AlphaServer 2100 Owner’s Guide Order Number: EK–KN450–OP. B01 Digital Equipment Corporation

AlphaServer 2100 Owner’s Guide Order Number: EK–KN450–OP. B01 Digital Equipment Corporation

AlphaServer 2100

Owner’s Guide

Order Number: EK–KN450–OP. B01

Digital Equipment Corporation

Maynard, Massachusetts

First Printing, May 1994

Revised February 1995

Digital Equipment Corporation makes no representations that the use of its products in the manner described in this publication will not infringe on existing or future patent rights, nor do the descriptions contained in this publication imply the granting of licenses to make, use, or sell equipment or software in accordance with the description.

Possession, use, or copying of the software described in this publication is authorized only pursuant to a valid written license from Digital or an authorized sublicensor.

© Digital Equipment Corporation 1995. All Rights Reserved.

The postpaid Reader’s Comments forms at the end of this document request your critical evaluation to assist in preparing future documentation.

The following are trademarks of Digital Equipment Corporation: AlphaServer,

DEC, DECconnect, Digital, OpenVMS, StorageWorks, ThinWire, VAX, VT, the

AlphaGeneration logo, and the DIGITAL logo.

OSF/1 is a registered trademark of Open Software Foundation, Inc. PostScript is a registered trademark of Adobe Systems, Inc. UNIX is a registered trademark in the United States and other countries licensed exclusively through X/Open Company Ltd. Windows and Windows NT are trademarks of

Microsoft Inc.

All other trademarks and registered trademarks are the property of their respective holders.

S2772

FCC Notice:

This equipment generates, uses, and may emit radio frequency. The equipment has been type tested and found to comply with the limits for a Class A digital device pursuant to Part 15 of FCC rules, which are designed to provide reasonable protection against such radio frequency interference.

Operation of this equipment in a residential area may cause interference, in which case the user at his own expense will be required to take whatever measures may be required to correct the interference.

This document was prepared using VAX DOCUMENT Version 2.1.

EC:

Warning! This is a Class A product. In a domestic environment this product may cause radio interference in which case the user may be required to take adequate measures.

Achtung! Dieses ist ein Gerät der Funkstörgrenzwerklasse A. In

Wohnbereichen können bei Betrieb dieses Gerätes Rundfunkstörungen auftreten, in welchen Fällen der Benutzer für entsprechende Gegenmaßnahmen verantwortlich ist.

Attention! Ceci est un produit de Classe A. Dans un environnement domestique, ce produit risque de créer des interférences radioeléctriques, il appartiendra alors à l’utilisateur de prendre les mesures spécifiques appropriées.

ACOUSTICS: Preliminary declared values per ISO 9296 and ISO 7779:

Idle

Operating

Sound Power Level

L wAd

6.5

6.5

, B

Sound Pressure Level

L pAm

, dBA (Bystander

Positions)

47

47

Current values for specific configurations are available from Digital representatives. 1 B = 10 dBA.

SCHALLEMISSIONSWERTE: Verläufige Werteangaben nach ISO 9296 und

ISO 7779/DIN EN27779:

Leerlauf

Betrieb

Schalleistungspegel

L wAd

, B

6,5

6,5

Schalldruckpegel

L pAm

, dBA

(Zuschauerpositionen)

47

47

Aktuelle Werte für spezielle Ausrüstungsstufen sind über die Digital Equipment

Vertretungen erhältlich. 1 B = 10 dBA.

Contents

Preface

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

1 Basic Operation

Before Using this Guide . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

In This Chapter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

System Features . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Characteristics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Architecture . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Environmental and Power Requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

In This Section . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

System Dimensions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Environmental Specifications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Power Requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Power Cords . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Moving the System . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Repositioning the System . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Opening the System Door . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Turning the System On . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Checking System Settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Powering Up the System . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Displaying Power-Up Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Checking Power-Up Display . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Preboot Tasks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Booting the Operating System . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Autobooting the Operating System . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Powering Down the System . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Before You Begin . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Turning Off DC Power . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Extended Power-Down (AC Power) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Invoking Console Mode . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

xiii

1–19

1–23

1–25

1–27

1–27

1–27

1–28

1–29

1–30

1–10

1–12

1–13

1–13

1–14

1–16

1–18

1–4

1–6

1–6

1–6

1–7

1–8

1–9

1–10

1–1

1–2

1–3

1–3

1–3 v

Console Subsystem . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Console Terminal . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Console Mode . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Invoking Console Mode . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Remote Access . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Connecting to Networks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Ethernet . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Connecting Peripherals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Serial/Parallel Connections . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Terminal Connections . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Operating Storage Devices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

For Additional Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Before You Operate Mass Storage Devices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Identifying Mass Storage Compartments . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Operating Storage Devices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Operating a Compact Disc Drive . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Compact Disc Drive Description . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Caddyless Drive . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Drive with Caddy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Inserting and Removing a Compact Disc . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Operating a DAT Tape Drive . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

DAT Description . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Inserting a Tape . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Removing a Tape . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Operating a Diskette Drive . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Diskette Drive Description . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Inserting a Diskette . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Removing a Diskette . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Operating a QIC Drive . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

QIC Drive Description . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Inserting a QIC Tape . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Removing a QIC Tape . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

2 Hardware Components

In This Chapter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Operator Control Panel (OCP) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Power-up Display . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

DC On/Off Button . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Halt Button . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Reset Button . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

vi

1–50

1–50

1–50

1–52

1–52

1–52

1–52

1–39

1–40

1–40

1–40

1–42

1–44

1–48

1–48

1–48

1–48

1–50

1–34

1–34

1–36

1–38

1–38

1–38

1–38

1–38

1–30

1–30

1–30

1–31

1–31

1–32

1–32

1–32

2–1

2–2

2–2

2–3

2–3

2–4

Doors and Panels . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Door and Panel Removal . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

System Front . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Front Components . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

System Rear . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Rear Components . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

System Module Locations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Card Cage . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Accessing the Card Cage . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Accessories . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Accessories . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

3 Options and Upgrades

In this Chapter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Upgrade Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Planning Your Upgrade . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Adding Third-Party Devices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Supported Options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Supported Options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Access from the Internet . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Access from CompuServe . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Digital Systems and Options Catalog . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Verifying System Configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Before You Begin . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Firmware Menu Options for Windows NT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Viewing ARC Hardware Display . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Viewing ARC Environment Variables . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

ARC Environment Variables . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

For More Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Firmware Console Commands for DEC OSF/1 and

OpenVMS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

show device . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

show memory . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Setting and Showing Environment Variables . . . . . . . . . . . . .

System Bus Options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

CPU Modules . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Memory Modules . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

External I/O . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Standard I/O Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

EISA Bus Options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

ISA Bus Options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Identifying ISA and EISA Options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

2–5

2–5

2–8

2–8

2–10

2–10

2–12

2–12

2–12

2–14

2–14

3–4

3–5

3–5

3–5

3–5

3–8

3–9

3–10

3–1

3–2

3–2

3–3

3–4

3–4

3–4

3–4

3–10

3–13

3–16

3–17

3–18

3–20

3–22

3–22

3–23

3–24

3–26

3–28 vii

Configuring EISA and ISA Options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

EISA Configuration Utility . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

System Configuration Diskette . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Before You Run the ECU . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Starting the ECU . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Configuring EISA Options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Configuring EISA/ISA Options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

PCI Bus Options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Installing PCI Boards . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

SCSI Buses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Internal SCSI Bus . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Configuring the Removable Media Bus . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Internal StorageWorks Shelves . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Installing StorageWorks Fixed Disks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Guidelines for Systems with SWXCR-Ex Controller . . . . . . . .

Power Supply Configurations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Power Supply Modes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Ordering Guidelines . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

4 Troubleshooting the System

Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

In This Chapter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Before You Begin . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Determine Service Provider . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Identifying Problems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Task Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Steps to Identifying a Problem . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Determining Type of Problem . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Types of System Problems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Reporting Problems to Digital Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Pre-Call Checklist . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Digital Support Center Contact Numbers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Power Problems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Problems Getting to Console Mode . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Interpreting the Operator Control Panel Power-Up Display . . . .

CPU Failover . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Console Reported Problems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

show fru . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

test . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Mass Storage Problems Indicated at Power-Up . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

EISA Bus Problems Indicated at Power-Up . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

PCI Bus Problems Indicated at Power-Up . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

viii

3–38

3–39

3–39

3–40

3–42

3–44

3–46

3–47

3–47

3–48

3–29

3–29

3–29

3–29

3–30

3–33

3–35

3–37

4–6

4–6

4–10

4–11

4–12

4–12

4–15

4–16

4–18

4–20

4–23

4–25

4–1

4–1

4–2

4–2

4–3

4–4

4–4

4–5

4–5

4–6

Figures

1–8

1–9

1–10

1–11

1–12

1–13

1–14

1–15

1–16

1–1

1–2

1–3

1–4

1–5

1–6

1–7

1–17

1–18

1–19

1–20

Boot Problems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Operating System Reported Problems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Problems with RAID Devices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Glossary

Index

Examples

1–1

3–1

3–2

Boot Menu Example . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Sample Hardware Configuration Display . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

ARC Environment Variable Display . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

System Architecture . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

System Dimensions and Service Area . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Power Requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

System Leveler Feet . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

System Keys . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Powered-Down System Settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Powering Up the System . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Turning Off the System . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Turning Off AC Power . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Ethernet Network Connections . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Connecting Serial and Parallel Devices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Terminal Connections . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Storage Compartments . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Caddyless CD–ROM Drive . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

CD–ROM Drive with Caddy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Inserting and Removing a Caddyless Compact Disc (Internal

Disc Caddy) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Inserting and Removing a CD–ROM Caddy . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Inserting and Removing a Tape: DAT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Diskette Drive and Diskette . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

QIC Tape Drive and QIC Tape . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

4–26

4–28

4–29

1–22

3–6

3–8

1–28

1–29

1–33

1–35

1–37

1–39

1–41

1–43

1–5

1–6

1–8

1–11

1–12

1–15

1–17

1–45

1–47

1–49

1–51

1–52 ix

Tables

1–1

1–2

1–3

1–4

1–5

3–1

3–2

3–3

3–4

3–5

4–1

4–2

4–3

4–4

4–5

3–4

3–5

3–6

3–7

3–8

3–9

3–10

2–1

2–2

2–3

2–4

2–5

2–6

3–1

3–2

3–3

Operator Control Panel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Door and Panel Removal . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

System Front . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

System Rear . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

System Module Locations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Accessories . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Device Name Convention . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

System Bus Option Locations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

System Bus Configurations According to Number of

CPUs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

ISA and EISA Boards . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

PCI Board . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Removable-Media Bus Configurations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Internal StorageWorks Configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

SCSI Cable Routing to Internal StorageWorks Shelves . . . . .

Installing Hard-Disk Drives . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Power Supply Configurations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

3–21

3–28

3–37

3–41

3–42

3–43

3–45

3–49

2–2

2–6

2–8

2–10

2–13

2–15

3–13

3–19

System Characteristics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Environmental Specifications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Power Cord Order Numbers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Interpreting Operator Control Panel Power-Up Display . . . .

Booting the Operating System for the First Time . . . . . . . . .

Device Names . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

ARC Firmware Environment Variables . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Summary of Procedure for Configuring EISA Bus (EISA

Options Only) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Summary of Procedure for Configuring EISA Bus with ISA

Options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

RAID Subsystem Documentation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

How to Identify a Problem . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Steps to Resolving Problems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Problem Reference . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Digital Support Centers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Troubleshooting Power Problems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

3–34

3–36

3–46

4–3

4–4

4–5

4–7

4–10

1–4

1–7

1–9

1–20

1–25

3–8

3–9 x

4–6

4–7

4–8

4–9

4–10

4–11

4–12

4–13

4–14

4–15

Troubleshooting Problems Getting to Console Mode . . . . . . . .

Interpreting Operator Control Panel Power-Up Display . . . .

Troubleshooting Console Reported Problems . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Troubleshooting Fixed-Media Problems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Troubleshooting Removable-Media Problems . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Troubleshooting EISA Problems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Troubleshooting PCI Problems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Troubleshooting Boot Problems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Troubleshooting Operating System Reported Errors . . . . . . .

Troubleshooting RAID Problems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

4–11

4–14

4–15

4–20

4–22

4–24

4–25

4–26

4–28

4–29 xi

Preface

Purpose of This

Guide

Online

Information

This guide describes how to operate, troubleshoot, and maintain the AlphaServer 2100 4/xxx or 5/xxx system.

Your system shipment includes a set of diskettes called the

‘‘Fast Track to Information.’’ Fast Track is an easy-to-navigate, electronic version of the information in this owner’s guide and the information in the AlphaServer 2000/2100 Firmware

Reference Guide.

You can install Fast Track on any personal computer or laptop computer running Microsoft Windows V3.1 or later or a Windows emulator. You need to have approximately four megabytes available on your designated disk.

xiii

Before You Use

This Guide

This guide assumes that you are ready to operate your system.

Before using this guide, a qualified service person should install the system at your site.

Caution

Only qualified service persons should install the system.

Qualified service persons need not be Digital service representatives, but they should have the technical training and experience necessary:

• To be aware of physical hazards to which they are exposed in performing a task.

• To take measures to minimize danger to themselves and other persons.

Books Used with This Guide

Who Should

Use This Guide

If you have not installed the system, refer to the Basic

Installation document shipped with the system.

Some procedures, such as the boot procedure, require you to refer to your operating system documentation. Please have your operating system installation documentation and related ‘‘Read Me First’’ documents or release notes available for use with this guide.

You will also need to become familiar with the console firmware interfaces that facilitate interaction between the server hardware and the operating system. The

AlphaServer 2000/2100 Firmware Reference Guide was included in your system shipment. Be sure to consult that guide as needed.

This book is for system managers and others who perform system management tasks.

xiv

Structure of

This Guide

Warning

Symbols

For More

Information

This guide contains information about how to use your system to best advantage:

• Chapter 1 introduces the system and describes basic system management tasks.

• Chapter 2 describes system components and their functions.

• Chapter 3 describes how to identify your system configuration and how to change your configuration.

• Chapter 4 explains how to identify and resolve problems that may prevent the system from operating correctly.

• The Glossary defines technical terms related to the

AlphaServer 2100 system.

This symbol indicates components that become extremely hot.

This symbol indicates a potential hazard of which you should be aware.

You may find it useful to have your operating system documentation and your system hardware documentation on hand for use with this guide.

You can download up-to-date files and information for managing the AlphaServer 2100 system from the Internet.

Via FTP on ftp.digital.com. Once connected, go to:

/pub/Digital/Alpha/systems

Via World Wide Web: http://www.service.digital.com/alpha/server/

The information includes firmware updates, the latest configuration utilities, software patches, a list of supported options, and more. There are no restrictions on accessing and downloading these files.

xv

Firmware

Updates

Conventions

Convention

Return

Ctrl/x lowercase

Warning

Caution

[ ]

console command abbreviations

boot

italic type

< >

{ }

! " #

. . .

Under some circumstances, such as a CPU upgrade, you may need to update your firmware. Firmware updates are shipped quarterly on CD–ROM for the DEC OSF/1 and

OpenVMS operating systems. Firmware updates for DEC OSF/1,

OpenVMS, and Windows NT are also available on the Internet, as noted above.

The following table lists conventions used in this guide.

Meaning

A key name enclosed in a box indicates that you press that key.

Ctrl/x indicates that you hold down the Ctrl key while you press another key, indicated here by x. In examples, this key combination is enclosed in a box, for example,

Ctrl/C

.

Lowercase letters in commands indicate that commands can be entered in uppercase or lowercase.

Warnings contain information to prevent personal injury.

Cautions provide information to prevent damage to equipment or software.

In command format descriptions, brackets indicate optional elements.

Console command abbreviations must be entered exactly as shown.

Console and operating system commands are shown in this special typeface.

Italic type in console command sections indicates a variable.

In console mode online help, angle brackets enclose a placeholder for which you must specify a value.

In command descriptions, braces containing items separated by commas imply mutually exclusive items.

In figures, a numbered callout labels a part of the figure. In text, it refers to a labeled part of a corresponding figure.

xvi

1

Basic Operation

Before Using this Guide

If you have not installed the system, refer to the Basic

Installation document shipped with the system.

Some procedures, such as the boot procedure, require you to refer to your operating system documentation. Please have your operating system installation documentation and related ‘‘Read Me First’’ documents or release notes available for use with this guide.

You will also need to become familiar with the console firmware interfaces that facilitate interaction between the server hardware and the operating system. The

AlphaServer 2000/2100 Firmware Reference Guide was included in your system shipment. Be sure to consult that guide as needed.

Basic Operation 1–1

Basic Operation

In This Chapter

This chapter covers the following information:

• System Features

• Environmental and Power Requirements

• Turning the System On

• Powering Down the System

• Invoking Console Mode

• Connecting to Networks

• Connecting to Peripherals

• Operating Storage Devices

1–2 Basic Operation

System Features

System Features

Overview

Characteristics

A powerful symmetric multiprocessing (SMP) server, the

AlphaServer 2100 4/xxx or 5/xxx pedestal system offers departmental computing power and capabilities in a pedestal package. The system is based on Digital’s 64-bit, Alpha RISC architecture, which provides fast processing and quick response for advanced applications.

The system resides in the BA740 pedestal enclosure. The system is designed for office environments where a compact footprint and low to medium disk storage capacities are required. It supports up to four CPUs, providing SMP, industry-standard PCI and EISA I/O, and up to 32 gigabytes of in-cabinet storage (200 gigabytes total). Up to 2 gigabytes of high-capacity memory will be available.

Table 1–1 highlights some key characteristics of the system.

Basic Operation 1–3

System Features

Table 1–1 System Characteristics

Characteristic Description

Four–processor capability

High-performance PCI I/O subsystem

EISA I/O bus

Flexible mass storage strategy

3.5-in. storage devices

High availability

CPU chip technology

CPU chip design features

System bus bandwidth

Memory

System can be configured as a uniprocessor or with up to four processors.

PCI is the emerging industry-standard bus that supports Digital and third-party options.

The current implementation of PCI on the server has a peak bandwidth of 132 MB/sec.

33 MB/sec EISA I/O bus supports industry standard

EISA options, such as:

Network adapters

Video/audio options

Storage adapters

StorageWorks compatible storage devices for low-cost, high-capacity flexible configurations

Up to 16, 3.5-in. high performance disk drives may be configured in the BA740 pedestal enclosure, providing many independent disks that may be configured in stripe sets, shadow sets, or RAID sets to optimize performance according to customer requirements.

With the optional RAID controller, the system supports disk hot swap in StorageWorks shelves with the operating systems as well as clustering.

Optional dual power supply provides N+1 redundancy.

All models except model 4/200 support CPU failover.

The Alpha chip is manufactured using Digital’s stateof-the-art CMOS process.

Superscalar, superpipelined.

667 MB/sec (128-bit, 24-ns cycle.)

Up to two gigabytes of main memory will be supported.

Architecture

Figure 1–1 illustrates the server system architecture.

1–4 Basic Operation

System Features

Figure 1–1 System Architecture

System Bus

128-bit

Slot 1 Expansion I/O or CPU 2

Slot 2

CPU 0

Slot 3

CPU 1

Slot 4

MEM 0

Serial

Control

Bus

Slot 5

CPU 3

MEM 1

Slot 6

MEM 2

Slot 7

MEM 3

PCI Bus 32-bit

PCI Bridge

Ethernet

PCI 0

PCI 1

PCI 2

CD-ROM

StorageWorks

SCSI

SCSI

SCSI

EISA 1

EISA 2

EISA 3

EISA 4

EISA 5

EISA 6

EISA 7

EISA 8

SCSI

SCSI

VGA

Optional

StorageWorks

EISA Bus

Standard I/O Module

Serial

COM1

Serial

COM2

Speaker

Parallel

M A 0 6 8 1 9 3 C

Basic Operation 1–5

Environmental and Power Requirements

Environmental and Power Requirements

In This Section

This section covers the following information:

• System Dimensions

• Environmental Specifications

• Power Requirements

• Power Cord Numbers

• Moving the System

System

Dimensions

Figure 1–2 shows the system dimensions and the service area that should be allowed for the system.

Figure 1–2 System Dimensions and Service Area

43 cm

(17 in)

81 cm

(32 in)

70 cm

(28 in)

175 cm

(69 in) 125 cm

(50 in)

M A 0 4 3 1 9 3

1–6 Basic Operation

Environmental and Power Requirements

Environmental

Specifications

Table 1–2 describes the environmental specifications for your system.

Table 1–2 Environmental Specifications

Specification Measurement

Operating temperature

Relative humidity

(noncondensing)

Max heat dissipation

Single power supply

Dual power supply

Minimum operating clearance

Front

Rear

Max operating altitude

Max power consumption

Single power supply

Dual power supply

Operating voltage range

(single phase)

Operating frequency range

Power cord length

Declared operating acoustic level

10-35° C (50-95° F)

20-80%

880 W, 3005 Btu/hr

1280 W, 4371 Btu/hr

75 cm (29.5 in)

15 cm (5.9 in)

2000 m (6562 ft)

880 W

1280 W

100 VAC to 120 VAC/220 VAC to

240 VAC

47 Hz to 63 Hz

2.4 m (8 ft)

LNPEc (BELs)=6.6 max per ISO

7779

Basic Operation 1–7

Environmental and Power Requirements

Power

Requirements

Your system has either one or two power supplies, depending on what you ordered. Figure 1–3 shows the power requirements for each power supply.

Voltage selection is not required. This equipment is intended for use at all rated AC-input voltages.

Warning: Plug this equipment into a properly grounded power receptacle.

Figure 1–3 Power Requirements

115 V (15.0 A)

220 V (6.0 A)

115 V (15.0 A)

220 V (6.0 A)

= Properly Grounded Power Receptacle

M A 0 3 9 5 9 3

1–8 Basic Operation

Power Cords

Environmental and Power Requirements

Power cords for your Digital system are country specific.

Table 1–3 lists the correct power cord order numbers for various countries.

• Use the power cord BN number to identify the power cord.

• The Digital Number is used by Digital service representatives.

Note

One power cord is required for each power supply in your system. To order, call 1-800-DIGITAL (U.S.A. and

Canada) or your authorized Digital Partner.

Table 1–3 Power Cord Order Numbers

Country Power Cord BN Number

U.S., Japan, Canada

Australia, New Zealand

Central European (Aus,

Bel, Fra, Ger, Fin, Hol,

Nor, Swe, Por, Spa)

U.K., Ireland

Switzerland

Denmark

Italy

India, South Africa

Israel

BN27Y-1J

BN19H-2E

BN19C-2E

BN19A-2E

BN19E-2E

BN19K-2E

BN19M-2E

BN19S-2E

BN18L-2E

Digital Number

17-00083-15

17-00198-14

17-00199-21

17000209-15

17-00210-13

17-00310-08

17-00364-18

17-00456-16

17-00457-16

Basic Operation 1–9

Environmental and Power Requirements

Moving the

System

If you need to move your system to a new environment, be sure you are familiar with the environmental specifications and power cord requirements.

Caution

Only qualified service persons should install the system.

Qualified service persons need not be Digital service representatives, but they should have the technical training and experience necessary:

• To be aware of physical hazards to which they are exposed in performing a task.

• To take measures to minimize danger to themselves and other persons.

Repositioning the System

To reposition the system within the same environment, raise the system leveler feet (Figure 1–4) from the floor, and push the system to the new destination. When you have positioned the system, lower the leveler feet to the floor so that they hold the system stationary. If you ship your system to a new location, repackage it carefully so that it can withstand the normal bumps or shocks associated with moving.

1–10 Basic Operation

Environmental and Power Requirements

Figure 1–4 System Leveler Feet

M A 0 6 6 1 9 3

Basic Operation 1–11

Environmental and Power Requirements

Opening the

System Door

The key used to lock and unlock the front door arrived with your system shipment, packaged with the system installation card. The key lock on the front door of the system is shown in

Figure 1–5.

Figure 1–5 System Keys

M A 0 6 4 2 9 3

1–12 Basic Operation

Turning the System On

Turning the System On

Overview

Turn on the system in the sequence shown below and described in the following sections:

• Check System Settings

• Power Up the System

• Check Power-Up Display

• Before Booting the Operating System

• Boot Operating System

Basic Operation 1–13

Turning the System On

Checking

System

Settings

When the system is off, the DC On/Off button and the Halt button are in the ‘‘out’’ position (not lit), as shown in Figure 1–6.

DC On/Off

Halt

Reset

Note

Some versions of the AlphaServer 2100 do not have an AC On/Off switch on the power supply (shown in

Figure 1–6). Ignore callout

!

if your system does not have this switch.

1–14 Basic Operation

Figure 1–6 Powered-Down System Settings

2

1

*

M A 0 4 4 0 9 3

* Some systems do not have this switch.

Turning the System On

Basic Operation 1–15

Turning the System On

Powering Up the System

1.

Be sure the AC power cord for each power supply is plugged in.

2.

Power up any external expansion boxes that are connected to your system, for example, expansion boxes that house storage devices.

3.

Power up the system as shown in callouts

!

through

$ in

Figure 1–7.

Note

Some versions of the AlphaServer 2100 do not have an

AC On/Off switch on the power supply. Ignore callouts

" and

# in Figure 1–7 if your system does not have this switch.

Caution

Both the left and right panels (shown in Figure 2–2) should be in place before you power up the system. An interlock switch on the left panel prevents the system from powering up if the left panel is not in place.

1–16 Basic Operation

Figure 1–7 Powering Up the System

1

2

3

*

*

4

Turning the System On

* Some systems do not have this switch.

M A 0 3 9 7 9 3

Basic Operation 1–17

Turning the System On

Displaying

Power-Up

Information

Power-up information is typically displayed on the system’s console terminal. The console terminal may be either a graphics terminal or a serial terminal connected through the COM1 serial port. The setting of the console environment variable determines where the system will display power-up output. Set this environment variable to ‘‘graphics’’ for a graphics terminal or to ‘‘serial’’ for a serial terminal.

Synopsis:

set console output_device

Arguments:

graphics serial

Displays the power-up output to a graphics terminal or device connected to the VGA module at the rear of the system.

Displays the power-up output to a device connected to the COM1 port at the rear of the system.

Example:

P00>>> set console serial

P00>>> init

. . .

1–18 Basic Operation

Checking

Power-Up

Display

Turning the System On

After you power up the system, check the status of three diagnostic indicators: the power-up/diagnostic display on the operator control panel, the system startup screen, and the console prompt (DEC OSF/1 or OpenVMS systems) or Boot menu

(Windows NT systems).

If any of the diagnostic indicators do not appear as described, refer to Chapter 4 for help.

Operator Control Panel Power-up/Diagnostic Display

The power-up/diagnostic display takes a moment to appear on the screen. The following message is then displayed for several seconds: starting console

When the system has completed self-tests, the message

Model x/xxx

is displayed, where x represents the CPU variant and xxx represents the system model number—for example,

Model 4/275

.

You can customize this message for your system by changing the value of the ocp_text environment variable. Refer to the section on the

set ocp_text

command in the AlphaServer 2000/2100

Firmware Reference Guide.

Table 1–4 describes how to interpret messages on the power-up display.

Note

AlphaServer 2100 systems, with the exception of the model 4/200, offer high-availability ‘‘CPU failover’’ functionality. On multiprocessor systems, the failover feature allows the system to power up and boot the operating system in case of a CPU failure. The

CPU

STATUS

message described in Table 1–4 indicates the status of each CPU. For more information on CPU failover, see Chapter 4.

Basic Operation 1–19

Turning the System On

Table 1–4 Interpreting Operator Control Panel Power-Up Display

Message Meaning

TEST

NO MEM INSTALLED

FAIL module_type

Displayed while the system performs diagnostic tests and exercisers. The type of module under test, its slot number, and the currently executing test number are also displayed.

Displayed if you power up with no memory installed.

If an error is detected in the CPU, memory, or I/O, a failure message is displayed and the Halt button LED lights for a few seconds. The error is logged to the appropriate module via the serial control bus. In nearly all cases, the power-up tests continue.

The module_type and slot number for the module that failed, along with the test number that detected the error are also displayed.

Module types and/or slot numbers:

CPU_nn — CPU module (0–3)

MEM_nn — Memory module (0–3)

I/O_0 — Standard I/O module

I/O_1 — Expansion I/O module (PCI)

CPU STATUS

Summary of CPU testing—The status of each CPU from right to left, starting with CPU0 is displayed:

‘‘P’’ — CPU passed

‘‘F’’ — CPU failed

‘‘–’’ — CPU not present

STARTING CPU #

TEST MEM BANK #

PROBE I/O SUBSYS

SYSTEM RESET

Model x/xxx

The console is starting the primary CPU.

The console is testing memory.

The console is checking the PCI and EISA bridges.

The Reset button has been pressed.

When the system is under operating system control, the

CPU variant (x) and system model number (xxx) are displayed unless you supply your own text using the ocp_ text environment variable.

System Startup Screen

The system startup screen scrolls. To stop the screen display from scrolling, enter Ctrl/S. To resume scrolling, enter Ctrl/Q.

1–20 Basic Operation

Turning the System On

The screen will look similar to the following example: starting console on CPU 0

Testing Memory bank 0

Testing Memory bank 1

Configuring Memory Modules probing hose 0, PCI bus 0, slot 0 -- ewa -- DECchip 21040-AA bus 0, slot 1 -- pka -- NCR 53C810 bus 0, slot 2 --- Intel 82375EB bus 0, slot 7 -- ewb -- DECchip 21040-AA probing hose 1, EISA bus 0, slot 2 -- vga -- CPQ3011 bus 0, slot 4 -- era -- DEC4220 bus 0, slot 5 --- DEC2500 bus 0, slot 5 --- DEC2500 bus 0, slot 6 -- ewc -- DEC4250 probing hose 2, PCI

Memory Testing and Configuration Status

Module Size Base Addr Intlv Mode Intlv Unit Status

-----------------------------------------

1-Way 0 Passed 1 64MB 00000000

Total Bad Pages 0

Testing the System

Testing the Disks (read only)

Testing the Network

AlphaServer 2100 Console T3.8-33, built on Oct 19 1994 at 12:22:36

P00>>>

Console Prompt or ARC Menu

The next display on your console terminal depends on the operating system you installed. On AlphaServer systems, a console subsystem containing firmware code (software code embedded in hardware) controls system initialization and bootstrapping.

There are two versions of the firmware. SRM firmware supports the DEC OSF/1 and OpenVMS operating systems. ARC firmware supports the Microsoft Windows NT operating system. Consult the AlphaServer 2000/2100 Firmware Reference Guide for detailed information on the console firmware.

DEC OSF/1 or OpenVMS Console Prompt

If you are going to boot DEC OSF/1 or OpenVMS, the following console prompt for the SRM firmware should be displayed:

P00>>>

Windows NT Systems

Basic Operation 1–21

Turning the System On

If you are going to boot Windows NT, the following screen should be displayed:

Example 1–1 Boot Menu Example

ARC Multiboot Alpha AXP Version n.nn

Copyright (c) 1993 Microsoft Corporation

Copyright (c) 1993 Digital Equipment Corporation

Boot menu:

Boot Windows NT

Boot an alternate operating system

Run a program

Supplementary menu...

Use the arrow keys to select, then press Enter.

Note

If you do not see either a console prompt or the Boot menu, press

Return several times.

If the screen display on your terminal does not correspond to the operating system that you plan to boot, switch to the other console firmware as described below.

Switching from SRM to ARC

To switch from the SRM console to the ARC console, enter the

arc

command:

P00>>> arc

Once the console firmware is loaded and the system is initialized, the first screen of the ARC console is displayed.

Switching from ARC to SRM

Switch from the ARC console to the SRM console as follows:

1.

From the Boot menu, select

Supplementary menu

.

2.

From the Supplementary menu, select

system . . .

.

Set up the

3.

From the Setup menu, select

Switch to OpenVMS or OSF console.

1–22 Basic Operation

Preboot Tasks

Turning the System On

4.

Select your operating system console, then select the Setup menu and press Enter.

5.

When the message

Power-cycle the system to implement the change

is displayed, press the Reset button.

Once the console firmware is loaded and the system is initialized, the SRM console prompt is displayed.

You may need to perform some of the following tasks before booting your operating system.

• Run the EISA Configuration Utility.

• Check required environment variable settings.

• Change the way your system powers up or boots.

• Verify your configuration.

The remainder of this section contains more information about each of these tasks.

Run the EISA Configuration Utility.

If you have added, removed, or moved an EISA or ISA board, you must run the EISA Configuration Utility before booting the operating system. See ‘‘EISA Bus Options ’’ in Chapter 3.

Check Required Environment Variable Settings—DEC OSF/1 or

OpenVMS.

If you are running DEC OSF/1 or OpenVMS, you may want to check that settings for the following variables match your configuration. The console command you use to reset the variable is shown in parenthesis. For more information about each console command, refer to AlphaServer 2000/2100

Firmware Reference Guide.

• Operating system (

set os_type

)

• Ethernet device type (

set ew*o_mode

)

• Speed for Fast SCSI devices (

set pk*0_fast

)

• Boot device (

set bootdef_dev

)

• Boot flags (

set boot_osflags

)

Basic Operation 1–23

Turning the System On

Change Default Power-Up or Bootstrap.

If you want to change the way the system powers up or boots the operating system, you need to change default values for your system’s environment variables. Typical changes would be to set the system to autoboot or to change the default boot device.

• For information about changing these variables on a DEC

OSF/1 or OpenVMS system, refer to the AlphaServer 2000

/2100 Firmware Reference Guide.

• Microsoft Windows NT systems boot automatically. If you do not want your Windows NT system to boot automatically, select

Set up autoboot

from the ARC Setup menu and choose

No

when prompted. Refer to the AlphaServer 2000/2100

Firmware Reference Guide for more information.

Verify Your Configuration.

• DEC OSF/1 or OpenVMS

Use the following SRM console commands to verify your system configuration.

show config

—Displays the buses on the system and the devices found on those buses.

show device

—Displays the devices and controllers in the system.

show memory

—Displays main memory configuration.

set

and

show

—Set and display environment variable settings.

For more information about these commands, refer to

Chapter 3.

• Microsoft Windows NT

The ARC menu option

Display hardware configuration

displays the system’s hardware configuration, including ARC boot device names for devices installed in the system. For more information about this menu option, refer to Chapter 3.

For a more complete listing of the options that are recognized by your system, you may want to enter the SRM commands listed previously for DEC OSF/1 and OpenVMS systems.

1–24 Basic Operation

Booting the

Operating

System

Turning the System On

To enter SRM commands, you must switch from the ARC to the SRM console. For information about switching to the

SRM console, refer to ‘‘Switching from ARC to SRM’’ earlier in this chapter. Switch back to the ARC console before booting the Windows NT operating system.

You can boot one of the following operating systems:

• DEC OSF/1

• OpenVMS

• Microsoft Windows NT

The instructions in this section assume that you have already booted your operating system at least once. If you have not booted the operating system at least once, refer to Table 1–5 for possible next steps.

Table 1–5 Booting the Operating System for the First Time

Condition Reference

If you have not booted

Factory Installed Software

If your operating system was not factory installed, and you have not loaded or booted the operating system

See the Factory Installed Software

(FIS) document that came with your DEC OSF/1 or OpenVMS system.

See the installation document that came with your operating system.

Windows NT systems come with installation and release notes. Be sure to read them before installing

Windows NT.

Booting DEC OSF/1 or OpenVMS Software

If you are booting either DEC OSF/1 or OpenVMS, the SRM console prompt

P00>>>

should be displayed. Boot the operating system as follows:

Basic Operation 1–25

Turning the System On

Step

1

2

Action

Enter

boot

or

b

at the console prompt.

P00>>> b

The system boots the operating system using default values for the boot device and boot flags. A ‘‘booting system software’’ screen is displayed on your console terminal.

After several minutes, the operating system login banner is displayed on your console terminal.

Log in at the login prompt. When the operating system prompt is displayed, you can begin normal operation.

For information about specifying an alternative boot device or boot flags, refer to the

boot

command in the AlphaServer

2000/2100 Firmware Reference Guide.

Booting Windows NT Software

If you are booting Windows NT, the Windows NT Boot menu

(Example 1–1) should be displayed.

Windows NT will begin booting automatically after the Boot menu is displayed for the specified countdown period.

1–26 Basic Operation

Autobooting the Operating

System

Turning the System On

If the system is set to autoboot, the operating system will automatically boot after you power up the system, press the

Reset button, or after recovery from a system crash.

DEC OSF/1 or OpenVMS:

1.

Set the

auto_action

environment variable to either ‘‘boot’’ or

‘‘restart’’. For more information, refer to the

set auto_action

command in the AlphaServer 2000/2100 Firmware Reference

Guide.

2.

Ensure that the default boot device has been set to the device from which you want the operating system to boot.

(Enter

show bootdef_dev

to see whether your default boot device has already been assigned.) For information about setting the default boot device, refer to the

set bootdef_dev

command in the AlphaServer 2000/2100 Firmware Reference

Guide.

The Windows NT operating system autoboots by default. If your system does not autoboot, set the system to autoboot by following the instructions in the AlphaServer 2000/2100

Firmware Reference Guide.

Powering Down the System

Before You

Begin

You may not need to power down the system to recover from some hangs or other problems. First try pressing the Reset button on the operator control panel.

Reset

Basic Operation 1–27

Powering Down the System

Turning Off DC

Power

To turn off your system:

1.

Shut down the operating system. Refer to the shutdown procedure in your operating system documentation.

2.

After you shut down the operating system, press the DC

On/Off button to the ‘‘off’’ position, as shown in Figure 1–8.

3.

Set the Halt button to the ‘‘out’’ position. If the Halt button is in, the system will not boot when you power up.

Figure 1–8 Turning Off the System

1–28 Basic Operation

M A 0 6 6 6 9 3

Extended

Power-Down

(AC Power)

Powering Down the System

If an extended power-down is required, first turn off DC power as described in the previous section. Next, turn off AC power and remove the system power plugs from the power outlets as shown in

!

and

" in Figure 1–9:

Note

Some versions of the AlphaServer 2100 do not have an

AC On/Off switch on the power supply (shown in

!

).

Ignore callout one if your system does not have this switch.

Caution

If two power supplies are present, unplug the AC power cord for each power supply.

Figure 1–9 Turning Off AC Power

1

*

2

* Some systems do not have this switch.

M A 0 6 6 5 9 3

Basic Operation 1–29

Invoking Console Mode

Invoking Console Mode

Console

Subsystem

Console

Terminal

On AlphaServer systems, underlying control of the system platform hardware is provided by a console subsystem. The console subsystem contains firmware code (software code embedded in the hardware) that offers service functions such as initializing and testing the hardware and bootstrapping the system software. Because the AlphaServer 2100 supports multiple operating systems, the server has two different versions of console firmware. They are explained in detail in the

AlphaServer 2000/2100 Firmware Reference Guide.

A console terminal is required for your system. You can connect either a VGA monitor or a Digital VT-series terminal or equivalent. The console terminal is used to configure the system and boot the operating system. From the console terminal, you can issue commands to the system while the operating system is not running.

Note

A VGA monitor is required to boot and configure

Windows NT systems.

Console Mode

Console mode is the state in which the system and the console terminal operate under the control of the console firmware rather than the operating system. When you issue commands from the console terminal and firmware is executing, you are in console mode.

On DEC OSF/1 and OpenVMS systems, the console mode prompt is

P00>>>

. You can use control characters and supported keys to enter console commands at the console mode prompt.

On Windows NT systems, a menu interface is used in console mode.

1–30 Basic Operation

Invoking Console Mode

Invoking

Console Mode

Remote Access

Invoke console mode by shutting down the operating system according to the operating system shutdown procedure described in your operating system documentation.

Pressing the Halt button on the operator control panel invokes console mode if you are running DEC OSF/1 or OpenVMS.

However, invoke console mode with the Halt button only if you are unable to shut down the DEC OSF/1 or OpenVMS operating system using the proper software shutdown procedure. Pressing the Halt button has no effect if you are running Microsoft

Windows NT.

For more information about using the Halt button, refer to

Figure 2–1.

If you are running DEC OSF/1 or OpenVMS, you can invoke console mode from a remote terminal that is connected to your system through the COM2 port at the rear of the system. (See

Figure 1–11.)

1.

Connect to your system from the remote terminal.

2.

Shut down the operating system.

3.

When the shutdown has completed, press

Return

.

The console prompt

P00>>>

is displayed.

Basic Operation 1–31

Connecting to Networks

Connecting to Networks

Overview

Ethernet

The AlphaServer 2100 system has a PCI-based Ethernet controller that supports either an AUI or 10BASE-T (twistedpair) interface. The system can also support other network options using network adapters that you can connect to the EISA and PCI buses.

For information about connecting your system to networks other than Ethernet, refer to the documentation that you received when you purchased your network adapter.

Connect your system to a ThinWire, AUI, or 10BASE-T Ethernet network as shown in Figure 1–10.

Caution

Before connecting your system to an Ethernet network, turn off the system’s DC power as described previously in

‘‘Powering Down the System.’’

1–32 Basic Operation

Connecting to Networks

Figure 1–10 Ethernet Network Connections

10BASE-T

*

AUI

*

ThinWire

*

AUI

M A U

(9)

M A 0 3 9 8 9 3

* Indicates an Ethernet option.

Note

AUI cables cannot extend more than twenty meters in length.

Basic Operation 1–33

Connecting Peripherals

Connecting Peripherals

Serial/Parallel

Connections

Connect a serial or parallel printer, modem, or console terminal to your system through the serial and parallel ports at the rear of the system (Figure 1–11).

For information about a connecting a specific device to your system, refer to the documentation for that device.

1–34 Basic Operation

Figure 1–11 Connecting Serial and Parallel Devices

1

2

3

Connecting Peripherals

M A 0 4 4 6 9 3

!

"

#

Parallel Port

Serial Port (COM1) (console terminal)

Serial Port (COM2) (modem that connects to auxiliary console device)

Basic Operation 1–35

Connecting Peripherals

Terminal

Connections

You can connect either a VGA monitor or a Digital VT–series terminal (VTxxx) or equivalent to your system as shown in

Figure 1–12.

For information about connecting a specific terminal to your system, refer to the documentation for that terminal.

Note

The cable that connects to the rear of the VGA terminal has multiple plugs. These plugs are either color-coded or coded by letters that indicate the color. Use the coding on the cable and the corresponding coding on the terminal to determine where to attach each cable plug.

1–36 Basic Operation

Figure 1–12 Terminal Connections

V G A

Connecting Peripherals

V T x x x

(9600 Baud)

H8571-J

M A 0 3 9 4 9 3

Note

The optional H8571-J adapter connects a VT-series terminal or equivalent. If you did not order the adapter with your system, call 1-800-DIGITAL (U.S.A. and

Canada) or your authorized Digital Partner to order the adapter.

Basic Operation 1–37

Operating Storage Devices

Operating Storage Devices

Overview

For Additional

Information

Before You

Operate Mass

Storage

Devices

Identifying

Mass Storage

Compartments

Mass storage devices are drives that are used to store large amounts of data for extended periods.

This section describes how to insert and remove media into removable-media drives. For more information about a specific drive, refer to the documentation for that drive.

Before operating mass storage devices:

• Set up the device.

Typically, you must set up a device before you can begin using it. You set up a device while the operating system is running.

— On DEC OSF/1 systems, use the

mount

command.

— On OpenVMS systems, use the

MOUNT

command.

— On Windows NT systems, use the Disk Administrator.

Refer to your operating system documentation for more information about how to set up a device.

• Familiarize yourself with the care and maintenance required by the device.

Refer to the option documentation for care instructions for each option.

Mass storage devices are located in several compartments inside your system as shown in Figure 1–13.

!

"

Diskette drive.

Removable-media storage device area (holds up to three

5.25-inch half-height drives).

The illustration shows a CD–ROM drive installed.

#

StorageWorks shelf (holds up to eight 3.5-inch StorageWorks drives)

$

Optional StorageWorks shelf area

1–38 Basic Operation

Operating

Storage

Devices

Operating Storage Devices

The remaining sections of this chapter describe how to operate removable-media mass storage devices.

Figure 1–13 Storage Compartments

1 2

3 4

M A 0 4 4 4 9 3 B

Basic Operation 1–39

Operating a Compact Disc Drive

Operating a Compact Disc Drive

Compact

Disc Drive

Description

Compact disc drives read information from removable, read-only compact discs.

Your system may have one of two types of compact disc drives: a caddyless drive or one that must be used with a disc caddy:

Caution

Handle a compact disc by its edges. Do not touch the surface of a disc. Fingerprints and dust can render the disc unreadable.

Caddyless

Drive

Figure 1–14 shows the components of a caddyless CD–ROM drive.

!

"

#

$

%

&

Compact disc

Headphone port

Headphone volume control

Busy light

Eject button

Manual eject hole

1–40 Basic Operation

Operating a Compact Disc Drive

Figure 1–14 Caddyless CD–ROM Drive

XXXXXXX

XXXXXXXXXX X

XXXX

XXX XX

XXXXXXXX

1 2 3 4 5 6

M A 0 7 0 3 9 3

Basic Operation 1–41

Operating a Compact Disc Drive

Drive with

Caddy

Figure 1–15 shows the components of a compact disc drive with a disc caddy.

%

&

'

(

)

!

"

#

$

Headphone port

Headphone volume control

Disc caddy slot

ID dimple

Busy light

Eject button

Manual eject hole

Compact disc caddy

Compact disc

1–42 Basic Operation

Operating a Compact Disc Drive

Figure 1–15 CD–ROM Drive with Caddy

1 2 3 4 5 6 7

8

9

MA068593

Basic Operation 1–43

Operating a Compact Disc Drive

Inserting and

Removing a

Compact Disc

Caddyless Drives

Insertion: (Figure 1–16):

1.

Press the drive Eject button (

!

). The disc drawer ejects part way.

2.

Using one finger, gently pull the disc drawer far enough out so that you can insert the compact disc.

3.

Insert the disc into the drawer.

4.

Push the drawer back in.

The busy light comes on. When the busy light goes off, the drive is ready to use. To operate the drive, follow the instructions provided with your system software.

1–44 Basic Operation

Operating a Compact Disc Drive

Removal: (Figure 1–16):

1.

Press the drive Eject button (

!

). The disc drawer ejects part way.

2.

Using one finger, gently pull the drawer out far enough so that you can remove the compact disc.

3.

Remove the compact disc.

4.

Push the drawer back in.

Figure 1–16 Inserting and Removing a Caddyless Compact

Disc (Internal Disc Caddy)

1

M A 0 7 0 2 9 3

Basic Operation 1–45

Operating a Compact Disc Drive

Drives With Caddy

Insertion: (Figure 1–17):

1.

Gather both the caddy and the disc you wish to insert.

2.

If there is a protective film on the center of the caddy lid, remove the film

!

.

3.

Open the caddy by pressing the tabs on both sides of the caddy at the end opposite the shutter

"

.

4.

Set the disc, printed side up, into the caddy

#

.

5.

Press firmly on both corners to close the caddy lid.

6.

Insert the caddy into the drive

$

. Push the caddy gently into the drive as far as it will go. The caddy should be completely inside the drive when properly inserted.

The busy light comes on when the caddy has been inserted correctly.

7.

When the busy light goes off, the drive is ready to use. To operate the drive, follow the instructions provided with your system software.

Removal: (Figure 1–17):

1.

Press the eject button

%

. The caddy ejects part way.

2.

Remove the caddy from the drive.

1–46 Basic Operation

Operating a Compact Disc Drive

Figure 1–17 Inserting and Removing a CD–ROM Caddy

1

2

5

XXXXXXXX XXXXXX XX XXXX

XX XXXX

XXXXXXXXXX XXXXXXXX

3

4

MA068693

Basic Operation 1–47

Operating a DAT Tape Drive

Operating a DAT Tape Drive

DAT

Description

Inserting a Tape

Removing a

Tape

A DAT tape drive stores information on removable tape cartridges. Figure 1–18 shows the components of a DAT drive.

!

"

#

$

%

&

'

Tape/activity light

Write-protect light

Tape cassette slot

Tape unload button

Tape

Write-protect switch (write-protected position)

Write-protect switch (write-enabled position)

To insert the tape into a DAT drive (Figure 1–18):

1.

Check to see that the tape/activity light

!

on the drive is unlit. If it is lit, there is already a tape in the drive. Remove the tape from the drive before continuing. (See ‘‘Removing a

Tape.’’)

2.

Set the write-protect switch on the tape that you wish to insert to either the write-protected

& or write-enabled

' position.

3.

Insert the tape into the drive, with the tape oriented as shown in

%

.

To remove a tape from a DAT drive (Figure 1–18):

1.

Check to see that the tape/activity light

!

is on steady green

(not flashing). If the tape/activity light is flashing, the drive has not finished completing a data transfer. Wait until the tape/activity light comes on steady green before proceeding.

2.

Press the unload button

$ to eject the tape. The tape ejects part way.

1–48 Basic Operation

Operating a DAT Tape Drive

3.

Remove the tape from the drive.

Figure 1–18 Inserting and Removing a Tape: DAT

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

M A 0 6 8 3 9 3

Basic Operation 1–49

Operating a Diskette Drive

Operating a Diskette Drive

Diskette Drive

Description

Inserting a

Diskette

Removing a

Diskette

Diskette drives read information from, or write it to, removable diskettes. Figure 1–19 shows a diskette and the components of a diskette drive.

!

"

#

$

%

Eject button

Busy light

Write-protect switch

Write-protect switch (write-protected position)

Write-protect switch (write-enabled position)

One diskette drive is located to the left of the removable-media mass storage compartment.

Insert a diskette into a diskette drive (Figure 1–19):

1.

Set the write-protect switch on the diskette

# to either the write-protected

$ or write-enabled

% position.

2.

Insert the diskette into the drive as shown.

Remove a diskette by pressing the Eject button on the diskette drive (

!

in Figure 1–19):

1–50 Basic Operation

Operating a Diskette Drive

Figure 1–19 Diskette Drive and Diskette

1

3

5

4

M A 0 6 8 7 9 3

2

Basic Operation 1–51

Operating a QIC Drive

Operating a QIC Drive

QIC Drive

Description

Inserting a QIC

Tape

Removing a

QIC Tape

QIC tape drives read information from removable tapes.

Figure 1–20 shows a QIC tape drive and a compatible tape.

Insert a QIC tape into a QIC tape drive as follows:

1.

Set the write-protect switch on the tape to either the write-protected

!

or write-enabled

" position.

2.

Insert the tape into the drive

#

.

Remove a QIC tape by pressing the Eject button on the QIC tape drive

$

:

Figure 1–20 QIC Tape Drive and QIC Tape

4

1 2

QIC-2GB

3

M A 0 6 9 3 9 3

1–52 Basic Operation

2

Hardware Components

In This Chapter

This chapter covers the following information:

• Operator Control Panel

• Doors and Panels

• System Front

• System Rear

• System Module Locations

• Accessories

Hardware Components 2–1

Operator Control Panel (OCP)

Operator Control Panel (OCP)

The operator control panel, shown in Figure 2–1, is located on the front of the system. It contains a diagnostic display and buttons that let you power, halt, and reset the system.

Figure 2–1 Operator Control Panel

1

Power-up

Display

M A 0 4 3 2 9 3 C

!

Power-up/Diagnostic Display

The power-up/diagnostic display displays system status messages during power-up and diagnostics. Use the display to check the results of system self-tests.

For information about interpreting specific messages, refer to

‘‘Interpreting the Operator Control Panel Power-Up Display’’ in Chapter 4.

2–2 Hardware Components

DC On/Off

Button

Halt Button

Operator Control Panel (OCP)

DC On/Off

The DC On/Off button controls the flow of DC power to the system. You use the DC On/Off button and the AC On/Off switch, if present, to power the system up or down. The DC

On/Off light, located on the DC On/Off button, is lit whenever

DC power is present.

Halt

The Halt button interrupts an operating system session if you are running DEC OSF/1 or OpenVMS. The Halt light, located on the Halt button, comes on briefly during the system self-tests.

Thereafter, the Halt light comes on and remains lit whenever DC power is present and the Halt button is in the ‘‘in’’ position.

Before Power-Up: Pressing the Halt button to the ‘‘in’’ position before you power up the system boots the SRM console and prevents the operating system from booting.

• To boot the DEC OSF/1 or OpenVMS operating system, the

Halt button must be in the ‘‘out’’ position (not lit).

• To boot the Windows NT operating system, the Halt button must be in the ‘‘out’’ position and you must enter the

arc

command at the SRM console to invoke the ARC console and access the Boot menu.

Invoking Console Mode: Pressing the Halt button during a

DEC OSF/1 or OpenVMS operating system session invokes the

SRM console. Pressing the Halt button during a Windows NT session has no effect.

Caution

Pressing the Halt button interrupts your DEC OSF/1 or

OpenVMS operating system session. Before pressing the

Halt button, shut down your operating system according to the operating system shutdown procedure described in your operating system documentation.

Hardware Components 2–3

Operator Control Panel (OCP)

Reset Button

Returning to Operating System Mode: To return to operating system mode from console mode, press the Halt button to the

‘‘out’’ position and reboot the operating system.

Note

If you unintentionally press the Halt button, but enter few or no console commands, you may be able to resume your operating system session by entering the command.

continue

Reset

Pressing the Reset button resets the system. The system stops all current processes, initializes, and performs startup self-tests.

Press the Reset button to reset the system if it hangs or to initialize the system if you have changed system settings.

Caution

Pressing the Reset button stops all system processes. Do not press Reset while the operating system is running unless your system is hung and you have exhausted all other ways of terminating the process.

2–4 Hardware Components

Doors and Panels

Doors and Panels

Door and Panel

Removal

To gain access to system components, remove the system’s side panels (Figure 2–2).

Caution

Replace side panels before you turn on DC power. The system will not power up if the left panel is not in place.

Do not remove the left panel when the system is running.

If you remove the left panel without first properly shutting down the system, the system will power down unexpectedly and you may lose data.

Hardware Components 2–5

Doors and Panels

Figure 2–2 Door and Panel Removal

1 2

3

M A 0 4 4 3 9 3 B

2–6 Hardware Components

Doors and Panels

!

Left Panel

The card cage is located behind the left panel. To access the card cage, remove the left panel as shown in Figure 2–2.

Caution

Before removing the left panel:

1.

Perform orderly shutdown of the operating system.

2.

Turn off DC power by pressing the DC On/Off button to the ‘‘off’’ position.

3.

Set the AC On/Off switch (if present) on each power supply to the ‘‘off’’ position.

4.

Unplug the AC power cord for each power supply.

"

Right Panel

The system ships with one power supply, unless you ordered a second power supply. The power supply is located behind the right panel. To access the power supply, remove the right panel as shown in Figure 2–2.

#

Front Door

Hard disks are located behind the front door. For normal operation, it is not necessary to remove the front door.

However, you may remove the front door as shown in

Figure 2–2.

Hardware Components 2–7

System Front

System Front

Front

Components

Front components are shown in Figure 2–3 and identified in the numbered callouts.

Figure 2–3 System Front

1 2 3

4

5

6 7 8

M A 0 4 4 4 9 3

2–8 Hardware Components

%

&

'

(

!

"

#

$

Operator control panel

Diskette drive

Removable media drive area

Removable media drive access door

Key lock

Leveler feet

StorageWorks shelf

Optional StorageWorks shelf area

System Front

Hardware Components 2–9

System Rear

System Rear

Rear

Components

Rear components are shown in Figure 2–4 and identified in the numbered callouts.

Figure 2–4 System Rear

1 2 3 4 5

16

13

12

15

14

6

9

10

7

8

11

M A 0 4 4 5 9 3

2–10 Hardware Components

System Rear

%

&

'

(

)

+>

+?

!

"

#

$

[email protected]

+A

+B

+C

+D

SCSI-2 expansion port

SCSI ports or other bulkhead expansion

Parallel port

Serial port (COM2)

Mouse port

Keyboard port

Serial port (COM1)

EISA module bulkheads

Standard I/O module bulkhead

PCI module bulkheads

DC power OK indicator

AC power OK indicator (if AC On/Off switch is present)

Primary power supply

AC On/Off switch (some systems do not have this switch)

AC power inlet

Optional power supply

Hardware Components 2–11

System Module Locations

System Module Locations

Card Cage

Accessing the

Card Cage

The locations of system modules are shown in Figure 2–5 and identified in the numbered callouts.

To access the card cage, remove the left panel, as shown in

Figure 2–2.

Caution

Do not remove the left panel when the system is running.

If you remove the left panel without first properly shutting down the system, the system will power down unexpectedly and you may lose data.

Before removing the left panel:

1.

Perform orderly shutdown of the operating system.

2.

Turn off DC power by pressing the DC On/Off button to the ‘‘off’’ position.

3.

Shut off AC power by setting the AC On/Off switch

(if present) on each power supply to the ‘‘off’’ position.

4.

Unplug the AC power cord for each power supply.

2–12 Hardware Components

1

2

3

4

Figure 2–5 System Module Locations

System Module Locations

M A 0 6 4 9 9 3 A

!

"

#

$

EISA slots

Standard I/O slot

PCI slots

System bus slots

Hardware Components 2–13

Accessories

Accessories

Accessories

Some combination of the accessories in Figure 2–6 came with your system shipment:

!

External SCSI terminator—Terminates the SCSI bus the rear of the system.

"

Optional MMJ serial port connector (H8571-J)—Attaches

DEC423 DECconnect cables (to connect VTxxx terminal or equivalent).

#

Internal SCSI terminator—Terminates the SCSI bus internally.

$

ECU diskette(s)—Runs the EISA Configuration Utility

(ECU). The system shipment includes two ECU diskettes: one for configuring DEC OSF/1 and OpenVMS and one for configuring Windows NT.

%

Optional CD–ROM caddy—Holds a compact disc to be loaded into the CD–ROM drive.

&

Mouse—Provides ‘‘point-and-click’’ navigation on VGA and other graphics terminals (shipped with Windows NT systems only).

'

(

Power cord—Connects AC power to the power supply.

Optional second power cord—Connects AC power to a second power supply, if you ordered one.

)

Documentation—Describes system operation, options, and related information.

Note

AlphaServer 2100 systems configured for Windows

NT come with a few additional items, including a

‘‘patch’’ diskette and installation and release notes that provide instructions for installing Windows NT on an

AlphaServer 2100 system.

2–14 Hardware Components

Figure 2–6 Accessories

Accessories

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

M A 0 4 5 5 9 3

Hardware Components 2–15

3

Options and Upgrades

In this Chapter

This chapter covers the following information:

• Upgrade Overview

• Verifying System Configuration

• Supported Options

• Configuring System Options

System bus

EISA bus

ISA bus

PCI bus

SCSI buses

• Power Supply Configurations

Options and Upgrades 3–1

Upgrade Overview

Upgrade Overview

Planning Your

Upgrade

Plan an upgrade by performing the following tasks:

1.

Obtain an accurate list of the modules and devices in your current configuration.

Refer to your operating system documentation for information about getting configuration information by using an operating system command.

You can also obtain configuration information in console mode. Refer to ‘‘Invoking Console Mode’’ in Chapter 1. Once you are in console mode, find configuration information as follows:

• If you are running DEC OSF/1 or OpenVMS, generate a list of your system’s modules and devices by entering the

show config

command at the

P00>>>

console prompt.

• If you are running Windows NT, obtain a list of your system’s modules and devices by accessing the

Display hardware configuration

menu item on the ARC

Supplementary menu.

2.

Decide how you wish to change your system.

You can obtain a current description of supported options as described in the section ‘‘Supported Options.’’

3.

Determine whether you can install the new option yourself, or whether you need to contact a Digital service representative or other qualified service person.

Note

The following options should only be installed by a qualified service person:

• Removable-media devices

• Internal StorageWorks shelves

3–2 Options and Upgrades

Adding

Third-Party

Devices

Upgrade Overview

4.

Determine whether the upgrade will require you to add a second power supply to your system.

If you have only one power supply, determine whether you need to add a second power supply. You need a second power supply if your system is fully configured and contains a second storage assembly or more than two CPUs. Refer to the section ‘‘Power Supply Configurations ’’ in this chapter.

5.

Order the options and, if necessary, a second power supply.

6.

Install and configure the options.

• To install the option, refer to the documentation shipped with the option.

• To configure the option, refer to the appropriate section in this chapter.

Third-party devices are devices purchased from vendors other than Digital.

Before attempting to connect third-party devices or install thirdparty devices inside your system unit, check with the third-party vendor to ensure that your system and operating system support the device.

For information about mounting supported devices inside the system unit, refer to the appropriate section in this chapter. All the necessary bracketry is supplied with your system.

To connect external third-party SCSI devices to the system, the mass storage bus must be extended. For information about extending the SCSI mass storage bus, refer to the section ‘‘SCSI

Buses ’’ later in this chapter.

Options and Upgrades 3–3

Supported Options

Supported Options

Supported

Options

Access from the Internet

Access from

CompuServe

Digital Systems and Options

Catalog

The AlphaServer 2100 system provides support for a number of bus options. You can obtain a current list of supported options from the Internet. The list is updated regularly as new options are added.

Access the list via ftp on ftp.digital.com. Once connected, go to: pub/Digital/Alpha/systems

Access the list from the Digital World Wide Web server: http://www.service.digital.com/alpha/server/

CompuServe subscribers can access the list of supported options from the DEC4WNT forum, Library 4, Hardware Support. The file name is OPTS21.TXT.

You can obtain information about hardware configurations for the AlphaServer 2100 from the Digital Systems and Options

Catalog. The catalog is regularly published to assist customers in ordering and configuring systems and hardware options.

Each printing of the catalog presents all of the products that are announced, actively marketed, and available for ordering. If necessary, past editions should be retained for reference.

• Call 1-800-DIGITAL (U.S.A. and Canada) or your authorized Digital Partner to talk to a consultant about your configuration.

• Access printable PostScript files of any section of the catalog from the Internet via FTP on ftp.digital.com. The files are in the following directory. Be sure to check the Readme file.

/pub/Digital/info/SOC

3–4 Options and Upgrades

Verifying System Configuration

Verifying System Configuration

Before You

Begin

Firmware Menu

Options for

Windows NT

Viewing ARC

Hardware

Display

Several console commands or menu options allow you to examine system configuration and environment variable settings.

To use these commands or menu options, you need to invoke console mode. For information about invoking console mode, refer to ‘‘Invoking Console Mode’’ in Chapter 1.

The following ARC menu options are used to verify system configuration on systems running the Windows NT operating system.

• The

Display hardware configuration

item on the

Supplementary menu lists the ARC boot device names for devices installed in the system.

• The

Set default environment variables

on the Setup menu allows you to select values for ARC firmware environment variables.

The next sections describe these menu options.

To view the hardware configuration on systems running the

Windows NT operating system, choose the

Display hardware configuration

menu item from the Supplementary menu and press Enter.

There are several parts to the hardware display:

• The first screen displays the boot devices.

• The second screen displays processor information, the amount of memory installed, and the type of video card installed.

• The third and fourth screens display information about the adapters installed in the system’s EISA and PCI slots, respectively.

Options and Upgrades 3–5

Verifying System Configuration

A sample hardware configuration display is shown next.

Note

The hardware configuration display does not list tape drives or network devices.

Example 3–1 Sample Hardware Configuration Display

Wednesday, 8-31-1994 10:51:32 AM

Devices detected and supported by the firmware:

!

eisa(0)video(0)monitor(0) multi(0)key(0)keyboard(0) eisa(0)disk(0)fdisk(0) multi(0)serial(0) multi(0)serial(1) scsi(0)disk(0)rdisk(0) scsi(0)cdrom(5)fdisk(0)

"

(Removable)

(1 Partition)

(Removable)

DEC

DEC

#

RZ26L

RRD43

(C)DEC440C

(C)DEC 0064

Press any key to continue...

Wednesday, 8-31-1994 10:51:32 AM

Alpha AXP Processor and System Information:

Processor ID 21064

Processor Revision 3

System Revision

Processor Speed

Physical Memory

0

190.00 Mhz

128 MB

Video Option detected:

BIOS controlled video card

Press any key to continue...

EISA slot information:

Wednesday, 8-31-1994 10:51:32 AM

(continued on next page)

3–6 Options and Upgrades

Verifying System Configuration

Example 3–1 (Cont.) Sample Hardware Configuration Display

Slot Device

0 Other

1 Disk

2 Network

5 Network

6 Network

7 Display

0 Disk

Press any key to continue...

Identifier

DEC2A01

ADP0001

DEC4220

DEC3002

DEC4250

CPQ3011

FLOPPY

Wednesday, 8-31-1994 10:51:32 AM

PCI slot information:

2

2

2

2

1

1

1

1

Bus Virtual Slot Function Vendor Device Revision Device type

0 1 0 1000 1 1 SCSI

0

0

2

7

0

0

8086

1011

482

2

3

23

EISA bridge

Ethernet

0

1

2

3

0

0

0

0

1011

1000

1077

1077

2

1

1020

1020

21

2

1

1

Ethernet

SCSI

SCSI

SCSI

2

3

0

1

0

0

0

0

1011

1011

1011

1011

2

2

2

2

23

23

23

23

Ethernet

Ethernet

Ethernet

Ethernet

Press any key to continue...

!

Device—Indicates the type of device, for example, EISA or

SCSI.

"

#

Configuration—Indicates how the device is configured, the number of partitions, and whether the device is a removable device.

Identifier string—Indicates the device manufacturer, model number, and other identification.

Options and Upgrades 3–7

Verifying System Configuration

Table 3–1 explains the meaning of each device name.

Table 3–1 Device Names

Name

multi(0)key(0)keyboard(0) multi(0)serial(0) multi(0)serial(1) eisa(0)video(0)monitor(0) eisa(0)disk(0)fdisk(0) scsi(0)disk(0)rdisk(0) scsi(0)cdrom(5)fdisk(0)

Description

The multi( ) devices are located on the system module.

These devices include the keyboard port and the serial line ports.

The eisa( ) devices are provided by devices on the EISA bus. These devices include the monitor and the floppy drive.

The scsi( ) devices are SCSI disk or CD–ROM devices.

These examples represent installed SCSI devices. The disk drive is set to SCSI ID 0, and the CD–ROM drive is set to SCSI ID 5. The devices have logical unit numbers of

0.

Viewing ARC

Environment

Variables

To view the default ARC environment variables, select the

Set default environment variables

item from the Setup menu. You will see a display similar to the following:

Example 3–2 ARC Environment Variable Display

Use Arrow keys to select a variable, ESC to exit:

Name:

Value:

Environment variables:

CONSOLEIN=multi()key()keyboard()console()

CONSOLEOUT=eisa()video()monitor()console()

FWSEARCHPATH=scsi()disk(0)rdisk()partition(1)

TIMEZONE=PST8PDT

A:=eisa()disk()fdisk()

FLOPPY2=N

FLOPPY=1

AUTOLOAD=YES

COUNTDOWN=10

KEYBOARDTYPE=0

DISABLEPCIPARITYCHECKING=FALSE

3–8 Options and Upgrades

Verifying System Configuration

ARC

Environment

Variables

Table 3–2 explains the default ARC firmware environment variables.

Table 3–2 ARC Firmware Environment Variables

Variable Description

CONSOLEIN

CONSOLEOUT

FWSEARCHPATH

TIMEZONE

A:

FLOPPY

FLOPPY2

AUTOLOAD

COUNTDOWN

KEYBOARDTYPE

DISABLEPCIPARITY-

CHECKING

The console input device. The default value is multi( )key( )keyboard( )console( ).

The console output device. The default value is eisa( )video( )monitor( )console( ).

The search path used by the ARC firmware and other programs to locate particular files. The default value is the same as the SYSTEMPARTITION environment variable value.

The time zone in which the system is located. This variable accepts ISO/IEC9945-1 (POSIX) standard values.

The default diskette drive. The default value is eisa( )disk( )fdisk( ).

The capacity of the default diskette drive, either 1 (1.2

MB), 2 (1.44 MB), or 3 (2.88 MB).

The capacity of an optional second diskette drive, either N

(not installed), 1, 2, or 3.

The default startup action, either YES (boot) or NO or undefined (remain in ARC firmware).

The default time limit in seconds before the system boots automatically when AUTOLOAD is set to yes. The default value is 10.

The keyboard language. The default is U.S. (English).

Disables parity checking on the PCI bus in order to prevent machine check errors that can occur if the PCI device has not properly set the parity on the bus. Also allows peripheral devices that do not fully conform to the

PCI specification to be used without generating parity errors. The default value is FALSE—PCI parity checking is enabled.

Options and Upgrades 3–9

Verifying System Configuration

For More

Information

Firmware

Console

Commands for

DEC OSF/1 and

OpenVMS

For a more complete listing of the options that are recognized by your system, you may want to enter the SRM commands described in the next section for DEC OSF/1 and OpenVMS users. To enter SRM commands, switch from the ARC to the SRM console. Refer to ‘‘Switching from ARC to SRM’’ in

Chapter 1. Switch back to the ARC console before booting the

Windows NT operating system.

The following SRM console commands are used to verify system configuration on systems running either the DEC OSF/1 or

OpenVMS operating system.

show config

—Displays the buses on the system and the devices found on those buses.

show device

—Displays the devices and controllers in the system.

show memory

—Displays main memory configuration.

set

and

show

(Setting and Showing Environment Variables)–

Set and display environment variable settings.

3–10 Options and Upgrades

Verifying System Configuration

show config

The

show config

command displays all devices found on the system bus, PCI bus, and EISA bus. You can use the information in the display to identify target devices for commands such as

boot

and

test

, as well as to verify that the system sees all the devices that are installed.

The configuration display shown on the next page includes the following:

• Core system status:

CPU, memory, and standard I/O are shown with the results of power-up tests: P (pass) or F (fail)

• Hose 0, Bus 0, 32-bit PCI:

– Slot 0 = Ethernet adapter (ewa0)

– Slot 1 = SCSI controller on standard I/O, along with storage drives on the bus.

– Slot 2 = EISA to PCI bridge chip

– Slots 3–5 = Reserved

– Slots 6–8 = Correspond to PCI card cage slots: PCI0,

PCI1, and PCI2. In the case of storage controllers, the devices off the controller are also displayed.

• Hose 1, Bus 0, EISA:

Slot numbers correspond to to EISA card cage slots (1–8).

In the case of storage controllers, the devices off the controller are also displayed.

• Hose 2, Bus 0, PCI:

Reserved for future expansion.

For more information on device names, refer to the command in this chapter.

show device

Options and Upgrades 3–11

Verifying System Configuration

Synopsis:

show config

Example:

P00>>> show config

SRM Console T3.8-33

Component

CPU 0

Memory 1

I/O

Status

P

P

Slot Option

0 DECchip 21040-AA

1 NCR 53C810

2 Intel 82375EB

7 DECchip 21040-AA

Digital Equipment Corporation

AlphaServer 2100 4/200

VMS PALcode X5.48-64, OSF PALcode X1.35-42

Module ID

B2020-AA DECchip (tm) 21064-3

B2021-BA 64 MB

B2110-AA dva0.0.0.0.1

RX26

Hose 0, Bus 0, PCI ewa0.0.0.0.0

pka0.7.0.1.0

dka0.0.0.1.0

dka600.6.0.1.0

mka400.4.0.1.0

mka500.5.0.1.0

ewb0.0.0.7.0

08-00-2B-E2-56-2A

SCSI Bus ID 7

RZ26L

RRD43

TLZ06

TZK11

Bridge to Hose 1, EISA

08-00-2B-3F-5B-D7

Slot Option

2 CPQ3011

4 DEC4220

5 DEC2500

6 DEC4250

Slot Option

P00>>>

Hose 1, Bus 0, EISA era0.0.0.4.1

ewc0.0.0.6.1

Hose 2, Bus 0, PCI

08-00-2B-3C-B2-52

08-00-2B-3A-C5-DC

3–12 Options and Upgrades

show device

Verifying System Configuration

The

show device

command displays the devices and controllers in the system. The device name convention is shown in Figure 3–1.

Figure 3–1 Device Name Convention

1 2 3 4 5 6 7

dka0.0.0.0.0

MA043993A

$

%

&

!

"

Storage Adapter ID: One-letter storage adapter designator

(A,B,C . . . )

#

Driver ID

Two-letter port or class driver designator

DR–RAID set device

DV–Floppy drive

ER–Ethernet port (EISA)

EW–Ethernet port (PCI)

PK–SCSI port, DK–SCSI disk, MK–SCSI tape

PU–DSSI port, DU–DSSI disk, MU–DSSI tape

Device Unit Number: Unique device unit number (MSCP

Unit Number).

SCSI unit numbers are forced to 100 X Node ID.

Bus Node Number: Bus Node ID

Channel Number: Used for multi-channel devices.

Slot Number:

• For EISA options—Correspond to EISA card cage slot numbers (1–*)

• For PCI options—Slot 0 = Ethernet adapter (EWA0)

— Slot 1=SCSI controller on standard I/O

— Slot 2=EISA to PCI bridge chip

— Slots 3–5=Reserved

Options and Upgrades 3–13

Verifying System Configuration

— Slots 6–8=Correspond to PCI card cage slots: PCI0,

PCI1, and PCI2

'

Hose Number: 0 PCI_0 (32-bit PCI); 1 EISA; 2 PCI_1

Synopsis:

show device [device_name]

Arguments:

[device_name] The device name or device abbreviation.

When abbreviations or wildcards are used, all devices that match the type are displayed.

3–14 Options and Upgrades

Verifying System Configuration

Example:

P00>>> show device

!

dka0.0.0.1.0

dka100.1.0.1.0

dka600.6.0.1.0

dva0.0.0.0.1

mka500.5.0.1.0

ewa0.0.0.0.0

pka0.7.0.1.0

P00>>> show device dk pk dka0.0.0.1.0

dka100.1.0.1.0

dka600.6.0.1.0

dva0.0.0.0.1

mka500.5.0.1.0

pka0.7.0.1.0

P00>>>

!

"

"

DKA0

DKA100

DKA600

DVA0

MKA500

EWA0

PKA0

DKA0

DKA100

DKA600

DVA0

MKA500

PKA0

#

Console device name:

Operating system device name:

$ %

RZ25L 0006

RZ25L 0006

RRD43 2893

RX26

TLZ06 0435

08-00-2B-3B-42-FD

SCSI Bus ID 7

RZ25L

RZ25L

RRD43

RX26

TLZ06

SCSI Bus ID 7

0006

0006

2893

0435

• For an allocation class of zero: NODENAME$DIAu

NODENAME is a unique node name and u is the unit number. For example, R7BUCC$DIA0.

• For a nonzero allocation class:

$ALLCLASS$DIAu

ALLCLASS is the allocation class for the system and devices, and u is a unique unit number. For example,

$1$DIA0.

#

$

%

Node name (alphanumeric, up to 6 characters)

Device type

Firmware version (if known)

Options and Upgrades 3–15

Verifying System Configuration

show memory

The

show memory

command displays information for each memory module in the system.

Synopsis:

show memory

Examples:

%

&

'

!

"

#

$

P00>>> show memory

!

"

Module Size

# $ % &

Base Addr Intlv Mode Intlv Unit Status

-----------------------------------------

0 64MB 00000000

Total Bad Pages 0

'

P00>>>

1-Way 0 Passed

Module slot number

Size of memory module

Base or starting address of memory module

Interleave mode—number of modules interleaved (1–4-way interleaving)

Interleave unit number

Status (passed, failed, or not configured)

Number of bad pages in memory (8 KB/page)

3–16 Options and Upgrades

Setting and

Showing

Environment

Variables

Verifying System Configuration

Environment variables are typically set when you are configuring a system. The settings determine how a system powers up, boots the operating system, and operates.

Synopsis:

set [-default] [-integer] -[string] envar value show envar

Arguments: envar value

The name of the environment variable to be modified.

The value that is assigned to the environment variable. This may be an ASCII string.

Options:

-default

-integer

-string

Examples:

Restores variable to its default value.

Creates variable as an integer.

Creates variable as a string (default).

P00>>> set bootdef_dev ewa0

P00>>> show bootdef_dev ewa0

P00>>> show auto_action boot

P00>>> set boot_osflags 0,1

P00>>>

For more information about the

set

and

show

commands, including the environment variables that you can set, refer to the AlphaServer 2000/2100 Firmware Reference Guide.

Options and Upgrades 3–17

System Bus Options

System Bus Options

The system bus interconnects the CPUs, memory modules, and the optional PCI external I/O module. It is the hardware structure through which data processed by the microprocessor is transferred throughout the system.

Figure 3–2 shows the location of the system bus and system bus options on the card cage. To access the card cage, remove the left panel. Refer to Figure 2–2 and the accompanying text before removing the left panel. Be sure to reattach the panel screws before attempting to power up the system again.

Caution

Do not remove the left panel when the system is running.

If you remove the left panel without first properly shutting down the system, the system will power down unexpectedly and you may lose data.

Your system supports options for several types of bus architectures, including EISA, ISA, and PCI. The next sections describe the system bus options for your system. For information about installing a specific option, refer to the documentation for that option.

3–18 Options and Upgrades

Figure 3–2 System Bus Option Locations

3

CPU2

CPU0

CPU1

CPU3

1

2

EISA8

EISA7

EISA6

EISA5

EISA4

EISA3

EISA2

EISA1

Standard I/O

PCI0

PCI1

PCI2

Expansion I/O

MEM0

MEM1

MEM2

MEM3

!

"

#

EISA Bus

PCI Bus

System Bus

System Bus Options

M A 0 4 5 6 9 3 A

Options and Upgrades 3–19

System Bus Options

CPU Modules

The AlphaServer 2100 system can support up to four CPUs in a symmetric multiprocessing (SMP) configuration:

• The system must have a CPU module installed in system bus slot 2 (CPU 0).

• Systems with more than two CPUs displace PCI expansion or memory module capacity as shown in Figure 3–3.

• You need a second power supply is your system is fully configured and contains a second storage assembly or more than two CPUs.

Warning

Before installing a CPU module, turn off all power to the system (both AC and DC). Refer to ‘‘Powering Down the

System’’ in Chapter 1 for information about turning off

AC and DC power.

3–20 Options and Upgrades

System Bus Options

Figure 3–3 System Bus Configurations According to Number of CPUs

1 2 3 4

- - -

CPU 0

- - -

MEM 0

MEM 1

MEM 2

MEM 3

EXT I/O

CPU 0

- - -

MEM 0

MEM 1

MEM 2

MEM 3

- - -

CPU 0

CPU 1

MEM 0

MEM 1

MEM 2

MEM 3

EXT I/O

CPU 0

CPU 1

MEM 0

MEM 1

MEM 2

MEM 3

CPU 2

CPU 0

CPU 1

MEM 0

MEM 1

MEM 2

MEM 3

EXT I/O

CPU 0

CPU 1

- - -

CPU 3

MEM 2

MEM 3

CPU 2

CPU 0

CPU 1

- - -

CPU 3

MEM 2

MEM 3

M A 0 4 6 2 9 3 A

!

"

#

$

One CPU

Two CPUs

Three CPUs

Four CPUs

Warning: CPU and memory modules have parts that operate at high temperatures. Wait two minutes after power is removed before handling these modules.

Options and Upgrades 3–21

System Bus Options

Memory

Modules

External I/O

The system can support up to four memory modules, for a maximum memory capacity of 2 GB. A minimum of one memory module is required.

Warning

Before installing a memory module, you should turn off all power to the system (both AC and DC). Refer to ‘‘Powering Down the System’’ in Chapter 1 for information about turning off AC and DC power.

Memory is available in 64-MB, 128-MB, and 512-MB variations.

See the Digital Systems and Options Catalog for order numbers and configuration information or call 1-800-DIGITAL (U.S.A. and

Canada) or your authorized Digital Partner for assistance.

A CPU slot (system bus slot 1, CPU 2) can be substituted for additional I/O expansion.

Note

The external I/O module will be available on the model

4/275 system.

3–22 Options and Upgrades

Standard I/O Module

Standard I/O Module

The standard I/O module provides a standard set of I/O functions and is required in all systems. The standard I/O module resides in a dedicated slot (I/O) in the EISA/PCI bus card cage (see

Figure 3–2).

To access the card cage, remove the left panel. Refer to

Figure 2–2 and the accompanying text before removing the left panel. Be sure to reattach the panel screws before attempting to power up the system again.

Caution

Do not remove the left panel when the system is running.

If you remove the left panel without first properly shutting down the system, the system will power down unexpectedly and you may lose data.

For information about installing a specific option, refer to the documentation for that option.

Warning

Before installing the standard I/O module, turn off all power to the system (both AC and DC). Refer to ‘‘Powering Down the System’’ in Chapter 1 for information about turning off AC and DC power.

Options and Upgrades 3–23

EISA Bus Options

EISA Bus Options

The EISA bus (Extended Industry Standard Architecture bus) is a 32-bit industry standard I/O bus. EISA is a superset of the well-established 16-bit ISA bus. EISA was designed to accept newer 32-bit components while still remaining compatible with older 8-bit and 16-bit cards.

With a bandwidth of 33 MB/sec, EISA is well suited to medium-performance options, such as modems, asynchronous communication controllers, and other miscellaneous peripherals.

Up to eight EISA (or ISA) modules can reside in the EISA bus portion of the card cage. All slots are bus master slots. EISA slots can be filled in any order.

Figure 3–2 shows the location of EISA options on the card cage. To access the card cage, remove the left panel. Refer to

Figure 2–2 and the accompanying instructions before removing the left panel. Be sure to reattach the panel screws before attempting to power up the system again.

Caution

Do not remove the left panel when the system is running.

If you remove the left panel without first properly shutting down the system, the system will power down unexpectedly and you may lose data.

3–24 Options and Upgrades

EISA Bus Options

For information about installing a specific option, refer to the documentation for that option. For information about configuring an EISA option, refer to the section ‘‘Configuring EISA and ISA

Options’’ in this chapter.

Warning

Before installing EISA bus options, turn off all power to the system (both AC and DC). Refer to the section ‘‘Powering Down the System’’ in Chapter 1 for information about turning off AC and DC power.

Warning: For protection against fire, only modules with current-limited outputs should be used.

Options and Upgrades 3–25

ISA Bus Options

ISA Bus Options

The ISA bus (Industry Standard Architecture bus) is a well established, industry-standard, 16-bit I/O bus. The EISA bus is a superset of the ISA bus and has been designed to be backward compatible with 16-bit and 8-bit architectures. Therefore, ISA modules can be used in the AlphaServer 2100 system, provided the operating system supports the device and enough system resources are available to configure the device.

Up to eight EISA or ISA modules can reside in the EISA bus portion of the card cage. Figure 3–2 shows the location of ISA options on the card cage.

To access the card cage, remove the left panel. Refer to

Figure 2–2 and the accompanying text before removing the left panel. Be sure to reattach the panel screws before attempting to power up the system again.

3–26 Options and Upgrades

ISA Bus Options

Caution

Do not remove the left panel when the system is running.

If you remove the left panel without first properly shutting down the system, the system will power down unexpectedly and you may lose data.

For information about installing a specific option, refer to the documentation for that option. For information about configuring an EISA option, refer to the section ‘‘Configuring EISA and ISA

Options’’ in this chapter.

Warning

Before installing ISA bus options, turn off all power to the system (both AC and DC). Refer to ‘‘Powering Down the System’’ in Chapter 1 for information about turning off AC and DC power.

Warning: For protection against fire, only modules with current-limited outputs should be used.

Options and Upgrades 3–27

Identifying ISA and EISA Options

Identifying ISA and EISA Options

By examining the contacts of the option board you can determine if a board is ISA or EISA (see Figure 3–4):

• ISA boards have one row of gold contacts.

• EISA boards have two interlocking rows of gold contacts.

Figure 3–4 ISA and EISA Boards

ISA

EISA

M A 0 0 1 1 1

3–28 Options and Upgrades

Configuring EISA and ISA Options

Configuring EISA and ISA Options

EISA

Configuration

Utility

System

Configuration

Diskette

Whenever you add, remove, or move an EISA or ISA option in your system, you must run a utility called the EISA

Configuration Utility (ECU). Each EISA or ISA option has a corresponding configuration (CFG) file, which describes the characteristics and the system resources required for that option.

The ECU uses the CFG file to create a conflict-free configuration.

The ECU is a menu-based utility that provides online help to guide you through the configuration process. The ECU is run from the ARC menu interface.

The ECU is supplied on the System Configuration Diskette that was shipped with your system. Make a copy of the ECU diskette and keep the original in a safe place. Use the backup copy when you are configuring the system. The diskette must have the volume label SYSTEMCFG.

Note

The CFG files supplied with the option you want to install may not work on this system if the option is not supported. Before you install an option, check that your system supports the option.

Before You Run the ECU

Before running the ECU:

1.

Install EISA boards. (You install ISA boards after you run the ECU.)

For information about installing a specific option, refer to the documentation for that option.

2.

Familiarize yourself with the utility.

You can find more information about the ECU by reading the ECU online help. To read the online help, start the

ECU (refer to ‘‘Starting the ECU.’’) Online help for the ECU is located under Step 1,

Important EISA Configuration

Information.

Options and Upgrades 3–29

Configuring EISA and ISA Options

Starting the

ECU

3.

Familiarize yourself with the configuration procedure for your system:

• If you are configuring an EISA bus that contains only

EISA options, refer to Table 3–3.

• If you are configuring an EISA bus that contains both

ISA and EISA options, refer to Table 3–4.

4.

Locate the ECU diskette for your operating system. Make a copy of the diskette and keep the original in a safe place.

Use the backup copy for configuring options.

• ECU Diskette DECpc AXP (AK-PYCJ*-CA) for Windows

NT

• ECU Diskette DECpc AXP (AK-Q2CR*-CA) for DEC

OSF/1 and OpenVMS

The ECU diskette is shipped in the accessories box with your system.

Complete the following steps to start the ECU:

1.

Invoke the console firmware.

Systems running Microsoft Windows NT—Shut down the operating system or power up to the console Boot menu.

Systems running DEC OSF/1 or OpenVMS—Shut down the operating system and press the Halt button or power up with the Halt button set to the ‘‘in’’ position.

When the console prompt P00>>> is displayed, set the halt button to the ‘‘out’’ position.

2.

Start the ECU as follows:

Systems running Microsoft Windows NT—Select the following menus: a.

From the Boot menu, select

Supplementary menu

.

b.

From the Supplementary menu, select

Set up the system . . .

. Insert the ECU diskette for Windows

NT (AK-PYCJ*-CA) into the diskette drive.

c.

From the Setup menu, select

Run EISA configuration utility from floppy.

This boots the ECU program.

3–30 Options and Upgrades

Configuring EISA and ISA Options

Systems running DEC OSF/1 or OpenVMS—Start

ECU as follows: a.

Insert the ECU diskette for DEC OSF/1 or OpenVMS

(AK-Q2CR*-CA) into the diskette drive.

b.

Enter the

ecu

command.

The message

loading ARC firmware

is displayed.

Loading the ARC firmware takes approximately 2 minutes. When the firmware has finished loading, the ECU program is booted.

3.

Complete the ECU procedure according to the guidelines provided in the following sections.

• If you are configuring an EISA bus that contains only

EISA options, refer to Table 3–3.

Note

If you are configuring only EISA options, do not perform

Step 2 of the ECU,

Add or Remove Boards

. (EISA boards are recognized and configured automatically.)

• If you are configuring an EISA bus that contains both

ISA and EISA options, refer to Table 3–4.

Options and Upgrades 3–31

Configuring EISA and ISA Options

4.

After you have saved configuration information and exited from the ECU:

Systems running Microsoft Windows NT—Remove the ECU diskette from the drive and boot the operating system.

Systems running DEC OSF/1 or OpenVMS—Remove the ECU diskette from the drive. Return to the SRM console firmware as follows: a.

From the Boot menu, select

Supplementary menu

.

b.

From the Supplementary menu, select

Set up the system . . .

. The Setup menu is then displayed.

c.

From the Setup menu, select

Switch to OpenVMS or OSF console.

This allows you to select your operating system console.

d.

Select your operating system console, then select

Supplementary menu, and save changes . . .

.

e.

When the message

Power-cycle the system to implement the change

is displayed, press the Reset button. (Do not press the DC On/Off button.) Once the console firmware is loaded and device drivers are initialized, you can boot the operating system.

5.

Verify that the new options are configured correctly.

3–32 Options and Upgrades

Configuring EISA Options

Configuring EISA Options

EISA boards are recognized and configured automatically.

Table 3–3 summarizes the steps necessary to configure an EISA bus that contains no ISA options. Review the section entitled

‘‘Before You Run the ECU.’’ Then run the ECU as described in the section ‘‘Starting the ECU.’’

Note

It is not necessary to run Step 2 of the ECU,

Add or

Remove Boards.

(EISA boards are recognized and configured automatically.)

Options and Upgrades 3–33

Configuring EISA Options

Table 3–3 Summary of Procedure for Configuring EISA Bus (EISA Options Only)

Step Explanation

Install EISA option.

Power up the system and run ECU.

Use the instructions provided with the EISA option.

If the ECU locates the required CFG configuration files, it displays the main menu. The CFG file for the option may reside on a configuration diskette packaged with the option or may be included on the system configuration diskette.

Note

It is not necessary to run Step 2 of the ECU,

Add or

Remove Boards.

(EISA boards are recognized and configured automatically.)

View or edit details

(optional).

The

View or Edit Details

ECU option is used to change user-selectable settings or to change the resources allocated for these functions (IRQs, DMA channels, I/O ports, and so on).

This step is not required when you are using the board’s default settings.

Save your configuration.

The

Save and Exit

ECU option saves your configuration information to the system’s nonvolatile memory.

Return to the SRM console (DEC OSF/1 and

OpenVMS systems only) and restart the system.

Refer to step 4 of the previous section for operating-systemspecific instructions.

3–34 Options and Upgrades

Configuring EISA/ISA Options

Configuring EISA/ISA Options

ISA boards are configured manually, whereas EISA boards are configured through the ECU software. Study Table 3–4 for a summary of steps to configure an EISA bus that contains both

EISA and ISA options. Review the section entitled ‘‘Before You

Run the ECU.’’ Then run the ECU as described in the section

‘‘Starting the ECU.’’

Options and Upgrades 3–35

Configuring EISA/ISA Options

Table 3–4 Summary of Procedure for Configuring EISA Bus with ISA Options

Step Explanation

Install or move EISA option. Do not install

ISA boards.

Power up the system and run the ECU.

Add the ISA board to the configuration list.

Use the instructions provided with the EISA option. ISA boards are installed after the configuration process is complete.

If you have installed an EISA option, the ECU must locate the CFG file for that option. The CFG file for the option may reside on a configuration diskette packaged with the option or may be included on the system configuration diskette.

Use the

Add or Remove Boards

ECU option to add the CFG file for the ISA option and to select an acceptable slot for the option.

The CFG file for the option may reside on a configuration diskette packaged with the option or may be included on the system configuration diskette.

If you cannot find the CFG file for the ISA option, select the generic CFG file for ISA options from the configuration diskette.

View or edit details

(optional).

Examine and set required switches to match the displayed settings.

The

View or Edit Details

ECU option is used to change user-selectable settings or to change the resources allocated for these functions (IRQs, DMA channels, I/O ports, and so on).

This step is not required when you are using the board’s default settings.

The

Examine Required Switches

ECU option displays the correct switch and jumper settings that you must physically set for each ISA option. Although the ECU cannot detect or change the settings of ISA boards, it uses the information from the previous step to determine the correct switch settings for these options.

Physically set the board’s jumpers and switches to match the required settings.

Save your configuration.

The

Save and Exit

ECU option saves your configuration information to the system’s nonvolatile memory.

Return to the SRM console (DEC OSF/1 and

OpenVMS systems only) and turn off the system.

Install ISA board and turn on the system.

Refer to step 4 of the section ‘‘Starting the ECU’’ for information about returning to the SRM console.

Use the instructions provided with the ISA option.

3–36 Options and Upgrades

PCI Bus Options

PCI Bus Options

For options that require high performance, a Peripheral

Component Interconnect (PCI) bus is included in the

AlphaServer 2100 system.

PCI is an industry-standard expansion I/O bus that is the preferred bus for high-performance I/O options, such as network interconnects (FDDI, Ethernet, Token Ring), storage interconnects (SCSI, Fast SCSI, IPI), and high-performance video applications. The AlphaServer 2100 system supports 32-bit

PCI options.

The PCI bus is shown in Figure 3–2. There are three slots for

32-bit PCI options. A PCI board is shown in Figure 3–5.

Figure 3–5 PCI Board

MA00080

Options and Upgrades 3–37

PCI Bus Options

Installing PCI

Boards

Install PCI boards according to the instructions supplied with the option. PCI boards require no additional configuration procedures; the system automatically recognizes the boards and assigns the appropriate system resources.

Warning

Before installing a PCI option, turn off all power to the system (both AC and DC). Refer to ‘‘Powering Down the

System’’ in Chapter 1 for information about turning off

AC and DC power.

Warning: For protection against fire, only modules with current-limited outputs should be used.

3–38 Options and Upgrades

SCSI Buses

SCSI Buses

Internal SCSI

Bus

A PCI-based SCSI controller provides a single-ended SCSI bus for the system. There is a SCSI bus expansion port on the rear of the system for extending the bus outside the system.

All tabletop or rackmounted SCSI-2 devices are supported via

EISA- or PCI-based SCSI adapters. Use the following rules to determine if a device can be used on your system:

• The device must be supported by the operating system.

Consult the software product description or hardware vendor.

• No more than seven devices can be on any one SCSI-2 controller, and each must have a unique SCSI ID.

• The entire SCSI bus length, from terminator to terminator, must not exceed 6 meters for single-ended SCSI-2 at 5

MB/sec, or 3 meters for single-ended SCSI-2 at 10 MB/sec.

For AlphaServer 2100 pedestal enclosures, the internal cabling for the removable media bus is 2.5 meters; therefore the maximum length for external expansion is 3.5 meters.

Note

If you extend the SCSI bus into the internal

StorageWorks shelf, you cannot expand the bus externally.

The Fast SCSI-2 adapter on the standard I/O module supports the internal removable-media devices:

• Up to three 5.25-in. half-height devices or

• One 5.25-in. full-height device and one 5.25-in. half-height device

This bus can be extended to a StorageWorks shelf or an external expander to support up to seven drives.

Options and Upgrades 3–39

SCSI Buses

Configuring the Removable

Media Bus

The system supports up to two internal StorageWorks shelves that can each support up to eight SCSI disk drives in a dual-bus configuration.

Removable-media storage devices should only be installed by a qualified service person.

Warning

Before connecting removable-media SCSI devices to your system, turn off all power to the system (both AC and

DC). Refer to ‘‘Powering Down the System’’ in Chapter 1 for information about turning off AC and DC power.

The removable-media bus can be configured to extend into an internal StorageWorks shelf or to allow expansion from the connector on the bulkhead at the rear of the enclosure:

• When the bus is configured to extend into an internal

StorageWorks shelf (Figure 3–6), the bus must be terminated at the bulkhead connector using the external SCSI terminator (12-37004-04).

External expansion from the back of the enclosure is not allowed in this configuration, as it would violate SCSI bus length rules.

• When the bus is not extended into an internal StorageWorks shelf, the internal SCSI terminator (12-41296-01) is required, as shown in Figure 3–6.

External expansion from the back of the enclosure is available in this configuration; however, the connecting cable cannot exceed 1.5 meters in length. If the bus is not expanded, be sure the external SCSI terminator

(12-37004-04) is in place.

When connecting devices to a bus, keep in mind that each device on the bus must have a unique bus node ID and that you may need to change a device’s default bus node ID in order to make it unique. All removable-media device bus node IDs are set via switches on the device. For information about setting a device’s bus node ID, refer to the owner’s guide for that device.

3–40 Options and Upgrades

SCSI Buses

To display bus node IDs for devices that are already connected to your system, enter the

show device

command. Refer to

‘‘Verifying System Configuration’’ earlier in this chapter for information about interpreting the

show device

command display.

Figure 3–6 Removable-Media Bus Configurations

1 3

2 4

6

5

M A 0 4 3 7 9 3 A

!

"

#

$

%

&

External Expansion (SCSI)

SCSI External Expansion Cable

Internal Expansion (SCSI)

External SCSI Terminator

Internal SCSI Terminator

Standard I/O

Options and Upgrades 3–41

SCSI Buses

Internal

StorageWorks

Shelves

The backplane of the StorageWorks shelf supplies the drive’s

SCSI node ID according to the location of the drive within the storage shelf. Each internal StorageWorks shelf can support up to four pair of drives (node IDs 0–3, top to bottom) in a dual-bus configuration (Figure 3–7).

Figure 3–7 Internal StorageWorks Configuration

2

1

1

1

0

0

2

2

3

3

Bus A

Bus B

!

"

Dual Bus SCSI Controller

SCSI ID

M A 0 4 4 1 9 3 A

3–42 Options and Upgrades

SCSI Buses

Figure 3–8 shows the SCSI cable routing from a SCSI controller to internal StorageWorks shelves.

Figure 3–8 SCSI Cable Routing to Internal StorageWorks

Shelves

M A 0 6 8 9 9 3

Options and Upgrades 3–43

SCSI Buses

Installing

StorageWorks

Fixed Disks

If your StorageWorks drives are plugged into a RAID controller, such as the SWXCR-Ex controller, you can ‘‘hot swap’’ drives, that is, you can install or replace drives without first shutting down the operating system or powering down the server hardware. For more information, see StorageWorks RAID Array

200 Subsystem Family Installation and Configuration Guide,

EK-SWRA2-IG.

If your StorageWorks drives are not plugged into a RAID controller, shut down the operating system before swapping a drive. However, you do not need to power down the server before installing the drive.

Installation Procedure

To install a StorageWorks disk drive:

1.

If your StorageWorks drives are plugged into a RAID controller, go to step 2. If your drives are not plugged into a

RAID controller, shut down the operating system before you go to step 2.

2.

Remove a blank bezel by pressing the two mounting tabs and pull the bezel out of the shelf.

3.

Insert the hard-disk drive into the guide slots and push it in until the tabs lock in place.

Figure 3–9 shows how to install hard-disk drives in a

StorageWorks shelf.

3–44 Options and Upgrades

Figure 3–9 Installing Hard-Disk Drives

SCSI Buses

M A 0 6 0 6 9 3

Options and Upgrades 3–45

SCSI Buses

Guidelines for

Systems with

SWXCR-Ex

Controller

If you purchased a StorageWorks RAID Array 200 Subsystem for your AlphaServer 2100 system, observe the guidelines below when you add, move, or reconfigure RAID devices. The RAID subsystem includes the SWXCR-Ex EISA backplane RAID controller.

• Run the EISA Configuration Utility (ECU) as described in this chapter to configure all modules on the EISA bus.

• Run the RAID Configuration Utility (RCU) as described in

StorageWorks RAID Array 200 Subsystem Family Installation

and Configuration Guide to set up the disk drives and logical units. The RCU is provided on a diskette with the RAID subsystem kit.

• On OpenVMS systems, RAID drives do not autoconfigure.

See the StorageWorks RAID Array 200 Subsystem Family

Software User’s Guide for OpenVMS AXP for instructions on configuring your RAID devices on OpenVMS.

RAID Subsystem Documentation

For information about the RAID subsystem and specific operating systems, consult the documents listed in Table 3–5.

These documents are included in your RAID subsystem kit.

Refer to the section ‘‘Problems with RAID Devices’’ in Chapter 4 for RAID troubleshooting hints related to the AlphaServer 2100 system.

Table 3–5 RAID Subsystem Documentation

Document Part Number

StorageWorks RAID Array 200

Subsystem Family Installation and

Configuration Guide

StorageWorks RAID Array 200

Subsystem Family Software User’s

Guide for OpenVMS AXP

StorageWorks RAID Array 200

Subsystem Family Software User’s

Guide for DEC OSF/1 AXP

StorageWorks RAID Array 200

Subsystem Family Software User’s

Guide for Windows NT AXP

EK-SWRA2-IG

AA-Q6WVA-TE

AA-Q6TGC-TE

AA-Q6SWB-TE

3–46 Options and Upgrades

SCSI Buses

Power Supply Configurations

AlphaServer 2100 systems offer added reliability with redundant power options, as well as uninterruptible power supply (UPS) options. Figure 3–10 shows some of the system’s power supply options.

Power Supply

Modes

The power supplies for AlphaServer 2100 pedestal systems support three different modes of operation. In addition, UPS options are available.

Power supply modes of operation:

1.

Single power supply—Supports entry-level systems, such as a system with two CPUs, one memory module, one diskette drive, one CD–ROM drive, one internal StorageWorks shelf with eight 3.5-in drives, and up to eight EISA/PCI options.

2.

Dual power supply (redundant mode)—Provides redundant power (n + 1) for entry-level and moderately configured systems, such as a system with two CPUs, one memory module, one diskette drive, one CD–ROM drive, one internal

StorageWorks shelf with eight 3.5-in drives, and up to eight

EISA/PCI options.

In redundant mode, the failure of one power supply does not cause the system to shut down. Normal operation continues with no effect on the system.

Note

The power supply mode jumper (J3) on the standard I/O module must be installed to activate redundant mode power.

3.

Dual power supply (full power mode)—Provides full power for system configurations beyond entry-level, such as a system with more than two CPUs or more than one internal

StorageWorks shelf. These systems require the power of two power supplies.

Options and Upgrades 3–47

Power Supply Configurations

Ordering

Guidelines

If you are ordering additional options for your server, consider the above guidelines for power consumption to determine if you need to upgrade the power supply configuration.

The single and redundant mode power supply configurations are available to those systems drawing:

• 602 watts DC output power or less

• 39 A or less of 3.3 V power

• 62 A or less of 5.1 V power

• 12.5 A or less of +12 V power

• 1.0 A of -12 V power

3–48 Options and Upgrades

Power Supply Configurations

Figure 3–10 Power Supply Configurations

1 2

4

3

UPS

1280W

M A 0 4 3 6 9 3 A

!

"

Single—602 Watts DC or less

Redundant—602 Watts DC or less (J3 installed on standard

I/O)

#

$

Full—Up to 1150 Watts DC

UPS

Options and Upgrades 3–49

4

Troubleshooting the System

Introduction

In This Chapter

This chapter provides troubleshooting information.

This chapter covers the following information:

• Before You Begin

• Task Overview

• Determining Type of Problem

• Reporting Problems to Digital Services

• Power Problems

• Problems Getting to Console Mode

• Interpreting the Operator Control Panel Power-Up Display

• Console Reported Problems

• Mass Storage Problems Indicated at Power-Up

• PCI Bus Problems Indicated at Power-Up

• EISA Bus Problems Indicated at Power-Up

• Boot Problems

• Operating System Reported Problems

• Problems with RAID Devices

Troubleshooting the System

4–1

Before You Begin

Before You Begin

Determine

Service

Provider

Before you begin, be sure you are aware of the service agreement for your system. Your agreement will help you determine how much troubleshooting and repair you should undertake yourself.

• If you plan to maintain the system yourself, use the information in this chapter to help identify and fix the problem.

• If you have a service agreement with Digital, you can contact your Digital service representative for assistance.

Note

If you are a self-maintenance customer, refer to the

AlphaServer 2000/2100/2100 RM/2100 CAB Series

Service Guide for more comprehensive troubleshooting information.

4–2 Troubleshooting the System

Identifying

Problems

Before You Begin

Table 4–1 lists ways to identify problems, and indicates where each method is described:

Table 4–1 How to Identify a Problem

Method Reference

Using the troubleshooting tables

Running diagnostic tests

This chapter

test

command or

show fru

command as described in the

‘‘Console Reported Problems’’ section in this chapter.

Note

If you are running Windows NT, switch from the ARC to the SRM console before you can run the

test

command.

For information about switching to the SRM console, refer to ‘‘Switching from ARC to SRM’’ in Chapter 1.

Troubleshooting the System

4–3

Task Overview

Task Overview

Steps to

Identifying a

Problem

Table 4–2 describes the steps required to identify and fix system problems.

3

4

5

1

2

Table 4–2 Steps to Resolving Problems

Step Description

Determine type of problem.

Locate problem in troubleshooting tables.

Follow suggested actions to resolve problem.

If necessary, run diagnostic tests.

Contact Digital service representative or your maintenance provider.

The next sections describe these steps.

4–4 Troubleshooting the System

Determining Type of Problem

Determining Type of Problem

Types of

System

Problems

Determine the type of problem that your system is experiencing from the list in Table 4–3.

Table 4–3 Problem Reference

Problem

System powers down unexpectedly or does not power up.

Power-up screens are not displayed on the console terminal.

Power-up screens report an error or do not complete.

System cannot find the boot device or the device does not boot.

Operating system startup screen does not appear, software applications do not run, or operating system reports an error.

Some RAID drives do not appear on the

show device d

display; drives on the controller power up with Fault light on; image copy of

DRA logical drive does not boot; cannot access disks.

Section

Power Problems

Problems Getting to Console

Mode

Console Reported Problems

Boot Problems

Operating System Reported

Problems

Problems with RAID

Devices

If you cannot locate the problem your system is experiencing, or if the corrective actions in the troubleshooting tables do not resolve the problem, see the section ‘‘Reporting Problems to

Digital Services.’’

Troubleshooting the System

4–5

Reporting Problems to Digital Services

Reporting Problems to Digital Services

Pre-Call

Checklist

Digital Support

Center Contact

Numbers

If you are unable to locate the system problem in the previous sections of this chapter, or the actions suggested could not resolve the problem, contact the nearest Digital support center.

Before calling to report a problem, complete these steps.

1.

Locate the part and serial numbers, printed on the label at the rear of your system. Record these numbers on a copy of the Problem Worksheet in this chapter.

The support center will need this information when you call.

2.

Fill in the ‘‘Status of the System’’ information on the worksheet.

3.

Note the problem, possible causes if you know them, and solutions suggested in the previous sections. Also indicate what actions (if any) you have already taken to try to correct the problem.

4.

Be prepared to read information from the screen and to enter commands at the keyboard while you talk to the support center representative.

Table 4–4 lists the telephone numbers for contacting your Digital support center.

If a Digital Services number for your area is not listed in

Table 4–4, contact your local Digital office for assistance.

4–6 Troubleshooting the System

Reporting Problems to Digital Services

Table 4–4 Digital Support Centers

Country Telephone Number

UNITED STATES

Colorado Springs, CO

From US/Canada/Mexico

Shrewsbury, MA

From US/Canada/Mexico

Alpharetta, GA

From US/Canada/Mexico

AUSTRALIA

AUSTRIA

BELGIUM

CANADA

English

French

DENMARK

FINLAND

FRANCE

GERMANY

HONG KONG

ISRAEL

ITALY

KOREA

MALAYSIA

MEXICO

NETHERLANDS

NORTHERN IRELAND

NORWAY

1-800-354-9000

719-592-7000

508-841-3700

404-343-0000

31-2-5615252

0222-86630-555

02-7297744

1-800-267-5251

1-800-267-2603

80301005

90 9800 2878

1-69874123

01307702

852-4149779

052-592-300

2-1678 20062

82-2-7991114

60-3-2300111

520140810017

030-832888

0232 381381

02-256300

(continued on next page)

Troubleshooting the System

4–7

Reporting Problems to Digital Services

Table 4–4 (Cont.) Digital Support Centers

Country Telephone Number

PHILLIPPINES

PORTUGAL

LISBON

OPORTO

PUERTO RICO

REPUBLIC OF IRELAND

SINGAPORE

SPAIN

MADRID

BARCELONA

SWEDEN

THAILAND

UNITED KINGDOM

JAPAN (Tokyo)

Trouble

SPS Telephone Support

Commodity Products Phone

Special Account Customers

Windows NT Hot Line

623-810-5156

01-3877051

02-6068805

800-981-4764

01-381216

330-6225

34-(9)1-5834257

34-(9)3-4012222

08-988835

66-254-8191

025 6-59200

0120-113035 (toll-free)

0120-113036 (toll-free)

0120-206042 (toll-free)

0120-113334 (toll-free)

03-3207-2881

4–8 Troubleshooting the System

Reporting Problems to Digital Services

AlphaServer 2100 Problem Worksheet

DEC service representative telephone number:

Serial Number:

Status of the System (check all that apply):

DC power light is not on

OCP power/diagnostic display failure message

Operating system fails to boot

Diagnostic test error message

Console program fails to boot

Console error message

OCP powerup/diagnostic display:

Screen error message:

Troubleshooting notes:

MA00086

Troubleshooting the System

4–9

Power Problems

Power Problems

This section describes how to troubleshoot the system when there is no power at the system enclosure or when the power supply subsystem lights indicate power trouble.

Table 4–5 Troubleshooting Power Problems

Symptom Action

No AC power. as indicated by AC OK light on the power supply when the AC On/Off switch is set to ‘‘on.’’

• Check the power source and power cord.

• Check that the left panel is properly secured.

A safety interlock switch shuts off power to the system if the panel is open.

• If there are two power supplies, make sure both have the AC On/Off switch set to ‘‘on’’, or that both power supplies are plugged in (systems with no AC

On/Off switches).

AC power is present, but system does not power on.

• Check the DC On/Off button setting on the operator control panel.

• Check that the ambient room temperature is within environmental specifications (10–35°C, 50–95°F)

Power supply shuts down after approximately 5 seconds

(fan failure).

Using a flashlight, look through the front (to the left of the internal StorageWorks shelf) to determine if the

6.75-inch fan is spinning at power-up. A failure of the

6.75-inch fan causes the system to shut down after approximately 5 seconds.

4–10 Troubleshooting the System

Problems Getting to Console Mode

Problems Getting to Console Mode

This section describes how to troubleshoot the system when you power up the system, but the console terminal does not display the power-up screen.

Table 4–6 Troubleshooting Problems Getting to Console Mode

Symptom Action

Power-up screen is not displayed.

Check power-up/diagnostic display on the operator control panel. (Table 4–7) for a failure during self-tests.

Check that keyboard and monitor are properly connected and powered on (‘‘Terminal Connections’’ section in Chapter 1).

If the power-up screen is not displayed, yet the system enters console mode when you press the Return key, check that the

console

environment variable is set correctly. If you are using a VGA console terminal, set the variable to ‘‘graphics.’’ If you are using a serial terminal, set the variable to ‘‘serial.’’

If

console

is set to ‘‘serial,’’ the power-up screen is routed to the COM1 serial communication port and cannot be viewed from the VGA monitor.

Try connecting a console terminal to the COM1 serial communication port (‘‘Terminal Connections’’ section in

Chapter 1). If necessary use a 9-pin connector. Check baud rate setting for console terminal and system.

The system baud rate setting is 9600. When using the

COM1 port, set the

console

environment variable to

‘‘serial.’’

Troubleshooting the System

4–11

Interpreting the Operator Control Panel Power-Up Display

Interpreting the Operator Control Panel Power-Up Display

Table 4–7 describes how to interpret messages that may be displayed on the power-up display located on the operator control panel on the front of the system (Figure 2–1).

CPU Failover

AlphaServer 2100 multiprocessor systems, with the exception of the model 4/200, offer high-availability ‘‘failover’’ functionality.

On systems with more than one CPU, the failover feature allows the system to power up and boot the operating system even if only one CPU is working.

How Failover Works

When you power up or reset a multiprocessor system, each CPU, in parallel, runs a set of diagnostic tests. If any tests fail, errors are logged, and the failing CPU is configured out of the system.

Responsibility for initializing memory and booting the console firmware is transferred to the next higher working CPU, and the boot process continues.

Note

The CPU number of the CPU serving as the primary

CPU is displayed in the SRM console prompt; for example,

P01>>>

.

4–12 Troubleshooting the System

Interpreting the Operator Control Panel Power-Up Display

How to Determine the Status of CPU Tests

If a CPU fails during power-up, the Halt button LED on the operator control panel lights for a few seconds and the power-up

/diagnostic display

CPU STATUS

(‘‘F’’ indicates failure).

message shows the failing CPU

You can also use the following firmware commands to examine the status of CPU tests or to see if errors are logged to a CPU.

show fru

, described in the next section

show config

, described in Chapter 3

Troubleshooting the System

4–13

Interpreting the Operator Control Panel Power-Up Display

Table 4–7 Interpreting Operator Control Panel Power-Up Display

Message Meaning

TEST

NO MEM INSTALLED

FAIL module_type

Displayed while the system performs diagnostic tests and exercisers. The type of module under test, its slot number, and the currently executing test number are also displayed.

Displayed if you power up with no memory installed.

If an error is detected in the CPU, memory, or I/O, a failure message is displayed and the Halt button LED lights for a few seconds. The error is logged to the appropriate module via the serial control bus. In nearly all cases, the power-up tests continue.

The module_type and slot number for the module that failed, along with the test number that detected the error are also displayed.

Module types and/or slot numbers:

CPU_nn — CPU module (0–3)

MEM_nn — Memory module (0–3)

I/O_0 — Standard I/O module

I/O_1 — Expansion I/O module (PCI)

CPU STATUS

Summary of CPU testing—The status of each CPU from right to left, starting with CPU0 is displayed:

‘‘P’’ — CPU passed

‘‘F’’ — CPU failed

‘‘–’’ — CPU not present

STARTING CPU #

TEST MEM BANK #

PROBE I/O SUBSYS

SYSTEM RESET

Model x/xxx

The console is starting the primary CPU.

The console is testing memory.

The console is checking the PCI and EISA bridges.

The Reset button has been pressed.

When the system is under operating system control, the

CPU variant (x) and system model number (xxx) are displayed unless you supply your own text using the ocp_ text environment variable.

4–14 Troubleshooting the System

Console Reported Problems

Console Reported Problems

This section describes how to troubleshoot your system when self-tests do not complete or when error messages are displayed on your console terminal in console mode.

Table 4–8 describes problems reported by the console and their solutions.

Table 4–8 Troubleshooting Console Reported Problems

Symptom Action

Power-up tests do not complete.

The system powers up to the

ash>

prompt.

Console program reports error.

• Operator control panel displays failure message at power-up

• Halt button LED lights during power-up

• Power-up screen includes error messages

Use power-up/diagnostic display on the operator control panel (Table 4–7).

Reinstall firmware. Refer to the firmware update documentation for firmware installation instructions.

Contact your Digital support center if you do not have a backup copy of the firmware.

Use power-up/diagnostic display on the operator control panel (Table 4–7) to determine error.

Use the

show fru

command described in the next section to see if errors have been logged.

Examine the console event log (enter the

cat el

command) or power-up screens to check for embedded error messages recorded during power-up.

If power-up screens or console event log indicate problems with mass storage devices, or if storage devices are missing from the

show config

display, use the troubleshooting flow charts (Table 4–9 and

Table 4–10) to determine the problem.

If power-up screens or console event log indicate problems with EISA devices, or if EISA devices are missing from the

show config

display, use the troubleshooting flow chart (Table 4–11) to determine the problem.

(continued on next page)

Troubleshooting the System

4–15

Console Reported Problems

Table 4–8 (Cont.) Troubleshooting Console Reported Problems

Symptom Action

If power-up screens or console event log indicate problems with PCI devices, or if PCI devices are missing from the

show config

display, use the troubleshooting flow chart (Table 4–12) to determine the problem.

Run the

test

command to verify the problem. See the description at the end of this section.

show fru

The

show fru

command reports FRU and error information for the following field-replaceable units based on the serial control bus EEPROM data:

• CPU modules

• Memory modules

• I/O modules

For each of the above FRUs, the slot position, option, part, revision, and serial numbers, as well as any reported symptomdirected diagnostics (SDD) and test-directed diagnostics (TDD) event logs are displayed.

In addition, installed PCI and EISA modules are displayed with their respective slot numbers.

Synopsis:

show fru ([target [target . . . ]])

Arguments:

[target] CPU{0,1,2,3}, mem{0,1,2,3}, io.

4–16 Troubleshooting the System

Example:

Console Reported Problems

P00>>> show fru

!

" #

Slot Option Part#

0

2

4

IO

CPU0

MEM0

B2110-AA

B2020-AA

B2021-BA

Slot Option

Slot Option

2

4

CPQ3011

DEC4220

$

Rev

%

Hw Sw Serial#

H2 0

B2 9

A1 0

KA427P0593

KA426C0457

ML34156292

Hose 0, PCI

Hose 1, EISA

&

Events logged

SDD TDD

00

00

00

00

00

00

"

#

$

%

&

Slot Option

P00>>>

!

Hose 2, PCI

System bus slot number for FRU (slots 0–7 top to bottom)

Slot 0: Standard I/O module (dedicated EISA/PCI card cage slot)

Slot 1–3, 5: CPU modules

Slot 4–7: Memory modules

Option name (I/O, CPU#, or MEM#)

Part number of option

Revision numbers (hardware and firmware)

Serial number

Events logged:

Numbers other than ‘‘00’’ indicate that errors have been logged.

SDD: Number of symptom-directed diagnostic events logged by the serial ROM diagnostics at power up.

TDD: Number of test-directed diagnostic events logged by the firmware diagnostics at power up.

Troubleshooting the System

4–17

Console Reported Problems

test

The

test

command runs firmware diagnostics for the entire core system. The tests are run sequentially and the status of each subsystem test is displayed to the console terminal as the tests progress. If a particular device is not available to test, a message is displayed.

Note

By default, no write tests are performed on disk and tape drives. Media must be installed to test the floppy drive and tape drives.

The

test

script tests devices in the following order:

1.

Memory tests (one pass)

Note

Certain memory errors that are reported by the OCP may not be reported by the ROM-based diagnostics.

Always check the power-up/diagnostic display before running diagnostic commands.

2.

Read-only tests: DK* disks, DR* disks, DU* disks, MK* tapes, DV* floppy

3.

Console loopback tests if lb argument is specified: COM2 serial port and parallel port

4.

VGA console tests—These tests are run only if the console environment variable is set to ‘‘serial.’’ The VGA console test displays rows of the letter ‘‘H’’.

5.

Network external loopback tests for EWA0—This test requires that the Ethernet port be terminated or connected to a live network; otherwise, the test will fail.

4–18 Troubleshooting the System

Console Reported Problems

Synopsis:

test [lb]

Arguments:

[lb] The loopback option includes console loopback tests for the COM2 serial port and the parallel port during the test sequence.

Example:

In this example, the system is tested, and the tests complete successfully.

P00>>> test

Testing the Memory

Testing the DK* Disks(read only) dkb600.6.0.2.1 has no media present or is disabled via the RUN/STOP switch file open failed for dkb600.6.0.2.1

No DR* Disks available for testing

Testing the MK* Tapes(read only)

Testing the DV* Floppy Disks(read only) file open failed for dva0.0.0.0.1

Testing the VGA(Alphanumeric Mode only)

Testing the EW* Network

P00>>>

In this example, the system is tested, and the system reports an error message. No network server responded to a loopback message. Ethernet connectivity on this system should be checked.

P00>>> test

Testing the Memory

Testing the DK* Disks(read only)

No DR* Disks available for testing

Testing the MK* Tapes(read only)

Testing the DV* Floppy Disks(read only)

Testing the VGA(Alphanumeric Mode only)

Testing the EW* Network

*** Error (ewa0), Mop loop message timed out from: 08-00-2b-3b-42-fd

*** List index: 7 received count: 0 expected count 2

P00>>>

Troubleshooting the System

4–19

Mass Storage Problems Indicated at Power-Up

Mass Storage Problems Indicated at Power-Up

Mass storage failures at power-up are usually indicated by read fail messages.

• Table 4–9 provides information for troubleshooting fixed-media mass storage problems indicated at power-up.

• Table 4–10 provides information for troubleshooting removable-media storage problems indicated at powerup. Use these tables to diagnose the likely cause of the problem.

Table 4–9 Troubleshooting Fixed-Media Problems

Problem Symptom

Drive has failed.

Duplicate SCSI IDs (when removable-media bus is extended to StorageWorks shelf).

SCSI ID is set to 7

(reserved for host ID).

Fault LED for drive is on

(steady).

Drives with duplicate SCSI

IDs are missing from the

show config

display.

Duplicate host IDs on a shared bus.

Valid drives are missing from the

show config

display.

One drive may appear seven times on the

show config

display.

Valid drives are missing from the

show config

display.

One drive may appear seven times on the configuration screen display.

Corrective Action

Replace drive.

Correct removable-media

SCSI IDs.

Correct SCSI IDs.

Change host ID using the

set pk*0_host_id

command described in the AlphaServer 2000

/2100 Firmware Reference

Guide.

(continued on next page)

4–20 Troubleshooting the System

Mass Storage Problems Indicated at Power-Up

Table 4–9 (Cont.) Troubleshooting Fixed-Media Problems

Problem Symptom Corrective Action

I/O module failure (if removable-media bus is extended to StorageWorks shelf) or PCI or EISA storage adapter option failure.

Problems persist after eliminating the above problem sources.

Replace storage adapter module or standard I/O module.

Troubleshooting the System

4–21

Mass Storage Problems Indicated at Power-Up

Table 4–10 Troubleshooting Removable-Media Problems

Problem Symptom Corrective Action

Replace drive.

Drive failure.

Fault LED for drive is on

(steady).

Duplicate

SCSI IDs.

SCSI ID is set to 7 (reserved for host ID.)

Drives with duplicate SCSI

IDs are missing from the

show config

display.

Valid drives are missing from the

show config

display.

One drive may appear seven times on the

show config

display.

Duplicate host IDs on a shared bus.

Valid drives are missing from the

show config

display.

One drive may appear seven times on the configuration screen display.

Missing or loose cables.

Missing terminator.

Activity LEDs do not come on. Drive missing from the

show config

display.

Read/write errors in console event log; storage adapter port may fail.

Extra terminator.

I/O module failure.

Devices produce errors or device IDs are dropped.

Problems persist after eliminating the above problem sources.

Correct SCSI IDs.

Correct SCSI IDs.

Change host ID using the

set pk*0_host_id

command described in the AlphaServer 2000/2100 Firmware

Reference Guide.

Remove device and inspect cable connections.

Attach terminators as needed: internal SCSI terminator (12-41296-

01) or external SCSI terminator

(12-37004-04).

Check that SCSI bus is terminated only at beginning and end. Remove unnecessary terminators.

Replace standard I/O module.

4–22 Troubleshooting the System

EISA Bus Problems Indicated at Power-Up

EISA Bus Problems Indicated at Power-Up

EISA bus failures at power-up are usually indicated by the following message displayed during power-up:

EISA Configuration Error. Run the EISA Configuration

Utility.

Run the EISA Configuration Utility (ECU) if this message is displayed.

Table 4–11 provides information for troubleshooting EISA bus problems that continue after you run the ECU.

Troubleshooting the System

4–23

EISA Bus Problems Indicated at Power-Up

Table 4–11 Troubleshooting EISA Problems

Step Action

1

2

Confirm that the EISA module and any cabling are properly seated.

Run the ECU as described in Chapter 3 to:

• Confirm that the system has been configured with the most recently installed controller.

• See what the hardware jumper and switch setting should be for each ISA controller.

• See what the software setting should be for each ISA and EISA controller.

• See if the ECU deactivated (<>) any controllers to prevent conflict.

• See if any controllers are locked (!), which limits the

ECU’s ability to change resource assignments.

3

4

5

Confirm that hardware jumpers and switches on ISA controllers reflect the settings indicated by the ECU.

Start with the last ISA module installed.

Check for a bad slot by moving the last installed controller to a different slot.

Call option manufacturer or Digital customer support for help.

4–24 Troubleshooting the System

PCI Bus Problems Indicated at Power-Up

PCI Bus Problems Indicated at Power-Up

PCI bus failures at power-up are usually indicated by the inability of the system to see the device. Use Table 4–12 to diagnose the likely cause of the problem.

Table 4–12 Troubleshooting PCI Problems

Step Action

1

2

3

Confirm that the PCI module and any cabling are properly seated.

Check for a bad slot by moving the last installed controller to a different slot.

Call option manufacturer or Digital customer support for help.

Troubleshooting the System

4–25

Boot Problems

Boot Problems

This section describes how to troubleshoot problems that occur while the system is booting operating system software.

Table 4–13 describes possible boot problems and their solutions.

Table 4–13 Troubleshooting Boot Problems

Symptom Action

System cannot find boot device.

Check the system configuration for the correct device parameters (node ID, device name, and so on).

• For DEC OSF/1 and OpenVMS, use the

show device

commands.

show config

and

• For Windows NT, use the selection and the

Display hardware configuration

Set default environment variables

selection.

Check the system configuration for the correct environment variable settings.

• For DEC OSF/1 and OpenVMS, examine the auto_action, bootdef_dev, boot_osflags, and os_type environment variables.

For problems booting over a network, check the er*0_ protocols or ew*0_protocols environment variable settings:

Systems booting from a DEC OSF/1 server should be set to bootp; systems booting from an OpenVMS server should be set to mop.

• For Windows NT, examine the FWSEARCHPATH,

AUTOLOAD, and COUNTDOWN environment variables.

(continued on next page)

4–26 Troubleshooting the System

Boot Problems

Table 4–13 (Cont.) Troubleshooting Boot Problems

Symptom Action

Device does not boot.

For problems booting over a network, check the er*0_protocols or ew*0_protocols environment variable settings: Systems booting from a DEC OSF/1 server should be set to bootp; systems booting from an OpenVMS server should be set to mop.

Run the

test

operating.

command to check that the boot device is

Troubleshooting the System

4–27

Operating System Reported Problems

Operating System Reported Problems

Table 4–14 describes possible operating system problems and their solutions.

Table 4–14 Troubleshooting Operating System Reported Errors

Symptom Action

System is hung or has crashed.

Operating system is up.

Examine the crash dump file.

Refer to OpenVMS AXP Alpha System Dump Analyzer

Utility Manual for information on how to interpret

OpenVMS crash dump files.

Refer to the Guide to Kernel Debugging (AA–PS2TA–

TE) for information on using the DEC OSF/1 Krash

Utility.

Have the Digital support center examine the operating system error log files to isolate the problem. Selfmaintenance customers can refer to the AlphaServer

2000/2100/2100 RM/2100 CAB Series Service Guide.

If the problem occurs intermittently, have the Digital support center run an operating system exerciser, such as DEC VET to stress the system.

Refer to the DEC Verifier and Exerciser Tool User’s

Guide (AA–PTTMA–TE) for instructions on running

DEC VET.

4–28 Troubleshooting the System

Problems with RAID Devices

Problems with RAID Devices

Table 4–15 provides troubleshooting hints for AlphaServer

2100 systems that have the StorageWorks RAID Array 200

Subsystem. The RAID subsystem includes the SWXCR-Ex EISA backplane RAID controller.

Table 4–15 Troubleshooting RAID Problems

Symptom Action

Some RAID drives do not appear on the display.

show device d

Drives on the RAID subsystem power up with the amber Fault light on.

Image copy of DRA logical drive does not boot

(OpenVMS systems).

Cannot access disks connected to the RAID subsystem on Windows NT systems.

Valid configured RAID logical drives will appear as

DRA0–DRAn, not as DKn. Configure the drives by running the RAID Configuration Utility (RCU), following the instructions in the StorageWorks

RAID Array 200 Subsystem Family Installation and

Configuration Guide, EK-SWRA2-IG.

Reminder: several physical disks can be grouped as a single logical DRAn device.

Whenever you move drives onto or off of the SWXCR-Ex controller, run the RAID Configuration Utility to set up the drives and logical units. Follow the instructions in the StorageWorks RAID Array 200 Subsystem Family

Installation and Configuration Guide.

If you copy the contents of a system disk to your RAID subsystem using the BACKUP/IMAGE command, for example, you need to repeat several steps in the data device installation procedure, as described in the StorageWorks RAID Array 200 Subsystem Family

Software User’s Guide for OpenVMS AXP, AA-Q6WVA-

TE, in order to make the second device a bootable device.

On Windows NT systems, disks connected to the

SWXCR-Ex controller must be spun up before they can be accessed. While running the ECU, verify that the controller is set to spin up two disks every six seconds. This is the default setting if you are using the default configuration files for the controller. If the settings are different, adjust them as needed.

Troubleshooting the System

4–29

Glossary

10BASE-T Ethernet network

IEEE standard 802.3-compliant Ethernet products used for local distribution of data. These networking products characteristically use twisted-pair cable.

AlphaGeneration

Identifies products and services that take advantage of Digital’s

Alpha 64-bit computing environments.

AlphaServer

Digital’s new generation of server systems based on the Alpha

64-bit computing architecture.

ARC

User interface to the console firmware for operating systems that require firmware compliance with the Windows NT Portable

Boot Loader Specification. ARC stands for Advanced RISC

Computing.

AUI Ethernet network

Attachment unit interface. An IEEE standard 802.3-compliant

Ethernet network connected with standard Ethernet cable.

autoboot

A system boot initiated automatically by software when the system is powered up or reset.

Glossary–1

Glossary–2 availability

The amount of scheduled time that a computing system provides application service during the year. Availability is typically measured as either a percentage of uptime per year or as system unavailability, the number of hours or minutes of downtime per year.

BA350 storage shelf

A StorageWorks modular storage shelf used for disk storage in some AlphaServer systems.

BA720 enclosure

The enclosure that houses the AlphaServer 2000 deskside pedestal system.

BA740 enclosure

The enclosure that houses the AlphaServer 2100 large pedestal system.

BA741 enclosure

The enclosure that houses the AlphaServer 2100 RM

(rackmountable) system and AlphaServer 2100 CAB (cabinet) system.

backplane

The main board or panel that connects all of the modules in a computer system.

backup cache

A second, very fast cache memory that is closely coupled with the processor.

bandwidth

Term used to express the rate of data transfer in a bus or I/O channel. It is expressed as the amount of data that can be transferred in a given time, for example, megabytes per second.

battery backup unit

A battery unit that provides power to the entire system enclosure

(or to an expander enclosure) in the event of a power failure.

Another term for uninterruptible power supply (UPS).

boot

Short for bootstrap. To load an operating system into memory.

boot device

The device from which the system bootstrap software is acquired.

boot flags

A flag is a system parameter set by the user. Boot flags contain information that is read and used by the bootstrap software during a system bootstrap procedure.

boot server

A computer system that provides boot services to remote devices such as network routers.

bootstrap

The process of loading an operating system into memory.

bugcheck

A software condition, usually the response to software’s detection of an ‘‘internal inconsistency,’’ which results in the execution of the system bugcheck code.

bus

A collection of many transmission lines or wires. The bus interconnects computer system components, providing a communications path for addresses, data, and control information or external terminals and systems in a communications network.

bystander

A system bus node (CPU, standard I/O, or memory) that is not addressed by a current system bus commander.

byte

A group of eight contiguous bits starting on an addressable byte boundary. The bits are numbered right to left, 0 through 7.

Glossary–3

Glossary–4 cache memory

A small, high-speed memory placed between slower main memory and the processor. A cache increases effective memory transfer rates and processor speed. It contains copies of data recently used by the processor and fetches several bytes of data from memory in anticipation that the processor will access the next sequential series of bytes.

card cage

A mechanical assembly in the shape of a frame that holds modules against the system and storage backplanes.

carrier

The individual container for all StorageWorks devices, power supplies, and so forth. In some cases because of small form factors, more than one device can be mounted in a carrier.

Carriers can be inserted in modular shelves. Modular shelves can be mounted in modular enclosures.

CD–ROM

A read-only compact disc. The optical removable media used in a compact disc reader.

central processing unit (CPU)

The unit of the computer that is responsible for interpreting and executing instructions.

client-server computing

An approach to computing whereby a computer—the ‘‘server’’— provides a set of services across a network to a group of computers requesting those services—the ‘‘clients.’’

cluster

A group of networked computers that communicate over a common interface. The systems in the cluster share resources, and software programs work in close cooperation.

cold bootstrap

A bootstrap operation following a power-up or system initialization (restart). On Alpha based systems, the console loads PALcode, sizes memory, and initializes environment variables.

commander

In a particular bus transaction, a CPU or standard I/O that initiates the transaction.

command line interface

One of two modes of operation in the AlphaServer operator interface. The command line interface supports the OpenVMS and DEC OSF/1 operating systems. It allows you to configure and test the hardware, examine and alter system state, and boot the operating system.

console mode

The state in which the system and the console terminal operate under the control of the console program.

console program

The code that the executes during console mode.

console subsystem

The subsystem that provides the user interface for a computer system when the operating system is not running.

console terminal

The terminal connected to the console subsystem. It is used to start the system and direct activities between the computer operator and the console subsystem.

CPU failover

On multiprocessor AlphaServer systems, functionality that allows the system to power up and boot the operating system even if only one CPU is working.

data bus

A bus used to carry data between two or more components of the system.

Glossary–5

Glossary–6 data cache

A high-speed cache memory reserved for the storage of data.

Abbreviated as D-cache.

DECchip 21064 processor

The CMOS, single-chip processor based on the Alpha architecture and used on many AlphaGeneration computers.

DEC OSF/1 Version 2.0 for Alpha systems

A general-purpose operating system based on the Open Software

Foundation OSF/1 2.0 technology. DEC OSF/1 V2.0 runs on the range of AlphaGeneration systems, from workstations to servers.

DEC VET

Digital DEC Verifier and Exerciser Tool. A multipurpose system diagnostic tool that performs exerciser-oriented maintenance testing.

diagnostic program

A program that is used to find and correct problems with a computer system.

direct-mapping cache

A cache organization in which only one address comparison is needed to locate any data in the cache, because any block of main memory data can be placed in only one possible position in the cache.

direct memory access (DMA)

Access to memory by an I/O device that does not require processor intervention.

DRAM

Dynamic random-access memory. Read/write memory that must be refreshed (read from or written to) periodically to maintain the storage of information.

DSSI

Digital’s proprietary data bus that uses the System

Communication Architecture (SCA) protocols for direct host-to-storage communications.

DSSI cluster

A cluster system that uses the DSSI bus as the interconnect between DSSI disks and systems.

DUP server

Diagnostic Utility Program server. A firmware program on-board

DSSI devices that allows a user to set host to a specified device in order to run internal tests or modify device parameters.

ECC

Error correction code. Code and algorithms used by logic to facilitate error detection and correction.

EEPROM

Electrically erasable programmable read-only memory. A memory device that can be byte-erased, written to, and read from.

EISA bus

Extended Industry Standard Architecture bus. A 32-bit industry-standard I/O bus used primarily in high-end PCs and servers.

EISA Configuration Utility (ECU)

A menu-based utility supplied on diskette that is used for configuring EISA or ISA options. The ECU uses the option’s configuration (CFG) file to create a conflict-free configuration.

environment variables

Global data structures that can be accessed only from console mode. The setting of these data structures determines how a system powers up, boots the operating system, and operates.

Ethernet

IEEE 802.3 standard local area network.

ERF/UERF

Error Report Formatter. ERF is used to present error log information for OpenVMS. UERF is used to present error log information for DEC OSF/1.

Glossary–7

Glossary–8

Factory Installed Software (FIS)

Operating system software that is loaded into a system disk during manufacturing. On site, the FIS is bootstrapped in the system.

fail-safe loader (FSL)

A program that allows you to power up without initiating drivers or running power-up diagnostics. From the fail-safe loader you can perform limited console functions.

Fast SCSI

An optional mode of SCSI-2 that allows transmission rates of up to 10 megabytes per second.

FDDI

Fiber Distributed Data Interface. A high-speed networking technology that uses fiber optics as the transmissions medium.

FIB

Flexible interconnect bridge. A converter that allows the expansion of the system enclosure to other DSSI devices and systems.

field-replaceable unit

Any system component that a qualified service person is able to replace on site.

firmware

Software code stored in hardware.

fixed-media compartments

Compartments that house nonremovable storage media.

Flash ROM

Flash-erasable programmable read-only memory. Flash ROMs can be bank- or bulk-erased.

FRU

Field-replaceable unit. Any system component that a qualified service person is able to replace on site.

full-height device

Standard form factor for 5 1/4-inch storage devices.

half-height device

Standard form factor for storage devices that are not the height of full-height devices.

halt

The action of transferring control of the computer system to the console program.

hose

The interface between the card cage and the I/O subsystems.

hot swap

The process of removing a device from the system without shutting down the operating system or powering down the hardware.

initialization

The sequence of steps that prepare the computer system to start.

Occurs after a system has been powered up.

instruction cache

A high-speed cache memory reserved for the storage of instructions. Abbreviated as I-cache.

interrupt request lines (IRQs)

Bus signals that connect an EISA or ISA module (for example, a disk controller) to the system so that the module can get the system’s attention via an interrupt.

I/O backplane

One of two backplanes on the AlphaServer 2000 system. The I/O backplane contains three PCI option slots and seven EISA option slots. It also contains a SCSI channel, diskette controller, two serial ports, and a parallel printer port.

Glossary–9

Glossary–10

ISA

Industry Standard Architecture. An 8-bit or 16-bit industrystandard I/O bus, widely used in personal computer products.

The EISA bus is a superset of the ISA bus.

LAN

Local area network. A high-speed network that supports computers that are connected over limited distances.

latency

The amount of time it takes the system to respond to an event.

LED

Light-emitting diode. A semiconductor device that glows when supplied with voltage. A LED is used as an indicator light.

loopback test

Internal and external tests that are used to isolate a failure by testing segments of a particular control or data path. A subset of

ROM-based diagnostics.

machine check/interrupts

An operating system action triggered by certain system hardware-detected errors that can be fatal to system operation.

Once triggered, machine check handler software analyzes the error.

mass storage device

An input/output device on which data is stored. Typical mass storage devices include disks, magnetic tapes, and CD–ROM.

MAU

Medium attachment unit. On an Ethernet LAN, a device that converts the encoded data signals from various cabling media (for example, fiber optic, coaxial, or ThinWire) to permit connection to a networking station.

memory interleaving

The process of assigning consecutive physical memory addresses across multiple memory controllers. Improves total memory bandwidth by overlapping system bus command execution across multiple memory modules.

menu interface

One of two modes of operation in the AlphaServer operator interface. Menu mode lets you boot the Windows NT operating system by selecting choices from a simple menu. The EISA

Configuration Utility is also run from the menu interface.

modular shelves

In the StorageWorks modular subsystem, a shelf contains one or more modular carriers, generally up to a limit of seven. Modular shelves can be mounted in system enclosures, in I/O expansion enclosures, and in various StorageWorks modular enclosures.

MOP

Maintenance Operations Protocol. A transport protocol for network bootstraps and other network operations.

motherboard

The main circuit board of a computer. The motherboard contains the base electronics for the system (for example, base I/O, CPU,

ROM, and console serial line unit) and has connectors where options (such as I/Os and memories) can be plugged in.

multiprocessing system

A system that executes multiple tasks simultaneously.

node

A device that has an address on, is connected to, and is able to communicate with other devices on a bus. Also, an individual computer system connected to the network that can communicate with other systems on the network.

NVRAM

Nonvolatile random-access memory. Memory that retains its information in the absence of power.

Glossary–11

Glossary–12

OCP

Operator control panel.

open system

A system that implements sufficient open specifications for interfaces, services, and supporting formats to enable applications software to:

• Be ported across a wide range of systems with minimal changes

• Interoperate with other applications on local and remote systems

• Interact with users in a style that facilitates user portability

OpenVMS operating system

A general-purpose multiuser operating system that supports

AlphaGeneration computers in both production and development environments. OpenVMS software supports industry standards, facilitating application portability and interoperability.

OpenVMS provides symmetric multiprocessing (SMP) support for

AlphaServer multiprocessing systems.

operating system mode

The state in which the system console terminal is under the control of the operating system. Also called program mode.

operator control panel

The panel located behind the front door of the system, which contains the power-up/diagnostic display, DC On/Off button, Halt button, and Reset button.

PALcode

Alpha Privileged Architecture Library code, written to support

Alpha processors. PALcode implements architecturally defined behavior.

PCI

Peripheral Component Interconnect. An industry-standard expansion I/O bus that is the preferred bus for high-performance

I/O options. Available in a 32-bit and a 64-bit version.

portability

The degree to which a software application can be easily moved from one computing environment to another.

porting

Adapting a given body of code so that it will provide equivalent functions in a computing environment that differs from the original implementation environment.

power-down

The sequence of steps that stops the flow of electricity to a system or its components.

power-up

The sequence of events that starts the flow of electrical current to a system or its components.

primary cache

The cache memory that is the fastest and closest to the processor.

processor module

Module that contains the CPU chip.

program mode

The state in which the system console terminal is under the control of a program other than the console program.

RAID

Redundant array of inexpensive disks. A technique that organizes disk data to improve performance and reliability.

RAID has three attributes:

• It is a set of physical disks viewed by the user as a single logical device.

• The user’s data is distributed across the physical set of drives in a defined manner.

• Redundant disk capacity is added so that the user’s data can be recovered even if a drive fails.

Glossary–13

Glossary–14

RAID Configuration Utility (RCU)

A configuration utility supplied on diskette that is used to set up the disk drives and logical units on systems that have the

StorageWorks RAID Array 200 Subsystem.

redundant

Describes duplicate or extra computing components that protect a computing system from failure.

reliability

The probability a device or system will not fail to perform its intended functions during a specified time.

responder

In any particular bus transaction, memory, CPU, or I/O that accepts or supplies data in response to a command/address from the system bus commander.

RISC

Reduced instruction set computer. A processor with an instruction set that is reduced in complexity.

ROM-based diagnostics

Diagnostic programs resident in read-only memory.

script

A data structure that defines a group of commands to be executed. Similar to an OpenVMS command file.

SCSI

Small Computer System Interface. An ANSI-standard interface for connecting disks and other peripheral devices to computer systems. Some devices are supported under the

SCSI-1 specification; others are supported under the SCSI-2 specification.

self-test

A test that is invoked automatically when the system powers up.

serial control bus

A two-conductor serial interconnect that is independent of the system bus. This bus links the processor modules, the I/O, the memory, the power subsystem, and the operator control panel.

serial ROM

In the context of the CPU module, ROM read by the DECchip microprocessor after reset that contains low-level diagnostic and initialization routines.

SIMM

Single in-line memory module.

SMP

Symmetric multiprocessing. A processing configuration in which multiple processors in a system operate as equals, dividing and sharing the workload.

SRM

User interface to console firmware for operating systems that expect firmware compliance with the Alpha System Reference

Manual (SRM).

standard I/O module

Module that provides a standard set of I/O functions on some

AlphaServer models. It resides in a dedicated slot in the EISA bus card cage.

storage array

A group of mass storage devices, frequently configured as one logical disk.

StorageWorks

Digital’s modular storage subsystem (MSS), which is the core technology of the Alpha SCSI-2 mass storage solution. Consists of a family of low-cost mass storage products that can be configured to meet current and future storage needs.

superpipelined

Describes a pipelined processor that has a larger number of pipe stages and more complex scheduling and control.

Glossary–15

Glossary–16 superscalar

Describes a processor that issues multiple independent instructions per clock cycle.

symmetric multiprocessing (SMP)

A processing configuration in which multiple processors in a system operate as equals, dividing and sharing the workload.

symptom-directed diagnostics (SDDs)

An approach to diagnosing computer system problems whereby error data logged by the operating system is analyzed to capture information about the problem.

system backplane

One of two backplanes on the AlphaServer 2000 system. The system backplane supports up to two CPU modules, up to two memory modules, and an expansion I/O module.

system bus

The hardware structure that interconnects the CPUs and memory modules. Data processed by the CPU is transferred throughout the system via the system bus.

system disk

The device on which the operating system resides.

TCP/IP

Transmission Control Protocol/Internet Protocol. A set of software communications protocols widely used in UNIX operating environments. TCP delivers data over a connection between applications on different computers on a network; IP controls how packets (units of data) are transferred between computers on a network.

test-directed diagnostics (TDDs)

An approach to diagnosing computer system problems whereby error data logged by diagnostic programs resident in read-only memory (RBDs) is analyzed to capture information about the problem.

thickwire

One-half inch, 50-Ohm coaxial cable that interconnects the components in many IEEE standard 802.3-compliant Ethernet networks.

ThinWire

Ethernet cabling and technology used for local distribution of data communications. ThinWire cabling is thinner than thickwire cabling.

Token Ring

A network that uses tokens to pass data sequentially. Each node on the network passes the token on to the node next to it.

twisted pair

A cable made by twisting together two insulated conductors that have no common covering.

uninterruptible power supply (UPS)

A battery-backup option that maintains AC power to a computer system if a power failure occurs.

warm bootstrap

A subset of the cold bootstrap operation. On AlphaGeneration systems, during a warm bootstrap, the console does not load

PALcode, size memory, or initialize environment variables.

wide area network (WAN)

A high-speed network that connects a server to a distant host computer, PC, or other server, or that connects numerous computers in numerous distant locations.

Windows NT

‘‘New technology’’ operating system owned by Microsoft, Inc.

The AlphaServer systems currently support the Windows NT,

OpenVMS, and DEC OSF/1 operating systems.

write back

A cache management technique in which data from a write operation to cache is written into main memory only when the data in cache must be overwritten.

Glossary–17

Glossary–18 write-enabled

Indicates a device onto which data can be written.

write-protected

Indicates a device onto which data cannot be written.

write through

A cache management technique in which data from a write operation is copied to both cache and main memory.

Index

A

Accessories, list of, 2–14

Adapter

Fast SCSI-2, 3–39

ARC firmware default environment variables, 3–9

ARC interface switching to, 1–22

Architecture system, 1–4

Autoboot

DEC OSF/1, 1–27

OpenVMS, 1–27

Windows NT, 1–27

B

Boot menu (ARC), 1–22

Boot problems, troubleshooting, 4–26

Boot procedure, 1–25 booting DEC OSF/1 automatically, 1–27 booting OpenVMS automatically, 1–27 for OpenVMS, 1–25 for OSF/1, 1–25 for Windows NT, 1–26

Bus system, 3–18

Bus configurations removable-media, 3–41

Buses, displaying (SRM), 3–13

C

Caddy

See Compact disc caddy

Card cage accessing, 2–7

CD

See Compact disc drive, 1–40

COM2 and parallel port loopback tests, 4–18

Commands to examine system configuration, 3–5

Compact disc caddy loading a disc into, 1–46

Compact disc drive components, 1–40, 1–42 inserting a disc into, 1–44, 1–46 operating, 1–40 removing a disc from, 1–45, 1–46

Configuration

See also ECU console port, 1–18

EISA boards, 3–33

EISA/ISA boards, 3–35 of environment variables, 3–17 removable-media bus, 3–40

Configuration file (CFG), EISA and ISA,

3–29

Configuration rules for StorageWorks shelves, 3–42 removable-media, 3–40

Index–1

Configuration, verifying for DEC OSF/1, 3–5 for OpenVMS, 3–5 for Windows NT, 3–5

Console commands set bootdef_dev, 3–17 set boot_osflags, 3–17 set envar, 3–17 show auto_action, 3–17 show config, 3–11 show device, 3–13 show envar, 3–17 show fru, 4–16 show memory, 3–16 test, 4–18

Console device, connecting, 1–34 console environment variable, 1–18

Console firmware updating, xvi

Console mode defined, 1–30 invoking, 1–30 invoking remotely, 1–30 invoking with Halt button, 1–30 problems, troubleshooting, 4–11, 4–15 prompt, 1–30 troubleshooting, 4–15

Console output, 1–18

Console port configurations, 1–18

Console prompt, 1–30

SRM console, 1–21

Console terminal, 1–30

Consoles switching between ARC and SRM, 1–22

Controllers, displaying (SRM), 3–13

CPU failover, 4–12

CPU module installation requirements, 3–20 location, 3–18 possible configurations, 3–20

Customer support, 4–6, 4–7

D

DAT tape drive operating, 1–48

DC On/Off button, 1–14, 2–3

Device naming convention, 3–13

Devices displaying (SRM), 3–13 third-party, 3–3

Diagnostic procedures

See Troubleshooting

Dimensions system, 1–6

Disk drives mounting, 1–38

Diskette drive location, 1–39

Door, front removal, 2–5

Dual-bus configuration with internal StorageWorks, 3–42

E

ECU actions after exiting, 3–32 configuration diskette, 3–29 defined, 3–29 invoking console firmware, 3–29 procedure for running, 3–29 starting, 3–29

EISA boards configuring, 3–33 identifying, 3–28

EISA bus, 1–3 features of, 3–24 location, 3–18 troubleshooting, 4–23

EISA Configuration Utility

See ECU

EISA/ISA boards configuring, 3–35

Index–2

Enclosure, 1–4

Environment variables configuring, 3–17 resetting, 1–23 setting and examining, 3–17

Environmental requirements, 1–6

Errors commands to report, 4–16

Ethernet external loopback, 4–18

Ethernet connections, 1–33

External I/O, 3–22 location, 3–18

F

Failover, 4–12

Fast SCSI-2 adapter, 3–39

Fixed-disk drives installing in StorageWorks, 3–44

Fixed-media storage problems, 4–20

FRUs commands to report errors, 4–16

H

Halt button invoking console mode with, 2–3

Hangs using Reset button to recover from, 2–4

Hard-disk drives installing in StorageWorks, 3–44 location, 2–7

Hardware configuration display, ARC, 3–6

I

I/O bus, EISA features, 3–24

I/O module, 3–23

Indicators, system

DC On/Off, 2–2

Halt, 2–3

Installation, xiv

Internal SCSI bus, 3–39

Internal StorageWorks dual-bus configuration, 3–42 shelf, 3–40

ISA boards, identifying, 3–28

ISA bus defined, 3–26

ISA/EISA boards configuring, 3–35

K

Keys, system, 1–12

L

Loopback tests

COM2 and parallel ports, 4–18

M

Mass storage actions before operating devices, 1–38 compartments, location, 1–38 described, 3–39 problems, troubleshooting, 4–20, 4–22 supported devices, 1–39

Mass storage devices actions before operating, 1–38 mounting, 1–38 supported, 1–39

Memory module, 3–22 displaying information for (SRM), 3–16 location, 3–18

Modem, connecting, 1–34

Modules accessing, 2–13

CPU, 3–20

EISA, 3–24 expansion I/O, 3–22

ISA, 3–26 memory, 3–22

PCI, 3–37

Index–3

N

Networks connecting to, 1–32

Ethernet, 1–32

O

OCP

See Operator control panel

Operating system boot failures, reporting, 4–28 booting, 1–25

OpenVMS booting, 1–25

OSF/1 booting, 1–25 preboot tasks, 1–23 problems, troubleshooting, 4–28 supported, 1–3, 1–25

Windows NT booting, 1–26

Operating systems supported, 1–3

Operator control panel

DC On/Off button, 2–2 display, interpreting, 4–12

Halt button, 2–2, 2–3 power-up/diagnostic display, 2–2

Reset button, 2–4

Options adding, 3–2 configuring with ECU, 3–29 from non-Digital vendors, 3–2 installing, 3–2 supported, 3–4 system bus, 3–18

P

Panels left, 2–7 removal, 2–5 right, 2–7

PCI, 1–4

PCI bus, 1–3 defined, 3–37 location, 2–13, 3–18 troubleshooting, 4–25

Peripheral devices, connecting, 1–34

Phone numbers customer support, 4–7

Power cords order numbers, 1–9

Power problems troubleshooting, 4–10

Power requirements, 1–6, 1–8

Power supplies, 1–8

Power supply accessing, 2–7 configurations, 3–47 redundant, configuring, 3–47

Power supply configurations, 3–49

Power-down procedure, 1–27 for extended power-down, 1–29 turning off DC power, 1–28

Power-up display interpreting, 4–12

Power-up procedure, 1–16

Power-up sequence

EISA bus failures, 4–23 mass storage failures, 4–20

PCI failures, 4–25

Power-up/diagnostic display, 1–19, 2–2

Printer, connecting, 1–34

Problems

See also Troubleshooting determining type, 4–5 identifying, 4–1, 4–4 reporting, 4–6

Q

QIC tape drive operating, 1–52

Index–4

R

RAID, 1–3

RAID subsystem guidelines, 3–46 problems with, 4–29

Reboot procedure, 1–25

Removable media bus configuring, 3–40

Removable media device area location, 1–39

Removable-media storage problems, 4–22

Removable-media compartments configuration rules, 3–40

Removable-media devices

SCSI support for, 3–39

Reset button for recovering from hangs, 2–4

S

SCSI bus internal, 3–39

Serial ports, 1–18

Service, telephone numbers, 4–7 show command (SRM), 3–17 show configuration command (SRM), 3–11 show device command (SRM), 3–13 show fru command (SRM), 4–16 show memory command (SRM), 3–16

Site preparation, xiv environmental requirements, 1–6 power requirements, 1–6

Specifications, environmental, 1–7

SRM interface switching to, 1–22

Standard I/O module, 3–23

Startup procedure booting an operating system, 1–25 checking power-up display, 1–19 checking system settings, 1–14 overview, 1–13 powering up, 1–16

Startup procedure (cont’d) preboot tasks, 1–23

Storage devices location, 1–38 mounting, 1–38 operating, 1–38

StorageWorks fixed disks, installing, 3–44 fixed disks, swapping, 3–44

StorageWorks shelf location, 1–39 optional, location, 1–39

StorageWorks shelf, internal dual-bus configuration, 3–42

Supported options, 3–4

SWXCR controller guidelines, 3–46

System configuration, verifying, 3–5 dimensions, 1–6 moving, 1–10

System architecture, 1–4

System bus accessing modules on, 2–13, 3–18 location, 2–13, 3–18

System components front, 2–8 front, list of, 2–9 rear, 2–10 rear, list of, 2–11

System Configuration Diskette, 3–29

System configuration, verifying for DEC OSF/1, 3–5 for OpenVMS, 3–5 for Windows NT, 3–5

System features cabinet system, 1–3 overview, 1–3 pedestal system, 1–3

System operation boot, 1–25 reboot, 1–25

System settings powered down system, 1–14

Index–5

System software booting, 1–25

System startup screen, 1–19

SYSTEMCFG volume label, 3–29

T

Tape drive

See QIC tape drive; DAT tape drive

Tape drives mounting, 1–38

Terminals, connecting, 1–36 test command (SRM), 4–18

Troubleshooting, 4–1 boot problems, 4–26 console, 4–11 console reported problems, 4–15

EISA problems, 4–23 errors reported by operating system,

4–28 for self-maintenance customers, 4–2 interpreting the operator control panel power-up display, 4–12 mass storage problems, 4–20 operating system problems, 4–28

PCI problems, 4–25 power problems, 4–10 problem reference, 4–5 problem worksheet, 4–9 problems getting to console mode, 4–11 problems reported by the console, 4–15

RAID device problems, 4–29 reporting problems, 4–6 task overview, 4–4 test command, 4–2

U

Upgrades planning, 3–2

V

VGA monitor, connecting, 1–36

VT terminal, connecting, 1–36

Index–6

How to Order Additional Documentation

Technical Support

If you need help deciding which documentation best meets your needs, call 800-DIGITAL

(800-344-4825) and press 2 for technical assistance.

Electronic Orders

If you wish to place an order through your account at the Electronic Store, dial

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Telephone and Direct Mail Orders

From

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Call

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Phone: 800-DIGITAL

(800-344-4825)

Fax: (603) 884-5597

Phone: (809) 781-0505

Fax: (809) 749-8377

Write

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Puerto Rico

Canada

International

Internal Orders

(for software documentation)

Internal Orders

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Phone: 800-267-6215

Fax: (613) 592-1946

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DTN: 264-3030

(603) 884-3030

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Call to request an Internal Software Order Form (EN–01740–07).

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