IC9452 An Underground Coal Mine Fire Preparedness and Response Checklist: The Instrument

IC9452 An Underground Coal Mine Fire Preparedness and Response Checklist: The Instrument
IC9452
INFORMATION
CIRCULAR/2000
An Underground Coal Mine Fire Preparedness
and Response Checklist: The Instrument
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES
Public Health Service
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health
Information Circular 9452
An Underground Coal Mine Fire Preparedness
and Response Checklist: The Instrument
By Ronald S. Conti, Linda L. Chasko, Charles P. Lazzara, Ph.D.,
and Gary Braselton
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES
Public Health Service
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health
Pittsburgh Research Laboratory
Pittsburgh, PA
August 2000
International Standard Serial Number
ISSN 1066-5552
CONTENTS
Page
Abstract . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Background . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Underground coal mine fire preparedness and response checklist . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Water system . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
High-expansion foam . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Fire extinguishers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Fire stations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Automatic fire detection and suppression systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Coal and other combustible materials . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Self-contained self-rescuer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
First responders, fire brigades, and mine rescue . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Other issues . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Generic checklists . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Summary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Acknowledgments . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
References . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Appendix A.—NIOSH underground coal mine fire preparedness and response checklist . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Water supply . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Hoses and nozzles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Foam firefighting equipment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Fire extinguishers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Fire stations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Detection systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Suppression systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Ventilation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Combustible materials underground . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Housekeeping . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Evacuation plans . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Self-contained self-rescuers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
First responders to fire . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Fire brigades . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Mine rescue . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Specialized equipment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Appendix B.—Examples of inspection, maintenance, and general housekeeping checklists and procedures . . . . . . . . . .
Annual hydrant checks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Annual fire hose checks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Annual fire hose tests . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Monthly checks on foam generator . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Brattice curtain for foam generator . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Monthly surface fire extinguisher checklist . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Biannual underground fire extinguisher checklist . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
6-month fire extinguisher inspection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Extinguisher mounting locations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Trailer-mounted Ansul 150C fire extinguishers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Firefighting equipment fire audit report . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
First-aid supplies (example 1) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
First-aid supplies (example 2) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Emergency material skids . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Fire audit form . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Surface fire brigade trailer contents . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Underground fire brigade skid contents . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Materials list for mine rescue emergency . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Safety trailer locations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
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CONTENTS–Continued
Page
Fire protection and firefighting standards . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Fire prevention equipment checklist . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Functional test of mine monitoring systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Weekly Conspec system functional test . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Mine monitor inspection report . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Conspec emergency communication center activity log . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Conspec room callout log . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Cutting/welding permit (example 1) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Cutting/welding permit (example 2) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Specifications for slope water line . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Sprinkler system for freezing and nonfreezing locations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Suppression system . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Annual functional test of the fire suppression at belt drives . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Drawing of a typical water lance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Individual work hazard assessment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Beltline inspection checklist . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
SCSR check sheet . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Daily SCSR examinations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Appendix C.—Examples of response plans and training programs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Mine emergency operation plan . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Emergency response (example 1) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Emergency response (example 2) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Emergency response (fire detection for two-entry system) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Firefighting and evacuation plan . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Firefighting and evacuation duties . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Procedure and duties for fire . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Specific individual duty labels in the event of a fire . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Mine fire training program . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Fire drill simulations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Selection procedures for new emergency response members . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Requirements for emergency response teams . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Training of fire brigade members . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Standard operating procedures for fire attack of the fire brigade . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Donning procedures for PA-80 SCBA . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
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ILLUSTRATIONS
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8.
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17.
1,000,000-gal surface water storage tank at an underground mine . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Measuring the throw distance of water hose . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Inspection of an underground fire hydrant . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Underground storage of fire water hose in barrel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Underground storage of fire water hose in a rack . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Erecting a typical mine stopping for a high-expansion foam generator . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Inflatable feed-tube partition in the Lake Lynn Experimental Mine . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Dry-chemical portable fire extinguisher mounted on the rib . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Dry-chemical wheeled fire extinguisher . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Rock dust stored in plastic bags . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Rock dust storage unprotected . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Fire trailer located on the surface of an underground mine . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
CO fire sensor mounted in mine entry . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Sprinkler system installed in mine entry . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Underground oil storage area . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Improper storage of underground trash . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Mine rescue teams fighting a conveyor belt fire at Lake Lynn Laboratory . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3
3
4
4
4
4
4
5
5
6
6
6
6
7
7
7
8
iii
UNIT OF MEASURE ABBREVIATIONS USED IN THIS REPORT
Btu
British thermal unit
m/sec
meter(s) per second
fpm
foot (feet) per minute
mg/L
milligram(s) per liter
ft
foot (feet)
min
minute(s)
ft/min
foot (feet) per minute
oz
ounce(s)
ft 3/min
cubic foot (feet) per minute
ppm
part(s) per million
gal
gallon(s)
psi
pound(s) (force) per square inch
gpm
gallon(s) per minute
psig
pound(s) (force) per square inch, gauge
hr
hour(s)
sec
second(s)
in
inch(es)
yd
yard(s)
lb
pound(s)
EF
degrees Fahrenheit
AN UNDERGROUND COAL MINE FIRE PREPAREDNESS AND RESPONSE CHECKLIST:
THE INSTRUMENT
By Ronald S. Conti,1 Linda L. Chasko,2 Charles P. Lazzara, Ph.D. 3 and Gary Braselton4
ABSTRACT
Preparedness is an important element of any underground mine's strategic plan in dealing with an unexpected
event, such as a fire. A fully implemented fire preparedness and response plan is essential in reducing the
probability and seriousness of a mine fire. This report describes the development of an underground coal mine
fire preparedness and response checklist (MFPRC). The checklist is a data collection instrument for profiling
both the fire prevention and response capabilities of a mine site and usually requires 3 to 4 days to complete.
The checklist encompasses conditions, procedures, and equipment that have frequently been identified as the
primary or contributing causes of underground coal mine fires. At least 1 day is needed underground to
evaluate the water system. This entails measurements of waterflows and pressures at fire hydrants, and water
throw distances of fire hose and nozzles at several locations (mains and branch lines). A few of the other topics
that are discussed with mine personnel include detection and suppression systems, combustible materials, mine
rescue and fire brigades, and firefighting equipment.
The MFPRC was developed by the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH),
Pittsburgh Research Laboratory. Under a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) with
Cyprus Amax, Twentymile Coal Co. (Oak Creek, CO), the checklist was field tested and further refined.
Additional field tests were conducted at several other operating coal mines.
1
2
3
4
Fire prevention engineer, Pittsburgh Research Laboratory, National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, Pittsburgh, PA.
Physical science technician, Pittsburgh Research Laboratory, National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, Pittsburgh, PA.
Research chemist, Pittsburgh Research Laboratory, National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, Pittsburgh, PA.
Safety trainer, Twentymile Coal Mine, Oak Creek, CO.
2
BACKGROUND
Fires are still too common an occurrence in the mining
industry. Statistics from the Mine Safety and Health Administration (MSHA)5 indicate that 153 reportable fires (i.e., fires
lasting more than 30 min after discovery or causing injury)
occurred at underground coal mines from 1990 to 1999 in
the United States, causing 1 fatality and 46 injuries.
A significantly higher number of unreportable fires are believed
to have occurred. A recent fire happened on November 25,
1998, at Cyprus Plateau Mining Corp.'s Willow Creek
underground mine near Price, UT, during coal production.
Forty-five miners evacuated. The mine was sealed, and inert gas
was injected into the fire area. Mine rescue teams entered the
sealed mine on December 9, 1998, to initiate recovery operations.
Another fire occurred on January 26, 1999, at Oxbow Mining,
Inc.'s Sanborn Creek underground coal mine near Somerset, CO.
All of the miners were evacuated, the mine was temporarily
sealed, and water was pumped into the mine through a borehole
to inundate the suspected fire area. Historically, mine fires have
caused fatalities, injuries, and economic losses totaling
hundreds of millions of dollars. One goal of the National
Institute for Occupational Safety and Health's (NIOSH)
Pittsburgh Research Laboratory (PRL) is to enhance the safety
of the mine worker by preventing disasters caused by fires and
explosions.
The remote nature of underground mining requires workers
at all positions within the organization to maintain higher skill
levels in emergency response compared with workers in many
other industries. Traditional work organizations can, in greater
part, rely on professional, full-time, expert community services,
and specialists to assist in the response to fire, rescue, and
medical emergencies. For example, smaller cities and towns have
volunteer fire departments that are highly capable. The issue of
measuring fire preparedness for the individual mine site is
critical for predicting the response (including elements of
evacuation and firefighting) in case of an underground fire.
Fire is a major concern for those who work underground.
A mine fire can occur at any time and often results in a partial or
total evacuation of mine personnel. Therefore, a workforce that
is well trained to prevent, detect, and fight a fire is important. It
is also paramount for miners to maintain and know their escape
routes. However, a study by Vaught et al. [1996] of the
underground preparedness of miners at seven underground coal
mines showed that only 8% of the miners were satisfied with the
firefighting training they were receiving. Some of these miners
called for less complacency and more involvement by the
workers. Out of 214 miners surveyed, 38% reported that they
were notified sometime during their mining career to evacuate
the mine because of a fire, and 70% were involved in at least
1 firefighting incident.
5
Mine fire statistics were obtained from MSHA's Denver Safety and
Health Technology Center, Injury and Employment Information Branch,
Denver, CO.
The success of safely controlling and extinguishing an
incipient mine fire depends on several factors, such as an
awareness of the fire hazards, early detection, availability of
effective firefighting equipment, quick response time, and
trained firefighters. If a coal mine fire cannot be contained by
direct firefighting methods within a few hours after discovery,
the chances of successfully extinguishing the fire without
sealing part of the mine or the entire mine are greatly diminished.
Many mine operators and workers are not aware of how quickly
mine fires can spread, have little knowledge of the magnitude of
a detectable fire, and lack experience in the proper selection and
use of modern firefighting equipment. Information on the latest
mine fire detection, alarm, and extinguishing technologies, and
firefighting strategies may be difficult to obtain. Such
equipment and techniques could significantly improve the
success rate of safe firefighting operations and reduce the risk
and occurrence of severe mine fires.
Fire research conducted by the former U.S. Bureau of Mines
(USBM) and actual mine fires have shown that fires can spread
very rapidly. For example, large-scale fire gallery experiments
have shown that conveyor belt fires can propagate at rates
greater than 0.10 m/sec (20 fpm) [Lazzara and Perzak 1990]. Still,
many in the mining industry believe that fire-resistant belting
will not burn. Modern fire detection and firefighting equipment,
although available, is not often found in underground mines.
Longer detection times result when fire sensors with slow
response times are employed [Conti and Litton 1992, 1993;
Morrow and Litton 1992]. Often, mine fires grow out of control
due to poor planning, inoperative detection systems, inadequate
water supplies, inappropriate firefighting equipment, broken
water lines, failed suppression systems, and improper personal
protective equipment.
Mitchell [1996] states that “the best facilities and equipment
can never compensate for poor preparation.” A large part of
mine fire preparedness is worker capability, experience,
motivation, and training, along with a strong commitment by
management. Facilities and programs for mine personnel to
learn about the hazards of mine fires, evaluate modern fire
detection and firefighting equipment and technologies, and
observe the proper methods to combat mine fires are lacking.
Mine fire application seminars and briefings, sponsored by
MSHA at the National Mine Health and Safety Academy
[Moser 1993] and conducted by NIOSH at PRL's Lake Lynn
Laboratory,6 are positive steps. Conti [1994] suggested that
increasing the mining industry's awareness of the dangers of
underground mine fires and conducting periodic fire audits with
a well-organized checklist could reduce the probability of a
major fire and improve the current state of fire preparedness.
6
PRL conducts open industry briefings on mine fire preparedness to
enhance the mining industry's awareness of the dangers of underground
mine fires and convey research findings on the latest methods for
detection, control, response, and extinguishment of mine fires.
3
UNDERGROUND COAL MINE FIRE PREPAREDNESS AND RESPONSE CHECKLIST
The underground coal mine fire preparedness and response
checklist (MFPRC) (appendix A) is a data collection instrument
used to profile both the fire prevention and response
capabilities of a mine site. This instrument can be used as an aid
in determining how well the mine meets certain portions of the
minimum requirements specified by 30 CFR or exceeds them.
Under a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement
(CRADA) with Twentymile Coal Co., Oak Creek, CO, the
checklist was field tested and further refined. Additional field
tests were conducted at several other operating coal mines. The
checklist encompasses conditions, procedures, and equipment
that have frequently been identified as the primary or
contributing causes of underground coal mine fires. The
checklist usually requires 3 to 4 days at the mine site to
complete. At least 1 day is needed underground to evaluate the
water system. Other topics that are discussed with mine
personnel include detection and suppression systems,
combustible materials, mine rescue and fire brigades, and
firefighting equipment. Tables are included in the MFPRC to
tabulate the data. The checklist provides an instant picture of
the preparedness of the mine to prevent or respond to a fire and
identifies areas that need to be strengthened. After the MFPRC
is completed at a mine site, a data summary is prepared by
NIOSH personnel and forwarded to the appropriate mine
officials, or the summary can be compiled by the operator.
The MFPRC includes tables to record the names of main
and branch water lines, pipe sizes and schedules, type of
material, and safe operating pressures. Measured waterflow and
pressures at fire hydrants are also noted. A fire nozzle table lists
the total number, type, and pressure rating of nozzles on the
surface and underground. A fire hose table identifies the location of water hoses, both on the surface and underground,
and includes total length, size, thread type, material, and
pressure ratings. Another table lists the throw distance of the
water stream at various locations with respect to entry height,
water hose size, and type of water nozzle.
HIGH-EXPANSION FOAM
When an underground fire cannot be directly attacked due
to heat, smoke, or hazardous roof conditions, high-expansion
foam may be one way to remotely quench the fire. Foam is a
convenient means of conveying water to a fire. It suppresses/
WATER SYSTEM
In the event of an underground coal mine fire, it is critical to
extinguish the fire in its early stages. Any delay in initiating
firefighting activities can result in an uncontrolled fire. Water is
an effective and economical fire extinguishing agent, and it is
usually abundant and easily pumped. However, water may not
always be available in sufficient quantity to fight a large fire.
Considerable planning should be given to adequate water
supplies, water lines, hydrants and their locations, water pressures, types and sizes of nozzles, and an appropriate hands-on
training program. It is crucial that an adequate amount of water
hose or line be readily available in a mine and that all fittings are
standardized to ensure equipment compatibility. Preparations
should be made to extend water lines in case a fire starts in a
remote section of the mine.
The MFPRC requires measurements of waterflows and
pressures at fire hydrants and water throw distances of the fire
hose and nozzles at several underground locations (main and
branch lines). The quantity and quality of the water available
for firefighting are determined and storage facilities examined.
A surface water storage tank at an underground mine is shown
in figure 1. Figure 2 illustrates testing of the throw distance of
a water hose. Fire hydrant locations and markings are checked,
as well as procedures to store and test water hose and nozzles.
The inspection of an underground fire hydrant is shown in
figure 3. The underground storage of water hose in a barrel and
in a rack is shown in figures 4 and 5, respectively.
Figure 1.—1,000,000-gal surface water storage tank at
an underground mine.
4
Figure 3.—Inspection of an underground fire hydrant.
Figure 4.—Underground storage of fire
water hose in barrel.
Figure 2.—Measuring the throw
distance of water hose.
Figure 5.—Underground storage of fire water hose in a
rack.
5
extinguishes a fire by cooling the fire, diluting the oxygen
concentration through the production of steam, and restricting
air currents to the fire and radiant energy fromthe burning fuel.
The foam can also reduce the spread of the fire by covering
combustibles near the fire. Before a foam system is implemented, the mine operator should consider the training and
resources needed to effectively use foam. Additional information on the use of foam for fighting underground coal mine fires
can be found in the report by Conti [1994]. The MFPRC
includes tables to record the various types of firefighting foam
generators and foam concentrates on hand, including their
locations, foam expansion ratio, and quantity of foam concentrates. Once the equipment and supplies are purchased,
a plan must be developed for using foam in the mine. Figure 6
illustrates the building of a typical mine stopping for use with a
foam generator. An inflatable feed-tube partition [Conti 1995;
Conti et al. 1998a] interfaced with a high-expansion foam generator is shown in figure 7.
Foam
Figure 6.—Erecting a typical mine stopping for a highexpansion foam generator.
Figure 7.—Inflatable feed-tube partition in the Lake Lynn
Experimental Mine.
6
equipment should be compatible with the mine water system
with regard to water quality, pressure, and fittings. When using
foam or any other means of extinguishment, the mine operator
should have an organized strategy for fast response and a
group of well-trained miners ready for an emergency situation.
The mine should also have periodic drills to test the
effectiveness of the firefighting plan.
ture to prevent caking.
FIRE EXTINGUISHERS
Time is a critical factor when using a fire extinguisher in any
fire situation. Two or three seconds can mean the difference between a successful fire extinguishment or disaster. Portable,
multipurpose dry-chemical-type fire extinguishers are placed in
strategic locations throughout the coal mine, such as working
sections, electrical installations, oil storage stations, and on
diesel-powered equipment. Extinguishers must be examined
every 6 months to ensure that they have not been moved, are
visible and accessible, have intact seals, and have no apparent
damage or other obvious defects. Sometimes, because of an
inadequate maintenance program or an inexperienced operator,
a fire extinguisher fails to operate or to extinguish the fire.
A study to determine the reliability of dry-powder, handportable fire extinguishers in the mining industry was conducted
by Allen Corp. of America for the USBM [Baker et al. 1981]. Of
the 151 cartridge-type and stored-pressure-type extinguishers
tested at underground coal mines, 18 (12%) failed to operate
properly. The predominant failure causes were related to
unreported discharging, improper maintenance, and neglect of
environmental effects.
Extinguishers may not be handled until an emergency
occurs; during this period, the dry chemical can settle and
compact. This phenomenon is known as packing and is dependent on the particle size distribution of the dry-chemical
agent. Packing will be more severe if the particle size difference
is large and is most likely to occur if the extinguisher is stored
vertically and subject to vibration. Caking occurs when the drychemical agent is contaminated by moisture. The moisture
chemically reacts with the dry chemical and the individual
particles adhere to each other, forming lumps. Caking and
packing in dry-chemical extinguishers can affect performance.
One recently visited coal mine had recurring problems with
clogging of the elbow that connects the body of the
extinguisher to the discharge hose.
Two types of dry-chemical fire extinguishers used underground are shown in figures 8 and 9. The MFPRC includes a
table to identify the location and sizes of all fire extinguishers
stored underground and on the surface. The table includes the
total number and whether the extinguishers are hand-portable,
wheeled, or skid-mounted. An essential element in any fire
safety program is adequate hands-on training in the use and
recharging of fire extinguishers.
In addition, rock dust is stored in bags, as shown in
figures 10 and 11, at various underground locations to fight
fires. It is important that the rock dust be protected from mois-
Figure 8.—Dry-chemical portable
fire extinguisher mounted on the rib.
Figure 9.—Dry-chemical wheeled fire
extinguisher.
FIRE STATIONS
Fire stations include cars, houses, trailers, boxes, and sleds
that can transport personnel and equipment to the site of the
fire. Figure 12 shows a fire trailer located on the surface of an
underground coal mine. The stations must be easily transported
to the fire area and be equipped with up-to-date firefighting
equipment, tools, supplies, first-aid kits, and personal protective
7
equipment such as bunker gear, including self-contained
breathing apparatus (SCBAs). The stations should be
inspected regularly.
8
UTOMATIC FIRE DETECTION AND
SUPPRESSION SYSTEMS
Figure 10.—Rock dust stored in
plastic bags.
The early and reliable detection of underground fires is
essential to ensure sufficient time to safely evacuate the miners
and to extinguish the fire before it spreads. Temperature, carbon
monoxide (CO), and smoke sensors can be used to detect
underground coal mine fires. Smoke and CO sensors can detect
a fire in its smoldering phase, before flames develop, depending
on the production rate of smoke or CO by the smoldering fuel
and the quantity of air flowing in the mine entry. The MFPRC
includes a table to record the types of sensors used, their
location, total number, spacing, and vertical position from the
mine floor. Any problems with false or nuisance alarms are
noted, and procedures for training personnel responsible for
monitoring, testing, and calibrating the detection system are
reviewed. A CO sensor mounted in an entry is shown in
figure 13.
Automatic fire suppression systems used in underground
coal mines include water deluge, water sprinkler, high-expansion
foam, and dry-chemical. Figure 14 shows a sprinkler system
mounted in a conveyor belt entry.
The MFPRC includes a table to record the type of system
employed and its location. The procedures used to test and
maintain the systems are reviewed. If water barriers (walls of
water) are installed in mine entries, another table is provided to
list their location, spacing, activation temperature, number of
nozzles, and waterflow.
COAL AND OTHER COMBUSTIBLE MATERIALS
In an underground coal mine, the coal is virtually an unlimited fuel supply. The most serious mine fires occurred when
the coal ignited and burned. The MFPRC addresses which
Figure 11.—Rock
unprotected.
dust
storage
A
Figure 12.—Fire trailer located on the surface of an
underground mine.
Figure 13.—CO fire sensor mounted
in mine entry.
9
Figure 14.—Sprinkler system installed in mine entry.
coalbed is being mined and several coal characteristics that can
influence its combustibility, including rank, volatility, and ash
content. In general, coals of lower rank have a greater selfheating tendency; high-volatile coals spread flame more readily.
Any occurrences of spontaneous combustion underground or
on the surface in storage piles or silos are noted.
The mining operation requires the use and underground
storage of combustible materials. These include fire-resistant
conveyor belting, ventilation tubing, electrical cable, and brattice cloth, as well as oil and grease, diesel fuel, wood timbers,
etc. It is important to realize that fire-resistant materials can
ignite and burn. For example, fire-resistant conveyor belting has
been shown to rapidly propagate flame and burn in large-scale
tests [Lazzara and Perzak 1990] and in actual mine fires [Strahin
et al. 1990]. The MFPRC includes tables to record the quantity
and characteristics of the conveyor belting and other
combustibles used and stored underground. For conveyor belting, the type (rubber or polyvinyl chloride), width, thickness,
length, location, and MSHA fire-resistant approval number are
recorded. The type, diameter, wall thickness, and MSHA fireresistant approval number of rigid ventilation ducting are also
noted. The total quantity of each combustible material, toxic
hazard (low, medium, high) due to burning, and any special
precautions beyond those required by Federal regulations are
listed. An underground oil storage area is shown in figure 15;
a trash storage area is shown in figure 16.
SELF-CONTAINED SELF-RESCUER
Federal regulations require that the mine operator make
available to each miner and authorized visitors an approved selfrescuer device(s) that is adequate to protect a person for 1 hr or
longer. The MFPRC addresses the type and model of the selfcontained self-rescuer (SCSR) used at the mine, the number of
units stored underground and on the surface and their
locations, and how often SCSR refresher training is conducted.
The procedures for inspecting the units for damage and removing units with expired service life are reviewed. Any problems that the mine has experienced with SCSRs are noted.
Figure 15.—Underground oil storage area.
Figure 16.—Improper storage of underground trash.
FIRST RESPONDERS, FIRE BRIGADES,
AND MINE RESCUE
If a small fire is discovered by a miner with limited training
in extinguishing fires, the fire may continue to grow before
trained personnel arrive on the scene. First responders are the
first persons to initiate firefighting. It is important that these
miners be properly trained in the use of fire extinguishers and
water hoses and in firefighting procedures. They should also
know how to immediately and effectively communicate information about the emergency to other miners and key personnel so that they are aware of the situation.
Underground fire brigades or firefighters and mine rescue
teams are important elements in any mine's emergency response
plan. Fire brigades are composed of specially trained and
equipped miners that work at the mine site and can rapidly
respond to a fire. Mine operators most often rely on mine rescue teams to save lives during an underground emergency, such
as a fire, explosion, roof fall, or water innundation. It is
10
extremely important that team members be provided with
adequate exploration equipment and that training simulations7
be conducted in a realistic manner [Conti et al. 1998b; Conti and
Weiss 1998; Conti et al. 1999]. Figure 17 shows rescue team
members fighting a conveyor belt fire in the surface fire gallery
at Lake Lynn Laboratory. The MFPRC examines the types of
firefighting training conducted. A series of questions is also
presented that deal with emergency response plans and duties
for miners during firefighting and evacuation. Appendix C
includes an example of an emergency response plan and a mine
fire training program divided into three areas: basic fire training
for all miners, intermediate fire training for mine fire brigades/
mine rescue, and advanced training for fire brigades/mine
rescue.
Figure 17.—Mine rescue teams fighting a conveyor belt
fire at Lake Lynn Laboratory.
OTHER ISSUES
Other issues addressed by the MFPRC include ventilation,
housekeeping, evacuation plans, and specialized equipment.
Ventilation plans and ventilation training drills for various fires
that could occur in the mine are addressed. The housekeeping
section focuses on the removal and proper disposal of batteries,
hazardous waste, and excessive coal dust accumulations. Under
evacuation plans, the maintenance and identification of
escapeways and how often miners walk the entire escapeway
are discussed. The specialized equipment section deals with
turnout gear, SCBAs, specialized fire warning systems, and
motion sensors for firefighters and mine rescue teams.
GENERIC CHECKLISTS
Some mines have already developed extensive checklists
and procedures on specific topics to improve their state of
preparedness. MSHA reported that more than 20% of belt entry
fires during 1970-88 were caused by welding/cutting operations
[Luzik 1991]. To address this issue, some mines require a hot
work permit before any welding or cutting operations are done
(see appendix B, “Cutting/Welding Permit,” examples 1 and 2).
This permit requires certain safety checks before and after the
planned maintenance activity. Each permit is monitored by a
communications coordinator. Another way to decrease the
probability of a fire in a conveyor belt drive area due to coal
dust accumulations, defective equipment, etc., is to have beltline
checklist inspections. The checklist requires the examiners to
look for potential problem areas and available safety equipment.
Some mines cover the total belt drive area (roof, ribs, and floor)
with noncombustible material and hose down the area with
water once per shift.
Appendix B contains 34 generic examples of checklists and
safety procedures that can be used by a mine. These include
procedures to conduct annual fire hydrant and fire hose checks;
semiannual inspections of fire extinguishers and a monthly
checklist for high-expansion foam generators; first-aid supplies
for fire cars or safety trailers, and an emergency material skid;
and functional tests of mine monitoring and fire suppression
systems.
SUMMARY
Preparedness is an essential element of any underground
mine's strategic plan in dealing with an unexpected fire. It is
important that the fire be detected in the incipient stage and that
well trained and fully equipped miners respond during that
crucial period. Time is a critical factor, and any delay may mean
serious injuries and the loss of the mine.
The NIOSH-developed underground coal mine fire preparedness and response checklist is a data collection
instrument for determining both the fire prevention and res
p
o
n
s
e
7
Mine rescue team training is conducted at NIOSH-PRL's Safety
Research Coal Mine at Bruceton, PA, and Lake Lynn Experimental Mine
near Fairchance, PA. Additionally, MSHA's National Mine Health and
Safety Academy near Beckley, WV, provides training for first responders
and mine rescue teams.
11
capabilities at an underground coal mine. It encompasses conditions, procedures, and equipment that have frequently been
the primary or contributing cause of underground coal mine
fires. Areas that need to be strengthened are identified.
Current NIOSH research is aimed at further refinement and
field testing of the MFPRC. A similar checklist for metal/nonmetal mines is currently being developed. Mines participating
in this study can have their strengths and weaknesses defined.
In addition, there is less chance that problem areas might go undiscovered and not addressed. It also gives miners a chance to
share their experiences and gain from the experiences of others.
The checklist can also be used as a training aid for the mine,
e.g., to show miners and new hires how to check water
pressures at fire
hydrants or properly store and use a fire hose. The completed
checklist gives the mine an instant picture of its fire
preparedness and response capabilities. In a subsequent report,
the data collected at the mines participating in this study will be
analyzed.
An interactive computer program is also being considered
for development. Mine personnel would enter the requested
MFPRC data, and the program would rate the effectiveness of
their mine fire preparedness and response program. The highest
anticipated rating would be attained by a mine that matched all
or most of the requirements specified for a model mine by a
group of experts. Recommendations to improve the state of
preparedness would be listed.
ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
The authors thank the following individuals at the NIOSH
Pittsburgh Research Laboratory for their contributions: William J. Wiehagen, Industrial Engineer, Robert W. Noll, Physical
Science Aide, and the following Twentymile Coal Co. employees
for their assistance during the initial field testing of the
checklist: Earl Almond, Rolland Barney, Dwaine Chesser, Jerry
Delay, John Garcia, Jim Grant, Andy Gustafson, David Hahn,
Butch Krump, Lee Norris, Clarence Reed, Dallas
Reed, Alan Selch, and Rory Wilson, Fire Brigade/Mine Rescue
Team Members; Daryl Firestone and Jim Pogline, Safety Department; and R. Lincoln Derick, Technical Safety Manager.
The authors also thank mine personnel from Arch of Illinois,
Energy West Mining Co., MAPCO Coal, Inc., and Monterey
Coal Co., a division of Exxon, who participated in the field
testing.
REFERENCES
Baker RM, McDonald LB, Reid G, Duncan C [1981]. Reliability of
hand-portable fire extinguishers in the mineral industry. Alexandria, VA:
Allen Corp. of America. U.S. Bureau of Mines contract No. H0292011.
Conti RS [1994]. Firefighting resources and fire preparedness for
underground coal mines. Pittsburgh, PA: U.S. Department of the Interior,
Bureau of Mines, IC 9410.
Conti RS [1995]. Inflatable partitions for high-expansion foam
generators. Min Eng 47(6):561-566.
Conti RS, Litton CD [1992]. Response of underground fire sensors:
an evaluation. Pittsburgh, PA: U.S. Department of the Interior, Bureau
of Mines, RI 9412.
Conti RS, Litton CD [1993]. Effects of stratification on carbon
monoxide levels from mine fires. In: Proceedings of the Sixth U.S. Mine
Ventilation Symposium. Littleton, CO: Society for Mining, Metallurgy,
and Exploration, Inc., pp. 489-494.
Conti RS, Weiss ES [1998]. Inflatable devices for combating
underground mine fires. In: Proceedings of Minesafe International 1998.
University of Witwatersrand, Republic of South Africa, pp. 388-393.
Conti RS, Chasko LL, Cool JD [1999]. An overview of technology
and training simulations for mine rescue teams. In: Proceedings of the
28th International Conference of Safety in Mines Research Institutes
(Sinaia, Romania). Vol. II, pp. 521-538.
Conti RS, Chasko LL, Pro RW [1998a]. Combating mine fires with
the aid of inflatable devices. In: Proceedings of the Second International
Conference on Fire Research and Engineering. Gaithersburg, MD: U.S.
12
Department of Commerce, National Institute of Standards and
Technology, pp. 441-449.
Conti RS, Chasko LL, Stowinsky LD [1998b]. Mine rescue training
simulations and technology. In: Proceedings of The International
Emergency Management Society (TIEMS) Conference 1998, pp. 453464.
Lazzara CP, Perzak FJ [1990]. Conveyor belt flammability studies.
In: Proceedings of the 21st Annual Institute on Coal Mining Health,
Safety, and Research (Blacksburg, VA, August 28-30, 1990), pp. 119-129.
Luzik SJ [1991]. Mine fire prevention response strategies.
Presented at the Annual Joint Meeting of SME/PCMIA, Meadowlands,
PA, October 31, 1991.
Mitchell DW [1996]. Mine fires: prevention, detection, fighting.
Chicago, IL: Maclean Hunter Publishing Co.
Morrow GS, Litton CD [1992]. In-mine evaluation of smoke
detectors. Pittsburgh, PA: U.S. Department of the Interior, Bureau of
Mines, IC 9311.
Moser W [1993]. Mine emergency preparedness. In: Proceedings
of the SME Annual Meeting, preprint 93-53. Littleton, CO: Society for
Mining, Metallurgy, and Exploration, Inc.
Strahin RA, Wolf DN, Pogue CW [1990]. Report of investigation,
mine fire, Marianna No. 58 (ID No. 36-00957), March 7, 1988. U.S.
Department of Labor, Mine Safety and Health Administration, March.
Vaught C, Fotta B, Wiehagen WJ, Conti RS, Fowkes RS [1996].
A profile of workers' experience and preparedness in responding to
underground mine fires. Pittsburgh, PA: U.S. Department of the Interior,
Bureau of Mines, RI 9584.
13
APPENDIX A.—NIOSH UNDERGROUND COAL MINE FIRE PREPAREDNESS
AND RESPONSE CHECKLIST
(Please feel free to photocopy.)
WATER SUPPLY
All text within a bordered box throughout appendix A represents language from 30 CFR.
75.1100-1(a) - Waterlines shall be capable of delivering 50 gallons of water a minute at a nozzle
pressure of 50 pounds per square inch.
75.1100-1(b) - A portable water car shall be of at least 1,000 gallons capacity and shall have at
least 300 feet of fire hose with nozzles. A portable water car shall be capable of providing a
flow through the hose of 50 gallons of water per minute at a nozzle pressure of 50 pounds per
square inch.
75.1100-2(a) - Each working section shall be provided with two portable fire extinguishers and
240 pounds of rock dust in bags or other suitable containers; waterlines shall extend to each
section loading point and be equipped with enough fire hose to reach each working face.
C Is there a map of the water system? Yes
No
.
Where is the map located?
.
Who is the contact person?
.
When was the map last updated?
.
• Availability of mine water: Unlimited supply
Reservoir
Approximate gallons:
.
Other source
Approximate gallons:
.
• Do you have water cars?
Yes
No
.
If yes, what is the total number of water cars?
Approximate gallons:
.
.
14
• Quality of underground mine water:
Caustic
Acidic
pH level
.
(A pH level >7 indicates caustic; <7 indicates acidic)
Hardness
mg/L (200 is normal for drinking water)
Total dissolved solids (TDS)
mg/L.
• If your water lines are in your beltline, please complete the following. If not, please explain:
.
Is waterflow and airflow in the same direction on main water lines?
Yes
No
.
If no, what precautions are used if smoke is outby a fire and you need water for firefighting?
.
Is waterflow and airflow in the same direction on branch water lines?
Yes
No
Varies
.
If no, what precautions are used if smoke is outby a fire and you need water for firefighting?
.
• Are safety valves (shutoff ball valves) supplied, for example, if line is broken? Yes
Spacing of valves
No
.
15
• Location of main water pump stations: Underground
Surface
None
.
If you have a main water pump station, indicate type:
Electrical
Diesel
Other
• Type of backup systems: Pump
.
Water Supply
None
.
If you have a pump-operated backup system, indicate type:
Electrical
Diesel
Other
.
75.1100-2(b) - Belt conveyors. Waterlines shall be installed parallel to the entire length of belt conveyors
and shall be equipped with firehose outlets with valves at 300-foot intervals along each belt conveyor and
at the tailpieces. At least 500 feet of firehose with fittings suitable for connection with each belt conveyor
waterline system shall be stored at strategic locations along the belt conveyor. Waterlines may be
installed in entries adjacent to the conveyor entry belt as long as the outlets project into the belt conveyor
entry.
75.1100-2(c) - Haulage trucks. Waterlines shall be equipped with outlet valves at intervals of not more
than 500 feet, and 500 feet of firehose with fittings suitable for connection with such waterlines shall be
provided at strategic locations. Two portable water cars, readily available, may be used in lieu of
waterlines prescribed under this paragraph.
• What is the spacing of your water hydrants/fire taps/hose drops/etc.?
• Water hydrant size(s):
ft.
in.
Type of fitting: NST
Pipe
Other
.
Approximate height of water hydrants from floor:
• Position of water hydrants outlet: Up
Down
ft.
Sideways
Varies
.
NOTE: Water hydrant outlets, etc., positioned downward collect sediment and must be flushed before
connecting water hoses.
Is the water pressure adjustable? Yes
No
.
If yes, do you have a written procedure to adjust the water hydrant pressure?
Yes
No
.
16
Type of valve(s) on water hydrant: ball valve
Other
10-turn valve
Please explain:
.
Can you use more than one hose at each manifold/hydrant?
Yes
No
.
Please explain:
.
• Are the locations of your water hydrants marked (examples: sign, painted rod)?
Yes
No
.
Type of marking:
Location of markings: Near roof
.
Center of entry
Other
Do these markings vary throughout the mine? Yes
No
C Are the water hydrants marked in adjacent entries? Yes
No
.
.
.
If yes, how are they marked?
.
Are the water hydrants accessible from adjacent entries? Yes
No
.
• Approximately how much access room is there between rib and belt? (This is important when connecting water
lines and evacuating in smoky conditions):
(Note: 24-in minimum requirement.)
Main -
Section -
Clearance between tight side of belt and rib:
ft.
Clearance between wide side of belt and rib:
ft.
Clearance between tight side of belt and rib:
ft.
Clearance between wide side of belt and rib:
ft.
17
75.1103-11 - Each fire hydrant shall be tested by opening to insure that it is in operating condition, and
each fire hose shall be tested, at intervals not exceeding 1 year. A record of these tests shall be
maintained at an appropriate location.
• Inspections are conducted every
months.
What are the procedures?
.
Are functional tests performed? Yes
No
.
If yes, how?
.
Are written records maintained? Yes
No
.
• Is water available in remote locations (areas not used)? Yes
No
.
If yes, what is the water pressure and flow in these areas?
psig:
gpm:
If no, what method would be used to supply water to these locations?
Pipe
Hose
Size(s)
Other
.
What would be the expected water pressure in these locations?
psig.
• Can your compressed airline or any other pipe line (if you have them) be converted over to be used as water lines
during an emergency (for example, water in remote areas or failure of existing water lines)?
No
Yes
.
If yes, how difficult or time-consuming is the conversion?
.
Do you have a conversion kit for this purpose? Yes
No
.
NOTE: When conducting the following tests, flush the water taps before connecting the water hose.
• Please complete the following table on main water lines.
MAIN WATER LINES
MEASURED WATERFLOW AT FIRE HYDRANTS
MAIN
WATER LINE
NAME
SIZE,
in
SCHEDULE
MATERIAL
TYPE
SAFE
OPERATING
PRESSURE,
psig
TEST LOCATION 1
TEST LOCATION 2
psig
psig
gpm
Static
Dynamic
TEST LOCATION 3
psig
gpm
Static
Dynamic
gpm
Static
Dynamic
NOTE: When conducting the following tests, flush the water taps before connecting the water hose.
• Please complete the following table on branch water lines.
BRANCH WATER LINES
MEASURED WATERFLOW AT FIRE HYDRANTS
BRANCH
WATER LINE
NAME
SIZE,
in
SCHEDULE
MATERIAL
TYPE
SAFE
OPERATING
PRESSURE,
psig
TEST LOCATION 1
TEST LOCATION 2
psig
psig
gpm
Static
Dynamic
TEST LOCATION 3
psig
gpm
Static
Dynamic
gpm
Static
Dynamic
20
HOSES AND NOZZLES
75.1100-1(f)(1) - The fire hose shall be lined with a material having flame resistant qualities meeting
requirements for hose in Bureau of Mines’ Schedule 2G.
• What procedures are used to store fire water hose?
.
Inspection intervals every
months.
What are the procedures?
.
What is your procedure for damaged or deteriorated water hose (replaced/repaired)?
.
Is testing according to NFPA 1962 Standard for the care, use, testing, and service of fire hose, including
couplings and nozzles? Yes
If no, what do you do?
No
.
.
21
• Please complete the following table of fire nozzles:
FIRE NOZZLES
Total Number
Expensive1
Surface
1
Underground
Inexpensive2
Surface
Brass
Nozzle over $200 and fully adjustable.
Nozzle under $50.
2
Plastic
Underground
Brass
Plastic
Size,
in
Thread,
type
Pressure
rating,
psig
• Please complete the following table on fire water hoses:
FIRE WATER HOSES
Size,
in
Thread,
type
Material
Pressure
rating,
psig
Total length, ft
Surface
Underground
Location
Surface
Underground
23
• Do you have couplers/reducers to attach nozzles to larger diameter water hose?
Yes
No
.
• Please complete the following tables on water throw distance (recommend 100 ft minimum)
THROW DISTANCE - SOLID STREAM (MAIN BELTLINE)
Location
Nozzle
type
Hose
size,
in
Entry
height, ft
Static
pressure,
psig
Throw
distance, ft
Dynamic
conditions
psig
gpm
THROW DISTANCE - SOLID STREAM (BRANCH BELTLINE)
Location
Nozzle
type
Hose
size,
in
Entry
height, ft
Static
pressure,
psig
Throw
distance, ft
Dynamic
conditions
psig
gpm
FOAM FIREFIGHTING EQUIPMENT
• Do you have foam generators at your mine? Yes
No
.
If no, skip this section.
• Please complete the following table on foam generators:
TYPE OF FIREFIGHTING FOAM GENERATORS ON SITE
Handheld
Location
Brand
Expansion
Ratio
Water-Powered
Total
Number
Brand
Expansion
Ratio
Diesel-Powered
Total
Number
Brand
Expansion
Ratio
Other
Total
Number
Brand
Expansion
Ratio
Total
Number
25
• Can foam nozzles be used with your water lines or fire hose? Yes
• Do you have the capability of using foam eductors? Yes
No
No
.
.
• If foam concentrate is stored on the surface, is it protected from extreme weather
temperatures? Yes
No
.
• Are the foam concentrate containers stacked according to the manufacturer’s
recommendations?
Yes
No
.
• Is the foam concentrate in closed containers? Yes
No
• Do you inspect/test the foam concentrate? Yes
No
.
.
• Is your foam concentrate compatible with your mine water supply? Yes
No
.
If no, why?
.
• Is your foam equipment compatible with foam concentrate?
Yes
No
.
If no, why?
.
• Do you have trained people to use foam equipment? Yes
No
.
When was the last time this equipment was tested?
.
• If you have more than one brand of foam concentrate, have you tested the quality of foam production if brands are
mixed?
Yes
No
Only one brand used
If yes, what were the results?
.
26
.
• Have you tested the foam generators in your mine? Yes
No
.
If yes, what problems did you experience, if any?
.
• For example, if you were using a diesel-powered, high-expansion foam generator in an upward sloping entry, what
would you do to prevent the foam plug from rolling back over the foam generator?
Please explain:
.
• Do you have procedures for inspecting foam generators? Yes
No
.
If yes, what are these procedures?
.
27
• Please complete the following table on foam concentrate:
FOAM CONCENTRATE
Foam
type
Storage
Surface
Unit
Underground
Unit
If you run out of foam during an emergency, do you have a supplier? Yes
Percent
concentrate
No
Total amount,
gal
.
• How long would it take to receive the foam?
.
FIRE EXTINGUISHERS
75.1100-3 - Condition and examination of firefighting equipment. All firefighting equipment shall be
maintained in a usable and operative condition. Chemical extinguishers shall be examined every 6
months and the date of the examination shall be written on a permanent tag attached to the extinguisher.
• How often do you inspect fire extinguishers? Every
months.
What are the procedures?
.
28
• Are you aware that if a fire extinguisher is not handled for extended periods of time, the dry chemical can settle and
compact?
Yes
No
.
• Are you aware that caking occurs when moisture contacts the dry chemical due to faulty gaskets and rusty
extinguishers?
Yes
No
.
• Are hydrostatic test dates of fire extinguishers and pressure vessels checked?
Yes
No
.
• Do you realize the hazards of rusty fire extinguishers and pressure vessels?
Yes
No
.
What are they?
.
• Do you have a plan to handle damaged, partially used, and rusty fire extinguishers?
Yes
No
.
What is done with rusty fire extinguishers (repair/replace)?
.
• Who removes defective extinguishers?
.
How is this handled?
.
29
• Are your employees trained to identify defective fire extinguishers? Yes
• Are fire extinguishers exposed to mud or wash plant overflows? Yes
No
No
.
.
If yes, how are they protected (example: shields, storage boxes)?
.
75.1100-2(d) - Transportation. Each track or off-track locomotive, self-propelled mantrip car, or personnel
carrier shall be equipped with one portable fire extinguisher.
75.1100-2(e)(1) - Electrical installations. Two portable fire extinguishers or one extinguisher having at least
twice the minimum capacity specified for a portable fire extinguisher in 75.1100-1(e) shall be provided at
each permanent electrical installation [greater than 6 months].
75.1100-2(e)(2) - Electrical installations. One portable fire extinguisher and 240 pounds of rock dust shall
be provided at each temporary electrical installation [less than 6 months].
75.1100-2(g) - Welding, cutting, soldering. One portable fire extinguisher or 240 pounds of rock dust shall
be provided at locations where welding, cutting, or soldering with arc or flame is being done.
• Are you prepared for on-site recharge of fire extinguishers? Yes
No
.
If yes, what is the number of on-site trained people to recharge fire extinguishers?
.
Quantity of charged cartridges:
Dry-chemical powder
lb.
If no, what is the timeframe for acquiring new fire extinguishers or having an
outside contractor recharge them?
.
30
• How do you protect rock dust stored underground from moisture?
.
• Please complete the following table on fire extinguishers:
FIRE EXTINGUISHERS - UNDERGROUND
Portable/stored
Location
lb
Total
Number
Wheeled
lb
Total
Number
Skid
lbs
Total
Number
• Please complete the following table on fire extinguishers:
FIRE EXTINGUISHERS - SURFACE
Portable/stored
Location
lb
Total
Number
Wheeled
lb
Total
Number
Skid
lb
Total
Number
33
FIRE STATIONS
(Fire stations include cars, houses, trailers, boxes, foam generator trailers, sleds, etc.)
75.1101-23(a)(1)(ii) - Rapid assembly and transportation of necessary men, fire suppression equipment, and
rescue apparatus to the scene of the fire.
75.1100-2(i) - Emergency materials.
75.1713-7 - First-aid equipment; location; minimum requirements.
• Total number of fire stations:
.
Locations: Underground
Surface
.
Are the stations easily transported to the fire area? Yes
No
.
If no, why?
How are they transported?
.
Do they require special handling or components, like hitches?
Yes
No
.
What are the special handling requirements?
.
34
• Is the station equipped with a pager phone and extra wire? Yes
No
.
• Do you have an up-to-date plastic laminated mine map with grease pencils located on the station?
Yes
No
.
• Some mines utilize fire hose in various sizes (1.5- to 2.5-in-diam) or a lightweight high- volume (5- to 6-in-diam)
nonpolarized hose fitting. What size hose do you use on your station?
.
• A portable hose clamp is used to temporarily stop the waterflow in hoses to reduce delays caused by turning the
main water supply on or off if problems are encountered. Do you have a hose clamp on your station?
Yes
No
.
• Spanner wrenches are used to detach fire hoses and fittings (the wrenches are small and easily lost, so several
wrenches should be available). Do you provide spanner wrenches on your station?
Yes
No
.
• Do you provide special hose nozzles that are suitable for firefighters and are appropriate to use with the mine water
pressure and equipment? Yes
No
.
• Are booster pumps provided on the station to raise water pressure? Yes
No
.
If yes, enter the total number in the following categories:
Diesel
Electric
Other
.
• Are regulators provided on the station to lower the water pressure? Yes
No
.
35
• Is firefighting foam equipment and a supply of foam concentrate available on the station?
Yes
No
.
• Type of foam equipment stored on the station?
.
How much foam concentrate is stored on the station?
.
Where do you go if you run out of foam concentrate during an emergency?
.
How long would it take to retrieve it?
• Are portable fire extinguishers available? Yes
.
No
.
• Is a supply of dry-chemical agent with replacement gas cartridges available?
Yes
No
.
Please explain:
.
• Are wheeled or skid-mounted fire extinguishers provided on the station? Yes
No
.
Please explain:
.
.
• Are various tools and supplies provided on these trailers/fire cars? Yes
No
.
What kinds of tools and supplies?
.
36
• Roof jacks may be necessary for temporary roof support. Are they provided on the
stations? Yes
No
.
• Hydraulic pump jacks may be necessary to lift heavy objects. Are they provided on
the station? Yes
No
.
• Are first-aid kits to treat minor burns and injuries provided? Yes
No
.
Please explain:
.
Personal Protective Equipment (PPE)
• Is personal protective clothing available for firefighters on the station? Yes
• Number of SCBAs (not SCSRs) provided on the station:
No
.
.
Miscellaneous
• Total amount of rock dust provided on the station:
Is the rock dust protected from moisture? Yes
.
No
Sometimes
.
Please explain:
.
• Does everyone know the location of these stations and procedures to be followed when moving to fire location?
Yes
No
.
Please explain:
.
• Who is responsible for inspecting, maintaining, and using the stations?
.
How often is this inspection conducted?
.
37
What constitutes an inspection?
.
Are records/logs kept? Yes
No
.
Location of records:
.
DETECTION SYSTEMS
75.1103-1 - Automatic fire sensors. A fire sensor system shall be installed on each underground belt
conveyor. Sensors so installed shall be of a type which will (a) give warning automatically when a fire
occurs on or near such belt; (b) provide both audible and visual signals that permit rapid location of the
fire.
FIRE SENSORS
Sensor type
Location
Total
number
• What is the CO background level if using diesel equipment?
Spacing,
ft
Vertical position
from floor, ft
ppm.
• Manufacturer of CO system?
Warning level
.
ppm
Alarm level
ppm.
38
• Manufacturer of thermal system?
Alarm level:
.
EF
• Manufacturer of smoke sensor:
.
• Manufacturer of diesel-discriminating sensor:
.
• Is there battery backup in case of electrical failure? Yes
If yes, how much time?
No
.
.
• Are there any unusual problems with the fire sensors? Yes
No
.
Please explain:
.
• Do you have a problem with false or nuisance fire alarms? Yes
No
.
What is the frequency (number of false alarms per month)?
.
Where is the location of false alarms?
.
What is the cause of false alarms?
.
• Do you have a hot work permit (welding/cutting)? Yes
No
.
Please explain:
.
39
• Location of monitoring room? Aboveground
.
Other:
.
• Is the person in monitoring room trained in proper response to sensor alerts and alarms?
Yes
No
. What is the training?
.
• Is there a procedure for checking wire continuity, sensor function, cable clearance around moving machinery, etc.?
Yes
No
.
• Are these wires/cables redirected around areas that have a high potential for fire (for example,
belt drives,
brake stations, etc.)? Yes
No
.
Please explain:
.
• Is the sensory element of the fire sensor oriented into the airflow (this is critical with only certain brands of sensors)?
Yes
No
Varies
.
• Are there any moisture, electrical, or other problems with the sensors? Yes
No
.
Please explain:
.
.
40
75.1103-8 - Automatic fire sensor and warning device systems; inspection and test requirements.
• What are the intervals of functional tests (a complete test of the system from underground sensor to surface
computer)?
.
• What are the calibration intervals?
.
• What kind of general training is provided for individuals who handle, install, and calibrate fire sensors?
.
• What kind of training is provided, in general, to better acquaint all miners in the day-to-day operation of fire sensors
(for example, better communications when using equipment near sensors, welding/cutting operations, diesel
equipment, etc.)?
Please explain:
.
• What is the procedure to be followed if a miner smells or sees smoke underground?
.
41
• What kind of underground communication system do you have?
.
Where are the phone lines located?
.
Are phones and other communication cables protected from areas prone to fires?
Yes
No
.
Please explain:
.
• Do you have a specialized fire warning alarm system to alert all miners of an emergency?
Yes
No
.
Please explain:
.
SUPPRESSION SYSTEMS
75.1101-1 - Deluge-type water spray systems.
75.1101-5 - Installation of foam generator systems.
75.1101-6 - Water sprinkler systems; general.
75.1101-13 - Dry powder chemical systems; general.
• Are functional tests of suppression systems performed? Yes
• Do you follow a checklist? Yes
No
No
.
.
What is the procedure?
.
Are records/logs kept? Yes
No
.
42
How often are suppression systems checked?
.
• Please complete the following table on suppression systems.
SUPPRESSION SYSTEMS UNDERGROUND
Location
Water
deluge
High-expansion
foam
Dry-chemical
Water sprinkler
• When the water sprinkler system is activated, will the water spray cover the entire cross-section of the entry? Yes
No
.
• Are water sprinkler heads changed? Yes
If yes, what is the time period?
• Are shutoff valves normally left open? Yes
No
.
.
No
.
How do you ensure that the shutoff valves are open, and if they were closed during a fire, could they be
opened?
Please comment:
.
• How do you protect your water from freezing?
.
43
44
• Who is responsible for maintaining the suppression systems?
.
What are the procedures?
.
Are records/logs kept? Yes
No
.
• Do you utilize water barriers (wall of water)? Yes
No
.
If yes, please complete the following table on water barriers (wall of water).
WATER BARRIERS (WALL OF WATER)
Spacing
interval
Location
No. of spray nozzles per
cross-section
Activation
temperature, °F
Waterflow,
gpm
• If water barriers (wall of water) are located in the belt entry, are they positioned in the middle of the block? Yes
No
N/A
.
C Do you utilize water lances (pipe with water sprays that can be inserted through stoppings or doors downwind of
a fire)? Yes
No
.
Please explain:
.
45
VENTILATION
• Is your mine fan a blowing or exhausting fan?
.
• Can you reverse the direction of your fan? Yes
No
.
If no, could it be modified during an emergency? Please explain:
.
C Do you have a ventilation plan for various fire scenarios that could occur in your mine?
Yes
No
.
Please explain:
.
C How many people are familiar with the ventilation plan?
.
Please explain:
.
Do miners on each section know where the air comes from and where the air goes (for example, location of
fans, ventilation materials, etc.)? Yes
No
.
C Do you conduct training exercises to show how to ventilate (for example, battery fire, belt fire)?
Yes
No
.
Please explain:
.
Do all miners participate in these drills? Yes
C Do you isolate your haulage road from the beltline? Yes
No
.
No
.
C Would you split your intake air before inby miners are out of the mine during a fire?
Yes
No
.
46
Please explain:
.
C Is someone knowledgeable about the mine’s ventilation system if changes are to be made (for example, where to
dump the air)? Yes
No
.
Please explain:
.
C Do all workers understand their role in implementing the fire ventilation plan if there is a fire in their section? Yes
No
.
Please explain:
.
• Is each section provided with a one-page write-up (bullet form) on how to respond to inby and outby fires (for
example, procedures to be followed for an inby belt fire)? Yes
No
.
Please explain:
.
47
COMBUSTIBLE MATERIALS UNDERGROUND
COAL CHARACTERISTICS (IN-PLACE)
Coalbed mined
Coal rank1
Moisture 2, %
Volatile matter2, %
Fixed carbon2, %
Ash 2, %
Organic, %
Sulfur
Pyritic, %
Sulfate
Heating value, Btu per pound
1
For example, high-volatile A bituminous.
From proximate coal analyses, as-received values.
2
Title 30, Chapter I, Subchapter B—Testing, Evaluation, and Approval of Mining Products
If you utilize conveyor belting, please complete the following table on conveyor belt.
CONVEYOR BELT
Belt characteristics
Location
Brand/type
Width, in
Ply
MSHA No.
Length, ft
48
• What is the clearance between the floor and the bottom of conveyor belting?
.
• If ventilation tubing is used, what is the MSHA approval number?
What is the diameter?
in.
What is the thickness?
in.
Type
.
What is the total length used underground?
• Do you use meshing for roof and rib control? Yes
Wire mesh
.
Plastic mesh
C Do you use plastic resin roof bolts?
ft.
No
.
. If plastic, approximate square feet
Yes
No
.
.
• Please complete the following table on combustible materials stored or used underground:
COMBUSTIBLE MATERIALS STORED OR USED UNDERGROUND
Toxic level due to burning
Material
Quantity
Unit
Low
Brattice
Conveyor belting
Diesel fuel (storage and vehicles)
Electrical cables
Fluids (emulsion)
Fluids (hydraulic)
Grouting
Oils
Plastic piping
Roof bolt resins
Lumber (untreated)
Lumber (treated)
Tires (on equipment)
Ventilation tubing
Oxygen
Acetylene
Propane
Medium
High
Special precautions
(above and beyond MSHA regulations)
Fires
Explosions
50
HOUSEKEEPING
• Do you have any surface hazards that can affect the underground mine (for example, propane storage tanks)? Yes
No
.
Please list:
.
C Do you store compressed gas cylinders underground? Yes
No
.
If yes, how and where do you store compressed gas cylinders?
.
C Do you have a battery disposal program? If yes, please explain:
.
C Are old batteries removed from the underground mine? Yes
No
.
• How do you handle hazardous waste, such as antifreeze, emulsion oil, etc.?
.
• How do you handle underground fuel spills (for example, diesel fuel)?
.
51
• What is done with underground trash?
.
• Are your crosscuts, with mandoors, free of obstructions, such as mine materials, equipment, etc.?
Yes
No
.
Please explain:
.
• Are your crosscuts or areas used to store emergency equipment free of obstructions?
Yes
No
.
Please explain:
.
• Do miners have an opportunity to assess their work area and personal protective equipment?
Yes
No
.
Please explain:
.
• How do you control the buildup of excess coal dust on beltlines?
.
• What procedures are used to inspect and dispose of residue from belt and V-plow scrappers?
.
52
53
How many belt scrapers do you have underground?
How many V-plow scrapers do you have underground?
.
.
• What procedures are used to reduce belt thread buildup?
.
• Are your belt drive areas covered with a noncombustible material? Yes
No
• Are your power center areas covered with a noncombustible material? Yes
.
No
• Are your charging station areas covered with a noncombustible material? Yes
No
.
.
• What is done to control the caking of rock dust and coal dust on sprinkler heads?
.
EVACUATION PLANS
75.380 - Escapeways; bituminous and lignite mines.
75.384 - Longwall and shortwall travelways.
75.1101-23(a) - Each operator of an underground coal mine shall adopt a program for the instruction of all
miners in the location and use of fire fighting equipment, location of escapeways, exits, and routes of
travel to the surface, and proper evacuation procedures to be followed in the event of an emergency.
• Do you incorporate your evacuation plan in your drills? Yes
No
.
Please explain:
.
• How often do miners walk the escapeway?
.
54
Do miners walk the entire escapeway or just part of the way?
.
• How much time is required to walk the escapeway from the section to the portal?
.
• How do you maintain your escapeways?
Please explain:
.
• How are your escape routes identified?
.
Are they identifiable in smoke? Yes
No
.
Please explain:
.
SELF-CONTAINED SELF-RESCUERS (SCSRs)
75.1714(a) - Each operator shall make available to each miner who goes underground, and to visitors
authorized to enter the mine by the operator, an approved self-rescue device or devices which is
adequate to protect such person for 1 hour or longer.
• What brand and model of SCSR is used at the mine? (If more than one type, please list all.)
.
C How often is refresher training conducted?.
.
• How many SCSRs are stored underground?
Total number:
MSA
Draeger
CSE
Other
Ocenco
55
Where are your underground SCSR caches located?
.
• How many SCSRs are stored on the surface?
Total number:
MSA
Draeger
CSE
Ocenco
Other
C How are SCSRs with expired service life removed from service?
Please explain:
.
What is done with these units?
.
Are records/logs kept of these units? Yes
No
.
Please explain:
.
Are serial numbers recorded? Yes
No
.
C How are these units tracked after they are taken underground?
Please explain:
.
C Are units visually inspected for damage? Yes
How often?
No
.
.
Who inspects them? Please explain:
.
56
57
C What is done with damaged units?
.
Are records kept of inspections and removal of damaged units? Yes
No
.
C Does your mine participate in NIOSH’s Long-Term Field Evaluation Program?
Yes
No
.
Date of last replacement:
.
Total number of units replaced:
.
C Has your mine experienced any problems with SCSRs? Yes
No
.
Please explain:
.
FIRST RESPONDERS TO FIRE1
75.1101-23 - Program of instruction; location and use of fire fighting equipment; location of escapeways,
exits and routes of travel; evacuation procedures; fire drills.
• How often are fire drills conducted?
.
• What kind of training is conducted for miners responding to a fire?
.
1
First responders are the first persons to initiate firefighting.
58
• Who conducts training?
.
If outside vendor/consultant, please list:
.
• What kind of firefighting equipment is used in training?
Extinguishers
Foam generators
Fire hose
Fire suppression systems
Other (please explain)
.
• During training, are real fires extinguished? Yes
No
.
If yes, describe fire scenario:
.
• How often is fire training conducted?
.
• Is smoke training conducted? Yes
No
.
If yes, describe scenario:
.
Type of apparatus used:
.
• What type of training is conducted for SCSRs or filter self-rescuers?
.
59
• Do miners have specific duties if there is a fire on their section? Yes
No
.
If yes, what are their duties for the section?
.
What are their duties if they are outby?
.
• What percentage of miners are trained in first aid?
%.
• Do you have a standard operating procedure (SOP) for first person to respond to a fire?
Yes
No
.
Please explain:
.
How many miners are trained overall?
• How many per section?
.
.
• Do you have an agreement for assistance from the local fire department, for example, fighting surface fires or the
use of fire hose and water? Yes
No
.
What precautions are taken (on-site training, liability)?
.
• Do you have a mutual agreement with other mines to fight fires? Yes
If yes, do you train together, etc.? Yes
No
No
.
.
Please explain:
.
60
FIRE BRIGADES
C Do you have a fire brigade? Yes
No
• How many teams do you have?
.
How many members per team?
. (If no, skip this section.)
.
• How are members selected?
.
• What are the criteria for being on the fire brigade?
.
• How often do fire brigade members train?
Describe training:
.
• Do fire brigade members train with the mine rescue team members? Yes
• Do you provide your fire brigade with specialized equipment? Yes
No
No
.
.
Please explain:
.
• How much time is required for the fire brigade team to muster and respond to an underground fire?
.
61
62
This amount of time depends on what?
.
• Do you have an SOP for the fire brigade? Yes
No
.
Please explain:
.
• Has your team ever participated in an actual mine emergency? Yes
No
.
Please explain:
.
MINE RESCUE
49.2 - Availability of mine rescue teams.
• If you have mine rescue teams, how many teams do you have?
How many members per team?
.
How many members per shift?
C If you do not have a team, how are you covered?
.
.
• What are the criteria for being on the mine rescue team?
.
• How often do mine rescue team members train?
.
63
Describe training:
.
• If you have more than one team, is cross-training provided? Yes
No
• Has your team ever trained with your State mine rescue teams? Yes
N/A
No
.
.
• Do mine rescue team members train with the fire brigade members? Yes
No
.
• Do you provide your mine rescue team with specialized equipment? Yes
No
.
Please explain:
.
• How much time is required for the mine rescue team to muster and respond to an underground fire?
.
• Do you have an SOP for mine rescue? Yes
No
.
Please explain:
.
• Has your team ever participated in an actual mine emergency? Yes
No
.
Please explain:
.
SPECIALIZED EQUIPMENT
• What type of turnout gear do you have?
.
64
65
Total number:
Where are they stored?
.
Do personnel have easy access to it? Yes
No
.
• What types of SCBAs do you have?
.
Please enter the total number of units:
30-min
60-min
4-hr
Other
Location:
.
Explain your SCBA preventive maintenance program:
.
Are records/logs kept? Yes
C Do you have extra tanks of air? Yes
No
No
.
.
• Do you have the capabilities of charging your own tanks? Yes
If yes, is your system a cascading system? Yes
• Do you provide motion sensors for team members? Yes
No
No
.
.
No
.
• Do you have infrared devices or thermal imaging cameras for locating hot spots, fires, or missing
miners? Yes
No
.
Please explain:
.
66
• What is your team’s communication system?
.
• Other comments:
.
67
APPENDIX B.—EXAMPLES OF INSPECTION, MAINTENANCE, AND GENERAL
HOUSEKEEPING CHECKLISTS AND PROCEDURES
ANNUAL HYDRANT CHECKS
30 CFR 75.1103-11
1.
Checked with Conflow fire hydrant setting bend:
a. Unlock the presetting dome by loosening the three set screws with an Allen wrench. Rotate presetting
dome by hand in a clockwise direction all the way out.
2.
Connect the presetting bend onto the hydrant outlet using a 1.5-in pipe thread to NST thread adapter.
3.
Use the 0.5-in presetting bend nozzle.
4.
Use caution when applying pressure flow through the 0.5-in nozzle. Hold the nozzle tightly, directing the
waterflow in a harmless direction so as not to hurt yourself or someone in the area or to cause damage to
equipment.
5.
Open the hydrant with the handwheel until the flow gauge is registering 120 psig.
6.
Rotate the presetting dome by hand in an anticlockwise direction until it can move no further.
7.
Lock the presetting dome in this position by tightening the three set screws.
8.
Double-check the psi setting by opening the handwheel as far as possible; the flow gauge should read 120 psi.
9.
Remove the presetting bend and adapter from the hydrant and replace hydrant cap.
10.
Punch tag in proper place.
68
ANNUAL FIRE HOSE CHECKS
30 CFR 75.1103-11
1.
Designated fire hose storage area consists of the following:
a. Ten 50-ft hoses are donut-rolled and placed in a blue 55-gal plastic barrel with two pogo poles taped with
red and white reflective tape. There is a white sign with red reflective letters stating “fire hose.”
b. Two brass fire hose nozzles screwed on a gated Y are placed on top of the hoses, which are stored in the
barrel.
2.
Hose spacing
a. Main north travelway - every 1,000 ft.
b. Panel section - every 2,000 ft or less, in an X-cut on the belt side of No. 2 entry. If muddy or wet
conditions exist on the belt side, the hose is placed on the uphill side. Both sides are on intake air.
c. If a belt drive is between this 2,000-ft spacing, then another barrel of hose is placed there.
3.
Hose testing
a. Every hose is pulled out of the rack or reel and checked for leaks. If a hose is found to have any kind of
leak, even a pinhole, the hose is replaced (cut both ends off of hose and discard).
b. The 50-ft hoses have a pressure check of 400 psi. To obtain that kind of pressure, a direct hookup to
the water line is used. A gated valve and pipe with a pressure gauge are connected to the gated Y where
the hoses are hooked up and laid out for testing. The hoses are laid out flat and the nozzles are opened
slightly to prevent a water hammer. The water is turned on and the nozzles are closed after water flows
through the nozzles. The water has pressure readings of 400 psi, and the water is left on for 2 min to
check for leaks. The rating on the 100-ft hose found in some safety trailers is 250 psi; that is the pressure
at which they are checked.
69
ANNUAL FIRE HOSE TESTS
SITE LOCATION
DATE TESTS WERE COMPLETED:
HOSE LOCATION
HOSE
LENGTHS
LENGTHS
TESTED
PRESSURE
USED
COMMENTS, DEFECTS, ETC.
70
MONTHLY CHECKS ON FOAM GENERATOR
In a toolbox on the foam generator, there is a notebook that contains a complete listing of various items that should
be on the generator. There are also a series of tests and checks to be made. After completing the inventory list and
making the necessary series of checks and tests, the person that does these checks signs his or her name and states
if anything is missing or wrong with the generator. If anything is missing or wrong with the generator, it must be
reported to management and corrected immediately.
Items on, or tests to be made on, foam generator.
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
12.
13.
14.
15.
16.
17.
18.
Check oil
Check fuel
Start generator
Check cage (for dents, punctures, etc.)
Check tires
Wheel chocks (3)
Six 2.5-in red rubber hoses
Seven 1.5-in cloth hoses
Fifteen 3-in cloth (400-psi) hoses in racks
One crank handle for starting the engine
One pressure reducer valve
One gang valve
One hose clamp
Two bull hoses
One fire extinguisher
Two 30-gal barrels of foam concentrate
Ax
Eight 4-in Vic couplers
19.
20.
21.
22.
23.
24.
25.
26.
27.
28.
30.
31.
32.
33.
34.
35.
Eight pogo sticks
Two sand bags
One diesel can, 2.5 gal full
One can spads
One can buttons
One 4-ft spad gun
One 6-ft ladder
One bow saw
Two shovels (one spade, one blunt end)
One pick
Four rolls brattice cloth
Two telephones (test system)
One 8-lb sledge hammer
One hitch
Approximately 300 ft telephone cable
Extra crank handle mounted on side of hose
rack
71
Items in tool box:
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
12.
13.
Three 24-in pipe wrenches
One 18-in pipe wrench
Two 0.5-in drive ratchets
Two 1-1/16-in (0.5-in drive) sockets
One wire brush
Two Akron nozzles
Various nozzles, fittings, and couplers
Foam generator instruction manual
Two 12-in crescent wrenches
One 8-in crescent wrench
One 6-in crescent wrench
One spanner wrench
One set Allen wrenches
14.
15.
16.
17.
18.
19.
20.
21.
22.
23.
24.
One 460 channel lock pliers
Two 2.5-lb hammers
One claw hammer
Three 6-in Vic couplers
One 2-in Vic couplers
One 1.25-in (0.5-in drive) socket
One 6- to 4-in Vic reducer
One extra bow saw blade
One funnel and 1-in hose
Functional test overhead door (manual and
electrical)
Annually drain and refill fuel tank and diesel can
LOCATION:
DATE:
EXAMINER:
FOAM GENERATOR TESTING PROCEDURES
1. Measure line pressure at manifold
(should be between 114 and 200 psi)
(pressure)
2. Set inductor into 5 gal of fresh water
(should have tapered end with screen)
(check)
3. Check foam inductor setting to ensure that it is
locked into position 1
(other settings for different foam,
not for different flow characteristics)
(setting)
(locked in position)
4. Start generator by simulating short circuit
(check)
BRATTICE CURTAIN FOR FOAM GENERATOR
MONTHLY SURFACE FIRE EXTINGUISHER CHECKLIST
STATION
NO.
MAIN
LOCATION
SUBLOCATION
ID
EXTINGUISHER
NO.
SIZE
MFG
HYDROSTATICALLY
TESTED
DATE
BY
COMMENTS
BIANNUAL UNDERGROUND FIRE EXTINGUISHER CHECKLIST
COUNTER
LOCATION
MCC#
SIZE
MFG
HYDROSTATICALLY
TESTED
DATE
COMMENTS
75
6-MONTH FIRE EXTINGUISHER INSPECTION
30 CFR 75.1100-3
1.
Visual inspection
a.
b.
Check for dents, rust, corrosion, welds.
Check indicator button. If it is up, you must
discharge any remaining pressure in a safe
direction.
2.
Remove CO2 cartridge - weigh (must be
within 0.25 oz of stamped weight).
3.
Check rubber washer in CO2 cartridge seat.
It must be intact and without cracks.
4.
Check seal on CO2 cartridge, and make sure
that it is not punctured.
8.
a. Place red tie around hose and through
pin, tie a knot, and clamp on white Ansul
clip.
b. Punch metal tag in appropriate spot. If
tag is used up or missing, replace with a
new one.
9.
10.
5.
Work puncture device to ensure smooth
operation.
6.
Open lid on cylinder and make sure that
there is adequate chemical.
a. Add chemical, if necessary.
b. Work red indicator button up and down
to ensure that it works properly.
c. Make sure rubber seal is in place on
underside of lid.
7.
Activate hose handle. Some chemical
should come out of hose. If not, turn unit
upside down and loosen chemical by
pounding unit on cap board.
Once these steps are taken and everything
checks out:
Then enter extinguisher number on the list, fill
in appropriate date and location. Also, initial
each row that you do.
If extinguisher has been discharged, it is
immediately removed from service from that
area and another fresh checked extinguisher
will be placed there. The discharged
extinguisher is taken outside to the foam
generator where the hose is disconnected
from the extinguisher and blown completely
out by compressed air. The
monoammonium phosphate is replaced, and
a complete check is done on the extinguisher
as stated above.
76
EXTINGUISHER MOUNTING LOCATIONS
Equipment
Location
Track jeeps
On floor, trolley side between seats
Diesel mantrips - 6 man
- 8 man
- 4 man
Inside cab right side of transmission shifter
Operator side rear fender well
Inside cab right side of transmission shifter
Diesel trucks
Mounted to cab behind driver
Tugs
Left inside cab support leg in front of operator seat
Battery scoop
Operator side rear cubbyhole
Shield haulers
Left inside cab support leg in front of driver seat
Diesel scoop
Left inside cab support leg in front of driver seat
Diesel duster
Left inside cab support leg in front of driver seat
New style service center
Operator side behind cab mounted to grid steel
Old style service center
Cap support driver side front fender
Propane carts
Right-hand side opposite tank
Oxygen-acetylene carts
Back side of axle housing (horizontally)
Track roadmotors
Right inside rear wall of cab
NOTE: Bracket No. 40-03-0185
77
TRAILER-MOUNTED ANSUL 150C FIRE EXTINGUISHERS
1.
Location:
a. Main North travelway between No. 2 and No. 3 entry at 46 and 61 crosscut and in No. 4 entry on
MS travelway at 20 crosscut.
b. Surface locations: tipple, weld shop, between shop and compressor, and extras east of light-duty bay.
2.
Consist of:
a.
b.
c.
d.
One cylinder holding 125 lb of Foray multipurpose dry-chemical agent
One nitrogen bottle
Hose with nozzle
One hitch used to move unit where needed
FIREFIGHTING EQUIPMENT FIRE AUDIT REPORT
Date
Main location
Location
Condition
Comments
Checked by
79
FIRST-AID SUPPLIES (EXAMPLE 1)
FIRST-AID BOX CHECKLIST
Location
Date
Names
Minimum quantity
1-in by 3-in Band Aid . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50 each
Fingertip Band Aid . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50 each
Knuckle Band Aid . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50 each
2-in by 2-in bandage . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 (2 boxes)
4-in by 4-in bandage . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 (8 boxes)
24-in by 72-in bandage . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 each
4-in by 6-yd dressing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 each
Triangular bandage . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15 each
Tourniquet . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 each
Burn compound . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 box
Ammonia inhalants . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 box
Merthiolate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 box
Eye wash . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 boxes
Ice pack . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 each
Scissors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 pair
Tape . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 roll
Disposable exam glove . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 each
Folding stretcher . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 each
Folding back board . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 each
Spider straps . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 set
Woolen blanket . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 each
Disposable blanket . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 each
Sam splints . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 each
Board splints . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 set
Air splints
Full arm . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 each
Full leg zippered . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 each
Half leg zippered . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 each
Sager traction splint . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 each
Oral airway . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 set
Non-rebreathing mask . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 each
Pocket mask . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 each
Oxygen mask . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 each
Oxygen bottle/regulator/wrench . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 each
Quantity needed
80
Stiff neck collars
Short . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 each
Regular . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 each
Tall . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 each
No-neck . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 each
Soft neck collars . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 each
BP cuff . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 each
Stethoscope . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 each
Glucose . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 each
81
FIRST-AID SUPPLIES (EXAMPLE 2)
NOTICE
To help keep the large first-aid box adequately supplied at all times, we ask that you please obtain basic first-aid
supplies from this small first-aid box. Below is a “minimum quantity” list of the supplies contained in this sma
first-aid box. You may wish to add additional items. Please feel free to do so. If this box becomes depleted,
please bring it to the safety/facility technicians, who will either refill or replace.
SMALL FIRST-AID BOX SUPPLY LIST
Item
Minimum
quantity
1-in by 3-in Bandits . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50 each
Fingertip Bandits . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50 each
Knuckle Bandits . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50 each
2-in by 2-in bandage . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 (2 boxes)
4-in by 4-in bandage . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 (2 boxes)
Item
Minimum
quantity
Burn compound (Folie) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 box
Merthiolate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 box
Eye wash . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 boxes
Ice packs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 each
Adhesive tape . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 roll or box
The idea here is to keep the large first-aid box properly supplied, clean, and organized for use in the event of a
critical emergency. For your reference, a list is attached to the outside of the large first-aid box identifying the
supplies it contains. Your cooperation is appreciated by all of your coworkers.
82
EMERGENCY MATERIAL SKIDS
These skids are located at 30 crosscut MN TW and at 10 or 11 of section on the high side.
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
12.
13.
14.
15.
16.
17.
18.
19.
20.
One skid to store and haul material
One chain used to help in hauling
1,000 board ft of brattice board
Two rolls of brattice cloth
Two bow saws
Three claw hammers
25 lb of 8d nails
25 lb of 10d nails
25 lb of 16d nails
Two shovels
One bundle of wedges
Twelve capboards
Four timbers
Five 5-gal buckets of Celtite (10 - 15c)
Four bags of rock dust
One ax
Six pogo sticks
One pointed trowel
One rectangular finishing trowel
One rectangular patching trowel
83
FIRE AUDIT FORM
EMERGENCY MATERIALS CHECKLIST FOR FIRE TRAM
DATE:
(
(
(
(
(
(
(
(
(
)
)
)
)
)
)
)
)
)
112 Kennedy metal stopping panels with associated head sills and twist clamps
24 Kennedy stopping rib angles
3 rolls of tape
3 twist tools
3 stopping jacks
3 picks
3 shovels
9 buckets of Celtite 10 - 12 Airtite (or equivalent material for stopping construction)
5 tons of rock dust
84
SURFACE FIRE BRIGADE TRAILER CONTENTS
A utility trailer with a trailer hitch will be located east of the administration building. The trailer will contain th
following supplies and will be connected to an electrical receptacle to provide power to a heater and emergency
light. The trailer is to be disconnected from the power source before moving it to the fire location. All surface
vehicles, except the heavy equipment service truck, will have two 5/16 ball hitches for transporting the trailer. I
addition, the 930 and 945 endloaders will be equipped to transport the trailer during inclement weather.
BREATHING APPARATUS
• Four Draeger PA-80-4,500 1-hr breathing apparatus
• Five spare compressed air cylinders
BUNKER GEAR
• 12 complete sets including fire repel firefighter coat and turnout bib pants, protective hood, firefighter glove
fire dome helmet
• 12 red carrying bags for bunker gear
FIREFIGHTING EQUIPMENT
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
300 ft of 2.5-in NST fire hose
400 ft of 1.75-in IPT fire hose
Two 25-ft rolls of 4-in supply line fire hose
Three H-VPGI nozzles, 1.5-in IPT
One H-VPGI nozzle, 2.5-in NST
One flowmeter, 1.5-in IPT
One Elkhart 241-95 in-line foam eductor
Two 5-gal pails of multipurpose foam; additional foam is located in the warehouse
Two-gated wye, 2.5 in to 1.5 in
Seven fire extinguishers
Four 20-lb fire extinguishers
One 30-lb fire extinguisher
One CO2 fire extinguisher
One 150-lb wheel unit
Four combination hydrant/spanner wrenches
Six spanner wrenches
One fire ax
Two pike poles
85
• One hose clamp
• Four firefighting brooms
• Three water vests
ONE 6,000-WATT WINCO GENERATOR
• Four 500-watt mounted quartz lights (outside trailer)
ONE HAZMAT BOOK
FIRST-AID SUPPLIES
•
•
•
•
One trauma kit
First-aid kit
One ked extrication device
Four blankets
TOOLS
•
•
•
•
•
Two boxes of tools
One 12-in crescent wrench for natural gas shutoff
Three electric extension cords
Regular wood saw
Regular broom for cleaning trailer
86
UNDERGROUND FIRE BRIGADE SKID CONTENTS
Firefighting Supplies
Firefighting Supply Box
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
1 each - Three-way manifold (5-in Storz to 2.5-in NST)
3 each - Adapter (2.5-in NST to 1.5-in NPSH)
1 each - Adapter (5-in Storz to 4-in Victaulic fitting)
1 each - Vari-X foam generator
1 each - On/off valved pistol grip
6 each - 5-gal VEE foam buckets
4 each - Storz spanner wrenches
2 each - Task Force tip nozzles (one with pistol grip)
2 each - 1.5-in spanner wrench
Tools to open a stopping between the belt entry and the adjacent intake entry (30 CFR 75.1103-9(a)(2)
requirement):
• 1 each - Dutch head
• 1 each - Ax
• 1 each - Track Shovel
• 1 each - Omega Block Saw
• 1 each - 500-ft roll of 0.25-in rope
• 1 each - tool bag with:
4-in screwdriver
Claw hammer
6-in screwdriver
Brass hammer
8-in crescent wrench
First-aid kit
10-in crescent wrench
S hooks
12-in crescent wrench
16 penny nails
15-in crescent wrench
Rolls of tape
Hacksaw
Bucket lid opener
• 2 each - 14-in pipe wrenches
Fire Hose Box
(30 CFR 75.1103-9(a)(1) requirement):
1.
2.
3.
4.
4 each - 100-ft lengths hi-volume 5-in Storz fire hose
2 each - 25-ft lengths hi-volume 5-in Storz fire hose
1 each - 50-ft length hi-volume 5-in Storz fire hose
12 each - 50-ft lengths 1.75-in NPSH fire hose
Open Storage
1. 240 lb of rock dust (30 CFR 75.1103-9(a)(3) requirement) in six buckets
2. Two rolls thick curtain
87
MATERIALS LIST FOR MINE RESCUE EMERGENCY
G
G
G
G
G
G
G
G
G
G
G
G
G
G
G
G
G
G
G
G
G
G
G
G
G
G
G
G
G
G
G
G
G
G
G
G
G
G
G
Mine rescue clothes and mine boots
Spare change of clothes
Hard hats
Mine belts with name tags
Cap lamps
Apparatus for each member and two spare apparatus
Extra canisters or BG4 training canisters with extra filters and DraegerSorb
RZ tester and tools
Spare part for apparatus
Antifog
Leak-Tec
Apparatus bench procedures manual
Turnout gear
Nomex gloves and hood
Firefighter helmet
Extra O2 bottles
Rescue rope and bands
Aprons with chalk
Thumping sticks
Hammers and nails
Spad guns
Spads and washers
Gas instrument
Chargers and extra batteries
Map boards with equipment
Two stretchers
Four fire extinguishers
Two blankets
One Exotecter
Two magnehelic gauges with tubing and pipe
Two sets of communication headphones
One 1,000-ft length of sound-powered cable with reel
One emergency procedures manual
EMT materials from competition list and two burn kits
One basket stretcher
Two mine rescue radios with batteries and chargers
Gas sampling bags, syringes, etc.
Rescue ropes and harness
Four fire lances
88
SAFETY TRAILER LOCATIONS
1. Position of safety trailers
All safety trailers are located in the kitchen or x-cut across the kitchen. In the longwall, it is located in front of
transformer. The only exception may be when a section is being developed, and the safety trailer will be found
the Main travelway.
2. Contents of safety trailer
a.
b.
c.
d.
e.
f.
g.
h.
i.
Five 100-ft fire hoses stored in a rack; some trailers have 55-gal barrels with 10- to 50-ft hoses
One 5121 Akron nozzle placed on end of last fire hose
One wheeled Ansul model 150 containing 125 lb of Foray multipurpose dry-chemical agent, one
nitrogen bottle, and a hose with a nozzle
One hitch used to haul trailer
Four sets of bunker gear
One scoop stretcher
One portable potty
One first-aid box with oxygen
Twelve SCSRs in metal box
89
FIRE PROTECTION AND FIREFIGHTING STANDARDS
1. Foam generators
a. Each mining complex shall have a trailer-mounted high-expansion foam generator stored on or near th
surface.
b. Each foam generator shall be equipped with 500 ft of #2 G-GC cable and is to have on hand another
1,500 ft of the same cable to reach remote power sources.
c. Items to be stocked with the generator are:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
500 ft of 2.5-in fire hose with 2.5-in NH thread
500 ft of 2-in fire hose with 2-in NPT threads and two nozzles with adaptors
A manifold with four 2-in NPT outlets for fire hoses or for the foam generator, with a 4-in by 6-in
reducer (Victaulic)
Eight 4-in by 4-in by 10-ft posts
1-in by 4-in lumber (or equivalent) (250 board ft)
Hammer and nails (8d, 16d, and roofing nails)
One roll of brattice
Spad gun, spads, and washers
Twenty 5-gal cans of foam concentrate
2. Firefighting storage stations
a. Per 30 CFR 75.1100-2(i), emergency materials that shall be stored, not exceeding 2 miles from each
working section, are:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
1,000 board ft of brattice boards
Two rolls of brattice cloth
Two handsaws
25 lb of 8d nails
25 lb of 10d nails
25 lb of 16d nails
Three claw hammers
25 bags of wood fiber plaster or 10 bags of cement (or equivalent material for stoppings)
5 tons of rock dust
90
The following items shall be stored at central warehouse, boxed and ready:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
500 board ft of 1-in lumber
Three spad guns
One can of spads
One box spad washers
One box 16d nails
One box 8d nails
Six carpenter hammers
Six rolls brattice
Six boxes rigipak foam
Three axes
Three handsaws
Twenty-four 4-in by 4-in adjustable posts with bolts and nuts
Five 100-ft lengths of 2-in fire hose with 2-in NPT threads
Two fire nozzles
Ten roof jacks, ratchet-type aluminum
Four shovels
300 framing boards, 1 in by 4 in by 10 ft (or equivalent) (1,000 board ft)
One bundle each cap pieces and wedges
Four 30-lb fire extinguishers
Two 10-lb sledge hammers
Two trimming bars
One pick
Four 2-in fire hydrants
One 24-hr supply of high-expansion foam
b. The following items shall be stored at each mine on the surface, boxed and ready:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Five 100-ft lengths of 2-in fire hose with 2-in NPT threads
Two fire nozzles
One spad gun
One box spad washers
Two claw hammers
One box 8d nails
One box 16d nails
One ax
Two rolls brattice
Two 30-lb fire extinguishers
Two 1.5-in pipe nipples
Two 2-in pipe nipples
Two 2-in to 1.5-in bell reducers
Two large water pump pliers
91
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
One 2-in fire hydrant valve
Two 12-in pipe wrenches
One scaling bar
Two pocket knives
One pick
Four 2-in fire hydrants
One manifold with four 2-in outlets
Emergency material to be kept on each miner section:
•
•
•
Two portable fire extinguishers (20 lb minimum)
240 lb of rock dust
Water lines extended to section loading point (tailpiece) with enough hose (500 ft minimum) to
reach each face
92
FIRE PREVENTION EQUIPMENT CHECKLIST
Fire Prevention Equipment Checklist
Emergency sled
700 ft of fire hose with nozzle
Vari-X foam generator and eductor
Three buckets of foam concentrate
Two rolls of brattice cloth
Two boxes of nails (6p and 8p)
12 or more SCSRs
Emergency escape map
Oil station
Five bags of rock dust
One 10-lb fire extinguisher
Area well dusted and free of trash
Power center
Five bags of rock dust
One 100-lb fire extinguisher
Area well dusted and free of trash
Water pump
Five bags of rock dust
One 10-lb fire extinguisher
Area well dusted and free of trash
Feeder
Controls and pump area clean, free of oil and oil-soaked coal dust
Fire suppression system intact
Machine and tailpiece free of excessive accumulations of
coal dust and/or spillage
Dinner hole/
repair wagon
Area well dusted and free of trash
One fire extinguisher
Compressed gas cylinders stored correctly and secured
Remote fire suppression operative
Continuous miner
Remote fire suppression operative
Manual fire suppression operative
Hose for a hose fire suppression operative (if available)
Miner clean, no oil or oil-soaked coal accumulations
Fire nozzle and adapter stored on miner
Operator has methane spotter and is making proper checks
93
Roof bolter
Fire suppression system intact
Bolter clean and free of oil or oil-soaked coal
Operator has methane spotter and is making proper checks
Coal haulers
Unit #
Fire suppression system intact
Hauler clean, free of oil and oil-soaked coal
SCSR OK
Scoop
Fire suppression system intact
Scoop clean, free of oil and oil-soaked coal
Operator has methane spotter and is making proper checks
SCSR OK
Belt
Two 20-lb fire extinguishers at drive area
Five bags of rock dust at the starter box
Five bags of rock dust at the take-up
One 10-lb fire extinguisher at the take-up
Drive clean and free of coal and oil accumulations
Fire sensor system tested and operative
Fire deluge system intact
Fire sensors every 125 ft along beltline
Fire outlets located every 300 ft or less along beltline
94
FUNCTIONAL TEST OF MINE MONITORING SYSTEMS
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------Req. By:
Page:
Run on:
at:
Report:
Stand Alone PM
Version:
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------JOB CARD FOR TASK NUMBER E001
7-DAY INSPECTION MSHA REQUIREMENT
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------WORK GROUP:
EQUIPMENT NUMBER:
RESOURCE TYPE
NO. REQUIRED
“
LAST SCHEDULE DATE
EST. HOURS
DATES
LAST PERFORMED DATE NEXT SCHEDULE DATE
JOB PRIORITY MAINTENANCE TYPE
COMPONENT MODIFIER SEQUENCE
------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------ COMPLETION TEXT --- JOB INSTRUCTIONS -ELECTRICAL
NECESSARY MATERIALS: CO CALIBRATION KIT
07 DAY INSPECTION
DATE DUE:
NEXT DUE DATE:
CALIBRATED BY:
DATE:
1. INFORM SECURITY, WORKING SECTIONS, BELT PEOPLE,
AND SHIFT FOREMAN THAT YOU WILL BE CREATING A
MINE-WIDE ALARM FOR TESTING PURPOSES ONLY
A. INFORM THEM OF AN APPROXIMATE TIME THAT
YOU WILL PERFORM THE TEST.
------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------2. PICK A BELT CO ANYWHERE UNDERGROUND, BUT DO NOT
IDENTIFY TO SECURITY WHAT THAT CO IS.
------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------3. APPLY CO GAS TO START MINE-WIDE ALARM
------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------4. CALL SECURITY AND ASK IF THEY RECEIVED A
MINE-WIDE ALARM AND FROM WHERE THE ALARM
ORIGINATED. IF SECURITY ANSWERS CORRECTLY
THE TEST WAS A SUCCESS.
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------5. ** IMPORTANT ** HAVE SECURITY ENTER IT IN
THE CONSPEC WEEKLY FUNCTIONAL TEST BOOK.
BOOK IS ON THE SHELF JUST ABOVE THE CONSPEC
95
PRINTER. MAKE SURE THEY SIGN IT, ALSO.
ADDITIONAL COMMENTS:
REVIEWED BY:
DATE
96
WEEKLY CONSPEC SYSTEM FUNCTIONAL TEST
DATE
LOCATION
STATUS
INITIALS
97
MINE MONITOR INSPECTION REPORT
CHECK POINTS
DATE
INSPECTED BY:
STATUS
COMMENTS:
ISOLATOR BOX BLINKING
YES - NO
ACC STATS/TRUNK 1 AND 2
YES - NO
PAPER IN PRINTER
YES - NO
SEQUENCE MONITOR FLASHING
YES - NO
TIME AND DATE ON LISTING
YES - NO
POWER UNIT
AC - READY - CHARGER LIGHTS ON
YES - NO
INVERTER AND ALARM LIGHTS OFF
YES - NO
VOICE ALARM WORKING
YES - NO
DISPLAY AND OPERATING CHECKS
YES - NO
CO’S CHANGING TRUNK 1 - NINE RIGHT
YES - NO
CO’S CHANGING TRUNK 2 - THIRD SW
YES - NO
CLEAR BUFFER SCREEN
YES
INVESTIGATE ALL NO’S!
NOTES
NAME:
DATE:
98
CONSPEC EMERGENCY COMMUNICATION CENTER ACTIVITY LOG
COMMENTS:
TIME:
READINGS:
LOCATIONS:
TIME:
READINGS:
LOCATIONS:
TIME:
READINGS:
LOCATIONS:
TIME:
READINGS:
LOCATIONS:
TIME:
READINGS:
LOCATIONS:
99
CONSPEC ROOM CALLOUT LOG
DATE
SECTION
WHO
TIME
STATUS
PED SYSTEM
CALL NO.
INITIALS
100
CUTTING/WELDING PERMIT (EXAMPLE 1)
CUTTING/WELDING OPERATIONS
CLOSE-OUT INSPECTION - 1 HOUR
Hot work permit
1. Inspection date:
2. Inspected by:
3. Conditions found:
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
12.
Call communication coordinator
Methane check: every 20 min
Rock dust before starting
10-lb fire extinguisher or 240 lb rock dust
Blankets to cover area, surface only
Protective equipment
Long sleeves or weldingleathers
Welding gloves
Safety glasses
Welding hood: check for holes, cracks in lens
Cutting goggles: check forbroken lenses
Leg bands or cuffs tied
ADDITIONAL SAFETY CHECKS
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
Examine work area for:
a. Stumbling hazards
b. Unsafe roof conditions
c. Adequate ventilation coursed to return
d. Cleanliness: grease, oil, coal dust
removed
Ground clamp secured
Inspect equipment before using: torch, welder,
etc.
Warn others before striking an arc
When welding overhead-protect ears with
nonflammable material
Do not gob hot material
.
.
.
4. Call communications coordinator to inform of
followup inspection
5. Turn in tag to shift manager or preparation plant
supervisor (surface).
101
CUTTING/WELDING PERMIT (EXAMPLE 2)
HOT WORK PERMIT
Note: Before issuing this permit, all of the
precautions described in company SOP should
be followed.
Both columns must be completed
I have been instructed, and I understand the
hazards, as well as the precautions necessary to
do this work.
Signature of person performing work
Good for this shift ONLY
date
From
to
time
Bldg.
time
Dept.
Floor
I verify that the work site has been inspected, all
necessary precautions have been taken to
prevent fire, and the individual who has signed
above is authorized to do this work.
Work to be done:
Signature of supervisor
Work performed by:
Date and time of signature
FIRE watch assigned? Yes
No
Names of fire watches:
Other special precautions taken:
102
1.
2.
3.
Have all flammable or combustible materials
been removed from the work area (35-ft
radius)? Yes
No
If any flammables or combustibles cannot be
removed, have they been properly covered by
fire-resistive shields or tarpaulins? Yes No
Work completed
Date/time
I have inspected the worksite after completion of the
work and find the area to be in safe condition.
Are fire extinguishing systems in service? Yes
No
Signature of supervisor
4.
Are adequate portable fire extinguishers and/or
hoses provided? Yes
No
5.
Have combustible floors or roofs been wet
down and/or properly covered? Yes No
6.
Have wall or floor openings been properly
covered? Yes
No
7.
Is hot work equipment in good working
condition? Yes
No
8.
Is a confined space permit required?
Yes
No
9.
Is a line breaking permit required? Yes
No
10.
Is lockout/tagout required? Yes
No
11.
Has the atmosphere been checked with a
combustible gas detector? Yes
No
12.
Is ventilation adequate? Yes
13.
Is adequate PPE provided (glasses, mask,
gloves, breathing apparatus)? Yes
No
No
Date and time of signature
103
SPECIFICATIONS FOR SLOPE WATER LINE
PERFORMANCE
The slope water line system shall deliver 50 gpm to each of three hydrants. The pipeline shall be drained after each
use and normally kept empty to prevent freezing. Water shall be introduced via an electrically operated valve that can
be locally (coal seam at surge bin) or remotely (Communications-Warehouse) actuated. The drain valve shall be
interlocked with the supply valve and must be closed prior to opening the supply valve. There will be local and remote
indication of valve positions. The supply and drain valve shall have manual override of electrical actuator.
MATERIAL SPECIFICATIONS
Pipeline
Three-inch nominal diameter aluminum pipe schedule 40 furnished in 20-ft lengths with grooved Victaulic style 77
couplers.
Supports
Pipeline shall be supported at least every 10 ft. An additional support shall be provided at each tee. The support shall
consist of a fiberglass Enduro Model #SR1-9P furnished by Westfall Co. The support shall be secured to the
concrete wall with two 3/8-in-diam “red-head” studs, stainless steel type.
Use a pipe clamp on each support. Clamp to be Model #PC-1617N.
Supply and Drain Valve
The supply valve shall be 3-in Trivaco MAK150 SG07-M. Adams Class 300 rotary tight shutoff valve. Rated for
210 psi. CS double flanged body, 3156 SS Disc and seat. NI Resist pressed bearings, and zero leakage. It shall
be actuated by 115 v AUMA SG07 Quarter-turn actuator complete with water-tight enclosure.
The drain valve shall be a nominal 1-in 110 v, SS construction, normally open. Similar to McMaster Carr 4665K46,
page 1428, catalog 100.
Air Release Valve and Vacuum Breaker
The air release valve shall be C.I. 1-in by 0.5-in similar to McMaster Carr 48045K73, page 1438, catalog 100, 50
XI S.
The vacuum breaker shall be 1.5 in by 1.25 in similar to McMaster Carr 4817K28, page 1429, catalog 100.
Water Tee
The tee shall be Victaulic style 72 — 3 in by 1.5 in.
The angle valve shall be rough brass 1.5 in UL 175# fire line angle valve.
SPRINKLER SYSTEM FOR FREEZING AND NONFREEZING LOCATIONS
106
GENERAL NOTES
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
All water pipes - 2 in (schedule 40) metal pipe, except as noted.
All pipe fittings - malleable iron - 300 lb. Extra heavy or equal.
Attach pipe to permit expansion movement.
If sprinkler is too low to have water discharge over belt, rotate pipe enough to get coverage. Flow test to adjust for proper tilt.
For freezing areas, system requires a 50/50 mixture of antifreeze (ethylene-glycol). To determine gallons required for 2-in pipe, multiply total number
of feet (pipe in system) by 0.18, then divide by 2; this equals gallons of antifreeze.
50-ft minimum at belt drive with fire-retardant belt. 150 ft minimum at belt drive without fire-retardant belt.
Optional 2-in outlet provided for optional 2-in hose connection to extend to remote head roller sprinklers.
Pipe may be mounted at any height. Uprights shall be installed to maintain sprinklers near the roof.
ELECTRICAL NOTES
Contacts of item No. 3 to be wired in stop circuit of belt drive motor starter.
A.
B. Contacts of item No. 3 to be wired to fire detection system or audible visual alarm system.
KEY
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
2-in ball valve class 300 FM approved or UL listed; pressure rating as required.
Ball valve class 300 FM approved or UL listed; pressure rating as required.
Waterflow switch FM approved or UL listed; pressure rating as required.
Sprinkler - pendant type - FM approved or UL listed; 0.5-in orifice, 212E F temperature rating.
Sprinkler - Upright type - FM approved or UL listed; 0.5-in orifice, 212E F temperature rating.
Pipe plug (optional 2-in outlet for headroller protection).
Valve - swing check - 2-in class 300 or equal (freezing areas only).
Reducing tee - 2 in by 2 in by 0.5 in - malleable iron - extra heavy or equal.
107
SUPPRESSION SYSTEM
MAINTENANCE - SEMIANNUAL EXAMINATION
To provide maximum assurance that your Ansul A-101 system will operate effectively and safely:
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
12.
13.
14.
Note the general appearance of the dry-chemical tank for
mechanical damage or corrosion.
Check nameplate for readability, corrosion, or looseness.
Remove fill cap.
Examine fill cap gaskets for elasticity. Clean and coat lightly with a
good grade of high-resistant grease.
Inspect threads on fill cap and in fill opening for nicks, burrs, crossthreading, rough or feathered edges.
Check pressure relief vent in fill opening threads for obstruction.
Make certain tank is filled with free-flowing Ansul Foray dry
chemical to a level of not more than 3 inches from bottom of fill
opening.
Secure fill cap, hand tighten.
Disengage bursting disc union.
Examine the bursting disc. If necessary, move the tank slightly to
view disc. The bursting disc should be properly seated with the
washer side facing out (smooth side in) and should be undamaged
(smooth, not scored or ruptured).
Engage bursting disc union (wrench tighten). CAUTION:
Overtightening can damage bursting disc.
Loosen the bolt(s) that restrain the cartridge or remove extinguisher
cartridge guard assembly.
Inspect the expellant gas cartridge assembly for evidence of
mechanical damage or corrosion.
Unscrew the cartridge from the pneumatic actuator/cartridge
receiver and weigh it. Replace if its weight is not within
specifications stamped on the cartridge.
15.
16.
17.
18.
19.
20.
21.
22.
23.
24.
Inspect threads on cartridge and in pneumatic actuator/cartridge
receiver for nicks, burrs, cross-threading rough or feathered.
Check pressure vent in pneumatic actuator/cartridge receiver for
obstruction.
Examine cartridge receiver gasket for elasticity. Clean and coat
lightly with a good grade of high heat-resistant grease. Return
cartridge pneumatic actuator/cartridge receiver, hand tighten.
Tighten the bracket bolt(s) uniformly or return cartridge guard
assembly.
Be sure the dry-chemical tank is firmly mounted in its bracket.
Check hose, fittings, and nozzles for mechanical damage.
Check nozzle openings. Slot should be closed (capped) with silicone
grease or covered with plastic blowoff cap.
Check remote actuator. Remove cartridge and weigh (replace if
weight is 0.25 oz less than stamped on cartridge). Inspect threads
on cartridge and in actuator for nicks, burrs, cross-threading, rough
or feathered edges. Check pressure safety vent in actuator body for
obstruction. Examine actuator cartridge gasket for elasticity. Clean
and coat lightly with a good grade of high heat-resistant grease. Pull
ring pin and operate actuator button several times to check for free
movement.
Seal ring pin to puncture lever with lead and wire seal. Return
cartridge to remote actuator, hand tighten.
Record date of maintenance.
108
ANNUAL FUNCTIONAL TEST OF THE FIRE SUPPRESSION AT BELT DRIVES
30 CFR 75.1107-16(b)
This test is done to make sure that:
1.
Water flows through each branch line in the system.
a.
b.
The last spray in each branch line of the fire suppression system has a tee with the spray pointed toward the belt. The other side of the tee
has a ball valve. This ball valve allows testing to be done without using tools.
The ball valve may be at the end of the branch line and not hooked to a spray or tee. The same results will take place when testing.
2.
When the ball valve is opened and water is flowing, the belt should shut off and the alarm will automatically be activated on the computer in the guard
shack.
3.
If any of these results are not obtained, correction shall be made at once, and the Safety Department is notified of shortcoming.
109
DRAWING OF A TYPICAL WATER LANCE
110
INDIVIDUAL WORK HAZARD ASSESSMENT
Name
Date
Return at end of shift
Protective Equipment Checklist
Metatarsal safety shoes/hard hat?
Safety glasses?
Hearing protection needed?
Gloves or respirator needed?
Cutting goggles/welding hood needed?
Fall protection required?
Ice grips or life vest needed?
Shift
Crew
Mandatory
Mandatory
Yes
No
Yes
No
Yes
No
Yes
No
Yes
No
Preoperational Equipment Inspection
Equipment #:
Equipment type:
Substandard conditions observed, but not corrected (describe):
Was a work order generated to correct these conditions?
Yes
No
Work Area Inspection
Substandard conditions observed, but not corrected (describe):
Were these conditions reported to a supervisor?
Job Safety Analysis (JSA)
Work task(s) performed:
Yes
No
111
Does a JSA exist for task(s) performed?
Was the JSA reviewed?
Was an “individual” JSA developed for task? Yes
Fls:
Time reviewed:
Smm:
Time reviewed:
Yes
No
Yes
No
No
(see details on next page)
Supt:
Time reviewed:
112
Daily Work Assignments
Job:
Sequence of Basic
Job Steps
“Individual” Job Safety Analysis
| Location:
Potential Accidents
or Hazards
Recommended Safe Job
Procedure
113
BELTLINE INSPECTION CHECKLIST
Date:
Shift
Belt No.
OK
Date
Defective Repaired
Stoppings
Doors
Guards
Cross-overs/unders
Dust
Roof/rib Conditions
Belt idlers
Drive/Take-ups
Splices/wipes accumulations
Trash/coal accumulations
Wire/electrical
Fire sensors
Fire line
Risers/valves
Fire hose/nozzles
Water sprays
Fire suppression
Extinguisher
Ventilation
Phones
Welds/tie-downs
Walkways
Belt bank or take-up pressure
Belt training
Comments:
114
Examiners:
Corrected by:
Routing list:
Belt Crew
Down Shift Supervisor
File
115
SCSR CHECK SHEET
MEMO
Need to check your crew’s SCSRs and fill out the form attached.
Information needed:
Name:
SCSR No.:
SCSR date:
Need this done and turned in to Safety by
Date
Name
SCSR No.
Manufacturer date
116
DAILY SCSR EXAMINATIONS
DATE:
LOCATION
SCSRs
EXAMINED
BY
LOCATION
SCSRs
EXAMINED
BY
LOCATION
SCSRs
EXAMINED
BY
118
APPENDIX C.—EXAMPLES OF RESPONSE PLANS AND TRAINING PROGRAMS
MINE EMERGENCY OPERATION PLAN
MEO Plan
COMMAND CENTER
119
MEO Plan
UNDERGROUND EMERGENCY
COMMAND STRUCTURE
UNDERGROUND
EMERGENCY
TASK COORDINATOR
BACKUP
UNDERGROUND
SUPERVISOR
UNDERGROUND
FIRE BRIGADE
P
THOSE ON DUTY
FIRE BRIGADE LEADER
E
R
SONNEL ASSIGNMENTS AND RESPONSIBILITIES
MINE RESCUE
TEAM
TEAM CAPTAIN
FIRST RESPONDER
C
Notifies Communications/Tech-Staff Warehouse of potential problem and to be on alert.
C Post a person, if available, just outby the area to act as a sentry to:
- Keep persons from inadvertently entering a dangerous area.
- Log activities (for example, people evaluating area, firefighting, etc.)
- Assist in notifying Communications.
- Be available to respond to helping first responder in case of a problem (for example, smoke inhalation.)
120
MEO Plan
•
UNDERGROUND EMERGENCY
Investigates to confirm evidence of fire/smoke (visual) and makes judgment on severity of situation.
- If it is a small fire that can be extinguished, attempt to extinguish fire using appropriate safety precautions and
existing safety equipment.
- If the fire is so large that efforts to control are not working, then return back to sentry and notify
communications to begin orderly evacuation of persons inby fire area. Give Communications/Tech-Staff
Warehouse directions as to which escape route is safest and fastest.
C Notifies appropriate personnel to shut off conveyor belts and/or kill power in affected area, if needed.
C First responder remains at the site to assist in evacuation and, with help of the sentry, maintains constant
communication with Communications/Tech-Staff Warehouse on status of fire and evacuation of potential problems.
COMMUNICATIONS
C Immediately notifies Fire Detection Team and alerts available Fire Brigade members if source of smoke is not
apparent.
Fire Detection Team: Shift Mine Manager; Safety Personnel; Maintenance Foreman; and Safety Committeeman
C If problem cannot be controlled by the first responder, the Communications/Tech-Staff Warehouse will dispatch
the Fire Brigade to the area.
C Communications/Tech-Staff Warehouse immediately dispatches Top Shop Repairman (or ?) to Water Treatment
Building to deactivate excess flow valve switch (located in northeast corner of building to right of breaker box).
Switch must be turned from “remote” to “local.” Ensure valve is open to fullest extent by manually pulling bypass
valve wheel out 3/8 inches and rotating counterclockwise as far as possible. The valve is located in lower level
of the Water Treatment Building.
C Top Shop Repairman should then be directed to Smith Lake Pump Station to ensure and maintain function of
water pumps.
121
MEO Plan
UNDERGROUND EMERGENCY
C Immediately notifies all underground areas of the problem. If necessary, begins evacuation of all personnel in
affected areas and receives information on possible evacuation routes.
C Notifies Mine Superintendent, Construction Coordinator/Operations Support, and Longwall Coordinator if a
severe problem is found.
C Contacts all surface foremen to come to Communications Center.
C Shift Mine Manager informs Communications/Tech-Staff Warehouse to assign lamp man and/or one surface
foreman to count and check off evacuated personnel and double check the check-in/check-out tag system.
C Assigns one Warehouse Clerk to remain with the Communications/Tech-Staff Warehouse to help answer/make
phone calls.
Warehouse Clerk - Primary
Surface Foreman - Backup
Designee out of Labor Pool
C Establish initial security at surface-controlled access locations by utilizing available Surface Foremen, Underground
Foremen, or any available employees. Secures Mine Examiners Books from the Examiners Room and Visitors
Log Book from the old Training Room.
C Sees that subsequent events and communications are noted with respective times in the Fire/Smoke log.
C Calls ambulance to be on-site for possible injuries resulting from fire or evacuation of mine.
122
MEO Plan
SMOKE AND FIRE LOG
Name of Person(s) Reporting
Times
C First discovered
C First reported
C All subsequent information
Location of Discovery
C Main, submain, and/or panel
C Intake, neutral, and/or return
C Entry number(s)
C Crosscut number(s)
Source of Smoke/Fire
C Actual source, if known
C Source inby/outby discovery location
C Smoke/fire traveling inby or outby
Extent of Smoke/Fire
C Smoke/fire detected by smell only
C Smoke/fire visible
C Visibility in feet
C Entry numbers affected
Any Other Pertinent Facts
C Extent of efforts to extinguish
C No. of people working in the area
C No. of people working inby area
C Active projects in the area
C Is equipment deenergized?
C Problems that may affect ability to evacuate inby personnel
UNDERGROUND EMERGENCY
123
MEO Plan
UNDERGROUND EMERGENCY
FIRST-LINE SUPERVISOR (OR PERSON IN CHARGE)
C Secure work area:
- Designate employee to monitor phone.
- Shut off unit power and water.
- Assemble entire crew.
•
If time permits:
- Back out all equipment outby last open crosscut.
- Hang all ventilation curtains.
C Prepare for evacuation:
- Communicate all known facts to crew, emphasizing a safe, calm evacuation.
- Distribute SCSRs.
- Obtain escapeway map.
- Notify Communications/Tech-Staff Warehouse that work area is secure and report any status change.
C Evacuation:
- Determine evacuation route based on all available information from Communications/Tech-Staff Warehouse
and first responder. Keep your crew together.
- Notify Communications/Tech-Staff Warehouse of departure time, names, and route.
- Proceed to surface via designated escape route (call out location, if route has telephones.)
- First supervisor on mine bottom helps coordinate caging of employees to surface and records name of those
leaving the mine.
- Other supervisors assign transportation to send in additional equipment and people as requested.
RESPONSIBILITIES OF FIRST SUPERVISOR ON SURFACE
C Check off persons exiting the mine and persons already on surface.
C Ensures that persons who have exited mine have “checked out” on the board.
C Assemble workers and maintain order in waiting area.
C Ensures that persons entering mine are logged in.
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MEO Plan
UNDERGROUND EMERGENCY
OPERATIONS CHECK-IN/CHECK-OUT PROCEDURES
C The Shift Mine Manager is responsible to see that Check-In/Check-Out Procedures are initiated during an
emergency mine evacuation. He/she will designate two first-line supervisors to coordinate caging and checkin/check-out from the mine.
C The standard “Check-In/Check-Out Log” form will be used to document all activities by recording the name,
affiliation, social security number, tag number, and time for anyone entering or leaving the mine.
C The Check-In/Check-Out Official will be notified of the mine emergency by the Shift Mine Manager. This official
will report to the mine and confirm the following:
- A first-line supervisor is stationed at each portal.
- A positive Check-In/Check-Out System is in place at each portal to restrict access into the mine and to
document the exit of personnel.
- All information is being documented on the “Check-in/Check-Out Log” form by the first- line supervisor and
sufficient forms are available.
C The Check-In/Check-Out Official must also:
- Obtain a list from Operations or Payroll of all personnel who were in the mine prior to the emergency.
- Based on this information and Check-In/Check-Out Logs, determine which personnel are still in the mine
- Provide all appropriate information to the Shift Mine Manager.
- If necessary, set up a rotation schedule for first-line supervisors monitoring check-in and check-out at portals.
- Arrange for a guard from the labor pool to guard the slope entrance.
SHIFT MINE MANAGER/MAINTENANCE FOREMAN
C Firefighting Brigade Mobilization:
- Team members proceed to site of fire, taking fire brigade equipment from area storage.
- Arrive at site, evaluate situation, and put on appropriate protective gear.
- Devise plan of attack and outline any materials/equipment needed, and relay this information to
Communications/Tech-Staff Warehouse. Also, request any extra people/equipment needed.
- Kill all power at fire site and inby fire area, lock out the trolley power outby the fire area. Station someone at
this point, and do not let other people inby this point unless they are associated with the fire brigade.
- Decide within 15 min on the scene whether to call mine rescue team members and fire brigade members on
other shifts for backup.
125
MEO Plan
UNDERGROUND EMERGENCY
OTHER ACTIONS
SURFACE
C Surface fire brigade members are notified to get the fire brigade equipment trailer and bring it to the elevator so
that equipment bags can be sent underground.
C Safety department personnel get all necessary carbon monoxide (CO) detectors, modified sampling pumps, and
sample tubing from their office. Additional handheld radios from Communications Center are also acquired. This
equipment is to be taken/sent underground to fire site:
- Prepares first-aid area for any reported injuries.
- Sees that procedures are followed for notifying regulatory agencies.
FIREFIGHTING GUIDELINES
C Initial response to a significant mine fire event:
- CO and methane gas levels must be monitored in the fire area, return, and intake to the fire area.
CO 10 ppm: indication of a fire
50 ppm: irrespirable atmosphere
- Using modified sampling pumps or protective breathing apparatus to determine CO reading in the return. Do
not adjust ventilation to the fire site. Take CO and methane readings every 15 min and set up sampling
pumps, if prolonged effort is envisioned.
- Notify the Communications/Tech-Staff Warehouse if extra air tanks are needed or if refilling of air tanks is
needed, and set up delivery system.
- Have warehouse send foam generators and additional foam, if needed.
C If firefighting actions exceed 15 min:
- Send top shop repairman to exhaust fan for monitoring. Send modified sampling pump, CO and methane
detector to fan with one underground foreman. Monitor exhaust fan readings every 15 min and report readings
to Communications/Tech-Staff Warehouse.
- Send one underground foreman to gate and control access until the Mine Emergency Organization is operating.
- Send one repairman and underground foreman with pager phone from warehouse to locked out power
switches. Establish communications with Communications/Tech-Staff Warehouse.
- Send one foreman to the Communications Ccenter to specifically log all firefighting activities and respective
times.
126
EMERGENCY RESPONSE (EXAMPLE 1)
A. FIREFIGHTING AND EVACUATION PROCEDURES INBY FIRE AREA
If a fire occurs or is suspected (i.e., alarm(s)) outby the working section, all personnel who are inby the fire area shall
be immediately withdrawn to a point outby the fire area, at which time they will be assigned to firefighting activities or
be withdrawn from the mine.
The supervisor inby the fire area should:
1.
Be in charge of the evacuation of those persons under his/her charge.
2.
Account for all persons within his/her respective area.
3.
Designate the escape route to be taken and notify the responsible person on the surface that an evacuation is
underway and the escape route to be used.
4.
The supervisor or his/her designee will check at frequent intervals at mandoors to see if the fire area has been
passed, if the fire area is unknown at the time of evacuation.
5.
When the fire area is passed, leave the emergency equipment in an accessible location.
6.
In the event that escape is impossible, the crew will travel to an area that can be safely barricaded. The
following procedures should be followed:
(i) Note outside of the barricade the number of persons and what time the barricade was entered.
(ii) Inside the barricade conserve food and water.
(iii) Conserve battery lights by using only one at a time, and conserve air by remaining inactive.
(iv) Circulate the air occasionally by having one person walk back and forth with their coat extended.
(v) One person should pound on a pipe, belt structure, roof bolt, rail, or other sound conductor at 15-min
intervals to alert rescue crew(s) as to the location of the barricade.
127
7.
Supervise the evacuation and see that the following assignments are carried out:
PERSONNEL ASSIGNMENTS FOR WORKING SECTIONS INBY A FIRE
Miner section
Longwall section
Personnel assignments
Mechanic
Mechanic
Assist Supervisor(s)
Miner Operator
Shearer Operator
First-aid supplies
Miner Operator
Shearer Operator
Hammer and nails
Roof Bolter
Cornerman
Saw and ax(es)
Roof Bolter
Laborers
Spads and spad gun
Shuttle Car Operator
Propman
Brattice cloth
Shuttle Car Operator
Propman
Brattice cloth
Faceman
Faceman
Account for and distribute SCSRs and see that
each person has his/her lunch bucket.
B.GENERAL FIREFIGHTING PROCEDURES
It is recognized that the majority of mine fires are not of major proportions and can be readily brought under control.
However, the seriousness that could develop must be considered with a predetermined plan for firefighting and
evacuation of underground mine personnel.
The following procedures should be followed in the event of a mine fire:
1.
If a fire is found or suspected, immediate action shall be taken to find and correct the cause, and the
requirements regarding notification shall be implemented immediately.
2.
Firefighting activities shall be started as soon as possible and continued until the fire is extinguished or until it
cannot be safely controlled.
3.
All electric power shall be deenergized in areas affected when posing a hazard to individuals in that area.
4.
Maintain control of and know the location of all persons in the fire area, and remove those not required for
firefighting activities.
128
5.
A carbon monoxide detection instrument shall be transported to the fire area and sampling started as soon as
possible.
6.
Always attack the fire from the smoke-free side, if possible.
7.
Never use water on an electrical fire until the power is deenergized.
FIRE DRILLS
All miners shall participate in fire drills in accordance with 30 CFR 75.1101-23(c).
A.
1.
TYPE OF TRAINING
Various types of training may constitute a fire drill (for example, demonstrations, hands-on training, group
discussions, and task-oriented training).
ESCAPEWAYS
The following shall apply with regard to escapeways:
A.
1.
B.
1.
C.
1.
ROUTES OF TRAVEL
Main escapeway systems and working section escapeways shall be reviewed with all miners in accordance
with 30 CFR 75.383(a) and (b).
ESCAPEWAY MAPS
Posting of maps showing the main escapeway system and working section escapeways shall comply with 30
CFR 75.383(a).
LIFELINES
A lifeline will be made available in each working section at or near the SCSR storage cache for use by the
section crew in the event of an emergency. The lifeline will have hookups at no more than every 7 ft. If tag
lines are used, they should be no longer than 3 ft.
129
EMERGENCY RESPONSE (EXAMPLE 2)
GENERAL SURFACE FOREMAN
1.
Shall go immediately to the mine monitor room, see that the on-site notification plan is in progress, and ensure
that all crews and affected persons have been notified.
2.
If the person in charge of the shift is not on the surface, the foreman shall assume temporary charge of the
operation and begin immediate implementation of the mine emergency responsibilities plan.
3.
Assign a guard(s) at the mine portals to check all persons in and out of the mine. (A written log shall be kept.)
4.
Assign an attendant(s) at the fan to ensure that the fan is operational, and take gas readings for carbon
monoxide and methane (a written log shall be kept). If the fan was stopped, it shall not be restarted without
authorization from the official in charge.
5.
Assign the bathhouse man to make a positive, written accounting of all persons on shift who check out of the
mine.
6.
Assign a competent person to log conversations on the mine phone, and assist the monitor operator with
his/her duties.
7.
Assign persons to ready emergency materials, including the foam generator and fire trailer for transport
underground.
8.
Secure all accessible entrances to the mine property to prevent entrance of unauthorized personnel.
9.
Organize a crew to load and deliver all needed supplies to the mine.
10.
Assemble and load on supply trucks all emergency materials. The following materials should be promptly
assembled (these are in addition to the mine emergency package maintained at the mine):
a.
b.
c.
d.
e.
f.
40 pieces of 2-in by 4-in lumber in lengths of 8 to 16 ft
5,000 board ft of brattice board
200 cap pieces and 200 wedges
1,000 concrete blocks
12 bags of mortar mix
15 packages of rigipak
130
11.
In addition to these supplies, other materials such as timber, crossbars, additional cap pieces and wedges,
cement blocks, etc., should be located and prepared to be sent underground as needed.
12.
Arrange for the scheduling of persons under his/her supervision to provide for uninterrupted coverage during
the emergency.
13.
Arrange for persons from other mines for possible backup duty.
14.
Keep surface area clear of all unnecessary equipment or vehicles.
MINE WAREHOUSE SUPERVISOR OR WAREHOUSEMAN
1.
Proceed immediately to the mine monitor room, assist with notification of underground personnel if needed.
2.
Shall be responsible to make immediate off-site notification by phone of the following persons (if not on shift):
a.
b.
c.
d.
e.
f.
g.
h.
Mine Manager
Chief Mine Safety Engineer
Mine Superintendent
General Mine Foreman
Maintenance Superintendent
Senior Mine Engineer
Warehouse Supervisor
Mine Clerk
A written log of persons contacted shall be kept.
3.
Prepare any emergency kits, such as fire boxes, which are stored in the warehouse, for immediate transport
underground.
4.
Make provisions for the immediate use of the following: nails, brattice, hammers, axes, saws, picks, scaling
bars, shovels, spad guns and spads and washers, fire extinguishers, rock dust, fire hose, rigipaks, telephones,
phone wire, and hangers. For persons authorized by mine management, also arrange for coveralls, boots,
gloves, hard hats, belts, and other safety equipment.
5.
Keep a record of all equipment issued and returned.
6.
Have assembled materials to be sent to the fresh air base for rescue workers, such as drinking water,
Gatorade, first-aid supplies, wet gear, etc.
131
7.
Arrange for uninterrupted coverage in the warehouse.
8.
Coordinate activities with Central Warehouse and Central Purchasing.
9.
Order adequate supplies and equipment for use during the emergency.
10.
Coordinate materials to be delivered with the surface foreman, Central Warehouse, and purchasing. Notify
the person in charge when needed materials are sent underground.
132
EMERGENCY RESPONSE (FIRE DETECTION FOR TWO-ENTRY SYSTEM)
The development of two-entry longwall systems will be done under the stipulations pertaining to the Decision and
Order for Petition for Modification, Docket No. 86-MSA-3, and outlined as follows:
I. Development of the Two-Entry System
(a)
An early-warning fire detection system utilizing low-level carbon monoxide detectors shall be installed
in the panel intake escapeway entry and the panel belt entry used as a return air course as follows:
(1) At the mouth of the panel in the intake escapeway entry, at the beginning of the working section,
and at intervals not to exceed 1,000 ft along the panel intake escapeway entry.
(2) At the mouth of the panel in the return/belt conveyor entry, not more than 50 ft outby the section
belt tailpiece, at intervals not to exceed 1,000 ft along the panel return/belt conveyor entry, and
at each belt drive, except as provided in paragraph III(1).
(b)
In addition to the carbon monoxide monitoring devices installed in the belt haulage entry, approved
methane monitors shall be installed as follows:
(1) Approved methane monitoring devices shall be installed to monitor the return air in each belt
haulage entry. Such devices shall be located so that the return air is monitored near the mouth of
the longwall section, near the tailpiece of the belt conveyor, and at or near any secondary belt drive
unit installed in the belt haulage entry.
(2) The methane monitoring devices shall be capable of providing both audible and visual alarm signals
on both the working section and at a location on the surface where personnel will be on duty at all
times when miners are underground and have two-way communication with all working sections.
When the level of methane equals or exceeds 1.0 volume per centum, the device shall initiate alarm
signals and shall deenergize the belt conveyor drive units and the equipment located on the section.
(3) The methane monitoring devices shall be visually examined at least once every 24 hr to ensure
proper functioning. The unit shall be inspected by a person qualified for such work at intervals not
exceeding 7 days. The qualified person shall ensure that the monitor is operating properly and that
the required maintenance as recommended by the manufacturer is performed. The monitor shall
be calibrated with known quantities of methane-air mixtures at intervals not exceeding 30 calendar
days. An inspection record shall be maintained on the surface and made available to all interested
persons. The inspection record shall show the date and time of each weekly inspection and
calibration of the monitor and all maintenance performed.
133
II. Retreat Mining in the Two-Entry System
(a)
An early warning fire detection system meeting the following requirements shall be installed as follows:
(1) A low-level carbon monoxide detection system shall be installed in the belt entries utilized as intake
air courses.
(2) The carbon monoxide monitoring devices in the intake entries shall be located so that the air is
monitored at each belt drive and tailpiece and at intervals not to exceed 1,000 ft in each conveyor
belt entry, except as provided in paragraphs II(a)(3) and III(1). The monitoring device located
at the tailpiece shall be at the tailpiece or not more than 50 ft inby the tailpiece on the same split
of air.
(3) Where a belt drive discharges onto a belt conveyor tailpiece in the intake entries as a continuation
of a belt conveyor haulage system without a change of direction of the belt conveyor and the belt
conveyor drive, belt take-up, and belt conveyor tailpiece are on the same split of air traveling in
the same direction, only one low-level carbon monoxide sensor is required. It shall be installed
not more than 100 ft inby the drive, belt take-up, and tailpiece on the same split of air.
(b)
A low-level carbon monoxide detection system shall be installed in the panel intake escapeway entry
at the mouth of the panel in the intake escapeway entry, at the beginning of the working section, and at
intervals not to exceed 1,000 ft in the panel intake escapeway entry.
(c)
During retreat mining, two separate and distinct intake air courses shall be provided from the beginning
of each longwall panel to the face.
III.
Requirements Applicable to Both Development and Retreat Mining Systems
(a)
The velocity of air in the belt conveyor entry shall be 50 ft/min or greater and shall have definite and
distinct movement in the designated direction. The intake air- velocity measuring station at the two-entry
section neck shall activate an alarm in the manned center on the surface and on the working section
when the normal section intake velocity falls to 80 ft/min or less. Upon installation of the full monitoring
system, the intake air velocity measuring station shall activate the alarm when the normal intake air
quantity is reduced by 9,000 ft3/min or more.
(b)
The low-level carbon monoxide system shall be capable of giving warning of a fire for a minimum of 4
hr after the source of power to the belt is removed during a fan stoppage or when the belt haulageway
is examined, as provided in 30 CFR 75.1103-4(e)(1) and (e)(2).
(c)
Interim alert and alarm signal levels and administrative controls approved by the District Manager shall
be established for the low-level carbon monoxide monitoring system and the operations of the diesel
equipment to provide early warning of fire. The warning time provided by the system shall be
maximized. Once permanently established, the Ventilation System and Methane and Dust Control Plan
required by 30 CFR 75.370 shall state the established alert and alarm signal levels and all administrative
134
controls necessary due to the operation of the diesel equipment.
The levels established shall be as follows:
In all belt entries, the maximum alert level shall be 20 ppm and the maximum alarm level shall be 30 ppm.
In all locations other than belt entries, the maximum alert level shall be 25 ppm and the maximum alarm level shall
be 30 ppm.
(1)
Methods for establishing the alert and alarm signal levels for the low-level carbon monoxide monitoring
system shall include continuous recording of carbon monoxide levels measured by all sensors in order to
establish a mine history for carbon monoxide.
Time delays may be incorporated as necessary, with the maximum allowable delays as follows:
When a CO sensor reaches the low-level alert concentration, there may be a maximum of 45 sec delay time
before the alert signal is activated in the control room. The operator shall immediately contact persons inby the
sensor in alert and initiate an immediate investigation of the cause of the alert.
During investigation of a low-level alert, all persons in the affected area shall be notified and a person shall man
the phone continuously until the cause of the alert has been investigated. If no report is received from persons
making the investigation within 15 min or if an additional sensor goes into alert, the visual alert on the section will
be activated and all persons inby the sensor in alert shall withdraw to a safe location outby the working places.
The procedures contained within this paragraph do not apply to the known nonhazardous alerts and alarms
mentioned below.
If communications cannot be made or are lost, the visual alert on the section shall be immediately activated and
all persons withdrawn to a safe location where communications can be established.
When a sensor reaches the high alarm level, the audible alarm on the affected section will be activated,
communications shall be established, all persons shall be withdrawn outby the sensor in alarm, and the cause of
the alarm shall be immediately investigated. If a hazardous condition is found and cannot be immediately
controlled, the mine-wide firefighting and evacuation plan shall be implemented.
Known nonhazardous alerts and alarms caused by activities such as cutting, welding, blasting, and use of diesel
to move heavy equipment other than normal daily diesel operation will not require the operator to withdraw
persons inby that location provided prior notification is made by the person(s) at the source of the alarm and
communications are maintained with that person throughout the duration of the alarm. The control room operator
shall be notified when known nonhazardous alert and/or alarm activities have ceased. Should the concentration
of CO reach the threshold limit value (TLV) of 50 ppm in the atmosphere of any work area, all affected persons
shall be withdrawn.
(2)
Administrative controls shall be used to minimize the number and type of pieces of diesel equipment in the
two-entry system, to notify miners on the working section when any diesel equipment is operating in the
135
two-entry system, and to avoid alert and alarm signals caused by operating diesel equipment.
(3)
Diesel equipment shall not be used for face haulage equipment on the working section, except that diesels
may be used on the working section for cleanup or similar noncoal haulage purposes.
(4)
No later than 2 years from the date of this Order and pursuant to a schedule developed by the petitioner
and approved by the District Manager, all diesel-powered equipment operated on any two-entry longwall
development or two-entry longwall panel shall be equipment-approved under 30 CFR 36.
(5)
All diesel-powered equipment operated on any longwall development or longwall panel shall be provided
with a fire suppression system.
(d)
The low-level carbon monoxide devices shall provide both visual and audible signals on the working
section and at a manned surface location. A visual alert signal shall be activated when the carbon
monoxide level at any sensor reaches a level established in accordance with paragraph III(c) for
the mine, and an audible alarm signal shall be activated when the carbon monoxide level reaches
a level established in accordance with paragraph III(c) for the mine. When the carbon monoxide
system gives a visual alert signal, all persons shall be withdrawn to a safe area outby the working
places, and appropriate action shall be taken to determine the cause of the signal. When the carbon
monoxide system gives an audible alarm signal, the mine evacuation plan required by 30 CFR
75.1101-23(a) shall be implemented.
(e)
When miners are underground, a responsible person shall be on duty at all times at a surface
location to see the visual alert and hear the alarm signals of the carbon monoxide monitoring system
when the carbon monoxide reaches the levels established in paragraph III(c). This person shall
have two-way communications with all working sections. When the established alert and alarm
signal levels are reached, the person shall notify all working sections and other personnel who may
be endangered. The person shall be trained in the operation of the carbon monoxide monitoring
system and in the proper procedures to follow in the event of an emergency or malfunction and, in
that event, shall take appropriate action immediately.
(f)
The carbon monoxide monitoring system shall be capable of detecting electrical malfunctions, such
as electrical short circuits, open circuits, and ground faults and, where appropriate, pneumatic
malfunctions in the system.
(g)
The carbon monoxide monitoring system shall be capable of identifying any activated sensor. A
map or schematic identifying each belt flight and the details for the monitoring system shall be posted
at the mine.
(h)
The carbon monoxide monitoring system shall be examined visually at least once each coalproducing shift and tested for functional operation at intervals not exceeding 7 days to ensure that
the monitoring system is functioning properly and that required maintenance is being performed.
The monitoring system shall be calibrated with known concentrations of carbon monoxide and air
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mixtures at intervals not exceeding 30 calendar days. A record of all inspections shall be maintained
on the surface and made available to all interested persons. The inspection record shall show the
time and date of each weekly inspection, monthly calibration, and all maintenance performed on the
system.
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(i)
If at any time the carbon monoxide monitoring system or methane monitoring system or any portion
of these systems required by this petition have been deenergized for reasons such as routine
maintenance or failure of a sensor unit, the belt conveyor may continue to operate provided the
affected portion of the belt conveyor entry is continuously patrolled and monitored for carbon
monoxide and methane by a qualified person in the following manner until the monitoring system is
returned to normal operation.
(1) If one sensor becomes inoperative, a qualified person shall monitor at that location.
(2) If two or more adjacent sensors become inoperative, a qualified person shall patrol and
monitor the area affected; and
(3) If the complete system becomes inoperative, a sufficient number of qualified persons shall
patrol and monitor the belt entries of the mine so that the belt haulage entries will be traveled
each hour in their entirety or qualified persons shall be located at the end of each belt
conveyor flight and monitor for carbon monoxide and methane.
Each of these qualified persons shall be provided with a handheld carbon monoxide detection device and methane
detection device. A carbon monoxide detection device and methane detection device shall also be available for use
of each working section in the event either monitoring system is deenergized or fails.
Monitoring with handheld instruments shall not be used in lieu of installation and use of the fire detection and methane
monitoring systems described in this Order.
(j)
The carbon monoxide monitoring system located in the intake escapeway shall be patrolled and
monitored in the same manner as described in paragraph III(I) if the system has been deenergized
for reasons such as routine maintenance or failure of a sensor unit.
(k)
MSHA is in the process of developing new conveyor belt flammability testing procedures. Once
these procedures have been developed, belting acquired for replacement and extensions of the
conveyor belt system shall be belting identified by the new test procedures as meeting improved
flame-resistant requirements.
(l)
The details for the fire detection system and methane monitoring system, including the type of
monitor and specific sensor location on the mine map, shall be included as a part of the Ventilation
System and Methane and Dust Control Plan required by 30 CFR 75.370. The District Manager
may require additional carbon monoxide monitors and methane monitors to be installed as part of
said plan to ensure the safety of the miners.
The concentrations of respirable dust in the intake air in the belt conveyor entries used as intake air
courses shall comply with the requirements of 30 CFR 70.100(b). Respirable dust samples shall
be taken in all belt entries used as intake aircourses, and the location of the sampling areas shall be
included as designated areas in the Ventilation System and Methane and Dust Control Plan.
(m)
(n)
Mantrip cars or personnel carriers or other transportation equipment shall be maintained on or near
the working section and shall be of sufficient capacity to transport all persons who may be in the
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area.
(o)
During development of the two-entry panel, a rock dusting unit shall be installed in the belt conveyor
entry near the section loading point. Also, during longwall retreat mining in the two-entry panel, a
rock dusting unit shall be installed on or near the last tailgate shield. These rock dusting units shall
run continuously during mining operations to render inert float coal dust in these entries except when
miners are performing maintenance, inspections, or other required work in these areas.
(p)
Diesel fuel shall not be stored in the two-entry panel.
(q)
Fire doors designed to quickly isolate the working sections shall be constructed in the two entries
for potential use in emergency situations. Miners working in the two-entry panel shall be trained
in the use of the fire doors.
(r)
The hydraulic fluid pump station for the longwall support system shall not be located in the twoentry panel and shall comply with the provisions of 30 CFR 75.345.
(s)
The permanent stoppings separating the conveyor belt entries from the intake escapeway shall be
constructed of solid concrete blocks. The stoppings shall be installed with mortared joints or
coated with a sealant that provides equivalent strength to a mortared joint installation. Overcasts
shall be constructed of concrete block with concrete and rail or I-beam construction. No ventilation
structures shall be constructed of aluminum.
(t)
A safe travelway shall be maintained for each longwall panel through the tailgate side of the longwall
in accordance with 30 CFR 75.215 and 75.222. MSHA shall be notified immediately if a roof fall
occurs that impedes travel in a tailgate travelway or if a travelway otherwise becomes unsafe for
travel. A weekly examination of tailgate travelways shall be conducted by a qualified person and
the results recorded.
(u)
Two separate communication lines shall be maintained. One shall be located in each of the two
entries during development.
(v)
At least one self-contained self-rescuer shall be available for each person on the working section
and shall be stored on the section while advancing the two-entry panel. During longwall retreat
mining, self-contained self-rescuer units shall be stored near the face on the headgate and tailgate
sides of the longwall unit at readily accessible locations. Sufficient self-contained self-rescuer units
for all miners on the working section shall be stored at both locations. These locations shall be
specified in the storage plan approved by the District Manager.
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FIREFIGHTING AND EVACUATION PLAN
75.1101-23
Firefighting and Evacuation Plans at the Mine will consist of a program of instruction, location, and use of firefighting
equipment, location of escapeways, exits and routes of travel, evacuation procedures, and fire drills, which will involve
all employees.
1. All new employees undergoing orientation classes at the mine site are instructed during their underground training
session on the use and locations of fire suppression equipment in the working sections, location of escapeway
exits, routes of travel, evacuation procedure, and fire drills.
2. All employees will receive instruction on location and use of communications systems.
3. All miners will participate in a fire drill at intervals of not more than 90 days using attached procedures as
guidelines.
4. A firefighting and evacuation program will be available on each section, which will include delegations of specific
persons and responsibilities.
5. A written record shall be kept in a Fire Drill Record Book, to be located in the Safety Supervisor’s office.
6. If the automatic belt fire warning system alarms, the location indicated on the monitor will be investigated
immediately. If conditions are found to warrant evacuation, the firefighting plan will be implemented.
7. On units that incorporate intake/belt air, when the carbon monoxide system gives an alert or alarm signal, the
following shall be followed:
a. Alert Level: When the carbon monoxide monitoring system gives a visual or audible alert signal, all miners
in the working sections on the same split of air shall be notified immediately, and an investigation shall be
conducted to determine the cause of the actuation.
b. Alarm Level: When the carbon monoxide system gives an audible and visual alarm signal, all miners in the
same split(s) of air shall be withdrawn immediately to a safe location at least one sensor outby the sensor(s)
activating the alarm, unless the cause is known not to be a hazard to the miners. When the carbon monoxide
warning system gives an audible and visual alarm signal at shift change, no one shall be permitted to enter the
mine except qualified persons designated to investigate the source of the alarm. If miners are en route
underground, they shall be held at, or be withdrawn to, a safe location at least one sensor outby the sensor(s)
activating the alarm. When a determination is made as to the source of the alarm and that the mine is safe to
enter, the miners shall be permitted underground.
c. When the established carbon monoxide alert and alarm levels are reached, all working sections and other
locations where personnel are normally assigned to work (e.g., belt transfers) will be notified.
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In steps a, b, and c above, if it is determined that a fire exists and the fire is not extinguished within 15 min of
discovery, all persons not required for firefighting activities shall be evacuated from the mine immediate
8. When the carbon monoxide warning system gives an audible and visual alarm signal at shift charge, no one shall
be permitted to enter the mine except qualified persons designated to investigate the source of the alarm. If miners
are en route underground, they shall be held at, or be withdrawn to, a safe location at least one sensor outby the
sensor(s) activating the alarm. When a determination is made as to the source of the alarm and that the mine is
safe to enter, the miners shall be permitted underground.
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Procedure in Case of Fire Outby Sections
1. Directly attack fire.
2. Call Warehouse to report fire:
a. Give your name
b. Location calling from
c. Location of fire
3. Warehouse will then:
a. Notify Shift Mine Manager or other appropriate personnel and shut off all belts.
b. Notify all areas inby the fire to immediately remove all personnel to a location outby the fire, or to a safe
location at least one carbon monoxide sensor outby the carbon monoxide sensor(s) activating the alarm (if
applicable).
c. Alert all other sections of location of fire and direct supervisors of those sections to standby telephone and
be prepared to take additional firefighting equipment to fire or to evacuate mine.
d. Notify Mine Manager, General Mine Foreman, and Supervisor of Safety.
4. Establish ventilation to direct smoke directly to a return and keep fresh air to persons fighting the fire.
5. Call for additional firefighting equipment if needed. Direct this request to the Warehouse.
6. If fire is not extinguished within 15 min of discovery, all persons not required for firefighting activities will be
removed from the mine.
7. After evacuation is completed, Shift Mine Manager will check or have checked, the check-in board to see that
all tags are removed, and that all personnel not involved in the firefighting activity are out of the mine.
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Procedure in Case of Fire on Continuous Miner Section
Order of Leadership
Duties To Perform
1. Foreman
Supervise the operation.
2. Mechanic
Shut power off, get tools ready; assist with getting extra hose
and other firefighting equipment, if needed.
3. Miner Operator
Water hose off miner.
4. Miner Operator
Operate water valve, get extra hose from emergency sled.
5. Coal Hauler #1 Operator
Fire extinguishers.
6. Coal Hauler #2 Operator
Fire extinguishers.
7. Coal Hauler #3 Operator
Ventilation and rock dust; get Vari-X foam concentrate from
sled and operate the eductor.
8. Roof Bolter #1
Phone attendant.
9. Roof Bolter #2
Ventilation; get Vari-X from sled and operate Vari-X.
10. Utilityman
Rock dust.
1.
Directly attack fire.
2.
Pull power at transformer.
3.
Remove all persons from inby fire.
4.
Call Warehouse and report fire.
Warehouse will then:
a.
b.
c.
Notify Shift Mine Manager or other appropriate personnel and shut off all belts.
Alert all underground sections of location of fire.
Notify Mine Manager, General Mine Foreman, and Supervisor of Safety.
5.
Establish ventilation to keep fresh air to persons fighting fire and direct smoke to return.
6.
Call for additional firefighting equipment: material, cars, rock dust, etc.
7.
If fire is not extinguished within 15 min of discovery, all personnel not required for firefighting will be removed
from the mine. Shift Mine Manager will direct evacuation of mine.
8.
After evacuation is completed, Shift Mine Manager will check, or have checked, the check-in board to see
that all tags are removed and that all personnel not engaged in the firefighting activity are out of the mine
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Procedure in Case of Fire on Section
Order of Leadership
Duties To Perform
1. Foreman
Supervise the operation.
2. Mechanic
Shut power off, get tools ready; assist with getting
extra hose and other firefighting equipment if needed
(e.g., Vari-X).
3. Technician
Phone attendant.
4. Roof Bolter #1
Operate water valve, get extra hose, if needed.
5. Roof Bolter #2
Fire extinguishers and fire hose.
6. Mini Scoop Operator
Fire extinguishers and fire hose.
7. Remote Scoop Operator
Get rock dust and change ventilation, if needed.
1.
Directly attack fire.
2.
Pull power at transformer.
3.
Remove all persons from inby fire.
4.
Call Warehouse and report fire.
Warehouse will then:
a.
b.
c.
Notify Shift Mine Manager or other appropriate personnel and shut off belts.
Alert all underground sections of location of fire.
Notify Mine Manager, General Mine Foreman, and Supervisor of Safety.
5.
Establish ventilation to keep fresh air to persons fighting fire and direct smoke to return.
6.
Call for additional firefighting equipment: material, cars, rock dust, etc.
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7.
If fire is not extinguished within 15 min of discovery, all personnel not required for firefighting will be removed
from the mine. Shift Mine Manager will direct evacuation of mine.
8.
Diesel foam generator may be used to indirectly attack the fire.
9.
After evacuation is completed, the Shift Mine Manager will check, or have checked, the check-in board to
see that all tags are removed and that all personnel not engaged in the firefighting activity are out of the mine.
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Procedure for Evacuation on Continuous Miner Section
Order of Leadership
Duties To Perform
Foreman
Direct the procedure. First-aid kit and escape map.
Mechanic
Shut off power and take nails, hammer, and spads, etc.
Miner Operator
Saw, pick, and shovel.
Miner Operator Helper
Sledge hammer and extra SCSRs.
Roof Bolters
Spads, nails, brattice cloth.
Coal Hauler Operators
Get all lunch buckets and clothing from dinner hole.
Utilityman
Brattice cloth and first-aid equipment.
Know Your Escape Routes:
1.
Account for all of the personnel on the section.
2.
Be sure that each miner has a self-rescuer, and take all the extra rescuers with you.
3.
Explain the escape route to the entire crew. Direct air to return not designated as alternate escapeway.
Attempt to travel the primary escapeway. If smoke is encountered, proceed to the alternate escapeway. The
foreman will lead the group with second-in-command bringing up rear to prevent stragglers.
4.
Move fast, but do not run. At frequent intervals, check the mandoors to see if you are past the fire area.
When past the fire area, you may travel in either escapeway and continue exiting the mine.
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Procedure for Evacuation on CM Section
Order of Leadership
Duties To Perform
Foreman
Direct the procedure. First-aid kit and escape map.
Mechanic
Shut off power and take nails, hammer, and spads, etc.
Technician
Saw, pick, shovel, and sledge hammer.
Roof Bolter #1
Spads, nails, and brattice cloth.
Roof Bolter #2
Get extra SCSRs.
Mini Scoop Operator
Get all lunch buckets and clothing from dinner hole.
Remote Scoop Operator
Brattice cloth and first-aid equipment.
Know Your Escape Routes:
1.
Account for all of the personnel on the section.
2.
Be sure that each miner has a self-rescuer, and take all the extra rescuers with you.
3.
Explain the escape route to the entire crew. Direct air to return not designated as alternate escapeway.
Attempt to travel the primary escapeway. If smoke is encountered, proceed to the alternate escapeway. The
foreman will lead the group with second-in-command bringing up rear to prevent stragglers.
4.
Move fast, but do not run. At frequent intervals, check the mandoors to see if you are past the fire area.
When past the fire area, you may travel in either escapeway and continue exiting the mine.
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FIREFIGHTING AND EVACUATION DUTIES
Precautions:
In the event that a miner should smell smoke, sees a fire, or possibly identifies a fire prior to an alarm, the miner will
communicate this immediately and follow the Firefighting and Evacuation Plan.
Firefighting Duties:
Each miner will be instructed in the following firefighting duties:
I. Continuous Miner Sections (Production)
a. Section Foreman
1.
2.
3.
4.
The foreman is responsible for all firefighting evacuation and communication procedures.
The section power and equipment are to be secured.
Section ventilation changes are to be directed by the foreman.
Assembly of miners for evacuation is to be directed by the foreman.
b. Miner Operator
If the fire is on the miner:
1.
2.
3.
Deenergize the miner (on board).
Activate the fire suppression.
Locate and use appropriate firefighting equipment.
c. Miner Helper
If the fire is on the miner:
1.
2.
3.
Deenergize the trailing cable.
Notify the foreman.
Locate and use appropriate firefighting equipment.
If the fire is on the section, the miner operator and helper are to:
1.
2.
3.
Secure the miner.
Deenergize the trailing cable.
Disconnect the miner water hose, attach fire nozzle, and await firefighting instructions.
148
d. Shuttle Car Operations
If the fire is on the shuttle car:
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
Set the brakes.
Deenergize the on-board power.
Activate the fire suppression.
Deenergize the trailing cable.
Locate and use appropriate firefighting equipment.
Notify the foreman.
If the fire is on the section:
1.
2.
3.
Secure the car.
Deenergize the trailing cable.
Locate appropriate firefighting equipment to assist in firefighting and assemble at the crew station.
e. Roof Bolter
If the fire is on the roof bolter:
1.
2.
3.
Deenergize the bolter (on board).
Activate the fire suppression.
Locate and use appropriate firefighting equipment.
f. Roof Bolter Helper
If the fire is on the bolter:
1.
2.
3.
Deenergize the trailing cable.
Notify the foreman.
Locate and use appropriate firefighting equipment.
If the fire is on the section, the roof bolter and helper are to:
1.
2.
Secure the bolter.
Locate appropriate firefighting equipment to assist in firefighting and assemble at the crewstation.
149
g. Bratticeman
If the fire is on the section:
1.
2.
Locate appropriate firefighting equipment and assemble at the crewstation.
Notify and assemble any nonproduction miners on the section.
h. Mechanic
If the fire is on the section:
1.
2.
3.
Assemble appropriate firefighting equipment.
Determine that section power is secured.
Assist the foreman as directed.
i. Material Man
If the fire is on the section:
1.
2.
3.
Start and prepare the mantrip for evacuation.
Assemble SCSR units in storage for use.
Establish communications with the surface, shift foreman, or designated person in charge.
If the fire is not on the section:
1.
2.
3.
4.
Notify the section foreman of the fire.
Establish communications with the surface.
All face personnel are to assemble at the crewstation.
All persons are to evacuate the mine or follow firefighting instructions from the shift foreman or
designated person in charge.
II. Continuous Miner Section (Maintenance Shift)
a. Maintenance Foreman
1.
2.
3.
4.
The foreman is responsible for all firefighting and evacuation procedures.
The section power and equipment are to be secured.
Section ventilation changes are to be directed by the foreman.
Assembly of miners for evacuation is to be directed by the foreman.
150
b. Mechanics
If the fire is on equipment being serviced or repaired or on service equipment:
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
Deenergize the machine (on board).
Activate the fire suppression.
Deenergize the trailing cable.
Locate and use appropriate firefighting equipment.
Notify the foreman.
III. Longwall Section (Production)
a. Section Foreman
1.
2.
3.
4.
The foreman is responsible for all firefighting and evacuation procedures.
The section power and equipment are to be secured.
Section ventilation changes are to be directed by the foreman.
Assembly of miners for evacuation is to be directed by the foreman.
b. Shear Operators
If the fire is on the shear:
1.
2.
3.
4.
Deenergize the shear (on board).
Activate the suppression.
Notify the foreman.
Locate and use appropriate firefighting equipment.
If the fire is on the face:
1.
2.
3.
4.
Notify the foreman.
Leave shear sprays on.
Activate and use an SCSR unit.
Move to the stageloader and assemble at the crewstation.
c. Shield Operators
If the fire is inby:
1.
2.
3.
Move to the crewstation.
Obtain appropriate firefighting equipment to assist in firefighting.
Await instructions.
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If the fire is outby:
1.
2.
3.
4.
Notify the foreman.
Activate and use an SCSR unit.
Move to the stageloader and outby to the crewstation.
Locate and use appropriate firefighting equipment.
d. Headgate Operator
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
Deenergize the longwall at the stageloader.
Notify the foreman and crew.
Use a fire extinguisher on a stageloader fire.
Establish communications with the surface.
Notify the shift foreman or person in charge.
Remain in contact with the surface.
Relay information about the fire.
e. Mechanic
1.
2.
Disconnect power at power center.
Locate all available fire extinguishers and move them to the stageloader.
f. Utilityman
1.
2.
3.
Start and prepare the mantrip for evacuation.
Assemble SCSR units in storage for use.
Notify and assemble any nonproduction miners on the section.
IV. Outby Areas
a. Use any firefighting equipment that is readily available.
b. Disconnect power from the affected area or equipment.
c. Notify the surface of the fire and conditions.
d. Obtain additional firefighting equipment for use on the fire.
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V. Shift Foremen
a. Evacuate all miners not required for firefighting.
b. Coordinate and dispatch personnel and equipment for firefighting.
c. Implement the Notification Plan.
d. Account for the location of all miners on shift.
Firefighting and Mine Rescue Mobilization:
Mine rescue and/or firefighting crews will be notified by pager or telephone, as appropriate, and will be assembled
at the mine rescue station.
Diesel mantrips and other diesel equipment that might be available will be assembled at the bathhouse area to be used
as transportation of mine rescue crews, rescue apparatus, firefighting crews, and fire suppression equipment.
All firefighting operations shall be conducted from the fresh air side of a fire.
Mine rescue teams will not operate inby a fire without specific permission of the mine emergency controller.
Self-Rescuer Program of Instruction:
The Program of Instruction will be presented to all experienced miners at least annually and will be included as part
of the 8-hr annual training program required by 30 CFR 48.8(a).
The Program of Instruction will be presented to newly hired miners and will be presented as part of the training
required for inexperienced miners and newly hired experienced miners prior to assigning them to work duties.
Self-Contained Self-Rescuer:
The recommended “hands-on” training method will be used to train miners on the SCSR units.
153
PROCEDURE AND DUTIES FOR FIRE
To follow up on the recent training you received on the Vari-X foam generator, the following procedures have been
developed to communicate to all employees their responsibilities in the event of a fire on a section.
ORDER OF LEADERSHIP
DUTIES TO PERFORM
1. Foreman
Supervise the operation.
2. Mechanic
Shut off power, get tools ready.
3. Miner Operator
Water-hose off miner.
4. Miner Operator
Operate water valve, get extra hose from emergency sled.
5. Coal Hauler #1 Operator
Fire extinguishers.
6. Coal Hauler #2 Operator
Fire extinguishers.
7. Coal Hauler #3 Operator
Ventilation and rock dust; get Vari-X foam concentrate from
sled and operate the eductor.
8. Roof Bolter #1
Phone attendant.
9. Roof Bolter #2
Ventilation/get Vari-X from sled and operate Vari-X.
10. Utilityman
Rock dust.
1. Directly attack fire.
2. Pull power at transformer.
3. Remove all persons from inby fire.
4. Call Communications Center/Warehouse and report fire. Communication Center/Warehouse will:
a. Alert all underground sections of location of fire.
b. Notify Mine Manager, Mine Superintendent, and Health & Safety Supervisor.
c. Notify Shift Supervisor to alert idle crews not working on the section of the fire.
5. Establish ventilation to keep fresh air to persons fighting fire, and direct smoke to return.
NOTE:
All fire hose outlets are equipped with an adapter to allow attachment of a 1.5-in fire hose. Extra
154
adapters are located in the bottom of each fire hose barrel and on the emergency sled should one of the
outlet adapters be damaged.
SPECIFIC INDIVIDUAL DUTY LABELS IN THE EVENT OF A FIRE
In case of
FIRE ON THE SECTION
WHEN ESCAPE IS CUT OFF
REPAIRMAN----------------Call communications
MINER OPERATOR--------Shut off section power
MINER HELPER------------Water hose and rock dust
SCOOP OPERATOR--------Water hose and rock dust
UTILITYMAN---------------Water hose and rock dust
ROOF BOLTERS------------Fire extinguishers
SHUTTLE CAR OP’S-------Assist as directed
SECTION FOREMAN------Direct firefighting
Report Status of Fire to Communications
Coordinator Every 10 Minutes.
If Fire is Not Under Control in
15 Minutes, Evacuate the Section!
1. BARRICADE
2. LISTEN for 3 shots, then...
3. SIGNAL by pounding hard 10 times
4. REST 15 min, then REPEAT signal
until...
5. YOU HEAR 5 SHOTS, which means
you are located and help is on the way.
LONGWALL FIREFIGHTING PLAN
IN THE EVENT OF A FIRE, THE LISTED PEOPLE
WILL ASSUME THE FOLLOWING DUTIES
Longwall repairman: Deenergize all power, then proceed
to
the telephone and coordinate all phone messages.
Other personnel on section: Assemble at fire skid.
Operators: Begin laying 1-3/4-in hose to fire areas.
Utilitymen: Begin laying 5-in feeder hose to fire area.
Supervisor: Contact all employees and communications.
PROCEDURES
CHECK THAT:
1. All power has been removed.
2. Communications has been notified.
3. All personnel are assembled at the fire skid.
4. Notify Communications that all employees are
accounted
for and action to be taken.
5. Advise employees of the plan of attack and
firefighting.
6. Report status of fire to Communication Coordinator
every 10 min. If fire is not under control in 15
min,
evacuate the section.
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MINE FIRE TRAINING PROGRAM
1. Mine fire training can be divided into the following three areas:
a. Basic training for all miners.
b. Intermediate training for mine fire brigades/mine rescue.
c. Advanced training for fire brigades/mine rescue.
2. The basic fire training for all miners may consist of the following and could be conducted aboveground:
a.
b.
c.
d.
e.
f.
g.
h.
Basic fire chemistry (classes of fires, fire triangle, smoke, heat).
Assessment of containability of fightable fires.
Types of portable fire extinguishers, hose lines, and water nozzles.
Extinguishing a liquid fuel and solid fuel fire with portable fire extinguishers.
Extinguishing a solid fuel fire with water lines.
Paper-and-pencil simulations on fighting a small mine fire.
Mine evacuation procedures.
Understanding the operation of fire sensors (thermal, smoke, CO).
3. Intermediate training for mine fire brigades/mine rescue basic fire training, plus the following:
a.
b.
c.
d.
e.
Use of handheld and large foam generators.
Turnout gear and equipment used for firefighting.
Fighting fires in smoke, wearing SCBAs.
Paper-and-pencil simulations on fighting fires outby the section.
Firefighting strategies: underground fire houses, fire cars, or trailers.
4. Advanced firefighting training would include all of the skills acquired in the basic and intermediate levels, plus the
following:
a. Combating simulated mine fires in ventilated entries with portable and wheeled fire extinguishers, water lines,
and foam generators. The fires would include equipment fires, conveyor belt fires, etc.
b. Erecting seals to isolate fire areas.
c. Examining the effect of ventilation on fires and regulating air during a fire.
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FIRE DRILL SIMULATIONS
Unannounced simulation fire drills were conducted. The drills were designed to test the response actions of production
crew personnel, including the Section Foremen responding to a fire/smoke emergency. Since each unit has unique
mining and ventilation systems, drill locations were selected based on greatest potential for occurrence. Each drill
lasted approximately 15 to 20 min, and a critique was held immediately following the drill. These drills were
conducted concurrent with MEO requirements designed to evaluate OIMS System 10-2 - Emergency Response.
This memo includes a brief description of each simulation scenario and documents key recommendations made by
observers and participants.
Drill Scenario Unit #3:
At 9:45 a.m.., the Section Foreman observed smoke leaking through the flame-resistant isolation curtains located at
the Unit Battery Charging Station. The smoke was contaminating entry No. 2, which is the intake airway for that
section.
Summary of Key Response Activities:
Section Foreman:
• Notified Communications of situation and advised him to notify Fire Brigade.
• Advised Scoop Operator to deenergize unit power center.
• Notified crew members to evacuate face area and assemble outby smoke location.
Crew Members:
• Four members brought fire extinguishers to smoke location.
• One member ensured that incoming power cable was deenergized prior to entering fire location.
• Several crew members installed line brattice to short-circuit smoke to return airway.
• Several crew members obtained SCSRs from storage location at power center and carried them to the fire location.
Critique:
• The crew/FLS responded promptly and orderly, although one crew member was not aware of emergency situation.
• Many crew members were aware of the unit fire skid, but were not familiar with assembly procedures of the
advanced firefighting equipment.
• One fire extinguisher brought to the fire location was in very poor condition (if even operable).
Drill Scenario Unit #2:
At 11:10 a.m., the Section Foreman discovered smoke on the inby end of the unit power center located in entry No.
5 several crosscuts outby the face area.
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Summary of Key Response Activities:
Section Foreman:
• Notified Communications of the situation and advised him to notify the Fire Brigade.
• Notified section repairman to deenergize unit power center.
• Notified crew members to evacuate the face area via the intake escapeway to a location just outby the smoke area.
• Advised responding crew members to remove smoke by coursing fresh air from an adjacent intake airway using
line brattice.
Crew Members:
• Several members brought fire extinguishers to the smoke location.
• One crew member obtained a roll of line brattice.
• One crew member brought pipe wrenches to break the water hose so that water would be available, if needed.
• Remaining crew members (less one who was not informed of the situation) assembled outby the fire area to assist
the initial responders.
Critique:
• Crew members responded promptly and took immediate action.
• As stated above, one crew member was not informed of the situation.
• Crew members were not aware of unit fire skid location or assembly procedures required to use their advanced
firefighting equipment stored on the skid.
Drill Scenario Unit #1:
At 12:15 p.m., the Section Foreman observed smoke entering the section from the No. 2 entry. Upon investigation,
he discovered that the scoop tractor was on fire. The unit had just begun a power and belt retraction.
Summary of Key Response Activities:
Section Foreman:
• Notified Communications of the situation and advised him to assemble the Fire Brigade.
• Notified section repairman to deenergize the unit power center.
• Notified crew members to evacuate the face area via escape routes and to approach the fire area from fresh air
(outby) side.
Crew Members:
• Three members obtained fire extinguishers from various locations and used them to extinguish the fire from the fresh
air side.
• Three other members began laying fire hose to the fire location. Hose was obtained from the unit fire skid.
158
• One non-crew member carried SCSRs from the headgate to the fire area.
• Remaining crew members assembled outby the fire location to form a labor pool.
Critique:
• Crew members responded promptly and took immediate action.
• Two surveyors working in the section were not notified of the emergency. After observing the crew members
exiting the face area, they decided to investigate.
• Several crew members stated that had they been operating the longwall and working on the face under similar
circumstances, they would evacuate via the tailgate escapeway. It was suggested that all crew members using this
escape route notify Communications so that the Section Foreman and responding personnel were aware of their
location.
Areas for Improvement
IMPROVEMENT ACTIVITIES
RESPONSIBILITY
TARGET DATE
WTC
Month/year
Evaluate the current SCSR storage location in all
units, and determine if a better location exists for
each working section.
Safety Department
Month/year
Evaluate the current SCSR storage containers for
the best possible protection from damage and/or
contamination.
Safety Department
Month/year
Fire Brigade
Month/year
Safety Department/
Mine Superintendent
Begin during
month/year
Identify the best means to notify persons working in
the unit of an emergency.
Train all crew members on proper assembly
procedures for advanced firefighting equipment
stored in the unit fire skids.
Conduct unannounced fire drills at least once per
year.
159
SELECTION PROCEDURES FOR NEW EMERGENCY RESPONSE MEMBERS
1. Post notice on bulletin boards informing all employees of any vacancy.
C The vacancy notice will be posted by management in a conspicuous place at the mine for a period of 5 calendar
days, but no less than 3 production days. All employees absent from work due to illness or other legitimate
reasons during the posting period will be notified by management of the vacancy. An employee on leave of
absence working for local, district, or International Union, if he/she so requests, shall be notified by management
of the vacancy. The employer will, on the date of the posting, give notice to such employees of the vacancy by
certified mail to their last known address. (This is the same as the contract job bidding procedures.)
C Vacancy notices will also be posted on the salaried bulletin boards located in foremen’s conference room and in
the mail room.
C All department heads and shift managers will be given copies of the notice of vacancy and will advise all minorities,
women, and staff personnel of the vacancy. This will ensure that all affirmative action guidelines are met. Each
manager will return to the Training Coordinator the list of minorities and/or staff personnel with the date that each
employee was advised of said vacancy. This list shall be retained for the current year plus 2 years.
2. Notices should direct interested employee(s) to the Training Coordinator in charge of the emergency response
teams.
3. The Training Coordinator will briefly explain what is expected of the particular emergency response team
members. This should include, but is not limited to, physical expectations, training requirements, and member
duties. At this time, the applicant will be given a questionnaire to complete and return to the Training Coordinator
within a specified time.
4. Those employees still interested will be instructed to sign a registration form located in the Training Office. This
list will be available for 2 weeks after notice of vacancy is taken down.
5. This list will be reviewed by the Human Resources Supervisor to determine if there are any applicants that are
covered by the Americans with Disabilities Act. If so, the Human Resources Supervisor will advise the Training
Coordinator.
160
6. After registration is closed, each interested employee will be interviewed for the position. Two interviewers will
be present; one will be the Training Coordinator and another interviewer to be named.
7. The Accident and Absenteeism history will be pulled from the archives and will be reviewed and discussed with
the individual. This history should be pulled for the current year plus 2 previous years.
8. Interviewer should tell in detail what the expectations are of the particular response team members. Also, the
interviewer should ask what the applicant expects to get from being a response team member.
9. Applicants will be asked if they have any experience as firefighters, rescue team members, or members of any
other emergency response teams.
10. The interviewers will use a summary form to rate the applicants. The name of the selected candidate shall be
submitted to the Mine Superintendent for approval. The remaining pool or list of candidates will be retained for
1 year. Any vacancies that occur within this period will be filled from the applicants listed in this pool.
161
REQUIREMENTS FOR EMERGENCY RESPONSE TEAMS
INITIAL MEDICAL EVALUATION
Step 1 - Health Risk Assessment (HRA)
C Required of all response team members.
C Will be used for informational purposes only.
Step 2 - Health Risk Followup and Additional Testing
C
C
C
C
Present results of the Health Risk Assessment.
Complete the medical questionnaires.
Lab work - blood and urinalysis.
Conduct pulmonary function.
Step 3 - Doctor’s Examination
C
C
C
C
C
Continue to use the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health form for mine rescue personnel.
Perform the Step Test.
Recommend further evaluation(s) if indicated.
Stress test required if over age 45.
Complete Notification of Exam Results Memorandum.
PERIODIC MEDICAL EVALUATION
C
C
C
C
C
C
Minimum fitness requirements should be met at all times.
Same format as the initial evaluation, except no Health Risk Assessment.
Continue annual National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health exam for mine rescue team members.
Medical evaluation every 3 years if under age 45.
Evaluation every 2 years if age 45 or older.
Members will complete the cardiovascular risk analysis questionnaire in the off years.
TEAM MEMBER THAT FALLS SHORT OF MINIMUM STANDARD
C Notification of Exam Results Memorandum forwarded to employee and Health Risk Assessment (HRA) Team
162
C HRA Team includes Training Specialist, Safety Superintendent, and Administration Superintendent.
C HRA Team makes recommendation to Operations Superintendent.
C Doctor must reexamine individual before he/she can reinstated on team or returned to normal duty.
PROCEDURES FOR FIT TESTING EQUIPMENT
C Annual fit test required for face masks.
C Beard/facial hair
- Fire Brigade members - no beards allowed
- Mine Rescue members - must remove beards for annual fit testing and prior to emergency response.
163
TRAINING OF FIRE BRIGADE MEMBERS
Fire brigade members are trained in coal mine firefighting and coal mine fire prevention. In the event of a fire, their
training skills will be utilized in controlling a fire. This training is done by the methods listed below:
1. Monthly meeting in which various techniques are practiced and discussed.
2. Outside experts are invited to lecture and train the fire brigade.
3. Certain members of fire brigade are chosen to attend training sessions provided by government agencies, schools,
and fire services. These sessions usually include classroom lectures, discussion, and a liberal amount of “handson” training.
These new skills and techniques are then shared with the rest of the fire brigade and mine rescue team members. The
members are asked to write a brief paper describing and explaining what they had seen, heard, and done.
FIRE BRIGADE MEMBERS TRAINING OTHER MINERS
Safety management here feels it is best to utilize fire brigade and mine rescue team members to train all employees in
the areas of fire prevention, firefighting techniques, and firefighting equipment. Since we are trained in these areas on
a regular basis, safety management feels that we are best equipped to share our knowledge and experience with our
coworkers. At our annual refresher, we have been asked to be instructors on such items as the foam generator,
handheld fire extinguisher, and hose and nozzle handling techniques.
164
STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURES FOR
FIRE ATTACK OF THE FIRE BRIGADE
1. Contact Communication Coordinator
•
•
•
•
Arrival time
Brigade members on scene
Conditions upon arrival
Action to be taken
2. Establish command
•
•
•
•
•
Establish a fresh air base
Secure evacuation transportation
Form a plan of attack
Check equipment
Radio check
3. Execute attack
•
•
•
•
•
Rescue
Exposures
Confinement
Extinguish
Overhaul
4. Terminate incident
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DONNING PROCEDURES FOR PA-80 SCBA
1.
Push demand regulator to donning mode.
2.
Turn cylinder valve on and compare gauges.
3.
Don the SCBA.
4.
Don the face mask.
5.
Insert the demand regulator in face mask.
6.
Check positive pressure.
7.
Check bypass function.
8.
Check face mask seal. Shut cylinder valve off. Watch chest gauge fall to zero and listen for warning whistle.
9.
Turn O2 valve back on and watch gauge.
10.
Put Nomex hood over face mask.
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