Unit Goals – Stage 1 English Language Arts Cooperation and Competition

Unit Goals – Stage 1  English Language Arts Cooperation and Competition
English Language Arts
Cooperation and Competition
Grade 5
Unit Goals – Stage 1
Unit Description Students will learn about cooperation and competition, how they are part of our daily lives, and how they help us reach our goals. Students will read and discuss several pieces of realistic fiction and
explore how authors use narrative techniques to develop experiences with descriptive details and clear event sequences. Students will craft a realistic fiction story related to the unit theme.
Approximate Duration-5 weeks
CCR Anchor Standards
Transfer Goals: SBAC Claims
R.CCR.2 Determine central ideas or themes of a text and
Students will be increasingly able to independently use their learning to…
analyze their development: summarize the key supporting
Read closely and analytically to comprehend a range of increasingly complex literary and informational text. (Claim 1)
details and ideas.
Produce effective and well-grounded writing for a range of purposes and audiences. (Claim 2)
R.CCR.4 Interpret words and phrases as they are used in a
Employ effective speaking and listening skills for a range of purposes and audiences. (Claim 3)
text, including determining technical, connotative, and
Engage in research and inquiry to investigate topics, and to analyze, integrate, and present information. (Claim 4)
figurative meanings, and analyze how specific word choices
Making Meaning
shape meaning or tone.
UNDERSTANDINGS
ESSENTIAL QUESTIONS
R.CCR.5 Analyze the structure of texts, including how
Students
will
understand
that…
Students will keep considering…
specific sentences, paragraphs, and larger portions of the
•
Specific
situations
call
for
cooperation,
competition
or
both.
1. How do you get what you want?
text (e.g., a section, chapter, scene, or stanza) relate to each
•
Authors
and
writers
make
specific
word
choices
to
shape
the
overall
2. Why did the author use this word or phrase?
other and the whole.
meaning and tone of a text.
3. How do authors build ideas?
R.CCR.6 Assess how point of view or purpose shapes the
•
Authors
use
devices
such
as
transitions,
organizational
patterns,
and
4. Who is telling the story and why is that important to know?
content and style of a text.
strategies
to
emphasize
certain
ideas,
events,
concepts,
and
information
5. How should a scholar act during discussions?
W.CCR.3 Write narratives to develop real or imagined
to
build
meaning.
6. How do I write a story with a message?
experiences or events using effective technique, well•
A
narrator’s
point
of
view
affects
or
influences
how
events
in
a
story
are
7. How do I figure out what a word or phrase means?
chosen details, and well-structured event sequences.
described.
W.CCR.4 Produce clear and coherent writing in which the
•
Collegial conversations with others help to build and clarify ideas.
development, organization, and style are appropriate to
•
Writers convey experiences in a fictional narrative using sensory details,
task, purpose, and audience.
dialogue, choosing words with care, and arranging events into authentic
W.CCR.5 Develop and strengthen writing as needed by
sequences that unfold naturally.
planning, revising, editing, rewriting, or trying a new
•
Conveying a message through fictional writing takes careful planning
approach.
and organization as well as considering the audience and purpose.
SL.CCR.1 Prepare for and participate effectively in a range of
•
A command of English Language conventions and grammar brings clarity
conversations and collaborations with diverse partners,
and sophistication to writing.
building on others’ ideas and expressing their own clearly
Acquisition
and persuasively.
KNOWLEDGE
SKILLS
L.CCR.1 Demonstrate command of the conventions of
standard English grammar and usage when writing or
Students will know…
Students will be skilled at (Do)
speaking.
•
Elements of realistic fiction (characters, setting, problem, plot or event
•
Reading closely to understand the surface details and the deeper
L.CCR.2 Demonstrate command of the conventions of
sequence, rising action, and solution)
meanings within a text.
standard English capitalization, punctuation, and spelling
•
Types of figurative language
•
Determining a theme from a story from the details in a text.
when writing.
•
The narrator (first or third person) refers to who is telling the story
•
Analyzing the meaning of phrases and specific words and how it
L.CCR.3 Apply knowledge of language to understand how
•
Point of view is the way an author allows you to “see” and “hear” what’s
contributes to the tone of the text.
language functions in different contexts, to make effective
going on in literature
•
Analyzing text structure and story elements.
•
Structures and techniques used by writers to tell a story including
•
Describing how the narrator’s point of view influences how events are
choices for meaning or style, and to comprehend more fully
when reading or listening.
descriptive details, pacing, clear event sequences, dialogue, and
described.
L.CCR.4 Determine or clarify the meaning of unknown and
transitional words phrases
•
Listening to classmates perspectives and elaborating or evaluating the
multiple-meaning words and phrases.
•
Sentence frames and linguistic patterns to build on the ideas of others.
perspective based on gathered evidence.
Note: Standards introduced in the Heritage Unit will
•
Coordinating, correlative, and subordinating conjunctions
•
Planning, organizing, and developing a realistic fiction story with a
continue to be spiraled throughout lessons.
•
Simple, compound, and complex sentences
competitive or cooperative theme.
LONG BEACH UNIFED SCHOOL DISTRICT
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English Language Arts
Cooperation and Competition
Grade 5
Grade Level Standards– Stage 1
Reading
Writing
Speaking and Listening
Language
Literature
RL.5.2 Determine a theme of a story,
drama, or poem from details in the text,
including how characters in a story or
drama respond to challenges or how the
speaker in a poem reflects upon a topic;
summarize the text.
Text Type
W.5.3 Write narratives to develop real or imagined experiences
or events using effective technique, descriptive details, and clear
event sequences.
a. Orient the reader by establishing a situation and introducing
a narrator and/or characters; organize an event sequence
that unfolds naturally.
b. Use narrative techniques, such as dialogue, description, and
pacing, to develop experiences and events or show the
responses of characters to situations.
c. Use a variety of transitional phrases and clauses to manage
the sequence of events.
d. Use concrete words and phrases and sensory details to
convey experiences and events precisely.
e. Provide a conclusion that follows from the narrated
experiences or events.
Comprehension and Collaboration
SL.5.1 Engage effectively in a range
of collaborative discussions (oneon one, in groups, and teacher-led)
with diverse partners on grade 5
topics and texts, building on
others’ ideas and expressing their
own clearly.
a.
Come to discussions prepared
having read or studied
required material; explicitly
draw on that preparation and
other information known
about the topic to explore
ideas under discussion.
b. Follow agreed-upon rules for
discussions and carry out
assigned roles.
c.
Pose and respond to specific
questions by making
comments that contribute to
the discussion and elaborate
on the remarks of others.
d. Review the key ideas
expressed and draw
conclusions in light of
information and knowledge
gained from the discussions.
Conventions
L.5.1 Demonstrate command of the
conventions of standard English grammar
and usage when writing or speaking.
L.5.1.a Explain the function of conjunctions,
prepositions, and interjections in general and
their function in particular sentences.
L.5.1.e Use correlative conjunctions
(either/or, neither/nor)
RL.5.4 Determine the meaning of words
and phrases as they are used in a text,
including figurative language such as
metaphors and similes.
RL.5.5 Explain how a series of chapters,
scenes, or stanzas fit together to provide
the overall structure of a particular story,
drama, or poem.
R.CCR.6 Describe how a narrator’s or
speaker’s point of view influences how
events are described.
Foundational
RF.4.3 Know and apply grade-level
phonics and word analysis skills in
decoding words.
RF.4.4 Read with sufficient accuracy and
fluency to support comprehension.
LONG BEACH UNIFED SCHOOL DISTRICT
Production and Distribution of Writing
W.5.4 Produce clear and coherent writing in which the
development and organization are appropriate to task, purpose,
and audience.
W.5.5 With guidance and support from peers and adults, develop
and strengthen writing as needed by planning, revising, editing.
Research to Build and Present Knowledge
W.5.8 Recall relevant information from experiences or gather
relevant information from print and digital sources; summarize or
paraphrase information in notes and finished work, and provide a
list of sources.
W.5.9 Draw evidence from literary or informational texts to
support analysis, reflection, and research.
a.
Apply grade 5 Reading standards to literature.
b. Apply grade 5 Reading standards to informational texts.
2
L.5.2 Demonstrate command of the
conventions of standard English
capitalization, punctuation, and spelling
when writing.
L.5.2.b Use a comma to separate an
introductory element from the rest of the
sentence.
L.5.3 Use knowledge of language and its
conventions when writing, speaking, reading,
or listening.
L.5.3.a Expand, combine, and reduce
sentences for meaning, reader/listener
interest and style
Vocabulary Acquisition and Use
L.5.4 Determine or clarify the meaning of
unknown and multiple-meaning words and
phrases.
2014-15
English Language Arts
Cooperation and Competition
Grade 5
Evidence of Learning – Stage 2
Evaluative Criteria (LBUSD Achievement Report Evidence)
End of Unit Assessment Evidence
See Teacher Annotated Guide located on Intranet
• Uses textual evidence to explain what the text says explicitly and when drawing
inferences
• Determines and summarizes central ideas and key details
• Determines word meanings and phrases in context
• Describes text structures and features of text
• Engages in collaborative conversations (See Collaborative Discussion Rubric).
• Organizes and maintains focus to support purpose.
• Uses appropriate details (textual evidence) and precise language to develop a
written response
• Applies grade level appropriate conventions
See CCSS-Aligned Narrative Writing Rubric
End of Unit On-Demand Reading and Responding to Text (Located on the Intranet)
Over the course of three days, students will read a piece of literature, answer several
text-dependent questions and work in collaborative groups to gather evidence that they
will use to write an analysis of the text in response to a prompt.
•
Organizes and maintains focus to support the sequential structure of a fictional
narrative with a problem and solution
•
Uses appropriate details and precise language to develop characters and
experiences
•
•
•
•
Conveys a message related to the theme of cooperation and competition
Realistic Fiction Writing Task – Cooperation/Competition Story
During the last week of the unit, students will work through the writing process to plan,
organize, draft, revise, and publish a realistic fiction story. The story will be organized
around a problem/solution and will convey a message relevant to the theme of
cooperation and competition.
Applies grade level appropriate conventions including varied sentence structure
Plans, speaks, and presents information/ideas connected to the unit theme
Listens and interprets information and ideas presented by others
Inquiry/Research Task and Presentation
Students will conduct a unit investigation that will be student-driven and emerge from
their interests, and encouraged or ignited by reading and class discussions. Students may
work individually or in small groups. (Refer to page 19A in Unit 1 for inquiry ideas.)
Evaluative Criteria (LBUSD Achievement Report Evidence)
Other Evidence – may be used formatively
•
BAP Culminating Writing Tasks
Short Constructed Responses to Focus Questions
Uses textual evidence to explain what the text says explicitly and when drawing
inferences
•
•
•
•
Determines and summarizes central ideas and key details
Determines word meanings and phrases in text
Describes text structures and features of texts
Integrates information from related texts
See Collaborative Discussion Rubric
See CCSS Aligned Fluency Rubric
Collaborative Discussions around Focus Questions
Grade Level Fluency Passages
LONG BEACH UNIFED SCHOOL DISTRICT
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English Language Arts
Cooperation and Competition
Grade 5
Learning Plan – Stage 3
Instructional Sequence Overview
Days
Reading and Responding to Text
Narrative Writing
Language Conventions
1-5
The Marble Champ (OCR) BAP
Initial Assessment of a realistic fiction survival story
Create a realistic fiction writing folder
Analyze The Marble Champ for story elements, story
structure, and evaluative criteria of realistic fiction
6-10
The Abacus Contest (OCR)
Analyze The Abacus Contest for story elements, story
structure, and evaluative criteria of realistic fiction
Creating compound sentences with
coordinating conjunctions
11-15
Class President (OCR) BAP
Analyze Class President for story elements, story
structure, and evaluative criteria of realistic fiction
Creating complex sentences with
subordinating conjunctions
16-18
Babe Didrikson (OCR Unit Opener)
Begin modeling a realistic fiction
cooperation/competition story (guided)
Identifying simple, compound, and
complex sentences
19-20
The New Kid (OCR Poetry)
Continue modeling a realistic fiction
cooperation/competition story (guided)
Revision Strategy: Varying sentence
structure
21-22
Two Raindrops (Poem, included in unit)
Plan, draft, revise, and edit a realistic fiction
cooperation/competition story (independent)
Editing Strategy: Sentence problems
23- 25
On-Demand Reading and Responding to Text
Realistic Fiction – Competition/Cooperation Theme
Students publish and share a realistic fiction cooperation/competition story with a message.
Other
available
resources to
support and
enhance
instruction
•
•
Write from the Beginning and Beyond Response to
Literature Manual
Open Court Leveled Library
Write from the Beginning and Beyond Setting the Stage
Manual
Write from the Beginning and Beyond Narrative Manual
Creating simple sentences with
compound subjects and predicates
•
Language Arts Handbook
*See last page of unit for an overview of research and inquiry and suggested lesson sequence.
LONG BEACH UNIFED SCHOOL DISTRICT
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English Language Arts
Cooperation and Competition
BAP LESSON: The Marble Champ
Grade 5
Days 1-5
Vocabulary
Theme Connections
See BAP lesson for a full list of vocabulary
words included in this lesson.
In this realistic fiction story, Lupe, who is not known for her athletic abilities, decides to enter a marble championship to prove she can be the best
marble player. Throughout the story we learn that through determination and hard work, you can become the best at something. Lupe also shows us
that it is important to be a good sport and show others respect when competing against them.
Reader and Task Considerations
In order to answer some of the questions in the BAP lesson, students will need to understand figurative language such as simile, metaphor, and
symbolism.
Learning Targets
I can read with accuracy and fluency
to support comprehension. (RF.5.4)
Focus of Instruction: Reading and Responding to Text
First Read
•
•
•
•
•
Tell students that following along to a text while they hear you read it aloud will improve their fluency.
Tell students that they will listen to you read the text aloud the first time so that they can get a sense of what the text is about.
Read aloud the entire text without stopping in order for students to get the “gist” of the selection.
Ask students for their reaction to the text (leave this very open-ended, the purpose of this conversation is for students to talk about the text).
You may want to have them discuss the essential question, “How do people get what they want?” as it relates to this text.
Refer to the REVISED BAP lesson for
possible learning targets.
Reread for Comprehension
•
Reread to Gather Evidence/Information and Respond to Text
•
I can determine how characters in a
story respond to challenges. (RL.5.2)
I can gather relevant information
from a text and summarize or
paraphrase the information in notes.
(W.5.8)
Choose from the following:
•
I can come to a discussion prepared
to share my ideas and use my
preparation and other information
to explore ideas under discussion..
(SL.5.1a)
•
I can follow agreed-upon rules for
discussions and carry out assigned
roles. (SL.5.1b)
•
I can pose and respond to specific
questions by making comments that
contribute to the discussion.(SL.5.1c)
LONG BEACH UNIFED SCHOOL DISTRICT
•
Follow the REVISED BAP lesson located on the Intranet for a full list of text-dependent questions, vocabulary, and tasks.
Introduce the Focus Question (Culminating Task): How does Lupe
respond to the challenges she faces as she works toward winning the
marble championship? What can the reader learn from this?
•
Analyze the task with students.
•
Ask students what evidence they will need to gather in order to
support a response to the prompt. Encourage them to create an
evidence chart or provide one for them.
•
Depending on the needs of your students, provide additional
scaffolds and modeling.
Collaborative Discussion
•
Place students in small collaborative groups to discuss responses
to the focus question using the evidence they have gathered.
•
Based on previous discussions and students’ needs, select a
learning target and provide direct instruction.
•
Monitor students’ discussions for the learning target selected.
•
Bring students back as a whole group and discuss how their
understanding changed or deepened in light of the conversation.
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English Language Arts
•
•
•
I can elaborate on the remarks of
others. (SL.5.1c)
I can review the key ideas expressed
and draw conclusions in light of
information and knowledge gained
from the discussions. (SL.5.1d)
Cooperation and Competition
Grade 5
Written Response to Text
•
Have students write a response to the focus question.
•
Based on the needs of your students provide direct instruction, modeling, and or scaffolds.
I can use evidence from a story or
poem to support an analysis,
reflection, or research. (W.5.9)
Learning Targets
Focus of Instruction: Narrative Writing and Conventions
Writing Text Type Pre-Assessment: Realistic Fiction (Day 1)
•
•
I can write narratives to develop an
imagined experience using effective
technique, descriptive details, and
clear event sequences. (W.5.3)
•
•
•
•
Explain to students that in this unit they will learn how to write a realistic fiction story with a message related to the theme of cooperation and
competition. They will be reading several stories to examine how real authors write stories with a message and eventually they will develop their
own stories.
Initial Assessment: With minimal instruction and prompting, provide students with a realistic fiction competition/cooperation scenario. For
example: Write a story about a group of students who work together to help out a classmate in need.
Scan the student essays to determine whether or not students have the basics of a problem/solution story using the Third Grade Imaginative
Narrative Rubric on page 344 of the Narrative manual. Look for an opening that orients the reader to the characters, setting, and problem; a
realistic and logical plot sequence that develops the experiences of the characters; and a concluding section that brings about a resolution.
Take anecdotal notes on gaps to use for future mini-lessons.
Prepare for the unit by having students create a Realistic Fiction writing folder to keep working drafts, notes from mini-lessons, and resources (i.e.
transitional word lists, proficient essays, a model of the basic
structure, student checklists, etc…).
Analyzing The Marble Champ (Days 2-5)
•
I can describe how an author builds
a story. (RL.5.5)
•
I can describe how the beginning of
LONG BEACH UNIFED SCHOOL DISTRICT
Analyze for story elements
Explain to students that there are certain elements common
to stories including characters, setting, problem, goal,
plot/event sequence, solution, and a message, lesson or
moral.
As a class, analyze the story elements of The Marble Champ
using a Tree Map with the following labels/branches:
Characters, setting, problem, goal, events/plot, and solution.
Discuss the types of characters, settings, and problems you
would see in a realistic fiction story.
For the Frame of reference, determine as a class possible
messages of the story. Examples could be “competing
requires commitment and practice,” or “it is important to understand one’s strengths and weaknesses when competing,”
Keep an ongoing list of these messages, as students will be able to pull from them when they write their own stories.
Ask students to discuss how the story elements support the message(s) of the story.
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English Language Arts
a story sets up what happens in the
rest of the story. (RL.5.5)
•
I can describe how an author orients
the reader to a situation and the
characters in a story. (W.5.3a)
•
I can identify how an author
organizes an event sequence that
unfolds naturally. (W.5.3a)
•
I can describe how an author
provides a conclusion that follows
from the narrated experiences or
events. (W.5.3e)
Cooperation and Competition
•
•
•
LONG BEACH UNIFED SCHOOL DISTRICT
Grade 5
Analyze for story structure
Explain to students that you will now be looking at the Marble Champ
through the eyes of a writer.
“Reverse Map” The Marble Champ into its opening, event sequence, and
closing, analyzing how the author builds the story.
Explain to students that an author gives background into the character and
the setting in the opening of the story.
Have students reread the first part of the story to see if they can determine
where the opening ends and the event sequence begins. (The event
sequence begins on page 37 with “I’ll never be good at sports.”
Explain to students that an author moves the story along by changing the
setting (where and when) events happen.
Have students reread the story looking for shifts in setting. Have students
stop each time the setting or time changes and record the event on a Flow
Map.
Proceed through the story based on the needs of your students, recording
the main events on a Flow Map.
Explain to students that once the event sequence is completed, the author
writes a closing.
Have students reread the last page to determine where the event sequence
ends and the closing begins.
Have students analyze for how the author ends the story.
Analyze for evaluative criteria - Using the Grade 4/5 Fictional Narrative Rubric
criteria, have students analyze the opening of The Marble Champ.(WftB &B
Narrative Manual p. 209)
Explain to students that an author orients the reader by establishing the
situation.
Have students reread the first page of The Marble Champ on page 36 and ask
students to analyze for what the author is describing in each
sentence/paragraph.
In the first paragraph the author is helping the reader understand what Lupe
is good at and what kind of person she is. He provides several examples to support the description.
The second paragraph starts with “But…” giving the reader a clue that the author is now going to explain something different.
The third paragraph starts with a statement that Lupe was no good at sports and then provides several examples of this.
The fourth paragraph continues to support the idea that Lupe is not athletic.
Have students brainstorm some possible character descriptions and practice writing a paragraph with examples to support a particular
description.
Analyze for evaluative criteria – Using the Grade 4/5 Fictional Narrative Rubric criteria, have students analyze how the author used suspense and
tension in the part of the story when Lupe was playing against Miss Baseball Cap. (WftB &B Narrative Manual p. 349)
Explain to students that one technique an author uses is to incorporate suspense or tension in a story.
Explain that suspense is excitement and uncertainty as to the outcome and tension is a mental state of opposition.
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English Language Arts
Cooperation and Competition
Grade 5
Have students turn to the section of the story beginning on page 42 and reread the part where Lupe is playing against Ms. Baseball Cap.
Ask students how the author creates uncertainty about the outcome (suspense) and a mental state of opposition (tension) in this portion of
the text. (He slows down the description of what is happening and provides back and forth replay of the events in great detail.) Explain to
students that this is one way to create tension or suspense in a story.
Have students brainstorm possible “events” and practice describing the event using suspense or tension. Examples: baseball game in the last
inning or any other sport, a student taking a test, walking into a new school/classroom, etc.
•
•
I can explain the function of a
coordinating conjunction and how it
is used in particular sentence.
(L.5.1.c)
I can identify and create simple
sentences with compound subjects
and or compound predicates using
the coordinating conjunction, “and.”
(L.5.1.c)
•
LONG BEACH UNIFED SCHOOL DISTRICT
Grammar Conventions: Coordinating conjunction “and” in simple sentences
Work with this concept over the course of days 1-5 providing students with multiple opportunities to work with it.
•
Review that a simple sentence has one complete thought made up of one subject and one predicate (Language Arts Handbook p. 358).
•
Display the following simple sentences: Maya walked to the park. Alicia walked to the park. Maya and Alicia flew their kites.
•
Ask students to identify the subjects and predicates in each of the sentences. They could underline subjects in one color and the predicates in
another color.
•
Ask them what they notice about the subjects and verbs in the predicates. (They repeat in the sentences making them sound repetitive.)
•
Explain that writers can combine ideas into a longer sentence to make it sound better.
•
The first two sentences can be combined to say, “Maya and Alicia walked to the park.”
•
This sentence can now be combined with the last sentence to say, “Maya and Alicia walked to the park and flew their kites.”
•
Provide students with the following simple sentences: “The cat drank from the water bowl. The dog drank from the water bowl. The cat and dog
ate cake off the counter.”
•
Have students identify the subjects and verbs that repeat and then combine the ideas into one sentence. (The cat and dog drank from the water
bowl and ate cake off the counter.)
•
Introduce students to the concept of coordinating
conjunctions by explaining to students that coordinating
conjunctions connect parts of a sentence.
•
Explain to students that the coordinating conjunction,
“and” can be used to create a compound subject and a
compound predicate.
•
Display the Tree Map with the following examples to
help students understand this concept.
•
Provide students with the following simple sentences:
“The chairs were stacked against the wall. The books
were stacked against the wall. The chairs and books
were waiting to be picked up by the teacher.”
•
Have students create the combination of sentences
used in the Tree Map to illustrate each type of sentence.
The chairs were stacked against the wall
The chairs and books were stacked against the wall.
The chairs were stacked against the wall and waiting to be picked up by the teacher.
The chairs and books were stacked against the wall and waiting to be picked up by the teacher.
•
Remind students that these are all simple sentences even the long ones because they express one complete thought.
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English Language Arts
Cooperation and Competition
Grade 5
The Abacus Contest
Days 6-10
Vocabulary
Theme Connections
abacus, aroma, drills, incense, alter,
honored, burlap, exchanging, frantically,
collided, slumped, motioned, carefree,
accuracy
This text is about a very competitive girl participating in her school’s Abacus Contest. The actions of the main character and those around her highlight
the differences between competitive and non-competitive people in how they get what they want.
Reader and Task Considerations
Prior to reading the text, explain to the students that an abacus is a device used for calculating equations. It is usually made of beads strung on wires. It
is sometimes used in Asian countries like Taiwan, China, and Japan to add and subtract.
Learning Targets
•
I can read with accuracy and fluency
to support comprehension. (RF.5.4)
Focus of Instruction: Reading and Responding to Text
First Read
•
•
•
•
I can determine how characters in a
story respond to challenges. (RL.5.2)
•
I can identify who is telling the story.
(RL.5.6)
•
I can determine the narrator’s point
of view. (RL.5.6)
•
I can describe how the narrator’s
point of view influences how events
are described in the text. (RL.5.6)
LONG BEACH UNIFED SCHOOL DISTRICT
Tell students that they will listen to you read the text aloud the first time so that they can get a sense of what the text is about.
Read aloud the entire text without stopping in order for students to get the “gist” of the selection. Based on the needs and abilities of your
students you may opt to have the students read it silently the first time through.
Ask students for their reaction to the text (leave this very open-ended, the purpose of this conversation is for students to talk about the text).
You may want to pose the essential question, “How do people get what they want?” and ask students to discuss this as it relates to the story.
Reread for Comprehension
Review the concept of character analysis. Review that readers pay attention to a character’s thoughts, words, feelings, and actions to help them
understand their personality and behavior.
Tell students that conflict is a struggle or challenge a main character has during a story. Most stories focus on a conflict/struggle and its outcome. If
it is an external conflict, a character struggles with an outside force, like a person or nature. If it is internal conflict, the struggle is something inside
him or her like choices or how to behave. Paying attention to how the character responds to the conflict can give the reader insight into the
character.
Reread the text with students and engage the class in a discussionwith the following text dependent questions:
Who is telling the story?
What is the narrator’s point of view of Gao Mai? (What does he/she think about her?) What makes you say that? How does this point of view
influence how the events are described in the story?
What is the narrator’s point of view of Li Zhi? (What does he/she think about her?) What makes you say that? How does this point of view
influence how the events are described in the story?
What are some examples of conflicts faced by the characters and were they internal or external?
What does Gao Mai’s dream help you understand how she feels about the contest?
What did Gao Mai do to ensure she would be the best in the competition? What does this tell us about her?
How do Gao Mai’s parents add pressure to her already high expectation of herself?
How are Gao Mai and Li Zhi’s attitudes different before the contest? After?
Why did Gao Mai say she wished she were more like Li Zhi?
In what way is Gao Mai’s attitude toward the abacus competition similar/different to Lupe’s in the “Marble Champ”?
9
2014-15
English Language Arts
I can gather relevant information
from a text and summarize or
paraphrase the information in notes.
(W.5.8)
I can use evidence from a story or
poem to support an analysis,
reflection, or research. (W.5.9)
Choose from the following:
•
I can come to a discussion prepared
to share my ideas and use my
preparation and other information
to explore ideas under discussion..
(SL.5.1a)
•
I can follow agreed-upon rules for
discussions and carry out assigned
roles. (SL.5.1b)
•
I can pose and respond to specific
questions by making comments that
contribute to the discussion.(SL.5.1c)
•
I can elaborate on the remarks of
others. (SL.5.1c)
•
I can review the key ideas expressed
and draw conclusions in light of
information and knowledge gained
from the discussions. (SL.5.1d)
LONG BEACH UNIFED SCHOOL DISTRICT
Cooperation and Competition
Grade 5
Reread to Gather Evidence/Information and Respond to Text
Introduce the focus question for collaborative discussion and written response to text: What conflicts does the main character, Gao Mai face in the
Abacus Contest? How does she respond to these conflicts and what does this reveal about her character? Use evidence from the text to support
your answer.
•
Analyze the task with students.
•
Ask students what evidence they will need to gather in order to support a response to the prompt. Students will need to identify the conflicts
Gao Mai faces in the Abacus Contest. (Possible conflicts include Gao Mai’s anxiety over the contest, her strong desire to beat her best friend,
the pressure she feels from her family, and feeling that she lost again.) Students will then need to look for evidence to support how she
responds to these conflicts and what those responses tell us about her character.
•
For each conflict, have students create a Multi Flow Map with the conflict in the middle, causes of the conflict, and how she responds to the
conflict on the “effects” side. For the Frame of Reference write down what this tells us about the narrator’s point of view.
Collaborative Discussion
•
Place students in small collaborative groups to discuss responses to the focus question using the evidence they have gathered.
•
Based on previous discussions and students’ needs, select a learning target and provide direct instruction.
•
Example: Learning Target “I can pose and respond to specific questions by making comments that contribute to the discussion.”
•
Work with students to ensure that they understand what this target means and what it should sound like.
•
Explain to students as they work in their groups, you will be listening specifically for students that pose and respond to specific questions by
making comments that contribute to the discussion.
•
You may want to assign an “observer” to each group to track the questions that are asked and how they link to the comments being made by
each other.
•
Monitor students’ discussions for the learning target selected.
•
Bring students back as a whole group and discuss how they did with the learning target. Have the “observers” share their comments.
•
Briefly discuss the focus question as a whole group in preparation for their written response.
Writing to Text
•
Have students write a response to the focus question.
•
Based on the needs of your students provide direct instruction, modeling, and or scaffolds.
10
2014-15
English Language Arts
Learning Targets
I can describe how an author builds
a story. (RL.5.5)
•
I can describe how the beginning of
a story sets up what happens in the
rest of the story. (RL.5.5)
•
I can describe how an author orients
the reader to a situation and the
characters in a story. (W.5.3a)
•
I can identify how an author
organizes an event sequence that
unfolds naturally. (W.5.3a)
•
I can describe how an author
provides a conclusion that follows
from the narrated experiences or
events. (W.5.3e)
•
I can identify a variety of transitional
words, phrases, and clauses used by
an author to manage the sequence
of events. (W.5.3c)
•
I can identify narrative techniques
such as dialogue, description, and
pacing, used by an author to bring
characters alive. (W.5.3b)
Cooperation and Competition
Focus of Instruction: Narrative Writing and Conventions
Analyzing a realistic fiction
•
•
•
LONG BEACH UNIFED SCHOOL DISTRICT
Grade 5
Analyze for story elements
Remind students that there are certain elements common to stories including characters, setting, problem, goal, plot/event sequence,
solution, and a message, lesson or moral.
As a class, analyze the story elements of The Abacus Contst using a Tree Map with the following labels/branches: Characters, setting,
problem, goal, events/plot, and solution.
Discuss the types of characters, settings, and problems you would see in a realistic fiction story. How are all of the story elements realistic in
The Abacus Contest?
For the Frame of reference, determine as a class possible messages of the story. Examples could be “Competition sometimes causes feelings
of anxiety,” “Competition can be a stimulating challenge,” “Competitions affect individuals differently.” Add these to the list of ongoing
lessons or messages for realistic fiction stories with the theme of cooperation or competition.
Analyze for story structure
“Reverse Map” The Abacus Contest into its opening, event sequence, and
closing, analyzing how the author builds the story.
See sample right:
One way to help students see the event sequence is to Flow Map the main
events of the story. Model for students how to skim the story again looking
for the event sequence. Tell students to pay attention to when the time or
the setting changes, this often indicates a new event. Refer to the sample
for a guide.
Explain to students that authors carefully craft their stories with a specific
message or lesson in mind. They plan details throughout the story to help
the reader come to that message or lesson.
Once you have created the Flow Map, provide students with the message
“Competitions affect individuals differently.” Tell students that the author
wanted the reader to come to this realization as the story develops. Have
students return to the text and find examples of how individuals were
affected differently by the same competition. Students should see that as
the author built the event sequence; he included detailed descriptions of
how the competition affected Gao Mai and Li Zhi differently.
Analyze for evaluative criteria – Using the Grade 4/5 Fictional Narrative Rubric
criteria, have students analyze and find examples of direct and indirect
intermittent reflections. (Refer to Wft&b Narrative Manual pages, 189-192 and
Bats lesson from Unit 1)
Remind students that intermittent reflections show the feelings of the
character concerning the events being described.
Have students return to the text and look for examples of both direct and
indirect intermittent reflections. They can record their examples on a Tree
Map.
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2014-15
English Language Arts
Cooperation and Competition
Grade 5
•
Analyze for evaluative criteria - Using the Grade 4/5 Fictional Narrative
Rubric criteria, have students analyze for embedded transitions.
Explain to students that an author uses transitions to move the events
along.
Ask students to look for examples of embedded transitions throughout
the story and record them in a Circle Map.
Note: these narrative strategies were included in the lesson sequence from the
previous unit. Consult the WftB&B Narrative binder pgs. 189-195 for instructions
on how to teach these strategies.
•
•
LONG BEACH UNIFED SCHOOL DISTRICT
Analyze for evaluative criteria – Using the Grade 4/5 Fictional Narrative
Rubric criteria, have students analyze how the author used suspense and
tension in the part of the story when Gao Mai was competing in the abacus
contest. (WftB &B Narrative Manual p. 349)
Remind students that authors incorporate suspense or tension in a
story to make it more exciting for the reader.
Remind students of how suspense or tension was used in The Marble
Champ.
Have students turn to the section of the story beginning on page 61
and reread the part where Gao Mai is in the contest.
Ask students how the author creates uncertainty about the outcome (suspense) and a mental state of opposition (tension) in this portion of
the text. (He slows down the description of what is happening and provides back and forth replay of the events in great detail.) Explain to
students that this is one way to create tension or suspense in a story.
Have students brainstorm possible “events” and practice describing the event using suspense or tension. Examples: baseball game in the last inning
or any other sport, a student taking a test, walking into a new school/classroom, etc.
12
2014-15
English Language Arts
•
I can identify and create compound
sentences using coordinating
conjunctions. (L.5.1.c)
LONG BEACH UNIFED SCHOOL DISTRICT
Cooperation and Competition
Grade 5
Grammar Conventions: Using coordinating conjunctions in compound sentences
Practice identifying the parts of a compound sentence
•
Explicitly teach students that a compound sentence is made up of two simple
sentences joined by a coordinating conjunction (and, or, but).
•
Display the Brace Map to illustrate this concept.
•
Provide students with the sentence, “Mariah loves to swim, and she wants to
be a lifeguard.” Model for students how to break each part of the sentence
into its parts (see Brace Map)
•
Provide students with several additional compound sentences and have
students identify the parts by breaking the sentence into a Brace Map or colorcoding each part of the sentence.
The Irish terrier wanted to play catch, and the beagle wanted to chase
him.
The night is cold, but Lily has a sweater to keep her warm.
Lupe is horrible at sports, but she succeeds in all things academic.
You can wear your swimsuit, or you can change at the beach.
•
Explain to students that writers can combine two simple sentences that are related to
form a compound sentence using the coordinating conjunctions and, but, or.
“and” is used when the two sentences have similar ideas
“but” is used when the two sentences have opposing ideas
“or” is used when the two sentences offer a choice
•
Provide students with several pairs of related sentences and have them practice making
compound sentences.
Jose loves to play football. He wants to be a professional player when he grows up.
(similar ideas)
Jackie really wants to go play with her friends. Jackie has too much homework.
(opposing ideas)
Bobby can do his homework right after school. Bobby can play video games right after school. (choice)
•
Have students work in pairs to create several compound sentences using and, but, or as the coordinating conjunction.
13
2014-15
English Language Arts
Cooperation and Competition
Grade 5
BAP LESSON: Class President
Days 11-15
Vocabulary
Theme Connections
See BAP lesson for a full list of vocabulary
words included in this lesson.
In the story, Class President, the children in Mr. Flores’s class are competing against each other in a class election. During the story, there are several
examples of the characters competing and cooperating. The main character, Julio, shows his ability to cooperate with others to meet the needs of the
group and in doing so earns a nomination in the election.
Reader and Task Considerations
In order for students to see how competition and cooperation play a role in this text, it is important for them to understand how to identify a
character’s traits based on what the characters think, say, feel, and do as well as how they respond to conflict or challenges including other characters.
Learning Targets
I can read with accuracy and fluency
to support comprehension. (RF.5.4)
Refer to the REVISED BAP lesson for
possible learning targets.
I can determine how characters in a
story respond to challenges. (RL.5.2)
I can determine the narrator’s point
of view. (RL.5.6)
I can describe how the narrator’s
point of view influences how events
are described in the text. (RL.5.6)
I can gather relevant information
from a text and summarize or
paraphrase the information in notes.
(W.5.8)
Choose from the following:
•
I can come to a discussion prepared
to share my ideas and use my
preparation and other information
to explore ideas under
LONG BEACH UNIFED SCHOOL DISTRICT
Focus of Instruction: Reading and Responding to Text
First Read (Day 11)
•
•
•
•
•
Tell students that following along to a text while they hear you read it aloud will improve their fluency.
Tell students that they will listen to you read the text aloud the first time so that they can get a sense of what the text is about.
Read aloud the entire text without stopping in order for students to get the “gist” of the selection.
Ask students for their reaction to the text (leave this very open-ended, the purpose of this conversation is for students to talk about the text).
You may want to have them discuss the essential question, “How do people get what they want?” as it relates to this text.
Reread for Comprehension (Days 12-13)
Follow the REVISED BAP lesson located on the Intranet for a full list of text-dependent questions, vocabulary, and tasks.
Reread to Gather Evidence/Information and Respond to Text (Days 14-15)
Introduce the Focus Question (Culminating Task): At the end of the story, Mr. Flores’s class has to choose between Cricket and Julio to be the class
president. If you could ask the narrator of Class President if the class made
the
right choice, what do you think the narrator would say? Support your
answer
with evidence from the text that helps you understand the narrator’s point
of view.
•
Analyze the task with students.
•
Ask students what evidence they will need to gather in order to support
a
response to the prompt. A Multi-Flow map could be used to look for
reasons
to support that the narrator thinks the class made the right choice in
picking
Julio. Students can work together to reread the text and look for textual
evidence to support what makes Julio a good president and what makes
Cricket
a less capable president.
•
Another way to collect evidence would be an “evidence chart” like the
one on
the following page. The information from the Multi-Flow is recorded on
the left
side of the evidence chart and then the inferences about those events
are on
the right side of the chart.
•
Depending on the needs of your students, provide additional scaffolds
and
modeling.
14
2014-15
English Language Arts
•
•
•
•
discussion.(SL.5.1a)
I can follow agreed-upon rules for
discussions and carry out assigned
roles. (SL.5.1b)
I can pose and respond to specific
questions by making comments that
contribute to the discussion.(SL.5.1c)
I can elaborate on the remarks of
others. (SL.5.1c)
I can review the key ideas expressed
and draw conclusions in light of
information and knowledge gained
from the discussions. (SL.5.1d)
Cooperation and Competition
Grade 5
Collaborative Discussion
•
Place students in small collaborative groups to discuss responses to the focus question using the evidence they have gathered.
•
Based on previous discussions and students’ needs, select a learning target and provide direct instruction.
•
Monitor students’ discussions for the learning target selected.
•
Bring students back as a whole group and discuss how
they did with the learning target. Have the observers
share their comments.
•
Briefly discuss the focus question as a whole group in
preparation for their written response.
Write to text
•
Have students write a response to the focus question.
•
Refer to the sample answer included in the REVISED
BAP lesson.
I can use evidence from a story or
poem to support an analysis,
reflection, or research. (W.5.9)
Learning Targets
Focus of Instruction: Narrative Writing and Conventions
Analyzing The Class President
•
I can write narratives to develop an
imagined experience using effective
technique, descriptive details, and
clear event sequences. (W.5.3)
•
I can describe how an author builds
a story. (RL.5.5)
•
I can describe how the beginning of
a story sets up what happens in the
rest of the story. (RL.5.5)
•
I can describe how an author orients
the reader to a situation and the
LONG BEACH UNIFED SCHOOL DISTRICT
•
•
Analyze for story elements (Day 11)
Remind students that there are certain elements common to stories including characters, setting, problem, goal, plot/event sequence,
solution, and a message, lesson or moral.
As a class, analyze the story elements of The Class President using a Tree Map with the following labels/branches: Characters, setting,
problem, goal, events/plot, and solution.
Discuss the types of characters, settings, and problems you would see in a realistic fiction story.
For the Frame of reference, determine as a class possible messages of the story. Examples could be “Cooperation and communication are
essential for leadership,” or “in many situations, cooperation is more productive than competition,”
Have students discuss how the story elements support these messages.
Keep an ongoing list of these messages, as students will be able to pull from them when they write their own stories.
Analyze for story structure (Days 12-13)
Explain to students that you will now be looking at Class President through the eyes of a writer.
“Reverse Map” this chapter from the Class President into its opening, event sequence, and closing, analyzing how the author builds the story.
15
2014-15
English Language Arts
Cooperation and Competition
characters in a story. (W.5.3a)
•
I can identify how an author
organizes an event sequence that
unfolds naturally. (W.5.3a)
•
I can identify narrative techniques
such as dialogue, description, and
pacing, used by an author to bring
characters alive. (W.5.3b)
•
I can identify a variety of transitional
words, phrases, and clauses used by
an author to manage the sequence
of events. (W.5.3c)
•
I can describe how an author
provides a conclusion that follows
from the narrated experiences or
events. (W.5.3e)
•
I can explain the function of a
subordinating conjunction and
explain how it is used in a particular
sentence. (L.5.1.c)
LONG BEACH UNIFED SCHOOL DISTRICT
•
Grade 5
Remind students that this is the beginning of a chapter excerpted from a book. Even a chapter has an opening that orients the reader to the
chapter. (The italics portion is not part of the chapter but some background to what has happened so far in the book.)
Explain to students that an author uses several techniques to move the story along by changing the setting (where and when) events happen.
Have students reread the story looking for shifts in setting. Have students stop each time the setting or time changes and record the event on
a Flow Map.
Proceed through the story based on the needs of your students, recording the main events on a Flow Map.
Explain to students that once the event sequence is completed, the author writes a closing.
Have students reread the last page to determine where the event sequence ends and the closing begins.
Have students analyze for how the author ends the chapter.
Analyze for evaluative criteria – Using the Grade 4/5 Fictional Narrative
Rubric criteria, have students analyze and find examples of dialogue or
monologue that is used to progress the story and/or reveal something
about the main character. (Days 14-15)
Explain to students that one technique an author uses to progress a
story or reveal something about a character is dialogue.
Create a Tree Map with the title, “Dialogue/Monologue, and two
branches, “progresses the story” and “reveals something about the
character”
Model for students by selecting dialogue and discussing how the
dialogue progresses the story or reveals something about the
character.
Ask students to record examples of dialogue and how it either
progresses the story and/or reveals something about the character.
Provide students with a short event sequence and have them create
dialogue between two characters to move the event sequence along
and to reveal something about the characters. (See sample)
Grammar Conventions: Creating complex sentences with subordinating conjunctions
Introduce complex sentences (Day 11)
•
Explain to students that a complex sentence is made up of an independent clause (complete sentence that can stand alone) and one or more
dependent clauses (a group of words that cannot stand alone as a sentence). The dependent clause begins with a subordinating conjunction.
(Language Arts Handbook, p. 244 and p. 351)
16
2014-15
English Language Arts
•
I can identify and create complex
sentences using a subordinating
conjunction. (L.5.1.c)
LONG BEACH UNIFED SCHOOL DISTRICT
Cooperation and Competition
Grade 5
•
Display the Brace Map to explain that a complex sentence can be broken into an
independent clause and a dependent clause.
•
Provide students with the following complex sentence: “I will help the man
because he deserves it.” Point out that “I will help the man” is the independent
clause because it can stand alone as a sentence. “because he deserves it” is the
dependent clause because it cannot stand alone as a complete thought.
•
Provide students with several more examples of complex sentences and have
them practice identifying the independent and dependent clauses.
Jack stopped talking when I came up to him.
Although he will not admit it, he knows he is wrong.
Since it is raining, we will not go to the park today.
Wherever you see Ruby, her best friend, Jessica is not far away.
As soon as I get home, I eat a snack and do my homework.
•
Point out to students that each dependent clause begins with a subordinating
conjunction.
•
Have students write the sentences above on sentence strips. Have them cut the
sentence strip into its independent and dependent clause. Then have students cut
the subordinating conjunction off of the dependent clause.
•
Have students manipulate the pieces of the sentence strip to make different
combinations of sentences. Point out that sometimes a complex sentence begins
with the dependent clause and sometimes it begins with the independent clause.
Practice making complex sentences
•
Provide students with the Tree Map of some common types of subordinating conjunctions and explain how each function in a sentence.
•
Using the following pairs of independent clauses, have students create complex sentences.
Mary came up. We were talking about her.
I admire Mr. Brown. He is my enemy.
I came. You sent for me.
Evelyn will come to school. She is able.
He knows he is wrong. He will not admit it.
The man is rich. He is unhappy.
I shall come tomorrow. You send for me.
You wish to be believed. You must tell the truth.
The dog bites. He ought to be muzzled.
It would be foolish to set out. It is raining.
Call at my office. You happen to be in town.
The cat ran up a tree. She was chased by a dog.
The sun shines brightly. It is very cold.
Boston became a large city. It has a good harbor.
17
2014-15
English Language Arts
Cooperation and Competition
Grade 5
Babe Didrikson
Days 16-18
Vocabulary
Theme Connections
Athlete, inspiring, powerful, athletic,
attracted, competed, victories, ability,
impressive, sponsored, sportsmanship,
diagnosed
In this biography, students will be able to identify the major events of Babe’s life and link these events to the personality traits needed to become an
elite athlete. Students will examine the internal and external factors that influence a person to be competitive.
Reader and Task Considerations
Students will likely need some context regarding the time period in which Didrikson lived and how women and sports were viewed.
Learning Targets
•
I can read with accuracy and fluency
to support comprehension. (RF.5.4)
Focus of Instruction: Reading and Responding to Text
First Read
•
•
•
•
•
•
I can determine the main ideas of a
text and explain how they are
supported by key details. (RI.5.2)
I can summarize the text. (RI.5.2)
LONG BEACH UNIFED SCHOOL DISTRICT
Tell students that they will listen to you read the text aloud the first time so that they can get a sense of what the text is about.
Provide students with a copy of the text and read aloud the entire text without stopping in order for students to get the “gist” of the selection.
Based on the needs and abilities of your students you may opt to have the students read it silently the first time through.
Ask students for their reaction to the text (leave this very open-ended, the purpose of this conversation is for students to talk about the text).
You may want to pose the essential question, “How do people get what they want?” and ask students to discuss this as it relates to the story.
Reread for Comprehension
Briefly explain the text features of the genre biography (factual account of a person’s life written by someone else and typically presented
chronologically.
Tell students that the author of a biographical text has a specific purpose for writing it. They often want you to see the person in a certain way.
They accomplish this by carefully selecting the key details they present and which events in the person’s life they will describe.
Reread the text with students having them analyze the events that are described and what they tell you about Babe Didrikson. (Based on the
needs of your class, determine how much scaffolding you will need to provide.)
Reread the first paragraph, what is the author describing in the opening of the text? What exact words does the author use to describe Babe?
How old is Babe in the first paragraph? What happens to the context (time and place) in the second paragraph?
Reread paragraph 2 and 3. What do we learn about Babe in the second and third paragraphs? Why does the author want us to know this?
Reread paragraph 4. What does the author tell us about Babe in this paragraph?
Reread paragraphs 5 and 6. What sport does she try next? Was she good at it? What evidence from the text supports your answer?
Reread paragraph 7 including the italicized section of Babe’s own words. What does the author want us to know about Babe by this
description of events?
In paragraph 8, the author includes words from Babe’s autobiography. What do these words reveal about Babe’s character?
Reread paragraph 9. How does Babe use the same determination up through the end of her life?
Reread the last paragraph. How does the author close the text? How did Babe influence future athletes?
What are some examples of competition from Babe’s life?
What events from Babe’s life are described in the text?
Did internal or external factors influence Babe to be competitive?
What internal qualities or internal factors allowed Babe to excel in her athletic career?
18
2014-15
English Language Arts
I can gather relevant information
from a text and summarize or
paraphrase the information in notes.
(W.5.8)
I can use evidence from a text to
support an analysis, reflection, or
research. (W.5.9)
Choose from the following:
•
I can come to a discussion prepared
to share my ideas and use my
preparation and other information
to explore ideas under discussion..
(SL.5.1a)
•
I can follow agreed-upon rules for
discussions and carry out assigned
roles. (SL.5.1b)
•
I can pose and respond to specific
questions by making comments that
contribute to the discussion.(SL.5.1c)
•
I can elaborate on the remarks of
others. (SL.5.1c)
•
I can review the key ideas expressed
and draw conclusions in light of
information and knowledge gained
from the discussions. (SL.5.1d)
Learning Targets
•
I can establish a purpose for my
writing. (W.5.4)
LONG BEACH UNIFED SCHOOL DISTRICT
Cooperation and Competition
Grade 5
Reread to Gather Evidence/Information and Respond to Text
Introduce the focus question for collaborative discussion and written response to text: What does the author want us to know about Babe Didrikson?
Use evidence from the text to support your answer.
•
Analyze the task with students.
•
Ask students what evidence they will need to gather in order to support a
response to the prompt. Students will need to trace the events that were
described in the text and infer what each of those events tells us about
Babe Didrikson.
•
Have students work individual, with a partner, or in a small group to
reread the text and create a Flow Map of the main events described in the
text. Under each event, have students Create a Bubble Map that shows
what the description reveals about Babe.
Collaborative Discussion
•
Place students in small collaborative groups to discuss responses to the focus question using the evidence they have gathered.
•
Based on previous discussions and students’ needs, select a learning target and provide direct instruction.
•
Example: Learning Target “I can pose and respond to specific questions by making comments that contribute to the discussion.”
•
Work with students to ensure that they understand what this target means and what it should sound like.
•
Explain to students as they work in their groups, you will be listening specifically for students that pose and respond to specific questions by
making comments that contribute to the discussion.
•
Monitor students’ discussions for the learning target selected.
•
Bring students back as a whole group and discuss how they did with the learning target.
•
Briefly discuss the focus question as a whole group in preparation for their written response.
Writing to Text
•
Have students write a response to the focus question.
•
Based on the needs of your students provide direct instruction, modeling, and or scaffolds.
Focus of Instruction: Narrative Writing and Conventions
Begin modeling a realistic fiction story related to the theme of
cooperation/competition with a message
This entire model is designed to take place over the next 5
instructional sessions (Days 16-20). It will begin here and continue
during the next text, The New Kid. You may choose to use the
sample provided or create your own with the class. The purpose is
to create a class story together with scaffolding based on the
needs of your students.
Explain to the students that you will be working together to write a
fictional story based on the facts and events from the Babe
Didrikson text. Together you will create the story elements based
on one or more events along with mapping out the structure.
Create a class Tree Map for the story elements. Begin with the
message, “Even fiercely competitive people need cooperation to
19
2014-15
English Language Arts
Cooperation and Competition
Grade 5
get what they want.” Write this message in the frame.
Provide the problem for the story, “Mildred (Babe) had so many chores at home that she didn’t have time to play on the school team.”
Based on this problem and the message that the story will convey, work collaboratively to create a Tree Map with characters, a setting, an
event sequence, and a solution. Remind students to think about how each of these story elements will support the message of the story.
•
I can identify and create simple
sentences with compound subjects
and or compound predicates using
the coordinating conjunction, “and.”
(L.5.1.c)
•
I can identify and create compound
sentences using coordinating
conjunctions. (L.5.1.c)
•
I can identify and create complex
sentences using a subordinating
conjunction. (L.5.1.c)
LONG BEACH UNIFED SCHOOL DISTRICT
Grammar Conventions: Identifying simple, compound, and complex sentences in text
•
Using the text, Babe Didrikson, ask students to identify the types of sentences used.
•
Have students work in a small group or with a partner.
•
Assign each small group a paragraph from the text.
•
Have students use the Brace Maps introduced for each sentence type to determine if the sentence is simple, compound, or complex.
•
Have students classify each sentence by placing it under the appropriate branch on a Tree Map with branches, “simple,” “compound,” and
“complex.”
•
Have students switch partners and explain to another partner why each sentence is simple, compound, or complex.
•
Students should notice that most of the sentences used are simple or compound.
•
Challenge students to combine two simple sentences and create a complex sentence. (Remind students to use their Tree Maps with
subordinating conjunctions.
20
2014-15
English Language Arts
Cooperation and Competition
The New Kid
Grade 5
Days 19-20
Vocabulary
Theme Connections
Muffs, league
In this poem, the speaker is describing a new kid that joins the baseball team and turns it around from a losing team to a winning team. The new kid is
really good and shows good sportsmanship. In a twist at the end, we learn that the new kid is a girl and some people don’t think that a girl should play
on a boy’s team. The speaker however doesn’t care because she is good and that is what matters.
Reader and Task Considerations
The language in the poem is simple and the ideas are not complex. Students will be asked to find the theme of the poem and to identify the speaker’s
point of view, which will require a close reading of each stanza.
Learning Targets
•
•
Focus of Instruction: Reading and Responding to Text
I can read with accuracy and fluency
to support comprehension. (RF.5.4)
First Read
I can determine the theme of a
poem. (RL.5.2)
Reread for Comprehension
•
I can determine how a speaker in a
poem reflects upon a topic. (RL.5.2)
•
I can describe how a speaker’s point
of view influences how events in a
poem are described. (RL.5.6)
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
LONG BEACH UNIFED SCHOOL DISTRICT
Tell students that they will listen to you read the text aloud the first time so that they can get a sense of what the text is about.
Read the poem aloud to the students.
Ask students for their reaction to the poem (leave this very open-ended, the purpose of this conversation is for students to talk about the text).
You may want to pose the question, “What did you think when we read the last line?”
Explain to students that just like stories and plays, poems also have themes. A theme of a poem is a message or lesson that the poem is trying to
express. The narrator of a poem is called the speaker.
To figure out the theme of a poem you need to think about what the poem describes and what it is mostly about, and then connect those details to
a lesson you think the poem is trying to get across.
Reread the poem, one stanza at a time to figure out what the speaker of the poem is describing by asking the following text-dependent questions:
Stanza #1: Do you think the speaker is a boy or girl? What makes you think that? What is the speaker describing in the first stanza? How
does the speaker refer to the new kid? (The speaker says the new kid but does not give any clues to whether it is a boy or girl.)
Stanza #2: What does the speaker describe in the second paragraph? What is the speaker trying to say when he says the new kid has an
official New York Yankee hat? What does it mean to play shortstop or second base?
Stanza #3: What words would the speaker use to describe the new kid based on the description in the third stanza? What does this show
that the speaker values?
Stanza #4: What did the new kid do?
Stanza #5: Why would a few kids and their parents believe the new kid should not play? What does the speaker think about playing with
a girl?
Ask students to tell what they think is the theme of the poem and tell what details helped them figure it out.
21
2014-15
English Language Arts
I can gather relevant information
from a text and summarize or
paraphrase the information in notes.
(W.5.8)
Choose from the following:
•
I can come to a discussion prepared
to share my ideas and use my
preparation and other information
to explore ideas under discussion..
(SL.5.1a)
•
I can follow agreed-upon rules for
discussions and carry out assigned
roles. (SL.5.1b)
•
I can pose and respond to specific
questions by making comments that
contribute to the discussion.(SL.5.1c)
•
I can elaborate on the remarks of
others. (SL.5.1c)
•
I can review the key ideas expressed
and draw conclusions in light of
information and knowledge gained
from the discussions. (SL.5.1d)
•
I can use evidence from a story or
poem to support an analysis,
reflection, or research. (W.5.9)
Cooperation and Competition
Introduce the focus question for collaborative discussion and written response to text: How does the speaker feel about the new kid? Use evidence
from the text to support your answer.
•
Analyze the task with students.
•
Ask students what evidence they will need to gather in order to support a response to the prompt.
•
Students could make a Bubble Map to write words that show what the speaker thinks of the new kid and use textual evidence to support their
inferences outside the bubbles.
Collaborative Discussion
•
Place students in small collaborative groups to discuss responses to the focus question using the evidence they have gathered.
•
Based on previous discussions and students’ needs, select a learning target and provide direct instruction.
•
Example: Learning Target “I can pose and respond to specific questions by making comments that contribute to the discussion.”
•
Work with students to ensure that they understand what this target means and what it should sound like.
•
Explain to students as they work in their groups, you will be listening specifically for students that pose and respond to specific questions by
making comments that contribute to the discussion.
•
You may want to assign an “observer” to each group to track the questions that are asked and how they link to the comments being made by
each other.
•
Monitor students’ discussions for the learning target selected and for their understanding of the poem.
•
Bring students back as a whole group and discuss how they did with the learning target. Have the observers share their comments.
•
Briefly discuss the focus question as a whole group in preparation for their written response.
Writing to Text
•
Have students write a response to the focus question.
•
Based on the needs of your students provide direct instruction, modeling, and or scaffolds.
Learning Targets
•
•
•
•
I can orient my reader to the story
by establishing a situation and
introducing the characters. (W.5.3a)
I can organize an event sequence
that unfolds naturally. (W.5.3a)
I can use narrative techniques such
as dialogue, description, and pacing,
to develop experiences and events.
(W.5.3b)
I can insert a variety of transitional
words, phrases, and clauses to
manage the sequence of events.
LONG BEACH UNIFED SCHOOL DISTRICT
Grade 5
Reread to Gather Evidence/Information and Respond to Text
Focus of Instruction: Narrative Writing and Conventions
Modeling the Realistic Fictional Narrative
•
•
•
•
•
•
Using the Tree Map created in the previous lesson and the How do I Model Imaginative Narrative Writing For My Students? p. 338-342 from
WftB&B Narrative, model mapping and drafting the story.
Work with students to create an event sequence to tell the story.
Work with students to decide how you will orient the reader to the event sequence. Be sure to explain that the opening should help the reader
understand what type of person Mildred is and the context (time and place) of the story.
Work with students to determine how the story will end.
Once the event sequence has been planned, model for students how to embed the evaluative criteria from the rubric such as a well thought out
opening, intermittent reflections, dialogue, precise language, humor, tension, etc.…
Model writing the story, thinking aloud as you embed the various techniques that have been taught and explored throughout the unit. (See the
sample realistic story located at the end of the unit for a model).
22
2014-15
English Language Arts
•
•
•
•
•
•
(W.5.3c)
I can use concrete words and
phrases and sensory details to
convey experiences and event
precisely. (W.5.3d)
I can provide a conclusion that
follows from the narrated
experiences or events. (W.5.3e)
I can establish a purpose for my
writing. (W.5.4)
I can determine an organizational
pattern to support my purpose.
(W.5.4)
I can stay on topic and include
enough details to make sure my
writing is clear to the reader.
(W.5.4)
I can expand, combine, and reduce
sentences to make my writing sound
better. (L.5.3.a)
Cooperation and Competition
•
•
Revision Strategy: Varying Sentence Structure
•
•
•
LONG BEACH UNIFED SCHOOL DISTRICT
Grade 5
Based on the needs of your students, you may choose to have students write
the story using the Flow Map you have created together or may want students
to create their own Flow Maps for the event sequence and write their own
stories.
Once students have drafted their stories, have them revise for the narrative
techniques introduced throughout the unit.
Once students have drafted their realistic fiction stories, have them analyze their writing for simple, compound, and complex sentence structure.
Explain to students that writers vary their sentences in order to make them sound better to the reader. When all of the sentences start the same
way, have a similar structure, or similar sentence length, the writing does not sound as good.
Refer to the mini-lessons from Write from the Beginning and Beyond, Setting the Stage Manual pages, 247, 250, 251, 252, and 253 for ideas.
23
2014-15
English Language Arts
Cooperation and Competition
Two Raindrops
Grade 5
Days 21-22
Vocabulary
Theme Connections
shower, pompously, extravagant, brook
trifling, refreshed, content
In this poem, two little raindrops come from the same place but are very different. One is full of himself, not wanting to do his job because he feels too
important. The other one is happy to help others and do his job. In the end, the “cooperative” raindrop gets the recognition he deserves.
Reader and Task Considerations
This poem has some complex vocabulary. Definitions are provided for the students on the note-taking guide (see the end of the unit). Encourage
students to read through the poem and paraphrase what is happening in each stanza.
Learning Targets
•
Focus of Instruction: Reading and Responding to Text
I can read with accuracy and fluency
to support comprehension. (RF.5.4)
First Read
I can determine the theme of a
poem. (RL.5.2)
Reread for Comprehension
•
I can determine how a speaker in a
poem reflects upon a topic. (RL.5.2)
•
I can describe how a speaker’s point
of view influences how events in a
poem are described. (RL.5.6)
LONG BEACH UNIFED SCHOOL DISTRICT
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Tell students that they will listen to you read the poem aloud the first time so that they can get a sense of what the poem is about.
Provide students with a copy of the poem and read aloud the entire text without stopping in order for students to get the “gist” of the poem.
Ask students for their reaction to the poem (leave this very open-ended, the purpose of this conversation is for students to talk about the text).
Explain to students that just like stories and plays, poems also have themes. A theme of a poem is a message or lesson that the poem is trying to
express. The narrator of a poem is called the speaker.
To figure out the theme of a poem you need to think about what the poem describes and what it is mostly about, and then connect those details to
a lesson you think the poem is trying to get across.
Have students reread the poem with a partner and record their thoughts in the right column.
Engage students in the following text-dependent questions:
•
First Stanza:
From where do the two raindrops come?
What is the first stanza mostly about?
How does the speaker describe the first raindrop?
What does the first raindrop think about himself?
Who needed the first raindrop’s help? Why didn’t he help?
What happened when the raindrop reached the sea?
•
Second Stanza
What is the first word in the second stanza? (But)
Who did the second raindrop help?
How did the second raindrop feel about doing the work for which it was sent?
How did the second raindrop greet the sea?
How did the second raindrop feel about joining the sea?
Ask students to tell what they think is the theme of the poem and tell what details helped them figure it out.
24
2014-15
English Language Arts
I can gather relevant information
from a text and summarize or
paraphrase the information in notes.
(W.5.8)
Choose from the following:
•
I can come to a discussion prepared
to share my ideas and use my
preparation and other information
to explore ideas under discussion..
(SL.5.1a)
•
I can follow agreed-upon rules for
discussions and carry out assigned
roles. (SL.5.1b)
•
I can pose and respond to specific
questions by making comments that
contribute to the discussion.(SL.5.1c)
•
I can elaborate on the remarks of
others. (SL.5.1c)
•
I can review the key ideas expressed
and draw conclusions in light of
information and knowledge gained
from the discussions. (SL.5.1d)
•
I can use evidence from a story or
poem to support an analysis,
reflection, or research. (W.5.9)
Learning Targets
•
•
•
•
I can orient my reader to the story
by establishing a situation and
introducing the characters. (W.5.3a)
I can organize an event sequence
that unfolds naturally. (W.5.3a)
I can use narrative techniques such
as dialogue, description, and pacing,
to develop experiences and events.
(W.5.3b)
I can insert a variety of transitional
words, phrases, and clauses to
manage the sequence of events.
LONG BEACH UNIFED SCHOOL DISTRICT
Cooperation and Competition
Grade 5
Reread to Gather Evidence/Information and Respond to Text
Introduce the focus question for collaborative discussion and written response to text: How does the speaker feel about the two raindrops? Use
evidence from the text to support your answer.
•
Analyze the task with students.
•
Ask students what evidence they will need to gather in order to support a response to the prompt.
•
Students could make a Bubble Map to write words that show what the speaker thinks of each raindrop and use textual evidence to support
their inferences outside the bubbles.
Collaborative Discussion
•
Place students in small collaborative groups to discuss responses to the focus question using the evidence they have gathered.
•
Based on previous discussions and students’ needs, select a learning target and provide direct instruction.
•
Example: Learning Target “I can pose and respond to specific questions by making comments that contribute to the discussion.”
•
Work with students to ensure that they understand what this target means and what it should sound like.
•
Explain to students as they work in their groups, you will be listening specifically for students that pose and respond to specific questions by
making comments that contribute to the discussion.
•
You may want to assign an “observer” to each group to track the questions that are asked and how they link to the comments being made by
each other.
•
Monitor students’ discussions for the learning target selected and for their understanding of the poem.
•
Bring students back as a whole group and discuss how they did with the learning target. Have the observers share their comments.
•
Briefly discuss the focus question as a whole group in preparation for their written response.
Writing to Text
•
Have students write a response to the focus question.
•
Based on the needs of your students provide direct instruction, modeling, and or scaffolds.
Focus of Instruction: Narrative Writing and Conventions
Realistic Fiction Competition/Cooperation Story – Process Piece
Plan the story
•
Students will now begin the process of writing their own realistic fiction stories with a completion/cooperation message or theme. You can either
provide them with a prompt or the students can create their own.
Please note: Make sure the students understand that they are to create a realistic fictional story that includes all the characteristics and elements that
they have studied throughout the unit.
•
Students will independently plan their stories using a Tree Map for the story elements and a Flow Map for the event sequence.
•
Remind them to look through their notes and thinking maps from the unit so that they will be able to incorporate all components of a fictional
narrative.
•
Keep anecdotal notes of those students who are unable to work on this task independently. Provide necessary support when needed.
Students take their survival stories through the writing process
•
Students will be expected to compose their stories using all components of the writing process.
25
2014-15
English Language Arts
•
•
•
•
•
•
(W.5.3c)
I can use concrete words and
phrases and sensory details to
convey experiences and event
precisely. (W.5.3d)
I can provide a conclusion that
follows from the narrated
experiences or events. (W.5.3e)
I can establish a purpose for my
writing. (W.5.4)
I can determine an organizational
pattern to support my purpose.
(W.5.4)
I can stay on topic and include
enough details to make sure my
writing is clear to the reader.
(W.5.4)
I can apply the conventions of
Standard English grammar and
usage to my writing. (L.5.1)
•
I can use verb tense to convey
various times, sequences, states,
and conditions. (L.5.1.c)
•
I can use correct capitalization,
punctuation, and spelling. (L.5.2)
•
I can use a comma to separate an
introductory element from the rest
of the sentence. (L.5.2.b)
•
I can expand, combine, and reduce
sentences to make my writing sound
better. (L.5.3.a)
LONG BEACH UNIFED SCHOOL DISTRICT
Cooperation and Competition
•
•
•
Grade 5
Make sure that each student has completed the planning and oral rehearsing components of the writing process before they begin composing.
Teachers can create writing mini-lessons based on the needs of their students.
Keep anecdotal records and conference with students to see if they need additional support.
Grammar Conventions: Sentence Problems
Note: This lesson was presented in the first unit. This activity can be used as a review for students who are having trouble with these types of
sentence problems as evidenced by their writing samples.
•
Review with students the most common sentence problems: fragments; run-on sentences; rambling sentences, and awkward sentences.
•
Create or have the students go back to their Tree Maps (from previous unit). Have the students write the title, “Sentence Problems” and a branch
for each type of problem.
•
Using the information on pages 360-361 in the Language Arts Handbook, define each type of problem and write an example.
•
Explicitly teach/review with students how to correct each type of sentence problem.
•
Have students identify the subject and predicate in each of the sentences of their realistic fiction stories.
•
Have students determine if the sentence is correct as written or if it has a problem.
•
Identify the problem and correct it so the sentence is correct.
•
Have students work with a partner and edit each other’s work for correct sentences.
26
2014-15
English Language Arts
Cooperation and Competition
Grade 5
Student Note-Taking Guide for Two Little Raindrops
By
Joseph Morris
Text
Two little raindrops were born in a shower,
And one was so pompously proud of his power,
He got in his head an extravagant notion
Vocabulary
Notes
pompously – believing
one is better, smarter, or
more important
He'd hustle right off and swallow the ocean.
A blade of grass that grew by the brook
extravagant – more than
is usual or necessary
Called for a drink, but no notice he took
Of such trifling things. He must hurry to be
brook – a small stream
Not a mere raindrop, but the whole sea.
trifling – having little
A stranded ship needed water to float,
value or importance
But he could not bother to help a boat.
mere - unimportant
He leaped in the sea with a puff and a blare-And nobody even knew he was there!
blare – to sound loud
But the other drop as along it went
Found the work to do for which it was sent:
It refreshed the lily that drooped its head,
And bathed the grass that was almost dead.
LONG BEACH UNIFED SCHOOL DISTRICT
refreshed – to restore
water to
27
2014-15
English Language Arts
Cooperation and Competition
Grade 5
It got under the ships and helped them along,
And all the while sang a cheerful song.
It worked every step of the way it went,
Bringing joy to others, to itself content.
content – pleased and
satisfied
At last it came to its journey's end,
And welcomed the sea as an old-time friend.
"An ocean," it said, "there could not be
Except for the millions of drops like me."
LONG BEACH UNIFED SCHOOL DISTRICT
28
2014-15
English Language Arts
Cooperation and Competition
Grade 5
Sample Realistic Fiction Story based on Babe Didrikson
There’s nothing like anticipating when the bat will connect with the pitch. She liked to watch the ball as it left the pitcher’s hand. She would watch this in what seemed like slow
motion. She liked the feel of firmly gripping the bat while she waited for the tightness in her stomach she knew would come as she stepped up to the plate. She liked the smell of
competition, but mostly, Mildred loved the sound of the baseball as it smacked against the bat. She would hear her brothers and sisters yelling for her to, “Run Mildred, run!”
Every one of her senses were part of this game and Mildred loved the power of that connection more than anything.
Power was all around her: the power of sport, the power of family, and the power of nature. Port Arthur, Texas was a hot and dry place to live, especially in 1914. It was the kind
of place where people moved slowly, the land was dry and dusty, and it was hot enough to cook an egg on the sidewalk. In Mildred’s family there were lots of brothers and
sisters. They were a close family, rather poor, and really depended on each other. The thing about Mildred’s family was that everyone loved sports. Her dad had even built a gym
in their back yard.
At Mildred’s house there was always lots of noise and some kind of game going on. There’s was the house where all the kids in the neighborhood wanted to play. One day there
was a new kid on the block and naturally, he ended up at the Didrikson’s house. The new kid was a good athlete, but nowhere as good as Mildred. He was in awe when he saw
her at bat. He had made it on the baseball team at school and encouraged her to join too. Mildred had never even entertained the idea of being on any team because she was
needed at home to help out with the little kids and with chores around the house. “Wouldn’t that be something,” she thought to herself, “me, playing on the school team!” And,
as quickly as she thought about it, the idea left her mind. It was time to go inside and help make dinner.
The next day at school she saw the new kid. He invited her to come and watch practice, just to see what it was like. Reluctantly she did, but, as she sat in the bleachers and
watched the team scrimmage, she felt that connection to the game come alive inside her. While she watched, she knew, with every fiber of her being, that she would love to be
part of that team. Mildred knew it just wasn’t going to happen. With a heavy heart, she got up and started to walk home. There were people waiting for her, people who
depended on her.
For the next few days, Mildred was quiet and reserved, not at all like her normal, energetic self. Her dad noticed that something was wrong with his daughter and asked her
about it. She hesitated before speaking, but ultimately told her dad about what was going on. Mildred was kind of emotional about her desire to be on the team and even cried
a little. She hadn’t realized how passionately she wanted to play and this took her by surprise. Her dad listened quietly, taking in the words as she spoke. After a few minutes, he
took in a deep breath and looked his daughter in the eye. He took Mildred’s hands into his own and told her how proud he was of her. He was proud of her athletic ability, proud
of how she always put their family and responsibilities first, and proud of how willing she was able to make compromises in her life for what was most important. Her dad had
never spoken to her like this before and they both knew that this was an important conversation. He ended by saying, “You are going to play on that baseball team. We are a
family and we can make compromises too. We will find a way to make this happen.”
Mildred wasn’t sure she’d heard him correctly, but inside she was feeling like it was her birthday and Christmas morning all rolled up into one. With her family beside her, and
the opportunity play the game she loved most, there was no stopping her. She had no way of knowing, but this was the moment that put Mildred Didrikson on a path to
becoming one of the most respected women athletes of our time.
LONG BEACH UNIFED SCHOOL DISTRICT
29
2014-15
English Language Arts
Cooperation and Competition
Grade 5
Research and Inquiry
Sequence Overview and Daily Performance Activities
Approximate
Number of Days
Resources
OCR Unit 1: 35A-D
Inquiry Process
Generate Ideas
•
3-5
•
•
3-5
3-5
3-5
3-5
3-5
Formulate Questions and Problems
OCR Unit 1: 55A-D
Inquiry Journal
Internet
Make Conjectures
OCR Unit 1: 65A-D
http://marshmallow
challenge.com/Instr
uctions.html
Inquiry Journal
Internet
Establishing Investigation Needs
OCR Unit 1: 85A-D
Inquiry Journal
Internet
Library
Establish Investigation Plans
OCR Unit 1: 99A-D
Inquiry Journal
Presenting Investigation Findings
•
•
Model for students the difference between a topic and a problem or question
Have students share their problems or questions to lead to the creation of
investigation groups
Explain to students that a conjecture is an educated guess we make to answer
the problem or question prior to gathering evidence
Present a problem to the class and have students practice making conjectures
Conduct a whole class discussion of students’ conjectures allowing for students
to contribute suggestions, constructive criticisms, and questions
Model how to take a conjecture and identify information they would need to
find or figure out the problem or question
Begin to develop ideas of how to present
Begin to outline a schedule for student presentations
Students develop plans for gathering information
In their investigation groups, have students assign jobs to each group member
based on strengths and likings making sure each student has a significant role
in the group
Students begin compiling their findings to present to the group, either orally or
in written form.
Students compile their findings into their chosen presentation format
Groups present findings and the audience members listen and comprehend
what they are hearing.
Following presentations, allow students time to respond to the speaker(s)
30
Skills
•
Chart acts of competition and acts of
cooperation
Parts of the
library
•
Have students read additional books
from the leveled classroom libraries
and form book clubs
Have students discuss the good and bad
points of both cooperation and
competition.
List activities that would not be possible
without cooperation between people
Have students discuss times they
needed the help of others to solve a
problem
Have students do the “marshmallow
challenge” (refer to website for
instructions)
discuss what the contest taught them
about cooperation and competition
Interviewing
Have groups debate, “It’s not whether
you win or lose, but how you play the
game.”
Have students interview and poll their
peers’ feelings about winning and
losing
Find a cause of their own to support
Using multiple
sources
Have students begin brainstorming problems or questions related to the
concepts of cooperation and competition.
Have students examine questions and wonderings made during discussions of
the text, from the concept/question board, and activities in Investigating the
Concepts Beyond the Text.
Have students record their ideas in their Inquiry Journal
OCR Unit 1: 45A-D
Leveled Classroom
Libraries
family /friends
Inquiry journals
LONG BEACH UNIFED SCHOOL DISTRICT
Guided Activity Options
•
Note-taking
Using charts
and diagrams
Using visual
aids
2014-15
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