Stereo audio codec for real time audio transmission
User Manual
Table of contents
1. Presentation – Getting started ................................................................ 1
1.1. Install and connect SCOOP 5 .................................................................................... 3
1.2. Audio settings ........................................................................................................... 3
1.3. Select and set up network to be used: wired networks .................................................... 3
1.4. Select and set up network to be used: mobile networks.................................................. 5
2. Functions ............................................................................................ 6
2.1. Transmission interfaces .............................................................................................. 7
2.2. Audio encoding and decoding ................................................................................. 14
2.3. Audio interfaces ...................................................................................................... 18
2.4. Auxiliary functions ................................................................................................... 19
2.5. Supervision and control interface .............................................................................. 22
3. Operation .......................................................................................... 24
3.1. General principles – Control means .......................................................................... 24
3.2. Physical description of the equipment ........................................................................ 25
3.3. Installation and set up ............................................................................................. 34
3.4. Initial setup of the Ethernet interface .......................................................................... 36
3.5. Managing links ....................................................................................................... 38
3.6. First level maintenance ............................................................................................ 42
4. Detailed operating mode – User interface .............................................. 44
4.1. Equipment start-up .................................................................................................. 44
4.2. Principles for the navigation ..................................................................................... 45
4.3. Dialing and text input keypad ................................................................................... 46
4.4. Description of the menus ......................................................................................... 47
4.5. Setting up a link...................................................................................................... 65
4.6. Management of the configuration profiles .................................................................. 79
4.7. Restricted operation mode ....................................................................................... 80
4.8. Clearing all settings ................................................................................................ 82
4.9. Backing up and restoring the configuration ................................................................ 82
4.10. Displaying received SMS ........................................................................................ 82
5. Operating mode – Embedded HTML pages ............................................. 83
5.1. Accessing the SCOOP 5 html pages ......................................................................... 83
5.2. Principles of operation with html pages ...................................................................... 84
5.3. “Status” tab ............................................................................................................ 85
5.4. “Connections” tab .................................................................................................. 86
5.5. “Profiles” tab .......................................................................................................... 87
5.6. “Network” tab ........................................................................................................ 88
5.7. “Audio” tab............................................................................................................ 92
5.8. “Coding” tab ......................................................................................................... 93
SCOOP 5 - User Manual
5.9. “Misc” tab .............................................................................................................. 94
5.10. “Maintenance” tab ................................................................................................ 95
5.11. “Alarm” tab .......................................................................................................... 99
6. Technical characteristics ....................................................................100
6.1. Characteristics of interfaces .................................................................................... 100
6.2. Audio performance................................................................................................ 109
6.3. Network protocols and ports ................................................................................... 111
6.4. Power supply ........................................................................................................ 112
6.5. Dimensions and weight .......................................................................................... 112
6.6. Environmental characteristics .................................................................................. 112
6.7. Options ............................................................................................................... 113
6.8. Accessories and related products ............................................................................ 114
7. Annexes...........................................................................................115
7.1. Additional information on the algorithms and protocols used...................................... 115
7.2. Overview of the SIP protocol................................................................................... 116
7.3. Some methods to deal with NAT routers and firewalls ................................................ 118
7.4. V35 interface adaptation ........................................................................................ 123
7.5. Notice regarding open source code ........................................................................ 124
8. Index ...............................................................................................125
SCOOP 5 - User Manual
1. Presentation – Getting started
The SCOOP 5 codec allows the bi-directional transmission of one or two audio signals with bit rate
reduction, over various transmission media: digital leased lines, ISDN lines, PSTN telephone lines, IP
protocol networks…
The standard version of the codec includes an Ethernet interface for IP transmission, and X24/X21
interfaces for transmission over digital leased lines. The unit can be complemented with many options
providing additional network interfaces, coding algorithms, etc.
One outstanding feature of AETA codecs in ISDN mode is the 5A System: on receiving an incoming
ISDN call, the unit can automatically detect the coding algorithm and parameters of the calling
codec, and then adjust itself in a compatible configuration so that the connection succeeds regardless
of the initial configuration and that of the remote unit.
In IP mode, the codec features the same ease of operation thanks to the use of the SIP and SDP
protocols.
For ISDN transmission, the unit can be operated in a “double codec” mode. It is then equivalent to
two independent mono codecs, each running G711 or G722 over a B channel of the ISDN (interface
#1).
This chapter gives basic instructions for a quick start. It obviously does not provide all the information
for full control. For comprehensive information one can refer to the rest of this manual:
 Chapter 2 describes all the functions and features of the SCOOP 5 (but not necessarily with
all the operating modes)

Chapter 3 gives a physical description of the unit, shows its setting up and operation
principles.




Chapter 4 details menus and operating modes.
Chapter 5 deals with using the html server embedded in SCOOP 5
Chapter 6 provides all the technical characteristics of the SCOOP 5
The annexes bring miscellaneous additional information, including an index you can use to
look for a given information topic.
The following table shows the main features of the product. Functions marked with  in this table are
available as options. Those marked with  are only available in units equipped with ISDN interface(s).
 5AS = Aeta Audio Advanced Automatic Adjustment System
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Characteristics
Optional
Operation modes
Single wide band codec
Double 7 kHz codec (ISDN mode)

IP transmission interface
Ethernet Interface, 10BaseT / 100BaseT; TCP/IP, UDP/IP, RTP protocols
Audio transmission in unicast mode: SIP signalling protocol, SDP, RTP streaming
Audio transmission in multicast mode: RTP streaming
Net bit rate 16 to 256 kbit/s (depending on coding algorithm)
Leased line transmission interfaces
Two X24/X21/V11/V35 interfaces;
64, 128, 192, 256 or 384 kbit/s over one interface (selectable)
ISDN transmission interface

One or two S0 interfaces
Single codec 64, 128, 192 or 256 kbit/s, or double codec 64 kbit/s
5AS auto configuration on incoming calls
Transmission interface on PSTN telephone line

One “2 wire” telephone interface
« POTS codec » mode with integrated V34 modem and CELP coding, 12 to 24 kbit/s
Mobile network access

Integrated 2G/3G/3G+/LTE (depending on version) network access module, 2 antenna sockets
Voice mode: standard telephone or “HD Voice” (7 kHz with AMR-WB)
Packet data mode: IP protocol, SIP signalling, SDP, RTP streaming, net bit rate 16 to 256 kbit/s
(depending on coding algorithm)
External 3G/LTE module connection via USB socket (data mode only)
SMS reception
Audio coding algorithms
G711 (standard telephone)
GSM, AMR (mobile telephone)
AMR-WB / G722.2 (mobile “HD Voice”
G722 SRT, H221, H242
CELP 7 kHz
MPEG Audio Layer II
MPEG AAC-LC , HE-AAC, HE-AAC v2
4 sub-band ADPCM (low latency)
TDAC (ISDN mode only)
(audio modes)
Mono
Mono
Mono
Mono
Mono
Mono, Stereo, Double mono, Joint stereo
Mono, Stereo
Mono, Stereo
Mono


Audio interfaces
Two analog inputs and two analog outputs with adjustable gain
Digital input and output, AES/EBU format
Level display for encoder inputs and ecoder outputs
Stereo headphone socket for monitoring, switchable send/receive
Auxiliary functions (available depending on transmission interface)
Relay transmission: 2 isolated inputs and 2 isolated outputs, 6 non isolated inputs and outputs
Data channel with RS232 serial port, 300 to 9600 bauds
Audio coordination channel (bandwidth 300-3400 Hz)

Control and supervision
Keyboard and LCD display on front panel
Programmable set-up/dial memories
Ethernet/IP remote control
Embedded html server
Remote control serial port, isolated control and status loops
Secondary Ethernet interface for remote control
Table 1 – Main features of the SCOOP 5
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
1.1. Install and connect SCOOP 5

Plug on a power source: the SCOOP 5 automatically starts up. To put it on stand-by or
restart it, press the
key (top left corner on the front panel) for at least 3 seconds.


Connect the necessary audio interfaces (details: page 29)

Using the SCOOP 5 menus:
key or
key to activate the main menu, use the arrows to
select a sub-menu or a parameter, enter or validate with the
key.
jumps back up to
the previous menu level, until getting back to the base screen (with level display).
(details: page 45)
Connect SCOOP 5 on the transmission network (details: page 29 and following)
1.2. Audio settings

With factory settings, the active inputs are the analog ones, and clipping level is set at
+16 dBu for both inputs and outputs.

Enter the menus using
further on page 58.
, select Setup then Audio. Perform necessary settings, see details
1.3. Select and set up network to be used: wired networks

Select network: Setup menu then Network, then select Change Network,
. In the
proposed choice, select the desired network (ISDN, LL, Ethernet, POTS). Validate with
.

Select the audio coding: menu Setup / Algorithm, then Other, then
. Browse the
available choice with the arrows, and make a selection with
. Restart the same procedure
to change for another coding setup.
 The available choice depends on the transmission network! For more details on coding,
see page 14.
1.3.1. Set up an ISDN link

If needed, select the protocol with Setup / Network / ISDN Parameter / Protocol. More
details: see page 52.


Enter the remote number to dial, using the keypad, and press the

Hang up with the
key.
If more than one B channel is involved due to the coding algorithm used, you must enter a
second number, then
, and so on. If the last dialled number is adequate, just confirm by
pressing
without typing a number again.
key to release the connection (you must confirm by pressing
SCOOP 5 - User Manual
again).
3
1.3.2. Set up a (wired) IP link
Over a public IP network, and especially when no SIP server is used, it is highly
recommended to use a STUN server.
The address of a STUN server can be set in the SCOOP 5 html pages (see page 89) or via the
menu: Setup / Network / AoIP Parameter / STUN Server, enter the address of a STUN server
(we propose our server stun.aeta-audio.com, look also the support pages on our web site
www.aeta-audio.com). Enable or disable STUN with Setup / Network / AoIP Parameter /
STUN Mode (On or Off).
More details: see page 119.

Check the Ethernet interface is active thanks to the LED on the Ethernet socket on the back,
and check an IP address is allocated: menu Tools / About / Local IP.

The default setting uses a DHCP server to get an IP address, which is suitable for most
occasions. In other situations, look for more details on page 36.

Using the keypad, enter the remote number to call (numeric IP address, or SIP URI if a SIP
server is used), then press the
key.


Hang up with the
key (you must confirm by pressing
again).
When using a SIP server, some data must be entered beforehand using the AoIP Parameter
menu; for more details, refer to page 50.
1.3.3. Set up a POTS link

For connecting the line, you must plug in ISDN socket #1 an adapter cable (included with
the POTS option), which provides an RJ45 socket for the ISDN line on one hand, and on the
other hand an RJ11 socket. Plug the POTS line in the latter.

If needed, adjust the POTS line parameters using Setup / Network / POTS Parameter.
Details on these settings: see page 53.

Enter the remote number to dial, using the keypad, and press the

Hang up with the
key.
key to release the connection (you must confirm by pressing
again).
1.3.4. Set up a leased line (LL)
No connection procedure is involved with such link, as it is automatically set (or reset) as soon as the
needed connections are done and the settings are correct on both sides of the link.
See in this manual on page 52 for configuration details.
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1.4. Select and set up network to be used: mobile networks
To set links over a mobile network, an antenna connection is required (more details on page 32), and
you must have a SIM card with a subscription suitable for the use. Specifically, for an IP mode
transmission the subscription must include access to data transmission, and RTP audio streams must
be allowed.

While the unit is switched off, insert t he SIM card into the drawer on the rear side of the
SCOOP 5.


Switch on the SCOOP 5 (depress
a few seconds).
Enter the menu Setup / Network / Other (Network) / Mobile (Int.) / Mobile Parameter
/ PIN. Enter the PIN code for the SIM card using the keypad then
.
1.4.1. Set up a link in voice mode
This mode allows communicating with any telephone terminal through the regular telephone service. It
also allows to benefit from the 7 kHz wide band service known as “HD Voice” whenever the remote
terminal is compatible and the network supports the service.


In the menu Setup / Network / Mobile Parameter, select Mode / Cellphone

The Network Select menu enables you to select among the available operators, if your
mobile subscription entiltes you to do so.

Enter the remote number to dial, using the keypad, and press the

Hang up with the
Afterwards, go to the menu Setup / Network / Mobile Parameter / Network Settings /
Preferred Technology / Auto
key.
key to release the connection (you must confirm by pressing
again).
1.4.2. Set up a (mobile) IP link
Over a public IP network, and especially when no SIP server is used, it is highly
recommended to use a STUN server.
The address of a STUN server can be set in the SCOOP 5 html pages (see page 89) or via the
menu: Setup / Network / AoIP Parameter / STUN Server, enter the address of a STUN server
(we propose our server stun.aeta-audio.com, look also the support pages on our web site
www.aeta-audio.com). Enable or disable STUN with Setup / Network / AoIP Parameter /
STUN Mode (On or Off).
More details: see page 119.


In the menu Setup / Network / Mobile Parameter, select Mode / IP Mode

Go to the menu PS Settings / APN: enter the operator’s APN code, using the keypad, then
press
.
Come back to the base screen using the
key.




Come back to the menu Setup / Network / Mobile Parameter / Network Settings /
Preferred Technology / Auto
Using the keypad, enter the remote number to call (numeric IP address, or SIP URI if a SIP
server is used), then press the
key.
Hang up with the
key (you must confirm by pressing
again).
When using a SIP server, some data must be entered beforehand using the AoIP Parameter
menu; for more details, refer to page 50.
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2. Functions
The following synoptic diagram shows the basic functions of the equipment.
Figure 1 – Functional diagram of the equipment
The audio signals to be transmitted are converted (when needed) to digital format, then the encoding
function reduces the bit rate, using a selectable algorithm; the resulting bit flow is sent to one of the
available transmission interfaces: Ethernet interface, permanent link data interfaces (X21/X24/V35),
ISDN interface(s), PSTN interface, mobile network...
The transmission interface functional block also extracts compressed data coming from the network
and sends them to a decoding block that reproduces uncompressed audio data. Last, the audio
signals are output to both digital and analogue outputs.
Monitoring the audio interfaces is possible thanks to a headphone and level meters for the
inpts/outputs.
In addition to the main task of transmitting an audio programme, the SCOOP 5 can also transmit
auxiliary information, usually by embedding them inside the transmitted audio streams.
Supervision and controlling the unit is performed using various remote control interfaces, and of
course by means of the displays and controls on the front panel.
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2.1. Transmission interfaces
The SCOOP 5 features in all versions an Ethernet interface for IP protocol networks, and leased line
transmission interfaces (X24/V11).
One or two ISDN come in addition on some versions.
PSTN/POTS and mobile network access is optionally available.
2.1.1. Ethernet/IP interface
The IP interface is a 10BaseT/100BaseT Ethernet interface allowing transmission of the audio
programmes in a wide range of possible bit rates. The audio stream is always transported under the
RTP/UDP protocol.
IP unicast mode
The most classical transmission mode is unicast: audio connection with one distant device, generally
bidirectional. This mode can be used on all types of networks links, LAN or WAN, including links via
Internet. The SCOOP 5 implements the SIP protocol, which allows it to interoperate with IP phones
and other SIP compatible audio codecs, in a way similar to ISDN or POTS connections. Links can be
set up in two ways:


“Peer to peer” connection between two compatible units
Use of a SIP proxy server to set up the link, or a SIP PBX
Details about the SIP protocols can be found in the annex (see 7.2, Overview of the SIP protocol).
The audio coding algorithm can be selected depending on the required quality and the available
network bandwidth. The following algorithms are currently available:
Codec
Bit rate
(coding)
Bit rate
(total)1
Audio
bandwidth
Typical use, main features
G711
64 kbit/s
86 kbit/s
3 kHz
Voice, telephony
Compatible with IP phones
CELP
24 kbit/s
28,5 kbit/s
7 kHz
Suitable for high quality speech;
Low network bandwidth consumption
G722
64 kbit/s
86 kbit/s
7 kHz
High quality speech.
Compatible with some IP phones.
MPEG Layer II
64 to 256
kbit/s
73 to 275
kbit/s
Up to
20 kHz
Highest quality, suitable for speech and
music
MPEG AAC-LC
16 to 256
kbit/s
30 to 277
kbit/s
Up to
20 kHz
Low bit rate, suitable for speech and
music
MPEG HE-AAC
and HE-AAC v2
16 to 128
kbit/s
23 to 139
kbit/s
Up to
20 kHz
Very low bit rate, suitable for speech and
music
4SB ADPCM
128 or
256 kbit/s
173 or
301 kbit/s
15 kHz
Low latency, suitable for speech and
music
Table 2 – Overview of algorithms available in IP mode
1 Informative value; higher than the “net” encoded audio bit rate because of the protocol overhead
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IP multicast mode
The multicast mode allows an encoder device to transmit an audio programme to several decoders by
sending a single encoded stream to a multicast group address. The link is unidirectional by nature.
This mode can be used on a local area network, and on larger private networks that can manage the
multicast mode. On the other hand, Internet cannot support this routing mode.
In this mode, the SCOOP 5 uses the RTP protocol to manage the audio stream, like in the unicast
mode, but the SIP protocol is not applicable here; instead a proprietary signalling system is used. As
the link is unidirectional, the unit has to be set either as a “sender” in order to encode and transmit
the audio stream to the selected group address, or as a “receiver” to receive and decode such stream
coming from a “sender” device.
The audio coding algorithm can be selected with just the same capability as for the unicast mode
described above.
SIP and SDP protocols
The SIP protocol is a signalling protocol, used for IP connections, which allows the SCOOP 5 to
interoperate with IP phones and other SIP compatible audio codecs, in a way similar to ISDN or POTS
connections. Details about the SIP protocols can be found in the annex (refer to 7.2, Overview of the
SIP protocol).
One significant advantage is the inclusion of SDP, a protocol which allows the connecting devices to
automatically negotiate and agree on the coding profile to use. Thanks to this system, it is not
necessary to set the units in the same way before setting up a connection. Moreover, the calling party
needs not know how the remote unit is configured before initiating a link.
 Note: the SIP protocol does not mandatorily imply the use of a server. Codecs can set up point-topoint links using this protocol, and benefit from some its advantages.
Packet replication
SCOOP 5 also proposes an RTP transmission mode with enhanced reliability, using packet
replication. When enabling this mode, every packet is transmitted twice; with such system a lost packet
has no effect since the receiver still gets the other copy of the packet. In this way, stable links can be
obtained even with a high packet loss rate. Of course, as a disadvantage the bit rate is double; you
must make sure this stays compatible with the transmission medium.
Remote control via IP
In addition, the Ethernet interface can be used for configuring or remote controlling the unit, with two
control methods:

SCOOP 5 provides html pages which allow to get complete control over the unit using a web
browser, via port 80 (default port for http protocol). See in chapter 5 the detailed operating
mode.

TCP port 6000 can be used for “command line” control, suitable for codec supervision
software such as Codec Live, MDC.net, etc.
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2.1.2. Leased line interfaces
For transmission over leased lines, the codec includes two X24/V11 ports which can run at 64 kbit/s,
128 kbit/s, 192 kbit/s, 256 kbit/s and 384 kbit/s bit rates.
Only one X24/V11 port is used, selectable among the two physical interfaces. The other, however,
send the same data as the active one, and it can be used e.g. for a redundant link.
For “leased line” transmission, the codec synchronises on the network clock provided by the X24/V11
interface. If no suitable clock is present, the system folds back to an internal clock.
2.1.3. ISDN interfaces
For access to the ISDN, the transmission interface is one or two S0 BRI (Basic Rate Interface), for
transmission over one to four 64 kbit/s B channels. Thus, the total available bit rate ranges from 64 to
256 kbit/s.
In “double codec” mode, only the first BRI is used, with each of the possible links using one B channel
on this single line.
The codec synchronises itself onto the ISDN network clock when a link is active.
Network protocols
Available protocols:



“Euro ISDN” (or ETSI), default protocol valid for a large number of countries, especially all
over Europe.
“NTT”: valid for the Japanese network of NTT
“NI-2”: valid for numerous operators in North America. This choice is also suitable for the
connection to network equipment with “NI-1” protocol.
 In North America (USA and Canada), the available interface is often a U0 interface (instead of
S0). In such case an “NT1” network adapter must be inserted between the line and the SCOOP 5.
Such adapter can be found on the local market.
5A System®
Setting an ISDN connection is often difficult, at least because of the numerous coding parameters to
be set. Moreover, with most proprietary algorithms, it is mandatory for the two devices to have exactly
the same settings, otherwise the connection will fail, and sometimes it is not easy to find out the
reason.
5A stands for Aeta Audio Advanced Automatic Adjustment. This system makes it easier to set an ISDN
connection, because the codec, on receiving a call, automatically adjusts itself, following the calling
party algorithm and parameters.
When the 5A System is enabled on the unit and a call is received, the unit first detects the coding
algorithm used by the calling codec, and also senses its parameters: audio mode (mono, stereo…),
sampling rate, bit rate, inverse multiplexing protocol, etc. Then the unit can decode the compressed
audio from the remote unit. In addition, the unit will use these same settings for encoding and sending
audio to the remote unit, so that the remote unit can also decode the outgoing audio programme.
The whole process just takes a few seconds. Of course, all compatible coding configurations can be
detected automatically by the 5A System.
Note that the 5A system is only active for ISDN connections.
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J52
The ITU-T J52 recommendation was defined in order to allow the interoperability of multimedia
terminals over the ISDN1, using common coding standards. It includes the following features:


Support of ITU-T recommended coding algorithms: G711, G722, MPEG Layer II


Interoperation procedures according to ITU-T H242 recommendation;
Framing as per ITU-T H221 recommendation, ensuring byte synchronisation and
interchannel synchronisation when more than one 64 kbit/s B channel is required for the
desired bit rate;
In the case of MPEG encoding, optional protection against transmission errors (ReedSolomon error correction codes).
Details about MPEG and J52 can be found in the annexes (refer to 7.1, Additional information on the
algorithms and protocols used).
It must be noted that, thanks to the interoperation protocol, J52 codecs, when setting up a link, can
negotiate automatically and agree on a configuration that is compatible with the capability of both
units (regarding bit rate, channel mode, etc.). In this way, when the units differ in their capability (or
make), the resulting configuration may be different from expected beforehand, but in most cases the
link will work and audio will be transmitted.
As another useful consequence, this also gives users more tolerance to mistakes when configuring the
units on the two sides of the transmission links, as the codecs will adapt automatically even with
differences in the initial settings of the two units.
Symmetric or asymmetric coding
In most operating cases, the codec sets up symmetrical links, wherein the encoder and decoder use
the same encoding/decoding algorithm with same settings (channel mode, etc.). In other words, the
link is “full-duplex” and the same encoding/decoding type is used on both directions.
For a link over the ISDN, in fact there are cases when the link is asymmetric, with a different coding
mode in each direction. This may happen in some cases with the J52 protocol. To give some
examples, it is possible to send MPEG Layer II in one direction and receive G722 in the reverse
direction, or send MPEG stereo and receive MPEG mono, etc.
2.1.4. POTS interface
The interface is a “two wire” analog telephone access, with characteristics adjustable depending on
the country. Dialling normally uses DTMF, but for older switching equipment it is possible to use pulse
dialling.
SCOOP 5 includes a V34 modem which transmits via this line a bidirectional audio flow, encoded at
a nominal 24 kbit/s bit rate. Depending on the line quality and the quality of the link with the remote
codec, this bit rate is automatically negotiated and dynamically adjusted from 12 to 24 kbit/s.
A “protected“ mode can be activated, which increases the resilience to transmission errors, at the cost
of a higher latency (encoder to decoder delay). You must make sure to set this parameter the same
way on both devices / both ends of the link.
1 J52 is only relevant for ISDN connections
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2.1.5. Mobile network access
Units equipped with the “Wireless” option include an integrated module for access to 2G/3G/3G+
mobile networks, and a holder for a SIM card.
Depending on the version the accessible networks are 2G (GSM, EDGE), 3G (UMTS), 3G+ (HSDPA,
HSUPA, HPA…), and 4G/LTE.
For the operation, at least one multiband antenna (to be selected for compliance with the mobile
network characteristics) must be connected on SCOOP 5. An antenna “diversity” feature gives an
opportunity to improve the stability when the radio reception quality is poor, by connecting a second
antenna.
Lastly, SCOOP 5 can display the received SMS messages.
Mobile voice mode – HD Voice
The integrated module allows to use the mobile phone service, for communicating with all ISDN or
PSTN telephone terminals or hybrids, or with other mobile terminals. The quality is in such case that of
mobile connections, with a 300-3400 Hz bandwidth and coding such as GSM, EFR, AMR...
Now many mobile networks also propose “HD Voice”, an extension of this mobile telephone service.
With this new capability, compatible terminals implement the AMR-WB coding algorithm (standardised
as G722.2 by the ITU-T) and provide speech transmission with a 50-7000 Hz bandwidth and a
quality very similar to the well-known G722. Automatic fallback to the standard coding takes place if
the network does not support the service or one of the terminals does not feature this capability.
No special subscription, other than to the regular telephone service, is needed, but for most operators
only the 3G/3G+ base stations support the service.
 This sometimes makes people believe that HD Voice is related to the mobile IP service, but this is
definitely not the case.
More and more mobile phones now support this service, especially (but not only, and not all)
smartphones. All AETA codecs in “Wireless” version support HD Voice, namely:




Scoopy+ HD (except old units, in doubt consult us)
SCOOP 4+ in “wireless” version
ScoopFone HD
SCOOP 5
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Mobile IP mode
The other service available with mobile access is the data packet transmission mode, abbreviated as
“PS” (for Packet Switched), with IP protocol.
This mode brings similar capabilities as a wired IP connection via the Ethernet interface, as described
above in 2.1.1, with some distinctive characteristics:

This requires a subscription including access to the data service, with conditions compliant
with the application. Among other requirements, an APN (Access Point Name) must be
provided that allows this type of media stream.

The available bit rate depends on various factors; first the network technology
(2G/3G/3G+…), but also the traffic level in the radio cell, the operator’s network capacity,
possibly the type of subscription. This may bring on restrictions for the usable compression
algorithms.


The multicast mode is not available on mobile networks
Setting a link implies first activating the data connection, before actually initiating an audio
stream transmission link
Using an external USB module
Instead of the integrated module, it is possible to plug a USB mobile module or “key”, in order to
access mobile IP transmission, with more or less similar conditions as described above.
 However be aware:




This capability is optional
The USB module must be from the list of devices supported by AETA. As this list is evolving,
please check our web site for up to date information.
The “HD Voice” mode is not available in this way
USB devices do not feature antenna diversity
2.1.6. Managing calls
Apart the LL mode (leased line) which is for a permanent connection, the audio transmission implies a
link/session setup phase.
One of the transmission interfaces is selected as the default interface on the SCOOP 5.
A call towards a remote unit, initiated by the user of the SCOOP 5, is implicitly sent through this
default interface.
On the other hand, an incoming call on any interface (regardless of the default interface) can be
processed and the link established, under following conditions:

The “called” interface must be connected and active. As an example, for mobile IP the data
connection must be active.
 The codec must not be already busy with another connection.
If the call comes on an interface other than the default interface, the codec first switches to the
suitable interface, and then processes the incoming call. When the link is released, it will come back
to its previous state (and default interface).
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2.1.7. Securing a link with a backup connection
When a fixed link (LL) is used, it is possible to use another network access in order to set a temporary
backup link in case the nominal LL link fails. The unit will then switch to a backup mode (ISDN or IP
depending on the selected backup arrangement), and provide the audio transmission via the backup
network access. More precisely, on one end of the link the codec will switch to the backup mode and
“call” its counterpart via the ISDN or and IP network. On the other end the unit will switch to the
backup mode when it receives the call on its ISDN or IP interface. The operating mode and
configuration for this backup feature are detailed further in following sections (3.5.4, Setting up a
backup link).
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2.2. Audio encoding and decoding
SCOOP 5 features a wide range of coding algorithms. Their availability depends on the transmisison
network used. Besides, the MPEG family algorithms feature a large configuration flexibility.
The table below synthetically describes the capabilities with the various transmission media:
Codec
G 711
G SM, AMR
AMR- W B
CE LP
CE LP
G 722
G722-H221
G722-H242
TDAC
4SB ADP CM
4SB ADP CM
MP E G L2
MP E G L2
MP E G L2
MP E G L2
MP E G L2
AAC- LC
AAC- LC
AAC- LC
AAC- LC
AAC- LC
AAC- LC
HE - AAC
HE - AAC
HE - AAC
HE - AAC
HE - AAC v 2
HE - AAC v 2
F requency ( kHz)
Audio
channels 16 24 32 48
Mono
Mono
Mono
Mono
Mono
Mono
Mono
Mono
Mono
Mono
Stéréo
M / S
M / S
M / S
Stereo
Stereo
M / S
M / S
M / S
M / S
M / S
Stereo
M / S
M / S
Stereo
Stereo
Stereo
Stereo
Bit rate
( kbit/s)
W ired
P STN
LL
64
12  22.8
24
64
64
64
64
128
256
64
128
192
256
384
16  56
64
96
128
192
256
16  56
64
96
128
16  56
64
Mobile
ISDN
3G +
E thernet
LTE
UMTS
Voice
[ 2]
[ 2]
[ 2]
IP networks
P ossible audio bandwidth:
3 kHz
7 kHz
15 kHz
20 kHz
[2] : requires two ISDN lines
Table 3 – Available coding depending on network
This table applies to the normal mode, single codec.
In double codec ISDN mode, only G711 and G722 algorithms are available for each codec.
The following chapters bring some precisions about the important features of the various algorithms
and protocols available.
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2.2.1. G711 coding
Application: telephony, coordination. Low latency.
G711 is the standard coding used for voice transmission on public telephone networks, and features
300 to 3400 Hz audio bandwidth. This algorithm is typically used for links over IP networks with IP
telephones or VoIP gateways. Via ISDN, G711 is used for links with telephones or hybrid devices.
G711 is available only for IP or ISDN transmission
2.2.2. Mobile telephony coding: GSM , AMR
Application: telephony, mobile coordination. Moderate latency.
These algorithms are exclusively used for speech transmission over mobile telephone networks, with a
300 to 3400 Hz audio bandwidth. Gateways perform, whenever needed, transcoding in order to
interface with fixed PSTN, ISDN and IP networks.
2.2.3. Mobile HD Voice coding: AMR-WB
Application: commentaries, mobile coordination. Moderate latency.
The AMR-WB coding (standardised as G722.2 by the ITU-T) is used between compatible mobile
terminals, when the mobile network supports the so called “HD Voice” service, and provides speech
transmission with a 50-7000 Hz bandwidth.
SCOOP 5 automatically implements this algorithm in mobile voice mode every time it is possible, and
automatically falls back to standard voice coding if not (when network does not support, or the remote
terminal is not compatible).
 Unfortunately it is not possible to see directly whether AMR-WB is active or not at a given moment.
You have to rely on your listening skills! However, it has to be active if the conditions are met: a)
support from the network on both sides of the link, b) both terminals compatible, c) service
continuity from end to end1
2.2.4. CELP coding
Application: commentaries, coordination. Low capacity transmission channels
This algorithm operates in mono for a net nominal bit rate of 24 kbit/s, and provides 7 kHz
bandwidth and a quality close to G722 for a much lower bit rate.
CELP is available for IP or PSTN networks. For PSTN (POTS), the bit rate may be reduced to adapt for
the line quality, among the following values: 12 kbit/s, 14.4 kbit/s, 16.8 kbit/s, 19.2 kbit/s,
21.6 kbit/s, 24 kbit/s. The bandwidth is reduced accordingly.
Still for POTS lines, in addition to the normal mode two “protected modes” are available, bringing an
increased resistance to transmission problems, however with an increased latency as well.
1 At the time of writing, this requires both units to be on the same network: same operator, same country
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2.2.5. G722 coding
Application: commentaries, coordination. Low latency.
This mono coding algorithm at a 64 kbit/s bit rate is a reference for commentaries, and features a
50-7000 Hz bandwidth.
It is available for LL, ISDN, IP networks (wired or mobile).
For leasedlines or ISDN, three synchronisation modes are possible:



“Statistical recovery” byte synchronisation method (alias SRT);
H221 synchronisation; in this case, 1.6 kbit/s from the compressed data are used for this;
H221 synchronisation and H242 protocol. This is only available for the ISDN mode.
H221 synchronisation is highly recommended when possible, as it features higher reliability and faster
recovery time, while degradation (because of the bit rate used for framing) is minimal.
H242 protocol, the most flexible mode, is recommended by the ITU-T, and is included in J52.
However, the mode with H221 synchronisation but without H242 protocol can be useful for
compatibility with old generation codecs which did not use this protocol.
No specific synchronisation is required for the IP mode.
2.2.6. TDAC coding
Application: commentaries, mono music via ISDN with only one B channel.
The SCOOP 5 can also include the TDAC algorithm. TDAC is for Time Domain Aliasing
Cancellation; this is a transform coding based on an MDCT (Modified Discrete Cosine Transform),
encoding a 15 kHz bandwidth mono signal at a 64 kbit/s bit rate.
TDAC is available as an option, only for the ISDN mode.
2.2.7. 4SB ADPCM coding
Application: commentaries, mono or stereo music. Low latency.
4SB ADPCM operates either in mono at a 128 kbit/s rate, or in stereo at 256 kbit/s, for a 15 kHz
bandwidth. It features a very low latency which makes it very interesting for live duplex transmission. It
also has the advantage to be very little sensitive to tandem coding.
4SB ADPCM is available for LL, ISDN; wired or mobile IP. However it is not recommended for mobile
networks, because it requires a high bit rate and it is highly sensitive to packet losses, which can be
frequent on such networks.
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2.2.8. MPEG Audio Layer 2 coding
Application: mono or stereo music, high quality.
As shown on Table 3, this coding algorithm features a maximum flexibility, with many variations for bit
rate, mono or stereo channel mode, sampling rates...
The two channel modes exist in three variations:


Stereo: coding of each channel stays independent
Dual mono: coding is similar to the previous case, but this choice applies to channel with no
acoustic relationship, e.g. two languages for commentaries

Joint stereo: applies to stereo programme, but here the encoder exploits the interchannel
correlation for improved coding. To be used only for a stereo programme
The 16 and 24 kHz sampling rates feature a moderate bandwidth (respectively 7 kHz and 10 kHz)
and are rather useful for commentaries.
 The latency is rather high with these sampling rates
MPEG L2 is available for LL, ISDN; wired or mobile IP networks.
ISDN mode specific aspects: J52
For ISDN transmission, MPEG L2 is proposed with two variations:

“MPEG L2 J52” variation, using the ITU-T J52 protocol for the link negotiation and inverse
multiplexing (B channel aggregation for connections requiring more than 64 kbit/s).
Moreover, optional protection against transmission errors (FEC) is also available. For more
details refer to 2.1.3, ISDN interfaces (page 9).

MPEG L2” variation, without the J52 protocol, using a system for inverse multiplexing two B
channels which is proprietary but compatible with several codecs on the market. The bit rate is
limited to 128 kbit/s with this option.
LL mode specific aspects
In leased line mode, an optional protection against transmission errors (FEC) is also available. This is
the same FEC system as implemented for the J52 variation of the ISDN mode.
2.2.9. MPEG AAC algorithms
Application: mono or stereo music, Low capacity transmission channels.
These (optional) algorithms feature a very high compression ratio, for a given audio quality,
compared to Layer 2. They can operate at a sampling rate of 32 or 48 kHz, and several bit rates: 16,
20, 24, 32, 40, 48, 56, 64, 96, 128, 192, 256 kbit/s. Three coding variations are available:

MPEG AAC-LC (“Low Complexity”): lower compression than other variations, but lower
latency.

MPEG HE-AAC (“High Efficiency” AAC): higher compression, and the bit rate is limited to
128 kbit/s for this variation.

MPEG HE-AAC v2 (“High Efficiency” AAC version 2): compared to the above, this coding
further enhances the performance for a stereo program (not available for mono). The bit rate
is limited to 128 kbit/s for this variation.
AAC codecs are available as an option for ISDN, and wired or mobile IP networks.
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2.3. Audio interfaces
2.3.1. Analog interfaces
The analogue inputs and outputs are balanced, and the input and output gains are adjustable.
The input to the encoder is selectable between the digital audio input and the stereo analogue input.
The output from the decoder is always provided on the stereo analogue output.
The sampling frequency of the analogue  digital converters is automatically set depending on the
coding algorithm used for transmission.
2.3.2. Digital interfaces
The equipment also provides digital audio inputs/outputs in AES/EBU format.
The input to the encoder is selectable between the digital audio input and the stereo analogue input.
The output from the decoder is always provided both on the digital output and the stereo analogue
output.
The digital audio interfaces are usually locked to the digital audio input (“genlock” mode), but
alternatively they can be synchronised to the internal clock reference of the codec (mode called
“Master”).
Sampling rate conversion is automatically performed, whenever needed, depending on the coding
algorithm used for transmission.
 As an important consequence, the selection or value of the sampling frequency of the AES/EBU
input/output is completely independent of the sampling frequency of the compression algorithm.
One should also be aware that the various audio settings have no relationship with those for the other
side of the link (the remote codec), whatever they are: selection of analog or digital source, sampling,
rate of AES interfaces, etc. This configuration is only relevant for the local installation.
2.3.3. Audio monitoring
Audio programmes can be monitored of the audio input (before encoding) and at the audio output
(after decoding the received signal).
First, the programme level is displayed on the graphic screen; both input and output levels are
monitored simultaneously.
Besides, a test output on a stereo headphone jack allows monitoring either the encoder or decoder
audio signals.
 Note: as the audio output is monitored immediately after decoding, this monitoring position is not
sensitive to the possible activation of the audio test loop (see further the chapter about test loops),
contrarily to the physical audio outputs (both analog and digital).
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2.4. Auxiliary functions
The main function of the SCOOP 5 is the transmission of one or two main audio programmes, but it
also provides auxiliary functions for transmitting data or additional signals, inside the same stream (or,
more generally, the same session).
These features are only compatible with AETA products, because they are not inside the scope of
independent standards.
The availability of these functions depends on the coding algorithms, and on the transmission
network. The following tables show these capabilities for the various networks.
 No auxiliary function is available for mobile voice transmission. Besides, for PSTN/POTS only
“relay transmission” (2 loops) is possible.
Codec
G 711
CE LP
G 722- SRT
G 722- H221
G722-H242
TDAC
4SB ADP CM
MP E G L2
MP E G L2/J52
AAC- LC
HE - AAC
HE - AAC v 2
Relays
Isolated G P IO
300
X
Data ( bauds)
1200 2400 4800
Coordination
9600
channel
X
X, Option
Option
X = exclusiv e ( only one function at a time)
Table 4 – Auxiliary functions: over leased lines
Codec
G 711
CE LP
G 722- SRT
G 722- H221
G 722- H242
TDAC
4SB ADP CM
MP E G L2
MP E G L2/J52
AAC- LC
HE - AAC
HE - AAC v 2
Relays
Isolated G P IO
300
Data ( bauds)
1200 2400 4800
9600
Coordination
channel
X
X
X, Option
X
X
X, Option
Option
X = exclusiv e ( only one function at a time)
Table 5 – Auxiliary functions: over ISDN
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Codec
Relays
Isolated G P IO
300
Data ( bauds)
1200 2400 4800
9600
Coordination
channel
G 711
CELP
G 722
G 722- H221
G 722- H242
TDAC
4SB ADP CM
MP EG L2
MP EG L2/J52
AAC- LC
HE- AAC
HE- AAC v 2
Table 6 – Auxiliary functions: over IP networks (wired or mobile)
2.4.1. Transmission of isolated relays
When this function is activated, the codec transmits to the remote unit the status of two isolated
current loops. The remote unit then opens or closes relay contacts according to the transmitted status.
Conversely, as the function is bi-directional, the codec activates its two relays (“dry” isolated contacts)
depending on the status of the two current loops on the remote unit.
For transmission over IP, this feature is always available whatever the coding algorithm. For the other
networks, availability depends on the algorithm: see above tables.
With G722 or 4SB ADPCM, relay transmission cannot be used at the same time as another auxiliary
function (see tables).
A typical application is the transmission of “on air” signals; a contact closure can be used for instance
to light up an indicator or switch on other equipment.
2.4.2. Transmission of GPIO
For IP transmission, SCOOP 5 also allows, in the same way as the two isolated relays, to transmit 6
additional binary signals, routed to “GPIO” interfaces, which are not isolated. This feature is available
whatever the coding algorithm.
2.4.3. Data channel
This function is not available in IP transmission mode.
In leased line mode or ISDN mode, a bi-directional data channel can be transmitted along with the
compressed audio signals, by reserving a fraction of the transmitted bit rate. The equipment includes a
serial asynchronous port for this purpose. The data are transparently transmitted end-to-end;
hardware signalling is not available.
Availability depends on the coding algorithm, as well as the max possible baud rate: see above
tables. With G722 or 4SB ADPCM, this data channel cannot be used at the same time as another
auxiliary function (see tables).
A typical application is the transmission of data related to the RDS.
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2.4.4. Coordination channel
This function is not available in IP transmission mode.
This function is available as an option. It enables the transmission of an auxiliary audio channel (or
coordination channel), along with the compressed audio, by reserving 8 kbit/s from the transmitted bit
rate. This channel uses a compression algorithm of CELP-HLTP type and provides a “voice grade”
channel (300-3400 Hz pass-band).
This feature is only usable for some algorithms, on leased lines or ISDN: see above tables.
With G722 or ADPCM, the coordination channel cannot be used along with other auxiliary functions
(i.e. data channel or relay transmission).
On a SCOOP 5 with this option, one of the sockets on the rear panel of the device includes one
isolated balanced input and one isolated balanced output. An adapter cable, included with the
option, provides an easy connection on XLR plugs.
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2.5. Supervision and control interface
The control and supervision of the equipment (configuration, communication management, status
monitoring), is carried out either “locally” thanks to a keyboard, an alphanumeric display, LED
indicators, or using various remote control interfaces.
2.5.1. “Local” control
For local management, the front panel includes a large keypad, a backlit graphic LCD, and various
LED indicators for essential status information.
2.5.2. Embedded html server: “web pages”
SCOOP 5 provides html pages that enable full control using a web browser, via port 80 (default port
for the HTTP protocol). See on chapter 5 the detailed operation mode.
This control mode can be used from any computer regardless of its OS (or a mobile device with a
web browser), and the embedded pages are compatible with all current browsers. No software
installation is needed on the control device.
2.5.3. Remote control via a serial port or TCP/IP
Another remote control mode makes use of a dedicated protocol (AARC), via a TCP/IP connection on
TCP port 6000. This “command line” mode is used by codec pool management systems such as
Codec Live, MDC.net, etc.
This interface can also be operated using AETA’s TeleScoop software.
Instead of TCP/IP over the Ethernet interface, it is possible to use the RS-232 serial remote control port
available on the unit.
2.5.4. Additional Ethernet/IP interface
It is possible to get a second Ethernet/IP interface by plugging a USB/Ethernet adapter1 on the USB
socket. This interface can be used as a remote control port (html pages via port 80, or “command
line” mode via port 6000), as an alternative to the normal integrated interface. It should not be used
for other functions (audio over IP).
2.5.5. Loop control and status
In addition, the equipment features a “Loop control” function: call set up and release can be remote
controlled with current loops and relays, instead of using for this the keyboard and/or the remote
control port. Relay contacts provide a status (idle/on line) of the unit.
2.5.6. Alarm contacts
Besides configuring the equipment operating mode, this module supervises its status (detection of
alarm conditions). On detecting operation or transmission faults, the equipment switches on indicators
and relay contacts. Two alarm classes are defined:


“Internal” alarm; corresponds to a major fault internal to the equipment;
“External” alarm; corresponds to a fault whose origin is deemed external to the equipment
(for example, transmission fault);
1 Reference : Logilink UA0144, or other device shown on our web site support pages.
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2.5.7. Configuration and dialling memories
To ease the operation, it is possible to store configuration memories, called “profiles”. These belong
to three categories:

“Remote profiles”, including the parameters for calling a given destination: dial numbers,
coding algorithm, etc.

“Local profiles” which memorise the network access characteristics. Recalling a local profile is
a quick way to recover the configuration needed for connecting on a given line/network.

“Snapshots” which memorise all the settings for the audio interfaces.
These various profiles can be used locally and also through the web pages, and they can be
imported/exported from/to a computer.
2.5.8. Test functions
For maintenance purposes, some test loops can be activated. The following drawing schematically
shows these test loops:
Figure 2 – Test loops

“Audio loop”: uncompressed audio data are looped from the input of the encoder to the
input of the output conversion functional block. This loop redirects the audio input to the
audio outputs;

“Loop 3”, or “Codec” loop: compressed audio data are looped just before the network
interface;

“Loop 2”, or “Network” loop: this loop sends the received data back to the network; for the
remote codec, the effect is the same as a loop 3 when the transmission works correctly;

“Audio feedback” loop (audio output to audio input); this allows the codec to send back to
the remote codec the signal it receives, after decoding and re-encoding.
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3. Operation
3.1. General principles – Control means
The equipment control and supervision (configuration, status monitoring) is possible either in “Local”
mode (front panel keypad and display, status indicators), or “Remote control” mode, thanks to an
asynchronous serial port or an Ethernet interface.
As a general rule, the configuration parameters are saved in non-volatile memory, and restored when
the unit is powered on.
Local mode operation is described in detail in chapter 4 (Detailed operating mode).
Remote control operation using a computer and a web browser, thanks to the embedded HTML
server, is detailed in chapter 5: Operating mode – Embedded HTML .
SCOOP 5 can also be controlled by the optional TeleScoop software (installed on a Windows PC),
which can control the other AETA codecs of the Hifiscoop, Scoop 3, Hifiscoop 3 and SCOOP 4+
ranges. Details about this supervision software can be found in the documentation and user manual
of the TeleScoop software.
The SCOOP 5 can be remote controlled by third-party codec management software and systems.
Please consult us for more information on the available offer in this field.
For controlling connections, it is also possible to use the “Loop control” function. When this special
connection mode is selected, one can trigger a call by activating an input current loop (optically
isolated), and release the line by de-activating this loop. In such case, an outgoing connection is
established or released only by this way, and no more from the front panel or the remote control
interface (however, all other parameters are still controlled from these interfaces as in the normal
mode).
If “loop control” is not activated, it is always possible to use the loop to release a running connection
(a pulse on the loop will release the line).
The loop control interfaces are described in 3.5.3 and 6.1.14.
Besides, whatever the connection mode (normal or loop control), a “dry loop” is closed when a
connection is active.
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3.2. Physical description of the equipment
The SCOOP 5 codec is housed in a 19 inches chassis of 1U height (44 mm or 1.75”). It includes a
universal mains power supply. There is an option for powering from a 12V DC source (which can be
used in parallel with the mains input, with priority to the latter).
3.2.1. Front panel
All the elements needed for local control are located on the front panel (see picture on page 26
below). This panel can be roughly divided in two areas:
On the left-hand side, one can find several LED indicators, an LCD and the main navigation keys. On
the right-hand side are located the dialling keys and the call management keys. Lastly, at the extreme
right side one can find audio monitoring elements.
On/Off switch and standby
First, completely on the left is located the
on/off key, and just besides the standby indicator (blue
LED). When the unit is powered but in standby (blue LED on), keep the key pressed for at least 3
seconds to switch on the unit. When it is operating, keep the key pressed for at least 3 seconds to
switch it off.
In addition to this manual “on/standby” switching, the unit automatically switches on when power is
applied on its mains socket (or its DC input for those units equipped with the DC option).
The standby LED next to the
power applied.
key is off in operation, but lights on when the unit is in standby with
Status LED indicators
The LEDs have the following meaning:
Marking
Function
Color
Shows an alarm
Alarm
Red
Sync 1
Green/Red
Off when unit is idle;
Green when the decoder is synchronised on “Line 1”;
Red if interface n°1 is active/connected but not synchronised or in
error
Sync 2
Green/Red
Off when unit is idle;
Green when the decoder is synchronised on “Line 2”;
Red if interface n°2 is active/connected but not synchronised or in
error
Line 1
Green
On when interface n°1 is active / connected
Line 2
Green
On when interface n°2 is active / connected
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Figure 3 – SCOOP 5 front panel
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LCD and navigation keys
Besides the backlit graphic LCD one can find the keys for navigating through the menus:
Key
Function
OK
Confirm a selection or enter data.
From the base screen: switch to the root menu.
Esc
Escape to upper menu level;
From the base screen: switch to the root menu.
Navigation keys

 

Keys used to move the cursor or browse through menu options.
The  can be used to enter a sub-menu (like the OK key).
When entering data/numbers, the
of the cursor.

erases the character on the left
More details on the navigation and sub-menus can be found in chapter 4, dealing with detailed
operating modes.
Function keys
The assignment of these F1 and F2 keys is programmable.
Call management and dialling keys
Key
Function
“Hang up”
Release an established link.
(except LL links, permanent by nature)
“Unhook”
Start a link or accept an incoming call.
(except LL links, permanent by nature)
Dialling keys
0 .. 9
*.
#
Keys for entering numbers or URI for the destination to call. These
keys are also used to enter texts such as profile names, etc.
Repeatedly press a key to get the characters other than the main
figure.
Keys 1 and “*.” also allow entering special additional characters
(not all marked on the keypad).
The “#” key is used for switching between numbers, lower case
letters or capital letters. An indicator on the screen recalls the current
type of characters.
L1
In double ISDN codec mode, this key is used to select line 1 for
calling or hanging up.
Useless in normal single codec mode.
L2
In double ISDN codec mode, this key is used to select line 2 for
calling or hanging up.
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“INFO” indicators
These LEDs show the state of the received information when the auxiliary function “Relay transmission”
is active:
Marking
Color
Function
INFO 1
Amber
Shows the state of the “relay contact” n°1
INFO 2
Amber
Shows the state of the “relay contact” n°2
Audio monitoring
The audio signals can be monitored with a low impedance headphone connected on the front panel
(1/4” or 6.35 mm stereo jack). The headphone volume is adjustable thanks to a potentiometer.
By pressing key
, you can select to listen either the transmitted program (Tx indicator) or received
audio (Rx indicator). The transmitted program is picked just before the encoder, the received program
is picked just after the decoder.
Actions dealing with this area (connecting or disconnecting the jack, Tx/Rx selection, volume
adjustment) never affect the transmitted or received signals.
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3.2.2. Rear panel
All connections are done on the rear panel of the codec. The characteristics of the interfaces and
layout of the sockets are detailed in chapter 6.1, Characteristics of interfaces.
The following elements are available (numbers such as [17] refer to the following Figure 4 – Rear
panel):
Mains power socket [17]
This is an IEC type power socket. The unit starts up as soon as power is applied.
See details in 6.1.17 and 6.4 (Power supply).
DC 12V power socket [16]
This 4 pin male XLR is optional. See details in 6.1.18, DC power supply (option).
Audio inputs/outputs

Analog inputs/outputs [9]: at the input, plug the audio cables into the female XLR sockets. At
the output, plug the audio cables into the male XLR sockets. In mono mode, only “A” channel
is used.

Digital inputs/outputs [1]: a digital input (mono or stereo) in AES/EBU format (or SPDIF) can
be connected on the female XLR socket, and a digital output in AES/EBU format is available
on a male XLR socket.

It is possible to select which input (analog inputs or digital input) is fed to the encoder for
transmission. On the receiving side, the decoded signals are output both on the analog and
digital outputs.
Ethernet interface [13]
This socket is a 100BaseT/10BaseT port, used for audio transmission over IP and/or for remote
controlling the unit. This RJ45 socket is devised for a normal “straight” cable to an Ethernet hub or
switch. The two integrated LEDs show the presence and activity of the network (green LED) and the
interface mode: half-duplex (yellow LED off) or full-duplex (yellow LED on).
The configuration of the interface is described in 3.4, Initial setup of the Ethernet interface.
ISDN 1 and POTS socket (marked “ISDN 1/POTS”) [5]
This RJ45 socket allows the connection to the ISDN, for the product versions which include this
capability. The wiring is for connecting an S0 (BRI) ISDN line using a standard RJ45 cable.
Only this socket has to be used when only one line is needed (links using one or two B channels),
which includes the operation in double ISDN codec mode.
For the units equipped with the PSTN/POTS option, this socket is also used to connect the POTS line.
For this you can use the adapter cable provided with the POTS option: this adapter splits on two
sockets the ISDN 1 line and the POTS line:


RJ45 socket to get the ISDN 1 access;
RJ11 socket to connect the POTS line: you must plug here a cable from the POTS wall
socket1 and terminated with a RJ11 plug.
Refer to 6.1.8 for more details on the pinout for the “ISDN 1” socket and the adapter cable.
1 Whose type depends on the country and the building wiring
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Figure 4 – Rear panel
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ISDN 2 socket (marked “ISDN 2”) [7]
This RJ45 socket allows the connection to the ISDN, for the product versions (TRIO 4B) which include
this capability. The wiring is for connecting an S0 (BRI) ISDN line using a standard RJ45 cable.
This socket is not used when only one line is needed (links using one or two B channels), which
includes the operation in double ISDN codec mode.
Main LL interface (marked “X24/V11/V35”) [10]
This socket is used for the connection to data transmission equipment in the “leased line” mode.
The connector is 15-point male, Sub-D type. It is possible, if needed, to select the other LL port.
Details on this interface: refer to 6.1.5 - Ethernet.
Secondary LL interface and alarms (marked “ALARM + X24/V11”) [2]
The 15-point male, Sub-D type connector includes two “form C” relays, signalling alarm conditions:


“Internal alarm” contact;
“External alarm” contact.
This port can be used as an alternative interface for connecting the codec to transmission equipment
in “leased line” mode.
See the wiring in: 6.1.7 - “Alarm + X24/X21” interface.
Alarm indicator [11]
A red LED indicator also indicates that an alarm relay is activated. In the factory setup, every alarm
cause sets the LED on, but by setting jumpers on the motherboard it is possible to program the
indicator to react to only one type (internal or external alarm).
The pin-out of the socket and the detailed characteristics of the alarm relays can be found in chapter
6.1.7: “Alarm + X24/X21” interface (p. 101).
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Drawer for SIM card [6]
In the units fitted with the mobile network access option, this drawer houses the SIM card enabling the
access to the network and services.
 The SIM card must be inserted while the unit is off (or in standby).
To remove the drawer and the card, push the small button shown by the little arrow besides the
drawer (see picture below).
Main
antenna
Figure 5 – Rear panel, SIM card
To set the SIM card in place, first insert it in the cavity inside the drawer. Make sure to have the cut
corner on the right place, with the SIM chip visible. Then insert the whole assembly into the slot, with
the SIM card chip facing down. Check that the drawer is well in its guides before pushing it completely
in place.
 If you have to use a smaller format µSIM card, you can use a SIM/µSIM adapter (available on
request from AETA): first set the µSIM inside this adapter, afterwards use this assembly like a
regular SIM card.
Antenna sockets [8]
On the products fitted with the mobile network access option, these SMA sockets allow to connect one
or two antennas (a multiband antenna is included with the mobile network option).
At least one antenna must be plugged on the main socket, the one that is shown on the picture above
(the outmost socket, left side of the unit).
A second antenna is optional, but it allows to improve the reception quality in less favourable areas; it
must be activated (configuration menus) if one is connected.
The antennas must cover the band(s) used for the operator and network services. Refer to the operator
in doubt. The provided antenna covers the 900 MHz, 1800 MHz, 1900 MHz, 2100 MHz bands. It is
compatible with almost all the 2G and 3G/3G+ networks in Europe.
USB socket [3]
This “host” socket allows the connection of a peripheral device, e.g. a mobile access USB module or
“key” in order to access mobile IP transmission.
Refer to chapter 2.1.5 about this function.
As another use, an Ethernet adapter can be plugged for providing a secondary Ethernet/IP remote
control interface; see chapter 2.5.4 for this topic.
Remote control serial port (Remote) [12]
This 9-pin female sub-D socket is an asynchronous serial interface port, usable for remote controlling
the equipment thanks to a control and supervision PC.
For this capability refer to 2.5.3 Remote control via a serial port or TCP/IP.
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Auxiliary data serial port (Data) [4]
This 9-pin female sub-D socket is an asynchronous serial interface port, usable for transmission of a
bi-directional data channel (refer to 2.4.3 above, Data channel).
“AUX” socket [15]
This 25-pin female sub-D socket groups the interfaces for the relay transmission function (described in
2.4.1) and the (optional) coordination audio channel (optional, cf. 2.4.4).
It also includes loop interfaces for the loop control function (cf. 2.5.5), as well as a +5 V power
supply that can be used to provide current for the loop and relay interfaces.
“Digital I/O” socket [14]
This 15-pin male sub-D socket is the interface for the GPIO transmission function (as described in
2.4.2).
Its wiring is described in: 6.1.16 - “Digital I/O” interface .
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3.3. Installation and set up
3.3.1. Mounting and connections
Natural convection cools the equipment. Avoid obstructing the openings on the flanges.
To operate the codec, the minimum necessary connections to set up are (see details in the rear panel
description):



Power supply (mains and/or DC);
Audio inputs and outputs (XLR sockets);
Network interface: depending on the networks used, Ethernet interface, ISDN line(s), POTS
line, X24/V11/V35 interface, or antenna(s) for mobile network access1;
Whenever needed, the “ALARM + X24/V11” socket must be connected to an external supervision
system (alarm relay contacts).
The pin out of the connectors is indicated in chapter 6.1: Characteristics of interfaces.
3.3.2. Initial set up
Before the first use, the equipment must be configured according to the desired operation mode:
audio input/output format, local conditions (network interface parameters…). Then to set up links you
must select the coding type and parameters.
For using the configuration menus, a password may have to be entered. After factory setting or after a
complete configuration erasure, the password is “blank” (no password) and the access is unrestricted.
Afterwards, if needed, a password can be programmed by the user and the restricted access mode
can be activated.
For more details about the codec configuration, see chapter 4 - Detailed operating mode. The setup
for the Ethernet interface is described in 3.4 below (Initial setup of the Ethernet interface).
3.3.3. Notes about the use of AES/EBU interfaces
When using digital audio interfaces, it must be decided whether the codec is “master” or “slave”
regarding audio sampling clock synchronisation. In the first case, the codec derives the sampling
clock from the network clock or an internal source, and the device(s) connected to the codec must
synchronise to the same clock source.
The most common choice is rather the “slave” mode, to be used when it is not possible (or not
desired) to synchronise the external equipment onto the clock of the transmission link or the codec. In
this case, the AES/EBU interfaces should be set in the so-called “genlock” mode. When in this mode,
the codec derives the sampling clock of the digital audio interfaces from its AES input (in other words
is “gen-locked” onto the incoming AES signal), and sampling rate conversion (SRC) is used for
interfacing to the coding parts.
 It is mandatory in such situation to provide the codec input with an AES signal featuring the
same sampling frequency as the external equipment, even if the codec is used only as a
decoder.
If this requirement is ignored, the unit will actually fall back to “master” mode. In such situation, clicks
in the audio programme might be heard, especially when the resulting sampling rate is very different
from that of the external device.
1 In such case, a SIM card should be set as well in order to enable the mobile services.
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If, on the contrary, it is decided to synchronise the external equipment (at 32, 48 or 96 kHz) onto the
transmission clock of the network interface, the codec must be configured in “master” mode. In this
case, the output is locked onto this clock, and it can be used as a reference to synchronise the
equipment connected to the codec output. The digital audio signal at the codec input must then come
from a device synchronised by this way.
 When you do not use the digital audio interfaces, the “master” or “slave” mode has no effect
on the actual operation. However, it is recommended in such case to select the “master” mode
to avoid undesired alarms. Otherwise, with the “genlock” setting (which is the default factory
setting), an alarm is raised because of the lack of a suitable signal on the AES input. In the
“master” mode, the device ignores this error condition.
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3.4. Initial setup of the Ethernet interface
The SCOOP 5 includes a 100BaseT / 10BaseT Ethernet interface, and the audio transmission can
take place over an IP network through this interface. In addition, it is always possible to use the
Ethernet interface to access the embedded html server or for remote control the unit via a TCP/IP
connection (TCP port 6000).
An initial set up is needed for using one of these features of the Ethernet interface. For setting into
operation, first connect the Ethernet interface to the network, using CAT5 wiring.

Connection to 10BaseT or 100BaseT interfaces are both suitable, as the SCOOP 5
automatically switches to the adequate 10 Mbit/s or 100 Mbit/s mode.

“Straightforward” patch cables should be used for a connection to a hub or a switch.
Conversely, a “crossed” cable might be needed for special configurations (e.g. a test
connection to a PC).
As a very first step, the Ethernet interface must be assigned an IP address, and related parameters.
This phase is very simple when a DHCP server is available in the network. The menu to use is reached
by Setup / Network / Ethernet Parameter.
3.4.1. DHCP server available
This is the simplest case, because the server will allocate a suitable IP address and give the unit the
right settings. Select “DHCP” in the menu (Setup / Network / Ethernet Parameter / Mode). The
unit will then automatically find the DHCP server and automatically set the parameters. You can read
the IP address (allocated to the unit by the DHCP server) in the “About” menu (Tools / About).
Note that, as an additional advantage with DHCP, you do not need to change this setting later, even
if you move the codec to another network, as long as it is still connected to a DHCP server.
3.4.2. “Static” IP configuration
When there is no DHCP server, you have to enter the settings manually. The IP address must be
“available”, i.e. not already assigned to other equipment. Ask support from the network
administrator(s) as needed.
First select the manual mode, menu Setup / Network / Ethernet Parameter / Mode / Manual.
Then, still in the menu Setup / Network / Ethernet Parameter, you must enter the following
parameters:
Parameter
Notes
Local IP
Must be unique on the network
Subnet Mask
A typical value is 255.255.255.0
Gateway
DNS Server 1
Domain Name Server (main)
DNS Server 2
Domain Name Server (secondary)
All addresses are in “dot-decimal” format, such as e.g.: 192.168.0.12, 10.0.54.123.
 Note: in contrast to the configuration with DHCP, the “static” setting has to be reviewed each time
you move the unit to a new physical site/network, as the previous IP addressing is probably not
valid for the new location.
3.4.3. Checking the IP configuration
The above configuration is kept in the unit’s memory, and reloaded at each start.
To check the setting, you can read the IP address in the “About” menu (Tools / About / Local IP).
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You can then also check that the unit is seen on the network and at the right address: from a
computer connected to the same network, enter (in the command mode, or console mode depending
on the OS) “ping ipaddr”, where ipaddr is the IP address of the SCOOP 5.
If the response is positive, then you can proceed with the rest.
3.4.4. Optional configuration of the “link” Ethernet layer
With factory settings, the Ethernet interface is set for an auto negotiation of the ”link” mode: speed
(10 or 100 Mbit/s) and half-duplex or full-duplex.
 This setting is suitable for almost all situations and usually you don’t need to change it.
However, in the rare cases where this is needed, it is possible to set the desired mode manually: use
the menu Setup / Network / Ethernet Parameter / Link Mode . The available choices are:





Auto-negotiation (standard setting)
100BaseT, full-duplex
100BaseT, half-duplex
10BaseT, full-duplex
10BaseT, half-duplex
Whenever this setting is needed, it must be done before the IP configuration described above.
3.4.5. Configuration of the secondary Ethernet interface
In case an external USB/Ethernet adapter is used to provide an additional interface (see 2.5.4), an
initial setup is also required for this interface. The procedure is similar to that for the main integrated
Ethernet interface:


First plug the adapter on the USB Interface.

Apply the same steps as described above (3.4.1 to 3.4.4), the settings are in this case
accessed via the sub-menu Config / Network / Ethernet 1 Parameter.

To check the IP address and status of the interface, go to the menu Config / Network /
Ethernet 1 Parameter / Network Config.
Connect the Ethernet interface to the network, using CAT5 wiring. Normally the adapter’s LED
should blink depending on the network activity. The additional interface is designated
“Ethernet 1” in the unit’s menus.
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3.5. Managing links
3.5.1. Setting up and releasing links
Generally speaking, once the codec is set up and the transmission interface(s) to be used is(are)
configured, it is possible to manage audio links with remote devices.
In the case of a leased line, the link sets up as soon as the physical connection is made, and all
parameters are suitably configured: this is a permanent link.
In other cases, transmission links/sessions have to be set, which can be done in two ways:

“Outgoing call” launched towards a remote device: the procedure is to select a transmission
interface, a coding configuration, “dial” the destination to call and then set the call to the
remote unit. The detailed operating mode is described further, for the various transmission
media, in 4.5 (Setting up a link).

“Incoming call” received from a remote device: on receiving a call on one of the connected
and active interfaces, the codec switches to this interface and processes the call.
In a similar way, ending/releasing a link is either initiated by the remote unit (remote release), or by
the operator of the SCOOP 5 (local release).
3.5.2. Auto-redial feature
In LL mode, the unit is always supposed to be linked, and it will transmit and look for a reception
signal as long as it is on. In contrast, the IP mode and the ISDN modes are “dial up modes”, where a
link can be set up and released at will. When it is necessary to hold the link on permanently, outgoing
calls may be backed up by using the auto-redial function (for each codec in the double ISDN mode).
When it is active and the codec is the initiator of the link, the codec automatically tries to re-set the
link in case of an initial failure, or if an established link is dropped for another reason than a local
release (i.e. hanging up by the user). The redial capability applies in the following situations:

If the initial call fails for any reason (e.g. called party is busy); the codec then redials and
retries to establish the link.

The codec can also redial if the link is already established and the link is lost, for any reason
else than “local release” (e.g. the remote unit mistakenly dropped the line).

After a power failure, after rebooting the codec will automatically redial and set-up the link
back.
 Note that, while “auto redial” is active, an established link can be definitively stopped only by
releasing the line on the calling codec side. Otherwise, every time the called party will hang
up, the calling codec will redial and reset the link.
It is possible to program the time period that the unit will wait before redialling after a failed trial, and
it is also possible to program the maximum number of times the codec will redial before giving up.
The activation of this function and the configuration of its parameters can be found in the “Auto
Redial” sub-menu (Tools / Misc / Auto Redial ). In dual codec mode, the function can be activated
separately for each codec.
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3.5.3. Loop control
In normal operation, outgoing calls are sent or released using the menus and/or the remote control
interface. When the loop control function is selected, outgoing calls are controlled by activating or not
optically isolated input loops. One loop is available for each codec when in double codec mode.
When the input loop is activated (i.e. current is flowing), the corresponding codec establishes a link by
calling the last number (or IP address, or SIP URI in the IP mode) previously dialled by the unit. When
the loop is de-activated, the codec releases the line and stays idle as long as the loop is not active
(except if receiving an incoming call).
 In normal operation, it is nevertheless possible to release a running connection by briefly activating
(“pulse”) the control loop.
The “auto-redial” feature is implicitly active when loop control is active: the codec tries to keep the
link, and automatically recalls the remote unit if the line drops, as long as the input loop is active. The
“time before redial” parameter described in the above is also applicable to the loop control mode.
On the other hand, the “redial attempts” parameter is not applicable here, because the unit will
always try to recover the link, until the loop is left inactive.
 Note that, as an important consequence, when using loop control, the termination of a link must
always be done on the calling party side by de-activating the input loop. Whenever the line is
released by the receiving party, the calling unit will redial and re-establish the link.
When loop control is active, the input loops are the only means of setting up an outgoing call; setting
a call from the menu is not allowed. Hanging up with the keypad is rejected.
 Remind that the first step is to set-up the link once in normal mode, and later activate the loop
control mode; afterwards the input loop is used to trigger a redial to the previous number.
In LL mode the link is always active. Loop control, in this case, can be used to control a call via a
backup IP or ISDN link: see further in 3.5.4, Setting up a backup link.
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3.5.4. Setting up a backup link
The SCOOP 5 has the capability for backing up a permanent leased line audio link thanks to a
switched link (ISDN, IP, POTS...).
A typical example of this application is shown in the following diagram, where a permanent leased
line is used for transmitting a radio programme from a studio to a transmitter. A codec is installed on
each side of the link, and each codec is also connected to a “backup” link (ISDN, IP, etc.). In this
way, transmission via this line can be used as a temporary back-up in case the normal permanent link
fails. Once the problem on the normal line is solved, the backup connection can be released and
normal operation in LL mode is restored.
Figure 6 – Backup link
The SCOOP 5 makes such back-up easy because both transmission interfaces (normal leased line
and backup interface) are available in the same unit. Moreover, the SCOOP 5 helps to automate the
switchover process, especially on the transmitter side, where most often quick human intervention is
not possible. The following describes one way of configuring such a system, and details the resulting
backup process.
Basic principles
When a failure of the leased line is detected, one of the two codecs has to switch to “backup” mode,
and then call the other unit over the backup network access. On receiving this call, the remote codec
will have to switch as well to the backup network interface and accept the call. The audio transmission
in then provided over the backup link. Later on, when the leased line comes back to normal, the
backup connection can be released and both codecs have to switch back to LL mode and normal
operation.
We designate as “caller” the codec which switches first and initiates the call over the backup network,
and “receiver” the codec which switches on receiving such a backup call.
Caller codec: setup and operation
For the switch to backup (following a failure on the leased line), two methods can be used:

Either the switchover is “manual”: an operator on the studio side can switch the studio codec
to backup mode and launch a call to the other site via the backup medium. For this method,
no special preliminary setting is needed.

The other method is to use the “loop control” feature as described above in section 3.5.3. In
this case, the whole switchover sequence can be executed by simply activating the input loop:
mode switch for the backup network access, backup call. Conversely, releasing the input loop
brings the unit back to normal operation in LL mode.
For this latter method, the best situation is when the leased line status is monitored by an alarm
contact that closes when the line is down. This alarm can be used for activating the control loop, so
that the studio codec quickly and automatically switches over to backup mode (and also comes back
to normal when the leased line recovers); no manual intervention is needed in such case.
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In order to use this operating mode, two settings have to be done on the “caller” codec:


Select the network to use for backup: menu Tools / Misc / LL Backup / Backup Call
Activate the loop controlled backup: menu Tools / Misc / Loop Control / Backup
 Important notice: when switching to backup mode the number called is the last dialled! For this
reason it is important to dial and call the backup destination in the desired mode at least once,
before setting the unit in its normal LL mode.
Receiver codec: setup and operation
The setup is easy on the “receive” side of the backup link, as it is somewhat “passive”. The “backup
receive” mode must be activated, via the menu Tools / Misc / LL Backup / Backup Receive.
Once this is done, when the codec is operating in LL mode, on receiving a call on the backup
interface, the codec switches to the corresponding network mode, answers the call and the connection
is established with the remote codec. Later, when the temporary connection is released (by the calling
party), the “receiver” codec automatically switches back to LL mode, and normal operation is
resumed.
 Reminder: in LL mode the codec accepts no incoming call whatever the network interface, unless
the backup receive mode is active.
 Conversely,
interface.
once this is done, the codec accepts incoming calls regardless of the network
 Thanks to the automatic coding algorithm detection (5AS in ISDN mode or SIP/SDP in IP mode),
the coding setup is not critical on this “receiver” side. However, for increased safety in ISDN mode
one may prefer to force the configuration (by de-activating the 5AS).
Notes regarding the automatic switchover
Note that, when switching from LL to backup mode, a separate set of parameters is recalled. As a
consequence, the coding configuration can be made, if desired, totally different in the back-up mode.
Of course, both units should be configured in an adequate configuration for each transmission mode,
and then each codec can be set in the LL mode to start the normal operation.
 For the backup configuration, do not set the units in double codec mode. Otherwise, the automatic
switchover will not work properly.
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3.6. First level maintenance
3.6.1. Internal configuration
 All
the configuration is done in the factory, and/or it can be changed by means of the
keyboard/display interface, without having to open the unit.
However, a few settings can be done internally by setting jumpers:

It is possible to prevent one alarm type to light on the red alarm LED on the back of the
equipment.

It is possible to disable the standby mode (in which case the device is always in operation as
long as the mains power is present).
Please consult us for such operation! We remind that unduly opening the unit can void the
warranty. In any case, opening the unit may expose live parts and is hazardous. Never open or
maintain the internal parts without first disconnecting the AC supply.
3.6.2. Analysis of malfunctions
The following table indicates the detected alarm conditions and their classification:
Alarm condition
Internal
Power or fuse fault
X
Bad start-up of a microprocessor, or
interface fault detected on start-up
X
External
Overload on an audio input
Minor1
X
Fault on AES/EBU audio input
X
Decoder synchronisation error
X
Network clock fault2
X
Table 7 - List and classification of alarm conditions
Excluding the case when an internal failure disables the management micro-controller, messages are
displayed to indicate the anomaly, or the fault can be searched using the menu (Tools / Status).
1 Minor alarms are readable on the display, but do not trigger alarms (contacts and LEDs)
2 Fault of the network clock source currently used for synchronisation (X21/X24 main port or secondary port)
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3.6.3. Using the test loops
The test loops accessible from the “Tools / Maintenance / Tests ” menu can help improve the
analysis of a problem:

In order to check if the audio part functions correctly, use the “Audio” loop and check if the
audio is OK at the output.

To check if the coding part functions correctly, activate “Loop 3” 1 and check if the alarm
disappears (and the decoding indicators come back to normal), and if the audio is present at
the output.

“Loop 2”2 sends back to the remote codec the compressed data received from the network
(see the description of test loops in 2.5.8, Test functions). In this way, it is possible to test the
integrity of the transmitted data and/or check that the remote codec works properly.

The decoder out to encoder in loop (“Audio feedback” loop) can be used for overall
functional check, and also for aligning the overall chain.
Note: not all test loops are available for all the network interfaces.
3.6.4. External alarms
In leased line mode, a clock fault is one typical cause of an external alarm. This can be due to:



complete loss of the X24/V11 interface, due to a failure of the transmission line;

lack of signal received from the X24/V11 interface, due to a failure of the transmission device
connected to the codec, or a transmission failure in the network;
a fault in the remote codec, or else the remote codec has an incompatible configuration;
a failure of the transmission device connected to the codec;
an incorrect clock frequency (i.e. incompatible with the codec configuration).
On the other hand, in case of a decoder alarm with no clock error, possible causes are:


transmission errors causing erratic alarms.
Errors such as “AES error” and “AES sync loss” can frequently be seen, even when the unit is
configured to use the analog inputs. This is because the AES output is always active, and by default
“genlocked” to the AES input. To avoid such undesired alarms:
 When
not using digital audio interfaces, set the digital audio sync in “Master” mode (Setup /
Audio / Digital / AES Synchro / Master)
1 Note: this loop is not available for all transmission configurations
2 This loop is not available for all transmission configurations
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4. Detailed operating mode – User interface
In local mode, the unit is operated thanks to a keypad and display on the front panel. The display is a
backlit graphic LCD.
Operating from the keyboard can be protected by a password (numeric sequence, that can be
programmed or erased by the user. In such case, the operation is in a “restricted” mode, without
direct access to settings or dialling. Only the profiles menu is accessible, for loading a profile or call a
remote profile (see later in 4.7, Restricted operation mode for more about the restricted mode).
4.1. Equipment start-up
When the unit is powered but in standby (blue LED on), press the
key for at least 3 seconds to
start up the unit.
During start-up, the unit displays temporary messages. This initialisation lasts around 30 seconds.
Then the main menu is displayed.
On this “base screen”, transmission and reception audio levels are permanently monitored for the two
audio channels.
At this time, the unit can be operated and receive calls. It is also possible, using the menus, to change
settings and/or set up calls.
 If the unit has been set in “restricted access” mode, for recovering full access to all menus type
directly the password (numeric sequence), and the device unlocks as soon as the last figure of the
password is pressed.
See further in 4.7 how to use and manage this restricted access.
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4.2. Principles for the navigation
From the base screen, if pressing the
”root menu”1.
key the display switches to the highest level menu, called
Pressing
again brings back the base screen.
The LED indicators and the main keys surrounding the LCD are described above in 3.2.1, Front panel
The unit proposes a tree structure of menus, and the arrows around the
key are used to navigate
through the menus. The
key is used to confirm choices or enter values for parameter, while the
key allows to come back up to the upper menu level. Repeatedly pressing this key brings you up
to the root menu, and the base screen.
From the root menu, you can enter one of the three main menus by using the arrows and pressing
to enter the highlighted menu.
From these main menus, the screen is organized in the following way:
The sub-menus have the following aspect:
At the end of a “branch”, lists of choices appear in this way:
In all cases, the principles are as follows:



Use the arrows to browse sub-menus or choices.


Validate a choice or entered value using
Give up a selection or action by pressing
Enter the highlighted sub-menu by pressing
Move to upper level with the
or the  key.
key.
(repeatedly as needed)
 After some time without pressing any key (about 30 seconds), the display comes back to the base
screen.
1 You can also press the
key
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4.3. Dialing and text input keypad
The keypad is used for entering numbers and/or texts. It is used in a similar way to a mobile phone:

The keypad works in “numeric” only mode, or in “alphanumeric” mode (where both numbers
and letters can be entered).

In numeric mode, only the numbers are used, and the “*” key (as a separation between ISDN
address and sub-address, or as a dot in a numeric IP address).

The “alphanumeric” mode allows text entry. A letter can be entered by pressing repeatedly a
key; for example, a “B” is entered by hitting the “2” key two times (sequence A, B).

Use the # key to switch between “numeric”, “alphanumeric (lower case)” and
“alphanumeric (capital)” modes.

The “0” and “1” keys provide access to various special characters which are not all printed
on the keypad: “@”, “:”, “-“, “_”…
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4.4. Description of the menus
The root menu shows the following three main menus:



configuration of the codec
Setup
(profiles):
Tools
access to configuration memories or “profiles”
Maintenance and miscellaneous functions, access to status information
Network
Setup
Algorithm
Audio
Remote Prof.
[Root]
Local Prof.
Prof.
Snapshots
About
Status
Tools
Misc
Maintenance
The « Setup » menu leads to the following sub-menus:



The
Network
Algorithm
selection and configuration of the network interface and parameters
selection and configuration of the coding algorithm
Audio
configuration of the audio interface and parameters
menu for profiles leads to the following sub-menus:



Remote Prof.
selection and edition of remote profiles
Local Prof.
selection and edition of local profiles
Snapshots
selection and edition of snapshots (memories for audio parameters)
 This menu is the only branch of the menu tree that is accessible even in restricted mode.
The « Tools » menu is itself divided in sub-menus:




About
display information on addressing and firmware version
Status
display information on the status or operation errors
Misc
miscellaneous functions
Maintenance
maintenance and test functions
The following diagrams show the various sub-menus and the available parameters.
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4.4.1. Network sub-menu
Change Network
Ethernet Parameter
AoIP Parameter
Network
ISDN Parameter
LL Parameter
Mobile Parameter
POTS Parameter
The Change Network sub-menu shows a selection among the available network interfaces. This is
how you select the “default” interface, which is used for an outgoing call. This menu must be used
before setting a call (except if the default interface is already the desired one). The current interface is
recalled on the right side of the screen:
The other sub-menus provide access to the settings for each existing interface. This is why some
interfaces (with a dashed frame outline on the picture above) may not be visible in the sub-menu
depending on the unit version, if it does not include such interfaces.
 If you have plugged a 3G or LTE “mobile key” on the USB interface, you can also see this module
in the list, and you can select it just like another network interface, designated as “Mobile 1 (Ext.)”.
If more than one mobile device is available (example: presence of an integrated module and also
an “external” device connected on the USB socket), then each is identified in a unique way.
 In a similar way, if an Ethernet adapter is plugged on the USB Interface, you will see in the list a
new interface, named “Ethernet 1”. The corresponding sub-menu has the same structure and
settings as the sub-menu “Ethernet Parameter”.
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Ethernet Parameters
DHCP
Mode
Manual
PPPoE
High
Network Quality
Middle
Low
Network Config
Display config
Local IP
Ethernet
Parameter
Subnet Mask
Gateway
DNS Server 1
DNS Server 2
PPPoE_user
PPPoE_password
PPPoE_service
Auto-negotiation
PPPoE Connection
100BaseT-FD
Link Mode
100BaseT-HD
10BaseT-FD
10BaseT-HD
Notes:

Mode: the current setting is recalled on the right side. The selection is operative immediately
after selecting an addressing mode.

Network Quality: select here the expected quality of the transmission via the Ethernet
interface. The unit switches to internal settings suitable for this quality level.
For instance, if you select “Low”, the codec sets a large size for the reception buffer, in order
to stand a higher jitter. As a counterpart, the latency will be higher as well.
Conversely, if you select “High”, the buffer is smaller and the latency is lower, but the system
is more vulnerable to possible jitter (fluctuations of the network transmission latency).

Network Config: only appears when DHCP is active, in which case this sub-menu displays
the addressing parameters that the SCOOP 5 got from the server:
Using the arrows, you can browse the various settings: local IP, sub-network mask, etc. Exit
this display with the
key.

If DHCP is not used, several menus allow you to enter the needed settings, such as Local IP,
Gateway, etc. (lighter background on the picture above)
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
Link Mode is related to the physical Ethernet interface; the default setting “Autonegotiation” is suitable for almost all situations.
AoIP Parameter
This sub-menu groups the settings related to the Audio over IP (AoIP) transmission. It is relevant for the
Ethernet interface but also for using a mobile access network, be it with the integrated module or an
external module via USB.
STUN Mode
X
STUN Server
STUN Interval
SIP registration
Selection 5 to 180 s
X
SIP User
SIP Registrar
SIP Auth User
SIP Auth Password
SIP Proxy
AoIP
Parameter
Keepalive Interval
RTP Port
Server Preset
Selection: 5 to 180 s
RTP TOS
0
Packet Replication
1
2
Transmission Mode
Multicast Mode
Multicast Control Port
Multicast
SIP
Receiver
Sender
Multicast Audio Port
Multicast TTL
Notes:

STUN Mode: enable or disable STUN. In this way you can disable STUN without erasing the
STUN server address.

STUN Server: enter the address of the STUN server, either in numeric form or with a symbolic
name. This kind of server allows SCOOP 5 to discover its public IP address when it accesses
the Internet through a router with NAT. You can use AETA’s server: stun.aeta-audio.com.

STUN Interval: interval between two queries to the server; usually you can keep the default
setting of 15 s.
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
SIP Registration: enable or disable the registration on a SIP server. The following menus
SIP xxx are used to enter the parameters of the account on this server, when using such
service. These parameters should be provided by the administrator of the SIP server. The SIP
User field usually corresponds to a number that a remote party can call to initiate a link with
the codec when it is registered on the server.
With this SIP Registration sub-menu, you can disable the registration and hence stop using a
SIP server, without having to erase account parameters; they stay ready for later use.

Keepalive Interval: sets the interval between two re-registrations on the SIP server. This
setting can be used to make the registration renewal more frequent, but the server always
imposes a maximal period; for this reason the default setting “Server Preset” is
recommended except for specific cases.

SIP port: the default port for SIP signalling is 5060 (UDP), you can enter a different value
here.

RTP Port: the default port for RTP/SIP audio streams is 5004 (UDP), but you can enter a
custom value here if desired.

RTP TOS: if the transmission network supports DiffServ to manage the media priority, you
can set here the type of service which is assigned to the stream transmitted by the codec.

Packet Replication: (see also 2.1.1 and page 8 regarding this feature) you can select here
the setting for packet replication:
0 => standard mode without replication (default setting)
1 => packet replication without interleaving
2 => packet replication with interleaving: the second packet is delayed; robustness is
improved but latency is increased.

Transmission Mode: select here between SIP (unicast) or using multicast (see also above in
2.1.1, IP multicast). The following sub-menus exclusively apply to the multicast mode. Besides,
the SIP settings are not relevant for this multicast transmission mode.

Multicast Mode: if the selected mode is Multicast, the transmission is unidirectional. Select
with this menu if the codec must be sender of a multicast stream, or rather receiver of such
stream.

Multicast Control Port: this port number (UDP) is used for sending control packets
accompanying the multicast stream. Default value is 6000.

Multicast Audio Port: this port number (UDP) is used for transporting the multicast audio
stream. Default value is 6001.
Note: this setting is not related to the RTP Port setting valid for RTP/SIP.
Multicast TTL: TTL value applicable to the RTP multicast audio stream. Default: 254.

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LL Parameter
LL 1
LL Parameter
Active Interface
LL 2
Notes: Interface: select the X24/V11 used for transmission; interface 1 is the default interface.
ISDN Parameter
This sub-menu is not available on versions with no active ISDN interface.
Euro ISDN
Protocol
NI-2
Local Number 1
NTT
Local Number 2
Local Number 3
RNIS
Parameter
Local Number 4
Sub-address 1
Sub-address 2
Sub-address 3
Sub-address 4
SPID
Codec Mode
Single Codec
Double Codec
Notes:

Protocol: NI-2 is used in North America, NTT is the protocol of the Japanese operator NTT,
and Euro ISDN (or ETSI) can be used in the majority of the other countries (see more details
on page 9, Network protocol).

Local Number and Sub-address: these settings are irrelevant for the NI-2 protocol. Their
meaning and use is detailed further, page 65, in 4.5.1, Setting up a link in ISDN mode.

SPID: this setting only applies to the NI-2 protocol, and is not presented for the other
protocole. See page 65, in 4.5.1, Setting up a link in ISDN mode, more about this setting.

Codec Mode: selection of either the normal “single codec” mode or the “Double codec”
mode. In this latter case, it may be important to set a distinctive local number + sub-address
combination for each of the two first channels. This is detailed page 67, in 4.5.2, Setting up
links in double ISDN codec.
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POTS Parameter
This sub-menu is only visible on units with the POTS option.
Dialing Mode
Tone
Pulse
Detect
Dial Tone
Ignore
Argentina
Country Code
….
….
United
States
POTS
Parameter
12000
14400
Max Speed
16800
19200
21600
24000
Speed Mode
Auto
Fixed
Notes:

Dialing Mode: tones are used by default (DTMF), but for specific cases (old PBXs, etc.) it is
possible to select pulse dialing.

Dial Tone: choose “Detect” so that the codec waits for the dial tone before dialing the
numbers. The dial tone may be specific with some particular equipment or networks, and may
not be detected by the SCOOP 5; in such case, disable this function (“Ignore”, and the
codec will dial the numbers just after picking up the line. This latter choice also works correctly
with most modern PBXs.

Country Code: this choice will set the internal modem for the characteristics applicable in the
selected country. The full list is not shown above as it is quite large! For a country not found in
the list, usually it is possible to select a country with similar standards (such information may
be found from local specialists).

Max Speed: in nominal use, the POTS codec runs at 24000 bit/s, but it can automatically
adapt according to the line quality, and change the bit rate if required at the beginning and
during the link. With this setting, you can constrain the bit rate to a lower value. Reason for
this: on a line featuring a variable quality1 you can avoid undesirable changes during the
communication by “limiting” the modem to a speed that you know to be stable. The speed
may nonetheless go down further if the quality decreases too much.
1 This can happen for example when the line suffers a strong crosstalk from neighboring lines.
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
Speed Mode: for a line/transmission with variable quality, and/or to avoid repeated changes
of the bit rate, with this setting you can force a fixed bit rate. In such case, the “Max Speed”
above setting becomes a fixed value. Be aware you must be sure that transmission conditions
will not require a lower speed; otherwise you incur a synchronization loss in such eventuality.
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Mobile Parameter
This sub-menu is only visible on units with the “wireless” option.
If more than one mobile access module is available (example: integrated module and “mobile key” on
the USB socket), then one such sub-menu is presented for each module.
PIN
Mode
IP Mode
Cellphone
High
Network
Quality
Middle
Low
Data
Connection
Connect
Disconnect
Auto
Mobile
Parameter
Only GSM
Network
Mode
Only UMTS
UMTS first
GSM first
Network
Operator
Available operators
APN
Access
Point
Username
Password
Network
Status
Hardware
Display
Display
Notes:

PIN: enter the PIN code allowing to use the SIM Card and access the network. Entering this
code is the first step necessary to operate the mobile access, except if the code for the card is
empty or disabled.

Mode: select the desired transmission mode: “IP Mode” for transmission of data packets (IP
protocol), also called “PS” mode (for Packet Switched), or “Cellphone” for the telephone
mode, which can also be wide band “HD Voice” when all conditions are met (see above in
2.1.5, Mobile voice mode – HD Voice).
Note: the “cellphone” mode is not available for a “mobile key” device on the USB interface,
because such devices only support IP data transmission.
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
Network Quality: select here the expected quality of the transmission via the mobile interface
in IP mode. This is the same type of setting as described (see above in 49, Ethernet
Parameters) for the Ethernet interface, but here applying specifically to the mobile interface.
These separate settings allow to take in account differences in quality and link conditions
between the two interface types.

Data Connection: applies to the IP mode; use this to activate the data connection, or
disconnect it if it is active. This is similar in function to connecting an Ethernet cable on a
wired network: by activating the connection the unit is linked to the Internet and it can send
and receive IP data. For instance it can receive an incoming call. It can also initiate an
outgoing call.

Network Mode: select the network technology. “Auto” is the normal choice, which provides
operation on 3G/3G+ as long as the conditions allow it, but fallback to GSM if 3G is not
available or the radio link is too poor. It is also possible to force either the 3G/3G+ modes
(“Only UTMS” selection), or the GSM/2G mode (“Only GSM” choice).

Network Operator: normally the unit automatically selects a suitable network. If you want to
force a specific operator (which can happen when using the unit abroad), this menu presents
the list of available network so you can manually select one. But not all networks are actually
allowed, this depends on the policy of the SIM card’s provider!

Access Point: this sub-menu allows to enter the necessary parameters for data connections
(IP mode): APN, user name and password. The essential setting is the APN (Access Point
Name), mandatory for accessing the mobile IP network. SCOOP 5 automatically sets the APN
for many operators, but you may have to enter this yourself, or change the default setting. The
other parameters can usually stay empty; otherwise they must be provided by the network
operator, along with the SIM card and the APN.

Network Status: information on the mobile network (for the current connection):
network/operator identification, technology (GSM, EDGE, UMTS, HSDPA, HSPA, etc.), radio
signal strength. Note: bars on the base screen also show the mobile reception level)

Hardware: information on the internal mobile access module (type, firmware, IMEI) and
about the SIM card (IMSI, subscriber number).
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4.4.2. Algorithm sub-menu
This sub-menu allows to select the desired configuration for an outgoing call, using the current
transmission interface.
CELP
Other
….
Previous (1)
HE-AAC v2
Algorithm
Previous(2)
….
It is possible to quickly recall the last used configurations (“Previous” above), scrolling the list and
selecting one of these recent settings.
Otherwise, selecting “Other” you get the list of the coding algorithms available for the current
network interface and the installed options. Choices that are not compatible with the network interface
or not installed are not displayed.
After selecting the coding algorithm, for some of these you must select additional parameters, such
as: channel mode (for stereo-capable coding), sampling frequency and bit rate (for MPEG L2 and
AAC coding), protection mode (only for MPEG J52 and CELP)
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4.4.3. Audio sub-menu
High
Input
Impedance
600 Ohm
0 dBu
Analog
Line Out
Level
…
22 dBu
0 dBu
Input Level
…
22 dBu
Master
AES
Synchro
Genlock
Audio
Digital
32 kHz
AES
Sampling
Rate
48 KHz
Analog
96 kHz
Input Source
Digital
40 dB
Headroom
….
0 dB
Notes:


Analog: settings for the balanced analog inputs/outputs

Input Level and Line Out Level: gain setting for (respectively) the inputs and the outputs.
The parameter is the maximum level (absolute level expressed in dBu) of the interface. For an
input this is the clipping level, which when applied at the input produces a transmitted signal
at 0 dBFS. For an output this is the maximum output level, produced when receiving a signal
at maximum level, i.e. 0 dBFS.
Input Impedance: configuration of the analog inputs, by default high impedance. You can
switch to a 600 Ohm input impedance instead.
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
AES Synchro: the default choice is “Genlock”: digital interfaces (input and output) locked
onto the digital audio input. This choice is suitable for most cases, when the codec should
slave to the system clock. However, it is possible, if required, to rather synchronize these
input/output from the internal clock of the codec: so-called “Master” mode (see also in
3.3.3 about the installation).

AES Sampling Rate: sampling rate to be used in the “Master” mode. In the Genlock mode,
this setting has no direct influence because the codec “follows” whatever sampling frequency
is set by the AES input.

Input Source: select the audio source to be used by the encoder: either the analog inputs,
or the AES input. Even if you use the analog inputs, the AES input can still be connected in
order to synchronize the AES output.

Headroom: this setting defines the reference level for the program level display. This display
is relative to a “0 dBr” reference which can be set here. The “Headroom” parameter is the
available headroom for a signal displayed as 0 dBr, i.e. the difference between the reference
and the 0 dBFS maximum level. For instance, a headroom of 10 dB means that the reference
is set at -10 dBFS.
 On the display, the “OVL” clipping indicator shows that the absolute maximum level is reached
(0 dBFS), regardless of this headroom setting. This is not necessarily the top of the bargraph scale,
which is +6 dBr (relative), and whose absolute level depends on the “headroom” setting.
Example, if the headroom is set at 10 dB: then the reference is -10 dBFS. The bargraph can go up
to +6 dBr, which is -4 dBFS. At this stage the “OVL” indicator does not yet trigger, as it reacts at
0 dBFS.
Beware of the differences between the three level measurements!

Absolute digital levels in dBFS for the AES input and output, internally (encoder/decoder) and
for transmission.

Displayed levels in dBr, relative to an adjustable 0 reference. The relationship between the
display and the dBFS level is controlled by the “Headroom” setting.

Absolute analog levels in dBu for the analog inputs and outputs. The relationship between the
absolute analog and digital levels is controlled by the “Input Level” and “Line Out Level”
settings.
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4.4.4. Profiles
menu
This is the only menu available in restricted access mode.
New
Remote Prof.
0: Name_prof0
1: Name_prof1
...
New
Prof.
0: Name_loc0
Local Prof.
...
New
Snapshots
0: Name_snap0
1: Name_snap1
...
“Profiles” are configuration memories that can be recorded and later recalled at will (see their
description in 2.5.7 above). For each profile category, a sub-menu provides the list of profiles already
recorded in the SCOOP 5 memory, each with its index and name.
On the top of the list, the “New” choice allows you to create a new profile:

Enter a name for this new profile, then
. For a “local profile” or a “snapshot”, the current
settings (respectively network settings or audio settings) are recorded into the new profile with
the name you just entered.

For a remote profile, first you can elect to include or not the coding parameters: select
“Current” (include the current codec settings) or “None” (do not include an algorithm with
this profile).

Then you can enter the dial number (or IP address, or SIP URI), then
. You can also leave
this field empty; in this case the profile is used for memorizing only coding parameters, rather
than a remote number.

Lastly, for ISDN and a setting exceeding 64 kbit/s, you must enter an additional number (or
more).
To use the profiles, just scroll the list, select one of the recorded profiles, and press OK: a choice is
presented:


Load this profile, recalling the memorized parameters;


Delete the profile (not available in restricted access mode);
Call the remote destination in the profile (choice available only for a remote profile): in this
case the codec recalls the memorized parameters, and then sets the call to the memorized
number(s);
Update the profile (for a remote profile): you can edit an existing profile, going through the
same steps as for creating a new remote profile. This choice is not available in restricted
access mode.
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4.4.5. Tools / About sub-menu
This sub-menu provides a list of data about the identification and status of the unit. Scroll the list using
the arrows and access all the information:

Local IP: IP address of the active IP interface (Ethernet or mobile depending on the current
one).

Public IP: public IP address, when SCOOP 5 accesses the Internet through a NAT router.
This address is usually detected thanks to a STUN server (configured via the “AoIP
parameters” menu, see in 4.4.1).

Version: SCOOP 5 firmware version global identification. Along with the unit serial number
(shown on the label stuck on the rear panel), this is part of the essential information to provide
whenever you contact AETA for support or maintenance issues.




EIM Version: version number for the audio via IP module.


SW Build: date of firmware generation.
MAC Address: of the main (integrated) Ethernet interface.
Ethernet Setup: current setting of the main Ethernet interface (10 or 100 Mbit/s, half/full
duplex…)
SIP-Registrar: address or domain name of the SIP server, if one is configured
SIP Status: shows whether the codec is registered on the SIP server.
4.4.6. Status sub-menu
This sub-menu provides the list of alarm conditions detected by SCOOP 5. If there are more than two
(in which case vertical arrows are shown on the display), scroll through the list using the vertical arrow
keys.
 The display is updated in real time if conditions change.
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4.4.7. Misc sub-menu
Reset Snapshots
Reset Profiles
General Reset
Reset Settings
Factory Reset
Relays
X
Data Channel
X
300
1200
Aux. Functions
Baud Rate
2400
4800
Coordination
SMS
9600
X
X
Low
Brightness
Middle
High
Deutsch
English
Language
Français
Divers
Italiano
5AS
X
Auto Redial Codec1
X
Auto Redial Codec2
X
1
…
Redial Attempts
Auto Redial
20
Time before dial
Loop Control
1
…
Off
30
On
Backup
Ethernet
Backup Call
LL Backup
Backup Receive
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ISDN
X
Infinite
Notes:

General Reset: you can select to delete only the snapshots or the profiles, or conversely to
reset all parameters but keep these memories (“Reset Settings” choice). For a complete
erasure with the restoration of all default settings, select “Factory Reset”. Caution: this
cannot be cancelled!

Aux. Functions: this sub-menu allows to enable the auxiliary functions ( (details on these
functions can be found in 2.4, Auxiliary functions), and select the baud rate for the data
channel. Besides, it also allows to enable or disable the displaying of the received SMS on the
LCD (active by default).



Brightness: select the preferred front panel display brightness
Language: select the preferred language, and the menus are immediately updated.

Auto Redial: this sub-menu deals with the auto redial feature, whose operation is described
in 3.5.2 above. For the double ISDN codec mode, auto redialling can be enabled separately
for each codec.

Redial Attempts: you can adjust from 1 to 20 the number of attempts to reset the link in
case of a drop, or even “Infinite” for redialing indefinitely.

Time before dial: (in seconds) adjust between 1 and 30 seconds, after a link loss, the
waiting time before redialing. It is often worth leaving such a pause, so that the cause of the
link loss is possibly cured, or the remote unit gets back to its normal state, etc.

Loop Control: for activating the loop control feature (cf 2.5.5, Loop control and status).
Warning: this feature is incompatible with controlling links using the front panel keypad or the
embedded html pages!

LL Backup: this sub-menu leads to settings for backing up a LL link using an IP or ISDN link
(see 2.1.7 and 3.5.4, Setting up a backup link).

Backup Call: this setting selects which interface is used to launch a backup call when the
control loop is activated (see 3.5.4, Setting up a backup link).

Backup Receive: enables the reception of an incoming IP or ISDN call when the unit is in LL
mode. This parameter should be set on the “Receiver” codec for a backup link (see 3.5.4,
Setting up a backup link). More generally, it can be used to accept incoming IP or ISDN calls
even when the unit is on LL mode.
5AS: by default the 5AS system for ISDN (cf. page 9, 5A System®) is active. If required, it can
be disabled using this sub-menu.
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4.4.8. Maintenance sub-menu
On one hand this sub-menu allows managing the restricted access mode, whihc is specifically
described further in 4.7, Restricted operation mode.
On the other hand it allows activating test loops (as described in 2.5.8, Test functions).
User Access
Reduce Access?
Password
None
Maintenance
Audio
Tests
Audio Feedback
Loop2 - Network
Loop3 - Codec
For setting up the restricted access, first you must set a password (that will be needed to later unlock
the device), and for this use the “Password” sub-menu.
To activate the restricted mode, select the “User Access” sub-menu, and confirm by selecting “Yes”.
Then you must enter the password to lock the unit (this in order to make sure you know this
password!). The unit immediately enters the restricted mode and will stay in this mode (even after a
power cycle or reboot) until it is unlocked using the password.
 If you lose the password: it is still possible to apply a complete factory reset; this will also clear the
password and restore full access. The various methods are recalled in chapter 4.8 further, Clearing
all settings.
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4.5. Setting up a link
Two essential aspects have a major impact on the way that links can be managed with the SCOOP 5:
First, various types of networks are used for transmission. Two cases differ from the others:

The transmission in « leased line » mode is permanent, without specific setup/release
procedures.

The transmission over the ISDN can use two channels simultaneously, or even more, and so
imply dealing with two (or more) destination numbers.
Second, in ISDN mode the unit can also be operated as a “double codec” capable to transmit
simultaneously two audio channels with 7 kHz bandwidth. This has an impact on the operating mode.
4.5.1. Setting up a link in ISDN mode
Preliminary settings
The network interface must be configured depending on the local ISDN line that is used, thanks to the
“ISDN Parameter” sub-menu (Setup / Network / ISDN Parameter)
Protocol
The default setting is “Euro ISDN”, also known as ETSI protocol. Change this setting if another
protocol is needed in your location.
Local address
In some cases, it may be necessary to set the local address (or local ISDN number) of the line, and/or
it is possible to assign a sub-address to the codec.
The local number allows “multiple subscriber numbering” or MSN. This number is usually the number
remote equipment must dial to call your equipment. Configuring this number in the equipment is not
mandatory if the equipment is directly connected to the public network. On the other hand, if the
equipment is connected to a PABX, the number(s) are often required. The PABX may also impose a
unique number for each B channel within the same BRI interface. In such a case, refer to the
characteristics and configuration of the PABX.
 Proper
configuration of the local numbers is essential, and many problems in setting up links
originate from mistakes or misunderstandings regarding this configuration. In doubt, leave this
number blank! This is usually appropriate for public lines.
Sub-address SA
This number differentiates several terminals connected to the same ISDN bus, which are allocated the
same call number(s). Thus it can be useful in case other devices are connected with the SCOOP 5 on
the same line.
Whenever a sub-address is set, the unit will only accept incoming calls specifically directed to this subaddress.
 Most often, the best setting is to leave this blank, except in double codec mode where this setting is
useful (see further the processing of calls in double codec mode).
SPID
This “Service Profile Identifier” is only relevant for the NI-2 protocol (used by some operators in North
America). This number identifies the services of the ISDN line, and usually includes the subscriber
number or part of it. This number is mandatory to operate the line, and must be provided by the
network operator.
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Calling an ISDN number
To set the link, first set –if not already done- the unit in ISDN mode (menu Setup / Network /
Change Network / ISDN). Then select the desired encoding format (Setup / Algorithm).
 You can get a fast setting by simply selecting one of the “recently used” configurations displayed;
otherwise select “Other” for a new coding configuration.
Come back if needed to the base screen using
. Then enter the ISDN number of the destination
and press the
key.
If a sub-address is needed, right after the number enter the “*” character and the sub-address (4 digits
max.). The number then has the form nnnn*ssss, e.g. 0912345678*32 (then press
).
When the selected encoder needs two or more B channels, the unit asks for additional numbers. If the
same number is suitable, just press the “green phone” button without re-entering a number.
An error message is displayed in case of a failure of the link establishment, or on a remote release. To
come back to the base screen, press
or
.
Receiving calls
When the 5A System is active, receiving calls is simple. When a call is received, the codec
automatically “unhooks” and recognises the coding algorithm and protocol used, and finally sets the
link automatically. On the receiving side, the unit will “follow” the calling unit.
When the 5A System is not active, you should first configure the codec for the desired coding
algorithm and configuration. When a call is received, the unit will synchronise with the calling device,
but the link will usually fail if the calling party has used another coding configuration than expected.
However, if J52 is used by both parties, the link will succeed even without 5AS active.
 Important
notice: the unit can receive and accept incoming ISDN calls even when its current
network interface is not ISDN, except if it is busy with an established link. On the other hand, it will
ignore such calls if it is running in LL mode, except if the ”Backup receive” mode is active (for
details see above 3.5.4, Setting up a backup link).
Releasing/Hanging up
In any case, to stop a link, press the
 Press
key.
a second time to confirm! (this is for safety, in order to avoid releasing by mistake)
Quick redialing
Once a number (or more for ISDN links with more than one B channel) has been called, it is easy to
recall it without having to type it again: press the
key, then you can scroll through the “history”
(last dialled numbers) using the arrows. Press again the
key when the desired number is displayed.
This is especially efficient for quickly redialling the previous number.
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4.5.2. Setting up links in double ISDN codec mode
The double codec mode is specific, as the unit behaves as two independent G711/G722 mono
codecs, designated “Codec 1” and “Codec 2”. Each codec sets or releases links separately on the B
channel it is assigned, and uses the audio input and output it is assigned: input and output A (or
“left”) for Codec 1, and input and output B (or “right”) for Codec 2.
Preliminary settings
The network interface must be configured depending on the local ISDN line that is used, just like in
the normal ISDN mode (see above 4.5.1). However, in this mode, configuring a sub-address on each
B channel (hence each codec) can be very useful. Indeed this is a means, when receiving calls, to
differentiate the two codecs (which often answer the same subscriber number as they are on the same
ISDN line). But be aware these addresses cannot be dialed from a remote analog telephone.
Besides, make sure to select the double codec mode: … / ISDN Parameter / Codec Mode /
Double Codec.
Calling an ISDN number
To set the link, first set –if not already done- the unit in ISDN mode (menu Setup / Network /
Change Network / ISDN).
 Note that the display (base screen) has changed to show the respective status of the two codecs.
Then select for the relevant codec the desired encoding format (Setup / Algorithm): first select the
codec (Codec 1 or Codec 2), then select the algorithm.
Come back if needed to the base screen using
. Then enter the ISDN number of the destination
(followed by * + sub-address if needed) and press the
key: you should then select the line/codec
by pressing the L1 or L2 key depending on the codec you want to use.
An error message is displayed in case of a failure of the link establishment, or on a remote release. To
come back to the base screen, press
or
.
Receiving calls
Receiving a call works in the same way as in te single codec mode, except for the following:

If the codecs are differentiated with exclusive subscriber numbers, a remote call can be sent
specifically to one of the two codecs.

You can have the same capability using the sub-addresses (but this cannot be used by a
remote analog phone).


Only G711 and G722 algorithms are supported by the codecs ion this mode.
If the call is not specifically addressing one of the two codecs, the first available one (priority
to codec 1) will pick up the call. Example: if codec 1 is busy, then codec 2 will pick up the
call.
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Releasing/Hanging up
To stop a link, press the
key. You must then select which line/codec you want to release, using key
L1 or L2. Press
a second time to confirm.
Quick redialing
Once a number has been called with a codec, it is easy to recall it without having to type it again:
press the
key, then you can scroll through the “history” of calls using the arrows. Press key L1 or
L2 depending on the desired codec.
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4.5.3. Setting up a link in IP mode via Ethernet
A link is set up in a similar way as an ISDN link. The difference is mainly that instead of the telephone
number, we use either an IP address, or a SIP URI (Uniform Resource Identifier).
Preliminary settings
If a SIP server is used, the SCOOP 5 must be registered on this server. Use the AoIP Parameter
menu (see above on page 50) for entering the SIP account data and activate the SIP registration).
Check that the codec is successfully registered, using the Tools / About sub-menu: SIP Status
information.
Besides, for links over the Internet, most often the link passes through a NAT router which “hides” to
the codec the characteristics of the public access: public IP address and RTP ports actually used. This
can make the SIP transactions fail, or get a non-optimal route through the network. To avoid this a
STUN server is often used; the corresponding settings are also found in the AoIP Parameter submenu.
Check that the public address discovery has succeeded: Tools / About sub-menu: Public IP
information (its mere presence shows the discovery has succeeded).
 You can find in annex 7.3 (Some methods to deal with NAT routers and firewalls) some additional
information on the use of STUN.
Directly call an IP address
This is the most basic way of setting the link. It is suitable only if:

The other unit is “directly” reachable, i.e. there is no NAT Router or firewall blocking the
connectivity. The simplest case is when both units are on the same LAN or private network.
 The IP address of the other unit is known!
To set the link, first set the unit in IP mode (Setup / Network / Change Network / Ethernet), and
set the desired encoding format (SETUP / Algorithm, etc.).
 Note that you can get a fast setting by simply selecting one of the “recently used” configurations
displayed; otherwise select “Other” for a new configuration.
Then enter the IP address and press the
key.
 When operating in this way, it is recommended to disable the SIP registration (SIP Registration
parameter in the AoIP Parameter sub-menu, see on page 50).
Calling via a SIP server
This is the technique when both units are registered on a SIP proxy server. In this case, each unit is
identified by its SIP URI, in the form username@sipservername, like an email address. There is no
need to know any IP address (and hence there is no problem if the IP address of a unit changes for
whatever reason).
To set the link, first set the unit in IP mode (Setup / Network / Change Network / Ethernet), and
set the desired encoding format (SETUP / Algorithm, etc.).
Then enter1 the SIP URI of the unit to call, and press the
key.
 It is often possible to dial the short form username (omitting the @sipservername) when the device
is itself registered onto the same “sipservername” server.
1 Use the “#” key to switch the keypad mode numeric/lowercase/uppercase
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Receiving calls
This is very simple, in both cases (direct peer to peer link or SIP server). There is nothing to do…
When a call is received, the units negotiate automatically a commonly acceptable coding algorithm,
and set the link automatically. On the receiving side, SCOOP 5 will “follow” the calling unit.
 Important notice: the unit can receive and accept incoming IP calls even when its current network
interface is not Ethernet/IP, provided it not already busy with an established link. On the other
hand, it will ignore such calls if it is running in LL mode, except if the ”Backup receive” mode is
active (for details see above 3.5.4, Setting up a backup link).
“Network quality” setting
Depending on the quality of service provided on the network, especially its jitter performance, it is
possible to change the stability/latency compromise used by the SCOOP 5. For this purpose, a setting
is available in the menu (Setup / Network / Ethernet Parameter / Network Quality). Three
choices are proposed:

“HIGH”:
suitable for a good quality and low jitter network; latency is minimal, but the
codec will have little tolerance to possible jitter


“MIDDLE”:
intermediate (and default) setting, suitable for a moderate transmission jitter
“LOW”:
to be preferred when the network has low QoS, especially for residential ADSL
lines. This setting ensures a safer operation, at the cost of a high latency.
On a LAN and/or private network with a controlled quality, the “HIGH” quality setting is
recommended, as it yields minimum latency.
On the contrary, it should be avoided for a link via the Internet, as it can only tolerate a low jitter.
One solution can be to start with a “MIDDLE” setting, and switch to the “LOW” setting if too much
audio disturbance is heard.
Quick redialing
Once a remote device has already been called, it is easy to recall it: press the
key, then you can
scroll through the call “history” using the arrows. Press again the
key when the desired number is
highlighted. This is especially efficient for quickly redialling the last called number.
Releasing/Hanging up
To stop a link, press the
 Press
key.
a second time to confirm! (this is for safety, in order to avoid releasing by mistake)
Links with IP phones
SCOOP 5 is compatible with IP phones that use the SIP protocol (many on the market do). The
algorithm used in this case is commonly G711, but a few IP phones also accept G722.
Note that “IP phones” include software SIP phones implemented on computers (also called
“softphones”) or smartphones.
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Multicast mode transmission
On a network that can support it1, the multicast mode can optimise the resource usage when an
audio stream has to be distributed simultaneously to several destinations. Contrary to the normal
bidirectional unicast mode, this mode is unidirectional: one sender encoder sends a stream towards a
multicast group address, and one or several decoders receiving the stream pick up the packets sent to
this group address and decode the audio stream.
On the SCOOP 5 the operating mode stays quite similar to the “normal” mode, with mainly two
differences in the multicast mode:


A codec must be set as sender or receiver device

Set the codec in “multicast send” mode. To do this, refer to the AoIP Parameter sub-menu,
page 50.


Select on this codec the desired audio coding parameters;
SIP is not used and hence the SIP configuration is not relevant
For the operation it is assumed the network “statically” supports UDP multicast, i.e. routers of the
network recognise and deal with routing the packets with multicast group addresses.
For obvious reasons the coding setup is entirely decided at the source. On the codec on the audio
source side (hence sender of the encoded stream), the procedure for setting up a multicast stream is
the following:
Start the streaming as for setting up a call in normal mode: enter the IP group address, then
press the
key.
 Note
that the codec decodes its own stream on its audio output; this can be useful for audio
monitoring.
For each codec that has to decode the stream, the procedure is simple:

Set the codec in “multicast receive” mode. To do this, refer to the AoIP Parameter sub-menu,
page 50.

Start the decoder as for setting up a normal call: enter the IP group address, then press the
key.
1 This does not include the Internet; multicast cannot be used over the Internet.
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4.5.4. Setting up a POTS link
Preliminary settings
The network interface must be configured depending on the PSTN line that is used, thanks to the
“POTS Parameter” sub-menu (Setup / Network / POTS Parameter)
 You should preferably disable services such as call waiting tones. Tone signals injected on the line
during the communication have a high risk of disturbing the codec operation, and even dropping
the link. It is not recommended to use a line if it is not possible to disable such tones.
Calling a POTS number
To set the link, first set –if not already done- the unit in POTS mode (menu Setup / Network /
Change Network / POTS). Then select the desired encoding format (Setup / Algorithm). Select the
desired variation:



P0: default mode of operation for this
P1: protected mode 1, with increased resilience to errors (but higher latency)
P2: protected mode 2, with slightly higher resilience to errors (and slightly higher latency)
 Make sure to set units the same on both sides of the link, because this setting cannot be negotiated
automatically by the units. It is recommended to use the default P0 mode, the other are mainly for
compatibility with older codecs of the AETA product range.
Come back if needed to the base screen using
. Then enter the number of the destination and
press the
key. The codec dials, negotiates with the remote unit the bit rate (this phase can last
several seconds) and sets up the link and the coding.
 A message is displayed in case of a failure of the link establishment, or on a remote release. To
come back to the base screen, press
or
.
Receiving a POTS call
Receiving calls is simple. When a call is received, the SCOOP 5 “unhooks” and the link is set up after
the negotiation of the bit rate with the calling unit (this can last several seconds).
 Important
notice: the unit can receive and accept incoming POTS calls even when its current
network interface is not the POTS line, provided it is not already busy with an established link. On
the other hand, it will ignore such calls if it is running in LL mode, except if the ”Backup receive”
mode is active (for details see above 3.5.4, Setting up a backup link).
Releasing/Hanging up
To stop a link, press the
 Press
key.
a second time to confirm! (this is for safety, in order to avoid releasing by mistake)
Quick redialing
Once a remote device has already been called, it is easy to recall it: press the
key, then you can
scroll through the call “history” using the arrows. Press again the
key when the desired number is
highlighted. This is especially efficient for quickly redialling the last called number.
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4.5.5. Setting up a link over a leased line
There is no specific procedure for establishing or interrupting such link: once the physical connections
and the coding configuration are done, set the unit in LL mode (Setup / Network / Change
Network / LL). The link is immediately started: the encoder transmits the encoded stream, and the
decoder looks for synchronisation on the received stream.
In case the link is broken, the decoder restarts looking for synchronisation and restarts as soon as the
stream comes back, without any action needed from an operator. This is also true when restarting
after a power cycle.
By default, no incoming call from another network interface (Ethernet, ISDN, POTS...) is accepted
when the unit is set in this LL mode. However, it is possible to allow such incoming calls by changing
the “Backup Receive” setting (in the sub-menu Tools / Misc / LL Backup / Backup Receive, or the
“Misc” tab in the html pages).
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4.5.6. Setting up a mobile telephone link
Prerequisites
You must have a subscription and a SIM card granting access to mobile transmission. In the case
described here the subscription must include access to the basic telephone service.
Preliminary settings
First insert the SIM card in the SCOOP 5 (the unit must be powered off for this), and connect at least
one antenna to the unit. See how to proceed on page 32, “Drawer for SIM card [6]”. Power up the
codec, enter the sub-menu Setup / Network / Mobile (Int.) / Mobile Parameter / PIN. Enter the
PIN code of the SIM card using the keypad and press
. This is useless, of course, if the card’s PIN
code is blank or disabled.
The network access must be configured using the “Mobile Parameter” menu (Setup / Network /
Mobile Parameter), see details in page 55, Mobile Parameter.
.
 Select the mobile phone mode: Mode / Cellphone.

If needed select the network type: Network Mode. In doubt, select “Auto” which fits most
situations.

The Network Operator sub-menu allows you to choose among the available operators, if
your mobile subscription allows you to do so.
Other settings (Network Quality, Access Point…) are meaningless for a telephone link.

Calling a mobile number
To set the link, first set –if not already done- the unit in mobile access mode (menu Setup / Network
/ Change Network / Mobile (Int.). If needed come back to the base screen, using
.
 Note
that the display now shows you the network type (example: 3G) and the radio reception
quality. Press
(display the root menu) and you get more details: operator name, more specific
technology (example: HSPA).
Enter the destination number and press
.
An error message is displayed in case of a failure of the link establishment, or on a remote release. To
come back to the base screen, press
or
.
Receiving a mobile phone call
Receiving calls is simple. When a call is received, the SCOOP 5 “unhooks” and the link is set up.
 Important
notice: the unit can receive and accept incoming mobile phone calls even when its
current network interface is not the mobile network, provided it not already busy with an
established link. On the other hand, it will ignore such calls if it is running in LL mode, except if the
”Backup receive” mode is active (for details see above 3.5.4, Setting up a backup link).
Releasing/Hanging up
To stop a link, press the
 Press
74
key.
a second time to confirm! (this is for safety, in order to avoid releasing by mistake)
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Quick redialing
Once a remote device has already been called, it is easy to recall it: press the
key, then you can
scroll through the call “history” using the arrows. Press again the
key when the desired number is
highlighted. This is especially efficient for quickly redialling the last called number.
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4.5.7. Setting up a link in IP mode via a mobile network
Prerequisites
You must have a subscription and a SIM card granting access to mobile transmission. In the case
described here the subscription must include access to packet switched data transmission. It is possible
to operate over a 2G network in EDGE mode, if using very low bit rates, but for an acceptable
performance it is preferred to access a 3G/3G+ network, at minimum UMTS.
Preliminary settings
First insert the SIM card in the SCOOP 5 (the unit must be powered off for this), and connect at least
one antenna to the unit. See how to proceed on page 32, “Drawer for SIM card [6]”. Power up the
codec, enter the sub-menu Setup / Network / Mobile (Int.) / Mobile Parameter / PIN. Enter the
PIN code of the SIM card using the keypad and press
. This is useless, of course, if the card’s PIN
code is blank or disabled.
 If you use a mobile access USB module, insert the SIM card in this device (refer if needed to its
dedicated literature) and plug the USB key in the back of the unit. After a while, the module is
detected and appears in the list of the network accesses under the name “Mobile 1” or
“Mobile 1 (Ext.)”. In all the instructions in this chapter, replace “Mobile (Int.)” by this name
allocated to the USB device.
The network access must be configured using the “Mobile Parameter” menu (Setup / Network /
Mobile Parameter1), see details in page 55, Mobile Parameter.
 Select the packet data mode: Mode / IP Mode.

If needed select the network type: Network Mode. In doubt, select “Auto” which fits most
situations. Avoid giving the priority to GSM, as its performance is poor.

The Network Operator sub-menu allows you to choose among the available operators, if
your mobile subscription allows you to do so.

Go to the sub-menu Access Point / APN: enter the APN code of the operator using the
keypad, then
.

If required enter the other access point settings: user name and password. This is n ot needed
usually, otherwise the needed data are provided along with the subscription and the SIM card.

You can define a Network Quality: in doubt, select Middle. You can test a setting on a
connection with a significant duration, and change the setting if the stability does not look
sufficient.
If a SIP server is used, the SCOOP 5 must be registered on this server. Use the AoIP Parameter
menu (see above on page 50) for entering the SIP account data and activate the SIP registration.
These settings are common to IP modes both via Ethernet and mobile networks.
Besides, for links over the Internet, most often the link passes through a NAT router which “hides” to
the codec the characteristics of the public access: public IP address and RTP ports actually used. This
can make the SIP transactions fail, or get a non-optimal route through the network. To avoid this a
STUN server is often used; the corresponding settings are also found in the AoIP Parameter submenu. These settings are common to IP modes both via Ethernet and mobile networks.
 You can find in annex 7.3 (Some methods to deal with NAT routers and firewalls) some additional
information on the use of STUN.
1 Or “Mobile 1” for an external USB device
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Calling via a mobile IP network
To set the link, first set –if not already done- the unit in mobile access mode (menu Setup / Network
/ Change Network / Mobile (xxx)1. If needed come back to the base screen, using
.
 Note
that the display now shows you the network type (example: 3G) and the radio reception
quality. Press
(display the root menu) and you get more details: operator name, more specific
technology (example: HSPA).
Enter the destination number and press
.
From this moment you can set a call just like a call over the Ethernet interface (see above in 4.5.3,
Setting up a link in IP mode via Ethernet):

Call directly, without a SIP server: enter the remote device IP address and press the
key.

Use a SIP server: enter the SIP URI of the remote device and press the
key.
An error message is displayed in case of a failure of the link establishment, or on a remote release. To
come back to the base screen, press
or
.
Receiving a mobile IP call
Receiving a call is basically the same as through the Ethernet interface, but with some significant
differences:

SCOOP 5 must be connected to the mobile data service to be able to receive requests from
the network (such connection is somewhat equivalent to the physical connection of an
Ethernet cable). This connection is performed automatically by SCOOP 5 just before setting
an outgoing call. To make it “manually” and get ready to receive a call, you must use the
sub-menu Setup / Network / Mobile Parameter / Data Connection. The “Connected”
status is recalled on the base screen and the main menu:

Mobile networks often include devices blocking the access towards a mobile terminal: NAT
routers, often symmetrical (which prevents a STUN server to be efficient), etc. Moreover, you
rarely get a public IP address, and it is never possible to get a public and fixed IP address.
For these reasons it is rather difficult to receive a call without using a SIP server. Conversely, if the
SCOOP 5 is registered on a SIP server, once the data connection is active the codec is actually able
to receive a call.
When a call is received, the units negotiate automatically a commonly acceptable coding algorithm,
and set the link automatically. On the receiving side, SCOOP 5 will “follow” the calling unit.
 Important notice: the unit can receive and accept incoming IP calls even when its current network
interface is not mobile IP, provided it is not already busy with an established link. On the other
hand, it will ignore such calls if it is running in LL mode, except if the ”Backup receive” mode is
active (for details see above 3.5.4, Setting up a backup link).
Releasing/Hanging up
To stop a link, press the
key.
1 The actual name of the network access depends on the concerned module: “Mobile (Int.)” for the module integrated with the “wireless”
option, “Mobile 1 (Ext.)” for an external USB device, etc.
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 Press
a second time to confirm! (this is for safety, in order to avoid releasing by mistake)
Quick redialing
Once a remote device has already been called, it is easy to recall it: press the
key, then you can
scroll through the call “history” using the arrows. Press again the
key when the desired number is
highlighted. This is especially efficient for quickly redialling the last called number.
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4.6. Management of the configuration profiles
The configuration profiles ease configuration changes and the setting up of routine links. There are
three types of profiles:

“Remote profiles”, which include call parameters for a given destination (number(s), coding,
etc.). Such a profile is similar to a directory entry, but in addition it can memorize the coding
parameters.

“Local profiles” memorize the network access parameters. These are the settings found in the
sub-menu Setup / Network. Recalling a local profile is a quick way to restore the
configuration needed for a given line or network.

“Snapshots” memorize the settings for the audio interfaces. These are settings found in the
Setup / Audio sub-menu.
These various memories are usable locally, but also through the embedded html pages, and also
using these pages they can be imported/exported from/to a computer.
Each remote profile includes the following elements:


Name assigned to the profile
Number(s): ISDN, POTS or mobile call number(s), or IP URI, Ip address, depending on the
transmission mode.

Coding configuration associated with the profile
A remote profile may have no number included; in such case it is used for quick and safe recall of a
given coding configuration.
Conversely a remote profile may have no associated coding configuration included; in such case it is
just like a directory entry, used for instant dialling a known destination.
The profiles are managed and used via the “Profiles” menu (refer to details in 4.4.4, Profiles
menu). For remote profiles, the available possibilities are:

Create a New profile, assigning it a name, possibly call number(s), and possibly an
associated coding configuration.

Load a profile previously recorded: the codec then configures itself with the coding
configuration memorized in the profile.

Call directly a profile: the codec then configures itself with the coding configuration
memorized in the profile (if any), and sets a call to the number(s) included in the profile.


Delete a profile previously recorded.
Update profile previously recorded, either for renaming it or change its content.
For local profiles or snapshots, the available possibilities are:

Create a New profile, which will memorize all the current network settings (for a local profile)
or all the audio settings (for a snapshot), assigning it a name.


Load a local profile or snapshot: the codec then restores the settings included in the profile.
Delete a local profile or snapshot.
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4.7. Restricted operation mode
4.7.1. Principles
SCOOP 5 can be locked in a restricted user access mode, which limits user access to the essential
controls and features. For routine operation, this mode allows to avoid risks such as random settings,
with unpredictable effects, handling or adjustment mistakes, accidental erasure of useful memories,
etc.
When SCOOP 5 is in restricted access, it is still quite operative, especially if suitable memories
(profiles, snapshots) have been prepared beforehand, because the following functions are still
accessible:





Receiving calls
Releasing links
Redialing (recalling previous numbers) outgoing calls
Loading and calling remote profiles
Loading local profiles or snapshots
On the other hand, it is not possible to change settings via the menus, as only the “Profiles” menu is
accessible. It is also impossible to delete or edit the recorded profiles.
A password is needed for switching to the restricted mode (locking) or back to full access (unlocking).
This password can be programmed (of course, not when in restricted access...).
 Warning: this access protection is completely independent from the one that can be set
for the
“web” interface (embedded html pages). The passwords have no relationship, and are set
separately. One of the interfaces (front panel or html) can be locked while the other is not.
4.7.2. Locking the front panel
Managing the restricted mode is done with the sub-menu Tools / Maintenance. See in 4.4.8
(Maintenance sub-menu) this sub-menu items.
First you must program the desired password, because the password is blank when the unit comes
from the factory or after a complete “factory reset”. The password is an arbitrary sequence of
numbers.
For switching to the restricted mode, select User Access and confirm (Yes). You must then enter the
password to actually lock the unit (this makes sure you really know the password before locking). The
screen warns you about the switching to restricted access.
Press
and come back to the base screen. From then on, on every attempt to navigate in the non
authorized menus, the following message is displayed:
4.7.3. Unlocking the front panel
From the base screen or the root menu, type the password sequence: SCOOP 5 unlocks:
The full access is restored. Press
80
to come back to the base screen.
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4.7.4. Lost the password?
You have forgotten or lost the password ? The only way to restore full access is to clear all the
settings, which will also clear the passwords. The unit will be accessible again.
Chapter 4.8 below shows the procedure for such erasure.
 In order not to lose all the memorized settings, you can perform a complete reset of the settings
without deleting the profiles. These can be useful for you to come back more easily to the desired
configuration.
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4.8. Clearing all settings
In some cases (especially if the password is lost), it can be necessary to come back to the “factory”
configuration.
To clear up all the configuration and come back to the factory settings, normally you should go to the
sub-menu Tools / Misc / General Reset and select Factory Reset, or Reset Settings (which does
not delete the memorized profiles and snapshots).
The default password is blank. In the factory setting, menus use the English language. Other
languages can be selected via Tools / Misc / Language.
 If it is not possible to access the menu to perform the factory reset (password lost), the erasure
should be done using the embedded html pages: see chapter 5 below for the operating mode.
4.9. Backing up and restoring the configuration
It is possible to save all the equipoment settings ina file, and conversely to restore a comple
configuration froma file previously recorded in such way. Such transfers can be done using the
embedded html server; refer to 5.10.6 for the operating mode.
Partial exports are also possible, selecting eleme,ts to include in the export: remote profiles, local
profiles, snapshots, settings…
4.10. Displaying received SMS
When the unit is equipped with the “wireless” option and it is registered on a mobile network,
SCOOP 5 can display SMS received on the SIM card’s subscriber number. The operation is very
simple: on receiving the SMS the text is directly displayed on the screen:
Whenever the complete message cannot be displayed on the screen, use the arrows to scroll the
message and read all the text. After the message is read, press
to come back to the normal
display.
Caution: the message is now cleared and it cannot be displayed again.
 If you do not want to display the received SMS, you can disable this feature: go to the sub-menu
Tools / Misc / Aux. Functions and disable the SMS parameter.
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5. Operating mode – Embedded HTML pages
The embedded html server in SCOOP 5 provides a comfortable and efficient means to control and
monitor the unit. It just needs the SCOOP 5 to be connected to an IP network and to be reachable
from a computer, or another device with an html browser: tablet, smartphone…
In the most common case, the two devices are connected on the same local network (LAN). But it is
also possible to control the SCOOP 5 by remote, provided that the control device can reach it
(TCP/IP port 80, HTTP protocol).
If you also have a secondary Ethernet interface (using a USB/Ethernet adapter), each of the two
interfaces can be used for this remote control access.
This control mode is usable regardless of the OS of the control unit, and the embedded pages are
compatible with all common browsers. No software installation is needed on the control position.
5.1. Accessing the SCOOP 5 html pages
Once the SCOOP 5 is connected on an IP network, the first step is to get its IP address, from the
menu: Tools / About / Local IP1. Then, on the control device, launch the html browser and enter
the IP address of the SCOOP 5 in the “address” or “URL” field. This gives access to the html server
integrated in SCOOP 5. The page which is displayed is similar to the following picture:
If needed, select another language by clicking the suitable flag (this choice is not linked to the
language selected for the menus on the front panel interface).
The home page displayed above is the “Status” page, which provides an overview of the unit status,
but allows no action on it. This is the only “free access” page, with no limitation or access control.
To access the other pages, you must “log in”, and get for the control device an exclusive access. Any
connection request from another device will remove this access.
To log in, enter the password and click the connection button. The initial password is blank: click
directly on the button. To set the password and enable protection, go to the “Maintenance” page (cf.
further).
To release control, click on “Logout” (also in the connection area). You are also logged out
automatically after a long period of time with no action on the pages.
1 For a possible secondary Ethernet interface, menu Config / Network / Ethernet 1 Parameter...
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5.2. Principles of operation with html pages
The picture below shows a typical page.
On top you find a bar of tabs corresponding to the various categories of functions and parameters for
the SCOOP 5. Clicking a tab you access either a page, or a drop-down list for selecting a secondary
page. These tabs and pages are detailed in the following chapters.
Under the bar can be found the information and adjustable parameters, with various selection or entry
modes for these parameters, grouped in blocks (each surrounded with a frame). On the right side, a
text area provides additional help and hints.
As a general rule, the displayed parameters are read when accessing the page, and are not refreshed
automatically1. To force a refresh, click the
refreshed.
icon: the data in the area or frame are read and
 Exception: some data on some pages is however periodically and automatically refreshed.
This
makes a modest bit rate, but you should exit the html pages if you want no traffic at all on the path
between SCOOP 5 and the control device.
Two tabs have a specific behavior:


“Status” is accessible without a login and some data are updated automatically.
“Alarms” is also updated automatically, and switches to red when an alarm triggers, showing
the number of issues detected. You can then check for details by clicking the tab.
Access to the tabs (other than “Status”) requires loggin in beforehand. If you click a tab without being
logged in, the login dialog box opens to allow you to enter the connection password. If it is blank, just
click the “Login” button.
1 This is on purpose, in order to avoid a permanent high rate of queries to the unit, which may be questionable in some situations.
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5.3. “Status” tab
This tab leads to the “Status” page, which is also the home page. It provides an overview of the
essential settings and parameters, sufficient for basic monitoring.
This page is accessible without a log in, and without a password.
The link status is monitored dynamically; e.g. you can see call reception and releasing. It is also
possible to monitor calls that an operator is managing using the front panel.
The page displays the audio level of the two transmitted signals (encoder) and the two received signals
(decoder), shown as bargraphs with a 0 dB reference. Refer to chapter 4.4.3 (Audio sub-menu) for
more details on the setting for this reference. The “Headroom” setting is adjustable using the “Audio”
tab.
 Note: the goal of these bargraphs is to provide an indication on the presence and level of the
audio modulation. The measurement has a good precision for stationary signals (1 dB accuracy
and resolution), but the update rate is rather slow. As a consequence these bargraphs are not
appropriate for precisely monitoring a dynamic program, and they should not be considered an
alternative to real program meters!
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5.4. “Connections” tab
This tab leads to the “Connections” tab, allowing to remote control the links: monitoring, outgoing
call set up and call releasing.
The “Connection State” block allows to monitor and/or manage links.

For direct dialing: the codec has to be set beforehand for the right interface (see “Network”
tab), and the suitable coding configuration (“Coding” tab). Enter the number (or numbers, or
SIP URI…), then click “Dial”. You can also use one of the last called numbers: click the arrow
on the right of the “Number” field and pick a number in the dropdown list.

For using a remote profile: select the profile in the list on the left, and click the “Dial” button.
Alternatively, you can click “Load”. The codec loads the profile settings but does not dial: this
is useful for quickly setting the coding parameters.
Indicators show the status of the relays when the “Relay transmission” feature is active. For auxiliary
functions, see the “Coding” tab.
The SMS received by SCOOP 5 are displayed in the “Messages” frame (in addition to being displayed
on the unit’s LCD). This block can be used also to send a text to the LCD from the control position.
 When SCOOP 5 is in double ISDN codec mode, the “Connection State” frame is replicated, one
frame for each codec. But selecting a remote profile switches back to the normal display (for the
single codec), because the profile data correspond to a single codec (remote profiles cannot be
used in double codec mode).
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5.5. “Profiles” tab
This tab proposes three secondary pages, one for each profile type.
5.5.1. “Remote profiles” page
Parameters that are not relevant in a given context are shaded and inactive.
5.5.2. “Local profiles” page
5.5.3. Snapshots
Snapshots are in fact managed on the “Audio” page, and this “Snapshots” choice on the “Profiles”
tab just redirects to the “Audio” page. See further the description of the audio page.
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5.6. “Network” tab
This tab leads to several pages, which correspond, just like the sub-menu “Network” of the front
panel interface (see 4.4.1 above), to the various network interfaces. For this reason, the number of
pages actually proposed depends on the version and the options of the unit (with or without ISDN,
mobile access, etc.).
5.6.1. “Change Network” page: default interface selection
This page is used for selecting the default interface: this is the one that is implicitly used when dialing
to set an outgoing call. Besides, codec algorithm settings (either via menus or the html pages) are
applicable to this interface1.
Select the desired interface and click “Save”.
5.6.2. “Ethernet Parameter” page
More details on these parameters in 4.4.1, Ethernet Parameters.
Remember to save the changes, clicking the “Save” button!
 Settings regarding the Ethernet interface and IP addressing are especially critical, because this is
just the interface you are controlling SCOOP 5 through. You can lose control because of a mistake
in the settings; it might even be the normal expected consequence for a configuration change. So
be very careful with the settings on this page!
In case control is lost after an error, you must regain control and correct the settings using the front
panel of SCOOP 5.
Note: if a secondary Ethernet interface is available, it is also shown in this page, in an “Ethernet 1”
frame.
1 Remind that the algorithm settings are memorized separately for each network interface. When switching the default interface, the codec
settings for this interface are recalled.
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5.6.3. “AoIP Parameter” page
More details on these parameters in 4.4.1, AoIP Parameter.
If you select (in the “AoIP Mode” frame) the multicast mode, the page is different:
Remember to save the changes, clicking the “Save” button!
5.6.4. LL Parameter page
More details on these parameters in 4.4.1, LL Parameter.
Remember to save the changes, clicking the “Save” button!
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5.6.5. ISDN Parameter page
This page is only visible for units equipped with ISDN interface(s). See more details on the parameters
in 4.4.1, ISDN Parameter.
Remember to save the changes, clicking the “Save” button!
5.6.6. “POTS Parameters” page
This page is only visible for units equipped with the POTS option. See more details on the parameters
in 4.4.1, POTS Parameter.
Remember to save the changes, clicking the “Save” button!
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5.6.7. “Mobile Parameter” page
This page is only visible for units equipped with the “wireless” option. See more details on the
parameters in 4.4.1, Mobile Parameter. You cannot access all settings unless the PIN code has been
entered (otherwise the view is partial only).
 If you have plugged a USB mobile access device, it is also assigned a specific parameter page.
Remember to save the changes, clicking the “Save” button!
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5.7. “Audio” tab
See all details for these parameters in 4.4.3, Audio sub-menu. Like the “Status” page, this page
shows the audio level transmitted/received to/from the network.
After changes on the audio parameters, make sure to save the changes, clicking the “Save” button.
This page includes the management of snapshots, memorizing the parameters controlled in this page.
To create a snapshot based on the current settings, click the “Create new” button, and enter a name
for the snapshot.
The other buttons can be used after selecting an existing snapshot. Click a snapshot: its parameters
are recalled in the fields of the page, but yet no change is done (the “Save” buttons warn of this).
Then you can:

Click the “Cancel” button to simply come back to the previous situation (also possible using
the
icons, but one frame at a time).

Click the “Load” button and directly apply the snapshot (also possible using the “Save”
buttons, but one frame at a time).

Click “Delete” to remove the selected snapshot from the list of snapshots.
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5.8. “Coding” tab
The “Coding” tab groups the selection of the algorithm and its parameters, as well as the auxiliary
functions. See details on all these parameters in 4.4.2, Algorithm sub-menu and 4.4.7, Misc submenu.
The available coding algorithms depend on the current network interface and the installed options,
such as e.g. the AAC codecs. The coding parameters depend on the algorithm and the network
interface. This is also true for the auxiliary functions.
Remember to save the changes, clicking the “Save” button!
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5.9. “Misc” tab
This Misc tab groups several settings that can be found in the Misc sub-menu of the front panel user
interface (see 4.4.7, Misc sub-menu): auto redialing configuration and activation, loop control
activation, SMS reception enabling/disabling…
It is also possible to configure a NTP server: this kind of server provides a time reference (from the
Internet or a server on the local network), useful and recommended for the absolute time stamping of
the events in the log (see further 5.10.5, “Event log” page). If such a server is available and accessible
via the Ethernet interface, enter its address in the “NTP Server” field. A few public servers are also
proposed in the dropdown list1.
 A reboot is needed for this setting to become effective!
 Remember to save the changes, clicking the “Save” button!
1 Note: to be able to use these servers 1) access to the Internet from the codec must not be restricted, 2) a DNS must be set so the symbolic
names can be resolved.
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5.10. “Maintenance” tab
This tab leads to a selection between several pages dedicated to maintenance aspects.
5.10.1. “Login data” page
This page is for setting the password for logging in the html pages. In a classic way, to set up a
password you must first enter the current one, and then enter the new one and confirm it.
Remember to save the change, clicking the “Save” button!
 Reminder: this password has no relationship with that for unlocking the restricted access on the
keypad/display front panel interface.
If you lose the password: using the front panel interface of SCOOP 5, perform a complete reset of the
settings, or a complete “factory reset”. The passwords (front panel and html access) are then reset as
well as the other parameters in the unit.
5.10.2. “Tests” page
This page provides the same choice as the Maintenance / Tests sub-menu (see in 4.4.8 and 2.5.8,
Test functions, the description, of the various test loops available).
 Do not forget to disable the test loops (setting “None”) to come back to normal operation!
5.10.3. “System update” page
This page allows to upload a system update file into the unit and update the unit’s firmware.
For an update, the file must be provided to you by AETA (or possibly your distributor/dealer). The
procedure is rather simple:





From this page, click “Browse…”, find and select the update file.
Click the “Update” button.
The process begins, and a warning message is also displayed on the SCOOP 5 front panel.
Wait for the completion of the update. Normally the unit should reboot by itself at the end of
the process.
Once the unit has restarted, perform a complete “Factory reset”.
This procedure requires maximum care, because such update always implies some risk. Please note
these additional recommendations:

Beforehand backup/export the recorded profiles and snapshots, if you would like to use them
again afterwards.

Make sure the link between the control computer and the SCOOP 5 is stable (no undesirable
interruption during the process).

Make sure the SCOOP 5 is not powered off and its Ethernet interface is not disconnected
during the process, do not use its keypad during the process.

Re-import your profiles and snapshots after the update. But be aware that, although we
always try to keep a maximum upward compatibility, AETA cannot guarantee the re-usability
and consistency of these memories after a firmware update.
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5.10.4. “Reset” page
This page provides two functions: clearing the settings and/or memories/profiles recorded in the unit,
and rebooting the unit.
You can reset the unit completely or only clear a category of data; the available options are:

“Factory reset”: all parameters are brought back to their default setting, and all memories
(profiles, snapshots) are deleted.

“Reset settings”: all parameters are brought back to their default setting, but all memories are
kept: profiles and snapshots.


“Reset snapshots”: all snapshots are cleared form the memory.
“Reset profiles”: all profiles (remote and local) are cleared form the memory.
The page also allows you to reboot the unit by remote, clicking the “Reboot” button. The device is
actually reboot when you confirm by clicking “OK” in the dialog box which then shows up 1. This is
equivalent for SCOOP 5 to an off/on power cycle. Of course, you must wait for the return to the
normal operative state before regaining control via the html pages.
1 If you mistakenly clicked the “Reboot” button, it is still possible to cancel this: close the page without clicking “OK” (do not hit the
computer’s Esc key neither).
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5.10.5. “Event log” page
This page displays a history if the system events, which can be useful for operational records, or for
investigating operation issues, etc.
Events are logged by the codec in its internal memory card; they are recorded in plain text
(unformatted ASCII), and the web page displays the 200 last lines of this log (with a scroll bar).
You can select the detail level for this history, depending on the target application:

“Coarse”: only essential events are logged, such as reboots, link set up, alarms… This type of
history can be useful as a link record, and gives a very synthetic overview.

“Normal”: gives more details, and this is the default setting, suitable for most operation
needs.

“Debug”: absolutely all events are logged; this makes a very “verbose” and technical history,
reserved for testing and fixing issues.
SCOOP 5 can also send event messages to a SYSLOG server is such server is available on the
network: enter the address or name of this server and click the “Apply” button. From then on,
SCOOP 5 sends the designated server all events, regardless of the detail level selected as described
above. The two “histories” run in parallel: on one hand messages to the SYSLOG server, on the other
hand the “filtered” events (depending on the detail level selected) recorded in the SCOOP 5 log file.
Events are time-stamped (date, hour, minute, second) from the internal clock of the unit. This clock is
not backed (no battery inside the unit), but the unit can synchronize at boot time using the NTP
protocol. The address of such server must be set in the “Misc” page (see 5.9 above).
 Important
notice: time stamps are universal time (UTC), hence they take no account of
geographical location, neither any DST (daylight saving time). Remember to add the appropriate
time difference when analysing the logs.
Under the log window you can find some control buttons:

“Hold”: normally the event window scrolls at any time while new events occur. Click this
button to stop this and freeze the display. The button becomes “Continue”. The events are
still logged, only the page update is interrupted.


“Continue”: resumes the automatic updating of the event display.

“Save logfile as”: allows you to download on the control computer the history file. This takes
place as a typical download. Depending on the browser and its settings, you can possibly
select the file destination, name…
“Refresh”: click this button to update the display and show the most recent events. This button
is relevant if the display has been frozen (with “Hold”), in order to refresh the event display on
demand.
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5.10.6. “Setup Transfer” page
This page provides a means to backup all the settings of the unit into a file, and reciprocally to restore
a complete configuration from a file previously saved in this way.
Partial exports are also possible, selecting the items you wish to include: remote profiles, local profiles,
snapshots, settings…
The left part of the page is dedicated to “exporting” the device configuration: the configuration is then
saved in a file, downloaded in the control computer. Before doing the export you can select which
type of data is to be included in this backup/export: check the desired categories (multiple choice
allowed), and click “Export”. The rest is carried out like a typical download. Depending on the
browser and its settings, you can possibly select the file destination, name…
The right side is for “importing” the device configuration: click “Browse…” to select the file to be
imported, and launch the process by clicking “Update”. The file must be a file previously exported
from a SCOOP 5 (same unit, or another). The settings or memories included in the file are
respectively applied to the codec, or recorded in its memory of profiles/snapshots.
 Warning: the export files can be imported into a device with the same firmware version, but there is
no guarantee of “portability” of the configuration files from one firmware version to another. In
other terms, the outcome is not guaranteed when importing into a unit files which were exported
from a unit with a different firmware version. We recommend to carefully check the settings in such
case, after importing the file.
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5.11. “Alarm” tab
The “Alarm” tab switches to red as soon as at least one anomaly is detected. In addition the number
of abnormal conditions is shown, like in the example below with two alarm conditions detected:
Clicking the tab, you reach this “Alarm” page showing all the alarm conditions. All possible issues are
listed, but only those actually detected are highlighted with the
The issues are grouped in three areas:



icon.
Alarms related to “Transmission”: essentially issues related to the decoder synchronization. In
addition, for ISDN links, there may be encoder or decoder fallback cases (“fallback” is the
situation when the encoder or decoder configuration actually set on the link differs from the
one which was initially programmed or expected).
Alarms related to the audio interfaces: audio clipping (minor alarm), AES input errors.
Hardware alarms (internal alarms): excess temperature, power failure.
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6. Technical characteristics
6.1. Characteristics of interfaces
6.1.1. Analogue audio inputs
Audio characteristics are measured over a 20 to 20 000 Hz bandwidth except when differently stated.
The inputs are balanced type, using 3-pin female XLR sockets.
Maximum input level:
adjustable from 0 to +22 dBu ± 0.3 dB
Nominal input impedance:
600  or 10 k
(menu setting: Setup / Audio / Analog / Input Impedance)
6.1.2. Analogue audio outputs
Audio characteristics are measured over a 20 to 20 000 Hz bandwidth except when differently stated.
The outputs are balanced type, using 3-pin male XLR sockets.
Maximum output level:
adjustable from 0 to +22 dBu ± 0.3 dB
Nominal load impedance:
600  or 10 k
Output impedance:
<50 
Symmetry:
> 40 dB
(ZL = 150 )
6.1.3. Digital audio input and output
These interfaces comply with recommendations:



AES3-1992
EBU Tech. 3250-E
CCIR Rec. 647
They support (in genlock mode) a sampling rate from 28 to 96 kHz. In master mode, the unit can be
set in one the following sampling rates: 32, 48 and 96 kHz.
6.1.4. Headphone output (front panel)
This output (6.35 mm jack on front panel) is for the connection of a 32  headphone. It is also
possible to plug a high impedance headphone; however, the maximum available power will be lower.
6.1.5. Ethernet Interface
This RJ45 socket has standard Ethernet pinout (for use of a normal “straight” cable to an Ethernet hub
or switch). The interface normally operates in 100BaseT full-duplex mode, with auto negotiation, but it
is possible to force other configurations.
The installation and operation of this function is detailed in 3.4, Initial setup of the Ethernet interface.
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6.1.6. Main X24/X21/V11/V35 interface
The X24/V11 interface uses a 15-pin male Sub-D connector. The following table shows the pinout.
Signal
Pin
Frame ground
Transmitted data
Ta
Received data
Indication
Received clock
Ra
Ia
Sa
Electrical ground
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
Signal
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
Tb
Transmitted data
Rb
Ib
Sb
Received data
Indication
Received clock
The codec does not transmit a C signal, and the I signal has no effect.
The codec can also be connected to a V35 interface; a specific adaptation cable is needed in such
case. The connection is described in Annex (7.4, V35 interface adaptation).
6.1.7. “Alarm + X24/X21” interface
This interface uses a 15-pin male Sub-D connector. The following table shows the pinout.
Signal
Internal alarm - Common
Transmitted data
Internal alarm - NC
Received data
Indication
Received clock
External alarm - NO
Electrical ground
Pin
IA-Com
Ta
IA-C
Ra
Ia
Sa
EA-O
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
Signal
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
Tb
IA-O
Rb
Ib
Sb
EA-C
EA-Com
Transmitted data
Internal alarm - NO
Received data
Indication
Received clock
External alarm - NC
External alarm - Common
The bold text refers to the alarm contacts. Both are form-C type. The “NO” terminal is open when the
alarm is set, otherwise it is connected to the “Common” terminal. The “NC” terminal is connected to
the “Common” terminal when the alarm is set, otherwise it is open.
The current and voltage handling capabilities of the relays (static type) are:
Maximum output current:
120 mA
Maximum output voltage:
350 V peak
Resistance of output loop:
< 35 
Isolation
> 1500 VRMS
The codec does not transmit a C signal and the I signal has no effect.
The codec can also be connected to a V35 interface; a specific adaptation cable is needed in such
case. The connection is described in Annex (7.4, V35 interface adaptation).
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6.1.8. ISDN interfaces
These interfaces are not available for all versions.
The sockets are ISDN S0 interfaces (BRI), the supported protocols are ETSI (Euro RNIS), NI-2 or NTT.
Socket #1 has a slightly different pinout, as contacts 1 and 2 (unused on a standard ISDN socket) are
allocated to the POTS interface.
6.1.9. POTS/PSTN interface
Interface available as an option.
The telephone interface (2 wires) is combined with the ISDN socket #1, using contacts normally
unused of the S0 socket. The pinout on this socket is as follows:
Line
POTS
ISDN
Pin
Signal
1
POTS line
2
3
T+ (transmission)
4
R+ (reception)
5
R- (reception)
6
T- (transmission)
7
-
8
-
An adapter cable is provided with the POTS option, in order to ease the installation. This adapter
features on one end an RJ45 plug, to be inserted in the ISDN socket #1 of the SCOOP 5. On the
other end it features a small block with two sockets:


An RJ45 socket, to be connected to an S0 line (BRI) using a « straight » RJ45 cable;
An RJ11 socket, to be connected to the POTS telephone line.
6.1.10. Antenna sockets (mobile networks)
Available on units equipped with the “wireless” option. See also chapter 2.1.5: Mobile network access.
These sockets are used to connect one or two antennas (one multiband antenna is included with the
mobile network option).
The interfaces are male SMA (female contact), 50  impedance.
The internal mobile access module can operate in following bands:
Frequency band
2G
GSM/EDGE
3G/3G+
UMTS/HSDPA/HSUPA/HSPA/HSPA+
850 MHz
900 MHz
1800 MHz
Specific versions exist for access to 4G/LTE networks (contact AETA).
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1900 MHz
2100 MHz
6.1.11. Serial remote control interface
This interface uses a 9-pin female Sub-D connector on the rear panel. This is a V24/RS-232 type
interface with only Tx and Rx signals (no flow control). The following table indicates its pinout (DCE
type pinout).
Pin
Function
2
Rx
V24 data to the PC
Output
3
Tx
V24 control data, from the PC
Input
5
Ground
Other
Not connected
The interface is configured as follows: 4800 bauds, 8 bits, no parity, one stop bit.
6.1.12. Serial data interface (“Data”)
This V24 interface uses a 9-pin female Sub-D connector on the rear panel. Like for the remote control
interface, only Tx and Rx are used, there is no flow control, and the pinout is of DCE type.
Broche
Fonction
2
Rx
Received V24 data
Output
3
Tx
Transmitted V24 data
Input
5
Ground
Other
Not connected
The data interface is configured as follows: 8 bits, no parity, one stop bit, no flow control. It is possible
(see menu Tools / Misc / Aux. Functions) to activate the interface and to configure its baud rate
(300 to 9600 bauds). However, the maximum allowed baud rate depends on the audio coding used
(see 2.4, Auxiliary functions).
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6.1.13. Relay transmission interface (“AUX” socket)
The relay transmission interface (refer to 2.4.1, Transmission of isolated relays) is available on the
25 pin female sub-D “AUX” Socket. It includes two isolated current loop inputs and two dry contact
outputs.
The following table shows the pinout of the socket for this function:
Pin
Function
13
Output loop n°2 (b)
25
Output loop n°2 (a)
12
Output loop n°1 (b)
24
Output loop n°1 (a)
11
Input loop n°1 (b)
23
Input loop n°1 (a)
10
Input loop n°2 (b)
22
9
Input loop n°2 (a)
+5V of internally supplied power supply
21
0V of power supply
All loops are isolated and bi-directional (free polarity).
The characteristics of the input loops are:
Input loop control current:
6 mA
Resistance of input loop:
 560 
Input loop isolation:
> 1500 VRMS
(max. 100 mA)
(current limiting series resistor)
A +5V to +12V source may be connected directly on an input loop, because the internal series
resistor is dimensioned for this purpose. For a higher voltage source, it may be necessary to limit the
input current.
The characteristics of the output loops are:
Maximum switching voltage:
350 V peak
Maximum switching current:
120 mA
Resistance of output loop:
< 35 
Output loop isolation:
> 1500 VRMS
The 5V power supply is available from the unit to power a low-consumption device (maximum
300 mA current consumption), e.g. to power the input loops or LED indicators connected to the
output loops.
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6.1.14. Loop control interface (“AUX” socket)
The 25 pin female sub-D “Aux.” socket includes isolated current loop inputs and dry contact outputs,
that can be used to remotely control the calls and indicate the link status:

The input loops have an effect only if the “loop control” function is enabled (see 3.5.3, Loop
control). The output loops are always operative.

Activating the input loop #1 triggers an ISDN or IP call on the codec (codec 1 only if the unit
is configured as a double ISDN codec); de-activating the loop releases the line.

Activating the input loop #2 triggers an ISDN call on codec 2 if the unit is configured as a
double ISDN codec; de-activating the loop releases the line. This loop has no action in single
codec mode.

Output loop #1 is closed while an ISDN or IP connection is running, or while codec 1 is
linked if the unit is configured as a double ISDN codec;

Output loop #2 is closed while an ISDN connection is running on codec 2, if the unit is
configured as a double ISDN codec;
The following table shows the wiring of the socket for this function:
Pin
Function
17
Input loop n°2 (a)
5
Input loop n°2 (b)
18
Input loop n°1 (a)
6
Input loop n°1 (b)
19
Output loop n°2 (a)
7
Output loop n°2 (b)
20
Output loop n°1 (a)
8
Output loop n°1 (b)
21
9
0V of power supply
+5V of internally supplied power supply
All loops are isolated and bi-directional (free polarity).
The characteristics of the input loops are:
Input loop control current:
6 mA
(max. 100 mA)
Resistance of input loop:
 560 
Input loop isolation:
> 1500 VRMS
(current limiting series resistor)
A +5V to +12V source may be connected directly on an input loop, because the internal series
resistor is dimensioned for this purpose. For a higher voltage source, it may be necessary to limit the
input current.
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The characteristics of the output loops are:
Maximum switching voltage:
350 V peak
Maximum switching current:
120 mA
Resistance of output loop:
< 35 
Output loop isolation:
> 1500 VRMS
The 5V power supply is available from the unit to power a low-consumption device (maximum
300 mA current consumption), e.g. to power the input loops or LED indicators connected to the
output loops.
6.1.15. Coordination channel interface (“AUX” socket)
In addition to the loop control and relay transmission interfaces, the (optional) coordination channel
input and output are available on the 25-pin female sub-D connector (“AUX” Socket on the rear
panel), with pinout as indicated hereunder.
The input and output are balanced floating signals, transformer isolated.
Maximum level:
9 dBm
Impedance:
600 
Nominal bandwidth:
300 – 3400 Hz
106
Pin
Function
1
Coordination channel output (-)
14
Coordination channel output (+)
2
Frame ground
15
Coordination channel input (+)
3
Coordination channel input (-)
16
Frame ground
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6.1.16. “Digital I/O” interface
This 15 pin female sub-D socket provides the GPIO signals described in 2.4.2, Transmission of
GPIO. The pinout is shown in the following table:
Pin
Function
Signal and power ground
1
9
2
GPI 3
10
3
GPO 3
GPI 4
11
4
GPO 4
GPI 5
12
5
GPO 5
GPI 6
13
6
GPO 6
GPI 7
14
7
GPO 7
GPI 8
15
8
GPO 8
+5V of internally supplied power supply
Note: the GPIO index starts at 3 because indexes 1 and 2 are allocated to the relays (see above in 0).
The GPIO signals do not have galvanic isolation as the relays. They feature the following
characteristics:
Characteristics
GPI: voltage (low level, active)
Min
Nominal
Max
-0.5 V
0V
1V
GPI: current (@ 0 V)
Notes
110 µA
GPI: voltage (high level, inactive)
3V
5V
7V
GPO: voltage (low level, active)
0V
0V
0.55 V
GPO: current (low level, active)
[1]
32 mA
GPO: voltage (high level, inactive)
5V
6.5 V
[2]
[1] An input pull-up ensures a high level if the GPI are “open” (not connected).
[2] The GPO are “open drain”, and must be “pulled up” (to 5 V nominal) for the high level, but an
internal pull-up ensures a 5 v voltage when they are inactive, even with no external polarization.
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6.1.17. AC power supply
The unit is connected to mains via an IEC 3 pin socket, and accepts a 85-263Vac, 47-63 Hz AC
source. Protection is provided by a resettable fuse.
6.1.18. DC power supply (option)
When the 12V DC option is installed, the unit features, in addition to the mains socket, a 4 pin male
XLR socket for connecting a 12 V DC supply (non isolated). The unit includes overvoltage and
overcurrent protection (resettable fuse on the DC input).
The DC supply is redundant with mains power, with priority to mains whenever it is present [1].
Characteristics
Min
Nominal
Max
Notes
Supply voltage
10 V
12 V
17 V
[1]
Supply current
0.5 A
2A
[2]
[1]: Beyond 15 V the DC supply takes precedence, and provides power to the unit even if AC power is
available.
[2]: The power consumption may vary in a wide range depending on the input voltage, the installed
options, and the operating mode.
Connections on the XLR socket: Ground is connected on pin 1, and pin 4 must provide the +12 V
voltage.
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6.2. Audio performance
The audio performance in this part applies to the system without coding/decoding, and excluding the
coordination channel. The additional effect of the audio encoding and decoding on audio
performance depends on the coding algorithm used and its parameters.
Except when differently stated, the following measurements are done at a +6 dBu input level and on
the AD/DA path, with maximum input and output level set at +16 dBu.
6.2.1. Transmission gain
The drift in time of the gain from the input to the output of the codec is less than  0.3 dB.
6.2.2. Amplitude-frequency response
All measurements are done with a +6 dBu input signal, and a reference frequency of 1020 Hz. The
measurements are done with a loopback before coding/decoding, so the possible effect of
compression has no influence.
For a 48 kHz sampling rate:
Frequency range
Tolerance
0 Hz
20 Hz
-
0 dB
20 Hz
40 Hz
-0.2 dB
0.1 dB
40 Hz
20 000 Hz
-0.1 dB
0.1 dB
For a 32 kHz sampling rate:
Frequency range
Tolerance
0 Hz
20 Hz
-
0 dB
20 Hz
40 Hz
-0.2 dB
0.1 dB
40 Hz
15 000 Hz
-0.1 dB
0.1 dB
6.2.3. Group delay distortion
Taking the minimum group delay as reference, the group delay distortion on the AD/DA path is
always less than 1 ms.
6.2.4. Idle channel noise
Background noise is measured with no audio modulation (idle channel), with maximum input and
output level set at +16 dBu, through the whole encoder-decoder chain (wide band coding, with 48 or
32 kHz coding frequency).
Maximum noise level1:
- 56 dBm (quasi-peak detection, CCIR weighting)
(or - 62 dBq0ps)
This result in a signal to noise ratio (SNR) of more than 72 dB.
When the maximum input and output level is set at another level, both the signal and noise levels are
shifted but the SNR remains in the same range.
1 Worst case for all types of algorithms; MPEG performs better than the others
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6.2.5. Total distortion vs frequency and level
Total distortion relative to maximum level (or THD + N) is less than –82 dB over the whole audio
bandwidth (20 – 20 000 Hz). This performance holds for audio signals from –80 dB to –1 dB relative
to the maximum level (+16 dBu).
6.2.6. Crosstalk
Crosstalk is less than -80 dB over the whole bandwidth.
6.2.7. Gain and phase difference between channels
The gain difference between channels is less than  0.3 dB over the whole bandwidth, for any
sampling frequency.
The phase difference between channels is less than  3 degrees over the whole bandwidth, for any
sampling frequency.
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6.3. Network protocols and ports
The SCOOP 5 implements or complies with the following protocols (non exhaustive list):





Physical and link layers: Ethernet, 100BaseT, 10BaseT
Network/Transport layers (IPv4): TCP/IP, UDP/IP, RTP/IP
Application: HTTP, Telnet, DHCP, STUN, NTP, SYSLOG
Audio transmission: SIP signalling, SDP, RTP, RTCP, RFC3550/3551, RFC3640
Compliant with EBU recommendation Tech 3326 (interoperability of audio codecs for
contribution)
The ports used by the device are the following:
Type
TCP
UDP
Port
Designation
Dir
Notes
80 HTTP

Embedded html server
6000 Control

Remote control (“command line” mode);
used by Scoop4Man and TeleScoop
123 NTP

For querying an NTP server
514 SYSLOG

For sending messages to a SYSLOG server
3478 STUN

For querying a STUN server
5004 RTP

For audio streaming
5005 RTCP

For audio streaming
5060 SIP

SIP signalling
6000 Multicast/description

Multicast stream description channel
6001 Multicast/audio

Multicast stream transmission channel
Ports shown in bold can be changed from the default values shown in the table.
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6.4. Power supply
The codec operates from mains 85-263Vac, 47-63 Hz.
As an option the product can also be powered from 12V DC source.
The maximum power consumption is 20 W (depending on version and installed options).
6.5. Dimensions and weight
The unit is a 19 inches frame of 1U height (44 mm or 1.75”) and 265 mm overall depth (12.5”).
Its maximum weight is about 3.8 kg (depends on version and installed options).
6.6. Environmental characteristics
The equipment operates over a 0°C to 45°C ambient temperature range (32°F to 113°F), and a 5%
to 90% humidity ratio range.
The SCOOP 5 complies with “CE” directives regarding safety and EMC.



Safety: compliance with EN60950
EMI: radiated emissions complying with EN55103-1
Susceptibility: compliance with EN55103-2
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6.7. Options
The basic version of SCOOP 5 includes digital leased line interfaces (X24/V11/V35) and an Ethernet
interface for IP transmission. Many available options can be added to complement the capabilities of
the SCOOP 5.
 Note: for IP or leased line transmission, and when the application does not require a front panel
interface, AETA also proposes the SCOOP 5 IP, which features a front panel with no control
element and is controlled only by remote. For more information refer to AETA web site and the
dedicated documentation for this product.
6.7.1. Network options
For adding more types of network interfaces, the following options are available:
Ordering code
Option
Description
80 00 211 01
2B ISDN
Addition of one ISDN interface, for 64 or
128 kbit/s transmission (1 or 2 B channels)
80 00 211 02
4B ISDN
Addition of two ISDN interfaces, for 64 to
256 kbit/s transmission (1 to 4 B channels)
80 00 193 21
Wireless
Addition of the mobile network access
80 00 193 01
POTS codec
Addition of the POTS/PSTN interface
80 00 193 31
Wireless + POTS codec
Mobile and POTS interfaces
6.7.2. Other options
Ordering code
Option
Description
80 00 192 51
AAC
Addition of AAC coding algorithms: AACLC, HE-AAC and HE-AAC v2
80 00 192 01
TDAC
Addition of the TDAC codec
80 00 194 01
12V DC power
Additional 12V DC power supply input
80 00 196 01
Coordination channel
Auxiliary coordination channel
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6.8. Accessories and related products
The SCOOP 5is delivered with a mains cord and a CAT5 Ethernet cable.
The POTS option includes a cable adapter which splits the ISDN socket #1 into an RJ45 socket
(ISDN) and an RJ11 socket (POTS).
The “wireless” option is delivered with a multiband antenna, with a 3 m cable and an SMA plug.
An adapter is available if needed for using a µSIM card instead of a standard SIM card.
Along with the coordination channel option, a specific cable is delivered, which provides XLR plugs for
the coordination channel input and output (input on a female plug, output on a male plug).
For remote controlling SCOOP 5 units from a PC, the TeleScoop configuration and supervision
software is available (for a Windows computer). The TeleScoop software also allows to control the
other rackmount codecs of the Hifiscoop, Scoop 3, Hifiscoop 3 and Scoop 4+ ranges.
SCOOP 5 can also be controlled by several third-party software tools such as Codec Live,
MDC.Net...
For an additional Ethernet interface, usable for remote control from a separate sub-network, it is
possible to plug on the USB socket a USB/Ethernet adapter, such as the LogiLink UA0144.
 Other compatible devices may be available later, in which case you can find them on our web
pages; consult our site www.aeta-audio.com .
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7. Annexes
7.1. Additional information on the algorithms and protocols used
7.1.1. Auxiliary data in the MPEG frames
The auxiliary data are used for the following purposes:



Reed-Solomon error detection and correction (J52 standard)
Data channel
Other auxiliary information: relay transmission, and/or auxiliary audio channel.
The insertion of this auxiliary information is an extension (AETA proprietary format) to MPEG.
However, the frame structure remains compliant.
7.1.2. Reed-Solomon encoding
In order to cope with possible transmission errors in the network, Reed-Solomon error correction
coding can be added, compliant with J52 recommendation. Four correction modes are available in
the SCOOP 5:


Mode 0: no error correction, Reed-Solomon coding disabled


Mode 2: protection of the whole frame, moderate (2.5 %) redundancy
Mode 1: protection of only the control information and scale factors in the MPEG frame, low
redundancy
Mode 3: protection of the whole frame, high (10 %) redundancy
Higher redundancy increases the protection against errors, but slightly degrades the audio quality, as
redundancy takes up part of the bit rate that could be allocated to audio coding.
Most often, for a normal quality transmission link, mode 1 is sufficient and it consumes little bit rate
from the compressed data, so it hardly impacts the audio quality. Although J52 does not apply to
leased line connections, this error protection technique is also implemented in the SCOOP 5 in leased
line mode.
7.1.3. H221 framing
H221 defines a framing structure that allows byte synchronisation recovery in leased lines, and the
transmission of control data along with the main data.
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7.2. Overview of the SIP protocol
7.2.1. What is SIP?
SIP is for Session Initiation Protocol, a protocol specified by the IETF for establishing media
transmission sessions. SIP is considered the communication protocol of the future by most vendors,
and as such it has deep influence on the VoIP applications.
As a signalling protocol, SIP brings methods and techniques to solve the issues related to the
establishing of an audio link. Almost as important, it is a recognised standard, implemented on many
network devices and systems. Using SIP helps you build modular and really evolutive systems, not
being tied to a single vendor.
The SIP protocol is an essential requirement in the EBU Tech 3326 recommendation (a.k.a. “N/ACIP”
recommendation, from the name of the EBU workgroup who elaborated it).
7.2.2. Setting a link with SIP
Let us look at an example (diagram below): a reporter on the move with a Scoopy+1 wants to make a
call to a SIP compliant codec located in the main station. The reporter may be at home, or at another
location, not necessarily known in advance.
Once the Scoopy+ is on and connected to the network, it will register itself  to a SIP “registrar”. This
registrar can be located on the LAN of the radio house, but it may as well be elsewhere in the
network. Then the registrar “knows” where the Scoopy+ is, what its IP address is. On the radio house
side, a similar process takes place .
To call the codec of the radio house (e.g. a SCOOP 5), the reporter just needs to know its SIP
address, which can be like studio12cod@radiomcr.com (indeed very similar to an e-mail address). To
call the unit, the reporter has to select the preferred audio coding mode on the Scoopy+ (e.g. mono
G722), then call the remote unit, simply using this SIP address (SIP URI).
IP telephone
SIP
proxy server
Gateway
4
IP
network
2
3
1
Gateway
Gateway
SIP
registrar
Scoop 5
5
Scoopy+
Figure 7 – Setting up an SIP session with server(s)
1 Scoopy+ is a portable audio codec from AETA; the description here applies to both Scoopy+ and the Scoop 5, as they are both SIP
compliant and mutually compatible
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What happens then on the network: the Scoopy+ sends the request  (INVITE in SIP protocol) to a
proxy server (often the same device is also the registrar). To make things simple, this proxy then relays
and routes the request  to its destination. Resolving the SIP URI to a physical network and address
uses mechanisms similar to those used for resolving URLs. Several proxys may be involved in cascade
to finally reach the desired destination, but this does not have to be known or dealt with by the end
devices. The following is like the initiation of a phone call: the IP codec “rings”; if it accepts the call,
this is notified to the Scoopy+.
At this stage, the proxy (s) provide the Scoopy+ and the IP codec with all the address data they need
for the link, then the actual audio streams can be exchanged  between both units. As a very
important feature, the end devices now can exchange data directly; the proxies do not have to be on
the path, they are only involved in the setting (and later the ending!) of the session. The codecs will
automatically exchange their coding capabilities, and agree on a coding mode, with no further user
intervention.
Alternatively, the call can be done from the station to the reporter, in a way very similar to the above.
In contrast with ISDN links, the operators at the station do not even need to know where the reporter is
located! This is because the registrar deals with this issue.
Note that it is also possible to set a link with a SIP-compliant VoIP phone instead of another codec.
This is one of the numerous advantages of using a standard.
7.2.3. Setting a link without a SIP server
Contrary to a commonplace but wrong idea, the SIP protocol does not impose using a SIP server. The
SIP protocol can be used without a SIP server, i.e. it is possible to set “peer to peer” links without
involving one or more SIP registrars or proxies. In such a case the process is more direct, and the
codec contacts the remote destination with no intermediate entity. However, there are some
drawbacks with such type of session:

Without a registrar, the identification of the destination is its IP address; this is not as “stable”
as a SIP URI, as it may change depending on the location, or time (with dynamic addressing).

The two codecs must have open access to the Internet, or otherwise the link must be made
possible by unlocking if necessary the appropriate routes and ports (conversely, when using a
proxy, such allowances can be restricted to the server connection, for a better control on the
access security).

Most often the gateways perform address translation (NAT), which is an a priori issue for UDP
protocols such as implemented for real time audio links. Proxies can help dealing with this
issue, but without such servers it may be rather difficult to work around such obstacle. The
following chapter provides some recommendations about this.
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7.3. Some methods to deal with NAT routers and firewalls
Problems arise when the desired connection has to go through a NAT router, and/or a firewall, that
blocks a direct IP communication.
This is a very common issue, especially if one needs to set up a transfer via the Internet. It is
impossible here to describe in details the possible ways to deal with this problem, but the following
just shortly discusses some typical solutions. Most probably, a network administrator should be
consulted for support, and for granting adequate network authorisations and/or privileges.
The most classical issues are related to:


The presence of a NAT router on the network path between the codecs.
The presence of a firewall on this path.
It is always important to have available the information regarding the network organization and to be
allowed to access the devices which need to be configured. Hence we highly recommend to involve
the persons empowered for such tasks.
7.3.1. Links via a private network
No special problem should be met within a LAN. The operation is also possible with codecs from
other manufacturers, provided that they comply with the Tech3326 EBU recommendation (also known
as “N/ACIP” recommendation). However you should check for specific settings or preparation
possibly needed on such devices.
A wide area network covers a wider geographic range, and the network topology most probably
includes routers on the path between the codecs to be linked. However, usually there is not much
difference with a local area network.
Note: using a VPN leads to just the same case; the operation is identical as far as the codecs are
concerned.
7.3.2. Links through a public network (Internet)
If each of the units has got a “direct” access to Internet with a public address, we are in the same
situation as the previous one, functionally speaking (private WAN). The addressing scheme is normally
static, as DHCP can rarely be used on a public access. In fact, this situation is very seldom met in the
field!
First, the Internet access is usually protected by a firewall which will, as a principle, block a priori the
desired connection. In such case exceptions (to the firewall security rules) must be created, that will
allow this connection; this has to be done by the person in charge of the network management.
Most often, on one access if not both, the codec accesses the Internet via a NAT router. This router
shares Internet access, with one or a few public addresses, among the equipment on the LAN. On this
LAN the devices get local private addresses, and the router carries out an IP address translation. Note
that:

As an example, a consumer ADSL modem-router is almost always a NAT router, sharing a
single public IP address between the devices connected to the router.

It is just the same on a 3G/3G+ mobile IP access; the terminals (phones or computers)
access the Internet via NAT routing.

NAT routing is often included in the firewall features; in fact NAT routing somewhat
participates to the protection against direct attacks from the outside.
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NAT routing is an obstacle to transmission with UDP, mainly for two reasons:

It does not allow unsolicited data to come in from the outside network. In other words, data
input is accepted on a port as an answer to a request from the local network, but an external
agent cannot directly initiate the transmission of a packet.

The terminal units on the LAN only know their private local address. On the other hand,
agents implementing the SIP protocol have to communicate to each other the addresses and
ports to be used for the media exchanges. Because of the NAT routing, agents do not get the
real public addresses, which leads to failure of the session setup attempts.
We are now looking at various methods used to overcome these obstacles.
NAT and use of a STUN server
The STUN protocol is a method which is often successful1 in helping the agents to discover their
public address even when they are “hidden” behind a NAT router. Here is the operation principle:



A STUN server is used, which is accessible over the Internet;
The address of this server is programmed into the agent (i.e. the audio codec in our topic);
The agent queries the server and discovers its public IP address and port number, as seen
from outside of the NAT router and LAN;

This addressing information is then used by the agent for negotiating and setting up a media
session.
The STUN server address is programmable in the menu or the html pages of a SCOOP 5 or
Scoopy+. Besides, there is also in the menu (keypad and display on the front of the unit) an
enable/disable (on/off) selection, without having to clear the server address.
There are many public STUN servers available on the Internet; here are a few examples, valid at the
time of writing:
Domain name
Numeric address
stun.aeta-audio.com
85.214.134.163
stun.ekiga.net
77.72.174.163
stun.sipgate.net
217.10.68.152
Examples of STUN servers
It is recommended to check that the server is operative. Moreover, numeric addresses may change,
even if the domain name stays the same. A list of servers can also be found on the support page of
our web site http://www.aeta-audio.com.
1 Although not with so called “symmetric” NAT routers
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119
Standard NAT router
Situation: codec A behind a NAT router with no specific programming (a codec accessing Internet via
a mobile network is almost always in such situation).
Besides, we assume that the other codec (B) is accessible with a public address.
Once codec A is configured for using a STUN server:


codec A can initiate a connection to (call) codec B
codec B cannot call codec A
Advantages
Drawbacks
Configuration is relatively simple
B cannot call A
No change is needed on the router
Several codecs can be set behind the NAT
router
Method suitable for mobile network access1
NAT router with DMZ
Situation: codec A behind a NAT router and placed in « DMZ ».
We also assume that the other codec (B) is accessible with a public address.
Once codec A is configured for using a STUN server:


codec A can initiate a connection to (call) codec B
codec B can call codec A, using the public address of the NAT router
Advantages
Drawbacks
Each codec can set up a session
Need to configure the router
A is nearly equivalent to a codec with a Only one codec can be set up in this way on a LAN
direct public access
A is exposed to external attacks
The DMZ may be already reserved for other network
equipment
Method not possible for a mobile network access
NAT router with port forwarding
Situation: codec A behind a NAT router and configuration of the router to forward to A the necessary
ports.
We also assume that the other codec (B) is accessible with a public address.
Port forwarding to be set on the router2:


UDP 5060 (= SIP port)
UDP 5004 (RTP port) and 5005 (RTCP port)
1 Except with symmetric NAT, which is often met for mobile network access
2 If needed you can change these numbers on the SCOOP 5
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Once codec A is configured for using a STUN server:


codec A can initiate a connection to (call) codec B
codec B can call codec A, using the public address of the NAT router
Advantages
Drawbacks
Each codec can set up a session
Need to configure the router
A is nearly equivalent to a codec with a direct Only one codec can be set up in this
public access
way on a LAN
Method not possible for a mobile
network access
Use of a SIP server
In addition to the numerous features it brings along, using a SIP proxy server is a very powerful
method to solve the issues related to NAT routers, because most SIP proxies are capable to detect the
presence of NAT routers and/or deal appropriately with their traversal.
If a SIP server is available, and once the codecs are registered on this server:

Any registered codec can call another registered1 codec, regardless whether there is or not a
NAT router on the path.

The identifier (SIP URI) is stable and does not depend on the location of the called agent
(“mobility” feature).
It is possible either to use a public server on the Internet, or to install a private server accessible via the
Internet.
Advantages
Each codec can initiate
Each codec can receive calls
Drawbacks
a
session Installation may not be easy (private
server)
Identification is simple and location/time-wise
stable
Reliability of server questionable (public
server)
Security: a private proxy can be linked with a
firewall
Also works with symmetric NAT routers
Interoperation with telephony over IP
Method suitable for mobile network access
 For a fast implementation, you can use SIP accounts on AETA’s SIP server sip.aeta-audio.com. This
server is dedicated to a professional broadcast usage, and housed in a safe site, available 24/7.
Contact AETA for subscribing SIP accounts.
1 Depending on the access control policy, a server may accept « outgoing » calls to third party domains, or accept « incoming » calls from
non registered agents.
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7.3.3. Summary and reminder of essential rules
The table below sums up the situations where a link can be set up (not using a SIP proxy server) and
reminds the needed specific settings:
Codec A
access
Possible
calls
Codec B
access
Notes
1
LAN


LAN
(same)
2
Private WAN


Private WAN
3
Internet direct


Internet direct
4
NAT

Internet direct
STUN needed for A
5
NAT + DMZ


Internet direct
STUN needed for A
6
NAT + port
forwarding


Internet direct
STUN needed for A
UDP ports 5004, 5005,
5060
7
NAT

NAT + DMZ
STUN needed for A and B
8
NAT + DMZ


NAT + DMZ
STUN needed for A and B
9
NAT + port
forwarding


NAT + DMZ
STUN needed for A and B
UDP ports 5004, 5005,
5060
10
NAT

NAT + forwarding
STUN needed for A and B
11
NAT + DMZ


NAT + forwarding
STUN needed for A and B
12
NAT + port
forwarding


NAT + forwarding
STUN needed for A and B
UDP ports 5004, 5005,
5060
 Basic rule: Codec behind a NAT router => use a STUN server.
This allows the codec to set up outgoing calls. This is not sufficient to be accessible to connection
requests from the outside.
 Mobile network access without SIP server or VPN => use a STUN server
 NAT + DMZ
or NAT + forwarding => incoming calls are possible.
Incoming calls are not possible behind a NAT router without either such change or a SIP proxy.
 SIP server => maximum versatility, at the expense of some initial effort (for installation)
 Reminder: the SIP protocol (always used by AETA codecs) does not impose the use of a SIP server.
Codecs can set up point-to-point links using this protocol in the above described conditions. When
no SIP registrar is involved, the identifiers are simply the IP addresses of the codecs.
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7.4. V35 interface adaptation
This annex indicates the proper connections to use when interfacing the SCOOP 5 codec to DCE
equipment using a V35 interface.
In the connection table below, the three leftmost columns show the pin allocation on the 15-pin
connector of the codec.
The two columns on the right indicate the pinout on a 34-pin V35 connector or a 37-pin sub-D
connector. Consult the DCE documentation for other connector types.
Only the bold indicated signals need be connected; leave other pins unconnected. However, the
frame ground (pin 1) may be used for connecting the shield of the connection cord.
X24
Signals
G
Pin
8
15
7
14
Sa
Sb
Ia
Ib
Ra
Rb
6
13
5
12
4
11
3
10
Ta
Tb
2
9
1
Signal
direction















Function
V35 signal
Pin number
34-pin
37-pin
connector
connector
B
19
Signal ground
102
SG
Data clock
Data clock
115a
115b
RETA
RETB
V
X
8
26
Received data
Received data
104a
104b
RDA
RDB
R
T
6
24
Transmitted data 103a
Transmitted data 103b
Frame ground
TDA
TDB
FG
P
S
A
4
22
1
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7.5. Notice regarding open source code
The software of this product includes programs and libraries that are covered by the GNU General
Public
License
(or
"GPL"),
available
for
example
at
following
address:
http://www.gnu.org/licenses/gpl.txt . Under this license, the source code for concerned elements is
available on our Internet site ("Download" page); otherwise it can be obtained on request by e-mailing
AETA AUDIO SYSTEMS (open_source@aeta-audio.com).
The software also includes the sipX stack covered by the LGPL license.
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8. Index
4SB, ADPCM ............................................. 16, 20
H221 ............................................... 10, 16, 115
H242 ....................................................... 10, 16
HTML server.................................................... 83
5
I
5AS ........................................................ 1, 9, 63
Impedance ................................................... 100
A
J
AAC ....................................................... 17, 113
ADPCM .................................................... 16, 20
AES ............................................ 18, 29, 34, 100
Alarm ............................. 22, 25, 31, 42, 43, 101
Antenna ............................................ 11, 32, 102
Auto redial ................................................ 63, 94
Auxiliary functions ............................................ 93
J52 .................................................. 10, 16, 115
B
M
Backup ........................................................... 13
BRI ................................................................. 65
Master (AES interface mode)........................... 100
Monitoring ...................................................... 18
MPEG AAC............................................. 17, 113
MPEG Audio Layer 2 ....................................... 17
Multicast ............................................... 8, 71, 89
4
C
CELP .............................................................. 21
Clock.......................................................... 9, 18
Consumption (power) ............................. 108, 112
Coordination channel ... 21, 33, 63, 93, 106, 113,
114
Crosstalk ....................................................... 110
L
Local address .................................................. 65
Loop
Loop control ............... 22, 24, 33, 39, 94, 105
Test loop .................................................... 23
N
NAT ....................................................... 50, 118
NI-2 (protocol) .................................................. 9
NTT (protocol) .................................................. 9
D
P
Data channel ...................... 20, 33, 63, 103, 115
DC power ............................................. 108, 112
DCE, DTE ............................................. 103, 123
DHCP ............................................................. 36
Dimensions ................................................... 112
Distortion ...................................................... 110
Double codec .................................. 9, 14, 67, 86
Packet replication ........................................ 8, 51
Password ...................................... 34, 44, 80, 82
PIN code ...................................... 55, 74, 76, 91
Port (forwarding) ........................................... 120
Port(s) (TCP/UDP) .................................... 51, 111
Power supply................................................... 33
Profile .......................................... 23, 60, 79, 87
Protocol........................................................ 111
Proxy ............................................................ 117
E
EMC, EMI ..................................................... 112
Environment .................................................. 112
F
Factory settings .......................................... 34, 82
Firewall ......................................................... 118
G
G711 ............................................................. 15
G722 ......................................... 16, 20, 21, 116
Genlock ...................................... 18, 34, 59, 100
GPIO ..................................................... 20, 107
GPL, LGPL .................................................... 124
Group address ............................................ 8, 71
H
H.R. .............................................................. 112
R
Redial (auto) ............................................. 38, 63
Relays
transmission .......................... 20, 33, 104, 115
Remote control ................ 8, 24, 32, 36, 103, 114
Replication (packet) ..................................... 8, 51
Restricted access ................................. 44, 64, 80
S
SDP.................................................................. 8
Server ........................................................... 121
SIM card......................... 11, 32, 55, 74, 76, 114
SIP
protocol............................................ 7, 8, 116
registration................................................ 116
server ....................................................... 117
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125
URI ..................................................... 69, 116
SNR (Signal to Noise Ratio) ............................ 109
SPID (Service Profile Identifier) ........................... 65
SRT................................................................. 16
Standby .............................................. 25, 42, 44
Start up ........................................................... 44
STUN ............................................. 50, 111, 119
Sub-address ........................................ 46, 65, 66
Supervision ......................................... 22, 24, 32
Synchronisation ................................... 10, 16, 34
T
THD, THD+N ............................................... 110
U
Unicast ............................................................. 7
USB ................................. 12, 32, 48, 55, 76, 91
V
VoIP ............................................................. 116
VPN ............................................................. 118
W
Weight ......................................................... 112
TDAC ..................................................... 16, 113
Tech 3326 (N/ACIP) .............................. 111, 116
TeleScoop ............................................... 24, 114
Temperature.................................................. 112
Test loop ......................................................... 43
X
X21, X24 .................................................. 9, 101
NOTES
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AETA AUDIO SYSTEMS S.A.S.
IMMEUBLE KEPLER 4 – PARC TECHNOLOGIQUE
18-22, AVENUE EDOUARD HERRIOT
92350 LE PLESSIS ROBINSON – FRANCE
TÉL. + 33 1 41 36 12 00 – FAX + 33 1 41 36 12 69
http://www.aeta-audio.com
Specifications subject to change – All rights reserved by AETA AUDIO SYSTEMS
55 000 077 - A
February 2013