Unit Goals – Stage 1 English Language Arts Sharing Stories Grade 2

Unit Goals – Stage 1 English Language Arts Sharing Stories Grade 2
English Language Arts
Sharing Stories
Grade 2
Unit Goals – Stage 1
Unit Description: Students will learn about the power of sharing stories as a way to connect with others and our past. Students will read several stories and examine how characters respond to major events and challenges.
They will also read informational text and understand how sharing stories can teach us about our past (History-Social Science 2.1). Students will begin to learn how to engage in collaborative conversations around text and
respond to text in writing. Finally, students will craft a personal narrative to share with others.
Approximate Duration-5 weeks
CCR Anchor Standards
Transfer Goals: SBAC Claims
R.CCR.1 Read closely to determine what the text says explicitly and to
Students will be increasingly able to independently use their learning to…
make logical inferences from it; cite specific textual evidence when
Read closely and analytically to comprehend a range of increasingly complex literary and informational text. (Claim 1)
writing or speaking to support conclusions drawn from the text.
Produce effective and well-grounded writing for a range of purposes and audiences. (Claim 2)
R.CCR.2 Determine central ideas or themes of a text and analyze their
Employ effective speaking and listening skills for a range of purposes and audiences. (Claim 3)
development: summarize the key supporting details and ideas.
Engage in research and inquiry to investigate topics, and to analyze, integrate, and present information. (Claim 4)
R.CCR.3 Analyze how and why individuals, events, and ideas develop and
Making Meaning
interact over the course of a text.
UNDERSTANDINGS
ESSENTIAL QUESTIONS
R.CCR.4 Interpret words and phrases as they are used in a text, including
Students will understand that…
Students will keep considering…
determining technical, connotative, and figurative meanings, and
•
Sharing stories is a way to connect with others and our past.
1. Why do people share stories?
analyze how specific word choices shape meaning or tone.
•
The purpose of a book review is to help readers decide if they 2. How do book reviews help readers?
R.CCR.7 Integrate and evaluate content presented in diverse media and
want to read a book.
3. What is the author trying to tell me?
formats, including visually and quantitatively, as well as in words.
•
To determine a central message, lesson, or moral, readers
4. How can I figure out the meaning of a word?
W.CCR.1 Write arguments to support claims in an analysis of substantive
can identify key details about how characters respond to
5. What are the rules I need to follow when I talk in a group?
topics or texts.
major events and challenges.
6. What story do I want to tell?
W.CCR.3 Write narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or
•
Good readers use many strategies to figure out unknown
events using effective technique, well-chosen details, and wellwords.
structured event sequences.
•
Gaining the floor in respectful ways, listening to others with
W.CCR.5 Develop and strengthen writing as needed by planning,
care, and speaking one at a time are rules for discussion.
revising, editing, rewriting, or trying a new approach.
•
Writers tell stories by using descriptive details and clear
W.CCR.8 Gather relevant information from multiple print and digital
event sequences.
sources, assess the credibility and accuracy of each source, and integrate •
A command of English Language conventions and grammar
the information while avoiding plagiarism.
brings clarity and sophistication to your writing.
SL.CCR.1 Prepare for and participate effectively in a range of
•
Investigating topics of interest builds knowledge.
conversations and collaborations with diverse partners, building on
Acquisition
others’ ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively.
KNOWLEDGE
SKILLS
SL.CCR.2 Integrate and evaluate information presented in diverse media
Students will know…
Students will be skilled at (Do)
formats, including visually, quantitatively, and orally.
•
Describing how characters in a story respond to events and
•
Story elements- characters, setting, problem, solution
SL.CCR.4 Present information, findings, and supporting evidence such
challenges
•
Moral/theme
that listeners can follow the line of reasoning and the organization,
•
Determining meaning of words or phrases using context clues
•
Question words
development, and style are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience.
•
Responding to a question by gathering information from provided
•
Elements of a book review
L.CCR.1 Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English
resources
•
Rules for engaging in collaborative conversations
grammar and usage when writing or speaking.
•
Writing a book review
•
Vocabulary related to the theme and the standards
L.CCR.2 Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English
•
Engaging in collaborative discussions centered around text, citing
•
Text structure and elements of narrative writing
capitalization, punctuation, and spelling when writing.
textual evidence to answer text dependent questions both orally
•
Context clues
L.CCR.4 Determine or clarify the meaning of unknown and multipleand in writing
meaning words and phrases by using context clues, analyzing meaningful •
Storyboards and Time lines
•
Producing clear and coherent narratives through the writing process
word parts, and consulting general and specialized reference materials,
•
Text features of informational text
using conventions of standard English
as appropriate.
•
Conventions of grammar
LONG BEACH UNIFED SCHOOL DISTRICT
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2014-2015
English Language Arts
Sharing Stories
Grade 2
Grade Level Standards– Stage 1
Reading
Literature
RL.2.1 Ask and answer questions as who, what, where, when,
why, and how to demonstrate understanding of key details in a
text.
RL.2.2 Recount stories, including fables and folktales from diverse
cultures, and determine their central message, lesson, or moral.
RL.2.3 Describe how characters in a story respond to major
events and challenges.
RL.2.7 Use information gained from the illustrations and words in
a print or digital text to demonstrate understanding of its
characters, setting, or plot.
Informational
RI.2.1 Ask and answer questions as who, what, where, when, why,
and how to demonstrate understanding of key details in a text.
RI.2.4 Determine the meaning of words and phrases in a text
relevant to a grade 2 topic or subject area.
RI.2.5 Know and use various text features (e.g., captions, bold
print, subheadings, glossaries, indexes, electronic menus, icons)
to locate key facts or information in a text efficiently.
Foundational
RF.2.3.b Know spelling-sound correspondences for additional
common vowel teams.
RF.2.4 Read with sufficient accuracy and fluency to support
comprehension.
LONG BEACH UNIFED SCHOOL DISTRICT
Writing
Speaking and Listening
Text Type
W.2.1 Write opinion pieces in which they
introduce the topic or book they are writing
about, state an opinion, use linking words to
connect opinion and reasons, and provide a
concluding statement or section.
W.2.3 Write narratives in which they recount a
well-elaborated event or short sequence of
events, include details to describe actions,
thoughts, and feelings, use temporal words to
signal event order, and provide a sense of closure.
Comprehension and Collaboration
SL.2.1.a Follow agreed-upon rules for
discussions (e.g., gaining the floor in respectful
ways, listening to others with care, speaking
one at a time about the topics and texts under
discussion).
SL.2.2 Recount or describe key ideas or details
from a text read aloud or information
presented orally or through other media.
SL.2.4 Tell a story or recount an experience
with appropriate facts and relevant, descriptive
details, speaking audibly in coherent sentences.
Language
Conventions
L.4.1.a Use collective nouns (e.g., group).
L.2.1.d Form and use the past tense of
frequently occurring irregular verbs (e.g., sat,
hid, told).
L.2.2.a Capitalize holidays, product names,
and geographic names.
Vocabulary Acquisition and Use
L.2.4.a Use sentence-level context as a clue to
the meaning of a word or phrase.
Production and Distribution of Writing
W.2.5 With guidance and support from adults and
peers, focus on a topic and strengthen writing as
needed by revising and editing.
Research to Build and Present Knowledge
W.2.8 Recall information from experiences or
gather information from provided resources to
answer a question.
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2014-2015
English Language Arts
Sharing Stories
Grade 2
Evidence of Learning – Stage 2
Evaluative Criteria (LBUSD Achievement Report Evidence)
End of Unit Assessment Evidence
See Performance Task#1 Rubric
Determines central ideas and recounts grade level texts using key
details
Organizes and maintains focus to support an opinion
Uses appropriate details and precise language (including academic
and domain specific vocabulary) to develop the topic
Applies grade level appropriate conventions (grammar, spelling,
capitalization, punctuation)
See Performance Task #2 Rubric
Plans, speaks, and presents information and ideas
Uses grade-appropriate language and vocabulary
Organizes and maintains focus to support purpose
Performance Task #1
Over the course of two days, students will write a book review for a children’s magazine. They will
choose their favorite story from the unit and explain why they liked it.
Organizes and maintains focus to support purpose
Uses appropriate details and precise language (including academic
and domain specific vocabulary) to develop the topic
Applies grade level appropriate conventions (grammar, spelling,
capitalization, punctuation)
Evaluative Criteria (LBUSD Achievement Report Evidence)
Performance Task #2
Over the course of two days, students will create a storyboard of their own life. They will choose four
special events to write about and draw an illustration for each event. Students will share their
storyboards with the class or with a partner.
Personal Narrative Process Piece
Students will select a narrative draft to take through the writing process.
Other Evidence – may be used formatively
Asks and answers questions about key details in a text
Determines central ideas and recounts grade level texts using key
details
Organizes and maintains focus to support purpose
BAP Culminating Writing Tasks
Dependent on type of question asked
Short Constructed Responses
Refer to the Collaborative Discussion Rubric
Uses grade-appropriate language and vocabulary
Listens and interprets information and ideas
Reads grade level text with accuracy and fluency
LONG BEACH UNIFED SCHOOL DISTRICT
Collaborative Discussions
Grade Level Fluency Passages
3
2014-2015
English Language Arts
Sharing Stories
Grade 2
Learning Plan – Stage 3
Instructional Sequence Overview
Days
Reading and Responding to Text
Narrative Writing
Language Conventions
1-3
Amber on the Mountain (OCR Unit 1 Opener)
(A copy of the text is provided at end of this guide)
Initial Assessment of personal narrative
Create a personal narrative writing folder
Analyze a personal narrative model of proficiency
Common and Proper Nouns
4-7
Story Hour-Starring Megan! (OCR) - BAP
Analyze a personal narrative model of proficiency
Subject and Object Pronouns
8-9
Come Back, Jack! (OCR)
10
Books to the Ceiling and Fine Art (OCR)
11-15
Tomas and the Library Lady (OCR) - BAP
16-17
Performance Task #1 - Book Review
18-19
People and Places Change (Reflections; p. 22-25)
Introduce Workshop
Editing Strategy: Correct Capitalization
20
Tracing My History and Read a Time Line
(Reflections; p. 28-33)
Continue Workshop
Editing Strategy: Correct Capitalization
21
A Family’s History (Reflections; p. 36-41)
Continue Workshop
Editing Strategy: End Punctuation
22-23
Performance Task #2- Storyboard
24-25
Students may share book reviews and orally present
storyboards.
Other
available
resources to
support and
enhance
instruction
Ant and the Three Little Figs (OCR Unit 1)
The Library (OCR Unit 1)
When I Was Young (Reflections; p. 8-21)
Amy Tan (Reflections; p.34-35)
Read a Diagram-Family Tree (Reflections; p.42-43)
Discovering Family History (Reflections; p.44-47)
Daily Life Then and Now (Reflections; p.48-53)
TIME for Kids Readers: Family Memories; Life in the 1950s
The Keeping Quilt by Patricia Polacco
LONG BEACH UNIFED SCHOOL DISTRICT
Model the Personal Narrative Structure
Model the Personal Narrative Structure
Model the Personal Narrative Structure
Action Verbs
Possessive Nouns and Pronouns
Review: Common & Proper Nouns, Subject
& Object Pronouns, Action Verbs,
Possessive Nouns & Pronouns
Continue to Review
Personal Narrative Process Piece
Students select a piece to revise/edit, publish and share
Write from the Beginning & Beyond
•
Setting the Stage Manual
•
Narrative Manual
Intranet Resources (Access link on the Language Arts webpage under
“Instructional Resources”
•
Model of proficiency, Student Checklist, Student folder cover
4
OCR Blue Section Unit 1
Language Arts Handbook
2014-2015
English Language Arts
Sharing Stories
Grade 2
Amber on the Mountain (OCR Unit 1 Opener, p. 13N-13Q)
Days 1-3
Vocabulary
Theme Connections
a challenge, to respond, the lesson,
perseverance, to overcome, lonesome,
skedaddled, shy, task, solitary, huddled,
concentration, breakable, stubborn
This text begins to build students’ understanding of the theme: sharing stories. In this realistic fictional narrative, students will be able to describe how Amber responded
to the challenges of learning to read and write while making a new friend. Students will also develop an understanding of how reading, writing, and sharing stories connect
us to one another. Finally, students will understand the purpose of a book review.
Text, Reader, and Task Considerations
The language features of this text are more complex. There are instances of figurative language as well as some unfamiliar vocabulary. Students will
likely need some context regarding dialect as a form of informal language. The author purposefully uses dialect as a way to help readers “hear” the way
the people on the mountain talk.
Learning Targets
I can listen and follow along to a text
read aloud. (RF.2.4)
I can answer questions to show I
understand the text. (RL.2.1)
I can read a story and understand its
moral. (RL.2.2)
I can describe how a character responds
to a challenge. (RL.2.3)
I can reread portions of the text orally
with accuracy, appropriate rate, and
expression. (RF.2.4b)
I can be prepared to discuss a text.
(SL.2.1)
Focus of Instruction: Reading and Responding to Text
First Read
•
Provide students with a copy of the text (located at the end of this unit guide).
•
Tell students that they will listen to you read the text aloud the first time so that they can get a sense of what the text is about.
•
Read aloud the entire text without stopping in order for students to get the “gist” of the selection.
•
Ask students for their reaction to the text (leave this very open-ended, the purpose of this conversation is for students to talk about the text).
Reread for Comprehension
Introduce the concept of how sharing stories can connect us to each other (e.g., sharing a book you like with a friend).
Explain the elements of realistic fiction (characters behave as people do in real life, the setting in the story is a real place or could be a real
place, and the events could happen in real life).
Tell students that in stories there are characters that face challenges and it’s important to notice how they respond to those challenges.
*Read the text aloud to students and engage them in a collaborative discussion around the following questions:
(You may use the “Notes” column for students to write down any thoughts, connections, opinions, big ideas/themes, drawings, questions, etc.)
Have students visualize as you read the first paragraph. Discuss how the author describes the setting.
What does Anna’s dad mean when he says, “You can do almost anything you fix your mind on?”
What is Amber’s first challenge? How does she respond to the challenge?
What is Amber’s next challenge? How does she respond to the challenge?
What does Amber learn at the end of the story? Discuss examples of how she demonstrates perseverance in the story.
What is the moral of the story?
To prepare for Performance Task #1 - writing a book review (Link to Standard W.1.1):
Discuss with students what they liked or didn’t like about the story. First, model by sharing your opinion with reasons to support it. Use a Onesided Multi-Flow Map to state an opinion and support it with reasons. Use linking words (e.g., because, and, also) to connect opinion and reasons.
Then, have students share their opinions in a conversation. Topics could include: characters, setting, the events, theme, illustrations, and if they
would recommend the story to someone else.
To prepare students for writing a brief summary (2-3 sentences), model how you would write one for this story. Amber on the Mountain, by Tony
Johnston, is about a girl named Amber who _____.
LONG BEACH UNIFED SCHOOL DISTRICT
5
2014-2015
English Language Arts
Sharing Stories
Grade 2
**For reading and publishing book reviews by kids for kids, refer to the website: spaghettibookclub.org
I can use context clues to figure out the
meaning of a word.
(L.2.4a)
Vocabulary Acquisition: Context Clues
I can gather and organize information
from sources.
(W.2.8)
Reread to Gather Evidence/Information and Respond to Text
Teach a mini-lesson on context clues using vocabulary words from the story (e.g., solitary, huddled, concentration).
Introduce the focus question for short constructed response: How did Amber respond to the challenges of learning to read and write?
Explain to students that today they will be rereading the text to gather and organize details to help them answer the focus question.
o Create a Multi-Flow Map either with students (if they need more guidance) or place students in pairs or small groups to work
independently to create the Multi-Flow Map.
o Begin with Amber’s challenges (Causes): Amber doesn’t know how to read or write.
o Her response to the challenges (Event): Amber learns to read and write.
o The Effects: Amber can stay connected to Anna because she knows how to read and write.
o Write the moral in the frame at the bottom of the Multi-Flow Map.
o Describe Amber using a Bubble Map (e.g., determined, intelligent, friendly). Add evidence from the text to the map.
I can use details from the text to support
my ideas.
(RL.2.1)
I can work with my group to help me
understand a topic. (SL.2.1)
Oral Processing: Understanding of evidence will be built through…
(Select activities based on the needs of your students)
Have students orally rehearse from the maps to prepare them to write. This can be done in collaborative groups and would provide the teacher an
opportunity to monitor their collaborative discussions.
Pantomime: Have students silently act out sections of the text where they gathered evidence (e.g., how she practiced reading, how she used her
book and copied the words). How does Amber respond to the challenges of learning to read and write?
Drawing: Students can draw a picture of how she feels when she is learning to read and write (frustrated). Then have them draw a picture of how
she feels when she finally learns to read and write (excited, joyous). Have students talk in partners about their drawings.
I can gather and organize information
from sources.
(W.2.8)
Response to Text:
Students answer the focus question: How did Amber respond to the challenges of learning to read and write?
Students add evidence/details from their maps.
Learning Targets
In a personal narrative piece of writing:
I can write the events of my story in
order.
I can use details to describe a
character.
I can use transition words to show
the order of events.
I can write a conclusion at the end of
my story.
Focus of Instruction: Writing and Conventions
Writing Text Type: Narrative
•
•
•
•
LONG BEACH UNIFED SCHOOL DISTRICT
Initial Assessment: With minimal instruction and prompting, provide students with a narrative writing prompt of your choice.
Scan the student essays to determine whether or not students have criteria in place using the Second Grade Personal Chronological Narrative
Rubric page 89.
Prepare for the Unit: Have students create a personal narrative writing folder to keep working drafts, notes from mini-lessons, and resources (e.g.,
transitional word lists, proficient essays, a model of the basic structure, student checklists, etc.).
Using the student checklist for the Basic Structure personal narrative, analyze a model of proficiency (checklists and models of proficiency may be
accessed on the Intranet by going to the Language Arts webpage, Instructional Resources, WftB&B link).
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2014-2015
English Language Arts
I can identify common and proper nouns.
Sharing Stories
Grade 2
Grammar Conventions: Common and Proper Nouns
I can use collective nouns.
(L.2.1.a)
I can capitalize holidays, product names,
and places.
(L.2.2.a)
LONG BEACH UNIFED SCHOOL DISTRICT
Introduce nouns. A noun names a person, place, or thing. (Refer to OC TE Unit 1 pg. 23F)
Teach the difference between Common Nouns and Proper Nouns. Classify on a Tree Map.
Lift nouns from Amber on the Mountain (e.g., Amber, mountain, Anna, cup, etc.) Classify nouns as either common or proper and write them
on the Tree Map.
Have students either collaboratively or independently locate other nouns in the text and classify them in the Tree Map.
Students identify nouns in their own writing.
Students select 1-2 common nouns from their own writing to change to proper nouns to make the writing more descriptive (revising strategy).
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2014-2015
English Language Arts
Sharing Stories
Grade 2
BAP Lesson: Story Hour-Starring Megan! (p. 62-79)
Days 4-7
Vocabulary
Theme Connections
See BAP lesson
In this realistic fictional narrative, students will be able to describe how Megan responded to the challenge of learning to read. They will also continue to
develop an understanding of how reading and sharing stories connect us to one another.
Text, Reader, and Task Considerations
The layers of meaning in this text might be more complex in the sense that being brave does not mean that you have no fear. Sometimes, it means that
even though you’re scared, you persevere to overcome a challenge. For example, Megan, like Amber from Amber on the Mountain, responds with
perseverance. Even though Megan is just learning to read and finds it difficult, she summons the courage to read aloud to a group of children.
Learning Targets
I can listen and follow along to a text
read aloud. (RF.2.4)
Focus of Instruction: Reading and Responding to Text
First Read
•
•
•
Read aloud the entire story once through without stopping or commentary. The purpose is to provide students with an opportunity to enjoy the
story and get the overall “gist.”
Ask students for their reaction to the story (leave this very open-ended, the purpose of this conversation is for students to talk about the text).
How does this story remind you of Amber on the Mountain?
I can answer questions to show I
understand the text. (RL.2.1)
Reread for Comprehension
I can describe how a character responds
to a challenge. (RL.2.3)
To prepare for the culminating task of writing a book review (Link to Standard W.1.1):
Discuss with students what they liked or didn’t like about the story. First, model by sharing your opinion with reasons to support it. Use a Onesided Multi-Flow Map to state an opinion and support it with reasons. Use linking words (e.g., because, and, also) to connect opinion and reasons.
Then, have students share their opinions in a conversation. Topics could include: characters, setting, the events, theme, illustrations, and if they
would recommend the story to someone else.
To prepare students for writing a brief summary (2-3 sentences), model how you would write one for this story. Story Hour-Starring Megan!, by
Julie Brillhart, is about a girl named Megan who _____.
**For reading and publishing book reviews by kids for kids, refer to the website: spaghettibookclub.org
I can reread portions of the text orally
with accuracy, appropriate rate, and
expression. (RF.2.4b)
I can be prepared to discuss a text.
(SL.2.1)
Follow BAP lesson on Intranet for a full list of text-dependent questions, vocabulary, and tasks.
LONG BEACH UNIFED SCHOOL DISTRICT
8
2014-2015
English Language Arts
I can use details from the text to support
my ideas.
(RL.2.1)
I can gather and organize information
from sources.
(W.2.8)
Sharing Stories
Grade 2
Culminating Writing Task: How did Megan show perseverance?
•
•
Analyze the task with students.
•
Reread to Gather Evidence and Respond to Text
o Create a One-sided Multi-Flow Map to show how Megan responded to the challenge of learning to read.
Ask students what evidence they will need to gather in order to support a response to the prompt. Students will need to cite examples of how
Megan showed perseverance.
I can work with my group to help me
understand a topic. (SL.2.1)
Learning Targets
In a personal narrative piece of writing:
I can identify the events in a story
I can identify details to describe a
character.
I can identify transition words to
show the order of events.
I can identify a conclusion at the end
of a story.
(W.2.3)
Focus of Instruction: Writing and Conventions
Writing Text Type: Narrative
Analyzing a personal narrative for narrative writing techniques (see samples in the WftB&B spiral)
•
Look for evidence of each of the following narrative techniques:
Analyze the opening/introduction
Note the sequential order of events. Does the writing make sense?
Are there details that describe actions, thoughts, and feelings?
Identify transition words or phrases
Identify examples of descriptive language
Analyze the closing/conclusion
Grammar Conventions: Subject and Object Pronouns
I can use pronouns in my writing.
(L.2.1.c)
LONG BEACH UNIFED SCHOOL DISTRICT
Teach the difference between a subject and a predicate.
Introduce pronouns. (Refer to OC TE Unit 1 pg. 43F)
Teach the difference between Subject and Object Pronouns by identifying them in sentences. Classify them using a Tree Map. Title: Changing
Nouns. Branches: noun, subject noun, object noun.
Lift subject and object pronouns from Story Hour-Starring Megan! (e.g., she, her).
Have students either collaboratively or independently locate other subject and object pronouns using the Tree Map as a reference.
Students identify subject and object pronouns in their own writing.
Students identify repetitive usage of a noun in their own writing and replace with the correct subject or object pronoun. (Revision Strategy)
9
2014-2015
English Language Arts
Sharing Stories
Grade 2
Come Back, Jack! (OCR Unit 1, p. 26-41)
Days 8-9
Vocabulary
Theme Connections
imagination, illustration, adventure,
alike/different, difference, attitude,
boring, adventure, exciting, searched,
steep, nimble, crumpled, clever,
enormous
In this fantasy, students will gather information from the illustrations and text to understand how Jack shared stories with his big sister. Students will
also develop an understanding of why people love to read and the kinds of stories they like to read.
Text, Reader, and Task Considerations
In regards to students’ knowledge, they will likely need some context regarding classic nursery rhymes (e.g., Jack and Jill). Students could reread nursery
rhymes from the First Reader and listen to the folktale Jack and the Beanstalk.
Learning Targets
I can listen and follow along to a text
read aloud. (RF.2.4)
Focus of Instruction: Reading and Responding to Text
First Read
•
•
I can use the illustrations to help me
understand a story.
(RL.2.7)
I can describe how a character responds
to a challenge. (RL.2.3)
I can reread portions of the text orally
with accuracy, appropriate rate, and
expression. (RF.2.4b)
I can be prepared to discuss a text.
(SL.2.1)
I can use context clues to figure out the
meaning of a word.
(L.2.4a)
Read aloud the entire story once through without stopping or commentary. The purpose is to provide students with an opportunity to enjoy the
story and get the overall “gist.”
Ask students for their reaction to the story (leave this very open-ended, the purpose of this conversation is for students to talk about the text).
Reread for Comprehension
Review how reading stories can open up new worlds of adventure, enjoyment, and imagination; and that there are many ways to share stories.
Explain the elements of fantasy (people, animals, or objects are able to do things that they cannot do in the real world, things happen that could
not happen in the real world, the setting could be in a make-believe place, and it can have creatures that are not found in the real world).
Tell students that in some stories there are illustrations that can help you better understand the characters, setting, or the plot.
Read the text aloud to students and engage them in a collaborative discussion around the following questions using the illustrations and words:
27: Are Jack and his sister alike or different? How do you know? How do they feel about books?
29: (Notice the book’s cover), what are Jack and his sister doing?
30-31: What nursery rhyme does the words and pictures remind you of?
34-35: The author says, “When the whole castle began to shake.” What story do you predict the author is going to use next?
38-39: What is the difference between the pictures? (Pg. 38: they are still inside the book, pg. 39: they are now outside the book)
41: How does Jack’s sister feel about books?
How does the sister’s attitude toward books change from the beginning of the story to the end?
To prepare for Performance Task #1 - writing a book review (Link to Standard W.1.1):
Discuss with students what they liked or didn’t like about the story. First, model by sharing your opinion with reasons to support it. Use a Onesided Multi-Flow Map to state an opinion and support it with reasons. Use linking words (e.g., because, and, also) to connect opinion and reasons.
Then, have students share their opinions in a conversation. Topics could include: characters, setting, the events, theme, illustrations, and if they
would recommend the story to someone else.
To prepare students for writing a brief summary (2-3 sentences), model how you would write one for this story. Come back, Jack! is about a
brother and sister who _____.
**For reading and publishing book reviews by kids for kids, refer to the website: spaghettibookclub.org
Vocabulary Acquisition: Context Clues
LONG BEACH UNIFED SCHOOL DISTRICT
10
2014-2015
English Language Arts
I can gather and organize information
from sources.
(W.2.8)
I can use details from the text to support
my ideas.
(RL.2.1)
Sharing Stories
Grade 2
Teach a mini-lesson on context clues using vocabulary words from the story (e.g., steep, crumpled, enormous).
Reread to Gather Evidence/Information and Respond to Text
Introduce the focus question for short constructed response: How did the sister’s attitude toward books change from the beginning of the story
to the end of the story?
Explain to students that today they will be rereading the text to gather and organize details to help them answer the focus question.
o Create a Circle Map divided down the middle. The left side is the Beginning and the right side is the End. In the center circle: the sister.
Add the sister’s feelings (outer circle) and text evidence (in frame) to each corresponding side.
I can work with my group to help me
understand a topic. (SL.2.1)
Oral Processing: Understanding of evidence will be built through…
(Select activities based on the needs of your students)
Have students orally rehearse from the maps to prepare them to write. This can be done in collaborative groups and would provide the teacher an
opportunity to monitor their collaborative discussions.
Drawing: Draw illustrations to match your answers in the Circle Map. A picture of how she felt about books at the beginning of the story and a
picture of how she felt about books at the end of the story. Have students talk in partners about their drawings.
Drama: (In partners) Have one student act out how the sister felt about books at the beginning of the story and have the other student act out how
she felt about books at the end of the story. Use quotes from the text!
I can gather and organize information
from sources.
(W.2.8)
Response to Text:
Students answer the focus question: How did the sister’s attitude toward books change from the beginning of the story to the end of the story?
Students add evidence/details from their maps.
Learning Targets
In a personal narrative piece of writing:
I can write the events of my story in
order.
I can use details to describe a
character.
I can use transition words to show
the order of events.
I can write a conclusion at the end of
my story.
(W.2.3)
Focus of Instruction: Writing and Conventions
Writing Text Type: Narrative
Begin Modeling a Personal Narrative
Select a time in your life that was special to you and that you would like to share.
Using the Modeling the Basic Structure of the Personal Experience Narrative, p. 77-85 from WftB&B Narrative Binder, begin to model a
personal narrative following the “I do, you do” strategy.
Model and think aloud as you introduce students to the elements and terminology of a structurally sound personal narrative.
After each step of the model, students should be able to articulate what they are doing and analyze their own work and that of others’ for
specific elements.
Incorporate daily mini-lessons that focus on the elements of a basic narrative.
*Keep anecdotal notes as to what students need for future mini-lessons.
I can make my writing clear to readers.
(L.2.3)
Grammar Conventions: Action Verbs
I can use action verbs in my writing.
(L.2.1.d)
LONG BEACH UNIFED SCHOOL DISTRICT
Introduce an action verb. It tells what’s happening in the sentence. (Refer to OC TE Unit 1 pg. 61F)
Have students “act out” some action verbs (e.g., walk, jump, skip, etc.)
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2014-2015
English Language Arts
Sharing Stories
Grade 2
Have students brainstorm other action verbs they can “act out” and capture them on a Circle Map.
Lift action verbs from Come Back, Jack! (e.g., sat, searched, crawling, crying, etc.) Add action verbs to Circle Map.
Have students either collaboratively or independently locate other action verbs in the text and add them to the Circle Map.
Students identify action verbs in their own writing.
(Revision Strategy) Have students Identify weak or overused action verbs in their writing (Example: walked) and generate more precise action
verbs (Example: strutted).
LONG BEACH UNIFED SCHOOL DISTRICT
12
2014-2015
English Language Arts
Sharing Stories
Books to the Ceiling, a poem by Arnold Lobel p. 24-25, and Fine Art p. 82-83 (OCR)
Day 10
Grade 2
Vocabulary
Theme Connections
rhyme, repeated, phrases, a line, beats, a
painting, an artist
In the poem, students will understand that people value and love books. In fine art, students will explore the theme in images rather than words.
Students will understand that one way people can share stories is through paintings.
Text, Reader, and Task Considerations
For the fine art section, students will likely need some context about the paintings. Refer to the background information in the fine art section.
Learning Targets
Focus of Instruction: Reading and Responding to Text
I can listen and follow along to a text
read aloud. (RF.2.4)
First Read
I can use the illustrations to help me
understand a piece of text.
(RL.2.7)
Reread for Comprehension
I can identify rhyming words in a poem.
(RL.2.4)
I can reread portions of the text orally
with accuracy, appropriate rate, and
expression. (RF.2.4b)
I can talk about artwork.
(SL.2.2)
•
•
•
Briefly explain that poems can be short or long and that they can rhyme but don’t have to.
Read aloud the poem as students follow along.
Ask students for their reaction to the poem (leave this very open-ended, the purpose of this conversation is for students to talk about the text)
“Books to the Ceiling” Poem- pgs. 24-25
RL.2.4: Tell students that some poems rhyme and can have repeated words, phrases, or lines and beats.
Have students choral read the poem then have them read it silently. Discuss the following:
What do you notice in the poem? Are there rhyming words? Are there repeated words, phrases, or lines? Is there a beat?
Using the illustration on pg. 25, what do you think the author means when he writes, “I’ll have a long beard by the time I read them?”
How do you think the author feels about books? What’s your evidence?
Link to Standard W.2.1: What do you like about the poem? Have students share their opinions using linking words to connect their opinions to
their reasons.
What kinds of stories do you like to read?
Have students practice reading the poem aloud to build fluency.
Fine Art- pgs. 82-83
SL.2.2: Tell students that one way in which people can share stories is through paintings.
Think time: Have students study the first painting on pg. 82 by themselves without telling them the title or background information. What do
you see in the painting? Have them draw their own conclusions silently.
Then, have students share their thoughts with partners or groups.
Open it up to a whole class discussion. After they share some of their ideas with the whole class, read the title and background information.
Then ask, what do you like about the painting? Have students share opinions.
Repeat the same procedure for the paintings on pg. 83.
Why do you think artists paint?
LONG BEACH UNIFED SCHOOL DISTRICT
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2014-2015
English Language Arts
I can gather and organize information
from sources.
(W.2.8)
Sharing Stories
Grade 2
Reread to Gather Evidence/Information and Respond to Text
Introduce the focus question for short constructed response: What is one way that people can share stories?
Students answer the focus question for short constructed response.
Have students draw an illustration of what sharing stories looks like to them. Have students talk in partners about their illustrations.
I can use details from the text to support
my ideas.
(RL.2.1)
Learning Targets
In a personal narrative piece of writing:
I can write the events of my story in
order.
I can use details to describe a
character.
I can use transition words to show
the order of events.
I can write a conclusion at the end of
my story.
(W.2.3)
Focus of Instruction: Writing and Conventions
Writing Text Type: Narrative
Continue Modeling a Personal Narrative
Select a time in your life that was special to you.
Using the Modeling the Basic Structure of the Personal Experience Narrative pages 77-85 from WftB&B Narrative Binder, begin to model a
personal narrative following the “I do, you do” strategy.
Model and think aloud as you introduce students to the elements and terminology of a structurally sound personal narrative.
After each step of the model, students should be able to articulate what they are doing and analyze their own work and that of others’ for
specific elements.
Incorporate daily mini-lessons that focus on the elements of a basic narrative.
*Keep anecdotal notes as to what students need for future mini-lessons.
I can make my writing clear to readers.
(L.2.3)
Grammar Conventions: Nouns and Pronouns- Possessives
I can use possessive nouns and pronouns
in my writing.
(L.2.2.c)
LONG BEACH UNIFED SCHOOL DISTRICT
Review nouns and pronouns.
Introduce possessive nouns and pronouns. Possessives show ownership. (Refer to OC TE Unit 1 pg. 81F)
Practice punctuating possessive nouns with apostrophes (e.g., Tim Tim’s, etc.)
Have students work in groups to brainstorm other possessives. Classify possessive nouns and pronouns on a Tree Map.
Lift possessives from Story Hour-Starring Megan! and Come Back, Jack! Identify if possessive noun or pronoun. Add to Tree Map.
Have students either collaboratively or independently locate other possessives from the text.
Students identify possessives in their own writing.
(Revision Strategy) Proofread for correct punctuation of possessive nouns.
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2014-2015
English Language Arts
Sharing Stories
Grade 2
BAP Lesson: Tomas and the Library Lady (p. 84-103)
Days 11-15
Vocabulary
Theme Connections
See BAP lesson
In this realistic fictional narrative, students will understand how stories expand our world and open our imagination by reading about a boy named,
Tomas, who loves books and uses his imagination when he reads. Students will also continue to develop an understanding of how reading and sharing
stories connect us to one another.
Text, Reader, and Task Considerations
In regards to students’ knowledge, they will need to know more about the life of migrant workers. Many migrant families keep their culture alive
through oral storytelling. Help them to understand that “migrant” comes from “migration.” Locate Texas and Iowa on a map. There is also some
unfamiliar vocabulary and complex sentence structure that might be difficult for students because it weaves English and Spanish throughout the story.
Learning Targets
I can listen and follow along to a text
read aloud. (RF.2.4)
Focus of Instruction: Reading and Responding to Text
First Read
•
•
•
Read aloud the entire story once through without stopping or commentary. The purpose is to provide students with an opportunity to enjoy the
story and get the overall “gist.”
Ask students for their reaction to the story (leave this very open-ended, the purpose of this conversation is for students to talk about the text).
How does Tomas remind you of Jack and Megan?
I can answer questions to show I
understand the text. (RL.2.1)
Reread for Comprehension
I can describe how a character responds
to a challenge. (RL.2.3)
To prepare for the culminating task of writing a book review (Link to Standard W.1.1):
Discuss with students what they liked or didn’t like about the story. First, model by sharing your opinion with reasons to support it. Use a Onesided Multi-Flow Map to state an opinion and support it with reasons. Use linking words (e.g., because, and, also) to connect opinion and reasons.
Then, have students share their opinions in a conversation. Topics could include: characters, setting, the events, theme, illustrations, and if they
would recommend the story to someone else.
To prepare students for writing a brief summary (2-3 sentences), model how you would write one for this story. Tomas and the Library Lady,
by Pat Mora, is about a boy named Tomas who _____.
**For reading and publishing book reviews by kids for kids, refer to the website: spaghettibookclub.org
I can reread portions of the text orally
with accuracy, appropriate rate, and
expression. (RF.2.4b)
I can be prepared to discuss a text.
(SL.2.1)
I can use details from the text to support
my ideas.
(RL.2.1)
I can gather and organize information
from sources.
(W.2.8)
Follow BAP lesson on Intranet for a full list of text-dependent questions, vocabulary, and tasks.
Culminating Writing Task: How is Tomas’s life on the farm different from his life in the library? Why does Tomas choose to spend
most of his days in the library?
•
•
Analyze the task with students.
•
Reread to Gather Evidence and Respond to Text
o Create a Double Bubble Map to contrast Tomas’s life on the farm with his life in the library.
o Create a One-sided Multi-Flow Map to identify the reasons why Tomas chooses to spend most of his days in the library.
I can work with my group to help me
understand a topic. (SL.2.1)
LONG BEACH UNIFED SCHOOL DISTRICT
Ask students what evidence they will need to gather in order to support a response to the prompt. Students will need to compare and contrast his
life on the farm and his life in the library. They will also need to identify the reasons why he spends most of his days in the library.
15
2014-2015
English Language Arts
Sharing Stories
Learning Targets
In a personal narrative piece of writing:
I can write the events of my story in
order.
I can use details to describe a
character.
I can use transition words to show
the order of events.
I can write a conclusion at the end of
my story.
(W.2.3)
Grade 2
Focus of Instruction: Writing and Conventions
Writing Text Type: Narrative
Continue Modeling a Personal Narrative
Select a time in your life that was special to you.
Using the Modeling the Basic Structure of the Personal Experience Narrative pages 77-85 from WftB&B Narrative Binder, begin to model a
personal narrative following the “I do, you do” strategy.
Model and think aloud as you introduce students to the elements and terminology of a structurally sound personal narrative.
After each step of the model, students should be able to articulate what they are doing and analyze their own work and that of others’ for
specific elements.
Incorporate daily mini-lessons that focus on the elements of a basic narrative.
*Keep anecdotal notes as to what students need for future mini-lessons.
I can make my writing clear to readers.
(L.2.3)
Grammar Conventions: Review
See learning targets from previous
lessons.
LONG BEACH UNIFED SCHOOL DISTRICT
Refer to OC TE Unit 1 pgs. 105F-105H
Suggested Review Instructional Sequence:
- Common and Proper Nouns
- Subject and Object Pronouns
- Action Verbs
- Possessive Nouns and Pronouns
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2014-2015
English Language Arts
Sharing Stories
Grade 2
Performance Task #1 –
(Criteria aligned to Second Grade Achievement Report)
Days 16-17
Teacher Instructions
Day One
Teacher Input: “For the past few weeks we have been learning about the power of sharing stories as a way to connect with others. We have
learned that there are many ways to share stories and that reading makes us part of a community. We have discussed our opinions about different
texts and learned that the purpose of a book review is to help readers decide if they want to read a book. Today, you have been asked to write a
book review for a children’s magazine. You are going to choose your favorite story from the unit we just finished and explain why you like it.”
Show sample models of book reviews to your students. As you study each sample, review the elements of a book review. The book review will
include the title, author, a brief summary of the plot that doesn’t give away too much, personal opinions with supporting reasons, and to whom
they would recommend the book.
Then, have students choose their favorite story from the Sharing Stories Unit to use for their book review. Have students create a One-sided MultiFlow Map to state their opinion and to identify the reasons why they like the story. When done, have students work in partners to read off their
maps for oral rehearsal.
Day Two
Review the elements of a book review. You may have the components of a book review listed on the board. Then have students write.
Students will share their books reviews with the class or partners.
LONG BEACH UNIFED SCHOOL DISTRICT
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2014-2015
English Language Arts
Sharing Stories
Grade 2
Performance Task #1
Book Review Rubric
Students are able to demonstrate consistent and independent mastery:
•
4
•
Includes well developed elements of a book review such as title, author, brief summary that is clear and easy to follow, a clearly stated opinion that is
thoroughly supported with detailed reasons, and a clear recommendation to specific types of readers with a strong support statement. (Determines
central ideas, organizes and maintains focus to support purpose, uses appropriate details and precise language to develop the topic, RL.2.2, W.2.1,
W.2.8)
Students are able to demonstrate progress toward consistent and independent mastery:
•
3
Includes many literary terms such as plot, character, setting, lesson, and several examples of grade 2 appropriate vocabulary in describing the book and
their opinion (“the plot was interesting” vs. “I liked the story”) (Uses appropriate details and precise language to develop the topic, L.2.6)
Includes some literary terms such as plot, character, setting, lesson, and some examples of grade 2 appropriate vocabulary in describing the book and
their opinion (“the plot was interesting” vs. “I liked the story”) (Uses appropriate details and precise language to develop the topic, L.2.6)
•
Includes elements of a book review such title and author, a summary that may give away too much or is too brief, an opinion adequately supported
with reasons, and a recommendation to specific types of readers with a support statement (Determines central ideas, organizes and maintains focus
to support purpose, uses appropriate details and precise language to develop the topic, RL.2.2, W.2.1, W.2.8)
Students are able to demonstrate partial application:
•
2
Does not include the use of literary terms such as plot, character, setting, lesson, and simple vocabulary in describing the book and their opinion (Uses
appropriate details and precise language to develop the topic, L.2.6)
• Includes some elements of a book review (title and author, a summary that may be unclear or overly complicated, an opinion that may not supported
with reasons, and a recommendation statement that is general such as, “Everyone will like it.” (Determines central ideas, organizes and maintains
focus to support purpose, uses appropriate details and precise language to develop the topic, RL.2.2, W.2.1, W.2.8)
Students are able to demonstrate minimal application:
•
1
•
Does not include the use of literary terms such as plot, character, setting, lesson, and simple vocabulary in describing the book and their opinion (Uses
appropriate details and precise language to develop the topic, L.2.6)
Is unclear and missing many elements (Determines central ideas, organizes and maintains focus to support purpose, uses appropriate details and
precise language to develop the topic, RL.2.2, W.2.1, W.2.8)
LONG BEACH UNIFED SCHOOL DISTRICT
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2014-2015
English Language Arts
Sharing Stories
People and Places Change, informational text (Reflections: Unit 1, Lesson 1; p. 22-25)
Grade 2
Day 18-19
Vocabulary
Theme Connections
history, past, change, community,
present
In this informational text, students will be able to compare the past with the present and understand that history tells the story of the past.
Text, Reader, and Task Considerations
Students will likely need concept development of the past (history) and the present. They will also need some explanation on text features and how to
read this informational textbook.
Learning Targets
I can listen and follow along to a text
read aloud. (RF.2.4)
Focus of Instruction: Reading and Responding to Text
First Read
•
•
•
•
•
•
I can answer questions to show I
understand the text. (RI.2.1)
Reread for Comprehension
Tell students that looking at text features: headings, bold print words, and photographs help readers identify the main topic of a text.
Read the text aloud to students and engage them in a collaborative discussion around the following questions:
22: What is history? What is the past?
23: What are some things that have changed over time?
22-23: Using the photographs, what is different about the way families lived in the past and the way families live today?
24: What is a community? What are the places in your community?
Using context clues, what is the present? Add to the Bridge Map. The present means its happening now or today just as the future means it
will happen later.
24: Using the photographs, which picture is from the past and which one is from the present? How do you know?
I can use the text features to help me
understand what I’m reading. (RI.2.5)
I can reread portions of the text orally
with accuracy, appropriate rate, and
expression. (RF.2.4b)
I can be prepared to discuss a text.
(SL.2.1)
I can use context clues to figure out the
meaning of a word. (L.2.4a)
Introduce the concepts of the past (history) and the present by providing a brief definition. Give an example of how people and places change over
time (e.g., you were a baby, then you were a toddler, now you are a child).
Go over pg. 1- unit opener and pgs.2-3- vocabulary.
Teach the text features of informational texts (headings, captions, photographs, illustrations, text boxes, bold words).
Tell students that they will listen to you read the text aloud the first time so that they can get a sense of what the text is about.
Read aloud the entire text without stopping in order for students to get the “gist” of the selection.
Ask students for their reaction to the text (leave this very open-ended, the purpose of this conversation is for students to talk about the text).
Vocabulary Acquisition:
LONG BEACH UNIFED SCHOOL DISTRICT
Review context clues.
Create a Bridge Map. The Relating Factor: ___means ___. The past means it already happened just as the present means its happening now or
today just as the future means it will happen later.
Create a Flow Map: past present future
19
2014-2015
English Language Arts
I can gather and organize information
from sources.
(W.2.8)
Sharing Stories
Introduce the focus question for short constructed response: In what ways do people and places change over time? Give at least 2-3 examples.
Explain to students that today they will be rereading the text to gather and organize details to help them answer the focus question.
o Create a Circle Map. In the center circle: Things that can change are ________. In the outer circle: the homes people live in, the clothes
they wear, and the ways they have fun. The purpose is to have students speak in complete sentences.
I can use details from the text to support
my ideas.
(RL.2.1)
I can work with my group to help me
understand a topic. (SL.2.1)
Grade 2
Reread to Gather Evidence/Information and Respond to Text
Oral Processing: Understanding of evidence will be built through…
(Select activities based on the needs of your students)
Have students orally rehearse from the maps to prepare them to write. This can be done in collaborative groups and would provide the teacher an
opportunity to monitor their collaborative discussions.
Drawing: Draw illustrations to match your answers in the Circle Map. (You might have students draw their pictures in the frame.) Have students
talk in partners about their illustrations.
I can gather and organize information
from sources.
(W.2.8)
Response to Text:
Students answer the focus question: In what ways do people and places change over time? Give at least 2-3 examples.
Students add evidence/details from their maps.
Learning Targets
In a personal narrative piece of writing:
I can write the events of my story in
order.
I can use details to describe a
character.
I can use transition words to show
the order of events.
I can write a conclusion at the end of
my story.
(W.2.3)
I can use correct capitalization in my
writing. (L.2.2.a)
Focus of Instruction: Writing and Conventions
Writing Text Type: Narrative
Introduce Workshop
Introduce Writer’s Workshop Process with workshop posters
Model each step of the writing process with a self-selected piece
Students work at own pace with a self-selected topic
Mini-lessons
Focus on the process and routines for workshop: Selecting topics, Planning/Mapping, and Drafting
Grammar Conventions: Editing for correct capitalization
•
Review rules of capitalization. Capital letters are used for the first word in a sentence, the pronoun “I”, dates, names of people, holidays, product
names, and geographic names.
•
•
Create a Tree Map with each of these categories and provide examples underneath each branch.
LONG BEACH UNIFED SCHOOL DISTRICT
Place students in pairs to look for examples of these categories in their own writing and check to make sure they have capitalized the words
properly.
20
2014-2015
English Language Arts
Sharing Stories
Tracing My History and Read a Time Line, informational text (Reflections: Unit 1, Lesson 2; p. 28-33)
Grade 2
Day 20
Vocabulary
Theme Connections
storyboard, event, sequence,
chronological order, family reunion, time
line, special
In this informational text, students will understand that stories can be shared by using storyboards as a way to connect with others.
Text, Reader, and Task Considerations
Students will likely need some context regarding chronological order and the types of special events that can happen in a person’s life that could be
used in a storyboard. You could bring pictures of yourself as a baby, a child, a teenager, and an adult to share with the class. Then, mix up the
photographs and have children arrange them in chronological order.
Learning Targets
I can listen and follow along to a text
read aloud. (RF.2.4)
Focus of Instruction: Reading and Responding to Text
First Read
•
•
•
•
•
I can answer questions to show I
understand the text. (RI.2.1)
Reread for Comprehension
Tell students that looking at text features: headings, bold print words, captions, and photographs help readers identify the main topic of a text.
Read the text aloud while students track the print, stopping in chunks to engage in a whole class or partner discussion:
28-29: Using the text, captions, and photographs, what is a storyboard? What is an event? How are the events placed on a storyboard?
Why is Rico’s first picture a baby picture?
30-31: What is a family reunion? What are some special events at which different generations of a family might gather?
If you were to make a storyboard, what three special events would you pick?
I can use the text features to help me
understand what I’m reading. (RI.2.5)
I can reread portions of the text orally
with accuracy, appropriate rate, and
expression. (RF.2.4b)
I can be prepared to discuss a text.
(SL.2.1)
I can use context clues to figure out the
meaning of a word. (L.2.4a)
Review that there are many ways to share stories that connect us to others in our community. Directors use storyboards to organize their story
before making a movie and writers use them to help organize their story.
Briefly review some text features of informational text (headings, subheadings, bold words, captions, photographs, and illustrations).
Tell students that they will listen to you read the text aloud the first time so that they can get a sense of what the text is about.
Read aloud the entire text without stopping in order for students to get the “gist” of the selection.
Ask students for their reaction to the text (leave this very open-ended, the purpose of this conversation is for students to talk about the text).
Read a Time Line
Begin with the Introduce activity found on pg. 32 of the TE.
32-33: What is a time line? How do you read a time line? Have students practice reading the time line from left to right as you read it aloud.
How is a time line like a storyboard? They both show events in chronological order.
How is a time line different from a storyboard? A time line has a mark above the event labeled with a specific date.
Have students answer questions #1-3 on pg. 33 about the time line.
Vocabulary Acquisition: Context Clues
LONG BEACH UNIFED SCHOOL DISTRICT
Review context clues.
30: What is a family reunion?
21
2014-2015
English Language Arts
I can gather and organize information
from sources.
(W.2.8)
Sharing Stories
Introduce the focus question for short constructed response: Why do people use storyboards and time lines? Give 2 examples of how someone
might use a storyboard or time line.
Explain to students that today they will be rereading the text to gather and organize details to help them answer the focus question.
o Create a One-sided Multi-Flow Map to record the reasons why someone might use a storyboard or time line.
o Create a Circle Map of special events (e.g., birthdays, losing a tooth, moving to a new place, a new baby brother or sister, going to
Disneyland).
I can use details from the text to support
my ideas.
(RL.2.1)
I can work with my group to help me
understand a topic. (SL.2.1)
Grade 2
Reread to Gather Evidence/Information and Respond to Text
Oral Processing: Understanding of evidence will be built through…
(Select activities based on the needs of your students)
Have students orally rehearse from the maps to prepare them to write. This can be done in collaborative groups and would provide the teacher an
opportunity to monitor their collaborative discussions.
I can gather and organize information
from sources.
(W.2.8)
Response to Text:
Students answer the focus question: Why do people use storyboards and time lines? Give 2 examples of how someone might use a storyboard
or time line.
Students add evidence/details from their maps to support this statement.
Learning Targets
In a personal narrative piece of writing:
I can write the events of my story in
order.
I can use details to describe a
character.
I can use transition words to show
the order of events.
I can write a conclusion at the end of
my story.
(W.2.3)
Focus of Instruction: Writing and Conventions
Writing Text Type: Narrative
Continue Workshop
Continue modeling the process with a self-selected piece
Mini-Lessons
Focus on the process and routines for workshop: Self-check using student checklist and revise/edit, peer conference using student checklist and
revise/edit, conference with the teacher and revise/edit
- Model how to have a conference with a peer
I can make my writing clear to readers.
(L.2.3)
Grammar Conventions: Editing for correct capitalization
I can use correct capitalization in my
writing. (L.2.2.a)
•
•
LONG BEACH UNIFED SCHOOL DISTRICT
Continue to work with students on editing for correct capitalization
Provide students with sample sentences with capitalization errors and have them edit for correct capitalization.
22
2014-2015
English Language Arts
Sharing Stories
Grade 2
A Family’s History, an informational text (Reflections: Unit 1, Lesson 3; p. 36-41)
Day 21
Vocabulary
Theme Connections
family history, ancestor, artifact, source,
interview, heritage, atlas, glossary
In this informational text, students will understand that every family has its own history and that there are many ways families pass along their history
using interviews, photographs, artifacts, and other sources.
Text, Reader, and Task Considerations
Students will likely need to understand the concept of an interview. You could do a quick interview with a student in front of the class. They might also
benefit from a discussion about culture.
Learning Targets
I can listen and follow along to a text
read aloud. (RF.2.4)
Focus of Instruction: Reading and Responding to Text
First Read
•
•
•
•
•
I can answer questions to show I
understand the text. (RI.2.1)
Reread for Comprehension
Tell students that looking at text features: headings, bold print words, captions, and photographs help readers identify the main topic of a text.
Read the text aloud while students track the print, stopping in chunks to engage in a whole class or partner discussion:
36-37. Using context clues, what are ancestors?
Where is Lan’s family from? Use the Atlas section in the back of the book or a globe to locate Vietnam.
Do you know where your family is from? Locate their answers on a map or globe.
What are artifacts?
37: Using the photograph, what artifacts do you see in the box?
Does your family have an artifact that has been passed down? Does that artifact tell a story?
Using the picture glossary in the back of the book, what is a source? (Found on R38)
38-39: What is heritage? How are the song and dress part of Lan’s heritage?
40-41: Using the illustration on pg. 40, what is a scrapbook? What are some things you can include in a scrapbook?
Does your family have a scrapbook? What kinds of things are inside your family’s scrapbook?
How did Lan learn about her family’s history?
I can use the text features to help me
understand what I’m reading. (RI.2.5)
I can reread portions of the text orally
with accuracy, appropriate rate, and
expression. (RF.2.4b)
I can be prepared to discuss a text.
(SL.2.1)
I can use apposition to figure out the
meaning of a word. (L.2.4)
Review the idea that every family has its own history. Families not only pass down stories, but they can also pass down photographs and artifacts
that tell stories, too.
Briefly review some text features of informational text (headings, subheadings, bold words, captions).
Tell students that they will listen to you read the text aloud the first time so that they can get a sense of what the text is about.
Read aloud the entire text without stopping in order for students to get the “gist” of the selection.
Ask students for their reaction to the text (leave this very open-ended, the purpose of this conversation is for students to talk about the text).
Vocabulary Acquisition: Apposition
LONG BEACH UNIFED SCHOOL DISTRICT
Teach apposition.
37: What is an artifact?
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English Language Arts
I can gather and organize information
from sources.
(W.2.8)
Sharing Stories
Introduce the focus question for short constructed response: How can we learn about a family’s history? Name 2-3 sources.
Explain to students that today they will be rereading the text to gather and organize details to help them answer the focus question.
o Create a Tree Map. Title: Ways we can learn about a family’s history. Branches: shared stories, interviews, artifacts, photographs,
scrapbooks, etc.
I can use details from the text to support
my ideas.
(RL.2.1)
I can work with my group to help me
understand a topic. (SL.2.1)
Grade 2
Reread to Gather Evidence/Information and Respond to Text
Oral Processing: Understanding of evidence will be built through…
(Select activities based on the needs of your students)
Have students orally rehearse from the maps to prepare them to write. This can be done in collaborative groups and would provide the teacher an
opportunity to monitor their collaborative discussions.
I can gather and organize information
from sources.
(W.2.8)
Response to Text:
Students answer the focus question: How can we learn about a family’s history? Name 2-3 sources.
Students add evidence/details from their maps to support this statement.
Learning Targets
In a personal narrative piece of writing:
I can write the events of my story in
order.
I can use details to describe a
character.
I can use transition words to show
the order of events.
I can write a conclusion at the end of
my story.
(W.2.3)
Focus of Instruction: Writing and Conventions
Writing Text Type: Narrative
Continue Workshop
Continue modeling the process with a self-selected piece
Mini-Lessons
Focus on the process and routines for workshop: Self-check using student checklist and revise/edit, peer conference using student checklist and
revise/edit, conference with the teacher and revise/edit
- Model how to have a conference with a peer
I can make my writing clear to readers.
(L.2.3)
Grammar Conventions: Editing for end punctuation.
I can edit my work for correct end
punctuation. (L.2.2)
LONG BEACH UNIFED SCHOOL DISTRICT
Review with students that sentences end in punctuation. Review the types of sentences and that each type has certain end punctuation.
Make a Tree Map with the 4 types of sentences, declarative, interrogative, imperative, and exclamatory. Write an example of each under the
corresponding branch emphasizing the end punctuation.
Have students work with a partner to edit for correct punctuation in their own writing.
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English Language Arts
Sharing Stories
Grade 2
Performance Task #2 – Storyboard –
(Criteria aligned to Second Grade Achievement Report)
Days 22-23
Teacher Instructions
Day One
Teacher Input: “For the past few weeks, we have been learning about sharing stories as a way to connect with others and our past. We have read
many stories and informational texts about ways people share stories. Today, you are going to share the story of your life with others by creating a
storyboard.”
Have students turn to pg. 28 in their Social Studies text. “Remember when we studied Rico’s storyboard and when you created a storyboard of Amy
Tan’s life? Now, you are going to create your own storyboard. You’re going to choose four special events to write about and draw an illustration for
each event. “
First, model how to make a storyboard using your own life. Create a Circle Map to brainstorm your special events. You can then use a Flow Map, if
you choose to, to make your storyboard. Begin with, “when you were born”, then add three more special events. Write a caption for each event
and draw a quick illustration to match. Remind students that storyboards are sequenced in chronological order.
Students can refer back to the Circle Map that was created in Lesson 2 to brainstorm ideas for their special events. Students may use a Flow Map to
create their storyboards (e.g., the illustration goes in the box and the caption for the event is written on the lines beneath the box).
Day Two
Students will continue to work on their storyboards.
Students will share their storyboards to the class or with a partner.
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English Language Arts
Sharing Stories
Grade 2
Performance Task #2
Storyboard Rubric
Students are able to demonstrate consistent and independent mastery:
4
•
•
•
•
Flow Map includes clear event sequencing of important events (organizes and maintains focus to support purpose, W.2.8)
•
Speaks clearly at an understandable pace (plans, speaks, and presents information/ideas, SL.2.4)
Captions provide descriptive details (uses appropriate details and precise language, W.2.3,L.2.6)
No grammatical errors (applies grade level appropriate conventions, L.2.1, L.2.2)
Orally recounts the experiences in an organized manner, using appropriate facts and relevant descriptive details (plans, speaks, and presents
information/ideas, SL.2.4)
Students are able to demonstrate progress toward consistent and independent mastery:
3
•
•
•
•
Flow Map includes clear event sequencing of important events (organizes and maintains focus to support purpose, W.2.8)
•
Speaks somewhat clearly at an understandable pace (plans, speaks, and presents information/ideas, SL.2.4)
Captions provide some detail (uses appropriate details and precise language, W.2.3,L.2.6)
A few grammatical errors may be present (applies grade level appropriate conventions, L.2.1, L.2.2)
Orally recounts the experiences in an organized manner, using appropriate facts and relevant descriptive details but may be somewhat unbalanced (plans,
speaks, and presents information/ideas, SL.2.4)
Students are able to demonstrate partial application:
2
•
•
•
•
•
Sequence of events are out of order or unclear (organizes and maintains focus to support purpose, W.2.8)
Captions provide little detail (uses appropriate details and precise language, W.2.3,L.2.6)
Several grammatical errors (applies grade level appropriate conventions, L.2.1, L.2.2)
Orally recounts the experiences but may be disorganized, using few descriptive details (plans, speaks, and presents information/ideas, SL.2.4)
Speaks too softly for most students to hear (plans, speaks, and presents information/ideas, SL.2.4)
Students demonstrate minimal application:
1
•
•
•
•
•
Events are not sequenced but rather in a random order (organizes and maintains focus to support purpose, W.2.8)
Lacking captions or very minimal (uses appropriate details and precise language, W.2.3,L.2.6)
Several grammatical errors (applies grade level appropriate conventions, L.2.1, L.2.2)
Unable to orally recount the events (plans, speaks, and presents information/ideas, SL.2.4)
Difficult to understand (plans, speaks, and presents information/ideas, SL.2.4)
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English Language Arts
Use the following rubric to score the Narrative Writing Process Piece:
Statement of Purpose/Focus and Organization
Development: Language and Elaboration
The narrative, real or imagined, is clearly focused and organized:
The narrative, real or imagined, provides thorough and effective
elaboration:
Score
effectively establishes a setting, narrator and/or characters
logical sequence of events from beginning to end
4
•
•
•
•
•
effective opening and closing
•
adequately established a setting, narrator and /or characters
adequate use of transitional words and phrases to signal
event order
2
•
•
•
•
1
effective use of details, dialogue, and/or description to
elaborate on events
effective use of details to describe the thoughts and feelings
of characters that advance the story
•
•
•
Grade 2
Conventions
The narrative, real or imagined, demonstrates a strong
command of conventions:
few, if any, errors in usage and sentence formation
effective and consistent use of punctuation, capitalization,
and spelling
effective use of sensory and concrete language to describe
characters, setting, and events providing a sense of voice
The narrative, real or imagined, provides adequate elaboration:
adequate sequence of events from beginning to end
adequate use of details, dialogue, and/or description to
elaborate on events
adequate use of details to describe the actions, thoughts,
and feelings of characters
The narrative, real or imagined, demonstrates an adequate
command of conventions:
some errors in usage and sentence formation but no
systematic pattern of errors is displayed
adequate use of punctuation, capitalization, and spelling
adequate use of sensory and concrete language to describe
characters, setting, and events
adequate opening and closing
The narrative, real or imagined, is somewhat focused and
organized:
•
•
effective use of a variety of transitional words and phrases to
signal event order
The narrative, real or imagined, is adequately focused and
organized:
3
Sharing Stories
inconsistently establishes a setting, narrator and/or
characters
uneven or inconsistent sequence of events
The narrative, real or imagined, provides some elaboration
•
•
•
uneven or limited use details to elaborate on events
limited use of details to describe actions, thoughts, and
feelings of characters
partial or weak use of sensory and concrete language
The narrative, real or imagined, demonstrates a partial
command of conventions:
frequent errors in usage may obscure meaning
inconsistent use of punctuation, capitalization, and spelling
inconsistent or limited use of transitional words to signal
event order
opening and closing, if present, are weak
weak connection among ideas
The narrative, real or imagined, lacks focus and organization:
The narrative, real or imagined, provides minimal elaboration
•
•
•
•
•
•
may be very brief
minimal or irrelevant details
may be off topic or include extraneous details
The narrative, real or imagined, demonstrates a lack of
command of conventions:
errors are frequent and severe and meaning is often
obscured
no discernible plot or sequence of events
may be confusing
few or no transitional words or phrases
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English Language Arts
Sharing Stories
Grade 2
NAME _________________________________________________
Amber on the Mountain
by Tony Johnston
(OCR UNIT 1 Opener)
RUNNING TEXT
Number
1
NOTES
Amber lived on a mountain so high, it poked through the clouds like a needle stuck in down.
Trees bristled on it like porcupine quills. And the air made you giddy—it was that clear. Still, for all
that soaring beauty, Amber was lonesome. For mountain people lived scattered far from one
another.
2
Once a man came on horseback to teach people to read and write. How Amber longed to read
and write! Books would be good company. But mountain life was too hard for the man. He left his
supplies behind and skedaddled before winter came.
3
One day another man came with a crew to build a road. His wife and daughter, Anna, came
too.
Amber’s Granny Cotton told the man straight out, “You can’t build a road here. Folks will roll
clean off it, like walking up a wall.”
But the man said, “You can do almost anything you fix your mind on.”
He fixed his mind on building that road.
4
Now Amber had seen Anna with her family, inching their way up the mountain. She wanted to
be friends.
But Amber was shy.
I will say “hey” to her when the time is right, Amber thought.
Meanwhile, she watched Anna, biding her time.
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English Language Arts
5
5
Sharing Stories
Grade 2
One day Amber was watching. Anna flopped on her stomach in a meadow, reading a book. The
sky was streaked with morning. The air was warm. The grass hummed with bees.
Suddenly, up jumped Anna shouting. “Once upon a time—“ and hopping around, crazy as a
doodlebug.
Amber decided the time was right to say “hey.”
“Hey!” she called. “Are you crazy?”
“Sure!” Anna called back. “Crazy with spring! Hey, yourself!”
“What are you shouting?” asked Amber.
“A story from my book. About a princess spinning gold.”
“Might I hold it?” Amber asked.
“Sure.”
6
Amber took the book as if it were a fine and breakable cup. She examined the pages.
“This tells of a princess—truly?”
“Yep. Want to read it?”
“I don’t know how,” Amber said. “There’s no school hereabouts.”
“I forgot,” said Anna.
She stared at Amber. A stubborn look came into her eyes.
Amber giggled. “You look like our mule, Rockhead. When old Rockhead looks balkity, he’s up to
something sure.”
“Well I am up to something,” said Anna. “Daddy says you can do almost anything you fix your
mind on. I’ve just fixed mine on teaching you to read!”
“For real and true?” cried Amber.
“For real and true.”
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English Language Arts
Sharing Stories
Grade 2
Anna began shouting from the book again. Amber joined in. Then they twirled through the
6
7
grass, crazy as two doodlebugs.
After that, Anna and Amber stuck to each other like burrs.
When Amber did her chores, Anna helped. She learned to slop the pigs, milk the goat, and
gather eggs. When Granny Cotton needed “young eyes” to help with her quilting, the girls sat on
either side of her, poking little silver needles in and out, in and out.
Whatever else they did, every day they practiced reading.
Learning to read was like walking up a wall. Amber kept rolling off.
“These marks are like the chicken tracks in our yard,” she moaned. “I know for a fact chickens
don’t write notes to each other. Are you certain sure these letters mean something?”
“Certain sure.” Anna smiled.
Sometimes Amber read a few words. Then she stumbled. Sometimes she forgot the words and
had to start all over. She was so eager, she hurried and tangled the words like quilting thread.
“Drat!” Amber grumbled. “I plain can’t do this!”
“You can,” said Anna. “Just pretend you’re old Rockhead. “Set your whole self to the task.”
Amber stiffened up mulish as could be.
Anna howled with delight. “Now that is the face of a reader!”
And one day—one very fine day—Amber took the book and read, “And he stamped his foot
through the floor and was never seen again. The end.”
“You did it!” hooted Anna. “You read all by yourself!”
“I read! I read! I READ!”
The girls marched around, stomping their feet like Rumplestiltskin.
8
Suddenly, Anna stopped. She stared at Amber.
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Sharing Stories
Grade 2
“Just what notion have you now, Miss Rockhead?” Amber asked.
8
“ Now I’ve fixed my mind on teaching you to write!” said Anna.
But that was not to be. The road was finished. Anna and her family were going home.
When the day of parting came, each gave the other a gift. Anna gave Amber her book of fairy
tales. Amber gave Anna a little clay mule.
Then Amber watched her friend down the mountain till she melted into blue mountain mist.
Months passed. Mountain people went down the road and learned the ease of city ways. City
people came up the road and learned the beauty of mountain ways. And funny thing—not one
solitary soul rolled off that road.
From time to time up on the mountain, Amber got a letter from Anna. Then she glowed with
happiness. Anna’s words set them side by side again. But Amber was sad too. She missed her
friend. And she could not tell her so.
9
But one day she got a notion. A wonderful, rockheaded notion.
“Attention! Attention!” she announced to the chickens. “I’ve fixed my mind on learning to
write. Soon I’ll send Anna a letter frilly as lace. And she’ll faint right to the floor!”
The chickens paid no attention. Amber didn’t care. She ran straight to Granny Cotton, jibbering
her news out before she stopped.
Granny chuckled, “Child, child, you’re peltering me with words, thick as spring rain. I feel
drenched.”
Granny was so pleased, she gave Amber the paper and pencils left behind by the teacher long
ago.
Whenever she could squeeze in time, Amber took her book and tried to copy the words.
If I can read ‘em, I can copy ‘em, she thought.
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Sharing Stories
Grade 2
At first they looked squat and squashed.
9
“My letters are lopsided as a herd of one-horned cows,” she groaned.
Amber kept working.
10
When it snowed and the world outside was muffled in white, she huddled under a quilt so only
her hands poked out. Cold and stiff, she formed her letters.
When clouds like grey geese flocked in the sky and rain glazed the land, Amber shivered. But
she kept working.
Her tongue curled to her upper lip in concentration, like a lizard stalking a bug. She squeezed
her pencil nearly to splinters. Her fingers hurt. Still, she kept working.
11
And one day—one very fine day—Amber sent a letter to Anna.
Dear Anna,
I am a rockhead to. I fixed my mind on riting. I teached myself to rite sos I can rite you. I hop
you faynt to the flor.
Love from yer frend Amber
Soon a letter came back.
Dear Rockhead,
Your letter made me faint right through the floor, like you-know-who! It made me happy. You
are not far away anymore.
Love from your friend,
Anna
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