Unit Goals – Stage 1 English Language Arts Survival Grade 4

Unit Goals – Stage 1 English Language Arts Survival Grade 4
English Language Arts
Survival
Grade 4
Unit Goals – Stage 1
Unit Description: Students will explore the will to survive in the face of various challenges, such as climate, fear, and extreme hardships. Students will read literature and explore how authors use various narrative
techniques to develop experiences with descriptive details. Students will develop their understanding of survival by examining how people and characters face and overcome different situations. Students will craft a
realistic fiction story related to the unit theme.
Approximate Duration-5 weeks
CCR Anchor Standards
Transfer Goals: SBAC Claims
R.CCR.1 – R.CCR.3 (Continued from Unit 1)
Students will be increasingly able to independently use their learning to…
R.CCR.4 Interpret words and phrases as they are used in a text,

Read closely and analytically to comprehend a range of increasingly complex literary and informational text. (Claim 1)
including determining technical, connotative, and figurative

Produce effective and well-grounded writing for a range of purposes and audiences. (Claim 2)
meanings, and analyze how specific word choices shape meaning

Employ effective speaking and listening skills for a range of purposes and audiences. (Claim 3)
or tone.

Engage in research and inquiry to investigate topics, and to analyze, integrate, and present information. (Claim 4)
R.CCR.5 Analyze the structure of texts, including how specific
Making Meaning
sentences, paragraphs, and larger portions of the text relate to
UNDERSTANDINGS
ESSENTIAL QUESTIONS
each other and the whole.
Students will understand that…
Students will keep considering…
1.
How do people survive scary events?

Surviving under conditions of extreme deprivation or danger
R.CCR.6 Assess how point of view or purpose shapes the content
2.
Why did the author use this word or phrase?
depends on many different factors such as perseverance,
and style of a text.
3.
How do authors build ideas?
individual knowledge, resources, and luck.
W.CCR.3 Write narratives to develop real or imagined experiences
4.
Who is telling the story and why is that important to know?

Authors and writers make specific word choices to shape the
or events using effective technique, well-chosen details, and well5.
What are some ways I can learn new words?
overall meaning and tone of a text.
structured event sequences.
6.
How do I write a story with a clear message?

Authors use devices such as transitions, organizational patterns,
W.CCR.4 Produce clear and coherent writing in which the
and strategies to emphasize certain ideas, events, concepts, or
development, organization, and style are appropriate to task,
information to build meaning.
purpose, and audience.

Point of view shapes the meaning and tone of a text.
W.CCR.5 Develop and strengthen writing as needed by planning,

Relating words to their opposites (antonyms) and to words with
similar but not identical meanings increases your vocabulary.
revising, editing, rewriting, or trying a new approach.

Collegial conversations with others help to build and clarify ideas.
W.CCR.8 (Continued from Unit 1)

Conveying a message through fictional writing takes careful
W.CCR.9 (Continued from Unit 1)
planning and organization as well as considering the audience
SL.CCR.1 Prepare for and participate effectively in a range of
and purpose.
conversations and collaborations with diverse partners, building on

A command of English Language conventions and grammar
others’ ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively.
brings clarity and sophistication to writing.
SL.CCR.2 Integrate and evaluate information presented in diverse
Acquisition
media and formats, including visually, quantitatively, and orally.
KNOWLEDGE
SKILLS
L.CCR.1 Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard
Students will know…
Students will be skilled at (Do)
English grammar and usage when writing or speaking.
•
The different ways people respond to and survive tragic events.

Determining the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in
•
Characteristics of survival stories.
L.CCR.2 Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard
a text.
•
The narrator (first or third person) refers to who is telling the

Describing how an author builds a story and referring to parts of
English capitalization, punctuation, and spelling when writing.
story.
stories when writing or speaking about them.
L.CCR.3 Apply knowledge of language to understand how language
•
Point
of
view
is
the
way
an
author
allows
you
to
“see”
and
“hear”

Determining if narration is first or third person and describing how
functions in different contexts, to make effective choices for
what’s going on in literature.
this affects point of view.
meaning or style, and to comprehend more fully when reading or
•
Realistic fiction story elements (characters, setting, problem, plot 
Identifying organizational patterns used in literature and
listening.
or event sequence, rising action, and solution).
informational text to help explain events, ideas, or information in
L.CCR.4 (Continued from Unit 1)
•
Organizational patterns used in literature and informational text.
the text.
L.CCR.5 Demonstrate understanding of figurative language, word
•
Strategies for organizing, planning, and developing realistic

Paraphrasing information presented through video.
fiction.
relationships, and nuances in word meanings.

Planning, organizing, and developing a realistic survival story that
•
Antonyms and synonyms
L.CCR.6 (Continued from Unit 1)
conveys a message.
•
LONG BEACH UNIFED SCHOOL DISTRICT
Progressive verb tenses

Using antonyms and synonyms to build vocabulary
1
IMPORTANT NOTE from Translating Team to TEACHERS: Please refer to your instructional materials to adapt the vocabulary used in the texts as needed.
2014-2015
English Language Arts
Survival
Grade 4
Grade Level Standards– Stage 1
Reading
Writing
Speaking and Listening
Language
Literature
RL.4.4 Determine the meaning of words
and phrases as they are used in a text.
RL.4.5 Explain major differences between
poems, drama, and prose, and refer to
the structural elements of poems, drama,
and prose when writing or speaking
about text.
RL.4.6 Compare and contrast the point of
view from which different stories are
narrated, including the difference
between first- and third- person
narrations.
Text Type
W.4.3 Write narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or
events using effective technique, descriptive details, and clear event
sequences.
a.
Orient the reader by establishing a situation and introducing a
narrator and/or characters: organize an event sequence that
unfolds naturally.
b. Use dialogue and description to develop experiences and events
or show the responses of characters to situations.
c.
Use a variety of transitional words, phrases, to manage the
sequence of events.
d. Use concrete words and phrases and sensory details to convey
experiences and events precisely.
e.
Provide a conclusion that follows from the narrated experiences
or events.
Comprehension and Collaboration
SL.4.1 Engage effectively in a range of
collaborative discussions (one-on one, in
groups, and teacher-led) with diverse
partners on grade 4 topics and texts,
building on others’ ideas and expressing
their own clearly.
a. Come to discussions prepared having
read or studied required material;
explicitly draw on that preparation
and other information known about
the topic to explore ideas under
discussion.
b. Follow agreed-upon rules for
discussions and carry out assigned
roles.
c. Pose and respond to specific
questions to clarify or follow up on
information, and make comments
that contribute to the discussion and
link to the remarks of others.
d. Review the key ideas expressed and
explain their own ideas and
understanding in light of the
discussion
SL.4.2 Paraphrase portions of a text read
aloud or information presented in diverse
media and formats, including visually,
quantitatively, and orally.
Conventions
L.4.1.b. Form and use the
progressive (e.g., I was walking; I
am walking: I will be walking) verb
tenses
L.4.1.f Produce complete
sentences, recognizing and
correcting inappropriate
fragments and run-ons.
L.4.2.a. Use correct capitalization
L.4.2.d Spell grade-appropriate
words correctly, consulting
references as needed.
Informational
RI.4.4 Determine the meaning of general
academic and domain-specific words or
phrases in a text.
RI.4.5 Describe the overall structure (e.g.,
chronology, comparison, cause/effect,
problem/solution) of events, ideas,
concepts, or information in a text or part
of a text.
RI.4.6 Compare and contrast a firsthand
and secondhand account of the same
event or topic; describe the differences in
focus and the information provided.
Foundational
RF.4.3 Know and apply grade-level
phonics and word analysis skills in
decoding words.
RF.4.4Read with sufficient accuracy and
fluency to support comprehension.
LONG BEACH UNIFED SCHOOL DISTRICT
Production and Distribution of Writing
W.4.4 Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development
and organization are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience.
W.4.5 With guidance and support from peers and adults, develop and
strengthen writing as needed by planning, revising, editing.
Research to Build and Present Knowledge
W.4.8 Recall relevant information from experiences or gather relevant
information from print and digital sources; take notes and categorize
information, and provide a list of sources
W.4.9 Draw evidence from literary or informational texts to support
analysis, reflection, and research.
a. Apply grade 4 Reading standards to literature (e.g., “compare
and contrast two or more characters, settings, or events in a
story or a drama, drawing on specific details in the text”)
b. Apply grade 4 Reading standards to informational texts (e.g.,
“Explain how an author uses reasons and evidence to support
particular points in a text, identifying which reasons and evidence
support which points”).
Vocabulary Acquisition and Use
L.4.3.a Choose words and phrases
to convey ideas precisely.
L.4.4.a Use context as a clue to
the meaning of a word or phrase.
L.4.5.c demonstrate
understanding of words by
relating them to their opposites
(antonyms) and to words with
similar but not identical meanings
(synonyms)
L.4.6 Acquire and use accurately
grade-appropriate general
academic and domain-specific
words and phrases.
2
IMPORTANT NOTE from Translating Team to TEACHERS: Please refer to your instructional materials to adapt the vocabulary used in the texts as needed.
2014-2015
English Language Arts
Survival
Grade 4
Evidence of Learning – Stage 2
Evaluative Criteria (LBUSD Achievement Report Evidence)
End of Unit Assessment Evidence
See Scoring guide located on Intranet
 Uses textual evidence to explain what the text says explicitly and
when drawing inferences
 Determines and summarizes central ideas and key details
 Determines word meanings and phrases in context
 Engages in collaborative conversations (See Collaborative Discussion
Rubric)
 Organizes and maintains focus to support purpose
See CCSS-Aligned Narrative Writing Rubric
 Organizes and maintains focus to support the sequential structure
of narrative writing
 Uses appropriate details and precise language to develop
experiences appropriate to a survival story. Characters will show
traits or qualities of those that survive extreme situation.
 Conveys a message related to the theme of survival
 Applies grade level appropriate conventions
End of Unit On-Demand Reading and Responding to Text Assessment (Intranet)
Over the course of three days, students will read a piece of literature, answer several text-dependent
questions and work in collaborative groups to gather evidence that they will use to write an analysis
of the text in response to a prompt.

Inquiry/Research Task and Presentation
Students will conduct a unit investigation that will be student-driven and emerge from their interests,
and encouraged or ignited by reading and class discussions. Students may work individually or in
small groups. (Refer to page 321A in the Teacher’s Edition of the “Survival” unit for inquiry ideas.)



Plans, speaks, and presents information/ideas connected to the unit
theme
Listens and interprets information and ideas presented by others
Reads beyond program material
Address the conceptual aims of the unit (Survival in extreme
conditions)
Realistic Fiction Writing Task – Survival story
During the last week of the unit, students will work through the writing process to plan, organize,
draft, revise, and publish a survival story in the genre of realistic fiction. The story will be organized
around a problem/solution and will convey a message relevant to the theme of survival.
Evaluative Criteria
Other Evidence – may be used formatively

BAP Culminating Writing Tasks
Uses textual evidence to explain what the text says explicitly and
when drawing inferences in response to a prompt.

Uses textual evidence to explain what the text says explicitly and
when drawing inferences in response to a prompt.
See CCSS Aligned Collaborative Discussion Rubric
Short Constructed Responses to Focus Questions
See CCSS Aligned Fluency Rubric
Grade Level Fluency Passages
LONG BEACH UNIFED SCHOOL DISTRICT
Collaborative Discussions on Focus Questions
3
IMPORTANT NOTE from Translating Team to TEACHERS: Please refer to your instructional materials to adapt the vocabulary used in the texts as needed.
2014-2015
English Language Arts
Survival
Grade 4
Learning Plan – Stage 3
Instructional Sequence Overview
Days
Reading and Responding to Text
1
Video Clip: Tsunami 101 3:30
www.teachertube.com/viewVideo.php?video_i
d=279743
2-5
The Big Wave (OCR) - BAP
6-10
Island of the Blue Dolphins (OCR)
11
12-16
17
18-22
23- 25
Available
resources
to support
and
enhance
instruction
Narrative Writing
Language Conventions
Initial Assessment of a realistic fiction survival story
Create a realistic fiction writing folder
Review present, past, and future verb
tenses
Analyze The Big Wave for story elements, story
structure, and evaluative criteria of fictional narrative
Analyze Island of the Blue Dolphins for story elements,
story structure, and evaluative criteria of fictional
narrative
Review subject-verb agreement in
present tense
Progressive verb tenses (present, past,
and future)
Video Clip: Intro to Inuits
http://www.teachertube.com/viewVideo.php?v
ideo_id=232607
Begin modeling a realistic fiction survival story (guided)
Pronoun-antecedent agreement in
present tense
Arctic Explorer: Matthew Henson (OCR) - BAP
Continue modeling a realistic fiction survival story
(guided)
Editing Strategy: Sentence problems
Plan a realistic fiction survival story (independent)
Editing Strategy: Sentence problems
continued
Draft, revise, and edit a realistic fiction survival story
(independent)
Editing Strategy: Proofread for errors in
spelling, punctuation, capitalization,
usage, and grammar.
A Biography of Anne Frank 2:55
www.teachertube.com/viewVideo.php?video_i
d=157843
Anne Frank: Diary of a Young Girl (OCR)
(compare and contrast this firsthand account to
the secondhand account in the video
On-Demand Reading and Writing Assessment




Reader’s Digest survival stories located at
http://www.rd.com/true-stories/survival
Response to Literature Manual
OCR leveled libraries
McBroom and the Big Wind (BAP)
Survival Story – Realistic Fiction
Students publish and share a realistic fiction survival story with a message.
•
•
Write from the Beginning and Beyond Narrative Manual
Write from the Beginning and Beyond – Setting the Stage
Manual
Language Arts Handbook
*See last page of unit for an overview of research and inquiry.
LONG BEACH UNIFED SCHOOL DISTRICT
4
IMPORTANT NOTE from Translating Team to TEACHERS: Please refer to your instructional materials to adapt the vocabulary used in the texts as needed.
2014-2015
English Language Arts
Survival
Grade 4
Video Clip – Tsunami 101
Day 1
Vocabulary
Tsunami, tectonic plates, displacing,
engulf, crest (wave)
Theme Connections
This video will provide students with some important background knowledge about tsunamis in preparation for the text, The Big Wave. In the video
clip, students will explore information about how a tsunami is formed and how it can devastate the land.
Text, Reader, and Task Considerations
•
Metas de Aprendizaje
•
Puedo escuchar
atentamente y parafrasear la
información presentada en
un video. (SL 4.2)
LONG BEACH UNIFED SCHOOL DISTRICT
Students will likely need some context regarding location of Japan and Indonesia. Students will watch the video several times so they can
determine how the information is organized in order to help them take notes and paraphrase the important ideas. The video moves rather
quickly and students may need you to pause at certain points so they can write down their notes.
Focus of Instruction: Reading and Responding to Text
First Viewing
•
Watch the entire video once through without stopping or commentary. The purpose is to provide students with an opportunity to enjoy the
video and get the overall “gist.”
•
Viewing #1: Play the video the first time and have students listen to factual information and details about Tsunamis. Have students create a
Circle Map with tsunami as the topic. As students watch and listen to the video, ask them to write notes in the circle. After viewing the video,
have students turn to a partner or in a group and discuss what they learned. Engage students in a whole group discussion with the following
questions.
•
Ask students for their reaction to the video (leave this very open-ended, the purpose of this conversation is for students to talk about the
video).
5
IMPORTANT NOTE from Translating Team to TEACHERS: Please refer to your instructional materials to adapt the vocabulary used in the texts as needed.
2014-2015
English Language Arts
•
Puedo escuchar atentamente
y parafrasear la información
presentada en un video.
(SL 4.2)
LONG BEACH UNIFED SCHOOL DISTRICT
Survival
Grade 4
Re-Viewing for Listening Comprehension
•
Replay the first 30 seconds of the video. Ask students what information they learned in that small section. Explain to students that this is the
“opening of the video and is designed to get the viewer’s attention.
•
Play the first 30 seconds again and ask students to watch for techniques that the video uses to get the viewer’s attention.
 ¿Qué técnicas se usaron paran captar tu atención? Students should come up with reference to the music, screams, tone of the narrator,
use of live video footage, etc…
•
Replay :31-2:11
 Tell students that the next section will explain how a tsunami is formed. Ask students for the type of Thinking Map they will need to use to
capture the steps to how a tsunami is formed. (Flow
Map)
 Ask students to watch this section of the video again and
record notes in a Flow Map capturing how a Tsunami is
formed. You may need to stop the video in places for
students to capture their notes.
 Have students paraphrase the information in their Flow
Maps with a partner or in a small group. Ask students to
revise their maps as needed.
•
Ask the following questions:
 ¿Qué causa que se forme un tsunami?
 ¿Qué ocurre cuando la ola golpea al agua poco profunda?
 ¿Cómo es un tsunami diferente a una ola regular?
 ¿Qué ocurre después que golpea la costa?
 ¿Hasta qué distancia de la costa puede llegar un tsunami?
•
Replay 2:11-2:47
 Tell students that the next section will provide a description of the deadliest
tsunami ever recorded.
 Tell them to listen for the cause of the tsunami and the effects. Ask
students which Thinking Map would best capture this information. (MultiFlow)
 Have students record their information in a Multi-Flow Map and then
paraphrase the information with a partner or in a small groups
• Replay 2:48-3:28
 Tell students that this last section presents information about a warning
system in place to help minimize the loss of lives in a tsunami.
 Ask students to listen for the steps the monitoring system goes through to
minimize the loss of lives and record the steps in a Flow Map.
 Have students paraphrase the information with a partner or in a small group.
• Ask the following questions
 ¿De qué manera ayuda el Sistema de Alerta a minimizar la pérdida de vidas?
 ¿Cuáles son algunas de las cosas que las personas pueden hacer para sobrevivir un tsunami según el consejo que da el video?
6
IMPORTANT NOTE from Translating Team to TEACHERS: Please refer to your instructional materials to adapt the vocabulary used in the texts as needed.
2014-2015
English Language Arts
•
Puedo tomar notas,
categorizar información, y
parafrasear el video en mis
propias palabras. (W.4.8)
Metas de Aprendizaje
•
Puedo identificar los verbos
en tiempos pasados,
presentes y futuros.
(repaso del 3er grado)
•
Puedo identificar los errores
de los tiempos verbales en los
escritos. (W.4.3.c)
•
Puedo usar los tiempos
verbales propios en mi propia
redacción. (W.4.3.c)
LONG BEACH UNIFED SCHOOL DISTRICT
Survival
Grade 4
Using Notes and Maps to Paraphrase the Information
Introduce the Focus Question: ¿Qué información presentó el narrador en el video acerca de los tsunamis?
•
•
Have students orally paraphrase the information using their notes and maps prior to writing a response to the focus question.
Have students paraphrase in writing the information presented in the video.
Focus of Instruction: Writing and Conventions
Writing Text Type Pre-Assessment: Realistic Fiction
•
Initial Assessment: With minimal instruction and prompting, provide students with a realistic fiction survival scenario. For example: Write a
story about a young boy or girl who was left at home alone during a bad storm. Tell how this young boy or girl survives the storm.
•
Scan the student essays to determine whether or not students have the basics of a problem/solution story using the Third Grade Imaginative
Narrative Rubric on page 344 of the Narrative manual. Look for an opening that orients the reader to the characters, setting, and problem; a
realistic and logical plot sequence that develops the experiences of the characters; and a concluding section that brings about a resolution.
•
Take anecdotal notes on gaps to use for future mini-lessons.
•
Prepare for the Unit: Have students create a Realistic Fiction writing folder to keep working drafts, notes from mini-lessons, and resources (i.e.
transitional word lists, proficient essays, a model of the basic structure, student checklists, etc…)
Grammar Conventions: Present, past, and future verb tenses
•
Remind students that verbs can be categorized as present, past or future (Unit 3 Lesson 2)
•
Remind students that past tense verbs end in the letters “-ed”, present tense verbs remain the same, and future tense verbs contain the word
“will” before the present form of the verb.
•
Provide students with a list of verbs and have them classify them as present, past or future.
•
Using previously read text from the anthology; ask students to select verbs and then categorize them in a Tree Map as either past, present, or
future.
•
Write some sentences related to the tsunami video in past tense and have students turn the sentences into present and future. For example,
“In the tsunami, the villagers left for higher ground.” Students will write, “En el tsunami, los habitantes dejaron el pueblo para ir a tierra más
alta” and “En un tsunami, los habitantes dejarán el pueblo para ir a tierra más alta”.
•
Have students create their own sentences in the same manner as the teacher did. Have the students give their sentences to each other and
rewrite them in the other two tenses. Whiteboards are an efficient way to accomplish this task.
•
During this time, teachers can go around the room to see which students have a solid grasp of the concept, and which students don’t, thus
allowing the teacher the opportunity to provide support.
7
IMPORTANT NOTE from Translating Team to TEACHERS: Please refer to your instructional materials to adapt the vocabulary used in the texts as needed.
2014-2015
English Language Arts
Survival
Grade 4
BAP LESSON: The Big Wave
Days 2-5
Vocabulary
wreckage, weep, gently, nostrils, panels,
flesh and blood, cruel, valuable,
unfortunate, fortunate, presence,
remained, unconscious, sobbing, timber,
snatching, persuaded, fragrance
Metas de Aprendizaje
•
Puedo escuchar y seguir un texto
que se lee en voz alta. (RF.4.4)
•
Puedo hacer referencia a los
detalles en el texto al contestar
preguntas sobre el significado del
texto. (RI.4.1)
•
Puedo determinar el significado
de las palabras en el texto al usar
las claves en el contexto. (L.4.4.a)
•
Puedo volver a leer partes del
texto oralmente con precisión,
ritmo adecuado y expresión.
(RF.4.4b)
•
Puedo identificar el narrador en
una historia y describir el punto
de vista que presenta el narrador.
(RL 4.6)
LONG BEACH UNIFED SCHOOL DISTRICT
Theme Connections
In the text, The Big Wave, students will connect their new knowledge about the science of a tsunami with the story of a boy who has just lost his
whole family in one.
Reader and Task Considerations
The text is an excerpt from a chapter book by the same name. The story is rich with vocabulary, and deals with a mature subject matter (people
dying due to natural disasters).
Focus of Instruction: Reading and Responding to Text
First Read
•
Provide students with a copy of the text
•
Tell students that they will listen to you read the text aloud the first time so that they can get a sense of what the text is about.
•
Read aloud the entire text without stopping in order for students to get the “gist” of the selection.
•
Ask students for their reaction to the text (leave this very open-ended, the purpose of this conversation is for students to talk about the text).
Reread for Comprehension
•
Follow the revised BAP lesson located on the Intranet for a full list of text-dependent questions, vocabulary, and tasks.
•
The following TDQ’s from the BAP lesson will be especially helpful in preparing your student’s for success on the end of unit assessment:
 Vuelve a leer el primer párrafo en la página 379 y mira la ilustración. El texto explica que Jiya estaba inconsciente.
¿Qué evidencia en el texto y la ilustración te ayuda a entender lo que significa inconsciente?
 Vuelve a leer el último párrafo en la página 380 y los dos primeros párrafos en la página 381. Según el padre de Kino, ¿cómo aprenderá Jiya
a vivir con la pérdida de su familia?
 El padre de Kino dice, “De la misma manera en que él vivió con ellos, él vivirá con su muerte.” (p. 381) ¿Qué significa esto?
 La personificación es un tipo de lenguaje figurativo que da características humanas a algo que no es humano. El párrafo comienza al pie de
la página 383 y continúa en la página 384 usando la personificación en la última oración. ¿Qué palabras en la oración hace que el mar
parezca como una persona? ¿Qué imagen creó el autor al usar estas palabras?
Reread to Gather Evidence/Information and Respond to Text
Introduce the Focus Question (Culminating Task): ¿Qué palabras y acciones de los personajes reflejan el pensamiento del narrador y sus
sentimientos acerca de la probabilidad de supervivencia de Jiya?
•
Analyze the task with students.
•
Ask students what evidence they will need to gather in order to support a response to the prompt. Encourage them to create an evidence
chart. (See the example provided on page 8 in the BAP lesson.)
•
Depending on the needs of your students, provide additional scaffolds and modeling.
8
IMPORTANT NOTE from Translating Team to TEACHERS: Please refer to your instructional materials to adapt the vocabulary used in the texts as needed.
2014-2015
English Language Arts
Survival
Metas de Aprendizaje
•
•
Puedo describe el punto de vista
del narrador. (RL. 4.5)
Focus of Instruction: Narrative Writing and Conventions
Analyzing a fictional narrative/survival story (third-person point of view)
•
Puedo describir cómo el autor
desarrolla la historia. (RL.4.5)
En una historia realista de ficción…
• Puedo identificar la apertura que
orienta al lector hacia una
situación y los personajes.
(W.4.3.a)
•
Analyze for story elements

Explain to students that there are certain elements common to stories including characters, setting, problem, goal, plot/event sequence,
solution, and a message, lesson or moral.

As a class, analyze the story elements of The
Big Wave using a Tree Map with the
following labels/branches: Characters,
setting, problem, goal, events/plot, solution.

Discuss the types of characters, settings, and
problems you would see in a realistic fiction
story.

For the Frame of reference, determine as a
class possible messages of the survival story.
Examples could be “Understanding and love
can help people cope with personal tragedy,”
“Environmental conditions can cause natural
disasters, which in turn can cause personal
tragedy,”
Sometime people need to be left alone to
deal with a tragedy,” “Life is stronger than
death; Life and death are a part of life”

Keep an ongoing list of these messages, as
students will be able to pull from them when
they write their own survival stories.
Puedo identificar el diálogo para
que el cuento avance y/o revele
algo acerca de los personajes.
(W.4.3.b)
•
•
LONG BEACH UNIFED SCHOOL DISTRICT
Grade 4
Analyze for story structure

“Reverse Map” The Big Wave into its opening, event sequence, and closing, analyzing how the author builds the story.

Draw the students’ attention to the opening of the passage on page 378 (Upon the beach…). Tell the students that this opening is an
example of introducing the setting right away in this survival story. Impress upon them that this could be a good type of opening to use
when they are writing their own survival stories.

Impress upon the students the importance of looking at examples of literature, because they will be creating their own survival story
themselves. Students will be expected to incorporate these elements in their own stories.
Analyze for evaluative criteria - Using the Grade 4/5 Fictional Narrative Rubric criteria, have students analyze the opening of The Big Wave

Explain to students that an author orients the reader by establishing the situation.

Have students reread the first paragraph of The Big Wave on page 378 and ask students what the author is describing in the paragraph.

Ask students what the author means in the sentence, “All that had been was now no more.”

Analyze what the author is doing in each sentence. She is orienting the reader to the devastation that the tsunami has caused.

Provide students with a scenario and challenge them to write an opening paragraph for the scenario using the same style as the author.
9
IMPORTANT NOTE from Translating Team to TEACHERS: Please refer to your instructional materials to adapt the vocabulary used in the texts as needed.
2014-2015
English Language Arts
Survival
•
Grade 4
Analyze for evaluative criteria – Using the Grade 4/5 Fictional Narrative Rubric criteria, have students analyze and find examples of dialogue or
monologue that is used to progress the story and/or reveal something about the main character.

Create a Tree Map with the title, “Dialogue/Monologue, and two
branches, “progresses the story” and “reveals something about the
character”

Model for students by selecting dialogue that represents each. Notesome dialogue will represent both.

Example: “It is better that he is unconscious.” “Let him remain so until
his own will wakes him. I will sit by him.” Under each branch, explain
how this dialogue moves the story and or reveals something about the
characters.

•
•
Puedo entender que los
sustantivos y los verbos deben
coincidir en la cantidad y en una
oración. (Repaso del 3er grado)
Puedo identificar los posibles
errores de concordancia en mi
escrito, al igual que la escritura de
otras personas. (W.4.3.c)
LONG BEACH UNIFED SCHOOL DISTRICT
Have students work individually, in pairs, or with a small group to Tree
Map another piece of dialogue and explain how it moves the story and
or reveals something about the character.
Grammar Conventions: Subject-verb agreement and Pronoun-antecedent agreement in present tense (Unit 3, lesson 3 and 4)
Subject-verb agreement (Unit 3 lesson 3)
•
Explain to students that in a sentence, the subject must always agree with the verb in number. (Singular subject- singular verb; plural subject-plural
verb) Have the students read the corresponding section in their Language Arts Handbooks (Note: In the present tense, singular verbs end in the
letter “s.” Many students incorrectly assume that when they see a verb with an “s” at the end, that it is a plural verb. This is not the case when the
verb is in the present tense. Make sure to clear up that potential misconception.)
•
Provides students with sample sentences, and point out why the sentences demonstrate subject-verb agreement.
•
Using The Big Wave, have students select sentences, and have them explain why the sentences that they have chosen agree.
•
Teacher writes some sentences related to the text The Big Wave making purposeful errors in subject-verb agreement. Have students make
corrections to the sentences.
•
Have students create their own sentences in the same manner as the teacher did. Have the students give their sentences to each other and make
corrections to the sentences. Whiteboards are an efficient way to accomplish this task.
•
During this time, teachers can go around the room to see which students have a solid grasp of the concept, and which students don’t, thus allowing
the teacher the opportunity to provide support.
10
IMPORTANT NOTE from Translating Team to TEACHERS: Please refer to your instructional materials to adapt the vocabulary used in the texts as needed.
2014-2015
English Language Arts
Survival
Grade 4
Island of the Blue Dolphins
Days 6-10
Vocabulary
Befall, deserted, chafing, pursued, idly,
haste, headland, stale, skirted, serpent,
seeping, pitch, leagues, omen
Metas de Aprendizaje
•
Puedo escuchar atentamente y
seguir un texto a medida que se lee
en voz alta. (RF.4.4)
•
Puedo hacer referencia a los
detalles de un texto y la evidencia
del mismo al explicar lo que
significa el texto. (RL.4.1)
•
Puedo identificar al narrador como
el escrito en primera persona o
tercera persona. (RL. 4.6)
•
Puedo determinar el significado de
una palabra o frase según se usa
en el texto. (RL.4.4)
•
Puedo determinar el significado de
las palabras en un texto al usar las
claves del contexto. (L.4.4.a)
•
Puedo volver a leer partes del texto
oralmente con precisión, ritmo
adecuado y expresión. (RF.4.4b)
LONG BEACH UNIFED SCHOOL DISTRICT
Theme Connections
This text is a realistic fiction story for students to continue building their understanding of the theme of survival. In this first-person narrative, the main
character is stranded on a deserted island. She attempts to sail to the mainland, but is forced to return to the island. Students will be able to glean from
the text that sometimes surviving a scary event involves a strong mental attitude, and resourcefulness.
Reader and Task Considerations
This text contains many terms that will be unfamiliar to the students. The text is a chapter in the classic novel Island of the Blue Dolphins. The text is
lengthy, so you may want to consider chunking up the text into manageable pieces depending on the current ability levels of your students.
Focus of Instruction: Reading and Responding to Text
First Read
•
Tell students that they will listen to you read the text aloud the first time so that they can get a sense of what the text is about.
•
Read aloud the entire text without stopping in order for students to get the “gist” of the selection. Based on the needs and abilities of your students
you may want to have the students read it silently the first time through.
•
Ask students for their reaction to the text (leave this very open-ended, the purpose of this conversation is for students to talk about the text).
Reread for Comprehension
•
This is a first person narrative. Have the students note the difference between the two writing styles.
•
Have the students read all or parts of the text, and have them answer the following questions:
 Vuelve a leer páginas 322-323. ¿Cómo describe el autor la escena? ¿Cómo se relaciona la escena al problema?
 En la página 323, ¿cómo ayuda el autor a imaginar o visualizar la manera en que Karana se siente? Usa evidencia del texto.
 En el segundo párrafo de la página 323, ¿qué palabras o frases del texto se usan para mostrar los sentimientos de Karana hacia la isla?
 En el segundo párrafo de la página 324, Karana dice que “…lo que me hubiera podido suceder en las aguas sin fin no me preocupó.”
¿Qué significa esta declaración?
 Al pie de la página 324, Karana describe los pasos que tomó para llevar la canoa al agua. ¿Qué hizo Karana para llevar la canoa pesada
al agua?
 Según las cosas que ella hace en la página 324, ¿qué características describirían a Karana?
 Vuele a leer el último párrafo en la página 326 y el primer párrafo en la página 327. ¿De qué manera utiliza Karana sus sentidos y su
conocimiento de la naturaleza para ayudarle a orientarse en su viaje?
 Vuele a leer el tercer párrafo en la página 329. El autor describe la canoa como flotando ociosamente en el mar tranquilo.
Ociosamente significas “perezosamente.” En este momento, ella se enfrentó a un dilema o conflicto. ¿Cuál fue el conflicto de Karana,
y qué decisión tomó?
 En la parte superior de la página 331, Karana indica “Más que nada, fueron los delfines azules que me regresaron a casa.” ¿Qué quiso
decir con esto? ¿Cómo impactan los delfines su percepción o creencia de la isla?
11
IMPORTANT NOTE from Translating Team to TEACHERS: Please refer to your instructional materials to adapt the vocabulary used in the texts as needed.
2014-2015
English Language Arts
•
Puedo hacer referencia a
detalles y evidencia en el texto al
explicar lo que significa el texto.
(RL.4.1)
•
Puedo describir al personaje, el
escenario y los eventos en una
historia. (RL. 4.3)
•
Puedo escuchar atentamente lo
que dicen mis compañeros de
clase, presento y respondo
preguntas específicas, hago
comentarios que contribuyen al
debate, y adquiero un nuevo
conocimiento. (SL.4.1)
•
Survival
Grade 4
Reread to Gather Evidence/Information and Respond to Text
•
Introduce the focus question: En la historia, Isla de los Delfines Azules, una muchacha por nombre Karana está luchando por sobrevivir
un viaje peligroso en canoa. ¿Qué obstáculos o desafíos enfrenta? ¿Crees tú que ella tomó la decisión correcta de regresar a la isla?
Asegúrate de apoyar tu respuesta con la evidencia del texto.
 Analyze the task with students
 Ask students what evidence they will need to gather in order to support a response to the prompt. Students will need to gather
evidence such as what the main character had to endure while on the canoe trip, as well as how that evidence proves their
answers (elaboration). A T-chart with the text evidence on one side, and the elaboration of that fact on the other side, might be a
good organizational tool for students to use.
 Ask students to share notes with a partner or in a small group and make revisions to their responses as necessary.
 Have students answer the focus question in their reading response log using evidence from the text to support their answer.
Metas de Aprendizaje
Focus of Instruction: Narrative Writing and Conventions
Puedo describir cómo el autor
desarrolla la historia. (RL.4.5)
Analyzing a fictional narrative/survival story (first-person point of view)
• Analyze for story elements
 Remind students that there are certain elements common to stories including characters, setting, problem, goal, plot/event sequence, solution,
and a message, lesson or moral.
 As a class, analyze the story elements of Island of the Blue Dolphins using a Tree Map with the following labels/branches: Characters, setting,
problem, goal, events/plot, solution.
 Discuss the types of characters, settings, and problems you would see in a realistic fiction story. How are all of the story elements realistic in
Island of the Blue Dolphins?
 For the Frame of reference, determine as a class possible
messages of the survival story. Examples could be
“Resourcefulness and courage can enable one to deal with
extreme danger,” “Adaptability is important to surviving,”
“Enduring loneliness is as big a challenge as enduring the hostile
forces of nature.” Add these to the list of ongoing survival
lessons or messages.
 Refer to the previous lesson for an example of how this could
look.
• Analyze for story structure
 “Reverse Map” Island of the Blue Dolphins into its opening, event
sequence, and closing, analyzing how the author builds the
story.
 See sample right:
 One way to help students see the event sequence is to Flow
Map the main events of the story. Model for students how to skim the story again looking for the event sequence. Tell students to pay attention
to when the time or the setting changes, this often indicates a new event. Refer to the sample for a guide.
En una historia realista de ficción…
• Puedo identificar la apertura
que orienta al lector hacia una
situación y los personajes.
(W.4.3.a)
•
Puedo identificar una variedad
de palabras de transición y
frases para que el cuento
avance. (W.4.3.c)
•
Puedo usar palabras concretas y
frases y detalles sensoriales para
describir las experiencias y
eventos con precisión. (W.4.3.d)
LONG BEACH UNIFED SCHOOL DISTRICT
12
IMPORTANT NOTE from Translating Team to TEACHERS: Please refer to your instructional materials to adapt the vocabulary used in the texts as needed.
2014-2015
English Language Arts
Survival
Grade 4

•
•
•
Puedo identificar el tiempo
verbal en pasado, presente y
futuro progresivo en una
oración. (L.4.1.f)
•
Puedo identificar y corregir los
posibles errores en el tiempo
verbal progresivo en mi
redacción, al igual que en la
escritura de otras personas.
(W.4.3.c).
LONG BEACH UNIFED SCHOOL DISTRICT
Explain to students that authors carefully craft their stories with a specific message or lesson in mind. They plan details throughout the story to
help the reader come to that message or lesson.
 Once you have created the Flow Map, provide students with the message “Resourcefulness and courage can enable one to deal with extreme
danger.” Tell students that the author wanted the reader to come to this
realization as the story develops. Have students return to the text and find
examples of Karana using resourcefulness and courage to deal with extreme
danger. Students should see that as the author build the event sequence; he
includes detailed descriptions of Karana’s resourcefulness.
Analyze for evaluative criteria - Using the Grade 4/5 Fictional Narrative Rubric criteria,
have students analyze for embedded transitions.
 Explain to students that an author uses transitions to move the events along.
 Ask students to look for examples of embedded transitions throughout the story
and record them in a Circle Map.
Analyze for evaluative criteria – Using the Grade 4/5 Fictional Narrative Rubric criteria,
have students analyze and find examples direct and indirect intermittent reflections.
 Remind students that intermittent reflections show the feelings of the character
concerning the events being described.
 Have students return to the text and look for examples of both direct and indirect
intermittent reflections. They can record their examples on a Tree Map.
Note: these narrative strategies were included in the lesson sequence from the
previous unit. Consult the WftB&B Narrative binder pgs. 189-195 for instructions on
how to teach these strategies.
Grammar Conventions: Progressive verb tenses (present, past, and future)
•
Tell students that the “past progressive tense” is used to describe an activity in the past.
Example: They were sleeping when the alarm went off.
•
To make a verb past progressive use (was or were + verb + ing)
•
Tell the students that the “present progressive tense” is used to describe an ongoing action in the present.
Example: Dan and Billy are fishing off the pier.
•
To make a verb present progressive use (“verb ‘to be’ in present tense”) + (verb + ing aka, present participle)
•
Tell students that the “future progressive tense” is used to describe an on-going activity that will occur in the future.
Example: We will be celebrating when she graduates.
•
To make a verb future progressive use (“will be” + verb +ing aka, present participle)
Note: Teachers may find it useful to create a class chart or have students create a tree map with all the progressive tenses.
•
Teacher provides examples of sentences with different progressive verb tenses so that students can correctly identify the proper tense.
•
Using previously read text from the anthology; have students find examples of the progressive verb tenses. Have them share out with the class or
with a partner/small group why their example is a particular type of progressive tense.
•
Have students create their own sentences in the same manner as the teacher did. Have the students give their sentences to each other to try to
figure out the correct progressive verb tense. Whiteboards are an efficient way to accomplish this task.
13
IMPORTANT NOTE from Translating Team to TEACHERS: Please refer to your instructional materials to adapt the vocabulary used in the texts as needed.
2014-2015
English Language Arts
Survival
Grade 4
Video Clip : Intro to Inuits
Day 11
Vocabulary
Teachers should watch the video
beforehand to determine words that
the students may be unfamiliar with.
Theme Connections
This video gives students a first-hand look at the living conditions in the Arctic. Following around Inuits to experience the lives they lead in this very cold, very
isolated region, students will build prior knowledge that will support their readings in the next lesson; Arctic Explorer: Matthew Henson.
Reader and Task Considerations
You will only watch the first 10 minutes of the video to provide students with a look into the harsh living conditions of the Inuit people. Questions and
activities are only based on this portion of the video. Students will be asked to gather the important details or ideas from the video about how the Inuit
survive such difficult living conditions.
Metas de Aprendizaje
•
Puedo escuchar atentamente
y parafrasear la información
presentada en un video.
(SL 4.2)
•
Puedo hacer referencia a los
detalles en un texto (video) al
contestar preguntas acerca
de lo que significa el video.
(Rl.4.1)
•
•
Puedo interpretar la
información en un texto
(video) y explicar cómo dicha
información me lleva a un
entendimiento general de un
video. (RI. 4.7)
Puedo explicar cómo el autor
usa el razonamiento y la
evidencia para apoyar los
puntos de vista particulares
en un texto (video). (RI.4.8)
LONG BEACH UNIFED SCHOOL DISTRICT
Focus of Instruction: Reading and Responding to Text
First Viewing
•
Watch the entire video once through without stopping or commentary. The purpose is to provide students with an opportunity to enjoy the video and
get the overall “gist.”
•
Play the video the first time and have students listen to factual information and details about the Inuits. Have students create a Circle Map with Inuits
as the topic. As students watch and listen to the video, ask them to write notes in the circle. After viewing the video, have students turn to a partner or
in a group and discuss what they learned.
Re-Viewing for Comprehension
•
Remind students that they are looking for important information, not just interesting information. You can support this by telling them the questions
in advance or by giving them some key things to look for.
•
Tell students that the people who make videos do so with a purpose. Asking themselves “What is the purpose?” or “What is the point?” or “What does
the video maker want us to learn in the end?” will help them think about the reasons and evidence used to support the point.
•
Tell students that they are going to watch the video again and think about why this video was made. Tell them that they will come up with the “point”
of the video. To help them stay focused, they can listen for important points regarding a description of the Arctic, shelter of the Inuit, and Food. They
can record their notes in a Tree Map with these 3 branches. At the end of the video ask students to share what point they think was being made in the
video. Record different student responses on chart paper. Ask for ways the video maker used reasons and evidence to support their point. For
example, if a student thinks the point of the video is to show how hard life is like for the Inuit, ask “how does the speaker or the video show this.”
•
After viewing the video 2 times, have a class discussion with the following questions:
 ¿Por qué vivir en casas modernas es tan caro en el ártico?
 ¿Cuál fue el propósito de la visita del narrador al ártico?
 ¿Qué materiales usaron para construir el iglú? ¿Por qué estaban construyendo este iglú en particular?
 ¿Qué propósito sirve la gordura de la ballena?
 ¿Cómo es la vida de un pequeño Inuit comparada con las experiencias de los mayores? ¿Más fácil? ¿Más difícil? ¿Cómo es igual o diferente?
14
IMPORTANT NOTE from Translating Team to TEACHERS: Please refer to your instructional materials to adapt the vocabulary used in the texts as needed.
2014-2015
English Language Arts
•
•
Puedo hacer referencia a los
detalles y la evidencia en un
texto al explicar qué significa
el texto. (RL.4.1)
Puedo escuchar atentamente
lo que dicen mis compañeros
de clase, presento y respondo
preguntas específicas, hago
comentarios que contribuyen
al debate, y adquiero un
nuevo conocimiento. (SL.4.1)
Survival
Gather evidence and respond to text (video)
Introduce the focus question: What point was being made in the video? Use reasons and evidence from the video that support the point or purpose of
the video.
•
Analyze the task with students
•
Ask students what evidence they will need to gather in order to support a response to the prompt. Students will need to find evidence to explain that
the purpose of the video was to explain what life was like for the Inuits, and how life has changed for them because of modern advances.
•
You may choose to have the students watch the video one more time to gather evidence.
•
Instruct the students to create a thinking map that is appropriate to the task (Determining point/main idea)
•
Ask students to discuss the question and their responses in a collaborative group, and make revisions to their charts as necessary.
•
Have the students present their final response to the question.
Metas de Aprendizaje
En una redacción narrativa y de
ficción:
•
•
•
Puedo escribir un párrafo de
apertura que orienta al lector
hacia una situación de
personajes. (W.4.3.a)
Puedo añadir un diálogo y/o
monólogo para desarrollar
experiencias y mostrar la
respuesta de los personajes.
(W.4.3.b)
Puedo elegir palabras de
transición que hacen avanzar
los acontecimientos.
(W.4.3.c)
•
Puedo crear una secuencia de
eventos basados en un
momento preciso. (W.4.3.d)
•
Puedo escribir una conclusión
que expresa un pensamiento
o reflexión sobre un evento.
(W.4.3.e)
LONG BEACH UNIFED SCHOOL DISTRICT
Grade 4
Focus of Instruction: Narrative Writing and Conventions
Begin Modeling a Realistic Fiction Survival Story
 This model is designed to take place over the next 6 instructional sessions. It will begin here and continue during the next text, Matthew Henson.
You may choose to use the sample provided below or create your own with the class. The purpose is to create a class story together with
scaffolding based on the needs of your students.

Explain to the students that you will be working together to write a survival story around the scenario of a young boy who went hiking in the
mountains, hurt himself in a fall, and had to survive
the night. Together you will create the survival
story elements based on this scenario along with
mapping out the structure.

Create a class Tree Map for the story elements.
Begin with the message, “Resourcefulness and
courage can enable one to deal with extreme
danger.” Write this message in the frame.

Provide the problem for the story, “a young boy is
hurt and must face a night alone in the mountains.”

Based on this problem and the message that the
story will convey, work collaboratively to create a
Tree Map with characters, a setting, an event
sequence, and a solution. Remind students to think
about how each of these story elements will
support the message of the story.
15
IMPORTANT NOTE from Translating Team to TEACHERS: Please refer to your instructional materials to adapt the vocabulary used in the texts as needed.
2014-2015
English Language Arts
Survival



•
•
Puedo entender que en una
oración, el pronombre debe
coincidir con el sustantivo
que lo reemplaza.
(Repaso del 3er grado)
Puedo identificar los posibles
errores de concordancia en mi
escrito, al igual que la escritura
de otras personas. (W.4.3.c)
LONG BEACH UNIFED SCHOOL DISTRICT
Grade 4
Using the Tree Map and the How do I Model Imaginative Narrative Writing For My Students? p. 338-342 (3rd grade section) from WftB&B
Narrative model mapping and writing
the survival story.
Once the event sequence has been
planned, have students work to plan
and embed the evaluative criteria
from the rubric such as a well
thought out opening, intermittent
reflections, dialogue, precise
language, etc…
Based on the needs of your students,
guide students through the drafting
of the story as a whole class, in
groups, with a partner, or individually.
(See the sample survival story located
at the end of the unit)
Grammar Conventions: Pronoun-antecedent agreement (Unit 3 lesson 4)
•
Explain to students that a pronoun must agree with, or match, its antecedent in number (a singular pronoun replaces a singular noun; a plural pronoun
replaces a plural noun)
•
Explain to the students that an antecedent is the noun that the pronoun replaces in a sentence.
•
Provides students with sample sentences, and point out why the sentences demonstrate subject-verb agreement.
•
Using any previous text, have students select sentences with pronouns, and have them explain why the sentences that they chose show pronoun
antecedent agreement.
•
Teacher writes some sentences making purposeful errors in pronoun-antecedent agreement. Have students make corrections to the sentences.
•
Have students create their own sentences in the same manner as the teacher did. Have the students give their sentences to each other to make
corrections to the sentences. Whiteboards are an efficient way to accomplish this task.
•
During this time, teachers can go around the room to see which students have a solid grasp of the concept, and which students don’t, thus allowing
the teacher the opportunity to provide support.
16
IMPORTANT NOTE from Translating Team to TEACHERS: Please refer to your instructional materials to adapt the vocabulary used in the texts as needed.
2014-2015
English Language Arts
Survival
Grade 4
Arctic Explorer: Matthew Henson (BAP)
Day 12-16
Vocabulary
Expedition, arctic, glaciers, ice cap, blubber,
igloo piercing, crevasses, insulation,
surveying, barely, ammunition, pitching,
passengers, enormous, sturdy, bracing,
sinew, swarmed
Metas de Aprendizaje
•
Puedo escuchar y seguir un texto a
medida que se lee en voz alta.
(RF.4.4)
•
Puedo hacer referencia a detalles en
un texto al contestar preguntas de
lo que significa el texto. (Rl.4.1)
•
Puedo volver a leer partes del texto
oralmente con precisión, ritmo
adecuado y expresión. (RF.4.4b)
•
Puedo hacer referencia a detalles y
evidencia en un texto explicando lo
que significa el texto. (RI.4.1)
•
Puedo escuchar atentamente lo que
dicen mis compañeros de clase,
presento y respondo preguntas
específicas, hago comentarios que
contribuyen al debate, y adquiero
un nuevo conocimiento. (SL.4.1)
LONG BEACH UNIFED SCHOOL DISTRICT
Theme Connections
In this expository text, the reader will read about Matthew Henson, the first African American to reach the North Pole. Henson joined a crew
and explored the Arctic. With help from the Eskimos, they learned about survival in a very different and difficult environment.
Reader and Task Considerations
Watching the Inuit video prior to reading this will help students anchor conceptually on just how difficult an environment it is in the Arctic.
Having a concept of the time in which this happened and the racial divides still present at this time in history will assist students in
formulating opinions about events that happen on the trip as well as why this was a big deal for African American explorers.
Focus of Instruction: Reading and Responding to Text
First Read
•
Tell students that they will listen to you read the text aloud the first time so that they can get a sense of what the text is about. You may choose
to have your students read the text independently the first time through.
•
Read aloud the entire text without stopping in order for students to get the “gist” of the selection.
•
Ask students for their reaction to the text (leave this very open-ended, the purpose of this conversation is for students to talk about the text).
Reread for Comprehension
•
Follow BAP lesson on Intranet for a full list of text-dependent questions, vocabulary, and tasks.
•
The following TDQ’s from the BAP lesson may help prepare your student’s for success on the end of unit assessment:
 In paragraph 2 on page 336 the author states, “The Kite plunged on through the Atlantic, rolling and pitching…” Why does the author use
plunged, rolling, and pitching?
 A simile is a type of figurative language comparing two unlike things using like or as.
On p. 337, identify the simile in this section of the text. What does it mean?
 On page 341, why did the Eskimos love Matthew like a brother?
 After reading paragraph 2 on page 346, explain how the Eskimos use all of the polar bear? What was each person’s role in the use of the
polar bear?
Reread to Gather Evidence/Information and Respond to Text
Introduce the focus question (Culminating Task): Matthew Henson learned many things from the Eskimos. Write about at least 2 things Matthew
learned and explain how these things could have helped him on later Arctic expeditions.
•
Support them in creating a sheet for note-taking or gathering evidence to support the culminating task as they read. At the end of each chunk of
text and questions/day, refer back to the evidence chart and add to it as appropriate. This helps children see that collecting information can be
done over time. (see sample on the BAP lesson document)
•
Use a Multi-Flow Map to show what caused people on the expedition to need the Eskimos’ help and what the effect their help had on their trip.
Link to question #6 in bank of Text-Dependent Questions.
•
Tasks for other Collaborative Discussion and Short Constructed Response:

Do you think it was fair that Matthew Henson was left behind when the rest of the team forged on to cross the ice cap? Why or why not?
17
IMPORTANT NOTE from Translating Team to TEACHERS: Please refer to your instructional materials to adapt the vocabulary used in the texts as needed.
2014-2015
English Language Arts
Survival

Grade 4
What information about survival from the video did you read about in this text? How did seeing the video help deepen your understanding
about surviving in this difficult environment?
Think about what support your student’s might need in order to respond to the
aforementioned questions (Thinking maps, etc.). You may want to create your
own questions based on the current performance levels of your students.
Focus of Instruction: Narrative Writing and Conventions
Metas de Aprendizaje
En una redacción narrativa y de ficción:
•
Puedo escribir un párrafo de
apertura que orienta al lector hacia
una situación de personajes.
(W.4.3.a)
•
Puedo añadir un diálogo y/o
monólogo para desarrollar
experiencias y mostrar la respuesta
de los personajes. (W.4.3.b)
•
Puedo elegir palabras de transición
que hacen avanzar los
acontecimientos. (W.4.3.c)
•
Puedo crear una secuencia de
eventos basados en un momento
preciso. (W.4.3.d)
•
Puedo escribir una conclusión que
expresa un pensamiento o reflexión
sobre un evento. (W.4.3.e)
•
Puedo identificar el sujeto y
predicado total en mi propio escrito.
(L.4.1.f)
•
Puedo reconocer los problemas de
la oración tal como los fragmentos,
LONG BEACH UNIFED SCHOOL DISTRICT
Continue Modeling a Realistic Fiction Survival Story
 This model is designed to take place over the next 6 instructional sessions. It began in the last lesson and will continue during this text,
Matthew Henson. You may choose to use the sample provided or create your own with the class. The purpose is to create a class story with
scaffolding based on the needs of your students.
 Explain to the students that you will be working together to write a survival story around the scenario of a young boy who went hiking in the
mountains, hurt himself in a fall, and had to survive the night. Together you will create the survival story elements based on this scenario
along with mapping out the structure, and write the final story.
 Create a class Tree Map for the story elements. Begin with the message, “Resourcefulness and courage can enable one to deal with extreme
danger.” Write this message in the frame.
 Provide the problem for the story, “un joven está herido y debe enfrentar una noche solo en las montañas”
 Based on this problem and the message that the story will convey, work collaboratively to create characters, a setting, an event sequence,
and a solution. Remind students to think about how each of these story elements will support the message of the story.
 Using the Tree Map and the How do I Model Imaginative Narrative Writing for My Students? p. 338-342 (3rd grade section) from WftB&B
Narrative model mapping and writing the survival story.
 Once the event sequence has been planned, have students work to plan and embed the evaluative criteria from the rubric such as a well
thought out opening, intermittent reflections, dialogue, precise language, etc…
 Based on the needs of your students, guide students through the drafting of the story as a whole class, in groups, with a partner, or
individually.
Editing Strategy: Sentence Problems
Note: This lesson was presented in the first unit. This activity can be used as a review for students who are having trouble with these types
of sentence problems as evidenced by their writing samples.
•
Review with students the 3 most common sentence problems: fragments; run-on sentences; and rambling sentences.
18
IMPORTANT NOTE from Translating Team to TEACHERS: Please refer to your instructional materials to adapt the vocabulary used in the texts as needed.
2014-2015
English Language Arts
oraciones mal formadas, y
oraciones divagantes. (L.4.1.f)
•
Puedo corregir las oraciones
divagantes a las que le faltan un
sujeto, predicado, o ambos. (L.4.1.f)
•
Puedo corregir una oración mal
formada al añadir una coma y
conjunción, o al volver a escribir dos
oraciones por separado. (L.4.1.f)
•
Puedo corregir una oración
divagante al crear una oración por
separado para cada pensamiento.
(L.4.1.f)
LONG BEACH UNIFED SCHOOL DISTRICT
Survival
Grade 4
•
Create or have the students go back to their Tree Maps (from previous unit). Have the students write the title, “Sentence Problems”
and a branch for each type of problem.
•
•
•
•
•
•
Using the information on pages 246-247 in the Language Arts Handbook, define each type of problem and write an example.
Explicitly teach/review with students how to correct each type of sentence problem.
Have students identify the subject and predicate in each of the sentences of their fictional narrative/survival story.
Have students determine if the sentence is correct as written or if it has a problem.
Identify the problem and correct it so the sentence is correct.
Have students work with a partner and edit each other’s work for correct sentences.
19
IMPORTANT NOTE from Translating Team to TEACHERS: Please refer to your instructional materials to adapt the vocabulary used in the texts as needed.
2014-2015
English Language Arts
Survival
Grade 4
A Biography of Anne Frank (Video clip)
Day 17
Teachers should watch the video beforehand
to determine words that the students may
be unfamiliar with.
Vocabulary
Theme Connections
This video covers the span of Anne Frank’s short life. It helps to put a face with the story and to ground children in what nonfiction/true means.
Reader and Task Considerations
In the video, the speaker speaks very quickly and at times it is difficult to understand her, especially when she says the names of the cities or countries.
Metas de Aprendizaje
Focus of Instruction: Reading and Responding to Text
•
Puedo escuchar atentamente y
parafrasear la información
presentada en un video. (SL 4.2)
•
Puedo escuchar atentamente y
parafrasear la información
presentada en un video. (SL 4.2)
First Viewing
•
Show the video one time through, allowing the children to simply watch and listen without the expectation of taking notes. Ask students what
they think the video maker is trying to say. In other words, what is the point or purpose of the video?
•
Ask students for their reaction to the video (leave this very open-ended, the purpose of this conversation is for students to talk about the video)
Reread for Comprehension





Like literature and informational text, videos have a purpose. Often the video maker is trying to get a point across to the viewer. The video
maker includes things in the video to support the point he or she is trying to make. Tell students that as they watch the video, they will ask
themselves, “What point is this video making?” Tell them look for ways the point of the video is being supported with reasons and evidence.
Explain to students that this video is a biography. Not only can we read biographies, but we can watch videos and movies that talk about
people’s lives. Knowing the genre of a video or film can help them pay attention to different parts, as the purpose of the video/film is often
driven by its genre.
Show the video a second time. Have students record important events in the life of Anne Frank.
Allow the students’ time to share with a partner the notes they wrote down and share ideas.
Use the following questions to lead a class discussion:

Where was Anne Frank from?

What religion was her family?

Why did they have to wear a star on their clothing?

Why did they go into hiding in the secret annex?

What did she write about in her diary?

What happened to Anne and her sister?
•
Puedo hacer referencia a detalles y
evidencia en un texto (video) al
explicar lo que significa el texto.
(RL.4.1)
Using note and gathering evidence to respond to the video
Focus question for collaborative discussion and or short constructed response: The “mood” is the atmosphere of a piece of writing; it’s the emotions
a selection arouses in a reader. What is the mood of this video? What clues in the making of this video sets the mood? Consider things like the
narrator’s word choices, pictures used, as well as the background music.
•
Puedo escuchar atentamente lo que
dicen mis compañeros de clase,
presento y respondo preguntas
específicas, hago comentarios que
contribuyen al debate, y adquiero
un nuevo conocimiento. (SL.4.1)
•
•
LONG BEACH UNIFED SCHOOL DISTRICT
Analyze the task with students
Ask students what evidence they will need to gather in order to support a response to the prompt. Students will need to gather evidence such as
how the narrator speaks and/or presents the information in the video. Also, the background music throughout the video, not to mention how
the photos of Anne and her family are shown. All these elements are designed to establish a serious, respectful, and thoughtful (though not
necessarily a sad) mood.
20
IMPORTANT NOTE from Translating Team to TEACHERS: Please refer to your instructional materials to adapt the vocabulary used in the texts as needed.
2014-2015
English Language Arts
•
•
Puedo describir cómo este video fue
organizado. (RI. 4.5)
Survival
•
Re-watch to Gather Evidence and Respond to the video.

Puedo determinar el humor del
video.

Metas de Aprendizaje
•
Puedo planear y producir una
redacción clara que se dirija a todas
las partes de una composición
asignada. (W.4.4)
•
Puedo identificar el sujeto y el
predicado total en mi propia
redacción. (L.4.1.f)
•
Puedo reconocer los problemas en
las oraciones tal como los
fragmentos, oraciones mal
formadas y oraciones divagantes.
(L.4.1.f)
•
Puedo corregir un fragmento que le
falta un sujeto, predicado, o ambos.
(L.4.1.f)
•
Puedo corregir una oración mal
formada al añadir una coma y
conjunción, o al volver a escribir en
dos oraciones por separado.
(L.4.1.f)
•
Puedo corregir una oración
divagante al crear una oración por
separado para cada pensamiento.
(L.4.1.f)
LONG BEACH UNIFED SCHOOL DISTRICT
Grade 4
Use a Partial Multi-flow Map to organize evidence in the video production (word choice, music, pictures, etc) to show that these
aspects help establish the mood of the video. Have the students discuss and write down these elements. After discussion time,
have the students write down their responses. Remind them to use text evidence to support your answer.
You may have to provide varying levels of support to your students for this activity, because this task is most likely not familiar to
most students.
Focus of Instruction: Narrative Writing and Conventions
Plan a realistic fiction survival story (independent)
•
Students will now begin the process of writing their own survival stories. You can either provide them with a prompt or the students
can create their own.
Please note: Make sure the students understand that they are to create a fictional survival story that includes all the characteristics and
elements that they have studied throughout the unit.
•
Students will independently plan their survival stories using a Tree Map for the story elements and a Flow Map for the event sequence.
•
Remind them to look through their notes and thinking maps from the unit so that they will be able to incorporate all components of a
fictional narrative.
•
Keep anecdotal notes of those students who are unable to work on this task independently. Provide necessary support when needed.
Editing Strategy: Sentence problems continued
Continue emphasizing the importance of going back to check your writing often for sentence or grammar problems. Design your own points
of emphasis based on the writings of your students. Consult the previous lesson for a suggested procedure of instruction.
21
IMPORTANT NOTE from Translating Team to TEACHERS: Please refer to your instructional materials to adapt the vocabulary used in the texts as needed.
2014-2015
English Language Arts
Survival
Grade 4
Anne Frank: Diary of a Young Girl (OCR )
Day 18-22
Vocabulary
World War II, Nazi, Germany, concentration
camp, annex, veranda, call-up, declared,
overawed, hiding, vital, satchel, dog-tired,
stifled, inquired, impression, brim, gaudy,
sufficiently, own accord, wardrobe, dignified,
scullery, corridor, chock-full, rubbish,
indescribably, keyed up, rations
Theme Connections
This text links to the theme of Survival in that millions of Jews during this time were hiding and escaping in order to survive. Anne Frank and
her family were attempting to survive the Nazi invasion in Holland.
Reader and Task Considerations
The topic of the Holocaust is a difficult one. Explain to students about the time period, the people/groups involved, and the impact on lives. Students
may need to have some of the vocabulary explicitly taught prior to reading this text to help with understanding. Students will be asked to explain how
point of view impacts how events are related and may need to review the difference between 1st and 3rd person point of view.
Metas de Aprendizaje
Focus of Instruction: Reading and Responding to Text
•
Puedo escuchar y seguir un texto
que se lee en voz alta. (RF.4.4)
•
Puedo hacer referencia a los detalles
en el texto al contestar preguntas
sobre el significado del texto. (Rl.4.1)
•
Puedo incrementar la lista del
vocabulario que aprendí al leer el
texto cuidadosamente. (L.4.6)
First Read
•
Ask students to think about how this text relates to the theme of survival.
•
Tell students that they will listen to you read the text aloud the first time so that they can get a sense of what the text is about.
•
Read aloud the entire text without stopping in order for students to get the “gist” of the selection.
•
Ask students for their reaction to the text (leave this very open-ended, the purpose of this conversation is for students to talk about the text).
Reread for Comprehension
•
Tell students that this text has a lot of unfamiliar vocabulary. Remind students of the strategies readers use to help them make meaning from
text and language that is confusing. Also let them know that knowing every word in a passage is not necessary, but doing the work to try to make
sense of the language is what is most important.
•
•
Puedo volver a leer partes del texto
oralmente con precisión, ritmo
adecuado y expresión. (RF.4.4b)
•
Discuss with students how the point of view of a text impacts the way the story is told; particularly in historical texts. As they read, students
should keep in mind the point of view the diary is being written from in order to make deeper meaning and more connections to the reading.
•
Have the students read the text (or chunks of text) independently. As they read, they should record notes using a Flow Map to keep track of
important events that happened.
•
Ask the following questions to lead a class discussion:

¿Qué evidencia existe en el texto que te deja saber que está en orden cronológico?

¿Por qué Anne escribió estas notas en su diario? (p. 393 encabezado). ¿A quién le escribe?

¿Desde el punto de vista de quién está el texto escrito? ¿Cómo pudo haberse escrito de una manera distinta si el punto de vista hubiera sido
de Margot?

En la página 396, el texto indica, “…daba la impresión que habíamos dejado el caos”. ¿Qué palabras en el texto te ayudan a entender el
significado de caos? ¿Qué crees tú que significa esto?

Según la página 394, ¿a quién le dan una “llamada”? En el párrafo 2, Anne comienza a llorar. ¿Qué ayuda a Anne a entender lo que significa
esta “llamada”?
Allow students time to share with a partner or group to compare the events they added to their notes.
Puedo identificar al narrador o un
texto y describir la postura del
narrador. (RI.4.6)

LONG BEACH UNIFED SCHOOL DISTRICT
22
IMPORTANT NOTE from Translating Team to TEACHERS: Please refer to your instructional materials to adapt the vocabulary used in the texts as needed.
2014-2015
English Language Arts
•
Puedo hacer referencia a los detalles
de un texto y la evidencia del mismo al
explicar lo que significa el texto.
(RL.4.1)
•
Puedo escuchar atentamente lo que
dicen mis compañeros de clase,
presento y respondo preguntas
específicas, hago comentarios que
contribuyen al debate, y adquiero
un nuevo conocimiento. (SL.4.1)
Metas de Aprendizaje
En una redacción narrativo y de ficción:
•
Puedo escribir un párrafo de apertura
que orienta al lector hacia una situación
y personajes. (W.4.3.a)
•
Puedo añadir un dialogo y/o monólogo
para desarrollar experiencias y mostrar la
respuesta de los personajes. (W.4.3.b)
•
Puedo elegir palabras de transición que
hacen avanzar los acontecimientos.
(W.4.3.c)
•
Puedo crear una secuencia de eventos
basados en un momento preciso.
(W.4.3.d)
•
Puedo escribir una conclusión que
expresa un pensamiento o reflexión
sobre un evento. (W.4.3.e)
•
Puedo planear y producir una redacción
clara que se dirija a todas las partes de
una redacción asignada. (W.4.4)
•
Con asesoría y apoyo de mis compañeros
y adultos, puedo desarrollar y fortalecer
mi redacción según sea necesario al
planear, revisar y redactar. (W.4.5)
LONG BEACH UNIFED SCHOOL DISTRICT
Survival
Grade 4
Reread to Gather Evidence/Information and Respond to Text
•
Introduce the focus question for collaborative discussion and short
constructed response: Describe la actitud de Anne acerca de la
situación en que se encontraba. Contrasta la actitud con la de su
hermana y su madre en la misma situación. Apoya tu respuesta
con la evidencia del texto.
•
Analyze the task with students
•
Ask students what evidence they will need to gather in order to
support a response to the prompt. Students will need to gather
evidence such as Anne’s feelings about moving in to the secret
annex, and what she did while she was there. Students will also
need to find evidence as to what her mother and sister did during
that same time frame.
•
Have the students complete a Compare/ Contrast thinking map.
•
Ask students to discuss the question and their responses in a
collaborative group, and make revisions to their maps as
necessary.
•
Have students write a paragraph answering the focus question
Focus of Instruction: Narrative Writing and Conventions
Students take their survival stories through the writing process (independent)
•
Students will be expected to compose their survival stories using all components of the writing process.
•
Make sure that each student has completed the planning and oral rehearsing components of the writing process before they begin
composing.
•
Teachers can create writing mini-lessons based on the needs of their students.
•
Keep anecdotal records and conference with students to see if they need additional support.
23
IMPORTANT NOTE from Translating Team to TEACHERS: Please refer to your instructional materials to adapt the vocabulary used in the texts as needed.
2014-2015
English Language Arts
•
Puedo usar las mayúsculas correctas
en mi redacción. (L. 4.2a)
•
Puedo deletrear las palabras
correctamente en mi redacción al usar
los recursos correctos si lo necesito.
(L. 4.2d)
•
Puedo usar la puntuación correcta al
identificar y corregir cualquier error
en mi propia redacción. (L. 4.3b)
•
Puedo usar la gramática apropiada al
identificar y corregir cualquier error
en mi propia redacción. (L.4.1)
LONG BEACH UNIFED SCHOOL DISTRICT
Survival
Grade 4
Editing Strategy: Proofread for errors in spelling, punctuation, capitalization, usage, and grammar

Using samples of text, direct the students’ attention to the use of correct spelling, punctuation, capitalization, and grammar.

Have students work in groups or with partners to edit their survival stories for correct use of spelling, punctuation, capitalization, and grammar
in their own writing.
 Have the student read his or her own survival story writing piece.
 Have them circle words they think they misspelled, and identify places in their writing where they feel they might have errors in
punctuation, capitalization, and grammar. (Have them use standard proofreading marks as established by your own procedures).
 Have the students switch papers with each other. Their partner will now read the writing piece and identify possible errors as the writer
did with his or her own paper.
 Students get their writing pieces back and begin making the corrections that were identified.

Teachers can use this time to conference with students to ensure that students are able to identify errors in spelling, punctuation, and
grammar usage.
24
IMPORTANT NOTE from Translating Team to TEACHERS: Please refer to your instructional materials to adapt the vocabulary used in the texts as needed.
2014-2015
English Language Arts
Survival
Grade 4
Research and Inquiry
Sequence Overview and Daily Performance Activities
Approximate
Number of Days
Resources
OCR Unit 4:
333 A-D
OCR Unit 3:
359 A-D
3-5
Inquiry Process
Guided Activity Options
Generate Ideas & Choosing an Investigation Problem
•
•
•
Explain to students the steps in the investigative process (post) so they can refer to it throughout the unit
Explain the purpose of this investigation is to add to the group’s knowledge of the unit theme, Survival
Explain to students that they will need to make important decisions about time management as this
investigation will be conducted over several weeks
•
•
Outline the timeline specifically and have students enter key dates into their calendar/planning sheet
Brainstorm ideas and questions related to the concept of survival. Remind them that a good idea to
investigate COULD NOT be answered by a GOOGLE search.
Skills
•
•
Chart ideas and questions related to Medicine
Create investigation groups to work on selected
problems
•
Present proposed problems along with reasons
for investigating them
•
Make initial conjectures (Inquiry p. 67)
•
•
•
Give each person their roles and expectations
Begin researching


Finalize problem statements
Share investigative problem and reasons for
choosing it
Broaden focus of not finding enough information
Discussing
Investigation
Findings
Maps
Students will watch others who are further along
and learn from them
Continue work in their groups
Primary and
Secondary Sources
Drawing
Conclusions from
Information
Allow students time to respond to the presenters
by asking questions, paraphrasing, contributing
new ideas and sharing conclusions
Evaluating
Research
Time Lines
and
Using Magazines
and Other Printed
Resources
•
•
•
•
3-5
3-5
3-5
3-5
OCR Unit 4:
375 A-D
OCR Unit 4:
389 A-D
OCR Unit 4
403 A-D
OCR Unit 4
413 A-D
Narrow ideas about survival that interest them into investigation problems or questions
Support students in choosing a specific question or problem that interests them
Students will form groups based on interests
Students will form conjectures to move them into their investigation
Allocating Tasks

Explain that each investigation group should agree on a precise statement for their investigation problem.

Explain how they come to clear decisions about each person’s role and expectations and how they will do
their roles simultaneously

Students begin research and quickly decide if there will be sufficient information for them to continue
researching

Remind them to change their topic if there is not enough information
Revise and Finalize Investigation Problems

Students may have needed or chosen to change their topics – this is fine. By this week they need to have
chosen a topic and finalize their problem statements

Allow time to meet with groups that need support

Allow time for students who have finalized to share their problems and their reasons for choosing it

Remind students if they are not finding information, they may need to widen their focus

Organizing Investigation Findings & Preparation of Investigation Findings

Start students in thinking about how they plan to present information. Knowing this will help them decide
about what information to gather

Share with students a variety of methods for sharing

Students who are further along can give practice presentations and the class can give feedback and learn from
them

Presenting Investigation Findings

Remind students about good presentation techniques

LONG BEACH UNIFED SCHOOL DISTRICT

Diagrams
Change topic of there is not enough information
25
IMPORTANT NOTE from Translating Team to TEACHERS: Please refer to your instructional materials to adapt the vocabulary used in the texts as needed.
2014-2015
English Language Arts
Survival
Grade 4
Muestra de una historia de supervivencia
A Travis le encantaba escalar. Era bueno para eso. A menudo le molestaba a su padre para que lo llevara para escala
rápidamente al Cañón de Coraje los sábados por la mañana. Su formación de niño explorador le permitió sentirse cómodo
afuera en la naturaleza. Él estaba seguro que si alguna vez se quedaba solo en un lugar silvestre podría fácilmente
sobrevivir y encontrar su camino de regreso con seguridad. Su medalla de supervivencia que se había ganado el año
pasado fue prueba suficiente para él.
Pero nada lo había preparado para la situación que estaba a punto de enfrentar. Estaba solo por la noche en un cañón que
nunca había escalado antes. Él se había caído muy mal y su tobillo izquierdo estaba muy hinchado y con un dolor
punzante. Ni sabía si alguien sabía que estaba desaparecido, pues a nadie le había dicho que iba a caminar solo.
Él podía escuchar su propia respiración. Todo estaba callado a su alrededor. Intentó mirar a su alrededor, pero sólo podía
ver la oscuridad. Manojos altos de hierbas seca le rozaban la piel de las piernas. ¿Qué es lo que le había pasado? ¿Dónde
estaba? ¿Dónde estaba su padre?
El tobillo le estaba doliendo, pulsaba con dolor. Rápidamente se dio cuenta de que no podría escalar por la montaña sin
ayuda. Entonces se dio cuenta que sería mejor quedarse en la zona en que estaba hasta el amanecer. Él tenía la
esperanza de que lo ubicaran y rescataran.
Travis se acomodó en una cueva rocosa unos 20 pies de donde había caído. Cuidadosamente movió con su tobillo
hinchado sobre una pequeña roca para tratar de elevar la pierna para reducir la inflamación. Su boca estaba seca.
Necesitaba desesperadamente un poco de agua, pero su cántaro se había caído en la oscuridad durante su caída, al igual
que su linterna y una brújula. Estaba en aprietos y él lo sabía. Lo único que él no sabía era que él enfrentaría una de las
peores noches frías.
A Travis lo despertó asustado un ruido. Estaba sorprendido de que se había quedado dormido porque él se había dicho a
sí mismo que se quedaría despierto por la noche. Miró por su alrededor; la única luz que veía era de la luna media
cubierta. Algo no estaba bien. ¡Alguien estaba allí con él, o algo! Él podía sentir que no estaba solo. De nuevo, miró a su
alrededor y a unos 100 pies de distancia de él, vio a lo lejos una figura con cuatro patas manoseando unos arbustos. Tenía
una cola larga, pero no podía ver mucho más.
El terror se apoderó de él, y su mente corría pensando en qué tipo de animales vivían en esta parte de las montañas.
¿Coyotes? ¿Osos? ¿Tal vez era un ciervo? No, la cola era demasiada larga. Un sonido aterrador en la distancia confirmó lo
que él rogaba no fuera cierto. ¡Era un gato montés! Había descendido desde la cima de la montaña sin duda en busca de
comida. Si éste había captado el aroma de Travis, el niño sabía que el gato montés lo atacaría y mataría de seguro.
El niño sorprendido pensó primero que tendría que estar callado, esperando esquivar la visión del gran gato.
Deliberadamente intentó calmar su respiración, lo cual era difícil hacer porque estaba muy asustado. Sentía que su
corazón latía en ambos lados del cuello. Por favor, vete; por favor, vete, rogaba a sí mismo. Justo en ese momento, vio la
cabeza del gato estirar el cuello hacia arriba como tratando de oler algo en el viento. El cauteloso cazador había olido a
otra criatura. Una criatura sabrosa. Una criatura herida.
Travis vio que el gato miró directamente a la cueva. Pudo ver el centello de los ojos ardientes del gato. Sabía entonces que
el gato lo había visto, y el gato se acercaba lentamente.
En un instante, la mente de Travis entró en pánico. ¿Qué haces si se acerca un gato montés? ¿Finges estar muerto?
¿Corres? ¿Huyes e intentas asustarlo? Él sabía que él no podía huir, y solo quedaba una cosa por hacer. Recogió
instintivamente unas piedras y empezó a tirarlas al gato que se acercaba rápidamente. Él gritó y gruñó por su vida,
lanzando piedras violentamente en la dirección del gato. La mayoría de las piedras cayeron inofensivamente alrededor de
él, pero algunos lograron golpear a la bestia. El gato huyó rápidamente y a la distancia se escuchaba el maullido
escalofriante de un gato herido. Travis había logrado salvarse del desastre seguro.
LONG BEACH UNIFED SCHOOL DISTRICT
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2014-2015
IMPORTANT NOTE from Translating Team to TEACHERS: Please refer to your instructional materials to adapt the vocabulary used in the texts as needed.
English Language Arts
Survival
Grade 4
Nombre
Fecha
4º/5º Grado: Narrativa de Ficción
Lista del Estudiante
Título
CRITERIOS
Pos
pts.
Puntos Recibidos / Comentario:
ESTRATEGIAS: Usa para revisar.
1. Tengo varios párrafos enfocados en un
problema/solución o aventura intrigante con
humor, drama y suspenso.
3
2. Tengo un buen párrafo de apertura o
principio que identifica a los personajes, la
escena, y el problema/situación.
3. Uso detalles relevantes para brindar más
información relacionada a la manera en que los
personajes solucionan el problema o se ocupan de
la situación. Incorporo humor, drama, suspenso o
tensión en los detalles.
4. Uso varios ejemplos de deliberación y precisión
con palabras descriptivas y frases para ayudar
a mi lector a visualizar vívidamente los
acontecimientos, los personajes y la escena que se
está describiendo.
5. Tengo varios ejemplos de palabras sutiles de
transición o frases que muestran el tiempo ha
transcurrido.
2
6. Proporciono reflexiones intermitentes, ya sea
directa o indirectamente relacionados a los
sentimientos del personaje, con respecto a los
acontecimientos que narra.
7. Tengo un párrafo bien elaborado al final o al
concluir el párrafo que muestra el pensamiento y
proporciona una conclusión a la historia.
8. Incluyo diálogo o monólogo con eficacia para
avanzar la historia y/o revelar algo sobre el
personaje principal.
2
4
2
2
2
1
CONVENCIONES GRAMATICALES: Usa para editar.
9. Uso las mayúsculas, la puntuación, la
ortografía, y la gramática correcta.
TOTAL:
LONG BEACH UNIFED SCHOOL DISTRICT
2
20
27
2014-2015
IMPORTANT NOTE from Translating Team to TEACHERS: Please refer to your instructional materials to adapt the vocabulary used in the texts as needed.
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