Safety and Security on Campus R p

Safety and  Security on  Campus R p
Safety and Security on Campus
2015 Annual Security and Fire Safety Report for the University of Minnesota Duluth Campus
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Message from the Chancellor:
Safety and security at the University of Minnesota Duluth are of the utmost importance to us. Whether you
work, study, or live at UMD, the University needs your cooperation and active participation to create a safe
campus. Be alert, and if you observe a public safety problem or a possible crime, don’t hesitate to report it.
Our staff is available to serve you 24-hours a day, seven days a week. We strive to provide a safe and secure
campus environment by protecting and providing assistance for students, faculty, staff, and visitors.
Thank you for joining us as we keep our campus safe.
-Lendley C. Black, Chancellor
University of Minnesota Duluth
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Table of Contents
Message from the Chancellor………………………………………………………………………......................2
The Clery Act…………………………………………………………………………………………………....…4
University of Minnesota Duluth Police Department .........................................................................................4
UMD Police, Crime Prevention, Public Log
Crime Reporting and the University’s Response................................................................................................6
Crime Reporting, University Response to Crime Reports, Crime Statistics, U-Report, Counselor’s Confidential Reporting
Emergency Response and Notification..............................................................................................................9
Campus Crisis Emergency Response Team, Timely Warnings/Crime Alerts, Crime Alerts, Monitoring Off-Campus
Activities, Public Safety Advisories
Emergency Notification Systems........................................................................................................................11
TXT-U Emergency Notification, Tone Alert Radio, Campus Wide Emergency Alert System (CWEAS), Testing and
Evacuation Drill
Services and Resources .......................................................................................................................................14
Access to Campus Facilities, Access and Security in Residence Halls and Apartments, Campus Lighting, Emergency
Telephone Access, Parking Facilities, Escorts, Crime Prevention and Educational Programs, Violence Prevention
Education, Sex Offender Registration, Student Behavioral Management Committee, Campus Climate Response Team
University of Minnesota Duluth Policies and Procedures.................................................................................19
Student Conduct Code
University of Minnesota Policy Statement on Sexual Assault, Stalking, Dating/Relationship and Domestic
Violence............................................................................................................................................................20
Definitions, Responsibilities, Responding to Incidents of Sexual Assault, Stalking and Relationship Violence:
Administrative Procedures, Victims/ Survivors, University Employees and Students (when informed of an incident of
assault), University Offices Receiving a Report, The Discipline Process, Student Hearings, Drug and Alcohol Policy,
University of Minnesota Duluth Office of Housing and Residential Life Missing Person Policy and Procedure, Bias
Incidents and Hate Crimes, Possession or Carrying of Weapons
Definitions.........................................................................................................................................................71
Criminal Offenses, Sex Offenses, Hate Crimes, Illegal Weapons Possession, Drug Abuse Violations, Liquor Law
Violations, Other Definitions, Locations
Crime Statistics .................................................................................................................................................77
Crime Charts, Records Retention
University of Minnesota Duluth Annual Fire Safety Report ............................................................................81
Residential Life Fire Safety, Fire Safety, Student Housing Evacuation Procedures, Education, Fire Reporting, Fire
Statistics 2014 Calendar Year, Fire Log
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The Clery Act
The Jeanne Clery Disclosure of Campus Security Policy and Campus Crime Statistics Act or Clery Act (1990), is
a federal statute codified at 20 U.S.C. § 1092(f), with implementing regulations in the U.S. Code of Federal
Regulations at 34 C.F.R. 668.46.
The Clery Act requires all U.S. colleges and universities that participate in federal financial aid programs to keep
and disclose information about crime on and near their respective campuses. Compliance with the Clery Act is
monitored by the United States Department of Education.
This report is prepared and presented in compliance with Clery Act requirements.
For further information on the Clery Act:
http://uscode.house.gov/view.xhtml?req=(title:20 section:1092 edition:prelim) OR (granuleid:USC-prelimtitle20-section1092)&f=treesort&edition=prelim&num=0&jumpTo=true#substructure-location_f
University of Minnesota Duluth Police Department
UMD Police – Enforcement Authority
The University of Minnesota Duluth Police Department (UMDPD) serves the UMD campus and surrounding
area, and is responsible for safety and security at all property owned by the University of Minnesota Duluth.
UMDPD may also take enforcement action in areas not owned by the university, as it relates to the interests of
the university and its personnel. The department seeks to maintain a staff of ten full-time licensed police
officers who provide proactive patrol, crime prevention, investigative law enforcement, and emergency services.
UMDPD provides 24-hour per day coverage throughout the year.
For further information on the areas served by UMDPD please see: http://www.d.umn.edu/police/cgeog.html
Officers of the UMDPD are licensed as peace officers by the State of Minnesota Board of Peace Officers
Standards and Training. Minnesota State Statute 629.40 gives peace officers statewide arrest powers while acting
in the course and scope of employment. The department investigates all crimes that occur on UMD property. By
working closely with federal, state, and local police agencies, the department strives to provide a safe
environment for all students, staff, faculty, and visitors.
The UMDPD has mutual aid agreements with the Duluth Police Department, St. Louis County Sheriff’s Office,
Minnesota State Patrol, the Hermantown Police Department, and most other law enforcement agencies in the
Duluth area. When the department receives information about an off-campus crime that requires investigation, it
forwards the information to the proper law enforcement agency. UMDPD officers may also assist in off-campus
investigations that fall under the primary scope of the agency responsible for law enforcement in that area.
UMDPD may also enlist the aid of other law enforcement agencies in its own investigations.
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The UMDPD can be contacted via telephone through the St. Louis County 911 Emergency Communications
Center; UMD Police Department officers can be contacted directly for non-emergencies at 218-726-7000.
The UMD Police Department is located in the Darland Administration Building (DAdB), office #287, at 1049
University Dr. in Duluth, MN (55812).
The UMDPD is also staffed by a full-time Associate Administrator and a full-time Principal Office and
Administrative Specialist. UMDPD may at times employ up to two Community Service Officers and two
student employees, all on part-time basis. Community Service Officers may provide assistance to the public and
to our officers and staff in matters that do not require full police powers. Student employees may assist officers
and staff with administrative and clerical tasks.
It is the University’s policy to encourage the prompt reporting of all crimes committed on campus to the UMD
Police Department and other appropriate law enforcement agencies and to assist the victims of those crimes.
Crime Prevention
Ensuring the safety of the University community is a group effort. We all must do our part. When working,
visiting, or attending classes on campus, keep in mind the following:
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Report any suspicious persons or activities to the UMD Police Department by calling 911
immediately.
•
Do not leave valuables unattended or unsecure anywhere on-campus.
•
Do not prop open entrances to buildings.
•
Lock your work and living areas every time you leave, no matter how long you will be gone.
•
Report any maintenance problems to UMD Facilities Management.
•
Contact the UMD Police or Safewalk service for protective escorts.
•
Be mindful of your surroundings.
•
Report lost keys and access cards immediately to UMD Facilities Management.
Securing Valuables
Property theft is one of the most frequently occurring crimes on college campuses. Stolen items are rarely
returned to the owner and most thieves are not identified or arrested. However, victims may aid in recovery of
property and criminal apprehension by recording and storing serial numbers and other identifying information of
their valuables. Students, staff, faculty, and visitors are encouraged to secure all their valuables while at UMD.
Public Log
A public log of campus Clery Act offenses is available for public viewing at the UMD Police Department, located
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at 287 Darland Administration Building on the UMD campus, during University non-holiday business hours
(Monday through Friday from 8:00am to 4:30pm).
The daily crime and fire log is also available on the UMD Police Department website at:
http://www.d.umn.edu/police
The UMD Police Department does not publish names of crime victims, or identifiable information regarding
their residences, in the UMDPD Daily Crime Log.
Crime Reporting and the University’s Response
Call police immediately if you witness a crime, are a victim of one, or observe suspicious activity. You can report
a crime by calling 911. The appropriate law enforcement agency will respond.
In non-emergency (not in-progress or just-occurred) situations involving sexual assault, domestic violence,
dating/relationship violence, or stalking, UMD community members may also contact the UMD Office of
Student Conduct (Nathaniel Schultz, director; http://www.d.umn.edu/conduct/ )or the UMD Office of Human
Resources and Equal Opportunity (Melissa Honkola, director; http://www.d.umn.edu/umdhr/) for guidance
and reporting assistance.
If you witness or are a victim of a crime, write down as much accurate information as you can remember. Try to
obtain a description of the offender’s clothing, age, gender, height, weight, and voice. Also try to describe details
such as ethnicity, eye color, hair color, facial structure and distinguishing characteristics.
Try to obtain a description and license number of any vehicles involved. Note the direction of travel if the vehicle
leaves. Do not touch any items involved in the incident. Discourage others from entering the incident area unless
they do so to lend aid to injured parties.
Members of the University of Minnesota Duluth community who become aware of violation of university policy,
or the Student Conduct Code, or illegal activity, are encouraged to report the incident to their supervisor or to
the UMD Police Department. In cases of illegal activity, community members should notify UMD Police by
calling 911 immediately.
The UMD Police Department encourages anyone who is the victim or witness to any crime to promptly report
the incident to the police. Because police reports are public records under state law, the UMD Police Department
cannot hold reports of crime in confidence. Confidential reports for purposes of inclusion in the annual
disclosure of crime statistics can generally be made to other UMD campus security authorities.
Prompt reporting of criminal or suspicious activity to law enforcement is the vital first step in efforts toward
making any community safer. In the UMD community, it enables our police department to respond rapidly to
aid those in need and contain threats to safety, and to issue timely warnings to the public that could enhance the
safety of people and property.
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University Response to Crime Reports
The UMD Police Department will investigate all criminal allegations. These investigations may be done in
conjunction with law enforcement agencies that participate in mutual aid agreements with UMDPD, or any law
enforcement agency involved in the matter.
The UMD Police Department will classify reports in conjunction with the appropriate police agency according to
Minnesota state law.
Students are members of the University community and citizens of the state. As citizens, students are responsible
to the community of which they are a part, and the University neither substitutes for nor interferes with regular
legal processes.
Students are also responsible for offenses against the academic community. Therefore, an action involving the
student in a legal proceeding in civil or criminal court does not necessarily free the student of responsibility for
this conduct in a University proceeding. When a student is charged in both jurisdictions, the University will
decide on the basis of its interest and the interest of the student whether or not to proceed with its internal
review simultaneously or defer action.
The major objective of the disciplinary system at the University of Minnesota Duluth is to maintain standards of
conduct and order commensurate with the educational goals of the institution. These procedures help students
understand and accept the consequences of their behavior in relation to themselves and others. The procedures
are designed to guarantee the rights of the accused and to protect the welfare of all members of the University
community.
Crime Statistics
This brochure is published annually by the University in compliance with The Clery Act and made available to all
current and prospective students, staff, and faculty. Statistics are compiled by the University of Minnesota Duluth
Police Department in consultation with the Duluth Police Department and other area law enforcement agencies,
and a wide range of University personnel called Campus Security Authorities (CSA). Campus Security
Authorities, as defined by the Clery Act, have an obligation to report allegations of Clery Act-defined crimes to
UMDPD if they conclude the allegations were made in good faith.
The Clery Act definition of a Campus Security Authority includes faculty and staff other than police officers. A
faculty or staff member who has significant responsibility for student and campus activities, including but not
limited to student housing, student discipline, and campus judicial proceedings, is a Campus Security Authority.
The intent of including non-law enforcement personnel as Campus Security Authorities is to acknowledge that
many individuals, students in particular, may be hesitant about reporting crimes to police, but may be more
inclined to report incidents to other campus-affiliated individuals.
Examples of Campus Security Authorities who report statistics to the University of Minnesota Duluth Police
Department are the Vice Chancellor for Student Life; faculty/staff advisors to student groups; Housing &
Residential Life; Office of Student Conduct and Community Standards; Athletics; Recreational Sports and
Outdoor Programs; and Parking Services.
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UReport (confidential reporting)
Reporting incidents of misconduct (e.g., misuse of University property or equipment, violation of safety rules,
NCAA violations, misuse of University computers) by a University staff or faculty member can be difficult for
employees. The University of Minnesota has established a resource for reporting such matters in a way that is
protective of the reporter’s concerns and identity. This resource is known as UReport.
When utilizing UReport, you are not required to provide your name or other information that might identify you.
The reporting website will not track the identity of the computer you use. If you choose to remain anonymous,
the University may be limited in its investigation and response. If you do provide your name, or if your identity
becomes known during an investigation, your identity may need to be released to the person who is allegedly
responsible for the conduct. The University forbids retaliation against people who make good faith reports of
violations of law or University policy. Information you provide will be used to help determine whether there has
been a violation of law or policy.
Information may be shared with persons within the University if they have a need to know. Other persons,
organizations, or agencies may obtain access to this information if they have statutory or judicial authority to do
so.
For more information or to make a report, go to: www.ureport.umn.edu
(Note: Do not use the UReport site to report immediate threat to life or property. Reports submitted through
this service may not receive an immediate response. If you require emergency assistance, please call 911. The
UMD Police Department cannot offer confidential reporting options due to state open records laws.)
Counselor’s Confidential Reporting
Campus pastoral counselors and campus professional counselors, when acting as such, are not considered to be
Campus Security Authorities and are not required to report crimes for inclusion into the annual disclosure of
crime statistics.
The Clery Act Definitions of Counselors:
A Pastoral Counselor includes an employee of an institution, who is associated with a religious order or
denomination and is recognized by that denomination as someone who provides confidential counseling and
who is functioning within the scope of that recognition as a pastoral counselor.
A Professional Counselor includes an employee of an institution whose official responsibilities include providing
psychological counseling to members of the institution’s community and who is functioning within the scope of
his or her license or certification.
Counselors are encouraged, if and when deemed it appropriate, to inform persons being counseled of the
procedures to report crimes on a voluntary basis for investigation and inclusion into the annual crime statistics.
Crime statistics from the past three calendar years can be found later in this report. Please review this section for
the definitions used in categorizing different crimes and locations.
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Emergency Response and Notification
Campus Crisis
The Chancellor, or in his/her absence a Chancellor’s Cabinet member identified as Officer of the Day, has the
responsibility and authority to implement UMD’s Emergency Operations Plan and provide overall policy
direction of UMD resources during an emergency situation. Emergency operations include coordination of
campus and community resources to save lives, protect property, and provide for the continuity of UMD
operations. The Chief Law Enforcement Officer (or designee) and the Vice Chancellor for Student Life are lead
personnel in campus crisis response. When an emergency situation occurs that impacts the campus community,
these administrators, in consultation with the Chancellor, identify a crisis response team (typically four to six
people) to coordinate a campus crisis response. Specific team members will vary to meet the needs of the
situation at hand.
The UMD Emergency Operations Plan can be viewed at: UMD Emergency Operations Plan (pdf)
Timely Warnings/Crime Alerts
The Chancellor/Officer of the Day, in conjunction with emergency response personnel, will direct the need for
emergency communications. Except in the event of imminent threat, UMD Marketing and Public Relations and
UMD Information Technology Systems and Services (ITSS) will coordinate on the communication approach
taken.
Imminent Threat
In the event of a potential emergency or dangerous situation, confirmed by university authorities and
that poses an imminent threat to members of the UMD campus community, university authorities will
notify the campus community without unnecessary delay, taking into account the safety of the
community, the appropriate audience for the communication, and the professional judgment of the
responsible authorities, to ensure that efforts to assist victims and contain, respond to, or mitigate the
emergency are not compromised. UMD authorities will determine the content of the notification and
initiate the notification process. The situation will dictate which notification methods are used. They
include information through news media; online at the UMD home page at www.d.umn.edu; through
TXT-U (the University’s text message emergency notification system); and through e-mail; tone-alert
radios; phone and fax trees; outdoor warning system; digital signage; social media; and posted
emergency notices on the entrances and exits to buildings, and by on-scene public safety personnel.
In these cases, the Chief Law Enforcement Officer or designee has the authority to immediately take
action to activate the emergency notification system. This authorization supersedes any established
structure or chain of command relating to emergency warning and notification at the University of
Minnesota Duluth as outlined in this and other annexes of the University of Minnesota Duluth
Emergency Operations Plan.
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Non-Imminent Threat
The Chancellor/Officer of the Day, in collaboration with the Chief Law Enforcement Officer (or designee), Vice
Chancellor for Finance and Operations, Executive Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs, and Vice Chancellor
for Student Life, will confirm the event and activate the appropriate level of the emergency notification system.
Activation of the emergency notification system must be approved by University officials. If the
Chancellor/Officer of the Day is not available, delegation of authority for emergency notification will be as
follows: Executive Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs, Vice Chancellor for Finance and Operations, Vice
Chancellor for Student Life, Chief Law Enforcement Officer (or designee).
The university will, without delay, and taking into account the safety of the community, determine the content of
the notification and initiate the notification system(s), unless issuing a notification will, in the professional
judgment of responsible authorities, compromise efforts to assist a victim or to contain, respond to, or otherwise
mitigate the emergency.
The University has set responses for different emergencies that could occur on campus. These include which
notification methods will be used in an emergency and at what point during an emergency they will be activated.
These set responses allow for quick and consistent activation of the emergency notification system.
Dissemination of emergency information to the larger community (i.e.: parents/families, the Duluth community,
etc.) will take place at the discretion of the Chancellor/Officer of the Day or Emergency Response Team, as
appropriate and as time allows. The UMD Police Department will work with these entities to determine which
information is appropriate to disseminate, and when it will be disseminated. Depending on the nature of the
incident, the University could utilize such avenues as the UMD home page or local media. The top priority of
the University will be to disseminate information to those people directly affected by the emergency.
Crime Alerts
The UMD Police Department issues timely crime alerts to the campus community for crimes we are made aware
of that occur on University property or in areas near campus that are frequented by members of the University
community, and are determined to represent a serious or ongoing threat. The alerts are timely and designed to aid
in the prevention of similar occurrences.
With approval from the Chief Law Enforcement Officer or designee, alerts are forwarded to the Office of the
Vice Chancellor for Finance and Operations for distribution approval. Alerts are electronically distributed to all
UMD students, staff, and faculty via UMD email. In certain cases (most often burglary), the alerts may be
distributed to a localized area of the University if it is determined that the threat is specific to a particular area.
The alerts may include the following details (if available):
•
•
•
•
•
Description of the incident
Physical description of the suspect, including gender and race
Composite drawing of the suspect or actual photos and video footage
Apparent connection to previous incidents, if applicable
Protected class status of the victim, if there was an apparent bias motive
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•
•
•
•
Sex of the victim, if relevant
Injury sustained by the victim
Date and time the campus crime alert was released
Pertinent crime prevention tips
The alerts are posted on the UMD Police Department website and archived there for approximately one year.
Content of timely warnings will be developed and sent by the UMD Police Department, UMD Marketing and
Public Relations, and/or UMD Information Technology Systems and Services (ITSS), depending on the
situation.
Monitoring Off-Campus Activities
The UMD Office of Student Conduct and the UMD Police Department work cooperatively with the Duluth
Police Department and other area law enforcement agencies to share information about criminal activity that
occurs off-campus, but may affect members of the UMD community. This information includes that pertaining
to officially recognized UMD student organizations that may have non-campus residential sites unaffiliated with
UMD Housing. This shared information enhances the welfare and safety of our campus.
Public Safety Advisories
The UMD Police Department may also from time to time issue Public Safety Advisories to the UMD
community. Public safety advisories are issued to relay important information that will help increase community
awareness and enhance public safety. Public safety advisories may be sent to the UMD campus community via
email or posted on the UMD Police website, through cooperative efforts of UMDPD, UMD ITSS, and the
UMD Office of Marketing and Public Relations.
Confidentiality Statement
The University of Minnesota Duluth will protect the confidentiality of crime victims by withholding identifying
victim information within its communications in its continual effort to inform the campus community and aid
and prevent similar occurrences.
Emergency Notification
The University of Minnesota Duluth has a variety of communication systems available to inform the campus
community about an emergency situation. Which systems may be used is dependent upon the scope and type of
emergency.
Emergency Notification Systems
TXT-U Emergency Notification
TXT-U is the University’s emergency notification text messaging system. Students, faculty, and staff can stay
informed of critical campus safety information by registering to receive TXT-U messages. Only University of
Minnesota students, faculty, and staff can register for TXT-U. However, you can add more than one
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mobile device to an account, so parents, family, friends, or members of the greater community can have access.
TXT-U will be used infrequently, and specifically for emergency situations. To register for TXT-U, go to:
http://www.d.umn.edu/emergency/TXT-U.html
Tone Alert Radio System (TARS)
A tone alert radio is a radio that is programmed to receive emergency broadcasts directly from the UMD Police
Department. Information sent to the tone alert radios includes crimes that threaten safety, severe weather
warnings, hazardous material incidents, bomb threats, civil disturbances, or any other immediate threat to
campus. Many departments, offices, reception desks, etc., have a tone alert radio and pass information on to
others in their area when they receive a message
Campus Wide Emergency Alert System (CWEAS)
CWEAS is the University of Minnesota Duluth’s outdoor emergency notification system. The University
currently has one speaker on the Duluth campus located at its upper northwest corner near Goldfine Hall.
Blastmail for Emergency Email
UMD has developed an email system call Blastmail, which is intended to deliver a large number of messages as
quickly as possible. Updated mailing lists of all students, faculty, and staff are generated on a regular basis, so
that they will be ready to use at a moment’s notice.
UMD Facebook and Twitter
Emergency information may also be communicated on UMD Facebook and Twitter accounts.
Digital Signs
Most digital signs on campus can be updated quickly to include an emergency message.
Web Announcements
Weather-related closings and other emergencies may be announced by placing an announcement on the UMD
home page (www.d.umn.edu) or on UMD’s Emergency Closings page (http://www.d.umn.edu/closings/). In
the case of a severe emergency, where we need to reach the maximum number of people immediately the entire
UMD web site will be replaced with a single page for emergency information.
On-Scene Emergency Personnel
On-scene emergency personnel may be able to provide valuable emergency communication depending upon the
emergency situation.
The UMD Police Department and Environmental Health and Safety work with other departments at the
University to ensure that emergency evacuation and response procedures are up-to-date and effective. The
Department of Environmental Health and Safety works with each department of the University to develop and
maintain emergency procedures and guidelines for their buildings and employees. The Office of Housing and
Residential Life is responsible for developing and maintaining emergency evacuation procedures for all University
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residence halls. The UMD Police Department has procedures in place for the response to incidents such as
active shooters and bomb threats.
Testing and Evacuation Drill
The UMD Campus Emergency Response Team organizes and participates in several exercises throughout the year
to prepare for emergencies. U M D Police and Environmental Health and Safety work with other departments at
the University to ensure that emergency evacuation and response procedures are up-to-date and effective. The
Office of Environmental Health and Safety conducts announced and unannounced evacuation drills throughout
the year. Records of evacuation drills and tests are maintained in the Office of Environmental Health and Safety.
Records contain documentation for each test, a description of the exercise, the date and time of each exercise,
and whether it was announced or unannounced.
At least once a year, UMD conducts an exercise to test the emergency response and evacuation procedures of the
UMD campus. The University community will be notified of this exercise, and the notification will summarize the
emergency evacuation procedures and indicate where full versions of the procedures can be found. The Office of
Environmental Health and Safety works with each department of the University to develop and maintain
emergency procedures and guidelines for their buildings and employees. The UMD Office of Housing and
Residential Life is responsible for developing and maintaining emergency evacuation procedures for all University
residence halls. UMD has procedures in place for the response to incidents such as active shooters and bomb
threats.
“Shelter-In-Place”
In certain emergencies, such as active shooter/threat and hazardous material situations, recipients of emergency
notifications may be advised to “shelter-in-place”. Though methods of sheltering-in-place may vary by hazard, a
common practice is selection of a small interior room with no or few windows and using it to take shelter in until
the crisis has been mitigated.
For active shooter/threat situations, the U.S. Department of Homeland Security offers shelter-in-place
advisement here:
http://www.dhs.gov/xlibrary/assets/active_shooter_pocket_card.pdf
For hazardous material situations, the American Red Cross offers shelter-in-place guidance here:
http://www.redcross.org/images/MEDIA_CustomProductCatalog/m4340182_shelterinplace.pdf
Criteria for Timely Warnings and Emergency Notifications
UMD authorities will issue timely warnings or emergency notifications for incidents that will or may directly
affect UMD community members that occur on property or in facilities owned, rented, or operated by the
University of Minnesota Duluth. Timely warnings or emergency notifications will be issued within an amount of
time that best serves the interest of the safety of those affected by the situation.
UMD authorities may issue timely warnings or emergency notifications for incidents that occur near the UMD
campus or its permanent or temporarily managed properties and facilities.
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Timely warnings and emergency notifications may be issued for, but not limited to, occurrences of crimes listed
in the Clert Act.
Communication Testing:
Communication Tool
Frequency Tested
Tester
Tone Alert Radios (TARs)
Monthly (1st Wednesday)
UMD Police
st
CWEAS
Monthly (1 Wednesday)
UMD Police
Mass E-mail
Each Semester
ITSS
Text Messaging (TXT – U)
Each Semester
ITSS CLER Group
UMD Homepage
Internal (Ongoing)
UMD Marketing and Public
l i
Digital Sign Admin. Group
Digital Signs
Each Semester
Media Advisory or Press
Release
Test Not Needed
UMD Marketing and Public
Relations
Outdoor Warning Sirens
Monthly (1st Wednesday)
St. Louis County 911
Services and Resources
Access to Campus Facilities
The UMD campus is for use by the students, faculty, staff, and guests. Access is limited to normal business and
building hours. Most campus facilities are accessible during business hours, Monday through Friday, and during
limited hours on weekends.
Requests for access to facilities for events or others purposes should be directed to contacts noted in UMD
scheduling policies. UMD reserves the right to deny access to facilities and services to those people or groups
who do not meet campus guidelines and policies.
Policies and Procedures for Safe Access to Campus Buildings:
• Keys and access cards are issued only to authorized faculty, staff, students, and approved contractors.
• Exterior doors should not be propped open when the doors are locked.
• Building evacuation is mandatory for all fire alarms.
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• Individual academic buildings are normally open by 7:00am. Employees and students in buildings after normal
working hours should have University ID in possession.
• Only authorized individuals will be allowed to stay after building hours.
Access and Security in UMD Housing
UMD Housing has nine on-campus residential facilities for students.
University Housing staff receives training on security measures and emergency/crisis management. Residence hall
staff members inform residents of safety and security information via handbooks, floor meetings, and
programming in the halls. Staff members work closely with the UMD Police Department in maintaining security
in all residence halls and apartment buildings, and in resolving situations that affect the safety of residents.
Campus visitors will only be allowed in the Residence Halls when they are guests of, and accompanied by, a
resident of that building. Residents are encouraged disallow access to anyone other than their guests.
Campus Lighting
The University of Minnesota Duluth encourages notification of Facilities Management to report defective or
poor lighting, or other hazards on campus or on UMD property. Contact Facilities Management at 218-726-8262
or 218-726-8263.
Emergency Telephone Access
Campus courtesy phones are placed in public areas around the campus. Courtesy phones provide free campus
and local calling and can be used to report emergencies or to request assistance.
Parking Facilities
Parking lots are well lit and checked frequently by the UMD Police Department and Facilities Management.
Security Cameras
Many areas of the UMD campus and properties are equipped with security cameras which are monitored by the
University of Minnesota’s Department of Central Security.
Escorts
The University’s “Safewalk” walking escort service is available Sunday through Thursday non-holidays from
8:00pm to midnight. Volunteers can be reached at 218-726-6100 or in the Greek office near the Kirby Student
Center Lounge.
The UMD Police Department may also provide escorts to students, faculty, and staff from all campus locations
to other on-campus or nearby locations, circumstances permitting.
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Crime Prevention and Security Awareness Education Programs
Crime prevention and security awareness programs on personal safety and theft prevention are sponsored by
various campus organizations throughout the year.
During orientation in August, students are informed of services offered by the UMD Police Department. The
presentations outline ways to maintain personal safety and residence hall security. Students are told about crime
on campus and in surrounding neighborhoods. Similar information is available to new employees.
UMD Police Department personnel, often in conjunction with other UMD departments, facilitate programs for
students, parents, faculty, staff, resident advisors and directors, student organizations, and community
organizations. They provide a variety of educational strategies and tips on crime prevention and personal safety.
Topics such as self-defense, alcohol and drug awareness, school and workplace violence, sexual assault,
relationship/dating violence, stalking, security of residence and personal property, and internet safety may be
covered.
A common theme of all awareness and crime prevention programs is to encourage students and employees to be
aware of their responsibility for their own security and the security of others.
(See tables on pages 24-38 for crime prevention and safety education programs provided to students, faulty, and
staff for calendar year 2014.)
Sexual Offender Registration
The Campus Sex Crimes Prevention Act (CSCPA) of 2000 is a federal law that provides for the tracking of
convicted sex offenders enrolled at, or employed by, institutions of higher education. This law requires state law
enforcement agencies (in Minnesota, it is the Minnesota Bureau of Criminal Apprehension) to provide UMD
with a list of registered sex offenders who have indicated that they are enrolled, employed, or carrying on a
vocation at UMD.
UMD is required to inform the campus community that a registration list of sex offenders is available by going to
the UMD Police Department website, click on Sex Offender Locator.
Or go to: https://coms.doc.state.mn.us/Level3/
The CSCPA further amends the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act of 1974 (FERPA) to clarify that
nothing in the Act can prohibit an educational institution from disclosing information provided to the institution
concerning registered sex offenders.
The Student Behavioral Management Committee (SBMC)
Purpose
The Student Behavioral Management Committee (SBMC) is a committee that collaboratively addresses issues
related to student behavior on campus. The SBMC brings representatives from a variety of campus departments
together to develop a general sense of patterns of student behavior, to share advice and counsel, to collaborate
on dealing with concerning behavior, and to recommend strategies, policies, and procedures that proactively
16
address student behavior.
The Student Behavioral Management Committee (SBMC) reports to the UMD Vice Chancellor for Student
Life and Dean of Students, and has the following responsibilities:
•Threat Assessment
Threat assessment is defined as using a collaborative process to address situations that have the potential to be
disruptive to the UMD community, in order to facilitate maximizing safety for students and the university
community. SBMC focuses on situations as they arise from student behavior and decides the most productive
course of action to minimize impact to the community and to facilitate the most positive outcome possible
for the student acting out. Threats are generally lower level threats that affect a limited number of students.
UMD’s emergency procedures take precedence and are employed when significant threats arise.
•Recommend Strategies, Policies and Procedures
SBMC recommends strategies, policies and procedures for dealing with issues such as sexual assault, alcohol and
drug abuse, self-harm, mental health concerns, and parental notification.
Membership
The SBMC is chaired by the Vice Chancellor for Student Life and Dean of Students, and includes membership
from the following UMD offices:
•Office of Cultural Diversity
•Office of Student Life
•Office of Student Conduct
•Health Services
•Housing and Residential Life
•University of Minnesota Duluth Police Department
(Guests may be invited as needed.)
Meetings
The SBMC meets every other week throughout the year, and more frequently if situations necessitate
immediate action.
SBMC Website: h t t p : / / w w w . d . u m n . e d u / s t u d e n t - l i f e / s b m c /
If a student or community member exhibits behaviors that indicate IMMEDIATE DANGER to SELF
or SOMEONE ELSE, CALL 9-911 from a campus phone or 911 from a cell phone or other off-campus
17
phone.
If a student exhibits behaviors of concern that should be addressed, contact the SBMC through the Office of
Student Life:
UMD Office of Student Life
245 Kirby Plaza
1208 Kirby Dr.
Duluth, MN 55812
[email protected]
(218) 726-8501
Campus Climate Response Team (CCRT)
Purpose
The University of Minnesota Duluth seeks to “create a positive and inclusive campus climate for all by advancing
equity, diversity, and social justice.” The Campus Climate Response Team was created to respond to issues or
incidents that degrade or threaten the campus climate and that require a response beyond that provided by
established processes.
Function
The Campus Climate Response Team (CCRT) reports to the UMD Chancellor, and has the following
responsibilities:
•The CCRT develops and facilitates the implementation of a timely and appropriate response to a campus climate
incident.
•The CCRT evaluates and analyzes an incident; CCRT coordinates a “real time” response, involving all critical
parties and/or stakeholders.
•CCRT coordinates communication with the campus, public, media, etc. in a timely manner.
•The CCRT receives data from other processes and offices that also respond to campus climate incidents. CCRT
conducts regular reviews of the data to analyze how incidents are handled on campus and to identify trends and
patterns occurring over time.
•The CCRT provides regular reports summarizing campus climate incidents to the campus in order to ensure
transparency (see below).
•The CCRT designs and recommends strategies to improve responses to issues and incidents and addresses
outcomes of data analyses. This includes recommendations for programming, education and other proactive
approaches.
Membership
The CCRT comprises a visible, high-level core (or “front-line”) team. It includes broad representation, and
18
convenes ad hoc teams as the situation demands.
•Vice Chancellor for Student Life and Dean of Students, convener
•Executive Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs
•Vice Chancellor for Finance and Operations
•Chancellor’s Chief of Staff/Associate to the Chancellor
•Director of Human Resources and Equal Opportunity
•Director of the UMD Police Department
•Director of Marketing and Public Relations
CCRT RESPONSE PROTOCOL
Actions that undermine and damage a safe, respectful, and diverse campus climate should be reported. After a
report has been made, referrals may be made to any member of the CCRT. Upon receiving a referral, the
following steps are taken:
• The Equity and Diversity administrator will convene the CCRT (and others as appropriate) immediately.
• The CCRT will review and analyze the issue and either: 1) delegate it to an appropriate UMD office or, 2)
convene an ad hoc team based on the specifics of the incident.
• If the CCRT creates an ad hoc working group, the ad hoc group will take the following steps:
o The ad hoc group will gather information.
o The ad hoc group will identify any need for further investigation.
o The ad hoc group will assign responsibilities (including further investigation, if needed) and coordinate
actions.
o The ad hoc group will communicate with the CCRT, stakeholders, and other constituents.
o The ad hoc group will debrief and report at the conclusion of the process.
CCRT Incident Reporting link: http://www.d.umn.edu/chancellor/climate/reporting/
University of Minnesota Duluth Policies and Procedures
Additional information and copies of relevant policies and procedures are available on the UMD website at:
http://www.d.umn.edu
Student Conduct Code
The University of Minnesota Student Conduct Code is based on these guiding principles:
•
The University seeks an environment that promotes academic achievement and integrity, that is
19
protective of free inquiry, and that serves the educational mission of the University.
•
The University seeks a community that is free from violence, threats, and intimidation; that is
respectful of the rights, opportunities, and welfare of students, faculty, staff, and guests of the
University; that does not threaten guests of the University; and that does not threaten the physical or
mental health or safety of members of the University community.
•
The University is dedicated to responsible stewardship of its resources and protection of its property
and resources from theft, damage, destruction, or misuse.
•
The University supports and is guided by state and federal law while also setting its own standards of
conduct for its academic community.
•
The University is dedicated to the rational and orderly resolution of conflict.
The University-wide Student Conduct Code specifically prohibits scholastic dishonesty; disruptive classroom
conduct; falsification; refusal to identify and comply; attempts to injure or defraud; threatening, harassing, or
assaultive conduct; disorderly conduct; illegal or unauthorized possession or use of weapons; illegal or
unauthorized possession, use, or distribution of illicit drugs or alcohol; unauthorized use of University facilities
and services; theft, property damage, and vandalism; unauthorized access; disruptive behavior; hazing; rioting;
violation of University rules; and violation of federal or state law. The entire Student Conduct Code, including
Duluth proceedings, is available on Office of Student Conduct page of the UMD website.
University of Minnesota Policy Statement on Sexual Assault,
Stalking, Dating/Relationship, and Domestic Violence
The University of Minnesota Duluth does not discriminate on the basis of sex in its educational programs, and
sexual harassment and sexual violence are types of sex discrimination. Other acts can also be forms of sex-based
discrimination and are also prohibited, whether sexually-based or not, and include dating/relationship violence,
domestic violence, and stalking. Therefore, University of Minnesota Duluth issues this statement of policy to
inform the community of our comprehensive plan addressing sexual misconduct, educational programs, and
procedures that address sexual assault, domestic violence, dating/relationship violence, and stalking, whether the
incident occurs on or off campus and when it is reported to a University official. In this context, University of
Minnesota Duluth prohibits the offenses of domestic violence, dating/relationship violence, sexual assault, and
stalking, and reaffirms its commitment to maintain a campus environment emphasizing the dignity and worth of
all members of the university community.
No one acting on behalf of the University may retaliate against an individual for having made a report in good
faith under this policy or having participated in an investigation of a sexual assault. Any individual employee who
engages in retaliation may be subject to disciplinary action up to and including termination of employment.
Reports of retaliation will be reviewed and investigated in the same manner in which other allegations of
misconduct are handled. This provision aligns with Board of Regents Policy: Code of Conduct.
20
For a complete copy of University of Minnesota’s policy governing sexual assault, stalking, domestic violence,
and relationship/dating violence, visit
http://www.policy.umn.edu/Policies/Operations/Safety/SEXUALASSAULT.html.
A. Definitions
There are numerous terms used by the University of Minnesota Duluth in its policies and procedures.
Consent: Consent is defined in Minnesota State Statute 609.341 Subdivision 4:
(a) "Consent" means words or overt actions by a person indicating a freely given present agreement to perform a
particular sexual act with the actor. Consent does not mean the existence of a prior or current social relationship
between the actor and the complainant or that the complainant failed to resist a particular sexual act.
(b) A person who is mentally incapacitated or physically helpless as defined by this section cannot consent to a
sexual act.
(c) Corroboration of the victim's testimony is not required to show lack of consent.
Affirmative Consent: The University of Minnesota defines Affirmative Consent as informed, freely and
affirmatively communicated willingness to participate in sexual activity that is expressed by clear and
unambiguous words or actions. This definition does not vary based upon a person’s sex, sexual orientation,
gender identity, or gender expression. Further information on Affirmative Consent can be found at:
https://policy.umn.edu/operations/sexualassault-appa
Sexual Assault: Sexual Assault means an offense that meets the definition of rape, fondling, incest, or statutory
rape as used in the FBI’s Uniform Crime Reporting system. A sex offense is any act directed against another
person, without the consent of the victim, including instances where the victim if incapable of giving consent.
Rape: Rape is defined as the penetration, no matter how slight, of the vagina or anus with any body part or
object, or oral penetration by a sex organ of another person, without the consent of the victim.
Fondling: Fondling is defined as the touching of the private parts of another person for purposes of sexual
gratification without consent of the victim, and includes instances where the victim is incapable of giving consent
due to age or due to temporary or permanent mental incapacity.
Incest: Incest is defined as non-forcible sexual intercourse between persons who are related to each other within
the degrees wherein marriage is prohibited by law.
Statutory Rape: Statutory Rape is defined a non-forcible sexual intercourse with a person who is under the
statutory age of consent.
Please click the link below for specific statute language, definitions, and resources related to Criminal Sexual
Conduct for the State of Minnesota:
https://www.revisor.mn.gov/topics/?type=statute&id=S6695543&year=2014
21
Domestic Violence: Domestic Violence means:
1) Felony or misdemeanor crimes of violence committed
(i) By a current or former spouse or intimate partner of the victim; (ii) By a person with whom the victim shares a
child in common;(iii) By a person who is cohabitating with or has cohabitated with the victim as a spouse or
intimate partner; (iv) By a person similarly situated to a spouse of the victim under the domestic or family
violence laws of the jurisdiction in which the crime of violence occurred; or(v) By any other person against an
adult or youth victim who is protected from that person’s acts under the domestic or family violence laws of the
jurisdiction in which the crime of violence occurred.
2) For the purposes of complying with the requirements of this section, any incident meeting this definition is
considered a crime for the purposes of Clery Act reporting.
Dating Violence: The term ‘‘dating violence’’ means violence committed by a person who is or has been in a
social relationship of a romantic or intimate nature with the victim and the existence of such a relationship shall
be based on the reporting party’s statement and with consideration of the length of the relationship, the type of
relationship, and the frequency of interaction between the persons involved in the relationship.
For the purposes of this definition,
(i) Dating Violence includes, but is not limited to, sexual or physical abuse or the threat of such abuse. (ii) Dating
violence does not include acts covered under the definition of domestic violence.
For the purposes of complying with the requirements of this section, any incident meeting this definition is
considered a crime for the purposes of Clery Act reporting.
The State of Minnesota does not have a specific statute on Dating Violence.
Stalking: Stalking means:
1) Engaging in a course of conduct directed at a specific person that would cause a reasonable person to:
(i) Fear for the person’s safety or the safety of others; or
(ii) Suffer substantial emotional distress.
2) For the purposes of this definition,
(i) Course of conduct means two or more acts, including, but not limited to, acts which the stalker directly,
indirectly, or through third parties, by any action, method, device, or means follows, monitors, observes, surveys,
threatens, or communicates to or about, a person, or interferes with a person’s property.
(ii) Substantial emotional distress means significant mental suffering or anguish that may, but does not
necessarily, require medical or other professional treatment or counseling.
22
(iii) Reasonable persons means a person under similar circumstances and with similar identities to the victim.
3) For the purposes of complying with the requirements of this section, any incident meeting this definition is
considered a crime for the purposes of Clery Act reporting.
B. Education and Prevention Programs
The University of Minnesota Duluth engages in comprehensive, intentional, and integrated programming,
initiatives, strategies, and campaigns intended to end dating violence, domestic violence, sexual assault, and
stalking that:
•
Are culturally relevant, inclusive of diverse communities and identities, sustainable, responsive to
community needs, and informed by research, or assessed for value, effectiveness, or outcome; and,
•
Consider environmental risk and protective factors as they occur on the individual, relationship,
institutional, community and societal levels.
•
Educational programming consists of primary prevention and awareness programs for all incoming
students and new employees and ongoing awareness and prevention campaigns for students and
employees that:
•
Identifies domestic violence, dating violence, sexual assault and stalking as prohibited conduct;
•
Defines using definitions provided both by the Department of Education as well as state law what
behavior constitutes domestic violence, dating violence, sexual assault, and stalking;
•
Defines what behavior and actions constitute consent to sexual activity in the State of Minnesota and/or
using the definition of consent found in the Student Code of Conduct if state law does not define
consent;
•
Provides a description of safe and positive options for bystander intervention. Bystander intervention
means safe and positive options that may be carried out by an individual or individuals to prevent harm
or intervene when there is a risk of dating violence, domestic violence, sexual assault, or stalking.
•
Bystander intervention includes recognizing situations of potential harm, understanding institutional
structures and cultural conditions that facilitate violence, overcoming barriers to intervening, identifying
safe and effective intervention options, and taking action to intervene;
•
Information on risk reduction. Risk reduction means options designed to decrease perpetration and
bystander inaction, and to increase empowerment for victim/survivors in order to promote safety and to
help individuals and communities address conditions that facilitate violence.
•
Provides an overview of information contained in the Annual Security Report in compliance with the
Clery Act.
23
The University of Minnesota Duluth prohibits all crimes related to domestic violence, dating and relationship
violence, sexual assault, and stalking. Toward the goal of campus safety, incoming students receive training via
Haven from EverFi. Haven is a population-level approach to educate all students on the issues associated with
sexual assault and relationship violence, taking into account their unique perspectives and experiences. The
training covers:
- Key definitions and statistics
- Reflective and personalized content
- Bystander skill and confidence-building strategies
- Campus-specific policies, procedures, and resources
- Rich data summaries to inform future programming
More information on Haven can be found at http://www.everfi.com/haven.
Additional trainings are provided during Bulldog Welcome Week (beginning of fall semester) and throughout the
school year by UMD Health Services (“Got Your Back” for UMD Peer Health Educators), the UMD Women's
Resource Action Center (for incoming students on awareness and education for prevention of relationship
violence, domestic violence, sexual assault, and stalking), and the Office of Student Conduct (on personal safety
and prevention of sexual violence). All incoming students attend a presentation on sexual violence prevention
during Bulldog Welcome Week.
For further information, please refer to the University of Minnesota Duluth’s policy regarding efforts to prevent
relationship violence, sexual assault, and stalking at:
http://www.d.umn.edu/conduct/sexassault.html
Definitions of “dating violence”, “domestic violence”, “sexual assault”, “stalking”, and “consent” are found on
pages 16-19 of this report.
The University of Minnesota Duluth has developed an annual educational campaign consisting of
presentations that include distribution of educational materials to new students, and participating in and
presenting information and materials during new employee orientation.
The University offered the following primary prevention and ongoing awareness programs for students, faculty,
and staff in 2014:
Name of Program
International
Presentation
National Center for
Higher Education Risk
Management Training
Date
01/16/14
03/05/14
Sponsoring Department
Office of Student
Conduct
Office of Student
Conduct
Topic
Presentation to
international students.
Sexual Violence,
Preponderance of
Evidence, Interviewing,
24
National Center for
Higher Education Risk
Management Training
03/10/14
Office of Student
Conduct
National Center for
Higher Education Risk
Management Training
03/12/14
Office of Student
Conduct
Gender Violence
Presentation
National Center for
Higher Education Risk
Management Training
03/14/14
Office of Student
Conduct
Office of Student
Conduct
National Center for
Higher Education Risk
Management Training
04/02/14
Office of Student
Conduct
Enough is Enough
04/07/14
Enough is Enough
04/08/14
Enough is Enough
04/09/14
Enough is Enough
04/10/14
Office of Student
Conduct
Office of Student
Conduct
Office of Student
Conduct
Office of Student
Conduct
Masculinity Brown Bag
04/23/14
Grad Student
Orientation
International Student
Orientation
Welcome Week
Presentations
Student Hearing and
Appeals Panel Training
Sexual Assault Issues
08/25/14
03/26/14
08/28/14
08/29/14
10/14/14
10/19/14
Office of Student
Conduct
Office of Student
Conduct
Office of Student
Conduct
Office of Student
Conduct
Office of Student
Conduct
Office of Student
Conduct
Hearing Processes
Sexual Violence,
Preponderance of
Evidence, Interviewing,
Hearing Processes
Sexual Violence,
Preponderance of
Evidence, Interviewing,
Hearing Processes
Issues pertaining to
gender violence.
Sexual Violence,
Preponderance of
Evidence, Interviewing,
Hearing Processes
Sexual Violence,
Preponderance of
Evidence, Interviewing,
Hearing Processes
Intimate partner
violence.
Issues pertaining to
gender violence.
Self-Defense
Violence Prevention
Day; Emotional
Intelligence.
Sexual Assault, Stalking,
Relationship Violence.
Issues pertaining to
graduate students.
Issues pertaining to
international students.
General information.
Instructional for
participants.
Issues related to sexual
assault.
25
Personal Safety
11/19/14
Athletics
12/08/14
Sexual Assault Issues
(ITSS)
Sexual Assault Issues
(NRRI)
Winter/Cold Weather
Safety
Scuba Diving Safety
12/09/11
Disability Awareness
01/30/14
Social Media Use
Awareness
Heart Health Awareness
02/03/14
Spring Break Safety
03/10/14
Spring Break Safety
03/11/14
Human Trafficking
03/12/14
Emergency Response
04/08/14
Enough is Enough
04/10/14
Title IX Training
08/22/14
Floor Meeting
08/28/14
Floor Meeting
08/28/14
Floor Meeting
08/28/14
Floor Meeting
08/28/14
Floor Meeting
08/28/14
12/11/14
01/21/14
01/27/14
02/14/14
Office of Student
Conduct
Office of Student
Conduct
Office of Student
Conduct
Office of Student
Conduct
Housing & Residential
Life
Housing & Residential
Life
Housing & Residential
Life
Housing & Residential
Life
Housing & Residential
Life
Housing & Residential
Life
Housing & Residential
Life
Housing & Residential
Life
Housing & Residential
Life
Housing & Residential
Life
Housing & Residential
Life
Housing & Residential
Life
Housing & Residential
Life
Housing & Residential
Life
Housing & Residential
Life
Housing & Residential
Practices to enhance
personal safety.
Issues pertaining to
student athletes.
Issues related to sexual
assault.
Issues related to sexual
assault.
Cold weather safety
practices.
Practices for safe scuba
diving.
Information
distribution.
Information
dissemination.
Physical health
practices.
Information
dissemination.
Information
dissemination.
Information on trends
and awareness.
Practices for dealing
with emergencies.
Violence Prevention
Fair.
For Resident Advisors.
Griggs M (policies)
Griggs R4, S4 (policies)
Griggs N
Griggs P3, Q3
Griggs L (safety,
26
Community Meeting
08/28/14
Floor Meeting
08/29/14
Floor Meeting
09/02/14
Floor Meeting
09/02/14
Floor Meeting
09/03/14
Got Alcohol?
09/15/14
Alcohol Awareness
09/16/14
Floor Meeting
09/16/14
Alcohol Jeopardy
09/20/14
Mocktail
09/25/14
Beer Goggle Olympics
09/25/14
Substance Abuse Article
Hand-Out
09/27/14
Self-Defense
09/28/14
Alcohol Awareness
09/29/14
Let’s Create a Little
CHAOS
Substance Abuse Flier
Distribution
Alcohol Awareness
09/29/14
Substance Abuse
Bulletin Board
09/29/14
09/29/14
09/29/14
Life
Housing & Residential
Life
Housing & Residential
Life
Housing & Residential
Life
Housing & Residential
Life
Housing & Residential
Life
Housing & Residential
Life
Housing & Residential
Life
Housing & Residential
Life
Housing & Residential
Life
Housing & Residential
Life
Housing & Residential
Life
Housing & Residential
Life
Housing & Residential
Life
Housing & Residential
Life
Housing & Residential
Life
Housing & Residential
Life
Housing & Residential
Life
Housing & Residential
Life
policies)
Safety
Griggs P, Q
Heaney Hall
Heaney Hall (stalking,
safety)
Heaney Hall (policies)
Oakland A; alcohol
awareness issues.
Oakland B; alcohol
awareness issues.
Drug and alcohol
education.
Griggs P, Q; alcohol
awareness.
Griggs E, F; alcohol
awareness.
Griggs E, F; alcohol
awareness.
Ianni Hall; drug and
alcohol abuse
awareness.
Heaney Hall; personal
safety and self-defense.
Oakland A; alcohol
awareness issues.
Heaney Hall; alcohol
and drug awareness.
Information
distribution.
Griggs P, Q; alcohol
awareness issues.
Griggs R4, S4;
information
dissemination.
27
Texting & Driving Safety
Article Distribution
10/01/14
Housing & Residential
Life
Alcohol Awareness
Poster Deployment
Drug & Alcohol
Education Bulletin
Board
Alcohol Jeopardy
10/01/14
Housing & Residential
Life
Housing & Residential
Life
High Risk Drinking
10/06/14
Safety, Drug & Alcohol
Education
Online Safety
10/09/14
Sex and Candy
10/22/14
Alcohol Awareness
10/23/14
Self-Safety Seminar
10/27/14
Community Meeting
10/27/14
Winter Safety
10/30/14
Bystander Intervention
10/30/14
Mock Rape Trial
10/30/14
Substance Abuse Risk
Article Distribution
Self-Defense
11/01/14
Self-Defense
11/04/14
Self-Defense
11/04/14
Winter Safety
11/05/14
10/01/14
10/03/14
10/16/14
11/04/14
Housing & Residential
Life
Housing & Residential
Life
Housing & Residential
Life
Housing & Residential
Life
Housing & Residential
Life
Housing & Residential
Life
Housing & Residential
Life
Housing & Residential
Life
Housing & Residential
Life
Housing & Residential
Life
Housing & Residential
Life
Housing & Residential
Life
Housing & Residential
Life
Housing & Residential
Life
Housing & Residential
Life
Housing & Residential
Lake Superior Hall,
Burntside; information
distribution.
Griggs L; alcohol
awareness information.
Griggs P3, Q3;
information
dissemination.
Griggs P, Q; alcohol
awareness.
Alcohol safety
information.
Heaney Hall; related
topics.
Goldfine B; internet
safety.
Oakland B; sexual
health.
Griggs P, Q; alcohol
awareness issues.
Griggs E, F; personal
safety.
Griggs N; general.
Ianni Hall; cold weather
safety practices.
Practices and issues.
Educational simulation.
Placement in all
Housing bathrooms.
Griggs E, F; personal
safety and self-defense.
Griggs P, Q; personal
safety and self-defense.
Griggs E, F; personal
safety and self-defense.
Ianni Hall; cold weather
28
safety practices.
Griggs E, F; related
topics and practices.
Griggs P, Q; personal
safety and self-defense.
Ianni Hall; practices.
07/28/14
Life
Housing & Residential
Life
Housing & Residential
Life
Housing & Residential
Life
Housing & Residential
Life
Housing & Residential
Life
Housing & Residential
Life
Housing & Residential
Life
Housing & Residential
Life
Housing & Residential
Life
Housing & Residential
Life
Housing & Residential
Life
Housing & Residential
Life
Housing & Residential
Life
Housing & Residential
Life
Housing & Residential
Life
Housing & Residential
Life
Human Resources
09/30/14
Human Resources
Training on all.
Social Media Safety
11/05/14
Self-Defense
11/05/14
Personal Safety and
Awareness
Internet Safety
11/05/14
Dinner & Drinking
11/06/14
Internet Safety
11/06/14
Winter Car Safety
11/08/14
Health and Safety
11/09/14
Safe Sex Jeopardy
11/10/14
Personal Safety and
Defense
Self-Defense
11/10/14
Come Talk to Bulldog
Taxi
Self-Awareness and
Protection
Personal Safety
11/12/14
Sexual Assault Training
11/17/14
Crime Prevention &
Security Awareness
Sexual Assault
Prevention, Awareness,
and Reporting
Sexual Assault
Prevention, Awareness,
and Reporting
12/16/14
11/06/14
11/11/14
11/14/14
11/14/14
Ianni Hall; related topics
and practices.
Lake Superior Hall;
alcohol awareness.
Griggs E, F; related
topics and practices.
Winter driving and
preparation.
Ianni Hall; general
topics.
Junction A; sexual
health.
Griggs E, F; personal
safety and self-defense.
Goldfine Hall; personal
safety and self-defense.
Heaney Hall; safe
transportation options.
Griggs P, Q; personal
safety and self-defense.
Griggs P, Q; personal
safety topics.
Provided to all Resident
Advisors.
Related topics.
Training on all.
29
Sexual Assault
Prevention, Awareness,
and Reporting
Sexual Assault
Prevention, Awareness,
and Reporting
Sexual Assault
Prevention, Awareness,
and Reporting
Sexual Assault
Prevention, Awareness,
and Reporting
Sexual Assault
Prevention, Awareness,
and Reporting
Sexual Assault
Prevention, Awareness,
and Reporting
Sexual Assault
Prevention, Awareness,
and Reporting
Got Your Back
Got Your Back
Emotional Violence
Awareness
Got Your Back
Got Your Back
Welcome Week
Presentation
Got Your back
UMD Seminar – Sexual
Health
Got Your Back
Got Your Back
Got Your Back
Got Your Back
Got Your Back
UMD Seminar – Sexual
Health
10/07/14
Human Resources
Training on all.
10/22/14
Human Resources
Training on all.
11/10/14
Human Resources
Training on all.
11/19/14
Human Resources
Training on all.
11/21/14
Human Resources
Training on all.
12/09/14
Human Resources
Training on all.
12/11/14
Human Resources
Training on all.
03/12/14
04/07/14
04/10/14
Health Services
Health Services
Health Services
05/07/14
08/30/14
09/01/14
Health Services
Health Services
Health Services
Bystander Intervention
Bystander Intervention
Issues related to
emotional abuse.
Bystander Intervention
Bystander Intervention
Sexual Health
09/01/14
10/27/14
Health Services
Health Services
Bystander Intervention
Sexual Health
10/30/14
10/30/14
11/06/14
11/11/14
11/11/14
11/14/14
Health Services
Health Services
Health Services
Health Services
Health Services
Health Services
Bystander Intervention
Bystander Intervention
Bystander Intervention
Bystander Intervention
Bystander Intervention
Sexual Health
30
UMD Seminar – Sexual
Health
Alcohol Risk Reduction
11/17/14
Health Services
Sexual Health (Housing)
08/26/14
Health Services
Alcohol and Incoming
Freshmen
Alcohol Overdose/UMD
Alcohol Policy
Making Alcohol-Free
Connections
Alcohol Risk Reduction
08/27/14
Health Services
08/30/14
Health Services
09/01/14
Health Services
09/16/14
Health Services
Alcohol Risk Reduction
09/18/14
Health Services
Alcohol Risk Reduction
09/22/14
Health Services
Alcohol Risk Reduction
09/23/14
Health Services
Alcohol Risk Reduction
09/23/14
Health Services
Alcohol Risk Reduction
09/23/14
Health Services
Alcohol Risk Reduction
09/24/14
Health Services
Alcohol Risk Reduction
09/24/14
Health Services
Alcohol Risk Reduction
09/24/14
Health Services
Alcohol Risk Reduction
09/30/14
Health Services
Alcohol Risk Reduction
10/01/14
Health Services
Alcohol Risk Reduction
10/02/14
Health Services
Alcohol Risk Reduction
10/03/14
Health Services
Alcohol Risk Reduction
10/07/14
Health Services
Specific to freshman
volleyball and football
athletes.
Specific for “Rock Star”
Housing personnel.
Alcohol safety topics;
for all freshmen.
Alcohol awareness
issues for freshmen.
Alcohol safety; via UMD
Seminar.
Alcohol safety; via UMD
Seminar.
Alcohol safety; via UMD
Seminar.
Alcohol safety; via UMD
Seminar.
Alcohol safety; via UMD
Seminar.
Alcohol safety; via UMD
Seminar.
Alcohol safety; via UMD
Seminar.
Alcohol safety; via UMD
Seminar.
Alcohol safety; via UMD
Seminar.
Alcohol safety; via UMD
Seminar.
Alcohol safety; via UMD
Seminar.
Alcohol safety; via UMD
Seminar.
Alcohol safety; via UMD
Seminar.
Alcohol safety; via UMD
Seminar.
31
Alcohol Risk Reduction
10/07/14
Health Services
Alcohol Risk Reduction
10/08/14
Health Services
Alcohol Risk Reduction
10/09/14
Health Services
Alcohol Risk Reduction
10/14/14
Health Services
Alcohol Risk Reduction
10/14/14
Health Services
Alcohol Risk Reduction
10/14/14
Health Services
Alcohol Risk Reduction
10/17/14
Health Services
Alcohol Risk Reduction
10/17/14
Health Services
Alcohol Risk Reduction
10/17/14
Health Services
Alcohol Risk Reduction
10/20/14
Health Services
Alcohol Risk Reduction
10/21/14
Health Services
Alcohol Risk Reduction
10/28/14
Health Services
Alcohol Risk Reduction
10/31/14
Health Services
Alcohol Risk Reduction
10/31/14
Health Services
Alcohol Risk Reduction
11/05/14
Health Services
Alcohol Risk Reduction
11/06/14
Health Services
Alcohol Risk Reduction
11/13/14
Health Services
Alcohol Risk Reduction
11/18/14
Health Services
Strategic Planning on
Alcohol Policy
Alcohol Risk Reduction
11/20/14
Health Services
12/03/14
Health Services
Alcohol safety; via UMD
Seminar.
Alcohol safety; via UMD
Seminar.
Alcohol safety; via UMD
Seminar.
Alcohol safety; via UMD
Seminar.
Alcohol safety; via UMD
Seminar.
Alcohol safety; via UMD
Seminar.
Alcohol safety; via UMD
Seminar.
Alcohol safety; via UMD
Seminar.
Alcohol safety; via UMD
Seminar.
Alcohol safety; via UMD
Seminar.
Alcohol safety; via UMD
Seminar.
Alcohol safety; via UMD
Seminar.
Alcohol safety; via UMD
Seminar.
Alcohol safety; via UMD
Seminar.
Alcohol safety; via UMD
Seminar.
Alcohol safety; via UMD
Seminar.
Alcohol safety; via UMD
Seminar.
Alcohol safety; via UMD
Seminar.
Topics specific to Greek
Life.
Alcohol safety; via UMD
32
Alcohol Harm Reduction 03/10/14
Health Services
Spring Break Safety
03/11/14
Health Services
Alcohol Harm Reduction 03/11/14
Health Services
Alcohol/Climate
04/03/14
Health Services
Alcohol Abuse
04/21/14
Health Services
Film: “Sex and Money”
01/29/14
One Billion Rising
02/14/14
Film: “Sex and Money”
02/19/14
From Girl, to Gal, to
Woman, to Crone
Intimate Partner
Violence Presentation
Brown Bag: PAVSA
03/12/14
Self-Defense Training
04/09/14
Film: “Very Young Girls”
04/09/14
Clothesline Project
04/14/14 - 04/18/14
Speaker: Rachel Lloyd
04/14/14
Book Club: “Girls Like
Us” by Rachel Lloyd
Mock Rape Trial
04/15/14
Man Up! presentation
04/23/14
Women’s Resource
Action Center
Women’s Resource
Action Center
Women’s Resource
Action Center
Women’s Resource
Action Center
Women’s Resource
Action Center
Women’s Resource
Action Center
Women’s Resource
Action Center
Women’s Resource
Action Center
Women’s Resource
Action Center
Women’s Resource
Action Center
Women’s Resource
Action Center
Women’s Resource
Action Center
Women’s Resource
04/07/14
04/09/14
04/17/14
Seminar.
Alcohol safety; specific
to UMD athletes.
Safety tips and
practices; for student
residents.
Alcohol safety; via Drug
Education class.
Alcohol awareness
issues; specific to Greek
Life.
Alcohol abuse issues;
specific to Phi Kappa
Tau organization.
Sexual Assault, Stalking,
Relationship Violence.
Sexual Assault, Stalking,
Relationship Violence.
Sexual Assault, Stalking,
Relationship Violence.
Relationship Violence.
Sexual Assault, Stalking,
Relationship Violence.
Sexual Assault, Stalking,
Relationship Violence.
Sexual Assault, Stalking,
Relationship Violence.
Sexual Assault, Stalking,
Relationship Violence.
Sexual Assault, Stalking,
Relationship Violence.
Sexual Assault, Stalking,
Relationship Violence.
Sexual Assault, Stalking,
Relationship Violence.
Sexual Assault, Stalking,
Relationship Violence.
Sexual Assault, Stalking,
33
by Nathaniel Schultz
The Vagina Monologues
04/25/14 and 04/26/14
Art Enrichment
Workshop
Art Enrichment
Workshop
Heart Stories Art Exhibit
09/22/14
Femicide Awareness
Display
Women’s Soccer: “Kicks
for a Cause” game
Art Enrichment
Workshop
Clothesline Project
Workshop
Brown Bag: “Fearless”
10/06/14 – 10/08/14
Art Enrichment
Workshop
Mock Rape Trial
10/27/14
Art Enrichment
Workshop
Performance of “Fired
Up: Survivors’ Stories of
Trauma, Hope, and
Change”
Art Enrichment
Workshop
Art Enrichment
Workshop
Self-Defense Class
11/03/14
Art Enrichment
Workshop
Art Enrichment
Workshop
12/08/14
09/29/14
10/01/14 – 10/28/14
10/04/14
10/06/14
10/13/14
10/15/14
10/30/14
11/12/14
11/17/14
11/24/14
12/03/14
12/15/14
Action Center
Women’s Resource
Action Center
Women’s Resource
Action Center
Women’s Resource
Action Center
Women’s Resource
Action Center
Women’s Resource
Action Center
Women’s Resource
Action Center; Athletics
Women’s Resource
Action Center
Women’s Resource
Action Center
Women’s Resource
Action Center
Women’s Resource
Action Center
Women’s Resource
Action Center
Women’s Resource
Action Center
Women’s Resource
Action Center
Relationship Violence.
Sexual Assault, Stalking,
Relationship Violence.
Sexual Assault, Stalking,
Relationship Violence.
Sexual Assault, Stalking,
Relationship Violence.
Sexual Assault, Stalking,
Relationship Violence.
Sexual Assault,
Relationship Violence.
Sexual Assault,
Relationship Violence.
Sexual Assault,
Relationship Violence.
Sexual Assault,
Relationship Violence.
Sexual Assault,
Relationship Violence.
Sexual Assault,
Relationship Violence.
Sexual Assault,
Relationship Violence.
Sexual Assault,
Relationship Violence.
Sexual Assault,
Relationship Violence.
Women’s Resource
Action Center
Women’s Resource
Action Center
Women’s Resource
Action Center
Women’s Resource
Action Center
Women’s Resource
Action Center
Sexual Assault,
Relationship Violence.
Sexual Assault,
Relationship Violence.
Sexual Assault,
Relationship Violence.
Sexual Assault,
Relationship Violence.
Sexual Assault,
Relationship Violence.
34
Art Enrichment
Workshop
Active Threat Response
12/22/14
Active Threat Response
03/24/14
UMD Police
Department
Keg with the Cops
03/24/14
Keg with the Cops
03/24/14
Active Threat Response
04/07/14
UMD Police
Department
UMD Police
Department
UMD Police
Department
01/21/14
Women’s Resource
Action Center
UMD Police
Department
Crisis Intervention Team 04/08/14
UMD Police
Department
Active Threat Response
04/08/14
Self-Defense
04/09/14
General Safety
04/09/14
Active Threat Response
04/24/14
UMD Police
Department
UMD Police
Department
UMD Police
Department
UMD Police
Department
Traffic Safety
05/21/14
Active Threat Response
(Law Enforcement only)
06/09/14 – 06/11/14
Active Threat Response
06/19/14
UMD Police
Department
UMD Police
Department
UMD Police
Department
Sexual Assault,
Relationship Violence.
Response to
school/workplace
shootings and violence
(Facilities
Management).
Response to
school/workplace
shootings and violence
(UMD Administration).
General safety
information.
General safety
information.
Response to
school/workplace
shootings and violence
(Children’s Place
childcare center).
Response to incidents
involving mental health
issues.
Response to school
shootings and violence.
Personal Safety and
Self-Defense.
Topics on personal
safety and security.
Response to school and
workplace
shootings/violence.
Information on traffic
safety.
Training of area law
enforcement officers in
active threat response.
Response to school and
workplace
shootings/violence.
35
Active Threat Response
(Law Enforcement only)
08/04/14 – 08/06/14
UMD Police
Department
Active Threat Response
08/12/14
UMD Police
Department
Active Threat Response;
Retail Loss Prevention
08/19/14
UMD Police
Department
Active Threat Response;
General Safety; Drug
Education
08/21/14
UMD Police
Department
Clery Act Training
08/26/14
General Safety
08/27/14
Clery Act, CSA, Sexual
Assault Reporting
08/27/14
UMD Police
Department
UMD Police
Department
UMD Police
Department
General Safety
08/28/14
General Safety
08/30/14
General Safety; Better
Neighbors
09/01/14
Welcome Week
Presentation
Active Threat Response
09/01/14
Alcohol Awareness
09/16/14
Alcohol Awareness for
Student Residents
Alcohol Awareness for
Student Residents
09/16/14
09/13/14
09/17/14
UMD Police
Department
UMD Police
Department
UMD Police
Department
UMD Police
Department
UMD Police
Department
UMD Police
Department
UMD Police
Department
UMD Police
Department
Training of area law
enforcement officers in
active threat response.
Response to school and
workplace
shootings/violence.
Response to school and
workplace
shootings/violence;
retail theft.
Response to school
shootings/violence;
personal safety topics;
drug recognition.
Clery Act topics to
UMDPD personnel.
Personal safety and
security.
Topics related to Clery
Act, Campus Security
Authorities, and Sexual
Assault reporting
regulations.
General safety and
security.
General safety and
security.
General safety and
student/neighborhood
relations.
Safety and security.
Response to school
shootings/violence.
Alcohol safety issues.
Alcohol safety issues.
Alcohol safety issues.
36
Alcohol Awareness for
Student Residents
Active Threat Response
09/18/14
Active Threat Response
10/01/14
UMD Police
Department
Safety Assessment
10/02/14
Clery Act and Campus
Security Authority
Training
Active Threat Response
10/14/14
UMD Police
Department
UMD Police
Department
10/16/14
UMD Police
Department
Self-Defense
10/28/14
Self-Defense
10/29/14
Self-Defense
11/04/14
Self-Defense
11/05/14
Self-Defense
11/11/14
Self-Defense
11/13/14
Donuts with the Cops
11/13/14
General Safety; Sexual
Assault Reporting
11/19/14
UMD Police
Department
UMD Police
Department
UMD Police
Department
UMD Police
Department
UMD Police
Department
UMD Police
Department
UMD Police
Department
UMD Police
Department
Self-Defense
12/03/14
General Safety
12/08/14
09/30/14
UMD Police
Department
UMD Police
Department
UMD Police
Department
UMD Police
Department
Alcohol safety issues.
Response to school and
workplace
shootings/violence.
Response to school and
workplace
shootings/violence.
Information on personal
safety and security.
UMD employee training
for Clery Act and CSA
awareness.
Response to school and
workplace
shootings/violence.
Personal safety and
self-defense.
Personal safety and
self-defense.
Personal safety and
self-defense.
Personal safety and
self-defense.
Personal safety and
self-defense.
Personal safety and
self-defense.
General safety.
General safety practices
and guidelines of
reporting sexual
assaults.
Personal safety and
self-defense.
General safety
practices.
37
Active Threat Response
12/09/14
UMD Police
Department
Response to school/
workplace
shootings/violence.
C. Procedures for Reporting a Complaint
The University of Minnesota Duluth has procedures in place that serve to be sensitive to those who report sexual
assault, domestic violence, dating/relationship violence, and stalking, including informing individuals about their
right to file criminal charges as well as the availability of counseling, health, mental health, victim advocacy, legal
assistance, visa and immigration assistance, and other services on and/or off campus as well as additional
remedies to prevent contact between a victim/survivor and an accused party, such as housing, academic,
transportation, and working accommodations, if reasonably available. The University will make such
accommodations if the victim/survivor requests them and if they are reasonably available, regardless of whether
the victim/survivor chooses to report the crime to the University of Minnesota Duluth Police Department or
other law enforcement. Students should contact Dr. Lisa Erwin, Vice Chancellor for Student Life and Dean of
Students at 218-726-8501 and employees should contact the Director of Human Resources at 218-726-6326, who
will arrange these accommodations.
After an incident of sexual assault and domestic violence, the victim/survivor should consider seeking medical
attention as soon as possible. Victim/survivors can be examined at a hospital of their choice. In Duluth, victims
can go to Essentia Health Center-St. Mary’s Hospital or St. Luke’s Hospital. Both medical facilities employ
Sexual Assault Nurse Examiners (SANE) nurses. PAVSA or the University of Minnesota Duluth Police
Department can assist the victim/survivor with contact information. In Minnesota, evidence may be
collected even if you chose not to make a report to law enforcement by making an anonymous/confidential
report.
Anonymous/Confidential Report:
Victims/survivors may choose to speak confidentially with PAVSA without making a report to law enforcement
or the University. Should a victim/survivor seek a sexual assault exam at St. Luke’s or Essentia Health (St.
Mary’s Hospital Emergency Department), s/he may opt to make an anonymous report to law enforcement
through a sexual assault nurse examiner (see Medical Assistance section). In this case, an Incident Criminal
Report (ICR) number will be assigned. Evidence collected will be turned over to law enforcement marked only
with the ICR number – no identifying information will be shared. Should the victim/survivor decide to pursue a
criminal investigation, evidence may be used by law enforcement at that time.
Further information may be obtained at:
http://www.d.umn.edu/umdoeo/saprotocol
It is important that a victim of sexual assault not bathe, douche, smoke, change clothing or clean the
bed/linen/area where they were assaulted if the offense occurred within the previous 120 hours so that evidence
may be preserved that may assist in proving that the alleged criminal offense occurred/or is occurring or may be
helpful in obtaining a protection order.
In circumstances of sexual assault, if victim/survivors do not opt for forensic evidence collection, health care
38
providers can still treat injuries and take steps to address concerns of pregnancy and/or sexually transmitted
disease.
Victims of sexual assault, domestic violence, stalking, and dating violence are also encouraged to preserve
evidence by saving text messages, instant messages, social networking pages, other communications, and keeping
pictures, logs or other copies of documents, if they have any, that would be useful to University hearing
boards/investigators or police.
Although the university strongly encourages all members of its community to report violations of this policy to
law enforcement, it is the victim/survivor’s choice whether or not to make such a report and victims have the
right to decline involvement with the police. The University will assist any victim/survivor with notifying local
police if they so desire. The University of Minnesota Duluth Police Department may be reached by calling 911,
or in-person at 1049 University Dr., Suite 287 DAdB, Duluth, MN.
Further information may be obtained at:
http://www.d.umn.edu/umdoeo/saprotocol/whatshouldido.html
Additional information about the University of Minnesota Duluth Police Department may be found at their
website:
www.d.umn.edu/police.
Under the Violence Against Women and Department of Justice Reauthorization Act of 2005, starting in 2009,
states must certify that they do not “require a victim of sexual assault to participate in the criminal justice system
or cooperate with law enforcement in order to be provided with a forensic medical exam, reimbursement for
charges incurred on account of such an exam, or both.
If you have been the victim of domestic violence, dating violence, sexual assault, or stalking, you should report
the incident promptly to the Title IX Coordinator(s) and/or the UMD Police Department,
Employees: Melissa Honkola, Director, UMD Human Resources; (218) 726-6326 Darland Administration Building,
Room 269-273;
Students: Nathaniel Schultz, Director, UMD Office of Student Conduct; (218) 726-7647; 245 Kirby
Plaza;
Student Athletes: Karen Stromme, Associate Director, UMD Athletics; (218) 726-7143; Sports and Health
Center, Room 170 SpHC;
or, by telephone, written letter, or in-person report to the University of Minnesota Duluth Police Department (if
the victim so desires). The University will provide on- and/or off-campus resources to persons who have been
victims of sexual assault, domestic violence, dating/relationship violence, or stalking, and will apply appropriate
disciplinary procedures to those who violate this policy.
Further information may be obtained at:
http://www.d.umn.edu/umdoeo/saprotocol/whatshouldido.html
39
http://www.d.umn.edu/umdoeo/saprotocol/rights.html
The procedures set forth below are intended to afford a prompt response to charges of sexual assault, domestic
or dating violence, and stalking, to maintain confidentiality and fairness consistent with applicable legal
requirements, and to impose appropriate sanctions on violators of this policy.
As time passes, evidence may dissipate or become lost or unavailable, thereby making investigation, possible
prosecution, disciplinary proceedings, or obtaining protection from abuse orders related to the incident more
difficult. If a victim/survivor chooses not to make a complaint regarding an incident, they nevertheless should
consider speaking with law enforcement to preserve evidence in the event that the victim changes her/his mind
at a later date. Below is the University of Minnesota’s administrative procedure for responding to incidents of
sexual assault, stalking and relationship violence.
The full document can be found at:
http://www.policy.umn.edu/Policies/Operations/Safety/SEXUALASSAULT_PROC01.html
University of Minnesota Duluth Process for Resolving Sexual Assault, Dating Violence,
Domestic Violence, and Stalking Complaints Involving Students
For further information, go to:
http://www.d.umn.edu/umdoeo/saprotocol/faq.html
40
Victims/Survivors
Any University of Minnesota Duluth student or employee who has been sexually assaulted or physically harmed
is strongly encouraged to contact the police department for the location where the assault occurred. University
police or campus security departments can assist in making the contact to the appropriate law enforcement
agency.
Victims/survivors are also encouraged to contact the campus or local victim/survivor service office and/or
counseling and health care services. These services are strictly confidential.
The University strongly encourages individuals to report sexual assault, relationship violence, and any violence to
appropriate officials because it is the only way that action can be taken against an alleged violator of the policy.
Timely reporting and a medical examination within 120 hours is critical in preserving evidence of sexual assault,
and the ability to respond effectively, but a victim/survivor can report an incident at any time.
Victims/survivors are also encouraged to contact University officials for appropriate action. In general:
•
Any UMD student, employee, or visitor may contact the UMD Police Department.
•
University housing residents should contact any Housing/Residential Life staff.
•
If a student is accused, report it to the Office of Student Conduct.
•
If an employee is accused, report it to the campus's Equal Opportunity officer.
•
Reports of misconduct by University employees can be made to the University through U Report. These
reports can be made anonymously.
University Employees and Students (when informed of an incident of assault)
Mandatory Reporting of Child Abuse
If the assault was against a child, you must immediately report the abuse to your university or local police
department, county sheriff, or local county social services agency. In addition, inform your supervisor you have
made the report. For further information about mandatory reporting for the protection of minors, consult
Administrative Policy: Safety of Minors or the University of Minnesota Office of General Counsel.
Encourage Prompt Reporting to Police
If the assault was against an adult, encourage the victim/survivor to report the incident to the appropriate law
enforcement agency.
Encourage Contact with Victim Services
Encourage the victim/survivor to contact the campus program against sexual violence or the local
41
victim/survivor service office and/or counseling and health care services.
Make Appropriate University Reports
If you are a University employee with supervisory or advising responsibilities, contact your campus student
conduct office, or Equal Opportunity office, to inform them of the reported assault and to obtain guidance on
next steps. You may also contact your campus's program against sexual violence for guidance on responding to
the report. Once informed, appropriate University departments will work to assist the victim/survivor, including
by providing guidance in reporting to law enforcement, obtaining counseling or other health or academic
services, and filing a complaint with University conduct offices. All other (non-supervisory) employees should
contact their supervisor for guidance on other steps. You may also contact your campus's program against sexual
violence for guidance on responding to the report.
Confidentiality
University employees cannot guarantee confidentiality, except when the reports are privileged communications
with counselors or health care professionals. If a complainant requests confidentiality, the University must take
all reasonable steps to investigate and respond consistent with that request, taking into account that
confidentiality may not be possible in every case, given the University's responsibility to provide a safe
environment for all. To ensure that the University has met its obligations, University employees must consult
with appropriate University offices concerning whether and what identifying information they can or must share
within the institution to respond to the report, and to promote campus safety.
University Offices Receiving a Report
Victim/survivor support services will:
•
Maintain the contacts as strictly confidential.
•
Provide crisis intervention and advocacy, in some cases to include assisting victims/survivors in seeking
restraining or protective orders.
•
Assist and support the victim/survivor in contacting police and/or reporting to other University offices,
if the victim/survivor consents.
•
Assist the victim/survivor in obtaining medical assistance and counseling, changing academic programs
or housing, transportation, working situations, etc.
•
Assist the victim/survivor in changing academic programs, housing arrangements, transportation,
employment schedules, etc. (Note: The University will maintain confidentiality in any such protective
measures for the victim, to the extent that doing so does not impair its ability to provide them.)
Counseling and health care services will:
•
Maintain the contact as confidential;
42
•
Encourage, assist (as needed) and support the victim/survivor in reporting the incident to police;
•
Provide appropriate counseling and medical services.
UMD Police Department will:
•
Contact PAVSA or WRAC for victim/survivor assistance;
•
Investigate and refer for prosecution when warranted;
•
Determine whether to issue a crime alert;
Housing/Residential Life Offices will:
•
Contact, or encourage contact with, PAVSA and WRAC, and assist in obtaining medical care if needed.
•
Encourage the victim/survivor to report the incident to the police, and assist in making the report if
requested by the victim/survivor. Housing/Residential Life may report to the police the fact that an
assault was reported and may share the alleged perpetrator's name, but the name of the victim/survivor
will only be provided with the victim/survivor's consent, except in extenuating circumstances.
•
If the person accused is a student, report the incident to OSCAI.
•
Report for appropriate investigation by campus authorities or police.
•
Make determinations regarding temporary relocation of residents, and regarding interim suspensions
from Housing pending Student Conduct Code proceedings.
Equal Opportunity Office will:
•
Contact, or encourage contact with PAVSA and WRAC, and assist in obtaining medical care if needed.
•
Encourage the victim/survivor to report the incident to the police, and assist in making the report if
requested by the victim/survivor. The Equal Opportunity officer may report to the police the fact that
an assault was reported and may share the alleged perpetrator’s name, but the name of the victim will
only be provided with the victim/survivor's consent, except in extenuating circumstances.
•
If the person accused is an employee, promptly investigate and make recommendations for action, as
appropriate (in many cases the police may conduct the investigation).
•
Proceed independently of any action taken in the criminal or civil courts, as determined on a case-bycase basis. Criminal court proceedings are not a substitute for University procedures.
43
The Office of Student Conduct will:
•
Contact, or encourage contact with, PAVSA and WRAC, and assist in obtaining medical care if needed.
•
Encourage the victim/survivor to report the incident to the police, and assist in making the report if
requested by the victim/survivor. Campus conduct offices may report to the police the fact that an
assault was reported and may share the alleged perpetrator’s name, but the name of the victim/survivor
will only be provided with the victim/survivor's consent, except in extenuating circumstances.
•
Respond promptly to the allegations and discipline if needed, consistent with the Student
Conduct
Code and the campus’s student disciplinary process (in many cases the police may conduct the
investigation).
•
Proceed independently of any action taken in the criminal or civil courts, as determined on a case-bycase basis. Criminal court proceedings are not a substitute for University procedures.
•
The Title IX Coordinator is regarded as a “Responsible Employee” under Title IX and also a “Campus
Security Authority” under the Clery Act. Statistical information less victim identifying information will be
provided to the Clery Act Coordinator within the UMD Police Department who compiles the annual
crime statistics, even if the victim chooses not to report to police personally.
Assistance for Victims: Rights & Options
Regardless of whether a victim elects to pursue a criminal complaint or whether the offense is alleged to have
occurred on- or off-campus, the university will assist victims of sexual assault, domestic violence, dating violence,
and stalking, and will provide each victim with a written explanation of their rights and options.
In Minnesota, a victim/survivor of domestic violence, dating violence, sexual assault, or stalking has the
following rights, per state statute:
https://www.revisor.mn.gov/statutes/?id=611A
UNIVERSITY OF MINNESOTA DULUTH SEXUAL ASSAULT
VICTIMS' RIGHTS POLICY
If you are the victim of a sexual assault, you may report the matter to the UMD Police Department by calling
911 at any time of the day or night. You may also report the assault in-person at the UMD Police Department
(1049 University Dr.; DAdB 287; Duluth, MN 55812) during weekday business hours (8:00am-4:30pm). For
personal support or assistance in notifying the proper law enforcement and University authorities, you may call:
44
24-Hour Sexual Assault Crisis Line (PAVSA)…..218-726-6115
UMD Office of Equal Opportunity…..218-726-6827 (TTY: 218-726-6115)
UMD Health Services…..218-726-8155
UMD Support Group/Individual Counseling for Survivors of Sexual Assault (Students)…..Contact: Jean
Baribeau-Thoennes, 218-726-6967 or 218-726-8155
St. Luke’s Hospital Employee Assistance Program (Faculty and Staff)…..218-249-7077 or 1-888-355-8495
UMD Women’s Resource Action Center (WRAC)…..218-726-6292 or 218-726-8444
Program to Aid Victims of Sexual Assault (PAVSA)…..218-726-1442 (Monday through Friday, 8:30am-4:30pm
You also have the right to assistance from:
State of Minnesota Crime Victims Reparations Board…..612‐282‐6256
Office of the Minnesota Crime Victim Ombudsman…..612-282-6258
Upon receipt of a complaint, the University will conduct an investigation into it, and advise the victim of its
results, subject to the limitations of the Minnesota Government Data Practices Act.
Victims have the right to participate in any related disciplinary proceeding, and to be notified of its outcome.
Victims have the right to have a person present to provide personal support while participating in the
investigation.
The University will follow the direction of law enforcement authorities in obtaining, securing, and maintaining
evidence related to any reported sexual assault. University authorities will also assist in preserving materials which
are relevant to a University disciplinary proceeding.
Upon victim’s request, the University will assist, as is reasonable and feasible and in cooperation with law
enforcement authorities, in shielding her/him from her/his alleged assailant. This may include providing
alternative academic, work, or living arrangements if these options are available and feasible. The University will
provide written notification to victims regarding these options.
Further, the University of Minnesota Duluth complies with Minnesota law in recognizing Orders for Protection
and Harassment Restraining Orders issued through criminal, civil, or tribal courts, or through the University
itself. Any person who obtains such an order should provide a copy of it to the University of Minnesota Duluth
Police Department. Persons in need of assistance in obtaining an Order for Protection or Harassment
Restraining Order can contact: Safe Haven at 218-623-1000; 414 W. 1st Street; Duluth, MN 55803; Monday
through Friday 8:00am - 4:00pm.
45
University department personnel that are made aware of an Order for Protection or Harassment Restraining
Order, and need assistance with related accommodations, can contact Dr. Lisa Erwin, Vice Chancellor for
Student Life and Dean of Students, at 218-726-8501 for cases involving UMD students, or the Director of
Human Resources at 218-726-6326 for cases involving employees.
Any person who is a witness or a victim of a violation of an Order for Protection or Harassment Restraining
Order should immediately call 911 for police response.
The University does not publish names of crime victims, or identifiable information regarding their residences, in
the UMDPD Daily Crime Log.
Victims may request that UMD directory information on file be removed from public sources. Students should
contact Carla L. Boyd, UMD Registrar, 139 DAdB, 218-726-8795. Employees should contact the Director of
Human Resources, 261 DAdB, 218-726-6326. Certain changes to directory information can also be made online
at: http://hrss.umn.edu/
Resources
General On-Campus Resources for Students, Staff, and Faculty
UMD Women’s Resource and Action Center (WRAC)
Support and advocacy for sexual assault, relationship violence, stalking, 24-hour help line.
266 Kirby Student Center
1120 Kirby Dr.
Duluth, MN 55812
218-726-6292
Website: http://www.d.umn.edu/mlrc/wrac/
UMD Health Services
Physical and mental health services.
615 Niagara Court
Duluth, MN 55812
218-726-8155
Websites: http://www.d.umn.edu/hlthserv/
http://www.d.umn.edu/hlthserv/counseling/
http://www.d.umn.edu/hlthserv/medical/women_health.html
University of Minnesota Duluth Police Department
Law enforcement for UMD campus, properties, events, and surrounding communities.
287 Darland Administration Building (DAdB)
1049 University Dr.
Duluth, MN 55812
Website: www.d.umn.edu/police
46
Emergencies and/or Police Services: Call 911
Administrative Resources: 218-726-7000
UMD Office of Disability Resources
Support and advocacy for persons with disabilities, including victims of violence and other crimes.
258 Kirby Student Center
1120 Kirby Dr.
Duluth, MN 55812
218-726-6101
Website: http://www.d.umn.edu/access/
UMD Multicultural Center
Multicultural support and resources.
270 Kirby Student Center
1120 Kirby Dr.
Duluth, MN 55812
218-726-6522
Website: http://www.d.umn.edu/mlrc/
UMD Office of Student Conduct
Student Conduct Code violations and sanctions.
245 Kirby Plaza
1208 Kirby Dr.
Duluth, MN 55812
218-726-7255
Website: http://www.d.umn.edu/conduct/
UMD Safewalk
On-campus secure walking escorts.
195 Kirby Student Center
1120 Kirby Dr.
Duluth, MN 55812
218-726-6100
Website: http://www.d.umn.edu/depts/view.cgi?groupid=248
UMD Employee Assistance Program
Faculty- and staff-specific professional consultation and mental health resources.
255 DAdB
1049 University Dr.
Duluth, MN 55812
218-726-7161
888-243-5744
612-625-2820
47
Website: http://www.d.umn.edu/umdhr/About/eap.html
Off-Campus Local, Regional, and National Resources
University of Minnesota Equal Opportunity and Affirmative Action
Harassment and discrimination advocacy and assistance.
274 McNamara Alumni Center
200 SE Oak St.
Minneapolis, MN 55455
612-624-9547
Website: www.eoaffact.umn.edu
Program for Aid to Victims of Sexual Assault (PAVSA)
Advocacy and assistance for victims of sexual assault.
32 E. 1st Street
Suite 200
Duluth, MN 55802
24-Hour Crisis Line: 218-726-1931
Office: 218-726-1442
Website: http://www.pavsa.org
Safe Haven
Advocacy, safe housing, counseling, legal services for victims of domestic and relationship violence.
414 W. 1st St.
Duluth, MN 55802
218-623-1000
24-Hour Crisis Line: 218-728-6481
Website: http://www.safehavenshelter.org
Domestic Abuse Intervention Programs (DAIP)
Advocacy, safe housing, counseling, legal services for victims of domestic and relationship violence.
202 East Superior Street
Duluth, MN 55802
(218) 722-2781
Website: http://www.theduluthmodel.org/
Minnesota Coalition Against Sexual Assault (MNCASA)
Assists local programs in providing advocacy and prevention programming in relation to sexual assault.
161 St. Anthony Ave.
Ste. 1001
St. Paul, MN 55103
48
651-209-9993
Website: www.mncasa.org
OutFront Minnesota
GLBT community-specific advocacy and assistance with sexual assault and relationship violence issues.
310 East 38th Street, Suite 209
Minneapolis, MN 55409-1337
612-822-0127
800-800-0350
Website: www.outfront.org
Canvas Health
Help for people of all ages with mental health, chemical health, and relationship and sexual abuse issues.
Various locations in the Twin Cities Metro area
Crisis Line: 612-379-6363 Website: www.crisis.org
Domestic Abuse Project
Advocacy and assistance for male victims of relationship violence.
204 West Franklin Avenue
Minneapolis, MN 55404
612-874-7063
Website: www.domesticabuseproject.org
Rape, Abuse, and Incest National Network: http://www.rainn.org
United States Department of Justice: http://www.ovw.usdoj.gov
United States Department of Education, Office of Civil Rights:
http://www2.ed.gov/about/offices/list/ocr/index.html
Note: Resources and organizations not affiliated with the University of Minnesota or the University of Minnesota Duluth are listed for
informational purposes only, and are not endorsed by the University of Minnesota or the University of Minnesota Duluth.
Tips for Being an Active Bystander
Bystanders play a critical role in the prevention of sexual and relationship violence. They are individuals who
observe violence or witness the conditions that perpetuate violence. They are not directly involved but have the
choice to intervene, speak up, or do something about it. UMD promotes a culture of community accountability
where bystanders are actively engaged in the prevention of violence without causing further harm. One may not
always know what to do, even with a willingness to help. Below is a list of some ways to be an active bystander.
o
If you or someone else is in immediate danger, dial 911.
o
Watch out for your friends and fellow students/employees. If you see someone who looks like
they could be in trouble or need help, ask if they are OK and seek help if needed.
49
o
Confront people who seclude, make sexual advances on, or have sex with people who are
incapacitated, and report such non-consensual sexual incidents to law enforcement.
o
Speak up when someone discusses plans to take sexual advantage of another person, and report
it to law enforcement.
o
Believe someone who discloses sexual assault, abusive behavior, or experience with stalking.
o
Refer victims to on- or off- campus resources listed in this document for support in health,
counseling, or with legal assistance.
Risk Reduction
With no intent to blame victims, and recognizing that only rapists are responsible for rape, the following are
some strategies to reduce one’s risk of sexual assault or harassment (from the Rape, Abuse, & Incest National
Network, http://www.rainn.org):
•
Trust your instincts. If a situation or location feels unsafe or uncomfortable, it probably isn’t the best
place to be.
•
Try not to load yourself down with packages or bags as this can make you appear more vulnerable.
•
Make sure your cell phone is with you and charged and that you have cab money.
•
Don't allow yourself to be isolated with someone you don’t trust or someone you don’t know.
•
Avoid putting music headphones in both ears so that you can be more aware of your surroundings,
especially if you are walking alone.
•
When you go to a social gathering, go with a group of friends, arrive together, check in with each other
throughout the evening, and leave together. Knowing where you are and who is around you may help
you to find a way out of a bad situation.
•
Trust your instincts. If you feel unsafe in any situation, go with your gut. If you see something
suspicious, contact law enforcement immediately (local authorities can be reached by calling 911 in most
areas of the U.S.).
•
Don't leave your drink unattended while talking, dancing, using the restroom, or making a phone call. If
you’ve left your drink alone, just get a new one.
•
Don't accept drinks from people you don't know or trust. If you choose to accept a drink, go with the
person to the bar to order it, watch it being poured, and carry it yourself. At parties, don’t drink from
punch bowls or other large, common, open containers.
50
•
Watch out for your friends, and vice versa. If a friend seems out of it, is way too intoxicated for the
amount of alcohol they’ve had, or is acting out of character, get him or her to a safe place immediately.
•
Be aware of your surroundings. Knowing where you are and who is around you may help you to find a
way to get out of a bad situation.
•
Try to avoid isolated areas; it is more difficult to get help if no one is around.
•
Walk with purpose; even if you don’t know where you are going, act like you do.
If you suspect you or a friend has been drugged, contact law enforcement immediately (local authorities can be
reached by calling 911 in most areas of the U.S.). Be explicit with doctors so they can give you the correct tests
(you will need a urine test and possibly others).
•
If you need to get out of an uncomfortable or scary situation here are some things that you can try:
•
Remember that being in this situation is not your fault. You did not do anything wrong, it is the person
who is making you uncomfortable that is to blame.
•
Be true to yourself. Don't feel obligated to do anything you don't want to do. "I don't want to" is always
a good enough reason. Do what feels right to you and what you are comfortable with.
•
Have a code word with your friends or family so that if you don’t feel comfortable you can call them and
communicate your discomfort without the person you are with knowing. Your friends or family can then
come to get you or make up an excuse for you to leave.
•
Lie if you don’t want to hurt the person’s feelings. It is better to make up a reason to leave than to stay
and be uncomfortable, scared, or worse. Some excuses you could use are: needing to take care of a friend
or family member, not feeling well, having somewhere else that you need to be, etc.
•
Try to think of an escape route. How would you try to get out of the room? Where are the doors?
Windows? Are there people around who might be able to help you? Is there an emergency phone
nearby?
•
If you and/or the other person have been drinking, you can say that you would rather wait until you
both have your full judgment before doing anything you may regret later.
Adjudication of Violations
Reports of all domestic violence, dating violence, sexual assault, and stalking made to the University of Minnesota
Duluth Police Department will automatically be referred to the Title IX Coordinator for investigation regardless
of if the complainant choses to pursue criminal charges.
51
The university disciplinary process is consistent with the institution’s policy and will include a prompt, fair, and
impartial investigation and resolution process transparent to the accuser and the accused.
Sexual assault, domestic violence, dating violence, and stalking are criminal acts which also may subject the
accused person to criminal and civil penalties under federal and state law.
Students (Resolving Alleged Student Conduct Code Violations)
Whether or not criminal charges are filed, the university or an individual person may file a complaint alleging that
a student violated the Board of Regent Policy: Student Conduct Code.
The University of Minnesota has fair processes for resolving complaints against students and student
organizations under the Board of Regents Policy: Student Conduct Code. This process emphasizes student
development through understanding and accepting responsibility for personal behavior, while protecting
community interests and due process. The University of Minnesota will:
•
provide fair notice to students of alleged violations of the Board of Regents Policy: Student Conduct
Code;
•
encourage informal resolution of alleged violations without the need for a hearing;
•
permit students the opportunity for a fair hearing upon request, and the opportunity for one campuswide appeal of a finding of violation of the Code; and
•
provide for a preponderance of the evidence (i.e. more likely than not) standard of proof.
For cases involving violations of sexual assault, sexual harassment, stalking, or relationship violence, the
University of Minnesota’s disciplinary process will:
•
be conducted by officials who receive annual training on the issues related to sexual assault, sexual
harassment, stalking, and relationship violence and how to conduct an investigation and hearing process
that protects the safety of victim/survivors and promotes accountability;
•
provide equitable access to an appeal by both the accused student and the reporting party;
•
allow equitable access to a support person of their choice for both the accused student and the reporting
party at any related meeting or proceeding;
•
allow equitable access to an advocate, if permitted for either, for both the accused student and the
reporting party at any related meeting or proceeding; and
•
provide simultaneous written notice to both the accused student and the reporting party:
52




of the results of any disciplinary proceeding;
of the procedure for the accused student and the reporting party to appeal the results of the disciplinary
proceeding;
of any change to the results prior to the time the results become final; and
when the results become final.
Hearings for incidents of sexual assault, sexual harassment, stalking, and relationship violence will be heard by the
Student Hearing Panel.
Sanctions for Students
In all cases, investigations that result in a finding of more likely than not that a violation of the Student Code of
Conduct occurred will lead to the initiation of disciplinary procedures against the accused individual.
The factors considered in sanctioning students for any violation, include:
•
Nature of offense
•
Severity of offense
•
Culpability of the student
•
Impact on other students or members of the U community
•
Opportunity for student development
Possible sanctions:
•
Academic Sanction
•
Warning
•
Probation
•
Required compliance
•
Confiscation
•
Restitution
•
Restriction of Privileges
•
University Housing Suspension
•
University Housing Expulsion
•
Suspension
•
Expulsion
•
Withholding of Diploma or Degree
•
Revocation of Admission or Degree
Sanctions for Employees
The Office for Equal Opportunity will promptly investigate any incidents of sexual assault, stalking or
relationship violence where the accused party is an employee. The Office for Equal Opportunity will make
recommendations for actions based on their investigation.
The Office for Equal Opportunity will proceed independently of any action taken in the criminal or civil courts,
as determined on a case-by-case basis. Criminal court proceedings are not a substitute for University procedures.
The victim/survivor and the accused employee will be allowed to have a non-participating/non-witness support
53
person present for interviews. The victim/survivor will not be required to mediate directly with the accused
employee.
Employees are not allowed a formal hearing.
The Office for Equal Opportunity will inform both victim/survivor and accused employee of the outcome.
Possible Sanctions:
•
Discipline
•
Termination
A person alleging sexual assault, domestic violence, dating violence, or stalking may also utilize the complaint and
investigatory procedures set forth in the university’s policy against Sexual Harassment
(http://www.policy.umn.edu/Policies/hr/HRMisc/SEXUALHARASSMENT.html) in order to remedy any
hostile environment. All conduct proceedings against students, however, will be resolved through the Office of
Student Conduct.
1. The accuser and the accused student each have the opportunity to attend a hearing before a properly trained
hearing board that protects the safety of victims and promotes accountability;
2. The accuser and the accused will have timely notice for meetings at which the accuser or accused, or both,
may be present;
3. The institution will allow for timely access to the accuser, the accused, and appropriate officials to any
information that will be used after the fact-finding investigation but during formal and informal disciplinary
meeting and hearings;
4. The institutional disciplinary procedures will not be conducted by officials who have a conflict of interest or
bias for or against the accuser or the accused;
5. The institution provides the accuser and accused the same opportunities to have others present during an
institutional disciplinary proceeding. The accuser and the accused student each have the opportunity to be
advised by a personal advisor of their choice, at their expense, at any stage of the process and to be accompanied
by that advisor at any meeting or proceeding. YOU SHOULD ADDRESS WHAT THE ADVISOR IS AND
IS NOT PERMITTED TO DO; MAKE SURE THE RESTRICTIONS APPLY TO BOTH. An advisor
may only consult and advise his or her advisee, but not speak for the advisee at any meeting or hearing.
When a complainant does not consent to the disclosure of his or her name or other identifiable information to
the alleged perpetrator, the university’s ability to respond to the complaint may be limited.
Victim Notification
Upon written request by the victim of a crime of violence or a non-forcible sex offense, the University will
disclose to her/him the report on the results of any disciplinary proceeding conducted by the University against a
student or students who allegedly committed the offense. If the victim is deceased as a result of the offense,
54
her/his next of kin will be afforded this same opportunity.
Confidentiality
The university will protect the identity of persons who report having been victims of sexual assault, domestic
violence, dating/relationship violence, and stalking to the fullest extent of the law and as previously mentioned in
this document.
Sexual Offender Registration
The Campus Sex Crimes Prevention Act (CSCPA) of 2000 is a federal law that provides for the tracking of
convicted sex offenders enrolled at, or employed by, institutions of higher education. The federal law requires
state law enforcement agencies (in Minnesota, it is the Minnesota Bureau of Criminal Apprehension) to provide
UMD with a list of registered sex offenders who have indicated that they are enrolled, employed, or carrying on a
vocation at UMD.
UMD is required to inform the campus community that a registration list of sex offenders is available by going to
the UMD Police Department website (click on Sex Offender Locator): http://www.d.umn.edu/police/ Or go
to: http://coms.doc.state.mn.us/level3/ .
The CSCPA further amends the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act of 1974 (FERPA) to clarify that
nothing in the Act can prohibit an educational institution from disclosing information provided to the institution
concerning registered sex offenders.
Minnesota State Statute 243.166 REGISTRATION OF PREDATORY OFFENDERS. Subdivision 1.
[Repealed, 2005 c 136 art 3 s 31]
Subdivision 1a.Definitions.
(a) As used in this section, unless the context clearly indicates otherwise, the following terms have the meanings
given them:
(b) "Bureau" means the Bureau of Criminal Apprehension.
(c) "Dwelling" means the building where the person lives under a formal or informal agreement to do so.
However, dwelling does not include a supervised publicly or privately operated shelter or facility designed to
provide temporary living accommodations for homeless individuals as defined in section 116L.361, subdivision 5.
(d) "Incarceration" and "confinement" do not include electronic home monitoring.
(e) "Law enforcement authority" or "authority" means, with respect to a home rule charter or statutory city, the
chief of police, and with respect to an unincorporated area, the county sheriff.
(f) "Motor vehicle" has the meaning given in section 169.011, subdivision 92.
(g) "Primary address" means the mailing address of the person's dwelling. If the mailing address is different from
the actual location of the dwelling, primary address also includes the physical location of the dwelling described
with as much specificity as possible.
55
(h) "School" includes any public or private educational institution, including any secondary school, trade, or
professional institution, or institution of higher education, that the person is enrolled in on a full-time or parttime basis.
(i) "Secondary address" means the mailing address of any place where the person regularly or occasionally stays
overnight when not staying at the person's primary address. If the mailing address is different from the actual
location of the place, secondary address also includes the physical location of the place described with as much
specificity as possible. However, the location of a supervised publicly or privately operated shelter or facility
designated to provide temporary living accommodations for homeless individuals as defined in section
116L.361, subdivision 5, does not constitute a secondary address.
(j) "Treatment facility" means a residential facility, as defined in section 244.052, subdivision 1, and residential
chemical dependency treatment programs and halfway houses licensed under chapter 245A, including, but not
limited to, those facilities directly or indirectly assisted by any department or agency of the United States.
(k) "Work" includes employment that is full time or part time for a period of time exceeding 14 days or for an
aggregate period of time exceeding 30 days during any calendar year, whether financially compensated,
volunteered, or for the purpose of government or educational benefit.
Subdivision 1b.Registration required. (a) A person shall register under this section if:
(1) the person was charged with or petitioned for a felony violation of or attempt to violate, or aiding, abetting,
or conspiracy to commit, any of the following, and convicted of or adjudicated delinquent for that offense or
another offense arising out of the same set of circumstances:
(i) murder under section 609.185, paragraph (a), clause (2); (ii) kidnapping under section 609.25;
(iii) criminal sexual conduct under section 609.342; 609.343; 609.344; 609.345; 609.3451, subdivision 3; or
609.3453; or
(iv) indecent exposure under section 617.23, subdivision 3;
(2) the person was charged with or petitioned for a violation of, or attempt to violate, or aiding, abetting, or
conspiring to commit criminal abuse in violation of section 609.2325, subdivision 1, paragraph (b), false
imprisonment in violation of section 609.255, subdivision 2; soliciting a minor to engage in prostitution in
violation of section 609.322 or 609.324; soliciting a minor to engage in sexual conduct in violation of section
609.352; using a minor in a sexual performance in violation of section 617.246; or possessing pornographic work
involving a minor in violation of section 617.247, and convicted of or adjudicated delinquent for that offense or
another offense arising out of the same set of circumstances;
(3) the person was sentenced as a patterned sex offender under section 609.3455, subdivision 3a; or
(4) the person was convicted of or adjudicated delinquent for, including pursuant to a court martial, violating a
law of the United States, including the Uniform Code of Military Justice, similar to the offenses described in
56
clause (1), (2), or (3).
(b) A person also shall register under this section if:
(1) the person was convicted of or adjudicated delinquent in another state for an offense that would be a
violation of a law described in paragraph (a) if committed in this state;
(2) the person enters this state to reside, work, or attend school, or enters this state and remains for 14 days or
longer; and
(3) ten years have not elapsed since the person was released from confinement or, if the person was not
confined, since the person was convicted of or adjudicated delinquent for the offense that triggers registration,
unless the person is subject to a longer registration period under the laws of another state in which the person
has been convicted or adjudicated, or is subject to lifetime registration.
If a person described in this paragraph is subject to a longer registration period in another state or is subject to
lifetime registration, the person shall register for that time period regardless of when the person was released
from confinement, convicted, or adjudicated delinquent.
(c) A person also shall register under this section if the person was committed pursuant to a court commitment
order under chapter 253D or Minnesota Statutes 1992, section 526.10, or a similar law of another state or the
United States, regardless of whether the person was convicted of any offense.
(d) A person also shall register under this section if:
(1) the person was charged with or petitioned for a felony violation or attempt to violate any of the offenses
listed in paragraph (a), clause (1), or a similar law of another state or the United States, or the person was
charged with or petitioned for a violation of any of the offenses listed in paragraph (a), clause (2), or a similar law
of another state or the United States;
(2) the person was found not guilty by reason of mental illness or mental deficiency after a trial for that offense,
or found guilty but mentally ill after a trial for that offense, in states with a guilty but mentally ill verdict; and
(3) the person was committed pursuant to a court commitment order under section 253B.18 or a similar law of
another state or the United States.
Subdivision 2.Notice. When a person who is required to register under subdivision 1b, paragraph (a), is sentenced
or becomes subject to a juvenile court disposition order, the court shall tell the person of the duty to register
under this section and that, if the person fails to comply with the registration requirements, information about
the offender may be made available to the public through electronic, computerized, or
other accessible means. The court may not modify the person's duty to register in the pronounced sentence or
disposition order. The court shall require the person to read and sign a form stating that the duty of the
person to register under this section has been explained. The court shall forward the signed sex offender
registration form, the complaint, and sentencing documents to the bureau. If a person required to register under
57
subdivision 1b, paragraph (a), was not notified by the court of the registration requirement at the time of
sentencing or disposition, the assigned corrections agent shall notify the person of the requirements of this
section. When a person who is required to register under subdivision 1b, paragraph (c) or (d), is released from
commitment, the treatment facility shall notify the person of the requirements of this section. The treatment
facility shall also obtain the registration information required under this section and forward it to the bureau.
Subdivision 3.Registration procedure. (a) Except as provided in subdivision 3a, a person required to register
under this section shall register with the corrections agent as soon as the agent is assigned to the person. If the
person does not have an assigned corrections agent or is unable to locate the assigned corrections agent, the
person shall register with the law enforcement authority that has jurisdiction in the area of the person's
primary address.
(b) Except as provided in subdivision 3a, at least five days before the person starts living at a new primary
address, including living in another state, the person shall give written notice of the new primary address to the
assigned corrections agent or to the law enforcement authority with which the person currently is registered. If
the person will be living in a new state and that state has a registration requirement, the person shall also give
written notice of the new address to the designated registration agency in the new state. A
person required to register under this section shall also give written notice to the assigned corrections agent or to
the law enforcement authority that has jurisdiction in the area of the person's primary address that the person is
no longer living or staying at an address, immediately after the person is no longer living or staying
at that address. The written notice required by this paragraph must be provided in person. The corrections
agent or law enforcement authority shall, within two business days after receipt of this information, forward it to
the bureau. The bureau shall, if it has not already been done, notify the law enforcement authority having primary
jurisdiction in the community where the person will live of the new address. If the person is leaving the state, the
bureau shall notify the registration authority in the new state of the new address. The person's registration
requirements under this section are suspended after the person begins living in the new state and the bureau has
confirmed the address in the other state through the annual verification process on at least one occasion. The
person's registration requirements under this section are reactivated if the person resumes living in Minnesota
and the registration time period described in subdivision 6 has not expired.
(c) A person required to register under subdivision 1b, paragraph (b), because the person is working or attending
school in Minnesota shall register with the law enforcement authority that has jurisdiction in the area where the
person works or attends school. In addition to other information required by this section, the
person shall provide the address of the school or of the location where the person is employed. A person shall
comply with this paragraph within five days of beginning employment or school. A person's obligation to register
under this paragraph terminates when the person is no longer working or attending school in Minnesota.
(d) A person required to register under this section who works or attends school outside of Minnesota shall
register as a predatory offender in the state where the person works or attends school. The person's corrections
agent, or if the person does not have an assigned corrections agent, the law enforcement authority that has
jurisdiction in the area of the person's primary address shall notify the person of this requirement.
Subdivision 3a.Registration procedure when person lacks primary address. (a) If a person leaves a primary
address and does not have a new primary address, the person shall register with the law enforcement authority
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that has jurisdiction in the area where the person is staying within 24 hours of the time the person no longer has a
primary address.
(b) Notwithstanding the time period for registration in paragraphs (a) and (c), a person with a primary address of
a correctional facility who is scheduled to be released from the facility and who does not have a new primary
address shall register with the law enforcement authority that has jurisdiction in the area where the person will be
staying at least three days before the person is released from the correctional facility.
(c) A person who lacks a primary address shall register with the law enforcement authority that has jurisdiction in
the area where the person is staying within 24 hours after entering the jurisdiction. Each time a person who lacks
a primary address moves to a new jurisdiction without acquiring a new primary address, the person shall register
with the law enforcement authority that has jurisdiction in the area where the person is staying within 24 hours
after entering the jurisdiction.
(d) Upon registering under this subdivision, the person shall provide the law enforcement authority with all of the
information the individual is required to provide under subdivision 4a. However, instead of reporting the
person's primary address, the person shall describe the location of where the person is staying with as much
specificity as possible.
(e) Except as otherwise provided in paragraph (f), if a person continues to lack a primary address, the person
shall report in person on a weekly basis to the law enforcement authority with jurisdiction in the area where the
person is staying. This weekly report shall occur between the hours of 9:00 a.m. and 5:00 p.m. The person is not
required to provide the registration information required under subdivision 4a each time the offender reports to
an authority, but the person shall inform the authority of changes to any information provided under this
subdivision or subdivision 4a and shall otherwise comply with this subdivision.
(f) If the law enforcement authority determines that it is impractical, due to the person's unique circumstances, to
require a person lacking a primary address to report weekly and in person as required under paragraph (e), the
authority may authorize the person to follow an alternative reporting procedure. The authority shall
consult with the person's corrections agent, if the person has one, in establishing the specific criteria of this
alternative procedure, subject to the following requirements:
(1) the authority shall document, in the person's registration record, the specific reasons why the weekly inperson reporting process is impractical for the person to follow;
(2) the authority shall explain how the alternative reporting procedure furthers the public safety objectives of this
section;
(3) the authority shall require the person lacking a primary address to report in person at least monthly to the
authority or the person's corrections agent and shall specify the location where the person shall report. If the
authority determines it would be more practical and would further public safety for the person to report to
another law enforcement authority with jurisdiction where the person is staying, it may, after consulting with the
other law enforcement authority, include this requirement in the person's alternative reporting process;
(4) the authority shall require the person to comply with the weekly, in-person reporting process required under
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paragraph (e), if the person moves to a new area where this process would be practical;
(5) the authority shall require the person to report any changes to the registration information provided under
subdivision 4a and to comply with the periodic registration requirements specified under paragraph (g); and
(6) the authority shall require the person to comply with the requirements of subdivision 3, paragraphs (b) and
(c), if the person moves to a primary address.
(g) If a person continues to lack a primary address and continues to report to the same law enforcement
authority, the person shall provide the authority with all of the information the individual is required to provide
under this subdivision and subdivision 4a at least annually, unless the person is required to register under
subdivision 1b, paragraph (c), following commitment pursuant to a court commitment under chapter
253D or a similar law of another state or the United States. If the person is required to register under subdivision
1b, paragraph (c), the person shall provide the law enforcement authority with all of the information the
individual is required to report under this subdivision and subdivision 4a at least once every three months.
(h) A law enforcement authority receiving information under this subdivision shall forward registration
information and changes to that information to the bureau within two business days of receipt of the
information.
(i)
For purposes of this subdivision, a person who fails to report a primary address will be deemed to
be a person who lacks a primary address, and the person shall comply with the requirements for a
person who lacks a primary address.
Subdivision 4. Contents of registration. (a) The registration provided to the corrections agent or law enforcement
authority, must consist of a statement in writing signed by the person, giving information required by the bureau,
a fingerprint card, and photograph of the person taken at the time of the person's release from incarceration or,
if the person was not incarcerated, at the time the person initially registered
under this section. The registration information also must include a written consent form signed by the person
allowing a treatment facility or residential housing unit or shelter to release information to a law enforcement
officer about the person's admission to, or residence in, a treatment facility or residential housing unit or shelter.
Registration information on adults and juveniles may be maintained together notwithstanding section
260B.171, subdivision 3.
(b) For persons required to register under subdivision 1b, paragraph (c), following commitment pursuant to a
court commitment under chapter 253D or a similar law of another state or the United States, in addition to other
information required by this section, the registration provided to the corrections agent or law enforcement
authority must include the person's offense history and documentation of treatment received during the person's
commitment. This documentation is limited to a statement of how far the person progressed in treatment during
commitment.
(c) Within three days of receipt, the corrections agent or law enforcement authority shall forward the registration
information to the bureau. The bureau shall ascertain whether the person has registered with the law
enforcement authority in the area of the person's primary address, if any, or if the person lacks a primary address,
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where the person is staying, as required by subdivision 3a. If the person has not registered with the law
enforcement authority, the bureau shall send one copy to that authority.
(d) The corrections agent or law enforcement authority may require that a person required to register under this
section appear before the agent or authority to be photographed. The agent or authority shall forward the
photograph to the bureau.
(1) Except as provided in clause (2), the agent or authority shall require a person required to register under this
section who is classified as a level III offender under section 244.052 to appear before the agent or authority
at least every six months to be photographed.
(2) The requirements of this paragraph shall not apply during any period where the person to be photographed
is: (i) committed to the commissioner of corrections and incarcerated, (ii) incarcerated in a regional jail or county
jail, or (iii) committed to the commissioner of human services and receiving treatment in a secure treatment
facility.
(e) During the period a person is required to register under this section, the following provisions apply: (1)
Except for persons registering under subdivision 3a, the bureau shall mail a verification form to the
person's last reported primary address. This verification form must provide notice to the offender that, if the
offender does not return the verification form as required, information about the offender may be made
available to the public through electronic, computerized, or other accessible means. For persons who are
registered under subdivision 3a, the bureau shall mail an annual verification form to the law enforcement
authority where the offender most recently reported. The authority shall provide the verification form to the
person at the next weekly meeting and ensure that the person completes and signs the form and returns it to the
bureau. Notice is sufficient under this paragraph, if the verification form is sent by first class mail to the person's
last reported primary address, or for persons registered under subdivision 3a, to the law enforcement authority
where the offender most recently reported.
(2) The person shall mail the signed verification form back to the bureau within ten days after receipt of the
form, stating on the form the current and last address of the person's residence and the other information
required under subdivision 4a.
(3) In addition to the requirements listed in this section, a person who is assigned to risk level II or III under
section 244.052, and who is no longer under correctional supervision for a registration offense, or a failure to
register offense, but who resides, works, or attends school in Minnesota, shall have an annual in-person contact
with a law enforcement authority as provided in this section. If the person resides in Minnesota, the annual inperson contact shall be with the law enforcement authority that has jurisdiction over the person's primary address
or, if the person has no address, the location where the person is staying. If the person does not reside in
Minnesota but works or attends school in this state, the person shall have an annual in-person contact with the
law enforcement authority or authorities with jurisdiction over the person's school or workplace. During the
month of the person's birth date, the person shall report to the authority to verify the accuracy of the registration
information and to be photographed. Within three days of this contact, the authority shall enter information as
required by the bureau into the predatory offender registration database and submit an updated photograph of
the person to the bureau's predatory offender registration unit.
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(4) If the person fails to mail the completed and signed verification form to the bureau within ten days after
receipt of the form, or if the person fails to report to the law enforcement authority during the month of the
person's birth date, the person is in violation of this section.
(5) For any person who fails to mail the completed and signed verification form to the bureau within ten days
after receipt of the form and who has been determined to be a risk level III offender under section 244.052, the
bureau shall immediately investigate and notify local law enforcement authorities to investigate the person's
location and to ensure compliance with this section. The bureau also shall immediately give notice of the person's
violation of this section to the law enforcement authority having jurisdiction over the person's last registered
address or addresses.
For persons required to register under subdivision 1b, paragraph (c), following commitment pursuant to a court
commitment under chapter 253D or a similar law of another state or the United States, the bureau shall comply
with clause (1) at least four times each year. For persons who, under section 244.052, are assigned to risk level III
and who are no longer under correctional supervision for a registration offense or a failure to register offense, the
bureau shall comply with clause (1) at least two times each year. For all other persons required to register under
this section, the bureau shall comply with clause (1) each year within 30 days of the anniversary date of the
person's initial registration.
(f) When sending out a verification form, the bureau shall determine whether the person to whom the
verification form is being sent has signed a written consent form as provided for in paragraph (a). If the person
has not signed such a consent form, the bureau shall send a written consent form to the person along
with the verification form. A person who receives this written consent form shall sign and return it to the bureau
at the same time as the verification form.
Subdivision 4a. Information required to be provided. (a) A person required to register under this section shall
provide to the corrections agent or law enforcement authority the following information:
(1) the person's primary address;
(2) all of the person's secondary addresses in Minnesota, including all addresses used for residential or
recreational purposes;
(3) the addresses of all Minnesota property owned, leased, or rented by the person; (4) the addresses of all
locations where the person is employed;
(5) the addresses of all schools where the person is enrolled; and
(6) the year, model, make, license plate number, and color of all motor vehicles owned or regularly driven by the
person.
(b) The person shall report to the agent or authority the information required to be provided under paragraph (a),
clauses (2) to (6), within five days of the date the clause becomes applicable. If because of a change in
circumstances any information reported under paragraph (a), clauses (1) to (6), no longer applies, the person shall
immediately inform the agent or authority that the information is no longer valid. If the person leaves a primary
address and does not have a new primary address, the person shall register as provided in subdivision
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3a.
Subdivision 4b.Health care facility; notice of status. (a) For the purposes of this subdivision, "health care facility"
means a facility:
(1) licensed by the commissioner of health as a hospital, boarding care home or supervised living facility under
sections 144.50 to 144.58, or a nursing home under chapter 144A;
(2) registered by the commissioner of health as a housing with services establishment as defined in section
144D.01; or
(3) licensed by the commissioner of human services as a residential facility under chapter 245A to provide adult
foster care, adult mental health treatment, chemical dependency treatment to adults, or residential services to
persons with disabilities.
(b) Prior to admission to a health care facility, a person required to register under this section shall disclose to: (1)
the health care facility employee processing the admission the person's status as a registered predatory
offender under this section; and
(2) the person's corrections agent, or if the person does not have an assigned corrections agent, the law
enforcement authority with whom the person is currently required to register, that inpatient admission will occur.
(c) A law enforcement authority or corrections agent who receives notice under paragraph (b) or who knows that
a person required to register under this section is planning to be admitted and receive, or has been admitted and
is receiving health care at a health care facility shall notify the administrator of the facility and deliver a fact sheet
to the administrator containing the following information: (1) name and physical description of the offender; (2)
the offender's conviction history, including the dates of conviction; (3) the risk level classification assigned to the
offender under section 244.052, if any; and (4) the profile of likely victims.
(d) Except for a hospital licensed under sections 144.50 to 144.58, if a health care facility receives a fact sheet
under paragraph (c) that includes a risk level classification for the offender, and if the facility admits the offender,
the facility shall distribute the fact sheet to all residents at the facility. If the facility determines that distribution to
a resident is not appropriate given the resident's medical, emotional, or mental status, the facility shall distribute
the fact sheet to the patient's next of kin or emergency contact.
Subdivision 5.Criminal penalty. (a) A person required to register under this section who knowingly violates any of
its provisions or intentionally provides false information to a corrections agent, law enforcement authority, or the
bureau is guilty of a felony and may be sentenced to imprisonment for not more than five years or to payment of
a fine of not more than $10,000, or both.
(b) Except as provided in paragraph (c), a person convicted of violating paragraph (a) shall be committed to the
custody of the commissioner of corrections for not less than a year and a day, nor more than five years.
(c) A person convicted of violating paragraph (a), who has previously been convicted of or adjudicated
delinquent for violating this section or a similar statute of another state or the United States, shall be committed
to the custody of the commissioner of corrections for not less than two years, nor more than five years.
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(d) Prior to the time of sentencing, the prosecutor may file a motion to have the person sentenced without regard
to the mandatory minimum sentence established by this subdivision. The motion must be accompanied by a
statement on the record of the reasons for it. When presented with the motion, or on its own motion, the court
may sentence the person without regard to the mandatory minimum sentence if the court finds substantial and
compelling reasons to do so. Sentencing a person in the manner described in this paragraph is
a departure from the Sentencing Guidelines.
(e) A person convicted and sentenced as required by this subdivision is not eligible for probation, parole,
discharge, work release, conditional release, or supervised release, until that person has served the full term of
imprisonment as provided by law, notwithstanding the provisions of sections 241.26, 242.19, 243.05, 244.04,
609.12, and 609.135.
Subdivision 5a.Ten-year conditional release for violations committed by level III offenders. Notwithstanding the
statutory maximum sentence otherwise applicable to the offense or any provision of the sentencing
guidelines, when a court commits a person to the custody of the commissioner of corrections for violating
subdivision 5 and, at the time of the violation, the person was assigned to risk level III under section 244.052, the
court shall provide that after the person has been released from prison, the commissioner shall place the person
on conditional release for ten years. The terms of conditional release are governed by section
609.3455, subdivision 8.
Subdivision 6. Registration period. (a) Notwithstanding the provisions of section 609.165, subdivision 1, and
except as provided in paragraphs (b), (c), and (d), a person required to register under this section shall continue to
comply with this section until ten years have elapsed since the person initially registered in connection with the
offense, or until the probation, supervised release, or conditional release period expires, whichever occurs later.
For a person required to register under this section who is committed under section
253B.18 or chapter 253D, the ten-year registration period does not include the period of commitment.
(b) If a person required to register under this section fails to provide the person's primary address as required by
subdivision 3, paragraph (b), fails to comply with the requirements of subdivision 3a, fails to provide information
as required by subdivision 4a, or fails to return the verification form referenced in subdivision 4 within ten days,
the commissioner of public safety may require the person to continue to register for an additional period of five
years. This five-year period is added to the end of the offender's registration period.
(c) If a person required to register under this section is subsequently incarcerated following a conviction for a
new offense or following a revocation of probation, supervised release, or conditional release for any offense, the
person shall continue to register until ten years have elapsed since the person was last released from incarceration
or until the person's probation, supervised release, or conditional release period expires, whichever occurs later.
(d) A person shall continue to comply with this section for the life of that person:
(1) if the person is convicted of or adjudicated delinquent for any offense for which registration is required under
subdivision 1b, or any offense from another state or any federal offense similar to the offenses described in
subdivision 1b, and the person has a prior conviction or adjudication for an offense for which registration was or
would have been required under subdivision 1b, or an offense from another state or a federal offense similar to
an offense described in subdivision 1b;
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(2) if the person is required to register based upon a conviction or delinquency adjudication for an offense under
section 609.185, paragraph (a), clause (2), or a similar statute from another state or the United States;
(3) if the person is required to register based upon a conviction for an offense under section 609.342, subdivision
1, paragraph (a), (c), (d), (e), (f), or (h); 609.343, subdivision 1, paragraph (a), (c), (d), (e), (f), or (h);
609.344, subdivision 1, paragraph (a), (c), or (g); or 609.345, subdivision 1, paragraph (a), (c), or (g); or a statute
from another state or the United States similar to the offenses described in this clause; or
(4) if the person is required to register under subdivision 1b, paragraph (c), following commitment pursuant to a
court commitment under chapter 253D or a similar law of another state or the United States.
(e) A person described in subdivision 1b, paragraph (b), who is required to register under the laws of a state in
which the person has been previously convicted or adjudicated delinquent, shall register under this section for the
time period required by the state of conviction or adjudication unless a longer time period is required elsewhere
in this section.
Subdivision 7. Use of data. (a) Except as otherwise provided in subdivision 7a or sections 244.052 and
299C.093, the data provided under this section is private data on individuals under section 13.02, subdivision
12.
(b) The data may be used only by law enforcement and corrections agencies for law enforcement and corrections
purposes.
(c) The commissioner of human services is authorized to have access to the data for:
(1) state-operated services, as defined in section 246.014, for the purposes described in section 246.13,
subdivision 2, paragraph (b); and
(2) purposes of completing background studies under chapter 245C.
Subdivision 7a. Availability of information on offenders who are out of compliance with registration law. (a) The
bureau may make information available to the public about offenders who are 16 years of age or older and who
are out of compliance with this section for 30 days or longer for failure to provide the offenders' primary or
secondary addresses. This information may be made available to the public through electronic,
computerized, or other accessible means. The amount and type of information made available is limited to the
information necessary for the public to assist law enforcement in locating the offender.
(b) An offender who comes into compliance with this section after the bureau discloses information about the
offender to the public may send a written request to the bureau requesting the bureau to treat information about
the offender as private data, consistent with subdivision 7. The bureau shall review the request and promptly take
reasonable action to treat the data as private, if the offender has complied with the requirement that the offender
provide the offender's primary and secondary addresses, or promptly notify the offender
that the information will continue to be treated as public information and the reasons for the bureau's decision.
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(c) If an offender believes the information made public about the offender is inaccurate or incomplete, the
offender may challenge the data under section 13.04, subdivision 4.
(d) The bureau is immune from any civil or criminal liability that might otherwise arise, based on the accuracy or
completeness of any information made public under this subdivision, if the bureau acts in good faith.
Subdivision 8. [Repealed, 2005 c 136 art 3 s 31]
Subdivision 9. Offenders from other states. (a) When the state accepts an offender from another state under a
reciprocal agreement under the interstate compact authorized by section 243.1605, or under any authorized
interstate agreement, the acceptance is conditional on the offender agreeing to register under this section when
the offender is living in Minnesota.
(b) The Bureau of Criminal Apprehension shall notify the commissioner of corrections:
(1) when the bureau receives notice from a local law enforcement authority that a person from another state who
is subject to this section has registered with the authority, unless the bureau previously received information
about the offender from the commissioner of corrections;
(2) when a registration authority, corrections agent, or law enforcement agency in another state notifies the
bureau that a person from another state who is subject to this section is moving to Minnesota; and
(3) when the bureau learns that a person from another state is in Minnesota and allegedly in violation of
subdivision 5 for failure to register.
(c) When a local law enforcement agency notifies the bureau of an out-of-state offender's registration, the agency
shall provide the bureau with information on whether the person is subject to community notification in another
state and the risk level the person was assigned, if any.
(d) The bureau must forward all information it receives regarding offenders covered under this subdivision from
sources other than the commissioner of corrections to the commissioner.
(e) When the bureau receives information directly from a registration authority, corrections agent, or law
enforcement agency in another state that a person who may be subject to this section is moving to Minnesota,
the bureau must ask whether the person entering the state is subject to community notification in another
state and the risk level the person has been assigned, if any.
(f) When the bureau learns that a person subject to this section intends to move into Minnesota from another
state or has moved into Minnesota from another state, the bureau shall notify the law enforcement authority with
jurisdiction in the area of the person's primary address and provide all information concerning the person that is
available to the bureau.
(g) The commissioner of corrections must determine the parole, supervised release, or conditional release status
of persons who are referred to the commissioner under this subdivision. If the commissioner determines that a
person is subject to parole, supervised release, or conditional release in another state and is not registered in
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Minnesota under the applicable interstate compact, the commissioner shall inform the local law enforcement
agency that the person is in violation of section 243.161. If the person is not subject to supervised release, the
commissioner shall notify the bureau and the local law enforcement agency of the person's status.
Subdivision 10. [Repealed, 1Sp2001 c 8 art 9 s 8]
Subdivision 10.Venue; aggregation. (a) A violation of this section may be prosecuted in any jurisdiction where an
offense takes place. However, the prosecutorial agency in the jurisdiction where the person last registered a
primary address is initially responsible to review the case for prosecution.
(b) When a person commits two or more offenses in two or more counties, the accused may be prosecuted for all
of the offenses in any county in which one of the offenses was committed.
Subdivision 11.Certified copies as evidence. Certified copies of predatory offender registration records are
admissible as substantive evidence when necessary to prove the commission of a violation of this section.
The Discipline Process
Alleged violations of the conduct code, no matter how minor or severe, are matters of concern to the University.
Allegations of individual or group misconduct may be reported by the UMD Police Department, University
departments, individual students, faculty/staff, or campus guests. All allegations of conduct code violations are
reviewed by the UMD Office of Student and Community Standards to determine (1) whether the alleged
misconduct appears, as judged by available evidence, to violate the conduct code; (2) which item(s) in the code
may have been violated, and (3) to recommend an outcome to resolve the complaint.
Student Hearings
If a disciplinary hearing is conducted, both the Complainant and Respondent will be given the opportunity to
have a support person with them during proceedings. If either party does not have a support person and wishes
to have one, Student Advocacy will provide the party with options to accommodate their needs.
Once the hearing is concluded and a determination made, the Respondent will be informed of the outcome in
writing, including information regarding access to an appeal if responsibility for a violation has been established.
The Complainant will be informed verbally of any portion of the disposition that has a direct impact on them.
The Complainant also has the right to appeal the case disposition.
The hearings are closed. Therefore the committee’s actions will not be made public.
Sanctions that may occur as a result of a determination of a violation include a warning and admonition, required
compliance, and probation, suspension, or expulsion.
Drug and Alcohol Policy
The UMD Police Department is responsible for the enforcement of state and federal laws regarding use,
possession, and sale of alcoholic beverages and illegal drugs.
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The University is committed to providing a healthy learning and working environment for all students and
employees and strives to meet this commitment through prevention and awareness programs. Alcohol abuse and
illegal drug use endangers the health and safety of all students and employees. As stated in the University’s DrugFree Policy (http://policy.umn.edu/Policies/Operations/Safety/DRUGFREE.html), students, faculty, and staff
are prohibited from engaging in:
• The illegal possession, use, sale, or distribution of alcohol, drugs, and drug paraphernalia on all University
premises, in University-supplied vehicles, and as part of University activities and business; and,
• The unlawful manufacture, distribution, dispensation, sale, possession, or use of a controlled substance on all
University premises, in University-supplied vehicles, and as part of University activities and business.
University students, employees, and others who conduct research and teaching activities with controlled
substances must comply with Administrative Policy: Using Controlled Substances for Research in order to ensure
that they follow all applicable regulations and safely handle and prevent diversion of controlled substances.
University community members are expected to refer suspected illegal situations to University police or local law
enforcement agencies for criminal investigation leading to possible prosecution.
Education and Treatment Programs
The University demonstrates its commitment to maintaining appropriate campus environments by offering a
variety of drug and alcohol abuse prevention and education services for students and employees, including
confidential diagnosis and assessment, short-term counseling, referral, and support groups.
Supervisors who are concerned that employees may have alcohol or drug-related problems should consult with
the Employee Assistance Programs (http://www.d.umn.edu/umdhr/About/eap.html)
Disciplinary sanctions will not be taken against students for seeking assistance from student health services or
against employees for seeking assistance from the Employee Assistance Programs.
Each campus is expected to provide information to students, faculty, and staff regarding available educational
and treatment programs and related services. For more information:
http://www.d.umn.edu/hlthserv/health_education/services/alcohol_drugs.html
Risks and Sanctions
To make informed choices about drug and alcohol use, students and employees should educate themselves about
the serious health consequences of the use, misuse, and abuse of alcohol and other drugs as described in the
Drug and Alcohol Health Risks Chart:
http://policy.umn.edu/Policies/Operations/Safety/DRUGFREE_APPA.html
Students and employees also should be aware that they may be subject to criminal prosecution under federal,
state, and local laws that specify fines or imprisonment or loss of federal financial student aid for conviction of
alcohol and drug-related offenses as described in the Drug and Alcohol Legal Sanctions Chart:
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http://policy.umn.edu/Policies/Operations/Safety/DRUGFREE_APPB.html
These legal sanctions are in addition to disciplinary sanctions by the University.
Students-Disciplinary Sanctions
Students who violate the prohibitions of the Drug Free policy are subject to progressive disciplinary procedures
as described in the Student Conduct Code: warning; probation; required compliance; confiscation of goods;
restitution; restriction of privileges; University housing suspension or expulsion; suspension or expulsion;
withholding of diploma or degree; and revocation of admission or degree.
Employees-Disciplinary Sanctions
Employees who violate the prohibitions of the Drug Free policy are subject to discipline ranging from an oral
warning, written warning, or unpaid suspension up to termination consistent with policies, rules, and contracts
governing the terms and conditions of their employment. Supervisors also may require an employee to provide
documentation of satisfactory participation in an alcohol or drug abuse assistance or rehabilitation program.
Employees who are convicted of any criminal drug statute violation in the workplace must report it to a
supervisor within five days of the conviction. Supervisors, department heads, and principal investigators who are
aware of any drug crime convictions of individuals (students or employees) who work on sponsored projects for
violations that occurred in the workplace must report them to the Office of the Associate Vice President for
Sponsored Projects Administration (SPA) within three calendar days of their notice of the conviction.
University of Minnesota Duluth Office of Housing and Residential Life
Missing Person Policy and Procedure
The purpose of this policy is to establish official standard procedures for the University of Minnesota Duluth’s
response to reports of missing student residents who reside in University-owned housing facilities, as required by
the US Higher Education Opportunity Act of 2008.
For purposes of this policy, a student resident may be considered a missing person if the resident’s absence from
residential life and the campus community is suspiciously different to his/her usual pattern of behavior and/or
unusual circumstances may have caused the absence.
I. Student designation of missing person contact information
•
Students age 18 and above and emancipated minors: Student residents will be given the opportunity to
designate an individual or individuals to be contacted by the University no more than 24 hours after the time that
the student resident is determined to be missing. A designation will remain in effect until changed or revoked by
the student resident via email to [email protected] or until the student is no longer a resident of University
housing.
69
•
Students under the age of 18 and not emancipated: In the event a student resident who is under age 18,
not emancipated, and is determined to be missing, the University is required to notify custodial parent or
guardian no more than 24 hours after the student resident is determined to be missing. The custodial parent or
guardian contact information will remain in effect throughout the duration of the contract period for which they
signed when under the age of 18, unless the student turns 18 during the contract period and contacts Office of
Housing and Residential Life to change or revoke the designation.
II.
Official notification procedures for missing persons:
A) Any individual on campus who has information that a University student resident may be a missing person
must notify the UMD Police Department as soon as possible. It shall be the policy of the University of
Minnesota Duluth that any of its agents that receive information on a missing student resident will report it to
the UMD Police Department within twenty-four (24) hours of the determination that the student is missing.
This will be done regardless of whether or not the student resident has designated a contact person, is over the
age of 18, or is an emancipated minor.
B) If a report of a potential missing person is made to UMD Housing, staff will immediately contact (call 911)
and work cooperatively with the UMD Police Department in its investigation of the matter. Cooperative efforts
may include:
•
Conduct a health and wellness check on the resident
•
Attempt to make contact via cellular phone, e-mail, or other means
•
Identify other students who may be aware of the missing person’s whereabouts (i.e. roommate, friends,
classmates, family, etc.).
•
Checking attendance at class or on-campus employment, use of meal plan, etc.
C) The UMD Police Department will gather all essential information about the University student resident from
the reporting person and other individuals who may provide information that will assist with the investigation.
D) No later than 24 hours after the University determines that a student resident is missing, the chief law
enforcement officer on campus or designee will notify the designated missing person contact (for students 18 and
above and emancipated minors) or the parent/guardian (for students under the age of 18 and not emancipated)
that the student resident is believed to be missing. This individual contact will be updated as to the progress of
the investigation into the missing person report.
III.
Campus communications in the event of a missing student resident:
In cases involving missing student residents, all inquiries by media or the public regarding missing student
residents shall be referred to the UMD Office of Marketing and Public Relations. Law enforcement personnel are
best situated to provide information that is designed to elicit public assistance in the search for a missing person.
Therefore, all communications regarding missing students will be coordinated through the UMD Police
Department and Marketing and Public Relations.
70
Information shared with University housing residents:
In accordance with the Higher Education Act of 2008, all student residents may register a missing person contact
with the Office of Housing and Residential Life. This is the individual who will be contacted by the University in
the event a student resident is determined to be missing.
In the event a student is under 18 years of age and has not been legally emancipated, the missing student
resident’s parent/guardian will be contacted. For students who are 18 years of age and above or emancipated
minors, the contact may be a parent or any other designated individual(s).
A student resident can be reported missing at any time. The UMD Police Department will conduct a thorough
investigation into all reports of potential missing student residents.
If you suspect a student to be missing, please contact the UMD Police Department immediately by calling 911.
Only authorized campus officials and law enforcement officers in furtherance of a missing person investigation
may have access to the missing person’s contact information.
The UMD Police Department will be notified of any missing person whether or not they have designated a
missing person contact.
Bias Incidents and Hate Crimes
Policy Statement
The University of Minnesota’s Mission Statement commits us to “establish and nurture an environment that
actively acknowledges and values diversity and is free from racism, sexism, and other forms of prejudice,
intolerance or harassment.” Members of the University of Minnesota community have the right not to be
discriminated against by any agent or organization of the University of Minnesota for reasons of actual or
perceived race, color, creed, religion, national origin, gender, gender identification, age, marital status, disability,
public assistance status, veteran status and/or sexual orientation. The University of Minnesota Duluth does not
tolerate such incidents and will seek resolution of such matters.
Definitions
Bias Incident: Expressions of disrespectful bias, hate, harassment, or hostility against an individual, group, or
their property because of the individual or group’s actual or perceived race, color, creed, religion, national origin,
gender, gender identification, age, marital status, disability, public assistance status, veteran status and/or sexual
orientation can be forms of discrimination. Expressions vary, and can be in the form of language, words, signs,
symbols, threats, or actions that could potentially cause alarm, anger, fear, or resentment in others, or that
endanger the health, safety, and welfare of a member(s) of the University community, even when presented as a
joke.
Hate Crimes: Minnesota does not have a “hate crimes law.” Instead, the Legislature has identified particular
71
crimes that, if perpetrated because of the victim’s actual or perceived race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation,
disability, age, or national origin, trigger heightened penalties. Included crimes are criminal damage to property,
assault, and harassment/stalking.
Bias Incidents not under the jurisdiction of the University of Minnesota: Bias incidents impacting students,
faculty, and staff but occurring beyond the campus should be reported through this process.
Conduct and Free Speech: The conduct underlying some bias incidents might be protected speech, but still
violate the University of Minnesota’s commitment to civility and diversity. Constitutional rights will continue to
be protected, and University community members will also exercise the right to speak, engage in educational
dialogue, and seek a constructive response rooted in the university’s mission and vision.
Procedures: Reporting a Possible Bias Incident
Please report any incidents in which it is perceived that you, someone you know, or a group within our university
community has experienced bias, discrimination or hostility. UMD is concerned about incidents based on actual
or perceived race, color, creed, religion, national origin, gender, gender identification, age, marital status,
disability, public assistance status, veteran status and/or sexual orientation. The University of Minnesota is ready
and willing to provide support, and address disrespectful bias and discrimination within our community. Details
need to be reported so that affected parties can gain needed assistance. Reporting of incidents is an important
part of resolving the problem.
It is essential that potential crimes and incidents are reported before repairing, removing, altering, or disposing of
any evidence of bias.
Reasons to report an incident:
•
So you or someone you know can receive support
•
So any damage to property can be repaired
•
So authorities can investigate and follow-up with any alleged perpetrators
•
So the University can track and examine campus climate, and work towards improving it
•
So that efforts can be undertaken to prevent further acts of bias
•
Because suffering in silence can be a suffocating experience.
University of Minnesota Duluth Contacts and Reporting
Many University of Minnesota offices and staff members are willing to assist and provide support. If you have
experienced or witnessed a bias incident please contact us for support and to allow us to respond:
FIRST RESPONSE:
PHONE NUMBER:
Emergency Police Assistance/UMD Police Department 911
72
UMD Human Resources & Equal Opportunity
218-726-7161
Or see the University of Minnesota Bias/Discrimination Reporting Form (for all UM campuses) at:
http://www.d.umn.edu/umdoeo/reporting.html
Possession or Carrying of Weapons
No person, whether a student, employee, or visitor, shall possess or carry a weapon while on University property,
except as authorized below.
Authorized Possession or Carrying of Weapons:
This policy authorizes the possession or carrying of weapons on University property under the following
circumstances:
Law Enforcement and Military Personnel: Licensed peace officers, other law enforcement agents, security
guards, and military personnel may possess or carry weapons on University property when acting in the course of
their official duties and when authorized by law to carry weapons.
Military Training: Students, employees, and visitors participating in military training may possess or carry
weapons on University property when acting in the course of their official duties or performing duly assigned
tasks involving weapons.
Presidential Approval: The president or delegate may in writing permit or revoke permission for the otherwise
lawful possession or carrying of a weapon on University property. This may include possession or carrying of
a weapon for an academic use, use of a firearm at a campus shooting range, otherwise lawful storage of a weapon
on residential property not operated as a residence hall, or any other possession or carrying of a weapon on
University property.
Storage of a Firearm:
Otherwise lawful storage of a firearm inside a personal motor vehicle is permitted on University property.
Violations:
Students: Violation of this policy by a student is a violation of, and will be adjudicated in accordance with,
Board of Regents Policy: Student Conduct Code.
Employees: Violation of this policy by an employee constitutes misconduct subject to University discipline up
to and including termination.
Visitors: Violation of this policy by a visitor shall result in a request to leave the University property, function, or
event, as the case may be, and also may result in a written directive prohibiting presence on University property.
Referral to Law Enforcement Agencies:
The University may refer related suspected violations of law to appropriate law enforcement authorities and
provide access to investigative and other data as permitted by law.
73
Definitions
Criminal Offenses
The majority of the definitions are from the FBI’s Uniform Crime Reporting Handbook. Sex offense definitions
are from the National Incident-Based Reporting System Edition of the Uniform Crime Reporting Program.
Aggravated Assault: The unlawful attack by one person upon another for the purpose of inflicting severe or
aggravated bodily injury. This type of assault usually is accompanied by the use of a weapon or by means likely to
produce death or great bodily harm. (It is not necessary that injury result from aggravated assault when a gun,
knife, or other weapon is used that could and probably would result in serious personal injury if the
crime were successfully completed.)
Arson: Any willful or malicious burning or attempt to burn, with or without intent to defraud, a dwelling, house,
public building, motor vehicle or aircraft, personal property of another, etc.
Burglary: The unlawful entry of a structure to commit a felony or a theft. For reporting purposes, this definition
includes unlawful entry with intent to commit a larceny or felony; breaking and entering with intent to commit a
larceny; housebreaking; safecracking; and all attempts to commit any of the aforementioned.
Motor Vehicle Theft: The theft or attempted theft of a motor vehicle. (Classify as motor vehicle theft all cases
where automobiles are taken by persons not having lawful access even though the vehicles are later abandoned.)
Murder and Non-Negligent Manslaughter: The willful (non-negligent) homicide of one human being by
another.
Negligent Manslaughter: The killing of another person through gross negligence. Robbery: The taking or
attempting to take anything of value from the care, custody, or control of a person or persons by force or threat
of force or violence and/or putting the victim in fear.
Sex Offenses
Forcible Sex Offenses: Any sexual act directed against another person, forcible and/or against the person’s will;
or not forcible or against the person’s will where the victim is incapable of giving consent.
Forcible Rape: The carnal knowledge of a person, forcibly and/or against that person’s will; or not forcibly or
against the person’s will where the victim is incapable of giving consent because of his/her temporary or
permanent mental or physical incapacity (or because of his/her youth).
Forcible Sodomy: Oral or anal sexual intercourse with another person, forcibly and/or against that person’s
will; or not forcibly or against the person’s will where the victim is incapable of giving consent because of his/her
youth or because of temporary or permanent mental or physical incapacity.
Sexual Assault With an Object: The use of an object or instrument to unlawfully penetrate, however slightly,
the genital or anal opening of the body of another person, forcibly and/or against that person’s will; or not
forcibly or against the person’s will where the victim is incapable of giving consent because of his/her youth or
74
because of temporary or permanent mental or physical incapacity.
Forcible Fondling: The touching of the private body parts of another person for the purpose of sexual
gratification, forcibly and/or against that person’s will; or not forcibly or against the person’s will where the
victim is incapable of giving consent because of his/ her youth or because of temporary or permanent mental or
physical incapacity.
Non-Forcible Sex Offenses: Unlawful, non-forcible sexual intercourse.
Incest: Non-forcible sexual intercourse between persons who are related to each other within degrees wherein
marriage is prohibited by law.
Statutory Rape: Non-forcible sexual intercourse with a person who is under the statutory age of consent.
Hate Crimes
Hate Crime: A criminal offense committed against a person or property which is motivated, in whole or in part,
by the offender’s bias. Bias is a preformed negative opinion or attitude toward a group of persons based on their
race, gender, religion, disability, sexual orientation or ethnicity/national origin.
Although there are many possible categories of bias, under the Clery Act, only the following six categories are
reported:
•
Race: A preformed negative attitude toward a group of persons who possess common physical
characteristics (e.g., color of skin, eyes, and/or hair; facial features, etc.) genetically transmitted by descent and
heredity, which distinguish them as a distinct division of humankind (e.g., Asians, blacks, whites).
•
Gender: A preformed negative opinion or attitude toward a group of persons because those persons are
male or female.
•
Religion: A preformed negative opinion or attitude toward a group of persons who share the same
religious beliefs regarding the origin and purpose of the universe and the existence or nonexistence of a supreme
being (e.g., Catholics, Jews, Protestants, atheists).
•
Sexual Orientation: A preformed negative opinion or attitude toward a group of persons based on their
sexual attraction toward, and responsiveness to, members of their own sex or members of the opposite sex (e.g.,
gays, lesbians, heterosexuals).
•
Ethnicity/National Origin: A preformed negative opinion or attitude toward a group of persons of
the same race or national origin who share common or similar traits, languages, customs and traditions (e.g.,
Arabs, Hispanics).
•
Disability: A preformed negative opinion or attitude toward a group of persons based on their physical
or mental impairments/challenges, whether such disability is temporary or permanent, congenital or acquired by
heredity, accident, injury, advanced age or illness.
75
Additional Hate Crime categories (Note: these crimes are only reported in the annual statistics if the crime is
considered a hate crime.)
•
Larceny/Theft: The unlawful taking, carrying, leading, or riding away of property from the possession
or constructive possession of another. (Note: constructive possession is defined by Black’s Law Dictionary, sixth
edition as “where one does not have physical custody or possession, but is in a position to exercise dominion or
control over a thing.”)
•
Simple Assault: An unlawful physical attack by one person upon another where neither the offender
displays a weapon, nor the victim suffers obvious severe or aggravated bodily injury involving apparent broken
bones, loss of teeth, possible internal injury, severe laceration, or loss of consciousness.
•
Intimidation: To unlawfully place another person in reasonable fear of bodily harm through the use
of threatening words and/or other conduct, but without displaying a weapon or subjecting the victim to actual
physical attack.
•
Destruction/Damage/Vandalism of Property (Except “Arson”): To willfully or maliciously
destroy, damage, deface, or otherwise injure real or personal property without the consent of the owner or the
person having custody or control of it.
Illegal Weapons Possession
The violation of laws or ordinances dealing with weapon offenses, regulatory in nature, such as manufacture, sale,
or possession of deadly weapons; carrying deadly weapons, concealed or openly; furnishing deadly weapons to
minors; aliens in possession of deadly weapons; and all attempts to commit any of the aforementioned.
Drug Abuse Violations
Violations of state and local laws relating to the unlawful possession, sale, use, growing, and making of narcotic
drugs. The relevant substances include opium or cocaine and their derivatives (morphine, heroine, codeine);
marijuana; synthetic narcotics (Demerol, methadone); and dangerous non-narcotic drugs (barbiturates,
Benzedrine).
Liquor Law Violations
The violation of laws or ordinances prohibiting the manufacture, sale, transporting, furnishing, and/or possessing
of intoxicating liquor; maintaining unlawful drinking places; bootlegging; operating a still; Furnishing liquor to a
minor or intemperate person; using a vehicle for illegal transportation of liquor; drinking on a train or public
conveyance; and all attempts to commit any of the aforementioned. (Drunkenness and driving under the
influence of alcohol are not included in this definition.)
Other Definitions
Pastoral counselor: A person who is associated with a religious order or denomination, is recognized by that
religious order or denomination as someone who provides confidential counseling, and is functioning within the
scope of that recognition as a pastoral counselor. (Note: pastoral counselors are not Campus Security Authorities
for reporting campus crime statistics.)
76
Professional counselor: A person whose official responsibilities include providing mental health counseling to
members of UMD’s community and who is functioning within the scope of his or her license or certification.
(Note: professional counselors are not campus security authorities for reporting campus crime statistics when
acting in their counseling capacities.)
Referred for Campus Disciplinary Action: The referral of a student to any campus official who initiates a
disciplinary action of which a record is kept and which may result in the imposition of a sanction. (Note: These
referrals do not include those students already counted in the arrest categories for liquor law violations, drug law
violations, and arrests for weapons violations, but will include students referred for disciplinary action for a major
crime [murder, sexual offenses, robbery, aggravated assault, burglary, motor vehicle theft, arson, and
manslaughter]). Crime Definitions are from the Uniform Crime Reporting Handbook.
Locations
Location Definitions are taken from the Jeanne Clery Disclosure of Campus Security Policy and Crime
Statistics Act.
On Campus: Any building or property owned or controlled by an institution within the same reasonably
contiguous geographic area and used by the institution in direct support of, or in a manner related to, the
institution’s educational purposes, including residence halls. Also, any building or property that is within or
reasonably contiguous to the area identified in the first part of this definition that is owned by the institution but
controlled by another person, is frequently used by student, and supports institutional purposes (such as a food
or other retail vendor).
On-Campus Residence Halls: Any student housing facility that is owned or controlled by the institution, or
located on property that is owned or controlled by the institution, and is within the reasonably contiguous
geographic area that makes up the campus and is considered an on-campus student housing facility.
Non-Campus Property: Any building or property owned or controlled by a student organization that is
officially recognized by the institution; or used in direct support of, or in relation to, the institution’s educational
purposes, is frequently used by students, and is not within the same reasonably contiguous geographic area of the
institution.
Public Property: All public property, including thoroughfares, streets, sidewalks, and parking facilities, that is
within the campus, or immediately adjacent to and accessible from campus.
Crime Statistics
This brochure is published annually by the University and made available to all current and prospective students,
and to staff and faculty. Statistics are compiled by the UMD Police Department in consultation with University
personnel in Student Affairs, faculty and staff advisors to student groups, Office of Housing and Residential Life,
and other University areas and departments.
Statistics from the past three calendar years can be found in the following charts. The definitions are listed for
categorizing different crimes and location.
77
•
•
These categories are new for the 2013 reporting period and were not required to be reported in this
manner in 2011 or 2012. Statistics for 2012, where available, have been provided for your information.
NOTE: Sodomy and sexual assault with an object are included in the rape category.
On-Campus Residence crimes are included in the On-Campus numbers.
Records Retention
Records supporting the statistics reported in the UMD Campus Safety and Security Report are kept for seven
years from the date of incident.
Reported Hate Crimes at UMD
2014:
•
2013:
•
2012:
•
•
None reported.
None reported.
One on campus (in a residence hall) case of Harassment/Intimidation characterized by disability.
One on campus case of Harassment/Intimidation characterized by race.
78
Clery Crimes at UMD (2012-2014)
Offense
On-Campus
Residence**
On-Campus
2014
Non-Campus
2013
2012
2014
2013
2012
2014 2013
Public
2012
2014
Unfounded
2013
2012
2014
Aggravated Assault
0
1
2
0
1
0
2
0
0
0
0
0
0
Arson
0
0
1
0
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
Negligent Manslaughter
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
Burglary: Total
0
5
3
0
1
0
0
0
1
0
0
0
0
Forcible Burglary
0
2
*
0
1
*
0
0
*
0
0
*
0
Non-Forcible Burglary
0
3
*
0
0
*
0
0
*
0
0
*
0
Attempted Burglary
0
0
*
0
0
*
0
0
*
0
0
*
0
Motor Vehicle Theft
2
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
Murder/Non-Negligent Manslaughter
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
Robbery
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
Sexual Offenses: Total
7
3*
3
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
7
5
*
***
Rape*
6
7
*
3
5
*
0
0
*
0
0
*
0
Fondling*
1
0
*
0
0
*
0
0
*
0
0
*
0
Incest*
0
0
*
0
0
*
0
0
*
0
0
*
0
Statutory Rape*
0
0
*
0
0
*
0
0
*
0
0
*
0
Stalking*
7
2
*
2
0
*
0
0
*
0
0
*
0
Domestic Violence*
0
0
*
0
0
*
0
0
*
0
0
*
0
Dating Violence*
3
0
*
0
0
*
0
0
*
0
0
*
0
* These categories are new for the 2013 reporting period and were not required to be reported in
this manner in 2012.
**2012 amended to include an on-campus residence hall sex offense not previously recorded.
***There were a total of 3 forcible offenses in 2012, one of which was in a residential facility.
Unfounded is a new category addition to the 2014 and subsequent reporting requirements.
79
Alcohol, Drug, & Weapon Violations at UMD (2012-2014)
Offense
On-Campus
Residence**
On-Campus
Non-Campus
Public
ARRESTS
2014
2013
2012
2014
2013
2012
2014
2013
2012
Liquor Law Violations
204
167
260
159
115
190
16
11
8
Drug Violations
60
49
51
51
25
31
3
0
Weapons Violations
2
0
0
0
0
0
0
2014
2013
2012
7
0
7
0
0
1
2
0
0
1
0
0
NON-ARREST CAMPUS
REFERRALS
Alcohol
459
471
541
458
470
541
0
0
0
0
0
0
Drug Violation
10
54
2
4
49
2
0
0
0
0
0
0
Weapons Violation
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
University of Minnesota Duluth Annual Fire Safety Report
80
The University of Minnesota Duluth has nine student housing facilities for approximately 2,900 student
residents. Five are traditional style residence halls and four are apartment style facilities. The chart below
summarizes fire safety systems in each facility and the number of fire drills held during the 2014 calendar year.
Fire Alarm
Monitoring
(3)
Full
Sprinker
System
(1)
Smoke
Detection
Fire
Extinguisher
Devices
Evacuation
Plans/
Placards (4)
Number of
drills (2)
Burntside Hall
x
x
x
x
x
3
Griggs Hall
x
x
x
x
x
3
Ianni Hall
x
x
x
x
x
3
Lake Superior Hall
x
x
x
x
x
3
Vermilion Hall
x
x
x
x
x
3
Goldfine Hall (apartments)
x
x
x
x
x
3
Heaney Hall (apartments)
x
x
x
x
x
3
Junction Apartments
x
x
x
x
x
3
Oakland Apartments
x
x
x
x
x
3
UMD Student Housing
1-Full Sprinkler System is defined as having sprinklers in both the common areas and individual rooms.
2-Number of drills is the number of evacuation (fire) drills each academic year.
3-Fire Alarm Monitoring indicates if the fire alarms are monitored at a central location.
4- Evacuation Plan indicates if a location has evacuation plans for fire evacuation.
Policies and Procedures
Policies and procedures for fire safety and evacuation are included in the UMD Housing & Residence Life
Guidebook at www.d.umn.edu/housing/guidebook Policies and procedures are also reviewed at “floor” or
“area” meetings with the residents living in University housing facilities at the beginning of fall semester.
Appliances, cookware or decorative items with open flames are not allowed. Student residents living in
traditional residence halls may bring a microwave up to 1,000 watts, a coffee pot and popcorn popper. No other
cooking appliances are allowed in traditional residence halls. Student residents living in University apartments are
allowed to bring cooking items that do not have an open flame. Policies are listed at
www.d.umn.edu/housing/guidebook/#pp-appliances Any fire, fire alarm activation or sprinkler activation needs
to be reported to Housing & Residence Life. Typically the first staff to be notified will be the Resident Advisors
for the specific living area. An electronic monitoring system, monitored by a contract vendor, notifies 911 of
activated systems.
UMD is a smoke free campus. No smoking is allowed in University facilities or on University grounds.
Education
UMD Housing & Residence Life staff receives training in use of fire extinguishers and fire safety on an annual
81
basis.
Resident Advisors review fire safety and fire evacuation procedures at floor and area meetings at the beginning
of fall semester.
Student Housing Evacuation
Fire evacuation drills are coordinated between UMD Housing & Residence Life, UMD Environmental Health
and Safety, and the Duluth Fire Department at the beginning of each fall semester.
Fire evacuation maps and/or procedures are posted on the inside of every residence hall room door and
University apartment door.
In a fire emergency:
• Pull the fire alarm if able.
• Call 9-911 (from land line) or 911 (from cellphone).
• Remain calm and act quickly.
• Wear protective clothing such as a coat and shoes, and carry a damp towel for use in heavy smoke.
• Close your room door and windows.
• Walk in an orderly manner to the nearest exit. Never use an elevator.
• Move a safe distance away from the building and out of the way of fire department personnel.
• Remain outside until you are told to return by the staff.
• If you think there is a fire in the hallway, feel the door before you open it:
• If the door does not feel hot, open it slightly, holding your head away and brace the door with your foot.
• Put your hand across the opening to test the heat of the air.
• If the door is hot and the hallway unsafe, plug any opening or cracks through which smoke may enter
your room using wet towels, sheets, blankets, etc.
• If smoke does enter the room, open the window for ventilation; break it if sealed.
• DO NOT JUMP FROM WINDOWS.
• Make your presence known.
• Wait for rescue.
In case of minor fire:
• Pull the fire alarm if able.
• Call 9-911.
• Use a fire extinguisher located in the hallway cabinets or a blanket to smother the fire.
• Call the Lake Superior Hall Information Desk at 218-726-7381.
• Never risk your personal safety!
Fire Statistics
82
UMD Housing & Residence Life maintains a fire log for fires that occur in UMD student housing facilities. The
fire log can be reviewed in the UMD Housing Office during normal business hours, Monday through Friday,
8:00 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.
Housing Facility
2010
2011
2012
2013
2014
Burntside Hall
0
0
0
0
0
Griggs Hall
0
0
0
0
0
N/A
0
0
0
0
Lake Superior Hall
0
0
1
0
0
Vermilion Hall
0
0
0
0
0
Heaney Hall
0
0
0
0
0
Junction Apartments
0
0
0
0
0
Oakland Apartments
0
0
0
0
0
Stadium Apartments (Closed May 2013)
0
0
0
0
N/A
Ianni Hall (Opened 2011)
Fire Details
04/15/12: Lake Superior Hall; 4th floor hallway; paper signs found to have been burned; no injuries; no arrests;
fire not witnessed by reporting party; burned signs were reported to UMDPD.
On 04/15/12 at 6:49am, a Resident Advisor in Lake Superior Hall reported to UMDPD the presence of four
burnt posters in a fourth-floor hallway. There was no active fire at the time the incident was reported; the
Duluth Fire Department was not called to the scene. There were no known injuries resulting from the incident.
UMDPD investigated the incident and was unable to identify any suspects. Cost of clean-up of the scene was
$100.00.
System Upgrades
Housing & Residence Life works closely with University code officials to review current systems and plan for
future improvements. There are currently no plans deemed necessary for improvements in fire safety systems or
procedures.
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This document is published to comply with Title II of the Federal Crime Awareness and Campus
Security Act of 1990, now known as the Jeanne Clery Disclosure of Campus Security Policy and Campus
Crime Statistics Act or Clery Act, and the Higher Education Opportunity Act of 2008.
This document was produced by University of Minnesota Duluth Police Department, September 2015.
This publication can be made available in alternative formats for people with disabilities. To request an
alternative format or more copies, contact:
UMD Police Department
1049 University Dr.
DAdB 287
Duluth, MN 55812
218-726-7000
The University of Minnesota shall provide equal access to and opportunity in its programs, facilities,
and employment without regard to race, color, creed, religion, national origin, gender, age, marital
status, disability, public assistance status, veteran status, sexual orientation, gender identity, or gender
expression.
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