Manual 19787859

Manual 19787859
RSTS/E V8.0
Release Notes
Order No. AA-5246F-TC
March 1983
The Release Notes describe new features on the RSTS/E system and
explain differences between this version and previous versions. System
managers and system maintainers should read this document prior to
system installation.
OPERATING SYSTEM AND VERSION: RSTS/E V8.0
SOFTWARE VERSION: RSTS/E V8.0
digital equipment corporation, maynard, massachusetts
The information in this document is subject to change without notice and
should not be construed as a commitment by Digital Equipment Cor-
poration. Digital Equipment Corporation assumes no responsibility for any
errors that may appear in this document.
The software described in this document is furnished under a license and
may be used or copied only in accordance with the terms of such license.
No responsibility is assumed for the use or reliability of software on equip-
ment that is not supplied by DIGITAL or its affiliated companies.
Copyright © 1982, 1983 by Digital Equipment Corporation.
All Rights Reserved.
The postage-paid READER'S COMMENTS form on the last page of this
document requests your critical evaluation to assist us in preparing future
documentation.
The following are trademarks of Digital Equipment Corporation:
РО ОАО TM DECwriter RSTS
DIBOL RSX
MASSBUS UNIBUS DECmate
PDP VAX DECsystem—10
P/OS VMS DECSYSTEM—20
Professional VT DECUS
DEC Rainbow Work Processor
Commercial Engineering Publications typeset this manual using DIGITAL'’s
TMS-11 Text Management System.
RSTS/E V8.8 Release Notes, May 1983
Table of Contents
Preface
TABLE OF CONTENTS
1.9 New Features of RSTS/E V8.9
1.1
1.8
1.9
New Device Support
1.1.1 Restrictions
Disk Structure
1.2.1 Summary of New Disk Structure
1.2.2 Disk Structure Conversion Program
System Generation (SYSGEN)
Pre-built CUSPs
Initialization Code (INIT.SYS)
Monitor
File Processor
1.7.1 STALL/UNSTALL Directive
1.7.2 EMT Logging
1.7.3 OPEN Mode for Disk Initialization
1.7.4 Changes to SYS Calls
Terminal Service/Line Printer Drivers
Micro RSTS Spooling Package
RSTS/E V8.
$ Release Notes, May 1983
Table of Contents
1.18
DCL
1.18.1 LINK command
1.18.2 MOUNT and DISMOUNT commands for disks
1.19.3 MOUNT and DISMOUNT commands for tapes
1.18.4 COBOL command
1.18.5 INITIALIZE command for disks
1.18.6 INITIALIZE command for tapes
1.19.7 DCL Commands via "$" CCL
DSKINT
Layered Product installation
BASIC-PLUS-2
1.13. 1 Compatibility with RMS and BASIC-PLUS-2 V1.6
1.13.2 New error messages
FORTRAN-77
DATATRIEVE V2.4
Documentation
V8e.P Release Information
1.17.1 DECnet/E V2.9 Support; Modified Build/Patch Procedure
1.17.2 Feature Patches
1.17.3 Mounting and Rebuilding (Cleaning) Disks
RSTS/E V8.9 Release Notes, May 1983
Table of Contents
2.0 Differences Between RSTS/E v8. and RSTS/E V7.2
2.1
System Generation (SYSGEN)
2.2 Initialization Code (INIT.SYS)
2.3
2.4
2.5
2.6
2.7
2.8
2.9
Monitor
2.3.1 ATTACH/REATTACH/SWAP CONSOLE Directive
2.3.2 Message Send/Receive Directive
2.3.2.1 Non-privileged SEND/RECEIVE
2.3.2.2 Local Object Types
2.3.2.3 SEND/RECEIVE Extensions for EMT Logging
2.3.3 Job Creation Directive
2.3.4 LOGIN Directive
2.3.5 LOGOUT Directive
2.3.6 CLEAN Disk Pack Directive
2.3.7 One-shot spooling request directive
2.3.8 RSTS/E Error Message
2.3.9 Single-Character CCL's
2.3.19 Terminal Service: chr$(155%)
2.3.11 Small Buffers: JDB? Structure Note
2.3.12 ECC Error Correction
File Processor
Commonly Used System Programs (CUSPs)
DCL
DCL Installation
RSX Emulator and Utilities Package
RT11 Emulator
RSTS/E V8.8 Release Notes, May 1983
Table of Contents
3.9
BASIC-PLUS
2.18.1 Handling of Floating Point Numbers
Documentation
Upgrading from RSTS/E V7.2 to RSTS/E V8.ß
Old Problems Corrected
Distribution Media
Optional Software
Support for RSTS/E V7.2
RSTS/E V8.9 Distribution Kits
3.1
3.2
3.3
3.14
3.5
3.6
3.7
Introduction
Magnetic Tape Distribution Kits
Disk Distribution Kits
Build Control Files
3.4.1 Location of Build Control Files
3.4.2 Contents of Build Control Files
SORT—11
EDT V2.8
Unsupported Components
3.7.1 RNO
3.7.2 TECO
3.7.3 SRCCOM and DUMP. SAV
3.7.4 RSTSFLX
3.7.5 EMTCPY
1,0 RSTS/E V8.8 Sample Installation Procedure
vi
RSTS/E V8.9 Release Notes, May 1983
Table of Contents
5.9 RMS-11 V2.8 for RSTS/E V8.9
5.1 RMS V2.8 Access Methods Feature
5.1.1 Support for Clustering and Task Independence
5.1.2 Segmented Resident Library
5.1.3 Disk-Overlaid RMS
5.1.4 Remote File and Record Access Via DECNET
5.1.4.1 Remote Node Specification
5.1.4.2 Linking Programs with RMSDAP Support
5.1.4.3 RMSDAP Environments
5.1.5 New File and Directory Operations
5.1.5.1 $RENAME
5.1.5.2 $PARSE
5.1.5.3 $SEARCH
5.1.6 Wildcarding
5.1.7 Random Access to FIXED-Format Sequential Files
5.1.8 Increased Device Independence
5.1.9 More Useable Block I/O Facilities
5.2 RMS V2.8 Utilities Features
5.2.1 New File Design Utility
5.2.2 New Features for RMSDSP
RSTS/E V8.9 Release Notes, May 1983
Table of Contents
5.3
5.4
5.5
5.6
5.7
5.8
5.2.3 New Features for RMSCNV
5.2.4 Additional Utility Features
Comparisons With V1.8
5.3.1 Memory-resident Library (RMSRES)
5.3.2 Memory-resident Library (RMSSEQ)
5.3.3 Memory-resident Library (DAPRES)
5.3.4 Disk-overlaid RMS
5.3.5 Non-overlaid RMS
5.3.6 Other V1.8 Compatibility Notes
Miscellaneous Information
Problems Fixed With This Version
Known Problems With This Version
RMS Files and Placement on the Kit
RMS V2.8 Installation
5.8.1 Startup Command Procedures
5.8.2 Utility Configurations
5.8.2.1 Utility Command and ODL Files
5.8.2.2 Rebuilding the Utilities
RSTS/E V8.9 Release Notes, May 1983
Preface
Preface
The RSTS/E V8.8 Release Notes describe new features in RSTS/E for this release
as well as differences between this and the previous release, RSTS/E V7.2.
Anyone who is about to generate a RSTS/E V8.8 system should be thoroughly
familiar with the information presented in these Release Notes. In addition,
users and programmers familiar with earlier versions of RSTS/E should read
this manual to learn about changes and new features.
NOTE
RC25 Device -- There are a number of
references in the RSTS/E manuals to the
RC25 device. This device is, as of the
first publication date of the manuals,
not available for sale or distribution:
nor is its mention in the documents a
commitment by DIGITAL to sell or
distribute this device,
ix
1.9 NEW FEATURES OF RSTS/E V8.9
1.1 New Device Support
For RSTS/E V8.8, new device support is included for the RD/RX disks for micro
RSTS and the Professional 358 with VT192 emulation with a few restrictions.
Support for the TU89 was added for RSTS/E V7.2 in October 1982, and for the
TSV95, RA81, RA69, LNS1, DZS11, LA58, LA190/LA12, MS11-P, LPV11 and VT131 in
December 1982. They are also supported for RSTS/E V8.8.
1.1.1 Restrictions
The following hardware is supported on RSTS/E V8.9 only for systems upgrading
from RSTS/E V7.2. RSTS/E support for these devices will cease in October,
1983.
Device Suggested Replacement
RF 11 | RK97, [email protected], or RABB
[email protected] ВКТ, [email protected], or RABY
RSE! [email protected] on 11/78; RMB? or RABP
RK95J (as a system disk) RLA?
RK95F (as a system disk) RLO2
LT33 LA34 or LA38
VTO5 VT198 series
VT59 VT190 series
IBM 2741-compatible terminals LA38 or LA128
DP11 synchronous line interface DUP11
RF11, RSP3, and [email protected] disks cannot be used as system disks in RSTS/E V8.8.
The TU58 will be supported on RSTS/E V8.8 only for systems upgrading from
RSTS/E V7.2. RSTS/E support for the TU58 will be stopped in January, 1984.
After RSTS/E V8.8, the LOAD and FILL options of INIT.SYS will no longer be
supported.
RSTS V8.9 and all of its Update Kits will continue to be distributed on $898
BPI 9-track magnetic tape, [email protected], [email protected], and [email protected] The next release after V8.8
will not be distributed on 8/20 BPI 9-track magnetic tape, RKP5, RLO1, and
[email protected]
RSTS/E V8.9 Release Notes, May 1983 Page 1-2
New Features of RSTS/E V8.9
1.2 Disk Structure
RSTS/E V8.2 supports a new disk directory structure. This new structure is
more efficient than the old one and allows for extensibility so that new
features can be implemented in the future. It also allows more accounts:
instead of approximately 1709 accounts, it is possible to have thousands. The
DSKINT program (both online and offline) will create disks with this new
structure. However, RSTS/E V8.9 still supports the older disk structure, and
disk packs of either kind can be mounted and accessed under V8.8. Note,
however, that new structure disk packs are not acceptable to RSTS/E V7.2 or
earlier releases -- an attempt to mount a new format pack under V7.2 will
result in a "?Protection violation" error.
The support of "old" structure packs is temporary; RSTS/E releases subsequent
to V8.9 will not support the old structure. Furthermore, the performance and
capacity improvements resulting from the new structure are not available on
old format packs. DIGITAL recommends that you convert your old format packs
as soon as convenient. However, do not convert them until you are satisfied
that you will no longer need to access the packs using RSTS/E V7.2 or older
systems. Some installations have programs, either written in-house or
supplied by third parties, that directly access the RSTS/E directory structure
(although this is not supported) -- such programs may need to be modified in
order to handle the new format disks. Be sure to do this prior to conversion.
Another difference is that more space is now available on RPP4, RPP5, and RPP6
disks: on RP84 and [email protected] disks, 171798 blocks are now available rather than
167298, and on RPP6 disks 3489678 blocks rather than 331482 blocks.
1.2.1 Summary of New Disk Structure
DISCLAIMER
The following information is included as a service to users who
have software that directly accesses the RSTS file structure, to
aid in converting such programs. Note that this is not a
supported capability of RSTS/E; therefore, the information
provided here is subject to change in future releases of RSTS/E.
DIGITAL assumes no responsibility for the use of this
information, and will not support software that uses the data
structures discussed. |
All numbers in the following discussion are in octal unless stated otherwise.
To minimize the impact of the directory structure change, all UFD data has
been left unchanged. The only changes are in the structure of the MFD. The
changes are such that most programs that reference the MFD directly (either
non-file-structured or by its old name "[1,1]") will fail in a "reasonably
sane" fashion.
RSTS/E V8.0 Release Notes, May 1983 Page 1-3
New Features of RSTS/E V8.9
Formerly, the UFDs were listed in the MFD, which was also the UFD for account
[1,1] and could be accessed either by opening [1,1] as a file or by looking at
Fip block number 1, which was the starting cluster of the MFD. The entries in
the MFD were linked together in the same fashion as the file entries in a UFD;
account entries were distinguished from file entries by a flag bit, but both
could occur in the [1,1] directory.
In the new structure, block 1 contains the pack label. Block 1 contains the
same information as before in the first 20 bytes; the rest of the block is
reserved. New packs can be distinguished from old ones by the fact that the
20909 bit is set in the pack flags (offset 12 of the pack label). If set,
offset 6 contains the structure revision number (491 for this version), and
offset U4 contains the starting device cluster number of the MFD.
The MFD no longer points directly to the UFDs, but ¡instead points to GFDs
(Group File Directories), which ín turn point to the UFDs. There is a GFD for
each group that has accounts defined, and it contains pointers to each of the
UFDs for that group. Both the MFD and the GFDs have the same basic format:
they look like a UFD, except for the second and third blocks. These blocks
are not formatted as UFD blocks (i.e. no clustermaps) but instead are
interpreted as tables. The tables consist of word entries indexed by group
number times 2 (for the MFD) or user number times 2 (for a GFD). The second
block contains the starting device cluster number of the GFD for the group (in
case of the MFD) or UFD for the user number (in the GFD). The third block is
reserved in the MFD, and contains a directory link word for the name entry of
the account in the GFD.
The UFD name entries and associated accounting entries (contained in the GFD)
are very similar to the old form with the following differences: The name
entries are not linked together, because they are accessed through the table
in the third block of the GFD. Instead, the link word of the name entry
contains a link to a chain of account attribute blocks. Each attribute block
contains a link to the next one (2 to end the chain) and a type field in the
third byte. A type code of 3 indicates a password block; other type values
are reserved for future use. Bytes 4 and up contain data (password in ASCII
padded with nulls, in the case of the password block).
Unlike the old [1,1], the MFD and GFDs contain account entries only, not file
entries. Note that in the new structure [1,1] is no longer the MFD and,
therefore, need not be present on a disk. In addition, files can now be
stored in [1,1] without affecting the number of accounts allowed on a pack.
The limit of 1734 accounts per disk no longer applies; the disk structure
allows every legal account number to be defined, although disk space
restrictions make it impossible to allocate a UFD for that many accounts.
However, the number of legal accounts is now limited by the amount of disk
space available rather than by some inherent limitation in the file structure.
RSTS/E V8.8 Release Notes, May 1983 Page 1-4
New Features of RSTS/E V8.8
Neither the MFD nor the GFDs have file names. Consequently they can be
accessed only by non-file-structured I/O. Note that the description just given
is a summary only; we strongly recommend you do not attempt to directly
access the RSTS directory structure since the structure is subject to future
change and extension. System directives are available that allow most if not
all programs to be implemented without access to the RSTS directory structure.
For example, the recommended way to find out what accounts exist on a disk is
to use the wildcard PPN lookup SYS call.
1.2.2 Disk Stucture Conversion Program
To facilitate conversion of old format packs, a conversion utility, DSKCYT, is
included as part of RSTS/E V8.9. DSKCVT is installed if you install the
"BIGPRG" programs. This utility performs an in-place conversion of the
directory structure to the new format. To do so, it needs some amount of work
space on the pack being converted. You should ensure that there is enough
space available; the amount required is approximately 32 blocks times the
number of different group numbers used on the pack. However, in most cases
the amount used is significantly less than this value.
The conversion program guarantees no loss of data even if the program aborts
because of lack of work space, a system crash, or disk hardware problem. This
means that should any problem be encountered during the conversion, you need
only correct the problem and rerun the conversion. In such a case, it is not
necessary to restore the pack from a backup. Nevertheless, we strongly
recommend you make a backup of any pack before conversion.
The conversion program uses two workfiles in account [1,1] on the disk being
converted: these are named NEW11.DAT and MFDGFD.DAT. If files by that name
already exist in [1,1], they will be deleted without warning. Please verify
that you are not using these file names in [1,1] before you convert a pack.
RSTS/E V8.9 Release Notes, May 1983 Page 1-5
New Features of RSTS/E V8.9
To convert a pack, proceed as follows:
run $dskevt
DSKCVT V8.9-986 RSTS V8.9-96
Disk to convert? DLP: [Specify the pack to convert]
Ready to convert DLA:NEWODS [DSKCVT displays the packid]
Proceed (Y or N)? y [Enter Y to proceed, N to quit]
~~ [DSKCVT performs the conversion]
Sorting PPNs
Processing [8,1] [Each PPN is printed when processed]
Processing [1,1]
Processing [1,2]
Processing [1,3]
Processing [1,9]
Processing [1,211]
Processing [1,234]
Processing [2,2]
Processing [7,2]
Processing [7,72]
etc.
Conversion of DLO: complete
DSKCVT accepts either logically mounted or logically dismounted packs.
However, the pack should not be in use by anyone when DSKCVT is run. To
verify this, DSKCVT dismounts and remounts the pack at the start of
processing.
DSKCVT can be run only by privileged users. It will ask you for the name of
the disk drive containing the pack to be converted. If the pack appears to be
an already converted pack, a message is printed to that effect and the
question is asked again. Otherwise, DSKCVT prints the device name and pack
label to allow you to verify you are converting the proper pack, and asks for
confirmation. If you answer YES, it proceeds without further intervention.
First, the account numbers are sorted in ascending order. Next, each account
is processed (its data is inserted into the work file which will become the
new directory structure). After all accounts have been processed, DSKCVT
dismounts the pack and updates the pack label. At this point the pack is a
new structure pack; however, the storage allocation table (SAT) does not yet
exactly reflect the free space on the pack. Therefore, the pack remains
marked as "dirty" while DSKCVT updates the SAT. After this is complete, the
pack label is updated once more to indicate the pack is "clean." Finally, if
the pack was mounted when DSKCYT started, it will be mounted once again (with
its pack ID as a logical name).
RSTS/E V8.9 Release Notes, May 1983 Page 1-6
New Features of RSTS/E V8.8
If DSKCVT aborts for any reason during processing (for example, due to a
hardware error or system crash), any data on the pack being converted is
unharmed. After correcting the problem, simply re-run DSKCVT and specify the
same pack again. If conversion had proceeded far enough, DSKCVT will report
that the pack has already been converted, in which case you can simply mount
it using the DCL MOUNT command, (the SAT will be rebuilt at mount time if
necessary), or use the ONLCLN utility. Otherwise, DSKCVT will simply restart
the conversion from the beginning after deleting the work files (NEW11.DAT and
MFDGFD. DAT) that were left behind by the abort. As pointed out before, we
still recommend you make a backup of each pack before conversion.
1.3 System Generation (SYSGEN)
Several new questions have been added to the SYSGEN dialogue which reflect new
device support and new or expanded features of RSTS/E V8.8. These questions
and their ramifications are described in detail in the RSTS/E System
Generation Manual and are outlined in Section 2.1 of these notes.
1.4 Pre-built CUSPs
RSTS/E V8.8 offers users the choice of 'BUILD'ing their system by compiling
the CUSPs themselves or by selecting to use the pre-built CUSPs supplied in
.TSK format on the distribution kit. See Section 2.5 (BUILD) of these notes
for information on how to select pre-built CUSPs during the BUILD. Using this
option will make the installation faster.
1.5 Initialization Code (INIT.SYS)
Several changes to the initialization code have been made for RSTS/E V8.8.
Please refer to Section 2.2 of these notes for detailed information.
RSTS/E V8.2 Release Notes, May 1983 Page 1-7
New Features of RSTS/E V8.8 |
1.6 Monitor
Several changes have been made to the Monitor for RSTS/E V8.8. The RSTS
monitor now allows a job's maximum size to be 32kw when an RTS or LIBRARY is
not used (and RSX emulation is included in the monitor). Please refer to
Section 2.3 of these notes for detailed information.
1.7 File Processor
The following directive is new for RSTS/E V8.8.
1.7.1 STALL/UNSTALL Directive
(UU.STL: SYS call subfunction 29)
This SYS call halts all activity on the system by all users, except for the
issuing user. This is accomplished by not scheduling any jobs to run except
the issuing job. The intent is to enable users whose system disk is on a
single spindle/multi-unit drive to stall the system, change the removeable
unit, and resume operations without taking down or crashing the system.
For more detailed information, please refer to the RSTS/E Programming Manual
and the RSTS/E System Directives Manual.
RSTS/E V8.9 Release Notes, May 1983 Page 1-8
New Features of RSTS/E V8.9
1.7.2 EMT Logging
EMT logging is an optional feature that provides the system manager with a
"window" on the process by which timesharing jobs request and receive services
from the RSTS/E Monitor. By using it, you can gather information about
certain kinds of activity on your system. For instance, you might be
interested in the number of LOGIN's on a particular terminal port, in how many
(or which) files are accessed on a certain drive, or in which non-resident FIP
overlays get the heaviest use. Such information can help a knowledgeable
system manager "tune" a system for improved performance, identify bottlenecks,
establish charging algorithms, and watch for potential security problems.
This section describes the EMT logging feature, how it works, and how to
include it in your system. Because of the wide variability among RSTS/E
systems, however, it does not attempt to describe which data will be most
useful to your particular environment. Similarly, it is up to you to decide
how to collect (or to use) the data provided.
EMT logging includes optional code in the Monitor, uses XBUF for passing
information, and requires a program (not supplied by DIGITAL) running as a
timesharing job. You should be aware, therefore, that use of EMT logging can
have an impact on performance. This impact is variable, and depends upon
which EMT's you decide to log, for which jobs you log them, and how much
processing your logging program attempts to do for each EMT.
Documentation and Other Materials
The EMT Logging feature is described in general terms in the RSTS/E
Programming Manual, the RSTS/E System Directives Manual, and the System
Manager's Guide. Certain details, such as description of data fields returned
for a logged EMT, are subject to change in future releases of RSTS/E. This
information is included in the Release Notes, instead of in the formal
documentation.
The RSTS/E distribution kit contains two additional components related to EMT
logging. A feature patch (article number 3.5.12F) allows you to specify which
EMT's are to be logged. A demonstration program (EMTCPY.BAS) is included in
the UNSUPP (unsupported) package, which illustrates sample techniques for
retrieving EMT logging data, including how to declare an EMT logger receiver
and how decode the packets passed by the Monitor. This program is not
supported, and may neither work with nor be supplied with future releases of
RSTS/E. )
RSTS/E V8.0 Release Notes, May 1983 | В В — Page 1-9
New Features of RSTS/E V8.9 | |
Background
Every system directive contains an "EMT" hardware instruction (hence this
feature's name: "EMT Logging"). To use a Monitor service, a timesharing job
loads parameters in its FIRQB and/or XRB and executes an "EMT." This causes a
hardware interrupt, and the RSTS/E Monitor gains control. The Monitor then
inspects the parameters passed in the FIRQB and/or XRB, and (based upon the
parameters, as well as the particular EMT) performs the requested service.
Upon completion, the Monitor may pass status information and/or other data
back to the job, depending upon the call. For example, the first byte in the
job's FIRQB is usually loaded with an error code (zero indicating success, and
nonzero values communicating specific kinds of failure).
Data Returned to an EMT Logger
EMT Logging provides information on timesharing activity in terms of what the
Monitor sees. Therefore, you will want to be familiar with the MACRO form of
system directives, as they are described in the RSTS/E System Directives
Manual. The data returned to your logging program is in terms of FIRQB and/or
XRB contents, regardless of the programming environment of the job that issues
the directives. | |
Contents of an EMT Logger Packet
(The following description assumes you have read the material on EMT Logging
contained in the appropriate sections of the RSTS/E System Manager's Guide and
RSTS/E Programming Manual.) |
In this release, the Monitor's EMT Logging code returns two fields in each EMT
packet: the "header", or context, field, and a field of information extracted
from the caller's FIRQB. Although the identities (and lengths) of the fields
returned in this release are the same for all packets, you should code your
EMT Logger program to respect the variable format (that is, honor the packet's
count word and the fields' count bytes), in order to minimize possible changes
later.
Recall that the packet described below concerns a single EMT, A single
receive may return to your EMT logging program a variable number of packets,
depending upon the buffer space you provide for the data portion of the
message. Each packet contains a count field (as its first two bytes) which
specifies the packet's length (exclusive of the count bytes). Additionally,
the "parameters" returned by the receive call contains a word that gives the
number of packets returned to your buffer.
RSTS/E V8.8 Release Notes, May 1983 Page 1-18
New Features of RSTS/E V8.8
"Bytes" are specified in octal, with the high byte's number to the left for
word fields.
Bytes (relative Bytes (relative Contents
to beginning of to beginning of
packet) field)
(possible preceding packets)
1 - £ This packet's length (word) <66>
Start of root (context) field
2 p Length of "options" area <B>
3 1 Length of XRB data <B>
Ц 2 Length of FIRQB data <34>
5 3 Length of context (root) field =— <32>
7- 6 5. Ц Packet sequence number
11 - 18 7 - 6 System date at EMT time
13 - 12 11 - 10 System time at EMT time
14 12 Seconds till next minute at EMT time
15 13 Ticks till next second at EMT time
16 14 Calling job number, times two
17 15 Reserved
29 16 IOSTS byte (at directive completion)
21 17 Function code of directive
22 20 Reserved
23 21 Calling job's keyboard number
25 - 28 23 - 22 Reserved
27 - 26 25 - 24 | Calling job's PPN
31 - 38 27 - 26 Job's virtual PC (EMT instr + 2)
32 38 UUO code (if call was a .UUO)
33 31 Reserved
End of root (context) field
Start of FIRQB data field
35 - 314 1-8 Third word of caller's FIRQB (*)
37 - 36 3 - 2 Fourth word of caller's FIRQB
67 - 66 33 - 32 Last word of caller's FIRQB
End of FIRQB data field
(*) - First two words of caller's FIRQB are not returned
in the FIRQB data field, since the information they
contain is conveyed in the root field.
RSTS/E V8.2 Release Notes, May 1983 Page 1-11
New Features of RSTS/E V8.8
Notes:
The numbers in angle brackets are the values that will be returned
in the indicated fields. (Not variable in this release, but
remember the note above about honoring count fields in any program
you write.)
"IOSTS byte" contains the returned error code (zero indicates
successful completion, no error)
Function code is the FIP function code for this directive. These
codes can be found in TBL.LST (one of the listings prepared during
SYSGEN: these function codes have MACRO mnemonics of the form
xxxFQ). They should be considered as subject to change in future
releases. As a current example, a function code of #14 corresponds
to UUOFQ - the FIP function code for a .UUO directive.
Calling job's keyboard number - in case of a detached job, this will
be the one's complement of the number of the keyboard the job
detached from.
Job's virtual PC - is the virtual address, in the user's job space,
of the instruction following the EMT instruction that invoked this
call. This may be of interest if the calling program is written in
MACRO. For other languages, it will be less useful: the PC will be
within the run-time system in the case of BASIC-PLUS, for instance.
(PC = Program Counter, the PDP-11's "next instruction” register.)
UUO code - If the call was a .UUO directive (FIP function code =
14), this byte will contain the code of the UUO. These codes can be
found in the System Directives Manual, or in TBL.LST; they have
MACRO mnemonics of the form UU.xxx. If the call was not a .UUO
directive, this byte will be 177. (Numbers are in octal.)
RSTS/E V8.2 Release Notes, May 1983 Page 1-12
New Features of RSTS/E V8.9
Which EMT's are Logged
You may select the EMT's for which the Monitor will construct packets and pass
them to your program by means of a feature patch (sequence number 3.5.12F,
included on the distribution kit).
When you generate a Monitor, it will by default log no EMT's. The feature
patch includes a segment for each potentially loggable directive. You may
edit the feature patch to select the directives you wish to log. (As shipped,
the patch has the effect of disabling logging for every one of the candidate
directives).
1.7.3 OPEN Mode for Disk Initialization
A new non-file-structured open mode, mode 512, has been created to allow a
program to read the factory bad block file of a disk. This new open mode also
affects error logging for that unit. Error messages will be re-routed to the
program if it is declared a local receiver with an object type of 64 decimal;
otherwise, the error message is discarded.
1.7.4 Changes to SYS Calls
Changes to several SYS calls have been made for V8.8. These changes are listed
below. Refer to chapter 2 for further details.
Function Change
Code
-29 Tables 3 Additional monitor tables returned for SYSTAT.
-28 Spool Changes for the new Micro-RSTS spooler
-24 Add CCL A CCL can now consist of a single, non-alphanumeric,
character (e.g., "$"). The "8" character is no longer
allowed in positions 2-n of a CCL keyword.
—8 Channel This SYS call has been enhanced to return access counts,
stats current file size, and status byte.
p Create Creation of account allows placement and pre-extension
account of the UFD, and creation of [1,1] on new structure disks.
1 Delete Account [1,1] can be deleted from the new disk structure.
account
RSTS/E V8. Release Notes, May 1983 Page 1-13
New Features of RSTS/E V8.8
Function
Code
2 Clean
5 Logout
6 Attach
13 Zero
22 Send/
Receive
24 Create
Job
(Spawn)
Change
This SYS call is no longer supported.
LOGOUT checks for violations of disk-usage quotas.
Disk quota checking is done on all read/write mounted disks
(locked disks are not checked if the user is not privileged).
If job is non-privileged, a new non-privileged detach quota
is checked. If the quota is not violated, the non-privileged
job is killed, and no return is made to the job.
Allows swapping consoles with another job
Zero does not release the UFD clusters unless specified
Non-privileged jobs can declare themselves as receivers.
Local receivers can have Object Types, and extensions have
been made for EMT Logging. See Sections 2.3.2 and 1.7.2
Jobs can be created logged into an account. Either
a program can be run in that account or a specified keyboard
monitor can be entered. With certain restrictions,
non-privileged jobs can create new jobs logged into the same
non-privileged account.
RSTS/E V8.0 Release Notes, Мау 1983 Page 1-14
New Features of RSTS/E V8.9
1.8 Terminal Service/Line Printer Drivers
A new feature, a "no stall" RECORD modifier to prevent the driver from
stalling when the output data cannot be buffered immediately, has been added
to terminal service and line-printer drivers in RSTS/E V8.P. This feature is
only available to programs written in MACRO; it is not available to
BASIC-PLUS programs.
Normal character-oriented output (the only kind available in previous
releases) works as follows: |
When a line printer or terminal output request is made (vía the .WRITE
directive), the driver first transfers the user data into a system buffer. If
there is insufficient room to buffer the user data, because the device cannot
empty the system buffer as fast as it is being filled, the driver will stall
while waiting for the system buffer to empty sufficiently so that the data
transfer can be completed. Such a stall will often occur, for example, when a
user's terminal has been XOFFed by the user typing CTRL/S. Once the system
buffer becomes full any additional .WRITE request will cause terminal service
to stall until sufficient buffer space becomes available (by the user typing
CTRL/Q) to complete the data transfer.
While the driver is in a stall state, the user program is also stalled. This
can cause problems for programs that have time-critical processing
requirements, such as message send/receive, where a .WRITE to an XOFFed
terminal might prevent the program from processing any incoming messages until
the terminal were XONed and the driver returned control to the program.
In V8.9, RECORD modifier bit 8192 can be included with a .WRITE directive to a
terminal or Jline-printer to instruct the driver not to stall when the user
data cannot be buffered. Instead, control is returned to the calling program
with the byte count in the XRB (XRBC) set to indicate the number of bytes that
were not buffered. The calling program may then re-issue the .WRITE, possibly
after processing any time-critical sequences, to complete writing any data not
sent in the original request. If XRBC is returned with the value 9, then all
data was successfully transferred and no additional .WRITE is required. For
WRITE directives issued without the new "no stall" RECORD modifier,
processing will be as in previous releases: control will not be returned to
the calling program until the data transfer has been completed, returning 9 in
XRBC.
RSTS/E V8.2 Release Notes, May 1983 Page 1-15
New Features of RSTS/E V8.9
NOTE
An exception to this is the case of a .WRITE to a hung line
printer. The initial .WRITE causes all data to be buffered, but
subsequent WRITES will not buffer any data (XRBC will be
returned unchanged) until the printer error is corrected.
i
When using the "no stall" option on a line printer, you can perform a special
test to see whether the line printer is busy without causing your program to
stall. To perform the test, write a single null character with modifier bits
28089(8) and U4 (both the "NO STALL" and "STALL UNTIL OUTPUT COMPLETE" bits)
set. With both bits set, the system will return control to your program
instead of stalling it. The value at XRB+XRBC tells you the status of the
line printer. If XRB+XRBC contains zero after this write, it indicates that
the line printer's buffers are empty (there are no more characters left to
print). If XRB+XRBC contains one, then the line printer is still busy printing
the characters that remain in its buffer.
Full use of the new "no stall" feature requires access to the XRBC word in the
XRB in order to determine the amount of data not transferred by the WRITE
directive. Therefore, only languages that can access the XRB directly (e.g.
MACRO) may use this feature. Note that high-level languages with an external
calling interface or commons (e.g. BASIC-PLUS-2) can still use the feature by
including a MACRO-coded routine to return the contents of XRBC to the calling
program or mapping into the XRB. BASIC-PLUS, which has no such calling
mechanism, or commoning, cannot take advantage of the new feature.
RSTS/E V8.2 Release Notes, May 1983 | Page 1-16
New Features of RSTS/E V8.9
1.9 Micro-RSTS Spooling Package
The new micro-RSTS spooling package provides an alternative to the standard
RSTS/E Spooling package. The new spooling package has both advantages and
disadvantages. Weigh these factors to decide which package is best for your
installation.
Advantages of the Micro-RSTS spooling package:
e It reduces system load. It requires only one permanent job on
the system, versus a minimum of three for comparable services
from QUEMAN. The new spooling package also uses less CPU
time, disk I/0, and memory.
e Performance is greatly improved. The programs in the package
are more efficient.
e You can print files with any RMS file organization. The
standard package is restricted to a few of the more common
organizations.
e Operator commands are easier to use. New command syntax for
starting the package, initializing printers, and so forth,
make managing the package easier.
e The package provides a Forms Definition File to provide easy
maintenance of form attributes. The file is keyword driven
and can be modified using a standard text editor.
e The package interface is "friendlier." For example, if a user
tries to delete a nonexistent job in the queue, the interface
displays an error message.
Disadvantages of the Micro-RSTS Spooling Package:
e The package does not have BATCH or RJ2788 capabilities.
(872788 183 optional RSTS/E layered software.)
e The package provides only a single queue (named PRINT:) to
hold all print requests.
e The package does not provide a means to determine the status
of the print devices, spooler, or queue manager. Án operator
must manually maintain information on which print devices have
been initialized, forms assigned, and so on.
RSTS/E V8.9 Release Notes, May 1983 | | Page 1-17
New Features of RSTS/E V8.8 |
Using the new package:
The new spooling package is designed to be used by DCL commands. See the
RSTS/E DCL User's Guide for descriptions of user commands for the package.
Chapter 12 of the RSTS/E System Manager's Guide has descriptions of the
operator commands for the package. Two versions of DCL can be installed; one
to support the new spooling package, and one to support the standard package
(you cannot support both within the same DCL run-time system). The syntax you
use depends on which package is installed on your system. The system manager
is responsible for telling users which spooling package is supported in DCL.
See section 12.2 of the RSTS/E System Manager's Guide for further information
on maintaining both old and new spooling packages on the same system.
Installation:
The Micro-RSTS spooling package is installed by running BUILD and using the
control file SPL.CTL, Two versions of the spooling package are offered to
reflect different usages of RMS. One version requires the RMS resident
library (RMSRES) to be installed during execution. The other version does not
require the resident library, but is heavily overlaid. The version that uses
the RMS resident library will perform better than the overlaid version.
The monitor must be configured to include RSX emulation (the "disappearing"
RSX run-time system), and a minimum swap-max of 29K. The interface utility
QUEUE.TSK requires approximately 22K plus the RMS resident library for the
resident library version, or 28K for the overlaid version.
1.19 DCL
The following commands have been added or enhanced for RSTS/E V8.8.
1.19.1 LINK Command
The DCL LINK command provides the program with more address space than it did
before and is substantially more flexible. It provides easy access to program
debugging tools, supports the linking of RSX-11-based MACRO programs, and can
be used on a wider variety of systems.
For more information, please refer to the RSTS/E DCL User's Guide.
% .
RSTS/E V8.8 Release Notes, May 1983 Page 1-18
New Features of RSTS/E V8.8
1.18.2 MOUNT and DISMOUNT Commands for Disks
The MOUNT command for mounting disks has been expanded as follows:
MOUNT device-namel:] label [logical-namel:]][/qualifier]
A privileged user can specify an alternate logical name in the MOUNT command
is allowed. |
The qualifiers are:
/[NOJWRITE - can be specified by privileged and non-privileged users to
indicate the desired read-only or write enabled access.
If the disk is initialized as read/write, then the default
action is to mount the disk write-enabled, unless the
drive is write protected, in which case it is mounted
read-only. If the disk is initialized as read-only, then
the default action is to mount the disk read-only.
/[NOJREBUILD - a privileged operation that allows a qualified user to
either mount a public or a private disk and
unconditionally perform the cleaning operation to rebuild
any corrupt disk file structures, or to mount the disk and
not rebuild it. The default action is to rebuild the disk
if it is "dirty" (was not logically dismounted). Mounting
a dirty disk and choosing not to rebuild it allows only
read-only access. |
/PRIVATE - can be specified by privileged and non-privileged users. A
non-privileged user can mount only a private disk as
private. A privileged user can mount a private or public
disk as private.
/PUBLIC - A privileged operation that allows a qualified user to mount
as public a disk that was initialized as public.
/[NO]SHARE - can be specified by privileged and non-privileged users to
limit disk access to only the job that mounted the disk
(which thus becomes non-shared) or to mount it as shared.
A disk mounted as shared is the same as a disk mounted as
private. A non-privileged user can mount only a private
disk as shared or non-shared. A privileged user can mount
a private or public disk as shared or non-shared.
If neither /PRIVATE, /PUBLIC, nor (/[NO]JSHARE are present, then the
default action is to mount the disk as private (shared). |
RSTS/E V8.0 Release Notes, May 1983 Page 1-19
New Features of RSTS/E V8.9
The DISMOUNT command for dismounting dísks has been expanded as follows:
DISMOUNT device-name[:] label[/qualifier]
The only qualifier is:
/PUBLIC - A privileged operation that allows a qualified user to
dismount a public disk that was initialized and mounted as
public. The default action is to dismount the private disk.
A restriction of the DCL DISMOUNT command is that if a job mounts a disk as
non-shared and a second job (which is running under a privileged account)
attempts to dismount the disk by specifying the correct pack-id label, then
the error "?Pack-id labels don't match" occurs. The work-around for this
situation is for the second job to not specify the pack-id label on the
DISMOUNT command.
Refer to the RSTS/E System Manager's Guide for more detailed information on
the MOUNT and DISMOUNT commands.
1.18.3 MOUNT and DISMOUNT Commands for Tapes
If you do not explicitly specify a density using the /DENSITY qualifier, the
MOUNT command assumes the system default density. If the system default
density is not the density at which the tape drive is currently set, and your
tape drive is connected via a [email protected] formatter, you will get the error "?Data
error or incorrect density". If your tape drive is connected via a TMP3
formatter, the density will be determined automatically. If you specify a
density different than that of the tape, you will get the error message
"? Incorrect density".
The MOUNT command deals with the format differently. If you do not explicitly
specify a format using the /FORMAT qualifier, the MOUNT command looks at the
header label on the tape to determine the format. If you specify a format
different from the format on the tape, you will get the error message "?Bad
directory for device". You will be prompted for a label, if the tape is in
ANSI format. This label is not optional. You will mot be prompted for a
label if the tape is in DOS format or if you mount the tape FOREIGN, The
label is ignored if you specify a label on a DOS tape, and a warning message
is given.
If you do not specify a density or format, this information will be supplied.
The DISMOUNT command has one new qualifier.
/ [NOJUNLOAD Requests that the tape be unloaded from the drive. The
default is /UNLOAD.
The DISMOUNT command will automatically rewind the tape.
RSTS/E V8.8 Release Notes, May 1983 | Page 1-20
New Features of RSTS/E V8.9
1.18.4 COBOL Command
The COBOL command has the following new qualifiers:
e /CHECK now accepts the arguments ALL, [NO]PERFORM, and
[NO]BOUNDS. The default is /CHECK=ALL. [NO]PERFORM and
([NO]BOUNDS control whether or not checking is to be done on
indexes and perform ranges. The arguments can be listed, eg.
/ CHECK= (PERFORM, NOBOUNDS), to check specific cases.
e /CODE=CIS and /CODE=NOCIS control whether or not the compiler
uses CIS (Commercial Instruction Set) in the object module it
produces.
e /DEBUG and /NODEBUG control whether or not your program uses
the COBOL-81 Symbolic Debugger. To use the debugger specify
/DEBUG on both the COBOL and LINK commands.
e /DIAGNOSTICS[=filespec] and /NODIAGNOSTICS control whether or
not the compiler produces a diagnostic file.
e /SHOW, /SHOW=MAP, and /NOSHOW control whether or not the
compiler produces a data division map showing the addresses
for data division entries.
e /SUBPROGRAM indicates that the compiler is compiling a
subprogram.
e /TEMPORARY:device changes the storage area for temporary work
files from SY: to the device specified.
e /TRUNCATE and /NOTRUNCATE control whether or not the compiler
preforms decimal truncation on the values of COMP data items.
e /WARNINGS, /WARNINGS=INFORMATION, and /NOWARNINGS “control
whether or not the compiler issues informational diagnostics
during the compilation.
RSTS/E V8.9 Release Notes, May 1983 Page 1-21
New Features of RSTS/E V8.9 |
1.18.5 INITIALIZE Command for Disks
You can now initialize disks online by using the DCL INITIALIZE command. The
format of the command is: |
INITIALIZE device-name[:] pack-id [/qualifier]
Default values have been set for all options such as number of patterns to run
during bad block checking, retaining the previous bad block file on current
RSTS file structured disks, specifying the pack cluster size, MFD cluster
size, and positioning of the storage allocation table (SATT.SYS). You can
specify values other than the default values by using the INITIALIZE command
qualifiers. INITIALIZE always creates the disk for new files last and no
pre-extending of directories. It creates account [6,1] but not [1,1] or
[1,2].
The command qualifiers are as follows:
/CLUSTER SIZE=n
/DATE=argument
/ [NOJ]EXERCISE[ =argument]
/INDEX=position
/MFD CLUSTER SIZE=n
/PRIVATE —
/PUBLIC
/[NO]QUERY
/[NO]RETAIN
/7[NOJWRITE
See the RSTS/E DCL User's Guide for full detaíl on how to use these
qualifiers.
1.18.6 INITIALIZE Command for Tapes
The INITIALIZE command for tapes now prompts for a label only if the tape to
be initialized in ANSI format. The system default format for tapes is used if
you do not specify a format. You will be told the settings that will be used
for the density and format if you did not specify them.
1.18.7 DCL Commands Via né" CCL
In V8.8, you can create a "$" CCL to point to DCL. Doing so allows access to
DCL for a single command from any keyboard monitor —- for example, you could
type "$COPY FOO BAR" or "$PRINT FOO" from BASIC-PLUS.
See Section 2.3.9 for general information on single-character CCL's.
RSTS/E V8.8 Release Notes, May 1983 Page 1-22
New Features of RSTS/E V8.8
1.11 DSKINT
The online DSKINT.BAS program has been replaced by DSKINT.TSK, which requires
the. RSX run-time system. The new version of DSKINT initializes a disk with
the new RSTS/E file structure and does pattern checking. The online version
of DSKINT provides all the functionality of the offline version with the
exception of formatting. INIT's version of DSKINT needs to be used to format
disks. The dialogue for the online and offline version is the same except for
the FORMAT prompt which is found in the offline version only.
For more information on DSKINT refer to the RSTS/E System Users Guide.
1.12 Layered Product Installation
Because RSTS/E V8.8 contains a new version of RMS, the following layered
products must be re-installed:
COBOL-81
DATATRIEVE
FMS
BASIC-PLUS-2 V1.6 and earlier releases are not supported on RSTS/E V8.8. You
will have to install BASIC-PLUS-2 V2.8§ or V2.1.
Please refer to the chapter 5 RMS Release Notes included with this document
for additional information. `
1.13 BASIC-PLUS-2
1.13.1 Compatibility with RMS and BASIC-PLUS-2 V1.6
User programs compiled with BASIC-PLUS-2 V1.6 cannot be task built with RMS
V2.9. Any BASIC-PLUS-2 V1.6 applications that were task built with RMS V1.8 in
the task image and with no RMS resident libraries will continue to run. If
they were linked against the RMS V1.8 resident library, they should be rebuilt
with RMS V1.8 in the task image and with no RMS resident library or recompiled
using BASIC-PLUS-2 V2.9 or V2.1 and task built against RMS V2.9.
RSTS/E V8.9 Release Notes, May 1983 Page 1-23
New Features of RSTS/E V8.9
1.13.2 New Error Messages
Three new error messages have been added:
185 %RECORDSIZE overflows МАР
186 hfo0limproper error handling
187 ?Illegal record lock clause
1.14 FORTRAN-77
One of the new RMS V2. rules impacting FORTRAN-77 states:
"If you are using disk-overlaid RMS, your ODL cannot make
reference to the RMS 'top-level' modules."
These 'top-level' modules are the [email protected]'op' modules that exist in SYSLIB.
Because the existing overlay descriptor file for the FORTRAN-77 RMS OTS,
LB:RMS11M.ODL, references RMS 'top-level' modules, it is incompatible with RMS
V2.8. Therefore, a new version of the FORTRAN-77 RMS overlay descriptor file
has been supplied on the update kit in this release.
1.15 DATATRIEVE V2.4
V8.8 Autopatch "A" must be installed to make DATATRIEVE V2.4 work.
1.16 Documentation
The RSTS/E Quick Reference Guide is new for V8.8. A replacement for the RSTS/E
Pocket Guide, it summarizes system information (such as file specifications
and device names), DCL commands, system programs (such as PIP and SYSTAT), and
RMS utilities.
Refer to the RSTS/E Documentation Directory for more information about changes
to the manuals for version 8.8.
RSTS/E V8.P Release Notes, May 1983 ‚ Раде 1-28
New Features of RSTS/E V8.8
1.17 V8.9 Release Information
1.17.1 DECnet/E V2.9 Support; Modified Build/Patch Procedure
DECnet/E V2.9 is the only version of DECnet/E supported on RSTS/E.
Beginning with RSTS/E V8.8, certain components of DECnet/E V2.8 will be
maintained by module replacement. For these components, patching and
task-building on-site will no longer be necessary. With update kit "A"
(shipped with the RSTS/E V8.0 distribution), three components of DECnet/E V2.8
are updated with module replacements: NFT, FAL, and NCP. These replacement
modules incorporate all previously-published patches, as well as fixes for
several problems which were not patchable.
Update kit "A" also includes a new version of the build/patch top-level
control file, DECNET.CTL. NOTE that this control file supersedes the
DECNET.CTL file supplied on the DECnet/E V2.89 distribution. The new control
file from update kit "A" will be used to install all future module
replacements, and to apply future patches, when the PATCH option of BUILD is
invoked. You must also use the new DECNET.CTL file to install the DECnet/E
utilities as you build DECnet/E for your V8.8 RSTS/E system.
You will find additional information in the RSTS/E V8.8 Maintenance Notebook.
1.17.2 Feature Patches
Please be aware that any feature patches from previous releases may have been
changed or dropped. Refer to the RSTS/E V8.8 Maintenance Notebook to see all
feature patches, notes, or restrictions which apply to RSTS/E V8.9.
Note that there are no BASIC-PLUS-2 or RMS patches included with this kit.
Article Seq 17.1.1 N describes the update kit included with this release.
RSTS/E V8.0 Release Notes, May 1983 Page 1-25
New Features of RSTS/E V8.9
1.17.3 Mounting and Rebuilding (Cleaning) Disks
The new disk structure of RSTS/E V8. is incompatible with the CLEAN SYS call
(FIP code 2). This call was used by a number of CUSPS in RSTS V7.2. Because of
this restriction, the CLEAN SYS call is now obsolete (see section 2.3.6).
CUSPS are affected as follows: |
1. The CLEAN command in UTILTY has been eliminated.
2. The MOUNT commands in UTILTY and INIT and the $MOUNT command
in BATCH will no longer clean (rebuild) a dirty pack.
The recommended way to mount disks is the DCL. MOUNT command, which will
rebuild disks as needed. You should use FORCE commands in INIT to do this
during system startup. If you do not want to use DCL, you should run ONLCLN
to rebuild each disk prior to using the UTILTY or INIT MOUNT commands.
2.1
2,0 DIFFERENCES BETWEEN RSTS/E V8.8 AND V7.2
System Generation (SYSGEN)
The "RM82/893/05's ? " question has been changed to "RMO2/93/05/88's ? ."
Although the RM8 disk drive was fully supported for RSTS/E V7.2, the
SYSGEN dialogue did not include RM88.
Previously, SYSGEN asked two questions regarding paper tape devices:
"pP,T. READER?"
np, T. PUNCH?"
Because the PR11 Paper Tape Reader is no longer supported, these are
combined into one question:
"p.T. reader/puneh zn
SYSGEN continues to support the PC11 which both reads and punches paper
tape.
The LS11 and LV11 line printer names were removed from the line printer
informational paragraph.
In the disk section, all references to million words have been changed to
mega bytes. The UDA question has been changed to ask for MSCP
controllers.
BASIC-PLUS-2 for the default RTS has been removed from the dialogue.
The maximum number of system wide logicals has been increased to 999.
The default is 25.
A question for "EMT logging" (emulator trap logging) has been added after
the question for Monitor Statistics. If you answer YES to this question,
the monitor being built includes the EMT Logging code. (See section
1.7.2.) In addition, the send/receive code is automatically made resident
(and the corresponding question in the SYSGEN dialogue is skipped).
TSVO5 was added to the long and short form of the TS11 question.
RF disks can no longer be system disks.
The RC25 was added to the long and short form of the MSCP question.
RSTS/E V8.8 Release Notes, May 1983 Page 2-2
Differences Between RSTS/E V8.8 and V7.2
2.2 Initialization Code (INIT.SYS)
In startup, INIT uses a free 8K area of memory to complete the loading of the
monitor. This was the case on systems with a UDA as system disk and is now
the case for all systems. This 8K area is allocated from available memory but
must be between 68K and 124K. It cannot be below 68K because INIT.SYS is still
running while this space is prepared for use and occupies memory up to 62K.
"Available" is defined as either "user" or "run-time system" memory. If no 8K
area can be found, the following error message is returned:
Need at least 8KW non-monitor memory below 124 K to start
You must allow room for this 8K area. If the system default RTS is 8 KW or
larger (for example BASIC-PLUS) there is no problem. Otherwise, you should
allocate "user" space above the RTS and put any desired XBUF at the top of
memory or ending at 512K if you have more than 512KW of memory. You can use
other layouts as long as the required 8 KW area is available between 68K and
124K,
The UNISYS option has been removed from INIT.SYS. You can perform the
function of the UNISYS option by using the DISABLE suboption in the HARDWARE
option to disable the terminal controllers you do not want. This has the
advantage of being selective; you can disable terminal controllers one at a
time as opposed to disabling all as UNISYS does.
The default for keyboard devices has been changed from UNPRIV to PRIV.
The COPY option no longer allows copying to DF (RF11) or DS (RS893/84) disks.
These disks are no longer bootable and, therefore, cannot be used as system
disks. You can still copy to DK (RK#5) disks with the COPY option, even
though the [email protected] is not supported as a system disk.
All device bootstraps were modified for this release. The new bootstraps are
not compatible with the ones used in RSTS/E V7.2 and previous releases. This
change is invisible to the user except in operations that involve setting up a
bootstrap for INIT.SYS ("hooking"). This is done in two places:
1. The COPY option in INIT hooks the output disk when it finishes copying.
Because the bootstraps are different, you cannot copy a V8.8 distribution
medium using a V7.2 or earlier INIT, nor copy a V7.2 or earlier
distribution medium with the V8.8 INIT. The normal procedure of booting
the distribution medium and then invoking the COPY option to set up the
new system disk will work properly. |
RSTS/E V8.P Release Notes, May 1983 Page 2-3
Differences Between RSTS/E V8.9 and V7.2
2.
SAVRES, both the off-line and the on-line version, sets up bootstraps in
two cases: on the first volume of an output saveset (SAVE option), and
on output RSTS disks if there is an INIT.SYS in account [2,1] on the
output disk (RESTORE or IMAGE option). As a result, there are certain
restrictions in the use of SAVRES across versions:
a. The on-line version of V7.2 SAVRES does not run on a v8.0 system, nor
does the V8.9 version run on a V7.2 system.
b. You cannot restore a V7.2 system disk (i.e. any disk that has an
INIT.SYS in account [#,1]) using the V8.8 SAVRES. The recommended way
to restore such a disk is to boot the saveset and run the off-line
(V7.2) SAVRES that resides on the saveset. Likewise, you cannot
restore a V8.9 system disk using the V7.2 SAVRES.
с. You cannot make an image copy of a V7.2 system disk with the V8.2
SAVRES, or a V8.0 system disk with the V7.2 SAVRES. The recommended
way to perform this operation is by booting the system disk to be
copied and using the off-line IMAGE option.
d. You should not use the SAVE option to save a V7.2 system disk with the
V8.7 SAVRES or a V8.2 system disk with the V7.2 SAVRES. Although the
operation succeeds, you would not be able to restore the resulting
saveset because of restriction b and because the SAVRES on the saveset
would be the wrong version. Data disks, (disks that do not contain an
INIT.SYS in [#,1]) can be saved, restored, or image-copied with either
version of SAVRES.
NOTE
There are no compatibility problems with data disks. Any disk
that does not have an INIT.SYS in account [2,1] can be copied
using either version of SAVRES and restored with either
version.
If you fail to observe the restrictions under a, b or e, you will get
either a system disk that cannot be booted, or the following error
message:
???Fatal SAV/RES bug: No BOOT in STB of INIT.SYS
Since there are no longer bootstraps for the DF and DS disks, V8.9 SAVRES
will treat these strictly as data disks. If you restore or image copy a
DF or DS disk and SAVRES finds an INIT.SYS in account [#,1], SAVRES will
print out a warning message to inform you that the output disk will not
be bootable. You could, of course, restore V7.2 DF or DS system disks
with V7.2 SAVRES to make them bootable.
RSTS/E V8.8 Release Notes, May 1983 | Page 2-1
Differences Between RSTS/E V8.8 and V7.2
3. There is also a restriction on booting 1688 bpi magnetic tapes with the
new bootstraps. Due to size restrictions on the bootstrap code, it is
not possible to boot 1698 bpi magnetic tapes on tape formatters other
than Formatter 2.
Because of the change in bootstraps, the HOOK program was changed.
version 8.8 HOOK will work on RSTS V8.8, and it will not work on
V7.2.
The following changes to the SET option have been made:
1. An 8BIT/NO8BIT characteristic has been added to the LP
option of SET. When enabled, this option allows 8 bit
characters to be sent to the printer. This allows the
use of printers with special control characters and
extended character sets which include 8 bit characters.
The 8BIT characteristic replaces patch article seq
3.7.3 F, with the advantage that it only affects line
printers for which screening out all 8 bit characters
is not desirable.
2. The VTAB/NOVTAB line printer characteristic has been
removed. This printer characteristic was added for a
line printer that is no longer supported.
3. A RESET macro has been added to the list of line
options. This option resets all of the characteristics
for a printer to their default values.
Previously all unspecified characteristics were set to RSTS
defaults, regardless of their values before invoking
the SET option. Now unspecified characteristics will
not be changed.
Ц. Set-up Macros for the unsupported LS11 and LV11 printers
have been removed.
RSTS/E V8.9 Release Notes, May 1983 Page 2-5
Differences Between RSTS/E V8./ and V7.2
2.3 Monitor
The RSTS monitor now allows jobs to have a maximum size of 32KW instead of
31KW.
In RSTS/E V8.6 a number of directive changes were made to facilitate the
creation of non-privileged application programs that run detached and perform
services for other jobs. Formerly such programs almost always required
privilege to perform their functions.
To ensure that non-privileged users do not swamp the system with detached
jobs, there exists a "detached job quota." This quota is defined using feature
patch 3.2.6 F; its default value is zero. The quota specifies the number of
detached non-privileged jobs allowed per attached job, i.e. the ratio of
detached to attached jobs. The monitor enforces this quota. Privileged jobs
are not affected by the detached job quota.
2.3.1 ATTACH/REATTACH/SWAP CONSOLE Directive
(UU.ATT: SYS call subfunction 6)
ATTACH Function
If the job being attached by the ATTACH function is running under the same PPN
as the job issuing the ATTACH call, the function is allowed to non-privileged
callers. The PPN specified in the call (which must match the PPN of the job
being attached) now defaults to the caller's PPN if it is passed as zero.
The password field of the ATTACH function is checked only if the job being
attached is running under a PPN different from that of the caller. Note that
this case is still restricted to privileged callers.
Non-privileged users only need to specify the function code (ATTACH), the job
number, and zeros in the rest of the FIRQB (or SYS call argument string). The
PPN is defaulted and the password is not required for matching PPNs.
REATTACH Function
The REATTACH function is now available to non-privileged users to allow a
non-privileged program to attach to a terminal. An additional restriction is
imposed on non-privileged callers - if the terminal being reattached to 15
free (i.e. not currently assigned or opened by anyone) then the REATTACH will
be permitted only if the terminal has been set as a 'non-privileged' device
(using the SET option of INIT.SYS). If the terminal is assigned to the caller
at the time of the reattach, this check is skipped. A privileged user can
'reassign' a terminal to a non-privileged job and, thereby, allow that job to
reattach to the terminal whether or not the terminal is a privileged device.
RSTS/E V8.9 Release Notes, May 1983 Page 2-6
Differences Between RSTS/E V8.8 and V7.2
SWAP CONSOLE Function
The SWAP CONSOLE to another job call is a new subfunction of the
ATTACH/REATTACH directive. It allows two jobs, one of which is detached, to
exchange ownership of a terminal. In effect, this call combines a detach of
the attached job with a reattach of the detached job. Its purpose is to allow
detached 'service' type programs to temporarily obtain ownership of a terminal
to perform certain functions at the request of the program running at that
terminal and then to return ownership of the terminal to the requesting
program when the function is complete.
This function is available to non-privileged jobs. It can be executed by
either the detached job or the attached job. Both jobs must be running under
the same PPN.
Refer to the RSTS/E Programming Manual and the System Directives Manual for
further detail on this directive.
2.3.2 Message Send/Receive Directive
(MESAG, SYS call subfunction 22)
2.3.2.1 Non-privileged SEND/RECEIVE
The "Declare Receiver" system call of BASIC-PLUS and the "Declare Receiver"
subfunction of the .MESAG monitor directive can now be used by non-privileged
jobs. However, the following restrictions are imposed on non-privileged
users:
e Non-blank receiver names must have six characters, and the
last two characters must be the job number (not the job number
¥2) and include a leading zero if appropriate. Blank names
are allowed.
e There is a new quota on the number of RIBs (Receiver ID Block)
per user. The default value of this quota is 3. This quota
can be changed by feature patch Seq 3.1.5 F.
e There 1s a new upper limit on the number of messages pending
per RIB. The default value of this limit is 4. This limit can
be changed by feature patch Seq 3.1.6 F.
e Small buffers cannot be used for the data portion of messages.
XBUF must be used.
e Receivers are not allowed to accept incoming network connects.
e The number of outbound network links per job is limited to 1.
This limit can not be changed by a feature patch.
RSTS/E V8.9 Release Notes, May 1983 Page 2-7
Differences Between RSTS/E V8.9 and V7.2
These restrictions require that the following conditions be satisfied in the
data passed with the BASIC-PLUS system call:
Bytes Parameter Value in non-privileged call
5.19 (name) six characters
(last two are job number)
22 N% 0%
0% 0%
23-24 B% 9%
25 ME within new limit
26 L% 0% (number of inbound links)
29 D% For privileged jobs: 1$0%-255%
where #% yields the maximum of 255%
For non-privileged jobs: ©%-1%
where 9% yields the maximum of 1%
(number of outbound links)
In addition, the number of RIBs that can be declared must be within the new
quota.
Violation of the restriction on the name of the receiver will cause an
2ILLEGAL FILE NAME error to occur. Violation of the other restrictions will
cause a ?PROTECTION VIOLATION error to occur.
On systems using DECnet, mandatory patch Seq 7.1.12 M must be installed. This
patch causes DECnet to enforce the limit on outgoing links per job.
NOTE
Patch Seq 3.1.1 F, published in earlier releases of RSTS/E,
making receiver declaration non-privileged no longer applies.
RSTS/E V8.9 Release Notes, May 1983 Page 2-8
Differences Between RSTS/E V8.9 and V7.2
2.3.2.2 Local Object Types
Prior to Version 8.0, the object type field in a Receiver ID Block (RIB), and
the corresponding field in the receiver declare call, only had meaning for
network receivers. In V8.8, local receivers (if they are privileged) may now
assign themselves an object type.
Local object types defined in V8.9 are:
LOT Use
Г Normal receivers
1 Error Logger (ERRCPY)
2 EMT Logger
64 Reserved for DSKINT
Note that user-written programs should not use any values other than 9 and 2
(an EMT Logger is a user-written program; see Section 1.7.2). All values
other than those listed above are reserved.
2.3.2.3 Send/Receive Extensions for EMT Logging
Some parameters of Send/Receive calls have been assigned special meaning for
EMT Logging; these are described in Section 1.7.2
RSTS/E V8.9 Release Notes, May 1983 | Page 2-9
Differences Between RSTS/E V8.2 and V7.2
2.3.3 Job Creation Directive
(UU.JOB, SYS call subfunction 24)
The Create a Job (Spawn) SYS call has been expanded to allow (a)
non-privileged users to create jobs, and (b) new jobs to be created logged-in.
The following information that describes the new SYS call is presented in
three categories: spawn logged-out, spawn logged-in to run a program, and
spawn logged-in to enter a specified keyboard monitor.
Spawn Logged Out
When used to spawn logged-out jobs, the SYS call is used exactly as it has
been used in the past, i.e., privilege is required and the bytes passed are
described in the current documentation for the SYS call.
Spawn Logged-In to run a Program
The SYS call can now be used to spawn jobs that are automatically logged into
an account. This feature can be used by both privileged and non-privileged
jobs. The new job can be either attached or detached.
For more detail, please refer to the RSTS/E Programming Manual and the System
Directives Manual.
NOTE
Feature Patch 3.1.6 F must be installed before non-privileged jobs can spawn
new jobs that are detached. Also, Feature Patch 3.5.14 must be installed
before non-privileged users can log out leaving detached jobs in that account.
For example, DECWORD spawns spooler jobs in the account where the DECWORD
programs reside. If this is a non-privileged account, it will not be possible
for a user to log out of the account if a spooler is active and the patch
(3.5.14) has not been installed.
Spawn Logged-In to enter Keyboard Monitor
The SYS call can now be used to spawn jobs that enter a keyboard monitor
instead of running a program. This feature can be used by both privileged and
non-privileged jobs. The new job must be attached.
For more detail, please refer to the RSTS/E Programming Manual and the System
Directives Manual.
RSTS/E V8.8 Release Notes, May 1983 Page 2-18
Differences Between RSTS/E V8.8 and V7.2
2.3.4 LOGIN Directive
(uu.LIN, SYS call subfunction 4)
The Login SYS call has been changed to prohibit passwords containing the "2%
character. In V7.2, this restriction was enforced by the LOGIN CUSP: the
change enhances security because possible loopholes (via other programs that
use the Login call but do not perform the check), are eliminated.
2.3.5 LOGOUT Directive
(UU.BYE, SYS call subfunction 5)
The Logout SYS call has been expanded to have three new functions:
1. Disk usage quotas are enforced . All read/write mounted disks are checked,
and if the job is privileged, locked disks are also checked. This
function can be suppressed by a control bit in the call parameters.
д. If the job is non-privileged, the number of detached jobs in the
non-privileged account is compared against a quota of detached jobs
allowed per attached job in that account. If this quota check number is
passed (and also the disk quota check), the job is logged out and killed.
(No return is made to the job.) See also the note in section 2.3.3 above.
3. It is now possible to LOGOUT without closing channels or deassigning
devices. This function can be activated by a control bit in the call
parameters.
For more detail, please refer to the RSTS/E Programming Manual and the System
Directives Manual.
2.3.6 CLEAN Disk Pack Directive
(UU.CLN; SYS call subfunction 2)
In RSTS/E V8.8, the Clean up a Disk Pack SYS call (subfunction code 2) is no
longer supported. The correct way to rebuild (clean) a disk is by using the
ONLCLN utility or the REBUILD option of the DCL MOUNT command. For V8.8 the
SYS call will still work on old format (V7.2) disk packs; however, it will
fail with a ?Protection violation error if used on new format disks. In
future releases the SYS call will be removed. Use of this SYS call on RP814,
RP85, or RP®6 type disks will result in a disk which is incompatible with
RSTS/E V7.2 and earlier systems.
RSTS/E V8.# Release Notes, May 1983 | Page 2-11
Differences Between RSTS/E V8.8 and V7.2
2.3.7 One-shot Spooling Request Directive
(UU.SPL; SYS call subfunction -28)
Changes have been made to the UU.SPL directive to provide support for the new
micro-RSTS spooling package (SPL).
If a UU.SPL directive is issued with a device name of "LP" (indicating a print
request) or a null device name (which defaults to "LP"), the monitor will
first search its message receiver table for the receiver ID of the Micro RSTS
spooler (QMAN). If found, then the print request is sent to that receiver;
if not found, the request is sent to the standard spooling package's receiver
(QUEMAN), as it has in the past. This design provides upward compatability
with the new spooling package; the applications that issue the UU.SPL
directive need no modifications to support the new spooling package.
If both spooling packages are running on the same system, the monitor will
send one-shot print requests to the new spooling package. A feature patch
(3.5.13 F) is provided with version 8.8 to disable routing of one-shot print
requests to the new spooling package, for those installations that prefer to
have all print requests routed to the standard spooling package.
For more detail, please refer to the RSTS/E Programming Manual and the System
Directives Manual. |
2.3.8 RSTS/E Error Message
RSTS/E error message 25, ?Disk pack needs 'CLEANing', has been changed to:
?Disk pack needs REBUILDing
RSTS/E V8.9 Release Notes, May 1983 | | Раде 2-12
Differences Between RSTS/E V8.8 and V7.2
2.3.9 Single-Character CCLs
The V8.8 Monitor can recognize and process certain special characters as
"self-delimiting™ CCL commands. (These characters are "em, "#", and "$",
ASCII 64, 35, and 36 decimal.) If such a character is defined as a CCL, typing
a string beginning with that character at keyboard monitor command level (or
passing such a string to the .CCL directive) will invoke the target CCL
program in the same manner as any CCL, except that no delimiter need follow
the special character. The monitor will automatically insert a blank
character between the CCL character and the rest of the command.
For instance, if you define the "$" character as a CCL with
UT CCL $-=[2, 1]DCL. DCL: PRIV €
then any command of the form "$xxxx" will work (invoking DCL) from any
keyboard monitor (where "xxxx" is any valid DCL command). Should DCL not
recognize the command, it will (as usual) pass it on to the Monitor to be
tried as a RSTS/E CCL. (A special case: should "$" not be defined as a CCL,
"xxxx" will be tried as a CCL, without reference to DCL. This has the effect
of allowing a user to type "$xxxx" (where xxxx is an installed CCL keyword)
whether or not DCL is available on the system; a command such as "$PIP", for
example, will invoke PIP on any usually-configured RSTS/E system.)
Other single-character CCLs operate normally, and may be set up to point to
any program capable of responding to them. The string passed in core common
will have a <space> character inserted following the single-character keyword
if there was no <space> (or <tab>) typed to separate the command character
from its parameters.
The syntax of a valid CCL keyword is now a string of one to nine characters.
If one character long, the keyword may be either a letter or one of the
characters above. If two to nine characters long, the keyword must begin with
a letter; each of the remaining characters may be either a letter or a digit.
This is different from V7.2, which allowed "@" characters to occur in other
than the first position.
RSTS/E V8.P Release Notes, May 1983 a | Page 2-13
Differences Between RSTS/E V8.8 and V7.2 | |
2.3.19 Terminal Service: CHR$ (155%)
As described in section 4.5.3.1 of the RSTS/E Programming Manual, you may use
a CHR$(155%) to transmit an <ESC> character to a terminal (that is, to bypass
the normal translation of an <ESC> to a "$" character). Previous versions of
RSTS/E transmitted the CHR$(155%) without change; all supported terminals
ignored the eighth bit, and "recognized" the received CHR$(155%) as a
CHR$(27%), an <ESC> character. In V8.8, normal terminal output (e.g., not
using binary mode) strips the eighth bit before transmitting any character in
the range from CHR$(128%) to CHR$(159%). (That is, the "C1 controls" are
transmitted as "CS controls".) Specifically, CHR$(155%) is now output as a
true <ESC>, CHR$(27%).
In RSTS V8.9, terminals are by default set up as privileged devices. This is
a security precaution. If you want to allow non-privileged users to open some
or all keyboards as files, you must use the UNPRIV option of the INIT SET
option (see the RSTS/E System Generation Manual.)
2.3.11 “Small Buffers: JDB? Structure Note
One of the small buffers required for each job (the "second job data block",
or JDB2) is now permanently allocated, being assembled into the Monitor at
SYSGEN time. |
The amount of Jlowcore memory required for a particular JOBMAX is not
significantly changed. The permanent allocation is made from the same memory
which is used for the General small-buffer pool. The creation of each new
job, on the other hand, now diminishes the pool by one fewer small buffer.
2.3.12 ECC Error Correction
The ECC hardware error correction algorithm used with the RKP6/7, RM82/3,
[email protected], RM806, and RP84/5/6 families of disks does not always correct multibit
errors properly. The monitor has been modified to cause multibit errors to be
retried instead of being ECC corrected. This change 1is transparent to the
RSTS/E user, except that the error-log will show that errors that appear to be
ECC correctable were retried instead of being ECC corrected. |
RSTS/E V8.0 Release Notes, May 1983 Page 2-14
Differences Between RSTS/E V8.8 and V7.2
2.4 File Processor
Non-privileged users are no longer allowed to mount or obtain write access to
non-file-structured diísks. Feature patches seq 3.5.5 F and 3.5.6 F need to be
installed to permit mounting and obtaining write access to non-file-structured
disks by non-privileged users.
Non-privileged users can reassign a device to another job only if the target
job is logged into the same account. In previous releases of RSTS/E,
non-privileged users were allowed to reassign devices unless the feature patch
to restrict non-privileged use was installed. The File Processor feature
patch has been eliminated.
2.5 Commonly Used System Programs (CUSPs)
This section describes the changes made to the RSTS/E CUSPs (Commonly Used
System Programs) for RSTS/E V8.9.
All supported BASIC-PLUS CUSPs, with the exception of the CPEXER program in
the DEVTST package, can be compiled with any of the three variants of BASIC:
BASIC-PLUS, BASIC-PLUS-2, or CSPCOM (which is described below). The CPEXER
program is compatible with BASIC-PLUS (provided the TRIG and LOG math
functions are generated into BASIC-PLUS) and BASIC-PLUS-2, but not with
CSPCOM. |
CSPCOM (the CUSP Compiler) generates object modules from the BASIC-PLUS system
library programs (CUSPs) that can be task built to run under the RSX run-time
system. This eliminates the need for the BASIC-PLUS run-time system on those
systems which would not otherwise use BASIC-PLUS or BASIC-PLUS-2.
NOTE
CSPCOM is included in the RSTS/E kit as a maintenance tool only.
CSPCOM is not supported for any use other than the compilation
of DIGITAL-supplied utility programs that are included with the
RSTS/E distribution kit.
The use of CSPCOM is not supported for the compilation of the
utility programs supplied with any optional RSTS/E software
product unless the installation guide for that product
specifically states that the software is compatible with CSPCOM.
The version of CSPCOM included on the V8.9 distribution kit
includes all patches previously published for earlier releases.
RSTS/E V8.9 Release Notes, May 1983 | Page 2-15
Differences Between RSTS/E V8.8 and V7.2
ANALYS
Includes changes in DISK, RTS, and LIB sections as noted under SYSTAT.
ATPK
No changes.
Automated Patching Facility Package
This package has been changed to handle module replacements to the CUSPS.
BACKUP
The BACKUP package has been changed to handle both new and old types of disk
structures.
When backup pre-extends accounts upon account creation, the account will be
pre-extended by 1 cluster.
BATCH
The $MOUNT command cannot mount a "dirty" disk. Use $ONLCLN to clean disks
packs before submitting them to a BATCH processor for MOUNTing.
The $BASIC/BP2 switch does not support BASIC-PLUS-2 beyond V1.6. To use later
versions of BASIC-PLUS-2 in BATCH, use commands to invoke the [email protected] compiler and
task builder directly.
BPCREF
No changes.
RSTS/E V8.9 Release Notes, May 1983 Page 2-16
Differences Between RSTS/E V8.8 and V7.2
BUILD
The BUILD program has been changed to allow compilation under the BASIC-PLUS-2
compiler. If you wish to use BASIC-PLUS-2 to compile your programs, you must
answer the following questions in the manner given below:
Run-Time System? RSX
Use CSPCOM <Yes> ? NO
Name of BASIC-PLUS-2 compiler <$BP2IC2> ?
(The third question, which is a new BUILD question, must be
answered with the name and location of the BASIC-PLUS-2
compiler when you installed it - e.g. SY:[1,2]BP2IC2.)
If you wish to use the pre-built CUSPs to build your system, answer RSX to the
Run-Time-System question and YES to the CSPCOM question. BUILD will generate
the commands necessary to copy the pre-compiled tasks from the distribution
media onto your system.
If you create your own BUILD control files, the following restriction applies:
In the BUILD control files, a file name must follow the
'COMPILE' command. (e.g. COMPILE/OBJ/LIN FOOBAR)
COPY
No changes.
DEVTST —- Device Exerciser Package
No changes.
DIRECT
Has been changed to handle both old and new disk structures.
Display Programs ([email protected]/VTSDPY)
No changes.
DSKINT
The DSKINT.BAS program has changed to DSKINT.TSK and requires the RSX run-time
system. Please refer to Section 1.11 of these notes for detailed information.
RSTS/E V8.9 Release Notes, May 1983 Page 2-17
Differences Between RSTS/E V8.8 and V7.2
Error Package
The ERRDIS Summary Report has had blank lines removed for a more compressed
format.
NOTE
See section 2.13 of this manual for updating procedures that
must be followed for the Error Package to function correctly.
FILCOM
No changes.
FIT
No changes.
FLINT
No changes.
GRIPE
No changes.
HELP
HELP has been modified to refer the user to the appropriate manual for more
detailed information on a specific topic. |
HELP no longer gains temporary privileges before opening HELP files. This
will require that all HELP files not meant for non-privileged users must be
set to a protection code of <6P$>. Other HELP files should be set with a
protection code of <48> to allow any user to view them. During the RSTS/E
BUILD all HELP files are set at the correct protection code; however, other
system independent HELP files may require the user to reset the protection
codes. If the message "?Access not granted to file" appears, the HELP file
was not set at the right protection code.
A /CHAIN qualifier has been added to HELP which directs help to chain to a
specified program upon completion. This allows an application to make use of
the help facility by chaining to HELP with a command in core-common followed
by the /CHAIN qualifier to cause a return to the original (or another)
application.
RSTS/E V8.0 Release Notes, May 1983 Page 2-18
Differences Between RSTS/E V8.8 and V7.2
The format is:
7CHLAIN]:"prog-namel ;line-number[ ;core-common-string]]"
where |
prog-name is the file spec of the program to chain to
line-number is the line number to chain to
core-common-string is a string to be placed in
core-common before chaîning
INIT
Since the CLEAN SYS call does not support the V8.P disk structures, INIT will
no longer attempt to automatically rebuild (clean) a disk found to be "dirty"
when processing a MOUNT command. It is recommended that you use ONLCLN to
rebuild any disk suspected of being dirty.
LOGIN
LOGIN now performs quota checks if the user is already logged in and ATTACHes
to another job or HELLOs to another account.
LOGIN now enforces quotas on all disks if logged in and changing accounts.
LOGIN will print a message giving old and new accounts when it is used to
change from one account to another. Feature patch 18.12.2 F has been
eliminated. |
When you log into an account, LOGIN will display the date, time, and terminal
at which the account last logged in.
LOGOUT
LOGOUT now enforces quotas on all disks mounted read/write at logout time.
LOGOUT does not check LOCKED disks if the user is not privileged, since that
user would not be able to access a locked disk to reduce his storage.
MAKSIL
Has been changed to process the new autoload vectors generated in the new TKB.
RSTS/E V8.2 Release Notes, May 1983 Page 2-19
Differences Between RSTS/E V8.8 and V7.2
MONEY
The MONEY program now allows specification of a wildcard account. For
example, all accounts matching [2,%] may be listed.
The dialog has changed in the following manner: 1) there are fewer questions,
2) some questions have changed, and 3) defaults are displayed. The
"Selective?" and "Device?" questions have been removed. The answers to these
questions are determined by the answer given to the "Account?" question. The
questions and their defaults appear below.
Qutput report to < KB:.LST>?
Print passwords <NO>?
Reset <NO>?
Account < SY:[4*,%*]>?
The format of the report has changed slightly. The phrase "with statistics
being reset" appears on a line by itself, and the introductory text lines
(Accounts dump of ...) appear each time the "Account < SY:[4*,%*]>7" question is
answered. |
An asterisk is printed next to the quota if an account is over quota.
For disks with the new disk structure, accounts are printed in ascending
order. For disks with the old disk structure, accounts are sorted by project
number but not programmer number.
There is a single-line command format for privileged users. This format may
be used through the CCL facility or from within a program by chaining to MONEY
at line 30088. Defaults are the same as those given above. The following
switches are avallable:
/PASSWORDS - causes passwords to appear in the report.
Default: passwords do not appear.
/ RESET …— causes statistics to be reset.
Default: statistics are not reset.
/ CHAIN - causes MONEY to chain to a specified program when MONEY is
ready to exit.
The format is:
/CH[AIN]:"prog-name[ ;line-number[ ;core-common-string)]"
RSTS/E V8.P Release Notes, May 1983 Page 2-28
Differences Between RSTS/E V8.8 and V7.2
ODT
No changes.
ONLCLN
To invoke the ONLCLN program via 'RUN $ONLCLN' the user must be privileged.
This is the program invoked by the DCL MOUNT command.
ONLCLN has been changed to handle both old and new type disk structures.
OPSER
At system startup time when the Spooling Package is started, or whenever OPSER
is run:
1. If OPSER is already declared by another job as a message receiver,
then a message will be generated to indicate that the new OPSER
can not stay online and that it will go offline.
2. If OPSER was already declared as a receiver by the calling job,
then an error will be generated to indicate that OPSER will remove
itself as a message receiver and then declare itself again.
3. If OPSER can not obtain required small buffers, it generates
a message to indicate that buffers were not available, and that
it will try again. It will try for about 1 minute to get resources;
upon failure it will notify the user that it is going offline
due to lack of small buffers.
PIP
The PIP program is no longer invoked on a DCL INITIALIZE command for tapes.
RSTS/E V8.9 Release Notes, May 1983 | - Page 2-21
Differences Between RSTS/E V8.9 and V7.2 |
PMDUMP
The following changes were made to PMDUMP in RSTS/E V7.2, but have not yet
been added to the documentation:
PMDUMP now prints information about all the libraries used in the program
being dumped. PMDUMP can read input from .TSK and MAKSIL type .SIL's as well
as .PMD files. Several new switches have also been added:
7 TSK ~ Treat input file as a .TSK (or .SIL) regardless
of file type.
/WIDE - During octal portion of the dump, also print
the ASCII characters.
/START:nn - Starting address of octal dump (does not print
the header portion of the dump).
/END:nn — Ending address of the octal dump (does not
print the header portion of the dump).
QUE
No changes.
QUEMAN
At system startup time when the Spooling Package is started, or whenever
QUEMAN is run:
1. if QUEMAN is already declared by another job as a message receiver,
then a message will be generated to indicate that the new QUEMAN can
not stay online and that it will go offline.
2. if QUEMAN was already declared as a receiver by the calling job,
then a message will be generated to indicate that QUEMAN will remove
itself as a message receiver and then declare itself again.
3. if QUEMAN can not get any small buffers, it generates a message to
indicate that none were available, and that it will try again. It
will try for about 1 minute to get resources, upon failure it will
notify the user that it's going offline due to lack of small buffers.
QUOLST
No changes.
RSTS/E V8.8 Release Notes, May 1983 Page 2-22
Differences Between RSTS/E V8.9 and V7.2 |
REACT
The 'Enter' mode has been changed to fully implement the disk directory
structure changes for RSTS/E V8.8. There are two new questions and two new
print outs.
The new questions are:
Number of Clusters - asks the system manager how many clusters to extend
the UFD (User's file Directory) by. If the response
is zero or nothing, there will be no UFD created for
the account. The pre-extension is useful for known
large accounts (since the monitor will not have to
go through cluster by cluster expansion). The
maximum amount by which the UFD can be extended is 7
and the minimum is 1.
NOTE
ONLCLN and the INIT,SYS REFRESH CLEAN option must examine the
complete contents of every directory during the clean operation.
Pre-extending directories beyond what is needed can therefore
substantially slow the cleaning operation.
Position - asks the system manager where to put the UFD on the
disk. This is a disk cluster number. The default
is to place the directory near the MFD (as specified
when the disk was initialized). A value of -1 will
attempt to place the UFD at the middle of the disk.
Example:
RUN $REACT
REACT 18.0-91 RSTS T8.9-91 * The Computer *
System Account Manager
Function? E
Proj, Prog? 235,2
Disk:Password? SY:BOILER
Quota <9>? 2909
Cluster Size <B>? 16
Number of Clusters (9-7) <1> ? 3
Position <8> ? -1 ;
Account Name? KIRTUS
Account SYP:[235,2]1BOILER Created at DCN's 31185 31213 31229
The new print outs are:
Account....Created - This message prints out confirmation of the creation
of the account and the DCN locations of the UFD.
RSTS/E V8.9 Release Notes, May 1983 : Page 2-23
Differences Between RSTS/E V8.9 and V7.2
The Delete function of the program now requires that you specify a disk name.
No default is accepted. This is because the Delete function will zero the
account before deleting the account.
REORDR
REORDR allows account [1,1] on new RSTS disks to be reordered.
RUNOFF
No changes.
However, as in earlier releases, the PRINT INDEX feature, which requires an
obsolete SORT package, is not supported.
SAVE/RESTORE
Has been changed to handle both old and new disk structures.
SPOOLING PACKAGE
See Section 1.9.
SHUTUP
If a user has an EMT logging program running, SHUTUP will send a shutdown
message to the EMT logger job after the final job killing phase. If the job
doesn't disappear in [email protected] seconds, SHUTUP will kill the job.
SWITCH
No changes.
RSTS/E V8.8 Release Notes, May 1983 Page 2-24
Differences Between RSTS/E V8.8 and V7.2
SYSTAT
The Links/Max field has been changed to Links/InMax/OutMax where InMax is the
number of incoming links and OutMax is the number of outgoing links.
SYSTAT prints the level (old or new) of the mounted disks and also prints the
names of the disk from which libraries and run-time systems were added.
TALK
No changes.
TTYSET
The terminal macros no longer reference other terminal macros in their
definitions, resulting in better performance.
The program size has been reduced by about 4K.
UMOUNT
The UMOUNT program is no longer invoked on a DCL MOUNT or DISMOUNT command for
disks or tapes.
UTILTY
The "SEND KBnn: (message)" command will not return the message "KBnn: is
busy" if KBnn is a pseudo keyboard. UTILTY no longer recognizes the CLEAN
command. Run the ONLCLN program to rebuild disks that are dirty.
RSTS/E V8.2 Release Notes, May 1983
Differences Between RSTS/E V8.8 and V7.2
2.6 DCL
The following changes were made to DCL in RSTS/E V8.8, and are documented
the RSTS/E DCL User's Guide:
All of the DCL feature patches have been re-released; the old patches will
The ALLOCATION qualifier to the COPY and CREATE commands now
accepts any integer. DCL formerly would not allow any integer
larger than 65535. If you specify an integer larger than
8388697 you will get the error ?Syntax error.
The /BLOCK SIZEzn qualifier was added to the COPY command.
This qualifier determines the blocksize of an output magnetic
tape file.
The /CREATE qualifier has been added to the EDIT/EDT command.
The /CREATE qualifier tells EDT to start your edit session
with an empty buffer if the input file you specify does not
exist. When you type EXIT EDT will create a new file.
/NOCREATE will cause EDT to exit immediately if the primary
input file does not exist. The default is /CREATE.
The /DEVICE TYPE qualifier has been added to the SET TERMINAL
command. The SET TERMINAL command currently allows the
following terminal type qualifiers: VIS, 72VT52, /VT55,
/VT188, /LA31, /LA36, /LA38, and /LA129. These terminal types
are valid as arguments to the /DEVICE TYPE qualifier. The
following is a list of all valid terminal types:
ASR33 ASR35 KSR33 KSR35 LA38 LA38S LA36 LA12
LA59 LA1898 LA128 LA189S LA34 LA38 RTP2 VTB5
[email protected] VT5P VI58H VT52 VT55 VT188 VT191 VT182
VT125 VT131 VK1® 2741
If you specify a terminal type other than one of these you
will get the error message '?Not a valid device type - xxxx'.
The /DMS qualifier was added to the LINK command. It allows
you to link a DIBOL program with DMS (Data Management System)
rather than RMS (Record Management Services).
The /ERASE qualifier was added to the DELETE command. This
qualifier requests that the file be written over with zeroes
prior to deletion.
The /OPTIMIZE qualifier has been added to the DIBOL command.
This qualifier will cause the DIBOL compiler to create a
program which takes less space and runs faster. |
not work.
Page 2-25
in
RSTS/E V8.9 Release Notes, May 1983 Page 2-26
Differences Between RSTS/E V8.8 and V7.2
The /FUP qualifier is no longer available in the FORTRAN and LINK commands, as
FORTRAN-IV-PLUS is no longer supported.
The LINK command is much more powerful than before. See Section 1.18.1 for a
description of the new features of this command.
The MOUNT command will automatically rebuild (clean) a disk that needs it, if
the user issuing the command is privileged. See Section 1.18.2 for a detailed
description of the changes to the MOUNT command.
The DISMOUNT command automatically rewinds a tape. It also will unload the
device. See section 1.18.3 for a detailed description of the changes to the
DISMOUNT command.
The INITIALIZE command can initialize both disks and tapes. There are a
number of new qualifiers for this command. See Section 1.18.5 and 1.10.6 for
a detailed description of the changes to this command.
There are two spooling packages for RSTS/E V8.8. A choice must be made at the
time of installation as to which package you want DCL to support. See section
1.9 for the advantages and disadvantages of the two packages. See section 2.7
for information on how to install the proper DCL.
The spooler commands DELETE/ENTRY, DELETE/JOB, PRINT, SHOW QUEUE, SET
QUEUE/ENTRY, SET QUEUE/JOB, and SUBMIT have added capabilities. Refer to the
RSTS/E DCL User's Guide for a detailed description of these commands.
The SET TERMINAL command now accepts the /VK188 qualifier. This declares the
terminal to be a VK199, or "GIGI", graphics terminal. /VK199 is equivalent to
/VT198 except that the width for the VK188 is 84.
The DIBOL command has the /DEBUG and /NODEBUG qualifiers to allow use of the
DIBOL Debugging Technique (DDT). To use DDT specify /DEBUG on both the DIBOL
and LINK commands.
The SET and SHOW commands now prompt for "What:" if no option is given.
The BASIC command will switch you into BASIC-PLUS-2 by default. Patch
Seq 20.2.2 F may be applied to change the default to BASIC-PLUS.
DCL assumes that the BASIC-PLUS-2 keboard monitor is called BP2. Patch
seq 20.2.3 may be applied to have DCL assume a different name.
DCL takes fuller advantage of DECnet/E capabilities:
e The /TOTAL qualifier is now legal with network DIRECTORY
operations. Formerly, it was legal only for local DIRECTORY
operations.
e The PRINT command allows printing of a remote file on a local
printer.
RSTS/E V8.8 Release Notes, May 1983 Page 2-27
Differences Between RSTS/E V8.89 and V7.2
e The SUBMIT command allows a remote file to be submitted to a
local bateh processor.
There are several new messages, many of which are only applicable to the MICRO
RSTS/E spooling package. Refer to the RSTS/E DCL User's Guide to see a
complete list.
One error message has been added and one has been changed that is not
reflected in the RSTS/E DCL User's Guide. The following was added:
?Invalid node name |
The node name you specified, although syntactically correct, contained
more than six characters. The Network File Transfer program (NFT)
will not accept node names more than six characters in length.
The following was changed:
?Too many elements in list
Replaces ?Too many items in list. It occurs when you indicate more
file specifications on the command line than the command allows.
NOTE
For DCL to work properly, all of the standard CUSPs and
certain layered products (DECnet/E, COBOL-81, DIBOL,
FORTRAN/FOR, and FORTRAN/77) must be installed in account
SY:[1,2].
The DCL HELP file has been changed to reflect the new features
of DCL.
Refer to article sequence number 28.1.4 N in the RSTS/E V8.9 Maintenance
Notebook for a description of some of the differences between DCL and
BASIC-PLUS keyboard monitor environments.
RSTS/E V8.9 Release Notes, May 1983 Page 2-28
Differences Between RSTS/E V8.8 and V7.2
2.7 DCL Installation
There are two versions of DCL available. One version supports the micro-RSTS
spooling package and the other supports the standard RSTS/E spooling package.
For information on the differences between the two spooling packages see
sections 1.9.
During the BUILD phase at installation time, you must choose the version of
DCL you want to use. The DCL build phase will type:
Two versions of the DCL keyboard monitor are available: one
recognizes commands for the standard RSTS/E spooling package: the
other recognizes commands for the micro-RSTS spooling package.
Type MICRO to install DCL which supports the micro-RSTS spooling
package. Type STANDARD to install DCL which supports the standard
spooling package. | |
Which version of DCL do you wish to install <STANDARD> ?
If you answer "STANDARD" (the default), you will install the DCL that supports
the standard RSTS/E spooling package. If you answer "MICRO", you will install
the DCL that supports the new spooling package.
There is a different help package for each of the DCL versions. One help
package descibes the micro-RSTS spooling commands, and the other describes the
standard spooling commands. If you answer "STANDARD" to the above question
DCL will reference the help file to SY:[1,2]DCL.HLP. This file will be copied
onto your system. If you answer "MICRO" to the above question, then DCL will
reference DCLA.HLP in the same account. Thus, it is possible to have both
help files on your system concurrently.
It is not possible to install a single DCL that supports both spooling
packages concurrently. See section 1.9 for details on using both spoolers on
the same system.
: RSTS/E V8.8 Release Notes, May 1983 | | Page 2-29
Differences Between RSTS/E V8.8 and V7.2?
2.8 RSX Emulator and Utilities Package
A11 of the RSX utilities and libraries are compatible with the corresponding
utilities in RSX-11M V4.8. |
The name of SLOTKB.TSK has been changed to STK. TSK.
The new TKB and the new SYSLIB are incompatible with the old TKB and the old
SYSLIB. The RSX package must be completely installed. The old RSX and the
new RSX can not be mixed. This is because of changes made in the AUTOLOAD
code and bug fixes.
The RSX keyboard monitor CLEAN command has been removed.
If you include the RSX Emulator in your Monitor, the ALUN$ directive will
accept user logicals. However, the logical must not be more than two
characters.
2.9 RT11 Emulator
The RT11 keyboard monitor CLEAN command has been removed.
MACRO no longer supports the .WEAK directive.
2.19 BASIC-PLUS
NOEXTEND/ EXTEND - BASIC-PLUS has changed its default from NOEXTEND mode to
EXTEND mode in this release of RSTS/E. This will make BASIC-PLUS compatible
with BASIC-PLUS-2 and allow the use of long variable names in programs,
possibly requiring less documentation within the program. Feature patch
Seg 4.1.4 F may be used to change the default from EXTEND mode to NOEXTEND
mode. Users will still be able to specify these modes within their programs .
IMMEDIATE MODE - Starting with this release of RSTS/E, BASIC-PLUS will not
allow, as the default, immediate mode statements to be executed from a program
file being read by BASIC-PLUS as a result of execution of the "OLD" or
"APPEND" commands. Since this feature is not compatible with other DIGITAL
products, "no immediate mode from .BAS files" will become the default.
Feature patch Seq 4.1.5 F may be used to allow your users to continue using
immediate mode from .BAS files. |
RSTS/E V8.9 Release Notes, May 1983 Page 2-39
Differences Between RSTS/E V8.8 and V7.2
SEND/RECEIVE: SYS(CHR$(6%)+CHR$(18%)+ . . .) - Future releases of RSTS/E will
not support SYS call 18. SYS call 22 replaces SYS call 18 and has been
available on RSTS/E for several releases. Article Seq 4.1.9 F contains a
patch that causes BASIC-PLUS to make note of all occurrences of the obsolete
SYS call. You may wish to utilize this patch to create a temporary version of
BASIC-PLUS in order to track down and alter all instances of SYS call 18 in
your programs. (It should not be applied to the version of BASIC-PLUS used to
compile and run Digital supplied RSTS/E CUSPs.)
2.19.1 Handling of floating point numbers
In previous releases, many SPRs have been submitted concerning floating point
operations. In an effort to minimize customer confusion in the future, we are
including here two typical SPRs and their responses.
The first problem involves possible inaccuracies with floating point numbers.
Please note that although this example uses BASIC-PLUS as an example, the same
is true of BASIC-PLUS-2.
PROBLEM ABSTRACT 1:
The BASIC statement PRINT INT(.16233*19E4), returns the value 16233, for
single precision and 16232 for double precision.
The aberration you are observing is due to the ¡inherent inaccuracy of the
floating point number system. Consequently let us assure you that the problem
has nothing to due with any of your own code, the BASIC-PLUS software you are
invoking, or the machine you are running on.
The floating point number system is an attempt to represent a broad range of
infinite precision values with only a finite number of bits. This system has
been adopted in some form or another by all computer systems performing
scientific application and is consequently widely used.
The floating point number system is analogous to performing decimal arithmetic
with only a finite number of significant digits. Using only a finite number
of significant digits means that some of the values you would like to
represent will contain small inaccuracies, and that results of arithmetic
operations will have to be rounded to the proper number of digits. Consider
the following sequence of operations:
(1) int(99%(18799)) = int(18) = 18.
RSTS/E V8.8 Release Notes, May 1983 Page 2-31
Differences Between RSTS/E V8.9 and V7.2
This statement is algebraicly correct. However, suppose the calculations were
carried out using a finite number of significant digits, say five. Notice
that 189/99 = .19101891819189..., and therefore if only five significant bits are
used, 18/99 = .189181, which is slightly less than the actual value. Using
only five significant digits equation (1) becomes:
(2) int(99.098%*.18191) = int(9.99999888)
Since only five significant digits are being used, the result of the product
must be rounded to five places. Now 9.999998#8 correctly rounded to five
digits is 10.998, so that equation (2) becomes:
(3) int(99.090*.19191) = int(19.099) = 19.
Notice that even though the finite representation of 19/99 was inexact, the
rounding procedure compensated for this and the correct answer was obtained.
Now, suppose the number of significant digits is doubled (to increase
accuracy). In this case 19/99 = .1812191918 and equation (1) now becomes
(4) int(99.PO000000%*.1919191918) = int(9.999999999900000000) .
Again, the result of the product contains too many digits and must be rounded.
Notice this time however that the correctly rounded product is 9.999999999, so
that equation (4) becomes
(5) int(99.90000000*. 1919191919) = int(9.999999999) = 9.
In this case, the rounding did not compensate for the initial error in
representing 18/99. Also notice that the difference in the two results is due
only to the number of significant digits used and the rounding procedure, it
has nothing to due with the integer function.
The problem that you have observed is essentially the same as the example
above with 19E4 playing the role of 99 and .16233 playing the role of 18/99.
The only difference is that on the machine the arithmetic is performed with a
finite number of binary digits, instead of a finite number of decimal digits.
This difference is important to the problem because while .16233 can be
represented in a finite number of decimal digits, it cannot be represented in
a finite number of binary digits. (To convince you that this is possible,
notice that 1718 = .1 in base 19, but 1/18 = .0991199119011021199119911... in
base 2)
RSTS/E V8.8 Release Notes, Мау 1983 | Page 2-32
Differences Between RSTS/E V8.8 and V7.2
In conclusion then, the statement
PRINT INT(.16233%18E4)
is returning the correct value in both the single and double precision cases.
The difference you are observing is due to the inherent inaccuracy of the
floating point computation .16233*19E4, which returns slightly different
values for the different data types.
The second area of confusion is with mixed mode arithmetic when using
BASIC-PLUS. This topic only pertains to BASIC-PLUS, not BASIC-PLUS-2.
PROBLEM ABSTRACT 2:
The BASIC-PLUS program:
190 A%(2) = 9%
28 PRINT A%(2) + (32767 + 2)
does not produce the expected result (32769).
BASIC-PLUS will print -32767 when the given program is run. The reason for
this is that the constants 2 and 32767 are ambiguous constants. To force a
floating point representation of an integer constant, end it with a decimal
point. To force an integer representation of a constant, end it with a %
character. Constants without a decimal point or % character are termed
ambiguous.
To detemine if an ambiguous constant will have an integer or a floating point
representation, BASIC-PLUS uses the following rule. If an integer variable or
constant occurs anywhere to the left of the ambiguous constant, BASIC-PLUS
represents it in integer format. Otherwise, BASIC-PLUS treats the ambiguous
constant as a floating point number.
In the example program the integer variable A%() does occur to the left of the
ambiguous constants 2 and 32767, and as a result they are treated as integers.
Because they are integers, the entire expression is evaluated as an integer,
and the result is -32767. |
This topic is covered in more detail in the BASIC-PLUS Language Manual under
the topic of "Mixed Mode Arithmetic”.
RSTS/E V8.0 Release Notes, May 1983 a — Page 2-33
Differences Between RSTS/E V8.0 and Y7.2 |
2.11 Documentation
The following manuals have been updated or revised for RSTS/E V8.9:
RSTS/E System Generation Manual
RSTS/E System Manager's Guide
RSTS/E DCL User's Guide
RSTS/E Task Builder Reference Manual
RSTS/E Programming Manual
RSTS/E System Directives Manual
Refer to the RSTS/E Documentation Directory and the Summary of Technical
Changes in each updated or revised manual for more information.
2.12 Upgrading From RSTS/E V7.2 to RSTS/E V8.0
when upgrading from RSTS/E V7.2 or earlier releases to RSTS/E V8.8, the
on-line SYSGEN feature of RSTS/E cannot be used on a V7.2 system to generate
your first V8.4 system. Due to differences between earlier releases of RSTS/E
and RSTS/E V8.0, the first RSTS/E V8.0 system generated must be generated
off-line on a newly initialized disk.
Because of changes to the ERRLOG.FIL file required due to the increased
function of the error-logging programs, earlier versions of ERRLOG.FIL must be
deleted prior to the initial running of the RSTS/E V8.0 ERRINT/ERRCPY. ERRCPY
will create and initialize a new ERRLOG.FIL when it determines that the file
is not present.
Because of changes to the ERRDAT.FIL file, it must be updated by running
RSTS/E V8.7 ERRBLD prior to the initial running of the RSTS/E V8.0 ERRINT.
These procedures will avoid any conflict that may be caused by inconsistencies
between the two versions,
NOTE
When installing FMS V1.5 on RSTS/E V8.8, do not use the FMS
patch entitled "FMSTIO" which is described in the FMS-11/RSTS
Installation Guide and Release Notes, March 1982, AA-L324A-TC.
It is also in the FMS distribution kit.
This patch is not necessary when installing FMS with
RSTS/E V8.0.
RSTS/E V8.2 Release Notes, May 1983 Page 2-34
Differences Between RSTS/E V8.9 and V7.2
2.13 01d Problems Corrected
Various system problems found after the release of RSTS/E V7.2 were fixed in
RSTS/E V8.8. All applicable mandatory RSTS/E Software Dispatch articles
published through March 1983 have been incorporated into RSTS/E V8.8.
2.14 Distribution Media
RSTS/E V8.2 is distributed on the following media:
9-Track Magnetic Tape - 889 BPI (TU19/TE19/TS93/TU16/TE16/TU45/TU77)
9-Track Magnetic Tape - 1699 BPI (TS11/TE16/TU77)
RK95 Disk Cartridge
RK96 Disk Cartridge
[email protected] Disk Cartridge
RLO1 Disk Cartridge
RLÿ2 Disk Cartridge
Please refer to Section 3.9 of these Release Notes for more information on the
distribution kits.
RSTS/E V8.2 Release Notes, May 1983 Page 2-35
Differences Between RSTS/E V8.8 and V7.2
2.15 Optional Software
Optional software supported by RSTS/E V8.9 includes the following:
ADE V2.0/V2.1
BASIC-PLUS-2 V2.8/V2.1
COBOL-11 v4.4
COBOL-81 V1.0/V1.1/V1.2
DATATRIEVE V2.p/vV2.4
DECAL V2.9
DECMAIL/RSTS V1.9
DECnet/E V2.8
DECWORD/DP V1.1/V1.2
DIBOL V4.5/V5.8
DIBS/CTS-509 V1.9
DMS-598 V2.1
DX/RSTS V3.1
FMS-11 V1.5
FORTRAN IV V2.5/V2.6
FORTRAN-77 YV4.0/V4.1
GIGI CAI PRIMER V1.9
GIGI SOFTWARE V1.9
INDENT V1.1/V1.2
MENU-11/RSTS V1.2
PLXY-11/RSTS V1.1
REGIS CAI PRIMER V1.9
RSTS/E-2788 (CTS-589/2788) V3.0
RSTS/E 3271 Protocol Emulator V2.1
RSTS/E High Performance 2788/3788 Protocol Emulator V1.1
SPM-RSTS/E V1.0
NOTE
Earlier versions of the above products are not supported on
RSTS/E V8.9.
2.16 Support for RSTS/E V7.2
RSTS/E V7.2 will be supported for 6 months after the release of RSTS/E V8.8.
3.8 RSTS/E V8.9 Distribution Kits
3.1 Distribution Kit Order Numbers
This chapter provides you with the most current order numbers for the RSTS/E
distribution kits and the RSTS/E update kits. It also provides you with the
most current order numbers for the DECnet/E V2.8 and RJ2788 V8.8 software
distribution kits. For the most current order numbers of other optional
software kit(s) see the bill of materials. Your RSTS/E System Generation
Manual tells you to check these order numbers prior to beginning the actual
system generation. | |
DIGITAL sends you distribution kits on one of the following:
e 9-track magnetic tape (890bpi)
e 9-track magnetic tape ([email protected]@bpi)
e RK/5 disk cartridge
e RLP1 disk cartridge
e RLÿ2 disk cartridge
e RK/P6 disk cartridge
e [email protected] disk cartridge
3.2 RSTS/E V8.9 Distribution Kit
The RSTS/E V8.2 distribution Kit consists of the tapes or disks that contain
the programs and files you need to perform a system generation. This section
provides the order numbers for the RSTS/E V8.9 distribution kits. You should
compare the numbers on the tapes or disks that make up your kit to the numbers
shown here, when you are instructed to do so by the RSTS/E System Generation
Manual.
RSTS/E V8.0 Distribution Kits
DEC Order Number
9-Track Magnetic Tape
(800 bpi)
AP-2773K-BC
AP-2753J-BC
AP-C725J-BC
[email protected]
AP-C883E-BC
AP-V35GA-BC
AP-V351A-BC
9-Track Magnetic Tape
(1699 bpi)
BB-H75 1K-BC
BB-V35 3A-BC
RKÿ5 Disk Cartridge
AN-277 1K-BC
AN-2751J-BC
AN-5444J-BC
AN-M276C—BC
AN-C885E-BC
— AN-V187A-BC
AN-V488A-BC
[email protected] Disk Cartridge
AM-2774K-BC
AM-V356A-BC
RK97 Disk Cartridge
AY-D526K-BC
RLO1 Disk Cartridge
AX-D527K-BC
AX-D528J-BC
AX-V354A-BC
AX—V355A-BC
RLA? Disk Cartridge
BC-J[email protected]
BC-V352A-BC
Pack ID
SYSGNK
CSP180
csP288
CSP380
CSPUBO
CSP580
CSP689
SYSGNK
CSP180
SYSGNK
SYSGNK
CSP189
CSP286
CSP380
SY SGNK
CSP180
RSTS/E
RSTS/E
RSTS/E
RSTS/E
RSTS/E
RSTS/E
RSTS/E
RSTS/E
RSTS/E
RSTS/E
RSTS/E
RSTS/E
RSTS/E
RSTS/E
RSTS/E
RSTS/E
RSTS/E
RSTS/E
RSTS/E
RSTS/E
RSTS/E
RSTS/E
RSTS/E
RSTS/E
RSTS/E
Label Title
v8.8
v8.0
v8.0
v8.0
v8.0
v8.0
v8.8
v8.0
v8.0
v8.0
v8.8
v8.0
v8.0
v8.0
v8.8
v8.0
v8.9
v8.0
v8.0
v8.0
SYSGNK
CSP180
CSP280
CSP380
CSP48G
CSP580
CSP680
SYSGNK
CSP180
SYSGNK
CSP180
CSP280
CSP380
[email protected]
CSP580
CSP686
SYSGNK
CSP18G
SYSGNK
SYSGNK
CSP180
CSP289
CSP389
SY SGNK
CSP 180
8MT9
8MT9
8MT9
8MT9
8MT9
8MT9
8MT9
16MT9
16MT9
RK5
RK5
RK5
RK5
RK5
RK5
RK5
RK6
RK6
RK7
RL1
RL1
RL1
RL1
RL2
RL2
Page 3-2
RSTS/E V8.0 Distribution Kits Page 3-3
3.1.2 RSTS/E V8.9 Update Kit
This section provides the order numbers for the RSTS/E V8.4 Update Kit A.
This kit consists of the tape(s) or disk(s) that contain feature and mandatory
patches and replacement modules. You receive this kit approximately every
three months between releases, and the kits are labeled A, B, C, and so forth.
Because each kit is cumulative, use the most current one, For example, Update
Kit C contains all of the patches and replacement modules that were on Update
Kits A and B plus some new patches and replacement modules. Pack IDs for disk
update kits are always in the form "Patchz", where "2" is the version of the
update kit.
DEC Order Number Pack ID Label Title
9-Track Magnetic Tape
(897 bpi)
AP-PO13A-BC — RSTS/E V8.0 Update A 8MT9
9-Track Magnetic Tape
(1600 bpi)
[email protected]#16A-BC — — RSTS/E V8.4 Update A 16MT9
[email protected] Disk Cartridge
AN-PG14A-BC PATCHA RSTS/E V8.8 Update A RK5
RKG6 Disk Cartridge
[email protected] PATCHA RSTS/E V8.8 Update A RK6
RKG7 Disk Cartridge
AY-P219A-BC PATCHA RSTS/E V8.4 Update A RKY
RLO1 Disk Cartridge
AX-P917A-BC PATCHA RSTS/E V8.8 Update A RL1
RLO? Disk Cartridge
BC-P815A-BC PATCHA RSTS/E V8.4 Update A RL2
RSTS/E V8.9 Release Notes, May 1983 Page 3-4
RSTS/E V8.8 Distribution Kits
3.1.3 DECnet/E V2.8 Software Kit
This section provides the order numbers for the DECnet/E V2.8 Software Fit.
The reason for providing you with the order numbers for this particular
optional software is that one of the configuration questions asks if you want
to support DECnet/E. If you answer YES to this question, then a later task
asks you to mount the correct tape or disk on which you received the
programs and files.
(See Phase U4 in the RSTS/E System Generation Manual.)
DEC Order Number Pack ID Contents
9-Track Magnetic Tape
(899 bpi)
AP-M478A-BC — DECnet/E Programs and Files
9-Track Magnetic Tape
(16989 bpi)
BB-M481A-BC — DECnet/E Programs and Files
[email protected] Disk Cartridge
AN-M4Y79A—-BC DECNTC DECnet/E Programs and Files
RKÿ6 Disk Cartridge
AM-M483A-BC DECNTC DECnet/E Programs and Files
[email protected] Disk Cartridge
MY-MUBUA-BC DECNTC DECnet/E Programs and Files
RL91 Disk Cartridge
MX-M482A-BC DECNTC DECnet/E Programs and Files
RLO? Disk Cartridge
BC-MUBBA-BC DECNTC DECnet/E Programs and Files
RSTS/E V8.9 Release Notes, May 1983 Page 3-5
RSTS/E V8.8 Distribution Kits
3.1.4 RJ2788 Software Kit Order Numbers
This section provides the order numbers for the RJ2788 V3.8 Software Kits.
DEC Order Number Pack ID Contents
9-Track Magnetic Tape
(899 bpi)
AP-2636D-BC — RJ2789 Programs and Files
9-Track Magnetic Tape
(1698 bpi)
BB-K17 3A-BC —— RJ2789 Programs and Files
RK95 Disk Cartridge
AN-2633D--BC ORCOAD RJ2789 Programs and Files
RKG6 Disk Cartridge
AM-C729D-BC ORCOAD RJ2788 Programs and Files
[email protected] Disk Cartridge
AY-H349D-BC ORCOAD RJ2789 Programs and Files
RLA1 Disk Cartridge
AX-H339D-BC ORCOAD RJ2789 Programs and Files
RLG2 Disk Cartridge
BC-K172A-BC ORCOAD RJ2788 Programs and Files
After you check the order numbers for all your kits, return to Phase 1, Task 2
of your RSTS/E System Generation Manual to find out the next task you should
perform.
RSTS/E V8.8 Release Notes, Мау 1983 Page 3-6
RSTS/E V8.8 Distribution Kits
3.1.5 Location of Control Files
DIGITAL distributes RSTS/E system programs, bundled software, and optional
software on control files. These control files are located on the
distribution tapes or disks. You process these control files during Phase 8
of system generation to build the system programs, bundled software, and
optional software your installation needs.
This section shows where each of the control files is located. Be sure to
keep this section of the release notes open while you are performing Phase 8
of system generation.
The control files used to build the system library and program packages are
listed on the next page.
The name immediately above each list is the Pack ID. For example, SYSGNK is
the pack ID of the RL91 distribution disk that contains the RSX.CTL, TECO.CTL,
and MICRO. CTL control files. Likewise, CSPI88 is the name of the 808 BPI
distribution tape that contains the MICRO.CTL, RSX.CTL, and TECO.CTL control
files.
In the case of magnetic tape distribution media, the control files have been
arranged to limit the number of times that the tape must rewind if the control
files are specified in the order in which they are listed on the next page.
Note that if more than one control file is used, the files must be specified
in the order listed on the next page. For example, if you are building the
Spooling and Operator Services Package, the Device Exerciser Package, and some
of the unsupported programs (and your distribution tape is 822 BPI), the order
in which you should specify the control files is SPLER.CTL, DEVTST.CTL, and
UNSUPP.CTL.
RSTS/E v8.p Releas
RSTS/E V8.0 Distri
9-Track Magnetic Tape (89
[email protected] Disk Cartridge:
9-Track
SYSGNK:
CSP4BP :
DEVTST.CTL
UNSUPP.CTL
— > ¡A EE
TECO .CTL
MICRO .CTL
Magnetic Tape (1688 BPI)
— F— a НР
RSX .CTL
BUILD .CTL
BIGPRG.CTL
DCL .CTL
HELP .CTL
EDT .CTL
SPLER .CTL
MICRO .CTL
e Notes, May 1983
bution Kits
cSP180:
BUILD .CTL
BACKUP.CTL
SORT .CTL
CSP18ß:
«ата она ча чо La
BUILD .CTL
BIGPRG.CTL
DCL .CTL
.CTL
EDT .CTL
HELP
cSP188:
BACKUP. CTL
rsx .CTL
RMS11 .CTL
.CTL
.CTL
DEVTST.CTL
UNSUPP.CTL
SPL .CTL
SORT
TECO
ÿ BPI) or
— ja fu wa
MICRO .CTL
RSX .CTL
TECO .CTL
cSP68ßB:
SPLER .CTL
BACKUP.CTL
DEVTST. CTL
UNSUPP.CTL
rkg5 Disk Cartridge:
BIGPRG.CTL
DCL .CTL
HELP .CTL
EDT .CTL
Page 3-7
RSTS/E V8.8 Release Notes, Мау 1983 | | Page 3-8
RSTS/E V8.8 Distribution Kits
RL92 Disk Cartridge
CSP188:
SYSGNK:
RSX .CTL BACKUP.CTL
BUILD .CTL RSX .CTL
BIGPRG.CTL RMS11 .CTL
DCL .CTL SORT .CTL
HELP .CTL TECO .CTL
EDT .CTL DEVTST.CTL
SPLER .CTL UNSUPP.CTL
MICRO .CTL SPL .CTL
[email protected] Disk Cartridge:
SYSGNK: CSP188:
RSX CTL BACKUP.CTL
BUILD .CTL RSX .CTL
BIGPRG.CTL RMS11 .CTL
DCL .CTL SORT .CTL
HELP .CTL TECO CTL
EDT .CTL SPL .CTL
SPLER .CTL
MICRO .CTL
DEVTST.CTL
UNSUPP.CTL
RKP7 Disk Cartridge:
SYSGNK:
RSX .CTL
BUILD .CTL
BIGPRG.CTL
DCL .CTL
HELP .CTL
EDT .CTL
SPLER .CTL
BACKUP.CTL
MICRO .CTL
RMS11 .CTL
SORT .CTL
TECO .CTL
DEVTST.CTL
UNSUPP. CTL
SPL .CTL
va. Release Notes, May 1983 Page 3-9
v8.90 Distribution Kits
Contents of Control Files
s of each of the control files distributed on
section explains the content
RSTS/E distribution kit, See Phase 8 of the RSTS/E system Generation
1 for instructions on how to process these control files.
y .CTL, BACKUP. CTL, BIGPRG.CTL, SPLER .CTL, DEVTST.CTL
Contain the commands necessary to build the standard RSTS/E system
library. The exact contents of these files are described in Appendix
of the RSTS/E System Generation Manual .
.CTL
Contains the commands necessary to build the RSX Run-Time System and
support utilities. Note that you must build RSX before puilding EDT and
most optional layered products.
3T .CTL
Contains the commands necessary to build the pDP-11 SORT package - Note
that you must build RSX and then RMS before puilding the SORT package-
d for SORT-11 through September 1982 have
Note that all patches publishe
sion of SORT-11 included ON the
already been applied to the ver
distribution tape or disk.
cL .CTL
Contains the commands necessary to build pCL and its associated programs
and files.
HELP .CTL
contains the commands necessary to build the HELP system program and its
associated data files.
EDT .CTL
o build EDT V2.9. Note that EDT uses
Contains the commands necessary t
must build RSX before you
the RSX run-time system and utilities, SO you
can build EDT.
RSTS/E V8.8 Release Notes, May 1983 | Page 3-18
RSTS/E V8.9 Distribution Kits
SPL .
TECO
CTL
Contains the commands necessary to build the new micro-RSTS Spooling
package. Note that the new spooling package cannot be started until you
build the RSX run-time system.
.CTL
Contains the commands necessary to build a number of TECO programs. The
BUILD program should be used with this file if you plan to install TECO
on your system. In addition to the TECO Run-Time System, this command
file will install several TECO programs which we have found to be
generally useful.
For documentation on the new features of TECO, the new TECO programs, and
instructions for tailoring the TECO Run-Time System for your system, see
the file TECORN.DOC on the distribution kit.
UNSUPP.CTL
Contains the commands necessary to build a number of programs which,
though unsupported, are used extensively by the RSTS/E development group.
They are included because you may find these programs, or modified
versions of them, to be useful on your system.
Unsupported BASIC-PLUS programs are not supplied in pre-compiled form
(.TSK), but only in source form (.BAS). Be sure to build the unsupported
components using the BASIC-PLUS run-time system.
NOTE
The programs built by UNSUPP.CTL are NOT released products
supported by DIGITAL for use on RSTS/E, and their inclusion on
the distribution kit does not imply recommendation or
endorsement by DIGITAL regarding their use. There is no
commitment by DIGITAL to continue to include any of these
modules in future distributions of RSTS/E. Each of these
modules is to be considered "user supported".
The RSTS/E Development Group would like to be informed of any
problems with or suggestions concerning these components as
supplied with RSTS/E V8.8. A reasonable effort will be made to
respond to such feedback, although problem fixes cannot be
guaranteed. If you ‚choose to provide reports on unsupported
components via the SPR mechanism, please check Priority 5,
"Documentation/ Suggestion".
RMS11.CTL
Contains the commands necessary to build RMS V2.9.
RSTS/E V8.9 Release Notes, May 1983 Page 3-11
RSTS/E V8.8 Distribution Kits
3.2 SORT-11
SORT-11 V2.8 is distributed as a part of RSTS/E V8.8. Note that as in RSTS/E
V7.2, all output files will be made non-contiguous by default. (Contiguous
input files by default will produce non-contiguous output files, unless the
/CO switch is specified for the output file.)
3.3 EDT V2.B
EDT V2.8 is included as part of RSTS/E V8.8. This version of EDT must be built
by each site, since you have a choice of 3 configurations of the editor. See
Phase 8 of the RSTS/E System Generation Manual for installation instructions.
3.4 Unsupported Components
NOTE
The following modules are NOT released products supported by
DIGITAL for use on RSTS/E, and their inclusion on the
distribution kit does not imply recommendation or endorsement by
DIGITAL regarding their use. There is no commitment by DIGITAL
to continue to include any of these modules in future
distributions of RSTS/E, Each of these modules is to be
considered "user supported”.
The RSTS/E Development Group would like to be informed of any
problems with or suggestions concerning these components, as
supplied with RSTS/E V8.8. A reasonable effort will be made to
respond to such feedback, although problem fixes cannot be
guaranteed. If you choose to provide reports on unsupported
components via the SPR mechanism, please check Priority 5,
"Documentation/ Suggestion."
RSTS/E V8.8 Release Notes, May 1983 Page 3-12
RSTS/E V8.8 Distribution Kits
3.4.1 RNO
RNO is available from the DECUS library and is widely used by many users of
RSTS/E. It is included on the distribution kit for the convenience of those
users who wish access to this program.
RNO is a variant of the RUNOFF program (which is part of the RSTS/E library of
system programs). RNO is written in MACRO-11 and generally executes much
faster than RUNOFF, which is written in BASIC-PLUS, However, RNO is not
completely compatible with RUNOFF, and may sometimes produce different
results. This version of RNO was originally developed on RSX-11M and was
distributed with the V3 release of that system.
For those users wishing to make their own modifications to RNO, sources are
included with this distribution. The RSTS/E Development Group would
appreciate hearing from any user making modifications in the hope that such
feedback will help to improve the program for future releases,
3.4.2 TECO
TECO is a character-oriented text editor that is implemented on all major
DIGITAL operating systems. TECO has many powerful features as a text editor
and is especially popular among programmers. Many users, however, find TECO's
set of commands rather cryptic, while others prefer line-oriented editors.
For these users, an editor like the DEC standard editor, EDT, is more
appropriate.
A copy of the PDP-11 TECO User's Guide is included in the documentation set
and a document file is included on the distribution kit explaining the use of
the TECO Video Terminal Editor (VTEDIT). For installation instructions, see
Phase 8 of the RSTS/E System Generation Manual.
RSTS/E V8.9 Release Notes, May 1983 Page 3-13
RSTS/E V8.8 Distribution Kits
3.4.3 SRCCOM,SAV and DUMP.SAV
RSTS/E users who are also users of RT11 may find SRCCOM.SAV (a text comparison
program) and DUMP.SAV (a file dump/display program) useful on RSTS/E, although
such use is not supported by DIGITAL,
The SRCCOM.SAV and DUMP.SAV files on the RSTS/E distribution kits are
identical to the SRCCOM.SAV and DUMP.SAV supplied with RT11 v4.9.
Installation of each program would consist of copying it from the distribution
Kit with PIP and insuring that it is named to the RT11 run-time system. This
has to be done manually, as no control file for automatic installation is
provided.
3.4.4 RSTSFLX
RSTSFLX is a program which will run on any VAX/VMS system and read files from
a RSTS disk and copy them to a VMS disk. This allows for easy interchange
from RSTS to VMS. More information is available on the distribution kit in
RSTSFL.DOC and RSTSFL.HLP,
4,9 RSTS/E V8.9 Sample Installation Procedure
The following outlines the steps required to build a new RSTS/E V8.8 operating
system. Once these steps have been performed, the system is ready for
timesharing.
The time estimates given are for a RSTS/E V8.9 system on an 11/78 with 2 RP26
disks, using BASIC-PLUS as the primary run-time system and IMAGE copying the
system RPP6 to the 'non-system RPP6. They do not include time for
troubleshooting hardware or for pattern checking large disks. The use of a
smaller processor will, of course, increase the time required.
NOTE
It is recommended that all steps be performed from a hard-copy
terminal and that the terminal printout be saved for future
reference.
1. System Generation 2 = 6 Hours
Bootstrap the distribution medium, tailor the SYSGEN monitor, configure
the RSTS/E monitor, tailor the RSTS/E monitor, start the RSTS/E monitor,
compile and patch, if necessary, the CUSPs, and install and patch
optional software ineluded on the RSTS/E distribution kit.
(For more detailed instructions on how to build a RSTS/E monitor, see
the RSTS/E System Generation Manual.) |
The monitor/CUSP system generation demonstrates that the hardware
supports RSTS/E; that MACRO programs can be assembled, linked, patched,
and executed; that the primary run-time system is operational; that
the standard library programs can be compiled (and patched, if
necessary); and that certain library programs, especially file transfer
utilities, are operational. |
2, Install Optional Software (Installation Dependent)
If optional software (e.g., COBOL) needs to be installed, you should
instal and patch it at this time. Sample procedures for optional
software products should be run to indicate that the hardware supports
the product and that the installation is complete and correct.
RSTS/E V8.9 Release Notes, May 1983 Page 4-2
RSTS/E V8.8 Sample Installation Procedure
3. Configure Control Files and Re-Start the System 1 - 4 Hours
Configure the standard start control files, START.CTL and CRASH.CTL, set
up the standard account file, ACCT.SYS, establish the system message
file, NOTICE.TXT, shut down the system, use the INIT HARDWR LIST
suboption to print a System Configuration List, use the INIT SET MODEM
suboption to enable dial-up lines, and restart the system.
This demonstrates that the system can be started, shut down, and
re-started. At this time it can be demonstrated that all local
terminals are accessible and, if feasible, dial-up lines can be checked.
The System Configuration List should be posted on the system for future
reference.
4, Save and Restore the System Using SAVE/RESTORE 39 — 48 Minutes
Save the system disk using the SAVE or IMAGE option of SAVE/RESTORE,
boot the saved media, and, if SAVE was used, restore to another disk,
boot the new system disk, re-install the monitor SIL, and start the
system.
This demonstrates SAVE/RESTORE's ability to backup and restore the
system and exercises the disk I/0 capability of the system. It also
leaves you with a full, bootable, system backup.
Note that you must supply the additional media needed to perform
SAVE/RESTORE, If additional media are not available to perform this
step, it may be omitted, but it is strongly recommended that this
procedure be followed.
5. Test Hardware Devices With DEVTST (Configuration Dependent)
Run DEVTST exercisers for the console terminal and any other devices
configured for the system. Refer to the System Configuration List
created in Step 3, above, and the Appendix B of the RSTS/E System
Generation Manual.
This demonstrates that the devices configured for the system are
functional.
At the conclusion of the above procedure, the installation is complete and
most hardware will have been exercised sufficiently to determine that it
operates within the system environment. Note, however, that the sample
procedure is not designed to be a hardware exerciser or a test of system
performance.
5,0 RMS-11 v2.0 FOR RSTS/E V8.0, MAY 1983
5.1 RMS V2.0 ACCESS METHODS FEATURES
The following new facilities appear in the RMS-11 V2.0 Access Methods.
5.1.1 Support for Clustering and Task Independence
The memory-resident library RMSRES can be clustered with any other
resident library which supports clustering; this allows RMS to share
task virtual memory with other libraries. See your FMS and language
documentation to determine if a particular library supports
clustering.
Task-independence means that once a program is linked with this
library, the library can be rebuilt or replaced without requiring that
the task linked to it be rebuilt.
Linking with this library requires use of the RMSRLX.ODL ODL file.
Include the element RMSROT in the .ROOT statement of your ODL, and the
indirect reference @LB:RMSRLX in your ODL file. If you used
RMSRLX.ODL in this manner with V1.8, no change should be required (if
you made reference to the RMSALL factor, this is no longer necessary
but will do no harm).
To use this library as a cluster library, your task simply needs to
specify the CLSTR option when linking the task.
5.1.2 Segmented Resident Library
RMSRES has been partitioned into seven separate library segments, not
all of which need to be physically resident in memory.
This allows "demand-paging" of the library segments: only those
segments containing code which is, or has most recently been, in use
must be resident, leaving the balance of the library segments eligible
for replacement by tasks which can make use of the physical memory.
Each of the seven segments is 8 KB or less in size, with not more than
two segments ever required simultaneously by a given user task.
e RMSRES.TSK is the "root" of the segmented library. As before,
this TSK and its associated STB file are the only files needed
to link user tasks against RMS.
e RMSLBA.TSK is the library segment that supports $DISPLAY,
SERASE, SPARSE, SSEARCH, SRENAME, sequential file SCREATE and
SOPEN, common portions of relative and indexed file SCREATE
and SOPEN, common $CLOSE (and file operation exit) processing.
e RMSLBB.TSK is the library segment that supports sequential
file SCLOSE and all sequential file record operations, $FREE,
RMS-11 V2.0 FOR RSTS/E V8.0, MAY 1983 Page 5-2
RMS V2.0 ACCESS METHODS FEATURES
magtape functions, block 1/0 record operations, and the common
internal EXTEND function.
e RMSLBC.TSK is the library segment that supports all relative
file operations, plus the SEXTEND function.
e RMSLBD.TSK is the library segment that supports indexed file
SOPEN, SCLOSE, SCONNECT, SDISCONNECT, SFIND, and SGET
operations.
e RMSLBE.TSK is the library segment that supports indexed file
SDELETE/SPUT/SUPDATE operations.
e RMSLBF.TSK is the library segment that supports data record
insertion and index-update for indexed SPUT/SUPDATE, plus the:
bucket allocation routine, and indexed SCREATE.
Note that although the library segments do not have to be physically
resident, all library segments must be installed before any use of the
resident library (including use of RMS utilities which are built
against the resident library).
Installation of the resident library is done during V2.0 installation
by the autoconfigure program, RMSACF, and subsequently by your system
manager through the use of the RMSACF program or the use of UTI ADD
LIBRARY commands. See Section 5.8, "RMS V2.0 Installation," for more
details.
5.1.3 Disk-Overlaid RMS
New versions of the V1.8 RMS ODLs are provided on the distribution
medium. These ODLs are:
e RMSILS.ODL
Designed to use minimal virtual address space for support of
seguential and relative file organizations, this ODL file adds
about 6.5KB to the task size.
e RMS11X.ODL
Designed to use minimal virtual address space for full support
of all file organizations, this ODL is structured to add about
10KB to the task size.
e RMS12X.ODL
This ODL adds about 12KB to the task size, supports all file
organizations, and‘ offers a good compromise between
performance for record operations on indexed files and use of
task virtual address space.
e RMS11.0DL.
This is a prototype ODL file that you can tailor to your own
needs.
The V1.8 versions of these ODLs will still work with RMS V2.0 but the
new versions of the ODLs will be more efficient, generally requiring
less memory and less disk space for the task image. For more
information on V1.8 comparisons, see Section 5.3.
RMS-11 v2.0 FOR RSTS/E v8.0, MAY 1983 Page 5-3
RMS V2.0 ACCESS METHODS FEATURES
In addition, two new ODLs are provided with V2.0:
e RMS12S.0DL
Supporting only sequential and relative file organizations,
this ODL adds about 9KB to the task size and is designed to
offer a good compromise between performance and use of task
virtual address space.
e DAPl11X.ODL
Structured to add about 14KB to the task size, this ODL is
designed to use minimal virtual address space for support of
all file organizations and (on systems with the required
DECnet support) remote access facilities.
5.1.4 Remote File and Record Access via DECNET
If suitable DECNET facilities exist on your system and on the target
system, RMS-11 v2.0 will allow file and record access to files
residing on other network nodes, provided that such nodes include an
RMS-based file access listener (FAL).
For most purposes, remote access is indistinguishable from local
access, although performance may not be equivalent. The following
general limitations apply:
e RMS-11 generally does not support remote functions which are
not supported locally.
e Certain RMS functions (wildcard support, SPARSE, $SEARCH,
SRENAME, and transmission of device, directory, and file
identifiers) are not supported by the data access protocol
(DAP) used, and hence cannot be executed remotely.
e Certain FALs do not support the full set of RMS functions
expressible via DAP, and hence further limit remote access.
For example, the current RSTS/E RMS FAL does not support
record access to indexed files.
e High-level languages may not allow expression of the file
specification necessary to establish contact with a remote
node.
To operate upon a remote file, your program must include a node
specification for the remote file and you must include the RMS remote
access code when you build your task.
5.1.4.1 Remote Node Specification - You must include a remote node
specification at the start of the file name string or the default name
string you provide to an SOPEN, $CREATE, or S$ERASE operation. In
addition, your file name string and default name string must conform
to the DIGITAL Command Language (DCL) file specification syntax rules,
and the file specification resulting from the merge of these two
strings must conform to the file specification conventions on the
destination system as well.
RMS-11 V2.0 FOR RSTS/E V8.0, MAY 1983 Page 5-4
RMS V2.0 ACCESS METHODS FEATURES
In general, a file specification consisting of the elements:
nodespec: :devicespec: [directoryspec]filename.filetype;fileversion
in the order (and with the delimiters) presented is appropriate, where
the elements beyond the nodespec conform to the conventions of the
target system. Elements not present will be defaulted according to
the conventions of the target system.
The nodespec:: element is of the form:
node"user password"::
where node is the (required) destination node name and "user password"
is an (optional) access control string containing login information
acceptable to the remote system.
If "user password" is provided, the device and directory defaults and
access privileges of that remote account are acquired; if not, the
device and directory defaults and access privileges of the default
DECNET account on the remote system are acquired.
5.1.4.2 Linking Programs with RMSDAP Support - To link your program
with remote RMSDAP modules, you can use either the disk-overlaid
version, or reference the DAPRES resident library:
e To link with the disk-overlaid version, reference the
DAP11X.ODL file in your ODL. And, as with other RMS ODLs, you
reference the RMS root modules as RMSROT, and specify other
RMS modules as the cotree RMSALL.
e To link with the DAPRES resident library, use the ODL file
DAPRLX, and specify RMSRES and DAPRES in your TKB command
file. RMSRES and DAPRES can be specified as single resident
libraries, or as clustered resident libraries.
Note that DAPRES is a clusterable, task-independent library as defined
previously for RMSRES. It is not a segmented library however.
5.1.4.3 RMSDAP Environments - RMS-based FALs are currently available
on VAX/VMS, RSTS/E, RSX-11M, and RSX-11M-PLUS systems. The version of
data access protocol which is used must be at least Version 5.6 or
greater; this means that you must have at least Version 2.0 of
DECNET/E, Version 3.1 of DECNET for 11M, version 1.1 of DECNET for
11MPLUS, or Version 2.0 of DECNET for VAX.
Note for RSTS users: you will need patch numbers 31.23.1 and 31.23.4
to DECNET/E before using the RMS remote access features. (These
patches will automatically be applied if you install/patch DECNET/E
when installing RSTS/E 8.0.)
For more information on remote access using RMS-1l, see Appendix B of
the RMS-11 User's Guide.
RMS-11 V2.0 FOR RSTS/E V8.0, MAY 1983 Page 5-5
RMS V2.0 ACCESS METHODS FEATURES
5.1.5 New File and Directory Operations
RMS-11 V2.0 supports several new file and directory operations.
5.1.5.1 S$RENAME - SRENAME is a new RMS operation macro which can be
used to replace the directory entry for a file (change the name of a
file). The file specification for the new directory entry must not
specify a new device or node for the file, but can specify a different
file name and file extension.
5.1.5.2 SPARSE - SPARSE 1s a new RMS operation macro which can be
used to analyze a file specification. |
The PARSE operation merges the file specification with the default
file specification and with the system defaults, and analyzes the
result. If you specify wildcarding, the SPARSE operation constructs a
match-pattern; this match-pattern can pe used by later wildcard
SEARCH operations. |
5.1.5.3 $SEARCH - SSEARCH is a new RMS-11 operation macro which can
be used to find the next (or first) £ile that matches a mateh-pattern
(constructed as the expanded string by a previous PARSE operation).
5.1.6 Wildcarding
You specify wildcarding by including wildcard characters in the file
specification (or the default file specification): wildcards can be
specified in the directory entry, file name, or type. The guidelines
for wildcarding match those described in the RSTS/E System User's
Guide.
See the RMS-11 Macro programmer's Guide for a full description of how
to use the new directory operations and wildcarding. In addition, you
may wish to examine the demo programs which are provided.
5.1.7 Random Access to Fixed-Format Sequential Files
For sequential files with records of fixed format, random access for
SGET, SFIND, and SPUT may be specified: it is very similar to random
access to relative files, with some exceptions.
Your program specifies keyed access by setting the RBSKEY code in the
1-byte RAC field of the RAB, and by specifying the address of a
"relative record number" in the KBF field of the RAB. Key size must
be specified as 4 in the KSZ field of the RAB.
some differences from relative file handling are:
e There is NO initialization of the space in the file. IE the
first operation is a random $PUT to the file at relative
record number >: the "cells" preceding record number 5 may
contain garbage: whatever data happened to be there.
(This is similar to RMS-32.)
RMS-11 V2.0 FOR RSTS/E v8.0, MAY 1983 Page 5-6
RMS V2.0 ACCESS METHODS FEATURES
5.1.8
There is also no maximum record number (except as limited by
the 4 byte specification of the key). If your program
specifies a random $PUT at relative record number 999, the
file will be extended to the appropriate size (but not
initialized).
SPUT overwrites any existing record in the target location.
There is no support for SDELETE to a sequential file.
Increased Device Independence
STREAM and VFC files may now be created on unit-record devices to
avoid the need for special-case code in copy-type operations.
In the case of VFC files, the record header is thrown away on
output unless it is a "print format" file, which RMS-11 now
supports as RMS-32 does.
For stream files, if none of the 3 carriage control bits is
set (print file format, carriage control or FORTRAN carriage
control), and if the last character is not a line feed, form
feed or vertical tab, then carriage-return/line feed (CR/LF)
is appended at the end of the record.
For stream files, where either of the carriage control or
FORTRAN carriage control attributes is set, then if the last
two characters of the record are CR/LF, the trailing CR/LF is
stripped off, and then definition of the carriage control (CR
or FTN) attribute is applied.
For similar ease-of-copying reasons, RMS-11 now allows creation of
relative
and indexed files for output to non-disk devices (though for
tape, record format must be VAR or FIX).
5.1.9 More Usable Block I/0 Facilities
The following enhancements have been made for block I/O:
Block I/O may now be used to copy files without the need to
"fix up" the file header attributes.
Block I/O SREAD operations now generally respect the logical
EOF header attribute (exceptions are documented in the RMS-11
User's Guide and in the RMS-11 Macro Programmer's Guide).
Block I/0 may also be used for sequential access, by zeroing
the RAB ВКТ field, allowing sequential copy and update
operations.
RMS-11 V2.0 FOR RSTS/E V8.0, MAY 1983 Page 5-7
RMS V2.0 UTILITIES FEATURES
5.2 RMS V2.0 UTILITIES FEATURES
5.2.1
New File Design Utility
The RMS-11 File Design Utility (RMSDES) is a new utility that allows
you to
interactively design and create files. RMSDES supersedes the
RMS-11 File Definition Utility (RMSDEF).
Some of the features of RMSDES are:
5.2.2
Full RMS-11 file structure capabilities -- you can design and
create any type of RMS-11 file to contain your data records,
tailoring it to meet your program's data processing
requirements exactly.
Error detection -- RMSDES can detect many kinds of errors and
omissions in the attribute information you supply. Because
RMSDES is interactive, you can correct the errors immediately,
before you create and load records into the file.
Saved file description -- You can save a description of a file
design for future use, whether or not you have created a file
based on the description. This is useful if you want to
complete an unfinished file design at a later date, or modify
a file design to accommodate a new use.
Copied file description -- RMSDES can construct a file
description based on the attributes of an existing data file.
You can either create a new file like the existing file, or
modify the file design before creating a new file.
Default calculations -- RMSDES can calculate defaults for many
attributes.
Extensive help facilities are provided for RMSDES.
New Features for RMSDSP
RMSDSP has a completely reorganized and much more readable format. It
also includes the following new features:
The combination of options /BP/FU now displays more complete
information about the contents of backup container files.
The size field lists high block as well.
DSP displays the clustersize of a file on disk.
The protection information is given as a number (for example,
<60>), and is also "decomposed" into Owner, Group, World
protection fields.
If RMSDSP is given a privileged protection code, it will now
drop privilege around wildcard operations, creation of the
output file, and around command file processing. In this
case, users of RMSDSP cannot look at files for which they do
not normally have access privileges.
However, note that if the system manager patches the FIP to
allow nonprivileged users to see all files with the directory
lookup, then RMSDSP users will also have read access to those
files, regardless of protection code.
RMS V2.0 UTILITIES FEATURES
5.2.3
New Features for RMSCNV
RMSCNV has been rewritten and is smaller and generally faster than the
1.8 version.
Other features of RMSCNV are:
5.2.4
The /CA switch can be used to dynamically create an output
file, by copying file attributes from another file. (That is,
you do not need to run RMSDES or RMSDEF to create the output
file before doing the convert, if you already have a prototype
file whose attributes can be copied for the output file.)
The /IM switch can be used to copy files in IMAGE (block)
mode.
The /EO switch can be used to change ASCII stream files that
end with a CTRL/Z character to end with null characters. This
switch is provided for help in converting certain non-RMS
stream files into a format readable by RMS V2. (See also
Section 5.3.6, "Other V1.8 Compatibility Notes.")
The /KN:keyname switch can be used to convert files based on a
keyname (as opposed to a key number, as in the /KR switch).
The /ML switch allows you to explicitly set the limit of
memory allocation.
The /SL switch, summary listing, has been significantly
enhanced. It now produces several summaries: summaries of
options used for the convert, summaries of the file attributes
for the files involved in the convert, a message summary of
errors and warnings, and a processing summary.
Remote access capability is provided for suitable
configurations. Your system and the target system must
include DECNET support (at least V2.0 of DECNET/E). The
target system must also include an RMS-based file access
listener (FAL). And you must rebuild RMSCNV to include the
remote access capability (see Section 5.8.2, "Utility
Configurations").
Additional Utility Features
RMSIFL has been rewritten and incorporates a number of bug
fixes.
In addition, the algorithms for allocating work file space for
sorting have been changed and in most cases, the amount of
space needed for the sort should be decreased.
The /DE switch has been enhanced to allow specification of a
different device for IFL's temporary files.
Command and ODL files are provided for rebuilding the RMS
utilities, to use different forms of the RMS-11 access
methods. See Section 5.8.2, "Utility Configurations."
All the utilities have been changed to use lowercase format.
The error message format has been changed for all the
utilities except RMSDEF and RMSIFL.
RMS-11 v2.0 FOR RSTS/E v8.0, MAY 1983 Page 5-9
COMPARISONS WITH V1.8
5.3 COMPARISONS WITH V1.8
Conversion from RMS-11 V1.8 to RMS-11 V2.0 has been made transparent
where possible. Structural changes required by feature additions,
however, may be significant to some programs.
5.3.1 Memory-Resident Library (RMSRES)
RMSRES now contains all RMS support code save for minor linkage code
in the task. Further, it has been configured as multiple segments,
not all of which need be resident in memory simultaneously, thus
dramatically reducing instantaneous physical memory overhead. The
library is also "task-independent," in that it can be rebuilt or
replaced without having to rebuild tasks which use it, and
"clusterable," which means that it can share task virtual memory with
other libraries that support "clustering" (see your FMS and language
documentation).
These features required changes in the file RMSRLX.ODL, the file
normally used to build tasks using RMSRES. Tasks which used
RMSRLX.ODL with RMS-11 V1.8 should continue to build properly using
the new RMSRLX.ODL and RMSRES. Build files which used RMSRES but did
not use RMSRLX.ODL with RMS-11 V1.8 must be changed to use (or
incorporate the contents of) the new RMSRLX.ODL file.
5.3.2 Memory-Resident Library (RMSSEQ)
RMS-11 V2.0 contains no library equivalent to the RMSSEQ
memory-resident library included with RMS-11 V1.8. RMSSEQ offered no
advantages in use of task virtual memory, and no advantages in use of
system physical memory which are not equally attainable through use of
disk-overlaid RMS at negligible performance cost. In addition,
structural constraints made it impossible for RMSSEQ to be clusterable
or task-independent.
The improved packaging of the full-function library RMSRES should make
that a suitable replacement for RMSSEQ in most environments. Where
this is inappropriate, disk-overlaid or non-overlaid RMS can be used.
5.3.3 Memory-Resident Library (DAPRES)
If your system includes the necessary DECNET facilities, the new
resident library DAPRES provides support for remote file and record
access as well as local access. Like RMSRES, DAPRES is both
task-independent and clusterable. In particular, a task using RMSRES
may include remote-access support via DAPRES with negligible increase
in task virtual address space requirement by clustering the two
libraries: the file DAPRLX.ODL should be used to generate this
configuration.
5.3.4 Disk-Overlaid RMS
Structural changes to the RMS code were performed such that the RMS-11
v1.8 ODL files RMS11X, RMS12X, and RMS11S would remain valid. Most
other ODL structures will probably continue to be valid, although this
cannot be guaranteed for all cases. Use of V1.8 ODL structures with
V2.0 code may require more task virtual address space than with V1.8
code.
RMS-11 V2.0 FOR RSTS/E V8.0, MAY 1983 Page 5-10
COMPARISONS WITH V1.8
New versions of RMS11X, RMS12X, and RMS1l1lS are provided which use
approximately the same (or slightly less) task virtual address space
as their V1.8 counterparts used with the V1.8 code. If your system
includes the necessary DECNET facilities, the new file DAPl11X.ODL
provides support for remote file and record access as well as local
access.
An extensively-commented "prototype" ODL file RMS11.0DL is also
included. This file is not meant to be used directly, but may be
helpful in designing your own ODL structures or in modifying the
structure of the above ODL files to suit your special needs.
A restriction on ODL structures involves the RMS entry point modules
ROxxxx (where xxxx represents the leading characters of the RMS
operation name, for example, ROPUT). These modules, which were not
explicitly referred to in previous RMS ODL files, MUST not be referred
to in RMS ODLs for v2.0; if they are, a multiple definition for
symbols of the form S$SRMxxx will occur.
5.3.5 Non-Overlaid RMS
While the total end-to-end size of RMS has decreased despite addition
of new features, the space savings and feature additions have not been
spread evenly throughout. Most of the added features have occurred in
the areas of file/directory operations and record operations for
seguential files.
The result is that applications using non-overlaid RMS for
sequential-file-only access may experience an increase in virtual
address space requirements for the RMS code (especially in RSTS/E
environments). Where this presents a problem, it should normally be
possible to select a suitable RMS disk overlay structure without
noticeable performance impact.
5.3.6 Other V1.8 Compatibility Notes
e The utility RMSDFN is no longer supported.
e The RMS-11 run-time system (RMS11.RTS) is no longer supported.
e During system generation of your RSTS system, you must answer
"YES" to the question about ¡including support for RSX
directives.
e Programs which have been compiled under RMS V1.8 should still
run under V2.0, without recompilation (they must be relinked).
Of course, such programs will not be able to take advantage of
any new features in Version 2.0 of RMS.
e In general, RMS V2.0 cannot be run on a previous version of
RSTS/E.
RMS V2.0 depends on changes to the monitor and on the new
structure of TKB autoload vectors in V8.0 of RSTS/E; do not
try to use old versions of TKB to link RMS V2.0 programs.
e With V2.0, some changes to the SYSLIB modules have been made;
several modules have been placed in SYSLIB to maintain
compatibility with previous releases.
As a result, you must be careful to reference RMSLIB as a
"search" library before referring to SYSLIB when building
tasks which use non-overlaid RMS. (This is only necessary if
you need to make an explicit reference to SYSLIB as a "search"
RMS-11 V2.0 FOR RSTS/E V8.0, MAY 1983 Page 5-11
COMPARISONS WITH V1.8
library when taskbuilding.)
e MACRO-11 programs using RMS should always check for errors by
checking the value of the appropriate STS field.
With V1.8, the C-bit may have been returned on RMS errors.
However, this is not a defined error return and has not been
maintained in RMS V2.0.
e “Z and ESC are no longer recognized as record terminators for
stream files, and “Z is no longer recognized as a file
terminator for stream files.
Note that RMSCNV has a new switch, /EO, which can be used to
convert stream files which were created by a non-RMS program,
and which used “Z as the file terminator.
e The expanded string is now an output from SOPEN and SERASE by
file-id. |
e RMS now makes a check that at least 2 keys fit into a bucket.
Therefore, with a bucket size of 1, the maximum key size is
243.
e When block 1/0 15 used, SOPEN and SDISPLAY operations no
longer return relative or indexed file key XAB, allocation
XAB, or summary XAB information.
MISCELLANEOUS INFORMATION
e Note that all the new features provided in RMS-11 are fully
accessible only to the MACRO-1] programmer; for high-level
languages, check the language documentation for supported
features.
e RMS-11 will process switches included in file specifications
when the ‘switch does not conflict with RMS-11's use of the
RSTS/E file system or with information explicitly provided via
the normal RMS-11 interface. These switches include the
/FILESIZE, /CLUSTERSIZE, /POSITION, /MODE, and /PROTECT
switches.
These switches are documented in the RMS-11 User's Guide,
Appendix A.
e For magtape, RMS now allows ANSI fixed format tape records to
be less than 18 bytes.
e Several RMS demonstration programs have been included on the
distribution. These sample programs are provided as MACRO-11
sources and task images; they illustrate how to use the new
SPARSE/SSEARCH/SRENAME/SERASE and vwildcarding facilities.
Also, a GSA source routine is included as illustration of how
to extend the task in the event of RMS pool exhaustion.
The names of the programs are: PARSE, SEARCH, RENAME, ERASE,
GSA.
RMS-11 V2.0 FOR RSTS/E V8.0, MAY 1983 Page 5-12
PROBLEMS FIXED WITH THIS VERSION
5.5
PROBLEMS FIXED WITH THIS VERSION
The problem which was reported on V1.8 of RMS on GET after
FIND on alternate keys (Dispatch article number 48.2.20), has
been fixed in this version.
The V1.8 version of RMSIFL did not load indexed files
correctly if the key type was integer. (Not all records could
be accessed by key value.) This problem has been fixed in the
new version of RMSIFL.
The V1.8 (and prior) difficulties associated with unwanted
write-accessors being allowed access when only read-sharing
was specified have been corrected in this version.
On V1.8, RMS-11 would create temporary files using an octal
(not decimal) representation of the job number in the
filename. This caused problems when the job number was
greater than 7 or when the decimal job number happened to
correspond to the octal representation of another job number.
This problem has been fixed in V2.0 of RMS; RMS now creates
temporary files using the correct RSTS temporary file
mechanism.
RMS now pads stream files with nulls, to the high block of the
file (not just to the end of the current block). This will
make RMS-created stream files readable by programs which do
not recognize the EOF value from the file header.
RMSBCK now saves the clustersize of the original file; RMSRST
will first attempt to use that original clustersize when
restoring the file. If there are enough clusters of the
correct size, then the file will be restored to that
clustersize. Otherwise, RMSRST will restore the file using
the default pack clustersize.
KNOWN PROBLEMS WITH THIS VERSION
Under some circumstances, the deferred write option may be
ignored.
Use of the mass insert feature may occasionally cause the
error ERSDME.
RMSDES and RMSIFL will incorrectly exit with an error status
following a command line consisting only of a “Z.
When using RMSDES and specifying a GET operation, it
‘incorrectly requests write access on the GET file. In some
cases, this may result in an ERSFLK or ERSPRV error if your
task does not have write access to the file.
RMSIFL will not reassign the sort work file devices if the /DE
switch specifies a logical name instead of a device name.
RMS-11 V2.0 FOR RSTS/E V8.0, MAY 1983 Page 5-13
RMS FILES AND PLACEMENT ON THE KIT
5.7 RMS FILES AND PLACEMENT ON THE KIT
The RSTS/E V8.0 kit contains the following RMS elements in [1,2];
note that the "destination" column describes the destination of files
for the default configuration (see Section 5.8).
File Name Destination Comments
RMS11.CTL SY:/deleted Input to the Build program to
; do the RMS installation.
RMSMAC .MLB LB: Can be deleted if you are not using
MACRO RMS programs.
RMSLIB.OLB LB: Object library for RMS local
access.
RMSDAP.OLB LB: Object library for RMS remote
access. Can be
deleted if you do not need remote
access.
RMSACF, TSK [1,2] Used during installation to install
RMS
resident libraries,
RMSBCK. TSK [1,2] BCK utility; uses RMSRES.
RMSRST. TSK [1,2] RST utility; uses RMSRES.
RMSDEF.TSK [1,2] DEF utility; uses RMSRES.
RMSDSP.TSK [1,2] DSP utility; uses RMSRES.
RMSCNV.TSK [1,2] CNV utility; uses RMSRES.
RMSDES. TSK [1,2] DES utility; uses RMSRES.
RMSIFL, TSK [1,2] IFL utility; uses RMSRES.
DES, HLP SY:/deleted Sequential file used to build
RMSDES indexed help file
DESHLP.DES SY: /deleted DES file used to build RMSDES
indexed help file
RMSFUN.OBJ SY:/deleted Concatenated object module
containing
objects to be put in LB:SYSLIB
RMS11.0DL LB: Prototype ODL file
RORMS1.MAC LB: For use with the prototype ODL
RMS11S.0DL LB: | ODL file for sequential
RMS12S.ODL LB: | ODL file for sequential
RMS11X.ODL LB: Standard indexed file ODL
RMS12X.ODL LB: * Indexed file ODL
RMSRLX.ODL LB: ODL for use with RMSRES
DAP11X.ODL LB: ODL for use with overlaid DAP
DAPRLX.ODL LB: ODL for use with DAPRES
RMSRES. LIB [0,1] Library image for RMSRES "root"
RMSRES. TSK LB: TSK image for linking against
RMSRES
(Continued on next page)
RMS-11 V2.0 FOR RSTS/E V8.0, MAY 1983 | Раде 5-14
RMS FILES AND PLACEMENT ON THE KIT
File Name Destination Comments
RMSLBA.LIB [0,1] Library image for RMSRES segment
RMSLBB.LIB [0,1] Library image for RMSRES segment
RMSLBC.LIB [0,1] Library image for RMSRES segment
RMSLBD. LIB [0,1] Library image for RMSRES segment
RMSLBE.LIB [0,1] | Library image for RMSRES segment
RMSLBF.LIB [0,1] — Library image for RMSRES segment
RMSRES.STB LB: STB file for RMSRES
DAPRES.LIB [0,1] | Library image for RMSDAP library
DAPRES.TSK LB: TSK file for linking against DAPRES
DAPRES.STB LB: STB file for DAPRES
RMSRES.MAP Not transferred
RMSLBA.MAP Not transferred
RMSLBB.MAP Not transferred
RMSLBC. MAP Not transferred
RMSLBD. MAP Not transferred
RMSLBE. MAP Not transferred
RMSLBF .MAP Not transferred
DAPRES.MAP Not transferred
DAPRES.CMD, Not transferred For rebuilding DAPRES
DAPRES.ODL
RMSRES.CMD, Not transferred For rebuilding RMSRES
RMSRES.ODL,
RMSRES.ONL,
RMSFAK. CMD
RMSLBA.CMD, Not transferred For rebuilding RMSLBA
RMSLBA.ODL
RMSLBB.CMD, Not transferred For rebuilding RMSLBB
RMSLBB, ODL
RMSLBC.CMD, Not transferred For rebuilding RMSLBC
RMSLBC.ODL
RMSLBD.CMD, Not transferred For rebuilding RMSLBD
RMSLBD.ODL
RMSLBE.CMD, Not transferred For rebuilding RMSLBE
RMSLBE. ODL
RMSLBF.CMD, Not transferred For rebuilding RMSLBF
RMSLBF.ODL
RMSROT.CMD, Not transferred For rebuilding segmented
RMSROT.ODL, library
RMSROT.STB
BCKNON.CMD, Not transferred For rebuilding the overlaid
BCKNON. ODL version of BCK
BCKNRN.CMD, Not transferred For rebuilding the resident
BCKNRN.ODL | library version of BCK
CNVNON.CMD, Not transferred For rebuilding the overlaid
CNVNON. ODL version of CNV
CNVNRN.CMD, Not transferred For rebuilding the resident
CNVNRN. ODL library version of CNV
CNVNOO.CMD, Not transferred For rebuilding the overlaid
CNVNOO.ODL version of CNV, with RMSDAP
CNVNRR.CMD, Not transferred For rebuilding the resident
CNVNRR.ODL library version of CNV,with RMSDAP
DEFNON.CMD, Not transferred For rebuilding the overlaid
DEFNON. ODL version of DEF
DEFNRN.CMD, Not transferred For rebuilding the resident
DEFNRN.ODL library version of DEF
(Continued on next page)
RMS FILES AND PLACEMENT ON THE KIT
Page 5-15
File Name Destination Comments
DESNON.CMD, Not transferred For rebuilding the overlaid
DESNON.ODL, version of DES
RMSDES .ODL
DESNRN.CMD, Not transferred For rebuilding the resident
DESNRN. ODL library version of DES
DSPNON.CMD, Not transferred For rebuilding the overlaid
DSPNON. ODL version of DSP
DSPNRN.CMD, Not transferred For rebuilding the resident
DSPNRN.ODL library version of DSP
IFLNON.CMD, Not transferred For rebuilding the overlaid
IFLNON.ODL version of IFL
IFLNRN.CMD, Not transferred For rebuilding the resident
IFLNRN. ODL library version of IFL
RSTNON.CMD, Not transferred For rebuilding the overlaid
RSTNON.ODL version of RST
RSTNRN.CMD, Not transferred For rebuilding the resident
RSTNRN.ODL library version of RST
RMSUTL .OLB, Not transferred For rebuilding several utilities
RMSODL.ODL
GSA.MAC Not transferred Demonstration program included
as an illustration of how to extend
an RMS task in the event
of pool exhaustion.
PARSE .MAC, Not transferred Demonstration programs for the
SEARCH.MAC, new directory and wildcarding
RENAME .MAC, facilities
ERASE .MAC,
PARSE. TSK,
SEARCH. TSK,
RENAME. TSK,
ERASE. TSK
RMSV2.DOC Not transferred RMS release notes (this chapter).
Note that all RMSDAP files can be deleted if you are not using RMS to
access files on remote nodes.
RMS-11 V2.0 FOR RSTS/E V8.0, MAY 1983 | Page 5-16
RMS V2.0 INSTALLATION
5.8 RMS V2.0 INSTALLATION
The control file RMS11.CTL is used as the input control file to the
SBUILD program to do the installation of RMS V2. In general, this
procedure is very similar to the V1.8 installation.
NOTE
In order to install RMS V2.0, you must
have specified YES to the "RSX
directives?" question when doing the
RSTS V8.0 sysgen.
First, you must physically mount the kit media, and log in under a
privileged account. Then, if the kit media is a disk, logically mount
the kit as:
MOUNT dev: name/RO
where dev: specifies the physical name and number of the drive with
the installation disk, and name is the packid of the disk that
contains the RMS files.
For all kit media, invoke the BUILD procedure, specifying the control
file as [1,2]RMS11.CTL. The control file executes the following
steps:
e Asks if you want the default RMS configuration which includes
the segmented resident library(s) and DAPRES, and the RMS
utilities built against the segmented resident library.
This is the recommended configuration, but you must have at
least 22KW of memory available to install the RMS segmented
library. And, you must always ensure that all segments of the
RMS segmented library are installed before trying to use any
of the RMS utilities.
The optional RMS configuration is one that does not include
any resident libraries, and the RMS utilities are rebuilt to
use disk-overlaid RMS.
e Removes libraries and deletes V1.8-specific files that will
not be replaced by the installation.
This is done to maintain consistency with resident libraries:
if you need to save V1.8 files, you must make provisions for
this before doing a V2.0 installation.
e Transfers the files from the kit media to the destination
accounts on the designated disk. The destination accounts are
described in Section 5.7.
e Replaces modules in LB:SYSLIB with modules included in the
concatenated object module RMSFUN.
Note that the module SIORTN is a new module added to SYSLIB;
it is used by RMSIFL and SORT-11. And, the modules R1GET and
RIGSET are deleted from SYSLIB, as they are no longer used.
e Replaces any existing CCL definitions for RMS utilities with
CCLs for the V2.0 RMS utilities. Note that a new CCL for the
RMSDES utility is added; a CCL for RMSDFN is no longer
needed, since RMSDFN is not supported with V2.0.
RMS-11 V2.0 FOR RSTS/E V8.0, MAY 1983 Page 5-17
RMS V2.0 INSTALLATION |
e If you have selected the default configuration using the
resident libraries, the control file runs the RMS
autoconfigure task, RMSACF. This task will remove any
existing RMS resident libraries from memory and will install
the RMS V2.0 resident libraries in memory with the NOERROR
option.
Note that the RMS resident library RMSRES now consists of 7
library images instead of one library image. (See Section
5.1.2 for a discussion on the segmented resident library.)
RMSACF installs all 7 segments for RMSRES and, if it detects
the presence of DECNET on your system, it installs DAPRES.
RMSACF can fail if you do not have enough memory for the
resident library. If that happens, the subsequent processing
by RMSDES and RMSCNV will also fail; you should in this case
restart the installation and specify the optional
configuration which does not include the RMS resident
libraries.
e If you have selected the optional configuration without
resident libraries, the control file retaskbuilds all the RMS
utilities to use disk-overlaid RMS.
e Runs the RMSDES and RMSCNV utilities to create an indexed file
in LB:RMSDES.HLP. This file will be the HELP file used by the
RMSDES utility.
e Terminates after displaying the line:
1 END OF INSTALLATION PROCEDURE
At this point, you can logically dismount the installation media with
a DISMOUNT command, and physically dismount the volume.
5.8.1 Startup Command Procedures
To examine the results of the installation autoconfigure program, run
SYSTAT.
Note that the autoconfigure program, RMSACF, inserts the resident
library segments in the order: RMSRES, RMSLBB, RMSLBA, RMSLBD,
RMSLBC, RMSLBE, RMSLBF. This is an attempt to order the segments in
order of "most-use" by applications, to avoid leaving "holes" in
memory when unused segments are displaced from memory. It is
recommended that you use a similar algorithm, based on your
application's use of RMS, when positioning the library segments in
memory.
That is, it is the system. manager's responsibility to modify the
system startup procedures to install the RMS resident libraries. The
startup procedures can use the RMSACF program to install the libraries
every time, or UTI ADD LIBRARY commands can be used, if more
flexibility is needed.
For example, you may wish to use the /STAY switch for segments which
will be used frequently (RMSRES is a very good candidate for this).
Using the /STAY switch will mean the segment stays in memory even when
it is not mapped by a task; for heavily-used segments, this could cut
down on possible thrashing.
However, you should not use the /REMOVE switch on the UTI ADD LIBRARY
command. This would force the library segment to go out of memory
whenever a task was done using a particular library segment.
RMS-11 v2.0 FOR RSTS/E V8.0, MAY 1983 Page 5-18
RMS V2.0 INSTALLATION
Note that although the library segments do not have to be physically
resident, all library segments must be installed before any use of the
resident library (including use of RMS utilities which are built
against the resident library). Failure to install the root segment
RMSRES will cause an error "?Resident library not found" when the task
or utility is invoked; however, failure to install any of the
remaining resident library segments will not give an error at
invocation, but may cause a BPT trap when the missing segment is
subsequently needed by RMS.
NOTE
There are several circumstances
involving "inconsistent or incomplete
resident libraries" which can cause a
BPT trap to be generated, with RO
containing the error code ERSLIB. This
can happen if not all the segments of
the library are installed or if the
version numbers of one or more segments
do not match the root segment, the
RMSDAP code, or the task itself.
You may also wish to include the new RMS CCL definitions in the system
start-up control file. RMSDES is a new V2.0 utility which needs a new
CCL definition.
5.8.2 Utility Configurations
The RMS utilities which are provided on the kit are built to use the
segmented resident library. At installation time, you can choose to
use these versions of the utilities or request that the utilities be
rebuilt to use disk-overlaid RMS. See the discussion on RMS V2.0
installation for more details of this process.
However, for selective rebuilding and optional configurations (such as
rebuilding RMSCNV to include remote access support), all the command
and ODL files are provided.
5.8.2.1 Utility Command and ODL Files - For each utility, a command
and ODL file is provided which can be used to build the utility using
disk-overlaid RMS. The names of the files are: |
For RMSBCK: BCKNON.CMD,BCKNON.ODL,RMSODL.ODL
For RMSRST: RSTNON.CMD,RSTNON.ODL,RMSODL.ODL
For RMSCNV: CNVNON.CMD,CNVNON.ODL
For RMSDSP: DSPNON.CMD,DSPNON.ODL,RMSODL.ODL
For RMSDES: DESNON.CMD,DESNON.ODL,RMSDES.ODL
For RMSDEF: DEFNON.CMD,DEFNON,ODL,RMSODL.ODL
For RMSIFL: IFLNON.CMD,IFLNON,ODL
For CNV, two additional configurations are available, if you wish to
use CNV to access files on remote nodes. To build CNV using the
clustered RMS and RMSDAP resident libraries, you can use:
For RMSCNV: CNVNRR.CMD,CNVNRR.ODL
To build CNV using disk-overlaid RMS and RMSDAP, you can use:
For RMSCNV: CNVNOO.CMD,CNVNOO.ODL
RMS-11 V2.0 FOR RSTS/E V8.0, MAY 1983 Page 5-19
RMS V2.0 INSTALLATION
For each utility, a command and ODL file are provided which can be
used to build the utility using the resident library RMSRES. The
names of the files are:
For RMSBCK: BCKNRN.CMD,BCKNRN.ODL
For RMSRST: RSTNRN.CMD,RSTNRN.ODL
For RMSCNV: CNVNRN.CMD,CNVNRN.ODL
For RMSDSP: DSPNRN.CMD,DSPNRN.ODL
For RMSDES: DESNRN.CMD,DESNRN.ODL
For RMSDEF: DEFNRN.CMD,DEFNRN.ODL
For RMSIFL: IFLNRN.CMD, IFLNRN.ODL
5.8.2.2 Rebuilding the Utilities ~ If you do decide to rebuild the
utilities, you must take the following steps:
e Use PIP to transfer the appropriate CMD and ODL files to your
account. The files are in [1,2] on the distribution media.
e Use PIP to transfer the file RMSUTL.OLB from [1,2] on the
distribution media, to your account.
e Use TKB to build the utility(s). The utilities and
corresponding map files will be built in your account; you
may then wish to put the utility in a system account.
Each command file for a particular utility creates a utility of the
correct name. So, for example, CNVNRN.CMD and CNVNON.CMD both produce
task images called RMSCNV.TSK; one is built against the resident
library and one is built with disk-overlaid RMS.
Finally, note that the IFL utility command files include an EXTTSK
value which is used to increase the size of internal buffers, thereby
allowing IFL to load larger-sized files and files with many areas and
key definitions.
The default EXTTSK which is specified is fairly large. If you want a
smaller IFL, you can edit the EXTTSK value and rebuild IFL. The
EXTTSK value however, must be greater than 2048 (decimal) words. If
the value is too small, you may get the error "IFL memory exhausted,"
or a SORTs error code.
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