PURSUIT | 3070 OFFSHORE | Owner`s manual | PURSUIT 3070 OFFSHORE Owner`s manual

3070 OFFSHORE
CENTER CONSOLE
OWNER’S MANUAL
FISHING BOATS
3901 St. Lucie Blvd.
Ft. Pierce, Florida 34946
3070 OFFSHORE
Print Date 8/2002
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3070 OFFSHORE
SAFETY INFORMATION
Your
3070 Offshore Owner’s Manual has been
written to include a number of safety instructions to assure the
safe operation and maintenance of your boat. These instructions
are in the form of DANGER, WARNING, CAUTION, and
NOTICE statements. The following definitions apply:
IMMEDIATE HAZARDS WHICH WILL RESULT IN
SEVERE PERSONAL INJURY OR DEATH.
HAZARDS OR UNSAFE PRACTICES WHICH COULD
RESULT IN SEVERE PERSONAL INJURY OR DEATH.
HAZARDS OR UNSAFE PRACTICES WHICH COULD
RESULT IN MINOR PERSONAL INJURY OR PRODUCT
AND PROPERTY DAMAGE.
NOTICE
INFORMATION WHICH IS IMPORTANT TO PROPER
OPERATION OR MAINTENANCE, BUT IS NOT HAZARD
RELATED.
All instructions given in this book are as seen from the stern
looking toward the bow, with starboard being to your right, and
port to your left. A glossary of boating terms is included.
IMPORTANT NOTE: Your boat uses internal combustion
engines and flammable fuel. Every precaution has been taken
by Pursuit Fishing Boats to reduce the risks associated with
possible injury and damage from fire or explosion, but your
own precaution and good maintenance procedures are necessary in order to enjoy safe operation of your boat.
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3070 OFFSHORE
BOAT INFORMATION
Please fill out the following information section and leave it in your Pursuit
3070 Offshore Owner’s Manual. This information will be important for you
and Pursuit service personnel to know, if and when you may need to call
Pursuit for technical assistance or service.
BOAT
MODEL:
HULL SERIAL #:
PURCHASE DATE:
DELIVERY DATE:
IGNITION KEYS #:
REGISTRATION #:
DRAFT:
WEIGHT:
ENGINE(S)
MAKE:
MODEL:
PORT SERIAL #:
STARBOARD SERIAL #:
TRANSMISSION(S) (Inboard)
MAKE:
MODEL:
PORT SERIAL #:
STARBOARD SERIAL #:
RATIO:
OUTDRIVE(S) (Inboard/Outboard)
MAKE:
MODEL:
PORT SERIAL #:
STARBOARD SERIAL #:
PROPELLER(S)
MAKE:
BLADES:
DIAMETER/PITCH:
OTHER:
GENERATOR
MAKE:
MODEL:
SERIAL #:
KW:
DEALER
PURSUIT
NAME:
PHONE:
DEALER/PHONE:
REPRESENTATIVE:
SALESMAN:
ADDRESS:
SERVICE MANAGER:
ADDRESS:
Pursuit Fishing Boats reserves the right to make changes and improvements in equipment, design and vendored
equipment items, at any time without notification.
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3070 OFFSHORE
IMPORTANT INFORMATION
Warranty and Warranty Registration Cards
The Pursuit Limited Warranty Statement is included with your boat. It has been written to be
clearly stated and easily understood. If you have any questions after reading the warranty, please
contact the Pursuit Customer Relations Department.
Pursuit, engine manufacturers, and the suppliers of major components maintain their own
manufacturer's warranty and service facilities. It is important that you properly complete the
warranty registration cards included with your boat and engine(s) and mail them back to the
manufacturers to register your ownership. This should be done within 15 days of the date of
purchase and before the boat is put into service. A form for recording this information is provided
at the beginning of this manual. This information will be important for you and service personnel
to know, if and when you may need service or technical information.
The boat warranty registration requires the Hull Identification Number “HIN” which is located
on the starboard side of the transom, just below the rubrail. The engine warranty registration
requires the engine serial number(s). Please refer to the engine owner's manual for the location
of the serial number(s).
IMPORTANT:
All boat manufacturers are required by the Federal Boat Safety Act of 1971 to notify first time
owners in the event any defect is discovered “which creates a substantial risk of personal injury
to the public.” It is essential that we have your warranty registration card complete with
your name and mailing address in our files so that we can comply with the law if it should
become necessary.
Product Changes
Pursuit is committed to the continuous improvement of our boats. As a result, some of the
equipment described in this manual or pictured in the catalog may change or no longer be
available. Pursuit reserves the right to change standard equipment, optional equipment
and specifications without notice or obligation. If you have questions about the equipment on
your Pursuit, please contact the Pursuit Customer Relations Department.
Transferring The Warranty
For a Transfer fee, S2 Yachts will extend warranty coverage to subsequent owners of Pursuit
models for the duration of the original warranty period. Please refer to the Pursuit Limited
Warranty Statement for the procedure to transfer the warranty.
To take advantage of this program, notification of the change of ownership, including the new
owner's name, address and telephone number together with the appropriate fee, must be sent to
Pursuit Fishing Boats, Customer Relations Department, 3901 St. Lucie Boulevard, Ft. Pierce,
Florida 34946, within 30 days of the date of resale.
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S2 Yachts will confirm, in writing, that the transfer of the warranty has taken place. After which,
the transferee will be treated as the original purchaser as outlined in the Pursuit Limited Warranty
Statement.
Service
All warranty repairs must be performed by an authorized Pursuit Dealer. Should a problem
develop that is related to faulty workmanship or materials, as stated in the Limited Warranty, you
should contact your Pursuit dealer to arrange for the necessary repair. If you are not near your
dealer or another authorized Pursuit dealer or the dealer fails to remedy the cause of the problem,
then contact the Pursuit Customer Relations Department within 15 days. It is the boat owner's
responsibility to deliver the boat to the dealer for warranty service.
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3070 OFFSHORE
OWNER'S/OPERATOR'S
RESPONSIBILITIES
Registration and Numbering
Federal law requires that all undocumented vessels equipped with propulsion machinery be
registered in the state of principal use. A certificate of number will be issued upon registering
the boat. These numbers must be displayed on your boat. The owner/operator of a boat must
carry a valid certificate of number whenever the boat is in use. When moved to a new state of
principal use, the certificate is valid for 60 days.
In order to be valid, the numbers must be installed to the proper specifications. Check with your
dealer or state boating authority for numbering requirements. The Coast Guard issues the
certificate of number in Alaska; all others are issued by the state.
Insurance
In most states the boat owner is legally responsible for damages or injuries he or someone else
operating the boat causes. Responsible boaters carry adequate liability and property damage
insurance for their boat. You should also protect the boat against physical damage and theft.
Some states have laws requiring minimum insurance coverage. Contact your dealer or state
boating authority for information on the insurance requirements in your boating area.
Reporting Boating Accidents
All boating accidents must be reported by the operator or owner of the boat to the proper marine
law enforcement authority for the state in which the accident occurred. Immediate notification
is required if a person dies or disappears as a result of a recreational boating accident.
If a person dies or there are injuries requiring more than first aid, a formal report must be filed
within 48 hours.
A formal report must be made within 10 days for accidents involving more than $500.00 damage
or the complete loss of a boat.
A "Boating Accident Report" form is located near the back of this manual to assist you in
reporting an accident. If you need additional information regarding accident reporting, please
call the Boating Safety Hotline, 800-368-5647.
Education
If you are not an experienced boater, we recommend that the boat operator and other people that
normally accompanies the operator, enroll in a boating safety course. Organizations such as the
U.S. Power Squadrons, United States Coast Guard Auxiliary, State Boating Authorities and the
American Red Cross offer excellent boating educational programs. These courses are worthwhile even for experienced boaters to sharpen your skills or bring you up to date on current rules
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v
and regulations. They can also help in providing local navigational information when moving
to a new boating area. Contact your dealer, State Boating Authority or the Boating Safety
Hotline, 800-368-5647 for further information on boating safety courses.
Required Equipment
U.S. Coast Guard regulations require certain equipment on each boat. The Coast Guard also sets
minimum safety standards for vessels and associated equipment. To meet these standards some
of the equipment must be Coast Guard approved. “Coast Guard Approved Equipment” has been
determined to be in compliance with USCG specifications and regulations relating to performance, construction, or materials. The equipment requirements vary according to the length,
type of boat, and the propulsion system. Some of the Coast Guard equipment is described in the
Safety Equipment chapter of this manual. For a more detailed description, obtain “Federal
Requirements And Safety Tips For Recreational Boats” by contacting the Boating Safety
Hotline 800-368-5647 or your local marine dealer or retailer and read the book “Sportfish,
Cruisers, Yachts - Owner's Manual,” included with this manual.
Some state and local agencies impose similar equipment requirements on waters that do not fall
under Coast Guard jurisdiction. These agencies may also require additional equipment that is
not required by the Coast Guard. Your dealer or local boating authority can provide you with
additional information for the equipment requirements for your boating area.
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3070 OFFSHORE
TABLE OF CONTENTS
Chapter 1:
Propulsion System
Page
1.1
1.2
1.3
1.4
1.5
1.6
Chapter 2:
2.1
2.2
2.3
2.4
2.5
2.6
2.7
2.8
Chapter 3:
3.1
3.2
3.3
3.4
3.5
Chapter 4:
General ............................................................................... 1-1
Drive System Corrosion ..................................................... 1-2
Engine Lubrication ............................................................. 1-2
Engine Cooling System ...................................................... 1-3
Propellers ........................................................................... 1-3
Engine Instrumentation ...................................................... 1-4
Helm Control Systems
General ................................................................................ 2-1
Engine Throttle and Shift Controls...................................... 2-1
Neutral Safety Switch .......................................................... 2-2
Engine Power Tilt and Trim ................................................ 2-2
Engine Stop Switch ............................................................. 2-3
Steering System ................................................................... 2-4
Trim Tabs ............................................................................ 2-4
Control Systems Maintenance ............................................. 2-5
Fuel System
General ................................................................................ 3-1
Outboard Fuel System ......................................................... 3-3
Diesel Generator Fuel System ............................................. 3-4
Fueling Instructions ............................................................. 3-5
Fuel System Maintenance .................................................... 3-7
Electrical System
4.1 General ................................................................................ 4-1
4.2 12-Volt System .................................................................... 4-1
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TABLE OF CONTENTS
Chapter 4:
Electrical System (Cont.)
Page
4.3 110-Volt System .................................................................. 4-9
4.4 Electrical System Maintenance ........................................... 4-13
Chapter 5:
5.1
5.2
5.3
5.4
5.5
5.6
Chapter 6:
Freshwater System
General ................................................................................ 5-1
Freshwater System Operation .............................................. 5-1
Water Heater ........................................................................ 5-2
Shore Water Connection ...................................................... 5-2
Shower Operation ................................................................ 5-3
Freshwater System Maintenance ......................................... 5-3
Raw Water System
6.1 General ................................................................................ 6-1
6.2 High Pressure Washdown .................................................... 6-1
6.3 Livewell ............................................................................... 6-2
6.4 Air Conditioning Pump ....................................................... 6-3
6.5 Raw Water System Maintenance ......................................... 6-4
Chapter 7:
Drainage Systems
7.1 General ................................................................................ 7-1
7.2 Cockpit Drains ..................................................................... 7-1
7.3 Hard-Top Drains .................................................................. 7-1
7.4 Bilge Drainage ..................................................................... 7-2
7.5 Fishbox, Cooler and Storage Compartment Drains ............. 7-3
7.6 Water System Drains ........................................................... 7-3
7.7 Cabin Drains ........................................................................ 7-3
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TABLE OF CONTENTS
Drainage Systems (Cont.)
Chapter 7:
Page
7.8 Rope Locker Drains ............................................................. 7-4
7.9 Drainage System Maintenance ............................................ 7-4
Ventilation System
Chapter 8:
8.1
8.2
8.3
8.4
8.5
Cabin Ventilation ................................................................
Windshield Ventilation .......................................................
Carbon Monoxide and Proper Ventilation ..........................
Bilge Compartment Ventilation ..........................................
Maintenance ........................................................................
Exterior Equipment
Chapter 9:
9.1
9.2
9.3
Deck ................................................................................... 9-1
Hull..................................................................................... 9-3
Cockpit ............................................................................... 9-4
Chapter 10:
10.1
10.2
10.3
10.4
10.5
10.6
8-1
8-1
8-2
8-3
8-3
Interior Equipment
Marine Head System .......................................................... 10-1
Refrigerator ........................................................................ 10-3
Air Conditioner .................................................................. 10-3
Galley and Sink .................................................................. 10-4
Carbon Monoxide Detector ................................................ 10-5
Convertible V-Berth and Table .......................................... 10-6
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TABLE OF CONTENTS
Chapter 11:
Safety Equipment
Page
11.1
11.2
11.3
11.4
11.5
11.6
11.7
11.8
General ................................................................................
Engine Alarms ....................................................................
Neutral Safety Switch .........................................................
Engine Stop Switch .............................................................
Required Safety Equipment ................................................
Carbon Monoxide Detector ................................................
First Aid ..............................................................................
Additional Safety Equipment..............................................
Chapter 12:
12.1
12.2
12.3
12.4
12.5
12.6
12.7
12.8
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Operation
General ............................................................................... 12-1
Rules of the Road ............................................................... 12-1
Pre-Cruise Check ............................................................... 12-3
Operating Your Boat .......................................................... 12-4
Tower Operation ................................................................ 12-7
Fishing ................................................................................ 12-8
Grounding and Towing ...................................................... 12-8
Transporting Your Boat ..................................................... 12-9
Chapter 13:
13.1
13.2
13.3
13.4
13.5
11-1
11-1
11-2
11-2
11-2
11-5
11-7
11-8
Routine Maintenance
Exterior Hull and Deck ...................................................... 13-1
Upholstery, Canvas and Enclosures ................................... 13-4
Cabin Interior ..................................................................... 13-6
Bilge and Generator ........................................................... 13-7
Drainage System ................................................................ 13-8
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TABLE OF CONTENTS
Chapter 14:
Seasonal Maintenance
Page
14.1 Storage and Lay-up ............................................................ 14-1
14.2 Winterizing ......................................................................... 14-4
14.3 Recommissioning ............................................................... 14-7
Chapter 15:
Schematics
DC Wiring Schematic ................................................................... 15-1
AC Wiring Schematic ................................................................... 15-2
Rod Locker Hatch Lifter Switch .................................................. 15-3
Battery Cable Routing .................................................................. 15-4
Hydraulic Steering System ........................................................... 15-5
Control Cables .............................................................................. 15-6
Generator ...................................................................................... 15-7
Fuel System 2-Stroke ................................................................... 15-8
Fuel System 4-Stroke ................................................................... 15-9
Fuel Selector Valves ..................................................................... 15-10
Freshwater System ........................................................................ 15-11
Raw Water System ....................................................................... 15-12
Drainage System ........................................................................... 15-13
Sump Pump Drain System ............................................................ 15-14
Air Conditioning System .............................................................. 15-15
Sling Positions .............................................................................. 15-16
Bunk Locations ............................................................................. 15-17
Half Tower Plate Locations .......................................................... 15-18
Appendix A:
Glossary of Terms .......................................................... A-1
Appendix B:
Maintenance Log ............................................................ B-1
Appendix C:
Boating Accident Report ................................................ C-1
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3070 OFFSHORE
Chapter 1:
PROPULSION SYSTEM
3070 Offshore
1.1 General
The Pursuit 3070 Offshore is designed to be powered with twin 2-cycle or 4-cycle outboard
motors.
Each manufacturer of the various outboard motors provides an owner’s information manual with
its product. It is important that you read the manual(s) very carefully and become familiar with
the proper care and operation of the engine and drive system. A warranty registration card has
been furnished with each new engine and can be located in the engine owner’s manual. All
information requested on this card should be filled out completely by the dealer and purchaser
and then returned to the respective engine manufacturer as soon as possible.
DO NOT ATTEMPT TO SERVICE ANY ENGINE OR DRIVE COMPONENT WITHOUT
BEING TOTALLY FAMILIAR WITH THE SAFE AND PROPER SERVICE PROCEDURES. CERTAIN MOVING PARTS ARE EXPOSED AND CAN BE DANGEROUS TO
SOMEONE UNFAMILIAR WITH THE OPERATION AND FUNCTION OF THE EQUIPMENT.
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1-1
DO NOT INHALE EXHAUST FUMES! EXHAUST CONTAINS CARBON MONOXIDE
THAT IS COLORLESS AND ODORLESS. CARBON MONOXIDE IS A DANGEROUS
GAS THAT IS POTENTIALLY LETHAL.
1.2 Drive System Corrosion
Each outboard motor is a complete drive system with the gear case being just forward of the
propeller and connected to the power head with a vertical drive shaft. Other than the routine
maintenance outlined in the engine owner’s manual, there is little to be concerned with unless
the boat is to be kept in saltwater for extended periods of time. Then the main concerns are marine
growth and galvanic corrosion.
Marine growth occurs when components are left in the water for extended periods and can cause
poor performance or permanent damage to the exposed components. The type of growth and how
quickly it occurs is relative to the water conditions in your boating area. Water temperature,
pollution, current, etc. can have an effect on marine growth.
Galvanic corrosion is the corrosion process occurring when different metals are submerged in
an electrolyte. Sea water is an electrolyte and submerged engine components must be properly
protected. Outboard motors are equipped with sacrificial anodes to prevent galvanic corrosion
problems. The anodes must be monitored and replaced as necessary. For locations and
maintenance, please refer to the engine owner’s manual.
When leaving the boat in the water, tilt the motors as high as possible. This will decrease the
risk of marine growth around the cooling inlets, propeller and exhaust ports and damage from
galvanic corrosion.
DO NOT PAINT THE OUTBOARD MOTORS WITH ANTIFOULING PAINTS DESIGNED FOR BOAT HULLS. MANY OF THESE PAINTS CAN CAUSE SEVERE DAMAGE TO THE ENGINES. CONTACT YOUR PURSUIT DEALER OR ENGINE MANUFACTURER FOR INFORMATION ON THE PROPER PAINTING PROCEDURES.
1.3 Engine Lubrication
2-cycle outboard motors are lubricated by a variable ratio oil injection system. The oil tanks are
mounted below the stern bait station near the transom. Always monitor the oil level before each
cruise by checking the gauge in the helm or visually checking the oil level using the reference
marks on the tanks. When additional oil is needed, use only the type of oil specified by the engine
manufacturer. Refer to the engine owner’s manual for oil specifications and additional
information on the oil injection system.
1-2
3070 OFFSHORE
4-cycle outboard engines have an oil sump in the crankcase that must be kept full of the type and
grade of oil recommended by the engine manufacturer. It is normal for 4-cycle engines to
consume a small amount of oil. Therefore, the oil must be checked before each use and changed
at regular intervals as instructed by the engine owner's manual. As with 2-cycle engines, use only
the type of oil specified by the engine manufacturer.
Note: Always monitor the oil level in the tanks and only use the type of oil specified by the
engine manufacturer.
1.4 Engine Cooling System
Outboard engines are raw water (sea water) cooled. Water is pumped through the water inlets,
circulated through the engine block, and relinquished with the exhaust gases through the
propeller hub. The water pump uses a small impeller made of synthetic rubber. The impeller and
water pump cannot run dry for more than a few seconds. In most outboard motors, some cooling
water is diverted through ports below the engine cowling. This allows the operator to visually
check the operation of the cooling system. When the engine is started, always check for a steady
stream of water coming out of those ports.
NEVER RUN AN OUTBOARD MOTOR WITHOUT WATER FLOWING TO THE WATER PUMP. SERIOUS DAMAGE TO THE WATER IMPELLER OR ENGINE COULD
RESULT.
Note: If the boat is used in salt or badly polluted water, the engines should be flushed after
each use. Refer to the engine owner’s manual for the proper engine flushing
procedure.
1.5 Propellers
The propellers convert the engine’s power into thrust. They come in a variety of styles, diameters
and pitches. The one that will best suit the needs of your Pursuit will depend somewhat on your
application and expected average load. Propeller sizes are identified by two numbers stamped
on the prop in sequence. The 1st number in the sequence (example 14 x 21) is the diameter of
the propeller, and the 2nd number is the pitch. Pitch is the theoretical distance traveled by the
propeller in each revolution. Always repair or replace a propeller immediately if it has been
damaged. A damaged and therefore out of balance propeller can cause vibration that can be felt
in the boat and could damage the engine gear assembly. Refer to the engine owner’s manual for
information on propeller removal and installation.
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1-3
RUNNING AGROUND OR STRIKING AN UNDERWATER OBSTRUCTION CAN RESULT IN SERIOUS INJURY TO PASSENGERS AND DAMAGE TO THE MOTOR OR
BOAT. IF YOUR BOAT RUNS AGROUND, EVALUATE THE DAMAGE THEN PROCEED AT LOW SPEED TO THE NEAREST SERVICE FACILITY AND HAVE AN IMMEDIATE INSPECTION MADE BEFORE FURTHER USE OF THE CRAFT. A DAMAGED BOAT CAN TAKE ON WATER. KEEP ALL LIFE SAVING DEVICES CLOSE
AT HAND WHILE DRIVING TO A DOCK AREA. IF THE BOAT CANNOT BE IMMEDIATELY REMOVED FROM THE WATER, THOROUGHLY INSPECT THE BILGE
AREA FOR LEAKS SO THAT THE BOAT DOES NOT SINK WHILE MOORED.
1.6 Engine Instrumentation
The helm station is equipped with a set of engine instruments and/or alarms. These instruments
allow the pilot to monitor the engines’ operational conditions. Close observation of these
instruments allows the pilot to operate the engines at the most efficient level and could save them
from serious costly damage. The instrumentation is unique to the type of outboard motors
installed on your Pursuit. Some or all of the following gauges may be present.
Tachometer
The tachometer displays the speed of the engine in revolutions per minute (RPM). This speed
is not the boat speed or necessarily the speed of the propeller. The tachometer may not register
zero with the key in the “OFF” position.
NEVER EXCEED THE MAXIMUM RECOMMENDED OPERATION RPM OF THE ENGINE. MAINTAINING MAXIMUM, OR CLOSE TO MAXIMUM
RPM FOR EXHelm
TENDED PERIODS CAN REDUCE THE LIFE OF THE ENGINE.
Speedometer
The speedometer indicates the speed of the boat in miles per hour. Most speedometers measure
the water pressure against a small hole in a pickup tube located in the engine lower unit or
mounted on the bottom of the transom.
Temperature Warning
The temperature warning indicates the temperature of the engine. A sudden increase in the
temperature could indicate an obstructed water inlet or an impeller failure.
CONTINUED OPERATION OF AN OVERHEATED ENGINE CAN RESULT IN ENGINE
SEIZURE. IF AN UNUSUALLY HIGH TEMPERATURE READING OCCURS, SHUT
THE ENGINE OFF IMMEDIATELY. THEN INVESTIGATE AND CORRECT THE
PROBLEM.
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Fuel Gauge
The fuel gauge indicates the amount of fuel in the fuel tanks. The fuel gauge switch, located on
the helm, is used to switch the gauge reading to the port or starboard fuel tank.
Voltmeter
The voltmeter displays the voltage for the battery and the charging system. The normal voltage
is 11 to 12 volts with the engines off and 13 to 14.5 volts with the engine(s) running.
Hour Meter
The hour meter keeps a record of the operating time for the engine.
Tilt/Trim Gauge
The tilt/trim gauge monitors the position of the outboard engine. The upper range of the gauge
indicates the tilt, which is used for trailering and shallow water operation. The lower range
indicates the trim position. This is the range used to adjust the hull angle while operating your
boat on plane. Please refer the engine owner’s manual for more information on the operation of
the outboard power tilt and trim.
Engine Alarms
Most outboards are equipped with an audible alarm system mounted in the helm area that
monitors selected critical engine systems. The alarm will sound if one of these systems begins
to fail. Refer to the engine owner’s manual for information on the alarms installed with your
engines.
IF THE ENGINE ALARM SOUNDS, IMMEDIATELY SHUT OFF THE ENGINE UNTIL THE PROBLEM IS FOUND AND CORRECTED.
Fuel Management
Fuel management systems are standard equipment with some outboard engines. On Yamaha®
engines, the fuel management gauge is a multifunction gauge used to monitor the gallons per
hour, miles per gallon, total gallons used and engine synchronization. If you have a fuel
management system installed on your boat, please refer to the engine or fuel management manual
for information on that system.
Depth Gauge
The depth gauge indicates the depth of the water below the bottom of the boat.
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1-5
Compass
The compass is on top of the helm. To adjust the compass for your area, read the instructions
on “Compass Compensation” given to you in the literature packet. The compass cannot be
adjusted accurately at the factory as it must be compensated for the influence of the electrical
equipment and electronics unique to your boat. Therefore, the compass should be adjusted by
a professional after the electronics and additional electrical accessories are installed and before
operating the boat.
Instrument Maintenance
Electrical protection for instruments and ignition circuitry is provided by a set of circuit breakers
located near the main battery switch. The ignition switches should be sprayed periodically with
a contact cleaner/lubricant. The ignition switches and all instruments, controls, etc. should be
protected from the weather when not in use. Excessive exposure can lead to gauge and ignition
switch difficulties.
1-6
3070 OFFSHORE
Chapter 2:
HELM CONTROL SYSTEMS
2.1 General
The helm controls consist of three systems: the engine throttle and shift controls, the steering
system, and the trim tab control switches. These systems provide the operator with the ability
to control the direction and attitude of the boat from the helm station.
Each manufacturer of the control components provides an owner’s manual with its product. It
is important that you read the manuals and become familiar with the proper care and operation
of the control systems.
2.2 Engine Throttle and Shift Controls
The shift and throttle controls on your boat may vary depending on the engines used. The following control description is
typical of most outboard remote controls. Refer to the engine
or control manuals for specific information on the controls
installed on your Pursuit.
The engine throttle and shift control systems consist of three
major components: the control handles, the throttle cable and
the shift cable. The cables are all the push-pull type. Two
cables are required for each engine. One cable connects the
remote throttle control to the carburetor or fuel injectors and
the other connects the remote shift control to the engine shift
rod linkage.
The helm on your Pursuit is designed for a binnacle style
control with a single lever for each engine that operates as a
Controls
gear shift and a throttle. General operation will include a
position for neutral (straight up and down), a forward position (the 1st detent forward of neutral),
and a reverse position (the 1st detent aft of neutral). Advancing the control lever beyond the shift
range advances the throttle in forward or reverse. Each control is equipped with a means of
permitting the engine to be operated at a higher than idle RPM while in neutral for cold starting
and warm-up purposes.
The handles of dual lever controls may not always align with each other at all rpm settings due
to variations in control cable routing, cable length and adjustments at the engine. Usually the
alignment of the handles can be optimized at a chosen rpm, but may vary at other settings.
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2-1
2.3 Neutral Safety Switch
Every control system has a neutral safety switch incorporated into it. This device prohibits the
engine from being started while the shift lever is in any position other than the neutral position.
If the engine will not start, slight movement of the shift lever may be necessary to locate the
neutral position and disengage the safety cutout switch. Control or cable adjustments may be
required to correct this condition should it persist. See your Pursuit dealer for necessary control
and cable adjustments.
The neutral safety switches should be tested periodically to ensure that they are operating
properly. To test the neutral safety switches, make sure the engines are tilted down and move
the shift levers to the forward position. Make sure the control levers are not advanced past the
idle position. Turn the ignition key to the start position just long enough to briefly engage the
starter for the engine. Do not hold the key in the start position long enough to start the engine.
The starter should not engage for either engine. Repeat this test with the shift levers in reverse
and the engine throttles at idle. Again, the starter should not engage for either engine. If the starter
for either engine engages with the shift controls in any position other than the neutral position,
then the neutral safety switch is not functioning properly and you should contact your dealer and
have the neutral safety switch repaired before using your boat. If an engine starts in gear during
this test, immediately move the control levers to the neutral position. Turn the engine off and
have the problem corrected by a qualified marine mechanic before using the boat.
IN SOME SITUATIONS, IT MAY BE POSSIBLE TO ACCIDENTALLY START THE ENGINES IN GEAR WITH THE THROTTLES ABOVE IDLE IF THE NEUTRAL SAFETY
SWITCH IS NOT OPERATING PROPERLY. THIS WOULD CAUSE THE BOAT TO
ACCELERATE UNEXPECTEDLY IN FORWARD OR REVERSE AND COULD RESULT
IN LOSS OF CONTROL, DAMAGE TO THE BOAT, OR INJURY TO PASSENGERS.
ALWAYS TEST THE NEUTRAL SAFETY SWITCH PERIODICALLY AND CORRECT
ANY PROBLEMS BEFORE USING THE BOAT.
2.4 Engine Power Tilt and Trim
All outboard engines have a tilt and trim feature. The tilt and trim switches are usually built into
the engine shift and throttle controls and allow the operator to control the position of the
outboards from the helm. Moving the outboards closer to the boat transom is called trimming
“in” or “down.” Moving the outboards further away from the boat transom is called trimming
“out” or “up.” In most cases, the boat will run best with the outboards adjusted so the hull will
run at a 3 to 5 degree angle to the water.
The term “trim” generally refers to the adjustment of the outboards within the first 20o range of
travel. This is the range used while operating your boat on plane. The term “tilt” is generally
used when referring to adjusting the outboards further up for shallow water operation or
trailering. For information on the proper use and maintenance of the power tilt and trim, please
refer to the engine owner’s manual.
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THE ENGINE HOSES AND CABLES OR THE TRANSOM GEL COAT CAN BE DAMAGED BY TILTING THE ENGINES TO THE FULL UP POSITION WITH THE ENGINES TURNED TO THE WRONG POSITION. MOST TWIN ENGINE AND SINGLE
ENGINE BOATS REQUIRE THE STEERING WHEEL TO BE TURNED COMPLETELY
TO STARBOARD BEFORE TILTING THE ENGINES TO THE FULL UP POSITION.
YOU SHOULD MONITOR THE ENGINES AS THEY TILT TO DETERMINE BEST
FULL TILT ENGINE POSITION FOR YOUR BOAT.
SOME AUTOPILOTS HAVE ENGINE POSITION SENSORS THAT ARE MOUNTED TO
THE HYDRAULIC STEERING CYLINDER. WITH THESE AUTOPILOTS, THE ENGINE POSITION SENSOR BRACKET COULD HIT THE TRANSOM WHEN THE ENGINES ARE TILTED TO THE FULL UP POSITION AND CAUSE DAMAGE TO THE
ENGINE RIGGING, THE AUTOPILOT OR THE TRANSOM. IF YOU HAVE AN AUTOPILOT INSTALLED ON YOUR BOAT, YOU SHOULD MONITOR THE LOCATION
OF THE ENGINE CABLES AND AUTOPILOT BRACKETS AS THE ENGINES ARE
TILTED TO DETERMINE THE BEST ENGINE POSITION AND MAXIMUM ENGINE
TILT FOR YOUR APPLICATION.
2.5 Engine Stop Switch
Your Pursuit is equipped with an engine stop switch and lanyard. When
the lanyard is pulled it will engage the switch and shut off the engines.
We strongly recommend that the lanyard be attached to the driver
whenever the engines are running. If the engines will not start, it could
be because the lanyard is not properly inserted into the engine stop
switch. Always make sure the lanyard is properly attached to the engine
stop switch before attempting to start the engine.
Refer to the engine owner's manual for more information on the engine
stop switch.
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Engine Stop Switch
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2.6 Steering System
The steering system is hydraulic and made of two main components: the helm assembly and the
hydraulic cylinder. The helm unit acts as both a fluid reservoir and pump. Turning of the helm,
or steering wheel, pumps the fluid in the hydraulic hoses and activates the hydraulic cylinder
causing the motors to turn. A slight clicking sound may be heard as the wheel is turned. This
sound is the opening and closing of valves in the helm unit and is normal. Refer to the steering
manufacturer owner’s manual for specific information on the steering system.
Dual engine outboards are coupled at the tiller arms by a tie bar. The engines must be aligned
so they are parallel with each other to provide maximum stability on straight ahead runs and
proper tracking through corners. Engine or steering system damage may require the engines to
be realigned.
2.7 Trim Tabs
The trim tabs are recessed into the hull below the swim platform and integrated transom engine
mounting system. A dual toggle switch is used to control the trim tabs. The switch is labeled
and controls bow up and down movements. It also controls starboard and port up and down
movements. Bow up and bow down will control the hull planing attitude, while port and
starboard up and down provides control for the hull listing.
Before leaving the dock, make sure that the tabs are in the
full “UP” position by holding the control in the bow up
position for ten (10) seconds.
Always establish the intended heading and cruise speed
before attempting to adjust the hull attitude with the trim
tabs. After stabilizing speed and direction, move the trim
tabs to achieve a level side to side running attitude being
careful not to over trim.
After depressing a trim tab switch, always wait a few
seconds for the change in the trim plane to take effect.
Avoid depressing the switch while awaiting the trim
plane reaction. By the time the effect is noticeable the
trim tab plane will have moved too far and thus the boat
will be in an overcompensated position.
Trim Tab
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When running at a speed that will result in the boat falling off plane, lowering the tabs slightly,
bow down, will improve the running angle and operating efficiency. Too much bow down tabs
can reduce operating efficiency and cause substantial steering and handling difficulties.
Be extremely careful when operating in a following sea. The effect of trim tabs is amplified under
such conditions. Steering and handling difficulties can result from improper trim tab usage,
particularly in a following sea. Always raise the tabs to the full bow up position in these
conditions.
When running at high speeds be sure that the tabs are in the full “UP” position. Only enough
trim plane action should be used to compensate for any listing. Trim tabs are extremely sensitive
at high speeds. Adjust for this and be prepared to slow down if difficulties arise.
When running into a chop, a slight bow down attitude will improve the ride. Be careful not to
over trim. Handling difficulties may result.
2.8 Control Systems Maintenance
Control Maintenance
Periodic inspection of the control systems and all connections should be made. Signs of rust,
corrosion, wear, or other deterioration should immediately be serviced. Generally, periodic
lubrication of all moving parts and connections with a light waterproof grease is in order.
Lubrication should be performed as often as necessary to keep the system operating smoothly.
Control system adjustments may become necessary. If adjustments become necessary, see your
Pursuit dealer.
DO NOT ATTEMPT CONTROL ADJUSTMENTS UNLESS YOU ARE FAMILIAR WITH
SERVICING CONTROL SYSTEM PROCEDURES. CONTROL MISADJUSTMENT CAN
CAUSE LOSS OF CONTROL AND SEVERE ENGINE OR LOWER UNIT DAMAGE.
Steering System Maintenance
A periodic inspection of all steering hoses, linkage and helm assemblies should be made. Signs
of corrosion, cracking, loosening of fastenings, excessive wear, or deterioration should be
immediately corrected. Failure to do so could lead to steering system failure that would result
in loss of control.
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When new, or after repairs, hydraulic steering systems may need to have all air purged from the
system. Review the information provided by the hydraulic steering manufacturer for proper
specifications and details on system service and maintenance.
Trim Tab Maintenance
Marine growth can interfere with the proper operation of the trim tab planes and actuators. To
reduce problems due to marine growth, always return the trim tabs to the full “UP” position after
operating the boat and periodically inspect and clean marine growth from the actuators and
planes.
The trim tab fluid should be checked often. Keep the fluid level between the marks on the trim
tab pump reservoir.
The trim tabs are equipped with a zinc anode to prevent galvanic corrosion. Galvanic corrosion
is the corrosion process occurring when different metals are submerged in an electrolyte. Sea
water is an electrolyte and submerged metal components must be properly protected. The anodes
were installed at the factory and will need to be changed when they are 75% of their original size.
Refer to the Routine Maintenance chapter of this manual for information on maintaining zinc
anodes and the trim tab owner’s manual for additional maintenance information, fluid specifications and operating instructions.
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Chapter 3:
FUEL SYSTEM
3.1 General
The fuel system used in Pursuit boats is designed to meet or exceed the requirements of the U.S.
Coast Guard, the Boating Industry Association, and The American Boat and Yacht Council in
effect at the time of manufacture.
All gasoline and diesel fuel systems have been factory inspected and pressure tested in
accordance with regulations in effect at the time of manufacture. This inspection assures that the
system is air tight, leak proof and safe. It is the responsibility of the purchaser to maintain it in
that condition. Make frequent inspections to assure that no deterioration or loosening of
connections is resulting from vibration.
DO NOT LET THE ODOR OF GASOLINE GO UNCHECKED. ANY ODOR OF GASOLINE MUST BE IMMEDIATELY INVESTIGATED AND STEPS TAKEN TO PROTECT
THE BOAT AND ITS OCCUPANTS UNTIL THE PROBLEM IS CORRECTED. IF THE
ODOR OF GASOLINE IS NOTED, SHUT OFF ALL ENGINES AND ELECTRICAL
EQUIPMENT. INVESTIGATE AND CORRECT THE SITUATION IMMEDIATELY.
HAVE ALL PASSENGERS PUT ON PERSONAL FLOTATION DEVICES AND KEEP A
FIRE EXTINGUISHER READY UNTIL THE SITUATION IS RESOLVED.
Fuel Withdrawal Tubes
The fuel withdrawal tubes are positioned in the fuel tanks to achieve optimum fuel usage, fuel
line routing, etc. At certain speeds and hull trim angles, the fuel supply at the withdrawal tank
location can increase or decrease accordingly. Be extremely careful when attempting to operate
the boat when low on fuel. Though some fuel may be in the tank, the relative trim angle of the
boat may cause the fuel to flow away from the withdrawal.
Fuel Gauge
This indicates the amount of fuel in the tanks. Due to the mechanical nature of the fuel senders,
variations in readings during various speeds of operation may occur. This system is merely a
relative indication of the available fuel supply and not a calibrated instrument. The fuel gauge
switch located on the helm is used to switch the gauge reading to the port or starboard fuel tank.
Note: The fuel gauge switch will not have any effect on the fuel supply to the engines. The
fuel supply must be controlled by the valves located near the fuel withdrawal tubes
on the fuel tanks.
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Fuel Fills
A fuel fill deck plate is located on each gunnel, and is marked
“GAS.” If your boat is equipped with the optional generator, an
additional fuel fill deck plate will be located on the port side of the
deck and will marked “DIESEL.” The fuel fill is opened by turning
it counter clockwise with a special key. After fueling, install the fuel
cap and tighten with the key. Be sure to use the proper type and grade
fuel. Refer to the engine owner’s manual for additional information.
Gas Fuel Fill
Note: Do not overtighten the fuel cap. If the cap is overtightened, the O-ring seal could
be damaged allowing water to contaminate the fuel system.
DO NOT CONFUSE FUEL FILL DECK PLATES WITH THE WATER OR WASTE FILL
DECK PLATES. THESE PLATES ARE ALSO LABELED ACCORDINGLY. IF GASOLINE IS ACCIDENTALLY PUMPED INTO THE WATER OR WASTE TANK, DO NOT
ATTEMPT TO PUMP IT OUT YOURSELF. WATER AND WASTE PUMPS ARE NOT
DESIGNED TO PUMP FUEL AND A FIRE OR EXPLOSION COULD RESULT. CONTACT YOUR DEALER OR THE PURSUIT CUSTOMER RELATIONS DEPARTMENT
FOR ASSISTANCE IN HAVING THE FUEL PROFESSIONALLY REMOVED.
Fuel Vents
There are two fuel vent fittings for the gasoline fuel tanks, one on each side of the hull. If your
boat is equipped with a generator, there is also an additional fuel vent fitting on the port hull side
for the diesel fuel tank. While the tank is being filled, the air displaced by the fuel escapes through
the vent.
After fueling, replace the fill cap(s), and wash the areas around the fuel fill plates and below the
fuel vent(s). Residual fuel left on the deck and hull sides can be dangerous, and will yellow the
fiberglass or damage the striping.
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3.2 Outboard Fuel System
The outboard fuel system on the Pursuit 3070 has two fuel tanks and four manual “ON/OFF” fuel
valves that are labeled to indicate the engine the valve will supply. The fuel valves are located
on the top of the fuel tanks below the inspection plates in the rear of the cockpit. The valves are
off when the handle is perpendicular to the fuel flow. The fuel valves allow the operator to run
the engines from both tanks or from either the port tank, which fills from the port gunnel, or the
starboard tank, which fills from the starboard gunnel.
Proper fuel management is important on all boats. During normal operation, the port engine
should be supplied fuel from the port tank and the starboard engine supplied fuel from the
starboard tank. The fuel valves on each tank are labeled port and starboard. The labels refer to
the engine the valve supplies. If a fuel supply problem should occur in one of the fuel tanks, both
engines can be temporarily operated from either the port or starboard fuel tank by opening both
valves on that tank. The fuel valves on the port tank should be off when operating both engines
on the starboard tank and the fuel valves on the starboard tank should be off when operating both
engines on the port tank. Operating the boat with all four fuel valves open is not recommended
and should be avoided.
Note: The engines will not draw fuel equally from the fuel tanks when the fuel valves are
set so both engines are operating from both tanks (all four fuel valves open.) This
could result in one tank being exhausted of fuel while the other tank is partially full,
causing fuel supply problems.
Fuel withdrawal lines are equipped with anti-siphon valves where the lines attach to the fuel
tanks. These valves prevent gasoline from siphoning out of the fuel tank should a line rupture.
DO NOT REMOVE THE ANTI-SIPHON VALVES FROM THE SYSTEM. SHOULD
THE VALVES BECOME CLOGGED, CLEAN AND REINSTALL OR REPLACE.
Fuel filters are installed in the transom area of the boat. The filters are the water separator type
and there is one filter for each engine fuel line. Each fuel filter has a sediment bowl that should
be checked for water frequently to assure an adequate supply of clean, dry fuel to the engines.
It is recommended that the filters are inspected periodically and the elements changed as needed.
See Fuel System Maintenance for additional information on the fuel filter.
Note: Some fuel injected engines have fuel filters on the engine and do not allow external
fuel filters. If your boat is equipped with fuel injected engine(s), it may not have a
separate water separator fuel filter.
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3.3 Diesel Generator Fuel System (Optional)
The diesel fuel system for the optional generator is completely separate from the gas system. The
diesel fuel tank is located in the generator compartment and is filled from a fuel fill deck plate
labeled “Diesel.” The main difference is the diesel system is not equipped with anti-siphon
valves, and there is always a fuel return line for the engine that returns unused fuel to its respective
fuel tank.
Proper diesel engine operation requires a good supply of clean, dry diesel fuel. Improper marina
fuel storage techniques, limited boat usage, etc. can cause the fuel to become contaminated.
Periodically, it may be necessary to pump accumulating water and contaminated fuel from the
bottom of the fuel tank. If the fuel system on your boat becomes contaminated, contact your
dealer or the Pursuit Customer Relations Department for assistance.
Algae can grow in the accumulated water in diesel fuel tanks. This condition is most prevalent
in warm climates. Periodically adding a high quality diesel fuel additive containing an algicide
may be required to control algae in your boating area. Please contact your Pursuit dealer or
generator manufacturer for additional information regarding fuels and additives.
Important:
Do not allow the generator to sit unused for an extended period with the fuel
tank less than full. Changes in temperature and weather conditions can
cause condensation in diesel fuel tanks that are less than 3/4 full.
Diesel Fuel Filters
The diesel fuel filters are installed in the generator compartment near the engine. A shut-off
valve for the fuel line is located on the fuel tank. The fuel line shut-off valve should always be
closed before servicing the fuel filters. Check the primary filter for water before each use and
replace the filter cartridge as needed.
Water is drained from the primary filter by placing a cup under the filter and draining through
the petcock at the bottom of the filter until clean fuel flows. It is particularly important to monitor
the condition of the fuel filter frequently because most diesel engines circulate much more fuel
than they consume. Because of the volume of fuel that flows through the filters, the elements
must be changed at least twice a season or more frequently depending on the quality of the fuel
and the hours run. Follow the filter or engine manufacturer’s instructions for cleaning and
replacing the filter elements.
IMPORTANT: Diesel fuel systems may need to be primed after servicing. Refer to the
generator owner’s manual for information on priming the fuel system.
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3.4 Fueling Instructions
FUEL IS VERY FLAMMABLE. BE CAREFUL WHEN FILLING THE FUEL TANKS.
NO SMOKING. NEVER FILL THE TANKS WHILE THE ENGINES ARE RUNNING.
FILL THE FUEL TANKS IN AN OPEN AREA. DO NOT FILL THE TANKS NEAR
OPEN FLAMES.
TO PREVENT DAMAGE TO THE FUEL SYSTEM, USE ONLY A GOOD GRADE OF
GASOLINE FOR GASOLINE ENGINES OR DIESEL FUEL FOR DIESEL ENGINES.
DO NOT USE A FUEL THAT CONTAINS HARSH ADDITIVES OR IS AN ALCOHOL
BLEND. ANY DAMAGE DONE TO THE FUEL SYSTEM THAT IS THE RESULT OF
USE OF AN ALCOHOL BLEND, IS NOT COVERED BY THE PURSUIT WARRANTY.
REFER TO THE ENGINE MANUFACTURER OWNER’S MANUAL REGARDING FUEL
REQUIREMENTS FOR YOUR ENGINES.
To fill the fuel tank at a marina, follow this procedure:
1.
Make sure all switches are in the “Off” position.
2.
Make sure the boat is securely moored.
3.
Make sure all passengers leave the boat.
4.
Estimate how much fuel is needed and avoid over filling the tank.
5.
A special key to open the fuel caps is supplied.
6.
Turn the key counterclockwise to open the cap.
7.
Remove the cap.
8.
Put the nozzle in the fuel opening.
STATIC ELECTRICITY CAN BE GENERATED WHILE FUELING AND CAN CAUSE
A FIRE OR EXPLOSION. TO PREVENT STATIC SPARKS WHEN FILLING THE
TANK, MAKE SURE THE NOZZLE IS IN CONTACT WITH THE FUEL OPENING.
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SPILLED FUEL IS DANGEROUS AND CAN YELLOW FIBERGLASS OR IGNITE.
MAKE SURE YOU DO NOT SPILL ANY FUEL. IF FUEL IS SPILLED ON THE DECK,
USE A CLOTH TO REMOVE THE FUEL AND PROPERLY DISPOSE OF THE CLOTH
ON SHORE. IF FUEL IS SPILLED ON THE WATER, EXERCISE EXTREME CAUTION. FUEL FLOATS ON TOP OF THE WATER AND CAN IGNITE. IF EXCESS
FUEL IS SPILLED INTO THE WATER, IMMEDIATELY EVACUATE THE AREA AND
NOTIFY THE MARINA AND THE PROPER OFFICIALS.
9.
Fill the fuel tanks slightly less than the rated capacity to allow for expansion and
to avoid spilling fuel out of the vents and fuel fills.
Note: The diesel fuel tank for the optional generator is small in capacity and will fill
quickly. You should be particularly alert while filling this tank.
10.
Remove the nozzle.
11.
Install and tighten the fuel cap. Be careful not to overtighten the cap.
12.
Check the fuel compartment and below the deck for fuel odors. If you smell
fuel, do not start the engine.
TO REDUCE THE RISK OF A FIRE AND/OR EXPLOSION, DO NOT START THE
ENGINE(S) WHEN FUEL FUMES ARE PRESENT. FUEL FUMES ARE DANGEROUS
AND HARMFUL TO YOUR HEALTH.
MAKE SURE ALL GASOLINE ODORS ARE INVESTIGATED IMMEDIATELY.
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3.5 Fuel System Maintenance
Periodically inspect all primer bulbs, connections, clamps and hoses for leakage and damage or
deterioration. Replace as necessary. Spray the valves, tank fuel gauge sender and ground
connections with a metal protector.
Frequently inspect and lubricate the fuel fill cap O-ring seals with petroleum jelly or silicone
grease. The O-ring seal prevents water from entering the fuel system through the fuel fill cap and
it should be immediately replaced if there is any sign of damage or deterioration.
The age of gasoline can affect engine performance. Chemical changes occur as the gasoline ages
that can cause deposits and varnish in the fuel system as well as reduce the octane rating of the
fuel. Severely degraded fuel can damage the engine and boat fuel tank and lines. Therefore, if
your boat is not being run enough to require at least one full tank of fresh fuel a month, a fuel
stabilizer should be added to the gasoline to protect the fuel from degradation. Your dealer or
the engine manufacturer can provide additional information on fuel degradation and fuel
stabilizers recommended for your engine.
Avoid using fuels with alcohol additives. Gasoline that is an alcohol blend will absorb moisture
from the air which can reach such concentrations that "phase separation" can occur whereby the
water and alcohol mixture becomes heavy enough to settle out of the gasoline to the bottom of
the tank. Since the fuel pick up tube is very near the bottom of the tank, phase separation can cause
the engine to run very poorly or not at all. This condition is more severe with methyl alcohol and
will worsen as the alcohol content increases. Water or a jelly like substance in the fuel filters is
an indication of phase separation from the use of alcohol blended fuels.
DO NOT DRAIN ANY FUEL INTO THE BILGE. THIS COULD LEAD TO A FIRE OR
EXPLOSION.
AFTER THE FILTER ELEMENT HAS BEEN CHANGED, PRIME THE FUEL SYSTEM
AND CHECK ALL FITTINGS FOR LEAKS BEFORE AND AFTER STARTING THE
ENGINES.
BEFORE STARTING THE ENGINES, ALWAYS OPEN ALL HATCHES, WINDOWS,
AND DOORS TO COMPLETELY VENTILATE THE BOAT AFTER SERVICING THE
FUEL SYSTEM.
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Chapter 4:
ELECTRICAL SYSTEM
4.1 General
Your Pursuit is equipped with 110-volt AC and 12-volt DC electrical systems. The AC system
can draw current from one of two sources, either shore power outlets at dock side or the optional
generator. The DC system draws current from on board batteries.
The 12-volt batteries in your boat are of the lead-acid type. They will require similar maintenance
as those found in automobiles.
There are electrical schematics included in this manual to aid in following an individual circuit
of the boat.
4.2 12-Volt System
The 12-volt system is a standard marine system. There are three batteries, one for the starboard
engine, one for the port engine and a house or accessory battery. The batteries themselves can
be charged by the engines or by the battery charger when hooked to shore power or when
operating the optional generator. An automatic 12-volt current control system called the “Total
Automatic Battery System® (TABS)” manages the charging current for the 12-volt system
whenever the engines are running. The TABS automatically senses the condition of each battery
and directs the available current to the batteries that require charging. The system is equipped
with a battery parallel feature that will connect all three batteries in parallel for extra battery
power while starting the engines. The battery parallel switch is a momentary switch located in
the helm switch panel that is labeled either “Accessory” or “Parallel.” A red LED light on the
front of the TABS indicates that the parallel switch is activated. Please refer to the TABS owner's
manual for additional information on the operation and maintenance of this system.
All 12-volt power is distributed to the 12-volt accessories through individual circuit breakers
located in the 12-volt breaker panel in the cabin. A main breaker located on the front of the TABS
protects the system from an overload. Other circuit breakers, located on the front of the TABS,
protect the circuit for the optional windlass, the main DC power and the automatic float switches
for the aft and forward bilge pumps. The engine main breakers located on each engine protect
the ignition systems and gauges. Some 12-volt accessories are operated directly by a circuit
breaker in the cabin breaker panel while others are operated by a switch fed by the panel breakers.
Most of the 12-volt accessories on the deck and cockpit are operated by switches in the helm and
accessory switch panels.
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PROPER FUSE OR BREAKER PROTECTION MUST BE PROVIDED FOR ALL 12VOLT EQUIPMENT ADDED. DO NOT OVERLOAD THE ACCESSORY CIRCUIT
BREAKERS OR OTHER CIRCUITRY THROUGH ADDITIONAL 12-VOLT EQUIPMENT.
Battery Switches
There are three “ON” - “OFF” battery switches located on the front of the TABS. The switches
are activated using special keys that are attached to the unit. The port battery switch is labeled
“Port” and activates the port engine, the starboard battery switch is labeled “Starboard” and
activates the starboard engine and the center battery switch is labeled “House” and activates the
12-volt breaker panel in the cabin and all other 12-volt accessories. The house battery switch key
is different from the engine switch keys, allowing the house battery to be activated without
providing access to the engine starting batteries. Make sure that all three switches are activated
whenever the engines are running to ensure that all 12-volt accessories will operate when they
are needed. Red LED lights above each switch indicate that the switch is on. The top LED light
will be lit when the engines are running or when the parallel switch is engaged.
The TABS controls the charging of all three batteries whenever one or both of the engines is
operating. When one or both engines is started, the engine alternator(s) starts to recharge the
batteries. This charging current passes through the TABS sensing circuit. This circuit senses the
charge and switches relays to connect the “House” battery in parallel with the engine batteries.
Thus the charge from the engines is split between the batteries, with the lowest battery receiving
the most charge. When the engines are turned off, the charging stops and the sensing circuit turns
off the relays, disconnecting the “House” battery from the engine starting batteries, thereby
automatically isolating the batteries from one another.
When in port or at anchor, the switch that supplies the port engine and the switch that supplies
the starboard engine should be off. Only the center battery switch that activates the “House”
battery should be on. This will keep the engine starting batteries in reserve for starting the
engines. All three battery switches should be in the “OFF” position when leaving the boat
unattended.
Note: Current is supplied to the automatic float switches for the bilge pumps when the
batteries are connected and the battery switches are off.
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12-Volt Accessory Switch Panels
The main accessory switch panel is located at the helm. The circuit breakers that protect the
accessories are located in another panel on the helm below the switches.
The following are descriptions of the accessories controlled by the main accessory switch panel:
Windlass Switch
This switch controls the optional windlass which is mounted to the deck directly above the rope
locker. It is protected by a circuit breaker, located in the TABS, of the type and rating
recommended by the windlass manufacturer.
Bilge Pump Fwd
Activates the forward bilge pump which is installed in the bilge below the aft berth. The
pump moves water out through the thru-hull fitting in the hull. To start the pump
manually, put the switch in the “ON” position.
Bilge Pump Aft
Activates the stern bilge pump which is installed in the rear center of the bilge. The pump
moves water out through the thru-hull fitting in
the hull. To start the pump
manually, put the switch in the “ON” position.
Note: The bilge pumps will start automatically when there is sufficient water in the bilge
to activate the float switches. The float switches are protected by 10-amp circuit
breakers located in the TABS and are always supplied current when the batteries
are connected.
Fuel Gauge Switch
The fuel gauge switch allows one fuel gauge to be used for both fuel tanks. With the ignition
switch on, move the switch to the port position and the gauge will show the fuel level in the port
fuel tank. Move the switch to the starboard position and the gauge will show the fuel level in the
starboard tank.
Anchor/Nav Lights
The switch is a three-position switch. The middle position is “OFF.” Moving the switch in
one direction will activate the navigation lights. Moving the switch in the opposite direction
activates the anchor light.
Cockpit Lights
Activates the lights that illuminate the cockpit area.
Spreader Lights
Activates the flood lights located on the optional radar arch or hardtop. These lights provide
additional lighting for the rear of the cockpit.
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Wipers
Activates windshield wipers if this option is installed on your boat. Otherwise this switch is wired
in reserve.
Parallel
The battery parallel switch is a momentary switch that will connect all three batteries in parallel
for extra battery power while starting the engines. A red LED light on the front of the TABS unit
indicates that the parallel switch is activated.
Accessory Switch
This switch is supplied to protect additional equipment that may or may not have been installed
by Pursuit or your Pursuit dealer. If no accessories are activated by this switch, it remains wired
in the panel in reserve. Some accessories that may be connected to the accessory switch are: the
hardtop lights, battery parallel switch or electronics.
Horn
Activates the boat horn.
Additional Accessory Switch Panels
Additional switch panels are located in various locations in the cockpit and helm area of the boat.
Most of these panels are equipped with one switch and one circuit breaker. The following are
descriptions of additional panels that may be on your Pursuit and the accessories they control:
Trim Tab Switch
Located in the helm. This switch controls the trim tab planes located on the transom of the boat.
It is protected by the 15-amp accessory plug breaker. Please refer to the Helm Control Systems
chapter for detailed information on the operation of the trim tab controls.
Baitwell Switch
Located under the gunwale in the cockpit. This switch activates the baitwell circulating pump
that supplies water to the baitwell. The pump is protected by a circuit breaker in the panel and
an automatically resetting breaker on the pump motor.
Washdown Pump
This switch activates the raw water washdown pump. The pump is the pressure demand type
and is protected by a circuit breaker in the panel and an automatically resetting breaker on the
pump motor.
Note: Please refer to the Raw Water System chapter for more information on the baitwell
and washdown systems.
Fishbox Pump Out Macerator Pump
The fishbox macerator switch panel is located in the rear of the cockpit near the stern access door.
It is a momentary switch that activates the overboard macerator discharge system for the fishbox.
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12-Volt Receptacle
Provides electrical current for portable 12-volt equipment.
Holding Tank Macerator
The holding tank overboard discharge macerator switch is located in the holding tank fluid level
monitor panel in the head compartment. It is a momentary switch that activates the overboard
macerator discharge system for the holding tank. Refer to the Marine Head System in the Interior
Equipment chapter for additional information on the operation of the overboard macerator
discharge system.
Rod Storage Hatch Lifter
The rod storage compartment hatch control panel is located in the cockpit. It is a momentary
switch that controls the electric actuator for the hatch. The leaning post seat must be in the full
aft position for this switch to activate the hatch lifter. Refer to the Exterior Equipment chapter
for additional information on the rod storage compartment.
Leaning Post / Seat Adjuster
The switch is located on the helm. It is a momentary switch that controls the fore and aft
movement of the leaning post seat.
Helm
The helm is raised and lowered by a switch located near the safety clamps at the front of the helm.
It is a momentary switch that activates an electric ram inside the helm. The leaning post seat must
be in the full aft position for this switch to raise or lower the helm. Please refer to the Exterior
Equipment section for more information regarding safety precautions and the operation of the
helm tilt control.
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Cabin DC Accessory Breaker Panel
Power is distributed to most of the 12-volt accessories through individual circuit breakers located
in the cabin DC breaker panel. A main breaker located on the TABS protects the system from
an overload. Some 12-volt accessories are operated directly by the circuit breaker in the panel
while others are operated by switches fed by the panel breakers.
A DC voltage meter is located in the panel to monitor the voltage level in the batteries. It will
monitor the voltage of the house battery plus any electrical charges supplied to it when the
engines or the battery charger is operating.
PROPER FUSE OR BREAKER PROTECTION MUST BE PROVIDED FOR ALL 12VOLT EQUIPMENT ADDED. DO NOT OVERLOAD THE ACCESSORY CIRCUIT
BREAKERS OR OTHER CIRCUITRY THROUGH ADDITIONAL 12-VOLT EQUIPMENT.
The following are descriptions of the accessories controlled by the cabin DC breaker panel:
12-Volt Main
Supplies the 12-volt current to the cabin DC breaker panel and protects the panel from an
overload.
Cabin Lights
Supplies 12-volt electrical current to the cabin light switches.
Fresh Water System
Supplies 12-volt electrical current directly to the fresh water pump pressure switch located on
the pump. The pump is the pressure demand type and is protected by a circuit breaker in the panel
and an automatically resetting breaker on the pump motor. The pressure switch automatically
controls the water pump when the system is activated and properly primed.
Electric Head
Supplies electrical current directly to the switch which controls the vacuum pump on the electric
head.
Hatch Lifter
Supplies 12-volt electrical current to the rod storage compartment hatch lifter control switch
located in the cockpit.
DC Refrigerator
Supplies 12-volt electrical current directly to the refrigerator when AC current is not being used.
Stereo
Supplies 12-volt electrical current to the stereo.
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Helm Main
Supples 12-volt electrical current to the breakers and switches in the helm switch panel.
Electronics Main
Reserved for electronics installations.
Macerator- Head
Supplies electrical current to the switch that controls the macerator overboard discharge pump
for the holding tank. This breaker should be in the “OFF” position except when pumping out the
holding tank.
Carbon Monoxide Detector
Supplies 12-volt electrical current to the carbon monoxide detector in the cabin. This is a "push
to reset" breaker that is normally on all the time when activated by the house battery switch on
the TABS, unless it is tripped by an overload . It should be checked, and the power indicator on
the carbon monoxide detector should be lit whenever someone is occupying the cabin. If the
breaker has tripped, it indicates that there is a problem with the carbon monoxide detector, the
breaker, or the wiring from the breaker panel to the detector. Always determine the cause of the
problem and correct it before resetting the breaker.
CARBON MONOXIDE IS A LETHAL, TOXIC GAS THAT IS COLORLESS AND ODORLESS. IT IS A DANGEROUS GAS THAT WILL CAUSE DEATH IN CERTAIN LEVELS.
Shower Sump
Supplies 12-volt electrical current directly to the cabin drain float switch which automatically
controls the console cooler drain and shower sump pump. This is a "push to reset" breaker that
is normally on all the time unless tripped by an overload. Make sure this breaker is on before
using the cabin shower.
Accent Lighting
Supplies 12-volt electrical current to the accent lights in the cabin. This is a "push to reset"
breaker that is normally on all the time unless tripped by an overload .
Accessory
Reserved for additional 12-volt equipment.
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Additional Breakers and Switches
Windlass
The windlass breaker is located on the TABS unit which is located in the stern bilge. It supples
current to the windlass switch in the helm panel. Push the button on the breaker in to activate
the windlass control switch and pull it out to return the breaker to “OFF” whenever the windlass
is not in use. Turning off this breaker when the windlass is not in use will reduce the possibility
of accidentally activating the windlass.
Forward Bilge
The forward bilge pump breaker is located on the TABS and provides protection for the
automatic float switch on the forward bilge pump. Another breaker in the helm provides circuit
protection for the manual switch.
Aft Bilge
The aft bilge pump breaker is located on the TABS and provides protection for the automatic float
switch on the aft bilge pump. Another breaker in the helm provides circuit protection for the
manual switch.
DC Power
The DC power breaker is located on the TABS and provides protection for all DC power to the
Cabin DC breaker panel.
Engine Circuit Breakers or Fuses
There are circuit breakers or fuses located on each engine that provide protection for the ignition
systems, electric fuel pump, charging system and other accessories unique to the engines
installed in your boat. Please refer to the engine owner's manual for information on the circuit
breakers or fuses installed on your engines.
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4.3 AC System
The AC system is fed by the shore power outlet or by the optional generator. It is wired totally
separate from the 12-volt DC system and is equipped with an on-board galvanic isolation system.
All AC current is distributed to the AC accessories through individual circuit breakers located
in the AC panel. The main breaker in the panel protects the system from an overload and the
reverse polarity light indicates any problems due to an improper shore power supply. All AC
outlets in the cabin are protected by ground fault interrupters to protect against electrical shock.
A cord set is provided to supply power from the shore power outlet to the boat’s AC system.
TO REDUCE THE RISK OF ELECTRICAL SHOCK IN WET WEATHER, AVOID MAKING CONTACT WITH THE SHORE CABLE OR MAKING A CONNECTION TO A
LIVE SHORE OUTLET. NEVER SPRAY WATER ON ELECTRICAL CABLES WHILE
WASHING DOWN DECKS.
TO REDUCE THE POSSIBILITY OF AN ELECTRICAL SHOCK, IT IS IMPORTANT
THAT THE AC GROUND SYSTEM IS FUNCTIONING PROPERLY AND THAT A
PROPER CONNECTION EXISTS BETWEEN THE SHORE POWER CORD, THE
SHORE POWER INLET, THE BOAT BONDING SYSTEM AND THE OUTLET
GROUND CIRCUITS. IF THERE IS ANY DOUBT ABOUT THE INTEGRITY OF THE
GROUND CIRCUIT, A QUALIFIED MARINE ELECTRICIAN SHOULD BE CONTACTED IMMEDIATELY AND THE AC SHOULD BE DISCONNECTED UNTIL THE NECESSARY REPAIRS ARE COMPLETED.
Recommended procedure for making a shore connection
Turn the AC main breaker to the “OFF” position. If the dock side outlet includes a disconnect
switch, turn it to the “OFF” position also.
To avoid strain on the cable make sure it has more slack than the mooring lines. Dress the cable
so that it cannot be damaged by chafing between the boat and the dock. Make sure the cable does
not come in contact with the water. Then connect the cable in the boat plug inlet and the dockside
outlet, making sure the connection plug includes a three-prong plug with a ground wire. Tighten
the lock rings on both the shore and the boat connector plugs.
Turn the dock side disconnect switch or circuit breaker to the “ON” position and check for proper
polarity. If reverse polarity has been achieved, the red polarity indicator in the AC panel will
light. If this should happen, make sure the main breaker on the panel is in the “OFF” position,
turn the dock power switch or breaker off and disconnect the power cable. A special relay
attached to the main breaker should automatically turn the main breakers off whenever reverse
polarity is achieved. Notify a qualified electrician to check the wiring at the dock outlet. If the
red polarity light does not illuminate when power is supplied to the panel, the polarity is correct
and the AC main switch can be moved to the “ON” position.
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DO NOT OPERATE THE AC ELECTRICAL SYSTEM FROM SHORE POWER WITH
REVERSE POLARITY. REVERSE POLARITY WILL DAMAGE THE SYSTEM AND
EXPOSE PASSENGERS TO ELECTROCUTION HAZARDS. THIS CONDITION COULD
ALSO CAUSE A FIRE IN THE ELECTRICAL SYSTEM.
DO NOT ATTEMPT TO CORRECT THE WIRING YOURSELF. ELECTRIC SHOCK
CAN CAUSE SEVERE INJURY OR EVEN DEATH. ALWAYS HAVE A QUALIFIED
ELECTRICIAN CHECK WIRING.
KEEP CHILDREN AWAY FROM ANY ELECTRICAL CABLES OR EQUIPMENT AND
ALWAYS USE GROUNDED APPLIANCES ON BOARD YOUR BOAT.
UNDETECTED FAULTS IN THE AC ELECTRICAL SYSTEM COULD CAUSE THE
WATER AROUND THE BOAT TO BECOME ENERGIZED. THIS COULD CAUSE A
SEVERE SHOCK OR EVEN DEATH TO SOMEONE IN THE WATER NEAR THE
BOAT. NEVER SWIM OR ALLOW SWIMMING AROUND THE BOAT WHEN THE
AC SYSTEM IS ACTIVATED BY THE GENERATOR OR THE SHORE POWER CONNECTION.
Disconnecting procedure for shore power connection
Turn the main breaker on the AC panel and the disconnect switch on the dock side outlet to the
“OFF” positions.
Disconnect the cable from the dock side outlet and replace the outlet caps. Disconnect the cable
from the boat and close the inlet cap. Store cable.
AC Accessory Breaker Panel
The AC breaker panel is located in the cabin. The following are descriptions of the AC panel
equipment and the breakers that protect the accessories:
AC Amp Meter
Indicates the total amperage or current being drawn through the AC panel. It is the total current
level of all of the AC equipment in operation at the time.
AC Volt Meter
Indicates the voltage supplied to the panel.
AC Main Breaker
Protects the general distribution network. This breaker is very sensitive. The resulting power
surge that occurs when connecting the dock side cord may cause the main breaker to trip. To
avoid this surge, always turn the main breaker to the “OFF” position before plugging or
unplugging the shore power cord. The AC panel also is equipped with a relay that will cause
the main breaker to trip when reverse polarity current is detected.
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Reverse Polarity Light
The red light indicates reverse polarity current supplied to the panel. This situation will cause
the red light to remain lit. Additionally a special relay attached to the main breaker will
automatically turn the main breaker off whenever reverse polarity is achieved. If reverse polarity
is achieved, immediately turn off all cabin AC breakers and dockside outlet breakers, disconnect
the shore power cable and notify a qualified electrician to check the dockside wiring.
Reverse Polarity Light Test Switch
There is a momentary switch located below the reverse polarity light in the AC breaker panel.
This switch is used to test the reverse polarity light to ensure that it is functioning. The light can
be tested by depressing the switch whenever the AC system is activated. The reverse polarity
light should be tested each time the AC system is activated. If the light does not activate when
the switch is pressed, disconnect the shore power cable and notify a qualified electrician to check
the light and the dockside wiring if necessary.
Microwave
Supplies AC current directly to the microwave oven. See the microwave manual for more
information.
Hot Water Heater
Supplies electrical current directly to the water heater circuit. The water temperature is
automatically controlled by a thermostat in the water heater control panel. Before operation, you
must have water in the water heater (see the water heater manual for more information).
Battery Charger
Supplies electrical current directly to the automatic battery charger. The battery charger charges
and maintains the 12-volt batteries simultaneously when activated. It is fully automatic and is
equipped with an amp meter to monitor charging. See the battery charger manual for more
information.
Charging also can be monitored by using the volt meters in the engine gauge cluster and the cabin
DC breaker panel. To monitor the engine batteries, activate the charger and turn the engine
battery switches on. Turn the ignition key switch for each engine to the “ON” position (DO NOT
START THE ENGINES) and read the voltage on the volt meter for each engine. To monitor
the house battery, activate the charger and turn the house battery switch on. Read the volt meter
in the cabin DC breaker panel. If the batteries are in good condition and charging properly, the
volt meters will indicate between 12 and 14.5 volts. If the reading is below 12 volts, then the
battery is not accepting a charge or the charger is not working properly. Always turn the ignition
switches off immediately after the monitoring is complete. See the battery charger manual for
more information.
The wires that supply DC charging current to the batteries are protected by an internal fuse in the
battery charger and three external circuit breakers, one for each battery bank output wire, located
near the TABS unit. The external breakers protect the DC charging circuit from the batteries to
the charger. The internal fuses in the charger protect the DC charging circuit from the charger
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to the batteries. The circuit breakers can be tested by pressing the red button on the breaker. This
will trip the breaker and deactivate the circuit. Reset the breaker by raising the lever at the center
of the breaker until it locks in the horizontal position.
Air Conditioner
Supplies electrical current to the air conditioning control panel and the air conditioner raw water
pump when this option is installed. Otherwise it is reserved for additional AC equipment.
Note: This breaker may trip if sea water is not being supplied to the air conditioning unit.
If this breaker trips, reset and check for water flow out of the air conditioning thru
hull. Refer to the air conditioner owner’s manual for additional information.
Refrigerator
Supplies AC electrical current directly to the optional refrigerator when AC power is available
and chosen over the 12-volt power supply. See the refrigerator manual for more information.
Outlets
Supply electrical current to the cabin ground fault interrupter (GFI) electrical outlets.
Note: All AC electrical outlets are provided with ground fault interrupters to protect
against electric shock. These outlets should be tested periodically to ensure proper
operation by pressing the test/reset buttons in the center of the face plate. GFI
outlets do not protect against short circuits and overloads. This is done by the outlet
breakers on the AC panel.
GFI OUTLETS DO NOT PROVIDE 100% PROTECTION FROM ELECTRIC SHOCK.
EVEN THOUGH GROUND FAULT INTERRUPTERS PROVIDE PROTECTION BY REDUCING EXPOSURE TIME FROM LINE TO GROUND SHOCK HAZARDS, IT IS
STILL POSSIBLE TO RECEIVE AN ELECTRIC SHOCK FROM DEFECTIVE APPLIANCES OR POWER TOOLS AND MISUSED ELECTRICAL EQUIPMENT.
Additional AC Breaker Panels
Shore Power Inlet
Located in the cockpit near the shore power inlet plug. This breaker protects the AC system
between the shore power inlet plug and the main AC panel.
AC Power Selector Switch
The AC breaker panel will be equipped with this switch if the optional AC generator has been
installed in your boat. Move the selector switch to the “SHORE” position when connected to
dock side power. Move the selector switch to the “OFF” position when disconnecting the dock
side power or when no AC power is being supplied. Move the selector switch to the
“GENERATOR” position when the generator is being operated.
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Generator Operation Panel
These switches control the starting, running, and stopping of the optional generator. The
procedures may vary depending on the model and type of generator installed in your boat. An
owner operator’s manual for the generator has been supplied with this manual. Please refer to
it for details on the generator operation.
Note: Diesel generators consume DC electrical current and do not charge the battery
when they are running. Therefore, it is important to activate the battery charger
to maintain the house battery whenever the generator is running.
GENERATOR ENGINES PRODUCE CARBON MONOXIDE WHICH IS A LETHAL,
TOXIC GAS THAT IS COLORLESS AND ODORLESS. IT IS A DANGEROUS GAS
THAT WILL CAUSE DEATH IN CERTAIN LEVELS. ONLY OPERATE THE GENERATOR IN WELL VENTILATED AREAS AND NEVER OPERATE THE GENERATOR
WHILE YOU ARE SLEEPING.
4.4 Electrical System Maintenance
12-Volt DC Electrical System Maintenance
At least once a year, spray all exposed electrical components behind the helm and in the plugs,
with a protector. Exterior light fixture bulbs should be removed and the metal contact areas
coated with a non-water soluble lubricant like petroleum jelly or silicone grease. The sockets
should be sprayed with a protector. Care must be taken not to get any oil or petroleum jelly on
the glass portion of the bulbs as this will cause the bulb to overheat and burn out.
WHEN REPLACING LIGHT BULBS IN MARINE LIGHT FIXTURES, ALWAYS USE
A BULB WITH THE SAME RATING AS THE ORIGINAL. USING A DIFFERENT
BULB COULD CAUSE THE FIXTURE TO OVERHEAT AND MELT OR SHORT CIRCUIT.
Check all below deck wiring to be sure it is properly supported, that the insulation is sound, and
that there are no loose or corroded terminals. Corroded terminals should be thoroughly cleaned
with sandpaper, or replaced, tightened securely and sprayed with a metal and electrical protector.
Inspect all engine wiring.
Check the electrolyte level in the batteries regularly and add distilled water as necessary. If the
batteries are frequently charged by the automatic battery charger, the electrolyte level will have
to be checked more often. The correct fluid level in the cells is usually approximately 1/4 to 1/
2 inch above the plates. If fluid is needed, fill to the proper level with distilled water. Do not
over fill! Please note that some batteries are sealed and cannot be filled.
Keep the battery tops clean and dry. Dirt and water can conduct electricity from one post to the
other causing the battery to discharge.
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The battery posts should be kept free of corrosion. Remove the cables and clean the posts and
cable clamps with a battery post cleaner or sandpaper as required. Coating the battery posts and
cable clamps with petroleum jelly or silicone grease will protect them and reduce corrosion.
Battery cables, both hot and ground, must be replaced when they show signs of corrosion or
fraying. Deteriorated cables cause a considerable voltage loss when high currents are drawn, as
for starting the engine.
NEVER USE AN OPEN FLAME IN THE BATTERY STORAGE AREA. AVOID STRIKING SPARKS NEAR THE BATTERY. A BATTERY CAN EXPLODE IF A FLAME OR
SPARK IGNITES THE HYDROGEN GAS THE BATTERY EMITS WHILE BEING
CHARGED.
AC Electrical System Maintenance
Periodically inspect all wiring for nicks, chafing, brittleness, improper support, etc. Examine the
shore power cord closely for cracks in the insulation and corrosion in electrical connectors.
Spraying receptacles and electrical connections with an electrical contact cleaner or a metal and
electrical protector will reduce corrosion and improve electrical continuity.
Inspect all wiring for proper support, sound insulation, and tight terminals, paying particular
attention to portable appliance cords and plugs.
The entire AC circuitry, especially the shore power cord, should be seasonally tested for proper
continuity by an experienced electrician. This will detect any shorts, open wires, or ground faults.
Ground fault interrupters should be tested periodically to ensure proper operation by pressing the
test/reset buttons in the center of the face plate. The polarity indicator system also should be
inspected for proper operation.
The engine maintenance required on the generator is similar in many ways to primary inboard
engines. The most important factors to the generator's longevity are proper ventilation,
maintenance of the fuel system, ignition system, cooling system, lubrication system and the AC
alternator.
Maintenance schedules and procedures are outlined in your generator owner’s manual. They
should be followed exactly.
CORROSION ALLOWED TO BUILD ON THE ELECTRICAL CONNECTORS CAN
CAUSE A POOR CONNECTION RESULTING IN SHORTS, GROUND FAULTS OR
POOR GROUND CONNECTIONS. ELECTRICAL CONNECTORS SHOULD BE
CHECKED AT LEAST ANNUALLY AND CLEANED AS REQUIRED. DO NOT ALLOW
CORROSION TO BUILD ON CONNECTIONS.
THE AC AND DC ELECTRICAL SYSTEMS ALWAYS SHOULD BE DISCONNECTED
FROM THE POWER SOURCE BEFORE INSPECTING OR SERVICING THE SYSTEM.
NEVER SERVICE ANY COMPONENT OF AN ELECTRICAL SYSTEM WHILE IT IS
ENERGIZED.
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Chapter 5:
FRESHWATER SYSTEM
5.1 General
The freshwater system consists of a potable water tank, distribution lines and a distribution pump.
The pump is equipped with an automatic pressure switch and is located in the stern bilge. An inline strainer located near the pump protects the system from debris. The tank is filled through a
labeled deck plate located on the gunnel.
DO NOT FILL SYSTEM WITH ANYTHING OTHER THAN WATER. SHOULD THE
SYSTEM BECOME CONTAMINATED WITH FUEL OR OTHER TOXIC FLUIDS,
COMPONENT REPLACEMENT MAY BE NECESSARY.
DO NOT CONFUSE FUEL FILL DECK PLATES WITH THE WATER OR WASTE
FILL DECK PLATES. THESE PLATES ARE ALSO LABELED ACCORDINGLY. IF
GASOLINE OR DIESEL FUEL IS ACCIDENTALLY PUMPED INTO THE WATER OR
WASTE TANK, DO NOT ATTEMPT TO PUMP IT OUT YOURSELF. WATER AND
WASTE PUMPS ARE NOT DESIGNED TO PUMP FUEL AND A FIRE OR EXPLOSION
COULD RESULT. CONTACT YOUR DEALER OR THE PURSUIT CUSTOMER RELATIONS DEPARTMENT FOR ASSISTANCE IN HAVING THE FUEL PROFESSIONALLY REMOVED.
5.2 Freshwater System Operation
Fill the water supply tank slowly through the labeled deck plate. After filling the water tank,
partially open all faucets. The “Fresh Water System” breaker on the cabin DC panel should be
on. Allow the pump to run until all of the air is purged from the system and a steady stream of
water is flowing from each outlet. Next, turn off the faucets one by one. As the pressure builds,
the pump will automatically shut off.
When properly primed and activated, the water system will operate much like the water system
in a home. An automatic pressure sensor keeps the system pressurized. If the system has been
recently filled or has not been used for an extended period, air bubbles may accumulate at the
pump and the system may have to be reprimed.
Whenever the boat is left unattended, the water pressure breaker should be placed in the “OFF”
position.
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DO NOT ALLOW THE FRESHWATER PUMP TO RUN DRY. THE FRESHWATER
PUMP WORKS ON DEMAND AND WILL NOT SHUT OFF AUTOMATICALLY WHEN
THE TANK IS EMPTY. THIS CAN RESULT IN DAMAGE TO THE PUMP. ALWAYS
TURN THE WATER PRESSURE BREAKER OFF WHEN THE FRESHWATER SYSTEM
IS NOT IN USE.
5.3 Water Heater
The water heater is located in the bilge near the stern. All heaters have a 110-volt element that
is thermostatically controlled at the heater and activated by a circuit breaker located in the 110volt panel. A high pressure relief valve protects the system from excessive pressure. Always
make sure all air is purged from the water heater and lines before activating the water heater
breaker. Refer to the water heater owner’s manual for additional information.
DO NOT SUPPLY CURRENT TO AN EMPTY WATER HEATER. DAMAGE TO THE
HEATER WILL RESULT. THE SYSTEM MUST BE FILLED AND PRIMED BEFORE
USING THE WATER HEATER.
5.4 Shore Water Connection (Optional)
The shore water connection allows the direct connection of the water system to a shore side water
supply. This provides the system with a constant supply of freshwater and minimizes the
pressure pump operation. A female inlet fitting is mounted in the cockpit. A pressure reducer
is installed in the system along with two check valves. One check valve keeps water from running
out of the shore water inlet fitting when the pressure pump operates. The second provides
protection for the pressure pump when the shore water is connected.
To use shore water, connect a hose from the shore water faucet to the shore water fitting on the
boat. Next, turn on the shore water. The pressure pump will not run and the water in the boat’s
water tank will not be used.
Note: The water tank will not be filled by connecting to shore water.
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DO NOT MODIFY OR CHANGE THE SHORE WATER INLET CONNECTOR WITH
ANOTHER TYPE WITHOUT CONSULTING PURSUIT CUSTOMER RELATIONS OR
YOUR DEALER. THE USE OF THE WRONG TYPE OF INLET CONNECTOR CAN
DAMAGE THE FRESHWATER SYSTEM.
5.5 Shower Operation
The head sink faucet is also the shower spray head. To use as a shower, make sure the “Fresh
Water System” breaker in the DC breaker panel is on, then lift the spray head off the sink or out
of the locker (cockpit shower) and turn the water on. Adjust the hot and cold water faucet until
the desired temperature is obtained. Some minor variations in the water temperature may occur
as the pressure pump cycles.
Shower water is drained from the head compartment by a sump pump system connected to the
shower drain. An automatic float switch in the shower sump controls the pump. The pump is
protected by the shower sump pump circuit breaker in the panel. After showering, let the cold
water flow for a period of time to flush the drainage system of soap residue.
The shower sump system is located in the bilge below the aft berth in the cabin. It is essential
that the shower drain strainer is cleaned regularly and the sump is inspected periodically for
accumulated debris that needs to be removed.
5.6 Freshwater System Maintenance
Information supplied with water system components, by the equipment manufacturers, is
included with this manual. Refer to this information for additional operation and service data.
The following items should be done routinely to maintain your freshwater system:
•
Remove the filter screens from the faucet spouts and eliminate any accumulation of debris.
A build up of debris can cause the pump to cycle excessively.
•
The freshwater system is equipped with a strainer located on the intake line near the pump.
This should be checked at least annually and cleaned as necessary.
•
Periodically remove the lid on the shower drain sump assembly located under the floor of the
cabin aft berth. Clean debris from the sump and flush with clean water.
•
Periodically spray the pumps and metal components with a metal protector.
•
The batteries must be properly maintained and charged. Operating the pressure pump from
a battery with a low charge could lead to pump failure.
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•
Add a commercially available potable water conditioner to the water tank to keep it fresh.
•
Periodically, remove the water tank vent and clean corrosion and salt buildup from the vent
screens. The screens will prevent insects and other foreign matter from contaminating the
water system. The vent should be replaced if the vent or screens are damaged or badly
corroded. Vent screens that are clogged will prevent the water tank from venting properly
and make filling the tank difficult.
Be sure the screens are secure and that the vent hose is properly routed and attached when
the vent is reinstalled or replaced. The vent hose must be looped above the vent, secured to
the hull near the vent and securely attached to the vent hose fitting with a hose clamp.
THE BATTERIES MUST BE PROPERLY CHARGED. OPERATING THE FRESHWATER PUMP FROM A BATTERY WITH A LOW CHARGE MAY LEAD TO A PUMP
FAILURE.
THE FRESHWATER SYSTEM MUST BE PROPERLY WINTERIZED PRIOR TO WINTER LAY-UP. SEE THE SECTION ON WINTERIZING
THE WATER PRESSURE BREAKER SHOULD BE PLACED IN THE “OFF” POSITION
WHENEVER LEAVING THE BOAT UNATTENDED OR WHEN THE FRESHWATER
SYSTEM IS NOT IN USE.
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Chapter 6:
RAW WATER SYSTEM
6.1 General
In the raw or seawater systems, all water pumps are supplied by hoses connected to ball valves
and thru hull fittings located in the bilge compartment. Always make sure the ball valves are open
before attempting to operate any component of the raw water system. 12-volt pumps supply
seawater to most of the various accessories.
The optional air conditioner uses a 110-volt AC seawater supply pump. This is the only 110-volt
AC pump in the system and it is automatically activated when the air-conditioning or heating
system is in use.
Priming the System
Make sure the ball valves are open. Open the hose connector for the raw water washdown and
activate the pressure pump by turning the washdown pump switch to the “ON” position. Run the
pump until all of the air is purged from the system and then turn the switch off. Turn the livewell
switch to the “ON” position. Run the pump until all of the air is purged from the system and then
turn the switch to the “OFF” position. Closing the thru hull ball valves before the boat is hauled
from the water will help to eliminate air locks in raw water systems.
Note: It may be necessary to reprime the raw water system if the system is not used for an
extended period and at the time of launching.
6.2 High Pressure Washdown
A high pressure pump, controlled by a pressure sensor, supplies the raw water hose connector
located in the cockpit. The pump is activated by the washdown switch located under the gunwale
on the side of the cockpit. This switch should be turned to the “ON” position just before using
the washdown and be turned to the “OFF” position when the washdown is not in use.
When activated, the pressure switch will automatically control the pump. As the pressure builds
in the washdown hose, the pump will shut off. When the washdown hose is in use and the
pressure drops, the pump will turn on.
The raw water washdown system is equipped with a sea strainer on the intake side of the pump
located in the bilge below the stern access hatches in the transom splashwell. This should be
checked frequently and cleaned as necessary.
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The Washdown Pump Connector
The washdown pump hose connector is located in the cockpit
and uses a standard garden hose connection.
Washdown Hose
Connector
ALWAYS TURN THE RAW WATER PUMP SWITCH TO THE “OFF” POSITION
WHEN LEAVING THE BOAT UNATTENDED.
DO NOT RUN THE HIGH PRESSURE PUMP DRY FOR EXTENDED PERIODS AS
DAMAGE TO THE PUMP WILL RESULT.
6.3 Livewell
Seawater is provided to the livewell by a 12-volt diaphragm pump. This pump is designed to
carry a constant flow of water to the livewell. The pump is activated by the baitwell switch in
the cockpit. An overflow built into the livewell automatically controls the water level in the
livewell. Always turn the pump off at the switch panel when the livewell is not in use.
The livewell pump is equipped with a sea strainer on the intake side of the pump located in the
bilge below the stern access hatches in the transom splashwell. This should be checked
frequently and cleaned as necessary.
To fill the livewell, insert the plug into the drain fitting at the bottom of the livewell. Make sure
the valve at the intake thru hull fitting is open and activate the baitwell switch. When the water
level reaches the overflow, it will begin to circulate.
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3070 OFFSHORE
To drain the livewell, turn off the livewell pump and pull out the plug in the drain fitting at the
bottom of the livewell. When the livewell has completely drained, use the washdown hose to
flush the livewell and drain of debris.
The livewell supply thru hull valve should be closed whenever the livewell is not in use. This
will prevent water from entering the livewell while the boat is cruising.
Note: Do not use the livewell as a dry storage area when it is not in use. Seawater could
accidently be delivered to the livewell from the thru hull fitting and damage
equipment stored there.
DO NOT RUN THE LIVEWELL PUMP DRY FOR EXTENDED PERIODS AS DAMAGE
TO THE PUMP WILL RESULT.
ALWAYS TURN THE LIVEWELL PUMP SWITCH TO THE “OFF” POSITION WHEN
LEAVING THE BOAT UNATTENDED.
6.4 Air Conditioning Pump
The air conditioner is self-contained and seawater cooled. An AC centrifugal raw water pump
supplies seawater that cools the condensing unit as it circulates through the system and is
discharged overboard. The pump is located below the water line and is activated whenever 110volt current is available and the air conditioning system is operating.
Seawater is supplied to the pump from a thru hull fitting located in the hull near the pump. A sea
strainer between the pump and thru hull fitting protects the system from contaminants that could
damage the pump or the air conditioning system. Make sure the seawater pump receives
adequate seawater by periodically cleaning the sea strainer basket.
Please refer to the air conditioner owner's manual for more information on the operation and
maintenance of the air conditioner.
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6-3
6.5 Raw Water System Maintenance
The following items should be done routinely to help maintain your raw water system:
•
Check hoses, particularly the seawater supply lines, for signs of deterioration.
•
Remove and clean the seawater strainers for the livewell, air conditioner and washdown
pump, as needed.
•
Spray pumps and thru hull valves with a protective oil periodically.
•
The fishboxes and livewells should be drained and cleaned after each use.
•
Operate all thru hull valves at least once a month to keep them operating properly.
SHOULD A HOSE RUPTURE, TURN THE PUMP OFF IMMEDIATELY. ALWAYS
CLOSE THE THRU HULL VALVE WHEN PERFORMING MAINTENANCE ON A SEAWATER PUMP.
THE BATTERIES MUST BE PROPERLY CHARGED. OPERATING ANY PUMPS
FROM A BATTERY WITH A LOW CHARGE MAY LEAD TO A PUMP FAILURE.
NOTICE
THE RAW WATER SYSTEM MUST BE PROPERLY WINTERIZED PRIOR TO WINTER LAY-UP. SEE THE SECTION ON WINTERIZING
NOTICE
6-4
3070 OFFSHORE
Chapter 7:
DRAINAGE SYSTEMS
7.1 General
All water is drained by gravity to overboard thru hull fittings located in the hull sides above the
waterline. The cabin and some cockpit component drain thru hull fittings are equipped with PVC
ball valves that are always open under normal operating conditions. In the event of an
emergency, the valves can be closed to prevent sea water from entering the boat through the
drainage system. It is important to check and operate the drain valves at least annually to make
sure they are in good condition and operating properly. You also should check the drain system
frequently to ensure it is free flowing and that the hoses on the thru hull fittings are secure and
not leaking.
Please review the drainage schematic to become familiar with the location of the thru hull drain
valves.
SITUATIONS REQUIRING ONE OR MORE DRAIN VALVES TO BE CLOSED CAN BE
POTENTIALLY DANGEROUS TO THE BOAT AND YOUR CREW. IF THIS OCCURS,
DISTRIBUTE PERSONAL FLOTATION DEVICES TO THE CREW AND TAKE ALL
NECESSARY SAFETY PRECAUTIONS, INCLUDING NOTIFYING THE COAST
GUARD, UNTIL THE PROBLEM IS FOUND AND CORRECTED.
7.2 Cockpit Drains
Your Pursuit has two scupper drains located in the rear of the cockpit. Water is channeled away
from all hatches by a gutter or drain rail system. The water then drains overboard through the
scupper drain system.
7.3 Hard-Top Drains
There is a hole drilled in one of the leg bases to prevent water from being trapped within the leg
and provide a wire chase for accessories. A small hole is drilled in the tubing at the base of the
other legs, which are not drilled for a wire chase, that allows water to drain.
3070 OFFSHORE
7-1
ALWAYS MAKE SURE THE LEG DRAIN HOLES ARE CLEAR WHEN THE BOAT
IS LAID UP FOR THE WINTER. WATER TRAPPED INSIDE THE LEGS COULD
FREEZE AND CAUSE THE LEGS TO SPLIT.
7.4 Bilge Drainage
The bilge pumps are activated both manually, by a switch in the helm station, and automatically,
by a float switch. The automatic float switches remain activated when the battery switches are
in the “OFF” position and the batteries are connected. All bilge pumps pump water out of thru
hulls located above the waterline in the hull. The rear bilge pump and automatic switch are
located near the transom, below the engine splashwell, and the forward pump and automatic
switch are located in the bilge below the aft berth in the cabin.
Note: See Electrical Systems for additional information on bilge pump operation.
When the boat is out of the water the bilge can be drained by a thru hull drain located in the
transom near the bottom of the hull. The plug should be removed whenever the boat is hauled
out of the water and installed just prior to launching. It is important to check the drain plug
regularly to make sure it is tight.
A LOOSE DRAIN PLUG WILL ALLOW SEA WATER TO ENTER THE BILGE AND
COULD CAUSE THE BOAT TO SINK. IT IS VERY IMPORTANT TO CHECK THE
DRAIN PLUG FREQUENTLY TO ENSURE IT IS PROPERLY TIGHTENED.
Important:
Any oil spilled in the bilge must be thoroughly removed and properly
disposed of before operating the bilge pump. The discharge of oil from the
bilge is illegal and subject to a fine.
THE FEDERAL WATER POLLUTION CONTROL ACT PROHIBITS THE DISCHARGE
OF OIL OR OILY WASTE INTO OR UPON THE NAVIGABLE WATERS OF THE
UNITED STATES OR THE WATERS OF THE CONTIGUOUS ZONE IF SUCH DISCHARGE CAUSES A FILM OR SHEEN UPON, OR A DISCOLORATION OF THE SURFACE OF THE WATER, OR CAUSES A SLUDGE OR EMULSION BENEATH THE
SURFACE OF THE WATER. VIOLATORS ARE SUBJECT TO A PENALTY OF
$10,000.
CERTAIN BULKHEAD AREAS ARE SEALED IN ACCORDANCE WITH U.S. COAST
GUARD REGULATIONS THAT WERE IN EFFECT AT THE DATE OF MANUFACTURE OF THE BOAT. ANY MODIFICATIONS TO THESE BULKHEADS SHOULD
BE IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE U.S. COAST GUARD REGULATIONS.
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3070 OFFSHORE
7.5 Fishbox, Cooler and Storage Compartment Drains
The cooler, located under the passenger seat in front of the console, is drained by the shower drain
sump pump system. Water drains by gravity to the sump system, located in the bilge, where it
is pumped overboard.
The rod locker and storage compartment drain by gravity to overboard thru hulls located in the
hull sides just above the waterline.
The fishbox below the cockpit floor is drained overboard by a macerator pump out system. The
macerator is activated by a momentary switch located in a switch panel near the transom access
door. The fishboxes should be flushed out and cleaned after each use.
Note: The macerator discharge pump can only be run dry for a few seconds. Allowing the
macerator pump to run after the fishbox is empty will cause damage to the pump.
7.6 Water System Drains
All exterior sinks and livewells, provided with fresh or raw water, drain by gravity to overboard
thru hulls located in the hull sides just above the waterline. The overflows in the livewell drain
into the overboard drains.
7.7 Cabin Drains
The galley and head sink drain by gravity to overboard thru hulls located in the hull sides just
above the waterline. The shower, air conditioner and console cooler are drained by a sump pump
system. The sump system is located in the bilge and accessed through a hatch below the aft berth
in the cabin. An automatic float switch in the sump controls the pump. The pump is protected
by the shower sump pump circuit breaker in the cabin DC panel. The sump has a removable hatch
to allow the system to be inspected and serviced. It is essential that the sump system be inspected
periodically and any accumulated debris removed.
The drain thru hull fittings for the sump pump and the sink drains are equipped with PVC ball
valves that are always open under normal operating conditions. In the event of an emergency,
the valves can be closed to prevent sea water from entering the boat through the shower sump
or drain system. The drain valve for the sump pump is located in the bilge below the port side
of the aft berth. The valves for the head and galley sinks are located at the thru hull fitting for
each drain. It is important to check and operate the valves at least annually to make sure they
are in good condition and operating properly. Please review the drainage schematic to become
familiar with the location of the sump pump and gravity drain thru hull valves.
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7-3
7.8 Rope Locker Drains
The rope locker drains overboard through a special drain fitting located in the hull side at the
bottom of the rope locker. It is important to inspect the drain frequently to remove any
accumulated debris.
7.9 Drainage System Maintenance
It is essential that the following items be done periodically to maintain proper drainage of your
boat:
•
Clean the cockpit drain rails with a hose to remove debris that can block water drainage.
•
Clean the hardtop leg drain holes. This is especially important just before winter lay-up.
•
Clean the bilge pump strainers of debris and check the bilge for foreign material that can
cause the automatic switch to malfunction.
•
Frequently test the automatic bilge pump switch for proper operation. This is accomplished
by inserting a stiff wire or small rod through one of the slots in the float chamber of the pump
and lifting the float switch until the pump is activated. You can also use a garden hose to flood
the bilge until the water level is high enough to activate the pump.
•
Flush all gravity drains with freshwater to keep them clean and free flowing.
•
Clean and inspect the shower and drain sump system. Remove accumulated debris and flush
with freshwater. Frequently test the automatic pump switch for proper operation.
•
Clean and flush the fishbox and cooler/storage boxes with soap or a bilge cleaner and
freshwater after each use to keep them clean and fresh.
•
Operate the thru hull valves once a month and service as required.
Note: All drains and pumps must be properly winterized before winter lay-up.
NEVER USE HARSH CHEMICAL DRAIN CLEANERS IN MARINE DRAIN SYSTEMS. PERMANENT DAMAGE TO THE HOSES AND FITTINGS MAY RESULT.
7-4
3070 OFFSHORE
Chapter 8:
VENTILATION SYSTEM
8.1 Cabin Ventilation
Ventilation to the cabin area is provided by a deck hatch and opening port windows.
Port Windows
The port windows are secured by cam action locks. The locks should be adjusted so they are tight
enough to seal the windows in the closed position, but not so tight that they break the plastic. The
cam locks are adjusted by turning the two allen head bolts located at the base of each cam lock.
Head Compartment
Ventilation to the head compartment is provided by an opening port window. The port window
is secured by cam action locks. The locks should be adjusted so they are tight enough to seal the
window in the closed position, but not so tight that they break the plastic.
Deck Hatch
The deck hatch is supported in the open position by an adjustable hatch adjuster. To close the
hatch, loosen the hatch adjuster and lower the hatch. Secure in the closed position with the two
cam levers on the inside of the hatch.
8.2 Windshield Ventilation
The windshield is equipped with an opening
vent panel on each side of the windshield. To
open the vent, release the locking T-handle and
rotate it outboard until it locks in place. To
prevent damage to the vent glass, do not leave
the T-handle in the unlocked position.
Windshield Vent
3070 OFFSHORE
8-1
8.3 Carbon Monoxide and Proper Ventilation
FAILURE TO PROPERLY VENTILATE THE BOAT WHILE THE ENGINES ARE RUNNING MAY PERMIT CARBON MONOXIDE TO ACCUMULATE WITHIN THE CABIN.
CARBON MONOXIDE IS A COLORLESS AND ODORLESS GAS THAT IS LETHAL
WHEN INHALED AND CAN CAUSE SERIOUS INJURY AND DEATH. CARE MUST
BE TAKEN TO PROPERLY VENTILATE THE BOAT AND TO AVOID CARBON MONOXIDE FROM ACCUMULATING IN THE BOAT WHENEVER THE ENGINES ARE
RUNNING.
Carbon monoxide (CO), a by-product of combustion, is invisible, tasteless, odorless, and is
produced by all engines, heating and cooking appliances. The most common sources of CO on
boats are gasoline engines, auxiliary generators and propane or butane stoves. These produce
large amounts of CO and should never be operated while sleeping. The hazard also may be
created by a boat nearby whose exhaust fumes are entering your boat. Boats also have a problem
due to the “station wagon effect” where engine exhaust fumes are captured in the vacuum or low
pressure area, usually the cockpit, bridge deck and cabin, that can be created by the forward speed
of the boat.
Boats underway should close all aft facing hatches and doors. The forward facing deck hatches
should be open whenever possible to help pressurize the living spaces of the boat. No sleeping
in the cabin should be permitted while underway. Proper ventilation should be maintained on
the bridge deck by opening windshield vents as far as possible to help pressurize the cockpit area.
The canvas drop or aft curtain must be removed and the side curtains should be opened or
removed to increase air flow and maintain proper ventilation whenever the engines are running.
Under no circumstances should the engines be operating with side curtains closed and the aft
or drop curtain installed.
Extreme caution must be taken while at anchor or in a slip when an auxiliary power generator
is operating. Wind still nights can easily allow exhaust fumes, containing high concentrations
of CO, from the generator on your boat or from an adjacent boat's generator to enter the boat. The
exhaust fumes may enter your boat through open hatches or windows.
A carbon monoxide detector has been installed in your cabin as standard equipment. While a CO
detector enhances your protection from CO poisoning, it does not guarantee it will not occur. Do
not use the carbon monoxide detector as a replacement for ordinary precautions or periodic
inspections of equipment. Never rely on alarm systems to save your life, common sense is still
prudent and necessary. Remember, the operator of the boat carries the ultimate responsibility
to make sure the boat is properly ventilated and the passengers are not exposed to dangerous
levels of carbon monoxide. You should always be alert to the symptoms and early warning signs
of carbon monoxide poisoning. You also should read the book entitled “Sportfish, Cruisers,
Yachts - Owner's Manual” included with this manual, the “Carbon Monoxide Monitoring
System” in the Safety Equipment chapter of this manual, and the owner’s manual supplied by
the CO detector manufacturer for operation instructions and additional information regarding the
hazards and symptoms of carbon monoxide poisoning.
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3070 OFFSHORE
ACTUATION OF THE CARBON MONOXIDE DETECTOR INDICATES THE PRESENCE OF CARBON MONOXIDE (CO) WHICH CAN BE FATAL. EVACUATE THE
CABIN IMMEDIATELY. DO A HEAD COUNT TO CHECK THAT ALL PERSONS ARE
ACCOUNTED FOR. DO NOT REENTER THE CABIN UNTIL IT HAS BEEN AIRED
OUT AND THE PROBLEM FOUND AND CORRECTED.
FAILURE TO PROPERLY VENTILATE THE BOAT WHILE THE ENGINES ARE RUNNING MAY PERMIT CARBON MONOXIDE TO ACCUMULATE WITHIN THE CABIN.
CARBON MONOXIDE IS A COLORLESS AND ODORLESS GAS THAT IS LETHAL
WHEN INHALED. CARE MUST BE TAKEN TO PROPERLY VENTILATE THE BOAT
AND TO AVOID CARBON MONOXIDE FROM ACCUMULATING IN THE BOAT
WHENEVER AN ENGINE IS RUNNING.
8.4 Bilge Compartment Ventilation
All 3070 Offshore models are equipped with ventilation for the bilge compartment. A flow of
air into the bilge compartment is provided by four vents located on either side of the cockpit,
under the gunnel boards. This provides adequate air movement in the bilge and generator
compartments.
8.5 Maintenance
•
Periodically lubricate all hinges and latch assemblies with a light oil.
•
Periodically clean and coat gasket materials with silicone to help keep them pliable.
•
The opening cabin deck hatches, port windows, venturi windshield and the curved section
in each front corner of the standard windshield are made of acrylic plastic glass. Acrylic glass
scratches easily. Never use a dry cloth or glass cleaning solutions on acrylic glass . Use a
soft cloth and mild soap and water for routine cleaning. Solvents and products containing
ammonia can permanently damage acrylic glass. Please refer to the Routine Maintenance
chapter for more information on the proper maintenance for acrylic plastic glass.
•
Periodically return the carbon monoxide alarm to the manufacturer for testing and recalibration.
Please refer to the carbon monoxide alarm manual or contact the manufacturer for more
information on maintaining and calibrating the alarm.
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INTENTIONALLY
3070 OFFSHORE
Chapter 9:
EXTERIOR EQUIPMENT
9.1
Deck
Rails and Deck Hardware
The rail system and hardware fittings have been selected and installed to perform specific
functions. Fenders or mooring lines should be secured to the cleats and not to rails or stanchions.
Mooring lines should be secured to the cleats. Be sure a clear lead exists when running dock lines
or anchor lines. A line inadvertently run around a stanchion or over the rail could cause damage.
Important:
All fittings must be periodically inspected for loose fit or wear and damage.
Any problems should be corrected immediately.
PURSUIT BOATS ARE NOT EQUIPPED WITH HARDWARE DESIGNED FOR TOWING PURPOSES. THE MOORING CLEATS ARE NOT TO BE USED FOR TOWING
ANOTHER VESSEL OR HAVING THIS BOAT TOWED.
Bow Pulpit and Roller
The bow pulpit is built into the hull and is equipped with a roller assembly that allows the anchor
to be operated and stored at the pulpit. The pulpit roller is designed for a Delta® plow or a
Danforth® style anchor. The anchor line is stored in the rope locker and routed out the rope locker
hatch, through the roller and connected to the anchor chain. A cleat or chain binder is provided
on the deck near the pulpit to secure the anchor. Always make sure the anchor is properly secured
when it is in the stored position on the pulpit.
Anchor/Rope Locker
The anchor locker is in the bow of the boat and accessed through a hatch in the deck. The anchor
line is always stored in the locker. The anchor locker has a built-in bracket for a “Danforth®” style
anchor. If the anchor is stored in the anchor locker, it must be properly secured to prevent it from
bouncing in the locker and causing damage to the hull or anchor locker.
The anchor locker is drained by a thru hull fitting in the hull side near the bottom of the locker.
It is very important to check the drain frequently to make sure they are clean and free flowing.
3070 OFFSHORE
9-1
THE ANCHOR MUST BE POSITIONED SO IT DOES NOT REST AGAINST THE
HULL SIDES AND BE PROPERLY SECURED AT ALL TIMES WHEN IT IS STORED
IN THE ANCHOR LOCKER. A LOOSE ANCHOR IN THE ANCHOR LOCKER WILL
BOUNCE AND CAN DAMAGE THE BOAT. DAMAGE RESULTING FROM THE ANCHOR BOUNCING IN THE ANCHOR LOCKER IS NOT COVERED BY THE PURSUIT
WARRANTY.
Windlass (Optional)
The optional windlass is mounted to the deck near the rear of the pulpit above the rope locker.
The anchor is stored on the pulpit and is raised and lowered by the windlass. The anchor line is
stored in the rope locker and routed out through the windlass to the anchor chain.
The anchor is lowered by releasing the anchor from the cleat or chain binder on the pulpit and
operating a “down” control at the helm. After the anchor is set, the windlass must not be left to
take the entire force from the anchor line. Boats lying to their anchor in a high swell or heavy
weather conditions will snub on the line. This can cause slippage or apply excessive loads to the
windlass. The line should be made fast to a bow cleat to relieve the load on the windlass.
The anchor is hauled in by releasing the line from the bow cleat and operating the “up” control
at the helm. Once the anchor is retrieved, independently secure the anchor to the chain binder
or a cleat to prevent it from being accidentally released. This is especially important while the
boat is under way.
The windlass manufacturer provides an owner’s manual with its product. It is extremely
important that you read the manual and become familiar with the proper care and operation of
the windlass.
A WINDLASS MUST BE USED WITH CARE. IT IS EXTREMELY IMPORTANT THAT
YOU READ THE OWNER’S MANUAL AND BECOME FAMILIAR WITH THE SAFETY
INSTRUCTIONS AND PROPER OPERATION OF THE WINDLASS BEFORE USING IT
WITH YOUR BOAT. ALWAYS ENSURE THAT LIMBS, FINGERS, HAIR AND
CLOTHING ARE KEPT CLEAR OF THE WINDLASS AND ANCHOR LINE DURING
OPERATION.
DO NOT USE A WINDLASS AS A SOLE MEANS OF SECURING AN ANCHOR IN
THE BOW PULPIT. ALWAYS SECURE THE ANCHOR LINE TO A CLEAT OR
CHAIN BINDER BEFORE OPERATING YOUR BOAT.
9-2
3070 OFFSHORE
Windshield
The Pursuit 3070 Offshore is equipped with an optional vented heavy duty aluminum windshield
with tinted glass and built in hand rails. The windshield is equipped with an opening vent panel
on each side of the windshield. To open the vent, release the locking T-handle and rotate it
outboard until it locks in place. To prevent damage to the vent glass, do not leave the T-handle
in the unlocked position. The front and side wing panels are tempered safety glass. The curved
glass panels on the port and starboard side of the windshield are made of tinted acrylic plastic
glass.
Acrylic glass scratches easily. Never use a dry cloth or glass cleaning solutions on acrylic. Use
a soft cloth and mild soap and water for routine cleaning. Solvents and products containing
ammonia can permanently damage acrylic. Please refer to the Routine Maintenance chapter for
more information on the proper care and maintenance of acrylic plastic glass.
9.2
Hull
Swim Platform
Your Pursuit is equipped with an integral swim platform and engine mounting system located
in the stern of the boat. There are three inspection deck plates in the transom engine well to
provide access to the stern bilge and engine mounting bolts. Always make sure these plates are
secure before operating your boat.
Boarding Ladder
The boarding ladder is mounted to the rear of the stern bait
and tackle rigging station when it is in the stored position.
To use the ladder, remove it from the storage clips and slide
the studs into the special bracket on the port side of the
transom. The ladder floats and must be secured in the
boarding position by turning the cam lock on the ladder so
it catches the bottom of the transom ladder bracket. The
ladder must be removed from the transom bracket and
properly secured to the storage clips before starting the
engine(s).
Boarding Ladder
MOVING PROPELLERS ARE DANGEROUS. THEY CAN CAUSE DEATH, LOSS OF
LIMBS, OR OTHER SEVERE INJURY. DO NOT USE THE SWIM PLATFORM OR
SWIM LADDER WHILE THE ENGINE(S) ARE RUNNING. STOP THE ENGINE(S) IF
DIVERS OR SWIMMERS ARE ATTEMPTING TO BOARD. ALWAYS REMOVE AND
PROPERLY STORE THE LADDER BEFORE STARTING THE ENGINE(S).
Trim Tabs
The trim tabs are recessed into the hull below the swim platform. The trim tabs are an important
part of the control systems. Please refer to the Helm Control Systems chapter for detailed
information on the trim tabs.
3070 OFFSHORE
9-3
9.3
Cockpit
IN CERTAIN CONDITIONS, OPEN EXTERIOR DOORS AND HATCHES THAT ARE
NOT SECURED PROPERLY CAN SLAM CLOSED UNEXPECTEDLY AND CAUSE INJURY TO PASSENGERS OR DAMAGE TO THE BOAT. MOST DOORS AND
HATCHES ARE EQUIPPED WITH SPECIAL FASTENERS, HATCH LIFTERS, OR
SNAPS AND/OR STRAPS, TO SECURE THEM IN THE OPEN POSITION. ALWAYS
MAKE SURE THAT THESE HATCHES AND DOORS ARE PROPERLY SECURED
WHENEVER THEY ARE IN THE OPEN POSITION.
Rod Storage
A large storage or rod compartment is
located below the leaning post and
tackle station. The rod storage hatch
lifter switch in the cockpit activates an
electric ram that raises the rear of the
bridge deck and the leaning post providing access to the rod storage area. A
limit switch on the leaning post seat
adjuster prevents the rod storage hatch
from opening unless the seat is in the
full aft position. This prevents the seat
and helm equipment from being damRod Locker
aged when the leaning post and bridge
deck is lifted to access the rod storage.
If the bridge deck is closed and the hatch lifter should malfunction, it can be accessed by removing
the tackle locker in the leaning post tackle station.
The compartment is equipped with overboard drainage and rod racks for secure rod storage.
Leaning Post and Tackle Station
The leaning post is equipped with an adjustable seat. An electric ram activated by a switch at
the helm moves the seat forward or backward. The seat is in the leaning post position when it
is in the aft position and can be used as a seat when it is adjusted forward. Always make sure the
seat is in the full aft position before opening the helm or the rod locker.
There are four tackle drawers and two storage compartments built into the rear of the leaning post.
The tackle station doors can be locked to secure the drawers when the boat is unattended.
9-4
3070 OFFSHORE
Stern Bait and Tackle Rigging Station
The stern bait and tackle rigging station is
equipped with a transom door, sink, livewell,
cutting board and rigged bait storage unit. The
sink is plumbed to the freshwater system and
drains overboard. The bait storage unit is
insulated and drains overboard. The livewell
is supplied by a raw water circulating pump
and drains overboard. Refer to the Raw Water
System chapter for additional information on
the livewell.
Stern Bait and Tackle Rigging Station
The three drawer bait storage unit is equipped with special drawers that can be cooled with ice.
There is a hatch on the starboard side of the rigging station for the TABS system and the battery
switches. The bait storage unit is removable to allow access to the stern bilge and the equipment
mounted in that area. To remove the bait storage unit, remove the screws in the frame and pull
the unit straight out and into the cockpit. Always reseal the frame and screws with marine silicone
caulk when the bait storage unit is reinstalled.
Below Deck Stern Fishbox
A fishbox is located in the stern below the cockpit sole. The fishbox is drained by a macerator
pump located in the bilge and activated by a momentary switch in the rear of the cockpit near the
stern bait and tackle rigging station. The fishbox should be pumped out and cleaned after each
use. Refer to the Drainage Systems chapter for more information on the fishbox drainage.
Transom Door
A transom door is incorporated into the rigging station. The
transom door should only be operated when the boat is not in
motion. The door must be latched in either the full “OPEN” or
full “CLOSED” position. Never leave the transom door
unlatched.
Note: Periodically inspect the transom door fittings for
wear, damage, or loose fit. Any problems should be
inspected and corrected immediately.
Transom Door
3070 OFFSHORE
9-5
THE TRANSOM DOOR SHOULD BE CLOSED AND PROPERLY LATCHED WHENEVER THE ENGINE(S) ARE RUNNING. NEVER OPEN THE TRANSOM DOOR
WHILE UNDERWAY OR IN ROUGH SEA CONDITIONS. IN CERTAIN SITUATIONS,
AN OPEN TRANSOM DOOR COULD ALLOW A SUBSTANTIAL AMOUNT OF WATER TO ENTER THE COCKPIT CREATING A POTENTIALLY DANGEROUS CONDITION.
OPERATING THE BOAT UNDER POWER WITH THE TRANSOM DOOR OPEN MAY
ALLOW PERSONS TO FALL OVERBOARD AND INTO BOAT PROPELLERS OR TO
BE LOST IN OPEN WATER. ALWAYS CHECK TO MAKE SURE THE TRANSOM
DOOR IS PROPERLY CLOSED AND LATCHED BEFORE STARTING THE ENGINES
AND NEVER OPERATE THE BOAT UNDER POWER WITH THE TRANSOM DOOR
OPEN.
Helm and Electronics Locker
The helm and engine controls are located on the rear of the center console. Molded-in electronics
storage is located forward of the engine controls. Four cup holders and a stern facing jump seat
are located to the starboard side of the helm.
The top section of the console is hinged and opens to provide access to service the helm
equipment or install electronics. The console cushion backrests also can be removed to expose
access holes that make installing or servicing electronics easier. To open the helm portion of
the console, release the clamps on the front of the console. Then activate the electric helm tilt
ram with helm tilt switch located near the clamps at the front of the console. The top of the console
will be tilted aft to expose the underside of the helm.
If the electric helm lifter fails, the helm can be opened manually by removing the quick release
pin at the top or bottom of the helm tilt ram. To access the pin with the helm closed, open the
access hatch below the helm accessory switches and pull the ring on the pin while someone holds
the helm in the closed position or with the helm latches in place. Be careful, the helm is heavy
and will open suddenly when the pin is released.
The tilt ram is an important part of the helm latching system. Never operate the boat unless the
tilt ram is completely assembled and operating properly. You also should make sure the clamps
are properly secured when the helm is closed.
Note: The adjustable seat must be adjusted to the full aft position and the rod locker
bridge deck hatch must be completely closed before opening the helm. A safety
switch in the seat prevents the helm tilt system from operating unless the seat is
adjusted to the full aft position.
9-5
3070 OFFSHORE
ALWAYS MAKE SURE THE HELM STATION CLAMPS AND TILT RAM ARE PROPERLY SECURED BEFORE OPERATING OR TRAILERING YOUR BOAT. IF THE
HELM STATION IS NOT PROPERLY SECURED, IT COULD OPEN UNEXPECTEDLY
AND DAMAGE THE BOAT OR CAUSE LOSS OF CONTROL.
UNDER NO CIRCUMSTANCES SHOULD THE HELM BE OPENED WHEN THE
ENGINE(S) ARE RUNNING. IN SOME SITUATIONS IT IS POSSIBLE TO ACCIDENTALLY ENGAGE THE ENGINE SHIFT AND THROTTLE CONTROL INTO GEAR AS
THE HELM IS OPENING. THIS COULD RESULT IN LOSS OF CONTROL, DAMAGE
TO THE BOAT, AND INJURY TO PASSENGERS.
THE HELM IS HEAVY AND WILL OPEN SUDDENLY IF THE HELM CLAMPS ARE
RELEASED AND THE TILT RAM PIN IS REMOVED FROM THE RAM. THIS COULD
CAUSE INJURY TO PEOPLE NEAR THE HELM OR DAMAGE THE BOAT. IT IS
EXTREMELY IMPORTANT THAT THE HELM CLAMPS ARE SECURED BEFORE REMOVING THE PIN FROM THE TILT RAM. ONCE THE RAM PIN IS REMOVED,
THE HELM CLAMPS CAN BE RELEASED AND THE CONSOLE CAN BE LOWERED
AGAINST THE RETAINING STRAPS.
Console Cooler
A molded insulated cooler is installed under the front seat of the console. The cooler drains
overboard thru the shower sump drain system. The cooler should be cleaned thoroughly after
each use.
Console Storage
A storage compartment is under the seat on starboard of the console cooler. The engine batteries
and oil tanks are mounted in this compartment.
Cabin door
The sliding cabin door is made of acrylic plastic glass and slides on a top and bottom track. A
lockable latch secures the door in the closed position. A special vinyl-covered latch secures the
door in the open position.
It is very important that the cabin door is secured properly in the open or closed position. The
cabin door is heavy and if the door is not properly latched, it could slide when the boat rocks and
pinch someone’s fingers between the door and the bulkhead or damage the door.
When closing the door, make sure you push the door against the door jam with enough pressure
to allow the latch to secure the door. When the door is open, it must be properly secured with
the latch near the bottom door track and to the port side of the companionway. To latch the door
in the open position, open the door until it hits the rubber bumper on the bulkhead. Then push
the door against the bumper, slightly compressing the bumper and allowing the vinyl covered
latch to secure the door in the open position.
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The door is made of acrylic plastic glass. Acrylic glass scratches easily and can chip. Always
make sure the bulkhead bumper and the vinyl-covered latch are in good condition. They should
be changed whenever they show signs of deterioration from the exposure to elements. Please
refer to the Routine Maintenance chapter for information on the proper care and maintenance of
acrylic plastic glass.
NEVER LEAVE THE CABIN DOOR UNLATCHED. THE CABIN DOOR IS HEAVY
AND SLIDES EASILY. IF THE DOOR IS LEFT UNLATCHED, IT COULD SLIDE UNEXPECTEDLY AS THE BOAT ROCKS, DAMAGING THE DOOR OR CAUSING AN
INJURY TO A PASSENGER. ALWAYS MAKE SURE THE DOOR IS PROPERLY
LATCHED IN THE OPEN OR CLOSED POSITION.
Hard Top
The optional hard top consists of a laminated fiberglass top mounted to a welded aluminum frame
that is bolted to the deck. It is designed to accommodate radio antennas, radar antennas and
navigation lights. It could also be equipped with optional Top Gun outriggers and/or rod holders.
The hard top is not designed to support the additional weight of items like an instrument locker
or a life raft. Radar and electronics antennas must be mounted to the top between the front and
rear legs. Do not mount any antennas or equipment to the brow area forward of the front legs.
The hard top frame is not designed to support the weight of accessories in this area and could be
damaged. The starboard rear leg is the wire chase for lights and antennas mounted to the top.
The warranty for the hard top will be void if the top is modified in any way or heavy accessories
like life rafts, or electronics lockers are mounted to the top. Additionally, if items like radar
antennas spotlights and other accessories are mounted in the wrong location, the warranty could
be void. If you intend to add equipment or make modifications to the hard top, you should contact
Pursuit Customer Relations to make sure the equipment you would like to add or the intended
modification will not void the warranty on the top.
Because the aluminum frames vary slightly, the side curtains, front clear connector and drop
curtain are custom made to each boat at the factory. To install the curtains, slide the front clear
connector into the slide track at the front of the top and snap it to the top of the windshield frame
(full windshield) or to the windshield landing on the deck (venturi windshield) beginning with
the center snaps. The clear connector will have to be stretched just enough to pull out the wrinkles
to reach the snaps on the windshield or the deck.
Once the clear connector is completely installed, the side curtains can be put on. Slide the side
curtains into the slide tracks on the sides of the top and to the zippers on the front connector. Snap
the curtains to the windshield and the deck beginning with the forward snaps on the windshield.
The side curtains will have to be stretched slightly to pull out the wrinkles and reach the snaps.
If you have an optional drop curtain, slide it into the slide track on the back of the hard top and
attach it to the rear of the side curtains. Snap the drop curtain to the deck and cockpit.
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Note: Cold weather can make the clear vinyl material on the curtains stiff and difficult to
stretch to the snaps. This can particularly difficult with new canvas that has been
stored off the boat. Laying the curtains in the sun for 30 minutes during the heat
of the day will make installing them much easier in cold weather.
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INTENTIONALLY
3070 OFFSHORE
Chapter 10:
INTERIOR EQUIPMENT
10.1 Marine Head System
The head compartment is equipped with a sink, hot and cold faucet that converts to a shower by
pulling the faucet out of the base. A special seat folds down over the toilet to make showering
more comfortable.
An opening port light above the sink provides daylight and ventilation. There is also a 12-volt
overhead light. A 110-volt G.F.I. duplex outlet is provided at the sink.
Marine Head System
Your boat is equipped with a VacuFlush marine head system as standard equipment. VacuFlush
systems use a small amount of water (one pint to one quart) and vacuum which is generated by
the 12-volt vacuum pump to flush. The toilet is connected to the pressurized fresh water system.
Using fresh water results in less odor in the head compartment.
To use the toilet, make sure the “Electric Head” breaker on the cabin DC breaker panel is on.
Then add water to wet the bowl by depressing the foot activated flush lever slightly until the
desired water level is reached. Flush the toilet by activating the flush lever all the way for
approximately three seconds or until contents clear the bowl. A sharp popping noise is normal
when the vacuum seal is broken and flushing action begins. It is also normal for a small amount
of water to remain in the bowl after flushing.
The waste is transferred into the holding tank where it
remains until it is pumped out by a waste dumping
station or the overboard macerator discharge system.
The waste moves through a one-inch opening in the
toilet base. Incoming air fragments the waste as it
passes through the base opening. This process eliminates the need for macerators or mechanical motors in
the toilet base.
Holding Tank
The vacuum generator is mounted on the holding tank
and contains stored vacuum. System vacuum is monitored by a vacuum switch which is located on the
vacuum generator tank. When the switch senses a drop
in vacuum in the system, it automatically signals the
pump to energize and bring the vacuum back to operating level. This process is normally completed in less
than two minutes.
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It is normal for the stored vacuum to leak down slightly between flushes, causing the vacuum
pump to run for a short period. The pump should not run more than once every three hours after
the last flush for recharging the system. Please refer to the toilet manufacturer owner’s manual
for more information on the operation of the marine head system.
Holding Tank and Macerator Discharge Pump
The holding tank is located in the compartment behind the head. When the tank is full, the tank
monitor will show full and the vacuum pump will not run. The tank must either be pumped out
by an approved waste dumping station through the waste deck fitting or be pumped overboard
with the optional macerator discharge pump, when legal to do so. There is no Y-valve in this
system.
To operate the macerator discharge pump, open the ball valve at the overboard discharge thru hull
fitting below the aft berth. Then activate the momentary macerator switch located in the holding
tank monitor panel in the head compartment, until the tank is emptied. Release the switch and
close the discharge ball valve when pumping is complete.
Note: The macerator discharge pump can only be run dry for a couple of seconds.
Allowing the macerator pump to run after the holding tank is empty will cause
damage to the pump.
IN MANY AREAS IT IS ILLEGAL TO FLUSH HEAD WASTE DIRECTLY OVERBOARD. VIOLATION OF THESE POLLUTION LAWS CAN RESULT IN FINES OR
IMPRISONMENT. ALWAYS KNOW THE LAW FOR THE AREAS IN WHICH YOU
BOAT. NEVER DUMP HEAD OR HOLDING TANK WASTE OVERBOARD ILLEGALLY.
Maintenance
The head should be cleaned and inspected for leaks regularly.
The holding tank should be pumped out and flushed as needed. Periodically add chemical to the
head to help control odor and to chemically break down the waste. See the manufacturer owner’s
manual for additional operating and maintenance information.
THE HEAD AND MACERATOR DISCHARGE SYSTEM MUST BE PROPERLY WINTERIZED BEFORE WINTER LAY-UP. SEE THE SECTION ON WINTERIZING
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10.2 Refrigerator (AC / DC)
A dual voltage refrigerator is supplied as standard equipment and is mounted in the galley. This
unit will operate on AC or 12-volt DC power. The refrigerator switches to 12-volt DC
automatically when the AC power is disconnected and the refrigerator breaker is activated on the
cabin DC panel. When AC current is provided by the refrigerator circuit breaker on the panel,
the refrigerator automatically switches to AC power.
Care should be exercised while operating the refrigerator on DC power without the engines
running. It draws a substantial amount of current and can severely drain a battery through
extended use. The refrigerator door has a special latch to secure the door while under way, make
sure the door is properly secured whenever the boat is moving. Refer to the refrigerator owner’s
manual for additional operating and maintenance instructions.
10.3 Air Conditioner (Optional)
The air conditioning unit is the reverse cycle type and
operates on AC power. The unit is equipped with reverse
cycle heat and can be operated as a cooling or heating unit.
It is protected by the accessory breaker in the AC breaker
panel. To operate, make sure the thru hull valve for the
air conditioner raw water supply pump is on. Turn the air
conditioner breaker to the “ON” position. The unit will
then be controlled by the air conditioning control panel in
the cabin. When activated, water should continuously
flow from the overboard drain thru hull.
Air Conditioning Control Panel
Air locks can occur in the air conditioning water supply system at the time of launching. If your
boat has been recently launched and water is not flowing from the overboard thru hull when the
air conditioner is activated, an air lock may have to be purged from the system. This can be
achieved by making sure the valve at the air conditioning pump intake thru hull is open. Then
run the boat at cruise speed for several minutes. A speed scoop attached to the intake thru hull
fitting will pressurize the system and force the air lock through the pump. The system will then
be primed and should operate properly. If this procedure does not correct the situation, there
could be a problem with the water pump and a qualified technician should be contacted to inspect
the system. See the air conditioner owner’s manual for additional operating and maintenance
instructions.
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Note: Air conditioners use surface water as a cooling medium. The boat must be in the
water and the raw water supply system must be properly activated prior to use.
Operation without proper cooling will cause the air conditioning circuit breaker to
trip and could cause system damage. Always check for proper water flow out of the
air conditioning pump discharge thru hull when the air conditioner is operating.
10.4 Galley and Sink
The galley is equipped with storage and a fresh water sink. Water is supplied to the sink by a 12volt pump located in the stern bilge. When activated by the “Fresh Water System” breaker in the
12-volt panel, the system will operate much like the water system in a home. An automatic
pressure sensor keeps the system pressurized. The sink drains overboard through the cabin drain
system.
See the Freshwater Systems chapter for more information on the freshwater system.
The companionway steps are hinged and can be
folded to provide access to the aft berth and more
room when in the galley or to access the aft berth.
The steps are held in the folded position by a
bracket on the cabin bulkhead. Always make
sure the steps are properly secured when they are
in the folded position.
Companionway steps
Microwave Oven
A microwave oven is provided as standard equipment on the 3070 Offshore. The microwave
operates on AC power and is protected by the microwave breaker in the AC breaker panel.
Please refer to the microwave owner's manual for detailed information on the microwave oven
installed in your boat.
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10.5 Carbon Monoxide Detector
A carbon monoxide (CO) detector is installed in the cabin on the
rear bulkhead. If excess carbon monoxide fumes are detected, an
audible beeping will sound indicating the presence to the toxic gas.
Carbon monoxide (CO), a by-product of combustion, is invisible,
tasteless, odorless, and is produced by all engines, heating and
cooking appliances. The most common sources of CO on boats are
gasoline engines and auxiliary generators and propane or butane
stoves. These produce large amounts of CO and should never be
operated while sleeping.
Please read the owner's manual supplied by the detector manufacturer for operation instructions and additional information regarding the hazards of carbon monoxide gas. Also read more about
carbon monoxide, carbon monoxide detectors, and proper ventilation in the Ventilation Systems and Safety Equipment chapters in
this manual. If you did not receive a manual for your carbon
monoxide detector, please contact the Pursuit Customer Relations
Department.
Carbon Monoxide Detector
ACTUATION OF THE CARBON MONOXIDE DETECTOR INDICATES THE PRESENCE OF CARBON MONOXIDE (CO) WHICH CAN BE FATAL. EVACUATE THE
CABIN IMMEDIATELY. DO A HEAD COUNT TO CHECK THAT ALL PERSONS ARE
ACCOUNTED FOR. DO NOT REENTER THE CABIN UNTIL IT HAS BEEN AIRED
OUT AND THE PROBLEM FOUND AND CORRECTED.
CO POISONING PRODUCES FLU-LIKE SYMPTOMS: WATERY AND ITCHY EYES,
HEADACHES, AND FATIGUE. YOU CAN'T SEE IT AND YOU CAN'T SMELL IT.
IT'S AN INVISIBLE KILLER.
CO DETECTORS ARE VERY RELIABLE AND RARELY SOUND FALSE ALARMS. IF
THE ALARM SOUNDS, ALWAYS ASSUME THE HAZARD IS REAL AND MOVE PERSONS WHO HAVE BEEN EXPOSED TO CARBON MONOXIDE INTO FRESH AIR IMMEDIATELY. NEVER DISABLE THE CO DETECTOR BECAUSE YOU THINK THE
ALARM MAY BE FALSE. ALWAYS CONTACT THE DETECTOR MANUFACTURER,
THE PURSUIT CUSTOMER RELATIONS DEPARTMENT OR YOUR LOCAL FIRE DEPARTMENT FOR ASSISTANCE IN FINDING AND CORRECTING THE SITUATION.
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10.6 Convertible V-Berth and Table
The V-berth is equipped with a table that will seat four people when the table is in the up position.
There is storage below a hatch under each V-berth cushion. The table is mounted on an adjustable
pedestal that allows the dinette to be converted to a double berth.
To convert the dinette to a double berth, lift the cam lock lever on the pedestal base. Then
carefully push the table down until it seats on the teak table supports on each side of the V-berth.
Secure the table in the down position by pushing the cam lock lever down on the pedestal base.
Place the separate berth cushions on the table top to complete the berth conversion. The table
should be lowered to the berth position whenever the boat is run offshore or in heavy sea
conditions to prevent damage to the pedestal assembly.
Daylight and fresh air is provided to this area by two opening port windows and by an overhead
opening hatch. Additional lighting is provided by 12-volt lights on the bulkheads. The air
conditioning control unit, the AC and DC breaker panels, and the carbon monoxide detector are
located on the galley bulkhead.
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Chapter 11:
SAFETY EQUIPMENT
11.1 General
Your boat and outboard engines have been equipped with safety equipment designed to enhance
the safe operation of the boat and to meet U.S. Coast Guard safety standards. The Coast Guard
or state, county, and municipal law enforcement agencies require certain additional accessory
safety equipment on each boat. This equipment varies according to length and type of boat and
type of propulsion. Most of the accessory equipment required by the Coast Guard is described
in this chapter. Some local laws require additional equipment. It is important to obtain “Federal
Requirements And Safety Tips for Recreational Boats,” published by the Coast Guard, and
copies of state and local laws, to make sure you have the required equipment for your boating
area. You should also read the book entitled “Sportfish, Cruisers, Yachts - Owner's Manual,”
included with this manual.
Your Pursuit could be equipped with engine alarms and cabin monitoring equipment. These
systems are designed to increase your boating safety by alerting you to potentially serious
problems in the primary power systems, the engine compartment, and the cabin. Alarm systems
are not intended to lessen or replace good maintenance and precruise procedures.
This chapter also describes safety related equipment that could be installed on your boat. This
equipment will vary depending on the type of engines and other options installed by you or your
dealer.
11.2 Engine Alarms
Most outboards and generator engines are equipped with an audible alarm system mounted in the
helm area that monitors selected critical engine systems. The alarm will sound if one of these
systems begins to fail. Refer to the engine owner’s manual for information on the alarms installed
with your engines.
If the alarms sounds:
•
Immediately throttle the engines back to idle.
•
Shift to neutral.
•
Monitor the engine gauges to determine the cause of the problem.
3070 OFFSHORE
11-1
•
If necessary, shut off the engines and investigate until the cause of the problem is found.
•
If the boat is equipped with water sensors in the fuel filters, be sure to check them for
excessive water.
11.3 Neutral Safety Switch
Every control system has a neutral safety switch incorporated into it. This device prohibits the
engines from being started while the shift lever is in any position other than the neutral position
and should be inspected and tested periodically to ensure the switch is working. If the engines
will not start, slight movement of the shift levers may be necessary to locate the neutral position
and disengage the safety cutout switch. Control or cable adjustments may be required to correct
this condition should it persist. See your Pursuit dealer for necessary control and cable
adjustments. Please refer to the Helm Control Systems chapter for more information on the
neutral safety switch.
11.4 Engine Stop Switch
Your Pursuit is equipped with a engine stop switch and lanyard. When
the lanyard is pulled it will engage the switch and shut off the engines.
We strongly recommend that the lanyard be attached to the driver and
the stop switch whenever the engines are running. If the engines will not
start, it could be because the lanyard is not properly inserted into the
engine stop switch. Always make sure the lanyard is properly attached
to the engine stop switch before attempting to start the engine.
Engine Stop Switch
Note: You should carry an extra stop switch lanyard and instruct at least one other crew
member on the operation of the stop switch and location of the extra lanyard.
11.5 Required Safety Equipment
Besides the equipment installed on your boat by Pursuit, certain other equipment is required by
the U.S. Coast Guard to help ensure passenger safety. Items like a sea anchor, working anchor,
extra dock lines, flare pistol, life vests, a line permanently secured to your ring buoy, etc., could
at some time save your passengers’ lives, or save your boat from damage. Refer to the “Federal
Requirements And Safety Tips For Recreational Boats” pamphlet for a more detailed description
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of the required equipment. You can also contact the U.S. Coast Guard Boating Safety Hotline,
800-368-5647 or the “Boat U.S. Foundation Course Hotline,” 1-800-336-2628 and 800-2452628 in Virginia, for information on boat safety courses and brochures listing the Federal
equipment requirements. Also, check your local and state regulations.
The Coast Guard Auxiliary offers a “Courtesy Examination.” This inspection will help ensure
that your boat is equipped with all of the necessary safety equipment.
The following is a list of the accessory equipment required on your boat by the U.S. Coast Guard:
Personal Flotation Devices (PFDs):
PFDs must be Coast Guard approved, in good and serviceable condition, and of appropriate size
for the intended user. Wearable PFDs must be readily accessible, meaning you must be able to
put them on in a reasonable amount of time in an emergency. Though not required, the Coast
Guard emphasizes that PFDs should be worn at all times when the vessel is underway. Throwable
devices must be immediately available for use. All Pursuit boats must be equipped with at least
one Type I, II or III PFD for each person on board, plus one throwable device (Type IV).
Visual Distress Signals:
All Pursuit boats used on coastal waters, the Great Lakes, territorial seas, and those waters
connected directly to them, must be equipped with Coast Guard approved visual distress signals.
These signals are either Pyrotechnic or Non-Pyrotechnic devices.
Pyrotechnic Visual Distress Signals:
Pyrotechnic visual distress signals must be Coast Guard approved, in serviceable condition, and
readily accessible. They are marked with a date showing the service life, which must not have
expired. A minimum of three are required. Some pyrotechnic signals meet both day and night
use requirements. They should be stored in a cool, dry location. They include:
•
Pyrotechnic red flares, hand held or aerial.
•
Pyrotechnic orange smoke, hand-held or floating.
•
Launchers for aerial red meteors or parachute flares.
PYROTECHNICS ARE UNIVERSALLY RECOGNIZED AS EXCELLENT DISTRESS
SIGNALS. HOWEVER, THERE IS POTENTIAL FOR INJURY AND PROPERTY DAMAGE IF NOT PROPERLY HANDLED. THESE DEVICES PRODUCE A VERY HOT
FLAME AND THE RESIDUE CAN CAUSE BURNS AND IGNITE FLAMMABLE MATERIAL. PISTOL LAUNCHED AND HAND-HELD PARACHUTE FLARES AND METEORS HAVE MANY CHARACTERISTICS OF A FIREARM AND MUST BE
HANDLED WITH CAUTION. IN SOME STATES THEY ARE CONSIDERED A FIREARM AND PROHIBITED FROM USE. ALWAYS BE EXTREMELY CAREFUL AND
FOLLOW THE MANUFACTURER'S INSTRUCTIONS EXACTLY WHEN USING PYROTECHNIC DISTRESS SIGNALS.
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Non-Pyrotechnic Devices:
Non-Pyrotechnic visual distress signals must be in serviceable condition, readily accessible, and
certified by the manufacturer as complying with U.S. Coast Guard requirements. They include:
•
Orange Distress Flag. (Day use only)
The distress flag is a day signal only. It must be at least 3 x 3 feet with a black square and
ball on an orange background. It is most distinctive when attached and waved from a paddle
or boat hook.
•
Electric Distress Light. (Night use only)
The electric distress light is accepted for night use only and must automatically flash the
international SOS. distress signal. Under Inland Navigation Rules, a high intensity white
light flashing at regular intervals from 50-70 times per minute is considered a distress signal.
Sound Signaling Devices:
The navigation rules require sound signals to be made under certain circumstances. Recreational
vessels are also required to sound fog signals during periods of reduced visibility. Therefore, you
must have some means of making an efficient sound signal.
Navigation Lights:
Recreational boats are required to display navigation lights between sunset and sunrise and other
periods of reduced visibility (fog, rain, haze, etc.) Navigation lights are intended to keep other
vessels informed of your presence and course. Your Pursuit is equipped with the navigation
lights required by the U.S. Coast Guard at the time of manufacture. It is up to you to make sure
they are operational and turned on when required.
Fire Extinguishers:
At least one fire extinguisher is required on all Pursuit boats. Coast Guard
approved fire extinguishers are hand-portable, either B-I or B-II classification and have a specific marine type mounting bracket. It is recommended
the extinguishers be mounted in a readily accessible position.
Fire extinguishers require regular inspections to ensure that:
•
Seals & tamper indicators are not broken or missing.
•
Pressure gauges or indicators read in the operable range.
•
There is no obvious physical damage, corrosion, leakage or clogged
nozzles.
Fire Extinguisher
Refer to the “Federal Requirements And Safety Tips For Recreational Boats” pamphlet or
contact the U.S. Coast Guard Boating Safety Hotline, 1-800-368-5647, for information on the
type and size fire extinguisher required for your boat.
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Please refer to the information provided by the fire extinguisher manufacturer for instructions
on the proper maintenance and use of your fire extinguisher.
INFORMATION FOR HALON OR AGENT FE-241 FIRE EXTINGUISHERS IS PROVIDED BY THE MANUFACTURER. IT IS ESSENTIAL THAT YOU READ THE INFORMATION CAREFULLY AND COMPLETELY UNDERSTAND THE SYSTEM, IN
THEORY AND OPERATION, BEFORE USING YOUR BOAT.
Bilge and Fuel Fires
Fuel compartment and bilge fires are very dangerous because of the presence of gasoline in the
various components of the fuel system and the possibility for explosion. You must make the
decision to fight the fire or abandon the boat. If the fire cannot be extinguished quickly or it is
too intense to fight, abandoning the boat may be your only option. If you find yourself in this
situation, make sure all passengers have a life preserver on and go over the side and swim well
upwind of the boat. This will keep you and your passengers well clear of any burning fuel that
could be released and spread on the water as the boat burns or in the event of an explosion. When
clear of the danger, check about and account for all those who were aboard with you. Give
whatever assistance you can to anyone in need or in the water without a buoyant device. Keep
everyone together in a group for morale and to aid rescue operations.
GASOLINE CAN EXPLODE. IN THE EVENT OF A FUEL COMPARTMENT OR
BILGE FIRE, YOU MUST MAKE THE DIFFICULT DECISION TO FIGHT THE FIRE
OR ABANDON THE BOAT. YOU MUST CONSIDER YOUR SAFETY, THE SAFETY
OF YOUR PASSENGERS, THE INTENSITY OF THE FIRE AND THE POSSIBILITY
OF AN EXPLOSION IN YOUR DECISION.
11.6 Carbon Monoxide Detector
CARBON MONOXIDE IS A LETHAL, TOXIC GAS THAT IS COLORLESS AND ODORLESS. IT IS A DANGEROUS GAS THAT WILL CAUSE DEATH IN CERTAIN LEVELS.
The carbon monoxide detector is in the cabin and warns the occupants of
dangerous accumulations of carbon monoxide gas. If excess carbon
monoxide fumes are detected, the detector will sound an alarm indicating
the presence of the toxic gas.
Should a very high level of carbon monoxide exist, the alarm will sound
in a few minutes. However, if small quantities of CO are present or high
levels are short-lived, the alarm will accumulate the information and
determine when an alarm level has been reached. The carbon monoxide
detector is automatically activated whenever the cabin DC breaker panel
is energized.
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Carbon Monoxide
Detector
11-5
Always make sure the cabin DC breaker panel and the carbon monoxide detector are activated
by the house battery switch whenever the cabin is occupied.
Carbon monoxide (CO), a by-product of combustion, is invisible, tasteless, odorless, and is
produced by all engines, heating and cooking appliances. It exists wherever fuels are burned to
generate power or heat. The most common sources of CO on boats are gasoline engines and
auxiliary generators and propane or butane stoves. These produce large amounts of CO and
should never be operated while sleeping. Also be aware that, in some situations, CO from a
generator or an engine being operated in nearby boats can enter your boat and present a hazard
for you and your passengers. High concentrations of CO can be fatal within minutes. Many cases
of carbon monoxide poisoning indicate that while victims are aware they are not well, they
become so disoriented they are unable to save themselves by either exiting the area or calling for
help. Also, young children, elderly persons, and pets may be the first affected.
Drug or alcohol use increases the effect of CO exposure. Individuals with cardiac or respiratory
conditions are very susceptible to the dangers of carbon monoxide. CO poisoning is especially
dangerous during sleep when victims are unaware of any side effects.
Low levels of carbon monoxide over an extended period of time can be just as lethal as high doses
over a short period. Therefore, low levels of carbon monoxide can cause the alarm to sound
before the occupants of the boat notice any symptoms of carbon monoxide poisoning. CO
detectors are very reliable and rarely sound false alarms. If the alarm sounds, always assume the
hazard is real and move persons who have been exposed to carbon monoxide into fresh air
immediately. Never disable the CO detector because you think the alarm may be false. Always
contact the detector manufacturer or your local fire department for assistance in finding and
correcting the situation.
In certain situations, boats can have a problem due to the “station wagon effect” where engine
exhaust fumes are captured in the vessel by the vacuum created by a rear opening or installed
canvas while underway. Boats that are underway should close all aft portholes and open a
forward facing hatch which may lend to pressurize the living spaces within the boat. Sleeping,
particularly in aft cabins, should not be permitted while underway. Occupants of the “bridge”
also should maintain proper ventilation by opening a forward window or windshield vents to
drive fumes away from the occupants. Extreme caution must be taken while at anchor or in a slip
and an auxiliary power generator is operating. Wind still nights can easily allow fumes to enter
the boat. Inspect the exhaust systems of propulsion and the auxiliary generators, if installed,
frequently for possible leaks. High concentrations of CO in your boat may originate from an
adjacent boat. Exhaust fumes from nearby boats may enter your boat through open hatches or
windows.
Symptoms of carbon monoxide poisoning are dizziness, ears ringing, headaches, tightness of
chest or hyperventilation, drowsiness, fatigue or weakness, inattention or confusion, lack of
normal coordination, nausea and unconsciousness. The victim's skin also may turn red. A slight
buildup of carbon monoxide in the human body over several hours causes headache, nausea and
other symptoms similar to food poisoning, motion sickness or the flu. Anyone with these
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symptoms should immediately be moved to an area of fresh air. Have the victim breath deeply
and seek immediate medical attention.
Remember, carbon monoxide detectors do not guarantee that CO poisoning will not occur. Do
not use the CO detector as a replacement for ordinary precautions or periodic inspections of
equipment. Never rely on alarm systems to save your life, common sense is still prudent and
necessary.
Please read the owner’s manual supplied by the CO detector manufacturer and included with this
manual, for operation instructions and additional information regarding the hazards of carbon
monoxide gas. Refer to the Ventilation Chapter for information on ventilating your boat properly
while underway and other precautions while at anchor or in a slip. This is especially essential
if your boat is equipped with a generator. The book entitled “Sportfish, Cruisers, Yachts,”
included with this manual, also has additional information and cautions regarding carbon
monoxide poisoning.
Many manufacturers of carbon monoxide detectors offer a testing and recertification program.
We recommend that you contact the manufacturer of your carbon monoxide detector and have
it tested and recertified periodically.
ACTUATION OF THE CARBON MONOXIDE DETECTOR INDICATES THE PRESENCE OF CARBON MONOXIDE (CO) WHICH CAN BE FATAL. EVACUATE THE
CABIN IMMEDIATELY. DO A HEAD COUNT TO CHECK THAT ALL PERSONS ARE
ACCOUNTED FOR. DO NOT REENTER THE CABIN UNTIL IT HAS BEEN AIRED
OUT AND THE PROBLEM FOUND AND CORRECTED.
11.7 First Aid
It is the operator's responsibility to be familiar with the proper
first-aid procedures and be able to care for minor injuries or
illnesses of your passengers. In an emergency, you could be far
from professional medical assistance. We strongly recommend
that you be prepared by receiving training in basic first aid and
CPR. This can be done through classes given by the Red Cross
or your local hospital.
Your boat should also be equipped with at least a simple marine first-aid kit and a first-aid
manual. The marine first-aid kit should be designed for the marine environment and be well
supplied. It should be accessible and each person on board should be aware of its location. As
supplies are used, replace them promptly. Some common drugs and antiseptics may lose their
strength or become unstable as they age. Ask a medical professional about the supplies you
should carry and the safe shelf life of prescription drugs or other medical supplies that may be
in your first-aid kit. Replace questionably old supplies whether they have been used or not.
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In many emergency situations, the Coast Guard can provide assistance in obtaining medical
advice for treatment of serious injuries or illness. If you are within VHF range of a Coast Guard
Station, make the initial contact on channel 16 and follow their instructions.
11.8 Additional Safety Equipment
Besides meeting the legal requirements, prudent boaters carry additional safety equipment. This
is particularly important if you operate your boat offshore. You should consider the following
items, depending on how you use your boat.
Satellite EPIRBS
EPIRBs (Emergency Position Indicating Radio Beacon) operate as part of a worldwide distress
system. When activated, EPIRBs will send distress code homing beacons that allow Coast Guard
aircraft to identify and find them quickly. The satellites that receive and relay EPIRB signals are
operated by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) in the United
States. The EPIRB should be mounted and registered according to the instructions provided with
the beacon, so that the beacon's unique distress code can be used to quickly identify the boat and
owner.
Additional Equipment to Consider:
VHF Radio
Heaving Line
Flashlight & Batteries
Sunburn Lotion
Whistle or Horn
Boat Hook
Food & Water
Marine Hardware
Spare Keys
11-8
Life Raft
Fenders
Mirror
Tool Kit
Anchor
Spare Propellers
Binoculars
Extra Clothing
Portable Radio
Spare Anchor
First Aid Kit
Searchlight
Ring Buoy
Chart and Compass
Mooring Lines
Sunglasses
Spare Parts
3070 OFFSHORE
Chapter 12:
OPERATION
12.1 General
Before you start the engines on your Pursuit, you should have become familiar with the various
component systems and their operation, and have performed a “Pre-Cruise System Check." A
thorough understanding of the component systems and their operation is essential to the proper
operation of the boat. This manual and the associated manufacturers’ information is provided
to enhance your knowledge of your boat. Please read them carefully. Also read the book titled
“Sportfish, Cruisers, Yachts - Owner's Manual,” included in your literature packet.
Your boat must have the necessary safety equipment on board and be in compliance with the U.S.
Coast Guard, local and state safety regulations. There should be one Personal Floatation Device
(PFD) for each person. Nonswimmers and small children should wear PFDs at all times. You
should know and understand the “Rules of the Road" and have had an experienced operator brief
you on the general operation of your new boat. At least one other person should be instructed
on the proper operation of the boat in case the operator is suddenly incapacitated.
The operator is responsible for his safety and the safety of his passengers. When boarding or
loading the boat, always step onto the boat, never jump. All passengers should be properly seated
whenever the boat is operated above idle speed. Your passengers should not be allowed to sit
on the seat backs, gunnels, bows, transoms or on fishing seats whenever the boat is underway.
The passengers should also be seated to properly balance the load and must not obstruct the
operator's view, particularly to the front.
Overloading and improper distribution of weight can cause the boat to become unstable and are
significant causes of accidents. Know the weight capacity and horsepower rating of your boat.
Do not overload or overpower your boat. Remember, it is the operator's responsibility to
use good common sense and sound judgment in loading and operating the boat.
12.2 Rules of the Road
As in driving an automobile, there are a few rules you must know for safe boating operation. The
following information describes the basic navigation rules and action to be taken by vessels in
a crossing, meeting or overtaking situation while operating in inland waters. These are basic
examples and not intended to teach all the rules of navigation. For further information consult
the “Navigation Rules” or contact the Coast Guard, Coast Guard Auxiliary, Department of
Natural Resources, or your local boat club. These organizations sponsor courses in boat
handling, including rules of the road. We strongly recommend such courses. Books on this
subject are also available from your local library.
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SAILBOATS NOT UNDER POWER, PADDLE BOATS, VESSELS UNABLE TO MANEUVER, VESSELS ENGAGED IN COMMERCIAL FISHING AND OTHER VESSELS
WITHOUT POWER HAVE THE RIGHT OF WAY OVER MOTOR POWERED BOATS.
YOU MUST STAY CLEAR OR PASS TO THE STERN OF THESE VESSELS. SAILBOATS UNDER POWER ARE CONSIDERED MOTOR BOATS.
Crossing Situations
When two motor boats are crossing, the boat on the right has the right of way. The boat with the
right of way should maintain its course and speed. The other vessels should slow down and
permit it to pass. The boats should sound the appropriate signals.
Meeting Head-On or Nearly-So Situations
When two motor boats are approaching each other head-on or nearly head-on, neither boat has
the right of way. Both boats should reduce their speed and turn to the right so as to pass port side
to port side, providing enough clearance for safe passage. The boats should sound the appropriate
signals.
Overtaking Situations
When one motor boat is overtaking another motor boat, the boat that is being passed has the right
of way. The overtaking boat must make the adjustments necessary to provide clearance for a safe
passage of the other vessel. The boats should sound the appropriate signals.
The General Prudential Rule
In obeying the Rules of the Road, due regard must be given to all dangers of navigation and
collision, and to any special circumstances, including the limitations of the vessels, which may
justify a departure from the rules that is necessary to avoid immediate danger or a collision.
Navigation Aids
Aids to navigation are placed along coasts and navigable waters as guides to mark safe water and
to assist mariners in determining their position in relation to land and hidden dangers. Each aid
to navigation is used to provide specific information. You should be familiar with these and any
other markers used in your boating area.
STORMS AND WAVE ACTION CAN CAUSE BUOYS TO MOVE. YOU SHOULD NOT
RELY ON BUOYS ALONE TO DETERMINE YOUR POSITION.
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12.3 Pre-Cruise Check
Before Starting the Engines
•
Check the weather forecast. Decide if the planned cruise can be made safely.
•
Be sure all required documents are on board.
•
Be sure all necessary safety equipment is on board and operative. This should include items
like the running lights, spotlight, life saving devices, etc. Please refer to the Safety Equipment
chapter for additional information on safety equipment.
•
Make sure you have signal kits and flare guns aboard, and they are current and in good
operating condition.
•
Be sure you have sufficient water and other provisions for the planned cruise.
•
Leave a written message listing details of your planned cruise with a close friend ashore
(Float Plan). The float plan should include a description of your boat, where you intend to
cruise, and a schedule of when you expect to arrive in the cruising area and when you expect
to return. Keep the person informed of any changes in your plan to prevent false alarms. This
information will tell authorities where to look and the type of boat to look for in the event you
fail to arrive.
•
Check the amount of fuel on board. Observe the “rule of thirds”: one third of the fuel for the
trip out, one third to return and one third in reserve. An additional 15% may be consumed
in rough seas.
•
Check the water separating fuel filters for water.
•
Check the oil in the engine oil tanks.
•
Set the battery switches as desired.
•
Check the bilge water level. Look for other signs of potential problems. Monitor for the scent
of fuel fumes.
•
Test the automatic and manual bilge pump switches to make sure the system is working
properly.
THERE MUST BE AT LEAST ONE PERSONAL FLOTATION DEVICE ON BOARD
FOR EVERY PERSON ON BOARD AND ONE THROW-OUT FLOTATION DEVICE.
CHECK THE U.S. COAST GUARD STANDARDS FOR THE CORRECT TYPE OF DEVICE FOR YOUR BOAT.
3070 OFFSHORE
12-3
•
Have a tool kit aboard. The kit should include the following basic tools:
Spark plug wrench
Spark plug gap gauge
Screwdrivers
Pliers
Adjustable Wrench
Needle Nose Pliers
End Wrench Set
•
Hammer
Electrician’s Tape
Lubricating Oil
Jackknife
Vise Grip Pliers
Wire Crimping Tool
Wire Connector Set
Have the following spare parts on board:
Extra light bulbs
Fuses and circuit breakers
Drain plugs
Propellers
Propeller nuts
Spark plugs
Flashlight and batteries
Engine oil
Fuel filters
Fuel hose and clamps
•
Make sure all fire extinguishers are in position and in good operating condition.
•
Be sure the shift control is in the neutral position.
•
Be sure the emergency stop lanyard is attached to the operator and the stop switch.
VAPORIZING LIQUID EXTINGUISHERS GIVE OFF TOXIC FUMES; USE ONLY
COAST GUARD APPROVED FIRE EXTINGUISHERS.
12.4 Operating Your Boat
After Starting the Engines
TO REDUCE THE RISK OF A FIRE OR EXPLOSION, DO NOT START THE ENGINES
WHEN FUEL FUMES ARE PRESENT. FUEL FUMES ARE DANGEROUS AND HARMFUL TO YOUR HEALTH.
•
Visibly check the engines to be sure there are no apparent water, fuel or oil leaks.
•
Check the operation of the engine cooling systems.
•
Check the engine gauges. Make sure they are reading normally.
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3070 OFFSHORE
•
Check the controls and steering for smooth and proper operation.
•
Make sure all lines, cables, anchors, etc. for securing a boat are on board and in good
condition. All lines should be coiled, secured and off the decks when underway.
•
Have a safe cruise and enjoy yourself.
Remember:
When you operate a boat, you accept the responsibility for the boat, for the safety of passengers
and for others out enjoying the water.
•
Alcohol and any drugs can severely reduce your reaction time and affect your better
judgment.
•
Alcohol severely reduces the ability to react to several different signals at once.
•
Alcohol makes it difficult to correctly judge speed and distance, or track moving objects.
•
Alcohol reduces night vision, and the ability to distinguish red from green.
YOU SHOULD NEVER OPERATE YOUR BOAT WHILE UNDER THE INFLUENCE OF
ALCOHOL AND DRUGS.
•
Avoid sea conditions that are beyond the skill and experience of you and your crew.
MAKE SURE ONE OTHER PERSON ON THE BOAT IS INSTRUCTED IN THE OPERATION OF THE BOAT AND MAKE SURE THE BOAT IS OPERATED IN COMPLIANCE WITH ALL STATE AND LOCAL LAWS GOVERNING THE USE OF A
BOAT.
DO NOT OPERATE THE BOAT UNLESS IT IS COMPLETELY ASSEMBLED. KEEP
ALL FASTENERS TIGHT. KEEP ADJUSTMENTS ACCORDING TO SPECIFICATIONS.
Before operating the boat for the first time, read the engine break-in procedures. The break-in
procedures are found in the owner’s manual for the engine. The manual is in the literature packet.
As different types of engines are used to power the boat, have the dealer describe the operating
procedures for your boat. For more instructions on “How To Operate The Boat,” make sure you
read the instructions given to you in the owner’s manual for the engines you have selected.
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12-5
Note: For more instructions on safety, equipment and boat handling, enroll in one of the
several free boating courses offered. For information on the courses offered in your
area, call the “Boating Safety Hotline,” 800-368-5647, or the “Boat U.S. Foundation
Course Hotline,” 1-800-336-2628, for further information on boating safety courses.
Note: If the drive unit hits an underwater object, stop the engine. Inspect the drive unit
for damage. If the unit is damaged, contact your dealer for a complete inspection
and repair of the unit.
To stop the boat, follow this procedure:
•
Allow the engines to drop to the idle speed.
•
Make sure the shifting levers are in the neutral position.
Note: If the engines have been run at high speed for a long period of time, allow the engines
to cool down by running the engines in the idle position for 3 to 5 minutes.
•
Turn the ignition keys to the “Off” position.
•
Raise the trim tabs to the full up position.
After Operation
•
If operating in saltwater, wash the boat and all equipment with soap and water. Flush the
engines using freshwater. Please refer to the engine owner's manual for instructions on
flushing your outboard engines.
•
Check the bilge area for debris and excess water.
•
Fill the fuel tanks to near full to reduce condensation. Allow enough room in the tanks for
the fuel to expand without being forced out through the vent.
•
Turn off all electrical equipment except the automatic bilge pumps.
•
If you are going to leave the boat for a long period of time, put the battery main switches
in the “Off” position and close all seacocks.
•
Make sure the boat is securely moored.
TO PREVENT DAMAGE TO THE BOAT, CLOSE ALL SEA COCKS BEFORE LEAVING THE BOAT.
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12.5 Tower Operation (Dealer Option)
Your boat could be equipped with a fabricated aluminum tower by your dealer. Towers are
normally equipped with full engine controls, trim tab controls, compass, engine alarms, restart
buttons and tachometers. This allows for complete operation of the boat from the tower.
Operation of the Tower Controls
The engines should be started at the lower helm. Monitor the gauges to make sure all systems
are normal and the engines have been allowed to warm up slightly before proceeding to the tower
helm. The ignition or restart switches on the tower are only used to restart an engine in the event
it should stall. The shift controls must be in neutral for the restart switches to be functional.
The following is a list of safety precautions for tower operation:
•
Do not operate the boat from the tower in rough sea conditions. The boat’s motions are
exaggerated in the tower and this motion may become excessive in rough seas.
•
Be careful when using the trim tabs from the tower. The reaction of the trim tabs will be
exaggerated in the tower. Use small tab corrections and wait ten (10) seconds for the tabs
to react. Keep making small corrections until the hull is at the desired attitude.
•
Do not overload the tower. Most towers are designed to hold the weight of only two average
sized people. Weight in the tower raises the boat’s center of gravity. Too much weight in
the tower could make the boat unstable.
•
Do not operate the boat in tight quarters, such as marinas, from the tower. The operator is
isolated from the boat while in the tower and will not be able to assist in docking procedures.
•
Always pay close attention to your grip and footing on the tower ladders. Your ability to
achieve a good grip and proper footing is reduced in wet or rough weather. Therefore, the
tower should be avoided in these conditions.
•
Only operate the boat from the tower in familiar waters or where running aground is not a
possibility. Running aground while operating the boat from the tower could result in severe
injury.
•
Always be alert for waves and boat wakes when operating the boat from the tower.
Remember that the boat's motions are exaggerated in the tower.
•
Good common sense and judgment must be exercised at all times when operating a boat from
the tower.
•
If the engine alarm sounds, immediately put the boat in NEUTRAL and shut “OFF” the
engine until the problem is found.
3070 OFFSHORE
12-7
•
Always put the boat in NEUTRAL before moving to and from the tower helm and cockpit.
GOOD COMMON SENSE, JUDGMENT AND EXTREME CAUTION MUST BE EXERCISED WHEN OPERATING A BOAT WITH SOMEONE IN THE TOWER. DO NOT
ALLOW ANYONE IN THE TOWER WHEN THE WATER IS ROUGH OR WHEN OPERATING IN UNFAMILIAR WATERS WHERE RUNNING AGROUND IS A POSSIBILITY. REMEMBER, WEIGHT IN THE TOWER RAISES THE BOAT'S CENTER OF
GRAVITY AND THE BOAT'S MOTION IS GREATLY EXAGGERATED FOR THE
PEOPLE IN THE TOWER.
12.6 Fishing
Fishing can be very exciting and distracting for the operator when the action gets intense. You
must always be conscious of the fact that your primary responsibility is the safe operation of your
boat and the safety of your passengers and other boats in the area.
You must always make sure the helm is properly manned and is never left unattended while
trolling. If your boat is equipped with a tower, caution and good common sense must be exercised
whenever someone is in the tower.
If you are fishing in an area that is crowded with other fishing boats, it may be difficult to follow
the rules of the road. This situation can become especially difficult when most boats are trolling.
Being courteous and exercising good common sense is essential. Avoid trying to assert your
right of way and concentrate on staying clear and preventing tangled or cut lines and other
unpleasant encounters with other boats. Also keep in mind that fishing line wrapped around your
propeller shaft can damage the seals in the outboard lower unit.
12.7 Grounding and Towing
If the boat should become disabled, or if another craft that is disabled requires assistance, great
care must be taken. The stress applied to a boat during towing may become excessive. Excessive
stress can damage the structure of the boat and create a safety hazard for those aboard.
Freeing a grounded vessel, or towing a boat that is disabled, requires specialized equipment and
knowledge. Line failure and structural damage caused by improper towing have resulted in fatal
injuries. Because of this, we strongly suggest that these activities be left to those who have the
equipment and knowledge, e.g., the U.S. Coast Guard or a commercial towing company, to safely
accomplish the towing task.
12-8
3070 OFFSHORE
THE MOORING CLEATS ON PURSUIT BOATS ARE NOT DESIGNED OR INTENDED TO BE USED FOR TOWING PURPOSES. THESE CLEATS ARE SPECIFICALLY
DESIGNED AS MOORING CLEATS FOR SECURING THE BOAT TO A DOCK, PIER,
ETC. DO NOT USE THESE FITTINGS FOR TOWING OR ATTEMPTING TO FREE
A GROUNDED VESSEL.
WHEN TOWING OPERATIONS ARE UNDERWAY, HAVE EVERYONE ABOARD
BOTH VESSELS STAY CLEAR OF THE TOW LINE AND SURROUNDING AREA. A
TOW LINE THAT SHOULD BREAK WHILE UNDER STRESS CAN BE VERY DANGEROUS, AND COULD CAUSE SERIOUS INJURY OR DEATH.
RUNNING AGROUND OR STRIKING AN UNDERWATER OBSTRUCTION CAN RESULT IN SERIOUS INJURY TO PASSENGERS AND DAMAGE TO THE MOTOR OR
BOAT. IF YOUR BOAT SHOULD BECOME GROUNDED, DISTRIBUTE PERSONAL
FLOTATION DEVICES AND INSPECT THE BOAT FOR POSSIBLE DAMAGE. THOROUGHLY INSPECT THE BILGE AREA FOR SIGNS OF LEAKAGE. AN EXPERIENCED SERVICE FACILITY SHOULD CHECK YOUR UNDERWATER GEAR AT THE
FIRST OPPORTUNITY. DO NOT CONTINUE TO USE YOUR BOAT IF THE CONDITION OF THE UNDERWATER EQUIPMENT IS QUESTIONABLE.
12.8 Transporting Your Boat
The Pursuit 3070 Offshore is a large boat and should only be trailered by professionals that have
the knowledge and equipment to move large boats without causing damage.
Please contact your dealer or the Pursuit Customer Relations Department if you are planning to
transport your boat and have any questions in regard to the proper equipment and support for the
hull.
BOATS HAVE BEEN DAMAGED BY TRAILERS THAT DON’T PROPERLY SUPPORT
THE HULL. ALWAYS MAKE SURE THE TRAILER BUNKS AND PADS ARE ADJUSTED SO THEY ARE NOT PUTTING EXCESSIVE PRESSURE ON THE LIFTING
STRAKES AND ARE PROVIDING ENOUGH SUPPORT FOR THE HULL. HULL DAMAGE RESULTING FROM IMPROPER TRAILER SUPPORT IS NOT COVERED BY
THE PURSUIT WARRANTY.
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INTENTIONALLY
3070 OFFSHORE
Chapter 13:
ROUTINE MAINTENANCE
13.1 Exterior Hull and Deck
Hull Cleaning-Below The Water Line
When the boat is removed from the water, clean the outer bottom surface immediately. Algae,
grass, dirt and other marine growth are easier to remove while the hull is still wet. Use a pressure
cleaner or a hard bristle brush to clean the surface.
Bottom Painting
If the boat is to be left in saltwater for extended periods, the hull must be protected from marine
growth by antifouling paint. Because of variations in water temperature, marine growth, and
pollution in different regions, your dealer and/or a qualified boat yard in your area should be
consulted when deciding what bottom paint system to apply to your hull. This is extremely
important as pollution and marine growth can damage fiberglass hulls.
SANDING OR SANDBLASTING THE HULL BOTTOM WILL DAMAGE THE FIBERGLASS. USE ONLY STANDARD ANTIFOULING PAINTS AND FIBERGLASS WAX
REMOVERS AND PRIMERS RECOMMENDED BY THE ANTIFOULING PAINT
MANUFACTURER WHEN PREPARING THE HULL FOR BOTTOM PAINT. SANDING OR SANDBLASTING AND THE USE OF A COATING OTHER THAN STANDARD
ANTIFOULING PAINT OR EPOXY BARRIER COATINGS ARE NOT RECOMMENDED
AND WILL VOID THE FIVE YEAR HULL BLISTER WARRANTY.
Do not allow the hull antifouling paint to contact the outboard motor. Most antifouling paints designed
for hull bottoms contain copper and can cause severe galvanic damage to the motor. Always leave
a 1/2" barrier between the hull bottom paint and outboard motor.
Most bottom paints require some maintenance. Proper maintenance is especially important
when the boat is in saltwater and not used for extended periods or after dry storage. If the hull
bottom has been painted with antifouling paint, contact your dealer for the recommended
maintenance procedures.
Anodes
Sacrificial anodes are installed on the outboard engines and should be installed on the trim tabs
if the boat is to be left in the water. The anodes are less noble than copper based alloys and
aluminum and will deteriorate first, protecting the more noble underwater hardware against
galvanic corrosion. Anodes should be checked monthly and changed when they are 75% of their
original size. Always use the type and grade of anode recommended by the engine manufacturer
of outboard and stern drive boats. When replacing the anodes, make sure the contact surfaces
are clean, shiny metal and free of paint and corrosion. Never paint over the anode.
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13-1
Boats stored in saltwater will typically need to have the anodes replaced at least every 6 months
to one year. Anodes requiring replacement more frequently may indicate a stray current problem
within the boat or at the slip or marina. Anodes that do not need to be replaced after one year may
not be providing the proper protection. Loose or low quality anodes could be the problem.
Contact your dealer for the proper size and type of anodes to be used and the specific installation
procedure.
Fiberglass Gelcoat Surfaces
Normal maintenance requires only washing with mild soap and water. A stiff brush can be used
on the nonskid areas. Kerosene or commercially prepared products will remove oil and tar which
could be a problem on trailered boats. Harsh abrasive and chemical cleaners are not recommended because they can damage or dull the gelcoat, reducing its life and making it more susceptible
to stains. When the boat is used in saltwater, it should be washed thoroughly with soap and water
after each use.
At least once a season, wash and wax all exposed fiberglass surfaces. Use a high quality
automotive or boat wax. Follow the procedure recommended by the wax manufacturer. The
washing and waxing of your boat will have the same beneficial effects as they have on an
automobile finish. The wax will fill minute scratches and pores thus helping to prevent soiling
and will extend the life of the gelcoat.
After the boat is exposed to the direct sunlight for a period of time, the color in the gelcoat tends
to fade, dull or chalk. A heavier buffing is required to bring the gelcoat back to its original luster.
For power cleaning use a light cleaner. To clean the boat by hand, use a heavier automotive
cleaner. Before cleaning the surfaces, read the instructions given with the cleaner. After cleaning
the surfaces, apply wax and polish all fiberglass surfaces except the nonskid areas.
If the fiberglass should become damaged and need repair, contact your dealer for an authorized
repair person to make the repairs.
DO NOT WAX NONSKID AREAS AS THIS COULD MAKE THEM SLIPPERY AND
CONSEQUENTLY INCREASE THE POSSIBILITY OF INJURY.
Stainless Steel Hardware
When using the boat in saltwater, the hardware should be washed with soap and water after each
use. When your boat is used in a corrosive environment such as saltwater, water with a high sulfur
content, or polluted water, the stainless steel will periodically develop surface rust stains. This
is perfectly normal under these conditions. The stainless can normally be cleaned and protected
by using a high quality boat or automotive wax or a commercial metal cleaner and protectant.
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3070 OFFSHORE
UNDER NO CIRCUMSTANCES SHOULD ANY ABRASIVE MATERIALS SUCH AS
SANDPAPER, BRONZE WOOL, OR STEEL WOOL BE USED ON STAINLESS STEEL.
DAMAGE TO THE HARDWARE WILL RESULT.
Anodized Aluminum Surfaces
Anodized aluminum should be washed periodically with soap and water to keep it clean. If the
boat is used in saltwater or polluted water, the aluminum should be washed with soap and water
after each use. Saltwater allowed to remain on anodized aluminum will penetrate the anodized
coating and attack the aluminum.
Hard tops with aluminum frames, bimini tops and towers with canvas and/or fiberglass tops
require special attention to the anodized aluminum just below the top. This area is subject to salt
build up from salty condensation and sea spray. It is also frequently overlooked when the boat
is washed and will not be rinsed by the rain. Consequently, the aluminum just below the top is
more likely to become pitted than the exposed aluminum on the structure. Make sure the
aluminum in this area is washed frequently with soap and water and rinsed thoroughly. Pay
particular attention to places where the top material and lacing contact the frame. Once a month
coat the entire frame with a metal protector made for anodized aluminum to protect against pitting
and corrosion caused by the harsh effects of saltwater. The anodized aluminum used on your
Pursuit was coated with a metal protector called Aluma Guard at the factory. Aluma Guard is
a nonabrasive marine metal protector that protects anodized aluminum, stainless steel, brass, and
chrome. It also protects color anodizing from fading and discoloring due to harmful ultraviolet
rays. It is available from Rupp Marine Inc., 4761 Anchor Avenue, P.O. Drawer F, Port Salerno,
FL 34992.
ONE DRAWBACK TO ALUMA GUARD AND OTHER METAL PROTECTORS IS
THAT THEY CAN MAKE THE METAL SLIPPERY. THEREFORE, THEY SHOULD
BE NOT BE USED ON TOWER LADDERS, STEERING WHEELS AND OTHER AREAS WHERE A GOOD GRIP AND SURE FOOTING ARE IMPORTANT.
Stains can be removed with a metal polish or fine polishing compound. To minimize corrosion,
use a caulking compound to bed hardware and fasteners mounted to aluminum fabrications. If
the anodized coating is badly scratched it can be touched up with paint. With proper care,
anodized aluminum will provide many years of service.
Note: You should contact Pursuit Customer Relations before making any modifications
to aluminum fabrications. Unauthorized modifications can void the warranty.
Chrome Hardware
Use a good chrome cleaner and polish on all chrome hardware.
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13-3
Acrylic Plastic Glass
Acrylic glass scratches easily. Never use a dry cloth or glass cleaning solutions on acrylic. Use
a soft cloth and mild soap and water for routine cleaning. Solvents and products containing
ammonia can permanently damage acrylic plastic glass.
Fine scratches can be removed with a fine automotive clear coat polishing compound. A coat
of automotive or boat wax is beneficial to protect the surface. Do not use the following on acrylic
glass:
Abrasive cleaners
Solvents
Glass cleaners
Acetone
Alcohol
Cleaners containing ammonia
Engines
Proper engine maintenance is essential to the proper performance and reliability of your outboard
engines. Maintenance schedules and procedures are outlined in your engine owner's manual.
They should be followed exactly.
If the boat is used in saltwater, flush the cooling systems after each daily use. To flush the systems
when the boat is out of the water, follow the procedure outlined in your engine owner's manual.
The age of gasoline can affect engine performance. Chemical changes occur as the gasoline ages
that can cause deposits and varnish in the fuel system as well as reduce the octane rating of the
fuel. Severely degraded fuel can damage the engine and boat fuel tank and lines. Therefore, if
your boat is not being run enough to require at least one full tank of fresh fuel a month, a fuel
stabilizer should be added to the gasoline to protect the fuel from degradation. Your dealer or
the engine manufacturer can provide additional information on fuel degradation and fuel
stabilizers recommended for your engine.
Avoid using fuels with alcohol additives. Gasoline that is an alcohol blend will absorb moisture
from the air which can reach such concentrations that "phase separation" can occur whereby the
water and alcohol mixture becomes heavy enough to settle out of the gasoline to the bottom of
the tank. Since the fuel pick up tube is very near the bottom of the tank, phase separation can cause
the engine to run very poorly or not at all. This condition is more severe with methyl alcohol and
will worsen as the alcohol content increases. Water or a jelly like substance in the fuel filters is
an indication of possible phase separation from the use of alcohol blended fuels.
13.2 Upholstery, Canvas and Enclosures
Vinyl Upholstery
The vinyl upholstery used on the exterior seats and bolsters, and for the headliner in the cabin,
should be cleaned periodically with soap and water. Any stain, spill or soiling should be cleaned
up promptly to prevent the possibility of permanent staining. When cleaning, always rub gently.
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Avoid using products containing ammonia, powdered abrasive cleaners, steel wool, ink, strong
solvents, acetone and lacquer solvents or other harsh chemicals as they can cause permanent
damage or shorten the life of vinyl. Never use steam heat, heat guns or hair dryers on vinyl.
Stronger cleaners, detergents and solvents may be effective in stain removal, but can cause either
immediate damage or slow deterioration. Lotions, sun tan oil, waxes and polishes, etc., contain
oils and dyes that can cause stiffening and staining of vinyls.
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Dry soil, dust and dirt - Remove with a soft cloth.
Dried on dirt - Wash with a soft cloth dampened with water.
Variations in surface gloss - Wipe with a water dampened soft cloth and allow to air dry.
Stubborn dirt - Wash with a soft cloth dampened with Ivory Flakes® and water. Rinse with
clean water.
Stubborn spots and stains - Spray with either Fantastik Cleaner® or Tannery Car Care
Cleaner® and rub with a soft cloth. Rinse with clean water.
Liquid spills - Wipe immediately with a clean absorbent cloth. Rinse with clean water.
Food grease and oily stains - Spray immediately using either Fantastik Cleaner® or Tannery
Car Care Cleaner®, wiping with a soft cloth. Take care not to extend the area of contamination
beyond its original boundary. Rinse with clean water.
Acrylic Canvas
Acrylic canvas should be cleaned periodically by using a mild soap and water. Scrub lightly and
rinse thoroughly to remove the soap. Do not use detergents. The top or accessories should never
be folded or stored wet.
After several years, the acrylic canvas may lose some of its ability to shed water. If this occurs,
wash the fabric and treat it with a commercially available water proofing designed for this
purpose.
Note: Some leakage at the seams is normal and unavoidable with acrylic enclosures.
Side curtains and clear connectors can be cleaned with mild soap and water. They should not be
allowed to become badly soiled. Dirt, oil, mildew, and cleaning agents containing ammonia, will
shorten the life of the vinyl that is used for clear curtains. After cleaning the curtains and allowing
them to dry, apply a non-lemon furniture polish or an acrylic glass and clear plastic protector to
extend the life of the curtains.
Vinyl curtains should be stored either rolled or flat, without folds or creases. Folding the curtains
will make permanent creases that could cause the vinyl to crack.
DO NOT USE ANY POLISH CONTAINING LEMON SCENTS OR LEMON. THE
LEMON JUICE WILL ATTACK THE VINYL AND SHORTEN ITS LIFE.
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Snaps should be lubricated periodically with petroleum jelly or silicone grease. Zippers should
be lubricated with silicone spray or paraffin.
The bimini top, side curtains, clear connector, back drop and aft curtain must be removed when
trailering. Canvas enclosures are not designed to withstand the extreme wind pressure
encountered while trailering and will be damaged. Always remove and properly store the
enclosure before trailering your boat.
Do not operate engines, fuel consuming heaters or burners with the canvas enclosures closed.
The cockpit must be open for legal ventilation and to prevent the possible accumulation of carbon
monoxide fumes, which could be lethal.
CARBON MONOXIDE IS A LETHAL, TOXIC GAS THAT IS COLORLESS AND ODORLESS. IT IS A DANGEROUS GAS THAT WILL CAUSE DEATH IN CERTAIN LEVELS.
13.3 Cabin Interior
The cabin interior can be cleaned just like you would clean a home interior. To preserve the teak
woodwork, use teak oil. To maintain the carpeting, use a vacuum cleaner. Because air and
sunlight are very good cleansers, periodically put cushions, sleeping bags, etc. on deck, in the sun
and fresh air, to dry and air out. If cushions or equipment get wet with saltwater, remove and use
clean, fresh water to rinse off the salt crystals. Salt retains moisture and will cause damage. Dry
thoroughly and reinstall.
Vinyl headliner material should be cleaned periodically as explained in the previous section.
Avoid using products containing ammonia, bleach, or harsh chemicals as they can shorten the
life of vinyl.
If you leave the boat for a long period of time, put all cushions on their sides, open all interior
cabin and locker doors, and hang a commercially available mildew protector in the cabin.
ALWAYS READ THE LABEL CAREFULLY ON MILDEW PROTECTORS. REMOVE
THE PROTECTOR AND ALLOW THE CABIN TO VENTILATE COMPLETELY BEFORE USING THE CABIN.
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13.4 Bilge and Generator
To keep the bilge clean and fresh, use a commercial bilge cleaner regularly. Follow the directions
carefully. The generator compartment should be kept clean and free of oil accumulation and
debris. All exposed pumps and metal components, including the generator, should be sprayed
periodically with a protector to reduce the corrosive effects of the high humidity always present
in these areas.
Maintenance intervals are outlined in the generator owner’s manual. Their recommendations
should be followed exactly.
Periodically check the bilge pumps for proper operation and clean debris from the strainers and
float switches. Inspect all hoses, clamps and thru hulls for leaks and tightness on a regular basis
and operate all thru hull valves at least once a month to keep them operating properly.
A flow of air into the bilge compartment is provided by vents. Periodic inspection and cleaning
of the ventilation ducts is necessary to ensure adequate air circulation.
Generator (Optional)
The engine maintenance required on the generator is similar in many ways to any inboard engine.
The engine incorporates a pressure-type lubrication system and a fresh water cooled engine block
which is thermostatically controlled. The most important factors to the generator's longevity are
proper ventilation and maintenance of the fuel system, ignition system, cooling system,
lubrication system and the AC alternator.
The primary fuel filter should be monitored for water before each use. Because of the volume
of fuel that flows through the filters, the elements must be changed at least twice a season or more
frequently depending on the quality of the fuel and the hours run. The sea strainer should be
checked frequently for debris and cleaned as required.
Note: Diesel generators consume DC electrical current and do not charge the battery
when they are running. Gasoline generators charge the battery just enough to
compensate for the DC electrical current the engine requires to operate. Therefore,
it is important to activate the battery charger to maintain the house battery
whenever the generator is running.
Maintenance schedules and procedures are outlined in your generator owner’s manual. They
should be followed exactly.
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13.5 Drainage System
It is essential that the following items be done periodically to maintain proper drainage of your
boat:
•
Clean the cockpit drains with a hose to remove debris that can block water drainage.
•
Clean the hardtop, tower or radar arch leg drain holes. This is especially important just before
winter lay-up.
•
Frequently test the automatic bilge pump switch for proper operation. This is accomplished
by inserting a stiff wire or small rod through one of the slots in the float chamber of the pump
and lifting the float switch until the pump is activated. You can also use a garden hose to flood
the bilge until the water level is high enough to activate the pump.
•
•
Flush all gravity drains with freshwater to keep them clean and free flowing.
Operate the thru hull valves once a month and service as required.
Note:
All drains and pumps must be properly winterized before winter lay-up.
NEVER USE HARSH CHEMICAL DRAIN CLEANERS IN MARINE DRAIN SYSTEMS.
PERMANENT DAMAGE TO THE HOSES AND FITTINGS MAY RESULT.
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Chapter 14:
SEASONAL MAINTENANCE
14.1 Storage and Lay-up
Before Hauling:
•
Pump out the head. Flush the holding tank using clean soap, water and a deodorizer. Pump
out the cleaning solution.
•
The fuel tank should be left nearly full to reduce condensation that can accumulate in the fuel
tank. Allow enough room in the tank for the fuel to expand without leaking out the vents.
Moisture from condensation in the fuel tank can reach such concentrations that it becomes
heavy enough to settle out of the gasoline to the bottom of the tank. Since fuel pickup tubes
are located near the bottom of the tank, this accumulated moisture can cause the engine to
run poorly or not at all after extended storage.
Chemical changes also occur as the gasoline ages that can cause deposits and varnish in the
fuel system as well as reduce the octane rating of the fuel. Severely degraded fuel can damage
the engine and boat fuel tank and lines.
Therefore, if your boat is not being run enough to require at least one full tank of fresh fuel
a month or during winter storage, a fuel stabilizer should be added to the gasoline to help
protect the fuel system from these problems. Operate the boat for at least 15 minutes after
adding the stabilizer to allow the treated fuel to reach the engine.
Your dealer or the engine manufacturer can provide additional information on fuel degradation
and fuel stabilizers recommended for your engine. For more recommendations for your
specific area, check with your local Pursuit dealer.
•
Drain water from the freshwater system.
•
Consult the engine owner’s manual for detailed information on preparing the engines for
storage.
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Lifting
It is essential that care be used when lifting your boat. Make sure the spreader bar at each sling
is at least as long as the distance across the widest point of the boat that the sling will surround.
Put the slings in position. Refer to the sling locations drawing for the correct position of the lifting
slings. The fore and aft slings should tied together to prevent the slings from sliding on the hull.
NOTICE
NOTICE
BOATS CAN BE DAMAGED FROM IMPROPER LIFTING AND ROUGH HANDLING
WHEN BEING TRANSPORTED BY LIFT TRUCKS. CARE AND PROPER HANDLING
PROCEDURES MUST BE USED WHEN USING A LIFT TRUCK TO MOVE THE
BOAT. NEVER ATTEMPT TO LIFT THE BOAT WITH A SUBSTANTIAL AMOUNT
OF WATER IN THE BILGE.
SEVERE GELCOAT CRACKING OR MORE SERIOUS HULL DAMAGE CAN OCCUR
DURING HAULING AND LAUNCHING IF PRESSURE IS CREATED ON THE GUNWALES (SHEER) BY THE SLINGS. FLAT, WIDE SLINGS AND SPREADERS LONG
ENOUGH TO KEEP PRESSURE FROM THE GUNWALES IS ESSENTIAL. DO NOT
ALLOW ANYONE TO HAUL YOUR BOAT WHEN THE SPREADERS ON THE LIFT
ARE NOT WIDE ENOUGH TO TAKE THE PRESSURE OFF THE GUNWALES.
Supporting The Boat For Storage
A trailer, elevating lift or a well-made cradle is the best support for your boat during storage.
When storing the boat on a trailer for a long period:
• Make sure the trailer is on a level surface and the bow is high enough so that water will drain
from the bilge and cockpit.
•
The trailer must properly support the hull. The bunks and rollers should match the bottom
of the hull and should not be putting pressure on the lifting strakes.
•
Make sure the hitch is properly supported.
•
Check the tires once each season. Add enough air for the correct amount of inflation for the
tires.
Note: Read the owner’s manual for the trailer for the correct amount of inflation for the
tires.
When storing the boat on a lift or cradle:
• The cradle must be specifically for boat storage.
•
Make sure the lift or cradle is well supported with the bow high enough to provide proper
drainage of the bilge.
•
Make sure the engines are in the down position.
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•
The cradle or lift must be in the proper fore and aft position to properly support the hull. When
the cradle or lift is in the correct location, the bunks should match the bottom of hull and
should not be putting pressure on the lifting strakes.
BOATS HAVE BEEN DAMAGED BY TRAILERS, LIFTS AND CRADLES THAT DON’T
PROPERLY SUPPORT THE HULL. ALWAYS MAKE SURE THE BUNKS AND ROLLERS ARE ADJUSTED SO THEY ARE NOT PUTTING PRESSURE ON THE LIFTING
STRAKES AND ARE PROVIDING ENOUGH SUPPORT FOR THE HULL. HULL DAMAGE RESULTING FROM IMPROPER CRADLE OR TRAILER SUPPORT IS NOT
COVERED BY THE PURSUIT WARRANTY.
Preparing The Boat For Storage:
•
Remove the bilge drain plug(s), if installed.
•
Thoroughly wash the fiberglass exterior, especially the antifouling portion of the bottom.
Remove as much marine growth as possible. Lightly wax the exterior fiberglass components.
•
Remove all oxidation from the exterior hardware, and apply a light film of moisture
displacing lubricant.
•
Remove propellers and grease the propeller shafts using light waterproof grease.
•
Remove the batteries and store in a cool place. Clean using clear, clean water. Be sure the
batteries have sufficient water and clean terminals. Keep the batteries charged and safe from
freezing throughout the storage period.
Note: Refer to the Electrical System chapter, for information on the maintenance of the
AC and DC electrical systems.
•
Coat all faucets and exposed electrical components in the cabin and cockpit with a protecting
oil.
•
Clean out, totally drain and completely dry the fishboxes, sinks and livewells.
•
Thoroughly clean the interior of the boat. Vacuum all carpets and dry clean drapes and
upholstery.
•
Remove cushions, open the refrigerator/cooler door and as many locker doors as possible.
Leaving as many of these areas open as possible will improve the boat’s ventilation during
the storage period.
Note: It is recommended that a mildew preventer be hung in the boat’s cabin before it is
closed for storage.
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14-3
•
Clean the exterior upholstery with a good vinyl cleaner and dry thoroughly. Spray the
weather covers and boat upholstery with a spray disinfectant. Enclosed areas such as the
refrigerator, shower basin, storage locker areas, etc. should also be sprayed with this
disinfectant.
14.2 Winterizing
Freshwater System
The entire freshwater system must be completely drained. Disconnect all hoses, check valves,
etc. and blow all the water from the system. Make sure the water heater and freshwater tank are
completely drained. Use only very low air pressure when doing this to prevent possible system
damage. Because of the check valve mechanism built in the pump, blowing the lines will not
remove the water from the freshwater pump. Remove the outlet hose on the pump. Turn the
pump on and allow it to pump out any remaining water....about a cupful.
A recommended alternative to the above-mentioned procedure is the use of commercially
available non-toxic, freshwater system antifreeze. After draining the potable water tank, lines
and water heater, pour the antifreeze mixture into the freshwater tank, prime and operate the
pump until the mixture flows from all freshwater faucets. Be sure to open all hot and cold water
faucets, including the freshwater spray head in the stern bait station sink and the water supply
valve for the head. Make sure antifreeze has flowed through all of the freshwater drains.
The shower drain sump system must be properly winterized. Clean debris from the drain and
sump and flush for several minutes with fresh clean water. After the system is clean, pump the
drain sump as dry as possible. Then pour a potable water antifreeze mixture into the shower drain
until antifreeze has been pumped through the entire system and out of the thru hull.
For additional information please refer to the Freshwater System chapter.
Raw Water System
Completely drain the raw water systems. Disconnect all hoses and blow the water from the
system. Use only very low air pressure when doing this to prevent possible system damage.
Because of the check valve mechanism built in the raw water washdown pump, blowing the lines
will not remove the water from the raw water pump. Remove the inlet and outlet hoses on the
pump. Turn the pump on and allow it to pump out any remaining water....about a cupful.
A recommended alternative to the above-mentioned procedure is the use of commercially
available non-toxic, potable water system antifreeze. If potable water antifreeze is used, pour
the mixture into a pail and put the raw water intake lines into the solution. Run the pumps one
at a time until the antifreeze solution is visible at all raw water faucets and discharge fittings and
drains. Be sure antifreeze has flowed through all of the raw water drains.
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Make sure to run the stern fishbox macerator pump until all the water is removed from the fishbox
and the pump. To avoid damage to the pump, be careful not to run the pump dry for more than
10 seconds.
Generator Raw Water Systems
Drain the sea strainer, heat exchangers and raw water supply and discharge lines for the optional
generator raw water supply pumps. Make sure all sea water has drained from the exhaust system.
Some, but not all, generator engine mufflers could have a drain plug that must be removed to
properly drain the muffler. Once this is accomplished, pour a non toxic marine engine antifreeze
mixture into a large pail and put the generator raw water intake lines into the solution. Run the
generator until the antifreeze solution is visible at the exhaust port, then shut the engine off.
Properly winterize the generator engine and fuel system by following the engine manufacturer’s
winterizing procedures located in your engine owner’s manuals or contact a Pursuit dealer.
Marine Toilet
The marine toilet must be properly winterized by following the manufacturer’s winterizing
instructions in the marine toilet owner’s manual. Drain the intake and discharge hoses
completely using low air pressure if necessary. The head holding tank and macerator discharge
pump must be pumped dry and one gallon of potable water antifreeze poured into the tank through
the deck waste pump out fitting. After the antifreeze has been added to the holding tank, open
the overboard discharge valve and activate the macerator pump until the antifreeze solution is
visible at the discharge thru hull.
Note: Make sure you follow the marine toilet manufacturer's winterizing instructions
exactly.
Air Conditioner
Disconnect and drain the air conditioner intake and discharge hoses. Remove all water from the
sea strainer and thru hull fitting. Allow all water to drain from the system. A recommended
alternative to the above-mentioned procedure is the use of commercially available non-toxic,
potable water system antifreeze. If potable water antifreeze is used, drain the sea strainer and
pour the mixture into a pail and put the raw water intake line into the solution. Run the air
conditioner until the antifreeze solution is visible at the discharge fitting on the hull side.
The air conditioner components must be properly winterized by following winterizing procedure
in the air conditioner owner’s manual.
Note: The air conditioning, engine control system, head, and steering systems have
specific lay up requirements. Please refer to their owner’s manuals for recommended winterizing procedures.
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14-5
Bilge
Coat all metal components, wire busses, and connector plugs, in the bilge with a protecting oil.
It is also important to protect all strainers, seacocks and steering components. The bilge pumps
and bilge pump lines must be completely free of water and dried out when the boat is laid-up for
the winter in climates where freezing occurs. Compartments in the bilge that will not drain
completely should be pumped out and then sponged until completely free of water. Dry the hull
bilge and self-bailing cockpit troughs. Water freezing in these areas could cause damage.
Hard Top
It is imperative that all drain holes in the legs are open and that the legs are completely free of
water. Remove the canvas and thoroughly clean and store in a safe, dry place. Remove all
electronics. Coat all wire connectors and bus bars in the helm compartment with a protecting oil.
Clean the aluminum frame with soap and water and dry thoroughly. Apply an aluminum metal
protector to the entire frame to reduce corrosion and pitting.
ALWAYS MAKE SURE THE LEG DRAIN HOLES ARE CLEAR WHEN THE BOAT
IS LAID UP FOR THE WINTER. WATER TRAPPED INSIDE THE HARDTOP,
TOWER OR RADAR ARCH LEGS COULD FREEZE AND CAUSE THE LEGS TO
SPLIT.
Tower (if installed)
It is imperative that all drain holes in the tower and hardtop legs are open and completely free
of water. Tower basket drains should be checked and cleared of debris. Remove the tower sun
shade, if installed, the belly band or other upholstery and thoroughly clean and store in a safe,
dry place. Remove all electronics. Coat all wire connectors and bus bars in the helm
compartment with a protecting oil. Cover the tower basket with a tarp and secure it properly.
Clean the aluminum frame with soap and water and dry thoroughly. Apply an aluminum metal
protector to the entire frame to reduce corrosion and pitting.
Special Notes Prior To Winter Storage
If the boat will be in outside storage, properly support a storage cover and secure it over the boat.
It is best to have a frame built over the boat to support the canvas. It should be a few inches wider
than the boat so the canvas will clear the rails and allow passage of air. If this cover is fastened
too tightly there will be inadequate ventilation and this can lead to mildew, moisture accumulation, etc. It is essential to fasten the canvas down securely so that the winds cannot remove it or
cause chafing of the hull superstructure. Do not store the boat in a damp storage enclosure.
Excessive dampness can cause electrical problems, corrosion, and excessive mildew.
Whenever possible, do not use the bimini top or convertible top canvas in place of the winter
storage cover. The life of these canvases may be significantly shortened if exposed to harsh
weather elements for long periods.
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PLACING AN ELECTRIC OR FUEL BURNING HEATING UNIT IN THE BILGE AREA
CAN BE POTENTIALLY HAZARDOUS AND IS NOT RECOMMENDED.
Proper storage is very important to prevent serious damage to the boat. If the boat is to be stored
indoors, make sure the building has enough ventilation. It is very important that there is enough
ventilation both inside the boat and around the boat.
Note: If the boat is to be stored indoors or outdoors, open all drawers, clothes lockers,
cabinets, and doors a little. If possible, remove the upholstery, mattresses, clothing,
and rugs. Then hang a commercially available mildew protector in the cabin.
14.3 Recommissioning
DO NOT OPERATE THE BOAT UNLESS IT IS COMPLETELY ASSEMBLED. KEEP
ALL FASTENERS TIGHT. KEEP ADJUSTMENTS ACCORDING TO SPECIFICATIONS.
Note: It is important and recommended that the fitting out procedure for the marine gear
be done by a qualified service person. Read the engine owner’s manual for the
recommended procedure.
BEFORE LAUNCHING THE BOAT, MAKE SURE THE HULL DRAIN PLUG IS INSTALLED.
Reactivating The Boat After Storage:
•
Charge and install the batteries.
•
Install the drain plug in the hull.
•
Check the engines and generator for damage and follow the manufacturer’s instructions for
recommissioning.
•
Check the engines mounting bolts to make sure they are tight.
•
Perform all routine maintenance.
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14-7
•
Check all hose clamps for tightness.
•
Pump the antifreeze from the fresh and raw water systems and flush several times with
freshwater. Make sure all antifreeze is flushed from the water heater and it is filled with
freshwater before it is activated.
•
Check and lubricate the steering system.
•
Clean and wash the boat.
•
Install all upholstery, cushions and canvas.
After Launching:
•
Carefully check all water systems and the engine bolts for leaks. Operate each system one
at a time checking for leaks and proper operation.
•
Check the bilge pump manual and automatic switches.
•
When the engines start, check the cooling system port below the engine cowling for a strong
stream of water. This ensures that the cooling pump is operating.
•
Carefully monitor the gauges and check for leakage and abnormal noises.
•
Operate the boat at slow speeds until the engine temperature stabilizes and all systems are
operating normally.
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Chapter 15:
SCHEMATICS
12-Volt DC Wiring Schematic
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15-1
15-2
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AC Wiring Schematic
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Rod Locker Hatch Lifter Switch
15-3
15-4
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Battery Cable Routing
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Hydraulic Steering System
15-5
Control Cables
15-6
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Generator
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15-7
15-8
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Fuel System 2-Stroke
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Fuel System 4-Stroke
15-9
Fuel Selector Valves
15-10
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Freshwater System
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15-11
Raw Water System
15-12
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Drainage System
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15-13
15-14
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Sump Pump Drain System
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Air Conditioning System
15-15
Sling Positions
15-16
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Bunk Locations
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15-17
15-18
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Half Tower Plate Loctaions
APPENDIX A:
GLOSSARY OF TERMS
Aft: In, near, or toward the stern of a boat.
Aground: A boat stuck on the bottom.
Amidships: In or toward the part of a boat midway between the bow and stern.
Anchor: A specially shaped heavy metal device designed to dig efficiently into the bottom under
a body of water and hold a boat in place.
Anchorage: An area specifically designated by governmental authorities in which boats may
anchor.
Ashore: On shore.
Astern: Behind the boat, to move backwards.
Athwartship: At right angles to the center line of the boat.
Barnacles:
Small, hard-shelled marine animals which are found in salt water attached to
pilings, docks and bottoms of boats.
Beam: The breadth of a boat usually measured at its widest part.
Bearing: The direction of an object from the boat, either relative to the boat's direction or to
compass degrees.
Berth: A bunk or a bed on a boat.
Bilge: The bottom of the boat below the flooring.
Bilge Pump: A pump that removes water that collects in the bilge.
Boarding: Entering or climbing into a boat.
Boarding Ladder: Set of steps temporarily fitted over the side of a boat to assist persons coming
aboard.
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Boat Hook: Short shaft of wood or metal with a hook fitting at one end shaped to aid in extending
one’s reach from the side of the boat.
Bow: The front end of a boat's hull.
Bow Line: A line that leads forward from the bow of the boat.
Bow Rail: Knee high rails of solid tubing to aid in preventing people from falling overboard.
Bridge: The area from which a boat is steered and controlled.
Bridge Deck: A deck forward and usually above the cockpit deck.
Broach: When the boat is sideways to the seas and in danger of capsizing; a very dangerous
situation that should be avoided.
Bulkhead: Vertical partition or wall separating compartments of a boat.
Cabin: Enclosed superstructure above the main deck level.
Capsize: When a boat lays on its side or turns over.
Chock: A deck fitting, usually of metal, with inward curving arms through which mooring or
anchor lines are passed so as to lead them in the proper direction both on board and off the boat.
Cleat: A deck fitting, usually of metal with projecting arms used for securing anchor and
mooring lines.
Closed Cooling System: A separate supply of fresh water that is used to cool the engine and
circulates only within the engine.
Coaming: A vertical piece around the edges of cockpit, hatches, etc. to stop water on deck from
running below.
Cockpit: An open space, usually in the aft deck, outside of the cabin.
Companionway: Opening in the deck of a boat to provide access below.
Compartment: The interior of a boat divided off by bulkheads.
Cradle: A framework designed to support a boat as she is hauled out or stored.
Cutlass Bearing: A rubber bearing in the strut that supports the propeller shaft.
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Deck: The floor-like platform of a boat that covers the hull.
Displacement: The volume of water displaced by the hull. The displacement weight is the
weight of this volume of water.
Draft: The depth of water a boat needs to float.
Dry Rot: A fungus attack on wood areas.
Dry-dock: A dock that can be pumped dry during boat construction or repair.
Electrical Ground: A connection between an electrical connector and the earth.
Engine Beds: Sturdy structural members running fore and aft on which the inboard engines are
mounted.
EPIRB: Emergency Position Indicating Radio Beacon. Operates as a part of a worldwide
satellite distress system.
Even Keel: When a boat floats properly as designed.
Fathom: A measure of depth. One Fathom = 6 feet.
Fender: A soft object of rubber or plastic used to protect the topsides from scarring and rubbing
against a dock or another vessel.
Fend off: To push or hold the boat off from the dock or another boat.
Flying Bridge: A control station above the level of the deck or cabin.
Flukes: The broad portions of an anchor which dig into the ground.
Fore: Applies to the forward portions of a boat near the bow.
Foundering: When a boat fills with water and sinks.
Freeboard: The height from the waterline to the lowest part of the deck.
Galley: The kitchen of a boat.
Grab Rail: Hand-hold fittings mounted on cabin tops or sides for personal safety when moving
around the boat, both on deck and below.
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A-3
Ground Tackle: A general term including anchors, lines, and other gear used in anchoring.
Grounds: A boat touches the bottom.
Gunwale: The upper edge of a boat’s side.
Hand Rail:
Rail mounted on the boat, for grabbing with your hand, to steady you while
walking about the boat.
Harbor: An anchorage which provides reasonably good protection for a boat, with shelter from
wind and sea.
Hatch: An opening in the deck with a door or lid to allow for access down into a compartment
of a boat.
Head: A toilet on a boat.
Heat Exchanger: Used to transfer the heat that is picked up by the closed cooling system to the
raw cooling water.
Helm: The steering and control area of a boat.
Hull: The part of the boat from the deck down.
Inboard: A boat with the engine mounted within the hull of the boat. Also refers to the center
of the boat away from the sides.
Inboard/outboard: Also stern drive or I/O. A boat with an inboard engine attached to an
outboard drive unit.
Keel: A plate or timber plate running lengthwise along the center of the bottom of a boat.
Knot: Unit of speed indicating nautical miles per hour. 1 knot = 1 nautical mile per hour (1.15
miles per hour). A nautical mile is equal to one minute of latitude: 6076 feet. Knots times 1.15
equals miles per hour. Miles per hour times .87 equals knots.
Lay-up: To decommission a boat for the winter (usually in northern climates).
Leeward: The direction toward which the wind is blowing.
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Length On The Waterline (l.w.l.): A length measurement of a boat at the waterline from the
stern to where the hull breaks the water near the bow.
Limber Hole: A passage cut into the lower edges of floors and frames next to the keel to allow
bilge water to flow to the lowest point of the hull where it can be pumped overboard.
Line: The term used to describe a rope when it is on a boat.
Lists: A boat that inclines to port or starboard while afloat.
L.O.A.: Boat length overall.
Locker: A closet, chest or box aboard a boat.
Loran: An electronic navigational instrument which monitors the boat's position using signals
emitted from pairs of transmitting stations.
Lunch hook: A small light weight anchor typically used instead of the working anchor.
Normally used in calm waters with the boat attended.
Midships: The center of the boat.
Marina: A protected facility primarily for recreational small craft.
Marine Ways or Railways: Inclined planes at the water’s edge onto which boats are hauled.
Moored: A boat secured with cables, lines or anchors.
Mooring: An anchor permanently embedded in the bottom of a harbor that is used to secure a
boat.
Nautical Mile: A unit of measure equal to one minute of latitude. (6076 feet)
Nun Buoy: A red or red-striped buoy of conical shape.
Outboard:
A boat designed for an engine to be mounted on the transom. Also a term that
refers to objects away from the center line or beyond the hull sides of a boat.
Pad Eye: A deck fitting consisting of a metal eye permanently secured to the boat.
Pier: A structure which projects out from the shoreline.
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Pile or Piling: A long column driven into the bottom to which a boat can be tied.
Pitching: The fore and aft rocking motion of a boat as the bow rises and falls.
Pitch: The measure of the angle of a propeller blade. Refers to the theoretical distance the boat
travels with each revolution of the propeller.
P.F.D: Personal Flotation Device.
Port: The left side of the boat when facing the bow.
Porthole (port): The opening in the side of a boat to allow the admittance of light and air.
Propeller: A device having two or more blades that is attached to the engine and used for
propelling a boat.
Propeller Shaft: Shaft which runs from the back of the engine gear box, aft, through the stuffing
box, shaft log, struts, and onto which the propeller is attached.
Pyrotechnic Distress Signals: Distress signals that resemble the brilliant display of flares or
fireworks.
Raw Water Cooled: Refers to an engine cooling system that draws sea water in through a hull
fitting or engine drive unit, circulates the water in the engine, and then discharges it overboard.
Reduction Gear: Often combined with the reverse gear so that the propeller turns at a slower
rate than the engine.
Reverse Gear: Changes the direction of rotation of the propeller to provide thrust in the opposite
direction for stopping the boat or giving it sternway.
Roll: A boat’s sideways rotational motion in rough water.
Rope Locker: A locker, usually located in the bow of a boat, used for stowing the anchor line
or chain.
Rubrail: Railing (often rubber or hard plastic) that runs along the boat’s sheer to protect the hull
when coming alongside docks, piers, or other boats.
Rudder: A moveable flat surface that is attached vertically at or near the stern for steering.
S
ea anchor: An anchor that does not touch the bottom. Provides drag to hold the bow in the
most favorable position in heavy seas.
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Scupper: An opening in the hull side or transom of the boat through which water on deck or in
the cockpit is drained overboard.
Seacock: Safety valves installed just inside the thru-hull fittings and ahead of the piping or hose
running from the fittings.
Shaft Log: Pipe through which the propeller shaft passes.
Sheer: The uppermost edge of the hull.
Sling: A strap which will hold the boat securely while being lifted, lowered, or carried.
Slip: A boat's berth between two pilings or piers.
Sole: The deck of a cockpit or interior cabin.
Spring Line: A line that leads from the bow aft or from the stern forward to prevent the boat
from moving ahead or astern.
Starboard: The right side of a boat when facing the bow.
Steerageway: Sufficient speed to keep the boat responding to the rudder or drive unit.
Stem: The vertical portion of the hull at the bow.
Stern: The rear end of a boat.
Stow: To pack away neatly.
Stringer: Longitudinal members fastened inside the hull for additional structural strength.
Strut: Mounted to the hull which supports the propeller shaft in place.
Strut Bearing: See “cutlass bearing.”
Stuffing Box: Prevents water from entering at the point where the propeller shaft passes through
the shaft log.
Superstructure: Something built above the main deck level.
Swamps: When a boat fills with water from over the side.
Swimming Ladder: Much the same as the boarding ladder except that it extends down into the
water.
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Taffrail: Rail around the rear of the cockpit.
Thru-hull: A fitting used to pass fluids (usually water) through the hull surface, either above
or below the waterline.
Topsides: The side skin of a boat between the waterline or chine and deck.
Transom: A flat stern at right angles to the keel.
Travel Lift: A machine used at boat yards to hoist boats out of and back into the water.
Trim: Refers to the boat's angle or the way it is balanced.
Trough: The area of water between the crests of waves and parallel to them.
Twin-Screw Craft: A boat with two propellers on two separate shafts.
Underway: When a boat moves through the water.
Wake: Disrupted water that a boat leaves astern as a result of its motion.
Wash: The flow of water that results from the action of the propeller or propellers.
Waterline: The plane of a boat where the surface of the water touches the hull when it is afloat
on even keel.
Watertight Bulkhead: Bulkheads secured so tightly so as not to let water pass.
Wharf: A structure generally parallel to the shore.
Working Anchor: An anchor carried on a boat for most normal uses. Refers to the anchor used
in typical anchoring situations.
Windlass: A winch used to raise and lower the anchor.
Windward: Toward the direction from which the wind is coming.
Yacht Basin: A protected facility primarily for recreational small craft.
Yaw: When a boat runs off her course to either side.
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Appendix B:
MAINTENANCE LOG
Date
Hours
Dealer
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Service/Repairs
B-1
MAINTENANCE LOG
Date
B-2
Hours
Dealer
Service/Repairs
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MAINTENANCE LOG
Date
Hours
Dealer
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Service/Repairs
B-3
MAINTENANCE LOG
Date
B-4
Hours
Dealer
Service/Repairs
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MAINTENANCE LOG
Date
Hours
Dealer
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Service/Repairs
B-5
MAINTENANCE LOG
Date
B-6
Hours
Dealer
Service/Repairs
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Appendix C:
DEPARTMENT OF
TRANSPORTATION
U.S. COAST GUARD
C.G. 1865 (REV. 1/88)
BOATING ACCIDENT REPORT
FORM APPROVED
OMB NO.211-0010
The operator/owner of a vessel used for recreational purposes is required to file a report in writing whenever an accident results in: loss of life or disappearance from a
vessel, or an injury which requires medical treatment beyond first aid: or property damage in excess of $200 or complete loss of the vessel. Reports in death and injury cases
must be submitted within 48 hours. Reports in other cases must be submitted within 10 days. Reports must be submitted to reporting authority in the state where the
accident occurred. This form is provided to assist the operator in filing the required written report.
COMPLETE ALL BLOCKS (indicate those not applicable by “NA”)
AGE OF OPERATOR
NAME AND ADDRESS OF OPERATOR
OPERATOR’S EXPERIENCE
This type of boat
Other boat operating Exp.
[ ] Under 20 Hours
[ ] Under 20 Hours
[ ] 20 to 100 Hours
[ ] 20 to 100 Hours
[ ] 100 to 500 Hours
[ ] 100 to 500 Hours
[ ] Over 500 Hours
[ ] Over 500 Hours
DATE OF BIRTH
OPERATOR TELEPHONE NUMBER
OWNER TELEPHONE NO.
NAME AND ADDRESS OF OWNER
RENTED BOAT
[ ] YES
[ ] NO
NUMBER OF
PERSONS ON
BOARD
VESSEL NO.
(this vessel)
FORMAL INSTRUCTION IN BOATING SAFETY
[ ] None [ ] State [ ] U.S. Power Squadrons
[ ] USCG Auxiliary
[ ] American Red Cross
[ ] Other (Specify)
BOAT REGISTER. NO.
BOAT NAME
BOAT MAKE
BOAT MODEL
MFR HULL IDENTIFICATION NO.
TYPE OF BOAT
[ ] Open Motorboat
[ ] Cabin Motorboat
[ ] Auxiliary Sail
[ ] Sail (only)
[ ] Rowboat
[ ] Canoe
[ ] Other (Specify)
HULL MATERIAL
[ ] Wood
[ ] Aluminum
[ ] Steel
[ ] Fiberglass
[ ] Rubber/vinyl
[ ] Other (Specify)
ENGINE
[ ] Outboard
[ ] Inboard gasoline
[ ] Inboard diesel
[ ] Inboard-outdrive
[ ] Jet
[ ] Other (Specify)
PROPULSION
No. of engines
Horse Power (total)
Type of fuel
CONSTRUCTION
Length
Year built (boat)
Has boat had a Safety Examination? [ ] Outboard [ ] NO
For current year?
[ ] YES [ ] NO
Year
Indicate whether
[ ] USCG Auxiliary Courtesy Marine Exam
[ ] State/local examination [ ] Other
ACCIDENT DATA
TIME
am
NAME OF BODY OF WATER
pm
NEAREST CITY OR TOWN
DATE OF ACCIDENT
STATE
WEATHER
[ ] Clear
[ ] Cloudy
[ ] Fog
[ ] Rain
[ ] Snow
[ ] Hazy
WATER CONDITIONS
[ ] Calm (waves less than 6")
[ ] Choppy (waves 6" to 2')
[ ] Rough (greater than 6')
[ ] Strong Current
OPERATION AT TIME OF ACCIDENT
(Check all applicable)
[ ] Commercial Activity
[ ] Drifting
[ ] Cruising
[ ] At Anchor
[ ] Maneuvering
[ ] Tied to Dock
[ ] Approaching Dock
[ ] Fueling
[ ] Leaving Dock
[ ] Fishing
[ ] Water Skiing
[ ] Hunting
[ ] Racing
[ ] Skin Diving/
[ ] Towing
Swimming
[ ] Other (Specify)
[ ] Being Towed
Air
Water
TYPE OF ACCIDENT
(Check all applicable)
[ ] Grounding
[ ] Capsizing
[ ] Flooding
[ ] Sinking
[ ] Fire or explosion (fuel)
[ ] Fire or explosion
(Other than fuel)
[ ] Fallen Skier
[ ] Collision with Vessel
F°
F°
[ ] Collision with
Fixed Object
[ ] Collision with
Floating Object
[ ] Falls Overboard
[ ] Falls in boat
[ ] Hit by Boat or
Propeller
[ ] Other (Specify)
Was the vessel carrying NON approved
flotation devices?
[ ] Yes [ ] No
Were they accessible? [ ] Yes [ ] No
Were they used?
[ ] Yes [ ] No
If Yes, indicate kind.
Lat
Long
COUNTY
TEMPERATURE
(Estimate)
PERSONAL FLOTATION DEVICES (PFDS)
Was the boat adequately equipped with
COAST GUARD APPROVED FLOTATION
DEVICES?
[ ] Yes [ ] No
Were they accessible?
[ ] Yes [ ] No
Were they serviceable?
[ ] Yes [ ] No
Were they used by survivors? [ ] Yes [ ] No
What type? [ ] I, [ ] II, [ ] III, [ ] IV, [ ] V
Were PFD’s properly used?
[ ] Yes [ ] No
Adjusted
[ ] Yes [ ] No
Sized
[ ] Yes [ ] No
LOCATION (Give location precisely)
WIND
[ ] None
[ ] Light (0 - 6mph)
[ ] Moderate (7 - 14 mph)
[ ] Strong (15 - 25 mph)
[ ] Storm (Over 25 mph)
VISIBILITY
DAY
NIGHT
[ ] Good [ ]
[ ] Fair [ ]
[ ] Poor [ ]
WHAT IN YOUR OPINION CONTRIBUTED TO
THE ACCIDENT (Check all applicable)
[ ] Weather
[ ] Alcohol use
[ ] Excessive speed
[ ] Drug use
[ ] No Proper Lookout [ ] Fault of Hull
[ ] Restricted Vision [ ] Fault of Machinery
[ ] Overloading
[ ] Fault of Equipment
[ ] Improper Loading [ ] Hunting
[ ] Racing
[ ] Operator Inexperience
[ ] Hazardous Waters [ ] Operator Inattention
[ ] Other (Specify)
PROPERTY DAMAGE
Estimated amount
This boat $
Other boat $
Other Property $
FIRE EXTINGUISHERS
Were they used? (If yes, list
Type(s) and number used.)
[ ] Yes [ ] No [ ] NA
Types:
DESCRIBE PROPERTY DAMAGE
(specify)
NAME AND ADDRESS OF OWNER OF DAMAGED
PROPERTY
Include any comments of PFD’s under ACCIDENT DESCRIPTION on other side of form
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C-1
BOATING ACCIDENT REPORT
If more than 3 fatalities and/or injuries, attach additional form(s)
DECEASED
NAME
ADDRESS
DATE OF
BIRTH
WAS VICTIM?
[ ] Swimmer
[ ] Non Swimmer
DEATH CAUSED BY
[ ] Drowning
[ ] Other
[ ] DISAPPEARANCE
WAS PFD WORN?
[ ] Yes
[ ] No
What Type?
NAME
ADDRESS
DATE OF
BIRTH
WAS VICTIM?
[ ] Swimmer
[ ] Non Swimmer
DEATH CAUSED BY
[ ] Drowning
[ ] Other
[ ] DISAPPEARANCE
WAS PFD WORN?
[ ] Yes
[ ] No
What Type?
NAME
ADDRESS
DATE OF
BIRTH
WAS VICTIM?
[ ] Swimmer
[ ] Non Swimmer
DEATH CAUSED BY
[ ] Drowning
[ ] Other
[ ] DISAPPEARANCE
WAS PFD WORN?
[ ] Yes
[ ] No
What Type?
NAME
ADDRESS
DATE OF
BIRTH
NATURE OF INJURY
MEDICAL TREATMENT
NAME
ADDRESS
DATE OF
BIRTH
NATURE OF INJURY
MEDICAL TREATMENT
NAME
ADDRESS
DATE OF
BIRTH
NATURE OF INJURY
MEDICAL TREATMENT
INJURED
ACCIDENT DESCRIPTION
DESCRIBE WHAT HAPPENED (Sequence of events. Include Failure of Equipment. If diagram is needed, attach separately. Continue on additional sheets
if necessary. Include any information regarding the involvement of alcohol and/or drugs in causing or contributing to the accident. Include any descriptive
information about the use of PFD's.)
Name of Operator
VESSEL NO. 2 (if more than 2 vessels, attach additional form (s)
Address
Boat Number
Boat Name
Telephone Number
Name of Owner
Address
Name
Address
Telephone Number
Name
Address
Telephone Number
Name
Address
Telephone Number
WITNESSES
WITNESSES
Address
SIGNATURE
QUALIFICATION (Check One)
[ ] Operator [ ] Owner [ ] Investigator [ ] Other
Telephone Number
Date Submitted
(do not use) - FOR REPORTING AUTHORITY REVIEW (use agency date stamp)
Causes based on (check one)
[ ] This report
[ ] Investigation and this report
[ ] Investigation
[ ] Could not be determined
Primary Cause of Accident
C-2
Name of Reviewing Office
Date Received
Secondary Cause of Accident
Reviewed By
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