Watlow Electric Ramping and Profiling Microprocessor-Based Control SERIES 1500 User`s manual

Series 1500
ACTUAL
ADJUST
Ramping and Profiling
Microprocessor-Based
Control
User's Manual
Watlow Controls, Inc: 1241 Bundy Blvd., Winona, MN 55987 507/454-5300, Fax: 507/452-4507
W150-MA30-9043
October, 1990
Supersedes:
W150-MA20-8843
$10.00
Made in the U.S.A.
How to Use the Manual
Use The Manual
First...
This manual will make your job easier. Reading it and applying the information is a good
way to become familiar with the Series 1500. Here's an overview.
Starting Out
Introduction, Chapter 1, Page 4.
Sample Program
A Sample Program in Action, Chapter 2, Page 16.
Install/Wire
Installation and Wiring, Chapter 3, page 26.
Programming
Technical Reference, Chapter 4, Page 40.
Appendix
Calibration
Specification
Ordering Information
Technical Service
Glossary
Index
Quick Reference on Back Cover
Quick Reference
Notes
This user's manual contains informational notes to alert you to important details. When you
see a note or note icon, look for an explanation in the margin.
NOTE:
Details of a "Note"
appear here, in the
narrow box on the
outside of each page.
Safety Information
This user's manual also has boldface safety information notes to protect both you and your
equipment. Please be attentive to them. Here are explanations.
NOTE:
Details of a "Warning"
appear here, in the
narrow box on the
outside of each page.
∫
(The Stop Sign or Lightning Bolt Sign in the wide text column alerts you to a "WARNING," a safety
hazard which could affect you and the equipment. A full explanation is in the narrow column on
the outside of the page).
!
!
NOTE:
Details of a "Caution"
appear here, in the
narrow box on the
outside of each page.
(The Deer Crossing Sign or Exclamation Point Sign in the wide text column alerts you to a "CAUTION,"
a safety or functional hazard which could affect your equipment or its performance. A full explanation is in
the narrow column on the outside of the page).
Technical Assistance
If you encounter a problem with your Watlow control, review all of your configuration information to verify that your selections are consistent with your application...Inputs, Outputs, Alarms,
Limits, etc. If the problem persists after checking the above, you can get technical assistance
by dialing: 1-507-454-5300
An Application Engineer will discuss your problem with you. Please have the following
information available when calling:
• Complete model number
• Serial Number
• All configuration information
• User's Manual
The model and serial numbers can be found on the outside of the case.
Your Feedback
Your comments or suggestions on this manual are welcome, please send them to: Technical
Writer, Watlow Controls, 1241 Bundy Blvd., Winona, MN 55987, phone 507/454-5300, fax 507/
452-4507. The Watlow Series 1500 User's Manual and integral software are copyrighted by
Watlow Winona, Inc., © 1985, 1986, 1987, 1988 with all rights reserved.
2
WATLOW Series 1500 User's Manual
blf1090
Page
4
4
5
6
7
9
10
12
Item
Starting Out with the Series 1500 -Chapter 1
General Description
Opening the 1500
Setting the DIP Switches
Quick Wire
Overview of the 1500 Modes
Reading the Displays and Keys
Overview of the Software
16
16
16
17
17
18
19
22
22
23
23
24
24
25
Learning the Series 1500: A Sample Program
in Action - Chapter 2
ApplePie Sample Program
Sample Program Chart
Setting Event Outputs
Modes of Operation
Clear Memory, Set DIP Switches
Programming
Start Your Program
Halt Conditions
Ramping Conditions
Wait Step
Jump Loop Step
Recycle
Interactive Changing Set Points & Events
26
26
27
27
29
32
32
34
34
Install and Wire the Series 1500 - Chapter 3
Sensor Installation Guidelines
Event Input and Remote Hold Input
Noise
Input Power Wiring
Eliminating Noise
Opening the 1500
Installation Procedure
Electrical Connections and Wiring
40
40
40
41
42
43
44
45
45
46
46
47
49
49
49
49
49
50
51
51
51
52
53-56
57
58
58
58
59
59
59
Technical Reference - Chapter 4
How to Program
Select the Proper DIP Switch Settings
Programming CHG DATA
Halt Conditions
Set Point Step Programming
Jump Loop Step Programming
Wait Step Programming
Next Step Programming
Altering a Program
Programming CHG PARA
Guarded Access Programming
Alarms
Alarm Options
Event Alarm Output Option
Latching Option
Alarms
Upper/Lower Set Point Limits
Event Outputs
Event Input
Remote Hold Input
Analog Retransmit Outputs
RTD and T/C Guarded Access/Parameter Charts
Programming Chart
Tuning
Initial Settings
Simple ON/OFF Control
Run and Halt a Program
How to Run a Program
How to Halt a Program
Contents
Contents
59
59
60
60
60
60
61
73
74
75
80
82
83
83
83
84
85
89
90
Restarting a Program
Remote Hold Input
Data Communications
Communication Parameters
Protocol
Command Rules & Words
Syntax
Data Communication Error Codes
Troubleshooting
Field Calibration Procedure
Specifications
Model # Information
Technical Service
Warranty Information
Returning Merchandise
Shipping Claims
Glossary
Index
Quick Reference
Figures
4 Series 1500 Input and Output Overview
6 DIP Switch Location and Setting
7 Quick Wire AC Power Connection
8 Quick Wire Simulated Sensor Wiring
9 Overview of the Series 1500 Operating Modes
10 Series 1500 Front Panel Components
13 Monitor Data (MNTR DATA) Mode Overview
14 Change Data (CHG DATA) Mode Overview
15 Change Parameter (CHG PARA) Mode
31 Differential Mode Filter Diagram
31 Common Mode Filter Diagram
31 Differential Common Mode Filter Diag.
33 Unit and Panel Cutout Dimensions
35 Signal Conditioner Connections and Jumpers
36 Event Output, Remote Hold Input, Event Input
Conn. for Dual Solid State Relay Version
37 Event Output, Remote Hold Input, Event Input
Conn. for Dual Solid State Switch Version A
36 Power Supply Input, Temp & RH Output Conn.
for Dual Solid State Relay Version
37 Power Supply Input, temp & RH Output Conn.
for Dual Solid State Switch Version A
38 Power Supply Input, CH-1 & CH-2 Output Conn.
38 Wiring to Disable Channel 2
39 RS-422/423 Pin Designations and Jumpers
42 Change Data Mode Flow Diagram
46 Change Parameter Mode Flow Diagram
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
15
16
16
17
18
19
20
21
Tables
6 DIP Switch Position and Function
17 Sample Program Event Outputs
21 Sample Program Steps
31 Noise Suppression Device Ratings
Table 1
Table 2
Table 3
Table 4
Charts
17 Series 1500 Sample Program Chart
53 RTD Guarded Access Chart
54 T/C Guarded Access Chart
55 RTD General Parameter Chart
56 T/C General Parameter Chart
57 Programming Chart
Chart 1
Chart 2
Chart 3
Chart 4
Chart 5
Chart 6
WATLOW Series 1500 User's Manual
3
Starting Out
Chapter 1
Starting Out with the Watlow Series 1500
"Read Me First."
Congratulations, you're about to become a fully-qualified user of the Watlow Series
1500! It is a versatile microprocessor-based control; powerful, yet simple to learn. In
this chapter of the user's manual, you'll get an overview of the 1500 and its software.
You'll "light" the displays and get a feel for moving through the control functions.
Figure 1 is a simplified view of the 1500's capabilities. The control has dual inputs,
one per channel, and dual control outputs for each channel. There is a choice of
auxiliary (event) or alarm outputs, an event input and remote hold input. An "Event
Output" in the Series 1500 is an ON/OFF solid state relay or solid state switch output
for activating periphered equipment or processes. Models with optional communications may be connected to a computer via a serial communications interface.
Figure 1 Series 1500
Input and Output
Overview
The Series 1500 will handle 51 separate control steps. Each step duration is variable
from one second to 24 hours, 59 minutes, 59 seconds. The 1500 is a "profiling"
control because it will control up to 51 consecutive steps with a single program; the
resulting graph of all the steps makes a program "profile." The 1500 is a "ramping"
Dual Inputs
See Pages 6, 35 & 82
TEMP and %RH or
TEMP
See Pages 6, 8 & 35
Event Input
See Pages 36 & 51
Dual Control
Outputs/Channel
See Pages 6 & 82
Heat/Cool
See Page 36
Humidify/
De-Humidify or
Heat/Cool
See Page 36
Remote Hold Input
See Pages 36 & 51
8 Auxiliary (Event)
Outputs, 4/Channel
See Pages 36 & 51
or
RS-422A/RS-423A (RS-232C)
Serial Communications Interface
See Page 62
4
WATLOW Series 1500 User's Manual
3 Auxiliary (Event)
Outputs/Channel and 1
Alarm Output/Channel
See Pages 36, 49 & 51
Starting Out, Chapter 1
Starting Out
control because it will move from one process variable to another in a uniform
manner.
Operator-friendly features include automatic "prompts," or entry codes, to assist you
in programming and monitoring. The Series 1500 has other display codes to indicate
a variety of alarm conditions about your process. The 1500 also has a "Jump Loop"
option for repeating program steps or segments. A "Wait For" option makes this
control responsive to particular process conditions, an external switch conditions or
real times of day.
In addition, you can change the three-mode, PID control to a simple ON/OFF control
by setting the proportional band parameter in each channel to zero.
When there's a power outage, the 1500 has memory protection provided by an
internal Lithium battery and optional battery-backed clock.
The standard RTD version Series 1500 is factory-configured to operate in degrees
Centigrade (°C) on Channel One and per cent relative humidity (%RH) on Channel
Two. A software selection, the "Temp-Temp" option, is also available for the RTD
unit. The Series 1500 Thermocouple version is strictly a "Temp-Temp" control. The
1500 has at least two switches you must set prior to entering your program. Information on how to set these switches follows in this chapter.
When you first apply power, the unit will "come up" with default values for set points,
alarm points, control parameters, recycle, events and time. These default values
provide minimum operating instructions until you enter your data. The default values
are listed in Chapter 4, "Technical Reference."
Remove the Series 1500 carefully from its shipping container. Be sure to set this
literature aside where it will not be discarded.
Packing List
Included with your Watlow Series 1500 RTD version are two 107Ω resistors, four
jumper wires, two mounting brackets with integral screws, and this manual. The
resistors and two jumpers will serve as pseudo-sensors at approximate room conditions while you learn the control. The other jumpers are for power connections.
How to Open the 1500
Before going further, open the Series 1500 and pull the control chassis from its case.
Here's how:
The control chassis fastens to the case with a single screw located at the lower front
panel. Turn the screw counterclockwise to loosen it. Three strip connector plugs, in
the rear of the control chassis, feed power and signals through the back of the case
to the triple terminal strip. These plugs will let go as you pull.
!
Pull firmly but gently to remove the Series 1500 from its case. The 1500 chassis will
not fit into the case upside down. However, always check to see that it is oriented
before returning the chassis to the case. Press the unit in firmly, then turn
Starting Out, Chaptercorrectly
1
the front panel screw clockwise to secure it. Do not overtighten the screw.
!
CAUTION:
Before attempting to
open a Series 1500
with data communications (RS-422/423
interface), remove
the two screws and
DB-15 male connector from the rear of
the case.
WATLOW Series 1500 User's Manual
5
Starting Out
How to Set the DIP Switches
The Watlow Series 1500 has a set of Dual In-Line Package (DIP) switches on circuit
board, A007-1318. The location of the board and switches appear in Figure 2. The
switches are clearly numbered; the "ON" direction is indicated by an arrow. Look at
the DIP switches from the bottom of the control. You'll see them as they appear
below.
!
CAUTION:
Power must be
interrupted before a
change in DIP
Switch will take
effect.
!
A007-1318
Board
DIP
Switches
Figure 2 DIP Switch Location and Setting
Control Chassis - Bottom View
Set the DIP switches according to Table 1 below. Make your initial choices now; you
may always return to change them later. Set DIP Switch #6 ON for a "Cold Start."
Table 1DIP Switch Position and Function
Sw
Position
Function
#1
ON
OFF
Auxiliary (Event) Output #4 for both Ch-1 and Ch-2 are alarm outputs.
Auxiliary (Event) Output #4 for both Ch-1 and Ch-2 are event outputs.
#2
ON
OFF
Alarms are latching (displayed until cleared manually).
Alarms are non-latching (displayed only as long as alarm condition exists).
RTD Unit Only
#3
ON
OFF
T/C Unit Only
#3
ON
#4
ON
The Ch-2 sensor is an RTD sensor. Jumpers W151 and W153 on the Signal
Conditioner board (A007-1316) must be installed.
The Ch-2 inputs is a 0-5V signal representing 0-100% RH. Jumpers W150
and W154 on the Signal Conditioner board (A007-1316) must be installed.
Not Used. Set in the ON position.
Dual PID per channel - #4
#5
ON
OFF
Single PID per channel.
Factory use only. Must be in the ON position.
#6
ON
OFF
Cold Start on power-up. (Memory cleared, parameters set to default values.)*
Warm Start on power up. (Programmed values are retained for all parameters.)*
#7
ON
OFF
OFF
°C function after a Cold Start.
°F function after a Cold Start.
Not Used. Set in the Off position.
#8
*For further Warm and Cold Start information, see the Technical Reference, Chapter
4.
6
WATLOW Series 1500 User's Manual
Starting Out, Chapter 1
Starting Out
Quick Wire
You may "power up " the Series 1500 with the following operational check-out. This
procedure also prepares you for the Sample Program in Chapter 2. Or, you may skip
this section and the sample program, and go directly to Chapter 3, Installation and
Wiring.
∫
1.
∫
WARNING:
To avoid potential
electric shock use
National Electric
Code safety practices when wiring
and when connecting this unit to a
power source and to
electrical sensors or
peripheral devices.
Put the 1500 chassis back in its case. Then place the unit on a bench and
connect AC power lines and the jumper wires to the Power Supply terminal
strip. Use Figure 3 below.
115VAC
L2
CHASSIS
GROUND
L1
For 115VAC control operation,
install a jumper wire from Terminal
32 to Terminal 35, and a separate
jumper wire from Terminal 33 to
Terminal 36. Bring line power in to
Terminals 32 and 36. Connect the
line ground wire to Terminal 34.
Figure 3 Quick Wire AC
Power Connections
230VAC
L2
CHASSIS
GROUND
For 230VAC control operation,
install a jumper wire from Terminal
33 to Terminal 35. Bring line power
in to Terminals 32 and 36. Connect
the ground wire to Terminal 34.
L1
ACTUAL
Display
2.
As soon as you apply power, the FUNCTION display will alternately flash "A1C1, A1-C1." Press the CLEAR key to clear the flashing A1. The display will CLEAR
then flash another A-code.
Key
When you apply power without sensor inputs on the Signal Conditioner
terminal strip, the Series 1500 will show a flashing "A-digit" in the FUNCTION
display. The digit is an alarm code The ACTUAL display will show four
steady dashes, "----," meaning "open sensor." These are normal displays for a
unit without sensors.
Starting Out, Chapter 1
FUNCTION
Display
WATLOW Series 1500 User's Manual
7
Starting Out
3.
If you did not set DIP Switch #6 in the "ON" position before, do that now:
Disconnect power from the unit. Open the 1500, set DIP Switch #6 to ON for a
Cold Start. Replace the control chassis in the enclosure. Reapply power to
the unit. (This clears all previously entered information from the 1500; it is a
"clean" or "cold" start).
4.
Now remove power again, open the unit, and set Switch #6 to OFF. (This will
make the next start a "warm" one, retaining all subsequently entered information in the processor's memory). Close the 1500.
5.
Locate the Signal Conditioner terminal strip on the back of the Series 1500, it's
on the far left as you look at the back of the unit. The resistors, or jumper wires
for the T/C version, will simulate input sensors at room temperature for this
procedure. Make the correct connections using Figure 4.
• For an RTD unit, connect a 107Ω resistor (provided) across Terminals 5 and
6, and another 107Ω resistor across Terminals 8 and 9. Also connect a jumper
wire (provided) across Terminals 6 and 7, and another jumper wire across
Terminals 9 and 10. See Figure 4.
• For a T/C unit, connect a jumper wire (provided) across Terminals 5 and 7,
and another jumper wire across Terminals 8 and 10.
Figure 4 Quick Wire Simulated Sensor
Wiring
RTD
6.
T/C
Apply power to the unit. With the CLEAR key, clear the "A1" alarm code and
any other "A" code that appears after it. The ACTUAL display will be reading
Channel 1 at simulated room temperature. Or the ACTUAL display will show
Channel 2 at a simulated %RH or temperature reading. Use the CH.SELECT
key to switch from one channel to the other.
If your Series 1500 responds this way, continue learning about the control. If your
unit does not respond like this, call Watlow at 507/454-5300 and ask for an applications engineer.
8
WATLOW Series 1500 User's Manual
Starting Out, Chapter 1
Starting Out
Overview of the Three Operating Modes
Before getting into the details of the Series 1500's keys and displays, take a look at
Figure 5, showing the three different modes. After you feel comfortable with the
names of the modes and their functions, go ahead to learn the keys and displays.
Series 1500: Four Mode Types
Series 1500: Three Mode Types
Monitor Data Mode
(MNTR DATA)
Monitor Data Mode
(MNTR DATA)
See Your
Program
Examine current
step information
in a running program.
OR
Set a NonRamping
Set Point
Generate
a
Set a non-ramping
non-ramping
(fixed)
(fixed) set point
and
set
point
and
manipulate event
manipulate event
outputs. At MNTR
outputs. At MNTR
DATA, halt the proDATA, halt the program and press
gram and press
RESTART. Select C1,
RESTART. Select C1,
C2, E1 or E2.
C2, E1 or E2.
Change Data Mode
(CHG DATA)
Set Up
Program
Steps
Set up or change
step type, program
loops, wait for…
conditions,
set points,
auxiliary (event)
outputs ON/OFF,
and step duration.
Figure 5 Overview of the
Series 1500
Operating Modes
Change Parameter
Mode (CHG PARA)
Set Up
Your
System
Starting Out, Chapter 1
Set up or change
system-wide parameters such as real
time, high/low range,
alarm types, alarm
points, PID settings,
RS-422 address.
WATLOW Series 1500 User's Manual
9
Starting Out
How to Read the Displays and Use the Keys
Here's an understanding of the Series 1500 displays, keys and LEDs. Use Figure 6
to locate the keys, LEDs and displays described here. Try everything! You'll learn
quickly how the 1500 works. The detailed overviews in the next section will further
your knowledge.
Figure 6 Series 1500 Front Panel
Components
CH SEL key: CHANNEL
SELECT--Selects either
Channel 1 or Channel 2
for the ACTUAL display.
ACTUAL display: Shows the actual
value of the variable in Channel 1 or
Channel 2, in four digits.
CH-1, CH-2 LEDs:
Indicates the channel
in the ACTUAL display.
°F LED: When lit indicates the value
in the ACTUAL display is temperature in degrees Fahrenheit.
% RH LED: When lit
indicates per cent relative
humidity in the ACTUAL
display.
CH-2 EVENT LEDs:
Indicates the status of
each Channel 2 Event
Output with one of four
LEDs visible only when the
output is energized (ON).
An Event Output in the
Series 1500 is an ON/OFF
solid state relay or
switched DC output for
activating periphered
equipment or processes.
CH-1 EVENT LEDs:
Indicates the status of
each Channel 1 Event
Output with one of four
LEDs visible only when the
output is energized (ON).
°C LED: When lit, indicates temperature in degrees Celsius in the
ACTUAL display.
10
WATLOW Series 1500 User's Manual
Starting Out, Chapter 1
Figure 6 (Con't) Series 1500 Front Panel
Components
Starting Out
PROG END LED: PROGRAM END-Indicates that the processor has
reached the end of the program.
CLEAR (erase) key:
a. Clears alarm codes
from FUNCTION display in
MONITOR DATA mode.
b. Clears the step in the STEP
display in CHANGE DATA mode
when the unit is in the HALT
condition.
c. Clears all 51 programmed steps
when the unit in the HALT
condition, and in GUARDED
ACCESS area of the CHANGE
PARAMETER mode. (This
prevents an operator from
accidentally clearing an entire
program. The GUARDED
ACCESS data is not cleared).
STEP display: Indicates the current
step number being programmed in
the CHANGE DATA mode, or the
current step being monitored in the
MONITOR DATA mode.
PROG HALT LED: PROGRAM HALT--When lit, indicates
that the processor is in the HALT condition. A RUN/HALT
key press, or a "Blank Step" in the program causes a
HALT. When flashing, indicates that the processor is in
"Remote-Hold" condition. See RUN/HALT key.
RUN/HALT key: Starts or
stops the program. The
processor will resume a
program where it was
interrupted, unless the RESTART key was pressed,
or the step number or set
point data at the current
step was changed during
the HALT condition.
RE-START key: Returns
the controller to the initial
program step only when
the 1500 is in the PROGRAM HALT condition.
See RUN/HALT key.
FUNCTION display: Shows the
prompts used in the three modes. It
also displays hours when TIME is
selected in MONITOR DATA,
CHANGE PARAMETER or CHANGE
DATA modes. The FUNCTION
display shows a flashing alarm code
if one is activated.
DATA display: Indicates
the entered data or
monitored value in four
digits.
CHG DATA LED:
When lit indicates
the processor is in
the CHANGE DATA
mode.
CHG PARA LED: When
lit indicates the processor
is in the CHANGE
PARAMETER mode.
TIME LED: When lit,
indicates that the FUNCTION and DATA displays
are showing time.
MNTR DATA LED:
When lit, indicates
the processor is in
the MONITOR
DATA mode.
MODE key: Selects
either the MONITOR
DATA, CHANGE
DATA or CHANGE
PARAMETER
mode.
Starting Out, Chapter 1
FCTN key: The
FUNCTION key
steps through the
prompts in each of
the three modes.
ENTER key: Enters
selected data or
NEXT STEP
operations in the
CHANGE DATA and
CHANGE PARAMETER modes.
UP key: Increases
the value in the
DATA display. A
light touch increases
the value by one.
Holding the key
down causes the
DATA display to
increase rapidly.
DOWN key: Acts opposite
the UP key. Ramps the
value in the DATA display
downward. A light touch
decreases the value by
one. Holding the key
down causes the DATA
display to decrease
rapidly.
WATLOW Series 1500 User's Manual
11
Starting Out
Now that you have a good idea how the 1500's front panel works, look again at the
operating modes. This time take a more detailed look.
Overview of the Mode Software
Again, the Series 1500 has three Operating Modes: Monitor Data, Change Data and
Change Parameter. These modes change with the MODE key. They make up the
basic software routines that run the Series 1500. Each mode has sub-routines and
different prompts that appear in the FUNCTION display whenever you press the
FCTN key.
Examine the three figures on the next pages, one for each of the modes. Understanding how these modes control the Series 1500 is the key to learning the control.
Figure 7 - Monitor Data (MNTR DATA) Mode Overview
Figure 8 - Change Data (CHG DATA) Mode Overview
Figure 9 - Change Parameter (CHG PARA) Mode Overview
12
WATLOW Series 1500 User's Manual
Starting Out, Chapter 1
Starting Out
Monitor Data Mode (MNTR DATA):
Figure 7 Monitor Data
(MNTR DATA)
Mode Overview
Monitoring a Halted Program
You may look at any step, but must
be in the CHG DATA mode to
change the step number.
You'll see:
•
•
•
•
Step type.
Ch-1 and Ch-2 set points.
Auxiliary outputs programming.
Step duration.
Monitoring a Running Program
You may look at the current step.
You'll see:
• Ch-1 and Ch-2 current set points.
• Auxiliaries programmed ON or OFF.
• Time remaining.
Set a Non-Ramping Set Point
Set a non-rampong (fixed)
set point and manipulate
event outputs.
Starting Out, Chapter 1
WATLOW Series 1500 User's Manual
13
Starting Out
Figure 8 Change Data (CHG
DATA) Mode
Overview
Change Data Mode (CHG DATA):
Three Step Types for Entering Program Data
Set Point (SP):
a simple,
regular profile
step.
Set Point Step,
Program:
Jump Loop (JL):
a means for
jumping to
a step out of
numerical
sequence.
Jump Loop Step,
Program:
Wait for…(WT):
a means to
wait for a
particular
condition or
time.
Wait for Step,
Program:
This Step#
is an SP
step.
This Step#
is a JL
step.
This Step#
is a WT
step.
Set Point
for Ch-1.
Jump to
Step# __.
Set Point
for Ch-2.
Repeat that
step, __
times (Jump
Counts).
Wait for
this Ch-1
value to
occur, __.
Auxiliary
(Event)
Outputs,
ON/OFF.
Step
Duration.
Go to any
next step.
Go to any
next step.
Wait for
this Ch-2
value to
occur, __.
Wait for
Input Event
to achieve a
specified
conditon.
Wait for
this real
time, ___.
Go to any
next step.
14
WATLOW Series 1500 User's Manual
Starting Out, Chapter 1
Starting Out
Change Parameter Mode (CHG PARA)
For Entering System-Wide Parameters
Figure 9 Change Parameter
(CHG PARA) Mode
Overview
Program Real Time
Then proceed to one of
three "Guarded Access"
areas – code-protected
system setup parameters.
Program These
Parameters:
Program These
Parameters:
Program These
Parameters:
Set Ch-1 & Ch-2
alarm type and
high/low points.
Set Recycle Option
(program repeat).
Set up Ch-1 and
Ch-2 high and low
ranges.
Leave "Guarded
Access."
Set up Ch-1 PID
parameters and
calibration offset.
Set up Ch-2 PID
parameters and
calibration offset.
Leave "Guarded
Access."
Select Series 1500
Ch-1/Ch-2
Operation,
TEMP-TEMP or
TEMP-RH.
Set Recycle Option
(program repeat).
Select RS-422
Address #.
Select keyboard
lock status.
Where To Go From Here
Leave "Guarded
Access."
You are now ready to go to the Sample Program, Chapter 2, or to Installation and
Wiring, Chapter 3.
If you skip the sample program, do not forget to check the position of DIP Switch 6
before you begin programming your control after installation. With DIP Switch 6 OFF,
the 1500 saves your program whenever power is removed (Warm Start). With DIP
Switch 6 ON, the 1500 will clear its memory of all programmed information whenever
power is removed,substituting default values (Cold Start).
Starting Out, Chapter 1
WATLOW Series 1500 User's Manual
15
Sample Program
Chapter 2
Learning the Series 1500 — A Sample Program
in Action
This chapter will guide you through an easy sample program for the Series 1500.
You can quickly grasp the necessary terms and concepts by entering and observing
this exercise.
If you feel that your knowledge of programmable controllers does not require a
sample program to learn the Series 1500, feel free to skip this chapter. In the
Technical Reference section (Chapter 4), you will find details on all material here.
The Series 1500 Wonderful-Apple-Pie
Sample Program
IMPORTANT
NOTE:
If you have a
Series 1500 T/C
version, or are
using the RTD
version for 2
channels of temperature control
(TEMP-TEMP), then
simply consider
all sample program
references to
relative humidity
as a second
channel of temperature. Use the
sample values as
temperatures
rather than relative
humidities.
16
Let's assume that Great-Grandma handed down to you her secret recipe for wonderful apple pie. It's not that her ingredients are so different; but she took great care to
control baking temperature and humidity, and to add topping ingredients at just the
right times in the baking cycle. These really are fantastic apple pies, so you've
bought an oven with a Series 1500 control, and you're starting an apple pie business.
Sample Program Chart
The chart here shows the baking process. Grandma's original recipe had Grandpa
turn the oven on early in the morning. Grandpa would raise and lower the oven
temperature at certain times, too. That is one of Grandma's secrets. With the Series
1500 you'll be able to make your oven "loop" between 275° and 110° three times
before a pie is done.
If Great-Grandma was right, this process should turn out a really fine apple pie.
Since your bakery will begin baking pies at the same time every morning, you'll want
your Series 1500 to automatically start the process each day.
The chart below details the "wonderful-apple-pie" sample program for the Series
1500.
WATLOW Series 1500 User's Manual
Sample Program, Chapter 2
Sample Program
Perform Steps 4-6 Th
Temp/
%RH
Step 1
Step 2
(Wait)
Step 4
Step 3
Step 5
Chart 1 Series 1500
Sample Program
Chart
90% RH
74% RH
Temp/
%RH
Step 1
Step 2
(Wait)
Step 4
Step 3
Step 5
90% RH
74% RH
*
400°F
50%RH
275°F
Setting Event Outputs
To make the pie process even more automated, you have your toppings — sugar,
cinnamon and nutmeg—connected to solenoid dispensers controlled by the 1500's
"Event Outputs." As you enter the sample program, you'll set the Event Outputs to
trigger just when you want them to. You even have an Event Output to put your pies
in and take them out of the oven at just the right times. You'll need to turn the
Events ON as follows:
STEP
1
2
3
4
5
6
8
CH #1 EVENTS
CH #2 EVENTS
Wait 0
1, 2, 4
2
3, 4
1
1, 2, 4
3, 4
0
1, 2
3
1, 4
2
2, 3, 4
1, 3
Table 2 Sample Program
Event Outputs
Understanding the Modes of Operation
Sample Program, Chapter 2
WATLOW Series 1500 User's Manual
17
Sample Program
Before you begin entering the program, notice three small lights (LEDs) on the
bottom half of the 1500's front panel. They are labeled "MNTR DATA" (Monitor
Data), "CHG DATA" (Change Data), and "CHG PARA" (Change Parameters). Press
the MODE key to move through these three modes as you read about each one.
Another LED, labeled "TIME" indicates when time is being displayed.
"MNTR DATA": While a program is running, you'll want to observe what's happening. Some items can be observed in the "ACTUAL" display and in the nearby top half
of the front panel: Actual Temperature or Relative Humidity, Events ON/OFF, etc.
But you'll also want to know which step is being performed, and the amount of time
remaining in the step.
You can monitor information in a running program by pressing the MODE key until
the MNTR DATA LED is ON. Then press the FCTN key until you are observing the
data you want. Right now you don't have a program entered, so no meaningful data
is available. As soon as you enter the sample program, use this mode to watch
things happen.
"CHG DATA": This is the mode where you'll enter program operating DATA (set
points, time interval for each step and Event Outputs). In this mode, you can also
change data or correct errors in the program. If you want to wait until a specific time
before doing something or to set up program loops, you also enter that information in
CHG DATA. With the CHG DATA LED on, pressing the FCTN key will move you
through the functions you can program.
"CHG PARA": Some Series 1500 information is more applicable to the overall
system than to just one specific program. This includes the "real time of day," system
maximum/minimum alarm limits and "PID Parameters" which tune the overall system.
This system-wide information is entered or changed in this mode.
!
CAUTION:
This sample program will activate
some of the "Control
Outputs" and "Event
Outputs" on the
Series 1500 terminal
strips. To avoid any
damage to your
equipment while
running the sample
program, be sure all
Event and Control
Outputs are disconnected from the
Series 1500 terminals. Or remove
power from any
external loads
attached to the
Series 1500.
18
Again – pressing the FCTN key selects functions while the CHG PARA LED is on.
Many of these functions are protected from accidental change by a "Guarded Access" (GA) code before they can be viewed or altered. You'll learn the GA codes
soon.
Before You Begin…
Before you begin to enter your Sample Program, take this precaution:
!
Clear Memory, Set DIP Switches
To clear your Series 1500's memory, do a "Cold Start." Turn the power OFF, open
the 1500 and ensure that DIP Switches 2, 3, 5 and 6 are ON and that DIP Switches
1,4,7 and 8 are OFF. If you haven't done so already, attach the provided 107Ω
resistor and a jumper (or jumpers for a T/C version) to each sensor input as described in Chapter 1 under "Quick Wire." If you want to use your sensors, refer to
Chapter 3, Figure 11 for wiring. Then turn the power ON and press the "CLEAR" key
to clear the flashing alarm indication(s).
WATLOW Series 1500 User's Manual
Sample Program, Chapter 2
4.
Press the ENTER key: the display will flash, then it will change to “MN.”
5.
Use the UP/DOWN keys to place the correct value for minutes into the Data
Display; then press ENTER.
6.
The display will show “SC” (seconds): again use the UP/DOWN keys to place
seconds into the display and then press ENTER.
7.
Press the FCTN key several times until the TlME LED is lit (along with the CHG
PARA LED). You should now see the correct real time on the display, with
the seconds counting up.
Set the Recycle Option
Now, while still in the CHG PARA mode, there is one more thing to enter. Remember
that you want your program to automatically repeat each day until you decide to halt it.
This “Recycle” condition is set within the “Guarded Access” (GA) section of the CHG
PARA mode. Do that now:
1.
With the CHG PARA LED ON, press the FCTN key until “GA” appears in the
Function Display. If you pass GA, keep pressing FCTN until GA comes
around again.
2.
Place “0006,” one of the Guarded Access codes, into the Data Display using
the UP/DOWN keys.
3.
Press ENTER until the "RC,"
“RC,” (Recycle) prompt appears in the Function
Display.
4.
Place a “0001” into the Data Display. Press ENTER.
Begin Entering Data
Now that you have entered the real time and the Recycle option, go to the CHG
DATA mode to enter actual program data:
1.
Press the MODE key until the CHG DATA LED is lit. The display will read
“01 SP.”
Programming Step 1
Refer back to the sample program chart at the beginning of this section. Remember,
that while you’d like to load your program and press the start button now, the first
program step must hypothetically wait until early morning before it starts running. To
program Step #1 as a Wait Step,” do this:
1.
Press the FCTN key until "WT" appears in the Function Display.
2.
Press the ENTER key, W1” (Wait for Ch-1) appears.
3.
Since you are waiting for a specific time, and not for input conditions, press
FCTN until “WH” (Wait for Hours) appears.
Sample Program, Chapter 2
WATLOW Series 1500 Users Manual
19
Sample Program
4.
We suggest that you enter a time one hour from right now. Changing this
time later is a simple matter. You go to the CHG DATA mode with "WH"
displayed and then enter the new time. Select hours (0 to 23) and press
ENTER.
5.
Also enter the "WM" (minutes) and "WS" (seconds). Select minutes, press
ENTER. Wait a moment for the display to change, then select seconds and
press ENTER.
6.
You have completed entering Step #1 as a "Wait Step." The display should
now read "01 NX 0002." This indicates that the 1500 is ready to move on to
program Step #2 unless you tell it otherwise.
Programming Step 2
1.
Since you do indeed want to program Step #2 now, just press ENTER. The
display should read "02 SP", and you are ready to begin programming Step
#2.
Refer again to the program chart. Note that the values you want to achieve are 400°,
90%RH. You want the 1500 to accomplish this in four minutes. You also want to
have Ch-1 Events 1, 2 and 4 ON, and Ch-2 Events 1 and 2 ON during Step #2. We
will now program all this data for Step #2:
1.
Since the display reads "02 SP," and you do want to enter Set Point Data,
first press ENTER. The display changes to "S1" (Set Point for Ch-1).
2.
Use the UP/DOWN keys to put "400.0" into the display. Some practice may
be necessary to stop at the right value. Then press ENTER. The display
changes to "S2" (Set Point for Ch-2).
3.
Place "090.0" into the display and press ENTER. The display changes to
"E1" (Events for Ch-1). The Data Display is blank right now.
4.
In the Data Display, Event #1 is represented on the right and Event #4 is on
the left. So, for Ch-1 Events #1, 2 and 4 ON, place "1011" into the
display and press ENTER. The display will change to "E2" (Events for
Ch-2).
5.
Likewise, for Ch-2 Events #1 and 2 ON, ENTER the value "0011." The
display changes to "HR" (The "hour" portion of the duration of Step #2).
6.
Since Step #2 is only four minutes long, just press ENTER to enter "0000"
hours. The display changes to "MN."
7.
For Step #2 Minutes, ENTER "0004." The display changes to "SC."
8.
For Step #2 Seconds, ENTER "0000." The display changes to "02 00
0400."
9. You have successfully programmed Step #2 as a "Set Point Step." The
display is indicating that Step #2 is programmed for a duration of 00 hours,
04 minutes, 00 seconds. Press either ENTER or FCTN; the display
changes to "02 NX 0003."
10.
20
Again since you do want to program Step #3 now, press ENTER. The
Sample Program, Chapter 2
to "03 SP."
WATLOW Series
1500 User's Manual
display
changes
Programming Steps 3 through 6
Now that you see how it’s done, enter the data for Set Point Steps #3,4,5,
& 6. But,
be sure to stop and then return to these instructions when the display reaches “07
SP.” This is because you will be looping through Steps #4 through #6 three times.
Refer to the table below for Steps #3,4,5 and 6.
FCTN
I STEP #2
I
STEP#3
I
STEP #4
I
STEP#5
I
Step#6
Table 3 Sample Program
Steps
Programming Step 7, a Jump Loop Step
You now have Steps #1-6 programmed. When you run the program, Step #7 will be
performed when Step #6 is completed. But, you do not want Step #7 to be a normal
“Set Point Step.” We want Step # 7 to cause the 1500 to JUMP back to Step #4 two
times (for a total of 3 times through Steps #4-6). That’s why you’ll program Step #7 as
a"JUMP LOOP Step.”
1.
With the STEP and FUNCTION displays now reading “07 SP,” press the
FCTN key until “07 JL” comes up.
2.
Press the ENTER key. The display changes to “JS” (Jump to Step #).
3.
Enter the number of the step the program will jump to (“0004”). Press
ENTER. The display changes to “JC” (Jump Count).
4.
Since you want to jump back to Step #4 two times (total of 3 times through
the loop), enter “0002.” Press ENTER. The display changes to “07 NX 0008.”
5.
Press ENTER (you do want to program Step #8 now). The diiplay
changes to “08 SP.”
Programming Step 8
f7
0
@
You’re ready to enter Step #8. It’s a normal Set Point Step, enter the information
below (Stop with the display reading “08 NX 0009”):
S1
S2
El
E2
HR
MN
SC
110.0
065.0
1100
0101
0000
0006
0000
Recall that you set the Recycle (RC) option to ON, so the program will repeat
indefinitely. You have now entered the entire program.You’re almost ready to run it.
Sample Program, Chapter 2
CAUTION:
Notice on the
Sample Program
Chart (at the
beginning of this
section) that the
Series 1500 hoIds
the Step #8 set
points and Step
#8 Event Outputs
ON as lt recycles
and waits through
Step #1 before
beginning the
program over.
WATLOW Series 1500 Users Manual
21
Almost Ready to Run
Remember that Step #1 was a “Wait Step.” Even though you press the “RUN” key,
you won’t see any action until the time you programmed into Step #1.
You may want to go back and adjust that time to a different value. Therearevarious
ways to get back to Step #1 in CHG DATA mode. Your display is now reading “08 NX
0009”; it is waiting for you to continue programming or monitoring. Use the DOWN
key to put “0001” in the Data display and press ENTER. The display will show “01 WI”
(Step#l is a Wait Step). Now use the FCTN key to move through “HR," “MN,” and
“SC;” enter a time real time1 0 minutes from now.
Start Your Program!
The Wonderful Apple Pie SampleProgram is all entered and ready. So press the
“RE-START’ key (upper front panel) to set the program to Step #1. Then press the
“RUN/HALT’ key to start the program.
Monitoring the Action
With the MNTR DATA LED lit, you can now use the FCTN key to check things out.
The control doesn’t seem to show much happening right now since Step #1 is a “Wait
Step.” Press the FCTN key. In one display you’ll see the “WT” (Wait for) time you
programmed into Step #1. The 1500 is watching for its real time to match that
programmed time.
Now use the MODE key to move to the CHG PARA mode with the TlME LED also ON.
You can watch as real time approaches your programmed time. When the times
match, the step number changes to 02. You will also see the Ch-1 and Ch-2 Event
lights come ON to coincide with the Events you programmed for Step #2.
As the program runs its course, you can use the MNTR DATA mode and the FCTN
key to view the process. As you observe the varying data, the individual functions will
become quite clear. After you have observed the program for awhile, read the
following information to gain an even more detailed understanding.
f?
CAUTION:
You now have a
basic understandlng of how
the Series 1500
handles a control
program. Please
read and then
continue to refer
to the following
fine points. The
“Helpful Hints”
sectlon will raise
your skills with
the Series 1500
to the highest
level.
22
f?
Helpful Hints
Here are some Series 1500 fine points:
1. Halt
Conditions
A.
A Blank Step halts the Series 1500. A “Blank Step” is any step which is not
programmed. An “SP” will appear in the Function Display when you select
a Blank Step with the MODE key.
B.
The Series 1500 can enter the HALT condition in two ways: It encounters a
Blank Step in a program, or you press the RUN/HALT key while a program
is running.
WATLOW Series 1500 User’s Manual
Sample Program, Chapter 2
C.
While in the HALT condition, the Series 1500 maintains the Set Points and
Event Output conditions from the step it was in when it was halted, or from last
step before a “Blank Step” halted the control. If you restart the control, having
made no change to the step data, the 1500 will complete the step from the time it
stopped. If you change data, the step begins from beginning.
D.
Thus, if your sample program did not have “Recycle” activated, it would halt
after performing Step #8, but would continue to hold the oven at 110°,
65%RH, and with Ch-1 Events 3 and 4 ON and Ch-2 Events 1 and 3 ON.
E.
If you press the RUN/HALT key at 1-1/2 minutes into Step #5, it would Halt
with the oven at 275°, 83.2%RH, and have Ch-1 Event 1 ON and Ch-2
Event 2 ON.
F.
However, you may not want the Step #8 conditions to be retained until
tomorrow. You could add a step at the end of the program to establish
Set Points of 75°, 50%RH, and with all Event Cutputs OFF.
2. Ramping Conditions
A.
When running any Set Point step, the Series 1500 notes what the
existing starting conditions are and what the desired ending conditions are.
Then it follows a linear path between the two.
B.
Although the desired ending conditions are specifically programmed into
each step, the beginning conditions depend on the step performed just
previously. Know where you are going and where you've been.
C.
Step #4 of your Sample Program is an example:
l
l
l
As the chart on page 17 shows, you expect to start Step #4 at 400°, and
ramp uniformly down to 275°. This certainly is what happens on the first
time through Step #4.
But when you “loop back-from Step #6, your starting point is 11 O°. You
will be ramping upward from 11 O° to 275°.
If this is not acceptable to you, you might want to jump loop back to Step
#2 to reach a full 400° through Step #3 before you start Step #4.
3. Wait Step
A.
A Wait Step maintains the same Set Points that existed at the end of the
previous step. With Step #1 as a Wait Step, this means that the 1500 will
use the default values for Step #1 (75°, 50%RH, ail events OFF) during its
first run. However, when it recycles from Step #6, it will retain the Step #8
values (11 O°, 65%RH, Ch. #1 Events 3 & 4 ON and Ch. #2 Events 1&3
ON).
If you were to halt the program during Step #3 and then “RESTART’ and run
it, Step #1 would retain the Step #3 values. Since this is not always desirable,
you could place a short (1 second) step immediately before the Wait Step to
establish different Set Point values.
B.
When waiting for "Time,” program all three units (HR-MN-SC). If you program
“53” for Minutes, but enter nothing for Hours or Seconds, the programmed
time will be 53 minutes after midnight.
Sample Program, Chapter 2
WATLOW Series 1500 User's Manual
23
C.
In your sample program’s Wait Step, you used “Wait for time” because you
aren’t connected to a variable oven yet. A more common use of the Wait Step
could be as follows:
In Step #2, you have allowed exactly four minutes to reach 400°,
90%RH. Depending upon your system, this may either be impossible
to do, or you may reach the desired conditions much earlier than that.
This could result in bad apple pies.
l
lf you reprogrammed Step # 2 as a Wait Step, you could measure how
long it takes to achieve the desired conditions, and then react
immediately. Much better apple pies.
l
But, there is a choice to make here: The Wait Step does not follow the
linear ramping path to reach the new conditions as a Set Point Step
does. A Wait Step uses the previous step’s Set Point. To optimize
control (reduce the overshoot and undershoot) a Wait Step uses the
“PID Parameters” to satisfy the wait condition. In other words, select
the step type which best matches your needs. (The PID parameters
are discussed in the Technical Reference Section that follows).
l
4. Jump
Loop Step (JL)
A.
In the sample program, you used this capability to jump from Step #6 back to
Step #4 two times. Your “Jump Count” (JC) was set to “2.” Any value from
1 to 255 can be used in loops of this type.
B.
If you program “0” into “JC,” the JUMP will occur infinitely. This action could
set up a never-ending loop if the jump is backwards. Oryou can set up a
one-time “unconditional jump” if the jump is forward. If you use a forward
jump, the 0 choice makes no difference. The jump will be performed once.
l
But why would you ever want to simply jump forward and skip over some
steps, you ask?
Suppose your overall program has various functional sections, not all of
which you want to do every time. By ending each section with a Jump
Step, you can easily alter the program to perform various sections in
diierent sequences.
During programming work, you may want to develop and test a program in
sections. You can develop the separate sections with unprogrammed
Blank Steps between them, then unite the separate sections laterwith
Jump Steps.
C.
As you learned earlier, jumping or looping into Steps from “different
directions” can sometimes cause unexpected results due to different
starting conditions as you enter a new step. Watch for such possibilities.
5. Recycle
With the Recycle option active, you might expect to see continuous activity as the
process repeats the program sequence. This sample program will, in fact,
immediately start Step #1 after it completes Step # 8 .
24
WATLOW Series 1500 User'sManual
Sample Program, Chapter 2
Sample Program
However, remember that Step #1 is programmed as a "Wait Step," so it will wait until
the same time tomorrow. Since you now know what a Wait Step does, you may want
to reprogram Step #1 as a simple "Set Point" step so that you can view the Recycle
action. If you do decide to reprogram Step #1, then read the following items.
•
1500
You cannot alter data or parameters while the program is running. The
must be in the HALT condition.
• If you want to move to a different Step #, to see what is programmed there
and then modify that step, enter the CHG DATA mode. Then to reprogram it from the CHG DATA mode, go to the appropriate step as described above. Then press the CLEAR key. All programmed data (for this
step only) will clear, and you can now reprogram it.
6. Interactive Changing of Set Points and Events
When in the halted condition, the Series 1500 actively maintains the current set
points and Event Output status. At times, you may wish to change these conditions
without actually entering and running a profile step. To do this, you must be in the
"MONITOR DATA" mode, halted (PROG HALT LED ON) and "RESTART" key just
pressed. Then use the function key to move to the desired prompt ("C1", "C2", "E1"
or "E2"), use the INCREMENT/DECREMENT keys to move to the desired data, and
press the ENTER key. The Series 1500 will quickly change to controlling at the new
condition.
Where To Go From Here
As soon as you feel comfortable with the Series 1500 sample program, move on to
Installation and Wiring, Chapter 3. Or if you have already installed and wired your
system, go to the Programming Chart in Chapter 4 and begin entering and documenting your Series 1500 program.
Sample Program, Chapter 2
WATLOW Series 1500 User's Manual
25
Installation-Wiring
Chapter 3
How to Install and Wire the 1500
This chapter tells you how to install and wire the Series 1500. There are also some
suggestions for sensor installation. Also, be sure to look at the noise reduction
guidelines before making your panel cutout.
Sensor Installation Guidelines
Temp-RH
In this 1500 configuration, a dry bulb RTD measures temperature on Channel 1. A
wet bulb RTD, in combination with the dry bulb RTD, senses relative humidity on
Channel 2. The 1500 calculates the temperature difference between the two bulbs to
determine percent relative humidity.
Temp-Temp
For Temp-Temp RTD operation, each dry bulb RTD senses temperature for its
channel.
RTDs
The RTDs for the Series 1500 are customer-supplied items. They may be Gordon
Part #S001-0133-0000, which is a wire-wound RTD inside a sealed, 18% NickelSilver sheath, made for fast temperature response. The detector element is platinum
wire 100Ω at 0°C with a temperature coefficient of 0.003916Ω/Ω/°C. The sheath is
0.1875 in. (5 mm) diameter, 2.75 in. (70 mm) long. The three wire leads are 48 in.
(1219 mm) long and teflon insulated.
Contact Gordon at:
5710 Kenosha St., Box 500
Richmond, IL 60071
Phone: 815/678-2211
Excessive lead length in a two-wire RTD sensor can create indication errors. To
combat this, use a three wire sensor in long lead applications.
RTD - The Dry Bulb Installation
We suggest you mount the dry bulb RTD at a location in your process or system
where it reads an average temperature. Air flow past this sensor should be moderate. The sensor should be thermally insulated from the sensor mounting.
RTD - The Wet Bulb Installation
One way to prepare the RTD wet bulb sensor for reading relative humidity on Channel 2 is to slip a cotton wick over the sensor sheath, Watlow Part # 0830-0111-0000
or an equivalent. Put one end of the wick in water. Some systems use a small
trough of water with a float valve to replenish the evaporating liquid.
26
WATLOW Series 1500 User's Manual
Installation - Wiring, Chapter 3
Installation-Wiring
Use distilled water to avoid mineral deposits on the wick that can change the %RH
reading. The wicking distance should be as short as practical. The cotton wick must
be free of any sizing and starch. The "float valve-trough" systems should also remove the water when the ambient temperature goes below freezing or above boiling.
To obtain valid %RH readings, air flow past the %RH sensor must be sufficient to
evaporate the maximum amount of water from the wick without drying it out. Evaporation cools the sensor; the amount of cooling relates directly to the relative humidity
present.
Thermally insulate the wet bulb sensor from the sensor mounting. This prevents
mounting surface heat from flowing into the sensor sheath and changing the wet bulb
temperature. (The result of such heat flow will be a humidity reading higher than
actual.)
Thermocouple Installation Guidelines
Locate the thermocouples in your process or system where they read average temperatures. Air flow past these sensors should be moderate. The sensors must be
thermally insulated from the sensor mounting. Both thermocouples must be ungrounded to obtain correct readings.
Wiring Practices for Preventing Noise
Most noise problems stem from wiring practices, the major means of coupling noise
from its sources to the control circuit.
An outstanding information resource for wiring guidelines is the IEEE Standard No.
518-1982 and is available from IEEE, Inc. 345 East 47th Street, New York, NY
10017.
Noise Sources
•
•
•
•
•
Switches and relay contacts operating inductive loads such as motors, coils,
solenoids, and relays, etc.
Thyristors or other semiconductor devices which are not zero crossover-fired
(randomly-fired or phase angle-fired devices).
All welding machinery.
Heavy current carrying conductors.
Fluorescent and neon lights.
How to Decrease Noise Sensitivity
1.
Our extensive noise testing has shown that the Series 1500 has a good level
of noise immunity. In extremely noisy environments, however, the testing has
shown that the most effective RFI techniques are:
a. An RFI filter (such as the Corcom 1ER1) in the power line mounted external to the Series 1500 case. The RFI filter should be an RFI sealed type.
b. Shielded power cord with the shield terminated to the Series 1500 case
Installation - Wiring, Chapter 3
WATLOW Series 1500 User's Manual
27
c. Shielded RTD sensor with the shield terminated to the Series 1500 case
and to an existing ground plane.
2.
Physical separation and wire routingmust be given careful consideration in
planning the layout of the system.. For example, A.C. power supply lines
should be bundled together and physically kept separate from input signal lines
(very low power level). Keep all switched output signal lines (high power level)
separate from current control loop signals (low power level).
3.
Excessive lead length in a two-wire RTD sensor can create indication errors.
For every 10 feet of lead length, a 1 ° C error is typical. To combat this, use a
three wire sensor in long lead applications.
4.
Another important practice is to look at the system layout and identify electrical
noise sources such as solenoids, relay contacts, motors, etc, and where they
are physically located. Then route the wire bundles and cables as far away as
possible from these noise sources.
5.
Shielded cables should be used for all low power signal lines to protect against
magnetic and electrostatic coupling of noise. Some simple pointers are as
follows:
l
l
l
l
28
Whenever possible, low level signal lines should be run unbroken from
signal source to the control circuit.
Connect the shield to the control circuit common end only. Never
leave the shield unconnected at both ends. Never connect both shield .
ends to a common.
If the shield is broken at some termination point and then continued
on, the shield must be connected to maintain shield continuity.
If the shield is used as a signal return, no electrostatic shielding should
be assumed. If this must be done, use a triaxed cable (electrostatically
shielded coaxial cable).
6.
Shielded twisted wire shou!d be used anytime control circuit signals must travel
over two feet or when they are bundled in parallel with other signal wires (not
line voltage or load wires).
7.
The size or gauge of wire should be selected by calculating the maximum circuit
current and choosing the guage meeting that requirement. Using greatly
larger wire sizes than required generally will increase the likelihood of
electrostatic (capacitance) coupling of noise.
8.
Ground loops must be eliminated in the entire control system. There are obvious
loops which can be spotted by studying the “as-built" wiring diagram. There
are also the not-so-o bvious ground loops that result from techniques
connecting internal circuit commons in the manufacturers equipment. An
example of this would be ifif a control circuit is designed to work with a
grounded sensor input.
9.
Do not daisy chain A.C. power (or return) lines or output signal (or return) lines to
multiple control circuits. Use a direct line from the power source to each input
requiring A.C. power. Avoid paralleling Ll (power lead) and L2 (return lead) to
bad power solenoids. Contactors, and control circuits. If Ll (power lead) is
used to switch a load,
(return lead) will have the same switched signal and
could couple unwanted noise into a control circuit.
10.
Grounding the chassis of each piece of equipment in the system is very
important. The simple practice of connecting each individual chassis to the
overall equipment chassis immediately adjacent to that piece and then tying all
the major chassis ground terminals to ether with one lead (usually green wire)
to ground at one signle point will work best.
11.
Do not confuse chassis grounds (safety ground) with control circuit commons or
with A.C. supply lines !2 (return or neutral line). Each return system wiring
must be kept separate, making absolutely sure chassis ground (Safety) is
never used as a conductor to return circuit current.
WATLOW Series 1500 User's Manual
Installation - Wiring, Chapter 3 3
Input Power Wiring
Installation-Wiring
Microprocessors are in a way like trout…
They require a clean environment to be successful and to prosper. A clean environment means on one level an environment that is free of excessive dust, moisture and
other airborne pollutants. But primarily it means a "clean" source of input power from
which to base all its operations. What is "clean power?"
Clean power is simply a steady, noise-free line voltage source that meets the rating
specifications of the hardware using it. Without clean power to the integrated circuitry, any microprocessor chip is doomed to failure.
Just as the water you get from a tap nowadays may not be acceptable to drink in
some locales, so the line voltage coming into your facility may not be acceptable for
your microprocessor devices. You may have to filter or "clean" the water or the
power. In industrial environments, the potential for pollutants increases, especially
electrical noise due to high level power consumption occurring in one place.
The recommendations we are providing for you are ways to achieve a minimum level
of clean input power protection. In almost all cases these guidelines will remove the
potential for input power problems. If you've applied these measures and still do not
get results, please feel free to call us at the factory. We are here to see that our
control products work well and do the job they were designed to do.
Definitions
Ground Loop - A condition created when two or more paths for electricity are
created in a ground line, or when one or more paths are created in a shield.
Earth Ground - The starting point for safety and computer grounds. It is usually a
copper rod driven into the earth.
Safety Ground - A ground line run along with electrical power wiring to protect
personnel.
Computer Ground - A ground line for the ground connections to computers or
microprocessor-based systems. This line is isolated from safety ground.
Common Mode Line Filter - A device to filter noise signals present on both power
lines with respect to ground.
Differential Mode Line Filter - A device to filter noise signals present between the
two power lines themselves.
The Dos and Don'ts of Clean Input Power
Do keep line filters as close to the control as possible to minimize the area for
interference pick up.
Do use twisted pair wire and possibly shielded wire from line filters to the control
Installation - Wiring, Chapter 3
WATLOW Series 1500 User's Manual
29
Installation-Wiring
keep the line "clean."
Do keep low power control wires physically separated as far as possible from line
voltage wires. Also keep all controller wiring separate from other nearby wiring.
Physical separation is extremely effective. A 12 inch minimum separation is
usually effective.
Do use common mode, differential mode or a combination of the two filters wherever
power may have electrical interferences.
Do cross other wiring at 90° angles whenever crossing lines is unavoidable.
Do have a computer ground line that is separate from all other ground lines. This
computer ground line should ideally terminate at the ground rod where the
electrical service is grounded.
Don't connect computer ground to safety ground or any other ground points in the
electrical system, except at the ground rod.
Don't mount relays or switching devices close to a microprocessor control.
Don't run wires carrying line voltage with signal wires (sensor, communications or
other low power lines) going to the control.
Don't use conduit for computer ground.
Don't have phase angle-fired devices in the same electrical enclosure or on the
same power line with the control.
Don't connect ground to the control case if the control is mounted in grounded
enclosure (prevent ground loops.)
Don't fasten common mode line filters or filters with metal cases to metal that is at
ground potential. This prevents ground loops and maintains filter effectiveness.
How to Check for Ground Loops
To check for ground loops, disconnect the ground wire at the ground termination.
Measure the resistance from the wire to the point where it was connected. The
ohmmeter should read a high ohm value. If you have a low ohm value across this
gap, that means there is at least one ground loop present in your system.
Or check for continuity; your reading should be "open". If you do find continuity, you
must now begin looking for the ground loops. Begin disconnecting grounds in the
system one at a time, checking for continuity after each disconnection. When
continuity reads "open" you have eliminated the ground loop(s). Also as you reconnect grounds, keep making the continuity test. It is possible to reconnect a ground
loop.
30
WATLOW Series 1500 User's Manual
Installation - Wiring, Chapter 3
Installation-Wiring
Noise Suppression Devices Available from Watlow
Watlow Winona stocks a few key noise suppression parts. You may order these by
calling your local Watlow distributor.
Item
Electrical Ratings
Part Number
Common Mode Line Filter
250V, 3 Amp
0804-0196-0000
Differential Mode Line Filter
Refer to the islatrol listing above.
Metal Oxide Varistor
150V, 80 Joule
0802-0273-0000
MOV
130V, 38 Joule
0802-0304-0000
MOV
275V, 75 Joule
0802-0266-0000
MOV
275V, 140 Joule
0802-0405-0000
Table 4 Noise Suppression Device
Ratings
1
Keep filters 12
inches or less from
the control. Minimize the line
distance where
noise can be reintroduced to
control.
Line Filtering Configurations for Controls
These three diagrams show you filter configurations for removing input power noise.
Choose the one best suited for your system if you are unsure which one to use, see
Figure 12.
For very dirty or critical application - use micro-computer-regulated power
supply or Uninterruptable Power Supply (U.P.S.)
k1
L1
L2
Line
Load
Control
Figure 10 Differential Mode
Filter Diagram
Control
Figure 11 Common Mode
Filter Diagram
Shield
k2
L2
To prevent ground
loops do not fasten
common mode line
filters or filters with
metal cases to metal
that is at ground
potential. Doing so
will reduce filter
effectiveness.
D.M. Line Filter
Ground
L1
2
k1
C.M. Line Filter
Line
Load
Ground
Shield
k2
k1
L1
L2
D.M. Line Filter
C.M. Line Filter
Ground
Installation - Wiring, Chapter 3
mov
Line
Load
Figure 12 Combination
DifferentialCommon Mode
Filter Diagram
WATLOW Series 1500 User's Manual
31
How to Eliminate Noise
Watlow Part Number
for Quencharc:
0804-0147-0000
1.
Use “Quencharcs” to suppress noise generated by devices such as relays,
relay contacts, solenoids, motors, etc. A Quencharc is a simple filter
device using a .1µf, 600 volt, non-polar capacitor in series with a 100
ohm, 1/2 watt resistor. The device can be used on an A.C. circuit to
effectively dampen noise at its source. For a D.C. circuit, use a diodex
across the inductive load coil to dampen noise. This diode must be sized
to the coil, having a reverse voltage larger than the coil voltage. The
diode forward current must also be larger than the reverse coil current.
Call Watlow
Customer Service
for MOV Part
Number.
2.
An “MOV’ (Metal Oxide Varistor) can be used to limit voltage “spikes” that occur
on the A.C. supply lines as a result of lightning strikes, switching large motors,
etc. The “MOV” is available in several varieties and for 115 or 230 volt lines. The
device dissipates the voltage “spikes” to ground and in doing so repeatedly,
deteriorates its ability to function. “MOV’s” have a limited life.
3.
A “Corcom IERI” and other similar power line filters are designed to carry the
power for the control circuit and at the same time “buffed the control circuit from
A.C. line noise. Devices like a Corcom use media (electromagnetic filtering)
other than electric circuits to filter out the electrical noise. Care must be
taken in matching the power capabilities of the filter in respect to the power
demands of the circuit.
4.
The ultimate protection is an “uninterrruptable” power supply. This device
“senses” the A.C. power line; when the line fluctuates, a battery-powered
60Hz inverted circuit takes over, supplying power within one-half to one cycle of
the A.C. line. This is a very expensive solution.
CAUTlON:
Whenever
attempting to
open a Series
1500 with data
communications
(RS-422/423
interface), be
sure your
system’s DB-15
male connector is
not connected to
the rear of the
unit. The DB-l5
male connector
may be attached
to the 1500 with
two screws
through the rear
of the case to the
female DB-15
connector Inside.
Attempting to
remove the Series
1500 control
chassis from its
case with the DB15 male still
attached could
pull the circuit
board from its
chassis socket
32
How to Open the 1500
Here’s how to open the Series 1500 and pull the control chassis from its case:
h
The control chassis fastens to the case with a single screw located at the lower front
panel. Turn the screw counterclockwise to loosen it. Three strip connector plugs, in
the rear of the control chassis, feed power and signals through the back of the case
to the triple terminal strip. These plugs will let go as you pull.
When removing the Series 1500 Control from its case, pull firmly but gently. When
returning the control to the case, be sure you have the top UP to match the boards
with the case plugs. The 1500 will not fit in to the case upside down. However,
always check to see that it is oriented correctly. Press the unit in firmly, then turn the
front panel screw clockwise to secure it. Do not overtighten screw.
Pre-Installation Information
The Watlow Series 1500 behind-bezel dimensions are 5.375 in. high by 5.375 in.
wide by 7.5 in. deep. The unit weighs 4.5 lbs. For dimensional and mounting
information, including the location of mounting holes and size of the front panel
cutout, see Figure 10.
The Series 1500 mounts on panels from 0.06 in. to 0.25 in. thick.
WATLOW Series 1500 User's Manual
Installation - Wiring Chapter 3
Installation-Wiring
8.68
1.180
7.000
0.500
Figure 13 Unit and Panel
Cutout Dimensions
5.375
± 0.015
Bezel
Mounting bracket
Note: All dimensions in inches.
5.433 SQ. MIN.
5.472 SQ. MAX.
Your Panel
Thickness:
or 5- 7/16
Nominal
0.06 to 0.25
Note: All dimensions in inches.
6.0
6.0
Installation - Wiring, Chapter 3
WATLOW Series 1500 User's Manual
33
Installation-Wiring
Installation Procedure
”
WARNING:
To avoid electric
shock, make all
connections on
the terminal strips
on the back of this
control before
connecting power
to the unit. Also
disconnect power
before opening the
Watlow Series
1500.
!
CAUTION:
All wiring and
fusing should
conform to the
National Electric
Code and to any
locally applicable
codes as well.
2
CAUTION:
Before connecting
the Series 1500 to
a data communications network,
remove power
from all devices
on the network.
!
2. Remove the Series 1500 chassis from its case by turning the front panel screw
CCW. Grip the bezel firmly and pull the control from the case.
3. Place the case in the cutout you just made.
4. Attach the mounting brackets either to the top and bottom, or to both sides of the
unit.
5. Tighten the screws on the ends of the mounting brackets to hold the case
securely against the back of the panel.
Electrical Connections and Wiring
”
Figures 14 and 15, on the following two pages, show you how to connect the Watlow
Series 1500 to your load or system. Study the strip connections carefully before
beginning the hook-up. Be sure to use these jumpers on the Power Supply terminals: For 115VAC, jumper 32 to 35 and jumper 33 to 36. For 230 VAC, jumper 33 to
35. Attach Chassis Ground to 34.
If you wish to disable Channel 2, Figure 18 will show you how to do that.
Figure 19 provides the pin configuration for units equipped with RS-422/RS-423 data
communications. On these models the serial communications interface is through a
DB-15, D-Type, female connector located on the 1500's backplane. This connector
is tapped to accept two 4-40 brass screws for attaching the male plug.
!
!
!
1
2
3
3
CAUTION:
Add external noise
isolators to any
unisolated power
supply components in devices
on an RS-422
network to prevent
noise from entering the network.
34
1. Make a panel cutout per the dimensions in Figure 10.
6. Insert the control chassis into its case and turn the front panel screw CW to hold
the chassis in place. If you have a Series 1500 with data communications:
Fasten your DB-15 male connector with two 4-40 brass screws to the 1500's DB15 female on the rear of the unit. Do not overtighten screws.
1
!
To mount the Watlow Series 1500:
Figures 14 & 15 - Signal Conditioners, Jumper Selection, p. 35, 36
Figures 16 & 17 - Power Supply Input, CH-1 & CH-2 Output Connections, p. 36, 37
Figure 18 - Wiring To Disable Channel 2, p. 37
Figure 19 - RS-422/423 Interface, Pin Designations, Jumper Selection, p. 38
Once you have the Watlow Series 1500 Control securely mounted and correctly
wired, you may apply power to the system.
WATLOW Series 1500 User's Manual
Installation - Wiring, Chapter 3
Installation-Wiring
SIGNAL CONDITIONER
RTD Version
Analog Signal Common
% RH Analog Output
Analog Output Ch-2 °F (Wet Bulb)
Figure 14 Signal Conditioner
Connections and
Jumpers.
Analog Output Ch-1 °F (Dry Bulb)
k Dry Bulb Sensor
CH-2
(+)
0-5V
input with
DIP #3 ( - )
OFF
k Wet Bulb Sensor
Analog Output Ch-1°C (Dry Bulb)
Analog Output Ch-2°C (Wet Bulb)
Not used on Signal Conditioner Board #A007-1316
NOTE:
For a two-wire
sensor on Channel
1, attach the leads
to Terminals 5 and
6 with a jumper
wire from Terminal
6 to Terminal 7.
For Channel 2,
attach the leads to
Terminals 8 and 9
with a jumper wire
from Terminal 9 to
RTD Version
Jumper Selection
with DIP Switch #3.
#3 ON = Jumpers on
W151 and W153 for
RTD sensor.
#3 OFF = Jumpers
on W150 and W154
for 0-5V signal.
SIGNAL CONDITIONER
T/C Version
Signal Common
Ch-2 °C Signal
NOTE:
Terminals 1-4, 1112 provide analog
signals for a chart
recorder.
Ch-2 °F Signal
Ch-1 °F Signal
Ch-1 Input
Ch-2 Input
Ch-1 °C Signal
Not Used
Installation - Wiring, Chapter 3
CAUTION:
Thermocouples
must be ungrounded.
Grounded thermocouples will
generate erroneous temperature
indication and can
develop communication errors.
WATLOW Series 1500 User's Manual
35
Installation-Wiring
Fig. 15 Event Output,
Remote Hold Input
and Event Input
Connections for
Dual Solid State
Relay Version
Event Input/Output, 0.5 Amp Solid State Relay
Model # 150_ - _ _ _ 1 - _ _ _0
Event Common
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
CH-2, Event 4 Load
CH-2, Event 3 Load
NOTE:
CH-2, Event 2 Load
Event outputs can
be powered by a line
(up to 240VAC)
independent of the
control input. The
event outputs can
conduct up to 0.5A
each.
CH-2, Event 1 Load
CH-1, Event 4 Load
CH-1, Event 3 Load
CH-1, Event 2 Load
CH-1, Event 1 Load
!
Remote Hold Input
Event Input
Digital Common
!
CAUTION:
Fuse event outputs
properly. Failure to
do so could cause
damage to your
equipment and
property.
Temp & RH Control Output, Power Supply Input,
0.5 Amp Solid State Relay
Figure 16 Power Supply Input,
Temp. & RH Output
Connections for
Dual Solid State
Relay Version
!
NOTE:
The control power
outputs for each
channel can be
powered by independent 115VAC or
230VAC lines.
36
Model # 150_ - _ AA _ - _ _ _0
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
32
33
34
35
36
WATLOW Series 1500 User's Manual
L
CH-1, Heat Load
L2
CH-1, Cool Load
L
CH-2, Humidify or Heat Load
L2
CH-2, De-humidify or Cool Load
Not Used
Power
See Figure 17 (next page)
Installation - Wiring, Chapter 3
Installation-Wiring
Event Input/Output, Open Collector
Model # 150_ - _ _ _ 2 - _ _ _0
+10 Unregulated Supply
Event Common
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
CH-2, Event 4 Load
CH-2, Event 3 Load
CH-2, Event 2 Load
CH-2, Event 1 Load
CH-1, Event 4 Load
CH-1, Event 3 Load
CH-1, Event 2 Load
CH-1, Event 1 Load
Remote Hold Input
Event Input
Digital Common
Fig. 15A Event Output,
Remote Hold Input
and Event Input
Connections for
Dual Solid State
Switch Version
Temp & RH Control Output, Power Supply Input,
Open Collector
Figure 16A Power Supply Input,
Temp. & RH Output
Connections for
Dual Solid State
Switch Version.
Model # 150_ - _ BB _ - _ _ _0
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
32
33
34
35
36
Installation - Wiring, Chapter 3
CH-1, Heat Load
CH-1, Cool Load
CH-2, Humidify or Heat Load
CH-2, De-humidify or Cool Load
+10 Unregulated Supply
Power
See Figure 17 (next page)
WATLOW Series 1500 User's Manual
37
Installation-Wiring
Figure 17 Power Supply
Input, CH-1 &
CH-2 Output
Connections
Power Supply Input, Temp & RH Control Output
115VAC
L2
For 115VAC control operation,
install a jumper wire from
Terminal 32 to Terminal 35, and
a separate jumper wire from
Terminal 33 to Terminal 36.
Bring line power in to Terminals
32 (L2B) and 36 (L1A). Connect
the line ground wire to Terminal 34.
CHASSIS GROUND
L1
CAUTON:
Fuse load and
power outputs
properly. Failure
to do so could
cause damage to
your equipment
and property.
230VAC
L2
CHASSIS GROUND
L1
Figure 18 Wiring to Disable
Channel 2
For 230VAC control operation,
install a jumper wire from Terminal
33 to Terminal 35. Bring line
power in to Terminals 32 (L2B)
and 36 (L1A). Connect the line
ground wire to Terminal 34.
To Disable Channel 2
Required when running Ch-1 TEMP control
without Ch-2.
RTD
CAUTON:
Total absence of
connections on
Terminals 8, 9,
and 10 will create
an alarm condition.
1. Select TT=1 for TEMP-TEMP operation.
Refer to Page 46, Figure 21.
1. Put a jumper between Terminals 8 and 10.
2. Install a 107Ω resistor between Terminals
8 and 9, plus a jumper wire between
Terminals 9 and 10.
NOTE:
For thermocouple
inputs, the 107Ω
resistor can be
used in place of
the jumper.
38
T/C
WATLOW Series 1500 User's Manual
k
NOTE
S1
S2
S3
RTD
T/C
Installation - Wiring, Chapter 3
RS-423A (RS-232C)
Installation-Wiring
Signal Common
Transmit (Data Out)
Jumper
Pin 11
to Pin 3
Serial Port
Groun
Jumper Pin 3 to Pin 11
Receive (Data In)
Figure 19 RS-422/423 Interface, Pin Designations and Jumper.
Series 1500
DB-15 Female
with respect
to the Series 1500
RS-422A
Tran +
Tran (Serial Port Common)
Rec +
Rec -
You must also set the RS-423/RS-422 Jumper for a communications interface. Put
the jumper on W423 for RS-423, or on W422 for RS-422.
NOTE:
The RS-423/RS422 Selection
Jumper is located
on the logic (A0071484) board, on
the side opposite
the DB-15 connector.
A007-1484
W423
W422
DB-15 Connector
Where To Go From Here
Now you are ready to program and tune your Series 1500. If you haven't read the
sample program information in Chapter 2, please do so now. Or if you already
understand how to program the Series 1500, go ahead and enter your program.
You'll find a Programming Chart in the Technical Reference section, Chapter 4, that
is particularly helpful in recording your program.
Installation - Wiring, Chapter 3
WATLOW Series 1500 User's Manual
39
Programming
Chapter 4
Technical Reference
Technical Reference
This section of the Series 1500 manual is compiled for easy reference and rapid
information retrieval. Notice the page headings as you thumb through the section;
they will assist you in finding what you need.
How to Program the Series 1500
Here's how to enter a program into the Series 1500 through the front panel. If you
haven't already read it, you'll find a good sample program in Chapter 2 which will
also teach you the programming process.
Write Out Your Program
The Watlow Series 1500 controls temperature or relative humidity for a specific
heating and/or cooling process in a controlled series of individually programmed
steps. Those programmed steps are valuable information. Your program, when it's
entered, gives the Series 1500 orders for the work you want it to perform.
Since the number of steps in the program may be as many as 51, we suggest that
you write it out on copies of the three charts located in this section. This will enable
you to program the Series 1500 quickly and without mistakes. Together, the Series
1500 Programming Chart, the Guarded Access Chart and the General Parameter
Chart will provide you with a back-up copy of your entire program.
Select the Proper DIP Switch Settings
Prior to programming and operating the Series 1500, you must set DIP Switches #1,
2, 6, and 7 for the conditions you want. Write your choices on a copy of the General
Chart, found in this section.
DIP Switch #1 selects whether Event 4 output will be used as an event output, or as
an alarm output for each channel.
DIP Switch #2 selects whether the alarm output will be a latching or a non-latching
output.
DIP Switch #3 selects an RTD sensor for Ch-2, or a 0 to 5v signal for Ch-2.
DIP Switch #3 for a T/C unit must be ON.
DIP Switch #4 single/dual PID.
DIP Switch #5 is for factory test and calibration, it must be ON.
DIP Switch #6 sets a "warm" or "cold" start following power removal from the 1500.
With "Warm Start" the microprocessor uses previously programmed information as if
power had not been removed. A Cold Start is when the 1500 starts "clean" or
completely cleared of all programmed information. All parameters will be empty or
set to the default limits.
40
WATLOW Series 1500 User's Manual
Programming, Chapter 4
Technical Reference
Programming CHG DATA
Normally, the 1500 should be in the Warm Start condition. In Cold Start, all program
information will be lost when power is applied to the unit.
DIP Switch #7 sets the temperature scale at °C or °F.
DIP Switch #8 is not used, set it to the OFF position.
Recycle Option
You may request that your program repeat indefinitely by selecting RC=1 in the
GA = 6 area of the CHG PARA mode.
With the Recycle option active, you may expect to see continuous activity as the
program sequence repeats. However, if your Step #1 is programmed as a "Wait
Step," the processor will be waiting for a time or actual condition and no action will
be taking place.
Programming in General
The programming method is simple. Press the MODE key to get to the mode you
want to program. Then use the FCTN key to move from one prompt to the next for
each of the displays.
When you want to enter data at any given FUNCTION display prompt, press the UP
or DOWN key to select the data for the DATA display. Then, press the ENTER key
to enter the data. The display will momentarily blank, then the entered data will reappear for a short duration and then self-prompt to the next parameter. Whenever
you press the MODE key, you'll get an immediate exit from any mode the 1500 is in.
The flow diagrams, Figures 15 and 16, will aid you in understanding the programming
process for CHG DATA and CHG PARA, respectively.
CAUTION:
Be sure DIP SW-6
is in the OFF
(Warm Start)
position before
you begin programming; all your
entries will be
saved when power
Programming the Change Data Mode (CHG DATA)
Press the MODE key to select the CHANGE DATA mode. The processor will automatically branch to one of three submodes or Step Types: SP-Set Point,
JL-Jump Loop, WT-Wait. See Figure 15.
When SP is in the FUNCTION window and the DATA window is blank, the 1500 is
displaying a "blank step." A blank step is simply an unprogrammed step.
1. For SP (Set Point) submode, press ENTER. The display responds with S1 and
the DATA window is blank. This means the set point for Channel 1 on this
particular step is not programmed. If you want to ENTER a set point for
Channel 1, select a value and press ENTER. Or, if you do not want to program
S1, just press FCTN, and display shows S2. The DATA window is again blank.
2. For the JL (Jump Loop) submode, press FCTN until JL appears in the FUNC
TION window. Then press ENTER. JS-Jump Step, and JC-Jump Count are the
parameters to be entered next.
Programming, Chapter 4
WATLOW Series 1500 User's Manual
41
Technical Reference
Press to light CHG DATA LED.
S e r i e s 1500 D i s p l a y s
Press to select the Step Type you want:
SP, JL, VVT or NX.
Press enter to select individual prompts.
STEP
FUNCTION
DATA
LA I
= Blank Display
Press to select values.
m = Step Number
W 1-1 = Next Step
in Sequence
Press to enter data into memory.
0=
0=
08
0*
Sl
S2
E1
E2
m HR
08
0
l
Figure 20 CHG DATA Mode
Flow Diagram
MN
SC
lzlm
* NX
0
3
=I
0 JS
0l JC
+Fl NX
W1 0
W2 0
WE 0
WH 0
Q
WS
0
[-y-J
-t
NX
For the WT (Wait) submode, do this: With SP displayed, press FCTN until WT
appears. Press ENTER and Wl comes up requesting a wait condition for the Ch1 set point. Enter a value and press ENTER. If no wait for Ch-1 set point is
needed, press FCTN. Now, W2 appears requesting a wait for Ch-2 set point.
After W2, WE, WH (Wait for Real Hours), then WM (Wait for Real Minutes), then
WS (Wait for Real Seconds) will appear in sequence. Select actual time-of-day
values for each and press ENTER.
The Blank Step
Any unprogrammed step is first a Blank Step before information entered makes it a
Set Point, Jump Loop, or Wait Step.
A Blank Step halts the processor. When it encounters a Blank Step at the end of a
program, the processor will always halt unless you selected the RECYCLE option in
the CHG PARA mode. In that case, the program returns to Step 01 and repeats. The
0001 entry option at the RC prompt in Guarded Access selects the recycle option.
In normal programming, only the last step in the program remains a Blank step.
Therefore, you retain a Blank Step simply by not programming the step.
Halt Conditions
The Series 1500 can HALT in three ways. It encounters a Blank Step in a program (a
Blank Step hatts the Series 1500) you press the RUN/HALT key while a program is
running, or the remote hold input is shorted.
While in the HALT condition, the Series 1500 actively maintains the Set Points and
Event Output conditions which existed at the time it hatted.
42
WATLOW Series 1500 User's Manual
Programming, Chapter 4
Technical Reference
At the end of a program, or in a hatted condition, the Series 1500 wiIl continue to
hold set points and Event Outputs at the same states they were in at the end of the
final step or when the program was halted.
Example: If you press the RUN/HALT key at 1-1/2 minutes into a step, the control
would hold an oven at that step’s set points and Event states.
If you do not want the “final” step conditions to be retained at the end of a program,
add a step to establish stand-by set points with all Event Outputs OFF.
SP (Set Point) Step Programming
Enter set point data for both channels in this submode. The SP prompt sequence,
appearing in the FUNCTION display and listed below, will receive data in the DATA
display. Use the UP or DOWN key, then press ENTER. The processor advances
automatically to the next prompt.
To advance to the next prompt without entering data, press the FCTN key. The CHG
DATA flow diagram will assist you in the programming process.
1.
Sl (Channel 1 Set Point) Select the Channel 1 set point and press ENTER.
2.
S2 (Channel 2 Set Point) Select the Channel 2 set point. Then press
ENTER.
3.
El (Channel 1 Event Outputs) Select a 1, or a 0 for each the four
available events (1 = ON, 0 = OFF). The DATA display shows the 1 or 0 entry for
Events 4 through 1, from left to right. Press ENTER.
l
4.
E2 (Channel 2 Event Outputs) Again, select a 1, or a 0 for each of the four
available events (1 = ON, 0 = OFF). The DATA display shows the 1 or 0 entry for
Events 4 through 1, from left to right. Press ENTER.
l
l
Note: If you’ve set DIP Switch #1 ON, then there are only three events
available for each channel. In that case each Event 4 is an alarm.
5. HR (Step Duration) Select hours, press ENTER. The prompt MN will
appear. Select minutes, press ENTER. The prompt SC will appear. Select
seconds, press ENTER. The step duration in hours, minutes and seconds will
appear in the FUNCTION and DATA displays. The TIME LED will be ON. Press
FCTN to proceed to the next prompt, NX.
6.
NX (Next Step) This prompt will automatically take you to the next step in
sequence when you press ENTER. If, however, you want to go to a different
step, simply enter that Step # with the UP and DOWN keys and press ENTER.
7.
Return to the SP, JL, WT, NX loop. The process begins over again; you
must choose the Step type before programming the step.
Set Point Ramping Conditions
When remembering any Set Point step, the Series 1500 notes what the existing
starting conditions are and what the desired ending conditions are. Then it follows a
linear path between the two.
Although the desired ending conditions are specifically programmed into each step,
the beginning conditions depend on the step the 1500 performed just previously.
Know where you are going and where you’ve been.
Programming, Chapter 4
WATLOW Series 1500 User's Manual
43
Technical Reference
Jump Loop Step
Here's an example:
•
You start a Step #4 at 400° (Step #3's set point), and ramp uniformly down to
275° (Step 4's set point).
•
If you "loop back" from Step #6, your starting point will be the Step #6 set point
and not the Step #3 set point. You will be ramping to 275° from a different
starting point.
•
You might want to jump back to an earlier step to reach a full 400° through Step
#3 before you start Step #4. Read on for more about Jump Steps…
JL (Jump Loop) Step Programming
In this submode you'll program the step # to be jumped to (JS) and the number of
jumps to be performed (JC). The most common Jump Loops are backward jumps,
that is, jumping to steps already performed. You can also program a forward jump,
but from there you cannot loop back.
"Nested loops" or "intertwined loops" are not acceptable. An example of an intertwined loop is a sequence with Steps 1, 2 , 3, 4 and 7 programmed as regular Set
Point steps; Step 5 as a jump to Step 1 and Step 6 as a jump to Step 2. The processor never reaches Step 7. See the example below.
Step 1
Step 2
Step 3
Step 4
Step 5
Step 6
Step 7
Set Point
Set Point
Set Point
Set Point
JS - 01
JS - 02
Set Point
Use simple loops in your programs. You'll find hints to programming below.
• JS (Jump Step) selects the step to jump to, press ENTER.
• JC (Jump Count) selects the number of times this loop is to run, press ENTER.
• For NX (Next Step), press ENTER to go to the next step, or select any step.
Any value from 1 to 255 can be used in loops of this type.
If you program "0" into "JC," the JUMP is always performed. If the jump is backwards, this will be a never-ending loop. Or set up a one-time "unconditional jump"
with a forward jump. By ending each section with a Jump Step, you can easily alter a
program to perform various sections in different sequences.
•
During programming work, you may want to develop and test a program in
sections. Develop the separate sections with unprogrammed Blank Steps
between them, then unite the separate sections later with Jump Steps.
As you learned earlier, jumping or looping into Steps from "different directions" can
sometimes cause unexpected results due to different starting conditions as you enter
a new step. Watch for such possibilities.
44
WATLOW Series 1500 User's Manual
Programming, Chapter 4
Technical Reference
WT (Wait) Step Programming
This submode allows the Series 1500 to wait for Channel 1 and/or Channel 2 actual
process inputs and/or the real time of day. You can wait for one or two of these
conditions, or all of them. If you don't need one wait condition, just press the FCTN
key, and the next Wait prompt will appear.
• With W1 (Channel 1 Actual) select the Ch-1 Wait set point and press ENTER.
• With W2 (Channel 2 Actual) select the Ch-2 Wait set point and press ENTER.
• With WE (Wait for Event) Enter a "1" to wait for a closed switch condition or a "0"
to wait for an open switch condition at the Event Input.
• With WH, WM, WS (Real Time of Day) select each component of the real time of
day set point and press ENTER.
A Wait Step maintains the same Set Points and Event Output conditions that existed
at the end of the previous step.
If Step #1 is a Wait Step and the program is halted on Step #3 a set point step. If
"RE-START" is pressed and you run again, the 1500 will wait for the Step #1 conditions maintaining the set points from Step #3. Since this is not always desirable, you
could place a short (1 second) step immediately before the Wait Step to establish
new set point values.
Enter "0" by pressing the ENTER key when the Data Display is blank, or when a "0"
is in the display.
When waiting for Time, program all three units (HR-MN-SC). If you program only
"53" for Minutes, but enter nothing for Hours or Seconds, the programmed time will
be 53 minutes after midnight, 00 53 00.
The Wait Step does not follow the linear ramping path to reach the new conditions,
as a Set Point Step does. A Wait Step uses the previous step's set point. To optimize control (reduce the overshoot and undershoot), a Wait Step uses the "PID
Parameters" to satisfy the wait condition. In other words, select the step type which
best matches your needs.
NX (Next Step) Programming
After the final prompt in each of the step types (SP, JL, or WT), pressing ENTER
advances the processor to NX, which selects the next program step. At the same
time the STEP display will advance by one.
Pressing ENTER again will bring up SP, JL or WT if the next step has no programmed information. Or, if there is data in the subsequent step, the processor will
move to the first prompt in that submode. For example, if the step is an SP step, S1
will come up; if a WT step, W1 appears in the FUNCTION display, and so on.
If you want a different step from NX, select the number of the step you want in the
DATA display with the UP and DOWN keys, then press ENTER. Again, the processor will move to one of the three step types if the step is blank, or to the first prompt
in the the step type loop: S1, JS or W1.
Pressing FCTN at NX instead of ENTER will send the processor back to the initial
prompt in the current step.
Programming, Chapter 4
WATLOW Series 1500 User's Manual
45
Technical Reference
Altering a Program
1 NOTE:
If you have the
opt ional battery
You cannot alter data or parameters while the program is running. The 1500
must be in the HALT condition.
backed clock, the
time may already
If you want to move to a diierent Step # to see what is programmed there and
then modify that step, enter the CHG DATA mode. Then press the FCTN key
until the “NX” appears in the Function Display. Place the Step # into the Data
Display and press ENTER.
be correct.
.
Figure 21 Change Parameter
(CHG PARA) Mode
Flow Diagram
If you want to completely clear a Step of all programmed data to re-program it, go
to the CHG DATA mode and to the appropriate Step # as described above. Then
press the CLEAR key. All programmed data (for this step only) will clear, and you
can now re-program it.
Programming the Change Parameter Mode (CHG PARA)
Press the mode key to select the Change Parameter (CHG PARA) mode. The TIME
LED will be ON. The FUNCTION and DATA displays will show the real time of day.
Press FCTN to produce the time prompt, HR, in the FUNCTION display. You’ll enter
the real time of day here, beginning with hours. 1 See Change Parameter Fig. 16.
Series 1500 CHG PARA
Selects MNTR
(Change Parameter) Software
DATA, CHG DATA
or CHG PARA
Mode.
Selects any prompt
in a mode.
J
SetCalib
Gffd
1
Pb
1
RS
1
RT
1
rb
1
CT
1
db
1
CA
Set
Heat PID
SetCalib
1
Offset f 1C
CoolPID
Select values for
the DATA display.
1
1C
1C
1C
1C
J
om
Places values from
the DATA display
into memory.
J3
GA = 6
GA-2
Channel 2
+i--•
Dual PID (DIP4 ON
f
)
i4
2H
2H
Set 2H
HeatPID 2H
!
NOTE:
Only RTD version
1500s have the TT
prompt (2-channel
temperature
control.
46
1
H
tDeadband 1
Set
m
L
1H
1H
1H
1H
WATLOW Series 1500 User’s Manual
Deadband 2
Set Calib. 2
offset
1
:
[
Set Deadband {2 2
Set Calib. 2
Offset 2 c
Set
Cool PID
2c
2C
2c
fl
2c
L
Programming, Chapter 4
Technical Reference
Guarded Access
minutes with the UP/DOWN keys. Press ENTER. The prompt SC will appear.
Select correct seconds with the UP/DOWN keys. Press ENTER; GA will appear.
GA (Guarded Access) Programming
The Guarded Access parameters control the process limits. The three GA parameter loops are restricted to operators by special codes. The Guarded Access codes
prevent inexperienced or unauthorized operators from changing the parameters.
The GA prompts appear in the Guarded Access Charts (p. 49 or 50) and in the CHG
PARA flow diagram. You may alter any one of them by changing the DATA display
with the UP and DOWN keys. Then press ENTER. Guarded Access parameters will
not self prompt. To proceed to the next prompt, press FCTN.
•
GA (Guarded Access) Select a GA code with the UP and DOWN keys. Then
press ENTER. The first prompt in the loop appears.
GA Code = 0000. Prompts appear for Ch-1, then repeat for Ch-2. These
parameters are more fully explained in the "Alarm" reference section, p. 46.
Ranges for your particular unit are in the charts on pages 49 or 50.
•
UP (Upper Process Type Alarm) Select an alarm point of this type for Ch-1.
Press ENTER; press FCTN. If you do not want this alarm set to highest value.
•
LP (Lower Process Type Alarm) Select an alarm point of this type for Ch-1.
Press ENTER; press FCTN. If you do not want this alarm set to lowest value.
•
Ud (Upper Deviation Type Alarm) Select an alarm point of this type for Ch-1.
Press ENTER; press FCTN. If you do not want this alarm set to highest value.
•
Ld (Lower Deviation Type Alarm) Select an alarm point of this type for Ch-1.
Press ENTER; press FCTN. If you do not want this alarm set to lowest value.
•
Sequence repeats for Channel 2 and then leaves the guarded area, returning to
real time.
•
•
GA Codes = 0001 and 0002. Prompts appear for Ch-1 with Code 0001, and then
This section will
repeat for Ch-2 with Code 0002. Except for CA, these parameters pertain
also vary accorddirectly to tuning your control to the system. See the "Tuning" reference section
ing to the flow
on p. 60. Ranges and default values are listed on pp. 49 or 50.
chart depending
upon DIP Switch
Pb (Proportional Band) Select a proportional band value with the UP/DOWN
#4 (single or dual
keys. Then press ENTER; press FCTN.
PID).
RS (Reset) Select a reset value with the UP/DOWN keys. Then press ENTER;
press FCTN.
Programming, Chapter 4
WATLOW Series 1500 User's Manual
47
Guarded Access
Technical Reference
•
RT (Rate) Select a rate value with the UP/DOWN keys. Then press ENTER;
press FCTN.
•
Rb (Rate Band) Rate band defines where the rate function will occur. The Rate
Band will occur at one to seven times the proportional band. With a "0" entry,
rate is always in effect. Select a rate band value with the UP/DOWN keys. Then
press ENTER; press FCTN.
•
CT (Cycle Time) Enter a cycle time value with the UP/DOWN keys. Then press
ENTER; press FCTN.
•
•
•
•
•
•
!
1
CAUTION:
Don't press the
db (Dead Band) The dead band defines an area on either side of set point
where no switching action will occur. Select a dead band value with the UP/
CLEAR key while
DOWN keys. Then press ENTER; press FCTN.
you are in the
Guarded Access
CA (Calibration Offset) Calibration offest enables you to offset the input value
0006 area. If you
from -10° to 10°C or °F. Enter a calibration offset value with the UP/DOWN keys.
press the CLEAR
Then press ENTER; press FCTN.
key, you will clear
GA Code = 0006. These parameters are high and low display and scroll limits, and all programmed
for some units, two channel control type and device address. Ranges and default
1 information for all
values are listed for your particular unit in the charts on pages 49 or 50.
steps. The GA
information will
U1 (Ch-1 Upper Set Point Limit) Place the Channel 1 upper set point limit into
the DATA display with the UP and DOWN keys. Press ENTER; press FCTN.
remain, but all
programmed
L1 (Ch-1 Lower Set Point Limit) Place the Channel 1 lower set point limit into
2 steps, and any
the DATA display with the UP and DOWN keys. Press ENTER; press FCTN.
information you
have entered for
U2 (Ch-2 Upper Set Point Limit) Place the Channel 2 upper set point limit into
the DATA display with the UP and DOWN keys. Press ENTER; press FCTN.
them, will clear.
L2 (Ch-2 Low Set Point Limit) Place the Channel 2 lower set point limit in the
DATA display with the UP and DOWN keys. Press ENTER; press FCTN.
•
LC (Front Panel Keyboard Lockout) Enter a "1" to lock the entire front panel, or
a "0" to unlock it.
•
RC (Recycle) Select "1" to activate the recycle option (begin again at Step #1
after completing a profile). Or, select "0" to deactivate the recycle option. Then
press ENTER; press FCTN.
•
TT (Temp-Temp, 2-channel temperature control) This prompt will not appear
on thermocouple units. Select 0000 for Temp-RH control, or 0001 for TempTemp control. Press ENTER; press FCTN.
•
Ad (RS-422 Address for the 1500) This prompt appears only on units with data
communications. It applies only for a RS-422 interface. Each device on the
network must have its own address. Choose an address for your Series 1500
with the UP/DOWN keys. Press ENTER; press FCTN.
•
Sequence then leaves the guarded area, returning to real time.
!
2
CAUTION:
The U1, L1, U2, L2
parameters are
simple scrolling
and display limits,
not alarms.
Where To Go From Here
For more Series 1500 programming experience, you may want to turn to the sample
program in Chapter 2, if you haven't already done so. However, once you have the
control installed and programmed, you need to tune it to your thermal system for
optimum performance. Turn now to "Tuning," in this chapter, for a general description.
48
WATLOW Series 1500 User's Manual
Programming, Chapter 4
Technical Reference
Alarms
The 1500 system provides four basic alarm conditions in each of the two control
channels. They are, with mnemonic abbreviations:
Upper Process - UP
Lower Process - LP
Upper Deviation - Ud
Lower Deviation - Ld
A “process” alarm, you will recall, is available at an absolute process level.
A “deviation” alarm, on the other hand, is linked to the process set point. It “deviates”
with a fixed value in either a positive or negative direction from the main set point: If
the process set point changes, the deviation alarm will shift with it while maintaining
the fixed deviation.
Alarm Options
There are two specific options for the 1500 alarms. Both are set in hardware:
Event Output Option Latching Alarm Option -
DIP Switch #1 ON
DIP Switch #2 ON
(See Chapter 1 for information on how to set the DIP switches.)
Event - Alarm Output Option
The Event Output option uses Event #4, the most significant (furthest left in the
DATA display) channel event output as an alarm indicator. With this option, any of the
four alarm conditions (listed above) on a channel will activate the alarm event output.
You may use the Event #4 output signal to control your alarm device or indicator.
When any one of a channel’s alarms is triggered, the Event #4 indicator on the
Series 1500 front panel for that channel will light.
If the Event Output Alarm Option is selected, the number of events per channel in a
program step is reduced from four to three.
Latching Option
The latching option allows alarms to be “latched,” so that momentary alarms are saved
for the operator. An alarm code will flash until the operator clears it with the CLEAR
key.
In the unlatched option state (DIP Switch ##2 = OFF), if an alarm condition is no longer
present, it is not displayed for the operator. If you press the CLEAR key and the alarm
indication remains, that means that the alarm condition is still present in the system.
Alarm Entry
Enter alarm points in the CHG PARA Mode, and in the Guarded Access (GA)
submode. The alarm ranges and defautts appear in the Guarded Access Chart for
your particular unit in this section of the manual.
Alarms, Chapter 4
WARNING:
The Series 1500
alarms are not
designed as system
“safety limits.”
These alarms do not
meet the minimum
separate power
supply requirements for the safety
limitfunction.Using
them as such could
result in damage to
your equlpment and
injury to personnel.
Watlow
recommends one
Series 140 per
channel in dual
output temperature
applications. The
Series 140 is an FMapproved and UL
recognizedlatching
limit control.
WATLOW Series 1500 User's Manual
49
Technical Reference
Alarm Display Codes
h in the FUNCTION display, indicating the type of alarm. These alarm messages are
listed below. The first two are operational alarms that have no effect on alarm/event
outputs.
j NOTE:
An Al power
interrupt alarm
will always flash
until an operator
presses the CLEAR
key (or sends
ALMOO), regardless
if aIarms are latched
or unlatched.
1
A0 - Low RAM back up battery
Al - Power intenupt
A2 - Ch - 1 Upper Process exceeded
A3 - Ch - 1 Lower Process exceeded
A4 - Ch - 1 Upper deviation exceeded
A5 - Ch - 1 Lower deviation exceeded
A6 - Ch - 2Upper Process exceeded
A7 - Ch -2 Lower Process exceeded
A8 - Ch - 2 Upper deviation exceeded
A9 - Ch - 2 Lower deviation exceeded
If more than one alarm condition is present, the lowest numbered alarm code will take
precedence. That is, if alarms Al and A6 are present, only Al will flash. If you clear
Al, then A6 will flash.
Alarm Results
What happens when an alarm occurs depends on how you have the auxiliary output
(Event #4) wired. The alarms by themselves don’t stop the Series 1500 program or
shut down the outputs.
The only alarm that has an effect on the Series 1500 program is “Al” - power
interrupt. If your unit has a battery-backed real time clock, and a short power
interruption occurs, the 1500 will pick up the program where it left off. The program
however, will be running behind the real time clock (correct time) by the duration of
the power outage. A “Waitfor" time step in the program would correct that time lag in
the next 24 hour period.
If your 1500 does not have a battery-backed clock and a short power outage occurs,
the 1500 still picks up on the step it left off, but both the real time clock and the
program will be running behind by the duration of the power outage. A Waitfor time
step will not re-synchronize the program and correct real time in this case.
Clearing Alarms
To clear the power intenupt alarm (Al, and alarms with the “latch” option, press the
CLEAR key in the MNTR DATA mode.
If an alarm condition is no longer present, the alarm will remain cleared. If the
condition is still present, the alarm message will reappear. In that case, you must
correct the condition that caused the alarm before it will clear.
Upper and Lower Set Point Limits are Display and Scroll
Limits, Not Alarms
The upper and lower set point limits, U1/L1 and U2/L2, are not alarms. They are
configured to limit the range of display and the scrolling capability of the Series 1500.
It is possible to have alarm points beyond the upper and lower limits of the control’s
set points.
50
WATLOW Series 1500 User's Manual
Alarms, Chapter 44
Technical Reference
Event Outputs
One of the most versatile features of the Series 1500 is its capability for event
outputs. An “event output” is simply a preprogrammed ON/OFF event. There are
eight total, four for each channel during each individual step. The event may turn any
number of peripheral devices ON or OFF to assist you in controlling your process,
system or environment.
For instance, in a closed environmental chamber, you might wish to circulate air at a
given time in your program for one or more steps. You might want to turn lights ON or
OFF, or signals, or lock out your humidifier, or you could activate a video recorder.
If the events are programmed for one step and left unprogrammed for the next step,
the events will repeat the last programmed sequence. The Output Event LEDs, to
the right of the ACTUAL display, are visible only when the outputs are active during a
program run.
These event outputs have solid-state switching rated at 0.5 amps up to 115VAC or
240VAC.
Program the Events in the CHG DATA Mode, entering them in a 1=ON, O=OFF
manner for each step. The four place DATA display shows the ON/OFF status
(reading from left to right) beginning with Event Output # 4 on the left and so on.
Thus, with the El or E2 prompts, the DATA display will read “1001” or "0011," or
any other combination of 1 's and/or 0’s. You program Event Outputs in. the Change
Data Mode.
When DIP Switch #1 is ON, Event # 4 is an alarm output and is not available to program
as an event.
When these Event Outputs are actually ON during a running program, you can see
them displayed in the EVENT box in the upper righthand corner of the front panel.
Event Input
The event input allows the Series 1500 to be programmed to wait at that point in the
profile until the external condition occurs. It can be programmed to wait for a switch
closure or opening.
Remote Hold Input
Closing the remote hold input switch will cause the Series 1500 to pause until the
switch opens. This is indicated by a flashing “RUN/HALT" LED. While in this
condition, the Series 1500 will actively maintain the set point and event output
conditions which exist.
EventOutputs,Chapter4
WALTOW Series 1500 User's Manual
51
Technical Reference
Analog Retransmit Outputs
Each sensor input signal level is made available at an “Analog Retransmit” output for
chart recording or other uses. See Terminals 1,2,3,4 and 11, page 35. The scaling
of these outputs varies with sensor type and function. The following is a summary of.
the scaling:
RTD Units
-0500VDC
0.000VDC
+5.000VDC
=
=
=
O.OOOVDC =
1.250VDC =
2.500VDC =
°
F
-1 00.0°F
0.0°F
1 000.0°F
Ei=uum
0°C
250°C
500°C
If using %RH
0.000VDC
0.500VDC
5.000VDC
= 0.0%RH
= l00.0%RH (If using 0 - 0.500V option)
= 1 00.0%RH (If using 0 - 5.000V option)
T/C Units
-0.500VDC
0.000VDC
5.000VDC
=
=
=
0.l00VDC
0.000VDC
2.750VDC
=
=
=
-1 00°F
0°F
3200°F
-
-64°C
0°C
1 760°C
Thermocouple types which use only parts of the -100 to +3200 degree range will
have a corresponding part of the retransmit voltage range.
52
WATLOW Series 1500 User’s Manual
Event Outputs, Chapter 4 4
Program #
GA
Cod
Ch Pmpt
Programmer
Parameter
Date
1 Default
High
Low
UP
Ch - 1 Upper Process Alarm
999
538
LP
Ch - 1 Lower Process Alarm
-99
-99
999
538
-999
-538
101
999
538
-001
-99
-99
101
999
538
-101
-999
-538
0004
0001
0001
OO(IO
0005
0000
0000
-99
0001
0001
Cl
Ud
Ch - 1 Upper Deviation Alarm
Cl
Ld
Ch - 1 Lower Deviation Alarm
C2
UP
Ch - 2 Upper Process Alarm
C2
LP
Ch - 2 Lower Process Alarm
C2
Ud
Ch - 2 Upper Deviation Alarm
C2
Ld
Ch - 2 Lower Deviation Alarm
1H
1H
5..
Dual
PID :
.:. ,:,
: ., . .
0002
Pb
Ch - 1 Prop. Band
RS
Ch - 1 Reset
1H
- - ICh-1
=-Ch1R- Rate
-te
RT
a
1H
1
H Rb
Ch - 1 Rate Band
1H
Ch - 1 Cycle Time
CT
1
db
Ch - 1 Dead Band
1
CA
Ch 1 Calib rationAdjust
1C
Pb
Ch - 1 Prop. Band
1C
RS
CH - 1 Reset
1C
RT
Ch - 1 Rate
-99
-99
. 0
0
-999
-538
-001
-99
-99
-001
-99
-99
000
0
0
000
-999
-538
0
00.00
1
I
1
I
999
538
°F
°C
999
°F
538
°C
999
538
0
0
101
999
538
101
999
538
101
999
538
-101
0
0
500
20.00
00.00
05.00
0
I
3
1
60
-20.0
20.0
-10.0 I
10.0
-990
3200
500
00.00
20.00
00.00
05.00
0
3
1
60
0
500
0
60
,
C
°F
°C
°F
°C
%RH
°F
°C
%RH
°F
°C
%RH
°F
°C
%RH
°F
0
° C or ° F
repeats/min.
1 min.
1 times_Pb
sec.
° C or ° F
r ° C 0r ° F
°F
° C or ° F
repeats/min.
Rb
Ch - 1 Rate Band
0000
CT
Pb
Ch - 1 Cycle Time
Ch - 2 Prop. Band
0005
0004
0004
2H
RS
Ch - 2 Reset
0001
00.00
20.00
%RH
repeats/min.
RT
CT
Ch-2Rate
Ch - 2 Rate Band
Ch - 2 Cycle Time
0001
0000
0005
00.00
0
1
5.00
3
60
min.
times Pb
sec.
db
Ch - 2 Dead Band
0000
-20.0
20.0
%RH, ° C or °F
2C
2C
2C
2C ’
Rb
CA
Pb
RS
Rt
Rb
CT
CH - 2 Calibration Adjust
Ch - Prop. Band
Ch - 2 Reset
Ch-2
Rate
Ch W 2Rate Band
Ch - 2 Cycle Time
U1
L1
Ch-1 Upper Set Point Limit
Ch-1 Lower Set Point Limit
U2
Ch-2 Upper Set Point Limit
0000
0004
0
0004
0001
0001
coo0
0
00.00
00.00
0
0005
sec.
° C or ° F
10.0
°C or °F
500
°C or °F
60
20.00
5.00
3
%RH
repeats/min.
min.
Times Pb
11
60
sec.
999.9
538.0
-99.9
-99.9
999.9
538.0
°F
°C
-99.9
-99.9
999.9
538.0
-99.9
-99.9
-99.9
-99.9
999.9
538.0
999.9
538.0 ,
°F
°C
100.0
-99.9
-99.9
0
0
0000
0.0
-99.9
-99.9
0.0
0
0
0
0
100.0
999.9
538.0
%RH
°F
°C
L2
Ch-2 Lower Set Point Limit
RC
TT
Recycle: ON=1 , OFF =O
T-RH=OOOO, T-T=0001
Ad
Address number RS-422
0
LC
Keyboard Lock
0
Chart 2 - Guarded Access Chart, Chapter 4
-10.0
100.0
1
1
9
1
1
min.
times Pb
1C
2H
2C
0006
!
-99
-99
Units
1C
2H
2H
2H
2
2
Dual
PID
!
Your I
Setting
Range
1
°F
°C
%RH
Device #
-
WATLOW Series 1500 User's Manual
Technical Reference
Use this chart to determine parameter ranges, limits and default settings. Then enter your setting for each
parameter. Make a photocopy of the chart and enter values for each program you use.
Program #
System
G A Ch Pmpt
Programmer
Parameter
Date
Default
Range
Your
. Setting
Code
Low
0000
OOOI
Cl
UP
Ch - 1 Upper Process Alarm
Cl
LP
Ch - 1 Lower Process Alarm
Cl
Ud
Ch - 1 Upper Deviation Alarm
Cl
Ld
Ch - 1 Lower Deviation Alarm
c2
UP
Ch - 2 Upper Process Alarm
C2
C2
LP
Ud
Ch - 2 Lower Process Alarm
Ch - 2 Upper Deviation Alarm
C2
Ld
Ch - 2 Lower Deviation Alarm
1H
Pb
RS
Ch - 1 Prop. Band
Ch - 1 Reset
1H
54
WATLOW Series 1500 User’s Manual
3200
1760
-99
-99
3200
1760
-999
-999
3200
1760
-99
-99
3200
1760
-999
-999
0004
0001
-99
-99
-99
-99
0
0
-999
-999
-99
-99
-99
-99
0
0
-999
-999
0
0
High
3200
1760
3200
1760
3200
1760
0
0
3200
1760
3200
1760
3200
1760
0
0
500
20.00
Units
°F
°C
°F
°C
°F
°C
°F
°C
°F
°C
°F
°C
°F
°C
°F
°C
°C or F
repeats/m in.
Chart 3 - Guarded Access Chart, Chapter 4
Technical Reference
Use this chart to determine parameter ranges, limits and default settings. Then enter your setting for each
parameter. Make a photocopy of the chart and enter values for each program you use.
Program #
.
System
Date
Programmer
Series 1500 DIP Switch Settings
Sw-Position
#1 -ON
#1 - OFF
##2 - ON
#2- OFF
#3-ON
#3-OFF
#4-ON
#4 - OFF
#5 - ON
#6 - ON
1 #6 - OFF
#7-ON
#7 - OFF
#&OFF
Function
Setting
Event Output #4 for both Ch-1 and Ch-2 are alarm outputs.
1 Event Output #4 for both Ch-1 and Ch-2 are event outputs.
1 Alarms are latching (displayed until cleared manually).
1 Alarms are non-latching (displayed only as tong as alarm condition exists).
The Ch-2 sensor is an RTD sensor. On the (A007-1316) board,
I Jumper J149 must be on Wl51, Jumper J152 must be on W153.
The Ch-2 input is a 0-5V signal for 0-l 00% RH. On the (A007-1316) board,
Jumper J149 must be on W150, Jumper J152 must be on Wl54.
Dual PID
1 Single PID
1 Factory use only. Must be in the ON position.
1 Cold Start on power-up. (Memory cleared, parameters set to default values)
I
I
I
I
I
I
1 Warm Start on power-up. (Programmed values are retained for all parameters): 1
°C function after a Cold Start.
I
° F function after a Cold Start.
Not Used. Set in the OFF position
OFF
RTD Series 1500 Parameter Ranges
Prompt
Parameter
Range
Low
S1
S 2
Fl
E2
El
E2
HR
MN
SC
JC
JC
1
w2
WE
WH
WM
WS
Number of Steps
Step Type (Data Comm.)
Ch-1 Set Point
Ch-2 Set Point
.
ON (DIP 1 ON) Dec. Equiv
ON (DIP 1=ON) Dec. Equiv.
ON (DIP 1=OFF) Dec. Equiv.
ON (DIP l=OFF) Dec. Equiv.
Step Duration-Hours
Step Duration-Minutes
Step Duration-Seconds
Jump Step
Jump Counts
or Ch-1 Actual
Wait for Ch-2 Actual
Wait for Event
Wait for Real Hour
Wait for Real Minute
Wait for Real Second
Chart 4 - General Parameter Chart, Chapter 4
1
0
Ll
L2
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
0
11
L2
0
0
0
0
High
51
3
U1
u2
15
15
7
7
24
59
59
51
255
U1
U2
1
23
59
59
Units
Steps
Type
°F/°C
%RH/°F/°C
N
binarv total ON
binarv total ON
binarv total ON
hours
minutes
seconds
Step#
counts
%RH/°F/°C
hours
minutes
,
seconds
WATLOW Series 1500 User's Manual
55
Technical Reference
Programming Chart
Make photocopies of this page and the previous page, then record your parameters and entire program step
by-step.
Prog. No. _______ System _______ Programmer _______ Date _______ Page _______ of _______
Step #
√ Step
Type
Event Outputs
Step Type
4 3 2 1
Set Point
SP
Jump Loop
JL
Wait For
WT
Set Point
SP
Jump Loop
JL
Wait For
WT
Set Point
SP
Jump Loop
JL
Wait For
WT
Set Point
SP
Jump Loop
JL
Wait For
WT
Set Point
SP
Jump Loop
JL
Wait For
WT
Set Point
SP
Jump Loop
JL
Wait For
WT
Set Point
SP
Jump Loop
JL
Wait For
WT
56
Set Value
WATLOW Series 1500 User's Manual
S1
S2
JS
JC
W1
W2
S1
S2
JS
JC
W1
W2
S1
S2
JS
JC
W1
W2
S1
S2
JS
JC
W1
W2
S1
S2
JS
JC
W1
W2
S1
S2
JS
JC
W1
W2
S1
S2
JS
JC
W1
W2
4 3 2 1
HR
HR
WE
WH
HR
WE
WH
HR
WE
WH
HR
WE
WH
HR
WE
WH
HR
WE
WH
HR
WE
WH
Chart 6 - Programming Chart, Chapter 4
Technical Reference
Programming Chart
Make photocopies of this page and the previous page, then record your parameters and entire program step
by-step.
Prog. No. _______ System _______ Programmer _______ Date _______ Page _______ of _______
JL
Wait For
WT
Set Point
SP
Jump Loop
JL
Wait For
WT
Set Point
SP
Jump Loop
JL
Wait For
WT
Set Point
SP
Jump Loop
JL
Wait For
WT
Set Point
SP
Jump Loop
JL
W1
W2
S1
S2
JS
JC
W1
W2
S1
S2
JS
JC
W1
W2
S1
S2
JS
JC
W1
W2
S1
S2
JS
JC
WE
WE
WE
WE
WE
WM
HR
MN
WH
WM
HR
MN
WH
WM
HR
MN
WH
WM
HR
MN
E1
WH
HR
Set Point
SP
WE
WH
HR
Set Point
SP
WE
Chart 6 - Programming Chart, Chapter 4
E2
WH
WH
WATLOW Series 1500 User's Manual
57
Technical Reference
Tuning
For optimum control performance, it is necessary to tune the Series 1500 to your
thermal system. At this point you should already have a program profile entered into
the 1500. This profile needs to be as nearly typical of your system requirements as
you are able to predict.
Recommended Tuning Reference
There are a number of quality references on the art of tuning electronic controllers to
the systems they control. If you are not an instrument technician qualified to tune
thermal systems, we suggest that you obtain and become familiar with the reference
below before attempting to tune your system. Remember that the time you spend
tuning your system is relative to the quality of control you need.
Process Control Instrumentation Technology - Third Edition
by Curtis D. Johnson Hardcover, 1982, 497 pp.
ISBN: 0-471-05789-4 approx. $37.00
“Its overall objective is to provide instructional material for a general understanding of
process control characteristics such as elements, modes, and stability along with
detailed knowledge of measurement technique, control mode implementation, and
final control element functions.” Johnson
Using a Chart Recorder
The tuning procedure will be greatly simplified if you use a chart recorder to assist in
tuning the Series 1500. See Page 35 for analog retransmit outputs to connect to a
chart recorder. Refer to Page 52 for signal conditioner output scaling.
i?
0
CAUTION:
Be sure the Series
1500 is in a Warm
Start condition
(DIP Switch #6
OFF) In order to
save your tunlng
entrles. Also
record your
experimental, and
then final settlngs
on a copy of the
Guarded Access
Chart available In
this sectlon of the
The analog retransmit output provides a chart recorder output for both temperature
and humidity.
If you don’t have a chart recorder available, you can still plat the time vs. temperature
system response. Record the 1500’s ACTUAL display readings on graph paper with
an x, y axis to accomplish the same thing.
How to Make the 1500 a Simple ON/OFF Control
If you want your 1500 to function as a simple ON/OFF control in either channel, just
set the Proportional Band (Pb) for that channel to zero.
manual.
58
WATLOW Series 1500User’s Manual
Run and Halt, Chapter 4
Technical Reference
Manual Tuning
For optimum control performance, tune the 1500 to the themal system. The tuning
settings here are meant for a broad spectrum of applications; your system may have
somewhat different requirements. Refer to the key flow charts, diagrams and definitions on Pages 42 - 61 for prompt location and description. Repeat this tuning
procedure for both Channel 1 and 2.
1 NOTE:
When tuning in the Heat mode, use H where X appears.
When tuning In the Cool mode, use C where X appears.
Apply power to the Series 1500 and enter a set point in the Change Data Mode
(CHG DATA). Next, go into the Change Parameter Mode (CHG PARA), and
enter (1) at the GA parameter. Using the MODE, UP/DOWN and ENTER keys,
set the operating parameters initially:
1X P b = O
Proportional Band:
Cycle Time:
1 1! X C T = 5
.
1lX RS = 0.00
Dead Band:
Reset:
1X d b = O
.
1X RT = 0.00
Rate:
Caiibration Offset: 1X CA = 0
1X Rb = 3.00
Rate Band:
1.
l
l
l
l
l
To tune a parameter relating to heat, set the set point above ambient temperature,
for cooling, set the set point below ambient temperature. Allow actual process ternperature to stabilize at or near set point. The ACTUAL display indicates when the
load is stabilized near set point.
2.
Proportional Band Adjustment: Gradually increase Pb until the ACTUAL display
temperature stabilizes to a constant value. The temperature will not be right on
set point because the initial reset value is 0.00 repeats per minute. The ACTUAL
temperature will stabilize below the desired set point. (When Pb = 0, RS, Rb,
RT, and Ct are inoperative, and the 1500 functions as a simple ON/OFF control
with a 3°F/1.7°C switching differential.
3.
Reset Adjustment: Gradually increase RS until the ACTUAL display temperature
begins to oscillate or “hunt.” Then slowly decrease RS until the ACTUAL display
stabilizes again near set point. NOTE: This is a slow procedure, taking from
minutes to hours to obtain optimum value.
4.
Rate Adjustment: Increase RT to 1 .OO min. Then raise set point by 20° to 30°F/
11° to 17°C. Observe the system’s approach to set point. lf the bad temperature overshoots set point, increase RT to 2.00 minutes.
5. Cycle Time Adjustment: Set CT as required. Optimum system controls is always
achieved with faster cycle times. However, if a mechanical contactor or solenoid
is switching power to the load, a longer cycle time may be desirable to minimize
wear on the mechanical components. Experiment until the cycle time is consistent with the quality of control you want.
6.
Calibration Offset Adjustment: You may want your system to control to a temperature other than the value coming from the input sensor. If so, measure the
difference (as much as ±90°F/±50°C) between that temperature, perhaps at
another point in the system, and the process value showing in the alphanumeric
display. Then enter the amount of CAL Offset YOU want Calibration offset adds
or subtracts degrees from the value of the input signal.
Tuning, Chapter 4
WATLOW Series 150O User's Manual
59
Technical Reference
to Run and Halt A Program
Here is how to run and halt Series 1500 programs.
How to Run a Program
When you have all program steps defined and entered, press RESTART to return the
processor to Step 01. Then press RUN/HALT to begin the program.
How to Halt a Program
To stop the program, press RUN/HALT. The PROG HALT LED will light. The
program stops in the current step.
The processor holds all values for the outputs as they were at the moment the program stopped. That means the controller is controlling to a fixed value, the set point
at the instant of termination.
How to Restart a Program
Press the RUN/HALT key to restart the program. The PROGRAM HALT LED goes
out. If you entered no new data or did not change steps during the halt, the program
resumes where it left off, completing the time remaining in the current step.
If, however, you changed the step data or the step number during the halt, the processor starts at the beginning of the step in progress when you hatted the program.
Remote Hold Input
Closing the remote hold input switch causes the Series 1500 to pause until the switch
opens. Remote hold is indicated by a flashing “RUN/HALT” LED. The Series 1500
actively maintains the set point and event output conditions which exist at the time
when remote hold occurs.
60
WATLOW Series 1500 User's Manual
Run and Halt, Chapter 4
Data Communications,
Commands and Syntax
In this section you’ll learn the Series 1500 data communications. See Figure 14 in
Chapter 1 for RS422 and RS423 pin designations, and also for locating and
making the required RS422/423
jumper selection.
The Series 1500 data communications package provides you with a foundation for a
sophisticated communications system based on your system needs and your software development. Your Watlow Sales Engineer has available, upon request, a
Series 1500 data communications sample computer program with sample profiles.
Communication Parameters
The Series 1500 with data communications operates with these parameters.
Baud Rate:
Character Format:
Stop Bits:
Parity:
1200 Baud
7 Data Bits
1 Stop Bit
Odd Parity
Protocol
You can select one of two hardware interfaces:
1) RS422A for a “multidrop” or (multiple device) network, up to ten devices total;
with 4000’ network length limit, or
2) RS-423A (RS-232C compatible) for one on one communication on a 50' network
you need, you must use the correct combination of interface and protocol.
We use ANSI X3.28 Protocol, based on ANSI X3.28 - 1976 Subcategories 2.2, and
A3, with the RS-422A interface to run a multiple devicenetwork We also use XON/
XOFF Protocol, a simpler protocol, to run a two device network with an RS-423A
interface. XON/XOFF Protocol requires no responses to messages like the ANSI
X3.28 Protocol does. XON/XOFF will also work with the RS422A interface, but the
network is limited to two devices. Likewise, ANSI X3.28 Protocol, which provides a
response to every message, will work with the RS-423 interface. But again you are
limited to two devices.
Data Communications, Commands and Syntax, Chapter 4
WATLOW Series 1500 User's Manual
61
Technical Reference
Command Rules
The following listing shows the command and the typical Series 1500's response string. The labels beneath
each parameter in a command or response string are here for your information only: they will not appear on
your computer screen.
.
A command word with a question mark is a direct request for a response, a query.
.
The__'s in the pages that follow are the number of character positions in a parameter available for entry
or response.
.
Each parameter in a string must have at least one digit or an asterisk entered.
.
To avoid making any entry for a given parameter, enter an asterisk in the string.
.
Each parameter in a string must be separated by at least one space.
.
Decimal points shown in the typical string must be understood; they are not transmitted or received.
.
The Series 1500 responds to and sends the minus sign, indicating a negative value.
.
Whenever you send an STP command (to enter step parameters) the Series 1500 is automatically halted.
.
The correct protocol must be applied to each command string for the communications to function.
.
Parameter limits are listed in the Guarded Access and General Parameter Charts located in this section.
.
An operator at the Series 1500 front panel and an operator at a computer remotely-linked to the same
Series 1500 both have equal access to the controller. Priority is on a first in, first out basis.
.
Communications are not affected in any way by the keyboard lockout status.
.
RS-422, STX-ETX.
.
In RS-423 a *CR’ (carriage return) is the required line terminator.
.
With the RS-422 interface, the Series 1500 sends an “ACK” or “NAK” after each command. For a
“NAK,” you may use “ERR? " to determine the cause of the error.
.
With the RS-423 interface there is no automatic indication of a successful command. You may query
“ERR? " after each command to determine if the Series 1500 accepted it.
62
WATLOW Series 1500 User’s Manual
Data Communications, Commands and Syntax, Chapter4
Technical Reference
Command Words
The Series 1500 recognizes and responds to the following list of syntactical
command words through a serial communication interface.
ACT? Requests actual process inputs.
MTR?
Requests information on the current step.
ST??
Requests programmed information for a step.
STP
Enter step information.
PTR?
Request real time of day, and high and low set point limits.
PTR
Enter real time of day, and high and low set point limits.
GAl?
Request the Guarded Access information for Ch-Y.
GA1
Enter the Guarded Access parameters for Ch1.
GA2?
Request the Guarded Access information for Ch-2.
GA2
Enter the Guarded Access parameters for Ch-2.
STS?
Request the program Run/Halt and End status information_
STS
Enter the program Run/Halt and End status.
ALM?
Request any current alarm code infonnation.
ALM 00 Clear all alarm codes.
NXS- - Put the Series 1500 into Step # - - .
ERR?
Request the last communication error, and then clear the error code to 0.
PDA?
Request the process and/or deviation alarm set points.
PDA
Enter the process and/or deviation alarm set points.
TIM?
Requests real time of day.
TIM
Enter real time of day.
LIM?
Requests high and low set point limits
LIM
Enter high and low set point limits
LOC?
Requests keyboard lockout status
LOC
Enter keyboard lockout status
RCY?
Request the Recycle option
RCY
Enter the Recycle option
Data Communications, Commands and Syntax, Chapter 4
WARNING:
Take all necessary
precautions to
ensure that BOTH
the Series 1500
front panel and a
remotecomputer
Interfaceare
prevented from
Initiating output
actlon from the
Series 1500 when
maintenance
personnel are
working on the
system. Failure to
do so could result
In damage to
equipment and/or
injury to personnel.
WATLOW Series 1500 User's Manual
63
Technical Reference
Command Words and Syntax
Here is a list of the command words with the syntax. Limits for all parameters are
in the Guarded
Access and General Parameters Charts located in this section of the Series 1500
manual. J NOTE: Decimal
points in general are not available for the Series 1500 T/C version. See the T/C
charts on pp. 50 and 52.
Requests the current ACTUAL process Inputs.
ACT?
Sample Response:
2050 0820
---.-
- - -.Ch-1 Actual
Ch2 Actual
Monitors information on the current step.
MTR?
--
--
--- .-
---.-
--
--
Step#
Step
Type
Ch-1 Set
Point
Ch2 Set
Point
Ch-1
Events
Ch-2
Events
--
--
Hr.
Mn.
Time Remaining In Step
--
Sec.
Sample Response:
0501 23400840150811 3200
Note: Event (Auxiliary) Outputs ON or OFF for Ch-1 and Ch-2
Monitoring and entry requires the decimal equivalent of the binary number totaling the states of the
events for each channel.
Each of the event outputs has a “1” state for ON or a “0” state for OFF.
If DIP SW-1 is ON, there are 4 events per channel, 8 total.
If DIP SW-1 is OFF, Event #4 for each channel is an alarm, and thus there are only 3 events per
channel, 6 total.
Event # 4 (or 3) holds the most significant digit position in the binary number denoting the states of
the events.
To find the decimal equivalent, add the integers representing the ON state for each event:
(Event 4=8, Event 3=4, Event 2=2, Event 1=1)
0000=0
0001 =l
0010=2
0011=3
0100=4
0101=5
1001=9
1101=13
0110=6
1010=10
1110=14
0111-7
1011 = 11
1111 = 15
001=1
101=5
010=2
110=6
011=3
111=7
1000-8
1100=12
000=0
100=4
The individual events are programmed to a “1” or “0” state when a step is entered; they remain in
the same state until a different step changes them.
64
WATLOW Series 1500 User's Manual
Data Communications, Commands and Syntax, Chapter 4
Technical Reference
STP? --
Requests.the programmed informatlon for Step# - - .
The first response parameter is the Step Type:
0000 = Blank Step
0001 = Set Point Step
0002 = Jump Loop Step
0003 = Wait For Step
Sample Transmission:
STP? 22
Blank Step - STP?
l
=Unprogrammed parameter
0000
****
****
Step
Type
Ch-1 set
Ch-2 set
Point
Point
Set Point Step - STP?
0001
— — —.—
———.—
Step
Ch-1 Set
Type
Point
Ch-2 Set
Point
————
————
Ch-1
Events
————
al-2
Events
————
——
Hr.
Mn.
Duration Of The Step
Sample Response:
00011234084000050011 00020030 0000
Jump Loop Step - STP?
l
= Unprogrammed parameter
0002
Step
Type
---Jump
Step
----
****
****
****
****
****
Jump
Count
Sample Response:
0002 0004 0010 **** **** **** **** ****
Data Communications, Commands and Syntax, Chapter 4
WATLOW Series 1500 User'sManual
65
Technical Reference
Walt Step- STP?
*=Unprogrammed parameter
-99
0 0
Step
0 -99
3
3200
---.-
Wait For
Type
- °F
--.- - - -
* * * ----
----
Wait For
Wait For
Event
Wait_
Ch-2
. Ch-1
l
----
Wait For
Minutes
wait For
RealTime
Sample Response:
0003 1234 0840 0001 **** 0015 0010 0030
l
Program a step.
STP
The first parameter entered after the step number is the Step Type.
00
01
02
03
=
=
=
=
Blank Step
Set Point Step
Jump Loop Step
Wait For Step
Note: Whenever you send an STP command (to enter Step parameters) the Series 1500 haIts
automatically.
Blank Step - STP
. = Unprogrammed parameter
--
00
S
t
e
p
Step
#
l
0001
Ch1-Set
Point
Type
l
—
— —.—
Ch-2Set
P o i n t
l
— —l — . —
Ch-1
Ch-2
Events
Events
l
— — —l —
Hr.
Mn.
Duration of the step
l
————
Sec.
Sample Transmission:
STP2200*******
or
STP 22 00
Set Point Step - STP
****
Step
I
****
Step
Type
****
****
****
Ch-1 Set
Point
Ch--2 set
Point
Ch-1
Events
Ch-2
Events
Hr.
Mn.
Duration Of The step
Sec.
SampIe Transmission:
STP 1201 1234 0820 00 03 01 25 00
Note: Enter Event (Auxiliary) Outputs ON/OFF for Ch-1 and Ch-2 per NOTE with “MNTR?” on p. 60.
WATLOW Series 1500 User's Manual
Data Communications, Commands and Syntax, Chapter 4
————
Technical Reference
Jump Loop Step - STP
Sample Transmission:
STPl202100004
Wait Step - STP
l
= Unprogrammed parameter
999.9 03 -99.9— — 999.9
—.—
°F — . —
——
—
—
Step
Ch-1 set
S
t
e
p
Type
#
————
Ch-2 set
Point
Point
*
——
Wait For
Evsflt
——
——
Hf.
Mn.
Wait For Real Time of Day
Sample Transmission:
STP 14 03 2100 0900 1*08 30 00
PTR?
Requests real time of day, and upper and lower set point limits.
--
--
--
--- -
HR
MN
SC
Ch-1 upper
Ch-1 Lowet
Ch-2Upper
Ch-2 Lower
Limit
Limit
Limit
Limit
RealTme Clock
.
———.—
w--
-
.
———.—
D-s
-
.
———.—
---
-
.
Sample Response:
08 25 00 9999 -999 9999 -999
Enter real time of day, and upper and lower set point limits.
PTR
---
-HR
MN
SC
.
—
CC
UPPef
h-1
Limit
---.-
--- . -
--- . -
Ch-1 Lower
Ch-2 Upper
c2 Lower
Limit
Limit
Limit
Sample Transmission:
PTR 08 25 00 9999 -999 9999 -999
Data Communications, Commands and Syntax, Chapter4
WATLOW Series 1500 User's Manual
67
Technical Reference
TIM?
_D
HR
Requests real time of day only
--
--
SC
MN
Sample Response
12 34 56
Enter real time of day only
TIM
MN
SC
SampleTransmission:
TIM 23 59 59
LIM?
Requests upper and lower set point limits
—
——.—
--CH-1 Upper Limit
—
——.—
---
.-
Ch-1 Lower Limit
—
——.—
---
— — — ..—
CH-2 Upper Limit
CH-2 Lower Limit
---
w
Sample Response:
8765 4321 1234 -123
LIM
Enter upper and lower set point limits
---.Ch-1Upper Limit
---.Ch-1 Lower Limit
---.CH-2Upper Limit
---.CH-2 Lower Limit
SampleTransmission:
LIM 8765 4321 1234 -123
LOC?
Requests keyboard lockout status
---0001
SampleTransmission:
LOC 0001
LOC
Enter keyboard lockout status
---0001
SamplelResponse
0001
68
WATLOW Series 1500 User’s Manual
Data Cornmunications, Commands and Syntax, Chapter4
Technical Reference
RCY?
Request the Recycle option
-Recycle
Sample Response:
01
RCY
Enter the Recycle option
Sample Transmission:
RCY O1
GAI?
Single PID:
————
-
—M--B—.——
— —-d-m
.——
— —---——
————
w-w-
Chl
Reset
Chl
Prop.
Band
Chl
Rate
Chl
Rate
—__d_
—.——
Chl
— —.— —
Chl
Cycle
Time
Heat
Rate
Time
Sample Response:
0048 0012 0034 0003 0029 0021 0012
Dual PID:
—— ——
— —.— —
-----.-——
Ch1
Prop.
Band
Heat
--.--— —-—-—- -
— —.— —
Ch1
Reset
Ch1n
Rate
Heat
Heat
----
—— ——
Ch1
Rate
Band
Heat
---.-
— —.— —
B-d-
— —.— —
Ch1
Dead
Ch1
Catib.
Offset
Time
Heat
----
————
Ch1
Prop.
Band
—.— —
————
--.-- —--.----- - —-—-
——.——
Ch1
Reset
Ch1
Ch1
Rate
Band
Ch1
W e
lime
Cool
Sample Response:
0048 0012 0034 0003 0029 0021 0012 0084 0021 0043 0000 0020
- - - -
————
--.--
——.——
- - . - - -— —
- —
- —-
——.——
Ch1
Ch1
Reset
Ch1
Prop.
Ch1
Rate
- -— -— -— —
- - - . -
——.——
Ch1
Cycle
Time
Ch1
Dead
Band
— —.—
- - -—. -
Ch1
Calib.
Offset
SampleCommand:
GA1 0048 0012 0034 0003 0029 0021 0012
Dual PID:
————
----
— —. — —
--.--
Chl
Prop
Chl
Reset
Heat
Heat
—
—. — — —-—-—
—
--.-- -
Chl
Rate
Chl
Rate
Band
Heat
————-
Chl
Cycle
Time
Time
Heat
—-—.
—.—
--
—S-B&_
—. — — — — — — — —. — —
————
- - - - - - . -—- —. -—-—. - -— —-—-—
-- - - Chl
Chl
Chl
Chl
Chl
Chl
Dead
Reset
Rate
Rate
Cycle
Time
p=Q* Reset
Ram
Calib.cabBand offset
Band
Time
Offset
Cool
Cool
Cool
Cool
Sample Response:
GA1 0048 0012 0034 0003 0029 0021 0012 0084 0021 0043 0000 0020
Data Communications, Commands and Syntax, Chapter 4
WATLOW Series 1500 User's Manual
69
Technical Reference
GA2?
Sample Response:
00480012003400030029 00210012
Dual PID:
---v
-dee
~~*~~
Ch2
Prop.
Band
Heat
Ch2
Rate
Reset
we--
~~~~
---*-
Rate
CYde
lime
Heat
Heat
:
M--d- - - - Calib.
offset
Prop.
Band
Reset
Rate
-v-m - - - Ch2
Rate
We
lime
Sample Response:
0048 0012 0034 0003 0029 0021 0012 0058 0021 0043 0000 0020
GA2
Single PID:
---w v-.-Ch2
Prop.
Band
- - - - - - - -
--*--
Ch2
Rate
Band
Ch2
Rate
Reset
Cycle
Time
---*Ch2
Dead
w-v*Calib.
offset
SampleCommand:
GA2 0048 0012 0034 0003 0029 0021 0012
Dual PID:
__d_
w--- e&w- -&-- B--B - - - - ---*_
ctl2
Ch2
Reset
Prop
Heat
Heat
Rate
Rate
Heat
Heat
Calib.
‘offset
Heat
---Prop.
--.--
Ch2
Reset
-3-w
Rate
E
SampleCommand:
GA2 0048 0012 0034 0003 0029 0021 0012 0058 0021 0043 0000 0020
STS? Request the program Run/Halt and End status.
l=Run,O=Halt, 2 = Remote Hold
1 = Program ended, 0 = Program not ended
-Run/Halt
--
Program
End
Sample Response:
01 00
STS Send Run or Halt to the Series 1500
- -
1= Run,O=Halt
Run/Halt
Sample Transmission:
STS O1
70
Note: STS = 00 maintains all Event and Control Outputs at levels existing when the program halts.
Data Communications, Commands and Syntax, Chapter 4
Watlow Series 1500 User's Manual
Technical Reference
ALM?
Request current alarm code information.
Sample Response:
0018
Note: These alarms are additive and may occur in any combination. To decode, use the following list.
Subtract out the largest possible integer first, then the next largest possible integer, and so on.
The integer 16 is the largest possible integer to subtract out, leaving a remainder of 2.
The integer 2 stands alone. Thus Alarm Codes 16 and 2 are now present in the system.
AlarmCode
1
2
4
8
16
32
64
128
256
512
0
*
*
*
*
•
•
.
•
.
ALM
=
=
=
=
=
=
=
=
=
=
00
Low RAM back-up battery.
Power interrupt.
Ch-1 Actual has exceeded UP, the upper process alarm value.
CH-1
Actual has exceeded LP, the lower process alarm value.
Ch-1 Actual has exceeded Ud, the upper deviation alarm value.
Ch-1 Actual has exceeded Ld, the lower deviation alarm va!ue.
Ch-2 Actual has exceeded UP, the upper process alarm value.
Ch-2 Actual has exceeded LP, the lower process alarm value.
Ch-2 Actual has exceeded Ud, the upper deviation alarm value.
Ch-2 Actual has exceeded Ld, the lower deviation alarm value.
Clear all alarm conditions now occurring.
Sample Transmission:
ALM 00
NXS
--
Put the Series 1500
into Step - - now.
Sample Transmission:
NXS 25
ERR?
Request the last communcation error code and clear the error code register to 0.
Error codes are listed in the Error Code section following this one.
Sample Response:
0111
Data Communications, Commands and Syntax, Chapter 4
WATLOW Series 1500 User's Manual
71
Technical Reference
Request values for the process and devlatlon alarm set points.
PDA?
C-1 Upper
Process
Ch-1 Lower
Process
Ch-1 Upper
Deviation
Ch-1 Lower
Deviation
Ch-2 Upper
Process
Ch-2 Lower
Process
Ch-2 Upper
Deviation
Ch-2 Lower
Deviation
Sample Response:
0999 -099 0555 -555 0101-001 0999 -099 0999 -999
PDA
Enter values for the process and deviation alarm set points.
————
C-1 Upper
Process
————
————
Ch-1
chl Lower
Lower
Process
Ch-1 Upper
Chl
Deviation
————
Ch-1 Lower
Deviation
————
Ch-2 Upper
Process
————
Ch-2 Lower
Process
————
Ch-2
Upper
Ch2
Upper
Deviation
————
Ch-2
Lower
Ch2
Lower
Deviation
Deviation
Sample Transmission:
PDA 0999 499 0555 -555 0101-0010999 -099 0999 -999
Where To Go From Here
As soon as you gain an understanding of Series1500 communications, we recommend that you put the
capability to wok You may write computer programs based on this command syntax. You will also be able
to build and store profiles for the Series 1500.
72
WATLOW Series 1500 User’s Manual
Data Communications, Commands and Syntax, Chapter 4
Technical Reference
Data Communication Error Codes
When you query “ERR?” using the correct protocol, a Series 1500 linked to a computer will respond with
these 3-digit data communications error codes. The code will appear on your computer screen. A
definition listing for each code is in the right-hand columns below.
2
3
Parity error
Framing error
Over run error
10
11
12
Talking while should be listening
Transmit buffer overflow
Receive buffer overflow
50
51
No command word match
Invalid character or too few command
parameters; not recognizable
90
LOC value out of limit
100
101
102
103
104
105
106
107
Step # or step type entered was out of limit
Ch-1 Set Point for any step was out of limit
Ch-2 Set Point for any step was out of limit
Ch-1 Event Output for any step is out of limit
Ch-2 Event Output for any step is out of limit
HR for any step was out of limit
MN for any step was out of limit
SC for any step was out of limit
108
109
JS for any step was out of limit
JC for any step was out of limit
110
111
112
113
114
115
Real time hours are out of limit
Real time minutes are out of limit
Real time seconds are out of limit
Ch-1 Upper Limit is out of limit
Ch-1 Lower Limit is out of limit
Ch-2 Upper Limit is out of limit
1
Data Comm Error, Chapter 4
116
Ch-2 Lower Limit is out of limit
117
118
119
120
121
Proportional Band for Ch-1 is out of limit
Reset for Ch-1 is out of limit
Rate for Ch-1 is out of limit
Cycle time for Ch-1 is out of limit
Dead Band for Ch-1 is out of limit
122
123
124
125
126
Proportional Band for Ch-2 is out of limit
Reset for Ch-2 is out of limit
Rate for Ch-2 is out of limit
Cycle time for Ch-2 is out of limit
Dead Band for C h-2 is out of limit
127
126
129
130
Run/Halt command is out of limit
Alarm clear command is out of limit
Step ## being forced to is out of limit
Recycle command is out of limit
131
132
133
134
Rate Band for Ch-1 is out of limit
Rate Band for Ch-2 is out of limit
Calibration adjustable for Ch-1 is out of limit
Calibration adjustable for Ch-2 is out of limit
135
136
137
138
139
140
141
142
Lower deviation for Ch-1 is out of limit
Upper deviation for Ch-1 is out of limit
Lower process for Ch-1 is out of limit
Upper process for Ch-1 is out of limit
Lower deviation for Ch-2 is out of limit
Upper deviation for Ch-2 is out of limit
Lower process for Ch-2 is out of limit
Upper process for Ch-2 is out of limit
WATLOW Series 1 500 Users Manual
73
Technical Reference
Bad Sensor
Bad Sensor Indication and Troubleshooting
Indication
When a bad (open or shorted) sensor occurs for Ch-1 or Ch-2, the ACTUAL display
will show "- - - - ". The Series 1500 control outputs in both channels de-energize
when a bad sensor occurs. The events outputs remain energized. Bad sensor on
Ch-1 will produce alarm codes A2 and A4. Bad sensor on Ch-2 will produce alarm
codes A6 and A8.
Troubleshooting
!
Follow this procedure to troubleshoot a suspected bad sensor:
CAUTION:
Use National
Electric Code
standard safety
procedures when
troubleshooting
an electronic
controller. Use
grounded test
equipment, nonconductive tools
and floor safety
mats.
!
74
1.
Remove power from the unit.
2.
Check each sensor input with an ohmmeter at the terminals with the sensor
installed. Use the Connection Label pasted on the right side of the Series 1500
case to locate the correct terminals. With an open sensor, the resistance will
read greater than 330 ohms. A shorted sensor will have a resistance less than
70 ohms.
3.
Replace the bad sensor.
4.
Apply power to the Series 1500.
WATLOW Series 1500 User's Manual
Bad Sensor, Chapter 4
Technical Reference
Field Calibration
Field Calibration Procedure
”1
— RTD Calibration —
The Series 1500 is shipped totally calibrated from the factory; it does not need field
calibration, and will not except in unusual circumstances. This calibration procedure
will enable you to calibrate the Series 1500 low voltage analog input and output
signals for accuracy.
Equipment Needed
”
1
1. Two 100 ohm decade boxes.
2. Two board connectors, Watlow P/N Z100-0285-0000.
3. Digital voltmeter.
WARNING
Use National
Electric Code
standard safety
procedures when
calibrating an
electronic controller. Use grounded
test equipment,
non-conductive
tools and floor
safety mats.
Carelessness
could result in
electric shock.
Wiring
1. Remove the Series 1500 from its case and attach the two Watlow board
connectors to the power supply board (A007-1313 or A007-1714) and the
signal conditioner board (A007-1316 or A007-1719).
• Power supply board is on the right looking at the rear of the unit.
• Signal conditioner board is on the left looking at the rear of the unit.
”2
2. Wire correct line voltage per wiring diagrams on page 37.
3. Connect decade box for Channel 1: S1 to Term. 5, S2 to Term. 6, and S3 to
Term. 7. Short S2 to S3 at decade box.
4. Connect decade box for Channel 2: S1 to Term. 8, S2 to Term. 9, and S3 to
Term. 10. Short S2 to S3 at decade box.
”2
WARNING
Use care to avoid
electric shock
when working with
the Series 1500
control chassis
outside of its case.
Line voltage is
present on both
the power supply
and signal conditioner circuit
boards. Carelessness could result
in electric shock.
Calibration
1.
Document DIP Switch positions and all values in Guarded Access, pp. 53 & 55.
NOTE:
2.
Check DIP Switches if #7 is OFF use °F values, #7 is ON, use °C values.
3.
Set Ch-1 and Ch-2 inputs to (136.59) [135.97] ohms.
4.
Connect DVM, (-) minus to Term. 1, (+) plus to test point E-120 on signal
conditioner board.
5.
Power up control. It will power up with Ch-1, °F or °C and Monitor Data
LED lit. Step flashes A1, hit CLEAR to stop. If the program halt LED is not lit,
press RUN/HALT key.
Use the regular
resistance values
(in parenthesis)
for calibrating JIS
Curve #3916. Use
the resistance
values in brackets
for calibrating DIN
Curve #3850.
6.
Adjust span pot for 5.000VDC on DVM.
Field Calibration, Appendix
WATLOW Series 1500 User's Manual
75
Technical Reference
Field Calibration
Calibrate Channel 1 °F Output
7. Remove (+) plus lead from E-120 and connect to Term. 4. Set Ch-1 input to
(92.93) [93.03] ohms. Adjust Ch-1 SC-Lo pot for 0.000V on DVM. Ch-1
Actual should be 000.0 ± 0.5°F (-18°C).
8.
Set Ch-1 input to (294.91) [291.56] ohms and adjust Ch-1 SC-Hi pot for
4.950VDC. Actual should read 990.0° ± 0.5°F (532°C).
9.
Repeat Steps 7 and 8 until all the readings are correct with no further
adjustment necessary.
10. Set Ch-1 input to (199.37) [197.69] ohms. DVM should read 2.50VDC. Actual
should read 500° ± 1.0°F (260°C).
Calibrate Channel 2 °F Output
11. Remove DVM (+) plus lead from Term. 4 and connect to Term. 3. Set Ch-2
input to (92.93) [93.03] ohms. Adjust Ch-2 SC-Lo pot for 0.000V on DVM.
12. Set Ch-2 input to (294.91) [291.56] ohms and adjust Ch-2 SC-Hi pot for
4.950VDC on DVM.
13. Repeat Steps 11 and 12 until all the readings are correct with no further
adjustment necessary.
NOTE:
#13 thru #16
required only if
%RH analog
output is used.
%RH analog
output does not
work with a
voltage input on
Channel 2
NOTE:
#17 thru #21
required only if °C
analog output is
used.
Calibrate %RH Output
14. Remove DVM (+) plus lead from Term. 3 and connect to Term. 2. Set Ch-1 and
Ch-2 inputs to (136.59) [135.97] ohms. Adjust F.S. pot for 0.500VDC on
DVM. Ch-2 Actual should read 100.0 ± 1.0.
15. Set Ch-2 input to (112.75) [112.53] ohms. Adjust zero pot for 0.000VDC on
DVM. Ch-2 should read 00.0 ± 1.0.
16. Repeat Steps 14 and 15 until readings are correct.
17. Set Ch-2 input to (132.28) [131.74]. DVM should read 0.325± 0.005VDC and
Ch-2 Actual should read 64.4 ±1.0.
Calibrate Channel 1 °C Output
18. Power down control. Set DIP Switch #7 ON.
19. Disconnect DVM (+) plus from Term. 2 and connect to Term. 11. Power up
control. Set Ch-1 input to (100.00) [100.00] ohms. Ch-1 Actual should read
000.0°C. Adjust °C Lo pot for 0.00V on DVM.
20. Set Ch-1 input to (284.04) [280.90] ohms. Ch-1 Actual should read 500.0°C.
Adjust °C Hi pot for 2.500VDC on DVM.
21. Repeat Steps 19 and 20 until readings are correct.
22. Set Ch-1 input for (195.70) [194.07] ohms. Actual should read 250.0°C. DVM
should read 1.25VDC.
76
WATLOW Series 1500 User's Manual
Field Calibration, Appendix
Technical Reference
d Calibration Field Calibration
Field Calibration Procedure
— Thermocouple Calibration —
The Series 1500 is shipped totally calibrated from the factory; it does not need field
calibration, and will not except in unusual circumstances. This calibration procedure
Equipment Needed
”
1
1. One Millivolt Source (two if doing both channels simutaneously).
2. Two board connectors, Watlow P/N Z100-0285-0000.
3. One C/J (Cold-Junction) Compensator (Omega "MCJ" Series) for the T/C
(Thermocouple) type being calibrated (two if doing both channels simultane
ously).
4. T/C Extension Wire.
Wiring
”
1 WARNING
Use National
Electric Code
standard safety
procedures when
calibrating an
electronic controller. Use grounded
test equipment,
non-conductive
tools and floor
safety mats.
Carelessness
could result in
electric shock.
1. Remove the Series 1500 from its case and attach the two Watlow board connectors to the power supply board (A007-1313 or A007-1714) and the Signal Conditioner board (A007-1316 or A007-1720).
• Power supply board is on the right looking at the rear of the unit.
• Signal conditioner board is on the left looking at the rear of the unit.
”
2
2. Wire correct line voltage per wiring diagrams on page 37.
3. Connect the "INPUT" terminals of the C/J Compensator (via appropriate connector & copper T/C extension wire) to the Ch-1 Signal Conditioner CH-1 Input
Terminals (observe proper polarity) per diagram on page 35.
4. If calibrating both channels at the same time, also connect a C/J Compansator to
the CH-2 terminals.
5. If calibrating one channel at a time, connect the CH-2 Signal Conditioner Input
Terminals (8 & 10) together with a short piece of wire to avoid an "Open T/C"
alarm.
”
2 WARNING
Use care to avoid
electric shock
when working with
the Series 1500
control chassis
outside of its case.
Line voltage is
present on both
the power supply
and signal conditioner circuit
boards. Carelessness could result
in electric shock.
6. Connect the "OUTPUT" terminals of the CJ Compensator to the mV (millivolt)
source, observing proper polarity.
Field Calibration, Appendix
WATLOW Series 1500 User's Manual
77
Technical Reference
Field Calibration
bration
Calibration
NOTE:
The following
procedure applies
to all three T/C
types, although
the Input/Output
values may differ
between types.
Use the values
corresponding to
1. Document DIP Switch settings and values in Guarded Access, pages 54 & 56.
2. Set Series 1500 DIP Switches 3 & 6 ON, all others OFF.
3. Set mV Source as follows.
Type
Setting
J
K
R
-0.885 mV, (0°F)
-0.692 mV, (0°F)
+2.282 mV, (550°F)
4. Connect DVM, (-) minus to Signal Conditioner connector terminal 1 and (+) plus
to test point TP-10 on the Signal Conditioner Board.
5. Power up Series 1500 Control. Will power up in deg. F. Press "CLEAR" to stop
flashing. Allow atleast 15 minutes for the control to stabilize.
6. With mV Source set as follows, adjust "SPAN POT" for 5.000VDC on DVM.
Type
Setting
J
K
R
-0.885 mV, (0°F)
-0.692 mV, (0°F)
+2.282 mV, (550°F)
7. Connect DVM, (+) plus to TP100 (TP99 for CH-2) and adjust "Zero Adjust Pot"
for the following DVM reading at TP-100 (TP99 for CH-2). Then verify that Actual
reads as follows.
Type
J
K
R
DVM Reading
0.0VDC ± 0.003
0.0VDC ± 0.003
0.8594VDC ± 0.003
Actual Reading
0°F ± 3
0°F ± 3
550°F ± 3
8. Set mV Source as follows, and adjust "F.S. POT" for the corresponding DVM
reading. Actual should read the value shown.
Type
mV Source
DVM Reading
Actual Reading
J
K
R
39.40mV, (1300°F)
52.93mV, (2400°F)
20.28mV, (3100°F)
2.031VDC ± 0.003
3.750VDC ± 0.003
4.884VDC ± 0.003
1300°F ± 3
2400°F ± 3
3100°F ± 3
9. Set mV Source as follows. DVM and Actual readings should be as shown.
78
Type
mV Source
DVM Reading
Actual Reading
J
K
R
17.19mV, (600°F)
26.97mV, (1200°F)
10.27mV, (1800°F)
0.9375VDC ± 0.005
1.875VDC ± 0.009
2.812VDC ± 0.005
600°F ± 5
1200°F ± 6
1800°F ± 5
WATLOW Series 1500 User's Manual
Field Calibration, Appendix
Reference
Field Calibration
10. Repeat Steps 5-8 until all the readings are correct with no further adjustments
necessary.
11. Turn power OFF. Set DIP Switch #7 ON (deg. C). Move DVM (+) plus lead to
Signal conditioner connector terminal 11 (terminal 4 for CH-2). Turn power back
ON.
12. Set mV Source as follows, and adjust "Deg. C Lo Pot" for the corresponding
DVM reading. Actual should read the value shown.
Type
mV Source
DVM Reading
Actual Reading
J
K
R
-0.885mV, (0°F)
-0.692mV, (0°F)
2.282mV, (550°F)
-0.028VDC ± 0.003
-0.028VDC ± 0.003
+0.448VDC ± 0.003
- 18°C ± 3
- 18°C ± 3
287°C ± 3
NOTE
Steps 10-14 only
required if the deg.
C Analog Output
is used.
13. Set mV Source as follows, and adjust "Deg. C Hi Pot" for the corresponding
DVM reading. Actual should read the value shown.
Type
mV Source
DVM Reading
Actual Reading
J
K
R
39.40mV, (1300°F)
52.93mV, (2400°F)
20.28mV, (3100°F)
1.100VDC ± 0.003
2.055VDC ± 0.003
2.662VDC ± 0.003
704°C 3
1315°C ± 3
1704°C ± 3
14. Set mV Source as follows. DVM and Actual Readings should be as shown.
Type
mV Source
DVM Reading
Actual Reading
J
K
R
17.19mV, (600°F)
26.97mV, (1200°F)
10.27mV, (1800°F)
0.4922VDC ± 0.003
1.014VDC ± 0.003
1.534VDC ± 0.003
315°C ± 3
649°C ± 3
982°C ± 3
15. Repeat Steps 12-14 until all the readings are correct with no further adjustments
necessary.
16. If calibrating one channel at a time, power-down the Series 1500 and mV Source.
Move the C/J Compensator from the CH-1 connector terminals to the CH-2
terminals, and move the shorting wiring to the CH-1 terminals. Then perform
Steps 6-14 for CH-2.
Field Calibration, Appendix
WATLOW Series 1500 User's Manual
79
Technical Reference
Specifications
General Features
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
Dual channel closed loop control.
Temperature and relative humidii.
51 time-based steps for ramping.
8 event outputs per step.
1 event input.
1 remote hold input.
Data communications interface optional.
Fully programmable parameters.
Membrane faceplate.
User-friendly, 1/2 DIN plug in chassis.
Three year warranty.
•
.
Control Mode
Microprocessor-based user selectable modes.
Dual channel with dual control outputs per channel.
Control parameters user selectable.
Channels 1 & 2 as Temp & Temp or Temp & RH.
On/Off switching hysteresis: 0.3°F or 0.3% RH with RTD or 0-5VDC inputs.
On/Off switching hysteresis: 3.0°F for T/C.
PID parameters per channel or per output.
Proportional band: 0-500°F or 060% RH.
Reset: 0.00-20.00 repeats per minute.
Rate: 0.00-5.00 minutes.
Rate band: 0-3 times proportional band.
Cycle time: 0-60 seconds.
Deadband: +20° On/Off or ±20° with PID.
Alarm parameters user selectable.
Latching or non-latching, both channels.
Process high & low and deviation high & low per channel.
51 steps each selectable as:
Set point value.
Ramping, value and time.
Wait For, time or value
Jump/Loop to another step.
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Operator Interface
Membrane front panel user-friendly I/2 DIN size.
Four digit 1/2” LED’s displaying actual process input value.
-Eight character alphanumeric 1/2” LED’s displaying set point, step number, and
various prompts and values for the 1500.
Nineteen LED’s to indicate various status conditions.
Nine keys for control and value entry.
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Input
. Thermocouple, RTD, and electrical % RH input.
Automatic cold junction compensation for thermocouples.
RTD input 2 or 3 wire, platinum, 100ohms Ω @ 25°C, calibrated to curve #3916
(0.003916ohms/ohms/°CΩ Ω Ω Ω
DIN curve calibration ##3850 (0.003850ohms/ohms/°C available upon request.
Sensor break protection de-energizes output to protect system.
°F, °C or % RH is user selectable, RTD version.
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80
WATLOW Series 1500 User's Manual
Specifications, Appendix
Technical Reference
Temperature
ranges:
.. -100 -99.91400°F
999.9
999.9
°F 760°C
-73 to
or
-73 to 1371 °C
K t/c: -100 to 2500°F o r
R t/c: 500 to 3200°F or 260 to 1760°C
RTD._* -99.9 to 9999°F or _-99.9 to 537.7%
T/C inputs must be ungrounded.
%RH ranges (on channel #2 only) and user selectable. Range limits are 0.0 to
100.0% RH Input types:
. RTD: % RH IS based upon Channel #1 RTD as dry bulb and Channel #2 RTD as
-99
-99
3200
°F
0-5/DC:’ Direct % RH signal on Channel #2.
Dual RTD input includes analog retransmit of input signal levels: -0.5 to 5.0VDC
for Temp and 0 to 0.5VDC for %RH.
Dual T/C inp ut includes analog retransmit of input signal levels: 1.5625mV per
LSD. 0° = 0 Volts.
Calibration offset of input signals.
RTD: ±10.0°F or °C.:
T/C: ±10° or °C.
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Outputs
Control outputs are two per channel: heat & cool (humidify & de-humidify) action.
Solid state relay, 0.5A @ 24VAC min, 253VAC max. opto-isolated, zero cross
switching or,
DC switched open collector solid state switches, 10VDC, 5mA.
Auxiliary discrete ouputs are displayed as Event #1 thru #4 for each channel and
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are user selectable as:
Solid state relay, 0.5A @ 24VAC min, 253VAC max, opto-isolated, zero cross
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switching or,
DC switched open collector solid state switches, 10VDC, 5mA.
. Eight event outputs programmed per step, or
Six event outputs programmed per step, an1 alarm output per channel.
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Accuracy
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Calibration Accuracy and Sensor Conformity: ± 0.25% of span, ± 1 digit (± 1% wet/
dry % RH) at 77°F ± 5°F ambient rated line voltage ± 1%.
Accuracy Span: 1000°F or 540°C minimum.
Temperature Stability: ±2µV / ° F ambient.
Voltage Stability: ± 0.01% of span / % of rated line voltage.
Communlcatlons
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Serial data communications.
RS422A or RS-423A (RS232C Compatible) 1200 Baud.
Electrically isolated.
All o perator indications and controls.
RS-422 with ANSI X3.28 subparagraph 2.2-A.3 protocol, RS-423 with XON/XOFF
protocol.
Terminals
36 each #6 screws on 3 barrier strips.
Communications: DB-15 female receptacle.
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Power
. 115/230VAC ±1 O%, 50/60Hz.
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Data retention upon power failure via Lithuim battery.
Optional battery backup real time clock.
Operating Environment
l
30 to 130°F/0-55°C.
O-9O% RH, non-condensing.
Dimensions
•Height:
6.0 in.
•Width:
6.0 in..
8.8 in:
. Overall depth:
Behind panel depth: 7.5 in.
4.5 lb.
Weight:
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Specifications, Appendix
WATLOW Series 1500 User's Manual
81
Technical Reference
Series 1500
B
= Standard
C
=
Battery-backed real time clock
1
2
3
4
5
=
=
=
=
=
Two RTDs
One RTD &One 0-5VDC
Two J t/c
Two K t/c
Two R t/c
ChanneIs
AA
BB
1 & 2 Control Outputs
=
=
2 S.S. relays, 0.5A.
2 S.S. switches, 10VDC, 5mA
Auxilliary Outputs/lnputs
0
= None
1
=
2
=
8 discrete outputs: S.S. relays, 0.5A and 2 dry-contact
inputs (event & remote-hold)
8 discrete outputs: S.S. switches, 1 OVDC, 5mA and
2 dry-contact inputs (event & remote-hold)
Communications
= None
A
C
= Electrically Isolated RS422/423
Modifications
0
=
1.
=
Curve (Calibration 0.003916ohm/ohm/°C
DIN Curve (Calibration 0.003850ohm/ohm°C
Analog Restransmit of Channel 2 Input Signal (Available with Dual RTD Input, Only)
0
= 0 - 0.5V out on Channel 2
1
= 0-5V out on Channel2
82
WATLOW Series 1500 User's Manual
Model # Information, Appendix
Technical Reference
Technical Service
If Something Goes Wrong
The Series 1500 is a designed for long life and durable service. If, however, something should go wrong, call Watlow at 507-454-5300, and ask for an application engineer. We’ll help you with the problem right on the phone.
Warranty Information
The Watlow Series 1500 is warranted to be free of defects in material and workmanship for 18 months after delivery to the first purchaser for use, providing that the unit
has not been misapplied.
Watlow cannot guarantee against failure, since Watlow has no control over use, and
sometimes misuse. Wat!ow’s obligations hereunder, at Watlow’s option, are limited
to replacement, repair, or refund of purchase price, on any parts which uponexamination prove to be defective within the warranty period specified. This warranty does
not apply to damage resulting from transportation, alteration, misuse or abuse.
Returning Merchandise
1.
Call Watlow Customer Service, 507/454-5300, for a Return Material Authorlzatlon
(RMA) number before returning any item for repair. We need this information:
Bill-to-address
Phone number
Ship via
P.O. number
Name and phone number of person returning the material
Symptoms and/or special instructions
. Ship-to-address
. Contact name
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2. Prior approval and an RMA number, from the Customer Serivce Department, is
needed when returning any unused product for credit. Make sure the RMA
number is on the outside of the carton, and on all paperwork returned. Ship on a
Freight Prepaid basis.
3. After we receive your return, we will examine it to determine the cause for your
action.
4.
In cases of manufacturing defect, we will enter a repair order, replacement order
or issue credit for material. A 20 percent restocking charge is applied for all
returned stock controls and accessories.
5. If the unit is unrepairable, we will return it to you with a letter of explanation.
Repair costs will not exceed 5 0 percent of the original cost.
Technical Service, Appendix
WATLOW Series 1500 User's Manual
83
Technical Reference
Shipping Claims
When you receive your Watlow Series 1500, examine the package for any signs of
external damage it may have sustained enroute. If there is apparent damage either
outside the box or to its contents, make a claim with the shipper immediately. Always
save the original shipping carton and the packing material.
Watlow Winona, Inc.
Watlow Winona, Inc. is a division of Watlow Electric Manufacturing Company of St.
Louis, Missouri. Watlow is an established manufacturer of industrial electric heating
products, in business since 1922. Watlow boasts the ability to begin with a full set of
specifications and to complete an industrial product that is manufactured totally inhouse, in the U.S.A. Products designed and manufactured by Watlow are electric
heating elements, sensors, electronic temperature controls, and power switching
devices.
The Winona operation has been designing solid state electronic control devices
since 1962, and has earned the reputation as an excellent supplier to original
equipment manufacturers. These OEMs depend upon Watlow Winona to provide
compatibly engineered controls which they can incorporate into their products with
confidence.
84
WATLOW
Series 1500 User's Manual
Technical Service, Appendix
Glossary
This glossary includes general thermal system control terms; not all are used with the Series 1500.
Actual display data:
Displayed information which gives the operator/programmer real or “actual”
data, i.e., actual time of day, actual process temperature, or actual process
relative humidity,etc.See“Programmeddisplaydata.”
Alarm:
A signal,generated by the Series 1500, warningthe operator that the process
hasexceededorfallen belowthe alarm setpoint.
Anti-reset:
Control
band.
Automatic prompts:
Data entry points where a microprocessor-based control “prompts” or asks the
operator/programmer for information input. A Series 1500 prompt has two
letters.
Auxiliary outputs:
ON/OFF outputs per channel, one of which may be designated as an alarm.
An unprogrammed step will take auxiliary output status from the programmed
step to that just prior to it.
Auto-reset:
Same as “reset” and “integal.”Controlactionthatautomaticallyeliminates
offset, or “droop,” between set point and actual process temperature.
Change Data Mode:
(CHG DATA) - Set up the program step information for the Serles 1500,
including step type, set points, step duration, "waitfor" or “jumploop”
conditions,andauxiliaryoutputstatus.
Change Parameter Mode:
(CHG PARA) - Set up the system step information for the Series 1500, including
real time, high and low range limits, alarm types, alarm points, PID parameters,
andRS-422address.
Channel:
A distinct electronic control bop or path for reading input data and
communicating information to an output device or devices.
Closed loop:
Control system that has a sensing device for process variable feedback.
Cold junction:
that inhibits automatic reset action outside of the proportional
Point of connection between thermocouple wires and the electronic instrument.
Cold junction
compensation:
Electronic means used to subtract the effect of the cold, or reference junction
temperature from a thermocouple’s electro-chemical circuit.
Cold start:
A“clean,”orcompletelycleared-of-user-programmedinformation,start-up
condition. In the Series 1500, powering up with DIP Switch #6 in the “ON”
position gives a “Cold Start.”
Cycle time:
The time necessary to complete a full ON-through-OFF period in a time
proportioning control system.
DATA:
Values (for a specific Series 1500 parameter) which appear in the control’s
DATA display. DATA may be changed in the CHG DATA mode with the UP/
DOWN keys.
Dead Band:
Represents the area where no heating or cooling takes place in a heat/cool
proportional control.
Glossary, Appendix
WATLOW Series 1500 User’s Manual
85
Derivative:
Same as “rate.” Anticipatory action that senses the rate of change of
temperature, and compensates to minimize overshoot.
Deviation:
The difference between the value of the controlled variable and the value at
which it is being controlled.
DIP switch:
Dual In-line Package (ON/OFF) switch.
Displaycapability:
In a digital indicating instrument, the entire span that can be indiiated if fully
utilized.
Droop:
Difference in temperature between set point and stabilized process
temperature.
Duty cycle:
Percentage of “load ON time” relative to total cycle time.
Event Output:
A programmable, ON/OFF output used for triggering peripheral devices or
processes from a specific Series 1500 program step. When events for a step
are unprogrammed, they retain the ON/OFF status from the last programmed
step.
Guarded Access:
(GA) -A set of Series 1500 parameters in the CHG PARA (change parameter)
mode which are “guarded” by access codes. The GA parameters include alarm
types, PID parameters, dead band, cycle times, calibration offset, recycle
option, 2-channel temperature control, device address, and the front panel
bck.
HALT condition:
Indicated by a steadily ON “PROG HALT” LED caused by a RUN/HALT key
press during a running program, or by the program reaching a “Blank”
(unprogrammed) step.” See “Remote-Hold”.
Hysteresis:
In ON/OFF control, the temperature change necessary to re-energize the
output after it was de-energized at set point.
Hunting:
Oscillation of process temperature above and below set point.
Input:
Process variable information being supplied to the instrument.
Integral:
Same as “auto-reset” and “reset.”
Isolation:
Electrical separation of functional circuits, such as the sensor circuit, or the data
communications circuits, from control power sources and ground.
Manualreset:
Manual adjustment made to provide coincidence between set point and
process temperature, thereby eliminating droop.
Monitor Data Mode:
(MTR DATA) - Examines the currently running step information.
off set:
A value added to or subtracted from the input signal.
ON/OFF control:
Control of temperature about a set point by turning the output full ON or full
OFF at set point.
Open loop:
Control system with no sensoryfeedback-
output:
A signal or value going out from a control.
86
WATLOW Series 1500 User's Manual
Gtossary, Appendix
Overshoot :
Condition whereby temperature exceeds set point due to initial power up or
process changes.
P control
Proportioning control.
Parameter:
Any of a set of physical properties whose values determine the response of an
electronic control to given inputs.
PD control:
Proportioning control with rate action.
PI control:
Proportioning control with auto-reset.
PID control:
Proportioning control with auto-reset and rate.
Process variable:
Signal or value reflecting the status of the process, such as temperature,
relative humidity, etc.
Programmed
display data:
Displayed information which gives the operator/programmer the “programmed”
or intended process information, i.e., intended set point, intended time-instep, intended process relative humidity, etc. See “Actual displayed data.”
Proportional band:
The span of temperature about the set point where proportional control action
takes place.
ProfiIing:
Executing several adjacent program steps where each step defines a ramp, or
a sloping control graph.
Program Step:
A numbered step in a process control program which contains its own specific
parameters for causing a predictable response by the control.
Ramping:
Progressing from one set point to another set point over a periid of time.
Range:
Minimum and maximum operating limits of a sensor or controller.
Rate:
Anticipatory action that senses the rate of change of temperature and
compensates to minimize overshoot. Also “derivative.”
Rate Band:
The area above and below set point where the rate (derivative) function occurs.
Available in certain VVattow controls at a value of 1 to n times the proportional
band.
Recycle:
Program option in some microprocessor-based temperature controls to repeat
the entire program indefinitely. Also “continuous loop.”
Reference junction:
Synonymous with cold junction. See “Cold junction.”
Remote - Hold:
The Remote - Hold input from a user-supplied switch closure will halt a Series
1500 program and cause the PROG HALT LED to flash. Opening the switch
causes the 1500 to resume the program where it left off.
Reset:
Same as “auto-reset” and “integral.”
Reset wind-up
Inhibit:
Synonymous with anti-reset. See “Anti-reset.”
Glossary, Appendix
WATLOW Series 1500 User' s Manual
87
Restart:
To begin to control a thermal system again, after stopping control and holding
the process variable at a fixed value. A “restart” may occur with newlyprogrammed information in microprocessor-based controls.
RTD:
Resistance Temperature Detector. Resistive sensing device displaying linear
resistance versus temperature characteristics. Displays positive temperature
coefficient.
Set point:
Intended value of the process variable.
Signal conditioner:
An electronic circuit that provides sensor compatibility of the input signal for use
in the control. Includes linearization and/or sensor excitiation.
Single .mode
cont rol :
Proportioning control.
Distance in degrees or other units between the minimum and maximum
operating limits of a sensor or controller.
Span:
Switching
sensltlvlty:
See "Hysteresis."
Thermalsystem:
A regulated environment consisting of a heat source, heat transfer medium,
sensing device and a process variable control instrument.
Thermocouple:
Temperature sensing device that is constructed of two dissimilar metals
wherein a measurable, predictable voltage is generated corresponding to
temperature.
Thermocouple
break protection:
Fail-safe operation that assures output shutdown upon an open thermocouple
condition.
Three mode control:
Proportioning control with auto-reset and rate.
Time-In-step:
Time remaining in any given program step.
Time Proportioning
Control:
Action which varies the amount of ON and OFF time when “close” to the set
point, i.e., in the proportional band. This variance is the result of the control
algorithm. In other words, the amount of time the output relay is energized
depends on the system control requirement.
Trlac:
Solid state switching device.
Twoposltlon
control:
An ON/OFF control.
Warm Start:
Start-up condition where all program information is remembered by the
instrument’s memory back-up protection. In the Series 1500, powering up with
Dip Switch #6 in the OFF position gives a “Warm Start.”
Wet Bulb:
Half of a wet bulb/dry bulb %RH sensor system, i.e., an RTD with a wet sock.
Zero switching:
Action which provides output switching only at the zero voltage crossing points
of the AC line.
88
WATLOW Series 1500 User's Manual
Glossary, Appendix
A
Alarms, 49
Alarm Codes, 50
Almost Ready to Run, 22
Analog Retransmit, 52
B
Before You Begin (Programming), 18
Bad Sensor, 74
C
Change Data Flow Diagram, Fig. 20,42
CHG DATA Overview, Fig. 8,14
Change Parameter Flow Diagram, Fig. 21,46
CHG PARA Overview, Fig. 9,15
Cycle Time, 48
D
Data Comm. Commands and Syntax, 61
Data Comm. Error Codes, 73
Dimensions, Unit and Panel Cutout, Fig. 13, 33
DIP Switches, 6, 18,40
Clear Memory, 18
How to Set, 6
Position and Function, Table 1, 6
Display and Keys, 10
Dry Bulb Installation, RTD, 26
E
Electrical Connections and Wiring, 34-38
Enter Real Time, 18
Entering Data, 19
Error Codes, 73
Event Input, 36.51
Event Outputs, 51
F
Front Panel Components, Fig. 6, 10
Flow Diagrams, Fig. 20,42
G
RTD General Parameter Chart, Chart 4,55
T/C General Parameter Chart 5,56
RTD Guarded Access Chart, Chart 2.53
T/C Guarded Access Chart, Chart 3,54
H
Halt Conditions, 22
Helpful Hints: 22-24
Ramping Conditions, 23
Wait-Step, 23
Jump Loop Step, 24
Recycle, 24
I
Installation Procedure, 34
Interface RS-422/423-Pins, Fig. 19,38
Introduction, Read Me First, 4
J
Jumper, Input Selection, 35
Jumper, RS423/422 Selection, 38
Jump Loop Step (JL), 24
M, N
Model # Information, 82
Modes, Operating Overview, Fig. 5,9
Monitoring the Action, 22
MNTR DATA Overview, Fig. 7,13
Noise, reduction of, 27-28
Non-Ramping Set Point, 9, 13
Index, Appendix
0
opening the 1500, 5, 32
Overview, Input & Output Fig. 1.4
Overview, Operating Modes, Fig. 5,9
Overview, MNTR DATA, Fg. 7,13
Overview, CHG DATA, Fig. 8.14
Overview, CHG PARA, Fig. 9.15
P
Packing List, 5
Pre-installation Information, 32
Programming, 16-2540-48
Programming Chart, Chart 6,57
Proportional Band, 47
Q
Quick Reference, 90
Quick Wire, 7
Quick Wire AC Power Connections, Fig. 3, 7
Quick Wire Simulated Sensor Wiring, Fig. 4, 8
R
Ramping Conditions, 23, 43
Rate, 48
Rate Band, 48
Recycle Option, 24.41
Remote Hold, 36,51
Reset, 47
Returning Merchandise, 83
RTD Installation Guidelines, 26
Run and Halt a Program, 60
S
Sample Program, 16
Programming Step 1, 19
Programming Step 2.20
Programming Steps 3 through 6,21
Programming Step 7, Jump Loop Step, 21
Programming Step 8, 21
Program Chart, Chart 1.17
Program Event Outputs, Table 2, 17
Program Steps, Table 3,2l
Setting Event Outputs, 17
Shipping Claims, 84
Software, Overview, 12
Specifications, 80
Start Your Program!, 22
Syntax, 64-72
T
Temp-RH Selection, 26
T/C Installation Guidelines, 27
Temp-Temp Selection, 26
Tuning, 59
UVw
Wait Step, 23,45
Warranty Information, 83
Watlow RTD’s, 26
Watlow Winona, Inc., 84
Wet Bulb Installation, RTD, 26
Wiring, Control, 36
Wiring Data Comm., 39
Wiring, Disable Ch-2.38
Wiring, Input, 36,37
Wiring, Output, 36,37
Wiring, Power, 38
Wiring Practices for Preventing Noise, 27-28
WATLOW Series 1500 User’s Manual
89
Series 1500 Quick Reference
MODE
FCTN
= Set Point Step:
Change Data Mode (CHG DATA) SP
Program set points, events
and time.
Selects MNTR DATA, How to Get Around in the
Series 1500 Software
CHG DATA or CHG
PARA Mode.
JL=Jump Loop Step:
Program step # to jump to,
and # of times to repeat
that step.
Selects any prompt in a mode.
WT=Wait Step:
Program a step to wait for…
Ch-1 condition, and/or
CH-2 condition, and/or
an event, and/or a real time
(hr, min, sec).
Selects values for the DATA display.
ENTER
Places values from the DATA display into memory.
NX= Next Step:
In sequence or any next step.
Change Parameter
Mode (CHG PARA)
ENTER
ENTER
ENTER
Prompt Key
ENTER
ENTER
ENTER
U1=Ch-1 Upper Set Point Limit
L1=Ch-1 Lower Set Point Limit
U2=Ch-2 Upper Set Point Limit
L2=Ch-2 Lower Set Point Limit
GA=Guarded Access
RC=Recycle Option
Pb=Proportional Band
RS=Reset
RT=Rate
Rb=Rate Band
db=Dead Band
CT=Cycle Time
CA=Calibration Offset
TT=Temp-Temp (Ch-1/Ch-2)
UP=Upper Process Alarm Point
LP=Lower Process Alarm Point
Ld=Lower Deviation Alarm Point
Ad=Adress #, RS-422 only
HR=Hours
MN=Minutes
SC=Seconds
C1=Channel 1
C2=Channel 2
Monitor Data Mode (MNTR DATA)
Monitoring a Wait (WT)
Step in a running program.
Monitoring a Set Point (SP)
Step in a running program.
Monitoring a Jump Loop (JL)
Step in a running program.
90
WATLOW Series 1500 User's Manual
Quick Reference