;. UNIVAC . UNISCOPE 100

;. UNIVAC . UNISCOPE 100
-
.
;.,~.;~:UNIVAC
,t
,
UNISCOPE 100
COMMUNICATIONS
CONTROL PROCEDURES
UP-7779.1
UNIVAC SYSTEMS PROGRAMMING LIBRARY SERVICES
RELEASE
T his UNISCOPE 100 P rogramming Information E xchange Bulletin 1, page i, announces the release and availability of "UNISCOPE 100
Displ ay T ermina l Commun ications Control Procedures," UP-7779.1, cover and 35 pages. This is a Restricted Distribution (RD) Item,
since all Custome rs do no t require it. Order where necessary.
One of the purposes of Programming Information Exchange Bulletins is to provide interim as well as updating
materials to released publications. P.I . E. BUlletins have form numbers and may be ordered with any accompanyi ng attachments by their "UP" number, as thi s one UP- 7779 . 1.
The Communications Control Procedures comprise the data communication formats and the data interchange system
which control the flow of information between the UNISCOPE 100 Display Terminal and a computer . The data communication formats, code, and code extension features conform to the American National Standard Institute
(ANSI, formerly USASI) standards, and are defined in this document .
The following items are described: message formats; address and routing techniques ; supervisory sequences;
text format; code definitions; and line control rules .
Distribution has been made as indicated below . Additional copies may be ordered via Sales Help Requisition
through your local Univac Manager from Holyoke, Massachusetts .
GROUP MANAGER
Documentation and Library Services
TO LISTS;
211 (less 217),
and S.P.L.S. Customer List
37, 43, 51, 510, 53, 530,
54, 540, 55, 550, 57, and
60 P.I.E. Bulletin 1 only.
A TT ACHMENTS ;
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THIS SHEET IS ;
UNISCOPE 100
P. I.E . Bulletin 1, UP-7779.1
DATE :April 13, 1970
i
DIVISION OF SPERRY RAND CORPORATION, S.P.L.S . P.O . BOX al00 PHILADELPHIA , PA . 1910·1
UP-4050 Rev. 3A
UNISCOPE 100 DISPLAY TERMINAL
Communications Control
Procedures
UP-7779.1
This manual is published by the Univac Division of Sperry Rand
Corporation as a rapid and complete means of keeping recipients
apprised of UNIVACID Systems developments. The information presented
herein may not reflect the current status of the programming effort.
For the current status of the programming, contact your local Univac
Representative.
The Univac Division reserves the right to make such additions,
corrections, and/or deletions as in the judgment of the Univac
Division are required by the development of its respective Systems.
UNIVAC is a registered trademark of Sperry Rand Corporation.
Other trademarks of Sperry Rand Corporation appearing in the text
of this publication are:
UNISCOPE
©1970 - SPERRY RAND CORPORATION
PRINTED IN U.S.A.
CONTENTS
1.
2.
3.
4.
Page
i
CONTENTS
INTRODUCTION
1
1.1.
FUNCTION OF EQUIPMENT
1
1.2.
NATURE OF MANUAL
1
1.3.
MESSAGE FORMATS
1
ADDRESS AND ROUTING
4
2.1.
REMOTE IDENTIFIER - RID
4
2.2.
STATION IDENTIFIER - SID
6
2.3.
DEVICE IDENTIFIER - DID
6
2.4.
GENERAL IDENTIFIER - GID
6
2.5.
END OF ADDRESS - EOA
6
SUPERVISORY SEQUENCES
7
3.1. POLLING
3.1.1. TEXT POLL
3.1.2. STATUS POLL - ENQ
3.1.3. RETRANSMIT REQUEST - DLE NAK
3.1.4. REPLY REQUEST - DLE ENQ
7
7
10
10
10
3.2.
TEXT (MESSAGE)
10
3.3.
CONTROL CODES AND SEQUENCES
10
3.4.
NO TRAFFIC - EOT EOT or EOT EOT ETX BCC
13
3.5.
BUSY (WABT) - DLE?
13
3.6.
BREAK AND RESUME (EMBEDDED MESSAGES) - DLE[, DLEJ
13
3.7.
NOT BUSY - DLE;
13
TEXT FORMAT
14
4.1.
15
CURSOR ADDRESS
4.2. TEXT
4.2.1.--nATA FORMAT, COMPUTER TO UNISCOPE 100 TERMINAL
4.2.2. DATA FORMAT, UNISCOPE 100 TERMINAL TO COMPUTER
15
18
19
4.3.
ROLL AND SCROLL
20
4.4.
LOCK KEYBOARD
20
4.5.
TAB STOP SET
20
4.6.
CHARACTER STRUCTURE AND BIT SEQUENCING
20
4.7.
SYNCHRONOUS TRANSMISSION
20
4.8.
ASYNCHRONOUS TRANSMISSION
21
21
UP-7779.1
i
5.
6.
CODE DEFINITIONS
23
5.1. COMMUNICATIONS CONTROL CHARACTERS
5.1.1. STANDARD CHARACTERS
5.1.2. CONTROL SEQUENCES REPRESENTED BY CODE EXTENSION
5.1.3. MISCELLANEOUS CONTROL CHARACTERS OR SEQUENCES
23
23
24
5.2.
DATA CHARACTERS
27
5.3.
EDITING AND DEVICE CONTROL CODES
27
26
MESSAGE FORMAT
31
6.1.
HEADING MESSAGE
31
6.2.
COMPOSITE MESSAGE
31
APPENDIX A.
LINE CONTROL RULES FOR ANY SINGLE STATION OR MULTIPLEXER
32
FIGURES
2
3
1-1.
1-2.
UNISCOPE 100 Display
Message Formats
2-1.
ANSClI Code Chart and UNISCOPE 100 Terminal Application
5
3-1.
Communications Control Characters
Typical Messages Containing Supervisory Sequences
Status and Text Poll Message Formats
Reply Request Message Formats
Control Codes and Control Code Sequences
7
3-2.
3-3 ..
3-4.
3-5.
Terminal~Typical
System Configuration
4-6.
Text Format, Computer to UNISCOPE 100 Terminal
Text Format, UNISCOPE 100 Terminal to Computer
Horizontal and Vertical Cursor Addressing for UNISCOPE 100 Screen
Cursor Addressing for Screen Display
Data Format, Computer to UNISCOPE 100 Terminal
Data Format, UNISCOPE 100 Terminal to Computer
A-I.
UNlSCOPE 100 Terminal Traffic Flow Diagram
4-1.
4-2.
4-3.
4-4.
4-5.
ii
8
9
11
12
14
15
16
17
18
19
33
UP-7779.1
1.
1.1.
INTRODUCTION
FUNCTION OF EqUIPMENT
The UNISCOPE 100 Display Terminal is a low-cost, alphanumeric display that can be used for a
broad range of applications requiring direct operator interaction with a central computer
system. The UNISCOPE 100 terminal can operate as an entry device or as a display device.
A number of UNISCOPE 100 Display Terminals may be connected to a single communication line or
to a computer input/output channel by means of a multiplexer. Additional terminals may be
accommodated by cascading multiplexers. A general-purpose multiplexer is available with all
the communication line interfaces on the UNISCOPE 100 Display Terminal; this permits mixing
single units and multiple units on one communication system. The multiplexer also permits
transmission of output messages to multiple devices. Figure 1-1 illustrates a typical system
configuration.
1.2.
NATURE OF MANUAL
This manual is a preliminary release of the Communications Control Procedures; it contains a
description of the UNISCOPE 100 message address and routing of control characters, and text/
message formats. Definitions of American National Standards Institute (ANSI, formerly USASI)
terms and codes related to the application of the UNISCOPE 100 Display Terminal are also
included. Familiarity with UNISCOPE 100 Display Terminal, General Description, UP-7701
(current version) is assumed.
1.3.
MESSAGE FORMATS
A complete acquaintance with proper formats of messages is necessary for efficient use of this
equipment. Figure 1-2 gives the general format. Three-letter groups other than those described
in Figure 1-2 are fully explained in the text at or near their first appearance.
UP-7779.1
1
COMPUTER
MODEM
MODEM
MODEM
DEDICATED (PRIVATE) LINE
DIAL-SWITCHED
OR
DEDICATED
COMMUNICA nON
LINES
MODEM
MODEM
MODEM
UNISCOPE
100
TERMINAL
UNISCOPE
100
TERMINAL
MULTIPLEXER
I
DEVICE
UNISCOPE
100
TERMINAL
UNISCOPE
100
TERMINAL
T
MODEM
MODEM
MULTIPLEXER
UNISCOPE
100
TERMINAL
UNISCOPE
100
TERMINAL
DEVICE
UNISCOPE
100
TERMINAL
DEVICE
Figure 1-1.
2
UNISCOPE 100 Oisplay Terminal, Typical System Configuration
UP-7779.l
CENTRAL PROCESSOR TO UNISCOPE TERMINAL
S*
Y
N
S
0
H
I I
ADDRESS
I
SUPERVISORY
IDENTIFIER
SEQUENCE
I
I
I
I
I I
I
I
I
I
I
I
S
T
X
I
~
CURSOR
ADDRESS
TEXT
SEQUENCE
(IF REQ'D)
HEADER
S*
Y
N
S
0
H
I
SUPERVISORY
IDENTIFIER
SEQUENCE
I
I
TRAILER
TEXT
I I
ADDRESS
I
I
I
I
I
E B
T C
X C
I
I
I
S
T
X
SOE
ADDRESS
TEXT
E B
T C
X C
I
UNISCOPE TERMINAL TO CENTRAL PROCESSOR
*Four SYN Characters minimum with synchronous transmission systems only.
DEFINITIONS OF CONTROL CHARACTERS AND MESSAGE ABBREVIATIONS
BCC
ETX**
SOE
SOH**
STX**
SYN**
BLOCK CHECK CHARACTER (PARITY CHECK)
END OF TEXT
START OF ENTRY
START OF HEADER
START OF TEXT
SYNCHRONOUS IDLE
**Actual transmitted characters.
Figure 1-2. Message Formats
UP-7779.1
3
2.
ADDRESS AND ROUTING
The header address immediately follows the SOH character. Three characters form the address with a
standard format of RID, SID, and DID. ANSCII* characters (Figure 2-1; columns 2 through 7) are used
for the address, and the column identifiers are used to distinguish addresses. An address is included
in all messages except the No Traffic response from the terminal to the computer.
A specific address includes an RID, an SID, then either a DID or GID, depending upon the terminal.
A general address contains a GID in either or both of the initial (RID and SID) positions, followed
by a DID or GID.
2.1.
REMOTE IDENTIFIER - RID
The RID is used for the first level of addressing. In a system using multiplexers, the RID
is used to address groups of displays connected to one multiplexer. A RID must be used whether
a multiplexer is used or not. The RIDs are selected from the 48 characters, SP through 0, in
columns 2, 3, and 4 of the code chart (Figure 2-1). The first character, SP (Space), is assigned
a nonspecific function called a General Identifier (GID). If the GID is used in the RID
position, any connected device would recognize it as the RID part of its address and continue
reading the next two characters. The GID should not be used in the RID position if there are
two or more multiplexers connected to the communications line since more than one terminal
might respond, with indeterminate results. The GID in the RID position is useful on dial
network circuits as part of a who-are-you message. The responding terminal never uses the
GID, but always uses its own address, allowing the computer to establish its identity.
*ANscn (formerly USASCn): "American National Standard Code for Information Interchange."
4
up-7779.1
b7
•
b6~
b5~
0
1
0
1
1
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
0
1
1
0
1
1
1
1
0
1
I-<
H
a:l
b2 bl ~
row
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
0
0
0
NUL
DLE
SP
0
@
P
\
0
0
1
1
SOH
DCl
1
1
A
Q
a
q
0
0
1
0
2
SIX
DC2
"
2
B
R
b
r
0
0
1
1
3
ETX
DC3
#
3
C
S
c
s
0
1
0
0
4
EOT
DC4
$
4
D
T
d
t
0
1
0
1
5
ENQ
NAK
%
5
E
U
e
u
0
1
1
0
6
ACK
SYN
&
6
F
V
f
v
0
1
1
1
7
BEL
ETB
t
7
G
W
9
w
1
0
0
0
8
BS
CAN
(
8
H
X
h
x
1
0
0
1
9
HI
EM
)
9
I
Y
i
y
1
0
1
0 10
LF
SUB
*
:
J
Z
j
z
1
0
1
1 11
VT
ESC
+
;
K
[
k
£
1
1
0
0
12
FF
FS
,
<
L
\
1
I
1
1
0
1 13
CR
GS
-
=
M
]
m
}
1
1
1
0 14
SO
RS
.
>
N
n
'"
1
1
1
1 15
SI
US
/
?
0
b4
b3
0
0
0
A
-
7
P
I
(See
Note 2)
0
------~~----~----~----~
-----------
SID
RID
----~~~------
DID
64 CHARACTER SET
-----------..
LOWER
CASE
..--------
-----~-------
96 CHARACTER SET
Note 1.
Note 2.
The SP, P, and p characters constitute the GID group.
The overpunch is not used as a delete (DEL) in the operation of
the UNISCOPE 100 Display Terminal. Its bit configurations, 1111111,
is utilized for an additional symbol, f.
Figure 2... 1.
UP-7779.1
ANSCII Character Chart and UNISCOPE 100 Terminal Application
5
2.2.
STATION IDENTIFIER
~
SID
The SID is used for the second level of addressing. The SID specifies a terminal or station
connected to the communications line by appropriate facilities either directly or through a
multiplexer. The SID is selected from the 32 characters (p through 0) of columns 5 and 6 of
the chart (Figure 2-1). The first character, P, is the General Identifier (GID), similar to SP,
as described in 2.1. When used with an RID specifying a multiplexer, the GID in the SID
position allows any station on that multiplexer to recognize its address through the SID,
thereby permitting the computer to address all of the stations on a multiplexer, and also
permitting the multiplexer to resolve the conflict if more than one station has traffic* This
significantly reduces the polling required, by allowing one poll to query multiple terminals.
The GID and the SID position is useful on dial network circuits as a part of a who-are-you
message. The responding terminal uses its own address in the reply, never the GID character.
2.3.
DEVICE IDENTIFIER - DID
The DID is used for the third and last level of addressing. The DID specifies a particular
device at a terminal or station~ The DID is selected from column 7 of the chart (Figure 2-1).
There are 16 coded characters, from p through DEL (delete) in column 7; however, the DEL code
(alII's, the overpunch code for paper tape or cards) is not used for this application. The
first code, p, is the GID character for this level, as described above. This allows the
computer to address the station without having to address a device. The GID in the DID
position is useful on dial network circuits as a part of a who-are-you message.
2.4.
GENERAL IDENTIFIER - GID
The use of the General Identifier, GID, is explained in 2.1, 2.2, 2.3; however, a summary may
be useful.
The address has three character positions, corresponding to the three levels of addressing.
The device at the first level recognizes two characters in the RID positions, either the GID
(which is SP character), or a character specifically assigned to the device. Following this,
the device at the second level recognizes two characters in the SID position, again either
the GID (in this case p) or a specific character; and similarly for the third level (DID
position; the GID in this case is p). The address of SP, P, P is recognized by any terminal
in the system.
2.5.
END OF ADDRESS - EOA
Address characters are only those found in columns 2 through 7 of the ANSCII chart (Figure 2-1).
Any character from columns 0 or 1 which follows SOH in the format, ends the address field.
6
UP-7779.1
3.
SUPERVISORY SEQUENCES
A Supervisory Sequence is a sequence of one or more communication control characters and, possibly,
other characters that perform a defined control function. The sequence of characters follows
immediately after the last address character, DID. The communications control characters and
sequences are shown in Figure 3-1. The message format with the supervisory sequences is shown in
Figure 3-2.
3.1.
POLLING
Polling is used to solicit Text, Status, or Reply Request. If an error is detected in a polling
sequence, no response is sent from any terminal in the network. A terminal never transmits
except when polled. All responses except the No Traffic response are identified with the
transmitting station's address in the heading.
3.1.1.
TEXT POLL
The text poll solicits traffic from the remote terminal. Included in the response will be
any outstanding acknowledgement from the addressed terminal or from any other terminal on
the same multiplexer. A text poll may have either a specific or a general address (any
station on a specific multiplexer). The text poll is distinguished by the lack of any other
control sequence except an acknowledge sequence (if required). A message containing text
cannot poll the remote terminal. Text poll formats are shown in Figure 3-3.
SYMBOL FROM
COMPUTER
FUNCTION
Start of Header
SOH
SOH
Start of Text
STX
STX
End of Text
ETX
ETX
Enquiry (Status Poll)
ENQ
Enquiry (Reply Request)
DIE ENQ
Synchronizing Character
SYN
SYN
Acknowledge
DIE 1
DIE 1
Retransmit Request
DIE NAK
Break
DIE[
Resume
DLE]
WABT (Busy)
DIE?
Traffic Response to
Status Poll
DLEO
Not Busy
DIE;
Computer Message Waiting
Figure 3-1.
UP-7779.1
SYMBOL TO
COMPUTER
BEL
Communications Control Characters
7
OOMPUTER-TG-UNISCOPE 100 TERMINAL
SOH
RID/GID
ADDRESS
SID/GID
DID/GID
ENQ
BEL
SUPERVISORY SEQUENCE
DLE NAK
STX
1
TEXT
1
ETX
BCC
UNISCOPE 100 TERMINAL-TO-COMPUTER
POSITIVE RESPONSE
SOH
RID
ADDRESS
SID
DID
DLEl
DLEO
DLE?
DLEENQ
SUPERVISORY SEQUENCE
STX
t
TEXT
!
ETX
BCC
NO TRAFFIC - NO ACKNOWLEDGE
EOT or EOT
EOT
EOT or ETX
BCC*
*See 3.4
Figure 3-2.
8
Typical Messages Containing Supervisory Sequences
UP-7779.1
COMPUTER-TO-UNISCOPE 100 TERMINAL
NOTE:
In the following message formats, S/G indicates SID or GID and D/G indicates DID or GID
TRAFFIC POLL WITHOUT ACKNOWLEDGE
SRSDEB
OI//TC
HDGGXC
TRAFFIC POLL WITH ACKNOWLEDGE
SRSDD EB
OI//LITC
HDGGE XC
STATUS POLL WITHOUT ACKNOWLEDGE
SRSDEEB
OI//l)TTC
HDGGQXC
STATUS POLL WITH ACKNOWLEDGE
SRSDED
EB
HDGGQE
XC
OI//~LlTC
TEXT
SRSDS
EB
a I I I T~ TEXT --... T C
HDDDX
XC
COMPUTER MESSAGE WAITING
S RS DB S EB
a I I lET T C
HDDDLXXC
BREAK - RESUME
xX
D
BD XX
S
-- COMPLETE FORMAT -- C LJ
••• X X L [0
x
XE H
C E
xX
XX
RETRANSMISSION REQUEST
SRSDDNEB
a I I I LATC
HDDDEKXC
Figure 3-3.
UP-7779.1
Status and Text Poll Message Formats
9
3.1.2.
STATUS POLL - ENQ
The Status Poll solicits status .information from the remote terminal. The response indicates
if the terminal (or any terminal on a multiplexer if a general address is used) has any
traffic. The traffic is not sent, but is held for a traffic poll. The DLEO sequence in
the response indicates that the terminal has traffic. The response includes any outstanding
acknowledgement from the addressed terminal and from any other terminal on the same multiplexer.
A Status Poll may have either a specific or a general address. The ENQ character is used to
solicit status. Status Poll formats are shown in Figure 3-3. The Status Poll may bring in
a Request Computer Message response.
3.1.3.
RETRANSMIT REQUEST - DLE NAK
The Retransmit Request from the computer causes the terminal to retransmit its last response.
The Retransmit Request is sent in response to the Reply Request (DLE?) from the terminal,
indicating that the text sent to the computer has not been acknowledged. If the text was
sent, ,an acknowledgement is sent, or repeated, instead of a Retransmission Request. Retransmission Request formats are shown in Figure 3-3.
3.1.4.
REPLY REQUEST - DLE ENQ
The Reply Request solicits the acknowledgement for the last transmission. If a terminal
does not receive an acknowledgement for text sent to the computer with the next poll
recognized by the transmitting terminal, the terminal sends a Reply Request to the computer.
This allows the computer to determine whether the text or the acknowledgement for the text
was lost, and to send an acknowledgement or cause the terminal to retransmit the text. ' The
terminal will continue to respond to its polls with a Reply Request until the computer either
acknowledges the text or requests a retransmission. Tne DLE ENQ sequence solicits the reply.
Reply Request formats are shown in Figure 3-4. After missing an acknowledgement, the terminal
will accept only an acknowledgement having a specific address.
3.2.
TEXT (MESSAGE)
The text message is a sequence of characters which conveys the text and the information
necessary to handle the text~ The text message begins with the STX character and ends with
the ETX character.
S
TX
3.3.
E
TEXT ----.. T
X
CONTROL CODES AND SEQUENCES
The control codes and control code sequences used with the UNISCOPE 100 terminal are shown in
Figure 3-5. Not all of the coding illustrated is necessary for programming the UNISCOPE 100
terminal, but it is included for completeness of information. A definition of the codes is
included in Figure 3-5.
10
UP-7779.1
UNISCOPE 100 TERMINAL TO COMPUTER
RESPONSES TO TRAFFIC AND STATUS POLLS
BUSY
SRSDD EB
OIIIL?TC
H DD D E X C
NO TRAFFIC WITHOUT ACKNOWLEDGE
*
or
E EEB
o0
T C
T T X C
I
NO TRAFFIC WITH ACKNOWLEDGE*
SRSDD
EB
I I ILl T C
HDDDE
XC
o
REPLY REQUEST
SRSDDEEB
o I I I LNTC
HDDDEQXC
REQUEST COMPUTER MESSAGE WITHOUT ACKNOWLEDGE
REQUEST COMPUTER MESSAGE WITH ACKNOWLEDGE*
SRSDBEB
I I lET C
HDDDLXC
o I I ILl ETC
SRS DD
BEB
HDDDE
LXC
THRU (PRINTING) WITHOUT ACKNOWLEDGE
THRU (PRINTING) WITH ACKNOWLEDGE*
SRSDD
EB
o I I I LTC
HDDDE
XC
S R S D D DEB
o I I ILl LTC
HDDDE
E XC
o
RESPONSES TO STATUS POLL ONLY
TRAFFIC WITHOUT ACKNOWLEDGE
TRAFFIC WITH ACKNOWLEDGE*
o I I I LOT C
SRSDD
EB
o I I ILl LOT C
SRSDD
D
EB
HDDDE
XC
HDDDE
E
XC
RESPONSES TO TRAFFIC POLL ONLY
TEXT WI THOUT ACKNOWLEDGE
SRSDS
o I I I T....- TEXT -
HDDDX
EB
TC
XC
TEXT WITH ACKNOWLEDGE*
SRSDD
S
EB
HDDDE
X
XC
o I I ILl T-TEXT-T C
*Busy (DLE?) may be sent instead of an acknowledgement (DLE1) by a terminal that has
received text correctly but cannot accept more text immediately. A specifically
addressed poll to a unit that is busy will always bring the Busy response. The Busy
response will be returned only once to a general poll.
Figure 3-4.
UP-7779.1
Reply Request Message Formats
11
CODE FROM
COMPUTER
FUNCTION
Carriage Return (New Line)
Erase to End of Display
Erase to End of Line
Delete - In Line
Delete - In Display
Insert - In Line
Insert - In Display
Scan Left
Scan Right
Scan Down
Scan Up
Character Erase (Space)
TAB
Message Waiting
Cursor to Home
Insert Line
Delete Line
Request Comp. Message
TAB STOP SET
Start Blink Field
End Blink Field
Lock Keyboard
Print (Output)
Print Transparent (Output)
Start of Entry (SOE) ~
~~
~~
E~
Transmit
[email protected]
ESC a
ESC b
ESC c
ESC C
ESC d
ESC D
ESC g
ESC h
ESC i
ESC f
SP
HT
BEL®
ESC e
ESC j
ESC k
ESC HT
FS
GS
CODE TO
COMPUTER
CR
SP
HT
FS
GS
DC4
DC2
RS
SI
SO
LF
FF
EM
DCI
RS
SI
SO
LF
FF
EM
NOTES:
~ ESC
The ESC code is used to provide control sequences as defined in the
proposed ANSI Standard for Code Extension Procedures for Information
Interchange, published in the Communications of the ACM, December 1968,
"Control Set Extension: Use of ESC (ESCAPE)."
® BEL
The Computer Message Waiting symbol (BEL) must be placed between the
address (RID, SID, DID) and the start of text (STX). If it follows
SIX, it is placed in memory and does not light the Computer Message
Waiting light. It is not displayed if in memory.
.
® BEL
BEL sent to the computer in a nontext message (no STX) indicates
that the Message Waiting key was depressed. If BEL appears in
text, it was placed in the UNISCOPE 100 terminal either by the
computer or through the parallel interface and is to be interpreted
by the user program.
® SI, SO
The SO character is used as a part of the cursor position sequence.
Otherwise the UNISCOPE 100 terminal is transparent* to these characters.
SI and SO are reserved for use by the UNISCOPE 100 terminal for graphic
set extension or by devices connected to the parallel channel as defined
in the proposed ANSI Standard for Code Extension Procedures for
Information Interchange published in the Communications of the ASM,
December 1968, "Graphic Set Extension: Use of SO (Shift Out) and SI
(Shift In)". SI is used by peripherals on parallel channels only.
® LF, FF,
The UNISCOPE 100 terminal is transparent* to these codes. They are
not displayed. LF, FF may be placed in UNISCOPE 100 terminal by
either the computer or the parallel interface.
EM
*The term "transparent" signifies that the UNISCOPE 100 terminal is unaffected by
the characters referred to, but transmits them for use by other devices.
Figure 3-5.
12
Control Codes and Control Code Sequences
UP-7779.1
3.4.
NO TRAFFIC - EaT EaT or EaT EaT ETX BCC
The No Traffic response sent by a terminal indicates that the terminal has neither text nor an
acknowledgement to send, and is not missing an acknowledgement for text transmitted (Reply
Request). If the terminal has no traffic but has an outstanding acknowledgement to send, the
normal format with address and block parity check is sent. Formats for no traffic responses
are shown in Figure 3-4. The long format (EaT EaT ETX BCC) is required by the Communication
Terminal Modular Control (CTMC).
3.5.
BUSY (WABT) - DLE?
The Busy response by a terminal indicates that the terminal is in an extended sequence, such
as printing, and is not immediately available. A Busy response is returned instead of an
acknowledgement when a terminal receives error-free text and cannot accept more text immediately.
The treatment of a Busy response is similar to that of an acknowledgement, with respect to format
and inclusion in messages from other terminals on a common multiplexer. The Busy response will
not be sent in response to subsequent general polls after the first Busy response sent as an
acknowledgement "to the initial general poll. Busy formats are shown in Figure 3-4.
3.6.
BREAK AND RESUME (EMBEDDED MESSAGES) - DLE[, DLE]
Messages may be embedded in other messages by delimiting the embedded message with the DLE[ and
DLE] characters. The embedded message must not be addressed to the same terminal as the
broken messa~e. The embedded message may not be broken (only one level of embedding). The
DLE[ and DLEJ characters are not included in the block check of either the broken or the
embedded message. The embedded message has an independent block check character (BCC). The
DLE] character initiates the resumption of the previous message. The break must occur between
STX and ETX; it must not occur between ETX and BCC.
3.7.
NOT BUSY - DLE;
The Not Busy sent from the terminal indicates that the terminal has completed an extended
sequence, and is now available for further traffic. The Not Busy response must be used only
subsequently to a Busy response.
UP-7779.1
13
4.
TEXT FORMAT
The formats of text between the computer and the UNISOOPE 100 terminal are shown in Figures 4-1 and
4-2. In transmissions from the computer to the UNISOOPE 100 terminal, the text is placed on the
screen of the UNISCOPE 100 terminal, starting at the position of the ·cursor. If the cursor is not
repositioned after data has been transmitted to the computer, text received for the computer will
follow the text already displayed on the screen. The cursor may be positioned by several different
methods, before or during transmission.
o
o
o
o
The cursor address sequence positions the cursor to any specified point on the screen.
"Cursor-to-home" sequence places the cursor in the upper left hand corner of the screen.
The carriage return and space characters position the cursor relative to its last position.
The TAB character moves the cursor in the same manner as the TAB key on the keyboard of a typewriter.
STX
VT
ESC
~I
!
CURSOR ADDRESS SEQUENCE (IF REQUIRED)
I
TEXT
ESC
VT
(
~I
CURSOR ADDRESS SEQUENCE (AS REQUIRED)
I
I
TEXT
ETX
Figure 4-1.
14
Text Format, Computer to UNISCOPE 100 Terminal
UP-7779.1
4.1.
CURSOR ADDRESS
The format for the cursor address in a text message from the computer to the UNISCOPE 100
terminal is the first one shown in Figure 4-1.
The ESC (Escape) character determines the meaning of the following character to permit extended
control sequences. The VT character following ESC denotes that the next two characters are the
cursor address; the first of the two identifies the row, and the second the column, according
to the character assignments given in Figures 4~3 and 4-4.
Figure 4-3 lists the address coding. Columns a and 1 of the address code table are not used;
these are for control. Column 7 is not used because no address greater than 80 is required
with the UNISCOPE 100 terminal. The exact code characters chosen are a function of the
'number of rows and columns in the particular UNISCOPE 100 terminal being addressed and the
desired position on the screen. The SI character is the character spec~fied by the ANSCII
code to end the sequence started by the ESC VT codes. The cursor address sequence may be
placed anywhere in text after the STX character and before the ETX character. There is no
limit to the number of times the cursor address sequence may be used in one message or on
the position that may be addressed.
The text sent from the computer to the UN1SCOPE 100 terminal starts at the cursor position and
moves to the right across the screen, superseding character by character any prior text
displayed. A carriage return character (CR) in the text will cause the next character to appear
at the beginning of the next line. If the end of a line is reached, the next character will
appear at the beginning of the next line, without the need for a carriage return character.
If a carriage return character is used before the end of a line, the rest of the line is
unaffected. The Erase to End of Line sequence (ESC b) may be used to erase the rest of the
line. The Erase to End of Display sequence (ESC a) may be used to clear the remainder of the
screen, following the end of the message if desired. It is recommended that the Erase to End
of Display sequence be used at the end of a message rather than at the beginning of a message
to avoid delay that would occur while the erasure is being accomplished.
STX
ESC
VT
START OF ENTRY (SOE) ADDRESS
Y
X
(For future application)
SI
I>
t
TEXT
I
I
ETX
BCC
Figure 4-2.
UP-7779.1
Text Format, UNISCOPE 100 Terminal to Computer
15
b7
~
b6
~
•
b5
b4
b3
b2
~
bl
~
~
~
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
col
row
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
0
1
1
1
0
1
1
1
1
1
0
0
0
1
1
1
0
2
3
4
5
6
0
1
17
33
49
65
1
1
2
18
34
50
66
1
0
2
3
19
35
51
67
0
1
1
3
4
20
36
52
68
0
1
0
0
4
5
21
37
53
69
0
1
0
1
5
6
22
38
54
70
0
1
1
0
6
7
23
30
55
71
0
1
1
1
7
8
24
40
56
72
1
0
0
0
8
9
25
41
57
73
1
0
0
1
9
10
26
42
58
74
1
0
1
0
10
11
27
43
59
75
1
0
1
1
11
12
28
44
60
76
1
1
0
0
12
13
29
45
61
77
1
1
0
1
13
14
30
46
62
78
1
1
1
0
14
15
31
47
63
79
1
1
1
1
15
16
32
48
64
80
Figure 4-3.
16
0
1
7
Horizontal and Vertical Cursor Addressing
for UNISCOPE 100 Screen
UP-7779.1
11 11 11 11 11 22 22 22 22 22 33 33 33 33 33 44 44 44 44 44 55 55 55 55 55 66 66 66 66 66 77 177 77 77 778
12 34 56 78 90 12 34 56 78 90 12 34 56 78 90 12 34 56 78 90 12 34 56 78 90 12 3f4 56 78 90 12 34 56 78 90 12 34 56 78 90
SP 1 " #$ %&
End of
12 Line
Display
1
SP
2
1
3
II
4
#
5
$
6
%
7
&
8
f
9
(
10
)
11
*
12
+
13
,
14
-
15
.
16
/
f
(
) * +, -. /0 12 34 56 78 9 : ; <=> [email protected] AB CD EF GH IJ KL MN OP QR ST UV WX YZ [\
]
A
-
\
ab cd e f gh i j k 1 mno
End of 64
Column Display
Figure 4-4.
Cursor Addressing for Screen Display
4.2.1.
DATA FORMAT, COMPUTER TO UNISCOPE 100 TERMINAL
An example of the data format used in transmission from the computer to the UNISCOPE 100
terminal is shown in Figure 4-5. In this example, the phrase "The Quick Brown Fox Jumps
Over", is transmitted to the UNISCOPE 100 terminal but by use of the cursor addressing sequence
and the carriage return, the data is placed on the screen as shown in the right of Figure 4-5.
The initial cursor position places the first letter on the second line in the fifth position.
The rest of the first two words are placed on the screen in sequence, the second cursor
positioning sequence places the first letter of the third word on the fifth line and in the
ninth character position. The rest of the word follows in sequence. The carriage return at
the end of the word causes the first letter of the fourth word to be in the first character
position of the next line. The two carriage returns followed by two spaces at the end of
the fourth word causes the first letter of the fifth word to be in the second position of
the eighth line. The third cursor position sequence causes the first letter of the last
word to be in the first character position of the first line returning the cursor to the
beginning of the screen. Since no erase sequences were used, the screen remains as before
the transmission except for the six words transmitted and the space between the first two
words and the spaces before the fifth word. This allows the computer to change specific
characters, words, phrases, sentences, or paragraphs on the screen without disturbing or
repeating the data that is already on the screen.
SIX
ESC
VT
!
$
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13
SI
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
T
h
e
SP
Q
u
i
c
-Ov e r
The
Qu
i
c
Br
0
w n
k
- Fox
J u mp s
-
k
ESC
VT
$
(
1
SI
B
r
o
w
RESULT ON UNISCOPE 100 SCREEN ILLUSTRATING:
n
CR
(1)
F
(2)
(3)
o
x
Cursor Addressing
Use of Carriage Return
Cursor Addressing in Text
CR
CR
SP
SP
J
u
m
p
s
~c (3
SP
SI
o
v
e
r
EIX
Figure 4-5.
18
Data Format, Computer to UNISCOPE 100 Terminal
UP-7779.1
4.2.2.
DATA FORMAT, UNISCOPE 100 TERMINAL TO COMPUTER
The format for data from the UNISCOPE 100 terminal to the computer is shown in Figure 4-6.
In this example, the transmit key is depressed while the text ItThe Quick Brown" shown at the
top of the figure is on the screen. The data that is transmitted is the portion between the
start of entry (SOE) character,t>, closest to the cursor and the cursor (1). Immediately
following STX is an Escape sequence (ESC VT) giving the address of the SOE.. The two
characters following the ESC VT are the row and column positions of the SOE character. The
third character following the ESC VT sequence is reserved for future application and is not
used at this time. The SI character is the ANSell symbol to end the address sequence.
Immediately following the address sequence, the first text character follows the SOE. The
text continues to the last significant character, in this case, n.. Nonsignificant spaces
that follow are suppressed, and a carriage return (CR) character is inserted. The first
character on the next line follows the carriage return. Spaces between words are included.
Again nonsignificant spaces after the ~ in ItJumpstr are suppressed, and a carriage return
follows the s. On the last line, the spaces are included between the last significant
character, e~ and the cursor. By transmitting the address of the SOE character at the
beginning of the text and also spaces out to the cursor, the computer program can accurately
ascertain the location of the transmitted text on the face of the screen. Since the
computer can control the unlocking of the keyboard, it can position the next reply to the
terminal at the end of the data transmitted from the terminal.
The t> Quick t> Brown
DATA ON 1HE UNISCOPE 100 SCREEN
Fox Jumps
Over the
1
SIX
ESC
VT
SP
)
(for future application)
SI
I>
ADDRESS OF SOE
[>
B
r
o
w
n
CR
F
o
x
SP
J
u
m
p
s
CR
o
v
e
r
SP
T
h
e
SP
SP
SP
SP
SP
ETX
Figure 4-6.
UP-7779.1
Data Format, UNISCOPE 100 Terminal to Computer
19
Since the computer can include SOE in its output text, it can insert the required SOE for
the operator, thereby simplifying the operational sequence. By having the SOE character
positioned at the end of a question, the operator can simply type in the answer and press
the transmit key without being concerned about either the SOE or the position of the data
on the screen.
4.3.
ROLL AND SCROLL
The effect of the data rolling downward or upward across the face of the screen can be
achieved by the use of the line insert (ESC j) or line delete sequences (ESC k), respectively.
The line insert function causes the contents of the line at and below the cursor position to
move down one line, the contents of the last line being lost; the result is a blank line
inserted at the cursor position. By transmitting a single line of data into the cursor
position, a line has been inserted.
When the line delete function is transmitted, the contents of the line at the cursor position
are lost and the lines belOW that line are all moved up to close the space; the bottom line is
then blank. By repositioning the cursor to the bottom line and transmitting a single line of
data the selected portion of the screen has been moved up one line. By repeating this, with
appropriate timing, the contents of the screen will move either up or down.
4.4.
LOCK KEYBOARD
Each text transmission from the computer to the display locks the keyboard at the beginning
of the text. At the end of the text, the keyboard is unlocked unless the keyboard lock
character (DC4) is included in the text. This gives the computer control over the keyboard.
4.5.
TAB STOP SET
The computer can insert tab stops (analogous to a typewriter) in text transmitted to the
UNISCOPE 100 terminal. The sequence ESC HT is inserted at each point in the text where a
tab stop is desired. When the operator presses the TAB key, the cursor moves to the next
tab stop in sequence. This can be repeated until the cursor reaches the end of the screen,
where it stops. This makes it convenient for the operator to fill in blanks in forms. The
character HT is placed in memory as the tab stop.
4.6.
CHARACTER STRUCTURE AND BIT SEQUENCING
The character structure conforms to ANSI X3.16 - 1966 Character Structure and Character Parity
Sense for Serial-by-Bit Data Communications in the USA Standard Code for Information
Interchange.
The bit sequencing conforms to ANSI X3.15 "Bit Sequencing of the USA Standard Code for
Information Interchange in Serial-by-Bit Data Transmission".
4.7.
SYNCHRONOUS TRANSMISSION
The character structure for synchronous data communications consist of eight bits; there are
seven ANSCII bits plus one character parity bit.
The bit sequence for an ANSCII character is least significant bit, bl, first, to most
significant bit, b7, in terms of the ANSCII nomenclature, (ANSI X3.4 ItCode for Information
Interchange") in ascending order.
b7
bl
I
I
I
I
I
I.
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
i
I
I
I
I I
I
I
Seven ANSCII Bits
I
I
I
I
.1
ParOt
l Y Bi t
/
NOTE:
20
The order of transmission is from left to right.
UP-7779.1
The UNISCOPE 100 Terminal generates a parity bit and adds it to every seven-bit code transmitted.
When receiving, it checks the character parity. The character parity for synchronous
transmission is odd; that is, there is an odd number of 1 bits per character.
4.8.
ASYNCHRONOUS TRANSMISSION
The character structure for asynchronous data communication consists of 10 signal elements
having equal time intervals; one a (spacing) start element, seven ANSCII bits, one character
parity bit, and one 1 (marking) stop element. The intercharacter interval (the time interval
between the end of a stop element and the beginning of the next start element) may be of any
length, and is of the same sense as the stop (marking) element, that is, 1.
The bit sequence for an ANSCII character shall be least significant bit, bl, first to most
significant bit, b7, in terms of the ANSCII nOTIlenclature (ANSCII, X3.4) in ascending
consecutive order.
b7
bl
EXAMPLE:
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
~
f
I
i
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
i
I
I
Seven ANSCII Bits
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
.1
I
I
I
I
I
I
Parity Bit
Start Bit
Sto p Bit
NOTE:
The order of transmission is from left to right.
The UNISCOPE 100 terminal supplies
on transmission. On receiving, it
timing, checks parity, and acts on
asynchronous transmission is even,
the start, parity, and stop bits to the seven ANSCII bits
uses the start and stop bits to establish bit and character
the seven ANSCII bits. The character parity for
i.e., an even number of 1 (marking) bits per character.
Character parity conforms to ANSI X3.l6 - 1966 "Character Structure and Character Parity
Sense for Serial-by-Bit Data Communications in the USA Standard Code for Information Interchange".
Message Parity conforms to ANSI X3.3.4/212 "Proposed American National Standard Data Communications Control Procedures for the American National Standard Code for Information Interchange".
The sense of character parity for synchronous data and communications is odd over the eight
bits; that is, there is an odd number of 1 bits per character.
The sense of character parity for asynchronous data communications is even over the eight bits
(seven ANSClI bits and the character parity bit); that is, there is an even number of 1 bits
per character.
The message parity character is the Block Check Character (BCC) defined in ANSI X3.3.4/212,
previously cited.
During transmission, the UNISCOPE 100 terminal generates a BCC and transmits it to the computer
as the last character of every message. During receiving, the UNISCOPE 100 terminal checks the
BCC.
The BCC is generated by taking the binary sum independently (without carry) on each of the
seven individual levels of the transmitted code (b1 to b7). If a sum is odd, a 1 bit is put
into the corresponding position of the BCC. (The longitudinal parity is even.)
UP-7779.1
21
The character parity bit of the Bee itself is the same sense as the character parity of the
text characters; the parity is even for asynchronous transmission, odd for synchronous
transmission.
The Bee calculation starts immediately following SOH. All characters, except SYN, which are
transmitted after SOH are included in the Bee calculation. This includes ETX, which signals
that the next character following is Bee, but excludes the break and resume sequences and all
characters between them.
The Bee must immediately follow the ETX character. SYN must not be transmitted between ETX
and Bee. Note that the BCC may produce any of the 128 code combinations.
EXAMPLE:
CHARAeTER PARITY
MSG
b7 b6
b5
b4
b3
b2
bI
SYNC
ASYNC
SOH
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
0
1
5
0
1
1
0
1
0
1
1
0
h
1
1
0
1
0
0
0
0
1
p
1
1
1
0
0
0
0
0
1
STX
0
0
0
0
0
1
0
0
1
A
1
0
0
0
0
0
1
1
0
ETX
0
0
0
0
0
1
1
1
0
BCC
1
1
0
1
1
0
0
1
0
NOTE:
22
The BCC is the same (bI through b7) for both
synchronous and asynchronous transmission.
UP-7779.1
5.
CODE DEFINITIONS
The discussion of codes is covered in three areas: (1) communications control characters used to
control the communications over the communications link; (2) data or text characters used to convey
the actual message; (3) function codes used to control the UN I SCOPE display. Except where otherwise
stated, the code used is ANSI X3.4 - 1967 "Code for Information Interchange".
5.1.
5.1.1.
COMMUNICATIONS CONTROL CHARACTERS
STANDARD CHARACTERS
SOH - Start of Heading
SOH is a communication control character used at the beginning of a sequence of
characters which constitutes a machine-sensible address or routing information. This
sequence is referred to as the "heading". The heading is terminated by STX or by ETX.
Use
(1)
(2)
SOH marks the start of a message heading.
SOH may not deselect a station without being followed by an appropriate address and
block ending.
STX - Start of Text
SIX is a communication control character which precedes a sequence of characters that is to
be transmitted in its entirety through to the ultimate destination. Such a sequence is
referred to as "text". STX may be used to terminate a sequence of characters (heading)
started by SOH.
Use
(1)
(2)
STX marks the start of a message text.
If a heading precedes the text, STX marks the end of the message heading.
ETX - End of Text
ETX is a communication control character used to terminate a sequence of characters
started with STX or SOH and transmitted as an entity.
~
(1)
(2)
ETX marks the end of a message text.
ETX may also mark the end of a heading.
EaT - End of Transmission
EaT is a two-character contiguous sequence consisting of E01=EOT.
EaT is a communication control sequence used to indicate the conclusion of a transmission,
which may have contained one or more texts 'and any associated headings. The sequence may
also be used to indicate "No Traffic" in response to a poll.
(1)
(2)
(3)
UP-7779.1
Receipt of the EaT sequence by a control station, subsequent to a poll, indicates
that the polled-tributary station has no traffic to send.
The EaT sequence never immediately follows terminal-to-computer traffic when
operating in interactive mode.
The EaT sequence is never transmitted from a control station to a tributary station
in interactive mode.
23
ENg - Enquiry
ENg is a communication control character used in data communication systems to request a
response from a remote station. It may be used as a "who-are"'you7" (WRU) to obtain
identification, or may be used to obtain station status, or both.
ENg is the basic character for the status poll.
(1)
(2)
ENQ is used to solicit status from a station.
ENQ is not used to solicit retransmissions.
SYN - Synchronous Idle
A communication control character used by a synchronous transmission system, in the absence
of any other character, to provide a signal from which synchronism may be achieved or retained.
(1)
(2)
(3)
SYN is used to achieve and maintain character synchronism in synchronous communication
systems.
SYN is used as a communications "time-fill" character during periods in a transmission
when no other charactels are available to send.
SYN may be transmitted by both central and remote stations as described below.
o After a period in which no characters have been transmitted on a channel, and prior
to the transmission of any other character, at least four SYN characters must be
transmitted.
o
Determination of synchronization, once achieved, and the recognition of character
synchronization are the responsibility of the receiving station. No station is
considered synchronized until two successive SYN characters have been received. All
stations in a multipoint mode remain in synchronization when not sending, if data is
present on the receive line.
o
Stations are considered out of synchronization when they detect three successive
characters other than SYN, which are not control functions, while the stations are
not in a data mode.
o When the SYN character is used as a communications "time-full" character during a
transmission, SYN may be arbitrarily added at any point in the transmission except:
(1)
(2)
in a control sequence following DLE
between ETB or ETX and the next following BCC
o The SYN character is not to be used for time=fill or media-fill functions that are to
be conveyed through the system.
DLE
The receiving station deletes all SYN characters.
Data Link Escape
DLE is a communication control character which changes the meaning of a limited number of
immediately following characters. It is used only to provide supplementary controls in data
communication networks.
Additional control functions are represented by an unbroken sequence of characters, the first
character of which is always DLE.
5.1.2.
CONTROL SEQUENCES REPRESENTED BY CODE EXTENSION
DEOT - Mandatory Disconnect
DEOT is a communication control sequence commanding the disconnection of a communication
link. It comprises the character sequence DLE EOT.
24
UP-7779.1
~
(1)
DEOT indicates the end of a transmission and results in the mandatory disconnection of a
circuit-switched communication link.
A master station relinquishes its right to transmit by sending DEOT.
The receipt of DEOT cancels any previous selection of a remote station.
A DEOT is never specifically addressed to only one station.
No response is made by the remote station to a DEOT.
(2)
(3)
(4)
(5)
ACKn - Acknowledgement n
Abbreviation
Representation
ACKO
DLE followed by 0
ACKI
DIE followed by 1
ACKn is a set of communication control sequences transmitted by a receiver as affirmative
responses to a sender. These are used in lieu of ACK to number affirmative replies.
(1)
(2)
ACKn is transmitted by a remote station as a numbered affirmative reply.
ACK1 is used as the acknowledgement in those links using single acknowledgements.
has all the functional properties of ACK.
WABT
~
It
Wait Before Transmit
WABT is a communication control sequence sent by a remote station when an error free bloct or
message has been received but the station is temporarily unable to receive more traffic.
It comprises the character sequence DIE ?
Functional Properties
WABT is transmitted by the remote station when it is not ready to receive, or when it has not
completed a control function.
DNAK - Negative Acknowledgement
The DNAK is a communication control sequence sent by a master station to indicate a negative
reply. Primarily used in conjunction with ACKn, DNAK has all the functional properties of NAK.
It comprises the character sequence DLE NAK.
Function
(1)
(2)
DNAK is transmitted by a remote station as a negative reply when operating in the batch
mode, or as a retransmission request for the last block or message.
DNAK is transmitted by a master station as a retransmission request when operating
multipoint. It is used in response to a DENQ Reply Request from the remote station.
DBR - Break (For Embedded Segment)
DBR is a communication control sequence used to break a message for the purpose of inserting
another message to another station. It is represented by the character sequence DLE [
The DRB sequence is not included in the BeC of either message block.
Function
(1)
(2)
(3)
It identifies the following characters as being in a new block.
It suspends the calculation of the BCC of 'the first block.
It causes the receiver of the first block to stand by.
DRE - Resume (After Embedded Segment)
DRE is a communication control sequence used to terminate the insertion begun by the DBR.
represented by the character sequence DLE].
It is
The DRE sequence is not included in the BCC of either message block.
UP-7779.1
25
Function
(1)
(2)
(3)
It marks the end of an embedded message.
It returns the interrupted receiver to its previous condition.
It initiates the resumption of the calculation of the BCC for the original block.
DENQ - Modified Enquiry
DENQ is a communication control sequence used in data communication systems as a request for
a response from a remote station. It comprises the character sequence DLE ENQ.
5.1.3.
MISCELLANEOUS CONTROL CHARACTERS OR SEQUENCES
The miscellaneous control characters are not necessarily communication controls, but they
are related and are included here as a matter of record.
EM - End of Medium
EM is a control character associated with transmitted data; it may be used to identify the
physical end of the medium or the end of the used or wanted portion of information recorded
in a medium.
(1)
(2)
(3)
It is normally used in fixed block systems to inform the receiving station that the block
being received has fewer characters than normal.
It may be followed by ETX or ETB or embedded block.
EM is included in the data and the l'edundancy check.
NUL - Null
The NUL is an all-zeros character which may serve to accomplish time fill and media fill.
The NUL character is used for time-fill or media-fill functions that are to be conveyed through
the system.
SO - Shi ft Out
SO is a control character which indicates that the code combinations that follow are not to
be interpreted as a member of the character set of the standard code table until a Shift In
character is reached.
It causes the replacement of the standard set of graphics by an alternate set.
SI - Shift In
SI is a control character indicating that the code combinations which follow are to be
interpreted according to the standard code table.
It causes the replacement of an alternate set of graphics by the standard set.
26
UP-7779.1
ESC - Escape
ESC is a control character intended to provide code extension (supplementary characters) in
general information interchange. The Escape character itself is a prefix affecting the
interpretation of a limited number of contiguously following ANSCII characters.
The combination of ESC and the following characters are used to represent a control function
not directly represented within the code.
BCC - Block Check Character
BCC is a character added at the end of a message or transmission
detection as follows:
(1)
( 2)
(3)
blc~k
to facilitate error
The BCC is generated by taking a binary sum independently (without carry) on each of
the 7 individual levels of the transmitted code (b l to b 7 ).
In each code level, the number of 1 bits, including any in the BCC, is caused to be
even. Thus, the sense of longitudinal parity is said to be even whether the transmission
is synchronous or asynchronous.
The correct value of the character parity bit of the BCC itself is that which makes the
sense of character parity the same as for text character.
Function
(1)
Counting for the BCC is started immediately following the first appearance in a message
or transmission block of either SOH or SIX. STX may appear once in a block started with
SOH; in that case, the count includes STX.
(2)
All characters following the delimiting character (SOH or STX) are included in the
summation except SYN characters, and embedded messages with their delimiters, DBR and
DRE.
The summation includes the delimiting control character which signals that the next
following character is the BCC.
(3)
5.2.
The BCC is transmitted as the next character following the transmission of each end-oftext or end-of-block marker (EIX or ETB).
DATA CHARACTERS
The data characters are the graphic symbols taken from ANSI X3.4 - 1967, "Standard Code for
Information Interchange." The character set is shown in Figure 2-1. The 64-character option
includes the characters shown in columns 2 through 5. The 96-character option includes the
characters in columns 2 through 7.
5.3.
EDITING AND DEVICE CONTROL CODES
CARRIAGE RETURN
The Carriage Return character sent from the computer to the UNISCOPE 100 terminal causes the
cursor on the UNISCOPE 100 terminal display to move to the beginning of the next line. The
Carriage Return is not placed in memory. Sent from the UNISCOPE 100 terminal to the computer,
Carriage Returns are inserted at the end of each line (after nonsignificant spaces are
suppressed) in the data transmitted to the computer.
ERASE TO END OF LINE
The Erase to End of Line function may be transmitted from the computer to the display; this
causes the erasure of the display from the current cursor position to the end of the line.
Erase to End of Line is not transmitted by the UNISCOPE 100 terminal to the computer.
UP-7779.1
27
ERASE TO END OF DISPLAY
Erase to End of Display causes erasure of the UNISCOPE 100 terminal display from the current
cursor position to the end of the display. The Erase to End of Display function is not transmitted from the UNISCOPE 100 terminal to the computer.
DELETE IN LINE
(NOTE:
DELETE, as used in this group of control functions, is equivalent to "erase and close uplt .. )
The Delete in Line function operates the same as the Delete in Line key on the UNISCOPE 100
terminal keyboard. The character at the cursor position is deleted, and the rest of the
characters in the line are moved to the left to close the gap, leaving a blank at the end of
that line. Delete in Line is not transmitted from the UNISCOPE 100 terminal to the computer.
DELETE IN DISPLAY
The Delete in Display function operates the same as the Delete in Display key (upper case) on
the UNISCOPE 100 terminal keyboard. The character under the current cursor position is deleted,
and all of the following characters to the end of the display are moved left one position,
leaving a blank at the end of the display.
INSERT IN DISPLAY
The Insert in Display function operates the same as the Insert in Display
the UNISOOPE 100 terminal keyboard. All of the characters beginning with
the cursor are moved to the right one position with the last character on
lost. A space is inserted at the cursor position. The Insert in Display
transmitted from the UNISCOPE 100 terminal to the computer.
(lower case) key on
the character under
the display being
character is not
INSERT IN LINE
The Insert in Line function operates the same as the Insert in Line (lower case) key on the
UNISCOPE 100 terminal keyboard. The character under the cursor and all of the characters to
the right of the cursor on the same line are moved to the right with the last character on
the line being lost. A space is inserted at the cursor position. The Insert in Line function
is not transmitted from the UNISCOPE 100 terminal to the computer.
SCAN LEFT
This function causes the cursor to move one position to the left.
transmitted from the UNISCOPE 100 terminal to the computer.
This function is not
SCAN RIGHT
This function causes the cursor to move one space to the right, without disturbing the contents
of memory.
SCAN DOWN
This function causes the cursor to move down one line.
UNISCOPE 100 terminal to the computer.
This function causes the cursor to move up one line.
UNISOOPE 100 terminal to the computer.
This function is not sent from the
This function is not sent from the
The Space character is a nondisplay character used as a space.
transmitted from the UNISOOPE 100 terminal to the computer.
The space character may be
The function of Tab is similar to that of the Tab key on the DNISCOPE 100 terminal keyboard.
The Tab function causes the cursor to move to the next tab stop set in the memory of UNISCOPE
100 terminal.
28
UP-7779.1
CURSOR TO HOME
The Cursor to Home function moves the cursor to the upper left hand corner of the screen
(line 1, position 1).
INSERT LINE
The Insert Line function causes the line at the cursor position, and all following lines, to
move down one line, resulting in a blank line at the cursor position and the loss of the
bottom line. The Insert Line function is not sent from the UNISCOPE 100 terminal to computer.
DELETE LINE
The Delete Line function causes all of the lines below the line at the cursor position to move
up one line, resulting in the loss of the data on the line at the cursor position and the
appearance of a blank line at the bottom of the screen. Repeated use of the Delete Line
function results in rolling the data upward across the screen. The Delete Line function is not
transmitted from the UNISCOPE 100 terminal to the computer.
MESSAGE WAITING
The Message Waiting function is sent from the computer to the UNISCOPE 100 display to indicate
that the computer has an unsolicited message available for the operator. The function lights
the Message Waiting light. The actual meaning of this message and the light may vary from
system to system according to local requirements. In many systems, it is used to permit the
computer to present a message to the operator without destroying information being typed into
the screen by the operator. BEL has this meaning only when it is included in the message
before SIX.
If BEL is included in the text of the message, it does not perform this function, but it is
placed in memory and is not displayed.
REQUEST COMPUTER MESSAGE
When the operator presses the Message Waiting button, a message is generated for transmission
to the computer; it contains the BEL character, indicating to the computer that the Message
~aiting key was pressed.
BEL has this meaning only if it comes before the SIX message. BEL
may appear in the text portion of the message as a result of having been entered either from
the computer or from the auxiliary interface.
TAB STOP SET
The Tab Stop Set function from the computer causes the display to place the HT character in
memory to act as a tab stop (see Tab). If text containing tab stops is returned to the
computer, the tab stops (HT) will appear in the data. There is no restriction on the number
of times HI may be used.
START BLINK FIELD
Start Blink Field, FS, is placed in memory; it causes the Start Blink character to appear on
the screen and blink.
END BLINK FIELD
End Blink Field, GS, is placed in memory; it causes the End Blink character to appear on the
screen and blink.
LOCK KEYBOARD
When either the Transmit key or the Message Waiting key is pressed, the keyboard becomes locked
(disabled). The keyboard is also locked when the Start of Text character (SIX) is received
from the computer. If the text message does not include the locked keyboard (DC 4) characters
at the end of the Text (ETX followed by a satisfactory BOC) the keyboard is automatically
unlocked. Ihis gives the programmer the ability to lock the keyboard, and makes it unnecessary
to use an unlocking character in each text message.
UP-7779.1
29
PRINT (OUTPUT)
The Print code causes the terminal to output data from the display memory to the auxiliary
channel. The format for outputting data to the auxiliary channel is identical to that for
outputting data to the communications channel; that is, the area to be transmitted is to be
defined by the SOE (~) character and the cursor with suppression of nonsignificant spaces and
the automatic insertion of carriage returns. The printed output thereby appears in the screen
format. This is the same print function exercised by the print key (FR 4).
PRINT TRANSPARENT (OUTPUT)
The Print Transparent function causes output from the display memory to the auxiliary channel
in the same manner as the print function; neither function starts until the receipt of a
satisfactory BCC associated with the message. The area transmitted is the same as in the
print function, but the carriage return characters normally inserted by the logic of the UNISCOPE
100 terminal are not transmitted to the auxiliary channel. This permits program use of other
functions, such as LF, for carriage return, transport function, etc. This makes the line
length and card length of the device on the auxiliary channel independent of the line length
of the particular display in use.
TRANSMIT
The Transmit code may be tran$mitted from the computer to the display_ It will not be acted
upon until the receipt of a satisfactory BCC character in the associated message. The result
of action is the same as for the depression of the transmit key (FR 6).
START OF ENTRY (SOE)
[>
RS
The Start of Entry character~defines the beginning of the area to be transmitted to the
computer or to the auxiliary interface. More than one SOE[> character may be on the screen
(in memory at one time). The SOE [> closest to the cursor defines the beginning of the area
that will actually be transmitted. The ability to have multiple SOE[> characters on the
screen eliminates, for the programmer, the problem of removing these characters in instances
where successive transmissions remain on the screen, and also enables the programmer to place
multiple SOE[> characters on the screen from the computer in order to aid the formatting of
the next text to be transmitted. This might be a multiple choice by the operator, where the
operator positioning the cursor takes some action including a transmit which would send back
a controlled area. It might be used in a situation where the program sends repeated questions
or answers, with a response requested from the operator by including the SOE[> character at the
end of the message transmitted by the program. The operator can type his response (question or
answer as appropriate) beginning at the position of the cursor, and then press the transmit
key at the end of his response without giving his attentions to the SOE [> character or to its
transmitted location. This is useful when the operator is not well-trained, and where program
control of the area to be transmitted is intended.
SI ... SO
The ANSCII Shift In (S1) and Shift Out (SO) characters are used to switch to an alternate graphic
set, and to return to the standard. By their use, transmission is not limited to the 96
characters defined in the ANSCII character set. These characters are reserved for this function.
LF, FF, EM
The ANSCII Line Feed (LF), Form Feed (FF), and the End of Medium (EM) are intended for use by
the UNISCOPE 100 terminal for the auxiliary interface. The UNISCOPE 100 terminal itself is
transparent to these characters; they may be placed in memory by either the communications
interface or the auxiliary interface, and do not affect the display on the UNISCOPE 100
terminal.
30
UP-7779.1
6.
MESSAGE FORMAT
A message is a sequence of characters arranged for the purpose of conveying information from an
originator to one or more destinations (or addresses). There are Heading Messages that convey
supervisory information and Composite Messages that convey both heading information and text.
HEADING
MESSAGE
COMPOSITE
MESSAGE
SOO
ADDRESS
SUPERVISORY SEQUENCE (IF REQUIRED)
ETX
BCC
SOH
ADDRESS
SUPERVISORY SEQUENCE (IF REQUIRED)
STX
TEXT
E~
BCC
6.1.
HEADING MESSAGE
A Heading Message is a sequence of characters that conveys addressing, routing, communication
control and device control functions. A Heading Message is preceeded by a SOH character and
is ended by either an STX character or an ETX character. The terminal logic automatically
generates the required header for each message. The program generates the header of each message
transmitted by the computer.
6.2.
COMPOSITE MESSAGE
The first part of a composite message is a sequence of characters forming a heading message as
defined in paragraph 6.1, and terminated by STX. The second part is the text message, which is
a sequence of characters conveying the text and information necessary to handle the text. The
text message begins with the same STX character that te~minates the heading and ends with the
ETX character.
UP-7779.1
31
APPENDIX A.
LINE CONTROL RULES FOR ANY SINGLE
STATION OR MULTIPLEXER
Certain rules must be followed to allow recovery from telephone line error without loss or duplication
of messages.. These rules establish the seqvence in which the various transmissions are exchanged.
The rules apply to anyone single station or to anyone multiplexer and its associated stations.
Figure A-I illustrates the traffic flow between the UNISCOPE 100 terminal and the computer.
1.
Acknowledgements from the computer to the terminal are always sent with the poll..
response to a message is a Poll with Acknowledge.
2.
The terminal must get an acknowledgement on its next poll (specific or general) if an acknowledgement
is due.. If one is not received, the terminal sends the Reply Request.
3..
When a "No Traffic Response It (EOT ETX) is the response to a Poll or a Poll with Acknowledge, the
next poll will not include an acknowledgement because no message was. received.
4.
When the response of a terminal to a poll is Acknowledge without Traffic, the computer must send
an Acknowledge with the next poll to prevent the terminal from sending a Reply Request.
5.
After receiving a message (text) from a terminal, a Poll with Acknowledge must be sent to that
station before a text message can be sent to that same station.
6..
After receiving a message (TEXT) from the computer, the acknowledgement to that message must be
sent with the next message to the computer from the terminal, or from any terminal recognizing
the. same RID.
7.
After the computer receives an acknowledgement from a terminal, it must poll that terminal again
before it can send another text message to that terminal.
8..
A terminal does not reply with a message to a Poll with Acknowledge. The terminal will respond
with a No Traffic Poll, generally EOT EOT, but for CYMC systems EOT EOT ETX BCC. The significance
of this is that a single terminal never sends in two successive text messages, this prevents loss
or duplication of blocks if there is an error condition. If the terminal sends a Reply Request
and the computer has not received, and therefore not acknowledged the message, the computer sends
a Retransmit Request to the terminal.
9.
If the terminal sends in a Reply Request and the computer had already received and acknowledged
the message, the acknowledgement is repeated with a poll specifically addressed to that terminal*
10.
The computer treats any error in a message as a No Response and calls for a retransmission. -The
terminal never responds to a message containing an error. Thus, if No Response follows a Poll,
the computer must repeat the Poll (without the Ackn:)wledge if one was present). If No Response
follows a Retl'ansmit Request, the computer must repeat the Retransmit Request. If a terminal
does not receive an answer to a Reply Request, the terminal must repeat the Reply Request when
polled again.
11.
The receipt of a message which causes a Busy condition at a terminal will be acknowledged with
a WABT (DLE?), in response to the poll that follows the message which caused the busy condition.
The response to subsequent specific polls will be a DLE? as long as the busy condition persists.
The No Traffic response will be sent in response to subsequent general polls" The end of a
Busy condition is indicated by transmission of DLE;. The DLE; response must not contain text
but may contain an Acknowledge or Busy from another terminal on the multiplexer.
32
The normal
UP-7Ti9.1
TERMINAL --.. COMPUTER
COMPUTER --.. TERMINAL
EB
-TC
...--- XC
TRAFFIC POLL
AT--~---:---
~ 7 ~ ~ ~~ ~
H D G G
Dl~1
S R S
--""""<'"""-1-----7"""""- a I I I
IX C --,~r-t-I----_t-r- H D 0 o ~~~
E
POL L
S
T
X
L 1 \(""
E
D
-
TEXT
E B
TC
XC
l A
\.
SELE CTION
_
(3
'-
L ?
E
I
I
RETRANSMIT REQUEST
BT--t-+~~----
J--t-+-~----
I
SRSODNEB
I I I L A T C
HODDE K X C
a
1
NO REPLY _
NO TRAFFIC
~
Va1<-
or
T
I
I
I
E E E B
T C
T T X C
a a
./
REPLy REQUEST
RECO VERY
S R S 0 D E E B
a I I I L N T C
H D D D E Q x C
l B
NO REPLY
STATUS PO LL
S R S D E
I I I N
H 0 G G Q
a
~EB
a
LIT C
E
XC
1-\
~
1\
l
ACK
0
L 1
E
S R S 0
I I I
H D 0 G
(EJhEBJ
LO
E
T C_v
XC
TO INTER VENTION
I
I
I
'-
0
L ?
E
WABT
-
SELECTION
0,---.,--- a
S R S 0
I I I
HOOD
S
----~T
X
TEXT
E B
TCI-------~-------------------------------------------------~
XC
NOTE: S/G Signifies SID or GID
w
w
Figure A-I.
"',.
DIG signifies DID or GIO
UNISCOPE 100 Terminal Traffic Flow Diagram
~~
.'~. r"1\/C~ ./'
sp'E~Yt~~">"i'~.
/
~ :rV\( ':"J':~'W N IVAc:. DIVISION
'"" ...)~'
fj
C
.
'\,:~, .
'\~.\ ) \..... .... ' 1f\I'.TERCGlMMUNICATION
("\'-,..:~,
.'. ' "
-'7
'~\,~""t'Regrori~a·:.thield Directors
;::n>'t/T.O~'Bf~nsVMarketing Managers
)
\0 F_
~s;:ems Analyst Managers
~~
/' &
FROM (NAME & EXT):
'
T Regional Sales Managers
T COID.'llunications Analysts
LOCATlON&OATE:
OEPARTMENT&M,S,:
,
/"
...cARBONS:
T. F. Lamb
SUBJECT:
S. C. Mehta
Chicago - 16 March 1971
Field Operations West
CMX, MODEL FOR NETWORKS WITH
UNISCOPE 100's and DCT's
A model for communications network with Uniscope 100's and
DCT's was built in GPSS.
A copy of the line control rules modeled for single station
and multiplexer is attached herewith. See Appendix A. The
model assumes that the number of errors will be very small
and' ignores retransmipsions and replY,requests.
In one typical case for which the model was used, the following calculations were made to validate the results of
the model with their help.
1.
Calculations of the line busy time for:
a)
b)
c)
2.
Complete processing of each input
message
Polls
Unsolicited messages
Calculations for line utilizations.
Central Site time calculations were made as the Central
Site time is used for input to the model.
The description of modeling of polling, line control procedures and transmission of unsolicited messages is given
in Appendix B.
Some of the output given by the model is listed below:
1)
2)
3)
4)
5)
6)
7)
Utilization of lines.
Utilization of devices for print.
Distribution of response time of all lines.
A separate distribution of response time for each
of the lines.
Distribution of wait time for a locked keyboard.
Distribution of wait time for receiving a poll.
Number of polls skipped and not skipped per
line and device.
Page -216 March 1971
Some of the questions the model can answer are:
1)
2)
3)
4)
5)
6)
At what load the network is saturated?
Are more lines necessary?
Is it necessary to have duplex lines?
What is the ideal interval between polls?
Does the network meet the criterion for the
response time?
Should the network design be changed for
improved response time?
For questions, conunents, and details, feel free to contact
me.
jkeAJkS.
/sp
e.
MEHTA
APPENDIX A.
LINE CONTROL RULES FOR AN'! SINGLE
STATION OR MULTIPLEXER
Certain rules must be followed to allow recovery from telephone line error without loss or duplication
of messages. These rules establish the sequence in which the various transmissions are exchanged •
• !he rules apply to anyone single station or to anyone multiplexer and its associated stations.
Figure A-l illustrates the traffic flow betwe~n the UNISCOPE 100 terminal and the computer. i
,
,'. 1.
Acknowledgements trom the computer to the terminal are always sent with the poll.
response to a,message is a Poll with Acknowledge.
:
2.
.
The termihal must get an acknowledgement on its next poll (specific or
is due. If one is not received, the terminal
sends the Reply Request.
,.
.
" .
.
g~ner~l) if
!he normal
an
aCkn~~ledgement
~..
3. Vfuen a "No Traffic Response" (EOT ETX) is·the response to a Poll or a Poll with Acknowledge, the
next poll will not inc~ude an ackn!Jwledgement because no message was received.
.
4.
When the response of a terminal to a poll is Acknowledge without Traffic, the computer ~ust ~cind
an Acknowledge with the next poll to prevent the terminal from sending a Reply Request.
5.
After receiving a mes'sage (text) from a terminal, a Poll with Ackno\'/ledge must be' sent to that
station before a text mes~age can be sent to that same station.
6.
After receiving a.message (TEXT)' from the computer, the acknowledgement to that message must be
sent with the next message to the computer from.the terminal, or· from any terminal recognizing
the same RID.
'
7.
After the computer receives an acknowledgement from a terminal, it must poll that t~rminal again
before it can s~nd another text message to th~t terminal.
8.
A terminal does not reply with a message to a Poll with Acknowledge. The terminal will respond
with a No Traffic PoU" generally EaT EOT, but for cn.tC systems EaT EOT EIX BCC. The significance
of this is that a singl~ terminal never sends in two successive text messages; this prevents loss
or duplication 'of blocks if there is an error condition. If the terminal sends a Reply Request
and the computer has not rece:ved, and therefore not acknowledged the message, the computer sends
a Retransmit Request to the terminal.
.
9.
If the terminal sends ina Reply Request and the computer had already received and acknowledged
the message, the acknowledgement is repeated, with a poll specifically addressed to'that terminal.
*- 10.
11.
32
The computer ,treats any error in a message as a No Response and calls for a retransmission. The
terminal never responds to a message containing an error. Thus, if No Response follows a Poll,
the computer must repeat the Poll (without the Acknowledge if one Vias present). If No Response
follows a Retransmit Request, the computer must repeat the Retransmit Request. If a terminal
does not receive an answer to a Reply Request, the terminal 'must repeat the Reply Request when
polled again.
The receipt of a message "':hich causes a Busy condition at a terminal wi~l be acknowl'edged with
a WABT (DLE?); in response to the poll that follows the message which caused the busy condition.
The response to subsequent specific polls will be a DLE? as long as the busy condition persists •
. The No Traffic response will be sent in response to subsequent general polls. The end of a,l.,:
Busy condition is indicated by tr~nsmission of, DiE;. The DLE; response must not contain text
but may contain an AcknolNledge or Busy from another terminal on the 'multiplexer.
UP-7779.1
",
APPENDIX B
This network model is very useful for marketing and response
time and analysis of networks with Uniscope 100's and DCT's.
It is flexible.
It can be used to model any network with
Uniscope 100's and DCT's by making a few changes. As long
as the other networks have upto 12 conununication lines and
up,to 90 devices, this model can be re-used by inputting the
ne\v data. Please contact me for more details 'about where
this model can be used repetitively. The model is described
below:
POLLING:
1. The lines are polled in round-robin manner.
2. General polls are sent.
3.' If the device is busy, receive wait-a-bit
message.
4~
Only 1 poll can be outstanding on a line.
S. The interval between polls is variable.
Try to poll all lines at each poll interval.
6. Once a poll is received by an input, the
keyboard is locked.
'
LI~m
CONTROL PROCEDURES MODELED ARE:
(l)
INPUT: The inputs from a device come is as
result of successful polls.
(NOTE)
In a modeled network, 123 characters
of header information is inputted. first.
1a.
CENTRAL SITE DELAY: Delay for processing
the header input.
(NO'rE)
For the modeled case, see central
site calculations.
(2)
OJTPUT: Send an ACKPOLL to the MUX. If no
MUX on the line, send it to the' device.
(NOTE)
For the modeled case, 12 characters
are transmitted for an ACKPOLL.
2a.
INPUT: An input or a NO TRAFFIC RESPONSE
from the second device on the ~.IUX.
(3)
00TPUT: Display header to the first device.
In' the modeled case, 280 characters are
output.
(4)
OUTPUT: Send a specific ACKPOLL if an input
message was received for the ACKPOLL in Step
2, otherwise a general ACKPOLL.
'
(NOTE)
In the modeled case, there are 12
characters par spacific ACKPOLL.
4a.
INPUT: Receive an ACK from the first
device with information about the cursor
position.
(NOTE)
In the modeled case," 12 char, acters for ACK plus 5 for cursor pqsition
are inputted assuming a non-home cursor
position.
(5)
OUTPUT:
(6)
OUTPUT: Display format.
(NOTE)
In the modeled-case,
acters are sent.
Send ACKPOLL for the above input.
160 char-
6a.
OPERATOR KEY-IN DELAY: Delay for the
operator to key-in the line items.
(NOTE)
In the modeled case", : this delay
is of 18 seconds.
(7)
OUTPUT:
7a.
INPUT: Receive line items from the deVice.
(NOrE)
In the modeled case', ". an average
of 6 line items are received with an average
of 123 characters; The maximum number of'
input characters reaches 280.
Same as Step 4.
If the input device is a DCT, the input is
received with 160 character buffers per
, transmission and for each input transmission
ACKPOLL is sent.
See step 2 and 2a above •
. Transmission of DCT output is also done in
buffers of 160 characters.
7b.
CENTRAL SITE DELAY: Delay for processiong
the line items.
(NOTE) For the modeled case, '. see the
central site time calculations.
(8)
INPUT:
(9')
Receive an input message or a NTR.
OUTPUT: Display line items.
(NOTE)
In the modeled case,
an average
of 518 characters are sent, the maximum
,being 1300.
(10)
OUTPUT:
Same as Step 4.
lOa.
INPUT:
Same as step 4a.
,(11)
OUTPUT:
Send an ACKPOLL.
.(12)
OUTPUT: Send the hardcopy output for
printing. The device remains busy for
printing.
(NOTE)
In the modeled case,
an
average of 970 characters are 'sent out.
The device prints at 30 characters per
second. ,The delays for line feed and
carriage return are also accounted.
(13)
At the end printing of characters, the
device is free for more inputs.'
UNSOLICITED
\
.
MES~GES:
(1)
OUTPUT:
(2)
INPUT: If the device is busy, get a
wait-a-bit message otherwise a NO TRAFFIC
message. If the device is found to be
busy, wait for it to beco~e fr~e.
(3)
OUTPUT: Send the output characters.
(NOTE)
In the modeled case,
an average
of 970 characters are sent.
If they are
destined ·for a DCT, they are transmitted
as 160 characters buffers. All of these
are for hardcopy printing. Hence, printing delay is also introduced.
(4)
.At the end of the printing, the device is
free for more inputs.
Send a status poll to the device.
CENTRAL SITE TIME CALCULATIONS
(The no. of instructions par file
access and the wait times in these
are my ,assumptions.
For more
accuracy, the C.S. model must be
run. )
1.
After receiving an input of header, read
3 files.
2 accesses per read to FH-1782
For'indices
(3*2)*(20 mils per accesS.)
1 access per read to 8414 disc
For record
(3*1)*80'
Add wait time for 1782
6*5
.Add wait time for 8414
3*15
Add CPU time
900 for translation of data etc.
9 accesses*1000 for 9 accesses
CPU wait time
CPU speed is taken as 1 microsec/instrn
120
240
30
45
9
9
7
460
2.
After receiving body of the input of line
items.
Ave. no. of line items = 6
Read 2 files per line items.
2 accesses per file read to FH-1782
12 reads*2*(20 mils per access)
1 access per file read to 8414 disc.
12*1*80 '
Add wait time for FH-1782
24*5
Add wait time for 8414
12*15
Read 3 files per input message
Regardless of no. of line items.
3*(2 accesses/file read)*(20 mils/access of 1782)
3*(1 access/file read)*(80 mils/access of 8414)
1 read of 8'414 to load user I plus D bank
. Wait time of 1782
6*5
Wait time of 8414
(3plus1) *15
CPU time
'
43 accesses*1000 for 43 accesses
User program instructions = 5000
CPU \vai t time
Since some files will be accessed by several
transactions, add some wait time for files.
480
960
120
180
120
240
80
30
.60
43
5
13
169
2500
AVERAGE NUMBER OF INPUT C"rlARACTERS FOR
EVERY INPUT MESSA.GE:
Co
"I
..L.
123
10
2.
17
3.
123
10
4.
17
300
AVE. NO. OF OUTPUT CHARS PER TRANSMISSION
FOR EVERY INPUT MESSAGE
1.
12
2.
280
3.
12
4.
12
5.
160
6.
12
7.
12
8.
this, Do not:· .
.
ignore the fact that DCT's buff can
hold 160 chars.
.
ti
0r
576 {518 ave. output plus 2 ACKPOLLS * 12
1Plus 2 * inputs of 17 chars. = 576
9.
12
10.
12
11.
970
DCTS· receive 160 char. buffs.
ssume 3 xmissions of output
text and 3 for ACKPOLL & 3 for
~CKS from devices to A~POLLS.
970 plus 3*12 = 1006 of output
{ 3*17 = ' .
51 of input
t
2070
'.
CALCULATING LINE BUSY TIME. FOR
CONVERSATION BETWEEN CPU AND A
TERMINAL FOR EACH INPUT MESSAGE
MIN. NO. OF XMISSIONS
=
27
FIGURING FOR 1800 B.P.S. LINES
milliseconds
8*27
216
. MIN. PROPAGA'rION DELAYS
150*23
'(4 times no. prop. delay)
LINE XMISSION TIME TO XMIT
2370 CHARACTERS ON AN 1800 B.P.S. LINE
3450
. PROPAGATION TIME
LINE TIME TO XMIT BACK & 'FORTH
14198
SAY
..
10532
14.2 sec.s
'
FOR 2400 B.P.S. LINE
XMISSION TIME
PROPAGATION
PROP. DELAYS
7900
8x27
216
150x23
3450
11566
SAY 11.6 sec.s
CALCULhTING MIN. LINE BUSY TIME PER POLL AND PER NTR.
NO. OF POLL CHARS
=
9
FIGURING FOR 1800 B.P.S. LINES
millisecond
PROPAGATION TIME
8
150
PROPAGATION DELAY
LINE XMISSION
TI~ffi
FOR 9 CHARS.
50
:40-1-98 .
:206
FOR 2400 B.P.S. LINE
PROPAGATION TIME
8
PROPAGATION DELAY
150 .
LINE XMISSION TIME FOR 9 CHARS.
30
188
NTR
FOR 1800 B. P.S. LINES
PROPAGATION TIME
8
150 .
PROPAGATION DELAY
LINE
~~ISSION
TIME FOR 5 CHARS.
') Fo R ?-A 0 0 g r ~ S.
,./ PROPAGATION TIME
I
L:fN r::s:
2f?
-2-2-
-180
t
. J '66.
8
!
I 'PROPAGATION
DELAY
150
{ LINE XMISSION TIME FOR 5 CHARs.
17
I
.I
"'-
175
CALCULATING MIN. NO. OF CHARS. FOR EVERY UNSOLICITED (OUTPUT) MESSAGE
no. of chars.
AVE. NO. OF OUTPUT CHARS. (USM ONLY)
:T 1000 GET BUFF.S OF 160 CHARS.
IGURE ABOUT 4 ACKPOLLS FOR EACH USM.
.
4*12 CHARS PER ACAPOLL
MOST USMS GO TO DCTS.
4 ACXS FROM TERMINALS FOR EACH USM.
4*17 ~rlARS per Ac,K
t
1 STATUS POLL
*
9 CHARS PER POLL
.1 REPLY TO STATUS POLL
*
5 CHARS/REPLY.
970
48
68
9
5
1100
NOTE:
NO.
O~
XMISSIONS
=
14
CALCULATING MIN. LINE BUSY TIME FOR EVERY UNSOLICITED (OUTPUT) MESSAGE
FIGURING FOR 1800 B.P.S.LINES.
milliseconds
THERE ARE 14 )G1ISSIONS/USM
112 .
PROPAGATION TIME
14*8
PROPAGATION DELAy....:
14*150
LINE XMISSION TIME FOR 1100 CHARS
2100
4778
6990
SAY 7.0 sec.
FIGURING FOR 2400 B.P.S. LINES.
PROPAGATION TIME
14*8
PROPAGATION DELAY
14*20
112
2100
LINE XMISSION TIME FOR 1100 CHARS.
3667
5879
SAY 5.9 sec.
vNISCOPE 200 DiS~Terminal
Print,d
Table 3-6.
SID Address Codes (Cant)
Table
Bend Pins Up
SIDCade
(Octal)
Connector
Part No.
153
154
2807774-60
1-11
2807774-61
1-3-13
155
156
2807774-62
1-13
2807774-63
1-3
157
2807774-61}
on A12
Table 3-7.
z24
Z45
Z60
Z72
z84
2807774-00
2807774-1+0
2807774-00
2307774-14
2807774-00
None
1-7-13
None
5-7-9
None
2807774-00
2807774-65
2807774-64
2807774-15
280777 11--00
None
3-7-13
1
7-9-11
None
MIL-STD-188c
(See Note)
Display Terminal
to Modem
Z36
ZlliJ
Z60
Z72
Z96
2507774-69
280777).-09
2307774-70
2807774-14
2807771}-00
1}-7
3-5-7-9-11
2-3-4-6-7-8
5-7-9
None
2807774-00
2807774-66
Not used
2807774-15
280'7774-00
None
1-5-7-9-11
empty socket
7-9-11
None
Multiplexer
z48
Z60
Z72
z84
2807774-09
2807774-00
2/J07774-33
2307774-00
3-5-7-9-11
None
1-3-5-7-11-13
None
2807774-66
2807774-00
2807774-33
280777 1.-00
1-5-7-9-11
None
1-3-5-7-11-13
None
Figure Reference
Select Interface Mode (Synchronous or Asynchronous)
folloying table 3-8
3-4
2
Check system operation (Univac or IBM)
3-4
3
Select Baud Rate folloying table 3-9
3-4
i
Bend Pins Up
Display Terminal
to l>lodem
Procedure / Function
Step
BAUD RATE SELECTION, SEE TABLE
ASYNCHRONOUS ONLY
Asynchronous
Synchronou5
COll."1ector
Part NUillber
BS2320/V.24
1/0-2 Board (A12) Strapping Procedure
Strappin,
3-8. Interface Mode Selection (A12)
IConnector
Location
System
Operation
Cire~Oard
Display Terminco.l
to Multiplexer
Connector
Bend Pins Up
Part Number
I
NOTE
MIL-STD-188c specifies a noninverted clock signal for
sJilchronous strapping.
MIL-STD-188B specifies either
an inverted or noninverted clock signal, and SPERRY
UNIVAC modems contain provisions to allo~ either configuration. Determine modem configuration and change
the modem, if necessary, to conform to M1L-STD-188C
(noninverted) clock signal.
3-9
NOT ON SYNCHRONOUS BOARDS
XZI33
~
Table 3-9.
JUMPER IN FOR IBM
OUT FOR UNIVAC
(FACTORY INSTALLED,
SEE TABLE 3-10)
I
~~
Baud Rate Selection (A12)
Asynchronous
Baud Rate
(bps)
110 BOARD NO.2, AI2
300
600
1200
1600
1800
2400
BA
Connector Part Number
at Location XZ133
Bend Pins Up
2807774-67
2807774-34
2807774-19
2807774-42
2807774-38
2807774-68
-i-3-9-11-13
1-3-5-7-13
3-9-11-13
1-3-5-7
1-5-7-13
3-5-7-13
Synchronous
Baud Rate
(bps)
2400
4800
9600
Figure }-4.
3-<3
Con.~ector Part Number
at Location xz84
2807774-62
2805281-17
2807774-63
Bend Pins Up
1-13
3-1 3
1-3
1/0-2 Board (A12) StrApping
REVISION:
HCB-1
MR6055
REVISION:
HCB-1
3-9
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