MicroVAX 3100 Model 90 Customer Technical Information

MicroVAX 3100 Model 90 Customer Technical Information
MicroVAX 3100
Model 90
Customer Technical Information
Order Number: EK–A0606–TM. B01
December 1993
This manual describes technical information about the MicroVAX 3100
Model 90 system. It also gives a list of the console commands and
specifications for the system unit and internal SCSI devices.
Digital Equipment Corporation
Maynard, Massachusetts
First printing: September 1992
Revised: December 1993
Digital Equipment Corporation makes no representations that the use of its products in the
manner described in this publication will not infringe on existing or future patent rights, nor do
the descriptions contained in this publication imply the granting of licenses to make, use, or sell
equipment or software in accordance with the description.
Possession, use, or copying of the software described in this publication is authorized only
pursuant to a valid written license from Digital or an authorized sublicensor.
© Digital Equipment Corporation 1992, 1993. All Rights Reserved.
The postpaid Reader’s Comments forms at the end of this document request your critical
evaluation to assist in preparing future documentation.
The following are trademarks of Digital Equipment Corporation: MicroVAX, OpenVMS, RX,
ThinWire, VAX, VAX DOCUMENT, VAXcluster, VT, and the DIGITAL logo.
All other trademarks and registered tradmarks are the property of their respective holders.
S2451
This document was prepared using VAX DOCUMENT Version 2.1.
Contents
Preface . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
vii
1 System Description
1.1
1.2
1.3
1.4
Model 90 System . . . . . . . . . . .
Internal Mass Storage Devices .
External Mass Storage Devices
Communications Devices . . . . .
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1–1
1–3
1–4
1–4
2 Console Security Feature and System Defaults
2.1
2.2
2.2.1
2.2.2
2.2.3
2.2.4
2.2.5
2.2.6
2.3
2.4
Returning to Console Mode . . . . . . . . . . . .
Console Security Feature . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Setting the Security Password . . . . . . .
Enabling the Console Security Feature
Logging in to Privileged Console Mode
Changing the Security Password . . . . .
Disabling the Console Security Feature
Exiting from Privileged Console Mode .
Setting the Default Boot Device . . . . . . . . .
Setting the Default Recovery Action . . . . .
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2–1
2–3
2–3
2–4
2–5
2–5
2–7
2–7
2–7
2–8
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3–1
3–3
3–3
3–4
3–5
3–6
3–6
3–8
3–9
3 Console Commands
3.1
3.2
3.3
3.4
3.5
3.6
3.7
3.8
3.9
BOOT . . . . .
CONTINUE
DEPOSIT . .
EXAMINE .
FIND . . . . .
HALT . . . . .
HELP . . . . .
INITIALIZE
LOGIN . . . .
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iii
3.10
3.11
3.12
3.13
3.14
3.15
3.16
3.17
3.18
3.19
3.19.1
3.20
MOVE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
NEXT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
REPEAT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
SEARCH . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
SET . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
SHOW . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
START . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
TEST . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
UNJAM . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
X—Binary Load and Unload . . . . . . . .
Controlling the Console Serial Line
! (Comment) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
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3–9
3–11
3–12
3–13
3–15
3–17
3–19
3–20
3–21
3–21
3–23
3–23
System Unit Specifications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Internal SCSI Device Specifications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
4–1
4–5
4 Hardware Specifications
4.1
4.2
A DSW42-AA Synchronous Communications Option
Installation Information for the United Kingdom
A.1
A.2
A.3
A.4
A.5
A.6
A.7
A.8
Service Categories . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Host Power Rating . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Module Isolation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Safety Warnings for UK Installations Only . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Cable Approval . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Supported Cables . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Synchronous Option Port Pin Specifications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Equipment Between the Approved Module and a Digital Circuit
(PTT) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
A–2
A–2
A–3
A–4
A–5
A–5
A–6
Model 90 System Halt Button . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Safety Warning Label . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2–2
A–5
A–9
Index
Figures
2–1
A–1
iv
Tables
1–1
1–2
1–3
1–4
2–1
2–2
4–1
4–2
4–3
4–4
4–5
4–6
4–7
4–8
4–9
4–10
4–11
4–12
4–13
A–1
A–2
A–3
A–4
A–5
A–6
Supported Internal Mass Storage Devices . . . . . . . . . . . .
Supported Asynchronous Devices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Supported Synchronous Device . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Synchronous Communications Option Cable Part
Numbers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Alternative Default Boot Devices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Default Recovery Actions and Associated Values . . . . . . .
System Specifications: Model 90 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Acoustic Levels . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
System Unit Metrics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
System Operating Conditions and Nonoperating
Conditions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
RZ23L, RZ24, and RZ24L Hard Disk Drive Specifications
RZ25, RZ26 and RZ26L Hard Disk Drive Specifications .
RZ25L and RZ28 Hard Disk Drive Specifications . . . . . . .
TZ30 Tape Drive Specifications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
TZK10 QIC Tape Drive Specifications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
TZK11 QIC Tape Drive Specifications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
TLZ06 Cassette Tape Drive Specifications . . . . . . . . . . . .
RX26 Diskette Drive Specifications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
RRD42 Compact Disc Drive Specifications . . . . . . . . . . . .
BABT Approved Service Specifications . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Module Power . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Clearance and Creepage Distances . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Cables Supported by the Approved Module . . . . . . . . . . .
Synchronous Option Port Pin Specifications
(EIA-232/V.24) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Synchronous Option Port Pin Specifications . . . . . . . . . .
...
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1–3
1–4
1–4
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1–5
2–8
2–8
4–2
4–3
4–3
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4–4
4–5
4–6
4–8
4–9
4–10
4–10
4–11
4–11
4–12
A–2
A–3
A–3
A–5
...
...
A–6
A–7
v
Preface
This manual describes technical information about the MicroVAX™ 3100
Model 90 system. It also gives a list of the console commands and specifications
for the system unit and internal SCSI devices.
Audience
This manual is intended for experienced users, such as system programmers or
system managers.
Structure of This Manual
This manual is divided into four chapters, an appendix, and an index:
•
Chapter 1 describes technical information about the Model 90 system.
•
Chapter 2 describes the console security feature and how to set system
defaults.
•
Chapter 3 describes the console commands.
•
Chapter 4 gives specifications for the system unit and for internal SCSI
devices.
•
Appendix A gives information that is specific to the United Kingdom on
installing the DSW42-AA synchronous communications option.
Additional Information
See the MicroVAX 3100 Model 90 Operator Information manual for the list of
associated and related documents.
vii
Conventions
The following conventions are used in this manual:
viii
Convention
Description
MONOSPACE
Text displayed on the screen is shown in monospace type.
boldface type
Boldface type in examples indicates user input. Boldface type in text
indicates the first instance of terms defined in the text.
italic type
Italic type emphasizes important information, indicates variables,
and indicates complete titles of manuals.
nn nnn.nnn nn
A space character separates digits in numerals with 5 or more digits.
For example, 10 000 equals ten thousand.
n.nn
A period in numerals signals the decimal point indicator. For
example, 1.75 equals one and three-fourths.
UPPERCASE
Words in uppercase indicate a command.
lowercase
In format descriptions, words in lowercase indicate parameters or
arguments to be specified by the user.
|
In command syntax descriptions, a vertical bar | separates similar
options, one of which you can choose.
Note
A note contains information of special importance to the reader.
Ctrl/x
Ctrl/x indicates that you hold down the Ctrl key while you press
another key or mouse button (indicated here by x).
x
A lowercase italic x indicates the generic use of a letter. For
example, xxx indicates any combination of three alphabetic
characters.
n
A lowercase italic n indicates the generic use of a number. For
example, 19nn indicates a 4-digit number in which the last 2 digits
are unknown.
{}
In format descriptions, braces indicate required elements. You must
choose one of the elements.
[]
In format descriptions, brackets indicate optional elements. You can
choose none, one, or all of the options.
1
System Description
This chapter gives a technical description of the MicroVAX 3100 Model 90. It
includes information on the following:
•
Model 90 system
•
Internal mass storage devices
•
Communications devices
1.1 Model 90 System
The Model 90 system uses the KA50 CPU module. The KA50 CPU module is
the primary component in the Model 90 system, and contains the following
components:
•
NVAX processor chip
•
DC244 NVAX memory controller (NMC) memory management chip
•
DC243 NVAX CP bus adapter (NCA) and CEAC input/output (I/O) control
chip
•
SCSI controller and SQWF buffer chip
•
Support for a second SCSI adapter
•
Time-of-year (TOY) clock SSC chip
•
DC541 SGEC chip Ethernet controller for standard or ThinWire Ethernet
•
DC7085 (QUART) serial line controller (4 serial lines, one with modem
control)
•
Support for up to 128M bytes of memory
•
Support for optional asynchronous communications devices, which provide
either 8 or 16 additional DEC423 ports, or 8 additional asynchronous
modem control ports
System Description 1–1
•
Support for optional synchronous communications devices, which provide
two synchronous ports
Model 90 VAX Architecture Support
The KA50 CPU module supports the following VAX data types:
•
byte, word, longword, quadword
•
character string
•
variable-length bit field
•
absolute queues
•
self-relative queues
•
f_floating point, d_floating point, and g_floating point
The operating system uses software emulation to support other VAX data
types.
The KA50 CPU module supports the following VAX instructions:
•
integer, arithmetic and logical
•
address
•
variable-length bit field
•
control
•
procedure call
•
miscellaneous
•
queue
•
character string instructions:
•
MOVC3/MOVC5
•
CMPC3/CMPC5
•
LOCC
•
SCANC
•
SKPC
•
SPANC
•
Operating system support
•
f_floating point, d_floating point, and g_floating point
1–2 System Description
The NVAX processor chip provides special microcode assistance to aid the
macrocode emulation of the following instruction groups:
•
Character string (other than those mentioned previously)
•
Decimal string
•
CRC
•
EDITPC
The operating system uses software emulation to support other VAX
instructions.
1.2 Internal Mass Storage Devices
The Model 90 system supports a maximum of five internal SCSI devices, only
two of which can be removable media devices. One of the RZ-series disks
contains factory installed software (FIS). Chapter 4 gives the specifications for
each internal SCSI device.
Table 1–1 shows the internal mass storage devices that are supported by the
Model 90 system.
Table 1–1 Supported Internal Mass Storage Devices
Device
Size (inches)
Capacity (bytes)
Description
RZ23L
3.5
121M
Hard disk drive
RZ24
3.5
209M
Hard disk drive
RZ24L
3.5
245M
Hard disk drive
RZ25
3.5
426M
Hard disk drive
RZ25L
3.5
635M
Hard disk drive
RZ26
3.5
1.05G
Hard disk drive
RZ26L
3.5
1.05G
Hard disk drive
RZ28
3.5
2.1G
Hard disk drive
TZ30
5.25
95M
Tape drive
TZK10
5.25
320M or 525M
Tape drive
TZK11
5.25
2G or 2.5G
Tape drive
TLZ06
5.25
Up to 4.0G
Tape drive
RX™26
3.5
1.44M or 2.88M
Diskette drive
RRD42
5.25
600M
CD–ROM drive
System Description 1–3
1.3 External Mass Storage Devices
Each SCSI bus on the Model 90 system supports a total of seven mass storage
devices, five of which may be installed internal to the system box. The other
two may be installed in an expansion box.
The KZDDA SCSI adapter allows the addition of a second SCSI bus. Seven
SCSI devices may be installed in an expander box attached to the second
bus, providing a maximum of 14 mass storage devices. See your Digital Sales
Representitive for a list of supported external devices.
1.4 Communications Devices
The Model 90 system supports asynchronous and synchronous communications
devices.
Asynchronous Communications Devices Table 1–2 lists the asynchronous
devices supported by the Model 90 system.
Table 1–2 Supported Asynchronous Devices
Device
Description
DHW42-AA
Eight-line DEC423 asynchronous option
DHW42-BA
Sixteen-line DEC423 asynchronous option
DHW42-CA
Eight-line EIA-232 asynchronous option with modem control
DHW42-UP
Eight-line to 16-line upgrade of the DEC423 asynchronous
option
Synchronous Communications Devices Table 1–3 lists the synchronous
device supported by the Model 90 system.
Table 1–3 Supported Synchronous Device
Device
Description
DSW42-AA
Two-line EIA-232/V.24 synchronous module
If you order a different synchronous option cable, you can use different
interface standards with the synchronous communications module. Table 1–4
lists each standard and the part number of the corresponding option cable.
1–4 System Description
Table 1–4 Synchronous Communications Option Cable Part Numbers
Standard
Option Cable Part Number
EIA-232/V.24
BC19D-02 (supplied with option)
EIA-423/V.10
BC19E-02
EIA-422/V.11
BC19B-02
System Description 1–5
2
Console Security Feature and System
Defaults
This chapter describes how to set system defaults and how to use the console
security feature. It includes information on the following:
•
Returning to console mode
•
Console security feature
•
Setting the default boot device
•
Setting the default recovery action
2.1 Returning to Console Mode
To use the procedures described in this chapter, the system must be in console
mode. To return to console mode, press the halt button on the back of the
system unit (see Figure 2–1). The system responds with the console prompt
(>>>) when it is in console mode.
Alternatively, if the break enable switch is in the up position (see Figure 2–1),
press the break key on the keyboard to return to console mode. When the
system is shipped, the break enable switch is in the down position.
Console Security Feature and System Defaults 2–1
Figure 2–1 Model 90 System Halt Button
1
3
2
1
2
MLO-012029
!
"
Halt Button
Break Enable Switch — Disable (default) Position Shown
2–2 Console Security Feature and System Defaults
2.2 Console Security Feature
The console security feature allows you to disable most of the system console
commands. When the security password is set, there are two types of users:
privileged users and unprivileged users. Privileged users know the security
password and can use the full range of console commands; unprivileged users
can use only the following commands:
•
LOGIN—Use this command with the security password to become a
privileged user.
•
BOOT—Use this command without parameters to boot the operating
system.
•
CONTINUE—Use this command to return to the operating system after
pressing the halt button.
Chapter 3 describes the console commands. The following subsections describe
how to do the following:
•
Set the security password
•
Enable the console security feature
•
Log in to privileged console mode
•
Change the security password
•
Disable the security password
•
Exit from privileged console mode
2.2.1 Setting the Security Password
The console security feature is disabled when you receive the system. To set
the security password on the system, follow these steps:
1. Enter the following command at the console prompt (>>>):
>>> SET PSWD
The system responds with the following prompt:
PSWD1 :
Note
•
The security password must be a string of exactly 16
hexadecimal characters (0 to 9 and A to F).
Console Security Feature and System Defaults 2–3
•
Write down the security password and store it in a safe place.
If you forget the security password, you must call your Digital
Services representative to disable the console security feature.
•
If the recall buffer is enabled when you use the SET PSWD
command, you delete all the commands stored in the buffer.
2. Enter a security password and press Return.
The system does not display the security password as you type it. The
system responds with the following prompt:
PSWD2 :
3. Verify the security password by entering it a second time.
The system does not display the security password as you type it. If you
enter the same security password at each prompt, the system saves the
security password in nonvolatile memory. The system does not lose the
security password when you turn off the system.
If the second security password does not match the first, the system
responds with the following error message:
?63 ILLEGAL PASSWORD
>>>
4. Repeat steps 1 to 3 if you see an error message.
2.2.2 Enabling the Console Security Feature
When you have set the security password, you must enable the console security
feature. To enable the console security feature, enter the following command at
the console prompt:
>>> SET PSE 1
Enter the following command to check whether you have enabled the console
security feature:
>>> SHOW PSE
If you have enabled the console security feature, the system displays the
following message:
Enabled
2–4 Console Security Feature and System Defaults
2.2.3 Logging in to Privileged Console Mode
When the console security feature is enabled, you must enter the security
password to log in to privileged console mode. In privileged console mode you
can use the full range of console commands. To log in to privileged console
mode, follow these steps:
Note
You must set the security password before following these steps (see
Section 2.2.1).
1. Enter the following command:
>>> LOGIN
The system responds with the following prompt:
Password:
2. Enter the security password and press Return.
The system does not display the security password as you type it. If you
enter the correct security password, the system returns you to the console
prompt and you become a privileged user. You can now use the full range
of console commands.
If you enter an incorrect security password, the system responds with the
following error message:
?63 ILLEGAL PASSWORD
>>>
3. Repeat steps 1 and 2 if an error message is displayed.
2.2.4 Changing the Security Password
You must be a privileged user to change the security password. To change the
security password, follow these steps:
1. Follow the procedure in Section 2.2.3 using the current security password
to log in to the system.
2. Enter the following command:
>>> SET PSWD
Console Security Feature and System Defaults 2–5
The system responds with the following prompt:
PSWD1 :
Note
•
The security password must be a string of exactly 16
hexadecimal characters (0 to 9 and A to F).
•
Write down the security password and store it in a safe place.
If you forget the security password, you must call your Digital
Services representative to disable the console security feature.
•
If the recall buffer is enabled when you use the SET PSWD
command, you delete all the commands stored in the buffer.
3. Enter a new security password and press Return.
The system does not display the security password as you type it. The
system then responds with the following prompt:
PSWD2 :
4. Verify the new security password by entering it a second time.
The system does not display the new security password as you type it. If
you enter the same new security password a second time, the system saves
the new security password in nonvolatile memory. The system does not
lose the new security password when you turn off the system.
If you incorrectly enter the new security password a second time, the
system responds with the following error message:
?63 ILLEGAL PASSWORD
>>>
5. Repeat steps 1 to 5 if an error message is displayed.
2–6 Console Security Feature and System Defaults
2.2.5 Disabling the Console Security Feature
When you disable the console security feature, all users can use the full range
of console commands. To disable the console security feature, follow these
steps:
1. Follow the procedure in Section 2.2.3 using the current security password
to log in to the system.
2. Enter the following command:
>>> SET PSE 0
Enter the following command to check whether you have disabled the console
security feature:
>>> SHOW PSE
If you have disabled the console security feature, the system displays the
following message:
Disabled
2.2.6 Exiting from Privileged Console Mode
When you exit from privileged console mode, privileged users must enter the
LOGIN command with the correct password before they can use the full range
of console commands. To exit from privileged console mode, enter one of the
following commands:
•
BOOT (with any supplied parameters)
•
CONTINUE
•
HALT
•
START
Chapter 3 describes each of these commands.
2.3 Setting the Default Boot Device
When the system is shipped, it is set to boot from the system disk, DKA300.
This RZ-series disk holds the factory installed software (FIS).
You can set the system to boot from a different default boot device that holds
the operating system software. Table 2–1 shows the alternative default boot
devices and their associated OpenVMS™ device names.
Console Security Feature and System Defaults 2–7
Table 2–1 Alternative Default Boot Devices
Device
OpenVMS Device
Name
Hard disk (SCSI ID 0 to 7)
DKxn001;2
Network (the system boots from a remote system)
EZA0
Tape drive (SCSI ID 0 to 7)
MKnx001;2
Compact disc (SCSI ID 0 to 7)
DKxn001;2
1x
represents either A or B, determined by the SCSI port used by the device.
2n
represents the SCSI ID of that device.
To set an alternative default boot device, enter the SET BOOT command using
the OpenVMS device name of the alternative default boot device. For example,
to set the system to boot over the network, enter the following command:
>>> SET BOOT EZA0
2.4 Setting the Default Recovery Action
There are five default recovery actions. You can change the default recovery
action by entering the SET HALT command and the value or keyword
associated with the action you want to set. Table 2–2 shows the five default
recovery actions and their associated values. When the system is shipped, the
default recovery action is set to halt.
Table 2–2 Default Recovery Actions and Associated Values
Recovery Action
Keyword
Associated
Value
Result
DEFAULT
RESTART
0
The default recovery action is HALT.
1
The system tries to restart the operating system.
If it fails to restart the operating system, it halts.
BOOT
2
The system tries to boot. If it fails to boot, it
halts.
HALT
3
The system halts and displays the console
prompt.
RESTART_REBOOT
4
The system tries to restart the operating system.
If it fails to restart the operating system, it tries
to boot. If it fails to boot, it halts.
2–8 Console Security Feature and System Defaults
To set an alternative default recovery action, enter the SET HALT command
using the value or keyword associated with the recovery action you want to set.
For example, to set the system to halt, enter one of the following commands:
>>> SET HALT 3
>>> SET HALT HALT
Console Security Feature and System Defaults 2–9
3
Console Commands
This chapter describes the console commands that you can enter when the
system is in console mode. The system displays the console prompt (>>>) when
it is in console mode. If the system is running the operating system software,
see Chapter 2 for information on returning the system to console mode.
If the console security feature is enabled and a security password is set, you
must log in to privileged console mode before using most of these commands.
See Chapter 2 for information on the console security feature.
The following sections describe all the console commands, give the command
format, and describe the significance of each parameter. The VAX Software
Handbook contains a detailed description of each command and its parameters
and qualifiers.
3.1 BOOT
The BOOT command initializes the processor and executes the VMB (virtual
memory block) program. The VMB program tries to boot the operating system
from the specified device or list of devices, or from the default boot device if
none is specified. The console qualifies the bootstrap operation by passing a
boot flags bitmap to the VMB program in R5.
Format:
BOOT [qualifier-list] [{boot_device},{boot_device},...]
If you do not enter either the qualifier or the device name, the default value is
used. Explicitly stating the boot flags or the boot device overrides, but does not
permanently change, the corresponding default value.
When specifying a list of boot devices (up to 32 characters, with devices
separated by commas and no spaces), the system checks the devices in the
order specified and boots from the first one that contains bootable software.
Console Commands 3–1
Note
If you include the Ethernet device, EZA0, in a string of boot devices,
it must be placed only as the last device of the string. The system
continuously tries to boot from EZA0.
Set the default boot device and boot flags using the SET BOOT and SET
BFLAG commands. If you do not set a default boot device, the processor times
out after 30 seconds and continuously tries to boot from the Ethernet device,
EZA0. To disable the autoboot feature, use three periods in place of the device
name for the SET BOOT command (SET BOOT . . . ).
Qualifiers:
Command specific:
/R5:{boot_flags}
A 32-bit hexadecimal value passed to the VMB program in R5.
The console does not interpret this value. Use the SET BFLAG
command to specify a default boot flags longword. Use the SHOW
BFLAG command to display the longword.
/{boot_flags}
Same as /R5:{boot_flags}
[device_name]
A character string of up to 17 characters. Longer strings cause
a VAL TOO BIG error message. When specifying a list of boot
devices, separate the device names using commas. Do not use
spaces. The console checks the length of the device name, but
does not interpret or validate it. The console converts the string
to uppercase, then passes the VMB program a string containing
the device name in R0. Use the SET BOOT command to specify
a default boot device or list of devices. Use the SHOW BOOT
command to display the default boot device. The factory default
device is the Ethernet device, EZA0. Table 2–1 lists the boot
devices supported by the Model 90 system.
Examples:
>>>SHOW BOOT
DKA300
>>>SHOW BFLAG
00000000
>>>B
!Boot using default boot flags and device.
(BOOT/R5:0 DKA300)
2..
-DKA300
3–2 Console Commands
3.2 CONTINUE
The CONTINUE command causes the processor to begin instruction execution
at the address currently contained in the program counter (PC). This address
is the address stored in the PC when the system enters console mode or the
address that the user specifies using the DEPOSIT command. The CONTINUE
command does not perform a processor initialization.
Format:
CONTINUE
Example:
>>>CONTINUE
$
!OpenVMS DCL prompt
3.3 DEPOSIT
The DEPOSIT command deposits data into the address specified. If you do not
specify an address space or data size qualifier, the console uses the last address
space and data size used in a DEPOSIT, EXAMINE, MOVE, or SEARCH
command. After processor initialization, the default address space is physical
memory, the default data size is longword, and the default address is zero.
If you specify conflicting address space or data sizes, the console ignores the
command and issues an error message.
Format:
DEPOSIT [qualifier-list] {address} {data} [data...]
Qualifiers:
Data control: /B, /W, /L, /Q, /N:{count}, /STEP:{size}, /WRONG
Address space control: /G, /I, /M, /P, /V, /U
Arguments:
{address}
A longword address that specifies the first location into which data is
deposited. The address can be an actual address or a symbolic address.
{data}
The data to be deposited. If the specified data is larger than the deposit
data size, the firmware ignores the command and issues an error response.
If the specified data is smaller than the deposit data size, the data is
extended on the left with zeros.
[{data}]
Additional data to be deposited (as many as can fit on the command line).
Console Commands 3–3
Examples:
>>>D/P/B/N:1FF 0 0
! Clear first 512 bytes of
! physical memory.
>>>D/V/L/N:3 1234 5
! Deposit 5 into four longwords
! starting at virtual memory address
! 1234.
>>>D/N:8 R0 FFFFFFFF
! Loads GPRs R0 through R8 with -1.
>>>D/L/P/N:10/ST:200 0 8
! Deposit 8 in the first longword of
! the first 17 pages in physical
! memory.
>>>D/N:200 - 0
! Starting at previous address, clear
! 513 longwords or 2052 bytes.
3.4 EXAMINE
The EXAMINE command examines the contents of the memory location or
register specified by the address. If no address is specified, + is assumed.
The display line consists of a single character address specifier, the physical
address to be examined, and the examined data.
EXAMINE uses the same qualifiers as DEPOSIT. However, the /WRONG
qualifier causes EXAMINE to ignore ECC errors when reading from physical
memory. The EXAMINE command also supports an /INSTRUCTION qualifier
that disassembles the instructions at the current address.
Format:
EXAMINE [qualifier-list] [address]
Qualifiers:
Data control: /B, /W, /L, /Q, /N:{count}, /STEP:{size}, /WRONG
Address space control: /G, /I, /M, /P, /V, /U
Command specific:
/INSTRUCTION
Disassembles and displays the VAX MACRO–32 instruction at the
specified address.
Arguments:
[{address}]
3–4 Console Commands
A longword address that specifies the first location to be examined.
The address can be an actual or a symbolic address. If no address is
specified, + is assumed.
Examples:
>>>EX PC
G 0000000F
>>>EX SP
G 0000000E
>>>EX PSL
M 00000000
>>>E/M
M 00000000
>>>E R4/N:5
G 00000004
G 00000005
G 00000006
G 00000007
G 00000008
G 00000009
! Examine the PC.
FFFFFFFC
! Examine the SP.
00000200
! Examine the PSL.
041F0000
! Examine PSL another way.
041F0000
! Examine R4 through R9.
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
801D9000
>>>EX PR$_SCBB
I 00000011 2004A000
!Examine the SCBB, IPR 17
! (decimal).
>>>E/P 0
P 00000000 00000000
! Examine local memory 0.
>>>EX /INS 20040000
P 20040000 11 BRB
! Examine 1st byte of ROM.
20040019
>>>EX /INS/N:5
P 20040019
P 20040024
P 2004002F
P 20040036
P 2004003D
P 20040044
20040019
D0 MOVL
D2 MCOML
D2 MCOML
7D MOVQ
D0 MOVL
DB MFPR
! Disassemble from branch.
I^#20140000,@#20140000
@#20140030,@#20140502
S^#0E,@#20140030
R0,@#201404B2
I^#201404B2,R1
S^#2A,B^44(R1)
>>>E/INS
P 20040048
DB MFPR
! Look at next instruction.
S^#2B,B^48(R1)
>>>
3.5 FIND
The FIND command searches main memory, starting at address zero for a
page-aligned 128K-byte segment of good memory, or a restart parameter block
(RPB). If the command finds the segment or RPB, its address plus 512 is left
in SP (R14). If it does not find the segment or RPB, the console issues an error
message and preserves the contents of SP. If you do not specify a qualifier,
/RPB is assumed.
Format:
FIND [qualifier-list]
Console Commands 3–5
Qualifiers:
Command specific:
Searches memory for a page-aligned block of good memory, 128K bytes
/MEMORY in length. The search checks only memory that is deemed usable by the
bitmap. This command leaves the contents of memory unchanged.
/RPB
Searches all physical memory for an RPB. The search does not use the
bitmap to qualify which pages are checked. The command leaves the
contents of memory unchanged.
Examples:
>>>EX SP
G 0000000E 00000000
>>>FIND /MEM
>>>EX SP
G 0000000E 00000200
>>>FIND /RPB
?2C FND ERR 00C00004
>>>
! Check the SP.
! Look for a valid 128 Kbytes.
! Note where it was found.
! Check for valid RPB.
! None to be found here.
3.6 HALT
The HALT command has no effect. It is included for compatibility with other
VAX consoles.
Format:
HALT
Example:
>>>HALT
>>>
! Pretend to halt.
3.7 HELP
The HELP command gives information about command syntax and usage.
Format:
HELP
Example:
3–6 Console Commands
>>>HELP
Following is a brief summary of all the commands supported by the
console:
UPPERCASE
|
[]
<>
..
...
denotes
denotes
denotes
denotes
denotes
denotes
a keyword that you must type in
an OR condition
optional parameters
a field specifying a syntactically correct value
one of an inclusive range of integers
that the previous item may be repeated
Valid qualifiers:
/B /W /L /Q /INSTRUCTION
/G /I /V /P /M
/STEP: /N: /NOT
/WRONG /U
Valid commands:
BOOT [[/R5:]<boot_flags>] [<boot_device>]
CONFIGURE
CONTINUE
DEPOSIT [<qualifiers>] <address> <datum> [<datum>...]
EXAMINE [<qualifiers>] [<address>]
FIND [/MEMORY | /RPB]
HALT
HELP
INITIALIZE
LOGIN
MOVE [<qualifiers>] <address> <address>
NEXT [<count>]
REPEAT <command>
SEARCH [<qualifiers>] <address> <pattern> [<mask>]
SET BFLG <boot_flags>
SET BOOT <boot_device>
SET HALT <0..4 |DEFAULT|RESTART|REBOOT|HALT|RESTART_REBOOT>
SET LANGUAGE <1..15>
SET PSE <0..1 | DISABLED | ENABLED>
SET PSWD <password>
SET RECALL <0..1 | DISABLED | ENABLED>
SET SCSI_ID <0..7>
SHOW BFLG
SHOW BOOT
SHOW CONFIG
SHOW DEVICE
SHOW ERROR
SHOW ETHERNET
SHOW HALT
SHOW LANGUAGE
SHOW MEMORY
SHOW PSE
SHOW RECALL
SHOW SCSI
SHOW SCSI_ID
Console Commands 3–7
SHOW TRANSLATION <physical_address>
SHOW VERSION
START <address>
TEST [<test_code> [<parameters>]]
UNJAM
X <address> <count>
>>>
3.8 INITIALIZE
The INITIALIZE command performs a processor initialization.
Format:
INITIALIZE
The following registers are initialized:
Register
State at Initialization
PSL
041F0000
IPL
1F
ASTLVL
4
SISR
0
ICCS
Bits <6> and <0> clear; the rest are unpredictable
RXCS
0
TXCS
80
MAPEN
0
Caches
Flushed
Instruction buffer
Unaffected
Console previous reference
Longword, physical, address 0
TODR
Unaffected
Main memory
Unaffected
General registers
Unaffected
Halt code
Unaffected
Bootstrap-in-progress flag
Unaffected
Internal restart-in-progress flag
Unaffected
The firmware clears all error status bits and initializes the following:
•
CDAL bus timer
•
Address decode and match registers
3–8 Console Commands
•
Programmable timer interrupt vectors
•
QUART LPR register is set to 9600 baud
Example:
>>>INIT
>>>
3.9 LOGIN
Allows you to put the system in privileged console mode. When the console
security feature is enabled (see Section 2.2) and when you put the system
in console mode, the system operates in unprivileged console mode. You can
access only a subset of the console commands. To access the full range of
console commands, you must enter this command. The format of this command
is as follows:
LO[GIN]
When you enter the command, the system prompts you for a password as
follows:
Password:
You must enter the current console security password. If you do not enter the
correct password, the system displays the error message, ILL PSWD. When
you enter the console security password, the system operates in privileged
console mode. In this mode, you can use all the console commands. The system
exits from privileged console mode when you enter one of the following console
commands:
•
BOOT
•
CONTINUE
•
HALT
•
START
3.10 MOVE
The MOVE command copies the block of memory starting at the source address
to a block beginning at the destination address. Typically, this command has
an /N qualifier so that blocks of data are transferred. The destination correctly
reflects the contents of the source, regardless of the overlap between the source
and the data.
Console Commands 3–9
The MOVE command performs byte, word, longword, and quadword reads and
writes to moving the data efficiently. The MOVE command supports physical
and virtual address spaces only.
Format:
MOVE [qualifier-list] {src_address} {dest_address}
Qualifiers:
Data control: /B, /W, /L, /Q, /N:{count}, /STEP:{size}, /WRONG
Address space control: /V, /U, /P
Arguments:
{src_address}
A longword address that specifies the first location of the source data
to be copied.
{dest_address}
A longword address that specifies the destination of the first byte
of data. These addresses may be an actual address or a symbolic
address. If no address is specified, + is assumed.
Examples:
>>>EX/N:4 0
P 00000000 00000000
P 00000004 00000000
P 00000008 00000000
P 0000000C 00000000
P 00000010 00000000
! Observe destination.
>>>EX/N:4 200
P 00000200 58DD0520
P 00000204 585E04C1
P 00000208 00FF8FBB
P 0000020C 5208A8D0
P 00000210 540CA8DE
! Observe source data.
>>>MOV/N:4 200 0
! Move the data.
>>>EX/N:4 0
P 00000000 58DD0520
P 00000004 585E04C1
P 00000008 00FF8FBB
P 0000000C 5208A8D0
P 00000010 540CA8DE
>>>
! Observe moved data.
3–10 Console Commands
3.11 NEXT
The NEXT command executes the specified number of macro instructions. If no
count is specified, 1 is assumed. After the last macro instruction is executed,
the console reenters console I/O mode.
Format:
NEXT {count}
The console implements the NEXT command using the trace trap enable and
trace pending bits in the PSL and the trace pending vector in the SCB.
The console enters the Spacebar Step Mode. In this mode, pressing the
spacebar initiates each single step, and a carriage return forces a return to the
console prompt. The following restrictions apply:
•
If memory management is enabled, the NEXT command works only if the
first page in SSC RAM is mapped in S0 (system) space.
•
Overhead associated with the NEXT command affects the execution time of
an instruction.
•
The NEXT command elevates the IPL to 31 for long periods of time
(milliseconds) while single-stepping over several commands.
•
Unpredictable results occur if the macro instruction being stepped over
modifies either the SCBB or the trace trap entry. This means that you
cannot use the NEXT command with other debuggers. You must validate
PR$_SCCB before using the NEXT command.
Arguments:
{count}
A value representing the number of macro instructions to execute.
Examples:
Console Commands 3–11
>>>DEP 1000 50D650D4
>>>DEP 1004 125005D1
>>>DEP 1008 00FE11F9
>>>EX /INSTRUCTION /N:5 1000
P 00001000 D4 CLRL
R0
P 00001002 D6 INCL
R0
P 00001004 D1 CMPL
S^#05,R0
P 00001007 12 BNEQ
00001002
P 00001009 11 BRB
00001009
P 0000100B 00 HALT
>>>DEP PR$_SCBB 200
>>>DEP PC 1000
>>>
>>>N
P 00001002 D6 INCL
R0
P 00001004 D1 CMPL
S^#05,R0
P 00001007 12 BNEQ
00001002
P 00001002 D6 INCL
R0
>>>N 5
P 00001004 D1 CMPL
S^#05,R0
P 00001007 12 BNEQ
00001002
P 00001002 D6 INCL
R0
P 00001004 D1 CMPL
S^#05,R0
P 00001007 12 BNEQ
00001002
>>>N 7
P 00001002 D6 INCL
R0
P 00001004 D1 CMPL
S^#05,R0
P 00001007 12 BNEQ
00001002
P 00001002 D6 INCL
R0
P 00001004 D1 CMPL
S^#05,R0
P 00001007 12 BNEQ
00001002
P 00001009 11 BRB
00001009
>>>N
P 00001009 11 BRB
00001009
>>>
! Create a simple program.
! List it.
! Set up a user SCBB...
! ...and the PC.
!
!
!
!
!
!
Single step...
SPACEBAR
SPACEBAR
SPACEBAR
CR
...or multiple step the program.
3.12 REPEAT
The REPEAT command repeatedly displays and executes the specified
command. Press Ctrl/C to stop the command. You can specify any valid
console command except the REPEAT command.
Format:
REPEAT {command}
Arguments:
{command} A valid console command other than REPEAT.
3–12 Console Commands
Examples:
>>>REPEAT EX
I 0000001B
I 0000001B
I 0000001B
I 0000001B
I 0000001B
I 0000001B
I 0000001B
I 0000001B
I 0000001B
I 0000001B
I 0000001B
I 0000001B
I 0000001B
I 0000001B
I 0000001B
I 0000001B
I 0000001B
>>>
PR$_TODR !Watch the clock.
5AFE78CE
5AFE78D1
5AFE78FD
5AFE7900
5AFE7903
5AFE7907
5AFE790A
5AFE790D
5AFE7910
5AFE793C
5AFE793F
5AFE7942
5AFE7946
5AFE7949
5AFE794C
5AFE794F
5^C
3.13 SEARCH
The SEARCH command finds all the occurrences of a pattern and reports the
addresses where the pattern was found. If the /NOT qualifier is present, the
command reports all addresses in which the pattern did not match.
Format:
SEARCH [qualifier-list] {address} {pattern} [{mask}]
SEARCH accepts an optional mask that indicates bits to be ignored (don’t care
bits). For example, to ignore bit 0 in the comparison, specify a mask of 1. The
mask, if not present, defaults to 0.
A match occurs if (pattern and not mask) = (data and not mask),
where:
Pattern is the target data
Mask is the optional don’t care bitmask (which defaults to 0)
Data is the data at the current address
Console Commands 3–13
SEARCH reports the address under the following conditions:
/NOT Qualifier
Match Condition
Action
Absent
True
Report address
Absent
False
No report
Present
True
No report
Present
False
Report address
The address is advanced by the size of the pattern (byte, word, longword, or
quadword), unless it is overridden by the /STEP qualifier.
Qualifiers:
Data control: /B, /W, /L, /Q, /N:{count}, /STEP:{size}, /WRONG
Address space control: /P, /V, /U
Command specific:
/NOT
Inverts the sense of the match.
Arguments:
{start_
address}
A longword address that specifies the first location subject to the
search. This address can be an actual address or a symbolic address. If
no address is specified, + is assumed.
{pattern}
The target data.
[{mask}]
A mask of the bits that the comparison checks for.
Examples:
3–14 Console Commands
>>>DEP /P/L/N:1000 0 0
>>>
>>>DEP 300 12345678
>>>DEP 401 12345678
>>>DEP 502 87654321
>>>
>>>SEARCH /N:1000 /ST:1 0 12345678
P 00000300 12345678
P 00000401 12345678
>>>SEARCH /N:1000 0 12345678
P 00000300 12345678
>>>SEARCH /N:1000 /NOT 0 0
P 00000300 12345678
P 00000400 34567800
P 00000404 00000012
P 00000500 43210000
P 00000504 00008765
>>>SEARCH /N:1000 /ST:1 0 1 FFFFFFFE
! Clear some memory.
!
!
!
!
!
!
P 00000502 87654321
P 00000503 00876543
P 00000504 00008765
P 00000505 00000087
>>>SEARCH /N:1000 /B 0 12
P 00000303 12
P 00000404 12
>>>SEARCH /N:1000 /ST:1 /w 0 FE11
>>>
>>>
>>>
! Search for all occurrences
! of the byte 12.
! Deposit some search data.
Search for all occurrences
of 12345678 on any byte
boundary. Then try
longword boundaries.
Search for all nonzero
longwords.
! Search for odd-numbered
! longwords on any boundary.
!
!
!
!
Search for all words that
could be interpreted as
a spin (10$: brb 10$).
Note that none were found.
3.14 SET
The SET command sets the parameter to the value you specify.
Format:
SET {parameter} {value}
Parameters:
BFLAG
Sets the default R5 boot flags. The value must be a hexadecimal
number of up to eight digits.
BOOT
Sets the default boot device. The value must be a valid device
name or list of device names as specified in the BOOT command
description in Section 3.1.
Console Commands 3–15
HALT
Sets the user-defined halt action. Acceptable values are the
keywords "default", "restart", "reboot", "halt", "restart_reboot", or
a number in the range 0 to 4 inclusive.
LANGUAGE
Sets the console language and keyboard type. If the current
console terminal does not support the multinational character set
(MCS), then this command has no effect and the console message
is displayed in English. Values are 1 to 15, as follows:
PSE
•
1—Dansk
•
2—Deutsch (Deutschland/Österreich)
•
3—Deutsch (Schweiz)
•
4—English (United Kingdom)
•
5—English (United States/Canada)
•
6—Español
•
7—Français (Canada)
•
8—Français (France/Belgique)
•
9—Français (Suisse)
•
10—Italiano
•
11—Nederlands
•
12—Norsk
•
13—Português
•
14—Suomi
•
15—Svenska
Allows you to enable or disable the console security feature of the
system. The SET PSE command accepts the following values:
•
0—Console security disabled
•
1—Console security enabled
When the console security feature is enabled, only a subset of the
console commands are available to the user. These commands
are listed in Section 2.2. To enable the complete set of console
commands once the console security feature is enabled, you must
use the LOGIN command (see Section 3.9).
PSWD
3–16 Console Commands
Allows you to set or change the console security password.
RECALL
Sets command recall state to either ENABLED (1) or DISABLED
(0).
SCSI_ID
Sets the SCSI ID of the SCSI controller to a number in the range
0 to 7. The SCSI ID of the SCSI controller is set to 6 before the
system is shipped.
Qualifiers: Listed in the parameter descriptions above.
Examples:
>>>
>>>SET
>>>
>>>SET
>>>
>>>SET
>>>
>>>SET
>>>
BFLAG 220
BOOT DKA300
LANGUAGE 5
HALT RESTART
3.15 SHOW
The SHOW command displays the console parameter you specify.
Format:
SHOW {parameter}
Parameters:
BFLAG
Displays the default R5 boot flags.
BOOT
Displays the default boot device.
Console Commands 3–17
CONFIG
Displays a list of the devices and optional modules present in the
system and the status of the hardware.
Note
If you enter this command, the configuration data is read from memory. Under
certain conditions the configuration data
in memory may become corrupt. You can
correct the corrupted configuration data
by running the test A1. See Section 3.17
for more information about the TEST
command.
DEVICE
Displays all devices in the system.
ERROR
Displays the errors detected during the power-up tests.
ETHERNET
Displays the system hardware Ethernet address.
HALT
Shows the user-defined halt action.
LANGUAGE
Displays console language and keyboard type. See Section 3.14
for more information about the SET LANGUAGE command.
MEMORY
Displays main memory configuration board by board.
PSE
Displays the condition of the console security feature of the
system.
RECALL
Shows the current state of command recall, either ENABLED or
DISABLED.
SAVED_STATE
Displays the values of non-volatile console parameters, such as
BOOT, BFLG, and SCSI_ID.
SCSI
Shows any SCSI devices in the system (tape drives, disk drives,
or compact disc drives, for example).
SCSI_ID
Shows the SCSI ID of the SCSI controller(s).
TRANSLATION
Shows any virtual addresses that map to the specified physical
address. The firmware uses the current values of page table base
and length registers to perform its search. It is assumed that
page tables have been properly built.
VERSION
Displays the current firmware version.
Qualifiers: Listed in the previous parameter descriptions.
3–18 Console Commands
Examples:
>>>
>>>SHOW BFLAG
00000220
>>>
>>>SHOW BOOT
DKA300
>>>SHOW ETHERNET
Ethernet Adapter
-EZA0 (08-00-2B-0B-29-14)
>>>
>>>SHOW HALT
restart
>>>
>>>SHOW LANGUAGE
English (United States/Canada)
>>>
>>>SHOW MEMORY
64 MB RAM, SIMM Set (0A,0B,0C,0D) present
Memory Set 0: 00000000 to 03FFFFFF, 64MB, 131072 good pages, 0 bad pages
64 MB RAM, SIMM Set (1E,1F,1G,1H) present
Memory Set 1: 04000000 to 07FFFFFF, 64MB, 131072 good pages, 0 bad pages
Total of 128MB, 262144 good pages, 0 bad pages, 160 reserved pages
>>>
>>>SHOW SCSI
SCSI Adapter A, SCSI ID 6
-DKA0 (DEC RZ24)
-DKA100 (DEC RZ24)
-DKA300 (DEC RZ24)
>>>
>>>SHOW TRANSLATION 1000
V 80001000
>>>
>>>SHOW VERSION
KA50-A V1.0 VMB 2.13
>>>
3.16 START
The START command starts instruction execution at the address you specify.
If no address is given, the current PC is used. If memory mapping is enabled,
macro instructions are executed from virtual memory, and the address
is treated as a virtual address. The START command is equivalent to a
DEPOSIT to PC, followed by a CONTINUE. It does not perform a processor
initialization.
Console Commands 3–19
Format:
START [{address}]
Arguments:
[address]
The address at which to begin execution. This address is loaded into
the user’s PC.
Example:
>>>START 1000
3.17 TEST
The TEST command invokes a diagnostic test program specified by the test
number. If you enter a test number of 0 (zero), all tests that are allowed to
be executed from the console terminal are executed. The console accepts an
optional list of up to five additional hexadecimal arguments.
You can see a full listing of all the tests by running test 9E.
Format:
TEST [{test_number} [{test_arguments}]]
Arguments:
{test_number}
A two-digit hexadecimal number specifying the test to be
executed. Test 9E displays a full list of all the available tests
and their parameters.
{test_arguments}
Up to five additional test arguments. These arguments are
accepted, but the console cannot interpret them.
Example:
>>>TEST 0
70..69..68..67..66..65..64..63..62..61..60..59..58..57..56..55..
54..53..52..51..50..49..48..47..46..45..44..43..42..41..40..39..
38..37..36..35..34..33..32..31..30..29..28..27..26..25..24..23..
22..21..20..19..18..17..16..15..14..13..12..11..10..09..08..07..
06..05..04..03..
Tests completed.
3–20 Console Commands
3.18 UNJAM
The UNJAM command performs an I/O bus reset, by writing a 1 (one) to IPR
55 (decimal).
Format:
UNJAM
Example:
>>>UNJAM
>>>
3.19 X—Binary Load and Unload
The X command is for use by automatic systems communicating with the
console. The X command loads or unloads (that is, writes to memory or reads
from memory) the specified number of data bytes through the console serial
line (regardless of console type) starting at the specified address.
Format:
X {address} {count} CR {line_checksum} {data} {data_checksum}
Arguments:
Console Commands 3–21
{address}
The address to unload data from or load data to.
{count}
Indicates whether to load or unload data, and also indicates the
amount of data to load or unload.
If bit 31 of the count is clear, data is received by the console
and put into memory. If bit 31 is set, data is read from memory
and sent by the console. The remaining bits in the count are a
positive number indicating the number of bytes to load or unload.
CR
The console accepts a load or unload command when it receives
the carriage return.
{line_checksum}
The line_checksum is the next byte the console receives. The
line_checksum is not echoed.
The line_checksum is verified by adding all the command
characters, including the checksum and separating space, into an
8-bit register initially set to zero. The line_checksum does not
include the terminating carriage return, rubouts, or characters
deleted by a rubout. If no errors occur, the result is zero.
If the line_checksum is correct, the console responds with the
input prompt and either sends data to the requester or prepares
to receive data.
If the line_checksum is in error, the console responds with an
error message. This prevents the operator from inadvertently
entering into a mode where the console accepts characters from
the keyboard as data and does not provide an escape mechanism.
{data}
If the command is a load (bit 31 of the count is clear), the console
responds with the input prompt (>>>), then accepts the specified
number of bytes of data to be put into memory and an additional
byte of received data_checksum. The data is verified by adding
all data characters and the checksum character into an 8-bit
register initially set to zero. If the final content of the register
is nonzero, the data or checksum is in error, and the console
responds with an error message.
If the command is a binary unload (bit 31 of the count is set), the
console responds with the input prompt (>>>), followed by the
specified number of bytes of binary data. As each byte is sent, it
is added to a checksum register initially set to zero. At the end
of the transmission, the two’s complement of the low byte of the
register is sent.
{data_checksum}
3–22 Console Commands
If the data_checksum is incorrect on a load, or if memory or
line errors occur during the transmission of data, the entire
transmission is completed, and the console issues an error
message. If an error occurs during loading, the contents of the
memory being loaded are unpredictable.
The console represses echo while it is receiving the data string and checksums.
The console terminates all flow control when it receives the carriage return at
the end of the command line to avoid treating flow control characters from the
terminal as valid command line checksums.
3.19.1 Controlling the Console Serial Line
You can control the console serial line during a binary unload using the control
keys (Ctrl/C, Ctrl/S, Ctrl/O, and so on). You cannot control the console serial
line during a binary load, because all received characters are valid binary data.
The console has the following timing requirements:
•
It must receive data being loaded with a binary load command at a rate of
at least 1 byte every 60 seconds.
•
It must receive the command checksum that precedes the data within 60
seconds of the carriage return that terminates the command line.
•
It must receive the data checksum within 60 seconds of the last data byte.
If any of these timing requirements are not met, then the console aborts the
transmission by issuing an error message and returning to the console prompt.
The entire command, including the checksum, can be sent to the console as a
single burst of characters at the specified character rate of the console serial
line. The console is able to receive at least 4K bytes of data in a single X
command.
3.20 ! (Comment)
The comment character (an exclamation point) is used to document command
sequences. It can be placed anywhere on the command line. All characters
following the comment character are ignored.
Format: !
Example:
>>>! The console ignores this line.
>>>
Console Commands 3–23
4
Hardware Specifications
This chapter lists the hardware specifications of the following:
•
System unit
•
Internal SCSI device
4.1 System Unit Specifications
The following tables list the specifications for the Model 90 system.
Hardware Specifications 4–1
Table 4–1 System Specifications: Model 90
Subject
Description
Processor
KA50 (NVAX).
Boot and diagnostic
firmware ROM
512K bytes.
DRAM memory
16M bytes, expandable to 128M bytes, all on MS44 or MS44L memory
options.
Hard disk
RZ23L, RZ24, RZ24L, RZ25, RZ25L, RZ26, RZ26L, or RZ28.
Tape drive
TZ30, TZK10, TZK11, or TLZ06.
Diskette drive
RX26.
Compact disc drive
RRD42.
Terminals
Supports the VT series.
Interfaces
Standard: one SCSI port, a ThinWire Ethernet port1 , a standard Ethernet
port1 , three MMJ ports, one port with modem control.
Optional: A second SCSI port, 8 or 16 additional asynchronous DEC423
MMJ ports or 8 additional asynchronous ports with modem control, 2
additional synchronous ports.
Input voltage
Automatically adjusting ac input. Range: 100 V2 ac to 120 V ac or 220 V
ac to 240 V ac.
Maximum inrush
current
36 A3 .
Maximum running
current
3.0 A at 110 V ac, 1.5 A at 220 V ac.
Steady state
current
1.8 A at 110 V ac, 1.0 A at 220 V ac.
Maximum power
consumption
215 W4 .
Frequency
49 Hz to 61 Hz.
1 Both
Ethernet types cannot be used simultaneously.
2 Volts
3 Amperes
4 Watts
4–2 Hardware Specifications
Table 4–2 shows the declared values for the ISO 9296 and ISO 7779 standards. The
current values for specific configurations are available from Digital representatives.
Note
In Table 4–2, 1 B = 10 dBA.
Table 4–2 Acoustic Levels
Sound Power
Level LW Ad , B
Sound Pressure Level LpAm ,
dBA (bystander positions)
Product
Idle
Operate
Idle
Operate
BA42B diskless system enclosure
4.8
4.8
33
33
Per device when installed in BA42B
RZ23L
4.0
4.7
28
35
RZ24
4.6
4.9
31
35
RZ24L
4.2
4.3
31
31
RZ25
4.4
4.4
26
26
RZ25L
4.0
4.4
25
31
RZ26
4.3
4.5
28
30
RZ26L
4.2
4.5
32
36
RZ28
4.3
4.6
26
29
RRD42
-
-
-
-
TLZ06
-
3.7
-
25
TZK10
-
6.2
-
48
TZK11
-
5.9
-
46
Table 4–3 System Unit Metrics
System Unit
Weight1
kg (lb)
Height
cm (in)
Width
cm (in)
Depth
cm (in)
Model 90
20.4 (45)
14.99 (5.90)
46.38 (18.26)
40.00 (15.75)
1 Depends
on the configuration. The value shown in this table is a typical value. Values vary depending on the
options that you install.
Hardware Specifications 4–3
Table 4–4 System Operating Conditions and Nonoperating Conditions
Operating Conditions
Range or Value
Temperature range
10°C (50°F) to 32°C (90°F) with TZ30 tape drive;
otherwise 10°C (50°F) to 40°C (104°F)
Temperature change rate
11°C (20°F) per hour maximum
Relative humidity
10% to 90% noncondensing
Maximum wet bulb temperature
28°C (82°F)
Minimum dew point
2°C (36°F)
Altitude
2400 m (8000 ft) at 36°C (96°F)
Nonoperating Conditions (System in
Shipping Container)1
Temperature range
–40°C (–40°F) to 66°C (151°F)
Relative humidity
10% to 95% at 66°C (151°F)
Altitude
4900 m (16 000 ft)
Maximum wet bulb temperature
46°C (115°F)
Minimum dew point
2°C (36°F)
1 The
60 days).
nonoperating conditions are associated with transport and short-term storage (
4–4 Hardware Specifications
4.2 Internal SCSI Device Specifications
Digital’s hardware and software are fully compatible with the SCSI-2
specifications. The following tables list the specifications for the internal
SCSI devices.
The MicroVAX 3100 Model 90 system supports a maximum of five internal
SCSI devices.
Table 4–5 RZ23L, RZ24, and RZ24L Hard Disk Drive Specifications
Formatted Storage Capacity
RZ23L
RZ24
RZ24L
Per drive (M bytes)
121
209
245
Blocks per track
39
38
44 to 87
Blocks per drive
237 588
409 792
479 350
Buffer size (K bytes)
64
64
Performance
RZ23L
RZ24
RZ24L
Transfer rate to or from
media (M bytes/s1 )
1.5
1.5
1.87 minimum
Sustained average data
transfer rate
(M bytes/s)
1.13
1.13
-
Transfer rate to or from
buffer, asynchronous
(M bytes/s)
3
3
4
Transfer rate to or from
buffer, synchronous
(M bytes/s)
4
4
5
19
16
16
35
35
30
Average latency
(ms)
8.8
8.6
6.97
Average access (ms)
26.8
24.6
-
Average seek time
(ms2 )
Maximum seek time,
full stroke (ms)
1 Megabytes
per second
2 milliseconds
(continued on next page)
Hardware Specifications 4–5
Table 4–5 (Cont.) RZ23L, RZ24, and RZ24L Hard Disk Drive Specifications
Functional Specifications
RZ23L
RZ24
RZ24L
3
Recording density (bits/in )
36 250
31 800
38 600
Track density
(tracks per inch)
1850
1700
1930
Area density
(M bytes per square inch)
67.06
54.06
-
Read/write heads
4
8
4
Disks
2
4
2
CF
ZBR5
4
Recording mode
CF
Power
RZ23L
RZ24
RZ24L
Maximum seeking (W)
4.3
10.4
6.7
Typical seeking (W)
3.8
6.6
4.9
Maximum starting (W)
14.5
27.5
13.5
3 bits
per inch
4 Continuous
5 Zone
frequency
bit recording
Table 4–6 RZ25, RZ26 and RZ26L Hard Disk Drive Specifications
Formatted Storage Capacity
RZ25
RZ26
RZ26L
Per drive (M bytes)
426
1050
1050
Blocks per track
48 to 74
57
59 to 119
Blocks per drive
832 527
2 050 860
2 050 860
Buffer size (K bytes)
60
512
512
(continued on next page)
4–6 Hardware Specifications
Table 4–6 (Cont.) RZ25, RZ26 and RZ26L Hard Disk Drive Specifications
Performance
RZ25
RZ26
RZ26L
Transfer rate to or from
media (M bytes/s)
2.1 to 3.2
3.3
2.7 to 5.5
Sustained average data
transfer rate
(M bytes/s)
2.33
2.6
–
Transfer rate to or from
buffer, asynchronous
(M bytes/s)
4
5
5
Transfer rate to or from
buffer, synchronous
(M bytes/s)
5
10
10
14
9.5
9.5
Maximum seek time,
full stroke (ms)
26
20
20
Average latency
(ms)
6.8
5.6
5.6
Average access (ms)
20.8
15.1
15.1
Functional Specifications
RZ25
RZ26
RZ26L
Recording density (bits/in)
38 834
56 000
58 000 to 61 500
Track density
(tracks per inch)
1760
2756
3256
Area density
(M bytes per square inch)
68.28
154
191.4 to 200.3
Read/write heads
9
14
8
Disks
5
7
Average seek time
(ms)
RLL 1,7
RZ25
RZ26
RZ26L
14
16.5
12.3
ZBR
Power
Maximum seeking (W)
2 Run
4
2
RLL 1,7
Recording mode
1 Zoned
1
Bit Recording
Length Limited
(continued on next page)
Hardware Specifications 4–7
Table 4–6 (Cont.) RZ25, RZ26 and RZ26L Hard Disk Drive Specifications
Power
RZ25
RZ26
RZ26L
Typical seeking (W)
10
13.8
10
Maximum starting (W)
34.5
29
Table 4–7 RZ25L and RZ28 Hard Disk Drive Specifications
Formatted Storage Capacity
RZ25L
RZ28
Per drive
535 MB
2.1 GB
Blocks per track
(512 byte blocks)
94.6 average
59 - 118
Blocks per drive
1 240 000
4 197 520
Buffer size
240 KB
1 MB
Performance
RZ25L
RZ28
Transfer rate to or from
media (M bytes/s)
2.6 - 4.4
2.7 - 5.5
Sustained average data
transfer rate
(M bytes/s)
3.1
Transfer rate to or from
buffer, asynchronous
(M bytes/s)
5.0 max. (burst)
5.0
Transfer rate to or from
buffer, synchronous
(M bytes/s)
10.0 max. (burst)
10.0
Average seek time
(ms)
10.5
9.7
Maximum seek time,
full stroke (ms)
20
19
Average latency
(ms)
5.6
5.6
Average access (ms)
16
15.3
(continued on next page)
4–8 Hardware Specifications
Table 4–7 (Cont.) RZ25L and RZ28 Hard Disk Drive Specifications
Functional Specifications
RZ25L
RZ28
Recording density (bits/in)
58.4 - 64.0
Track density
(tracks per inch)
2150
3256
Area density
(M bytes per square inch)
-
187.6 to 216.11
Read/write heads
7
16
Disks
4
8
1
RLL2 (1,7)
Recording mode
ZBR
Power
RZ25L
RZ28
Maximum seeking (W)
10.76
16.62
Typical seeking (W)
8.4
14.88
Maximum starting (W)
22.4
39
1 Zoned
2 Run
Bit Recording
Length Limited
Table 4–8 TZ30 Tape Drive Specifications
Subject
Description
Mode of operation
Streaming
Media
12.77 mm (0.5 in) unformatted magnetic tape
Bit density
2624 bits/cm (6667 bits/in)
Number of tracks
22
Transfer rate (at host)
62.5K bits/s
Tape speed
190 cm/s (75 in/s)
Track format
Multiple track serpentine recording
Cartridge capacity
95M bytes, formatted (approx)
Hardware Specifications 4–9
Table 4–9 TZK10 QIC Tape Drive Specifications
Subject
Description
Mode of operation
Streaming.
Media
DC6320, DC6525, or Digital approved equivalent.
See the MicroVAX 3100 Model 90 Operator
Information manual.
Head and track width: write
0.1778 mm +0.0000, -0.0127 mm (0.0070 in +0.0000,
-0.0005 in).
Head width: read
0.1270 mm +0.0127, -0.0000 mm (0.0050 in +0.0005,
-0.0000 in).
Bit density
16K bits/in.
Number of tracks
26.
Transfer rate
200K bytes/s at average streaming mode, 1.5M bytes
/s at SCSI maximum.
Tape speed
305 cm/s (120 in/s).
Track format
Multiple track serpentine recording.
Cartridge capacity
320M or 525M bytes, formatted (approx), depending
on the QIC tape used.
Table 4–10 TZK11 QIC Tape Drive Specifications
Subject
Description
Mode of operation
Streaming.
Media
DC9200, DC9200XL, or Digital approved equivalent.
See the MicroVAX 3100 Model 90 Operator
Information manual.
Head and track width: write
0.1778 mm
Head width: read
60.00038 mm (0.0070 in) 60.00015 in
0.0762 mm 60.00038 mm (0.0030 in) 60.00015 in
Bit density
40,640 bits/in.
Number of tracks
42.
Transfer rate
300K bytes/s at average streaming mode, 3 M bytes/s
burst transfer rate.
Tape speed
70.9 inches/sec with QIC-2GB cartridge.
Track format
Multiple track serpentine recording.
Cartridge capacity
2 G or 2.5 Gbytes, formatted (approx), depending on
the QIC tape used.
4–10 Hardware Specifications
Table 4–11 TLZ06 Cassette Tape Drive Specifications
Subject
Description
Mode of operation
Streaming and start/stop.
Media
TLZ04-CA, TLZ06-CA, or Digital approved
equivalent. See the MicroVAX 3100 Model 90
Operator Information manual.
Bit density
114M bits/in.
Transfer rate (sustained)
183K bytes/s noncompression
Recording format
Digital Data Storage (DDS, DC)
Table 4–12 RX26 Diskette Drive Specifications
Subject
Description
Diskette size
9 cm (3.5 in)
Diskettes per diskette drive
1
Number of read/write heads
2
Data capacity (formatted)
1.44M bytes—high density (HD) diskettes
2.88M bytes—extra density (ED) diskettes
Number of bytes per sector
512
Number of sectors per track
18 (HD diskettes)
36 (ED diskettes)
Number of cylinders
80
Number of tracks per cylinder
2
Transfer rate
500K bits/s (HD diskettes)
1M bits/s (ED diskettes)
Hardware Specifications 4–11
Table 4–13 RRD42 Compact Disc Drive Specifications
Subject
Description
Acceptable discs
CD–ROM mode-1 data discs
CD–ROM mode-2 data discs
Disc capacity
600M bytes
Rotation speed: innermost track
530 r/min1 at CLV = 1.4 m/s
Rotation speed: outermost track
200 r/min at CLV = 1.2 m/s
Sustained data transfer rate
150K bytes/s
Burst data transfer rate
1.5M bytes/s
Access time: full stroke
650 ms
Access time: average
380 ms
1 revolutions
per minute
4–12 Hardware Specifications
A
DSW42-AA Synchronous Communications
Option Installation Information for the
United Kingdom
This appendix includes the following installation information, which is
required only in United Kingdom:
•
Service categories
•
Host power rating
•
Module isolation
•
Safety warnings for UK installations only
•
Cable approval
•
Supported cables
•
Equipment between the approved module and a Digital circuit (PTT)
DSW42-AA Synchronous Communications Option Installation Information for the United Kingdom A–1
A.1 Service Categories
Table A–1 lists the specifications for service category 1.
Table A–1 BABT Approved Service Specifications
Service Category
Interface Type
(CCITT recommendation)
Service Requirements
Electrical
1
X.21bis
V.24/V.28
Data Rate
Public
Telecommunications
Operators1
Physical
ISO 2110,
BS.6623:
part 1, 1985.
2400 bps 2
4800 bps
9600 bps
19200 bps
BT
Hull
MCL
Yes
Yes
Yes
No
Yes
Yes
Yes
No
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Approved adapter cable:
BC19V-02
BC19D-023
Approved extension cable:
BC22F-25 (25 feet)4
1 BT
— British Telecommunications plc.
Hull — Kingston Communications (Hull) plc.
MCL — Mercury Communications Limited.
2 bits
per second
3 Where
two adapter cables are shown, they are electrically identical. The only difference is the angle at which
the cable is projected off of the 50-way connector.
4 The
total length of cable used must not exceed 27 feet.
A.2 Host Power Rating
You must ensure that the total power drawn by the approved module, the host,
and other auxiliary equipment drawing power from the host, is within the
rating of the host power supply.
Digital has designed all permutations of the host configuration to operate
within the limits of the host power rating. The module power rating is shown
in Table A–2.
A–2 DSW42-AA Synchronous Communications Option Installation Information for the United Kingdom
Table A–2 Module Power
Input Voltage
Maximum Input Current
(Volts DC)
(Amperes)
+5
0.6
+12
0.3
-12
0.3
A.3 Module Isolation
Except at the connector that plugs into the host, clearance and creepage
distances of Xmm and Ymm, as listed in Table A–3, must be maintained
between the approved module and other parts of the host, including expansion
cards. Clearance is the shortest distance in air between two points. Creepage
is the shortest distance along a continuous surface between those same two
points.
Table A–3 Clearance and Creepage Distances
Clearance
Xmm
Creepage
Ymm
Voltage Used or Generated by Other
Parts of the Host or Expansion Card
Vrms or Vdc
2.0
2.4 (3.8)1
Up to 50
2.6
3.0 (4.8)
Up to 125
4.0
5.0 (8.0)
Up to 250
4.0
6.4 (10.0)
Up to 300
1 The
distances shown in parentheses apply in an uncontrolled environment where heat, humidity,
and temperature may fluctuate.
Creepage distances apply when the module is installed in a controlled
environment. You can check creepage distances by measuring the distance
between adjacent parts.
If in doubt, seek the advice of a telecoms safety engineer. Failure to install the
module in accordance with these instructions will invalidate the approval.
DSW42-AA Synchronous Communications Option Installation Information for the United Kingdom A–3
A.4 Safety Warnings for UK Installations Only
Ports indicated by the safety warning label do not provide sufficient isolation to
satisfy the requirements of the relevant parts of standard BS6301. Therefore,
any product connected to this port must meet one of the following conditions:
•
Be covered by OFTEL’s General Approval NS/G/1234/J/100003
(All products supplied by Digital comply with this General Approval.)
•
Have been approved to the relevant parts of standard BS6301
•
Have previously been evaluated against British Telecom (Post Office)
Technical Guide 2 or 26 and given permission to attach
Any other use of this product invalidates approval.
If a port has either of the following labels, direct or indirect interconnection
of that port, whether the port is marked or not, may produce hazardous
conditions on the network:
SAFETY WARNING --- See Instructions for Use
or
SAFETY WARNING - See Instructions for Use Before Making Any Connection to This Module
Obtain advice from a competent engineer before making such a connection.
Figure A–1 shows the location of the safety label on the DSW42-AA
synchronous communications option.
A–4 DSW42-AA Synchronous Communications Option Installation Information for the United Kingdom
Figure A–1 Safety Warning Label
Safety Warning Label
RE_EN06497A_91
A.5 Cable Approval
The module is approved for direct connection to a particular digital circuit.
This approval includes an interconnecting cable with mating connectors that
conform to the British standard BS6623, parts 1 and 4. If the module is
connected to the service with anything other than its own approved cables,
those cables must benefit from relevant general approval NS/G/1235/100009
and/or conform to any other applicable requirements.
A.6 Supported Cables
Digital supports all of the following cables. The approved module may not
use all of these cables, so check the instructions for use to determine which
interface types are supported.
Table A–4 Cables Supported by the Approved Module
Interface
Cable Type
Name
Molding
Pins
V.36
adapter
BC19B-02
45 degree
50-37
V.36
adapter
BC19U-02
straight
50-37
V.36
extension
BC55D-xx
V.24
adapter
BC19D-02
45 degree
50-25
(continued on next page)
DSW42-AA Synchronous Communications Option Installation Information for the United Kingdom A–5
Table A–4 (Cont.) Cables Supported by the Approved Module
Interface
Cable Type
Name
Molding
Pins
V.24
adapter
BC19V-02
straight
50-25
V.24
adapter
BC23V-02
straight
50-25
V.24
extension
BC22F-xx
V.241
extension
low cap
BC13P-10
V.10
adapter
BC19E-02
45 degree
50-37
V.10
adapter
BC19W-02
straight
50-37
X.21
adapter
BC19C-02
45 degree
50-15
X.21
adapter
BC20Q-02
straight
50-15
X.21
extension
BC22Z-xx
Kilostream/X.21
adapter
BC21G-02
37-15
Kilostream
adapter
BC22X-02
50-15
1 The
BC13P-10 is supported only on KN02 (DECstation 5000 Model 120, 125, 133) and KN03A-AA
(DECstation 5000 Model 240)
A.7 Synchronous Option Port Pin Specifications
The synchronous option 50-pin port supports the following standards:
•
EIA-232/V.24
•
EIA-423/V.10
•
EIA-422/V.11
Table A–5 lists the signals on each pin of the 25-pin connector on the EIA-232
/V.24 cable (BC19D-02). The connector pins are numbered from left to right
and from top to bottom.
Table A–5 Synchronous Option Port Pin Specifications (EIA-232/V.24)
Pin
EIA-232/V.24 Signal Names
Pin
EIA-232/V.24 Signal Names
1
–
14
–
2
Tx DATA
15
Tx CLOCK
(continued on next page)
A–6 DSW42-AA Synchronous Communications Option Installation Information for the United Kingdom
Table A–5 (Cont.) Synchronous Option Port Pin Specifications (EIA-232/V.24)
Pin
EIA-232/V.24 Signal Names
Pin
EIA-232/V.24 Signal Names
3
Rx DATA
16
–
4
RTS
17
Rx CLOCK
5
CTS
18
LOCAL LOOP
6
DSR
19
–
7
DTE GROUND
20
DTR
8
DCD/I
21
REM. LOOP
9
–
22
RI
10
–
23
SPEED
11
–
24
CLOCK
12
–
25
TEST 1
13
–
Table A–6 lists the signals on each pin of the 37-pin connectors on the EIA-423
/V.10 cable (BC19E-02) and EIA-422/V.11 cable (BC19B-02). The connector pins
are numbered from left to right and from top to bottom.
Table A–6 Synchronous Option Port Pin Specifications
Pin
EIA-423/V.10 Signal Names
EIA-422/V.11 Signal Names
1
–
–
2
–
–
3
–
–
4
Tx DATA
Tx DATA (A)
5
–
Tx CLOCK (A)
6
Rx DATA (A)
Rx DATA (A)
7
RTS
RTS/C (A)
8
Rx CLOCK (A)
Rx CLOCK (A)
9
CTS (A)
CTS (A)
10
LOCAL LOOP
LOCAL LOOP
11
DSR (A)
DSR (A)
(continued on next page)
DSW42-AA Synchronous Communications Option Installation Information for the United Kingdom A–7
Table A–6 (Cont.) Synchronous Option Port Pin Specifications
Pin
EIA-423/V.10 Signal Names
EIA-422/V.11 Signal Names
12
DTR
DTR (A)
13
–
DCD/I (A)
14
REM. LOOP
REM. LOOP
15
RI
RI
16
SPEED
–
17
CLOCK
CLOCK (A)
18
TEST 1
TEST 1
19
DTE GROUND
DTE GROUND
20
DCE GROUND
DCE GROUND
21
–
–
22
DTE GROUND
Tx DATA (B)
23
DCD/I (A)
Tx CLOCK (B)
24
Rx DATA (B)
Rx DATA (B)
25
DTE GROUND
RTS/C (B)
26
Rx CLOCK (B)
Rx CLOCK (B)
27
CTS (B)
CTS (B)
28
–
–
29
DSR (B)
DSR (B)
30
DTE GROUND
DTR (B)
31
–
DCD/I (B)
32
DCD/I (B)
–
33
–
–
34
–
–
35
DTE GROUND
CLOCK (B)
36
–
–
37
DTE GROUND
DTE GROUND
A–8 DSW42-AA Synchronous Communications Option Installation Information for the United Kingdom
A.8 Equipment Between the Approved Module and a Digital
Circuit (PTT)
If any other equipment, including cables or wiring, is to be connected between
the approved module and the point of connection to any particular digital
circuit, that equipment must conform as follows:
•
The overall transmission characteristics of all other equipment must not
have any material effect on the electrical conditions between the equipment
and the digital circuit.
•
All other equipment must comprise only the following:
Approved equipment, which may be subject to limitations on its use,
for the purpose of connection between it and a particular digital circuit
Cable or wiring that complies with a code of practice for the installation
of equipment covered by this standard or other requirements that may
be applicable
DSW42-AA Synchronous Communications Option Installation Information for the United Kingdom A–9
Index
A
Alternative boot devices, 2–7
Asynchronous communications devices
DHW42-AA, 1–4
DHW42-BA, 1–4
DHW42-CA, 1–4
DHW42-UP, 1–4
B
Binary load and unload (X command), 3–21
Boot
device, 2–7
recovery action, 2–8
BOOT command, 2–3, 3–1
use of, 2–7
Boot device
alternatives, 2–7
default, 2–7
device names, 2–7
resetting default, 2–7
C
Cables
synchronous option, 1–4
Commands
for unprivileged users, 2–3
Comment command (!), 3–23
! (comment command), 3–23
Communications devices
asynchronous, 1–4
synchronous, 1–4
Compact disc drives
RRD42, 1–3
Console command
LOGIN, 3–9
Console commands
binary load and unload (X), 3–21
BOOT, 3–1
! (comment), 3–23
CONTINUE, 3–3
DEPOSIT, 3–3
EXAMINE, 3–4
FIND, 3–5
HALT, 3–6
HELP, 3–6
INITIALIZE, 3–8
MOVE, 3–9
NEXT, 3–11
REPEAT, 3–12
SEARCH, 3–13
SET, 3–15
SHOW, 3–17
START, 3–19
TEST, 3–20
UNJAM, 3–21
X (binary load and unload), 3–21
Console mode
privileged, 2–5
returning to, 2–1
Console prompt, 2–1
Console security feature
description, 2–3
disabling, 2–7
enabling, 2–4
values, 3–16
Index–1
CONTINUE command, 2–3, 3–3
use of, 2–7
CPU
KA50, 1–1
D
Defaults
boot device, 2–7
recovery action, 2–8
DEPOSIT command, 3–3
Device names
boot device, 2–7
Dimensions
system unit, 4–3
Disk drives
RZ23L, 1–3
RZ24, 1–3
RZ24L, 1–3
RZ25, 1–3
RZ25L, 1–3
RZ26, 1–3
RZ26L, 1–3
RZ28, 1–3
Diskette drives
RX26, 1–3
HALT command, 3–6
use of, 2–7
Hardware specifications
RRD42 compact disc drive, 4–11
RX26 diskette drive, 4–11
RZ23L hard disk drive, 4–5
RZ24 hard disk drive, 4–5
RZ24L hard disk drive, 4–5
RZ25 hard disk drive, 4–6
RZ25L hard disk drive, 4–8
RZ26 hard disk drive, 4–6
RZ26L hard disk drive, 4–6
RZ28 hard disk drive, 4–8
system unit, 4–1
TLZ06 cassette tape drive, 4–10
TZ30 tape drive, 4–9
TZK10 QIC tape drive, 4–9
HELP command, 3–6
I
INITIALIZE command, 3–8
K
KZDDA SCSI adapter, 1–4
E
L
EXAMINE command, 3–4
LOGIN command, 2–3, 3–9
use of, 2–5, 2–7
F
Factory installed software, 1–3, 2–7
Features
Model 90, 1–1
FIND command, 3–5
FIS, 1–3, 2–7
H
Halt
recovery action, 2–8
Halt button
use of, 2–1
Index–2
M
Mass storage devices
internal, 1–3
Model 90
features, 1–1
KA50 CPU, 1–1
system description, 1–1
VAX architecture support, 1–2
MOVE command, 3–9
N
NEXT command, 3–11
Nonoperating conditions
system specifications, 4–4
NVAX processor, 1–1
RZ25L
hardware
RZ26
hardware
RZ26L
hardware
RZ28
hardware
specifications, 4–8
specifications, 4–6
specifications, 4–6
specifications, 4–8
O
Operating conditions
system specifications, 4–4
P
Password
security password, 2–3
Privileged console mode
exiting, 2–7
logging in to, 2–5
use of, 2–5
Privileged user
definition, 2–3
R
Recovery action
actions, 2–8
default, 2–8
resetting default, 2–8
REPEAT command, 3–12
Restart
recovery action, 2–8
RRD42 compact disc drive
hardware specifications,
RX26 diskette drive
hardware specifications,
RZ23L
hardware specifications,
RZ24
hardware specifications,
RZ24L
hardware specifications,
RZ25
hardware specifications,
4–11
4–11
4–5
4–5
4–5
4–6
S
SEARCH command, 3–13
Security password
changing, 2–5
entering, 2–3, 2–5
setting, 2–3
verifying, 2–3
SET BOOT command
use of, 2–7
SET command, 3–15
SET HALT command
boot, 2–8
halt, 2–8
restart, 2–8
use of, 2–8
SET LANGUAGE, 3–15
SET PSE command
use of, 2–4, 2–7
SET PSWD command
use of, 2–3, 2–5
SHOW command, 3–17
START command, 3–19
use of, 2–7
Storage conditions
system unit, 4–3
Storage devices
compact disc drives, 1–3
disk drives, 1–3
diskette drives, 1–3
tape drives, 1–3
Support
VAX architecture, 1–2
Synchronous communications devices
DSW42-AA, 1–4
Index–3
Synchronous option cables, 1–4
System description
Model 90, 1–1
System disk, 1–3, 2–7
System specifications
nonoperating conditions, 4–4
operating conditions, 4–4
System unit
dimensions, 4–3
hardware specifications, 4–1
storage conditions, 4–3
T
Tape drives
TLZ06, 1–3
TZ30, 1–3
TZK10, 1–3
TZK11, 1–3
TEST command, 3–20
TLZ06 cassette tape drive
hardware specifications, 4–10
Index–4
TZ30 tape drive
hardware specifications, 4–9
TZK10 QIC tape drive
hardware specifications, 4–9
U
UNJAM command, 3–21
Unprivileged user
definition, 2–3
V
VAX architecture support
Model 90, 1–2
VAX instructions
support of, 1–2
X
X command (binary load and unload), 3–21
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