Zypcom Z34-PC User`s guide

Zypcom Z34-PC User`s guide
Zypcom
Data/Fax/Voice Modems
User’s Guide
Z34-SC
Z34-PC
Part number: 18008-509D
November 1997
Z
Copyright 1997 by Zypcom, Inc.
Document No. 18008-509D
November 1997
This manual is published by Zypcom, Inc. who reserves the right to
make changes and improvements in the product(s) at any time.
Zypcom also reserves the right to revise this manual at any time and
without notice.
All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be transcribed,
reproduced, or stored in electronic media, translated into any
language or computer code, or be transmitted in any form whatsoever
without the prior consent of Zypcom, Inc.
All versions, titles, trademarks, compatibility claims, etc. of hardware
and software products mentioned in this publication are the sole
responsibility and property of the respective vendors. Zypcom makes
no endorsement of any vendor’s product, nor claims responsibility for
the operation and accuracy of said product.
____________________________________________________________
Zypcom, SE-Series, SX-Series, C-Series, L-Series, Z32-Series, Z34Series, Z32, Z34, Z32b-SE, Z32t-SE, Z34-SE, Z32b-SX, Z32t-SX,
Z34-SX, Z34-SC, Z34-PC, Z34-SL, Z34-PL, Z32CH, Z32CH-2, Z32CH48, Z32CH-48-2, Z3200, Z3200E, and Zscript are trademarks of
Zypcom, Inc.
Carbon Copy and MNP are trademarks of Microcom, Inc.
Hayes is a trademark of Hayes Microcomputer Products, Inc.
IBM is a registered trademark of International Business Machines.
MS-DOS, Windows 3.1 and Windows 95 are registered trademarks of
Microsoft Corporation.
pcANYWHERE is a trademark of Symantec.
PROCOMM is a trademark of DataStorm Technologies, Inc.
QModem and QModem SST are trademarks of Mustang Software Inc.
UNIX is a registered trademark of Unix System Laboratories.
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Contents
Chapter 1
Introduction
Description .............................................................. 1-1
Features .................................................................. 1-2
System Requirements .............................................. 1-3
Modes of Operation .................................................. 1-3
Modem Interface ...................................................... 1-7
Check List ................................................................ 1-8
Chapter 2
Installation
Introduction ............................................................. 2-1
Z34-PC COM Port & IRQ Settings or
Plug-and-Play Settings ............................................. 2-2
Hardware Installation Steps ..................................... 2-4
Additional Installation Information ........................... 2-7
Windows 95 Modem Setup for Z34-PC and
Z34-SC .................................................................... 2-8
Using HyperTerminal with Windows 95 .................. 2-12
Installation Problems ............................................. 2-13
Windows 95 IRQ Conflicts ...................................... 2-14
Using the Windows 95 Computer
Properties Screen ................................................... 2-15
Using SuperVoice Software With Your
Modem...................................................................2-17
Using Other Communication Software
With Your Modem .................................................. 2-19
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Chapter 3
AT Commands
Introduction ............................................................. 3-1
Functional Modem States ......................................... 3-2
Basics of the AT Command Set ................................. 3-4
AT Command Summary ........................................... 3-6
AT Command Descriptions ....................................... 3-7
AT Commands for Data Mode ................................... 3-9
Error Control and Compression Commands ........... 3-24
Chapter 4
Troubleshooting
General .................................................................... 4-1
Basic Communication Problems ............................... 4-2
Other Common Problems ......................................... 4-6
Other Frequently Encountered Problems ................ 4-15
Appendix
A: Specifications ....................................................... A-1
B: IS-101 Voice Command ........................................B-1
C: Fax Commands ....................................................C-1
D: Modem Terms ..................................................... D-1
E: Removing Old Windows 95 Drivers ....................... E-1
F: Downloading Firmware ........................................ F-1
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About This Manual
Shown below is a chronological listing of revisions to
this manual. The revision sequence, date, and synopsis
of revised materials are included to provide the reader
with a comprehensive manual history.
REVISION NUMBER
18008-507A
18008-509A
18008-509B
18008-509C
18008-509D
DATE
01/97
04/97
04/97
05/97
11/97
DESCRIPTION
1st Edition
2nd Edition
3rd Edition
4th Edition
5th Edition
Zypcom welcomes your comments concerning this
manual. Although every effort has been made to keep it
free of errors, some do occasionally occur. When
reporting a specific problem or error, please describe it
briefly and include the manual name, the document
revision number, the paragraph or figure number, and
the page number.
Mail, phone in, or fax your comments to:
Zypcom, Inc.
2301 Industrial Parkway, Bldg. 7
Hayward, CA 94545
Phone: (510) 783-2501
Fax: (510) 783-2414
Printed in U.S.A.
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Warranty and Limitation of Liability
Zypcom, Inc. warrants that its products will perform in
accordance with Zypcom’s published specifications (or
the specification agreed to, in writing, by the Buyer and
Zypcom, and made a part of the sales contract) for a
period of twenty-four (24) months from the date of
original shipment.
During this warranty period, Zypcom will repair any
equipment that it determines is defective. The Buyer
will return the defective equipment to Zypcom, and will
prepay transportation charges. A repair order (RO)
number must accompany all returned equipment (see
“Service Information” later in this section). Zypcom will
repair and return the equipment to the Buyer, and will
prepay transportation charges for destinations in the
continental United States.
This warranty shall not apply to damage resulting from
abuse, negligence, an accident, a natural disaster (flood,
earthquake, etc.), an act of nature (lightening, wind,
etc.), loss, or damage in transit. The warranty shall be
voided should the Buyer attempt any repairs or
alterations without prior written permission of Zypcom,
Inc.
ZYPCOM MAKES NO OTHER WARRANTY, EXPRESSED
OR IMPLIED, AND DISCLAIMS ANY IMPLIED
WARRANTY OF MERCHANTABILITY OR FITNESS FOR A
PARTICULAR PURPOSE.
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THE BUYER AND ZYPCOM AGREE THAT THE SOLE AND
EXCLUSIVE REMEDIES FOR BREACH OF ANY WARRANTY CONCERNING THE GOODS SHALL BE REPAIR
OR REPLACEMENT OF DEFECTIVE PARTS UPON THE
TERMS ABOVE DESCRIBED OR, AT ZYPCOM’S OPTION,
REFUND OF THE PURCHASE PRICE. ZYPCOM SHALL
NOT BE LIABLE FOR CONTINGENT OR CONSEQUENTIAL
DAMAGES TO PERSONS OR PROPERTY, AND ITS SOLE
LIABILITY IS AS SET FORTH ABOVE.
Any action by the Buyer for any alleged breach of the
warranty set forth herein shall be brought to the
attention of Zypcom, Inc. by the Buyer within the
warranty period, but not later than thirty (30) days after
the alleged breach.
THIS STATEMENT OF WARRANTY AND LIMITATION OF
LIABILITY IS A COMPLETE AND EXCLUSIVE STATEMENT
OF ALL WARRANTY AND LIABILITY REPRESENTATIONS
OF ZYPCOM, INC. It may not be varied, supplemented,
qualified or interpreted by any prior dealings between
the parties, by any usage of the trade, or upon the face
or reverse of any form to which this is attached or is a
part of, nor may it be modified by any agent, employee
or representative of Zypcom unless such modification or
representation is made in writing and signed by an
officer of Zypcom, Inc.
Repairs and/or replacements under the terms of this
warranty SHALL NOT EXTEND THE WARRANTY LIFE OF
THE ORIGINAL EQUIPMENT SUPPLIED. After this
warranty has expired, service can be purchased directly
from Zypcom, Inc.
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Service Information
In the event of malfunction or other indication of
product failure, please follow this procedure:
1. Call Zypcom Technical Support at (510) 783-2501,
Monday through Friday from 8:00 A.M. to 5:00 P.M.
Pacific time (excluding holidays).
2. Your support representative will ask you to perform
a few easy tests. If the tests and other remedies do not
solve the problem, you will be issued a Repair Order
(RO) number.
3. Return the unit in the original box or similar
protective shipping container and send it prepaid to:
Repair Department
Reference: RO Number _______
Zypcom, Inc.
2301 Industrial Parkway West, Bldg. 7
Hayward, CA 94545
Please mark the shipping container on the outside with
the RO number and enclose a written description of the
problem with the defective unit.
Terms
For warranty repair replacements, the customer pays
freight charges incurred for sending the defective
modem to Zypcom. Zypcom pays freight charges
(destinations in the continental United States only) for
sending replacement units. Replacements and/or
repairs are performed at no charge to the customer.
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For non-warranty repairs, charges vary according to the
specific model of the modem being repaired. Repair
charges are estimated before an RO number is issued.
Customer prepays all freight and repair charges by
means of credit card or C.O.D. terms. Zypcom can
accept prepayment by company check.
FCC Part 15: Radio/Television Interference
This equipment has been tested and found to comply
with the limits for a Class B digital device, pursuant to
Part 15 of the FCC Rules. These limits are designed to
provide reasonable protection against harmful
interference in a residential installation. This
equipment generates, uses and can radiate radio
frequency energy and, if not installed and used in
accordance with the instructions, may cause harmful
interference to radio communications. However, there
is no guarantee that interference will not occur in a
particular installation. If this equipment does cause
harmful interference to radio or television reception,
which can be determined by turning the equipment on,
the user is encouraged to try to correct the interference
by one or more of the following measures:
q Reorient or relocate the receiving antenna.
q Increase the separation between the equipment
and the receiver.
q Connect the equipment into an outlet on a
circuit different from that to which the receiver
is connected.
q Consult the dealer or an experienced radio/TV
technician for help.
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CAUTION: Changes or modifications not expressly
approved by the party responsible for compliance
could void the user’s authority to operate the
equipment.
CAUTION: Shielded interface cables, if any, must
be used in order to comply with emissions limits.
Part 68: Telephone Connection
This equipment complies with Part 68 of the FCC rules.
This equipment has a label that contains, among other
things, the FCC Registration Number and Ringer
Equivalence Number (REN). Upon request, provide the
above information to your telephone company.
The REN value is useful to determine the number of
devices that may be connected to your telephone line
and that will still ring when your telephone number is
called. In most areas, but not all, the sum of the RENs
of all the devices you may connect to one line should
not exceed five (5.0). To be certain of the number of
devices you may connect to your line, as determined by
the REN, you should contact your local telephone
company to determine the maximum REN for your
calling area.
If this equipment causes harm to the telephone network
equipment, the telephone company may discontinue
your service temporarily. If possible, they will notify you
in advance. However, if advance notification is not
possible, you will be notified as soon as possible. You
will be informed of your right to file a complaint with the
FCC.
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Your telephone company may make changes in its
facilities, equipment, operations or procedures that
would affect the proper functioning of your equipment.
If they do, you will be notified in advance to give you an
opportunity to maintain uninterrupted telephone
service.
If you experience trouble with this equipment, please
contact Zypcom technical support. The telephone
company may ask that you disconnect this equipment
from the network until the problem has been corrected
or until you are sure that the equipment is not
malfunctioning.
This equipment may not be used on coin service
provided by the telephone company. Connection to
party lines is subject to state tariffs.
Statement of Fax Branding
The Telephone Consumer Protection Act of 1991 makes
it unlawful for any person to use a computer or other
electronic device to send any message via a telephone
fax machine unless the message clearly contains a
margin at the top or bottom of each transmitted page or
on the first page of the transmission; the date and time
the message is sent; an identification of the business,
other entity, or individual sending the message; and the
telephone number of the sending machine, business,
other entity, or individual.
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Canadian Department of Communications—
Requirements For End Users
The Canadian Department of Communications label
identifies certified equipment. This certification means
that the equipment meets certain telecommunications
network requirements. The Department does not
guarantee the equipment will operate to the user’s
satisfaction.
Before installing this equipment, the user should ensure
that connection to the line is allowed by the local
telecommunications company. The equipment must
also be installed by using an acceptable method of
connection. In some cases, the company’s inside
wiring, associated with a single-line individual service,
may be extended by means of a telephone extension
cord. Compliance with the above conditions may not
prevent degradation of service in certain situations.
Equipment repairs should be made by an authorized
Canadian maintenance facility designated by Zypcom,
Inc. Any repairs or alterations made by the user may
cause the telecommunications company to request
disconnection.
The electrical ground connections of the power utility,
telephone lines, and internal metallic water pipe system,
if present, should be connected together. This
precaution may be particularly important in rural areas.
CAUTION: Users should not attempt to make such
connections themselves, but should contact the
appropriate electrical inspection authority, or
electrician, as appropriate.
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The Load Number (LN) assigned to each terminal device
indicates the total load percentage that can be connected to a telephone loop. The termination on a loop
may consist of any combination of devices. However,
the total LN of all the devices must not exceed 100.
The Load Number and Canadian certification number
are listed on the modem label. The Canadian DOC
connector codes supported are CA11A, CA41A, and
CA45A. For internal modems on which the agency
information label cannot be seen when the modem is
installed, a second agency label will be provided. The
customer must attach the label to the exterior of the
cabinet in which the modem is installed.
Repairs
Inquiries regarding Canadian repair centers should be
addressed to:
Customer Service
Zypcom, Inc.
2301 Industrial Parkway, Bldg. 7
Hayward, CA 94545
(510) 783-2501
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xiv
CHAPTER
1
Introduction
Description
T
he Zypcom Z34-SC and Z34-PC modems
are versatile desktop communication devices.
These devices have high-speed data transfer
(56Kbps) and send/receive facsimile transmission
capabilities, as well as a variety of important voice and
video communication features. The Z34-SC and Z34PC (C-Series) modems operate full-duplex (data and
voice) on dial-up lines.
C-Series modems use advanced DSP technology to
transform your computer into a 56Kbps* data modem, a
fax machine, a professional voice mail system, and a full
duplex speakerphone. In addition, these C-Series
modems support V.80, the videophone standard that is
required by H.324 videophone software. The C-Series
modems include software to control and use the
advanced data, fax, and voice features supported by
this modem.
*Note: Zypcom x2 products are capable of 56 Kbps
downloads; however, due to FCC rules restricting power
output of modems, current download speeds are limited
to 53 Kbps. Actual speeds may vary depending on line
conditions. Uploads from the user to the ISP travel at
speeds up to 28.8 Kbps.
1
Features
q V.34+ 33,600bps asynchronous data modem
with throughput up to 115.2Kbps
q
q
q
q
56000 bps using USR x2 technology*
q
q
q
q
q
q
q
q
q
Hayes AT auto-dialing
V.42 and MNP 2-4 error correction
V.42bis and MNP 5 data compression
Fax Group 3 compatibility, V.17 at 14.4Kbps and
V.29 at 9.6Kbps, fax software Class 1
EIA/TIA IS-101 compatible voice commands
Answer machine and voice mail
Full-duplex speakerphone
Audio recording and playback of messages
Flash memory for modem upgrades
V.80 compatible for videophone software
Caller ID support
Non-volatile memory for stored profiles and
phone directory
q Plug and Play or manual configuration
q Z34-SC includes built-in audio speaker and MIC
for speakerphone
q Z34-PC has an MIC, speaker and earphone jacks
with volume control
q Z34-PC comes with an external MIC
q Windows 3.1 and Windows 95 software for data,
fax, and video operation is included
1-2
1
System Requirements
Z34-SC Requires
q PC with a free COM port 1, 2, 3, or 4
q 3.5” floppy drive
q Hard disk drive with 5MB free space
Z34-PC Requires
q
q
q
q
q
PC with a free 16-bit ISA slot
3.5” floppy drive
Hard disk drive with 5MB free space
Free COM port address: 1, 2, 3, or 4
Free IRQ for the COM port: 3, 4, 5, 7, 10, 11, or
12
q Speaker or earphone set (optional)
Modes of Operation
The Zypcom C-Series modems incorporate the CLMD3452 DSP chipset from Cirrus Logic. The Cirrus
Logic chipset uses special AT commands to control the
modem's advanced features of data mode, fax mode, and
voice mode. Each mode has its own AT command set.
Data mode uses the Hayes AT command set. Fax mode
uses commands specified in EIA-578. Voice mode uses
IS-101 commands.
1-3
1
Data Mode
In data mode, the modem can operate at a line speed of
up to 56,000 bps. These modems will automatically
downshift during the initial handshake to communicate
with lower-speed modems. The C-Series modems
support the following modem standards:
ITU-T: V.34+, V.34, V.32bis, V.32, V.22bis, V.22,
V.21
USR: x2 56Kbps technology
Bell: 212A, 103
The C-Series modems implement a Hayes compatible AT
command set in data mode. This command set is
compatible with any communication application
software that supports the standard AT command set.
The AT commands for data are listed in Table 3-1 in
Chapter 3.
Error Control Modes
In data mode, the modem supports error correction
(V.42, MNP 2, MNP 3 and MNP 4) and data compression
(V.42bis and MNP 5). Error correction ensures errorfree data transfer, while data compression increases the
modem data throughput over the basic line speed of the
connection. Depending on the data stream, MNP 5 may
provide up to 2-to-1 compression. Alternately, V.42bis
may provide up to 4-to-1 compression. In V.34
modems, if possible, you should type \N4 to force your
software to hang up the call if an error control
connection is not negotiated during handshake. A
description of the AT commands that support error
correction and data compression is provided in Chapter
3.
1-4
1
Fax mode
In fax mode, the modem operates at up to 14,400 bps
(transmit and receive), and implements all the data
rates and modulation schemes for standards V.17, V.29,
V.27ter, and V.21 channel 2. The C-Series modems
implement a standard Class 1 fax command set,
compatible with any communication application
software that also supports EIA/TIA-578 Fax Class 1.
However, users never have to use the EIA/TIA-578
commands to control fax operation, since this is the sole
responsibility of the fax software. The EIA/TIA-578
commands are listed in Appendix C. For more
information about Class 1 faxing, please refer to the
SuperVoice User's Guide included with your modem or
use the software's Help functions.
Voice Mode
The C-Series modems support voice mode operation
using IS-101 AT type voice commands. The modem's
voice mode requires IS-101 compatible software for voice
operation. Voice mode allows the user to use the
modem as a digital answer machine, a voice mail
system, and a full-duplex speakerphone. The Z34-SC's
built-in microphone and speaker allow the modem to be
a speakerphone without additional hardware. The
complete set of IS-101 commands are listed in Appendix
B. For the operation of voice applications, please refer
to the SuperVoice User’s Guide.
Full-Duplex
Speaker-phone
Both of the C-Series modems support full-duplex
speakerphone with internal adaptive echo cancellation.
Phone users can talk simultaneously without the
remote user hearing an echo.
1-5
1
On the Z34-SC modem, everything that is required to
operate the modem in this mode of operation is provided
(MIC, speaker, software and modem).
With the Z34-PC modem, optional speakers are needed
for speakerphone operation. To use the speakers
attached to your soundcard, jumper the modem's
speaker jack (sound-out) to the soundcard's input jack
(sound-in) with a standard (male-to-male) phono plug
cable.
Caller ID
Caller ID is a service that allows the called party to
know the caller’s telephone number before the call is
answered. The information transmitted to the called
party via Caller ID includes the call date, the call time,
and the calling telephone number. This service is not
available everywhere due to Central Office telephone
equipment limitations and legal prohibition in some
locations.
The +VCID = n command controls the reporting and
presentation of the data associated with the Caller ID
services in the United States and Canada, in the ICLID
(incoming call line ID) data format. For more
information about this command, please refer to
Appendix B.
1-6
1
Modem Interface
Plug and Play Host
Interface
The Z34-PC supports both PC 16-bit Plug-and-Play and
Non-Plug-and-Play ISA Bus applications. You may use
jumpers to set up the COM port base address and IRQ
interrupt for non-Plug-and-Play applications, or use the
Plug-and-Play feature to let the included driver disc PNP
software select the COM port address and interrupt for
the modem.
Speaker Interface
The Z34-SC modem has an internal high quality audio
speaker and does not require external speakers. The
Z34-PC modem supports a phono jack connection for an
external speaker. The Z34-PC's speaker jack supports
volume control and an amplifier necessary to drive an
external speaker. The Z34-PC's internal amplifier is
capable of driving a minimum load of 8 ohm up to a
maximum load of 100 ohm.
Earphone Interface
The Z34-PC implements the external earphone with
volume control. Before you wear the ear piece, make
sure it is connected to the earphone (EPH) jack. The
Z34-SC does not support this feature.
1-7
1
Microphone
Interface
The modem provides a microphone interface that
connects a microphone to the modem. On the Z34-SC,
it is built-in on the front left, bottom. On the Z34-PC, it
is included and attached via a phono jack. This
microphone input can then be used for record messages
(for the answer machine feature) or for speakerphone
operation.
Videophone
Interface
The C-Series modems support V.80 for videophone calls.
In addition to the C-Series V.80 compatible modem, you
must have a videophone software package, a camera,
and a video capture card. For videophone operation,
refer to your videophone software manual.
Check List
In addition to this User's Guide, your package includes
the following items, depending on the specific model you
have purchased:
Z34-SC
q 56,000 bps data/fax/voice modem with built-in
MIC and speaker
q
q
q
q
Power supply
Telephone cord (RJ11-RJ11)
Modem driver utility diskette
SuperVoice communication software diskette
and manual
q User's Guide
1-8
1
Z34-PC
q
q
q
q
q
56,000 bps data/fax/voice modem
Telephone cord (RJ11-RJ11)
External MIC
Modem driver utility diskette
SuperVoice communication software diskette
and manual
q User's Guide
As you can see from our User's Guide, both the Z34-SC
and Z34-PC are sophisticated modems with advanced
fax and voice features, which will serve you well for
years to come. Zypcom thanks you, our valued
customer, for purchasing our product, and encourages
you to explore our Web Site at www.zypcom.com for
news on 56K bps upgrades. Enjoy speeding to new
places on the Net and moving information faster!
1-9
1
1-10
CHAPTER
2
Installation
Introduction
T
he Zypcom Z34-SC and Z34-PC are
technologically advanced modems with many
powerful features for communicating into the
twenty-first century. The more you know more about
your modem, the more you can do with it. But like
most people, you are probably anxious to get your
modem online as soon as possible and will consult the
manual only as necessary. This chapter, therefore,
contains only the information you'll need to get the Z34SC and Z34-PC installed on your PC and running on an
asynchronous data dial-up communication link.
You'll learn about the communication software you
might need, how to connect the Z34-SC and Z34-PC to
your computer, and how to run basic tests. You'll also
be presented with some setup tips, dialing commands,
and other ready information. Once the Z34-SC and
Z34-PC are operational, you can browse through the
rest of the manual at your leisure.
The Z34-SC and Z34-PC packages come with a modem,
a User's Guide, a Windows drivers diskette for Windows
95, SuperVoice communication software and manual, a
telephone cable (RJ11-RJ11), a power supply (Z34-SC
only), and an external MIC (Z34-PC only).
2
For either modem, you must provide a telephone line
terminated with a modular jack, as well as a
screwdriver. For the Z34-PC, you must also provide a
set of speakers and/or a phono plug cable (i.e., a miniRC cable) if you use sound in your PC. For the Z34-SC,
you must also provide a serial modem cable to connect
the modem to your PC. Check with your PC dealer for
the correct one for your machine. Normally, a standard
modem cable will have pins 1 through 8 and 20.
Z34-PC COM Port and IRQ Settings or Plug-and-Play Settings
If you have the Z34-PC, you must, first of all before
installing it, either set your modem to a COM port and
IRQ or set up your modem for Plug-and-Play. If you
know your system has a free COM port and Interrupt
(IRQ) (perhaps because you are replacing a lower-speed
modem), use those settings on your Z34-PC. If you do
not know of an available COM port and IRQ, then try
Plug-and-Play. Plug-and-Play is Microsoft technology
that will attempt to find the free settings available and
assign your modem a COM port and IRQ that will make
your modem operational. However, this sometimes does
not work and is difficult to recover from once Plug-andPlay does an incorrect assignment.
If you decide to set your modem to a COM port and IRQ,
you can keep it set to COM port 2, IRQ 3 (its default
setting that it came with). However, if this configuration
conflicts with another device on your system, you can
set your modem to another COM port and IRQ (that are
not being used). To do this, place jumpers according to
the jumper setting table on the modem card, or refer to
the diagram below.
2-2
2
If you set up your modem for Plug-and-Play, Windows
95 will assign the COM port and IRQ. However, it is
recommended that you select your own settings, rather
than having the computer do it for you. To place the
jumpers, refer to the diagram below.
2-3
2
Hardware Installation Steps
Z34-PC Modem
Hardware
Installation
1. Turn your computer’s power off.
2. Remove the cover from your PC and retain the
screws for reassembly.
3. If you are setting your modem to a COM port and
IRQ, select an unused COM port and IRQ and set
the jumpers accordingly. If you are setting up your
modem for Plug-and-Play, set the jumpers
accordingly.
4. Find an empty 16-bit slot inside your computer.
Remove the existing silver bracket behind the slot
where you want to install the modem.
5. Before you remove the modem from its static
resistant bag, be sure to discharge any static
electricity on your person by touching a grounded
metallic surface. Insert the modem card in the
selected slot and tighten the retaining screw.
Take a moment to look at the modem. One end of
the modem has a wide metal bracket with a
telephone line connector and phono jacks on it.
When properly installed, this metal bracket should
be accessible from the rear of your computer so that
you can connect your external devices and telephone
line.
2-4
2
6. With the metal bracket facing towards the rear of
your computer, insert the modem’s “gold fingers”
into the slot. Depending on the type of computer
you have, the board may insert easily, or it may
require a firm push. Be careful not to twist the
board when inserting it. When properly inserted,
the card should not wobble around. Secure the
modem to the back of your PC with the screw you
removed in step 4.
7. Slide the cover back on your PC, and secure it with
the screws you removed in step 2. Reconnect your
PC power cord and any cables removed in the
installation.
8. Connect the modem telephone cable to the outside
telephone line. Plug one end of the telephone cable
(included with the modem) into the LINE jack on the
modem. Plug the other end into the modular
telephone wall outlet.
9. Connect the external microphone (included with the
modem) to the Z34-PC's MIC phono jack.
10. Place the MIC bracket on your monitor, using the
adhesive strip. Install the MIC onto the MIC
bracket.
11. Either connect an external speaker set to the Z34PC's SPKR jack, or connect a jumper (phono plug
cable) from the Z34-PC's SPKR jack to the sound-in
(line-in) jack on your PC's sound card. Both
methods allow you to play recorded personalized
greeting messages and your received voice mail
messages through the speaker.
2-5
2
Z34-PC NOTE: When you are using the speakerphone
feature, you will notice that sound is output from only
one speaker. This is normal. The reason you have two
speakers is so that you can use these same speakers in
stereo mode when running other multimedia
applications from your sound card.
NOTE: If you are using Windows 95, go to the
"Windows 95" section below. If you are using
Windows 3.1, go to the "Windows 3.1" section
below.
Z34-SC Modem
Hardware
Installation
1. Turn your computer’s power off.
2. Connect the serial modem cable to the modem and
tighten the retaining screws.
3. Connect the serial modem cable to the COM port
you have selected and tighten the retaining screws.
4. Connect the power supply to the modem.
5. Connect the AC transformer to an electrical outlet.
6. Connect the modem telephone cable to the outside
telephone line. Plug one end of the included
telephone cable (part number 15047-004) into the
WALL jack on the modem and the other end into the
modular telephone wall outlet.
7. Turn on the modem. PWR LED (Power on the LED)
will be green when on.
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2
NOTE: The Z34-SC already has an MIC and
speaker built-in, so no additional connections of
MIC or speaker is required.
Windows 95
If you are using Windows 95, then you will need to set
up the modem using the new .INF file provided on the
Windows Drivers disk. Please refer to the "Windows 95
Modem Setup" section in this chapter.
Windows 3.1
If you are using Windows 3.1, then you are ready to use
the modem with your existing software for data and/or
fax operation once you change the modem type in your
software. If your software does not support Zypcom's
Z34-PC or Z34-SC, try another Zypcom model or a
Cirrus Logic model. If voice capabilities are important,
install the SuperVoice communication software.
Additional Installation Information
Sound Card
If you already have a sound card installed in your
computer, you can connect your Z34-PC modem to the
sound card and use the sound card to record
personalized greeting messages or play voice mail
messages. To connect your modem to a sound card, use
a standard male phono cable to connect your Z34-PC's
SPKR jack to the sound-in (line-in) on the sound card.
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2
Earphone Headset
An optional headset phono jack allows you to use the
Z34-PC as a hands free telephone set. The optional
headset comes with a microphone and an earphone
plug. Connect the earphone plug to the Z34-PC's EPH
jack and the microphone plug to the Z34-PC's MIC jack.
Windows 95 Modem Setup for Z34-PC and Z34-SC
With Windows 95, the setup of your modem will vary
depending on the model. Please follow the Windows 95
setup instructions for your specific modem, detailed
below. You might need your Windows 95 CD to install
the Z34-PC. Also, if you had a Cirrus Logic chipsetbased modem before on your PC, you will need to
remove it first before installing the new driver files.
Please refer to the section entitled "Removing Old
Modem Drivers," which appears later in this chapter.
Z34-PC Installation
for Windows 95
When Windows 95 loads, it checks whether or not new
plug-and-play devices have been installed. If Windows
95 detects your new Zypcom Z34-PC board, it displays
the following message: “Windows 95 recognized new
hardware and was incorporating”. If it does not detect
your modem, it displays a different message: "Select
which drive you want to install for your new hardware."
From a bulleted list, select "Driver from disk provided by
hardware manufacturer." Click OK. Insert the CD
labeled "Windows 95 CD-ROM". Click OK.
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2
Windows 95 then asks whether or not to use the
information already included in the system. If the
ISAPNP Unimodem ID is not already supported,
Windows 95 requests a disk which we have included
and is labeled Windows Drivers.
Click on OK and continue. You may need your
Windows 95 installation CD to copy needed files to your
Windows 95 system. Once all files are copied to your
Windows 95 directory, you may install the SuperVoice
communication software included with the modem. You
may also use the HyperTerminal program, which comes
with Windows 95, to test your modem. Please refer to
the section below entitled "Using HyperTerminal to Test
Your Modem".
The very latest versions of Windows 95 .INF files
mdmcir.inf and serwvcir.inf can be obtained from
Zypcom’s BBS by calling 510-783-2580.
Using Hyper
Terminal to Test
Your Modem
To access HyperTerminal, click on START|
PROGRAM|ACCESSORIES, click on HyperTerminal,
then click on HyperTrm. Type in the name, select and
click on an icon, then click on OK. Type the phone
number. Make sure HyperTerminal is connected using
the Zypcom Z34-PC bps internal modem. Click on OK.
In the Connect dialog box, click on Dial, then click on
Dial Now. The modem should go off-hook and you
should hear a dialtone from the speaker. Listen for the
modem handshake. Log in to the computer system that
was called. To log off, click on the Disconnect icon. If
this does not work, please refer to Chapter 4 entitled
"Troubleshooting."
2-9
2
Z34-SC Installation
for Windows 95
Make sure the modem is turned on and you have
installed the modem serial cable. Start Windows 95, left
click the START icon, go to settings, click on the Control
Panel, and select "Modems" with a double click. Check
"Don't Detect My Modem", click "Next", and select "Have
Disk" from the INSTALL NEW MODEM screen.
From the INSTALL FROM DISK screen, choose the drive
(A:, B:) where you placed the Zypcom Windows Drivers
disk and click OK. Select "Zypcom Z34-SC" or "Cirrus
56000 bps Modem External (CL-MD3450) Modem" and
click next. Select the COM port, then click on "Next".
NOTE: You will need your Windows 95 CD for
this stage so that the necessary files get updated.
(The win95_11.cab file is in the win95 subdirectory.)
Windows 95 will ask for some basic information; input it
and click on "Next". Check "Finish"; the MODEM
PROPERTIES screen will appear. The "Zypcom Z34-SC"
or "Cirrus 56000 . . ." should be highlighted. At this
point, you can check on DIALING PROPERTIES and
advanced setting from the MODEM PROPERTIES
screen. Close all screens by clicking OK. Close the last
screen by clicking OK.
The Z34-SC is now installed. To install SuperVoice at
this point, see the section on "SuperVoice," which
appears later in this chapter. To use HyperTerminal to
test your new modem, see the section on
"HyperTerminal," which appeared earlier in this chapter.
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2
NOTE: Do not increase SuperVoice's
speakerphone volume-in or volume-out above the
75-percent mark; otherwise, frequent
speakerphone feedback will occur, which reduces
usability of this feature.
Removing Old
Modem Drivers
CAUTION: On Windows 95, if your old modem is
based on a Cirrus Logic 14,400 bps or 28,800 bps
chipset, you will need to remove the old modem
drivers before installing the new 56,000 bps
drivers.
If you are upgrading from an earlier version of the
56,000 bps Windows driver, you must remove the old
56,000 bps drivers first.
Unfortunately, removing modems from the control panel
does not remove the driver files, so you need to follow
these detailed procedures; otherwise, Windows 95 will
use the old drivers to operate the new modem, and your
new modem will be unreliable. The procedures for
removing old Cirrus Logic chipset drivers are explained
in Appendix E. This is required only if your system has
a previously installed Cirrus Logic-based modem.
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2
Using HyperTerminal with Windows 95
After installing the modem and the .INF file, run
Windows 95 HyperTerminal (in the Program Accessories
menu). If you haven’t yet used HyperTerminal for this
modem, you will have to configure HyperTerminal before
it can be used. HyperTerminal first asks for the name
of the session. Enter "Zypcom V.34 C-Series" or some
other name and press "<CR>". A new screen then pops
up. Enter a dummy telephone number such as "1234".
Set the modem configuration. If the correct modem
name is not displayed, scroll down the list until you see
the appropriate Zypcom or Cirrus Logic name. Press
the OK button. A Dial screen pops up. Press the
Cancel button. You should now be able to type AT
commands to the screen.
Type "ATZ <CR>". Sometimes you may not see
anything. Wait a second or two and type "AT&F <CR>",
followed by "AT <CR>". If you get an “OK” message,
then the installation works properly. If you get an error
message from Windows 95 or if the modem does not
respond with an “OK” message, then either you have a
IRQ conflict or the .INF file was not installed properly.
Look at the section entitled “Installation Problems,”
which appears later in this chapter.
Note that you can download subsequent firmware into
the modem without repeating the installation process;
however, you cannot do this if you have downloaded
new features not supported by the modem you selected
in the previous installation. It is recommended that you
remove the old Windows 95 modem setup if you repeat
the installation process for the same modem. Please
refer to the section entitled "Removing Old Modem
Drivers," which appeared earlier in this chapter.
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2
Installation Problems
COM Port Address and IRQ Hardware Conflicts are
some of the most common installation problems. They
occur when more than one modem uses the same COM
port or IRQ. Additionally, other devices, such as the
mouse and sound card, may also use conflicting IRQs.
To check for a hardware conflict, you must first enter
DOS mode. Restart Windows 95 using the Restart to
DOS function in the Shut Down menu. Next, start any
DOS terminal emulation program such as PCPLUS. Try
sending AT commands to the modem.
COM Port or IRQ
Conflict
If you have a COM port conflict, you can try a different
COM port. Many computer systems come with either
one serial port and a modem or two serial ports that use
COM port 1 and COM port 2; therefore, it is best to try
COM port 3 and COM port 4.
If you believe an IRQ conflict may exist, go into the
Windows 95 Computer Properties screen and double
click the Systems icon at the top of the screen.
Windows 95 shows the IRQs being used by the system.
Scroll down the screen and find an IRQ not being used,
then try changing the modem board's IRQ to this
number. If the board does not support this IRQ, you
can change the IRQ number on another device and use
this IRQ for your modem. Alternately, you can free up
an IRQ by removing an existing board from the
computer and removing its name from the Computer
Properties screen.
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2
CAUTION: Removing the device name from the
Computer Properties screen may cause problems
later when using the removed board.
.INF File Problem
To determine whether or not the .INF was loaded
properly, go back to the Modem icon in the Windows 95
Control Panel. After double-clicking the icon, check
whether your modem’s name is displayed in the
Modems Properties screen. If it is, then the .INF file is
loaded properly. If your modem is not shown, then one
of the following problems could have occurred: a wrong
.INF file was installed, Windows 95 did not recognize
your modem, the Cancel button was mistakenly pressed
during installation, or the modem type name was
removed previously.
What To Do
Try adding the board again. If this does not work, try
removing the board and adding a different modem. If
this works, then there may be a hardware problem or a
COM port conflict problem.
Windows 95 IRQ Conflicts
Is There A Conflict?
Even if the hardware works perfectly and the .INF file is
installed properly, Windows 95 may still have problems
using the board. Part of the problem is that even
though DOS and Windows 3.1 allow you to share IRQs
between COM ports (for example, COM1 and COM3
typically use IRQ4; COM2 and COM4, IRQ3), Windows
95 does not appropriately support devices sharing IRQs.
For plug-and-play devices, this may become a major
problem. For non-plug-and-play boards, Windows 95
may allow you to share IRQs.
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2
What To Do
On the Computer Properties screen, manually select the
modem’s IRQ. This may or may not work. Alternately,
free an IRQ line by deleting or removing existing devices
or boards, then manually select the modem’s IRQ from
the Computer Properties screen.
Using the Windows 95 Computer Properties Screen
The Computer Properties screen displays the hardware
and software drivers used by the computer. Use the
following directions to access the Computer Properties
screen:
Systems Properties
1) Press the Windows 95 Start icon, then press the
Settings icon. Choose the Control Panel.
2) Double-click the System icon on the Control Panel.
The System Properties screen appears.
3) Press the Device Manager tab in the System icon. A
screen displays the devices installed on your
computer.
4) Double click the Modem icon. This screen displays
the installed modems.
5) Find your modem and double-click on that selection.
If your modem does not appear, then either the
modem was not added through the Modem Icon in
the Control Panel or the modem’s installation
process failed.
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2
6) After double-clicking your modem type, a new
screen displays information about your modem.
This screen informs you if the device is working
properly and if there is a COM port or device
conflict. After you’re finished viewing this window,
press the OK button to return to the System
Properties menu.
7) To remove or eliminate a modem, select the modem
in the System Properties menu and press the
Remove button. Also, please refer to the section
entitled "Removing Old Modem Drivers," which
appeared earlier in this chapter. Alternately, access
the Modem icon from the Control Panel, select the
modem name, and press the Remove button.
Computer Properties
1) From the System Properties window, double-click
the Computer icon. This opens up the Computer
Properties screen. This screen provides information
on which IRQs, I/O address, Memory address, and
DMA channels are used by the computer.
2) To see if any IRQs are available, select the Interrupt
Request (IRQ) circle at the top of the Computer
Properties screen (the default selection when first
entering this window). Next, scroll down to see
which IRQ numbers are used. If an IRQ number is
not shown, then that IRQ is not being used by the
system and can be used by your modem (if your
modem supports that IRQ number).
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2
3) To determine which COM port addresses are
available, select the Input/Output (I/O) circle at the
top of the Computer Properties screen. Scroll down
the screen to see what COM ports are being used.
The COM port addresses are: COM1 03F8-03FF,
COM2 02F8-02FF, COM3 03E8-03EF, and COM4
02E8-02EF. If the address for any of the COM ports
is not shown, then that COM port is available.
Using SuperVoice Software With Your Modem
The SuperVoice communication software, which comes
with the Z34-SC and Z34-PC, enables you to use your
modem to receive phone messages, to use your modem
to send and receive fax and data messages, and to use
your modem as a speakerphone. To use SuperVoice to
perform these functions, please refer to the SuperVoice
User's Guide included in your package. The following
sections highlight portions of some procedures.
Installing
SuperVoice
Insert Diskette #1 in Drive A (or in your floppy disk
drive). Click on START|RUN. When the Run dialog box
appears, type A:\INSTALL in the Command line field (or
type the letter of the drive in which you inserted
Diskette #1, followed by :\INSTALL). Click on OK. The
SuperVoice Install program dialog box will appear.
Enter the path and directory name where you wish to
install SuperVoice. Click on Proceed. The SuperVoice
Install program dialog box will appear again. Click on
Proceed again. "SuperVoice Install is now copying all
needed files" will appear in the dialog box. After all files
have been copied, insert diskette #2 into drive A. Click
on OK. "SuperVoice Install is now copying all needed
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2
files" will appear in the dialog box, followed by
"Installation completed". Click on OK. To access
SuperVoice, click on
START|PROGRAM|SUPERVOICE|SUPERVOICE.
Recording Your
Answering Machine
Greeting
In the Start Up dialog box, click on Greeting. Type your
greeting in the Message field, click on Record, then
record your greeting. Click on Play to review your
greeting. Click on Done when you are finished.
Reviewing Your
Phone Messages
In the SuperVoice Manager box, click on the Voice Msg
icon (or, alternatively, in the Speaker Phone box, click
on Voice). The Incoming Voice Manager box will appear.
Click on Play to hear messages that you have received.
Click on Done when you are finished.
Sending a Fax from
Within SuperVoice
In the SuperVoice Manager box, click on Fax, Send,
then Send Fax (or simply click on the Send Fax icon).
Type the requested information. Click on Attachment,
type the name of the file that you want to fax, click on
OK, click on OK again, then click on Send. Click on
Done when you are finished.
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2
Making a
Speakerphone Call
In the Speaker Phone box, click on S.Phone. Dial the
phone number you wish to call by clicking on the
numbers on the keypad or by typing them in the
Message field. Make sure the "vol" button reads "vol.in".
When a connection is made, talk to the person (or the
answering machine) on the other end of the line. Click
on HangUp and Clear when you are finished.
NOTE: Do not increase SuperVoice's
speakerphone volume-in or volume-out above the
75-percent mark; otherwise, frequent
speakerphone feedback will occur, which reduces
usability of this feature.
Using Other Communication Software With Your Modem
Communication software allows you to change settings
and issue commands to your modem.
Once the modem hardware is installed and configured
properly, you may use the modem with any PC
communication software. The bundled software
package is pre-configured for optimal performance with
your modem. Please refer to the Software User’s guide
for additional information.
If you are using other communication software, please
follow these suggestions:
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2
1. You must indicate to your communication software
which COM port and IRQ have been assigned to
your modem.
2. Set the Data Rate to 115.2 or 57.6 Kbps. Do not
select 56,000, 28,800 or 14,400 bps as serial port
rates.
3. Set the Flow Control to Hardware (or RTS/CTS).
4. Turn Auto Baud off (or Lock Baud Rate on).
5. Set Terminal Emulator to ANSI.
For Fax Setup:
1. Set the Flow Control to Hardware (or RTS/CTS).
2. Set Class 1 fax class.
2-20
CHAPTER
3
AT Commands
A
Hayes AT-compatible modem operates with
standard communications software that
enables a computer to control the C-Series
modems have a standard set of Hayes AT dialing
commands, in addition to an expanded set of commands
to control options not found in Hayes modems. The
Zypcom C-Series modems use the Cirrus Logic modem
chipset; thus, the C-Series modems will be compatible
with both Zypcom and Cirrus Logic modem drivers
found in popular communications software packages.
Software that will automatically identify your modem
(Windows 95, Netscape, etc.) will probably identify your
modem as a C-Series modem or a Cirrus Logic modem.
(The speed of the detected modem will vary with
software.) If your software says your modem is a
Zypcom C-Series or Cirrus Logic modem, accept the
modem description. Do not worry if your
communications software says it has detected a Zypcom
14.4 Kbps modem. Your software may have only
modem drivers for slower-speed versions of Zypcom or
Cirrus Logic. However, since the commands are the
same, these drivers will still operate your modem in
data and fax modes. The advanced voice features will
require the latest drivers from your communications
software manufacturer.
3
Functional Modem States
During asynchronous AT operation, the C-Series
modem functions in one of these six modes:
q
q
q
q
q
q
Command mode
Online (data) mode
Online (data) command mode
Fax mode
Voice mode
V.80 Videophone mode
Command Mode
When the modem is powered up, it enters command
mode and is ready to receive AT commands. These
commands can direct the modem to dial a telephone
number, go off-hook to answer an incoming fax, receive
an incoming voice-mail message, and perform other
actions.
Online (Data) Mode
When the modem connects to a remote modem, it
acquires carrier from the remote modem, then
negotiates its error control and data compression
features. At this point, the modem goes online (data
mode) and can transmit data to the remote modem
using the telephone line. In online mode, the modem
can send and receive data, but cannot execute any
command instructions. To be able to execute
commands while online, the modem must be in online
command mode.
3-2
3
Online Command
Mode
When the modem receives the +++ escape sequence (or
a sequence defined by register S2), it enters online
command mode, maintains the data communications
link, but suspends data transmission. At this point,
commands sent to the modem are executed as they
would be in normal command mode. The modem
implements a TIES (time independent escape sequence)
escape sequence. To return to online data mode, use
the ATO<ENTER> command or the ATH<ENTER>
command to disconnect. If you enter an incorrect AT
command while in this mode, the modem automatically
returns to online data mode.
Fax Mode
The Zypcom C-Series modems support Class 1 fax
compatibility. The modem enters this mode via an AT
command (+FCLASS=1) sent by fax software. In
addition, the modem can enter fax mode if the
automatic handshaking detection is enabled. (The
modem determines if the incoming call is a data, fax or
voice call).
Voice Mode
The C-Series modems support industry standard EIA/
TIA IS-101 voice AT commands (+FCLASS=8).
3-3
3
Videophone Mode
In 1996 a new standard adopted by the ITU called
H.324 allows for videophone calls over ordinary
telephone lines. The H.324 standard defines a V.80
modem command set. Zypcom modems that support
V.80 standard allows H.324 compatible videophone
software to operate together. Now with Zypcom you can
see, hear, and talk to remote locations over plain old
telephone lines.
Basics of the AT Command Set
An AT command consists of the AT prefix followed by a
string of command characters. These command
characters, which can be upper- or lower-case but not
both, tell the modem what to do. For example, to dial a
telephone number, type
ATDT1-510-783-2538<ENTER>
OK
AT is the prefix command, D is the dialing command, T
is the dial modifier that enables tone dialing, and 1-510783-2538 is the telephone number to be dialed.
<ENTER> is the end-of-line flag that tells the modem to
process the command entered.
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3
Command
Responses
When you issue an AT command and end of line flag
(<ENTER>) to the modem, your DTE screen should
display an OK message. If the modem does not
recognize a command or command parameter, the
screen displays ERROR. Table 4-x shows the complete
list of messages for both words and digits.
The response messages like OK or ERROR are verbose.
You can select either a verbose or a character message
to be sent by the modem. ATV0 specifies character
response messages; ATV1 specifies verbose response
messages.
AT Command Buffer
When you send the AT<ENTER> command to the
modem, it determines the DTE’s serial port speed and
bits per character. The modem supports these 10-bit
character formats:
q
q
q
q
q
q
8,N,1
7,E,1
7,O,1
7,N,2
7,MARK,1
7,SPACE,1
To clear each command parameter from the command
buffer, do one of the following:
3-5
3
1. Type AT<ENTER> or lower DTR to reset the
command buffer.
2. Use the <BACKSPACE> key to move backward or the
<DELETE> key to erase the last character.
Multiple commands can be entered into the command
buffer. You can control EIA signals, set answer mode,
change speaker volume, select response messages, and
turn off echo all in one command string. If your
command string is longer than 40 characters, an error
message will result.
AT Command Summary
AT commands normally have a number of possible
values. When a command has multiple parameters, the
default is the parameter set at the factory to work with
most applications. Default values for each command
are marked with an asterisk (*).
AT command strings can contain multiple commands in
the same string. These commands are placed after the
AT prefix and before the <ENTER>. Spaces may be used
to separate commands within the string, but no
punctuation is needed except for fax and voice
commands. In a multiple-command line, fax and voice
AT commands must be separated from the following
command by a semicolon (;).
The modem supports the commands listed in this
chapter. AT commands must always begin with the AT
prefix and end with <ENTER>. The only exceptions are
the A/ (Repeat) command or the +++ escape sequence.
When using the AT commands to dial, you may add
spaces, hyphens or periods to enhance readability.
These characters are ignored.
3-6
3
The notion (n) in the command description represents a
numeric option. For example, in the &Dn command, n
is a number from 0 through 3. If you issue a command
without a number, the modem assumes 0. For
example, if you type AT&F, the modem assumes AT&F0.
Table 3-1 shows a list of valid AT commands and
provides a page reference for detailed descriptions of
each command.
TABLE 3-1. AT COMMAND SET–DATA GROUP
COMMAND
A/
A
B
D
E
H
I
L
M
N
O
Q
V
W
X
Y
Z
&C
&D
&F
DESCRIPTION
Re-execute last command
Manual answer
CCITT/Bell compatibility
Dial command
Command character echo
Switch hook control
Memory and firmware status
Speaker volume control
Speaker control
Handshaking
Return to data mode
Result codes transmission
Result codes type
Connection result codes
Basic result codes
Long space disconnect
Recall user-profile
CXR control
DTR control
Recall factory-profile
PAGE
3–9
3–9
3–9
3–10
3–10
3–11
3–11
3–12
3–12
3–12
3–13
3–13
3–13
3–14
3–14
3–16
3–16
3–17
3–17
3–17
3-7
3
&G
&K
&P
&Q
&S
&T
&U
&V
&W
&Y
&Z
%E
%G
-C
+MS
%A
%C
\A
\C
\G
\J
\N
\O
\Q
\T
\U
\X
-J
"H
"O
3-8
Guard tone control
Modem flow control
Pulse dial make/break ratio
Communication protocol
DSR control
Diagnostic tests
Trellis control
Display profiles
Store profile
Power up profile
Store telephone number
Auto retrain control
Rate renegotiation
Generate data calling tone
Modulation control
Auto-reliable abort character
MNP control
MNP block size
Buffer control
Modem port flow control
Speed conversion
Data mode control
Originate reliable link
Serial port flow control
Inactivity timer
Accept reliable link
Xon/off passthrough mode
V.42 detect phase
V.42bis control
V.42bis word length
S-registers
3–18
3–18
3–18
3–19
3–19
3–19
3–20
3–20
3–20
3–21
3–21
3–21
3–21
3-22
3-22
3–24
3–24
3–25
3–25
3–25
3–26
3–26
3–27
3–28
3–28
3–28
3–29
3-29
3-30
3-30
3-30
3
AT Commands For Data Mode
A/ (Repeat Last
Command)
Repeat the last AT command string issued. An "AT"
prefix is not used. Do not terminate this command with
<ENTER>.
A (Manual Answer)
Go off-hook and enter the answer mode. After a few
seconds, the modem will initiate an answer tone.
Bn (Bell/CCITT)
Selects the frequency transmitted by the modem.
COMMAND
B0
B1*
B2
B3
DESCRIPTION
Use CCITT V.22 at 1200 bps, and CCITT
V.21at 300 bps.
Use Bell 212A at 1200 bps, and Bell 103 at
300 bps.
Use CCITT V.23 only. The originating
modem transits at 75 bps (and receives at
1200 bps); the answering modem receives
at 75 bps (and transmits at 1200 bps).
Selects CCITT V.23 only. The originating
modem transmits at 1200 bps (and
receives at 75 bps); the answering modem
receives at 1200 bps (and transmits at 75
bps).
3-9
3
D (Dial)
Instructs the modem to dial a specified telephone
number. The D command has several additional
modifying commands which can be used in conjunction
with the D command.
COMMAND
T
P
,
W
!
@
;
S=n
DESCRIPTION
Selects tone dialing.
Selects pulse dialing.
Inserts a pause of two seconds (or the
value in seconds of register S8).
Causes modem to wait for dial tone for a
period equal to the value of register S6.
Switch hook flash = 0.75 seconds duration.
Waits for 5 seconds of silence before
continuing.
Returns to command mode after dialing.
Dials one of the four stored telephone
numbers (each with a maximum of 30
characters), i.e., DS=n, where n = locations
0 through 3.
En (Echo
Command)
Controls whether or not the modem echoes the AT
commands, which is what allows one to see A7 on the
PC or terminal screen. The default setting for echo is
enabled. (Note: modem will not echo characters in
online command mode).
COMMAND
E0
E1*
3-10
DESCRIPTION
Disables command echo from the modem.
Enables command echo from the modem.
3
Hn (Switch Hook
Control)
Makes the modem pick-up or hang-up the line,
depending on the numerical notion that follows H.
COMMAND
H0
H1
DESCRIPTION
Hang-up the telephone line.
Pick-up the telephone line.
In (Memory Status)
Shows information about the read-only memory (ROM),
the firmware revision level, and the revision levels of the
data pump.
COMMAND
I0
I1
I2
I3
I4
I5
I6
I7
I8
I10
I11
DESCRIPTION
Reports product code.
Reports modem chip firmware version.
Verifies ROM checksum.
Reports device set name.
Reserved
Reserved for modem chip hardware
configuration
Country code
Reserved
Reserved
Modem board configuration
Modem board configuration
3-11
3
Ln (Volume Control)
Sets the speaker volume when the speaker is on.
COMMAND
L0,1
L2*
L3
DESCRIPTION
Low volume
Medium volume
High volume
Mn (Speaker
Control)
Controls operation of the speaker setting. M2 is great
for troubleshooting frequently foiled modem
handshakes.
COMMAND
M0
M1*
M2
M3
DESCRIPTION
Speaker off.
Speaker on until modem detects the carrier
signal.
Speaker is always on when modem is offhook.
Speaker off during dialing, on until modem
carrier present.
Nn (Negotiate
Handshake)
Selects whether a connection will be forced to the speed
selected by +MS command or allowed to negotiate the
highest common speed possible.
COMMAND
N0
N1*
3-12
DESCRIPTION
Handshake only at the data rate specified
by the +MS command.
Begin handshake at the +MS command
data rate and fall to the highest common
data rate.
3
NOTE: The port speed must always be higher
than the highest possible line rate (i.e., 38,400 or
higher). A port speed of 19,200 will cause the
maximum line rate to be 19,200 even if both
modems support 56,000 bps.
On (Return to Data
Mode)
Returns to data mode from online command mode (+++).
COMMAND
O0
O1
DESCRIPTION
Returns modem to data mode.
Retrains equalizer and then returns to data
mode.
Qn (Result Codes)
Defines whether or not the modem will issue result
codes to the DTE during normal operation. These codes
can cause confusion to some host computer
applications and may need to be disabled.
COMMAND
Q0*
Q1
DESCRIPTION
Enables modem result codes.
Disables modem result codes.
Vn ( Result Codes
Type)
Selects whether modem response codes are in numeric
or verbose form.
COMMAND
V0
V1*
DESCRIPTION
Enables short-form result codes (Numeric).
Enables long-form result code (Text).
3-13
3
Wn (Connection
Result Codes)
Selects whether the modem sends the DTE independent
modem connection result codes for speed, error control
protocol, or data compression.
COMMAND
W0*
W1
W2
W3
W4
DESCRIPTION
Reports DTE port speeds.
Reports DTE port speed.
Reports DCE line speed.
Reports DTE speed, modulation, protocol,
data compression, receive/transmit line
speeds.
Reports protocol and line speed.
Xn (Result Code)
Defines the type of result codes to be returned to the
DTE.
COMMAND
X0
X1
X2
X3
X4*
3-14
DESCRIPTION
Enables result codes 0-4; disables
detection of busy and dial tone.
Enables result codes 0-5, 10 and above;
disables busy and dial tone detection.
Enables result codes 0-6, 10 and above;
disables busy detection and enables dial
tone detection.
Enables result codes 0-5, 7, 10 and above;
enables busy detection and disables dial
tone detection.
Enables result codes 0-7, 10 and above;
enables busy and dial tone detection.
3
TABLE 4-1
MODEM RESULT CODES
WORDS
DIGITS X0
CONNECT
1
Y
RING
2
Y
NO CARRIER
3
Y
ERROR
4
Y
CONNECT 1200
5
N
NO DIAL TONE
6
N
BUSY
7
N
CONNECT 75/1200 23
N
CONNECT 1200/75 22
N
CONNECT 2400
10
N
CONNECT 4800
11
N
CONNECT 7200
24
N
CONNECT 9600
12
N
CONNECT 12000
25
N
CONNECT 14400
13
N
CONNECT 16800
59
N
CONNECT 19200
14
N
CONNECT 24000
62
N
CONNECT 26400
63
N
CONNECT 28800
64
N
CONNECT 31200
65
N
CONNECT 33600
66
N
CONNECT 38400
28
N
CONNECT 57600
N
Y
CONNECT 115200
31
N
FAX
33
N
DATA
35
N
RINGBACK
45
N
Y=Message is Enabled
N=Message is Disabled
TABLE 4-1 CONTINUED
X1
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
N
N
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
MODEM RESULT CODES
X2
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
N
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
X3
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
N
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
X4
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
N
Y
Y
Y
Y
3-15
3
WORDS
CONNECT 36000
CONNECT 33333
CONNECT 37333
CONNECT 38400
CONNECT 41333
CONNECT 42666
CONNECT 44000
CONNECT 45333
CONNECT 46666
CONNECT 48000
CONNECT 49333
CONNECT 50666
CONNECT 52000
CONNECT 53333
CONNECT 54666
CONNECT 56000
CONNECT 57333
3-16
DIGITS X0
32
N
33
N
34
N
28
N
35
N
36
N
37
N
38
N
39
N
42
N
43
N
53
N
54
N
55
N
56
N
57
N
58
N
X1
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
X2
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
X3
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
X4
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
3
Yn (Long Space
Disconnect)
Some computer systems end a data session by sending
or receiving a continuous break signal. This capability
only works when the modem is online with no error
control. When the long space disconnected is enabled,
the modem detects the incoming break and signals the
remote modem to hang up.
COMMAND
Y0*
Y1
DESCRIPTION
Disables Long Space Disconnect.
Enables Long Space Disconnect.
The modem disconnects when it receives 1.6 or more
seconds of a continuous break signal. In addition,
when the modem receives a break signal from the DTE,
it transmits 4 seconds of break signal to the remote
modem before hanging up.
Zn (Recall Stored
Profile)
Recalls one of the four user-specified profiles and loads
it into the modem's active configuration.
COMMAND
Z0
Z1
DESCRIPTION
Resets modem and recalls user profile 0.
Resets modem and recalls user profile 1.
&Cn (CXR Control)
Determines how the modem handles CXR on the DTE
interface. Most computers operate with CXR set to
follow true carrier from the remote modem. Most
terminals operate with CXR forced on; some answerside host computers operate with the CXR port
contender option.
3-17
3
COMMAND
&C0
&C1*
DESCRIPTION
CXR always on.
CXR follows true carrier.
&Dn (DTR Control)
Determines how DTR is interpreted by the modem. &D
operates differently in asynchronous and synchronous
communication and also works in conjunction with
register S25 in asynchronous communication.
COMMAND
&D0
&D1
&D2*
&D3
DESCRIPTION
In async mode, modem ignores DTR.
Modem switches to command mode when
DTR switches from on-to-off.
When DTR switches on-to-off, the modem
goes on-hook and disables auto-answer
mode; when DTR switches off-to-on, autoanswer is enabled.
Turning off DTR hangs up the on-line
modem and resets (ATZ) the modem to the
default stored profile.
&F (Load Factory
Profile)
Loads the factory default setting for each command into
the active profile. AT&F&W0 loads the factory defaults
into stored profile 0.
&Gn (Guard Tone
Control)
Defines how the modem will handle guard tone. Guard
3-18
3
tone is a frequency generated by the answer-side
modem.
COMMAND
&G0*
&G1
&G2
DESCRIPTION
Disables guard tone.
Enables 550-Hz guard tone.
Enables 1800-Hz guard tone.
&Kn (Flow Control)
Specifies the DTE-to-modem flow control. Software flow
control uses the characters XOFF and XON to stop and
start data transmission, respectively, both to and from
the DTE. Bidirectional hardware flow control uses RTS/
CTS to stop and start data from the modem.
COMMAND
&K0
&K3*
&K4
DESCRIPTION
Disables flow control.
Bidirectional hardware flow control
Xon/Xoff software flow control
&Pn (Pulse/dial
Ratio)
Determines the make/break (that is, off-hook/on-hook)
ratio during pulse dialing.
COMMAND
&P0*
&P1
DESCRIPTION
Sets 10-pps with 39/61% make-break.
Sets 10-pps with 33/67% make-break.
&Q0
(Communication
Protocol Control)
The modem is always in asynchronous mode. The &M0
command is also supported and represents the same
3-19
3
function as &Q0. Use the \Nn command to specify
which error control protocol is used during a
connection.
&Sn (DSR Control)
Controls how the modem treats the DSR signal.
COMMAND
&S0*
&S1
DESCRIPTION
DSR is always active.
DSR is active only during handshaking and
when carrier is lost.
&Tn (Diagnostic
Tests)
Used to initiate and terminate loopback tests for testing
modem-to-modem and DTE-to-modem data
communication integrity.
COMMAND
&T0
&T1
&T4
&T5
&T6
&T7
3-20
DESCRIPTION
Terminates test in progress.
Initiates Local Analog Loopback.
Grants RDL request from remote modem.
Denies RDL request from remote modem.
Initiates Remote Digital Loopback.
Initiates Remote Digital Loopback with selftest
3
&T8
Initiates Local Analog Loopback with selftest.
&Un (Trellis
Control)
Selects whether the modem transmits or receives
modulated 9600 bps carrier with QAM or Trellis
encoding for V.32.
COMMAND
&U0*
&U1
DESCRIPTION
Enables Trellis coding with QAM as
fallback.
QAM modulation only
&Vn (Display Stored
Profiles)
Causes the modem to display its current configuration
as well as other stored profiles and telephone numbers.
COMMAND
&V0
&V1
DESCRIPTION
View active profile and stored profile 0
View active profile and stored profile 1
&Wn (Store Profile)
Enables the modem's active configuration to be written
to a user-stored profile in nonvolatile memory.
COMMAND
&W0
&W1
DESCRIPTION
Store in user profile 0.
Store in user profile 1.
&Yn (Power Up
Profile)
Recall a user-stored profile into the active configuration
upon power-up.
3-21
3
COMMAND
&Y0*
&Y1
DESCRIPTION
Recall stored profile 0 on power-up
Recall stored profile 1 on power-up
&Zn=x (Store
Telephone Numbers)
Stores telephone number x in location n, where n=0
through 3. The maximum length of each stored
telephone number is 68 characters (including the
automatic logon sequence). Storing telephone numbers
with this command retains them in the modem's
memory even during power loss.
COMMAND
&Zn=x
&Zn?
DESCRIPTION
Stores telephone number x to nonvolatile
memory location n (where n=0 through 3)
Displays the telephone number stored in
memory location n
%En (Auto-retrain
Control)
Controls the retraining in V.22bis (2400bps) and V32/
V.32bis (14.4K to 4.8Kbps) modes only. The retraining
at higher speed is automatically manually controlled by
AT01&R.
COMMAND
%E0
%E1*
DESCRIPTION
Disables auto-retrain.
Enables auto-retrain.
%Gn ( Rate
Renegotiation)
Selects whether the modem automatically initiates a
change to a higher speed or lower speed depending on
received signal quality (that is, rate renegotiation). The
3-22
3
modem always responds to any rate change initiated by
the remote modem.
COMMAND
%G0
%G1*
DESCRIPTION
Disabled
Enabled
-Cn (Generate Data
Calling Tone)
Allows the DTE to select whether the modem sends a
1300-Hz calling tone or V.8 calling tone when
originating a data modem connection.
COMMAND
-C0*
-C1
-C2
DESCRIPTION
Calling tone disabled.
1300-Hz calling tone enabled.
V.8 calling tone and 1300-Hz calling tone
+MS=m (Modulation
Control)
The +MS command controls the modulation used on a
connection. It also controls whether or not automode is
used, as well as the maximum and minimum carrier
data rates (line speed) on the connection. Default is
+MS=Vx2, 1, 300, 0;B1
+MS=<carrier>,<automode>,<min rate>, <max rate>;Bn
Valid carrier parameters are: Vx2, V34B, V34BS, V34,
V34S, V32B, V32, V22B, V22C, V22, V21.
V34BS and V34S parameters set symmetrical line rates
for both transmit and receive. V34B and V34 allow for
asymmetrical data rates on transmit and receive. Vx2
is for 53,333 to 33,333 on receive side and 31,200 to
4800 on transmit side. V34B or V34BS is for 33600 to
3-23
3
2400. V34 or V34S is for 28800 to 2400. V32B is for
14400 to 7200. V32 is for 9600 and 4800. V22B is for
2400 and 1200. V22 is for 1200. V21 is for 300.
Automode allows the modem to find the highest
common speed for each connection given the line
conditions encountered by the modem. This parameter
is also controlled by the Nn command. 0 is automode
disabled and 1 is automode enabled.
The minimum line rate parameter specifies the lowest
data rate at which the modem will establish a
connection. Allowable parameters are: 33600, 31200,
28800, 26400, 24000, 21600, 19200, 16800, 14400,
12000, 9600, 7200, 4800, 2400, 1200 and 300. A
setting of 0 is the same as the lowest setting for any
given modulation method.
The maximum line rate parameter specifies the highest
data rate at which the modem will establish a
connection. Allowable parameters are: 57,333*,
56,000*, 54,666*, 53,333, 52,000, 50,666, 49,333,
48,000, 46,666, 45,333, 44,000, 42,666, 41,333,
37,333, 36,000, 33,333, 33600, 31200, 28800, 26400,
24000, 21600, 19200, 16800, 14400, 12000, 9600,
7200, 4800, 2400, 1200 and 300. A setting of 0 is the
same as the highest setting for any given modulation
method.
The Bn command is used to control Bell or CCITT
modulation at 1200 and 300bps.
* NOTE: Current download speeds are limited to 53,333
bps due to FCC rules that restrict modem power output.
3-24
3
+MS Examples (DTE speed is 115200):
Set 21600 as max rate +MS=V34B,1,0,21600;B1
Set 9600 as min rate +MS=V34B,1,9600,0
Set 28800 only +MS=V34,1,28800,28800
Set 9600 to 300 only +MS=V32,1,0,0;B1
Set 9600 to 4800 only +MS=V32,0,0,0
Set 33600 to 9600 +MS=V34B,1,9600,33600
ERROR CONTROL AND COMPRESSION COMMANDS
Your modem supports two types of error correction
(MNP 2-4 and V.42) and data compression (MNP5 and
V.42bis). V.42 error correction uses LAPM as the
primary error-control protocol and uses MNP2-4 as an
alternative. V.42bis data compression requires V.42 in
order to operate. MNP5 requires MNP2-4 in order to
operate. The supported V.42bis/MNP AT commands are
listed below.
%An (Auto-reliable
Abort Character)
Sets the ASCII character (from 0 to 127) that, if sent
during an error control negotiation, aborts error control
negotiation and causes the modem to return to
standard (buffered) asynchronous communication.
COMMAND
%An
DESCRIPTION
Defines auto-reliable abort character,
where n=character 0 through 127.
Default=13.
3-25
3
%Cn (MNP 5 Control)
Controls whether the data sent during the MNP frame is
compressed using MNP Class 5 compression standard.
COMMAND
%C0
%C1*
DESCRIPTION
No compression
Enables MNP 5 data compression.
\An (MNP Block
Size)
Specifies the maximum number of data bytes in an MNP
data frame. A smaller frame size may improve
throughput on high-impairment (noisy) telephone lines.
COMMAND
\A0
\Al
\A2
\A3*
DESCRIPTION
64 characters (uses for cellular
connections)
128 characters
192 characters
256 characters
\Cn (Buffer Control)
In auto-reliable mode (\N3), determines the fallback
method and enables data buffering. The settings for
this command are used by the modem during the V.42
detection phase.
COMMAND
\C0*
\C2
3-26
DESCRIPTION
No data buffering
No buffering. Connects non-V.42 modems
to V.42 modem.
3
\Gn (Modem Port
Flow Control)
Used for special cases when a non-error controlled, nonbuffered modem calls a modem operating in buffered
mode.
COMMAND
\G0*
\G1
DESCRIPTION
Disables port flow control.
Sets port flow control to XON/XOFF.
\Jn (Speed
Conversion)
If enabled, the serial port speed automatically changes
to the modem-connection speed. This forces the user to
change the DTE-to-modem bps rate, if needed. If
disabled, the serial port speed is independent of the
connection speed, which allows much greater
throughput when using error correction and data
compression.
COMMAND
\J0*
\J1
DESCRIPTION
Disables speed conversion.
Enables speed conversion.
\Nn (Data Mode
Control)
If auto-reliable is selected, then the modem will go to
non-error control with buffering if error control cannot
be negotiated. If a force error control option (V.42,
MNP, or V.42 and MNP) is selected and cannot be
negotiated, then the modem will hang-up the call. If
non-error control (normal mode) is selected, then the
modem will not attempt to connect in V.42 or MNP
mode. The %Cn, "Hn, and -J1 commands will also
affect the operation of error control and data
compression.
3-27
3
COMMAND
\N0
\N1
\N2
\N3*
\N4
DESCRIPTION
Normal data mode with buffering
Normal data mode with buffering
Force MNP reliable only mode
V.42/MNP auto-reliable mode
Force V.42 or MNP reliable only mode
Error control and data compression examples:
V42bis, MNP5, V42, MNP2-4 or BUFFER mode:
\N3 "H3 %C1
V42bis, V42, MNP2-4 or hang-up:
\N4 %C0 "H3 -J1
V42bis or hang-up:
\N4 "H3 -J0
V42 or hang-up:
\N4 "H0 -J0
MNP5, MNP2-4 or hang-up:
\N2 %C1
MNP2-4 or hang-up:
\N2 %C0
\O (Originate
Reliable Link)
Issue this command when you need the modem to go to
an MNP error controlled connection from a non-error
controlled connection. This command works in
conjunction \U which is for the accept side.
3-28
3
\Qn (Serial Port
Flow Control)
Specifies the DTE-to-modem flow control. Software flow
control uses the XOFF command to stop and the XON
characters to start data transmission, both to and from
the DTE. Unidirectional hardware flow control uses the
CTS control line to stop or start data from the DTE only,
while bidirectional hardware flow control also uses the
RTS control to stop or start data from the modem.
COMMAND
\Q0
\Q1
\Q2
\Q3*
DESCRIPTION
Disables flow control.
XON/XOFF software flow control
Unidirectional hardware flow control
Bidirectional hardware flow control
\Tnn (Inactivity
timer)
Is measured in minutes and has a range of from 0
(disable timer) to 90 minutes. If \T1 to \T90 is selected
and there is no receive or transmit data for that period,
then the modem will hang-up the connection.
COMMAND
\T0*
\T1-90
DESCRIPTION
Disable timer
Length in minutes
\U (Accept Reliable
Link)
Issue this command when you need the modem to go to
an MNP error controlled connection from a non-error
controlled connection. This command works in
conjunction \O which is for the originate side.
3-29
3
\Xn (XON/XOFF
pass-through)
If software flow control is enabled (\Q1), this command
defines whether the XON (11h) and XOFF (13h)
characters received from the DTE are sent to the remote
modem. If the modem port flow control is enabled (\G1)
in normal mode, this command specifies whether the
XON and XOFF characters received from the remote
modem are sent to the DTE. In both cases, flow control
operation is not affected.
COMMAND
\X0*
\X1
DESCRIPTION
Processes flow control characters.
Processes flow control characters and
passes them through.
-Jn (V.42 Detect
Phase)
In V.42 modes (\N3, \N4), specifies whether the modem
detects V.42, MNP, or no error-correcting protocols from
the remote modem and changes to the appropriate
mode. Otherwise, only V.42 is attempted.
COMMAND
-J0
-J1*
DESCRIPTION
Disables the V.42 detect phase.
Enables the V.42 detect phase.
"Hn (V.42bis
Control)
Specifies whether the data in the LAPM frames are
compressed using V.42 bis data compression.
Compression can be negotiated to operate in one
direction or both.
COMMAND
3-30
DESCRIPTION
3
"H0
"H1
"H2
"H3*
Disables V.42 bis.
Enables V.42 bis only when transmitting
data.
Enables V.42 bis only when receiving data.
Enables V.42 bis for both transmitting and
receiving data.
"On (V.42bis Word
Length)
This command sets the maximum number of characters
that can be compressed into one V.42bis word. The
default is 32 bytes. The range is 6 to 250 characters.
S-REGISTER
The C-Series modem has 30 status registers, commonly
referred to as S-registers, which can be used to control
specific modem functions. S-registers are memory
locations that hold values for various parameters. For
example, S-registers are counters, timers, and specific
ASCII characters used to configure and operate the
modem. S-registers impact the way a variety of modem
settings operate. S-registers control options that
determine the manner in which the modem dials, what
features and speeds the modem will negotiate with
remote modems, and how and when the call will
disconnect.
There are four different types of S-registers:
3-31
3
q
q
q
q
Storable
Bit-mapped
Reserved
Read only
A storable S-register is one whose value can be
permanently saved with the &W<ENTER> command (see
Table 6-1). Bit-mapped registers contain the values of
multiple commands. Reserved registers and read only
registers should never be written to.
The content of storage registers can be changed using
the ATSn=x command, where "n" is the register number
and "x" is the value to be stored. The contents of the Sregisters can be read using the ATSn? command. Each
S-register that is storable will have a default value and a
range that can be set.
Auto Answer (S0=0255)
Register S0 controls the auto-answer option. S0=0
disables auto answering, and S0=n (where n can be a
value from 1 through 255) specifies the number of rings
before the modem automatically answers an incoming
call. (DTR must be on.) When S0 is not set to 0, the AA
LED is on, on the modem’s front panel. Default = 0.
Ring Count
(S1)*
Register S1 counts the number of rings the modem
receives during an incoming call. When S1 matches the
value set for S0, the modem answers the call. S1 resets
to 0 if no ring occurs for 8 seconds. Default = 0.
3-32
3
CAUTION: An asterisk (*) next to the S-registers
in this section indicates that it is read only.
Escape Character
(S2=0-128)
Register S2 defines an ASCII character as the escape
character. Default = 43 (ASCII +).
Return Character
(S3=0-127)
Register S3 defines the end-of-line character. Upon
receiving this character, the modem executes a
command line. The end-of-line character is also
appended to response messages. Default = 13 (ASCII CR
or <ENTER> on a keyboard).
Line Feed Character
(S4=0-127)
Register S4 defines the ASCII character that follows the
carriage return when the modem is set to give verbose
(word) responses (V1). Default = 10 (ASCII LF).
Backspace
Character
(S5=0-32,127)
Register S5 defines the ASCII character used as the
backspace character. The backspace character causes
the cursor to move backwards in a line, deleting the
characters. If the backspace character is set to a value
between ASCII 33 and 127 or a value greater than 127,
the modem does not recognize it. Default = 8 (ASCII
backspace).
3-33
3
Dial Tone Delay
(S6=2-255)
Register S6 determines how long the modem will wait
after going off-hook before dialing the telephone
number. The S6 register is in effect when the X
command is set to 0, 1 or 3. When the X command is
equal to 2 or 4, this register is ignored. Also, since the
W modifier overrides S6, the modem will wait the length
of the failed call timer (S7) for dial tone when the W
modifier is part of the dial command string. Default = 2
(seconds).
Wait Time for
Carrier/Silence
(S7=1-255)
Register S7 controls the wait time for carrier or wait
time for silence. If the at sign (@) is used in the dialing
command string, register S7 also controls the wait time
for silence; otherwise, after dialing a call, the modem
must receive a valid carrier signal within the specified
wait time. If carrier is not received within that specified
wait time, the modem sends a NO CARRIER message to
the DTE. Register S7 is also active when the modem
answers a call. This register should be set to at least 90
for international calls. Default = 60 (seconds).
Comma Delay
(S8=0-255)
Register S8 determines the length of the delay of the
pause command (,). For every comma in the dialing
command string, the modem looks at the S8 register
and pauses for that value in seconds. Default = 2
(seconds).
3-34
3
Valid Carrier Detect
(S9=1-255)
Register S9 sets the amount of time that carrier must
be received before it is determined to be a valid signal.
Each number between 1 and 255 represents the
number of tenths of a second that the modem must see
carrier before responding to it. Default = 6 (0.6
seconds).
Lost Carrier
Disconnect
(S10=1-255)
Register S10 determines the amount of time the modem
must wait to disconnect after losing carrier from the
remote modem. If carrier remains absent for the time
specified by the S10 register, the modem disconnects
the call and responds with a NO CARRIER message to
the DTE. Each number between 1 and 255 represents
the number of tenths of a second that the modem must
wait before beginning the disconnect sequence. Cellular
connections normally require register S10 to be set to at
least 50. Default = 14 (1.4 seconds).
Touch Tone Timer
(S11=50-255)
Register S11 controls the length of time that touch
tones (telephone numbers) are transmitted by the
modem. The default value is set to the telephone
company’s standard. Each number between 50 and 255
represents the number of milliseconds that the tone will
be sent. Default = 70 (0.070 seconds).
3-35
3
Guard Time (S12=0255)
Register S12 controls the amount of time, after receiving
three escape characters, that must elapse before
entering on-line command mode and sending the OK
message to the DTE. Default = 50 (1 second).
S13 Reserved
N/A
S14 Bit-mapped
N/A
S15 Reserved
N/A
S16 Bit-mapped
N/A
S17 Reserved
N/A
Test Duration
(S18=0-255)
Register S18 sets the duration of the modem’s
diagnostic tests. When S18 is set to 0, the test
continues indefinitely until stopped by the operator. To
manually stop a test, enter the +++ escape sequence,
and from online command mode issue an
AT&T0<ENTER> command or ATH<ENTER>. Default =
0 (indefinite).
3-36
3
S19 Reserved
N/A
S20 Reserved
N/A
S21 Bit-mapped
N/A
S22 Bit-mapped
N/A
S23 Bit-mapped
N/A
S24 Reserved
N/A
DTR Detect Time
(S25=0-255)
Register S25 determines the amount of time the modem
will wait before detecting a change in the DTR signal.
Default = 5 (0.05 seconds).
S27 Bit-mapped
N/A
3-37
3
Inactivity Timer
(S30=0-255)
Register sets the length of time (in minutes) that the
modem stays online before disconnecting when no data
is transmitted or received between the DTE and modem.
Default = 0 (minutes).
S31 Bit-mapped
N/A
Max Line Speed
(S37=0-19)
Register selects maximum line speed to be attempted.
Note that the +MS command also controls this
capability. If you want to limit the maximum data rate
at which the modem will begin to handshake, this
command is easier to use than the more robust +MS
command.
0 = DTE Rate
1 = Reserved
2 = Reserved
3 = 300
4 = Reserved
5 = 1200
6 = 2400
7 = 4800
8 = 7200
9 = 9600
10 = 12,200
11 = 14,400
3-38
3
12 = 16,800
13 = 19,200
14 = 21,600
15 = 24000
16 = 26,400
17 = 28,800
18 = 31,200
19 = 33,600
20 = x2
36,000
21 = x2
33,333
22 = x2
37,333
23 = x2
41,333
24 = x2
42,666
25 = x2
44,000
26 = x2
45,333
27 = x2
46,666
28 = x2
48,000
29 = x2
49,333
30 = x2
50,666
31 = x2
52,000
32 = x2
53,333
33 = x2
54,666**
34 = x2
56,000**
35 = x2
57,333**
**NOTE: Current download speeds are limited to
53,333 bps due to FCC rules that restrict modem
power output.
3-39
3
3-40
CHAPTER
4
Troubleshooting
General
A
lthough the modem’s default option settings are
suitable for most PC computers, a default option
setting can cause problems if it is incorrect for
your application. You can resolve many problems by
first checking the following settings on your computer
(DTE), making sure that the modem is set to match the
DTE:
q Data and parity (7/odd, 7/even, or 8/none)
q Terminal speed (115200 or 57600 or 38400)
q Correct COM port is selected (Z34-SC - DTR LED
on)
q Local echo setting on PC terminal is set to off.
q Hardware flow control (RTS/CTS) is on for both
PC/terminal and modem.
q Make sure the modem card is fully inserted in
the expansion slot (Z34-PC).
q Make sure a serial model cable connects your
PC/terminal to the modem.
q Make sure the modem has the RTS and DTR
LED's on.
q Check the telephone line to be sure it is
connected to the modem (Z34-SC – WALL jack;
Z34-PC – LINE jack).
4
q Check telephone line with a regular phone to
make sure dialtone is present.
q Are speakers connected to the SPKR jack (Z34PC)?
q Is the MIC connected to the MIC jack (Z34-PC)?
q SuperVoice has been set up to use MIC and
speakers for input/output settings, not for
telephone handset.
If you encounter basic communication problems (cannot
dial, answer, or connect), run through the
troubleshooting procedures and attempt to isolate the
source of your trouble.
Basic Communication Problems
The modem comes with PC software that will help you
to troubleshoot communication problems. Install the
SuperVoice software on your computer. If you do not
have a Windows PC, use another compatible
communications package that has a terminal
emulation mode (TTY or VT100), which is sometimes
called a direct connect mode.
To start troubleshooting, double click on the
SuperTerminal icon and set up the
Setting|Communication parameters. Set Baud Rate to
57600, Init string #1 to AT&F&C1, COM Port to the
correct one, Data Bits to 8, Parity to none, Stop bits to
one, and Flow Control to hardware. Now click on OK.
Type AT<ENTER>. The AT should be echoed back to the
DTE screen, followed by OK from the modem. If these
characters don’t appear on your screen, try a different
COM Port setting and repeat the instructions above.
4-2
4
NOTE: On the Z34-SC, the DTR LED will be on if
the correct comport is selected.
If still unsuccessful, follow the procedures described
below to determine the problem.
Cable Connections
1. Check that the modem and computer or terminal
are plugged in and turned on. When the modem
has power and the correct COM port is selected, the
DTR and RTS LEDs are on (Z34-SC only).
2. Check the modem cable. Make sure it is specifically
wired for your DTE. Normally any modem cable
would require pins 1 through 8, 20, and 22, and
would be a straight-through cable (where pin 1 goes
to pin 1 on each end).
3. Check the connectors at both ends of the cable.
Make sure they are firmly attached and the screws
are tightened.
4. Verify that the modem is connected to the serial port
on your terminal or computer with your
communications software. Normally terminals and
PCs for a selected port will have DTR and RTS on.
For example, if you set your modem software for
COM1 and the modem’s DTR LED is not on, your
modem is probably attached to COM2. If your DTR
LED is on, but the RTS LED is off, you need another
serial cable--one with the RTS lead in it.
4-3
4
Terminal or
Computer Settings
These are the most common problems involving
terminal or computer settings:
1. Check that your computer or terminal operates at a
speed the modem can handle: 115,200, 57,600,
38,400, 19,200, 9,600, 4,800, 2,400, 1,200 and 300
bps. Do not set your PC/terminal for 33,600,
28,800 or 14,400 bps.
2. Make sure that your terminal or communications
software is set for 10 bits per character. The total of
the data bits, parity bit, and the start and stop bits
must equal 10. The modem automatically
determines speed and parity for 10-bit characters.
The most common settings are:
q 8N1 (8 data bits, no parity, 1 start bit, and 1
stop bit)
q 7E1 (7 data bits, even parity, 1 start bit, and 1
stop bit)
q 7O1 (7 data bits, odd parity, 1 start bit, and 1
stop bit)
3. Type AT<ENTER>. The TXD and RXD LEDs should
reflect some activity by monitarily turning on/off. If
these LEDs show activity when you type
AT<ENTER>, then type AT&F&W<ENTER> or type
AT&V<ENTER>, which should show activity on the
RXD LED.
4-4
4
Other
Communications
Programs
If you are using a different communications software
package, verify that the modem’s software settings
match those of the communications software or
terminal.
1. In the modem’s default setting, CXR is set normal.
Some software packages need CXR to be on. In AT
autodialing, you can control this option using the
AT&Cn command.
2. Check the setting for DSR. The default setting is
forced on, but it can be changed using the AT&Sn
command in AT autodialing.
3. Check the CTS setting. The default setting is forced
on, but it can be changed using the &Rn command
in AT autodialing.
4-5
4
Other Common Problems
DTE Doesn’t Display
When your modem and computer or terminal are
properly connected, the screen should display what you
type. If it doesn’t, enable local echo
ATE1<ENTER>
and type the command blindly (no echoing). If ATE1
was already set, then check to see if the CXR and DSR
LEDs are on (on the Z34-SC). If not, set them on
AT&C0&S0&Wn<ENTER>
Also, check to make sure that the modem cable you
have contains RTS (pin 4) and that the RTS LED is on.
Displays Double
Characters
If the DTE screen doubles every character you type,
then the terminal and modem are both echoing
characters. Try to disable your terminal’s local echo
option. If that’s not possible, then disable the modem's
local echo using the ATE0<ENTER> command.
Program Thinks
Modem is Online
If you receive an ONLINE message somewhere on your
DTE screen but the modem is not online, set the CXR
command to normal setting using the
AT&C1&Wn<ENTER> command (and then store this
command into the communications software’s
initialization string field).
4-6
4
Screen Displays
Unusual Characters
If your DTE screen displays unusual characters while
you are off-line, check the speed setting of your
communications software or terminal and the character
length and parity. To match the software settings to the
modem, type A7 <ENTER> and get the OK message
back.
If you are on-line, a common problem involves error
control. If your modem is set for error control but you
did not complete an error control handshake, you can
see a lot of unusual characters on your screen. Force
error control using the AT\N4<ENTER> command, then
redial the telephone number.
By forcing error control (\N4), the modem will hang-up
the connection if it doesn't successfully negotiate error
control. If this happens several times, then you must
also reduce the maximum handshake speed using
S37=nn. Try 9600, then try faster speeds to determine
the maximum line speed that you can support on your
telephone line.
If your communications software program does not have
the Zypcom or Cirrus Logic modem listed in its modem
setup menu, and it is possible to define a custom
modem, then type the following initialization string:
AT&F0&C1&D2&S1K3&Q0\N3S7=90S0=0
4-7
4
Delays On
Connections
A small amount of character delay is normal for errorcontrolled communication links. Large file transfers
normally call for a communications software file
transfer protocol to be used. Zypcom recommends that
a protocol with large data packets be used, such as
Ymodem-G or Zmodem, for the best data throughput
rates. PPP has delays built in to it as well. However,
these described delays are barely noticeable.
Noticeable and frequent delays can be bothersome and
require some effort to resolve. However, with patience
and a systematic approach to trouble shooting, you can
determine if the modem is the source of your delays or
not. The four-step process covers the following areas:
modem retraining, line speed fallback, and error control
retransmissions.
Step One: System Delays. If the modem gets data with
a lot of delays in it, then the modem is not the problem;
it's the system. Look at the RXD and TXD LEDs. If you
have a consistent on/off pattern, then the data may
have a lot of delay in it. Try another ISP or BBS to see if
delays are across all connections or just with one
source.
4-8
4
Step Two: Modem Retraining. If modem retraining is
the problem, you will be able to determine it easily. Go
into on-line command mode using the escape sequence
(+++) and wait for OK, turn on the speaker (ATM2), then
go back on-line (ATO). Your speaker is always on now.
You can adjust the manual volume control, and you can
tell when a modem does a short or long retrain. During
the retraining, no data can be transmitted; hence,
delays will occur. Some modems will do a retraining
every 10 seconds, which would result in serious delays.
Listen to your connections for 15-30 minutes or so in
order to understand what is occurring relative to
retraining. If you decide there is a problem, you have
four basic solutions:
1. Call another computer to determine if your results
are the same or better. If they are the same, then
choose one of the solutions provided below. If your
results are better, then the problem is the answer
side telephone line, the answer side modem, or your
modem. Call Zypcom technical support to assist
you.
2. However, if the results are the same (lots of modem
retraining), then reduce the maximum line speed
allowed for the modem (use the S37 or +MS
command).
3. Have the phone company provide you with a higher
quality telephone line.
4. Use a Zypcom modem on the answer side as well.
4-9
4
Step Three: Line Speed Changes. Sometimes delays
can result from a series of retrains that reduce the line
speed of the modem. To check the line speed, go into
on-line command mode (+++), wait for OK, send the
ATW3 command, then go back on-line (ATO). Observe
the result messages, particularly the transmit and
receive speeds. The speed will be slow (e.g., 9600) for
noticeable delays to occur. If you decide the line speed
is a problem, you have three basic solutions:
1. Increase the minimum line speed you will allow for
any given connection (+MS command).
2. Have the phone company provide you with a higher
quality telephone line.
3. Use a Zypcom modem on the answer side as well.
Step Four: Error Control Retransmissions. A delay
due to standard error control retransmissions is more
difficult to determine. You cannot interrogate an Sregister directly to find out the number of packets that
have been retransmitted due to errors. Therefore, first
reduce the size of the V.42 packet (AT\A0) in order to
speed up retransmissions when they do occur. Check
to see if improvement has resulted. If not, reset the \A0
command to \A3 and reduce the line speed maximum
by one- or two-speed increments. If no improvement
has resulted, then delays are not due to
retransmissions.
4-10
4
Modem Drops the
Connection
Frequent line drops are normally due to a noisy
telephone line, a low-quality modem at one end of the
connection, or a modem incompatibility between the
modems. If the line or lines are bad, the remedy is
simple. If you experience frequent connection drops,
check to make sure you have the latest code for your
Zypcom modem. Call our BBS (510-783-2580) to get a
new code to reflash your modem, if any. To see if the
line drops are due to a low-quality modem, try another
brand but use the same telephone line. If the problem
goes away when you try another brand, then call
Zypcom technical support and have them check out
your disconnect problem. If the problem does not go
away, then you might try to use your Zypcom modem at
a lower maximum line speed to make it more immune to
line drops.
Modem Fails to
Handshake
The occasional failure to handshake is normally due to
a telephone network problem. A frequent failure to
handshake is normally because the modem failed to
negotiate a carrier or an error control link. In the nocarrier case, the modem will hang-up clearly upon
issuing a "no carrier" message. In the no-error control
case, the modems actually go on-line, but at a speed
that does not allow an error control link to be
successfully negotiated. Hence, errors occur during a
computer session login (particularly with PPP links) and
eventually cause the modems to be hung-up by the PC
software. This kind of problem is usually site specific
(that is, there are no problems with many other
numbers) and is due to some peculiarity in the modems
which are communicating. If the problem is repeatable,
try reducing the maximum line speed (S37).
4-11
4
To see if this is what you are experiencing, reduce the
maximum line speed to a lower number. (Try a real low
number first, for example, 14400.) Then, eventually go
back up to see at what speed the problem occurs.
With this information, you can limit your maximum
connection speed so that error control is always likely to
be successfully negotiated on each call, or you can force
error control on (\N4) in your initialization string and
make multiple calls in order to ensure that the
maximum line speed you have selected will consistently
give you a reliable connection.
Modem Does Not
Answer Incoming
Calls
If the modem does not answer incoming calls,
1. Verify that your terminal or computer supplies DTR.
(The Z34-SC’s DTR LED should be on). If not, force
DTR on. Type
AT&D0&Wn<ENTER>
2. Verify that the Z34-SC's AA LED (automatic answer)
is on. If not, while the modem is in command mode,
type
ATS0=1&Wn<ENTER>
Note that &Wn in the command string writes the
command settings to memory. If you don’t specify
memory location n (where n can be 0 or 1), the modem
assumes 0.
4-12
4
If the modem does not automatically answer when
connected to a minicomputer or mainframe and the
DTR and AA LEDs are on, turn off the echo and
response message options:
ATE0Q1&Wn<ENTER>
In international markets or for modems attached to
PABXs, the ring signal that is generated is different
than the modem expects. If the AA LED doesn't flash on
an incoming ring, then the modem does not recognize
the incoming line signal as a "ring." Call Zypcom
technical support.
Modem Answers
Incoming Calls
If the modem has the AA LED on and DTR LED on, it
will answer all incoming calls. To disable this feature,
set S-Register 0 to 0 and write it to memory. Type
ATS0=0&W<ENTER>
Modem Does Not
Dial
If your DTE displays the NO DIALTONE message, the
modem is not receiving dial tone.
1. Connect a telephone to the back of the modem,
plugging the modular jack into the connector labeled
“PHONE." For the Z34-PC, plug the phone line into
a telephone to check dialtone.
2. Lift the telephone handset. If dial tone is not
present, you probably have a faulty line. Call the
telephone company.
4-13
4
3. If you hear dial tone but the modem does not dial,
change the X command setting from X4 to X1, since
you probably have a nonstandard dial tone.
Modem Dials But
Cannot
Communicate
If the modem dials a telephone number but does not
establish a communication link, something may be
wrong with the remote modem. Refer to the section
entitled "Modem Fails to Handshake."
Modem Dials,
Connects, but No
Data
If the modem connects but you cannot get data from
either modem or from only one modem, it is probably
because the modem has RTS/CTS flow control (&K3)
set, but the modem cable you are using does not have it
installed. To verify this, first set &K0 (no flow control)
on both modems. If data still does not pass, then you
probably have a speed mismatch between the answer
modem and terminal/PC attached to it, or you have a
modem that needs repair. Get another modem cable.
Modem Dials,
Connects, but
Streams Garbage
Characters
If the modem dials, connects to the remote modem,
streams lots of garbage characters on to your screen,
then streams possible hangs up, see previous section
(modem fails to handshake).
4-14
4
Other Frequently Encountered Problems
Does Not Dial
Correctly
Your phone system may require that you obtain an
outside line before dialing. In this case, place the
numeric prefix for the outside line (usually the number
9) before the phone number in your dialing string.
Place a comma immediately after the number 9 in the
dialing string to create a two-second delay at that point
in the dialing. This prevents the modem from dialing
the phone number before the phone system has had
time to connect to an outside line.
The other end could be busy or not answering. Make
sure the number you dialed is correct and test the
number by dialing it on your telephone, not through
your modem. If you are using the modem
internationally, your modem may not recognize the dial
tone in the local country. Try the command ATX3DT
and the telephone number.
Error Message
Make sure you selected the correct modem in your
communications software. If you are typing from the
command line in terminal mode, make sure you typed
correctly. Make sure you are issuing the correct AT
command.
NOTE: Not all modems support the same AT
command set. Check the AT command set in this
manual to ensure that you are using a supported
AT command in your modem's initialization string.
4-15
4
Modem COMM Error
or Modem Not Found
Make sure you have selected the correct COM port in
your communications software setup. Check all the
cable connections and make sure they are secure. In
fax software, make sure you have selected the correct
fax class (Class 1). The port setting in the Control Panel
in Windows may not be set properly.
Modem Would Not
Fax
Make sure you have selected Class 1 as your fax class.
Make sure that you do not have another
communications program open. Be sure you selected
the fax printer in your word processing program.
Fax Not Found
Re-install or re-setup fax software with the modem
installed. The port setting in the Control Panel in
Windows may not be set properly. You may have
connected the phone line, coming from the wall, to the
phone jack on the back of the modem. The phone line,
coming from the wall, must be connected to the Wall or
Line jack.
Windows 95
Installation
Problems
Refer to Chapter Two or Appendix E in this manual.
4-16
4
Technical Support
If you could not solve your problem, please call Zypcom
technical support for assistance. Our number is (510)
783-2501; our hours are 8:00am to 5:00pm PST,
Monday through Friday. Our BBS number is (510) 7832580. Our E-mail address is [email protected] Our
WWW site is zypcom.com.
4-17
4
4-18
APPENDIX
A
Specifications
Chipset
Cirrus Logic CL-MD56xx DSP
Z34-PC
16C550A/16C450 Register Compatible Buffered UART
Z34-PC and Z34-SC
16bit ISA Parallel Bus and Plug and Play Interface
Data Communication Standards
Modulation
Vx2, V.34+, V.34, V.32bis, V.32, V.23, V.22bis, V.22,
V.21 and Bell 12A & 103
Data Rates
57.3K, 56K, 54.6K, 53.3K, 52K, 50.6K, 49.3K, 48K,
46.6K, 45.3K, 44K, 42.6K, 45.3K, 44K, 42.6K, 41.3k,
37.3K, 36K, 33.3K, 33.6K, 31.2K, 28.8K, 26.4K, 24K,
21.6K, 19.2K, 16.8K, 14.4K, 12K, 9600, 7200, 4800,
2400, 1200, and 300 bps
A
Error Control
V.42 and MNP 2-4 error correction
Compression
V.42bis or MNP Class 5
Commands
AT & AT Voice
Data: AT Hayes Compatible
Fax: EIA/TIA 578 Fax Class 1
Voice: EIA/TIA IS-101 compatible
Video: V.80 compatible
Fax Standards
Modulation
ITU-T V.17, V.29, V.27 ter, and V.21 channel 2
Data Rate
14,400, 12,000, 9600, 7200, 4800, 2400, 300 bps
Format
ITU-T T.4 Group 3 Fax
Appendix A-2
A
Handshake
ITU-T T.30 Group 3 Fax
Voice Standards
Voice Sample Rate
11,025, 9600, 8000, 7200, 4800 Hz
Voice Compression
3-bit/4-bit ADPCM
8-bit/16-bit Linear PCM
CL1:8-bit Cirrus A-law
Functional
Caller ID: Formatted and unformatted messages
Automatic Sleep (Power-Down) and Wake-Up
Physical/Electrical/Environmental
Dimensions
Z34-PC: 3.5" x 6.2"
Z34-SC: 1.5"H; 4.5"W; 7.5"L
ROM
Flash memory (see Appendix F)
Appendix A-3
A
S-RAMS
ITU-T 56K bps upgradeable
Cables
7' telephone cable
Connectors
One RJ11 jack for a telephone line connection
Speaker Interface
Minimum load 8 Ohm, maximum load 100 Ohm
Humidity
20-90% (non-condensing)
Temperature
0° to 70° C (32° to 158° F)
Transmit Level
-10 dBm ±1 dB dialup; programmable.
Receive Level
-9 to -43 dBm. Carrier is deactivated at -48dBm or
below.
Appendix A-4
APPENDIX
B
APPENDIX
IS-101 Voice Commands
IS-101 VOICE MODE AT COMMANDS
Your modem implements a voice AT command set that
allows a DTE to record and play back voice messages.
This product is compatible with EIA/TIA IS-101 voice
command set. Supported IS-101 commands and
descriptions are listed below:
+FCLASS=n
Mode selection. Default is 0. Range is 0-1, 8.
n=0, 1, 8
n=0*Data mode
n=1 Class 1 fax mode
n=8 Voice mode enabled
+FLO=n
Flow control select. n = 0 disables flow control, n = 1
enables XON/XOFF, n = 2 enables CTS/RTS. Default is
1.
+VTS=n
DTMF and tone generation command.
B
+VBT=m
Buffer threshold setting. Command sets assert and
deassert threshold points for modem’s transmit buffer.
Default is 192,320.
+VCID=n
Caller ID selection: n = 0 disables Caller ID, n = 1
enables Caller ID formatted, n = 2 enables Caller ID
unformatted. Default is 0.
+VDR=m
Distinctive ring selection (can be disabled by +VEM
command). This command has two parameters which
are separated by a comma. Intervals are in .1 seconds.
Default is 0,0 and the range is 0-255, 0-255.
+VEM=m
Event reporting and masking. This command selects
which detection events are supported in voice mode.
+VGM=n
Speakerphone microphone gain. Default is 128. Range
is 121-131.
+VGR=n
Receive gain selection. Default is 128. Range is 121131.
+VGS=n
Speakerphone speaker gain. Default is 128. Range is
121-131.
Appendix B-2
B
VGT=n
Volume selection for voice playback. Default is 128.
Range is 121-131.
+VIP
This command causes the modem to reset all voice
parameters to the factory default values.
+VIT=n
DTE/DCE inactivity timer. This command sets the
length of time the modem can be inactive in voice mode
before resetting its relays (+VLS=0). This command also
changes back to data mode. Default setting is 0
(disables) and the range is 0-255 seconds.
+VLS=n
Relay/playback control. This command controls the
relays that operate voice playback/record for transmit
and recieve. Default is 0 (DCE on-hook) and the range
is 0-16.
COMMAND
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
DESCRIPTION
DCE on-hook. Local phone (LP) port
connect to telco line.
DCE off-hook. DCE connected to telco.
DCE on-hook. LP connected to DCE.
N/A
Internal speaker connected to DCE. DCE
on-hook. LP connected to telco.
Internal speaker connected to telco. DCE
off-hook. DCE connected to telco.
Internal MIC connected to DCE. DCE onhook. LP connected to telco.
Appendix B-3
B
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
Internal MIC and speaker connected to
telco. Squelching is active. DCE off-hook.
DCE connected to telco.
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
External microphone and external speaker
connected to telco. Squelching active.
DCE off-hook.DCE connected to telco. LP
provided with power to detect hook
condition.
Handset or headset connected to DCE.
DCE on-hook. LP connected to telco.
Handset or headset connected to telco.
DCE connected to telco.
Handset or headset connected to telco with
MIC muted. DCE off-hook.
DCE connected to telco.
+VNH=n
Automatic hang-up control. This command changes the
way the modem responds to hang-up commands after it
switches from voice mode to data/fax modes. Default is
0 (normal hang-up). n=1 modem disables normal
automatic hang-ups. n=2 modem disables all automatic
hang-ups.
Appendix B-4
B
+VRA=n
Ringback-goes-away timer. Command selects the
length of time modem waits between ringbacks before
the DCE assumes the remote party has gone off-hook.
Default is 50. Each increment is .1 seconds; therefore,
default of 50 is 5.0 seconds. Range is 0-50.
+VRN=n
Ringback-never-appeared timer. This command sets
length of time modem waits for ringback when
originating a call in voice mode. If timer times out, an
ERROR message is sent. If ringback is detected before
timeout, an OK is sent. Default is 10 (seconds). Range
is 0-255.
+VRX
Record mode. This command causes the modem to
enter record mode to record voice messages.
+VSD=m
Silence detection. This command allows the DTE to set
two parameters: <sds> which reports the sensitivity for
silence detection, and <sdi> which reports the length of
silence detected. The format is m=<sds>,<sdi>. Default
is 128,50. The <sds> range is 121 to 131. The <sdi>
range is 0 to 255 (.1 seconds), with 0 disabling the
silence detection.
Appendix B-5
B
+VSM=m
Compression method selection. This command contains
four parameters that specify the voice compression
method, voice sampling rate, silence compression
sensitivity, and degree of silence expansion. The
format is m=<cml>,<vsr>,<scs>,<sel>. Default is 140,
8000,0,0.
<CML>COMMAND DESCRIPTION
0
LIN 1: 8bit linear PCM
1
LIN 2: 16bit linear PCM
2
AD 4: 4bit adaptive differential PCM
(ADPCM)
140*
CL 1: Cirrus A-law
141
AD 3: 3bit ADPCM
<VSR>COMMAND DESCRIPTION
4800
4800 samples per second
7200
7200 samples per second
8000*
8000 samples per second
9600
9600 samples per second
11025
11025 samples per second
<SCS>COMMAND DESCRIPTION
0*
Disables DCE silence compression
n=1+
Increments of one second. Raises noise
detection threshold.
<SEL>COMMAND DESCRIPTION
0
DCE ignores the <sel> parameter
n=1+
Increments of one second. Sets the
maximum period of silence the DCE
expands a period of silence compressed by
the <scs> parameter.
Appendix B-6
B
+VSP=n
Speakerphone on/off control. This command turns the
speakerphone mode on (n=1) and off (n=0).
#VSPS=n
Speakerphone type selection. This command
determines which type of speakerphone is used when
the modem receives a +VSP command. If n=0,
telephone emulation mode is selected. If n=1, digital
speakerphone is used.
+VTD=n
Beep tone duration timer. This command sets the
DTMF duration. Default is 100. Each increment is .01
seconds; therefore, default of 100 is 1 second. The
range is 5-255.
+VTS=m
DTMF and tone generation. This command causes the
modem to generate DTMF tones or pulse tones in voice
mode.
+VTX
Play mode. This command causes the modem to start
voice transmission (playback mode) and play back a
recorded voice message.
NOTE: Do not increase SuperVoice's
speakerphone volume-in or volume-out above the
75-percent mark; otherwise, frequent
speakerphone feedback will occur, which reduces
usability of this feature.
Appendix B-7
B
Appendix B-8
APPENDIX
C
Fax Commands
FAX CLASS 1 AT COMMANDS
Your modem implements the EIA-578 data/fax Class 1
AT command set standard. This AT command set
allows a DTE (with Class 1 communication software)
and a Zypcom C-Series modem to communicate with
group 3 fax machines. The fax identity and test
commands are listed below.
Fax Identity Commands
These commands are used by fax software to identify
the modem and its capabilities.
+FMFR?
Identifies modem manufacturer
+FMDL?
Identifies product model
+FMI?
Identifies modem manufacturer
+FMM?
Identifies product model
C
+FMR?
Identifies product version number
+FREV?
Identifies product version number
Fax Class 1 AT Commands
+FCLASS=n
Mode selection default=0. Settings: 0, 1, 8, 80. The
DTE can be 300 to 115200 bps when +FCLASS=0.
When +FCLASS=1, the DTE should be set to 19200 bps.
Setting to 8 selects IS-101 voice mode.
+FRH=n
Receives HDLC data type. The only setting for this
command is 3.
+FRM=n
Selects receive data modulation. Modulation standards
followed by ST represent short training. Settings are 24
(V.27ter/2400), 48 (V.27ter/4800), 72 (V.29/7200), 73
(V.17/7200), 74 (V.17ST/7200), 96 (V.29/9600), 97
(V.17/9600), 98 (V.17ST/9600), 121 (V.17/12200), 122
(V.17ST/12200), 145 (V.17/14400) and 146 (V.17ST/
14400). This command is normally controlled by fax
Class 1 software.
+FRS=n
Controls the amount of time in .01seconds that the
modem will wait for silence before sending OK message
to fax software. Wait for silence range is 1-255.
Appendix C-PB
C
+FTH=n
Transmits HDLC data. The only setting for this
command is 3.
+FTM=n
Selects transmit data modulation mode. Modulation
standards followed by ST represent short training.
Settings are 24(V.27ter/2400), 48(V.27ter/4800),
72(V.29/7200), 73(V.17/7200), 74(V.17ST/7200),
96(V.29/9600), 97(V.17/9600), 98(V.17ST/9600),
121(V.17/12200), 122(V.17ST/12200), 145(V.17/14400)
and 146(V.17ST/14400). This command is normally
controlled by fax Class 1 software.
+FTS=n
Stops transmission and pauses 0-255 (which are 10ms
intervals) before sending an OK message to the fax
software.
Appendix C-3
C
Appendix C-PB
APPENDIX
D
Modem Terms
This chapter will address some basic terminology
associated with your modem and your communications
software.
Modem
Modem is a compound word of Modulator and
DEModulator. It is used for computer communication.
Modem translates computer data to analog signal
(modulation) that travels through the telephone network
and reaches the other modem. The remote modem
translates the analog signal received back to data
(demodulation) and sends to the receiving end
computer.
Fax Modem
Normal modem can be designed to have the fax
transmitting and/or receiving function(s).
Voice Modem
Modem with digitized voice capability can digitize the
incoming voice message, and the computer can store it
as a file. The voice modem can also playback a recorded
digital voice message either locally or to the line as an
announcement.
D
DTE / DCE
DTE stands for Data Terminal Equipment and DCE
stands for Data Communication Equipment. The
Computer or terminal is the DTE and the modem is the
DCE.
DSP
Digital Signal Processor. It performs all digital signal
processing functions for the chipset, such as
modulation schemes and modem handshakes.
UART
UART (Universal Asynchronous Receiver Transmitter) is
the device used in DTE or DCE for asynchronous data
receiving and transmitting. The normal UART device
used in PC is NS16450. For high-speed serial data
receiving (38400 bps and up), the PC may not be fast
enough and data may get lost. In this case, a UART
with data buffer is needed, such as NS16550A.
NVRAM
NVRAM (Nonvolatile RAM) is a device to store the DCE
configuration. Upon powering-up, the modem defaults
to the configuration specified in the NVRAM or to the
factory default. DCE configuration can be changed and
stored by DTE in the NVRAM by first setting up the
current configuration and then sending an AT
command &Wn.
For example,
ATZ
Appendix D-2
D
resets and then configures the modem to NVRAM stored
profile 0.
AT&F S0=1 &W1 &Y1
&F configures the modem to factory default.
S0=1
configures the modem to answer after 1 ring. &W1
saves the active configuration to stored profile 1. &Y1
configures the modem to use NVRAM stored profile 1 as
the power-up defaults.
INIT Strings
An initialization string is a series of specific commands
that prepares a modem to operate with communications
software. Consult your communication software
manual and AT commands in Chapter 3 to modify INIT
strings.
Xmodem, Ymodem,
Zmodem
These are file transfer protocols used by the host (e.g.,
communication program in the PC). These protocols do
error checking and ensure data integrity of the file
transfer. There are some other protocols. Zmodem is
the most preferred protocol to use.
Appendix D-3
D
Data Rates and DTE
Speed
A data rate (or line speed) is sometimes confused with a
DTE speed setting in PC software. In this manual, AT
commands from the DTE are referred to as a speed or
DTE speed. Data rate or line speed refer to the speed of
the connection between modems.
Modem-to-modem data rates (line speed):
300-33,600bps
DTE-to-modem speeds (AT commands):
300-115200bps
Fax mode DTE-to-modem speed (+FCLASS commands):
19,200bps
Voice mode DTE-to-modem speed (+FCLASS
commands):
19,200-115,200bps
MNP
Microcom Network Protocol is an older data
communication protocol that allows error-free
interactive communications with a variety of computers
or terminals over ordinary voice-grade telephone lines.
LAPM
Link Access Procedure for Modems. An HDLC error
correction protocol for use with error-correcting
modems. Part of the new error control protocol CCITT
V.42.
Appendix D-4
D
XON/XOFF
A handshaking, flow control mechanism that
communicates that the device is ready to accept more
data. The flow control is embedded into the data stream
by using special characters. Hence, transmit on (XON),
transmit off (XOFF) are often referred to as software flow
control.
RTS/CTS
RTS stands for Request To Send, a handshake line in
which the computer tells the modem it can accept new
data. CTS stands for Clear To Send, which allows the
modem to tell the computer that it can accept new data.
CXR
Data Carrier Detect, also called DCD. This signal is
supplied by the modem.
DSR
Data Set Ready. This signal is supplied by the modem
to indicate it has power and is ready to accept
commands.
DTR
Data Terminal Ready. This signal is generated by the
computer to indicate it can accept data from the
modem.
Appendix D-5
D
Duplex
A communication system which is capable of
communicating in both directions can be half duplex or
full duplex. Half duplex allows communication in both
directions, but only one direction at a time. Full duplex
allows data to be transmitted in two directions
simultaneously.
Off-hook
Picks up a telephone receiver. You take the modem offhook to dial or answer, and it remains off-hook while
you are connected.
On-hook
Hangs up a telephone receiver. You are not connected
to the Telephone Central Office when the modem is onhook.
DTMF
Dual-Tone-Multi-Frequency. The use of two
simultaneous audio band tones for dialing, touch-tones.
CCITT
Acronym for the International Telegraph and Telephone
Consultative Committee. An international organization
that decides upon recommended communication
protocol standards. Also, see ITU-T.
ITU-T
International Telecommunication Union-Telecom.
Formerly CCITT.
Appendix D-6
APPENDIX
E
Removing Win 95 Drivers
If you have previously installed a modem profile based
upon a Cirrus Logic chipset (14.4K, 28.8K, old
33.6Kbps) in the Windows 95 system, you must remove
it before installing the new modem .INF drivers. It is
also a good idea to remove any additional modem
profiles that are not actually installed on the PC.
1) Insert the Zypcom Windows Drivers diskette
containing the new INF files (mdmcir.inf and
serwvcir.inf) into the floppy drive. The latest
versions are on the BBS at Zypcom, 510-783-2580.
2) Click on START|SETTINGS|CONTROL
PANEL|MODEMS|REMOVE to remove any modems
listed that are not installed in the system.
3) From the Windows 95 Start Menu, select Run and
type regedit to edit your Windows registry file.
Remove the following keys (sub-directories) from the
registry:
HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE|Enum|MODEMWAVE
HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE|System|Current Control
Set|control|Media Resources|
wave|serwvdrv.drv<000X>
HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE|System|Current Control
Set|Services|Class|Media|000X
E
One way to find these keys is to do a search for Zypcom
or Cirrus in the registry file. You will find these three
keys when you search for Zypcom or Cirrus. You
should delete these three keys (sub-directories) to be
sure the new .INF files will be installed properly.
4) Take a look at the \WINDOWS\INF directory.
Remove drvidx.bin. Then remove the two files that
begin with “OEM” that correspond to MDMCIR.INF
and SERWVCIR.INF. OEM1.INF on the system
contains the MDMCIR.INF file, and OEM2.INF
contains the SERWVCIR.INF file. Make sure the
“OEM" file references the Zypcom or Cirrus Logic
INF file. If it does, remove both files. By removing
these files, Windows 95 will look at everything on
the diskette without taking any shortcuts.
5) Now you can install the new INFs. Click on Control
Panel|Modems. Check the box that says “Don’t
detect modem; select from list”. This causes
Windows 95 to rebuild the database.
6) Press “Have Disk” and select the location of your
floppy drive. Then select "Zypcom Z34-PC" or
“Cirrus 33600 bps Modem Internal (CL-MD3450)
Modem” for the Z34-PC; or select "Zypcom Z34-SC"
or “Cirrus 33600 bps Modem External (CL-MD3450)
Modem” for the Z34-SC. Press Next>. Select the
appropriate COM port. Windows 95 will then
discover the Wave Device for Voice Modem. Press
OK twice so that it loads the files from the diskette.
Appendix E-PB
E
7) Windows 95 will display the modem, and you will
see a “Properties” button. Press the Properties
button, press the Connection tab, press the
Advanced button, and check the box for “Record Log
File”. This will set up the system so that whenever
you use the modem with Microsoft Phone, a log file
will be recorded in
\WINDOWS\MODEMLOG.TXT
This is very useful for debugging, if needed.
Appendix E-3
E
Appendix E-PB
APPENDIX
F
Downloading Firmware
Downloading the Latest Modem Firmware
1) Load your communication software (SuperVoice
terminal or ProComm).
2) Enter Local Command mode. (See your
communication software’s instruction manual for
directions.)
3) In your communication software, set the
communication parameters to the following:
q
115.2-Kbps data connection (modem to
DTE)
q
q
q
q
Parity: none
Data bits: 8
Stop bits: 1
RTS-CTS flow control
4) Test the connection by typing “AT”. The modem
should respond with “OK”. If not, consult your
communication software’s instruction manual for
help in making a successful communication.
5) Reset modem to factory default
AT&F&W0&W1<ENTER>
F
6) Set modem up for downnload, then type the
following (in upper- or lower-case):
[email protected] <ENTER>
Modem goes off-hook momentarily and several LEDs
will go off, then back on.
7) The screen message “>>>Download Begin” appears.
If the “>>>” does not appear, turn off the modem
and start the procedure again at Step 5.
8) To continue the download procedure, press the Page
Up key.
9) From the menu of download protocols, choose “R”
for the RAW ASCII downloading protocol.
10) At the prompt “Please enter filename”, enter the
path and name of the firmware file you want to
download. For example, type
C:\LV34\FILE_NAME.BIN <CR>
11) The communication software will start the
download. An “..... END” message from the
communication software indicates that the
download is complete. The firmware is loaded into
your modem automatically. No other actions are
needed.
Appendix F-2
F
CAUTION: Don’t abort the transmission (using the
Escape key or by turning off the PC or modem)
until after you see the “..... END” message. If this
happens, you must re-install downloadable code
with the burning-in procedure in Section II above.
12) To see the version of firmware you've downloaded,
type
ATI1
13) The modem with the new downloaded code may now
be configured for your application.
Appendix F-3
F
Appendix F-4
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