Unit Goals – Stage 1 English Language Arts Storytelling Grade 3

Unit Goals – Stage 1 English Language Arts Storytelling Grade 3
English Language Arts
Storytelling
Grade 3
Unit Goals – Stage 1
Unit Description: Students will learn about the history and value of storytelling across time and cultures. Students will read and discuss several pieces of literature to build understanding about the ways authors develop
stories around a situation using descriptive details to deliver a message. This unit provides an opportunity to understand the author’s craft and the treatment of story elements. Students will be able to write an imaginative
narrative using understanding of the theme to develop story elements.
Approx. Duration 5 weeks
CCR Anchor Standards
Transfer Goals: SBAC Claims
R.CCR.4 Interpret words and phrases as they are used in a text,
Students will be increasingly able to independently use their learning to…
including determining technical connotative, and figurative meanings,
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Read closely and analytically to comprehend a range of increasingly complex literary and informational text. (Claim 1)
and analyze how specific word choices shape meaning or tone.
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Produce effective and well-grounded writing for a range of purposes and audiences. (Claim 2)
R.CCR.5 Analyze the structure of texts, including how specific
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Employ effective speaking and listening skills for a range of purposes and audiences. (Claim 3)
sentences, paragraphs, and larger portions of the text (e.g., a section,
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Engage in research and inquiry to investigate topics, and to analyze, integrate, and present information. (Claim 4)
chapter, scene, or stanza) related to each other and the whole.
Making Meaning
R.CCF.6 Assess how point of view or purpose shapes the content and
UNDERSTANDINGS
ESSENTIAL QUESTIONS
style of a text.
Students will understand that…
Students will keep considering…
R.CCF.9 Analyze how two or more texts address similar themes or
topics in order to build knowledge or to compare the approaches the
• Storytelling has traditions and cultural foundations which continue to be an 1. Why are stories important?
authors take.
2. How can stories be told?
integral part of daily lives.
W.CCR.3 Write narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or
3. How do authors organize texts for readers?
• Narrator and character point of view of view, builds an understanding
events using effective technique, well-chosen details, and well4. What can I do to help me understand a word?
about characters or topics, so that students can critically analyze multiple
structured event sequences.
5. How can I learn about an interesting topic and share it with
perspectives and express their own point of view.
W.CCR.4 Produce clear and coherent writing in which the
others?
development, organization, and style are appropriate to task,
• Authors use a variety of text structures and word choice to shape meaning. 6. How can I be ready to express my ideas in a group discussion?
purpose, and audience.
• Effective readers use appropriate strategies to figure out unknown words. 7. How do I write a good creative story?
W.CCR.5 Develop and strengthen writing as needed by planning,
revising, editing, rewriting, or trying a new approach.
W.CCR.8 Recall information from experiences or gather information
from print and digital sources: take brief notes on sources and sort
evidence into provided categories.
SL.CCR.1 Prepare for and participate effectively in a range of
conversations and collaborations with diverse partners, building on
others’ ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively.
SL.CCR.4 Present information, finding, and supporting evidence such
that listeners can follow the line of reasoning and the organization,
development, and style are appropriate to task, purpose and
audience.
SL.CCR.5 Make strategic use of digital media and visual displays of
data to express information and enhance understanding of
presentation.
L.CCR.1 Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard
English grammar and usage when writing or speaking.
L.CCR.2 Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard
English capitalization, punctuation, and spelling when writing.
L.CCR.3 Apply knowledge of language to understand how language
functions in different contexts, to make effective choices foe meaning
or style, and to comprehend more fully when reading or listening.
L.CCR.4 Determine or clarify the meaning of unknown and
multiple-meaning words and phrases by using context clues, analyzing
meaningful word parts, and consulting reference.
Long Beach Unified School District
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Scholars engage in research about a topic of interest to build and share
knowledge with others.
Participation in effective collaborative discussions involves being prepared,
following agreed upon rules, and building on other’s ideas.
Creative narrative writing is developed around an event using appropriate
techniques, descriptive details, and a specific structure.
Acquisition
KNOWLEDGE
Students will know…
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Different ways stories are told and why they are passed on
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Function of word choice to shape meaning
Point of view of text
Strategies to figure out the meaning of a word (context clues, affixes, root
words, reference books)
Evidence based writing to answer text dependent questions
Appropriate skills for discussions and inquiry investigations
Creative narrative writing structure and purpose
Process for editing and revising writing
1
SKILLS
Students will be skilled at (Do)
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Identifying and understanding point of view
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Understanding the use of specific word choices and
structures in a text
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Process to compare and contrast similar ideas across texts
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Citing textual evidence to answer text dependent questions
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Applying vocabulary strategies
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Participating in inquiry and collaborative discussion
opportunities centered around a topic
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Writing an imaginative narrative using story elements and
vivid language
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Identifying and using simple and combined sentences when
editing writing
2014-2015
English Language Arts
Storytelling
Grade 3
Grade Level Standards– Stage 1
Reading
Writing
Speaking and Listening
Literature
RL.3.4 Determine the meaning of words
and phrases as they are used in a text,
distinguishing literal from non-literal
language.
RL.3.5 Refer to parts of stories, dramas,
and poems when writing or speaking
about a text, using terms such as
chapter, scene, and stanza; describe how
each successive part builds on earlier
sections.
RL.3.6 Distinguish their point of view
from that of the narrator or those of the
characters.
Informational
RI.3.4 Determine the meaning of general
academic and domain-specific words and
phrases in a text relevant to a grade 3
topic efficiently
RI.3.5 Use text features and search tools
(e.g., key words, sidebars, hyperlinks) to
locate information relevant to a given
topic efficiently.
RI.3.6 Distinguish their point of view
from that of the author of a text.
RI.3.9 Compare the most important
points and key details presented in two
texts on the same topic.
Foundational Skills
FS.3.3 Know and apply grade-level
phonics and word analysis skills in
decoding words.
FS.3.4 Read with sufficient accuracy and
fluency to support comprehension
Text Type
W.3.3 Write narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or
events using effective technique, descriptive details, and clear event
sequences.
a. Establish a situation and introduce a narrator and/or characters;
organize an event sequence that unfolds naturally.
b. Use dialogue and descriptions of actions, thoughts, and feelings
to develop experiences and events or show the response of
characters to situations.
c. Use temporal words and phrases to signal event order.
d. Provide a sense of closure.
Production and Distribution of Writing
W.3.4 With guidance and support from adults, produce writing in
which the development and organization are appropriate to task
and purpose.
W.3.5 With guidance and support from peers and adults, develop
and strengthen writing as needed by planning, revising, editing,
rewriting, or trying a new approach.
W.3.8 Recall information from experiences or gather information
from print and digital sources; take brief notes on sources and sort
evidence into provided categories.
Comprehension and Collaboration
SL.3.1 Engage effectively in a range of
collaborative discussions (one-on one, in
groups, and teacher-led) with diverse
partners on grade 3 topics and texts,
building on others’ ideas and expressing
their own clearly.
c. Ask questions to check understanding of
information presents, stay on topic, and link
their comments to the remarks of others.
SL.3.4 Report on a topic or text, tell a story,
or recounts an experience with appropriate
facts and relevant, descriptive details,
speaking clearly and understanding pace.
SL.3.5 Create engaging audio recordings of
stories or poems that demonstrates fluid
reading at an understandable pace; add
visual displays when appropriate to
emphasis or enhance certain facts or details.
Long Beach Unified School District
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Language
L.3.1 Demonstrate command of the
conventions of standard English grammar
and usage when writing or speaking.
h. Use coordinating and subordinate
conjunctions.
i. Produce simple, compound and complex
sentences.
L.3.2 Demonstrate command of the
conventions of standard English
capitalization, punctuation, and spelling
when writing.
a. Capitalize appropriate words in titles.
g. Consult reference materials, including
beginning dictionaries, as needed to check
and correct spelling.
L. 3.3 Use knowledge of language and its
conventions when writing, speaking,
reading, or listening.
b. Recognize and observe differences
between the conventions of spoken and
written standard English.
L.3.4 Determine or clarify the meaning of
unknown and multiple-meaning word and
phrases based on grade 3 reading and
content, choosing flexibly from a range of
strategies.
2014-2015
English Language Arts
Storytelling
Grade 3
Evidence of Learning – Stage 2
Evaluative Criteria
Assessment Evidence
See Scoring guide located on Intranet
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Uses textual evidence to demonstrate understanding of grade level text
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Determines central ideas and recounts grade level text using key details
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Determines meaning of words and phrases in text
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Describes text structures and features of text
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Organizes and maintains focus to support purpose
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Uses appropriate details and precise language to develop the topic
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Applies grade level appropriate conventions
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Engages in collaborative conversations about grade level topics and texts
End of Unit On-Demand Reading and Responding to Text Assessment (Intranet)
Over the course of three days, students will read a piece of literature to answer several text-dependent
questions and work in collaborative groups to gather evidence that they will use to answer a question in
response to a text.
See CCSS-Aligned 3-5 Narrative Writing Rubric
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Organizes and maintains focus to support purpose
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Uses appropriate details and precise language to develop the topic
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Applies grade level appropriate conventions
Writing a Legend
During the last week of the unit, students will work through the writing process to plan, organize, draft, revise,
and publish a legend in the genre of imaginative narrative. The folktale will be organized around a
problem/solution and will convey a message relevant to the theme of storytelling.
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Inquiry/Research Task and Presentation
Students will conduct a unit investigation that will be student-driven and emerge from their interests, and
encouraged or ignited by reading and class discussions. The investigations should involve reading beyond
program material and address the conceptual aims of the unit.
Plans, speaks, and presents information/ideas
Listens and interprets information and ideas
Engages in collaborative conversations about grade level topics and text
Uses grade-appropriate language and vocabulary
Evaluative Criteria
Other Evidence-May be used formatively
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BAP Culminating Writing Tasks
Short Constructed Responses on Focus Questions
Uses textual evidence to demonstrate understanding of grade level text
Uses appropriate details and precise language to develop the topic
Organizes and maintains focus to support purpose
Integrates information from related texts
See CCSS Aligned Collaborative Discussion Rubric
Collaborative Discussions on Focus Questions
See CCSS Aligned Fluency Rubric
Grade Level Fluency Passages
Long Beach Unified School District
3
2014-2015
English Language Arts
Storytelling
Grade 3
Learning Plan – Stage 3
Days
Reading and Responding to Texts
Oral History (OCR p.120-125)
1-3
Instructional Sequence Overview
Imaginative Narrative Writing
Initial Assessment: Write an imaginative narrative story
Create writing folder, review writing procedures & routines
Understanding personal vs. imaginative narrative
Language
Colons
4-6
Customs and Folklore /Story telling section
(Reflections; p.116-117 the text)
How Eagle and Crow Made Land
(Reflections; p.117 the legend)
Analyze How Eagle and Crow Made Land for story elements,
story structure, and evaluative criteria of a legend
Conjunctions
Subjects and Predicates
7-8
Fire Race (Reflections p. 88-90)
Analyze Fire Race for story elements, story structure, and
evaluative criteria of a legend
Simple and compound sentences
9-11
Carving the Pole (OCR p.146-153)
Begin modeling a legend (guided)
Storm in the Night (OCRp.128-141)- BAP
Continue modeling a legend (guided)
Rachel’s Journal (Reflections; p. 204-207)
Plan a legend (Independent)
12-15
16-17
18-22
22-25
Additional
Resources to
Support and
Enhance
Instruction
Aunt Flossie’s Hats (and Crab Cakes Later) -BAP
Draft, revise, and edit legend (Independent)
On-Demand Reading and Writing Assessment
A Story A Story (OCR; p.108-115)
Legend-Imaginative Narrative
Students publish and share a folktale with a message.
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Write from the Beginning and Beyond
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Narrative Binder/Imaginative Narrative Section
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Setting the Stage binder
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Response to Literature
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Intranet
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The Keeping Quilt (OCR)
Carving the Pole (OCR)
Fine Art (OCR; p. 156-157)
Preserving the Culture (Reflections; p. 142-147)
Capitalization: Review Rules
Capitalization of Titles
Review
Editing Strategy
OCR Unit 5: Blue Section
OCR Language Arts Handbook
Communicating with Others (Health and Fitness; p. 234236)
Johnny Appleseed (OCR)
OCR Classroom Leveled Library
website of short folktales.http://www.topics-mag.com/folktales/page.htm
*See page 26 of unit for an overview of research and inquiry.
Long Beach Unified School District
4
2014-2015
English Language Arts
Storytelling
Grade 3
Oral History
Days 1-3
Vocabulario
Registros, ancestros, recitados,
heredado, folclor, clan, herencia,
prosperar
Theme Connections
This text is the first opportunity for students to begin building their understanding of the theme of Storytelling. In this informational text, students will
explore oral history. Students will also be given the opportunity to discuss the importance of this practice in the past and the present.
Reader and Task Considerations
Students may need background knowledge on what it means to have a culture. In this informational text, students will explore the importance of oral
history. Students will also be able to determine if oral history is practiced today.
Objetivos de Aprendizaje
Puedo escuchar y seguir un texto a
medida que se lee en voz alta. (RF.3.4)
Puedo describir los pasos de un proceso.
(RL.3.3)
Puedo utilizar detalles para explicar la
idea principal.
(RI.3.2)
Puedo determinar el significado de las
palabras.
(RI.3.4)
Puedo entender el punto de vista del
autor acerca de este tema. (RI.3.6)
Long Beach Unified School District
Focus of Instruction: Reading and Responding to Text
First Read
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Have students turn to page 120 in their Open Court Anthology.
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Introduce the concepts of oral history and give students the opportunity to think of a story that their family tells at family gatherings.
Read the entire text without stopping for enjoyment and for students to get the “gist.”
Have students share what they thought about the text and what it taught them about oral history.
Reread for Comprehension
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Tell students that authors often use key words and language to sequence steps in a process. Time order words such as first, next and the use of
numbering can help to locate the process that is being sequenced.
 ¿Cómo muestra el primer párrafo la actitud del autor acerca de la historia oral?
 ¿Qué es historia oral?
 ¿Por qué es importante la historia oral?
 ¿Cómo se practica la historia oral en la actualidad?
 ¿Por qué escribió esta historia el autor?
 En la página 120, ¿qué significa la palabra recitó?
 ¿Por qué el autor incluyó la información acerca de las tribus de África y Nueva Zelanda?
 ¿Cómo fue que las tribus de África y Nueva Zelanda preservaron la historia de su gente?
 ¿De qué manera el autor le dio secuencia a los eventos de la historia?
 De acuerdo al autor, ¿cuáles son los pasos que puedes utilizar para preservar la historia de tu familia?
 En la página 121, ¿qué significa la palabra prospera?
 En la página 120, ¿cuál es la frase que el autor utiliza para explicar el significado de la palabra oral?
 Lee la página 121. ¿Qué hizo un grupo de estudiantes de escuela preparatoria como proyecto? ¿Por qué era eso importante?
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2014-2015
English Language Arts
Puedo estar preparado para hablar del
texto.
(SL.3.1.a)
Puedo escuchar atentamente lo que
dicen mis compañeros de clase.
(SL.3.1.b)
Puedo plantear y contestar preguntas
específicas. (SL.3.1c)
Storytelling
Reread to Gather Evidence/Information and Respond to Text
Grade 3
Introduce the focus question for short discussion and constructed response: De acuerdo al autor, ¿por qué es importante la historia oral? ¿Cómo se
puede recopilar la historia de la familia?
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Gathering Evidence
 Create two different maps to take notes.
 One-sided Multi-flow Map (focus on causes) - Event “Oral history is important.”
 Map #2- Sequencing Map- sequence the steps to gather information about family history.
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Frame both maps with the following question. Do you feel it is important to preserve the history of your family? Explain.
Puedo hacer comentarios que se suman
al debate. (SL.3.1.c)
Puedo adquirir un nuevo conocimiento al
participar en el debate. (SL.3.1.d)
Puedo recopilar y organizar la
información de fuentes.
(W.3.8)
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Collaborative discussion and oral processing
 Using their maps place students in groups or with a partner and have them discuss their answers.
 Remind students to follow agreed-upon rules for discussions.
 Encourage students to build on each other’s talk and link comments made by others.
 Encourage students to ask for clarification when they are confused.
Writing to text
 Have students write a brief paragraph answering the focus question.
Focus of Instruction: Writing and Conventions
Objetivos de Aprendizaje
Writing Text Type Pre-Assessment: Legend-Imaginative Narrative
Initial Assessment: With minimal instruction and prompting provide students with the following prompt: Write a story about a little boy who always lies
and how he learns to tell the truth.
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Scan student essays to determine whether or not students have the basics for a problem/solution story using the 3rd Grade Imaginative Narrative
Rubric pgs.344-347. Look for an opening that orients the reader to the characters, setting, and problem.
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Take anecdotal notes on gaps for future mini-lessons.
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Create writing folder, review writing procedures & routines.
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Explain to students that we are writing narratives that are imagined instead of personal.
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Create Tree map that classifies the elements of personal and imaginative narrative (See WftB narrative binder pg. 307).
Puedo utilizar los dos puntos para añadir
información adicional a mis oraciones.
(L.3.1.i)
Long Beach Unified School District
Language Conventions: Colons (Language Arts Handbook p. 273 and OCR TGE p. 127f)
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Explain the three uses of a colon focusing on the use in a sentence prior to creating a list.
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2014-2015
English Language Arts
Storytelling
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Long Beach Unified School District
Grade 3
Have students identify and create sentences with the correct use of a colon prior to a sequence of items.
Use the text “Oral History” or another text to locate how the author uses the colon to add information to their sentences.
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2014-2015
English Language Arts
Storytelling
Grade 3
Customs and Folklore
Day 4
Vocabulario
Folclor, historia oral, tribu, aldea,
creencias, costumbres, ancestros,
recitaron, heredaron.
Theme Connections
This text gives students the opportunity to build their understanding of the theme of Storytelling. In this informational text, students will explore the
main beliefs, ceremonies, and customs held by California Indians. Students will also be given the opportunity to discuss the importance such traditions
had on this group of people.
Reader and Task Considerations
Students will likely need some context regarding how to read their Social Studies Textbook. Review the text features of an informational text (headings,
subheadings, highlighted words, captions, photographs, diagrams) and how those features are tools to help the reader understand the text.
Focus of Instruction: Reading and Responding to Text
Puedo escuchar y seguir un texto a
medida que se lee en voz alta.
(RF.3.4)
First Read
Puedo encontrar información utilizando
las características del texto. (RI.3.5)
Reread for Comprehension
Puedo entender el punto de vista del
autor acerca de este tema. (RI.3.6)
Puedo describir los pasos de un proceso.
(RI.3.3)
Puedo utilizar detalles para explicar la
idea principal.
(RI.3.2)
Puedo determinar el significado de las
palabras.
(RI.3.4)
Puedo estar preparado para hablar del
texto. (SL.3.1.a)
Puedo escuchar atentamente lo que
dicen mis compañeros de clase. (SL.3.1b)
Puedo plantear y contestar preguntas
específicas. (SL.3.1c)
Puedo hacer comentarios que se suman
al debate. (SL.3.1d)
Long Beach Unified School District
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Have students turn to page 114 in their Reflections text.
Introduce the concepts of traditions and customs by providing a brief definition.
Read the entire text without stopping for enjoyment and for students to get the “gist.”
Have students share what they thought about the text and what it taught them about traditions and customs.
Tell students that you want them to pay attention to the headings and captions in the text as another way to understand the information.
 Mira el encabezado de la página 114. ¿De qué habla el texto en las páginas 114-115?
 Vuelve a leer el primer párrafo de la página 114. ¿Cuál es la actitud o punto de vista de autor respecto a la importancia de las costumbres?
 ¿Por qué las celebraciones eran importantes en la vida de los indios de California?
 ¿Qué es un “chamán”? ¿Qué papel desempeñan en una tribu?
 ¿Por qué el autor utiliza texto resaltado y letras negritas?
 ¿Cuáles son algunas razones por las cuales la gente practica estas tradiciones?
 Vuelve a leer la pagina 115, ¿qué quiere decir el autor cuando dice que las ceremonias marcaban tiempos especiales?
 ¿Qué lecciones importantes se aprendían a través del folclor y la narración de historias?
 ¿Qué es una “historia oral”?
 ¿Por qué se utilizaba la narración de historias en las Primeras Tribus Americanas?
Reread to Gather Evidence/Information and Respond to Text
Introduce the focus question for short constructed response and collaborative discussion: ¿Por qué se utilizaba la narración de historias en las primeras
tribus americanas?
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Gathering evidence
 Have students create the Multi-Flow Map to record the evidence for the effects of storytelling in Early American tribes.
 Based on the needs of your students, you may wish to use the Circle Map and Bridge Map for vocabulary and define the difference between
storytelling and celebrations.
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2014-2015
English Language Arts
Storytelling
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Puedo adquirir un nuevo conocimiento al
participar en el debate. (SL.3.1)
Puedo recopilar y organizar la
información de fuentes.
(W.3.8)
Puedo usar detalles del texto para apoyar
mis ideas.
(RL.3.1)
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Grade 3
Frame Multi-Flow Map- answers the following questions on the frame. So what did you learn? So why is this important?
Collaborative Discussion and oral processing
 Using their maps place students in groups or with a partner and have them discuss their answers.
 Remind students to follow agreed-upon rules for discussions.
 Encourage students to build on each other’s talk and link comments made by
others.
 Encourage students to ask for clarification when they are confused.
Writing to text
 Have students write a brief paragraph answering the focus question.
Focus of Instruction: Writing and Conventions
Objetivos de Aprendizaje
Analyzing a legend/imaginative narrative
Puedo describir cómo el autor construye
una historia.
(RL.3.5)
Long Beach Unified School District
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Analyze for story elements
 Explain to students that there are certain elements common to
folktales and legends including characters, setting, problem,
solution, and a message.
 As a class analyze the story elements of How Eagle and Crow Made
Land using a Tree Map with the following labels/branches:
characters, setting, problem/attempts, and solution.
 Discuss the types of characters, setting, and problems you would
see in a folktale
 See website for examples of short folktales.http://www.topicsmag.com/folk-tales/page.htm
 For the Frame of Reference, determine as a class what this legend
is explaining. “How the Coast Ranges and Sierra Nevada came to
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2014-2015
English Language Arts
Storytelling
Grade 3
be.”
Puedo identificar conjunciones
coordinadas y subordinadas.
(L.3.1.h)
Language Conventions: Coordinate and Subordinate Conjunctions (OCR Unit 5, Lesson 3 and Language Arts Handbook, pg. 255)
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Use a Tree Map to classify the two types of conjunctions
after students are given the definition and 1-2 examples.
Puedo utilizar conjunciones coordinadas
y subordinadas para formar oraciones
más complejas. (L.3.1.i)
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Have students work in pairs or small groups with a small
piece of the text to identify coordinating conjunctions.
Have students tell their partner what is a conjunction
and give an example from the text: So why is this
important?
Tell students to think about how they could use
subordinating conjunctions to write a complex sentence.
Explain to students the definition of a conjunction and classify the two types of conjunctions.
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Long Beach Unified School District
10
2014-2015
English Language Arts
Storytelling
Grade 3
How Eagle and Crow Made Land
Days 5-6
Vocabulario
Cordillera de Montañas, Cordillera
Costera, Sierra Nevada
Theme Connections
This legend provides an opportunity for students to begin building their understanding of the different ways stories are told and what they can teach.
Students will also start to develop an understanding of the internal and external factors that influence a character to be competitive.
Reader and Task Considerations
Students will likely need some context regarding a legend. Explain that in the Native American community, some legends were stories (Folklore) used to
explain how the world and humans came to be. Students may also need some information about the flooding, Sierra Nevada and Coast Ranges.
Objetivos de Aprendizaje
Puedo escuchar y seguir un texto a
medida que se lee en voz alta.
(RF.3.4)
Focus of Instruction: Reading and Responding to Text
First Read
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Have students locate the legend on page 117 in their Reflections text.
Have students read the text independently.
Read the entire text without stopping for enjoyment and for students to get the “gist.”
Have students share what they thought about the story and what the message that was passed on to others.
Reread for Comprehension
Puedo volver a relatar los eventos de una
historia. (RL.3.2)
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Puedo describir los personajes de una
historia. (RL.3.3)
Puedo determinar el significado de una
frase utilizada en diferentes maneras.
(RL.3.4)
Puedo poner en secuencia los eventos
importantes para mostrar cómo se llega
a un final. (RL.3.5)
Puedo formar mi propio punto de vista
diferente al punto de vista del personaje.
(RL.3.6)
Read the text aloud to students and engage students in a collaborative discussion around the following questions:
Review story elements with students (Character, setting, problem, solution)
 ¿Qué problema tiene el Águila y el Cuervo?
 En legendas, los autores frecuentemente les dan atributos de humanos a los animales. ¿Cómo ayuda esto a entender los eventos de esta historia?
 ¿Qué palabras describen mejor al Águila y el Cuervo al principio de la historia?
 Describe cómo cambia la actitud del Águila. ¿Estás de acuerdo con la manera en que él se siente?
 ¿Por qué el Águila comienza a darle más pescado al Pato?
 ¿Qué sucede al principio, en la parte central y al final para explicar la leyenda?
 ¿Qué trata de decir el autor cuando dice “Un sol caliente orneaba los dos montones de lodo?”
 ¿Por qué crees que los Indios Yokut crearon esta leyenda?
 Nosotros leímos la versión escrita de esta leyenda. ¿Cómo crees que la leyenda fue narrada por vez primera en la tribu Yokut? (Refer to Oral
History from previous lesson)
 ¿Qué explica esta leyenda?
Reread to Gather Evidence/Information and Respond to Text
Puedo escuchar atentamente lo que
dicen mis compañeros de clase.
Puedo plantear y contestar preguntas
específicas.
Puedo hacer comentarios que se suman
al debate.
Puedo adquirir un nuevo conocimiento
del debate. (SL.3.1)
Long Beach Unified School District


Introduce the focus question for collaborative discussion and short constructed response: ¿Qué motivó al Águila para crear una montaña más
alta? ¿Cómo contribuyen sus acciones al mensaje de la leyenda?
Gathering Evidence
 Create a one-sided Multi-flow Map- One sided map to list the causes of the event: “There is not enough land.” and a Bubble Map- Describe
Eagle’s traits.
 Have them add a Frame of Reference question- What is this legend explaining? Provide time for students to orally process the information
from the maps in multiple group settings (i.e., pairs, small groups, whole group).
11
2014-2015
English Language Arts
Puedo recopilar y organizar la
información de fuentes.
(W.3.8)
Puedo usar detalles del texto para apoyar
mis ideas.
(RL.3.1)
Storytelling


Collaborative discussion and oral processing
 Using their maps place students in groups or with a partner and have them discuss their answers
 Remind students to follow agreed-upon rules for discussions.
 Encourage students to build on each other’s talk and link comments made by others.
 Encourage students to ask for clarification when they are confused.
Writing to text
 Have students write a brief paragraph answering the focus question.
Focus of Instruction: Writing and Conventions
Objetivos de Aprendizaje
En una narrativa imaginaria…

Puedo identificar una introducción
que explica la situación y presenta al
narrador o personajes.
(W.3.3)
Analyzing a legend/imaginative narrative
•

Puedo describir cómo el autor construye
una historia.
(RL.3.5)
Puedo escribir una introducción.
(W.3.3.a)
Long Beach Unified School District
Grade 3
•
Review Story Elements
 Review the story elements Tree Map from the previous day.
Analyze for story structure
 “Reverse Map” How Eagle and Crow Made Land into its opening, event sequence, and closing, analyzing how the author builds the story.
 Draw the students’ attention to the opening of the story. Tell the students that this opening is an example of introducing the setting,
characters, and problem.
 Explain to students the importance of looking at examples of folktales and legends because they will be creating their own folktale.
Analyze for evaluative criteria-Using the Grade 3 Legend/Imaginative Narrative Rubric criteria, analyze for opening.
12
2014-2015
English Language Arts
Storytelling



Puedo formar oraciones sencillas y
compuestas.
(L.3.1.i)
Language Conventions: Subjects and Predicates (Language Arts Handbook p. 256)





Long Beach Unified School District
Grade 3
Explain to students that an author sets up a situation,
characters, and an event sequence for the reader in
the introduction.
Ask students to locate the setting, characters, and the
problem in this opening.
Provide students with a different scenario and have
them practice in small groups or pairs writing a 2-3
sentence introduction.
Explain to students that every sentence has a subject and a predicate, and they need to know what these are in order to create different sentence
structures.
Use a Bridge Map to show the relationships between the different types of subjects and predicates that can be used in sentences. Add sample
sentences to show the different types.
Review with students what they learned about conjunctions and, or, but.
Provide sample sentences for students to practice identifying the different types of subjects and predicates.
Remind students that this information will be helpful when writing their own sentences and when they learn about combining sentences using
conjunctions.
13
2014-2015
English Language Arts
Storytelling
Grade 3
Fire Race
Days 7-8
Vocabulario
Legenda, carbón, vigilado, chamarras
amarillas, crestas.
Theme Connections
This legend provides an opportunity for students to continue building their understanding that legends are stories that people of different cultures
created to explain how certain things in the world have come to be. Students will also develop an understanding of how Native Americans used these
stories to help them make sense of the world.
Reader and Task Considerations
Students will likely need some context regarding the animals in the story and the natural characteristics animals have that helps them protect
themselves from enemies.
Objetivos de Aprendizaje
Puedo escuchar y seguir un texto a
medida que se lee en voz alta. (RF.3.4)
Focus of Instruction: Reading and Responding to Text
First Read




Puedo hacer referencia a los detalles de
un texto al contestar preguntas sobre lo
que significa el texto. (RL.3.3)
Puedo determinar el significado de una
frase utilizada en diferentes maneras.
(RL.3.4)
Puedo formar mi propio punto de vista
diferente al punto de vista del personaje.
(RL.3.6)
Puedo poner en secuencia los eventos
importantes para mostrar cómo se llega
a un final.
(RL.3.5)
Long Beach Unified School District
Ask students to locate page 88 in their Reflections text.
Remind students that this is a legend similar to How Eagle and Crow made Land and will explain an event.
Read aloud the entire story once through without stopping or commentary. The purpose is to provide students with an opportunity to enjoy the
story and get the overall “gist”.
Ask students for their reaction to the story (leave this very open-ended, the purpose of this conversation is for students to talk about the text).
Reread for Comprehension


Remind students that this is a legend similar to How Eagle and Crow made Land and will explain an event.
Have students note the similarities in how both legends begin by setting up the situation, characters, and how the events will build the action.
 ¿Qué es explica el autor en la introducción?
 ¿Qué significa “gente animal”?
 ¿Qué significa la palabra “vigilado”?
 El autor utiliza la palabra “sabio” para describir al Coyote. ¿De qué manera sus acciones apoyan esta descripción? ¿Basados en lo que él hace,
estás de acuerdo con esta descripción?
 ¿Qué significa carbonizado?
 ¿Qué palabra utiliza el autor para describir la rama de roble carbonizado cuando se la pasan al Zorro y al Oso?
 ¿Cómo le pasan el fuego a la rana?
 ¿Qué significa la frase “El árbol se tragó el fuego”? ¿Qué está sucediendo?
 ¿Qué les enseña a hacer el Coyote a la gente en el final de la leyenda?
 ¿Qué significa la palabra “convencer? ¿Cómo se mira eso?
 ¿Cómo explica el autor que esta leyenda sigue siendo compartida entre la tribu Karuk?
 ¿Qué trata de explicar esta leyenda?
 ¿Estás de acuerdo con la manera en que la leyenda explica el fuego? ¿Por qué sí o por qué no?
14
2014-2015
English Language Arts
Puedo escuchar atentamente lo que
dicen mis compañeros de clase.
(SL.3.1b)
Puedo plantear y contestar preguntas
específicas.
(SL.3.1c)
Puedo hacer comentarios que se suman
al debate. (SL.3.1d)
Puedo adquirir un nuevo conocimiento
del debate. (SL.3.1)
Storytelling
Reread to Gather Evidence/Information and Respond to Text
Introduce the focus question for collaborative discussion and short constructed
response: ¿Qué hizo el autor para desarrollar el argumento de la historia?
¿Qué querían los autores de esta leyenda que su gente aprendiera de esta
historia?

Gathering Evidence
 Create a a Multi-Flow Map to organize information. Event: “Coyote
took a charred branch from the Yellow Jacket sisters.”
 Have them add a Frame of Reference question- ¿Qué está explicando
esta leyenda?

Collaborative discussion and oral processing
 Using their maps place students in groups or with a partner and have
them discuss their answers
 Remind students to follow agreed-upon rules for discussions.
 Encourage students to build on each other’s talk and link comments
made by others.
 Encourage students to ask for clarification when they are confused.

Writing to text
 Have students write a brief paragraph answering the focus question.
Objetivos de Aprendizaje
En una narrativa imaginaria…

Puedo identificar una introducción
que explica la situación y presenta al
narrador o personajes.
(W.3.3a)

Focus of Instruction: Writing and Conventions
Analyzing a legend/imaginative narrative

Puedo describir acciones y
respuestas de personajes para
desarrollar eventos.
(W.3.3.b)
Puedo describir cómo el autor construye
una historia. (RL.3.5)


Long Beach Unified School District
Grade 3
Analyze for story elements
 Remind students that there are certain elements common to imagined
stories including characters, setting, problem, plot/event sequence,
solution. In a legend or folktale, there is a message or event explained
that is passed on to others.
 As a class, analyze the story elements of Fire Race using a Tree Map and
discuss the types of characters, settings, and problems you would see in
a legend.
 For the Frame of Reference, determine as a class the event that is
explained.
Analyze for story structure
 “Reverse Map” Fire race into its opening, event sequence, and closing,
analyzing how the author builds the story.
 One way to help students see the plot or event sequence is to Flow Map
the main events of the story. Model how to skim the story to look for the event sequence. Tell students to pay attention to the characters
actions and responses as a clue to a new event in the plot.
Analyze for evaluative criteria-Using the Grade 3 Legend/Imaginative Narrative Rubric criteria, have students analyze for the description of actions
and the response of characters.
15
2014-2015
English Language Arts
Storytelling


Puedo variar mis oraciones, entendiendo
cómo producir oraciones sencillas,
compuestas y complejas.
(L.3.1.i)
Language Conventions: Simple and Compound Sentences (OCR p. 117G and Language Arts Handbook p.257)






Long Beach Unified School District
Grade 3
Explain to students that an author can use vivid verbs to describe
actions and response of characters to events.
Ask students to look for examples of vivid verbs throughout the
story and
record them in
a
Circle
Map.
Explain to students that there are different sentence structures that can be used to vary their writing. A simple sentence has one subject (noun)
and one predicate (verb/action phrase). A compound sentence uses a conjunction to join two related simple sentences with the use of a comma
before the conjunction.
Review the conjunctions they learned from the previous lesson
(and, but, or) and when they are used.
Have students create a Tree Map to classify the two types, write
a definition, and an example of each type of sentence.
Provide pairs or small groups of students with sample sentences
to identify if they are simple or compound and explain their
reasoning.
Extend the activity by having students take two simple related
sentences and combine them with conjunctions, reminding them
of the use of the comma.
During this time, teachers can gather formative data about the
students that have a solid understanding of this concept, and
which students require additional support.
16
2014-2015
English Language Arts
Storytelling
Grade 3
Carving the Pole
Day 9-11
Vocabulario
Símbolo, tótem, reserva, leyendas,
generación, aleta dorsal, embaucador
Theme Connections
This text continues to build their understanding of the theme of how stories are told and passed on to others. In this informational text, students will
learn about totem poles. Students will also be given the opportunity to discuss the importance of this practice in the past and the present.
Reader and Task Considerations
This informational text explains a process of sharing traditional stories through wood carving. The author uses a structure of sequencing with a clear
point of view by the boy who is the narrator. Students may need to use a Flow Map to understand the process and a way to process the significance of
each symbol in this culture.
Objetivos de Aprendizaje
Puedo escuchar y seguir un texto a
medida que se lee en voz alta. (RF.3.4)
Puedo hacer referencia a los detalles y la
evidencia de un texto para explicar lo
que significa el texto. (RI.3.1)
Puedo determinar la idea principal del
texto utilizando detalles clave. (RI.3.2)
Puedo describir los pasos de proceso
utilizando un lenguaje de causa y efecto.
(RI.3.3)
Puedo determinar el significado de las
palabras. (RL. 3.4.)
Puedo encontrar información utilizando
las características del texto. (RI.3.5)
Puedo entender el punto de vista del
autor acerca de este tema. (RI.3.6)
Long Beach Unified School District
Focus of Instruction: Reading and Responding to Text
First Read
•
•
Ask students to locate the story in their Open Court text.
•
Ask students for their reaction to what they learned from the text (leave this very open-ended, the purpose of this conversation is for students to
talk about the text).
Read aloud the entire story once through without stopping or commentary. The purpose is to provide students with an opportunity to enjoy the
story and get the overall “gist”.
Reread for Comprehension


Review with students that informational text often uses features such as captions and photos to add information.
Read the text aloud to students and engage students in a collaborative discussion with the following questions:
 ¿Cuál es el punto de vista del narrador respecto a las figuras talladas? Utiliza evidencia del texto.
 ¿Qué grupos culturales utilizan las figuras tótem?
 ¿Qué tienen que ver las figuras tótem con la narración de historias? ¿De qué manera es similar a una leyenda?
 ¿Cómo se hacen las figuras tótem? ¿Cuáles son los principales pasos para hacer las figuras tótem?
 ¿Qué explican los animales de las figuras Klallam en su cultura?
 Lee la última oración de la página 149. ¿Qué crees que son los dijes?
 Mira el subtítulo que está abajo de la ilustración de la página 149. ¿Qué puedes aprender de David?
 ¿Por qué crees que los artistas continúan tallando figuras tótem? Utiliza evidencia del texto para apoyar tu punto de vista/respuesta.
 ¿Qué habilidades tiene un artista que talla figuras tótem?
 ¿Por qué el autor cree que es importante leer esta información?
 En la página 150, ¿qué claves del texto te ayudan a entender lo que es una azuela?
 Utiliza el subtítulo que se encuentra en la parte superior de la página 151. ¿Por qué la azuela es una herramienta importante para un tallador
de figuras?
 En la página 151, encuentra una ilustración de una azuela. ¿Cómo les describirías este objeto a otras personas?
 ¿Crees tú que las historias se pueden compartir con el arte como las figuras tótem? ¿Por qué si o por qué no?
17
2014-2015
English Language Arts
Puedo escuchar atentamente lo que
dicen mis compañeros de clase. (SL.3.1)
Puedo plantear y contestar preguntas
específicas. (SL.3.1c)
Puedo hacer comentarios que se suman
al debate. (SL.3.1d)
Puedo adquirir un nuevo conocimiento
del debate. (SL.3.1)
Storytelling
Reread to Gather Evidence/Information and Respond to Text.
Grade 3
Introduce the focus question for collaborative discussion and short
constructed response: ¿Cómo se crean los tótems? ¿Por qué son
importantes? ¿Qué evidencia del texto te ayudó a entender esto?

Gathering Evidence
 Create a Tree Map to classify the information about totem poles
 Have them add a Frame of Reference question- Why are totem
poles important.

Collaborative discussion and oral processing
 Using their maps place students in groups or with a partner and
have them discuss their answers
 Remind students to follow agreed-upon rules for discussions.
 Encourage students to build on each other’s talk and link
comments made by others.
 Encourage students to ask for clarification when they are
confused.

Writing to text
 Have students write a brief paragraph answering the focus question. Ask students to share any new understandings or ideas that they have
gained in light of the discussion
Objetivos de Aprendizaje
Focus of Instruction: Writing and Conventions
Begin Modeling a legend/imagined narrative
En una narrativa imaginaria…

Puedo identificar una introducción
que explica la situación y presenta al
narrador o personajes.
(W.3.3a)






Puedo describir acciones y
respuestas de personajes para
desarrollar eventos.
(W.3.3.b)
Puedo utilizar palabras para
conectar mis eventos.
(W.3.3c)
Puedo escribir una conclusión.
(W.3.3d)
Puedo fortalecer mi escritura
mediante las revisiones. (W.3.5)
Long Beach Unified School District





This model is designed to take place over the next 6 instructional sessions. It will begin here and continue during the next text, Storm in the Night.
You may choose to use the sample provided below or create your own with the class. The purpose is to create a class story together with
scaffolding based on the needs of your students.
Explain to the students that you will be working together to write a legend about how a young boy learns to overcome his fear of the ocean.
Together you will create the legend story elements based on this scenario along with mapping out the structure.
Create a class Tree Map for the story elements. Begin with the event that is being explain, “The Ocean is the provider of much.” Write this message
in the Frame of Reference.
Provide the problem for the story, “a young boy living in a fishing village needs to overcome his fear of the ocean.”
Based on this problem and the message that the story will convey, work collaboratively to create a Tree Map with characters, a setting, an event
sequence, and a solution. Remind students to think about how each of these story elements will support the explanation of the legend.
Using the Tree Map and the How do I Model Imaginative Narrative Writing For My Students? p. 338-342 from the WftB & Beyond Narrative binder.
Once the event sequence has been planned, have students work to plan and embed the evaluative criteria from the rubric such as descriptive
language to explain the events and response by characters.
18
2014-2015
English Language Arts
Storytelling

Grade 3
Based on the needs of your students, guide students through the drafting of the story as a whole class, in groups, with a partner, or
individually.(See sample legend located at the end of the unit)
Mini-lessons
Focus on mini-lessons that will address basic structure

Keep anecdotal notes as to what students’ need for future
mini-lessons.
See Mini-lessons from the WftB & Beyond Setting the Stage Binder
that address basic structure of Imaginative Narrative.
Puedo demostrar uso apropiado de
mayúsculas.(L.3.2.a)
Long Beach Unified School District
Language Conventions: Capitalization (Language Arts Handbook p.275)




Review rules and examples of capitalization rules they have learned.
Explain to students that it is important to also capitalize important words in titles.
Provide examples of titles that need to be capitalized (people’s titles, books, magazines, languages).
Have students take notes on this information to support the following lesson.
19
2014-2015
English Language Arts
Storytelling
Grade 3
BAP LESSON: Storm in the Night
Days 12-15
Vocabulary
See BAP lesson located on the Intranet
Theme Connections
Students will be able to continue to reflect on the impact of stories and how they link generations and the effect it can have on memories today. This
realistic fiction story looks at the relationship between a grandfather and grandson. The grandfather shares a memory of a time when he was a boy and
was afraid of thunderstorms. The reader sees the close relationship between the two characters as the story unfolds through their dialogue with each
other.
Reader and Task Considerations
Explain to students that the author uses a type of writer’s craft that can read like a poem. He includes similes, personification, and descriptive
vocabulary that may need some elaboration. The heavy use of dialogue and exchanges between the grandfather and grandson lends itself to being read
aloud in order for students to differentiate the character’s thoughts.
Objetivos de Aprendizaje
Puedo escuchar y seguir un texto a
medida que se lee en voz alta. (RF.3.4)
Focus of Instruction: Reading and Responding to Text
First Read



Ask students to turn to the story in their Open Court text.
Read aloud the entire story once through without stopping or commentary. The purpose is to provide students with an opportunity to enjoy the
story and get the overall “gist”
Ask students for their reaction to the story( leave this very open-ended, the purpose of this conversation is for students to talk about the text)
Puedo hacer referencia a los detalles de
un texto al contestar preguntas sobre lo
que significa el texto. (RL.3.1)
Reread for Comprehension
Puedo hacer referencia a los detalles y la
evidencia de un texto para explicar lo
que significa el texto. (RL.3.1)
Reread to Gather Evidence/Information and Respond to Text
Puedo escuchar atentamente lo que
dicen mis compañeros de clase. (SL.3.1)
Puedo plantear y contestar preguntas
específicas. (SL.3.1)
Puedo hacer comentarios que se suman
al debate. (SL.3.1)
Puedo adquirir un nuevo conocimiento
del debate. (SL.3.1)
Long Beach Unified School District

Follow BAP lesson on Intranet for a full list of text-dependent questions, vocabulary, and tasks.
Introduce the focus question for collaborative discussion and short constructed response: Explain how grandfather understands and uses storytelling
to help Thomas overcomes his fears.

Gathering Evidence
 Create a Double Bubble to look at the similarities between the grandfather and Thomas and a Flow Map of the
important events from the grandfather’s story that explain how the grandfather overcame his fears.
 Frame of Reference: What message is this story trying to tell?

Collaborative discussion and oral processing
 Using their maps place students in groups or with a partner and have them discuss their answers.
 Remind students to follow agreed-upon rules for discussions.
 Encourage students to build on each other’s talk and link comments made by others.
 Encourage students to ask for clarification when they are confused.

Writing to text
 Have students write a brief paragraph answering the focus question.
20
2014-2015
English Language Arts
Storytelling
Objetivos de Aprendizaje
Grade 3
Focus of Instruction: Writing and Conventions
Continue the legend/imagined narrative process you started with during Carving the Pole. Below is a copy of the lesson sequence.
En una narrativa imaginaria…

Puedo identificar una introducción
que explica la situación y presenta al
narrador o personajes.
(W.3.3a)




Puedo describir acciones y
respuestas de personajes para
desarrollar eventos.
(W.3.3.b)
Puedo utilizar palabras para
conectar mis eventos.
(W.3.3c)
Puedo escribir una conclusión.
(W.3.3d)
Puedo fortalecer mi escritura
mediante las revisiones. (W.3.5)
Puedo demostrar uso apropiado de
mayúsculas.(L.3.2.a)
Long Beach Unified School District







Explain to the students that you will be working together to write a legend about how a young boy learns to overcome his fear of the ocean.
Together you will create the legend story elements based on this scenario along with mapping out the structure.
Create a class Tree Map for the story elements. Begin with the event that is being explain, “The Ocean is the provider of much.” Write this message
in the Frame of Reference.
Provide the problem for the story, “a young boy living in a fishing village needs to overcome his fear of the ocean.”
Based on this problem and the message that the story will convey, work collaboratively to create a Tree Map with characters, a setting, an event
sequence, and a solution. Remind students to think about how each of these story elements will support the explanation of the legend.
Using the Tree Map and the How do I Model Imaginative Narrative Writing For My Students? p. 338-342 from the WftB & Beyond Narrative binder.
Once the event sequence has been planned, have students work to plan and embed the evaluative criteria from the rubric such as descriptive
language to explain the events and response by characters.
Based on the needs of your students, guide students through the drafting of the story as a whole class, in groups, with a partner, or
individually.(See sample legend located at the end of the unit)
Language Conventions: Capitalization (Language Arts Handbook p.275)




Review the importance of capitalizing important words in titles.
Provide examples of titles that need to be capitalized (people’s titles, books, magazines, languages).
Have students practice identifying correct capitalization of titles using the text Johnny Appleseed.
Remind students to make sure they use this capitalization rule in their own writing.
21
2014-2015
English Language Arts
Storytelling
Grade 3
Rachel’s Journal
Day 16-17
Vocabulario
Términos de geografía, cumbre, valores,
provisiones, crónica, llorando a mares,
carreta, viaje
Theme Connections
This text gives the students an opportunity to explore the format of journaling as a way of storytelling about an event or experience. In this historical
fiction, students will read about a family’s journey to California from the point of view of a young girl named Rachel. Students will build more
understanding about how stories can explain or teach about traditions, beliefs, and customs from the past.
Reader and Task Considerations
In the task, students will be asked to identify details and traits about a character that affect the historical fiction story being told. Explain to the students
that the format of journaling involves the use of dates and personal thoughts to tell a story about an experience. Also, the author includes pictures and
vocabulary to help students reach an understanding about how things were during this particular time in history and the traditions that were important
Objetivos de Aprendizaje
Puedo escuchar y seguir un texto a
medida que se lee en voz alta. (RF.3.4)
Puedo hacer referencia a los detalles y la
evidencia de un texto para explicar lo
que significa el texto. (RI.3.1)
Focus of Instruction: Reading and Responding to Text
First Read
•
•
Have students locate the text in their Reflections textbook.
•
•
Read the entire text without stopping for enjoyment and for students to get the “gist.”
Explain that this journal format of storytelling will help in understanding Rachel’s point of view, or way of thinking and feeling about what is
happening. These details will be used to reach the historical message of her story.
Have students share what they thought about the journal.
Reread for Comprehension
•
Puedo determinar la idea principal del
texto utilizando detalles clave. (RI.3.2)
Puedo describir los pasos de proceso
utilizando un lenguaje de causa y efecto.
(RI.3.3)
Puedo entender el punto de vista del
autor acerca de este tema. (RI.3.6)
Tell students that looking closely at characters can help in understanding how their actions contribute to events described in a text.
 El texto que se encuentra en la parte superior de la página 204 proporciona para el lector algunos antecedentes acerca de los personajes y el
medioambiente. Vuelve a leer el párrafo, ¿de qué se tratará el diario de Rachel?
 De acuerdo a la página 204, ¿qué recibió Rachel de su abuelo?
 Vuelve a leer lo que Rachel escribió el 10 de marzo. ¿Cuál es el punto de vista de Rachel respecto al viaje de la familia?
 En la página 205, Rachel escribe “la abuela y el abuelo estaban llorando a mares. ¿Cuál es la diferencia entre su punto de vista y al punto de
vista de Rachel?
 Lee el subtítulo de la ilustración que se encuentra en la página 205. ¿Cómo se siente Rachel respecto a dejar su gato?
 ¿Por qué la familia de Rachel va a California? ¿Cómo es que el punto de vista del tío Pete los ayudó a tomar esa decisión?
 ¿Cuál es la información importante que Rachel incluye en su diario con la cual podría ayudar a los demás a realizar este viaje?
 Vuelve a leer lo que Rachel escribió el 7 de septiembre y el 3 de octubre. ¿De qué manera ha cambiado el punto de vista de Rachel? ¿Qué
palabras o frases utiliza ella para ayudar al lector a entender?
Puedo escuchar atentamente lo que
dicen mis compañeros de clase. (SL.3.1b)
Reread to Gather Evidence/Information and Respond to Text
Puedo plantear y contestar preguntas
específicas. (SL.3.1c)

Puedo hacer comentarios que se suman
al debate. (SL.3.1d)
Long Beach Unified School District
Introduce the focus question for collaborative discussion and short constructed response: ¿Cuál es la información importante que Rachel incluye en su
diario con la cual podría ayudar a los demás a realizar este viaje? ¿Cómo se siente acerca de este viaje?

Gathering Evidence

Create a Tree Map that tells about the journey and how she feels and a One-sided Multi-Flow with the details from Rachel’s journal that tells what can be
learned from her journal.
Collaborative discussion and oral processing

Using their maps place students in groups or with a partner and have them discuss their answers.
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English Language Arts
Storytelling
Puedo adquirir un nuevo conocimiento
del debate. (SL.3.1)

Grade 3
 Remind students to follow agreed-upon rules for discussions.
 Encourage students to build on each other’s talk and link comments made by others.
 Encourage students to ask for clarification when they are confused.
Writing to text
 Have students write a brief paragraph answering the focus question.
Focus of Instruction: Writing and Conventions
Objetivos de Aprendizaje
Puedo planear, revisar y editar mi
escritura. (W.3.5)
Plan a legend/imagined narrative (independent)
Puedo entender como producir oraciones
sencillas, compuestas y complejas.
(L.3.1.i)
Language Conventions: Review capitalization (TE pg.165F), Conjunctions (TE pg. 143F), Simple and Combined Sentences (TE pg.117F)
Puedo utilizar las mayúsculas y la
puntuación correcta en mi escritura.
(L.3.2)
Long Beach Unified School District

Students will now begin the process of writing their own legend stories. You can either provide them with a prompt or event to explain or students
can create their own.
Please note: Make sure students understand that they are going to create a legend that includes all the story elements they have studied and will
explain an event or message.

Students will independently plan their legend stories using a Tree Map for the story elements and a Flow Map for the event sequence/attempts.

Have students look back through their notes from the unit so that they will be able to recall all the components.

Keep notes of those students that struggle with the process and those that are able to complete this task independently. Provide time to support
students as needed.




Remind students that conjunctions were used when learning about simple and compound sentences.
Explain to students how conjunctions can connect words and simple sentences.
Remind them that this is a way to vary their sentence structure in their writing.
Remind them that it is important to understand the rules of capitalization as readers and writers to have a clear understanding of what they read
and write.
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English Language Arts
Storytelling
Grade 3
BAP LESSON: Aunt Flossie’s Hats (and Crab Cakes Later)
Day 18-22
Vocabulary
Theme Connections
See BAP lesson located on the Intranet
Students will continue to reflect on the impact of stories to link generations, the effect it can have on memories today, and the closeness created
through the process. Sarah and Susan are sisters who enjoy spending Sunday afternoons with their great-great Aunt Flossie, who entertains her greatgrandnieces by letting them explore her collection of hats. Each hat reminds Aunt Flossie of a treasured story from her life.
Reader and Task Considerations
Explain to students that special objects sometimes hold memories. These objects can create an emotional reaction about events from the past and
connect to present generations through storytelling. Students may need some additional information about the events Aunt Flossie shares to
understand the significance and connection to the hats.
Objetivos de Aprendizaje
Puedo escuchar y seguir un texto a
medida que se lee en voz alta. (RF.3.4)
Focus of Instruction: Reading and Responding to Text
First Read



Ask students to think about how this story has to do with the theme of storytelling.
Read aloud the entire story once through without stopping or commentary. The purpose is to provide students with an opportunity to enjoy the
story and get the overall “gist”
Ask students for their reaction to the story (leave this very open-ended, the purpose of this conversation is for students to talk about the text)
Puedo hacer referencia a los detalles de
un texto al contestar preguntas sobre lo
que significa el texto. (RI.3.1)
Reread for Comprehension
Puedo escuchar atentamente lo que
dicen mis compañeros de clase. (SL.3.1)
Reread to Gather Evidence/Information and Respond to Text
Puedo plantear y contestar preguntas
específicas. (SL.3.1.c)
Puedo hacer comentarios que se suman
al debate. (SL.3.1d)
Puedo adquirir un nuevo conocimiento
del debate. (SL.3.1)
Long Beach Unified School District

Follow BAP lesson on Intranet for a full list of text-dependent questions, vocabulary, and tasks.
Introduce the focus question for collaborative discussion and short constructed response:
¿Cómo es que historias y tradiciones de la familia a menudo hacen que las familias se
sientan más cerca?

Gathering Evidence
 Use a Flow Map to organize the events in the story that show the importance
of the Sunday tradition of visiting her Aunt Flossie: ¿Qué tradiciones disfrutan las
niñas cada vez que visitan a su tía Flossie?
 Use a Multi-Flow Map to organize the information from the story to reach
an understanding about the impact Aunt Flossie’s stories have on Susan: The
event is Aunt Flossie shares hats.

Collaborative discussion and oral processing
 Using their maps place students in groups or with a partner and have them
discuss their answers.
 Remind students to follow agreed-upon rules for discussions.
 Encourage students to build on each other’s talk and link comments made by others.
 Encourage students to ask for clarification when they are confused.

Writing to text

Have students write a brief paragraph answering the focus question.
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2014-2015
English Language Arts
Storytelling
Objetivos de Aprendizaje
Grade 3
Focus of Instruction: Writing and Conventions
Students take their legend stories through the writing process (independent)
En una narrativa imaginaria…

Puedo identificar una introducción
que explica la situación y presenta al
narrador o personajes.
(W.3.3a)








Students will be expected to compose their survival stories using all components of the writing process.
Make sure that each student has completed the planning and oral rehearsing components of the writing process before they begin composing.
Teachers can provide mini-conferences to check-in on students’ progress.
Provide mini-lessons base on notes gathered during conferences and their needs.
Puedo describir acciones y
respuestas de personajes para
desarrollar eventos.
(W.3.3.b)
Puedo utilizar palabras para
conectar mis eventos.
(W.3.3c)
Puedo escribir una conclusión.
(W.3.3d)
Puedo fortalecer mi escritura
mediante las revisiones. (W.3.5)
Puedo entender como producir oraciones
sencillas, compuestas y complejas.
(L.3.1.i)
Puedo variar mis oraciones, entendiendo
cómo utilizar conjunciones en mi
escritura.
(L.3.1.h)
Long Beach Unified School District
Editing Strategy: Varied sentences




Remind students that conjunctions were used when learning about simple and compound sentences.
Explain to students how conjunctions can connect words and simple sentences.
Remind them that this is a way to vary their sentence structure in their writing.
Have students go back to their writing to locate places that they can combine sentences with the use of a conjunction.
25
2014-2015
English Language Arts
Storytelling
Grade 3
Research and Inquiry
Approx.
Number
of Days
3-5
3-5
3-5
3-5
3-5
3-5
Resources
Inquiry Process
Guided Activity Options
Investigating Concepts Beyond the Text
 Decide on a problem or question to investigate
 Formulate a conjecture about the problem
 Revise conjectures
 Present findings
 Initiate a whole-class discussion around the theme
 Generate questions
 Present possible presentation options
Refine Problems or Questions and form Conjectures

Have students share their problems or questions to lead to the
creation of investigation groups

Remind students that a good question cannot be answered by
“Googling it” and it must add to group's understanding of
investigation

Have students organize into groups based on interests
Collaborative Investigation on Conjectures-Needs and Plan Phase 1

Have the students discuss the conjectures created with their group to
the whole class

Allow students the opportunity to contribute suggestions, criticisms
and questions

After discussion, all groups move into the Needs and Plans phase.

OCR Unit 5:
165 A-D
Inquiry Journal
p. 122-123
OCR Unit 5:
179 A-D
OCR Unit 5:
p.117A-D
Inquiry Journal
p.112
OCR Unit 5:
127 A-D
Inquiry journal
p. 89-92
OCR Unit 5:
155 A-D
Inquiry Journal
p. 116-117
Internet or
Library
Skills
Have students form a panel of five or six class
members to discuss ideas related to storytelling
(What are some examples of American Folktales?)
Individually or in small groups, have them generate
complete Inquiry Journal, page. 112 or use a Circle
Map
Interviewing
(See p. 127 D for
suggestions on teaching,
guided practice, and
independent practice)
Inquiry Journal p. 7
Conduct an interview of a relative or friend about a
memory they have from their past
Remind them of the task of interviewing and that it
is a research tool.
Diagrams
(See p. 143 D for
suggestions on teaching,
guided practice, and
independent practice)

Have a discussion about their plan for their
investigation and complete 116-117 in the Inquiry
Journal
Internet Searches
(See p. 155 D for
suggestions on teaching,
guided practice, and
independent practice)
Inquiry Journal p. 120-121
Needs and Plan Phase 2

Meet with the groups and discuss difficulties they are having with
problems, conjectures, needs or plans

Remind the students they can still change their problems or
questions

Discuss how objects can tell a story
Inquiry Journal p. 122-123
Have students discuss if or what object they would
like to use to represent their storytelling project
Maps
(See p. 165D for
suggestions on teaching,
guided practice, and
independent practice)
Reevaluating Problems and Questions

Based on findings, students will revise conjectures and investigations

Students begin final preparations for the group or individual
presentations

Students can have a discussion about interviews
and sources use a Tree Map to take notes
Dictionaries
(See p. 193D for
suggestions on teaching,
guided practice, and
independent practice)




Inquiry/Research Task and Presentation

Provide time for students to finish their investigations

Provide time for presentations
Long Beach Unified School District
26
2014-2015
English Language Arts
Storytelling
Grade 3
Legend/Imaginative Narrative: Sample written piece
Prompt: Imagínate que un niño le tiene miedo al océano y la gente del pueblo se burla de él porque no tiene valor. Su padre es conocido como un gran pescador. Escribe una
leyenda acerca de cómo el niño supera su miedo.
In a small village near the Pacific Ocean, there lived a fisherman and his son Lance. All the villagers knew the fisherman as a man who knew how to bring many fish from the sea,
and soon his son would be joining in his work. Unfortunately, Lance was a boy born with a deep fear of the ocean and it made him the joke of this tiny seaside village. He had to
find a way to make the sea his friend so that he could make his father proud.
As the sun rose one morning, Lance decided he was going to find his courage to work on the sea by talking to the village’s oldest boat driver. He walked many miles to the dock
where the driver lived on his boat. As he approached the boat he could see the many supplies the driver had: tools, ropes, orange vests, fishing poles, and maps. Lance quietly
and politely asked, “Please tell me how you have the courage to ride on the powerful ocean every day?” The wise old boat driver explained that he had learned to use the
feeling of the waves as music when he was driving. This helped him to stay calm even when the ocean was rough. Lance decided he would try and he stepped on the rocking
boat, but instead of hearing music in his head he felt a queasy feeling in his stomach. His headed started spinning and he jumped off the boat.
Disappointed that he could not find his courage from the boat driver, Lance walked down to the cliffs that overlooked the ocean. There he found Isabella, the artist that sat and
painted the beautiful sea every day. She sat so close, that her face and clothes would be wet from the spray of the waves. Lance knew if Isabella could face this mighty water
each day, that maybe she could help his. Isabella sat in a chair perched at the edge of the sea surrounded by her many art supplies: brushes, paints, rags, and canvas. Softly
Lance spoke, “How do you have the courage to sit so close to the ocean each day?” Isabella looked up from her painting to explain that when she paints the ocean she sees the
many creatures that depend on the sea. This makes her feel like the ocean is a home and a home is a warm place to be. “Try to imagine the ocean as a moving home filled with
many family members,” Isabella told Lance. Lance tried to picture the watery home, but when he closed his eyes the pictures of sharks and storms turned the warm place into a
watery haunted house. Shaking with fear, Lance wearily said goodbye to the artist.
Feeling down, Lance decided he would go find his father to tell him that he would never be able to be a fisherman. Finding his father on the pier with his fishing pole in the sea,
Lance muttered, “Dad, I’m too afraid of the ocean to be a fisherman.” He told him how he had tried to solve his problem, but it had not worked. Calmly, his father put his pole
down and said, “Son, you must have some fear of the ocean to understand its power.” He began to tell Lance that the ocean is powerful, but he learned to love it because of the
food it provides to his family, He put the fishing rod in Lance’s hand, and for the first time he saw the gifts the ocean gives when he pulled a up a mighty fish at the end of his
pole. Lance knew the ocean gives many gifts to his people and his fear began to disappear. Standing for many hours, Lance was able to replace his fear with respect for this
powerful body of water.
Many years have passed, but the story of Lance is still shared with children in the village. He is a reminder to all, that the courage to face the ocean is only found when you can
understand the gifts it gives.
Long Beach Unified School District
27
2014-2015
English Language Arts
Storytelling
Grade 3
Tercer Grado Escolar: Legenda/Narración Imaginativa
Lista de Verificación del Estudiante
CRITERIO
Nombre____________
Fecha____________
Título________________________
Puntos
Posibles
Puntos Recibidos/Comentarios:
ESTRATEGIAS: Utilice para la revisión.
1. Tengo múltiples párrafos enfocados
en contar una historia con un
7
problema/solución, utilizando personajes,
medioambiente y secuencia de eventos.
2. Tengo una introducción o inicio con
2-3 oraciones que plantean mi historia e
identifican los personajes, el
2
medioambiente y el problema.
3. Tengo por lo menos 3 eventos
importantes en la parte central, cada
3
uno con una oración temática y por lo
menos tres oraciones adicionales que
proporcionan detalles acerca de dichos
eventos.
4. Tengo un párrafo final o conclusión
con por lo menos 2 oraciones que
1
proporcionan una observación, mensaje
o explican un evento natural.
5. Tengo por lo menos 3 ejemplos de
palabras descriptivas o frases que
2
ayudan a mi lector a visualizar la gente,
los eventos y lugares que se describen.
6. Utilizo por lo menos 3 diferentes
2
palabras o frases de transición para
darle fluidez a mi historia.
CONVENCIONES: Utilice para la edición.
7. Todas las palabras de mi lista están
deletreadas correctamente.
1
8. Utilice las mayúsculas y la
puntuación correcta.
2
TOTAL:
Long Beach Unified School District
20
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2014-2015
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