Dollars and Sense

Dollars and Sense
English Language Arts
Dollars and Sense
Grade 4
Unit Goals – Stage 1
Unit Description: Students will explore basic business concepts such as marketing, cost, income, profit, and volume as they consider the factors that contribute to a successful business. Students will read several texts about
these concepts, engage in collaborative discussions, and synthesize their ideas in writing. Through close reading of informational texts, students will examine how an author uses reasons and evidence to support points in
the text. Students will demonstrate understanding of these concepts by writing an opinion piece in which they examine the most important factors that contribute to a business’s success. Approximate Duration- 5 weeks
CCR Anchor Standards
Transfer Goals: SBAC Claims
R.CCR.1 Read closely to determine what the text says explicitly and to
Students will be increasingly able to independently use their learning to…
make logical inferences from it; cite specific textual evidence when
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Read closely and analytically to comprehend a range of increasingly complex literary and informational text. (Claim 1)
writing or speaking to support conclusions drawn from the text.
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Produce effective and well-grounded writing for a range of purposes and audiences. (Claim 2)
R.CCR.2 Determine central ideas or themes of a text and analyze their
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Employ effective speaking and listening skills for a range of purposes and audiences. (Claim 3)
development: summarize the key supporting details and ideas.
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Engage in research and inquiry to investigate topics, and to analyze, integrate, and present information. (Claim 4)
R.CCR.3 Analyze how and why individuals, events, and ideas develop
Making Meaning
and interact over the course of a text
UNDERSTANDINGS
ESSENTIAL QUESTIONS
R.CCR.4 Interpret words and phrases as they are used in a text,
Students will understand that…
Students will keep considering…
including determining technical, connotative, and figurative meanings,
1. What does it take to start and run a successful business?
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Starting and operating a business takes careful planning,
and analyze how specific word choices shape meaning or tone.
2. In what ways do you learn new information?
perseverance, skill, insight, passion, and hard work.
R.CCR.8 Delineate and evaluate the argument and specific claims in a
3. How do people get their point across?
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Sentence-level context can provide a clue to the meaning of a
text, including the validity of the reasoning as well as the relevance and
4. How do I support my opinion?
word or phrase.
sufficiency of the evidence.
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Opinions can build, change, or be refined as a result of
R.CCR.9 Analyze how two or more texts address similar themes or
collaborative conversations.
topics in order to build knowledge and vocabulary.
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Authors/Writers use valid reasons and relevant evidence,
W.CCR.1 Write arguments to support claims in an analysis of
including specific facts, details, and academic vocabulary to
substantive topics or texts using valid reasoning and relevant and
support opinions and key points in a text.
sufficient evidence.
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Authors/Writers use different types of sentences to create
W.CCR.8 Gather relevant information from multiple print and digital
variety in their writing.
sources, assess the credibility and accuracy of each source, and
Acquisition
integrate the information while avoiding plagiarism.
KNOWLEDGE
SKILLS
W.CCR.9 Draw evidence from literary or informational texts to support
Students will know…
Students will be skilled at (Do)
analysis, reflection, and research.
SL.CCR.1 Prepare for and participate effectively in a range of
conversations and collaborations with diverse partners, building on
others’ ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively.
SL.CCR.2 Integrate and evaluate information presented in diverse
media and formats including visually, quantitatively, and orally.
L.CCR.1 Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English
grammar and usage when writing or speaking.
L.CCR.2 Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English
capitalization, punctuation, and spelling when writing.
L.CCR.4 Determine or clarify the meaning of unknown and multiplemeaning words and phrases by using context clues, analyzing
meaningful word parts, and consulting general and specialized
reference materials, as appropriate.
L.CCR.6 Acquire and use accurately a range of general academic and
domain-specific words and phrases
LONG BEACH UNIFED SCHOOL DISTRICT
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Basic business concepts such as marketing, cost, profit, and
volume.
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Gathering evidence to support what it takes to start and run a
successful business.
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Main idea, details, and summaries.
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Use of context clues when determining meanings of unknown
words.
Citing textual evidence to answer text dependent questions both
orally and in writing.
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Linguistic frames for posing and responding to questions, making
comments, and linking comments to the remarks of others.
Explaining how an author uses reasons and evidence to support
particular points in a text.
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Organizational structure of opinion writing.
Using context clues to determine the meaning of words and
phrases as they are used in a text.
Words and phrases that signal logical relationships (e.g., for
instance, in order to, in addition).
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Engaging in collaborative discussions to develop, clarify and refine
their thinking.
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Quality reasons and various elaboration strategies such as
clarification statements and examples.
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Writing clear and coherent opinion pieces to support a claim
using quality reasons and valid evidence.
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Types of sentences: simple, compound, and complex.
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Identifying, using, and correctly punctuating simple, compound,
and complex sentences.
Correct way to punctuate compound sentences.
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2014-2015
English Language Arts
Dollars and Sense
Grade 4
Grade Level Standards– Stage 1
Reading
Informational
RI.4.1 Refer to details and examples in a
text when explaining what the text says
explicitly and when drawing inferences
from the text.
RI.4.2 Determine the main idea of a text
and explain how it is supported by key
details; summarize the text.
RI.4.3 Explain events, procedures, ideas, or
concepts in a historical, scientific, or
technical text, including what happened
and why, based on specific information in
the text.
RI.4.4 Determine the meaning of general
academic and domain-specific words and
phrases in a text relevant to a grade 4
topics or subject area.
RI.4.8 Explain how an author uses reasons
and evidence to support particular points in
a text.
RI.4.9 Integrate information from two texts
on the same topic in order to write or speak
about the subject knowledgeably.
Writing
Speaking and Listening
Language
Text Type
W.4.1 Write opinion pieces on topics or texts, supporting a point of view
with reasons and information.
a.
Introduce a topic or text clearly, state an opinion, and create an
organizational structure in which related ideas are grouped to
support the writer’s purpose.
b. Provide reasons that are supported by facts and details.
c.
Link opinion and reasons using words and phrases (e.g., for
instance, in order to, in addition).
d. Provide a concluding statement or section related to the opinion
presented.
Comprehension and Collaboration
SL.4.1 Engage effectively in a range of
collaborative discussions (one-on one, in
groups, and teacher-led) with diverse partners
on grade 4 topics and texts, building on others’
ideas and expressing their own clearly.
a.
Come to discussions prepared, having
read or studied required material;
explicitly draw on that preparation and
other information known about the topic
to explore ideas under discussion.
b. Follow agreed-upon rules for discussions
and carry out assigned roles.
c.
Pose and respond to specific questions to
clarify or follow up on information, and
make comments that contribute to the
discussion and link to the remarks of
others.
d. Review the key ideas expressed and
explain their own ideas and
understanding in light of the discussion
Conventions of Standard English
L.4.1 Demonstrate command of the
conventions of standard English grammar and
usage when writing or speaking.
f.
Produce complete sentences,
recognizing and correcting inappropriate
fragments and run-ons.
Production and Distribution of Writing
W.4.4 Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development
and organization are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience.
W.4.5 With guidance and support from peers and adults, develop and
strengthen writing as needed by planning, revising, editing.
Research to Build and Present Knowledge
W.4.8 Recall relevant information from experiences or gather relevant
information from print and digital sources; take notes and categorize
information, and provide a list of sources
W.4.9 Draw evidence from literary or informational texts to support
analysis, reflection, and research.
b. Apply grade 4 Reading standards to informational texts (e.g.,
“Explain how an author uses reasons and evidence to support
particular points in a text, identifying which reasons and evidence
support which points”).
SL.4.2 Paraphrase portions of a text read aloud
or information presented in diverse media and
formats, including visually, quantitatively, and
orally.
L.4.2 Demonstrate command of the
conventions of standard English capitalization,
punctuation, and spelling when writing.
b. Use commas and quotation marks to
mark direct speech and quotations from
a text.
c.
Use a comma before a coordinating
conjunction in a compound sentence.
Vocabulary Acquisition and Use
L.4.4 Determine or clarify the meaning of
unknown and multiple-meaning words and
phrases based on grade 4 reading and
content, choosing flexibly from a range of
strategies.
a.
Use context as a clue to the meaning of a
word or phrase.
L.4.6 Acquire and use accurately gradeappropriate general academic and domainspecific words and phrases.
Foundational
RF.4.3 Know and apply grade-level phonics
and word analysis skills in decoding words.
RF.4.4Read with sufficient accuracy and
fluency to support comprehension.
LONG BEACH UNIFED SCHOOL DISTRICT
2
2014-2015
English Language Arts
Dollars and Sense
Grade 4
Evidence of Learning – Stage 2
Evaluative Criteria (LBUSD Achievement Report Evidence)
End of Unit Assessment Evidence
Reading Achievement Subsets
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Uses textual evidence to explain what the text says explicitly and when drawing
inferences
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Determines and summarizes central ideas and key details in grade level texts
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Determines word meanings and phrases in context
Speaking and Listening Achievement Subsets
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Engages in collaborative conversations about grade level topics and texts (See
Collaborative Discussion Rubric)
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Uses grade appropriate language and vocabulary
Writing Achievement Subsets
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Organizes and maintains focus to support purpose
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Uses appropriate details and precise language to develop the topic (including
academic and domain specific vocabulary)
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Applies grade level appropriate conventions (grammar, spelling, capitalization,
punctuation)
Writing Achievement Subsets (See CCSS-Aligned Opinion Writing Rubric)
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Organizes and maintains focus to support purpose
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Uses appropriate details and precise language to develop the topic (including
academic and domain specific vocabulary)
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Applies grade level appropriate conventions (grammar, spelling, capitalization,
punctuation)
Reading Achievement Subsets
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Integrates information from related texts
Speaking and Listening Achievement Subsets
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Plans, speaks, and presents information/ideas connected to the unit theme
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Listens and interprets information and ideas presented by others
End of Unit On-Demand Reading and Responding to Text (Intranet)
Over the course of three days, students will read a piece of text, answer several textdependent questions, and work in collaborative groups to gather evidence that they will
use to write an analysis of the text in response to a prompt.
Evaluative Criteria (LBUSD Achievement Report Evidence)
Other Evidence – may be used formatively
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BAP Culminating Writing Tasks
Short Constructed Responses to Focus Questions
Collaborative Discussions on Focus Questions
Grade Level Fluency Passages
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Task-dependent
Task-dependent
Task-dependent
Reads grade level text with accuracy and fluency (See CCSS-Aligned Fluency
Rubric)
LONG BEACH UNIFED SCHOOL DISTRICT
Opinion Writing Task
At the end of the unit, students will work through the writing process to plan, organize,
draft, revise, and publish an opinion piece. The writing will require students to select
which factor is the most important in starting and running a successful business (e.g.,
hard-work, careful planning, perseverance, passion, skill, insight, luck). Students will need
to support their claim with evidence from the selections in the unit.
Inquiry/Research Task and Presentation
Students will conduct a unit investigation that will be student-driven and emerge from
their interests, and encouraged or ignited by reading and class discussions. (Refer to page
125A in Open Court Unit 2 for inquiry ideas.)
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2014-2015
English Language Arts
Dollars and Sense
Grade 4
Learning Targets– Stage 3
Reading
Writing
Speaking and Listening
Language
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I can refer to details and evidence in a
text when explaining what the text
means. (RI.4.1)
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I can write an opinion piece on a topic or
text, supporting a point of view with
reasons and information. (W.4.1.a)
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I can prepare for a collaborative
conversation by reading and studying
the required material. (SL.4.1.a)
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I can produce complete simple,
compound, and complex sentences.
(L.4.1.f)
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I can determine the main idea of a text
and explain how it is supported by key
details. (RI.4.2)
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I can introduce a topic or text clearly and
state an opinion (W.4.1.a)
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I can draw on my preparation and other
ideas I have about the topic to explore
ideas under discussion. (SL.4.1.a)
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I can recognize and correct sentence
fragments and run-ons. (L.4.1.f)
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I can summarize the text. (RI.4.2)
I can create an organizational structure in
which related ideas are grouped to support
my purpose. (W.4.1.a, W.4.4)
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I can correctly punctuate a compound
sentence by placing a comma before the
coordinating conjunction. (L.2.4.c)
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I can use information from the text to
explain what happened and why. (RI.4.3)
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I can provide reasons that are supported by
facts and details. (W.4.1.b)
I can follow agreed-upon rules for
discussions and carry out assigned roles
during a collaborative conversation.
(SL.4.1.b)
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I can edit for correct capitalization.
(L.4.2.a, W.4.5)
I can determine the meaning of a word or
phrase as it is used in the text. (RL.4.4)
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I can explain how an author uses reasons
and evidence to support particular points
in a text or video. (RI.4.8)
I can link my opinion and reasons using
appropriate transitional words and
phrases. (W.4.1.c)
I can use context as a clue to the meaning
of a word or phrase. (L.4.4.a)
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I can provide a concluding statement or
section related to my opinion. (W.4.1.d)
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I can work with my peers and adults to
plan my writing. (W.4.5)
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I can work with my peers and adults to
develop, revise, and edit my writing.
(W.4.5)
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I can integrate information from two texts
on the same topic in order to write or
speak about it knowledgably. (RI.4.9)
I can read with sufficient accuracy and
fluency to support comprehension.
(RF.4.4)
LONG BEACH UNIFED SCHOOL DISTRICT
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I can gather, take notes and categorize
information from text. (W.4.8)
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I can draw evidence from informational
texts to support analysis, reflection, and
research. (W.4.9)
4
I can make comments that contribute to
the discussion during a collaborative
conversation. (SL.4.1.c)
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I can pose and respond to specific
questions during a collaborative
conversation. (SL.4.1.c)
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I can gain new understandings as a
result of having a collaborative
conversation. (SL.4.1d)
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I can listen carefully and paraphrase the
information presented in a video.
(SL.4.2)
2014-2015
English Language Arts
Dollars and Sense
Grade 4
Learning Plan – Stage 3
Days
1-2
Starting A Business (OCR Unit 2)
3-4
Lemons to Lemonade (webisode)
http://smckids.com/episodes/
5
Food from the ‘Hood (OCR Unit 2, BAP-REVISED)
http://bizkids.com/clip/profile-food-from-the-hood
11-15
Salt (OCR Unit 2, BAP)
16-17
Baja Sonora (informational article)
http://www.bajasonora.com/about.html
23- 25
Additional
resources
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Initial Assessment of opinion writing
Analyze a model of proficiency
Language Conventions
Simple sentences
Subject-verb agreement
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Taybear (webisode)
http://bizkids.com/clip/profile-taybear
6-10
18-22
Opinion Writing – EXPOSITORY Writing to Explain
(WFTB)
Reading and Responding to Text
Modeling basic structure– What would be a
good business for you to start?
Correcting sentence fragments
Reverse Map
Revise Using Student Checklist
Compound sentences
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Modeling with strategies – Why were the kids in
Food from the ‘Hood successful?
Complex sentences
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Modeling with strategies – Was Ivan a fool?
Identifying simple, compound, and
complex sentences
Revise for strategies
Revision Strategy: Adding variety with
simple, compound, and complex
sentences
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Elias Sifuentes (OCR Unit 2, BAP)
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On-Demand Reading and Responding to Text
Opinion Process Piece
Students plan, draft, revise, and edit an opinion piece answering the question, “What is the
single most important factor that contributes to the success of a business?”
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Write from the Beginning and Beyond Response to
Literature Manual
Open Court Leveled Library
Write from the Beginning and Beyond Setting the Stage
Manual
Write from the Beginning and Beyond Expository Manual
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Language Arts Handbook
*See last page of unit for an overview of research and inquiry and suggested lesson sequence.
LONG BEACH UNIFED SCHOOL DISTRICT
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2014-2015
English Language Arts
Dollars and Sense
Starting a Business
Grade 4
Days 1 - 2
Vocabulary
Theme Connections
entrepreneur, obligations,
manufacturing, profitable, analyzing,
business market, product
This text is the first opportunity for students to begin building their understanding of business concepts. Students will learn about business goals,
interests, types of businesses, and the definition of a business market.
Text, Reader, and Task Considerations
This text contains many complex features and would be best read aloud to the students while they follow along. The knowledge demands of the text
include entrepreneurs and the two types of businesses. The language is academic and may be unfamiliar (see words to the left). Many complex
sentences are used and will require a close reading.
Learning Targets
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I can read with sufficient accuracy
and fluency to support
comprehension. (RF.4.4)
Focus of Instruction: Reading and Responding to Text
First Read
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I can refer to details and evidence in
a text when explaining what the text
means. (RI.4.1)
•
I can determine the main idea of a
text and explain how it is supported
by key details. (RI.4.2)
•
I can explain how an author uses
reasons and evidence to support
particular points in a text. (RI.4.8)
•
I can determine the meaning of a
word or phrase as it is used in the
text. (RL.4.4)
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I can read with sufficient accuracy
and fluency to support
comprehension. (RF.4.4)
Tell students that they will listen to you read the text aloud the first time so that they can get a sense of what the text is about.
Read aloud the entire text without stopping in order for students to get the “gist” of the selection. Based on the needs and abilities of your
students you may want to have the students read it silently the first time through.
Ask students for their reaction to the text (leave this very open-ended, the purpose of this conversation is for students to talk about the text).
Reread for Comprehension
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LONG BEACH UNIFED SCHOOL DISTRICT
Set the purpose
Explain to students that an author makes several key points in a text (main ideas) and supports those points using reasons and evidence (key
details). In this text, you will determine the key points the author is making regarding starting a business and explain how the author uses
reasons and evidence to support these key points.
Review with students several questioning strategies you use to determine the main ideas in a text. (e.g., What is the author trying to convey in
this section? The next? What is this mostly about? Are there words that repeat? What does the author say first? What does he say last? What
do all of the details seem to be about? Are there headings or subheadings to give me clues?)
Reread and ask the following text dependent questions to determine the key points made by the author (main ideas):
Ask students to reread the first paragraph on page 126 and ask what point the author is making. (Successful entrepreneurs take time to plan
their business before they start.)
Tell students that this is the overall main idea or point of the entire text but the author makes several more points within the text.
What is the meaning of the word entrepreneur? What clues from the text help you determine the meaning?
Reread paragraph 2 and 3. What point is the author making in these paragraphs? (You need to think about your business goals before going
into business.)
What details from paragraphs 2 and 3 does the author use to support the point that you need to think about your business goals before going
into business?
What does the author mean when she says, “short term business” or “ongoing business”?
Look at the sentence in paragraph 3 that begins, “If you already…” and find the word obligations. Based on its location in the sentence, what
part of speech is it? Based on the clues in the sentence, how can you figure out what the word obligations means?
Reread page 127 to determine the point the author is making on this page.
How does the author use pictures, captions, and a chart to support the point that your business should be something you think is fun and
something that is easy for you to do?
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2014-2015
English Language Arts
Dollars and Sense
Grade 4
Reread paragraphs 1 and 2 on page 128.
What are the differences between service and manufacturing businesses?
Look at the photograph at the bottom of page 128. Is that an example of a service or manufacturing business? Why did the author include
this photograph?
Reread page 129. What is a business market? What words of phrases help to define the word?
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I can gather, take notes and
categorize information from text.
(W.4.8)
•
I can explain how an author uses
reasons and evidence to support
particular points in a text. (RI.4.8)
•
I can draw on my preparation and
other ideas I have about the topic to
explore ideas under discussion.
(SL.4.1.a)
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I can follow agreed-upon rules for
discussions and carry out assigned
roles during a collaborative
conversation. (SL.4.1.b)
•
I can make comments that
contribute to the discussion during a
collaborative conversation.
(SL.4.1.c)
•
I can pose and respond to specific
questions during a collaborative
conversation. (SL.4.1.c)
•
I can gain new understandings as a
result of having a collaborative
conversation. (SL.4.1d)
Reread to Gather Evidence/Information and Respond to Text
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LONG BEACH UNIFED SCHOOL DISTRICT
Introduce the focus question: In the text, Starting a Business, how does the author support the point that there are many things to consider
when starting a business? (The author presents questions to the reader to consider and then gives examples for how you might answer them.)
Have students reread the text, Starting a Business, with a partner, and create a Tree Map with the heading, “There are many things you need
to consider before you start a business.”
Based on the needs of your students, have them
work independently, with a partner, or in a small
group to reread the text and create a separate
branch for the key points the author is making in
the text. Under each branch, have students record
the reasons and evidence the author uses to
support each key point.
Remind students that this is how they will prepare
for their collaborative discussions. They will use
their notes to discuss the focus question.
Collaborative Discussion
Place students in small groups or with different
partners to discuss their notes in response to the
focus question.
Remind students that the purpose of a
collaborative discussion is to build on ideas and
express their own clearly and this will be their
opportunity to add to their notes/maps.
Monitor students’ conversations using the
“Collaborative Discussion Rubric” in order to determine students’ strengths and weaknesses.
Following the conversations, ask students what new information they now have as a result of the conversation.
Written Response to focus question
Have students write a response to the focus question.
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2014-2015
English Language Arts
Dollars and Sense
Learning Targets
•
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I can write an opinion piece on a
topic or text, supporting a point of
view with reasons and information.
(W.4.1.a)
I can introduce a topic or text clearly
and state an opinion (W.4.1.a)
•
I can create an organizational
structure in which related ideas are
grouped to support my purpose.
(W.4.1.a, W.4.4)
•
I can provide reasons that are
supported by facts and details.
(W.4.1.b)
•
I can link my opinion and reasons
using appropriate transitional words
and phrases. (W.4.1.c)
•
I can provide a concluding
statement or section related to my
opinion. (W.4.1.d)
Grade 4
Focus of Instruction: Opinion Writing and Conventions
Writing Text Type: Opinion Writing
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LONG BEACH UNIFED SCHOOL DISTRICT
Initial Assessment (Writing piece #1 to be kept and used later for revision strategies)
With minimal instruction and prompting, provide students with a writing prompt. What do you want to be when you grow up and why? State
your opinion of what you would like to be and support your opinion with reasons and information.
Scan the student essays to determine whether or not students have structure in place using the Basic Structure Opinion Rubric on page 148 of
the Expository/Informative manual.
Prepare for the Unit
Explain to students that in this unit they will learn how to write opinion pieces in which they state an opinion about a topic or text and support
that opinion with reasons and information.
Explain to students that at the end of the unit they will have the last week to plan, draft, revise, and edit an opinion piece of writing to answer
the question: What is the single most important factor that makes a business successful?
Tell students that as you read each selection in the unit, you will take notes on the factors that are essential to plan and run a business. You
will be keeping track of
notes and evidence from
the texts in a Tree Map
with branches for each
factor you determine to
be important (e.g.,
careful planning,
perseverance, skill,
insight, hard work).
Have students create an Opinion Writing folder to keep working drafts, notes from mini-lessons, and resources (i.e. transitional word lists,
proficient essays, a model of the basic structure, student checklists, etc…)
Analyze and Reverse map a model of proficiency (IF students do NOT have basic structure in place as evidence by their initial assessments, use the
student checklist for basic structure and the model of proficiency (structure only) to analyze for criteria. IF students DO have basic structure in
place as evidenced by their initial assessments, use the student checklist with strategies and the model of proficiency (with strategies) to analyze
for criteria. (Located in the appendix)
Reverse map the model of proficiency by filling in the blank map with the information from the model of proficiency.
Analyze for criteria using the checklist. For each of the criteria, have students write down a justification for the score. (See sample provided)
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2014-2015
English Language Arts
•
I can produce complete simple,
compound, and complex sentences.
(L.4.1.f)
Dollars and Sense
Grade 4
Grammar Conventions: Simple Sentences
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LONG BEACH UNIFED SCHOOL DISTRICT
Review with students that a sentence is made up of a subject and a predicate and
represents a complete thought.
The complete subject is made up of a simple subject (who or what does or is
something in a sentence) and any words and phrases that describe the simple
subject.
The complete predicate is made up of a simple predicate (what the subject
does or is) and any words or phrases that describe the action.
Have students practice identifying the subjects and predicates in the following
simple sentences from Starting a Business.
Successful entrepreneurs take time to plan their business before they start.
They ask themselves many questions.
Some businesses are service businesses.
Others are manufacturing businesses.
Customers pay service businesses to do things they themselves don’t have the time
or desire to do.
Manufacturing businesses make and sell products, such as jewelry, dog collars, or
lanyards.
The management for these buildings has probably made other arrangements for
snow removal.
After students have divided the sentences into subjects and predicates, have them use
the Bridge Map to tell the function of each part of the sentence.
“Successful entrepreneurs’ is the complete subject because it is telling
who is doing something in the sentence and ‘take time to plan their
business before they start’ is the complete predicate because it is
telling what successful entrepreneurs do.”
Have students select simple sentences from their own writing and identify
the complete subject and complete predicate in each of the sentences.
Provide multiple opportunities for students to identify simple sentences,
talk about the parts of the sentence and the function of each part. They will
need to have a solid foundation of this concept in order to build on with
compound and complex sentences in the subsequent lessons.
9
2014-2015
English Language Arts
Dollars and Sense
Lemons to Lemonade
Grade 4
Days 3-4
Vocabulary
Theme Connections
competition, quality, retail business
In this media/website resource, students will learn that in order to be successful when trying to sell a product, several factors must be in place including
quality, reasonable price, low competition, good business market, and location. When one is missing, the product may not sell.
Text, Reader, and Task Considerations
Students will listen to and watch the video several times in order to capture the important information.
Learning Targets
•
•
•
•
•
Focus of Instruction: Reading and Responding to Text
I can listen carefully and paraphrase
the information presented in a
video. (SL.4.2)
First Viewing
I can refer to details and evidence in
a text (video) when explaining what
the text means. (RI.4.1)
Replay for Comprehension
I can determine the main idea of a
text (video) and explain how it is
supported by key details. (RI.4.2)
Play the video all the way through without stopping
•
Tell students that they will listen to the video the first time so that they can get a sense of what it is about.
•
Play the entire video without stopping in order for students to get the “gist.”
•
Ask students how this video relates to the first text they read, “Starting a Business.”
•
•
•
•
I can explain how an author uses
reasons and evidence to support
particular points in a text (video).
(RI.4.8)
I can gather, take notes and
categorize information from text.
(W.4.8)
•
•
•
LONG BEACH UNIFED SCHOOL DISTRICT
Explain to students that a video provides you with information similar to an informational text.
In this video, several points regarding what it takes for a business to be successful are made and each of those points is backed up with reasons and
evidence. Watch the video and look for the points (main ideas) being made and how those points are supported with evidence and reasons (key
details).
Stop webisode @ :50
What is the problem? (Britney has to have the $ for a class trip in 24 hours)?
Stop webisode @1:00 – 2:12
What are the four essential factors to consider for running for a successful retail business? (quality, competition, price, location)
Stop @ 2:10.
Why is Britney not making any business based on her location? (Britney’s stand is located on a quiet street instead of a main street).
Replay 2:46
Why is soccer practice a great idea for a location?
What does Warren mean when he says, “if the people won’t come to your business, bring the people to your business.”
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English Language Arts
•
Dollars and Sense
I can prepare for a collaborative
conversation by reading and
studying the required material.
(SL.4.1.a)
Replay to Gather Evidence/Information and Respond to Text
•
I can draw on my preparation and
other ideas I have about the topic to
explore ideas under discussion.
(SL.4.1.a)
•
I can follow agreed-upon rules for
discussions and carry out assigned
roles during a collaborative
conversation. (SL.4.1.b)
Collaborative Discussion
•
Place students in small collaborative groups to
Lemons to Lemonade
discuss responses to the focus question using
Factors to Consider When Starting A Business
the evidence they have gathered.
•
Ask students to refer to their notes (Tree Maps)
from Starting a Business and pull information in
from that text as well.
Price
Competition
Quality
•
Based on previous discussions and students’
needs, select a learning target and provide direct
instruction.
•
Monitor students’ discussions for the learning target selected.
•
Bring students back as a whole group and discuss how their understanding changed or deepened in light of the conversation.
•
I can make comments that
contribute to the discussion during a
collaborative conversation.
(SL.4.1.c)
•
I can pose and respond to specific
questions during a collaborative
conversation. (SL.4.1.c)
•
I can gain new understandings as a
result of having a collaborative
conversation. (SL.4.1d)
•
I can integrate information from two
texts on the same topic in order to
write or speak about it
knowledgably. (RI.4.9)
Grade 4
Introduce the focus question, “What factors need to be considered when running a manufacturing business (selling a product)?”
•
Play the video one more time and have students take notes in a Tree Map, listening for the reasons and evidence given for each of the factors
discussed in the video.
Location
Written Response to Text
•
Have students answer the focus question in their reading response log using evidence from BOTH texts to support their answer.
•
Based on the needs of your students, provide direct instruction or model how to integrate information from both texts.
•
After writing, ask students to share their
responses in their table/collaborative groups.
•
Add evidence from the webisode to the Tree
Map “Factors contributing to a successful
business”
•
Students may choose to write down evidence
under several of the factors as long as they
can back up their choice. For example, the
evidence listed to the right under careful
planning could just as easily go under
“insight.”
•
This map will continue to build throughout
the unit so that students will be able to pull
from it for their final opinion process piece.
LONG BEACH UNIFED SCHOOL DISTRICT
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English Language Arts
Dollars and Sense
Learning Targets
•
I can write an opinion piece on a
topic or text, supporting a point of
view with reasons and information.
(W.4.1.a)
•
I can introduce a topic or text clearly
and state an opinion (W.4.1.a)
•
I can create an organizational
structure in which related ideas are
grouped to support my purpose.
(W.4.1.a, W.4.4)
•
I can provide reasons that are
supported by facts and details.
(W.4.1.b)
•
I can link my opinion and reasons
using appropriate transitional words
and phrases. (W.4.1.c)
•
I can provide a concluding
statement or section related to my
opinion. (W.4.1.d
Grade 4
Focus of Instruction: Opinion Writing and Conventions
Model Opinion Writing
Model writing to the following prompt: Based on the ideas in Starting a Business, what would be a good business for you to start? Describe
why you think this would be a good business for you using reasons and evidence to support your opinion. (Writing piece #2 to be kept and
used later for revision strategies)
Note - The instructional sequence provided here will follow the basic structure for opinion writing (pages 135-143 of the Expository manual). Based on
the evidence from the initial assessment, you may choose to introduce the strategies here if your students demonstrated that they have structure in
place.
•
Analyze the prompt with students.
“Based on the ideas in Starting a Business” – Discuss with students the key ideas (criteria) from Starting a Business such as considering your
goals and amount of time you have, what you like or are good at, whether or not the business will be service or manufacturing, and consider
the business market.
What would be a good business for you to start?” – There are many businesses you could start but the best one for you would be the one that
meets all of the criteria from the key ideas in Starting a Business.
“Describe why you think this would be the best business…” – You will be writing an essay to support your opinion that the business you choose
is the best one for you.
“Use reasons and evidence to support your opinion” – You will support your opinion with reasons why you would be good at that business
using personal examples to support the criteria from the text (evidence).
•
Show the model of proficiency (structure) for this prompt (located in the appendix) and have students identify the criteria using the student
checklist.
•
Brainstorm ideas for writing.
Create a class Circle Map defining “Possible Businesses.” (This varies slightly from the instructions provided on page 135.)
As students give you suggestions for possible businesses, ask them why they think this would be a good business for them using the criteria
from Starting a Business. For example, if a student says mowing lawns. Have them provide a reason such as, “I would have time on every
Saturday to mow lawns.”
•
Select Topic and Brainstorm Reasons
Create a partial Multi-Flow Map and place your selected topic in the event box. Next, brainstorm possible reasons why the business you chose
would be the best for you. You may want to title each of the “cause” boxes with one of the criteria from the text Starting a Business.
Have students create their partial Multi-Flow Maps.
Ask students to share their information with a partner and invite their partners to suggest additional ideas.
•
Select Reasons and Organize for Writing
Model how to select the best 2 or 3 reasons. Choose the reasons that differ from each other and will be easier to elaborate.
Have students select their best reasons.
•
Write an opening paragraph
•
Extend with details to clarify
Clarification statements
Examples
Personal experiences and or experiences of others
LONG BEACH UNIFED SCHOOL DISTRICT
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English Language Arts
•
I can produce complete simple,
compound, and complex sentences.
(L.4.1.f)
•
I can correctly punctuate a
compound sentence by placing a
comma before the coordinating
conjunction. (L.2.4.c)
•
I can edit for correct capitalization.
(L.4.2.a, W.4.5)
Dollars and Sense
Grade 4
Grammar Conventions: Subject-Verb Agreement (Language Arts Handbook p. 336-337)
•
•
•
Remind students that a simple sentence has a subject and predicate and that the predicate contains the verb.
Using the sentences from the previous lesson, have students identify the simple subject and the simple predicate (verb). Then have them tell
whether the subject is singular or plural.
Successful entrepreneurs take time to plan their business before they start. (plural)
They ask themselves many questions. (plural)
Some businesses are service businesses. (plural)
Others are manufacturing businesses. (plural)
Customers pay service businesses to do things they themselves don’t have the time or desire to do. (plural)
Manufacturing businesses make and sell products, such as jewelry, dog collars, or lanyards. (plural)
The management for these buildings has probably made other arrangements for snow removal. (singular)
Explain to students that the subject and the verb must agree in number in the present tense.
If the simple subject is singular, the verb also needs to be singular. For regular verbs, they will end in –s or –es and irregular verbs will use the
singular form.
Have students practice rewriting the sentences, changing the simple subject from singular to plural or from plural to singular.
Example: “They ask themselves many questions.” “He asks himself many questions.” or “She asks herself many questions.”
Practice editing:
•
Provide students with sentences that do NOT have subject-verb agreement and have them work with a partner to edit the sentence by making the
verb match.
The boy look out the window.
The dogs eats the food.
The man cross the street.
My teacher bring the books to class.
Neil and Bob walks to the store.
•
Emphasize to students how to talk about the errors in the sentences. This will help them when they work with a partner to edit for subject-verb
agreement in their own writing. It may be helpful to provide linguistic patterns for students to follow as they discuss the sentences.
•
As they work through the sentences, have one student pretend they are editing the other partner’s work. It would sound something like, “In this
sentence your subject and verb do not agree. Your subject, “boy” is singular and the verb is plural because it is regular and doesn’t have an –s at the
end. You need to change your verb to a singular verb by adding an –s to the end. The correct sentence should say, “The boy looks out the window.”
LONG BEACH UNIFED SCHOOL DISTRICT
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English Language Arts
Dollars and Sense
Taybear
Grade 4
Day 5
Vocabulary
Theme Connections
non-profit, motivation, plan, finances,
records
In this informational video, students will be able to gather information from another media source. Taybear is a video about Taylor and her nonprofit
company that raises money to give bears to kids with cancer.
Reader and Task Considerations
Explain that there will be videos on the Smarter Balanced Assessment and during that time, they can watch the video multiple times if they need to
when answering the questions.
Learning Targets
Focus of Instruction: Reading and Responding to Text
•
I can listen carefully and paraphrase
the information presented in a
video. (SL.4.2)
First Viewing
•
Tell students that they will listen to the video all the way through the first time in order to get a sense of what it is about.
•
Ask students to discuss how the video relates to Starting a Business and to Lemons to Lemonade.
•
I can refer to details and evidence in
a text (video) when explaining what
the text means. (RI.4.1)
•
I can determine the main idea of a
text (video) and explain how it is
supported by key details. (RI.4.2)
Replay for Comprehension
•
Play the video again and have students jot down important notes or ideas in a Circle Map
•
Ask students to discuss the information in their Circle Maps with a partner
•
Ask students the following questions
What happened in Taylor’s life that motivated her to start Taybear?
How do they get the money to buy the bears?
What does non-profit mean?
How successful is the business? Explain how much money it makes and how many bears it donates.
Taylor states, “Success isn’t just in the numbers. . .” What does that mean?
•
I can gather, take notes and
categorize information from text.
(W.4.8)
•
I can make comments that
contribute to the discussion during a
collaborative conversation.
(SL.4.1.c)
•
I can pose and respond to specific
questions during a collaborative
conversation. (SL.4.1.c)
Replay to Gather Evidence/Information and Respond to Text
Introduce the focus question: What makes Taylor’s business successful?
•
Have students think about 2-3 factors that make Taylor’s business
successful. Have them write these ideas as branches on a Tree Map.
•
Play the video one more time and have students look for evidence
to support what makes her business successful.
•
Ask students to share notes with a partner or in a small group and
make revisions to their Circle Maps as necessary.
Collaborative Discussion
•
Place students in small collaborative groups to discuss responses to
the focus question using the evidence they have gathered.
•
Ask students to refer to their notes (Tree Maps).
•
Based on previous discussions and students’ needs, select a learning
target and provide direct instruction.
•
Monitor students’ discussions for the learning target selected.
LONG BEACH UNIFED SCHOOL DISTRICT
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English Language Arts
Dollars and Sense
Grade 4
•
Bring students back as a whole group and discuss how their understanding changed or deepened in light of the conversation.
Written Response to Text
•
Have students answer the focus question in their reading response log using evidence from the video to support their answer.
•
After writing, ask students to share their responses in their table/collaborative groups.
Add evidence from the text to the “Factors contributing to successful businesses” Tree Map under the appropriate branches.
Learning Targets
•
I can write an opinion piece on a
topic or text, supporting a point of
view with reasons and information.
(W.4.1.a)
•
I can introduce a topic or text clearly
and state an opinion (W.4.1.a)
•
I can link my opinion and reasons
using appropriate transitional words
and phrases. (W.4.1.c)
•
I can provide a concluding
statement or section related to my
opinion. (W.4.1.d
I can produce complete simple,
compound, and complex sentences.
(L.4.1.f)
•
Focus of Instruction: Opinion Writing and Conventions
Model Opinion Writing
Continue model writing to the following prompt: Based on the ideas in Starting a Business, what would be a good business for you to start? Describe
why you think this would be a good business for you using reasons and evidence to support your opinion.
•
Orally rehearse (page 140)
•
Select transition words and phrase
•
•
•
Note: Based on the needs of your students and anecdotal evidence, provide mini-lessons to address the structure of opinion writing.
Grammar Conventions: Fragments and Run-ons (Language Arts Handbook pages 216-217)
•
•
•
Provide students with transition words and phrases that are appropriate for linking reasons to opinions. These are different from the narrative
transitional words they used previously.
Write a closing paragraph that summarizes the opinion
Have students orally rehearse with a partner
Model drafting the essay by taking the information “off the map”
I can recognize and correct sentence
fragments and run-ons. (L.4.1.f)
•
•
•
•
LONG BEACH UNIFED SCHOOL DISTRICT
Explain to students that fragments are common problems
to watch for in your writing.
Teach students that a fragment is a group of words meant
to be a sentence but is missing a subject, predicate (verb)
or both.
Show students the Tree Map “Fragments” with the
branches, “missing a verb,” “missing a subject,” and
“missing a subject and a verb.”
Provide students with several examples of fragments and have them decide if the fragments are missing a subject, verb, or subject and verb.
Have students work with a partner to edit the sentences by adding what is missing.
Be sure to have students use the language that they will be using when they edit with a partner. For example, “This is a fragment. It is missing a
subject. You need to tell who or what is doing the action of the sentence.”
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English Language Arts
Dollars and Sense
BAP Lesson: Food from the Hood (OC p.156-169)
Grade 4
Days 4-7
Vocabulary
Theme Connections
(See BAP lesson)
This story explains how a group of Crenshaw High School students founded Food from the ‘Hood as the nation’s first student-based company which
provided food for the community and provided jobs for the neighborhood teenagers. Students will come to understand the importance of working
hard and working together in order to run a successful business.
Reader and Task Considerations
This text contains many complex features and would be best read aloud to the students while they follow along. The knowledge demands of the text
include the Los Angeles Riots of 1992. The language is academic and may be unfamiliar (see words in BAP lesson). Many complex sentences are
used and will require a close reading. The text is sequentially organized which will be pointed out with the coherently sequenced text dependent
questions. With teacher support, students will identify the details of each paragraph in the text in order to determine the overall main ideas.
Learning Targets
•
I can integrate information from two
texts on the same topic in order to write
or speak about it knowledgably. (RI.4.9)
Focus of Instruction: Reading and Responding to Text
First Read
•
•
•
•
I can read with sufficient accuracy and
fluency to support comprehension.
(RF.4.4)
•
Read the entire text aloud while students follow along. Based on the abilities of your students, you may to choose to have the students read
the entire text independently the first time.
As students listen to you read the text aloud (or as they read it independently) ask them to think about how this selection relates to the
previously read texts and webisodes.
Ask students to share with a partner how this text relates to the other texts in the unit so far.
I can refer to details and evidence in a
text when explaining what the text
means. (RI.4.1)
Reread for Comprehension
•
I can determine the main idea of a text
and explain how it is supported by key
details. (RI.4.2)
•
•
I can summarize the text. (RI.4.2)
•
I can use information from the text to
explain what happened and why.
(RI.4.3)
•
I can determine the meaning of a word
or phrase as it is used in the text.
(RL.4.4)
•
I can explain how an author uses
•
•
LONG BEACH UNIFED SCHOOL DISTRICT
Follow the REVISED BAP lesson located on the Intranet for a full list of text-dependent questions, vocabulary, and tasks.
In addition to the suggested text-dependent questions and tasks, select from the learning targets listed to the left to provide your students
with direct instruction based on their needs.
For example, if you have evidence from previous instruction and assessments that your students are struggling with being able to use details
from the text to explain what happens and why, you will want to design lessons addressing this standard. These lessons can precede the
instruction outlined in the BAP lesson.
16
2014-2015
English Language Arts
•
reasons and evidence to support
particular points in a text or video.
(RI.4.8)
I can explain how an author uses
reasons and evidence to support
particular points in a text or video.
(RI.4.8)
•
I can gather, take notes and categorize
information from text. (W.4.8)
•
I can prepare for a collaborative
conversation by reading and studying
the required material. (SL.4.1.a)
•
I can draw on my preparation and other
ideas I have about the topic to explore
ideas under discussion. (SL.4.1.a)
•
I can follow agreed-upon rules for
discussions and carry out assigned roles
during a collaborative conversation.
(SL.4.1.b)
•
I can make comments that contribute to
the discussion during a collaborative
conversation. (SL.4.1.c)
•
I can pose and respond to specific
questions during a collaborative
conversation. (SL.4.1.c)
•
I can gain new understandings as a
result of having a collaborative
conversation. (SL.4.1d)
•
I can draw evidence from informational
texts to support analysis, reflection, and
research. (W.4.9)
Dollars and Sense
Grade 4
Reread to Gather Evidence/Information and Respond to Text
Introduce the REVISED Focus Question (Culminating Writing Task) that has been aligned to the task that will be asked of students on the On-Demand
Reading and Responding to Text assessment that will take place at the end of the unit.
In the text, Food from the ‘Hood, the
author supports the idea that the
student owners of the business had
pride in their community. What
reasons and evidence does she
provide to support this idea?
•
Analyze the prompt with the
students.
The prompt is asking us to
explain the reasons and evidence
the author gives to support the
idea that the student owners had
pride in their community.
Have students create a T-Chart
with reasons on the left side and
evidence from the text to
support each reason on the right
side.
•
Depending on the needs of your
students, you may want to provide
additional scaffolds such as coming up
with the reasons together and then
having students work with a partner
to go back into the text to find evidence to support each reason.
Collaborative Discussion
•
Place students in small groups to discuss and refine the evidence collected.
•
Bring students back to a whole group and discuss any new ideas gained in light of the discussion.
Written Response to Text
•
Based on the needs of your students, you may want to provide additional scaffolds by providing a frame for writing the essay.
•
Either model writing the essay or have students write the essays independently.
Add evidence from the text to the “Factors contributing to successful businesses” Tree Map under the appropriate branches.
LONG BEACH UNIFED SCHOOL DISTRICT
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English Language Arts
Dollars and Sense
Learning Targets
•
I can write an opinion piece on a topic
or text, supporting a point of view with
reasons and information. (W.4.1.a)
•
I can introduce a topic or text clearly
and state an opinion (W.4.1.a)
•
I can create an organizational structure
in which related ideas are grouped to
support my purpose. (W.4.1.a, W.4.4)
•
I can provide reasons that are supported
by facts and details. (W.4.1.b)
•
I can link my opinion and reasons using
appropriate transitional words and
phrases. (W.4.1.c)
•
I can provide a concluding statement or
section related to my opinion. (W.4.1.d)
•
I can work with my peers and adults to
plan my writing. (W.4.5)
•
I can work with my peers and adults to
develop, revise, and edit my writing.
(W.4.5)
Grade 4
Focus of Instruction: Opinion Writing and Conventions
Writing Text Type: Opinion Writing
•
•
Reverse map and revise for structure criteria
Model how to reverse map using the procedure outlined on pages 144 and 147 of the Expository Manual.
Provide guided practice using the essay you modeled in the previous lesson.
Using either the student essay from the first writing prompt (initial assessment) or the second writing prompt (what would be a good
business for you to start), have students reverse map their own essay with a partner.
Have students create a Tree Map like the one on page 144 with their “holes” and then for the second branch, list the criteria they need.
Using the same essay, have students work in pairs to fill out the student checklist.
Teach students revision strategies for the structure criteria
Model for students what it would sound like to work with a partner. Provide sentence frames if needed. For example, if you are working
on the opening, student #1 might say, “In an opening, you need to address the topic and state your opinion. In your opening you
addressed the topic when you said ___________ OR you didn’t address the topic. What is the topic you are writing about? You also need
to state your opinion. You stated your opinion when you said, ___________. OR you didn’t state your opinion. What is your opinion on the
topic?”
If student #2 did NOT meet the criteria, that student will then revise his or her essay for that criteria only.
The roles are then reversed and student #2 gives feedback to student #1 on the same criteria.
Pair students up to practice this skill with each of the criteria.
Note- IF students demonstrated structure on the initial assessment, follow the same process but use the checklist for opinion writing with
strategies.
LONG BEACH UNIFED SCHOOL DISTRICT
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2014-2015
English Language Arts
•
I can produce complete simple,
compound, and complex sentences.
(L.4.1.f)
•
I can recognize and correct sentence
fragments and run-ons. (L.4.1.f)
•
I can correctly punctuate a compound
sentence by placing a comma before the
coordinating conjunction. (L.2.4.c)
•
I can edit for correct capitalization.
(L.4.2.a, W.4.5)
Dollars and Sense
Grade 4
Grammar Conventions: Using coordinating conjunctions in compound sentences
Practice identifying the parts of a compound sentence
•
Explicitly teach students that a compound sentence is made up of two simple
sentences joined by a coordinating conjunction (and, or, but).
•
Display the Brace Map to illustrate this concept.
•
Provide students with the sentence, “Mariah loves to swim, and she wants to
be a lifeguard.” Model for students how to break each part of the sentence
into its parts (see Brace Map)
•
Provide students with several additional compound sentences and have
students identify the parts by breaking the sentence into a Brace Map or colorcoding each part of the sentence.
The Irish terrier wanted to play catch, and the beagle wanted to chase
him.
The night is cold, but Lily has a sweater to keep her warm.
Lupe is horrible at sports, but she succeeds in all things academic.
You can wear your swimsuit, or you can change at the beach.
•
Explain to students that writers can combine two simple sentences that are related to
form a compound sentence using the coordinating conjunctions and, but, or.
“and” is used when the two sentences have similar ideas
“but” is used when the two sentences have opposing ideas
“or” is used when the two sentences offer a choice
•
Explain to students that when you combine two simple sentences, you need to place a
comma before the coordinating conjunction.
•
Provide students with several pairs of related sentences and have them practice making
compound sentences.
Jose loves to play football. He wants to be a professional player when he grows up.
(similar ideas)
Jackie really wants to go play with her friends. Jackie has too much homework. (opposing ideas)
Bobby can do his homework right after school. Bobby can play video games right after school. (choice)
Jose wants to have a service business. Ella thinks she would be good at a manufacturing business. (opposing ideas)
Some businesses are service businesses. Others are manufacturing businesses. (similar ideas)
In May 1992, riots destroyed the neighborhood surrounding their school. Businesses went up in flames. (similar ideas)
Most of the burned-out stores had owners who lived outside the neighborhood. The money they made left South Central Los Angeles at
the end of the workday. (similar ideas)
•
Have students work in pairs to create several compound sentences using and, but, or as the coordinating conjunction.
•
Have students look at a piece of their own writing, and identify simple sentences that they could combine to make compound sentences.
Run-on sentences
•
Explain to students that another problem to watch out for in their writing is the run-on sentence. A run-on sentence contains two or more
sentences that are combined incorrectly. Run-on sentences can be corrected with a comma and a conjunction (making a compound sentence)
or by adding end punctuation to create two or more sentences.
LONG BEACH UNIFED SCHOOL DISTRICT
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English Language Arts
Dollars and Sense
•
LONG BEACH UNIFED SCHOOL DISTRICT
Grade 4
Provide students with examples of run-on sentences and show them the two ways to correct it.
I raised my hand I wasn’t sure I knew the answer. (run-on)
o I raised my hand. I wasn’t sure I knew the answer.
o I raised my hand, but I wasn’t sure I knew the answer.
I need new shoes my sister needs a new coat.
o I need new shoes. My sister needs a new coat.
o I need new shoes, and my sister needs a new coat.
My brother prefers honey mustard salad dressing my uncle likes ranch.
o My brother prefers honey mustard salad dressing. My uncle likes ranch.
o My brother prefers honey mustard salad dressing, but my uncle prefers ranch.
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2014-2015
English Language Arts
Dollars and Sense
Salt (OCR) - BAP
Days 11-15
Grade 4
Vocabulary
Theme Connections
See BAP lesson located on the Intranet
Salt is a Russian tale that tells of a rich merchant’s youngest son, Ivan the Fool, who discovers an island with a mountain of salt. He takes a shipload
of this salt to a kingdom and pleases the king with savory dishes seasoned with salt. Ivan trades his salt for silver and gold. After winning the heart of
the king’s daughter, the two set sail for Ivan’s home. However, Ivan’s brothers find him at sea, toss Ivan overboard and claim the princess and his
ship as their own. With the help of a giant, Ivan is able to return to his home, reclaim what is his, and earn his father’s respect in the process.
Reader and Task Considerations
This fun folktale will provide students with a piece of literature that explores some of the same concepts of business. In this selection, students
should see that luck sometimes plays a role in being successful.
Learning Targets
•
I can integrate information from two
texts on the same topic in order to write
or speak about it knowledgably. (RI.4.9)
Focus of Instruction: Reading and Responding to Text
First Read
•
•
•
I can read with sufficient accuracy and
fluency to support comprehension.
(RF.4.4)
•
Read the entire text aloud while students follow along. Based on the abilities of your students, you may to choose to have the students read
the entire text independently the first time.
As students listen to you read the text aloud (or as they read it independently) as them to think about how this selection relates to the
previously read texts and webisodes.
Ask students to share with a partner how this text relates to the other texts in the unit so far.
Reread for Comprehension
•
•
I can gather, take notes and categorize
information from text. (W.4.8)
•
I can make comments that contribute to
the discussion during a collaborative
conversation. (SL.4.1.c)
•
I can pose and respond to specific
questions during a collaborative
conversation. (SL.4.1.c)
•
I can gain new understandings as a
result of having a collaborative
conversation. (SL.4.1d)
•
I can draw evidence from literary texts
to support analysis, reflection, and
research. (W.4.9)
Follow BAP lesson on Intranet for a full list of text-dependent questions, vocabulary, and tasks.
Reread to Gather Evidence/Information and Respond to Text
Introduce the focus question: At the beginning of the story Ivan’s father believed his son was a fool. In a paragraph, explain how Ivan proved that,
“Ivan the Fool”, was not a good title for him and how he earned his father’s respect. Use text evidence to support your answer.
•
Analyze the prompt with students. Determine with students that they will need to find evidence to support the idea that Ivan earned his
father’s respect and that “Ivan the Fool” is no longer a good title for him.
•
Have students make a partial Multi-Flow with the event, “Ivan earned his father’s respect and should no longer be called “Ivan the Fool.” Then
have students go back into the text and find evidence to support this statement placing each piece of evidence in a “cause” box on the partial
Multi-Flow Map.
Collaborative Discussion
•
Place students in small groups or with a partner to discuss their ideas in response to the focus question.
•
Remind students to make revisions to their ideas or add new ones.
•
Based on anecdotal evidence from previous discussions, select a learning target in which you will provide direct instruction and modeling. As
students have their discussions, monitor for that specific target and provide students with feedback.
•
Bring students back whole group and share new ideas in light of the discussion.
Written Response to Text
•
Based on the needs of your students, provide necessary scaffolds such as organizational plans for writing, sentence frames, modeling, etc.
Add evidence from the text to the “Factors contributing to successful businesses” Tree Map under the appropriate branches.
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English Language Arts
Dollars and Sense
Learning Targets
•
I can write an opinion piece on a topic
or text, supporting a point of view with
reasons and information. (W.4.1.a)
•
I can introduce a topic or text clearly
and state an opinion (W.4.1.a)
•
I can create an organizational structure
in which related ideas are grouped to
support my purpose. (W.4.1.a, W.4.4)
•
I can provide reasons that are supported
by facts and details. (W.4.1.b)
•
I can link my opinion and reasons using
appropriate transitional words and
phrases. (W.4.1.c)
•
I can provide a concluding statement or
section related to my opinion. (W.4.1.d)
•
I can work with my peers and adults to
plan my writing. (W.4.5)
•
I can work with my peers and adults to
develop, revise, and edit my writing.
(W.4.5)
Grade 4
Focus of Instruction: Opinion Writing and Conventions
Based on the needs of your students, you will need to spend the next two weeks either reinforcing the structure of an opinion piece or begin to
introduce strategies. The following are merely suggestions as to how to introduce strategies using activities and mini-lessons OR through continued
modeling. Select from these activities, the WftB Expository manual, and your own lessons to move students toward proficiency in the learning
targets based on the standards.
Introducing Strategies
•
Compare the “What would be a good business to start?” structure essay to the same essay with strategies embedded. (Located in the
appendix)
•
Have students note the differences.
•
Begin introducing strategies using the activities and mini-lessons suggested in the Expository manual on pages 151-214.
•
Based on the needs of your students, select strategies and pace your lessons accordingly following the process outlined below:
Explicitly teach the strategy by explaining what it is and showing an example in a proficient model.
Provide examples/non-examples (meets the criteria and doesn’t meet the criteria).
Provide opportunities to practice the strategy with activities and mini-lessons.
Provide sample student essays that fall short of the strategy and have students practice how to revise for the strategy.
Apply the strategy to a piece of their own writing.
•
Below is an example of this process with strategy #1, using quality reasons pages 152-157.
Begin by explaining the criteria for quality reasons (global in nature and distinctly different from the other reasons). A global reason
represents a “big idea” which will then allow for extensive elaboration.
Provide examples and non-examples using page 152 and 153.
Select activities to practice the strategy either using suggestions from the manual or creating activities linked to the text they are reading.
Write global reason for why the student owners of Food from the ‘Hood were successful.
o They made healthy salad dressing due to the fact that so many people from the community had heart disease.
o They grew their food organically with no chemicals that would hurt their bodies.
o They wanted to create a business that would put money back into the burned-out community.
o Global reason: ______________________________________________________________ (They cared about the people in their
community.)
Write a global reason for why the salad dressing was successful.
o One student studied what buyers liked and disliked in new products finding that more people were willing to try new salad
dressings than other new products.
o They took the time to experiment with salad dressing recipes to get the right balance of taste using herbs from their garden.
o They created a healthy, low-fat dressing for the people in the community.
o Global reason: ______________________________________________ (They studied the business market before putting their
product on the market.)
Pass around activity – Follow the process on page 156 but link it to the selections read so far in this unit using the following suggestions:
o There are many reasons why running a business is challenging. First of all __________________. Another reason is
____________________. In addition to those ____________________________.
o There are several reasons why you should study the business market before starting your own business. First of all
_____________________. Another reason is ________________________. Finally, ______________________.
o There are several reasons why you need to be willing to work hard to start and run your own business. One reason is
LONG BEACH UNIFED SCHOOL DISTRICT
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English Language Arts
Dollars and Sense
•
LONG BEACH UNIFED SCHOOL DISTRICT
Grade 4
______________________. Another reason you need to be willing to work hard is ______________________. Lastly, working
hard will ________________________________________.
Provide students with sample essays with reasons that are not global in nature and or are not distinctly different from each other and
follow the process outlined on pages 156-157. (You may choose to use samples from the manual OR create fictional student samples using
the students’ first two writing samples. If you use actual student samples, either ask for permission first and remove the name from the
paper OR change it enough so that it is not recognizable.)
Model for students how to have a peer conference regarding the specific strategy. Students need to practice what it sounds like when you
are looking for a specific strategy.
Apply the strategy to a previously written opinion piece.
Model writing an opinion piece with strategies: Why were the kids in Food from the ‘Hood Successful?
Brainstorm reasons that made the students successful. Record in a class partial Multi-Flow. Accept all reasons including those that are
global in nature and those that are specific. Also accept answers that are NOT distinctly different.
Model how to narrow down and select reasons that are global in nature and distinctly different from each other. (Strategy #1)
Write an opening paragraph that is well thought out using the types of openings on pages 174-175. (Strategy #5)
Model how to support each reason with clarification statements (p.165-168) and different types of examples from pages 169-174
(Strategies #3 and #4)
Model how to embed varied transition words and phrases related to logical thinking using the suggestions on pages 158-164. (Strategy #2)
Model how to write a well thought out closing using the suggestions on pages 178-183. (Strategy #6)
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English Language Arts
•
I can produce complete simple,
compound, and complex sentences.
(L.4.1.f)
•
I can recognize and correct sentence
fragments and run-ons. (L.4.1.f)
•
I can correctly punctuate a compound
sentence by placing a comma before the
coordinating conjunction. (L.2.4.c)
•
I can edit for correct capitalization.
(L.4.2.a, W.4.5)
Dollars and Sense
Grade 4
Grammar Conventions:
Introduce complex sentences
•
Explain to students that a complex sentence is made up of an independent clause (complete sentence that can stand alone) and one or more
dependent clauses (a group of words that cannot stand alone as a sentence). The dependent clause begins with a subordinating conjunction.
(Language Arts Handbook, p. 35, 215, and 325)
•
Display the Brace Map to explain that a complex sentence can be broken into an
independent clause and a dependent clause.
•
Provide students with the following complex sentence: “I will help the man
because he deserves it.” Point out that “I will help the man” is the independent
clause because it can stand alone as a sentence. “because he deserves it” is the
dependent clause because it cannot stand alone as a complete thought.
•
Provide students with several more examples of complex sentences and have
them practice identifying the independent and dependent clauses.
Jack stopped talking when I came up to him.
Although he will not admit it, he knows he is wrong.
Since it is raining, we will not go to the park today.
Wherever you see Ruby, her best friend, Jessica is not far away.
As soon as I get home, I eat a snack and do my homework.
•
Point out to students that each dependent clause begins with a subordinating
conjunction.
•
Have students write the sentences above on sentence strips. Have them cut the
sentence strip into its independent and dependent clause. Then have students
cut the subordinating conjunction off of the dependent clause.
•
Have students manipulate the pieces of the sentence strip to make different
combinations of sentences. Point out that sometimes a complex sentence begins
with the dependent clause and sometimes it begins with the independent
clause.
Practice making complex sentences
•
Provide students with the Tree Map of some common types of
subordinating conjunctions and explain how each function in a
sentence.
•
Using the following pairs of independent clauses, have students
create complex sentences.
Mary came up. We were talking about her.
I admire Mr. Brown. He is my enemy.
I came. You sent for me.
Evelyn will come to school. She is able.
He knows he is wrong. He will not admit it.
The man is rich. He is unhappy.
I shall come tomorrow. You send for me.
You wish to be believed. You must tell the truth.
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English Language Arts
Dollars and Sense
Grade 4
The dog bites. He ought to be muzzled.
It would be foolish to set out. It is raining.
Call at my office. You happen to be in town.
The cat ran up a tree. She was chased by a dog.
The sun shines brightly. It is very cold.
Boston became a large city. It has a good harbor.
LONG BEACH UNIFED SCHOOL DISTRICT
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Dollars and Sense
Grade 4
Baja Sonora
Days 16-17
Vocabulary
Authentic, atmosphere, transforming, partners,
newlywed, mouth-watering
Theme Connections
This text gives students the opportunity to read and learn about a local business and how it has changed over time. In this
informational article, students will be able to identify the factors that contributed to Baja Sonora’s success.
Reader and Task Considerations
Students will likely need some information about the different text structures (chronology, comparison, cause/effect, and
problem/solution). Explain that authors choose specific structures when organizing and writing the text. Understanding the text
structure used will help the reader comprehend the information in the text (RI.4.5).
Learning Targets
•
I can integrate information from two texts on the
same topic in order to write or speak about it
knowledgably. (RI.4.9)
•
I can read with sufficient accuracy and fluency to
support comprehension. (RF.4.4)
•
I can refer to details and evidence in a text when
explaining what the text means. (RI.4.1)
•
I can use information from the text to explain what
happened and why. (RI.4.3)
•
I can determine the meaning of a word or phrase as
it is used in the text. (RL.4.4)
•
I can explain how an author uses reasons and
evidence to support particular points in a text or
video. (RI.4.8)
LONG BEACH UNIFED SCHOOL DISTRICT
Focus of Instruction: Reading and Responding to Text
First Read
•
•
•
•
•
Provide students with a copy of the text.
Tell students that they will listen to you read the text aloud the first time so that they can get a sense of what the text is about.
Read aloud the entire text without stopping in order for students to get the “gist” of the selection.
As students listen to the text, remind them to think about how it adds to their knowledge of Dollars and Sense.
Ask students for their reaction to the text (leave this very open-ended, the purpose of this conversation is for students to talk
about the text).
Reread for Comprehension
•
•
•
Set the purpose
Explain to students that an author makes several key points in a text (main ideas) and supports those points using reasons and
evidence (key details). In this text, you will determine the key points the author is making regarding what has made Baja
Sonora successful.
Review with students several questioning strategies you use to determine the main ideas in a text. (e.g., What is the author
trying to convey in this section? The next? What is this mostly about? Are there words that repeat? What does the author say
first? What does he say last? What do all of the details seem to be about? Are there headings or subheadings to give me
clues?)
Have students reread the text with a partner, annotating possible reasons for Baja Sonora’s success.
Engage students in a class discussion with the following questions:
What sentence in paragraph 2 illustrated that Baja Sonora was a popular restaurant?
In paragraph 3, what where the effects of the “Best of the West” article in Sunset Magazine?
Reread paragraph 4. It states, “Mike and Mary Lynn set to work transforming an old donut shop into Baja Sonora #2.” What
does transforming mean? What words or phrases in the paragraph help to define the word?
Why did they bring Sean and Nicole Lockridge in as new partners? What were the effects?
Reread paragraph 6. Why did “business boom(ed) yet again”? How was this similar to the previous time Baja Sonora saw a
business increase?
Why was the media so favorable of Baja Sonora?
Reread the last paragraph of the article and underline all of the adjective and adjective phrases used to describe the food.
26
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English Language Arts
•
I can explain how an author uses reasons and
evidence to support particular points in a text or
video. (RI.4.8)
Dollars and Sense
Grade 4
Reread to Gather Evidence/Information and Respond to Text
•
I can gather, take notes and categorize information
from text. (W.4.8)
Introduce the focus question - What reasons does the author of this article give for Baja Sonora’s success? Use evidence from the text to
support these reasons.
•
Have students come up with 2-3 reasons for the success of Baja Sonora and record evidence from the text for each of these
reasons.
•
Record the reasons on the left side of a T-Chart and the evidence on the right side.
•
I can prepare for a collaborative conversation by
reading and studying the required material.
(SL.4.1.a)
Collaborative Discussions
•
Place students in small collaborative groups to discuss their reasons and evidence.
•
Remind students to revise their ideas and or add to their ideas in light of the discussion.
•
I can draw on my preparation and other ideas I have
about the topic to explore ideas under discussion.
(SL.4.1.a)
Written Response to Text
•
Based on the needs of your students provide scaffolds to ensure success.
•
I can draw evidence from informational texts to
support analysis, reflection, and research. (W.4.9)
Add evidence from the text to the “Factors contributing to successful businesses” Tree Map under the appropriate branches.
Learning Targets
•
I can provide reasons that are supported by facts
and details. (W.4.1.b)
•
I can work with my peers and adults to plan my
writing. (W.4.5)
•
I can work with my peers and adults to develop,
revise, and edit my writing. (W.4.5)
•
I can produce complete simple, compound, and
complex sentences. (L.4.1.f)
•
I can recognize and correct sentence fragments and
run-ons. (L.4.1.f)
•
I can correctly punctuate a compound sentence by
placing a comma before the coordinating
conjunction. (L.2.4.c)
•
I can edit for correct capitalization. (L.4.2.a, W.4.5)
LONG BEACH UNIFED SCHOOL DISTRICT
Focus of Instruction: Opinion Writing and Conventions
Modeling with Strategy #3 Clarification Statements Was Ivan a Fool?
Using the process outlined on 165-168, practice writing clarification statements.
Divide the class in half. Assign one half of the class to use the statement Ivan was a fool to write a clarification statement and
examples from the text to show what you mean. Assign the other half to use the statement that Ivan was NOT a fool to write
a clarification statement and examples from the text to show what you mean.
Students may work in pairs and then have students regroup to share their paragraphs.
Students may then partner up with another student that supported the opposing position to share their writing.
Grammar Conventions: Identifying simple, compound, and complex sentences in text
•
Using the text, Baja Sonora, ask students to identify the types of sentences used.
•
Have students work in a small group or with a partner.
•
Assign each small group a section from the text.
•
Have students use the Brace Maps introduced for each sentence type to determine if the sentence is simple, compound, or
complex.
•
Have students classify each sentence by placing it under the appropriate branch on a Tree Map with branches, “simple,”
“compound,” and “complex.”
•
Have students switch partners and explain to another partner why each sentence is simple, compound, or complex.
•
Challenge students to combine two simple sentences and create a complex sentence. (Remind students to use their Tree
Maps with subordinating conjunctions.
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English Language Arts
Dollars and Sense
Elias Sifuentes (OCR) - BAP
Days 18-22
Grade 4
Vocabulary
Theme Connections
See BAP lesson located on the Intranet
This excerpt from All in a Day’s Work: Twelve Americans Talk About their Jobs is an informational text that describes what Elias Sifuentes did to
start and run a successful business. It discusses what motivated him to start the business and explore what he did to make sure his business
remains successful.
Reader and Task Considerations
Students will likely need some context regarding what is an excerpt. Remind students to pay particular attention to Elias Sifuentes. What were
some of his qualities that made his business thrive?
Learning Targets
•
I can integrate information from two texts on
the same topic in order to write or speak
about it knowledgably. (RI.4.9)
Focus of Instruction: Reading and Responding to Text
First Read
•
•
•
•
•
I can read with sufficient accuracy and
fluency to support comprehension. (RF.4.4)
•
Read aloud the entire text without stopping in order for students to get the “gist” of the selection or have students read the text
independently first.
Remind students to think about how this text adds to their knowledge about factors necessary to starting and running a successful
business.
Ask students for their reaction to the text (leave this very open-ended, the purpose of this conversation is for students to talk about the
text)
I can refer to details and evidence in a text
when explaining what the text means.
(RI.4.1)
Reread for Comprehension
I can explain how an author uses reasons and
evidence to support particular points in a text
or video. (RI.4.8)
Reread to Gather Evidence/Information and Respond to Text
•
I can gather, take notes and categorize
information from text. (W.4.8)
•
I can prepare for a collaborative conversation
by reading and studying the required
material. (SL.4.1.a)
•
I can draw on my preparation and other
ideas I have about the topic to explore ideas
under discussion. (SL.4.1.a)
•
I can follow agreed-upon rules for discussions
and carry out assigned roles during a
LONG BEACH UNIFED SCHOOL DISTRICT
•
Follow BAP lesson on Intranet for a full list of text-dependent questions, vocabulary, and tasks.
Introduce the focus question (Culminating Writing Task) - Before starting his restaurant, Elias Sifuentes was frustrated with his job as a punch
press operator for General Electric. Then he and his partner started their own restaurant. How did his life change when he stopped working for
General Electric and started working for himself? Use evidence from the text to support your answer.
•
Analyze the task with students.
•
Ask students what evidence they will need to gather in order to support a response to the prompt. Encourage them to create an evidence
chart or provide one for them.
•
Depending on the needs of your students, provide additional scaffolds and modeling.
Collaborative Discussion
•
Place students in small collaborative groups to discuss responses to the focus question using the evidence they have gathered.
•
Based on previous discussions and students’ needs, select a learning target and provide direct instruction.
•
Monitor students’ discussions for the learning target selected.
•
Bring students back as a whole group and discuss how their understanding changed or deepened in light of the conversation.
28
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English Language Arts
collaborative conversation. (SL.4.1.b)
•
I can make comments that contribute to the
discussion during a collaborative
conversation. (SL.4.1.c)
•
I can pose and respond to specific questions
during a collaborative conversation.
(SL.4.1.c)
•
I can gain new understandings as a result of
having a collaborative conversation.
(SL.4.1d)
•
I can draw evidence from informational texts
to support analysis, reflection, and research.
(W.4.9)
Learning Targets
•
I can work with my peers and adults to plan
my writing. (W.4.5)
•
I can work with my peers and adults to
develop, revise, and edit my writing. (W.4.5)
•
I can produce complete simple, compound,
and complex sentences. (L.4.1.f)
•
I can recognize and correct sentence
fragments and run-ons. (L.4.1.f)
•
I can correctly punctuate a compound
sentence by placing a comma before the
coordinating conjunction. (L.2.4.c)
•
I can edit for correct capitalization. (L.4.2.a,
W.4.5)
LONG BEACH UNIFED SCHOOL DISTRICT
Dollars and Sense
Grade 4
Written Response to Text
•
Have students write a response to the focus question.
•
Based on the needs of your students provide direct instruction, modeling, and or scaffolds.
Elias was able to talk
to others throughout
the day.
Elias
Started
his own
business
He no longer received
a paycheck.
He works harder,
longer days, because
his employees and
customers rely on him
Focus of Instruction: Opinion Writing and Conventions
Opinion Writing
•
Based on the needs of your students, continue modeling and introducing strategies.
•
Once strategies have been introduced, have students return to previous drafts and revise for the strategies.
Grammar Conventions: Revision Strategy
•
Explain to students that different types and lengths of sentences add interest to a piece of writing.
•
Have students look at a previously written opinion piece and examine the types of sentences they used.
•
If they used all of the same sentence types, have them revise one or more sentences to a different type to add variety.
•
Remind students of the ways to create compound and complex sentences.
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English Language Arts
Approx. #
Days
Resources
OCR Unit 2:
p.131 A-D
3-5
3-5
Dollars and Sense
Research and Inquiry
OCR Unit 2:
p.143 A-D
3-5
OCR Unit 2:
p.153 A-D
3-5
OCR Unit 2:
p.171 A-D
3-5
OCR Unit 2:
p.187 A-D
3-5
OCR Unit 2:
205 A-D
Grade 4
Inquiry Process
Guided Activity Options
Generating Questions to Investigate
•
Explain to students that a good investigation problem or question will require them to consult
multiple sources and add to the group’s knowledge of business
•
Teach the difference between choosing a topic and a problem.
•
Explain that choosing a specific part of a topic and asking a question about it will help them
narrow their focus and search for information more easily
•
Model creating a problem from a topic
You may find that students may all want to create their own business. The following are suggestions
that you may choose to do with your class:
Ask students to create their own business.
Plan a culminating class activity for all students to sell their goods to the class or classmates.
Determine what students will do with their profits. Research local non-profits during your
computer lab time and suggest supporting a cause.
Choosing an Investigation Group
Remind students that the primary purpose of this investigation is to build on the entire groups’
knowledge about business
Allow the students time to get into groups based on common interests
Discuss why they need to utilize multiple resources
Reteach what a conjecture is and have students make conjectures about their proposed topics
(Inquiry Journal p. 39)
Allocating Tasks
Refer to page 153C in Teacher’s Edition to see a bulleted list of how to get students moving
forward in the process
•
•
Skills
Project Planning Sheet
Generate a list of problems related to
business that they might like to investigate.
Have students form groups to formulate
conjectures on the following questions:
When starting a business, do you take
risks?
What motivates people to start their
own businesses?
Have students determine how their inquiry
and investigation projects connect to the
unit theme Dollars and Sense.
Using Encyclopedias
and Other Media
Discuss the steps suggested in “Starting a
Business”. Have students determine what
steps to take in order to create their
business.
Have students determine a learning target
for their presentation and identify a proving
behavior for their classmates.
Research
(Computer Lab)
Think about the problems Elias Sifuentes
came across and analyze how he solved
those problems.
Connect any people they have read about to
anyone in their community
Interviewing
Continuing the Investigation
Students should review what they have found in their investigation
Check in with groups that are succeeding in the process as a model of how they are finding
success for the ones who are struggling
Clarify the kind of information they are looking for to support meaningful searches
Organizing and Preparing Investigation Findings
Encourage students to begin thinking of engaging ways to present their information
Tell students to begin gathering the materials they will need to create the presentation
Teach students tips for being a good presenter (for ideas p. 201 C)
Reach out to a business owner in the city –
use interviewing skills or invite them into the
classroom
Plan culminating class activity.
Inquiry and
Investigation Group
Reflections
Discuss the quote “You have to spend
money to get money.”
List the steps Renaldo and Jinx took to start
their business
Presenting Investigation Findings
Teach students what good listeners do and link to SL.4.1c and page 205 C for support in instilling
the proper behaviors
Discuss the quote “Don’t count your
chickens before they hatch”
Summarizing/
Organizing
Information
Asking Additional
Questions
Organizing
Information into
Charts
LONG BEACH UNIFED SCHOOL DISTRICT
30
•
•
Parts of a Book
Local Non-Profit
Groups
2014-2015
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