Unit Goals – Stage 1 English Language Arts Neighborhoods at Work First Grade

Unit Goals – Stage 1 English Language Arts Neighborhoods at Work First Grade
English Language Arts
Neighborhoods at Work
First Grade
Unit Goals – Stage 1
Unit Description: Students will learn that our neighborhoods provide goods and services that satisfy people’s needs and wants. Students will read several informational texts to explore and learn
about occupations and the supply of goods and services. Students will practice asking questions when they encounter a word or parts of a text they do not understand. Opinion writing will be the
focus throughout the unit.
Approximate Duration: 4 weeks
R.CCR.1 Read closely to determine what the text says explicitly and to
Transfer Goals
make logical inferences from it; cite specific textual evidence when
Students will be increasingly able to independently use their learning to…
writing or speaking to support conclusions drawn from the text.
•
Read closely and analytically to comprehend a range of increasingly complex literary and informational text. (Claim 1)
R.CCR.3 Analyze how and why individuals, events, and ideas develop
•
Produce effective and well-grounded writing for a range of purposes and audiences. (Claim 2)
and interact over the course of a text.
•
Employ effective speaking and listening skills for a range of purposes and audiences. (Claim 3)
R.CCR.4 Interpret words and phrases as they are used in a text,
•
Engage in research and inquiry to investigate topics, and to analyze, integrate, and present information. (Claim 4)
including determining technical, connotative, and figurative meanings,
Making Meaning
and analyze how specific word choices shape meaning or tone.
UNDERSTANDINGS
ESSENTIAL QUESTIONS
R.CCR.6 Assess how point of view or purpose shapes the content and
Students
will
understand
that…
Students will keep considering…
style of a text.
•
Goods and services satisfy people’s needs and wants
1. What do people spend money on?
R.CCR.7 Integrate and evaluate content presented in diverse media
and
communities
depend
on
one
another
to
supply
2. How do I build knowledge?
and formats, including visually and quantitatively, as well as in words.
them.
3. How do I figure out a word I don’t know?
RI.CCR.9 Analyze how two or more texts address similar themes or
•
Reading multiple texts on one topic builds knowledge
4. Do you get more information from pictures or
topics in order to build knowledge or to compare the approaches the
and offers different perspectives.
words?
authors take.
•
Asking questions about a text or what a speaker says
5.
How do I support my opinion?
W.CCR.1 Write arguments to support claims in an analysis of
helps clarify understandings and builds comprehension.
substantive topics or texts, using valid reasoning and relevant and
sufficient evidence.
W.CCR.5 Develop and strengthen writing as needed by planning,
revising, editing, rewriting, or trying a new approach.
W.CCR.6 Use technology, including the Internet, to produce and
publish writing and to interact and collaborate with others.
W.CCR.8 Gather relevant information from multiple print and digit
sources, assess the credibility and accuracy of each source, and
integrate the information while avoiding plagiarism.
SL.CCR.2 Integrate and evaluate information presented in diverse
media and formats, including visually, quantitatively, and orally.
SL.CCR.3 Evaluate a speaker’s point of view, reasoning, and use of
evidence and rhetoric.
L.CCR.1 Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English
grammar and usage when writing or speaking.
L.CCR.4 Determine or clarify the meaning of unknown and multiplemeaning words and phrases. L.CCR.5 Demonstrate understanding of
figurative language, word relationships, and nuances in word
meanings.
LONG BEACH UNIFIED SCHOOL DISTRICT
•
•
•
There are different strategies you can use to figure out
the meaning of unknown words.
Illustrations enhance a reader’s understanding of the
information the author intends to convey.
Given the same factual information about a topic,
individuals can have differing opinions.
Acquisition
Knowledge
Students will know…
Skills
Students will be skilled at (Do)
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Vocabulary: goods, services, producers, consumers,
purchase, neighborhood
Structures of informational texts (compare/contrast,
cause/effect)
Strategies to determine word meaning (context clues,
prefixes, root words, inflectional endings)
Facts vs. Opinions
Reading strategies: questioning, making connections
Shades of meaning
1
•
•
•
•
•
Making connections from one text to another and
between two pieces of information
Formulating questions to gather additional
information or to clarify what was said or read
Using strategies to determine word meaning
Listening closely to text read aloud and using
illustrations to gain more information.
Drawing and writing opinion pieces
Sorting and defining words by category
2014-2015
English Language Arts
Neighborhoods at Work
First Grade
Grade Level Standards – Stage 1
Reading
Writing
Speaking and Listening
Language
Literature
RL.1.1 Ask and answer questions about key details in a text.
RL.1.3 Describe characters, settings, and major events in a story, using key
details.
RL.1.4 Identify words and phrases in stories or poems that suggest feelings or
appeal to the senses.
RL.1.7 Use illustrations and details in a story to describe its characters, setting,
or events.
Text Type
W.1.1 Write opinion pieces in
which they introduce the topic
or name the book they are
writing about, state an opinion,
supply a reason for the opinion,
and provide a sense of closure.
Comprehension and Collaboration
SL.1.2 Ask and answer questions
about key details in a text read aloud
or information presented orally or
through other media.
SL.1.3 Ask and answer questions
about what a speaker says in order to
gather additional information or
clarify something that is not
understood.
Conventions of Standard English
L.1.1 Demonstrate command of the
conversations of standard English
grammar and usage when writing or
speaking.
f. Use frequently occurring
adjectives.
Informational
RI.1.1 Ask and answer questions about key details in a text.
RI.1.3 Describe the connection between two individuals, events, ideas, or
pieces of information in a text.
RI.1.4 Ask and answer questions to help determine or clarify the meaning of
words and phrases in a text.
RI.1.6 Distinguish between information provided by pictures or other
illustrations and information provided by the words in a text.
RI.1.7 Use illustrations and details in a text to describe its key details.
RI.1.9 Identify basic similarities in and differences between two texts on the
same topic (e.g., in illustrations, descriptions, or procedures.
NOTE: To teach the Foundational Reading Standards, refer to the CCSS
document, Scope and Sequence, and continue to follow the Green Section of
Open Court (Unit 5, lessons 6-15 and Unit 6, lessons 1-10).
LONG BEACH UNIFIED SCHOOL DISTRICT
Research to Build and Present
Knowledge
W.1.5 With guidance and
support from adults, focus on a
topic, respond to questions and
suggestions from peers, and add
details to strengthen writing as
needed.
W.1.6 With guidance and
support from adults, use a
variety of tools to produce and
publish writing, including in
collaboration with peers.
W.1.8 With guidance and
support from adults, recall
information from experiences or
gather information from
provided sources to answer a
question.
2
Presentation of Knowledge and Ideas
SL.1.4 Describe people, places, things,
and events with relevant details,
expressing ideas and feelings clearly.
SL.1.5 Add drawings or other visual
displays to descriptions when
appropriate to clarify ideas, thoughts,
and feelings.
SL.1.6 Produce complete sentences
when appropriate to task and
situation.
Vocabulary Acquisition and Use
L.1.4 Determine or clarify the
meaning of unknown and multiplemeaning words and phrases based
on grade 1 reading and content,
choosing flexibly from an array of
strategies.
a. Use sentence-level context
as a clue to the meaning of a
word or phrase.
b. Use frequently occurring
affixes as a clue to the meaning
of a word.
c. Identify frequently occurring
root words and their in their
inflectional endings.
L.1.5. With guidance and support
from adults, demonstrate
understanding of word relationships
and nuances in word meanings.
a. Sort words into categories to
gain a sense of the concepts
the categories represent.
b. Define words by category
and one or more attributes.
d. Distinguish shards of
meaning among adjectives
differing in intensity
2014-2015
English Language Arts
Neighborhoods at Work
First Grade
Evidence of Learning – Stage 2
Evaluative Criteria (LBUSD Achievement Report Evidence)
See Performance Task Rubric (included in unit)
•
Engages in collaborative conversations about grade level topics & texts
•
Listens and interprets information and ideas
•
Plans, speaks, and presents information and ideas
•
Uses grade-appropriate language & vocabulary
•
Uses appropriate details & precise language to develop a topic
See CCSS-Aligned Opinion Writing Rubric
•
Organizes and maintains focus to support purpose
•
Uses appropriate details & precise language to develop the topic
•
Spells simple words using common spelling patterns & more difficult words
phonetically
•
Applies grade level appropriate rules for capitalization & punctuation
Evaluative Criteria (LBUSD Achievement Report Evidence)
End of Unit Assessment Evidence
Performance Task
Students will work with a group to create an advertisement for a good or
service they could offer in their neighborhood. The advertisement will provide
a description of the good or service, who will benefit from the good or service
and how.
Opinion Writing Task
At the end of the unit students will be provided with the prompt, “In your
opinion, what is more important to a community? A good or a service” Prior to
writing, students will work with the teacher in gathering evidence to support
both opinions and then students will choose one to support.
Other Evidence – may also be used formatively
Engages in collaborative conversations about grade level topics & texts
•
Listens and interprets information and ideas
•
Uses grade-appropriate language & vocabulary
•
Asks and answers questions about key details in a text
•
Uses key details to identify main topics and retell stories
•
Determines meaning of words and phrases in text
•
Makes connections between texts
•
Organizes & maintains focus to support purpose
•
Uses appropriate details and precise language to develop the topic
•
Spells simple words using common spelling patterns & more difficult words
phonetically
•
Applies grade level appropriate rules for capitalization & punctuation
See CCSS-Aligned Collaborative Discussion Rubric
Anecdotal evidence during Reading and Responding to Text (Oral
Participation)
•
LONG BEACH UNIFIED SCHOOL DISTRICT
Learning Logs/Reading Response Logs
Anecdotal evidence during Collaborative Discussions
3
2014-2015
English Language Arts
Neighborhoods at Work
First Grade
Learning Plan – Stage 3
Instructional Sequence Overview
Reading and Responding to Text
and Vocabulary Acquisition
Days
Goods and Services (Reflections pages 276-279)
Day 1
Days 2-6
Goods and Services (Content Connections)
Performance Task Planning Session
Days 7-8
Jobs People Do (Reflections, Lesson 2, pages 282-283)
Performance Task Planning Session
Day 9
Firefighters (OCR, Unit 4)
Days 13-14
One Afternoon (Reflections, page 308-313)
Performance Task Planning Session
Days 15-16
Buyers and Sellers (Reflections, Lesson 3, pages 292-297
Performance Task: Planning Session
Days 17-18
Work Song (Reflections, pages 272-275 and OCR, Unit 4)
Days 19-20
Available
Resources
to
Support
and
Enhance
Instruction
•
•
Guess Who? (OCR, Unit 4)
Days 10-12
Performance Task: Goods or Services Advertisement
•
•
OCR Unit 4
Classroom Library Read Alouds related to theme
LONG BEACH UNIFIED SCHOOL DISTRICT
Foundational Reading
Skills
Language Conventions and Opinion Writing
Language Conventions: Capitalization
Opinion Writing:
Favorite Food (Day 1 of Modeled Journal Writing)
Opinion Writing:
Favorite Food (Days 2-3 of Modeled Journal Writing)
3 Days of Teacher Choice
Opinion Writing:
Who do you think is a great person? (Days 1-2 of Modeled Journal Writing
Opinion Writing:
Who do you think is a great person? (Day 3 of Modeled Journal Writing)
Opinion Writing:
In your opinion, would being a firefighter be a good job? (Days 1-2 of Modeled
Journal Writing)
Opinion Writing:
In your opinion, would being a firefighter be a good job? (Day 3 of Modeled
Journal Writing)
Language Conventions: Adjectives
Opinion Writing: What in your opinion makes the world better? or Teacher Choice
(Days 1-2 of Modeled Journal Writing)
Language Conventions: Adjectives
Opinion Writing: What in your opinion makes the world better? or Teacher choice
(Day 3 of Modeled Journal Writing)
Do the following
daily:
• OCR Green Section•
•
•
•
Unit 4, lessons 11-15
Unit 5, lessons 1-15
Phonological
Awareness Songs
Small Group
Instruction
Workshop
Fluency Passages
Opinion Writing Task
FRSA
•
•
•
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WftB Expository Binder
WftB Setting the Stage Binder-mini lessons to teach essential criteria
OCR Blue Section
4
•
FRS Teacher Guide
(located on intranet)
OCR Units 5 and 6
2014-2015
English Language Arts
Neighborhoods at Work
First Grade
Goods and Services (Reflections, pages 276-279)
Day 1
Vocabulary
Goods, service
Learning Targets
•
Theme Connection
Students will learn why goods and services are important to a neighborhood.
Reader and Task Considerations
At this point in the year, students should be able to start summarizing what was read. Remind students to use details from the text in their summary.
For those who may struggle with this, partner them with someone who will be encouraging and helpful and provide sentence frames.
Focus of Instruction: Reading and Responding to Text and Vocabulary Acquisition
I can listen and follow along as a
text is read aloud. (RF.1.4)
First Read
•
Prior to reading tell students that today you are going to begin a new unit: Neighborhoods at Work. Explain that you will begin the unit by
learning about Goods and Services. Tell students that describing the connection between goods and services can be helpful in understanding
each better. We will take a close look at both goods and services and discuss how they are similar and how they are different in regards to
their impact on neighborhoods.
•
Read the entire text without stopping in order for students to get the “gist.” Students should follow along in their own book as you read.
I can use illustrations to gather
more information and to
describe key details. (RI.1.6,
RI.1.7)
Rereading for Comprehension
Tell students that illustrations can be used to describe key details and to gather more information. Prior to rereading pages 276-279, have
students observe the pictures and encourage them to talk about what they see. Tell students to pay close attention to the smaller pictures
within the larger picture. Students will share with a partner their observations.
Reread the text and ask the following text-dependent questions:
What is the main idea of this chapter? Begin two Circle Maps. One with “Goods” written in the small circle and one with “Services”
written in the small circle. As you ask and answer the questions below, add the information to the maps. (See next page for completed
Circle Maps after information is added from tomorrow’s lesson).
What is a good?
Who sells goods?
Where do people buy goods?
What are some examples of goods? How do you know this?
What is a service?
What do people use to pay for goods and services?
What are some examples of services in a community?
Why are goods and services important to a community?
•
Tell students that asking a question when something is not understood is important strategy because it not only helps clarify something not
understood but it also creates dialogue between you and your partner.
- With a partner have students summarize what was read today. Encourage students to ask questions of their partner about key details
and request clarification if something is not understood.
I can determine the main idea of
a text. (RI.1.2)
I can answer questions about
key details in the text. (RI.1.1,
SL.1.2)
I can ask questions to get a
better understanding of what I
read. (SL.1.1.c, RI.1.1)
LONG BEACH UNIFIED SCHOOL DISTRICT
5
2014-2015
English Language Arts
Learning Targets
•
•
I can identify capitalization
errors. (L.1.2.a)
I can apply capitalization rules in
my writing. (L.1.2.a)
Neighborhoods at Work
Focus of Instruction: Language Conventions and Opinion Writing
First Grade
Language Conventions-Capitalization (see Unit 4, lesson 1, T37 for added support)
For a short video on MINTS see http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rtSu_QTX8JQ&safe=active
•
•
To help students remember the rules for capitalization introduce the acronym M.I.N.T.S (months, pronoun I, names, titles, starting sentences)
•
Show students several sentences written with correct capitalization. EX: Yesterday Alex and I went to Disneyland. We are planning on going
again in October. Have students identify the capital letters and explain why it is capitalized.
•
Play beat the clock: Display a sentence written with all lowercase letters. Partner the students and give them 15 seconds to find all the
capitalization errors in the sentence. Repeat with a different sentence.
•
Ask students to look for M.I.N.T.S in the books they are reading.
Explain to students that names include names of people, places, and things. Also explain that titles can include titles of books and titles of
people (Mr., Mrs.)
Opinion Writing
•
I can write an opinion piece that
states my opinion, provides
logical reasons with transition
words, and a closing sentence.
(W.1.1)
•
I can use complete sentences
when talking to my partner
about my opinion. (SL.1.6)
LONG BEACH UNIFIED SCHOOL DISTRICT
In opinion writing students will write a response to a question posed by the teacher. In their writing they will include:
- Opening sentence that states a position
- Closing sentence that summarizes the same position using different words
- Logical sequence of reasons for the opinion
- Transition words
Follow Day 1 of Modeled Writing Lesson Plan for Explain Why found in the WftB&B Expository Binder, pages 51-52.
Teacher creates a Circle Map and writes “Favorite Foods” (which is a good) in the center of the map and brainstorms her/his favorite
foods. Students will create their own Circle Map, using the teacher’s map as a model.
Ask students to share their Circle Maps orally with a partner and to invite their partners to suggest additional favorite foods.
Teacher creates a partial Multi-Flow map and places her selected topic, in the form of a complete sentence, in the event box. She then
brainstorms reasons why this is her/his favorite food. Students will create their own partial Multi-Flow maps using their own ideas with
the teacher’s map as a model.
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2014-2015
English Language Arts
Neighborhoods at Work
First Grade
Goods and Services (Content Connections)
Days 2-6
Vocabulary
Theme Connection
community, goods, services, consumers,
producers, purchase, barter
This text provides a more detailed description of goods and services and their impact on a neighborhood.
Reader and Task Considerations
Students may find the text structure of compare and contrast difficult. Make sure students understand the words used to compare (both) and words
used to contrast (but). Be sure to use sentence frames using these words for struggling students.
Learning Targets
•
•
•
•
I can follow along and listen to a
text read aloud. (RF.1.4)
I can ask questions to clarify the
meaning of words or phrases.
(RI.1.4)
I can listen to two texts on the
same topic and identify the
similarities. (RI.1.9)
I can answer questions to clarify
meaning of words. (RI.1.4)
Focus of Instruction: Reading and Responding to Text and Vocabulary Acquisition
First Read:
•
Prior to reading say: “Understanding what individual words mean has everything to do with how well you understand a text. As I read, I want
you to be on the “lookout” for words you do not understand.
•
•
Read the entire text without stopping in order for students to get the “gist.”
Ask: What words did you not understand?
Rereading for Comprehension
•
Remind students that the text yesterday and today were both titled “Goods
and Services.” Tell them that reading more than one text on a topic is an
opportunity to gain more information. It also allows the reader to identify
basic similarities and differences between the information presented. Ask:
How is this text similar or different from the text we read yesterday about
goods and services?
Text Dependent Questions
•
Tell students that answering questions about unknown words in a text is also
important and will sometimes give the reader a deeper understanding of a
word.
-
How does the author help the reader define producer, consumer, good,
service? (provides word in the index, words to think about page,
definition, used in bold throughout the text)
-
How is the word producer related to the word produce?
-
Using the illustrations on pages 14-15, how is the picture on top related
to the picture on the bottom?
The author begins each chapter by asking a question. Why do you think
she did this?
Activity
•
I can answer questions about
key details in a text. (RI.1.1,
SL.1.2)
LONG BEACH UNIFIED SCHOOL DISTRICT
Add information to the Circle Maps. You may want to ask the following
questions to illicit information.
What are some examples of goods mentioned in the text?
What are some things you can do with goods?
How are goods made?
What examples of services are mentioned in the text?
7
2014-2015
English Language Arts
Neighborhoods at Work
First Grade
What examples of services are included on these pages?
Why do people provide services?
What are some of the different ways people can pay for a good or a service?
I can use words I learned in a
sentence. (L.1.6)
I can sort words into categories.
(L.1.5a)
•
I can define words by category
and by one or more key
attributes. (L.1.5.b)
•
I can participate in shared
writing projects. (W.1.7)
LONG BEACH UNIFIED SCHOOL DISTRICT
Vocabulary Acquisition (Using pages 2-3)
Working with Vocabulary from pages 2-3: Give students questions similar to the ones below and have them write the correct word on a
lapboard. Students will then use the words in a sentence.
- Who is buying the goods?
- What is a place people live, work and play?
- What do people provide for others?
- What are things that are made for others?
- Another word for this is “to buy”.
- Who provides goods and services?
- Have students practice using each vocabulary word in a sentence.
Sorting Words into Categories: (This activity can be done over several days)
- Explain to students that grouping words into a category, such as Goods, can help them see the similarities and differences between
words and understand more about the meanings of the individual words.
- Create a Circle Map (different than the one created above) titled “Goods”. Have students brainstorm many goods that may or may
not have been mentioned in the day’s reading.
- Using the Circle Map, create a Tree Map to classify different types of goods: (goods that can be eaten, worn, looked at, listened to...)
- Once categories have been selected, add more words to each branch.
- Using the same Circle and Tree Maps from the days before, create a different way to classify goods into another Tree Map (example:
small goods, large goods, or expensive goods, cheap goods)
- Continue working with categorizing using the concept: Services
- Have students work in partners or groups to create their own categories by making a Tree Map.
Performance Task Planning
In groups of 3-4, students will plan a business for the neighborhood. They will decide if their group would like to make a good or provide
a service. (See Performance Task Day one on page 25)
8
2014-2015
English Language Arts
I can describe the connection
between two pieces of
information in a text. (RI.1.3)
•
I can gather evidence to answer
a question. (W.1.8)
•
I can participate in shared
research. (W.1.7)
Neighborhoods at Work
•
•
Introduce focus question: What are the similarities and differences between goods and services in a neighborhood?
Test drive (for teachers only): There are many similarities and differences between goods and services. Both a good and a service are bought
by consumers and can be traded for money, bartered, or exchanged. Goods and services are made or performed by producers. For example, a
baker makes cakes and sells them for money. A good is different than a service in that goods are made by hand or by machine or something
that can be grown. A service is work people do for one another, such as a pizza deliveryman, a dentist, or a clown. Both goods and services are
a necessary part of a working neighborhood.
Using the Circle Maps created on Goods and Services begin a Double Bubble to compare and contrast goods and services. Color code the
similarities and differences so students can see the correlation between the two.
all
similarities
will be
purple
red
green
I can speak in complete
sentences. (SL.1.6)
I can use a thinking map to help
me recall information. (W.1.8)
•
I can add drawings to my writing
to add additional detail. (SL.1.5)
•
I can express my ideas clearly by
describing the similarities and
differences of goods and
services. (SL.1.4)
LONG BEACH UNIFIED SCHOOL DISTRICT
red
green
blue
•
First Grade
Reread to Gather Evidence/Information and Respond to Text
blue
Oral Rehearsal
•
Give students time to orally rehearse taking information off the map. To practice talking off the map, place a red, blue, and green crayon in a
bag. Ask students to pull a color out of the bag. Depending on the color pulled, students will use that information in a sentence. For
example: If blue is pulled a student may say: A good is made by hand or by machine whereas a service is a job. If purple is pulled a student
may say: Both goods and services are bought by consumers.
Responding to Text
•
Have students answer the focus question in their listening and learning log. Encourage students to add a detailed drawing to their writing.
Remind them to describe the similarities and differences with relevant details.
9
2014-2015
English Language Arts
Learning Targets
• I can write an opinion piece with
an opening sentence, logical
reasons with the use of
transition words and a closing
sentence. (W.1.1)
•
•
I can listen to others’
suggestions to strengthen my
writing. (W.1.5)
I can use a variety of tools to
produce and publish my writing.
(W.1.6)
LONG BEACH UNIFIED SCHOOL DISTRICT
Neighborhoods at Work
Focus of Instruction: Language Conventions and Opinion Writing
First Grade
Opinion Writing
•
In opinion writing students will write a response to a question posed by the teacher. In their writing they will include:
Opening sentence that states a position
Closing sentence that summarizes the same position using different words
Logical sequence of reasons for the opinion
Transition words
•
Follow Days 2-3 of Modeled Writing Lesson Plan for Explain Why found in the WftB&B Expository Binder, pages 53-56 (Day 1 began in
previous lesson)
- Take the reasons from the partial Multi-Flow map and create a Flow Map with the three best reasons.
- Teacher models and students write an opening sentence.
- Teacher models and students write a closing sentence.
- Teacher models and students add transition words or phrases.
- Orally rehearse in pairs.
- Teacher models and students write their opinion piece using the “I do you do” process.
•
For the remainder of the three days, you may want to give students other prompts that would require them to form an opinion and write
about their opinion in their journals. (You do not have to follow the three day modeled journal writing for these prompts. It is just an
opportunity for students to apply what they have been learning.) Here are some ideas:
Read several books written by the same author and have the students choose their favorite.
Choose two books with different style of illustrations and have the students choose which illustrator they liked better.
Discuss scary roller coaster rides and have students choose the one they think is the scariest.
Mini lessons
•
Read the Text Connection “B is Best”, and have students find the reasons that support the opinion.
Editing Strategy
•
Review the acronym M.I.N.T.S.
•
Using a highlighter, students will look for correct capitalization at the start of all sentences, and the pronoun I.
•
Have students publish their writing either by typing, rewriting, or some other means of publication such as a class book.
10
2014-2015
English Language Arts
Neighborhoods at Work
First Grade
Jobs People Do (Reflections, Lesson 2, pages 282-283)
Days 7-8
Vocabulary
Theme Connection
job, business, volunteer
This text provides students with an overview of the different jobs people do and how they contribute to the production of goods and services. The text
also introduces children to the concept of volunteer work and the contributions of those who work in the home.
Reader and Task Considerations
Students will benefit from connecting back to previously read texts on goods and services. Remind students that people earn money in order to pay for
the goods and services that are provided in our community.
Learning Targets
•
•
•
Focus of Instruction: Reading and Responding to Text and Vocabulary Acquisition
I can follow along as a text is read
aloud. (RF.1.4)
First Read
I can distinguish between
information provided by pictures
and information provided by the
words in a text. (RI.1.6)
Rereading for Comprehension
• Remind students that the illustrations and pictures in informational text help provide a more complete understanding of the information
•
•
I can participate in collaborative
conversations with my peers.
(SL.1.1)
•
•
I can answer questions about
key details in a text. (RI.1.1,
SL.1.2)
•
•
I can ask questions about what a
speaker says. (SL.1.3)
•
I can describe the connection
between two events. (RI.1.3)
•
I can use words I learned
through reading in a sentence.
(L.1.6)
•
I can use affixes as a clue to the
meaning of a word. (L.1.4.b)
LONG BEACH UNIFIED SCHOOL DISTRICT
Read the entire text, pages 282-287, aloud while students track the print in their own books. Be sure to read the information in the margins.
presented in the text. After reading the text, give students time to go back through the pages and look closely at the pictures. Ask the students
to discuss what part of the text the illustrations depict.
Using your established routine for pair/share, have students turn to a partner and share what they learned from the text about the types of
jobs people do (adding any service jobs to the Circle Map). Encourage students to ask questions of one another.
Reread page 282-283. Engage students in a discussion to help them understand the job done by Mrs. Brown in the business she owns.
Ask the following TDQ's
What are some of the tools (goods) Mrs. Brown needs to do her job?
How do the job applications help Mrs. Brown do her job? What is your evidence?
What goods and services are mentioned on these pages?
Reread the Children in History (page 285). Tell students that it is important to identify language that lets them know two pieces of information
are being compared. What language did the author use to let the reader know that a comparison is being made? Engage the students in a
collaborative discussion about the life of children in Addie Laird’s time with children’s lives in our country today.
Vocabulary Acquisition
Working with Vocabulary
• Reread page 284. Point out the word Transport on the truck. Help children to understand that to transport or transporting means to move
goods from one place to another. Help children to connect transportation to the words transport and transporting. Explain that the root
words trans (move across) and port (place of entry), are the same in all three words.
• Create a Circle Map with the title “jobs that transport”, list the job titles for people who transport goods: pilot, truck driver, train engineer,
bus driver, delivery person (courier). As students suggest jobs in the business of transportation, have them use a complete sentence using the
words transportation, transport and transporting in a sentence.
Prefixes
•
Explain that a prefix is a group of letters placed at the beginning of a word to change its meaning. Give examples of common prefixes: un, pre,
re, in, dis and the meaning of each.
•
Create a Tree Map with different Prefixes for each branch. Have students brainstorm words that could be listed under each prefix.
•
Write several root words on index cards. Have students use the list of prefixes to make new words.
•
Students will look for prefixes in text they are reading, write the word, and try to define the word.
11
2014-2015
English Language Arts
I can participate in shared
writing projects. (W.1.7)
Neighborhoods at Work
•
•
•
Point out the photograph on page 285 of Mr. Hernandez and his Advertisement. Tell students that this is similar to what they will be doing.
Show students samples of advertisements. Google images of advertisement posters. As students look at these samples, have them discuss what
the good or service is, who is the intended consumer, and how would they benefit.
Give students time to work in their groups. Refer to Performance Task instructions Days 2-17. Remind students that their ads should be interesting
to look at, easy to read and understand, have a description or illustration of what makes the good or service special or interesting.
Learning Targets
I can write an opinion piece with
an opening sentence, logical
reasons with the use of
transition words, and a closing
sentence. (W.1.1)
I can organize information using
a map and then use it to write.
(W.1.8)
First Grade
Performance Task Planning
Focus of Instruction: Language Conventions and Opinion Writing
Opinion Writing
In opinion writing students will write a response to a question posed by the teacher. In their writing they will include:
- Opening sentence that states a position
- Closing sentence that summarizes the same position using different words
- Logical sequence of reasons for the opinion
- Transition words
Read the Text Connection “Great People Make America Great.” Look for reasons given in the text to support why each person is a Great
American.
Suggested Prompt: Who do you think is a great person?
•
Follow Days 1-2 of Modeled Writing Lesson Plan for Explain Why found in the WftB&B Expository Binder, pages 51-54
-
Teacher models and students brainstorm “great” people using a Circle Map. The person could be a famous person or someone the
student knows personally.
-
Teacher models and students choose who they admire and create a partial Multi-Flow map with reasons why they admire this person.
Take the reasons from the partial Multi-Flow map and create a Flow Map with the three best reasons.
Teacher models and students write an opening sentence.
Teacher models and students write a closing sentence.
Teacher models and students add transition words or phrases.
Mini lessons
st
Scan student work to determine strengths and areas of need. (1 Grade Writing to Explain Why Rubric page 65)
Determine 2-3 areas of need to begin mini-lessons with modeled writing.
LONG BEACH UNIFIED SCHOOL DISTRICT
12
2014-2015
English Language Arts
Neighborhoods at Work
First Grade
Guess Who? (OCR)
Day 9
Vocabulary
veterinarian, juggler, potter,
pitcher
Theme Connection
In this photo-essay, various neighborhood workers and the jobs they do for the neighborhood are presented. The photographs provide unusual choices to
answer some straightforward questions about jobs.
Reader and Task Considerations
Students will likely benefit from background regarding the genre of photo-essay. A photo essay is a type of informational text that uses photographs as
much as words to inform or explain. A photo-essay includes pictures and words depicting real things. Explain that although this photo-essay uses a riddle
format and incorporates humor, it is still an informational text and provides facts.
Learning Targets
•
I can listen to a text read aloud.
(RF.1.4)
•
I can describe how this text is
organized. (RI.1.3)
•
I can answer questions about
key details in a text. (RI.1.1,
SL.1.2)
•
I can use root words, affixes
and illustrations to help me
figure out the meaning of a
word. (L.1.4a)
•
I can make connections
between individuals in a text.
(RI.1.3)
Focus of Instruction: Reading and Responding to Text and Vocabulary Acquisition
First Read
• Read the entire text without stopping in order for students to get the “gist.”
• Read the entire text through in the big book. Using a pointer to touch the label under each photograph will provide vocabulary support to EL students.
Rereading for Comprehension
•
Tell students that a photo-essay is a type of informational writing that uses photographs as much as words to inform or explain. Authors are very
purposeful when writing and organizing their work.
How is this text organized?
Why do you think the author chose to use this format while writing this text?
How do the illustrations and the words work together to help me understand the main topic?
How do the illustrations help you understand some of the jobs mentioned in this text?
What are some of the jobs mentioned in the text that provide only a service? (dentist, window washer, pilot, bus driver, a juggler, a magician, a
clown, a veterinarian, a mechanic, a plumber, a police officer, a mail carrier)-Add some of these services to the Circle Map
What jobs mentioned in the text provide both a good and a service? (a shoe maker (shoes), an artist (a painting), a potter (a pot), a baker (bread)Add some of these goods and services to the Circle Maps
Look at the word potter on page 13. Look at the picture of the potter. How do the words and the picture help you to understand what a potter
does? (the root word is pot)
How is the job of a juggler similar to a magician? (both provide a service, both entertain)
Collaborative Discussion
•
I can speak in complete
sentences. (SL.1.6)
•
I can ask questions of a speaker
to clarify understanding or gain
more information. (SL.1. 3)
LONG BEACH UNIFIED SCHOOL DISTRICT
•
•
•
Students will engage in a collaborative discussion: Which of the jobs mentioned in this story would you like to do when you grow up and why?
Prior to students discussing in partners or groups, have a student come up to the front of the class and state which job he/she would want to do by
saying: “The job mentioned in the text that I would like to do when I grow up is _______. The reasons why are _____. Model for the class how to ask
questions of the speaker. Encourage other students to ask questions of the speaker.
Group students in either partners or small groups, and have each student take turns sharing their job choice, giving reasons for their choice, and
having the listening students asking questions of the speaker.
13
2014-2015
English Language Arts
•
•
I can use words I learned
through reading in a
sentence. (L.1.6)
Neighborhoods at Work
Working with Vocabulary
•
Create a Bridge Map with the Relating Factor: is a job done by. Students use their Listening and Learning logs to draw a Bridge Map with
some of the professions presented in this text and the job each does. If students aren’t able to do this on their own, you may consider doing
it whole class. Once done, have students orally rehearse talking off the map.
I can identify root words.
(L.1.4.c)
Root Words
•
Tell students that a root is the basic element of a word, and it is the foundation on which the meaning of a word is built. When the suffix -er is
added to the end of the word, it forms the noun into a word that designates a person or an occupation.
•
Have students look to find as many words that end in er and have them write the root word + er. Discuss words that end in er but do not refer to
a person or occupation (letter).
•
As you read and look for words with prefixes (previous lesson) have students identify the root word.
Learning Targets
•
I can write an opinion piece with
an opening sentence, logical
reasons with the use of
transition words and a closing
sentence. (W.1.1)
•
I can listen to others’
suggestions to strengthen my
writing. (W.1.5)
•
I can use a variety of tools to
produce and publish my writing.
(W.1.6)
LONG BEACH UNIFIED SCHOOL DISTRICT
First Grade
Vocabulary Acquisition
Focus of Instruction: Language Conventions Opinion Writing
Writing
Follow Day 3 of Modeled Writing Lesson Plan for Explain Why found in the WftB&B Expository Binder, pages 55-56 (Who do you think is a great
person?)
- Students will orally rehearse in pairs using their Flow Map of a great person
- Teacher models and students write their opinion piece using the “I do you do” process.
- Have students publish their written work either by typing, rewriting, or some other means of publication such as a class book.
Editing/Revising Strategy
•
Students will peer edit one another’s work. Students will be looking for an opening sentence, closing sentence, three reasons to support their opinion,
and transition words. Encourage students to ask each other questions such as: Do you feel you have enough details in your writing? Do you feel your
closing sentence is strong? Are your reasons the best three reasons?
•
Once the work is edited and revised, decide as a class how each student would like to publish their work. Some students may choose to type it.
14
2014-2015
English Language Arts
Neighborhoods at Work
First Grade
Firefighters (OCR, Unit 4)
Days 10-11
Vocabulary
hazardous, monitor, gear, platform,
embers
Theme Connection
This informational text provides students with a glance into the daily work and routines of firefighters who work in a neighborhood. The text shows in
vivid detail the dangers and challenges firefighters face.
Reader and Task Considerations
This text contains many higher-level vocabulary words. All students including EL students will benefit from being told before reading that they will be
hearing some new words. Remind students that good readers ask questions about words or ideas that are not clear.
Learning Targets
•
•
Focus of Instruction: Reading and Responding to Text and Vocabulary Acquisition
I can listen to a text read aloud.
(RF.1.4)
First Read
I can use clues in a text to
determine the meaning of
words. (L.1.4.a)
Rereading for Comprehension
Tell students that often times there are clues in the text that will help a reader figure out the meaning of unknown words. Sometimes those clues can be
found in illustrations, examples given, or defined by the author.
•
Read Firefighters without stopping so students are able to hear the flow of the text and have time to develop a coherent understanding of the text
as a whole.
On page 34-35, what clues in the text helps the reader figure out the meaning of gear?
On page 39, what clues in the text helps the reader figure out what is a walkie-talkie?
On page 45, what clue in the text helps the reader figure out the meaning of embers?
Explain to students that the main idea is one big idea the author wants the reader to understand. The key details are small pieces of information that
help support the main idea.
•
I can determine the main idea of
a text and retell key details.
(RI.1.2)
What are some of the jobs firefighters do that are mentioned of pages 24-29? What is the main idea of these pages? What are the key details
that support this main idea?
Do firefighters provide a good or a service?
What are some of the things firefighters do when all the jobs are done?
•
What are some of the things firefighters do to get to a fire fast? (slide down poles, keep their gear near the truck)
I can answer questions about
key details in a text. (RI.1.1,
SL.1.2)
•
I can sort words into categories.
(L.1.5.a)
•
I can categorize words by one or
more key attributes. (L.1.5.b)
LONG BEACH UNIFIED SCHOOL DISTRICT
What are some of the steps firefighters go through when there is a fire?
What are some of the tools (goods) a firefighter uses?
Vocabulary Acquisition: Sort words into categories
•
Explain to students that grouping words into a category, such as Workers in a Neighborhood, can help them see the similarities and differences
between words and understand more about the meanings of the individual words.
•
•
Create a Circle Map titled “Workers in a Neighborhood”. Have students brainstorm many different types of workers.
•
Once categories have been selected, add more words to each branch.
Using the Circle Map, create a Tree Map to classify different types of Workers in a Neighborhood: (selling, helping, transporting, manufacturing,
teaching...)
15
2014-2015
English Language Arts
• I can gather evidence to answer
Neighborhoods at Work
•
a question. (W.1.8)
•
•
I can participate in shared
research. (W.1.7)
•
•
Introduce focus question: In your opinion, would being a
firefighter be a good job?
Test drive (for teachers only): Test Drive for “Yes”: I think
being a firefighter would be a good job. I feel this way because
they get to save lives. Also, they learn about hazardous
materials and that would be interesting. Another reason is
firefighters get to sleep while they are on the job. I would like
to be a firefighter when I grow up. Test drive for ‘No”: I do not
think being a firefighter would be a good job. I feel this way
because they have to do lots of work like wash the fire truck
and cook. Also, they have to put out fires and that can be very
dangerous. Another reason is firefighters have to always study
and learn about new things. I would not want to be a
firefighter when I grow up.
Create a one sided Multi-Flow Map with the event: Firefighters
have many responsibilities while on the job. Look for evidence
in the text that supports this statement.
See Opinion Writing below for the writing instructional
sequence.
Learning Targets
I can write an opinion piece with
an opening sentence, logical
reasons with the use of
transition words and a closing
sentence. (W.1.1)
I can use a thinking map to
organize my writing. (W.1.8)
LONG BEACH UNIFIED SCHOOL DISTRICT
First Grade
Reread to Gather Evidence/Information and Respond to Text
Focus of Instruction: Language Conventions and Opinion Writing
Opinion Writing
•
In opinion writing students will write a response to a question posed by the teacher. In their writing they will include:
- Opening sentence that states a position
- Closing sentence that summarizes the same position using different words
- Logical sequence of reasons for the opinion
- Transition words
•
Follow Days 1-2 of Modeled Writing Lesson Plan for Explain Why found in the WftB&B Expository Binder, pages 51-54
- Suggested Prompt: In your opinion, do you think being a firefighter will be a good job?
- Teacher models and students form an opinion on whether they think being a firefighter would be a good job. Teacher models and
students create a partial Multi-Flow map with reasons to support their opinion.
- Take the reasons from the partial Multi-Flow map and create a Flow Map with the three best reasons.
- Teacher models and students write an opening sentence.
- Teacher models and students write a closing sentence.
- Teacher models and students add transition words or phrases
16
2014-2015
English Language Arts
Neighborhoods at Work
First Grade
One Afternoon
Days 12-13
Vocabulary
errands, stickball, El train
Theme Connection
One Afternoon is a story about how people in a community depend on one another for goods and services.
Reader and Task Considerations
Students may need the El train is a special city train. The word El is short for the word elevated, which means “up high”.
Learning Targets
•
I can listen to a text read
aloud. (RF.1.4)
Focus of Instruction: Reading and Responding to Text and Vocabulary Acquisition
First Read
•
Read One Afternoon without stopping for enjoyment and for students to get the “gist.”
Reread for Comprehension
•
I can clarify the meaning of
words using context clues.
(L.1.4.a)
•
Remind students that when you come to a word you don’t know, sometimes there are clues in the text that will help you figure out the meaning.
On page 308, it says that Minho liked to do errands with his mother. What was written in the text to help you figure out the meaning of errands?
On page 312, it says “children were playing stickball.” If you don’t know what stickball is, what can you do to try to figure out what it is?
Who are the characters in this story? What is the setting (where and when)?
•
•
•
Minho and his mother went on many errands throughout this story. The errands that they went on are the major events. What are some of the
errands they did together? Create a Flow Map to sequence the
errands they did together. (See sample map)
I can identify characters,
setting, and major events in a
story. (RL.1.3)
I can use illustrations in a story
to describe its characters,
setting, or events. (RL.1.7)
I can answer questions about
key details in a text. (RL.1.1,
SL.1.2)
Which errands did they do that provided a service and which
errands provided a good? (Add to the Circle Maps)
Have students look closely at the illustrations on each page. How
do the illustrations help the reader gain more information about what is written?
•
Reread page 311 and invite the students to talk with a partner about what is happening on this page and in the illustrations.
Then ask the following: What special jobs do the workers on the top of page 311 do in a community? Why does it help the business when workers
repair the roads?
The train itself does not look like it is up high in the illustration. What clue in the illustration shows that it is up high?
Does the driver of the El train provide a good or a service?
What evidence in the text supports the statement on page 312 that “Minho and his mother were very happy to get back to their quiet home.”
Why do you think the author ended the story with “But from the bathroom...PLUNK?
LONG BEACH UNIFIED SCHOOL DISTRICT
17
2014-2015
English Language Arts
Neighborhoods at Work
•
I can identify words in a story
that appeal to the senses.
(RL.1.4)
•
I can define words by category
and by one or more key
attributes. (L.1.5.b)
•
I can sort words into
categories. (L.1.5.a)
•
I can participate in
collaborative conversations
with my peers. (SL.1.1)
•
I can speak in complete
sentences. (SL.1.6)
•
I can ask questions of a
speaker to clarify
understanding or gain more
information. (SL.1. 3)
•
Vocabulary Acquisition (Categorizing)
•
•
•
Using the Circle Map and the Tree Map from the days before, create a different way to classify
Workers in a Neighborhood into another Tree Map (example: jobs that work indoors and jobs that
work outdoors, jobs that wear/don’t wear uniforms
In groups students will continue working with categorizing using the concept: Things in a
Neighborhood. Groups will create a Circle Map and then a Tree Map.
Continue the process by having the students categorize Things in a Neighborhood in a different way
Collaborative Discussion
•
•
•
•
Students will engage in a collaborative discussion: The first sentence of the story says “Minho liked to do errands with his mother.” When you
run errands with your mom, which one do you like the most?
Model for the students your opinion and reasons to support your opinion. EX: The errand I like the most is going to the pet store to buy food for
our turtle. The pet store has so many different animals. Sometimes the pet store even has kittens to hold and pet. I also like to listen to the
parrots talk. The pet store is the best errand to run!
Group students in either partners or small groups, and have each student take turns sharing their opinion, giving reasons for their opinion.
To ensure students are listening, encourage students to ask questions of the speaker to gain additional information or to clarify understandings.
Performance Task Planning Session
•
•
•
Provide magazines for students to look through for sample advertisements.
As students look at these samples, have them discuss what is the good or service, who is the intended consumer, and who would benefit.
Give students time to work in their groups. Refer to Performance Task instructions Days 2-17 (page 16).
I can participate in shared
writing projects. (W.1.7)
Learning Targets
•
•
First Grade
Tell students that onomatopoeia words are words that imitate sounds. Plunk is an example of a
word that imitates a sound. The illustrator included many of these type words in the illustrations.
Sometimes authors use these type words to give “voice” to their stories. Have students look for
onomatopoeia words and record them in a Circle Map.
Focus of Instruction: Language Conventions and Opinion Writing
I can write an opinion piece with
an opening sentence, logical
reasons with the use of transition
words and a closing sentence.
(W.1.1)
Continue Opinion Writing: Do you think being a firefighter would be a good job?
I can listen to others’ suggestions
to strengthen my writing. (W.1.5)
Editing/Revising Strategy
I can use a variety of tools to
produce and publish my writing.
(W.1.6)
LONG BEACH UNIFIED SCHOOL DISTRICT
Follow Day 3 of Modeled Writing Lesson Plan for Explain Why found in the WftB&B Expository Binder, pages 55-56 (In your opinion, do you think
being a firefighter would be a good job?)
- Students will orally rehearse in pairs their firefighter flow map.
Teacher models and students write their opinion piece using the “I do you do” process.
•
Students will peer edit for conventions and revise for criteria. Students will be looking for capital letters, correct punctuation, an opening sentence,
closing sentence, three reasons to support their opinion, and transition words. Encourage students to ask each other questions such as: Do you feel
you have enough details in your writing? Do you feel your closing sentence is strong? Are your reasons the best three reasons?
Once the work is edited and revised, decide as a class how each student would like to publish their work. Have students publish their writing
either by typing, rewriting, or some other means of publication such as a class book.
18
2014-2015
English Language Arts
Neighborhoods at Work
First Grade
Buyers and Sellers (Reflections, Lesson 3,pages 292-297)
Days 14-15
Vocabulary
Theme Connection
Market, save, trade
This lesson uses the setting of an outdoor market to teach the concept of exchange and the use of money to purchase goods and services.
Reader and Task Considerations
Many neighborhoods have different kinds of markets. Emphasize that markets bring together people who want to buy things with people who want to
sell things. Explain that the market in this lesson is very similar to Farmers’ Markets that are located throughout Long Beach.
Learning Targets
•
•
Focus of Instruction: Reading and Responding to Text and Vocabulary Acquisition
I can follow along as a text is read
aloud. (RF.1.4)
First Read
I can ask questions to determine
or clarify the meaning of words in
a text. (RI.1.4)
Reread for Comprehension
I can answer questions about key
details in a text. (RI.1.1, SL.1.2)
Read Buyers and Sellers without stopping in order for students to get the “gist.”
Remind students that it is very important to ask questions when you do not understand a word or if you want to learn more about the word. Asking
questions to get clarification will help you comprehend what the author is telling the reader as well as build your vocabulary. Ask the students to look
through the pages on their own to find the highlighted vocabulary words. In groups or with partners, have students discuss the words that are
highlighted, look for the definition in the text, use the words in a sentence, and encourage them to ask each other questions about the word.
•
Ask the following TDQ’s:
Why did Amy decide to go to the market?
What decisions does Amy have to make when buying the gift for her grandmother?
What’s the difference between a buyer and a seller?
What will Amy use to trade for the gift?
What does Amy decide to buy for her grandmother? How do you know this?
•
I can answer questions to help
determine or clarify the meaning
of phrases in a text. (RI.1.4)
If there were two booths selling flowers, why would Amy buy from one over the other? What evidence supports your answer?
•
Looking at page 295, there is a flowchart to illustrate how money moves from person to person as people buy and sell goods and services. How does
Amy get her money? What did Mr. Lopez do with the money Amy gave him for the flowers? Where do you think Mr. Harris got the money to pay for
the lemonade?
•
Benjamin Franklin once said, “A penny saved is a penny earned.” What does this mean?
Vocabulary Acquisition: Shades of Meaning (Note: you may want to teach the Adjective lesson below prior to teaching this lesson)
•
I can distinguish shades of
meaning among adjectives by
ordering words by their intensity.
(L.1.5.d)
Understanding how words are related helps you become a better reader and writer. Some words are related because they mean almost the same
thing.
Amy looks happy about buying a gift for her grandmother. Words happy and delighted are similar in meaning but delighted has a stronger meaning
than the word happy. Although both these words are similar, they have slightly different meanings (shades of meaning).
Write the word cold on the board. Have students help you write words that mean something similar to cold: chilly cool, freezing. Decide as a class
how to order these words according to their intensity (weakest to strongest) using a Flow Map. Encourage students to dialogue and possibly debate
why they feel one word is more intense than the other.
Start a Shades of Meaning Chart. Add words to the chart each time you work with words that have shades of meaning.
LONG BEACH UNIFIED SCHOOL DISTRICT
19
2014-2015
English Language Arts
• I can participate in collaborative
Neighborhoods at Work
conversations with my peers.
(SL.1.1)
•
I can speak in complete
sentences. (SL.1.6)
•
I can ask questions of a speaker to
clarify understanding or gain
more information. (SL.1. 3)
•
I can participate in shared writing
projects. (W.1.7)
First Grade
Collaborative Discussion
•
Students will engage in a collaborative discussion: “If you were really making money on the good or service you and your group were providing,
in your opinion, what’s more important: saving that money or spending that money? Why?
•
Model for the students your opinion and reasons to support your opinion. EX: I think saving the money I earn is more important than spending
it. I think it is really important to save money because you never know when you may need it. Sometimes unexpected things happen and I want
to make sure I have enough money if that happens. Another reason why I would save my money is because I may want to buy something that is
special but expensive. If I spent all my money as I earned it, I would never have enough to buy expensive things. Saving money is very important!
•
Group students in partners and have each student take turns sharing their opinion, giving reasons for their opinion. To ensure students are
listening, encourage students to ask questions of the speaker to gain additional information or to clarify understandings.
Performance Task Planning:
•
•
•
Provide newspapers for students to look through for sample advertisements.
As students look at these samples, have them discuss what the good or service is, who is the intended consumer, and how would they benefit.
Give students time to work in their groups. Refer to Performance Task instructions Days 2-23 (page 23).
Learning Targets
I can use adjectives. (L.1.1.f)
I can write an opinion piece with
an opening sentence, logical
reasons with the use of transition
words and a closing sentence.
(W.1.1)
LONG BEACH UNIFIED SCHOOL DISTRICT
Focus of Instruction: Language Conventions and Opinion Writing
Adjective lesson: Tree Map adjectives
•
Review that a noun is the name of a person, place, or thing and adjectives are words that describe nouns. Adjectives help the reader picture
what you are writing.
•
•
•
Write sentences with describing words on the board. Have students identify the adjectives and the noun it describes.
Create a Circle Map and have students brainstorm adjectives.
Using the Circle Map, create a Tree Map to categorize the adjectives into words that describe how things smell, taste, feel, sound, and looks.
Some adjectives may not fall under one of the five senses, in that case title one branch “other”.
Opinion Writing
•
In opinion writing students will write a response to a question posed by the teacher. In their writing they will include:
- Opening sentence that states a position
- Closing sentence that summarizes the same position using different words
- Logical sequence of reasons for the opinion
- Transition words
•
•
Read the Text Connection “Electricity Makes the World Better”, and have students find the reasons to support the opinion
Follow Days 1-2 of Modeled Writing Lesson Plan for Explain Why found in the WftB&B Expository Binder, pages 51-54
- Prompt: What in your opinion makes the world better? or Teacher’s Choice
- Teacher models and students form an opinion. Teacher models and students create a partial Multi-Flow map with reasons to support their
opinion.
- Take the reasons from the partial Multi-Flow map and create a Flow Map with their reasons.
- Teacher models and students write an opening sentence.
- Teacher models and students write a closing sentence.
Teacher models and students add transition words or phrases
20
2014-2015
English Language Arts
Neighborhoods at Work
First Grade
Work Song (OCR and Reflections, pages 272-275)
Days 16-18
Vocabulary
Keening, jolting, sights, flashing,
fresh, towering, glowing, brave,
bold,
Theme Connection
This poem describes many of the jobs that people do and gives examples of ways those jobs affect our lives.
Reader and Task Considerations
Explain that meaning is often hard to come by in a poem. Tell students that the easiest way to do this is to break the poem down into smaller parts and
analyze-line by line. Also, poetry can be very subjective, so often the meaning is what the reader makes of it. There are no wrong answers.
Learning Targets
•
•
•
•
Focus of Instruction: Reading and Responding to Text and Vocabulary Acquisition
I can follow along as a text is read
aloud. (RF.1.4)
First Read
Work Song is in both the OCR (lessons 11-15) as well as in Reflections. You may want to have students follow along in their own Reflection’s
book as you read Work Song for the first time but the illustrations in the Open Court Big Book will help the students understand the poem
better.
Read Work Song without stopping in order for students to get the “gist.”
I can identify words and phrases in
poems that suggest feelings.
(RL.1.4)
Reread for Comprehension
I can use illustrations to describe
who the author is referring to in
the poem. (RL.1.7)
I can use illustrations to describe
characters, settings, or events.
(RL.1.7)
I can answer questions about
words or phrases in a text that
suggest feeling or appeal to the
senses. (RL.1.4)
I can distinguish shades of meaning
among adjectives by ordering
words by their intensity. (L.1.5.d)
LONG BEACH UNIFIED SCHOOL DISTRICT
Tell students that words supply rhythm and meaning in a poem. Word choice in poems is very purposeful. There are many words in this poem that
suggest feelings or appeal to the senses. This means that words will be used to describe how things sound, taste, look, feel, or smell.
•
Reread the poem. This time read the poem stanza by stanza. Tell students to listen closely for words that appeal to the senses. Add these
words to the Tree Map that was created in the previous lesson.
•
•
Reread the poem and have students listen and record the rhyming words.
•
Tell students that the illustrations are also a very important feature in this poem. The illustrations are used to describe what is happening and
to help the reader visualize, making it easier to comprehend the poem. You will now reread the poem to the students using the Open Court Big
Book. Explain that the illustrations will make it easier for the students to comprehend what type of worker the author is referring to. (Add
these workers to the Circle Map.)
•
How do the illustrations help you as a reader come to a better understanding of what the author is saying?
Tell students you will read the poem again and you want them to pay close attention to the workers mentioned in the poem. Create a Circle
Map to record the workers (only list the workers the students can find on their own.)
Text-Dependent Questions
Each stanza begins with “It”. What does “it” refer to? (many kinds of work people do).What time of day does the poem begin? end?
Page 273: what does it mean “ice cream cones to lick and wear?”
Page 275: What does it mean “resting short but loving long?”
Vocabulary Acquisition: Shades of Meaning
•
The author uses the word “towering” to describe the buildings (page 273). Why do you think the author used the word towering instead of
tall?
•
Towering means really tall. Authors will sometimes use words to help the reader get a better visual of what it he/she is describing. Both the
words tall and towering have similar meanings but are slightly different (shades of meaning) because towering means really tall.
Understanding how words are related, helps you become a better reader and writer. Some words are related because they mean almost the
same thing.
21
2014-2015
English Language Arts
Neighborhoods at Work
First Grade
•
Write other words that are similar in meaning to towering: tall, huge, enormous, giant. Using a Flow Map, model how you would order these
words according to their intensity (weakest to strongest)
•
Divide students into groups and give each group the following list of words to order according to their intensity: cute, pretty, beautiful,
gorgeous, stunning
•
•
Groups will then share the way they ordered the words and why they chose to do it this way.
Other words to use for extra reinforcement: mad, grumpy, cross, furious, angry
Add these words to the Shades of Meaning Chart. Encourage students to refer to the chart when writing descriptive sentences.
Learning Targets
Focus of Instruction: Language Conventions and Opinion Writing
Language Conventions: Adjectives
•
I can use adjectives in a
sentence. (L.1.1.f)
I can write an opinion piece
with an opening sentence,
logical reasons with the use of
transition words and a closing
sentence. (W.1.1)
•
Read through Work Song and record the adjectives under the proper heading on the Tree Map that was started in the previous lesson.
Students may not identify keening, jolting, or towering as adjectives. You may want to point out these words and explain how these words
modify the nouns that follow them in the poem.
•
Encourage students to use the adjectives in a sentence.
Continue Opinion Writing from the previous lesson
-
Follow Day 3 of Modeled Writing Lesson Plan for Explain Why found in the WftB&B Expository Binder, pages 55-56. (Days 1-2 was started in the
previous lesson.)
Students will orally rehearse in pairs their Flow Map.
Teacher models and students write their opinion piece using the “I do you do” process.
Editing/Revising Strategy
I can organize information
using a map and then use it to
write. (W.1.8)
•
I can listen to others’
suggestions to strengthen my
writing. (W.1.5)
•
Students will peer edit for conventions and revise for criteria. Students will be looking for capital letters, correct punctuation, an opening sentence,
closing sentence, three reasons to support their opinion, and transition words. Encourage students to ask each other questions such as: Do you feel
you have enough details in your writing? Do you feel your closing sentence is strong? Are your reasons the best reasons?
•
Once the work is edited and revised, decide as a class how each student would like to publish their work. Have students publish their writing either
by typing, rewriting, or some other means of publication such as a class book.
I can use a variety of tools to
produce and publish my
writing. (W.1.6)
LONG BEACH UNIFIED SCHOOL DISTRICT
22
2014-2015
English Language Arts
Neighborhoods at Work
First Grade
Performance Task: A Goods or Services Advertisement
Teacher Instructions
For this task, students will work with a group to create an advertisement for a good or service they could offer in their neighborhood. The advertisement should answer the
following questions: What is the good or service? Who will benefit from the good or service and how? Students will design their advertisement to answer these questions
through illustrations, phrases, captions, text, etc. The advertisement may be in the form of a poster, song, flier, commercial (skit), short video or any other idea they may come
up with.
Day 1
Teacher Input:
“In every neighborhood, there are businesses that offer goods and services for money. Part of any successful business is to also advertise. Advertising is a way to get people to
learn about your good or service. Some businesses advertise on TV, on freeway billboards, or in magazines and newspapers. As we study about different goods and services
available in any neighborhood, you will be working with a group to come up with a good or service you could offer. Your group will decide how you will advertise the good or
service. You may want to create your own TV commercial, song, flyer, or poster. Your advertisement should make a person want to purchase your good or service by describing
what it is and how it will benefit others. Throughout the unit, you will be given time to work in your groups.”
Help students brainstorm different goods and services groups may want to create.
Possible Services: dog walking, raking leaves, homework help, taking out trashcans, car washing, etc. (Students do not actually have to provide this service.)
Possible Goods: rubber band bracelets, origami figures, paper airplanes, duct tape wallets, book markers, and etc.(students do not actually have to provide this good)
Days 2-18
Students will work in their groups and create their advertisements. It will be helpful for students to view models of advertisements. You may want to bring in appropriate
advertisements from newspapers, magazines, fliers, etc. As students look at these samples, have them discuss what the good or service is, who is the intended consumer, and
how would they benefit.
Days 19-20 Presentations
Prior to presentations, have students practice. After each group presents, encourage students to ask questions of the presenting group to clarify or gather more information
about the good or service. You may want each group to be responsible for coming up with one question each.
*As an alternative, instead of whole class presentations, teachers may consider partnering groups and giving each group 5 minutes to present prior to moving and presenting to
the next group.
LONG BEACH UNIFIED SCHOOL DISTRICT
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2014-2015
English Language Arts
Neighborhoods at Work
First Grade
Goods and Services-Performance Task Rubric
Speaking and
Listening
Achievement Level
Subsets
4
3
2
1
Engages in collaborative
conversations about grade level
topics & texts (SL.1.1)
Plans, speaks, and presents information and ideas
(SL.1.4, SL.1.5)
Uses grade appropriate language &
vocabulary (L.1.6, SL.1.6)
Effectively engages in the group
discussions for the good or service
the group is planning on creating,
builds on others’ ideas, and
expresses their own clearly.
Clearly and effectively presents an advertisement of
a good or service that clearly shows ALL the
following: a drawing or other visual display, a
detailed description of the good or service, who is
the intended consumer, and how the consumer will
benefit.
Accurately and purposely demonstrates a
strong command of the unit vocabulary
(goods, services, producers, consumers,
product, etc.), language of cause/effect
and its conventions.
Engages in the group discussions
for the good or service the group is
planning on creating, shares their
own ideas.
Clearly presents an advertisement of a good or
service that shows MOST of the following: a
drawing or other visual display, a detailed
description of the good or service, who is the
intended consumer, and how the consumer will
benefit.
Demonstrates a general command of the
unit vocabulary (goods, services,
producers, consumers, product, etc.),
language of cause/effect, and its
conventions.
Participates in the group
discussions for the good or service
the group is planning on creating,
attempts to ask questions and
listens to others some of the time.
Presentation of the good or service is vague or at
times difficult to follow and shows only SOME of the
following: a drawing or visual display, a description
of the good or service, who is the intended
consumer, and how the consumer will benefit.
Demonstrates a partial command of the
unit vocabulary (goods, services,
producers, consumers, product, etc.),
language of cause/effect, and its
conventions.
Contributes minimally or
monopolizes the group discussions
on the good or service and may be
off task.
Presentation of the good or service lacks of
planning, ideas are disconnected and or incomplete
and shows little of the following: a description of
the good or service, who is the intended consumer,
and how the consumer will benefit.
Demonstrates a minimal command of the
unit vocabulary (goods, services,
producers, consumers, product, etc.),
language of cause/effect, and its
conventions.
LONG BEACH UNIFIED SCHOOL DISTRICT
24
2014-2015
English Language Arts
Neighborhoods at Work
First Grade
Opinion Writing Task
Drawing and Writing
Day One
Teacher Input
“We have learned about goods and services throughout this unit. We have learned the similarities and differences
between the two. Now that you have gained all this knowledge about goods and services, which one in your
opinion is the most important to neighborhoods, a good or a service? Before you begin writing, let’s gather
evidence to support both opinions.”
Teacher Instructions
Display all maps that were created throughout this unit.
Create two different one-sided Multi-Flow maps. One with the opinion “Goods are more important to a
community than services” and the other with the opinion “Services are more important to a community
than goods.”
Together as a class write the reasons to support each opinion in the boxes to the left based on the readings as
well as students own reasons (see maps as a sample)
Based on the information gathered, students will form their opinion and create a Flow Map.
Day Two
Teacher Instructions
“Using your Flow Map, you will write your opinion piece. Do your best work. In your writing be sure to state your
opinion, along with reasons and examples to clarify your reasons, and a closing. When you write, be sure to start your
sentences with a capital letter, use a period at the end, and leave good spaces between your words.”
Once students begin to write, do not prompt them or provide support. This is an assessment of what students can do
independently.
Scoring:
Use the LBUSD Grade 1 CCSS Opinion Writing Rubric to assign a holistic proficiency level.
LONG BEACH UNIFIED SCHOOL DISTRICT
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2014-2015
English Language Arts
Statement of Purpose/Focus and Organization
Neighborhoods at Work
CCSS Opinion Writing Rubric
Grade 1
First Grade
Development: Language and Elaboration
Conventions
Score
4
The response is clearly focused and organized:
Opinion is clearly stated, focused, and maintained
Logical progression of ideas from beginning to end
Effective use of varied transitional words to connect opinion
and reasons
The response provides thorough and effective
elaboration:
•
•
•
Effective concluding statement
3
The response is adequately focused:
•
•
•
2
1
Opinion is clear and for the most part maintained
Use of simple transitional words to connect opinion and
reason
•
forms and expands complete simple and compound sentences with
proper subject verb agreement correctly
uses correct capitalization for the first word in a sentence the
pronoun “I”, dates, and names of people
spells words with common spelling patterns and frequently occurring
irregular words correctly and uses inventive spelling for all other
words that are decipherable by most readers
uses correct end punctuation
uses commas correctly in dates and to separate single words in a
series (if used)
Reason(s) effectively support opinion
Use of examples to clarify reason(s)
Effective use of varied, precise, and appropriate
academic and domain specific vocabulary
The response provides adequate elaboration:
•
The response demonstrates a strong command of conventions :
The response demonstrates an adequate command of conventions:
Includes a reason that adequately supports the
opinion
forms complete simple sentences with proper subject verb
agreement most of the time
uses capitalization for the first word in a sentence the pronoun “I”,
dates, and names of people most of the time
spells words with common spelling patterns and frequently occurring
irregular words and uses inventive spelling for all other words that
are decipherable most of the time
uses end punctuation most of the time
uses commas in dates and to separate single words in a series (if
used)
Adequate use of varied, precise, and appropriate
academic and domain specific vocabulary
Provides an adequate sense of closure
The response is somewhat focused and organized:
The response provides some elaboration
•
•
•
•
•
•
Opinion may be unclear and unfocused
Inconsistent or limited use of transitional words
The response demonstrates a partial command of conventions:
Uneven or weak reason to support the opinion
has many capitalization errors
spelling errors interfere with reading
inconsistent use of punctuation
Use of simple vocabulary
Closing, if present, may be weak or patterned
Weak connection among ideas
The response lacks focus and organization:
The response provides minimal elaboration
•
•
•
•
•
•
May be off topic, or include extraneous details
Fails to state an opinion
Lacks reason to support the opinion
Uses limited language
May be confusing
The response demonstrates a lack of command of conventions by:
•
errors in capitalization, punctuation, and spelling are frequent and
meaning is often obscured
No transitional words
LONG BEACH UNIFIED SCHOOL DISTRICT
26
2014-2015
English Language Arts
LONG BEACH UNIFIED SCHOOL DISTRICT
Neighborhoods at Work
27
First Grade
2014-2015
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