OpenVMS Systems Operations Guide: VAX 4000 and VAXstation 4000 Systems

OpenVMS Systems Operations Guide: VAX 4000 and VAXstation 4000 Systems

OpenVMS Systems Operations

Guide: VAX 4000 and VAXstation

4000 Systems

Order Number: EK-V4000-OG. A01

February 1993

This document is a quick reference guide to basic system operations for VAX

4000 and VAXstation 4000 systems. It contains information from multiple sources covering such topics as: system physical characteristics, system power up, boot, backup procedures, and console command descriptions.

Revision/Update Information:

Revision 1.0

Digital Equipment Corporation

February 1993

The information in this document is subject to change without notice and should not be construed as a commitment by Digital Equipment Corporation.

Digital Equipment Corporation assumes no responsibility for any errors that may appear in this document.

© Digital Equipment Corporation 1993.

All Rights Reserved.

Printed in U.S.A.

The following are trademarks of Digital Equipment Corporation:

DEC, DECconnect, Digital, DSSI, KRQ50, MSCP, OpenVMS, Q22–bus, Q–bus,

RL, RRD42, RX, RZ, ThinWire, TK, TURBOchannel, VAX, VAX MACRO,

VAX–11/780, VAXcluster, VAXstation, VMS, and the DIGITAL Logo.

FCC Notice:

This equipment generates, uses, and may emit radio frequency. The equipment has been type tested and found to comply with the limits for a Class A digital device pursuant to Part 15 of FCC rules, which are designed to provide reasonable protection against such radio frequency interference.

Operation of this equipment in a residential area may cause interference, in which case the user at his own expense will be required to take whatever measures may be required to correct the interference.

This document was prepared using VAX DOCUMENT, Version 2.1.

Contents

Preface

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

1 System Overview

Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

System Models . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

VAX 4000 Systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

VAXstation 4000 Systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

VAX 4000 System Enclosures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Enclosure Types . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Model 100 Enclosure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Model 200, BA215 Enclosure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Model 200, BA430 Enclosure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Model 300/400/500/600 BA440 Enclosure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

VAXstation 4000 System Enclosures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Enclosure Types . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Model 60 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Model 90 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Model VLC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

System Specifications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

VAX 4000 Systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

VAXstation 4000 Systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

System Options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

VAX 4000 Systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

VAXstation 4000 Systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Related Documents . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

VAX 4000 System Documents . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

VAXstation 4000 System Documents . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

xi

1–9

1–9

1–10

1–10

1–11

1–12

1–12

1–13

1–14

1–14

1–15

1–3

1–4

1–5

1–6

1–7

1–8

1–8

1–8

1–1

1–2

1–2

1–2

1–3 iii

2 System Physical Description

Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

VAX 4000 Model 100 System Unit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Front Panel Access Cover . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Rear Panel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Rear Panel Description . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Console Terminal Port Settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Expansion Ports . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

VAX 4000 Model 200 System, BA215 Enclosure . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Front Panel Window . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Enclosure Front View . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Mass Storage Shelf . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Mass Storage Shelf Description . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

ISE Control Panel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

ISE Control Panel Description . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

CPU Cover Panel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

CPU Cover Panel Description . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Power Supply Controls . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Power Supply Control Descriptions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

VAX 4000 Model 200 System, BA430 Enclosure . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Front Door Access . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Enclosure Front View . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Mass Storage Shelf . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Mass Storage Shelf Description . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

ISE Controls . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

ISE Control Descriptions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

CPU Cover Panel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

CPU Cover Panel Description . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Power Supply Controls . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Power Supply Control Descriptions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

VAX 4000 Model 300/400/500/600 Enclosure — BA440 . . . . . . . .

Front Door Access . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Enclosure Front View . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Mass Storage Shelf . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Mass Storage Shelf Description . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

ISE Controls . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

ISE Control Descriptions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Console Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Console Module Description . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Power Supply Controls . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Power Supply Control Descriptions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

VAXstation 4000 Models 60 and 90 System Unit . . . . . . . . . . . . .

2–25

2–26

2–28

2–29

2–30

2–30

2–31

2–17

2–18

2–18

2–19

2–20

2–21

2–23

2–24

2–32

2–33

2–35

2–36

2–37

2–38

2–41

2–42

2–43

2–7

2–8

2–9

2–10

2–11

2–12

2–13

2–14

2–16

2–1

2–2

2–2

2–3

2–4

2–5

2–6

2–7 iv

Front Panel View . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Front Panel Components . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Rear Panel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Rear Panel Description . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

VAXstation 4000 Model VLC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Side Panel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Side Panel Description . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Rear Panel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Rear Panel Description . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

3 Console Commands

Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Console I/O Mode . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

How the System Enters Console I/O Mode . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Console I/O Mode Control Characters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Entering Console Commands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Console Command Summary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Changing the Console Language . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Entering Language Inquiry Mode . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Sample Language Selection Menu, VAX 4000 Systems . . . . .

Sample Language Selection Menu, VAXstation 4000

Systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Console Security Feature: VAX 4000 Model 100 and VAXstation

4000 Systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Setting the Security Password . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Enabling the Console Security Feature . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Logging in to Privileged Console Mode . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Changing the Security Password . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Disabling the Console Security Feature . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Exiting from Privileged Console Mode . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Console Command Descriptions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

BOOT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

CONTINUE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

DEPOSIT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

EXAMINE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

FIND . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

HALT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

HELP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

INITIALIZE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

LOGIN . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

MOVE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

2–43

2–44

2–45

2–46

2–48

2–48

2–49

2–49

2–50

3–1

3–2

3–2

3–3

3–5

3–6

3–12

3–12

3–13

3–14

3–19

3–20

3–20

3–22

3–22

3–24

3–26

3–26

3–27

3–27

3–28

3–29

3–15

3–15

3–16

3–16

3–17

3–18

3–19 v

NEXT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

REPEAT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

SEARCH . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

SET . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

SHOW . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

START . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

TEST . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

UNJAM . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

X — Binary Load and Unload . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

! (Comment) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

4 System Startup and Shutdown Procedures

Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

System Startup . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Startup Procedure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Startup Display, VAX 4000 Systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Startup Display, VAXstation 4000 Systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Startup Display with Error, VAX 4000 Systems . . . . . . . . . . .

Startup Display with Error, VAXstation 4000 Systems . . . . .

After You Start Up the System . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

System Shutdown . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Precautions on Shutting Down the System . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Three Ways to Shut Down the System . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Orderly Shutdown Under Program Control . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Emergency Shutdown Under Program Control . . . . . . . . . . .

Emergency Shutdown Under Console Control . . . . . . . . . . . .

Powering Off the System . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Other System Operations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Restarting the System . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Recovering from an Over Temperature Condition . . . . . . . . .

5 System Boot Procedures

Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Boot Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Steps in the Boot Process . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Boot Device Names . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Listing Possible Boot Devices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Boot Methods . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Autobooting the System . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Boot Conditions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

System Response to Boot Conditions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

vi

3–30

3–32

3–33

3–35

3–37

3–41

3–41

3–42

3–42

3–42

4–8

4–9

4–9

4–10

4–11

4–12

4–12

4–12

4–1

4–2

4–2

4–3

4–4

4–5

4–6

4–7

4–8

4–8

5–1

5–2

5–2

5–3

5–5

5–5

5–6

5–6

5–7

Sample Boot, VAX 4000 System, Boot Device Defined . . . . .

Sample Boot, VAX 4000 System, Boot Device Not Defined

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Sample Boot, VAX 4000 System, Selecting a Boot Device . . .

Manually Booting the System . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Exiting to Console Mode . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Exit to Console Mode, VAX 4000 Systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Exit to Console Mode, VAXstation 4000 Systems . . . . . . . . . .

Using the BOOT Command . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

BOOT Command Syntax . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

BOOT Command Examples . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Optional Boot Procedures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Booting from [SYSF] During an Upgrade . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Booting from a Different Directory . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Definition: Conversational Boot . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

What You can do During a Conversational Boot . . . . . . . . . .

Conversational Boot Procedure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

SYSGEN Commands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Defining Default Boot Actions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Defining a Default Boot Device . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

SET BOOT Syntax . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

SET BOOT Examples . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Notes on Defining a Boot Device . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Defining the Default Halt Action . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

SET HALT Syntax . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

SET HALT Keywords . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

6 System Backup and Restore Procedures

Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Standalone BACKUP Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Definition: Standalone BACKUP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Why Use Standalone BACKUP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Where to Store Standalone BACKUP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Installing Standalone BACKUP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Installing on the System Disk . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Installing on a Tape Cartridge . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Booting Standalone BACKUP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Before Booting Standalone BACKUP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Booting from the System Disk . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Booting from a Tape Cartridge . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Booting from a Compact Disc . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Backing Up the System Disk . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

5–8

5–14

5–14

5–14

5–15

5–15

5–16

5–17

5–17

5–9

5–10

5–11

5–11

5–11

5–12

5–13

5–13

5–13

5–14

5–17

5–17

5–17

5–18

5–18

5–18

6–7

6–7

6–8

6–9

6–11

6–13

6–1

6–2

6–2

6–2

6–3

6–4

6–4

6–5 vii

Figures

2–2

2–3

2–4

2–5

2–6

2–7

2–8

1–1

1–2

1–3

1–4

1–5

1–6

1–7

2–1

Image Versus Physical Backup . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Before You Run Standalone BACKUP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

BACKUP Procedure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Notes on Volume Parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Restoring the System Disk . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Restore Procedure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Index

Examples

3–1

3–2

3–3

3–4

5–1

5–2

5–3

5–4

5–5

Setting the Console Security Feature . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Logging in to Privileged Console Mode . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Changing the Console Security Password . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Disabling the Console Security Feature . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Sample SHOW DEVICE Display . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

VAX 4000 System Boot, Boot Device Defined . . . . . . . . . . . .

VAX 4000 System Boot, Boot Device Not Defined . . . . . . . . .

VAX 4000 System Boot, Selecting a Boot Device . . . . . . . . . .

VAX 4000 Systems, Power Up to Console Mode . . . . . . . . . . .

VAX 4000 Model 100 Enclosure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

VAX 4000 Model 200, BA215 Enclosure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

VAX 4000 Model 200, BA430 Enclosure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

VAX 4000 Model 300/400/500/600 BA440 Enclosure . . . . . . . .

VAXstation 4000 Model 60 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

VAXstation 4000 Model 90 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

VAXstation 4000 Model VLC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

VAX 4000 Model 100: Front Panel Access Cover . . . . . . . . .

VAX 4000 Model 100: Rear Panel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

VAX 4000 Model 100: Expansion Ports . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

BA215 Cabinet: Front Panel Window and Keylock . . . . . . . .

BA215 Cabinet: Front View . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

BA215 Cabinet: Mass Storage Shelf . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

BA215 Cabinet: ISE Control Panel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

BA215 Cabinet: CPU Cover Panel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

viii

6–13

6–13

6–14

6–17

6–18

6–18

3–16

3–17

3–18

3–19

5–5

5–8

5–9

5–10

5–11

2–3

2–6

2–7

2–8

2–9

2–11

2–13

1–4

1–5

1–6

1–7

1–8

1–9

1–9

2–2

Tables

1–1

1–2

1–3

1–4

1–5

1–6

1–7

1–8

1–9

2–1

4–1

4–2

4–3

4–4

5–1

2–20

2–21

2–22

2–23

2–24

2–25

3–1

3–2

2–9

2–10

2–11

2–12

2–13

2–14

2–15

2–16

2–17

2–18

2–19

BA215 Cabinet: Power Supply Controls . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

BA430 Cabinet: Front Door Access . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

BA430 Cabinet: Front View with Doors Open . . . . . . . . . . . .

BA430 Cabinet: Mass Storage Shelf . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

BA430 Cabinet: ISE Controls . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

BA430 Cabinet: CPU Cover Panel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

BA430 Cabinet: Power Supply Controls and Indicators . . . . .

BA440 Cabinet: Front Door Access . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

BA440 Cabinet: Front View with Doors Open . . . . . . . . . . . .

BA440 Cabinet: Mass Storage Shelf . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

BA440 Cabinet: ISE Controls . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

BA440 Cabinet: Console Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

BA440 Cabinet: Power Supply Controls and Indicators . . . . .

VAXstation 4000 Models 60 and 90: Front Panel . . . . . . . . . .

VAXstation 4000 Models 60 and 90: Rear Panel . . . . . . . . . .

VAXstation 4000 Model VLC: Side Panel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

VAXstation 4000 Model VLC: Rear Panel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Language Selection Menu, VAX 4000 System . . . . . . . . . . . .

Language Selection Menu, VAXstation 4000 System . . . . . . .

VAX 4000 System Startup Display . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

VAXstation 4000 System Startup Display . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

VAX 4000 Startup Display, with Error . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

VAXstation 4000 Startup Display with Error Message . . . . .

VAXstation 4000 System, Power Up to Console Mode . . . . . .

2–37

2–41

2–43

2–45

2–48

2–49

3–13

3–14

2–16

2–18

2–19

2–20

2–23

2–25

2–28

2–30

2–31

2–32

2–35

4–3

4–4

4–5

4–6

5–12

VAX 4000 System Models . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

VAXstation 4000 System Models . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

VAX 4000 System Enclosures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

VAX 4000 System Specifications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

VAXstation 4000 System Specifications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

VAX 4000 System Options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

VAXstation 4000 System Options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

VAX 4000 System Documentation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

VAXstation 4000 System Documentation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

VAX 4000 Model 100: Console Terminal Settings . . . . . . . . .

1–2

1–2

1–3

1–10

1–11

1–12

1–13

1–14

1–15

2–5 ix

x

2–2

2–3

2–4

2–5

2–6

2–7

2–8

2–9

2–10

2–11

2–12

2–13

2–14

2–15

5–4

5–5

5–6

5–7

5–8

5–9

6–1

2–16

2–17

3–1

3–2

4–1

5–1

5–2

5–3

BA215 Cabinet: Mass Storage Shelf Components . . . . . . . . .

BA215 Cabinet: ISE Control Panel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

BA215 Cabinet: CPU Cover Panel Components . . . . . . . . . .

BA215 Cabinet: Power Supply Controls and Indicators . . . .

BA430 Cabinet: Mass Storage Shelf Components . . . . . . . . .

BA430 Cabinet: ISE Control Panel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

BA430 Cabinet: CPU Cover Panel Components . . . . . . . . . .

BA430 Cabinet: Power Supply Controls and Indicators . . . .

BA440 Cabinet: Mass Storage Shelf Components . . . . . . . . .

BA440 Cabinet: ISE Controls . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

BA440 Cabinet: Console Module Components . . . . . . . . . . .

BA440 Cabinet: Power Supply Controls and Indicators . . . .

VAXstation 4000 Models 60 and 90: Front Panel

Components . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

VAXstation 4000 Models 60 and 90: Rear Panel

Components . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

VAXstation 4000 Model VLC: Side Panel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

VAXstation 4000 Model VLC: Rear Panel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Console I/O Mode Control Characters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Console I/O Mode Command Summary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

System Shutdown Methods . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Boot Process . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Boot Device Names . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Boot Methods . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

System Response to Boot Conditions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

BOOT Command Examples . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Conversational Boot Procedure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

SYSGEN Commands Used in SYSBOOT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Sample SET BOOT Commands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

SET HALT Keywords . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Standalone BACKUP/IMAGE and /PHYSICAL Qualifiers . . .

2–10

2–12

2–14

2–17

2–21

2–24

2–26

2–29

2–33

2–36

2–38

2–42

2–44

2–46

2–49

2–50

3–3

3–6

4–8

5–2

5–3

5–5

5–7

5–13

5–15

5–16

5–17

5–18

6–13

Intended

Audience

Document

Structure

Preface

This document contains material from multiple sources and provides a single, quick reference guide to information on a variety of topics relative to the operation of VAX 4000 and

VAXstation 4000 systems.

This guide is designed primarily for:

• System software support personnel

• Digital Services personnel

• System managers

• Instructors and participants in certain OpenVMS operating system courses:

OpenVMS Systems Troubleshooting

OpenVMS System and Network Management I, II, and

III

The document organization is as follows:

Chapter 1

Chapter 2

Chapter 3

Chapter 4

Chapter 5

Chapter 6

Presents overviews of the VAX 4000 and

VAXstation 4000 system models

Describes the system physical components

Describes the console I/O mode commands

Describes the system startup and shutdown procedures

Describes the system boot procedures

Describes the system backup procedures xi

Conventions

The following conventions are used in this manual:

Convention

monospace type

boldface type

italic type

UPPERCASE lowercase

|

Note

Ctrl/X

n

{ }

[ ]

Description

Represents text displayed on the screen by the system.

Indicates user input in examples or text.

Emphasizes important information or indicates a variable or manual title.

In examples, indicates a command.

In examples, indicates parameters or arguments to be specified by the user.

In command syntax descriptions, a vertical bar | indicates options, one of which you can choose.

A note contains information of special importance to the reader.

Indicates to hold down the Ctrl key while you press another key.

A lowercase italic n indicates the generic use of a number. For example, 19nn indicates a 4-digit number in which the last 2 digits are unknown.

In format descriptions, indicates required elements. You must choose one of the elements.

In format descriptions, indicates optional elements. You can choose none, one, or all of the options.

xii

1

System Overview

Introduction

VAX 4000 and VAXstation 4000 systems are available in a variety of models from high performance, multi-user systems to entry level, desktop workstations. This chapter presents overviews of the systems. Topics include:

• System models

• VAX 4000 system enclosures

• VAXstation 4000 system enclosures

• System specifications

• System options

• Related documents

System Overview 1–1

System Models

System Models

VAX 4000

Systems

VAXstation

4000 Systems

All VAX 4000 systems except the VAX 4000 Model 100 are deskside systems. Model 100 is a desktop system. Table 1–1 lists the system models.

Table 1–1 VAX 4000 System Models

Model Memory

1

Disk

1

Performance

2

100

200

300

400

500

600

128 MB

64 MB

256 MB

512 MB

512 MB

512 MB

28 GB

42 GB

56 GB

56 GB

56 GB

56 GB

24 VUPS

5 VUPS

8 VUPS

16 VUPS

24 VUPS

32 VUPS

1

Maximum on system.

2

Performance relative to a VAX–11/780 system.

All VAXstation 4000 systems are desktop workstations.

Table 1–2 lists the system models.

Table 1–2 VAXstation 4000 System Models

Model Memory

1

Disk

1

SPECmarks

2

60

90

VLC

104 MB

128 MB

24 MB

8.7 GB

8.7 GB

6.1 GB

12.0

32.7

6.2

1

Maximum on system.

2

SPECmark is an industry standard measure of system performance.

1–2 System Overview

VAX 4000 System Enclosures

VAX 4000 System Enclosures

Enclosure

Types

VAX 4000 systems are available in four basic enclosures as shown in Table 1–3.

Table 1–3 VAX 4000 System Enclosures

Model(s) Enclosure Type

100

200

300, 400,

500, 600

BA42B

BA215

BA430

BA440

Desktop

Deskside, small pedestal

Deskside, large pedestal

Deskside, large pedestal

The following sections show the enclosures.

System Overview 1–3

VAX 4000 System Enclosures

Model 100

Enclosure

The VAX 4000 Model 100 system is housed in a BA42B enclosure, a desktop unit. Figure 1–1 shows the enclosure.

Figure 1–1 VAX 4000 Model 100 Enclosure

RE_EN06213A_91

1–4 System Overview

Model 200,

BA215

Enclosure

VAX 4000 System Enclosures

The BA215 enclosure is a small pedestal deskside cabinet with a

6 slot Q–bus backplane. Figure 1–2 shows the enclosure.

Figure 1–2 VAX 4000 Model 200, BA215 Enclosure

MLO-000670

System Overview 1–5

VAX 4000 System Enclosures

Model 200,

BA430

Enclosure

The BA430 is a large pedestal deskside cabinet with a 12 slot

Q–bus backplane. Figure 1–3 shows the enclosure.

Figure 1–3 VAX 4000 Model 200, BA430 Enclosure

MLO-004032

1–6 System Overview

VAX 4000 System Enclosures

Model

300/400/500/600

BA440

Enclosure

These models are all housed in a BA440 enclosure, a large pedestal, deskside cabinet with a 12 slot Q–bus backplane. The

BA440 enclosure is similar to the BA430 enclosure. Figure 1–4 shows the enclosure.

Figure 1–4 VAX 4000 Model 300/400/500/600 BA440 Enclosure

MLO-004032

System Overview 1–7

VAXstation 4000 System Enclosures

VAXstation 4000 System Enclosures

Enclosure

Types

Model 60

All VAXstation 4000 systems consist of a desktop system unit, a monitor, a keyboard, and a mouse.

Figure 1–5 shows the basic VAXstation 4000 Model 60 system.

Figure 1–5 VAXstation 4000 Model 60

O I

O I

NUO-0535-01-MPS

1–8 System Overview

Model 90

VAXstation 4000 System Enclosures

Figure 1–6 shows the basic VAXstation 4000 Model 90 system.

Figure 1–6 VAXstation 4000 Model 90

Model VLC

O I

O I

NUO-0535-02-MPS

Figure 1–7 shows the basic VAXstation 4000 Model VLC system.

Figure 1–7 VAXstation 4000 Model VLC

NUO-0535-03-MPS

System Overview 1–9

System Specifications

System Specifications

VAX 4000

Systems

Table 1–4 lists selected specifications for VAX 4000 systems.

Table 1–4 VAX 4000 System Specifications

Models 100, 200, 300 Models 400, 500, 600

Processor clock

Model 100: KA52 / 72 MHz

Model 200: KA660 / 28 MHz

Model 300: KA670 / 36 MHz

Model 400: KA675 / 63 MHz

Model 500: KA680 / 72 MHz

Model 600: KA690 / 83 MHz

Cache

1

Memory

Disk

3

2

Interfaces

OpenVMS

4

Model 100: 10 kB / 128 kB

Model 200: 6 kB

Model 300: 2 kB / 128 kB

Model 100: 16 MB / 128 MB

Model 200: 8 MB

5

/ 64 MB

Model 300: 32 MB / 128 MB

Model 400: 10 kB / 128 kB

Model 500: 10 kB / 128 kB

Model 600: 10 kB / 512 kB

64 MB/ 512 MB

Model 100: 381 MB / 28 GB

Model 200: 381 MB / 21 GB

Model 300: 381 MB / 28 GB

381 MB / 56 GB

All support Q–bus, DSSI, and Ethernet. Model 100 also supports

SCSI.

Model 100: 5.5–1HN

Model 200: 5.4–2

Model 300: 5.3–2

Model 400: 5.5–2

Model 500: 5.5

Model 600: 5.5

1

On Chip/On Board

2

Minimum/maximum

3

Minimum/maximum

4

OpenVMS operating system version that first supported system

5

16 MB on large pedestal (BA430 cabinet) systems

1–10 System Overview

System Specifications

VAXstation

4000 Systems

Table 1–5 lists selected specifications for VAXstation 4000 systems.

Table 1–5 VAXstation 4000 System Specifications

Processor clock

Cache

Memory

1

Disk capacity

Interfaces

Serial comm

Monitor size

Resolution

(Optional)

Planes

Graphics

(Optional)

OpenVMS

4

Model VLC Model 60 Model 90

KA48

25 MHz

5 kB

8 MB / 24 MB

KA46

55.5 MHz

256 kB

8 MB / 104 MB

KA49

74.1 MHz

256 kB

16 MB / 128 MB

6.1 GB 8.7 GB 8.7 GB

All support SCSI and Ethernet. Models 60 and 90 also optionally support

TURBOchannel and FDDI.

All support 1 printer and 1 modem port.

13/16/17/19 16/17/19

1024 x 768

1280 x 1024

8

2D accelerator

5.5

1280 x 1024

Dual 1280 x 1024

Quad 1280 x 1024

4 or 8

2D accelerator

3

3D accelerator

5.5–2

16/19

1280 x 1024

8

2

2D accelerator

3

3D 8 or 24 plane

5.5

1

Minimum/maximum

2

24 planes on Model 60 SPXg and Model 90 SPXgt systems

3

3D accelerator with Z and double buffering is standard on Model 60 SPXg and Model 90 SPXgt systems

4

OpenVMS operating system version that first supported system

System Overview 1–11

System Options

System Options

VAX 4000

Systems

Table 1–6 lists the options commonly installed on typical VAX

4000 system configurations. For a complete list of options, refer to the system documentation manuals.

Table 1–6 VAX 4000 System Options

Device Description

Model 100

B400X

R400X

RF31T

RF35

RRD42

RWZ01

RX26

Q–bus expansion cabinet

RF-series expansion cabinet

381 MB ISE disk drive

852 MB ISE disk drive

600 MB CDROM drive

Magneto-optical disk drive

2.8 MB diskette drive

TZ30

TLZ06

95 MB tape drive

4.0 GB tape drive

TZK10 320 MB or 525 MB tape drive

DHW42-AA 8-line asynchronous DEC423

DHW42-BA 16-line asynchronous DEC423

DHW42-CA 8-line asynchronous EIA-232

DSW42-AA 2-line synchronous EIA-232/V.24

Models 200/300/400/500/600

B400X, R400X, RF31, RF35, RRD42 — See above

TLZ04 1.2 GB tape drive

TSZ07 140 MB tape drive

RF72

RF73

TF85

TK70

1.0 GB ISE

2.0 GB ISE

2.6 GB tape drive

296 MB tape drive

TU81

CXA16

CXY08

DSV11

140 MB tape drive

16-line asynchronous

8-line asynchronous

2-line synchronous

1–12 System Overview

VAXstation

4000 Systems

System Options

Table 1–7 lists the options commonly installed on typical

VAXstation 4000 system configurations. For a complete list of options, refer to the system documentation manuals.

Table 1–7 VAXstation 4000 System Options

Device Description

Models 60 and 90

RZ23L

RZ24L

RZ25

RZ26

RZ56

RZ58

RX26

RRD42

TLZ04

TLZ06

TZ30

TZK10

121 MB disk drive

245 MB disk drive

426 MB disk drive

1.05 GB disk drive

665 MB disk drive

1.3 GB disk drive

4.0 MB diskette drive

600 MB CDROM drive

1.2 GB tape drive

4.0 GB tape drive

95 MB tape drive

320/525 MB tape drive

DSW21

VSXXX-AB

VSXXX-GA

VSXXX-JA

1-line synchronous comm.

Tablet

3-button mouse

Audio headset

SZ03, SZ12, SZ16 — expansion boxes

Model VLC

RRD42, RX26L, RZ23L, RZ24L, RZ25, RZ56, RZ58, TZ30,

TZK10, TLZ06, SZ03, SZ12, SZ16 — See above

System Overview 1–13

Related Documents

Related Documents

VAX 4000

System

Documents

Table 1–8 lists the documents available for the VAX 4000 series.

Table 1–8 VAX 4000 System Documentation

Order Number Title

Model 100 Documents

EK-467AA-TI

EK-465AA-IN

EK-466AA-OP

EK-468AA-TS

VAX 4000 Model 100 Customer Technical

Information

VAX 4000 Model 100 Installation Information

VAX 4000 Model 100 Operator Information

VAX 4000 Model 100 Troubleshooting and

Diagnostics

Model 200 Documents

EK-432AB-IN

EK-433AA-OM

EK-436AB-IN

EK-395AB-OM

EK-396AB-TM

EK-437AB-TS

VAX 4000 Model 200 (BA215) Installation

VAX 4000 Model 200 (BA215) Operation

VAX 4000 Model 200 (BA430) Installation

VAX 4000 Model 200 (BA430) Operation

VAX 4000 Model 200 Technical Information

VAX 4000 Model 200 Troubleshooting and

Diagnostics

Model 300 Documents

EK-335AC-IN

EK-336AC-OP

EK-337AB-TI

EK-386AB-TS

VAX 4000 Model 300 Installation

VAX 4000 Model 300 Operation

VAX 4000 Model 300 Technical Information

VAX 4000 Model 300 Troubleshooting

(continued on next page)

1–14 System Overview

VAXstation

4000 System

Documents

Related Documents

Table 1–8 (Cont.) VAX 4000 System Documentation

Order Number Title

Model 400/500/600 Documents

EK-K42AA-DK

EK-448AD-IN

EK-450AD-OP

EK-452AD-TI

EK-451AD-TS

VAX 4000 Model 400/500/600 Documentation Kit

VAX 4000 Model 400/500/600 Installation

VAX 4000 Model 400/500/600 Operation

VAX 4000 Model 400/500/600 Technical Information

VAX 4000 Model 400/500/600 Troubleshooting and

Diagnostics

VAXstation 4000 documents are available in documentation kits.

Table 1–9 lists the kits.

Table 1–9 VAXstation 4000 System Documentation

Order Number Title

EK-PMARI-DK VAXstation 4000 Model 60 Documentation Kit

EK-VAXOG-DK VAXstation 4000 Model 90 Documentation Kit

EK-VXVLC-DK VAXstation 4000 VLC Documentation Kit

System Overview 1–15

2

System Physical Description

Introduction

This chapter describes the controls, indicators, connectors, and other physical components of the VAX 4000 and VAXstation 4000 systems.

Topics include:

• VAX 4000 model 100 system unit

• VAX 4000 model 200 system, BA215 enclosure

• VAX 4000 model 200 system, BA430 enclosure

• VAX 4000 model 300/400/500/600 enclosure — BA440

• VAXstation 4000 models 60 and 90 system unit

• VAXstation 4000 model VLC

System Physical Description

2–1

VAX 4000 Model 100 System Unit

VAX 4000 Model 100 System Unit

Front Panel

Access Cover

The system unit provides access to removable media internal devices by way of an access cover on the front panel. Figure 2–1 shows the access cover.

Figure 2–1 VAX 4000 Model 100: Front Panel Access Cover

RE_EN06149A_91

2–2 System Physical Description

Rear Panel

VAX 4000 Model 100 System Unit

1

2

3

4

The rear panel of the system unit contains several connectors, controls, and indicators. Figure 2–2 shows the rear panel.

Figure 2–2 VAX 4000 Model 100: Rear Panel

7

8

9

10

5

6

11

12

MLO-009279

System Physical Description

2–3

VAX 4000 Model 100 System Unit

Rear Panel

Description

The following list keyed to Figure 2–2 describes the rear panel components.

!

"

#

Power On/Off switch — turns the system unit on and off.

AC power connector — receptacle for the ac power cord.

Synchronous communications ports 0 (bottom) and 1 — for connecting devices that use synchronous communications.

$

Asynchronous communications ports A (bottom) and B — for connecting devices that use asynchronous communications.

%

Modified modular jack (MMJ) ports 0, 1, and 3 — for connecting the user terminal, printer, or other devices that require an asynchronous DEC423 data-line-only port.

The console terminal is always connected to port 3.

&

Asynchronous modem control port (port 2) — for connecting a modem, terminal, printer, or other devices that require an

EIA-232 port.

'

Halt button — halts the system and returns it from program

I/O mode to console mode.

(

Break/Enable switch and LED — when in the up position, causes the system to halt when the keyboard break key is pressed. The LED is on when the switch is in the up position and off when the switch is in the down position.

)

Diagnostic LEDs — indicate system and test status, and error conditions.

+>

Standard Ethernet port — for connecting the system to the

Ethernet by way of a standard connector.

+?

Network Select switch — enables either the ThinWire or standard Ethernet connection. Standard Ethernet is selected when the switch is in the left-hand position.

[email protected]

ThinWire Ethernet port — for connecting the system to the

Ethernet by way of a ThinWire connector.

2–4 System Physical Description

Console

Terminal Port

Settings

VAX 4000 Model 100 System Unit

If installed, the console terminal is always connected to port

3. The terminal settings shown in Table 2–1 are required to communicate with the system unit by way of the console port.

Table 2–1 VAX 4000 Model 100: Console Terminal Settings

Parameter Setting

Mode

Speed

Format

Comm 1 port

VTxxx-7-bit

9600 baud; receive = transmit

8 bits, no parity, 1 stop bit

DEC423, data-leads-only

System Physical Description

2–5

VAX 4000 Model 100 System Unit

Expansion

Ports

The system unit provides additional ports for system expansion.

Figure 2–3 shows the port locations.

Figure 2–3 VAX 4000 Model 100: Expansion Ports

1

2

3

!

"

Q–bus ports — for connecting an external Q–bus expander.

DSSI port — for connecting external DSSI devices and building a DSSI based VAXcluster system.

#

SCSI port — for connecting small computer system interface

(SCSI) storage devices. An SCSI terminator is installed on this port when the unit is shipped.

MLO-009280

2–6 System Physical Description

VAX 4000 Model 200 System, BA215 Enclosure

VAX 4000 Model 200 System, BA215 Enclosure

Front Panel

Window

The BA215 enclosure has a removable front panel with a sliding window that provides access to certain system controls. The window is controlled by a rotary lock that allows the window to be locked in one of three positions.

Figure 2–4 shows the rotary lock and indicates which controls are accessible in each key position.

Figure 2–4 BA215 Cabinet: Front Panel Window and Keylock

Rotary Key Lock

Key Position 1:

No Access to Controls

Key Position 2:

Access to Tape Drive and

Operator Control Panel

Key Position 3:

Access to Power Switch and Front Panel

Release Latch

MLO-000671

System Physical Description

2–7

VAX 4000 Model 200 System, BA215 Enclosure

Enclosure

Front View

Figure 2–5 shows a typical BA215 cabinet with the front panel removed.

Figure 2–5 BA215 Cabinet: Front View

ISE

Controls and

Indicators

Mass

Storage

Shelf

Card

Cage

Power

Supply

Tape

Drive

CPU Cover

Panel

Fans

MLO-005509

2–8 System Physical Description

Mass Storage

Shelf

VAX 4000 Model 200 System, BA215 Enclosure

Figure 2–6 shows the mass storage shelf that extends across the top of the enclosure. The shelf may contain a TK series tape drive and up to two RF-series integrated storage elements

(ISEs).

Figure 2–6 BA215 Cabinet: Mass Storage Shelf

DSSI

Connector ISE 1 ISE 0

Tape

Drive

Write

Protect

Tape in Use

TK70

Unload

D R I V E

U n i t N u m b e r

F a u l t

W r i t e -

P r o t e c t

R e a d y

S Y S T E M

1

R e s t a r t / H a l t

R u n

0

ISE

Controls and

Indicators

Restart/Run

Button

Halt

Button

DC OK

Indicator

MLO-005510

System Physical Description

2–9

VAX 4000 Model 200 System, BA215 Enclosure

Mass

Storage Shelf

Description

Table 2–2 describes the components in the mass storage shelf.

Table 2–2 BA215 Cabinet: Mass Storage Shelf Components

Component Description

ISE controls

DC OK indicator

Halt button

Each ISE drive has its own set of controls and indicators. When the system is turned on, the indicator lights indicate the state of the ISEs.

Illuminates (green) if the power supply voltages are within operating range.

The Halt button is a two-position switch that controls the running state of the system.

Pressing the button in halts the system and illuminates the red indicator on the button. When pressed a second time, the button is returned to the out position.

When the Halt button is in the out position, the console mode prompt (>>>) is displayed and commands can be entered on the console. If you inadvertently press Halt, enter CONTINUE

Return on the console to continue.

CAUTION: Pressing the Halt button halts the system regardless of the setting of the Break Enable

/Disable switch.

Restart/Run button

Pressing the Restart/Run button causes the system to return to its power-up state and execute self-tests.

If a boot device has been specified, and the Break

Enable/Disable switch is set to disable, the system will reboot the system software. The button has a green indicator.

DSSI connector Allows additional RF-series ISEs to be added to the system by way of a connection to an expansion cabinet.

2–10 System Physical Description

ISE Control

Panel

VAX 4000 Model 200 System, BA215 Enclosure

Figure 2–7 shows the ISE control panel.

Figure 2–7 BA215 Cabinet: ISE Control Panel

ISE Controls and Indicators

D R I V E

U n i t N u m b e r

F a u l t

W r i t e -

P r o t e c t

R e a d y

2 1 0

S Y S T E M

R e s t a r t /

R u n

H a l t

MLO-005512

Note

The ISE control panel is designed to operate on several system platforms and can service up to three ISE drives.

A maximum of two ISE drives can be installed in a

BA215 cabinet.

System Physical Description

2–11

VAX 4000 Model 200 System, BA215 Enclosure

ISE Control

Panel

Description

Table 2–3 describes the ISE control panel.

Table 2–3 BA215 Cabinet: ISE Control Panel

Component Function

Bus Node ID plug

Fault light

Identifies the bus node number of the ISE.

Bus node numbers are factory-configured in consecutive order from right to left with the rightmost ISE being node 0. If the plug is missing, the bus node number is undefined and the fault indicator lights.

Illuminates if an error condition exists in the

ISE. The light is on temporarily during the power-up sequence.

Write-Protect button

Determines if the ISE is to be write-protected.

Pressing the button in write-protects the ISE and illuminates the (amber) indicator light.

Ready button Determines if the ISE is to be placed on-line or off-line.

Releasing the button (out position) places the ISE on-line and illuminates the (green) indicator light. Under normal operation the green indicator flashes as seek operations are performed. Pressing the button in places the ISE off-line and extinguishes the indicator light.

2–12 System Physical Description

CPU Cover

Panel

VAX 4000 Model 200 System, BA215 Enclosure

The CPU cover panel contains certain system controls, indicators, and connectors. Figure 2–8 shows the panel.

Figure 2–8 BA215 Cabinet: CPU Cover Panel

A1

Break

Enable/

Disable

Switch

A1

LED

Display

Power-Up

Mode Switch

Modified

Modular

Jack

Standard

Ethernet

Connector

Ethernet

Connector

Switch

ThinWire

Ethernet

Connector

MLO-000679

System Physical Description

2–13

VAX 4000 Model 200 System, BA215 Enclosure

CPU Cover

Panel

Description

Table 2–4 describes the components on the CPU cover panel.

Table 2–4 BA215 Cabinet: CPU Cover Panel Components

Component Function

Power-Up Mode switch

Determines the system response at power up:

• Language Inquiry Mode (top position, indicated by a profile of a face):

Causes the system to display a language selection menu at power up if the console terminal supports multiple languages. Also, if a default boot device has not been selected, this mode causes the system to prompt for a boot device from a list of bootable devices. Once a device is selected, the system will autoboot from that device on power up.

• Run Mode (middle position, indicated by an arrow):

This position is the normal operating setting.

• Loop Back Test Mode (bottom position, indicated by a T in a circle):

Causes the system to run loopback tests on the console serial line at power up. This setting requires special loopback connectors and is for

Digital Services use only.

Modified modular jack

(MMJ)

LED display

Provides the connection for the console terminal.

Shows the testing sequence during power up.

(continued on next page)

2–14 System Physical Description

VAX 4000 Model 200 System, BA215 Enclosure

Table 2–4 (Cont.) BA215 Cabinet: CPU Cover Panel

Components

Component Function

Break Enable

/Disable switch

Ethernet connectors

Determines if the system will respond to a break signal from the console. If the switch is down, breaks are disabled. If the switch is up, breaks are enabled.

When breaks are enabled, pressing Break on the console halts the processor and transfers control to the console program. Use the console command SET

CONTROLP if you wish to specify

Ctrl/P rather than

Break to initiate a break.

The Break Enable/Disable switch also controls the system power-up response. When breaks are disabled, the system autoboots at power up. When breaks are enabled, the system enters console mode

(indicated by the (>>>) prompt) at power up.

The console commands SET HALT REBOOT and

SET HALT RESTART_REBOOT allow you to override the Break Enable/Disable switch and automatically boot software after an error halt or power up, even if breaks are enabled.

Provide for connecting to either ThinWire Ethernet or standard Ethernet.

The position of the Ethernet connector switch determines which connector is active. Setting the switch to the up position selects standard Ethernet.

Setting the switch to the down position selects

ThinWire Ethernet. A green LED for each connector indicates the active connection.

System Physical Description

2–15

VAX 4000 Model 200 System, BA215 Enclosure

Power Supply

Controls

The power supply provides power to the mass storage devices, the modules in the card cage, and the cabinet fans. Figure 2–9 shows the power supply controls and indicators.

Figure 2–9 BA215 Cabinet: Power Supply Controls

DC OK

Light

Reset

Button

Circuit

Breaker

A1

Power

Supply

MLO-000680

2–16 System Physical Description

Power Supply

Control

Descriptions

VAX 4000 Model 200 System, BA215 Enclosure

Table 2–5 describes the power supply controls and indicators.

Table 2–5 BA215 Cabinet: Power Supply Controls and

Indicators

Component Function

DC OK

Reset button

Circuit breaker

Illuminates (green) if the power supply voltages are within the correct operating range.

When pressed, resets the system to the powerup state. The button is recessed to prevent inadvertent resetting of the system.

Protects the system from power surges. When tripped, the circuit breaker is in the out position.

To reset the breaker, press the circuit breaker to the in position.

System Physical Description

2–17

VAX 4000 Model 200 System, BA430 Enclosure

VAX 4000 Model 200 System, BA430 Enclosure

Front Door

Access

The BA430 enclosure has hinge mounted upper and lower doors that provide access to the system controls. The doors are controlled by a three-position rotary lock that allows you to open both doors or the upper door only.

Figure 2–10 shows the rotary lock and indicates which controls are accessible in each key position.

Figure 2–10 BA430 Cabinet: Front Door Access

Door Handle

Rotary Key Lock

Top Key Position:

Access to SCP, ISEs, and

Tape Drive Controls and

Indicators (Upper Part Open)

Middle Key Position:

No Access to Controls

(Both Parts Locked)

Bottom Key Position:

Access to Power Switch;

All Controls and Indicators

(Both Parts Open)

MLO-006033

2–18 System Physical Description

Enclosure

Front View

VAX 4000 Model 200 System, BA430 Enclosure

Figure 2–11 shows a typical BA430 cabinet with both doors open.

Figure 2–11 BA430 Cabinet: Front View with Doors Open

Integrated Storage Elements (ISEs)

Tape Drive

System Control

Panel (SCP)

Power Supply

CPU Cover Panel

Card Cage

Fans

MLO-005502

System Physical Description

2–19

VAX 4000 Model 200 System, BA430 Enclosure

Mass Storage

Shelf

The mass storage shelf extends across the top of the enclosure.

The shelf contains a system control panel (SCP), up to three

RF-series integrated storage elements (ISEs), and a TF85, TK70, or TLZ04 tape drive. Tapeless systems can have up to four

RF-series ISEs.

Figure 2–12 shows the mass storage shelf.

Figure 2–12 BA430 Cabinet: Mass Storage Shelf

ISE 2 ISE 1 ISE 0 Tape Drive

System Control Panel (SCP)

Over Temperature

Warning Indicator

DC OK Indicator

Halt Button

Restart Button

MLO-005386

2–20 System Physical Description

Mass

Storage Shelf

Description

VAX 4000 Model 200 System, BA430 Enclosure

Table 2–6 describes the mass storage shelf components.

Table 2–6 BA430 Cabinet: Mass Storage Shelf Components

Component Description

ISE units

Tape drive

Up to three ISEs can be installed in the BA430 cabinet (four ISEs on a tapeless system). Each

ISE drive has its own set of controls and indicators.

When the system is powered on, the indicator lights indicate the state of the ISEs.

A TF85, TK70, or TLZ04 tape drive can be installed in this position. If no tape is installed, a fourth ISE drive can be installed in the cabinet.

System Control Panel

Over

Temperature

Warning indicator (red)

DC OK indicator

(green)

Flashes red if the internal system temperature approaches a level that may cause system component overheating. If the internal temperature reaches a certain threshold, the system automatically shuts down.

In addition to the indicator, an audible alarm also provides warning of a possible over temperature condition.

Illuminates if the power supply voltages are within operating limits.

(continued on next page)

System Physical Description

2–21

VAX 4000 Model 200 System, BA430 Enclosure

Table 2–6 (Cont.) BA430 Cabinet: Mass Storage Shelf

Components

Component Description

System Control Panel

Halt button

Restart button

Controls the running state of the system.

Pressing the button in halts the system and illuminates the red indicator on the button. When pressed a second time, the button returns to the out position.

When the Halt button is out, the console mode prompt (>>>) is displayed and commands can be entered on the console. If you inadvertently press

Halt, enter CONTINUE

Return to continue.

CAUTION: Pressing the Halt button halts the system regardless of the setting of the Break

Enable/Disable switch.

Pressing the Restart button causes the system to return to its power-up state and execute self-tests.

If a boot device has been specified, and the Break

Enable/Disable switch is set to disable, the system will reboot the system software. The button has a green indicator.

Note

The Halt and Restart buttons can be disabled to prevent accidental activation. Contact the Digital Services representative if you want to disable the controls on the

SCP.

2–22 System Physical Description

ISE Controls

VAX 4000 Model 200 System, BA430 Enclosure

Up to three ISEs can be installed in a BA430 enclosure (four on tapeless systems). Figure 2–13 shows the ISE controls and indicators.

Figure 2–13 BA430 Cabinet: ISE Controls

Run/Ready Button

Write-Protect Button

Bus Node

ID Plug

Fault Indicator

MLO-004044

System Physical Description

2–23

VAX 4000 Model 200 System, BA430 Enclosure

ISE Control

Descriptions

Table 2–7 describes the ISE control panel.

Table 2–7 BA430 Cabinet: ISE Control Panel

Component Function

Bus Node ID plug

Fault light

Identifies the bus node number of the ISE.

Bus node numbers are factory-configured in consecutive order from right to left with the rightmost ISE being node 0. If the plug is missing, the bus node number is undefined and the fault indicator lights.

Illuminates if an error condition exists in the

ISE. The light is on temporarily during the power-up sequence.

Ready button Determines if the ISE is to be placed on-line or off-line.

Pressing the button in places the ISE on-line and illuminates the green indicator light. Under normal operation, the indicator flashes as seek operations are performed. Setting the button out places the ISE off-line and extinguishes the indicator light.

Write-Protect button

Determines if the ISE is to be write-protected.

Pressing the button in write-protects the ISE and illuminates the (amber) indicator light.

2–24 System Physical Description

CPU Cover

Panel

VAX 4000 Model 200 System, BA430 Enclosure

The CPU cover panel contains certain system controls, indicators, and connectors. Figure 2–14 shows the panel.

Figure 2–14 BA430 Cabinet: CPU Cover Panel

CPU Cover Panel

Break

Enable/

Disable

Switch

Standard

Ethernet

Connector

LED Display

Power-Up

Mode Switch

Modified

Modular Jack

Ethernet

Connector Switch

ThinWire Ethernet

Connector

MLO-005504

System Physical Description

2–25

VAX 4000 Model 200 System, BA430 Enclosure

CPU Cover

Panel

Description

Table 2–8 describes the CPU cover panel components.

Table 2–8 BA430 Cabinet: CPU Cover Panel Components

Component Function

Power-Up Mode switch

Determines the system response at power up:

• Language Inquiry Mode (top position, indicated by a profile of a face):

Causes the system to display a language selection menu at power up if the console terminal supports multiple languages. Also, if a default boot device has not been selected, this mode causes the system to prompt for a boot device from a list of bootable devices. Once a device is selected, the system autoboots from that device each time it is powered on.

• Run Mode (middle position, indicated by an arrow):

This position is the normal operating setting.

• Loop Back Test Mode (bottom position, indicated by a T in a circle):

Causes the system to run loopback tests on the console serial line at power up. This setting requires special loopback connectors and is for

Digital Services use only.

Modified modular jack

(MMJ)

LED display

Provides the connection for the console terminal.

Shows the testing sequence during power up.

(continued on next page)

2–26 System Physical Description

VAX 4000 Model 200 System, BA430 Enclosure

Table 2–8 (Cont.) BA430 Cabinet: CPU Cover Panel

Components

Component Function

Break Enable

/Disable switch

Ethernet connectors

Determines if the system will respond to a break signal from the console. If the switch is down, breaks are disabled. If the switch is up, breaks are enabled.

When breaks are enabled, pressing Break on the console halts the processor and transfers control to the console program. Use the console command SET

CONTROLP to specify

Ctrl/P rather than

Break to initiate a break if desired.

The Break Enable/Disable switch also controls the system power-up response. When breaks are disabled, the system autoboots at power up. When breaks are enabled, the system enters console mode

(indicated by the (>>>) prompt) at power-up.

Use the console commands SET HALT REBOOT and SET HALT RESTART_REBOOT, if desired, to override the Break Enable/Disable switch setting.

These commands will cause an autoboot after an error halt or power up, even if breaks are enabled.

Provide for connecting to either ThinWire Ethernet or standard Ethernet.

The position of the Ethernet connector switch determines which connector is active. Setting the switch to the up position selects standard Ethernet.

Setting the switch to the down position selects

ThinWire Ethernet. A green LED for each connector indicates the active connection.

System Physical Description

2–27

VAX 4000 Model 200 System, BA430 Enclosure

Power Supply

Controls

The power supply provides power to the mass storage devices, the modules in the card cage, and to the cabinet fans.

Figure 2–15 shows the power supply controls and indicators.

Figure 2–15 BA430 Cabinet: Power Supply Controls and

Indicators

Power Supply

Power Switch

AC Present Indicator

DC OK Indicator

Fan Failure

Indicator

Over Temperature

Condition Indicator

Power Bus

Connectors

Power Cable

Connector

MLO-005506

2–28 System Physical Description

Power Supply

Control

Descriptions

VAX 4000 Model 200 System, BA430 Enclosure

Table 2–9 describes the power supply controls and indicators.

Table 2–9 BA430 Cabinet: Power Supply Controls and

Indicators

Component Function

Power switch

AC Present indicator

DC OK indicator

Fan Failure indicator

Turns system power on and off.

The power switch also functions as the system circuit breaker. In the event of a power surge, the breaker will trip, causing the power switch to return to the off position. Turning the system on resets the circuit breaker. If the circuit breaker trips, wait one minute before turning the system back on.

Illuminates (orange) when the power switch is on and voltage is present at the input of the power supply.

Illuminates (green) if the power supply voltages are within operating limits.

Illuminates (amber) if either of the two cooling fans stops working. The power supply will automatically shut down the system as a precautionary measure when a fan failure is detected.

Illuminates (amber) if the system shuts down due to an over temperature condition.

Over

Temperature

Condition indicator

Power bus connectors

Provides a means for the system cabinet to control power sequencing in expansion cabinets. This allows one power switch to control power for an entire expanded system.

CAUTION

Dual-host systems should not be configured with a power bus. Inadvertently shutting off a host system and bringing down the cluster defeats the reliability of a dual-host system.

System Physical Description

2–29

VAX 4000 Model 300/400/500/600 Enclosure — BA440

VAX 4000 Model 300/400/500/600 Enclosure — BA440

The BA440 enclosure is the main system cabinet for VAX 4000

Model 300, 400, 500, and 600 systems. This section describes the main features of the enclosure.

Front Door

Access

The BA440 enclosure has hinge-mounted upper and lower doors that provide access to the system controls. The doors are controlled by a three-position rotary lock that allows you to open both doors or the upper door only.

Figure 2–16 shows the rotary lock and indicates which controls are accessible in each key position.

Figure 2–16 BA440 Cabinet: Front Door Access

Door Handle

Rotary Key Lock

Top Key Position:

Access to SCP, ISEs, and

Tape Drive Controls and

Indicators (Upper Part Open)

Middle Key Position:

No Access to Controls

(Both Parts Locked)

Bottom Key Position:

Access to Power Switch;

All Controls and Indicators

(Both Parts Open)

MLO-006033

2–30 System Physical Description

Enclosure

Front View

VAX 4000 Model 300/400/500/600 Enclosure — BA440

Figure 2–17 shows a typical BA440 cabinet with both doors open.

Figure 2–17 BA440 Cabinet: Front View with Doors Open

Integrated Storage Elements (ISEs)

Tape Drive

System Control

Panel (SCP)

Power Supply

Console Module

Card Cage

Fans

MLO-004016

System Physical Description

2–31

VAX 4000 Model 300/400/500/600 Enclosure — BA440

Mass Storage

Shelf

The mass storage shelf extends across the top of the enclosure.

The shelf contains a system control panel (SCP), up to three

RF-series ISEs, and a tape drive. Tapeless systems can have up to four RF-series ISEs.

Figure 2–18 shows the mass storage shelf.

Figure 2–18 BA440 Cabinet: Mass Storage Shelf

ISE 2 ISE 1 ISE 0 Tape Drive

System Control Panel (SCP)

Note

With RF35 ISE drives, up to six ISEs and a tape drive can be installed in the BA440 cabinet. On tapeless systems, seven ISEs can be installed.

The RF35 ISE has a dual-disk capability; two separate

ISEs share the same mass storage cavity and control panel.

Over Temperature

Warning Indicator

DC OK Indicator

Halt Button

Restart Button

MLO-005386

2–32 System Physical Description

Mass

Storage Shelf

Description

VAX 4000 Model 300/400/500/600 Enclosure — BA440

Table 2–10 describes the mass storage shelf components.

Table 2–10 BA440 Cabinet: Mass Storage Shelf Components

Component Description

ISE units

Tape drive

Each ISE drive has its own set of controls and indicators (shared controls for RF35 drives). When the system is powered on, the indicator lights indicate the state of the ISEs.

A TK70, TLZ04, or TF-series tape drive can be installed in this position. If no tape is installed, a fourth ISE drive can be installed in the cabinet.

System Control Panel

Over

Temperature

Warning indicator (red)

DC OK indicator

(green)

Flashes red if the internal system temperature approaches a level that may cause system component overheating. If the internal temperature reaches a certain threshold, the system automatically shuts down.

In addition to the indicator, an audible alarm also provides warning of a possible over temperature condition.

Illuminates if the power supply voltages are within operating limits.

(continued on next page)

System Physical Description

2–33

VAX 4000 Model 300/400/500/600 Enclosure — BA440

Table 2–10 (Cont.) BA440 Cabinet: Mass Storage Shelf

Components

Component Description

System Control Panel

Halt button

Restart button

Controls the running state of the system.

Pressing the button in halts the system and illuminates the red indicator on the button. When pressed a second time, the button is returned to the out position.

When the Halt button is out, the console mode prompt (>>>) is displayed and commands can be entered on the console. If you inadvertently press

Halt, enter CONTINUE

Return to continue.

CAUTION: Pressing the Halt button halts the system regardless of the setting of the Break

Enable/Disable switch.

Pressing the Restart button causes the system to return to its power-up state and execute self-tests.

If a boot device has been specified, and the Break

Enable/Disable switch is set to disable, the system will reboot the system software. The button has a green indicator.

Note

The Halt and Restart buttons can be disabled to prevent accidental activation. Contact the Digital Services representative if you want to disable the controls on the

SCP.

2–34 System Physical Description

ISE Controls

VAX 4000 Model 300/400/500/600 Enclosure — BA440

With dual-disk, RF35 ISE devices, up to seven ISEs or up to six

RF-series ISEs and a tape drive can be installed in the cabinet.

Figure 2–19 shows the ISE controls and indicators for the two styles of RF-series ISE devices: single disk per cavity, and dual disk per cavity.

Figure 2–19 BA440 Cabinet: ISE Controls

Bus Node

ID Plug

Fault Indicator

Run/Ready

Button

Write-Protect

Button

Bus Node

ID Plugs

Fault

Indicator

Run/Ready

Indicator

MLO-007175

System Physical Description

2–35

VAX 4000 Model 300/400/500/600 Enclosure — BA440

ISE Control

Descriptions

Table 2–11 describes the controls and indicators for the two types of RF-series ISE devices: single disk per cavity, and dual disk per cavity (RF35 ISE).

Table 2–11 BA440 Cabinet: ISE Controls

Component Function

Bus Node ID plug

Fault light

Run/Ready button

Write-Protect button

Identifies the bus node number of the ISE.

Bus node numbers are factory-configured in consecutive order from right to left with the rightmost ISE being node 0. If the plug is missing, the bus node number is undefined and the fault indicator lights.

If the system has an RF35 with only one disk, one set of controls will have a blank bus node ID plug and its indicators will not light.

Illuminates if an error condition exists in the

ISE. The light is on temporarily during the power-up sequence.

Determines if the ISE is to be placed on-line or off-line.

Pushing the button in places the ISE on-line and illuminates the green indicator light. Under normal operation, the indicator flashes as seek operations are performed. Setting the button out places the ISE off-line and extinguishes the indicator light.

Determines if the ISE is to be write-protected.

Pressing the button in write-protects the ISE and illuminates the (amber) indicator light.

The RF35 ISE has no Write-Protect button.

Write-protecting the RF35 is by way of commands issued by the operating system or firmware commands in console mode.

2–36 System Physical Description

Console

Module

VAX 4000 Model 300/400/500/600 Enclosure — BA440

The console module contains several system controls, indicators, and connectors. Figure 2–20 shows the module.

Figure 2–20 BA440 Cabinet: Console Module

Power-Up

Mode Switch

Baud Rate

Select Switch

LED Display

Baud

300___________0

600___________1

1200__________2

2400__________3

4800__________4

9600__________5

19200_________6

38400_________7

Bus 0

Y

DSSI

Connectors

(External

Bus,

Bus 1)

X

Bus 1

Modified

Modular Jack

Break Enable/

Disable Switch

Bus Node

ID Plugs

Ethernet

Connector

Switch

Standard

Ethernet

Connector

ThinWire

Ethernet

Connector

MLO-004038

System Physical Description

2–37

VAX 4000 Model 300/400/500/600 Enclosure — BA440

Console

Module

Description

Table 2–12 describes the console module components.

Table 2–12 BA440 Cabinet: Console Module Components

Component Function

Power-Up Mode switch

Determines the system response at power up:

• Language Inquiry Mode (top position, indicated by a profile of a face):

Causes the system to display a language selection menu at power up if the console terminal supports multiple languages. Also, if a default boot device has not been selected, this mode causes the system to prompt for a boot device from a list of bootable devices. Once a device is selected, the system autoboots from that device each time it is powered on.

• Run Mode (middle position, indicated by an arrow):

This position is the normal operating setting.

• Loop Back Test Mode (bottom position, indicated by a T in a circle):

Causes the system to run loopback tests on the console serial line at power up. This setting requires special loopback connectors and is for

Digital Services use only.

Baud Rate

Select switch

Modified modular jack

(MMJ)

LED display

Set to match the baud rate of the console terminal.

The factory setting is position 5 (9600).

Provides the connection for the console terminal.

Shows the testing sequence during power up.

(continued on next page)

2–38 System Physical Description

VAX 4000 Model 300/400/500/600 Enclosure — BA440

Table 2–12 (Cont.) BA440 Cabinet: Console Module

Components

Component Function

Break Enable

/Disable switch

Bus Node ID plugs

DSSI Bus 1 connectors

Determines if the system will respond to a break signal from the console. If the switch is down, breaks are disabled. If the switch is up, breaks are enabled.

When breaks are enabled, pressing Break on the console halts the processor and transfers control to the console program. Use the console command SET

CONTROLP to specify

Ctrl/P rather than

Break to initiate a break if desired.

The Break Enable/Disable switch also controls the system power-up response. When breaks are disabled, the system autoboots at power up. When breaks are enabled, the system enters console mode

(indicated by the (>>>) prompt) at power up.

Use the console commands SET HALT REBOOT and SET HALT RESTART_REBOOT, if desired, to override the Break Enable/Disable switch setting.

These commands will cause an autoboot after an error halt or power up, even if breaks are enabled.

Identifies the bus nodes of DSSI adapters in the

CPU. The system has two separate DSSI buses. One plug identifies an internal DSSI bus (Bus 0) and the other plug identifies an external DSSI bus (Bus 1).

Both plugs are factory-configured.

(Labeled X and Y)

Provides a means for expanding the system by connecting additional mass storage devices to the second DSSI bus.

(continued on next page)

System Physical Description

2–39

VAX 4000 Model 300/400/500/600 Enclosure — BA440

Table 2–12 (Cont.) BA440 Cabinet: Console Module

Components

Component Function

Ethernet connectors

Provide for connecting to either ThinWire Ethernet or standard Ethernet.

The position of the Ethernet connector switch determines which connector is active. Setting the switch to the up position selects standard Ethernet.

Setting the switch to the down position selects

ThinWire Ethernet. A green LED for each connector indicates the active connection.

2–40 System Physical Description

Power Supply

Controls

VAX 4000 Model 300/400/500/600 Enclosure — BA440

The power supply provides power to the mass storage devices, the modules in the card cage, and the cabinet fans. Figure 2–21 shows the controls and indicators.

Figure 2–21 BA440 Cabinet: Power Supply Controls and

Indicators

Power Switch

AC Present Indicator

DC OK Indicator

Fan Failure

Indicator

Over Temperature

Condition Indicator

Power Bus

Connectors

Power Cable

Connector

MLO-004040

System Physical Description

2–41

VAX 4000 Model 300/400/500/600 Enclosure — BA440

Power Supply

Control

Descriptions

Table 2–13 describes the power supply controls and indicators.

Table 2–13 BA440 Cabinet: Power Supply Controls and

Indicators

Component Function

Power switch

AC Present indicator

DC OK indicator

Fan Failure indicator

Turns system power on and off.

The power switch also functions as the system circuit breaker. In the event of a power surge, the breaker will trip, causing the power switch to return to the off (0) position.

Turning the system on resets the circuit breaker. If the circuit breaker trips, wait one minute before turning the system back on.

Illuminates (orange) when the power switch is on and voltage is present at the input of the power supply.

Illuminates (green) if the power supply voltages are within operating limits.

Illuminates (amber) if either of the two cooling fans stops working. The power supply automatically shuts down the system as a precautionary measure when a fan failure is detected.

Illuminates (amber) if the system shuts down due to an over temperature condition.

Over

Temperature

Condition indicator

Power bus connectors

Provides a means for the system cabinet to control power sequencing in expansion cabinets. This allows one power switch to control power for an entire expanded system.

CAUTION

Dual-host systems should not be configured with a power bus. Inadvertently shutting off a host system and bringing down the cluster defeats the reliability of a dual-host system.

2–42 System Physical Description

VAXstation 4000 Models 60 and 90 System Unit

VAXstation 4000 Models 60 and 90 System Unit

The VAXstation 4000 Models 60 and 90 system units are similar.

This section describes the physical characteristics of the system units.

Front Panel

View

Figure 2–22 shows the ports, switches, and indicators on the front of the system unit.

Figure 2–22 VAXstation 4000 Models 60 and 90: Front Panel

1

2

VAXstation 4000 Models 60 and 90 System Unit

Front Panel

Components

Table 2–14 describes the front panel components.

!

"

#

Table 2–14 VAXstation 4000 Models 60 and 90: Front Panel

Components

Item Component Function

$

%

&

'

On/Off switch

Front door

Headset jack

Power switch for system unit.

Protects switches.

For audio output to a headset (software controlled).

Audio speaker switch Turns speaker on (down) and off (up).

Halt button Used to put the system into console mode.

Alternate console switch

Diagnostic lights

Set to the up position to select a terminal as an alternate console for testing purposes, or to the down position to return to normal use of the workstation monitor.

Show status of the system during diagnostic tests.

2–44 System Physical Description

Rear Panel

VAXstation 4000 Models 60 and 90 System Unit

Figure 2–23 shows the ports, switches, and indicators on the back of the system unit.

Figure 2–23 VAXstation 4000 Models 60 and 90: Rear Panel

1

2

5

6

7

3

4

8

9

10

11

12

MLO-008073

System Physical Description

2–45

VAXstation 4000 Models 60 and 90 System Unit

Rear Panel

Description

Table 2–15 describes the rear panel components.

"

#

$

%

&

'

(

Table 2–15 VAXstation 4000 Models 60 and 90: Rear Panel

Components

Item Component Function

!

SCSI port

)

+>

Monitor video port

Monitor power port

System power port

Remote mouse/ keyboard port

Mouse port

Keyboard port

Printer/ communications port

(TTA3)

Communications/ printer port (TTA2)

Standard Ethernet port

Connects small computer system interface (SCSI) peripheral devices to the system unit. The system comes with a SCSI terminator preinstalled.

Remove this terminator to attach external options to the system unit or expansion boxes.

Connects the monitor video cable.

Connects the monitor power cord.

Connects the system unit power cord.

Connects the remote mouse and keyboard cable.

Connects the mouse cable.

Connects the keyboard cable.

Primarily for connecting a printer or hardcopy terminal through an RS423 cable. OpenVMS does not support modems on this port.

Primarily for connecting an asynchronous communications device such as a modem, through an RS232 cable. The secondary use is to attach a printer or hardcopy terminal.

Connects to a standard Ethernet network.

(continued on next page)

2–46 System Physical Description

VAXstation 4000 Models 60 and 90 System Unit

Table 2–15 (Cont.) VAXstation 4000 Models 60 and 90: Rear

Panel Components

Item Component Function

+?

Network switch

[email protected]

ThinWire Ethernet port

Selects either ThinWire Ethernet or standard Ethernet. Move the switch to the left for standard Ethernet or to the right for ThinWire Ethernet.

Connects to a ThinWire Ethernet network.

System Physical Description

2–47

VAXstation 4000 Model VLC

VAXstation 4000 Model VLC

Side Panel

Figure 2–24 shows the ports and controls on the side of the system unit.

Figure 2–24 VAXstation 4000 Model VLC: Side Panel

Keyboard Port

Alternate Console Switch

Halt Button

Headset Jack

Mouse Port

S3

MLO-009238

2–48 System Physical Description

Side Panel

Description

Rear Panel

VAXstation 4000 Model VLC

Table 2–16 describes the side panel components.

Table 2–16 VAXstation 4000 Model VLC: Side Panel

Component Function

Headset jack

Halt button

Alternate console switch

Keyboard port

Mouse port

Connects an optional headset for audio input and output.

Halts the system and puts it into console mode.

Connects a terminal as an alternate display device for testing purposes.

Connects the keyboard cable.

Connects the mouse or an alternate pointing device.

Figure 2–25 shows the ports and controls on the back of the system unit.

Figure 2–25 VAXstation 4000 Model VLC: Rear Panel

Monitor Video Port

Printer/Communications Port

SCSI Port

System Power Port

Monitor Power Port

Communications/Printer

Port

Standard Ethernet Port

On/Off Switch

MLO-007021

System Physical Description

2–49

VAXstation 4000 Model VLC

Rear Panel

Description

Table 2–17 describes the rear panel components.

Table 2–17 VAXstation 4000 Model VLC: Rear Panel

Component Function

Monitor video port

Printer/communications port

Communications/printer port

SCSI port

Standard Ethernet port

Monitor power port

System power port

On/Off switch

Connects the monitor video cable.

For connecting a DEC423 —

DECconnect cable-compatible printer or hardcopy terminal, or for connecting a communications device.

For connecting an asynchronous communications device such as a modem, or for connecting a printer or hardcopy terminal.

Connects small computer system interface (SCSI) peripheral devices.

Connects to a standard Ethernet network.

Connects the monitor power cord.

Connects the system power cord.

Turns the system power on and off.

2–50 System Physical Description

3

Console Commands

Introduction

The console subsystem provides the means to control and monitor systems operations. When the console control program is in the console I/O mode of operation, you can enter commands to display information about the system and to set various system parameters.

This chapter describes the console I/O mode of operation, summarizes all console commands, and describes the more commonly used commands.

Topics include:

• Console I/O mode

• Changing the console language

• Console security feature: VAX 4000 model 100 and

VAXstation 4000 systems

• Console command descriptions

Console Commands

3–1

Console I/O Mode

Console I/O Mode

How the

System Enters

Console I/O

Mode

The console control program enters console I/O mode when the system is powered on for the first time. The action taken on a subsequent power up depends on the settings of certain system hardware or software controls.

VAX 4000 systems

On these systems, the action taken on a subsequent power up depends on the position of the Break Enable/Disable switch and the setting of the halt action flag.

The console control program will enter console I/O mode on power up if:

• The Break Enable/Disable switch is set to enable, OR

• The switch is set to disable and the default halt action was set to HALT by the last SET HALT console command.

VAXstation 4000 systems

On these systems, the console program will enter console I/O mode if the halt action was set to HALT by the last SET HALT console command. VAXstation 4000 systems do not have a Break

Enable/Disable switch.

3–2 Console Commands

Console I/O

Mode Control

Characters

Console I/O Mode

Table 3–1 lists the keyboard control characters that have special meaning in console I/O mode.

Table 3–1 Console I/O Mode Control Characters

Character Function

Return

Ends a command line. No action is taken on a command until it is terminated by a carriage return.

< x (rubout) Deletes the previously typed character.

On a video terminal, the previous character is erased and the cursor is restored to its previous position.

On a hardcopy terminal, each time the

< x key is pressed, the console echoes a backslash

(\ ) followed by the character deleted. If you type a non-rubout character, the console echoes another backslash, followed by the character typed. The result is to echo the characters deleted, surrounded by backslashes.

Ctrl/A or

F14

Ctrl/C

Ctrl/D or

Ctrl/E

Ctrl/F or

!

Ctrl/B

,

"

, or

#

Ctrl/H or

F12

Toggles insertion/overstrike mode for command line editing. By default, the console powers up to overstrike mode.

Aborts processing of a command. Has no effect as part of a binary load data stream. Clears

Ctrl/S and reenables output stopped by

Ctrl/O

.

Moves the cursor one position to the left.

Moves the cursor to the end of the line.

Moves the cursor one position to the right.

Recalls previous commands.

Same as

< x

(rubout), above.

(continued on next page)

Console Commands

3–3

Console I/O Mode

Table 3–1 (Cont.) Console I/O Mode Control Characters

Character Function

Ctrl/O

Ctrl/Q

Ctrl/R

Ctrl/S

Ctrl/U

Suspends output to the console until you enter

Ctrl/O again. Output stream data continues to be sent to the console but is not displayed.

Output display is resumed if the console prints an error message or when the end of the output stream is reached (console prompts for the next command). Output is also resumed by entering

Maintenance mode:

Break or

Ctrl/C

.

Resumes the display of an output stream that was suspended by

Ctrl/S

. On pressing

Ctrl/Q

, output stream data is resumed from the point where it was suspended.

Echoes the current command line. Useful for improving command line readability on edited command lines.

Suspends output to the console terminal until you enter

Ctrl/Q

. On pressing

Ctrl/Q

, output stream data is resumed from the point where it was suspended.

Echoes ^U<CR>. Entered, but otherwise ignored if typed on an empty line.

3–4 Console Commands

Entering

Console

Commands

Console I/O Mode

Command line length

Console commands can be up to 80-characters long. Longer commands produce error messages. The character count does not include rubouts, rubbed-out characters, or the

Return at the end of the command.

Spaces and tabs

Multiple spaces and tabs are treated as a single space. Leading and trailing spaces and tabs are ignored.

Numerics

Enter all numbers (addresses, data, counts) in hexadecimal except for symbolic register names. Enter the numeric portion of the register name in decimal. Hexadecimal digits include the numbers 0 through 9 and the alpha characters A through F.

Command line case

You can enter commands in uppercase or lowercase letters, including hexadecimal digits (A through F).

Qualifiers

You can place command qualifiers after the command keyword or after any symbol or number in the command.

The following symbols denote qualifier and argument conventions:

[ ] Optional qualifier or argument

{} Required qualifier or argument

Console Commands

3–5

Console I/O Mode

Console

Command

Summary

Table 3–2 is a summary of VAX 4000 and VAXstation 4000 console I/O mode commands. Some of the commands in the table may not apply to your system. To display a list of supported commands, enter the following command at the console prompt:

>>> HELP

Table 3–2 Console I/O Mode Command Summary

Command Function

BOOT

CONFIGURE

CONTINUE

DEPOSIT

EXAMINE

FIND

HALT

HELP

INITIALIZE

Initializes the processor and transfers execution to the VMB, the primary bootstrap program.

Invokes an interactive mode that allows you to enter Q22–bus device names, then generates a table of Q22–bus I/O page device

CSR addresses and interrupt vectors.

Resumes instruction execution at the point where a halt occurred. Does not initialize the processor.

Deposits data into the address you specify.

If you do not specify an address space or data size qualifier, the console uses the last address space and data size used in a

DEPOSIT, EXAMINE, MOVE, or SEARCH command.

Examines the contents of the memory location or register of the address you specify.

Searches main memory starting at address

0 (zero) for a page-aligned 128 kB segment of good memory, or a restart parameter block

(RPB).

Has no effect. Is included for compatibility with other VAX consoles.

Displays the correct syntax for all console commands.

Performs a processor initialization.

(continued on next page)

3–6 Console Commands

Console I/O Mode

Table 3–2 (Cont.) Console I/O Mode Command Summary

Command

LOGIN

1

Function

MOVE

NEXT

REPEAT

SEARCH

SET BFLAG

SET BOOT

SET

CONTROLP

Places the console in privileged console mode.

When the console security feature is enabled and you put the system in console mode, the system operates in unprivileged console mode.

You can access only a subset of the console commands. To access the full range of console commands, use the LOGIN command. This command may only be executed in secure console mode.

Copies a block of memory starting at the source address to a block beginning at the destination address.

Executes the number of macroinstructions you specify. If you do not specify a number, 1

(one) is assumed.

Repeatedly displays and executes the command you specify. Press

Ctrl/C to stop the command. You can specify any valid console command except the REPEAT command.

Finds all occurrences of a pattern and reports the addresses where the pattern was found. If you include the /NOT qualifier, the command reports all addresses for which the pattern did not match.

Sets the default R5 boot flags. The value must be a hexadecimal number of up to eight digits.

Sets the default boot device. The value must be a valid device name.

Sets

Ctrl/P as the console halt condition, instead of a BREAK.

1

VAX 4000 Model 100 and VAXstation 4000 systems.

(continued on next page)

Console Commands

3–7

Console I/O Mode

3–8 Console Commands

Table 3–2 (Cont.) Console I/O Mode Command Summary

Command Function

SET

DIAGENV

1

SET FBOOT

SET HALT

SET HOST

1

Determines the default diagnostic environment for the system. The values are: 1 for customer (default), 2 for Digital

Services, and 3 for manufacturing.

Defines the system tests to be run at startup.

The values are: 0 to test all components

(default), 1 to test all components except memory. Excluding memory tests can reduce startup time.

Sets the default halt action. You can enter a keyword: default, restart, reboot, halt, restart_reboot, or a number in the range 0 to

4.

Connects to the DUP or MAINTENANCE driver on the node or device you specify.

Sets the console language and keyboard type.

SET

LANGUAGE

SET PSE

1

Enables or disables the console security feature. The command accepts the following values:

0 — Disables console security

1 — Enables console security

SET PSWD

1

SET RECALL

When the console security feature is enabled, only a subset of the console commands are available to the user. To enable the complete set of console commands once the console security feature is enabled, use the LOGIN command.

Allows you to set or change the console security password.

Sets command recall state to either

ENABLED (1) or DISABLED (0).

1

VAX 4000 Model 100 and VAXstation 4000 systems.

(continued on next page)

Console I/O Mode

Table 3–2 (Cont.) Console I/O Mode Command Summary

Command

SET SCSI_ID

1

Function

Sets the SCSI ID of the SCSI controller to a number in the range 0 to 7. The SCSI ID of the SCSI controller is set to 6 by default.

SHOW BFLAG Displays the default R5 boot flags.

SHOW BOOT Displays the default boot device.

SHOW CONFIG Displays the system configuration and information about the devices the firmware has tested. Also displays the most recent errors detected by device tests.

SHOW

CONTROLP

Shows the current state of Control-P halt recognition, either ENABLED or DISABLED.

SHOW DEVICE Displays all devices on the system.

SHOW DSSI Displays the status of all nodes that can be found on the DSSI bus. For each node on the

DSSI bus, the firmware displays the node number, node name, boot name, and device type, if available. Does not indicate whether the device contains a bootable image.

SHOW

ETHERNET

SHOW HALT

Displays the hardware Ethernet address for all Ethernet adapters that can be found, both on-board and on the Q22–bus.

Displays the halt action. Keywords include: default, restart, reboot, halt, restart_reboot, or a number in the range 0 to 4.

Displays console language and keyboard type.

SHOW

LANGUAGE

SHOW

MEMORY

SHOW PSE

1

Displays main memory configuration, board by board.

Displays the state of the console security feature.

1

VAX 4000 Model 100 and VAXstation 4000 systems.

(continued on next page)

Console Commands

3–9

Console I/O Mode

Table 3–2 (Cont.) Console I/O Mode Command Summary

Command Function

SHOW QBUS Displays all Q22–bus I/O addresses that respond to an aligned word read, plus vector and device name information. For each address, the console displays the address in the VAX I/O space in hexadecimal, the address as it would appear in the Q22–bus

I/O space in octal, and the word that was read in hexadecimal. Also displays the vector that you should set up, and device name or names that could be associated with the CSR.

SHOW

RECALL

SHOW RLV12

Displays the current state of command recall, either ENABLED or DISABLED.

Displays all RL01 and RL02 disks that appear on the Q22–bus.

Shows any SCSI devices in the system.

SHOW SCSI

1

SHOW

TRANSLATION

Shows any virtual addresses that map to the specified physical address.

SHOW UQSSP Displays the status of all disks and tapes found on the Q22–bus that support the

UQSSP protocol. For each such disk or tape on the Q22–bus, the firmware displays the controller number, the controller CSR address, and the boot name and type of each device connected to the controller. The command does not indicate whether the device contains a bootable image.

SHOW

VERSION

Displays the current firmware version.

1

VAX 4000 Model 100 and VAXstation 4000 systems.

(continued on next page)

3–10 Console Commands

Console I/O Mode

!

Table 3–2 (Cont.) Console I/O Mode Command Summary

Command Function

START

TEST

UNJAM

X

Starts instruction execution at the address you specify. If you do not give an address, the current program counter is used. If memory mapping is enabled, macroinstructions are executed from virtual memory, and the address is treated as a virtual address.

Equivalent to a DEPOSIT to PC, followed by a CONTINUE. Does not perform a processor initialization.

Invokes a diagnostic test program specified by the test number you enter. If you enter a test number of 0 (zero), all tests allowed to be executed from the console terminal are executed. The console accepts an optional list of up to five additional hexadecimal arguments.

Performs an I/O bus reset by writing a 1 (one) to IPR 55 (decimal).

Loads or unloads (writes to, or reads from memory) the specified number of data bytes through the console serial line (regardless of console type), starting at the specified address. For use by automatic systems communicating with the console.

Character can be used to document command sequences. The comment character can appear anywhere on the command line. All characters following the comment character are ignored.

Console Commands

3–11

Changing the Console Language

Changing the Console Language

Entering

Language

Inquiry Mode

VAX 4000 and VAXstation 4000 systems all support a feature that allows you to change the language used by the console program. When the console is in Language Inquiry Mode, you select the language of your choice from a menu of languages displayed on the console terminal.

The manner in which the console enters Language Inquiry Mode depends on the system, as follows:

System

VAX 4000 systems

(except Model 100)

VAX 4000 Model 100

VAXstation 4000

How to Enter Language Inquiry Mode

Set the Power-Up Mode switch to the

Language Inquiry Mode position before you power on the system. This position is indicated by the profile of a face on the switch.

Issue the console command:

>>> SET LANGUAGE

Issue the console command:

>>> SET KBD

3–12 Console Commands

Changing the Console Language

Sample

Language

Selection Menu,

VAX 4000

Systems

Figure 3–1 shows the language selection menu displayed on a

VAX 4000 system.

Figure 3–1 Language Selection Menu, VAX 4000 System

KA6nn-A Vn.n VMB n.n

1) Dansk

2) Deutsch (Deutschland/Osterreich)

3) Deutsch (Schweiz)

4) English (United Kingdom)

5) English (United States/Canada)

6) Español

7) Français (Canada)

8) Français (France/Belgique)

9) Français (Suisse)

10) Italiano

11) Nederlands

12) Norsk

13) Português

14) Suomi

15) Svenska

(1..15):

Select a language by entering the number listed next to the language. Save the language by rotating the Power-Up Mode switch to run mode, indicated by an arrow. The new language will be the default on subsequent reboots of the system.

Note

If you do not select a language within 30 seconds, the system defaults to English (United States/Canada).

Console Commands

3–13

Changing the Console Language

Sample

Language

Selection Menu,

VAXstation

4000 Systems

Figure 3–2 shows the language selection menu for a VAXstation

4000 system.

Figure 3–2 Language Selection Menu, VAXstation 4000 System

>>> SET KBD

0) Dansk

1) Deutsch

2) Deutsch (Schweiz)

3) English

8) Français (Suisse Romande)

9) Italiano

10) Nederlands

11) Norsk

4) English (British/Irish) 12) Português

5) Español 13) Suomi

6) Français

7) Français (Canadien)

14) Svenska

15) Vlaams

3 >>>

Select the language from the menu by entering its number. The new language will be the default on subsequent system reboots.

3–14 Console Commands

Console Security Feature: VAX 4000 Model 100 and VAXstation 4000 Systems

Console Security Feature: VAX 4000 Model 100 and

VAXstation 4000 Systems

Overview

VAX 4000 Model 100 and VAXstation 4000 systems support a console security feature that allows you to disable most of the console commands.

When the security feature is enabled, only privileged users

(those who know the security password) can use the full range of console commands. When the console is in privileged mode, only the following commands can be entered:

LOGIN Allows a privileged user to gain entry to the privileged state.

BOOT Allows a nonprivileged user to boot from default boot device. The command can only be issued without parameters.

CONTINUE Allows a nonprivileged user to continue operations if the Halt button is accidentally pressed.

Console Commands

3–15

Console Security Feature: VAX 4000 Model 100 and VAXstation 4000 Systems

Setting the

Security

Password

Enabling the Console

Security

Feature

The console security feature is disabled when the system is installed. To set the security password, follow the sample procedure shown in Example 3–1.

Example 3–1 Setting the Console Security Feature

>>> SET PSWD

!

>>> PSWD1 : {password}

"

>>> PSWD2 : {password}

#

>>> ! Next console command

$

!

"

Request the set password dialog.

Enter the password in response to the system prompt (the prompt displayed is system dependent).

The password must be a string of exactly 16 hexadecimal characters (0 to 9 and A to F). The system does not echo the password on the console.

#

$

Verify the password by entering it a second time.

If you enter the same password both times, the system saves the password in non-volatile memory.

If you enter a different password, the system displays an error message. Repeat steps

!

through

# if you receive an error message.

Once you set the password, write it down and store it in a safe place. If you forget the password, you must call Digital Services to disable the console security feature.

After setting the security password, you must enable the console security feature, by entering the following command at the console prompt:

>>> SET PSE 1

3–16 Console Commands

Logging in

Console Security Feature: VAX 4000 Model 100 and VAXstation 4000 Systems

to Privileged

Console Mode

When the console security feature is enabled, you must enter the security password to log in to privileged console mode. In privileged console mode you can use the full range of console commands.

To log in to privileged console mode, follow the sample procedure shown in Example 3–2. The procedure is specific to VAX 4000

Model 100 systems, but is similar for VAXstation 4000 systems.

You must have previously set the security password (SET PSWD command).

Example 3–2 Logging in to Privileged Console Mode

>>> LOGIN

!

>>> Password: {password}

"

>>> ! Privileged console command

#

!

"

Request entry to privileged mode.

Enter the security password in response to the system prompt (the prompt displayed is system-dependent).

#

If you enter the correct password, the system returns the console prompt and you become a privileged user.

If you enter the wrong password, the system displays an error message before returning the console prompt. Repeat steps

!

and

" if you receive an error message.

Console Commands

3–17

Console Security Feature: VAX 4000 Model 100 and VAXstation 4000 Systems

Changing the Security

Password

You must be a privileged user to change the security password.

To change the password, follow the sample procedure shown in

Example 3–3. The procedure is specific to VAX 4000 Model 100 systems, but is similar for VAXstation 4000 systems.

Example 3–3 Changing the Console Security Password

>>> LOGIN

!

>>> Password: {old password}

"

>>> SET PSWD

#

>>> PSWD1 : {new password}

$

>>> PSWD2 : {new password}

%

>>> ! Next console command

&

!

"

#

$

Log in as a privileged user.

Enter the old password in response to the system prompt.

Enter the command to set a new password.

Enter the new password in response to the system prompt.

The password must be a string of exactly 16 hexadecimal characters (0 to 9 and A to F). The system does not echo the password on the console.

%

&

Verify the new password by entering it a second time.

If you enter the same password both times, the system saves the new password in non-volatile memory and returns the console prompt.

If you enter the wrong password, the system displays an error message before returning the console prompt. Repeat steps

!

through

% if you receive an error message.

After you set the new password, write it down and store it in a safe place. If you forget the password, you must call a Digital

Services representative to disable the console security feature.

3–18 Console Commands

Console Security Feature: VAX 4000 Model 100 and VAXstation 4000 Systems

Disabling the Console

Security

Feature

Exiting from

Privileged

Console Mode

When you disable the console security feature, all users can use the full range of console commands. To disable the console security feature, follow the sample procedure below.

Example 3–4 Disabling the Console Security Feature

>>> LOGIN

!

Password: {password}

>>> SET PSE 0

"

>>> ! Next console command

!

"

Log in as a privileged user.

Entering a value of 0 disables the security feature.

To exit from privileged console mode, enter one of the following commands:

• BOOT

• CONTINUE

• HALT

• START

When you exit from privileged mode, privileged users must enter the LOGIN command with the correct password before they can use the full range of console commands.

Console Commands

3–19

Console Command Descriptions

Console Command Descriptions

This section describes the more common console commands.

Some commands may not apply to your system. For a list of commands supported on your system, enter the command:

>>> HELP

BOOT

Format:

BOOT [qualifier-list] [{boot_device},{boot_device},...]

Function:

Initializes the processor and transfers execution to VMB, the primary bootstrap loader. VMB attempts to boot the operating system from the specified device or list of devices, or from the default boot device if none is specified. The console passes a boot flag bitmap (if any) to VMB in R5.

If you do not enter either the qualifier or the device name, the default value is used. Entering boot flags or a boot device overrides, but does not permanently change, the corresponding default value.

When specifying a list of boot devices (up to 32 characters, with devices separated by commas and no spaces), the system checks the devices in the order specified and boots from the first one that contains bootable software.

Note

If included in a string of boot devices, the Ethernet device (for example, EZA0), should be the last device of the string. The system will continuously attempt to boot from EZA0.

3–20 Console Commands

Console Command Descriptions

Qualifiers:

/R5:{boot_flags} A 32-bit hex value passed to VMB in R5. Use the SET BFLAG command to specify a default boot flags longword. Use the SHOW BFLAG command to display the longword.

/{boot_flags}

[device_name]

Same as /R5:{boot_flags}

Character string of up to 32 characters. When specifying a list of boot devices, separate the device names by commas and no spaces. The factory default device is the Ethernet device.

Examples:

>>> SHOW BOOT

DKA300

>>> SHOW BFLAG

00000000

>>> B !Boot using default boot flags and device.

(BOOT/R5:0 DKA300)

2..

-DKA300

Console Commands

3–21

Console Command Descriptions

CONTINUE

DEPOSIT

Format:

CONTINUE

Function:

Causes the processor to begin instruction execution at the address currently contained in the program counter (PC). This address is the address stored in the PC when the system entered console mode or an address that the user specifies using the

DEPOSIT command. The CONTINUE command does not perform a processor initialization. The console enters program

I/O mode.

Example:

>>> CONTINUE

$ !VMS DCL prompt

Format:

DEPOSIT [qualifier-list] {address} {data} [data...]

Function:

Deposits data into the address specified. If you do not specify an address space or data size qualifier, the console uses the last address space and data size used in a DEPOSIT, EXAMINE,

MOVE, or SEARCH command. After processor initialization, the default address space is physical memory and the default data size is longword. If you specify conflicting address space or data sizes, the console ignores the command and issues an error message.

3–22 Console Commands

Console Command Descriptions

Qualifiers:

Data control: /B, /W, /L, /Q, /N:{count}, /STEP:{size}, /WRONG

Address space control: /G, /I, /M, /P, /V, /U

Arguments:

{address}

{data}

[{data}]

A longword address that specifies the first location into which data is deposited. The address can be an actual address or a symbolic address.

The data to be deposited. If the specified data is larger than the deposit data size, the firmware ignores the command and issues an error response. If the specified data is smaller than the deposit data size, it is extended on the left with zeros.

Additional data to be deposited (as many as can fit on the command line).

Examples:

>>> D/P/B/N:1FF 0 0

>>> D/V/L/N:3 1234 5

>>> D/N:8 R0 FFFFFFFF

>>> D/L/P/N:10/ST:200 0 8

>>> D/N:200 - 0

! Clear first 512 bytes of

! physical memory.

! Deposit 5 into four longwords

! starting at virtual memory address

! 1234.

! Loads GPRs R0 through R8 with -1.

! Deposit 8 in the first longword of

! the first 17 pages in physical

! memory.

! Starting at previous address, clear

! 513 longwords or 2052 bytes.

Console Commands

3–23

Console Command Descriptions

EXAMINE

Format:

EXAMINE [qualifier-list] [address]

Function:

Examines the contents of the memory location or register specified by the address. If no address is specified, + is assumed.

The display line consists of a single character address specifier, the physical address to be examined, and the examined data.

EXAMINE uses the same qualifiers as DEPOSIT. However, the

/WRONG qualifier causes EXAMINE to ignore ECC errors on reads from physical memory. The EXAMINE command also supports an /INSTRUCTION qualifier, which will disassemble the instructions at the current address.

Qualifiers:

Data control: /B, /W, /L, /Q, /N:{count}, /STEP:{size}, /WRONG

Address space control: /G, /I, /M, /P, /V, /U

Command-specific:

/INSTRUCTION Disassembles and displays the VAX

MACRO–32 instruction at the specified address.

Argument:

[{address}] A longword address that specifies the first location to be examined. The address can be an actual or a symbolic address. If no address is specified, + is assumed.

3–24 Console Commands

Console Command Descriptions

Examples:

>>> EX PC

G 0000000F FFFFFFFC

>>> EX SP

G 0000000E 00000200

>>> EX PSL

M 00000000 041F0000

>>> E/M

M 00000000 041F0000

>>> E R4/N:5

G 00000004 00000000

G 00000005 00000000

G 00000006 00000000

G 00000007 00000000

G 00000008 00000000

G 00000009 801D9000

>>> EX PR$_SCBB

I 00000011 2004A000

! Examine the PC.

! Examine the SP.

! Examine the PSL.

! Examine PSL another way.

! Examine R4 through R9.

! Examine the SCBB, IPR 17

! (decimal).

>>> E/P 0

P 00000000 00000000

>>> EX /INS 20040000

P 20040000 11 BRB

! Examine local memory 0.

20040019

! Examine 1st byte of ROM.

>>> EX /INS/N:5 20040019 ! Disassemble from branch.

P 20040019 D0 MOVL I^#20140000,@#20140000

P 20040024 D2 MCOML @#20140030,@#20140502

P 2004002F D2 MCOML S^#0E,@#20140030

P 20040036 7D MOVQ R0,@#201404B2

P 2004003D D0 MOVL

P 20040044 DB MFPR

I^#201404B2,R1

S^#2A,B^44(R1)

>>> E/INS

P 20040048 DB MFPR

! Look at next instruction.

S^#2B,B^48(R1)

>>>

Console Commands

3–25

Console Command Descriptions

FIND

HALT

Format:

FIND [qualifier-list]

Function:

Searches main memory, starting at address zero, for a pagealigned 128 kB segment of good memory, or a restart parameter block (RPB). If the command finds the segment or RPB, its address plus 512 is left in SP (R14). If it does not find the segment or RPB, the console issues an error message and preserves the contents of SP. If you do not specify a qualifier,

/RPB is assumed.

Qualifiers:

/MEMORY Searches memory for a page-aligned block of good memory, 128 kB in length. The search looks only at memory that is deemed usable by the bitmap.

This command leaves the contents of memory unchanged.

/RPB Searches all physical memory for an RPB. The search does not use the bitmap to qualify which pages are looked at. The command leaves the contents of memory unchanged.

Examples:

>>> EX SP

G 0000000E 00000000

>>> FIND /MEM

>>> EX SP

G 0000000E 00000200

>>> FIND /RPB

?2C FND ERR 00C00004

>>>

! Check the SP.

! Look for a valid 128 kB.

! Note where it was found.

! Check for valid RPB.

! None to be found here.

Format:

HALT

Function:

Command has no effect; included only for compatibility with other VAX system consoles.

3–26 Console Commands

HELP

INITIALIZE

Console Command Descriptions

Format:

HELP

Function:

Provides information about command syntax and usage.

Example:

The HELP screen display is system-dependent.

Format:

INITIALIZE

Function:

Initializes the processor. The hardware components initialized are system-dependent.

Example:

>>> INIT

Console Commands

3–27

Console Command Descriptions

LOGIN

Format:

LOGIN

Function:

Allows you to put the system in privileged console mode.

If console security is enabled when you put the system in console mode, the system operates in unprivileged console mode. You can access only a subset of the console commands.

To access the full range of console commands, you must use the

LOGIN command. The command may only be executed in secure console mode. When you enter LOGIN, the system prompts for a password as follows:

Password:

You must enter the current console security password. If you do not enter the correct password, the system displays an error message.

When you enter the console security password, the system operates in privileged console mode. The system exits from privileged console mode when you enter one of the following console commands:

• BOOT

• CONTINUE

• HALT

• START

3–28 Console Commands

MOVE

Console Command Descriptions

Format:

MOVE [qualifier-list] {src_address} {dest_address}

Function:

Copies a block of memory starting at the source address to a block beginning at the destination address. Typically, this command has an /N qualifier so that more than one datum is transferred.

The MOVE command performs byte, word, longword, and quadword reads and writes as needed to move the data. Moves are supported only for the physical and virtual address spaces.

Qualifiers:

Data control: /B, /W, /L, /Q, /N:{count}, /STEP:{size}, /WRONG

Address space control: /V, /U, /P

Arguments:

{src_address}

{dest_address}

A longword address that specifies the first location of the source data to be copied.

A longword address that specifies the destination of the first byte of data. These addresses may be an actual address or a symbolic address. If no address is specified, + is assumed.

Example:

>>> EX/N:3 0

P 00000000 00000000

P 00000004 00000000

P 00000008 00000000

P 0000000C 00000000

>>> EX/N:3 200

P 00000200 58DD0520

P 00000204 585E04C1

P 00000208 00FF8FBB

P 0000020C 5208A8D0

>>> MOV/N:3 200 0

>>> EX/N:4 0

P 00000000 58DD0520

P 00000004 585E04C1

P 00000008 00FF8FBB

P 0000000C 5208A8D0

>>>

! Observe destination.

! Observe source data.

! Move the data.

! Observe moved data.

Console Commands

3–29

Console Command Descriptions

NEXT

Format:

NEXT {count}

Function:

Executes the specified number of macroinstructions. If no count is specified, 1 is assumed. After the last macroinstruction is executed, the console re-enters console I/O mode.

The console enters Spacebar Step Mode. In this mode, subsequent spacebar strokes initiate single steps and a carriage return forces a return to the console prompt.

The following restrictions apply:

• If memory management is enabled, the NEXT command works only if the first page in SSC RAM is mapped in S0

(system) space.

• Overhead associated with the NEXT command affects execution time of an instruction.

• The NEXT command elevates the IPL to 31 for long periods of time (milliseconds) while single-stepping over several commands.

• Unpredictable results occur if the macroinstruction being stepped over modifies either the SCBB or the trace trap entry. This means that you cannot use the NEXT command in conjunction with other debuggers.

Argument:

{count} A value representing the number of macroinstructions to execute.

3–30 Console Commands

Examples:

Console Command Descriptions

>>> DEP 1000 50D650D4

>>> DEP 1004 125005D1

>>> DEP 1008 00FE11F9

>>> EX /INSTRUCTION /N:5 1000

P 00001000 D4 CLRL

P 00001002 D6 INCL

P 00001004 D1 CMPL

P 00001007 12 BNEQ

R0

R0

S^#05,R0

00001002

00001009 P 00001009 11 BRB

P 0000100B 00 HALT

>>> DEP PR$_SCBB 200

>>> DEP PC 1000

>>>

>>> N

P 00001002 D6 INCL

P 00001004 D1 CMPL

P 00001007 12 BNEQ

P 00001002 D6 INCL

>>> N 5

P 00001004 D1 CMPL

P 00001007 12 BNEQ

P 00001002 D6 INCL

R0

S^#05,R0

00001002

R0

S^#05,R0

00001002

! Create a simple program.

! List it.

! Set up a user SCBB...

! ...and the PC.

! Single step...

! SPACEBAR

S^#05,R0 ! SPACEBAR

00001002 ! SPACEBAR

R0 ! CR

! ...or multiple step the program.

P 00001004 D1 CMPL

P 00001007 12 BNEQ

>>> N 7

P 00001002 D6 INCL

P 00001004 D1 CMPL

P 00001007 12 BNEQ

P 00001002 D6 INCL

P 00001004 D1 CMPL

P 00001007 12 BNEQ

P 00001009 11 BRB

>>> N

P 00001009 11 BRB

>>>

R0

S^#05,R0

00001002

R0

S^#05,R0

00001002

00001009

00001009

Console Commands

3–31

Console Command Descriptions

REPEAT

Format:

REPEAT {command}

Function:

Repeatedly displays and executes the specified command. Press

Ctrl/C to stop the command. You can specify any valid console command except the REPEAT command.

Argument:

{command}

Example:

A valid console command other than REPEAT.

>>> REPEAT EX PR$_TODR !Watch the clock.

I 0000001B 5AFE78CE

I 0000001B 5AFE78D1

I 0000001B 5AFE78FD

I 0000001B 5AFE7900

I 0000001B 5AFE7903

I 0000001B 5AFE7907

I 0000001B 5AFE790A

I 0000001B 5AFE790D

I 0000001B 5AFE7910

I 0000001B 5AFE793C

I 0000001B 5AFE793F

I 0000001B 5AFE7942

I 0000001B 5AFE7946

I 0000001B 5AFE7949

I 0000001B 5AFE794C

I 0000001B 5AFE794F

I 0000001B 5^C

>>>

3–32 Console Commands

SEARCH

Console Command Descriptions

Format:

SEARCH [qualifier-list] {address} {pattern} [{mask}]

Function:

Finds all occurrences of a pattern and reports the addresses where the pattern was found. If the /NOT qualifier is present, the command reports all addresses in which the pattern did not match.

SEARCH accepts an optional mask that indicates bits to be ignored (don’t care bits). For example, to ignore bit 0 in the comparison, specify a mask of 1. The mask, if not present, defaults to 0.

A match occurs if (pattern and not mask) = (data and not mask), where:

Pattern is the target data

Mask is the optional don’t care bitmask (which defaults to 0)

Data is the data at the current address

SEARCH reports the address under the following conditions:

/NOT Qualifier

Absent

Absent

Present

Present

Match Condition

True

False

True

False

Action

Report address

No report

No report

Report address

The address is advanced by the size of the pattern (byte, word, longword, or quadword), unless overridden by the /STEP qualifier.

Qualifiers:

Data control: /B, /W, /L, /Q, /N:{count}, /STEP:{size}, /WRONG

Address space control: /P, /V, /U

Command specific:

/NOT Inverts the sense of the match.

Console Commands

3–33

Console Command Descriptions

Arguments:

{start_address}

{pattern}

[{mask}]

A longword address that specifies the first location subject to the search. This address can be an actual address or a symbolic address. If no address is specified, + is assumed.

The target data.

A mask of the bits desired in the comparison.

Examples:

>>> DEP /P/L/N:1000 0 0

>>>

>>> DEP 300 12345678

>>> DEP 401 12345678

! Clear some memory.

! Deposit some search data.

>>> DEP 502 87654321

>>>

>>> SEARCH /N:1000 /ST:1 0 12345678 ! Search for all occurrences

P 00000300 12345678

P 00000401 12345678

>>> SEARCH /N:1000 0 12345678

P 00000300 12345678

>>> SEARCH /N:1000 /NOT 0 0

P 00000300 12345678

P 00000400 34567800

P 00000404 00000012

! of 12345678 on any byte

! boundary.

Then try on

! longword boundaries.

! Search for all non-zero

! longwords.

P 00000500 43210000

P 00000504 00008765

>>> SEARCH /N:1000 /ST:1 0 1 FFFFFFFE ! Search for odd-numbered

! longwords on any boundary.

P 00000502 87654321

P 00000503 00876543

P 00000504 00008765

P 00000505 00000087

>>> SEARCH /N:1000 /B 0 12

P 00000303 12

P 00000404 12

! Search for all occurrences

! of the byte 12.

>>> SEARCH /N:1000 /ST:1 /w 0 FE11

>>>

>>>

>>>

! Search for all words that

! could be interpreted as

! a spin (10$: brb 10$).

! Note that none were found.

3–34 Console Commands

SET

Console Command Descriptions

Format:

SET {parameter} {value}

Function:

Sets the parameter to the value you specify.

Parameters:

BFLAG

BOOT

Sets the default R5 boot flags. The value must be a hex number of up to eight digits.

Sets the default boot device. The value must be a valid device name or list of device names as specified in the BOOT command description in

BOOT.

HALT Sets the user-defined halt action. Acceptable values are the keywords "default," "restart,"

"reboot," "halt," "restart_reboot," or a number in the range 0 to 4 inclusive.

Makes a DUP connection to a DSSI device.

HOST

LANGUAGE Sets console language and keyboard type. If the current console terminal does not support the multinational character set (MCS), then this command has no effect and the console message appears in English. Values are 1 through 15.

PSE Allows you to enable or disable the console security feature of the system. The SET PSE command accepts the following values:

0 — Disable console security

1 — Enable console security

When console security is enabled, only a subset of the console commands is available to the user.

To enable the complete set of console commands once the console security feature is enabled, you must use the LOGIN command.

Console Commands

3–35

Console Command Descriptions

PSWD

RECALL

SCSI_ID

Allows you to set or change the console security password.

Sets command recall state to either ENABLED

(1) or DISABLED (0).

Sets the SCSI ID of the SCSI controller to a number in the range 0 to 7. The SCSI ID of the

SCSI controller is set to 6 by default.

Examples:

>>> SET BFLAG 220

>>> SET BOOT DUA0

>>> SET LANGUAGE 5

>>> SET HALT RESTART

3–36 Console Commands

SHOW

Console Command Descriptions

Format:

SHOW {parameter}

Function: Displays the console parameter you specify.

Parameters:

BFLAG

BOOT

CONFIG

DEVICE

HALT

DSSI

ETHERNET

LANGUAGE

MEMORY

Displays the default R5 boot flags.

Displays the default boot device.

Displays the system configuration. The command displays information about the devices that the firmware has tested. It also displays the device errors that the most recent device test detected.

Displays all devices in the system.

Shows the user-defined halt action.

Shows the status of all nodes that are on the

DSSI bus. For each node on the DSSI bus, the console displays the node number, the node name, and the boot name and type of the device, if available. The command does not indicate the "bootability" of the device.

The node that issues the command reports a node name of "*".

The device information is obtained from the media type field of the MSCP command GET

UNIT STATUS. In the case where the node is not running or is not capable of running an MSCP server, no device information is displayed.

Displays hardware Ethernet address for all Ethernet adapters that can be found.

Displays as blank if no Ethernet adapter is present.

Displays console language and keyboard type. Refer to the corresponding SET

LANGUAGE command for the definition.

Displays main memory configuration.

Console Commands

3–37

Console Command Descriptions

MEMORY/FULL Additionally, displays the normally inaccessible areas of memory, such as the

PFN bitmap pages, the console scratch memory pages, the Q22–bus scatter-gather map pages. Also reports the addresses of bad pages, as defined by the bitmap.

PSE Displays the condition of the console security feature of the system.

QBUS

RECALL

RLV12

Displays all Q22–bus I/O addresses that respond to an aligned word read, and speculative device name information. For each address, the console displays the address in the VAX I/O space in hex, the address as it would appear in the Q22–bus

I/O space in octal, and the word data that was read in hex.

This command may take several minutes to complete. Press

Ctrl/C to terminate the command. During execution, the command disables the scatter-gather map.

Shows the current state of command recall, either ENABLED or DISABLED.

Displays all RL01 and RL02 disks that appear on the Q22–bus.

UQSSP

SCSI

Displays the status of all disks and tapes that can be found on the Q22–bus that support the UQSSP protocol. For each such disk or tape on the Q22–bus, the firmware displays the controller number, the controller CSR address, and the boot name and type of each device connected to the controller. The command does not indicate whether the device contains a bootable image.

This information is obtained from the media type field of the MSCP command GET

UNIT STATUS. The console does not display device information if a node is not running

(or cannot run) an MSCP server.

Shows any SCSI devices in the system.

3–38 Console Commands

Console Command Descriptions

TRANSLATION Shows any virtual addresses that map to the specified physical address. The firmware uses the current values of page table base and length registers to perform its search; it is assumed that page tables have been properly built.

Displays the current firmware version.

VERSION

Examples:

>>> SHOW BFLAG

00000220

>>> SHOW BOOT

DUA0

>>> SHOW HALT restart

>>>

>>> SHOW LANGUAGE

English (United States/Canada)

>>>

>>> SHOW TRANSLATION 1000

V 80001000

>>>

>>> SHOW VERSION

KA52 Vn.n VMBn.n

>>>

>>>

>>> SHOW ETHERNET

Ethernet Adapter

-EZA0 (08-00-2B-0B-29-14)

>>>

>>> SHOW SCSI

SCSI Adapter 0 (761300), SCSI ID 7

-DKA100 (DEC TLZ04)

>>>

>>> SHOW DEVICE

DSSI Bus 0 Node 0 (SYSDSK)

-DIA10 (RF31)

DSSI Bus 0 Node 1 (R7EB3C)

-DIA11 (RF31)

DSSI Bus 0 Node 5 (TFDR1)

-MIA5 (TF85)

DSSI Bus 0 Node 6 (*)

Console Commands

3–39

Console Command Descriptions

DSSI Bus 1 Node 0 (SNEEZY)

-DIB0 (RF71)

DSSI Bus 1 Node 1 (DOPEY)

-DIB1 (RF71)

DSSI Bus 1 Node 7 (*) UQSSP Tape Controller 0 (774500)

-MUA0 (TK70)

Ethernet Adapter

-EZA0 (08-00-2B-06-10-42)

>>> SHOW QBUS

Scan of Qbus I/O Space

-20001920 (774440) = FF08 DELQA/DESQA

-20001922 (774442) = FF00

-20001924 (774444) = FF2B

-20001926 (774446) = FF08

-20001928 (774450) = FFD7

-2000192A (774452) = FF41

-2000192C (774454) = 0000

-2000192E (774456) = 1030

-20001F40 (777500) = 0020 IPCR

Scan of Qbus Memory Space

>>>

>>> SHOW MEM/FULL

16 MB RAM, SIMM Set (0A,0B,0C,0D) present

Memory Set 0: 00000000 to 00FFFFFF, 16 MB, 32768 good pages, 0 bad pages

Total of 16 MB, 32768 good pages, 0 bad pages, 104 reserved pages

Memory Bitmap

-00FF3000 to 00FF3FFF, 8 pages

Console Scratch Area

-00FF4000 to 00FF7FFF, 32 pages

Scan of Bad Pages

3–40 Console Commands

START

TEST

Console Command Descriptions

Format:

START [{address}]

Function:

Starts instruction execution at the address you specify. If no address is given, the current PC is used. If memory mapping is enabled, macroinstructions are executed from virtual memory, and the address is treated as a virtual address. The START command is equivalent to a DEPOSIT to PC, followed by a

CONTINUE. It does not perform a processor initialization.

Argument:

[address] The address at which to begin execution. This address is loaded into the user’s PC.

Example:

>>> START 1000

Format:

TEST [{test_number} [{test_arguments}]]

Function:

Invokes a diagnostic test program specified by the test number.

If you enter a test number of 0 (zero), the power-up diagnostics are executed. The console accepts an optional list of up to five additional hexadecimal arguments.

Arguments:

{test_number}

{test_arguments}

A two-digit hex number specifying the test to be executed.

Up to five additional test arguments.

These arguments are accepted, but they have no meaning to the console.

Example:

>>> TEST 0

72..71..70..69..68..67..66..65..64..63..62..61..60..59..58..57..

56..55..54..53..52..51..50..49..48..47..46..45..44..43..42..41..

40..39..38..37..36..35..34..33..32..31..30..29..28..27..26..25..

24..23..22..21..20..19..18..17..16..15..14..13..12..11..10..09..

08..07..06..05..04..03..

Tests completed.

>>>

Console Commands

3–41

Console Command Descriptions

UNJAM

X — Binary

Load and

Unload

! (Comment)

Format:

UNJAM

Function:

Performs an I/O bus reset. Resultant action is system-dependent.

Example:

>>> UNJAM

>>>

Format:

X {address} {count} CR {line_checksum} {data} {data_ checksum}

Function:

Loads or unloads (writes to, or reads from memory) the specified number of data bytes through the console serial line (regardless of console type) starting at the specified address.

The X command is for use by automatic systems communicating with the console.

Format:

!

(exclamation point)

Function:

Useful in documenting command sequences. The comment character can appear anywhere on the command line. All characters following the comment character are ignored.

Example:

>>> ! The console ignores this line.

>>>

3–42 Console Commands

4

System Startup and Shutdown Procedures

Introduction

This chapter describes the basic system startup and shutdown procedures. It is assumed that the system hardware and software were properly installed and the diagnostic software ran successfully.

Topics include:

• System startup

• System shutdown

• Other system operations

System Startup and Shutdown Procedures

4–1

System Startup

System Startup

Startup

Procedure

To start up the system, use the following procedure:

Step

1.

2.

3.

4.

User Action or System Response

Power on the console terminal and wait for it to complete self-tests.

On VAXstation 4000 and VAX 4000 Model 100 systems, power on the disk, tape, and compact disc drives, if so configured.

On VAX 4000 systems, if expansion cabinets are connected to the system, power on the cabinets.

Note: If a power control bus cable is connected between the system cabinet and the expansion cabinets, the expansion cabinets will not power on until the system cabinet is powered on.

On VAX 4000 systems, if you want the console to use a language other than English, set the Power-Up Mode switch to Language Inquiry Mode (indicated by the profile of a face on the switch).

Power on the system cabinet (or system unit) by setting the power switch to the 1 position.

4–2 System Startup and Shutdown Procedures

System Startup

Startup Display,

VAX 4000

Systems

Figure 4–1 shows a typical startup display for a VAX 4000 system.

Figure 4–1 VAX 4000 System Startup Display

KAxx-A Vn.n, VMB n.n

!

Performing normal system tests.

66..65..64..63..62..61..60..59..58..57..56..55..54..53..52..51..

50..49..48..47..46..45..44..43..42..41..40..39..38..37..36..35..

"

34..33..32..31..30..29..28..27..26..25..24..23..22..21..20..19..

18..17..16..15..14..13..12..11..10..09..08..07..06..05..04..03..

Tests completed.

>>>

#

!

CPU name, firmware version number, and VMB version number

"

#

ROM based diagnostics countdown

Console mode prompt

System Startup and Shutdown Procedures

4–3

System Startup

Startup Display,

VAXstation

4000 Systems

Figure 4–2 shows a typical startup display for a VAXstation 4000 system.

Figure 4–2 VAXstation 4000 System Startup Display

KA49−A Vn.n

1

08−00−2B−04−03−12

32MB

3

2

4

OK

>>>

5

NUO−0535−04−GRA

!

"

#

$

%

CPU type and firmware version number

Ethernet hardware address

Memory size

Status bar — increases in size as self-tests run

Console mode prompt

4–4 System Startup and Shutdown Procedures

System Startup

Startup Display with Error, VAX

4000 Systems

On VAX 4000 systems, errors during self-tests are indicated by one or more error summaries, depending on the type of error being displayed on the console terminal. A sample error summary is shown in Figure 4–3.

Figure 4–3 VAX 4000 Startup Display, with Error

KA6nn-A Vn.n

VMB n.n

Performing normal system tests.

95..94..93..92..91..90..89..88..87..86..85..84..83..82..81..80..

79..78..77..76..75..74..73..72..71..70..69..68..67..66..65..64..

63..62..61..60..59..58..57..56..55..54..53..52..51..50..49..48..

47..46..45..44..43..42..41..40..39..38..37..36..35..34..33..32..

31..30..29..28..27..26..25..24..23..22..21..20..19..18..17..16..

15..14..13..12..11..10..09..08..07..

?58 2 02 FE 0004 0000 02 ; SUBTEST_58_02, DE_SHAC_RESET.LIS

P1=00000001 P2=00000000 P3=0000000F P4=00000000 P5=00000000

P6=00000000 P7=00000000 P8=00000000 P9=00000000 P10=00000000 r0=90000026 r1=00000000 r2=00000000 r3=00004200 r4=00000000 r5=00000000 r6=00004018 r7=20004000 r8=00004000 EPC=200618BC

Normal operation not possible.

>>>

System Startup and Shutdown Procedures

4–5

System Startup

Startup Display with Error,

VAXstation

4000 Systems

On VAXstation 4000 systems, errors during self-tests are indicated by a double question mark followed by an error ID. A sample error message is shown in Figure 4–4.

Figure 4–4 VAXstation 4000 Startup Display with Error

Message

KA49−A Vn.n

08−00−2B−04−03−12

32MB

??001

1

?84 FAIL

9 NI 0172

2 3

4

>>>

NUO−0535−05−GRA

!

"

#

$

ID number

Component number

Component mnemonic

Error message number

4–6 System Startup and Shutdown Procedures

System Startup

After You Start

Up the System

After you start up the system, you need to decide if you want the system to reboot or enter console mode on a subsequent startup, after a system shutdown, or in response to a power-fail or error halt.

On VAX 4000 systems, the Break Enable/Disable switch determines the system response on startup. On VAXstation 4000 systems, the setting of the halt action determines the response.

The following table indicates how to specify the action the system is to take on startup or after a shutdown.

If you want the system to . . .

Then . . .

VAX 4000 systems

Reboot

Enter console mode

Set the Break Enable/Disable switch to disable

Set the switch to enable

VAXstation 4000 systems

Reboot Issue either of the following commands:

Enter console mode

>>> SET HALT REBOOT

>>> SET HALT RESTART

Issue the command:

>>> SET HALT HALT

System Startup and Shutdown Procedures

4–7

System Shutdown

System Shutdown

Precautions on

Shutting Down the System

Three Ways to

Shut Down the

System

In the shutdown procedures that follow, you will be asked to halt the system. You should be aware that:

• Halting the system interrupts all processes.

• Halting the system may result in loss of data if the shutdown procedure is not followed properly.

• The system will halt if breaks are enabled and you press the console

Break

(F5) key or if you shut off the console while breaks are enabled (the system interprets the action as a break and halts).

• If the system is part of a VAXcluster, halting, restarting, or turning the system off will interrupt other processes on the cluster. Do not perform any of these activities without consulting the cluster manager.

Table 4–1 describes three methods for system shutdown.

Table 4–1 System Shutdown Methods

Method System shutdown performed by...

Orderly, under program control

Emergency, under program control

Emergency, under console control

Executing the command procedure:

SYS$SYSTEM:SHUTDOWN.COM

Executing the program:

SYS$SYSTEM:OPCCRASH.EXE

Issuing console commands that result in a fatal machine check exception.

It is recommended that you first attempt an orderly shutdown.

If that fails, attempt an emergency shutdown under program control. If that fails, issue console commands to force a machine check exception condition. For detailed information about

SHUTDOWN.COM and OPCCRASH.EXE, see the Guide to

Setting Up a VMS System.

4–8 System Startup and Shutdown Procedures

System Shutdown

Orderly

Shutdown

Under Program

Control

Emergency

Shutdown

Under Program

Control

The procedure SYS$SYSTEM:SHUTDOWN.COM shuts down the system in an orderly manner, performing maintenance functions such as disabling future logins, stopping the batch and printer queues, dismounting volumes, and stopping user processes.

To shut down the system using SHUTDOWN.COM, use the following procedure:

Step

1.

2.

3.

Action

Log in to the SYSTEM account.

Enter the following command:

$ @SYS$SYSTEM:SHUTDOWN

When the procedure terminates, halt the system by pressing the Halt button twice. Make sure the light on the button goes off. If the system does not have a Halt button, press the

Break

(F5) key.

If you cannot perform an orderly shutdown with

SHUTDOWN.COM, you can attempt an emergency shutdown by executing the program SYS$SYSTEM:OPCCRASH.EXE.

To perform an emergency shutdown with the OPCRASH program, use the following procedure:

Step

1.

2.

3.

Action

Log in to the SYSTEM account.

Enter the following command:

$ RUN SYS$SYSTEM:OPCCRASH

When the program exits, halt the system by pressing the

Halt button twice. Make sure the light on the button goes off. If the system does not have a Halt button, press the

Break

(F5) key.

System Startup and Shutdown Procedures

4–9

System Shutdown

Emergency

Shutdown

Under Console

Control

If the operating system is in a hung state, and you cannot log in to the SYSTEM account to use SHUTDOWN or OPCCRASH, you can halt the system and enter console commands to force a system failure. This results in an immediate shutdown.

CAUTION: Use this method only if the system is in a hung state.

To force a system failure, use the following procedure:

Step

1.

2.

3.

User Action or System Response

On VAX 4000 systems, set the Break Enable/Disable switch to the Enable position.

Stop the system. If the system has a Halt button, press it twice. Make sure the light on the button goes off.

If your system does not have a Halt button, press the

Break

(F5) key.

Examine key processor registers by issuing the following console commands:

Command

>>> E PC

>>> E PSL

>>> E/I 0

>>> E +

>>> E +

>>> E +

>>> E +

>>> E/N:F R0

Register Contents Displayed

Program counter

Processor status longword

Kernel stack pointer

Executive stack pointer

Supervisor stack pointer

User stack pointer

Interrupt stack pointer

General purpose registers

4.

5.

Record the register contents for later analysis.

Enter the following commands:

>>> D PC FFFFFFFF

>>> D PSL 041F0000

These commands will force a fatal machine check exception condition when attempting to CONTINUE program execution.

Enter the following command:

>>> CONTINUE

4–10 System Startup and Shutdown Procedures

Powering Off the System

System Shutdown

Step

6.

7.

8.

9.

User Action or System Response

The system detects the fatal machine check condition and enters an exception handler routine.

The exception handler sends the contents of memory to a dump file on the system disk. You can analyze the dump file later to determine the cause of the system hang.

The system attempts a reboot.

If reboot fails (for example, boot device not defined), reboot the system manually.

After the system reboots, you can examine the dump file by:

• Logging in to the SYSTEM account

• Entering the following commands:

$ ANALYZE/CRASH SYS$SYSTEM:SYSDUMP.DMP

SDA> SHOW CRASH

For more information about the system dump analyzer (SDA), see the VMS System Dump Analyzer Utility Manual.

Once you complete the recommended shutdown procedure, you can turn off the system by setting the power switch to off (0).

Note: On VAX 4000 systems with expansion cabinets linked to the system cabinet by a power bus cable, you need only turn off the system unit. The expansion cabinets will power down when you set the system power switch to off. Note that the ac indicator on the expansion cabinet power supply should remain lit even though the system cabinet power is off.

System Startup and Shutdown Procedures

4–11

Other System Operations

Other System Operations

Restarting the

System

Recovering from an Over

Temperature

Condition

Restarting the system returns it to the power-up state. All current and pending operations are aborted and power-up selt-tests are run.

To restart the system, press the Restart/Run button on the operator control panel. The Halt button must be out (not lit) to effect a restart operation.

CAUTION: Restarting the system aborts all current and pending operations. To prevent loss of data, warn all users to log off before restarting the system. Follow the recommended shutdown procedure before restarting the system.

If the system cabinet internal temperature reaches a certain threshold, an audible alarm will sound and the Over

Temperature Warning indicator will flash. If the temperature continues to increase, the system will automatically shut down.

When the system shuts down due to overheating, the Over

Temperature Warning indicator remains lit. To recover from a shutdown, set the power switch to off (0) and wait five minutes before turning on the system.

4–12 System Startup and Shutdown Procedures

5

System Boot Procedures

Introduction

Booting is the process of loading system software into main memory. VAX 4000 and VAXstation 4000 systems include an internal ROM that contains the code necessary to boot the operating system from the default system disk or an alternate device.

This chapter overviews the boot process and describes the various boot methods and associated console commands.

Topics include:

• Boot overview

• Autobooting the system

• Manually booting the system

• Optional boot procedures

• Defining default boot actions

System Boot Procedures 5–1

Boot Overview

Boot Overview

Steps in the

Boot Process

Table 5–1 describes the steps in the boot process.

7.

8.

9.

10.

Table 5–1 Boot Process

Step Action

1.

2.

3.

4.

5.

6.

11.

System initiates the boot sequence, either automatically or in response to a BOOT command issued from the console.

Boot procedure deposits boot control data in the CPU generalpurpose registers.

System loads VMB into memory from the system ROMs.

VMB is the primary bootstrap program that allows access to the system disk (or alternate device).

VMB locates SYS$SYSTEM:SYSBOOT.EXE on the system disk

(or alternate device) and loads it into memory.

SYSBOOT.EXE loads the SYSGEN parameters stored in the file SYS$SYSTEM:VAXVMSSYS.PAR and checks the state of the conversational boot flag.

If the conversational boot flag is set, SYSBOOT.EXE stops and displays the SYSBOOT> prompt.

If the flag is not set, SYSBOOT.EXE loads the operating system executive into memory and transfers control to the executive.

When the executive finishes, it executes the SWAPPER process.

The SWAPPER creates the SYSINIT process.

SYSINIT creates the STARTUP process.

STARTUP executes SYS$SYSTEM:STARTUP.COM (unless another file was specified at the SYSBOOT> prompt) and

SYSTARTUP_V5.COM. The current values of SYSGEN parameters are written back to VAXVMSSYS.PAR.

The boot process finishes, and you can log in to the operating system.

5–2 System Boot Procedures

Boot Device

Names

Boot Overview

VAX 4000 and VAXstation 4000 systems support booting from a variety of devices, including disk drives, tape drives, PROM, or from another system by way of the Ethernet.

Table 5–2 lists the device names of the more commonly used boot devices.

Table 5–2 Boot Device Names

Device Logical

Name Device Type Controller/Adapter

VAX 4000 Model 100 System

RF-series disk

Compact disk

Tape drive

Ethernet

On-board DSSI adapter

On-board SCSI controller

On-board SCSI controller

On-board adapter

DIAu

DKAxnn

MKAxnn

EZA0

VAX 4000 Models 200/300/400/500/600

RF-series disk

RRD4x drive

TF-series tape

TF85 tape

TK70 tape

On-board DSSI adapter

KFQSA DSSI adapter

KZQSA adapter

KRQ50 controller

On-board DSSI adapter

On-board DSSI adapter

KFQSA DSSI adapter

TQK70

DImu

DUcu

DKAu

DUcu

MImu

MIAu

MUcu

MUcu

Key to device logical names

• m — DSSI bus adapter: A = bus 0; B = bus 1

When under operating system control, DIBu devices are recognized as DIAu devices.

• c — Disk or tape controller designator: A = first, B = second, and so on

• u — unit number

• x — SCSI ID of device, (except ID 6 — reserved for SCSI controller)

• nn — SCSI logical unit number; usually 00.

(continued on next page)

System Boot Procedures 5–3

Boot Overview

Table 5–2 (Cont.) Boot Device Names

Device Type Controller/Adapter

VAX 4000 Models 200/300/400/500/600

TLZ04 tape

Ethernet

PROM

KZQSA adapter

On-board adapter

DESQA Ethernet controller

MRV11 module

Device Logical

Name

MKAu

EZA0

XQAu

PRAu

VAXstation 4000 Systems

Fixed disk

Tape

Ethernet

SCSI controller (in system unit or expansion box)

SCSI controller (in system unit or expansion box)

On-board adapter

DKAxnn

MKAxnn

ESA0

Key to device logical names

• m — DSSI bus adapter: A = bus 0; B = bus 1

When under operating system control, DIBu devices are recognized as DIAu devices.

• c — Disk or tape controller designator: A = first, B = second, and so on

• u — unit number

• x — SCSI ID of device, (except ID 6 — reserved for SCSI controller)

• nn — SCSI logical unit number; usually 00.

5–4 System Boot Procedures

Listing

Possible Boot

Devices

Boot Methods

Boot Overview

To obtain a list of boot devices available on the system, issue the console command SHOW DEVICE.

Example 5–1 is a sample SHOW DEVICE listing for a VAX 4000 system. The system displays the device logical name preceded by a dash (–) for each device.

Example 5–1 Sample SHOW DEVICE Display

>>>SHOW DEVICE

DSSI Bus 0 Node 0 (CLYDE)

-DIA0 (RF73)

DSSI Bus 0 Node 1 (BONNIE)

-DIA1 (RF73)

DSSI Bus 0 Node 5 (TFDR1)

-MIA5 (TF85)

DSSI Bus 0 Node 6 (*)

DSSI Bus 1 Node 7 (*)

UQSSP Tape Controller 0 (774500)

-MUA0 (TK70)

SCSI Adaptor 0 (761400), SCSI ID 7

-MKA0 (DEC TLZ04 1991(c)DEC)

Ethernet Adapter

-EZA0 (08-00-2B-06-10-42)

VAX 4000 and VAXstation 4000 systems support two basic boot methods, listed in Table 5–3.

Table 5–3 Boot Methods

Method Description

Autoboot

Manual boot

The system automatically attempts to boot the operating system software on power-up or after a power-fail or error halt.

The system exits to console mode on power-up or after a power-fail or error halt. The user then issues a BOOT command to boot the system.

The following sections describe the boot methods.

System Boot Procedures 5–5

Autobooting the System

Autobooting the System

Boot

Conditions

The system tests the following conditions during the boot process to determine if an autoboot should be performed:

1.

Position of the Break Enable/Disable switch (normally set to the disable position)

Note:

VAXstation 4000 systems do not have a Break Enable

/Disable switch.

2.

Halt action setting (SET HALT command)

3.

Whether or not a boot device is defined (SET BOOT command)

Depending on the conditions, the system will autoboot from a default device, prompt for a device and then boot, or exit to console mode.

5–6 System Boot Procedures

System

Response to Boot

Conditions

Autobooting the System

Table 5–4 indicates the action the system takes in response to the boot conditions.

Note

VAXstation 4000 systems do not have a Break Enable

/Disable switch. The boot action depends on the halt action setting and whether or not a boot device is defined.

Table 5–4 System Response to Boot Conditions

Break

Switch Halt Action

Boot

Device

Defined?

System Action

Disabled

Enabled

NA

Reboot or

Restart_reboot

Halt

Yes

No

Yes

No

NA

Boot from device

Prompt for device

Boot from device

Prompt for device

Exit to console mode

System Boot Procedures 5–7

Autobooting the System

Sample Boot,

VAX 4000

System, Boot

Device Defined

On a VAX 4000 system, if a boot device is defined, the system displays the device logical name and the number 2 on the console. As the system continues booting, it decrements the countdown to 1 then 0.

Example 5–2 shows a sample VAX 4000 system autoboot with

DIA0 as the boot device.

Example 5–2 VAX 4000 System Boot, Boot Device Defined

KAxx-A Vn.n, VMB n.n

!

Performing normal system tests.

66..65..64..63..62..61..60..59..58..57..56..55..54..53..52..51..

50..49..48..47..46..45..44..43..42..41..40..39..38..37..36..35..

"

34..33..32..31..30..29..28..27..26..25..24..23..22..21..20..19..

18..17..16..15..14..13..12..11..10..09..08..07..06..05..04..03..

Tests completed.

Loading system software.

(BOOT/R5:0 DIA0)

#

2..

-DIA0

1..0..

$

!

CPU name, firmware version number, and VMB version number

"

#

$

ROM based diagnostics countdown

BOOT command string issued by system

Boot countdown

5–8 System Boot Procedures

Sample Boot,

VAX 4000

System, Boot

Device Not

Defined

Autobooting the System

If a boot device is not defined, the system displays a list of bootable devices and prompts for a device from the list.

Example 5–3 shows a power-up display and the boot device list.

Example 5–3 VAX 4000 System Boot, Boot Device Not Defined

KAxx-A Vn.n VMB n.n

Performing normal system tests.

66..65..64..63..62..61..60..59..58..57..56..55..54..53..52..51..

50..49..48..47..46..45..44..43..42..41..40..39..38..37..36..35..

34..33..32..31..30..29..28..27..26..25..24..23..22..21..20..19..

18..17..16..15..14..13..12..11..10..09..08..07..06..05..04..03..

Tests completed.

Loading system software.

No default boot device has been specified.

!

Available devices.

-DIA0 (RF31)

-DIA1 (RF31)

"

-MUA0 (TK70)

-EZA0 (08-00-2B-06-10-42)

Device? [EZA0]:

#

!

"

#

System reports it is unable to identify a default boot device

List of available devices

Boot device prompt

System Boot Procedures 5–9

Autobooting the System

Sample Boot,

VAX 4000

System,

Selecting a

Boot Device

To select a boot device, enter a device name at the system prompt. Once a boot device is specified, the system will autoboot from that device on power up.

Example 5–4 shows a power-up display with the user entering the boot device name.

Note

If you do not enter a device name within 30 seconds, the system attempts to boot from the Ethernet device, EZA0.

Example 5–4 VAX 4000 System Boot, Selecting a Boot Device

KAxx-A Vn.n VMB n.n

Performing normal system tests.

66..65..64..63..62..61..60..59..58..57..56..55..54..53..52..51..

50..49..48..47..46..45..44..43..42..41..40..39..38..37..36..35..

34..33..32..31..30..29..28..27..26..25..24..23..22..21..20..19..

18..17..16..15..14..13..12..11..10..09..08..07..06..05..04..03..

Tests completed.

Loading system software.

No default boot device has been specified.

Available devices.

-DIA0 (RF31)

-DIA1 (RF31)

-MUA0 (TK70)

-EZA0 (08-00-2B-06-10-42)

Device? [EZA0]: DIA0

!

(BOOT/R5:0 DIA0)

2..

-DIA0

1..0..

!

User specifies device DIA0

5–10 System Boot Procedures

Manually Booting the System

Manually Booting the System

Exiting to

Console Mode

Exit to Console

Mode, VAX

4000 Systems

The system will exit to console mode (>>> prompt) on power up or after a power-fail or error halt if the Break Enable/Disable switch is set to enable and the halt action is set to HALT (or

DEFAULT on VAX 4000 systems).

VAXstation 4000 systems do not have a Break Enable/Disable switch. Exiting to console mode depends on the halt action.

Example 5–5 shows a power up to console mode for a typical

VAX 4000 system.

Example 5–5 VAX 4000 Systems, Power Up to Console Mode

KAxx-A Vn.n VMB n.n

Performing normal system tests.

66..65..64..63..62..61..60..59..58..57..56..55..54..53..52..51..

50..49..48..47..46..45..44..43..42..41..40..39..38..37..36..35..

34..33..32..31..30..29..28..27..26..25..24..23..22..21..20..19..

18..17..16..15..14..13..12..11..10..09..08..07..06..05..04..03..

Tests completed.

>>>

!

!

Console mode prompt

System Boot Procedures 5–11

Manually Booting the System

Exit to

Console Mode,

VAXstation

4000 Systems

On VAXstation 4000 systems, power-up self-tests are indicated by a status bar that fills as each self-test completes. The more memory in the system, the longer self-tests take. When all self-tests are run, the console prompt (>>>) is displayed.

Figure 5–1 shows a power up to console mode for a typical

VAXstation 4000 system.

Figure 5–1 VAXstation 4000 System, Power Up to Console

Mode

KA49−A Vn.n

1

08−00−2B−04−03−12

32MB

3

2

4

OK

>>>

5

NUO−0535−04−GRA

!

"

#

$

%

CPU type and firmware version number

Ethernet hardware address

Memory size

Status bar — increases in size as self-tests run

Console mode prompt

5–12 System Boot Procedures

Using the

BOOT

Command

BOOT

Command

Syntax

BOOT

Command

Examples

Manually Booting the System

When the system is in console mode you can manually boot the system by issuing the BOOT command.

The BOOT command allows you to boot the system from a:

• Predefined boot device

• Predefined boot device search list

• Device specified on the command line

• Device search list specified on the command

The BOOT command syntax is as follows:

>>> BOOT [/qualifier...] [device_name[,device_name...]]

Table 5–5 shows examples of BOOT command strings.

Table 5–5 BOOT Command Examples

Command System Action

BOOT Boot from the default boot device or from the first bootable device in a string of devices.

A default boot device, or string of bootable devices, can be defined by the SET BOOT command.

BOOT MIA5 Boot from TF85 tape unit 5.

BOOT DUA0,DIA0,MIA5,EZA0

Boot from the first device in the search string that contains bootable software.

The boot device string can be up to 32 characters, with devices separated by commas and no spaces.

The system checks the devices in the order specified and boots from the first one that contains bootable software.

Note

If the Ethernet device (for example, EZA0) is to be part of the boot device search string, it should be the last device in the string. The system will continually attempt to boot over the Ethernet.

System Boot Procedures 5–13

Optional Boot Procedures

Optional Boot Procedures

Booting from

[SYSF] During an Upgrade

Booting from a Different

Directory

Definition:

Conversational

Boot

During a system upgrade, you may be required to boot from the

[SYSF] root directory. To boot from [SYSF], enter the BOOT command in the following format:

>>> BOOT /R5:F0000000 ddcu

Where ddcu is the device name of the system disk.

Example: The following command specifies to boot from the

[SYSF] directory of a RF31 fixed disk:

>>> BOOT /R5:F0000000 DIA0

By default, the OpenVMS operating system is installed in the system root directory named [SYS0]. However, you can use the

VMSKITBLD procedure to add a copy of the operating system to another root directory (as long as it is not on the system disk).

You can then boot the system from that directory.

Example: The following command specifies to boot from [SYS3] on an RF31 fixed disk that is not the system disk:

>>> BOOT /R5:30000000 DIA1

A conversational boot is commonly used in research and development environments and during software upgrades.

Perform a conversational boot when you want to stop the boot process before it completes. The boot process stops after it loads

SYS$SYSTEM:SYSBOOT.EXE and displays the SYSBOOT> prompt.

5–14 System Boot Procedures

Optional Boot Procedures

What You can do During a

Conversational

Boot

Conversational

Boot Procedure

When the SYSBOOT> prompt is displayed during a conversational boot, you can enter certain SYSGEN commands to do the following:

• Look at system parameter values

• Change system parameter values

• Specify another parameter file

• Specify another system startup command procedure

• Select the default system parameter file if you modified system parameters to values that render the system unbootable

• Specify a minimum startup

There are several ways to perform a conversational boot.

Table 5–6 presents a typical method.

Table 5–6 Conversational Boot Procedure

Step Action

1.

2.

3.

Enter the BOOT command in the following format:

>>> BOOT/R5:00000001 [ddcu]

Where ddcu is the device name of the boot device. If you do not specify a device name, the system will boot from the default boot device when you finish issuing SYSGEN commands.

At the SYSBOOT> prompt, enter the SYSGEN commands from the subset commands available:

SYSBOOT> sysgen_command

When you finish issuing SYSGEN commands, enter the

CONTINUE command to complete the boot process

SYSBOOT> CONTINUE

System Boot Procedures 5–15

Optional Boot Procedures

SYSGEN

Commands

Table 5–7 lists the subset of SYSGEN commands available at the SYSBOOT> prompt. For more information about these commands, see the VMS System Generation Manual.

Table 5–7 SYSGEN Commands Used in SYSBOOT

Command Description

CONTINUE

DISABLE CHECKS

ENABLE CHECKS

HELP

SET parameter-name

SET/STARTUP

SHOW [parameter-name]

USE [file-spec]

Resumes the boot process.

Inhibits checking of parameter values specified with the SET command.

Permits checking of parameter values specified with the SET command.

Displays a summary of commands on the console.

Establishes the name of a system parameter.

Sets the name of the system startup command procedure.

Displays active, current, default, maximum, and minimum values for specific parameters. Use qualifiers to display characteristics of parameters grouped by categories.

Specifies a parameter file to be used as a source of values. You must enter the entire file specification, including device and directory; you cannot specify a logical name.

5–16 System Boot Procedures

Defining Default Boot Actions

Defining Default Boot Actions

Defining a

Default Boot

Device

SET BOOT

Syntax

SET BOOT

Examples

The SET BOOT console command allows you to specify a default boot device, or a list of devices, which the system will search for boot software.

Once a default boot device is defined, the system will automatically boot from the device on power up or after a power-fail or error halt. If a boot device list is defined, the system will boot from the first device on the list which contains bootable software.

The SET BOOT command syntax is as follows:

>>> SET BOOT [/qualifier...] device_name[,device_name...]

Table 5–8 shows examples of SET BOOT command strings.

Table 5–8 Sample SET BOOT Commands

Command String Description

SET BOOT EZA0 Defines the default boot device to be the

Ethernet controller.

SET BOOT DUA0,DIA0,MIA5,EZA0

Defines a boot device search string with DUA0,

DIA0, MIA5, and EZA0 as possible boot devices.

When attempting an autoboot, or if the BOOT command is issued without specifying a device, the system checks each device in order and boots from the first one that contains bootable software.

Notes on

Defining a Boot

Device

Selecting a device other than the Ethernet device is not appropriate for diskless and tapeless systems that must boot over the network.

If defining a boot device search string, the string can be up to

32 characters, with device names separated by commas and no spaces.

System Boot Procedures 5–17

Defining Default Boot Actions

Defining the

Default Halt

Action

SET HALT

Syntax

SET HALT

Keywords

If an Ethernet device (for example, EZA0) is part of the string, it should be the last device of the string. The system will continuously attempt to boot over the Ethernet.

The SET HALT command allows you to define the action the system takes on power up or after a power-fail or error halt. The action taken depends on the state of the halt action flag.

When the system is shipped, the default action is set to halt.

You can change the default action by entering the SET HALT command and specifying the keyword or value of the action you want to set.

The SET HALT command syntax is as follows:

>>> SET HALT {key_word | value}

Table 5–9 shows the SET HALT keywords, the associated values, and the system action taken on power-up or after a power-fail or error halt.

Table 5–9 SET HALT Keywords

Keyword

DEFAULT

1

RESTART

2

REBOOT

HALT

RESTART_

REBOOT

1

Value

0

1

2

3

4

System Action

Halt and display console prompt.

Attempt restart. If restart fails, halt.

Attempt reboot. If reboot fails, halt.

Halt and display console prompt.

Attempt restart. If restart fails, attempt reboot. If reboot fails, halt.

1

Keyword not supported on VAXstation 4000 systems.

2

RESTART on VAXstation 4000 systems is the same as RESTART_REBOOT for the other systems.

5–18 System Boot Procedures

6

System Backup and Restore Procedures

Introduction

This chapter describes the procedures for backing up and restoring the system disk. Topics include:

• BACKUP overview

• Installing standalone BACKUP

• Booting standalone BACKUP

• Backing up the system disk

• Restoring the system disk

System Backup and Restore Procedures 6–1

Standalone BACKUP Overview

Standalone BACKUP Overview

Definition:

Standalone

BACKUP

Why Use

Standalone

BACKUP

Standalone BACKUP is a subset of the OpenVMS Backup utility that allows you to make a complete backup of the system disk.

The utility runs without the support of the operating system.

Digital recommends that you run standalone BACKUP to make a complete backup of the system disk for the following reasons:

• The Backup utility that runs under control of the operating system copies only what is on the disk and ignores sections of any open files in memory.

If you were to use the on-line backup utility, portions of files that were in memory, and data about files not yet written back to the disk (cached data), would not be saved to the backup copy.

• In case a problem occurs during an operating system update, or during the installation of other software products.

Before you attempt any of these procedures, you should back up the system disk. If a problem occurs, you can restore the backup copy of the system disk.

• To prevent loss of system files if they are accidentally deleted.

After you install or upgrade the operating system, or any other software products, you should back up the system disk. If a system file is deleted and renders the system disk inoperable, you can restore the backup copy and continue to use the system.

• In case the drive that holds the system disk malfunctions.

If you have a backup copy of the operating system, you can restore it to a functioning disk and continue to use the system.

• To eliminate disk fragmentation, which happens when files are stored noncontiguously on the disk. The BACKUP command creates contiguous copies of files.

6–2 System Backup and Restore Procedures

Standalone BACKUP Overview

Where to Store

Standalone

BACKUP

Standalone BACKUP is normally supplied on a tape cartridge or compact disk, depending on the distribution media received with the system.

You can store standalone BACKUP on the system disk, a compact disk, a tape cartridge, or any other media the system supports.

Digital recommends that you store standalone BACKUP on the system disk and on one or more tape cartridges (in case the original tape is damaged).

System Backup and Restore Procedures 6–3

Installing Standalone BACKUP

Installing Standalone BACKUP

Installing on the System

Disk

You can install standalone BACKUP in any available root directory on the system disk from [SYS1] to [SYSE]. However,

Digital has established [SYSE] as the standard directory for standalone BACKUP.

To install standalone BACKUP in the [SYSE] directory on the system disk, use the following procedure:

Step

1.

2.

3.

Action

Log in to the SYSTEM account.

Enter the following command:

$ @SYS$UPDATE:STABACKIT SYS$SYSDEVICE:

When the procedure finishes, the system displays the following message:

The kit is complete.

The STABACKIT procedure places the files in the directories

[SYSE.SYSEXE] and [SYSE.SYS$LDR] on the system disk. It lists the files as they are copied.

If you want to install standalone BACKUP in another directory, change the target directory from SYS$SYSDEVICE: to the directory of your choice.

6–4 System Backup and Restore Procedures

Installing Standalone BACKUP

Installing on a

Tape Cartridge

2.

3.

4.

5.

Digital recommends that you keep standalone BACKUP on a tape cartridge in case the system disk becomes corrupted. If you have a tape cartridge distribution kit, you already have standalone BACKUP on tape. However, you may want to make additional copies in case the original tape becomes damaged.

To install standalone BACKUP on a tape cartridge, use the following procedure:

Step

1.

6.

7.

8.

9.

User Action or System Response

Obtain a blank tape cartridge and write a descriptive name on the paper label. Insert the label into the label slot.

The tape label should reflect the contents of the tape.

For example, if you are building a Version 5.5-n kit, you may want to label the cartridge S/A BKUP V5.5-n TK85.

Write-enable the tape cartridge.

Insert the tape cartridge in the tape drive.

Log in to the SYSTEM account.

Enter the following command:

$ @SYS$UPDATE:STABACKIT

When the procedure asks for the name of the target device, enter the device name of the tape drive.

In the example below, MIA5 is entered in response to the prompt for the device name.

%STABACKIT-I-SYMDEL, all global symbols deleted

Enter the name of the device on which to build the kit:

MIA5

The system displays the following message.

Please place the scratch tape cartridge in drive _MIA50:

This volume will receive the volume label SYSTEM.

Enter "YES" when ready:

When you are ready to continue, enter Y (for Yes).

The procedure displays verification messages informing you that files are being copied.

System Backup and Restore Procedures 6–5

Installing Standalone BACKUP

Step

10.

11.

12.

User Action or System Response

When standalone BACKUP is installed, the system displays a message similar to the following.

Ending time 19-APR-1991 13:45:29.90

Starting time 19-APR-1991 13:22:39.05

The kit is complete.

$

Remove the tape cartridge from the tape drive.

Write-protect the cartridge and store it in a safe place.

6–6 System Backup and Restore Procedures

Booting Standalone BACKUP

Booting Standalone BACKUP

Before Booting

Standalone

BACKUP

3.

4.

Before you boot standalone BACKUP, you must shut down the operating system. The shutdown procedure writes the contents of the system caches back to the disk and closes any open files.

To shut down the operating system, perform the following procedure:

Step

1.

2.

User Action or System Response

Set the Break Enable/Disable switch to Enable.

Take one of the following actions:

If the operating system is . . .

Running

Not running

Then

Go to step 3

Go to step 5

5.

Enter the following command to shut down the system:

$ @SYS$SYSTEM:SHUTDOWN

Answer the questions.

When the procedure asks if an automatic system reboot should be performed, press

Return for No. When the procedure is finished, the system displays the following message.

SYSTEM SHUTDOWN COMPLETE - USE CONSOLE TO HALT SYSTEM

Stop the system. If the system has a Halt button, press it twice. Ensure that the light on the button goes off. If the system does not have a Halt button, press the

Break

(F5) key.

System Backup and Restore Procedures 6–7

Booting Standalone BACKUP

Booting from the System

Disk

Standalone BACKUP is normally booted from the system disk to save time. To boot standalone BACKUP from the system disk, use the following procedure:

Step

1.

2.

3.

4.

5.

6.

User Action or System Response

Shut down the operating system.

Enter the BOOT command in the following format:

>>> B/E0000000 device_name

Where device_name is the name of the system disk.

For example, if the system disk is on DIA0, enter the following:

>>> B/E0000000 DIA0

When the procedure asks for the date and time, enter the date and time in the 24-hour clock format. For example:

Please Enter Date And Time (DD-MMM-YYYY HH:MM)

19-APR-1991 13:00

The system displays a list of the local devices on the system. For example:

Available device MIA5:

Available device DIA0:

Available device DUB0:

.

.

.

device type TF85 device type RF31 device type RRD42

Check the device listing. If the list is incomplete, make sure that all devices are connected properly to the system. See the installation manual for your system for details.

When standalone BACKUP finishes booting, it displays an identification message followed by the dollar-sign prompt ($):

%BACKUP-I-IDENT, Standalone BACKUP V5.5; the date is 20-DEC-

1992 13:43

$

6–8 System Backup and Restore Procedures

Booting Standalone BACKUP

Booting from a

Tape Cartridge

Step

1.

2.

3.

If the system disk containing standalone BACKUP should become unusable, you can boot standalone BACKUP from a tape cartridge containing standalone BACKUP (either the distribution tape or one you created).

To boot standalone BACKUP from a tape cartridge, perform the following procedure. Booting from a tape takes approximately 20 minutes.

4.

5.

6.

User Action or System Response

Shut down the operating system.

Insert the tape cartridge containing standalone

BACKUP in the tape drive.

Enter the following command:

>>> B device_name

Where device_name is the device name of the tape drive.

For example, if the system uses a TLZ04 drive, enter

MKA0. If it uses a TF85 drive, enter MIA0.

Standalone BACKUP displays a message similar to the following:

VAX/VMS Version V5.5--n Major version id=1 Minor version id=0

When the procedure asks for the date and time, enter the date and time in the 24-hour clock format. For example:

Please Enter Date And Time (DD-MMM-YYYY HH:MM)

19-APR-1991 13:00

The system displays a list of local devices on the system.

For example:

Available device MIA0:

Available device DIA0:

Available device DUB0:

.

.

.

device type TF85 device type RF31 device type RRD42

System Backup and Restore Procedures 6–9

Booting Standalone BACKUP

Step

7.

8.

User Action or System Response

When standalone BACKUP finishes booting, it displays an identification message followed by the dollar-sign prompt ($):

%BACKUP-I-IDENT, Standalone BACKUP V5.5; the date is 19-APR-

1991 13:00

$

Remove the tape cartridge containing standalone

BACKUP from the tape drive.

6–10 System Backup and Restore Procedures

Booting Standalone BACKUP

Booting from a

Compact Disc

Step

1.

2.

3.

You can boot standalone BACKUP from the original compact disc that was supplied as the operating system distribution media.

To boot standalone BACKUP for a compact disc, use the following procedure. Booting from compact discs takes approximately 3 minutes.

4.

5.

6.

Action

Shut down the operating system.

Insert the operating system distribution compact disc in the drive.

At the console prompt, enter the BOOT command:

>>> BOOT device_name

Where device-name is the device name of the compact disc drive. For example, if the compact disc drive has a device name of DUB0, enter the following command:

>>> BOOT DUB0

When the procedure asks for the date and time, enter the date and time using the 24-hour clock format. For example:

Please Enter Date And Time (DD-MMM-YYYY HH:MM)

20-DEC-1991 13:00

The procedure displays a list of the local devices on the system. For example:

Available device MIA5: device type TK85

Available device DIA0: device type RF31

Available device DUB0: device type RRD42

.

.

.

Copy the names of the RF drives on a piece of paper.

If you will be using an RF drive to hold the system disk, you will need the device name as displayed by the standalone BACKUP procedure.

System Backup and Restore Procedures 6–11

Booting Standalone BACKUP

Step

7.

Action

When standalone BACKUP finishes booting, the procedure displays an identification message followed by the dollar-sign prompt ( $ ).

%BACKUP-I-IDENT, Standalone BACKUP V5.5; the date is 20-DEC-

1991 13:00

$

6–12 System Backup and Restore Procedures

Backing Up the System Disk

Backing Up the System Disk

Image Versus

Physical

Backup

Before You Run

Standalone

BACKUP

Standalone BACKUP uses a subset of the VMS Backup utility’s qualifiers. The key qualifier relative to backing up and restoring the system disk is /IMAGE. Table 6–1 summarizes the qualifier and contrasts it with /PHYSICAL which is used during other types of backup operations.

Table 6–1 Standalone BACKUP/IMAGE and /PHYSICAL

Qualifiers

Qualifier BACKUP Function

/IMAGE

/PHYSICAL

Creates a functionally equivalent copy of the entire system disk.

Copies, saves, restores, or compares the entire system disk in terms of logical blocks, ignoring any file structure.

For a description of the Backup utility, see the VMS Backup

Utility Manual.

Before you run standalone BACKUP to back up the system disk, perform the following preliminary steps:

Step

1.

2.

3.

4.

Action

Write-protect the system disk by pressing the write protect button on the drive.

Decide if you want to back up the system to a disk or to a tape cartridge.

If you are using a tape cartridge, obtain a scratch tape that you can use for the backup copy. Write-enable the cartridge and insert it in the tape drive.

Determine the device name of the drive holding the system disk, and the one holding the backup disk or tape cartridge. Enter the SHOW DEVICE command to obtain a list of devices.

System Backup and Restore Procedures 6–13

Backing Up the System Disk

BACKUP

Procedure

To back up the system disk, use the following procedure:

Step

1.

2.

Action

Boot standalone BACKUP.

Enter the BACKUP command in one of the following formats.

• If backing up to disk:

$ BACKUP/IMAGE/VERIFY source_drive: target_drive:

• If backing up to tape:

$ BACKUP/IMAGE/VERIFY source_drive: target_drive:-

_$ saveset.BCK/LABEL=volume_label/REWIND

Where:

source_drive target_drive saveset.BCK

volume_label

Is the:

Device name of the system disk drive.

Device name of the drive holding the backup disk or tape.

Note:

Before the backup operation begins, the target device is initialized, erasing all data currently on the device.

Name of the saveset to be created.

The name should reflect the contents of the backup tape and cannot exceed

17 characters in length.

Volume label of the tape cartridge in the tape drive.

If the tape has been initialized already, use the same volume label assigned by the INITIALIZE command. If the tape has not been initialized, you can assign a volume label at this time. The volume label cannot have more than six characters.

6–14 System Backup and Restore Procedures

Backing Up the System Disk

Step

3.

4.

Action

Examples:

• Backing up to disk:

$ BACKUP/IMAGE/VERIFY DIA0: DIA1

• Backing up to tape:

$ BACKUP/IMAGE/VERIFY DIA0: MIA5:-

_$ APR_19_1991.BCK/LABEL=19APRF/REWIND

The system displays the following message.

%BACKUP-I-STARTVERIFY, starting verification pass

Take one of the following actions:

If you are backing up to . . .

Another disk

Tape and the contents of the system disk fit on one tape cartridge

Tape and the system disk contains more data than one tape cartridge can store

Then . . .

Go to step 11

Go to step 11

Go to step 5

7.

8.

5.

6.

The system displays the following messages:

%BACKUP-I-RESUME, Resuming operation on volume n

%BACKUP-I-READYWRITE, Mount volume n on _MIA5: for writing

Enter "YES" when ready:

Remove the backup tape cartridge from the tape drive and write-protect the cartridge.

Label, number, and date the cartridge. The label and number should reflect the contents of the tape.

Write-enable another scratch tape cartridge and insert it in the drive.

When you are ready to continue, enter Y (for Yes) and press

Return

.

System Backup and Restore Procedures 6–15

Backing Up the System Disk

Step

9.

10.

11.

12.

13.

14.

Action

The procedure displays the following message:

%BACKUP-I-STARTVERIFY, starting verification pass

Each time the procedure displays a mount request, repeat steps 5 through 9.

When the backup is complete, go to step 11.

When the procedure is finished, the system displays a message similar to the following:

%BACKUP-I-PROCDONE, operation completed.

Processing finished at 18-JAN-1993 15:23

If you do not want to perform another standalone BACKUP operation, use the console to halt the system.

If you do want to perform another standalone BACKUP operation, ensure the standalone application volume is on-line and ready.

Enter "YES" to continue:

If you were backing up to tape, remove the backup tape cartridge from the drive and write-protect the cartridge.

Label, number, and date the cartridge. The label and number should reflect the contents of the tape.

Stop the system. If the system has a Halt button, press it twice. Ensure that the light on the button goes off. If the system does not have a Halt button, press the

Break

(F5) key.

Reboot the system.

Store the backup copy of the system disk in a safe place.

6–16 System Backup and Restore Procedures

Notes on

Volume

Parameters

Backing Up the System Disk

The BACKUP command creates a system disk that includes a Digital provided set of volume parameters, including a CLUSTER_SIZE (disk access scheme) of value 1. (The

CLUSTER_SIZE parameter refers to the way files are stored on the disk, not to VAXcluster environments.)

You can change most volume parameters later with the SET

VOLUME command. However, to change the CLUSTER_SIZE parameter, you must back up the system disk that has been initialized previously with the CLUSTER_SIZE value that you want.

To prevent the BACKUP command from reinitializing the target disk, use the /NOINITIALIZE qualifier. For more information about initializing a disk, see the Guide to Maintaining a VMS

System. For more information on the BACKUP command, see the VMS Backup Utility Manual.

System Backup and Restore Procedures 6–17

Restoring the System Disk

Restoring the System Disk

Restore

Procedure

2.

3.

4.

You can restore the system disk from a backup copy that was created on another disk or on a tape cartridge. To restore the system disk, use the following procedure:

Step

1.

Action

Determine the device name of the drive holding the system disk, and of the drive holding the backup disk or tape cartridge.

Enter the SHOW DEVICE command at the console prompt if needed for a list of devices.

If you are restoring from a backup tape cartridge, write-protect the cartridge and insert it in the drive.

Boot standalone BACKUP.

Enter the BACKUP command in one of the following formats.

• To restore from a backup disk:

$ BACKUP/IMAGE/VERIFY source_drive: target_drive:

• To restore from a tape cartridge:

$ BACKUP/IMAGE/VERIFY source_drive:-

_$ saveset.BCK/SAV/REWIND target_drive:

Where:

source_drive target_drive saveset.BCK

Is the:

Device name of the drive holding the backup disk or tape cartridge.

Device name of the drive holding the system disk.

Name of the saveset if restoring from a backup tape cartridge.

6–18 System Backup and Restore Procedures

Restoring the System Disk

Step

5.

6.

Action

Examples:

• Restoring from a backup disk:

$ BACKUP/IMAGE/VERIFY DIA0: DIA1:

• Restoring from a backup tape:

$ BACKUP/IMAGE/VERIFY-

_$ MIA5:APR_19_1991.BCK/SAV/REWIND DIA0:

The system displays the following message:

%BACKUP-I-STARTVERIFY, starting verification pass

Take one of the following actions:

If you are restoring from . . .

A backup disk

A tape saveset, and the saveset fits on one tape

A tape saveset, and the saveset takes more than one tape

Then

Go to step 9

Go to step 9

Go to step 7

7.

8.

The system displays the following message:

%BACKUP-I-RESUME, Resuming operation on volume 2

%BACKUP-I-READYWRITE, Mount volume 2 on _MIA5: for reading

Enter "YES" when ready:

Remove the backup tape cartridge from the drive. Insert the next cartridge in the drive and enter Y (for Yes).

Each time you receive a mount request, repeat this step.

When the restore is complete, go to step 9.

System Backup and Restore Procedures 6–19

Restoring the System Disk

Step

9.

10.

11.

12.

Action

When the procedure is finished, the system displays the following message:

%BACKUP-I-PROCDONE, operation completed.

Processing finished at 19-APR-1991 15:00:00.00

If you do not want to perform another standalone BACKUP operation, use the console to halt the system.

If you do want to perform another standalone BACKUP operation, ensure the standalone application volume is online and ready.

Enter "YES" to continue:

If you were restoring from a backup tape cartridge, remove the cartridge from the drive.

Stop the system. If the system has a Halt button, press it twice. Ensure that the light on the button goes off. If the system does not have a Halt button, press the

Break

(F5) key.

Reboot the system.

6–20 System Backup and Restore Procedures

A

ANALYZE/CRASH command, 4–11

Autobooting the system

See Booting the system

B

BA215 Cabinet

CPU cover panel

Break Enable/Disable switch, 2–14 diagram, 2–13

Ethernet connectors, 2–15

LED display, 2–14 modified modular jack, 2–14

Power-Up Mode switch, 2–14

DC OK indicator, 2–10

DSSI connector, 2–10 front panel window, 2–7 front view, 2–8

Halt button, 2–10

ISE control panel

Bus Node ID plug, 2–12 component descriptions, 2–12 diagram, 2–11

Fault light, 2–12

Ready button, 2–12

Write-Protect button, 2–12

ISE controls, 2–10

Mass storage shelf description, 2–10 diagram, 2–9

Power supply panel circuit breaker, 2–16

Index

BA215 Cabinet

Power supply panel (cont’d)

DC OK indicator, 2–16

Reset button, 2–16

Power-Up Mode switch

Language Inquiry Mode, 2–14

Loop Back Test Mode, 2–14

Run Mode, 2–14

Restart/Run button, 2–10 window keylock, 2–7

BA430 Cabinet cabinet interior, 2–19

CPU cover panel

Break Enable/Disable switch, 2–26 diagram, 2–25

Ethernet connectors, 2–27

LED display, 2–26 modified modular jack, 2–26

DC OK indicator, 2–21 front door diagram, 2–18 front view, doors open, 2–19

Halt button, 2–22

Integrated storage elements location,

2–20

ISE control panel descriptions, 2–24 diagram, 2–23

Mass storage shelf description, 2–21 diagram, 2–20

Over Temperature Warning indicator,

2–21

Power supply panel

AC Present indicator, 2–28

Index–1

BA430 Cabinet

Power supply panel (cont’d)

DC OK indicator, 2–28 fan failure indicator, 2–28 location, 2–28

Over Temperature indicator, 2–28 power bus connectors, 2–28 power cable connector, 2–28 power switch, 2–28

Power-Up Mode switch, 2–26

Language Inquiry Mode, 2–26

Loop Back Test Mode, 2–26

Run Mode, 2–26

Restart button, 2–22

System control panel, 2–21 system controls access, 2–18

BA440 Cabinet

Baud Rate Select switch, 2–38

Break Enable/Disable switch, 2–38

Bus Node ID plugs, 2–39

Console module components, 2–38 to 2–40 diagram, 2–37

DC OK indicator, 2–33

DSSI Bus connectors, 2–39

Ethernet connectors, 2–39 front door diagram, 2–30 front view, doors open, 2–31

Halt button, 2–34

ISE control panel component descriptions, 2–36

ISE controls diagram, 2–35

LED display, 2–38

Mass storage shelf description, 2–33 diagram, 2–32

Modified modular jack connector, 2–38

Over Temperature Warning indicator,

2–33

Power supply panel

AC Present indicator, 2–41

DC OK indicator, 2–41

BA440 Cabinet

Power supply panel (cont’d)

Fan Failure indicator, 2–41

Over Temperature Condition indicator, 2–41

Power bus connectors, 2–41

Power switch, 2–41

Power-Up Mode switch, 2–38

Language Inquiry Mode, 2–38

Loop Back Test Mode, 2–38

Run Mode, 2–38

Restart button, 2–34

System control panel, 2–33 system controls access, 2–30

Backing up the system disk

See Standalone BACKUP

BACKUP command also see Standalone BACKUP backing up the system disk, 6–14 command parameters, 6–14 restoring the system disk, 6–18

Binary load and unload (X command), 3–42

BOOT command, 3–20 examples, 5–13 use of, 3–19, 5–13

Boot Device defining default, 5–17

Booting the system autoboot, 5–6 boot conditions, 5–6 conversational boot, 5–14

SYSGEN usage, 5–15 conversational boot procedure, 5–15 defining a boot device, 5–17 defining halt action, 5–18 from a different directory, 5–14 from console mode, 5–11 from [SYSF] directory, 5–14

SYSBOOT.EXE, usage during conversational boot, 5–14

Break Enable/Disable switch as a boot condition, 5–6

Index–2

C

Cabinets

See System Enclosures

Comment command (!), 3–42

! (comment command), 3–42

Console commands binary load and unload (X), 3–42

BOOT, 3–20

! (comment), 3–42

CONTINUE, 3–22

DEPOSIT, 3–22

EXAMINE, 3–24

FIND, 3–26

HALT, 3–26

HELP, 3–27

INITIALIZE, 3–27

LOGIN, 3–28

MOVE, 3–29

NEXT, 3–30 qualifier and argument conventions, 3–5

REPEAT, 3–32

SEARCH, 3–33

SET, 3–35

SHOW, 3–37

START, 3–41

TEST, 3–41

UNJAM, 3–42

X (binary load and unload), 3–42

Console I/O mode console commands, 3–3 entering console I/O mode, 3–2 privileged mode, 3–17

Console security feature disabling, 3–19 enabling, 3–16 values, 3–8, 3–35

CONTINUE command, 3–22, 5–15 use of, 3–19

D

DEPOSIT command, 3–22

Documentation list of, VAX 4000 systems, 1–14 list of, VAXstation 4000 systems, 1–15

E

Enclosures

See System Enclosures

Error messages on system startup, 4–5, 4–6

EXAMINE command, 3–24

F

FIND command, 3–26

H

Halt action boot condition, 5–6 defining, 5–18

HALT command, 3–26 use of, 3–19

HELP command, 3–27

I

INITIALIZE command, 3–27

L

LOGIN command, 3–28 use of, 3–17, 3–19

M

Models

See System Models

MOVE command, 3–29

Index–3

N

NEXT command, 3–30

O

OPCRASH.EXE

See System shutdown

Options

See System options

Over Temperature condition recovery from, 4–12

P

Password security password, 3–16

Privileged console mode exiting, 3–19 logging in to, 3–17 use of, 3–17

R

Reboot defining halt action, 5–18

Recovering from an Over Temperature condition, 4–12

REPEAT command, 3–32

Restart defining halt action, 5–18

Restarting the system, 4–12

Restoring the system disk

See Standalone BACKUP

S

SDA (system dump analyzer), 4–11

SEARCH command, 3–33

Security password changing, 3–18 entering, 3–16, 3–17 setting, 3–16 verifying, 3–16

Index–4

SET BOOT command usage, 5–17

SET command, 3–35

SET HALT command keywords, 5–18 usage, 5–18

SET HOST/DUP command, 3–35

SET PASSWORD command use of, 3–16

SET PSE command use of, 3–16, 3–19

SET PSWD command use of, 3–18

SHOW command, 3–37

SHUTDOWN command procedure, 6–7

Shutdown procedure when turning off system, 4–11

SHUTDOWN.COM

See System shutdown

Shutting down the system

See System Shutdown during system backup, 6–7

Specifications

See System specifications

STABACKIT command procedure, 6–4, 6–5

Standalone BACKUP backing up to disk, 6–14 backing up to tape, 6–14 booting from compact disc, 6–11 booting from system disk, 6–8 booting from tape cartridge, 6–9 definition, 6–2 installing on system disk, 6–4 installing on tape, 6–5 qualifiers

/IMAGE, 6–13

/PHYSICAL, 6–13 restoring the system disk, 6–18

STABACKIT procedure, 6–4 storing, 6–3 usage, 6–2

START command, 3–41 use of, 3–19

SYSBOOT.EXE

usage during conversational boot, 5–14

SYSGEN commands for conversational boot, 5–16 entering commands, 5–15 usage during conversational boot, 5–15

System disk backing up and restoring

See Standalone BACKUP

System dump analyzer (SDA), 4–11

System Enclosures

VAX 4000 Model 100, 1–4

VAX 4000 Model 200 (BA215), 1–5

VAX 4000 Model 200 (BA430), 1–6

VAX 4000 Model 300/400/500/600, 1–7

VAXstation 4000 Model 60, 1–8

VAXstation 4000 Model 90, 1–9

VAXstation 4000 Model VLC, 1–9

System Generation utility

See SYSGEN

System halt action

See Halt action

System Models

VAX 4000 systems, list of, 1–2

VAXstation 4000 systems, list of, 1–2

System Options

VAX 4000 systems, 1–12

VAXstation 4000 systems, 1–13

System shutdown emergency, program control, 4–9 emergency, under console control, 4–10 methods, 4–8 orderly shutdown, 4–9 precautions, 4–8

System Specifications

VAX 4000 systems, 1–10

VAXstation 4000 systems, 1–11

System startup procedure, 4–2 sample error message, 4–5, 4–6 sample startup displays, 4–3 to 4–6

System startup (cont’d) specifying subsequent system response,

4–7

T

TEST command, 3–41

Turning off the system, 4–11

U

UNJAM command, 3–42

V

VAX 4000 Model 100 access cover, 2–2 console security feature, 3–15 console terminal settings, 2–5 enclosure, 1–4 expansion ports descriptions, 2–6 diagram, 2–6 front panel, 2–2 rear panel component descriptions, 2–4 diagram, 2–3

VAX 4000 Model 200

BA215 cabinet — See BA215 cabinet

BA430 cabinet — See BA430 cabinet

BA215 enclosure, 1–5

BA430 enclosure, 1–6

VAX 4000 Model 300 cabinet — See BA440 cabinet enclosure, 1–7

VAX 4000 Model 400 cabinet — See BA440 cabinet enclosure, 1–7

VAX 4000 Model 500 cabinet — See BA440 cabinet enclosure, 1–7

VAX 4000 Model 600 cabinet — See BA440 cabinet

Index–5

VAX 4000 Systems enclosure types, list of, 1–3 models, list of, 1–2

VAXstation 4000 Model 60 console security feature, 3–15 enclosure, 1–8

System unit communications/printer port, 2–46 front panel components, 2–44 front view, 2–43 keyboard port, 2–46 monitor power port, 2–46 monitor video port, 2–46 mouse port, 2–46 network switch, 2–47 printer/communications port, 2–46 rear view, 2–45 remote mouse/keyboard port, 2–46

SCSI port, 2–46 standard Ethernet port, 2–46 system power port, 2–46

ThinWire Ethernet port, 2–47

VAXstation 4000 Model 90 console security feature, 3–15 enclosure, 1–9

System unit communications/printer port, 2–46 front panel components, 2–44 front view, 2–43 keyboard port, 2–46 monitor power port, 2–46 monitor video port, 2–46 mouse port, 2–46 network switch, 2–47 printer/communications port, 2–46 rear view, 2–45 remote mouse/keyboard port, 2–46

SCSI port, 2–46 standard Ethernet port, 2–46 system power port, 2–46

ThinWire Ethernet port, 2–47

VAXstation 4000 Model VLC console security feature, 3–15 enclosure, 1–9

System unit

Index–6

VAXstation 4000 Model VLC

System unit (cont’d) alternate console switch, 2–49 communications/printer port, 2–50

Halt button, 2–49 headset jack, 2–49 keyboard port, 2–49 monitor power port, 2–50 monitor video port, 2–50 mouse port, 2–49

On/Off switch, 2–50 printer/communications port, 2–50 rear panel, 2–49

SCCI port, 2–50 side panel, 2–48 standard Ethernet port, 2–50 system power port, 2–50

VAXstation 4000 Systems enclosures, 1–8 models, list of, 1–2

X

X command (binary load and unload), 3–42

Was this manual useful for you? yes no
Thank you for your participation!

* Your assessment is very important for improving the work of artificial intelligence, which forms the content of this project

Related manuals

Download PDF

advertisement