Eagle III Owner`s manual

YUKON
EAGLE
OWNER’S
MANUAL
•
•
•
•
Assembly
Installation
Operation
Repair Parts
Model No.
LWE-020
Yukon Eagle iII
Wood/coal Electric
fired central furnace
CAUTION:
Read Rules And
Instructions
Carefully For
Safe Operation
For your safety:
Do not store or use gasoline or other flammable vapors
and liquids in the vicinity of this or any other appliance.
IMPORTANT:
Installation must be made in
accordance with state and local
ordinances which may differ
from this installation manual.
Alpha American Co., 10 Industrial Blvd., Palisade, MN 56469
www.yukon-eagle.com
DAnger
risk of fire or explosion
Do not burn garbage, gasoline, drain oil, kerosene, thinners, etc.
WARNING
Risk of fire
- Firing door and ash door must be tightly closed during
operation.
- Do not operate with flue draft exceeding .03” W.C.
- Do not store flammable materials within marked installation clearances.
- Frequently inspect and clean heat exchanger, smoke pipe,
and chimney of soot and/or creosote.
- Do not connect this unit to a chimney flue serving another
appliance.
CAution
Black surfaces are hot
Keep children away. Do not touch.
TABLE OF CONTENTS
INTRODUCTION
Unpacking and Inspection...................................................... 5
Rules for Safe Installation and Operation.............................. 5
Furnace Specifications........................................................... 5
Locating the Furnace.............................................................. 5
Dangers - Caution - Fire Hazards.......................................... 5
Typical Installation.................................................................. 6
Clearances to Combustibles.................................................. 7
INSTALLATION
Lower Fire Brick..................................................................... 6
Upper Fire Brick..................................................................... 6
Door Handle........................................................................... 7
Ductwork Connection............................................................. 7
Damper Control...................................................................... 9
Smoke Baffles........................................................................ 8
Installing the Fan and Limit Control....................................... 8
Mounting Thermostat and Sub-base...................................... 8
Electrical Wiring............................................................... 10-11
Wiring the Furnace........................................................... 9
Connecting Smoke Pipe....................................................6-12
Draft Regulator Location...................................................... 12
Draft Regulator Installation................................................... 12
Proper Chimneys.................................................................. 13
Causes of Faulty Draft........................................................ .14
Fresh Air Duct Capabilities..............................................15-16
Combustion Air..................................................................... 16
OPERATION
Electric Heating Unit............................................................. 17
If Electric Heating Unit Fails to Operate............................... 17
Sequence of Operation........................................................ 17
Wood Firing the Unit............................................................ 17
Use During Power Failure or Furnace Fan Failure.............. 17
Coal Firing the Unit.............................................................. 18
Checks and Adjustments...................................................... 20
Furnace Blower Adjustment........................................... 20
Air Conditioning.............................................................. 20
Ductwork and Blower Speed Adjustment....................... 20
Testing Installations for Efficiency.................................. 20
Test Procedures............................................................. 20
MAINTENANCE
How to Prevent Rust and Corrosion.................................... 21
Cleaning the Chimney, Smoke Pipe and Heat Exchanger.. 21
In Case of Chimney Fire...................................................... 21
Creosote - Formation and Need for Removal...................... 22
Service Hints...................................................................24-30
Parts Breakdown.............................................................21-29
Areas of this manual refer to
Underwriters Laboratories (UL)
and the National Fire Protection
Association (NFPA).
UL & NFPA are non-profit organizations.
UL is the oldest and largest public safety testing laboratory in the world. All furnaces in this manual are Listed by UL. They have passed
all of the safety requirements in both the U.S. and Canada. The UL Listing label is also your assurance that UL employees inspect our
furnaces during the manufacturing process several times a year on an unannounced basis.
NFPA Codes, Standards, recommended practices, and guides referred to in this document have been developed through a consensus
process approved by the American National Standards Institute. State and local codes are adopted from these standards.
INTRODUCTION
This manual provides installation, operation and maintenance instructions and parts ordering information for the
combination electric/solid fuel fired furnace.
IMPORTANT
Please read all instructions carefully before attempting
installation of this unit. Installation should only be done
by a qualified installer.
UNPACKING AND INSPECTION
Inspect the unit for visible damage. The furnace is shipped in
two cartons. Contents of items shipped is as follows:
1. Carton One: The basic furnace comes in this crate
with the electric duct heater pre-installed. Inside
the furnace wood-firing door, the primary air draft
tube and a bag containing the wood firing door latch
assembly and handle, the ash door latch handle and
the ash door pull handle. Remove these items and
set aside for later installation.
2. Carton Two: This accessory package contains the
thermostat, subbase, barometric damper, fan and
limit control, damper control unit, transformer, wiring
and owner's manual.
RULES FOR SAFE INSTALLATION AND OPERATION
1. Read these rules and the instructions carefully.
Failure to follow these rules and instructions could
cause a malfunction of the furnace. This could result
in death, serious bodily injury and/or property damage.
2. Check your local codes. The installation must com
ply with them.
3. Use only the type of fuel approved for this furnace.
Over-firing will result in failure of heat exchanger
and
cause dangerous operation .
4. You must have a sufficient supply of combustion air
to the area in which the furnace is located. (page
16)
5. Factory Built Chimneys: Connect this furnace to a
chimney that complies with NFPA 211 3-1.2. Factory
built chimneys for use with wood-burning appliances
shall comply with the HT requirements of UL 103 or
CAN/ULC-S629-M87. This means you must install
what is referred to as type HT all fuel chimney.
Masonry Chimneys: Connect this furnace to a chimney that complies with NFPA 211 3-1.2. A field
constructed chimney of solid masonry units, bricks,
stones, listed masonry chimney units, or reinforced
Portland cement concrete that is lined with suitable
chimney flue liners and built in accordance with the
provisions of Chapter 4 of this standard.
6. Follow a regular service and maintenance schedule
for efficient and safe operation.
7. Before servicing, allow furnace to cool. Always shut
off electricity and fuel to furnace when working on it.
This will prevent electrical shocks or burns.
FURNACE SPECIFICATIONS
Electric Heating Element
Input Rating
Blower Size
Blower C.F.M.
Motor Size
Firebrick Lined
Cast Iron Grates
Wood Fire Door
Wood Combustion Chamber Size
4-stage, 20 Kilowatt
68,260 BTU/HR.
10” x 10”
800 - 1800
1/3 - 1/2 - 3/4 HP
2” THICK
YES
11” x 10”
24” x 16”
LOCATING THE FURNACE
Locate the furnace as close to the chimney and flue as possible and near the center of the heat distribution center.
Furnace should be located so that sufficient air is available
for proper combustion and ventilation. Location must comply
with minimum clearances required for fire protection and
accessibility. See Fig. 1, page 6 for typical installation. See
Combustion Air, page 16.
NOTE
It is recommended that a 2", noncombustible raised pad
be used for the furnace. This will prevent moisture from
getting under the furnace and causing corrosion.
DANGERS - CAUTION - FIRE HAZARDS
(Burn wood logs or coal only)
• Do not install a power humidifier on the warm air plenum.
• Do not load wood above the top of the bottom row of bricks.
Doing so will cause over-fire and damage to combustion chamber will result.
• Do not install on combustible floor.
• Load wood or coal carefully or damage may result to fire
brick.
• If an over-fire situation should occur, be sure ash door and
firedoor are closed. Turn thermostat down to close primary air
damper.
• In the event of a power failure, be sure ash door and fire door
are closed.
• In the event of a soot fire, call your fire department immediately.
Turn thermostat down to close primary air damper and make
sure ash door and fire door are closed.
INSTALLATION
Typical furnace installation is shown in Fig. 1. Place your furnace
in the pre-selected location, making sure it is level. Proceed as
follows:
READ ALL INSTRUCTIONS BEFORE INSTALLING
NOTE
If barometric damper control is installed horizontally, as
illustrated, it must be at least 18” from furnace flue outlet.
See Fig. 2.
LOWER FIREBRICK
1. Three 6” firebricks are set along lower rear of firebox.
2. Four 6” bricks are set in lower left and lower right of
firebox. These bricks should be pushed to the rear of the
firebox. See Fig. 6, page 9.
UPPER FIREBRICK
1. Three 6” firebricks are set along upper rear of firebox.
2. Four 6” bricks are set along upper left and upper right of
firebox.
3. All bricks should fit tightly together with no gaps between
them.
4. Brick retainers are tightened to hold bricks securely in
place.
Fig. 2
SECONDARY AIR INTAKE COVER
SECONDARY AIR SHUT OFF
1. Remove round secondary air shut off disc from plastic
bag.
1. Remove secondary air intake cover from accessory package and align over mounting holes located above fire door
assembly on face of furnace.
2. Screw disc to the intake cover just installed
Opening the disc when burning wood provides room air to the
round perforated tubes between the top and bottom row of firebrick, thereby causing secondary combustion of the unburned
wood gases as they leave the initial flame. This patented feature
increases wood burning efficiency up to 40% while reducing
smoke and creosote.
2. Insert 12 number 10 x 3/4 hex HD drill screws (furnished
with cover) through mounting holes and tighten.
DOOR HANDLE
Install door handle as follows: See page 9.
1. Remove handle assembly, machine screw and washer
from plastic bag.
2. Place machine screw through handle assembly.
3. Place washer over machine screw and fasten the handle
assembly to the door.
CLEARANCES TO COMBUSTIBLES
Above Top of
Warm Air Plenum
From the
Front
From Sides
and Back
From Chimney
Connector
6 Ft. of
Plenum
6 Ft. of
Plenum
6"
48"
18"*
18"
6"
1"
Up to 50% less clearance between combustible walls and
chimney connector to furnace and ducts is allowed if insulated according to NFPA Standard 90B or your local building
code. This copyrighted book is available from the National
Fire Protection Association Inc. P.O. Box 9101, Quincy, MA
02269-9101.
SMOKE BAFFLES
The smoke baffles are factory installed and must be
checked to see that they have not become dislodged
during shipping. Refer to Fig. 3 for proper installation
and, if necessary to reposition, proceed as follows:
1. Holding baffle in proper position, tilt rear up
to clear baffle mounting brackets.
2. Push baffle up to top of combustion chamber above all three brackets, level off , slide
left and lower onto mounting brackets.
3
3. Check to see that all three brackets are
engaged.
4. Repeat with second baffle, making sure baffles interlock as shown in Fig. 6. When properly installed, baffles will not move
more than 1/4" in any direction. Failure to have baffles properly installed will severely affect combustion efficiency.
­­­
INSTALLING THE HONEYWELL
FAN/LIMIT CONTROL
1. After attaching the warm air sheet metal plenum to the furnace, using the fan/limit control white mounting flange as
a template, place it on the top edge of the furnace casing
above the fire door so that the holes in the furnace casing and the flange are aligned with each other. Attach the
screws to secure the flange. (See Fig. 4)
2. Using the flange as a template, mark the center of the large
hole and the two smaller holes, remove the bracket and drill
a 7/8" hole and two 1/8" holes in the sheet metal plenum.
3. Replace the flange and reattach it with the mounting
screws.
4. Mount the fan/limit control ridged bracket (furnished with the
fan/limit control) with two 1/2 x 7 sheet metal screws.
4
5. Insert the fan/limit control into the bracket. Align so that it is
straight. Tighten setscrew to secure control.
MOUNTING THE THERMOSTATS
The thermostats must be mounted on an interior centrally located wall away from
direct sunlight and drafts and approximately 5 feet above the floor. It is not required
that they be level. Place them right next to each other.
Two Honeywell digital thermostats are furnished with all multi-level furnaces. The
larger thermostat controls your gas, oil or electric, whichever back-up fuel you have.
It offers one setting for the temperature you want the burner started in the event your
wood supply is not adequate to keep your home at its temperature setting. It also
has a night setback feature that allows you to keep a lower temperature at desired
times. This thermostat also controls the air conditioning, if applicable.
The smaller thermostat controls the wood/coal room temperature. It does not have
a night setback feature.
If you have no plans for air conditioning now or in the future, you will need a 3-wire
thermostat cable from your furnace to your thermostat. If you intend to install air
conditioning either now or in the future, a 5-wire thermostat cable is required.
TYPICAL THERMOSTAT SETTINGS
The wood thermostat (the smaller one) is set
on 74 degrees. The larger thermostat is set at
70 degrees. The night setback on the larger
thermostat is set at 66 degrees. The wood thermostat calls for heat first by opening the air to
the wood fire. It opens and closes automatically
to keep the temperature at 74 degrees. If you
run low or out of wood, the burner will come on
automatically when the temperature in the home
re­duces to 70 degrees, or if the thermostat were
in the set-back mode, the burner would not start
until it is called on at 66 degrees.
When the expensive fuel in burning, the wood
thermostat goes blank.
DAMPER CONTROL
Remove control from accessory box and install as follows:
1. Remove the four screws that hold the gasket to the DS-103
panel.
2. Mount the DS-103 to the draft tube using screws removed
above. Make sure gasket stays in place. (see Fig. 5, page 9)
3. Loosen the two screws located at slotted end of draft tube,
and remove remaining 10 screws. Make sure gasket stays in
place.
4. Mount DS-103 control and draft tube assembly to furnace as
shown in Fig. 5 (page 9.)
DS-103 DAMPER CONTROL
The T&T terminals are connected to the T&T terminals on the oil
burner. The R terminal is not used. The C terminal is connected to
the C terminal on the 24-volt transformer. Terminal 1 is connected
to the wood thermostat. Terminal 2 is connected to the burner
thermostat. When terminal 1 is energized by the wood thermostat, a relay on the circuit board energizes a solenoid that opens
a damper that supplies air to the wood fire. When terminal 2 is
energized, it closes this damper and energizes the T&T terminals,
which in turn energizes the burner.
ELECTRIC WIRING
All electrical wiring must be done in accordance with the National
Electrical Code and the code legally authorized in the area where
the installation is being made. The circuit protector device must
be located in a convenient place near the furnace. No lighter than
No.14 wire should be used in the furnace power supply circuit. All
furnaces covered by this manual and installed in the United States
of America operate on 115 Volts, 60 Cycle, 1-Phase Alternating
Current with a 15 amp Circuit Protector device.
5
WARNING
Turn off electric power at circuit protector device before making
any line voltage connections.
WIRING THE FURNACE
The furnace wiring is provided in harness form.
Mount the 4 x 4 junction box on 7/8 inch diameter opening on front
of blower compartment and secure with conduit connector and
lock-nut for blower motor lead conduit and least one screw.
Connect components as shown in wiring diagrams on pages 1011.
CAUTION
This furnace is not approved for use with aluminum wire.
ELECTRIC HEATING UNIT
The electric heating element circuit come pre-wired and assembled in a metal chassis in the furnace blower compartment, Fig.
8. Make sure the wiring form the junction box is connected to the
control terminal board and automatic reset switch as shown in Fig.
8 and 8A.
6
INSTALLING AIR CONDITIONING COIL
The coil should always be installed in the warm air plenum. The
metal condensate pan should be at least 2 inches above the
fan limit control probe so that the heated air flow direction is not
changed. The air flow needed for gravity operation in the event
of an electric power or furnace fan failure must not be restricted.
It is recommended that you install manual dampers along side of
the condensate pan that can be manually removed or opened for
winter operation.
Connect a 240 volt power supply to the power distribution panel as
in Fig. 8. Provide a good equipment ground.
NOTE
24 volt wires from a transformer to DS 103 and from thermostat to versatrol need not be enclosed in conduit unless
required by local codes.
10
11
INSTRUCTIONS FOR INSTALLING
FIELD R-C
BAROMETRIC DRAFT CONTROLS
CHOOSING THE LOCATION
Do not attach draft control to top or bottom of flue
pipe, nor in room separated from appliance.
Best location is as close to appliances as possible.
7
INSTALLATION
Important: Make these adjustments when installing.
VERTICAL FLUE:
1. Adjustment weight must be in RIGHT HAND SLOT
(marked "V") in bracket on gate.
2. The arrow on flap at bottom of gate must line up with letter
"V" on lower right part of gate. If is does, not, remove flap,
turn over and snap on to gate again.
Flap can be removed by inserting small screw driver at the back
side of the gate between the gate and the flap, then pulling
downward on flap.
HORIZONTAL FLUE:
1. Adjustment weight must be in LEFT HAND SLOT (marked
"H") in bracket on gate.
2. The arrow on flap at bottom of gate must line up with letter
"H" on lower left part of gate. If is does not, remove flap,
turn over and snap on to gate again.
Bend outward the two ears at the front corners of collar and insert
clamping screw. Bolt the remainder of the collar together. See
Figure 8. Hold the collar against the glue in the EXACT position
and mark the outline of the collar on the flue. Cut a hole in the flue
about half an inch smaller than the marks.
Then cut a series of short slits (about 3/8" or 1/2" deep) around
the edges of the opening. After the collar is strapped on the flue
the cut edges can be bent outward into the collar and thus make
a better joint. WHEN FINISHED, THE OPENING INTO THE FLUE
MUST BE EQUAL IN SIZE TO THE COLLAR OF THE DRAFT
CONTROL. If flue pipe is made of material too heavy to bend out
12
into the collar, the opening into the flue must be within 1/4" of the
same diameter as the collar.
Strap the collar to the flue pipe and place the draft control into the
collar, fastening it there by tightening the clamping screw in the
collar.
Use a spirit level to make sure that the control does not lean forward
or backward but instead is plumb in both directions, regardless of
whether the flue is horizontal, vertical or sloping. See Fig. 9.
8
9
INITIAL SETTING OF BAROMETRIC CONTROL
Set the control at a maximum of .03 or as Low a draft as will
give good combustion and meet the requirements for heat. Turn
adjustment weight counter-clockwise to loosen, then slide in slot
to proper position and tighten. Bracket is marked 2, 4, 6, and 8,
which indicates draft settings of .02, .04, etc. (These are drafts in
flue adjacent to control, not over-fire drafts.) A monometer must be
used to accurately adjust flue draft.
CAUTION
Do not use any smoke pipes less than 24 gauge between
furnace and chimney.
CONNECTING SMOKE PIPE
Set the smoke pipe end of the furnace as close to the chimney as
possible. For every foot of lateral pipe, the rise of the smoke pipe
toward the chimney must be at least one inch. Do not exceed 10
feet in length. A cleanout tee should be installed for removal of
soot and fly ash. (See Fig. 2, page 6 and Fig. 7, page 12)
Do not install the smoke pipe longer than necessary to reach the
chimney for purposes of trapping heat. The smoke outlet temperature is designed so that the heat emitted is needed to carry the
by-products of combustion out through the chimney.
The smoke pipe must not pass through any combustible material.
PROPER CHIMNEYS
The National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) requires that all
factory built chimneys be Listed and installed in accordance with
conditions of the Listing in the manufacturers instructions. NFPA
also requires that your chimney extend at least three (3) feet
above the highest point when it passes through the roof and at
least two (2) feet higher than any portion of the building within ten
(10) feet of the chimney. (See Fig. 10)
Factory built chimneys must be what NFPA refers to NFPA 211
1-5.217.4* as Type HT. HT is an abbreviation meaning high temperature.
Masonry Chimneys as referred to in NFPA 211 1-5.2.17.6, a field
constructed chimney of solid masonry units, bricks, stones, listed
masonry chimney units, or reinforced concrete that is lined with
suitable chimney flue liners and built with the provisions of Chapter
4 of this standard.
WARNING
No damper, heat saver or automatic vent damper device
except the barometric draft regulator should be installed in or
on the smoke pipe.
The smoke pipe entrance into a masonry chimney should be at
least 2 feet above the cleanout. The smoke pipe must not extend
into the chimney beyond the inner face of the chimney liner.
LESSER CLEARANCES TO COMBUSTIBLE
MATERIALS ALLOWED
This furnace is UL Listed thus requiring 18 inches from the smoke
pipe to a combustible surface. A reduction of 9 inches from a combustible ceiling and 12 inches from a combustible wall is allowed if
the space is insulated according to NFPA 90B, table 6-5.1.2.
DO NOT CONNECT THIS FURNACE TO A CHIMNEY
SERVING ANOTHER APPLIANCE
The chimney should be no less than 8 inches inside diameter or
equal.
WARNING
10
Check your chimney. The chimney is a very important part of
your heating system. It must be the right size, properly constructed and in good condition. No furnace can function properly with a bad chimney. The chimney must supply a draft of
at least .03 Water Column. If possible, use a 15 foot or higher
chimney. Add an additional foot to the chimney for each 1,000
feet of elevation above sea level.
13
FAULTY CHIMNEY AND/OR DRAFT PROBLEMS CAUSES AND CURES
A sound chimney system is imperative, especially when burning
wood. Indoor chimneys, either masonry or type "HT" metal chimneys are best. Because warm air rises, a warm chimney allows
the smoke and other by-products of combustion a natural exit up
and out the chimney. Outdoor chimneys should be your last choice.
Cold air naturally falls right down the cold chimney. Until the heat
from the furnace warms the chimney, there is no natural draft to
allow the smoke and by-products of combustion to rise naturally up
the chimney. Outdoor class "A" triple wall is not acceptable because
their thermo-siphon design will not allow the chimney to heat up,
causing heavy creosote build-up and possible chimney fires.
If you know your chimney is sound and you still have downdraft
problems such as smoke or smell in the room in which the furnace
is located, your chimney may not be operating properly. One or
more of the following suggestions may be necessary.
14
1. Barometric draft control- This control must be set at .03.
This is just a guide. It must be set with a draft gauge to
prove that the chimney is drawing .03.
2. Combustion air -You must have outdoor combustion air
introduced into the room where the furnace resides in the
manner described on page 17. This method supplies air
for combustion as well as replacing air that is drawn out
by the chimney. Leaky doors and windows will not provide
acceptable results.
3. Cold outdoor chimney -Sometimes in the spring or fall, or
if you live in a mild climate, your heat demands are small
and your chimney just does not heat up enough to induce
a natural exit up draft, you may want to consider a power
vent to force a draft up the chimney. A Model D-3 or AD-1
power venter is available from Tjurnland Manufacturing
Co. in White Bear Lake, Minnesota or Model D1-2 is available from Field Controls Co., Kinston, North Carolina.
4. Chimney not tall enough -Your chimney must terminate
at least 2 feet above the peak of the roof. Adding more
chimney height sometimes cures the problem. (See Fig.
12, page 14)
5. Home located on side of hill- When the wind blows over a
hill toward your home, the wind will fall. This could cause
a downdraft into your chimney. Some common solutions
to correct downdrafts are to add a chimney cap with a
weather vane, add height to the chimney or add a power
venter.
6. Tall trees near your home -If you have trees that are near
and higher than your home, a downdraft can occur when
the wind blows. Correct the same way as if you live on the
side of a hill or in a valley.
7. Chimney too large -Your chimney should not be more
than 8 inches in diameter or the equivalent. If too large,
the sides of the chimney may not heat up to create a
natural draft. When this happens, the smoke and gases
cool. They become heavy and other gases from the fire
try to penetrate this heavy column of cool air. This results
in back puffing, poor combustion or burning and may
cause odors in your home. The solution is to improve your
chimney or line it with 8-inch type 304 stainless steel flue
liner. If your large chimney is outside masonry, insulate
between the masonry and 8-inch flue pipe.
CAUTION
COMBUSTION AIR
Don’t install this furnace or any furnace
unless you provide combustion air as described
in these instructions.
Make-up outside air to the furnace for proper fuel combustion must
be provided by openings to the outside of the building. The openings of ducts supplying such make-up air shall have unobstructed
areas not less than the area of the flue pipe.
NOTE
You must provide for enough fresh air to assure proper combustion. The fire in the furnace uses oxygen and must have a continuous supply. The air in a house contains only enough oxygen
to supply the burner for a short time. Outside air must enter the
house to replace that used by the furnace. See page 16
|
If you use your fireplace or use a kitchen or bathroom exhaust
fan, you should install an outside air intake. These devices will
draw off the furnace combustion air.
WARNING
Enough air insures proper combustion and assures that no
hazard will develop due to the lack of oxygen.
FURNACE LOCATED IN CONFINED SPACE
A. When the furnace is in a utility room, install two open grilles in
a wall or door opening to the rest of the house. One grille will
supply combustion air. Locate it near the floor. The other grille
is for ventilation. Locate it close to the ceiling. Each grille must
have a free area of not less than one square inch for each
1000 BTU/hr. of the total input rating of all the appliances in
the confined space.
FOR EXAMPLE: Your furnace is rated at 150,000 BTU per hour.
The water heater is rated 30,000 BTU per hour. The total is
180,000 BTU per hour.
You need two grilles, each with 180 square inches of free opening.
Metal grilles have about 60% free (open) area, so you need two
metal grilles with 300 square inches each of louvered area. The
height should be about half the width.
Refer to Fig. 11 which shows grille installation. Note also that the
return air duct starts from outside the confined space, extends all
the way to the furnace and is securely attached. This is important.
B. Install a duct or pipe from a point near the burner to a ventilated
attic or crawl space or the outside where fresh air is freely available. (Fig. 12, page 16). The duct should have a net free area
of 1 square inch for each 5,000 BTU/hr. input of all appliances.
Screen the opening to keep animals or birds from entering. The
following chart (page 16) shows the BTU per hour capabilities
of ducts with several screening methods.
11
15
12
NOTE
Lack of make-up combustion air will cause a negative pressure or vacuum to occur within the home. This negative pressure will cause cold air to be drawn into the home from around
doors and windows which will create drafts. It will also cause
incomplete combustion of the wood. Incomplete combustion of
wood will tend to increase the possibility of creosote build-up
in the heat exchanger, flue pipe and chimney. This will have
an insulating effect which will cause more heat to be lost up
the chimney and less heat available to the heating distribution
system.
FRESH AIR DUCT CAPACITIES
Fresh air duct capacities for duct supplying fresh air to furnaces in
tightly constructed houses.
BTU Per Hour Input*
Size
3-1/4 x 12 in.
8 in. round
8 x 12 in.
8 x 16 in.
1/4 in. Mesh
Screen
BTU
Wood
Louvers
BTU
Metal
Louvers
BTU
144,000
200,000
382,000
512,000
36,000
50,000
96,000
128,000
108,000
150,000
288,000
384,000
* Based on opening covered by 1/4 inch mesh screen, wood or metal louvers.
16
OPERATION
WOOD FIRING THE UNIT
ELECTRIC HEATING UNIT
To start electric heating unit, proceed as follows:
1. Be sure electrical fuses are in good condition and that any
circuit breakers are in “on” position.
2. Be sure duct heater is placed properly in blower compartment.
3. Set thermostat about 10 degrees higher than room temperature to make sure thermostat contacts are made.
(Remember “H” lever on thermostat is for electric heat). If
wiring is properly done and all controls properly installed
and adjusted, the blower motor will start and the heating
elements begin to heat up.
IF ELECTRIC HEATING UNIT FAILS TO OPERATE
Refer to Fig. 8
WARNING
Always shut off all power to the furnace before working on it!!
1. Recheck all fuses and circuit breakers to be sure power is
available to the furnace.
2. See that the temperature limit control manual reset switch
is “on”.
3. Repeat OPERATION steps. If furnace does not operate,
have a qualified technician inspect the furnace.
NOTE
Whenever the access door to the duct heater is opened the
door interlock switch opens, removing power to the heating
elements. The duct heater will not operate with this door
open.
SEQUENCE OF OPERATION
When the room temperature drops below the temperature at which
the “H” lever is set, 24 volt current from the damper control passes
through the control terminal board. This closes a circuit in the control terminal board, permitting 115 volts to pass through the relay
mounted on the junction box. This activates the blower motor,
sending air through the heat distribution system.
As the blower motor warms up to full speed, the airflow switch in
the duct heater closes, sending current to the heating elements.
Air from the blower motor passes through the heating elements
and is then forced through the heat distribution system, maintaining the house at the thermostat setting.
The four heating elements in the duct heater are separated by
45 second time delays. Whenever the electric furnace goes into
operation the heating elements are automatically activated, one at
a time, with a 45 second interval between each element until all
four elements are giving off heat.
Place 3 or 4 split, dried pieces of wood in the firebox with paper
and kindling as you would in a fireplace. Set the thermostat a few
degrees above room temperature to open the automatic draft.
Light the paper and when the fire has started, set thermostat to
desired room temperature. Thermostat will then open and close
damper as heat is required.
Proceed slowly on initial firing of the wood firebox. Avoid high firing
or damage to the heat exchanger may occur.
CAUTION
RESTRICTED USE DURING
ELECTRIC POWER OR
FURNACE FAN FAILURE
Furnace may be converted to a gravity system. Directions
must be followed carefully to avoid an over-fire situation.
Remove access door to blower compartment and remove
air filter. Then replace access door. Keep ash drawer tightly
closed. Do not tamper with wood primary air control. Load
wood to half the recommended normal height, approximately
4 inches above grate.
Do not overload, as no furnace fan is available to rapidly carry
away the heat. Load small amounts of wood frequently until
power is restored.
Open all air registers and remove all obstructions near them.
Keep children away from air registers or burns could result.
Primary air damper and burner will operate automatically
when electric power is restored.
IMPORTANT
Keep ash drawer empty. Primary air to the wood chamber
travels under the grate. Also, if ashes are permitted to build up
above the grates, the grates will warp and eventually burn out.
CAUTION
OVERLOADING WITH WOOD
Do not overload your furnace with wood. Failure or damage to
the firebox could result. Never allow the hot coals to build up
above the lower firebricks.
DANGER
Never burn materials other than coal or wood logs, preferably
split and dried. A chimney fire or heat exchanger failure could
result. This includes large amounts of corrugated boxes, wood
shavings, paper scraps, dried Christmas trees, coke, garbage,
tires or other burnable products.
Know what types of wood to burn. Wood is a safe, clean and
economical fuel. Freshly felled wood is not suitable due due to the
moisture content of the wood. Well seasoned wood is best for the
proper production of heat. The following table will give you some
relative values of the heating content of some of the more readily
available types of wood.
17
BTU's
Equivalent
Pound
Per Cord
Value #2
WeightAir DriedFuel Oil
Type
per Cord
WoodGallons
White Pine
1800
17,000,000
120
Aspen
1900
17,500,000
125
Spruce
2100
18,000,000
130
Ash
2900
22,500 ,000
160
Tamarack
2500
24,000,000
170
Soft Maple
2500
24,000,000
170
Yellow Birch
3000
26,000,000
180
Red Oak
3250
27,000,000
195
Hard Maple
3000
29,000,000
200
Hickory
3600
30,500 ,000
215
The thermostat always calls for heat from the wood side of the
furnace first. When the “C” lever on the thermostat anticipates the
need for heat, the thermostat opens the damper which allows primary air to the wood fire which allows the wood fire to increase its
burning rate. When the thermostat is satisfied, the damper closes,
removing primary air to the wood fire causing the fire to be banked
until needed again. This sequence of operation will continue as
long as there is a sufficient supply of wood in the firebox to maintain the temperature at thermostat setting.
When the wood burns down to the point where it can’t handle the
load, the temperature in the home will drop to the temperature
as which the “H” lever is set. (The “H” lever controls the electric
heating elements.) At this point the primary damper in the damper
assembly will close and the electric heater will take over. The electric elements will maintain this temperature setting until either the
“H” lever is moved up or the firebox is loaded again.
IMPORTANT
During normal operation, fire door and ash pan must be kept
tightly closed. Air leakage will cause loss of efficiency resulting
in higher heating costs. If door gaskets become worn, replace
with 1/2” asbestos rope available from local sources.
CAUTION
REMOVE AIR CONDITIONING COIL FROM WARM AIR
PLENUM IF USING FURNACE DURING FAN FAILURE OR
ELECTRIC POWER FAILURE.
NOTE
If for any reason there should be an electric power failure,
either from high limit cutoff or electrical power outage, the
damper will automatically close, preventing over-fire with no
blower, thus preventing heat exchanger damage.
BURNING COAL ON 1/2-INCH OPENING GRATES
GENERAL INFORMATION
This section contains the instructions for burning various types of
coal, storage of coal, and the cleaning of the furnace.
Some coal is oil-treated at the mine and some users have indi18
cated that it tends to make the coal more difficult to start.
Burning coal requires some patience and a regular procedure.
With improper tending, a coal fire can go out in a short time. Once
the fire starts to go out, it is almost impossible to reverse. After a
coal fire goes out, all the coal must be removed from the furnace
before the starting process can be repeated.
Our coal burning instructions are general, as coal comes in various
sizes and types. Anthracite coal is most recommended as it burns
with little smoke when burning properly.
OPERATING INSTRUCTIONS FOR BURNING COAL
GENERAL INFORMATION
CAUTION
Burn Anthracite - Bituminous - Lignite coals only
DO NOT BURN
Petroleum - Coke - Cannel Coals
IGNITION TEMPERATURE OF COAL AND WOOD
How hot does coal have to get to ignite? Following are examples
of the ignition points of various materials:
COAL: Paper ignites @ Wood ignites @ Western lignite ignites @ Low volatile bituminous ignites @ High volatile bituminous ignites @ Anthracite ignites @ 350º F
435º F
630º F
765º F
870º F
925º F
WHAT SIZE COAL SHOULD I BURN?
The air space between the furnace grates is 1/2”; therefore, coal
smaller than 1/2 inch can fall through the grates into the ash pan.
Pea size coal ranges from 9/16 to 11/16 inches.
Nut size coal ranges from 1-3/16 to 1-5/8 inches.
Stove size coal ranges from 1-5/8 to 2- 7/16 inches.
Nut size is preferred by most people and is recommended for use
in this furnace.
Anthracite coal is hard and burns like the charcoal that is used
in your barbecue grill. The coals must touch each other to ignite.
Therefore, the smaller the coal, the easier to ignite. Stove coal is
not as likely to touch each other because of its size.
Bituminous coal is soft and not as desirable as hard coal. It creates
dust when handled and produces large amounts of smoke and
soot when burned at a slow rate. Also, soft coal from some areas
of the country contains higher sulfur content, but a large portion of
it may be removed if the coal is cleaned.
HOW TO START A COAL FIRE
CAUTION
Do not use kerosene, gasoline, thinners, etc. to start a coal fire.
To start a coal fire, place a small amount of crumpled paper and
sticks of kindling wood on the ash-covered grates.
Ignite the paper and after the wood is burning briskly, cover with
a thin layer of coal. As the first layer of coal becomes ignited, add
more coal gradually until the fire bed is built up to approximately
6 inches deep. As fresh coal is added always leave some of the
glowing coal uncovered.
Draw the top red coals toward the front of the firebox and pile fresh
coals toward the back.
The grates must be protected from direct contact with the fire by
a layer of ash, one (1) or two (2) inches thick. The ash left on the
grate will help prevent overheating of the cast iron grates and coal
from falling through the grate's opening.
MAINTAINING A COAL FIRE
Bituminous coal should be built into a cone shape once the fire
has started. When refiring, break up the cone a little using a poker,
especially if it has caked over to form a crust. Be careful not to mix
the coal as this increases the chance of forming clinkers.
Western lignite coal should be burned the same way you would
burn wood. (Refer to wood burning instruction.)
SHAKING THE GRATES
Shaking a fire should only be done if room is needed for fresh coalor if the ash accumulation on the grates is excessive. Generally,
the grates need only be shaken once or twice a day.
RECOVERING UNBURNED COAL
Screen coal ashes through a piece of 1/4 inch or 3/8 inch mesh
hardware cloth to recover any unburned coal that has fallen
though the grates.
STORAGE OF COAL
Coal may be stored indoors or outdoors, with some precautions:
1. The storage area must be free of materials that are easily
burned, such as paper, wood, rags and leaves.
2. Alternate wetting and drying of coal should be avoided.
Outside storages should be protected from rain or snow.
Wet coal should not be piled on dry coal.
3. Locate the storage area in a cool, 75Q F or lower, area.
4. Nut coal weighs approximately 58 Lbs. per cu. ft. A storage bin 4-feet square by 4-feet high will hold 2 tons.
CLEANING FURNACE AND CHIMNEY FLUE PIPES
Be sure to check and clean the furnace heat exchange flue pipes
and chimney on a frequent basis. Soot and fly ash should not be
allowed to build up on any of these surfaces. Chimneys are best
cleaned professionally.
CHECKS AND ADJUSTMENTS
Shake the grates using a few short strokes and stop when the
first red coals appear in the ash pan. Under-shaking restricts the
amount of air that reaches the fire and over-shaking may cause
the fire to go out.
If you have installed your own furnace, we ask that you call for
an inspection by a Service Technician. The peace of mind and
assured performance are well worth the cost involved. A technician has the proper instruments to make the necessary checks
and adjustments.
A coal fire should never be poked or broken up as this serves to
bring ash to the surface of the coal bed where it may fuse into
lumps or clinkers which interfere with proper burning.
FURNACE BLOWER ADJUSTMENT
IMPORTANT
Never smother fire when adding fresh coal.
Anthracite Coal — To bank the fire for the night, pile the coal
higher to the back of the firebox and allow it to slope toward the
fire box door. Always leave some red or burning coals uncovered
in the front of the firebox.
Bituminous Coal — To bank the fire for the night, shake the fire
and add coal, forming the center cone. Allow enough time for the
volatiles to burn off before closing the fire door.
GRATE CARE — ASH REMOVAL
It is necessary that ashes be removed from the ash pan on a daily
basis and should never be allowed to accumulate high enough to
come in contact with the grates. Such a condition could cut off
necessary air circulation and could also result in a warping or
burnout of the grates.
ASH DISPOSAL
Unlike wood ashes, coal ash should not be spread on the garden.
The minerals in coal ash contain several chemicals which could
be harmful to plant life.
Set adjustable motor pulley so blower will give approximately 90º F
temperature rise through furnace. After pulley has been adjusted
check bolt as follows: (see Fig. 18)
The belt is drawn tight during shipment; therefore both belt tension
and sheave alignment must be rechecked by the installer when the
furnace is placed in service.
Improper belt tension and pulley misalignment are the major
causes of furnace fan noise and failure of belts and bearings.
Sheave alignment is easily determined with a straight edge held
across the outer face of the fan sheave. The face of the motor
sheave should also be parallel to the straight edge at all points.
Proper belt tension is more difficult to determine accurately. Too
little tension will permit slippage causing belt wear and may cause
noise or squealing when the motor starts. Excessive tension
increases motor load and may cause the oil film between shaft
and bearing to fail. This, in turn, causes the bearing to seize or
burn out.
The proper belt tension is the minimum which will drive the blower
without slippage. This varies with sheave diameter, fan size, and
motor starting torque characteristics. The practical belt tension can
best be determined by actual experience, but when in doubt it is
better to have the belt too loose rather than too tight. Belt tension
can be judged by grasping the belt as shown. The belt should
be deflected approximately one inch when moderate pressure is
applied.
19
AIR CONDITIONING
Existing motor and pulley will handle up to 42,000 BTU cooling.
For 48,000 BTU cooling, blower motor must be changed to 1/2
HP. For 60,000 BTU cooling, blower motor must be changed to
3/4 HP.
DUCT WORK AND BLOWER SPEED ADJUSTMENT
TEST PROCEDURE
Using the draft gauge manufacturer’s instructions, set the Draft
Regulator so that there is .03 Water Column Draft in the smoke
pipe between the flue outlet and Draft Regulator.
MAINTENANCE INSTRUCTIONS
Supply and return duct system should be sized properly for efficient operation. Normal air temperature rise through the furnace
should be adjusted to approximately 90º F. Proper blower speed
adjustment, in conjunction with adequate duct work are necessary
to achieve this.
Before cleaning chimney, smoke pipe furnace, be sure to turn
off electrical power to furnace. Be sure wood fire is out and
inside of furnace is cool.
A high temperature rise will result in excessive fuel usage, due to
the high stack temperature that always accompanies a high air
temperature rise. It can also cause premature heat exchanger
failure.
At the start of the heating season:
1. It is advisable to have a service technician inspect and service
your furnace for the coming heating season.
To perform temperature rise check, start furnace and let it run a
minimum of 10 minutes (be sure all duct work is complete and
furnace is in its normal operating condition) .Place #1 thermometer in the return near the furnace. Place #2 thermometer in the
supply duct near the furnace, but not in the plenum. After 10
minutes or more operation, take thermometer readings. Supply
air temperature should be no more than 90Q higher than return
air temperature.
Air temperature rise can be lowered by:
1. Increasing blower speed.
2. Additional supply or return outlets.
3. Lowering firing rate.
TESTING INSTALLATIONS FOR EFFICIENCY
IMPORTANT
Draft gauge must be used. Draft in smoke pipe must be set at
.03 Water Column updraft. Failure to set properly will cause fuel
to be wasted, heating will not be satisfactory, fast build-up of
creosote in heat exchanger and chimney may occur, and cause
damage to your heating system.
In preparation for this test, the following should be checked. The
Draft Regulator as installed should be:
• plumb and level
• in the same room as the unit
• on the side of a vertical, sloping or horizontal smoke pipe
• located close to the furnace
20
CAUTION
2. Furnace, smoke pipe and chimney should be cleaned and
checked for repairs.
Emergency stops:
Cut off all electrical current to the furnace by turning off electrical
power in main fuse panel.
Air filter:
Check and clean monthly. Change filter at least twice a year.
Blower motor:
Check belt for proper tension.
Grates:
Keep ash drawer emptied. Failure to do this will cause grates to
warp.
Smoke Pipe, Chimney and Furnace Heat Exchanger:
Do not burn green or freshly felled wood. If you do, creosote and
soot may build up in the chimney, smoke pipe and furnace heat
exchanger. This should be checked and cleaned several times
each heating season. Soot will act as an insulator which will cause
less heat to be transferred into your duct system thus reducing the
efficiency of the wood being burned.
HOW TO PREVENT RUST AND CORROSION
At the end of each heating season, clean heat exchanger and
ash pan thoroughly. Paint the inside of the heat exchanger with
automobile crankcase oil. This will decrease rusting caused by
summer moisture.
If black paint on firing door area wears or burns off , it can be repainted with a high temperature, flat black, air-drying paint.
CLEANING THE CHIMNEY, SMOKE PIPE
AND HEAT EXCHANGER
Avoid chimney fires. On a regular schedule, check for creosote
and soot buildup in the chimney, smoke pipe and heat exchanger.
They must be kept clean. Keep a professional chimney sweep in
mind if you have access to one.
IN CASE OF CHIMNEY FIRE
CALL THE FIRE DEPARTMENT IMMEDIATELY!
EXTINGUISH THE FIRE IN FURNACE BY SETTING THE
THERMOSTAT ALL THE WAY TO THE LEFT TO CLOSE
PRIMARY AIR DAMPER. EMPTY FIRE CHAMBER AND ASH
PAN INTO SAFE, FIREPROOF CONTAINER.
Steel brushes are the safest for cleaning metal surfaces. Salt
solutions and some chemicals may damage metal surfaces. Do
not overfire your furnace. Do not burn anything that combusts in
seconds. Excessive flue temperatures may result, thereby igniting
creosote.
To clean the chimney, obtain a stiff brush with an extendible handle
and insert the brush into the chimney from the top. Continue
brushing and sweeping downward until entire length of chimney
is cleaned.
After cleaning, the debris will be at the bottom of the chimney at
the clean-out opening. Open the clean-out door and sweep the
debris out into a metal container.
CLEANING THE SMOKE PIPE AND HEAT EXCHANGER
Turn off electrical power to furnace to prevent electric elements
from operating. Disconnect the smoke pipe from the furnace and
clean the inside of the pipe with an 8” diameter or smaller steel
brush.
DO NOT USE YOUR FURNACE UNTIL A PROFESSIONAL
INSPECTION HAS BEEN MADE OF YOUR FURNACE,
SMOKE PIPE AND CHIMNEY.
DISPOSAL OF ASHES
Ashes should be placed in a metal container with a tight fitting lid.
The closed container of ashes should be placed on a noncombustible floor or on the ground, well away from all combustible materials, pending final disposal. If the ashes are disposed of by burial in
soil or otherwise locally dispersed, they should be retained in the
closed container until all cinders have thoroughly cooled.
Open the secondary heat exchanger clean-out door and clean the
inside of the heat exchanger. A 4” x 6” steel brush is provide for
this purpose. The primary heat exchanger may be cleaned with
steel brush. A furnace vacuum cleaner may be used.
CREOSOTE — FORMATION AND NEED FOR REMOVAL
When wood is burned slowly, it produces tar and other organic vapors, which combine with expelled moisture to form creosote.
The creosote vapors condense in the relatively cool chimney flue of a slow-burning fire. As a result, creosote residue accumulates on the flue lining. When ignited, this creosote makes an extremely hot fire.
The chimney connector and chimney should be inspected at least twice monthly during the heating season to determine if a
creosote buildup has occurred.
If creosote has accumulated it should be removed to reduce the risk of a chimney fire.
SERVICE HINTS
If floors are cold...
POSSIBLE CAUSE
Return (cold) air grilles blocked
WHAT TO DO
Check to make sure rugs and carpets are not covering return air
grilles.
Air filter is dirty
Clean or replace air filter, as necessary.
System is out of balance
Check supply pipe dampers or registers to balance system.
If blower/motor is noisy...
Check motor bearings
Replace motor if necessary
Check blower bearings
Replace bearings if necessary
Air filter is dirty
Clean or replace air filter, as necessary
21
Smoke puffs out through doors...
Chimney draft incorrect
Check chimney draft. With normal wood fire, chimney should draw
.03 inch water column between furnace and barometric control
Soot and creosote buildup in heat exchanger or chimney
Clean if necessary.
Chimney too low
Increase chimney height.
Obstruction in chimney
Check for obstruction such as loose mortar, bird nests and squirrel
nests. Clean chimney to eliminate obstructions.
Not enough fresh air to furnace room
Check for obstructions in combustion air inlet. See page 14.
Chimney diameter too large
Too cold a chimney will chill flue gases as they rise up the chimney. As this gas cools, it becomes heavy and other gases from the
fire try to penetrate this heavy column of cool air. This results in
back puffing, and may cause odors in your home. Obviously, the
solution lies in improving your chimney.
If your furnace is not giving you enough heat...
Thermostat not set correctly
Make sure chimney clean-out door is tightly closed.
No electric power to furnace
Install separate chimney.
Using excessive amount of wood, but not heating
Reset thermostat above room temperature.
Chimney clean-out door partially open
Check fuse or circuit breaker. If fuse is blown, replace. If breaker is
tripped, reset. Check to make sure that electrical switch is on.
Other fuel burning device connected to same chimney
Baffles in firebox out of place or barometric damper set too high.
Check baffle position, page 6, Fig. 6. Set barometric control to .03
or less.
Damper control fails to open...
Improper thermostat wiring
Recheck field wiring against wiring diagram.
No power to damper control
Check 24 Volt side of transformer, check 115 Volt power to transformer. Check for burn spot on damper control relay. Replace
board if defective.
Damper does not open
Check power to solenoid. Replace if defective.
If you don't seem to be getting enough air circulation...
Air filter is dirty
Registers and grilles are obstructed
Clean or replace filter, as necessary.
Check supply pipes or damper positions. Check registers and
grilles to make sure they are not closed or obstructed by carpet,
draperies, furniture or clothing. Remove obstructions.
NOTE
Multiple coats of paint on registers and grilles may reduce the amount of free air opening causing restriction of
air flow and reduction of warm air circulation. Registers and grilles in this condition should be replaced.
22
This circulating fan performance curve chart is for determining motor
Horsepower needs for the LWE-020 Electric-Solid Fuel furnace
Model Number:_ _________________________Serial Number:________________________________
Installation Date:_________________________Contractor:___________________________________
Service Calls:__________________________________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________________________________________
Notes:________________________________________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________________________________________ 23
repair parts
CASING ASSEMBLY
24
repair parts
CASING ASSEMBLY
25
repair parts
COMBUSTION CHAMBER ASSEMBLY
26
repair parts
COMBUSTION CHAMBER ASSEMBLY
27
repair parts
DS103
28
repair parts
ELECTRIC DUCT HEATER
29
YUKON
EAGLE
OWNER’S
MANUAL
Yukon Eagle iII
Wood/coal Electric
fired central
furnace
Now that you have purchased your electric/solid fuel furnace, should a need ever exist for repair parts or service,
simply contact any HVAC service organization or our company. Be sure to provide all pertinent facts when you call
or visit.
The model number of your electric/solid fuel furnace will
be found on the model number plate on the inside of the
blower compartment.
how to order
repair parts
Model No.
LWE-020
When ordering repair parts,
Always give the following information:
• Part Number • Part description
• Model Number
• NAME OF ITEM
CAUTION:
Read Rules And
Instructions
Carefully For
Safe Operation
IMPORTANT:
Installation must be made in
accordance with state and local
ordinances which may differ
from this installation manual.
30
ALL PARTS MAY BE PURCHASED FROM ANY
HEATING CONTRACTOR, OR direct FROM the
FACTORY.
PHONE:
1-800-358-0060
FAX:
1-800-440-1994
E-MAIL:
yukon@mlecmn.net
WEBSITE:
www.yukon-eagle.com
Alpha American Co., 10 Industrial Blvd., Palisade, MN 56469
www.yukon-eagle.com