Merida Bike User manual

Merida Bike User manual
Please read pages 6 and 7
before your first ride!
Please perform the functional check on pages 8 and 9
before every ride!
U SER MANUAL
Please go through the check list
of the delivery receipt together
with your MERIDA dealer
Frame:
1 Top tube
2 Down tube
3 Seat tube
4 Chainstay
5 Rear frame
Saddle
Stem
Handlebar
Shift lever
Brake lever
Headset
Seat post
Seat post clamp
1
3
Rear shock
Brake
Front derailleur
Cassette sprockets
Rear derailleur
Chain
Chainring
Crank set
Pedal
2
5
4
Suspension fork
Drop-out
Brake
Brake disc
Wheel:
Quick-release
Spoke
Tires
Rim
Valve
Hub
Frame:
1 Top tube
2 Down tube
3 Seat tube
4 Chainstay
Saddle
Stem
Seat post
Seat post clamp
Handlebar
Brake/shift lever
1
Headset
Brake
Brake
3
2
Fork
Drop-out
Cassette sprockets
Front derailleur
Rear derailleur
Chain
Chainring
Crank set
4
Wheel:
Quick-release
Tire
Spoke
Rim
Valve
Hub
Frame:
1 Top tube
2 Down tube
3 Seat tube
4 Chainstay
Saddle
Handlebar
Brake lever
Shift lever
Stem (adjustable)
Headset
Front light with
reflector
Suspension seat post
Seat post clamp
Carrier
1
Rear light with
reflector
Brake
Reflector
Lock
Cassette sprockets
Front derailleur
Rear derailleur
Kick stand
Chain
Chainring
Crank set
Pedal
3
2
Brake
Suspension fork
Drop-out
Dynamo
4
Wheel:
Quick-release
Spoke
Rim
Reflector ring
Tire
Valve
Hub
1. Introduction
Dear customer,
In purchasing this MERIDA bike you have
chosen a product of high quality and technology. Your new bike was produced with care
and expertise and has been equipped with
the best possible components. Your MERIDA
dealer has assembled the bike, checked the
function and made adjustments according to
your needs so that you can enjoy cycling with
complete peace of mind from the very first
metres.
In this brochure we have compiled for you a
wealth of tips on how to use and adjust your
bike as well as an extensive account of things
worth knowing about bike maintenance and
care. Please read these pages carefully – you
will find it worthwhile, even if you have been
cycling a whole lifetime. Bike technology has
developed at a rapid pace during recent
years. So before setting off on your new bike,
please be sure to read chapter 3. “Before
your FIRST ride”.
To make sure cycling gives you the greatest
possible enjoyment, you should always carry
out the minimum functional check described
in chapter 4. “Before EVERY ride” before
mounting your bike.
This manual cannot teach you the skills of a
bike mechanic. Even a manual as big as an
encyclopaedia, could not cover all possible
combinations of bikes and parts. Therefore,
this manual focuses on the bike as well as on
some common parts and important notes and
warnings. It does not, however, teach you the
skills of a bike mechanic.
When doing maintenance or repair work, be
aware that the extensive instructions provided
in your manual only refer to MERIDA bikes
and not necessarily to other bikes. Due to frequent redesigns and modifications, it may be
that some of the jobs are not described fully
or in every detail. For this reason be sure also
to observe the instructions of our component
suppliers which you have received from your
MERIDA dealer.
1. Introduction
Note that the instructions may require further
explanations, depending on the experience
and/or skill of the person doing the work,
some jobs may require additional (special)
tools or supplementary instructions.
In your own interest, never do any
work unless you feel absolutely sure
about it. If in doubt, ask your MERIDA dealer for advice!
Before you set off, let us point out a few things
to you that are very important to us being
cyclists ourselves. Never ride without a properly adjusted helmet and take care always to
wear suitable clothing. As a minimum, you
should wear straight cut trousers and shoes
which are compatible with the pedal-system.
Always ride carefully on public roads and
observe the traffic rules so as not to endanger
yourself or others.
This manual cannot teach you how to ride.
Even a manual as big as an encyclopaedia,
could not cover all possible conditions, different types of bikes and riders. Therefore, this
manual focuses on the bike and important
notes and warnings, not teaching you how to
ride and not teaching you the rules of traffic.
Please be aware that cycling is a hazardous
activity that requires the rider to stay in control of his or her bike at all times.
Like any sport, bicycling involves risk of injury
and damage. By choosing to ride a bike, you
assume the responsibility for the risk. Always
keep in mind that there are no safety devices
protecting you from injury, such as e.g. the
bodywork or the airbag of a car. Therefore,
always ride carefully and respect the other
traffic participants.
Never ride under the influence of drugs, medicals, alcohol or when you are tired. Do not
ride with a second person on your bike and
never ride without having your hands on the
handlebar.
Observe the legal regulations concerning offroad cycling. These regulations may differ
in each country. Please respect nature when
riding off-road. For your own safety stay on
marked and well-maintained trails and forest
roads.
1. Introduction
First we would like to make you familiar with
the various components of your bike.
For this purpose, please unfold the front
and rear cover of this booklet. Here, you
will find pictures of all types of bikes showing all the essential components. Leave this
page unfolded while you read so that you
can quickly locate the components referred
to in the text.
The illustrations show arbitrary MERIDA bikes
– not every bike will look like this. Nowadays,
there are numerous types of bikes designed
for specific purposes and equipped accordingly. The range of MERIDA bikes includes:
City bikes/All Terrain Bikes (ATB)
Cross bikes
Fitness bikes
Mountain bikes (MTBs)/Hardtail/
Full Suspension
Road bikes
Trekking bikes
BMX bikes
Kids’ bikes
If your bike is made of carbon, you
will find important notes as of chapter
28. “Special characteristics of carbon”.
Some notes on this manual
The table of contents will help you to quickly
find whatever information you are looking
for.
Pay particular attention to the following symbols!
This symbol means that your life or
health may be in danger unless you
comply with the instructions given or carry
out the measures prescribed.
If your bike is equipped with rear
shock, please note chapter 15. “The
rear shock”.
This symbol warns you about actions
that could lead to damage of property
or environment.
This symbol signifies information
about how to handle the product or
refers to a passage in the user manual that
deserves your special attention.
The possible consequences described above
are not repeated every time one of the symbols appears!
2. Table of contents
1. Introduction.................................................1
2. Table of contents.........................................4
3. Before your first ride...................................6
4. Before every ride........................................8
5. After an accident.......................................10
6. Legal requirements for riding on public..........
roads........................................................12
7. How to use the quick-releases....................13
7.1 Use of quick-releases................................13
7.2 Notes on the mounting of thru axle wheels15
8. Adjusting the bike to the rider ..................17
8.1 Adjusting the saddle to the correct height...17
8.2 Adjusting the height of the handlebars.......20
8.2.1 Conventional stems.............................20
8.2.2 Adjustable stems................................21
8.2.3 Stems for threadless systems, .................
the so-called Aheadset system.............22
8.3 Correcting the fore-to-aft position and ..........
horizontal tilt of the saddle........................24
8.3.1 Adjusting saddle position and tilt.........24
8.4 Adjusting the gripping distance . ..................
of the brake levers....................................25
8.5 Adjusting the tilt of the handlebars,
brake levers and bar ends .......................25
8.6 Adjusting the handlebar position . ................
by turning the handlebar...........................26
8.7 Adjusting the bar ends.............................27
8.8 Adjusting the tilt of the handlebars and
brake levers with road, triathlon and
cyclocross bikes........................................28
8.9 Adjusting the tilt of the handlebars and
brake levers with road, triathlon and
cyclocross bikes........................................29
8.10Seating position on BMX and dirt bikes.....30
9. The brake system......................................31
9.1 Brakes – how they work and what to do
about wear..............................................31
9.2 Rim brakes (general) ...............................32
9.3 Checking, adjusting and synchronizing
V-brakes..................................................32
9.3.1 Functional check.................................33
9.3.2 Synchronizing and adjusting
the brakes..........................................33
9.4 Checking, adjusting and synchronizing
racing or side-pull brakes ........................34
9.4.1 Functional check.................................34
9.4.2 Vertical adjustment of the
brake pads........................................34
9.4.3 Synchronizing and adjusting
the side-pull brakes ...........................34
9.5 Characteristics of cantilever brakes . .........35
9.5.1 Functional check.................................35
9.5.2 Synchronizing and adjusting
the cantilever brakes...........................35
9.6 Rim brakes (U-brakes)..............................36
9.6.1 Checking, adjusting and
synchronizing U-brakes......................36
9.6.2 Adjustment possibilities at the lever......37
9.6.3 Adjustment possibilities at the brake
pads and bowden cables....................37
9.6.4 Adjustment of the rear brake
at the rotor system..............................38
9.6.5 Synchronization.................................38
9.7 Drum or roller brakes...............................39
9.7.1 Checking and readjusting...................39
9.8 Back-pedalling brakes (coaster brakes)......40
9.9 Disc brakes..............................................41
9.9.1 Checking and adjusting hydraulic
disc brakes........................................42
9.9.2 Checking, adjusting and synchronizing
mechanical disc brakes.......................43
10. The gears.................................................44
10.1Derailleur gears.......................................44
10.1.1 How they work and how
to use them......................................45
10.1.2 Mountain bike gear levers.................45
10.1.3 Road bike gear levers.......................48
10.1.4 Bar end gear levers..........................49
10.1.5 Inspecting and adjusting
the derailleur gear............................50
10.1.6 Rear gear changer (rear derailleur)...50
10.1.7 Front gear changer (front derailleur)..52
10.2 Multi-speed hubs - internal gear hubs......53
10.2.1 How they work and how to use them53
10.2.2 Readjustment....................................54
10.2.3 Readjustment of the chain tension of
bikes with adjustable drop outs ........54
10.3 Chain maintenance................................55
10.3.1 Chain wear......................................56
11. The wheels...............................................57
11.1 Tires, tubes, rim tapes, valves,
tire pressure .........................................57
11.2 Rim trueness, spoke tension.....................60
11.3 Wheel fastening with wheel nuts
or quick-releases....................................61
11.4 Repairing punctures...............................62
11.4.1 Dismounting wheels..........................62
11.4.2 Dismounting tires..............................63
11.4.3 Mounting tires..................................64
11.4.4 Mounting wheels..............................66
12. The headset.............................................67
2. Table of contents
12.1 Checking the bearing play of
the headset............................................67
12.2 Adjusting the conventional headset..........67
12.3 Adjusting the threadless headset
(Aheadset).............................................68
13. The suspension fork.................................70
13.1 Adjusting suspension forks......................70
13.2 Suspension fork maintenance..................72
14. The suspension seat post..........................73
14.1 Adjustment............................................73
14.2 Check and maintenance.........................74
15. The rear shock.........................................75
15.01 Notes on the sitting position..............75
15.02 Application and intended use............76
15.1 General notes on the adjustment
of the frame...........................................78
15.2 Adjusting the rear shock absorber..........79
15.2.1 Adjusting the shock absorbers...........79
15.2.2 Adjusting the damping......................82
15.2.3 Making corrections on a test ride.......82
15.3 Checks, care and maintenance
of the rear shock...................................83
15.3.1 Care................................................83
15.3.2 Check..............................................83
15.3.3 Maintenance....................................84
15.3.4 Service intervals...............................85
16. The pedals...............................................86
16.1 Different systems – how they work
at a glance............................................86
16.2 Adjustment and maintenance..................87
17. The lighting set.........................................88
17.1 How it works.........................................88
17.2 Troubleshooting......................................89
17.3 Adjusting the front light..........................89
18. Dirt bikes – special features......................90
19. Kids’ bikes...............................................91
19.1 What parents must bear in mind.............91
19.2 Notes on BMX bikes...............................92
19.3 Adjustment of kids’ bikes........................93
19.4 Training wheels......................................94
20. Helmets, accessories.................................95
20.1 Helmets.................................................95
20.2 Accessories............................................95
21. Baggage..................................................96
22. Taking children with you..........................97
22.1 Child carriers.........................................97
22.2 Child trailers..........................................98
23. Transport by car.......................................99
24. Cleaning and caring...............................100
25. Storing the bike.....................................101
26. Service and maintenance schedule.........102
27. Assembling and equipping a
MERIDA frame.......................................104
28. Special characteristics of carbon.............106
28.1 Carbon - special characteristics.............106
28.1.1 General notes on care....................107
28.1.2 Protection of the frame finish...........107
28.1.3 What to bear in mind when
braking with carbon wheels............108
28.2 MERIDA framesets................................109
28.2.1 Determining the correct frame size...109
28.2.2 Before your first ride.......................109
28.2.3 Assembling and equipping a
MERIDA-frame...............................110
28.2.4 The headset....................................112
28.2.5 Bottom bracket bearings.................112
28.2.6 Chainsuck protection......................112
28.2.7 Rear drop-out spacing....................113
28.2.8 Replaceable derailleur hanger.........113
28.2.9 Front derailleur hanger...................113
28.2.10Permitted torques for seat post
binder with Allen bolt.....................114
28.2.11Bottle cage.....................................114
28.3 Carbon forks.......................................116
28.3.1 Before your first ride.......................116
28.3.2 Adjusting the headset.....................116
28.3.3 Mounting the full carbon fork
with carbon steerer.........................117
28.4 Carbon handlebars and stems..............120
28.4.1 Before your first ride.......................120
28.4.2 Mounting.......................................120
28.5 Carbon seat post..................................124
28.5.1 Before your first ride.......................124
28.5.2 Adjusting the correct saddle height..124
28.5.3 Adjusting the position and
angle of the saddle.........................125
28.5.4 Mounting the carbon seat post........126
28.5.5 Mounting the saddle.......................126
29. Recommended torques for bolted
connections............................................127
29.1 Recommended torque settings:
Campagnolo/Shimano/Avid/
SRAM components...............................128
29.2 Recommended torque settings:
FSA components..................................129
29.3 Recommended torque settings
for other components............................130
30. Warranty and guarantee........................131
30.1 Introduction.........................................131
30.2 A note on wear....................................132
30.3 Guarantee on MERIDA bikes................133
Imprint..........................................................134
3. Before your first ride
1. Road and fitness bikes are exclusively
designed for use on roads with a smooth,
hard surface.
City, cross and trekking bikes are intended for hard-surface roads and paths.
Mountain bikes are suitable for off-road
use, but not for drops, dual slalom, free
ride and downhill. For these purposes, we
have special dirt, free ride and downhill
models.
Depending the model, dirt bikes are also
suitable for drops, dual slalom, free ride
and downhill.
BMX bikes are intended for use on secured
terrain. There are different types of bikes
which are either suitable for tricks and
show rides on smooth ground or for jumps
and freestyle on special obstacle courses
or for races.
For your own safety, do not over
estimate your riding skills. Please note
that, though looking easy, the tricks of a
professional are hazardous to your life and
limb. Always protect yourself with suitable
clothing.
Only use your bike according to its intended purpose as it may otherwise not stand
up to the stress and fail! If used other than
for its intended purpose, the warranty
will become void. For cycling on public
roads, please observe the regulations of
the respective countries.
2. Each of our bikes are designed for a maximum overall weight (rider, baggage and
bike together).
In chapter 27. “Assembling and equipping a MERIDA frame“ you will find a
table listing the additional load permitted
for the different bike models. Here a short
overview:
Road, fitness and mountain bikes 120 kg
Cross and trekking bikes:
Men’s version
120 kg
Ladies’ version
100 kg
City bikes:
100 kg
The permissible baggage weight is marked
on the carrier.
Before you tow a trailer or before you
mount a child carrier, please have
a look at chapter 27. “Assembling and
equipping a MERIDA frame“ and chapter
22. “Taking children with you”.
3. Before your first ride
3. Are you familiar with the brake system?
Check whether the lever of the front brake
is in the position you are used to (right or
left). If this is not the case, you will need to
train to get used to it, as inadvertent use
of the front brake can make you crash!
Or ask your MERIDA dealer to switch the
brake levers.
Your new bike is equipped with modern
brakes which may be far more powerful
than those you are used to!
Be sure to first practise using the brakes off
public roads!
You will find more information about
brakes in chapter 9. “The brake system“
and in the brake manufacturers’ manuals
your bike is supplied with.
Please note that your bike’s braking
power and road grip will both be
severely reduced in wet conditions. Look
well ahead when riding on wet roads and
go well below the speed you would ride at
in dry conditions.
4. Are you familiar with the type and functioning of the gears?
If not, make yourself familiar with the
gears in a place free of traffic.
For more information see chapter 10. “The
gears“.
5. Are saddle and handlebars properly
adjusted?
The saddle should be set to a height from
which you can just reach the pedal in
its lowest position with your heel. Check
whether your toes reach to the floor when
you are sitting on the saddle. Your MERIDA
dealer will be pleased to help you, if you
are not happy with your sitting position.
You will find more information on this
in chapter 8. “Adjusting the bike to the
rider“.
6. If your bike is equipped with clipless or
step-in pedals: Have you ever ridden in
the shoes they go with?
First practise locking one shoe onto a
pedal and disengaging it while standing
on the other leg!
For more information see chapter 16. “The
pedals“. You will find more information on
the pedals in the enclosed pedal manual.
7. If you bought a suspension bike, you
should ask your MERIDA dealer to adjust
the suspension mechanism to your needs.
Improperly adjusted spring components
are liable to malfunction or become damaged. In any case, they will impair the
performance of your bike as well as your
safety whilst riding.
You will find more information about this
in chapter 13. “The suspension fork“,
chapter 14. “The suspension seat post“,
chapter 15. “The rear shock“ and in the
enclosed manuals.
4. Before every ride
Check the following points before setting off:
1. Are the quick-release levers or nuts of the
front and rear wheel, the saddle and other
components properly closed?
For more information see chapter 7. “How
to use the quick-releases“.
2. Are the tires in good condition and do
they have sufficient pressure (thumb test,
how far can you press the tire to the rim
with your thumb)?
For more information see chapter 11. “The
wheels“.
Improperly closed quick-releases can
cause components to come loose. This
can cause a serious accident!
3. Spin the wheels to check whether the rims
are true. Watch the gap between rim
and brake pad or, in case of disc brakes,
between frame and rim. Untrue rims can
be an indication of tires with ruptured
sides or broken axles or spokes.
For more information see chapter 11. “The
wheels“.
4. Test the brakes while standing by firmly
pulling the brake levers towards the handlebars. The brake pads of calliper brakes
must hit the rim with their entire surface
without touching the tire. You should not
be able to pull the lever all the way to the
handlebars! Check the lines for leaks!
With disc brakes, you should have a stable
pressure point at once. If a stable pressure
point is only achieved after having repeatedly pulled the brake lever, you should
have the bike checked by your MERIDA
dealer.
For more information see chapter 9. “The
brake system“.
4. Before every ride
5. If you want to ride on public roads, you
must equip your MERIDA bike according
to the regulations of your country. Riding
without a light and without reflectors in
the dark or when visibility is poor, is very
dangerous because you will not be seen
by other road users. Turn on the lights as
soon as dusk sets in.
For more information see chapter 6.
“Legal requirements for riding on public
roads“.
6. Let your bike bounce on the ground from
a small height. If there is any rattling, find
out where it comes from. Check the bearings and bolted connections, if necessary.
7. If your bike is suspended, check the frame:
Lean on your bike and see whether the
spring elements retract and extend as
usual.
9. Do not forget to take a high quality lock
with you on your ride. The only way to
effectively protect your bike against theft is
to lock it to an immovable object.
8. If your bike has a kick-stand, check that it
is fully raised before you set off.
!
Do not use your bike, if it fails on one
of these points! If in doubt, contact
your MERIDA dealer! A defective bike can
lead to serious accidents!
5. After an accident
1. Check whether the wheels are still firmly
fixed in the drop-outs and whether the
rims are still centered with respect to the
frame or fork. Spin the wheels and watch
the gap between rims and brake pads. If
the width of the gap changes markedly
and you have no way to true the wheel
on site, you will need to open the brakes
a little so that the rim can run between the
brake pads without touching them. In this
case remember that the brakes will not act
as powerfully as you are used to.
2. Check that the handlebars and stem are
neither bent nor ruptured and whether
they are level and upright. Check also
whether the stem is firmly fixed in the fork
by trying to twist the handlebars relative
to the front wheel. Also, briefly lean on the
brake levers to make sure the handlebars
are firmly fixed in the stem.
For more information see chapter 8.
“Adapting the bike to the rider“ and
chapter 12. “The headset“.
For more information see chapter 9. “The
brake system“ and chapter 11. “The
wheels”.
through all the gears. Pay particular attention when switching to the small gears,
making sure the gear changer does not get
too close to the spokes as the chain climbs
onto the larger sprockets. If the derailleur
or the drop-outs have been bent, this can
cause the gear changer to collide with the
spokes. This in turn can destroy the gear
changer, the rear wheel or the frame!
Check the derailleur function, as a displaced gear changer can throw off the
chain, thus interrupting the power train.
For more information see chapter 10. “The
gears“.
3. Check whether the chain still runs on the
chainwheel and sprockets. If your bike fell
over to the chain side, check that the gears
still work properly. Ask a helper to lift the
bike by the saddle, then gently switch
10
5. After an accident
4. Make sure the saddle is not twisted using
the top tube or the bottom bracket shell as
a reference.
Bent parts, especially parts made of
aluminium, can break without any previous warning. They must not be repaired,
i.e. straightened, as this will not reduce the
imminent risk of breakage. This applies in
particular to forks, handlebars, stems, crank
sets and pedals. When in doubt, replace
these parts for your own safety.
7. If your bike is equipped with parts made
of carbon, please bear in mind the particularities of this material as described
in chapter 28. “Special characteristics of
carbon”.
5. Lift your bike up a few centimetres and let
it bounce onto the ground. If this causes
any sort of noise, search for loose bolt
connections.
6. Finally, take a good look at the whole bike
to detect any deformation, discolouration
or cracks.
If your bike has passed the complete test
successfully, ride back home very carefully
by taking the shortest possible way. Do not
accelerate or brake hard and do not ride
your bike out of the saddle.
If you are in doubt about the performance
of your bike, have yourself picked up by car
instead of taking any risk.
Back home, the bike must be checked thoroughly again and damaged parts must be
repaired. In case of doubt, see your MERIDA
dealer.
11
6. Legal requirements for riding on public roads
If you want to use your bike on public roads,
it has to be equipped according to the regulations of your country. This applies in particular to the reflectors and the lighting set!
Ask your MERIDA dealer or the distributor
in your country. You will find the address on
the cover of this manual or on www.meridabikes.com.
12
7. How to use the quick-releases
7.1 Use of quick-releases
How to fasten components securely
Although handling quick-releases is very
easy, they have repeatedly been the cause of
accidents resulting from improper use. Quickrelease retention mechanisms essentially consist of two manipulable parts:
Open the quick-release. The word “Open“
should now be readable on the lever.
Over the second half of its travel, the force
you need to move it, should increase considerably. Towards the end of its travel, the lever
should be very hard to move. Use the ball
of your thumb while your fingers pull on an
immovable part such as the fork or a rear
stay, but not on a brake disc or spoke, to push
it in all the way.
1. The hand lever on one side of the hub
which creates a clamping force via a cam
when you close it.
2. The tightening nut on the other side of the
hub with which to set the preliminary tension on the threaded rod.
Make sure the levers of both quick
releases are always on the side opposite the chain. This will help you to avoid
mounting the front wheel the wrong way
round.
Move the lever back as if to close it. Now you
should be able to read the word “Close” on
the outside of the lever. From the start of the
closing movement up to about the first half of
its travel, the lever should move very easily,
i.e. without clamping the wheel.
In its end position the lever should be parallel
to the bike, i.e. it should not stick out to the
side. The lever should lie close to the frame,
i.e. the fork, so that it cannot be opened accidentally.
To check whether the lever is securely locked,
try to turn it while it is closed. Apply pressure
to the end of the hand lever as if to turn it in
a circle.
13
7. How to use the quick-releases
Improperly closed quick-releases can
cause parts to come loose. This can
result in an accident with severe injuries.
If you close a quick-release, do not
pull the lever with your fingers propped
up against a brake disc or a spoke.
Close the lever again and check the position
for tightness. If the lever can no longer be
turned, it is properly fastened.
Finally, lift the bike up a few centimetres, so
that the wheel no longer touches the ground,
and hit the tire from above. If the quick-release
is properly fastened, the wheel will remain
firmly fixed in the drop-outs of the frame.
If your seat post is equipped with a quickrelease retention mechanism, check whether
the saddle is firmly fixed by trying to twist it
relative to the frame.
14
7. How to use the quick-releases
7.2 Notes on the mounting of
thru axle wheels
With a conventional thru axle system, slide
the thru axle through fork and hub so that the
head of the Allen bolt comes to a rest on the
right side, seen in direction of motion.
Once the axle is mounted, let the fork deflect
a few times, thus excluding that the axle gets
jammed. Screw the nut onto the axle and
tighten it according to the enclosed instructions of the fork manufacturer.
Finally tighten the four Allen bolts at the front
side of the fork, according to the enclosed
instructions of the fork manufacturer in order
to lock the axle. Check the bolts after one
to two operating hours and then every 20
hours.
If your bike is equipped with a thru axle
system with quick-releases, put the wheel
into the fork and mount the brake disc in the
brake calliper. Bring the wheel into the right
position between the drop-outs and slide the
axle with open quick-release levers from the
right side through the drop-out and the hub.
As soon as the axle thread engages with the
thread of the left drop-out, close it by turning
it clockwise.
Close the thru axle quick-release lever like a
usual quick-release lever. From the start of
the closing movement up to about the first
half of its travel, the lever should move very
easily without clamping the wheel, whereas
over the second half of its travel the force you
need to move it should increase considerably.
Towards the end of its travel, the lever should
be very hard to move. Use the palm of your
hand while your fingers pull on an immovable part, such as the fork leg, but not on a
spoke or the brake disc. In its end position,
the quick-release lever should be tight so that
it can no longer be turned.
Do not use any other tools to fix the
axle. A too tight fixing of the axle can
damage the axle or the fork leg.
In any case make yourself familiar
with the user manual of the respective
fork manufacturer.
15
7. How to use the quick-releases
There are other thru axle systems which are
a combination of threaded axle and quickrelease system.
With these systems, the wheel including
brake disc, must be mounted in fork and
brake calliper. Then, the thru axle must be
slided through the drop-out of one fork leg
into the thread of the second fork leg where
it is screwed in. The fold-out screw-in fitting
helps you in doing so.
After this, close both quick-release levers
to clamp the axle. Proceed as with regular
quick-releases. From the start of the closing
movement up to about the first half of its travel, the lever should move very easily without
clamping the wheel, whereas over the second
half of its travel the force you need to move
it should increase considerably. Towards the
end of its travel the lever should be very hard
to move. Use a matching Allen key to adjust
the initial tension of the quick-release lever.
Use the palm of your hand while your fingers
pull on an immovable part, such as the fork
leg.
Do not use any other tools to fix the
axle. A too tight fixing of the axle can
damage the axle or the fork leg.
In any case make yourself familiar
with the user manual of the according
fork manufacturer.
16
8. Adjusting the bike to the rider Adjusting the bike
Your body height is the decisive criterion for
the frame size you need. Pay particular attention that there is enough space between your
crotch and the top tube so that you won’t hurt
yourself when having to get off your bike
quickly.
By choosing a specific type of bike, you
already roughly determine the posture you
will be riding in. However, some components
of your bike are especially designed so that
you can adjust them to your proportions up to
a certain degree. These include the seat post,
the stem and the brake levers.
After carrying out assembly work, always
make a short functional check as described
in “Before every ride” and do a test ride in
an unfrequented place. This will allow you to
safely check whether everything is in good
order.
8.1 Adjusting the saddle to the
correct height
The correct saddle height is the height which
provides maximum pedalling comfort and
efficiency. When pedalling, the balls of your
big toes should be positioned above the centre of the pedal spindles. With your feet in
this position, you should not be able to stretch
your legs completely at the lowest point, otherwise your pedalling will become awkward.
You can check the height of your saddle in
the following, simple way. This is best done
wearing flat-soled shoes.
Sit on the saddle and put one of your heels on
the pedal at its lowest point. In this position,
your leg should be fully stretched and your
hips should not be tilted to either side.
All the tasks described in the following
require experience, appropriate tools
and manual skill. Take particular care when
tightening bolted joints. Increase the torque
bit by bit, checking the seat of the component in between. Use a torque wrench and
never exceed the maximum permissible
torque!
To adjust the saddle height, loosen the binder
bolt or quick-release lever (first read chapter
7. “How to use the quick-releases“).
Use a suitable tool to release the seat post
binder bolt, turning it counterclockwise by
two to three turns.
Now you can shift the saddle to the desired
height.
If you are unsure about how to do something,
it will be better just to check your seating position. Consult your MERIDA dealer, if you feel
you want something changed. He will see to
your wishes the next time you leave your bike
at the workshop, e.g. for the first inspection.
17
8. Adjusting the bike to the rider
Be sure not to pull out the seat post too
far. The mark on the seat post must always
remain within the seat tube. As a minimum,
the seat post should be inserted by 2.5 times
the diameter, i.e. with a 30 mm diameter seat
post, at least 75 mm of it must remain within
the seat tube.
Make sure the part of the seat post inserted
inside the seat tube is always well greased.
In case of frames with long seat tube stretching beyond the top tube, the seat post must at
least reach below the height of the top tube
i.e. the tip of the rear stays! This can entail a
minimum insertion length of 10 centimetres
or more.
Do not grease seat post or seat tube, if the
frame or the seat post are made of carbon.
For more information see chapter 28.4 “Carbon handlebars and stems” and chapter
28.5 “Carbon seat post”.
If the seat post does not move easily inside
the seat tube, ask your MERIDA dealer for
advice. Do not ever use brute force.
Align the saddle with the frame using the saddle nose and the bottom bracket or top tube
as a reference point.
Clamp the seat post tight again by turning the
seat post binder bolt clockwise. You should
not need much strength in your hands to
clamp the seat post sufficiently tight. If you
do, it means the seat post is the wrong size
for the frame.
If you have a road bike with a very
small frame, there may be a danger
of your foot colliding with the front wheel.
Check the position of your cleats (the plates
on the soles of cycling shoes), if this applies
to your bike.
Never ride your bike with the seat
post drawn out beyond the limit, maximum, or stop line! The seat post might break
or cause severe damage to the frame.
18
8. Adjusting the bike to the rider
Verify that the seat clamp is sufficiently tight
by taking hold of the saddle at both ends and
trying to rotate the seat post inside the seat
tube. If you can rotate it, you must increase
the clamping force and repeat the test.
If sitting causes you trouble e.g.
because it numbs your crotch, this may
be due to the saddle. Your MERIDA dealer
has a very wide range of saddles available
and will be pleased to advise you.
Check whether you can still reach the ground
safely with your feet while sitting on the saddle. If not, you should lower the saddle a little,
at least to begin with.
Does the leg stretch test now produce the right
result? Check by moving your foot and pedal
to the lowest point. If the ball of your foot is
exactly above the pedal centre (ideal pedalling position) your knee must be slightly bent.
If this is the case, you have adjusted the saddle height correctly.
With some mountain bikes, such as
e.g. the dirt jump bikes, it is sensible
to lower the saddle a little for some riding
manoeuvres. A lower saddle is advisable
in particular for riding steep descents with
the mountain bike. Longer rides with a too
low saddle may, however, lead to knee joint
pain.
The position of the saddle is very individual.
Contact your MERIDA dealer and let him help
you find the best position for you.
19
8. Adjusting the bike to the rider
8.2 Adjusting the height of the
handlebar
The height of the handlebar determines the inclination of the upper body. Lowering the handlebars gives the rider a streamlined position and
brings more weight to bear on the front wheel.
However, it also entails an extremely forward
leaning posture which is tiring and less comfortable because it increases the strain on your
wrists, arms, upper body and neck.
8.2.1 Conventional stems
Release the expander bolt by two to three
complete turns. You should now be able to
turn the stem freely inside the fork.
If this is not the case, release the bolt by tapping it softly with a hammer. With most Allen
bolts, you will first need to stick the Allen key
into it, because they will probably be countersunk and therefore impossible to be hit directly. Then gently tap the key with the hammer.
Now you can move the handlebars and stem
up and down as a whole. Do not pull the stem
out beyond the mark on the shaft! According
to the CEN-standard, the minimum inserted
length should be 2.5 times the diameter of
the stem shaft.
Handlebars with conventional stems only
allow limited adjustment of height by moving
the stem up or down inside the fork tube.
To change the height of handlebars with an
adjustable stem, all you have to do is loosen
and retighten a few bolts. In the case of the
threadless system, the so-called Aheadset system, the stem is part of the headset. Adjusting
the height of this type of stem is more difficult,
because it means dismantling and reassembling the stem.
The stem is one of the load bearing
parts of your bike and changes to it
can impair your safety. If you are not sure
about how to adjust the stem, your MERIDA
dealer will be pleased to help you.
insertion depth
In any case, a deeper insertion depth means
higher safety.
Never try to unscrew the top race when you
only want to adjust the stem, as you will otherwise alter the bearing play. These top races
serve the purpose of modifying the bearing
play.
Align the handlebars so that they are symmetrical to the front wheel when riding
straight-ahead.
Tighten the expander bolt. Make sure not to
exceed the maximum permissible torque.
20
8. Adjusting the bike to the rider
Check that the stem is firmly fixed by taking
the front wheel between your legs and trying
to twist handlebars and stem. If the stem gives
way, you have to increase the torque.
If the handlebars are still too high or too low,
the only solution will be to replace the stem.
This can be quite a big job, as it may mean
taking off and remounting all the fittings on
the handlebars. Ask your dealer about the
various stem types available.
Note that the bolted connections of
stem and handlebars have to be tightened to their specified torques. If you disregard the prescribed values, the handlebar
or stem may come loose or break.
8.2.2 Adjustable stems
Adjustable stems allow for the handlebar
height to be modified by raising or lowering
the front part of the stem.
Release the bolt of the locking mechanism
located on the side by about three to five turns
until the integrated ratchet mechanism comes
loose. Do not unscrew it all the way; otherwise the whole assembly will come apart.
Slide the bolt to the side opposite the head.
Adjust the stem which can now be moved,
according to your needs.
Never ride a bike whose stem has
been drawn out beyond the mark for
the maximum permissible height! Check all
bolted joints and do a brake test before you
set off!
Please note: Changing the position of
the stem alters the position of the
handlebars as well as of the brake and
gear levers. Correct them, if necessary, as
described in chapter 8. “Adjusting the bike
to the rider“.
Slide the loose adjusting part back into the
stem until the locking mechanism snugly
engages with the ratchet mechanism. Then
tighten the bolt by taking care not to exceed
the maximum torque of 12 Nm.
21
8. Adjusting the bike to the rider
With adjustable conventional stems, the
height of the front stem area is modified by a
mechanism located on the bottom side.
Release the bolt of the locking mechanism
located on the bottom side of the stem until
the ratchet mechanism comes loose. Do not
unscrew it all the way, otherwise the whole
assembly will fall apart.
Adjust the stem, which can now be moved,
according to your needs. Gently tighten the
bolt of the locking mechanism again, until it
engages. Then tighten the bolt.
Do not exceed the maximum torque of
10 Nm.
Please note: Changing the position
of the stem alters the position of the
handlebars as well as of the brake and
gear levers. Correct them, if necessary, as
described in chapter 8. “Adjusting the bike
to the rider“.
8.2.3 Stems for threadless systems,
the so-called Aheadset* system
(*Aheadset is a registered trade mark of
the DiaCompe company which invented the
threadless fork tube system).
On bikes with an Aheadset system, the stem
also serves to adjust the initial headset bearing pressure. If you change the position of
the stem, you have to readjust the bearings
(see chapter 12. “The Headset”). The vertical
setting range is determined by the intermediate rings, also referred to as spacers. In the
case of flip-flop stem models, it is also possible to mount the stem the other way round to
achieve a different handlebar height.
Release the bolt at the top of the fork tube
which serves to adjust the initial bearing pressure and remove the Ahead cap.
22
8. Adjusting the bike to the rider
Untighten the stem clamping bolts at the side
of the stem and pull the stem off the fork.
Now you can remove the spacers.
Raising the handlebar height must
not be achieved by simply mounting
more spacers. The upper edge of the stem
clamping (or the spacer respectively) must
surmount the top of the fork’s steerer tube
by approximately 3 mm.
Slip the spacers you have removed onto the
fork tube above the stem.
If you want to turn the stem around, you also
have to release the bolts securing the handlebars. If the stem is fitted with a cap, you
can simply take out the handlebars at this
point. If it is not fitted with a cap, you have
to remove the handlebar fittings (see chapter
8.5 “Adjusting the tilt of the handlebars, bar
ends and brake levers”).
After turning the stem around, centre the
handlebars and screw them tight again (see
chapter 8.5 ”Adjusting the tilt of the handlebars, bar ends and brake levers”).
Readjust the bearing, align the stem and then
tighten it (see chapter 12. “The headset“).
Check whether the handlebars are firmly
seated in the stem by trying to turn the handlebars downwards. Also check, whether you
can twist the handlebars and stem against
the fork. Do this by holding the front wheel
between your knees and trying to twist the
handlebars. If there is any movement, carefully tighten the bolts a little more and check
again. Do not go beyond the maximum permissible torque!
Do not use a steel stem together with
aluminium handlebars unless this
combination is expressly approved by the
manufacturer.
Make sure the stem clamp is free
of sharp edges.
When removing the spacers, you will
have to shorten the fork’s steerer tube.
This adjustment is irreversible and in any
case best left to an expert. When you are
sure of the position you want, ask your
MERIDA dealer to do the job for you.
Note that the bolted connections of
stem and handlebars have to be tightened to their specified torques. If you disregard the prescribed values, the handlebar
or stem may come loose or break.
Stems come in very different lengths
as well as shaft and binder tube
diameters. A stem of inappropriate dimension can become a serious source of danger: Handlebars or stem can break, causing
an accident in the process.
If your road racing bike is equipped
with a carbon fork, you will find
more information in chapter 28.4 “Carbon
handlebars and stems” and chapter 28.5
“Carbon seat post”.
23
8. Adjusting the bike to the rider
8.3Correcting the fore-to-aft position
and horizontal tilt of the saddle
The inclination of your upper body and hence
your riding comfort and pedalling power are
also influenced by the distance between the
handlebar grips and the saddle. This distance can be altered slightly by changing the
position of the saddle rails in the seat post
clamp.
Some seat posts have two bolts for finer
adjustment of tilt. Another version is the socalled saddle clamp which usually has two
nuts seated on a single through bolt.
Release one or both bolts at the top of the seat
post. Turn the bolt two to three turns counterclockwise at the most, otherwise the whole
assembly can come apart.
However, this also influences your pedalling.
Depending on whether the saddle is positioned more to the front or more rearwards,
your legs will reach the pedals to a greater or
lesser extent from behind.
After fastening the saddle, check whether it
resists tilting by bringing your weight on it
once with your hands on the tip and once at
the rear end.
Keep to the prescribed torques, because
too loose or overtightened bolts can
lead to a failure of the seat post!
The setting range of the saddle is very
small. Replacing the stem allows you
to make far larger changes to the fore-toaft position, because stems come in different lengths. In most cases, the length of
the cables must be adjusted. Make sure the
saddle is not positioned in the bends of the
saddle rails, the latter might get damaged.
The saddle needs to be horizontal in order to
pedal in a relaxed manner.
If it is tilted, you will constantly have to lean
against the handlebars to prevent yourself
from slipping off the saddle.
8.3.1 Adjusting saddle position and tilt
With so-called patent seat posts, one bolt
fixes the clamping mechanism, which ensures
the tilt and the horizontal position of the saddle.
Make sure the seat of the saddle remains
horizontal as you tighten the bolt. Tighten the
bolts to the prescribed torques.
Move the saddle forward or backward as
desired. You may have to give it a light blow
to move it.
If your bike is equipped with a seat
post made of carbon, make sure to
read the instructions given in chapter 28.5
“Carbon seat post“ before doing any
adjustment or mounting.
24
8. Adjusting the bike to the rider
8.4 Adjusting the gripping distance
of the brake levers
8.5 Adjusting the tilt of the handle-
bars, brake levers and bar ends
With most brake systems of MTBs, city and
trekking bikes, the distance between the brake
levers and the handlebar grips is adjustable.
This gives riders with small hands the convenience of being able to bring the brake levers
closer to the handlebars. The length of the
rider’s fingers also determines how the lever
position for first brake contact should be set.
The handlebars of mountain bikes and trekking bikes are usually slightly bent at the ends.
Set the handlebars to a position in which your
wrists are relaxed and not turned outwards
too much.
Check the point, front and rear, at which the
brake pads touch the rims. If this point is
reached after the lever has only travelled a
short distance, you will have to readjust the
brakes when altering the gripping distance
(for more information see chapter 9. “The
brake system“). Otherwise the brakes could
rub on the rim after the gripping distance has
been changed.
On most bikes, there is a small (headless)
screw near the point where the brake cable
enters the brake lever mount. Turn the screw
clockwise and watch how the lever wanders
as you do so.
When you have set the levers to the desired
gripping distance, be sure to check whether
there is still enough free travel for the brake
levers to move a little before the brake pads
hit the rim.
You should not be able to pull the
brake levers all the way to the handlebars. Your maximum brake force should be
reached short of this point!
With road racing bikes, the straight bar ends
should be parallel to the ground or slant
slightly downwards toward the rear. The tips
of the brake levers should coincide with an
imaginary straight line extending forward
from the straight extension below the drops.
This is only a recommendation. What is
important is that the brake is at easy reach
at any time. Shifting the brake levers is a job
best left to an expert, as it involves retaping
the handlebars afterwards.
25
8. Adjusting the bike to the rider
8.6 Adjusting the handlebar position
by turning the handlebar.
Release the Allen bolt at the bottom or front
side of the stem by two to three turns.
Turn the handlebars to the desired position.
Make sure the handlebars are accurately centred in the stem.
Then gently tighten the bolts evenly and crosswise. Try twisting the handlebars inside the
stem tube, and tighten the bolt a little more
if necessary.
Observe the maximum torque (for more information see chapter 29. “Recommended torques for bolted connections“).
Fasten the grips again to the prescribed
torque and do a twist test!
After adjusting the handlebar, you will also
need to readjust the brake and gear levers
(unless you have a road racing bike).
Release the Allen bolt at either grip binder.
Twist the grip on the handlebars. Sit in the
saddle and place your fingers on the brake
levers. Check whether the back of your hand
forms a straight line with the back of your
lower arm.
26
8. Adjusting the bike to the rider
8.7 Adjusting the bar ends
Retighten the bolts to the required torque.
Bar ends give you additional ways of gripping the handlebars. They are usually fixed in
a position that gives the rider a comfortable
grip when pedalling out of the saddle. Therefore, they are usually mounted almost parallel
to the ground or tilted slightly upwards.
Note that the bolted connections of
stem, handlebars, bar ends, and
brakes have to be tightened to their specified
torques. You will find the prescribed values
in chapter 29. “Recommended torques for
bolted connections“ or in the instructions of
the handlebar and bar end manufacturers.
Note that the distance you need to
stop your bike, increases while riding
with the hands on bar ends as the brake
levers are not within reach as long as you
have not changed the position of your
hands.
See whether the bar ends are firmly fixed by
trying to twist them out of position.
Keep in mind that not all handlebars
are suitable for being equipped with
bar ends. Ask your dealer for help.
Release the bolts, which are usually located
on the bottomside of the bar ends, by one to
two complete turns.
Turn the bar ends to the desired position making sure that the angle is the same on both
sides.
27
8. Adjusting the bike to the rider
8.8 Adjusting the tilt of the handlebars
and brake levers with road,
triathlon and cyclocross bikes
Triathlon handlebars
In triathlons and time trials (training and
competition), where a particularly aerodynamic seating position is important, so-called
aero handlebars are used. With these aero
models, the gear levers are often positioned
at the handlebar ends. When you ride with
your back in horizontal position, the brake
levers are out of reach and the reaction time
extends which makes your stopping distance
longer. For this reason, it is very important for
you to ride particularly anticipatory.
Within certain limits the position of the aero
handlebars can be adjusted according to
your personal preferences. This means that
the straight part of the aero handlebars
should – if at all – only point slightly downward or upwards, whereas the upward inclination should not exceed 30 degrees. Make
sure your forearms are always comfortably
rested, i.e. the elbows should project the armrests a little towards the rear.
The basic bullhorn handlebar should be
aligned parallel to the lane. In this position,
the ends generally point upwards.
To adjust the angle of the handlebars, release
the Allen bolt/s on the underside or front side
of the stem and/or the areo handlebar. Turn
the handlebars to the desired position. Make
sure the handlebars are accurately centred
in the stem.
Now carefully tighten the bolt/s with a torque
wrench. Try twisting the handlebars inside the
stem tube and tighten the bolt a little more
if necessary. Observe the maximum torque
(see the chapter “Recommended torques for
bolted connections”).
Note that the bolted connections of
the stem and aero handlebars have
to be tightened to their specified torques.
You will find the prescribed values in chapter 29. “Recommended torques for bolted
connections“, in the enclosed manuals or
on the components.
The setting options may be different
according to the model used. Please
read the manual of the aero handlebar/
stem manufacturer in any case.
28
8. Adjusting the bike to the rider
8.9 Adjusting the tilt of the handlebars
and brake levers on road,
triathlon and cyclocross bikes
Road handlebars
With road bikes, the straight extension below
the drops should be parallel to the ground
or point slightly down towards the rear. The
tips of the brake levers should coincide with
an imaginary straight line extending forward
from the lower edge of the straight extension
below the drops. Shifting the brake levers is
a job best left to your MERIDA dealer, as it
involves retaping the handlebars afterwards.
To adjust the tilt of the handlebars, release the
Allen bolt/s on the underside or front side of
the stem. Turn the handlebars to the desired
position. Make sure the handlebars are accurately centred in the stem.
Now carefully tighten the bolt/s with a torque
wrench. Try twisting the handlebars inside the
stem tube and tighten the bolt a little more, if
necessary.
Note that the bolted connections of the
stem and aero handlebars have to be
tightened to the prescribed torques. You will
find the values in chapter 29. “Recommended torques for bolted connections“, in the
enclosed manuals or on the components.
29
8. Adjusting the bike to the rider
8.10 Seating position on BMX and
dirt bikes
The seating position on BMX and dirt-bikes is
not comparable to that on other bikes. When
riding a BMX and dirt-bike, maximum control and movability on the bike are important.
Such a seating position does not provide pedalling comfort when riding longer distances.
In comparison to the conventional seating
position, riding on a very low saddle considerably increases the stress on the knee joints.
Pay attention to the signals of your body and
seek medical advice, if necessary.
30
9. The brake system
The brake system
Brakes are used for adjusting one’s speed to
the traffic situation. If necessary, they must be
able to bring the bike to a halt as quickly
as possible. Such emergency-stops are also
a study in physics. In the process of braking
the rider’s weight shifts forward, thus reducing the load on the rear wheel. The rate of
deceleration is primarily limited by the danger of overturning and only in the second
place by the road grip of the tires. This problem becomes particularly acute when riding
downhill. When performing an emergency
stop, you have to try to put your weight as
far back as possible.
Do not imitate!
Actuate both brakes simultaneously. Bear
in mind that due to the weight transfer, the
front brakes take by far the greater part of
the load.
9.1 Brakes – how they work and
what to do about wear
Actuating the hand lever on the handlebars
or the back pedal brake causes a brake pad
to be pressed against a brake surface, and
the ensuing friction slows down the wheel. If
water, dirt or oil gets in contact with one of
the engaging surfaces, this changes the coefficient of friction and deceleration is reduced.
This is why brakes respond at a slight delay
and less powerfully in wet weather. This
applies above all to rim brakes.
In order to maintain their effectiveness, brakes
need to be checked and readjusted once in a
while.
Be careful while getting used to the
brakes. Practise emergency stops in a
place clear of traffic until you have perfect
command of your bike. This can save you
from having accidents in road traffic.
The assignment of brake lever to brake
pad, e.g. right lever acts on rear
brake, can vary. Please make yourself
familiar with the lever-to-brake assignment
on your bike or ask your MERIDA dealer to
change the brakes as you want them.
Always brake carefully when riding
on wet or slippery roads, as the
wheels can easily slip away. Make a habit
of riding more slowly in such conditions.
If parts of the brake system, e.g. the
brake pads, must be replaced, please
use original spare parts only.
31
9. The brake system
9.2 Rim brakes (general)
The friction generated by braking causes
wear to the brake pads as well as to the rims.
Frequent rides in the rain and dirt encourage wear on both engaging surfaces. Once
the abrasion of the rim has reached a certain
critical point, the rim can rupture under the
tire pressure. This can make the wheel jam
or the tire burst, both of which can cause a
crash! See your MERIDA dealer and ask him
to examine the remaining thickness of the
rims at the latest when you are through your
second set of brake pads. Professionals have
a special measuring device for determining
the remaining thickness of the rims.
Some rims are equipped with an all around
groove or such like which serve as wear indicator. In case parts of this wear indicator are
no longer visible, the rim must be replaced.
9.3 Checking, adjusting and
synchronizing V-brakes
Be aware of longer stopping distan
ces when riding in the rain! When
replacing brake pads, be sure to only use
brake pads that bear the appropriate mark
and match your rim.
Your MERIDA dealer will be pleased to
help you. Ensure that braking surfaces are
absolutely free of wax, grease and oil. Have
your rims regularly inspected and measured
by an expert.
Common cantilever and V-brake designs have
two brake arms mounted separately on either
side of the rim. When pulling the brake lever,
both arms are contracted by the cable, the
pads touch the rim.
Brake cables which are damaged, e.g.
frayed, should be replaced immediately, as they can otherwise fail in a critical
moment, possibly causing a crash.
32
9. The brake system
9.3.1 Functional check
Check whether the brake pads are perfectly
aligned with the rims and still sufficiently thick.
You can tell this by the grooves in the brake
pad. If the pads are worn down to the bottom
of the grooves, it is time to replace them.
The brake pads should hit the rim simultaneously, both first touching it with their front
part. At the moment of the first contact the
rear part should be a millimetre away from
the rim. Viewed from the top the brake pads
form a “V” with the trough pointing to the
front. This V-shaped setting prevents screeching when the brakes are applied.
9.3.2 Synchronizing and adjusting the
brakes
Almost all brake designs have a bolt located
next to one or both brake pads for adjusting
the initial spring tension. Adjust this bolt until
the distance between brake pad and rim is
the same on either side.
Tighten the lock ring against the brake lever
mount while holding the adjusting bolt. This
prevents the adjusting bolt from coming loose
by itself.
Ensure that the slot of the bolt faces neither
forward nor upward, as this would permit
water or dirt to enter.
To adjust the brakes, release the knurled lock
ring located at the point where the brake
cable enters the brake lever at the handlebars.
The brake lever must always remain clear of
the handlebars. You should not be able to pull
it all the way to the handlebars – not even in
the event of an emergency stop.
Release the knurled, slotted adjusting bolt by
a few turns. In this way you shorten the free
travel of the brake lever.
Adjusting the brake pads to the
rims requires a considerable degree
of skill. Replacing and adjusting the brake
pads is a job best left to your MERIDA dealer.
33
9. The brake system
9.4 Checking, adjusting and synchro
nizing racing or side-pull brakes
9.4.2 Vertical adjustment of the brake
pads
With side-pull brakes, the brake arms are
suspended from a common point, thus forming an integral system.
Release the fastening bolt of the brake pad by
one to at most two complete turns.
9.4.1 Functional check
Push the brake pad to the required height
and tighten the fastening bolt again.
Check whether the brake pads are accurately
aligned with the rims and sufficiently thick.
You can judge the wear of the brake pads by
appearance of the grooves.
To adjust the brake, turn the knurled nut or
bolt, through which the brake cable passes
at the arms, until the travel of the brake lever
suits your needs.
Do the arms contact the rim simultaneously
when you pull the brake, and do they stay
clear of the tire? They must not come in contact with the spokes.
Do you get a clear-cut braking response when
you pull the brake lever hard, and does the
lever remain clear of the handlebars no matter how hard you pull? If your brakes pass on
all these points, they are properly adjusted.
Test the brake in standing after adjus
ting it. Make sure the brake pads
engage fully with the rim when you pull them
hard. You should not be able to pull the lever
all the way to the handlebars!
9.4.3 Synchronizing and adjusting the
side-pull brakes
With double-jointed brakes, turn the small
(headless) bolt located at the side or slantingly above until the left and right brake pads
are at the same distance from the rim. Check
whether the bolt fastening the brake to the
frame is still sufficiently tight.
34
9. The brake system
9.5 Characteristics of cantilever brakes
9.5.1 Functional check
Cyclo cross bikes are usually equipped with
cantilever brakes with a few special features
in the brake system. Additional brake levers
are mounted to the handlebars so that you
can brake safely even in tricky terrain while
riding securely with your hands on the upper
part of the handlebar. These brake levers can
be used on an equal footing with the other
road bike brake levers. It is impossible to
simultaneously actuate both brake levers of
one brake.
As with all rim brakes, the brake pads must
be aligned accurately with the rims and be
sufficiently thick.
As the usual side-pull brakes can get clogged
up with dirt and mud under the conditions of
a cyclo cross ride, these bikes are equipped
with cantilever brakes which leave more
space for the tire, thus avoiding a pading of
the tire.
Furthermore, the brake pads should touch the
rim with their front part first. At the moment
of the first contact, the rear part should be a
millimetre away from the rim. Viewed from
the top the brake pads form a “V” with the
trough pointing to the front. This V-shaped
setting prevents screeching when the brakes
are applied.
When you pull the brake lever, both brake
arms must contact the rim simultaneously.
You should not be able to pull the brake lever
all the way to the handlebar in the event of
an emergency stop.
9.5.2 Synchronizing and adjusting the
cantilever brakes
For synchronizing the brake, almost all cantilever brakes have a bolt located on the side of
one brake pad for adjusting the initial spring
tension. Adjust this bolt until the distance
between brake pad and rim is the same on
either side.
To adjust the brakes, release the knurled lock
ring located at the cable hanger or brake
lever. Release the knurled, slotted adjusting
bolt by a few turns. In this way, you shorten
the free travel of the brake lever.
Keeping the adjusting bolt fixed, tighten the
lock ring against the cable hanger or brake
lever. This prevents the adjusting bolt from
coming loose by itself.
Adjusting the position of the brake
pads to the rims requires a considerable degree of skill. Replacing and adjusting the brake pads is a job best left to your
MERIDA dealer.
Test the brake in standing after adjus
ting it. Make sure the brake pads
engage fully with the rim when you pull
them hard.
35
9. The brake system
9.6 Rim brakes (U-brakes)
Many BMX bikes are equipped with a rotor
and in connection with this system with
brakes, also referred to as U-brakes. Common U-brake designs have two brake arms
mounted separately on either side of the rim.
When pulling the brake lever, both arms are
contracted by the cable, the pads touch the
rim.
The brake pads should hit the rim simultaneously, both first touching it with the front
portion of their surface. At the moment of
the first contact, their rear part should be a
millimetre away from the rim. Viewed from
the top, the brake pads form a “V” with the
trough pointing to the front. This V-shaped
setting prevents screeching when the brakes
are applied. To align the brake pads, release
the fixing bolts, re-align the pads and retighten the fixing bolt.
The brake lever must always remain clear of
the handlebars. You should not be able to
pull it all the way to the handlebars even in
the event of an emergency stop. A correctly
adjusted brake will pass on all these points.
Adjusting the position of the brake
pads to the rims requires a considerable degree of skill. Replacing and adjusting the brake pads is a job best left to your
MERIDA dealer.
The brake cable of U-brakes with rotor system
is composed of several sections all of which
must be checked and adjusted. To begin
with, release the counter nut of all adjusting
devices; then unscrew the adjusting bolt until
the cable tension meets your requirements.
Finish by holding the bolt, while tightening
the counter nut against the limit stop. The
brake only works properly, when all sections
are adjusted accurately – a job for a skilled
mechanic.
9.6.1 Checking, adjusting and
synchronizing U-brakes
Check whether the brake pads are accurately
aligned with the rims and still sufficiently thick.
You can judge the wear of the brake pads by
appearance of the grooves. If the pads are
worn down to the bottom of the grooves, it is
time to replace them.
36
9. The brake system
9.6.2 Adjustment possibilities at the lever
To adjust the brakes at the lever, release the
knurled lock ring located at the point where
the brake cable enters the brake lever on
the handlebars. Release the knurled, slotted
adjusting bolt by a few turns. In this way
you shorten the free travel of the brake lever.
Keeping the adjusting bolt fixed, tighten the
lock ring against the brake lever mount. This
prevents the adjusting bolt from coming loose
by itself.
9.6.3 Adjustment possibilities at the brake
pads and bowden cables
Another possibility to adjust the brake is by
means of an adjusting bolt located at the front
brake. Release in this area the knurled nut
of the bolt through which the cable passes,
unscrew the adjusting bolt by a few turns and
finish by retightening the knurled nut relative
to the brake arm.
Test the brake in standing after adjust
ing it. Make sure the brake pads
engage fully with the rim when you pull
them hard.
Ensure that the slot of the bolt faces neither
forward nor upward, as this would permit
water or dirt to enter.
The adjustment of the rear brake can be
performed in the same way. In addition, the
rear brake cable which is running along the
bottom of the frame tube can be adjusted by
means of another adjusting bolt. Release the
lock nut at the cable holder and unscrew the
adjusting bolt by a few turns. Then retighten
the lock nut in order to avoid a coming loose
of the adjusting bolt by itself.
37
9. The brake system
9.6.4 Adjustment of the rear brake at the
rotor system
The rotor uncouples the brake cables from
the handlebar’s angle of turn. It allows for the
handlebar to be turned all the way round by
providing full braking power at the same time.
As a result, much more attention must be paid
to the adjustment of the rear wheel brake. By
the time the brake pads wear down, readjust
the brake by means of the adjusting devices
at the brake lever as well as at the bottom of
the frame tube, as above described.
9.6.5 Synchronization
Some U-brakes are equipped with two bolts
for the adjustment of the initial spring tension
which are located on the axle on which the
brake arms are fixed to the frame. Keep the
outer sleeve nut with a fork spanner in its
original position and loosen the inner Allen
bolt.
There are U-brakes of other designs which
have a bolt located next to one or both brake
pads for the adjustment of the initial spring
tension. Adjust these bolts carefully until the
distance between brake pad and rim is the
same on either side.
There are two adjusting bolts with counter
nuts located directly above and two underneath the rotor. These adjusting devices allow
for a synchronization of the brake cables in
pairs, so that the rotor moves regularly and
does not get jammed, when pulling the lever.
The work at the rotor and brake cable
parts on the frame are best left to a
skilled mechanic. Maladjustement can lead
to a failure of the brakes!
Following the stationary test check the brakes
in a place clear of traffic
Continue by carefully adjusting the outer
adjustment nut with the fork spanner until
the distance between brake pad and rim is
the same on either side. Retighten the inner
Allen bolt when both pads are in the accurate
position. Do not exceed the recommended
torque.
38
9. The brake system
9.7 Drum or roller brakes
9.7.1 Checking and readjusting
With these brake systems, the brake pads
and surfaces are largely protected against
the influences of weather. The braking power
is transmitted through cables from the levers
to the brakes.
Regularly check whether you get a clear-cut
braking response before the lever touches the
handlebars.
To a certain extent, wear of the brake pads
can be compensated for directly at the hand
lever. Release the union nut on the bolt
through which the cable enters the lever and
then release the bolt itself until the levers has
the desired travel.
After this, check the function and make sure
the brake pads do not grind on the rims and
the wheel turns easily.
After several adjustments, the position of the
brake lever may change. This can reduce
the braking power so that it won’t be high
enough anymore in an extreme case.
Some models offer further adjusting possibilites directly at the brake. In any case, be
sure to read the original instructions of the
brake manufacturer before adjusting the
brakes. If in doubt, ask your MERIDA dealer
for advice.
Check regularly whether the coaster brake
bracket is still firmly attached to frame or
fork.
Tighten the lock nut again, taking care that
the slit of the bolt head does not face upward
or forward, as this would permit an unnecessarily high amount of water or dirt to enter.
39
9. The brake system
Damaged cables should be replaced
immediately, as they can tear. Brakes
that have only been adjusted at the hand
lever can lead to a severely reduced braking power.
Enclosed brake systems are particu
larly prone to overheating. This occurs
when braking permanently on long and
steep downhill roads or paths. As a result
thereof, the braking power may be reduced
(fading) with a complete failure of the brake
in the extreme case. As soon as you feel a
reduction of braking power, you should give
the brake time to cool down. Sometimes, it
will do already to alternate between front
and rear break. If this does not suffice, you
must stop and wait a few minutes.
9.8 Back-pedalling brakes (coaster brakes)
This type of brake is a special form of the roller or drum brake. Some city bike models are
equipped with this type of brake. The brake
mechanism is fully enclosed and combined
with a gear hub.
Check regularly whether the coaster
brake bracket is still firmly attached to
the frame or fork.
The back pedal brake is actuated by pedalling backwards. For maximum braking power,
step on one of the pedals in its rearmost position, with the cranks horizontal.
If your bike has a back-pedalling brake, you
should occasionally check the tension of the
chain. The amount of play midway between
chainwheel and sprocket should not be more
than 2 centimetres.
Drum brakes become very hot
during riding. For this reason do not
touch the brakes shortly after a stop, especially after riding downhill a long time.
40
9. The brake system
9.9 Disc brakes
again, whenever the road surface and the
situation allow it. If you are in doubt, stop
and let the brake system cool down with the
brake levers released.
Disc brakes are distinguished by their formidable braking power and good weather
resistance. They respond a lot faster in wet
conditions than rim brakes do and produce
their normal high power within a very short
time. They also require fairly little maintenance and do not wear down the rims as rim
brakes do.
One drawback of disc brakes is that they tend
to be noisy when they are wet.
The brake levers can be adjusted to the size
of your hands, allowing you to operate them
with optimal effectiveness. In most cases this
is done by means of a small Allen bolt located
directly at the hand lever.
New brake pads have to be braked
in before they reach their optimal
braking power. Accelerate the bike 30 to
50 times to around 30 km/h and bring it to
a halt each time.
With mechanical disc brakes the travel of the
brake lever becomes longer as the brake pad
wears down, making it necessary to readjust
the brakes regularly.
Disc brakes get hot while in use! For
this reason do not touch the brakes
shortly after a stop, especially after riding
downhill a long time.
Hydraulic MERIDA brakes are equipped with
a mechanism which automatically compensates for the wear!
Manufacturers of hydraulic and
mechanical disc brakes deliver their
products with detailed instructions. Be sure
to read these instructions carefully before
you dismount a wheel or do any maintenance work.
Do not open the brake lines. Brake fluid which
is very aggressive might leak out.
Continuous braking or dragging of brakes can
cause the brake system to overheat. This may
lead to a considerable reduction of the braking power or even to a failure of the brake.
This may cause severe accidents. Therefore,
check your way of riding and make it a habit
to brake hard and then to open the brake
For more information have a look at the manufacturers’ websites:
www.magura.com / www.sram.com
www.shimano.com / www.hajos-sport.de
www.tektro.com / www.hayesdiscbrake.com
41
9. The brake system
9.9.1 Checking and adjusting hydraulic
disc brakes
Regularly check the lines and connections for
leaks while pulling on the lever. If brake fluid
leaks out, contact your MERIDA dealer immediately, as a leak can render your brakes useless.
To adjust the travel of the lever, turn the
adjusting bolt located on the setting bush of
the lever by using a small screwdriver or an
Allen wrench. Keep in mind that the adjusting range of the bolt is limited. Do not try to
unscrew the bolt beyond this range.
Loose connections and leaky brake
lines drastically impair the braking
power. If you find leaks in the brake system or buckled lines, contact your dealer.
Do under no circumstances use your bike
anymore.
Leaking brake fluid may harm your
health and is also aggressive against
paint etc.
Please clean the pads and disc exclusively with spirit or brake cleaner.
Check the pads for wear (if necessary by
inspecting the nose or ear-shaped metal lugs
protruding from behind the brake calliper).
When these wear indicators have approached
the disc with about a millimetre to spare, you
should dismount the pads according to the
manufacturer’s instructions and examine them
carefully.
42
9. The brake system
9.9.2 Checking, adjusting and synchroniz
ing mechanical disc brakes
Regularly check whether you get a clear-cut
braking response before the lever touches the
handlebars.
To adjust the travel of the lever, turn the
adjusting bolt located on the setting bush of
the lever by using a small screwdriver or an
Allen wrench. Keep in mind that the adjusting range of the bolt is limited. Do not try to
unscrew the bolt beyond this range.
To a certain extent, wear of the brake pads
can be compensated for directly at the hand
lever. Release the union nut on the bolt
through which the cable enters the lever and
then release the bolt until the levers has the
desired travel.
Tighten the lock nut again, taking care that
the slit of the bolt head does not face upward
or forward, as this would permit an unnecessarily high amount of water or dirt to enter.
After this, check the function and make sure
the brake pads do not drag on the disc when
you release the brake lever and let the wheel
spin.
After several adjustments, the position of the
brake lever may change. This can reduce the
braking power so that it may not be high
enough anymore in an extreme case.
There are also ways of adjusting the brakes
directly at the brake caliper, though they
require a certain amount of skill. In any case,
be sure to read the original instructions of
the brake manufacturer before adjusting the
brakes. If in doubt, ask your MERIDA dealer
for advice.
Check the pads for wear (if necessary by
inspecting the nose or ear-shaped metal lugs
protruding from behind the brake calliper).
When these wear indicators have approached
the disc with about a millimetre to spare, you
should dismount the pads according to the
manufacturer’s instructions and examine them
carefully.
Damaged cables should be replaced
immediately, as they can tear. Brakes
that have only been adjusted at the hand
lever may have a severely reduced braking
power.
43
10. The gears
The gears
The gears on your bike serve to adjust your
pedalling power to the slope of the road,
wind conditions, and the desired speed. A
low gear (where in the case of derailleur
gears the chains runs on the small chainwheel
at the front and a large sprocket at the rear)
allows you to climb steep hills with moderate
pedalling force, but you also have to pedal
relatively fast.
High gears (large chainwheel at the front,
small sprocket at the rear) are for riding
downhill. Every turn of the pedals takes you
many metres forward at correspondingly
high speed.
On level ground your pedalling speed, also
referred to as cadence, should be higher than
60 strokes a minute. Racing cyclists pedal at
a rate between 90 and 110 strokes a minute
on level ground. When climbing uphill, your
cadence will naturally fall off somewhat. Your
pedalling should always remain fluent however.
Thee are two types of gears in general use:
The derailleur and the multi-speed hubs.
For more things to know about operation,
checking and maintenance, see the chapter
on your type of gears.
10.1 Derailleur gears
Derailleur gears are currently the most effective types of transmission for bikes. With specially designed sprocket teeth, flexible chains
and clearcut lever positions, gear shifting has
become very easy. Most systems nowadays
have an indicator on the handlebars showing
the currently used gear.
Modern bikes can have up to 30 gears. Using
gears, in which the chain runs extremely
oblique, reduces power transmission efficiency and hastens wear of the chain. An unfavourable run of the chain is when the smallest
chainwheel (front gearwheel) is being used
with one of the two or three outermost (smallest) sprockets (rear gearwheels) or when the
largest chainwheel is being used with one of
the inmost (biggest) sprockets.
Always wear straight-cut trousers or use trouser clips or the like to make sure your trousers do not get caught in the chain or chainwheels.
44
10. The gears
10.1.1 Derailleur gears - how they work
and how to use them
Derailleur gears always work according to
the following principle.
Large front
chainwheel
Small front
chainwheel
Large rear
sprockets
Small rear
sprockets
– higher/heavier gear
– big transmission
– lower/easier gear
– small transmission
– lower/easier gear
– small transmission
10.1.2 Mountain bike gear levers
Gear shifting is initiated by pressing a shifter
on a gear lever, a combined brake and gear
lever unit or by a short turn of the wrist with
the twist grip, as the case may be.
Because of the variety of different products
your MERIDA bike can be equipped with
components which are different in their shifting directions. Ask your MERIDA dealer and
check this before you ride. Read the manual
of the shifting component manufacturer and
practise switching gears until you are familiar
with it.
With Shimano Rapid Fire shifters (press shifters) pressing the large shifter moves the chain
to the large chain rings. Pulling the small
lever, located in front of the handlebars from
the rider’s viewpoint, shifts the chain towards
the smaller sprockets.
This means that any gear shift made by pushing the large thumb shifter on the right produces a lower gear, while pressing the large
thumb shifter on the left moves the chain
to the larger chainwheel, thus producing a
higher gear.
– higher/heavier gear
– big transmission
Normally the shifters are mounted according
to the following scheme:
Right shifter – rear chainwheels (sprockets)
Left shifter – front chainwheels
45
10. The gears
The Shimano Rapid Fire Plus shifters (e.g.
XTR model 2007) work according to the usual
Rapid Fire principle (see above), but in addition the small lever (the index finger lever)
can be used with the thumb too. Using the
thumb leads to the same shifting action like
using the index finger. The chain runs to the
small chainwheels and sprockets.
So you can shift by thumb and index finger or
use the thumb only.
With the Shimano Dual Control gear and
brake lever components, the brake lever has
to be pushed downward to shift to the smaller
sprockets at the rear or to shift to the bigger
chainwheels at the front. This will give you a
higher gear.
Furthermore, you can shift more than one
gear by one move: A short shifter travel
results in a one gear change, a long shifter
travel leads to a double gear jump.
Pushing the brake lever upward or pushing
the optional small lever, located under the
handlebar, with the thumb, will give you a
bigger sprocket at the rear or a smaller chainwheel at the front, both leading to a smaller
transmission.
46
10. The gears
Press the large shifter of SRAM trigger shifters located under the handlebar with your
thumb, to shift to the bigger chainwheels. The
smaller shifter, located under the handlebar
as well, but a bit higher than the big one, is
pushed with the thumb, too, and makes the
chain move to the smaller chainwheels.
The principle of twist grips is slightly different. Twisting the right-hand grip towards you
gives you a lower gear, while the same movement on the left produces a higher gear. The
shifting direction may vary in this case, as
well.
47
10. The gears
10.1.3 Road bike gear levers
On road bikes the gear levers are integrated
in the brake lever.
With Shimano Dual Control levers, swivelling
the entire brake lever inward shifts the chain
towards the larger sprockets. Up to three
sprockets can be shifted per tap. Moving the
small lever alone shifts towards the smaller
sprockets, but only one per tap.
SRAM Doubletap levers have only one shifting lever positioned behind the brake lever. A
short tap to the inward moves the chain to a
smaller sprocket. Sweeping the shifting lever
more in means the derailleur shifts the chain
to larger sprockets. One tap can shift up to
three gears.
On a Campagnolo Ergopower equipped
bike moving the small gear lever located
behind the brake lever inward by means of
your index or middle finger shifts the chain
towards the larger sprockets. Pressing with
your thumb on the shifter located on the
inward facing side of the brake lever mount,
moves the chain towards the next smaller
sprocket. A maximum of three sprockets can
be shifted per move.
48
10. The gears
10.1.4 Bar end gear levers
With Shimano and SRAM bar end shifters
for triathlon and time trial use, the shifter is
pressed downwards to move the chain to the
smaller sprockets in the rear, i.e. to shift to a
higher gear, and to the smaller chainwheels
in the front, i.e. to shift to a smaller gear. By
pulling the shifter upwards the chain can be
moved to the bigger sprockets and chainwheels.
It is always important when switching gears to
continue pedalling smoothly without force as
long as the chain is moving between sprockets or chainwheels! Shifting gears under load,
i.e. while pedalling hard, can cause the chain
to slip and considerably shorten its service
life.
Shifting under load with the front derailleur
can cause the chain to fall off the chainwheels; this can lead to an accident! At least
the durability of the chain will be shortened
considerably.
Practise switching gears in a place clear of
traffic until you are familiar with the functioning of the levers or twist grips of your MERIDA
bike.
Avoid gears which involve an extremely
oblique run of the chain.
49
10. The gears
10.1.5 Inspecting and adjusting the
derailleur gear
The gears of your bike were carefully adjusted by your MERIDA dealer before delivery.
However, bowden cables may give a little
way on the first kilometres, making gearchanging imprecise. This will result in the
chain not wanting to climb onto the next
larger sprocket.
10.1.6 Rear gear changer (rear derailleur)
Adjusting the limit stops
Increase the tension of the bowden cable by
turning the adjusting bolt through which it
passes at the entry to the shift lever or gear
changer. Shift to the smallest sprocket and
turn the adjustment bolt counterclockwise in
half turns until the cable is tensioned.
The rear derailleur is equipped with limit bolts
which limit the swivelling range of the gear
changer, thus preventing the gear changer
and chain from colliding with the spokes
or the chain from dropping off the smallest
sprocket. The limit bolts have been adjusted
by your MERIDA dealer. They do not alter
their position during normal use. After a
crash or replacement of the rear wheel, the
correct position must, however, be checked.
After tensioning the gear cable, check whether
the chain readily climbs onto the next larger
sprocket. To do so, you either have to turn the
cranks by hand or ride the bike.
If your bike tips over or the rear derailleur
receives a blow, the rear derailleur or its
mount can get bent. It is advisable to check
the swivelling range and readjust the limit
bolts if necessary after such an incident or
after mounting new wheels on your MERIDA
bike.
If the chain readily climbs onto the next larger
sprocket, check whether it also readily shifts
to the small sprockets when you change to a
higher gear. You may need several tries to get
the derailleur system properly adjusted.
50
10. The gears
Shift the right gear lever to the highest gear.
Now the inner cable will be totally relaxed
and the chain will automatically run on the
smallest sprocket. Look from the rear at the
sprocket cluster and check whether the chain
rollers are perfectly aligned with the teeth of
the sprocket.
If the bolts are not marked, you will have to
find out by trial and error. Turn one of the
bolts, counting the number of turns, and
watch the gear changer. If it does not move,
it is the bolt for the other limit stop. Turn back
the counted rotations to find its original position.
If necessary, correct the position of the chain
roller with the limit bolt. The adjusting bolts on
gear changers are often marked “H” for high
gear and “L” for low gear. In this case, high
gear stands for high transmission ratio, i.e.
the chain running on the smallest sprocket.
Turn the bolt clockwise to shift the gear changer towards the wheel and counterclockwise to
shift it away from the wheel.
Shift gears to the largest sprocket. Be careful as you do so in order not to let the gear
changer collide with the spokes. When the
chain runs on the largest sprocket, deliberately overshift and then press the gear changer
further towards the spokes by hand. Spin the
wheel. If the roller cage touches the spokes or
if the chain begins to move beyond the largest sprocket, you have to reduce the swivelling range. Turn the bolt marked “L“ until the
gear changer is clear of the spokes.
Adjusting the front and rear gear changers
is a job which must be carried out by an
experienced mechanic. If you want to do this
yourself, be sure also to read the operating
instructions of the gears manufacturer. If your
gears give you any trouble, please ask your
MERIDA dealer for advice.
Always take a test ride in a place free of traffic, after adjusting the gears of your bike.
51
10. The gears
10.1.7 Front gear changer
Adjusting the swivelling range of the front
gear changer requires a great deal of experience. The range within which the front
gear changer only just keeps the chain on
the chainwheel, but does not grind, is very
small. It is often better to let the chain grind
slightly on the derailleur than to risk having it
fall off the chainwheel, which would interrupt
the power train. If the chain tends to jump off
the chainwheels, you will need to reduce the
swivelling range in the same way as with the
rear gear changer, i.e. by turning the limit
bolts marked “H“ and “L“. This adjustment is
a job best left to your MERIDA dealer.
As with the rear gear changer, the cable of
the front gear changer is subject to lengthening, which may lead to a reduced precision
in gear changing.
If necessary, shift to the small chainwheel and
increase the tension of the bowden cable by
turning the adjusting bolt, through which it
passes at the entry to the gear lever, or at the
bottom area of the frame.
After a crash, always check whether the guide
plate of the derailleur is still in parallel with
the chainwheels.
Adjusting the front gear changer is a delicate
job. Improper adjustment can cause the chain
to jump off, thus interrupting the power train.
This can cause an accident!
Always take a test ride in a place free of traffic, after adjusting the gears of your bike.
52
10. The gears
10.2 Multi-speed hubs - internal
gear hubs
Two advantages of multi-speed hubs are
their enclosed design and the fact that you
can switch up to 14 gears on the same lever.
Beside this, the chain lasts a lot longer than
with derailleur gears, provided it is taken
care of.
Multi-speed hubs from Shimano are available with a free-wheel, i.e. the wheel hub is
combined with a hand activated V-brake or
roller-brake, and with integrated drum-brake,
the so-called back-pedal-brake. The latter is
activated by pedalling backwards. The best
braking power is achieved with the pedals on
a horizontal level and in low gears.
Multi speed hubs from SRAM are available
with a free-wheel, i.e. the wheel hub is combined with a hand activated V-brake or drum
brake, and with integrated drum brake, the
so-called back-pedal brake. The latter is activated by pedalling backwards. The best braking power is achieved with the pedals on a
horizontal level and in low gears.
10.2.1 How they work and how to
use them
Internal gear hubs are equipped with a shift
lever or thumb switch for changing gears as
well as with an indicator showing the current
gear. Depending on the type of hub, you can
either continue pedalling without load on the
pedal while shifting gears, or you have to
free-wheel. For more information, read the
operating instructions for your gears or ask
your MERIDA dealer. In any case, make sure
changing gears makes as little noise as possible.
Twist grips from SRAM: When shifting gears,
the bike should roll without being driven forward, i.e. do not move the pedals for a short
moment.
Twist grips of a Shimano Nexus hub: switching gears is better while pedalling. But for
jerk-free and noiseless gear changing, you
need to reduce the pedal power.
Practise switching gears in a place clear of
traffic until you are familiar with the functioning of the levers or twist grips.
53
10. The gears
10.2.2 Readjustment
Multi-speed hubs need not be adjusted very
often. The adjusting mechanisms are located
at the hubs and/or at the shifting lever. There
are two (red) marks on the hub which have
to be brought into alignment by adjusting the
cable directly at the lever or twist grip – similar to derailleur gears.
10.2.3 Readjustment of the chain tension
of bikes with adjustable drop outs
For the adjustment of the chain tension you
need to release the bolt connections of the
rear wheel axle. The bolt of the coaster brake
bracket must be released by two turns, as
well.
Read the operating instructions of the gear
manufacturer carefully. If you have any questions, your MERIDA dealer will be pleased to
help you.
Check regularly whether the coaster brake
bracket is still fastened to the frame.
Then pull the rear wheel to the rear, i.e. tension the chain with the bolts intended for
this purpose, and screw tight again the rear
wheel axle on both sides. Check the chain
tension. The amount of play midway between
chainwheel and sprocket should not be more
than two centimetres.
After the adjustment of the appropriate chain
tension finish by tightening the rear wheel
axle bolts with a torque wrench.
Tighten the bolt of the coaster brake bracket
to the stipulated torque.
Checking the chain tension
In the case of multi-speed or single-speed
hubs, e.g. BMX, which are not equipped with
a chain tensioner with spring preload, the
drive chain tension must be checked occasionally, i.e. every 1,000 km, depending on
the frequency of use. The amount of play
midway between chainwheel and sprocket
should not be more than two centimetres.
54
10. The gears
10.3 Chain maintenance
It still holds true today that proper lubrication of the chain ensures a long service life
and provides for enjoyable riding. Not the
quantity, rather the distribution and regular
application of lubricant is what counts.
Having cleansed the chain as thoroughly as
possible, apply appropriate lubricants.
To lubricate the chain, drip the lubricant onto
the rollers while you turn the crank. This done,
pedal through several chain lengths and then
let the chain rest for a few minutes so that the
lubricant can disperse.
Cleanse your chain and, if necessary, the
chainwheels from time to time with an oily
rag of dirt and oil. There is no need to use
special degreasers.
Finally rub off excess lubricant with a rag so
that it does not spatter around during riding.
For the sake of the environment, only
use biodegradable lubricants. Bear in
mind that some of the lubricant will always
end up on the ground, especially in wet
conditions.
Make sure the braking surfaces
of the rims and disc brakes remain
clear of lubricant, as the brakes will otherwise fail!
55
10. The gears
10.3.1 Chain wear
An improperly riveted or heavily worn
chain can break, possibly causing a
crash.
Although the chain is one of the wearing components of a bike, there are still ways of influencing its service life. Make sure the chain is
lubricated regularly, especially after riding in
the rain. Try only to use gears which allow a
more or less straight run of the chain. Get in
the habit of pedalling fast.
Chains running on derailleur gears are worn
out after approximately 1,000 to 3,000 km.
Heavily lengthened chains may impair the
shifting characteristics. Cycling with a wornout chain also cause sprockets and chainwheels to wear out quite quickly. Replacing
these components is relatively expensive compared with the costs of a new chain. It is therefore advisable to check the condition of the
chain at regular intervals.
It is advisable to only use original
chains for replacement. An inappropriate chain may lead to a reduced precision in gear changing and make the chain
slip temporarily. This may cause a crash.
Your MERIDA dealer has accurate measuring instruments for precise chain inspection.
Replacing the chain should be left to an expert
because not all chains have a master link
nowadays. Instead, they have a continuous
design and require a special tool for mounting. If you need help, ask your MERIDA dealer to select and mount a chain matching your
gear system.
To do so, shift the chain on the large front
chainwheel. Take the chain between your
thumb and index finger and try to lift it off
the teeth. If you can lift it off clearly, it is seriously lengthened and probably needs to be
replaced.
56
11. The wheels
Wheels and tires
The wheel consists of hub, spokes and rim.
The tire is mounted onto the rim so that it
encases the tube. There is a rim tape running around the base of the rim to protect the
sensitive tube against the spoke nipples and
the edges of the rim base, which are often
sharp.
The wheels are subject to considerable stress
through the weight of the rider and his or her
baggage as well as through bumpy road surfaces or ground. Although wheels are manufactured with great care and delivered accurately trued, this does not prevent the spokes
and nipples from losing a little tension on the
first kilometres. Ask your MERIDA dealer to
true up the wheels after you have run them in
over around 200 to 400 kilometres. Check the
wheels regularly after running them in. It will
rarely be necessary to tighten the spokes.
11.1 Tires, tubes, rim tape, valves,
tire pressure
The tires provide the friction needed for carry­
ing the bike forward on the riding surface.
At the same time they should afford minimum
rolling friction and enhance the rider’s comfort by absorbing small shocks. The suitability
of a tire for road surfaces or cross-country
cycling is determined by its inner structure,
also referred to as its carcass, as well as by
the type of tire profile. Your MERIDA dealer
will be pleased to help you choose among the
numerous different types available for various
cycling purposes.
If you want to replace a tire, you need to
know the dimensions of the old tire. These
are written on the side of the tire. There are
two designations, the more precise of which
uses millimetres. The number sequence 37622 means that the tire is 37 mm wide when
fully inflated and has an inner diameter of
622 millimetres. The other designation for this
tire reads 28 x 1 5/8 x 1 3/8, which refers
to inches.
Only use tires of the appropriate
diameter. If you mount a bigger tire,
there may be a danger of your foot colliding
with the front wheel – risk of accident!
57
11. The wheels
Tires have to be inflated to the correct air
pressure in order to function properly. Properly inflated tires are also more resistant to
flats. An insufficiently inflated tire can easily get pinched (“snake-bitten”) when it goes
over a sharp curb.
The air pressure recommended by the manufacturer is given on the side of the tire or on
the type label.
Increasing the pressure even further does
little to reduce friction but only makes the tire
harder. Ask your MERIDA dealer for advice.
Inflation pressure is often given in
the old system of units, i.e. in psi
(pounds per square inch). The table gives
the most common pressure values in terms
of both systems.
The lower of the two pressure specifications
makes for better cushioning and is therefore
best for off-road cycling.
Rolling resistance decreases with growing
pressure, but so does comfort. A high tire
pressure is therefore most suitable for riding
on tarred roads.
psi
30
40
50
60
bar psi
2.1 70
2.8 80
3.5 90
4.1 100
bar
1.8
5.5
6.2
6.9
psi
110
120
130
140
There are various valve types in general use
on bikes:
Sclaverand or Presta valves: This type is nowadays used on almost all types of bikes. It is
designed to withstand extremely high pressures.
Schrader or car valve: This is an adapted car
tire valve.
MERIDA exclusively uses Sclaverand valves.
bar
7.6
8.3
9.0
9.7
The tire and rim alone would not be able to
hold the air. Therefore a tube has to be placed
inside the tire to retain the air pressure. The
tube is pumped up via a valve.
An exception to this are the classical tubular
tires used on road racing bikes which have to
be glued to the rim and the newly developed
tubeless systems for mountain bikes (e.g.
UST). In both cases, rim and tire provide an
air-tight design without the aid of a tube.
These valve types are equipped with a plastic
cap to protect them from dirt. The Schrader
valve can be inflated with a suitable pump
directly after removing the protective cap.
58
11. The wheels
With Presta valves you first have to undo the
small knurled nut a little and press it in carefully until air starts to escape. With this valve
type it often happens that the valve body is
not screwed in properly and air slowly leaks
out. Check the seat of the valve body in its
stem.
Hand pumps are often unsuitable for inflating
tires to high pressures.
A better choice is a floor- or foot-operated
pump equipped with a manometer which
enables you to check the pressure at home.
Treat your tires well, in particular do
not ever ride over sharp edges. Never
inflate your tires beyond the maximum permissible pressure, otherwise one of them
might burst or come off the rim during the
ride.
Always ride your bike with the pre
scribed tire pressure and check the
pressure at regular intervals.
Replace spoilt rim tapes immediately.
Strictly adhere to the notes on instal
lation and care of your tire given in
chapter 11. ”The wheels“ as well as to the
service instructions of the tire manufacturer.
Tires with Schrader valves have the convenience that you can inflate them at a filling station with a compressed air dispenser. Actuate
the compressed air dispenser in short blasts
as you may otherwise overinflate the tire and
make it burst. To let off air, press the needle in
the centre of the valve using e.g. a key.
Your MERIDA dealer has adapters for all
types of valves which allow you to inflate any
type of tire at the filling station.
Replace tires with a worn tread, brittled or
frayed sides. Dampness and dirt penetrating
the tire can cause damage to its inner structure.
If you replace, e.g., a worn tire, make
sure you mount a tire which is identical in size. Wide tires on a too narrow rim
may lead to a spongy rideability and the
tire may at worst slip off the rim. Danger of
crash!
59
11. The wheels
11.2 Rim trueness, spoke tension
Check regularly the condition of the
rims. Keep in mind that the friction
generated by braking causes wear to the
rims. Once the abrasion of the rim has
reached a certain critical point, the rim can
rupture under the tire pressure. If in doubt,
ask your MERIDA dealer for advice.
The tension exerted by the spokes has to be
distributed evenly around the rim in order for
the wheel to run true. If the tension of single
spokes changes, e.g. as a result of riding fast
over a curb or because of spoke breakage, the
tensile forces acting on the rim become unbalanced and the wheel will no longer run true.
The functioning of your bike may even be
impaired before you notice the untrue wheel
by its wobbling.
With rim brakes the sides of the rims also
serve as braking surfaces. An untrue wheel
can impair your braking power.
It is therefore advisable to check the wheels
for trueness from time to time. For this purpose lift the wheel from the ground and spin
it with your hand. Watch the gap between the
rim and the brake pads or in the case of disc
brakes between frame or fork. If the gap varies by more than a millimetre, you should ask
your dealer to true up the wheel.
Do not ride with untrue wheels. In the
case of extreme side-to-side wobbles,
the brake pads of rim brakes can miss the
rim and get caught in the spokes! This normally instantly jams the wheel. Danger of
crash!
Truing wheels is a difficult job which
you should definitely leave to your
MERIDA dealer.
60
11. The wheels
11.3 Wheel fastening with wheel nuts
or quick-releases
The wheels are attached to the frame at the
hub axles. Each axle is clamped tight in its
drop-outs by means of hexagon nuts or a
quick-release.
Wheel nuts usually require a 15 mm spanner
for tightening or loosening. This tool is a must
on any bike ride, as you can have a lot of
trouble repairing a puncture without it.
Quick-releases require no tools at all. Just
release the lever, unscrew it a few turns, if
necessary, and take out the wheel (see chapter 7. “How to use quick-releases”). The only
drawback is that a thief will find this just as
easy to do!
There are special locks available which you
can use instead of quick-release levers. For
these you need a specially coded key or
an Allen key. If in doubt, ask your MERIDA
dealer.
In case your bike is equipped with quickreleases, please read chapter 7. “How to use
quick-releases”.
Never ride a bike without first having
checked whether the wheels are
securely fastened. A wheel that comes loose
en route will definitely cause an accident!
If your bike is equipped with quick
releases, be sure to lock it to an
immovable object together with the wheels
when you leave it outside.
The front wheel is usually additionally secured
by means of drop-out catches which prevent
the wheel from coming off altogether, if the
quick-release or nuts come loose.
61
11. The wheels
11.4 Repairing punctures
Tire punctures can happen to any cyclist.
As long as you have the necessary tools for
changing tires and tubes and a spare tube or
a tire repair kit, this need not mean the end
of your cycle tour, however. For bikes with
quick-releases, all you need in addition, are
two tire levers and a pump; if your wheels are
secured with nuts, you also need a suitable
spanner for removing the wheel.
11.4.1 Dismounting wheels
If your bike has V-brakes, you first have to
disengage the brake cable from the brake
arm. To do this, grip around the wheel with
one hand and press the brake pads and arms
together. In this position, it should be easy to
disengage the outer cable.
With U-brakes, dismounting the wheel is
more complicated due to the brake lever
arms which lie close together. The possibility
to simply disengage the brake cable at the
brake pad is only given in the case of a few
brakes.
If this is not the case, the easiest way is to
deflate the tire, in order to be able to pull the
tire without tool through the adjusted brake
arms.
If you have disc brakes, you should first
check the exact position of the brake pads,
i.e. the wear indicators. These are ear or
nose-shaped metal protrusions. In this way,
you will be able to tell later whether the brake
pad is still in its proper position. Read the
brake manufacturer’s operating instructions.
If you have road rim-brakes, open the quickrelease lever at the brake (Shimano) or shift
the pin in the combined gear-and-brake-lever
unit mounted to the handlebars (Campagnolo).
Do not pull on the brake lever with
the wheel belonging to that brake
being dismounted.
Brake discs can become hot, so let
them cool down before you dismount
a wheel.
In the case of drum brakes, i.e. multi-speed
hubs, you also have to release the coaster
brake bracket which fixes the rear axle to the
frame.
62
11. The wheels
If you have derailleur gears, you should shift
the chain to the smallest sprocket before
removing the rear wheel. This shifts the rear
gear changer right to the outside where it
does not interfere with the removal of the
wheel.
Turn the wheel nut counterclockwise or open
the quick-release lever as described. If you
cannot remove the front wheel after releasing
the lever or nut, it is probably still being held
in place by drop-out catches. These come as
protrusions which extend out of each side of
the drop-outs. Just release the quick-release
adjusting nut by a few turns and slip the
wheel past the catch.
Lift the bike off the ground a little and give
the wheel a light blow with your hand so that
it drops out.
11.4.2 Dismounting tires
Screw the valve cap and the fastening nut off
the valve and deflate the tire completely.
Press the tire from the sides towards the centre of the rim. You will find it easier to remove
the tire, if you do this around its entire circumference.
Apply a plastic tire lever to the bottom edge
of the tire at a place close to the valve and
lever the tire out of the rim at this place. Hold
the tire lever tight in its position.
Now you can pull out the tube. See to it that
the valve does not get caught, as this can
damage the tube.
Slip the second tire lever between rim and
tire at a distance of about ten centimetres on
the other side of the valve and lever the next
portion over the edge of the rim.
You will find it easier to remove the rear
wheel, if you pull the gear changer rearwards a little.
After levering a part of the tire over the edge
of the rim, you should normally be able to slip
off the whole tire on one side by moving the
tire lever around the whole circumference.
63
11. The wheels
Repair the puncture according to the instructions of the repair kit manufacturer or replace
the tube by a new one. In the case of high
pressure tires, we advise against repairing
punctures.
Ask your MERIDA dealer, if you are in doubt
about what kind of rim tape to use.
If you have removed the tire, you should
also check the rim tape. The tape should lie
squarely in the base of the rim, covering all
spoke ends, and should not be torn anywhere
or brittle.
If you have a puncture en route, do
not pull the whole tube out of the tire.
Leave the valve sticking in the rim. Pump up
the tube. Look for the hole through which
the air escapes with a hissing sound. When
you have found the hole, look for the corresponding place on the tire and examine it.
Often, you will find a foreign body sticking
in the tire. If so, remove it.
In the case of rims with a double base – known
as hollow section rims – the tape must cover
the entire floor of the rim, but it should not be
so broad as to stand up along the sides of the
rim. Rim tapes for this type of rim should only
be made of textile or durable plastic.
If necessary, you can remove the whole tire
by pulling the other tire edge off the rim.
11.4.3 Mounting tires
When mounting a tire make sure no foreign
matter such as dirt or sand gets inside the tire
and you do not injure the tube.
Slip one edge of the tire onto the rim. Using
your thumbs, press it over the edge of the rim
around the entire circumference. This should
always be possible without using tools,
regardless of the type of tire.
Stick the valve of the tube through the hole
in the rim.
Inflate the tube slightly so that it becomes
round and push it into the tire all the way
round. Make sure not to leave any folds in
the tube.
64
11. The wheels
To finish mounting the tire, start at the point
opposite the valve. Using your thumbs, press
the other side of the tire over the edge of the
rim as far you can. Make sure the tube does
not get pinched and squashed between the
tire and rim by pushing the tube inside the tire
with a finger as you work along.
Check again that the tube lies properly inside
the tire and press the last stretch of tire over
the edge of the rim using the balls of your
thumbs.
If this does not work, you will have to use
the tire levers. Make sure the blunt ends point
towards the tube and the tube does not get
damaged.
Press the valve deep into the tire so that the
tube does not get caught between the rim and
the tire beads. Does the valve stand upright?
Work the tire into the rim, approaching the
valve symmetrically from both sides. Towards
the end you will have to pull the tire vigorously downwards to make the already mounted
portion of the tire slip towards the deepest
part of the rim base. This will ease the job
noticeably on the last centimetres.
If not, dismount one side of the tire again
and reposition the tube. To make sure the
tube does not get pinched between rim and
bead, inflate the tire a little and then move it
sideways back and forth between the sides of
the rim. While doing this you can also check
whether the rim tape has been displaced.
While doing this, you can also check whether
the rim tape has been displaced.
Check that the tire is properly seated, orienting yourself by the line on the circumference
of the tire just above the edge of the rim. The
distance between the line and the edge of the
rim should be constant around the entire circumference of the tire.
Inflate the tube to the desired pressure. The
maximum pressure is indicated on the side
of the tire.
65
11. The wheels
11.4.4 Mounting wheels
To mount a wheel, follow the reverse procedure of wheel dismounting. Make sure the
wheel is correctly seated in the dropouts and
accurately centred between the legs of the
fork or seat and chain stays.
Make sure the quick-release and the drop-out
catches are correctly seated.
If you have V-brakes, make sure you immediately connect the brake cable again!
With U-brakes make sure the drop-out
catches are correctly seated. Inflate the tire
again, if it has been deflated for dismounting/mounting.
In the case of racing brakes close the cam
lever.
In the case of multi-speed hubs of city bikes
check that all the relevant components are
properly mounted. Tension the chain before
tightening the wheel nuts by pulling the wheel
rearwards. You should not be able to move
the chain more than two centimetres up and
downwards. On no account should the chain
sag! Fasten the coaster brake bracket again.
If you have disc brakes, check whether the
brake pads rest snugly in their seats in the
brake caliper. This is the case when the gap
between the pads is parallel and when the
wear indicators are in the allocated spots.
Make sure you push the brake disc between
the brake pads.
After mounting the wheel and tightening the
quick-releases, pull the brake lever and spin
the wheel afterwards. The brake disc should
not drag on the brake caliper or on the brake
pads as a rule.
Check whether the brake pads hit their braking surfaces. Make sure the wheel is correctly and firmly fixed in the drop-outs and
the coaster brake bracket, if there is one, is
properly mounted. Under all circumstances,
make a brake test!
Before riding again, check that you
have not let any grease or other lubricants get on the brake pads or disc while
mounting the wheel.
66
12. The headset
Headset
The headset connects the fork, stem, handlebars and front wheel to the frame but allows
them to turn freely as a unit. It must afford
virtually no resistance to turning if the bike
is to go straight, stabilizing itself as it runs.
Shocks caused by uneven road surfaces subject the headset to considerable stress. In this
way it can become loose and maladjusted.
The adjustment of the headset is a job best
left to your MERIDA dealer.
12.1 Checking the bearing play of
the headset
Check the headset for play by placing your
fingers around the upper head cup.
Actuate the front brakes with your other hand
and push the bike vigorously back and forth
on the ground.
If the bearing has play, you will feel the upper
head cup moving against the lower cup.
Another way to check the headset is to lift the
front wheel off the ground a little and then
let it drop. A rattling noise tells you that the
bearing has play.
To check the bearing for ease of running,
lift the frame until the front wheel no longer
touches the ground. Move the handlebars left
and right. The front wheel should turn very
easily left and right through its full range
without catching anywhere. A light tap on
the handlebars should be enough to turn the
wheel to the side.
12.2 Adjusting the conventional
headset
For adjusting a headset of the classical type
you need two flat fork spanners. The spanners must have an opening of at least 32
millimetres depending on the diameter of the
bearing.
Keeping the front wheel fixed between your
legs apply both spanners and release the top
locknut.
Screw the upper head cup downward a little.
Be sure not to screw the head cup completely tight, as you may otherwise immediately
damage the bearing.
67
12. The headset
Hold the head cup in place with a spanner
so that it stays in its new position. Tighten the
locknut against the head cup with the other
spanner.
Check the headset again for play. If the fork
does not turn freely and easily, you have
tightened the bearing too much. In this case,
readjust it. It may take several tries to adjust
the headset accurately. It is essential for a
long service life that the bearing moves easily
without play.
12.3 Adjusting the threadless headset
(Aheadset)
The special feature of this system is that the
stem is not encased by, but rather clamped
onto the fork tube, which in this case is
threadless. The stem is an important part
of the headset bearings. Its clamping force
secures the bearing in its set position.
Release the clamping bolts located on the side
of the stem by one to two complete turns.
Align the stem again with the frame so that
the handlebars are not slanted when the
wheel points straight ahead.
Using an Allen key, gently tighten the countersunk adjusting bolt on top a little.
68
12. The headset
Using a torque wrench, tighten the stem
clamping bolts gradually up to the maximum
value given in chapter 29 “Recommended
torques for bolted connections”. You should
not be able to turn the stem against the fork
after tightening the bolts.
Check the headset for play as described
before. Take care not to tighten the bearing
too much, as this could easily destroy it.
To check the stem for tightness, stand in
front of the bike, fix the front wheel
between your knees, take hold of the handlebars and try to twist them against the
front wheel. A loose stem can cause bad
accidents.
Riding the bike with a loose headset
subjects the fork and bearings to
extreme stress. This can lead to a fork rupture with serious consequences!
Adjusting the headset requires a
certain amount of experience and
should therefore be left to your MERIDA
dealer. Be sure to follow the instructions of
the bearing manufacturer in any case.
With road bike steerer tubes made
of carbon the manufacturer’s manual
must be followed strictly. Be particularly
careful when clamping the stem, otherwise
you may damage the steerer tube.
Do not tighten the upper bolt com
pletely, it only serves the purpose of
adjusting the bearing play.
69
13. The suspension fork
Suspension forks
The damping is usually afforded by oil or by
the self-damping properties of the elastomers.
All MERIDA mountain bikes as well as some
trekking and cross bikes are equipped with
suspension forks. This feature gives you better control of your bike when riding crosscountry or on rough road surfaces. It noticeably reduces the strain on you and your bike
caused by mechanical shocks.
When the front wheel receives an impulse,
the lower fork, the so-called immersion tubes,
are forced upwards. The lower fork legs travel on thinner upper fork legs which are fixed
to the fork crown (stanchion tube). The fork
retracts as a spring inside it is compressed.
The spring allows the fork to extend again
and assume its original position.
An undamped spring would instantly extend
again, making riding impossible. The fork
has an oscillation damper built into it which
prevents the fork from springing back uncontrolled and provides a smooth return travel.
The telescopic forks differ in their spring elements and in the way the damping is realised.
The suspension may be provided by steel
springs, special types of plastic known as elastomers or sealed air compartments or combinations of these options.
13.1 Adjusting suspension forks
In order to function optimally the fork has to
be adjusted to the weight of the rider and its
intended purpose. Have your MERIDA dealer
do this job. Please follow the manufacturer’s
instructions.
Adjusting the fork to your needs before first use
requires little work, if you use a simple trick.
Almost all fork manufacturers include
well-written instructions in their deliveries. Read these instructions carefully
before changing any settings on your fork.
Adjustment and maintenance routines are
in any case jobs best left to your MERIDA
dealer.
Please also visit the websites of the suspension fork manufacturers and importers:
Before you start adjusting the fork the initial
spring tension and the damping should both
be at their lowest.
Slip a cable binder onto the upper fork tube so
that you can shift it easily along the tube. If you
cannot slip the cable binder onto the upper
fork tube because of a bellows, ask a helper to
measure the distance from the top edge of the
fork crown to the ground, once with and once
without you in the saddle.
www.foxracingshox.com, www.toxoholics.de
www.answerproducts.com
www.rockshox.com, www.sram.com
www.dtswiss.com, www.marzocchi.com
www.srsuntour-cycling.com
www.rst.com.tw, www.magura.com
70
13. The suspension fork
Generally speaking, the fork should deflect
by about 10 to 25 % of its total travel when
you sit on the bike. If this is not the case, you
have to change the initial spring tension or
the air pressure.
Ride your bike on different kinds of surface
and have a look afterwards how much of the
fork’s travel was used. If the cable binder has
only moved a few millimetres, your fork is in
too rigid adjustment or has too much pressure
in it. Check whether the initial spring tension
is at its lowest and have the springs replaced
or reduce the air pressure if it is.
If this does not help, you should have the
springs replaced by your MERIDA dealer.
After adjusting the springs to your needs you
can start optimizing the damping. Adjust it
in small steps and watch the rebound movement.
If you find it impossible to put a cable
binder around the upper fork leg, you
will need a partner to ride with you and
watch the behavior of your fork in operation
and advise you on how to adjust it.
Do not ride, if your fork bottoms out.
Insufficient damping causes the fork to
rebound powerfully, making you feel as
though your bike is trying throw you off. The
more you close the damping mechanism, the
slower the spring responds and the softer the
rebound becomes.
If the cable binder has moved along the entire
travel range, or if you can hear the fork bottom out, the spring is too flexible. Apply an
initial spring tension or increase the air pressure.
Do not turn any bolts on your suspen
sion fork in the vague hope of adjusting it somehow. You could be loosening the
fastening mechanism, thus provoking an
accident. As a rule, adjustment devices are
marked with a scale or “+” and “-“ signs.
Adjusting a suspension fork accurate
ly can be a long and difficult process.
If in doubt, ask your MERIDA dealer.
Never try to do any adjustment of the
fork during the ride.
Excessive damping will cause the fork to sink
in when subjected to a quick series of shocks
because the rebound movement will be too
slow.
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13. The suspension fork
13.2 Suspension fork maintenance
Suspension forks are quite intricately designed
and require a considerable amount of maintenance and care. Therefore, almost all suspension fork manufacturers have established
service centers where customers can have
their forks thoroughly checked and overhauled at regular intervals.
The following routines are essential for suspension fork maintenance:
Whatever type of fork you have, make sure
the sliding surfaces of the upper fork legs
(stanchion tubes) are absolutely clean. Clean
the fork with water and a soft sponge after
every ride. After washing your mountain
bike, spray the upper fork legs of the suspension fork a little (with MOTOREX Joker 440 or
MOTOREX Silicone) or apply a very thin film
of hydraulic oil (MOTOREX Fork Oil).
Have your dealer regularly check all bolted connections on your fork with a torque
wrench.
If your fork has an elastomer suspension, you
will have to clean and lubricate the synthetic
springs regularly. Only use acid- and resinfree grease for this purpose. Some fork manufacturers provide special greases for fork
maintenance. Observe your manufacturer’s
recommendations.
Forks with pneumatic springs have to be
regularly checked for air pressure, as the air
escapes over time.
Before and after adjusting the fork,
check whether the bolted connection
at the top of the upper fork legs is still tight.
With most suspension forks this bolt accommodates the adjusting mechanism. The bolt
can come loose while you adjust the fork!
If the available setting options do not
cover your needs, you will need
to replace the springs or shock absorbers. Many manufacturers have tuning and
retro­fitting sets on offer. Be sure only to use
components approved by the manufacturer
of your fork. Ask your MERIDA dealer to
exchange the parts: wrong assembly can
cause accidents and injuries.
Some suspension fork manufacturers
have established service centers, ask
your MERIDA dealer for the addresses.
Suspension forks are intricately
designed. The maintenance routines
and above all the disassembly of the fork
are jobs best left to your MERIDA dealer.
When checking the bolts at the suspension
fork, use an appropriate torque wrench and
follow the fork manufacturer’s instructions.
Depending on how much you ride
with your bike and on the wear, the
suspension fork has to be serviced by an
authorized MERIDA dealer at least once a
year.
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14. The suspension seat post
Suspension seat post
14.1 Adjustment
Suspension seat posts enhance the cyclist’s
comfort when riding on uneven ground. They
can be used on roads and field tracks as
well as for cross-country cycling. However,
suspension seat posts are not suitable for dirt
biking, dual slalom and downhill riding etc.
To increase the initial spring tension you first
have to remove the seat post from the frame.
Before you do this, mark the position of the
seat post in the seat tube with a pen or adhesive tape or the like.
Release the bolt or quick-release that clamps
the seat post to the frame and pull the suspension seat post out of the frame.
The adjusting bolt is located inside the seat
post. To increase the initial tension, turn the
bolt clockwise with an Allen key. To relax the
spring, turn the bolt counterclockwise. When
turning the bolt counterclockwise (as when
looking at the bolt from below) do not release
it beyond the point where it is even with the
seat post, as the mechanism could otherwise
fail.
As a rule, suspension seat posts are adjusted
for a cyclist of average weight, i.e. 75 kilograms. Their shock-absorbing properties can
be altered either by adjusting the initial spring
tension or by exchanging the springs.
Grease the post over the length to be inserted
into the seat tube (except if you have a carbon frame; for more information see chapter 28. “Special characteristics of carbon”).
Clamp the seat post tight and check that it is
firmly fixed inside the seat tube (see chapter 8.1 “Adjusting the saddle to the correct
height“).
If the setting range does not meet you needs,
you will need to replace the springs inside the
seat post with harder or softer ones. Only use
springs from the original manufacturer.
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14. The suspension seat post
14.2 Check and maintenance
Manufacturers recommend servic
ing the seat post after about 60 operating hours. Ask your local MERIDA dealer
to do this lubrication work.
To check the seat post for side-to-side play,
take hold of the saddle at both ends and try
to move it from side to side.
Keep in mind the minimum insertion
depth! Never ride your bike with the
seat post drawn out beyond the limit, maximum or stop mark!.
If you notice any play, get it reduced at your
Merida dealer, or follow the instructions in the
seat post manufacturer’s manual.
Most suspension seat post manufac
turers include well-written operating
instructions in their deliveries. Read them
carefully before changing any settings or
doing any maintenance work.
Check, whether the seat post still moves easily
and whether there is no more play. Readjust it
once again, if necessary, or reduce the initial
tension.
Release the bolt for the initial spring
tension only so far that it is flush with
the seat post.
74
15. The rear shock
Full suspension (rear shock absorption)
15.01 Notes on the sitting position
Full suspension bikes are equipped not only
with a suspension fork but also with movable rear stays which are sprung and shockdamped by a shock absorber. Shock absorption is afforded by a steel or air spring, and
damping usually by oil.
Full-suspension bikes yield a little when you
sit on the saddle (sag). This can cause the
saddle to tilt a little backwards, an effect that
should be taken into account when adjusting
the tilt of the saddle. If you have trouble sitting, try lowering the nose of the saddle a
little relative to the usual position.
Furthermore, full-suspension bikes have a
markedly greater ground clearance than
bikes without suspension. If the saddle is
adjusted to its proper height, you will not be
able to reach the floor with your feet. Set the
saddle a little lower to begin with and practise getting on and off the saddle.
If you are not used to it, you may
topple over with the bike due to the
higher saddle height. Therefore practise
getting on and off the saddle and lower the
saddle a little, if necessary.
75
15. The rear shock
15.02 Application and intended use
The MERIDA full-suspension models are
designed for different application areas.
Permissible total weight for all suspension
bikes: bike 120 kg (rider and baggage
together).
Ninety Six – for fastest forward movement
in cross-country races. Designed to provide
a maximum of weight saving with compromises, however, in view of stability, durability
and load capacity. This model is intended to
be used mainly for efficient, fast rides in competitive races on terrain which is not paded.
It is not suitable for heavy riders (with baggage, as the case may be), jumps, drops and
highspeed downhill riding with heavy loads
on the material, downhill races, free riding,
dual slalom and trick rides.
Mission – for efficient forward movement in
mountainbike races and marathons. Slightly
limited in stability and durability. This model
is intended to be used mainly for fast rides
on varying terrain. It is not suitable for overly
heavy riders (with baggage, as the case may
be), jumps, drops and highspeed downhill
riding with heavy loads on the material,
downhill races, free riding, dual slalom and
trick rides.
TM (Trans-Mission) – all mountain usage,
for classical touring with excellent uphill and
downhill features. Comfortable and light
weight design, however always with compromises between light and stable/durable. This
model is intended to be used mainly for long
and extended rides on a varying terrain. Not
suitable for jumps and drops, downhill races,
free riding, dual slalom and trick rides.
76
15. The rear shock
One five O – Enduro usage, for demanding,
fast downhill rides with good handling in
extreme (paded) terrain and yet good uphill
features. The One five O models can also be
used for rides, also referred to as free riding. They are, however, not suitable for large
drops, downhill races or dual slalom and trick
rides.
The UMF Freddy bikes are stable, durable and designed for an uncompromising
freeride use. They allow for higher jumps,
drops, downhill or dual slalom races as well
as for trick rides. Due to the higher weight
and the handling-oriented seating position,
longer rides can only be recommended to a
limited extent.
Please keep in mind that though look
ing easy the tricks of a professional
actually require a lot of training and experience. For your own safety’s sake do not
overestimate your abilities and protect yourself with suitable clothing.
Both Freddy and Duncan bikes need to
be serviced twice as much as other
bikes.
The UMF Duncan bikes are designed to be
used for the hardest freeride and downhill
races.
77
15.1 General notes on the adjustment of the frame
General notes on the adjustment of the
frame
Your dealer should have adjusted your bike
already prior to delivery, i.e. the spring
should have been selected or the air pressure
adjusted, according to the frame size and the
anticipated weight of the rider. The spring
characteristics of the rear shock have to be
adapted to the rider’s weight and posture.
The rear shock of the rear swing arm (and
the suspension fork) should retract slightly
under the rider’s weight to allow for sufficient negative spring excursion (referred to
as sag). When the rear wheel passes over
a hole, the spring will rebound and the suspension mechanism will smoothen the uneven
movement.
If the selected spring rate is too high, this
effect is lost because the wheel will already
be fully extended. This means the loss of an
important feature of safety and comfort.
For city riding, touring, trekking and cross
country cycling the sag is normally set to
somewhere between 15% and 30% of rear
wheel travel.
Enduro riders and freeriders set the sag to
approx. 25% to 40%, depending on the type
of shock absorber. As this is in part a matter
of taste, you can try different versions or vary
the adjustment according to the terrain.
Bobbing of the rear frame under the impact
of pedalling occurs only to a small degree
with MERIDA bikes and on some models it
can be inhibited altogether.
The rear shock should be adjusted in such a
way that it never bottoms out. A spring which
is too soft (or with air-spring-only models, too
little air pressure) makes itself felt and usually
also clearly heard by the hard shocks caused
by the sudden complete compression of the
shock absorber. If the rear shock frequently
bottoms out, it will become damaged in the
long term, and so will the frame.
The action of the rear shock is governed by
valves inside which control the oil flow rate
and hence the speed with which the rear
shock moves in and out. In this way it is possible to optimize the bike’s reaction to obstacles. Adjusting the rear shock is a delicate
job, as even a small change on the adjusting
wheel can have a big effect. Try approaching
the exact setting you need in increments no
larger than a quarter turn or click by click.
Do not ride your mountain bike with
spring elements that bottom out – risk
of failure!
78
15.2 Adjusting the rear shock absorber
15.2.1 Adjusting the shock absorbers
Find yourself a level area where you can sit
on your bike while leaning onto something.
A handrail within reach or a helper who can
keep you from falling over would be ideal.
Make sure you have adjusted the saddle to
your desired seating position and check the
tire pressure.
In addition to the above-described general
advantages of MERIDA rear frames in terms
of spring kinematics, some of the special
shock absorber systems provide the option
of completely eliminating the bobbing of the
frame by a lockout mechanism of the rear
shock.
Only actuate the lockout mechanism of the
spring elements on hard-surface roads and
smooth ground, e.g. on tarred roads, as the
suspension is no longer responsive.
Riding with a closed lockout mecha
nism on an uneven ground may lead
to a damage of the rear shock or frame or
make the rider lose control of the bike.
Push the O-ring on the piston rod of the rear
shock upward until it engages with the damper body.
To achieve the most favourable riding performance, the rear shock must be adjusted to
your weight, your seating position and your
riding habits.
For this reason please read the following
instructions thoroughly before setting about
work on your bike.
All rear shock manufacturers include
mounting and operating instructions
with their deliveries. Be sure to read these
instructions.
Gently sit on your bike and assume your normal riding position.
79
15.2 Adjusting the rear shock absorber
Gently get off your bike again. Measure the
distance the O-ring has moved on the piston
rod. For cross country / all mountain use, the
O-ring should have moved by 20 to 25 % of
the total travel of the damper; otherwise there
is a risk of bottoming out, resulting in a damage of the frame.
Distance measured on the Sag in percent (%)
rear shock (mm)
6
12
18
24
30
40
Sag of rear wheel given 90 mm
rear wheel travel
10
20
30
40
50
60
9
18
27
36
45
54
The highlighted fields show the recommended adjustment.
If your rear shock has an overall travel of
approx. 60 mm, the table below allows you
to classify your value measured with regard to
the sag with a rear wheel travel of 90 mm.
In general, a long sag makes for soft riding,
which is good for freeriders, enduro riders
and comfort cyclists, while a short sag makes
for hard riding, which is what is needed for
cross country and marathon cycling. For the
overall travel of your rear shock model, see
chapter 27. “Assembling and equipping a
MERIDA frame”.
If the sag is not as you want it, you can adjust
the spring rate by altering the air pressure.
When adjusting the spring rate, a
good value to begin with is 4 bar.
Make it a rule to inflate the rear shock with
0.5 bar more than intended, as air escapes
when unscrewing the pump.
Ask you MERIDA dealer for the sag
and the overall travel of your damper,
in order to be able to make the adjustment
in accordance with the example.
If you want a shorter sag, i.e. a harder ride,
you will need to increase the pressure.
80
15.2 Adjusting the rear shock absorber
Unscrew and remove the black dirt cap from
the rear shock and screw the rear shock pump
onto the valve.
Air and oil may escape under high
pressure, when unscrewing the valve
cap and at the moment of screwing and
unscrewing the pump. Make sure not to
get dirty and to keep the braking surfaces
clean.
If you want to reduce the pressure to get a
longer sag, screw on the special rear shock
pump and let a little air escape via the bleed
valve. Here too it is best to proceed in small
increments.
psi
After completing the adjustment, screw the
dirt cap back onto the valve.
To ensure a proper filling, it is advisa
ble to use an appropriate rear shock
pump, which your MERIDA dealer keeps for
sale.
bar
psi
bar
Minimum pressure
160
11
50
3.5
170
11.7
60
4.1
180
12.4
70
4.8
190
13.1
80
5.5
200
13.8
90
6.2
210
14.5
100
6.9
220
15.2
110
7.6
230
15.9
120
8.3
240
16.6
130
9.0
250
17.3
140
9.7
260
18
150
10.4
Maximum pressure
Do not exceed the maximum pressure
(e.g. of 18 bar or 260 psi with DT
Swiss) in the air chamber. Please observe
the imprint on your rear shock.
Using a special rear shock pump increase
the pressure a little. Increase the pressure in
increments of 0.5 bar by taking care not to
exceed the maximum pressure (e.g. of 18 bar
with DT Swiss (260 psi))! Always observe the
maximum pressure indicated for the respective rear shock.
81
15.2 Adjusting the rear shock absorber
15.2.2 Adjusting the damping
Rebound damping can be adjusted by simply
turning the red handwheel at the upper end
of the rear shock. The handwheel enables you
to modify the valve sections in the oil bath
and hence the oil flow rate and volume.
Start with the rebound damping value entirely
open and increase it in small increments.
Rebound damping is normally considered
to be good when the rear frame bobs about
one to one-and-a-half times after descending
from a high kerb.
Turn the handwheel in very small increments
(i.e. click by click) from the open to the closed
position until you reach the degree of damping that suits you best.
Test the response you get after every change.
If you turn the adjusting wheel too far, the oil
will flow very slowly and increase the shock
absorption to a maximum. This results in a
sluggish rebound movement and the rear
shock will yield all the way when subjected to
a quick series of shocks.
Turning the adjusting wheel in the other direction reduces shock absorption, making the
rear shock rebound faster.
When you increase rebound damping, this
slows down the rebound movement, effectively preventing the rear frame from bobbing
up and down. Excessive rebound damping,
however, prevents the spring element from
rebounding fast enough for the rear frame to
respond adequately to holes.
With some models compression damping can be altered, as well. Experience has
shown that it is best to start with adjusting the
rebound damping before varying the compression damping. Start with the compression
damping value entirely open and increase it
in small increments. You will notice changes by the speed with which the rear shock
yields.
15.2.3 Making corrections on a test ride
Take your bike for a test ride on different
kinds of surface. If the rear shock bottoms
out several times, you will need to change the
spring rate, i.e. increase the pressure in the
air chamber.
Do not ride your bike, if the rear
shock tends to bottom out. This could
cause damage to the rear shock as well as
to the frame. Increase the air pressure as
described before.
Take down the results obtained in
the course of this hard detail work.
This will save you time, i.e. you will not have
to repeat the procedure again, in case you
ever lose pressure.
You are then in a position to directly adjust
the rear shock by means of the rear shock
pump according to your wishes.
82
15.3 Checks, care and maintenance of the rear shock
Checks, care and maintenance of the
MERIDA rear shock
15.3.1 Care
Generally, all the rear frame needs in terms of
care is a thorough cleaning around the rear
shock, the moving rear stays and the area
around the bearings. Do not use a steam jet
or aggressive cleaning agents!
Make sure from time to time to also clean the
engaging surfaces of the rear shock from dust
and dirt with a soft rag. Get into the habit of
doing this every time you return from a ride
through dusty terrain or rain and dirt.
You can also gently clean
the whole rear frame, as
well as the entire bike,
with a soap-based bike
cleaning agent. We recommend MOTOREX
cleaning products.
Always make sure the protective caps
are screwed onto the valves when
cleaning your bike. Thinners and aggressive
cleaning agents are liable to damage seals
and stickers. Do not use abrasive cleaning
agents, such as steel wool, polish or the
like.
The lower end of the piston rod and the
adjoining end of the rear shock should regularly be cleaned, dried and lubricated.
After cleaning your bike apply
a little spray, e.g. Motorex Joker
440, to the upper and lower
bases of the rear shock and the
joints of the connection pieces.
15.3.2 Check
Every 30 to 40 hours of riding, check the
bearing of the swing arm for side-to-side
play and the bearing of the rear shock for
vertical play.
To check the rear swing arm for play, lift the
bike by the saddle and try to move the rear
wheel from side to side.
If necessary, ask a helper to keep the front
part of the frame still while you do this.
This provides lubrication and
makes for silent riding.
This job can be done with soft cotton rags.
83
15.3 Checks, care and maintenance of the rear shock
To check the rear shock for vertical play, place
the rear wheel gently on the ground and lift it
again a little. Check for any rattling.
If you find any play, ask your MERIDA dealer
to eliminate it without delay.
With all MERIDA suspension bikes, the swing
arm is equipped with sealed bearings at its
lower end which are largely maintenancefree. Check with a torque wrench whether
the bolted-on bearing components and the
rear shock bases are firmly seated. Before the
swing arm bearings can be bolted against
one another, the bearing on the left side must
be loosened. The recommended torque is 910 Nm.
If there is a clicking noise, apply a lit
tle spray oil, such as MOTOREX Joker
440, to the area around the bearings and
shock bases.
If you want to dismantle the rear shock from
the frame, be sure to take good note of the
order in which you remove the parts! Arrange
them in the order you disassembled them to
avoid mistakes when reassembling.
Disassembling the rear frame is a job
best left to your MERIDA dealer.
Wrong assembly may cause damage and
serious accidents!
Lubricate the sliding bearings and the rear
base with a resin and acid-free grease, such
as MOTOREX Bike Grease 2000, when reassembling the rear shock.
15.3.3 Maintenance
Although spring elements require fairly little
maintenance, you should regularly invest a
little time in their cleaning and maintenance
and have the suspension system serviced by
your dealer at least every 200 hours of riding
or once a year.
Complete disassembly of the rear shock for
maintenance purposes should be left to skilled
service staff and in any case requires prior
permission by MERIDA. Opening a spring
element voids the guarantee.
The rear shock is under pressure.
Improper disassembly can lead to
a sudden loss of pressure and is liable to
cause injury!
A shock absorber is basically a wearing part!
Some of its components are subject to ageing dependent on, some independent of the
degree of use. Components that wear through
use include in particular seals that are subject
to friction and guide elements.
Observe the recommended maximum torques
when reassembling the rear shock!
This wear depends to a large degree on the
manner of use as well as maintenance.
84
15.3 Checks, care and maintenance of the rear shock
The rate of wear increases when components
are subject to heavy soiling or put to use in
extreme weather conditions.
Mechanical stress such as from crashes or
lateral forces exerted by baggage, increases
the rear shock’s rate of wear. Make sure,
therefore, not to rest pannier bags on the
rear shock.
After a fall or crash check the rear shock for
damage. In case of doubt ask your MERIDA
dealer for advice.
Seals or coatings contain materials whose
wear is dependent on storage conditions, UV
light or moisture rather than degree of use.
For example, anodized surfaces are subject
to ageing and changes in colour intensity are
therefore normal.
The maintenance work of all spring
elements is carried out by the national importers.
15.3.4 Service intervals
We urgently recommend you to observe the
service intervals specified below. For more
information on how to perform the tests see
chapter 15.3 “Checks, care and maintenance”.
After every ride: Clean the rear shock, in
particular its functional components, from
dirt and dust.
Before every ride: Push the saddle down with
your weight to check whether the rear shock
retracts and extends as it should. If necessary,
check the pressure in the air chamber and
– if you have a Manitou shock – in the SPV
chamber.
Every 30 to 40 hours of riding: Check whether the bearings of the rear swing arm and /
or rear shock have any side-to-side or vertical play.
Every 200 hours of riding or once a year:
Bring your bike to your dealer for servicing.
This will involve an inspection and, if necessary, an overhaul of the rear shock.
To ensure that your rear shock serves
you for many years without failure
you should have it serviced by your dealer
once a year or every 200 hours of riding.
Every 8-10 hours of riding: Check whether
the sag is still properly adjusted.
Check the fastening bolts of the rear shock
and frame with a torque wrench according to
the torque specifications in this manual.
Your MERIDA dealer is, however, your contact for any inquiry arising.
85
16. The pedals
Pedal systems
Not all shoes are suited for cycling. Shoes
used for cycling should have a stiff sole
and provide a firm support for your feet. If
the soles are too soft, the pedals can press
through and cause foot pain. Moreover, soft
soles make for poor power transmission. The
sole should not be too broad near the heels,
as the rear stays will otherwise get in the way
of your pedalling. This will prevent your feet
from assuming a natural position and may
cause knee pain in the long run.
If your bike is equipped with platform
pedals for competitive use, they are
sharp-edged for a better hold of the shoes.
There is the danger of hurting yourself, if
you slip off. Be sure to wear protective clothing.
16.1 Different systems – how they
work at a glance
For sporty biking the pedals recommended
most are those which provide a lock and
release mechanism for your shoe, also
referred to as clipless pedals. The firm connection between shoe and pedal prevents your
feet from slipping off when pedalling fast or
when riding over rough ground. Besides this,
it enables you not only to push but also to pull
on the pedals, which makes your pedalling
more fluent.
Lean against a wall or ask someone to help
you steady yourself when you try to engage
and disengage the shoe from the pedal.
Taking up the pedals, engaging the
shoes and disengaging them by turning the heel outward should first be practised in standing. Later you can refine your
technique in a place clear of traffic.
Clipless pedals come with a special type of
cycling shoe which locks onto the pedal. The
usual way to engage with the pedal, is to turn
it to the horizontal using the tip of the cleat
(the plate on the sole of the shoe) and then
rest your foot on it. Most mountain bike pedals are equipped with a double-sided lock-in
mechanism, so that you can step on the pedal
with either face up. The shoe engages with
the pedal with a click which you will hear and
feel clearly.
With all commercially available systems the
shoe is disengaged from the pedal by twisting
the heel outward.
86
16. The pedals
16.2 Adjustment and maintenance
If there is a clicking noise, apply a
little MOTOREX spray oil to the area
around the bearings and shock bases.
Current pedal systems can show considerable
differences in design.
Be sure to thoroughly read the oper
ating instructions of the pedal and
shoe manufacturers. Your MERIDA dealer
will be pleased to help you, if you should
have any questions.
Nevertheless, there are some general rules
for adjustment which apply to all of them:
The cleat has to be attached to the shoe in a
position allowing for the ball of the foot to rest
on the pedal spindle.
Your feet should assume a natural position
when pedalling. For most people this means
that the heels will point inward a little. Make
sure the fastening bolts are properly tightened, as you will find it almost impossible to
disengage your shoe from a loose plate!
Adjust the required releasing force according
to your needs. It is advisable to adopt a low
initial tension to begin with. Turn the small
Allen bolt and examine the change in initial
tension when you engage and disengage the
shoe from the pedal.
Exposed springs and other components that
attract dirt have to be cleaned and regreased
regularly.
Only use clipless pedals that allow
you to engage and disengage smoothly. A defective pedal or a badly worn cleat
can lead to an accident by causing the shoe
to come off by itself.
Squeaking or creaking cleats can often be
silenced by applying a little grease to the
point of contact between cleat and pedal. It
may also be a sign of wear.
Regularly check the cleats for wear, especially
if they are made of plastics.
If your shoe wobbles on the pedal, it is probably because the cleat or the sole of your
shoes are worn.
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17. The lighting set
The lighting set
Anyone cycling on public roads is required
by law to have a properly working lighting
set (see chapter 6. “Legal requirements for
riding on public roads“).
It is important to be familiar with the design
of the lighting set so that you can repair it
yourself in the event of a failure.
Tire dynamos are usually put into operation
by pressing on the joint or a key from above
to release a spring which then presses the
pulley wheel against the tire for electricity
generation.
Dynohubs can be switched on very comfortably by pressing a button mounted on the
handlebars.
17.1 How it works
The dynamo produces the electricity required
for operating the light bulbs. It has two dual
cables attached to it, one running to the front
light and the other to the rear light. On some
bikes, the electricity is conducted for a part of
the way via strip conductors integrated in the
mudguards.
Most trouble occurs when you ride a lot in the
rain or during the winter.
The pulley wheel can slip on the wet rubber
tire, making the light dimmer or fail altogether.
Therefore, dynohubs are becoming more
and more popular. Besides its indifference
to weather, this type of dynamo is also distinguished by its greater efficiency, i.e. the
smaller power input required for producing
the same amount of electricity as compared
with a tire dynamo.
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17. The lighting set
17.2 Troubleshooting
17.3 Adjusting the front light
First inspect the light bulbs of the front and
rear light. Check whether the filaments are
intact. Bulbs with a black tint are a sure indication of a defect.
The centre of the light beam from the front
light should hit the ground no further than 10
metres ahead of the bike. To correct the orientation of the light beam, release the fastening
bolt and adjust the light as required. Tighten
the bolts again.
Check the contacts and the sockets in the
lamp housing. White or greenish stains are a
sign of corrosion. Remove the corroded material with a screwdriver or emery cloth until the
contact surfaces are shiny again.
Inspect the cable along its entire length and
check for any damage. Check all contact
points. Pin and socket connectors tend to corrode if exposed to salt and rain. Take the connectors apart and stick them together again.
An incomplete or inoperative lighting
set is not only against the law, it is
also a hazard to your life. Cyclists riding in
the dark without a light may easily be overlooked and risk getting involved in serious
accidents
If you still cannot find the cause of the trouble,
ask your MERIDA dealer who will repair your
lighting set competently.
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18. Dirt bikes – special features
Special features of dirt bikes
Dirt bikes are designed for hard use, such as
freeride, dirt, street or dual slalom. You may
also do jumps with these bikes. However, do
not overestimate your riding capacities when
jumping or riding downhill. Although these
bikes are strong and durable, there are limits
which depend on the rider, his riding technique as well as the ground he is riding on
and the obstacles. Only use your bike for
its proper purpose, as it may otherwise not
stand up to the stress and fail!
Make it a rule to wear shoes which fit the
pedal system and sufficient protective clothing, such as helmet, protective pads and
gloves. Handling you bike is best learned by
joining a club.
Chain guide: This component protects the
chain from slipping off the chainring as a
result of too hard shocks caused by jumps,
races and other tricks.
Dirt bikes have a shorter wheel base and a
lower trail than usual mountain bikes. This
makes the performance of your bike more
nervous, particularly in bends and at higher
speeds, which must be considered during riding.
Bashguard: Bashguards (chainring protections) are to protect the chainrings from damage in the event, the rider gets stuck with
them on an obstacle. This protection against
damage is, however, only ensured to a certain extent. A too hard impact may damage the set of chainrings, the bearing or the
frame. This strain depends on both, the driver
and the underground which strikes the bashguard. Therefore, only use your bashguard
very carefully
chain guide
bashguard
If you use your dirt bikes for riding on
public roads, it must be fitted according to the regulations of the respective country. If in doubt, ask your MERIDA dealer.
Keep in mind that the laws of physics are
merciless. Please note that, though looking easy, the tricks of a professional require
instructions, a lot of training and experience.
Do not overestimate your riding skills.
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19. Kids‘ bikes
19.1 What parents must bear in mind
Children are among the most vulnerable road
user groups - not only because of their lack
of experience and practise, but also for the
simple reason that they are smaller and may
therefore have difficulties overseeing things
and be easily overlooked.
If you want your child to use his/her bike on
the road, you should be willing to invest time
in road safety instruction and help him/her
improve his/her riding skills. Children are
not as observant as adults, and you should
therefore get into the routine of checking the
bike and performing adjustments and maintenance as necessary.
In case of any inquiries, your local MERIDA
dealer will be pleased to help you. Bear in
mind that it is your responsibility to supervise
your child on his or her first rides – and do
not expect too much!
Inform yourself about the traffic rules in your
country. In Germany, children must use the
sidewalk until they are eight years old and
they are permitted to do so until the age of
ten!
It is essential that your child has good control
of his/her bike before riding on the road. As
a first step in this direction we recommend
giving your child a scooter or pedalles bike
so that he/she can train their sense of balance.
Make sure the child always wears a
properly fitting bike helmet and well
visible, i.e. bright, clothing. It is also advisable to wear reflector stripes to increase visibility.
This being accomplished you will need to
make your child familiar with the functioning of the brakes and gears before you let
him or her sit on the bike. Find a place away
from the road, ideally a backyard or play
street, where you can practise braking and
switching gears with your child under your
supervision.
If your child has progressed to a point where
he or she can ride in traffic, train how to
negotiate kerbs and other obstacles, that is
as much at right angles as possible. Your
child should also learn to look ahead and
back for any danger before taking this kind
of obstacle.
Set a good example by using bike lanes wherever possible. It is also advisable to let your
child take part in road safety lessons offered
at school or by automobile associations.
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19. Kids‘ bikes
19.2 Notes on BMX bikes
19.3 Adjustment of kids‘ bikes
BMX bikes are designed to be used purely as
sports equipment and therefore, due to their
geometry and transmission, only suitable to
a limited extend to be used as kids’ bikes.
However, they are sometimes used as kids’
bikes due to the small frame, the popularity
of the BMX bicycling as a sport and the children’s urging.
Adjusting the bike to the bodily proportions
of a child is even more important than in the
case of an adult. In determining the height of
the saddle you will need to find a compromise
that allows the child to reach the ground with
both feet when sitting on the saddle while at
the same time giving him/her enough space
for pedalling.
Set the saddle to a height where the child can
fully extend his/her leg when he/she rests
his/he heel on the pedal at the lowest point.
As a second test, make sure the child’s knee
is slightly bent when the ball of the foot rests
on the pedal in this position.
If you intend to use your BMX bikes
for riding on public roads, it must be
fitted according to the regulations of the
respective country. If in doubt, ask your
MERIDA dealer.
For more information see the instruc
tions given in chapter 18. “Dirt bikes
– special features”.
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19. Kids‘ bikes
During both tests the child’s pelvis should of
course rest horizontally on the saddle. As a
final check, see whether the child can still
reach the ground with both feet at the same
time when sitting on the saddle. If this is not
the case, lower the saddle a little.
For more information on how to adjust the
height of the saddle see chapter 8. ”Adjusting the bike to the rider”.
Children and adolescents need to
have the height of their saddle checked
at least every 3 months!
Handlebars which are too far away from
the saddle, can also impair the child’s riding comfort. Therefore, the saddle has been
designed to allow fore-to-aft adjustment.
Using a wrench, release the nut of the saddle
clamp at the top of the seat post by one to
two turns.
Do not unscrew the nut all the way, otherwise the whole mechanism may come apart.
Push the saddle into the desired position and
tighten the nut again. Make sure the saddle is
horizontal and the ratchet mechanism in the
saddle clamp engages when you tighten the
nut. Try to tilt the saddle a little to determine
whether the mechanism has engaged. If this
is the case, screw the nut tight.
Now check whether the child can easily reach
the brake levers.
If this is not the case, adjust the brake lever
as described in chapter 8.“Adjusting the bike
to the rider” and chapter 9. “The brake system”.
It is important to tell the child when he/she
practises braking that he or she should ride
more slowly in wet conditions, because the
brakes will be slippery and not brake as
well.
Make a final check on how securely the saddle is fastened by trying to tilt it.
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19. Kids‘ bikes
Get into the habit of doing the checks given
in chapter 4. “Before every ride” together
with your child. In this way, the child will
learn to handle the bike properly and you
will be able to detect any defects that have
developed during use. Encourage your child
to tell you, if anything should not be working
properly on his or her bike. Rectify the fault
immediately or hand the bike in for repair, if
you are in doubt.
Children can be vain. Make sure
you buy a tested bike helmet that the
child feels happy with. Take your child with
you to make sure you buy one which the
child likes and which fits properly. This will
increase the chances that the helmet is actually used, which might be life-saving one
day!
advisable to let your child train beforehand
with a three wheeler or a scooter. Experience
has shown that once your child has good
control of the scooter, he/she will find it easy
to get used to riding a bike.
If you decide to assemble training wheels,
start, if necessary, with mounting the wheels
to the supporting arms. Then release and
remove the wheel bolts on one side completely and attach the supporting arm together
with the mounting bracket to the chainstay.
Keep in mind that training wheels only
insufficiently help small children to
ride a bike and ought to be removed at the
earliest stage possible so that your child can
learn to balance a two-wheeler.
19.4 Training wheels
Experts are of the opinion that training wheels
are suitable to only a limited extent for learning how to ride a bike and therefore even
counterproductive due to the memorizing of
movement patterns. Therefore, if this aid is
mounted, try to do without them as soon as
possible; otherwise your child will get used
to a completely wrong riding technique. It is
Both training wheels are then to be aligned
in a way that they touch the ground when
the bike is in an upright position. Finish by
tightening the wheel nuts to the prescribed
torque.
Make sure to correctly assemble the mounting
bracket to the chainstay. Tighten the wheel
nut hand-tight and continue by mounting the
training wheel on the other side.
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20. Helmets, accessories
20.1 Helmets
20.2 Accessories
Cycling helmets are a must in today’s road
traffic. Your MERIDA dealer keeps a large
range of helmets of different sizes for sale.
There are all sorts of accessories on the market that are intended to increase your pleasure
in cycling. There are electronic speedometers
that show your current and average speed,
your daily and annual mileage as well as
the duration of the present ride. Real de luxe
models also give the highest speed achieved,
differences in elevation, your cadence and
many other things.
Take your time when buying a helmet and
keep the one you prefer most on for a while
before making your final choice. A good
helmet should fit tight without pinching. Pay
attention to the test seals indicating the helmet passed the tests required by the respective standard.
Never ride without a helmet! But the
safest helmet is useless, if its belts are
not fastened or if it is not properly adjusted.
However, the most important accessories for
a successful bike tour will always remain an
air pump and a small tool kit. The tool kit
should include two tire levers, the most commonly used Allen keys, a spare tube, a tire
repair kit, a telephone card and a little cash.
In this way, you will be well prepared in the
event of a puncture or some other mishap.
Before buying any additional bells, horns
or lighting accessories, inform yourself
thoroughly whether these are permitted and
tested and accordingly approved for use on
public roads. Additional battery/accumulator-operated lamps have to be marked with
the wavy line and the letter “K”.
Rear-view mirrors offer better view backwards. Before buying one, make sure it has a
firm, non-vibrating mounting.
Do not forget to equip yourself with a good
lock – bikes are frequently stolen. Your
MERIDA dealer will be pleased to advise
you about the various security categories of
bike locks.
Retrofitted accessories such as mud
guards, disc brakes, drum brakes,
carriers etc. can impair the functioning of
your bike. This can result in your losing control and falling off your bike. Make it a rule
of asking your MERIDA dealer for advice
before mounting any kind of accessories on
your bike.
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21. Baggage
Transporting baggage
Make sure the weight of your
baggage is favourably distributed
when loading your bike. Heavy items should
be carried as close to the ground as possible. Handlebar bags and bags mounted
to the top of the carrier are only suited for
lightweight objects.
There are various ways of carrying baggage
on a bike. Your choice will primarily depend
on the weight and volume of the baggage
and on the bike you want to use. Mountain
bikers and racing cyclists often carry their
baggage in a rucksack on their back. In this
way the additional load influences the performance of your bike the least.
However, there are also many ways of fastening baggage directly to a bike.
removal. Handlebar bags are particularly
suitable for valuables and photo equipment.
Bikes equipped with a carrier permit you
to fasten a bag or basket to the carrier top.
However, this solution is the least favorable
in terms of the bike’s riding performance. A
better one is to carry your baggage in stable
pannier bags, as this lowers the overall centre
of gravity.
Lowrider bags for the front of the bike are
mounted to the fork by means of special holders. They are a usefull add-on for long tours.
They are well suited for heavy items, as they
hardly affect the rider’s control of the bike as
a result of the good weight distribution.
When buying pannier bags make sure they
are water-tight so that the first heavy rain
does not turn into a very bad surprise.
Another way of loading your baggage is in
handlebar bags. They are often equipped
with snap buckles for quick mounting and
Do not overload your bike (see chap
ter 3. “Before your first ride“) and
observe the maximum load bearing capacity printed on or impressed in your carrier. Baggage generally changes the riding
characteristics of your bike and makes your
stopping distance longer! Practise riding a
loaded bike in a place clear of traffic.
Do not overload your carrier and be sure to
observe the imprinted or engraved permissible maximum load. Do not exceed the permissible load bearing capacity of the bike
indicated in chapter 3. “Before your first
ride”.
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22. Taking children with you
The only possible and legal way of transporting children by bike is in special child carriers
or trailers. The fastenings of child carriers are
usually designed for intermittent use so that
the carrier can be fastened to any bike that is
equipped with the necessary fittings.
Child carriers have a strong influence on
the bike’s riding characteristics. The weight
of both carrier and child will make the bike
somewhat top-heavy and tend to give you a
wobbly ride. Practise getting on and riding
your bike with a child on it!
22.1 Child carriers
A critical moment is when you
have just placed the child in
the carrier, because this is
when the danger of the bike
toppling over is greatest. A
good way to obviate this danger is to use a two-legged kick
stand to keep the bike stable
in standing.
Make sure to only buy tested child carriers
(e.g. with DIN/GS-seals). Before use, it is
essential to fasten the child’s seat belt and to
make sure his/her feet are properly seated in
the shields.
Make sure the child you are taking
with you wears a helmet!
Do not overload your carrier and be sure to
observe the imprinted or engraved permissible maximum load. Do not exceed the permissible overall load of the bike indicated in
chapter 3. “Before your first ride”.
Cover the springs of your saddle so
that the child cannot get his/her
fingers pinched between them.
Children may only be transported in
special child carriers that provide sufficient protection for their feet. In Germany
e.g. the child to be transported must not be
older than 7 and the rider not younger than
16 years old. Please inform yourself about
the regulations in your country!
Not all types of frames, in particu
lar lightweight frames, are suitable for
mounting a child carrier with special fittings.
The table given in chapter 27. “Assembling
and equipping a MERIDA frame” and chapter 28. “Special characteristics of carbon”
will help you. Ask your MERIDA dealer how
to mount the carrier.
Inform yourself in your country about
the regulations regarding child transport, before taking your child with you. If in
doubt, ask your MERIDA dealer.
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22. Taking children with you
22.2 Child trailers
Special child trailers to be drawn behind a
bike, are usually designed to accommodate
up to two children. Children can play in the
trailer without any danger of toys falling out.
Some models provide the option of mounting
a sunshade or rain shield.
Trailers mainly affect the braking response of
your bike, while other performance aspects
remain largely unchanged. One drawback is
that child trailers occupy far more width than
the bike would alone. Moreover, trailers are
not very high and therefore liable to be overlooked by others. For this reason, equip your
trailer with a long pole with coloured pennant
to increase visibility. Also, first practise drawing the trailer without passengers. A rearview mirror will allow you to keep an eye on
the trailer and its occupants while riding.
Trailers should be equipped with all the reflectors that are also required for bikes. If you use
it in the dark, illuminate the rear end of the
trailer with at least one battery/accumulatoroperated lamp.
Please make sure the child you carry wears
a helmet. A trailer is an insufficient protection
in the case of an accident!
Before towing a trailer with your bike,
check whether your bike is suited
for it by reading chapter 27. “Assembling
and equipping MERIDA frames”. In case of
doubt, ask your MERIDA dealer for advice.
Always buckle up the child, as erratic
movements inside the trailer can make
the trailer topple over.
Make sure the child you are taking
with you wears a helmet!
Keep in mind that towing a trailer alters
riding behaviour and braking
response.
Make it a rule to always ride at an
adequate speed and never off-road.
Never exceed the permissible overall
load of the trailer and make sure to
read the operating instructions of the trailer.
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23. Transport by car
Taking the bike by car
When you intend to travel with your
bike mounted outside your car, inform
yourself about the regulations regarding
bike transport in the transit countries. There
are different regulations e.g. with regard to
the marking.
Transporting the bike by car is very easy.
There is hardly any car accessories dealer
or car company that does not offer bike carrier systems. These save the user from having to disassemble the bike for transport. The
usual design involves rails fixed to the roof of
the car onto which the bikes are fixed with
clamps gripping the down tubes.
Rear carriers are becoming more and more
popular. Their big advantage over roof carriers is that you do not have to lift up the bikes
so high to attach them.
When buying a bike carrier, make sure it
complies with the safety standards and is
provided with seals, such as TÜV/GS-seals
or the like.
Read the operating instructions of your bike
carrier and observe the maximum loading
capacity and driving speed.
If you have a rear carrier, make sure it does
not conceal the lights or the number plate of
your car. For some carriers a second exterior
rear view mirror is prescribed by the road
traffic regulations.
Keep in mind that your bike is more exposed
to the weather conditions when mounted
to the outside of your car. Driving at high
speed in rainy weather is comparable to the
effects of a steam cleaner. The water can pass
through the seals and penetrate the bearings
and bowden cables. This leads to the dilution
of lubricants and consequently to greater friction, which destroys bearings and bowden
cables in the long run.
Most clamps are a potential source of
damage to large-diameter frame
tubes!
Do not buy a carrier on which the
bike has to be taken upside down, i.e.
with the handlebars and saddle fixed face
down to the carrier. This way of fastening
the bike subjects the handlebars, stem, saddle and seat post to extreme stress during
transport and can lead to failure of these
parts!
Bear in mind that your car has a
greater overall height with the bike
on it. Measure the overall height and place
a sign stating the height somewhere in the
cockpit or on the steering wheel so that it
can be easily seen.
Never transport bikes with hydraulic
brakes upside down. This could let air
enter the brake calipers and lead to brake
failure.
Disc brakes have to be secured with
safety locks, if the bike is to be transported with wheels dismounted.
99
24. Cleaning and caring
Your MERIDA dealer will have assembled and
adjusted your bike ready for use when you
come to collect it. Nevertheless, you should
service it regularly. Have your local MERIDA
dealer do the scheduled maintenance work
This is the only way to ensure that all its components function safely and reliably and that
you can use it safely and with joy for many
years.
A much more gentle way of cleaning your
bike is with a soft water jet or with a bucket
of water and a sponge or large brush, e.g.
a glue brush.
Cleaning and caring for the bike
Do not use solvent-containing cleaners for
powder-coated frames.
Dried sweat, dirt and salt from riding during
the winter or in sea air harm your bike. You
should therefore make it a habit to regularly
clean all its components to protect them from
corrosion.
The easiest way to remove dirt and minerals would be with a steam jet. This cleaning
method is quick, but it also has serious drawbacks. As the water is ejected at high pressure in a narrowly focussed jet, it may pass
through seals and penetrate bearings. This
leads to the dilution of lubricants and consequently to greater friction. This destroys and
impairs the functioning of the bearing races
and the smooth running of bearings in the
long term.
Cleaning your bike by hand has another
positive side-effect: you may discover defects
in the paint or worn or defective components
at an early stage.
After your bike has dried, you should touch
up damaged areas in the paint, if necessary.
Impregnate the painted and metal surfaces of
your bike by regularly applying hard wax.
Apply the hard wax to spokes, hubs etc., as
well. Use a hand-held atomizer for parts with
small surfaces.
When working on your bike, restrict
yourself to jobs you are equipped for
and have the necessary knowledge.
Do not clean your bike with a strong
water or steam jet from a short distance.
While cleaning, watch out for cracks,
scratches, dents as well as bent or discoloured material. If in doubt, contact your
MERIDA dealer. Have defective components
replaced immediately.
Inspect the chain after you have finished
cleaning and grease it if necessary (see chapter 10.3 “Chain maintenance”).
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25. Storing the bike
Sheltering and storing the bike
If you regularly look after your bike during
the season, you will not need to take any special precautions when storing it for a short
time, apart from securing it against theft. It
is advisable to store the bike in a dry and
airy place.
There are some things to bear in mind when
putting the bike away for the winter:
Inflated tubes tend to gradually lose air when
the bike is not used for a long time. If the bike
is left standing on flat tires for an extended
period, this can cause damage to the structure of the tires. It is therefore better to hang
the bike or else to check the tire pressure
regularly.
Take off the seat post and allow for any
moisture that may have entered to dry away.
Spray a little finely atomized oil into the seat
tube (except if you have a carbon frame or a
carbon seat post).
Clean the bike and protect it against corrosion as described above.
Switch the gear to the smallest chainwheel
and the smallest sprocket. This relaxes the
cables and springs as much as possible. Keep
in mind that with Nexave gears the spring of
the rear derailleur is relaxed, when the chain
rests on the biggest sprocket.
Store the bike in a dry place.
Keep cleaning agents and chain oil
clear of the brake pads and brake
surfaces of the rim! This could impair the
functioning of the brakes and cause an accident!
There is usually hardly any waiting
time at MERIDA dealers during the
winter months. What is more, many dealers offer annual checks at a special price.
Use the off-season to take your bike to your
MERIDA dealer for inspection!
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26. Service and maintenance schedule
The bike will be due for its first maintenance
after 100 to 300 kilometres or 3 to 6 weeks.
The running-in phase typically involves
spokes losing tension, cables lengthening,
gears becoming maladjusted, and bearings
running in, so there is every reason to have
your dealer service the bike at this stage. This
maturing process is unavoidable. Therefore
make an appointment with your MERIDA
dealer for a first inspection of your new bike.
The first inspection is very important for the
functioning and durability of your bike.
It is advisable to have your bike serviced
regularly after the running-in phase. The
schedule given in the table below is a rough
guide for cyclists who ride their bike between
1,000 and 2,000 km a year. If your consistently ride more or if you ride a great deal on
poor road surfaces, the maintenance periods
will shorten accordingly.
The intended use of the bike includes
regular maintenance and the replacement of worn out parts in time and therefore
has an influence on the warranty as well.
For your own safety, bring your
bike to your MERIDA dealer for its
first inspection after 100 to 300 kilometres
or 3 to 6 weeks, at the very latest however
after three months.
It is advisable to only use original
spare parts or parts approved by the
manufacturer. Wearing parts of other manu­
factuers, e.g. brake pads or tires which are
not of identical dimension, may cause harm
to the safety of your bike - risk of an accident!
Component
What to do
Bolts and nuts
Bottom bracket
Bottom bracket
Brake (coaster brake)
Brake cables
Brakes (disc brake)
Brakes (rim brake)
Brakes (rim brake)
Cables gear / brakes
ride
Check and tighten if necessary
X
Check for play
X
Dismount and regrease thread
D
Check coaster brake bracket and chain tension
X
Visual inspection
X
Check lever travel, wear of brake pads, visual inspection seals, X
test brakes in standing
Check lever travel, wear of brake pads, position of pads X
test brakes in standing
Clean pads
X
Disassemble and regrease
D
Before every Jobs marked with an “X“ you should be able to do yourself, provided you have a certain degree of manual skill, a little
experience and suitable tools, this including, e.g., a torque wrench. If you come across any defects, take appropriate
measures without delay. Your MERIDA dealer will be pleased to help you, if you have any questions or problems. Jobs
marked with a “D“ are best left to your MERIDA dealer.
Monthly
Annually
Other
Intervals
UMF Hardy, Freddy and Duncan models require
halved service intervals.
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26. Service and maintenance schedule
Component
What to do
Before every Monthly
Annually
Other
ride
Intervals
Chain
Check and grease, if necessary
X
Chain
Check and replace if necessary
After 1,000 km
Cranks
Check and retighten if necessary
x
Full Suspension
(rear frame suspension)
Service
D
Gear changer / derailleur
Clean and grease
X
Handlebars, aluminium
Check, replace if necessary
At least every 2 years
Headset
Check for play
X
Headset
Regrease
D
Hubs Check for play
X
X
Hubs
Regrease
D
Lighting
Check
X
Metal surfaces
Polish
Every 6 months
Paint
Polish
Every 6 months
Pedals
Check for play
X
Pedals
Clean and grease locking mechanism
X
Quick-release
Check seat relative to rim
X
Rims (with rim brakes, Check thickness, replace if necessary
At the latest after second
aluminium) set of brake pads
Stem, seat post
Disassemble and regrease, if made of carbon clean only
D
Suspension fork
Change oil or grease elastomers
D
Suspension fork
Check and retighten bolts
D
Suspension seat post
Service
D
Tires
Check pressure
X
Tires
Check tread and side walls
X
Valves
Check seat
X
Wheels/spokes
Check for trueness and tension
X
Jobs marked with an “X“ you should be able to do yourself, provided you have a certain degree of manual skill, a little
experience and suitable tools, this including, e.g., a torque wrench. If you come across any defects, take appropriate
measures without delay. Your MERIDA dealer will be pleased to help you, if you have any questions or problems. Jobs
marked with a “D“ are best left to your MERIDA dealer.
UMF Hardy, Freddy and Duncan models require
halved service intervals.
103
27. Assembling and equipping a MERIDA frame
All components (except for carbon seat
posts and stems for carbon forks) have to be
mounted to the frame with high-grade grease
to inhibit corrosion. Omission of the grease
may make future disassembly problematic or
impossible.
Road racing frame sets often include matching (carbon) forks. Observe the fork manufacturer’s instructions for mounting carbon
fork tubes.
When assembling a carbon frame, be sure to
read chapter 28. “Special characteristics of
carbon” before.
The following dimensions are important for
assembling a bike:
Headset
All frames have press fitted cups and an integrated headset.
Common cartridge bearings can be mounted
directly into the bottom bracket shell of all
models with high-grade grease. For special
bottom brackets, e.g. Shimano Dura Ace and
XTR, the sides of the shell can be milled, as the
paint may otherwise give the bearing a bad
fit. Please protect the metal surfaces against
corrosion e.g. with wax or grease.
Rear drop-out spacing
See table further on in this chapter.
Permitted travel of the fork
See table further on in this chapter.
Please contact your MERIDA dealer, if you
have any questions regarding compatibility
of individual components with the frame.
When mounting a fork to a mountain
bike frame, make sure the fork crown
turns freely without touching the down
tube!
Take a close look to the table with the
measurements of all models further
on in this chapter and the table of recommended torques.
Do not clamp the frame to the mount
ing stand by the frame tubes! This
could cause damage to the thin-walled
tubes. Instead, first mount the seat post and
then clamp this part to fix the frame.
Whoever assembles a bike from a
bare frame carries the responsibility for ensuring that the components are
selected and mounted in accordance with
the manufacturers’ guidelines, generally
accepted standards and the state of the art
in science and technology.
Bottom bracket bearings
All frames: BSC or BSA thread: 1.370“ x 24
TPI, (left-handed thread on right side!).
Shell width, see table further on in this chapter.
104
27. Assembling and equipping a MERIDA frame
Name/
Type
Category
Child carrier Trailer
Max. load
Seat post Shell width of Rear drop-out Travel of Allowed travel
mounting allowed? rider + baggage diameter bottom bracket
spacing rear frame of suspension
allowed?
(kg)
(Ø -0.1 mm) in mm (4)
(mm)
(mm)
fork (mm)
MATTS
MTB* Allround Hardtail
MATTS TFS XC
MTB* Race Hardtail
MATTS TFS TRAIL
MTB* Allround Hardtail
MATTS HFS XC
MTB* Race Hardtail
MATTS HFS TRAIL
MTB* Allround Hardtail
CARBON FLX
MTB* Race Hardtail
JULIET
Lady-MTB*
NINETY-SIX
MTB* Race Full-Suspension
MISSION
MTB* Race Full-Suspension
TRANS-MISSION
MTB* All-Mountain Full-Suspension
ONE-FIVE-O
MTB* Enduro Full-Suspension
CROSSWAY
700 C Cross bike
CROSSWAY LADY
700 C Cross bike
CROSSWAY TFS
700 C Cross bike
CROSSWAY TFS LADY 700 C Cross bike
FREEWAY
Trekking bikes
FREEWAY LADY
Trekking bike
CITY
City bike -(low step-in)
SPEEDER
(Fitness bike)
SPEEDER LADY
(Fitness bike)
S-PRESSO
(Fitness bike)
S-PRESSO LADY
(Fitness bike)
CYCLOCROSS
Cross country race bike
WARP
Triathlon bike
ROAD RACE/RIDE
Road bike
SCULTURA FLX
Road bike
SCULTURA EVO FLX Road bike
yes (1)
no
no
no
no
no
yes (1)
no
no
no
no
yes (1)
yes (1)
yes (1)
yes (1)
yes (1)
yes (1)
yes (1)
yes (1)
yes (1)
yes (1)
yes (1)
no
no
no
no
no
yes
yes
yes
yes
yes
no
yes
no
yes (2)
yes (2)
yes (2)
yes
yes
yes
yes
yes
yes
yes
yes
yes
yes
yes
yes
yes
yes
no
no
120
120
120
120
120
120
120
120
120
120
120
120
100
120
100
120
100
100
120
100
120
100
120
120
120
120
120
27.2
31.6
31.6
31.6
31.6
31.6
27.2
31.6
31.6
31.6
31.6
27.2
27.2
27.2
27.2
27.2
27.2
27.2
31.6
31.6
27.2
27.2
27.2
27.2
31.6
31.6
31.6
68
73
73
73
73
73
68
73
73
73
73
68
68
68
68
68
68
68
68
68
68
68
68
68
68
68
68
135
135
135
135
135
135
135
135
135
135
135
135
135
135
135
135
135
135
130
130
135
135
130
130
130
130
130
/
100
/
80-100
/
100-120
/
80-100
/
100-120
/
80-100
/
80
96 mm
100
110 mm 100-120
130 mm 110-140
150 mm 110-160
/
50-75
/
50-75
/
50-75
/
50-75
/
50-75
/
50-75
/
50-75
/ Rigid fork only
/ Rigid fork only
/ Rigid fork only
/ Rigid fork only
/ Rigid fork only
/ Rigid fork only
/ Rigid fork only
/ Rigid fork only
/ Rigid fork only
* Mountain bike
(1) Child carrier mounting: Carrier mounting only (3) 130 mm with multi-speed hubs, 135 mm with derailleur gears
(2) With full suspension: bikes Trailer only with special hitch to be mounted at quick release (4) All frames BSA threading (1.37“ *24 TPI). (Attention: Right cup with
left hand threading!)
105
28. Special characteristics of carbon
28.1 Carbon - special characteristics
As is the case with all products made of carbon composites, also referred to as CFK, with
MERIDA frames, some particularities have to
be paid attention to, as well.
Carbon is extremely strong and durable
with very low weight, making it perfect for
the production of high-performance parts.
However, one of the characteristics of carbon also is that the components do not bend
when overstressed though the structure may
already be damaged. If a carbon item has
suffered a heavy impact or undue stress of
any kind, it may – unlike steel or aluminium
parts – not show obvious signs of damage,
like deflections. This should not be taken as
a sign that the part is undamaged, since the
internal carbon fibers may have sustained
serious damage.
After having been overstressed, a pre-damaged carbon part may fail without any previous warning. This makes it very dangerous
to keep on using the part after an impact
or undue stress. If you continue to use a
damaged bike part, this may lead to accidents with unforeseeable consequences. We
strongly recommend taking the respective
part or – even better – the whole bike to your
MERIDA dealer for examination after an incident, e.g. a crash.
If necessary, he may contact our service
department in order to clarify open questions.
Damaged parts made of carbon must never
be repaired. They must be replaced at once!
Make absolutely sure that any damaged
part will never be used again. It should be
destroyed to be certain that further using is
impossible.
Parts made from carbon should under no circumstances be subjected to excessive heat.
Therefore never paint a carbon part and
cure it by heat. The temperatures required for
enameling or powder-coating will destroy the
component. Do not leave carbon fibre parts
near a source of heat e.g. a radiator or in
your car during hot or sunny weather.
Carbon parts have, like all very light
weight constructions, only a limited
service life. For this reason, change stem
and handlebar at regular intervals as a preventive measure (every 3 years e.g.), even
if they have not experienced any crashes or
similar.
If your MERIDA carbon frame or
carbon fork makes any cracking
noise or shows any dents, deformations, dis­
colouration, scratches or notches, do not use
the bike until the part has been replaced!
Contact your MERIDA dealer at once. He
will check the part thoroughly!
Make sure all carbon clamping areas
are absolutely free of grease and
other lubricants. Grease would penetrate
the surface of the carbon material, reducing the coefficient of friction and hence
impairing the stability of the clamping joint.
Greased carbon may never again afford
a safe clamping joint. Please use a special
carbon assembly paste in clamping areas.
106
28. Special characteristics of carbon
28.1.1 General notes on care
28.1.2 Protection of the frame finish
Clean the carbon components with water
and a soft cloth. If necessary, also use a mild
soap. Only use petroleum based solvents for
cleaning tough stains of oil or grease. Do
not use degreasing agents containing MEK,
acetone, trichloroethylene, methylene, chloride, etc., solvents, non-neutral or chemical
detergents or detergents containing solvents,
as they may damage the carbon structure.
Protect the vulnerable areas of your frame;
such as steerer tube or lower side of the down
tube etc., with protective pads against damage caused by rubbing cables or stone chipping. Your MERIDA dealer keeps these pads
for sale. Take particular care to accurately fit
the delivered chain stay protection and the
chain suck protection plate made of stainless
steel (MTB-hardtail only).
To protect and re-polish the surface, use car
wax. Polishing agents contain solid constituents that might attack the surface.
Protect the vulnerable areas of your
carbon frame, such as steerer tube
or lower side of the down tube etc., with
protective pads against damage caused
by rubbing cables or stone chipping. Your
MERIDA dealer keeps these pads for sale.
Also keep in mind that carbon is sensitive
to pressure. Do not lean your MERIDA bike
carelessly against a post or such like.
If you intend to equip your carbon frame
with components, such as mudguards, carrier, kick-stand and lighting set, you will need
the manufacturer’s approval. In general, only
frames with special threaded eyes can be fitted with additional accessories.
Never mount a carbon frame in the
holding claw of a workstand! It is better to clamp it instead on an aluminium seat
post mounted beforehand.
107
28. Special characteristics of carbon
28.1.3 What to bear in mind when
braking with carbon wheels
There are some special features with carbon
braking surfaces.
The brake surfaces of carbon rims are sensitive to high temperatures. Therefore, when
you are riding in the mountains, avoid any
drag braking. Riding downhill, for example
with a permanently activated rear wheel
brake, may heat up the material and thus
lead to a deformation. The rim may suffer
serious damage, the tire might burst, thus
causing an accident.
Note that your bike‘s braking power
is greatly reduced in wet conditions.
Avoid, as far as possible, to ride on your
bike in damp weather or with imminent
rain. If you ride, nevertheless, on wet or
moist roads, be particularly anticipatory
and do not ride as fast as under dry conditions.
Always use both brakes simultaneously and
release them regularly to allow the material
to cool down.
Adapt your driving behaviour to the
particularities of braking on carbon
material, in particular in the mountains.
Only use brake pads that are suitable for
carbon wheels. It is always advisable to use
the brake pads of the wheel manufacturer.
Carbon brake pads usually wear down faster
than conventional brake pads.
Check the condition of the brake
pads at short intervals, as they wear
down faster than with aluminium rims.
Keep in mind that the braking response of
the rims needs getting used to, in particular
under wet conditions. Test your brakes in an
area free of traffic until you have full control
of your bike.
108
28.2 MERIDA framesets
MERIDA framesets
28.2.1 Determining the correct frame size
Please find the correct frame size in the “frame
geometry” chart in the MERIDA catalogue.
28.2.2 Before your first ride
Road bike frames
Carriers must not be mounted on any of our
road bike carbon frames. Furthermore, it is
not permitted to mount trailers and child carriers!
Before setting off on your bike for the first
time, please be sure to read chapter 3.
“Before your first ride”.
Note that the instructions may require further
explanation, depending on the experience
and/or skill of the person doing the work and
some jobs might only be possible with additional, special-purpose tools (e.g. a torque
wrench) or supplementary instructions.
For your own safety, never carry out
work on your bike unless you are
absolutely confident in your ability to complete the task to a satisfactory standard. If in
doubt, ask your MERIDA dealer for advice!
For more information on mounting a carrier, a child carrier or a trailer as well as on
the permitted total weight, see the table in
chapter 27. “Assembling and equipping a
MERIDA frame”.
Note that many types of bike carri
ers for cars are unsuitable and can
damage the frame tubes or the fork. Only
use carriers without clamps or rigid fixtures
for taking your bike by car. If in doubt, ask
your MERIDA dealer.
Road bikes are exclusively designed for use
on roads with a smooth, hard surface. Permitted total weight, see chapter 27.1.
Mountain bike frames (hardtail and full suspension)
MERIDA mountain bike carbon frames are
only designed for cross country or marathon
bikes and their intended use. The carbon
frames are not designed for extreme situations, such as free-riding, dual slalom, downhill, drops etc.
109
28.2 MERIDA framesets
28.2.3 Assembling and equipping a
MERIDA frame
MERIDA frames are also delivered bare for
individual assembly. Please note that assembling a bike is a job for a skilled mechanic.
Mistakes or inappropriate assembly may
make the bike unsafe. We therefore strongly
recommend that your MERIDA dealer carries
out all assembly work.
Frames are delivered ready for mounting, i.e.
with threads cut and bearing seats and seat
tube faced. Further finishing work is normally
not necessary. Contact your MERIDA dealer,
if problems occur nevertheless.
Never grease the clamping area of
the stem and steerer tube of a full
carbon fork and the seat tube of the frame,
if you are using a carbon seat post. With
MERIDA carbon road race frames which
have NO aluminium insert inside the upper
end of the seat tube, it is definitely NOT
ALLOWED to grease the carbon seat tube,
whatever kind of seat post is used. Grease
would penetrate the surface of the carbon
material, reducing the coefficient of friction and hence impairing the stability of the
clamping joint within the permitted torques.
Greased carbon may never again afford a
safe clamping joint.
Do not clamp the frame to the mounting stand
at the frame tubes! This can damage the thinwalled carbon tubes. First mount a sturdy
aluminium seat post to the frame. Clamp only
this seat post in the work stand to secure the
frameset.
Specific types of workstands suitable for carbon frames are available in specialist shops.
Do not modify the frame or functional parts,
e.g. adjustable cable guides, by filing, drilling or such like.
All components (except for carbon seat posts
and stems on carbon fork steerer tubes) have
to be mounted to the frame coated with highgrade grease to inhibit corrosion. Otherwise,
you will possibly no longer be able to disassemble your bike again after some time.
Road racing framesets include matching
forks. For the assembly of carbon forks, see
the notes in chapter 28.3 “Carbon forks”.
110
28.2 MERIDA framesets
Do not clamp the frame to the work
stand by the frame tubes! This can
damage the thin-walled carbon tubes. First
mount a sturdy aluminium seat post to the
frame. Clamp only this seat post in the workstand to secure the frameset. More suitable
workstands are available in specialist shops.
They fix the frame at three points inside the
front triangle or only hold the fork ends and
the bottom bracket shell.
All bolted connections on the components of
your bike have to be tightened carefully and
checked regularly to ensure the safe operation of the bike. This must be done with a
torque wrench that allows the recommended
torque to be accurately set by clicking audibly and noticeably as soon as the respective
torque is reached.
Whoever assembles a bike from a
bare frame carries the responsibility for ensuring that the components are
selected and mounted in accordance with
the manufacturers’ guidelines, generally
accepted standards and the state of the art
in science and technology. Please contact
your MERIDA dealer, if you have any questions regarding compatibility of individual
components with the frame.
With all mountain bike and road racing models, the diameter of the seat post must be 31.6
± 0.05 mm or 27.2 ± 0.05 mm.
For the mounting and adjustment of the seat
post, see the notes in chapter 8. “Adjusting
the bike to the rider”.
When mounting a seat post, be sure to also
read the notes on mounting and adjusting
both seat post and saddle, in the respective
manuals.
You will find the prescribed torques in this
MERIDA manual in chapter 29. “Recommended torques for bolted connections” and
in the manuals of the component manufacturers.
111
28.2 MERIDA framesets
28.2.4 Headset bearing
Every carbon frame set is delivered with a
semi-integrated headset that is already fitted.
The included flat bearing shells made of aluminium must be mounted with specific tools.
Be sure to read the operating instructions for
carbon forks in chapter 28.3 “Carbon forks”,
before doing any work at the fork.
28.2.5 Bottom bracket bearings
All MTB frames: BSA thread: 1.370”x 24 TPI,
(left handed thread on right side).
The width of the shell is 73 ± 0.5 mm.
All road bike frames: BSA thread: 1.370”x
24 TPI, (left handed thread on right side).
The width of the shell is 68 ± 0.5 mm.
exactly with a specialist facing tool, otherwise
the bearings might not run perfectly in line.
Observe the bottom bracket manufacturer’s
torque specifications.
28.2.6 Chainsuck protection
To protect the sensitive surface of the bottom
bracket area against rupture through chain
suck (the chain getting stuck between frame
and chainwheel), there is a protection plate
made of stainless steel fixed on every carbon
mountain bike hard tail frame. Make sure the
protection is located in the correct position, at
the chainstay close to the chain rings.
The diameter of the steerer tube for the
MERIDA carbon models is 1 1/8” = 28.6 mm
on the upper and bottom side. The outside
diameter of the bearing shells at the steering head bearing is 50 mm; the diameter of
the flange of the shells to be pressed into the
frame is 44.05 + 0.05 mm.
Common cartridge bearings can be mounted
directly with high-grade grease. For special
bottom brackets with unconnected left and
right side bearings, for example Hollowtech
II (e.g. Dura-Ace, Ultegra, XTR, XT and LX
bearings) the ends of the shell can be aligned
112
28.2 MERIDA framesets
28.2.7 Rear drop-out spacing
28.2.9 Front derailleur hanger
Road bike frames: 130 ± 0.5 mm.
(cross, speed and cyclo frames as well)
MTB, trekking frames: 135 ± 0.5 mm.
MERIDA carbon road frames are suitable
only for the mounting of a Campagnolo or
Shimano derailleur with an inside clamping
diameter of 34.9 mm.
28.2.8 Replaceable derailleur hanger
Secure the bolts with a medium/strong, nonpermanent threadlocker and use a torque of
2-3 Nm. Do not exceed a maximum torque
of 3 Nm!
Shimano offers a clamp with fitting diameter
for brazed on type derailleurs.
MERIDA MTB carbon frames are not designed
for top swing derailleurs. Only use down
swing derailleurs (conventional type with high
clamp).
The outer diameter of the carbon seat tube in
the area of the derailleur clamping is 34.9
mm with all mountain bike models.
If there are raised dots at the inner
side of the clamp (e.g. Shimano Deore
XT FD-M 761), these must be filed off, until
the surface is absolutely smooth. Otherwise,
there will be a risk of damaging the carbon
seat tube when fixing the derailleur clamp.
Use a torque of 5-7 Nm. Do not exceed the
maximum torque of 7 Nm!
MTB full suspension carbon frames must be
equipped with a top route derailleur (cable
from upper side).
113
28.2 MERIDA framesets
Seat post binder
Every MERIDA carbon frame includes a
special seat post binder to achieve an optimum clamping power. Only use the included
model.
28.2.10 Permitted torques for seat post
binder with Allen bolt
Use a torque of 6-8 Nm to clamp the seat
post. Do not exceed a maximum torque of
8 Nm!
Ask your MERIDA dealer as to the mounting
of suitable seat post binders. Check whether
frame and seat post diameters match before
mounting.
28.2.11 Bottle cage
Use a torque of 2-3 Nm. Do not exceed a
maximum torque of 3 Nm!
Never grease the clamping area
between seat post and seat tube when
mounting a carbon seat post.
114
28.2 MERIDA framesets
Tighten carefully by approaching the maximum permissible torque in small steps.
Check, how securely the component is fastened, as described in chapter 29. “Recommended torques of bolted connections” or
prescribed in the manuals of the component
manufacturers.
For your own safety adhere to the
service intervals given in this MERIDA
manual. We recommend, however, having
your MERIDA dealer do the maintenance
work.
Where no maximum torque is prescribed,
tighten the bolts carefully in steps, checking in between the seat of the component
as described in the relevant chapters of this
manual.
Some components have the torque
specifications printed on or affixed
to them. Be sure to observe these specifications. Also observe the instructions provided
by the component manufacturers!
115
28.3 Carbon forks
Carbon forks
28.3.2 Adjusting the headset
28.3.1 Before your first ride
Before you start to adjust the headset, make
sure to read chapter 12. “The headset” and
the operating instructions of the headset manufacturer.
Road bike forks are exclusively made for road
and triathlon use. The forks are just as unsuitable for riding on unpaved roads, over rough
terrain and jumping etc. as they are for riding
with heavy baggage or towing a trailer. The
maximum permitted overall weight is 120 kg
(rider, baggage, bike).
Take the front wheel between your knees and
try to turn the handlebar including stem. If
you are able to turn the stem against wheel or
fork respectively, you must increase the torque
step by step. Never exceed 7 Nm in torque.
adjust
release/
tighten
Do not file off or remove otherwise the
security notch on the dropout of the
fork. These notches prevent the wheel from
falling out in the event of a quick release
failure.
Bear in mind that the stem can crush the
steerer tube, if the bolts are tightened too
much. In particular forks with carbon steerer
tubes are highly sensitive to overtightening
of shaft clamping at the stem. See chapter
28.3.2 “Assembling and equipping MERIDA
frames”.
Never exceed the maximum torque pre
scribed by the stem manufacturer. If in
doubt, contact your bike dealer. Check the
torque and the firm seat of the stem after the
first 100 - 300 km and then every 2,000
km.
Use a torque wrench when fixing the stem.
Start with 4 Nm and increase in steps of 0.5
Nm to match the recommended torque of
4 - 7 Nm.
116
28.3 Carbon forks
28.3.3 Mounting the full carbon fork with
carbon steerer
Cutting the steerer tube, pressing the seat
mounting of the cone bearing and mounting
the fork to the frame, are jobs best left to an
expert. These steps are to be carried out by
authorized MERIDA dealers only. Otherwise
the warranty will become void.
• The inner diameter of the headset crown
race must fit the diameter of the crown
of the carbon fork. With 1 1/8”- forks,
the steerer crown race diameter is 30 ±
0.05mm.
tion and until any gap between bearing
and fork head has disappeared. Keep the
fork in hand during hitting and do not put
it down – risk of breakage!
Each of the following instructions
must be followed strictly. Non-observance of these instructions can cause the fork
to fail and lead to a crash with serious consequences.
• Usually, the aluminium bearing seat on
every fork is prepared. If additional work
is necessary nevertheless, only use a suitable milling tool for preparing the cone
bearing seats. Sharp-edged or blunt tools
can notch the bearing seats and make the
steerer tube fail.
• To cut the fork, do not put it into a vice
as this could damage the shaft. Clamp the
steerer tube with an appropriate device
(e.g. a special vice) and use a sharp metal
saw blade to saw it. Saw with low pressure and remove the burrs with a small file.
• Clean the contact area of cone and fork
seat and apply a little grease. Hit the cone
bearing seat with an appropriate specialpurpose tool until it is in a horizontal posi-
117
28.3 Carbon forks
To increase the clamping area, place a
burr-free 5-mm-spacer above the stem.
Make sure the clamping area of the sleeve
and all spacers are free of burrs.
Seal the cut with two-component-adhesive
(epoxy resin) clear varnish or with instant
adhesive.
• Only use stems with symmetric outside
clamps, i.e. clamping should be provided
around the entire circumference. Stems
with asymmetric clamping and segment
clamping may damage the steerer tube
and must not be used.
• Only use the cone mechanism supplied
with the product together with bolt and
cover as counter bearing for the adjusting bolt of the headset. Do not use star
fangled nuts and other full contact clampmechanisms, because they can destroy the
steerer tube.
• The stem’s clamping area must be free of
burrs and the fork must have enough support inside the stem. The material used for
MERIDA bikes is tested and approved to
be used in the respective combinations.
We recommend special stems for carbon steerer tubes.
NEVER mount a star fangled nut as
counter bearing or a stem system
without cone mechanism clamping design.
Sometimes, the steerer tube is only propped up by the upper edge of the stem by
a few millimetres and thus is cut into and
gets damaged!
118
28.3 Carbon forks
• Carbon steerer tubes are usually fabricated in a highly precise way. For this reason, the stem normally fits snugly on the
fork. Do not mount any stems which have
play when put on the steerer tube.
• Do not grease the steerer tube in the clamping area of the stem!
• If you have strictly followed the above, you
will not need high torques for the clamping
bolts. With regard to the necessary torques, see chapter 29. “Recommended torques for bolted connections”. Approach
these torques by means of a torque wrench
in 0.5 Nm steps.
If the torques for two components to be
combined differ, make it a rule to stick to
the lower torque.
• If there is no particularly long nut delivered
together with the fork, use the sleeve nut of
the brake manufacturer included for the
brake mounting. Check that the nut has a
minimum grip of 8 turns!
Never exceed the torque prescribed
by the stem manufacturer and the
maximum torque of the fork (chapter 29.
“Recommended torques for bolted connections”)! Retighten all bolts after the first 100
- 300 km to the prescribed torque and then
every 2,000 km.
• Test the secure seat of the stem to the fork,
by trying to turn the handlebar against the
front wheel.
119
28.4 Carbon handlebars and stems
Carbon handlebars and stems
Note that the instructions may require further
explanation, depending on the experience
and/or skill of the person doing the work and
some jobs might only be possible with additional, special-purpose tools (e.g. a torque
wrench) or supplementary instructions.
28.4.1 Before your first ride
• Carbon road handlebars and stems are
only designed for being used with road
race and triathlon bikes and their intended
use.
• Never use clip-on or aero bar extensions
with carbon road handlebars unless they
are specifically approved for such use by
the manufacturer.
• Carbon mountain bike handlebars and
stems are only designed for being used
with cross country or marathon mountain
bikes and their intended use.
• Carbon handlebars and stems are not
designed for extreme situations, such as
free-riding, dual slalom, downhill, drops
or such like.
• When using bar ends, make sure your
handlebar is approved to be fitted with
these parts. Most of the carbon handlebars
are not suitable for being fitted with bar
ends. Ask your bike dealer or the manufacturer of your handlebar for advice.
• Never modify or change the handlebar or
stem.
• Make sure you are always able to easily
reach the brake levers.
• Be sure to only fit bar ends to specifically
approved handlebars.
28.4.2 Mounting
1. Please note that stem and handlebar
always have the appropriate clamping
diameter! For example, stems with a
clamping diameter of 31.8 mm are only
approved to be used with handlebars of a
clamping diameter of 31.8 mm.
MERIDA denies any liability for damage/loss
resulting from the combination of a carbon
handlebar or stem with an unsuitable stem
or handlebar.
For your own safety, never carry out
work on your bike unless you are
absolutely confident in your ability to complete the task to a satisfactory standard. If in
doubt, ask your local dealer for advice.
Mounting incompatible components may
lead to an insufficient clamping and hence to
a severe crash. We recommend using components of the same manufacturer, as they are
compatible
120
28.4 Carbon handlebars and stems
If you prefer to use parts from another manufacturer, please check with the dealer and
ensure that its design and dimensions make it
suitable for direct attachment to carbon components. In this case, please follow the mounting instructions and warning notes of the stem
manufacturer, as well.
2. Before the mounting, make sure both clamping areas of the stem are free of sharp
edges and burrs. Do not use, but replace
the stem in this case. Only remove these
sharp edges or burrs, if there is absolutely
no other option.
If you mount a new handlebar to an existing stem, check the old handlebar for
marks in the clamping area. Notches in
the clamping area indicate defective processing of the stem in this area.
If you replace the stem at a full-carbon
fork, check that the steerer tube is in sound
condition. If you have the slightest doubt,
ask your MERIDA dealer for advice and
replace the part if necessary - your safety
comes first.
4. Mount your carbon handlebar accurately
in the middle of the stem. The handlebar
must slide into the stem clamp without
requiring force on the one hand and
be seated without any play on the other
hand.
The ends of the road handlebar should be
parallel to the ground, i.e. point slightly
downwards.
Make sure the clamping area is absolutely
free of grease, if either of the clamping
faces is made of carbon.
3. Slide the stem onto the steerer tube. It must
fit snugly onto the fork. Do not fit stems
which have play on the steerer tube.
The ends of MTB handlebars should be
orientated slightly rearwards, i.e. in direction of the rider.
121
28.4 Carbon handlebars and stems
5. Screw in the bolts which have a greased
thread and head by a few turns with your
fingers. Screw in all bolts by hand until
they are snug. The clamping slot between
stem cap and stem body must be even with
the same gap at either end.
6. Tighten the bolts of both clamping areas
alternately and gradually with a torque
wrench until you reach the lower limit of
the recommended torque. In the case of
stems with a 4-bolt front clamp, tighten the
bolts diagonally.
Check whether the handlebar is firmly seated
in the stem by trying to turn the handlebar
downwards. Furthermore, check whether you
can twist the handlebar/stem unit against
the fork. Take the front wheel between your
knees and try to turn the handlebar against
the wheel.
If the clamping of the handlebar or stem is still
not tight, increase the torque until you reach
the upper limit of the torque setting given by
the stem manufacturer.
With regard to the necessary torques, see
chapter 29. “Recommended torques for
bolted connections”. If the torques for two
components to be combined differ, make it a
rule to tighten them to the lower torque.
Check the firm seat once again, as described
above. If the clamping of the handlebar into
the stem or the stem onto the fork stem is not
properly tight, there is a dimensional compatibility problem. In this case the stem should be
replaced by a compatible one.
122
28.4 Carbon handlebars and stems
Technical data
7. Check shift/brake levers for burrs and
sharp edges in the clamping areas. Remove the clamping bands completely from the
road handlebar levers before sliding them
onto the handlebar.
Mountain bike
Handlebar:
Clamping area (sleeve):
Standard: 25.4 mm
Oversized: 31.8 mm
To prevent scratches in the carbon, never
make rotational movements when fitting
the levers.
Once the clamping bands are positioned
accurately on the handlebar, mount the
levers and tighten the clamps.
Make sure to also read the instruc
tions of the shift/brake lever manufacturer before the mounting.
8. Bring the levers into their final position
and tighten the clamps to the lower limit
of the recommended torque setting. If the
levers are still not tight enough, increase
the torque. Never exceed the recommended maximum torque of the component
manufacturer.
With regard to the necessary torques, see
chapter 29. “Recommended torques for
bolted connections”. If the torques for two
components to be combined differ, make it a
rule to tighten them to the lower torque.
Never exceed the maximum torque
settings that are recommended by
the stem, handlebar or fork manufacturers.
Retighten all bolts after the first 100 - 300
km with the prescribed torque and then
again every 2,000 km.
Stem:
Handlebar clamping area:
Standard: 25.4 mm
Oversized: 31.8 mm
Fork steerer tube clamping area:
28.58 ± 0.05 mm (1 1/8“)
Road bike
Handlebar:
Handlebar clamping area:
Standard: 26 mm
Oversized: 31.8 mm
Stem:
Handlebar clamping area:
Standard: 26.0 mm
Oversized: 31.8 mm
Fork steerer tube clamping area:
28.58 ± 0.05 mm (1 1/8“)
123
28.5 Carbon seat post
28.5.2 Adjusting the correct saddle height
Carbon seat post
28.5.1 Before your first ride
• Carbon seat posts are only designed for
being used on road and triathlon bikes
as well as on cross country and marathon mountain bikes and their intended
use. Carbon seat posts are not designed
for extreme situations, such as free-riding,
dual slalom, downhill, drops and such
like.
Release the bolts of the seat tube clamp by two
to three turns. Then pull the seat post upwards
or push it down until the saddle height matches your needs. During the adjustment, avoid
any rotating movement of the seat post in the
frame, as this would scratch the surface of
the seat post. Do not use brute force for the
adjustment.
Never grease the seat tube when
mounting a carbon seat post. The
grease would penetrate the surface of the
carbon material, reducing the coefficient
of friction and hence impairing the stability
of the clamping joint. Once in contact with
grease or oil, a carbon fibre part may never
be able to be clamped in a secure and safe
way again.
If the seat post cannot be shifted easily and
smoothly up and down in the seat tube, ask
your MERIDA dealer for help.
• Only mount carbon seat posts to frames
with suitable seat post clamps. Special
seat post clamps reduce the forces occurring at the clamping slit.
If necessary, use special clamps that are suitable for carbon seat posts.
124
28.5 Carbon seat post
When the saddle is in the perfect position,
tighten the bolt or the seat tube binder bolt
gradually in half-turn increments, while
checking whether the seat post is sufficiently
tight after each half-turn. For this purpose,
take hold of the saddle at both ends and try
to turn it. If it does not move, the seat post is
firmly seated.
Do not overtighten the bolt or the seat post
binder bolt. Overtightening may cause a seat
post failure, resulting in a crash and injury
of the rider.
28.5.3 Adjusting the position and angle of
the saddle
Single-bolt clamping
With a released fixing bolt, the saddle can
be pushed back and forth and be adjusted in
the angle. Tighten the fixing bolt so that both
clamps are in contact with the saddle rails as
soon as the saddle is in a perfect position.
Never exceed the recommended torque.
Double-bolt clamping
Release the fixing bolt you can reach from
below and push the saddle back and forth
to adjust the horizontal saddle position. To
adjust the saddle angle, use the second fixing
bolt you can reach from the upper side of
the seat post. When the saddle is in a perfect position, tighten the fixing bolts until both
clamps are in contact with the saddle rail.
Never exceed the recommended torque.
After fastening the saddle, check whether it
resists tilting by bringing your weight to bear
on it once with your hands on the tip and
once at the rear end of the saddle.
The seat post must be inserted by at
least 100 mm (120 mm with LRSbikes) into the frame. Never ride your bicycle, when the stop mark is visible. In any
case, a deeper insertion depth means more
safety.
125
28.5 Carbon seat post
28.5.4 Mounting the carbon seat post
28.5.5 Mounting the saddle
Make sure your new carbon seat post matches the inside diameter of the seat tube of the
frame. The seat post must fit easily, without
pushing or twisting, and free of play into the
frame. A mismatch between frame and seat
post can cause failure of the seat post.
Carbon seat posts are usually designed to
be combined with most sports saddles with
a saddle rail diameter of 7 mm. To mount
the saddle, release the fixing bolt/s by two
to three turns. You need not disassemble the
complete mechanism. In case the saddle rails
do not fit exactly into the clamp grooves, do
not try to force them in! The clamping mechanism or the saddle rail might break, thus
causing an accident or injury to the rider.
Do not use any grease!
Before the carbon seat post is inserted into the
seat tube, make sure the seat tube is absolutely free of lubricants, sharp edges and
burrs. Clean the seat tube and remove burrs,
if necessary.
Retighten all bolts to the prescribed
torque after the first 100 - 300 km
and thereafter every 2,000 km. Improperly
tightened fixing bolt(s) may cause an accident.
Even a slight mismatch between seat
tube and carbon seat post diameter
or oil and grease in the seat tube, may lead
to a breakage of the seat post. This can
cause an accident or injury to the rider.
Technical data
Diameters available
Maximum torque
of the seat tube clamping:
Minimum insertion depth:
LRS bikes
all hardtail bikes
31.6 mm
8 Nm
120 mm
80 mm
If in doubt, play safe and increase the insertion depth of the seat post. An increased
insertion depth always means more safety.
Recommended torque of the saddle rail
clamping
Single-bolt clamping
Double-bolt clamping (M5) Double-bolt clamping (M6) 22 - 25 Nm
5 - 7 Nm
6 - 8 Nm
126
29. Recommended torques for bolted connections
All bolted connections of the components
have to be tightened carefully and checked
regularly to ensure the safe operation of the
bike. This is best done with a torque wrench
that switches off as soon as the desired torque
has been reached.
Where no maximum torque is prescribed,
tighten the bolts carefully in steps by checking in-between the seating of the component
as described in the relevant chapters.
Some components have the maximum
permissible torque printed on them.
Observe these limits on the labels and make
it a rule to stick to the lower limit, if the torques of two components to be combined differ.
Also observe the instructions provided by the
component manufacturers!
Tighten the bolts carefully by approaching the
maximum permissible torque in small steps.
Check the safe seating of the components, as
described in the relevant chapters.
127
29. Recommended torques for bolted connections
29.1 Recommended torque settings: Campagnolo /Shimano /Avid /SRAM components
Component
Bolted connection
Campagnolo*
Nm
Nm
Rear gear changer Fastening bolt
15
(rear derailleur)
Cable fixing bolt
6
Chain roller bolt
3
Front derailleur
Fastening bolt
3.5
Cable fixing bolt
5
Brake/shift lever Mounting bracket bolt (Allen bolt)
10
Mounting bracket bolt (screwdriver)
Bolt of cable stop on frame (screwdriver)
Shifter fastening bolt (rapidfire)
Disc brakes
Caliper bolt (fixation to frame)
Disc (rotor) fixing bolts
Hub
Quick-release lever
Locknut for adjustment of quick-release hub bearing
3.5
Free-wheel hub
Freewheel body fastening bolt
Freewheel body fastening nut
Sprocket cluster lock ring
Crank set
Crank fixing bolt (cotterless, grease-free)
32 - 38
Crank fixing bolt (octalink) SRAM GXP
Chainwheel bolt
Sealed cartridge Shell
70
Bottom bracket
Pedal
Pedal axle
40
Shoe
Cleat bolts
Spike
Brake
Fastening bolt (V-brake)
Fastening bolt (racing brake)
10
Cable fixing bolt
5
Brake pad fixing bolt
8
Pad fixing bolt in cartridge brake shoe
(
(
Shimano**
SRAM***
Nm
8 - 10
8 - 10
4 - 6
4-5
3 - 4
5 - 7
5 - 6.5
5 - 7
4.5
6 - 8
5-7
2.5 - 3
1.5 - 2
2.5
7 5 - 7 (RW)/ 9 - 10 (FW)
4
9 - 12
10 - 25
35 - 49
40
35 - 44
29 - 49
34 - 44
35 - 50
48 - 54
8 - 11
49 - 69
34 - 41
34
5-8
4
5 - 9
8 - 10
6 - 8
5 - 7
1 - 2
31 - 34
5-7
6-8
6-8
* From Campagnolo technical specifications ** From Shimano Product Information and Tech Tips, *** From SRAM technical information / Avid installation and operating instructions/Truvativ instructions.
128
29. Recommended torques for bolted connections
29.2 Recommended torque settings: FSA components
Model no.
Model name
Stems
ST-CX-120
XC-120
ST-FR-200
FR-200
ST-FR-200 1,5
FR-200 One Point Five
ST-RD-120
RD-120
ST-RK-100
K-Force Lite with Alloy Front Cap
ST-RK-100K
K-Force Lite with Carbon Front Cap
ST-RK-200
K-Force
ST-DH-300
DH-300
ST-BX-400
Powder Keg
ST-BX-400 1,5
Powder Keg One point Five
All bottom brackets
Alloy Cups
Crank bolts (ISIS)
Crank bolts
BB-527 (X-Drive DH)
BB-527 (X-Drive DH)
BB-500 (Afterburner BMX)
BB-500 (Afterburner BMX)
BB-511 (X-Drive BMX/Flatland) BB-511 (X-Drive BMX/Flatland)
B-522
B-522 (Smack Daddy/Wild Child)
BB-510 (CK40/Pig)
BB-510 (CK40/Pig)
Chainring bolts
Bolts
M5 Ti
M5 Cromo
M6 Cromo
M5 Cromo
M5 Ti
M5 Ti
M5 Ti
M6 Cromo
M8 Cromo
M8 Cromo
39.2 - 49
M8 steel
M12 steel
M14 steel
M14 aluminium
M15 steel
M15 aluminium
3/8“ Cromo
M6-Thru Boron
3/8“ Cromo
M14 steel
M8 steel
Allen Cromo
Allen aluminium
Torx aluminium
Nm
8
9
12
9
8
8
12
18
18
34
49
49
44
49
49
39
39
39
39
39
12
10
11
-
40
59
59
49
59
59
49
49
49
49
49
From FSA service instructions: Product Torque Specifications
129
29. Recommended torques for bolted connections
29.3 Recommended torque settings for other components
Maximum torque of other parts
Disc brake (Magura)
Caliper bolt (fixation to frame/fork)
Brake lever clamp bolt
Disc (rotor) fixing bolt
Reservoir cover bolt
Disc brake (Hayes)
Caliper bolt (fixation to frame/fork)
Brake lever clamp bolt (Allen bolt)
Disc (rotor) fixing bolt (6 hole)
Disc brake Avid
Caliper bolt (fixation to frame/fork)
Brake lever clamp bolt (single-bolt clamping Juicy5))
(Double-bolt clamping Juicy7 / Carbon)
Cable bolt at lever and brake caliper (alu clamping) (Steel-clamping)
Disc brake Formula
Caliper bolt (fixation to frame/fork)
Brake lever clamp bolt Cable bolt at lever and brake caliper Disc (rotor) fixing bolt
Stems
Expander bolt in stem of fork
Seat post
Saddle fixing bolt double bolt M5
Saddle fixing bolt double bolt M6
Saddle fixing bolt M7 / M8
Saddle clamping (except with carbon seat posts)
Bottle cage
Bolts
Bolts (carbon frame)
Bar ends
Nm
6
4
4
<1
12.4
3.4 - 4 (HFX9)
5.6 – 6.2
5 - 7 (HR)/ 9 - 10 (VR)
4-5
2.8 – 3.4
5
7.8
9
2.5
5
5.75
19 - 20
5-7
6-8
22 - 25
12
5
3
6 -8
If you are not sure with respect to the mounting or if you have any questions as to the correct torque of components which are not listed in the
above table, please contact your MERIDA dealer. Be sure to strictly follow the component manufacturers’ instructions!
130
30. Warranty and guarantee
30.1 Introduction
Your MERIDA bike was manufactured with
care and delivered to you by your MERIDA
dealer fully mounted.
As direct purchaser, you have full warranty
rights within the first two years (EU countries)
after purchase. Please contact your MERIDA
dealer in the event of defects.
To smoothly handle your claim, it is necessary that you present your receipt and the
delivery receipt. Therefore, please keep
these documents in a safe place.
To ensure a long service life and good durability of your bike, use it only for its intended
purpose (see chapter 3. “Before your first
ride“). Make sure to also observe the specifications as to the allowable loads. Further particulars to be observed strictly are the mounting instructions of the manufacturers (above
all torques for bolted connections), the notes
given in chapter 28. “Special characteristics
of carbon”, notably in chapter 28.2 “MERIDA
frame sets” as well as the prescribed maintenance intervals.
Please observe the checks and routines listed in this manual or in any other manual
enclosed in this delivery (see chapter 26.
“Service and maintenance intervals”) as
well as any instructions as to the replacement
of safety-relevant components, such as handlebars, brakes etc.
131
30. Warranty and guarantee
30.2 A note on wear
Some components of your bike are subject
to wear due to their function. The rate of
wear depends on care and maintenance as
well as on the way you use your bike (kilometres travelled, rides in the rain, dirt, salt
etc.). Bikes that are often left standing in the
open may also be subject to increased wear
through influence of weather.
These components require regular care and
maintenance. Nevertheless, sooner or later
they will reach the end of their service life,
depending on the conditions and intensity
of use. Parts that have reached their limit of
wear must be replaced.
This concerns:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
The
The
The
The
The
The
The
The
The
The
chain
brake cables
handlebar grips / tape
chainwheels
paint
sprockets
chain rollers
gear cables
tires
saddle covering
• The lubricants
• The brake pads
• Bearings and seals of suspension forks
and rear shocks
Pads of caliper and disc brakes are inherently
subject to wear. If you use your bike for competitive cycling or in hilly terrain, they may
have to be replaced quite frequently. Check
your brake pads regularly and have them
replaced by your MERIDA dealer, if necessary.
Seals and bearings are constantly in motion
when the frame is subject to changing loads.
These moving components are inherently subject to wear through the influence of weather
(rain, dirt) and must therefore be cleaned and
serviced regularly by your MERIDA dealer.
However, depending on the intensity of use,
these parts may wear down to a point where
they have to be replaced, e.g. when bearings
become slack.
• Rims of bikes with V-brakes or hydraulic
caliper brakes
Braking causes wear not only to the brake
pads but also to the rims. Therefore, check
your rims regularly, e.g. when pumping up the
tires. Some rims have wear indicators, such
as rings, coloured marks or grooves, which
become visible when the rim has reached its
limit of wear. Take note of the specifications
given on the rim. Ask your MERIDA dealer to
examine the remaining thickness of the rims
at the latest when you are through your second set of brake pads. Signs of deformation
or fine cracks that appear in the sides of a rim
when you increase the tire pressure indicate
that the rim has reached the end of its service
life. In this case, the rim must be replaced.
• Lighting and reflectors
The lighting is essential for your safety on the
road, especially at night. Check whether the
reflectors are in good working order before
every ride. Light bulbs are inherently subject
to wear. Always have a set of spare bulbs
with you so that you can replace them, if necessary.
132
30. Warranty and guarantee
30.3 Guarantee on MERIDA bikes
Your MERIDA bike is guaranteed (as of date
of purchase to the initial buyer) for
– 5 years against rupture of all aluminium
and steel frames.
– 5 years against rupture of all carbon frames.
In a guarantee-activating event, MERIDA
reserves the right to provide a bike of the
current successor model in an available
colour or, if no such bike is available, a higher grade model.
Guarantee claims for shock absorbers, suspension forks, SRAM or Shimano components or other branded accessories will be
processed not by MERIDA, but by the component manufacturers’ national distributors.
This does not apply to the MERIDA own LRS
spring element. Complaints with regard to
this element will be received by MERIDA.
Your direct contact in any case should be
your MERIDA dealer, who will be pleased to
answer your inquiries.
The manufacturer’s guarantee only applies to
claims made by the initial buyer and substantiated by presenting the customer’s receipt,
the delivery receipt and the bike card stating
the date of purchase, the dealer address as
well as model and frame number.
It does not cover damage resulting from wear,
neglect (insufficient care and maintenance),
accidents, overstress caused by overloading,
incorrect mounting or improper treatment or
damage resulting from changes to the bicycle (e.g. mounting or alteration of additional
components).
Guarantee claims will only be accepted, if the
bicycle has been used for non other than its
intended purpose, had an inspection during
its first 500 km or the first six months after
purchase, has been fitted with none other
than original spare parts or accessories and
had its suspension systems serviced by a
MERIDA dealer at least once a year.
Diligent compliance with the manufacturers’
mounting instructions and the prescribed
maintenance intervals is crucial to a long
service life and good durability of the bicycle’s
components. Non-observance of the mounting instructions or maintenance intervals
renders the guarantee null and void. Please
observe the tests described in this manual as
well as all instructions concerning the regular
replacement of safety-relevant components,
such as the handlebars etc.
The guarantee does not cover labour and
transport costs, nor does it cover follow-up
costs resulting from defects.
In case of any inquiries, ask your national
distributor; visit www.merida.com to find his
address.
The guarantee does not apply to bikes that
have been used for jumps, in competition or
that have been subjected to any other kind
of overstress. Coverage for competitive use is
only provided in the case of road racing and
MTB carbon frames and their intended use.
133
Imprint
MERIDA Industry CO.; LTD
P. O. Box 56 Yuanlim Taiwan R. O. C.
Phone: +886-4-8526171
Fax: +886-4-8527881
www.merida.com
[email protected]
MCG MERIDA & CENTURION
Germany GmbH
Blumenstr. 49-51
71106 Magstadt
Phone: 07159/9459-30
www.merida.com
www.centurion.de
In case of any inquiries, ask your national
distributor; visit www.merida.com to find his
address.
This manual complies with the requirements
of the European standards:
EN 14766 / EN 14781 / EN 14764 /
EN 14765
This manual does not help you to assemble a
bike from individual parts, to repair it or to
make a partly assembled bike ready-for-use!
Technical details in the text and illustrations of
this manual are subject to change.
This manual is subject to European law. If
delivered to other countries, supplementary
information has to be added by the bike
manufacturer.
Concept, text and photos:
Zedler Engineering
Phone: +49 (0) 71 41-3 16 47
Fax: +49 (0) 71 41-3 16 48
[email protected]
www.zedler.de
Design:
Ott • DTP-Service
www.ott-dtp-service.de
© No part of this publication may be reprinted, copied or transmitted by hand or with
mechanical or electronical systems or used
for another business purpose without prior
written permission.
February 2008
2nd edition
134
MERIDA Industry CO.; LTD
P. O. Box 56 Yuanlim Taiwan R. O. C.
Phone: +886-4-8526171
Fax: +886-4-8527881
www.merida.com
[email protected]
MCG MERIDA & CENTURION Germany GmbH
Blumenstr. 49-51
71106 Magstadt
Phone: 07159/9459-30
www.merida.com
www.centurion.de
Dealer-stamp
Sail + Surf GmbH
Bundesstr. 55
4822 Bad Goisem
Austria
Phone: 06135/20633-0
Belimport Lugano
Via Adamini 20
6907 Lugano
Switzerland
Phone: +41 0919942544
[email protected]
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