Excalibur | Ivan II | User manual | Excalibur Ivan II User manual

IVA
VAN ”THE
”THE TERRIBLE”
TERRIBLE”
USER MANUAL
ENTER THE FUTURE OF
COMPUTERIZED CHESS!
Excalibur Electronics is the pioneer of computerized chess games. In the
last few years, through spectacular growth and widened horizons,
Excalibur has become one of the most prominent electronic game
manufacturers in the world.
The highlight of our collection is the Mirage. This unique robotic chess
set has the advanced technology to move chess pieces by itself! It also has
the intelligence to beat over 90% of all chess players. By using our
Robotic Technology and powered by an 8 bit 10 MHz processor, the
Mirage will amuse and dazzle everyone. With automated chess pieces
the computer moves effortlessly across the board, the Mirage will provide
the most unique chess playing experience in the world. Match wits with
the computer, or simply sit back, and watch the computer play itself.
The Mirage comes with an extensive list of features that can help
beginners improve their game and challenge advanced players as well.
Table of Contents
INTRODUCTION
2
FUNCTION OF IVAN’S KEYS
3
QUICK START
4
GETTING STARTED
5
LEVELS
14
HOW TO USE YOUR PIECES
22
TROUBLESHOOTING GUIDE
44
GENERAL INFORMATION
46
Other innovative Excalibur products include a two-in-one chess and
checkers set and Ivan “The Terrible”, the chess game with a personality
that actually talks to you. We have upgraded our products with new
looks, new designs and more user friendly features. So, experience the
future of electronic chess and see why the most innovative games in the
world have the name Excalibur Electronics on them.
Excalibur Electronics.....We make you think.
1
FUNCTION OF IVAN’S KEYS:
INTRODUCTION
Congratulations! You now own Ivan The Terrible, a wonderful chess
computer that will surprise you with its strong chess program and delight you
with his outrageous speaking vocabulary. If you are a strong chess player, you
will find IVAN to be an admirable opponent that will challenge you to one
exciting chess game after another. If you are just learning to play chess, IVAN
will be a helpful friend and instructor. As you play the computer, IVAN will
help you to grasp the essentials of chess.
If you would like to play a game of chess against your chess computer
immediately, without first reading the entire instruction manual, simply turn
to the QUICK START section and let the game begin!
When you first look at IVAN, you will see the Control Panel. The control
panel contains the buttons that access different functions and features during a
game. You will find the Control Panel described in detail later in this manual.
First, take a moment to look at the playing surface. You will see each square is
numbered by a rank and file coordinates that will help you to enter piece
locations for your moves. There is a magnetic sensor under each square to
help keep your pieces in place and to automatically sense all game moves. The
voice feature enables the computer to communicate more information to you
than conventional models. You will learn more about features and controls as
you play. In this instruction manual we use WHITE and BLACK to describe
the white square and black square symbols that appear on the computer’s
display. The display itself is called an “LCD” (liquid crystal
display). The piece names PAWN, KNIGHT, BISHOP,
ROOK, QUEEN and KING describe the symbols that
appear on the LCD and on the keys to represent these
chess pieces.
SETUP: Used to add or remove chess pieces and to enter special positions.
LEVEL: Used to change skill levels.
HINT: Used to obtain hints and scoring.
VERIFY: Used to verify the position of the chess pieces on the board.
MULTI MOVE: Used to enter multiple moves for both sides.
MOVE: Used to switch sides or to control the length of time Ivan is thinking.
OFF / SAVE : Puts IVAN into a sleep mode and saves your game.
OPTION: Used to change the many available sound options.
TAKEBACK: Used to take back moves and mistakes.
NO: Used to answer NO to a question or to turn a feature off.
< > : Used to increase or decrease the volume or levels.
On / Clear : Used to turn Ivan ON or to Clear an entry.
BLK/WHT: Used to choose color of side to move in Setup Mode.
REPEAT: Used to repeat the last phrase spoken by Ivan.
YES: Used to answer YES to a question or to turn a feature ON.
NEW GAME: Starts a New Game.
MODE: Used to enter the teach mode and to learn piece movement.
Right now, why not sit down “face to face” with
your new opponent and challenge him to a
game...Only if you dare risk being crushed by
one of the strongest manipulating forces in
chess...and to find out why, they call him
“Ivan The Terrible.”
2
3
QUICK START
1. POWER - Insert the batteries in the base of the computer as specified by the
label near the battery compartment, remembering to ensure that the positive
tip of each battery matches up with the + sign in the battery compartment.
This game may be operated using an optional AC adapter, which should be in
a voltage range of 6-8 volts and 100-200 Milliamps. The tip of the connector
should be positive.
2. SET UP CHESS PIECES - Place the chess pieces in their initial starting
position, with the white pieces closest to you. If you choose to play black, then
go to the section “Black from the bottom”.
3. TURN ON - Press the ON button to power up the IVAN. If the display
does not scroll CHESS, then press a pointed object, such as a paper clip, into
the RESET hole on the bottom of the unit to clear any data which might be
stored in the game.
7. SWITCH OFF AND SAVE POSITION - At anytime you wish to stop
playing just press the OFF/SAVE key. The computer will switch off and go
into a sleep mode. IVAN will now remember the last position as long as you
do not interrupt the power supply. To resume play press the ON/Clear key.
GETTING STARTED:
1 THE BATTERIES AND POWER SUPPLY
Your chess computer works with 4 “AA” batteries. Based on normal playing
conditions, you should experience approximately 40 hours of battery life (or 1
month when switched to SAVE) when using new alkaline batteries. When
you wish to insert new batteries, remove the plastic battery cover on the base of
the computer and insert the batteries, making sure that the polarity of the
batteries is correct. If the computer fails to respond (Static discharge from
new batteries may cause it to lock up) use a paper clip or other pointed object
to press into the hole marked RESET in the base of the unit. This will act as a
master reset for your computer.
4. START THE GAME - Press NEW GAME and Ivan will introduce
himself. PLAY CHESS will scroll in the display.
5. MAKE YOUR MOVE - Make your moves and those of the computer by
pressing down lightly with the piece on its current square and then press down
with the same piece on its new square. If the move does not seem to have
registered, press down with the edge of the piece. Ivan displays its moves, with
the FROM and TO square, plus the piece and color symbol illuminated in
the LCD. After you have pressed the computer’s piece on the FROM square,
the display will show you only the TO square reminding you to finish the
computer’s turn. The clock will now begin to count the time it takes you and
Ivan to make your moves. For example, if you press the pawn on (E2), the E
and the 2 will appear on the display along with the symbol for white and the
pawn. Then press on the TO square (E4). The computer will display your full
move “E2-E4” and then display its move.
6. WATCH COMPUTER’S MOVE - When the computer makes its move,
it will show the move in the display. The display will then begin counting
your move time. Make your next move and continue the game. Enjoy the
fascinating Ivan.
4
1.1 LOW BATTERIES
When battery power drops, the low battery indicator will show in the LCD.
On the left side of the display, BAT will appear. The batteries should be
changed soon or else your computer may begin behaving erratically, or
signaling impossible or illegal moves. Ivan’s voice may also begin to sound
unclear.
1.2 AC OPERATION (OPTIONAL)
For AC operation, plug the transformer into an AC wall outlet and plug the
connector into the right side of Ivan. We recommend using an AC adapter
with a voltage range of 6-8 volts and 100-200 Miliamps. The tip of the
connector should be positive. Depending on how frequently you play, you
may want to purchase an AC adapter available for this game to achieve the best
performance. If you have difficulty locating an Excalibur adapter locally, you
can fill out the order form inside your box or call our customer service
department for more information.
5
2. STARTING A GAME
A. Set up the pieces on the chess board in their starting positions,. with the
white pieces nearest to you (see the USCF’s “LETS PLAY CHESS” rules
found in your Ivan box, if you are unsure of the piece positions). If you
choose to play black, then go to the section “Black from the bottom”.
IVAN is a player who can speak but cannot see. If you move a piece on the
board without using the sensory technology, the computer will still think there
is a piece at the previous location. The same is true when you remove a piece.
If you ever have a question concerning the board position, just use the
VERIFY mode (pg.15) to check the position.
B. Press the ON button.
Note: At the beginning of a game, the computer’s reply is often instantaneous
on many levels, because it is playing moves that are stored in its book opening’s
library and therefore, does not need anytime to think.
C. Press NEW GAME, Ivan will now introduce himself and ask you to
prepare for battle. The display will scroll the words PLAY CHESS, indicating
that Ivan is now ready to play. It is now your move.
D. To make a move, lightly press
down on the center of the square with
the piece you want to move. This will
be the FROM square. Now pick up
the same selected piece and press down
on the square you want to move to.
This is called the TO square. The
sensor board registers your move. The
display window also indicates your
move, for example E2E4. Make your
moves and those of the computer by
pressing down lightly with the piece on
its current square and then press down
with the same piece on its new square. If the move does not seem to have
registered, press down with the edge of the piece. Ivan displays its moves,
with the FROM and TO square, plus the piece and color symbol, illuminated
in the LCD. After you have pressed the computer’s piece on the FROM
square, the display will show you only the TO square reminding you to finish
the computers turn. The clock will now begin to count the time it takes you
and Ivan to make your moves. For example, if you press the pawn on (E2),
the E and the 2 will appear on the display along with the symbol for white and
the pawn. Then press on the TO square (E4). The computer will display your
full move “E2-E4” and then display its move. If your move does not seem to
have registered, press down lightly with the edge of the piece to activate the
sensor under your playing surface. Pressing harder on the square will not make
your piece register any better, it may only damage your game.
6
TAKE BACK
If you press the TO square and change your mind, or if you just do not like
the outcome of your last few moves then press the TAKEBACK button. The
display will now show the last move in the window. Press on the
corresponding squares until you have taken back the moves of the game to
your desired position. If the move you have just taken back was a capturing
move, once you have moved the capturing piece back to its FROM square the
symbol for the captured piece will be illuminated on the LCD. You then take
the appropriate piece and press it down gently on the TO square of the move
you have just taken back. When you press on this square the piece symbol
will go out.
When taking back your moves you must complete the computers last move.
Once you have completed the computer’s move you can then take back your
move. NOTE : That in the case of En Passant capture the captured pawn
does not get replaced on the TO square of the capturing pawn. If you decide
to take back a move, you may only do so when it is your turn to move. Once
you have taken back the position to your desired move choice, just begin again
with your new choice or press MOVE if it is the computer’s turn to move.
Following this procedure allows you to take back up to 12 moves previously
made in the game. If you press the FROM square and change your mind, just
press the FROM square again to clear your entry and make another move.
You may also use the CLEAR button to do the same thing.
7
SOUND FEATURES
Volume
You have the ability to control the volume of Ivan’s voice and features. By
pressing OPTION you will see L O U D appear in the LCD window. You
will also see a number ranging from 1-8. These numbers are the eight
different volume levels that are available with 1 being the softest and 8 being
the loudest. You can increase the volume by pressing > and you can decrease
by pressing <.
Sound Effects
Ivan comes equipped with many different sound effects. You can hear
anything from sword battles when you capture a piece to the galloping of a
horse when moving your knight. Ivan has even been known to laugh and
tease his opponents. You can also combine this feature with the other different
speaking modes. To control the sound effects you must do the following.
Press OPTION until S N D F appears in the LCD window. This stands for
Sound Effects. IF a “-” appears next to S N D F then that feature is on. If
there is no “-” then that feature is off. By pressing the ON or OFF keys this
will control the “-” in the options mode. Therefore, S N D F - means that
your sound effects are on.
Speech and Personality
Ivan has the ability to actually interact with you during your game. He can ask
you questions, which are answered by the YES and NO keys. He will be nice
and humble if you should happen to be winning the game. Beware, Ivan
enjoys winning. He will amuse and most likely abuse you, if he gets ahead.
Even though it may sound like Ivan is laughing at you, we would like to say he
is only laughing with you. In coach/teach mode Ivan will always be nice. He
loves training new warriors for battle.
You control his speech feature by using the OPTION key. Press OPTION
until S P C H appears in the LCD window. This stands for Speech. If a “-”
appears next to S P C H then that feature is on. If there is no “-” then that
feature is off. By pressing the ON and OFF keys this will control the “-” in
the options mode. Therefore, S P C H - means that your Ivan’s speech and
personality are on.
8
Move Announce
If you choose, you can have Ivan only announce the legal moves of chess and
leave out his comments. He will announce piece movements and other
necessary chess terms. This feature can also be combined with the SPEACH
feature to have Ivan announce moves and to comment on your play. This
feature could actually allow a blind player to play chess with Ivan. To activate
this feature, press OPTION until A N N C appears in the LCD display. This
can be controlled by using your ON and Off keys to adjust the “-” in the
display.
Beeper
If you choose you can turn off all of the previous sound features and play only
with a move beeper. To do so, just make sure that the other sound features are
turned off and that the beeper is on. To activate the beeper press OPTION
until B E E P appears in the window. By pressing the ON and OFF keys you
can control the “-” which turns your beeper on and off. B E E P - means that
your beeper is on.
Coach
Ivan has the ability to coach you during play. This feature is designed for
beginner to intermediate players who could use some additional help during
play. In this mode, Ivan will warn you if he thinks you have a major piece in
danger. He will give you the option to change a move if you are about to lose a
piece. He will ask you if you are sure you want to make that particular move.
You must answer with a yes or no answer. To activate Coach press the
OPTION until C O C H appears in the LCD window. By pressing the ON
and OFF keys you can control the “-” which turns your coaching feature on and
off. C O C H - means that your coaching feature is on.
Total Silence
If you want total silence when you play Ivan, just make sure all of the above
sound features are turned off.
GAME OVER? START A NEW GAME ANYTIME
Whenever you finish a game (or if you decide to abort your current game) you
may reset the computer to start another game simply by pressing NEW GAME,
the display will show C H E S S. The computer will automatically reset the
board. IMPORTANT - Pressing NEW GAME clears the current game from
the computer’s memory — be careful not to press this key by mistake!
9
TOO EASY OR TOO HARD? CHANGE THE LEVEL
When the computer is first turned on, it is set to Level 6, which is the weakest
level. However, you may choose a different level. To change the level, simply
press LEVEL and the computer will display the current playing level. You can
change levels one at a time by pressing the arrow buttons or by 10 levels at a
time by holding down the arrow button for a full second. To lower the level of
play press the arrow pointing to the left. To raise the level press the arrow
pointing to the right. Continue pressing the desired arrow until the level you
want appears in the display. When you have selected your desired level, press
the CLEAR button and continue playing.
PIECE SYMBOLS SHOWN IN THE DISPLAY
THE CHESS RULES
Remember that your computer knows the rules of the game, including the
rules about castling, en passant captures, pawn promotion and stalemate. It
will never break any of these rules. Sometimes it may seem that the computer
has made an irregular move. What may have happened is that you
accidentally made a mistake when entering a move, or you may have
accidentally put one or more of the chess pieces on the wrong square during
the game. If this happens, you should verify the locations of all the pieces by
using “Verify Position” mode.
If you are in any doubt about the rules of chess, you should take another look
at the U. S Chess Federation’s “Let’s Play Chess” rules found in your box.
En Passant
For an “En Passant” capture, press the FROM and TO squares of the
capturing pawn. The square of the pawn being captured will then appear on
the display. This is to remind you to remove the captured pawn. You must
press down on the captured pawn before removing it from the board.
Pawn
Queen
Knight
Bishop
Rook
King
CAPTURING MOVES
Captures are performed just like any other move. The moving piece is pressed
down on the FROM and TO squares while the captured piece is removed
from the board without being pressed. If the computer makes a capture move
it flashes the right most : Symbol when displaying the FROM and TO
squares on the LCD.
When making an en passant capture, the computer directs you to move the
capturing pawn in the usual way. It then indicates the square from which the
captured pawn is to be removed. Press down with this pawn as you remove it
from the board.
10
Castling
The computer automatically recognizes castling maneuvers after the King is
moved two squares. After you have pressed the King down on its FROM and
TO squares, IVAN’S display will remind you to press down on the Rook’s
FROM and TO squares to finish the move. Remember you must always
move the King first when castling. It is illegal to move the rook first. See U.
S. Chess Federation’ s rules of chess if you do not fully understand the rules
for Castling.
Pawn Promotion
For Pawn Promotion, make your next pawn move to the last row as usual.
Then, press the piece symbol button for the desired piece to enter your
promotion choice into the computer. The computer immediately recognizes
your new piece, and begins thinking about its next move. The computer can
also under promote. Under promoting is when you would like another piece
other than the Queen. If you wanted, let’s say, a Knight you would just press
the Knight symbol when promoting your pawn. When the computer
promotes, it displays the newly promoted piece. Remember to change the
piece on the board after a pawn promotion.
11
ILLEGAL MOVES / WRONG MOVES
IVAN never accepts illegal moves. If you attempt such a move, the computer
sounds a low double beep, and the display will continue to indicate the square
the piece came from. Since the computer will not allow you to move to an
illegal square, it completely disregards that square and waits for a legal entry.
Either move that same piece to another square, or press the piece back down
on its original FROM square and move a different piece. If you press down
on a piece and the from square appears in the display, but you decide not to
make that move, press down on that same square again to cancel the input.
This has the same effect as using CLEAR. You may also use the CLEAR
button to change the move. Now make another move of your choice. If you
change your mind after entering your whole move, you must use the TAKE
BACK button.
CHECK, MATE, AND DRAW
When a King is in check, the computer displays a flashing “CHEC” on the
display. If you are in check, the computer will only allow you to make a move
which will bring you out of check. Any other move, and the computer will
respond that it is an illegal move. When a game ends in checkmate, the
computer displays the move as usual, and then displays “U Lose” or “I lose.”
The computer recognizes draws by stalemate, consecutive 3-fold repetition,
and the 50-move rule. See the following chart for the various draw displays. If
you are unfamiliar with these draws, refer to the “Let’s Play Chess” pamphlet.
GAME SYMBOLS SHOWN IN THE DISPLAY
Checkmate
U LOSE or I LOSE
Draw (Stalemate) STALEMATE
Draw (3-Fold Repetition) DR 3
Draw (50-Move Rule) DR 50
12
TERMINATING THE COMPUTERS SEARCH
To interrupt the computer while it is thinking, press MOVE. This forces the
computer to play the best move it has found so far. This feature can be very
useful on the higher levels, where the computer can take a long time to move.
On the Infinite Level, for instance, the computer keeps thinking indefinitely
until it either finds a mate or determines that it cannot avoid mate but you can
stop its search on this level at any time with MOVE.
Note: On the Position Solving Levels, pressing MOVE does not cause the
computer to make a move. Instead, the computer sounds an error beep to
indicate that it was interrupted before it found a mate. To continue your
game, switch to another playing level.
CHANGING SIDES WITH THE COMPUTER
You may change sides with the computer at any time by pressing MOVE
when it is your turn to move. This causes the computer to make the next
move for your side. You may change sides as often as you wish.
Note: Pressing MOVE twice at the beginning of a game causes the computer
to make the first move for White playing from the top of the board (see Black
From The Bottom).
BOOK OPENINGS
At the beginning of a game, Ivan’s reply is usually instantaneous on many
levels, because the computer is playing moves that are stored in its book
opening library. The computer’s opening library consists of many positions
from grandmaster play. If the current board position is in its opening book,
instead of thinking about a move, Ivan instantly plays a response to that
position from its collection of moves.
THINKING ON THE OPPONENTS TIME
As you play, you will notice that the computer may reply to your moves
instantaneously. This is because the computer thinks while you are thinking,
using the time you are contemplating a move to plan ahead and develop its
strategies. The Ivan will try to anticipate the move you are likely to make and
calculate a response for that move before you have made the move. If it has
guessed right, it will strike immediately and play the move it found while you
were thinking.
13
GAME MEMORY
You may interrupt a game and save your position at any time by pressing the
ON/OFF button. Play is then suspended, and the computer will remember
the current position. Ivan will remember your position as long as you do not
interrupt the power supply! When you switch on again, the computer is ready
to resume your game.
LEVELS
Ivan has 100 different levels. Levels 1-94 are used when you are playing a
game against the computer. Levels 95-100 are used to make your computer
perform a position solving search.
THE PLAYING LEVELS
At the start of the game the computer uses its openings “book” which contains
thousands of moves, and when it is still in its openings book the program will
move instantly. Once the program is out of its openings book the thinking
times for the various playing levels are:
Level times and Responses
LEVEL 1 User Adaptable: The computer calculates the average time you have
taken over your past 6 moves and will respond in the same average time. If
you slow down, the computer will also slow down. If you start to play more
quickly, the computer will also play more quickly
FIXED PLY SEARCH
Levels 6 is the fastest and weakest level and your computer will respond almost
instantly on every move. The playing strength improves progressively from
level 6 (the weakest of this group of levels) to level 2 (the strongest of this
group). When you put in new batteries or when you switch on the computer
while using a power adapter, it will be set to level 6. This level is designed for a
beginning player, using only a 1 ply search. A ply is a half move. When the
player moves and the computer responds with a move, this is one complete
move. There are 2 plies for one move. If you are a beginner and you are not
winning in level 6, we have some additional things you can do to help with
your chess training process. One option would be to use the SETUP feature
and remove the computer’s Queen and then begin the game. With a Queen
advantage a beginner should have a better chance against the computer.
When you win in this position, return the queen and then try to win by
14
removing the rook. Continue returning pieces until you are winning against
the computer with an even set of pieces on the board. Then go to level 5....etc.
LEVEL 2
LEVEL 3
LEVEL 4
LEVEL 5
LEVEL 6
5 PLY
4 PLY
3 PLY
2 PLY
1 PLY
FIXED TIME LEVELS
The computer will always respond in exactly the specified amount of time,
unless it has only one legal move, in which case it will play instantly, or unless
it sees that it can force checkmate, or can not avoid being checkmated, in
which case it will make its move as soon as it finds the mating sequence.
Remember the longer you allow the computer to think, the stronger it will
play.
7
8
9
10
11
12
25
26
27
28
29
30
1secs
2secs
3secs
4secs
5secs
6secs
1min
1min
13
14
15
16
17
18
7secs
8secs
9secs
10secs
12secs
14secs
40secs
45secs
50secs
60secs
15secs
30secs
31
32
33
34
35
36
19
20
21
22
23
24
16secs
18secs
20secs
25secs
30secs
35secs
1min 45secs
2min
2min 15secs
2min 45secs
2min 45secs
3minutes
15
AVERAGE TIME LEVELS
The computer will take an average of the specified amount of time. If it has
only one legal move it will respond instantly.
37
38
39
40
41
42
55
56
57
58
59
60
1secs
2secs
3secs
4secs
5secs
6secs
43
44
45
46
47
48
7secs
8secs
9secs
10secs
12secs
14secs
1min
1min
40secs
45secs
50secs
60secs
15secs
30secs
61
62
63
64
65
66
16
49
50
51
52
53
54
16secs
18secs
20secs
25secs
30secs
35secs
1min 45secs
2min
2min 15secs
2min 45secs
2min 45secs
3minutes
COUNTDOWN LEVELS
You or the computer must try to make all of the moves in a fixed amount of
time. When set to any of these levels the computer will display the total
amount of time taken by each of the players (instead of the amount of time
taken over a particular move). The clock will countdown the remaining time
left in the game. When either player consumes the permitted total time a sour
beep sounds and the word TIME appears in the display. Then a sour beep
sounds which indicates a loss due to surpassing the fixed time. If you so
choose, the game will still allow you to continue the game and disregard the
time controls.
67
68
69
70
71
2mins.
3mins.
4mins.
5mins.
6mins.
82
83
84
85
86
72
73
74
75
76
45mins.
50mins.
55mins.
60mins.
75mins.
7mins.
8mins.
9mins.
10mins.
15mins.
87
88
89
17
77
78
79
80
81
90mins.
105mins.
120mins.
20mins.
25mins.
30mins.
35mins.
40mins.
TOURNAMENT LEVELS
The computer will play within the specified rate. The clocks will show the
total time consumed. Time saved during the first time period can be added to
the next time period.
LEVEL 90
LEVEL 91
LEVEL 92
LEVEL 93
60 moves every 60 minutes
40 moves every 60 minutes
40 moves In 120 minutes then
20 moves every 60 minutes
20 moves every 60 minutes
INFINITE LEVEL
On level 94 the computer will normally go on thinking, to find the best
possible move, until you press the MOVE key. Otherwise it will not move,
unless:
(a)
(b)
(c)
it has a “book” move available;
it runs out of memory for its analysis of the position; or
it completes the analysis to its own satisfaction, e.g. by finding a
forced mate.
MATE Solving Levels
Levels 95-100 are mate solving levels.
LEVEL 95
LEVEL 96
LEVEL 97
LEVEL 98
LEVEL 99
LEVEL 100
Mate in 1
Mate in 2
Mate in 3
Mate in 4
Mate in 5
Mate in 6
SETTING UP POSITIONS AND PROBLEMS
By using the SET UP button you may change the position on the board by
adding or removing pieces or setting up a problem you want IVAN to solve.
You can also change the direction of the game, strengthen your side or the
computer’s, resurrect lost pieces or even move your king out of an imminent
checkmate situation. To change a position on the board, press the SET UP
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button. The display will show SETUP. Press the symbol on the keyboard of
the piece you want to place or remove on the board. Then press the square of
the piece you want to move and then the square, where you want to place the
piece. Note the symbol color in the top left of the square to tell the computer
which color choice you are selecting. The open square denotes whites pieces
and the shaded square denotes black pieces. To choose a piece color you
would press the square with the piece once for white and twice for black. If
you press the square again that will remove a piece. Therefore, If there is a
white piece on a particular square it becomes a black piece if you press that
square again. If it is a black piece it becomes an empty square, if you press that
piece. If it is an empty square it then becomes a white piece once you press
that square again.
For example, if you want to start a new game with the computer having a
handicap of no queen you would do the following: Press SET UP, then press
the queen symbol. The computer will show you the piece location for whites
queen(D1). Now press the queen symbol again and you would now see the
black queen (D8) in the LCD. Press that square until it shows only the Queen
symbol and no piece location or color. That would now mean that the
computer is playing without its queen.
Proceed until you have reached the position you want. When you are
finished, press the CLEAR button and continue playing. You may want to
verify the positions before continuing the game. When you want to set up a
problem, you may find it easier to clear the board first, then press SET UP and
then OPTION. The display will show [?]. Ivan is asking you to confirm you
really wish to clear the board. Press OPTION once more and the board will
be clear. You will hear an error beep if you try to exit this mode without
placing the kings on the board. Ivan is reminding you that the position on
the board is illegal because there are no kings. Place the kings, or any other
piece, back on the board by pressing the piece symbol and then the square
where you wish it to be. In set up mode you may also change the color of the
side to move. Simply press the WHT/BLK button and the computer will
show S I D E in the display. Just choose either the black square for black or
the white square for white. You may only do this when you are in the set up
mode. When you have finished setting up your problem, press the CLEAR
button to exit from the set up mode. Now make your move, or if it is the
computers turn to move, just press the MOVE button.
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VERIFYING POSITION
Whenever you think a piece is in the wrong position on the board, or if you
want to restore a previously saved position, VERIFY will tell you what Ivan
believes the position is. You may use the VERIFY button at any time, before
or during a game as long as it is your turn to move. Press the VERIFY button
and the display will show the symbol for white, the queen, and the location of
the white queen, if there is one. Press the button a second time and the
display will show the symbol for black, the queen symbol and the location of
the black queen. Proceed by pressing each of the piece symbol buttons and
the display will show the location of each piece. When you have finished
verifying the pieces, simply press the CLEAR key to exit the verification mode
and resume play.
DON’T KNOW WHAT TO DO? ASK FOR A HINT
If you do not know which move to make, or you think the computer might
have a better idea, you can ask Ivan for a hint. Press the HINT once and the
computer will display what it thinks you should do based on its previous
search. If you choose to accept the hint then make that move. If you choose
not to accept the hint and you want to make another move then simply press
CLEAR and make another move.
Pressing the HINT button twice this will cause the display to show you the
score of the position. The score is always displayed from the Ivan’s point of
view. A plus score is good for Ivan and a minus score is good for you. The
numbers range from 0.0 to 9.9 where 1.0 means a pawn and 0.5 means a half
a pawn value because of superior position.
BLACK FROM THE BOTTOM
If you want to play black from the bottom of the board, press MOVE at the
beginning of a game and the display will show FLIP?. Ivan is asking you to
confirm your choice. Press MOVE again and the computer will flip the
white pieces with the black pieces. If, instead of pressing MOVE again, you
press CLEAR the computer will play white from the bottom of the board.
REPEAT
You may use the REPEAT button to repeat the last phrase said by Ivan.
MULTI MOVE
If you want to use the computer as a monitor and referee while you play
against a friend, you can use the Multi Move Mode. This feature allows you
to enter moves for both black and white pieces. Simply press the MULTI
MOVE button to enter the mode. When you are in Multi Move the display
will show PLAY. Then proceed with your game. Should you or your
opponent make an illegal move, the computer will beep and or notify you of
your illegal move. The Hint feature does not work in this mode. But if you
do require assistance you can press the MOVE key and the computer will
make what it thinks is the best possible move. You can have the computer, by
pressing the MULTI MOVE button, allow you to enter your own book
opening line by making moves for both sides, and then by exiting this feature
you can begin to play your game. To exit Multi Move, just press Multi Move
again and you are back into regular computer play.
The values are: pawn = 1; knight =3; bishop = 3; rook = 5; queen = 9.
Position superiority goes from 0.1 to 0.9.
Example - 1.75; Ivan thinks you are up in the position by 1 3/4 of a pawn.
Pressing the button one more time will cause Ivan to display the depth of
search that was just used to arrive at this move. The left number is the node
number and the right number is the ply number. Nodes are legal chess
positions the IVAN is examining each move.
Example 3 5 = The IVAN is examining the third position of the fifth ply.
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21
HOW TO USE YOUR PIECES
A Special Teaching Method Built into your Chess Computer!
WHAT IS OUR SPECIAL TEACHING METHOD?
Our special teaching method teaches beginners in a simple, methodical way,
the fundamentals of chess, ranging from individual-piece moves to strategies
for the whole game.
New players can choose from five easy-to-follow teaching modes. In the first
mode, for example, you compete against the computer in a game in which
only the pawns and kings are used. Once you have understood that mode,
you progress to the next modes where more chess pieces are used. The five
teaching modes are:
MODE 1:
MODE 2:
MODE 3:
MODE 4:
MODE 5:
In the following pages you will learn about the pawns and the other piece
types, and how they interact with each other. The piece symbols in the chess
diagrams are similar to those used on the piece type keys on your chess
computer.
CHESS NOTATION
We describe the moves of a chess game using a system called “algebraic
notation”. The files, or vertical columns of squares on the chessboard, are
identified by the letters a-h (looking at the board from White’s side, and
reading from left to right). The ranks, or horizontal rows, are numbered 1-8,
starting from the White end.
Black plays from this side
Uses kings and pawns.
Uses kings, knights and pawns.
Uses kings, bishops and pawns.
Uses kings, rooks and pawns.
Uses kings, queens and pawns.
This simple teaching method has proven to be the most effective teaching
method in chess.
HOW THE SPECIAL TEACHING METHOD WORKS
You can start a new game in which each player has only the king and eight
pawns. By playing this form of “mini-chess” you will gain valuable experience
as to how the pawns and kings interact with each other. For example, how a
king can be used to attack enemy pawns, or to prevent a passed pawn from
being promoted.
To start a game of mini-chess with only the kings and pawns on the board
press NEW GAME followed by the MODE, the display will now read
TEACH, then by selecting PAWN symbol.
Similarly, you can learn how each of the other piece types interacts with the
kings and pawns by pressing NEW GAME, MODE and then followed by
one of the other piece type keys (KNIGHT, BISHOP, ROOK or QUEEN).
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White plays from this side
So every square can be named by the letter of its file and the number of its
rank - like a grid reference on a map. At the start of the game the white king is
on e1 and the black queen is on d8.
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“ - “ between the “from” and “to” squares indicates a simple move.
“ x “ between the “from” and “to” squares indicates a capture.
The initial letter K (king), Q (queen), R (rook), B (bishop) or N (knight - to
distinguish it from a king), is used before the “from” square whenever a piece
other than a pawn is being moved.
Thus Ng1-f3 means “knight moves from g1 to f3”
while Re1xe7 means “rook on e1 captures on e7”.
KINGS AND PAWNS
When you press the NEW GAME key to start a new game you will see
CHESS displayed on the LCD. Instead of beginning from the usual initial
position, you may now press the MODE button then the PAWN key to
indicate that you wish to play with the kings and pawns only. The computer
will then be ready to start from the position shown in the above diagram after
it has removed the other pieces.
By playing many games against the computer from this position you will learn
how the kings can be used to attack and defend pawns and to help create
“passed pawns” which can later be promoted to queens. This is a very good
way to learn the fundamentals of chess. Once you are confident that you
understand how the kings and pawns relate to each other you can use the
modes which allow you to commence a game with only the kings and knights
on the board; or kings and bishops; or kings and rooks; or kings and queens.
You can now press move for each side to watch the computer play a random
game or you can choose to play our example.
From the above position let us assume that the game begins as follows:
1
2
3
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e2-e4
d2-d4
d4xe5
d7-d6
e7-e5
d6xe5
25
8
9
10
11
12
...
Ke6-d7
Kd7-c7
Kc7-b7
Kb7-b6
Kh8-g8
c7-c5
b7-b5
a7-a5
Black’s pawns at a5, b5 and c5 will now fall like ripe plums, and White will
win easily.
ACTIVE KING AND PASSIVE KING.
In this position, which is completely even, we shall see what happens if White
uses its king ACTIVELY, while Black does nothing and hides its king away
PASSIVELY in the comer.
4
5
6
Kel-d2 Ke8-f8
Kd2-d3 Kf8-g8
Kd3-c4 Kg8-h8
In just three moves White’s king has advanced to a menacing position while
Black’s is taking no active part in the game.
7
Kc4-d5
White threatens the pawn on e5. If this pawn falls White will be a pawn ahead
which is usually enough of an advantage to force a win.
7
8
...
Kd5-e6
f7-f6
Although Black has defended his e5 pawn White’s king marches on
mercilessly. The target is now the group of black pawns on c7, b7 and a7.
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PROBING FOR WEAKNESSES
In the previous example we learned some very important advice for the
endgame. YOUR KING IS AN ACTIVE PIECE. USE IT! Here White’s
king is actively placed but this time Black has also placed his king near the
center of the board. How can White make progress? The answer is to probe
Black’s position and try to create weaknesses. White now starts an advance on
the Q-side where he has the advantage because of his well placed king.
1
2
a2-a4
a4-a5
g7-g6
h7-h6?
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A mistake. Black has completely overlooked White’s idea.
3
a5-a6!!
A fine move. No matter how Black responds, the black pawns on the queen’s
side will be forced to weaken their formation, allowing the white king to
decimate them.
3
...
b7xa6
White was threatening simply 4 a6xb7, followed by 5 b7-b8, promoting to a
queen. Black’s only alternative was equally unpalatable: 3 ... b7-b6+ 4 Kc5-c6,
followed by Kc6xc7, Kc7-b7, Kb7xa7 and the white a-pawn will then
promote in a few moves.
4
Kc5-c6
White’s king will pick up the c7 pawn, then it will capture the pawns on the
a-file, and finally White will advance his b- and c-pawns to promotion.
CREATING A PASSED PAWN WHICH PAWN TO ADVANCE FIRST
In positions with only kings and pawns on the board, the key to victory lies in
creating passed pawns and marching them up the board to promotion.
Usually the player who first makes a new queen will be the one who wins the
game.
In the above position Black has the only passed pawn on the board (his hpawn). White has a 2:1 pawn majority on the queen’s side but has not yet
converted this into a passed pawn. How can he do so? White’s king must
keep an eye on Black’s h- pawn and prevent it from advancing to promotion,
so White must advance either his a- pawn or his b-pawn. Which should it be?
1
b3-b4!!
With this move White creates a passed pawn. The alternative, 1 a3-a4 allows
Black to blockade the queen’s side with 1...a6-a5, when White can not
advance his b-pawn without losing it for nothing.
1
28
...
Kh7-g8
29
Black sees what is about to happen and rushes back to try to stop White from
promoting.
2 a3-a4
3 b4-b5
A SACRIFICIAL BREAKTHROUGH FOR PROMOTION
Kg8-f8
a6xb5
Here White has a very neat way to win. The idea is to force through one of
his pawns to promotion before the black king can rush back to the queen’s
side. Can you see how?
4
a4-a5!!
1
The only good move. If White recaptures on b5 Black can catch the passed
pawn in time: 4 a4xb5 Kf8-e7 5 b5-b6 Ke7-d7 6 b6-b7 Kd7-c7, and the
white pawn will be captured so the game will end in a draw.
4
5
6
...
a5-a6
Ke4-d3
b5-b6!!
a7xb6
If Black tried 1 ... c7xb6 then 2 a5-a6!! sacrifices a second pawn to decoy the
black pawn on b7 away from its defense of c6: 2 ... b7xa6 3 c5-c6, followed by
4 c6-c7 and 5 c7-c8=Q, winning.
b5-b4
b4-b3
and White’s king prevents the black b-pawn from promoting so White will be
able to promote his own a-pawn for an easy win.
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31
insert the photo pg39
insert photo pg 38
2
3
c5-c6!!
a5-a6
b7xc6
KINGS, KNIGHTS and PAWNS
After pressing MODE and seeing TEACH displayed on the LCD, if you
press the KNIGHT key the computer will be ready to start play from the
above position, with the kings, knights and pawns on the board.
And the promotion of White’s a-pawn cannot be stopped.
Even in a symmetrical position such as this, it is very easy for an unsuspecting
player to overlook a simple threat.
1
Nbl-c3
Ng8-f6
This move appears to be a serious mistake because it does not take into account
white’s threat. Safe moves for Black include 1 ... Nb8-c6’or 1 ... a7-a6.
2 Nc3-b5 Nb8-a6
Defending the c7 pawn.
3 Nb5xa7
So White has won a pawn. Does this mean that the game will be a relatively
easy win for white? Not at all.
3
32
.....
c7-c6!
33
The white knight on a8 cannot escape and now Black is threatening to march
his king to b8 and pick up the errant knight.
4
5
6
photo pg 41
Ngl-f3 Ke8-d8
Nf3-g5 Kd8-c7
Ng5xf7 Kc7-b8
White is already two pawns up but his knight on a7 is attacked and has
nowhere safe to go. Under the circumstances White extracts as much as he
can for his knight:
7
Na7xc6+ d7xc6
An interesting choice. Should Black capture the knight with the d-pawn or
the b-pawn? If Black captures with the b-pawn then White will have a
“passed” a-pawn. The a-pawn will not have any enemy pawns to oppose it on
its path to promotion and so Black will need to use his king or one of his
knights to keep the a-pawn under observation. If Black captures on c6 with
his d pawn he leaves the pawn on e7 “isolated”, that is to say, it has none of its
own pawns on adjacent files to protect it. But by capturing on c6 with his dpawn, Black avoids leaving White with a passed pawn, and although the black
e-pawn (on e7) represents a weakness, it is less important than allowing White
a passed pawn. So 7 ... d7xc6 is stronger than 7 ... b7xc6.
After recapturing on c6 Black has won a knight for 3 pawns. In pure material
terms a knight is worth roughly the same as 3 pawns, but in this position
White has no passed pawns and none of White’s pawns is any kind of a threat
to Black, so Black has a clear advantage.
KINGS AND BISHOPS
After pressing MODE and seeing TEACH displayed on the LCD, if you
press the BISHOP key the computer will be ready to start play with kings,
bishops and pawns on the board. The bishop is often a mobile piece but it is
important that it does not get hemmed in and even trapped by the enemy
pawns. Here is an example of what can happen from the above position.
1
2
3
4
e2-e4
Bfl-b5
Bb5-a4
Ba4-b3
e7-e5
a7-a6
b7-b5
a6-a5
Can you see what Black is threatening?
5
d2-d3??
White is anxious to get his c1 bishop into play and completely overlooks
Black’s idea. Better moves, for example, would be 5 a2-a4 or 5 c2-c3.
5
6
...
Bb3-d5
a5-a4
c7-c
White’s bishop on d5 is attacked and has no safe place to go, so White loses a
bishop in return for only a pawn.
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35
THE TRAP THAT BEAT BOBBY FISCHER
There is a very common trap which almost all beginners fall into at some time
or other. One player, say White, captures a pawn at a7 or h7 with his bishop,
only to see his bishop trapped when his opponent advances the neighboring
pawn one square. Here is an example, starting from the position in the
previous diagram.
1
2
3
4
e2-e4
d2-d4
Bfl-d3
g2-g3!
exactly this manner. Fischer (black) grabbed a pawn at h2 with his bishop,
expecting the bishop to be able to extricate itself eventually. Unfortunately for
Fischer he was wrong - he lost the bishop and the game (but he won the
match).
e7-e6
Bf8-d6
Bd6xh2??
So Black has won a pawn but the bishop on h2 is now shut in by the white
pawn chain on f2 and g3. Black must act quickly to try to save his bishop.
4
...
h7-h5
Black’s plan is to advance the pawn to h4, then to exchange pawns on g3 and
finally to capture on g3 with his bishop, extricating the bishop. Alternatively,
when the black pawn advances to h4, if White captures (g3xh4) then the
black bishop can escape from h2. But here this plan is too slow.
5
Kel-fl
Black has no satisfactory way to meet the threat of Kfl-g2.
5
...
h5-h4
Of course, White must not now play g3xh4 because then the bishop on h2
would escape. This is one of the ideas behind the advance of Black’s h-pawn.
6
Kfl-g2 h4xg3 7 f2xg3
And on the next move Black loses his h2 bishop. Even though Black could
play 7 ... Bh2xg3, the material advantage of a bishop for two pawns is
normally sufficient to guarantee a win.
Amazingly the famous American Grandmaster Bobby Fischer lost the first
game of his 1972 World Championship match against Boris Spassky in
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ACTIVE BISHOP vs. PASSIVE BISHOP
In this position White has a well posted bishop in the center which is free to
maneuver over much of the board. Black’s bishop, in contrast, is “biting on
granite”. It has no scope because of the white pawn chain: e4, f3, g4. If Black
were to try the move ... h7-h5, to break open the prison bars, White would
simply respond with h2-h3, so that if Black exchanged pawns on g4 White
could recapture with the h-pawn, thereby keeping the prison intact. So
although White’s bishop and Black’s bishop have the same material value,
Black’s piece is useless to him. White already has the unstoppable threat of
Bd5-b7, picking up the a6 pawn.
1
2
...
Ke7-d6
Bd5-b7
The attempt to trap Black’s bishop by 2 h2-h4 (threatening 3 h4-h5) does not
work and, in fact, would be a serious mistake because it allows 2 ... h7-h5
under favorable circumstances White would no longer have the reply h2-h3 at
his disposal.
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2
...
Kd6-c7
3
Bb7xa6 Kc7-b6
4
Ba6-c8 Kb6-c7
only safe squares for the white bishop are a6 and f5, and if the bishop returns
to a6 then the black king returns to b6. So White plays
5
Bc8-f5 Bg6xf5 6 g4xf5
And White will eventually win because of his extra pawn.
WHEN TO EXCHANGE BISHOPS
There will be many instances in your games when you are unsure about
whether to exchange off a particular bishop. A useful rule is to first decide
whether the bishop is “good” or ‘bad”. In general you should be happy about
exchanging a bad bishop for a good one or for an enemy knight.
Photo pg. 45
“GOOD” BISHOP vs. “BAD” BISHOP
We refer to a bishop that has plenty of scope as a good bishop and one which
is restricted by its own pawns as a bad bishop. In the above position the black
bishop on c8 is bad because its own pawns at e6, d5, c6 and b7 create what is
almost a coffin, keeping the black bishop out of play for several moves.
In order to escape from behind this pawn chain Black must go through the
somewhat tortuous maneuver: ... Bc8-d7, ... Bd7-e8,...f7-f6 and ... Be8-g6 (or
... Be8-h5). The problem with this plan is that it takes 4 moves to carry out
and in the meantime White will be doing something active. It is rare in chess
to be given the luxury of 3 or 4 “free” moves to carry out a plan without the
opponent being able to use his reply moves very productively.
Contrast the restricted scope of the bishop on c8 with that of the “good” white
bishop on e2. This bishop is ready to come into play on the Q-side or K-side,
whichever is appropriate. It is also able to switch from one side of the board to
the other very rapidly.
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“OPPOSITE COLORED” BISHOPS
The above position provides an excellent example of what are called opposite
colored bishops. This does not mean that White has one bishop and Black has
one bishop. It means that each player has only one bishop and they stand on
squares of opposite colors. Here, for example, white has a bishop on a dark
square whereas Black has a bishop on a light square. What then is the
significance of opposite colored bishops?
If you think about this position you will soon realize that half of the squares on
the board are completely safe for each player. Black’s king, for example, cannot
be dislodged from the e6 square because it can NEVER be checked by the
white bishop, and by leaving his own bishop occupying or controlling the d5
square Black prevents his opponent from advancing the pawn from d4 to d5.
39
To put it very simply, Black can simply move his bishop back and forth
between the squares (for example) a8, d5 and hl, and refuse to move his king.
There is absolutely no way that White can then make progress. So although
White is two pawns ahead, and they are both passed pawns, White can do no
more than draw.
Since the presence of opposite colored bishops very often heralds a draw in the
endgame, if you find yourself behind in material you should always try to
trade off the bishops and knights in such a way as to leave opposite colored
bishops on the board, preferably without any knights, rooks or queens on the
board. On the other hand, the presence of opposite colored bishops can
sometimes help a player who is attacking his opponent’s king with the
assistance of his queen.
KINGS, ROOKS AND PAWNS
After pressing MODE and seeing TEACH displayed on the LCD, if you
press the ROOK key the computer will be ready to start play with only the
kings, rooks and pawns on the board.
There are two important rules to remember about using your rooks. The first
and most useful is that you should nearly always try to place your rooks on
“open” files, that is columns of squares (such as the column from al to a8)
which have no pawns on them. A rook on an open file has plenty of scope to
advance at the correct moment into the enemy camp.
I
0-0
0-0
We use the symbols 0-0 to indicate castling king’s side.
2
c2-c4
c7-c6
3
d2-d4 d7-d5
4
c4xd5 c6xd5
5
Rfl-c
Now, after 5 ... Rf8-c8, it would be a mistake for White to play 6 Rclxc8+
because then Black’s recapture 6...,Ra8xc8 would leave BLACK in command
of the only open file on the board. Black would then follow up with 7 ... Rc8c2, with a dominating position. (The second rule for rooks is that they are
very well placed on their 7th rank in the endgame. For Black this means
putting the rooks on the rank numbered 2 in the above diagram. After 5 ...
Rf8-c8, White should continue with the plan: Kgl-fl, Kfl-el, Kel-dl, followed
only now by Rclxc8 and then Ral-cl, challenging for control of the open file.
40
41
If, instead of playing 5 ... Rf8-c8, Black forgets about the open file, White can
quickly build up a completely overwhelming position. Watch how easy it is
for Black to go astray.
5
...
e7-e6?
This innocuous move probably loses the game for Black.
6
Rcl-c7
b7-b6
Safeguarding the b-pawn.
7
Ra1-cl
Now there is no way that Black can challenge White’s control of the c-file.
7
8
9
10
...
Kgl-fl
Kfl-el
Kel-d2
g7-g6
Kg8-g7
Kg7-f6
White will continue with Kd2-c3, Kc3-b4, Kb4-b5, Kb5-a6 and then
Rc7xa7, winning the a-pawn at once and the b-pawn soon afterwards. Black
is virtually helpless against this plan, which could not have worked if Black
had neutralized the c-file. This example demonstrates not only the importance
of controlling open files with your rooks, it also illustrates the power of rooks
on the 7th rank. All pawns start life on their 2nd rank (i.e. the opponent’s 7th
rank) and even in the late stages of the game there are often pawns still on
their starting squares. By placing a rook on the 7th rank you therefore put
pressure on your opponent’s pawns and hopefully win one or more of them.
KINGS, QUEENS AND PAWNS
After pressing MODE and seeing TEACH displayed on the LCD, if you
press the QUEEN key the computer will be ready to start play with only the
kings, queens and pawns on the board.
The Queen is the most active piece and can move around an open board with
great speed. The most important advice to remember about the Queen is - Be
Careful. Always think about every move that your opponent can make with
his Queen, in case one of them would cause you serious problem. Here we
can see how easy it is to overlook a powerful queen move.
1 e2-e4
d7-d6?
From the normal starting position with all 32 pieces on the board this would
be perfectly acceptable first move. In the above position, however, it is a fatal
mistake that loses a pawn.
2 Qd1 - h5
Threatening the pawn at h7
2 ....
h7-h6
3 qh5-b5+
No matter how black evades check, White will reply 4 Qb5xb7, and should
win comfortably because of his extra pawn.
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43
TROUBLESHOOTING GUIDE
Your computer has been manufactured and tested to very high quality
standards and it is most unlikely to have a fault. We have found in the past
that almost all so-called “faults” can be traced to the user accidentally pressing
a wrong key or moving a piece to the wrong square, which makes it appear
later in the game that the chess computer is not operating as expected.
THE COMPUTER REFUSES TO MAKE A MOVE
If the computer has been playing normally but then refuses to make a move:
1. If the computer’s color symbol is flashing then the computer is still
thinking. Be patient if you can, or press the MOVE key and the computer
will respond immediately with the best move it has found so far.
THE MOST COMMON “FAULT” TO BE FOUND WITH CHESS
COMPUTERS IS THAT THE USER HAS DONE SOMETHING
WRONG AND, WITHOUT REALIZING IT, PUTS THE BLAME ON
THE COMPUTER!
2. If your color symbol is on and the clock is ticking, the computer thinks
that you have not made your last move. Make sure that the pieces on the
board are on the same squares as those in the computer’s internal memory.
You can do this by using “Verify Position” mode. If the pieces all appear to be
on the same squares as the computer thinks they should be, this means that it
is still your turn to move.
Often a “fault” is due to the user having misunderstood something about the
way the pieces move. You may wish to consult the rules of chess to make sure
you are not making an illegal move. Just in case you do encounter a problem
when using your computer we have prepared this troubleshooting guide.
THE COMPUTER REFUSES TO ACCEPT YOUR MOVE
If you make a move but the computer refuses to accept it as a move:
THE DISPLAY SHOWS NOTHING
If there is nothing showing on the display and the computer does not react to
any key press or to pressing any of the pieces down on its square:
1. If you are using a power adapter make sure that the adapter is the correct
voltage and polarity, as shown on the label on the underside of the computer.
Also ensure that the adapter is plugged in properly to the computer and plug
outlet has not blown a fuse).
2. If you are using batteries make sure that they are held firmly by the battery
clips and that you have observed the correct polarity. See the diagram
engraved in the battery compartment. If you have had the batteries a long
time they may have run down so try replacing them.
1. Make sure that you have completed your move by pressing down on the
“TO” square.
2. If you your move was castling, make sure that you have moved your rook
and king. Always making sure to move the King first.
3. If the move was an en passant capture, make sure that you have moved the
capturing pawn in the correct way and that you also pressed down on the
square of the captured pawn before you removed it from the chess board.
4. If your move was a pawn promotion make sure that you pressed down on
the promotion square with the newly promoted piece.
5. Look to see if the computer’s last move put you in check, and if so, make
sure that your reply move does not leave you in check.
3. If the batteries or power adapter appear to be OK the computer may have
been affected by a static discharge which may have caused it to “lock up”.
Press a thin object or paper clip in the RESET hole in the base of the
computer and press it down firmly once.
6. Look to see if your move puts your king in check, either by moving the
king to a square attacked by an enemy piece or by moving something away
from a square where it blocked an attack on your king by an enemy piece.
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GENERAL INFORMATION
The RESET hole
Ivan may occasionally “lock up” due to static discharge or some other sort of
electrical disturbance. If this occurs, press the RESET button on the bottom
of the game. Use of this button will clear the computers memory.
NOTE: After using the RESET, the computer will have forgotten any game
positions that may have been in its memory.
ON AND OFF
The IVAN is never really “off” as long as batteries are installed or the adapter
is plugged into a wall outlet. It will be in a sleep mode and continue to draw
power. It is very important that you remember this if you are using only
batteries to power your computer. If the computer has a position in its
memory and you put it away for a period of time, you may find that the
batteries are drained when you go to use it again. If you do not play with your
IVAN for a period of time and do not remember whether or not you cleared
the board the last time you played with it, you should use the RESET button
to clear any data that may be stored in its memory. You may also use the
VERIFY button to remind you of the position the last time you played.
THINGS YOU SHOULD NEVER DO!
Never handle the IVAN roughly. It is a precision electronic device.
Never expose the IVAN to moisture or extreme temperatures.
Never use chemical agents to clean the unit.
Never use anything except a soft damp cloth to clean the unit.
Never mix new batteries with old batteries.
Never mix Alkaline and Carbon Zinc batteries.
If you have any questions please call our customer service department between
9-5 Miami time.
1-800-59 CHESS (592-4377) OR 305- 477-8080
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