AlphaServer 1000 Owner's Guide Order Number: EK–DTLSV–OG. B01 Digital Equipment Corporation

AlphaServer 1000 Owner's Guide Order Number: EK–DTLSV–OG. B01 Digital Equipment Corporation

AlphaServer 1000

Owner's Guide

Order Number: EK–DTLSV–OG. B01

Digital Equipment Corporation

Maynard, Massachusetts

June 1995

Digital Equipment Corporation makes no representations that the use of its products in the manner described in this publication will not infringe on existing or future patent rights, nor do the descriptions contained in this publication imply the granting of licenses to make, use, or sell equipment or software in accordance with the description.

Possession, use, or copying of the software described in this publication is authorized only pursuant to a valid written license from Digital or an authorized sublicensor.

Copyright

Digital Equipment Corporation, 1994. All Rights Reserved.

The following are trademarks of Digital Equipment Corporation:

Alpha AXP, AlphaGeneration, AXP, DEC, DECchip, Digital, OpenVMS, the AXP logo, and the

DIGITAL logo.

Digital UNIX Version 3.0 is an X/Open UNIX 93 branded product.

The following are third party trademarks:

Microsoft is a registered trademark, and Microsoft Windows and Microsoft Windows NT are trademarks of Microsoft Corporation.

OSF/1 is a trademark of the Open Software Foundation, Inc.

PostScript is a trademark of Adobe Systems, Inc.

All other trademarks and registered trademarks are the property of their respective holders.

S2955

FCC ID: AO9-PB70

FCC NOTICE: This equipment has been tested and found to comply with the limits for a Class B digital device, pursuant to Part 15 of the FCC rules. These limits are designed to provide reasonable protection against harmful interference in a residential installation.

Any changes or modifications made to this equipment may void the user's authority to operate this equipment.

This equipment generates, uses, and can radiate radio frequency energy and, if not installed and used in accordance with the instructions, may cause harmful interference to radio communications.

However, there is no guarantee that interference will not occur to radio or television reception. If this equipment does cause harmful interference to radio or television reception, which can be determined by turning the equipment off and on, the user is encouraged to try to correct the interference by one or more of the following measures:

- Reorient or relocate the receiving antenna.

- Increase the separation between the equipment and receiver.

- Connect the equipment into an outlet on a circuit different from that to which the receiver is connected.

- Consult the dealer or an experienced radio/TV technician for help.

The user may find the following booklet prepared by the Federal Communications Commission helpful: How to Identify and Resolve Radio-TV Interference Problems. This booklet is available from the U.S. Government Printing Office, Washington, D.C., 20402. Stock No. 004-00398-5.

All external cables connecting to this basic unit need to be shielded. For cables connecting to option boards, see the option manual or installation instructions.

This digital apparatus does not exceed the Class B limits for radio noise emissions set out in the radio interference regulations of the Canadian Department of Communications.

ACOUSTIC DECLARATION:

Preliminary declared values per ISO 9296 and ISO 7779:

AlphaServer 1000 Model 200

(PB70A-A9)

Idle

Operating

Lw

A d, B Lp

A m, dBA

(Bystander Positions)

5.6

5.6

36

36

AlphaServer 1000 Model 200

(PB70A-A9) with 6xRZ26L

Idle

Operating

5.7

5.8

38

39

Current values for specific configurations are available from Digital representatives. 1 B = 10 dBA.

Contents

Preface

About This Guide ............................................................................................................. xi

Purpose and Audience......................................................................................... xi

Online Version ................................................................................................... xi

Before You Use This Guide................................................................................. xi

Organization...................................................................................................... xii

Conventions ................................................................................................................... xiii

Related Documentation................................................................................................... xiv

1 Overview

Introduction.................................................................................................................... 1-1

System Overview............................................................................................................ 1-1

Supported Operating Systems............................................................................ 1-2

System Console Firmware................................................................................. 1-2

System Features ................................................................................................ 1-4

Front Panel Controls and Indicators .................................................................. 1-6

Rear Panel Ports and Slots ................................................................................ 1-9

Internal System Options.................................................................................. 1-10

External Options............................................................................................. 1-12

Ordering Options ............................................................................................ 1-12

2 Hardware Installation

Introduction.................................................................................................................... 2-1

Hardware Setup Overview .............................................................................................. 2-1

Selecting a System Location ........................................................................................... 2-2

Environmental Conditions ................................................................................ 2-2

Power Requirements ......................................................................................... 2-3

Identifying Accessories................................................................................................... 2-5

Optional Accessories......................................................................................... 2-6

Connecting a Keyboard, Mouse, or Printer...................................................................... 2-6

Connecting a Monitor or Terminal ................................................................................. 2-7

Connecting to Network Hardware................................................................................... 2-7

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Verifying Hardware Setup .............................................................................................. 2-8

Locking Your System ................................................................................................... 2-10

Recording the System Unit Key Number......................................................... 2-11

3 Preparing to Install an Operating System

Introduction.................................................................................................................... 3-1

Preparing to Install Windows NT ................................................................................... 3-1

Preparing the System ........................................................................................ 3-1

Installing Microsoft Windows NT..................................................................... 3-6

Preparing to Install Digital UNIX................................................................................... 3-8

Installation Preparation..................................................................................... 3-8

Installing Digital UNIX .................................................................................... 3-9

Preparing to Install OpenVMS ....................................................................................... 3-9

Preparing the System ........................................................................................ 3-9

Installing OpenVMS....................................................................................... 3-11

4 Basic Operation

Introduction.................................................................................................................... 4-1

Turning the System On .................................................................................................. 4-1

Turning the System Off .................................................................................................. 4-3

Accessing the System from a Remote Location............................................................... 4-4

Interpreting Startup Messages ........................................................................................ 4-5

Reading the Startup Test Results....................................................................... 4-7

Using the Consoles......................................................................................................... 4-8

Invoking Console Mode.................................................................................... 4-8

When to Switch Consoles ................................................................................. 4-9

Switching to the Digital UNIX and OpenVMS (SRM) Console......................... 4-9

Switching to the Windows NT (ARC) Console.................................................. 4-9

Windows NT (ARC) Console Menus .............................................................. 4-10

Digital UNIX and OpenVMS (SRM) Console Commands .............................. 4-11

Getting Help on the Windows NT (ARC) Console .......................................... 4-14

Getting Help on the Digital UNIX and OpenVMS (SRM) Console.................. 4-15

Booting the Operating System ...................................................................................... 4-17

Booting Windows NT ..................................................................................... 4-21

Booting Digital UNIX or OpenVMS Operating Systems ................................. 4-23

Using Storage Drives.................................................................................................... 4-24

Using a Diskette Drive.................................................................................... 4-26

Using a CDROM Drive................................................................................... 4-27

Using a StorageWorks Disk Drive................................................................... 4-30

Caring for Your System................................................................................................ 4-31

Cleaning Your System Unit ............................................................................ 4-31

Cleaning Your Mouse ..................................................................................... 4-31

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Cleaning Your Keyboard................................................................................. 4-31

Moving Your System ...................................................................................... 4-31

Packing Your System...................................................................................... 4-32

Installing Your System at a New Location....................................................... 4-32

5 Installing and Removing Components

Introduction.................................................................................................................... 5-1

Preparing to Install or Remove Components ................................................................... 5-2

Required Equipment ......................................................................................... 5-2

Antistatic Precautions ....................................................................................... 5-2

Top Cover and Side Panels ............................................................................................. 5-3

Removing the Top Cover and Side Panels ......................................................... 5-3

Replacing the Top Cover and Side Panels ......................................................... 5-5

Memory Modules............................................................................................................ 5-6

Removing Memory Modules ............................................................................. 5-7

Installing Memory Modules .............................................................................. 5-8

EISA, ISA, and PCI Option Cards ................................................................................ 5-10

Installing an Option Card ............................................................................... 5-11

Removing an Option Card .............................................................................. 5-12

Testing an Option Card Installation ................................................................ 5-13

Configuring an Option Card ........................................................................... 5-15

Network Interface Card................................................................................... 5-15

Storage Devices ............................................................................................................ 5-15

Identifying the Drive Bays .............................................................................. 5-16

Installing a Tape Drive ................................................................................... 5-17

Removing a Tape Drive .................................................................................. 5-18

Installing a CDROM Drive ............................................................................. 5-19

Removing a CDROM Drive ............................................................................ 5-19

Installing a StorageWorks Disk Drive ............................................................. 5-19

Installing a Diskette Drive .............................................................................. 5-21

Removing a Diskette Drive ............................................................................. 5-22

Power Supply................................................................................................................ 5-23

CPU Card ..................................................................................................................... 5-26

6 Configuring

Introduction.................................................................................................................... 6-1

Viewing the System Configuration ................................................................................. 6-1

ARC Console Configuration Options ................................................................ 6-2

SRM Console Configuration Commands........................................................... 6-2

Memory.......................................................................................................................... 6-8

Network Connections ..................................................................................................... 6-9

Setting Network Configuration ......................................................................... 6-9

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vii

Power Supply ............................................................................................................... 6-10

Keyboard Type ............................................................................................................. 6-10

EISA and ISA Options ................................................................................................. 6-10

EISA Bus........................................................................................................ 6-10

ISA Bus .......................................................................................................... 6-12

EISA Configuration Utility (ECU) .................................................................. 6-13

Configuring EISA Options.............................................................................. 6-14

Configuring ISA Options ................................................................................ 6-16

PCI Option Cards ......................................................................................................... 6-18

Storage Devices............................................................................................................ 6-20

Determining SCSI Storage Device IDs............................................................ 6-20

On-board SCSI Bus Configuration.................................................................. 6-21

SCSI Controller Option Cards ........................................................................ 6-22

SCSI Device Configurations ........................................................................... 6-23

Single-Controller, Split-Backplane Configuration........................................... 6-24

Single-Controller Configuration with Jumper Cable........................................ 6-27

Dual-Controller Configuration........................................................................ 6-29

Triple-Controller, Split-Backplane Configuration ........................................... 6-32

7 Upgrading

Introduction.................................................................................................................... 7-1

Planning Your Upgrade.................................................................................................. 7-1

Access from the Internet ................................................................................... 7-3

Digital Systems and Options Catalog ................................................................ 7-3

Upgrade Options ............................................................................................................ 7-4

Firmware .......................................................................................................... 7-4

Updating Firmware Using the CDROM Drive .................................................. 7-5

Updating Firmware Using the Network............................................................. 7-6

Updating Firmware Using the Diskette Drive.................................................... 7-6

8 Troubleshooting

Introduction.................................................................................................................... 8-1

Troubleshooting Overview.............................................................................................. 8-2

System Diagnostics......................................................................................................... 8-3

Interpreting Error Beep Codes .......................................................................... 8-3

Reading the Console Event Log ........................................................................ 8-3

The test Command............................................................................................ 8-4

The kill and kill_diags Commands ................................................................... 8-6

The show_status Command .............................................................................. 8-7

Power Problems.............................................................................................................. 8-7

Console Problems........................................................................................................... 8-7

Boot Problems .............................................................................................................. 8-10

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Problems Detected by the Operating System ................................................................. 8-12

Storage Problems.......................................................................................................... 8-13

Option Card Problems .................................................................................................. 8-15

Network Problems........................................................................................... 8-15

EISA/ISA Bus Problems ................................................................................. 8-15

PCI Bus Problems ........................................................................................... 8-16

Monitor and Terminal Problems ................................................................................... 8-16

Keyboard and Mouse Problems..................................................................................... 8-18

Printer Problems........................................................................................................... 8-18

Overheating Problems .................................................................................................. 8-19

RAID Device Problems................................................................................................. 8-19

Using the Fail-Safe Loader ........................................................................................... 8-20

9 Quick Reference

Introduction.................................................................................................................... 9-1

Messages ........................................................................................................................ 9-1

Hardware Overview........................................................................................................ 9-2

System Front View............................................................................................ 9-2

System Rear View............................................................................................. 9-3

System Side View ............................................................................................. 9-4

System Board Connectors, Chips, and Slots ...................................................... 9-6

Port Pinouts ...................................................................................................... 9-7

Indicator Lights ............................................................................................................ 9-11

System Board Jumper Settings...................................................................................... 9-12

SCSI ID Settings .......................................................................................................... 9-16

Single-Controller Configuration Jumper Options ............................................ 9-16

Dual-Controller Configuration Jumper Options............................................... 9-18

Triple-Controller Configuration Jumper Options............................................. 9-19

Specifications ............................................................................................................... 9-20

System Architecture...................................................................................................... 9-22

Glossary of Terms

Index

AlphaServer 1000 Owner's Guide Contents

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ix

Preface

About This Guide

Purpose and Audience

This guide describes how to set up, operate, troubleshoot, and maintain your server system. This information is intended for users, system managers, and others who perform system management tasks.

Online Version

Your system shipment includes documentation on a CDROM. It contains an easy-tonavigate, electronic version of all the information in this printed user's guide, plus information to help you upgrade your system, add options, obtain support, and order additional products and services.

You can install the CDROM on any personal computer running Microsoft Windows

3.1 or later, Microsoft Windows NT 3.1, or a Windows emulator. The disk on which you install the CDROM must have approximately four megabytes of free space available.

Before You Use This Guide

If you have not already installed the system, refer to the installation card shipped with the system.

Some procedures in this document require that you refer to your operating system documentation. Please have your operating system documentation available for use with this guide.

Preface

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xi AlphaServer 1000 Owner's Guide

Organization

This guide is organized as follows:

The Preface provides an overview of this guide.

Chapter 1, "Overview," provides an overview of the system features and capabilities.

Chapter 2, "Hardware Installation," provides instructions for installing your system hardware.

Chapter 3, "Preparing to Install an Operating System," explains how to prepare your system for installation of an operating system.

Chapter 4, "Basic Operation," describes how to turn the system on and off, interpret startup messages, use console mode, boot an operating system, and use storage devices.

Chapter 5, "Installing and Removing Components," explains how to install and remove internal system components and options.

Chapter 6, "Configuring," describes how to configure the system.

Chapter 7, "Upgrading," describes how to plan for upgrading the system with additional memory, network connections, power supply, options, and firmware.

Chapter 8, "Troubleshooting," explains how to identify and solve system problems and how to perform diagnostics.

Chapter 9, "Quick Reference" contains system messages, jumper settings, SCSI

ID settings, specifications, and the system diagram.

The Glossary defines technical terms related to the system.

The Index provides a listing of main topics in this guide.

xii

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Preface AlphaServer 1000 Owner's Guide

Conventions

The following table lists the typographical conventions used in this guide.

Convention

Ctrl/x

Warning:

Caution:

Note:

boot show config

[ ]

{ }

< > italic type

1

Meaning

Ctrl/x indicates that you hold down the Ctrl key while you press another key, indicated here by x.

Warnings contain information to prevent personal injury.

Cautions provide information to prevent damage to equipment or software.

Notes provide important additional information that you may need when performing certain procedures.

Commands that you enter are shown in this special typeface. Commands shown in lowercase letters can be entered in either uppercase or lowercase. Commands shown in uppercase letters must be entered in uppercase for the command to work.

Console command abbreviations must be entered exactly as shown.

In command descriptions, brackets indicate optional elements.

In command descriptions, braces containing items separated by commas indicate mutually exclusive items.

In console mode online help, angle brackets enclose a placeholder for which you must specify a value.

Italic type in console command sections indicates a variable.

In figures, a numbered callout labels a part of a figure. In text, the numbered callout refers to a labeled part of a corresponding figure.

AlphaServer 1000 Owner's Guide Preface

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xiii

Related Documentation

This section lists related documents that you may find helpful when operating your system or adding options.

To Learn More about the System:

Document

Alpha Architecture Concepts (Digital UNIX)

Alpha Architecture Concepts (OpenVMS)

Part Number

EY-N389E

EY-K725E

To Install the System:

Document

AlphaServer 1000 Basic Installation Card

AlphaServer 1000 Installation Label (attached to inside of system's top cover)

DEC OSF/1 AXP Factory Installed Software

User Information

OpenVMS Factory Installed Software User

Information

Part Number

EK-DTLVSV-IC

36-43629-01

EK-SFFIS-UG

EK-A0377-UG

To Install and Operate Options:

Document

RRD43 CDROM Disc Drive Operating Guide

RX26 Diskette Drive Owner's Reference Card

TZK11 Tape Backup System User's Guide

StorageWorks RAID Array 200 Subsystem

Family Installation and Configuration Guide

Part Number

EK-RRDDD-IN

EK-RX26D-RC

EK-TZK11-UG

EK-SWRA2-IG

To Service the System:

Document

AlphaServer 1000 Service Guide

AlphaServer 1000 Illustrated Parts Breakdown

Part Number

EK-DTLSV-SV

EK-DTLSV-IP

xiv

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Preface AlphaServer 1000 Owner's Guide

1 Overview

Introduction

This chapter provides an overview of your system features and capabilities. The following topics are covered:

System Overview

Supported Operating Systems

Console Firmware

System Features

Front Panel Controls and Indicators

Rear Panel Ports and Slots

Internal System Options

External Options

Ordering Options

System Overview

This high-performance, single-processor system is intended for use as a local area network (LAN) server or commercial applications server. It is housed in a deskside enclosure, which is divided into two sides. One side contains components: the system board, CPU card, other logic modules, and fans. The other side contains up to two power supplies and a StorageWorks backplane. The system uses the

DECchip 21064, a reduced instruction set computer (RISC) microprocessor based on the Alpha architecture, and provides all the power of a 64-bit computing environment. The Alpha Privileged Architecture Library code (PALcode) supports multiple operating environments that offer a choice of applications.

AlphaServer 1000 Owner's Guide Overview

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1-1

This system is intended for the following types of uses:

As an applications server, running relational databases, electronic mail, communications, or other applications

As a print server, providing common printing resources to PCs and other systems in a LAN

As a file server, providing disk storage to PCs and other systems in a LAN

As a compute server, displaying the output of applications that you run remotely on the server

Supported Operating Systems

This system supports the following operating systems:

Microsoft Windows NT

OpenVMS

Digital UNIX (DEC OSF/1)

While the operating system is running, it controls the system, which is in program mode. When the operating system is not running, a second mode, console mode, allows you to control system management functions, described in the next section.

System Console Firmware

You perform many of the tasks for managing and configuring your server system in console mode, where the system is controlled by the console subsystem, rather than the operating system.

The console subsystem, located in ROM (read-only memory) on the system board, contains special software, called firmware, that interacts directly with hardware components and facilitates interaction between the system hardware and the operating system.

Because the system is designed to support multiple operating systems, it offers two separate interfaces to the console subsystem. The Windows NT operating system is supported by the Advanced RISC Computing (ARC) console. The OpenVMS and

Digital UNIX operating systems are supported by the Alpha System Reference

Manual (SRM) console. Regardless of the operating system you use, you need to access both consoles, depending on the particular task.

Console Firmware Tasks

The console firmware allows you to perform the tasks listed in Table 1-1 through either the ARC or the SRM console.

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Overview AlphaServer 1000 Owner's Guide

The Windows NT (ARC) console firmware has a menu-based interface designed to facilitate hardware interaction with the Windows NT operating system. The

OpenVMS and Digital UNIX (SRM) console firmware has a command line interface designed to facilitate hardware interaction with the Digital UNIX or OpenVMS operating systems. Table 1-1 lists the tasks that you can perform with each console.

Table 1-1 Console Firmware Tasks

You Are Using...

And You Want to...

Windows NT

Digital UNIX or

OpenVMS

Boot Windows NT

Run the EISA Configuration Utility

Run the RAID Configuration Utility

Update firmware

Console to Use

Switch to the SRM console ARC

Run programs written to run within the ARC firmware ARC

List Windows NT device names

Change Windows NT boot configurations and environment variables

ARC

ARC

Initialize the system

Display system configuration

Perform diagnostic tests

Boot Digital UNIX or OpenVMS

ARC

ARC

ARC

ARC/SRM

ARC/SRM

ARC/SRM

SRM

SRM

Update firmware

Switch to Windows NT console

Initialize the system

Display system configuration

Display system storage devices

Set and display environment variables specific to

Digital UNIX and OpenVMS

Set and display environment variables that are common to Digital UNIX, OpenVMS and Windows NT

Perform diagnostic tests

Run the RAID Configuration Utility

Run the EISA Configuration Utility

SRM/ARC

SRM

SRM/ARC

SRM

SRM

SRM

SRM

SRM

SRM

ARC

AlphaServer 1000 Owner's Guide Overview

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1-3

System Features

The system provides a number of special features that enhance its reliability, ensure its availability, and improve its expansion capabilities, as well as facilitate hardware management and improve security.

Reliability/Availability

64-bit Alpha RISC architecture

Error Correction Code (ECC) memory and CPU cache

Dual SCSI backplanes

Second power supply

Variable fan speed

Internal sensors

Provides significantly better performance than 32-bit architecture.

Allows recovery from most cache and memory errors.

One SCSI controller for each backplane allows fully redundant disk subsystems.

Provides redundant power as backup.

Adjusts fan speed according to system temperature.

Monitor and detect internal system temperature, fan failure, power supply temperature.

System Expansion

Flexible memory architecture

Seven EISA expansion slots, two PCI expansion slots, and one

PCI or EISA expansion slot

Integrated Fast SCSI-2 controller with external SCSI-2 connector

Integrated SVGA controller

Capacity for 10 internal storage devices

Provides a 128-bit data path with ECC protection. System memory can be upgraded from 16 MB to 512 MB using memory options.

Accommodates industry-standard option cards such as Ethernet, FDDI, SCSI, and modems.

Supports tape, CDROM and hard disk drives without use of an expansion slot.

Supports management and configuration applications locally without use of an expansion slot.

Accommodates seven 3½-inch half-height drives, two 5½-inch half-height drives

(CDROM or tape), and one 3½-inch diskette drive.

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Overview AlphaServer 1000 Owner's Guide

External ports

Wide-ready SCSI backplane

Hot swap disk capability

Two serial ports and one parallel port support external options such as a printer, modem or local terminal.

Allows upgrade to newer high-performance drive technology.

Allows replacement of StorageWorks disk drives while the system continues to operate.

Server Management

System diagnostics

Hardware configuration

Unique asset management

RAM-based error log

Firmware upgrade utility

Error information display

Hard drive indicator lights

Allows local and remote diagnosis of system problems.

Allows local and remote system configuration.

Unique system identifier in nonvolatile memory provides easy asset management.

Records startup error messages.

Provides loading and verification of firmware versions.

Identifies CPU, bus, and system errors.

Provide immediate status information on hard drive activity or failure.

System Security

Key lock

Security loop (on rear of system unit)

Interlock sensor switch

Limits access to system components.

Allows system to be secured in place.

Automatically turns off system power if the top cover is removed while power is on.

AlphaServer 1000 Owner's Guide Overview

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1-5

7

6

5

Front Panel Controls and Indicators

The controls and indicators on the front panel of the system unit are shown in Figure

1-1 and described in Table 1-2.

Figure 1-1 shows the locations of the controls and indicators on the front panel of the system unit.

Figure 1-1 Front Panel Indicators

8 9 10 11

4 3 2 1

MA00209

1 Halt switch

2 Reset switch

3 On/Off indicator

4 On/Off switch

5 Operator control panel

6 Diskette drive activity indicator

7 Diskette drive eject button

8 CDROM volume control

9 CDROM activity indicator

10 CDROM eject button

11 CDROM emergency eject hole

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Overview AlphaServer 1000 Owner's Guide

Front Panel Controls and Indicators Description

Table 1-2 describes how the front panel controls and indicators function.

Table 1-2 Front Panel Controls and Indicators

Control or Indicator

Halt switch

Reset switch

On/Off switch

On/Off indicator

Diskette drive activity indicator

Diskette drive eject button

CDROM volume control

CDROM drive activity indicator

CDROM eject button

Operator control panel display

Function

Halts an OpenVMS or Digital UNIX system, returning it to console mode control

Halts a Windows NT system, but you must press the Reset switch to completely reboot the firmware

Reinitializes the system and performs startup tests

Switches the system unit on and off

Lights when the system unit is turned on

Lights when the system is accessing the diskette drive

Ejects a diskette from the diskette drive

Adjusts headphone volume

Lights when the system is accessing the CDROM drive

Ejects disc from the CDROM drive

Displays startup messages

AlphaServer 1000 Owner's Guide Overview

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1-7

Front Panel Switches

The On/Off, reset, and halt switches are located on the left side of the front panel.

They are identified by the icons shown in Figure 1-2.

Figure 1-2 Front Panel Switches

1 2 3

1 On/Off switch

2 Reset switch

3 Halt switch

MA00210

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Overview AlphaServer 1000 Owner's Guide

5

4

3

2

1

Rear Panel Ports and Slots

The ports and slots on the rear of the system unit are shown in Figure 1-3 and described in Table 1-3.

Figure 1-3 Rear Panel Ports and Slots

8

9

6

7

MA00211

10

1 PCI/EISA slots

2 Parallel port

3 Serial port/ terminal port

(COM2)

4 Mouse port

5 VGA port

6 Keyboard port

7 Serial port/ terminal port

(COM1)

8 SCSI port

9 Power inlet

10 Four additional

SCSI ports

AlphaServer 1000 Owner's Guide Overview

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1-9

Rear Panel Ports and Slots Description

Table 1-3 describes the rear panel ports and slots shown in Figure 1-3.

Table 1-3 Rear Panel Ports and Slots

Port or Slot Used to connect....

Up to three PCI slots

Up to eight EISA slots

Parallel port

Serial port/terminal port (COM1)

Mouse port

VGA port

Keyboard port

Serial port (COM2)

Option cards for high-performance network, video, or disk controllers

Option cards for network, video, sound, or disk controllers

Parallel device such as a printer

Console terminal or serial-line peripheral such as a modem

PS/2-compatible mouse

VGA monitor

PS/2-compatible keyboard

Serial-line peripheral such as a modem

SCSI port

Power inlet

External SCSI devices

System unit to a power outlet

Four additional SCSI port knockouts External SCSI devices without using an adjacent slot

Internal System Options

Your system supports the following types of options:

Storage options

EISA, ISA, and PCI options

Memory options

Storage Options

Mass storage options are located in several compartments inside the system as shown in Figure 1-4. The system accommodates the following types of storage options:

One diskette drive

Two removable-media storage devices, typically, a CDROM drive, a digital audio tape (DAT) drive, or a quarter-inch cartridge (QIC) tape drive

Up to seven 3½-inch StorageWorks drives

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Overview AlphaServer 1000 Owner's Guide

2

1

Figure 1-4 shows the locations of the storage option compartments.

Figure 1-4 Storage Option Compartments

3 4

1 Diskette drive compartment

2 CDROM drive compartment

3 Tape drive compartment

4 StorageWorks drives shelf

MA00223

EISA, ISA, and PCI Options

The system supports EISA, ISA, and PCI options, including those for:

SCSI storage expansion

Networking

Communications

Graphics

Memory Options

You can increase your system's memory to 512 megabytes by using various combinations of memory options. Adding more memory allows your system to run memory-intensive software more quickly.

The system supports the following memory option sizes:

16 MB

32 MB

64 MB

128 MB

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1-11

Memory options consist of five single-in line memory modules: a 16-MB option consisting of five 4-MB modules, a 32-MB option consisting of five 8-MB modules, a 64-MB option consisting of five 16-MB modules, or a 128-MB option consisting of five 32-MB modules.

External Options

External options that can be added to the system include the following:

Monitor or terminal

Expansion boxes

Printers

RAID controller

Uninterruptible power supply (UPS)

Ordering Options

The list of supported options is subject to change. Contact your sales representative for information on the current list of supported options and for information on ordering. If you are an Internet participant, you can obtain information related to the

AlphaServer 1000 system through the Digital FTP archive: ftp.digital.com: /pub/DEC/Alpha/systems/as1000/docs/

For access through the Digital World-Wide Web Server: http://www.service.digital.com/alpha/server/1000.html

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Overview AlphaServer 1000 Owner's Guide

2 Hardware Installation

Introduction

This chapter explains how to set up your system hardware. The following topics are discussed:

Hardware Setup Overview

Selecting a System Location

Identifying Accessories

Connecting a Keyboard, Mouse, or Printer

Connecting a Monitor or Terminal

Connecting to Network Hardware

Verifying Hardware Setup

Locking Your System

Hardware Setup Overview

The steps for setting up your hardware are summarized as follows. Depending on the options you use with your system, these steps may vary.

1. Select a location for the system, giving consideration to service access, environmental conditions, and power requirements.

2. Confirm that you have all the desired accessories that ship with the system and any additional accessories you may want to add.

3. Connect the keyboard, mouse, printer, and monitor or terminal.

4. Connect to the network hardware.

5. Verify your hardware setup.

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Selecting a System Location

When choosing a system location, keep in mind the optimal environmental conditions and power requirements for the system. Be sure to keep the system in an upright position. Figure 2-1 shows the system dimensions and the clearance needed to access the system for servicing.

Figure 2-1 System Dimensions and Service Area

35 cm

(14.1 in)

53 cm

(21 in)

44 cm

(17.4 in)

1 m

(36 in)

65 cm

(26 in)

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Environmental Conditions

Table 2-1 lists the environmental conditions in which the system unit best operates.

Table 2-1 Optimal Environmental Conditions

Condition

Temperature range

Relative humidity

Air circulation

Specification

The room temperature must be between 10º C and 40º C (50º F and 104º F).

The relative humidity must be between 10% and

90% (20% to 80% with removable media options).

You must have a minimum clearance of 8 cm (3 inches) on all sides of the system unit to allow sufficient air circulation. Fans inside the system unit circulate the air to prevent excessive heat, which can damage the system components.

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Power Requirements

Your system ships with one primary power supply and the option of a second power supply. The second power supply provides redundant power to the system. Both the primary and secondary power supplies connect to an AC outlet. An internal cable connecting the two power supplies is required when using the second power supply.

Voltage selection is not required. The system is intended for use at all rated ACinput voltages. Table 2-2 lists the power supply ratings for systems using one or two power supplies. Figure 2-2 shows the power supply requirements for a system with one power supply.

Table 2-2 Power Supply Ratings

Specification

Voltage

Frequency

Current

Range

100-120/220-240 volts AC

50-60 Hz

8.5/4.0 amperes (one power cord)

7.0/3.5 amperes (two power cords)

Note: These ratings are the maximum with a fully loaded system enclosure and do not include a monitor or terminal.

Figure 2-2 Power Supply Requirements (Single Power Supply)

1 Power supply cable

2 Power supply cable socket

2

1

100-120 VAC 7.5A 50-60 Hz

220-240 VAC 3.5A 50-60 Hz

M A 0 0 2 1 2

= Properly grounded power receptacle

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Identifying Accessories

Figure 2-3 shows the accessories that are included with the system. Table 2-2 describes the accessories.

Figure 2-3 System Accessories

1

2

3

4

M A 0 0 2 1 3

5

6

7

8

1 System unit keys (2)

2 Installation card

3 Owner's Guide (CDROM)

and EISA Configuration

Utility kit

4 External SCSI terminator

5 MMJ Serial Connector

6 Mouse

7 Power cord

8 Keyboard

Table 2-3 System Accessories

Accessory

System unit keys (2)

Basic Installation card, installation label, and Owner's Guide (in hardcopy and

CDROM versions)

EISA Configuration Utility kit

External SCSI terminator

MMJ serial port connector (H8571-1)

Mouse

Power cord

Keyboard

Description

Locks and unlocks the system unit

Installation, operation, and troubleshooting information

Runs the EISA Configuration Utility

Terminates the SCSI bus at system rear

Attaches Digital 423 DECconnect cables

PS/2-style mouse

Connects AC power to power supply

PS/2-style keyboard

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Optional Accessories

Table 2-4 lists optional accessories that you may want to order, depending on your system's configuration.

Table 2-4 Optional Accessories

Accessory

Monitor or terminal

Second power supply

Second power cord

Power supply interconnect cable

(with 3-pin connector)

Description

VGA or SVGA monitor or terminal

Provides redundant power in case primary power supply fails.

Connects AC power to second power supply

Connects primary and secondary power supplies

Connecting a Keyboard, Mouse, or Printer

If you are using a keyboard, a mouse, or a printer, connect each to the appropriate connector at the rear of the system. Refer to Figure 1-3, "Rear Panel Ports and

Slots," to verify the location of the connectors.

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Connecting a Monitor or Terminal

Connect a VGA monitor, an SVGA monitor, or a terminal to your system unit, as shown in Figure 2-4.

Figure 2-4 Connecting a Monitor or Terminal

VGA

1

2

1 Mouse port connection

2 Keyboard port connection

3 High-performance graphics option card slot

4 Terminal port (COM1) connection

3

4

VTxxx

M A 0 0 2 1 6

Connecting to Network Hardware

Your system supports various network options. You can connect to ThinWire, AUI, or 10Base-T Ethernet networks as shown in Figure 2-5. With appropriate options, you can also connect to FDDI and token ring networks.

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Figure 2-5 Network Connections

1

2

3

1 10BASE-T cable

2 AUI cable

3 ThinWire cable

M A 0 0 2 1 7

Verifying Hardware Setup

Before turning on the system, check that you have made all the proper cabling connections, as shown in Figure 2-6. Refer to the section, "Basic Operation," for information about turning on your system.

Figure 2-6 External System Cabling

2

VTxxx

3

1

8

7

4

VGA

5

6

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1 Printer

2 Terminal

3 Modem

4 VGA monitor

5 Mouse

6 Keyboard

7 High-performance graphics option

8 Power cable

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Locking Your System

The system unit is protected by a key lock located on the front door that prevents unauthorized access to the hardware inside the unit. Turning the key to the left locks the front door. When the front door is locked, the top cover and side panels cannot be removed. Turning the key to the right unlocks the system unit and allows you access to install or remove system components. When the system unit is unlocked, push the lock to open the door. Figure 2-7 shows the system lock in the unlocked position.

To remove the top cover, pull down the latch located on the front of the system above the lock, and while holding down the latch, pull the top cover off from the rear of the system. With the top cover and side panels removed, the system cannot be turned on.

Figure 2-7 System Lock and Key

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Additional security is provided by a latching loop on the rear panel of the system unit that allows you to attach the system unit to a post or other fixed object.

Recording the System Unit Key Number

Write down the number and letter of the system unit key and record this information in a safe place in case you need to order a replacement key. Figure 2-8 shows the location of the key number on the system unit key.

Figure 2-8 System Unit Key Number Location

00

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3 Preparing to Install an Operating

System

Introduction

This chapter covers the following topics:

Preparing to Install Windows NT

Preparing to Install Digital UNIX

Preparing to Install OpenVMS

These sections explain how to prepare for installing or upgrading:

Windows NT Server or Workstation 3.5 or later

Digital UNIX Version 3.0B or later

OpenVMS Version 6.1-1H2 or later

If your system was shipped with pre-installed software, refer to the software documentation to start up your operating system for the first time.

Preparing to Install Windows NT

Preparing the System

1. Before you install the Windows NT operating system, make sure that you have the following items:

Microsoft Windows NT ARC firmware for the AlphaServer 1000, Version

3.5-15 or later. The ARC firmware is a menu-driven utility to configure your system.

Microsoft Windows NT Server or Workstation 3.5 or later.

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The EISA Configuration Utility (ECU) diskette for Microsoft Windows NT,

Version 1.6 or later.

A partitioned and formatted hard disk drive installed in your system. If your drive has not yet been prepared, follow the instructions in "Hard Disk

Preparation" later in this section.

2. If a Microsoft Windows NT product announcement was included with your system, read the announcement, which contains important READ FIRST information.

3. Contact the administrator of your local area network to obtain the network information you will need. This information will vary depending on the type of network hardware and software installed at your location.

Setting the Operating System Type

1. Turn the system on by pressing the On/Off switch on the front of the system.

After a short wait, the operator control panel on the front of the system displays the message "Model 4/2xx," and the screen displays initialization and testing information. Internal errors are indicated by audible "beep" codes. (See Chapter

8, "Troubleshooting.")

2. Press the Enter key. If your screen displays the ARC console Boot menu, your system has already been prepared for use with Microsoft Windows NT and you can proceed to the next section, "Updating the Firmware."

If your screen displays a triple arrow (>>>) prompt instead of the ARC console

Boot menu, your system has booted the SRM console. Proceed to step 3.

3. Type the following two commands at the SRM console prompt and press the

Enter key after each command: set console graphics set os_type nt

4. Turn off the power to your system by pressing the On/Off switch on the front of your system. Wait at least 10 seconds, then turn the power back on.

5. The system performs several diagnostics. If you see an ECU error message, you can ignore it, because the remainder of the configuration procedure will correct any configuration errors that are displayed on the screen.

Updating the Firmware

When the ARC Boot menu is displayed, note the firmware version number at the top of the screen display. Compare this version number to the required version listed in your Windows NT documentation. If no update is required, proceed to the section,

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"Setting Default Environment Variables." If an update is required, follow these steps:

1. From the Boot menu, use the arrow keys to highlight Supplementary menu, then press the Enter key.

2. Insert the Digital AlphaServer 1000 4/200 Drivers and Firmware Update diskette for Windows NT 3.5 into the diskette drive.

3. From the Supplementary menu, select "Install new firmware" and press the Enter key. The update process begins and the following prompt appears.

Apu ->

4. Type Update and press the Enter key.

5. At the prompt, "Are you ready to program device?" type the letter y and press the

Enter key.

6. If the update is successful, the screen displays the message, "ARC ROM update successful." If this message is not displayed, call your technical support representative for further assistance.

7. Turn off the power to your system by pressing the On/Off switch on the front of your system. Wait at least 10 seconds, then turn the power back on.

Setting Default Environment Variables

After updating the firmware, verify that the correct firmware version number is displayed at the top of the ARC Boot menu. Then follow these steps to set the default environment variables:

1. From the ARC Boot menu, select the Supplementary menu and press the Enter key.

2. Select "Set up the System..." and press the Enter key.

3. Select "Set default environment variables" and press the Enter key.

4. When prompted to enter the system partition location, select "SCSI hard disk" and press the Enter key.

5. When prompted to enter SCSI bus and SCSI ID numbers, enter the SCSI bus and ID for the location for the system partition. These values are used to set an environment variable, which Windows NT uses to determine the correct drive and partition to boot from.

If you are unsure about these values, simply accept the default values of 0. If these values are incorrect for your particular system (if, for example, your hard drives are on a secondary controller on SCSI bus 1), NT setup will prompt you

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to run the arcinst utility. The arcinst utility provides valid values to choose for setting this environment variable correctly.

6. When prompted to enter the partition number on the disk, verify that it is set to 1, and press the Enter key. If you plan to partition your hard disk, set the partition number to 2. Otherwise, enter the boot partition number corresponding to your existing disk and NT configuration.

If you are unsure about your disk configuration, select "Display hardware configuration" to view a summary of your system hardware.

7. Select "Set default configuration" and choose the diskette and keyboard settings that correspond to your system.

Setting the EISA Configuration

1. Insert the EISA Configuration Utility diskette for Microsoft Windows NT into the diskette drive on your server.

2. From the Setup menu, select "Run EISA Configuration Utility from floppy" and press the Enter key. After a few moments, the EISA Configuration Utility dialog box appears. Press the Enter key.

If any of the EISA option cards in your computer have not yet been identified, a

Caution dialog box is displayed. You can ignore this dialog box because your option cards will be identified in the following steps.

3. Press the Enter key to display the "Steps in Configuring your Computer" dialog box.

4. Select "Step 3: View or edit details" to verify your system's configuration

(optional).

5. Select "Step 5: Save and Exit" and press the Enter key. At the confirmation prompt, select "Save the configuration" and press the Enter key. When a dialog box appears, indicating that the configuration has been saved, press the Enter key. Your system will restart with the updated information.

Preparing Your Hard Disk

If your first hard disk is already partitioned and formatted with either the FAT or

NTFS file systems, you can omit the steps in the section "Partitioning and Formatting the First Hard Disk" and begin installation of the Microsoft Windows NT software.

It is recommended that you partition and format your system's hard disk before installing Windows NT software, even if your hard disk has already been partitioned and formatted. Repartitioning and reformatting reduce the likelihood of operational

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problems due to conflicting versions of the operating system or disk-related problems.

Note: If the first hard disk in your system currently contains any information that you need, back that information up to another medium before proceeding.

Partitioning and Formatting Your Hard Disk

Note: Omit these steps if you want to maintain your current partitions.

1. Insert the Microsoft Windows NT CDROM into your system's CDROM drive.

2. Turn on your system. After your system performs startup diagnostics, the screen displays the Windows NT (ARC) console Boot menu.

3. From the Boot menu, select "Run a program" and press the Enter key. A

"Program to run" prompt appears.

4. Type cd: \alpha\arcinst and press the Enter key. The ARC Installation Program screen is displayed.

5. Select "Configure Partitions" and press the Enter key. The available disk partitioning options appear.

6. Select "Delete Partition" and press the Enter key. If your system has only one hard disk, press the Enter key. If your system has more than one hard disk, select the disk to be prepared, and press the Enter key.

Depending on the previous disk configuration, you might be notified that no partitions exist, or you may see a list of one or more partitions. Follow the onscreen prompts to delete all partitions on the disk.

7. Select "Create Partition" and press the Enter key. When the list of available disks appears, select the disk to be prepared and press the Enter key. You are prompted for the size of the partition.

8. Type 6 after the "Enter size" prompt, then press the Enter key. A 6-megabyte partition is created. This partition will be a file allocation table (FAT) system partition. Note that the number you enter depends on the maximum parititon size. The number must equal the maximum size displayed minus 6. For example, if the largest possible value is 500, you would enter 494.

9. Press the Enter key to format the partition. Once the formatting is completed, press the Enter key again.

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10. Select "Create Partition" and press the Enter key. When the list of available disks appears, select the first disk again and press the Enter key. You are prompted for the size of the partition.

11. Type the larger of the two values at the "Enter size" prompt, then press the Enter key. The partition is created.

12. Press the Enter key to format the partition. Once the formatting is completed, press the Enter key again.

13. Select "Make Existing Partition into a System Partition" and press the Enter key.

A message may appear asking whether to overwrite an already defined system partition. Type y.

If the message, "Boot selections already exist" is displayed, exit the ARCINST program, go to the Setup menu, choose "Manage boot selections," and delete all existing boot selections. Then return to the Boot menu to restart the ARCINST program and return to step 13 in these instructions.

14. When the list of available disks is displayed, select the same disk you just formatted and then press the Enter key. The list of available partitions is displayed.

15. Select "Partition 1" and press the Enter key. Your system is now prepared for installation of Microsoft Windows NT.

16. Select Exit and press the Enter key. Select Exit again and press the Enter key.

Installing Microsoft Windows NT

From the ARC Boot menu, select the Supplementary menu and press the Enter key.

When the Supplementary menu appears, select "Install Windows NT from CDROM" and press the Enter key. At this point, installation of Windows NT begins. For further installation information, refer to your Windows NT documentation.

Note: During installation, you are prompted for the location of the files for Microsoft Windows NT. Install the files into the larger of the two partitions you just created, and when prompted, format that partition with the NTFS file system.

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Preparing to Install Digital UNIX

Installation Preparation

Before installing Digital UNIX (DEC OSF/1) on your system, make sure that you have the following:

Digital UNIX Version 3.0B, Version 3.2, or later

SRM console firmware, Version 2.0-3 or later

EISA Configuration Utility (ECU) diskette for Digital UNIX and OpenVMS.

Before starting installation, be sure to review the Digital UNIX release notes

("General Installation") and the Digital UNIX installation guide for your version of the operating system.

Setting the Operating System Type

1. Turn the system on. After a short wait, the operator control panel on the front of the system displays the message "Model 4/2xx," and the screen displays initialization and testing information.

2. Press the Enter key. If the screen displays a triple arrow prompt (>>>) you have booted the SRM console and you can proceed to the next section, "Installing

Digital UNIX."

If the computer booted directly into the ARC Boot menu, and you did not see the

>>> prompt, you must switch to the SRM console.

3. From the ARC Boot menu, select the Supplementary menu.

4. From the Supplementary menu, select "Set up the system."

5. From the Setup menu, select "Switch to OpenVMS or OSF console." This allows you to select your operating system console.

6. Select your operating system, then select "Enter" on the Setup menu.

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7. When the system displays the message, "Power-cycle the system to implement the change," press the Reset button.

These steps initiate loading of the firmware. Once the Digital UNIX and

OpenVMS firmware is loaded and the system is initialized, the system displays the SRM console prompt (>>>).

Installing Digital UNIX

To install the Digital UNIX operating system from a CDROM or to do a remote installation over a local network using Remote Installation Service (RIS), refer to your operating system documentation.

To determine the unit number of the drive for your device, enter the following command at the Digital UNIX and OpenVMS (SRM) console prompt :

>>> show device

The show device command will display output similar to the following example:

Example 3-1 The show device Command Display

dka400.4.0.6.0

dva0.0.0.1

ewa0.0.0.13.0

pka0.7.0.6.0

DKA400

DVA0

EWA0

PKA0

RRD43 2893

08-00-2B-3E-B6-C8

SCSI Bus ID 7

In the display, look for the line with the CDROM device string, RRD43, which indicates the CDROM device. The device boot string for your system, which begins with the letters DKA, appears in that line. In the example, the device boot string is

DKA400.

Preparing to Install OpenVMS

Preparing the System

Before you install the OpenVMS operating system on your system, make sure that you have the following:

OpenVMS operating system, Version 6.1-1H2 or later

SRM console firmware, Version 2.0-3 or later

EISA Configuration Utility (ECU) diskette for Digital UNIX (DEC OSF/1) and OpenVMS.

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Before beginning the installation or upgrade, prepare the required hardware and software components, as described in this section. After preparation is complete, refer to the OpenVMS AXP Version 6.1 Upgrade and Installation Manual to install the operating system.

Preparing Hardware Components

To prepare the hardware components, follow these steps:

1. Be sure the hardware has been installed and checked for proper operation.

2. Be sure you know how to turn on and operate your system components, including the system unit, console, monitor or terminal, drives, and printer. Refer to the section, "Basic Operation" in this guide, if necessary.

3. Set up your system to record the installation procedure on either a hardcopy terminal or a printer attached to the console terminal. If you do not do this, the screen messages will be lost. You should record a transcript of screen messages to refer to in case there is a problem during installation.

Preparing Software Components

To prepare the software components, follow these steps:

1. Be sure you have all the items listed on the bill of materials in the software distribution kit. If your distribution kit is incomplete, notify your service representative and request priority shipment of any missing items.

2. Review all cover letters and release notes.

Setting the Operating System Type

To set the operating system type, follow steps 1 through 7.

1. Turn the system on. After a short wait, the operator control panel on the front of the system displays the message "Model 4/2xx" and the screen displays initialization and testing information.

2. Press the Enter key. If the screen displays a triple arrow prompt (>>>), you have booted the SRM console and you can proceed to the next section.

If the computer booted directly into the ARC Boot menu, and you did not see the

>>> prompt, you must switch to the SRM console.

3. From the ARC Boot menu, select the Supplementary menu.

4. From the Supplementary menu, select "Set up the system."

5. From the Setup menu, select "Switch to OpenVMS or OSF console." This allows you to select your operating system console.

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6. Select your operating system, then select Enter on the Setup menu.

7. When the system displays the message, "Power-cycle the system to implement the change," press the Reset button.

These steps initiate loading of the firmware. Once the Digital UNIX and

OpenVMS firmware is loaded and the system is initialized, the system displays the SRM console prompt (>>>).

Required PALcode

If your computer console does not have a specific minimum version of the privileged architecture library code (PALcode), you may not be able to boot your system during the installation or upgrade procedure. To ensure the correct version, follow these steps before performing an installation or upgrade:

1. At the SRM console prompt (>>>) on your running system, enter the show configuration command. The system display will indicate the PALcode version your system is using.

2. Refer to the most recent OpenVMS operating system cover letter or release notes, or contact your service representative to determine whether your system is running the required or recommended version of PALcode.

3. If the PALcode version is below the required or recommended minimum, upgrade your firmware either by following the directions in the section, "Firmware," in

Upgrading, or by contacting your service representative.

Installing OpenVMS

Use the OpenVMS CDROM to install or upgrade the operating system, or to perform operations such as backing up the system disk. For installation information, refer to your operating system documentation.

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4 Basic Operation

Introduction

This chapter explains how to start and stop your system, issue console commands, and operate other basic system functions. It includes the following topics:

Turning the System On

Turning the System Off

Accessing the System from a Remote Location

Interpreting Startup Messages

Using the Consoles

Booting the Operating System

Using Storage Drives

Caring for Your System

This chapter assumes that you have set up the hardware and made all necessary connections, as described in the Hardware Installation chapter.

Turning the System On

Note: Your server may be equipped with pre-installed operating system software when you receive it.

To turn on a system that has pre-installed operating system software, follow steps 1 through 5 below. For a system without pre-installed software, follow steps 1 through

8:

1. Connect any external options, such as monitors or terminals, or expansion boxes that house storage devices.

2. Make sure the top cover and side panels of the system unit enclosure are in place.

The system will not start if the cover and side panels are not in place.

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1

2

3. Plug the power cord into a wall outlet. If your system has two power supplies, plug in a power cord for each one.

4. Turn on any external options that are connected to the system.

5. Press the On/Off switch on the front of the system unit. The switch stays depressed in the "on" position. The green On/Off indicator on the front of the system will light.

Figure 4-1 shows the location of the On/Off switch (1 shows the switch in the

"on" position; 2 shows the switch in the "off" position).

Figure 4-1 Location of the On/Off Switch

1 On/Off switch in ("on" position)

2 On/Off switch out ("off" position)

MA00222

The screen on your monitor or terminal will display test codes and initialization messages. When the startup procedure is complete, the operator control panel displays the message "Model 4/2xx." By default, the screen displays the SRM console prompt (>>>).

6. If you encounter a problem, verify that you correctly followed steps 1 through 5.

Refer to Chapter 8, "Troubleshooting" for more information. If your operating system was preinstalled, proceed to the section, "Turning the System Off."

7. At this point, if your operating system was not preinstalled, you may have to perform one or all of the following tasks, depending on the startup display messages and the operating system you choose to run:

Run the EISA Configuration Utility.

Check required environment variable settings.

Change the way your system powers up or boots.

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Verify your configuration.

Refer to the section "Booting the Operating System" in this chapter for more information on each of these tasks.

8. Install the operating system. (Refer first to Chapter 3, "Preparing to Install an

Operating System" and then refer to your operating system documentation.)

9. Reboot the system by pressing the Reset button.

10. If you encounter a problem, verify that you correctly followed steps 1 through 8.

Refer to Chapter 8, "Troubleshooting" for more information.

Turning the System Off

You may not need to turn the system off in order to resolve system hangs or similar problems. You can often recover from hangs or other problems by pressing the Reset switch on the operator control panel shown in Figure 1-2.

Caution: Pressing the Reset switch reinitializes the system and causes you to lose the applications you are running.

Within Windows NT, pressing the Ctrl, Alt, and Delete keys simultaneously allows you to reset a window without losing an application.

The following list summarizes the steps for turning the system off.

1. Shut down the operating system, following the instructions in the operating system documentation.

2. Press the On/Off switch on the front of the system unit.

3. Turn off all external options that are connected to the system unit.

Turning the System Off for an Extended Period

If you need to turn off your system for an extended period, first turn off power as described above. Next, unplug the power cords from the power outlets.

Caution: If two power supplies are present, unplug the power cord for each supply.

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Accessing the System from a Remote Location

If you are running the Digital UNIX or OpenVMS operating systems, you can invoke console mode from a remote device that is connected to your system through one of the serial ports on the rear of the system. The default console port is COM1. (See

Figure 1-3, which shows the rear panel ports and slots.)

To access the system from a remote location, follow these steps:

1. Connect to your system from the remote location.

2. Shut down the operating system. (Refer to the operating system documentation, if necessary.)

3. When the shutdown has completed, press Return.

The SRM console prompt (

>>>

) is displayed.

If you want to run the EISA Configuration Utility (ECU) from a terminal connected to a serial line, refer to the section, "EISA Configuration Utility

(ECU)" in Chapter 6 for more information.

.

Note: The terminal must be set for 8-bit controls, the keyboard set so that the tilde (~) key sends the escape signal, and the console environment variable set to serial.

From a remote location you cannot reset or initialize a system running Windows NT. If the system is running

Windows NT when you try to access it from a remote location, attempts to access the system will fail.

Interpreting Startup Messages

After you turn the system on, the operator control panel and your monitor or terminal screen provide the following status information:

The countdown and ready message on the operator control panel

The system startup display on your monitor or terminal screen

The Boot menu (for Windows NT systems) or the console prompt (for Digital

UNIX or OpenVMS systems) on your monitor or terminal screen

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Audible beep codes indicate startup errors. See "Interpreting Error Beep Codes" in

Chapter 8, "Troubleshooting."

While the system runs the startup tests, the operator control panel on the front of the system displays a series of codes. When the startup tests are complete, the operator control panel displays the following message:

Model 4/2xx

During the startup sequence, the startup display scrolls on your monitor or terminal screen. To stop the display from scrolling, type Ctrl/S. To resume scrolling, type

Ctrl/Q. The system startup display looks similar to the following example:

The operating system determines whether your system displays a Boot menu (for the

Windows NT operating system) or a console prompt (for Digital UNIX and

OpenVMS operating systems) after the startup display. If the system does not display either a menu or a console prompt, press the Return key several times. If there is no response, refer to the "Troubleshooting" section of this guide for more information.

Systems with Windows NT

If you are using the Windows NT operating system, the ARC firmware displays the

Windows NT Boot menu after the system startup display. The following example shows the Windows NT Boot menu.

Example 4-1: Windows NT Boot Menu

ARC Multiboot Alpha AXP Version n.nn

Copyright (c) 1993 Microsoft Corporation

Copyright (c) 1993 Digital Equipment Corporation

Boot menu:

Boot the Windows NT operating system

Boot an alternate operating system

Run a program

Supplementary menu...

Use the arrow keys to select, then press Enter.

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Systems with Digital UNIX or OpenVMS

If you are using the Digital UNIX or OpenVMS operating systems, the SRM console prompt is displayed after the system startup display. The prompt looks like this:

>>>

To display any messages that may have scrolled by, enter the cat el

command at the prompt.

Note: When entering a command that results in a lengthy screen display, you can use these formats to limit the screen display to 23 lines at a time:

>>> cat el | more or

>>> more el.

The following example shows a sample startup display and the SRM console prompt for systems running Digital UNIX or Open VMS. (The initial lines, related to copyright and patent information, remain on-screen for a few seconds only.)

Example 4-2: Digital UNIX or OpenVMS SRM Startup Display

BIOS Emulation V1.12

Copyright (c) 1993-1994 Digital Equipment Corporation

All Rights Reserved

Patent Pending eb.....ea.e9.e8.e7.e6.e5.e4.e3.e2.e1.e0.

Vx.x-xxxx, built on Oct 4 1995 at 14:48:51

>>>

Reading the Startup Test Results

The Windows NT startup test display indicates successful tests with the word

passed. It indicates tests that fail with the word failed and an error code.

The Digital UNIX and OpenVMS startup test displays indicate successful tests with the word OK. Tests that fail are indicated by double question marks (??) and an error code.

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If the System Passes Startup Tests

If the system passes the startup tests, it either boots the selected operating system or emits audible "beep" codes and halts in console mode, depending on the system default settings.

If the System Fails Startup Tests

The following list summarizes the steps to follow if the system fails the startup tests.

1. Turn the system unit off, wait approximately 15 seconds, then turn it on again.

2. If the system continues to fail the startup tests, or emits audible error beep codes and halts, refer to the "Troubleshooting" section of this guide.

Using the Consoles

The Windows NT (ARC) console and the Digital UNIX and OpenVMS (SRM) console are used to perform different tasks. For example, ROM-based diagnostics

(such as the test

command) are run only from the Digital UNIX and OpenVMS console, regardless of the operating system you are running.

Invoking Console Mode

To perform tasks from console mode you must first invoke console mode by shutting down the operating system according to the operating system shutdown procedure described in your operating system documentation. If you are running either the

Digital UNIX or OpenVMS operating system, you can also invoke console mode by pressing the Halt switch on the operator control panel.

Caution: If you are running Digital UNIX or

OpenVMS operating systems, press the Halt switch only after you have shut down the operating system using the proper shutdown procedure.

The Halt switch halts the Windows NT operating system; you must then press the

Reset switch to completely reboot the firmware.

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When to Switch Consoles

You can perform most console-related tasks from the interface designed to interact with your operating system. However, the console interfaces are designed so that you can easily switch between them. You will need to switch between the consoles in the following instances:

If you are running Digital UNIX or OpenVMS and need to run the RAID

Configuration Utility (RCU), switch to the Windows NT (ARC) console.

If you are running Windows NT and want to perform any of the following tasks, switch to the Digital UNIX and OpenVMS (SRM) console:

1. Test the system (other than self-tests at system startup)

2. Examine and verify memory locations that are recognized by the system

3. Set or change some environment variables, such as Ethernet device type and speed for Fast SCSI devices

4. Verify the versions of all firmware PALcode.

Switching to the Digital UNIX and OpenVMS (SRM) Console

To switch from the Windows NT (ARC) console to the Digital UNIX and OpenVMS

(SRM) console, you can press the Reset switch on your system unit, or turn the system off and then back on.

Alternatively, you can use the following procedure, which loads the firmware:

1. From the ARC Boot menu, select the Supplementary menu.

2. From the Supplementary menu, select "Set up the system."

3. From the Setup menu, select "Switch to OpenVMS or OSF console." This allows you to select your operating system console.

4. Select your operating system, then press enter on the Setup menu.

5. When the system displays the message, "Power-cycle the system to implement the change," press the Reset button.

Once the Digital UNIX and OpenVMS firmware is loaded and the system is initialized, the system displays the SRM console prompt (>>>).

Switching to the Windows NT (ARC) Console

To switch from the Digital UNIX or OpenVMS (SRM) console to the Windows NT

(ARC) console, type the following command at the console prompt:

>>> set os_type nt

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Basic Operation AlphaServer 1000 Owner's Guide

Then turn the system off and then back on. This procedure loads the firmware. Once the Windows NT firmware is loaded and the system is initialized, the system displays the Windows NT Boot menu.

The following command allows you to switch from the SRM to the ARC console in your current session but return to the SRM console if you turn off the system:

>>> arc

Windows NT (ARC) Console Menus

The Windows NT (ARC) console has three primary menus: the Boot menu, the

Supplementary menu, and the Setup menu.

Boot Menu Functions

The Boot menu contains menu items that allow you to perform the following tasks:

Boot the default boot selection

Boot an alternative boot selection

Run a program

Access the Supplementary menu

Supplementary Menu Functions

The Supplementary menu contains items that allow you to perform the following tasks:

Install new firmware

Install Windows NT from a compact disc

Access the Setup menu

List the ARC firmware device names for the installed devices

Return to the Boot menu

Setup Menu Functions

The Setup menu contains menu items that allow you to perform the following tasks:

Set the system time

Set the default system partition

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Configure the system floppy drives and keyboard

Manage the Windows NT (ARC) boot selections

Set the system to boot automatically

Run the EISA Configuration Utility

Edit the system environment variables

Reset the system to factory defaults

Set the default operating system and system firmware

Return to the Supplementary menu, with or without saving Setup menu changes

Digital UNIX and OpenVMS (SRM) Console Commands

There are two levels of Digital UNIX and OpenVMS (SRM) console commands:

Basic

Comprehensive

Basic Commands

You use basic commands to perform common tasks described in this guide. Table

4-1 lists each console task and provides the corresponding command and its syntax.

Caution: Environment variables must be entered exactly as shown, not abbreviated. The system will not recognize an abbreviated form.

Comprehensive Commands

Additional commands are available for system diagnosis and other complex tasks.

Use of these commands requires detailed knowledge of your system. Do not use these commands without fully understanding the effect they can have on your system.

To see a list of additional commands, enter help

or man at the SRM console prompt.

Note: When entering a command that results in a lengthy screen display, you can use this format to limit the screen display to 23 lines at a time: >>> more el

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Table 4-1 Basic SRM Console Commands

Task

Boot the Windows NT

(ARC) console firmware.

Boot the operating system.

Command

arc boot

Syntax

arc boot [-flags

[ longword,]longword

[-halt] [filename]

[ boot_device] cat el or

more el continue

Display error logs.

Resume program execution.

Invoke the EISA

Configuration Utility.

Display online help on using console commands.

Initialize the system.

Halt system tests invoked by test command.

Display online help on using console commands.

Display status of all system processes.

Set an environment variable.

Display the value of an environment variable or display configuration information.

Test the system and display results.

cat el continue ecu help init kill_diags man ps set show test ecu help [ command . . .] init kill_diags man [ command . . . ] ps set [-default] envar val show [ envar]

[{config,device,memory, pal,version}] test

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Getting Help on the Windows NT (ARC) Console

The Windows NT (ARC) console provides general help on using the Setup menu, although it does not provide help on all the menu items contained in its menus. Table

4-2 lists the steps that you follow to display the Setup menu help screen.

Table 4-2 Windows NT (ARC) Console Help

Step Action

1

2

3

4

If necessary, enter the Windows

NT console by shutting down the operating system following the procedure described in the operating system documentation.

Turn the system off and then on.

Result

The system displays the Windows

NT console Boot menu.

Choose "Supplementary menu..." The system displays the

Supplementary menu.

Choose "Set up the system..." The system displays the Setup menu.

Choose Help menu and press

Enter.

The system displays the Setup menu help screen.

Setup Menu

Example 4-3 shows a partial Setup menu display with the help menu item selected

(shown in bold).

Example 4-3: Setup Menu

ARC Multiboot DEC Version n.nn Thursday, 6-10-1994

9:49:50 PM

Copyright (c) 1991, 1992 Microsoft Corporation

Copyright (c) 1993 Digital Equipment Corporation

Setup menu:

.

.

.

Reset system to factory defaults

Help

Switch to OpenVMS or OSF console

Supplementary menu, and do not save changes...

Use the arrow keys to select, then press Enter.

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Setup Menu Help

Example 4-4 shows the Setup menu help display.

Example 4-4: Setup Menu Help Display

Do the following steps, in this order, to set up the system:

1. Set system time.

2. Set default environment variables.

3. Set default configuration.

4. Create at least one boot selection.

5. Setup autoboot, if desired.

6. Run the EISA configuration utility.

-> An arrow next to a menu item means that something is wrong in this area of the machine, and you should select this item to fix it.

"Reset system to factory defaults" does steps 2 -- 5 for a typical system.

The ESCape key returns from a menu, and aborts a sequence.

The firmware automatically reboots if the configuration is changed.

Press any key to continue. . .

Getting Help on the Digital UNIX and OpenVMS (SRM) Console

To get online help, enter help at the SRM console prompt. Example 4-5 shows the help command and the resulting display.

Example 4-5: The help Command

>>> help

NAME

help

FUNCTION

Display information about console commands.

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SYNOPSIS

help [<command>...]

Command synopsis conventions:

<item> Implies a placeholder for user specified item.

<item>... Implies an item or list of items.

[] Implies optional keyword or item.

{a,b,c} Implies any one of a, b, c.

{a|b|c} Implies any combination of a, b, c.

The following help topics are available: alloc boot bpt break cat check chmod clear continue crash create date deposit dynamic echo edit eval examine exer exit false find_field fr_cmd free fw_cmd grep halt hd help init isp1020_edit kill kill_diags line ls man memtest mem_more net nettest ps rm sa semaphore set set host shell show show cluster show config show hwrpb show iobq show map show memory show_status sleep sp start stop true update wc x

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Basic Operation AlphaServer 1000 Owner's Guide

Booting the Operating System

You may need to perform some of the following tasks before booting your operating system.

Run the EISA Configuration Utility.

Check required environment variable settings.

Change the way your system powers up or boots.

Verify your configuration.

The remainder of this section contains more information about each of these tasks.

Running the EISA Configuration Utility

If you have added, removed, or moved an EISA or ISA card, you must run the EISA

Configuration Utility before booting the operating system. Refer to the EISA

Configuration Utility section of this guide for more information.

Checking Required Environment Variable Settings

If you are running Digital UNIX or OpenVMS, you may want to check that settings for the following variables match your configuration. The SRM console command to reset each variable is shown in parenthesis. To see a complete list of environment variables, type show * at the SRM console prompt.

Operating system ( set os_type

)

Ethernet device type ( set ew*o_mode

)

Speed for Fast SCSI devices ( set pk*0_fast

)

Boot device ( set bootdef_dev

)

Boot flags ( set boot_osflags

)

Changing Startup and Boot Defaults

You can change the way the system starts up or boots the operating system. For example, you can set the system to autoboot or you can change the default boot device. To make these kinds of changes you need to change default values for your system's environment variables.

To change default values for Windows NT systems, which boot automatically, you can prevent autoboot by selecting one of the menu options.

To change default values for Digital UNIX or OpenVMS systems, see "set" in

Table 4-1, "Basic SRM Console Commands."

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Startup and Boot Environment Variables

The following environment variables affect the way the system starts up or boots: auto_action autoload countdown os_type

Table 4-3 lists the boot environment variables and their values, and briefly describes their effects.

Table 4-3 Startup and Boot Environment Variables

Operating

System

Digital

UNIX

OpenVMS

Environment

Variable

Value

auto_action

Boot

Halt

Restart

Description

Specifies the system default startup action. Applies only to the Digital UNIX and OpenVMS operating systems.

Windows NT autoload

Windows NT countdown

Windows NT

Digital

UNIX

OpenVMS os_type

YES or NO

10 seconds

(default value)

NT

OSF

VMS

Specifies whether the Windows NT operating system should boot. Does not affect the OpenVMS or Digital

UNIX operating systems. If the value is YES, the

Windows NT firmware boots the system after the

COUNTDOWN time-limit expires. If the value is NO, the system halts at the Windows NT firmware Boot menu.

Specifies the time limit within which you can stop the

Windows NT operating system from booting if

AUTOLOAD is set to YES. The time limit is specified in seconds. When you turn on the system or reinitialize the firmware, the system displays the seconds remaining before the operating system boots automatically. To stop the system from booting automatically, you must choose another menu item from the Boot menu.

Specifies the system default operating system setting.

Depending on the value, the system either boots or restarts the specified operating system, or halts in the specified console. You can modify the value from either the Windows NT (ARC) console or Digital

UNIX and Open VMS (SRM) console.

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Basic Operation AlphaServer 1000 Owner's Guide

Entering the Windows NT Firmware

The system enters and remains in the Windows NT firmware under the following conditions:

When os_type

is set to NT and autoload

is set to NO

When autoload

is set to YES and you choose another menu item on the Boot menu before the countdown

time limit expires.

Entering the Digital UNIX and OpenVMS Firmware

The system enters and remains in the Digital UNIX and OpenVMS firmware under the following conditions:

When auto_action

is set to HALT and os_type

is set either to OSF or

VMS.

When the startup tests fail, the system ignores the os_type

setting and enters the Digital UNIX and OpenVMS console automatically. If the os_type setting is NT when the system fails, it returns to the Windows NT firmware when you correct the error.

Verify Your Configuration

Windows NT Systems

To verify your Windows NT configuration, select the ARC console menu option

"Display Hardware Configuration," which lists the ARC boot device names for devices installed in the system. For a more complete listing of the options that are recognized by your system, you may want to enter the Digital UNIX and OpenVMS commands described in the section "Viewing the System Configuration" in Chapter

6, "Configuring." To enter these commands, you must switch from the Windows NT

(ARC) console to the Digital UNIX and OpenVMS (SRM) console. For information about switching to the Digital UNIX and OpenVMS (SRM) console, refer to

"Switching to the Digital UNIX and OpenVMS (SRM) Console" earlier in this section.

Note: Switch back to the Windows NT (ARC) console before booting the Windows NT operating system.

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Digital UNIX or OpenVMS Systems

Use the following SRM console commands to verify system configuration for Digital

UNIX or OpenVMS systems.

show config show device show memory set

and show

Displays the buses on the system and the devices found on those buses

Displays the devices and controllers in the system

Displays main memory configuration

Set and display environment variable setting

Booting Windows NT

When the system is shipped with the Microsoft Windows NT operating system already installed, the system default settings cause the system to boot from the system disk automatically after it successfully completes the startup tests. However, the system counts down for 10 seconds after it displays the Boot menu before booting. You can stop the system from booting before this time limit expires by choosing another menu item by using the up or down arrow key.

You can change these system default settings. For example, you can cause the system to halt at the Windows NT firmware Boot menu after the startup tests, or you can increase the countdown time limit.

Changing Windows NT Boot Selections

The Windows NT firmware uses boot selections to identify the location of the operating system files. When the system is shipped, the default boot selection identifies the system disk as the location of the operating system files. Thus, the system boots from the system disk. You can set alternative boot selections if, for example, you want to boot the operating system from a different device.

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Using the Windows NT Boot Menu

Example 4-6 shows the Windows NT Boot menu.

Example 4-6: Windows NT Boot Menu

ARC Multiboot Alpha AXP Version n.nn

Copyright (c) 1993 Microsoft Corporation

Copyright (c) 1993 Digital Equipment Corporation

Boot menu:

Boot the default operating system

Boot an alternate operating system

Run a program

Supplementary menu...

Use the arrow keys to select, then press Enter.

Table 4-4 lists the steps you must follow to boot Windows NT from the Boot menu.

Table 4-4 Booting Windows NT from the Boot Menu

Step

1

2

3

Action

To boot the system using the default boot selection, choose

"Boot Windows NT" on the

Boot menu, and press Return.

To boot the system using an alternative boot selection, choose "Boot an alternative operating system" on the Boot menu and press Return.

Choose the alternative boot selection name that you want to boot and press Return.

Result

The system boots from the system disk, using the default boot selection --

Environment Variables.

The system displays a list of the alternative boot selection names.

The system boots from the boot selection that you choose.

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Windows NT Boot Selection Menu

Use the Windows NT Boot selection menu to change boot selections for your system.

You choose "Supplementary menu" from the Boot menu and then "Manage boot selection menu" to access the Boot selection menu. The following example shows the

Windows NT Boot selection menu.

Example 4-7: Windows NT Boot Selection Menu

ARC Multiboot Alpha AXP Version n.nn

Copyright (c) 1993 Microsoft Corporation

Copyright (c) 1993 Digital Equipment Corporation

Boot selection menu:

Add a boot selection

Change a boot selection

Check boot selections

Delete a boot selection

Dump boot selections

Rearrange boot selections

Setup menu...

Use the arrow keys to select, then press Enter.

Booting Digital UNIX or OpenVMS Operating Systems

The operating system, if supplied, is installed on the system disk.

For more information on pre-installed Digital UNIX software, see the DEC

OSF/1 AXP Factory Installed Software user information card.

For more information on pre-installed OpenVMS software, see the OpenVMS

Factory Installed Software user information card.

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When the system is shipped with Digital UNIX or OpenVMS software installed, the system default settings cause the system to boot from the system disk automatically after it successfully completes the startup tests. You can change these settings if, for example, you want the system to halt at the console prompt (>>>) after it completes the startup tests.

Digital UNIX and OpenVMS System Defaults

The Digital UNIX and OpenVMS operating systems use default settings to tell the system where the operating system is located and how to boot the system. When the system is shipped, these default settings cause the system to boot from the system disk. You can set different default settings if, for example, you want to boot the operating system from a different device. See "set" in Table 4-1, "Basic SRM

Console Commands."

Boot Command

Use the following command to boot either the Digital UNIX operating system or the

OpenVMS operating system using the default settings.

>>> boot

If you wish to change any default settings, see "Changing Startup and Boot Defaults" in the section, "Booting the Operating System" earlier in this chapter.

Using Storage Drives

Mass storage drives are devices that are used to store large amounts of data for extended periods. The system accommodates the following types of storage devices, shown in Figure 4-2:

One 3½-inch diskette drive

Two 5½-inch half-height drives (CDROM or tape)

Up to seven 3½-inch StorageWorks hard disk drives

The drives are located in compartments inside your system, as shown in Figure 4-3.

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Figure 4-2 Storage Devices

1

3 4

2

M A 0 0 2 2 1

1 CDROM drive

2 Diskette drive

3 Tape drive

4 StorageWorks hard disk drive

Figure 4-3 Location of Storage Devices

3 4

2

1

1 Diskette drive compartment

2 CDROM drive compartment

3 Tape drive compartment

4 StorageWorks shelf

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Using a Diskette Drive

Diskette drives read information from removable diskettes.

One diskette drive is located to the left of the removable-media mass storage compartment, below the CDROM drive. The diskette drive components are shown in

Figure 4-4.

To insert a diskette into a diskette drive:

1. Set the write-protect switch (

1

) on the diskette to either the write-protected (

3

) or write-enabled position ( 2 ).

2. Insert the diskette as shown in the figure.

The activity indicator (

4

) lights when the systems reads the diskette.

Figure 4-4 Diskette Drive Components

4

5

1 Write-protect switch

2 Write-protect switch

(enabled)

3 Write-protect switch

(protected)

4 Activity indicator

5 Eject button

1

3 2

MA00226

To remove a diskette:

Press the Eject button ( 5 ) on the diskette drive.

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Using a CDROM Drive

CDROM drives read information from removable CDROMs (read-only compact discs).Your system uses a CDROM drive that has an automatic loading/ejection feature that is functional only when power is supplied. Figure 4-5 shows the components of a

CDROM

drive.

Caution: Handle a

CDROM

by its edges. Do not touch the surface of a

CDROM

. Fingerprints and dust can cause the

CDROM

to malfunction.

Figure 4-5 CDROM Drive Components

XXXXXXXXXX XXXXXXXX

XXXXXXXX XXXXXX XX XXXX

1 2 3 4 5 6

M A 0 0 2 2 4

1

CDROM

2 Drive headphone port

3 Drive volume control

4

D rive activity indicator

5

D rive eject button

6

E mergency eject hole

To insert a disc in the drive:

1. Press the drive Eject button (

5

in the figure).

The

CDROM drawer opens approximately one inch.

2. Gently pull the drawer far enough out so that you can insert the disc ( 1).

3. Insert the disc into the drawer.

4. Push the drawer back into the drive.

The activity light ( 4 in the figure) comes on. When the activity light goes off, the drive is ready to use. To operate the drive, follow the instructions provided with your system software.

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To remove a disc from the drive:

1. Press the drive Eject button ( 5 ).

The CDROM drawer opens approximately one inch.

2. Gently pull the drawer out far enough so that you can remove the compact disc.

3. Remove the disc from the drawer.

4. Push the drawer back into the drive.

Note: If the CDROM drawer will not open when you press the Eject button, use the following emergency procedure: Insert the end of a paper clip (no more than 2.0 mm in diameter) into the emergency eject hole (6 in Figure 4-5) and push in gently. The caddy will eject from the drive. (Do not insert the bar more than 1 inch 25 mm.)

To insert a disc in a drive with a caddy:

1. Open the caddy by pressing the tabs on both sides of the caddy (1) in Figure 4-6.

2. Set a disc, printed side up, into the caddy as shown.

3. Insert the caddy into the drive, as shown (2):.

Be sure the system is on and the indicator light is off.

Insert the caddy into the drive with the arrow forward (3), as shown.

4. Push the caddy into the drive as far as it will go. The caddy should be completely inside the drive when properly inserted.

5. Check the indicator light, which comes on when the caddy is inserted correctly.

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Figure 4-6 Inserting a Disc in a Drive with a Caddy

1

2

MA00452

XXXXXXXX

XXXXXXXX XXXXXX XX XXXX

To remove a disc from a drive with a caddy:

1. Press the drive Eject button (

4

).

The CDROM caddy ejects from the drive.

2. Remove the disc from the caddy.

3

4

MA00452

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Using a StorageWorks Disk Drive

StorageWorks disk drives are mass storage devices. They are located in a seven-bay shelf on the front right of the system unit, behind the door.

When the system is turned on and during periods of activity, the StorageWorks disk drive indicator lights blink, but do not stay on. Table 4-5 explains the meaning of the indicator lights.

Table 4-5 StorageWorks Disk Drive Indicator Lights

Indicator

Activity (green)

Fault (amber)

Status

Blinks

On

Meaning

Reading or writing to disk

Problem exists

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Caring for Your System

Before doing any cleaning of your system, make sure you turn off the system and disconnect any external devices. When using a moistened cloth for cleaning, do not allow any excess fluid to leak into the system, keyboard, or monitor. Wait until the system is completely dry before turning it on.

Cleaning Your System Unit

Clean the outside of your system periodically with a soft cloth lightly moistened with a mild detergent solution. Do not use solvents or abrasive cleaners.

Cleaning Your Mouse

If your mouse does not move smoothly or if the pointer jumps across the screen when you are using the mouse, the ball inside the mouse may need cleaning. To clean the ball, do the following:

1. Turn the mouse over and remove the plate on the bottom.

2. Remove the rubber ball.

3. Clean the ball and rollers with a cotton swab that has been lightly dampened with a mild detergent.

4. Replace the ball and plate.

Cleaning Your Keyboard

From time to time, your keyboard keys may get dirty with use. Clean them with a clean cloth that has been lightly dampened with a mild detergent solution.

Moving Your System

Perform the following steps before moving or shipping the system:

1. Back up all files stored on the hard disk drive.

2. Turn off the external peripherals, the system, and the monitor or terminal.

3. Disconnect the power cord for each power supply from the wall outlet and from the back of the system unit.

4. Disconnect the monitor or terminal, keyboard, mouse, and any other cables from the back of the system unit.

5. Package the system as described in the next section, "Packing Your System."

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Packing Your System

If you are moving the system a short distance (from one room to another in the same building), you do not need to pack it. If you are shipping the system or moving it by vehicle, pack it to avoid damage.

Pack the system in the original packing material and containers. If you did not save the boxes and packing material, use a sturdy carton and padding to avoid damage.

Installing Your System at a New Location

After moving the system to a new location, follow the installation instructions that came with your system to unpack and install it. Ensure that the new location conforms to the recommendations provided in "Selecting a System Location" in

Chapter 2, "Hardware Installation."

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5 Installing and Removing

Components

Introduction

This chapter explains how to prepare for and perform installation and removal of your system's components. You need to perform these procedures in order to upgrade your system or replace defective components. Topics covered in this chapter are listed below.

Caution: Be sure to follow the appropriate antistatic precautions whenever handling internal components.

Components listed in "Removing/Replacing Other

Options" should be handled by qualified service personnel only.

Preparing to Install or Remove Components

Top and Side Panels

Memory Modules

EISA, ISA, and PCI Option Cards

Storage Devices

Power Supply

CPU Card

Removing/Replacing Other Options

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Preparing to Install or Remove Components

To prepare your system for installation and removal of components, you will need to assemble the required equipment, familiarize yourself with antistatic precautions, and remove the top and side panels of the system unit.

Required Equipment

You need the following equipment to perform the installation and removal procedures described in the following sections.

Flat-head screwdriver

Phillips screwdriver

Antistatic wrist strap

Replacement option board kit or device kit, if necessary

Antistatic Precautions

When handling internal system components, use an antistatic wrist strap to avoid damaging the components.

Caution: Do not disconnect the system unit power cord or unplug the power cord from the power supply socket. The power cord grounds the system unit, preventing damage to the internal components.

Figure 5-1 shows how to attach the antistatic wrist strap to your wrist and to the system unit.

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Figure 5-1 Attaching the Antistatic Wrist Strap

MA00230

Top Cover and Side Panels

Depending on the components involved, you may not need to remove all panels from the system unit. The top cover and left side panel must be removed to install or remove any internal component; the right side panel, to install or remove a power supply or second SCSI controller.

Removing the Top Cover and Side Panels

To remove the top cover and side panels, refer to Figure 5-2 and follow these steps:

Caution: Make sure the system unit On/Off switch is in the "off" position before removing the system cover and panels.

1. Shut down the operating system following the instructions listed in the operating system documentation.

2. Set the On/Off switches on all external options connected to the system to the off position.

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3. Set the On/Off switch on the system unit to the off position. An interlocking sensor switch inside the system unit (see Figure 9-4) will automatically turn off the system if you remove the top cover and have not turned off the system.

4. Turn the front door lock to the right to unlock the system unit.

5. Pull down the top cover release latch on the front of the system until it catches in the down position.

6. Grasp the finger groove at the rear of the top cover and pull the top cover straight back about two inches, and lift up on the cover.

7. Pull the top of the side panel back, then up and away from the unit and pull up on the panel to remove it. (Repeat this step for the other panel.)

Figure 5-2 Removing the Top Cover and Side Panels

1

1 Top cover release latch

M A 0 0 2 3 1

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Installing and Removing Components AlphaServer 1000 Owner's Guide

Replacing the Top Cover and Side Panels

Follow these steps and refer to Figure 5-3 to replace the top cover and side panels of the system unit:

1. Align the guides on the top and bottom inside of the side panel with the lip of the system unit frame.

2. Tilt the side panel top towards the unit and lift the flange at the top of the panel over the system unit frame.

3. Slide the panel forward into position. (Repeat steps 1 to 3 for the other panel.)

4. Align the top cover with the top of the side panels and slide the cover gently onto the unit from the rear (5). Hold down the top cover release latch (4) until the top cover is in place, and then release it to secure the cover and panels.

5. Lock the top cover and side panels using the system unit key.

6. Set the On/Off switches on all external options connected to the system to the

"on" position.

7. Set the On/Off switch on the system unit to the "on" position.

Figure 5-3 Replacing the Top Cover and Side Panels

4

2

5

3

1 Bottom side panel guide

2 Top side panel guide

3 Right side panel

4 Top cover release latch

5 Top cover

1

M A 0 0 2 8 1

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Memory Modules

The system unit supports 20 single in-line memory module (SIMM) connectors on the system board. The SIMM connectors are grouped in four memory banks consisting of five memory modules, including one for ECC (Error Correction Code).

Figure 5-4 shows the four memory banks and their memory module connectors.

Keep in mind the following rules when installing memory modules:

A memory option consists of five memory modules.

Bank 0 must contain a memory option (five modules: 0,1,2,3 plus one ECC module)

All memory modules within a bank must be of the same capacity.

The system unit supports four sizes of memory options: 16-, 32-, 64-, and 128megabytes. Using combinations of these four memory options, the system supports between 16 to 512 megabytes of memory.

Figure 5-4 Memory Banks and Connectors

Bank 3

Bank 2

Bank 1

Bank 0

ECC Banks

SIMM 1

SIMM 0

SIMM 1

SIMM 0

SIMM 1

SIMM 0

SIMM 1

SIMM 0

ECC SIMM for Bank 2

ECC SIMM for Bank 0

SIMM 3

SIMM 2

SIMM 3

SIMM 2

SIMM 3

SIMM 2

SIMM 3

SIMM 2

ECC SIMM for Bank 3

ECC SIMM for Bank 1

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Removing Memory Modules

Caution: To avoid electrostatic damage to components, use an antistatic wrist strap while handling these components (see the section, "Antistatic Precautions").

You may need to remove memory modules to either remove or install another memory module. Note the position of any memory modules that you remove.

Figure 5-5 shows the removal procedure for a memory module. To remove a memory module:

1. Remove the appropriate memory modules by pressing the metal clips (1) on both sides of the memory module connector to the side.

2. Tilt the memory module and lift it (2) out of its connector.

Note: Memory modules can only be removed and installed in successive order. For example, to remove a module at bank 0, you must first remove modules 0 and

1 for banks 3, 2, and 1.

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Figure 5-5 Removing a Memory Module

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1

2

Installing Memory Modules

You need to install a new memory module to replace a faulty module or when upgrading a memory bank. You may need to remove memory modules in order to access the memory slots for any new modules (see the earlier section, "Removing

Memory Modules"). To install a memory module, refer to Figure 5-6 and follow these steps:

1. Tilt the connecting end of the module and press gently on the module so it slips over the two posts located at each end of the slot (see Figure 5-5).

2. Reinstall any memory modules you may have removed for access purposes.

3. Replace the system covers following the procedures listed in "Replacing the

System Unit Covers."

4. Test the memory configuration using the following commands:

>>> show memory

>>> memory

For more information, see the section, "Configuring Memory" in Chapter 6,

"Configuring."

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Figure 5-6 Installing a Memory Module

1

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EISA, ISA, and PCI Option Cards

For a description of available system options, see the section, "Upgrade Options," in

Chapter 7, "Upgrading."

Installing and removing EISA, ISA, and PCI option cards includes the following tasks:

Installing an Option Card

Removing an Option Card

Testing an Option Card Installation

Configuring an Option Card

Figure 5-7 shows the option card slots on the system board.

Figure 5-7 EISA, ISA, and PCI Slots on the System Board

2

3

1 EISA/ISA option slots

2 PCI option slots

3 PCI or EISA/ISA option slot

Note: If the top EISA option slot is used, the bottom PCI slot cannot be used. If the bottom

PCI slot is used, the top

EISA slot cannot be used.

1

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Installing an Option Card

To install an EISA, ISA, or PCI option card on the system board, refer to Figures 5-

8 and 5-9, and follow the steps below.

Note: If you want to install a high-performance graphics option card, you must disable the SVGA jumper (J27) on the system board. Figure 9-6 in Chapter 9, "Quick

Reference" shows the jumper location.

Caution: Static electricity can damage electronic components. Use an antistatic wrist strap while handling these components.

(See "Antistatic Precautions.")

1. Select a vacant option card slot on the system board. The top three slots are reserved for PCI options; the bottom eight are for EISA or ISA options. Figure

5-8 shows examples of the three kinds of option cards.

Figure 5-8 EISA, ISA, and PCI Option Cards

ISA

EISA

PCI

M A 0 0 2 3 6

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5-11

2. Remove the screw securing the slot cover to the chassis.

3. Remove the slot cover from the system unit and store it for future use.

4. Carefully install the option card into the appropriate connectors on the system board and press it firmly into place.

5. Secure the option card to the chassis using the screw you removed.

6. If you have finished removing or installing internal options, reassemble the system following the procedure described in "Replacing the Top Cover and Side

Panels" earlier in this chapter.

7. Test the option card installation (see the section, "Testing an Option Card

Installation" later in this chapter).

Figure 5-9 Installing or Removing an Option Card

1 Option card

2 Slot cover screw

2

1

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Removing an Option Card

To remove an EISA, ISA, or PCI option card from the system unit, refer to Figure 5-

9 and follow the steps below.

Caution: Static electricity can damage electronic components. Use an antistatic wrist strap while handling these components.

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1. Disconnect any cables connected to the external or internal ports on the option card you want to remove.

2. Remove the slot cover screw securing the option card to the chassis.

3. Carefully disconnect the option card (1) from the slot connectors on the system board and remove it from the system.

4. If you intend leaving the option slot vacant, install a slot cover and secure it to the chassis using the screw that you removed.

5. If you have finished removing or installing internal options, reassemble the system following the procedure described in "Replacing the Top Cover and Side

Panels," earlier in this chapter.

Testing an Option Card Installation

To test an option card installation, follow the steps in Table 5-1 and refer to Example

5-1.

Caution: Reassemble the system following the procedures listed in "Replacing the Top

Cover and Side Panels."

Table 5-1 Testing with the show config Display

Step Action

1

2

3

Enter the show config command to display the system configuration.

Examine the PCI Bus or

EISA bus information in the display to make sure that the new option is listed.

Determine the device name of the new option.

4 Run a self-test on the option by entering the test command followed by its device name.

Result

The system responds with a display similar to that shown in Example

5-1.

If the option is not listed, see

"Troubleshooting."

You must know the device name to run diagnostic tests on the option.

Enter the show device command to see the device name.

If the self-test passes, the system displays the word OK (6) before displaying the console prompt

(>>>).

If the system displays a failure message, see "Troubleshooting."

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Example 5-1 The show config Command Display

>>> show config

SRM Console: X3.11-208

ARC Console: 3.5-15

PALcode: VMS PALcode X5.48-93, OSF PALcode X1.35-59

Serial ROM: V1.3

Processor

DECchip (tm) 21064-2

MEMORY

48 Meg of System Memory

Bank 0 = 32 Mbytes(8 MB Per Simm) Starting at 0x00000000

Bank 1 = 16 Mbytes(4 MB Per Simm) Starting at 0x02000000

Bank 2 = No Memory Detected

Bank 3 = No Memory Detected

PCI Bus

Bus 00 Slot 06: NCR 810 Scsi Controller

pka0.7.0.6.0 SCSI Bus ID 7

dka0.0.0.6.0 RZ26L

dka100.1.0.6.0 RZ26L

dka400.4.0.6.0 RRD43

Bus 00 Slot 07: Intel 8275EB PCI to Eisa Bridge

Bus 00 Slot 13: Digital PCI FDDI

fwa0.0.0.13.0 08-00-2B-A2-30-A5

EISA Bus Modules (installed)

Slot 2 CPQ3011

Slot 4 DEC4220

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Installing and Removing Components AlphaServer 1000 Owner's Guide

Configuring an Option Card

Depending on the type of option card you install, you may or may not need to configure it. When installing EISA and ISA option cards, refer to the system startup display screen to see if configuration of the card is required. After you turn on the system, the system startup sequence examines the EISA option slots and reports whether you need to run the EISA Configuration Utility. See the section, "EISA and

ISA Options" in Chapter 6, "Configuring" for more information. When installing PCI option cards, you do not need to perform any configuration procedures. The system configures PCI cards automatically.

Network Interface Card

The system supports PCI or EISA network option cards. For information on installing network option cards in your system, refer to the section, "Installing an

Option Card" earlier in this chapter. For information on cabling them to destinations outside the unit, refer to the documentation that accompanies the option.

Storage Devices

The system unit is designed to accommodate multiple SCSI devices, including a

CDROM drive, a tape drive, and several StorageWorks device options. The diskette drive connects directly to the system board and is not a SCSI device.

Whenever you install a SCSI device, you must assign it a unique SCSI ID number.

Otherwise, the system will not recognize the device. Depending on how many SCSI devices you are using or how you want them configured, you may need to alter the

SCSI cabling to enable all of the devices (see Chapter 6, "Configuring").

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Identifying the Drive Bays

The system contains four storage drive bays, shown in Figure 5-10.

Figure 5-10 System Drive Bays

3 4

2

1

1 3½-inch diskette drive bay

2 5¼-inch CSI CDROM drive bay

3 5¼-inch SCSI tape drive bay

4 3¼-inch StorageWorks drive shelf

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Installing a Tape Drive

To install or replace a tape drive, refer to Figure 5-11 and follow these steps:

1. If you have not done so already, remove the original drive that you want to replace. To remove the tape drive, reverse the order of steps 3 to 7 in this installation procedure.

2. If you are replacing a drive, set the SCSI ID jumpers on the replacement drive to the same ID as the original drive. If you are installing a drive, set the SCSI device ID to 5. The ID 5 is the default device ID for a tape drive. See the section, "Determining SCSI Storage Device IDs" in Chapter 6, "Configuring" for more information.

3. Remove the tape drive bracket from the bay by loosening the bracket retaining screw and pulling back on the bracket.

4. Slide the tape drive you want to install into the bracket and insert two screws on each side.

5. Slide the drive assembly into the back of the bay until its screw holes are aligned with the tape drive bracket holes.

6. Tighten the single retaining screw in the tape drive bracket.

7. Connect the power cable and the data cable to the back of the drive.

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Figure 5-11 Installing a Tape Drive

2

1

1 Bracket screw

2 Tape drive and bracket

3 Tape drive screws

4 Bracket screw

5 Data cable

6 Power cable

3

4

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6

Removing a Tape Drive

To remove a tape drive, reverse the order of steps 3 to 7 in the installation procedure.

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Installing and Removing Components AlphaServer 1000 Owner's Guide

Installing a CDROM Drive

To install or replace a CDROM drive, refer to Figure 5-12 and follow these steps:

1. Before you can install the CDROM drive, you must first remove the tape drive and tape drive bracket. See "Removing a Tape Drive" earlier in this section.

2. If you have not done so already, remove the drive you want to replace.

3. Set the SCSI ID on the replacement drive to the same ID as the original drive. If you are installing a drive, set the SCSI drive ID to 4. The ID 4 is the default device ID for a CDROM drive. See the section "Determining SCSI Storage

Device IDs" in Chapter 6, "Configuring" for more information.

4. Slide the drive into the front of the bay until its screw holes are aligned with the drive bracket holes.

5. Insert two screws into each side of the CDROM drive.

6. Connect the power cable and the data cable to the back of the drive.

7. If necessary, reinstall the tape drive. See "Installing a Tape Drive" earlier in this section.

8. Screw in the holding clip that secures the drives from on top.

Removing a CDROM Drive

Reverse the order of steps 4 to 8 in the installation procedure to remove the CDROM drive.

Installing a StorageWorks Disk Drive

If your StorageWorks disk drives are plugged into a RAID controller, you can hot

swap drives, that is, you can install or replace drives without first shutting down the operating system or turning off the system hardware. For more information, see the

StorageWorks RAID Array 200 Subsystem Family Installation and Configuration

Guide (EK-SWRA2-IG).

Note: External SCSI terminators used with the SWXCR controller must be of the following type: 12-41667-02.

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Figure 5-12 Installing a CDROM Drive

1

1 Drive bracket holes

2 Data cable

3 Power cable

M A 0 0 2 3 9

2

3

To install a StorageWorks drive, refer to Figure 5-13 and follow these steps:

1. If your StorageWorks drives are plugged into a RAID controller, go to step 2. If your drives are not plugged into a RAID controller, shut down the operating system before you go to step 2.

2. Remove a blank bezel or drive by pressing the two mounting tabs and pull the unit out of the shelf.

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Installing and Removing Components AlphaServer 1000 Owner's Guide

3. Insert the hard disk drive into the guide slots and push the drive in until its tabs lock in place.

4. Check the configuration of the drive. See the section "Determining SCSI Storage

Device IDs" in Chapter 6, "Configuring" for more information.

Figure 5-13 Installing a StorageWorks Disk Drive

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Removing a StorageWorks Disk Drive

To remove StorageWorks disk drives, reverse all steps in the installation procedure.

Installing a Diskette Drive

To replace a 3½-inch diskette drive, refer to Figure 5-14 and follow these steps:

1. Remove the original diskette drive.

2. Locate the ID select switch toward the rear on the righthand side of the replacement diskette drive. Set the switch to the 1 position.

3. Slide the diskette assembly into the front of the bay until the screw holes line up with the holes on the bracket.

4. Attach the mounting bracket to the replacement diskette drive using the two screws that you removed from the original diskette drive.

5. Connect the power cable and the data cable to the diskette drive.

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Removing a Diskette Drive

To remove the diskette drive, reverse steps 3 to 5 in the installation procedure, and refer to Figure 5-14.

Figure 5-14 Replacing or Installing a Diskette Drive

1 Power cable

2 Data cable

3 Screws (2)

4 Diskette drive

4

1

2 3

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Power Supply

The following procedures describe how to install and remove the primary and optional power supplies. The primary power supply resides in the bottom position, the secondary power supply in the top position. The procedures for installing and removing both power supplies are similar, unless otherwise noted.

Installing the Power Supply

To install a power supply, refer to Figure 5-15, and follow these steps:

1. If you are installing a second power supply, remove the four screws that secure the protective shield at the back of the system unit. Remove the shield and store it with the screws for future use.

2. Slide the power supply over its tabs and toward the back panel so that it aligns with the screw holes in the system unit frame. The primary power supply slides directly into the lower position from the side of the system unit. The secondary power supply slides down from above the system unit and rests upon a ledge.

3. Tighten the two screws that secure the internal end of the power supply.

4. Tighten the four screws that secure the power supply to the outside of the unit.

Do not use the screws that secured the protective shield.

5. Connect all internal and external cables to the power supply. If you are installing a second power supply, an additional internal cable is required for connecting the two supplies. Each power supply connects directly to an AC outlet.

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Figure 5-15 Installing the Power Supply ma00245

6

5

2

1

1 Position for second power supply

2 Second power supply

3 Rear screws (4)

4 Internal screws (2)

5 Cable connections

6 Internal connecting cable

3

4

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Removing the Power Supply

To remove a power supply, refer to Figure 5-16 and follow these steps:

1. If an optional power supply is installed, you must remove it before removing the primary power supply.

2. Disconnect all internal and external cables from the power supply.

3. Loosen the four screws that secure the power supply to the outside rear of the unit.

4. Loosen the two screws that secure the internal end of the power supply to the system unit.

5. Slide the power supply towards the internal side and lift it up off its tabs.

Figure 5-16 Removing the Power Supply ma00246

1

3

1 Cable connections

2 Internal screws

3 Rear screws

4 Power supply removal

2

4

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CPU Card

Your system comes with the CPU installed on a board that connects to the system board. To upgrade to another CPU type, you need to replace the CPU card.

Warning: CPU and memory modules have hot components. Wait

2 minutes after power is off before handling these modules. Take appropriate antistatic precautions when handling internal parts.

Removing the CPU Card

To remove the CPU card, refer to Figure 5-17 and follow these steps:

1. Unscrew the crossbar that secures the outer edge of the CPU card.

2. Lift up on the other end of the bar. Release the card by extending the handle clip on each end outward.

3. Holding the outer edge of the card, gently pull it out of its system board slot.

Figure 5-17 Removing and Installing the CPU Card

3

2

1 Crossbar retaining screw

2 Handle clip

3 CPU card

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Installing the CPU Card

To install the CPU card, refer to Figure 5-17 and follow these steps:

1. Slide the card into its designated slot on the system board making sure it slips entirely into the slot.

2. Press inward on the handle clip on each end of the card until they catch in a closed position.

3. Place the crossbar in position and screw in the single retaining screw.

Removing/Replacing Other Options

The following components should be installed by a qualified service representative only:

System board

System fans

Interlocking sensor switch

Front bezel

Operator control panel

SCSI Backplane

For assistance in removing or installing these components, contact your authorized service representative.

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6 Configuring

Introduction

This chapter covers the following topics:

Viewing the System Configuration

Memory

Network Connections

Power Supply

Keyboard Type

EISA and ISA Option Cards

PCI Option Cards

Storage Devices

Viewing the System Configuration

Several SRM console commands or ARC console menu options allow you to examine your system configuration and environment variable settings.

To use these commands or menu options, you need to invoke console mode. For information about invoking console mode, refer to the section, "Using the Consoles," in Chapter 4, "Basic Operation."

Configuring

••

6-1 AlphaServer 1000 Owner's Guide

ARC Console Configuration Options

On systems running the Windows NT operating system, the following Windows NT

(ARC) menu options are used to verify system configuration:

"Display Hardware

Configuration"

"Set Default Variables"

Lists the Windows NT boot device names for devices installed in the system.

Allows you to select values for

Windows NT firmware environment variables.

Note: For a more complete listing of the options recognized by your system, see the next section, "SRM Console

Configuration Commands."

To enter Digital UNIX and OpenVMS console commands, you must switch to the

SRM console (see the section, "Switching between Consoles," in Chapter 4, "Basic

Operation").

Note: Remember to switch back to the Windows NT (ARC) console before booting the Windows NT operating system.

SRM Console Configuration Commands

The following console commands are used to verify system configuration on systems running either the Digital UNIX or OpenVMS operating system: show config show device show memory set and show

Displays the buses on the system and the devices found on those buses.

Displays the devices and controllers in the system.

Displays main memory configuration.

Set and display environment variables.

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Configuring AlphaServer 1000 Owner's Guide

The show config Command

The show config

command displays all devices found on the system bus, PCI bus, and EISA bus. You can use the information in the display to identify target devices for commands such as boot and test

, as well as to verify that the system sees all the devices that are installed. The configuration display looks similar to that in

Example 6-1:

Example 6-1: The show config Command Display

>>> show config

SRM Console: X3.11-208

ARC Console: 3.5-15

PALcode: VMS PALcode X5.48-93, OSF PALcode X1.35-59

Serial ROM: V1.3

Processor

DECchip (tm) 21064-2

MEMORY

48 Meg of System Memory

Bank 0 = 32 Mbytes(8 MB Per Simm) Starting at 0x00000000

Bank 1 = 16 Mbytes(4 MB Per Simm) Starting at 0x02000000

Bank 2 = No Memory Detected

Bank 3 = No Memory Detected

PCI Bus

Bus 00 Slot 06: NCR 810 Scsi Controller

pka0.7.0.6.0 SCSI Bus ID 7

dka0.0.0.6.0 RZ26L

dka100.1.0.6.0 RZ26L

dka400.4.0.6.0 RRD43

Bus 00 Slot 07: Intel 8275EB PCI to Eisa Bridge

Bus 00 Slot 13: Digital PCI FDDI

fwa0.0.0.13.0 08-00-2B-A2-30-A5

EISA Bus Modules (installed)

Slot 2 CPQ3011

Slot 4 DEC4220

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For more information on device names, refer to the next section, "The show device

Command."

The show device Command

The show device command displays the devices and controllers in the system.

Synopsis:

show device [device_name]

Arguments:

device_name The device name or device abbreviation. When abbreviations or wild cards are used, all devices that match the type are displayed.

The command and a sample resulting display are shown in Example 6-2. The device name convention used in the display is shown in Figure 6-1.

Example 6-2 The show device Command Display

>>> show device dka400.4.0.6.0 DKA400 RRD43 2893 dva0.0.0.0.1 DVA0 era0.0.0.3.1 ERA0 08-00-2B-BC-F6-CC pka0.7.0.6.0 PKA0 SCSI Bus ID 7

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Figure 6-1 Device Name Convention

dka0.0.0.0.0

Hose Number: 0 PCI_0 (32-bit PCI); 1 EISA; 2 PCI_1

Slot Number: For EISA options---Correspond to EISA card cage slot numbers (1--*)

For PCI options---Slot 0 = Ethernet adapter (EWA0) or reserved on AlphaServer 1000 systems.

Slot 1 = SCSI controller on standard I/O or I/O backplane

Slot 2 = EISA to PCI bridge chip

Slots 3--5 = Reserved

Slots 6--8 = Correspond to internal PCI slots

Slots 11--13 = Correspond to external PCI slots

Channel Number: Used for multi-channel devices.

Bus Node Number: Bus Node ID

Device Unit Number: Unique device unit number

SCSI unit numbers are forced to 100 x Node ID

Adapter ID: One-letter adapter designator (A,B,C...)

Driver ID: Two-letter port or class driver designator:

DR--RAID-set device

DV--Floppy drive

ER--Ethernet port (LANCE chip, DEC 4220)

EW--Ethernet port (TULIP chip, DECchip 21040)

PK--SCSI port, DK--SCSI disk, MK--SCSI tape

PU--DSSI port, DU--DSSI disk, MU--DSSI tape

FR--FDDI

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6-5

The show memory Command

The show memory

command displays information for each memory module in the system. A sample of the show memory

display is shown in Example 6-3.

Example 6-3 The show memory Command Display

>>> show memory

48 Meg of System Memory

Bank 0 = 16 Mbytes (4 MB Per Simm) Starting at 0x00000000

Bank 1 = 16 Mbytes (4 MB Per Simm) Starting at 0x01000000

Bank 2 = 16 Mbytes (4 MB Per Simm) Starting at 0x02000000

Bank 3 = No Memory Detected

>>>

The set and show Commands

The set

and show

commands are used to set environment variables. Typically, you set environment variables when you configure a system.

CAUTION: Environment variables must be entered exactly as shown, not abbreviated. They will not be recognized by the system in abbreviated form.

Synopsis:

set [-default] [-integer] [-integer] -[string] envar value show envar

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Configuring AlphaServer 1000 Owner's Guide

Arguments:

envar value

The name of the environment variable to be modified.

The value that is assigned to the environment variable.

Options:

-default Restores variable to its default value.

-integer Creates variable as an integer.

-string Creates variable as a string (default).

The set

and show

commands and a sample display are shown in Example 6-4.

Example 6-4 The set and show Commands Display

>>> set bootdef_dev ewa0

>>> show bootdef_dev ewa0

>>> show auto_action boot

>>> set boot_osflags 0,1

>>>

Note: Remember to switch back to the Windows NT

(ARC) console before booting the Windows NT operating system.

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Memory

The system unit supports 20 single in-line memory modules (SIMM) on the system board. The SIMM modules are grouped in four memory banks consisting of five modules: four memory modules plus one memory module in each bank for ECC

(Error Correction Code). Figure 6-2 shows the memory bank groupings on the system board.

A minimum of one memory bank (five modules) is required.

Warning: Before installing a memory module, turn off all power to the system. Refer to "Turning the

System Off" in Chapter 4, "Basic Operation" for information about turning off power.

Figure 6-2 Memory Banks

Bank 3

Bank 2

Bank 1

Bank 0

ECC Banks

SIMM 1

SIMM 0

SIMM 1

SIMM 0

SIMM 1

SIMM 0

SIMM 1

SIMM 0

ECC SIMM for Bank 2

ECC SIMM for Bank 0

SIMM 3

SIMM 2

SIMM 3

SIMM 2

SIMM 3

SIMM 2

SIMM 3

SIMM 2

ECC SIMM for Bank 3

ECC SIMM for Bank 1

MA00327

Memory requirements for operating systems differ. Requirements for each are shown in Table 6-1.

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Configuring AlphaServer 1000 Owner's Guide

Table 6-1 Operating System Memory Requirements

Operating System

Digital UNIX and OpenVMS

Windows NT

Windows NT Server

Memory Requirements

32 MB minimum; 64 MB recommended

16 MB minimum; 32 MB recommended

32 MB minimum; 64 MB recommended

Network Connections

Your system supports various Ethernet network options. You can connect to

ThinWire, AUI, or 10Base-T Ethernet networks as shown in Figure 2-5. With the correct option, you can also connect to FDDI and token ring networks.

Setting Network Configuration

Any new network device is initially set to AUI mode, which is preserved in memory until the network type is changed using the following command: set ewx0_mode mode_name

In this command, x identifies the controller, and mode_name

is the mode to be selected. To determine the controller ID, use the show config command (see

Example 6-1) or the

show device command (see Example 6-2). Refer to the following configuration command examples to set the network configuration for the network option card:

>>> set ewa0_mode twisted-pair

(10BASE-T/twisted-pair network)

>>> set ewa0_mode full

(full duplex, twisted-pair network)

>>> set ewa0_mode aui

(AUI/standard network)

>>> set ewa0_mode bnc

(ThinWire network)

Mode names can be abbreviated; the system prompts you with correct names if you enter an invalid name. To verify the network setting, use the show

command:

>>> show ew*

CAUTION: Modes for all network devices should be reassigned whenever a network device is moved, installed, or removed because associations between devices and the device names and modes they are set to may be altered.

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Power Supply

The system has a single power supply that provides all the power your system needs.

For added reliability, you can add a second power supply, which provides redundant power for a fully loaded system. Refer to "Installing and Removing Components" for instructions on adding a second power supply to your system.

Keyboard Type

Your system comes equipped with a 101-key enhanced keyboard that allows you to communicate with your system by entering data or commands. Note that some

European language keyboards have 102 keys. Use the ARC console Setup menu to change the keyboard configuration. Refer to your operating system or application software documentation for software-specific key functions.

EISA and ISA Options

You can determine whether an option card is an EISA or ISA option by examining the contacts of the card (see Figure 6-3):

EISA cards have two interlocking rows of gold contacts.

ISA cards have a single row of gold contacts.

Figure 6-3 EISA and ISA Cards

ISA

M A 0 0 2 7 8

EISA

EISA Bus

The EISA (Extended Industry Standard Architecture) bus is a 32-bit industry standard input/output bus. EISA is a superset of the well-established 16-bit ISA bus.

EISA was designed to accept newer 32-bit components while still remaining compatible with older 8-bit and 16-bit cards.EISA offers performance of up to 33

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Configuring AlphaServer 1000 Owner's Guide

MB/sec for cards with bus mastering and DMA capabilities. Up to eight EISA or

ISA modules can reside in the EISA bus portion of the system board. All EISA slots are bus master slots, and can be filled in any order.

Figure 6-4 shows the location of EISA and ISA option slots on the system board. To access the slots, you will need to remove the top and left panels of the system enclosure. Be sure to replace the panels before attempting to start the system again.

Caution: Do not remove the system's top cover when the system is running. If you remove the top cover without first properly turning off the system, the system will shut down, with potential loss of data.

Figure 6-4 EISA, ISA, and PCI Option Slots

2

3

1 EISA/ISA option slots

2 PCI option slots

3 PCI or EISA/ISA option slot

Note: If the top EISA option slot is used, the bottom PCI slot cannot be used. If the bottom PCI slot is used, the top EISA slot cannot be used.

1

MA00235

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For information about installing a specific option, refer to the documentation for that option. For information about configuring an EISA option, refer to the sections,

"EISA Configuration Utility (ECU)" and "Configuring EISA Options," later in this chapter.

Warning: Before installing EISA bus options, turn off all power to the system.

Refer to "Turning the System Off" in

Chapter 4, "Basic Operation."

ISA Bus

The ISA (Industry Standard Architecture) bus is an industry-standard, 16-bit I/O bus. The EISA bus is a superset of the well-established ISA bus and has been designed to be backward compatible with 16-bit and 8-bit architectures. Therefore,

ISA modules can be used in your system, provided the operating system supports the device.

Up to eight EISA or ISA modules can reside in the EISA bus portion of the system board. Figure 6-4 shows the location of the ISA option slots on the system board.

To access the system board, you need to remove the top and left panels of the system enclosure. Be sure to replace the panels before attempting to turn on the system again.

Caution: Do not remove the system's top cover when the system is running. If you do so without first properly turning off the system, the system will shut down, with potential loss of data.

For information about installing a specific option, refer to the documentation for that option. For information about configuring an ISA option, refer to the sections,

"EISA Configuration Utility" and "Configuring ISA Options" later in this chapter.

Warning: Before installing ISA bus options, turn off all power to the system. Refer to "Turning the System Off" in the Chapter 4, "Basic

Operation."

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Configuring AlphaServer 1000 Owner's Guide

EISA Configuration Utility (ECU)

Whenever you add, remove, or move an EISA or ISA card to your system, the EISA

Configuration Utility (ECU) must be run. The ECU is a menu-based utility, run from the Windows NT (ARC) firmware, that provides online help to guide you through the configuration process.

Each EISA or ISA card has a corresponding configuration (CFG) file, which describes the characteristics and the system resources required for that option. The

ECU uses the CFG file to create a conflict-free configuration.

The ECU is supplied on the System Configuration Diskettes shipped with your system. Make copies of the System Configuration Diskettes and keep the originals in a safe place. Use the backup copies when you are configuring the system. The

System Configuration Diskettes must have the volume label SYSTEMCFG.

Note: The CFG files supplied with the option you want to install may not work if the option is not supported on your system.

Before you install an option, check your system's product literature to verify that your system supports the option. Refer to

Chapter 7, "Upgrading" for instructions on obtaining information on options.

Caution: Turn the system off before you install EISA options.

Before You Run the ECU

Note: To run the ECU from a terminal connected to a serial line, you must use a VT320 or VTxxx terminal running in 320 mode.

From the ARC console, you must also create the environment variable

TERM

with a value of VT320. For example:

TERM=VT320.

If you later want to run the ECU on a video monitor, you must delete this environment variable first.

Before you run the ECU, follow these steps:

1. Refer to the documentation that comes with your option card to determine if it is an EISA or ISA option.

2. Install EISA option card(s). (Install ISA option cards after you run the ECU.)

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For information about installing a specific option, refer to the documentation for that option.

3. Familiarize yourself with the utility.

You can find more information about the ECU by reading the ECU online help.

To read the online help, start the ECU (refer to "Configuring EISA Options" later in this chapter). Online help for the ECU is located under Step 1,

"Important EISA Configuration Information."

4. Familiarize yourself with the configuration procedure for your system:

If you are installing, moving, or removing an EISA option, refer to

"Configuring EISA Options" later in this chapter.

If you are installing, moving, or removing an ISA option, refer to

"Configuring ISA Options" later in this chapter.

5. Locate the ECU diskette for your operating system. It is shipped in the accessories box with your system. Make a copy of the diskette and keep the original in a safe place. Use the backup copy for configuring options.

ECU Diskette DECpc AXP for Windows NT

ECU Diskette DECpc AXP for Digital UNIX (DEC OSF/1) and OpenVMS

Configuring EISA Options

EISA options are recognized and configured automatically. To configure an EISA bus that contains no ISA options, follow these steps:

1. Install, move, or remove the EISA option card. See Chapter 5, "Installing and

Removing Components.)

Use the instructions provided with the EISA option.

2. Invoke the console firmware.

For systems running Windows NT:

Shut down the operating system or power up to the console Boot menu.

For systems running Digital UNIX or OpenVMS:

Shut down the operating system and press the Halt switch. When the console prompt >>> is displayed, press the Halt switch to the "out" position.

3. Start the ECU as follows:

For systems running Windows NT:

a. From the Boot menu, select "Supplementary menu."

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Configuring AlphaServer 1000 Owner's Guide

b. From the Supplementary menu, select "Setup menu." Insert the ECU diskette for Windows NT into the diskette drive.

c. From the Setup menu, select "Run EISA Configuration Utility from floppy." This boots the ECU program. There may be a 10 to 20 second delay in system activity while the system recognizes the ECU.

For systems running Digital UNIX or OpenVMS:

a. Insert the ECU diskette for Digital UNIX (DEC OSF/1) or OpenVMS into the diskette drive.

b. At the SRM prompt, enter the ecu

command.

The message "loading ARC firmware" is displayed. There may be a 10 to

20 second delay in system activity while the system recognizes the ECU.

When the firmware has finished loading, the ECU program is booted.

If the ECU locates the required CFG configuration files, it displays the main menu. The CFG file for the option may reside on a configuration diskette packaged with the option or may be included on the system configuration diskette.

Note: It is not necessary to run Step 2 of the ECU, "Add or remove boards." (EISA boards are recognized and configured automatically.)

4. Change settings or resources (optional).

This step is not required when you are using the card's default settings.

The "View or Edit Details" ECU option is used to change user-selectable settings or to change the resources allocated for these functions (IRQs, DMA channels,

I/O ports, and so on).

5. Save your configuration.

The "Save and Exit" ECU option saves your configuration information to the system's nonvolatile memory.

6. Return to the SRM console (Digital UNIX and OpenVMS systems only) and restart the system.

For systems running Windows NT:

Remove the ECU diskette from the diskette drive and boot the operating system.

For systems running Digital UNIX or OpenVMS:

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To return to the SRM console, press the Reset switch on your system unit, or turn the system off, then back on.

Alternatively, you can use the following procedure: a. From the Boot menu, select the Supplementary menu.

b. From the Supplementary menu, select the "Set up the system" menu.

c. From the Setup menu, select "Switch to OpenVMS or OSF console."

This allows you to select your operating system console.

d. Select your operating system, then press enter on "Setup menu." e. When the message "Power-cycle the system to implement the change" is displayed, press the Reset button. (Do not press the On/Off switch.)

Once the console firmware is loaded and device drivers are initialized, you can boot the operating system.

Configuring ISA Options

To configure ISA options, follow these steps:

Note: Do not install ISA cards until after you start the EISA

Configuration Utility.

1. Start up the system and run the ECU, as follows:

For systems running Windows NT:

a. From the Boot menu, select "Supplementary menu." b. From the Supplementary menu, select "Setup menu." Insert the ECU diskette for Windows NT into the diskette drive.

c. From the Setup menu, select "Run EISA Configuration Utility from floppy." This boots the ECU program. There may be a 10 to 20 second delay in system activity while the system recognizes the ECU.

For systems running Digital UNIX or OpenVMS:

a. Insert the ECU diskette for Digital UNIX (DEC OSF/1) or OpenVMS into the diskette drive.

b. At the SRM prompt, enter the ecu

command.

The message "loading ARC firmware" is displayed. There may be a 10 to

20 second delay in system activity while the system recognizes the ECU.

When the firmware has finished loading, the ECU program is booted.

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Configuring AlphaServer 1000 Owner's Guide

If the ECU locates the required CFG configuration files, it displays the main menu. The CFG file for the option is included on a configuration diskette.

2. Add the ISA card configuration file to the configuration list.

Use the "Add or Remove Boards" ECU option to add the configuration

(CFG) file for the ISA option and to select an acceptable slot for the option.

In some cases, the CFG file for the ISA option may reside on a configuration diskette packaged with the option. If so, insert that diskette and follow its directions.

For most ISA options, the configuration (CFG) file is not on a diskette. If it is not, you need to use the Generic ISA Adapter Definition option on the

ECU diskette.

3. Change settings or resources (optional)

The "View or Edit Details" ECU option is used to change user-selectable settings or to change the resources allocated for these functions (IRQs, DMA channels, I/O ports, and so on).

This step is not required when you are using the card's default settings.

4. Examine and set required switches to match the displayed settings.

The "Examine Required Switches" ECU option displays the correct switch and jumper settings that you must physically set for each ISA option.

Although the ECU cannot detect or change the settings of ISA cards, it uses the information from the previous step to determine the correct switch settings for these options.

Physically set the card's jumpers and switches to match the required settings.

5. Save your configuration.

The "Save and Exit" ECU option saves your configuration information to the system's nonvolatile memory.

6. Return to the SRM console (Digital UNIX and OpenVMS systems only) and restart the system.

For systems running Windows NT: Remove the ECU diskette from the diskette drive and boot the operating system.

For systems running Digital UNIX or Open VMS:

To return to the SRM console, press the Reset switch on the system unit, or turn the system off, then back on.

Alternatively, you can use the following procedure:

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a. From the Supplementary menu, select the Setup menu.

b. From the Setup menu, select "Switch to OpenVMS or OSF console." This option allows you to select your operating system console.

c. Select your operating system; then press Enter on the Setup menu.

d. When the message "Power-cycle the system to implement the change" is displayed, press the Reset button. (Do not press the On/Off switch.)

Once the console firmware is loaded and device drivers are initialized, you can boot the operating system.

7. Install the ISA card using the instructions provided with the ISA option, and turn on the system.

PCI Option Cards

PCI (Peripheral Component Interconnect) is an industry-standard expansion I/O bus that is the preferred bus for high-performance I/O options. The system supports 32bit PCI options.

The PCI bus is shown in Figure 6-4. The system has two dedicated PCI slots and one slot that can be used if the top EISA slot is not used.

A PCI card is shown in Figure 6-5.

Figure 6-5 PCI Option Card

M A 0 0 2 7 9 PCI

Install PCI cards according to the instructions supplied with the option.

Warning: Before installing a PCI option, turn off all power to the system. Refer to "Turning the System Off" in Chapter 4,

"Basic Operation" for information about turning off power.

PCI cards require no additional configuration procedures; the system automatically recognizes the cards and assigns the appropriate system resources.

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Configuring AlphaServer 1000 Owner's Guide

Storage Devices

Configuring the storage devices on your system requires assigning the correct SCSI

IDs according to the type of configuration you choose: single-controller, singlecontroller with jumper, dual-controller, or triple controller.

Determining SCSI Storage Device IDs

When you add or remove a CDROM drive, a tape drive, or StorageWorks drives, you may want to consider how these are configured and whether you want to reconfigure them. These storage devices all reside on one or more SCSI buses that connect to the system board and to the StorageWorks backplane. The system configuration determines a unique ID for each device. (The diskette drive has its own dedicated bus and is not included in the SCSI configuration.)

When adding or changing devices, be careful to avoid assigning device IDs (SCSI

IDs) already in use. Duplicate IDs result in one or more devices not being recognized by the system.

To determine the available SCSI IDs for all SCSI storage devices, follow the steps in

Table 6-2 and refer to Example 6-5.

Table 6-2 Determining Available SCSI IDs

Step

1

2

3

Action

Enter the show device command to display the SCSI configuration.

Examine the ADDR column in the display.

Result

The system responds with a display similar to that shown in Example 6-5.

The ADDR column lists the

SCSI address of each device connected to the SCSI bus.

The first number in the SCSI address is the SCSI ID. It must be a unique number in the range 0 to 7. Any unused

SCSI IDs in this range are available for use by the devices that you want to connect to the system.

Write down the list of unused

SCSI IDs.

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Example 6-5 The show device Display

>>> show device dka400.4.0.6.0 DKA400 RRD43 2893 dva0.0.0.0.1 DVA0 era0.0.0.3.1 ERA0 08-00-2B-BC-F6-CC pka0.7.0.6.0 PKA0 SCSI Bus ID

On-board SCSI Bus Configuration

A Fast SCSI-2 controller on the system board supports the two 5¼-inch removable media devices (typically a CDROM drive and a tape drive) and an internal

StorageWorks shelf that supports up to seven hard disk drives. This controller provides a narrow (8-bit) single-ended SCSI bus for the system.

This bus can be configured to be a purely internal bus, or to support a restricted set of internal SCSI devices and a single external SCSI device. It can also be configured to support only the 5¼-inch removable media devices, plus up to five external SCSI devices when an alternative SCSI controller option is connected to the StorageWorks shelf.

Internal Configuration

When the SCSI bus is configured to be a purely internal bus (see Figure 6-8), the bus must be terminated at the bulkhead connector using an external SCSI terminator (12-

41667-01). External expansion from the back of the enclosure is not permitted in this configuration because it would violate SCSI bus length rules.

In this configuration, the two halves of the StorageWorks SCSI backplane are jumpered together to form a single backplane. See "Single-Controller, Split-

Backplane Configuration" later in this chapter for a complete description of this procedure. Note that only seven devices can be connected to this bus; therefore, not all slots in the StorageWorks backplane can be filled (unless there are no 5¼-inch devices in the system).

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External Configuration

When the SCSI bus is configured to permit a single external SCSI device (see Figure

6-7), the bus is connected to the two 5¼-inch removable media devices and the top four slots (upper half) of the Storage Works SCSI backplane. A cable connects the bus to an external bulkhead connector. The bus can be terminated at this point using an external SCSI terminator (12-41667-01), or an external SCSI cable can be attached to connect to an external SCSI device. Note that the maximum length of the external SCSI bus must be less than one meter to meet SCSI bus length restrictions.

If an additional SCSI controller option is plugged into the system, the integrated controller can be connected to only the 5¼-inch removable media devices and then routed to an external bulkhead connector (see Figures 6-9 and 6-10). The bus can be terminated at this point using an external SCSI terminator (12-41667-01), or an external SCSI cable can be attached to connect to external SCSI devices. To meet

SCSI bus length restrictions, the total external bus length must be less than 1.5

meters.

SCSI Controller Option Cards

All SCSI-2 devices are supported via EISA- or PCI-based SCSI controller cards.

Use the following rules to determine if a SCSI controller or SCSI device can be used on your system.

The controller/device must be supported by the operating system. Consult the software product description or hardware vendor.

No more than seven devices can be on any one SCSI-2 controller, and each must have a unique SCSI ID.

The entire SCSI bus length, from terminator to terminator, must not exceed 3 meters for single-ended SCSI-2.

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SCSI Device Configurations

Storage devices can be configured on your system in three SCSI controller configurations: single, double, or triple. Each SCSI controller that is used represents one or more buses. Table 6-3 describes the three general types of SCSI bus configuration.

Table 6-3 SCSI Bus Configurations

Controller or Bus

Single, splitbackplane

Single

Double

Triple, splitbackplane

Description

Using a jumper cable, a single-controller configuration configures as many as seven

StorageWorks backplane devices, provided you disable the CDROM and tape drives.

A single-controller configuration configures up to four StorageWorks backplane devices on the same bus as the 5¼-inch removable media devices. The bus is driven by a native Fast SCSI-2 controller on the system board.

A double-controller configuration configures the 5¼inch removable media devices on their own bus driven by the native controller. An additional controller option card drives a second SCSI bus that connects to the StorageWorks backplane and its seven StorageWorks backplane devices.

A triple-controller configuration configures the 5¼inch removable media devices on their own bus driven by the native controller. Two SCSI controller option cards (or a dual-bus controller option card) assign the StorageWorks backplane devices to two separate buses.

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Configuring AlphaServer 1000 Owner's Guide

Single-Controller, Split-Backplane Configuration

The following procedure describes how to connect the top four StorageWorks slots to the on-board controller, which is the same controller that runs the CDROM drive and the tape drive, if one is installed.

Caution: Avoid bending the SCSI cable when folding it.

1. Insert the end of the SCSI cable (17-03959-01) in its system board connector.

2. Connect the SCSI cable CDROM drive connector to the rear of the CDROM drive.

3. Bring the remainder of the cable over the system board and connect it to the rear of the tape drive, if one is installed.

4. Connect the cable to the 50-pin connector (J1) on the top rear of the backplane.

Figure 6-7 shows the location of the J1 connector.

5. Connect one end of the SCSI cable (17-03962-01) to the 50-pin connector (J2) on the StorageWorks backplane and the other end to the bulkhead connector (the lowest of the three cutouts on the rear of the system near the power supply).

6. Terminate the bus connecting an external SCSI terminator (12-41667-01). See

Figure 6-6.

7. Ensure that the three sets of J3 jumper pins on the backplane are disabled

(removed).

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Figure 6-6 SCSI Cable Termination

1

2

MA00274

1 Optional SCSI ports

2 SCSI terminator

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Configuring AlphaServer 1000 Owner's Guide

Single-Controller, Split-Backplane SCSI Configuration

In the single-controller configuration shown in Figure 6-7, the top four StorageWorks slots are run from the system board SCSI controller. The bottom three StorageWorks slots are unused. The system reserves SCSI ID numbers for the CDROM drive (ID

4) and the tape drive (ID 5).

Table 6-4 shows the SCSI ID settings for this configuration.

Figure 6-7 Single-Controller, Split-Backplane SCSI Configuration

17-03959-01

Bus ID 4

Bus ID 5

17-03962-01

W3

W2

W1

J3

J10

J1

J12

J13

J2

J11

J16

J14

J15

J17

0

1

2

2

3

0

1

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Table 6-4 SCSI IDs for Single-Controller Configuration

SCSI Device

CDROM drive

Tape drive

Slot 0

Slot 1

Slot 2

Slot 3

SCSI ID

0

1

4

5

2

3

Single-Controller Configuration with Jumper Cable

The following procedure describes how to connect the seven StorageWorks slots to the on-board controller, that is, the same controller that runs the CDROM drive and the tape drive. In order to use slot 4, the CDROM drive must be disconnected; in order to use slot 5, the tape drive must be disconnected. Configuration of all seven

StorageWorks slots to the integrated controller requires the use of a jumper cable.

Caution: Avoid bending the

SCSI cable when folding it.

1. Insert the end of the SCSI cable (17-03959-01) in its system board connector.

2. Connect the SCSI cable CDROM drive connector to the rear of the CDROM drive.

3. Bring the remainder of the cable over the system board and connect it to the rear of the tape drive, if one is installed.

4. Connect the cable to the 50-pin connector (J1) on the top rear of the backplane.

5. Attach a jumper cable (17-03960-01) between the 50-pin connectors (J2 to J14) in the center of the backplane. This unites the upper four and the bottom three drives to the bus.

6. Connect one end of the SCSI cable (17-03962-01) to the 50-pin connector (J15) on the StorageWorks backplane and the other end to the bulkhead connector (the lowest of the three cutouts on the rear of the system near the power supply).

7. Terminate the bus connecting an external SCSI terminator (12-41667-01).

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8. Ensure that jumper W1 in the J3 set of jumper pins on the backplane is installed, and the W2 and W3 jumpers removed.

Single-Controller SCSI Configuration with Jumper Cable

In the single-controller configuration shown in Figure 6-8, all seven StorageWorks slots are run from the system board SCSI controller. The system reserves SCSI ID numbers for the CDROM drive (ID 4) and the tape drive (ID 5). Table 6-5 shows the

SCSI ID settings for this configuration.

Figure 6-8 Single-Controller SCSI Configuration with Jumper Cable

17-03959-01

Bus ID 4

Bus ID 5

J10

J1

17-03960-01

17-03962-01

W3

W2

W1

J3

J12

J13

J2

J11

J16

J14

J15

J17

4

5

6

2

3

0

1

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Table 6-5 SCSI IDs for Configuration with Jumper Cable

SCSI Device

CDROM drive

Tape drive

Slot 0

Slot 1

Slot 2

Slot 3

Slot 4

Slot 5

Slot 6

SCSI ID

2

3

0

1

4*

5*

4*

5*

6

Note: The system does not recognize two drives with the same

ID number. Seven drives is the maximum number this configuration can recognize. If you use slots 4 and 5, you must disable the CDROM drive and the tape drive. If you use the

CDROM drive and tape drive, you must remove drives from slots 4 and 5.

Dual-Controller Configuration

The following procedure describes how to connect all seven StorageWorks drives to a PCI or EISA SCSI controller adapter (bus B). Bus A includes the CDROM drive and the tape drive, if one is installed.

Caution: Avoid bending the SCSI cable when folding it.

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1. Insert the plug end of the internal SCSI cable (17-03959-01) into its system board connector.

2. Connect the cable to the rear of the CDROM drive.

3. Bring the cable over the system board and connect it to the rear of the tape drive, if one is installed.

4. Connect the end of the internal SCSI cable (17-03959-01) to the plug end of the

SCSI cable (17-03962-01) and run the other end to the bulkhead connector (the lowest of the three cutouts on the rear of the system near the power supply).

5. Terminate the A bus by connecting an external SCSI terminator (12-41667-01) to the external SCSI cable.

6. Connect the socket end of the SCSI cable (17-03960-02) to the option card, pass the remainder of the cable beneath the system board, and connect the cable to the

50-pin connector (J15) at the bottom of the StorageWorks backplane.

7. Attach a jumper cable (17-03960-01) between the 50-pin connectors (J2 to J14) in the center of the backplane. This enables the upper four and the bottom three drives to be united on the B bus.

8. Connect the SCSI cable (17-03962-02) to the 50-pin connector (J1) at the top of the backplane. Run the cable beneath the system board and out to one of the two larger cutout slots on the bulkhead.

9. Terminate the B bus by connecting an external SCSI terminator (12-41667-02) to the external SCSI cable.

10. Enable the W1 or lowest set of pins on the J3 jumper on the backplane, and disable the W2 and W3 sets of pins.

Dual-Controller SCSI Configuration

In the dual-controller configuration shown in Figure 6-9, all seven StorageWorks slots are run from a controller on a PCI or EISA adapter card. A jumper cable connects the J2 and J14 connectors on the backplane. Note that the lowest set of pins

(W1) on the J3 jumper are enabled. The CDROM drive and tape drive reside on a dedicated bus. There are two external terminators: one for each SCSI controller used. Table 6-6 shows the SCSI ID settings for this configuration.

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Figure 6-9 Dual-Controller SCSI Configuration

17-03959-01

12-41667-02

J10

J1

17-03962-01

17-03962-02

17-03960-02

17-03960-01

W3

W2

W1

J3

J12

J13

J2

J11

J16

J14

J15

J17

Bus ID 4

Bus ID 5

4

5

6

0

1

2

3

MA00303

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Table 6-6 SCSI IDs for Dual-Controller Configuration

SCSI Device

Bus A

CDROM drive

Tape drive

Bus B

Slot 0

Slot 1

Slot 2

Slot 3

Slot 4

Slot 5

Slot 6

SCSI ID

4

5

2

3

6

0

1

4

5

Triple-Controller, Split-Backplane Configuration

The following procedure describes how to divide the seven StorageWorks devices between two PCI or EISA SCSI controller adapters (bus B and bus C). Bus A includes the CDROM drive and the tape drive, if one is installed.

Caution: Avoid bending the SCSI cable when folding it.

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1. Insert the plug end of the internal SCSI cable (17-03959-01) in its system board connector.

2. Connect the cable to the rear of the CDROM drive.

3. Bring the cable over the system board and connect it to the rear of the tape drive, if one is installed.

4. Connect the plug end of the SCSI cable (17-03959-01) to the socket end of the

SCSI cable (17-03962-01) and run the other end to the bulkhead connector (the lowest of the three cutouts on the rear of the system near the power supply).

5. Terminate the A bus by connecting an external SCSI terminator (12-41667-01) to the SCSI cable.

6. Connect the end of the first SCSI cable (17-03960-02) to the SCSI option card controller, pass the remainder of the cable beneath the system board, and connect the cable to the 50-pin connector (J2) on the backplane.

7. Connect the plug end of the second SCSI cable (17-03960-02) to the second connector on the SCSI option card controller, pass the remainder of the cable beneath the system board, and connect the cable to the 50-pin connector (J15) on the bottom of the backplane.

8. Connect a SCSI cable (17-03962-02) 50-pin connector (J1) at the top of the backplane. Run the cable beneath the system board and out to one of the two larger cutout slots on the bulkhead.

9. Terminate this SCSI cable by connecting an external SCSI terminator (12-

41667-02).

10. Connect a second SCSI cable (17-03962-02) to the 50-pin connector (J14) on the backplane. Run the cable beneath the system board and out to the remaining cutout slot on the bulkhead.

11. Terminate this external SCSI cable by connecting an external SCSI terminator

(12-41667-02).

12. Ensure that the three sets of pins on the J3 jumper on the backplane are all disabled.

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Triple-Controller, Split-Backplane SCSI Configuration

In the triple-controller configuration shown in Figure 6-10, two SCSI controllers are used to configure the backplane. There are three external terminators, one for each

SCSI controller used. Table 6-7 shows the SCSI ID settings for this configuration.

Figure 6-10 Triple-Controller, Split-Backplane SCSI Configuration

12-41667-02

12-41667-02

17-03960-02

17-03962-01

17-03962-02

17-03960-02

17-03962-02

17-03959-01

Bus ID 4

Bus ID 5

W3

W2

W1

J3

J10

J1

J12

J13

J2

J11

J16

J14

J15

J17

Bus A

Bus B

MA00304

2

3

0

1

0

1

2

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Table 6-7 SCSI IDs for Triple-Controller Configuration

SCSI Device

Slot 2

Slot 3

Bus C

Slot 4

Slot 5

Slot 6

Bus A

CDROM drive

Tape drive

Bus B

Slot 0

Slot 1

SCSI ID

2

3

0

1

0

1

2

4

5

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Configuring AlphaServer 1000 Owner's Guide

7 Upgrading

Introduction

This chapter includes the following topics:

Planning Your Upgrade

Upgrade Options

Planning Your Upgrade

The information in this section describes how to plan for upgrading your server.

Once you have decided which options to add, refer to Chapter 5, "Installing and

Removing Components" in this guide for information on how to install new options or replace existing ones.

Refer to the following list of tasks to help you plan an upgrade:

Determine your current configuration

Determine your new configuration

Determine whether you can install the new option yourself

Order the option

Install the option

Configure the option

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7- 1 AlphaServer 1000 Owner's Guide

1. Determine your current configuration.

Refer to your operating system documentation to find out how to get configuration information by using an operating system command.

You can also obtain configuration information about your system when the server is in console mode. Once the server is in console mode, you can find configuration information as follows:

If you are running the Windows NT operating system, get a list of your system's modules and devices by accessing the Windows NT (ARC) console and accessing the Supplementary menu. Choose the "List available boot devices" menu item to see the "Available boot devices" display. Note that this display does not list tape drives or network devices.

If you are running the Digital UNIX or OpenVMS operating systems, get a list of your system modules and devices by entering the show config command at the console prompt.

2. Determine your new configuration.

You can obtain a current list of supported options from several sources, including:

The Digital FTP archive on the Internet

CompuServe

Digital Systems and Options Catalog

3. Determine whether you can install the new option yourself, or whether you need to contact a qualified service person.

Caution: Internal StorageWorks shelves should be installed only by a qualified service person.

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Upgrading AlphaServer 1000 Owner's Guide

4. Order the option(s).

5. Install the option.

To install an option, refer to the documentation that is shipped with the option, and to Chapter 5, "Installing and Removing Components."

6. Configure the option.

To configure an option, refer to Chapter 6, "Configuring."

Access from the Internet

If you are an Internet participant, you can obtain information about your

AlphaServer 1000 system as follows:

From the Digital FTP archive: ftp.digital.com: /pub/DEC/Alpha/systems/as1000/docs/

From the Digital World-Wide Web Server: http://www.service.digital.com/alpha/server/1000.html

Digital Systems and Options Catalog

You can obtain information about hardware configurations for your server from the

Digital Systems and Options Catalog. The catalog is regularly published to assist customers in ordering and configuring systems and hardware options. Each printing of the catalog presents all of the products that are announced, actively marketed, and available for ordering. You can also obtain information from the following sources:

Call 1-800-DIGITAL to talk to a consultant about your server's configuration.

Retrieve printable PostScript files of any section of the Digital Systems and Options

Catalog from the Digital FTP archive on the Internet: ftp.digital.com cd /pub/digital/info/soc

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7- 3

Upgrade Options

This section lists the types of upgrade options that you may want to choose for your server. Before you attempt to connect third-party devices or install third-party devices inside your system unit, you should first check with the third-party vendor to ensure that your system hardware and operating system software support the device.

Storage devices

SCSI bus backplane cabling

Secondary power supply (for redundant operation)

Memory modules

CPU card

EISA, ISA, and PCI options

-- Network interface cards

-- Graphics cards

-- SCSI controller cards

-- Video cards

Operating systems

RAID controller

Firmware

Firmware

You may want to update your system firmware as later versions become available.

The Windows NT (ARC) firmware and the Digital UNIX and OpenVMS (SRM) firmware reside in the four FlashROM chips located on the system board. This section describes how to update to a later version of firmware. You may also need to recopy firmware onto the system if the FlashROM should ever become corrupted.

To do this, you would use a different procedure. (See "Using the Fail-Safe Loader" in

Chapter 8, "Troubleshooting").

You can load firmware into the FlashROM from any of the following sources:

CDROM

Network

Diskette

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Upgrading AlphaServer 1000 Owner's Guide

Updating Firmware Using the CDROM Drive

To update an OpenVMS or Digital UNIX system:

1. At the console prompt (

>>>

), enter the show device

command:

>>> show device dka0.0.0.6.0 DKA0 RZ26L 440C dka400.4.0.6.0 DKA400 TOSHIBA CD-ROM XM-4101TA 0064 dva0.0.0.0.1 DVA0 ena0.0.0.1.1 ENA0 08-00-2B-38-67-6B pka0.7.0.6.0 PKA0 SCSI Bus ID 7

In the above example, the

CDROM

drive has a device ID of dka400.

2. Load the Firmware Update compact disc into the drive.

3. Boot the system from the update utility disc, using the device ID determined in step 1 (in this case, dka400) and the filename given in the Firmware Update document on the compact disc. For example:

>>> boot -fl 0,A0 dka400

Bootfile: [alpha1000]as1000_v4_0.exe

4. Update the system, entering the following command at the update prompt:

APU-> update

5. Confirm the update:

APU-> verify

A successful update will produce the following display:

ARC Rom Verify Successful

SRM Rom Verify Successful

6. Exit from the Firmware Update Utility by pressing the Reset button or turning the system off and on.

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7- 5

To update a Windows NT system:

1. Shut down the Windows NT operating system. Turn the system off and then on.

2. From the Boot menu, select "Supplementary."

3. From the Supplementary menu, select "Install new firmware."

4. Update the system, entering the following command at the update prompt:

APU-> update

5. Confirm the update:

APU-> verify

A successful update will produce the following display:

ARC Rom Verify Successful

SRM Rom Verify Successful

6. Exit from the Firmware Update Utility by pressing the Reset button or turning the system off and on.

Updating Firmware Using the Network

To update the firmware using the network, refer to the Read Me instructions on the

Web Server.

Updating Firmware Using the Diskette Drive

To update the firmware using the diskette drive:

1. Insert the diskette with the new firmware version in the diskette drive.

2. Enter the following command at the SRM console prompt:

>>> boot dva0

3. Load and execute the update utility:

APU-> update

4. Turn the system off and on.

5. Confirm the update:

>>> show version

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Upgrading AlphaServer 1000 Owner's Guide

Note: To update your system using the SRM console, use a diskette formatted with the Alpha boot block. To update using the ARC console, use an FAT formatted diskette.

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8 Troubleshooting

Introduction

This chapter describes procedures for resolving problems with the system. The first section provides an overview and a general guide to determining the type of problem that exists. The next two sections describe diagnostic procedures that you can use to identify the source of a particular problem. To correct a problem, locate the troubleshooting table for that problem type and follow the guidelines provided. If you cannot correct the problem, report it to your service representative.

This chapter covers the following topics:

Troubleshooting Overview

System Diagnostics

Power Problems

Console Problems

Boot Problems

Problems Detected by the Operating System

Storage Problems

Option Card Problems

Monitor and Terminal Problems

Keyboard and Mouse Problems

Printer Problems

Overheating Problems

RAID Device Problems

Using the Fail-Safe Loader

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Troubleshooting Overview

Before you begin troubleshooting your system, consult your service agreement to determine how much troubleshooting and repair you should undertake yourself.

If you plan to maintain the system yourself, use the information in this guide to help identify and resolve the problem.

If you have a service agreement with a service provider, contact your representative for assistance.

Table 8-1 lists possible problems and the relevant sections in this chapter.

Table 8-1 Determining Where to Look

Task or Problem Relevant Section

To confirm that EISA cards or memory modules are properly configured.

To run a diagnostic test of the whole system, show its status, or terminate the testing.

No startup display appears when you turn on the system.

Option Card Problems

System Diagnostics

Startup tests do not complete.

The system cannot boot the operating system.

System Diagnostics (Error Beep Codes)

Power Problems

Console Problems

Problems Detected by the Operating System

Console Problems

Boot Problems or System Diagnostics

The operating system reports errors, is hung, or crashes.

The system cannot access a mass storage device.

Storage devices are missing from the show device display.

The system indicates network problems, an EISA card is not configured, or a PCI card is unseen by the system.

The monitor or the terminal are not working.

The keyboard and mouse are not working.

The system repeatedly shuts down after 10 seconds.

Problems Detected by the Operating System

Storage Problems

Option Card Problems

Monitor and Terminal Problems

Keyboard and Mouse Problems

Overheating Problems

System does not see or cannot access RAID drives.

RAID Device Problems

The FlashROM is corrupted, and the system cannot access console mode.

Using the Fail-Safe Loader

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System Diagnostics

This section describes three sources of error information that can help you diagnose and troubleshoot system problems. Beep codes are audible error codes emitted by the system for specific problems. The console event log is a record of startup status messages, which may contain helpful diagnostic information. Console command displays, such as the test command display, are another source of diagnostic information.

Interpreting Error Beep Codes

Table 8-2 describes error beep codes that you may encounter while using your system. For example, if the SROM (serial read only memory) code could not find any good memory, you would hear a 1-3-3 beep code (one beep, a pause, a burst of three beeps, a pause, and another burst of three beeps).

Table 8-2 Error Beep Codes

Beep Code

1-1-4

3-3-1

1-2-1

1-3-3

Meaning

The SROM code could not read the flashROM headers, or there was a checksum failure.

Generic system failure.

TOY NVRAM failure.

The SROM code could not find at least 2 MB of good memory, or there was no memory available.

Action

Refer to the section, "Using the Fail-

Safe Loader."

Call your service representative.

Call your service representative.

Verify that the memory modules are properly seated.

Replace faulty memory modules.

Reading the Console Event Log

The system maintains a console event log consisting of status messages received during startup testing. If problems occur during startup, standard error messages may be embedded in the console event log. To display the console event log, use the cat el

command. Or, to display the log screen by screen, use the more el command.

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8-3

The test Command

The test command runs firmware diagnostics for the entire core system. The tests are run sequentially, and the status of each subsystem test is displayed to the console terminal as the tests progress. If a particular device is not available to test, a message is displayed.

The test script is made up of several exercisers that can test subsystems. The test command runs these exercisers sequentially and the status of each subsystem test is displayed to the console terminal as the tests progress. Any of the subsystem tests can be invoked as a standalone test. If a device is not available to test, a message is displayed. The test script does no destructive testing, that is, it does not write to disk drives.

To run a complete diagnostic test using the test

command, the system configuration must include:

Serial loopback connected to the COM2 port

Parallel loopback (12-27351-01) connected to the parallel port

Connection to a network or a terminator connected to the Ethernet port

A trial diskette with files installed

A trial CDROM with files installed

The test script tests devices in the following order:

1. Console loopback tests if

1b

argument is specified: COM2 serial port and parallel port

2. Network external loopback tests for EW: this test is run if a Digital Ethernet controller (EW) is present. The test requires that the Ethernet port be terminated or connected to a live network; otherwise, the test will fail.

3. Memory tests

4. Read-only tests: DK, DR, and DU disks, MK tapes, DV diskettes

5. VGA console tests: these tests are run only if the console environment variable is set to "serial." The VGA console test displays rows of the letter "H."

Note: By default, no write tests are performed on disk and tape drives. Media must be installed to test the diskette drive and tape drives.

Example 8-1 shows a sample of the test command display.

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Troubleshooting AlphaServer 1000 Owner's Guide

Example 8-1 The test Command

>>> test

Requires diskette and loopback connectors on COM2 and parallel port type kill_diags to halt testing type show_status to display testing progress type cat el to redisplay recent errors

Testing COM2 port

Setting up network test, this will take about 20 seconds

Testing the network

80 Meg of System Memory

Bank 0 = 32 Mbytes(8 MB Per Simm) Starting at 0x00000000

Bank 1 = 32 Mbytes(8 MB Per Simm) Starting at 0x02000000

Bank 2 = 16 Mbytes(4 MB Per Simm) Starting at 0x04000000

Bank 3 = No Memory Detected

Testing the memory

Testing parallel port

Testing the SCSI Disks

Non-destructive Test of the Floppy started serial port not used as main console - VGA test bypassed

Printer offline file open failed for para

The kill and kill_diags Commands

The kill and kill_diags

commands terminate diagnostics that are currently executing.

The kill

command terminates a specified process.

The kill_diags

command terminates all diagnostics.

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8-5

The show_status Command

The show_status

command reports one line of information per executing diagnostic. Many of the diagnostic tests are run in the background and provide information only if an error occurs. Use the show_status command to display the progress of the diagnostics.

Power Problems

Table 8-3 describes how to troubleshoot the system when there is no power at the system enclosure.

Table 8-3 Troubleshooting Power Problems

Symptom Action

No AC power

AC power is present, but system does not power on.

Power supply shuts down after approximately 10 seconds (fan failure).

Check the power source and power cord.

Check that the system cover is properly secured. An interlocking sensor switch shuts off power to the system if the cover is removed.

If there are two power supplies, make sure that both power supplies are plugged in.

Check the On/Off switch on the operator control panel.

Check that the ambient room temperature is within environmental specifications (10–40ºC, 50–140ºF).

Check that cable connectors on the system board are properly connected.

Check that the internal power supply cables are plugged in at the right place on both the power supply and system backplane.

Using a flashlight, look through the front (to the left of the internal StorageWorks shelf) to determine if the fans are spinning at startup. Replace the fan that does not spin. If neither fan spins, check the power supply.

Console Problems

Table 8-4 describes how to troubleshoot the system when, at startup, the console terminal does not display the startup screen, or the startup screen displays error messages.

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Troubleshooting AlphaServer 1000 Owner's Guide

Table 8-4 Troubleshooting Console Problems

Symptom

Startup screen is not displayed.

Startup screen displays error messages.

Action

Check that keyboard and monitor are connected and functioning properly. Check that power is on.

If the startup screen is not displayed, yet the system enters console mode when you press the Return key, check that the console

environment variable is set correctly. If you are using a

VGA console terminal, the variable should be set to "graphics." If you are using a serial terminal, the variable should be set to "serial."

If you are using other than the standard on-board VGA controller, the on-board

CIRRUS VGA options must be set to disabled through the

ECU

, the

VGA

jumper (J27) on the upper-left corner of the system board disabled (off), and the console environment variable set to "graphics."

Combining multiple VGA controllers will produce unpredictable results. Use of multiple VGA controllers is therefore not recommended or supported.

Try connecting a console terminal to the

COM1

serial communication port. If necessary use a 9-pin connector.

Check baud rate setting for console terminal and system.

The system baud rate setting is 9600. When using the

COM1

serial port, set the console

environment variable to "serial."

If you have verified that there are no monitor, terminal or keyboard problems, the problem may be with the firmware. Refer to the section, "Using the Fail-Safe

Loader."

If startup screens or the console event log indicate problems with mass storage devices, or if storage devices are missing from the show config display, use the troubleshooting tables in the section, "Storage Problems" to determine the problem.

If startup screens or the console event log indicate problems with EISA or PCI devices, or if EISA or PCI devices are missing from the show config

display, use the troubleshooting table in the section, "Option Card

Problems" to determine the problem.

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8-7

Boot Problems

Table 8-5 describes how to troubleshoot problems that occur while the system is booting operating system software.

Table 8-5 Troubleshooting Boot Problems

Symptom

The system cannot find the boot device.

Action

Verify that your system recognizes the boot device, using the show device command.

Check that the boot device environment variable correctly identifies the boot device:

Digital UNIX and OpenVMS: use the show bootdef_dev command to display the boot device.

Windows NT: Select the ARC console menu options

"Display Hardware Configuration" and "Set Default

Environment Variables."

Check system configuration for the correct environment variable settings:

For Digital UNIX and OpenVMS, examine the auto_action, bootdef_dev, boot_osflags, and os_type environment variables.

For problems booting over a network, check the ew*0_protocols

or er*0_protocols environment variable settings: Systems booting from a

Digital UNIX server should be set to bootp

; systems booting from an Open VMS server should be set to mop .

For Windows NT, examine the

FWSEARCHPATH,

AUTOLOAD,

and

COUNTDOWN

environment variables.

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Troubleshooting AlphaServer 1000 Owner's Guide

System does not boot.

There is a software problem or the operating system is not installed correctly.

Check that the Halt switch is set to the "off" position.

Verify that you have not installed an unsupported graphics module or another type of unsupported adapter.

For problems booting over a network, check the ew*0_protocols

or er*0_protocols environment variable settings: Systems booting from a

Digital UNIX server should be set to bootp

; systems booting from an OpenVMS server should be set to mop.

Run the test

command to check that the boot device is operating. See the table in the section, "Console

Problems."

Refer to your operating system software information.

Verify that you have the correct firmware revision for your system. See Chapter 3, "Preparing to Install an

Operating System."

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Problems Detected by the Operating System

Table 8-6 describes possible operating system problems and their solutions.

Table 8-6 Troubleshooting Problems Detected by the Operating System

Symptom

System is hung or has crashed.

No startup display.

Action

Examine the crash dump file.

Refer to the OpenVMS AXP Alpha System Dump

Analyzer Utility Manual for information on how to interpret OpenVMS crash dump files.

Refer to the Guide to Kernel Debugging (AA-PS2TA-

TE) for information on using the Digital UNIX (DEC

OSF/1) Crash Utility.

The console environment is set to "serial;" thus, the startup screen is routed to the COM1 serial communication port and cannot be viewed from the

VGA monitor.

If you are using a VGA monitor, set the console environment variable to "graphics." (Use the set console graphics command).

Errors have been logged, and the operating system is up.

Have your service provider examine the operating system error log files to isolate the problem.

If the problem occurs intermittently, have your service provider run an operating system exerciser, such as

DEC VET, to stress the system.

Refer to the DEC Verifier and Exerciser Tool User's

Guide (AA-PTTMA-TE) for instructions on running

DEC VET.

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Troubleshooting AlphaServer 1000 Owner's Guide

Storage Problems

Mass storage device problems at startup are usually indicated by read fail messages.

Problems are also indicated by storage devices missing from the show config display. Use the following tables to diagnose the likely cause of the problem. Table

8-7 provides information for troubleshooting fixed-media mass storage problems indicated at startup. Table 8-8 provides information for troubleshooting removablemedia storage problems indicated at startup.

Table 8-7 Troubleshooting Fixed-Media Problems

Symptom

Fault indicator light for drive is on (amber).

Drives with duplicate SCSI

IDs are missing from the show config display.

Valid drives are missing from the show config display.

One drive may appear seven times on the configuration screen display.

Problem

Drive has failed.

Action

Replace drive.

Duplicate SCSI IDs (when removable-media bus is extended to StorageWorks shelf).

SCSI ID is set to 7 (reserved for host ID).

Correct removable-media SCSI device IDs. May need to reconfigure internal

StorageWorks backplane.

Correct SCSI IDs.

You cannot access the software or data on the drive.

.Activity indicators do not come on.

Drive is missing from the show config display.

Duplicate host IDS on a shared bus.

The SCSI ID of the drive is not unique or the SCSI drive cables are connected incorrectly.

The SCSI drive is faulty.

Missing or loose cables.

Drive is not properly seated on

StorageWorks shelf.

Change host ID through the pk*0_host_id environment variable ( set pk*0_host_id

).

See Chapter 6, "Configuring" for information on displaying

SCSI device configuration. If the device is not listed in the display, check the SCSI cabling and the drive's SCSI

ID.

Contact your service representative.

Remove device and inspect cable connections.

Reseat drive on StorageWorks shelf.

Table 8-8 lists suggestions for troubleshooting fixed-media mass storage problems at startup or when storage devices are missing from the show config

display.

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Table 8-8 Troubleshooting Removable Media Problems

Problem

Drive failure.

Duplicate SCSI IDs.

SCSI ID is set to 7

(reserved for host ID).

Duplicate host IDs on a shared bus.

Faulty cable termination.

Missing or loose cables.

Cable length.

Missing terminator.

Extra terminator.

Symptom

Drive fault indicator is on.

Drives with duplicate SCSI IDs are missing from the show config display.

Valid drives are missing from the show config display.

One drive may appear seven times on the configuration display.

Valid drives are missing from the show config display.

One drive may appear seven times on the configuration display.

Activity indicators do not come on. Drive missing from the show config

display.

Activity indicators do not come on.

Read/write errors in the console event log; storage adapter port may failure.

Devices produce errors or device

IDs are dropped.

Action

Replace the drive.

Correct removable-media SCSI IDs.

Correct SCSI IDs.

Change host ID using the pk*0_host_id set

command.

Check cable termination. Remove device and inspect cable connections.

Check cable length: maximum cable length is 3 m for external expansion boxes.

Attach terminators as needed: internal SCSI terminator or external

SCSI terminator.

Check that SCSI bus is terminated only at beginning and end. Remove unnecessary terminators.

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Troubleshooting AlphaServer 1000 Owner's Guide

Option Card Problems

Option card problems can include problems related to network options, EISA/ISA bus options, and PCI options.

Network Problems

Network problems can vary depending on the type of network option card that you have installed. See the option card documentation for information on troubleshooting network problems. Make sure you have correctly set the network type for the network interface card. See Chapter 6, "Configuring" for more information.

EISA/ISA Bus Problems

EISA bus problems at startup are usually indicated by the following display during startup. Run the EISA Configuration Utility (ECU) if this message is displayed.

Table 8-9 describes the steps for troubleshooting EISA problems.

EISA Configuration Error. Run the EISA Configuration

Utility.

Table 8-9 Troubleshooting EISA/ISA Bus Problems

4

5

Step Action

1

2

3

Check that the EISA card and any cabling are properly seated.

Run the ECU as described in Chapter 6, "Configuring" to:

Confirm that the system has been configured with the most recently installed controller.

See what the hardware jumper and switch settings should be for each

ISA controller.

See what the software setting should be for each ISA and EISA controller.

See if the ECU deactivated (< >) any controllers to prevent conflict.

See if any controllers are locked, which limits the ECU's ability to change resource assignments.

Confirm that hardware jumpers and switches on ISA controllers reflect the settings indicated by the ECU. Start with the last ISA module installed.

Check for a bad slot by moving the last installed controller to a different slot.

Call the option manufacturer or your service representative for help.

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PCI Bus Problems

PCI bus problems at startup are usually indicated by the inability of the system to detect the PCI device. Use Table 8-10 to diagnose the likely cause of the problem.

PCI Parity

Some PCI devices do not implement PCI parity, and some have a parity-generating scheme that may not comply with the PCI Specification. In such cases, the device functions properly as long as parity is not checked. The pci_parity

environment variable for the SRM console, or the

DISABLEPCIPARITY CHECKING

variable for the ARC console, allows you to turn off parity checking so that false PCI parity errors do not result in machine check errors.When you disable PCI parity, no parity checking is implemented for any PCI device, even those that produce correct, compliant parity.

Table 8-10 Troubleshooting PCI Bus Problems

Step

1

2

3

Action

Confirm that the PCI module and any cabling are properly seated.

Check for a bad slot by moving the last installed controller to a different slot.

Call the option manufacturer or your service representative for help.

Monitor and Terminal Problems

If the system starts up but has no startup display when you turn on the system, refer to Table 8-11.

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Troubleshooting AlphaServer 1000 Owner's Guide

Table 8-11 Troubleshooting Monitor and Terminal Problems

Possible Cause Action

The monitor or terminal are not turned on.

The monitor or terminal brightness and contrast controls are incorrectly set.

Check that the monitor or terminal is turned on.

Make sure that all cables are connected at both ends.

Adjust the monitor or terminal contrast and brightness controls.

Incorrect graphics configuration.

The terminal cable is not connected to the correct serial port.

See Chapter 6, "Configuring."

Check that the serial port to which the terminal cable is connected. Make sure that it is connected to the left-hand serial port.

If you are using a console terminal, check the baud rate setting for the terminal and system. The system default baud rate setting is 9600.

The power cord is not connected.

The power cord may be faulty. The power cord socket may not be working.

If you are using other than the standard on-board

VGA

controller, settings may be incorrect.

Connect the console terminal to the COM1 serial communication port and set the console environment variable to serial ( set console serial command).

Make sure that all the power cords are connected correctly at both ends. Try a power cord that works or test the power socket with an appliance that works.

The terminal or monitor fuse may have blown.

The port to which the terminal or monitor connects may not be the correct one.

The port to which the terminal or monitor connects may be faulty.

Make sure that on-board

CIRRUS VGA

options are set to disabled through the

ECU

, the

VGA

jumper (J27) on the upper-left corner of the motherboard is disabled

(off), and the console environment variable is set to

"graphics."

Combining multiple VGA controllers will produce unpredictable results, and use of multiple VGA controllers is not recommended or supported.

Replace the blown terminal or monitor fuse. Refer to the terminal or monitor documentation.

Ensure that your monitor cable is plugged into the correct graphics port if you have an optional graphics card installed. You should plug the cable into the connector of your option card, not the connector on the system board.

Try connecting the terminal or monitor to another system using the same terminal or monitor cable. If the terminal or monitor works, the port to which the terminal or monitor was connected is faulty. Contact your service representative.

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8-15

Keyboard and Mouse Problems

Table 8-12 lists problems that may occur with the keyboard or mouse.

Table 8-12 Troubleshooting Keyboard and Mouse Problems

Symptom Possible Cause Action

The monitor does not display the character that you type.

The monitor displays a message indicating a keyboard error.

The mouse pointer is displayed on the monitor, but does not move correctly.

The mouse pointer does not show on the monitor.

The keyboard cable is incorrectly connected.

The keyboard has failed.

The keyboard is not connected correctly.

Make sure that the keyboard is connected to the keyboard port.

The mouse is connected incorrectly.

Make sure that the keyboard cable is connected correctly in the keyboard connector.

Replace the keyboard. If the problem persists, contact your Digital service representative.

The mouse ball is dirty.

The mouse is connected incorrectly or the mouse cable is loose.

The system is in console mode.

The mouse is faulty.

Make sure that the mouse cable is connected correctly in the mouse connector.

Remove the ball from the mouse and clean it in a lukewarm, mild-soap solution. Dry the ball and replace it in the mouse.

Make sure that the mouse cable is connected correctly in the mouse connector.

The mouse pointer is displayed only when the operating system is running. Boot the operating system.

Replace the mouse.

Printer Problems

Verify that the printer is correctly cabled to the system (see Figure 1-3 to verify the connection) and refer to the printer's documentation if necessary.

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Troubleshooting AlphaServer 1000 Owner's Guide

Overheating Problems

Internal sensors monitor system and power supply temperature and shut down the system if maximum limits are exceeded. If the system shuts down unexpectedly:

Verify that the ambient temperature does not exceed the limits specified in Table

2-1, "Optimal Environmental Conditions."

Refer to Table 8-3, "Power Problems" to troubleshoot power supply problems and fan failure.

RAID Device Problems

For systems that have the StorageWorks RAID Array 200 Subsystem installed,

Table 8-13 describes symptoms of RAID device problems and offers solutions.

Table 8-13 Troubleshooting RAID Device Problems

Symptom

Some RAID devices do not appear on the show device

display.

Drives on the RAID subsystem start up with the amber fault indicator light on.

Image copy of DRA logical drive does not boot (OpenVMS systems).

Cannot access disks connected to the

RAID subsystem on Microsoft

Windows NT systems.

Action

Valid configured RAID logical drives will appear as

DRA0-DRAn, not as DKn. Configure the drives by running the RCU, following the instructions in the

StorageWorks RAID Array 200 Subsystem Family

Installation and Configuration Guide,

EK-SWRA2-IG

.

Several physical disks can be grouped as a single logical

DRAn device. External SCSI terminators used with the

SWXCR

controller must be of type:

12-41667-02.

Whenever you move drives on or off the RAID controller, run the RCU to set up the drives and logical units. Follow the instructions in the installation and configuration guide.

If you copy the contents of a system disk to your RAID subsystem using the

BACKUP/IMAGE

command, you must repeat several steps in the data device installation procedure, as described in the StorageWorks RAID

Array 200 Subsystem Family Software User's Guide for

OpenVMS AXP,

AA-Q6WVA-TE

, in order to make the second device a bootable device.

On Microsoft Windows NT systems, while running the

ECU, verify that the controller is set to spin up two disks every six seconds. This is the default setting if you are using the default configuration files for the controller.

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••

8-17

Using the Fail-Safe Loader

The fail-safe loader (FSL) allows you to boot an Update Utility diskette in an attempt to repair corrupted console files that reside within the FlashROMs on the system board. Use the FSL only when a failure at startup prevents you from accessing the console mode and you have checked the operator control panel for progress messages.

Using the Update Utility

To activate the fail-safe loader:

1. Turn off the system

2. Install the update utility diskette in the diskette drive.

3. Remove the top cover and side panels (See "Removing the Top Cover and Side

Panels" in Chapter 5, "Installing and Removing Components").

4. Enable the fail-safe loader by moving the jumper on the CPU card to the position nearest the system board (see Figure 8-1).

5. Replace the top cover and side panels.

6. Turn on the system, and check the operator control panel for progress messages.

Respond "yes" to the update prompt.

7. After the update utility has completed, turn off the system.

8. Remove the top and side panels.

9. Disable the fail-safe loader and set the SROM jumpers to their normal operating position.

10. Replace the top cover and side panels, and turn the system back on.

11. Check to make sure that the appropriate console prompt appears.

Note: The fail-safe loader is available for order by part number

AK-QDEDA-CA

.

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Troubleshooting AlphaServer 1000 Owner's Guide

Figure 8-1 Fail-Safe Jumper on the CPU Card

J1

0

1

2

3

6

7

4

5

MA00453

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8-19

9 Quick Reference

Introduction

This chapter contains the following reference information:

Messages

Hardware Overview

Indicator lights

System Board Jumper Settings

SCSI ID Settings

Specifications

Block Diagram

Messages

The system maintains a console event log consisting of status messages received during startup testing. If problems occur during startup, standard error messages may be embedded in the console event log. To display the messages in the console event log, use the cat el command, or, to display the log screen by screen, use the more el

command.

Quick Reference

••

9-1 AlphaServer 1000 User Guide

7

6

5

Hardware Overview

This section includes front, rear, and side views of the system unit.

System Front View

Figure 9-1 shows system components on the front panel.

Figure 9-1 System Front View

8 9 10 11

4 3 2 1

MA00209

1 Halt switch

2 Reset switch

3 On/Off indicator

4 On/Off switch

5 Operator control panel

6 Diskette drive activity indicator

7 Diskette drive eject button

8 CDROM volume control

9 CDROM activity indicator

10 CDROM eject button

11 CDROM emergency eject hole

9-2

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Quick Reference AlphaServer 1000 User Guide

5

4

3

2

1

System Rear View

Figure 9-2 shows system ports and slots on the rear panel.

Figure 9-2 System Rear View

8

9

6

7

MA00211

10

1 PCI/EISA slots

2 Parallel port

3 Serial port/terminal port (COM2)

4 Mouse port

5 VGA port

6 Keyboard port

7 Serial console port/ terminal port

(COM1)

8 SCSI port

9 Power inlet

10 Four additional

SCSI ports

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9-3

System Side View

Figure 9-3 shows system components on the system board side with the side panel removed.

Figure 9-3 System Side View: System Board Side

1 2

3

4

5

6

7

1 System board

2 CPU card

3 CDROM drive

4 Diskette drive

5 Upper fan

6 Speaker

7 Lower fan

MA00253

9-4

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Quick Reference AlphaServer 1000 User Guide

2

1

Figure 9-4 shows system components on the power supply side with the side panel removed.

Figure 9-4 System Side View: Power Supply Side

3 4

1 Front bezel

2 Operator control panel display

3 Tape drive housing

4 Sensor switch

5 Backplane

6 Primary power supply

MA00254

5 6

AlphaServer 1000 User Guide Quick Reference

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9-5

3

2

System Board Connectors, Chips, and Slots

Figure 9-5 shows the location of the system board connectors, chips, and expansion slots.

Figure 9-5 System Board Connectors, Chips, and Slots

5 6

7

8 9

4

1

MA00275

10

11

12

13

14

15

1 EISA/ISA expansion slots

(1-8, top to bottom)

2 PCI expansion slots

(11-13, top to bottom)

3 CPU module connector

4 Memory module connectors (20)

5 Power connector

6 Power connector

7 Power connector

8 Diskette drive connector

9 Upper fan connector

10 Lower fan connector

11 Internal SCSI connector

12 PCI/EISA expansion slot

13 TOY/NVRAM chip

(E78 on board)

14 NVRAM chip (E14 on board)

15 Speaker connector

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Quick Reference AlphaServer 1000 User Guide

Port Pinouts

This section describes pin functions for port connectors on the rear of the system.

VGA Port Connector

The VGA port provides an interface to a VGA terminal. Table 9-1 lists pin assignments for the VGA port.

Table 9-1 VGA Port Pinouts

Pin

13

14

15

9

10

11

12

7

8

5

6

3

4

1

2

Signal

Red

Green

Blue

NC

GNDB

GNDB

GNDB

GNDB

NC

GNDB

NC

NC

HSYNC

VSYNC

NC

Function

Red color driver

Green color driver

Blue color driver

Not connected

Video ground

Video ground

Video ground

Video ground

Not connected

Video ground

Not connected

Not connected

Horizontal synch

Vertical synch

Not connected

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9-7

Parallel Port Connector

The parallel port provides an interface to a printer or other parallel devices. Table 9-

2 lists pin assignments for the parallel port. An asterisk (*) after a signal name indicates an active low signal.

Table 9-2 Parallel Port Pinouts

Pin

13

14

15

16

9

10

11

12

17

18 to 25

7

8

5

6

3

4

1

2

Signal

STB-R*

PRTD0

PRTD1

PRTD2

PRTD3

PRTD4

PRTD5

PRTD6

PRTD7

ACK*

BUSY

PE

SLCT

AUTOFDXT*

ERR*

INIT*

SLCTIN*

CHAS

Function

Strobe

Printer data bit 0

Printer data bit 1

Printer data bit 2

Printer data bit 3

Printer data bit 4

Printer data bit 5

Printer data bit 6

Printer data bit 7

Acknowledge

Busy

Paper end

Select

Autofeed

Error

Initialize printer

Select input

Chassis ground

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Quick Reference AlphaServer 1000 User Guide

Serial Port Connectors

The serial port connectors consist of two 9-pin D-submini connectors. Table 9-3 lists their pin assignments.

Table 9-3 Serial Port Pinouts

Pin

3

4

1

2

5

6

7

8

9

Signal

DCD

RXD

TXD

DTR

GND

DSR

RTS

CTS

RI

Function

Data carrier detect

Receive data

Transmit data

Data terminal ready

Ground

Data set ready

Request to send

Clear to send

Ring indicator

Keyboard and Mouse Port Connectors

The keyboard and mouse connectors consist of two 6-pin mini-DIN connectors.

Table 9-4 lists their pin assignments.

Table 9-4 Keyboard and Mouse Port Pinouts

Pin

3

4

1

2

5

6

Signal

Data

Reserved

Ground

+5 V dc (fused)

Clock

Reserved

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9-9

SCSI Port Connector

The external SCSI connector is a 50-pin high-density connector. Table 9-5 lists the pin assignments.

Table 9-5 SCSI Port Pinouts

Pin

19

20

21

22

15

16

17

18

23

24

25

11

12

13

14

7

8

9

10

3

4

1

2

5

6

Signal

GND

GND

GND

GND

GND

GND

GND

GND

GND

GND

GND

GND

GND

GND

GND

GND

GND

GND

GND

RESERVED

OPEN

RESERVED

GND

GND

GND

Pin

44

45

46

47

40

41

42

43

48

49

50

36

37

38

39

32

33

34

35

26

27

28

29

30

31

Signal

-DB (0)

-DB (1)

-DB (2)

-DB (3)

-DB (4)

-DB (5)

GND

-ATN

GND

-BSY

-ACK

-RST

-MSG

-SEL

-DB (6)

-DB (7)

-DB (P)

GND

GND

RESERVED

TERMPWR

RESERVED

-CD

-REQ

-I/O

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Quick Reference AlphaServer 1000 User Guide

Indicator Lights

Table 9-6 describes system indicator lights and their functions.

Table 9-6 Indicator Lights

Indicator Light

On/Off indicator (green)

Diskette drive activity indicator

(green)

CDROM drive activity indicator

(green)

StorageWorks Disk Drive (green)

StorageWorks Disk Drive (amber)

Function

Lights when the system unit is turned on.

Lights when the system is accessing the diskette drive.

Lights when the system is accessing the CDROM drive.

Blinks when reading or writing to disk.

Lights when there is a problem with the disk.

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9-11

System Board Jumper Settings

Table 9-7 lists the default jumper settings for the system board.

Table 9-7 System Board Default Jumper Settings

Number

J27

J49

J50

J52

J53

J55

J56

Name

VGA enable

SCSI terminator

FROM VPP enable

Temperature shutdown

Fan shutdown

Small fan

Fan fault

Description and Default

Enables the on-board VGA logic.

Enabled. Set to the disabled position

(pins 2 and 3) when using a graphics option card.

Enables the on-board SCSI terminators. The system specification requires that the SCSI bus be terminated at both ends. Enabled.

Permits the 12 volts needed to update the Flash ROMs. Enabled.

Allows the temperature chips to shut down the system in an orderly sequence. Enabled.

Allows the software to shut down the system in the event of a fan failure.

Enabled.

Allows the small fan to be disabled.

Enabled.

Allows hardware to detect a fan fault and shut down the system in an orderly sequence. Enabled.

Set to disable if testing the system board or CPU card outside of the enclosure.

9-12

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Quick Reference AlphaServer 1000 User Guide

Figure 9-6 shows the system board jumper settings for normal operation.

Figure 9-6 System Board Jumper Positions for Normal Operation

VGA Enable

(J27)

Small Fan (J55)

SCSI

Termination (J49)

Temperature

Shutdown (J52)

Fan

Shutdown (J53)

Fan Fault (J56)

Flash ROM

VPP Enable (J50)

MA00371

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••

9-13

Figure 9-7 shows the default settings for jumpers on the CPU card.

The J1 jumper on the CPU card activates the SROM tests and the fail-safe loader.

The J3 and J4 jumper settings affect clock speed and other critical settings for the

AlphaServer 1000 4/200 system. The supported setting for J3 is off. Supported settings for J4 are off, on, on, off, on.

Figure 9-7 CPU Card Jumper Positions for Normal Operation

J1

0

1

2

3

6

7

4

5

MA00328

J4

J3

MA00368

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Quick Reference AlphaServer 1000 User Guide

Figure 9-8 shows jumper locations for the CDROM drive.

Figure 9-8 RRD43 CDROM Jumper Locations

Mode

0

1 2

L

GND

R

0 1 2

ID SELECT

F.GND

GND

12V+10%

5V+5%

DC INPUT

MA00227

Figure 9-9 shows the jumper locations for the hard disk drive.

Figure 9-9 RZxx Hard Disk Jumper Locations

A2 A1 A0 WS EP SS

MA00228

AlphaServer 1000 User Guide Quick Reference

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9-15

SCSI ID Settings

The system backplane can be configured as a single SCSI bus, a single SCSI bus with a jumper cable, a dual SCSI bus, or a triple SCSI bus arrangement.

For each configuration, the CDROM drive and tape drive IDs are manually set at address 4 and 5, respectively. StorageWorks drive IDs are set automatically by the backplane using a combination of three jumper settings on the backplane.

Single-Controller Configuration Jumper Options

Table 9-8 shows the SCSI ID settings for a system with a single-controller configuration.

Table 9-8 Single-Controller Configuration Jumper Options

J2 J3 J1/J2 J1/J3 J2/J3 J1/J2/J3 Device or Slot

None

Bus A

CDROM 4

Tape

Slot 0

5

0

Slot 1

Slot 2

Slot 3

Slot 4

1

2

3

Slot 5

Slot 6

J1

2

3

4*

5*

6

0

1

4*

5*

0

1

4

5

2

3

8

9

4

5

10 2

11 3

0

1

4

5

8

9

4

5

10

11

8

9

4

5

10

11

8

9

4

5

10

11

Note: The system does not recognize two drives with the same ID number.

Seven drives is the maximum number this configuration can recognize. A backplane jumper cable enables you to configure all seven StorageWorks drives.

If you use slots 4 and 5, you must disable the CDROM drive and the tape drive.

If you use the CDROM drive and the tape drive, you must remove drives from slots 4 and 5.

9-16

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Quick Reference AlphaServer 1000 User Guide

Dual-Controller Configuration Jumper Options

Table 9-9 shows the SCSI ID settings for a system with a dual-controller configuration. A jumper cable is used on the backplane to enable all seven

StorageWorks slots on a single bus.

Table 9-9 Dual-Controller Configuration Jumper Options

J1 J2 J3 J1/J2 J1/J3 J2/J3 J1/J2/J3 Device or Slot

None

Bus A

CDROM 4

Tape

Slot 0

5

0

Slot 1

Slot 2

Slot 3

1

2

3

Bus B

Slot 4

Slot 5

Slot 6

0

1

2

0

1

4

5

2

3

4

5

6

0

1

4

5

2

3

8

9

10

8

9

4

5

10

11

0

1

2

0

1

4

5

2

3

12

13

14

8

9

4

5

10

11

4

5

6

8

9

4

5

10

11

8

9

10

8

9

4

5

10

11

12

13

14

AlphaServer 1000 User Guide Quick Reference

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9-17

Triple-Controller Configuration Jumper Options

Table 9-10 shows the SCSI ID settings for a system with a triple-controller configuration.

Table 9-10 Triple-Controller Configuration Jumper Options

Device or Slot

None

Tape

Slot 0

Slot 1

Slot 2

Slot 3

Bus B

Slot 4

Slot 5

Slot 6

Bus A

CDROM 4

1

2

5

0

3

0

1

2

J1

4

1

2

5

0

3

4

5

6

J2

4

J3

4

5 5

0 8

J1/J2

4

1 9 1

2 10 2

5

0

3 11 3

8

9

10

0

1

2

12

13

14

J1/J3

4

5

8

9

10

11

4

5

6

J2/J3

4

5

8

9

10

11

8

9

10

J1/J2/J3

4

5

8

9

10

11

12

13

14

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Quick Reference AlphaServer 1000 User Guide

Specifications

Table 9-11 System Specifications

Attributes

PCI clock

Data I/O

Motherboard RAM

Specification

33 MHz

32-bit PCI

Expandable up to 512 MB

Table 9-12 System Dimensions

Dimension

Width

Length

Height

Weight - minimum

Weight - maximum

Specification

35.3 cm (14.1 in.)

53 cm (21 in.)

44 cm (17.4 in.)

36 kg (80 lbs) diskless system, single power supply

42 kg (93 lbs) fully configured system, two power supplies

Table 9-13 System Environmental Specifications

Condition

Temperature

Humidity

Air circulation

Specification

The room temperature must be between 10º C and 40º C

(50º F and 104º F).

The relative humidity must be between 10% and 90%

(20% to 80% with removable media options).

Minimum clearance of 8 cm

(3 in.) on all sides of the system unit.

AlphaServer 1000 User Guide Quick Reference

••

9-19

Table 9-14 Power Supply Ratings

Specification

Voltage

Frequency

Current

Range

100-120/220-240 volts AC

50-60 Hz

8.5/4.0 amperes (one power cord)

7.0/3.5 amperes (two power cords)

Note: These are the maximum ratings with a fully loaded system enclosure.

These ratings do not include those for a monitor or terminal.

Table 9-15 Acoustics-Declared Values per ISO 9296 and ISO 7779

AlphaServer 1000 Model 200

(PB70A-A9)

Lw

A d, B Lp

A m, dBA

(Bystander Positions)

Idle

Operating

AlphaServer 1000 Model 200

(PB70A-A9) with 6xRZ26L

5.6

5.6

36

36

Idle

Operating

5.7

5.8

38

39

Note: Current values for specific configurations are available from Digital representatives.

1B-10dBa.

9-20

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Quick Reference AlphaServer 1000 User Guide

System Architecture

Figure 9-10 illustrates the server system architecture.

Figure 9-10 System Architecture

Comanche

21064

Bcache

2MB

Memory

Decade

(16MB-2GB)

SROM

CPU Card

Epic

PCI Bus

PCI-EISA

Bridge

EISA Slots

PCI Slots

PCI Slots

PCI Slots

NCR

810

SCSI Bus

EISA Bus

Buffers

EISA Slots

EISA Slots

EISA Slots

EISA Slots

EISA Slots

EISA Slots

X-Bus

Flash

ROM

OCP

Real

Time

Clock

EISA

Config

RAM

8242

Keybd &

Mouse

Keyboard

Mouse

SVGA

Cirrus

5422

NS

312

Serial Ports

Floppy Port

Parallel Port

MA00340

AlphaServer 1000 User Guide Quick Reference

••

9-21

Glossary of Terms

10BASE-T Ethernet network

IEEE standard 802.3-compliant Ethernet products used for local distribution of data.

These networking products characteristically use twisted-pair cable.

AlphaGeneration

Identifies products and services that take advantage of Digital's Alpha 64-bit computing environments.

AlphaServer

Digital's new generation of server systems based on the Alpha 64-bit computing architecture

ARC

User interface to the console firmware for operating systems that expect firmware compliance with the Windows NT Portable Boot Loader Specification. ARC stands for Advanced RISC Computing.

AUI Ethernet network

Attachment unit interface. An IEEE standard 802.3-compliant Ethernet network made of standard Ethernet cable.

autoboot

A system boot initiated automatically by software when the system is powered up or reset.

AlphaServer 1000 User Guide Glossary of Terms

••

1

availability

The amount of scheduled time that a computing system provides application service during the year. Availability is typically measured as a percentage of uptime per year; or, if measured as system unavailability, as the number of hours of downtime per year.

backplane

The main board or panel that connects all of the modules in a computer system.

Short for bootstrap. To load an operating system into memory.

bandwidth

Term used to express the rate of data transfer in a bus or I/O channel. It is expressed as the amount of data that can be transferred in a given time, for example, as megabytes per second.

boot device

The device from which the system bootstrap software is acquired.

boot flags.

boot

A flag is a system parameter set by the user. Boot flags contain information that is read and used by the bootstrap software during a system bootstrap procedure.

bootp

A load host protocol for UNIX host systems.

bootstrap

The process of loading an operating system into memory.

2

••

Glossary of Terms AlphaServer 1000 User Guide

bus

A collection of many transmission lines or wires. The bus interconnects computer system components, providing a communications path for addresses, data, and control information or external terminals and systems in a communications network.

byte

A group of eight contiguous bits starting on an addressable byte boundary. The bits are numbered right to left, 0 through 7.

cache memory

A small, high-speed memory placed between slower main memory and the processor.

A cache increases effective memory transfer rates and processor speed. It contains copies of data recently used by the processor and fetches several bytes of data from memory in anticipation that the processor will access the next sequential series of bytes.

CDROM

A read-only compact disc. The optical removable media used in a compact disc reader.

central processing unit (CPU)

The unit of the computer that is responsible for interpreting and executing instructions.

client-server computing

An approach to computing whereby a computer - the "server" - provides a set of services across a network to a group of computers requesting those services - the

"clients."

command line interface

One of two interfaces in the AlphaServer operator interface. The command line interface supports the OpenVMS and Digital UNIX operating systems. It allows you to configure and test the system, examine and alter system state, and boot the operating system.

AlphaServer 1000 User Guide Glossary of Terms

••

3

console mode

The state in which the system and the console terminal operate under the control of the console program.

console program

The code that firmware executes during console mode.

console subsystem

The subsystem that provides the user interface for a computer system when the operating system is not running.

console terminal

The terminal connected to the console subsystem. It is used to start the system and direct activities between the user and the computer system.

data bus

A bus used to carry data between two or more components of the system.

data cache

A high-speed cache memory reserved for the storage of data.

DEC VET

Digital Verifier and Exerciser Tool. A multipurpose system diagnostic tool that performs exerciser-oriented maintenance testing.

DECchip 21064 processor

The

CMOS

, single-chip processor based on the Alpha architecture and used on many

AlphaGeneration computers.

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Glossary of Terms AlphaServer 1000 User Guide

Digital UNIX operating system

A general-purpose operating system based on the Open Software Foundation OSF/1

2.0 technology. Formerly called DEC OSF/1, V3.0 runs on the range of

AlphaGeneration systems, from workstations to servers.

diagnostic program

A program that is used to find and correct problems with a computer system.

direct memory access (DMA)

Access to memory by an I/O device that does not require processor intervention.

DSSI

Digital's proprietary data bus that uses the System Communication Architecture

(SCA) protocols for direct host-to-storage communications.

DSSI cluster

A cluster system that uses the DSSI bus as the interconnect between DSSI disks and systems.

DUP server

Diagnostic Utility Program server. A firmware program on-board DSSI device that allows a user to set host to a specified device in order to run internal tests or modify device parameters.

ECC

Error Correction Code. Code and algorithms used by logic to facilitate error detection and correction.

EISA bus

Extended Industry Standard Architecture bus. A 32-bit industry-standard I/O bus used primarily in high-end PCs and servers.

AlphaServer 1000 User Guide Glossary of Terms

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5

EISA Configuration Utility (ECU)

A feature of the EISA bus that helps you select a conflict-free system configuration and perform other system services. The ECU must be run whenever you change, add, or remove an EISA or ISA controller.

environment variables

Global data structures that can be accessed from console mode. The setting of these data structures determines how a system powers up, boots the operating system, and operates.

ERF/UERF

Error Report Formatter. ERF is used to present error log information for OpenVMS.

UERF is used to present error log information for Digital UNIX.

Ethernet

IEEE 802.3 standard local area network.

fail-safe loader (FSL)

A program that allows users to power up without initiating drivers or running startup diagnostics. From the fail-safe loader users can perform limited console functions.

Fast SCSI

An optional mode of SCSI-2 that allows transmission rates of up to 10 megabytes per second.

FAT

File allocation table file type. All MS-DOS Windows files are of this type.

firmware

Software code stored in hardware.

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Glossary of Terms AlphaServer 1000 User Guide

Flash ROM

Flash-erasable programmable read-only memory. Flash ROMs can be bank- or bulk-erased.

full-height device

Standard form factor for 5 1/4-inch storage devices.

half-height device

Standard form factor for storage devices that are not the height of full-height devices.

halt

The action of transferring control of the computer system to the console program.

hot swap

The process of removing a device from the system without shutting down the operating system or powering down the hardware.

initialization

The sequence of steps that prepare the computer system to start. Occurs after a system has been powered up.

Interrupt request lines (IRQs)

Bus signals that connect an EISA or ISA module (for example, a disk controller) to the system so that the module can get the system's attention via an interrupt.

ISA

Industry Standard Architecture. An 8-bit or 16-bit industry-standard I/O bus, widely used in personal computer products. The EISA bus is a superset of the ISA bus.

LAN

Local area network. A high-speed network that supports computers that are connected over limited distances.

AlphaServer 1000 User Guide Glossary of Terms

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7

loopback test

Internal and external tests that are used to isolate a failure by testing segments of a particular control or data path. A subset of ROM-based diagnostics.

machine check/interrupts

An operating system action triggered by certain system hardware-detected errors that can be fatal to system operation. Once triggered, machine check handler software analyzes the error.

mass storage device

An input/output device on which data is stored. Typical mass storage devices include disks, magnetic tapes, and CDROM.

MAU

Medium attachment unit. On an Ethernet LAN, a device that converts the encoded data signals from various cabling media (for example, fiber optic, coaxial, or

ThinWire) to permit connection to a networking station.

memory interleaving

The process of assigning consecutive physical memory addresses across multiple memory controllers. Improves total memory bandwidth by overlapping system bus command execution across two or four memory modules.

menu interface

One of two interfaces in the AlphaServer operator interface. The menu interface allows users to boot and configure the Windows NT operating system by selecting choices from a simple menu. The EISA Configuration Utility is also run from the menu interface.

MOP

Maintenance Operations Protocol. A transport protocol for network bootstraps and other network operations.

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Glossary of Terms AlphaServer 1000 User Guide

NFS

Network File System protocol that allows a user to remotely access a host file system as if it were the user's local file system.

node

A device that has an address on, is connected to, and is able to communicate with other devices on a bus. Also, an individual computer system connected to the network that can communicate with other systems on the network.

NTFS

Windows NT file system, a high-performance file system.

NVRAM

Nonvolatile random-access memory. Memory that retains its information in the absence of power.

OCP

See operator control panel.

OpenVMS AXP operating system

A general-purpose multiuser operating system that supports AlphaGeneration computers in both production and development environments. OpenVMS AXP software supports industry standards, facilitating application portability and interoperability.

operating system mode

The state in which the system console terminal is under the control of the operating system. Also called program mode.

operator control panel

The panel located behind the front door of the system, which contains the startup/diagnostic display, DC On/Off switch, Halt switch, and Reset switch.

AlphaServer 1000 User Guide Glossary of Terms

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9

PALcode

Alpha Privileged Architecture Library code, written to support Alpha processors.

PALcode implements architecturally defined behavior.

PCI

Peripheral Component Interconnect. An industry-standard expansion I/O bus that is the preferred bus for high-performance I/O options. Available in a 32-bit and a 64bit version.

PCI-to-EISA bridge

The capability to transfer commonly available EISA and ISA options to the PCI bus.

power-cycle

A process initiated by pressing the reset switch, which causes the system to reinitialize and re-display its startup display.

power-up

The sequence of events that starts the flow of electricity to a system or its components.

RAID

Redundant array of inexpensive disks. technique that organizes disk data to improve performance and reliability. RAID has three attributes:

It is a set of physical disks viewed by the user as a single logical device.

The user's data is distributed across the physical set of drives in a defined manner.

Redundant disk capacity is added so that the user's data can be recovered even if a drive fails.

redundant

Describes duplicate or extra computing components that protect a computing system from failure.

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Glossary of Terms AlphaServer 1000 User Guide

reliability

The probability that a device or system will not fail to perform its intended functions during a specified time

Remote Installation Service (RIS)

A tool that allows remote installation of Digital UNIX to Alpha systems through a local area network.

RISC

Reduced instruction set computer. A processor with an instruction set that is reduced in complexity.

ROM-based diagnostics

Diagnostic programs resident in read-only memory.

SCSI

Small Computer System Interface. An ANSI-standard interface for connecting disks and other peripheral devices to computer systems. Some devices are supported under the SCSI-1 specification; others are supported under the SCSI-2 specification.

self-test

A test that is invoked automatically when power is supplied to the system.

serial ROM

In the context of the CPU module, ROM read by the DECchip microprocessor after reset that contains low-level diagnostic and initialization routines.

SIMM

Single in-line memory module.

AlphaServer 1000 User Guide Glossary of Terms

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11

SRM

User interface to console firmware for operating systems that expect firmware compliance with the Alpha System Reference Manual (SRM).

StorageWorks

Digital's modular storage subsystem (MSS), which is the core technology of the

Alpha SCSI-2 mass storage solution. Consists of a family of low-cost mass storage products that can be configured to meet current and future storage needs.

system board

The main circuit board of a computer. The motherboard contains the base electronics for the system (for example, base I/O, CPU, ROM, and console serial line unit) and has connectors where options (such as I/O and memories) can be plugged in.

system bus

The hardware structure that interconnects the CPUs and memory modules. Data processed by the CPU is transferred throughout the system via the system bus.

system disk

The device on which the operating system resides.

ThinWire

Ethernet cabling and technology used for local distribution of data communications.

ThinWire cabling is thinner than thick wire cabling.

twisted-pair cable

Cable made by twisting together two insulated conductors that have no common covering.

uninterruptible power supply (UPS)

A battery-backup option that maintains AC power to a computer system if a power failure occurs.

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Glossary of Terms AlphaServer 1000 User Guide

wide area network

A high-speed network that connects a server to a distant host computer, PC, or other server, or that connects numerous computers in numerous distant locations.

Windows NT

"New technology" operating system owned by Microsoft Corporation.

write-enabled

Describes a device onto which data can be written.

write-protected

Describes a device onto which data cannot be written.

AlphaServer 1000 User Guide Glossary of Terms

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13

Index

A

Accessories identifying, 2-5 optional, 2-6

Acoustics-declared values, 9-21

Antistatic precautions, 5-2

ARC console, 1-3 help, 4-15 menus, 4-11 verifying configuration, 6-2

Architecture system, 9-22

ARCINST utility, 3-4

B

Backplane configuring, 6-23, 6-27, 6-33 configuring with two controllers, 6-30

SCSI ID settings, 9-16

Beep codes interpreting, 8-3

Boot automatic, 4-12

Boot defaults changing, 4-18

Boot device names

ARC firmware, 4-21

Boot menu (ARC console) functions, 4-11 steps, 4-23

Windows NT, 4-6

Boot problems troubleshooting, 8-9

Boot selection menu (ARC console), 4-24

AlphaServer 1000 User Guide

Boot selections changing, 4-24

Windows NT, 4-22

C

cat el command, 4-7

CDROM documentation, xi

CDROM drive, 4-28, 5-15 installing, 5-19 jumper positions for, 9-15 removing, 5-19

CFG file, 6-13, See also EISA Configuration

Utility (ECU)

Commands basic, 4-12 comprehensive, 4-12 console, 4-12 limiting display, 4-12

Configuration, See also EISA Configuration

Utility (ECU)

determining current, 7-2 verifying, 4-21 viewing, 6-1

Console commands, 4-12

Console event log, 8-3

Console mode, 1-2 invoking, 4-9

Console problems troubleshooting, 8-6

Console subsystem, 1-2

Console tests, 8-4

Consoles switching between, 4-9 tasks, 1-3

Controls front panel, 1-7

Countdown changing, 4-22

CPU card installing, 5-27 jumper positions for, 9-14 removing, 5-26

D

DEC OSF/1 booting, 4-24

Index

••

1

installing, 3-8 preparing to install, 3-7 verifying configuration for, 6-2

Default settings changing, 4-24

DEC OSF/1, 4-25

OpenVMS, 4-25 resetting, 4-12

Windows NT, 4-22

Diagnostic tests, 8-4 halting, 8-5

Digital Systems and Options Catalog, 7-3

Dimensions of system, 2-2

Disk drives, See also StorageWorks disk drives hot swapping, 5-19

Disk space requirements

CDROM documentation, xi

Diskette drive, 4-27 configuring, 4-11 installing, 5-21 removing, 5-22

Drive problems troubleshooting, 8-12

E

EISA bus, 6-10

EISA bus problems troubleshooting, 8-14

EISA Configuration Utility (ECU), 6-13 error messages, 8-14 running from serial line, 4-5 using with DEC OSF/1, 6-15 using with OpenVMS, 6-15 using with Windows NT, 3-4 when to use, 4-18

EISA option card identifying, 6-10

EISA option slots location, 6-10

EISA options, 1-12 configuring, 6-15

Environment variables boot, 4-20 changing default, 4-18 editing, 4-12 setting, 4-18

2

••

Index

setting for Windows NT, 3-3

Environmental specifications, 2-2

Equipment installation and removal, 5-2

Error beep codes, 8-3

Error Correction Code (ECC), 5-6

Error messages

EISA Configuration Utility (ECU), 8-14 startup, 8-7

Expansion system, 1-4

F

Fail-safe loader using, 8-19

Fan problems troubleshooting, 8-6

Fast SCSI-2 controller, 6-21

Firmware description, 1-2 setting default, 4-12 tasks, 1-3 updating, 7-4 updating for Windows NT, 3-3 verifying version, 3-3

G

Graphics option cabling, 2-8 installation, 5-11

Graphics option slot, 2-7

Graphics options environment variable, 8-6

H

Halt switch, 1-8, 4-9

Hard disk formatting, 3-5 jumper positions, 9-15 partitioning, 3-5 preparing for Windows NT, 3-4 help command, 4-16

AlphaServer 1000 User Guide

I

Indicators front panel, 1-7 functions, 9-11

Interlock switch, 5-4

Internet accessing options list on the, 7-3

ISA bus, 6-13

ISA option card identifying, 6-10

ISA option slots location, 6-10

ISA options, 1-12 configuring, 6-17

J

Jumper settings, 9-16 dual controller configuration, 9-18 single controller configuration, 9-16 system board, 9-12 triple controller configuration, 9-19

K

Key, 2-10 identification number, 2-11

Keyboard, 6-10 cleaning, 4-32 configuring, 4-11 connecting, 2-6 connector, 9-9

Keyboard port pin assignments, 9-9

Keyboard problems troubleshooting, 8-17 kill command, 8-5 kill_diags command, 8-5

L

Lock system, 2-10

M

Maintenance

AlphaServer 1000 User Guide

system, 4-32

Memory banks, 5-6

Memory modules, 5-6 installation rules, 5-6 installing, 5-8 removing, 5-7

Memory options, 1-12 sizes, 5-6

Messages displaying, 4-7

Monitor, See also SVGA, VGA monitor connecting, 2-7

Monitor problems troubleshooting, 8-15 more el command, 4-7

Mouse cleaning, 4-32 connecting, 2-6 connector, 9-9

Mouse port pin assignments, 9-9

Mouse problems troubleshooting, 8-17

N

Network external loopback tests, 8-4

Network configuration setting, 6-9

Network hardware connecting, 2-7, 6-9

Network interface cards, 5-15

Network options, 2-7, 6-9

Network problems troubleshooting, 8-14

Network tests, 8-4

O

On/Off switch, 1-8 location, 4-2

OpenVMS booting, 4-24 installing, 3-10 preparing to install, 3-9 verifying configuration, 6-2 verifying version, 3-8

Index

••

3

Operating system defaults changing, 4-18

Operating system problems troubleshooting, 8-11

Operating system type setting for DEC OSF/1, 3-7 setting for Windows NT, 3-2

Operating systems installation, 3-1 memory requirements, 6-8 pre-boot tasks, 4-18 pre-installed, 4-1 setting default, 4-12 supported, 1-2

Operator control panel (OCP) display, 4-6

Option card problems troubleshooting, 8-14

Option cards configuring, 5-14 installing, 5-11 removing, 5-12 testing installation, 5-13

Options

EISA, 1-12 external, 1-13

ISA, 1-12 memory, 1-12 ordering, 1-13, 7-2

PCI, 1-12 storage, 1-11 system, 1-11 upgrade, 7-4

Overheating problems troubleshooting, 8-18

P

PALcode, 1-1, 3-10

Parallel port pin assignments, 9-8

PCI bus problems troubleshooting, 8-15

PCI options, 1-12 configuring, 6-19 identifying, 6-19

Pin assignments keyboard port, 9-9

4

••

Index

mouse port, 9-9 parallel port, 9-8

SCSI port, 9-10 serial port, 9-9

VGA port, 9-7

Port pinouts rear panel, 9-7

Ports rear panel, 1-11

Power requirements, 2-3

Power supply, 6-9 cabling, 5-23 installing, 5-23 removing, 5-25 secondary, 2-3, 5-23

Power supply problems troubleshooting, 8-6

Pre-installed software, 4-1

Printer connecting, 2-6

Printer problems troubleshooting, 8-17

Program mode, 1-2

R

RAID Configuration Utility (RCU), 8-18

RAID controller, 5-19

RAID device problems troubleshooting, 8-18

Reliability, 1-4

Remote location accessing system from, 4-5

Reset switch, 1-8, 4-4

S

screen display, 4-7

SCSI bus maximum length, 6-22

SCSI bus configuration, 6-21 external, 6-22 internal, 6-21 types of, 6-23

SCSI cable terminating, 6-24

SCSI configuration dual controller, 6-31

AlphaServer 1000 User Guide

rules, 6-22 single controller, 6-26 triple controller, 6-35

SCSI devices configuring, 6-22

SCSI IDs assigning, 5-15, 6-20 dual controller configuration, 6-33 duplicate, 8-12 settings, 9-16 single controller configuration, 6-27, 6-30 storage drive, 6-20 triple controller configuration, 6-36

SCSI port pin assignments, 9-10

Security, 1-5, 2-10

Serial port pin assignments, 9-9

Server management, 1-5 set command, 4-22 example, 6-6 set console graphics command, 3-2

Setup overview, 2-1 verifying, 2-8

Setup menu (ARC console) example, 4-15 functions, 4-11 help display, 4-16 show command, 4-22 example, 6-6 show config command, 4-21 example, 6-3 show device command, 4-22 example, 6-4, 6-21 show memory command, 4-22 example, 6-6 show os_type command, 4-2 show_status command, 8-6

Side panels removing, 5-3 replacing, 5-5

Slots rear panel, 1-11

Space requirements system, 2-2

Specifications system, 9-20

AlphaServer 1000 User Guide

SRM console, 1-3 commands, 4-12 help, 4-16 switching to, 4-10 verifying configuration from, 6-2

Startup display, 4-6

DEC OSF/1, 4-7

OpenVMS, 4-7

Windows NT, 4-6

Startup screen display problems troubleshooting, 8-6

Startup tests results, 4-8

Storage drive problems troubleshooting, 8-12

Storage drives determining SCSI IDs, 6-20 location, 4-25, 5-15 types, 4-25

Storage options, 1-11

StorageWorks disk drives, 4-31, 5-15 installing, 5-19 removing, 5-21

StorageWorks shelf, 6-21

Supplementary menu (ARC console) functions, 4-11

SVGA jumper disabling, 5-11

SVGA monitor connecting, 2-7

Switches front panel, 1-8

System architecture, 9-22 dimensions, 2-2 features, 1-1, 1-4 front panel view (figure), 9-2 maintenance, 4-32 moving, 4-32 packing, 4-33 rear panel view (figure), 9-3 remote access to, 4-5 setting up, 2-1 side view (figure), 9-4, 9-5 upgrading, 7-1 uses, 1-2

System board (figure), 9-6

System board jumpers

Index

••

5

settings, 9-13

System partition setting default, 4-11

T

Tape drive, 5-15 installing, 5-17 removing, 5-18

Temperature sensor, 8-18

Terminal connecting, 2-7

Terminal problems troubleshooting, 8-15 test command, 8-4 script, 8-4

Tests halting, 8-5 startup, 4-8

Time setting system, 4-11

Top cover interlock switch, 5-4 removing, 5-3 replacing, 5-5

Troubleshooting overview, 8-2

U

Upgrading options, 7-4

Utility update diskette using, 8-19

V

VGA console tests, 8-4

VGA monitor connecting, 2-7

VGA port pin assignments, 9-7

Voltage power supply, 2-3

W

Windows NT

6

••

Index

boot menu, 4-6 installing, 3-6 preparing to install, 3-1 verifying configuration, 6-2 verifying version, 3-1

AlphaServer 1000 User Guide

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