GLK24064-25/GLT24064 Technical Manual Revision 2.2

GLK24064-25/GLT24064 Technical Manual Revision 2.2
GLK24064-25/GLT24064
Including GLK24064-25-422, GLK24064-25-USB, GLT24064-422, and GLT24064-USB
Technical Manual
Revision 2.2
PCB Revision: 4.0 or Higher
Firmware Revision: 8.1 or Higher
Revision History
Revision
2.2
2.1
2.0
Date
March 8, 2011
January 27, 2011
November 3, 2010
Description
Updated Electrical Specifications
Filesystem Command Updates for Firmware Revision 8.1
Initial Release
Author
Clark
Clark
Clark
2
Contents
1 Introduction ............................................................................................................................................... 1
2 Quick Connect Guide.................................................................................................................................. 2
2.1 Available Headers ............................................................................................................................... 2
2.2 Standard Module ................................................................................................................................ 3
Recommended Parts ............................................................................................................................. 3
2.3 Serial Connections............................................................................................................................... 3
I2C Connections ..................................................................................................................................... 4
2.4 USB Module ........................................................................................................................................ 5
Recommended Parts ............................................................................................................................. 5
USB Connections ................................................................................................................................... 5
2.5 RS422 Module ..................................................................................................................................... 6
RS422 Connections ............................................................................................................................... 6
3 Software ..................................................................................................................................................... 7
3.1 MOGD# ............................................................................................................................................... 7
3.1 Firmware Upgrade .............................................................................................................................. 8
3.2 Application Notes................................................................................................................................ 8
4 Hardware.................................................................................................................................................... 9
4.1 Standard Model .................................................................................................................................. 9
Extended Communication/Power Header ............................................................................................ 9
Serial DB9 Connector ............................................................................................................................ 9
Power Through DB9 Jumper ............................................................................................................... 10
Alternate Serial Header ....................................................................................................................... 10
Protocol Select Jumpers ...................................................................................................................... 10
Hardware Lock .................................................................................................................................... 10
4.2 USB Model......................................................................................................................................... 11
Mini USB Connector ............................................................................................................................ 11
Alternate USB Header ......................................................................................................................... 11
Alternate Power Connector ................................................................................................................ 11
4.3 RS422 Model ..................................................................................................................................... 12
RS422 Header ...................................................................................................................................... 12
Alternate Power Connector ................................................................................................................ 12
4.4 GLK Model ......................................................................................................................................... 13
Keypad Header .................................................................................................................................... 13
4.5 GLT Model ......................................................................................................................................... 14
Touch Screen ....................................................................................................................................... 14
Coordinate Mode ................................................................................................................................ 14
Region Mode ....................................................................................................................................... 14
4.6 Common Features ............................................................................................................................. 15
General Purpose Outputs ................................................................................................................... 15
Dallas One-Wire Connector ................................................................................................................ 15
5 Troubleshooting ....................................................................................................................................... 16
5.1 Power ................................................................................................................................................ 16
5.2 Display ............................................................................................................................................... 16
5.3 Communication ................................................................................................................................. 17
5.4 Manual Override ............................................................................................................................... 17
6 Commands ............................................................................................................................................... 18
6.1 Communications ............................................................................................................................... 18
6.2 Text.................................................................................................................................................... 20
6.3 Fonts.................................................................................................................................................. 21
Font File Creation ................................................................................................................................ 22
6.4 Bitmaps ............................................................................................................................................. 23
Bitmap File Creation............................................................................................................................ 24
6.5 Drawing ............................................................................................................................................. 25
6.6 General Purpose Output ................................................................................................................... 27
6.7 Dallas One-Wire ................................................................................................................................ 28
6.8 Piezo Buzzer ...................................................................................................................................... 28
6.9 Keypad............................................................................................................................................... 29
6.10 Touchpad ........................................................................................................................................ 30
6.11 Display Functions ............................................................................................................................ 32
6.12 Filesystem ....................................................................................................................................... 33
File Upload Protocol............................................................................................................................ 35
XModem Upload Protocol .................................................................................................................. 36
4
6.13 Data Security ................................................................................................................................... 37
6.14 Miscellaneous ................................................................................................................................. 38
7 Appendix .................................................................................................................................................. 39
7.1 Command Summary ......................................................................................................................... 39
7.2 Environmental Specifications............................................................................................................ 42
7.3 Electrical Tolerances ......................................................................................................................... 42
7.4 Optical Characteristics ...................................................................................................................... 42
7.5 Dimensional Drawings ...................................................................................................................... 43
8 Ordering ................................................................................................................................................... 45
8.1 Part Numbering Scheme ................................................................................................................... 45
8.2 Options .............................................................................................................................................. 45
8.3 Accessories ........................................................................................................................................ 46
9 Definitions ................................................................................................................................................ 48
10 Contact ................................................................................................................................................... 48
1 Introduction
Figure 1: GLK24064-25/GLT24064 Display
The GLK24064-25/GLT24064 is an intelligent graphic liquid crystal display engineered to quickly and
easily add an elegant creativity to any application. In addition to the RS232, TTL and I2C protocols
available in the standard model, USB and RS422 communication models allow the GLK2406425/GLT24064 to be connected to a wide variety of host controllers. Communication speeds of up to
115.2kbps for serial protocols and 100kbps for I2C ensure lightning fast text and graphic display.
The simple command structure permits easy software control of many settings including backlight
brightness, screen contrast, and baud rate. On board memory provides thirty-two kilobytes of
customizable fonts and bitmaps to enhance the graphical user experience.
User input on the GLK24064-25 is available through a five by five matrix style keypad or a resistive touch
overlay on the GLT24064. Six general purpose outputs provide simple switchable five volt sources on
each model. In addition, a versatile Dallas One-Wire header provides a communication interface for up
to thirty-two devices.
The versatile GLK24064-25/GLT24064, with all the features mentioned above, is available in a variety of
colour, voltage, and temperature options to suit almost any application.
1
2 Quick Connect Guide
2.1 Available Headers
Figure 2: GLK24064-25/GLT24064 Header Locations
Table 1: List of Available Headers
#
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
Header
RS422 Terminal Block
Extended Communication/Power Connector
Alternate Power Connector
Mini USB Connector
GPO Header
DB9 Serial Header
Keypad/Touchpad
Mate
16-30 AWG Wire
ESCCPC5V/BBC
PCS
EXTMUSB3FT/INTMUSB3FT
None Offered
CSS1FT/CSS4FT
KPP4x4/Touch Panel
Population
422 Model Only
Standard Model Only
422 and USB Models Only
USB Model Only
All Models
Standard Model Only
GLK/GLT Model Only
2
2.2 Standard Module
The standard version of the GLK24064-25/GLT24064 allows for user configuration of three common
communication protocols. First, the unit can communicate using serial protocol at either RS323 or TTL
voltage levels. Second, it can communicate using the Inter-Integrated Circuit connect, or I2C protocol.
Connections for each protocol can be accessed through the four pin Communication/Power Header as
outlined in the Serial Connections and I2C Connections sections below.
Recommended Parts
The most common cable choice for any standard Matrix Orbital
display, the Extended Communication/ Power Cable offers a simple
connection to the unit with familiar interfaces. DB9 and floppy power
headers provide all necessary input to drive your display.
Figure 3: Extended Communication/Power
Cable (ESCCPC5V)
For a more flexible interface to the GLK24064-25/GLT24064, a
Breadboard Cable may be used. This provides a simple four wire
connection that is popular among developers for its ease of use in a
breadboard environment.
Figure 4: Breadboard Cable (BBC)
2.3 Serial Connections
Serial protocol provides a classic connection to the GLK24064-25/GLT24064. The Extended
Communication/Power Cable is most commonly used for this set up as it provides connections for DB9
serial and floppy power cables. To place your board in Serial mode, adhere to the steps laid out below.
1. Set the Protocol Select jumpers.
 RS232: Connect the five jumpers* in the 232 protocol box with the zero ohm jumper resistors
provided or an alternate wire or solder solution.
 TTL: Connect the four jumpers* in the TTL protocol box.
*Note: Jumpers must be removed from all protocol boxes save for the one in use.
3
2. Make the connections.
a. Connect the six pin female header of the Extended Communication/Power Cable to the
Communication/Power Header of your GLK24064-25/GLT24064.
b. Insert the male end of your serial cable to the corresponding DB9 header of the Extended
Communication/Power Cable and the mate the female connector with the desired
communication port of your computer.
c. Select an unmodified floppy cable from a PC power supply and connect it to the power header
of the Extended Communication/Power Cable.
3. Create.
 MOGD# or hyperterminal will serve to get you started, and then you can move on with your
own development. Instructions for these programs can be found below and a variety of
application notes are available at www.matrixorbital.ca/appnotes.
I2C Connections
A more advanced connection to the GLK24064-25/GLT24064 is provided by the I2C protocol setting. This
is best accomplished using a breadboard and the Breadboard Cable. Power must be supplied from your
breadboard or another external source. To dive right into your application and use the GLK2406425/GLT24064 in I2C mode, get started with the guidelines below.
1. Set the Protocol Select switches.
 I2C: Ensure that the two I2C jumpers in the corresponding protocol box are connected while all
others are open.
2. Make the connections.
a. Connect the Breadboard Cable to the Communication/Power Header on your GLK2406425/GLT24064 and plug the four leads into your breadboard. The red lead will require power,
while the black should be connected to ground, and the green and yellow should be connected
to your controller clock and data lines respectively.
b. Pull up the clock and data lines to five volts using a resistance between one and ten kilohms on
your breadboard.
3. Create.
 This time you're on your own. While there are many examples within the Matrix Orbital
AppNote section, www.matrixorbital.ca/appnotes, too many controllers and languages exist to
cover them all. If you get stuck in development, it is possible to switch over to another protocol
on the standard board, and fellow developers are always on our forums for additional support.
4
2.4 USB Module
The GLK24064-25-USB/GLT24064-USB offers a single USB protocol for easy connection to a host
computer. The simple and widely available protocol can be accessed using the on board mini B style
USB connector as outlined in the USB Connections section.
Recommended Parts
The External Mini USB cable is recommended for the GLK24064-25-USB
/GLT24064-USB display. It will connect to the mini-B style header on the
unit and provide a connection to a regular A style USB connector, commonly
found on a PC.
Figure 5: Mini USB Cable
(EXTMUSB3FT)
USB Connections
The USB connection is the quickest, easiest solution for PC development. After driver installation, the
GLK24064-25-USB/GLT24064-USB will be accessible through a virtual serial port, providing the same
result as a serial setup without the cable hassle. To connect to your GLK24064-25-USB/GLT24064-USB,
please follow the steps below.
1. Set the Protocol Select jumpers.
 USB: The GLK24064-25-USB/GLT24064-USB offers USB protocol only. Model specific hardware
prevents this unit from operating in any other protocol, and does not allow other models to
operate in the USB protocol. Protocol Select jumpers on the USB model cannot be moved.
2. Make the connections.
 Plug the mini-B header of your External Mini USB cable into your GLK24064-25-USB/GLT24064USB and the regular USB header into your computer USB jack. Additional power may be
required, especially for YG displays, and can be supplied to the Alternate Power Connector.
3. Install the drivers.
a. Download the latest drivers at www.matrixorbital.ca/drivers, and save them to a known
location.
b. When prompted, install the USB bus controller driver automatically
c. If asked, continue anyway, even though the driver is not signed
d. When the driver install is complete, your display will turn on, but communication will not yet be
possible.
e. At the second driver prompt, install the serial port driver automatically
f. Again, if asked, continue anyway
4. Create.
 Use MOGD# or hyperterminal to get started, and then move on with your own development.
Instructions for these programs can be found below and a number of application notes are
available at www.matrixorbital.ca/appnotes.
5
2.5 RS422 Module
The GLK24064-25-422/GLT24064-422 provides an industrial alternative to the standard RS232
communication protocol. Rather than single receive and transmit lines, the RS422 model uses a
differential pair for each of the receive and transmit signals to reduce degradation and increase
transmission lengths. Power can be transmitted at distance to a -VPT module or supplied from the
immediate vicinity to a regular unit. RS422 signals are available in a six pin connector as described in the
RS422 Connections section.
RS422 Connections
The GLK24064-25-422/GLT24064-422 provides a robust RS422 interface to the display line. For this
interface, a series of six wires are usually screwed into the RS422 terminal block provided. An alternate
header is also available to provide local power to a regular unit. To connect to your GLK24064-25422/GLT24064-422, adhere to the steps laid out below.
1. Set the Protocol Select jumpers.
 RS422: The GLK24064-25-422/GLT24064-422 offers only RS422 protocol and does not require
any jumper changes.
2. Make the connections.
a. Screw one wire; sized 16 to 30 on the American Wire Gauge, into each of the six terminal block
positions. When local power is supplied, a floppy cable may link to the alternate power header.
b. Connect the Vcc wire to the positive terminal of your power supply and the GND terminal to
the negative or ground lead to provide appropriate power as in Table 62.
c. Secure the A and B wires to your non-inverting and inverting output signals respectively, while
attaching the Z and Y wires to your inverting and non-inverting inputs.
3. Create.
 In a PC environment, MOGD# or hyperterminal will serve to get you started. In addition, a
variety of application notes are available online in a number of different languages to aid in the
development of a host controller. Instructions for these programs can be found below and the
simple C# example at www.matrixorbital.ca/appnotes is a great first programming reference.
6
3 Software
The multiple communication protocols available and simple command structure of the GLK2406425/GLT24064 means that a variety of applications can be used to communicate with the display. Text is
sent to the display as a character string, for example, sending the decimal value 41 will result in an 'A'
appearing on the screen. A single control character is also available. Commands are merely values
prefixed with a special command byte, 254 in decimal.
Table 2: Reserved Control Characters
10
Control Characters
Line feed / New line
Once the correct communication port is identified, the following communication settings can be applied
to communicate correctly with the GLK24064-25/GLT24064.
Table 3: Communication Settings
BPS
19200
Data Bits
8
Parity
None
Stop Bits
1
Flow Control
None
Finally, with a communication port identified and correctly setup simple text strings or even command
bytes can easily be transmitted to control your display.
3.1 MOGD#
The Matrix Orbital Graphic Display interface, MOGD#, is offered as a free download from
www.matrixorbital.ca/software/software_graphic. It provides a simple graphical interface that allows
settings, fonts, and bitmaps to be easily customised for any application.
While monotone bitmaps can easily be created in virtually any image editing program, MOGD# provides
an extensive font generation suite to stylize your display to any project design. In addition to standard
font wide modifications, character ranges can be specified by start and end values to eliminate unused
symbols, and individual glyphs can be modified with a double click. Finally, text spacing can be tailored
and a complete font library built with your Matrix Orbital graphic display.
7
Like uProject, MOGD# offers a scripting capability that provides the ability to stack, run, and save a
series of commands. The most basic function is the Send Numeric tool which is used to transmit a string
of values to the display to write text or execute a command.
Figure 6: MOGD# Command Example
Again, the clear screen command is sent to a connected display, this time using the MOGD# Send
Numeric function command style. Scripts can be run as a whole using the Play button from the toolbar
or as single commands by selecting Step; once executed it must be Reset. Before issuing commands, it is
a good idea to ensure communication with a display is successful using the autodetect button.
This program provides both a staging areas for your graphics display and a proving ground that will
prepare it for any application environment.
3.1 Firmware Upgrade
Beginning with revision 8.1, the firmware of the GLK24064-25/GLT24064 can be upgraded in the field.
Alternatively, the changes to the filesystem and subsequent commands can also be reverted by
downgrading the firmware to revision 8.0 using the same process.
All firmware revisions of the GLK24064-25/GLT24064 can be downloaded from
www.matrixorbital.ca/software/GLTSeries and installed using MOGD#.
3.2 Application Notes
Full demonstration programs and code are available for Matrix Orbital displays in the C# language from
Simple C# AppNote Pack in the Application Note section at www.matrixorbital.ca/appnotes. Difficulty
increases from beginner, with the Hello World program, to advanced, with the Dallas One-Wire
temperature reading application.
Many additional applications are available in a number of different programming languages. These
programs are meant to showcase the capability of the display and are not intended to be integrated into
a final design. For additional information regarding code, please read the On Code document also found
on the support site.
8
4 Hardware
4.1 Standard Model
Extended Communication/Power Header
Table 4: Extended Communication/Power Pinout
Figure 7: Extended Communication/Power Header
Pin
1
2
3
4
5
6
Function
Vcc
Rx (SCL)
Tx (SDA)
Gnd
RTS
CTS
The Extended Communication/Power Header provides a standard connector for interfacing to the
GLK24064-25/GLT24064. Voltage is applied through pins one and four of the four pin
Communication/Power Header. Please ensure the correct voltage input for your display by referencing
the electrical specifications in Table 62 before connecting power. Pins two and three are reserved for
serial transmission, using either the RS-232/TTL or clocking data through the I²C protocol, depending on
what has been selected by the Protocol Select Jumpers. Pins five and six can be used for serial
transmission hardware flow control, and are ignored for I²C communications. The Molex 22-04-1061
style header used can be mated to a number of connectors.
Serial DB9 Connector
Table 5: Serial DB9 Pinout
Pin
2
3
5
9
Function
Tx
Rx
Gnd
NC/Vcc*
Figure 8: Serial DB9 Connector
The GLK24064-25/GLT24064 provides a DB-9 Connector to readily interface with serial devices using
EIA232 standard signal levels. It is also possible to communicate at TTL levels of 0 to +5V by setting the
Protocol Select Jumpers to TTL. As an added feature it is also possible to apply power through pin 9 of
the DB-9 Connector in order to reduce cable clutter. A standard male DB9 header will provide the
perfect mate for this connector.
*Note: Do not apply voltage through pin 9 of the DB-9 Connector AND through the Communication/Power Header
at the same time.
9
Power Through DB9 Jumper
In order to provide power through pin 9 of the DB-9 Connector you must connect the Power Through
DB-9 Jumper labelled R42, as illustrated below. This connection can be made using a zero ohm resistor,
recommended size 0603, or a solder bridge. The GLK24064-25/GLT24064 allows all voltage models to
use the power through DB-9 option, see the specifications in Table 62 for voltage requirements.
Figure 9: Power Through DB9 Jumper
Alternate Serial Header
Some advanced applications may prefer the straight two by five pin connection offered through the
optional Alternate Serial Header. This header offers power and communication access in a simple
interface package. The Alternate Serial Header may be added to the GLK24064-25/GLT24064 Standard
model for an added charge as part of a custom order. Please Contact sales for details.
Protocol Select Jumpers
The Protocol Select Jumpers provide the means necessary to toggle the standard GLK2406425/GLT24064 model between RS-232, TTL and I²C protocols. As a default, the jumpers are set to RS-232
mode with solder jumps on the RS232 jumpers. In order to place the display module in I²C mode you
must first remove the solder jumps from the RS232 jumpers and then place them on the I2C jumpers.
The display will now be in I²C mode and have a default slave address of 80, unless changed with the
appropriate command. Similarly, in order to change the display to TTL mode, simply remove the zero
ohm resistors from the RS232 or I²C jumpers and solder them to the TTL jumpers.
Hardware Lock
The Hardware Lock allows fonts, bitmaps, and settings to be saved, unaltered by any commands. By
connecting the two pads near the memory chip, designated as R13, with a zero ohm resistor the display
will be locked. This supersedes the data lock command and cannot be circumvented by any software
means. To unlock the display and make changes simply remove the jumper.
10
4.2 USB Model
Mini USB Connector
Table 6: Mini USB Pinout
Figure 10: Mini USB Connector
Pin
1
2
3
5
Function
Vcc
DD+
Gnd
The GLK24064-25-USB/GLT24064-USB comes with a familiar Mini USB Connector to fulfill both
communication and power needs. The standard Mini-B style header can be connected to any other USB
style using the appropriate cable. Most commonly used with a PC, this connection creates a virtual com
port that offers a simple power solution with a familiar communication scheme.
Alternate USB Header
Some advanced applications may prefer the straight four pin connection offered through the Optional
Alternate USB Header. This header offers power and communication access in a simple interface
package. The Optional Alternate USB Header may be added to the GLK24064-25-USB/GLT24064-USB for
an added charge as part of a custom order. Please use the Contact section to request more information
from the friendly Matrix Orbital sales team.
Alternate Power Connector
Table 7: Alternate Power Pinout
Figure 11: Alternate Power Connector
Pin
1
2
3
4
Function
Vcc
Gnd
Gnd
NC
The Alternate Power Connector provides the ability to power the GLK24064-25-USB/GLT24064-USB
using a second cable. The Tyco 171825-4 style header is particularly useful for connecting to an
unmodified floppy power cable from a PC power supply for a simple bench power solution.
11
4.3 RS422 Model
RS422 Header
Table 8: RS422 Pinout
Pin
1
2
3
4
5
6
Function
Gnd
Rx (Y)
Inv Rx (Z)
Inv Tx (B)
Tx (A)
Vcc
Figure 12: RS422 Header
The six pin RS422 interface header of the GLK24064-25-422/GLT24064-422 offers power and ground
connections as well as two differential pair communication lines. Regular and inverted lines are
provided for both receive and transmit signals. Power is supplied locally to the regular variant while the
–VPT can receive power over a distance. The Tyco 282834-6 style header is most suited to a simple wire
connection.
Alternate Power Connector
Table 9: Alternate Power Pinout
Figure 13: Alternate Power Connector
Pin
1
2
3
4
Function
Vcc
Gnd
Gnd
NC
The Alternate Power Connector provides the ability to power the GLK24064-25-422/GLT24064-422 using
a second cable. This is particularly useful for the regular module that is to be powered locally. The Tyco
171825-4 style header will fit a floppy power cable from a PC power supply for a simple bench power
solution.
12
4.4 GLK Model
Keypad Header
Table 10: Keypad Pinout
Figure 14: Keypad Header
Pin
1
2
3
4
5
6
Function
Gnd
Row 1
Row 2
Row 3
Row 4
Row 5
Pin
7
8
9
10
11
12
Function
Column 1
Column 2
Column 3
Column 4
Column 5
Gnd/Vcc*
To facilitate user input, the GLK24064-25 provides a Keypad Interface Connector which allows a matrix
style keypad of up to twenty-five keys to be directly connected to the display module. Key presses are
generated when a short is detected between a row and a column. When a key press is generated, a
character specific to that key press is automatically sent on the Tx communication line. If the display
module is running in I²C mode, the “Auto Transmit Keypress” function may be turned off to allow the
key presses to remain in the buffer so that they may be polled. The character that is associated with
each key press may also be altered using the “Assign Key Codes” command. The straight twelve pin
header of the Keypad Interface Connector will interface to a variety of different devices including the
Matrix Orbital KPP4x4 keypad.
*Note: The Ground / +5V pin is toggled by the jumper to the right of the keypad connector. Jump pads 1 & 2 for
+5V or 2 & 3 for GND.
13
4.5 GLT Model
Touch Screen
The GLT24064 facilitates user touch input in one of two distinct ways. Coordinate mode will report
events by supplying their exact position on the screen. Region mode will report events within defined
boundaries on the screen. Both modes are outlined below.
Coordinate Mode
In coordinate mode all touch events are reported using three
single byte values. First, the type of event is transmitted,
followed by the x and y coordinates of its position. Pressure
and drag thresholds must be exceeded for an event to be
registered. A low drag threshold will result in greater tracking
accuracy but transmits much more data to the host. Care
should be taken to find balance. This mode offers a great
degree of flexibility and creativity.
Table 11: Coordinate Mode Event Prefixes
Return Value
Touch Event
1
Press
2
Release
4
Drag
Region Mode
A simpler, keypad style alternative to coordinate mode,
region mode offers only a single byte for each touch event.
Unique regions are created by specifying a position, size, and
return values. A value corresponding to a specific region is
returned when an event occurs within its bounds. Events
outside of regions result in transmission of the value 255.
Regions can be deleted individually or collectively when no
longer needed. This mode allows quick and easy set up.
Table 12: Region Mode Event Responses
Return Value
Touch Event
Key Down
Press
Key Up
Release
Key Down
Drag
255
Out of Region
14
4.6 Common Features
General Purpose Outputs
Table 13: GPO Pinout
Figure 15: GPO Header
Pin
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
Function
GPO 1
GPO 2
GPO 3
GPO 4
GPO 5
GPO 6
Vcc
Pin
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
Function
Gnd
Gnd
Gnd
Gnd
Gnd
Gnd
Gnd
A unique feature of the GLK24064-25/GLT24064 is the ability to control relays* and other external
devices using one of six General Purpose Outputs. Each can source up to 19mA of current at 4.6V when
on or sink 19mA at 0V when off. The two row, fourteen pin header can be interfaced to a number of
female connectors to provide control to any peripheral devices required.
*Note: If connecting a relay, be sure that it is fully clamped using a diode and capacitor in order to absorb any
electro-motive force (EMF) which will be generated.
Dallas One-Wire Connector
Table 14: Dallas One-Wire Pinout
Figure 16: Dallas One-Wire Connector
Pin
1
2
3
Function
Vcc
D
Gnd
In addition to the six general purpose outputs the GLK24064-25/GLT24064 offers an Optional Dallas
One-Wire bridge, to allow for an additional thirty two one-wire devices to be connected to the display.
This header can be populated with a Tyco 173979 connector at an added cost by custom order only.
Please use the Contact section to request more information from the Matrix Orbital sales team.
15
5 Troubleshooting
5.1 Power
In order for your Matrix Orbital display to function correctly, it must be supplied with the appropriate
power. If the power LED near the top right corner of the board is not illuminated, power is not applied
correctly. Try following the tips below.




First, check the power cable which you are using for continuity. If you don't have an ohm meter,
try using a different power cable, if this does not help try using a different power supply.
If power is applied through the DB9 connector, ensure that the Power Through DB9 Jumper is
connected.
If changes have been made to the protocol select block, ensure all the appropriate protocol
select jumpers are connected and all unused protocol jumpers are disconnected.
The last step will be to check the interface connector in use on your display. If the power
connections have become loose, or you are unable to resolve the issue, please Contact Matrix
Orbital for more information.
5.2 Display
If your display is powered successfully, the Matrix Orbital logo, or user created screen should display on
start up. If this is not the case, check out these tips.


Ensure the contrast is not too high or too low. This can result in a darkened or blank screen
respectively. See the Manual Override section to reset to default.
Make sure that the start screen is not blank. It is possible to overwrite the Matrix Orbital logo
start screen, if this happens the screen may be blank. Try writing to the display to ensure it is
functional, after checking the contrast above.
16
5.3 Communication
When communication of either text or commands is interrupted, try the steps below.








First, check the communication cable for continuity. If you don't have an ohm meter, try using a
different communication cable. If you are using a PC try using a different Com Port.
Next, please ensure that the display module is set to communicate on the protocol that you are
using, by checking the Protocol Select Jumpers.
In serial protocol, ensure that the host system and display module are both communicating on
the same baud rate. The default baud rate for the display module is 19200 bps.
Match Rx from the GLK24064-25/GLT24064 to the transmitting pin from your host and the Tx
pin to the receiving pin.
If you are communicating to the display via I²C* please ensure that the data is being sent to the
correct address. The default slave address for the display module is 80.
In I2C mode, connect Rx to the clock line of your controller and Tx to the data output.
Unlock the display. See the Set and Save Data Lock command for more info.
Finally, you may reset the display to its default settings using the Manual Override procedure.
*Note: I²C communication will always require pull up resistors on SCL and SDA of one to ten kilohms.
5.4 Manual Override
Should the settings of your display become altered in a way that dramatically impacts usability, the
default settings can be temporarily restored. To override the display, please follow the steps below.
1. Disconnect power from your display.
2. Place a jumper on the two manual override pins, for the GLK model these are the middle two
keypad pins, for the GLT these are the two pins near the keypad header.
3. Reconnect power to your unit, and wait for the start screen before removing the jumper. Please
note the jumper will adversely affect GLT performance if left in place during use.
4. Settings will be temporarily** overridden to the defaults listed in the Manual Override Settings
table. At this point any important settings, such as contrast, backlight, or baud rate, should not only
be set but saved so they remain when the override is removed.
Parameter
Backlight
Contrast
Baud Rate
2
I C Address
Value
255
128
19200
80
Table 15: Manual Override Settings
**Note: The display module will revert back to the old settings once turned off, unless desired settings are saved.
17
6 Commands
6.1 Communications
1.1 Changing the I2C
Slave Address
Dec
254 51
Hex
FE 33
ASCII
■3
Immediately changes the I2C write address.
the read address. Default is 80.
Address 1 byte, even value
Address
Address
Address
Only even values are permitted as the next odd address will become
1.2 Changing the
Baud Rate
Dec
254 57 Speed
Hex
FE 39
Speed
ASCII
■9
Speed
Immediately changes the baud rate. Not available in I2C. Baud rate can be temporarily forced to 19200 by a
manual override.
Speed 1 byte, valid settings shown below
Table 16: Accepted Baud Rate Values
Rate
Speed
9600
207
14400
138
19200
103
28800
68
38400
51
57600
34
76800
25
115200
16
1.3 Transmission Dec
254 160 Protocol
Protocol Select
Hex
FE A0
Protocol
Selects the protocol used for data transmission from the display. Data transmission to the display is not affected.
Must be set to the protocol in use to receive data correctly.
Protocol 1 byte, 1 for Serial (RS232/RS422/TTL/USB) or 0 for I2C
1.4 Turn Software
Flow Control On
Dec
254 58 Full Empty
Hex
FE 3A
Full Empty
ASCII
■:
Full Empty
Enables simple flow control. The display will return a single, Xoff, byte to the host when the display buffer is
almost full and a different, Xon, byte when the buffer is almost empty. Full value should provide enough room for
the largest data packet to be received without buffer overflow. No data should be sent to the display between full
2
and empty responses to permit processing. Buffer size is 128 bytes. Not available in I C. Default off.
Full
1 byte, number of bytes remaining before buffer is completely full, 0 < Full < Empty < 128
Empty 1 byte, number of bytes remaining before buffer can be considered empty enough to accept more data
1.5 Turn Software
Flow Control Off
Dec
254 59
Hex
FE 3B
ASCII
■;
Disables flow control. Bytes sent to the display may be permitted to overflow the buffer resulting in data loss.
18
1.6 Set Software
Dec
254 60 Xon Xoff
Flow Control
Hex
FE 3C
Xon Xoff
Response
ASCII
■<
Xon Xoff
Sets the values returned for almost full and almost empty messages when in flow control mode. This command
permits the display to utilize standard flow control values of 0x11 and 0x13, note that defaults are 0xFF and 0xFE.
Xon
1 byte, value returned when display buffer is almost empty, permitting transmission to resume
Xoff
1 byte, value returned when display buffer is almost full, signaling transmission to halt
1.7 Set Hardware Dec
254 62
Level
Flow Control
Hex
FE 3E
Level
Trigger Level
ASCII
■>
Level
Sets the hardware flow control trigger level. The Clear To Send signal will be deactivated once the number of
characters in the display buffer reaches the level set; it will be reactivated once all data in the buffer is handled.
Level 1 byte, trigger level as below
Table 17: Hardware Flow Control Trigger Levels
Bytes
Level
1.8 Set Flow
Control Mode
1
0
4
1
8
2
14
3
Table 18: Flow Control Settings
Flow Control
Mode
None
0
Software
1
Hardware
2
Dec
254 63 Mode
Hex
FE 3F
Mode
ASCII
■?
Mode
Toggles flow control between hardware, software and off settings. Software and Hardware control can be further
tuned using the settings above. Default is Hardware, or 2.
Mode 1 byte, flow control setting as above
19
6.2 Text
2.1 Auto Scroll
On
Dec
254 81
Hex
FE 51
ASCII
■Q
The entire contents of screen are shifted up one line when the end of the screen is reached. Display default is on.
2.2 Auto Scroll
Off
Dec
254 82
Hex
FE 52
ASCII
■R
New text is written over the top line when the end of the screen is reached. Display default is Auto Scroll on.
2.3 Clear
Screen
Dec
254 88
Hex
FE 58
ASCII
■X
Clears the contents of the screen.
2.4 Set Cursor
Position
Dec
254 71 Column Row
Hex
FE 47
Column Row
ASCII
■G
Column Row
Sets the cursor to a specific cursor position where the next transmitted character is printed.
Column 1 byte, value between 1 and number of character columns
Row
1 byte, value between 1 and number of character rows
2.5 Set Cursor
Coordinate
Dec
254 121 X Position Y Position
Hex
FE 79
X Position Y Position
ASCII
■y
X Position Y Position
Sets the cursor to an exact pixel position where the next transmitted character is printed.
X Position 1 byte, value between 1 and screen width, represents leftmost character position
Y Position 1 byte, value between 1 and screen height, represents topmost character position
2.6 Go Home
Dec
254 72
Hex
FE 48
ASCII
■H
Returns the cursor to the top left of the screen.
20
6.3 Fonts
3.1 Upload a
Font File
Dec
254 36 ID Size Data
Hex
FE 24
ID Size Data
ASCII
■$
ID Size Data
Upload a font to a graphic display. To create a font see the Font File Creation section, for upload protocol see the
File Upload Protocol or XModem Upload Protocol entries. Default font is ID 1.
ID
2 bytes*, unique font identification number, LSB first
Size
4 bytes*, size of the entire font file, LSB first
Data variable length, font file data, see Font File Creation for example
3.2 Set the
Current Font
Dec
254 49 ID
Hex
FE 31
ID
ASCII
■1
ID
Set the font in use by specifying a unique identification number. Characters sent after the command will appear in
the font specified; previous text will not be affected. Default is 1.
ID 2 bytes*, unique font identification number
3.3 Set Font
Metrics
Dec
254 50 Line Margin Top Margin Character Spacing Line Spacing Scroll Start
Hex
FE 32
Line Margin Top Margin Character Spacing Line Spacing Scroll Start
ASCII
■2
Line Margin Top Margin Character Spacing Line Spacing Scroll Start
Set the font spacing, or metrics, used with the current font. Changes only appear in text sent after command.
Line Margin
1 byte, space between left of display and first column of text. Default 0.
Top Margin
1 byte, space between top of display area and first row of text. Default 0.
Character Spacing 1 byte, space between characters. Default 0.
Line Spacing
1 byte, space between character rows. Default 1.
Scroll Start
1 byte, point at which text scrolls up screen to display additional rows. Default height-1.
3.4 Set Box Space Dec
254 172 Switch
Mode
Hex
FE AC
Switch
Toggle box space on or off. When on, a character sized box is cleared from the screen before a character is
written. This eliminates any text or bitmap remnants behind the character. Default is on.
Switch 1 byte, 1 for on or 0 for off
*Note: To accommodate additional memory, Font and Bitmap IDs have been increased to 2 bytes and size to 4
from firmware revision 8.1 onward. Please query your display revision to ensure this command is issued correctly.
21
Font File Creation
Matrix Orbital graphic displays are capable of displaying text in a wide variety of styles customizable to
suit any project design. Font files alter the style of text and appearance of the display.
By default, a Matrix Orbital graphic display is loaded with a small filled font in slot one and a future bk bt
16 style in slot two. Both are available in the software download section at www.matrixorbital.ca. The
easiest way to create, add, or modify the fonts of any graphic display is through the MOGD# tool. This
provides a simple graphic interface that hides the more complex intricacies of the font file.
Manually created font files will have three parts: the file header, character table, and character data.
Table 19: Example Font File Header
Maximum Width
5
Character Height
7
ASCII Start Value
72
ASCII End Value
74
The font file header contains four bytes: First, the number of columns in the widest character; usually
‘w’, second, the pixel height of each character, and finally, the start and end values of the character
range. The range represents the values that must be sent to the display to trigger the characters to
appear on the screen. In the example, the decimal values corresponding to the lowercase letters ‘h’
through ‘j’ will be used resulting in the range shown.
Table 20: Example Character Table
h
i
j
MSB
0
0
0
LSB
13
18
21
Width
5
3
4
The character table contains information that allows the display to locate each individual character in a
mass of character data. Each character has three bytes; two indicating it’s offset in the character data
and one indicating its width. The offset takes into account the header and table bytes to point to the
first byte of the character data it references. The first byte of the file, maximum width, has an offset of
zero. The width byte of each character can be identical as in a fixed width font, or in our case, variable.
The character table will become clearer after analyzing the final part of the font file, character data.
Table 21: Character ‘h’
Bitmap
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
0
0
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
1
1
1
Table 22: Character ‘h’ Data
1
0
1
1
0
0
0
0
1
0
0
1
0
0
1
0
0
1
0
0
0
1
1
0
0
1
1
0
1
0
0
0
0
1
0
0
1
0
0
0
84
2D
98
C6
20
132
45
152
198
32
22
The character data is a binary graphical representation of each glyph in a font. Each character is drawn
on a grid containing as many rows as the height specified in the header and as many columns as the
width specified in the character table. Cells are drawn by writing a one in their location and cleared by
setting a value of zero. Starting at the top left, moving right, then down, eight of these cells form a
character data byte. When all cells are accounted for, zeroes may be added to the last byte to complete
it. A sample of an ‘h’ glyph is shown above. The data for the ‘i’ and ‘j’ characters will follow to complete
the custom font file displayed below.
Table 23: Example Font File
Header
Character Table
Character Data
h
i
j
h
i
j
5 7 72 74
0 13 5
0 18 3
0 21 4
132 45 152 198 32
67 36 184
16 49 25 96
6.4 Bitmaps
4.1 Upload a
Bitmap File
Dec
254 94
ID Size Data
Hex
FE 5E
ID Size Data
ASCII
■^
ID Size Data
Upload a bitmap to a graphic display. To create a bitmap see the Bitmap File Creation section, for upload protocol
see the File Upload Protocol or XModem Upload Protocol entries. Start screen is ID 1.
ID
2 bytes*, unique bitmap identification number, LSB first
Size
4 bytes*, size of the entire bitmap file, LSB first
Data variable length, bitmap file data, see Bitmap File Creation example
4.2 Draw a Bitmap
from Memory
Dec
254 98 ID X Position Y Position
Hex
FE 62
ID X Position Y Position
ASCII
■b
ID X Position Y Position
Draw a previously uploaded bitmap from memory. Top left corner must be specified for drawing.
ID
2 bytes*, unique bitmap identification number
X Position 1 byte, leftmost coordinate of bitmap
Y Position 1 byte, topmost coordinate of bitmap
*Note: To accommodate additional memory, Font and Bitmap IDs have been increased to 2 bytes and size to 4
from firmware revision 8.1 onward. Please query your display revision to ensure this command is issued correctly.
23
4.3 Draw a Bitmap
Directly
Dec
254 100 X Position Y Position Width Height Data
Hex
FE 64
X Position Y Position Width Height Data
ASCII
■d
X Position Y Position Width Height Data
Draw a bitmap directly to the graphic display without saving to memory.
X Position 1 byte, leftmost coordinate of bitmap
Y Position 1 byte, topmost coordinate of bitmap
Width
1 byte, width of bitmap
Height
1 byte, height of bitmap
Data
bitmap dependent, see Bitmap File Creation example
Bitmap File Creation
In addition to fonts, Matrix Orbital graphic displays can also hold a number of customizable bitmaps to
provide further stylistic product integration. Like font files, bitmaps files are most easily uploaded to a
display using MOGD#. However, the critical data component of the bitmap upload command is detailed
below for reference.
The bitmap data block is similar to that of a font. However, as a bitmap is only a single glyph, only a
simple two byte header is required. First, one byte representing the bitmap width is sent, then one byte
for the height. Each bitmap is merely encoded in binary fashion using a series of ones and zeroes. Again
a grid can be created using the width and height specified in the upload command, populated in the
manner above, and converted into byte values. A smiley face example is shown below to indicate the
ultimate affect of the Matrix Orbital graphic stylization ability.
Table 24: Smiley Face Bitmap
0
0
1
0
1
0
0
1
0
0
0
1
1
0
0
1
0
0
1
0
Table 25:Smiley Face Data
0 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 50 80
0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 22 34
1 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 E0 224
Table 26: Example Bitmap File
Header
Bitmap Data
54
80 34 224
24
6.5 Drawing
5.1 Set Drawing
Colour
Dec
254 99
Colour
Hex
FE 63
Colour
ASCII
■c
Colour
Change the drawing colour used for all subsequent drawing commands that do not implicitly specify colour.
Colour 1 byte, 0 for background or 1 to 255 for text colour
5.2 Draw Pixel
Dec
254 112 X Position Y Position
Hex
FE 70
X Position Y Position
ASCII
■p
X Position Y Position
Draw a single pixel on the graphic display using the current drawing colour.
X Position 1 byte, horizontal position of pixel, value between 0 and 239
Y Position 1 byte, vertical position of pixel, value between 0 and 63
5.3 Draw a
Line
Dec
254 108 X1 Position Y1 Position X2 Position Y2 Position
Hex
FE 6C
X1 Position Y1 Position X2 Position Y2 Position
ASCII
■l
X1 Position Y1 Position X2 Position Y2 Position
Draw a line connecting two termini. Lines may be rendered differently when drawn right to left versus left to right.
X1 Position 1 byte, horizontal coordinate of first terminus, value between 0 and 239
Y1 Position 1 byte, vertical coordinate of first terminus, value between 0 and 63
X2 Position 1 byte, horizontal coordinate of second terminus, value between 0 and 239
Y2 Position 1 byte, vertical coordinate of second terminus, value between 0 and 63
5.4 Continue a
Line
Dec
254 101 X Position Y Position
Hex
FE 65
X Position Y Position
ASCII
■e
X Position Y Position
Draw a line from the last point drawn to the coordinate specified using the current drawing colour.
X Position 1 byte, left coordinate of terminus, value between 0 and 239
Y Position 1 byte, top coordinate of terminus, value between 0 and 63
5.5 Draw a
Rectangle
Dec
254 114 Colour X1 Position Y1 Position X2 Position Y2 Position
Hex
FE 72
Colour X1 Position Y1 Position X2 Position Y2 Position
ASCII
■r
Colour X1 Position Y1 Position X2 Position Y2 Position
Draw a rectangular frame one pixel wide using the colour specified; current drawing colour is ignored.
Colour
1 byte, 0 for background or 1 to 255 for text colour
X1 Position 1 byte, leftmost coordinate, value between 0 and 239
Y1 Position 1 byte, topmost coordinate, value between 0 and 63
X2 Position 1 byte, rightmost coordinate, value between X1 and 239
Y2 Position 1 byte, bottommost coordinate, value between Y1 and 63
25
5.6 Draw a Solid
Rectangle
Dec
254 120
Colour X1 Position Y1 Position X2 Position Y2 Position
Hex
FE 78
Colour X1 Position Y1 Position X2 Position Y2 Position
ASCII
■x
Colour X1 Position Y1 Position X2 Position Y2 Position
Draw a filled rectangle using the colour specified; current drawing colour is ignored.
Colour
1 byte, 0 for background or 1to 255 for text colour
X1 Position 1 byte, leftmost coordinate, value between 0 and 239
Y1 Position 1 byte, topmost coordinate, value between 0 and 63
X2 Position 1 byte, rightmost coordinate, value between 0 and 239
Y2 Position 1 byte, bottommost coordinate, value between 0 and 63
5.7 Initialize a
Bar Graph
Dec
254 103 ID Type X1 Position Y1 Position X2 Position Y2 Position
Hex
FE 67
ID Type X1 Position Y1 Position X2 Position Y2 Position
ASCII
■g
ID Type X1 Position Y1 Position X2 Position Y2 Position
Initialize a bar graph in memory for later implementation. Graphs can be located anywhere on the screen, but
overlapping may cause distortion. Graph should be filled using the Draw Bar Graph command below.
ID
1 byte, unique bar identification number, between 0 and 15
Type
1 byte, graph style, see Table 27
X1 Position 1 byte, leftmost coordinate, value between 0 and 239
Y1 Position 1 byte, topmost coordinate, value between 0 and 63
X2 Position 1 byte, rightmost coordinate, value between 0 and 239
Y2 Position 1 byte, bottommost coordinate, value between 0 and 63
Table 27: Bar Graph Types
Type
0
1
2
3
Direction
Vertical
Horizontal
Vertical
Horizontal
Base
Bottom
Left
Top
Right
5.8 Draw a
Bar Graph
Dec
254 105 ID Value
Hex
FE 69
ID Value
ASCII
■i
ID Value
Fill in a portion of a bar graph after initialization. Any old value will be overwritten by the new. Setting a value of
zero before setting a new value will restore a graph should it become corrupted.
ID
1 byte, unique bar identification number, between 0 and 15
Value 1 byte, portion of graph to fill in pixels, will not exceed display bounds
26
5.9 Initialize a
Strip Chart
Dec
254 106 ID X1 Position Y1 Position X2 Position Y2 Position
Hex
FE 6A
ID X1 Position Y1 Position X2 Position Y2 Position
ASCII
■j
ID X1 Position Y1 Position X2 Position Y2 Position
Designate a portion of the screen for horizontal scrolling. Can be used to create scrolling graphs or marquee text.
ID
1 byte, unique chart identification number, between 0 and 6
X1 Position 1 byte, leftmost coordinate, value between 0 and 239
Y1 Position 1 byte, topmost coordinate, value between 0 and 63
X2 Position 1 byte, rightmost coordinate, must be separated from 0 by a multiple of eight
Y2 Position 1 byte, bottommost coordinate, value between 0 and 63
5.10 Shift a
Strip Chart
Dec
254 107 Direction & ID
Hex
FE 6B
Direction & ID
ASCII
■k
Direction & ID
Shift a designated strip chart area eight bits left or right. All text and fonts within the area are shifted.
Direction & ID 1 byte, MSB is direction, 0 for left or 1 for right, remaining bits indicate chart number
Table 28: Strip Chart Shift Example
Direction
0
1
ID
000 0001
000 0001
Byte
01
81
Value
1
129
Description
Shift chart 1 left
Shift chart 1 right
6.6 General Purpose Output
6.1 General Purpose
Output Off
Dec
254 86 Number
Hex
FE 56
Number
ASCII
■V
Number
Turns the specified GPO off, sinking current to an output of zero volts.
Number 1 byte, GPO to be turned off, value between 1 and 6
6.2 General Purpose
Output On
Dec
254 87 Number
Hex
FE 57
Number
ASCII
■W
Number
Turns the specified GPO on, sourcing current from an output of five volts.
Number 1 byte, GPO to be turned on, value between 1 and 6
6.3 Set Start Up
Dec
254 195 Number State
GPO State
Hex
FE C3
Number State
Sets and saves the start up state of the specified GPO in non volatile memory. Changes will be seen on start up.
Number 1 byte, GPO to be controlled, value between 1 and 6
State
1 byte, 1 for on or 0 for off
27
6.7 Dallas One-Wire
7.1 Search for a One-Wire Dec
254 200 2
Device
Hex
FE C8 02
Sends a search query to each of the up to 32 devices on the one wire bus. Any connected device will respond with
an identification packet.
Response 14 bytes, identification packet as shown below
Table 29: Dallas One-Wire Packet Information
Offset
0
2
Length
2
1
3
4
5
13
1
1
8
1
Value
9002
138
10
49
0
0
Description
Preamble
Another device packet will follow OR
Last device packet
Packet Type
Error Code (0 indicates success)
Device Address
CRC8 address check (0 indicates validity)
7.2 Dallas One-Wire
Dec
254 200 1
Flags Send Bits Receive Bits Data
Transaction
Hex
FE C8 01
Flags Send Bits Receive Bits Data
Performs a single Dallas 1-Wire transaction. Consult your device documentation for information regarding device
specific protocols. If an error is encountered, a corresponding value will be returned by the device.
Flags
1 byte, flags for transaction, see below
Send Bits
1 byte, number of bytes to be sent to the device
Receive Bits 1 byte, number of bytes expected to be received from the device
Data
Variable, data to be transmitted LSB to MSB
Table 30: Dallas One-Wire Flag Table
Bit
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
0
Flag Description
Unused
0 (Future Compatibility)
Add CRC8 to transaction
0 (Future Compatibility)
Read CRC8 from transaction
Reset Bus prior to transaction
Table 31: Dallas One-Wire Error Table
Code
0
1
2
3
Error Description
Success
Unknown Command
No Devices Found
Fatal Search Error
6.8 Piezo Buzzer
8.1 Activate Piezo Dec
254 187 Frequency Time
Buzzer
Hex
FE BB
Frequency Time
Activates a buzz of specific frequency from the onboard piezo buzzer for a specified length of time.
Frequency 2 bytes, frequency of buzz in hertz
Time
2 bytes, length of buzzer sound in milliseconds
28
6.9 Keypad
9.1 Auto Transmit
Key Presses On
Dec
254 65
Hex
FE 41
ASCII
■A
Key presses are automatically sent to the host when received by the display. Default is Auto Transmit on.
9.2 Auto Transmit
Key Presses Off
Dec
254 79
Hex
FE 4F
ASCII
■O
Key presses are held in the 10 key buffer to be polled by the host using the Poll Key Press command. Use this
mode for I2C transactions. Default is Auto Transmit on.
9.3 Poll Key
Press
Dec
254 38
Hex
FE 26
ASCII
■&
Reads the last unread key press from the 10 key display buffer. If another key is stored in the buffer the MSB will
be 1, the MSB will be 0 when the last key press is read. If there are no stored key presses a value of 0 will be
returned. Auto transmit key presses must be turned off for this command to be successful.
Response 1 byte, value of key pressed (MSB determines additional keys to be read)
9.4 Clear Key
Buffer
Dec
254 69
Hex
FE 45
ASCII
■E
Clears all key presses from the key buffer.
9.5 Set Debounce
Time
Dec
254 85 Time
Hex
FE 55
Time
ASCII
■U
Time
Sets the time between a key press and a key read by the display. Most switches will bounce when pressed; the
debounce time allows the switch to settle for an accurate read. Default is 8 representing a debounce time of
approximately 52ms.
Time 1 byte, debounce increment (debounce time = Time * 6.554ms)
9.6 Set Auto Repeat
Dec
254 126 Mode
Mode
Hex
FE 7E
Mode
Sets key press repeat mode to typematic or hold. In typematic mode if a key press is held, the key value is
transmitted immediately, then 5 times a second after a 1 second delay. In hold mode, the key down value is
transmitted once when pressed, and then the key up value is sent when the key is released. Default is typematic.
Mode 1 byte, 1 for hold mode or 0 for typematic
29
9.7 Auto Repeat Dec
254 96
Mode Off
Hex
FE 60
Turns auto repeat mode off. Default is on (typematic).
9.8 Assign Keypad
Dec
254 213 Key Down Key Up
Codes
Hex
FE D5
Key Down Key Up
Assigns the key down and key up values sent to the host when a key press is detected. A key up and key down
value must be sent for every key, a value of 255 will leave the key unaltered. Defaults are shown below.
Key Down 25 bytes, key down values
Key Up
25 bytes, key up values
Table 32: Default Key Down Values
Table 33: Default Key Up Values
Key Down
B(66) C(67) D(68)
G(71) H(72) I(73)
L(76) M(77) N(78)
Q(81) R(82) S(83)
V(86) W(87) X(88)
Key Up
c(99)
h(104)
m(109)
r(114)
w(119)
A(65)
F(70)
K(75)
P(80)
U(85)
E(69)
J(74)
O(79)
T(84)
Y(89)
a(97)
f(102)
k(107)
p(112)
u(117)
b(98)
g(103)
l(108)
q(113)
v(118)
d(100)
i(105)
n(110)
s(115)
x(120)
e(101)
j(106)
o(111)
t(116)
y(121)
6.10 Touchpad
Set Touch
Dec 254 132 ID X Position Y Position Width Height Key Down Key Up
Region
Hex
FE 84 ID X Position Y Position Width Height Key Down Key Up
Creates a region of the screen that responds when pressed and released with a defined single byte.
ID
1 byte, unique region identification number, maximum 32 regions
X Position 1 byte, leftmost coordinate, value between 0 and 239
Y Position
1 byte, topmost coordinate, value between 0 and 63
Width
1 byte, width of region, must be within screen bounds
Height
1 byte, height of region, must be within screen bounds
Key Down 1 byte, value returned when region is pressed
Key Up
1 byte, value returned when region is released
Delete a Touch
Dec 254 133 ID
Region
Hex
FE 85 ID
Deletes a previously created touch region. Events from undefined regions return the value 255 by default.
ID 1 byte, unique region identification number
30
Delete All Touch
Dec 254 134
Regions
Hex
FE 86
Deletes all previously created touch regions. Recommended for use before dividing the screen into new regions.
Set Touch
Dec 254 135 Mode
Mode
Hex
FE 87 Mode
Sets the method used to return touch events. Region mode will return a single value for events in defined areas.
Coordinate mode will return event, x position, and y position bytes for each press, drag, or release.
Mode 1 byte, touch reporting mode, 0 for region or 1 for coordinate mode. Default is coordinate.
10.1 Set Region
Dec
254 136 Mode
Reporting Mode Hex
FE 88
Mode
Defines the events transmitted in region mode. Allows only events specified to return a value to the host. Key
down values are transmitted for press and drag events, key up for release, and the value 255 for out of region.
Mode 1 byte, region reporting mode, see table below. Default reporting returns all events.
Table 34: Region Reporting Mode Byte
Byte
Event
7-4
Reserved
3
Out of Region
2
Drag
1
Release
0
Press
10.2 Set Dragging Dec
254 137 Threshold
Threshold
Hex
FE 89
Threshold
Sets the distance a press is required to travel before a drag event is reported. Precision will vary inversely to data
transmitted; care should be taken to find a suitable balance. Distance is calculated as
.
Threshold 1 byte, threshold value between 1 and 255. Default is 8.
10.3 Set Pressure Dec 254 138 Threshold
Threshold
Hex
FE 8A Threshold
Sets the pressure required to trigger a touch event.
Threshold 2 bytes, threshold value between 1 and 65535. Default is 1000.
10.4 Run Touchpad
Dec
254 139
Calibration
Hex
FE 8B
Triggers an interactive calibration of the touchpad. User will be required to touch various points on the screen
during calibration. This command is recommended for use when environmental or user conditions change to
ensure correct operation.
Response
2 bytes, command byte 254, then 21 for success or 20 for failure.
31
6.11 Display Functions
11.1 Display
On
Dec
254 66 Minutes
Hex
FE 42
Minutes
ASCII
■B
Minutes
Turns the display backlight on for a specified length of time. If an inverse display color is used this command will
essentially turn on the text.
Minutes 1 byte, number of minutes to leave backlight on, a value of 0 leaves the display on indefinitely
11.2 Display
Off
Dec
254 70
Hex
FE 46
ASCII
■F
Turns the display backlight off. If an inverse display colour is used this command will turn off the text.
11.3 Set
Dec
254 153 Brightness
Brightness Hex
FE 99
Brightness
Immediately sets the backlight brightness. If an inverse display color is used this represents the text colour
intensity instead. Default is 255.
Brightness 1 byte, brightness level from 0(Dim) to 255(Bright)
11.4 Set and Save Dec
254 152 Brightness
Brightness
Hex
FE 98
Brightness
Immediately sets and saves the backlight brightness. Although brightness can be changed using the set command,
it is reset to this saved value on start up. Default is 255.
Brightness 1 byte, brightness level from 0(Dim) to 255(Bright)
11.5 Set
Contrast
Dec
254 80 Contrast
Hex
FE 50
Contrast
ASCII
■P
Contrast
Immediately sets the contrast between background and text. If an inverse display color is used this also represents
the text brightness. Default is 128.
Contrast 1 byte, contrast level from 0(Light) to 255(Dark)
11.6 Set and Save Dec
254 145 Contrast
Contrast
Hex
FE 91
Contrast
Immediately sets and saves the contrast between background and text. Although contrast can be changed using
the set command, it is reset to this saved value on start up. Default is 128.
Contrast 1 byte, contrast level from 0(Light) to 255(Dark)
32
6.12 Filesystem
12.1 Wipe
Filesystem
Dec
254 33 89 33
Hex
FE 21 59 21
ASCII
■!Y!
Completely erase all fonts and bitmaps from a graphic display. Extended length of the command is intended to
prevent accidental execution. To ensure filesystem integrity, cycle power to the display after erasure.
12.2 Delete a Dec
254 173 Type ID
File
Hex
FE AD
Type ID
Removes a single font or bitmap file given the type and unique identification number. Cycle power after deletion.
Type 1 byte, 0 for font or 1 for bitmap
ID
2 bytes, unique identification number of font or bitmap to be deleted
12.3 Get Filesystem Dec
254 175
Space
Hex
FE AF
Returns the amount of space remaining in the display for font or bitmap uploads.
Response
4 bytes, number of bytes remaining in memory, LSB to MSB
12.4 Get Filesystem Dec
254 179
Directory
Hex
FE B3
Returns a directory to the contents of the filesystem. The total number and type of each entry will be provided.
Response
variable length, 2 bytes representing number of entries plus 8 identification bytes for each entry
Table 35: Filesystem Identification Bytes
Byte
Description
7
Size(MSB)
6
Size
5
Size
4
Size(LSB)
3
Type(4)/ID(4)
2
ID (LSB)
1
Start Page (MSB)
0
Start Page (LSB)
Table 36: Extended Byte Descriptions
Size
Type/ID
Start Page
The complete file size
First four bits designate file type, 0 for font or 1 for bitmap, remaining bits indicate ID number
Memory start page, a value of 0 indicates entry is not in use
12.5 Filesystem Dec
254 176 Size Data
Upload
Hex
FE B0
Size Data
This command will upload a filesystem image to the display. The size used is almost always the entire memory.
Filesystem data can be uploaded LSB to MSB in the same manner as a font or bitmap file.
Size
4 bytes, size of the filesystem to upload, LSB to MSB
Data variable length, data to upload
33
12.6 Download Dec
254 178 Type ID
a File
Hex
FE B2
Type ID
Downloads a single font or bitmap file from the display to the host.
Type
1 byte, 0 for font or 1 for bitmap
ID
2 bytes, unique identification number of font or bitmap to download
Response
variable length, first 4 bytes represent file size followed by file data
12.7 Move Dec
254 180 Old Type Old ID New Type New ID
a File
Hex
FE B4
Old Type Old ID New Type New ID
Used to move a single file and/or alter the type of an existing file. Old ID location must be valid and new ID empty.
Old Type
1 byte, original file type, 0 for font or 1 for bitmap
Old ID
2 bytes, original unique file identification number
New Type 1 byte, new file type, 0 for font or 1 for bitmap
New ID
2 bytes, new unique file identification number
12.8 Dump the
Filesystem
Dec
254 48
Hex
FE 30
ASCII
■0
Downloads complete filesystem containing all fonts and bitmaps stored in the display. A veritable heap of data.
Response
4 bytes of size LSB to MSB followed by entire filesystem
34
File Upload Protocol
Once a bitmap or font file has been created and paired to its command it must be sent using a file
protocol developed specifically for Matrix Orbital displays. Once a file upload command has been sent
requesting a unique reference number and specifying the file size required, the display will respond
indicating whether it has enough room to save the file or not. As is the case throughout the upload
protocol, a response of 1 will indicate confirmation while an 8 corresponds to rejection and will
terminate the session.
Table 37: Upload Protocol Responses
Value
1
8
Action
Confirm
Decline
Description
Transfer successful, upload continues
Transfer failed, abort upload
Once a file is confirmed to fit within the display, the upload will begin. A protocol is used here to ensure
each byte is uploaded successfully. After each byte is sent, the module will echo it back to the host. It
should then be checked against the value originally sent before a confirmation byte of 1 is returned. If
the transmitted and echoed values do not match the upload should be aborted by sending a value of 8
instead. The upload will continue in this manner as indicated by the examples below which utilize
familiar font and bitmap files.
Table 38: Font Upload Protocol
Host
254
36
1
0
31
0
0
0
Display
1
5
5
1
...
96
...
96
1
Comments
Command Prefix
Upload Font File Command
Reference ID LSB
Reference ID MSB
Font File Size LSB
Font File Size
Font File Size
Font File MSB
Size Confirmation
First Font Data Byte
Echo Data Byte
Confirm Data Byte
...
Last Font Data Byte
Echo Data Byte
Confirm Data Byte
Table 39: Bitmap Upload Protocol
Host
254
94
1
0
5
0
0
0
Display
1
5
5
1
...
224
...
224
1
Comments
Command Prefix
Upload Bitmap File Command
Reference ID LSB
Reference ID MSB
Bitmap File Size LSB
Bitmap File Size
Bitmap File Size
Bitmap File MSB
Size Confirmation
First Bitmap Data Byte
Echo Data Byte
Confirm Data Byte
...
Last Bitmap Data Byte
Echo Data Byte
Confirm Data Byte
It should be noted that the display has a timeout setting of 2.1 seconds before it resets to prevent it
from hanging during the upload process. Upon reset, the values 254 and 212 will be returned to
indicate an error or lengthy delay has occurred in the upload process. If everything goes smoothly, the
protocol will end with the host transmitting a final confirmation byte and the font will be stored in the
display ready for any application.
35
XModem Upload Protocol
In addition to its original simple upload format, Matrix Orbital has added an XModem based protocol.
This facilitates much faster download speeds by increasing the packet size from 1 byte to 128 bytes
greatly increasing throughput. Though a protocol similar to the original upload scheme is used, a two
byte CRC check is preformed at the end of each packet in place of the byte echo system. To begin the
upload, a series of command bytes are sent, much however, no distinction is made between bitmap and
font as the XModem protocol is used to upload bin or ebin files that contain all the bitmaps and fonts
required for the unit. Once the command bytes are sent, the size of the file is sent in two bytes, least
significant byte first. Then two additional bytes are sent of the value zero. At this point the display will
respond with an ACK if the file fits or a NAK otherwise. Please note that these values are different than
those of the original protocol as seen in the table below. If a NAK is seen at any point by the host, the
upload is to be aborted in the same fashion as the regular protocol. If the file will fit, the start of header
byte will be sent by the host, followed by a block count, in regular and inverted format, representing the
number of 128 byte blocks remaining to. The display will then check to make sure the block count value
matches its own before ACKing. The host can then send a 128 byte block of data followed by that blocks
high and low CRC16 bytes. The display then performs a CRC check on the data receive and ACKs if it
matches that which was sent. Transfer continues with a block count and continues in this way until the
end of file is reached. Once the end of the upload file is reached, the host should transmit a single end
of transmission byte. If the end of file is expected, the display will ACK one last time. This EOT byte
along with the other special characters mentioned above is listed in the table below.
Table 40: XModem Upload Protocol
Host
254
219
133
6
48
0
0
1
0
Display
6
1
128
127
6
<128 B>
30
71
…
4
6
…
6
Comments
Command Prefix
XModem Upload Command
Command Byte One
Command Byte Two
Command Byte Three
Size LSB
Size
Size
Size MSB
ACK (NAK if file is too big)
Start of Header
Block Count
Inverted Block Count (255-Count)
ACK (NAK if counts don’t match)
128 Byte Data Block
CRC MSB
CRC LSB
ACK (NAK if CRCs don’t match)
…
End of Transmission
ACK (NAK if EOT is not expected)
Table 41: XModem Protocol Message Bytes
Value
Action
6
Acknowledged
33
1
4
Not
Acknowledged
Start of Header
End of
Transmission
Description
Transfer successful,
upload continues
Transfer failed,
upload aborted
Begin upload transfer
End completed
upload transfer
36
6.13 Data Security
13.1 Set
Dec
254 147 Switch
Remember Hex
FE 93
Switch
Allows changes to specific settings to be saved to the display memory. Writing to non-volatile memory can be slow
and each change consumes 1 write of at least 100,000 available. The Command Summary outlines which
commands are saved always, never, and when this command is on only. Remember is off by default.
Switch 1 byte, 1 for on or 0 for off
13.2 Set Data Dec
254 202 245 160
Level
Lock
Hex
FE CA F5 A0
Level
Temporarily locks certain aspects of the display to ensure no inadvertent changes are made. The lock is released
after a power cycle. A new level overrides the old, and levels can be combined. Default is 0.
Level 1 byte, each bit representing a level, see Table 42
Table 42: Data Lock Bits
Display
7
Command
6
Filesystem
5
Setting
4
Address
3
Reserved
2
Reserved
1
Reserved
0
Table 43: Lock Parameters
Reserved
Address
Setting
Filesystem
Command
Display
Place holders only, should be 0
Locks the Baud Rate and I2C address
Locks all settings from being saved
Locks all bitmaps and fonts
Locks all commands, text can still be written
Locks entire display, no new text can be displayed
13.3 Set and Save
Dec
254 203 245 160
Level
Data Lock
Hex
FE CB F5 A0
Level
Locks certain aspects of the display to ensure no inadvertent changes are made. The lock is not affected by a
power cycle. A new level overrides the old, and levels can be combined. Default is 0.
Level 1 byte, see data lock table
37
6.14 Miscellaneous
14.1 Write
Customer Data
Dec
254 52 Data
Hex
FE 34
Data
ASCII
■4
Data
Saves a user defined block of data to non-volatile memory. Useful for storing display information for later use.
Data 16 bytes, user defined data
14.2 Read
Customer Data
Dec
254 53
Hex
FE 35
ASCII
■5
Reads data previously written to non-volatile memory. Data is only changed when written, surviving power cycles.
Response
16 bytes, previously saved user defined data
14.3 Read Version
Number
Dec
254 54
Hex
FE 36
ASCII
■6
Causes display to respond with its firmware version number.
Response
1 byte, convert to hexadecimal to view major and minor revision numbers
14.4 Read
Module Type
Dec
254 55
Hex
FE 37
ASCII
■7
Causes display to respond with its module number.
Response 1 byte, module number, see partial list below
Table 44: Sample Module Type Responses
21
107
109
GLK24064-25
GLK24064-25-USB
GLK24064-25-422
105
106
110
GLT24064
GLT24064-USB
GLT24064-422
14.5 Read Screen
Dec
254 184
Hex
FE B8
Return the current commanded state of each pixel on the screen.
Response 1920 bytes, 30 bytes per display row, 64 rows of data representing the Boolean value of each pixel
38
7 Appendix
7.1 Command Summary
Available commands below include identifying number, required parameters, the returned response and
an indication of whether settings are remembered always, never, or with remember set to on.
Table 45: Communication Command Summary
Name
Changing the I2C Slave Address
Changing the Baud Rate
Transmission Protocol Select
Turn Software Flow Control On
Turn Software Flow Control Off
Set Software Flow Control Response
Set Hardware Flow Control Trigger Level
Set Flow Control Mode
Dec
51
57
160
58
59
60
62
63
Hex
33
39
A0
3A
3B
3C
3E
3F
ASCII
3
9
á
:
;
<
>
?
Parameters
Address
BaudRate
Protocol
Full, Empty
None
Xon, Xoff
Level
Mode
Response
None
None
None
None
None
None
None
None
Remembered
Always
Always
Remember On
Remember On
Remember On
Remember On
Remember On
Remember On
Table 46: Text Command Summary
Name
Auto Scroll On
Auto Scroll Off
Clear Screen
Set Cursor Position
Set Cursor Coordinate
Go Home
Dec
81
82
88
71
121
72
Hex
51
52
58
47
79
48
ASCII
Q
R
X
G
y
H
Parameters
None
None
None
Col, Row
X, Y
None
Response
None
None
None
None
None
None
Remembered
Remember On
Remember On
Never
Never
Never
Never
Table 47: Font Command Summary
Name
Dec
Hex
ASCII
Parameters
Response
See Font File
Creation
Remembered
Upload a Font File
36
24
$
ID [2], Size [4], Data []
Set the Current
Font
49
31
1
ID [2]
None
Remember On
Set Font Metrics
50
32
2
LineMargin, TopMargin,
CharSpace, LineSpace, ScrollStart
None
Remember On
Set Box Space
Mode
172
AC
¼
Switch
None
Remember On
Always
Table 48: Bitmap Command Summary
Name
Dec
Hex
ASCII
Parameters
Upload a Bitmap File
94
5E
^
ID [2], Size [4], Data []
Draw a Bitmap from
Memory
98
62
b
Draw a Bitmap Directly
100
64
d
39
Response
See Bitmap File
Creation
Remembered
ID [2], X, Y
None
Never
X, Y, Width, Height,
Data []
None
Never
Always
Table 49: Drawing Command Summary
Name
Set Drawing Colour
Draw Pixel
Draw a Line
Continue a Line
Draw a Rectangle
Draw a Solid Rectangle
Initialize a Bar Graph
Draw a Bar Graph
Initialize a Strip Chart
Shift a Strip Chart
Dec
99
112
108
101
114
120
103
105
106
107
Hex
63
70
6C
65
72
78
67
69
6A
6B
ASCII
c
p
l
e
r
x
g
i
j
k
Parameters
Colour
X, Y
X1, Y1, X2, Y2
X, Y
Colour, X1, Y1, X2, Y2
Colour, X1, Y1, X2, Y2
ID, Type, X1, Y1, X2, Y2
ID, Value
ID, X1, Y1, X2, Y2
DirectionID
Response
None
None
None
None
None
None
None
None
None
None
Remembered
Remember On
Never
Never
Never
Never
Never
Remember On
Never
Remember On
Never
Table 50: General Purpose Output Command Summary
Name
General Purpose Output Off
General Purpose Output On
Set Start Up GPO State
Dec
86
87
195
Hex
56
57
C3
ASCII
V
W
├
Parameters
Number
Number
Number, State
Response
None
None
None
Remembered
Never
Never
Always
Table 51: Dallas One-Wire Command Summary
Name
Search for a One-Wire Device
Dallas One-Wire Transaction
Dec
200, 2
200, 1
Hex
C8, 02
C8, 01
ASCII
╚, ☻
╚, ☺
Parameters
None
Flags, Send, Receive, Data []
Response
Data [14]
Data []
Remembered
Never
Never
Table 52: Piezo Buzzer Command Summary
Name
Activate Piezo Buzzer
Dec
187
Hex
BB
ASCII
»
Parameters
Frequency [2], Time [2]
Response
None
Remembered
Never
Table 53: Keypad Command Summary
Name
Auto Transmit Key Presses On
Auto Transmit Key Presses Off
Poll Key Press
Clear Key Buffer
Set Debounce Time
Set Auto Repeat Mode
Auto Repeat Mode Off
Assign Keypad Codes
Dec
65
79
38
69
85
126
96
213
Hex
41
4F
26
45
55
7E
60
D5
ASCII
A
O
&
E
U
~
`
╒
Parameters
None
None
None
None
Time
Mode
None
KeyUp [25], KeyDown [25]
Response
None
None
KeyPress
None
None
None
None
None
Remembered
Remember On
Remember On
Never
Never
Remember On
Remember On
Remember On
Always
40
Table 54: Touchpad Command Summary
Name
Dec
Hex
ASCII
Set Touch Region
132
84
ä
Delete a Touch Region
Delete All Touch Regions
Set Touch Mode
Set Region Reporting Mode
Set Dragging Threshold
Set Pressure Threshold
Run Touchpad Calibration
133
134
135
136
137
138
139
85
86
87
88
89
8A
8B
à
å
ç
ê
ë
è
ï
Parameters
ID, X, Y, Width, Height,
KeyUp, KeyDown
ID
None
Mode
Mode
Threshold
Threshold
None
Response
Remembered
None
Remember On
None
None
None
None
None
None
Outcome [2]
Remember On
Remember On
Remember On
Remember On
Remember On
Remember On
Always
Table 55: Display Functions Command Summary
Name
Display On
Display Off
Set Brightness
Set and Save Brightness
Set Contrast
Set and Save Contrast
Dec
66
70
153
152
80
145
Hex
42
46
99
98
50
91
ASCII
B
F
Ö
ÿ
P
æ
Parameters
Minutes
None
Brightness
Brightness
Contrast
Contrast
Response
None
None
None
None
None
None
Remembered
Remember On
Remember On
Remember On
Always
Remember On
Always
Table 56: Filesystem Command Summary
Name
Wipe Filesystem
Delete a File
Get Filesystem Space
Get Filesystem Directory
Filesystem Upload
Download a File
Dec
33, 89, 33
173
175
179
176
178
Hex
21, 59, 21
AD
AF
B3
B0
B2
ASCII
!, Y, !
¡
»
│
°
▓
Move a File
180
B4
┤
Dump the Filesystem
48
30
0
Parameters
None
Type, ID [2]
None
None
Size [4], Data[]
Type, ID [2]
Old Type, Old ID [2],
New Type, New ID [2]
None
Response
None
None
Space [4]
Entries []
None
Data []
Remembered
Always
Always
Never
Never
Always
Never
None
Always
Size [4],
Data []
Never
Table 57: Data Security Command Summary
Name
Set Remember
Set Data Lock
Set and Save Data Lock
Dec
147
202, 245, 160
203, 245, 160
Hex
93
CA, F5, A0
CB, F5, A0
ASCII
ô
╩, ⌡, á
╦, ⌡, á
Parameters
Switch
Level
Level
Response
None
None
None
Remembered
Always
Remember On
Always
Table 58: Miscellaneous Command Summary
Name
Write Customer Data
Read Customer Data
Read Version Number
Read Module Type
Read Screen
41
Dec
52
53
54
55
184
Hex
34
35
36
37
B8
ASCII
4
5
6
7
╕
Parameters
Data [16]
None
None
None
None
Response
None
Data [16]
Version
Module
Pixels [1920]
Remembered
Always
Never
Never
Never
Never
7.2 Environmental Specifications
Table 59: Environmental Limits
Operating Temperature
Storage Temperature
Operating Relative Humidity
Standard
*Extended (-E)
0°C to +50°C
-20°C to +70°C
-10°C to +60°C
-30°C to +80°C
Maximum 90% non-condensing
*Note: The Extended Temperature option is not available for any variant of the GLT24064.
7.3 Electrical Tolerances
Current Consumption
Table 60: Current Consumption
Board
85mA
+
Backlight
55 to 440 mA
+
GPOs
20mA each maximum
Table 61: Backlight Current Draw
YG
440mA
GW & WB
55mA
Input Voltage Specifications
Table 62: Voltage Specifications
Standard**
4.75-5.25V
Extended Wide Voltage (-VPT)
9.0-35.0V
**Note: The Standard Voltage variant of the RS422 model should be powered from a local source only.
7.4 Optical Characteristics
Table 63: Display Optics
Module Size
Viewing Area
Active Area
Pixel Size
Pixel Pitch
Viewing Direction
Viewing Angle
Contrast Ratio
Backlight Half-Life
180.00 x 65.00 x 30.5
132.2 x 39.2
127.16 x 33.88
0.49 x 0.49
0.53 x 0.53
12
-30 to +30
3
50,000
mm
mm
mm
mm
mm
O’clock
°
Hours
42
7.5 Dimensional Drawings
Figure 17: Display Dimensional Drawing
43
Figure 18: Standard Model Dimensional Drawing
Figure 19: USB Model Dimensional Drawing
Figure 20: RS422 Model Dimensional Drawing
44
8 Ordering
8.1 Part Numbering Scheme
Table 64: Part Numbering Scheme
GLK
1
-24064
2
3
4
-GW
5
-VPT
6
-E
7
8.2 Options
Table 65: Display Options
#
Designator
1
Product Type
2
Display Size
3
Keypad Size
4
Protocol
5
Colour
6
Voltage
7
Temperature
Options
GLK: Graphic Liquid Crystal Display with Keypad Input
GLT: Graphic Liquid Crystal Display with Touchpad Input
24064: 240 pixel columns by 64 rows
NP: No keypad
25: 25 key maximum
NP: Standard Model
-USB: USB Only Model
-422: RS422 Only Model*
NP: Standard (Grey Text with Yellow-Green Background)
GW: Grey Text with White Background
WB: White Test with Blue Background
NP: Standard Voltage
-VPT: Wide Voltage with Efficient Switching Power Supply
NP: Standard
-E: Extended Temperature**
*Note: The RS422 model should only be powered from a local source, unless the –VPT variant is used.
**Note: The Extended Temperature option is not available for any variant of the GLT24064.
45
8.3 Accessories
Power
Table 66: Power Accessories
PCS
Standard Power Cable
Communication
Table 67: Communication Accessories
CSS4FT
4 ft. Serial Cable
EXTMUSB3FT
Mini-USB Cable
INTMUSB3FT
Internal Mini-USB Cable
ESCCPC5V
Extended Serial Communication/5V
Power Cable
BBC
Breadboard Cable
46
Peripherals
Table 68: Peripheral Accessories
47
KPP4x4
16 Button Keypad
Temperature Probe
Dallas One-Wire Temperature Probe
9 Definitions
ASCII: American standard code for information interchange used to give standardized numeric codes
to alphanumeric characters.
BPS:
Bits per second, a measure of transmission speed.
DOW: Dallas One-Wire protocol, similar to I2C, provides reduced data rates at a greater distance. One
wire carries data, while two others supply power and ground. Matrix Orbital tests non-parasitic devices
only, those that do not draw power from the data line; however, some parasitic devices may work.
FFSTN: Double film super-twisted nematic in reference to an LCD. The addition of two layers of film
between the STN display and polarizer improves contrast.
GPO:
General purpose output, used to control peripheral devices from a display.
GUI:
Graphical user interface.
Hexadecimal:
A base 16 number system utilizing symbols 0 through F to represent the values 0-15.
I2C:
Inter-integrated circuit protocol uses clock and data lines to communicate short distances at
slow speeds from a master to up to 128 addressable slave devices. A display is a slave device.
LSB:
Least significant bit or byte in a transmission, the rightmost when read.
MSB:
Most significant bit or byte in a transmission, the leftmost when read.
RS232: Recommended standard 232, a common serial protocol. A high level is -30V, a low is +30V.
RS422: Recommended standard 422, a more robust differential pair serial protocol.
SDA: Serial data line used to transfer data in I2C protocol. This open drain line should be pulled high
through a resistor. Nominal values are between 1K and 10K Ω.
SCL:
Serial clock line used to designate data bits in I2C protocol. This open drain line should be pulled
high through a resistor. Nominal values are between 1K and 10K Ω.
STN: Super-twisted nematic in reference to an LCD. In a relaxed or nematic state, crystals orientate
themselves in the same direction and pass light. In an excited state these crystals align to block light.
Super-twisted crystals move from 180 to 270 degrees between to increase contrast over TN models.
TTL:
Transistor-transistor logic applied to serial protocol. Low level is 0V while high logic is 5V.
10 Contact
Sales
Support
Online
Phone: 403.229.2737
Phone: 403.204.3750
Purchasing: www.matrixorbital.com
Email: [email protected] Email: [email protected] Support: www.matrixorbital.ca
48
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