PICmicro® MCU multiprogrammer www.matrixtsl.com EB006V9

PICmicro® MCU multiprogrammer www.matrixtsl.com EB006V9
PICmicro® MCU multiprogrammer
www.matrixtsl.com
EB006V9
Contents
About this document
General information
Board layout
Circuit description
Protective cover
PICmicro microcontroller pin out details
Bus connections
Circuit diagram
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
11
Copyright © 2014 Matrix Technology Solutions Ltd
About this document
This document concerns the EB006V9 E-blocks
PICmicro multiprogrammer board (version 9).
for all E-blocks, which can be found in the Support
section of the website.
1. Trademarks and copyright
PIC and PICmicro are registered trademarks of Arizona
Microchip Inc. E-blocks is a trademark of Matrix
Technology Solutions Ltd.
4. Product support
If you require support for this product then please
visit the Matrix website, which contains many learning
resources for the E-blocks series. On our website you will
find:
•
2. Disclaimer
The information provided within this document is
correct at the time of going to press. Matrix TSL reserves
the right to change specifications from TSL to time.
•
•
•
3. Testing this product
It is advisable to test the product upon receiving it to
ensure it works correctly. Matrix provides test procedures
How to get started with E-blocks - if you are new to
E-blocks and wish to learn how to use them from the
beginning there are resources available to help.
Relevant software and hardware that allow you to use
your E-blocks product better.
Example files and programs.
Ways to get technical support for your product, either
via the forums or by contacting us directly.
General information
The EB006 V9 PICmicro microcontroller programmer
connects to your PC via USB to provide you with a low
cost and flexible PICmicro microcontroller programmer.
This board can be used with conventional microcontroller
programs that generate hex code for the PIC family:
MPLAB, C compilers, BASIC compilers etc. The EB006
V9 has many features that are optimised for use with
Flowcode version 6 including Ghost technology.
The board will program most 8, 14, 18, 20, 28 and 40 pin
flash PICmicro microcontroller devices using the free
‘mLoader’ programming software provided. mLoader
can be downloaded from the Matrix web site.
The board also provides ‘clean’ access to all Input/Output
lines on the relevant PICmicro microcontroller device.
These are presented on 9 way D-type connectors: 8 bits
and earth. A range of additional E-blocks boards can
plug into these D-type connectors to provide a rapid
prototyping system for learning and development.
More information on Ghost technology can be found on
our website at www.matrixtsl.com/ghost.
3
1.
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Features
E-blocks compatible
Low cost
Used as a programmer and as a development board
Programs a wide range of PICmicro MCU devices
Full suite of programming software available
Ghost technology included
Removable crystal oscillator source
5 I/O ports
In-Circuit Debugging via PICkit2 connector
In-Circuit Debug with Flowcode 6
In-Circuit Test with Flowcode 6
Charge pump capability to allow high voltage
programming from USB supply
2mm power connector sockets
Powerful 16bit host chip with Ghost technology
operating system included
All pins on target device monitored by host
microcontroller
On-board SRAM memory for data storage
LEDs for Power, In-Circuit -Debug, In-Circuit -Test,
and Program
Lower operating voltage (9V)
Copyright © 2014 Matrix Technology Solutions Ltd
General information
2. Block schematic
3. Support devices
Currently mLoader and the EB006V9 support the
following PICmicro devices:
12F Devices
PIC12F609, PIC12F615, PIC12F629, PIC12F635, PIC12F675,
PIC12F635, PIC12F683
16F Devices
PIC16F616,
PIC16F630,
PIC16F676,
PIC16F688,
PIC16F737,
PIC16F76,
PIC16F819,
PIC16F871,
PIC16F874,
PIC16F87,
PIC16F887,
PIC16F946
4
PIC16F627A, PIC16F627, PIC16F628A, PIC16F628,
PIC16F631, PIC16F636, PIC16F639, PIC16F648A,
PIC16F677, PIC16F684, PIC16F685, PIC16F687,
PIC16F690, PIC16F689, PIC16F716, PIC16F72,
PIC16F73, PIC16F747, PIC16F74, PIC16F767,
PIC16F777, PIC16F785, PIC16F77, PIC16F818,
PIC16F83, PIC16F84A, PIC16F84, PIC16F870,
PIC16F872, PIC16F873A, PIC16F873, PIC16F874A,
PIC16F876A, PIC16F876, PIC16F877A, PIC16F877,
PIC16F88, PIC16F883, PIC16F884, PIC16F886,
PIC16F913, PIC16F914, PIC16F916, PIC16F917,
18F Devices
PIC18F242, PIC18F248, PIC18F252, PIC18F258, PIC18F442,
PIC18F448, PIC18F452, PIC18F458, PIC18F1220, PIC18F1230,
PIC18F1231,
PIC18F1320,
PIC18F1330,
PIC18F1331,
PIC18F13K50, PIC18F14K50, PIC18F2220, PIC18F2221,
PIC18F2320,
PIC18F2321,
PIC18F2331,
PIC18F2410,
PIC18F2420,
PIC18F2423,
PIC18F2431,
PIC18F2439,
PIC18F2450,
PIC18F2455,
PIC18F2458,
PIC18F2480,
PIC18F24J10,
PIC18F2510,
PIC18F2515,
PIC18F2520,
PIC18F2523,
PIC18F2525,
PIC18F2539,
PIC18F2550,
PIC18F2553,
PIC18F2580,
PIC18F2585,
PIC18F2586,
PIC18F25J10,
PIC18F2610,
PIC18F2620,
PIC18F2680,
PIC18F2681,
PIC18F2682,
PIC18F2685,
PIC18F4220,
PIC18F4221,
PIC18F4320,
PIC18F4321,
PIC18F4331,
PIC18F4410,
PIC18F4420,
PIC18F4423,
PIC18F4431,
PIC18F4439,
PIC18F4450,
PIC18F4455,
PIC18F4458,
PIC18F4480,
PIC18F44J10,
PIC18F4510,
PIC18F4515,
PIC18F4520,
PIC18F4523,
PIC18F4525,
PIC18F4539,
PIC18F4550,
PIC18F4553,
PIC18F4580,
PIC18F4585,
PIC18F4586, PIC18F45J10, PPIC18F4610, PIC18F4620,
PIC18F4680, PIC18F4681, PIC18F4682, PIC18F4685
Copyright © 2014 Matrix Technology Solutions Ltd
Board layout
2
4
3
1
18
21
19 20
17
22
16
15
23
13
5
14
24
12
25
11
6
10
26
9
8
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
Power connector - either polarity 7.5 – 9V
USB connector
Reset switch
Port E I/O
Port A I/O
Port B I/O
Port C I/O
Port D I/O
PICkit ICSP Header
Removable crystal / oscillator pin assignment jumper
2mm sockets for supplying power to downstream E-block
boards
12. Analogue switch to allow programming and debug pins
to be connected / disconnected from circuit
13. Power screw terminals
5
7
14.
15.
16.
17.
18.
19.
20.
21.
22.
23.
24.
25.
USB/ICSP programming selector
USB/PSU power selector
5V voltage regulator
3V3/5V VDD voltage selector
Bridge rectifier
3V3 voltage regulator
SRAM storage IC
Status LEDs, Power, ICD, Test, Program
Powerful host microcontroller
Charge pump circuitry
Turned pin DIL socket for 18 pin PICmicro devices
Turned pin DIL socket for 28 and 40 pin PICmicro devices /
40 pin 16F1937 Target Microcontroller (supplied)
26. Turned pin DIL socket for 8, 14, 20 pin PICmicro devices
Copyright © 2014 Matrix Technology Solutions Ltd
Circuit description
The multiprogrammer solution is made up of two
parts: a circuit board that allows various slave PICmicro
devices to be programmed, and the Windows based
programming utility ‘mLoader’.
1. Power supply
The board is normally operated from a regulated DC
supply of 7.5 - 9V or from a USB supply. This allows full
operation including programming. The board can be
operated solely from the USB cable provided. However
care must be taken, as there is only limited power that
can be taken from a computer’s USB port.
The jumper link system, J11, allows the user to decide
on the source of the power supply. If using a regulated
7.5V power supply the jumper should be positioned to
the right hand side of the jumper system labeled ‘PSU’. If
using USB power place the jumper on the left hand side
of the jumper system. LED D6 indicates that power is
correctly supplied to the board.
Please note that both USB and the PSU cables should
be removed for the Multiprogammer board BEFORE
changing the position of this jumper.
Remember that other E-blocks will have to receive their
voltage by placing a connecting wire from the “+V” screw
terminal of the Multiprogrammer to the “+V” screw
terminal of each E-Block that requires a voltage.
!
WARNING: Take extra care when wiring in a
power supply 12V may cause the board to run
hot.
2.
Programming circuit
The Multiprogrammer connects to a personal computer
via the USB socket. Any USB socket on the PC can be
used. The host microcontroller is used to communicate
between the USB bus and the Multiprogrammer
circuitry. The host is connected to a network of analogue
switches formed by U4 and a charge pump circuit which
is used to multiply the operating voltage up to the 9-12V
programming voltage. This circuitry routes 0V, VDD and
VPP to appropriate pins on the slave PICmicro devices as
and when necessary.
3. DIL sockets and I/O ports
The slave PICmicro DIL sockets are wired in parallel (see
table of connections below) and the ports are fed out to
5 D-type sockets grouped in ports. These signals are also
6
available on a 40-way header (J5) for expansion purposes.
Other important signals can be accessed via the other
expansion header J24 (see table of connections below).
Port E has only 3 connections, which reflects the pin outs
of the various PICmicro devices themselves. When using
an 8-pin or 14-pin device it should be placed in the upper
pins of the 20-pin DIL socket as marked on the board.
Please refer to device datasheets for availability of port
outputs on each device.
NOTE: RA4 on some PICmicro devices has an open
collector output. This means that you will most likely
need a pull up resistor to be able to drive an LED etc.
Please see the datasheet on the device you are using
for further details. (Does not apply to 16F1937 device
supplied with the board).
WARNING: Only fit one PICmicro device at a time.
Inserting more then one PICmicro device will
cause programming to fail and may even cause
damage to the board or the PICmicros.
!
4.
Reset push button
PB1 provides a reset by pulling the MCLR pin low. Note
that the programming chip will reset the slave PICmicro
as part of the send routine so that you do not need to
press this switch each time you send your program to
the board. If you are using a device with internal MCLR
functionality then you will have to ensure that the chip
is configured with an external MCLR to allow the reset
operation to work. Devices using the internal MCLR
configuration setting will be able to use the reset switch
as a digital input.
5. Frequency selection
By default the board is fitted with a 19.6608MHz crystal.
The crystal fits into a small socket, which allows the
crystal to be easily changed. For older Matrix TSL courses
a 3.2768MHz crystal is recommended. These frequencies
are chosen as they divide down by PICmicro prescalers
to give suitable frequencies for clock systems and for
facilitating serial communication using standard baud
rates.
The Jumper link system J18, J19 allows PICmicro devices
with internal oscillators to route the signals from the
oscillator pins through to Port A pins 6 and 7. This allows
the devices with internal oscillators to use all 8-bits of
the Port A for I/O operation.
Copyright © 2014 Matrix Technology Solutions Ltd
6. In-Circuit Debugging
The Multiprogrammer board has an in-circuit debugging
(ICD) connection between the USB peripheral device
and the target microcontroller. This allows the Flowcode
software to start, stop, step and inspect an active
program, synchronized both in hardware and Flowcode
6 software. As well as the standard ICD operation,
Flowcode is capable of reading back real time variable
values from the target device.
To use the Microchip PICkit2 ICSP interface, remove
the power supply and the USB cable from the
Multiprogrammer. Then place the 3-way jumper link
associated with J12-14 to the left hand side of the 3 x
3 header pins, labeled ‘ICSP’. Then simply connect the
PICkit into the Multiprogrammer via header J20.
7. In-Circuit Test
The Multiprogrammer board has an in-circuit test (ICT)
connection between the USB peripheral device and all
of the target microcontroller’s I/O pins. This allows the
Flowcode 6 software to monitor all of the signals on the
board in either analogue or digital modes.
The in circuit test feature can be combined with packet
decoding to allow data and control busses to be explored
and debugged
8. Low voltage programming
Many PICmicros have a low voltage programming mode
where it is possible to program the device without the
need for a 12V supply line or charge pump. The difficulty
here is that different families of PICmicro devices use
different pins as the Low Voltage programming pin. B3 is
predominantly used for this function but B4 and B5 are
also used on some devices. For this reason the version
9 EB006 does not support low voltage programming
modes so care must be taken when generating the chip
configuration to disable the low voltage programming
functionality. If the low voltage programming
configuration is left enabled then you will not be able to
use the LVP pin as an I/O pin in your application.
Protective cover
Most of the boards in the E-blocks range can be fitted
with a plastic cover as an optional extra. These covers
are there to protect your E-blocks board therefore
extending the life of the board. The covers also prevent
the removal of external components while still allowing
for the adjustment of applicable parts on the board.
12mm M3 spacers, anti-slip M3 nuts and 25mm M3 bolts
can be used to attached the cover to the board. These
are not included but can be bought separately from our
website.
The order code for the EB006 PICmicro® MCU
microcontroller cover is EB706.
7
Copyright © 2014 Matrix Technology Solutions Ltd
PICmicro microcontroller pin out details
Broadly speaking the ranges of PICmicro devices are
designed to be upwards compatible: the pin functions
on an 18-pin device are available on a 28-pin device and
a 40-pin device. This can be seen from the following
excerpt from the Microchip product selector card. The
following diagram shows the pin out of the various
PICmicro devices:
18-pin PICmicro
8-pin PICmicro
Note that GP0 maps to RB7
GP1 maps to RB6
GP2/AN2 maps to RA0/AN0
RA2/AN2/Vrefout
1
18
RA1/AN1
Vdd
1
8
Vss
RA3/AN3/CMP1/Vrefin
2
17
RA0/AN0
GP5/OSC1/CLKIN
2
7
GP0/AN0
GP4/OSC2/AN3/CLKOUT
3
6
GP1/AN1/Vref
Vpp/GP3/MCLR
4
5
GP2/T0CKI/AN2/INT
RA4/T0CKI/CMP2
3
16
OSC1/CLKIN/RA7
Vpp/RA5/THV/MCLR
4
15
OSC2/CLKOUT/RA6
Vss
5
14
Vdd
RBO/INT
6
13
RB7/T1OSI
RB1/RX/DT
7
12
RB6/T1OSO/T1CKI
RB2/TX/CK
8
11
RB5
RB3/CCP1
9
10
RB4/PGM
20-pin PICmicro
14-pin PICmicro
Vdd
1
14
Vss
RA5/T1CKI/OSC1/CLKIN
2
13
RA0/CIN+/ICSPDAT
RA4/TIG/OSC2/CKLOUT
3
12
RA1/CIN-/ICSPCLK
RA3/MCLR/Vpp
4
11
RA2/COUT/T0CKI/INT
Rc5
5
10
Rc0
Vdd
1
20
Vss
Rc4
6
9
Rc1
RA5/OSC1/CLKIN
2
19
RA0/D+/PGD
Rc3
7
8
Rc2
RA4/AN3/OSC2/CLKOUT
3
18
RA1/D-/PGC
RA3/MCLR/Vpp
4
17
VUSB
RC5/CCP1/P1A
5
16
RC0/AN4/INTO/VREF+
RC4/P1B
6
15
RC1/AN5/INT1/VREF-
RC3/AN7/P1C/PGM
7
14
MCLR
1
40
RB7/PGO/KB13
RC2/AN6/INT2
RA0/AN0
2
39
RB6/PGC/KB12
RA1/AN1
3
38
RB5/KBI1
RA2/AN2/Vrl/Vref-
4
37
RB4/KBI0
RA3/AN3/Vrh/Vref+
5
36
RB3/PGM/CCP2/CANRX
RA4/T0CKI
6
35
RB2/INT2/CANTX
RA5/AN4/SS/Lvdin
7
34
RB1/INT1
RC6/AN8/T1OSCO
8
13
RB4/AN10/SDI/SDA
RC7/AN9/SDO/T1OSCO
9
12
RB5/AN11/RX/DT
10
11
RB6/SCK/SCL
RB7/TX/CK
40-pin PICmicro
28-pin PICmicro
RE0/AN5/RD
8
33
RB0/INT0
Vpp/MCLR
1
28
RB7/PGO
RE1/AN6/WR
9
32
Vdd
RA0/AN0
2
27
RB6/PGC
RE3/AN7/CS
10
31
Vss
RA1/AN1
3
26
RB5
Avdd
11
30
RD7/PSP7/PD
RA2/AN2/Vrl/Vref-
4
25
RB4
Avss
12
29
RD6/PSP6/PC
RA3/AN3/Vrh/Vref+
5
24
RB3/PGM/CCP2
OSC1/CLKI
13
28
RD5/PSP5/PB
RA4/T0CKI
6
23
RB2/INT2
OSC2/CLKO/RA6
14
27
RD4/PSP4/ECC/PA
RA5/AN4/SS/Avdd/Lvdin
7
22
RB1/INT1
RC0/T1OSO/T1CKI
15
26
RC7/RX/DT
Vss
8
21
RB0/INT
RC1/T1OSVCCP2
16
25
RC6/TX/CK
OSC1/CLKI
9
20
Vdd
RC2/CCP1
17
24
RC5/SKO/D+
8
OSC2/CLKO/T1CKI
10
19
Vss
RC3/SCK/SCL
18
23
RC4/SDI/SDA/D-
RC0/T1OSO/CCP2I
11
18
RC7/RX/DT
RD0/PSP0/C1IN+
19
22
RD3/PSP3/C2IN
RC1/T1OS/CCP2I
12
17
RC6/TX/CK
RD1/PSP1/C1IN-
20
21
RD2/PSP2/C2IN+
RC2/CCP1
13
16
RC5/SDO/D+
RC3/SKC/SCL
14
15
RC4/SKI/SDA/D-
Copyright © 2014 Matrix Technology Solutions Ltd
Bus connections
1. Expansion bus
The pin connections on the expansion bus exactly mirror
the pin numbering on the 40-pin DIL socket. Note that
the pin numbering on the IDC socket is slightly different
to that on a DIL socket which results in the seemingly
odd arrangement of pins on the IDC pin chart.
PICmicro pinout
Bus name
18 Pin
8 Pin
14 Pin
20 Pin
28 Pin
40 Pin
Vpp/MCLR
4
4
4
4
1
1
Vdd
14
1
1
1
20
11 & 32
Vss
5
8
77
20
8 & 19
12 &31
OCS1
16
2
2
2
9
13
OCS2
15
3
3
3
10
14
RA0/AN0
17
19
2
2
RA1/AN1
18
18
3
3
RA2/AN2
1
4
4
RA3/AN3
2
4
5
5
RA4
3
3
6
6
RA5/AN4
4
2
7
7
RB0
6
21
33
RB1
7
22
34
RB2
8
23
35
RB3
9
24
36
RB4
10
13
25
37
RB5
11
12
26
38
RB6
12
6*
12*
11
27
39
RB7
13
7*
5*
11*
13*
10
28
40
RC0
10
16
11
15
RC1
9
15
12
16
RC2
8
14
13
17
RC3
7
7
14
18
RC4
6
6
15
23
RC5
5
5
16
24
RC6
8
17
25
RC7
9
18
26
RD0
19
RD1
20
RD2
21
RD3
22
RD4
27
RD5
28
RD6
29
RD7
30
RE0/AN5
8
RE1/AN6
9
RE2/AN7
10
9
For the 18, 28 and 40 pin devices the buses on devices
are largely upwards compatible - pin connections on an
18-pin device appear on a 28-pin device and a 40-pin
device, and pins on a 28-pin device appear on a 40-pin
device. This allows the 18, 28 and 40 pin DIL sockets to
be connected in parallel with the PICmicro bus structure
intact.
* This parallel connection is not possible with 8, 14 and
20 pin devices due to programming requirements which
means that there are anomalies with the pin connections
for the 8, 14 and 20 pin devices as follows:
Multiprogrammer port
line
Connection pin on 20
pin device
20 pin port line
RB2
5
RA2
RB6
6
RA1
RB7
7
RA0
Multiprogrammer port
line
Connection pin on 14
pin device
14 pin port line
RB2
5
RA2
RB6
6
RA1
RB7
7
RA0
Multiprogrammer port
line
Connection pin on 8
pin device
8 pin port line
RB2
1
RA2
RB6
12
RA1
RB7
13
RA0
Copyright © 2014 Matrix Technology Solutions Ltd
2. Connections on the IDC expansion connectors
Bus name
40 pin
J5 IDC connector
J24 IDC connector
Vpp/MCLR
1
1
2
VCCchip
11& 32
18 & 21
21,22
GND
12 & 31
20 & 23
5
OCS1
13
25
26, 25
OCS2
14
27
28, 27
RA0/AN0
2
3
4
RA1/AN1
3
5
6
RA2
4
7
8
RA3/AN3
5
9
10
RA4/AN4
6
11
12
RA5
7
13
14
RB0
33
16
RB1
34
14
RB2
35
12
RB3
36
10
RB4
37
8
RB5
38
6
RB6
39
4
37
RB7
40
2
39
RC0
15
29
30
RC1
16
31
32
RC2
17
33
34
RC3
18
35
36
RC4
23
36
RC5
24
34
RC6
25
32
RC7
26
30
RD0
19
37
38
RD1
20
39
40
RD2
21
40
RD3
22
38
RD4
27
28
RD5
28
26
RD6
29
24
RD7
30
22
RE0/AN5
8
15
16
RE1/AN6
9
17
18
RE2/AN7
10
19
20
35
Note: J5 is set to copy the 40-way DIL socket
10
Copyright © 2014 Matrix Technology Solutions Ltd
Circuit diagram
11
Copyright © 2014 Matrix Technology Solutions Ltd
Circuit diagram
12
Copyright © 2014 Matrix Technology Solutions Ltd
Matrix Technology Solutions Ltd.
The Factory
33 Gibbet Street
Halifax, HX1 5BA, UK
t: +44 (0)1422 252380
e: [email protected]
www.matrixtsl.com
EB006-30-9
Was this manual useful for you? yes no
Thank you for your participation!

* Your assessment is very important for improving the work of artificial intelligence, which forms the content of this project

Download PDF

advertisement