amplifiers = 1000 ohms).
The THRU jacks can also be used to relay
the signal on to other devices such as a DAT or
cassette recorder, enabling you to record exactly what the audience is hearing. The THRU
jacks are wired straight from the XLR and TRS
INPUTs
— there is no electronic circuitry
between — so the signal going into the amp is
exactly the same as the signal coming out of
the THRU jacks.
You can use the THRU jack
as an input, if necessary,
since it’s wired in parallel
with the other input connectors. You can also use the
1/4" TRS INPUT jacks as THRU jacks. Simply
connect the 1/4" TRS INPUT jacks on the first
amplifier to the TRS 1/4" INPUT jacks on the
second amplifier using 3-conductor shielded
cables with TRS plugs on both ends.
Warning: If you use a regular guitar cord with
2-conductor TS plugs, you’ll unbalance the signal at the XLR input by grounding the low side
(–) of the signal (pin 3).
LOW CUT FILTER
Every woofer has frequency response specifications. It’s usually expressed in Hertz (or
cycles per second), like “40Hz–300Hz.” The
“40Hz” refers to the low-frequency point (usually, but not always) where the speaker’s
output drops by 3 dB, and will "roll off" completely as the frequency goes down. There is no
point in sending a woofer any frequencies it
18
can’t reproduce — you can’t hear it, and worse
yet, it’s a waste of amplifier power that can be
better used reproducing frequencies you can hear.
5dB
0dB
–5dB
–10dB
–15dB
1Hz
10Hz
100Hz
1kHz
10kHz 20kHz
Low Cut Filter Frequency Response
In order to match the output bandwidth
with your particular speaker system, the
M•1200/M•1400 amplifier has a tunable LOW
CUT FILTER. The frequencies are clearly
marked along the knob’s travel :
• Fully counterclockwise, the frequency is
below 10Hz, effectively bypassing the filter.
• Center detent is 35Hz and labeled TYPICAL,
since precious few woofers actually go
below that.
• 3/4 of the way up is labeled STAGE MONITOR, 100Hz, perfect for, well, stage monitors
(they seldom reproduce below 100Hz;
besides, it prevents low-frequency “leakage” into the house).
• Fully clockwise is labeled 170Hz.
So, grab your woofer’s spec sheet and find
the low roll-off spec. Then set the M•1200/
at the same
M•1400’s LOW CUT FILTER
frequency.
If you do this correctly (and make sure the
are happy), you’ll never again see
meters
your woofer moving sporadically without audible signal. Your system will play louder and
cleaner, and you may never blow another
woofer again!
CONSTANT DIRECTIVITY
Compression drivers mounted on constantdirectivity horns require compensation, in the
form of a high-frequency boost, with its “knee”
set somewhere between 2.5kHz and 6kHz.
Until now, you’d have to resort to external
crossovers or worse yet, graphic EQ modules.
Both of these are fraught with limitations, not
to mention adding cost, rack space requirements and complexity to your system.
The M•1200/M•1400 Power Amplifiers
eliminate the need for any of these external
devices — they have the compensation circuitry already built in. And using it is a breeze.
CD Frequency
More on Constant Directivity Horns
Back in the early ’70s, radial
horns were the common
mechanism for reproducing
high frequencies. Radial
horns had a serious problem,
though. The high frequencies
tended to beam straight ahead, so if you moved
away from front and center (off-axis), the brilliance and sizzle quickly diminished to a
muffled blur. Constant Directivity horns were
designed to spread the higher frequencies
evenly throughout the horn’s dispersion pattern.
This was accomplished by using a smaller
opening to the horn, using straight sidewalls in
both the horizontal and vertical planes (radial
horns typically have curved vertical sections
that cause beaming), and providing a flare at
the mouth of the horn to disperse the mid to
high frequencies.
All high-frequency compression drivers have
an inherent roll-off of about 6 dB per octave
above about 3kHz. The exact frequency at
which the roll-off occurs (called the mass
breakpoint) depends on the materials used,
the mass of the moving parts (diaphragm and
voice coil) and the strength of the magnet. The
CONSTANT DIRECTIVITY HORN EQ control
on the M•1200/M•1400 compensates for this
natural roll-off in the power response of the
compression driver coupled to a CD horn, with
the end result of flat-frequency response (constant) with a wide coverage angle (directivity).
Your compression drivers’ spec sheet should
have a suggested frequency for compensation
boost. If so, just turn the CONSTANT DIRECTIVITY switch ON and set its knob to match
that frequency. If your spec sheet doesn’t have
that information, you can simply adjust the
Frequency knob by ear, preferably using the
same music as the actual performance (3.5kHz
is a good place to start).
15dB
10dB
5dB
0dB
–5dB
20Hz
100Hz
1kHz
10k Hz 20k Hz
Constant Directivity EQ
Wait, there’s more: If you don’t have constant directivity horns, you can forget all this,
and leave the switch OFF.
Or, better yet, you can use this CONSTANT
DIRECTIVITY feature to enhance your EQ
curve. By setting the Frequency knob fully
clockwise, you introduce a very high frequency
boost to the signal (above 6kHz). And in
Mackie-land, this gentle boost has a name: AIR,
as seen on our SR series of consoles. By boosting these high frequencies, AIR will breathe
life into your mix, making cymbals brighter
and vocals silkier.
Speaking of Mackie SR consoles: If you use
both the AIR feature on an SR console as well
as the AIR feature just described on the
M•1200/M•1400, you may be overdoing it. You
won’t hyperventilate or anything, but it might
cause your audience to experience ear fatigue
from too much high-frequency content. Too
much of a good thing, perhaps.
1 CHANNEL
/ BRIDGE / MONO
MONO
STEREO
TYPICAL
BALANCED
OR
UNBALANCED
TYPICAL
35 Hz
This three-way switch, along with the OUTthree-way switch,
PUT APPLICATION’s
determines what kind of amplifier you want
the M•1200/M•1400 to be.
CHANNEL
AMP MODE
INPUT
LOW CUT
FILTER
AMP MODE
INPUT
BRIDGE
LOW CUT
FILTER
BALANCED
OR
UNBALANCED
TYPICAL
35 Hz
STAGE
MONITOR
STAGE
MONITOR
OUTPUT APPLICATION
100 Hz
170 Hz
OFF
FULL
RANGE
LIMITER (CH1 & CH2)
CONSTANT DIRECTIVITY
HORN EQ /AIR EQ
4.5 kHz
2k Hz
5.6k Hz
AIR EQ
EQ
2
STEREO
TYPICAL
ON
ON OFF
OFF
TYPICAL
THRU
100 Hz
170 Hz
OFF
SUB
WOOFER
CONSTANT DIRECTIVITY
HORN EQ /AIR EQ
FREQUENCY
125Hz
ON
4.5k Hz
2k Hz
63Hz
OFF
TYPICAL
5.6k Hz
AIR EQ
AIR
THRU
19
The AMP MODE switch determines the input signal routing within the M•1200/M•1400
amplifier. Shipped from the factory, the switch
is set to STEREO. This is correct for about 90%
of the applications using an amp like this
(hence the TYPICAL indicator near it). But
you may be in the 10% bracket, requiring special input routing within the amp.
AMP MODE should be configured before
operation — if you must change it during percontrols as
formance, turn down the GAIN
a precaution to protect the speakers from any
inadvertent pops or thumps.
STEREO
mode (separate left and right
inputs, separate left and right outputs) is the
typical setup for amplifying stereo signals.
MONO
mode (sometimes called DualMono – one mono input, two mono outputs) is
for sending a mono signal to two different
speaker sets, with separately-adjustable GAIN
controls.
BRIDGE
mode (sometimes called
Bridged-Mono – one mono input, one mono
output) uses both sides of the amp to double
the power to one speaker set. With two M•1200
power amplifiers, each set to BRIDGE mode,
you can deliver as much as 1200 watts per
amplifier.
If you set the AMP MODE
switch in MONO or
BRIDGE, use the CHANNEL 1 inputs only — the
CHANNEL 2 inputs go nowhere in this case.
Note: There is one exception to this rule. If you
have the OUTPUT APPLICATION switched to
SUBWOOFER, the inputs to Channels 1 and 2
are summed regardless of the AMP MODE
setting (see ). Also, BRIDGE mode requires special connections at the SPEAKER
OUTPUTS .
BRIDGE
In STEREO mode, the M•1200 Power
Amplifier can deliver 600 watts per side into
2 ohms. If that’s not enough, you can use two
M•1200s, each in BRIDGE mode, and deliver
1200 watts per amplifier into 4 ohms. The
M•1400 produces 630 watts per side into
2 ohms in STEREO and 1260 watts into 4 ohms
in BRIDGE mode. Or, you can use one amp in
BRIDGE mode to power a monaural system.
Finally, BRIDGE mode is also popular for
subwoofer applications — but please see
SUBWOOFER
for a special subwoofer surprise.
20
To use all the M•1200/M•1400’s power to
drive one speaker cabinet using BRIDGE mode,
you’ll have to do four things:
1. Turn off the power to the M•1200/M•1400.
switch to BRIDGE.
2. Set the AMP MODE
3. Connect the positive side of the speaker
cable to the Channel 1 red (+) binding post.
4. Connect the negative side of the speaker
cable to the Channel 2 red (+) binding post.
5. (Okay, make that five things!) Use only the
CHANNEL 1 INPUT
(unless you’re using
the SUBWOOFER OUTPUT APPLICATION).
The CHANNEL 1 GAIN control adjusts the
output level of the amplifier. The CHANNEL 2
GAIN control has no effect.
Once again: Before making connections to
an amp or reconfiguring an amp’s routing, turn
the power off, make the changes, then turn the
power back on.
OUTPUT APPLICATION
The OUTPUT APPLICATION switch should
be configured before you turn on the amplifier.
This switch allows you to choose between three
different configurations:
LIMITER ON (TYPICAL). This is the normal
configuration: full-bandwidth audio with protective limiting (please see ).
LIMITER OFF is also full bandwidth audio,
but without protective limiting (please see ).
SUBWOOFER mode, with built-in low-pass
filter, no protective limiting (please see ).
LIMITER
The LIMITER is not designed to alter your
sound — it’s just there to protect your speakers from clipping. Its effect is virtually
transparent, meaning you probably won’t even
notice any audible difference. We recommend
that you leave it engaged (via OUTPUT APPLICATION ), hence the TYPICAL label below it.
If you’re working at quiet levels all the time,
or you’ve already placed a compressor/limiter
in the signal path, or if you just hate compression, you can leave the LIMITER out of the
circuit (via OUTPUT APPLICATION ).
The LIMITER senses when
the amp is about to be
overdriven and attenuates
the overall level just enough
to keep the signal from clipping. Clipping occurs when the output voltage
no longer linearly follows the input voltage
and simply stops. This causes a sine wave to
“square off,” and the average power going into
the speaker is roughly double that of a sine
wave. Square waves sound awful, and could
possibly damage your speakers and/or your
reputation.
The LIMITER is especially handy when
you’re working with loud output levels. Having
the signal spikes (kick drum, for instance) attenuated a bit can actually increase the
apparent loudness of the overall mix without
diminishing the “power” behind the spikes.
Since most low-frequency energy is monophonic (the same in both channels), the
subwoofer circuit takes the signal from both
Channels 1 and 2 and sums them together. This
summed signal is then directed to both power
amplifier output stages. It doesn’t matter
switch is set to
whether the AMP MODE
STEREO, MONO, or BRIDGE, it will sum the
inputs when the OUTPUT APPLICATION
switch is set to SUBWOOFER.
Here’s how to configure it:
off.
1. Turn the M•1200/M•1400’s POWER
2. Set the OUTPUT APPLICATION
switch
to SUBWOOFER.
3. Select a rolloff point, via the FREQUENCY
switch: At “125Hz,” you’ll get the low
sub-harmonics on up to the audible bass
range. At “63Hz,” you’ll get just the lowest
frequencies, more to be felt than heard.
You’ll probably want to try this switch both
ways.
4. Connect your cords and speaker cables as
usual (see “Quick Start” ). Set the AMP
MODE
to either STEREO, MONO, or
BRIDGE, depending on your application.
(STEREO and MONO operate the same
with SUBWOOFER activated).
5. Turn the M•1200/M•1400’s POWER on.
Woof!
If you want to use a second M•1200/M•1400
to reproduce the rest of the audio range, follow
this procedure:
jacks on the first
1. Connect the THRU
jacks
subwoofer amplifier to the INPUT
on the second amplifier.
2. With POWER off, set the OUTPUT
switch on the second
APPLICATION
amplifier to FULL RANGE (LIMITER either
ON or OFF).
Be Forewarned: With the
LIMITER engaged, you can
still overdrive the amplifier
into clipping. It just takes a
stronger signal to do it. So
even with the LIMITER turned on, you should
still pay attention to the OL LEDs .
SUBWOOFER
Here’s a special surprise: If you bought the
M•1200/M•1400 amplifier to power a subwoofer
system, you just saved yourself the cost of a
crossover! The M•1200/M•1400 amps have an
active SUBWOOFER filter built in. You can use
it, along with the variable LOW CUT FILTER
in a second M•1200/M•1400, to reproduce the
function of a crossover.
5dB
0dB
–5dB
–10dB
–15dB
20Hz
100Hz
1kHz
10kHz 20kHz
Subwoofer Filter
1 CHANNEL
/ BRIDGE / MONO
MONO
STEREO
TYPICAL
BALANCED
OR
UNBALANCED
TYPICAL
35 Hz
CHANNEL
AMP MODE
INPUT
LOW CUT
FILTER
INPUT
BRIDGE
LOW CUT
FILTER
BALANCED
OR
UNBALANCED
TYPICAL
35 Hz
STAGE
MONITOR
STAGE
MONITOR
OUTPUT APPLICATION
100 Hz
170 Hz
OFF
FULL
RANGE
LIMITER (CH1 & CH2)
CONSTANT DIRECTIVITY
HORN EQ /AIR EQ
4.5 kHz
2k Hz
5.6k Hz
AIR EQ
EQ
2
STEREO
TYPICAL
ON
ON OFF
OFF
TYPICAL
THRU
100 Hz
170 Hz
OFF
SUB
WOOFER
CONSTANT DIRECTIVITY
HORN EQ /AIR EQ
FREQUENCY
125Hz
ON
4.5k Hz
2k Hz
63Hz
OFF
TYPICAL
5.6k Hz
AIR EQ
AIR
THRU
21
3. Set the LOW CUT FILTER
frequency
control to either 63Hz or 125Hz, depending
on the cutoff frequency selected in the
subwoofer amplifier .
Since these exact frequencies are not labeled on the amplifier, you can guesstimate the
position of the knob. 63Hz is located at about
1 o’clock and 125Hz is about 4 o’clock.
If you want to be really accurate, you will
need to use a variable-frequency signal generator along with a frequency counter and a voltmeter or oscilloscope to find the exact position
for the knob. The voltmeter or o’scope should
be capable of measuring low frequencies accurately (down to 60Hz).
1. Connect the signal generator to the INPUT
of the amplifier and monitor the
SPEAKER OUTPUT
with the voltmeter
or o’scope.
22
2. Adjust the signal generator level so you
measure 1V rms output at 1kHz. (You
should turn down the GAIN knobs on the
amplifier about halfway.)
3. Change the frequency of the signal generator to 63Hz or 125Hz, whichever you’re
using as your subwoofer crossover frequency. You may need to use a frequency
counter for accuracy.
frequency
4. Adjust the LOW CUT FILTER
control until the voltmeter or o’scope reads
0.707VAC rms. This is the –3 dB point, and
means you have now matched the LOW
CUT FILTER frequency cut-off point to the
SUBWOOFER FREQUENCY switch setting
(either 63Hz or 125Hz).
After you’ve completed this exercise, you
should mark the position of the control with
a stick-on arrow or label so you don’t have
to repeat it should the control accidentally
get moved.
GENERAL PRECAUTIONS AND CONSIDERATIONS
RACK MOUNTING
The M•1200/M•1400 amp requires two rack
space units (2U = 3.5"). It also requires 16.25"
depth inside the rack, including the rear supports. When designing your rack, put the
heavier items at the bottom and the lighter
items toward the top.
Secure the front panel of the amplifier to
the front of the rack using four screws with soft
washers to prevent scratching the panel. In addition, because of the weight of the amplifier,
you must secure the rear support brackets of
the amplifier to the back of the rack. You could
use a support rail or shelf across the back of
the rack, or angle brackets attached between
the rear support brackets and the rear rails of
the rack. This is recommended for all components mounted in a rack that is going to be
moved frequently (or thrown in the back of a
pickup truck and transported down a bumpy
gravel road to that outdoor festival!).
THERMAL CONSIDERATIONS
The M•1200/M•1400 amps are fan-cooled
and bring air in through the front and out
through the sides. Make sure that cool air is
available at the front of the amplifier, and that
there is room on each side for the warm air to
exit from the amplifier and dissipate. If rackmounted, make sure there is room for the
warm air to circulate around the side and out
through the rear of the rack. In a typical rack,
there will be a space of 1 to 2 inches on either
side of the amplifier. This is adequate to allow
the warm air to exit from the amplifier.
The M•1200/M•1400’s unique T-Design
Constant Gradient Cooling Tunnel provides
substantially better cooling for the output transistors than conventional designs that simply
blow air through the chassis, getting dust and
other contaminants over all the internal
components. The Cooling Tunnel provides a
shorter, more directed path so the cool air concentrates on the heat produced by the output
devices. This results in increased reliability
and longevity for the amplifier.
AC POWER CONSIDERATIONS
Be sure the M•1200/M•1400 is plugged into
an outlet that is able to supply 120VAC at high
current. If the voltage should drop below
116VAC, the M•1200/M•1400 will no longer be
able to supply rated power. (It will continue to
operate down to 50% of the rated voltage, but it
just won’t be able to reach full rated power.)
Be sure the AC outlet can supply enough
current to allow full power operation of all the
amplifiers plugged into it. The outlet should be
a three-prong socket that matches the power
cord.
WARNING: Bypassing the plug’s ground pin
can be dangerous. Please don’t do it.
The AC current demand of an amplifier varies depending on several factors, including the
crest factor and the duty cycle of the program
material. Under typical conditions reproducing
rock music where musical peaks are just below
clipping, the M•1200/M•1400 will require the
following average currents:
Amplifier Loading
2 ohms per side or 4 ohms bridged
4 ohms per side or 8 ohms bridged
8 ohms per side or 16 ohms bridged
Average
Current
Required
Peak
Current
Required
8A
5A
3.2A
25A
16A
10A
It is recommended that a stiff supply of AC
power be used because the amplifier places
high current demands on the AC line. The
more power that is available on the line, the
louder the amplifier will play and the more
peak output power will be available for cleaner,
punchier bass.
Having said this, we also realize that in
many applications a standard 15A service may
be all that is available. Under typical conditions, reproducing rock music where musical
peaks are just below the clipping point, you
can safely connect more than one amplifier to
a 15A service. Use the table below as a guideline:
Amplifier Loading
2 ohms per side or 4 ohms bridged
4 ohms per side or 8 ohms bridged
8 ohms per side or 16 ohms bridged
Maximum Number
of Amplifiers
on a 15A Service
2
3
5
23
The extension cord used to supply power to
the “amp rack” should have a third wire safety
ground to avoid presenting a safety hazard. We
also recommend using a cord that has conductors large enough to avoid severely limiting the
amplifier’s ability to supply high currents on
transients. With this in mind, we recommend
using the following for a fully loaded 15A service:
Extension Cord Length Wire Gauge
25 feet
14 AWG
50 feet
12 AWG
100 feet
10 AWG
Power amplifiers can have
momentary peak current requirements many times
above the nominal average
current draw. According to
Ohm’s Law, the greater the resistance of the
linecord, the more input power is lost between
the AC outlet and the power amplifier (across
the linecord). And to further aggravate the
matter, this relationship is nonlinear. The
amount of power lost across the linecord increases exponentially as the current demand
increases. So if the current demand doubles
momentarily because of an exceptionally loud
bass note, the amount of AC input power lost
across the linecord increases four times. You
can see that it is very important to keep the
resistance of the linecord to a minimum. That’s
why we recommend using a heavy gauge extension cord (like 14 gauge or bigger). Remember,
wire gets thicker as the gauge number gets
smaller (10 gauge is thicker than 14 gauge).
AC Power Distribution
The majority of AC outlets encountered in
homes and clubs are served by a 240VAC center-tapped service entrance transformer. This
provides two phases of AC power on either side
of the center tap at 120V each.
In order to minimize ground loops, the safety
grounds for all the outlets should be connected
HIGH VOLTAGE POWER LINE
120V
PRIMARY
WINDING
240V
120V
TRANSFORMER
240V Center-Tapped Secondary
24
EARTH
GROUND
(NEUTRAL)
SECONDARY
WINDING
to a common (“star”) grounding point, and the
distance between the outlets and the common
grounding point should be as short as possible.
If lighting is used in a show, it is preferable
to power the lights from one leg of the service,
and power the audio equipment from the other
leg. This will help minimize noise from the
lights coupling into the audio (particularly if
SCRs are used).
When setting up for a show, oftentimes you
are plugging into an AC power distribution system you know nothing about. You may even be
faced with 2-wire outlets that are missing the
third safety ground pin. It’s a good idea to have
a three-wire AC outlet tester in your toolbox so
you can check the outlets yourself to make
sure they are wired correctly. These testers will
tell you if the polarity of the hot and neutral
wires is reversed and if the safety ground is disconnected. Don’t use an outlet if it is wired
improperly! This is to protect yourself as well
as your equipment.
If you find that you must plug into a twowire outlet, you will need to use a two-wire to
three-wire adapter (cheater plug). These come
with a metal tab that you put underneath the
center screw that holds the AC outlet faceplate
in place. This center screw should be grounded.
You can check it by connecting the adapter to
the outlet and then plugging in your AC outlet
tester.
INPUT WIRING
Use a high-quality 3-conductor shielded
cable to connect the signal between the signal
source (mixing console, equalizer, etc.) and
the balanced inputs to the amplifier. If you’re
using the unbalanced inputs, use a high-quality
2-conductor shielded cable. Your Mackie
Dealer can recommend a suitable cable for
your application.
If you want to build your own cables, refer to
the “Connectors” section in Appendix C.
OUTPUT WIRING
Use heavy gauge, stranded wire for connecting speakers to the M•1200/M•1400 amplifier’s
SPEAKER OUTPUT
terminals. As the distance between the amplifier and the speakers
increases, the thickness of the wire should also
increase. Speaker wire has resistance, and
when electricity passes through a resistor,
power is lost. The thicker the wire, the less resistance it offers, and the more power actually
gets to the speakers.
The thickness of wire is rated in gauges.
Use the chart below to determine the correct
gauge of wire to use according to the distance
between the speakers and the amplifier, and
the impedance of the load the amplifier is driving. This ensures that the power lost across the
speaker wire is less than 0.5 dB.
Wire Length
Up to 25 ft.
Up to 40 ft.
Up to 60 ft.
Up to 100 ft.
Up to 150 ft.
Up to 250 ft.
Load
Impedance
2Ω
4Ω
8Ω
2Ω
4Ω
8Ω
2Ω
4Ω
8Ω
2Ω
4Ω
8Ω
2Ω
4Ω
8Ω
2Ω
4Ω
8Ω
tions when setting up a multi-speaker system.
You just add up the total wattages of all the
speakers in the system and make sure that it
doesn’t exceed the total power rating of the
amplifier (allowing at least 10% for insertion
losses). Another benefit is that by using high
voltage and low current, losses in the speaker
distribution wiring are kept to a minimum.
Standard voltage levels include 25V, 70V, and
100V, but 70V systems are most commonly used
in commercial sound distribution systems in
the U.S.
Because of the high power capability of the
M•1200/M•1400 amplifiers, they can be used
to directly drive 70V constant-voltage distribution systems without the use of a step-up
transformer. When the M•1200 amplifier is
mode, it can produce
operated in BRIDGE
800 watts into 8 ohms, or 80V. This is slightly
higher than the standard 70.7V for which the
system was designed. You can recalculate the
actual power delivered to each tap by multiplying the tap’s rated wattage by a correction
factor (K). The correction factor is P1/P2,
where P1 is the power delivered by the amplifier
into 8 ohms (BRIDGE mode), and P2 is the
power delivered by 70.7V into 8 ohms (625W).
M•1200: K = 800W/625W = 1.28. Thus, a
2.5W tap becomes 3.2W, a 5W tap becomes
6.4W and a 10W tap becomes 12.8W.
M•1400: K = 850W/625W = 1.32. Thus, a
2.5W tap becomes 3.3W, a 5W tap becomes
6.6W and a 10 W tap becomes 13.2W.
CAUTION: A characteristic of tapped transformers is that they saturate at very low frequencies,
which causes their impedance to decrease, approaching the DC resistance of the copper wire.
This can result in overloading the amplifier if
the signal contains lots of low frequencies.
When using an FR Series amplifier in a 70V distribution system, set the LOW CUT FILTER
to 100Hz or higher. In addition, install an RC
of the
network at the SPEAKER OUTPUT
amplifier, as shown in the figure below.
Gauge of
Wire
14 gauge
16 gauge
18 gauge
12 gauge
14 gauge
18 gauge
10 gauge
12 gauge
16 gauge
8 gauge
10 gauge
14 gauge
6 gauge
8 gauge
12 gauge
4 gauge
6 gauge
10 gauge
70V DISTRIBUTION SYSTEMS
A distributed sound system uses a constantvoltage, high-impedance network that feeds a
number of tapped transformers which, in turn,
deliver power to individual speakers. Each tap
is rated in watts, so you can select the amount
of power delivered to the speaker. Developed
for distributed paging and public address systems, one benefit of such a system is that it
eliminates complicated impedance calculaFR SERIES
POWER AMPLIFIER
IN BRIDGE MODE
RC NETWORK
+ C1 C2+
+
CH 1
CH 2
–
R1
70V LINE
–
+
CONSTANT
VOLTAGE
TRANSFORMER
R1
70V Constant Voltage
Distribution System
2.5W
5W
10W
C3
2.5W
5W
10W
ALTERNATE RC NETWORK
Note: You can substitute
a single capacitor for C1/C2.
C3 = 330µF @ 250VDC,
NON-POLARIZED.
2.5W
5W
10W
RC NETWORK VALUES
C1 = C2 = 660µF @ 250VDC
R1 = 4Ω @ 100W
POWER TAP
SWITCH
+
+
+
–
–
–
25
APPENDIX A: Service Info
WARRANTY SERVICE
Details concerning Warranty Service are
spelled out on the Warranty Card included with
your amplifier (if it’s missing, let us know and
we’ll rush one to you).
If you think your amplifier has a problem,
please do everything you can to confirm it before calling for service, including reading
through the following Troubleshooting section.
Doing so might save you from the deprivation
of your amplifier and the associated suffering.
Of all Mackie products returned for service
(which is hardly any at all), roughly 50% are
coded “CND” — Could Not Duplicate, which
usually means the problem lay somewhere else
in the system. These may sound obvious to you,
but here are some things you can check:
TROUBLESHOOTING
No power!
• Our favorite question: Is it plugged in?
Make sure the AC outlet is live (check with
a tester or lamp).
• Our next favorite question: Is the POWER
switch
on? If not, try turning it on.
• Is the green light next to the power switch
illuminated? If not, make sure the AC
outlet is live. If so, refer to “No Sound”
below.
• The AC line fuse inside the cabinet is
blown. This is not a user-serviceable part.
Refer to “Repair” on the next page to find
out how to proceed.
No sound!
• Are the GAIN
controls turned all the
way down? Slowly turn them up and see if
you hear anything.
• Is the signal source turned up? Make sure
the signal level from the mixing console (or
whatever device immediately precedes the
amplifier) is high enough to produce sound
LEDs should
in the amplifier. The SIG
be blinking to indicate that signal is
present.
• If the speakers are wired for BRIDGE mode,
switch is
make sure the AMP MODE
set to BRIDGE .
26
• If the OUTPUT APPLICATION
switch is
set to SUBWOOFER , make sure the
LOW CUT FILTER
frequency control is
set to OFF or nearly OFF. If it is turned up
above the subwoofer cutoff frequency, then
there will be no output from the amplifier.
• Is the SHORT
LED lit? Turn the POWER
off, check the speaker connections and
make sure that there are no strands of wire
shorting across the speaker terminals.
• Is the HOT TEMP STATUS
LED lit?
Make sure there is cool air available at the
front of the amplifier. Make sure there is
room at the sides of the amplifier for warm
air to exit. Allow the amplifier to cool off.
• Are there fuses in the speaker or in-line
fuses in the speaker wire? Check ’em to see
if they’re blown.
• Make sure the speakers are working
properly.
One side is way louder than the other!
• Do the M•1200/M•1400’s meters
read the same on both sides? If not, your
source signal may be delivering an outof-balance stereo signal.
knobs set to the same
• Are both GAIN
position?
• Are the speaker(s) impedances
matched? (See Appendix E — “Do The
Math: Ohms, Loads and Such.”)
• Try swapping sides: Turn off the amp,
swap the speaker cables at the amp, turn
the amp back on. If the same side is still
louder, the problem is with your speakers or speaker cabling. If the other side
is louder now, the problem is with the
mixer, the amp, or the line-level cabling.
The stereo music sounds kind of sideways,
and the bass frequencies diminish when
standing center, but get louder as you
approach one side!
• Check the polarity of the speaker cable
connections. You may have your positive
and negative connections reversed at
one end of one speaker cable.
As soon as the music gets loud, the amp
shuts down!
• Check the M•1200/M•1400’s meters .
Be sure that OL is not lighting up
frequently or continuously.
• Can the amp breathe? The M•1200/M•1400
amps draw their ventilation air in from the
front and out through the side panels.
They need plenty of fresh air to stay cool.
Do not block the ventilation ports.
LED lit? If so, you’ve got
• Is the SHORT
a dead short somewhere in your speaker
setup, or the total impedance of the load is
too low. Turn the amp off and rectify that
right away.
Something’s missing in the mid and high
frequencies!
• If you’re using horns with compression
drivers, please read CONSTANT
DIRECTIVITY .
It hurts when I touch my arm, or my leg, or
even my head!
• You have a broken finger.
Bad sound!
• Is it loud and distorted? Turn down the
signal coming from the mixer or signal source.
• Is the input connector plugged completely
into the jack? Check the speaker connections and verify that all connections are
tight and that there are no stray strands of
wire shorting across the speaker terminals.
• If possible, listen to the signal source with
headphones plugged into the console. If it
sounds bad there, the problem’s not in the
amplifier.
Noise/Hum
• Check the signal cable between the mixer
and the amplifier. Make sure all connections
are good and sound.
• Make sure the signal cable is not routed
near AC cables, power transformers, or
other EMI-inducing device.
• Is there a light dimmer or other SCR-based
device on the same AC circuit as the
monitor? Use an AC line filter or plug the
amplifier into a different AC circuit.
• If possible, listen to the signal source with
headphones plugged into the console. If it
sounds noisy there, the problem’s not in the
amplifier.
• Refer to “Grounding” in Appendix D.
REPAIR
Service for the U.S. versions of our amplifiers is available only from one of our authorized
domestic service stations or at the factory, located in sunny Woodinville, Washington.
(Service for amplifiers living outside the
United States can be obtained through local
dealers or distributors.) If your amplifier needs
service, follow these instructions:
1. Review the preceding troubleshooting
suggestions. Please.
2. Call Tech Support at 1-800-258-6883, 8am
to 5pm PST, to explain the problem and
request an RA (Return Authorization)
number. Have your amplifier’s serial
number ready. You must have an RA
number before you can obtain service at
the factory or an authorized service center.
3. Keep this owner’s manual. We don’t need it
to repair the amplifier.
4. Pack the amplifier in its original package,
including endcaps and box. This is very
important. When you call for the RA
number, please let Tech Support know if
you need new packaging. Mackie is not
responsible for any damage that occurs due
to non-factory packaging.
5. Include a legible note stating your name,
shipping address (no P.O. boxes), daytime
phone number, RA number, and a detailed
description of the problem, including how
we can duplicate it.
6. Write the RA number in BIG PRINT on top
of the box.
7. Ship the amplifier to us. We recommend
United Parcel Service (UPS). We suggest
insurance for all forms of cartage. Ship to
this address:
Mackie Designs
SERVICE DEPARTMENT
16220 Wood-Red Rd. NE
Woodinville, WA 98072
8. We’ll try to fix the amplifier within three
business days. We normally send everything
back prepaid using UPS BLUE (Second
Day Air). However, if you rush your amplifier to us by Air Shipment, we’ll treat it in
kind by letting it jump to the head of the
line, and we’ll also ship it back to you UPS
RED (Next Day Air). This paragraph does not
necessarily apply to non-warranty service.
27
APPENDIX B: Glossary
This Glossary contains brief definitions of
many of the audio and electronic terms used in
discussions of sound mixing and recording.
Many of the terms have other meanings or nuances or very rigorous technical definitions
which we have sidestepped here because we
figure you already have a lot on your mind. If
you’d like to get more information, you can call
Mix Bookshelf at 1-800-233-9604. We recommend the following titles: The Audio
Dictionary, by Glenn White; Tech Terms, by
Peterson & Oppenheimer; Handbook for
Sound Engineers, by Glen Ballou; Mackie
Mixer Book by Rudy Trubitt; and Sound Reinforcement Handbook, by Gary Davis.
balanced
In a classic, balanced audio circuit, the two
legs of the circuit (+ and –) are isolated from
the circuit ground by exactly the same impedance. Additionally, each leg may carry the signal
at exactly the same level but with opposite polarity with respect to ground. In some balanced
circuits, only one leg actually carries the signal,
but both legs exhibit the same impedance characteristics with respect to ground. Balanced
input circuits can offer excellent rejection of
common-mode noise induced into the line and
also make proper (no ground loops) system
grounding easier. Usually terminated with 1⁄4"
TRS or XLR connectors.
bandwidth
The band of frequencies that pass through a
device with a loss of less than 3 dB, expressed
in Hertz or in musical octaves. Also see Q.
clipping
A cause of severe audio distortion that is the
result of excessive gain requiring the peaks of
the audio signal to rise above the capabilities
of the amplifier circuit. Seen on an oscilloscope, the audio peaks appear clipped off. To
avoid distortion, reduce the system gain in or
before the gain stage in which the clipping occurs. See also headroom.
console
A term for a sound mixer, usually a large
desk-like mixer.
crest factor
The ratio of the peak value to the RMS
value. Musical signals can have peaks many
times higher than the RMS value. The larger
the transient peaks, the larger the crest factor.
dB
See decibel.
dBA
Sound Pressure Level (SPL) measured with
an “A” weighting filter.
dBm
A unit of measurement of audio signal level
in an electrical circuit, expressed in decibels
referenced to 1 milliwatt. The “m” in dBm
stands for “milliwatt.” In a circuit with an impedance of 600 ohms, this reference (0 dBm)
corresponds to a signal voltage of 0.775 VRMS
(because 0.775 V across 600 ohms equals 1mw).
dBu
bus
An electrical connection common to three
or more circuits. In mixer design, a bus usually
carries signals from a number of inputs to a
mixing amplifier, just like a city bus carries
people from a number of neighborhoods to
their jobs.
channel
A functional path in an audio circuit: an input channel, an output channel, a recording
channel, the left channel, and so on.
A unit of measurement of audio signal level
in an electrical circuit, expressed in decibels
referenced to 0.775 VRMS into any impedance.
Commonly used to describe signal levels within
a modern audio system.
dBv
A unit of measurement equal to the dBu but
no longer in use. It was too easy to confuse a
dBv with a dBV, to which it is not equivalent.
dBV
A unit of measurement of audio signal level
in an electrical circuit, expressed in decibels
28
referenced to 1 VRMS across any impedance.
Commonly used to describe signal levels in
consumer equipment. To convert dBV to dBu,
add 2.2 dB.
decibel (dB)
The dB is a ratio of quantities measured in
similar terms using a logarithmic scale. Many
audio system parameters measure over such a
large range of values that the dB is used to simplify the numbers. A ratio of 1000V:1V=60 dB.
When one of the terms in the ratio is an
agreed-upon standard value such as 0.775V,
1V, or 1mw, the ratio becomes an absolute
value, i.e., +4 dBu, –10dBV, or 0 dBM.
detent
A point of slight physical resistance (a clickstop) in the travel of a knob or slide control,
used in Mackie mixers to indicate unity gain.
diffraction
The bending of sound waves around an obstacle (Huygens Principle). The longer the
wavelength in comparison to the obstacle, the
more the wave will diffract around it.
dipping
The opposite of peaking, of course. A dip is
an EQ curve that looks like a valley, or a dip.
Dipping with an equalizer reduces a band of
frequencies. See guacamole.
dry
Usually means without reverberation, or
without some other applied effect like delay or
chorusing. Dry is not wet, i.e. totally unaffected.
duty cycle
The ratio of pulse width to total cycle time.
dynamic
In sound work, dynamic refers to the class
of microphones that generates electrical signals by the movement of a coil in a magnetic
field. Dynamic microphones are rugged, relatively inexpensive, capable of very good
performance and do not require external power.
EMI
Electro Magnetic Interference. This refers
to current induced into the signal path as a
result of an external magnetic field. In audio
systems, this is usually manifested as a 60Hz or
120Hz hum or buzz. The source of this noise
can be from a ground loop or from the signal
wire coming too close to a strong magnetic
field such as a transformer or high-current
linecord.
EQ curve
A graph of the response of an equalizer, with
frequency on the x (horizontal) axis and amplitude (level) on the y (vertical) axis.
Equalizer types and effects are often named
after the shape of the graphed response curve,
such as peak, dip, shelf, notch, knee, and so on.
equalization
Equalization (EQ) refers to purposefully
changing the frequency response of a circuit,
sometimes to correct for previous unequal response (hence the term, equalization), and
more often to add or subtract level at certain
frequencies for sound enhancement, to remove
extraneous sounds, or to create completely
new and different sounds.
Bass and treble controls on your stereo are
EQ; so are the units called parametrics and
graphics and notch filters.
A lot of how we refer to equalization has to
do with what a graph of the frequency response
would look like. A flat response (no EQ) is a
straight line, a peak looks like a hill, a dip is a
valley, a notch is a really skinny valley, and a
shelf looks like a plateau (or a shelf). The
slope is the grade of the hill on the graph.
Graphic equalizers have enough frequency
slider controls to form a graph of the EQ right
on the front panel. Parametric EQs let you vary
several EQ parameters at once. A filter is simply a form of equalizer that allows certain
frequencies through unmolested while reducing or eliminating other frequencies.
Aside from the level controls, EQs are probably the second most powerful controls on any
mixer (no, the power switch doesn’t count!).
fader
dynamic range
The range between the maximum and minimum sound levels that a sound system can
handle. It is usually expressed in decibels as
the difference between the level at peak clipping and the level of the noise floor.
Another name for an audio level control.
Today, the term refers to a straight-line slide
control rather than a rotary control.
filter
A simple equalizer designed to remove
certain ranges of frequencies. A low-cut filter
29
(also called a high-pass filter) reduces or
eliminates frequencies below its cutoff frequency. There are also high-cut (low-pass)
filters, bandpass filters (which cut both high
and low frequencies but leave a band of frequencies in the middle untouched), and notch
filters (which remove a narrow band but leave
the high and low frequencies alone).
frequency
The number of times an event repeats itself
in a given period. Sound waves and the electrical signals that represent sound waves in an
audio circuit have repetitive patterns that
range from a frequency of about 20 repetitions
per second to about 20,000 repetitions per second. Sound is the vibration or combination of
vibrations in this range of 20 to 20,000 repetitions per second, which gives us the sensation
of pitch, harmonics, tone, and overtones. Frequency is measured in units called Hertz (Hz).
One Hertz is one repetition or cycle per second.
Maintaining a good safety ground is always
essential to prevent electrical shock. Follow
manufacturer’s suggestions and good electrical
practices to ensure a safely grounded system.
Never remove or disable the grounding pin on
the power cord.
In computer and audio equipment, tiny
currents and voltages can cause noise in the
circuits and hamper operation. In addition to
providing safety, ground provisions in these
situations serve to minimize the pickup, detection and distribution of these tiny noise signals.
This type of ground is often called technical
ground.
Quality audio equipment is designed to
maintain a good technical ground and also operate safely with a good safety ground. If you
have noise in your system due to technical
grounding problems, check your manual for
wiring tips or call technical support. Never disable the safety ground to reduce noise problems.
ground loop
gain
The measure of how much a circuit amplifies a signal. Gain may be stated as a ratio of
input to output values, such as a voltage gain of
4, or a power gain of 1.5, or it can be expressed
in decibels, such as a line amplifier with a gain
of 10 dB.
gain stage
An amplification point in a signal path,
within either a system or a single device. Overall system gain is distributed between the
various gain stages.
graphic EQ
A graphic equalizer uses slide pots for its
boost/cut controls, with its frequencies evenly
spaced through the audio spectrum. In a perfect world, a line drawn through the centers of
the control shafts would form a graph of the
frequency response curve. Get it? Or, the positions of the slide pots give a graphic
representation of boost or cut levels across the
frequency spectrum.
ground
Also called earth. Ground is defined as the
point of zero voltage in a circuit or system, the
reference point from which all other voltages
are measured. In electrical systems, ground
connections are used for safety purposes, to
keep equipment chassis and controls at zero
voltage and to provide a safe path for errant
currents. This is called a safety ground.
30
A ground loop occurs when the technical
ground within an audio system is connected to
the safety ground at more than one place. Two
or more connections will allow tiny currents to
flow in the loops created, possibly inducing
noise (hum) in the audio system. If you have
noise in your system due to ground loops,
check your manual for wiring tips or call technical support. Never disable the safety ground
to reduce noise problems.
headroom
The difference between nominal operating
level and peak clipping in an audio system. For
example, a mixer operating with a nominal line
level of +4 dBu and a maximum output level of
+22 dBu has 18 dB of headroom. Plenty of
room for surprise peaks.
Hertz
The unit of measure for frequency of oscillation, equal to 1 cycle per second. Abbreviated
Hz. KHz (pronounced “kay-Hertz”) is an abbreviation for kilohertz, or 1000 Hertz.
Hz
See Hertz.
impedance
The AC resistance/capacitance/inductance
in an electrical circuit, measured in ohms. In
audio circuits (and other AC circuits) the impedance in ohms can often be very different
than the circuit resistance as measured by a
DC ohmmeter.
Maintaining proper circuit impedance relationships is important to avoid distortion and
minimize added noise. Mackie input and output impedances are designed to work well with
the vast majority of audio equipment.
knee
A knee is a sharp bend in an EQ response
curve not unlike the sharp bend in your leg.
Also used in describing dynamics processors.
level
Another word for signal voltage, power,
strength, or volume. Audio signals are sometimes classified according to their level.
Commonly used levels are: microphone level
(–40 dBu or lower), instrument level (–20 to
–10 dBu), and line level (–10 to +30 dBu).
line level
A signal whose level falls between –10 dBu
and +30 dBu.
master
A control affecting the final output of a
mixer. A mixer may have several master controls, which may be slide faders or rotary
controls.
mixer
An electronic device used to combine various audio signals into a common output.
Different from a blender, which combines various fruits into a common libation.
monaural
Literally, pertaining to or having the use of
only one ear. In sound work, monaural has to
do with a signal which, for purposes of communicating audio information, has been confined
to a single channel. One microphone is a mono
pickup; many microphones mixed to one channel is a mono mix; a mono signal played
through two speakers is still mono, since it only
carries one channel of information. Several
monaural sources, however, can be panned
into a stereo (or at least two-channel, if you are
going to be picky) mix. Monaural sound reinforcement is common for environments where
stereo sound reinforcement would provide an
uneven reproduction to the listener.
formers to hear themselves. Monitor speakers
are also called foldback speakers. In recording,
the monitor speakers are those used by the
production staff to listen to the recording as it
progresses. In zoology, the monitor lizard is the
lizard that observes the production staff as the
recording progresses. Keep the lizard out of the
mixer.
noise
Whatever you don’t want to hear. Could be
hum, buzz, or hiss; could be crosstalk or digital
hash or your neighbor’s stereo; could be white
noise or pink noise or brown noise; or it could
be your mother-in-law reliving the day she had
her gallstone removed.
noise floor
The residual level of noise in any system. In
a well-designed product, the noise floor will be
a very quiet hiss, which is the thermal noise
generated by bouncing electrons in the transistor junctions. The lower the noise floor and the
higher the headroom, the more usable dynamic
range a system has.
parametric EQ
A “fully” parametric EQ is an extremely powerful equalizer that allows smooth, continuous
control of each of the three primary EQ parameters (frequency, gain, and bandwidth) in each
section independently. “Semi” parametric EQs
allow control of fewer parameters, usually frequency and gain (i.e., they have a fixed
bandwidth, but variable center frequency and
gain).
peaking
The opposite of dipping, of course. A peak
is an EQ curve that looks like a hill, or a peak.
Peaking with an equalizer amplifies a band of
frequencies.
phone jack
Ever see those old telephone switchboards
with hundreds of jacks and patch cords and
plugs? Those are phone jacks and plugs, now
widely used with musical instruments and
audio equipment. A phone jack is the female
connector, and we use them in 1⁄4" two-conductor (TS) and three-conductor (TRS)
versions.
monitor
In sound reinforcement, monitor speakers
(or monitor headphones or in-the-ear
monitors) are those speakers used by the per-
phone plug
The male counterpart to the phone jack.
See above.
31
Q
TRS
A way of stating the bandwidth of a filter
or equalizer section. An EQ with a Q of .75 is
broad and smooth, while a Q of 10 gives a narrow, pointed response curve. To calculate the
value of Q, you must know the center frequency
of the EQ section and the frequencies at which
the upper and lower skirts fall 3 dB below the
level of the center frequency. Q equals the center frequency divided by the difference between
the upper and lower –3 dB frequencies. A peaking EQ centered at 10kHz whose –3 dB points
are 7.5kHz and 12.5kHz has a Q of 2.
Acronym for Tip-Ring-Sleeve, a scheme for
connecting three conductors through a single
plug or jack. 1⁄4" phone plugs and jacks and
1⁄8" mini phone plugs and jacks are commonly
wired TRS. Since the plug or jack can carry two
signals and a common ground, TRS connectors
are often referred to as stereo or balanced
plugs or jacks. Another common TRS application is for insert jacks, used for inserting an
external processor into the signal path. In
Mackie mixers, the tip is send, ring is return,
and sleeve is ground.
RFI
TS
Radio Frequency Interference. High
frequency radiation that often results from
sparking circuits. This can be manifested in a
number of ways in audio systems, but is usually
evident as a high-frequency buzz or hash sound.
Acronym for Tip-Sleeve, a scheme for connecting two conductors through a single plug
or jack. 1⁄4" phone plugs and jacks and 1⁄8"
mini phone plugs and jacks are commonly
wired TS. Sometimes called mono or unbalanced plugs or jacks. A 1⁄4" TS phone plug or
jack is also called a standard phone plug or
jack.
RMS
An acronym for root mean square, a conventional way to measure AC voltage and audio
signal voltage. Most AC voltmeters are calibrated to read RMS volts. Other conventions
include average volts, peak volts, and peak-topeak volts.
shelving
A term used to describe the shape of an
equalizer’s frequency response. A shelving
equalizer’s response begins to rise (or fall) at
some frequency and continues to fall (or rise)
until it reaches the shelf frequency, at which
point the response curve flattens out and remains flat to the limits of audibility. If you were
to graph the response, it would look like a
shelf. At least, more like a shelf than a hiking
boot. The EQ controls on your stereo are usually shelving equalizers. See also peaking and
dipping.
stereo
Believe it or not, stereo comes from a Greek
word that means solid. We use stereo or stereophonic to describe the illusion of a continuous,
spacious soundfield that is seemingly spread
around the listener by two or more related audio signals. In practice, stereo often is taken to
simply mean two channels.
sweep EQ
An equalizer that allows you to “sweep” or
continuously vary the affected frequency of one
or more sections.
32
unbalanced
An electrical circuit in which the two legs of
the circuit are not balanced with respect to
ground. Usually, one leg will be held at ground
potential. Unbalanced circuit connections require only two conductors (signal “hot” and
ground). Unbalanced audio circuitry is less
expensive to build but under certain circumstances is more susceptible to picking up noise.
unity gain
A circuit or system that has its voltage gain
adjusted to be one, or unity. A signal will leave
a unity gain circuit at the same level at which
it entered. In Mackie mixers, unity gain is
achieved by setting all variable controls to the
marked “U” setting. Mackie mixers are optimized for best headroom and noise figures at
unity gain.
volume
Electrical or sound level in an audio system.
Perhaps the only thing that some bands have
too much of.
XLR connector
A three-pin connector used in audio for
transmitting a balanced signal. Sometimes referred to as a Cannon connector, named for the
manufacturer who first popularized the threepin connector.
APPENDIX C: Connectors
“XLR” CONNECTORS
Mackie amplifiers use 3-pin female “XLR”
connectors on each input, with pin 1 wired to
the grounded (earthed) shield, pin 2 wired to
the “high” (”hot” or positive polarity) side of
the audio signal, and pin 3 wired to the “low”
(“cold” or negative polarity) side of the signal
(Figure A). All totally above-board and in full
2
SHIELD
HOT
COLD
SHIELD
COLD 3
HOT
1
3
1
3
1
2
SHIELD
COLD
2
HOT
Figure A: XLR Connectors
• Balanced mono circuits. When wired as a
balanced connector, a 1⁄4" TRS jack or plug is
connected tip to signal high (hot), ring to signal low (cold), and sleeve to ground (earth).
This is the application used for the inputs to
Mackie amplifiers.
1⁄4" TS PHONE PLUGS AND JACKS
“TS” stands for Tip-Sleeve, the two connections available on a “mono” 1⁄4" phone jack or
plug (Figure C). TS jacks and plugs are used
in many different applications, always unbalanced. The tip is connected to the audio signal
and the sleeve to ground (earth). Some
examples:
• Unbalanced microphones
• Electric guitars and electronic
instruments
• Unbalanced line-level or speaker-level
connections
accord with the hallowed standards dictated
by the AES (Audio Engineering Society).
Use a male “XLR”-type connector, usually
found on the nether end of what is called a
“mic cable,” to connect to a female XLR jack.
SLEEVE
SLEEVE
TIP
TIP
TIP (HOT)
Figure C: TS Plug
SLEEVE (SHIELD)
1⁄4" TRS PHONE PLUGS AND JACKS
“TRS” stands for Tip-Ring-Sleeve, the three
connections available on a “stereo” 1⁄4" or “balanced” phone jack or plug (Figure B). TRS
jacks and plugs are used in several different
applications:
RING SLEEVE
SLEEVE RING TIP
TIP
RING (COLD)
TIP (HOT)
Figure B: 1⁄4" TRS Plugs
SLEEVE (SHIELD)
• Stereo Headphones, stereo microphones
and stereo line connections. When wired for
stereo, a 1⁄4" TRS jack or plug is connected tip
to left, ring to right and sleeve to ground
(earth).
• Unbalanced Send/Return circuits. When
wired as a send/return “Y” connector, a 1⁄4" TRS
jack or plug is connected tip to signal send
(output from mixer), ring to signal return
(input back into mixer), and sleeve to ground
(earth).
UNBALANCING A LINE
In most studio, stage, and sound reinforcement situations, there is a combination of
balanced and unbalanced inputs and outputs
on the various pieces of equipment. This
usually will not be a problem in making
connections.
• When connecting a balanced output to
an unbalanced input, be sure the signal high
(hot) connections are wired to each other, and
that the balanced signal low (cold) goes to the
ground (earth) connection at the unbalanced
input. In most cases, the balanced ground will
also be connected to the ground at the unbalanced input. If there are ground-loop problems,
this connection may be left disconnected at the
balanced end.
• When connecting an unbalanced output
to a balanced input, be sure that the signal
high (hot) connections are wired to each
33
other. The unbalanced ground (earth) connection should be wired to the low and the ground
connections of the balanced input. If there are
ground-loop problems, try connecting the unbalanced ground connection only to the input
low connection, and leaving the input ground
connection disconnected.
• In some cases, you will have to make up
special adapters to interconnect your equipment. For example, you may need a balanced
XLR female connected to an unbalanced 1⁄4"
TS phone plug. The balanced-to-unbalanced
connection has been anticipated in the wiring
of Mackie jacks. A 1⁄4" TS plug inserted into a
1⁄4" TRS balanced input, for example, automatically unbalances the input and makes all
the right connections. Conversely, a 1⁄4" TRS
plug inserted into a 1⁄4" unbalanced input
automatically ties the ring (low or cold) to
ground (earth).
SPEAKONS
Speakon® connectors have become popular
with many loudspeaker manufacturers because they provide a quick, yet safe and secure
method of connecting speaker cables. The
M•1400 is outfitted with Speakon connectors
(Figure G) instead of the 1/4" TS jacks provided on the M•1200. Speakon connectors
have a twist-locking mechanism that prevents
them from being pulled out accidentally. Plus,
they are capable of handling high currents, and
meet IEC 65 and IEC 348 safety requirements.
Pin 1+ is positive (+) and Pin 1– is negative (–).
CH
+
1
MONO
BRIDGE
CH
–
2
+
+
–
–
SPEAKER OUTPUTS
BINDING POSTS
Binding posts provide a number of different
methods for connecting speaker wire to the
outputs of the amplifier. For fixed installations,
you can use bare wire (Figure D), or wire terminated with spade lugs (Figure E).
Figure G: Speakon Connectors
1/4"
Figure D: Binding Posts with Bare Wire
Figure E: Binding Posts with
Spade Lug
G
N
D
For portable applications, the binding posts
accept single or double banana plugs (Figure
F). They provide a method of quickly connecting and disconnecting speaker cables to and
from the amplifier. Double banana plugs have a
tab on one side to indicate the ground (GND)
side of the connector. This side connects to the
black (–) binding post terminals on the amplifier.
Figure F: Binding Posts with Double Banana Plug
34
APPENDIX D: Arcane Mysteries Illuminated
Balanced Lines
Balanced lines offer increased immunity
to external noise (specifically, hum and buzz).
Because a balanced system is able to minimize
noise, it is the preferred interconnect method,
especially in cases where very long lengths of
cable are being used. A long unbalanced cable
carries with it more opportunity for noise to get
into a system — having balanced inputs means
very little noise will enter the system via snakes
and other cables that typically must run a long
length.
A balanced line is a threewire system where two wires
carry the signal and the third
is a ground wire that shields
the inner conductors from
EMI. The two inner conductors carry the same
signal, but with opposite polarity. The balanced
input amplifies only the difference between the
two conductors. But a signal that is common
to both conductors, and in phase, is rejected
(canceled out) at the balanced input. This
includes hum from AC lines or other EMI
induced noise.
An unbalanced line does not have this
noise-rejecting capability because it has only
two conductors. One conductor carries the signal and the other is a ground wire that shields
the inner conductor. Any hum or EMI noise
that gets through the shield is added to the signal and amplified at the unbalanced input.
Often the hum can be louder than the signal itself!
“Do’s” and “Don’ts” of Fixed Installations
If you install sound systems into fixed installations, there are a number of things that you
can do to make your life easier and increase
the likelihood of the sound system operating
in a predictable manner. Even if you don’t do
fixed installations, these are good practices for
any sound system.
1. Do use foil-shielded snake cable for long
cable runs. Carefully terminate each end,
minimizing the amount of shielding
removed. Protect the exposed foil shield
with shrink sleeving or PVC sleeving.
Prevent adjacent shields from contacting
each other (electrically). Use insulating
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
sleeving on the drain wire (the one that
connects to pin 1) to prevent it from
contacting the connector shell.
Don’t connect the XLR connector shell to
pin 1 of the XLR connector. Doing so is an
invitation for a ground loop to come
visiting.
Do ensure that your speaker lines and AC
power lines are physically separated from
your microphone lines.
If you use floor pockets, use separate
pockets for inputs and speakers, or put the
connectors on opposite sides of the box so
that they may be shielded separately.
If your speaker lines run in the open, they
should be twisted pairs, at least 6 twists per
foot. Otherwise, run the speaker lines in
their own conduit. (Of course, conduit is not
too practical for portable systems, heh-heh.)
Minimize the distance between the power
amplifiers and the speakers.
Use heavy gauge, stranded wire for speaker
lines. Ideally, the wire resistance should be
less than 6% (0.5 dB power loss) of the load
impedance. Remember that the actual run
is twice as long as the physical length of
the run. See below.
Maximum wire run for 0.5dB power loss in feet
wire
res. per
2
4
8
gauge 1000 ft.
Ω
Ω
Ω
10
1.00
60
120
240
12
1.59
40
75
150
14
2.5
24
48
95
16
4.02
15
30
60
8. Ensure that the electrician uses the starground system for the safety grounds in
your electrical system. All of the audio
system grounds should terminate at the
same physical point. No other grounds may
come in contact with this ground system.
9. Ensure that the AC power feeds are
connected to the same transformer, and
ideally, the same circuit breaker.
10. Walk outside — look at the horizon. See
any radio towers? Locate potential sources
35
11.
12.
13.
14.
of RF interference and plan for them
before you begin construction. Know the
frequency, transmitter power, etc. You can
get this information by calling the station.
Remember that many broadcast stations
change the antenna coverage pattern and
transmitter power at night.
Don’t use hardware-store light dimmers.
Don’t allow for anything other than microphone inputs at stage/altar locations.
Supplying line inputs at these locations is
an invitation for misuse. Make all sources
look like microphones to the console.
Balance (or at least impedance balance)
all connections that are remote from the
console’s immediate location.
If you bridge an amplifier, don’t use 1⁄4"
phone plugs for speaker connectors.
Grounding
Grounding exists in your audio system for
two reasons: product safety and noise reduction. The third wire on the power cord exists
for product safety. It provides a low-resistance
path back to the electrical service to protect
the users of the product from electrical shock.
Hopefully, the resistance to ground through the
safety ground (third wire) is lower than that
through the user/operator to ground. If you remove this connection (by breaking or cutting
the pin off, or by using a ‘ground cheater’), this
alternate ground path ceases to exist, which is
a safety hazard.
The metal chassis of the product, the
ground connections provided by the various
connectors, and the shields within your connecting cables provide a low-potential point for
noise signals. The goal is to provide a lower impedance path to ground for noise signals than
through the signal wiring. Doing so helps
minimize hum, buzz, and other extraneous
non-audio signals.
Many “authorities” tell you that shields
should be connected only at one end. Sometimes this can be true, but for most (99%)
audio systems, it is unnecessary. If you do everything else correctly, you should be able to
connect every component of your audio system
using standard, off-the-shelf connecting cables
that are available at any music store.
36
Here are some guidelines:
1. Use balanced lines if at all possible. They
provide better immunity to induced noise
and ground loops. Remember that you can
balance a line by inserting in-line a piece of
equipment that has a balanced output.
2. Avoid using three-phase power lines since
they are usually used for air conditioning
and other heavy power equipment. If using
240VAC single phase with center-ground
power, connect all audio equipment to one
side of the AC power, and all lighting and
other equipment to the other side.
3. Be sure all AC outlet safety grounds are
connected to one common point in a star
ground arrangement. This common ground
point should then tie back to earth ground
at the service entrance by one heavy
stranded wire, #2 gauge or larger.
4. Don’t cut the third pin off the power cord.
Carry some ground-lifter adapters and use
them only if you have to plug into an
ancient two-wire outlet.
5. Cables that are too long are less likely to
pick up hum if you uncoil them in their
entirety, and then find a place to stow the
excess. Leaving the excess coiled only helps
the cable pick up hum more efficiently.
6. If you bundle your cables together, don’t
bundle AC wiring and audio wiring together. Bundle them separately.
7. If your sound system insists on humming,
you may need to teach it the words.
Optimizing Sound System Levels
In a full-blown (not fully blown) sound
system, the signal level can be controlled or
adjusted at many different points throughout
the signal chain. The best system performance
is achieved when the dynamic range of the
system is maximized, thus reducing noise and
allowing a nominal signal level to be used with
maximum headroom. Whatzat!?
Dynamic range is the difference between
the noise floor and the maximum undistorted
signal level capability of the component. The
greater the dynamic range, the better the signal to noise ratio, because the nominal signal
level can be set at a higher amplitude and the
noise tends to get buried underneath the signal. Headroom is the difference between the
maximum undistorted signal level capability of
the component and the nominal signal level.
It is important to maintain a reasonable
amount of headroom so that the dynamic
transient peaks of the musical program can be
reproduced without clipping. 10 dB of headroom is usually adequate, but some program
material may require up to 20 dB.
40dB
30dB
MAXIMUM OUTPUT LEVEL
(M•1200 = 400W/4Ω)
HEADROOM
NOMINAL LEVEL (25W/4Ω)
20dB
10dB
0dB
–10dB
–20dB
SIGNAL TO NOISE
RATIO
DYNAMIC
RANGE
–30dB
–40dB
–50dB
–60dB
–70dB
–80dB
NOISE FLOOR
Dynamic Range
The best way to accomplish this goal is to
optimize the input and output levels for each
component in the system. It is best to start at
the beginning of the chain (the microphone)
and work your way to the end (the speakers).
The following procedure details how to optimize a sound system with 10 dB of headroom.
A microphone is connected to the mic input
on the mixing console. The gain of the mic
preamp circuit, sometimes called Mic Trim,
should be adjusted so that the loudest microphone signal is just below the overload point
of the preamp. Most mixing consoles provide a
mic preamp clipping indicator or level metering of some kind to optimize the mic preamp.
Next comes the output level of the channel,
controlled by a fader or rotary gain control.
Faders usually have an indication in the graphics that shows the normal or nominal setting
for the fader. This setting is usually 10 or 12 dB
below the maximum output level of the channel. This provides the headroom needed to
reproduce the transient peaks associated with
music. If the channel has a meter, you can use
that to visually confirm that the nominal output
level of the channel is around “0” on the meter.
Next set the master output level (fader)
control on the mixer to the nominal level indication next to the control. Again, this should be
at least 10 dB below the maximum output level
of the mixer. You can double check the actual
output signal level if there is an output meter
on the mixer. On most professional equipment,
this nominal output level will be +4 dBm
(1.23V rms into 600 ohms).
The output of the mixer may drive a power
amplifier directly, or it may go through a signal
processor first (i.e., equalizer, compressor limiter, crossover). Determine the maximum
output capability of the signal processor.
Hopefully, it can produce at least +14 dB to
maintain the required 10 dB of headroom.
Chances are it can produce considerably more
than that (like +20 dB to +24 dB). If 10 dB of
headroom is not available, you’ll have to introduce a resistive pad between the mixer and the
signal processor to reduce the signal level from
the mixer so it is at least 10 dB below the maximum output of the processor.
If the processor has enough headroom, set
the level controls to unity gain, so with a +4 dB
input it produces a +4 dB output. Keep in
mind that if this is an equalizer, and you’ve
boosted several frequency bands, the nominal
output level may be more than +4 dB because
of the extra energy the processor is adding to
those frequencies. It may be necessary, in that
case, to reduce the level controls a few dB
below unity.
The M•1200/M•1400 amps are designed to
accept a nominal +4 dB input signal. Set the
GAIN controls fully clockwise. This will provide the best signal-to-noise ratio and available
headroom for the amplifier.
37
Biamplified and Triamplified Systems
Most speaker systems in use today are of
the two-way or three-way variety. Cone speakers are good at reproducing low and mid-range
frequencies, but not high frequencies. Likewise, compression drivers are good at
reproducing high frequencies, but definitely
not low frequencies. This is why two-way,
three-way and even four-way speaker systems
were developed — to improve the efficiency
of each individual driver by requiring it to
reproduce only the frequencies that it reproduces best.
One method of accomplishing this is
through the use of a passive crossover network
between the amplifier and the speaker(s).
Often the passive crossover is built into the
cabinet along with the various drivers. The
crossover divides the high-level speaker signal
into frequency bands, which are then directed
to the appropriate driver. There are some
drawbacks to this method, however. The passive crossover adds reactance to the load that
the amplifier sees, which can affect the damping. Power is wasted as heat across the
resistors in the crossover, reducing the
amount of amplifier power available to the
drivers themselves.
Biamplified and triamplified systems use
separate power amplifiers to power each individual low-frequency and high-frequency
driver. An electronic crossover (a.k.a. active
crossover) is located between the signal source
and the power amplifier. The advantages of
this method include 1) increased headroom
available from each amplifier, since they’re amplifying only a portion of the entire audio
spectrum; 2) improved damping factor because the amplifier output is connected
directly to the driver; 3) improved efficiency
because there are no passive resistors to dissipate heat; and 4) flexibility to choose the
optimum crossover frequency and crossover
slope for the individual drivers in the system.
HIGH-LEVEL
PASSIVE
CROSSOVER
FR SERIES
POWER AMPLIFIER
(STEREO MODE)
FROM SIGNAL SOURCE
(MACKIE MIXING CONSOLE)
CH 1
IN
CH 1
OUT
+
FROM SIGNAL SOURCE
(MACKIE MIXING CONSOLE)
CH 2
IN
CH 2
OUT
–
TWO-WAY SPEAKER CABINET
HIGH FREQUENCIES
TO TWEETER
LOW FREQUENCIES
TO WOOFER
–
TWO-WAY SPEAKER CABINET
+
HIGH-LEVEL
PASSIVE
CROSSOVER
HIGH FREQUENCIES
TO TWEETER
LOW FREQUENCIES
TO WOOFER
Passive Crossover System
FR SERIES
POWER AMPLIFIER
(STEREO MODE)
FROM SIGNAL SOURCE
(MACKIE MIXING CONSOLE)
LOW-LEVEL
3-WAY ACTIVE
CROSSOVER
TO HIGH-FREQUENCY
AMPLIFIER
TO MID-FREQUENCY
AMPLIFIER
TO HIGH-FREQUENCY
AMPLIFIER
LOW-LEVEL
2-WAY ACTIVE
CROSSOVER
TO LOW-FREQUENCY
AMPLIFIER
CH 1
INPUT
CH 2
INPUT
CH 1
OUT
CH 2
OUT
+
CH 2
OUT
TWEET
TO LOW-FREQUENCY
AMPLIFIER
CH 1
INPUT
CH 1
OUT
–
CH 2
OUT
–
+
Biamplified System with Active Crossover
38
CH 2
INPUT
CH 1
OUT
TWEET
+
–
–
+
MID
FR SERIES
POWER AMPLIFIER
(BRIDGE MODE)
FR SERIES
POWER AMPLIFIER
(STEREO MODE)
FROM SIGNAL SOURCE
(MACKIE MIXING CONSOLE)
CH 1
INPUT
+
–
–
WOOF
+
WOOF
Triamplified System with Active Crossover
APPENDIX E: Technical Info
DO THE MATH: OHMS, LOADS AND SUCH
Remember: As the load gets “heavier,” its
value in ohms goes down. For instance, a
2-ohm speaker load is twice as “heavy” as a
4-ohm load. An ohm is a unit of resistance —
the more ohms, the more resistance (impedance). The more the resistance, the less the
power. It can all seem backwards at first. Just
remember that a dead short means no resistance at all, or zero ohms.
Since you’re in the biz (or you are now,
since you just bought an amp), you probably
own a volt/ohm meter (or DVM, for Digital Volt
Meter). It’s an indispensable tool for anyone
working with speakers and such. If you don’t
own a meter, go out and get one right now —
we’ll wait.
If you’re just dealing with one speaker (or
cabinet) per output, the load in ohms will be
printed on it somewhere. That’s your load. You
can confirm this with the volt/ohm meter you
just bought — set it for ohms, set it for the
lowest range (unless it’s an autoranging
meter) and measure across the speaker terminals. It may not agree exactly; a speaker rated
at eight ohms may read between 5 and 7 ohms.
(If it’s a multiple-driver speaker with a built-in
passive crossover, this method won’t work.)
If you’re driving an assortment of speakers
(or cabinets), things can get complicated.
There are two basic ways of linking multiple
loads (speakers in this case): series and parallel.
“Series” means that the positive amp output
connects to the first speaker’s positive terminal, the first speaker’s negative terminal
connects to the second speaker’s positive terminal, the second speaker’s negative terminal
goes to the third, and so on, until the chain
ends at the amp’s negative output. Series connections are not normally used in PA
applications because it ruins the amplifier’s
ability to damp (control) the speakers.
Doing load calculations with series configurations is easy — just add the loads. For
instance, four 8-ohm speakers, connected in
series, will equal 32 ohms (8 + 8 + 8 + 8 = 32).
“Parallel” means that the positive amp output connects to the positive terminals of all the
speakers, and the negative amp output connects to the negative terminals of all the
speakers. If one speaker fails in a parallel configuration, the others will still work, but the
load will change. That lets you breathe a little
easier (the show will go on), except that you
may have a dead speaker and not even know it.
Calculating parallel loads is also easy, as
long as each speaker has the same value —
just divide the value by the number of speakers. For instance, four 8-ohm speakers,
connected in parallel, will equal 2 ohms
(8 / 4 = 2). If the loads aren’t all the same, the
formula gets a little more complicated, but
nothing that you can’t do with a simple calculator.
ZT =
1
1 + 1 + 1 +
...
Z1
Z2
Z3
There are other, more complicated configurations, like series-parallel (using a combination
of series and parallel links to arrive at a desired load) and parallel configurations of
unmatched loads (usually not recommended).
But rather than get too deep into this, let’s just
summarize the basics, as they apply to you and
your M•1200/M•1400 Power Amplifier:
• As a load gets “heavier,” its impedance in
ohms decreases.
• The lower the impedance (ohms), the
higher the power: The M•1200 has 600 watts
(per side) with a 2-ohm load, 400 watts with
4 ohms, and 225 watts with 8 ohms.
• Do not connect a load of under 2 ohms
(in STEREO and MONO mode) or 4 ohms
(in BRIDGE mode).
• Never plug amplifier outputs into anything except speakers (unless you have an
outboard box designed to accept speaker levels).
• Never play good music through bad speakers. You may, however, play bad music through
good speakers (but only on odd-numbered
Fridays).
39
SPECIFICATIONS
Continuous Average Output Power, both
channels driven:
Channel Separation:
M•1200
> 80 dB @ 1kHz
225 watts per channel into 8 ohms from 20Hz to 20kHz,
with no more than 0.025% THD
Damping Factor:
400 watts per channel into 4 ohms from 20Hz to 20kHz,
with no more than 0.050% THD
> 350 from 0 to 400Hz
Input Impedance:
600 watts per channel into 2 ohms from 20Hz to 20kHz,
with no more than 0.095% THD
20kΩ balanced bridging
Bridged mono operation:
Input Sensitivity:
800 watts into 8 ohms from 20Hz to 20kHz, with no more
than 0.050% THD
1.23 volts (+4 dBu) for rated power into 4 ohms
1200 watts into 4 ohms from 20Hz to 20kHz, with no
more than 0.095% THD
Gain:
30.25 dB (32.5V/V)
Maximum Input Level:
M•1400
9.75 volts (+22 dBu)
250 watts per channel into 8 ohms from 20Hz to 20kHz,
with no more than 0.012% THD
Rise Time:
425 watts per channel into 4 ohms from 20Hz to 20kHz,
with no more than 0.025% THD
< 4.4µs
Slew Rate:
630 watts per channel into 2 ohms from 20Hz to 20kHz,
with no more than 0.050% THD
Voltage Slew Rate
Bridged mono operation:
Current Slew Rate > 32A/µs at 2Ω
850 watts into 8 ohms from 20Hz to 20kHz, with no more
than 0.025% THD
CMRR:
1260 watts into 4 ohms from 20Hz to 20kHz, with no
more than 0.050% THD
Maximum Power at 1% THD:
280 watts per channel into 8 ohms
480 watts per channel into 4 ohms
700 watts per channel into 2 ohms
960 watts into 8 ohms bridged
1400 watts into 4 ohms bridged
Note: The M•1200/M•1400 power amplifiers draw large
amounts of current from the AC line with continuous
sine wave testing. Accurate measurement of power requires a steady and stable AC supply. This means the
line impedance must be very low to insure that the peak
AC line voltage does not sag to less than 97% of its value.
If driving highly reactive loads, we recommend that the
limiter circuit be engaged.
> 50V/µs
> 100V/µs bridged
> 40 dB, 20Hz to 20kHz
Load Angle:
8(+jω) time independent at 8Ω
4(+jω) time dependent, T > 6 min. at 4Ω
2(1+jω) time dependent, T > 2 min. at 2Ω
Transient Recovery:
< 1µs for 20 dB overdrive @ 1kHz
High Frequency Overload and Latching:
No latch up at any frequency or level.
High Frequency Stability:
Unconditionally stable driving any reactive or capacitive
load.
Turn On Delay:
Power Bandwidth:
3 seconds
20Hz to 70kHz (+0, –3 dB)
Variable High-Pass Filter:
Frequency Response:
10Hz (Off) to 170Hz, 2nd Order Bessel
20Hz to 40kHz (+0, –1 dB)
10Hz to 70kHz (+0, –3 dB)
Subwoofer Low-Pass Filter:
Switched: 63Hz/125Hz, 3rd Order Bessel
Distortion:
THD, SMPTE IMD, TIM
< 0.025% @ 8Ω
< 0.050% @ 4Ω
< 0.150% @ 2Ω
Signal-to-Noise Ratio:
> 107 dB below rated power into 4 ohms
40
Constant Directivity High Frequency Boost:
2.5kHz to 6kHz (+3 dB points)
6 dB/octave high-frequency shelving filter,
(shelving occurs at approximately 30kHz)
Limiter Section:
AC Line Power:
Complementary Positive and Negative Peak Detecting
US
Europe
Japan
Korea
Indicators:
6 meter LEDs per channel
SIG (Signal Present), –20, –9, –6, –3, OL (Overload)
120VAC, 60Hz
240VAC, 50/60Hz
100VAC, 50/60Hz
240VAC, 60Hz
AC Drop-out Voltage:
CH 1 & 2
PROTECT LEDs
SHORT LEDs
At approximately 50% of rated line voltage
Physical:
TEMP STATUS
COLD/HOT LEDs
Height
Width
Depth
Overall Depth
Handle Depth
Weight
Power Consumption:
65 watts at idle
900 watts with musical program fully loaded
(2 ohms per side, or 4 ohms bridged)
550 watts with musical program fully loaded
(4 ohms per side, or 8 ohms bridged)
850 watts at full power into 8 ohms
(continuous sine wave)
1500 watts at full power into 4 ohms
(continuous sine wave)
2500 watts at full power into 2 ohms
(continuous sine wave)
3.5 inches (89mm)
19.0 inches (483mm)
15.25 inches (387mm)
16.25 inches (413mm)
1.25 inches (32mm)
36 pounds (16.3kg)
Mackie Designs is always striving to improve our
products by incorporating new and improved materials,
components, and manufacturing methods. Because we’re
always trying to make things better, we reserve the right
to change these specifications at any time without notice.
17.25" (43.8cm)
15.25" (38.7cm)
1.25"
(3.2cm)
16.25" (41.3cm)
M•1200/1400
WEIGHT
36 lbs.
(16.3 kg)
GAIN/dB
CH
1
3v
18
20
22
OL
OL
–3
–3
–6
–6
–9
–9
–20
–20
GAIN/dB
CH
2
3v
18
20
22
2v
16
24
14
26
28
SENSITIVITY
30
1v
1.23v (+4dBu)
2
1
ON
INTERNAL STATUS
24
SIG
SIG
PROTECT
26
28
8
0
0
0
0
8
CH
CH
2v
16
14
SENSITIVITY
30
1v
1.23v (+4dBu)
SHORT
OFF
TEMP STATUS
CH
1& 2
COLD
HOT
POWER
19.00" (48.3cm)
41
3.50"
(8.9cm)
2U
PROFESSIONAL POWER AMPLIFIER
FULL SYMMETRY DUAL DIFFERENTIAL HIGH CURRENT DESIGN
42
MACKIE DESIGNS
M•1200/M•1400
BLOCK DIAGRAM
(#110896DF)
CH 2
BALANCED
LINE INPUT
(TRS)
THRU
(XLR-M)
CH 2
BALANCED
LINE INPUT
(XLR-F)
CH 1
BALANCED
LINE INPUT
(TRS)
THRU
(XLR-M)
CH 1
BALANCED
LINE INPUT
(XLR-F)
FUSE
LOW CUT
FILTER
FREQ
LOW CUT
FILTER
FREQ
TO CH 1
AND CH 2
MUTE
LAMP
POWER
SWITCH
OFF
ON
CD EQ
FREQ
OFF
ON
CD EQ
FREQ
THERMAL
PROTECT
TOROIDAL POWER
TRANSFORMER
SIG
(TO CH 2
METER DRIVE)
SIG
(TO CH 1
METER DRIVE)
+
80 VDC
–
PD's LEASH
LOW PASS
FILTER
(SUBWOOFER)
125 Hz
63 Hz
FREQ
ON
OFF
SUB
+
90 VDC
–
TEMP
SENSOR
(ON HEATSINK)
NC
NC
TO
LIMITER
ON
OFF
SUB
OUTPUT
APPLICATION
SWITCH
COLD
LED
HOT
LED
80ºC MUTE
55ºC UNMUTE
CH 2
GAIN
STEREO
MONO
NC BRIDGE
INVERTING
UNITY GAIN
AMPLIFIER
CH 1
GAIN
CH 1 AMP OUT
CH 2 AMP OUT
TO CH 1
AND CH 2
MUTE
AMP
MODE
SWITCH
CH 1
MUTE
MUTE
CH 2
MUTE
MUTE
CH 2
PROTECT
LED
CH 1 MUTE
CH 2 MUTE
60ºC
DETECTOR
LIMITER
LIMITER
CH 1
PROTECT
LED
LO DCV
HI DCV
–80VDC
+80VDC
–80VDC
+80VDC
FAN
SPEED
CONTROL
FUSE
POWER
AMPLIFIER
FUSE
TO CH 2
MUTE
FUSE
POWER
AMPLIFIER
FUSE
TO CH 1
MUTE
FAN
DC OFFSET
DETECT
SHORT
DETECT
CH 2
SHORT
LED
DC OFFSET
DETECT
SHORT
DETECT
CH 1
SHORT
LED
METER
DRIVE
TO HUSKY
STADIUM
CH 2
SIG
CH 1
SIG
METER
DRIVE
CH 2
SPEAKER
OUT
OL
–3
–6
–9
–20
SIG
CH 1
SPEAKER
OUT
OL
–3
–6
–9
–20
SIG
BLOCK DIAGRAM
M•1200/M•1400
COLOPHON
Manual written by Jeff Gilbert and Dave
Franzwa, with tidbits borrowed from almost
everywhere, including huge chunks of technically baffling text contributed by Rick Chinn.
Manual then defaced with proofreading pens in
the hands of Mackie’s legendary Tech Support
staff (Paul Larson), New Products Engineering
staff (Cal Perkins and Cameron Jones), and
our incomparable Art Department (Sara
Delahan). Back cover collage composed by
Jayme Delma.
Manual composed with No. 4 blue sidewalk
chalk on the banks of beautiful Sammamish
Slough by Mackie’s notorious Technical Writing
staff, then converted to this amazing piece
of work using a 13-story 1000 gigawhat
Macintosh, powered by its own dedicated AC
supply with extensive voltage regulation and
noise filtering to insure pure, undistorted text.
Please, feel free to let us know if you find an
error or stumble over a confusing paragraph.
Thank you for reading the entire manual (we
know you have, or you wouldn’t be here).
Mackie, The Running Man, and FR Series
are either trademarks or registered trademarks
of Mackie Designs Inc.
Speakon is a registered trademark of Neutrik.
All other brand names mentioned are
registered trademarks or trademarks of their
respective holders, and are hereby acknowledged.
©1996 Mackie Designs Inc.
All Rights Reserved.
Printed in the U.S.A.
43
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