GUIDE TO USING SAITEK GAMING EXTENSIONS (SGE)

GUIDE TO USING SAITEK GAMING EXTENSIONS (SGE)
Introduction
What is SGE
How We Make Game Profiles Here at Saitek
Programming Commands
Method A
Method B
Advanced Programming
Cyborg 3D USB Stick & Cyborg 3D Digital II
Shift Function
Hat Switch
Stick Axis Configuration
P750, P1500 and P2000 Pads
Shift Function
Hat Switch
Stick Axis Configuration
GM2
Hat Switch
Thumb Wheel
Shift Function
X36 Flight Controller/X45 Flight Controller
Hat Switch
Rotaries
Pinkie Switch
Mode Switch
P8000/PC Dash 2
Button Properties
More SGE Features…
Printing
Importing and Exporting a Profile
Importing
Exporting a Profile
What to do if a profile isn’t there for your controller
Advanced Command Creation
Extended Commands
Cycle Commands
Application Commands
Website Commands
Troubleshooting Your Profiles
IMPORTANT!! – PLEASE READ
The first thing to say about Saitek Gaming Extensions (SGE) is that with the exception of a
few products (GM2, GM3, P8000/PCDash 2) IT IS NOT REQUIRED TO MAKE THE
CONTROLLER WORK IN THE GAME. Most of the controllers just need to be set up and
calibrated within Game Controllers > Gaming Options in the Control Panel in Windows® in
order for the games to be able to recognise them. You then need to tell the game that you
want to use a joystick/pad/wheel from within the game’s options menus and that’s all there is
to it. Most games these days also have control configuration screens built into them where
you can set up each button on your controller to do what you want it to in the game.
The presence of such a screen in a game essentially negates the need for SGE to be used,
as SGE is just simply software that enables you to program each button on the controller to
do what you want it to in the game. Controllers that really don’t require the use of SGE include
the Cyborg USB stick, P750, P1500, P2000 and the R100 USB Wheel. The one feature of the
above products that might attract you to using SGE is the "shift" button feature that can be
found on the stick and the pads; this allows you to essentially "double up" the commands that
can be assigned to each button but this will be explained later on in the Advanced
Programming section of this guide.
The controllers that really do have to use SGE are the GM2, GM3 and the PCDash 2/P8000 as these rely on essentially "replacing" the keyboard. The X36 Flight Controller and X45 Flight
Controller also really need to be programmed to gain full use of all their features and their
multiple modes although, like the Cyborg stick and the pads, they operate perfectly well within
games without programming.
Introduction
What is SGE
Every game that you buy has a list of functions and commands built into it. A Flight Simulator,
for example, often has a host of commands one of which might be the landing gear. The key
on the keyboard that this command is usually assigned to is G. SGE allows you to make the
buttons on your controller emulate a key (or combination of keys – more on that later) from
the keyboard - so you could have any button on your controller perform as the key in order for
it to activate the landing gear.
However, this programmability is not limited to the buttons, every part of the controller is
programmable including the hat switches and axis movements (up, down, left and right on a
stick – even the throttle and rudder can be configured if your controller has them but they
usually don’t need to be). The rest of this guide will start with the basics of creating and
assigning commands and then move onto controller-specific sections and advanced features.
How We Make Game Profiles Here at Saitek
The product manual that came with your controller just covers the basic aspects of
programming your controller. This guide will show you how WE make a profile when creating
them for the website.
The first step is to read the guide that came with your game. As mentioned in the introduction,
every game has a list of commands that have been assigned to different keys on the
keyboard. If you don’t have a manual then you are going to need to find out what key does
what on the keyboard - the game may have a list of commands in an option menu somewhere
so you can also copy these out to a piece of paper. Either way, you need a list of commands
with the associated keyboard presses so you know what you are going to be programming.
Firstly, you need to first create a Profile within Saitek Gaming Extensions, so open up the
Saitek Gaming Extensions Window and you will see a view like this.
You need to double-click on New Game Wizard and you will start a step-by-step process for
creating a new profile. There are only two screens that you actually need to worry about
during this process.
The first screen is basically just a starter screen explaining that you are running the New
Game Wizard, so just click on Next – it will take you get to the first screen that we need to
look at.
When you first open this screen, the wizard immediately starts searching your computer for all
the .exe files on your computer. The .exe files are the files that actually run all of your
programs - so you will probably notice that the list of programs in here includes many
programs that aren’t necessarily games, such as WordPad or Internet Explorer. Once it has
finished searching you will see a list of possible choices. Initially, the list is in date order with
the most recently installed program at the top. However, if you click the Name bar at the top
of the list of programs, it will shuffle these into alphabetical order, which might make it easier
for you to find the game that you’re after. Either way, simply select the game you want to
create a profile for and then click Next.
The next screen checks what game you have selected and also gives you the option to
change the name of the profile or add a comment to the profile. Neither is really necessary,
especially as they can be adjusted later once you have created the profile.
The screen after this has two checkboxes. The first says Set As Default Profile, you should
usually leave this ticked otherwise the profile you are making won’t work. The other says Use
Target Directory and this should also be left ticked to ensure the profile will actually work.
The screen after is an important one – where you select the controller you want to use in the
profile. Obviously, you should select the controller you have but it is possible to select multiple
controllers by holding down the Ctrl key on the keyboard and then clicking on all the
controllers you want. In the example below you can see that We have selected the Cyborg
USB stick, the GM2 Pad, the P750 Pad and the X36 Controller. For now, just select the
controller you are using as you can always add controllers to your profile later, once it has
been created.
The next screen gives you the option to Disable The Buttons In this Profile that generally
you should not do so leave that alone.
The final screen is there for you to check that the profile is set up as you desire. It lists the
name of the profile, the target directory of where the game you are creating this profile for is
installed and the controllers you are adding into this profile. Just click Finish to go back to the
Saitek Gaming Extensions window and you will see the icon for your new profile appear
next to the New Game Wizard, Import Game Wizard and Default Profile.
Open up the profile by double-clicking on it and you will see the following screen.
Programming Commands
There are now two methods of programming commands to the buttons on your controller. The
first method that a lot of people use is to go straight into the 3D model of the controller and
program there. This is fine for saving time but for some controllers it is not the best way to do
things. We will illustrate this method first and then go on to describe the method we use here
at Saitek.
Method A
Double-clicking on the controller icon (in this case the Saitek Cyborg 3D Stick USB) brings up
the 3D model of the controller. From here it is very easy to program the buttons to do what
you want. Using the mouse, just click on the button you want to program and you will see it
turn light blue in colour. At the bottom of the screen you can see four drop-down menus (we
will explain these later but they are fairly self explanatory) and a bar at the bottom that has a
number in it surrounded by a red circle. All you need to do is click in that bar (this highlights
the number in blue) and then press the key on the keyboard that you want that button to be
from now on.
As you can see in the picture above we have programmed the trigger to be the G key on the
keyboard. Do the same for all your buttons and you have a configured stick – no need to save
the settings you have changed as they are automatically saved as you enter them. Just close
the SGE window and play the game and the buttons will now do what you tell them to.
For a controller like the Cyborg this is fine, but it doesn’t help when you are trying to create
advanced commands. In order to fully understand the Advanced Programming Section of this
guide that appears later, it will be easier if you use the following method.
Method B
Instead of going into the 3D model of the controller, open up the Command List by doubleclicking on that icon instead. In here you will see a list of DirectX Button numbers. These are
here because each button on the stick has its own unique identifying number. Leave these
alone and point to a blank area of the window and right-click (click the right mouse button).
You will get a drop-down menu appear with options in it; point to New and then click the
Command option that pops out from it.
You will then get a new icon underneath the DirectX Buttons called New Command – doubleclick on it to open it and you will see a Properties window pop-up. There is a box that says
Name next to it and that will currently have the words New Command in it – simply type the
name that you want this command to be. In the example below, we are creating a command
called Punch.
You can see that there are other settings that you can adjust here, but for the time being we
just want Single Action. The others will be explained in the Advanced Programming Section
of the manual. Now you simply need to click the Action tab at the top and you will be
presented with the following screen.
Simply click in the white bar at the top and then press the key on the keyboard that activates
the command that you are trying to create. You should see it appear in that bar, much like it
did in the example in Method A.
Now click Apply and then OK and you will be back at the Command List. You will see your
new command is now called what you renamed it to. If at any point after creating your
command you come back here and it is still called New Command then simply press F5 on
the keyboard to refresh the screen and it should then change to what you called it. Now, using
the same method, create all the commands you want to program in and you will end up with
something like below (obviously your command names will be different unless you are using
the same game as we are in the example).
In the column on the left, click on the icon for your controller and this will bring up the 3D
model again. Using the mouse, click on the button you want to assign and then, instead of
clicking in the bar at the bottom, click the drop-down list on the right of the screen, underneath
the 3D view, as indicated in the picture below.
You can see that in that drop-down list all the commands that you created are present, so
simply scroll through the list until you find the command that you want to assign to this button.
As soon as you do so you will see that in the bar at the bottom of the screen the key press
you assigned to that command appears.
You can now go and program all your buttons in the same way. Initially this may seem like a
more laborious method compared to Method A but the benefits will really become clear when
we move onto Advanced Programming features like the hat switch or axes of a controller.
Also, it helps if you create all of your commands first as you can then make sure that they are
all present.
Advanced Programming
Now that we’ve covered the basics of creating commands in the command list and then
assigning them to buttons, we can move on to the more advanced parts of the controllers.
This section will lead off with the Cyborg Stick, as it essentially contains all the features that
the other controllers have to a greater or lesser degree. The sections that follow afterwards
will address specific controllers and the way in which configuring these functions differs but
will otherwise refer directly back to the explanation in the Cyborg Section. For example, all the
controllers (with the exception of the R100 USB Wheel) have a shift function which is
programmed in much the same way. There are some differences that occur because of other
features on the controller and these are addressed in the controller-specific sections.
Finally, a section will follow that addresses advanced command creation – the SGE software
is not just limited to single keystrokes for a command, as will be seen.
Cyborg 3D USB Stick & Cyborg 3D Digital II
Shift Function
To enable a shift button to act as a shift you need to bring up the 3D view of your controller
and double-click on the shift button on the 3D model. You will see a Properties screen like
the one below.
Simply change the Attribute of the button at the bottom from Action to Shift, as illustrated.
You will see that the Action tab at the top of the window changes to Left Shift. Clicking on
this brings up the following screen;
This enables you to change the way the shift button operates. As the description at the
bottom of that screen says, if you set the shift to operate as a Latched Shift it works much
like the Caps Lock key on your keyboard. When you press it enables the shifted functions
until you press it again at which point it will return to Unshifted functions. If you leave it as a
normal shift it will only enable the shifted functions whilst held down and return to unshifted
functions when released.
Programming shifted functions to your buttons is very similar to programming normal
functions. Now that you have enabled the shift button to act as a shift you will find that things
are a bit different when you open up the properties of the other buttons on the controller – like
in the picture below.
As you can see, the drop-down commands menu next to Left Shift is now no longer greyed
out like the Right Shift is and we can select a command from our drop-down list, just like we
did for the normal commands earlier on in this guide. Also, we can assign a different
command from the one that operates when the button is in its unshifted state. If we were to
also enable the Right Shift button on the controller as a shift rather than an action button you
can see that we could effectively assign a third command to every button. This can bring the
number of assignable commands on the stick up from a basic 10 to a potential of 24
commands! (58 commands if we include the 8 directions of the hat switch but this is not very
feasible because of the difficulty of selecting a specific hat switch position when using the
controller).
Hat Switch
The hat switch can be assigned shifted functions in a similar way but its properties screen will
look slightly different - as shown.
If you click the Unshifted tab then you will see that you can set the hat switch’s attributes as
illustrated earlier in the manual and can now see when you click on the Left Shift or Right
Shift tabs a check box that says Use Unshifted Attributes.
If you unpick this then you can set the hat switch to use different actions than that in the
unshifted mode, make it emulate a mouse or a D-pad or just operate as a normal POV (pointof-view) switch – just like you could in Unshifted mode.
Stick Axis Configuration
As mentioned briefly in the opening paragraph of this Cyborg section, you can configure the
stick itself to operate in a different manner. Note: Please do bear in mind that it is not normally
recommended that you attempt this; it is usually best to leave the stick itself operating as it
normally does. If you are ever unsure, just set the attribute for the stick back to analogue in
the Properties window for each axis. To do this you will need to open the 3D view of the
controller up in your profile in SGE. Then click on the middle drop-down menu, look for x-axis
in there and click on it
When you do you will get the x-axis properties window on-screen. Click the Unshifted tab at
the top and you will see that you have some attributes to adjust, much like you get when you
open up the hat switch properties. If you leave the attribute as analogue then the stick itself
will operate exactly as if you had not programmed it – this is the default attribute for any axis.
As you can see, there are other attribute options available. In our first example, we will look at
the mouse option.
If we choose Mouse we get the option of what mouse axis we want to assign the currently
selected axis to. In our example, we are adjusting the x-axis of the stick (left/right movement),
so we would logically assign it to emulate the left/right motion of the mouse. If we configured
the y-axis to emulate the up/down mouse motion then we would have a stick that operated
like a mouse so you could effectively use it in games that don’t actually include joystick
support like strategy games.
The banded mode is slightly different. If you select it you get a button called Edit Bands.
If you then click on this button you get the following screen.
This screen with increments from 0 – 100 describes the movement of the joystick across its
current axis. The red line indicates where the stick currently is positioned (at rest in the
centre). If you now move your stick you will see that the red line moves to correspond with the
movement of the stick. If you move the stick fully left the red line goes to zero and if you move
the stick fully right the red line goes to 100. If we were adjusting the y-axis the red line would
move to zero if you pulled the stick back and up to 100 if you pushed the stick forwards.
What we can do here is set it up so that when the stick reaches a certain position it activates
a command that we have set up. First though, we have to "split" this axis.
There are two ways of doing this. One way is to move the stick so that the red line is at the
point where you want the command to start and click the Split At Axis Position button. The
other way is to use your mouse and point to the position where you want the command to
start and then click the right mouse button. You will get a drop-down menu from which you
can choose the option Split Band. Either way, you will get something that looks like this.
Obviously, the split will appear at whatever position you chose. We now want to create a
second split so that we end up with three sections that say No Command in them. Once that
is done, we can click the Space Evenly button to get them to a nice equal size. The reason
for creating three sections is that we need to have a section that covers the middle of the axis’
movement that has no command assigned to it. This way the stick will have a position where
it is "at rest" and therefore not continually issue commands, as would have been the case had
we just created two sections by splitting at the 50 mark.
Once you have your three sections you simply choose the section you want to assign a
command to and then choose the command from the drop-down list at the top of the window
that says Deflection xx-xx (where xx is the number that it is on your screen – it will vary
depending on where you set your splits up on the 0-100 scale). Do the same for the other
section (remembering to leave the middle section blank) and you will end up with something
like the following.
In the example above, the Bank Left Ailerons command will be activated as soon as you
move the stick past the point where that "band" starts. Obviously you can assign any
command you want to these banded areas. You might find it useful for games that only
include keyboard support so you can assign the movement keys from the keyboard to these
positions and the stick will then work in the game because it is "pretending" to be the
keyboard.
Remember that every axis on the stick, including the throttle and rudder can be configured in
this way.
Finally, if we go back to the properties screen of the axis we can see that just like with the hat
switch there are options for the two shifted modes at the top of the window so we could have
the stick operating differently for each shift mode.
P750, P1500 and P2000 Pads
Everything that can be done on the Cyborg stick can be done on the P-Series pads and in
exactly the same way. There are just some minor differences that need clarifying.
Shift Function
Because of the way the controllers’ configuration changes when you change from Analogue
to Digital control the shifted function is slightly more complex on the P-series pads. In the
picture above you can see a typical Properties screen of a button when the shift button has
been enabled as a shift function for the P2000 Tilt Pad. The P750 and P1500 obviously would
not have the extra options for the tilt + etc. as they do not have a tilt function. You can see
here that we could have 8 different assignments for the one button depending on what mode
the pad is in. This obviously isn’t required and in practice you will find that you only need to
make sure that the shifted functions have one command assigned to them and the unshifted
commands have another command assigned to them like in the picture below. This will avoid
confusion.
In the example above we can see that the shifted commands are Extend Flaps Fully and the
unshifted commands are Lights On/Off. Using this, we avoid confusion by ensuring that no
matter what mode we are in, a shifted command is always going to be the same and the
same for the unshifted commands.
Hat Switch
Obviously, when the pad is in Digital Mode the hat switch is no longer a hat switch but
replaces the stick as the controller and this can lead to some possible confusion when
programming it. The hat switch can be programmed just like it can on the Cyborg stick (choice
of Actions, D-Pad (default in Digital mode), POV (default in Analogue mode) and mouse).
Again, just like the buttons (explained just above) you should generally keep shifted
commands the same as each other and do the same for unshifted commands (with the
obvious exception that the hat switch’s attribute should be set to D-pad for any digital modes
so that you still have movement control in the game. The different combinations of Digital,
Digital+Shift etc. can be accessed by clicking on the tabs at the top of the Properties window
and if you can’t see a tab you want then click the little arrows at the top-right of the screen to
scroll across to the tab you want.
Stick Axis Configuration
You have exactly the same options as you do on the Cyborg stick, except you have the same
complications caused by the multiple modes of the pads, like with the buttons and hat switch
above. Otherwise the axes can be programmed in exactly the same way, which of course
also includes the Throttle Wheel on the pads.
GM2
The GM2 Action Pad is one of the controllers that needs to be configured fully before it will
work correctly. A common mistake that is made is for people to forget about using SGE,
enable joystick control within the game they are using and reassign the buttons to do what
they want from within the game. This causes a few problems. First of all, the hat switch on the
GM2 pad that is commonly used for movement in games can only be assigned to 4-way
movement. As soon as you try to get diagonal movement (forwards and left, backwards and
right etc) the character you are controlling will just stand still because no command is
assigned to the diagonal positions of the hat switch.
You will also find that if you enable joystick control within the game that it then picks up the
Thumb Wheel on the GM2 pad and it usually picks it up as the y-axis (up/down movement) on
a joystick. Consequently, whatever you are controlling will immediately run forwards as soon
as you get into the game (the assumption here is that you are using the GM2 with a first
person shooter game such as Quake 3 Arena). Also, you will not be able to configure the
Thumb Wheel as you can using SGE.
The first lesson is to disable joystick support in the games you will be using the GM2 with, as
the GM2 is just a keyboard replacement that will be programmed with keyboard commands.
Assigning commands to the buttons on the GM2 is the same as that for any other SGEsupported controller and has already been described in the basic section of this manual so we
will examine the trickier aspects of the pad, using the example of a first person shooter game
like Project I.G.I. from Eidos Interactive.
Hat Switch
The hat switch on the GM2 pad is most commonly used for movement control but there is an
important point to note when you do so. As mentioned above, you must have diagonal
movement commands. This is easily done – you just create 8 movement commands in your
profile’s command list, one for each "compass direction" of the hat switch (Forwards,
Forward+Right, Step/Strafe Right, Backwards+Right, Backwards, Backwards+Left,
Step/Strafe Left and Forwards+Left). For example, the Forward and Right command in
Project I.G.I. would look something like this.
Once you’ve created those commands then you can assign them to the hat switch on the pad.
Bring up the 3D view of the GM2 Pad and double-click on the Hat Switch. Make sure the
action is set to 8-way rather than 4-way and then click the Unshifted Tab at the top of the
window. Set the Attributes to Actions and you can then assign the appropriate commands to
each "compass direction" on the hat switch. Below you can see what this should look like.
The hat switch will now operate movement correctly on the GM2 pad. Before we move on to
something else a common question asked by people is why we don’t put the turn left and right
commands to the left and right positions of the hat switch. The answer is simple – in the
average first person shooter you’ve already got the turn left and right commands on your
mouse’s movement so there’s no need to assign them to the hat switch; besides which you
need to be able to strafe in these sorts of games as it always marks the difference between a
successful and unsuccessful gamer.
In strategy games the hat switch can be assigned to anything you want. Some games have a
scroll function where you can move the view around the map that you are looking at, so you
could assign those commands to the hat switch. Of course it is entirely up to you what you
assign but basically, anything goes.
The hat switch on the mouse can be programmed in the same way but it is limited to 4-way
movement.
Thumb Wheel
The Thumb Wheel on the pad can again be used for anything. Most commonly it is banded,
just as described in the section that deals with the Cyborg 3D stick’s axes but we will go over
it again here.
In Project I.G.I. you have a Sniper Rifle and Binoculars, both of which have the ability to zoom
the view in and out and this is a perfect function to use the Thumb Wheel for.
To set this up we first need to have created our commands in the Command List as
described in the basic section of the manual. You will need to bring the properties of the
Thumb Wheel up on screen so go into the 3D view of the GM2 in your profile and double-click
on the Thumb Wheel. Click the Unshifted tab at the top of the Properties window and then
set the attributes to Banded.
You can then click the Edit Bands button to bring up the following screen.
This Band Editor window with increments from 0 – 100 describes the movement of the
Thumb Wheel. The red line indicates where the Thumb Wheel currently is positioned (at rest
in the centre). If you now move your Thumb Wheel you will see that the red line moves to
correspond with the movement of the wheel. If you move the wheel fully left the red line goes
to zero and if you move the wheel fully right the red line goes to 100.
What we can do here is set it up so that when the wheel reaches a certain position it activates
a command that we have set up. First though, we have to "split up" this axis.
There are two ways of doing this. One way is to move the wheel so that the red line is at the
point where you want the command to start and click the Split At Axis Position button. The
other way is to use your mouse and point to the position where you want the command to
start and then click the right mouse button. You will get a drop-down menu from which you
can choose the option Split Band. Either way you will get something that looks like this.
Obviously, the split will appear at whatever position you chose. We now want to create a
second split so that we end up with three sections that say No Command in them. Once that
is done we can click the Space Evenly button to get them to an equal size. The reason for
creating three sections is that we need to have a section that covers the middle of the axis’
movement that has no command assigned to it. This way, the wheel will have a position
where it is "at rest" and therefore not continually issue commands, as would have been the
case had we just created two sections by splitting at the 50 mark.
Once you have your three sections, you simply choose the section you want to assign a
command to and then choose the command from the drop-down list at the top of the window
that says Deflection xx-xx (where xx is the number that it is on your screen – it will vary
depending on where you set your splits up on the 0-100 scale). Do the same for the other
section (remembering to leave the middle section blank) and you will end up with something
like the following.
When we move the wheel right when the binoculars or the sniper mode on the rifle are in use
then the view will zoom in and if we move it left then the view will zoom out.
Again, as with the hat switch any command can be assigned to this Thumb Wheel. In other
shooter games you may want to assign commands to the wheel for switching between
weapons. Some strategy games have an option to rotate the view of the map/battle area you
are viewing and the wheel is ideal for this.
Shift Function
This is programmed in precisely the same way as that for the Cyborg 3D Stick with the
obvious exception that the GM2 only has one shift button whereas the Cyborg has two.
One final point for the GM2. We do get asked sometimes why the mouse buttons can’t be
reprogrammed. The answer is quite simply that they don’t need to be. In all the games that
the GM2 was designed to be used with, a left and right mouse button are needed to operate
commands in those games. It makes sense therefore to leave the mouse clicks on the
buttons that everyone uses every day whilst using their computer.
X36 Flight Controller/X45 Flight Controller
The X36/X45 looks complicated to program but it isn’t really. If you take everything you’ve
learned from the basic section of this manual and refer back to the sections for the Cyborg
and GM2 controller then you really can’t go far wrong. The only complex part of the X36/X45
is the sheer number of commands that you can assign to it. When you consider that every
button, hat switch and rotary dial on the combo can have three different commands assigned
to it for each of the three modes it sounds a lot. But you can double this number too when you
realise that every mode can have a shifted command assigned too because of the pinkie/shift
button – that’s a possible six commands per button.
Hat Switch
These are programmed in exactly the same way as the Cyborg stick.
Rotaries
These are programmed in exactly the same way as the GM2’s Thumb Wheel.
Pinkie Switch
This is programmed in exactly the same way as the shift button on the Cyborg stick.
Mode Switch
The three modes are exactly the same as the "two modes" provided by the Cyborg’s two shift
buttons – except that you obviously have an extra mode to play with. You will find that the
properties of every axis (rotaries, throttle, rudder and x-axes) and hat switch has three tabs at
the top for each of the modes – this changes to six tabs when you enable the pinkie switch in
its shifted function so you have Mode 1, Mode1 + Pinkie etc. as illustrated below.
The button properties look slightly different in that rather than tabs you have a list of dropdown menus like so;
Either way, commands can be assigned in the appropriate way so that you can set different
commands for each mode/shift function etc.
P8000/PC Dash 2
The P8000 is programmable in exactly the same way as any other controller supported by
SGE. It has a total of 37 buttons and a hat switch, all of which are programmable as
described in the basic and advanced section of the manual. One of those buttons can
become a shift mode button to double up the number of commands to 72 plus the hat switch
so it can be a very versatile device.
Bear in mind also that the P8000 doesn’t just have to be used for games. In its default setting
the buttons all activate different programs and features within Windows itself, such as
launching Internet Explorer, opening your Word Processor or even SGE; they can all be
reconfigured to do something else and this will be covered in the Advanced Programming
section of this guide.
The main feature of the P8000 though (aside from it’s programmability) is the ability to print a
command overlay sheet that you can cut out and lay over the keys on the unit. This overlay
sheet is divided into squares representing each button and, provided you created your
commands as described in the basic section of this manual, they will have the name of the
command that you assigned to it. Using the software you can change the background colour
of each square so that you can have obvious groups of commands (weapon type commands
could all be red for example) for quicker and easier location of the command you want to
activate. Obviously, without this sheet it could be a tough job remembering what command
you assigned to what key.
The method for printing this overlay is described in the printing section of this manual.
Button Properties
When you double-click on a button in the 3D view of the P8000 you get the following
Properties window.
It’s very similar to the Properties window that you get for other controllers but it has an extra
tab at the top called Display. This is where we adjust how the button appears on the overlay
sheet.
Here you can change how the text appears on the button for your overlay sheet. The dropdown menu next to 1 allows you to adjust the font for the text. The drop-down menu next to 2
allows you to adjust the size, 3 allows you to add Bold, Italicise or Underline settings and
whether you want the text to be centred or aligned to the left or right of the box it is in. 4
allows you to adjust the colour settings – foreground adjusts the colour of the text and
background the colour of the box the text will appear in. The box next to 5 allows you to
change the text that appears in the box and finally 6 allows you to see what it will all look like
before you print.
Using this method it is possible to create simple command overlay sheets with commands
that are grouped and arranged to your liking.
When checking for profiles on our website, you will see that some of them have more
elaborate looking command overlay sheets that you can download. These are created using
Paint Shop Pro – the software that is provided on the CD that came with your P8000 – but we
will not cover that here. Suffice to say that creation of such command sheets would require a
second manual; indeed buying a manual for Paint Shop Pro from a bookshop would be a
good idea if you were interested in creating such command overlay sheets for yourself.
More SGE Features…
Printing
After creating profiles for your controllers it can be easy to forget exactly what commands you
have assigned to what buttons. This can be especially annoying if you forget whilst playing
your game. Therefore we have included a printing option in SGE that prints out a Command
Sheet. This lists each button/axis etc. on your controller, next to which it tells you the name of
the command you have assigned to it and the associated keypress. Printing a Command
Sheet is easy. Simply open up your game profile in SGE and then right-click on the controller
icon within the profile. You will get a drop-down menu appearing, in which one of the options
is Print. Simply click on this and a sheet will be printed on your printer, which lists each button
and the commands associated to it.
The P8000 is slightly different. You actually have two print options with this controller and this
is reflected when you point to Print in that drop-down menu; you get two options pop out to
the side of it like below.
Clicking on Overlay will print out a command overlay sheet as described in the section of this
manual relating to P8000. Clicking on Configuration will print out a similar sheet to the one
you get with all the other controllers.
Either way you can then use the printed sheet for reference to which command you have
assigned to a button on your controller.
Importing and Exporting a Profile
Before we move on to Advanced Command Creation, we will quickly show how to import a
pre-made profile and also how to export your profiles so you can back them up. The CD that
came with your controller has a number of pre-made profiles on it and there are more added
to our website nearly every week. The benefit to you is that the profiles we make already have
all the basic commands from the game it was created for – this will save you the time and
effort of creating all those commands yourself. Any advanced, extended commands or cycle
commands you want to create can be added to the profile by yourself as described in the
Advance Command Creation section of this manual.
Importing
Importing is a simple step-by-step process just like creating a new profile. From the main SGE
window, double-click on the Import Game Wizard icon to start importing a profile. The first
screen is a simple welcome so you can just click Next. The next screen asks you if you want
to import an exported SGE file or a Command Centre file.
In the majority of cases you will be selecting an exported SGE file. The Command Centre files
are those that were created by the programming software for three of our older products – the
original Cyborg 3D Digital Stick and Pad and the PC Dash. These profiles are available on
our website under the Cyborg 3D Digital’s files section but please bear in mind that importing
these will just import a command list – you will have to assign any commands to the buttons
as if starting from fresh.
For this example though select Exported SGE file and then click Next – you will get the
following screen.
The first thing we need to do is to locate the file we want to import. To do this we click
Browse and then we point the Browse window to the location of the profile either on your
hard disk or on the CD that came with your controller. Once we’ve selected the profile we
want to import in the Browse window, we click open and it then takes us back to the Import
Game screen.
In the example above we have chosen the Oni profile. Because the profile was correctly
made using the New Game Wizard and was associated with the Oni.exe file when we
imported the profile above it correctly inputted the location information for Oni in the Game
window (C:\Program File\Oni\ONI.EXE). However, if the profile was not correctly associated
with the game’s exe file when it was created or if you have installed the game into a different
location (e.g. C:\Oni\ONI.EXE) then the profile will not be able to link up with the .exe file on
your computer and you will get the following message.
At this point you should click Yes and you will get a Browse window, which you should point
to the correct location of the game’s .exe file on your hard drive. Once that is done click Open
and the correct location of the game should then be displayed in the Game window. Click
Finish to finalise these settings and you will then have an icon for your new profile in the SGE
window.
Exporting a Profile
All the profiles you can download are available because you can export any profiles you make
to a single file. This is a good thing to do just to have a backup of any profiles that you’ve
made – having to create all those commands from scratch can be laborious. It’s very simple
to export a file – all you do is right-click on the profile in the SGE window and choose Export.
A window will then pop up asking you where you want to save the file to on your hard disk,
also giving you the option to change the name of the file if you require. Make all your choices
and then click Save. That’s it – you’ve just exported a profile.
What to do if a profile isn’t there for your controller
A hypothetical situation - you are looking for a profile for a particular game for your controller,
either on the website or on the CD. You can find one for another controller but not for yours;
what do you do? The answer is to import that profile anyway because you can add a
controller into a profile whenever you like. This is another simple process. Once you’ve
imported the profile, open it up in the SGE window and then point to a blank area of the
window and right-click the mouse. Point to New in the drop-down menu and then choose the
controller you want to add from the pop-out list.
Once you’ve selected your controller you will see the icon for it appear within the profile. You
can then double-click on it to bring up the 3D model and then begin assigning commands just
as described in the basic section of this guide.
Advanced Command Creation
As mentioned earlier, you are not limited to single key presses when creating commands; in
fact command creation is only limited by what you want to do. As well as this you can assign
the opening of applications or even websites to the buttons on your controller. All this will be
covered in this section.
Extended Commands
Open up a command and click the Action tab at the top of the window to bring up the bar
where you input your keystrokes. Now click the Advanced button on this window and you will
get the following.
As you can see we have some new options on the screen now. In the command input bar we
now have three ‘columns’ that refer to the actual button on your controller you are configuring.
Any keystroke we place in the press column will activate when we press the buttons on the
controller. Any keystroke in the repeat column will activate as long as we hold down the
button on the controller and the keystroke in the release column will be activated when we let
go of the button on the controller.
The mouse buttons allow us to make the button pretend to be a mouse button of our choice
and the Repeat Cycle sets how often the keystrokes placed in the Repeat column will repeat
whilst the button on the controller is held down. For example if we had keystrokes h,g,f in the
repeat column then at the current setting in the picture above the software would wait .20 of a
second before repeating h,g,f whilst we held the button on the controller down.
So what does this allow us to do? Anything. One thing you will notice when inputting
keystrokes whilst in Advanced Mode is that you get two keystrokes for every one key you
press – like below.
This is reflecting the way in which your keyboard actually works. When you press a key on a
keyboard you actually get two signals – one when you press it and one when you release it.
The numbers under the key presses above are the time (in seconds) between the key being
pressed and released – in this case it was a simple short keypress because the time is only
.11 of a second. This time can be adjusted though. When creating the keypress the software
will record how long you pressed the key down for, so you can adjust it there by holding the
key down for how long you want it to be held down for. Alternatively, you can adjust the
timings below the key presses by using the mouse to ‘drag’ the time to your chosen setting.
Simply point to the time you want to adjust and click and hold down the left mouse button.
Now drag the mouse right or left to increase or decrease, respectively, the timing.
To give you an idea of what all this means together have a look at the below example.
Imagine we are playing a space combat simulator. When I press the button on the controller
that this command is assigned to a missile is launched (Space). Whilst holding the button
down the command switches to a Missile View (F6) so we can track the progress of the
missile. It then waits 5 seconds before switching to a view of the enemy ship we have
targeted (F7). When we let go of the button it switches back to a view of our cockpit (F1).
Note that unless we adjust the Repeat Cycle setting it will very quickly switch back to the
Missile View if we leave the button on the controller held down so we may want to adjust the
Repeat Cycle setting to something like 4.00 or 5.00 seconds.
This is just an example of what you can do with the Advanced Command editor.
Cycle Commands
If we go back to the General tab in the command properties we can see that there are other
settings we can assign to the button.
In this example we have changed the setting from Single Action to Cycle of Actions and you
will notice that the tab at the top of the window has changed from Action to Cycle. Clicking
on this tab gives you the following screen.
A Cycle of Actions is basically a series of commands that you can assign to a single button.
These commands are then activated in the order you assigned them each time you press the
button that this Cycle of Actions has been assigned to. Looking at the picture above we are
looking at the list of commands created for the game Oni (the same one used in the basic
section of the manual). In this game you can use combinations of commands to create more
powerful move combinations. For example, if you were to press Punch, Punch, Kick it would
execute two punches and then a spinning kick. Rather than pressing two separate buttons we
could assign this cycle to the one button.
So all we do is select the first action in the cycle that we want to add in from the Single
Actions column. Then we click the box with the arrow pointing to the right to add it in to the
Actions in Cycle column.
Do this for each command you want to place in the cycle and you will end up with something
like the above. Now, when we want to execute the combo move in Oni we simply need to
press the same button three times and it will activate the punch command on the first press,
the punch command again on the second press and then the kick command on the third
press. It will start the cycle from the beginning the next time you press the button. That’s all
there is to programming a Cycle of Actions.
Application Commands
Clicking the Application option in the General tab of a command properties page changes
the Action tab at the top to an Application tab. Clicking on this tab brings up the following
screen.
This is a function that will mainly only be used with the P8000 but it can be done for any
controller supported by SGE. Basically, you can assign any button on your controller to
launch an application when you press it. This would only normally be used from within
Windows rather than in a game.
To choose the application you want to assign a command to simply click Browse and then
point it to the .exe file for the application you are looking to run from this button. In the
example below we have associated the button with the NotePad application in Windows.
Here you can choose anything you want – you can even assign the buttons to launch your
favourite games.
You can also access the application setup from the 3D model of the controller as indicated in
the picture below.
Simply click on the button you want to assign and then from the drop-down menu at the
bottom of the screen, choose Application. You can then click the Set-up button and then
Browse for the .exe file for your application or game just as described above.
Website Commands
Finally, it is possible to assign a button to open specific Website addresses. Again this is
going to be mainly used by the P8000 but any controller supported by SGE can do it.
Selecting the Website option in the Command Properties window will change the tab at the
top to Web Command and clicking on this will bring up the following window.
Simply type in the address of the website you wish to assign to this command (e.g.
www.saitek.com). Clicking Browse will take you to the Favourites folder in Windows where
any websites that you have bookmarked will be saved, so you can also select any websites
from there.
As with the Application option you can also set up website commands to buttons from the 3D
model of the controller, using the drop-down list at the bottom of the screen – as below.
Clicking the Browse button that then appears takes you to the Favourites folder again or you
can type the web address into the bar at the bottom of the screen.
Troubleshooting Your Profiles
Sometimes you might find that your profile simply isn’t doing what you programmed it to do.
There are several things to check if this is the case. Firstly, you need an understanding of
how SGE works. Every profile you create in SGE is associated with a program. What SGE
basically does is monitor what your PC is running. As soon as you run a program that SGE
has a profile made for then it loads the profile into your controller – this is called AutoActivation or Auto-Configure. The program that monitors this is represented by the little
black joystick icon in the system tray next to your clock.
Some programs, because of the way they work and load, do not work correctly with the AutoConfigure so we have included an option to load the profile you want into the controller
manually.
All you do is open up the SGE window and right-click on the profile you want to load into your
controller. You will get a drop-down menu like below.
Select Configure Game Now and you will get the following warning.
Basically, what it is saying is that we are going to load a profile into the controller, but in order
to do this we need to temporarily disable the Auto-Configure. Click Yes, and you will notice
that the black joystick icon next to your clock now has a red ‘Stop’ sign around it.
The profile is now loaded into your controller. If at any time you want to reactivate the AutoConfigure just right-click on the black stick icon and the red ‘stop’ sign will disappear meaning
that Auto-Configure is reactivated.
Whilst the profile has been loaded into the controller, there is a good way to test whether your
commands are programming other than going into a game – run a word processor! Any one
will do but most the one that everyone has is NotePad. This can be accessed from the Start >
Programs > Accessories menu in Windows. Once you’ve opened it, just press the buttons
on your controller and you should start seeing keystrokes appearing in NotePad. Obviously,
some keys that you’ve programmed won’t appear – the F1-F12 buttons don’t print out in a
word processor for example. Any letters or numbers however should print out quite happily
and of course any commands including the cursor keys on the keyboard will move the cursor
in the NotePad left, right, up and down.
This is a good test because if the keys all work in here then they will work in the game.
One other reason for the Auto-Configure not be work is that the profile is not correctly
associated with the game’s .exe file. This is unlikely if you have created a profile using the
New Game Wizard, because part of that process is ensuring that the profile is associated
with the game that you selected during the wizard.
If you have imported a profile, however, either from the CD, from the website or elsewhere,
then it is possible that it won’t be correctly associated with the game’s .exe file. Again, if you
ran the Import Game Wizard then you should have associated the profile with the game you
were importing it for but we will go over how to check a profile’s associations here.
In the SGE window right-click on the profile you want to check and click Properties from the
drop-down list.
You will see the following window.
The Target window is where we need to be looking. It needs to list the correct location of the
game’s .exe file on your hard drive. In the example above you can see that the game we used
when creating our profile in the basic section of the manual, Oni, is installed in the
C:\Program Files\Oni directory. If this was incorrect or if it said nothing in the Target box
then we would need to click Find Target and point the profile to the correct location of the
.exe file.
Click Open and then Apply and this will ensure that the profile is now correctly associated
with the profile.
Another reason for the profile to not be working correctly is if you have created more than one
profile for the same game. If you have done this then one of the profiles will be slightly greyed
out as seen in the example below.
The profile whose icon is still bold is currently set as the ‘default profile’, which means that it
overrides the other profile and is currently the only one that will load into the controller when
you run the game. To make the greyed-out profile your controller’s default, just right-click on it
and choose the Set As Default option from the drop-down list
That should cover any possible problems you might have with your profiles under SGE.
Enjoy your gaming!