Yamaha | MSS1 | THE OFFICIAL PUBLICATION OF THE YAMAHA USERS

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THE OFFICIAL PUBLICATION OF THE YAMAHA USERS GROUP
FEBRUARY 1988
------
~TM
Editor
Tom Darter
-----
Operations
Sibyl Darter
Editorial Board
Bob Frye
Bill Hinely
Mark Koenig
J.P. Lincoln
Jim Smerdel
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February 1988
4
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Volume 4, Number 2
Issue #29
RX5
"Gate Snare," a new RXS voice edit by Robert Cavallo.
Cover Photograph
Jim Hagopian
Dee Dee Cawley
4
RX5
5
RX5
"Locust," a new RXS voice edit by Lil Crawford.
"Techno-Funk," a new RXS voice edit by Ken Como.
5
RX5
"Boomin' Bass," a new RXS voice edit by Joe Chila.
6
TX81Z
"ChorusCell," a new TXSIZ performance setup by
Scot Ragland.
7
TX81Z
"CymlsVoice," a new TXSIZ performance setup by
Chris Chen.
8
TX81Z
"WineGlass," a new TXSIZ voice by Craig Anderton.
9
TX81Z
"ParisDream," "PetalPiano," and "Bass Beast," three new
TXSIZ voices by Dan Van Oss.
10 DX11
An introduction to Yamaha's new multi-timbral FM digital
synthesizer. By Tom Darter.
AITERTOUCH is published monthly. Third class
postage paid at Long
Prairie, MN and additional
points of entry.
SUBSCRIPTIONS: Free.
Address subscription correspondence to AFfERTOUCH, P.O. Box 7938,
Northridge, CA 913277938. POSTMASTER:
Send form 3579 to P.O.
Box 7938, Northridge, CA
91327-7938.
2
14
Hot Tips
Reader tips for the RXll, REV7, FB-01, SPX90, MEP4,
and more.
18 FM Studies In NY
Information on a new, non-profit educational resource located
in New York City.
©1988 Yamaha Music Corporation USA. No part of this publication may he reproduced, stored m a retrieval system, or transmitted in any form or by any means,
electromcally, mechanically, photocopying, recording, or otherwise, without the pnor written permission of Yamaha International Corporation.
AITERTOUCH/Vol. 4 No. 2
Information & Services
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TOUCH is a
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Vol. 4 No. 2/ AITERTOUCH
3
ANewR X5
Voice Edit By
Robert Cavallo.
Notes:
Far different gated snare
sounds, try adjusting the following: Pitch in the range between -650 and -200 cents,
Decay 1 Rate in the range between 50 and 47, and Gate
Time in the range between
0500 and 0275 milliseconds.
Voice Name: Gate Snare
JOB •
02
03/1
03/2
03/3
03/4
03/5
03/6
04/1
04/2
. 05
06
ANewR X5
Voice Edit By
LU Crawford.
Notes:
Far sharter locust attacks,
adjust the Attack Rate parameter to a higher value.
4
AITERTOUCH/Vol. 4 No. 2
PARAMETER
02
03/1
03/2
03/3
03/4
03/5
03/6
04/1
04/2
05
06
lnt-SD 2
RANGE
-3600 ~ 2400
Pitch
1 ~ 99
Attack Rate
1 -99
Decay 1 Rate
1 ~ 60
Decay 1 Leve 1
1 99
Decay 2 Rate
1- gg
Re 1ease Rate
Gate Time
100- 6500
Bend Rate
-60- 60
1 ~ 60
Bend Range
0- 31
lnst Leve1
Sound Loop
OFF I ON
N
Voice Name: Locust
JOB •
Origin:
PARAMETER
NEW VALUE
-400 cent
99
50
53
80
no effect
0500 ms
00
00
31
ON
Origin: lnt-Sha ker
RANGE
-3600- 2400
Pitch
1- gg
Attack Rate
1 ~ 99
Decay 1 Rate
1 ~ 60
Decay 1 Leve 1
1 -99
Decay 2 Rate
1- gg
Re 1ease Rate
100 ~ 6500
Gate Time
-60- 60
Bend Rate
1 -60
Bend Range
0 ~ 31
lnst Leve1
Sound Loop
OFF I ON
NEW VALUE
-2400 cent
11
99
59
-82
60
6500 ms
47
+34
27
ON
Voice Name: Techno-Funk
JOB •
02
03/1
03/2
03/3
03/4
03/5
03/6
04/1
04/2
05
06
PARAMETER
RANGE
-
-3600 ~ 2400
Pitch
1-99
Attack Rate
1 -99
Decay 1 Rate
1 -60
Decay 1 Leve 1
1 -99
Decay 2 Rate
1-99
Re 1ease Rate
100- 6500
Gate Time
-60- 60
Bend Rate
1 -60
Bend Range
0-31
lnst Level
OFF I ON
sound Loop
Voice Name: Boomin' Bass
JOB •
02
03/1
03/2
03/3
03/4
03/5
03/6
04/1
04/2
05
06
Origin: lnt-Rim 2
PARAMETER
NEW VALUE
-500 cent
99
53
47
59
60
0450 ms
15
-24
31
ON
Origin: lnt-Tom 4
. RANGE
-3600- 2400
Pitch
1 -99
Attack Rate
1 -99
Decay 1 Rate
1 -60
Decay 1 Leve 1
1 -99
Decay 2 Rate
1 -99
Re 1ease Rate
100- 6500
Gate T1me
-60- 60
Bend Rate
1 - 60
Bend Range
0-31
I nst Leve I
OFF I ON
Sound Loop
NEW VALUE
-1600 cent
99
65
01
99
99
6500 ms
00
00
30
ON
ANewRX5
Voice Edit
By Ken Como.
Notes:
This voice edit works well as a
synth percussion sound, or as
a tecno-funk bass drum
sound.
ANewRX5
Voice Edit
By Joe Chila.
Notes:
For an even more incredible
sound, try this with a good
digital reverb.
Vol. 4 No. 2/ AITERTOUCH
5
TX81Z
ChorusCell.
ANewTX81Z
Performance
Setup By Scott
Ragland.
I
name: ChorusCell
assign mode NORM
micro tune select OCT.
effect select OFF
inst. number
Notes:
This TX81 Z performance
setup is based on three voice
patches: "BoxCello 2" (a
new voice), "BoxCello"
(from the TX81Z's internal
ROM bank B), and
"HarmoPad" (from the
TX81Z's internal ROM bank
B).
"BoxCello 2" is exactly Uke
the ROM voice "BoxCello,"
except for some changes in the
envelope generator for
Op #2.
This "ChorusCell" performance setup sounds good
playing fourths or fifths, or as
a melodic voice anywhere
across the range. 1t can also be
used for thick, powerful bass.
~
1: HarmoPad
2: BoxCello
3: BoxCello 2
5:
6:
4:
8:
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
number of notes
3
voice number B28
receive ch.
1
key limit /L C-2
key limit /H G 8
3
B19
1
C-2
G8
2
!01
1
C-2
G8
0
!01
0
!01
0
!01
0
!01
4
5
6
7
C-2
G8
C-2
G8
C-2
G8
C-2
G8
0
!01
8
C-2
G8
detune -2
note shift +0
volume 99
out assign LR
lfo select
1
micro tune OFF
+0
+0
99
+3
+0
99
LR
VIB
OFF
+0
+0
99
LR
VIB
OFF
+0
+0
99
+0
+0
99
+0
+0
99
+0
+0
99
LR
2
OFF
1
OPERATOR~0~
~=-~~~.
on/off ON ON ON ON
out level 99 58 81
72
freq. type RTO RTO RTO RTO
fix range 255 255 255 255
freq. coarse
8
8 22
4
freq. fine
o o o o
detune +0 -3 +3 +3
.......:·1·;..... T......:·2·;.... 'T......:·i·;.... 'T......;·4·:.......
2 . 00 ! 2 . 00 ! 7 • 00 ! 1. 00
ENVELOPE------------~
attack rate 11 12 17 28
decay 1 rate 10 18 16
4
decay 1 level 15 13
9
14
decay 2 rate
o 1 0 0
release rate
5
4
11
6
eg shift OFF OFF OFF OFF
SCALING/SENS - - - - - . .
rate
2
0
0
0
level
5 21 12 15
ams on/off OFF OFF OFF OFF
sans eg bias
o 0 0 0
key vel
1
1
2
0
6
AFTERTOUCH/Vol. 4 No. 2
7:
LR
LR
LR
LR
VIB
OFF
VIB
OFF
VIB
OFF
VIB
OFF
voice name: BoxCello 2
algorithm no. 3
feedback 6
LFO-------------------,.
waveform~
sync OFF
delay
6
speed 29
amp mod depth 0 sans o
pitch mod depth 15 sans 5
FUNCTION-----------~.
mode
portamento
porta time
......... vol
POLY mid C = C 2
FULL rev rate 5
pb range 4
0
99 ......... pitch o
amp 0
~pitch o ;
eg bias o
......... amp o
L....... p bias +0
~ p!~~ ~
:(i'
TX81Z
Cymls Voice.
ANewTX81Z
name: CyrnlsVoice
I
assign mode NORM
micro tune select OCT.
effect select OFF
inst. number
1 : Male Voice
5:
2: Synballs
3:
6:
4:
8:
II
D31
1
C-2
G8
detune +2
note shift +0
volume 59
out assign LR
Ito select
1
micro tune OFF
-2
+0
99
R
2
OFF
4
5
6
7
8
0
I01
3
C-2
G8
0
I01
0
I01
0
I01
C-2
G8
0
!01
5
C-2
G8
0
I01
8
C-2
G8
+0
+0
99
+0
+0
99
LR
LR
VIB
OFF
VIB
OFF
4
OPERATOR~0~1 -=~~~~~
on/off
out level
freq. type
fix range
freq. coarse
freq. fine
detune
ON
95
60
RTO
RTO
j 5.00
ON
ON
59
50
RTO RTO
4
+0
+0
99
LR
VIB
OFF
6
7
C-2
G8
C-2
G8
+0
+0
99
+0
+0
99
LR
LR
VIB
OFF
VIB
OFF
+0
+0
99
LR
VIB
OFF
Notes:
This TXBI Z performance
setup is based on two voice
patches: "Male Voice" (a
new voice) and "Synballs"
(from the TXBIZ's internal
ROM bank D).
voice name: Male Voice
algorithm no. 4
feedback 1
255 255 255 255
13
16
0 63
o o o 15
+0
-3
+3 +0
·······:·1·~·····T······:·;a·~······l
4.00
ON
7:
3
2
number of notes
4
voice number I01
receive ch.
1
key limit /L C-2
key limit /H G 8
Performance
Setup By Chris
Chen.
.......
:·:;·~···
j 0.50
...l....... ...... .
~·~·:
j 27.57
ENVELOPE------------~
attack rate 14
11
15
31
decay 1 rate
o 2 2 0
decay 1 level 15 15 15 15
decay 2 rate
1
3
4
0
release rate
6
1
1
4
eg shift OFF OFF OFF OFF
SCALING/SENS -------..
rate
o 0 0 0
level
8
13
35
44
ams on/off OFF OFF OFF OFF
sens eg bias
o o o 0
key vel
3
o o 0
LFO------------------~.
sync
waveform C:...v
delay
speed 10
amp mod depth 1 sens
pitch mod depth 5 sens
ON
7
o
6
FUNCTION------------~
mode POLY mid C = c 2
portamento FULL rev rate o
pb range 5
porta time o
:........ vol 99 ......... pitch o
amp o
~pitch 0 '
......... amp o
eg
0
~pitch 3 :........ p b1as +0
l~ amp o
fJJ
~ias
Vol. 4 No. 21 AFTERTOUCH
7
TX81Z
WineGlass.
ANewTX81Z
Voice By Craig
Anderton.
1
-=~~~~~
OPERATOR~0~
on/off
out level
freq. type
fix range
freq. coarse
freq. fine
detune
ON
99
ON
91
ON
52
RTO
RTO
RTO RTO
255 255
8 25
255 255
8 36
o
0
+3 -3
o
o
-3
+3
i
2 . 00
voice name: wineGlass*
algorithm no. 5
feedback 0 '""='"---.. ~~~
·······:·1·;······1·······:·2·;······1·······:·:;·;······1·······;·~·:·······
2 . 00
i
8. 00
i
12 . 00
LFO------------------~.
ENVELOPE------------~
3
8
8
3
attack rate
5
9
7
1
decay 1 rate
o
12
12
decay 1 level 12
o 1 o 5
decay 2 rate
4
4
4
4
release rate
eg shift OFF OFF OFF OFF
SCALING/SENS -------,
3
rate
level 50
ams on/off ON
0
sens eg bias
2
key vel
1
64
ON
1
3
64
50
ON OFF
0
1
0
4
0
1
1
~~~~~.
OPERATOR~0~
on/off ON ON ON ON
75
84
99
out level 99
RTO
RTO
RTO
RTO
freq. type
fix range 255 255 255 255
10 31
22
freq. coarse 22
o 0 8 8
freq. fine
+2 -2
-2
detune +2
waveform~
sync OFF
o
delay
speed 8
3
sens
34
depth
amp mod
pitch mod depth 8 sens 3
FUNCTION--------- --,.
mode POLY mid C = C 3
portamento FULL rev rate 5
pb range 4
porta time o
;········ vol 99 r······· pitch 0
~pitch 0 ~ amp o
......... amp o :
eg ~ias 96
:........ p btas +0
~ p!~~ ~
voice name: ParisDream
algorithm no. 7
feedback 7
·······:·1·;·····T······:·2·;······1·······:·:;·;······1·······;·~·:·······
7. 00
i
7. 00
1 3. 50 i
10. 50
ENVELOPE----------- ---,
attack rate 14
decay 1 rate 15
decay 1 level 13
decay 2 rate 12
7
release rate
eg shift OFF
31
19 31
. 11
10
9
11
10
10
11
12
12
7
6
6
OFF OFF OFF
SCALING/SENS - - - - - - .
1
0
0
0
rate
o o 0 0
level
ams on/off OFF OFF OFF OFF
o 0 o 0
sens eg bias
2
2
o 2
key vel
8
AFTERTOUCH!Vol. 4 No. 2
LFO------------------~.
waveform~
speed 26
sync OFF
delay 0
amp mod depth 0 sens o
pitch mod depth 5 sens 4
FUNCTION------- --..
mode POLY mid C = C 2
portamento FULL rev rate o
pb range 1
porta time o
:-······· vol 99 r······· pitch 0
amp o
~pitch o A
......... amp o ~eg ~ias 0
:........ p btas +0
~ p!~~ ~
TX81Z
0 1
OPERATOR
on/off ON
out level 99
freq. type RTO
fix range 255
freq. coarse
0
freq. fine
0
detune +2
ParisDream,
PetalPiano, and
Bass Beast.
Three New
TX81Z Voices
By Dan Van
Oss.
voice name: PetalPiano
ON
59
ON
67
ON
87
RTO RTO RTO
255
0
0
-2
255 255
4
0
0
0
-3 +2
algorithm no. 2
feedback o
·······:·i·~·····T······:·;a·~·····T······:·;;·~·····T······~·~·:·······
0. 50
j 0. 50
j 0. 50
j 1. 00
LFO------------------~.
ENVELOPE
attack rate 19 19 29
29
decay 1 rate
5
6
8
8
decay 1 level
3
10
10
9
decay 2 rate
7
7
7
7
release rate
6
6
6
6
eg shift OFF OFF OFF OFF
SCALING/SENS
rate
1
1
0
0
level
0
0
87
0
ams on/off OFF OFF OFF OFF
sens eg bias
0
0
0
0
key vel
2
0
7
0
OPERATOR~0~1 ~~~=-~~.
on/off ON ON ON ON
out level 97
7 4 90
99
freq. type RTO RTO RTO RTO
fix range 255 255 255 255
freq. coarse
0
8 13
0
freq. fine
0
o o 0
detune -2
-1
+3 +1
waveform~
.speed 28
sync OFF
delay 8
amp mod depth 0 sens o
pitch mod depth 4 sens 3
FUNCTION----------------,.
mode POLY mid C = C 4
portamento FULL rev rate 6
pb range 2
porta time o
:········
vol 99 r······· pitch 0
amp o
~pitch o
:........ amp 0 ~eg ~ias 0
~pitch so :........ p b1as +0
L ..... amp o
A
voice name: Bass Beast
algorithm no. 3
feedback 4
·······:·i·~·····T······:·;a·~·····T······:·;;·~·····T······~·~·:·······
0. 50
j 2. 00
j 4 . 00
j 0. 50
LFO--------------~-----,
ENVELOPE-------~.
attack rate 16
decay 1 rate
5
decay 1 level 13
decay 2 rate
3
release rate
6
eg shift OFF
11
3
5
8
9
15
8
10
4
3
3
5
3
5
9
48 OFF OFF
SCALING/SENS - - - - - - - - ,
rate
o 0 1 0
level
o 0 56 34
ams on/off OFF OFF ON OFF
sens eg bias
o 0 0 0
key vel
o 2 2 2
sync
waveform ~
delay
speed 28
amp mod depth 6 sens
pitch mod depth 4 sens
ON
6
3
4
FUNCTION----------------,.
mode POLY mid C = C 3
portamento FULL rev rate o
pb range 2
porta time 0
:········
vol 99 ········· pitch o
amp 0
~pitch o
:........ amp o ~eg ~ias 0
:........ p b1as +0
A
~ p!~~ ~
These TX81Z
voices and per~
formances can
also be loaded
into the new
DXll FM digi~
tal synthesizer.
Vol. 4 No. 2/ AITERTOUCH
9
DXll
An lntroduc ..
tion To
Yamaha's New
Multi..Timbral
FM Digital Syn..
thesizer. By
Tom Darter.
OX II FM digital synthesizer.
T
HE DX11 IS Yamaha's first fully multitimbral keyboard synthesizer. It combines
all of the features of the popular TX81Z FM
digital tone generator with a 61-note, velocitysensitive, aftertouch-equipped keyboard. Also,
like most Yamaha keyboard synthesizers, the
DX11 has both a Pitch Bend wheel and a
Modulation wheel, plus jacks that allow
connection of a Breath Controller, a Foot
Controller, a Footswitch, and a volume pedal.
The DXll And The TX81Z
The basic layout of both instruments is the
same. Like the TX81Z, the DXll has a 4-operator, 8-algorithm FM voice architecture. In
addition, the TX81Z and DXll are the only
Yamaha FM digital synthesizers that have
waveforms other than sine waves. Both give you
a choice of eight different waveforms, offering a
greater richness of timbre than ever before
available in a 4-operator unit. (See the accompanying diagram.)
Since the DXll has a full set of front panel
controls, all editing and utility features are
much easier to access than they are on the rackmount TX81Z. In addition, the DX11 offers
new parameters, new editing features, and
expanded memory options. (For more information on the basic layout of the TX81Z, see the
February 198 7 issue of AfterTouch.)
New Features
The DX11 offers one major new voice feature
10
and one major new editing feature as additions
to the basic architecture made popular by the
TX81Z.
The Pitch Envelope Generator lets you
change the overall pitch of the sound over time.
There are settings for three Rates and three
(pitch) Levels. Although not as complex, this
pitch envelope generator is patterned after
those featured on the DX7 and DX7 II.
The Quick Edit section allows you to make
overall adjustments in the sound of a voice.
There are four basic parameters:
•
•
•
•
Attack
Release
Volume
Brilliance
Attack and Release adjust the Attack Rate,
Decay 1 Rate, and Release rate of all operators
equally. Volume adjusts the Output Level of all
carriers. Brilliance adjusts the Output Level and
Decay 1 Rate of all modulators.
Memory
The internal memory of the DX11 hold 128
voices in permanent ROM (Read-only memory), plus space for another 32 userprogrammable voices in RAM (random-access
memory). To expand your voice library quickly,
you can also load voices from a TX81Z, DX21,
DX27, or DX100 into the DX11. Since voices
from the DX21 family use only sine waves, you
can load them into the DXll and experiment
AITERTOUCH!Vol. 4 No.2
--------
--
- -
---------------
Effects
with different waveforms to enrich the basic
sounds.
In addition, the DXll has a cartridge port
(unlike the TX81Z), which houses a Yamaha
RAM4 cartridge. This gives you access to an
additional 64 voices and 64 performance
memories.
Like the TX81Z, the DXll offers three sets of
effects: Delay, Pan, and Chord. These are all
edited in the Single Utility mode.
For the Delay effect, the delay time, feedback
W2
Odd partials somewhat like a square wave
I
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
I
1
2
3
4
100
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
100
0
19
9
II
1
2
3
4
•
5
100
39
0
8
0
100 109
.
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
3
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
II
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
4
0
2
0
1
0
1
100
55
18
0
3
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
.
W5
Partials 2, 3, 5, 7, 9 .... (stronger partials than W4)
Second partial is stronger than fundamental.
2
I
W4
Partials 2, 3, 5, 7, .......
W3
Even partials.
1
OX II 's eight available
waveforms. The amplitude
(volume) of each harmonic
partial is given as a percentage
of the fundamental.
Continued on page I2
W1
Sine wave. Only fundamental.
I II
This chart shows the harmonic
content for each of the
I
•
3
4
5
6
7
8
56
0
15
0
6
0
.
.
9
10
11
12
4
0
2
0
W7
Partials 3, 4, 5,. 7, 8, 9, ... (no 2, 6, 10, .... )
I
1
2
3
4
5
6
100
0
56
50
15
0
II
I
.
W6
Partials 2, 3,. 5, 6, 7,. 9, 10, 11, ... (no 4, 8, .... )
Second partial is stronger than fundamental.
I II
1
2
100 116
3
4
66
0
I
.
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
34
25
6
0
3
4
1
0
W8
Partials 3, 4, 5, 7, 8, 11, .... (no 2, 6, 8, 10 .... )
7
8
•
9
10
11
12
6
9
4
0
2
4
•
I
•
I
1
2
III
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
100
0
66
74
34
0
6
0
3
0
1
0
•
Vol. 4 No. 2/ AFTERTOUCH
11
DXll
Continued
amount, effect level, and pitch shift amount are
all programmable. Although this effect sounds
like a digital delay, it actually creates the delay
effect by retriggering the voice at a lower velocity. This creates an extremely cleansounding delay. The pitch shift feature can be
set in semitone increments, so that the voice
will be transposed every time it is echoed.
The Pan effect moves the voice between output I and output II. Panning can be controlled
by the LFO, velocity, or MIDI note number. To
further enhance the effect, pan direction and
depth are also programmable.
Chord, the third effect, lets you set up a chord
(of up to four notes) and assign it to a single
note. Twelve different chords can be defined,
one for each note in the chromatic scale.
The DXll has memory to store four settings
for each of these three effects, for a total of
twelve possibilities. Each performance memory
can use one of these effect memories. The Delay
and Chord effects only operate on the first
instrument in a performance.
Microtuning
Another important aspect of the DXll is
that, like most members of Yamaha's new generation of electronic instruments, it comes
equipped with' both preset and programmable
microtuning data.
On many electronic instruments, only standard equal-tempered tuning is available. Most
acoustic instruments don't have this limitation.
This chart shows the 128
preset voices supplied with the
DXII in its ROM memory.
BANK A
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
32
12
Syn.Str 1
Syn.Str 2
Sy.Brass 1
Sy.Brass 2
Sy.Brass 3
Sy.Brass 4
Sy.Ensem. 1
Sy.Ensem. 2
Sy.Ensem. 3
Sy.Ensem. 4
Sy.Ensem. 5
Sy.Perc. 1
Sy.Perc. 2
Sy.Perc. 3
Sy.Perc. 4
Sy.Bass 1
Sy.Bass 2
Sy.Bass 3
Sy.Bass 4
Sy.Bass 5
Sy.Organ 1
Sy.Organ 2
Sy.Solo 1
Sy.Solo 2
Sy.Solo 3
Sy.Solo 4
Sy.Voice 1
Sy.Voice 2
Sy.Decay 1
Sy.Decay 2
Sy.Sitar
Sy.AftrTch
BANK B
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
32
DX7 EP
Old Rose
E.Piano 1
E.Piano 2
Grand PF
Upright
Flamenco
A.Guitar
F.Guitar
Banjo
E. Guitar
Mute Gtr
Harp 1
Harp 2
Harpsichrd
Clavi
Koto
Syamisen
Marimba
Xylophone
Vi be.
Glacken
Tube Bell
Toy Piano
Pizz. 1
Pizz. 2
E. Bass 1
E.Bass 2
E.Bass 3
Wood Bass
Bell
Steel Drum
BANK C
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
32
Strings 1
Strings 2
Ensemble 1
Ensemble 2
Violin 1
Violin 2
Cello 1
Cello 2
Brass 1
Brass 2
Trumpet 1
Trumpet 2
Trombone
Horn
Tuba
Sax 1
Sax 2
Wood Wind
Clarinet 1
Clarinet 2
Oboe
Flute 1
Flute.2
Recorder
Harmonica
E.Organ 1
E.Organ 2
E.Organ 3
E.Organ 4
P.Organ 1
P.Organ 2
Accordion
BANK D
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
32
AFTERTOUCH!Vol. 4 No.2
----------- - - - - - - - - - - - -
Bass Drum 1
Bass Drum 2
Snare 1
Snare 2
Tom 1
Tom 2
Tom 3
Tom 4
"Hi!" Hat!
Cow Bell
Agogo Bell
Wood Block
Castanet
SyBon
BoConga
Tom-Pany
SynGameran
Mouse- Tom
Carnival I
"Air" imba
SplashCiav
BamboBiock
Terror!
Wind Voice
GuiRoach::
Space BUG?
Passing By
Earthquake
TAP TAP<<<
Space Gong
RADIATION?
White Blow
For instance, when string players perform as a
section, they often deviate from strict equaltempered tuning. You can use the preset
microtuning scales to imitate these tuning
effects, or use the programmable memory locations to experiment with new tuning
possibilities.
The list price of the DXll is $995.00. Since
it combines the full multi-timbral capabilities of
the TX81Z with the expressive control of avelocity-sensitive keyboard, it offers a powerful
package that should be attractive to a wide
range of electronic musicians.
This chart outlines the contents of the 32 Performances
supplied in the OX II 's memory when it is shipped from the
factory. Before storing your
own performances, you may
want to save this data in an
available storage medium,
since it is not part of the
instrument's ROM memory.
Factory--set Performance Data
When the DX11 is shipped, the performance memories contain the following data.
1.
BRASS N01!
A03 Sy. Brass 1 doubled.
2.
Tight BASS
A16 synth bass doubled, B28 electric bass doubled.
3.
Glacken
Glacken with pitch shift delay effect, rising in perfect 4ths.
4.
Analog Str
Press down on the keyboard to move the stereo image.
5.
Hit 1 Key!
A four-note chord for each note, in two banks-- -one using the chord effect, and the other
using note shift.
6.
Power Rap
Noisy drums arranged across the keyboard.
7.
EP/Fiute
Electric piano (6-notes) and flute (2-notes), split at G3.
8.
Wind Band
This uses alternate assign mode. Various wind instruments alternate.
PROGRESS IV
Horn and synth strings (octave down)
10.
Syn Lead
Single voice layered for solos. Uses short delay effect.
11 .
LyricSplit
Classic guitar and oboe split at G3.
12.
Church
Two pipe organs layered.
13.
9.
Rotary Str
Strings with pan effect.
14.
Sax Solo
Two types of sax, two of each layered on each key. 2-note polyphonic.
15.
Floating?
Pan effect. Nice for sequencer arpeggios.
16.
Brastrings
Brass and strings.
17.
Rich Str
Smooth strings.
18.
Orchestra
"Orchestra hit" with brass, strings and timpani. Single-note only.
19.
FolkGuitar
Dual acoustic guitars.
20.
Synth BASS
Two types of synth bass, four of each on every note. Single-note only.
21.
Latin Perc
Various latin percussion arranged over the keyboard.
22.
Rich Horns
Stacked and detuned horns.
23.
Magic Slam
Delay effect. Bass drum on C2, snare on G4. Try the aftertouch.
24.
Tension
Chord effect, with high-tension chord.
25.
Hanky Tonk
Alternate assign to mistune alternate notes.
26.
B(R)ASS
Brass or Bass?
27.
"Fantasy"
Synth strings with white noise as you raise the modulation wheel.
28.
Power Solo
Short delay effect. 2-note polyphonic.
29.
Heavy Brass
Stacked voices for depth.
30.
Blues Time
C1- F2 has normally tuned bass. White keys G2- C6 play the blues scale. Black keys above
F2 play a jazzy chord C,F,G.
31.
Brass Band
Trumpet and trombone.
32.
I'm ZOMBI
Sound effects and percussion arranged across the keyboard.
Vol. 4 No. 2/ AFTERTOUCH
13
Hot Tips
Creating A "Quiet" Level For RX Series
Rhythm Units, Plus Other RX Tips
Reader Tips
For The RXll,
REV7, fB ..O1,
By Gints Klimanis
SPX90, MEP4,
And More.
REV7 digital reverberator.
Enhancing Synthesizer Sounds With The
REV7
By Mark Hannah
As many of you know by now, the Yamaha
REV7 digital reverberator has an almost endless
number of possibilities for use. Here are a few of
the tricks I use.
If you don't already have a digital synthesizer,
you can get an analog synthesizer to sound like
one by processing it through the REV7. For
example, to get that funky, popping bass sound,
try the following: First choose a good bass sound
on the analog synth. Next, set the REV7 on
preset #22 (Snare), and set the front panel
controls as follows:
50%-75% (according to
taste)
EQ
ON
EQ LOW Freq 100
(2 o'clock)
EQ LOW Level - 6
(10 o'clock)
1000
EQ MID Freq
(center)
(2 o'clock)
EQ MID Level + 6
EQ HIGH Freq 6000
(center)
EQ HIGH Level + 6
(2 o'clock)
Mix Control
With the REV7 set this way, the analog bass
patch has a whole new sound.
Another trick for use with the REV7 and a
synthesizer involves getting a realistic guitar
sound from a keyboard. Set your synth on a
bright brass voice, and adjust the decay of the
synth voice to match the decay of an electric
guitar. {It also helps to run the sound from the
synth through a distortion pedal and a compressor.) For a real fat rhythm sound, set the REV7
to preset # 24 (Reverse Gated Reverb); set the
EQ as desired, and set the Mix at 50%. Another
good choice is preset #5 (Early Reflections 1).
You will find that, with preset #24, playing octaves for rhythm works best, while preset #5
works well with chords as well as octaves.
14
AFTERTOUCH/Vol. 4 No. 2
The sounds on the RXll, RX15, and RX21
drum machines have both an Instrument Level
and an Accent Level. Most users set the instrument levels of the sounds at the optimum volume levels, and only use the accent function to
make the sounds louder.
Although the user cannot change the Accent
function to reduce volume, he or she can simulate this effect in a roundabout fashion. The
desired "quiet" volume should be the basic
Instrument Level, and the Accent Level should
equal the "optimum" level.
To optimize your RX machine, adjust the
relative instrument volume levels by ear until
your kit sounds good, but make sure that at least
one instrument volume level is at its maximum
value to get a good signal-to-noise ratio. Write
down these values. Find the desired "quiet"
level by decreasing each Instrument Level.
Then, use the Accent Level to adjust the accent
value for each instrument until the numerical
sum of the decreased Instrument Level and the
Accent Level equals the original optimum level.
Optimum levels are played with the Accent
switch down, and quiet levels are played without the Accent switch. The settings will vary
with the application, but the difference between them should be noticeable.
For many applications, the closed hi-hat
quiet and accent levels at 01 are a little louder
than I would like. Since I only have the facilities to use one mix output, I further decrease the
closed hi-hat level by panning most of it into
the unused mix output. The level decrease to
the last position before full pan is significantly
greater than the change between the other pan
positions. At this pan value, the closed hi-hat
has a very usable and easily adjustable instrument level range.
Precise level adjustment over a usable limited
range is more useful than coarse level adjustment over an unused maximum range. Every
instrument should have its range reduced if its
accented level never need the provided maximum level.
A different application for the Accent function is changing the relative levels for the
sounds in performance. For example, one song
may require a quiet bass drum and a prominent
snare, while the next may need a pounding bass
drum with the same sound, plus the same snare.
This bass drum level change could be done
automatically by setting the appropriate quiet
level for the first song, and programming an accented bass drum for the entire second song.
This method saves the second RXll bass drum
pad for a different sound and yet another level.
If the same pattern is used in several songs and if
memory permits, it would be worthwhile to
copy the pattern with the accented instruments
into another location.
When using the RXll Heavy Snare for your
main snare, a repeated snare fill may be
enhanced by assigning the Medium Snare
sound to the other SD pad and alternating between the two sounds. At the proper quiet and
accent levels, this two-snare combination will
not sound like a machine gun, because the
minor differences between the Heavy and Medium snares will simulate a drummer's alternating stick fills.
An easy method to modify RX11 claps,
snares, and so on is to quickly retrigger the
sound several times. First, record the part. Set
Quantize on OFF, and carefully overdub several
times, trying to hit the original dub right on unless you are going for a specific groove shift.
Chances are excellent that you will not be perfect, and well-placed retriggers will sound better. A shift from quiet to accent and vice-versa
is interesting for moderate to extended
retriggers with large quiet/ accent level differences and at various quantize values. In addition, experiment with layering different sounds.
If a few retriggered strikes are bad, stay in
Real Time Record (with Quantize OFF), and
erase only the incorrect ones by pressing and
holding Clear and pressing and holding that
instrument pad just before the hit. Release the
held instrument immediately afterward, or the
rest of the part for that instrument will be erased
as well.
Although not mentioned in the manual, RX
drum machines can be programmed to perform
nested repeats. Nested repeats reduce redundant programming. For example, enter Song
Edit mode and enter these pattern numbers:
Part
000
001
002
Pattern
00
01
02
Now, after Part 002, program a Loop repeat
(Loop 1) as follows:
Repeat to
001
RXII digital rhythm
programmer.
#of Times
3
When you have done so, the display will show
the song part and pattern that is to begin the
repeat. Now, after Part 002, program another
Loop repeat (Loop2) as follows:
Repeat to
000
#of Times
3
Advance the song by two steps to verify that the
Loop2 repeat has been placed after the Loop 1
repeat. It is intuitive to program the Loop2 repeat and "insert" (not Insert) the Loop1 repeat,
but the RX will not yield the correct order when
programmed in this way.
To automate your Song tempo changes, place
a very short blank measure at the end of each
song with the appropriate tempo change. To
prevent any accidents, keep the tempo slider
either all the way down or all the way up, and
set the initial tempo using the increment/
decrement switches.
A quick way to "rewind" to the beginning of
a song in Song Edit mode is to hit the Edit
switch twice.
When an RX11 receives MIDI clock data
from a Roland TR909, the RX11 automatically
switches to the MIDI clock sync. There is no
need to set this option manually. The RX11
Continued on page 16
Vol. 4 No. 21 AITERTOUCH
~-~-----
----------
------------
-~--------------
-----
---
---
15
Hot Tips
eomm.,d
responds to its Local Start Stop commands only
when there is no MIDI clock data at its MIDI
input.
Camber Chimes and Impossible .Glissandos
Using The RX17 And The fB,01
By Martin Willett
I once needed to replicate the sound of camber chimes (the percussion instrument made up
of many hanging rods, often played in a rapid
glissando, ascending or descending in pitch),
but found that when either miking the real
thing or trying to run a finger up the keyboard, I
could never be precise enough.
Here's a way to obtain a nice, bright glissando chime sound and be able to keep control
over its exact length and tempo, using the RX17
and the FB-0 1:
First, in "dual" configuration mode on the
FB-01, set voice #1 as 3/20 (Glocken) and
voice #2 as 6/36 (Glockn2); set the octave at
+ 1 for both instruments, and set the pan and
detune as desired.
Set MIDI receive on the FB-01, and MIDI
transmit on the RX17 to the same channel, and
bring down the audio output from the RX17
(we'll just be using the FB-01 audio). Now,
write a pattern in Step Write mode by simply
hitting the instrument buttons in order of pitch,
ascending or descending as desired. (Remember, you'll have to hit each instrument key twice
in Step Write mode; once to designate the
instrument, and once to play it.) The May 1987
issue of AfterTouch lists the factory preset MIDI
key number assignments. If you are using these
key numbers, you'll have to toggle between
"upper" and "lower" a few times.
Now that you have a steady pattern, you can
use it as is, or use it with an accelerando pattern
(or even increase the tempo manually on the
fly) for a more realistic sound.
FB-0 1 FM digital tone
module.
This technique, used with various FB-01
voices-especially in the keyboard bank-gives
you the ability to perform "impossible"
glissandos at breathtaking speed. And, if your
basement or garage studio lacks crickets of its
own, call up voices 7/31 (Huffsyn) and 7/48
(SinceWav) and up the tempo-instant insects!
At any rate, I've found it handy to retain one
or two of these ascending or descending glissando patterns in the RX17's memory.
Setting Up Brass Sounds With the DX7 and
fB,01
By Michael Le
I own a DX7 and an FB-01, and I have
recently discovered a perfect way of stacking up
a couple of brass patches from these two instruments to emulate the rich harmonic texture of a
brass ensemble.
First, I use a patch called Lead Brass from side
A of DX7 ROM cartridge 4 (Orchestral &
Percussive Group). Next, I combine this patch
with two additional brass patches from the FB01: I call up the "single" configuration on the
FB-01 and call up these patches with the following settings:
Instrument # 1:
Voice Bank 5, #12: HardBr4
Notes: 4
MIDI channel: 1
Out level: 105
Octave: +2
LFO: on
Detune: 0
Instrument #2:
Voice Bank 5, .#10: HardBr2
Notes: 4
MIDI channel: 1
Out level: 97
Octave: 0
LFO: on
Detune: 0
After I've entered the system settings above, I
am able to play three different kinds of brass
instruments simultaneously from my DX7 keyboard, and can always use the volume slider on
the DX7 to control its volume and set the bal-
16
AFTERTOUCH/Vol. 4 No.2
MEP4 MIDI event processor.
ance to suit my taste.
I hope you have as much fun with this patch
as I do.
different way to create a velocity switch and use
only one processor. I enter the following in the
Data Modifier section of the relevant Processor:
0: MSG: 9n.xx.yy
1: OFS: yy,v= -50
New Uses For The MEP4
By John Honig
I recently purchased a Yamaha MEP4, and I
have found it to be very much like the joke
about the closet space-once you have it, you
can find more and more uses for it. I have a
remote keyboard controller going into the
MEP4's MIDI IN, and I have an analog synthesizer, a TX7, and a TX81Z connected to
three of the MEP4's MIDI OUTs. On many
tunes, I like to kick in one of the keyboards at a
certain velocity level (a velocity switch). Generally, the way to do this is to limit the velocity
parameter in the Data Modifier section of a Processor, to select the range of key velocities a
given tone generator is to accept. For example,
if I want a power brass section voice to come in
only on strongly played notes, I would have the
following commands in the Data Modifier portion of the Processor controlling that voice:
0: MSG: 9n.xx.yy
1: LIM: xx,50<D<7F
The problem with this setup is that any note
with velocity greater than 50 will remain on
(the dreaded MIDI stuck-note syndrome), because most manufacturers (Yamaha included)
use a 9n.xx.OO (Note On with velocity 00) as a
Note Off command instead of 8n.xx. yy. To get
the note to turn off, I would have to use another
processor, go into the Message Filter, and filter
out everything except Note Off data. Since I
would rather not dedicate an entire processor
just to turn off occasional notes, I've found a
By pure luck(?), it happens that a Note On
with negative velocity is just as good as a Note
Off, and this technique only uses one processor,
freeing up another to do more interesting things
like delays, adding harmonics, and so on. Like
most good things in life, there is a slight catch
h.ere. If you use this technique for a voice, you
find that hitting the keyboard at the velocity to
which you are accustomed will not give you the
results to which you are accustomed. One fix is
to put in another line in the Data Modifier:
2: EXP: yy,R=2 (or4)
It then may be hard to tell the difference between the velocity you are now required to use
and the velocity you normally use.
Another interesting feature about negative
velocity allows you to make controlled duration
echoes (or delays). Pick out a bell-like voice or
any voice that has a decay independent of Note
Off, and try setting up the Data Modifier as
follows:
0: MSG: 9n.xx. yy
1: OFS: yy,V= -40
2: OFS: yy, V = 40
Since the processor assigns yy = 00 (I think) to
negative velocity data, Command 2 will give a
Note On even when the key is struck with a velocity less than 40. Command 2 will also give a
Note On command when the key is released. By
varying the OFS parameters, you can adjust the
relative balance between the primary note and
the echo.
Continued on page 19
Vol. 4 No. 2/ AITERTOUCH
17
FM Studies in NY
Information On
ANewEduca..
tional Resource
Located In New
York City.
18
A
FTERTOUCH READERS may wonder
./""\..where they can go to learn more about the
many Yamaha products covered in these pages.
Naturally, the nearest authorized Yamaha dealer
will be a good source for information. Now
there's also the Center for Electronic Music, a
unique non-profit organization based in New
York City-a valuable new resource for all
Yamaha product owners and users. CEM offers a
number of special services to the public, including a wide variety of regularly scheduled seminars and workshops on a broad range of topics,
from "Introduction to MIDI" right on up to
"Digital FM Programming" and "Sampling and
Samplers." What's more, you can stop by and
simply work with any of the products in the
facility on your own, for a nominal charge. The
Center has an impressive collection of state-ofthe-art synthesizer and MIDI equipment,
including many Yamaha products.
Special one-day seminars in the programming and use of the Yamaha DX7 II FD/D,
TX81Z, and WX7 MIDI wind controller are
presented each month, and private instruction
is also available. The Center also provides consultations-both on and off premises-for the
user who isn't sure what to buy, or who needs
assistance with his or her setup. In addition, a
free manufacturer's clinic is also presented each
month. Recently, Yamaha Product Specialist
Phil Clendenon hosted an entertaining evening
of music and demonstration of the latest
Yamaha MIDI products before an appreciative
audience.
CEM's enthusiastic and well-trained staff-all
working professionals-are also constantly
involved in a number of research projects. For
example, they have recently completed a comprehensive survey of MIDI software for four
major computers; this study is currently available as the "Compact Guide to MIDI Software"
series of books, from AMSCO Publications.
In the large and comfortable classroom area,
clients can work on their own or with staff assistance with any piece or pieces of equipment,
one at a time or configured into a custom system. Preproduction services are also availablefor instance, many CEM clients choose to create demo tapes with the complete Yamaha
"home studio" workstation (consisting of a
DX100 synthesizer, QX5 sequencer, RX17 drum
machine, and MT2X 4-track cassette deck).
The CEM facility also includes an impressive
state-of-the-art S-track recording studio, which
AITERTOUCH!Vol. 4 No.2
utilizes Yamaha MC2404 and DMP7 mixing
boards, with the DMP7 automated under the
control of a QX3 sequencer and DMP7 Pro software running on a Macintosh computer. For clients creating audio for video, a Yamaha MSS1 is
used to allow complete synchronization of
SMPTE and MIDI signals. At the heart of the
studio is a KX88 MIDI keyboard controller driving an impressive rack of gear, which includes
both TX802 and TX81Z tone generators.
The founder and director of CEM is Howard
Massey, an educator, composer, producer I engineer, and author of numerous articles and books
on the subject of music technology (including
The Complete DX7 and The Complete DX7 II).
He explains, "the basic philosophy here is to try
and make the technology accessible to the
public at large. Our focus is education, and,
since we're not a store, we can offer clients
complete, objective, unbiased information
about the state of the art and the best products
out there. We like to think of ourselves as being
a center for information-a place where anyone
can stop in and learn about this complex and
rapidly expanding field in a comfortable, creative environment."
He continues, "Yamaha has long been on the
leading edge of music technology, and so it was
very important to us to have their support.
We're very glad that our clients have the opportunity to work with so many new Yamaha products, and to see for themselves just how welldesigned and user-friendly these products really
are. And, as the state of the art inevitably
advances, we plan on keeping pace by continually featuring the newest and best instruments
available."
What lies ahead for CEM? During the coming year, they plan on implementing three new
programs: 1) an outreach to the disabled program that will provide access to equipment to
disabled individuals in their homes and in hospitals; 2) an artist-in-residency program that
will encourage outside artists to realize their
artistic goals at the CEM facility; and 3) a
scholarship program that will help to further
the organization's educational activities. A regular lecture series is also planned, where guest
speakers-experts in the field-will be invited to
speak on various topics of interest.
For more information about CEM, write to
the Center for Electronic Music, 432 Park
Avenue South, New York, NY 10016; or call
212-686-1755.
Hot Tips
Continued fnnn page I 7
A Detune Flange Program For the SPX90
An Electric Drums Program For The SPX90
By P.J. Otto
By P.J. Otto
I have discovered a way to create flange
effects using the Pitch Change A program
( # 21) of the SPX90. The difference between
this effect and regular flange is that the sweep
will appear to rise or fall continuously, depending on how the FINE parameter is set.
Also, the effect is retriggered by each new note.
Start with Pitch Change A program, and set
the values as follows:
With this patch, you can use a rhythm
machine or even real drums to simulate the
popular sound of synthesized drums. The patch
uses the PITCH CHANGE A program (#21)
to drop the pitch of a percussion sound quickly.
Start with the Pitch Change A program, and
enter the following values:
PITCH: 0
FINE: 1 to 4 or - 1 to - 4
DELAY: 0.1
F. B. GAIN: 25% to 50%
BALANCE: 50%
PITCH: -2
FINE: 0
DELAY: 40.0
F. B. GAIN: 60%
BALANCE: 100%
Changing the PITCH to
direction of the effect.
+ 2 will reverse the
TET US HEAR FROM YOU! We want AfterTouch to be an information network
Lfor all users of Yamaha professional musical products, so please join in. We're
looking for many different kinds of material.
Have you created an incredible patch for the DX7 II, the DXlOO, or any of the
other members of the Yamaha FM digital synthesizer family? How about a program
for the CX5M II music computer or a great pattern or voice for the RX5? Send in
your patches, programs, and patterns. If we use your material, we'll give you full
credit plus $25.00 for each item used.
Have you discovered a trick that increases the musical flexibility of one of the
Yamaha AfterTouch products? Send it in to our "Hot Tips" column. If we use your
hot tip, you'll receive full credit plus a check for $25.00.
Have you developed a new approach to one of the Yamaha AfterTouch instruments, or have you discovered an important secret regarding their use? Put it on
paper and send it to us. Don't worry about your writing style-just get the information down. If we decide to use your material as a full article in AfterTouch, we'll
write it up, put your name on it, and send you a check for $100.00. (An AfterTouch
article always covers at least one magazine page-which translates to at least four
double-spaced pages of typescript.)
By the way, we cannot assume liability for the safe return of unused ideas,
patches, or manuscripts. We will only be able to return unused material if you enclose a self-addressed, stamped envelope with your submission.
If you just have a question regarding the use of Yamaha professional musical
products, send it along too, and we'll do our best to answer it in the pages of
AfterTouch. (We regret that we won't be able to answer questions through the mail,
but we will use all of your questions to guide us in our choice of future topics.)
Finally, if you just want to get something off your chest, or if you'd like to establish direct contact with other Yamaha AfterTouch product users, send in something
to our "Letters" column. We'll do our best to print names, addresses, and phone
numbers of all those who are interested in starting up regional users groups.
AfterTouch is your publication. Let us hear from you!
Write To:
AFTERTOUCH,
P.O. Box 7938,
Northridge, CA
91327-7938.
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