----------Unit Goals – Stage 1 English Language Arts Friendship Grade 3

----------Unit Goals – Stage 1 English Language Arts Friendship Grade 3
English Language Arts
Friendship
----------Unit Goals – Stage 1
Grade 3
Unit Description: Students will explore what constitutes a good friendship and how friendships can be found in unlikely places. Students will read several pieces of realistic fiction and informational text about the unit
theme, participate in collaborative discussions, and integrate their ideas in writing. Students will be able to write a personal narrative to develop a real experience that links to the theme. Approx. Duration 5 weeks
CCR Anchor Standards
Transfer Goals: SBAC Claims
R.CCR.1 Read closely to determine what the text says explicitly
Students will be increasingly able to independently use their learning to…
and to make logical inferences from it; cite specific textual
•
Read closely and analytically to comprehend a range of increasingly complex literary and informational text. (Claim 1)
evidence when writing or speaking to support conclusions
•
Produce effective and well-grounded writing for a range of purposes and audiences. (Claim 2)
drawn from the text.
•
Employ effective speaking and listening skills for a range of purposes and audiences. (Claim 3)
R.CCR.2 Determine central ideas or themes of a text and
•
Engage in research and inquiry to investigate topics, and to analyze, integrate, and present information. (Claim 4)
analyze their development: summarize the key supporting
Making Meaning
details and ideas.
UNDERSTANDINGS
ESSENTIAL QUESTIONS
R.CCR.3 Analyze how and why individuals, events, and ideas
Students will understand that…
Students will keep considering…
develop and interact over the course of a text.
1. Who are my friends?
•
Building and maintaining friendships can challenge beliefs and
W.CCR.3 Write narratives to develop real or imagined
2. What is the author trying to tell me?
views, expanding the possibilities beyond the idea of similarities.
experiences or events using effective technique, well-chosen
3. How do characters help tell the story?
• Authors use details about characters and events to develop and
details, and well-structured event sequences.
4. How do I tell my story?
communicate a message.
W.CCR.4 Produce clear and coherent writing in which the
5. How do I learn more about an interesting topic?
development, organization, and style are appropriate to task,
• Effective narrative writing is developed around an experience
6. How do I express my ideas in a group?
purpose, and audience.
using appropriate techniques, descriptive details, and structure.
W.CCR.5 Develop and strengthen writing as needed by
• Scholars engage in research about a topic of interest to build
planning, revising, editing, rewriting, or trying a new approach.
knowledge.
W.CCR.8 Gather relevant information from multiple print and
•
Proper use of conventions brings greater clarity and sophistication
digital sources, assess the credibility and accuracy of each
to writing.
source, and integrate the information while avoiding
plagiarism.
SL.CCR.1 Prepare for and participate effectively in a range of
conversations and collaborations with diverse partners,
building on others’ ideas and expressing their own clearly and
persuasively.
SL.CCR.2 Integrate and evaluate information presented in
diverse media and formats, including visually, quantitatively,
and orally.
SL.CCR.6 Adapt speech to a variety of contexts and
communicative tasks, demonstrating command of formal
English when indicated or appropriate
L.CCR.1 Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard
English grammar and usage when writing or speaking.
L.CCR.2 Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard
English capitalization, punctuation, and spelling when writing.
L.CCR.4 Determine or clarify the meaning of unknown and
multiple-meaning words and phrases by using context clues,
analyzing meaningful word parts, and consulting general and
specialized reference materials, as appropriate.
•
Participation in effective collaborative discussions involves being
prepared and following agreed upon rules.
Acquisition
SKILLS
Students will be skilled at (Do)
•
Analyzing characters in realistic fiction to identify specific personal traits
Different ways relationships can be damaged and repaired
and how it can impact story events( i.e. Bubble Maps, Multi-Flow Maps,
Character traits/analysis
constructed responses)
Text structure and elements of narrative writing
•
Engaging in collaborative discussions centered around text and textual
evidence following agreed upon rules
Understanding a text involves asking and finding answers
•
Citing textual evidence to answer text dependent questions both orally
Rules and procedures for participation in collaborative discussions
and in writing
Narrative writing structure and purpose
•
Writing personal narratives
•
Engaging in the inquiry process to investigate a question or problem of
Process for inquiry investigation
interest
Evidence based writing to answer text dependent questions
•
Identifying and explaining the function nouns and verbs in reading and
Context clues as a method to understanding vocabulary
writing
•
Revising and editing for language
Function of nouns and verbs
KNOWLEDGE
Students will know…
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LONG BEACH UNIFIED SCHOOL DISTRICT
1
IMPORTANT NOTE from Translating Team to TEACHERS: Please refer to your instructional materials to adapt the vocabulary used in the texts as needed.
2014-2015
English Language Arts
Reading
Literature
RL.3.1 Ask and answer questions to
demonstrate understanding of a text,
referring explicitly to the text as the
basis for the answers.
RL.3.2 Recount stories, including
fables, folktales, and myths from
diverse cultures; determine the central
message, lesson, or moral and explain
how it is conveyed through key details
in the text.
RL.3.3 Describe characters in a story
(e.g., their traits, motivations, or
feelings) and explain how their actions
contribute to the sequence of events.
Informational
RI.3.1 Ask and answer questions to
demonstrate understanding of a text,
referring explicitly to the text as the
basis for the answers.
RI.3.2 Determine the main idea of a
text; recount the key details and explain
how they support the main idea.
RI.3.3 Describe the relationship
between a series of historical events,
scientific ideas or concepts, or steps in
technical procedures in a text, using
language that pertains to time,
sequence, and cause/effect.
Foundational Skills
FS.3.3 Know and apply grade-level
phonics and word analysis skills in
decoding words.
FS.3.4 Read with sufficient accuracy
and fluency to support comprehension
Friendship
Grade 3
Grade Level Standards– Stage 1
Writing
Text Type
W.3.3 Write narratives to develop real or imagined
experiences or events using effective technique, descriptive
details, and clear event sequences.
a. Establish a situation and introduce a narrator and/or
characters; organize an event sequence that unfolds
naturally.
b. Use dialogue and descriptions of actions, thoughts, and
feelings to develop experiences and events or show the
response of characters to situations.
c. Use temporal words and phrases to signal event order.
d. Provide a sense of closure.
Production and Distribution of Writing
W.3.4 With guidance and support from adults, produce
writing in which the development and organization are
appropriate to task and purpose.
W.3.5 With guidance and support from peers and adults,
develop and strengthen writing as needed by planning,
revising, editing, rewriting, or trying a new approach.
Research to Build and Present Knowledge
W.3.8 Recall information from experiences or gather
information from print and digital sources; take brief notes
on sources and sort evidence into provided categories.
Speaking and Listening
Comprehension and Collaboration
SL.3.1 Engage effectively in a range of
collaborative discussions (one-on one, in
groups, and teacher-led) with diverse
partners on grade 3 topics and texts, building
on others’ ideas and expressing their own
clearly.
a. Come to discussions prepared, having read
or studied required material; explicitly draw
on that preparation and other information
known about the topic to explore ideas under
discussion.
b. Follow agreed-upon rules for discussions
(e.g., gaining the floor in respectful ways,
listening to others with care, speaking one at
a time about the topics and texts under
discussion).
SL.3.2 Determine the main ideas and
supporting details of a text read aloud or
information presented in diverse media and
formats, including visually, quantitatively, and
orally.
SL.3.6 Speak in complete sentences when
appropriate to task and situation in order to
provide requested detail or clarification.
Language
L.3.1 Demonstrate command of the
conventions of standard English grammar
and usage when writing or speaking.
a. Explain the function of nouns,
pronouns, verbs, adjectives, and adverbs
in general and their functions in particular
sentences.
b. Form and use regular and irregular
plural nouns.
g. Form and use comparative and
superlative adjectives and adverbs, and
choose between them depending on what
is to be modified.
L.3.2 Demonstrate command of the
conventions of standard English
capitalization, punctuation, and spelling
when writing.
e. Use conventional spelling for highfrequency and other studied words and
for adding suffixes to base words
L.3.4 Determine or clarify the meaning of
unknown and multiple-meaning word and
phrases based on grade 3 reading and
content, choosing flexibly from a range of
strategies.
a. Use sentence-level context as a clue to
the meaning of a word or phrase.
L.3.5 Demonstrate understanding of word
relationships and nuances in word
meanings.
a. Distinguish the literal and nonliteral
meanings of words and phrases in context.
L.3.6 Acquire and use accurately gradeappropriate conversational, general
academic and domain-specific words and
phrases, including those that signal spatial
and temporal relationships.
LONG BEACH UNIFIED SCHOOL DISTRICT
2
IMPORTANT NOTE from Translating Team to TEACHERS: Please refer to your instructional materials to adapt the vocabulary used in the texts as needed.
2014-2015
English Language Arts
Friendship
Grade 3
Evidence of Learning – Stage 2
Evaluative Criteria (LBUSD Achievement Report Evidence)
Assessment Evidence
See Scoring guide located on Intranet
End of Unit On-Demand Reading and Responding to Text Assessment
Over the course of three days, students will read a piece of literature and informational text to
answer several text-dependent questions and work in collaborative groups to gather evidence that
they will use to write an analysis of the text in response to a prompt.
•
Uses textual evidence to explain what the text says explicitly and
when drawing inferences
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•
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Determines and summarizes central ideas and key details
Determines word meanings and phrases in context
Describes text structures and features of text
Organizes and maintains focus to support
Uses appropriate details
See CCSS-Aligned 3-5 Narrative Writing Rubric
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•
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Organizes and maintains focus to support purpose
•
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Listens and interprets information and ideas presented by other
•
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Uses grade-appropriate language and vocabulary
Uses appropriate details
Personal Narrative Writing Task
Throughout the unit, students will work through the writing process to produce a personal narrative
illustrating a time with a friend.
Applies grade level appropriate conventions
Plans, speaks, and presents information/ideas connected to the unit
theme
Engages in collaborative conversations(See Collaborative Discussion
Rubric)
Inquiry/Research Task and Presentation
Students will conduct a unit investigation that will be student-driven and emerge from their interests,
and encouraged or ignited by reading and class discussions. Students may work individually or in
small groups. (Refer to pg. 13A in OCR Unit 1)
Compares and contrasts information from related texts
Evaluative Criteria
Other Evidence-May be used formatively
•
Uses textual evidence to explain what the text says explicitly and
when drawing inferences in response to a prompt.
BAP Culminating Tasks
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•
•
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Integrates information from related texts
Short Constructed Responses
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Reads grade level text with accuracy and fluency
Uses grade-appropriate language and vocabulary
Listens and interprets information and ideas
Engages in collaborative conversations(See Collaborative Discussion
Rubric
Collaborative Discussions
Grade Level Fluency Passage
LONG BEACH UNIFIED SCHOOL DISTRICT
3
IMPORTANT NOTE from Translating Team to TEACHERS: Please refer to your instructional materials to adapt the vocabulary used in the texts as needed.
2014-2015
English Language Arts
Friendship
Grade 3
Learning Plan – Stage 3
Days
1-2
Reading and Responding to Texts
Amos and Boris (OCR Unit 1 Opener)
Instructional Sequence Overview
Narrative Writing
• Initial Assessment(Teacher Choice)
• Create writing folder, establish writing procedures &
routines
•
3-5
Gloria Who Might Be My Best Friend (OCR)
6-10
•
•
•
Relationships with Family and Friends (Health;p.228) •
11
12-16
17
•
Angel Child, Dragon Child (OCR)- BAP
Rugby & Rosie (OCR)- BAP
response
Being a Good Citizen (Reflections; 294-299)
•
•
•
Analyze a model of proficiency to establish writing
expectations and structure of narrative
Daily mini-lessons based on the essential criteria of
narrative
Begin modeling personal narrative structure
Daily mini-lessons based on students’ needs
Model revision/editing skills and strategies
Revision: Locate areas in writing to replace common
nouns with proper nouns
Model personal narrative structure with another prompt
Daily mini-lessons based on students’ needs
Revision: Locate areas in writing to revise for use of
verbs and the use of pronouns for sentence variety
Model personal narrative structure
Daily mini-lessons based on students’ needs
Language
Nouns (Unit 1, Lesson 1)
Nouns: Naming Ideas (Unit 1, Lesson 1)
Pronouns (Unit 1, Lesson 2)
Verbs: action, state of being, linking (Unit 1,
Lesson 3)
Verbs: verb phrase, main verb, helping
verbs (Unit 1, Lesson 4)
Types of Sentences: The Four Types (Unit 1,
Lesson 5)
18-22
Teammates (OCR)- BAP
•
•
23-25
On-Demand Reading and Writing Assessment
Personal Narrative Process Piece
Students select a piece to revise/edit, publish and submit for a score
Available
Resources to
Support and
Enhance
Instruction
http://www.history.com/videos/jackie-robinson-changes-theface-of-america#jackie-robinson-changes-the-face-of-america
(primary source documentary video of Jackie Robinson)
The Legend of Damon and Pythias (OCR)
Being a Good Citizen (Reflections; 294-299)
OCR Classroom Leveled Library
WftB and Beyond
•
Narrative Binder
•
Setting the Stage binder
•
Intranet
Review
OCR Unit 1: Blue Section
OCR Language Arts Handbook
LONG BEACH UNIFIED SCHOOL DISTRICT
4
IMPORTANT NOTE from Translating Team to TEACHERS: Please refer to your instructional materials to adapt the vocabulary used in the texts as needed.
2014-2015
English Language Arts
Friendship
Grade 3
Amos and Boris (OCR Unit 1 Opener)
Vocabulary
breakers, navigation, savage,
immensely, enterprise,
phosphorescent, driftwood, afloat,
loomed, privilege, secure, rage,
exchanging, admiration, delicacy,
grandeur, plankton, spout, century,
stranded, moisture, agony, breaded
Metas de Aprendizaje
Puedo seguir un texto cuando se está
leyendo en voz alta.
(RF.3.4)
Puedo describir personajes en el
cuento.
(RL.3.3)
Puedo explicar cómo los personajes
resuelven un problema.
(RL.3.3)
Puedo estar preparado para hablar del
texto.
(SL.3.1)
Puedo recopilar y organizar la
información de fuentes.
(W.3.8)
Puedo usar detalles del texto para
apoyar mis ideas.
(RL.3.1)
Days 1-2
Theme Connections
This text is the first opportunity for students to begin building their understanding of the theme of building and maintaining healthy
relationships. Students will also start to develop an understanding of how friends are so essential and what role rules have in
establishing a relationship.
Text, Reader, and Task Considerations
This text contains many features that lend it to being read aloud. It has language features that include sentences containing multiple
concepts and complex construction. In addition, the vocabulary could be unfamiliar and subject specific (see words on the left).Students
will likely need some context regarding the similarities and difference between mammals in the ocean and on land. Photocopies of the
story will need to be provided for students.
Focus of Instruction: Reading and Responding to Text
First Read
•
Provide each student with a copy of the text.
•
Introduce the concepts of friendships and relationships by providing a brief definition.
•
Read the entire text without stopping for enjoyment and for students to get the “gist.”
•
Have students share what they thought about the story and what it taught them about friendship.
Reread for Comprehension
•
Tell students that you want them to pay attention to what Boris and Amos say and do to better understand who they are and how
they become friends.
•
Read the text aloud to students and engage students in a collaborative discussion around the following questions:
− ¿Qué hizo Boris para ayudar a Amos?
− ¿Cómo empezó la amistad de Amos y Boris? ¿Qué hicieron después de conocerse?
− Boris dijo, "Vamos a ser amigos para siempre, pero no podemos estar juntos." ¿Qué significa esta frase?
− ¿Cuáles son las reglas de esta amistad?
− ¿Cómo ayudó Amos a Boris?
− ¿Qué causó que se molestarán en el último párrafo?
Reread to Gather Evidence/Information and Respond to Text
Introduce the focus question for short constructed response: ¿Cómo se hicieron amigos Amos y Boris?
• Explain to students that today they will be rereading the text to gather and organize details to help answer the question.
• Create a pair of one-sided Multi-Flow maps
o Map #1- event “Amos fell off the boat”
o Map #2-event “Boris was stuck on the sand”
o Frame Maps-Entonces, ¿Qué sabemos acerca de estos personajes? Entonces, ¿Por qué fue importante su amistad?
LONG BEACH UNIFIED SCHOOL DISTRICT
5
IMPORTANT NOTE from Translating Team to TEACHERS: Please refer to your instructional materials to adapt the vocabulary used in the texts as needed.
2014-2015
English Language Arts
Friendship
Grade 3
• Have students orally rehearse from the map and have them write several sentences answering the focus question.
Focus Statement: Amos y Boris se hicieron amigos porque dependieron del uno al otro en momentos de necesidad.
(Students add details from the map to support statement)
Metas de Aprendizaje
Focus of Instruction: Writing and Conventions
Writing Text Type: Narrative
Initial Assessment (Teacher Choice)
•
•
With minimal instruction and prompting, provide students with a narrative writing task
•
•
Scan student essays to determine strengths and areas of need.(3 Grade Personal Chronological Narrative Rubric pgs.128-130)
Familiarize yourself with the elements and criteria required for the grade 3 personal narrative in your WftB (and Beyond) narrative
manuals.
(The Personal Experience Narrative pgs. 113-116)
rd
Determine 2-3 areas of need to begin mini-lessons with modeled writing.
Create writing folder, establish writing procedures & routines
Puedo identificar los sustantivos en
un texto. (L.3.1.a)
Conventions: Nouns
•
Explain to students the definition of common and proper nouns. They are used in text and writing to provide clarity for the reader.
Have students create a quick Tree Map recording the difference.
•
•
•
Have students work in pairs or small groups with a small piece of the text from Amos and Boris.
•
Instruct students that they will identify 5 common and proper nouns to highlight and add to their Tree Map
Have students frame their Tree Map: Entonces, ¿Qué aprendimos acerca de la diferencia entre los sustantivos comunes y propios?
¿Por qué es importante esto?
Tell students to think about how they could use proper nouns in their writing to provide a better picture of an experience
LONG BEACH UNIFIED SCHOOL DISTRICT
6
IMPORTANT NOTE from Translating Team to TEACHERS: Please refer to your instructional materials to adapt the vocabulary used in the texts as needed.
2014-2015
English Language Arts
Friendship
Grade 3
Gloria Who Might Be My Best Friend, a realistic fiction by Ann Cameron (Unit 1 OCR)
Days 3-5
Vocabulary
tease, lonely, cartwheel, pale,
collection, mustache, fastened,
rags, fig tree, jerked, stiff
Metas de Aprendizaje
Theme Connections
In this realistic fiction, students will be able to understand how to make a new friend. Julian models for readers how they might try
making friends with someone they wouldn’t initially consider their type of friend. Students will have another example of how friends are
essential and can be found in unexpected places.
Reader and Task Considerations
This text has a knowledge demand that may be easily relatable for students about the experience of making new friends. The first
person narrative structure of the text allows for internal dialogue and feelings to be expressed as a reaction to events. This is sometimes
subtle and students may need attention drawn to these moments in the text to understand the sequence of events.
Focus of Instruction: Reading and Responding to Text
Puedo seguir un texto cuando se está
leyendo en voz alta.
(RF.3.4)
First Read
•
Have students locate the story in the Open Court anthology.
•
Ask students to recall some information they learned about friendship from Amos and Boris.
•
Read the entire text without stopping for enjoyment and for students to get the “gist.”
•
Have students share what they thought about the story and what it taught them about friendship
Puedo describir cómo se siente un
personaje. (RL.3.3)
Reread for Comprehension
•
Tell students that looking closely at how characters feel can help explain the events in a story.
•
Read the text aloud to students and engage students in a collaborative discussion around the following questions:
− ¿Quién está contando la historia? ¿Qué evidencia en el texto ayuda al lector a saber eso?
− ¿Cómo se sentía Julián antes de conocer a Gloria? ¿Por qué se sentía así?
− ¿Por qué Julián trata de hacer una voltereta lateral? ¿Cómo se siente al ser observado por Gloria?
− Hay muchos ejemplos de cómo los dos personajes compartían cosas entre ellos. Haz una lista de ejemplos del texto.
− Al final de la historia, Julián le preguntó a Gloria si quería que fueran muy buenos amigos. ¡Ella dijo, "No debes preguntarme
eso!" ¿Con esta declaración de qué manera ella le deja saber a Julián lo que deseaba?
− Al comienzo de la historia Julián dijo, "Si eres amigo de una niña, la gente se entera y te toma el pelo." ¿De qué manera cambió
los sentimientos de Julián durante la historia? (Bubble Map inside a Flow)
Puedo recontar los sucesos de un
cuento. (RL.3.2)
Puedo prepararme para hablar del
texto. (SL.3.1.a)
Puedo escuchar atentamente lo que
dicen mis compañeros de clase.
(SL.3.1.b)
Puedo plantear y responder preguntas
específicas. (SL.3.1.c)
Puedo hacer comentarios que se
suman al debate. (SL.3.1.c)
LONG BEACH UNIFIED SCHOOL DISTRICT
7
IMPORTANT NOTE from Translating Team to TEACHERS: Please refer to your instructional materials to adapt the vocabulary used in the texts as needed.
2014-2015
English Language Arts
Puedo recopilar y organizar la
información de fuentes.
(W.3.8)
Friendship
Grade 3
Puedo usar detalles en el texto para
apoyar mis ideas.
(RL.3.1)
Reread to Gather Evidence/Information and Respond to Text
• Introduce the focus question for short constructed response: ¿Cómo se hacen amigos Julián y Gloria? ¿Cómo fue esta amistad
inesperada?
• Explain to students that today they will be rereading the text to gather and organize details to help answer the question
• Have students take out their bubble map from the previous day to review how Julian’s feelings changed throughout the story
• Explain that they will be using a one-sided Multi-flow to figure out the main causes of the event: “Julián y Gloria se hacen amigos”
• Provide time for students to orally process the information from the maps in multiple group settings (i.e., pairs, small groups, whole
group)
Focus Statement: Julian and Gloria become friends by exploring activities together even though Julian was nervous about being friends
with a girl. (Students support with details from their map)
Metas de Aprendizaje
Focus of Instruction: Writing and Conventions
Puedo identificar lo que necesita
tener mi escritura narrativa.
(W.3.3)
Writing Text Type: Narrative
• Introduce what a proficient narrative looks like.
• Using a model of narrative proficiency located on the Intranet and the student checklist, ask students to identify the criteria of a
personal narrative.
• These should be kept in the students’ folders for future reference.
• Use the text “Gloria Who Might Be My Best Friend “ to review story elements of a narrative (Who, did what, when, where, and why)
Puedo entender cómo un sustantivo
nombra una idea.
(L.3.1.a)
Conventions : Nouns used to name ideas
• Remind students that a noun names a person, place, thing or idea and that a proper noun is used to provide more specificity
• Call attention to nouns being used to name ideas by providing the examples: kindness, honesty, and friendship.
• Tell students to think about how these nouns are more abstract than other common nouns
LONG BEACH UNIFIED SCHOOL DISTRICT
8
IMPORTANT NOTE from Translating Team to TEACHERS: Please refer to your instructional materials to adapt the vocabulary used in the texts as needed.
2014-2015
English Language Arts
Friendship
BAP LESSON: Angel Child, Dragon Child by Michele Maria Surat (Unit 1 OCR)
Grade 3
Days 6-10
Vocabulary
See BAP lesson located on the
Intranet
Metas de Aprendizaje
Puedo escuchar y seguir un texto a
medida que se lee en voz alta.
(RF.3.4)
Puedo hacer referencia a los detalles de
un texto al contestar preguntas sobre lo
que significa el texto. (RL.3.1)
Puedo estar preparado para hablar
del texto. (SL.3.1.a)
Puedo escuchar atentamente lo que
dicen mis compañeros de clase.
(SL.3.1.b)
Puedo plantear y responder
preguntas específicas. (SL.3.1.c)
Puedo hacer comentarios que se
suman al debate. (SL.3.1.c)
Puedo adquirir un nuevo conocimiento
del debate. (SL.3.1.d)
Theme Connections
Angel Child, Dragon Child illustrates the challenges involved in cross-cultural friendships. During her first days at school in America, Ut
experiences alienation and separation. Later, she finds understanding and acceptance. With his first encounters with a child from
Vietnam, Raymond sees only her differences. Later, through closer encounters, he is able to see similarities in their needs and feelings.
Reader and Task Considerations
This text may require building knowledge about the Vietnam war and the impact it had on immigrant families. The figurative language
used to describe character events and emotions adds to the complexity of this text. Students are likely to need support in understanding
how to discuss answers to text-dependent questions in small groups and/or with a partner.
Focus of Instruction: Reading and Responding to Text
First Read
• Ask students to think about how this story has to do with the theme of friendship.
• Read aloud the entire story once through without stopping or commentary. The purpose is to provide students with an opportunity
to enjoy the story and get the overall “gist” of the selection.
• Ask students for their reaction (leave this very open-ended, the purpose of this conversation is for students to talk about the text).
Reread for Comprehension
• Follow BAP lesson on Intranet for a full list of text-dependent questions, vocabulary, and tasks.
Reread to Gather Evidence/Information and Respond to Text
Introduce the focus question for culminating task: ¿Cómo los personajes principales, Ut y Raymond, cambian desde el principio de la
historia hasta el final? ¿Qué causó los cambios en ambos personajes? Apoya tu respuesta con evidencia de la historia.
• Analyze the task with students
• Ask students what evidence they will need to gather in order to support a response to the prompt. Students will need to gather
evidence to show the changes both Raymond and Ut went through that eventually
lead to their friendship.
• Reread to Gather Evidence and Respond to text
− Use a Flow Map with a Bubble Map inside to describe how Ut and Raymond
Text
Evidence
change throughout the story. Cómo cambiaron Ut y Raimundo durante la historia. Usa
evidencia del texto para apoyar tu respuesta.
− Identify the effects of an event in the story. Create a Multi-Flow Map with “Raymond had
to write for Ut” in the “event” box. Write down the effects of this punishment and
discuss how they became friends. Determina que efectos tuvo el hecho de que
Raimundo escribiera para Ut. Usa evidencia del texto para apoyar tu respuesta.
Text
Evidence
Raymond
had to
write for
Ut.
LONG BEACH UNIFIED SCHOOL DISTRICT
9
IMPORTANT NOTE from Translating Team to TEACHERS: Please refer to your instructional materials to adapt the vocabulary used in the texts as needed.
Text
Evidence
Text
Evidence
2014-2015
English Language Arts
Friendship
Metas de Aprendizaje
En una escritura narrativa y personal:
Grade 3
Focus of Instruction: Writing and Conventions
Writing Text Type: Model Personal Narrative Structure (Possible Prompt: Cuenta de alguna vez cuando aprendiste algo de un amigo)
Select a topic to model and use the “I do, you do” strategy as students develop a personal narrative on the same topic. The purpose
of modeling is to introduce students to the elements and terminology of a structurally sound personal narrative. As you model each
step, students should be able to articulate what they are doing, analyze their own work and that of others’ for specific elements.
See WftB & Beyond Narrative binder/ Modeling the Personal Experience Narrative (pgs.117-125)
− analyze the prompt for audience, purpose, and task
− brainstorm possible topics
− create an event sequence
− write an opening paragraph
− extend with details using horizontal and vertical elaboration (encourage students to use proper nouns where appropriate)
− select transition words and phrases
− write a closing paragraph
− orally rehearse multiple times throughout the modeling
− draft the narrative(Have students keep their unfinished drafts in their working folders so they can return to them later in the unit)
Mini-lessons
Focus on mini-lessons that will address basic structure
•
•
•
•
•
Puedo escribir un párrafo de
apertura que presenta un
evento. (W.3.3.a)
Puedo usar palabras de
transición que indican el orden
de los sucesos. (W.3.3.c)
Puedo escribir una conclusión
que expresa una reflexión del
evento. (W.3.3.d)
Puedo hacer que mi escritura sea
clara para los lectores. (L.3.3)
•
•
Puedo variar mis oraciones al
entender cómo usar los pronombres
en mi escrito. (L.3.1.a)
Incorporate daily mini-lessons that focus on the elements of a personal narrative.
Keep anecdotal notes as to what students’ need for future mini-lessons.
See Mini-lessons from the WftB & Beyond Setting the Stage Binder that address basic structure of Personal Narrative
Conventions: Pronouns
• Explain to students what pronouns do and why writers and speakers use them.(See OCR Unit 1 TE pgs. 45f-45H)
• Tell students that by using pronouns, writers avoid repetition and create varied sentences
• Have students work in pairs to practice identifying the different pronouns used on pg. 40 in the text “Angel Child, Dragon Child”
o Repeat this process with other paragraphs in the text stressing how pronouns function and why they are used
• Tell students to revisit their modeled piece to identify possible areas that a pronoun could be used to avoid repetition and vary their
sentences
LONG BEACH UNIFIED SCHOOL DISTRICT
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IMPORTANT NOTE from Translating Team to TEACHERS: Please refer to your instructional materials to adapt the vocabulary used in the texts as needed.
2014-2015
English Language Arts
Friendship
Relationships with Family and Friends (Health; p. 228-232)
Grade 3
Day 11
Vocabulary
Relationship, peers, peer pressure,
negative, positive
Theme Connections
This lesson is an opportunity for students to read informational text that provides additional insight into the ways to support healthy
relationships with family members and friends. Students will describe the character traits that support healthy relationships and how to
resolve conflicts. Students will identify the difference between positive and negative peer pressure. Students begin to connect the
benefits and challenges of healthy relationships with family members and friends.
Reader and Task Considerations
Students are likely to need support in understanding of the language associated with peer pressure. A suggestion is to provide some
pictures or opportunities to act out situations that demonstrate negative and positive peer pressure.
Metas de Aprendizaje
Puedo escuchar y seguir un texto a
medida que se lee en voz alta.
(RF.3.4)
Puedo hacer referencia a los detalles
y la evidencia en un texto al explicar
lo que significa el texto. (RL.3.1)
Puedo determinar la idea principal
del texto con detalles clave.(RI.3.2)
Focus of Instruction: Reading and Responding to Text
First Read
•
Have students locate the text in their Health book.
•
Review the meaning of the word relationship and the connection to friendship.
•
Read the entire text without stopping for students to get the “gist” of the selection.
•
Have students share what they learned from the text.
Reread for Comprehension
•
Briefly point out the way the text features are used to organize and present the information(headings, bold-face, highlighted words,
captions)
•
Read the text aloud to students and engage students in a class discussion with the following questions.
− ¿Cómo se parecen los miembros de una familia a los amigos? ¿Diferente?
− ¿Por qué son la confianza, el respeto y ser responsable importante en las relaciones sanas?
− ¿Qué Puedos hacer si un compañero te presiona que para que hagas algo que se siente mal?
− ¿Cómo Puedo la presión de un compañero ser positiva? ¿Negativo? Crea un Mapa Conceptual para
clasificar los tipos de presión de los compañeros (grupo completo, grupo pequeño, parejas)
− ¿Cuáles son algunas maneras en que los amigos resuelven los conflictos?
Puedo secuenciar los pasos de un
proceso. (RI.3.3)
Discuss the importance of resolving conflicts within relationships through listening. Make a
connection to the text Angel Child, Dragon Child
− ¿Cómo el escuchar lleva a una comprensión más profunda de las necesidades de los demás?
− ¿Por qué escuchar es importante para resolver del problema entre Ut y Raimundo?
Reread to Gather Evidence/Information and Respond to Text
•
Puedo estar preparado para hablar
del texto. (SL.3.1.a)
Puedo escuchar atentamente lo que
dicen mis compañeros de clase.
•
Introduce Focus Question for Collaborative Discussion: ¿Cuáles son las cualidades que ayudan a mantener una relación saludable
con la familia y los amigos?
•
Ask students to draw a Tree Map with the Lesson title, “Relationships with Family and Friends” at the top. Draw 4 branches with the
LONG BEACH UNIFIED SCHOOL DISTRICT
11
IMPORTANT NOTE from Translating Team to TEACHERS: Please refer to your instructional materials to adapt the vocabulary used in the texts as needed.
2014-2015
English Language Arts
Friendship
(SL.3.1.b)
Puedo plantear y responder
preguntas específicas.(SL.3.1.c)
Puedo hacer comentarios que se
suman al debate. (SL.3.1.c)
titles, “Family Relationships”, “Relationships with Friends”, “Resolving Conflicts”, and “How to Choose Friends.”
•
Grade 3
Have students read the text independently writing 2-3 details under each branch of the Tree Map.
− Ask students to share their notes making any revisions necessary.
•
•
Provide a collaborative discussion structure for students to share responses to focus question using details from the text.
Ask students to share any new understandings or ideas that they have gained in light of the discussion.
Puedo adquirir un nuevo conocimiento
del debate. (SL.3.1.d)
Metas de Aprendizaje
Puedo reforzar mi escritura al
corregirlo. (W.3.5)
Puedo cambiar las palabras de mi
escrito para hacer que mi escrito sea
más descriptivo. (L.3.3.a)
Puedo entender qué hacen los verbos
y cómo pueden ser utilizados.
(L.3.1.a)
Focus of Instruction: Writing and Conventions
Writing Text Type: Revision Strategy- Using Proper Nouns to enhance elaboration
− Have students locate the modeled narrative piece that they have done in their writing folder.
− Review with students the way proper nouns can be used to give more precise details of setting and character in their narrative
writing.
− Model how peer revision could look when focused on the strategy of replacing common nouns with proper nouns.
− Have students form teams of 2 or 3 to work with each other to locate areas in their piece where common nouns can be replaced by
proper nouns.
− Provide time to orally rehearse the revised piece and reflect on how their writing has changed based on the use of proper nouns.
Conventions: Verbs
•
•
Explain to students what action verbs do and the difference between actions that are seen and unseen (See OCR Unit 1 TE pgs. 61F-61H).
•
Have students create a Tree Map in their ELA notebooks that will help them capture the knowledge about different types of verbs.
The branches are action verbs, state-of-being verbs, and linking verbs (See OCR Language Arts Handbook pgs. 250-251).
•
Provide students with an example of each and ask small groups or pairs to locate additional examples in the Health text.
Use the following sentence from pg. 231 in the Health text to locate a verb that can be seen(work) and one that is unseen(think):
o Then you can work together to think of a new idea.
LONG BEACH UNIFIED SCHOOL DISTRICT
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IMPORTANT NOTE from Translating Team to TEACHERS: Please refer to your instructional materials to adapt the vocabulary used in the texts as needed.
2014-2015
English Language Arts
Friendship
Grade 3
BAP LESSON: Rugby and Rosie by Nan Parson Rossiter (Unit 1 OCR)
Days 12-16
Vocabulary
See BAP lesson located on the
Intranet
Metas de Aprendizaje
Puedo escuchar y seguir un texto a
medida que se lee en voz alta.
(RF.3.4)
Puedo hacer referencia a los detalles
de un texto al contestar preguntas
sobre lo que significa el texto.
(RL.3.1)
Theme Connections
This text gives students the opportunity to see how pets can teach people about friendship. The family in the story chooses to train a
guide dog (Rosie) and highlights the emotions that come with forming a new relationship and growing attachments. This realistic fiction
story exposes students to circumstances that may shorten the length of a friendship and the lessons that can be gained from the
experience.
Reader and Task Considerations
Students will identify characters in the story that demonstrate friendship from what they say and do. The boy and the dogs are able to
sustain their friendship through time spent together and this is powerful for all of them. Students are likely to need support in
understanding the idea of training a guide dog and how people can choose to do this as a service to others.
Focus of Instruction: Reading and Responding to Text
First Read
• Ask students to think about how this story relates to the theme of friendship.
• Read aloud the entire story once through without stopping or commentary. The purpose is to provide students with an opportunity
to enjoy the story and get the overall “gist.”
• Ask students for their reaction to the story(leave this very open-ended, the purpose of this conversation is for students to talk about
the text)
Reread for Comprehension
• Follow BAP lesson on Intranet for a full list of text-dependent questions, vocabulary, and tasks.
LONG BEACH UNIFIED SCHOOL DISTRICT
13
IMPORTANT NOTE from Translating Team to TEACHERS: Please refer to your instructional materials to adapt the vocabulary used in the texts as needed.
2014-2015
English Language Arts
Puedo hacer referencia a los detalles
y la evidencia en un texto al explicar
lo que significa el texto. (RL.3.1)
Puedo describir lo que sucede debido
a cómo se siente un personaje.
(RL.3.3)
Friendship
Grade 3
Reread to Gather Evidence/Information and Respond to Text
Introduce Focus Question for Culminating Task: Hay muchos ejemplos de amistad en la historia. Escojan a dos personajes en la historia.
Den ejemplos del texto que compruebe que son amigos. ¿Qué aprendimos acerca de la amistad de lo que dijeron los personajes y lo que
hicieron en la historia? Den ejemplos de la historia para apoyar sus respuestas.
•
Suggested Thinking Maps and questions for short constructed responses to use throughout the BAP lesson that will lead students to
the Culminating Task:
− Use a Tree Map to categorize how the characters illustrated friendship from what they said or did. What did the characters say
or do that showed they were friends. Use evidence from the text to support your answer.
Puedo estar preparado para hablar
del texto. (SL.3.1.a)
Rugby and
Rosie were
sleeping
together
on the
porch.
Puedo escuchar atentamente lo que
dicen mis compañeros de clase.
(SL.3.1.b)
Puedo plantear y responder
preguntas específicas.(SL.3.1.c)
They were always
together playing.
− Use a one-sided Multi-Flow Map to identify when Rugby changed in the story.
At the beginning Rugby did not like Rosie and then something changed. What was the event in the
story that made Rugby and Rosie become friends and what were the effects? Use evidence from the
text to support your answer.
They were racing
and chasing
through the snow.
Puedo hacer comentarios que se
suman al debate. (SL.3.1.c)
Puedo adquirir un nuevo
conocimiento del debate. (SL.3.1.d)
Metas de Aprendizaje
En una narrativa personal de la
escritura:
• Puedo escribir un párrafo de
apertura que presenta un
evento. (W.3.3.a)
• Puedo usar palabras de
transición para indicar el orden
de los sucesos. (W.3.3.c)
•
•
Puedo escribir una conclusión
que expresa una reflexión sobre
el evento. (W.3.3.d)
Puedo hacer que mi escritura sea
clara para los lectores. .(L.3.3)
Focus of Instruction: Writing and Conventions
Writing Text Type: Narrative(Possible Prompt: Tell about a time you had a problem with a friend)
Model Personal Narrative Structure
•
•
Select a new topic to model and continue using the “I do, you do” strategy. Continue to focus on the elements and terminology.
Following the modeling of each step of the process, invite students to evaluate their own work and that of a peer’s for the specific
element or criteria. For example, after modeling the opening and providing students with time to write the opening, have students
go back and identify the who, did what, when, and why and verify they had 2 sentences. Ask them to “conference” with a partner to
verify he or she also has the elements of the opening. (This will lay the foundation for independent revisions later in the unit.)
Mini-lessons
− Focus on mini-lessons that will address basic structure based on evidence elicited from the previous week.
− Use the text Angel Child, Dragon Child to look at the introduction to identify how the author introduces the narrative.
− Begin to introduce the student checklist and have students practice looking at their own work and the work of a peer’s to verify the
presence of criteria.
LONG BEACH UNIFIED SCHOOL DISTRICT
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IMPORTANT NOTE from Translating Team to TEACHERS: Please refer to your instructional materials to adapt the vocabulary used in the texts as needed.
2014-2015
English Language Arts
•
Puedo entender qué hacen los
verbos y cómo pueden ser
utilizados. (L.3.1.a)
Friendship
Grade 3
Conventions: Verb phrases, main verbs, and helping verbs
• Use a Brace map to explain the parts of a verb phrase (main verb and helping verb) and to reinforce what verbs do.(See OCR Unit 1
TE pgs. 81F-81H)
• Have students work in pairs or small groups to Brace map sentences to locate the parts that are helping verbs and main verbs (See
OCR Language Arts Handbook pg. 248)
• Remind students that authors choose action verbs to bring clarity to actions both seen and unseen
LONG BEACH UNIFIED SCHOOL DISTRICT
15
IMPORTANT NOTE from Translating Team to TEACHERS: Please refer to your instructional materials to adapt the vocabulary used in the texts as needed.
2014-2015
English Language Arts
Friendship
Being a Good Citizen, an informational text (Reflections; 294-299)
Grade 3
Day 17
Vocabulary
responsibility, participating,
community, laws, nation, justice,
fairness, character traits, engine,
honorary, crutches, volunteer, food
bank, editor, inauguration, hero
Theme Connections
This text will help students understand how friendship and citizenship are linked. In this informational text, students will be able to
identify what it is to be a good citizen and learn about some Americans who show citizenship. Students will be able to identify the role
rules, laws and citizenship play in establishing relationships.
Reader and Task Considerations
This text explores the greater impact of relationships in the classroom, community, and civic life. This informational piece introduces the
ideas of citizen being associated with particular character traits. Biographical sketches are provided to support each trait and the bigger
impact on being a good citizen beyond the boundaries of the classroom or home. Students will likely need some context regarding how
to read informational texts.
Metas de Aprendizaje
•
Puedo escuchar y seguir un texto
a medida que se lee en voz alta.
(RF.3.4)
Focus of Instruction: Reading and Responding to Text
First Read
•
Have students locate the text in their Health book.
•
Review the meaning of the word citizenship and the connection to friendship.
•
Read the entire text without stopping for students to get the “gist.”
Briefly point out the way the text features are used to organize and present the information (headings, bold-face, highlighted words,
captions)
•
Have students share what they learned from the text.
Reread for Comprehension
•
Briefly explain the text features of the genre informational texts (headings, subheadings, bold words, captions).
•
Tell students that paying attention to the headings and subheadings in a textbook will help you to determine the main ideas and
details.
• Read the text aloud to students and engage students in a class discussion with the following questions:
− What is the main idea of this text? What key details support the main idea?
− The second paragraph on page 294 states, “Good citizens follow the laws of the nation, the state, and the community? Use
the glossary in the back of the textbook to find the definitions of citizen, laws and community? What does each of those
words mean? Restate the sentence in your own words.
− Reread the text book on page 295. How did Lillie Hitchcock illustrate citizenship? What caused her to act that way?
− What does the caption and photograph on the bottom of page 297 have to do with the text on that page?
− How does Maya Angelou teach others about being a good citizen?
− Look at the headings on pages 296-299. What character traits are needed to become a good citizen?
− How are fairness, responsibility, respect and caring traits needed to be a good friend?
•
•
Puedo hacer referencia a los
detalles y la evidencia en un
texto al explicar lo que significa
el texto. (RI.3.1)
•
Puedo determinar la idea
principal del texto con detalles
clave. (RI.3.2)
•
Puedo usar las características
del texto para ayudar a localizar
la información. (RI.3.5)
•
Puedo usar un glosario para
ayudarme a entender el
significado de una palabra.
(L.3.4.d)
LONG BEACH UNIFIED SCHOOL DISTRICT
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IMPORTANT NOTE from Translating Team to TEACHERS: Please refer to your instructional materials to adapt the vocabulary used in the texts as needed.
2014-2015
English Language Arts
Puedo estar preparado para hablar
del texto. (SL.3.1.a)
Puedo escuchar atentamente lo que
dicen mis compañeros de clase.
(SL.3.1.b)
Puedo plantear y responder
preguntas específicas. (SL.3.1.c)
Puedo hacer comentarios que se
suman al debate. (SL.3.1.c)
Friendship
Grade 3
Reread to Gather Evidence/Information and Respond to Text
• Introduce Focus Question for Collaborative Discussion: Describan qué es ser un buen
ciudadano. Escojan a una persona de la página 295-299 y expliquen cómo ellos
demostraron su ciudadanía en su comunidad.
• Have students read the text independently, and gather evidence to discuss the focus
question.
− Create a Tree Map using the title of the lesson as the “top” and the headings as the “branches”
•
•
•
Provide a collaborative discussion structure for students to share responses to focus question using details from the text.
Have students select an individual from the text and use a one-sided Multi-Flow map to organize information for the causes.
Ask students to share any new understandings or ideas that they have gained in light of the discussion.
Puedo adquirir un nuevo conocimiento
del debate. (SL.3.1.d)
Metas de Aprendizaje
Puedo reforzar mi escritura al
corregirlo. (W.3.5)
Puedo cambiar las palabras de mi
escrito para hacer que mi escrito sea
más descriptivo. (L.3.3.a)
Puedo entender cómo hacer
diferentes tipos de oraciones. (L.3.1.i)
Puedo usar las mayúsculas y la
puntuación correctamente en mi
escrito. (L.3.2)
Focus of Instruction: Writing and Conventions
Writing Text Type: Revision Strategy- Verbs to describe character actions
− Have students locate one of their draft narrative pieces in their writing folder.
− Review with students the way verbs can be used to give more precise details of a character’s action both seen and unseen in their
narrative writing.
− Model how peer revision could look when focused on the strategy of replacing “dead verbs” with “active verbs”
− Use pg. 68 in the text Rugby & Rosie to identify how the author used verbs to set up the events and actions of the characters.
− Have students form teams of 2 or 3 to work with each other to locate areas in their piece where active verbs could enhance their
writing.
Conventions: Types of Sentences
•
Explain to students what a sentence does and how it is created with a subject, predicate, capitalization, and punctuation
(See OCR Unit 1 TE pgs. 93F-93H).
•
Have students create a Tree Map in their ELA notebooks that will help them capture the knowledge about the four different types of
sentences. The branches are declarative, imperative, interrogative and exclamatory (See OCR Language Arts Handbook pg. 257).
•
•
Focus on the end punctuation and the function of each type of sentence as you provide students with an example of each.
Ask small groups or pairs to locate additional examples in the text Rugby & Rosie and what those sentences tell the reader.
LONG BEACH UNIFIED SCHOOL DISTRICT
17
IMPORTANT NOTE from Translating Team to TEACHERS: Please refer to your instructional materials to adapt the vocabulary used in the texts as needed.
2014-2015
English Language Arts
Friendship
BAP LESSON: Teammates by Peter Golenbock (Unit 1 OCR)
Grade 3
Days 18-22
Vocabulary
See BAP lesson located on the Intranet
Metas de Aprendizaje
Puedo escuchar y seguir un texto a
medida que se lee en voz alta. (RF.3.4)
Puedo hacer referencia a los detalles de
un texto al contestar preguntas sobre lo
que significa el texto. (RI.3.1)
Puedo estar preparado para hablar del
texto. (SL.3.1.a)
Puedo escuchar atentamente lo que dicen
mis compañeros de clase. (SL.3.1.b)
Puedo plantear y responder preguntas
específicas. (SL.3.1.c)
Puedo hacer comentarios que se suman
al debate. (SL.3.1.c)
Theme Connections
In the story, Teammates, Jackie Robinson becomes the first African American to play major league baseball. He is asked to
exemplify specific character traits so that “the great experiment” would work. Through the story, Pee Wee Reese decides to show
friendship to Jackie even though there are rules and laws to keep people of different colors segregated. This act by PeeWee
illustrates the power of friendship.
Reader and Task Considerations
This text has complex layers of meaning tied to racial prejudice and courageous acts of friendship. Students are likely to need
support in understanding racial prejudice and segregation. Give the students a quick summary of the events that are occurring in
the 1940s so they understand the time period for the story and the significance of the risks Jackie was taking.
Focus of Instruction: Reading and Responding to Text
First Read
• Ask students to think about how this story has to do with the theme of friendship.
• Read aloud the entire story once through without stopping or commentary. The purpose is to provide students with an
opportunity to enjoy the story and get the overall “gist”
• Ask students for their reaction to the story(leave this very open-ended, the purpose of this conversation is for students to talk
about the text)
Reread for Comprehension
• Follow BAP lesson on Intranet for a full list of text-dependent questions, vocabulary, and tasks.
Reread to Gather Evidence/Information and Respond to Text
Introduce the focus question for the culminating task: What was Branch Rickey looking for? How did Jackie Robinson demonstrate
that he was that special man? Use evidence from the text to prove your answer.
− Use a Bubble Map to describe the character traits that Jackie exhibited. What character
traits did Jackie have that made Branch Rickey think he “might just be that man” (page
86) that he was looking for?
− Use a one sided Multi-flow map to pull evidence of events that highlighted his character
traits and led to the decision to have him join the team
Trait
Text
Evidence
Jackie
Puedo adquirir un nuevo conocimiento del
debate. (SL.3.1.d)
LONG BEACH UNIFIED SCHOOL DISTRICT
18
IMPORTANT NOTE from Translating Team to TEACHERS: Please refer to your instructional materials to adapt the vocabulary used in the texts as needed.
2014-2015
English Language Arts
Friendship
Metas de Aprendizaje
En una escritura narrativa y personal:
• Puedo escribir un párrafo de
apertura que presenta un evento.
(W.3.3.a)
•
Puedo usar palabras de transición
que indican el orden de los sucesos.
(W.3.3.c)
•
Puedo escribir una conclusión que
expresa una reflexión del evento.
(W.3.3.d)
•
Puedo hacer que mi escritura sea
clara para los lectores. (L.3.3)
•
Puedo hacer que mi escritura sea
clara para los lectores. (L.3.3)
•
Puedo entender cómo hacer
diferentes tipos de oraciones. (L.3.1.i)
•
Puedo entender qué hacen los verbos y
cómo pueden ser utilizados. (L.3.1.a)
•
Puedo usar las mayúsculas y la
puntuación correctamente en mi
escrito. (L.3.2)
•
Puedo variar mis oraciones al
entender cómo usar los pronombres
en mi escrito. (L.3.1.a)
Grade 3
Focus of Instruction: Writing and Conventions
Writing Text Type: Narrative
•
•
•
•
Select a new topic to model and continue using “I do, you do” strategy.
At this point, the amount of time for the modeling will decrease.
More time should be spent on laying the foundation for workshop and independent practice of writing personal narratives.
Have students practice the language and terminology you will want them to use during peer conferencing. For example, put
students in pairs and have them use complete sentences to analyze for specific criteria. Students may say something like, “You
have used several different transitional words and phrases to begin each paragraph.” Or if the student is missing transitions, the
partner might say, “In your second body paragraph, you did not use a transition or transitional phrase. What could you add
here?”
Conventions: Review Verbs, nouns, and sentence types
• Have students go back to their notes about the different language conventions studied.
• Lead students in a discussion about what they have learned and how these skills are used by authors to enhance writing.
• Provide time for students to reflect on what helped provide clarity in their own writing by using what they learned.
LONG BEACH UNIFIED SCHOOL DISTRICT
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IMPORTANT NOTE from Translating Team to TEACHERS: Please refer to your instructional materials to adapt the vocabulary used in the texts as needed.
2014-2015
English Language Arts
Approximate
Number of Days
3-5
Resources
OCR Unit 1: 27A-D
Inquiry Journal p.5
Inquiry Journal p. 6
Inquiry Journal p.6
Family/friends
3-5
OCR Unit 1: 45A-D
Family /friends
Inquiry journals
3-5
OCR Unit 1: 61A-D
Inquiry Journal
3-5
OCR Unit 1: 81A-D
Inquiry Journal
Classroom Leveled
Libraries
3-5
OCR Unit 1: 93A-D
Inquiry Journal
Internet
Library
3-5
Friendship
Research and Inquiry
Sequence Overview and Daily Performance Activities
Inquiry Process
Introduce the Investigation Cycle (Process)
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Guided Activity Options
Interviewing
(See p. 27D )
Have students form a panel of five or
six class members to discuss whether
boyus and girls in the third grade can
really become friends.
•
Individually or in small groups, have
them complete Inquiry Journal, page. 5
•
Conduct an interview someone who
moved to the United States from other
countries trying to find out about the
experiences and difficulties these
people had trying to form friendships.
Choosing
appropriate
sources
•
Small groups can role-play good ways
to repair damaged friendships.
After the role-play, students should
discuss their ideas about ways to mend
a damaged friendship
ABC Order
•
Students can conduct a literature
search to identify qualitites, such as
courage, that make up good friendships
Following
Directions
•
Students can invite a school or
community coach to speak to the class.
Students can plan some questions
around friends and teammates
Parts of a Book
Formulate a conjecture about the problem
Present findings
Skills
•
Decide on a problem or question to investigate
Revise conjectures
Grade 3
Initiate a whole-class discussion around the theme
Generate questions
Present possible presentation options
Formulate Questions
•
Model for students the difference between a topic and a problem or question
•
Have students share their problems or questions to lead to the creation of
investigation groups
•
Have students organize into groups based on interests
Make Conjectures and Establish Investigation Needs
•
Explain to students that a conjecture is an educated guess we make to answer
the problem or question prior to gathering evidence
•
Present a problem to the class and have students practice making conjectures
•
Help students identify their information needs to answer questions
Establishing Investigation Needs
•
Conduct a whole class discussion of students’ conjectures allowing for students
to contribute suggestions, constructive criticisms, and questions
•
Model how to take a conjecture and identify information they would need to
find or figure out the problem or question
•
Students begin to make individual job assignments and gather information
Revising Conjectures and Investigations
•
Based on findings, students will revise conjectures and investigations
•
Students begin final preparations for the group or individual presentations
•
•
Inquiry/Research Task and Presentation
•
Provide time for students to finish their investigation and present
LONG BEACH UNIFIED SCHOOL DISTRICT
20
IMPORTANT NOTE from Translating Team to TEACHERS: Please refer to your instructional materials to adapt the vocabulary used in the texts as needed.
2014-2015
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