Course Descriptions
Course Descriptions
This is the Course Descriptions section of the 2007-2009 Duluth Catalog
for the University of Minnesota
Contents
Course Numbers.................................................287
Liberal Education Abbreviations.........................287
Prerequisites......................................................287
Symbols and Abbreviations................................287
Term Information................................................287
Medical School Grading......................................287
Accounting (ACCT)..............................................288
Aerospace Studies (AIR).....................................288
American Indian Studies (AMIN).........................289
Anthropology (ANTH)..........................................290
Art (ART).............................................................292
Art History (ARTH)...............................................296
Astronomy (AST).................................................297
Behavioral Sciences (BHSC)...............................297
Biochemistry and Molecular Biology (MDBC).....297
Biology (BIOL).....................................................298
Business Law (BLAW).........................................301
Chemical Engineering (CHE)...............................302
Chemistry (CHEM)...............................................303
Chinese (CHIN)....................................................305
Coaching (CC).....................................................306
College of Liberal Arts (CLA)...............................306
Communication (COMM).....................................306
Communication Sciences and Disorders
(CSD)..............................................................309
Composition (COMP)...........................................311
Computer Science (CS).......................................312
Criminology (CRIM).............................................315
Cultural Studies (CST).........................................316
Dance (DN)..........................................................317
Early Childhood Studies (ECH)............................317
Economics (ECON)..............................................319
Education (EDUC)................................................320
Education and Human Service Professions
(EHS)..............................................................324
Education, Secondary (EDSE).............................324
Educational Administration (EDAD).....................325
Electrical and Computer Engineering (ECE)........326
Elementary Education (ELED).............................328
Engineering (ENGR)............................................329
Engineering Management (EMGT)......................329
English (ENGL)....................................................330
Environmental Education (ENED)........................332
Environmental Science (ESCI)............................334
Environmental Studies (ES)................................334
Exercise Science Athletic Training (ESAT)...........334
Family Medicine (FMED).....................................336
Finance and Management Information (FMIS)...337
Fine Arts (FA)......................................................338
Foreign Studies (FST).........................................338
French (FR).........................................................339
Geography (GEOG)..............................................339
Geology (GEOL)...................................................341
German (GER).....................................................344
Graduate School (GRAD).....................................345
Health (HLTH)......................................................345
Health Care Management (HCM)........................346
Health, Physical Education and Recreation
(HPER)............................................................347
History (HIST)......................................................347
Honors (HON)......................................................349
Industrial Engineering (IE)..................................349
Integrated Biosciences (IBS)...............................351
Inter-Institutional Cross-Registration (IICR)........351
Interdisciplinary Studies (IS)...............................351
International Business (INTB).............................352
International Studies (INTS)................................352
Italian (ITAL)........................................................352
Journalism (JOUR)..............................................353
Labovitz School of Business and Economics
(LSBE).............................................................353
Language (LANG)................................................353
Limnology (LIM)..................................................354
Linguistics (LING)................................................354
Management Studies (MGTS).............................354
Marketing (MKTG)...............................................356
Master in Advocacy and Political Leadership
(MAPL)............................................................357
Master of Business Administration (MBA)..........358
Mathematics (MATH)..........................................359
Mechanical Engineering (ME).............................361
Medical and Molecular Physiology (PHSL)..........362
Medical Microbiology and Immunology (MICB)..362
Medicine (MED)..................................................363
Music (MU)..........................................................364
Ojibwe Education (OJED)....................................369
Pharmacology (PHCL).........................................371
Pharmacy (PHAR)................................................371
Philosophy (PHIL)................................................375
Physical Education (PE)......................................376
Physical Education Professional (PEP)...............377
Physics (PHYS)....................................................378
Political Science (POL)........................................380
Psychology (PSY)................................................381
Recreation (REC).................................................385
Russian (RUSS)...................................................386
Safety (SAFE)......................................................386
Science (SCI)......................................................387
Social Work (SW)................................................387
Sociology (SOC)..................................................389
Spanish (SPAN)...................................................391
Special Education (SPED)...................................392
Statistics (STAT)..................................................395
Supportive Services Program (SSP)...................396
Theatre (TH)........................................................396
Toxicology (TXCL)................................................398
Urban and Regional Studies (URS).....................399
Water Resources Science (WRS)........................399
Women’s Studies (WS)........................................399
UMD offers a wide spectrum of courses
across diverse fields.
Course Descriptions
Courses
Course Numbers
Prerequisites
Semester courses have four-digit numbers as
follows:
0xxx—Courses that do not carry credit toward
any University degree.
1xxx—Courses primarily for undergraduate
students in their first year of study.
2xxx—Courses primarily for undergraduate
students in their second year of study.
3xxx—Courses primarily for undergraduate
students in their third year of study.
4xxx—Courses primarily for undergraduate
students in their fourth year of study; graduate
students may enroll in such courses. 4xxx
courses may be counted for a Graduate School
degree if the course is taught by a member of
the graduate faculty and has been approved for
graduate credit.
5xxx—Courses primarily for graduate students;
undergraduate students in their third or fourth
year may enroll in such courses.
6xxx—Courses for postbaccalaureate students
in professional degree programs.
7xxx—Courses for postbaccalaureate students
in professional degree programs.
6xxx and 7xxx—Courses to be used primarily
for postbaccalaureate professional programs
that are not offered through the Graduate
School.
8xxx—Courses for graduate students.
Prereq—The prerequisite is intended to show
what is required before taking the course.
If no prerequisites are listed, there are none, except for the class standing requirement indicated
by the course number. When no department
designation precedes the course number listed as
a prerequisite, that course is in the same department as the course being offered.
Liberal Education Abbreviations
Course Descriptions
LE............ Liberal education. Prerequisites show
courses that can be taken for liberal education
along with the category (i.e., LE 4).
LECD...... Cultural diversity
LEIP........ International perspectives
For more information about liberal education
categories and requirements, see page 56.
286
Symbols and Abbreviations
§…Credit will not be granted if credit has been
received for the course listed after this symbol.
¶…Concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in the course listed after this symbol.
#…Approval of instructor is required before
registration.
%…Approval of the department offering the
course is required for registration.
o…Approval of the college unit offering the
course is required before registration.
,…In prerequisite listings, comma means “and.”
1–4 cr [max 6]…The course can be taken for
1 to 4 credits and may be repeated for up to
6 credits.
DGS...Director of graduate studies
Term Information
Not all courses are offered every term (semester). Refer to the Course Schedule or the online
catalog at www.catalogs.umn.edu/umd/index
.html to learn during which terms specific
courses are offered.
Medical School Grading
O......Outstanding
E......Excellent
S......Satisfactory
P...... Passing
N..... Failing
Aerospace Studies
Accounting (ACCT)
ACCT 3201. Cost Accounting. (3 cr; A-F only. Prereq-LSBE cand or non-LSBE acct
minor or o)
Labovitz School of Business and Economics
Determining manufacturing costs, e.g., in a job order or process
manufacturing environment. Cost-volume-profit relationships,
activity- based accounting, standard costing techniques.
ACCT 2001. Principles of Financial Accounting. (3 cr; A-F only. Prereq-Min 15
cr or o)
Concepts of financial accounting and external reporting. Nature
and measurement of assets, liabilities, equities, revenues, expenses. Emphasis on use and understanding of external financial
statements.
ACCT 2002. Principles of Managerial Accounting. (3 cr; A-F only. Prereq-2001,
LSBE student or o)
Information accumulation, analysis, and use for managerial
decisions. Cost-volume-profit relationships; short- and longterm decisions; standards and budgets; segment and managerial
performance evaluation.
ACCT 2005. Survey of Accounting. (3 cr; A-F only. Prereq-Not open to LSBE
students or non-LSBE acct minors LE 8)
Accounting information presented in published financial statements. Debt financing, stock issuance, alternative methods of
accounting. Bookkeeping topics not emphasized.
ACCT 3096. Volunteer Income Tax Assistance. (1-2 cr [max 3 cr]; S-N only. Prereq%, 2 cr first registration, 1 cr repeat)
ACCT 3401. Individual Income Taxation. (3 cr; A-F only. Prereq-LSBE cand or
approved non-LSBE acct minor or o, §4152 or 3152)
Provides an understanding of how taxes impact personal financial decisions. Takes tax planning/minimization perspective and
provides a basic information on reporting tax positions to the
IRS. In addition to tax planning and compliance, the student
will be exposed to basic tax concepts.
ACCT 3402. Advanced Business Taxation. (3 cr; A-F only. Prereq-3401, LSBE cand
or o, §3151)
Understanding how taxes impact basic business and entrepreneurial decisions. It takes a tax planning/minimization perspective and presents advanced tax research and resource materials
available on the web.
ACCT 4160. Auditing. (3 cr; A-F only. Prereq-3102, 3110, LSBE cand or o; no Grad
School cr)
Theory and procedures in audit process.
ACCT 4261. Advanced Auditing. (3 cr; A-F only. Prereq-4160, LSBE cand or o)
Provides volunteer experience preparing tax returns for low and
moderate income Duluth residents through both classroom and
hands-on training.
Topics including, but not limited to, statistical sampling, EDP
auditing, internal auditing. Seminar covers actual audit cases
and simulation audit package.
ACCT 3101. Intermediate Accounting I. (3 cr; A-F only. Prereq-LSBE cand or
non-LSBE acct minor or o)
ACCT 4501. Advanced Accounting. (3 cr; A-F only. Prereq-3102, LSBE cand or o)
Review of financial accounting standard setting, conceptual
framework, and accounting process. Income statement, balance
sheet, and statement of cash flows. Present value concepts, cash,
receivables, inventories, fixed assets, current liabilities, and
contingencies.
ACCT 3102. Intermediate Accounting II. (3 cr; A-F only. Prereq-3101, LSBE cand or
non-LSBE acct minor or o)
Long-term liabilities, stockholders’ equity, earnings per share,
revenue recognition, and tax allocation. Investments, pensions,
leases, accounting changes and error analysis, financial statement analysis, and disclosures in financial statements.
Topics including consolidated financial statements, partnership,
and fiduciary accounting.
ACCT 4505. International Accounting. (3 cr; A-F only. Prereq-3102, LSBE cand
or o)
International comparative analysis, accounting measurement,
and reporting issues unique to multinational business transactions and multinational enterprises; international financial
markets; foreign exchange accounting; international audit
environment; international taxation and transfer pricing; harmonization of worldwide accounting.
ACCT 4510. Fund and Not-For-Profit Accounting. (3 cr; A-F only. Prereq-LSBE
cand or o)
Accounting concepts and processes applied to government,
hospital, education, charity, and other not-for-profit entities.
Overview of the characteristics and functions of modern accounting information systems. Focus on system use, internal
controls, security issues, and system design and implementation
in computerized accounting procedures within the business
organization. Develop proficiency in the use of accounting
software.
ACCT 4795. Special Topics (Various Titles to be Assigned). (1-3 cr [max 9 cr]; A-F
only. Prereq-3101, LSBE cand or o; no Grad School cr)
ACCT 3191. Independent Study. (1-3 cr [max 3 cr]; A-F only. Prereq-BAc cand with
80 cr, %; cr not available as acct elective)
For students wishing to do special work in an accounting area
that extends beyond, or in greater depth than, regular course
offerings.
ACCT 3196. Internship in Accounting. (2-6 cr [max 6 cr]; S-N only. Prereq-3101,
%; repeatable for a max of 6 credits; 3 repeats allowed; max 3 cr may be applied to
acct electives)
Participation in an approved program with professional accounting firms, businesses, government agencies, or non-profit
organizations. Requires minimum 200 hours work experience,
assigned written reports, and performance evaluations. Students
can take an additional credit for each additional 100 hours of
work, up to a maximum of 6 credits. 3 repeats allowed, max 3
credits may be applied to acct electives.
Enables students, working closely with the instructional faculty,
to explore one or more contemporary accounting issues in
substantial depth.
Aerospace Studies (AIR)
College of Science and Engineering
AIR 100. AFROTC GMC Leadership Laboratory. (0 cr; S-N or Aud)
Practical environment giving leadership training while being
instructed on military customs and courtesies, physical fitness,
military drill and the general Air Force environment. This
class is taken concurrently with AFROTC 1xxx and 2xxx level
academic classes.
AIR 1000. AFROTC GMC Lead Lab. (1 cr [max 4 cr]; S-N or Aud)
Practical environment giving leadership training while being
instructed on military customs and courtesies, physical fitness,
military drill and the general Air Force environment. This class
MUST be taken concurrently with AFROTC 1xxx and 2xxx
level academic classes
287
Course Descriptions
ACCT 3110. Accounting Information Systems. (3 cr; A-F only. Prereq-LSBE cand or
non-LSBE acct minor or o)
Course Descriptions
AIR 1101. Foundations of the U.S. Air Force. (1 cr; A-F or Aud)
AIR 3591. Leadership Practicum. (1-4 cr [max 4 cr]; A-F or Aud)
Two-part survey of U.S. Air Force as public-service organization. Role of military in U.S. society; military history; officership; professionalism; core values; career opportunities; customs/courtesies; communication skills. Leadership Laboratory
(Air 0100) is mandatory for AFROTC cadets and complements
this course by providing followership experiences.
Practical application of leadership and management in structured realistic situations.
AIR 1102. Foundations of the U.S. Air Force. (1 cr; A-F or Aud)
Two-part survey of U.S. Air Force as public-service organization. Role of military in U.S. society; military history; officership; professionalism; core values; career opportunities; customs/courtesies; communication skills. Leadership Laboratory
(Air 0100) is mandatory for AFROTC cadets and complements
this course by providing followership experiences.
AIR 1591. Leadership Practicum. (1-4 cr [max 4 cr]; A-F or Aud)
Leadership techniques and their practical application in
structured problems and realistic situations; Air Force customs
and courtesies.
AIR 2101. The Evolution of the U.S. Air Force Air and Space Power. (1 cr; A-F
or Aud)
Air Force heritage; development/deployment of air power, a
primary element of U.S. national security; leadership and quality principles; ethics and values. Leadership development based
on student participation in group problem solving. Oral/written
communication development. Leadership Laboratory (Air 0100)
is mandatory for AFROTC cadets and complements this course
by providing followership experiences.
AIR 2102. The Evolution of the U.S. Air Force Air and Space Power. (1 cr; A-F
or Aud)
Air Force heritage; development/deployment of air power, a
primary element of U.S. national security; leadership and quality principles; ethics and values. Leadership development based
on student participation in group problem solving. Oral/written
communication development. Leadership Laboratory (Air 0100)
is mandatory for AFROTC cadets and complements this course
by providing fellowship experiences.
AIR 3000. AFROTC POC Leadership Laboratory. (1 cr [max 4 cr]; S-N or Aud)
Practical environment giving leadership training through teaching freshmen and sophomores military customs and courtesies,
physical fitness, military drill and the general Air Force environment. This class is taken concurrently with AFROTC 3xxx and
4xxx level academic classes.
Course Descriptions
AIR 3001. AFROTC POC Lead Lab. (2 cr [max 8 cr]; S-N or Aud)
Practical environment giving leadership training through teaching freshmen and sophomores military customs and courtesies,
physical fitness, military drill and the general Air Force environment. MUST be taken concurrently with AFROTC 3xxx and
4xxx level academic classes
AIR 3101. Air Force Leadership Studies. (3 cr; A-F or Aud)
Comprehensive study of leadership/quality management fundamentals, professional knowledge, organizational doctrine and
ethics, and communication skills required of today’s Air Force
officer. Leadership/management case studies. A mandatory
Leadership Laboratory (Air 3000) provides advanced leadership
experiences and the opportunity to apply the leadership and
management principles of this course.
AIR 3102. Air Force Leadership Studies. (3 cr; A-F or Aud)
Comprehensive study of leadership/quality management fundamentals, professional knowledge, organizational doctrine and
ethics, and communication skills required of today’s Air Force
officer. Leadership/management case studies. A mandatory
Leadership Laboratory (Air 3000) provides advanced leadership
experiences and the opportunity to apply the leadership and
management principles of this course.
288
AIR 4101. National Security Affairs, Preparation for Active Duty. (3 cr; A-F or
Aud. Prereq-No Grad School cr)
Advanced leadership development; national security processes,
regional studies, advanced leadership ethics, doctrine, the
military as a profession, officership, military justice, civilian
control of the military. A mandatory Leadership Laboratory
(Air 3000) provides advanced leadership experiences and the
opportunity to apply the leadership and management principles
of this course.
AIR 4102. National Security Affairs, Preparation for Active Duty. (3 cr; A-F or
Aud. Prereq-No Grad School cr)
Advanced leadership development; national security processes,
regional studies, advanced leadership ethics, doctrine, the
military as a profession, officership, military justice, civilian
control of the military. A mandatory Leadership Laboratory
(Air 3000) provides advanced leadership experiences and the
opportunity to apply the leadership and management principles
of this course.
American Indian Studies
(AMIN)
College of Liberal Arts
AMIN 1103. Beginning Ojibwe I. (3 cr; A-F only. LECD 03)
Speaking and comprehension of basic Ojibwe speech patterns.
Development of rudimentary reading knowledge.
AMIN 1104. Beginning Ojibwe II. (3 cr; A-F only. Prereq-1103 or # LECD 03)
Speaking and comprehension of basic Ojibwe speech patterns.
Development of rudimentary reading knowledge.
AMIN 1106. American Indian Prose, Poetry, and Oratory. (3 cr; A-F only. LE 9)
Survey of transcribed/translated American Indian oratory, post1900 prose, and contemporary poetry by Indian writers/speakers. Works used to facilitate understanding of major themes in
American Indian life.
AMIN 1120. American Indians in the 20th Century. (3 cr; A-F only. LECD 07)
Topical review of Indian-white contacts, antiquity to present.
Historical analysis of the people and their cultures.
AMIN 2105. Survey of American Indian Arts. (3 cr; A-F only. LE 9)
Traditional arts of American Indians and the cultures that produced them; techniques, motifs, and aesthetics of Indian textiles
and utilitarian and ceremonial arts.
AMIN 2115. Ojibwe History and Culture. (3 cr; A-F only)
Anishinabe, Ojibwe, and Chippewa. Origins and lifestyle; relationship between traditional and contemporary times. Emphasis
on Minnesota.
AMIN 2203. Intermediate Ojibwe I. (3 cr; A-F only. Prereq-1104 or # LECD 03)
Speaking basic Ojibwe sentences and paragraphs at fluent level
so listener can understand speaking pattern context. Ability to
write and read Ojibwe language proficiently.
AMIN 2204. Intermediate Ojibwe II. (3 cr; A-F only. Prereq-2203 or # LECD 03)
Speaking basic Ojibwe sentences and paragraphs at fluent level
so listener can understand speaking pattern context. Ability to
write and read Ojibwe language proficiently.
AMIN 2520. Tribal Law and Government. (3 cr; A-F only. Prereq-Intro soc sci
course, 1120, 3106 or #)
Review of American Indian law and analysis of modern tribal
government.
Anthropology
AMIN 3106. Indian-White Relations. (3 cr; A-F only. Prereq-1120 or # LECD 08)
Ten to twelve significant events and their ramifications for
contemporary Indian affairs. Variety of options for fulfilling
course requirements.
AMIN 3260. American Indian Novel. (3 cr; A-F only. Prereq-1120 or #)
Approximately four novels by American Indian authors are read
with an explanation of the novels and the milieu that produced
them.
AMIN 3300. Projects in American Indian Studies. (1-5 cr [max 10 cr]; A-F only.
Prereq-1120, #)
Directed reading, research, or involvement in social action
culminating in the preparation of a paper.
AMIN 3301. Advanced Ojibwe. (3 cr; A-F only. Prereq-2204 or #)
Taught entirely in Ojibwe language. Fluent Ojibwe speaking, writing, reading, and conversations to increase oral and
comprehension abilities.
AMIN 3333. Introduction to Federal Indian Law. (3 cr; A-F only. Prereq-1120 or #)
Legal concepts, cases, and issues surrounding American Indian
federal law (e.g., treaties).
AMIN 3410. Fur Trade in Canada and the United States. (3 cr; A-F only. Prereq1120 or #)
Historical review and analysis of Canadian and U.S. Indians in
the fur trades.
AMIN 3750. American Indian Psychology. (3 cr; A-F only. Prereq-Intro soc sci
course, 1120, 3106 or #)
Reviews major theories of personality development and
motivational psychology applicable to American Indian issues.
Attributes of culturally appropriate developmental models
are advanced through cross-cultural examination of general
traits, perspectives, norms, and values. Relevant techniques of
counseling.
AMIN 3905. Special Topics: (Various Title to be Assigned). (3 cr [max 12 cr]; A-F only.
Prereq-Intro soc sci course or 1120 or #)
Study of topics not included in regular curriculum.
AMIN 3997. Internship in American Indian Studies. (4-8 cr [max 12 cr]; A-F only.
Prereq-AmIn major, #; may not be taken final semester of sr yr; may be taken in one
or two semesters)
Supervised lab experience in American Indian agency or project
or with significant Indian clientele. Advance, concurrent, and
follow-up written and oral presentations.
Individual opportunity to devise and/or be involved in programs
to increase fluency.
AMIN 4630. American Indians and the Media. (3 cr; A-F only. Prereq-1120 or #;
no Grad School cr)
Examination of images of American Indians in media such
as literature, movies, TV, toys, music, and sports as they have
contributed to and continue to perpetuate stereotypic and
distorted images.
AMIN 4990. Directed Research. (1-6 cr [max 12 cr]; A-F only. Prereq-max 8 cr to
Grad School program, #)
Qualified seniors and graduate students may register for work
on tutorial basis in research of an advanced nature in American
Indian Studies
AMIN 5905. Legal Aspects of Federal Indian Policy For Human Services. (3 cr;
A-F only. Prereq-AmIn 1120 and one upper division soc sci course or #)
Examines federal Indian policy as a by-product of treaty rights,
sovereignty and self-determination. Emphasis on federal policy
impact on American Indian family life, education, child welfare,
and religious freedom. Selected case studies used.
Focus on areas of particular relevancy to both Indian and
non-Indian people in this region. Faculty-student-community
consultation determines topic selection for a given semester.
Anthropology (ANTH)
College of Liberal Arts
ANTH 1080. Freshman Seminar: Understanding Global Cultures. (3 cr; A-F only.
Prereq-Freshman, fewer than 30 credits LEIP 08)
Explores nations around the globe towards the goal of developing a cross-cultural understanding of how cultures function.
Explores America as a foreign culture, looking at the United
States from the viewpoints of foreign anthropologists and
other scholars, using comparative ethnographic perspectives to
interpret aspects of American culture.
ANTH 1095. Freshman Seminar: Topics: (Various Titles to be Assigned). (3-4 cr
[max 4 cr]; A-F or Aud. Prereq-Freshman, fewer than 30 cr LEIP 08)
Seminar designed specifically for freshmen.
ANTH 1601. Freshman Seminar: Prehistoric Cultures. (4 cr; A-F or Aud. PrereqFreshman, fewer than 30 cr, §1602 LEIP 07)
Origin and development of extinct and living human beings,
including growth and differentiation of cultures from their
beginnings to earliest stages of ancient civilizations.
ANTH 1602. Prehistoric Cultures. (4 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-§: 1601 LEIP 07)
Origin and development of extinct and living human beings,
including growth and differentiation of cultures from their
beginnings to earliest stages of ancient civilizations.
ANTH 1604. Cultural Anthropology. (4 cr; A-F or Aud. LEIP 06)
Introduction to representative cultures of the world and to concepts and methods of cultural anthropology, focusing on range
of variation and degree of uniformity in human behavior and in
cultural adaptations.
ANTH 1612. Introduction to Archaeology. (4 cr; A-F or Aud. LE 6)
Basic principles of archaeology with examples of their application to world prehistory.
ANTH 2001. Career Development in Anthropology. (2 cr; A-F only. Prereq-1602 or
1604 or equivalent, or #)
Overview of career opportunities for anthropological skill sets.
The mechanics of career development: locating jobs; matching
skills to job requirements; networking; writing resumes, cover
letters, CV’s, and graduate school application essays. A focus
on the lifelong process of building a career.
Course Descriptions
AMIN 4302. Independent Study of the Ojibwe Language. (1-6 cr [max 12 cr]; A-F
only. Prereq-1103, #; no Grad School cr)
AMIN 5910. Special Topics: (Various Titles to be Assigned). (3 cr [max 12 cr]; A-F
only. Prereq-Intro soc sci course or 1120 or #; no more than 6 cr may be applied to
Grad School program)
ANTH 3618. Ancient Middle America. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-1604, min 30 cr)
Survey of the Aztecs, Maya, and their predecessors.
ANTH 3622. Prehistoric Archaeology: Old World. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-1604,
min 30 cr)
Archaeological survey of Europe, Africa, and Asia.
ANTH 3624. Archaeology of North America. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-1604, min
30 cr)
Archaeological survey of major cultural areas of North America
north of Mexico.
ANTH 3628. Women in Cross-Cultural Perspective. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-1604,
min 30 cr)
Worldwide survey of the structure of gender systems, focusing
on women’s lives in selected, primarily non-Western, cultures,
how gender relations are impacted by colonialism, industrialism, and economic development
289
Course Descriptions
ANTH 3632. Latin American Cultures. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-1604, min 30 cr)
Survey of social, political, economic, and religious organization
of contemporary national and native cultures of Mexico, Central
America, and South America.
ANTH 3635. Peoples and Cultures of Europe. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-1604, min
30 cr, or #)
Exploration of European peoples to develop a cross-cultural
understanding of how cultures function. Survey of social, political, economic, religious, family and kinship, gender, urban,
globalism/globalization and the European Union (EU) on all of
the above.
ANTH 3638. Peoples and Cultures of the Middle East. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq1604, min 30 cr or #)
Examines how anthropologists study the cultures and social
institutions of the modern Islamic Middle East. Focus on
religion, family life, gender, politics, economy, urban ways of
life, kinship and marriage, and the impacts of globalism on the
Middle East.
ANTH 3640. What is a City?: Archaeological Perspectives on Urbanism. (3 cr;
A-F or Aud. Prereq-Min 30 cr or #)
Focus on a variety of historically and archaeologically documented urban case studies and important concepts, e.g., the use
of space, the physical manifestation of cities, urban abandonment, and the impact of cities on the environment.
ANTH 3642. Exploring Human Origins. (3 cr; A-F only. Prereq-Min 30 cr or #)
Designed to familiarize students with the discipline of paleanthropology or human evolution. Addresses primate and hominid
anatomy, dating techniques, stratigraphy, fossil formation and
paleoecology as well as human evolution through the fossil
evidence and associated archaeological material of various
hominid groups including the australopithecines, Homo erectus,
Neanderthals, and early modern humans. Explores human
evolution and current debates surrounding the evolutionary
relationships of various hominid taxa.
ANTH 3691. Independent Study in Anthropology. (1-5 cr [max 10 cr]; A-F or Aud.
Prereq-Min 60 credits or #)
Directed reading and research in ethnography leading to
preparation of paper.
ANTH 3695. Special Topics: (Various Titles to be Assigned). (1-4 cr [max 4 cr]; A-F or
Aud. Prereq-1604, min 30 cr or #)
Seminar on contemporary topics in selected branches of
anthropology.
Course Descriptions
ANTH 4616. Culture and Personality. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-1604, min 60 cr)
Role of culture in forming of personality; problems of individual adjustment to demands of culture. Psychological and
sociopsychological approach to culture.
ANTH 4621. Myth and Sacred Symbols. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-1604, min 60 cr)
Interpretation of myths and sacred symbols found in beliefs and
rituals of selected traditional cultures.
ANTH 4623. Anthropology and Contemporary Human Problems. (3 cr; A-F or
Aud. Prereq-1604, min 60 cr)
Cultural roots of such interrelated contemporary human
problems as over-population, food production and distribution,
health and nutrition, social and ecological disorders. Review of
alternative solutions to such problems as suggested by anthropological study and analyses.
ANTH 4628. Language and Culture. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-1604, min 60 cr)
Relationship between language and culture studied through
comparative cases from diverse areas of the world.
ANTH 4631. Anthropology and Environment. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-1604, min
60 cr)
In-depth study of some of the methods and concepts concerning
the interrelations of certain human populations with their
290
environments in diverse natural, cultural, historical, and evolutionary settings.
ANTH 4632. Anthropology of Landscapes. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-1604, min 60
credits or Grad School student or #)
Concepts of landscape and space in anthropology. Topics
include culturally constructed landscapes, memory, pilgrimage,
commemoration, and ways of making a living from the landscape. Theoretical background and analytical examples drawn
from the four subfields of anthropology: cultural, physical,
linuistics, and archaeology.
ANTH 4640. Medical Anthropology. (4 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-1604, min 60 credits
or Grad School student, or #)
Comparative, cross-cultural examination of sickness and
healing. Drawing from ethnographic work on indigenous,
alternative, and Euro-American medical systems as well as
shamanism, the course works with symbolic, social, political,
and historical perspectives.
ANTH 4651. Development of Anthropological Theory. (4 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq1604, min 90 cr, no Grad School cr)
Theoretical perspectives from mid-19th century to the present;
examines the interrelationship of method and theory, and implications for practice of anthropology.
ANTH 4653. Senior Seminar. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-1604, min 90 cr or #; no
Grad School cr)
Contemporary topics in selected branches of anthropology.
Active participation in group research project to develop and
enhance anthropological research skills.
ANTH 4654. Biological Anthropology. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-1604, min 60 cr)
The human skeleton as source of information about individual
variations, population structure, and human evolution. Study
of human remains from archaeological sites, morphology,
paleopathology, and relevant statistical methods. Lectures and
labs emphasize acquiring practical experiences in analysis and
interpretation.
ANTH 4691. Independent Study in Anthropology. (1-5 cr [max 5 cr]; A-F or Aud.
Prereq-Min 60 cr or #, no Grad School cr)
Directed reading and research in ethnology leading to preparation of paper.
ANTH 4695. Special Topics: (Various Titles to be Assigned). (1-5 cr [max 10 cr]; A-F
or Aud. Prereq-1604, min 90 cr or #)
Seminar on contemporary topics in selected branches of
anthropology.
ANTH 4696. Field Research in Archaeology. (1-10 cr [max 10 cr]; A-F or Aud.
Prereq-1602 or 1612, #)
Archaeological field excavation, survey, and research in historic
and prehistoric sites.
ANTH 4697. Anthropology Internship. (2-6 cr [max 6 cr]; S-N or Aud. Prereq-#, no
Grad School cr)
Supervised experience in an anthropological work related
setting: social service agency, museum, immigration services,
school or other, approved by instructor. Setting learning objectives, techniques for measuring progress and report writing will
be taught.
ANTH 4699. Honors Project. (2-4 cr [max 4 cr]; A-F or Aud. Prereq-1604, #; no
Grad School cr)
Advanced individual project in any area of anthropology
demonstrating sound theoretical and research foundations and
resulting in a written report, oral presentation. A web page or
poster presentation may be done in consultation with the honors
advisor.
ANTH 4997. Teaching Assistantship in Anthropology. (1-3 cr [max 3 cr]; A-F only.
Prereq-Min 60 cr, #, no Grad School cr)
Practical experience in teaching-related activities in anthropology courses.
Art
Art (ART)
ART 1015. Freshman Seminar: 3-D Design. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-Freshman,
fewer than 30 cr; §1012. LE 10)
School of Fine Arts
Introduction to the design, fabrication and analysis of three
dimensional form and space based on principles and elements
of design, hands on design assignments and study of 3-D design
as a source of cultural artifacts in contemporary society.
ART 901. Graphic Design Portfolio Review. (0 cr; S-N or Aud. Prereq-{repeatable
one time}, 9 cr in art courses, pre-graphic design major or %)
Presentation of portfolio and other required evaluative materials
for admission to graphic design major candidacy.
ART 902. Studio Art Portfolio Review. (0 cr; S-N only. Prereq-15 cr in art courses,
pre-studio art major or %)
Presentation of portfolio and other required evaluative materials
for admission to studio art major candidacy.
ART 903. Art Education Portfolio Review. (0 cr; S-N or Aud. Prereq-{repeatable one
time}, 9 cr in art courses, pre-art ed major or %)
ART 1125. Watercolor I. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-1002 or 1010 or #)
Basic concepts and techniques.
ART 1126. Watercolor II. (3 cr [max 6 cr]; A-F or Aud. Prereq-1125 or #, §3125)
Advanced concepts and techniques.
ART 1405. Fundamentals of Ceramics I. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-Not for art majors
or minors LE 10)
Basic handbuilding and glazing of earthenware ceramics.
Presentation of portfolio and other required evaluative materials
for admission to art education major candidacy.
ART 1605. Fundamentals of Photography. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-Not for art
majors or minors; §1600 or 1607. LE 10)
ART 1001. Art Today. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. LEIP 09)
Introduction to photography and its roles in the communications culture. Basic photographic principles and introduction
to digital darkroom. Assignments emphasize creative thinking.
Requires digital camera with adjustable shutter speeds and
apertures. Laptop and software required; instruction presented
only on the Mac platform. Plus 3 hours arranged studio work
per week.
Introductory survey of influence of art and roles of artists in
varied sociocultural contexts, emphasizing recent art and its
historical sources.
ART 1002. Introduction to Art. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-Pre-elementary/middle sch
educ or [BA theatre or music], or BFA theatre or BMus music education; §1005. LE 10)
Studio course with strong lecture component for those with
little or no creative experience in art, introducing various
materials, techniques, and concepts. Studio work, lectures, class
discussions, viewing artworks, and outside reading.
ART 1005. Freshman Seminar: Introduction to Art. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. PrereqFreshman, fewer than 30 cr; §: 1002. LE 10)
Studio course with a strong analytical component for those
with little or no creative experience in art; introducing various
materials, techniques and concepts in the context of lectures,
discussions, critical writing and analysis.
ART 1006. Freshman Seminar: Fundamentals of Drawing. (3 cr; A-F or Aud.
Prereq-Freshman, fewer than 30 cr; §1009. LE 10)
ART 1607. Freshman Seminar: Fundamentals of Photography. (3 cr; A-F or Aud.
Prereq-Freshman, fewer than 30 cr; §1600 or 1605. LE 10)
Introduction to photography as a communicative tool and
medium for creative expression. Investigation of photography’s
role in the communications culture and to historical influences
in the medium. Students produce a final portfolio of photographic prints. Requires digital camera with adjustable shutter
speeds and apertures. Laptop and software required; instruction
presented only on the Mac platform.
ART 1800. Creating Visual Narratives. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-Film studies
minor, #)
Development of visual and conceptual skills through drawing as
well as lectures, presentations, group discussions, critiques.
Introductory level video course offering the basic concept of
video narrative and the fundamental aspects of working with
digital production processes and techniques.
ART 1009. Fundamentals of Drawing. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-Not for art majors
or minors; §1006. LE 10)
ART 1814. Creating Across Cultures. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-§2814 LECD 09)
Stimulation of visual and conceptual skills through dynamics of
drawing as well as lectures/presentations and group discussions.
ART 1010. Drawing I. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-Art or art ed major or art minor or
architecture and design minor or #)
ART 1011. 2-D Design. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-Art or art ed major or art minor or #)
Introduction to two-dimensional design through study of design
elements and principles, including visual organization and color
theory and their application in various media.
ART 1012. 3-D Design. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-Art or art ed major or architecture
and design studies minor or #; §1015)
Introduction to basic concepts and materials of three-dimensional form and space.
ART 1013. 2-D Digital Design. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-Art or art ed major or art
minor or photography minor or achitecture and design studies minor or communication
arts or arts in media minor or #)
Two-dimensional studio and graphic design concepts using the
computer as a creative tool. Laptop required; digital instruction
presented only on the Mac platform.
ART 1900. Visual Literacy. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-§2900 LE 9)
Various forms of visual expression--art, commercial imagery,
typography, architecture, graffiti, etc.--as rhetoric. Introduction
to variety of theories and/or modes of criticism, and consideration of their value for explanation of visual expression.
ART 2014. 3-D Digital Studio I. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-1013 and art or art ed
major, pre-art educ major or pre-graphic design major, or art minor or architecture and
design studies minor or #. §1014 or 3014)
Introduction to design using 3-D digital applications, particularly for the creation of images for the purpose of artistic
expression or for use as graphic elements. The class will cover
use of the software as well as artistic and design issues raised by
this particular medium.
ART 2016. 2-D Digital Studio I. (3 cr [max 6 cr]; A-F or Aud. Prereq-1013, art or art
ed major, pre-art educ major or pre-graphic design major, or art or photography minor
or #, §3016)
Introduction to digital printmaking and other 2-Dimensional
outputs in relationship to contemporary fine art practice. Focus
on digital input and output, with cross-media explorations. The
class is conceptually driven, teaching skills, techniques, and introducing theory, history and criticism. Development of a serial
approach to visual imagery. Laptop required; digital instruction
presented only on the Mac platform.
291
Course Descriptions
Introduction to the drawing experience and problems concerned
with translation of three-dimensional visual experience into
two-dimensional form.
Underrepresented visual arts of cultural groups within U.S.
society.
Course Descriptions
ART 2030. Digital Arts I. (3 cr [max 6 cr]; A-F or Aud. Prereq-1013, 2016, art or art
ed major, pre-art educ major or pre-graphic design major, or art minor or #, §3030)
Introduction to digital media practice and theory through
lectures, studio time, readings and hands-on assignments.
Introduction to the most vital forms of contemporary 4-D art
making, including video art, sound/sonic, and web art/net.art.
Other introductions may include narrative driven structures,
interactivity and basic animation.
ART 2100. Painting I. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-1006 or 1009 or 1010, 1011, art or
art ed major or art minor or #, §1100)
Introduction to theory and practice of graphic design. Meaning
and aesthetics of image juxtaposition; resonance of type and
image.
ART 3015. 3-D Digital Studio II. (3 cr [max 9 cr]; A-F or Aud. Prereq-2014, art or art
ed major or architecture and design studies minor or art minor or #, §4014)
Color and pigment theory, basic concepts and explorations in
technology and imagery. Painting traditions and contemporary
directions.
Advanced study in 3-D digital applications, particularly for
the creation of images and animation for the purpose of artistic
expression or for use as graphic elements. The class covers use
of the software as well as artistic and design issues raised by
this particular medium.
ART 2200. Sculpture I. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-1015 or 1012, art or art ed major or
art minor or #, §1200)
ART 3017. 2-D Digital Studio II. (3 cr [max 6 cr]; A-F or Aud. Prereq-2016, art or art
ed major or art minor or #, §5016)
Sculptural materials, methods, and concepts, with problems
relating to form, time, and space; experience with various sculptural forms and media, emphasizing creative expression.
Advanced art making as part of the tradition of digital printmaking and other 2-Dimensional outputs in relationship to
contemporary fine art practice.
ART 2300. Printmaking I: Intaglio, Relief. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-1006 or 1009
or 1010, 1011, art or art ed major or art minor or #, §1300)
ART 3031. Digital Arts II. (3 cr [max 6 cr]; A-F or Aud. Prereq-2030, art or art ed
major, pre-art educ major or pre-graphic design major, or art minor or #, §5030)
Introduction to methods and materials used in zinc plate etching
and relief printing from wood and linoleum. Technical, aesthetic, and contextual considerations encountered in production
of meaningful artwork. Theoretical, legal, critical, and historical
aspects of printmaking.
Advanced art making for students interested in exploring
interdisciplinary or advanced study and research in current or
emerging technologies.
ART 2301. Printmaking I: Litho, Screen. (3 cr [max 6 cr]; A-F or Aud. Prereq-1006
or 1009 or 1010, 1011, art or art ed major or art minor or #, §1301)
Intensive study of special topics in visual arts. Topic announced
before course offered.
Introduction to methods and materials used in lithographic
printmaking from stones and plates and water-based screenprinting. Content includes technical, aesthetic and contextual
considerations encountered in the production of meaningful
artwork. Additional information on theoretical, legal, critical
and historical aspects of printmaking.
ART 2400. Ceramics I. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-1006 or 1009 or 1010, 1012, art or
art ed major or art minor or #, §1400)
Handbuilding methods, surface enhancement, and conceptual
support for pottery and/or ceramic sculpture.
ART 2500. Jewelry and Metals I. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-1011 or 1013, art or art
ed major or art minor or #, §1500)
Basic jewelry design, fabrication, and surface enhancement
techniques.
ART 2600. Photography I. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-Art or art ed major or art or
photography minor or #, §1600 or 1605 or 1607)
Course Descriptions
ART 2911. Graphic Design I. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-1010, 1011, 1013, 2905,
2907, arts in media minor, graphic design major, or digital art and photography
emphasis or #)
Introduction to photographic concepts, materials, and the
digital darkroom. Varied thematic assignments within the visual
arts context. Requires digital camera with adjustable shutter
speeds and apertures. Laptop and software required; instruction
presented only on the Mac platform.
ART 2905. Design Technology I. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-1013 and graphic design
major or pregrad art and tech major or arts in media minor or #)
Fundamentals of graphic reproduction and Web site design;
application of digital programs used in preparing print and web
work. Laptop required; digital instruction presented only on the
Mac platform.
ART 2907. Typography I. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-Graphic design major or digital
arts and photography emphasis or #)
Introduction to fundamentals of typography in print and screen
media. Presents terminology, history, and theories of letterforms.
Students will perform directed assignments to develop typographic skills on computer and by hand.
ART 3095. Special Topics: (Various Titles to be Assigned). (1-3 cr [max 12 cr]; A-F
or Aud. Prereq-#)
ART 3100. Painting II. (3 cr [max 9 cr]; A-F or Aud. Prereq-2100, art or art ed major,
pre-art educ major or pre-graphic design major, or art minor or #; max 9 cr)
Painting in specialized interest area, using student/instructorgenerated semester goals outline.
ART 3200. Sculpture II. (3 cr [max 6 cr]; A-F or Aud. Prereq-2200, art or art ed major
or art minor or #)
Sculptural materials, methods, and concepts, with problems
relating to form, time, and space; experience with various sculptural forms and media, emphasizing creative expression.
ART 3214. Sculpture II: Robotics and Physical Computing. (3 cr [max 6 cr]; A-F
or Aud. Prereq-2200, art or art ed major or art minor or #)
Intermediate and advanced sculpture robotics and physical
computing: Approaches to sculpture, digital control of objects,
kinetic sculpture and sound in installation events, performances,
and exhibitions.
ART 3300. Printmaking II. (3 cr [max 6 cr]; A-F or Aud. Prereq-2300 or 2301, art or
art ed major or art minor or #)
Continued exploration of processes explored in either or both
of the introductory courses. Increased technical challenges
combined with refinement of image and concept. Some photographic and mixed-media processes; increased experience in
editioning and critical review.
ART 3400. Ceramics II. (3 cr [max 6 cr]; A-F or Aud. Prereq-2400 or #)
Advanced handbuilding and surface enhancement techniques;
development of a stylistically consistent body of work.
ART 3405. Fundamentals of Ceramics II. (3 cr [max 6 cr]; Stdnt Opt. Prereq-1405
or #; not for art majors or minors)
Handbuilding, glazing, and firing of earthenware ceramics.
ART 3425. Ceramics II Wheel Throwing. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-2400, art or art
ed major or art minor or #)
Introduction to the potters wheel and clay throwing techniques.
Glazing and firing; surface work and enhancement, with conceptual support for pottery and sculptural clay forms.
ART 3500. Jewelry and Metals II. (3 cr [max 6 cr]; A-F or Aud. Prereq-2500, art or
art ed major or art minor or #)
Advanced application of jewelry techniques and design.
292
Art
ART 3600. Photography II: Alternative Processes and Film. (3 cr [max 6 cr];
A-F or Aud. Prereq-1013, 2600 or 1607 and art or art ed major or art or photography
minor or #)
Continued development of photographic concepts using film
and the wet darkroom, and selected other alternative processes
techniques within the creative context. Portfolio requirements
are project-based. Requires both digital and film cameras, at
least one of them with adjustable shutter speeds and apertures.
Laptop and software required; instruction presented only on the
Mac platform.
ART 3700. Drawing II. (3 cr [max 6 cr]; A-F or Aud. Prereq-1010, art or art ed major,
pre-art educ major or pre-graphic design major, or art minor or #)
Individually supervised projects supporting involvement in
other studio areas.
ART 3715. Figure Drawing. (3 cr; A-F only. Prereq-3700, art or art ed or graphic
design major or art minor or #)
The study of the human form, its structures and movements
related to aesthetic considerations. Intermediate and advanced
issues include perspective, space, foreshortening, proportioning
and appropriation for the purposes of approaching the figure as
an expressive and conceptual tool of art making.
ART 3800. Community Involvement Through Art. (1-3 cr [max 3 cr]; A-F or Aud.
Prereq-#; 1 cr for each 45 hrs of fieldwork)
For students interested in working with public and private social
agencies through an art program.
ART 3806. Early Childhood Art. (1 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-Art or art ed major or
admission to ECh studies program or #)
Aspects of preschool art development, including studio
expenses.
ART 3809. Art in Elementary Education Methods. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-0903,
art education cand)
Instructional problems based on the growth of artistic expression in children, philosophy of art education, and contemporary
problems. Museum and multicultural based experiences are
combined with outreach opportunities to develop includsive
elementary art curriculum and assessment.
ART 3810. Art in Elementary Education. (2 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-1002 or 1005,
pre-elem/middle school ed major only)
Instructional problems; growth and development of artistic
expression in children. Studio experience relating to elementary
art curriculum.
ART 3811. Art Education Elementary-Middle School Experience. (2 cr; A-F or
Aud. Prereq-3809 or 3810, Art ed major or #)
Continuation of theory and practice of graphic design.
Introduction to professional practices. Materials meaning,
aesthetics, and practical use.
ART 3933. Graphic Design III. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-3922, graphic design major
or #)
Continuation of theory and practice of graphic design. Graphic
design as an organizational and informative medium and as a
purely aesthetic pursuit.
ART 3950. Architecture Studio. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-1009, 1012, 1013, 2016,
Hist 3361, architecture and design studies minor or #)
Architectural concepts, methods, and materials, with experience
in architectural planning and problem-solving.
ART 4040. Introduction to Digital Filmmaking. (3 cr; A-F only. Prereq-2030, art or
art ed major, pre-art educ major or pre-graphic design major, or art minor or #)
Introduction to the narrative, documentary and experimental
possibilities of digital filmmaking production, development
of critical appreciation of film, with an exposure to history
and theory of the medium and factors influencing intercultural
communication in these genres. Students develop, produce and
complete a digital film.
ART 4100. Painting III. (3 cr [max 9 cr]; A-F or Aud. Prereq-3100, art or art ed major
or art minor or #; no Grad School cr)
Advanced individually supervised projects using both traditional and contemporary painting media and techniques.
ART 4191. Individual Study in Painting. (1-3 cr [max 9 cr]; A-F or Aud. Prereq-Two
sem painting, #; no Grad School cr)
Instruction tailored to individual’s needs outside of traditional
class structure.
ART 4200. Sculpture III. (3 cr [max 6 cr]; A-F or Aud. Prereq-3200, art or art ed major
or art minor or #; no Grad School cr)
Sculpture in area of specialized interest.
ART 4291. Individual Study in Sculpture. (1-3 cr [max 9 cr]; A-F or Aud. Prereq-2
sem sculpture, #; no Grad School cr)
Individual study in sculpture.
ART 4300. Printmaking III. (3 cr [max 6 cr]; A-F or Aud. Prereq-3300, art or art ed
major or art minor or #)
Further exploration of print processes. Emphasis on refinement
of technical skills as well as development of concepts and
imagery. Experimentation encouraged in nontraditional, collaborative, and cross-disciplinary approaches. Increased experience
in editioning and alternative formats combined with a more
comprehensive critical review.
ART 3814. Digital Methods in Art Education. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-Art education major or #)
ART 4391. Individual Study in Printmaking. (1-3 cr [max 9 cr]; A-F or Aud.
Prereq-3300, %)
Theoretical and practical experiences with emerging visual technologies. Assignments will integrate contemporary pedagogical
theories of visual culture and digital media in art education. Art
projects will use the computer as a creative tool.
Graduate students complete a project by contract with instructor, supported by a research paper.
ART 4400. Ceramics III. (3 cr [max 6 cr]; A-F or Aud. Prereq-3400, art or art ed major
or art minor or #; no Grad School cr)
ART 3815. Art in Secondary Education. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-3811, art ed
majors only or #)
Technical and conceptual refinement of advanced body of
ceramic work.
Nature and objectives of art programs in secondary school;
content and methods. Development of secondary art curriculum
and classroom site visits.
ART 4491. Individual Study in Ceramics. (1-3 cr [max 9 cr]; A-F or Aud. Prereq-2
sem ceramics, %)
ART 3895. Problems in Art Education. (1-3 cr [max 3 cr]; A-F or Aud. Prereq-Art
ed major or #)
ART 4600. Photography III: Digital Portfolio. (3 cr [max 9 cr]; A-F or Aud. Prereq2900, 3600 or 3625, art or art ed major or art or photography minor or #)
Individual supervised study for advanced art education students.
Applied research in art education.
ART 3907. Typography II. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-2907, graphic design major or #)
Directed study in specific areas.
Intensive digitally-based portfolio development in area of
special interest. Selected readings in photographic theory and
criticism. Graduate student portfolios are complemented by a
Advanced exploration of typography concepts and issues in
screen and print media.
293
Course Descriptions
Experience of the complex role of the teacher in a postmodern
setting within the framework of teacher as artist.
ART 3922. Graphic Design II. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-2911, graphic design major
or #)
Course Descriptions
related research project. Requires digital camera with adjustable
shutter speeds and apertures. Laptop and software required;
instruction presented only on the Mac platform.
ART 4650. Photography IV: Alternative Processes Portfolio. (3-6 cr [max 6 cr];
A-F only. Prereq-1900, 3600 or 3625, 4600, art or art ed major or art or photography
minor or #)
Intensive portfolio development using alternative contemporary
and historic photographic processes in area of special interest.
Graduate student portfolios are complemented by a related
research project. Requires both digital and film cameras, at
least one of them with adjustable shutter speeds and apertures.
Laptop required. Instruction presented only on the Mac
platform.
ART 4675. Photography V: The Photographic Book. (3-9 cr [max 9 cr]; A-F only.
Prereq-1900, [3600 or 3625], [4600 or 4650], art or art ed major or art or photography
minor or #)
Intensive portfolio development using alternative contemporary
and historic photographic processes in area of special interest. Selected readings in photographic theory and criticism.
Graduate student portfolios are complemented by a related
research project. Requires digital camera with adjustable shutter
speeds and apertures. Laptop required; instruction presented
only on the Mac platform.
ART 4691. Individual Study in Photography. (1-3 cr [max 9 cr]; A-F or Aud. Prereq2 semesters of photography, %)
For advanced students. Field research and experience working
with arts programming, practice, or management in public or
private agency, including the University.
ART 4899. Senior Presentation/Exhibition. (1 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-Sr art major or
#; no Grad School cr)
Students, singly or in pairs, plan/prepare/present under guidance
of faculty/museum staff an exhibition of their work in Tweed
Museum of Art or an approved alternative public venue.
ART 4901. Honors Graphic Design. (3 cr [max 9 cr]; A-F or Aud. Prereq-Graphic
design major and #; no Grad School cr)
Directed, but primarily independent, creative research for
outstanding students.
ART 4903. Art Education Student Teaching Seminar. (1 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-Art
ed major and [P]Educ 4500, EdSe 4600, ElEd 4650; no Grad School cr)
For students currently student teaching in art (K-12). Students
will share concerns and situations, suggestions, and gain group
support. The seminar supplements the field experience and
builds on issues of supervision, evaluation, professional development, and the culminating Standards of Effective Practice art
education portfolio.
ART 4905. Design Technology II. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-2905, graphic design
major or #)
Graduate students complete a project by contract with instructor, supported by a research paper.
Advanced concepts and digital program applications for print
and web graphic contexts.
ART 4700. Drawing III. (3 cr [max 6 cr]; A-F or Aud. Prereq-3700, art or art ed major
or art minor or #)
ART 4907. Motion Graphics. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-2911 and graphic design
major, or digital art and photography empasis or Grad Student, or #, §5907)
Individually supervised projects supporting involvement in
other studio areas. Graduate students produce a technically and
conceptually sophisticated portfolio of drawing, supported by a
research paper.
ART 4908. Interactive Design I. (3 cr [max 6 cr]; A-F or Aud. Prereq-4907, graphic
design major, or digital art and photography emphasis or Grad Student or #, §5909)
ART 4702. Honors Studio. (3 cr [max 9 cr]; A-F or Aud. Prereq-#; no Grad School cr)
Directed, but largely independent, creative inquiry for students
of exceptional ability.
ART 4791. Individual Study in Drawing. (1-3 cr [max 9 cr]; A-F or Aud. Prereq-2
semesters of drawing, #)
Graduate students complete a project in drawing by contract
with instructor, supported by a research paper.
ART 4812. Senior Seminar. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-Sr or #; no Grad School credit)
Course Descriptions
ART 4897. Arts Internship Experience. (1-9 cr [max 9 cr]; A-F or Aud. Prereq-#; 1
cr for each 45 hrs of fieldwork; no Grad School cr)
Current visual arts and design issues investigated through
research, lectures, assigned readings, discussion, writing
assignments,and presentations.
ART 4813. Senior Seminar II: Studio Practice. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-4812, Sr or
#, studio art-general major; no Grad School cr)
Preparation for the emerging studio professional in such areas
as documenting work, building an exhibition history, and artsrelated employment opportunities, through lectures, presentations, discussion, assigned readings, writing assignments, and
field experience.
ART 4891. Honors Art Education Research. (3 cr [max 9 cr]; A-F or Aud. Prereq-Art
ed major and #; no Grad School cr)
Directed, but largely independent, research in an area of art
education for students of exceptional ability.
ART 4892. Independent International Study. (1-6 cr [max 9 cr]; A-F or Aud. Prereq1-6 cr with %, sr standing advisable; no Grad School cr)
Travel and research in international museums, schools, arts organizations, and art centers. Requires advanced planning. Credit
allowed depends on nature and scope of project.
Introduces aesthetics, mechanics, and meaning of motion
graphics.
Interactivity in graphic design, concentrating on computerbased interactive presentations.
ART 4909. Interactive Design II. (3 cr [max 6 cr]; A-F or Aud. Prereq-4908, graphic
design major, or digital art and photography emphasis or Grad Student, or #, §5910)
Interactivity in graphic design, concentrating on computerbased interactive presentations.
ART 4922. Senior Design Studio I. (3 cr [max 6 cr]; A-F or Aud. Prereq-3933 or #,
no Grad School cr, §4910)
Exploration of advanced graphic design topics through an
extensive project for print and/or screen: research, creative
production and development of a presentation system. Done
individually or in groups.
ART 4933. Senior Design Studio II. (3 cr [max 6 cr]; A-F or Aud. Prereq-4922 or #,
no Grad School cr)
Professional presentation, portfolio development and professional practice.
ART 4950. Architecture Capstone/Portfolio. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-3950 and
architecture and design studies minor, ArtH 3331 or ArtH 3361 or Hist 3365 or #; no
Grad School cr)
Continued work in architectural concepts, methods, and materials, culminating in a capstone portfolio.
ART 5091. Individual Study in Electronic Arts. (1-3 cr [max 9 cr]; A-F or Aud.
Prereq-1014 or 3016, art or art ed major or art minor and #; no Grad School cr)
Individually supervised projects in electronic arts media.
ART 5095. Special Topics in Art Education: (Various Titles to be Assigned). (.5-3 cr
[max 12 cr]; A-F or Aud. Prereq-#)
Intensive study of special topics in art education.
ART 5795. Intermedia Studio Problems. (1-3 cr [max 9 cr]; A-F or Aud. Prereq-2
sem work in each subject area with #)
Directed study emphasizing intermedia concerns.
294
Art History
ART 5991. Independent Study in Graphic Design. (1-3 cr [max 9 cr]; A-F or Aud.
Prereq-2 sem work in graphic design and graphic design major and #)
Independent work in graphic design
ART 5997. Art Museum Internship. (1-3 cr [max 12 cr]; A-F or Aud. Prereq-1001, 6
cr ArtH; 1 cr for each 45 hrs of work; no Grad School cr, #)
Supervised practicum in art museum operation
ART 5999. Special Projects in Design. (3 cr [max 6 cr]; A-F or Aud. Prereq-Graphic
design major or Grad Student; #)
Specific projects in graphic design practice.
ART 8333. FTE: Master’s. (1 cr; No grade. Prereq-Master’s student, adviser and
DGS consent)
ART 8901. Graduate Seminar. (4 cr [max 16 cr]; A-F or Aud. Prereq-[P]8980)
Critique of student work and discussion of readings. Faculty
presentations on design history, criticism, theory, and analysis.
ART 8903. Art Teaching Practicum. (1 cr [max 4 cr]; A-F or Aud. Prereq-Grad tchg
asst or #)
Theory of and experience in teaching college-level art.
ART 8980. Graduate Studio. (4 cr [max 16 cr]; A-F or Aud. Prereq-[P]8901; Grad
student)
Production of graphic designs based on problems and topics
that are discussed in Art 8901 (Graduate Seminar), in which
students enroll concurrently.
ART 8990. M.F.A. Creative Thesis. (3-6 cr [max 6 cr]; A-F or Aud. Prereq-Grad
Student and #)
In consultation with advisor, completion of major project as
culmination of M.F.A. studies.
Art History (ARTH)
ARTH 3331. European Architecture, 1400-1800. (3 cr; A-F or Aud)
Developments during Renaissance and Baroque periods.
ARTH 3340. Baroque and Rococo Art. (3 cr; A-F or Aud)
Developments in European painting and sculpture during 17th
and 18th centuries.
ARTH 3360. European Art in an Age of Revolution. (3 cr; A-F or Aud)
European art from French Revolution through pan-European
revolutions of 1848, examined in social and historical contexts.
ARTH 3361. European Art: Impressionism and Post-Impressionism. (3 cr; A-F
or Aud)
European art from mid-19th century through 1900, including
late Realism, Impressionism, pan-European Symbolism and Art
Nouveau, examined in social and historical contexts.
ARTH 3370. European Art, 1900-1945. (3 cr; A-F or Aud)
Includes Cubism, Futurism, Dada, de Stijl, German
Expressionism, New Objectivity, Surrealism, art of Bauhaus,
and art of National Socialists, examined in social and historical
contexts.
ARTH 3380. Art of the United States: Colonial to Impressionist. (3 cr; A-F or Aud)
U.S. art from colonial period through 1900, examined in social
and historical contexts.
ARTH 3395. Special Topics: (Various Titles to be Assigned). (1-3 cr [max 6 cr]; A-F
or Aud)
Title announced before course is offered.
ARTH 4491. Directed Study in 19th- and 20th-Century European Art. (1-4 cr
[max 9 cr]; A-F or Aud. Prereq-Grad Student or #; max 6 cr for undergrads, max 9 cr
for grad)
Independent research in an area of the student’s interest; fundamental knowledge of period or subject required.
School of Fine Arts
ARTH 4620. History of Photography. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-2390 or 3370 or art
or art ed major or art, photography or communication arts minor or #)
ARTH 1303. History of World Art I. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. LE 9)
Conceptual and technical evolution of the photographic medium
from its inception to the present, with special emphasis upon its
development within art, design and new media contexts.
Development of world art and architecture from prehistory
through Middle Ages.
ARTH 1304. History of World Art II. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. LEIP 09)
Development of world art and architecture from Renaissance
to present.
ARTH 1400. Freshman Seminar: Honors: Paris in the Age of Impressionism. (3
cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-Freshman, fewer than 30 cr, honors student LE 9)
Paris in art and literature, 1860-1900.
Genres of painting and related subjects in Western art,
1400-1800.
ARTH 2390. American Art of the 20th Century. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. LECD 09)
American art from Armory Show of 1913 to present examined
in social and historical contexts.
ARTH 2815. Women Artists in History. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. LECD 09)
Survey of contributions women have made in the visual arts
throughout history.
ARTH 3091. Honors Research in Art History. (1-3 cr [max 3 cr]; A-F or Aud.
Prereq-#)
Directed research in an art history area for students of exceptional ability. Students must be invited by art history faculty to
register for this course.
ARTH 3320. Ancient Art. (3 cr; A-F or Aud)
Art and architecture of Minoans, Mycenaeans, Greeks, and
Romans.
ARTH 3330. Renaissance Painting and Sculpture. (3 cr; A-F or Aud)
Developments in Europe, 1300-1600.
Independent research in an area of the student’s interest,
culminating in a paper or project. Fundamental knowledge of
subject required. Graduate student must complete a substantial
research paper or project on a topic chosen in consultation with
instructor
ARTH 4901. History of Graphic Design. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-Art or art ed major
or graphic design major or art or communication arts or arts in media minor or Grad
student or #)
Introduction to the history of graphic design, from the origins of
written communication to present. Graduate students complete
a substantial research paper or project on a topic in consultation
with the instructor.
ARTH 4991. Directed Study in the History of Graphic Design. (1-4 cr [max 8 cr];
A-F or Aud. Prereq-Grad student or #)
Independent research in an area of the student’s interest,
culminating in a paper or project. Fundamental knowledge of
subject required.
ARTH 4999. Senior Paper Art History. (1 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-Major in ArtH with
90 cr, #; no Grad School credit)
Students write and/or revise a final paper demonstrating their
competency in art historical research and writing.
ARTH 5191. Directed Study in Ancient and Medieval Art. (1-3 cr [max 9 cr]; A-F
or Aud. Prereq-#; max 6 cr for undergrads)
Independent research in an area of art history pertinent to the
interests of the student. Fundamental knowledge of period or
subject required.
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Course Descriptions
ARTH 2305. Classical Themes in Art History. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. LE 9)
ARTH 4691. Directed Study in the History of Photography. (3-4 cr [max 4 cr]; A-F
only. Prereq-#,[P]4620 is not allowed)
Course Descriptions
ARTH 5391. Directed Study in Renaissance and Baroque Art. (1-3 cr [max 9 cr];
A-F or Aud. Prereq-#; max 6 cr for undergrads)
BHSC 5591. Studies in Medical Behavioral Sciences. (2 cr; P-N only. Prereq-Regis
med student, #)
Independent research in an area of art history pertinent to the
interests of the student. Fundamental knowledge of period or
subject required.
Selectives on topics in general medical behavioral science,
typically including women’s mental health issues, chronic pain,
socialization into medicine, aging, hypnosis and others.
ARTH 5591. Directed Study in American Art. (1-3 cr [max 9 cr]; A-F or Aud. Prereq#; max 6 cr for undergrads)
BHSC 6200. Behavioral Medicine. (1 cr; O-N only. Prereq-Regis med student)
Independent research in an area of art history pertinent to the
interests of the student. Fundamental knowledge of period or
subject required.
Astronomy (AST)
College of Science and Engineering
AST 1040. Introductory Astronomy. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. LE 5)
Survey of present knowledge of solar system, interstellar space,
stars, galaxies, and universe. Historical development of astronomy as a science. Taught in day school and in Individualized
Learning Program format.
AST 1051. Freshman Seminar: The New Solar System. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. PrereqFreshman, fewer than 30 credits LE 5)
Examination of the planets and moons of our solar system and
other star systems from the perspective of planet formation and
evolution. Are there other Earths? Are there other places which
could sustain life?
AST 1061. Freshman Seminar: Observing the Universe. (4 cr; A-F or Aud. PrereqFreshman, fewer than 30 cr LE 4)
Introduction to principles of astronomical observation,
telescopes and mounts, naked-eye astronomy, constellation
identification, lunar phases, motion of the planets, astrophotography, image processing, and image analysis. Highlights
the work of Galileo Galilei and the 18th century astronomer
Charles Messier.
AST 2040. The Solar System. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-1040, Math 1250 or #)
Survey of terrestrial and jovian planets and their satellites;
asteroids, comets, interplanetary debris; examination of lunar
rocks and meteorite samples when available; origin and evolution of solar system.
Course Descriptions
AST 4110. Observational Astronomy. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-Phys 2012 or #)
Applied principles of astronomical observation; review of optical telescopes and mounts; locating and tracking objects; remote
telescope operation, CCD, CMOS, and film astrophotography,
astrometry, photometry, spectroscopy, astronomical image
processing and analysis.
Behavioral Sciences (BHSC)
School of Medicine
BHSC 5432. Clinical Psychopharmacology. (3 cr; Stdnt Opt)
Clinical application of pharmacological principles; overview
of major psychological disorders, such as depression, anxiety,
psychosis, ADHD, substance abuse, and sleep disorders; appropriate treatments of psychological disorders with psychotropic
medications. Clinical guidelines for psychotropic drugs.
BHSC 5491. Problems in Medical Behavioral Sciences. (1-6 cr [max 6 cr]; A-F or
Aud. Prereq-Med or upper div or Grad Student, #; max 6 cr to Grad School program)
Independent study on a tutorial, seminar, or lecture basis.
Investigative work, lecture material, and/or appropriate reading
and discussions designed according to interest and capabilities
of individual student.
Introduction to contemporary behavioral medicine. Interface of
biological, psychological, and social factors in a range of health
issues, including stress, substance abuse, chronic pain and illness, cardiovascular disease, obesity, and infectious diseases.
BHSC 6211. Medical Sociology. (1 cr; P-N only. Prereq-Regis med student)
Advanced aspects of sociology and its application to areas of
medical science. Emphasis on doctor-patient relationship, role
of medicine in society, and institutionalization of medical care
through hospitals, medical schools, and medical profession.
BHSC 6230. Medical Psychology: Interviewing. (1 cr; P-N or Aud. Prereq-Regis
med student)
Psychological aspects of interviewing in health care settings;
interpersonal communicative skills and problems; techniques of
rapport building and history taking.
BHSC 6260. Psycho-Social-Spiritual Aspects of Life-Threatening Illness. (2 cr;
O-N only. Prereq-Regis med student)
Psychological, social, and spiritual coping of patients, families,
and health care professionals as they experience life-threatening illnesses. Effective intervention strategies for health care
professionals are emphasized. Post-death responses of families
and care providers.
BHSC 6652. Human Behavioral Development and Problems. (4 cr; O-N only.
Prereq-Regis med student)
Human psychological development throughout life; normal cognitive, learning, social, and personality development; problems
expressed during various stages of life in the family and other
settings. Assessment/treatment described as relevant to practice
of family medicine.
BHSC 6701. Medical Ethics. (2 cr; O-N only. Prereq-Regis med student)
Basic concepts and skills of medical ethics, including core
values, clinical issues, and case analysis.
Biochemistry and Molecular
Biology (MDBC)
School of Medicine
MDBC 5201. Topics in Biochemistry. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-Chem 3322 or Chem
4341 or #)
In-depth coverage and expansion of selected biochemical principles introduced in introductory undergraduate courses
MDBC 5202. Cellular and Molecular Biology. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-Biol 2102 or
Biol 5231 or Chem 4342 or #)
In-depth coverage of selected topics in cellular and molecular
biology. Most topics will have been introduced in undergraduate
courses.
MDBC 5501. Neurobiochemistry. (2 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-Chem 3322 or Chem
4342 or #)
Current concepts on anatomical and compositional properties of
brain; membranes and transport; neurotransmission; receptors
and signal transduction mechanisms; energy, carbohydrate,
protein, lipid, and nucleic acid metabolism; development and
diseases of the central nervous system.
MDBC 8151. Biochemistry Seminar. (1 cr [max 4 cr]; S-N or Aud. Prereq-Biochem
or Chem Graduate Student or #)
Current topics in biochemistry.
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Biology
MDBC 8294. Current Research Techniques. (1-3 cr [max 4 cr]; S-N or Aud. PrereqBiochem or Chem Graduate Student or #)
Research projects in biochemistry, each carried out in research
lab of a faculty member.
MDBC 8333. FTE: Master’s. (1 cr; No grade. Prereq-Master s student, adviser and
DGS consent)
MDBC 8444. FTE: Doctoral. (1 cr; No grade. Prereq-Doctoral student, adviser and
DGS consent)
MDBC 8666. Doctoral Pre-Thesis Credits. (1-6 cr [max 12 cr]; No grade. PrereqMax 6 cr per semester or summer; doctoral student who has not passed prelim oral;
no required consent for the first two registrations up to 12 cr; departmental consent for
the third and fourth registrations up to an additional 12 cr, or 24 cr total (for doctoral
students admitted summer 2007 and beyond; doctoral students admitted prior to
summer 2007 may register up to 4 times totaling 60 cr))
MDBC 8777. Thesis Credits: Master’s. (1-18 cr [max 50 cr]; No grade. Prereq-Max
18 cr per semester or summer; 10 cr total required (Plan A only))
MDBC 8888. Thesis Credits: Doctoral. (1-24 cr [max 100 cr]; No grade. Prereq-Max
18 cr per semester or summer; 24 cr required)
Biology (BIOL)
College of Science and Engineering
BIOL 1001. Biology and Society. (4 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-For nonmajors LE 4)
Contemporary issues in biology. (3 hrs lect, 2 hrs lab)
BIOL 1010. Home Horticulture. (3 cr; A-F or Aud)
Concepts of plant identification, growth and culture with
practical application to home landscape, house plants and fruit,
flower and vegetable gardening. Labs include plant propagation,
grafting, computer landscape design and one field trip.
BIOL 1011. General Biology I. (5 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-1 yr high school Chem or 1
sem college Chem LE 4)
Fundamental concepts of biology, including chemical basis
of life, cell structure and function, energy transformations,
photosynthesis, cellular respiration, genetics, molecular biology,
DNA technology, development, origin of life, and evolution. (4
hrs lect, 2.5 hrs lab)
BIOL 1012. General Biology II. (5 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-1011)
Fundamental concepts of biology, including classification and
diversity of life, anatomy, physiology, and development of
prokaryotes, protistans, fungi, animals, and plants; behavior;
population, community, and ecosystem ecology. (4 hrs lect, 2.5
hrs lab)
Introduces the diversity and beauty of the biological world
through sketching and drawing. Develops the student’s
observational abilities by drawing animals and plants in various
settings. Retention of biological concepts is enhanced when a
drawing class is included at the introductory level.
BIOL 1086. Freshman Seminar: Food Preservation, Sanitation and Handling. (3
cr; Stdnt Opt. Prereq-Freshman, fewer than 30 credits LE 5)
Association of microorganisms with food, contamination in
nature, during handling and processing, food spoilage and
prevention, role of microorganisms in food production, vehicle
for bioterrorism will be emphasized. Lectures, discussions,
demonstrations, student participation by hands-on experience,
field trips.
BIOL 1087. Freshman Seminar: Darwinian Medicine. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. PrereqFreshman, fewer than 30 credits LE 5)
Darwinian medicine integrates evolutionary explanations into
understanding human vulnerabilities to disease. This course
introduces principles of evolution including natural selection,
BIOL 1088. Freshman Seminar: Biodiversity at Risk; Exotic and Invasive Species. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-Freshman, fewer than 30 credits LE 5)
Introduction to basic ecological concepts of plant, animal and
microbial interactions in communities and ecosystems. Popular
articles, literature reviews, discussions and student presentations focused on selected exotic and invasive species of local,
regional, continental and global concern.
BIOL 1089. Freshman Seminar: Northland Environmental Issues. (3 cr; A-F or
Aud. Prereq-Freshman, fewer than 30 cr. LE 5)
Many significant environmental issues affect those who live in
the upper Midwest. This course will identify those issues and
provide students with a scientific framework for studying the
problems involved and evaluating possible solutions.
BIOL 1092. Freshman Seminar: Earth’s Life Support System. (3 cr; A-F or Aud.
Prereq-Freshman, fewer than 30 credits LE 5)
Fundamental concepts of a specific area within the biological sciences; in this case, consideration of global perspectives
and their relationship to current societal problems and issues.
Students will develop the biological knowledge necessary for
the critical analysis of current literature dealing with environmental problems: population, industrial growth, the economy
and other issues critical to the plant’s life support systems.
BIOL 1093. Freshman Seminar: Biological Illustration. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq§1083, freshman, fewer than 30 credits LE 5)
Introduces the diversity and beauty of the biological world
through sketching and drawing. Develops the student’s
observational abilities by drawing animals and plants in various
settings. Retention of biological concepts is enhanced when a
drawing class is included at the introductory level.
BIOL 1094. Freshman Seminar: Northern Stream Ecosystems and the Angler. (3
cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-Freshman, fewer than 30 credits LE 5)
Fundamental concepts of nature and history of stream ecosystems, their inhabitants, and ecological concepts of stream
organization in addition to appreciation of stream conservation
and angling. Acquisition of skills and techniques for participation in the sport of flyfishing.
BIOL 1096. Freshman Seminar: Science, Policy and Environment. (3 cr; A-F or
Aud. Prereq-Freshman, fewer than 30 credits. LE 5)
Investigation of the intersection between science, science policy,
and social policy present in a current, regional environmental
issue. Actual environmental issue explored will vary from
semester to semester.
BIOL 1097. Freshman Seminar: Topics: (Various Titles to be Assigned). (3 cr; Stdnt
Opt. Prereq-Freshman, fewer than 30 cr. LE 5)
Presentations, discussions, and literature reviews of selected
topics in basic/applied biological sciences. Topic announced
before course is offered.
BIOL 1761. Human Anatomy. (4 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-1 yr high school Biol or 1011)
Gross and microscopic structure of body from functional
standpoint using charts, models, skeletons; cat and sheep organ
dissection demonstrates mammalian anatomy. Not for biology
majors/minors; primarily for students in nursing, allied health
professions, preprofessional programs, communication disorders, physical education. (2 hrs lect, 4 hrs lab)
BIOL 2101. Cell Biology. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-1012, chem 1152 or 1162)
Structure and function of procaryotic and eucaryotic cells,
including cell surface, membranes, organelles, cytoskeleton, cell
growth, cell physiology, and experimental methods used in cell
studies. (3 hrs lect)
297
Course Descriptions
BIOL 1083. Freshman Seminar: Honors: Biological Illustration. (3 cr; A-F or Aud.
Prereq-Freshman, fewer than 30 cr, honors student, §1093 LE 5)
adaptation and phylogeny within Darwinian medicine’s major
subject categories: defenses, infection, novel environments,
genes, design compromises, and evolutionary legacies.
Course Descriptions
BIOL 2102. Cell Biology Laboratory. (2 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-[P]2101)
Contemporary cell biology research techniques, hypothesis
testing and communication of results.
BIOL 2201. Genetics. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-1012)
Basic principles of Mendelian inheritance, molecular genetics,
chromosomal aberrations, and population genetics. (3 hrs lect)
BIOL 2202. Genetics Laboratory. (2 cr; A-F only. Prereq-1011, 2201 (concurrent
registration is allowed for 2201))
Credit given for professional work experience outside an
academic department. Requires prior department approval and
coordination with faculty sponsor.
BIOL 3997. Seminar I. (.5 cr; S-N or Aud. Prereq-60 cr or #)
Students attend and evaluate department seminars.
BIOL 3998. Seminar II. (.5 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-3997, 60 cr or #)
Mendelian and molecular research techniques used to illustrate
fundamental principles of genetics.
Experience in oral presentation of student-initiated field, lab, or
library research findings. (1 hr sem)
BIOL 2763. Biology of Women. (2 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-1012 LECD 05)
BIOL 4199. Frontiers in Cell Biology. (2 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-2101, 2201, 90 cr, or
Biol or IBS Grad Student, §5199)
Fundamental principles of biology unique to women. Evolution
of sex and gender; sex determination, differentiation, and development; sexual brain differences; anatomy and physiology;
menstruation; oogenesis; ovulation; fertilization; pregnancy and
birthing; birth control; menopause; aging; cancer; and nutrition.
(2 hrs lect)
BIOL 2801. General Ecology. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-1012 or #)
Relationships between life and environment for individuals, populations, communities, and ecosystems; surveys of
environmental factors and biomes.May be taken without lab
2802. (3 hrs lect)
BIOL 2802. Ecology Laboratory. (2 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-[P]2801)
Experience in methods of measuring environmental factors,
interpreting data. (4 hrs lab)
BIOL 2961. Introduction to Veterinary Medicine. (1 cr; S-N or Aud. Prereq-1012
or #)
Lecture and discussion on principles and practices of veterinary
medicine.
BIOL 3601. Plant Diversity. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-1012)
Evolutionary survey of plants, focusing on diversity of life
histories and patterns of organization. Fossil and extant groups,
including algae and nonvascular and vascular land plants. (2 hrs
lect, 2 hrs lab, field trip)
BIOL 3603. Plant Taxonomy. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-1012)
Introduction to taxonomy of vascular plants, emphasizing seed
plants; representative families; terminology; literature; use of
keys. (2 hrs lect, 2 hrs lab)
Analysis and discussion of current literature and topics.
BIOL 4231. Molecular Biology. (3 cr; A-F only. Prereq-2101, 2201 or #, or Biol or IBS
Grad School student, §5231)
Contemporary molecular biology techniques, linkage analysis,
mutation, DNA repair and recombination, genetics of viruses
and bacteria, transposable genetic elements, genetics of mitochondria and chloroplasts, genomics, genetic control of animal
development and the vertebrate immune system.
BIOL 4361. Developmental Biology. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-2101, 2201 or #, or
Biol or IBS Grad School student, §5361)
Molecular and cellular mechanisms of development, emphasizing animal systems and including cell cycle, gametogenesis, fertilization, morphogenetic movements, cytodifferentiation, cell
interactions, pattern formation, gene expression, organogenesis,
metamorphosis, regeneration, and aging. (2 hrs lect, 3 hrs lab)
BIOL 4501. General Microbiology. (4 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-2101 or #, or Biol or IBS
Grad School student)
Morphology of microorganisms; growth; environmental and
physiological types; physical and chemical control; taxonomy;
viruses; genetics of bacteria; practical applications, including
medical, water, soil, and food microbiology. (2 hrs lect, 4 hrs
lab)
BIOL 4503. General Microbiology offered in Wroclaw, Poland. (4 cr; A-F or Aud.
Prereq-2101, o; no Grad School cr)
Survey of major animal phyla, focusing on phylogeny, anatomy,
physiology, and ontogeny. (2 hrs lect, 4 hrs lab)
Microbial cell structure, metabolism, nutrition, growth, and
genetics. Structure and pathogenicity of viruses. Microbial
taxonomy and diversity. Microbial diseases, immunity, serology,
and control. Applied and environmental microbiology including medical, food, aquatic, and soil microbiology. Offered at
Wroclaw University, Poland.
BIOL 3703. Animal Physiology. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-1011, 1012, one semester
college chemistry)
BIOL 4603. Plant Physiology. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-2101, one year of college
chem, or Biol or IBS Grad School student)
BIOL 3701. Animal Diversity. (4 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-1012)
Course Descriptions
BIOL 3996. Internship in Biology. (1-2 cr [max 2 cr]; S-N or Aud. Prereq-1012, #;
max 1 cr may be applied to biol or cell biol major)
Examination of principles, patterns, and mechanisms of biological function from the level of cells and tissues to the whole
animal. Primary focus on comparative vertebrate physiology.
BIOL 3990. Special Topics: (Various Titles to be Assigned). (1-5 cr [max 5 cr]; Stdnt
Opt. Prereq-1012 or #)
Specific topics submitted for biology department review. Topic
announced before course offered.
BIOL 3993. Laboratory Teaching Experience. (1-2 cr [max 2 cr]; S-N or Aud.
Prereq-#, biol or cell biol major, 90 cr incl 25 cr Biol; max 2 cr may be applied toward
Biol major)
Participation in teaching biology lab courses: help set up labs,
participate in teaching of labs, and share in instruction of review
labs.
BIOL 3994. Undergraduate Research. (1-3 cr [max 6 cr]; S-N or Aud. Prereq-1012,
60 cr, #; max 4 cr may be applied to biol or cell biol major or biol minor as upper div
elective)
Advanced independent work in special fields.
298
Overview of the mechanisms underlying plant function, growth
and development. Topics include plant metabolism, plant water
relations, mineral nutrition, transport, internal and external regulators of plant growth and development, plant stress physiology
and plant biotechnology.
BIOL 4731. Entomology. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-1012 or #, or Biol or IBS Grad
School student)
Structure, life history, ecology, classification, evolution, principles of control, and significance of insects in our society. Field
collections.(2 hrs lect, 3 hrs lab and field)
BIOL 4761. Ichthyology. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-2801 or #, or Biol or IBS Grad
School student)
Physiologic, taxonomic, ecologic, economic, and behavioral
aspects of fishes. Lab emphasis on fishes of Great Lakes region,
including field conducted independent study. (2 hrs lect, 3 hrs
lab, field)
Biology
BIOL 4763. Ornithology. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-2801 or #, or Biol or IBS Grad
School student)
Lab and field identification of birds, their migration and habitats; biological, taxonomic, and economic considerations. (2 hrs
lect, 8 hrs lab and field for 7 weeks)
BIOL 4764. Mammalogy. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-2801 or #, or Biol or IBS Grad
School student)
Origin, taxonomy, distribution, physiology, ecology and behavior of mammals. Laboratory and fieldwork includes collection,
preparation and identification of Minnesota species. (2 hrs
lecture, 3 hours lab, field)
ecology and genetics of interacting organisms will be studied to
understand their evolution. Includes two hours lecture and one
three-hour lab per week.
BIOL 5511. Virology. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-4501, or Biol or IBS Grad School
student)
Viruses and hosts; effects of viral infections on cells; expression
of viral genome in procaryotic and eucaryotic cells; epidemiology and pathogenesis of viruses, including emerging ones; viral
evolution. (2 hrs lect, 2 hrs lab)
BIOL 5513. Experimental Immunology. (4 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-4501 or #, or Biol
or IBS Grad School student)
BIOL 4801. Evolution. (2 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-1012, 2201 or #, or Biol or IBS Grad
School student)
Principles and practices of basic and advanced immunological
lab techniques. (2 hrs lect, 6 hrs lab)
Origin, history, opposition, and evidence supporting evolutionary ideas. Basic concepts: origin of life, phylogeny, biological
history, mechanisms of evolutionary change, population genetics, speciation, tempo of evolution, macroevolution, extinction,
biogeography, evolution of social systems, altruism. (2 hrs lect)
BIOL 5515. Microbial Diversity and Phylogeny. (3 cr; A-F only. Prereq-2101 or
4501 or #, or Biol or IBS Grad School student)
BIOL 4805. Ecological Invasions. (2 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-2801 or Biol or IBS Grad
School student)
Characteristics of successful invaders, ecological effects of
invasive species, genetic effects on native populations, impacts
on human societies, options for control, relationships to other
global changes. Case studies
BIOL 4891. Animal Behavior. (2 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-1012, 2801 or #, or Biol or
IBS Grad School student)
Known behavior of various vertebrate and invertebrate phyla,
emphasizing adaptive significance and the genetics and ontogeny of behavioral patterns. Mating, aggressive, nutritive, and
nurturing behavior and relation to ecology of animal populations. (2 hrs lect)
BIOL 5232. Molecular Biology Laboratory. (2 cr; A-F only. Prereq-[P]4231 or #, or
Biol or IBS Grad School student, §4232)
Regulation of gene expression in prokaryote and eukaryotes
explored through use of recombinant DNA technologies.
BIOL 5233. Genomics. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-1012, 2201, 2101 or a course in
biochemistry or molecular biology or #)
A comprehensive examination of how the genomic revolution
has shed insight into eukaryotic gene expression by illustrating
the methods that show how coordinate sets of genes control
biochemical events at the cellular level.
BIOL 5235. Biotechnology. (4 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-(2101, 2102, 2201, Chem 3322
or Chem 4341) or Biol or IBS Grad School student)
BIOL 5240. Ecological Genetics. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-1012, 2201 and Stat
1411, or Biol or IBS Grad School student)
Examines basic concepts in population and quantitative genetics. Focus is on techniques that reveal the genetic structure and
adaptive value of ecologically important traits.
BIOL 5365. Developmental Physiology. (2 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-1012; 4361 and
3703 strongly recommended, or Biol or IBS Grad School student)
Review of physiological mechanisms of animal development.
Emphasis on well-studied animal models such as insects,
crustaceans, zebrafish, and mice.
BIOL 5401. Coevolution of Plants, Animals and Microbes. (3 cr; A-F or Aud.
Prereq-2801, 2802, or Biol or IBS Grad School student)
Explores the evolution of interactions between species ranging
from strongly antagonistic such as predator-prey interactions to
strongly cooperative such as obligate mutualisms. The behavior,
BIOL 5603. Plant Physiology Laboratory. (2 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-2101, one year
of college chemistry, prior or concurrent enrollment in 4603 or #, or Biol or IBS Grad
School student)
Lab exercises that evaluate the physiological processes that
enable plants to grow under the varied conditions found in
nature such plant water relations, mineral nutrition, metabolism,
and plant growth and development. Exposure to modern plant
physiology techniques includes gas exchange, chlorophyll fluorescence, spectrophotometry, and pressure chamber methods to
assess plant function. Independent projects include hypothesis
testing data analysis and communication of results.
BIOL 5760. The Physiology of Fishes. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-1012, 3703, or Biol
or IBS Grad School student)
Comprehensive review of major areas of research in fish
physiology. Comparative approach will focus on recirculating fresh and salt water systems, reproductive physiology and
neurophysiology.
BIOL 5772. Mechanisms of Neural Behavior. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-1012, 3703
or Biol or IBS Grad School student)
Review of the basic neurophysiological components of animal
behavior. Emphasis will be on well studied neuroethological
models such as weakly electric fish, bats, owls and crayfish.
BIOL 5777. Plankton Biology. (2 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-2801, 2802 or Biol or IBS
Grad School student)
Explores topics in the biology of plant and animal plankton with
emphasis on lake communities. Topics include biogeography,
life-history, anatomy, physiology, and ecology of plankton.
Basic limnology covered as relevant. Meets twice weekly for
lecture and literature discussion.
BIOL 5801. Microbial Ecology. (2 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-(2101, (2801 or 4501) or #),
or Biol or IBS Grad School student)
Microorganisms in natural environments: diversity, distribution, energetics, and growth of heterotrophic and autotrophic
microbes in oxic and anoxic habitats. Roles of microbial
populations and communities in biogeochemical cycling,
ecosystem functioning, landscapes, and industrial, agricultural,
and environmental applications.
BIOL 5802. Microbial Ecology Laboratory. (2 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-[P]5801 or # or
Biol or IBS Grad School student)
Lab and field-oriented exercises that teach concepts about
microbial populations and their communities, energetics, food
webs, biogeochemistry, and biodiversity while providing an
introduction to research methods. Students master advanced
microscopic, culturing, spectroscopic, molecular, radioisotopic,
and computational techniques.
299
Course Descriptions
Genetic engineering with emphasis on large-scale production and isolation of recombinant proteins and metabolites.
Microbial, plant and animal cell culture. Comparison of
recombinant DNA technology to selective breeding and natural
isolate use. Practical, legal and ethical considerations of genetic
engineering.
Evolutionary survey and characteristics of microorganisms
focusing on autotrophic and heterotrophic prokaryotes from
various habitats. Isolation, examination, and identification of
bacteria from field collections using microscopic, physiological,
biochemical, molecular, phylogenetic, and computer database
techniques.
Course Descriptions
BIOL 5803. Water Pollution Biology. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-5861 or # or Biol or
IBS Grad School student)
BIOL 5867. Managing and Monitoring Lakes and Streams. (3 cr; A-F or Aud.
Prereq-(2801, 2802, [5833 or 5861]) or #, or Biol or IBS Grad School student)
Systems approach to responses of aquatic organisms, communities, and ecosystems to pollutants and human use. Case studies
of stressed aquatic ecosystems; (2 hrs lect, 3 hrs lab)
Review of basic concepts in the ecology and management of
lakes, streams, and wetlands. Common water resource problems
and technical tools for assessing problems will be presented
along with strategies for restoring and remediating disturbed
aquatic ecosystems.
BIOL 5805. Fisheries Ecology. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-2801, 2802, college-level
course in statistics or Biol or IBS Grad School student)
Lectures, readings and computer exercises relating to current
issues in fisheries ecology. Computer exercises will emphasize
techniques used by scientists working in the field and prepare
the student for the use of quantitative research tools for independent research. Includes 2 one-hour lectures and 1 three-hour
lab weekly.
BIOL 5807. Mathematical Ecology. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-(2801, (Math 1290 or
Math 1297)) or Biol or IBS Grad School student)
Development and use of mathematical models to describe
ecological patterns and processes.
BIOL 5808. Landscape Ecology: Theory and Application. (3 cr; A-F or Aud.
Prereq-2801, 2802 or Biol or IBS Grad School student)
Key issues in landscape ecology including scale, measuring
landscape patterns, mechanisms shaping landscapes, implications of landscape patterns on plant and animal populations,
communities, and ecosystems, and implementing landscape
principles for natural resource management.
Examines the effects of toxicants on constituents of the
biosphere at levels of biological organization from cells to
ecosystems. Toxicant identification, toxicity testing, exposure
routes, bioaccumulation, toxicant effects, regulations, and
current issues.
BIOL 5870. Wetland Ecology. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-2801, 2802 or Biol or IBS
Grad School student)
Hydrology, nutrient cycling, and productivity of wetland
ecosystems and the adaptations and interactions of resident
biota; assessment, management, conservation, restoration, and
creation of wetlands. Two daylong weekend field trips required.
BIOL 5990. Special Topics: (Various Titles to be Assigned). (1-5 cr [max 10 cr]; A-F
or Aud. Prereq-1012, #)
Special topics submitted for biology department review. Topic
announced before course offered.
BIOL 5811. Plant Autecology. (2 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-2801 or Biol or IBS Grad
School student)
BIOL 8139. Seminar in Cell Biology. (1 cr [max 10 cr]; S-N or Aud. Prereq-2101,
grad student in biol or related field)
Survey of environmental factors, responses to these by an
individual plant. Ecological life histories. Biotic interactions.
Intraspecific variation. Use of instrumentation. Emphasizes
seed plants.
Analysis of current topics.
BIOL 5831. Plant Population and Community Ecology. (4 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq2801 or Biol or IBS Grad School student)
BIOL 8333. FTE: Master’s. (1 cr; No grade. Prereq-Master s student, adviser and
DGS consent)
BIOL 8777. Thesis Credits: Master’s. (1-18 cr [max 50 cr]; No grade. Prereq-Max
18 cr per semester or summer; 10 cr total required (Plan A only))
Structure and dynamics of plant populations and plant communities in relation to environment; emphasis on seed plants. (2
hrs lect, 4 hrs lab) Schimpf
BIOL 8899. Seminar in Ecology. (1 cr [max 10 cr]; S-N or Aud. Prereq-2801, grad
student in biol or related field)
BIOL 5833. Stream Ecology. (4 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-2801 or # or Biol or IBS Grad
School student)
BIOL 8993. Graduate Seminar. (1 cr [max 10 cr]; S-N or Aud. Prereq-Grad student
in biol or related field)
Studies of stream communities and ecosystems as influenced by
biological interactions and physical factors. Emphasis on North
Shore streams. (2 hrs lect, 6 hrs lab and field)
Reports on recent developments in biology and on research
projects in the department.
BIOL 5839. Coral Reef Field Studies. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-2801 or # or Biol or
IBS Grad School student, §Geol 5839)
Course Descriptions
BIOL 5868. Ecotoxicology. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-2101, 2801, college-level
statistics course or #, or Biol or IBS Grad School student)
Biological studies of the coral reef complex and associated
habitats of Florida Keys. Ecology and taxonomy of associated
biota. Field study in Florida.
BIOL 5861. Lake Ecology. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-2801 or # or Biol or IBS Grad
School student)
Ecology of lakes and reservoirs. (3 hrs lect)
BIOL 5862. Advanced Lake Ecology. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-[P]5861 or Biol or IBS
Grad School student)
Lake and laboratory approaches to evaluation of ecosystem
health and experimental aquatic ecology. (1 hr lect, 4 hrs lab)
BIOL 5863. Ecosystems Ecology. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-2801 or #, or Biol or IBS
Grad School student)
Survey of terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems, emphasizing current literature on ecosystem processes. (3 hrs lect) Hershey
BIOL 5864. Ecosystems Ecology Laboratory. (1 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-[P]5863;
2802 or Biol or IBS Grad School student)
Lab and field investigations of ecosystem processes. (3 hrs lab)
BIOL 5865. Conservation Biology. (2 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-2801 or Biol or IBS Grad
School student)
Introduction to science of species, habitat, and ecosystem
conservation and management.
300
In-depth analyses of topics in ecology.
BIOL 8994. Graduate Research. (1-4 cr [max 10 cr]; S-N or Aud. Prereq-Grad
student in biol or related field)
Directed research or study on an advanced topic.
Business Law (BLAW)
Labovitz School of Business and Economics
BLAW 2001. The Legal Environment. (3 cr; A-F only. Prereq-Min 30 cr. LE 8)
Introduction to U.S. legal system and its impact on modern
business operations. Ethical, economic, social, and political
perspectives of legal environment. Constitutional law, administrative regulation, torts and products liability, contracts, business
organizations, employment/labor law.
BLAW 3001. Law and Ethics for Financial Professionals. (3 cr; A-F only. PrereqLSBE cand or %; §3101)
Examination of the legal and ethical issues faced by financial
professionals. Topics include agency, bankruptcy, insider
trading and other securities laws, obligations of corporate directors and officers, negotiable instruments and secured lending
transactions.
Chemical Engineering
BLAW 3101. Business Law. (3 cr; A-F only. Prereq-2001, SBE cand or o)
CHE 3112. Heat and Mass Transfer. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-3111)
Introduction to advanced topics of law related to business;
emphasis on laws having an impact on accounting profession.
Common law of contracts, sales and lease contracts, negotiable
instruments, secured transactions, securities regulation, and
accountants’ liability.
Theory and practice of heat and mass transfer. Fundamentals of
diffusion, conduction, convection, and radiation with application to design of heat and mass transfer equipment and systems.
CHE 3211. Chemical Engineering Laboratory I. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-3111)
Introduction to legal topics relevant to entrepreneurs, including
law of agency, government regulation of employment, property
and bailments, forms of business organizations bankruptcy.
Introduction to statistical uncertainty analysis and design of
experiments. Experiments illustrating physicochemical, fluid
mechanics, and heat and mass transfer principles. Technical
report writing and presentation. Standard laboratory practice
and safety.
BLAW 3301. Estate Planning Concepts and Strategies. (3 cr; A-F only. Prereq-Acct
3401, LSBE cand or o)
CHE 3231. Properties of Engineering Materials. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-2121,
Chem 2521)
Examines the basics of estate planning, including both the legal
and tax aspects of developing an estate and/or incapacity plan.
Topics include: probate and probate substitutes, wills and other
estate planning documents, gifting and insurance strategies,
use of trusts, and federal estate, gift and generation-skipping
taxation.
Thermodynamic, mechanical, and kinetic properties of materials: structure and bonding in metals, alloys, corrosion, crystals,
semiconductors, polymers, colloids, ceramics, interfaces, and
composites.
Chemical Engineering (CHE)
The science and engineering dealing with the production,
handling, modification and use of a wide variety of particulate
materials, both wet and dry, in sizes ranging from the sub-micron to the centimeter scale.
BLAW 3201. Law for Entrepreneurs. (3 cr; A-F only. Prereq-SBE cand or o)
College of Science and Engineering
CHE 1011. Introduction to Chemical Engineering.. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-High
school chem, high school algebra LE 5)
Differences between natural sciences and chemical engineering.
Continuous processing concept and waste disposal. Hazardous
waste; engineering economy, including value of money and rate
of return. Chemical engineering equipment and flow sheets.
Process paths based on economics. Species allocation and
separation.
CHE 2001. Introduction to Environmental Engineering. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. PrereqHigh school chem, high school algebra LE 4)
Comprehensive survey of environmental engineering.
Fundamental science and engineering principles as basis for
analyzing environmental issues. Federal laws on air pollution,
wastewater discharge, and hazardous waste. Wastewater
treatment, air pollution control, waste minimization, resource
recovery, and recycling.
CHE 3241. Principles of Particle Technology. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-B.S.Ch.E.
candidate, 2111, Phys 2012, Math 3280 or #; §4621)
CHE 3791. Independent Study. (1-3 cr [max 3 cr]; Stdnt Opt. Prereq-BSChE cand, %)
Directed individual study arranged with instructor and head of
department before registration.
CHE 3894. Chemical Engineering Research. (1-3 cr [max 6 cr]; Stdnt Opt. PrereqBSChE cand, max 6 cr in 3994)
Experience in a selected research area. Student must present
a satisfactorywritten report and oral presentation. Course may
also be used for portionof a research proposal.
CHE 3951. Cooperative Education. (1-6 cr [max 20 cr]; Stdnt Opt. Prereq-BSChE
cand, %)
Practical work experience with an employer closely associated
with student’s academic area. Arranged by mutual agreement
among student, department, and employer. Formal written
report of work completed must be submitted to department at
end of experience.
CHE 3994. Honors Chemical Engineering Research. (1-3 cr [max 6 cr]; A-F or Aud.
Prereq-BSChE cand and %)
Basic theories of experimental design, data analysis, and statistical process control, emphasizing their application to chemical
engineering practice.
Experience in selected area of research in chemical engineering
for honors students. Student must present a satisfactory written
report and oral presentation. Course may also be used for preparation of research proposal for a department honors program.
CHE 2111. Material and Energy Balances. (3 cr; Stdnt Opt. Prereq-Chem 1151 or
Chem 1161)
Elementary principles of chemical processes, emphasizing
material and energy balances.
CHE 2121. Chemical Engineering Thermodynamics. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq2111, Math 1297, [P]1011)
Application of thermodynamic principles to chemical engineering, emphasizing pressure-volume-temperature relationships,
thermodynamic laws, thermochemistry, chemical equilibrium,
and phase relationships.
CHE 3031. Computational Methods in Chemical Engineering. (3 cr; A-F or Aud.
Prereq-B.S.Ch.E. candidate, 2111, Math 3280)
Modeling and simulation of chemical engineering processes;
computational methods applied to chemical engineering; use of
computation and process simulation tools.
CHE 3111. Fluid Mechanics. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-Engr 2015, Math 3280)
Mass and energy balances, Bernoulli’s equation, momentum
balance, laminar and turbulent flow, boundary layer theory,
pumps, compressors, and turbines.
CHE 4111. Separations. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-3112; no Grad School cr)
Application of principles of mass transfer. Design of distillation, gas absorption, liquid extraction, drying, leaching, and
membrane separation processes.
CHE 4211. Chemical Engineering Laboratory II. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-3211;
no Grad School cr)
Statistical design of engineering experiments. Experiments illustrating principles of separations and reactor design. Technical
report writing and presentation. Standard laboratory practice
and safety.
CHE 4301. Chemical Reaction Engineering. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-3112; no
Grad School cr)
Theory of rates of chemical reactions. Application of rate
data to design of batch, tubular, continuous stirred-tank, and
catalytic-chemical reactors.
CHE 4401. Process Control. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-2121, 3112, 4301, Math
3280; no Grad School cr)
Dynamic behavior of open-end closed-loop system. Design of
automatic controller, emphasizing chemical process systems.
301
Course Descriptions
CHE 2011. Design of Engineering Experiments. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-Math
1297)
Course Descriptions
CHE 4402. Process Dynamics and Control. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-B.S.Ch.E.
candidate, 2121, 3112, 4301, CS 11xx, Math 3280, #, no Grad School cr, §4401)
CHE 5031. Chemical Engineering Analysis. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-4111 or Grad
student or #)
Dynamic behavior of open-and closed-loop systems. Design
and operation of automatic controllers for chemical process
systems. The programming of a microcontroller.
Development of mathematical and statistical models for chemical engineering systems; simulation of these systems using digital computers; and system optimization and analysis of results.
CHE 4501. Chemical Engineering Design I. (4 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-2121, 3231
and (prereq or coreq 4111, 4211, 4301); no Grad School cr)
CHE 5894. Chemical Engineering Research. (1-3 cr [max 6 cr]; A-F or Aud.
Prereq-Grad student and #)
Preliminary design of chemical processing or hazardous waste
treatment plant. Use of engineering economics and calculation
of rate return and hazardous waste management as applied to
chemical plants. Market survey, flow sheet preparation, material
and energy balances.
Experience in a selected research area. Student must present a
satisfactory written report and oral presentation. May be used
for portion of a research proposal.
CHE 4502. Chemical Engineering Design II. (4 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-4501; no
Grad School cr)
Study of current and special topics not available in regular
department curriculum. May involve specialties of department
or visiting faculty.
Continuation of ChE 4501. Equipment design, instrumentation,
process control, hazardous waste management plan, plant safety,
economic feasibility, and institute analysis for process chosen.
CHE 4601. Biochemical Engineering. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-2111)
Application of chemical engineering principles to design and
operation of industrial biological processes, emphasizing
enzyme and cell growth kinetics.
CHE 4602. Bioseparations. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-2111, Math 1297)
Application of engineering principles to the isolation, purification, and finishing of biologically derived products. Design of
unit operations specific to biochemical processes, including cell
disruption, sedimentation, precipitation, filtration, extraction,
chromatography, crystallization and drying. Integration of
operations with upstream processing.
CHE 4612. Hazardous Waste Processing Engineering. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq2111, Chem 2521)
Identification of hazardous substances and their effects. Federal
and state regulations. Design of waste treatment processes.
Management of hazardous wastes. Modifications of processes to
avoid hazardous waste formation.
CHE 4613. Air Pollution Control. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-2111, Math 3280, min
60 cr)
Analysis of what air pollution is, where it comes from
and where it goes on the local, regional and global scales.
Discussion of the regulatoryapparatus concerning air quality.
Design of air pollution controlequipment.
Course Descriptions
CHE 4621. Particle Technology. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-2111, 3111)
Applications of particle technology, especially in the chemical
and minerals industry context. Particle concepts including:
particle characterization, slurry characterization, size reduction,
size enlargement, particle separation, and multi phase processes.
The major unit operations common to solids processing:
mining, crushing, concentration by sedimentation, filtration,
flotation, and pryrometallurgy.
CHE 5021. Transport Phenomena. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-3112 or Grad student
or #)
Study of the fundamentals and field equations for momentum,
heat and mass transport with emphasis on the prediction of
transport rates in chemical engineering applications.
CHE 5022. Transport Processes in Wells and Pipelines. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq3111, 3112 or Grad student or #)
Exposes students to various elements of fluid and heat flows
that occur in oil/gas wells and pipelines. The fundamentals of
multiphase flow are explained in terms of single-phase flow
mechanics and configuration of the phases. Simplicity in modeling approach is retained. Field examples are used to reinforce
understanding of the models.
302
CHE 5895. Special Topics: (Various Titles to be Assigned). (1-4 cr [max 10 cr]; Stdnt
Opt. Prereq-#; no Grad School cr)
Chemistry (CHEM)
College of Science and Engineering
CHEM 1102. Aspects of Chemistry. (3-4 cr [max 4 cr]; A-F or Aud. Prereq-§1113,
1151, 1161 or 2172 LE 4)
Topics in general, organic, and biological chemistry. Study of
chemical principles, their application, and their impact on daily
life. Independent unit in contrast to Chem 1113, 1151, 1161 or
2172; 4 credit option with lab. Three cr meets lib ed cat 5, four
cr meets lib ed cat 4.
CHEM 1113. Introduction to General, Organic, and Biological Chemistry I. (5 cr;
A-F or Aud. Prereq-§1151, 1161, 2172; for students terminating study of chem with
no more than 10 cr LE 4)
Chemical principles and their applications: atomic and molecular structure, solutions, acids, bases, salts, equilibria; physical
and chemical properties of organic compounds, organic chemistry of living systems; carbohydrates, lipids, proteins, enzymes,
nucleic acids, and metabolic pathways.
CHEM 1114. Introduction to General, Organic, and Biological Chemistry II. (5 cr;
A-F or Aud. Prereq-1113; §2521 or 3322)
Chemical principles and their applications: atomic and molecular structure, solutions, acids, bases, salts, equilibria; physical
and chemical properties of organic compounds, organic chemistry of living systems; carbohydrates, lipids, proteins, enzymes,
nucleic acids, and metabolic pathways.
CHEM 1151. General Chemistry I. (5 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-High school chem, high
school algebra; §1161 or 2172 LE 4)
Fundamental principles exemplified by study of elements,
compounds, and their reactions.
CHEM 1152. General Chemistry II. (5 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-1151 or 1161; §1162
or 2172)
Fundamental principles exemplified by study of elements,
compounds, and their reactions.
CHEM 1161. Honors: General Chemistry I. (5 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-High school
chem and high school algebra or %, §1151 or 2172 LE 4)
Fundamental principles exemplified by study of elements,
compounds, and their reactions.
CHEM 1162. Honors: General Chemistry II. (5 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-1151 or 1161;
§1152 or 2172)
Fundamental principles exemplified by study of elements,
compounds, and their reactions.
CHEM 1191. Independent Study. (1-2 cr [max 4 cr]; A-F or Aud. Prereq-%)
For students wishing to do special work in areas useful to
individual programs and objectives when such are not available
in regular course offerings.
Chemistry
CHEM 2095. Special Topics: (Various Titles to be Assigned). (4 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq10 cr college chem or #)
Selected topics that fall outside currently offered courses. Topic
announced before course offered.
CHEM 2212. Environmental Chemistry. (4 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-1152 or 1162)
Study of chemical processes in natural air, water, soil and
sediment environments. Sources, reaction, transport, effects,
and fates of natural and anthropogenic chemical species will be
covered. Methods of analysis of environmental samples, with
emphasis on quantitative treatment of data.
CHEM 2222. Quantitative Analysis. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-1152 or 1162,
[P]2223)
Theory in analytical techniques; introduces gravimetric, volumetric, and spectrophotometric methods.
CHEM 2223. Quantitative Analysis Laboratory. (1 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-[P]2222)
Lab companion to 2222 involving the quantitative analysis of
organic and inorganic samples using classical and instrumental
techniques. Students are instructed in the use of classical and
modern computer-controlled instrumentation and techniques, as
applied to the acquisition and analysis of experimental data.
CHEM 2242. Analytical Chemistry Applied to Environmental Problems in
Eastern Europe. (4 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-1152 or 1162, §2222 and 2223)
Theory and practice in quantitative analysis, covering statistics,
acid-base equilibria, chelometry, spectrometry, and chromatography, including volumetric, spectrophotometric, and separation
methods, to be offered in Poland, with field trips to sites of
environmental concern.
CHEM 2521. Organic Chemistry I. (4 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-1152 or 1162)
Structure and bonding, stereochemistry, functional group
reactions.
CHEM 2522. Organic Chemistry II. (4 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-2521)
Functional group reactions, bioorganic chemistry.
CHEM 2532. Organic Chemistry II for B.S. Chemistry Majors. (5 cr; A-F or Aud.
Prereq-2521)
Functional group reactions, bioorganic chemistry
CHEM 3097. Internship in Chemistry. (1-2 cr [max 2 cr]; S-N only. Prereq-2521 or
2223, chem or biochem/molecular biol majors and %)
talks. Use of visual aids and computer technology, presentation
organization and delivery, and use of scientific literature will be
among the skills students will learn. In addition, students will
attend and evaluate weekly departmental seminars. Students
will participate in and present at the annual Departmental
Undergraduate Symposium.
CHEM 4242. Instrumental Analysis. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-2222, 4632 or 4642)
Theory of instrumental methods of chemical analysis, including
electrochemistry, spectroscopy, and separations.
CHEM 4243. Instrumental Chemistry Laboratory. (2 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-2223,
[P]4242)
Lab companion to 4242 involving the use of computerized
chemical instrumentation in the analysis of organic and inorganic samples. Students learn the use of modern programming
tools as applied to the control of chemical instrumentation and
acquisition and analysis of data there from.
CHEM 4351. Biochemistry I. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-2222, 2522 or 2532, Math
1296, concurrent registration in physical chem recommended, §Phar 6151)
Introduction to structural classes of biologically relevant
molecules. Descriptions of monomeric small molecules and
their incorporation into macromolecules. Covers amino acids,
proteins, fatty acids, lipids, sterols, carbohydrates, nucleic acids,
RNA, and DNA structures.
CHEM 4352. Biochemistry II. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-4351, §Phar 6152)
Introduction to metabolism of carbohydrates, fatty acids,
sterols, nucleic acids, amino acids, and xenobiotics. Common
metabolic pathways of glycolysid, gluconeogenesis, citric acid
cycle, et. The interrelated nature of these pathways and their
cellular regulation will be covered.
CHEM 4363. Biochemistry Laboratory. (2 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-2223, 2522 or
2532, [P]4341)
Applications of biochemistry and molecular biology techniques.
CHEM 4434. Inorganic Chemistry. (4 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-4632 or 4642)
Atomic structure and properties of elements based thereon.
Chemical bonding. Chemistry of coordination compounds.
Mechanisms of selected inorganic reactions; survey of chemistry of representative elements. Organometallic chemistry.
Bioinorganic chemistry.
Experience in a commercial, government, or industrial setting.
Prior department approval and coordination with faculty sponsor are required.
CHEM 4435. Inorganic Chemistry Laboratory. (1 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-[P]4434)
CHEM 3194. Chemistry Undergraduate Research. (1-3 cr [max 30 cr]; S-N or
Aud. Prereq-%)
CHEM 4632. Physical Chemistry. (4 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-Phys 2012 or Phys 1002,
2 years of chemistry)
CHEM 3322. Biochemistry. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-2522 or 2532)
Survey of biochemistry, emphasizing enzyme catalysis, cellular
energetics, and major metabolic processes.
CHEM 3324. Biochemistry Laboratory. (1 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-[P]3322)
Identification and analysis of biological molecules with emphasis on the macro-molecules, polysaccharides, proteins, and
nucleic acids (RNA, DNA).
Properties of gases, liquids, and solutions; thermodynamics
and equilibria; electrochemistry; chemical kinetics; quantum
mechanics; spectroscopy.
CHEM 4633. Physical Chemistry Laboratory. (1 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-[P]4632)
Laboratory program in physical chemistry, including thermodynamics, spectroscopy, kinetics and quantum mechanics.
CHEM 4641. Physical Chemistry I. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-2 yrs chem, Math 3280,
Phys 2012)
CHEM 4184. Undergraduate Seminar I. (1 cr; S-N or Aud. Prereq-BS Chem or BS
BMB Major; min 90 cr)
Quantitative treatment of physical principles and theories in
chemistry, including topics in thermodynamics and kinetics.
First course of a two-course senior seminar requirement for
B.S. Chemistry and B.S. Biochemistry and Molecular Biology
majors. Students will learn to prepare and present scientific
talks. Use of visual aids and computer technology, presentation
organization and delivery, and use of scientific literature will be
among the skills students will learn. In addition, students will
attend and evaluate weekly departmental seminars.
CHEM 4642. Physical Chemistry II. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-4641)
CHEM 4185. Undergraduate Seminar II. (1 cr; S-N or Aud. Prereq-4184)
Quantitative treatment of physical principles and theories
in chemistry, including topics in quantum mechanics and
spectroscopy.
CHEM 4643. Physical Chemistry Laboratory I. (1 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-[P]4641)
Laboratory program in physical chemistry, accompanying
lecture Chem 4641.
Second course of a two-course senior seminar requirement for
B.S. Chemistry and B.S. Biochemistry and Molecular Biology
majors. Students will learn to prepare and present scientific
303
Course Descriptions
Experience in a selected area of research.
Preparation and study of the properties of selected inorganic
compounds.
Course Descriptions
CHEM 4644. Physical Chemistry Laboratory II. (1 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-[P]4642)
CHEM 8224. Advanced Analytical Chemistry II. (4 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-5725)
Laboratory program in physical chemistry, accompanying
lecture Chem 4642.
Advanced treatment of selected methods in analytical chemistry.
CHEM 5150. Organic and Stable Isotope Biogeochemistry. (3 cr; A-F or Aud.
Prereq-Chem 1152 or 1162 or #, Geol 1110 or 2610 or #, Biol 1012 or #, upper level
undergrad or grad standing in the sciences or engineering or #, Chem 2222 and 2521
(recommended))
Production and chemical composition of natural organic matter
(OM), diagenesis and catagenesis of OM; stable isotopic
CHEM 5350. Research Topics for High School Chemistry Teachers. (2-4 cr [max
8 cr]; Stdnt Opt. Prereq-Ed MA or MEd student, %)
Experimental work and philosophy associated with a selected
research topic.
CHEM 5424. Advanced Inorganic Chemistry I. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-4434 or
equivalent or Grad student)
Advanced topics in inorganic chemistry including the following:
Applications of Group Theory to inorganic chemistry such
as molecular orbital theory and valence bond theory as well
as vibrational analysis, organmetallic chemistry including
structure and bonding in organometallic compounds, reactions
and reaction mechanisms of organometallic compounds, and
the application of organometallic compounds as reagents
and catalysts in organic synthesis, other advanced aspects of
inorganic chemistry, e.g. Bioinorganic Chemistry and Aspects
of Material Science.
CHEM 5524. Advanced Organic Chemistry I. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-2522 or
equivalent or Grad student)
This course will cover advanced topics of Organic Reaction
Mechanisms and Aspects of Organic Synthesis
CHEM 5624. Advanced Physical Chemistry I. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-4642 or
equivalent or Grad student)
CHEM 8333. FTE: Master’s. (1 cr; No grade. Prereq-Master s student, adviser and
DGS consent)
CHEM 8424. Advanced Inorganic Chemistry II. (4 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-5424)
Discussion of structure, reactions, and bonding in inorganic and
organometallic compounds in terms of valence bond, molecular
orbital, and ligand field theories.
CHEM 8444. FTE: Doctoral. (1 cr; No grade. Prereq-Doctoral student, adviser and
DGS consent)
CHEM 8524. Advanced Organic Chemistry II. (4 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-5524)
Advanced treatment of synthetic methods and reaction mechanisms in organic chemistry.
CHEM 8624. Advanced Physical Chemistry II. (4 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-5624)
Advanced topics selected from quantum and computational
chemistry, reaction kinetics and dynamics, statistical mechanics,
and thermodynamics.
CHEM 8666. Doctoral Pre-Thesis Credits. (1-6 cr [max 12 cr]; No grade. PrereqMax 6 cr per semester or summer; doctoral student who has not passed prelim oral;
no required consent for the first two registrations up to 12 cr; departmental consent for
the third and fourth registrations up to an additional 12 cr, or 24 cr total (for doctoral
students admitted summer 2007 and beyond; doctoral students admitted prior to
summer 2007 may register up to 4 times totaling 60 cr))
CHEM 8750. Special Topics: (Various Titles to be Assigned). (1-4 cr [max 8 cr]; Stdnt
Opt. Prereq-Grad student or #)
Topics not available in standard curriculum.
Classical and statistical thermodynamics, chemical kinetics,
other selected topics in physical chemistry.
CHEM 8777. Thesis Credits: Master’s. (1-18 cr [max 50 cr]; No grade. Prereq-Max
18 cr per semester or summer; 10 cr total required (Plan A only))
CHEM 5650. Computational Chemistry. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-4642 or equivalent
or Grad student)
CHEM 8888. Thesis Credits: Doctoral. (1-24 cr [max 100 cr]; No grade. Prereq-Max
18 cr per semester or summer; 24 cr required)
Molecular Mechanics, Quantum Mechanics, semiempirical
and ab initio molecular orbital calculations, density functional
theory, and selected additional topics in computation chemistry
such as biochemical applications, QSAR, and ligand modeling
and docking.
Chinese (CHIN)
CHEM 5714. Applications of Spectroscopy. (4 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-4434 or
equivalent or Grad student)
Course Descriptions
CHEM 8324. Advanced Biochemistry and Molecular Biology. (4 cr; A-F or Aud.
Prereq-4342 or equiv)
Application of spectroscopic techniques to structure elucidation,
including NMR, FTIR, MS, UV-Vis, X-ray, EPR spectroscopy.
Includes practical component.
CHEM 5725. Advanced Analytical Chemistry I. (3 cr; A-F only. Prereq-Grad student
or 4242 or equivalent)
Intended for advanced undergraduate and beginning graduate students in chemistry and related fields. Augment basic
coursework in wet and instrumental analytical chemistry. Topics
include statistical and chemometric methods for experimental
design and data analysis, electronics and computers in chemical instrumentation, and selected techniques of instrumental
analysis such as mass spectrometry, inductively coupled optical
emission spectroscopy and analytical gas chromatography.
College of Liberal Arts
CHIN 1101. Beginning Chinese I: A Practical Introduction to Everyday Mandarin Chinese. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. LEIP 03)
Introduction to Mandarin Chinese for students with little or no
prior study. Emphasis will be on expressions for daily living
with appropriate grammar and vocabulary. Writing in the phonetic pin yin system will be introduced as will high frequency
characters.
CHIN 1102. Beginning Chinese II: A Practical Introduction to Everyday Mandarin Chinese. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-1101 LEIP 03)
Introduction to Mandarin Chinese for students with little prior
study. Emphasis will be on expressions for daily living with appropriate grammar and vocabulary. Writing in the phonetic pin
yin system will be introduced as will high frequency characters.
CHIN 1201. Intermediate Chinese I: Mandarin Chinese. (3 cr; A-F only. Prereq1102 or equivalent LEIP 03)
Directed laboratory or theoretical research in the chemical
sciences.
Consolidation and enrichment of previously acquired abilities
speaking and understanding Mandarin Chinese. Emphasis on
oral and aural skills, vocabulary building, some reading and
writing in the phonetic pin yin system with high frequency
characters.
CHEM 8184. Seminar. (1 cr; S-N or Aud. Prereq-Grad chem major or #)
CHIN 1399. Chinese: Mandarin Chinese in China. (6 cr; A-F only. LEIP 03)
CHEM 5994. Directed Research in Chemistry. (1-3 cr [max 9 cr]; Stdnt Opt. PrereqMin 90 cr or Grad in the sciences or engineering or #)
Practice in preparation and oral presentation of reports on
articles from the literature or on graduate research.
304
Conversation and communicative course for students with little
or no previous study of Chinese. Emphasis on oral and aural
skills, some grammar. For study in China.
Communication
Coaching (CC)
CC 3178. Coaching and Officiating Track and Field. (2 cr; A-F or Aud. PrereqCoaching minor or #)
College of Education and Human Service Professions
Fundamentals, mechanical analysis of events, training techniques and strategies.
CC 3101. Sport Science Applications. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-Coaching minor, min
30 cr or #, §3100)
Sport sciences applied to coaching: includes nutrition, training,
conditioning and legal/illegal ergogenic agents and drugs.
CC 3117. Functional Anatomy and Sport Injury Management. (3 cr; A-F or Aud.
Prereq-Min 30 cr, current Red Cross First Aid and CPR card or Hlth 1600, §3116)
Functional anatomy, care and prevention of sport injuries,
emergency care and external support application. Principles
and techniques appropriate for coaches, recreational personnel,
pre-professional physical therapists and nurses.
CC 3150. Coaching Methods. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-Coaching minor, min 30 cr
or #)
Study and application of educational methods in an athletic
setting. Skill development, learning styles, communication
skills, technology skills and practice development as it pertains
to sport.
CC 3160. Psychological Aspects of Coaching and Athletic Performance. (3 cr;
A-F or Aud. Prereq-Coaching minor, min 30 cr or #)
CC 3179. Coaching and Officiating Softball. (2 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-Coaching
minor or #)
Fundamentals, practice sessions, training techniques, and offensive and defensive strategies.
CC 3991. Independent Study. (2 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-Coaching minor and #)
A coaching methods experience. Directed individual study must
be arranged with the instructor before registration.
CC 3997. Coaching Practicum. (2 cr; S-N only. Prereq-Coaching minor and #)
Supervised coaching in a school or agency setting. Coaching
practicum must be arranged with the instructor before
registration.
College of Liberal Arts (CLA)
College of Liberal Arts
CLA 1001. Learning Community Integrative Seminar. (1 cr [max 2 cr]; A-F only.
Prereq-Freshman, fewer than 30 cr, o)
Psychological techniques and interventions to enhance athletic
performance. Emphasizes the implementation of mental skills
that enhance athletic performance into sport practice by the
coach and/or athlete.
Designed to facilitate integration of learning community courses
and collegiate academic expectations. The seminar supports
integration of liberal education curriculum within the context of
intellectual growth, academic goal setting, and major exploration. Study group practicum required.
CC 3161. Administrative Aspects of Coaching. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-Coaching
minor, min 30 cr or #)
Communication (COMM)
Examines state governing organizations, budgeting, scheduling,
insurance, contest administration, and public relations procedures in athletic programs.
College of Liberal Arts
CC 3170. Coaching and Officiating Football. (2 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-Coaching
minor or #)
Systems of offense and defense, strategy, and methods of organizing practices and working with team members.
CC 3171. Coaching and Officiating Basketball. (2 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-Coaching
minor or #)
Fundamentals, styles of offense and defense, training
suggestions.
CC 3172. Coaching and Officiating Volleyball. (2 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-Coaching
minor or #)
CC 3173. Coaching and Officiating Baseball. (2 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-Coaching
minor or #)
Fundamentals, practice sessions, training techniques, and offensive and defensive strategies.
CC 3174. Coaching and Officiating Soccer. (2 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-Coaching
minor or #)
Fundamental skills, systems of offense and defense, strategy
and rules of the game, methods of organizing practices.
CC 3175. Coaching and Officiating Ice Hockey. (2 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-Coaching
minor or #)
Fundamental skills, systems of offense and defense, strategy
and rules of the game, methods of organizing practices.
CC 3177. Coaching and Officiating Tennis. (2 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-Coaching
minor or #)
Strategies, fundamentals, psychology of tennis, attack and
defensive patterns.
Introduction to fundamental concepts, models, and theories of
human communication. Issues concerning verbal and nonverbal
symbolic processes, language and meaning, and the relationship
between communication and understanding. Communication
processes and problems in various contexts.
COMM 1010. Persuasion. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. LE 6)
Social scientific theory and research on communication techniques used to influence attitudes, perceptions, knowledge, and
behavior of others. Research evidence regarding processes and
effects on individuals and society in multiple contexts.
COMM 1112. Public Speaking. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-§1511 LE 3)
Application of the theoretical bases of rhetoric to the public
speaking situation.
COMM 1222. Interpersonal Communication. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. LECD 03)
Analysis of the role communication plays in interpersonal
relationships.
COMM 1500. Media and Society. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. LE 8)
Manipulative influence of contemporary media on American
society. Examples drawn from campaigns, commercial advertising, and editorials.
COMM 1511. Honors: Public Speaking. (3 cr; A-F only. Prereq-Honors student,
§1200 LE 3)
Application of the theoretical bases of rhetoric to the public
speaking situation.
COMM 1600. Argumentation and Debate: A Practical Approach. (3 cr; A-F or
Aud)
Utilizes a symbolic action approach to introduce the theory and
practice of argumentation, particularly within practical contexts;
aiming at the related goals of making students more effective
arguers, more critical consumers of arguments, and more critical
thinkers generally.
305
Course Descriptions
Coaching and officiating offenses and defenses; conditioning
programs; coaching and officiating philosophies.
COMM 1000. Human Communication Theory. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. LE 3)
Course Descriptions
COMM 1625. Philosophy and Rhetoric. (3 cr; A-F or Aud)
Introduction to the philosophy and history of rhetoric from
ancient to modern times, including rhetoric s role in reasoning
about values, defining the duties and methods of citizenship,
and shaping self-awareness.
COMM 2025. Communication Inquiry: Rhetorical and Historical Methods. (3
cr; A-F or Aud)
Familiarizes students with major theories, perspectives, and
principles associated with Internet as a social realm. Facilitates
student understanding of role of technology and communication
in a variety of contexts available on the Internet.
COMM 3205. Relationship Communication. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-1222)
Exploration/survey of rhetorical and historical approaches
to understanding the role that communication plays in social
influence.
Study of advanced interpersonal communication skills in
context of family and gender issues.
COMM 2030. Communication Inquiry: Social Scientific Methods. (3 cr; A-F or
Aud)
Small group approaches to problem management. Useful for
anyone intending to participate in decision-making groups.
Introduction to social scientific inquiry related to the study
of communication, and will provide an overview of research
methods and an introduction to statistics.
COMM 2101. Foundations of Mass Communication. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. LE 8)
Theories, research, regulation, and ethical concerns surrounding
contemporary mass media. Identifies U.S. media’s role within
the international marketplace. Survey of contemporary media
content, industry structures, technology, and delivery systems.
COMM 2102. Media Effects. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. LE 8)
Theory and research on the effects of media. Topics include
media violence effects, sexual media content, fright reactions
to media, news and political content effects, the impact of
stereotyping, advertising effects, and the impact of new media
technologies.
COMM 2200. Leadership and Group Communication. (3 cr; A-F or Aud)
How leaders should communicate in group context and how
communication affects team processes. Definition of what a
group is, different group processes (i.e., group development,
decision-making, and conflict management), and the different
ways of leading in groups.
COMM 2202. Introduction to Organizational Communication. (3 cr; A-F or Aud)
Introduction to theories, systems, structures, and processes of
communication in the organization. Explores the relationship
between organizational characteristics (i.e., selection, socialization, training, and evaluation) and communication.
COMM 2505. Analysis of Public Discourse. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-1112)
Guided investigation of public discourse within selected
periods. Topics vary.
COMM 2929. Intercultural Communication. (4 cr; Stdnt Opt. LEIP 06)
Course Descriptions
COMM 3203. Communication and the Social Environment of the Internet. (3
cr; A-F or Aud)
Understanding variations among international cultures regarding
communication practices. Potential difficulties in intercultural
communication; effective means of engaging in intercultural
communication.
COMM 3115. Persuasion and Argumentation in Public Speaking. (3 cr; A-F or
Aud. Prereq-1112, 2505)
Advanced theories. Developing persuasive strategies, carefully
managing logical and argumentational structures within the
speech, and fostering critical thinking tools in creation, analysis,
and evaluation of persuasive speech.
COMM 3116. Professional Communication. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-1112, 2505)
Theory and practice of communication skills related to the
workplace. Skill development in presentational speaking and
vocational interviewing.
COMM 3200. Interpersonal Communication Theory. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq1000 or 1222)
Role of communication in developing, maintaining, and changing personal relationships.
306
COMM 3210. Group Communication. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-Min 30 cr or #)
COMM 3211. Communication and Technology in the Information Age. (3 cr;
A-F or Aud)
Explores communication technologies in the information society; introduces students to new technologies used in contemporary organizations; explores implications of those technologies
for human communication; and provides hands-on experience
within a theoretical framework.
COMM 3215. Conflict Management. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-30 cr or #)
Application of interpersonal conflict management theory and
skills to small group, organizational, and community conflicts.
COMM 3223. Communication and Creativity. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-§3123,
min 30 cr or #)
Examines the relationship between communication and creative
processes. Content includes techniques of deliberate creativity;
creativity audits; the necessity of creative approaches to group,
organizational, and social circumstances; the psychological and
social aspects of creativity; and creative versus critical thinking.
COMM 3300. Teaching Assistantship in Communication. (1-3 cr [max 6 cr]; S-N
or Aud. Prereq-Min 60 cr, Comm major or minor, #, may not be applied to elective cr for
a Comm major or minor)
Practical experience in teaching beginning courses in the department.Students serve as intern teachers assisting the instructor
inadministration of the course. Application deadline is one week
beforebeginning of registration for following semester.
COMM 3310. Research Assistant in Communication. (1-3 cr [max 18 cr]; S-N or
Aud. Prereq-#)
Practical experience in assisting communication faculty in
ongoing research projects. Comm 3310 and 4397 carry variable
credit, only some of which may count toward the comm major
or minor. While all credits for these courses apply to the 120 cr
required for graduation, the max number of credits from these
courses (either one course or combined from the two courses)
that may apply to the student’s major or minor is three (3).
COMM 3390. Special Topics: (Various Titles to be Assigned). (3 cr [max 6 cr]; A-F
or Aud)
Relationship between communication and creative process.
Techniques of deliberate creativity audits. Necessity for creative
approaches in group, organizational, and social circumstances.
Physical/social aspects of creativity.
COMM 3392. Special Topics: (Various Titles to be Assigned). (3 cr [max 9 cr]; A-F
or Aud)
Topics not included in regular curriculum. Announced before
course offered and will fit into Cluster A (Interpersonal
Communication/Social Groups) electives.
COMM 3395. Special Topics: (Various Titles to be Assigned). (3 cr [max 9 cr]; A-F
or Aud)
Topics not included in regular curriculum. Announced before
course offered and will fit into Cluster B (Rhetoric/Persuasion/
Media) electives.
Communication
COMM 3505. Media Communications. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-Comp 1120)
Journalistic and public relations writing techniques: fact
gathering; selection and editing of news-editorial content of
newspapers, magazines, television, and radio; reporting and editing court and municipal and county agency news; and practical
application of public relations principles.
COMM 3510. Ethics in Human Communication. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-1112)
Examination of the recurring ethical questions faced by people
as we communicate both in interpersonal/non-professional
contexts and as practitioners in communication professions.
COMM 3525. Deciding What’s News. (3 cr; A-F or Aud)
Review history of news in the United States, examine definitions of news, engage in critical evaluations of news in its
various genres (news magazines, infotainment, investigative
journalism, checkbook journalism, tabloid journalism, etc.), and
apply news writing skills.
COMM 3550. Children and Media. (3 cr; A-F or Aud)
Theory and research on the impact of media on children.
COMM 3560. Video Game Entertainment. (3 cr; A-F or Aud)
Research and theory on video games, including work on
content, uses, and effects. Overviews of game history, industry
economics, design, and policy. Hands-on exposure to game
technologies. Information about careers in video games.
COMM 3605. Public Relations. (3 cr; A-F or Aud)
Examines functions of public relations in society and surveys
concepts, theories, and principles of effective, ethical public
relations.
COMM 3612. Rhetorical Criticism. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-1112, min 60 cr)
Survey of approaches to rhetorical analysis of communicative
acts, events, and artifacts.
COMM 3620. Controversy in the Boundary Waters. (3 cr; A-F or Aud)
Considers the rhetorical and political processes conditioning
the debate over the Boundary Waters Canoe Area’s wilderness
designation. Culminates in a class field trip to the BWCA,
and a group project pertaining to contemporary environmental
rhetoric.
COMM 3700. Interpersonal Influence. (3 cr; A-F or Aud)
Social scientific theory and research on communication techniques used to influence attitudes, perceptions, knowledge, and
behavior of others. Research evidence regarding processes and
effects on individuals and society in multiple contexts.
Relationship between communication and organization design.
Emphasis on development and impact of organization culture.
Communication issues, including power, networks, gender, race,
and decision making. Explores qualitative and field research.
COMM 4300. Communication Teaching Methods. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-1112,
1222, 60 cr, §5300, no Grad School cr)
Issues in teaching communication theory and skills, suggested
methods and materials of instruction. Specific focuses on public
speaking, interpersonal communication, effective listening, and
media literacy.
COMM 4399. Directed Projects in Communication. (1-3 cr [max 6 cr]; S-N only.
Prereq-Min 60 cr, comm major, #; may not be applied to elective cr for comm major or
minor; no Grad School cr)
Individual projects in the communication discipline, undertaken
under the supervision of a regular faculty member.
COMM 4500. History of Rhetoric. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-1112 or #; no Grad
School cr)
Development of rhetorical thought as expressed by representative writers.
COMM 4505. Media Theory and Research. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-1500 or 2101,
min 60 cr or #; no Grad School cr)
Theoretical concepts and research perspectives currently used
to understand intricacies of a mediated society. Introduction
and application of basic research methods to study questions
concerning impact of media on society and individuals.
COMM 4525. Foundations of Media Literacy. (4 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-2101 or #)
Historical overview of the Media Literacy movement. Social
scientific, critical and economic knowledge bases about media
industries; appreciation of the production and content of media
messages; development of media literacy skills and strategies
for media literacy instruction.
COMM 4949. Intercultural Communication Practicum. (4-12 cr [max 12 cr]; S-N
or Aud. Prereq-#; no Grad School credit; repeatable 3 times at different designated
sites)
Practice of intercultural communication at culturally diverse
sites. Students will immerse themselves in Non-European/
American cultures and participate in intercultural communication with members of those cultures. Offered at various sites
within the U.S. and internationally.
COMM 5000. Senior Seminar. (3-6 cr [max 6 cr]; A-F or Aud. Prereq-1000, 1112,
2025, 2030 with the grade of “C” or better in each course,%, no Grad School cr)
Advanced study and individual research on a selected topic
or theme in communication; senior seminar course for communication majors.
COMM 5095. Special Topics:(Various Titles to be Assigned). (3 cr [max 36 cr]; A-F or
Aud. Prereq-Grad Student, #)
Theory and research in communication. Extensive readings,
mastery of the material through oral/written examinations, and
employ to develop a proposal for original research.
COMM 5200. Communication and Organizational Creativity. (3 cr; A-F or Aud.
Prereq-4200 or Grad Student or #)
Role of communication in establishing organization cultures
that value and promote creativity and innovation. Emphasis
on importance of social networks, narrative construction of
organizational verity, intrinsic and extrinsic motivation, and
understanding group and organizational creativity as communication events. Case studies.
COMM 4394. Directed Research in Communication. (1-3 cr [max 6 cr]; A-F or
Aud. Prereq-Min 60 cr, comm major, #; may not be applied to elective cr for comm
major or minor)
COMM 5390. Communication Workshop. (1-3 cr [max 6 cr]; S-N only. Prereq-Min
60 cr or #)
Individual research project, written under the supervision of a
regular faculty member, to result in a research paper.
COMM 5391. Independent Study in Communication. (1-3 cr [max 6 cr]; A-F or
Aud. Prereq-#)
COMM 4397. Internship in Communication. (1-8 cr [max 8 cr]; S-N or Aud. PrereqMin 79 cr comm major/minor, 2.50 GPA in major/minor; no Grad School cr)
Individual research project written under supervision of communication graduate examining faculty member, to result in a
research project.
Students work in pre-approved program with a public agency,
private organization, or other service agency; work must be in
specific area of communication. Application deadline is one
Course Descriptions
COMM 4200. Communication in Organizations. (4 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-Min 60
cr or #)
week before beginning of registration for following semester.
Comm 3310 and 4397 carry variable credit, only some of which
may count toward the comm major or minor. While all credits
for these courses apply to the 120 cr required for graduation, the
max number of credits from these courses (either one course or
combined from the two courses) that may apply to the student’s
major or minor is three (3).
Intensive study of various aspects of communication.
307
Course Descriptions
Communication Sciences and
Disorders (CSD)
College of Education and Human Service Professions
CSD 1100. Phonetics. (2 cr; Stdnt Opt. LE 3)
Study and practice of International Phonetic Alphabet. English
and non-English speech sounds as they occur separately and in
connected speech. Variations in speech production as related to
regional and/or class distinctions.
CSD 2001. American Sign Language Studies I. (3 cr; Stdnt Opt. LECD 03)
Application of basic vocabulary in American Sign Language
and the fingerspelling alphabet. Introduction to various sign
systems and their use by the deaf community.
CSD 2002. American Sign Language Studies II. (3 cr; Stdnt Opt. Prereq-2001 or
# LECD 03)
Expansion of vocabulary base in American Sign Language.
Comparative linguistic study of various sign systems, their
use by the deaf community. In-depth study of principles of
American Sign Language as used receptively and expressively
in communication with deaf individuals.
CSD 2230. Human Communication Disorders. (3 cr; Stdnt Opt. LECD 08)
Receptive and expressive human communication disorders.
Importance of communication to human behavior; influence that
communication disorders exert on broad spectrum of human
activities. Professional roles and responsibilities of speech-language pathologists and audiologists.
CSD 3103. Anatomy of Speech and Hearing Mechanisms. (3 cr; A-F only. PrereqPre CSD candidate or #)
Anatomy and physiology as they relate to hearing and speech
processes including respiration, phonation, and articulation.
CSD 3130. Language Development and Disorders. (4 cr; A-F only. Prereq-Pre CSD
candidate or #)
Normal processes of language development in children.
Incidence, etiology, diagnosis, and intervention strategies for
children with language disorders.
CSD 3131. Language Development. (4 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-Pre CSD candidate
or #)
Course Descriptions
Emphasis on the acquisition and development of language, verbal and nonverbal, as children learn to communicate effectively
by selecting the most appropriate communication strategies.
CSD 3150. Fundamentals and Clinical Applications of Speech Science. (3 cr;
A-F or Aud. Prereq-Pre CSD candidate or #)
Basic principles of speech science including, acoustic characteristics of speech; physiology of respiration, phonation, and
resonance; and theories of speech perception and production.
Clinical and research applications of speech science will also
be discussed.
CSD 3241. Foundations of Treatment in Communication Disorders. (3 cr; A-F or
Aud. Prereq-3103, 3131, 3150, 3200, pre CSD candidate or CSD candidate or #)
Focuses on foundational principals of treatment, applicable to a
variety of communication disorders.
CSD 4010. Portfolio Development. (1 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-CSD candidate or #,
no Grad School cr)
Introduction to the ongoing process of developing and updating an undergraduate student portfolio that may be used for
purposes of reflection and self assessment, documentation of
professional organization designated competencies, and/or application to graduate programs.
CSD 4097. Introduction to Clinical Practicum in Communication Disorders.
(1 cr; A-F only. Prereq-CSD candidate, C grade or better in 3241, 25 hrs clinical
observation)
Clinical practicum with speech, language, and/or hearing
impaired persons in an on-campus clinic under supervision of
an ASHA-certified speech-language pathologist. (1 hr seminar
per wk)
CSD 4197. Clinical Practicum in Communication Disorders. (3 cr; A-F only.
Prereq-3241 with C grade or better, CSD candidate or #, no Grad School cr)
Clinical practicum with speech, language, and/or hearing
impaired individuals in the on-campus clinic under the supervision of an ASHA-certified speech-language pathologist. (1 hr
seminar per wk)
CSD 4200. Introduction to Fluency Disorders. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-2230, CSD
candidate or #, no Grad School cr)
Etiologies, characteristics, and development of stuttering and
other fluency disorders.
CSD 4297. Advanced Clinical Practicum in Communication Disorders. (3 cr; A-F
or Aud. Prereq-4197 with C grade or better, CSD candidate or #, no Grad School cr)
Clinical practicum with speech, language, and/or hearing
impaired individuals in the on-campus clinic, under the supervision of an ASHA certified speech-language pathologist, with expectation for increased level of independence than demonstrated
in CSD 4197.
CSD 4400. Hearing Disorders and Evaluation. (3 cr; A-F only. Prereq-3103, 3160,
CSD candidate or #)
Characteristics, development, and etiologies of typical auditory
pathologies. Overview of basic hearing assessment and diagnostic techniques. Clinical observation required.
CSD 4500. Voice Disorders. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-CSD candidate)
Theoretical and practical study of voice and voice disturbances
in children and adults.
CSD 5000. Departmental Seminar. (1-3 cr [max 6 cr]; Stdnt Opt. Prereq-CSD
candidate or #)
Recent developments in speech, language, and hearing; reports
on current faculty/student research projects within department.
CSD 5003. American Sign Language Studies III. (3 cr; Stdnt Opt. Prereq-2002 or
#; no Grad School cr)
Introductory study of acoustics and psychoacoustics.
Intermediate-level study of grammatical and linguistic features
of ASL; focus on understanding deaf culture and fluency in
expressive and receptive skills.
CSD 3200. Articulation and Phonological Disorders. (3 cr; A-F only. Prereq-1100,
2230, pre CSD candidate or #)
CSD 5004. American Sign Language Studies IV. (3 cr; Stdnt Opt. Prereq-5003 or
#; no Grad School cr)
CSD 3160. Fundamentals of Hearing Science. (3 cr; A-F only. Prereq-3103, pre
CSD candidate or CSD candidate or #)
Differential diagnosis, assessment, and treatment considerations
for articulation and phonological disorders. Outside observation
required.
Advanced-level study of grammatical and linguistic features of
ASL; understanding deaf culture and fluency in expressive and
receptive skills.
CSD 3232. Language Disorders. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-3131, pre CSD candidate
or CSD candidate or #)
CSD 5005. American Sign Language V. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-5004 or #; no
Grad School cr)
Focuses on the functional applications in the assessment and
intervention of language disorders including a review of the
various formal and informal assessment tools, and the approaches to language intervention.
308
Continued study of American Sign Language vocabulary
and structure. Expressive and receptive skill development.
Additional focus on use of ASL by the deaf community.
Communication Sciences and Disorders
CSD 5010. Portfolio Development. (1 cr; A-F only. Prereq-CSD Grad student or #)
Introduction to the ongoing process of developing and updating
a graduate student portfolio that may be used for purposes of
reflection and self assessment, documentation of professional organization designated competencies. Used for ASHA
standards
CSD 5091. Independent Study. (1-3 cr [max 6 cr]; Stdnt Opt. Prereq-CSD candidate
with 90 cr or CSD Grad student)
Directed study, readings, and/or projects of student interest in
communication disorders.
CSD 5302. Language Disorders in School-Age Children. (2 cr; A-F or Aud.
Prereq-%)
Advanced study of language disorders in individuals 6 to 21
years old. The course includes an examination of etiology,
diagnosis, clinical techniques, and study of relevant research.
CSD 5400. Rehabilitative Procedures for the Hard of Hearing. (3 cr; A-F only.
Prereq-4400, CSD candidate or CSD Grad or #)
Theories, principles, and methods regarding current approaches
to aural rehabilitation of hard-of-hearing children and adults.
CSD 5095. Special Topics: (Various Titles to be Assigned). (.5-3 cr [max 6 cr]; Stdnt
Opt. Prereq-no Grad School cr)
CSD 8097. Internship: Communication Disorders. (1-3 cr [max 12 cr]; A-F only.
Prereq-Can apply max 4 cr to a Graduate School program. 25 hrs supervised clinical
observation, CSD Grad student or #)
Special topics of interest to speech-language pathologists, audiologists, special educators, and related professionals. Workshop
and seminar format.
Supervised clinical practicum in on-campus clinic and/or an
approved professional setting under supervision of an ASHAcertified speech-language pathologist. (1 hr seminar per wk)
CSD 5098. Communication Sciences and Disorders Workshop. (1-3 cr [max 6
cr]; Stdnt Opt)
CSD 8099. Projects in Communication Disorders. (2 cr; A-F only. Prereq-CSD
Grad student or #)
Opportunities for speech-language pathologists, audiologists,
other related professionals, and students to concentrate study on
a specific topic presented in a workshop format.
Plan B project or individual research under faculty supervision.
CSD 5100. Research Methods in Communication Disorders. (3 cr; A-F only.
Prereq-CSD Grad)
Full-time professional clinical experience in an approved
professional setting under supervision of an ASHA-certified
speech-language pathologist.
Especially designed for new CSD graduate students to introduce
them to the research process. Topics will include generating
a research question, experimental designs, data collection,
analysis, and interpretation, and writing the research paper.
Students will conduct a guided class research project and begin
their Plan B project.
CSD 5142. Introduction to Diagnosis of Communication Disorders. (2 cr; A-F or
Aud. Prereq-CSD Grad or #; §4142)
General issues of evaluation and diagnosis of communication
disorders pertinent to all age groups and disorders.
CSD 5195. Special Topics: (Various Titles to be Assigned). (.5-3 cr [max 18 cr]; A-F
or Aud. Prereq-#)
Special topics of interest to speech-language pathologists, audiologists, special educators, and related professionals. Workshop
and seminar format. Topics vary and will be announced in class
schedule.
CSD 5200. Dysphagia. (3 cr; Stdnt Opt. Prereq-CSD Grad or #)
Anatomy and physiology of normal and disordered deglutition.
Etiology, diagnosis, and management of swallowing disorders,
including head and neck cancer.
Assistive technology approaches and devices designed to
improve communication skills of persons who do not speak or
whose speech is not intelligible. Hands-on experience adapting
computers into communication aids and operating computers
with alternate access methods.
CSD 5240. Dementia: Communication Impairment and Management. (1-2 cr
[max 2 cr]; A-F only. Prereq-CSD candidate or CSD Grad or #)
Examines the issue of communication with people with dementia. It will identify the features of communication as observed
in the different stages of dementia. It will develop strategies for
speech language pathologists and health professionals that will
assist them to communicate more effectively with their clients.
CSD 8205. Advanced Fluency Disorders. (3 cr; Stdnt Opt. Prereq-4200 or equiv,
CSD Grad student or #)
Differential diagnosis, assessment, and treatment considerations
for developmental stuttering and other fluency disorders.
CSD 8210. Professional Issues in Speech-Language Pathology. (1 cr; Stdnt Opt.
Prereq-CSD Grad student or #)
Identification and discussion of current issues and trends in the
profession of speech-language pathology. Topics include professional work settings, credentialing agencies and requirements,
federal and state laws influencing delivery of services, advocacy
organizations, securing employment.
CSD 8230. Neurogenic Language Disorders. (3 cr; Stdnt Opt. Prereq-CSD Grad
student or #)
Advanced study of diagnosis, treatment, and research of
acquired language disorders resulting from neurological impairment: aphasia, right brain damage, dementia, and traumatic
head injury.
CSD 8231. Neurogenic Speech Disorders. (3 cr; Stdnt Opt. Prereq-CSD Grad
student or #)
Advanced study of neuroanatomical bases for motor speech
disorders; diagnostic and therapeutic procedures used in speech
disorders related to central and peripheral nervous system
damage.
Course Descriptions
CSD 5230. Assistive Technology. (4 cr; Stdnt Opt. Prereq-4197 or CSD Grad or #)
CSD 8197. Externship: Communication Disorders. (4 cr; A-F only. Prereq-8097,
CSD Grad student or #)
CSD 8235. Counseling Applications in Communication Disorders. (2 cr; Stdnt
Opt. Prereq-CSD Grad student, at least 4 cr of 8097 or #)
Applications of interviewing and counseling theories and
behaviors to field of speech-language pathology.
CSD 8297. Audiology Practicum. (1-2 cr [max 4 cr]; S-N only. Prereq-5400, 8400,
CSD grad student or #; Cannot apply more than 2 cr to a Graduate School program)
Clinical assessment and rehabilitative experiences in an on-campus clinic under supervision of an ASHA-certified audiologist.
CSD 5301. Language Disorders in Infants, Toddlers, and Preschoolers. (2 cr;
A-F or Aud. Prereq-%)
CSD 8333. FTE: Master’s. (1 cr; No grade. Prereq-Master’s student, adviser and
DGS consent)
Advanced study of language disorders in individuals birth to
6 years old. The course includes an examination of etiology,
diagnosis, clinical techniques, and study of relevant research.
CSD 8402. Clinical Seminar in Audiology. (2 cr; Stdnt Opt. Prereq-5400, CSD Grad
student or #)
Directed readings in current trends in rehabilitation of hard-ofhearing individuals.
309
Course Descriptions
Composition (COMP)
COMP 3121. Advanced Writing: Business and Organizations. (3 cr; A-F or Aud.
Prereq-1120, min 60 cr)
College of Liberal Arts
Study and practice of writing tasks in business and organizations, including oral presentations. Exploration of rhetorical
situations in professional practice, including research methods,
document design, editing, effective collaboration, and ethical
issues in the production of professional documents, such as
instructions, proposals, short and long reports, and career
documents.
COMP 1005. Freshman Seminar: Cyber Theory and Practice. (3 cr; A-F or Aud.
Prereq-Freshman, fewer than 30 cr. LE 7)
Analyze some of the most recognized theoretical work on
cyber theory, comparing theorists’ characterizations of the
emergent technologies to students’ own experiences with them.
Students will interact with many of the newest technologies,
such as WWW, IM, course management software, and security
software.
COMP 1007. Freshman Seminar: The Rhetoric of Popular Culture. (3 cr; A-F or
Aud. Prereq-Freshman, fewer than 30 credits LE 8)
Students will reflect on the ways they are products of popular
culture, in that the ways their thoughts, feelings and actions are
in some sense constructed in response to the popular culture that
surrounds them.
COMP 1015. Freshman Seminar: Honors: Cyber Theory and Practice. (3 cr; A-F
or Aud. Prereq-Freshman, fewer than 30 cr, honors student, §1005 LE 7)
Study and practice of writing tasks in engineering, including
oral presentations. Exploration of rhetorical situations in professional practice, including research methods, document design,
editing, effective collaboration, and ethical issues in the production of professional documents, such as instructions, lab reports,
proposals, short and long reports, and career documents.
COMP 3140. Advanced Writing: Human Services. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-1120,
min 60 cr)
Analyze some of the most recognized theoretical work on
cyber theory, comparing theorists’ characterizations of the
emergent technologies to students’ own experiences with them.
Students will interact with many of the newest technologies,
such as WWW, IM, course management software, and security
software.
Study and practice of writing tasks in education as well as other
fields related to the human service professions. Designed to
prepare students to master their use of Edited Standard Written
English while producing professional documents, including a
major research project with an oral presentation. Assignments
focus on audience, purpose, and the process of writing as they
relate to the workplace.
COMP 1017. Freshman Seminar: Honors, The Rhetoric of Popular Culture. (3 cr;
A-F or Aud. Prereq-Freshman, fewer than 30 cr, honors student, §comp 1007. LE 8)
COMP 3150. Advanced Writing: Science. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-1120, min 60 cr)
Students will reflect on the ways they are products of popular
culture, in that the ways their thoughts, feelings and actions are
in some sense constructed in response to the popular culture that
surrounds them.
COMP 1120. College Writing. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-Students speaking English as
a second language must have TOEFL score of 550 LE 1)
Instruction and practice in writing argumentative prose for
academic situations with integrated computer lab. Emphasis on
academic research, documentation, and the writing process.
COMP 1506. Literacy, Technology and Society. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. LE 7)
Historical survey of cultures without writing systems and
cultures with writing systems and then later with printing, telegraph, radio, telephone, television, computers as well as other
forms of technology. Survey of attitudes toward technology
from Thoreau to Gandhi and beyond.
Course Descriptions
COMP 3130. Advanced Writing: Engineering. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-1120, min
60 cr)
COMP 3100. Advanced Writing: Language and Literature. (3 cr; A-F or Aud.
Prereq-1120, min 60 cr)
Study and practice of reading and writing about literature--poetry, fiction, drama, and creative non-fiction. Seeks to advance
critical reading and analytical skills as a means to improving
a student’s proficiency in the conventions of academic and
professional discourses, including grammar, style, organization,
argumentation, and documentation. Addresses career documents, proposals, and grant writing.
COMP 3110. Advanced Writing: Arts and Letters. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-1120,
min 60 cr)
Study and practice of writing tasks appropriate for the arts and
letters. Seeks to advance research and critical thinking skills as
well as skills in applying conventions of grammar, style, argumentation, and documentation. In addition, the course addresses
professional writing for the arts, including reviews, proposals,
grant writing, and career documents.
310
Study and practice of writing tasks in science, including oral
presentations. Exploration of rhetorical situations in professional practice, including research methods, document design,
editing, effective collaboration, and ethical issues in the production of professional documents, such as instructions, lab reports,
proposals, short and long reports, and career documents.
COMP 3160. Advanced Writing: Social Sciences. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-1120,
min 60 cr)
Study and practice of writing for those whose professional
interests are in sociology, anthropology, geography, criminology, psychology, women’s studies, history, political science,
and similar fields. Assignments center on producing documents
encountered in the workplace, such as career documents,
proposals, research projects, oral presentations, observational
studies, and position papers.
COMP 3180. Honors: Advanced Writing. (3 cr; A-F only. Prereq-Min 60 cr, UMD
Honors Program, or #)
Develops research, critical thinking, and collaborative writing
strategies as well as rhetorical skills to draft documents in
multiple genres for multiple audiences. This includes professional correspondence and reports, research proposals, literature
reviews, oral presentations and related documents for the honors
project.
COMP 3220. Visual Rhetoric and Culture. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-1120)
Practical graphics techniques essential for effective presentations and web page design. Students will learn Photoshop and
PageMaker software packages, and the techniques of video
capturing, scanning, and digital photography. They will be introduced to the basic principles of document design and layout.
COMP 3595. Special Topics: (Various Titles to be Assigned). (1-3 cr [max 6 cr]; A-F or
Aud. Prereq-1120, 30 cr)
General composition topics not included in regular curriculum.
Topic announced before course offered.
Computer Science
COMP 5100. Introduction to Grant Writing and Project Planning. (3 cr; A-F or
Aud. Prereq-1120, 60 credits)
COMP 8902. Teaching College Composition. (3 cr; A-F only. Prereq-Required for
tchg assts in comp and Engl depts, #)
Introduction to basic grant writing principles, including common types of grants, project planning, locating and researching
funders, and preparing effective narratives and budgets. Course
utilizes lectures, discussion, group work, and guest speakers.
Analyze theoretical works and study pedagogical principals
and practices related to teaching academic writing in college,
including methods, materials, and objectives. Includes a major
research project as well as oral presentations and/or teaching
demonstrations.
COMP 5197. Internship in Writing. (1-3 cr [max 3 cr]; S-N only. Prereq-#)
Practical writing experience with a media organization, publisher, business, or government agency.
COMP 5220. Document Design and Graphics. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-1120, 60
cr; max 3 cr may be applied to Grad School prog)
Principles and practice of using computer programs to design,
create, and print documents that effectively integrate verbal and
graphic texts.
COMP 5222. Electronic Publication. (4 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-Min 60 cr or Grad
or #)
Introduces students to recent developments in the creation of
books, journals and newsletters in electronic form and acquaints
them with the conversion of print into electronically distributed
form.
COMP 5230. Web Design and Digital Culture. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-60 cr or
Grad or #)
Design, creation, and posting of Web pages; theory of the World
Wide Web; practical background in design principles; uploading
and updating of Web sites; registering and marketing Web sites;
HTML coding and Web design software, such as Dreamweaver.
COMP 5250. New Media Writing. (3 cr; A-F or Aud)
Combines the theory and production of new media writing-digital, verbal practices in converged media--through the application of readings and discussion to five projects that progress
from written, print-based genres to new-media presentation.
COMP 5290. Advanced Web Design and Digital Culture. (3 cr; A-F or Aud.
Prereq-5230)
Provides students with instruction and practice in creating
increased functionality and interactivity in Web-based projects,
and with the conceptual tools and cultural contexts needed to
manage and direct rhetorical initiatives in digital environments.
COMP 8910. Practicum in Teaching Composition. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-#)
Teaching, tutoring, and assisting in composition courses; experience in preparation of materials, microteaching, and grading
student work.
COMP 8994. Directed Research in Composition. (1-3 cr [max 3 cr]; A-F or Aud.
Prereq-8902; #)
Controlled research in methods, materials, and theories
(both linguistic and rhetorical) used in composition classes,
sometimes involving experiments with composition students in
secondary schools and colleges.
Computer Science (CS)
College of Science and Engineering
CS 1011. Introduction to Computers and Software. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-1 yr
high school algebra, Comp 1120 or # LE 3)
Introduction to the personal computer, hardware and software.
Recognition of the computer’s role as a productivity tool in
business and society as a whole. Focus on developing a broad
understanding of computing systems and widely used software
applications.
CS 1094. Freshman Seminar: Computers and Society. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. PrereqFreshman, fewer than 30 credits LE 8)
Explores the impact of computers on each of us. Topics include
history of computing, automation, information overload, the
digital divide, privacy and security issues, virtual communities, piracy and copyright, internet and hacker culture, the open
source movement, and future trends.
CS 1121. Introduction to Programming in Visual BASIC.NET. (3 cr; A-F or Aud.
Prereq-1 yr high school algebra or # LE 3)
COMP 5591. Independent Study. (1-3 cr [max 6 cr]; A-F or Aud. Prereq-Max 3 cr
may be applied to Grad School prog, #)
CS 1131. Introduction to Programming in FORTRAN. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq§1135; 3 1/2 yrs high school algebra or Math 1250 or # LE 3)
Students choose projects with their instructor.
Study of FORTRAN and its application in science and engineering. Basic syntax and data types, operators, input and output,
expressions, subprograms, control structures, data files, arrays,
pointers, and programmer-defined types.
COMP 5595. Special Topics: (Various Titles to be Assigned). (1-3 cr [max 6 cr]; A-F
or Aud. Prereq-Min 60 cr)
Intensive study of rhetoric or composition topics not focused on
in regular upper-division composition courses or related offerings. Topic announced before course offered.
COMP 5610. Technical Editing. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-Advanced writing course,
Grad student or #)
Introduces editorial responsibilities, document management,
copy marking, copy editing, comprehensive editing, and proofreading. It also covers ethical and legal issues related to editing.
COMP 8500. Graduate Seminar. (3-6 cr [max 6 cr]; A-F or Aud)
Varying topics appropriate to study of composition, English,
language, and rhetoric.
CS 1135. Introduction to Programming in FORTRAN 90. (2 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq§1131; 3 1/2 yrs high school algebra or Math 1250 or # LE 3)
Study of FORTRAN and its application in science and engineering. Basic syntax and data types, operators, input and output,
expressions, subprograms, control structures, and single-dimensional arrays.
CS 1301. Solving Problems with Computers: Using Contemporary Tools to
Program Computers. (4 cr; A-F or Aud. LE 3)
Introduces skills used to solve problems with computers.
Students learn fundamental computer programming skills
through a variety of possible contemporary applications, including creating dynamic web pages, programming robots, and/or
animating 3D computer graphics, and games. For students with
no prior programming experience.
311
Course Descriptions
Provides students with instruction and practice in critiquing
research, generating research questions, designing research
projects, and reporting research results in the study of writing.
Introduction to programming in Visual BASIC, including eventdriven Windows programming, data types, operators, objects
and properties, menus, procedures, control structures, and
database file processing. For students with no prior programming experience.
COMP 5300. Research Methods for the Study of Writing. (3 cr; A-F or Aud)
Course Descriptions
CS 1511. Computer Science I. (5 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-§1581, 3 1/2 yrs high
school math or # LE 3)
CS 3211. Database System Concepts. (4 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-FMIS 3201 or FMIS
2201 or SBE 1101, 2511 or #)
Introduction to the discipline of computer science and its
theoretical foundations. Introduction to structured programming, problem analysis and solution design, control structures,
recursion, arrays and classes. Students will learn a high-level
programming language. Requires design and implementation of
computational solutions for sample problems.
Design and use of database management systems. Emphasis on
the relational data model, SQL, integrity constraints, relational
database design, file structures, indexing, query processing, and
optimization. Oracle-based laboratory work.
CS 1521. Computer Science II. (5 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-1511)
Hands-on introduction to operating systems and tools. Systems
administration experience with operating systems such as
Linux, Unix, or Windows. Concepts of processor management
and scheduling, memory management, file systems.
Continuation of introduction to computer science. Methods
for procedural and data abstraction. Focus on classical data
structures, procedural and data abstraction, and the abstract
data type. Introduction to software engineering technique.
Algorithm analysis, principles of object-oriented programming
issues in ethical use of computers. Requires implementation of
significant programming projects.
CS 3512. Computer Science Theory. (4 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-1296 or 1596, CS
2511 or #)
Similar to 1511, but in greater depth and with more challenging
assignments. For high-ability students.
Sets, relations, functions. Recursive definitions of functions and
sets. Proof methods, including mathematical and structural induction, diagonalization. Program correctness, time/space complexity. Formal language theory, including regular languages
and expressions, deterministic/nondeterministic finite automata,
Kleene’s Theorem, context-free languages and grammars.
CS 2121. Introduction to Programming in Java. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-3 yrs
high school math, or # LE 3)
CS 3996. Internship in Computer Science. (1-3 cr [max 3 cr]; S-N or Aud. PrereqComp sci jr, #)
Design and implementation of Java programs, including
exception handling, graphical user interface components, file
system interface and network interface. Emphasis is on internet
programming and web applets.
Practical, independent computer science experience in commercial, industrial, or educational setting. Department approval
required before beginning internship.
CS 1581. Honors: Computer Science I. (5 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-Credit will not be
received if credit granted for 1511, 3 1/2 yrs high school math, # LE 3)
Course Descriptions
CS 3221. Operating Systems Practicum. (4 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-3011 or #, CIS
majors only, min 60 cr)
CS 2511. Software Analysis and Design. (4 cr; Stdnt Opt. Prereq-1521 or #)
CS 4411. Data Communications and Network Technology. (4 cr; A-F or Aud.
Prereq-3011 or #, CIS majors only, min 60 cr)
Techniques for analyzing, designing, and creating medium-scale
software through object-oriented design and implementation.
Introduction to design patterns. Emphasis on polymorphism
and abstraction to increase software modularity, reusability, and
flexibility. Includes a medium-scale team-development project.
In-depth experience with telecommunications fundamentals,
including voice-video-data transmission in LAN and Internet.
Network protocol analysis and implementation. Network
layered architecture and abstractions. Installation, configuration,
systems integration, and management of the technologies.
CS 2521. Computer Organization and Architecture. (4 cr; Stdnt Opt. Prereq-1521,
ECE 1315, Math 1296 or #)
CS 4511. Computability and Complexity. (4 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-3511 or 3512
or #)
Internal representation of programs and data. Computer
organization andintroduction to computer architecture. Machine
and assembly languageprogramming. Data and procedural
structures. Addressing methods. Systems software including
linking and loading. Introduction to hardware performance
anlaysis and measurements.
Fundamentals of the mathematical theory of computation.
Turing machines, Church-Turing Thesis, recursive and recursively enumberable languages, unsolvable problems, Rice’s
Theorem, deterministic and nondeterministic time and space
complexity, complexity classes, NP-completeness, Cook’s
Theorem, P vs NP.
CS 2991. Independent Study. (1-4 cr [max 8 cr]; Stdnt Opt. Prereq-#)
CS 4521. Algorithms and Data Structures. (4 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-(2511, 3511)
or 3512 or #)
Directed study of special interest topics not available in standard
curriculum. Must be arranged with instructor before registration. May include readings, research, or special projects.
CS 3011. Information Technology Hardware and Software. (4 cr; A-F or Aud.
Prereq-FMIS 3201 or FMIS 2201 or SBE 1101, 2511 or #)
Principles and application of telecommunication and computer
systems hardware and software focusing on coding of data
and programs, system hardware organization, and operating
systems.
CS 3111. Computer Ethics. (4 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-Comp 3100 or 3110 or 3121 or
3130 0r 3140 or 3150 or 3160 or Engr 4001, min 60 cr or #)
Ethical issues posed by computer use, including those related
to networking, intellectual property, privacy, crime and security,
risk and reliability, and effects on work and wealth. Includes
significant writing and a class presentation
CS 3121. Interactive Multimedia Technology. (4 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-FMIS 3201
or FMIS 2201 or SBE 1101, 2511 or #)
Fundamentals of multimedia computing and interactive
technologies; digitizing and manipulating images, audio, and
video materials; perception, cognition, and communication
issues; software engineering, design, and analysis; web-related
languages (e.g., JavaScript, HTML, CSS); media formats and
compression; copyright and ethics. Includes practical labs and
authoring a large-scale project.
312
Asymptotic analysis of algorithms. Methods for proving correctness. Implementation of algorithms. Survey of algorithms
and data structures, such as: heaps and heapsort, quicksort,
binary search trees, red-black trees, B-trees, hash tables, graph
algorithms, dynamic programming, and greedy algorithms.
CS 4531. Software Engineering. (4 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-2511 or #)
Formal methods of software design and development.
Recognition ofconditions for production of high quality software. Organization andmanagement of software development
projects. Introduction to designmethodologies.
CS 4611. Database Management Systems. (4 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-2511, 2521
or #)
Study of database management fundamentals focusing on the
relational data model. Topics include database organization, file
organization, query processing, concurrency control, recovery,
data integrity, optimization and view implementation.
Computer Science
CS 4821. Computer Security. (4 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-(2511, 2521, 3511) or (2521,
3512) or #; §4711)
CS 5721. Computer Graphics. (4 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-2511, (CS 3511 or Math
2326) or #)
Entropy and the underlying characteristics of text. Encryptionbasic techniques based on confusion and diffusion and modern
day encryption. Access, information flow and inference control.
Program threats and intrusion detection. Network and Internet
security. Firewalls, trusted systems, network authentication.
Design of 2D and 3D graphics applications. Introduction to
modeling and viewing transformations, illumination models, design of hierarchical geometric models, animation. Analysis and
implementation of basic graphics algorithms: scan conversion,
clipping, visible surface determination, and rendering.
CS 4991. Independent Study. (1-4 cr [max 8 cr]; A-F or Aud. Prereq-#)
CS 5741. Object-Oriented Design. (4 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-(2511, 3511) or 3512
or #)
Directed study of special interest topics not available in standard
curriculum. Must be arranged with instructor before registration. May include readings, research, or special projects.
CS 4993. Seminar. (1 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-2511, Comm 1112, Comp 3130 or
3150, CS or CIS major and 90 cr; no Grad School credit)
Written report and oral presentation of a topic relating to the
social and ethical implications of computing.
CS 4994. Honors Project. (2-3 cr [max 3 cr]; A-F or Aud. Prereq-Consent of comp sci
honors prog committee)
Required for students who wish to participate in the computer
science honors program. Students must complete a research
project under supervision of a faculty adviser.
CS 4995. Special Topics: (Various Titles to be Assigned). (1-4 cr [max 8 cr]; A-F or
Aud. Prereq-#)
Study of selected topic announced in [Class Schedule].
CS 5541. Artificial Intelligence. (4 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-(2511, 3511) or 3512 or #)
Principles and programming methods of artificial intelligence.
Knowledge representation methods, state space search strategies, and use of logic for problem solving. Applications chosen
from among expert systems, planning, natural language understanding, uncertainty reasoning, machine learning, and robotics.
Lectures and labs will utilize suitable high-level languages (e.g.,
Python or Lisp).
CS 5551. User Interface Design. (4 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-2511, (Math 1297 or
Math 2326) or #)
Design and layout of interactive programs using menus, dialogs,
and events. The use of color, text, fonts, and bitmaps; giving
user feedback and help. Rapid prototyping and interface management systems. Design for accessibility and usability.
CS 5621. Computer Architecture. (4 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-2521 or #)
Advanced concepts in processor and computer system organization and their impact on performance. Exploitation of parallelism, multilevel memory organization, system interconnection,
and imput-output organization.
Operating system as resource manager. Processor management
and scheduling, deadlocks, concurrency, memory management
and protection and security as applied in modern operating
systems. Concepts are illustrated via laboratory assignments
which heavily emphasize concurrency.
CS 5641. Compiler Design. (4 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-(2511, 2521, 3511) or (2521,
3512) or #)
A selection from the following topics: finite-state grammars,
lexical analysis, and implementation of symbol tables. Contextfree languages and parsing techniques. Syntax-directed translation. Run-time storage allocation. Intermediate languages. Code
generation methods. Local and global optimization techniques.
CS 5651. Computer Networks. (4 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-2511, 2521 or #)
Introduction to computer networking and associated software
protocols. Network reference models and layered architecture. Network services and applications. Design of computer
networking software. Quality of service concepts.
CS 5751. Introduction to Machine Learning. (4 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-(2511, 3511,
Stat 3611) or (3512 or Stat 3611) or #)
Survey of methods in machine learning including supervised
and unsupervised methods. Topics covered may include clustering, decision trees, neural networks, support vector machines,
genetic algorithms and reinforcement learning. Theoretical
concepts associated with machine learning.
CS 5761. Introduction to Natural Language Processing. (4 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq(2511, 3511) or 3512 or #)
Techniques for creating computer programs that analyze, generate, and understand natural human language. Topics include
syntactic analysis, semantic interpretation, and discourse
processing. Applications selected from speech recognition,
conversational agents, machine translation, and language generation. Substantial programming project required.
CS 5831. Information and Text Processing. (4 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-(2511, 2521,
3511) or (2521, 3512)or #)
The properties that underlie text processing and their application in terms of compression and encryption. Retrieval models.
Digital libraries. Web applications.
CS 5991. Independent Study. (1-4 cr [max 8 cr]; A-F or Aud. Prereq-#)
Directed study of special interest topics not available in the
standard curriculum. Must be arranged with the instructor in
advance of registration. May include readings, research, or
special projects.
CS 5994. Advanced Topics in Computer Science. (4 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-Grad
student or #)
Research-oriented study of topics of current academic or
industrial interest, such as parallel algorithms, VLSI design,
computational geometry, logic programming languages, program correctness, information retrieval systems, and decision
support systems.
CS 8333. FTE: Master’s. (1 cr; No grade. Prereq-Master s student, adviser and DGS
consent)
CS 8511. Advanced Theory of Computation. (4 cr; Stdnt Opt. Prereq-4511 or #)
Mathematical theory of computability and computational complexity. Deterministic and nondeterministic Turing machines.
Recursive and recursively-enumerable languages. Undecidable
problems, Rice’s Theorem, the Church-Turing thesis. Time and
space complexity. P-time reductions, completeness for complexity classes, Cook’s Theorem, P=NP, and the polynominal
hierarchy.
CS 8561. Human Computer Interaction. (4 cr; A-F only. Prereq-5551 or 5721)
Introduction to the software algorithms, hardware components,
and concepts for building and evaluating virtual environments
for effective human-computer interaction (visual, auditory,
haptic, and mechanical aspects). Includes the perceptual components for constructing effective human-computer interaction
with a virtual environment.
313
Course Descriptions
CS 5631. Operating Systems. (4 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-2511, 2521 or #)
Overview of software design and design methods, focusing on
object-orienteddesign. Impact of object and class organization
on software maintenance and reusability. Implementation of a
significant project using object-oriented methods and tools.
Course Descriptions
CS 8621. Advanced Computer Architecture. (4 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-5621 or #)
Algorithmically-specialized functional units. Principles of
advanced memory subsystem organization, including virtual
memory and caches. Novel hardware technologies. Foundations
of parallel architectures: from supercomputers to cluster environments. Advanced hardware/software performance analysis.
CS 8631. Advanced Systems Programming. (4 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-5631, 5641
or #)
Overview of systems programs with emphasis on unifying
themes common to major application areas, such as compiler
construction, operating systems, and networks. Advanced study
of practical aspects of one of these systems, including a substantive software development project.
CS 8721. Advanced Computer Graphics. (4 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-5721 or #)
Currently available computer graphics techniques. Curve and
surface representation, solid modeling, visible surface determination, rendering, and illumination techniques. Advanced
algorithms for scan-conversion, clipping, and anti-aliasing.
CS 8731. Information Retrieval. (4 cr; Stdnt Opt. Prereq-5731 or #)
Methods, major models, and theoretical issues in automatic
processing and retrieval of text. Statistical and syntactic approaches, very large database issues (data mining), distributed
retrieval, web retrieval and relevant applications.
CS 8751. Advanced Machine Learning. (4 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-5751 or #)
Survey of emerging research topics in machine learning and
data mining plus the relation of machine learning to fields such
as bioinformatics. Topics drawn from emerging techniques such
as support vector machines, ensemble methods and Bayesian
networks.
CS 8761. Natural Language Processing. (4 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-5761 or #;
Graduate Student)
Techniques to analyze, generate, and understand human
language via computational techniques. This course focuses
on empirical approaches to lexical and syntactic analysis,
semantic interpretation, and discourse processing. Applications
include part-of-speech tagging, parsing, lexical acquisition, and
machine translation.
Course Descriptions
CS 8771. Advanced Computational Logic. (4 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-4511 or #;
Graduate Student)
Mathematically sound reintroduction to classical logic. Syntax,
semantics, and proof theory for propositional and first-order
logic. Soundness and completeness. Incompleteness. Additional
topic(s)from among: automated theorem proving, second-order
logic, nonmonotonic logics and knowledge representation, logic
programming.
CS 8777. Thesis Credits: Master’s. (1-24 cr [max 50 cr]; No grade. Prereq-Max 18
cr per semester or summer; 10 cr total required (Plan A only))
CS 8993. Seminar. (1 cr [max 3 cr]; A-F or Aud. Prereq-#)
Presentation and discussion of articles in literature and/or of
current research in department.
CS 8995. Special Topics: (Various Titles to be Assigned). (1-4 cr [max 8 cr]; A-F or
Aud. Prereq-CS grad student, #)
Topics not available in standard curriculum. Topic announced in
[Class Schedule].
Criminology (CRIM)
College of Liberal Arts
CRIM 8100. Criminology and Criminal Justice Systems. (3 cr; A-F or Aud.
Prereq-Grad student or #)
Review of the historical development of criminology and the
criminal justice system. Emphasis on a systems/organizational
approach to the structural aspects of the criminal justice system
including comparative analyses of systems in other countries.
CRIM 8110. Correctional Systems. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-Grad student or #)
Corrections consists of a continuum of sanctions ranging from
probation to institutional confinement. This class is an analysis
of issues that arise in these settings, including; theory and
philosophy of corrections, risk assessment, prison culture and
violence, and correctional intervention.
CRIM 8120. Law, Courts, and The Judicicary. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-Grad
student or #)
Investigates the interplay of the form, nature, and contents of
law and judicial administration in the United States by investigating a broad range of legal and judiciary issues including law
and social control, theories of law, functions of law in society,
types of law, processes of law, the American judiciary, principal
agents in the court system, adjudication, litigation, features of
the U.S. court system, issues and problems facing the legal and
court systems.
CRIM 8130. Law Enforcement and Community. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-Grad
student or #)
Focuses on the variety of law enforcement agencies in the U.S.
and other countries, the structure of those agencies, the nature
and behavior of personnel, role of the agencies in society and
in the criminal justice system, and the connection of the law
enforcement function to the community.
CRIM 8200. Criminology Research Methods and Statistics. (4 cr; A-F or Aud.
Prereq-Grad student or #)
Survey of research methods and statistics appropriate for the
study of criminal behavior and criminal justice system organizations. Focus is on conceptualization, measurement, and the
application of designs and statistical techniques.
CRIM 8210. Advanced Research Design and Analysis. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. PrereqGrad student or #)
Survey of advanced bivariate and multivariate statistics appropriate for large and small data sets. Includes the application of
qualitative analysis techniques and the use of secondary data.
CRIM 8220. Advanced Evaluation Research Methods. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. PrereqGrad student or #)
Reviews the history and development of evaluative research.
Focuses primarily on process/outcome and project/program
evaluation. Involves students in the application of formative and
summative evaluation in criminal justice.
CRIM 8295. Special Topics: (Various Titles to be Assigned). (3-4 cr [max 8 cr]; A-F or
Aud. Prereq-Grad student or #)
Provide graduate students with a diversity of topics that reflect
developments and changes in the field while providing students
the opportunity to work with a wide range of faculty.
CRIM 8300. Theories of Crime and Delinquency. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-Grad
student or #)
Looks at the causal explanations of crime and delinquency
and to a lesser extent other nonconforming behavior. Various
theoretical accounts of deviant behavior and attempts to
describe explain, and predict deviance from structural and social
psychological perspective. Explore policy directives stemming
from alternative theories aimed at elevating what is considered
by some as undesirable behavior.
314
Cultural Studies
CRIM 8310. Advanced Theory. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-Grad student or #)
The application of criminological theories and concepts that
may contribute to the framing of various relevant issues to
criminologists. These may include but are not limited to the
influence of class, ethnicity, and gender.
CST 1040. American Immigrant Heritage. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-§AmS 1061
LECD 08)
Immigrant and ethnic experiences in the 20th century as
depicted in prose, poetry, and the arts; patterns of contemporary
prestige and status.
CRIM 8333. FTE: Master’s. (1 cr; No grade. Prereq-Master’s student, adviser and
DGS consent)
CST 1095. Freshman Seminar: Bodies and Culture Through Film. (4 cr; A-F or
Aud. Prereq-Freshman, fewer than 30 credits. LE 8)
CRIM 8395. Topics in Advanced Theory: (Various Titles to be Assigned). (3-4 cr
[max 8 cr]; A-F or Aud. Prereq-Grad student or #)
Explores the ways in which our bodies are culturally constructed through gender, race, and sexual orientation. Using
documentary film as a primary pedagogical tool, attention will
focus on how marginalization is embodied in everyday life.
Provide graduate students with a diversity of topics that reflect
theoretical developments in the field while providing students
the opportunity to work with a wide range of faculty.
CRIM 8600. Practicum in Criminology. (1-15 cr [max 15 cr]; S-N or Aud. PrereqGrad student or #)
Supervised direct experience in a criminal justice agency and a
concurrent seminar which focus on identification, application,
and evaluation of the implementation of concepts, principles,
theories and best practices in criminal justice. Experience in
law enforcement agencies, juvenile courts, probation and parole
departments, correctional institutions, delinquency control
programs and public or voluntary agencies. Orientation sessions
precede placement. Student must submit internship application
during the first 30 days of the preceding spring or fall semester.
CST 1096. Freshman Seminar: Topics (Various Titles to be Assigned). (3-4 cr [max 4
cr]; A-F or Aud. Prereq-Freshman, fewer than 30 credits LE 8)
Seminar specifically designed for freshmen.
CST 1101. Introduction to Cultural Studies. (4 cr; A-F or Aud. LE 8)
Examines how cultural practices relate to everyday life by introducing students to each of the four core areas of the Cultural
Studies minor: Identity Politics, Media Cultures, Cultures
of Space & Place, and Cultures of Science, Technology, &
Medicine.
CST 1201. American Working Class History and Culture: The Struggle for
Control. (4 cr; A-F or Aud. LE 7)
CRIM 8777. Thesis Credits: Master’s. (1-18 cr [max 50 cr]; No grade. Prereq-Max
18 cr per semester or summer; 10 cr total required (Plan A only))
Introduces students to working class history and culture and
examines the struggle by workers to control their work, communities, identity, and social norms.
CRIM 8900. Directed Readings. (1-6 cr [max 6 cr]; A-F or Aud. Prereq-Grad student
or #)
CST 2001. Introduction to Gay Lesbian Bisexual and Transgender Studies. (4
cr; A-F or Aud. LECD 08)
Students conduct intense and detailed reading in a topic area of
their choice under the guidance of a professor.
Cultural Studies (CST)
College of Liberal Arts
CST 1004. From Classical Antiquity to Medieval Culture. (4 cr; A-F or Aud. LE 7)
Ancient Greek and Roman world. Historical and cultural
contexts. Reorganization of late Roman world from Diocletian
to 13th century A.D. Emergence of feudalism and medieval
experience. Idea of “Classicism” which the Renaissance discovered and promoted.
CST 1010. Romanticism and Revolutions. (4 cr; A-F or Aud. LE 9)
CST 1020. Landscapes, Environments, and U.S. Culture. (3 cr; A-F or Aud.
Prereq-§AmS 1031 LE 7)
Interdisciplinary study of U.S. landscapes and environments as
an index to the diverse cultures of the United States. Readings
from travelers, naturalists, ecologists, geographers, poets, and
fiction writers; slides of paintings and photographs; films.
CST 1022. The Bible as Literature. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. LE 9)
The Hebrew Bible, the New Testament, and the Apocrypha
examined as literary works of their time.
CST 1030. Frontier Heritage in Canada and the United States. (4 cr; A-F or Aud.
LECD 07)
The frontier experience examined through primary documents,
film, art, myth, literature, and historiography, with emphasis
on cross-cultural comparisons of the Canadian and American
frontiers from perspective of Europeans and Native Americans
of both genders.
CST 3010. Popular Culture in the 1960s. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-Min 30 cr)
Interrelationships among the arts, popular culture, politics, and
social change as found in literature, theatre, film, photography,
painting, and music in the United States during the 1960s.
CST 3030. Science Fiction. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-Min 30 cr)
Selected science fiction short stories, novels, films, videos, and
music that explore impact of physical, biological, and social
sciences in producing changing views of human nature, values,
institutions, and societies.
CST 3040. The Music and Lives of the Beatles. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-Min 30 cr)
Impact on our culture of music and lives of the Beatles. Their
music; influence on music, fashion, and attitudes; Beatles’ movies; interrelationship with political and social movements; later
careers; their legacy.
CST 3050. Utopian Images. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-Min 30 cr)
Ways that humans imagine a better existence in a finer world,
with examples from such expressive forms as utopian treatises,
science fiction, pastoral poetry and art, religious traditions,
landscape architecture, urban designs.
CST 3060. Women and Men in Popular Culture. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-Min 30
cr or #)
Analysis of popular culture texts (literature, television,
advertisements, music) and audiences to understand cultural
construction of gender as reflected in representations of masculinity and femininity. Introduction to range of methods for
cultural analysis.
315
Course Descriptions
Exploration of the changes in the arts and humanities produced
by political, scientific, social, and revolutions that spring from
the industrial revolution and the Romantic response to that
revolution.
Examines identity politics, GLBT popular media images and
analysis, birth and history of GLBT social movement and intersections with other social movements, HIV/AIDS, policy/legislative issues especially immigration, marriage, adoption, and
U.S. military policy; all with international comparative analysis.
Course Descriptions
CST 3080. Cultural Constructions of the Body. (4 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-Min 30
cr or #)
Contemporary cultural constructions of the human body. How
biology and culture intersect in body building, menstruation,
childbirth, and tattooing. Students gain skills in reading the
body as social text and learn core theoretical approaches to
cultural studies of the body.
CST 3095. Special Topics: (Various Titles to be Assigned). (3-4 cr [max 8 cr]; A-F or
Aud. Prereq-1101, min 30 cr)
Special Topics courses will be offered at least one time per year
in order to increase possible course offerings in the Cultural
Studies minor and give students the opportunity to work with a
wide range of interdisciplinary faculty and topics.
CST 3161. Egyptian Literature and Language. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-Min 30 cr)
Ancient Egyptian civilization explored through primary texts in
religious, historical, secular, and technical literature. Elementary
Egyptian vocabulary; opportunities to learn to read and write
hieroglyphic.
CST 3715. Popular Culture. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-Min 30 cr or #)
What qualifies as American popular culture, methodologies
used to study popular culture, and sociological significance of
such study.
CST 4653. Cultural Studies Senior Seminar/Capstone. (4 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq1101, CSt minor, no Grad School credit)
As the capstone for the cultural studies minor, this course asks
students to engage with current work produced in the field of
cultural studies, including (but not limited to) texts, documentary videos, and experimental films produced for both popular
and academic audiences.
CST 4691. Independent Study in Cultural Studies. (1-4 cr [max 8 cr]; A-F or Aud.
Prereq-#)
Intermediate work, emphasizing modern dance as a performing
art form.
DN 3211. Jazz Dance Technique II. (2 cr [max 18 cr]; A-F or Aud. Prereq-#)
Intermediate work in lyrical and percussive jazz dance
techniques.
DN 3221. Tap Dance Technique II. (2 cr [max 8 cr]; A-F or Aud. Prereq-1121 or #)
Intermediate work, emphasizing tap dance as a performing art
form. Tap dance composition and development of improvisational skills.
DN 3231. Ballet Technique II. (2 cr [max 12 cr]; A-F or Aud. Prereq-#)
Intermediate work, emphasizing ballet as a performing art form.
DN 3401. Dance Composition. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-3201, 3231 or 3211, #)
Study and development of dance choreography through creative
experiences.
DN 3611. Dance History. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-1001 or #)
Religious, social, political, and artistic forces that have
contributed to development of dance in Western civilization,
emphasizing Romantic era through present.
DN 3991. Independent Study in Dance. (1-3 cr [max 6 cr]; A-F or Aud. Prereq-#;
undergrads may not take more than 6 cr in 3991 and 5991 combined)
Directed readings and projects arranged between student and
faculty mentor.
DN 4116. Musical Theatre Audition Techniques. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-#, no
Grad School cr)
Advanced dance, song, acting, and marketing capstone course
for professionally oriented musical theatre student.
DN 4311. Jazz Dance Technique III. (2 cr [max 12 cr]; A-F or Aud. Prereq-#; no
Grad School cr)
Directed reading, research, or involvement in an issue leading to
the preparation of a paper or other product.
Advanced work, emphasizing jazz dance as a performing art
form.
CST 4997. Teaching Assistant in Cultural Studies. (1-3 cr [max 3 cr]; A-F only.
Prereq-Min 60 cr, #, no Grad cr)
DN 4331. Ballet Technique III. (2 cr [max 12 cr]; A-F or Aud. Prereq-3231, #; no
Grad School cr)
Practical experience in teaching-related activities in cultural
studies courses.
Dance (DN)
School of Fine Arts
DN 1001. Introduction to the World of Dance. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. LEIP 09)
Course Descriptions
DN 3201. Modern Dance Technique II. (2 cr [max 12 cr]; A-F or Aud. Prereq-#)
Appreciation of dance as an art and entertainment form using
aesthetic, sociocultural, historical, and genre studies. Video
and concert viewing, readings on choreographers and dancers,
critiques, and lab experiences.
DN 1011. Tap Dance Fundamentals. (2 cr [max 4 cr]; A-F or Aud. LE 10)
Fundamental tap dance technique, emphasizing tap dance as a
social and performing art form.
DN 1101. Modern Dance Technique I. (2 cr [max 12 cr]; A-F or Aud. LE 10)
Beginning work, emphasizing modern dance as a performing
art form.
DN 1111. Jazz Dance Technique I. (2 cr [max 8 cr]; A-F or Aud. LE 10)
Beginning work, emphasizing jazz dance as a performing art
form.
DN 1121. Tap Dance Technique I. (2 cr [max 8 cr]; A-F or Aud. Prereq-4 cr of 1101
or 1111, #)
Beginning work, emphasizing tap dance as a performing art
form.
DN 1131. Ballet Technique I. (2 cr [max 12 cr]; A-F or Aud. LE 10)
Beginning work, emphasizing ballet as a performing art form.
316
Advanced work, emphasizing ballet as a performing art form.
DN 4901. Intern Teaching Dance. (2 cr [max 6 cr]; A-F or Aud. Prereq-3201 or 3211
or 3221 or 3231, #; no Grad School cr)
Practical experience teaching introductory level dance classes.
Students serve as intern teachers assisting instructor in administration of course.
DN 5991. Independent Study in Dance. (1-3 cr [max 6 cr]; A-F or Aud. Prereq-#;
undergrads max 6 cr in 3991 and 5991 combined; no Grad School credit)
Advanced directed readings and projects arranged between
student and faculty mentor.
DN 5997. Internship in Professional Dance. (1-12 cr [max 12 cr]; A-F or Aud.
Prereq-%; 1 cr for each 45 hrs of work; no Grad School credit)
Internship with a cooperating professional, commercial, or
regional dance company.
Early Childhood Studies (ECH)
College of Education and Human Service
Professions
ECH 2010. Foundational Issues in Early Childhood Studies. (3 cr; A-F or Aud)
Historical and cultural perspectives of Early Childhood Studies.
Theoretical models for the education of young children from
birth through age eight will be addressed through professional
exploration. Methods for facilitating child development as well
as strategies for collaborating with families and communities
will be discussed. Practicum experience with young children
will provide a hands on experience for the students.
Early Childhood Studies
ECH 2015. Literature for Young Children. (3 cr; A-F or Aud)
Introduces professionals who work with children from birth
through age eight to literature for young children. Criteria
for selecting book and non-book materials will be presented,
discussed and utilized when examining, selecting, and reading
such materials. Strategies for sharing the books and non-book
materials with children and for integrating the materials into day
care, preschool, and primary settings will be explored.
ECH 2025. Cognitive Development: Theory to Practice. (3 cr; A-F or Aud)
ECH 4011. Parent Education. (4 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-¶: 3020, 3030, SpEd 3105,
#; no Grad School cr)
Planning, presenting, and evaluating educational programs
for parents; adult learning and development; philosophy of
Minnesota early childhood family education program; teaching
strategies; curriculum development.
ECH 4251. Parenting. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-UECh major, Educ 1000 or Psy 2021
or Psy 3371 or #; no Grad School cr)
Issues related to early brain development and the biological
underpinnings of early emotional and cognitive development. A
biological view of attachment and social vulnerability.
Parent-child interaction, roles and responsibilities throughout
the life cycle; analysis of parenting strategies; contemporary
variation of family cultures, structures and lifestyles; sources of
education and support.
ECH 3006. Early School Years. (2 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-Pre-ElEd major, concurrent
registration is required (or allowed) for ElEd 1010)
ECH 4400. Professional Development Seminar. (1 cr [max 3 cr]; A-F or Aud.
Prereq-#; no Grad School cr)
Theoretical, historical, and cultural influences that impact early
childhood education. Environments, methods, and materials that
facilitate development. Collaborating with families and communities. Practicum required.
Professional development through documentation, reflection,
synthesis of learning as related to standards. Development of
process and product portfolios. Presentation of and dialogue
about emergent learning.
ECH 3021. Teaching Mathematics: Birth-Age Eight. (4 cr; A-F or Aud. PrereqAdmission to the ECh program)
ECH 4600. Student Teaching in Early Childhood/Primary. (3-12 cr [max 12 cr];
S-N only. Prereq-3005, 3007 or #; no Grad School cr)
Development and instruction in play-based and problem-based
mathematics in birth to age 8 settings. Methods, materials, and
research findings related to teaching of mathematics. Practicum
required.
Application of skills, understanding, and knowledge related to
working with children from birth through age eight.
ECH 3022. Literacy for Young Children: Teaching Reading, Writing, Speaking,
and Listening. (4 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-Admission to the ECh program)
Reflections on current issues and ethical dilemmas in field of
early childhood education, birth through age eight; preparation
for professional job-seeking and interviewing.
Prepares professionals who work with children from birth to
age eight to introduce and teach developmentally appropriate skills and strategies related to reading, writing, speaking,
and listening. Course assignments will be linked to practicum
experiences. Practicum required.
ECH 3030. Inquiry, Social Studies, and Science Learning: Birth-Age Eight. (5 cr;
Stdnt Opt. Prereq-ECh major, 2010, 3010, ¶: 3020, 4011 and SpEd 3105)
Exploratory and socially sensitive environments for children
from birth through age 8; inquiry, physical knowledge, social
processes in children’s play; planning, implementing, evaluating
culturally and developmentally appropriate science and social
studies learning experiences; integrated, thematic curricula and
use of technology to enhance learning. Practicum required.
ECH 3050. Observing and Guiding Behavior: Birth-Age Eight. (4 cr; Stdnt Opt.
Prereq-UECh major, 2010, 3010, SpEd 3103)
ECH 3055. Creative Expressions in Early Childhood: Birth-Age Eight . (3 cr; A-F
or Aud. Prereq-Admission to the UECh program)
Exploration of developmentally appropriate methods and materials for the integration of art, music and movement experiences
for children’s overall growth, ages birth-age 8.
ECH 3104. Family Partnerships. (1 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-Admission to the ECh
program)
Practicum experience in which students partner with a young
child and their family. Through this experience, students
practice advocacy skills, integrate theory in early childhood, and
observe children in the context of the family.
ECH 4009. Leadership in Early Childhood Studies. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. PrereqAdmission to UECh program; no Grad School cr)
Develops knowledge and competencies in the area of educational leadership, including development and administration of
early childhood programs, professionalism, ethics and social
policy.
ECH 4991. Independent Study. (1-6 cr [max 6 cr]; A-F or Aud. Prereq-#; no Grad
School cr)
Individualized reading and research in a special topic.
ECH 4993. Special Area Project. (1-4 cr [max 4 cr]; A-F or Aud. Prereq-#; no Grad
School cr)
Independent project for advanced students to substantially
further their theoretical knowledge base or professional competencies in early childhood, birth through age eight.
ECH 5010. Programs for Education of Young Children: Birth-Age Eight. (4 cr;
A-F or Aud. Prereq-MEd Student)
Historical and theoretical models for education of young
children from birth through age eight. Methods for facilitating
development and collaborating with families and communities.
Use of technology with young children. Practicum.
ECH 5050. Observing and Guiding Behavior: Birth-Age Eight. (4 cr; Stdnt Opt.
Prereq-2010, ¶: 3010, SpEd 3103)
Course Descriptions
Observing, recording, and guiding behaviors in children from
birth through age eight. Focuses on informal methods for observation. Practicum is required. Use of technology for behavioral
observation.
ECH 4610. Professional Issues Seminar in Early Childhood Education. (1 cr;
Stdnt Opt. Prereq-¶ in 4600; no Grad School cr)
Observing, recording, and guiding behaviors in children from
birth to age eight. Focuses on informal methods for observation. Practicum is required. Use of technology for behavioral
observation.
ECH 5993. Special Area Project. (1-4 cr [max 4 cr]; A-F or Aud. Prereq-no Grad
School cr)
Independent project for advanced students to substantially further their theoretical knowledge base or professional
competencies.
ECH 5995. Special Topics: (Various Titles to be Assigned). (1-6 cr [max 96 cr]; A-F or
Aud. Prereq-Grad student or post-baccalaureate status; no Grad School cr)
Special topics in early childhood education to meet needs and
interests of different groups of students.
ECH 7030. Cognitive Development. (4 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-Collegiate grad
program admission or #)
Issues related to early brain development and the biological
underpinnings of early emotional and cognitive development. A
biological view of attachment and social vulnerability will also
be addressed.
317
Course Descriptions
ECH 7031. Critical Connections During the Early Years. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq7030, collegiate grad program admission or #)
ECON 3030. Economic Research Methodology. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-1022,
1023, 2030, Math 1160 or Math 1296)
Issues related to quality care and appropriate support for young
children, as well as the role of attachment, and the role teachers,
parents and community members play in the facilitation of the
development of social skills for young children.
Techniques used in analyzing economic and business data; emphasis on computer methods and research applications. Analysis
of variance, qualitative data analysis, modeling, regression,
residual and influence analysis, time series.
ECH 7032. The Competent Child. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-7030, collegiate grad
program admission or #)
ECON 3031. History of Economic Thought. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-1003 or 1022,
1023 LE 7)
Addresses the role early childhood education plays in the
facilitation of early regulation, coping strategies, and the development of social and emotional competence within the context
of adult relationships.
Development of economic ideas, principles, and systems of
analysis from early times to present, emphasizing personalities
and historical events surrounding development of economic
thought.
ECH 7033. The Child as a Citizen. (4 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-7030, collegiate grad
program admission or #)
ECON 3036. Radical Economics. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-1003 or 1022, 1023 LE 7)
Children in the context of the family and community. Focuses
on the child as a contributor within the family structure and as
a member of the greater society. Issues of gender, culture and
early citizenship will be discussed as well as the emergence of
developmental skills related to these issues.
Economics (ECON)
Labovitz School of Business and Economics
ECON 1003. Economics and Society. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-Cannot apply cr to
econ major or minor or BAc or BBA majors LE 8)
General description of U.S. economy and analysis of contemporary economic problems. Introduction to major economic issues
and problems of the day, providing a simple framework used by
economists for analysis.
ECON 1022. Principles of Economics: Macro. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-Min 15 cr
or % LE 6)
Analyzing overall performance of an economic system.
National income accounting and theory, unemployment, inflation, fiscal policy, money, monetary policy, economic growth,
international trade, non-U.S. economies, and real-world application of these concepts.
ECON 1023. Principles of Economics: Micro. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-Min 15 cr
or % LE 6)
Course Descriptions
Analyzing free enterprise system through study of product and
resource markets. Supply and demand, utility, production and
cost, market structure, resource use, market failures, regulatory role of government, and real-world application of these
concepts.
Radical Marxist critique of traditional economic models and of
methodology used in developing and applying these models.
Alternatives to market system. Analysis of current economic
issues from radical’s perspective.
ECON 3150. Development Economics. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-1022, 1023)
Overview of the conceptual meaning of economic growth and
development, problems facing developing countries, economic
models underlying different development paths. Exploration of
socio-historical and economic reasons for lack of development in selected areas and policy options to promote economic
progress.
ECON 3311. Money and Banking. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-1022)
Role of financial institutions and markets, emphasis on Federal
Reserve System and its control of commercial banking system,
monetary theory and policy, and international economics.
ECON 3402. Global Economic Issues. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-LSBE cand; cannot
apply cr to econ major or minor)
Application of economic theory of marke6s to analyze major
issues shaping the future of the world economy. Emphasized
globalization of markets and the institutions involved in coordinating economic policies among world economies
ECON 3512. Managerial Economics. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-1023, 2030)
Application of economic theory to management decision making and policy formulation within the firm. Demand analysis,
production and cost analysis, price analysis, capital budgeting.
Strategic interaction of firms.
ECON 3595. Special Topics: (Various Titles to be Assigned). (1-3 cr [max 3 cr]; A-F or
Aud. Prereq-1003 or 1022, 1023 or #)
Topics announced in Class Schedule.
ECON 2030. Applied Statistics for Business and Economics. (3 cr; A-F or Aud.
Prereq-Min 30 cr; §Econ 2020, Stat 1411, Stat 2411, Stat 3611, Soc 3151, Psy 3020)
ECON 3821. Labor Economics: Theory and Issues. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-1023,
preferred but not required 3023)
Introduction to modern business statistics, emphasizing problem
solving through statistical decision making using case studies.
Topics include organization and presentation of data, summary
statistics, probability theory, distributions, statistical inference including estimation, hypothesis testing, introduction to
regression and correlation, introduction to use of computers in
statistical analysis.
Labor markets from theoretical and institutional perspectives,
including wage theories, labor supply, labor demand and employment, human capital investments, and occupational choice.
ECON 3022. Macroeconomic Analysis. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-1022, 1023, Math
1160 or Math 1296)
Determinants of national income, employment, and price levels
with particular attention to aggregate demand and aggregate
supply, and monetary and fiscal policy.
ECON 3023. Microeconomic Analysis. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-1022, 1023, Math
1160 or Math 1296)
Behavior of households as consuming units and suppliers of
resources; analysis of decision making by firms under various
market conditions.
318
ECON 3910. Economics of Health Care. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-1022, 1023, Econ
major or minor or LSBE cand)
Explores the health care sector and health policy issues from
an economic perspective. Topics to be examined include the
demand for health and medical care services, health insurance
markets, federal health insurance programs, and the pharmaceutical industry.
ECON 4040. Tools: Applications of Economic Analysis. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq3030 or Stat 5511)
Development and application of tools of economic research and
analysis; emphasis on critical thinking using computer-based
statistical methods. Econometrics (theory and practice), applied
research techniques, economic forecasting, and time series
analysis. Research report.
Education
ECON 4213. Mathematical Economics. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-1022, 1023, Math
1160 or Math 1296)
ECON 4935. Urban/Regional Economics. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-1003 or 1022,
1023, preferred but not required 3023)
Application of fundamentals of differential and integral calculus
and linear algebra to static, comparative static, and dynamic
topics in microeconomics and macroeconomics.
Allocation of unevenly distributed and imperfectly mobile
resources. Alternative theories relating to urban and regional
growth processes. Analysis of intraregional structures as contributors to growth process. Selected economic problems unique
to urban communities.
ECON 4315. Monetary Theory and Policy. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-3022)
Development of monetary theory and implications of theory for
Federal Reserve System’s control of money supply and financial
institutions, money market strategy, and monetary policy,
including goals, targets, and indicators.
ECON 4397. Half-Time Internship. (3 cr [max 6 cr]; S-N only. Prereq-Econ major,
3022, 3023, #, §4497)
ECON 4991. Independent Study. (1-6 cr [max 6 cr]; A-F or Aud. Prereq-Econ major,
12 cr of Econ 3xxx or above, #)
For students wishing to do special work in areas useful to
individual programs and objectives and not available in regular
course offerings.
Following written approval of proposal, student engages in
supervised program of half-time work experience in public
agency, private business, or other organization. Advance, concurrent, and follow-up written and oral presentations required.
20 hr per wk over 15 wk period.
Education (EDUC)
ECON 4410. International Economics . (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-1022, 1023, 3022,
3023, no Grad School cr)
EDUC 1000. Human Development. (3 cr; A-F or Aud)
Classical and modern theory of international trade. Extension,
empirical verification, and applications of modern theory.
Alternative theories of international trade. Concept and measurement of balance of payments. Methods of balance of payments adjustments. Alternative international monetary systems.
Selected current issues.
ECON 4497. Full-Time Internship. (6 cr; S-N only. Prereq-Econ major 3022, 3023,
#, §4397,)
Following written approval of proposal, student engages in supervised program of full-time work experience in public agency,
private business, or other organization. Advance, concurrent,
and follow-up written and oral presentations required. 40 hr per
wk over 15 wk period.
ECON 4570. Public Finance. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-1022, 1023)
Theory and practice of determining governmental expenditures
and revenues, including consideration of public goods, welfare
economics, raising of revenues, debt policy, and economic
stabilization.
ECON 4610. Industrial Organization. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-3023 or 3512)
Industrial structure and firm’s trade practices. Methodology
links observed market behavior with microeconomic models.
Strategic behavior of firms analyzed by integrating areas of
production, finance, and marketing. Public policies evaluated in
terms of their efficiency and equity.
Alternatives open to a free-enterprise economy when economic
goals have not been satisfactorily achieved by the private sector.
Public regulation and antitrust legislation and enforcement
examined as a means of social control when unacceptable
market failures exist.
ECON 4721. Natural Resource and Energy Economics. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq1023, preferred but not required: 3023)
Microeconomic analysis of natural resource and energy markets. Role of these resources in production processes and waste
generation, use and pricing of nonrenewable and renewable
resources over time, resource availability, sustainable development, and ecological economics.
ECON 4777. Environmental Economics. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-1023, preferred
but not required: 3023)
Patterns and theories of development from conception through
late adulthood emphasizing early childhood through adolescence; analysis of individual, family, and environmental factors
which affect development over the life span.
EDUC 1100. Human Diversity. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. LECD 08)
Cultural, physical, socially constructed, and psychological differences in people. Social, political, and economic implications
of human diversity in modern society. Practicum in community
agency.
EDUC 1101. Education in Modern Society. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. LE 7)
Survey of educational institutions and practices used in different
sectors of society. Historical and philosophical foundations of
American education.
EDUC 1201. Managing Planet Earth. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. LE 8)
Environmental education; exploration of key concepts and
principles that govern how nature works; potential solutions to
environmental and resource problems.
EDUC 3412. The Computer in Education. (1-4 cr [max 6 cr]; A-F or Aud. Prereq-Pre
educ or educ majors or cand)
Introduction to computer use in instructional settings. PC and
Mac platforms. Develops basic skills using software commonly
used by educators. Teaching strategies using computer-based
instruction.
EDUC 3416. Teaching Elementary Keyboarding and Computer Applications. (2
cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-3412 or 5412, pre-ElEd, ElEd, pre-UECh, UECh, or non-degree
cand, §5416)
Course Descriptions
ECON 4613. The Economics of Antitrust and Regulation. (3 cr; A-F or Aud.
Prereq-1023, 3023)
College of Education and Human Service
Professions
Developing the competencies and skills to provide students
in grades K-8 age-appropriate instruction that focuses on
keyboarding knowledge, application, and skills, including keyboarding terminology, techniques, ergonomics, and appropriate
fingering on computer keys, and basic computer applications,
including word processing, graphics, multimedia presentations,
and gathering information from electronic sources.
EDUC 3417. Teaching Elementary Keyboarding and Computer Applications
Practicum. (1 cr; S-N or Aud. Prereq-3416, pre ElEd, ElEd, pre UECh, UECh, §5417)
Supervised practicum in elementary schools with a specific
focus on elementary keyboard and computer applications.
Supervision conducted by University faculty in conjunction
with licensed elementary teacher or the school’s designated
elementary computer instructor.
Microeconomic analysis of environmental quality as an
economic good. Pollution control, benefit-cost analysis,
valuation methodologies and their application to air and water
quality, hazardous waste management, preservation, and global
pollutants.
319
Course Descriptions
EDUC 4226. Geometry for Teachers in Grades 5-8. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-Math
1141 or #; no Grad School cr)
The development of geometry concepts through investigations
of geometric relationships and informal properties provides the
basis for examining the teaching and learning of geometry in
grades 5-8.
Issues relating to working with and advocating for families
from diverse backgrounds and/or with diverse needs. Emphasis
on linguistically diverse families, immigrant families, families
headed by single parents, families with members with a disability, families headed by lesbian/gay parents.
EDUC 4227. Number Theory for Teachers in Grades 5-8. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. PrereqMath 1141 or #; no Grad School cr)
EDUC 5381. Teaching American Indian Students. (2 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-No
Grad School cr)
The development of number concepts and theories through
investigations and applications of discrete mathematics strategies provides the basis for examining the teaching and learning
of number theory in grades 5-8.
Survey of contemporary Indian education; evaluation of one’s
attitudes toward Indian students; direct interaction with Indian
parents and students; development of culturally sensitive teaching plans regarding Indians.
EDUC 4228. Teaching Mathematics with Technology. (3 cr; A-F only. Prereq-Math
1141 or declared secondary mathematics education major; no Grad School cr)
EDUC 5401. Creative and Intellectually Gifted Children. (2 cr; A-F or Aud. PrereqNo Grad School cr)
Using mathematics-based technology such as computer software, calculators, and Internet applets to examine the teaching
and learning of mathematics.
Identification, characteristics, and service needs of creative and
intellectually gifted children; various programs to meet needs.
EDUC 4234. Science, Technology, and Society. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-Min 30
cr, no Grad School cr)
Nontechnical study of historical and cultural impact of natural
science and technology on the earth and its inhabitants.
EDUC 4360. Teaching Methods for Ojibwe Language. (1-4 cr [max 12 cr]; A-F or
Aud. Prereq-Admitted to ElEd or pre-ElEd, no Grad School cr)
Prepares teachers to teach the Ojibwe language including:
Hands-on micro teaching; demonstration of various methods;
and a developmental and theoretical understanding of teaching
an Indigenous language.
EDUC 4381. Teaching American Indian Students. (2 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-10 cr
Educ; no Grad School cr)
Survey of contemporary Indian education; evaluation of one’s
attitudes toward Indian students; direct interaction with Indian
parents and students; development of culturally sensitive teaching plans regarding Indians.
EDUC 4500. Professional Issues in Teaching. (1 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-Admission
to the elementary education program, successful completion of courses in block one
and block two, no Grad School cr)
Issues related to professional status and activity of teachers,
historical and philosophical foundations of education, communication, job seeking skills, and current national and state
study group results.
EDUC 4650. Student Teaching in Parent Education. (1-3 cr [max 3 cr]; S-N or Aud.
Prereq-Admission to parent ed program; no Grad School cr)
Course Descriptions
EDUC 5340. Interacting With Diverse Families. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-90 cr or #)
Application of knowledge, understandings, and skills related to
working with adult learners in parent education or early childhood/family education programs.
EDUC 4991. Independent Study. (.5-3 cr [max 6 cr]; A-F or Aud. Prereq-#; no Grad
School cr)
Directed independent study, readings, and/or projects of interest
to education students.
EDUC 4993. Special Area Project. (1-4 cr [max 4 cr]; A-F or Aud. Prereq-#; no Grad
School cr)
Independent project for advanced students to substantially further their theoretical knowledge base or professional
competencies.
EDUC 5128. Urban Education. (3 cr; Stdnt Opt. Prereq-No Grad School cr)
EDUC 5412. The Computer in Education. (.5-4 cr [max 6 cr]; A-F or Aud. Prereq-No
Grad School cr)
Introduction to computer use in instructional settings. PC and
Mac platforms. Develops basic skills using software commonly
used by educators. Teaching strategies using computer-assisted
instruction.
EDUC 5413. Teaching With Technology. (4 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-3412 or 5412,
min 60 cr or grad or #)
Develops basic computer and educational technology skills
focusing on using microcomputers for communications.
EDUC 5414. Using Technology for the Administrative Tasks of Teaching. (4 cr;
A-F or Aud. Prereq-Min 60 cr or Grad; 3412 or 5412, 5413 or #)
Develops basic computer and educational technology skills
focusing on using microcomputers for administrative tasks of
teaching.
EDUC 5415. Advanced Educational Media Production. (4 cr; A-F or Aud. PrereqMin 60 cr or Grad, 3412 or 5412, 5413, 5414 or #)
Advanced multimedia design; hardware, software and peripherals including video and audio production and editing, compression software, virtual reality; development of an advanced
multimedia project for production to CD Rom or the World
Wide Web.
EDUC 5416. Teaching of Elementary Keyboarding and Computer Applications.
(2 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-3412 or 5412, pre-ElEd or ElEd or pre-UECh or UECh or
non-degree cand, §3416, no Grad School cr)
Competencies and skills to provide students in grades K-8 ageappropriate instruction that focuses on keyboarding knowledge,
application, and skills, including keyboarding terminology,
techniques, ergonomics, and appropriate fingering on computer
keys, and basic computer applications, including word processing, graphics, multimedia presentations, and gathering information from electronic sources.
EDUC 5417. Teaching Elementary Keyboarding and Computer Applications
Practicum. (1 cr; S-N or Aud. Prereq-3416 or 5416, pre ElEd, ElEd, pre UECh, UECh or
non degree cand, no Grad School cr, §3417)
Supervised practicum in elementary schools with a specific
focus on elementary keyboard and computer applications.
Supervision conducted by University faculty in conjunction
with licensed elementary teacher or the school’s designated
elementary computer instructor.
Combines on-site experience in an urban educational setting
with reading and reflection. Develops knowledge, skills, attitudes, motivation, and commitment to work individually and
collectively with poor children in urban schools.
EDUC 5560. Current Research and Issues in Science Education. (2-3 cr [max 6
cr]; A-F or Aud. Prereq-MEd student; offered summer only, #)
EDUC 5295. Special Topics: (Various Titles to be Assigned). (.5-4 cr [max 8 cr]; A-F or
Aud. Prereq-No Grad School cr)
EDUC 5570. Exemplary Models for Science Education. (2-3 cr [max 6 cr]; A-F or
Aud. Prereq-MEd student; offered summer only; #)
Current issues in Education to meet needs and interests of various groups, particularly practicing professionals.
320
Examines science education research literature. Trends in
research and teaching.
Emphasis on hands-on and/or integrated curriculum models.
Education
EDUC 5600. Practicum in Education. (1-12 cr [max 12 cr]; S-N or Aud. Prereq-#;
no Grad School cr)
EDUC 6116. Teacherline: Math in Everyday Life Grades 6-8. (1 cr; A-F or Aud.
Prereq-No Grad School cr)
Arranged opportunity for persons interested in gaining practical
experience in a nontraditional educational program under direction and supervision of faculty. Location, type of experience,
duration of experience, and assessment are determined in
consultation with faculty supervisor.
Designed to convey the most effective planning and teaching
methods for a problem-solving unit that integrates the use of
technology. Through the use of two classroom technologies--the
Internet and computer software--learners will discover ways to
provide a richly engaging and instructive learning environment.
EDUC 5650. Families in Crisis. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-Grad student or #)
EDUC 6117. Teacherline: Rational Numbers: Fractions, Decimals, and Percents
for Grades 5-8. (1 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-No Grad School cr)
Examines impact of various crises on family members. Analysis
of coping strategies, reorganization of family roles, and survey
of community resources for assistance in crisis situations.
Designed to increase the range and depth of teaching strategies
and assessment formats for rational numbers.
EDUC 5850. Classroom Learning Applications. (2 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-Admission
to MEd or #)
EDUC 6118. Teacherline: Count on it: Number Sense for Grades K-5. (1 cr; A-F or
Aud. Prereq-No Grad School cr)
Cognitive processes in education in preparation for developing
curriculum and teaching. Emphasis on application of brainbased learning theory to development of knowledge systems in
education.
Designed for participants to better understand number sense,
with emphasis on additional ways to assess student number
sense development.
EDUC 5991. Independent Study. (.5-4 cr [max 8 cr]; A-F or Aud. Prereq-#; no Grad
School cr)
Directed independent study, readings, and/or projects of interest
to students in education.
EDUC 5993. Special Area Project. (.5-4 cr [max 14 cr]; A-F or Aud. Prereq-No Grad
School cr)
Independent project for advanced students to substantially further their theoretical knowledge base or professional
competencies.
EDUC 5995. Special Topics: (Various Titles to be assigned). (.5-4 cr [max 16 cr]; A-F
or Aud. Prereq-No Grad School cr)
Topics selected from education to meet needs and interests of
different groups of students.
EDUC 6111. Teacherline: Searching and Researching on the Internet. (1 cr; A-F
or Aud. Prereq-No Grad School cr)
EDUC 6119. Teacherline: Teaching for Multiple Intelligences K-12. (1 cr; A-F or
Aud. Prereq-No Grad School cr)
Detailed study of the theory of multiple intelligences; practical
application in a variety of subject disciplines.
EDUC 6120. Teacherline: Children’s Authors on the Web: Online Sites that
Motivate Students to Write (K-6). (1 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-No Grad School cr)
Exploration of an “Author Study,” location of resources, and
inclusion in the curriculum.
EDUC 6121. Teacherline-Putting Technology to Use in the Classroom: Where to
Start. (1 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-No Grad School cr)
Designed for K-12 technology novices, focuses on understanding NETS standards, using a course bulletin board, and devising
a plan to integrate technology into a K-12 lesson plan.
EDUC 6122. Teacherline-Building Critical Thinking Skills for Online Research
K-12. (1 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-No Grad School cr)
Focuses on learning pre-K through grade- 12 strategies and
tools to build students’ critical thinking skills and help them
attain information literacy. Based on ISTE, NCTM, and NCSS
national standards, explore information search process models
and create an Internet-based lesson.
EDUC 6112. Teacherline: Evaluating and Organizing Internet Resources and
Content. (1 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-No Grad School cr)
EDUC 6123. Teacherline-Creating Units to Support Different Learning Styles
K-12. (1 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-No Grad School cr)
How to evaluate different types of material on the Internet and
how to judge if it is appropriate for classroom use. Explore
social and ethical issues that arise when students use material
from the Internet. Critically evaluate the content of Web sites.
Focuses on developing a K-12 technology-enhanced curriculum
that meets the learning needs of a wide range of students.
Design a thematic unit with technology-based adaptations to
facilitate learning for all students.
EDUC 6113. Teacherline: The Online Learning Environment. (1 cr; A-F or Aud.
Prereq-No Grad School cr)
EDUC 6124. Teacherline-Enabling Students with Special Needs to Succeed in
Math for Grades 4-8. (1 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-No Grad School cr)
Introduction to basic concepts of using the Internet in the classroom. Review of critical perspectives about use of technology
in the classroom.
Techniques for providing equity in mathematics education
for students with disabilities. Learn how to adapt curricula,
use instructional accessibility strategies, and collaborate with
special needs teachers to help students succeed. Develop a plan
to incorporate accessibility strategies into teaching.
EDUC 6114. Teacherline: Teaching with WebQuests. (1 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-No
Grad School credit)
Introduction to WebQuest and how to use it to locate quality
information on the Internet. Use of WebQuests for meaningful
engagement of students in research in an elementary or secondary classroom.
EDUC 6115. Teacherline: Math in Everyday Life Grades K-5. (1 cr; A-F or Aud.
Prereq-No Grad School cr)
Designed to help elementary school teachers effectively
incorporate real world problem solving into their teaching.
Exploration of ways that real life activities can help teach problem solving skills to students through the use of two classroom
technologies--the Internet and calculators.
Course Descriptions
Introduction to methods and concepts related to searching the
Internet for useful information; explore and compare search
engines and learn effective and efficient use; explore ethical
issues surrounding use of these tools in the classroom.
EDUC 6125. Teacherline-Teaching Reading in Mathematics for Grades 3-12. (1
cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-No Grad School cr)
Examines strategies for teaching reading in mathematics, as
well as elements of reading and the premises that guide reading
in mathematics. Create learning environments that promote
effective reading and learning in mathematics resulting in more
effective readers and independent learners.
EDUC 6126. Teacherline-Proportional Reasoning for Grades 6-8. (1 cr; A-F or
Aud. Prereq-No Grad School cr)
NCTM Principles and Standards for School Mathematics
(PSSM 2000) described mathematics of proportional reasoning
and expectations for middle school students. Use rich mathematical problems to draw on a variety of different mathematics
topics and relate them to a common idea.
321
Course Descriptions
EDUC 6127. Teacherline-Number and Operation Sense in Grades 3-5. (1 cr; A-F
or Aud. Prereq-No Grad School cr)
EDUC 7009. Assessment of Learning. (3 cr [max 12 cr]; A-F or Aud. Prereq-MEd
candidate, no Grad School credit)
Focuses on how to consolidate and extend students’ knowledge
of addition and subtraction, develop understanding of multiplication and division, and build solid foundations for efficiently
and flexibly computing with all four operations. Integrate
technology into the study of number and operation sense while
meeting national mathematics education standards.
Focuses on the design and application of appropriate learning
assessment strategies that consider the pedagogical intent, state,
federal, and subject standards, and the diversity for all learners.
Teaching theory and practice will be viewed in the context of
learning assessment.
EDUC 7001. Introduction to Graduate Study. (2 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-MEd
candidate or #; no Grad School cr)
Develop writing skill needed to prepare research article, grant
proposal, or other material for publication.
Expectations of graduate study, scholarly writing and online
learning. Develop skills in using the Internet for scholarly research and writing, culminating in writing of a literature review.
EDUC 7002. Human Diversity and Exceptionality. (2 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-MEd
candidiate or #, no Grad School cr)
Stresses the importance of diversity and exceptionality in
educational settings, and its relevance to teaching and learning
strategies, assessment, and professional community building.
The concepts of privilege and power will be explored from the
standpoint of the educator and his/her role in the educational
setting.
EDUC 7003. Families and Social Service Systems. (1-4 cr [max 12 cr]; A-F or Aud.
Prereq-MEd candidate or #, no Grad School credit)
Explore diverse family systems, understand complexities of
bilingual, single parent, lower/upper SES, transient, families
with disabled/terminally ill members. Social services/special
programs available to at-promise students, staff and families in
crisis/need. Demonstrate parent involvement/mentoring/referral
strategies.
EDUC 7004. Research Methods in Education. (4 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-MEd
candidate or #; no Grad School credit)
Prepares students to design and conduct a scholarly research
project. Practical application of the range of methods employed
in educational research is guided by the principle, goodness of
fit. Ethical issues in research with human subjects will include
preparation of an IRB application.
EDUC 7005. Teaching and Learning in a Systems Context. (3 cr; A-F or Aud.
Prereq-MEd candidate or #; no Grad School credit)
Course Descriptions
Concentrates on teaching and learning from a systems and community context. Systems theory will be addressed as it applies
to educational systems, as well as teaching applications that
cross traditional classroom boundaries.
EDUC 7006. Ethics and Professionalism in Education. (2 cr; A-F or Aud. PrereqMEd candidate or #; no Grad School credit)
Offers a synthesis of previous courses, reviewed from the
context of ethics and ethical dilemmas that touch on diversity,
systems change, educators’ roles, professional competencies,
and leadership roles.
EDUC 7007. Leadership, Change and Collaboration. (2 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-MEd
or #; no Grad School credit)
Focuses on change theory as it relates to systems issues and
educational reform. Professional collaboration will be emphasized, as well as the dynamics inherent in the change process.
EDUC 7008. Foundations of Teaching and Learning: Curriculum Theory and
Design. (4 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-MEd student or #; no Grad School credit)
Broad-based foundational course designed to study advanced
learning theory and curriculum design, and develop skills in
critical analysis of teaching application and student outcomes.
Focuses on the importance of working in the context of a
professional community.
322
EDUC 7020. Writing for Publication. (1 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-No Grad School credit)
EDUC 7030. World Indigenous Language Revitalization. (4 cr; A-F only. Prereq7008, no Grad School cr)
Survey course on world language revitalization, special emphasis on indigenous languages. Includes basic introduction to
language acquisition, readings from Hawaii, New Zealand, and
indigenous nations within the US; principles of endangered language revitalization, context specific circumstances of several
indigenous languages.
EDUC 7032. Instructional Materials Design for Indigenous Language Revitalization. (3 cr; A-F only. Prereq-7030, no Grad School cr)
Curriculum development and materials design for indigenous
language revitalization. Builds on students’ prior knowledge of
planning and on proficiency in a language other than English.
Includes design of curriculum and materials, such as creation of
books, audio and video production with Elders and native communities, strategic design of materials as related to language
and content objectives.
EDUC 7033. Integrated Curriculum: History, Theory, Rationale, and Models of
Implementation. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-No Graduate School credit)
Overview of the history, theory, rationale, and models for the
implementation of integrated curriculum in the classroom.
EDUC 7034. Content Reading Strategies. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-No Grad School
credit)
Effective strategies in teaching reading to secondary students.
Foci include examination of how students learn to read, analysis
of specific strategies and materials used to teach reading, and
facilitating reading strategies across content areas.
EDUC 7035. Inquiry-based Science Teaching. (4 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-Target
audience is elementary teachers, no Grad School credit)
Develops appropriate instructional skills and strategies for
inquiry-based science teaching, learn and apply recommended
methods for inquiry-based science instruction and reflect upon
their personal development and abilities to integrate science
education and inquiry.
EDUC 7040. Principles of Adult Education. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-No Grad
School credit)
Philosophy and application of adult education principles.
EDUC 7099. Portfolio: Reflective Practice with National Board for Professional
Teaching Standards. (1-6 cr [max 6 cr]; S-N only. Prereq-o, no Grad School cr)
Field research for students sitting for candidacy for National
Board certification or for MEd students choosing the portfolio
option.
EDUC 7444. Principles of Program Evaluation in Educational Settings. (3 cr;
A-F or Aud. Prereq-Acceptance to Master’s of Special Education program; no Grad
School cr)
Models, theories, and philosophies of program evaluation in
education settings; evaluation of general and special education
curriculum; specific strategies for family and professional
involvement in educational planning, implementation, and
evaluation.
Secondary Education
EDUC 8001. Historical, Social, and Philosophical Foundations of Education. (3
cr; A-F only. Prereq-Ed.D. majors or #)
Survey of the historical, social, and philosophical issues in education, in order to prepare and build a foundation for doctoral
level students in education.
EDUC 8003. Educational Policy. (3 cr; A-F only. Prereq-Ed.D. majors or # [Students
enrolled in other Graduate School or collegiate graduate programs])
Modes of educational policy analysis; assessment of educational
policy in its political, cultural, and economic contexts; and
techniques for effective communication about education policy.
EDUC 8005. Curriculum: Theory into Practice. (3 cr; A-F only. Prereq-Ed.D. majors
or #)
Education and Human Service
Professions (EHS)
College of Education and Human Service
Professions
EHS 799. CEHSP Masters Active Status. (0 cr; No grade. Prereq-MEd or MSpEd
students only)
Maintains continuous enrollment for collegiate masters students
who have finished required coursework and are finishing the
final product. Does NOT include eligibility (athletic, defer
loans, etc).
Overview of curriculum mapping, methods for analysis of
scope and sequence and articulation, current curriculum theory,
standards, and curriculum audit strategies, purposes and
responsibilities.
EHS 5595. Special Topics: (Various Titles to be Assigned). (.5-4 cr [max 16 cr]; A-F or
Aud. Prereq-Course in human dev or ed psy or multicultural ed or spec ed, grad student
or #; no Grad School cr)
EDUC 8007. Research on Knowledge and Learning in Education. (3 cr; A-F only.
Prereq-Ed.D. majors or #)
EHS 5713. American Indian Culture and Tradition: Oral Tradition and History. (2
cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-No Grad School cr)
An exploration of theoretical definitions of knowledge and a
review of research on the processes of learning.
EDUC 8009. Distance Education: From Theory to Practice. (3 cr; A-F only.
Prereq-Ed.D. majors or #)
Theoretical framework, historical development and practical
applications of different models of distance education. Topics:
theory and perspectives, adult education principles, course design, teaching strategies, assessment, and current and emerging
technologies applied to distance education.
EDUC 8015. Research Design. (3 cr; A-F only. Prereq-Psy 5052 or equiv, Ed.D.
majors or #)
An overview of research designs that span qualitative, quantitative, and mixed methods. The learners will critically examine
and select the appropriate research methodology based on a specific question, hypothesis, or problem statement; and interpret
and evaluate various research studies.
EDUC 8016. Theory and Practice of Qualitative Research Methods. (3 cr; A-F
only. Prereq-8015 or equivalent, Ed.D. majors or #)
Qualitative research traditions and methods, and practice
with the skills and attitudes necessary to successfully conduct
qualitative research.
EDUC 8017. Theory and Practice of Quantitative Research Methods. (3 cr; A-F
only. Prereq-8015 or equivalent, Ed.D. majors or #)
EDUC 8020. Doctoral Seminar. (1 cr [max 6 cr]; S-N only. Prereq-Ed.D. majors)
Review of current research around best practices, or focused
strategies for progression with the program or the dissertation.
EDUC 8021. Theories, Principles, and Methodology of Assessment in Organizational Systems. (3 cr; A-F only. Prereq-Ed.D. majors)
Designed to provide an understanding of assessment methods
in organizational systems. Examines current practice and theory
regarding the use of assessment as feedback to improve system
processes.
EDUC 8444. FTE: Doctoral. (1 cr; No grade. Prereq-Doctoral student, adviser and
DGS consent)
EDUC 8666. Doctoral Pre-Thesis Credits. (1-6 cr [max 12 cr]; No grade. PrereqMax 6 cr per semester or summer; doctoral student who has not passed prelim oral;
no required consent for the first two registrations up to 12 cr; departmental consent for
the third and fourth registrations up to an additional 12 cr, or 24 cr total (for doctoral
students admitted summer 2007 and beyond; doctoral students admitted prior to
summer 2007 may register up to 4 times totaling 60 cr))
Explores historical and current methods and issues in oral
tradition and education with emphasis on Woodlands and Plains
Indians.
EHS 5990. Research Project. (1-12 cr [max 12 cr]; S-N only. Prereq-No Grad School
credit)
Faculty-supervised research project required for MEd
Education, Secondary (EDSE)
College of Education and Human Service
Professions
EDSE 3204. General Instructional Methods. (4 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-Admission
to EdSe program)
Effective teaching, teaching for diversity, teaching through
multiple intelligences, Minnesota graduation rules, writing
objectives and lesson plans, using instructional media and
technology, various teaching strategies, methods of assessing
student learning, classroom management.
EDSE 3205. Apprenticeship: Middle School. (2 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-Admission to
EdSe program, concurrent registration is required (or allowed) for 3204)
Fifty hours of experience in a middle school, including observing, teaching, tutoring, working with individual students and
small groups.Focuses on classroom management, multicultural
education, and students with special needs. Weekly seminar.
EDSE 3206. Apprenticeship: Secondary School. (2 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-Admission to EdSe program, [P]3204)
Course Descriptions
In-depth focus on quantitative research methods. Issues related
to data collection methods and analysis using computer software packages.
Topics announced in [Class Schedule].
Fifty hours of experience in a high school, including
observing,teaching, tutoring, working with individual students
and small groups.Focuses on classroom management, multicultural education, and students withspecial needs. Weekly
seminar.
EDSE 4100. Human Relations in Classrooms. (2 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-Admission
to EdSe program)
Examination of cultural differences; planning instruction to
accommodate individual differences in race, gender, ethnic
background, cultural background, and physical and mental
development; needs of persons with disabilities; humanizing
classroom and classroom management procedures.
EDSE 4120. Philosophy and Organization of the Middle School. (2 cr; A-F or Aud.
Prereq-Secondary majors admitted to teacher education or pre-elementary education
majors, 45 cr, §5120)
Philosophies and organization and structure of middle schools.
Assessment of benefits, drawbacks, and rationale.
EDUC 8888. Thesis Credit: Doctoral. (1-24 cr [max 100 cr]; No grade. Prereq-Max
18 cr per semester or summer; 24 cr required)
323
Course Descriptions
EDSE 4212. Literature for Adolescents. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-Teaching comm
arts/lit major, minor or pre students or elem-middle educ comart/lit specialization,
§5215)
Extensive reading in literature written for adolescents; analysis
of studies of adolescent choices in literature; principles of selection; critical reading in broad fields of literary, biographical,
historical, scientific interests of both genders; pedagogy and
critical theory appropriate for adolescent study of literature.
EDSE 4214. Reading in the Middle and Secondary School, Grades 5-12. (2 cr;
A-F or Aud. Prereq-§5215)
Teaching procedures, objectives, and materials: emphasis on
teaching reading according to research and theory; analysis of
reading difficulties; connected practicum.
EDSE 4215. Teaching Reading and Literature: Grades 5-12. (5 cr; A-F or Aud.
Prereq-§4212 or 4214 or 5215; major, minor or pre teaching comm arts/lit students)
Teaching procedures, objectives, and materials; emphasis on
teaching of reading in various subject-matter fields, practicum
experience.
EDSE 4222. Teaching Mathematics: Grades 5-12. (4 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-Admission to EdSe program, 3204 or #; no Grad School credit)
Standards for secondary mathematics as they apply to learning,
teaching, curriculum, and integration of technologies in mathematics grades 5-12; emphasis on use of problematic approach
to mathematical sense-making.
EDSE 4244. Teaching Social Studies: Grades 5-12. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. PrereqAdmission to EdSe program, 3204 or #; no Grad School credit)
History and philosophy of social studies education; social studies objectives; curriculum design; instructional planning and use
of resources; evaluation procedures.
EDSE 4255. Teaching Science: Grades 5-12. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-Admission to
EdSe program, 3204 or #; no Grad School credit)
Historical development of science education. Goals and purposes of science education in secondary schools; methods and
materials; evaluation procedures; current trends.
EDSE 4400. Professional Development Seminar for Secondary Education
Majors. (1 cr [max 3 cr]; A-F or Aud. Prereq-Acceptance into EdSe program; no Grad
School credit)
Professional development for Secondary Education majors
through documentation, reflection, synthesis of learning as related to standards. Development of process and product portfolios.
Presentation of and dialogue about emergent learning.
Course Descriptions
EDSE 4501. Educational Psychology. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-Admission to EdSe
program; no Grad School cr)
Educational Administration
(EDAD)
College of Education and Human Service
Professions
EDAD 5911. Leadership and Personal Growth. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-EdAd lic
program or collegiate grad program admission or #, no Grad School cr)
An overview of leadership from a theoretical perspective.
Learners will begin to see the role and styles of leadership in
relationship to the culture of schools and communities.
EDAD 5912. Supervision of Teachers and School Staff. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. PrereqEdAd lic program or collegiate grad program admission or #; no Grad School cr)
Philosophy behind supervision of teachers, principals and skills
needed to accomplish this task. Practitioners approach.
EDAD 5913. Communication and Community Relations . (3 cr; A-F or Aud. PrereqEdAd lic program or collegiate program admission or #; no Grad School cr)
Schools as political systems; relationships between public
perception and education’s reality; public and media relations;
definitions of community.
EDAD 5914. Creation/Implementation and Interpretation of Rules and Regulations. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-EdAd lic program or collegiate graduate program
admission #; no Grad School cr)
Provide basis for decision-making and school governance based
in current federal and state law and mandates.
EDAD 5915. Resource Management and Scheduling in Education. (3 cr; A-F
or Aud. Prereq-EdAd lic program or collegiate graduate program admission or #; no
Grad School cr)
Focus on skills, knowledge and dispositions that enable administrators to plan and schedule work in ways that ensure that
resources are used appropriately and goals are met.
EDAD 5916. Curriculum and Instruction and Assessment. (3 cr; A-F or Aud.
Prereq-EdAd lic program or collegiate graduate program admission or #; no Grad
School cr)
An overview of standards-based, culturally aware, curriculum
design. Both traditional and backwards design frameworks
presented. Elements of assessment and concepts of planned staff
development. Current trends and curriculum theory introduced
and analyzed.
EDAD 5917. Technology Seminar. (1 cr [max 10 cr]; S-N or Aud. Prereq-No Grad
School cr)
EDSE 4600. Student Teaching. (6-12 cr [max 12 cr]; S-N or Aud. Prereq-4100,
4501, appropriate methods course; no Grad School cr)
Showcases school management systems and innovation in
technology. Keynote speakers, panel discussions, demonstrations and workshop sessions on a variety of technology topics,
such as data management systems for schools, assessment data,
security issues, staff development plans, evaluating school
technology software and equipment.
Supervised practicum in secondary or middle school under
direction of licensed teacher. Demonstration of subject matter,
teaching competence, and potential for future improvement.
EDAD 5918. Continuous Improvement Processes for Schools. (3 cr; Stdnt Opt.
Prereq-EdAd lic program or collegiate graduate program admission or #, no Grad
School cr)
EDSE 4993. Special Area Project. (1-4 cr [max 4 cr]; A-F or Aud. Prereq-#; no Grad
School credit)
Independent project for advanced students to substantially further their theoretical knowledge base or professional
competencies.
Effective site-based, data-driven continuous improvement
spirals based on successful models exhibiting best practice in
schools. Examine change literature, stages of adult development, strategic planning, accreditation process, state and federal
accountability, AYP, and the improvement cycles.
EDSE 5495. Special Topics: (Various Titles to be Assigned). (.5-4 cr [max 8 cr]; A-F or
Aud. Prereq-no Grad School credit)
EDAD 5919. The Superintendency. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-EdAd lic program or
collegiate graduate program admission or #, no Grad School cr)
Principles of psychology applied to teaching; examination of
adolescent growth and development; classroom management.
Current issues in secondary education to meet needs and interests of various groups, particularly practicing professionals.
324
Examine the level of decision making that differentiates district
administration and identify the categories of responsibility
unique to the superintendent. Gain practice in media relations
at a district level and examine models of effective practices in
school board leadership.
Electrical and Computer Engineering
EDAD 5920. Student Discipline and Behavior Management. (3 cr; A-F or Aud.
Prereq-EdAd lic program or collegiate graduate program admission or #, no Grad
School cr)
Theories of behavior management; effectiveness of discipline
approaches through lenses of development, culture, leadership
styles and climate, gain experience in creating building and
district level discipline policy.
EDAD 5996. Professional Competency Assessment: Director of Special
Education. (1 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-EdAd lic program or collegiate graduate program
admission or #, no Grad School cr)
Design and complete an electronic repository with evidence and
reflection demonstrating proficiency in each of the components
and subcomponents required for certificate approval. Prepare for
final panel presentations by engaging in situational components
and creating final presentation formats.
EDAD 5997. Professional Competency Assessment:Principals. (1 cr; A-F or
Aud. Prereq-EdAd lic program or collegiate graduate program admission or #; no Grad
School cr)
Design and complete an electronic repository with evidence and
reflection demonstrating proficiency in each of the components
and subcomponents required for certificate approval. Prepare for
final panel presentations by engaging in situational components
and creating final presentation formats.
EDAD 5998. Professional Competency Assessment: Superintendents. (1 cr; A-F
or Aud. Prereq-EdAd Lic program ro collegiate graduate program admission or #, no
Grad School cr)
Electrical and Computer
Engineering (ECE)
College of Science and Engineering
ECE 1001. Introduction to Electrical and Computer Engineering. (2 cr; A-F or
Aud. Prereq-Pre-Engr, ChE, CS, ECE, IE majors only)
Definition and description of electrical and computer engineering. Digital and analog systems. Electrical and computer
engineering lab equipment and software. Selected specialties.
(2 hrs lect)
ECE 1315. Digital System Design. (4 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-Pre-Engr, ChE, CS, ECE,
IE majors only)
Binary number system and digital coding techniques. Boolean
algebra, combinational logic circuits, and minimization
techniques. Synchronous sequential circuits and state reduction
techniques. Medium Scale Integration (MSI) combinational
components.
ECE 2006. Electrical Circuit Analysis. (4 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-Phys 2011, [P]Math
3280)
Basic circuit analysis: resistive circuits, voltage and current
sources--independent and dependent. Nodal and mesh analysis.
Network theorems. Energy storage elements. RC, RL, and RLC
transient and steady state analysis, phasors. SPICE analysis. (3
hrs lect, 3 hrs lab)
Design and complete an electronic repository with evidence and
reflection demonstrating proficiency in each of the components
and subcomponents required for certificate approval. Prepare for
final panel presentations by engaging in situational components
and creating final presentation formats.
ECE 2111. Linear Systems and Signal Analysis. (4 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-2006)
EDAD 6996. Internship: Directors of Special Education. (4 cr; A-F or Aud. PrereqEdAd lic program or collegiate graduate program admission or #; no Grad School cr)
ECE 2212. Electronics I. (4 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-2006)
Places the candidate for licensure in the schools, working
with a practicing, licensed Director of Special Education for a
minimum of 200 hours.
EDAD 6997. Internship: Principals. (6 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-EdAd lic program or
collegiate graduate program or #, no Grad School cr)
To place the candidate for licensure in the schools, working
with a practicing, licensed principal for a minimum of 320 total
hours.
EDAD 6998. Internship: Superintendents. (6 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-EdAd lic
program or collegiate graduate program admission or #; no Grad School cr)
EDAD 6999. Internship: Principals Additional Field. (4 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-EdAd
lic program or collegiate graduate program admission or #; no Grad School cr)
Places candidates for additional licensure in the schools, working with a practicing, licensed principal for a minimum of 200
total hours.
Diodes, BJTs, FETs, ideal operational amplifiers, DC analysis,
small signal models, and analysis; single-stage circuits design;
power amplifiers. (3 hrs lect, 3 hrs lab)
ECE 2325. Microcomputer System Design. (4 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-1315)
Microcomputer components. Instruction set, machine and assembly languageprogramming. Addressing modes. Signed/unsigned arithmetic. Stack uses. Assembly-level translation of
high-level language constructions.Input/Output interfacing.
Interrupt programming. Microcomputer systemhardware. (3 hrs
lect, 3 hrs lab)
ECE 3151. Control Systems. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-2111)
System mathematical modeling: differential equations, Laplace
transform, block diagrams, signal flow graphs. System performance characteristics: time response, sensitivity, steady-state
error. Stability analysis: Routh-Hurwitz, root locus and Nyquist.
State variables. Compensation design, software tools.(3 hrs lect)
ECE 3235. Electronics II. (4 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-2212)
Multistage circuits, frequency analysis, non-ideal operational
amplifiers, feedback and stability, oscillators, filters. (3 hrs lect,
3 hrs lab)
ECE 3341. Digital Computer Circuits. (4 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-2325)
Digital logic family characteristics. Medium Scale Integration
(MSI) components and applications. Programmable Logic
Devices (PLDs). Alternative clocking techniques. Computer
arithmetic circuits and memory design. Fundamental mode
asynchronous finite-state machine design. (3 hrs lect, 3 hrs lab)
ECE 3445. Electromagnetic Fields. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-Math 3280, 3298,
Phys 2011, 2012)
Fundamentals of electromagnetic analysis. Electrostatic and
magnetostatic fields. Introductory numerical analysis of electromagnetic fields. Time-varying fields and potentials. Maxwell’s
equations and their applications.(3 hrs lect)
325
Course Descriptions
Places the candidate for licensure in the schools, working with
a practicing, licensed superintendent for a minimum of 320
total hours.
Signal and system modeling concepts, system analysis in time
domain, Fourier series and Fourier transform. Discrete time
domain signals and systems, Z transform, applications. (3 hrs
lect, 3 hrs lab)
Course Descriptions
ECE 3611. Introduction to Solid-State Semiconductors. (3 cr; A-F or Aud.
Prereq-Phys 2012)
ECE 5315. Multiprocessor-Based System Design. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-3341;
§4315)
Fundamentals of solid-state semiconductors and devices.
Quantum mechanical concepts and atomic states, solid-state
structure, band structure, semiconductor statistics, and transport.
(3 hrs lect)
Parallelism, interconnection networks, shared memory architecture, principles of scalable performance, vector computers,
multiprocessors, multicomputers, dataflow architectures, and
supercomputers.
ECE 4305. Computer Architecture. (4 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-3341)
ECE 5351. Introduction to Robotics and Mobile Robot Control Architectures. (3
cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-3151, CS 1521, no Grad School credit)
Advanced assembly language programming techniques.
Memory design principles. Virtual memory. Cache memory.
Processor design. Pipelined and Reduced Instruction Set
Computers (RISC). Advanced microprocessor features. (3 hrs
lect, 3 hrs lab)
ECE 4311. Design of Very Large-Scale Integrated Circuits. (3 cr; A-F or Aud.
Prereq-3235, 3341 or #)
Philosophy of and techniques for designing VLSI circuits in
CMOS technology. Full- and semi-custom design techniques.
Digital, analog, and hybrid CMOS circuits and systems.
Substantial design project required. (3 hrs lect)
ECE 4321. Computer Networks. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-3341, Stat 3611)
Network classification and services. Protocol and communication architectures. Hardware components: multiplexers, concentrators, bridges, routers, access servers. (3 hrs lect)
ECE 4501. Power Systems. (4 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-2006; no Grad School credit)
Fundamentals of rotating machines: DC, synchronous, and
induction machines. Transformers. Power system representation. Transmission lines. Power system analysis: stability and
dynamic performance. Balanced and unbalanced faults. Power
system protection. (3 hrs lect, 3 hrs lab)
ECE 4781. Telecommunications. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-3445; no Grad School
credit)
Switching theory, transmission, networking, traffic engineering,
and associated engineering problems and solutions.
ECE 4899. Senior Design Project I. (1 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-3341, BSECE cand,
§4951 #; no Grad School credit)
Selection and completion of team project approved and supervised by faculty. See also ECE 4999.
ECE 4951. ECE Design Workshop. (4 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-Comp 3130, BSECE
cand, 100 cr or #; §4899 or 4999; no Grad School cr)
Course Descriptions
Study of a selected topic; its application to a design project,
completed individually or in a small group. Focuses on a
different method each semester offered. Completion satisfies
requirement for a senior design project.
ECE 4991. Independent Study. (1-3 cr [max 3 cr]; A-F or Aud. Prereq-#; does not
qualify as ECE technical elective; no Grad School cr)
Special projects not available in regular curriculum.
Independent investigation, research studies, or survey of
selected projects or problems.
ECE 4999. Senior Design Project II. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-#; §4951, 4899,
BSECE cand; no Grad School credit)
Students present senior design project results in formal written
and oral reports after making refinements. Complete documentation of results in professional manner required. Results must
be presented in an oral report with other senior project team
members. ECE 4899 and ECE 4999 must be completed within
one year for credit.
ECE 5151. Digital Control System Design. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-3151, 3341,
§4151)
Digital control system characteristics: transient and steady-state
responses, frequency response, stability. Digital control system
design using transform techniques. Controllability and observability. Design of digital control systems using state-space
methods: pole placement and observer design, multivariable
optimal control. Implementation issues in digital control
326
Basic concepts and tools for the analysis, design, and control
of robotic mechanisms. Topics include basic robot architecture
and applications to dynamical systems, mobile mechanisms,
kinematics, inverse kinematics, trajectory and motion planning,
mobile roots, collision avoidance, and control architectures.
ECE 5477. Antennas and Transmission Lines. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-3445,
§4477)
Concepts and theory of antennas and transmission lines; emphasis on design and applications. Topics: nonlinear source and
loads, cross talk, interconnecting circuits, line characteristics,
radiation, measurements. EM propagation, scattering and antenna design techniques. Numerical analysis of wire, aperture,
reflector antennas; diffraction theory.
ECE 5741. Digital Signal Processing. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-2111, §4741)
Discrete linear shift-invariant systems,z- & Fourier transform,
sampling, discrete-time processing of signals, reconstruction of
analog signals, filters and filter structures in direct, parallel, and
cascaded forms, FIR & IIR digital filter design, implulse-invariant, bilinear transform & window functions, FFT, introduction
to image processing.
ECE 5765. Modern Communication. (4 cr; Stdnt Opt. Prereq-2111, 3235; §4765)
Design and analysis of modern communication systems; evaluation of analog and digital modulation techniques. (3 hrs lect,
3 hrs lab)
ECE 5801. Introduction to Artificial Neural Networks. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-CS
1521, Math 3280, Stat 3611 or #, §4801)
General techniques and theory of neural networks, their applications and limitations. The course particularly addresses
the design issues and learning algorithms for diverse areas of
applications.
ECE 5813. Tools and Methods of Design Automation. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq3341, §4813)
Methods and techniques for designing electronic systems
based on top-down strategy. Emphasis on high-level synthesis
techniques and tools. Automated design of large, electronic
systems. Design project using electronic design automation
tools available in the ECE department.
ECE 5831. Fuzzy Set Theory and Its Application. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-CS
1521, Math 3280, §4831)
Fuzzy sets and operations on fuzzy sets. Fuzzy relations and
the extension principle. Linguistic variable and fuzzy IF-THEN
rules. Fuzzy arithmetic. Fuzzy logic and approximate reasoning.
Design of Fuzzy Systems from I/O data. Fuzzy logic--based
control. Pattern Classifications.
ECE 5995. Special Topics: (Various Titles to be Assigned). (1-3 cr [max 3 cr]; A-F or
Aud. Prereq-#)
Current problems and research. Discussions, selected reading,
and/or invited speakers.
ECE 8151. Linear Systems and Optimal Control. (3 cr; A-F only. Prereq-3151)
State-space representations of dynamic systems. Input-output
stability. Lyapunov stability. Controllability and observability.
Minimal realizations. State and output feedback. Pole placement design. State observers. Linear quadratic optimal control:
fixed and free end point, finite and infinite horizon. Pontryagin’s
Minimal Principle. Dynamic programming.
Elementary Education
ECE 8315. Embedded Systems and Microcomputer Interfaces Design. (4 cr; A-F
or Aud. Prereq-2325, 3341, CS 1511, CS 2521)
Introduces students to the design of advanced embedded and
microprocessor based system, and microcomputer interfaces,
with an emphasis on embedded systems hardware and software
design relevant to talking with computer hardware.
ECE 8333. FTE: Master’s. (1 cr; No grade. Prereq-Master’s student, advisor and DGS
consent)
ECE 8611. Semiconductor Device Design, Fabrication, and Analysis. (3 cr; A-F or
Aud. Prereq-3611 or Phys 4021 and Math 3280)
Provides an in-depth treatment of the design, fabrication, and
analysis of semiconductor devices including: Silicon bipolar
transistors, Si MOS transistors, Integrated Circuits, III-V photonic devices, and Micro-Electro-Mechanical systems (MEMs).
ECE 8741. Digital Image Processing. (4 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-4741)
Mathematical foundations and practical techniques to process
and manipulate images. Students will acquire the ability to analyze two-dimensional images, dealing with mathematical representation of images, image sampling and quantization, Image
Transforms, Image Enhancement, Image Restoration, Image
Coding, Edge Detection, Texture Analysis, and Compression.
ECE 8765. Digital Communications. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-4765)
Overview of digital data transmission, performance analysis of
digital modulation, quadrature multiplexed signaling schemes,
signal-space methods in digital data transmission, information
theory and block coding, convolutional coding, repeat-request
system, spread-spectrum systems, satellite communications.
ECE 8777. Thesis Credits: Master’s. (1-18 cr [max 50 cr]; No grade. Prereq-Max 18
cr per semester or summer; 10 cr total required (Plan A only))
ECE 8831. Soft Computing. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-Knowledge of linear algebra and
computer programming)
Fuzzy set theory, neural networks, genetic algorithms, data clustering techniques, and several stochastic optimization methods
that do not require gradient information which is aimed at solving real world decision-making, modeling, and control problem.
Elementary Education (ELED)
College of Education and Human Service
Professions
ELED 1010. Introduction to Elementary Education. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-Pre
elementary education student)
ELED 3113. Learning Environments and Diverse Learning Communities. (3 cr;
A-F or Aud. Prereq-Admission to the elementary education program)
Teaching and learning models as a basis for structuring diverse
learning environments for children. Curriculum, classroom
management, and instructional strategies. Sociocultural and
historical backgrounds, issues, and unique learner needs of
students.
ELED 3325. Language and Literacy. (4 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-Concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in the following: 3113, 3331, 3355, 4400, SpEd 3310,
admission to the elementary education program)
Development and instruction in children’s literature-based reading, writing, and oral language in elementary schools. Methods,
materials, and research findings related to teaching of integrated
language arts.
Purposes of reading; bases for selecting and evaluating reading
materials; integrated creative arts: literature, music, drama, and
visual arts for elementary classrooms, including those with
special needs students.
ELED 3355. Critical Thinking: Elementary Mathematics. (4 cr; A-F or Aud.
Prereq-Successful completion of block one, concurrent registration is required (or
allowed) in the following: 4344,4345,4366, SpEd 5310, admission to elementary
education program)
Concepts learned through discovery, induction, critical reasoning, problem solving. Standards for elementary mathematics,
use of a problematic approach to mathematical sense making.
ELED 3381. Teaching American Indian Students in the Elementary Classroom.
(2 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-Elementary education major)
Survey of contemporary Indian education; evaluation of one’s
attitudes toward Indian students; direct interaction with Indian
parents and students; development of culturally sensitive teaching plans regarding Indians.
ELED 4344. Teaching Science and Environmental Education. (4 cr; A-F or Aud.
Prereq-admission to elementary education program, successful completion of block
one, [P]3381, 4345, 4366, SpEd 5310, no Grad School cr)
Curriculum standards and research-based pedagogy. Includes
field experience.
ELED 4345. Instructional Strategies, Assessment, and Management. (3 cr; A-F
or Aud. Prereq-admission to elementary education program, successful completion of
block one, [P]3381, 4344, 4366, SpEd 5310, no Grad School cr)
Formal and informal assessment strategies to ensure and evaluate continuous intellectual, social, and physical development of
students while managing and supporting a positive classroom
environment. Includes field experience.
ELED 4366. Teaching Social Studies and Environmental Education. (4 cr; A-F
or Aud. Prereq-admission to elementary education program, successful completion of
block one, [P]3381, [P]4344, [P]4345, [P]SpEd 5310; no Grad School cr)
Content and organization of social studies; planning instruction
for diverse students; understanding and improving the learning
situation; effective use of materials in environmental education.
ELED 4400. Professional Development Seminar for Elementary Education Majors. (1 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-Admission to elementary education program, [P]3113,
3325, 3331, 3355, SpEd 3310, no Grad School cr)
Professional development for Elementary Education Majors
through documentation, reflection, synthesis of learning as related to standards. Development of process and product portfolios.
Presentation of and dialogue about emergent learning.
ELED 4600. Student Teaching. (6-12 cr [max 12 cr]; S-N or Aud. Prereq-Admission
to elementary education program, successful completion of block one and block two
courses, no Grad School cr)
Planning, implementing, and evaluating an elementary curriculum. Assessing learning needs and collaborating with specialists
to individualize methods and materials.
ELED 4650. Student Teaching in Individual Subjects: K-8. (1-6 cr [max 7 cr]; S-N
or Aud. Prereq-Art ed cand or music ed cand , or phy ed cand or #; no Grad School
credit)
Student teaching in, e.g., art, music, physical education.
Demonstrating subject matter competence, instructional strategies, and management skills; self-evaluation.
ELED 4991. Independent Study. (1-6 cr [max 6 cr]; A-F or Aud. Prereq-%; no Grad
School cr)
Directed independent study, reading, and/or projects in elementary or middle school education of interest to student.
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Course Descriptions
The elementary teaching profession; personal goals, teaching-learning environment, learner sensitive model, and career
opportunities. Experiences which help students gain accurate
knowledge of their field.
ELED 3331. Children’s Literature and Integrated Creative Arts. (4 cr; A-F or Aud.
Prereq-Concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in the following: 3113, 3325,
3355, 4400, SpEd 3310, admission to the elementary education program)
Course Descriptions
ELED 4993. Special Area Project. (1-4 cr [max 4 cr]; A-F or Aud. Prereq-#; no Grad
School cr)
Independent project for advanced students to substantially further their theoretical knowledge base or professional
competencies.
ELED 5695. Special Topics: (Various Titles to be Assigned). (.5-4 cr [max 8 cr]; A-F or
Aud. Prereq-No Grad School credit)
Current issues in Elementary Education to meet needs and interests of various groups, particularly practicing professionals.
ELED 5993. Special Area Project. (1-4 cr [max 4 cr]; A-F or Aud. Prereq-#; no Grad
School cr)
Independent project for advanced students to substantially further their theoretical knowledge base or professional
competencies.
Engineering (ENGR)
College of Science and Engineering
ENGR 1210. Introduction to Design and Reverse Engineering. (3 cr; A-F only.
Prereq-[P]Math 1297 or #; §IE 1225)
College of Science and Engineering
EMGT 4110. Engineering Professionalism and Practice. (2 cr; A-F only. PrereqCOMP 3130 or 3150 or 3180 and BSChE or BSECE or BSIE or BSME candidate within
2 semesters of graduation or #; no Grad School cr; §IE 4155 or ME 4155)
Professional responsibilities of engineers and expectations of
industry and society. Ethics and law for engineers. Codes of
ethics and professional engineering societies. Design, intellectual property, record keeping. Environmental and safety
issues in design. Group processes, conflict management. Project
management.
EMGT 5110. Management of Engineers and Technology. (3 cr; A-F only. PrereqEMgt student or %)
Managing the synergism of people and technology. Overview of
management functions, tools, methods. Planning, organization,
leadership, motivation, control, quality, human resources, effective decision making.
Explores “reverse engineering” (i.e., how engineers evaluate
existing products for ideas to improve future products). Learn
to communicate product features through engineering design
graphics, recognize manufacturing processes involved, and
understand how design objectives and constraints impact
realization of part designs.
EMGT 5120. Advanced Project Management. (3 cr; A-F only. Prereq-EMgt student
or %)
ENGR 2015. Statics. (3 cr; Stdnt Opt. Prereq-Math 1297, Phys 2011)
EMGT 5130. Operations Modeling and Analysis. (3 cr; A-F only. Prereq-EMgt
student or %)
Vector algebra. Applications of equations of equilibrium to
analysis of simple engineering structures and machines. Nature
and influence of friction. Elementary theory of static determinate framed structures.
Project justification and finance. The development and management of project plans and resources. Working with contractors and union personnel. Covers the life cycle of projects.
Applications to current practice.
Modeling and analysis of manufacturing and service systems.
Linear programming, network analysis, queuing theory, Markov
chains, and non-linear optimization.
ENGR 2016. Mechanics of Materials. (3 cr; Stdnt Opt. Prereq-2015, ¶ Math 3280)
EMGT 5160. Quality Management. (3 cr; A-F only. Prereq-EMgt student or %)
Introductory treatment of stress and strain at a point. Stressstrain relation in two dimensions. Axial loading, torsion, shear
and bending moment diagrams, bending stresses, deflection of
determinate and indeterminate beams, instability.
Global competitiveness, organizational culture, management
role responsibilities, concepts for customer value, strategic
management, measurement of customer value, organizing to
improve systems, employee involvement, culture change and
organizational learning. ISO 9000, quality awards.
ENGR 2026. Dynamics. (3 cr; Stdnt Opt. Prereq-2015, ¶ Math 3280)
Review of particle dynamics. Mechanical systems and rigidbody model. Kinematics and dynamics of plane systems.
ENGR 2110. Introduction to Material Science for Engineers. (3 cr; A-F or Aud.
Prereq-Chem 1151, [P]2015)
Course Descriptions
Engineering Management
(EMGT)
Atomic bonding, structure, properties and characteristics of
most common engineering materials: metal (ferrous and nonferrous), polymers, ceramics and composites. Modes of material
failure and standard laboratory tests for material properties. Use
of equilibrium phase diagrams. Corrosion and their prevention
methods
ENGR 4001. Engineering Professionalism. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-BSECE or
BSChE or BSIE or BSME student, min 60 credits, no Grad School credit)
Relationship of engineering to topics in economics, environment, sustainability, manufacturing, ethics, health & safety,
society, and politics. Multidisciplinary engineering design lab
experience. Written lab reports, proposals, professional letters,
resume. Oral lab progress reports.
EMGT 5210. Information Technology for Management. (3 cr; A-F only. PrereqEMgt student or %)
Intended to bring the student up to date on developments in the
field of information technology (IT) and to prepare the student
to manage those technologies in the workplace. Presents a
combination of current management and technical topics.
EMGT 5220. Environmental Issues in Engineering. (3 cr; A-F only. Prereq-EMgt
student or %)
A historical perspective on society’s environmental concerns,
discussion of federal environmental statutes, our regulatory
system, approaches to preventing and mitigating environmental problems, and the elements of an effective environmental
management system.
EMGT 5230. Technical Forecasting. (3 cr; A-F only. Prereq-EMgt Student or %)
Statistical review, data sources, choosing a forecasting technique, moving averages, smoothing, regression analysis, time
series analysis, the Box-Jenkins (ARIMA) methodology.
EMGT 5240. Advanced Operations Management. (3 cr; A-F only. Prereq-EMgt
student or MBA student or %)
Emphasis on quantitative methods for designing and analyzing
manufacturing and service operations, simulation, and recent
paradigms in manufacturing including just-in-time production,
synchronous manufacturing, and agile manufacturing. Current
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English
competitiveness-enhancing techniques like continuous improvement, benchmarking, and business process re-engineering will
also be covered.
EMGT 5250. Legal and Ethical Issues in Engineering. (3 cr; A-F only. Prereq-EMgt
student or %)
Overview of the legal and ethical issues of concern to the
engineering manager. Basic law, contracts, intellectual property,
product liability. Ethics case studies.
EMGT 5991. Independent Study in Engineering Management. (1-4 cr [max 6 cr];
Stdnt Opt. Prereq-MSEM cand, %)
Directed study of special interest topics not available in standard
curriculum. Must be arranged with instructor before registration. May include readings, research and/or special projects.
EMGT 5995. Special Topics: (Various Titles to be Assigned). (1-3 cr [max 9 cr]; A-F or
Aud. Prereq-EMgt student or %)
Selected current topics in engineering management. (Various
titles to be assigned).
EMGT 8310. Project Methodology and Practice. (3 cr; A-F only. Prereq-5110,
5120, 5130, 5160)
Applying research, analysis, and management skills to a topic
or situation of current interest to industry. Demonstrating the
ability to achieve results in a fixed time frame with limited
resources.
EMGT 8333. FTE: Master’s. (1 cr; No grade. Prereq-Master’s student, adviser and
DGS consent)
EMGT 8777. Thesis Credits: Master’s. (1-18 cr [max 50 cr]; No grade. Prereq-Max
18 cr per semester or summer; 10 cr total required (Plan A only))
EMGT 8993. Engineering Management Seminar. (1 cr [max 2 cr]; S-N only.
Prereq-Grad student, %)
Reports on recent developments in engineering management
and on research projects in the department.
EMGT 8994. Directed Research. (1-8 cr [max 8 cr]; Stdnt Opt. Prereq-MSEM or Grad
School student, %)
Directed research or study on an advanced topic.
ENGL 1585. Australian and New Zealand Literature and Culture. (4 cr; A-F or
Aud. LEIP 09)
Introduces students to the literature and cultures of Australia
and New Zealand, focusing on the formation of national
identity, both countries’ relationship to Great Britain and the
US, conventions like “mateship,” and the cultural politics of
aboriginal peoples.
ENGL 1666. Tales of Terror. (4 cr; A-F or Aud. LE 9)
Gothic masterpieces chiefly from English and American
literature, with emphasis on sociological and psychological
implications of the genre.
ENGL 1801. Freshman Seminar: American Gothic. (4 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-Freshman, fewer than 30 cr. LE 9)
Exploration of the Gothic tradition in American literature
from colonial days to the present, with special attention to
psychological and cultural implications. Some attention, also, to
visual arts, film, and theories of terror, horror, the uncanny, and
the grotesque.
ENGL 1802. Freshman Seminar: Asian Culture. (4 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-Freshman, fewer than 30 credits LE 7)
Exploration of Chinese and Japanese cultures with attention
to Confucianism, Taoism, Buddhism, Shinto and arts such as
calligraphy, painting, poetry, garden design, and music. Some
attention also to political history.
ENGL 1803. Freshman Seminar: Unseen Reality. (4 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-Freshman, fewer than 30 cr. LE 9)
Concepts of “the ideal” and “the real” as developed by writers
with differing perspectives, in various literary forms (e.g., fiction, non-fiction, poetry).
ENGL 1805. Freshman Seminar: Satire and Humor. (4 cr; A-F or Aud. PrereqFreshman, fewer than 30 cr LE 9)
Satire and humor in their historical, social, aesthetic, and intellectual contexts.
ENGL 1907. Introduction to Literature. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-Primarily for
nonmajors LE 9)
English (ENGL)
Literary modes and methods of literary study and interpretation.
College of Liberal Arts
Readings in American and British literature since 1945.
Emphases, authors, and titles vary.
ENGL 1001. Great American Authors. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. LE 9)
Introduction to American authors important for their artistic
mastery and/or significant role in American literary history.
Developing critical reading skills in fiction, poetry, and drama.
ENGL 1507. Time and Place. (4 cr; A-F or Aud. LE 9)
Close reading of selected works about experience of time and
place.
ENGL 1535. King Arthur in History, Literature, and Art. (4 cr; A-F or Aud. LE 9)
Survey of historical accounts, and literary and artistic treatments of King Arthur in Latin, French, and German sources
of the Middle Ages and in selected works in modern Arthurian
literature.
ENGL 1575. 20th-Century Literature. (4 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-Primarily for
nonmajors LE 9)
Readings primarily in American, British, and Irish literature.
ENGL 1582. Introduction to World Literatures. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. LEIP 09)
Sampling of literary works mainly from Middle East, Africa,
Far East, and South America.
ENGL 2581. Women Writers. (4 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-30 cr or # LECD 09)
Feminist reading of selected plays, poetry, prose (including
critical works) written by women writers.
ENGL 2922. Honors Seminar: The Art of the Memoir: Reading and Writing
Memoir. (4 cr; A-F or Aud)
Study of the memoir as a literary genre--its conventions, elements, and its historical importance--and as an art form. Use of
critical approaches in the reading of memoirs. Directed practice
writing the student’s own memoir.
ENGL 3115. Writing Fiction. (4 cr [max 8 cr]; A-F or Aud. Prereq-Comp 1120, min
60 cr (6 cr lit) or #)
Writing of original fiction, with emphasis on the short story;
structure and techniques learned from critical reading and
classroom analysis.
ENGL 3121. Writing Poetry. (4 cr; A-F or Aud)
Writing of poetry, with emphasis on techniques learned through
critical reading and classroom analysis.
ENGL 3195. Special Topics: (Various Titles to be Assigned). (1-4 cr [max 16 cr];
A-F or Aud)
Special topics in English.
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Course Descriptions
ENGL 1101. Literature Appreciation. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-§1907; primarily for
nonmajors but also for potential majors and creative writers LE 9)
ENGL 2571. Contemporary Literature. (4 cr; A-F or Aud. LE 9)
Course Descriptions
ENGL 3223. Shakespeare. (4 cr; A-F or Aud. LE 9)
Introduction to Shakespeare. Selected plays from the histories,
comedies, tragedies, and dramatic romances. Aspects of drama,
such as structure, language, characterization, theme, and dramatic conventions examined in study of individual plays.
ENGL 3333. Children’s Literature: Texts and Contexts. (4 cr; A-F or Aud)
Forms of children’s literature, from folk and fairy tales to
contemporary stories, poems, and novels for children; major
historical, literary and critical issues affecting the production
and reception of literature for children.
ENGL 3411. The Modern Short Story. (4 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-Min 60 cr (6 cr lit)
or #)
Study of the genre, emphasizing close reading and interpretation of the elements of short fiction in selected works.
ENGL 3501. British Literature I. (4 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-Engl major or minor or
teach comm art/lit major or minor or elem-middle educ comart/lit specialization)
Study of poetics and poetry, with emphasis on student poems.
ENGL 5222. Shakespeare. (4 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-6 cr literature)
Concentrated study of selected plays, with attention to
Shakespearean criticism and scholarship. Recommended as the
second course in Shakespeare.
ENGL 5312. Chaucer. (4 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-6 cr literature)
Introduction to Middle English. Reading and analysis of
Chaucer’s works, primarily Canterbury Tales and Troilus and
Criseyde.
ENGL 5331. Milton. (4 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-6 cr literature)
Minor poems, Areopagitica, Paradise Lost, and Samson
Agonistes.
ENGL 5375. Modern Poetry. (4 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-6 cr literature)
Chronological study of English literature from beginnings
to late-18th century, emphasizing major works, authors, and
important literary forms, styles, themes, and movements.
Study of modern poetry written in English.
ENGL 3502. British Literature II. (4 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-Engl major and minor)
Examines traditional kinds of children’s literary texts, as well
as literary and pedagogical theory, advertising, movies, and
television to consider childhood as an historical, aesthetic and
social construct in Western culture from the eighteenth century
to the present.
Chronological study of English literature from late-18th to late20th century, emphasizing major works, authors, and important
literary forms, styles, themes, and movements.
ENGL 3563. American Literature I. (4 cr; A-F or Aud)
Historical survey of important authors, movements, conventions, genres, and themes: origins to Civil War.
ENGL 3564. American Literature II. (4 cr; A-F or Aud)
Historical survey of important authors, movements, conventions, genres, and themes: Civil War to present.
ENGL 3906. Methods of Literary Study. (4 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-Comp 1120, Engl
major or Tch Comm Art/Lit major or #)
Introduction to interpretive and scholarly methods.
ENGL 4097. Internship in Publishing. (1-4 cr [max 8 cr]; S-N or Aud. Prereq-minimum 60 credits,#Credit cannot be applied to Grad School program)
Practical experience in publishing at an approved business or
organization.
ENGL 5444. Childhood in Literature, History and Culture. (4 cr; A-F or Aud.
Prereq-Jr or sr or grad student or #)
ENGL 5471. The Novella. (4 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-Min 90 cr (12 cr lit) or #)
In-depth study of selected masterworks of the form.
ENGL 5533. Studies in English Literature Before 1800. (4 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-6
cr literature)
Intensive study of a theme, literary school or circle, literary
genre in historical and cultural context. Topics vary.
ENGL 5541. Restoration and 18th-Century Literature. (4 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-6
cr literature)
Study of controversies and cultural change evident in English
literature, 1660-1800. Such authors as Dryden, Behn, Pope,
Fielding, Johnson
ENGL 5561. English Romanticism. (4 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-6 cr literature)
Comparative study of novels and their film adaptations.
The Romantic movement in England as reflected in the works
of such writers as Wordsworth, Coleridge, Mary Shelley, Keats,
Percy Shelley, and Anne Radcliffe.
ENGL 4375. Drama. (4 cr; A-F or Aud)
ENGL 5562. Victorian Literature. (4 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-6 cr literature)
Selected playwrights, plays, types, traditions, or periods; relevant theoretical and critical writings. Authors and topics vary.
Cultural and social concerns of Victorian England as reflected
in the works of such writers as Tennyson, Arnold, Christina
and D.G. Rossetti, Robert and Elizabeth Barrett Browning, and
Samuel Butler.
ENGL 4292. Literature into Film. (4 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-Min 90 cr (10 cr lit) or #)
Course Descriptions
ENGL 5122. Advanced Writing of Poetry. (4 cr [max 8 cr]; A-F or Aud. Prereq-3121
or #)
ENGL 4909. Senior Portfolio. (1 cr; S-N or Aud. Prereq-Engl major, sr)
Required portfolio and research project undertaken for senior
seminar.
ENGL 4931. Practicum in Teaching Literature. (4 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-3906, sr, 4
other upper division literature courses and #; no Grad School credit)
Assisting in teaching a 1-, 2-, or 3-level literature course; experience preparing course materials; advising students in course;
learning about the grading process; experience in lecturing and
leading discussions; conferences with professor about teaching
issues.
ENGL 5097. Internship in Publishing. (1-3 cr [max 3 cr]; S-N or Aud. Prereq8906,#)
Practical experience in publishing at an approved business or
organization.
ENGL 5116. Advanced Writing of Fiction. (4 cr [max 8 cr]; A-F or Aud. Prereq-#)
Writing of original fiction beyond the beginning stages; some
experience required.
330
ENGL 5566. Irish Literary Revival. (4 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-6 cr literature)
Anglo-Irish literature in its socio-historical context. Such
authors as Yeats, Synge, Gregory, Joyce, and O’Casey.
ENGL 5572. American Renaissance. (4 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-6 cr literature)
American Romanticism and the flowering of American literature from early 19th century to the Civil War (authors and topics
vary; e.g., Thoreau, Fuller, Hawthorne, Dickinson, Whitman).
ENGL 5574. Studies in American Literature to 1914. (4 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-6
cr lit)
Study of selected North American authors from the Colonial
Era to the end of WWI. Literature studied will vary in relation
to what kind of literary or cultural study instructor intends or
what kind of critical approach to literature is used.
Environmental Education
ENGL 5575. Studies in American Literature after 1914. (4 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-6
cr lit)
ENGL 5922. Teaching Literature and Communication. (5 cr; S-N or Aud. Prereq5902, teach comm art/lit major or minor or TESOL licensure or #)
Study of selected North American authors after 1914. Literature
studied will vary in relation to what kind of literary or cultural
study instructor intends or what kind of critical approach to
literature is used.
Theory and applications in teaching reading, writing, literature,
speaking, listening, and non-print media, grades 5-12.
ENGL 5577. Major American Authors. (4 cr [max 8 cr]; A-F or Aud. Prereq-6 cr
literature)
Selected topics in the study of British literature written prior
to 1800.
Concentrated study in one to three authors, who are announced
before course is offered.
ENGL 5581. American Novel I. (4 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-6 cr literature or #)
ENGL 8171. Seminar in Pre-1800 British Literature. (4 cr; A-F or Aud. PrereqGraduate Student)
ENGL 8181. Seminar in British Literature, Late 18th - 20th Century. (4 cr; A-F
or Aud)
The American novel, origins through 1920; cultural, intellectual,
and aesthetic contexts. Authors and topics vary.
Graduate seminar on selected topics in the study of British
literature written from the late 18th century through the 20th
century.
ENGL 5582. American Novel II. (4 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-6 cr literature)
ENGL 8191. Seminar: American Literature. (4 cr; A-F or Aud)
The American novel, 1920 to present; cultural, intellectual, and
aesthetic contexts. Authors and topics vary.
Intensive study of selected authors and topics announced ahead
of time; historical, cultural, and literary contexts; methodology;
relevant scholarship and criticism.
ENGL 5583. British Novel. (4 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-6 cr lit)
The British novel in its social, aesthetic, and intellectual
contexts.
ENGL 8333. FTE: Master’s. (1 cr; No grade. Prereq-Master’s student, adviser and
DGS consent)
ENGL 5591. Independent Study. (1-5 cr [max 8 cr]; A-F or Aud. Prereq-#, max 6 cr
may be applied to Grad School program)
ENGL 8444. FTE: Doctoral. (1 cr; No grade. Prereq-doctoral student, adviser and
DGS consent)
Students choose projects in consultation with their instructor.
ENGL 8888. Thesis Credits: Doctoral. (1-24 cr [max 100 cr]; No grade. Prereq-[max
18 cr per semester or summer]; 24 cr required)
ENGL 5595. Special Topics: (Various Titles to be Assigned). (1-5 cr [max 10 cr]; A-F
or Aud. Prereq-Primarily for majors, minors, grads)
Topics not included in regular English curriculum. Topic and
credits announced before course offered.
ENGL 5661. Publishing the Middle Ages. (4 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-Jr or sr or grad
student or #)
Study of the ways in which the middle ages were defined
and canonized in print culture. Instruction on the processes
of medieval manuscript production and editing, followed by
analysis of rhetorical framework within which “medievalism”
was constructed in the 19th century.
ENGL 5662. The Making of a Major Author:The Scholarly Edition in 17th-and
18th-Century England. (4 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-Jr or sr or grad student or #)
Study of the ways in which writers such as Shakespeare and
Milton were transformed into “major authors” and “national poets” through the publication of scholarly editions of their works
subsequent to their deaths. Textual analysis of the editions is
combined with study of their publication histories, including the
roles of editors and publishers who produced them.
History of reading, primarily in the United States and England.
Study of factors affecting literacy in late 18th through early 20th
centuries, including technological advances, educational reform
and changes in authorship and literature.
ENGL 5664. Small Presses, Little Magazines, and Modernism. (4 cr; A-F or Aud.
Prereq-Jr or sr or grad student or #)
The founding and promotion of the modernist movement in
little magazines and small presses. Publishing careers of significant modernists (e.g. Ford, Pound, Yeats, H.D. Eliot, Joyce).
ENGL 5811. Introduction to Modern English. (4 cr; A-F or Aud)
Modern theories of English grammar.
ENGL 5821. History of the English Language. (4 cr; A-F or Aud)
History of sounds, word stock, and structures of English
language from earliest records to present.
Core course required for all English M.A. (Plan B) students.
Seminar in critical theory and methods of literary research.
ENGL 8931. Practicum in Teaching Literature. (4 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-8 cr
grad-level literature or #)
Teaching in sophomore literature courses; experience preparing
supplementary materials, consulting with students, and assisting
instructors in grading student work.
Environmental Education
(ENED)
College of Education and Human Service
Professions
ENED 3309. Outdoor Leadership. (1 cr; S-N or Aud. Prereq-Rec 2300, PEP 3507)
Theories of leadership practices commonly used in outdoor
education settings. Includes group development stages and
techniques of group management. Concludes with preparation
for 9-day field experience (EnEd 3310). This course MUST be
taken in conjunction with EnEd 3310.
ENED 3310. Outdoor Leadership Field Experience. (2 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-EnEd
3309)
Practice, theory, and methods involved in leadership development including a detailed analysis of the qualities and roles of
leaders in outdoor educational settings. recreation settings. This
course will occur as a 9-day field experience.
ENED 3331. Organization of Environmental Education Centers. (2 cr; A-F or Aud.
Prereq-2300 or #; §Rec 3331)
Philosophy and organization of environmental education centers
as non-formal education providers. Both residential and nonresidential centers including history, philosophy, management,
and educational delivery relative to environmental literacy will
be studied. Visits to local environmental learning centers are
included.
ENGL 5902. Teaching Language, Cognition, and Writing. (4 cr; A-F or Aud. PrereqTeach comm art/lit major or minor or TESOL licensure or elem/middle educ comart/lit
specialization or #)
Theory and practice of teaching composition; for prospective
teachers grade five to community college level.
331
Course Descriptions
ENGL 5663. Readers and the History of Books. (4 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-Jr or sr
or grad student or #)
ENGL 8906. Introduction to Critical Theory. (4 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-Grad Student)
Course Descriptions
ENED 3341. Field Interpretive Techniques I. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-Rec 2300
or #, §Rec 3341)
ENED 5236. Environmental Education for Teachers. (5-3 cr [max 3 cr]; A-F or Aud.
Prereq-#; §Educ 5236; no Grad School credit)
Techniques and methods used to interpret natural history of autumn and early winter environments. Emphasizes geomorphology, tree identification, and basic raptor ecology. Primarily field
based at sites throughout northeastern Minnesota.
Combines environmental study with field experiences to prepare
pre-service and in-service teachers for implementation of environmental learning experiences in the school curriculum, grades
K-12, all subject areas.
ENED 3342. Field Interpretive Techniques II. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-3341, #;
§Rec 3342)
ENED 5325. Environmental Issues Investigation. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-#, no
Grad School cr)
Techniques and methods used to interpret natural history of winter and spring environments. Ecology of winter,
vernal ponds, spring wildflowers, biomes, and migratory
birds. Primarily field based at sites throughout northeastern
Minnesota.
The study of resolving environmental problems as taught in
environmental education. This includes issue identification;
building an effective team of investigators; and, study of the
issue to the point of making recommendations to resolution of
the issue.
ENED 4163. Outdoor Education Methods. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-Rec 3342 or #;
no Grad School credit)
ENED 5343. Advanced Field Interpretive Techniques. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq3341 or 3342 or #, no Grad School credit)
Methods and theoretical basis for teaching outdoor education.
Emphasis on application at outdoor sites. Weekend experience
at a regional nature center required.
Techniques and methods used to interpret the natural and
cultural history of unique field sites; For example, Isle Royale
National Park. Specific, in-depth topics of natural and cultural
history will be emphasized. Techniques for field site investigation and field based interpretation as an educational approach
will be investigated.
ENED 4315. Operations and Management. (4 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-2300 or #; no
Graduate School credit)
Methods and practice of administrative processes of personnel,
fiscal, and facility management. Field study and presentation of
a management plan.
ENED 4410. Ropes Course Management. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-Rec 2300, Psy
3524 or #, no Grad School credit, §Rec 4410)
Management of a ropes course as a part of an outdoor education
facility. Includes ropes course elements, instructional techniques, group debriefing skills, site inspection, safety, rescue
and equipment maintenance. This course will follow industry
standards such as Project Adventure.
ENED 4555. Foundations of Environmental Education. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. PrereqRec 2300 or #)
Provides a background of skills and understanding of environmental education delivery in various educational settings, with
emphasis on formal classroom audience.
ENED 4601. Wilderness Philosophy. (2 cr; Stdnt Opt. Prereq-no Grad School credit)
People and social forces that have influenced land-use related
to designated wilderness; philosophical and historical basis for
wilderness management.
ENED 4996. Outdoor Education Internship. (12 cr; S-N or Aud. Prereq-Rec major, #;
no Grad School credit; §Rec 4996)
Course Descriptions
Supervised field experience in outdoor education.
ENED 5163. Outdoor Education Methods. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-MEd candidate
or #, no Graduate School credit)
Methods and theoretical basis for teaching outdoor education.
Emphasis on application at outdoor sites. Weekend experience
at a regional nature center required
ENED 5164. Environmental Education In-Service Training. (.5-10 cr [max 10 cr];
A-F or Aud. Prereq-#; no Grad School credit)
Environmental education methods, materials, and curricula for
educators wishing to enhance their environmental education
training.
ENED 5165. Theories and Models in Outdoor Education. (2 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq#; no Grad School credit)
Overview of theoretical foundations of outdoor education.
Definitions of terms related to outdoor education, historical
antecedents, futureadventure education, social and psychological benefits of outdooreducation.
ENED 5167. Research and Issues in Outdoor Education. (2 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereqno Grad School credit)
Research literature and related issues pertaining to outdoor
education,including research design and methods. Application
of research tospecific issues.
332
ENED 5495. Special Topics: (Various Titles to be Assigned). (1-4 cr [max 4 cr]; Stdnt
Opt. Prereq-no Grad School cr)
Treatment of topics not included in regular curriculum or
in-depth treatment of topics associated with normal curricular
offering.
ENED 5555. Environmental Education for Practicing Educators. (2 cr; A-F or Aud.
Prereq-No Grad School credit)
Provides information base for informed decision making about
environmental issues. Develops knowledge, skills, attitudes,
motivation, and commitment to work individually and collectively toward sustaining a healthy world environment.
ENED 5560. Current Research and Issues. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-MEd candidate
or #, no Graduate School credit)
Examines research literature and related issues pertaining to
outdoor education including disciplines of science, environmental experiential, and adventure education. Trends in research,
teaching, plus research design and methods.
ENED 5625. Program Development and Evaluation. (3 cr; A-F or Aud)
A comprehensive approach to program development will be applied to youth-based environmental education programs. Course
is designed for those working in supervisory capacities to gain
skills in designing, implementing, and evaluating environmental
education programs.
ENED 5850. Classroom Applications. (2 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-MEd candidate or #,
no Graduate School credit)
Understanding the formal classroom environment: scope
and sequence, management, assessment, and standards for
applications pertinent to audience and setting in environmental
education.
ENED 5855. Programming for School Systems. (2 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-5850,
Educ 5850 or #, no Graduate School credit)
The relationship between environmental education and the
formal school system (P-12) will be examined. Instructional
approaches that use the environment as a context for helping
students develop essential content and skills in the core academic disciplines will be emphasized.
ENED 5998. Outdoor Education Seminar. (1 cr [max 3 cr]; S-N or Aud. Prereq-§Rec
4998, #; no Grad School credit)
Facilitated discussions and presentations of contemporary
recreation research, curricula, and/or issues.
Exercise Science Athletic Training
Environmental Science (ESCI)
ES 3050. Special Topics: (Various Titles to be Assigned). (3 cr [max 6 cr]; Stdnt Opt.
Prereq-30 cr, ES major or instructor’s consent)
College of Science and Engineering
In depth examination of a particular problem, topic, or group
thereof, in the field of interdisciplinary environmental studies.
ESCI 2210. Science and Management of Environmental Systems. (4 cr; A-F or
Aud. Prereq-Geol 1110 or #)
Scientific foundations of major environmental issues, water
chemistry, atmospheric chemistry, natural resources, global
climate, national and international environmental regulation and
policy, and environmental economics.
ESCI 3101. Nonrenewable Resources. (4 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-2210, Chem 1151
or 1161, Phys 2011 or #)
Geology of nonrenewable resources and introduction to
extractive industry methods and procedures. Formation and
occurrence of natural resources, theory and practice of technologies associated with the production, separation, purification,
conversion, consumption, and waste disposal of nonrenewable
energy and mineral resources.
ESCI 3102. Renewable Resources. (4 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-3101 or #, Phys 2012)
Principles of renewable energy, energy conversion, irreversible
thermodynamics and thermodynamic engines, thermoelectric
generators, turbines, photovoltaic conversion, electrochemical
conversion, fuel cells, pumping efficiency, wind energy, conversion of wave energy, heat pumps, ecosystems and biomass
energy, and energy transmission and storage.
ESCI 4101. Pollution and Technology. (4 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-2210, Chem 1151
or 1161, Phys 2011 or #, no Grad School cr)
Sources, distribution, and ultimate fate of air, water and
solid/hazardous wastes. Principles of treatment of point and
non-point source wastes. Case studies of successful remediation
technologies. Models of contaminant movement in the environment. Landfill construction. Application of federal law: National
Environmental Policy Act, Clean Air Act, Clean Water Act,
Pollution Prevention Act, Resource Conservation and Recovery
Act, and Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act.
ESCI 4102. Environmental Assessment. (4 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-3102, 4101 or
#; no Grad School cr)
Environmental issues identification and investigation. Review of
case studies of environmental investigations and the components
of environmental impact statements. Selection of local or regional environmental issues and evaluation of the environmental
problems from a multidisciplinary perspective. Preparation of
draft Environmental Impact Statement (EIS).
College of Liberal Arts
ES 1001. Introductory Seminar. (2 cr; A-F only)
Introduction to the complexities of multidisciplinary environmental issues through research and literature review with
emphasis on development of critical thinking skills.
ES 2001. Ecosystems I. (3 cr; A-F only. Prereq-ES major)
Contains a theoretical description of the fundamental physical,
chemical and biological components comprising ecosystems,
how these components interact to determine ecosystem structure
and function, and the response of these components, hence
ecosystems, to anthropogenic stress.
ES 2002. Ecosystems II. (3 cr; A-F only. Prereq-2001)
Builds upon the theoretical information provided in ES 2001
by providing students a hands-on approach to understanding
ecosystem dynamics. Students will learn hypothesis testing,
experimental techniques, and methods for analyzing data that
indicates ecosystems’ response to anthropogenic stress.
Examine the basic principles and assumptions of Micro and
Macro Economics, and their relevance in our modern global
economic system. Examine the environmental/social consequences of deviations from these assumptions, and alternative
economic models/analyses and policies consistent with sustainable development.
ES 4001. Independent Study. (1-3 cr [max 3 cr]; A-F only. Prereq-60 cr or #; no
Grad School credit)
Directed readings and projects for students who wish to do
independent advanced study or work on topics not normally
covered in other courses.
ES 5001. Environmental Studies Seminar. (4 cr; A-F only. Prereq-ES major, 90 cr;
no Grad School credit)
Critical discussion, research, and literature review of multidisciplinary environmental issues.
ES 5040. Environmental Studies Internship Preparation. (1 cr; S-N only. PrereqES major, no Grad School credit)
Various employers and members of environmental organizations in the Duluth region, and in Minnesota will speak to the
class each week to describe what they do in their perspective
fields of environmental studies. Students will research careers
in environmental studies, producing reports on prominent fields
and directions in environmental sciences. Students will be
placed with perspective internship experiences at the end of the
semester.
ES 5050. Environmental Studies Internship. (3 cr; S-N only. Prereq-5040, ES major,
No Grad School cr)
Practical experience in some field of environmental work, under
direction of a faculty adviser and a work-site adviser.
Exercise Science Athletic
Training (ESAT)
College of Education and Human Service
Professions
ESAT 2610. Introduction to Athletic Training. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-Pre-athletic
training; §PEP 2610)
An overview of the responsibilities of an athletic trainer and the
athletic trainer’s role as a sports medicine team member; as well
as the basic concepts in the prevention, recognition, and care of
injuries to the physically active.
ESAT 2620. Prevention and Care of Athletic Injuries. (2 cr; A-F or Aud. PrereqAthletic training major, #, §PEP 2620)
Principles and techniques of the prevention and care of common
athletic injuries. Emphasis is on preparing the student to make
appropriate decisions in the prevention, first aid treatments,
emergency care, and transportation of the sick and injured in
sports.
ESAT 2697. Clinical Experience in Athletic Training I. (2 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq2610, Athletic Training major)
Athletic training psychomotor skills are enhanced and assessed
by an approved clinical instructor during the clinical rotation.
Emphasis is on competencies and proficiencies previously
instructed in courses. A minimum of 100 hours of clinical
experience are required.
ES 2803. Issues in Global Ecology. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-§Biol 2803 LEIP 05)
Holistic approach to current status and future prospects of
Earth’s life support systems.
333
Course Descriptions
Environmental Studies (ES)
ES 3500. Ecological Economics. (3 cr; A-F only. Prereq-ES major or cand or #)
Course Descriptions
ESAT 2698. Clinical Experience in Athletic Training II. (2 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq2697, Athletic Training major)
ESAT 3600. Fundamentals of Athletic Training Evaluation. (4 cr; A-F or Aud.
Prereq-2620, athletic training major,§PEP 3632)
Athletic training psychomotor skills are enhanced and assessed
by an Approved Clinical Instructor. Emphasis is on competencies and proficiencies previously instructed in courses. A
minimum of 100 hours of clinical experience are required.
Fundamental concepts of functional anatomy and biomechanics
related to athletic performance and injury. An introduction to
injury evaluation, palpation, goniometry, and manual muscle
testing will also be presented.
ESAT 3200. Motor Learning and Development. (5 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-Athletic
training or exercise science or pe major or cand or #; §PEP 3020)
ESAT 3630. Athletic Injury Evaluation I. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-3600, athletic
training major, §PEP 3620)
Principles and practices that affect the learning and performing
of motor skills; theories of motor learning; professional applications of the motor learning in exercise science, physical therapy,
athletic training, and physical education.
Pathology, etiology, palpation, special tests, and neurological
tests used by athletic trainers in the evaluation of injuries to the
lower extremity, lumbar spine and pelvic structure.
ESAT 3210. Exercise Adherence. (3 cr; A-F only. Prereq-Psy 1003, exercise sci cand
or #; §PEP 3021)
Fundamental concepts of exercise psychology. Physical activity
models of involvement; exercise determinates and correlates;
exercise interventions.
ESAT 3300. Human Biomechanics. (4 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-Phys 1001, athletic
training or exercise science cand or #; §PEP 3030)
Application of physical laws to human movement. Laws of mechanics and tissue biomechanics concepts are applied to human
motor function. (3 hr lect, 1 hr lab)
ESAT 3400. Exercise Physiology. (4 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-Hlth 2040, athletic
training or exercise science cand or #; §PEP 3040)
Physiological responses and adaptations to acute and chronic
exercise. (3 hrs lect, 1.25 hrs lab)
ESAT 3410. Performance Nutrition and Weight Management. (4 cr; A-F or Aud.
Prereq-Hlth 2030, Hlth 2040, ath trng or exer sci or #, §PE 3470 or PEP 3470)
A study of the principles of sports nutrition with emphasis on
the effects of diet on body composition, metabolic processes,
physiological function, and physical performance.
ESAT 3420. Exercise Testing and Prescription. (4 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-3400 or
PEP 3040, athletic training or exercise science cand or #; §PEP 3400)
Physical fitness programming for adults; principles of exercise
testing and prescription.
ESAT 3430. Principles of Strength and Conditioning Programs. (4 cr; A-F or Aud.
Prereq-3300 or PEP 3030, 3400 or PEP 3040, athletic training or exercise science
cand or #; §PEP 3402)
Course Descriptions
Theory and practice of developing and implementing strength
training and conditioning programs; emphasis on technique
analysis and instructional methods.
ESAT 3432. Exercise Leadership. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-3400, exercise science
cand or #)
Principles and practices of group exercise leadership and
instruction.
ESAT 3440. Clinical Exercise Physiology. (4 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-3420 or PEP
3400, exercise science cand or #; §PEP 3404)
Examination of the use of physiological principles and relationships in clinical situations where exercise is used for prevention
or alleviation of disease.
ESAT 3450. Management of Fitness Facilities. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-Exercise
science cand or #, cr will not be granted if cr received for PEP 3500)
Theory and practice of managing sports facilities.
ESAT 3495. Special Topics: (Various Titles to be Assigned). (1-4 cr [max 16 cr]; A-F
or Aud. Prereq-Ex sci cand or #)
Treatment of topics not included in regular curriculum or in
depth treatment of topics associated with normal curricular
offering.
334
ESAT 3632. Athletic Injury Evaluation II. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-3630, athletic
training major)
Pathology, etiology, palpation, special tests, and neurological
tests used by athletic trainers in the evaluation of injuries to the
upper extremity, head, neck and torso.
ESAT 3640. Therapeutic Modalities. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-3600, 3630, 3632,
athletic training major, §PEP 3640)
Theories and concepts in the appropriate application and
utilization of therapeutic modalities in the treatment of athletic
injuries. A supervised laboratory experience is included within
this course to ensure that students develop the appropriate psychomotor skills in applying and using each modality safely.
ESAT 3642. Therapeutic Exercise. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-3640, athletic training
major, §PEP 3610)
Theories and concepts in the appropriate application and utilization of therapeutic exercises in the rehabilitation of athletic
injuries. A supervised laboratory experience is included within
this course to ensure that students develop the appropriate psychomotor skills in applying and using rehabilitation techniques.
ESAT 3697. Clinical Experiences in Athletic Training III. (2 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq2698, Athletic Training major)
Athletic training psychomotor skills are enhanced and assessed
by an approved clinical instructor during the clinical rotation.
Emphasis is on previously learned classroom material. 225
hours of clinical experiences are required.
ESAT 3698. Clinical Experiences in Athletic Training IV. (2 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq3697, Athletic Training major)
Athletic training psychomotor skills are enhanced and assessed
by an approved clinical instructor during the clinical rotation.
Emphasis is on previously learned classroom material. 225
hours of clinical experiences are required.
ESAT 4001. Pharmacology in Athletic Training. (2 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-3632,
3642, 3698, Athletic Training major, no Grad School cr)
Pharmacological application of therapeutic medications commonly prescribed for acute and chronic health problems and
injuries in athletic populations. Also examined is the use and
abuse of drugs, ergogenic aids and supplements frequently used
by athletes.
ESAT 4600. Senior Seminar Athletic Training. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-4001,
Athletic Training major,§PEP 5600, no Grad School cr, #)
A culminating course that includes the athletic training student
portfolio, encompasses the final preparation for the NATABOC
examination, and concludes with athletic training research
techniques and synthesis.
ESAT 4646. Medical Aspects of Athletic Training. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-3642,
3698, Athletic Training major, no Grad School cr)
The recognition, evaluation, management, and treatment of
non-orthopedic medical conditions that affect the physically
active population.
Family Medicine
ESAT 4650. Administrative Aspects of Athletic Training. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq4646, 4001, Athletic Training major, no Grad School credit)
Managerial and organizational strategies for developing and
directing athletic training services at the high school, collegiate,
and clinical setting. Practical applications and case studies are
emphasized.
ESAT 4697. Clinical Experiences in Athletic Training V. (2 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq3697, Athletic Training major, no Grad School cr)
Athletic training psychomotor skills are enhanced and assessed
by an approved clinical instructor during the clinical rotation.
Emphasis is on previously learned classroom material. 300
hours of clinical experience are required
ESAT 4698. Clinical Experiences in Athletic Training VI. (2 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq4697, Athletic Training major, no Grad School credit)
Athletic training psychomotor skills are enhanced and assessed
by an approved clinical instructor during the clinical rotation.
Emphasis is on previously learned classroom material. 300
hours of clinical experiences are required.
ESAT 4700. Statistics and Research Methods in Exercise Science. (4 cr; A-F or
Aud. Prereq-ESAT 3200, 3300, 3400, 3410, exercise science candidate; §PEP 5700,
no Grad School credit)
Interpretation of statistical procedures and research design in
exercise science. Prepares students to conduct research projects
in the exercise physiology, biomechanics, motor learning, and
the psychological factors that influence exercise.
ESAT 4710. Applied and Experimental Exercise Science. (4 cr; A-F or Aud.
Prereq-4700 or PEP 5700 or #, exercise science cand; §PEP 5041; no Grad School cr)
Advanced study and research in exercise science; methods of
quantifying exercise responses and adaptations; basic research
design.
ESAT 4996. Internship. (3-12 cr [max 12 cr]; S-N or Aud. Prereq-3420, exercise
candidate, #; no Grad School cr; §PEP 4996)
Supervised field internship experience in hospital, fitness facility, or agency setting.
ESAT 5420. Current Controversies in Nutrition. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-MEd
candidate, upper-div health or exercise science student, no Grad School cr)
Exploration of current controversies in nutrition including
such topics as: government good guides, food policy, weight
reduction diets, childhood obesity, physical activity, supplements, organically grown foods, and products of biotechnology
- functional foods and nutraceuticals, irradiation and genetically
modified foods.
School of Medicine
FMED 5591. Independent Study. (1-8 cr [max 12 cr]; Stdnt Opt. Prereq-%)
Intensive, independent study project of student’s interest in
medical research, interdisciplinary fellowship, preceptorship in
rural health care delivery, or another medical area approved by
Department of Family Medicine.
FMED 6101. Family Medicine. (2 cr; P-N or Aud. Prereq-Regis med student)
Lectures and seminars on disease syndromes affecting human
organ systems and on disease prevention with reference to
health issues in epidemiology, environment, and public health;
exposure to community preventive health and alternative medicine programs; provides basic foundation in current computer
technology.
Students spend periods with area physician in family medicine
observing problems encountered in this type of practice and
methods by which health care is delivered.
FMED 6441. Clinical Rounds and Clerkship I. (1 cr; O-N only. Prereq-Regis med
student)
Clinical practicum, hospital based, covering core material
in family practice, internal medicine, obstetrics, pediatrics,
surgery. Patient work-ups with discussion by preceptor.
FMED 6442. Clinical Rounds and Clerkship II. (2 cr; O-N only. Prereq-Regis med
student)
Clinical practicum, hospital based, covering core material
in family practice, internal medicine, obstetrics, pediatrics,
surgery. Patient work-ups with discussion by preceptor.
FMED 6461. Preceptorship III. (2 cr; P-N or Aud. Prereq-Regis med student)
Students spend periods of time with a physician in family practice in rural/small communities of Minnesota and Wisconsin
observing methods by which health care is delivered.
FMED 6462. Preceptorship IV. (3 cr; P-N or Aud. Prereq-Regis med student)
Students spend periods of time with a physician in family practice in rural/small communities of Minnesota and Wisconsin
observing methods by which health care is delivered.
FMED 6501. Clinical Pathology Conferences I. (1 cr; P-N or Aud. Prereq-Regis
med student)
Applying knowledge gained in pathology and laboratory
medicine to an unknown clinical case in order to work through a
differential diagnosis.
FMED 6502. Clinical Pathology Conferences II. (1 cr; P-N or Aud. Prereq-Regis
med student)
Applying knowledge gained in pathology and laboratory
medicine to an unknown clinical case in order to work through a
differential diagnosis.
FMED 6967. The Healer’s Art. (1 cr; P-N or Aud. Prereq-Regis med student, #, no
Grad School credit)
Provides a basis for inquiry and discussion between medical
students and clinical faculty on topics that are entwined within
the practice of medicine. Due to course content, enrollment is
limited.
FMED 6977. Family Connection. (1 cr; P-N or Aud. Prereq-Preregis med, #, cannot
be concurrently registered for 6987)
Introduces the first-year medical student to family health care
concepts through contact with an assigned family in conjunction
with their local family physician, lectures and small group
discussions. Due to course content, enrollment is limited.
FMED 6987. Obstetrical Longitudinal Course. (1 cr; P-N or Aud. Prereq-Preregis
med, #, cannot be concurrently registered for FMed 6977)
Introduces the first-year medical student to obstetrical care
through small group lectures and discussions while following
an obstetrical patient on a longitudinal basis in conjunction
with a local family practitioner or OB specialist. Due to course
content, enrollment is limited. Discussion.
FMED 7100. Clinical Family Medicine. (13 cr [max 117 cr]; P-N or Aud. Prereq-%;
no Grad School credit)
Supervised care of patients of all ages emphasizing continuous,
primary, preventive, acute, and chronic care in all general
diagnostic categories.
FMED 6121. Preceptorship I. (1 cr; P-N or Aud. Prereq-Regis med student)
Students spend periods with area physician in family medicine
observing problems encountered in this type of practice and
methods by which health care is delivered.
335
Course Descriptions
Family Medicine (FMED)
FMED 6122. Preceptorship II. (4 cr; P-N or Aud. Prereq-Regis med student)
Course Descriptions
Finance and Management
Information (FMIS)
Special work in information sciences that extends beyond, or in
greater depth than, regular course offerings.
Labovitz School of Business and Economics
FMIS 3295. Special Topics: (Various Titles to be Assigned). (1-3 cr [max 6 cr]; A-F or
Aud. Prereq-LSBE candidate or o)
FMIS 2201. Information Technology in Business. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-§1201
or 3201 or CS 1011, LSBE student or Computer Information Systems majors, min 15
cr or o)
Exploration of specific MIS problems, issues, and approaches.
Introduction to information technology (IT) concepts: computer
hardware and software; use of personal productivity tools
(spreadsheet, database, and presentation software); system
development processes; Web technologies; applications of IT in
business processes.
Introductory survey of production and operations as a functional
area of management, including operations strategy, process
design, forecasting, resource allocation, inventory management,
scheduling, quality management, and project management.
Computer applications of quantitative techniques to support
operations decision making.
FMIS 2225. Introduction to Visual Basic .NET Programming. (3 cr; A-F or Aud.
Prereq-LSBE student, 1201 or 2201, or concurrent registration, or o,§CS1121)
Introduction to programming in Microsoft Visual Basic
.Net. Introduction to the Microsoft .NET Framework and the
Microsoft Visual Studio development interface. Emphasis on
object-oriented approaches, event-oriented programming and
development of business solutions.
FMIS 3301. Production and Operations Management. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. PrereqLSBE cand or approved non-LSBE bus adm minor or o)
FMIS 3397. LSBE Internship. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-Admitted to LSBE candidacy,
consent of internship director)
FMIS 3141. Business Communications. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-LSBE cand or
Econ major or o)
Work-integrated learning program providing practical
experiences withinstudents’ majors. Students participate in an
approved program withincooperating businesses, government
agencies, or civic organizations. Requires minimum 200 hours
work experience, assigned written reports, and performance
evaluations.
Principles of business communication and their application to
oral, written, and nonverbal communication.
FMIS 3421. Database Management and Design. (3 cr; A-F only. Prereq-2225 or CS
1121 or CS 1511, LSBE cand or o)
FMIS 3202. Enterprise System Architectures. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-2201 or
3201, 2225 or CS 1121, LSBE candidate or o)
Concepts and structures relating to design, implementation, and
administration of database management systems. Emphasis on
relational databases and development of integrated applications.
Combines an accelerated introduction to an object-oriented
programming language with an appreciation for developing
scalable, flexible and interoperable enterprise-wide application.
Focus is on how to select appropriate technologies and combine
them in the design of effective enterprise architectures.
FMIS 3222. Systems Analysis and Design. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-(2201 or
3201), 3421, LSBE cand or o)
Analysis phase of systems development life cycle. Emphasizes
feasibility study, requirements analysis, and system specification. Detailed study of current physical and logical systems
models and specification.
FMIS 3224. Telecommunications. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-3201 or 2201, CS 1121
or CS 1511, LSBE cand or o)
Management of telecommunications networks from a business
problem solving perspective. Survey of telecommunications
technologies, network architectures, management issues, and
evolving business environments.
Course Descriptions
FMIS 3291. Independent Study MIS. (1-3 cr [max 3 cr]; A-F only. Prereq-§3991, [T])
FMIS 3228. Electronic Commerce. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-2201 or 3201, CS 1121
or CS 1511, LSBE cand or o)
Overview of the impact of electronic commerce (EC) on
business, principles and practices of Internet-based electronic
commerce, business and IT strategies, and future developments.
Survey of EC applications, business models and information
technologies underlying these applications.
FMIS 3230. Extensible Markup Language and its Applications. (3 cr; A-F or Aud.
Prereq-2201 or 3201, LSBE candidate, or o)
Covers XML and its applications ranging from an introductory to an intermediate level. The standard specifications and
technologies will be delivered, including DTDs, XML schemas,
XSLT, and Web services along with their real-world business
applications.
FMIS 3232. ASP.Net and Web Services. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-2201 or 3201,
LSBE candidate or o)
Introduces Micorsoft.Net technology, which consists of the .Net
Platform and the .Net Framework. Focuses on the ASP.Net with
VB.Net, which is part of .Net Framework designed for developing Web applications and Web services.
336
FMIS 3601. Corporation Finance. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-LSBE cand or approved
non-LSBE bus adm minor or o)
Fundamental concepts of managerial financial decision making.
Time value of money, valuation, risk and return, financial statement analysis, short-run financial management, capital budgeting, cost of capital, long-term financing, and corporate taxation.
FMIS 3612. Managerial Finance. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-3601, LSBE cand or o)
Intermediate conceptual and analytical applications in capital
budgeting, funds flow, cost of capital, debt management, equity
financing, mergers and acquisitions, business reorganizations,
international financial management.
FMIS 3619. Analysis of Financial Statements. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-3601,
LSBE candidate or #; §Acct 3619)
Analysis and interpretation of financial statements, presentation
of analytical techniques, including trend, comparative, and ratio
analysis. Use of computer assisted analysis
FMIS 3644. Investment Fundamentals. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-3601, LSBE cand
or o)
Comprehensive introduction to nature, problems, and process
of evaluating particular securities and portfolio construction.
Survey of basic principles of security analysis, analytical techniques, and investment policy for individual and institutional
investors. Introduction to computer-assisted investment analysis.
FMIS 3647. Financial Markets and Institutions. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-3601,
LSBE cand or o)
Analysis of money and capital markets, savings-investment
process, and financial institutions. Role of Federal Reserve and
Treasury in finance market development; supply and demand
for loanable funds; level and structure of interest rates. Asset/liability management.
FMIS 3649. International Finance. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-3601, LSBE cand or o)
Comprehensive framework and analysis for financial management of international firm. International financial markets,
exchange rates and international firms, elements of international
investments, financing decisions, and strategy formulation.
Foreign Studies
FMIS 3655. Risk Management and Insurance. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-3601,
LSBE candidate or #)
FMIS 4624. Applied Portfolio Management. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-4616, 4620,
%; no Grad School credit)
Foundations as well as the economic, financial and legal issues
surrounding risk management and insurance. Students will
discuss and analyze risk management techniques currently used
in business and examine different types of insurance policies.
Gives students in the financial markets program “hands on”
learning experience by analyzing and managing a real-money
investment fund. Students will be responsible for managing all
aspects of the investment fund.
FMIS 3691. Independent Study Finance. (1-3 cr [max 3 cr]; A-F only. Prereq-[T],
§3991)
FMIS 4644. Portfolio Management. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-3644, LSBE candidate)
For students wishing to do special work in finance that extends
beyond, or in greater depth than, regular course offerings.
FMIS 3695. Special Topics: (Various Titles to be Assigned). (1-3 cr [max 6 cr]; A-F or
Aud. Prereq-3601, LSBE cand or o)
Exploration of specific finance problems, issues, and
approaches.
FMIS 4220. Medical Informatics. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-2201 or 3201, LSBE
cand or o, no Grad School cr)
Introduction to the convergence of computing, information systems, and healthcare with a focus on managing information and
developing systems that leads to more effective decisions and
actions in healthcare. Covers the standards, ethics and security
of the electronic health record.
FMIS 4222. Trends and Issues in Information Systems. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq3201 or 2201, CS 1121 or CS 1511, MIS major with 90 credits; no Grad School credit)
Exploration of new and emergent technologies, assessment of
industrial opportunities for and impacts of the technologies,
management of the enterprise’s information system function,
ethical issues, and other IS-related issues and trends.
FMIS 4225. Advanced Applications Development. (3 cr; A-F only. Prereq-3222,
MIS major or o)
Development of advanced microcomputer-based applications
using modern development environments (languages). Emphasis
on systems development and integration, interface design, and
data access strategies.
FMIS 4295. MIS Special Topics: (Various Titles to be Assigned). (1-3 cr [max 6 cr];
A-F or Aud. Prereq-2201 or 3201, LSBE cand or o)
Exploration of specific MIS problems, issues, and approaches
FMIS 4615. Futures and Options. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-3644, LSBE cand with 60
cr or grad student or o)
Nature and functions of derivative security markets such as options, futures, options on futures, swaps, and financial engineering. Emphasizes their use as tools for risk reduction, portfolio
management, and speculative medium for aggressive investor.
Introduction to theory, concepts, and practices of security
analysis and investment practices. Common stock, fixed income
securities, derivative securities, and mutual funds will be analyzed. Other topics include sector analysis, financial statement
analysis, ratio analysis, diversification, and hedging.
FMIS 4617. Management of Financial Institutions. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-3647,
LSBE cand with 60 cr or grad student or o)
Techniques for managing commercial banks and other financial
institutions through asset/liability management.
FMIS 4620. Portfolio Theory and Analysis. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-4616, %; no
Grad School credit; §FMIS 4611)
Portfolio management in a modern portfolio theory (MPT)
framework. Risk measurements, risk-return relationships, and
portfolio models are developed. Topics include Markowitz
portfolio theory, risk-return models, bond portfolio management, evaluating portfolio performance, and outperforming the
market.
FMIS 4695. Special Topics: (Various Titles to be Assigned). (1-3 cr [max 6 cr]; A-F or
Aud. Prereq-LSBE cand or o; no Grad School credit)
Exploration of specific finance problems, issues, and
approaches.
Fine Arts (FA)
School of Fine Arts
FA 1102. Creating Art. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-§1101 LE 9)
Discussion/direct experience of settings/ways in which art
(including aesthetic philosophy and other creative work) arises.
FA 1103. Freshman Seminar: Honors: Creating Art. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. PrereqFreshman, fewer than 30 cr, honors student LEIP 09)
Critical understanding of the means and concepts that foster
creative work. Examination of the diversity within modern societies that link experiences to the products of the artistic mind.
FA 1300. Creating Across Disciplines. (3 cr; Stdnt Opt)
Investigation of interdisciplinary creative possibilities offered
by artists working with computers, sound, visual arts, theatre,
dance, and music, culminating in individual or collaborative
public performance.
FA 2595. Special Topics: (Various Titles to be Assigned). (1-3 cr [max 9 cr]; Stdnt Opt)
Selected studies with interdisciplinary or multidisciplinary
focus.
FA 5300. Creating Across Disciplines. (3 cr [max 9 cr]; Stdnt Opt. Prereq-No Grad
School credit)
Advanced work in interdisciplinary and interactive or collaborative projects, performances, or installations, drawing upon
concepts and processes from various arts disciplines.
Foreign Studies (FST)
Course Descriptions
FMIS 4616. Security Analysis. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-3644, Acct 3101 or FMIS
3619; %; no Grad School credit)
Portfolio analysis in the mean-variance framework of
Markowitz. Portfolio management strategies. The CAPM,
APT, and other capital market theory implications. Portfolio
performance evaluation.
Academic Adm–Adm
FST 228. Foreign Studies Preparation. (0 cr; No grade. Prereq-#)
Provides tools necessary to prepare for and improve their
study abroad experience. On-line instruction allows students to
explore the country and culture in which they will study abroad
as well as preparing them to develop realistic expectations of
themselves and their study abroad experience.
FST 2929. Orientation to Foreign Studies. (2 cr; S-N or Aud. Prereq-Admitted to
an approved Study Abroad Program, required consent from the International Education
Office)
Study Abroad Course
FST 4949. Foreign Study Synthesis. (2 cr; S-N or Aud. Prereq-Admitted to an
approved Study Abroad Program, required consent from the International Education
Office. INTL PERSP)
Study Abroad Course, IP theme
FSt 1xxx-5xxx. Foreign Studies Courses. (1-20 cr Prereq-Admitted to an approved
study abroad program. Required consent from the International Education Office.)
Undergraduate and graduate courses used to designate study
abroad programs.
337
Course Descriptions
French (FR)
FR 4422. 20th-Century Novel. (4 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-2301 or equiv with C or
better or #; no Grad School credit)
College of Liberal Arts
Study of representative novels.
FR 1101. Beginning French I. (4 cr; A-F or Aud. LE 3)
FR 4472. French Classical Literature. (4 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-2301 or equiv with
C or better or #; no Grad School credit)
Conversation and communicative course for students with little
or no previous study of French. Emphasis on oral and aural
skills; some grammar. Taught in French and English.
FR 1102. Beginning French II. (4 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-1-2 yrs high school Fr or
1101 or # LE 3)
FR 4482. Voltaire and Rousseau in English. (4 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-2301 or equiv
with C or better or #; no Grad School credit)
Conversation and communicative course for students with
limited previous study of French. Emphasis on oral and aural
skills; some grammar. Taught in French and English.
Representative works.
FR 4492. 19th-Century Novel. (4 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-2301 with C or better or #;
no Grad School credit)
FR 1201. Intermediate French I. (4 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-3-4 yrs high school Fr or
1102 or # LE 3)
Study of several novels by major 19th-century writers: Hugo,
Balzac, Stendhal, Flaubert, Zola, Maupassant).
Consolidation and enrichment of previously acquired abilities
speaking and understanding French, set within introduction to
written French and survey of contemporary culture of Frenchspeaking societies. Emphasis on oral, aural, and reading skills;
vocabulary building; some writing. Taught in French.
Geography (GEOG)
FR 1202. Intermediate French II. (4 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-4 yrs high school Fr or
1201 or # LEIP 03)
Geography of human groups in diverse settings. Emphasis
on cultural diversity, regional development, and human and
environmental forces shaping regional patterns and processes.
Geographic analysis of selected regions and countries.
Consolidation and enrichment of previously acquired abilities
speaking and understanding French, set within introduction to
written French and survey of contemporary culture of Frenchspeaking societies. Emphasis on oral, aural, and reading skills;
vocabulary building; some writing. Taught in French.
FR 2301. Advanced French. (4 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-5 yrs high school Fr or 1202
or # LEIP 03)
College of Liberal Arts
GEOG 1202. World Regional Geography. (3 cr; A-F only. LEIP 08)
GEOG 1304. Human Geography. (3 cr; A-F only. LECD 06)
Ecological basis of human existence. Human population patterns and cultural diffusion. Agricultural geography. Political
geography. Geography of language, religion, and ethnic groups.
Effects of urbanization; economic geography.
Development of French literacy within a culturally authentic
contemporary context. Emphasis on practical writing and formal oral and aural communication skills; vocabulary building;
enhancement of reading skills; review of key grammar. Taught
in French.
GEOG 1414. Physical Geography. (4 cr; A-F only. LE 4)
FR 2315. French Cinema. (4 cr; A-F or Aud. LEIP 09)
GEOG 2306. Environmental Conservation. (3 cr; A-F only. LE 8)
Images of human diversity in French cinema. Films with
English subtitles; class discussion in English.
FR 3031–3032. French Language Study Abroad I–II. (1-5 cr [max 10 cr]; Stdnt
Opt. Prereq-%)
For students pursuing formal study of French, beyond the beginning and intermediate levels, in a French-speaking country,
under the auspices of another college or university or by
individual agreement.
Course Descriptions
Representative works of 17th-century French prose, poetry, and
theatre.
FR 3045–3048. French Culture and Civilization Study Abroad I–IV. (1-5 cr [max
10 cr]; Stdnt Opt. Prereq-%)
For students pursuing formal study of French culture and
civilization, beyond the beginning and intermediate levels, in a
French-speaking country, under the auspices of another college
or university or by individual agreement.
FR 3302. Advanced French Composition and Conversation. (4 cr; A-F or Aud.
Prereq-2301 with grade of C or higher)
Refines students’ skills in oral and written expression after they
have completed the French language sequence. Individualized
work on points of syntax and semantics, set in a contemporary
context, using a variety of texts and resources.
FR 3591. Independent Study. (1-4 cr [max 8 cr]; A-F or Aud. Prereq-2301 with C
or better, #)
Students develop and carry out reading and research programs
in consultation with the instructor.
FR 4412. Contemporary French Culture and Society. (4 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq2301 with grade of C or higher or #; no Grad School credit)
Study of contemporary social, cultural, and political issues in
France and other Francophone regions. Conducted in French.
338
Earth-sun relations, maps and globes, and major factors of the
natural environment, including water resources, landforms,
weather and climate, natural vegetation, and soils. (3 hrs lect,
2 hrs lab)
Integrated study of physical, economic, social, and political
aspects of natural resource management. Emphasis on identifying environmental problems and evaluating alternatives for
resolution, including planning, regulation, market incentives,
and mitigation activities.
GEOG 2313. Economic Geography. (3 cr; A-F only. LE 6)
Contemporary geographic pattern analysis of production, distribution, and consumption of goods and services. Development of
geographic theories and models that attempt to explain spatial
variations of economic activities such as agriculture, manufacturing, and trades and services.
GEOG 2405. Geography of Cultural Diversity. (3 cr; A-F only)
Culture is ubiquitous as it is ambiguous in social science
research. Cultural geography overlaps into all other sub
disciplines, along with current approaches, issues and debates in
contemporary research. It defies any clear, satisfying definition.
Consequently, the numerous philosophical, theoretical, methodological and ethical issues pertaining to the investigation and
representation of culture in academia will be the focus.
GEOG 2552. Introduction to Maps and Cartographic Methods. (3 cr; A-F only.
LE 2)
Defines maps and map-like images. Maps as communication tools. Scale, projections, cartographic generalization and
symbolization. Compares spatial data models and types of
spatial (geographic) data. How classification and symbolization
methods determine representation of spatial data.
Geography
GEOG 3334. Urban Geography and Planning. (3 cr; A-F only. Prereq-Min 30 cr incl
3 cr Geog or #)
GEOG 3702. Geography of the United States and Canada. (3 cr; A-F only. PrereqMin 30 cr incl 6 cr Geog or #)
Urbanization as a geographic process. Perspectives on economic, political and cultural foundations of cities; cities as life
spaces; environmental aspects of urbanization; principles and
history of urban planning; practice and politics of local government planning.
Topical presentation of geographic patterns in the United States
and Canada. Emphasis on contemporary social issues, including patterns of regional development and underdevelopment,
environmental issues, regionalism, nationalism, cultural patterns
and conflict, and social inequality.
GEOG 3342. Geography of Transportation. (4 cr; A-F only. Prereq-6 cr Geog incl
2313, 30 cr or #)
GEOG 3712. Geography of Latin America. (4 cr; A-F only. Prereq-Min 30 cr incl 6
cr Geog or #)
Distribution and pattern of various transportation models; geographic aspects of transport systems at empirical and theoretical
levels.
Survey of cultural and physical diversities of Latin America.
Physical resources, historical development, population characteristics, and economic activities.
GEOG 3350. Geography of Population, Gender, and Migration. (3 cr; A-F only)
GEOG 3762. Geography of Europe. (3 cr; A-F only. Prereq-Min 30 cr incl 6 cr Geog
or #)
Explores issues and themes related to the special distribution of
the world’s population. Various factors are involved in population change including fertility, mortality, migration, immigration, food, health, and environment. Population geographers
have begun to recognize the importance of gender in the spatial
patterns and social dimensions of human activities. Focuses on
the critical population theories; examines social constructions
and geographical variations based on masculinity and feminity;
and relates to the complex relations between gender and population in diverse historical and geographic settings.
Physical and cultural geography of countries of Europe considered regionally and through a more detailed discussion of topics
dealing with environmental, energy, urban, and industrial issues.
GEOG 3991. Independent Study in Geography. (1-4 cr [max 6 cr]; A-F only.
Prereq-#)
For students interested in doing advanced work in selected
fields of geography.
GEOG 3370. Geographies of Development. (3 cr; A-F only. Prereq-Min 30 cr)
GEOG 3995. Special Topics: (Various Titles to be Assigned). (1-4 cr [max 8 cr]; A-F
only. Prereq-#)
Focuses on the theories of development, development in
practice, and the spaces of development. Specifically considers
theories of development and their interpretations, strategies of
development and developing nations, and interconnections and
globalization and development.
Topics in geography of current and special interest to students
that are not offered in regular department curriculum. Topics
may involve specialties of staff or visiting faculty.
GEOG 3997. Internship in Geography. (1-6 cr [max 8 cr]; Stdnt Opt. Prereq-Geog
major, 60 cr or #)
GEOG 3401. Weather and Climate. (3 cr; A-F only. Prereq-1414, 25 cr or #)
Scheduled assignments with direct supervision in public agencies or relevant private firms.
Atmospheric composition, structure, and motion; precipitation processes, air masses, fronts, cyclonic storms, and general
weather patterns. Global distribution and classification of
climates.
GEOG 3422. Natural Hazards. (4 cr; A-F only. Prereq-1414, min 30 cr or #)
Geography of natural hazards. Human-physical environment
interrelationships under extreme geophysical conditions; causes,
characteristics, and consequences of natural hazards such as
earthquakes, tornadoes, hurricanes, floods, and drought; human
adjustment to these events.
GEOG 3461. Geography of Global Resources. (3 cr; A-F only. Prereq-Min 30 cr or #)
Survey of political geography past and present. Environmentalpolitical theories, German geopolitics, territoriality, nationstates and nationalism, boundaries and frontiers, jurisdictional
organization and reorganization, locational conflicts, electoral
geography, locality studies, and urban politics.
GEOG 4394. Gender, Space and Culture. (4 cr; A-F only. Prereq-Min 75 cr inc 6 cr
geog or #)
Gender differences in experiences of space and place; relationship between gender politics and geographies of cities, regions,
nation-states, and other social institutions; gender differences in
“making place” and interacting with environments; emphasis on
possibility of feminist alternatives.
GEOG 3481. Urban Ecology. (3 cr; A-F only)
GEOG 4451. The Geography of Soils. (4 cr; A-F only. Prereq-1414 or Geol 1110 or
Chem 1113 or Chem 1151 or grad student or #)
Introduction to theoretical, practical and policy aspects of
urban ecology. Discusses methods of sustainable cities and
ecologically responsible planning. Includes study of relevant
field techniques and policy issues, including public participation in planning process and development of sustainable growth
strategies.
Examines soil formation and processes in varied environments,
with emphasis on soil as a dynamic system, integral to all terrestrial ecosystems. Human impact and use of soils is examined
with regard to land degradation and soil erosion.
GEOG 4563. Introduction to Geographic Information Science. (3 cr; A-F only.
Prereq-3532, [P]4564, 60 cr incl 16 cr geog or #)
GEOG 3532. Map Design and Graphic Methods. (4 cr; A-F only. Prereq-2552 or #;
Stat 1411 recommended)
Theory of design, operation, and application of geographic
information science (GIS); theoretical application of GIS to environmental, physical, and socioeconomic problems; from data
gathering and coding through spatial analysis and interpretation.
Thematic mapping of qualitative and quantitative data. Data
measurement levels and their relationships to geographic
phenomena and map symbols. Appropriate treatment (both
statistical and representational) of map data. Designing and
creating maps using computers. (2 hrs lect, 4 hrs lab)
GEOG 4564. Laboratory in Geographic Information Science. (2 cr; A-F only.
Prereq-Min 60 cr, [P]4563 or #)
Application of geographic information science (GIS) to
environmental, physical, and socioeconomic problems; from
planning and creating a spatial database to spatial analysis of
database to explore contemporary spatial problems.
339
Course Descriptions
Spatial distribution and uses of global natural resources addressed through models of resource management, focusing on
energy, non-fuel minerals, population, food, and technology.
Theoretical approach and political perspective applied to trade,
international economic development, and environmental issues.
GEOG 4393. Political Geography. (4 cr; A-F only. Prereq-Min 75 cr inc 6 cr Geog
or #)
Course Descriptions
GEOG 4580. Introduction to Remote Sensing and Image Interpretation. (4 cr;
A-F only. Prereq-2552, 4563, 4564; course in computer programming, introductory
statistics recommended)
Introduces basic concepts of remote sensing of the environment.
Intended to provide the background information necessary to
successfully use remotely sensed imagery in conjunction with
GIS technology to answer questions about the world in which
we live.
College of Science and Engineering
GEOL 1040. Freshman Seminar: Topics: (Various Titles to be Assigned). (3 cr; A-F or
Aud. Prereq-Freshman. Fewer than 30 cr. LE 5)
Topics of general interest in the geosciences. Topic announced
before course is offered.
GEOG 5446. Water Processes and Management. (4 cr; A-F only. Prereq-1414 or
grad student)
GEOL 1041. Freshman Seminar: Minerals and Life: All That Glitters is Not Gold.
(3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-Freshman, fewer than 30 cr. LE 5)
Introduction to the components of surface water processes and
water resources management, including precipitation, runoff
generation, channel processes, spatial and temporal variations
in water distribution, aspects of water quantity and quality, and
basin management problems.
Civilizations have been built by the exploitation of rock and
mineral resources. This class chronicles mineral use from ancient civilization to the present. Topics covered include mineral
composition, use exploitation through time as well as the identification of common useful minerals. Field Trip Required.
GEOG 5541. Environmental Application of GIS. (4 cr; A-F only. Prereq-4563 or #)
GEOL 1042. Freshman Seminar: Natural Disasters and Civilization. (3 cr; A-F or
Aud. Prereq-Freshman, fewer than 30 cr., §1047, §1052 LE 5)
Introduction to ArcView GIS and its applications to the
environmental issues such as natural hazards, forest management, contaminated sites, soil erosion, habitat assessment, and
regional planning.
GEOG 5543. Advanced Cartographic Methods. (4 cr; A-F only. Prereq-3532, Stat
1411, 60 cr incl 12 cr geog or grad student or #)
Alternative map representations, such as multimedia representations, map animations, and maps for physically challenged
individuals. Focuses on cognitive issues concerning map design,
such as color perception andsymbolization, that enhance map
reading and understanding. (2 hrs lect, 4hrs lab)
GEOG 5612. Field Techniques. (4 cr; A-F only. Prereq-Min 60 cr incl 12 cr geog or
grad student or #)
Geographic survey of physical and cultural aspects of selected
urban and rural landscapes, including basic methods of observation, measurement, recording, analysis, and presentation of field
data. Chiefly field training.
GEOG 5803. Geographic Thought. (3 cr; A-F only. Prereq-30 cr incl 12 cr geog or
grad student or #)
Development and significance of geographic concepts and
thought. History and intellectual roots of contemporary geography, geographers, and geographic institutions.
GEOG 5991. Independent Study in Geography. (1-4 cr [max 6 cr]; A-F only. PrereqMax 4 cr can be applied to Graduate School program; #)
Independent problems for postbaccalaureate students interested
in doing additional work in selected fields in geography.
Course Descriptions
Geology (GEOL)
GEOG 5995. Special Topics: (Various Titles to be Assigned). (1-4 cr [max 6 cr]; A-F
only. Prereq-Grad student or #; max 8 cr to Grad School program)
Topics of current and special interest to students that are not
offered in regular curriculum. Topics may involve specialties of
staff or visiting faculty.
GEOG 5999. Senior Project in Geography. (3-4 cr [max 4 cr]; A-F only. Prereq-#;
Max 3 cr can be applied to Grad School program)
Student-initiated field, lab, and/or library research topic. Formal
written and oral presentation.
Natural disasters examined first from a geological perspective,
and then in terms of their effects on civilizations and/or species.
GEOL 1043. Freshman Seminar: Science and Societal Issues: Whom to
Believe?. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-Freshman, fewer than 30 cr. LE 5)
Reading current topics in society dealing with scientific issues:
e.g., global warming, water reserves, U.S. energy independence,
evolutionary science vs creationism. How do we read about
these issues critically to form an opinion? Seminar class primarily for non-science majors.
GEOL 1044. Freshman Seminar: Revolution in the Earth Sciences. (3 cr; A-F or
Aud. Prereq-Freshman, fewer than 30 cr. LE 4)
How theories of mountain building evolved to continental drift
to a not-quite-all-encompassing dynamic plate tectonics model
for the outer reaches of the Earth--a triumph of observation and
synthesis despite disbelief, ridicule, and hard luck.
GEOL 1045. Freshman Seminar: Minnesota’s Geologic History. (3 cr; A-F or Aud.
Prereq-Freshman, fewer than 30 cr. LE 4)
From volcanoes to oceans to Ice Ages, take a journey through
3.6 billion years of Minnesota’s geologic history. The journey
starts with volcanoes rising from the sea and takes students
through episodes of mountain building, marine invasions, and
Ice Ages. (Course fees assessed.)
GEOL 1047. Freshman Seminar: People and Volcanoes. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. PrereqFreshman, fewer than 30 credits, §1042, §1052 LE 5)
From 3.7 million year old footprints in volcanic ash through
world changing eruptions like Tambora and Santorini to
robots investigating volcanic craters, this course explores the
fascinating and dangerous relationship of humans and human
civilizations with volcanoes.
GEOL 1048. Freshman Seminar: Human Dimension of Global Environmental
Change. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-Freshman, fewer than 30 credits, §1058 LEIP 05)
Study of environmental change on Earth, past and present.
Integration of natural systems with human activity, including
natural cycles in Earth systems, human population, resources,
sustainability, global atmospheric change, and environmental
ethics.
GEOL 1052. Freshman Seminar: Honors: Natural Disasters and Civilizations.
(3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-Freshman, fewer than 30 credits, honors student, §1042,
§1047 LE 5)
Natural disasters examined from the perspective of the geological and climatic processes that govern them, and their effect on
human civilization and/or living species.
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Geology
GEOL 1058. Freshman Seminar: Honors: Human Dimension of Global Environmental Change. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-Freshman, fewer than 30 credits, honors
student, §1048 LEIP 05)
Study of environmental change on Earth, past and present.
Integration of natural systems with human activity, including
natural cycles in Earth systems, human population, resources,
sustainability, global atmospheric change, and environmental
ethics.
GEOL 1110. Geology and Earth Systems. (4 cr; A-F or Aud. LE 4)
Comprehensive survey of Earth’s composition, structure, and
dynamics to develop an understanding of internal processes,
plate tectonics, and surface processes as a framework for
geological history and development of life.
GEOL 1120. Life and Death of the Dinosaurs. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. LE 5)
Survey of dinosaurs, who dominated large-animal life on
Earth for 150 million years; theories of dinosaur origins and
extinction; habitat of dinosaurs on worldwide Mesozoic coastal
plains; dinosaur fossilization and modern excavation.
GEOL 1130. Introduction to Environmental Science. (4 cr; A-F or Aud. LEIP 04)
Earth’s physical and biological systems and human interaction
with the environment. Climate, rocks, soils, ecosystems, human
population, land use, energy use and its consequences, environmental policy, air and water pollution, and conservation issues.
GEOL 1610. Oceanography. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-§2610 LE 5)
Origin and history of ocean basins, sea floor morphology, chemistry of sea water, currents, waves, tides, life in the sea, primary
productivity, nutrient dynamics, human impact.
GEOL 2110. Earth History. (3 cr; A-F only. Prereq-1110 or 1130 or 2610 or Ast 1040
or Geog 1414 or #)
The historical development of the science of geology, nature
of the geologic record, fossils, the geologic time scale, and
tectonic evolution of continents and ocean basins. Concepts
presented are developed within the framework of the theory of
plate tectonics.
GEOL 2111. Earth History Laboratory. (1 cr; A-F only. Prereq-1110 or 1130 or 2610
or Ast 1040 or Geog 1414 or #)
Laboratory companion to GEOL 2110, the historical development of the science of geology. Geological science majors and
minor are required to take this 1 (one) 2-hour lab each week.
GEOL 2120. The Earth’s Dynamic Interior. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-1110 or 1130
or 2110 or 1610 or Geog 1414)
GEOL 2300. Basic Mineralogy and Petrology. (4 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-§2311, 1 yr
high school chem or 1 sem of college chem, 1110 or #, not for geol BS majors)
Introduction to study of minerals and rocks; survey of the most
common and economically important minerals and rock types,
including their composition, identification, and origin. (2 hrs
lect, 4 hrs lab, field trip)Taught alt. years
GEOL 2311. Mineralogy. (4 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-§2300; 1110 or 2110, 1 sem
college chem or Instructor approval)
Systematic study of minerals and their relationship to rocks.
Emphasis will be placed on introductory crystal chemistry,
crystallography and physical properties; optical mineralogy, and
identification of minerals in hand specimen, thin section, and by
x-ray diffraction. (Course fee assessed.)
Petrology of igneous, sedimentary and metamorphic rocks,
including their occurrence, petrogenesis and tectonic setting.
Emphasis on the relationships between mineral assemblages,
rock textures, geochemistry, origins, and rock-forming processes. Course fees assessed.
GEOL 2350. Earth’s Resources. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-25 sem cr or # LEIP 05)
Distribution of Earth’s resources through space and time, including metals, minerals, fossil fuels, building materials, water,
and soil. Relationships between population growth and Earth’s
finite resources. (field trip)
GEOL 3000. Geologic Maps. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-1110 or 1130 or Geog 1414)
Principles of reading and interpreting geological maps.
Emphasis will be placed on interpreting and visualizing
published geologic maps, constructing geologic histories, and
an introduction to the basic methods of making geologic maps
in the field.
GEOL 3091. Independent Study. (1-2 cr [max 4 cr]; Stdnt Opt. Prereq-#)
Directed readings and projects on topics not normally covered
in other courses.
GEOL 3100. Earth’s Climate and Environment: Past and Future. (3 cr; A-F or Aud.
Prereq-1110 or 1130 or 1610)
Exploration of the processes that control Earth’s climate and
affect the environment on timescales of 100’s of millions to 10’s
of years. Discussions will include how and why the dinosaurs
environment was different from today’s and concerns about
future global warming.
GEOL 3180. Teaching Assistant Experience I. (1-2 cr [max 6 cr]; S-N only. Prereq2110, 2120, 2311, 2312, geological sciences major, # (Max 2 cr can be applied toward
geological sciences major.))
Participation in teaching Geological Sciences lecture and lab
courses, including preparation of material, instruction, and
student interaction.
GEOL 3210. Geomorphology. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-1110 or 2110, Math 1250
or #, §2210)
Study of Earth surface processes emphasizing the origin and
evolution of landforms; response of the physical environment to
climatic change and tectonic events, and application of physical,
chemical, and mathematical principles to the study and interpretation of landforms.
GEOL 3420. Sedimentology and Stratigraphy. (4 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-2110,
2311 or #)
Introduction to the concepts, methods, and application of
sedimentology and stratigraphy, including the description
and interpretation of sediments and sedimentary rocks, their
provenance, stratal packaging, and tectonostratigraphic setting.
(Course fee assessed.)
Course Descriptions
Treatment of the origin, structure and internal composition
of the Earth, synthesizing geological, chemical and physical knowledge bearing on the Earth’s inaccessible interior.
Emphasis is placed on dynamic processes at all depths in the
Earth.
GEOL 2312. Petrology. (4 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-2311)
GEOL 3710. Introduction to Geochemistry. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-Math 1296 or
equiv, Chem 1152 or #)
Understanding chemical reactions occurring in geological processes on scales ranging from atomic to global. Geochemistry
of the Earth; chemical reactions and stability of minerals;
applications of geochemistry to understanding global processes
and environmental problems. (3 hrs lect)
GEOL 4091. Geologic Problems and Research. (1-2 cr [max 4 cr]; A-F or Aud.
Prereq-#, no Grad School cr)
Individual research in lab or field problems.
GEOL 4110. Advanced Earth Science for Teachers. (2 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-1110,
teaching science majors or grad student or #)
Investigative approach to secondary school teaching of modern
earth science curricula, including aspects of astronomy, meteorology, oceanography, and geology, the latter with an emphasis
on plate tectonics. (2 hrs lect)
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Course Descriptions
GEOL 4180. Teaching Assistant Experience II. (1-2 cr [max 4 cr]; S-N only. PrereqGeol core, geological sciences major, #; max 2 cr can be applied toward geological
sciences major; cr cannot be applied to a Grad School program)
Participation in teaching Geological Sciences lecture and lab
courses, including preparation of material, instruction, and
student interaction.
GEOL 4210. Glacial and Quaternary Geology. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-3210 or
grad student or #, §5210)
Physics of glacier flow, processes of erosion and deposition,
survey of glacial landforms, history and chronology of glaciation. Survey of geological and biological responses to changing
environment resulting from climatic fluctuations during last
three million years of Earth history. Field studies on the glacial
deposits of Minnesota. (2 hrs lect, 2 hrs field lab)
GEOL 4240. Physical Hydrogeology. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-2110, Phys 2011,
Math 1296 or Math 1290 or grad student or #, §5240)
Introduction to concepts of fluid movement in Earth’s crust and
the interaction of rocks and water. Introduction to the hydrologic cycle, theory of flow through porous media, crustal-scale
flow systems, role of fluids in the plate tectonic cycle.
GEOL 4250. Environmental Hydrogeology. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-Math 1296 or
Math 1290 and Phys 2011 or Grad student or #, §5250)
A quantitative introduction to hydrogeology and aquifer
mechanics with emphasis on environmental applications,
including, unsaturated flow, interaction between surface water
and groundwater, wellhead protection, well hydraulics, inverse
methods, and solute transport. Offered alternate years.
GEOL 4320. Precambrian Geology. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-4450 or grad student
or #, §5320)
Nature, distribution, origin, correlation, and special problems
of the Precambrian, emphasizing Lake Superior region. Term
paper. 3 hrs. lect, field trips; offered alternate years.
GEOL 4335. Physical Volcanology. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-2312 or grad student
or #, §5335)
Morphology and development of volcanic formations and deposits, and criteria for their recognition in ancient rock terranes.
Types of eruptions and deposits, tectonic environments of volcanism, evolution of volcanoes, physical processes and controls of
volcanism, and volcanic hazards. Offered alternate years.
Course Descriptions
GEOL 4350. Economic Geology. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-2312 or grad student or
#, §5350)
Geologic description, distribution, and genesis of economic
mineral deposits; processes leading to their formation; relationship to plate tectonics; exploration techniques and criteria for
finding new deposits. Course fees assessed.
GEOL 4450. Structural Geology. (4 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-2312 or #, §3520)
Introduction to brittle and ductile deformation, including joints,
faults, shear zones, and folds; elementary stress and strain
theory; deformation mechanisms; introduction to plate tectonics. Labs emphasize geologic map interpretation and structural
analysis. (Two hrs lec, 4 hrs lab, field trip - course fee assessed.)
GEOL 4480. Tectonics. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-2120, 4450, or grad student or #,
§5500)
Ancient and active plate-tectonic processes. Topics include
tectonic theory, plate motions, evolution of divergent, convergent and transform margins, anatomy of orogenic belts, and
neotectonics. Examines tectonic phenomena in the context
of geological, geophysical and surficial processes. Offered
alternate years.
GEOL 4500. Field Geology. (6 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-4450, %)
Geological mapping of sedimentary, igneous, and metamorphic
terranes and of Quaternary deposits and landforms; topographic
maps and aerial photographs, including preparation of geologic
maps and cross sections, and map unit descriptions.
342
GEOL 4610. Terrestrial Planets. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-2120 or 2312 or 2300 or
grad student or #, §5610)
Investigate formation and evolution of the terrestrial planets
through primary literature and data; examine the interaction between and within material reservoirs: interior (core and mantle),
lithosphere, hydrosphere and biosphere, across a range of spatial and temporal scales; discuss critical unresolved questions.
GEOL 4805. Environmental Geophysics. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-1110, Math 1297
or grad student or #, §5810)
Review of principle geophysical techniques used in the environmental and exploration industries. Emphasizes the application
of these techniques for solving near-surface problems. Includes
review of case histories and group projects.
GEOL 4820. Global Geophysics. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-2120, Math 1290 or 1296
or grad student or #, §5820)
Build upon material presented in 2120, exploring the contribution of geophysics to our understanding of the Earth and the
processes that control its appearance and behavior. Offered
alternate years.
GEOL 5091. Geologic Problems. (1-2 cr [max 4 cr]; Stdnt Opt. Prereq-Graduate
Student or #)
Individual research in lab or field problems.
GEOL 5095. Special Topics: (Various Titles to be Assigned). (1-2 cr [max 4 cr]; A-F
or Aud. Prereq-#)
Topics not covered in regular curriculum. Topic announced
before course offered.
GEOL 5100. Seminar. (1-2 cr [max 4 cr]; Stdnt Opt. Prereq-#)
Oral and written presentation on topics of current significance
to geoscientists. Participation by department staff.
GEOL 5200. Geological Field Studies. (2-3 cr [max 6 cr]; Stdnt Opt. Prereq-[2110 or
2120] or grad student or #)
Project-oriented field class in classical geological localities.
Trips may be 1 or 2 weeks long, normally run during semester
breaks or summer sessions. Examples of trips include Barbados,
Hawaii, desert Southwest, California, and Big Bend area of
Texas. Travel fee assessed for each location.
GEOL 5215. Glaciology. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-8 cr geol, Math 1290 or Math 1296,
Phys 2011 or grad student of #)
Theory of glacier flow. Anatomy of glaciers and ice sheets,
mechanics and therodynamics of glacier flow. Reconstruction of
physical characteristics of past ice sheets from glacial sediments
and landforms. Glacier response to climate change. Offered
alternate years
GEOL 5220. Global Climate Change. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-#)
Analysis of past global change from climate proxy records in
glacial ice, tree rings, ocean and lake sediments, ocean corals.
Impact of ocean and atmospheric circulation on global climate;
climate cycles; El Nino; human impact on global climate.
Offered alternate years.
GEOL 5310. Advanced Petrology. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-2312 or grad student)
Physico-chemical principles applied to origin of igneous and
metamorphic rocks. Phase equilibria in important mineral systems. Lab study and interpretation of igneous and metamorphic
rocks using petrographic microscope. (2 hrs lect, 2 hrs lab)
GEOL 5430. Stratigraphy and Basin Analysis. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-2110, Math
1296 or grad student or #)
An integrated study of sedimentary basins as dynamical
systems. Analysis of how tectonic and climatic processes drive
sedimentation in basins, how these processes are preserved in
the basin fill, and how stratigraphers interpret the rock record.
Offered alternate years.
German
GEOL 5440. Depositional Environment and Stratal Architecture I: Field Methods and Applications. (2 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-3420 or grad student, #)
GEOL 8777. Thesis Credit: Master’s. (1-18 cr [max 50 cr]; No grade. Prereq-Max 18
cr per semester or summer; 10 cr total required (Plan A only))
Advanced field-methods aimed at teaching the methods and
applications of depositional-facies analysis and sequence
stratigraphy using outcrop data over regional scales. Includes a
one-week field trip. (Course fee assessed.)
GEOL 8888. Thesis Credits: Doctoral. (1-24 cr [max 100 cr]; No grade. Prereq-[max
18 cr per semester or summer]; 24 cr required)
GEOL 5442. Depositional Environments, Stratal Architecture II: Conceptual,
Mathematical, and Physical Modeling. (2 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-3420, Grad school
student, or instructor consent)
An introduction to techniques in forward and inverse stratigraphic modeling, with emphasis on developing an understanding of how physical processes in various depositional
environments generate a stratigraphic response to climatic and
tectonic forcing.
GEOL 5450. Advanced Structure. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-2120, 4450, or grad
student or #)
Modern structural analysis: strain (paths, partitioning, history),
theology, displacement, deformation processes, (mesoscopic,
grainscale, microstructures), and fabric evolution. Application
of structural techniques to integrative problems (e.g., tectonics,
hydrogeology, and planetary, sedimentary and economic geology). Offered alternate years. Course fee assessed.
GEOL 5710. Aqueous Geochemistry/Chemical Hydrogeology. (3 cr; A-F or Aud.
Prereq-Math 1290 or Math 1297 and Chem 1152 or grad student or #,)
Principles of solution chemistry, with application to chemical
weathering, acid deposition, rivers, lakes, and oceans. Use of
chemical equilibrium software to examine complex real world
problems.
GEOL 5730. Geochronology. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-2311, one year of college
chemistry or grad student)
Covers both radiometric and non-radiometric methods of dating
primarily Earth but also solar-system materials (meteorites).
The chronometers discussed will cover a range of timescales,
from early solar-system history to recent human-influenced
history. Offered alternate years.
GEOL 5839. Coral Reef Geology. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-Jr or sr or grad student in
Geol or related field and #; §Biol 5839)
Physical, chemical and sedimentary processes in coral reef
environments, reef morphology, stratigraphic framework of
modern and ancient reefs, reef type and dependence on basin
morphology and tectonic setting, coral reefs and Quaternary
sea-level change. Includes field study of reef systems.
GEOL 8094. Geologic Research. (1-6 cr [max 6 cr]; A-F or Aud. Prereq-#)
GEOL 8100. Seminar. (1-2 cr [max 6 cr]; S-N or Aud. Prereq-Grad geol major or #)
Oral and written presentations on topics of current significance
to geoscientists.
GEOL 8200. Professional Issues in Earth and Environmental Science. (1 cr; S-N
or Aud. Prereq-Graduate student or #)
Introduces the incoming graduate student in geological sciences
to professional practice, standards and ethics, including peer
review, proposal writing, ethical problems, the purpose of a
university.
GEOL 8333. FTE: Master’s. (1 cr; No grade. Prereq-Master s student, adviser and
DGS consent)
GEOL 8444. FTE: Doctoral. (1 cr; No grade. Prereq-prereq doctoral student, adviser
and DGS consent
GEOL 8666. Doctoral Pre-Thesis Credits. (1-6 cr [max 12 cr]; No grade. Prereq-Max
6 cr per semester or summer; doctoral student who has not passed prelim oral; no
required consent for the first two registrations up to 12 cr; departmental consent for
the third and fourth registrations up to an additional 12 cr, or 24 cr total (for doctoral
students admitted summer 2007 and beyond; doctoral students admitted prior to
summer 2007 may register up to 4 times totaling 60 cr))
College of Liberal Arts
GER 1101. Beginning German I. (4 cr; A-F or Aud. LE 3)
Conversation and communicative course for students with little
or no previous study of German. Emphasis on oral and aural
skills; some grammar. Taught in German and English.
GER 1102. Beginning German II. (4 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-1-2 yrs high school Ger
or 1101 or # LE 3)
Conversation and communicative course for students with
limited previous study of German. Emphasis on oral and aural
skills; some grammar. Taught in German and English.
GER 1201. Intermediate German I. (4 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-3-4 yrs high school Ger
or 1102 or # LE 3)
Consolidation and enrichment of previously acquired abilities
speaking and understanding German, set within introduction to
written German and survey of contemporary culture of Germanspeaking societies. Emphasis on oral, aural, and reading skills;
vocabulary building; some writing. Taught in German.
GER 1202. Intermediate German II. (4 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-4 yrs high school Ger
or 1201 or # LEIP 03)
Consolidation and enrichment of previously acquired abilities
speaking and understanding German, set within introduction to
written German and survey of contemporary culture of Germanspeaking societies. Emphasis on oral, aural, and reading skills;
vocabulary building; some writing. Taught in German.
GER 2301. Advanced German. (4 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-5 yrs high school Ger or
1202 or # LEIP 03)
Development of German literacy within a culturally authentic
contemporary context. Emphasis on practical writing and formal oral and aural communication skills; vocabulary building;
enhancement of reading skills; review of key grammar. Taught
in German.
GER 2402. Germany Today. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-Cr will not count toward Ger
major or minor LEIP 08)
Survey of culture, politics, and society of Germany and
German-speaking countries, beginning with post World War
II era and emphasizing the European Union’s emergence and
Germany’s role in contemporary Eastern Europe.
Course Descriptions
Individual research.
German (GER)
GER 3031–3032. German Language Study Abroad I–II. (1-5 cr [max 10 cr]; Stdnt
Opt. Prereq-%)
For students pursuing formal study of German, beyond the
beginning and intermediate levels, in a German-speaking
country, under the auspices of another college or university or
by individual agreement.
GER 3040. Culture of Germany Studied in Germany. (4 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq1202 or #)
Study of German culture, both contemporary and past as it
informs the present, on site in Germany. Conducted entirely
in German, and all language skills will be inculcated and
improved. Format will include seminar, discussions, field trips,
and small group projects
GER 3045–3048. German Culture and Civilization Study Abroad I–IV. (1-5 cr
[max 10 cr]; Stdnt Opt. Prereq-%)
For students pursuing formal study of German culture and
civilization, beyond the beginning and intermediate levels, in a
German-speaking country, under the auspices of another college
or university or by individual agreement.
343
Course Descriptions
GER 3302. Advanced Composition and Conversation. (4 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq2301)
Graduate School (GRAD)
Refines students’ skills in oral and written expression after they
have completed the German language sequence. Individualized
work on points of syntax and semantics, set in a contemporary
context, using a variety of texts and resources.
Academic Adm-Adm
GER 3401. Introduction to Literary Studies. (4 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-2301 or
[P]2301 or #)
Techniques and tools for understanding and writing about
German poetry, fiction, and drama both as literary texts and as
cultural testimony. Emphasis on class discussion and writing
critical essays in German.
GER 3403. German Poetry and Theater. (4 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-2301 with a grade
of C or higher or #)
Survey of major German poets since the Middle Ages (first five
weeks) and modern German dramatists (remainder of semester).
Emphasis on class discussion and interpretive reading in
German, with two critical essays in German.
GER 3405. German Literature until 1832. (4 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-2301 (concurrent registration permitted with #.))
A survey of German literature from the Lay of Hildebrant until
the death of Goethe, including introduction to critical reading.
Readings in German (primary texts) and English (commentaries); discussion and writing in German.
GER 3406. German Literature from the Romantics (1800) until the End of the
Modern Era (1965). (4 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-2301 with a grade of C or higher or #,
3405 is recommended preparation)
A survey of German literature from the Romantic era (1800)
until the beginning of the student movement in about 1965.
Readings in German (primary texts) and English (commentaries), and an introduction to critical reading (with guides in
German and English).
GER 3591. Independent Study. (1-4 cr [max 8 cr]; A-F or Aud. Prereq-2301 with a
grade of C or higher or equiv or #)
Students develop and carry out reading and research programs
in consultation with the instructor.
GER 4095. Special Topics: (Various Titles to be Assigned). (1-4 cr [max 8 cr]; A-F or
Aud. Prereq-2301 with a grade of C or higher or #)
Various topics in the language history and structure, literature,
and culture of the German-speaking countries.
Course Descriptions
GER 4202. The German Novelle. (4 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-2301 with a grade of C or
higher or equiv or #; no Grad School credit)
Reading and analysis of short fiction created in German-speaking countries from late 1700s to modern era, with emphasis on
texts as social commentary. Class discussion and term paper in
German.
GER 4302. German Women Writers and Filmmakers. (4 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq2301 or #; no Grad School credit)
Analysis of German written and visual texts and exploration
of women’s oppression within repressive political systems as
well as Western democracies; women’s exploration of their
selves; and the question of whether there is a “female writing”.
Conducted in German.
GER 4305. German Cinema. (4 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-2301 with a grade of C or
higher or instructor’s consent; no Grad School credit)
An introduction to the history of German cinema and to film
analysis with a focus on the relationship among German film,
history, literature, culture, and politics. The course will examine
representative works from various cinematic periods. Taught in
German.
GER 4404. Contemporary Germany. (4 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-2301 with a grade of
C or higher or equiv or #; no Grad School credit)
Civilization, culture, and politics of Germany and Germanspeaking countries since 1945. Research term paper in German.
344
GRAD 999. Graduate School Active Status. (0 cr; No grade. Prereq-Grad School
Students Only)
A zero-credit registration mechanism for Grad School students
who must register solely to meet the Grad School’s registration
requirement. Registration requirements established by departments and agencies within or outside the University (which
include, but are not restricted to registration required to hold an
assistantship, athletic eligibility, maintain legal visa status or
defer loans) are NOT met by Grad 0999.
Health (HLTH)
College of Education and Human Service
Professions
HLTH 1100. Health and Wellness Strategies for Life. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq§Hlth 1000 LE 8)
A lecture series introducing students to health and wellness
encompassing nutritional, physical, emotional and spiritual
aspects of health and well-being with emphasis on behavioral,
environmental and social influences on developing a satisfying
and productive lifestyle in our society.
HLTH 1104. Health Science Terminology. (1-3 cr [max 3 cr]; A-F or Aud)
Terms commonly used in health sciences and medical professions; emphasis on word structure.
HLTH 1470. Human Nutrition. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. LE 5)
Emphasis on chemical nature of dietary nutrients, physiological and metabolic aspects of human nutrition, effects of diet on
human health, and global issues in health and nutrition.
HLTH 1600. Basic First Aid and CPR. (2 cr; A-F or Aud)
Basic skills and knowledge to respond correctly in first aid
emergencies. Leads to American Red Cross Certification basic
first aid and CPR certification.
HLTH 1650. CPR/AED for the Professional Rescuer. (1 cr; A-F or Aud)
Techniques of cardiopulmonary resuscitation involving one and
two rescuers. Leads to American Red Cross certification for
infant/child/adult CPR and AED.
HLTH 1700. First Responder. (3 cr; A-F or Aud)
Principles of emergency response and accident prevention in
the home and community. Leads to Red Cross first emergency
responder certification.
HLTH 2030. Applied Human Anatomy. (4 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-Athletic training, hlth
ed or pe or exer sci or rec major or cand, [Biol 1001 or Biol 1011] and [Chem 1102 or
Chem 1113]; §Biol 1761)
Introduction to human gross anatomy. Skeletal, muscular,
nervous, circulatory, respiratory, and excretory systems.
Applications in health and physical education. Demonstrations
with predissected specimens.
HLTH 2040. Principles of Human Physiology. (4 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-Athletic
training or hlth ed or pe or rec or ex sci majors or cand or hlth ed minor, 1 sem each of
college Biol, Chem, Anat recommended)
Physiological mechanisms of cells, organs, and organ systems;
function, control, and coordination of body systems.
HLTH 3101. Community Health. (3 cr; A-F or Aud)
Health promotion and disease prevention at local, state, and
national levels. Comparison between health problems of
individuals and those of groups. Analysis of functions and roles
of voluntary and official agencies. Exploration of communitybased programs.
Health Care Management
HLTH 3115. Consumer Health Education. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-Min 30 credits)
Overview of concepts of marketing, analysis, selection, and
decision making regarding health care, products, services, and
providers.
HLTH 3116. Principles of Epidemiology and Human Disease. (3 cr; A-F or Aud)
Discussion of diseases and distribution among people. Topics
include epidemiological concepts of how diseases are transmitted, surveillance and outbreak investigations, and prevention
to eliminate diseases in the community. Vital statistics and
methods of tabular-graphical data will be explored.
HLTH 3117. Principles of Sex Education. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-hlth ed cand or #)
HLTH 3305. Community Health Methods and Strategies. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq3301, 3303, hlth ed cand or #)
Theory, methods and practice of community health education.
Includes identification and prioritization of community health
problems with emphasis on development and implementation
of strategies to address these problems. Students will test these
strategies within community and school settings.
HLTH 3500. Environmental Health. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-hlth ed cand or #)
Biological, ecological, and physiological aspects of the environment; concurrent effects on health of the community; and
possible solutions to environmental problems.
Planning and implementing comprehensive sex education
programs in various settings. Sexual physiology, sociocultural
aspects of sexuality, birth control, prevention of STDs/HIV,
teen pregnancy, and other current topics. How community and
family values affect sex education.
HLTH 3620. Wilderness First Response. (3 cr; Stdnt Opt)
HLTH 3118. Women’s Health Issues. (3 cr; A-F or Aud)
HLTH 3991. Independent Study. (1-6 cr [max 6 cr]; A-F or Aud. Prereq-#)
Survey of American women’s health issues. Role of women as
patients and as health care providers. Language, politics, and
economics of women’s health care. Comparison of American
women’s health status to that of women around the world.
Opportunity for upper-division students to undertake an independent project that would serve to further their knowledge base
and/or professional competencies.
HLTH 3161. School Health Programs: Early Childhood through Middle School.
(2 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-ElEd 1010 and completion of 45 cr, el/middle school educ,
hlth ed or ECh cand or pre el/middle school educ majors)
Special complementary work and investigation in undergraduate student’s field of interest; survey of literature and resources
available to health educators.
Survey of school health programs with in-depth study of
selected health education curricula and topic areas, including
alcohol, tobacco, drugs, communicable disease, and nutrition.
Development of strategies and methods for teaching controversial areas.
HLTH 3202. Drug Education. (2 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-45 cr, for students seeking
and admitted to the STEP (Secondary Teaching Education program), cand in health
education, physical education, exercise science and communication sciences and
disorders or #)
Physiological and psychological effects of alcohol, tobacco,
and other drugs. Survey of societal causes and effects of drug
use and abuse. Reasons and pressures for drug use by students.
Appraisal and assessment of teacher’s role in education, intervention, and treatment of drug abuse.
HLTH 3301. Foundations of Health Education. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-1100, hlth
ed cand or #)
History, philosophy, and theories of health education; professional associations; basic functions of school and community
health education programs; program planning.
Coordinated school health programming with a focus on comprehensive school health education for grades 5-12. Methods,
strategies, and materials for effective teaching. Determining
students needs and interest, selecting content, planning curriculum, stating objective, developing learning opportunities, and
evaluating student learning.
HLTH 3303. Health Education and Promotion Program. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. PrereqConcurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 3301, hlth ed cand or #; §3450)
Introduction to planning models used in health education/promotion programming. Provides knowledge and skills necessary
to assess, plan, and implement health education/promotion
programs for multi-age populations. Includes needs assessment,
community analysis and organization, program design, and
implementation.
HLTH 3992. Readings in Health. (1-4 cr [max 4 cr]; A-F or Aud. Prereq-#)
HLTH 4000. Professional Issues for Health Educators. (4 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq3305, hlth ed candidate or #; no Grad School cr)
Application of advanced skills/competencies. Identifying controversial issues, developing life/work balance and job seeking
skills with electronic portfolio, professional networking, beginning grant writing, and preparing for Certified Health Education
Specialist (CHES) exam. Students will spend 40 hour minimum
in community.
HLTH 4996. Internship in Health Education. (1-15 cr [max 15 cr]; S-N or Aud.
Prereq-hlth ed major, #; no Grad School credit)
Supervised entry-level health education practical experience in
hospital, worksite, voluntary, or official agencies. Number of
settings is limited to two.
HLTH 5991. Independent Study. (1-6 cr [max 6 cr]; A-F or Aud. Prereq-#, non-degree
seeking or grad student; maximum of 6 cr can be applied toward degree)
Directed independent study, readings, research, or projects in
a particular area of interest. Degree program plan and project
proposal should be approved before course is taken by graduate
students.
Course Descriptions
HLTH 3302. School Health Education Methods and Materials. (3 cr; A-F or Aud.
Prereq-3301, hlth ed cand or #)
Emergency procedures to care for ill or injured persons in
wilderness settings. Planning, equipment, and evacuation procedures used in nontechnical rescues. American Red Cross First
Aid and CPR certification to first responder level.
HLTH 5992. Readings in Health. (1-4 cr [max 4 cr]; A-F or Aud. Prereq-#)
Special complementary readings and discussion in advanced
or graduate student’s field of interest in health and health
education.
Health Care Management
(HCM)
Labovitz School of Business and Management
HCM 4510. Medical Sociology. (3 cr; A-F only. Prereq-LSBE candidate or o, no
Grad School cr)
Introduction to common theoretical and empirical approaches
used by sociologists to study health and illness. Social inequalities in health and illness and the social processes that shape
these experiences are the themes of the course.
HCM 4520. Health Care Organization and Management. (3 cr; A-F only. PrereqLSBE candidate or o, MgtS 3401 preferred but not required, no Grad School cr)
Studies the organizational structures, types of governance and
management issues of the American health care system.
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Course Descriptions
HCM 4530. Legal Aspects of and Ethics in Health Care. (3 cr; A-F only. PrereqLSBE candidate or o, no Grad School cr)
HPER 3200. Research and Evaluation in Health Science. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. PrereqMin 60 cr, Health ed major or minor or rec major or minor or #)
Introduction to the legal and ethical environment of health services administration and offers a current and historical overview
of legal regulation of the health care industry.
Exploration of the principles of investigation and evaluation
in the health and human service professions with emphasis on
methods, data analysis and presentation, and evaluation reports.
Basic background information for scientific inquiry and use of
evaluative data in health and human service programs.
HCM 4540. Health Services Operations Management. (3 cr; A-F only. Prereq-LSBE
candidate or o, FMIS 3301, no Grad School cr)
Analytical techniques to support operational decision making
in health care operations. In particular, decision making, quality improvement methods, forecasting, project management,
and process flow, inventory, and capacity management are
discussed.
HCM 4550. Health Care Finance. (3 cr; A-F only. Prereq-4520, FMIS 3601, LSBE
cand or o, no Grad School cr)
Covers finance issues related to healthcare organizations. Topics
include: reimbursement analysis, understanding the nature of
costs, uncertainty, forecasting, service line profitability analysis,
and preparation of operating and capital budgets.
HCM 4560. International Comparisons of Health Care Systems. (3 cr; A-F only.
Prereq-LSBE candidate or o, no Grad School cr)
Explores various health care systems offered around the world
by evaluating their characteristics, issues and reforms.
HCM 4570. Health Care Quality Management. (3 cr; A-F only. Prereq-4520, LSBE
cand or o; no Grad School cr)
Covers basic principles of quality and patient safety measurement and improvement in health care. Methods for measuring
health outcomes and satisfaction as well as regulatory and
accreditation requirements affecting quality of care in hospitals,
nursing homes, and other areas of healthcare will be discussed.
HCM 4591. Independent Study. (1-3 cr [max 3 cr]; A-F only. Prereq-LSBE candidate,
#, no Grad School cr)
Special work in health care management that extends beyond or
in greater depth than regular course offerings.
HCM 4595. Special Topics: (Various Titles to be Assigned). (1-3 cr [max 9 cr]; A-F
only. Prereq-LSBE candidate or o, 4520 or #, no Grad School cr)
Specific health care management problems, issues, and
approaches.
Course Descriptions
HCM 4597. Internship. (3 cr; A-F only. Prereq-LSBE candidate, consent of program
director or internship director, no Grad School cr)
Work-integrated learning program providing practical experiences within the health services industry. Students participate in
approved program within cooperating businesses, governmental
agencies, or civic organizations. Requires a minimum of 200
hours of work experience, assigned written reports, and performance evaluations.
Health, Physical Education and
Recreation (HPER)
College of Education and Human Service
Professions
HPER 3000. Organization and Administration of Health, Physical Education,
and Recreation. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-hlth ed or pe or exer sci or rec cand or #)
Theoretical and practical basis of administrative process and
organizational structure of HPER programs.
HPER 3100. Risk Management. (2 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-exer sci or rec cand or #)
Proactive approach to managing risks associated with conducting health, physical education, and recreation programs.
Emphasis on planning for a safe environment.
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History (HIST)
College of Liberal Arts
HIST 1025. Freshman Seminar: World War II: War of Technologies. (3 cr; A-F or
Aud. Prereq-Freshman, fewer than 30 cr LE 7)
World War II saw the introduction or development of technologies that determined the fate of combatants. Focus on development of rocketry, radar, the A-bomb, cryptology, the fighter
plane, the concentration camp, the submarine; their impact and
results.
HIST 1026. Freshman Seminar: The Cold War. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-Freshman,
fewer than 30 cr LEIP 07)
Origin and history of the Cold War between the United States
and the Soviet Union, 1945-1991. Global examination of the
foreign policy and military crises produced by this ideological
contest that divided the planet.
HIST 1027. Freshman Seminar: Introduction to Islam. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. PrereqFreshman, fewer than 30 credits LEIP 07)
Introduction to Islamic religion, covering the life of the prophet
Muhammad; origins of the Qur’an and Qur’anic Traditions;
sectarian intellectual and social developments in Islam; Islamic
institutions and practices as well as Islam’s encounter with other
religions.
HIST 1095. Freshman Seminar Topics: (Various Titles to be Assigned). (3-4 cr [max
8 cr]; A-F or Aud. Prereq-Freshman, fewer than 30 cr LE 7)
Treatment of historical subjects within the Freshman Seminar
Program not included in the regular curriculum.
HIST 1207. Dawn of Modern Europe. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. LE 7)
Early history of the modern era: Renaissance, Reformation, Age
of Reason, French Revolution and its impact, Napoleonic era.
HIST 1208. Europe in the Modern Age. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. LE 7)
Making of modern Europe; analysis of economic and technological revolution, collision of ideologies, imperialist expansion,
revolutions, and wars.
HIST 1304. US History Part I: 1607-1877. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. LE 7)
Evolution of the United States from colonial origins into a
modern nation. Frontier and agrarian heritage, constitutional
development, emergence of modern U.S. political system,
expansion of democracy, and cultural diversity. Colonial period
to 1877.
HIST 1305. US History Part II: 1865-Present. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. LE 7)
Historical roots of major challenges facing Americans today:
global responsibility as a world power; the quest for political,
economic, and social justice; and community and family
changes in modern society; 1877 to present.
HIST 1603. Modern Latin America. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-§3603)
Thematic survey of Latin American history in the nineteenth
and twentieth centuries.
HIST 2244. The History of Science: Ancients to Newton. (3 cr; A-F or Aud)
The intellectual and cultural history of science from the Greeks
(6th c. BC) to the work of Isaac Newton (17th c).
History
HIST 2245. Science and Society: 1500 to Present. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. LE 7)
HIST 3091. Directed Readings in History. (1-4 cr [max 16 cr]; A-F or Aud. Prereq-#)
Explores a series of creative moments in development of
science and scientific methods within their broader social and
cultural contexts.
By arrangement in the department: individual study of material
below the research level or formal study of history at an accredited institution abroad.
HIST 2265. Russia in the 20th Century. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. LEIP 07)
HIST 3095. Special Topics: (Various Titles to be Assigned). (1-4 cr [max 4 cr]; A-F
or Aud)
Revolutions of 1917, the Soviet period, collapse of the Soviet
Union and evolution of Soviet successor states; 1900 to present.
Special topics in history.
HIST 2353. American Youth Culture. (3 cr; A-F or Aud)
HIST 3097. Internship in History. (1-3 cr [max 6 cr]; A-F or Aud. Prereq-60 cr, #)
Traces the emergence of youth culture through historical
analysis of the experience of youth in the twentieth century and
will examine what unified an encompassing “American youth
culture,” and what fragmented, divided, and reformulated it
over time.
Supervised opportunity to pursue local or regional history under
auspices of local museums, historical societies, commemorative commissions. Written and oral presentation of completed
project.
HIST 2355. United States Military History. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. LE 7)
Explore the history of the United States military from the
colonial era to the present in the context of broader patterns of
American history.
HIST 2357. Women in American History. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. LECD 07)
Roles and contributions of women in American life from
colonial period to present.
HIST 2515. Precolonial Africa. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. LECD 07)
Political, cultural, and socioeconomic developments in precolonial Africa to 1800. Emphasis on slave trade, Islamic revolution,
and European commercial penetration.
HIST 2525. Islamic Societies. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. LEIP 07)
An introduction to the cultural and religious base of Islamic
Societies. Covers history from Qur’anic origins and career of
Muhammad down to beliefs, observances, and socio-political
and religious issues of the present day.
HIST 2605. Honors: World War I History and Literature. (3 cr; A-F only. PrereqHonors student)
Examines the history and literature of World War I. Discussion
of representative works of fiction along with historiographic
questions of the war.
HIST 3007. The World of Late Antiquity. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-§HmCl 3007)
Historical transformation from ancient to medieval society in
the eastern and western Mediterranean in the second to eighth
centuries A.D. including the Germanic states in the West and
Byzantium and the Islamic states in the Near East
HIST 3021. The Age of the Heroes: Homer and his World. (3 cr; A-F or Aud.
Prereq-Min 30 cr, §HmCl 3021, §CSt 3021)
HIST 3031. The Roman Republic. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-§HmCl 3031)
Republican Rome from origins through collapse in 44 B.C.,
with emphasis on cultural and political attributes, leading
figures, and causes of its demise.
HIST 3041. The Roman Empire. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-§HmCl 3041)
Assisting in teaching a 1xxx- or 2xxx-level history course;
experience preparing course materials, advising students in
learning about the grading process; experience in lecturing and
leading discussions, conferences with professor about teaching
issues.
HIST 3151. Ancient Egyptian Culture. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-Min 30 cr; §HmCl
3151 or CSt 3151)
History, culture, and arts of ancient Egypt as known through the
archaeological record.
HIST 3239. Europe in the Age of Renaissance and Reformation: 1348-1648. (3
cr; A-F or Aud)
Social, economic, political, and cultural development of
Europe from the Black Death to the Thirty Years’ War. Central
themes include Renaissance humanism and art, Columbus and
European expansion, the Protestant and Catholic Reformations,
and the era of religious wars.
HIST 3240. Early Modern England: 1485-1689. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-§3245)
Early Modern English society and culture from the 15th to the
17th centuries.
HIST 3243. Europe in Crisis in the 20th Century. (3 cr; A-F or Aud)
Causes, conduct, and consequences of World Wars I and II
from European perspective. Offered during day school and in
Individualized Learning Program.
HIST 3244. History of Holocaust. (3 cr; A-F or Aud)
Anti-Semitic and extermination policies of the Hitler regime.
Origins of that regime and its policies. European anti-Semitism
and the Jewish experience in Europe. Conduct of perpetrators, victims, onlookers, resisters. Theological responses and
Holocaust representations. Historiographic controversies.
HIST 3245. Early Modern England, 1485-1689: Honors. (3 cr; A-F or Aud.
Prereq-§3240, o)
Early Modern English society and culture from the 15th to the
17th centuries, with an emphasis on primary source research for
UMD honors students.
HIST 3257. Modern France. (3 cr; A-F or Aud)
History of France from 1789 to present.
Imperial Rome from Age of the Caesars through 550 A.D.,
with emphasis on politics of pax Romana, rise and spread of
Christianity, and Roman legacy to the modern world.
HIST 3264. Imperial Russia. (3 cr; A-F or Aud)
HIST 3055. The Ancient Near East. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-Min 30 cr; §HmCl
3055 or CSt 3055)
Explores the social history of the United States during the long
nineteenth century, focusing on the development of specific
regional communities within the larger nation as examples of
the richness and complexity of the American experience.
History of Ancient Near East from birth of civilization in Egypt
and Mesopotamia (c. 3100 B.C.) to arrival of Alexander (330
B.C.). Review of the ancient cultures of Egypt, Babylonia,
Assyria, the Hittites, Persia, Syria, and Palestine.
Peter I to end of reign of Alexander III.
HIST 3316. US Social History, 1800-1916. (3 cr; A-F or Aud)
347
Course Descriptions
Organization and development of the Greek world from the
fourth millennium B.C. to 700 B.C. Descriptive study of
Minoan and Mycenaean worlds emphasizing critical evaluation
of archaeological, mythological, and artistic significance of
Homer.
HIST 3099. Practicum in Teaching History. (3 cr [max 6 cr]; A-F or Aud. PrereqHistory major, completion of 20 cr of 2xxx and above history courses with GPS of 3.3,
completion of 90 credits, #)
Course Descriptions
HIST 3317. American Expansion, 1800-1900. (3 cr; A-F or Aud)
Follows the geographic and economic development of the
United States from a rural strip bordering the Atlantic Ocean,
through civil war to emerge as an industrialized, continent-spanning global power.
HIST 3320. American Popular Culture, 1940 to the Present. (3 cr; A-F or Aud)
Examines the intersection of the American popular arts--especially film, music, the visual arts, and literature--with national
and international politics and American public life from World
War II to the present.
HIST 3333. From Homer to Alexander: Archaic and Classical Greece. (3 cr; A-F
or Aud. Prereq-§HmCl 3333)
Early history of Greek world from Heroic Age to death of
Alexander the Great, 850-323 B.C.
HIST 3335. From Alexander to Mohammad. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-§HmCl 3335)
Social and cultural analysis of the impact Alexander the Great
had on eastern Mediterranean development between 323 B.C.
and 631 A.D. Alexander and his world, the formation of its three
great religions, and the Alexandrian legacy of his achievement.
HIST 3361. The American City. (3 cr; A-F or Aud)
American urbanization from colonial town to modern metropolis, emphasizing social and cultural problems peculiar to cities
and impact of the city on American civilization.
HIST 3365. American Culture and Globalization. (3 cr; A-F or Aud)
The U.S. as an importer and exporter of cultural and social
trends from the colonial period to the present. Global relationships among reform movements, migration, business and labor,
intellectual ideas, and popular culture. Analysis of the American
character.
HIST 3386. The United States and the World since 1898. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq(§3384 and 3385), students will receive credit if 3384 (only) or (3385) were taken)
Examines United States foreign relations--political, economic,
social, and cultural--since 1898.
HIST 3396. The Vietnam War. (3 cr; A-F only)
Examines the Vietnam war as a transformative event in both the
United States and Vietnam. It will cover the decades-long history of the conflict, and will address its legacies in U.S. foreign
relations, domestic politics and culture, and Vietnamese life.
Course Descriptions
HIST 3505. Colloquium for Majors. (1-2 cr [max 2 cr]; S-N or Aud. Prereq-Hist or
teaching soc studies major/minor; attendance at 5 dept-approved lectures/discussions
over 1-yr period; regis only during semester of 5th lect; (1 cr for attendance; 2 cr for
attendance, presentation))
Lecture and discussion groups on a variety of topics.
HIST 3515. Modern Africa. (3 cr; A-F or Aud)
Africa, 1800 to present. Colonial conquest and domination,
African resistance, nationalism, and problems of independence.
HIST 3516. Society and Culture in 20th-Century Africa. (3 cr; A-F or Aud)
Generational, class, and gender conflicts in the wake of
European occupation, impact of colonial and neocolonial
domination, and African responses to that occupation and to the
world economy in the 20th century; selected films and literary
sources.
HIST 3725. Islamic History from Muhammad to the Ottomans. (3 cr; A-F or Aud.
Prereq-1027 or 2525 or #)
History and development of Islamic society from seventh to
sixteenth century.
HIST 3726. Modern Middle East: 18th Century-Present. (3 cr; A-F or Aud)
Survey from Ottoman to present times concentrating on themes,
such as colonialism and the anti-colonialist struggle, the rise of
state power, gender relations, the rise of new socio-economic
groups, new expressions of identity, and western perceptions of
the region.
348
HIST 5094. Directed Research. (4 cr [max 12 cr]; A-F or Aud. Prereq-#, max 4 cr
may be applied to Grad School program)
Directed Research
HIST 5095. Special Topics: (Various Titles to be Assigned). (.5-4 cr [max 12 cr]; A-F
or Aud. Prereq-#)
To treat historical subjects not included in the regular
curriculum.
HIST 5905. History Seminar. (4 cr [max 8 cr]; A-F or Aud. Prereq-#)
Advanced study and individual research on a selected historical
topic or theme; senior capstone course for history majors. (2.5
hrs lect, 1 hr student/faculty consultation)
Honors (HON)
College of Liberal Arts
HON 400. Honors Capstone Seminar. (0 cr; S-N only. Prereq-Honors student)
Provides guidance for completion of Capstone projects required
of all UMD Honors students, and provides a forum for the
presentation of completed projects. Students will present their
research, and will attend the presentations of fellow-students.
Seminar participants will also mentor an incoming Honors
student, and be provided with assistance in preparing graduate
school applications and resumes.
Industrial Engineering (IE)
College of Science and Engineering
IE 1225. Introduction to Design and Manufacturing Engineering. (4 cr; A-F or
Aud. Prereq-Math 1296 or #, §1105, 1205)
Introduction to methods used to design and manufacture high
quality products. Through the use of a CAD system the student
will learn design techniques relative to a product. Students,
working in teams, will produce their design using appropriate
manufacturing methods.
IE 2222. Design Manufacturing Laboratory. (2 cr; A-F only. Prereq-Engr 2015, Engr
2110; §1225)
Modern manufacturing processes to economically produce
finished products that meet design and quality requirements.
Student teams will design and manufacture a product to tolerance using the most appropriate methods. Topics include DFM,
TQM, GD&T, machining, casting, and forming processes for
ferrous, non-ferrous and organic materials.
IE 3105. Human Factors. (4 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-BSIE candidate or #)
Design and analysis of the workplace using ergonomic principles; safety concerns; environmental considerations. Testing
and performance measures in worker-machine environment.
IE 3115. Operations Research. (4 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-Math 3280, Stat 3411,
BSIE candidate or #)
Optimization. Linear programming, network analysis, Markov
chains, and queuing theory.
IE 3122. Materials Engineering Laboratory. (2 cr; A-F only. Prereq-2222)
ASTM standards for testing metals, polymer, ceramic, and composite materials. Measurement of material properties including:
yield strength, tensile strength, stiffness, hardness, toughness,
and hardenability. Traditional methods of processing materials
including: punching, plastic injection molding, thermoforming,
sand casting, sheet metal forming, extrusion, welding, polymer
matrix composites vacuum bagging. Heat treatment and metallographic study of metals. Estimation of the effects processing
techniques have on material properties using both analytical and
empirical techniques. Use of Design of Experiments approach
for estimation of process control factor effects and modeling of
process quality characteristics. Detailed lab report writing and
oral presentation of results.
Industrial Engineering
IE 3125. Engineering Economic Analysis. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-[P]Stat 3411,
BSIE or BSME cand or #)
IE 4255. Multidisciplinary Senior Design. (4 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-EMgt 4110,
BSIE cand, or #, no Grad School credit; §ME 4255)
Data analysis and methods for engineering decision making
under risk; using time and value of money concepts; using
expectation principles for project selection; and using forecasts.
Capstone design course in industrial engineering. Project
Management, problem definition, root cause analysis, baseline
analysis, alternative solutions, analysis, reporting. Societal,
economic, ethical, environmental, political considerations. Oral
and written reports. Work is in teams focused on industrial or
competition-based projects.
IE 3130. Materials Processing Engineering. (3 cr; A-F only. Prereq-Engr 2110, Engr
2016, Stat 3411)
An introduction to common materials processes and material
responses, including thermal and mechanical processing of
metals, polymers and composite materials.
IE 3135. Materials Processing. (4 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-Engr 2016, Engr 2210, IE
1225, Stat 3411, BSIE or BSME cand or #)
Thermal and mechanical processing techniques for metals,
plastics, and composites using special and general purpose
machines and tools.
IE 3140. Human Factors and Ergonomic Design. (3 cr; A-F only. Prereq-Engr 2026
or #; §IE 3105)
Through the study of perception, cognition, and motor performance, explores human abilities and limitations as well as
the external factors impacting them. To improve performance
of a human-machine system, learn about tools for analyzing
products, identifying design elements to augment abilities, and
recognizing limitations.
IE 3222. Occupational Systems Laboratory. (2 cr; A-F only. Prereq-3122, 3140,
[P]4020 or #; §3105 and/or 3265)
Using principles of human factors and production management,
introduces methods for assessing and optimizing performance
of occupational systems (i.e., workers, workplaces and tasks,
and tools and equipment). These methods are applied in
laboratory exercises to evaluate effects of workplace factors on
various performance measures.
IE 3255. Statistical Quality Control. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-Stat 3411, BSIE or
BSME cand or #)
Statistical quality control in manufacturing; modeling, process
quality, control charts, process capability, acceptance sampling
methods, reliability.
IE 3265. Production and Operations Management. (4 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-3115,
3125, BSIE cand)
Production system design and analysis based on inventory
policies, production flow concepts, scheduling policies, material
handling, and cost analysis. Plant location factors and Total
Quality Management.
Develops management systems using lean methods: JIT, CMS,
ERP, SCM, TQM, SMED, and Kaizen Techniques. Forecasting,
aggregate planning, inventory management, and other facilities
improvement techniques, including efficient scheduling of
manufacturing and service systems.
IE 4115. Facility Planning and Simulation. (4 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-3255, 3265,
BSIE candidate)
Facility and process design and analysis using flow rates, design
relationships, graphical aids, and computer simulation.
IE 4196. Cooperative Education. (1 cr [max 2 cr]; A-F or Aud. Prereq-BSIE candidate;
no Grad School credit)
Practical work experience with employer closely associated
with student’s academic area; arranged by mutual agreement
among student, department, and employer. Biweekly status reports and final written report must be submitted to department.
IE 4235. Manufacturing Systems Integration. (4 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-3265
or ME 4135, ECE 2006, CS 1121 or CS 1131 or CS 1211 or CS 1511 or CS 2121,
BSIE cand)
Design and use of hardware and software to integrate computer
control and decision making into product development and
manufacturing systems.
Directed individual study arranged with instructor and department head before registration.
IE 4495. Special Topics: (Various Titles to be Assigned). (1-4 cr [max 8 cr]; Stdnt Opt.
Prereq-BSIE candidate or #)
Topics not available in regular department curriculum. May
involve specialties of department or visiting faculty.
IE 4801. International Engineering Report. (1 cr [max 2 cr]; S-N or Aud. PrereqBSIE or BSME cand, %, no Grad School credit)
Directed self-examination of engineering study abroad in
Sweden. Required for each semester abroad
IE 4803. Simulation of Swedish Manufacturing. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-BSIE or
BSME cand; no Grad School credit)
Facility and process design and analysis using flow rates, design
relationships, graphical aids, and computer simulation. (MPR
003 at Lulea University of Technology, Sweden)
IE 4812. Computer Integrated Manufacturing. (4 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-BSIE or
BSME cand; no Grad School credit)
Computers and computer systems in industrial settings,
networks, CAD communication standards (IGES, STEP, Etc.).
CAM, e-business, development of CIM strategies, future trends.
(MPR012 at Lulea University of Technology, Sweden)
IE 4823. Project Management and Swedish Industrial Design Project. (6 cr; A-F
or Aud. Prereq-BSIE or BSME cand, no Grad School credit)
Design or improve a product or system with a Swedish
company and/or team. Define problem, assess baseline, develop
alternatives, prioritize recommendations. Project management,
team dynamics, reports and documentation. (MPR023 at Lulea
University of Technology Sweden)
IE 4827. Manufacturing Systems Project. (8 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-BSIE or BSME
cand; no Grad School credit)
Manufacturing equipment, processes, information control,
budget, safety, maintenance of integrated production systems.
Major project requires design, manufacture, handling of a
project and design, modeling construction, and control of an
automated projection system. (MPR 027 at Lulea University of
Technology, Sweden)
IE 4870. Advanced Manufacturing Processes. (4 cr [max 8 cr]; A-F or Aud. PrereqBSIE or BSME cand; no Grad School credit)
Advanced topics in material processes. Traditional and
advanced materials. New processes like laser or waterjet cutting. (MPM, MPB, or MPP at Lulea University of Technology,
Sweden)
IE 4993. Industrial Engineering Seminar. (1 cr [max 2 cr]; S-N or Aud. Prereq-BSIE
or BSChE or BSECE or BSME or MEHS cand or #; no Grad School credit)
Reports on recent developments in engineering and on research
projects in the department.
IE 5305. Supply Chain Management. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-3265,BSIE cand or
MSEM student or #)
Concepts essential to understanding supply chain management,
including strategy and design, as well as operational, managerial, technological, and implementation issues. It provides an
integrated perspective of the supply chain, including purchasing,
production, transportation, distribution and information systems.
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Course Descriptions
IE 4020. Lean Enterprises Management. (3 cr; A-F only. Prereq-2222, 3125,
§3265; no Grad School cr)
IE 4491. Independent Study. (1-4 cr [max 4 cr]; A-F or Aud. Prereq-BSIE or BSME
cand, %)
Course Descriptions
IE 5315. Organizational Control Methods. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-BSIE or MSEM
cand or %)
IBS 8099. The Biological Practitioner. (1 cr; S-N or Aud. Prereq-IBS Graduate
Student)
Roles of the engineer in managing organizational resources.
Budgeting, cost-volume relationships, product costing, annual
reports, audits. Project estimating and reporting.
A course designed to introduce the incoming graduate student
in biological sciences to professional practice, standards and
ethics, including peer review, proposal writing, ethical problems, the purpose of a university, and other problems. Required
for all IBS students.
IE 5325. Advanced Engineering Economics. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-3125, BSIE
or MSEM cand or %)
Fundamentals of engineering economics: decision trees, time
value of money, analysis of alternatives for project investments, taxes, inflation. Applications to engineering services and
manufacturing.
IE 5335. Engineered Products and Services. (3 cr; Stdnt Opt. Prereq-BSIE or MSEM
candidate, #)
Development, production, and distribution of engineered products and services. Strategies for positioning engineered products
and services to successfully compete in a global market. Sales,
purchasing, qualification, and service. Standards, regulations.
IE 5991. Independent Study in Industrial Engineering. (1-4 cr [max 6 cr]; Stdnt
Opt. Prereq-MSEM cand, %)
Directed study of special interest topics not available in standard
curriculum. Must be arranged with instructor before registration. May include readings, research and/or special projects.
Integrated Biosciences (IBS)
College of Science and Engineering
IBS 5101. Biochemistry and Molecular Biology. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-Chem
4341 or equivalent)
A thorough review of the structure and properties of biomolecules. This will include a complete understanding of the
components and macromolecules that comprise nucleic acids,
proteins, carbohydrates, and lipids.
IBS 8011. Integrated Biological Systems. (2 cr; A-F only. Prereq-IBS Graduate
Student)
Introduction to integrated biosciences by way of a systems
approach, including feedbacks between system components,
stiochiometry, and energetics as integrating principles at all
levels from molecular and cellular systems to physiological
systems, population dynamics, and ecosystems. Required for all
IBS students.
Course Descriptions
IBS 8012. Integrated Evolutionary Processes. (2 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-8011, IBS
Grad student)
Review of advanced topics in evolutionary biology, including
coevolution, evolution of disease organisms, ecosystem consequences of evolution, evolutionary stable strategies, and game
theory. Required for all IBS students.
IBS 8020. Integrated Biosciences Colloquia. (1 cr [max 4 cr]; S-N only. Prereq-IBS
Graduate Student)
Presentations by Integrated Biosciences Graduate Faculty
on their research and how it is integrated with various other
research programs in Duluth and worldwide.
IBS 8030. IBS Research Club. (1 cr [max 5 cr]; S-N or Aud. Prereq-Admission to the
Integrated Biosciences Graduate Program)
Readings and discussion of current literature integrating the
areas of Cell, Molecular and Physiological Biology with
Ecology, Organismal, and Population Biology. Current literature
emphasizing the application of novel techniques to biological
problems at several levels of organization will be presented.
Students will lead a discussion on at least one paper. Required
for IBS students both semesters of their first two years.
IBS 8094. Rotations. (3 cr; S-N only. Prereq-IBS Graduate Student)
Rotations through laboratories of faculty members of the
Integrated Biosciences Program. During the rotations students
will be exposed to molecular, cellular, physiological, and
ecological problems and techniques.
350
IBS 8102. Cell, Molecular and Developmental Biology. (3 cr; A-F only. Prereq5101, Chem 4342 or equivalent, IBS Grad School student)
Comprehensive review of contemporary topics in modern molecular biology. This will include systemic examples from cell
and developmental systems. Required for CMP emphasis.
IBS 8103. Comparative Animal Physiology. (3 cr; A-F only. Prereq-One year of
college biol, two years of college chem; 8011, IBS Grad School student)
In depth review of selected topics in animal physiology. Lecture
presentation of fundamental concepts of cardiovascular, neural,
respiratory, renal, and endocrine physiology. In-depth discussion and student presentation of selected topics with particular
emphasis on current advances.
IBS 8201. Ecological Processes. (2 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-8011, IBS Grad School
student)
In depth survey of advanced topics in ecological processes, including allometry and scaling, animal behavior, food webs, and
energy and material flows through organisms and ecosystems.
Required for EOP Track.
IBS 8333. FTE: Master’s. (1 cr; No grade. Prereq-Master’s student, adviser and DGS
consent)
IBS 8777. Thesis Credits: Master’s. (1-18 cr [max 50 cr]; No grade. Prereq-Max 18
cr per semester or summer; 10 cr total required (Plan A only))
Inter-Institutional CrossRegistration (IICR)
Continuing Education
IICR 1001–5002. Inter-Institutional Cross Registration. (1-9 cr [max 36 cr]; Stdnt
Opt. Prereq-#)
Inter-institutional cross registration reflecting the credit hour
load of University of Minnesota Duluth students enrolling under
the inter-institutional cross registration agreement with the
College of Saint Scholastica and the University of Wisconsin
Superiorand any other institution with whom such an agreement
exists.
Interdisciplinary Studies (IS)
College of Liberal Arts
IS 3001. Interdisciplinary Methods Seminar. (2 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-#)
Definitions, history, and philosophy of interdisciplinary research, writing, learning, and teaching. Readings in major types
of interdisciplinary work; preliminary methods for interdisciplinary projects.
IS 3095. Special Topics: (Various Titles to be Assigned). (1-4 cr [max 12 cr]; A-F or
Aud. Prereq-15 cr or #)
Special topics in interdisciplinary studies.
IS 3099. Senior Project. (1-10 cr [max 10 cr]; A-F or Aud. Prereq-#)
An agreement that specifies nature of the project, amount of
work, and number of credits must be approved by two advisers
and filed with director of interdisciplinary studies.
Italian
IS 5001. Construction and Deconstruction of Nation: Reflections of 20th
Century Hispanic History. (2 cr; A-F only. Prereq-Min 90 cr)
International Studies (INTS)
Introduction to 20th Spanish cinema, literature, and culture: the
historical, social aesthetic, and theoretical factors that brought
about Spain’s Civil War, Francoism, exile and deportation to
Nazi camps, Basque separatism, ETA terrorism, and Spain’s
membership in the European Union. Spain, along with so
many other countries in our increasingly “globalized world,”
is currently undergoing an “identity crisis.” The concept of
“Spanishness” will be addressed.
College of Liberal Arts
IS 5002. Exodus and Exile in Contemporary Cinema. (4 cr; A-F only. Prereq-Min
90 cr)
Cross-border and internal population movements have assumed
dimensions beyond the response capacity of any single governmental and international body. A socio-historical understanding
of uprooted social groups and individuals who voluntarily
or involuntarily leave their country and culture. Effects and
implications of displacement and examines how European exilic
and diasporic filmmakers signify exile and diaspora by expressing, allegorizing, commenting upon and critiquing home, host
societies and cultures. Analyses of film texts whose narrative
strategies undermine conventional cinema, in particular
cinematic realism.
INTS 1066. An Introduction to Britain. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. LEIP 08)
Interdisciplinary survey of British Isles: major geographic,
historical, social, and cultural features of region.
INTS 1070. An Introduction to Scandinavia. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. LEIP 08)
Interdisciplinary survey of Scandinavia and its people: major
historical, social, political, and cultural features of region.
INTS 1095. Special Topics: (Various Titles to be Assigned).. (1-4 cr [max 8 cr]; A-F
or Aud)
Special topic identified at time course offered.
INTS 1191. International Study. (1-5 cr [max 15 cr]; A-F or Aud. Prereq-%)
For students who want to take an independent study course
while traveling or living in a foreign country. Course must
be approved by supervising faculty member and director of
international studies.
INTS 3166. Study in England Evaluation. (1 cr; S-N or Aud. Prereq-#)
Self-examination of study abroad experience in Britain.
INTS 3191. International Study. (1-5 cr [max 15 cr]; A-F or Aud. Prereq-%)
Introduction to methods of interdisciplinary liberal studies.
Minimum of 4 credits required of M.L.S. candidates.
For students who want to take an independent study course
while traveling or living in a foreign country. Course must
be approved by supervising faculty member and director of
international studies.
IS 8250. Ecological Economics. (4 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-Econ 1003 or 1023 or
Biol 2803 or #)
INTS 3195. Special Topics: (Various Titles to be Assigned). (1-3 cr [max 8 cr]; A-F
or Aud)
An introduction to the emerging new discipline of ecological
economics, which situates traditional economic models with an
ecological framework. Ecological economics views the notion
of endless economic growth as not merely socially undesirable
but actually ecologically impossible.
INTS 3197. International Internship. (1-6 cr [max 8 cr]; S-N or Aud. Prereq-50 cr,
%; max 4 cr may be applied to IntS major)
IS 8001. Introduction to Liberal Studies. (1-4 cr [max 8 cr]; S-N or Aud. PrereqMLS candidate or %)
IS 8501. Seminar: Ethics and the Human Condition. (4 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-MLS
candidate or %)
Explores applications of values and ethical considerations from
humanistic study to problems of modern world.
IS 8502. Ecology, Economics, and Ethics. (4 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-8250, Grad
Student or #)
IS 8591. Directed Study. (1-8 cr [max 8 cr]; A-F or Aud. Prereq-MLS candidate or %)
Supervised work experience involving international interaction.
INTS 3295. Special Topics: (Various Titles to be Assigned). (1-3 cr [max 8 cr]; A-F
or Aud)
Special topic identified at time course offered.
INTS 4100. Seminar in International Studies. (4 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-Pol 1050,
60 cr incl 8 upper div cr approved IntS courses or #)
Analysis of and supervised research and writing on selected
topics.
INTS 4891. Independent Study. (1-5 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-8 cr IntS, #)
Advanced study and research under faculty member
supervision.
INTS 4995. Special Topics: (Various Titles to be Assigned). (1-5 cr [max 10 cr]; A-F or
Aud. Prereq-50 cr incl 8 cr in IntS or #)
Individualized study under supervision of the director of the
liberal studies program.
Detailed examination of contemporary international studies
topics.
International Business (INTB)
Italian (ITAL)
Labovitz School of Business and Economics
College of Liberal Arts
INTB 3201. International Business. (3 cr; A-F only. Prereq-SBE cand or o)
ITAL 1101. Beginning Italian. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. LEIP 03)
Identification of position of United States in world trade; impact
of international trade on national businesses and policies; business and employment opportunities in international business.
Conversation and communicative course for students with little
or no previous study of Italian. Emphasis on oral and aural
skills, and vocabulary and idioms useful in daily life. Taught in
Italian and English.
ITAL 1102. Beginning Italian II. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-1101 or # LEIP 03)
Conversation and communicative course for students with lone
semester’s previous study of Italian. Emphasis on oral and aural
skills, and vocabulary and idioms useful in daily life, building
on the content of Italian 1101: Beginning Italian. Taught in
Italian and English.
351
Course Descriptions
Explores the nature of THE GOOD SOCIETY with respect
to its economic, political, and moral dimensions. It considers
alternative conceptions of THE GOOD and issues of distributive
justice, including the distribution of economic wealth and its
consequences.
Special topic identified at time course offered.
Course Descriptions
Journalism (JOUR)
JOUR 4021. Sports and Outdoors Journalism. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-2001,
Comp 1120; no Grad School cr)
College of Liberal Arts
Covers the basics of sports journalism as it pertains to newspapers, magazine and television. Explores the psychology,
sociology, business and ethics of sports
JOUR 2001. Reporting and Writing I. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-COMP 1120)
Basic course in reporting and writing on which much of the
student’s work for the Journalism minor is built. Information
gathering, writing of basic news stories; news style, structure
and readability; news sources and interviewing techniques.
JOUR 2501. History of American Journalism. (3 cr; A-F or Aud)
Examines the cultural and social history of journalism in the
United States, from Colonial times to the present, using a variety of both secondary and contemporary samples of journalistic
work. Students will explore the values, practices and social
roles that encompass the institution of journalism.
JOUR 3001. Reporting and Writing II. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-2001, COMP 1120)
Emphasizes magazine-style feature writing. Students will
develop interviewing skills and learn advanced reporting
techniques, including searching public records and using the
Freedom of Information Act.
JOUR 3101. News Editing. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-2001, COMP 1120)
Mechanics of copy and picture editing, selection of stories,
news judgment, the writer-reporter relationship, headline writing, basic page layout and design, and use of graphics, and basic
legal issues.
JOUR 3300. News Photography. (3 cr; A-F or Aud)
Theory and practice of news photography. Practical experience
taking news photographs as well as the professional standards
required of photojournalists. Discusses the theoretical issues
behind news photography.
JOUR 3400. Community Journalism. (3 cr; A-F or Aud)
An introduction to community journalism. Useful for those
interested in daily journalism (print or broadcast) to learn how
to cover the daily lives of citizens, as well as those interested
in working for weekly publications or publicizing community
issues.
JOUR 3401. Broadcast News Writing. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-2001, COMP 1120)
Students will learn to research and write broadcast news reports
and features. They will edit quarter inch tape and be introduced
to digital editing techniques. They will prepare a weekly public
affairs news program for broadcast on KUMD.
Course Descriptions
JOUR 3555. Research for Reporters. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-§ COMP 3555)
Covers research techniques for reporters, including computerassisted reporting, data practices laws, using government
documents, reading business reports, and an introduction to
statistical methods.
JOUR 3700. Media Law and Ethics. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-Comp 1120)
Laws regarding news gathering and dissemination. First
Amendment principles of press freedom, libel, invasion of
privacy, prior restraint, access to information, and electronic
media content regulation issues.
JOUR 4101. News Layout and Design. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-2001, no Grad
School credit)
Students will learn basic principles as well as gain practical
skills with advanced programs. Students will layout and paginate newspaper pages, choose and edit photographs and other
graphical elements, and write headlines.
JOUR 4500. Special Topics: (Various Titles to be Assigned). (3 cr [max 6 cr]; A-F or
Aud. Prereq-2001, 3101, Comp 1120; no Grad School cr)
Selected themes and issues in journalism, such as staff organization, policies, finance, law, photography, design, and the role of
the student press.
JOUR 4800. Perspectives on International News Reporting and Editing. (3 cr;
A-F or Aud. Prereq-No Grad School credit)
Outlines the role of the press in shaping foreign policy and
highlight the challenges faced by journalists working abroad.
We shall critique editorial routines and examine ways to improve international news pages in local newspapers.
JOUR 5102. Advanced Editing. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-2001, 3101 or Grad
Student)
Advanced theory and practice in news selection, preparation,
and display for newspaper, magazine, broadcast and photojournalism media; emphasis on the ethical and professional
responsibility of the journalist.
JOUR 5197. Journalism Internship. (1-3 cr [max 3 cr]; S-N only. Prereq-2001,
3700, 60 cr. or Grad Student, #)
Supervised professional experience as a working staff member
with a newspaper, magazine, broadcast station or other communications organization.
Labovitz School of Business
and Economics (LSBE)
Labovitz School of Business and Economics
LSBE 1101. The Business Environment. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. LE 8)
Introduction to context, environment, and operation of business
and organizations. Study of foundations and functional areas
of business and entrepreneurship. Analysis of technological,
ethical, diversity, and global issues from business and organizational perspectives.
Language (LANG)
College of Liberal Arts
LANG 1101. Beginning Foreign Language I. (4 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-#, % LE 3)
Directed reading and research in journalism.
For students studying beginning language where that language
is spoken, under the auspices of another college or university or by individual arrangement with prior approval by the
Department of Foreign Languages and Literatures; or students
studying a less frequently taught language at UMD.
JOUR 4001. Specialized Reporting and Writing. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-2001,
3101, Comp 1120; no Grad School cr)
LANG 1102. Beginning Foreign Language II. (4 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-1101 or
# LE 3)
Students will study basic concepts of investigative reporting,
opinion writing, science reporting and feature writing, then
choose any two of the above as the basis for long articles and
write short pieces in the remaining two areas.
For students studying beginning language where that language
is spoken, under the auspices of another college or university or by individual arrangement with prior approval by the
Department of Foreign Languages and Literatures; or students
studying a less frequently taught language at UMD.
JOUR 3991. Independent Study in Journalism. (1-5 cr [max 5 cr]; A-F or Aud.
Prereq-2001, #)
352
Management Studies
LANG 1201. Intermediate Foreign Language I. (4 cr; Stdnt Opt. Prereq-1102 or
# LE 3)
Linguistics (LING)
For students studying intermediate language under the auspices
of another college or university or by individual arrangement
with prior approval by the Department of Foreign Languages
and Literatures; or students studying a less frequently taught
language at UMD.
College of Liberal Arts
LANG 1202. Intermediate Foreign Language II. (4 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-1201
or # LEIP 03)
For students studying intermediate language under the auspices
of another college or university or by individual arrangement
with prior approval by the Department of Foreign Languages
and Literatures; or students studying a less frequently taught
language at UMD.
LANG 1301. ESL: English for Academic Writing and Speaking. (3 cr [max 6 cr];
A-F or Aud)
Integrated study of reading, listening, writing, and speaking
skills for students who are not native speakers, with an emphasis on academic and scholarly American English. Content is
individualized to each student’s needs.
LANG 3091. Directed Study. (1-3 cr [max 6 cr]; A-F or Aud. Prereq-#, %)
Directed Study
LANG 3095. Special Topics: (Various titles to be Assigned). (1-4 cr [max 8 cr]; Stdnt
Opt)
LING 1811. Introduction to Language. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. LE 2)
Theoretical study of the nature of language and its application,
including a survey of linguistic science (sound system, structures, words, meaning, first language acquisition, socio-linguistics, and computational linguistics).
LING 3101. Introduction to Phonology. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-1811 or #)
Survey of the fundamentals of phonology and its place in
linguistic science, with emphasis on descriptive analysis.
LING 3102. Introduction to Syntax. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-1811 or #)
Survey of the fundamentals of syntax, with emphasis on systems for describing, analyzing, and creating natural languages,
studied within the development of linguistic science.
LING 3195. Special Topics: (Various Titles to be Assigned). (3 cr [max 12 cr]; A-F or
Aud. Prereq-1811 or #)
Selected topics, not currently offered, that deal with subdisciplines within linguistics, such as pragmatics, semantics,
regional and social language variation, sociolinguistics, childhood language acquisition, second language learning, language
change and linguistic reconstruction, and history of linguistic
inquiry.
Selected topics, not currently offered, that deal with genres,
periods, specific authors, or cultural movements of Germanic,
Hispanic, Francophone, or other foreign worlds.
LING 3591. Independent Study in Linguistics. (1-3 cr [max 6 cr]; A-F or Aud.
Prereq-1811 or #, %)
LANG 4044. Language Teaching Methods. (4 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-Fr 2301 or Ger
2301 or Span 2301 or equiv)
LING 5195. Special Topics: (Various Titles to be Assigned). (1-4 cr [max 4 cr]; A-F or
Aud. Prereq-60 cr)
Theory and practice of teaching a second language. Survey and
application of current methods used to teach skills and cultural
concepts of world languages.
Subdisciplines such as pragmatics, semantics, regional and
social language variation, sociolinguistics, childhood language
acquisition, second language learning, language change and
linguistic reconstructions, and history of linguistic inquiry.
LANG 5198. Language Workshop. (1-4 cr [max 8 cr]; A-F or Aud. Prereq-Tchg
credentials in a second lang or #)
Directed reading and/or research.
LING 5802. Applied Linguistics. (4 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-1811 or #)
Service course for prospective and in-service teachers provides
postgraduate study of any matters related to teaching of a
foreign language.
Application of linguistic theory to reading and writing instruction, with emphasis on preparation of secondary school teachers
in English and communication.
Limnology (LIM)
LING 5852. Practicum in Teaching Linguistics. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-1811,
3101, 3102 or #)
College of Science and Engineering
LIM 5004. Field Limnology. (2 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-Graduate student or #)
Supervised teaching in introductory linguistics courses.
Experience in preparation for and in conduct of classes, in
consultations with students, and in testing.
LING 8591. Independent Study in Linguistics. (1-3 cr [max 6 cr]; A-F or Aud.
Prereq-%)
LIM 5101. Physical Limnology. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-Math 1297, Phys 2012, or
grad student, §5001)
Management Studies (MGTS)
Physical description of lake dynamics including: lake morphometry, water budget, light distribution, circulation, fronts,
waves and mixing. Descriptive, mathematical, numerical and
data-analysis techniques are used to investigate the various
topics.
LIM 5102. Chemical Limnology. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-Math 1296, Phys 1002 or
1202, Chem 1152 or 1162, or grad student, §5001)
Organic and inorganic chemistry of natural waters, major and
minor ions, pH-Eh relationships, carbon and nutrient cycles,
pore water chemistry, sediment chemistry, microbial geochemistry. Offered alternate years.
LIM 5103. Geological Limnology. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-Math 1296, Phys 1002
or 1202, Chem 1152 or 1162, or grad student, §5002)
Course Descriptions
Field measurements on local lakes, streams; research cruise
aboard R/V Blue Heron on Lake Superior; laboratory exercises
in biological, chemical, geological and physical limnology.
Directed reading and/or research.
Labovitz School of Business and Economics
MGTS 3401. Organizational Behavior and Management. (3 cr; A-F only. PrereqLSBE cand or approved non-LSBE bus adm minor or o)
Introduction to organizations, management processes, and
understanding human behavior at work. Covers the effects of
the external environment, organizational structure, job design,
teams, and leadership on employees attitudes, motivation, and
behavior.
MGTS 3491. Independent Study. (1-3 cr [max 3 cr]; A-F only. Prereq-%)
For students wishing to do special work in strategic, organizational, human resource, or marketing management that extends
beyond, or in greater depth than, regular course offerings.
Geological aspects of freshwater systems: origins, tectonic
and climatic settings of lakes, geophysical mapping, phy­si­cal
sedimentary processes, sedimentary geochemistry, geochronology
and paleolimnology. Offered alternate years
353
Course Descriptions
MGTS 3497. Organizational Management Internship. (3 cr; A-F only. Prereq-LSBE
cand, consent of internship director)
MGTS 4461. Business and Society. (3 cr; A-F only. Prereq-3401, 3801, LSBE cand
or o)
Work-integrated learning program providing practical experiences within students’ major. Students participate in approved
program within cooperating businesses, governmental agencies, or civic organizations. Requires minimum of 200 hours
work experience, assigned written reports, and performance
evaluations.
Business as part of larger system--economic, political, social.
Emphasis on external environment--economics, culture, government, technology, international relations, labor--within which
business operates. Business ethics and social responsibility.
MGTS 3801. Human Resource Management. (3 cr; A-F only. Prereq-LSBE cand or
approved non-LSBE bus adm or o)
Introduction to theory and practice of human resource management in private and public organizations. Organizational, legal,
and ethical influences on major personnel functions, including
planning, staffing, training, performance appraisal, compensation, and labor-management relations.
MGTS 3897. Human Resources Internship. (3 cr; A-F only. Prereq-LSBE cand,
consent of internship director)
Work-integrated learning program providing practical experiences within students’ major field. Students participate in
approved program with businesses, governmental agencies, or
civic organizations. Requires minimum of 200 hours work experience, assigned reports, and performance evaluations.
MGTS 3997. Management of Community Projects. (1-3 cr [max 3 cr]; A-F only.
Prereq-3401, 3801, LSBE cand or #)
Requires design and administration of community-related
project involving volunteers. Interns identify project, contact
appropriate persons, obtain approval, and submit written
proposal. Requires completion of minimum of 100-300 hours,
maintenance of weekly journal, oral presentation, and written
analysis.
MGTS 4411. Organizational Studies. (3 cr; A-F only. Prereq-3401, LSBE cand or o)
Survey of organization theories and their application to
organizational structuring, coordination, control, job design,
organizational decision making, leadership, and organizational
development.
MGTS 4421. Managing Change. (3 cr; A-F only. Prereq-3401, 3801 or equiv, LSBE
cand or grad student or o)
Causes, goals, programs, and results of organizational change
and employee responses to it. Assumptions, values, contingency
factors, ethical considerations, models, and intervention
strategies for organizational development. Role of managers as
change agents.
Course Descriptions
MGTS 4431. Leadership. (3 cr; A-F only. Prereq-3401, LSBE cand or o)
Nature and character of leadership; traditional and contemporary views of leadership.
MGTS 4443. Building and Leading Teams in Organizations. (3 cr; A-F only.
Prereq-LSBE candidate, 3401 or #)
Examines effective design and management of a variety of
groups in organizations, including work groups, task forces,
self-managed teams and coalitions. Covers group composition,
goals, processes, and effectiveness; includes leadership, managing external relationships, and performance measurement.
MGTS 4451. Management Inquiry. (3 cr; A-F only. Prereq-3401, 3801, approved
LSBE cand or o)
Methods employed by organizational specialists in conducting
applied inquiry (research) to assist organizational decision making, coupled with an examination of a contemporary management issue. Preparation and written/oral presentation of research
findings from student-conducted field, laboratory, or library
research projects focused on contemporary management issues.
354
MGTS 4472. Entrepreneurship. (3 cr; A-F only. Prereq-LSBE cand or o)
Seminar on the fundamentals of entrepreneurship, the characteristics of entrepreneurs, and the life cycle of a new venture:
creating and starting a new venture; financing the new venture;
managing, growing, and ending the new venture.
MGTS 4473. Management of Innovation and Technology. (3 cr; A-F only. Prereq3401, LSBE cand or o)
Issues related to achieving maximum leverage from innovation
competencies, skills, and resources. Factors distinguishing
high-innovation companies, strategies for innovation, internal
and external conditions, and market consequences of innovation. Integration of technology within the strategic management
process.
MGTS 4474. International Management. (3 cr; A-F only. Prereq-3401, LSBE
candidate or o)
Differences in culture, history, resources, etc. are explored in the
context of managing global businesses and workforce. Students
will reflect on their own managerial skills, and develop skills to
become a global manager.
MGTS 4475. Negotiations, Bargaining and Conflict Resolution. (3 cr; A-F only.
Prereq-LSBE candidate, 3401 or #)
Combines analytical material on the negotiation process, with a
series of negotiating experiences, to develop your understanding
of, and skills in, negotiating and resolving conflicts in business.
Covers topics and strategies appropriate for use between people,
departments, organizations and countries, across a variety of
industries.
MGTS 4481. Strategic Management. (3 cr; A-F only. Prereq-3401, 3701, FMIS
3301, FMIS 3601, 90 cr, LSBE cand or o; no Grad School credit)
Integration of basic functions of marketing, finance, production,
and behavioral sciences. Emphasis on organizational environments and development and implementation of competitive
strategies that respond to social, political, and economic conditions from perspective of top management.
MGTS 4483. Cooperative Strategy and Strategic Alliances. (3 cr; A-F only.
Prereq-LSBE candidate, 3401, 4481 preferred or #)
Introduces the concept that firms are engaged in cooperative
as well as competitive relationships. Creates understanding for
the nature of strategic alliances-forming, negotiating, operating,
evaluating-in an international context.
MGTS 4495. Special Topics: (Various Titles to be Assigned). (1-3 cr [max 9 cr]; A-F
only. Prereq-LSBE cand, 3401 or o)
Enables students, working closely with the instructional faculty,
to explore one or more contemporary organization management
issues in substantial depth.
MGTS 4821. Staffing Work Organizations. (3 cr; A-F only. Prereq-3801, LSBE
cand or o)
Theory and practice of staffing work organizations. Emphasis
on design and implementation of staffing systems, legal requirements, and career planning.
MGTS 4831. Compensation Systems. (3 cr; A-F only. Prereq-3801, LSBE cand or o)
Theory, design, and practice of employee compensation
systems. Impacts of compensation, economic and institutional
forces influencing employer compensation policies and practices, supplemental forms of compensation and administrative
practices.
Marketing
MGTS 4841. Training and Development. (3 cr; A-F only. Prereq-3801, LSBE cand
or o)
Elements of training and development program planning and
delivery: learning theories and approaches, needs assessment,
training objectives, design, training methods, transfer-of-training strategies, and evaluation. Assess, design, and evaluate
human resource development systems. Develop training skills
and techniques.
MGTS 4851. Unions and Collective Bargaining. (3 cr; A-F only. Prereq-3801, LSBE
cand or o)
Nature of and basis for contractual relationships between
employers and unions. Emphasis on background of labor movement, union organizing, bargaining relationships, labor law, and
contemporary trends in private and public sector labor relations.
MGTS 4861. International Human Resource Management. (3 cr; A-F only. Prereq3801, LSBE candidate or #)
Course combines theories of culture with HRM applications to
develop students’ awareness cultural issues as they apply in the
workplace.
cies, or civic organizations. Requires minimum of 200 hours
work experience, assigned written reports, and performance
evaluations.
MKTG 4711. Business-to-Business Marketing. (3 cr; A-F only. Prereq-MTGS 3701
or MKTG 3701, LSBE cand or o; §MGTS 4711)
Marketing goods and services to organizations. Emphasis on
differences between marketing to organizations and consumers. Derived demand, long-term trade relationships, contact,
negotiations, channels, promotion, physical distribution, product
development, markets.
MKTG 4721. Advertising and Marketing Communications. (3 cr; A-F only. PrereqMGTS 3701 or MKTG 3701, LSBE cand or o; §MgtS 4721)
Promotional planning. Emphasis on planning for advertising,
sales promotion, public relations/publicity, direct marketing,
and personal selling. Importance of integrated marketing communications to organizations.
MKTG 4731. Consumer Behavior. (3 cr; A-F only. Prereq-MGTS 3701 or MKTG 3701,
LSBE cand or o; §MgtS 4731)
Integrative, problem-solving approaches to contemporary human resource challenges, with emphasis on employment law.
Buyer behavior and implications for marketing strategy.
Emphasis on information processing concepts, influences on
behavior, and decision-making processes from both conceptual
and pragmatic perspectives. Students requiring graduate credit
must complete additional coursework.
MGTS 4895. Special Topics: (Various Titles to be Assigned). (1-3 cr [max 9 cr]; A-F
only. Prereq-LSBE cand, 3801 or o)
MKTG 4741. Developing and Marketing New Products. (3 cr; A-F only. PrereqMGTS 3701 or MKTG 3701, LSBE cand or o; §MgtS 4741)
Enables students, working closely with the instructional faculty,
to explore one or more contemporary human resource management issues in substantial depth.
A marketing-oriented new products management course that
explores the new product development process with a focus on
marketing strategies for the planning, development and launch
of new products and services.
MGTS 4881. Human Resource Issues and Trends. (3 cr; A-F only. Prereq-3801,
LSBE cand or o)
Marketing (MKTG)
Labovitz School of Business and Economics
MKTG 3701. Principles of Marketing. (3 cr; A-F only. Prereq-LSBE cand or approved
non-LSBE bus adm minor or o; §MgtS 3701)
Marketing as a process of exchange management. Emphasis on
conceptual tools necessary to deal with both strategic marketing
management issues and tactical management of product, price,
promotion, and distribution.
MKTG 3711. Marketing Research. (3 cr; A-F only. Prereq-MGTS 3701 or MKTG
3701, LSBE cand or o; §MgtS 3711)
Emphasis on improving skills of conducting secondary research,
designing a primary research study, and analyzing and reporting
results of a research study.
Theory and practice of personal selling as used by organizations
to develop long-term partnerships with customers. Emphasis on
marketing, planning, communication, and presentation skills.
MKTG 3781. International Marketing. (3 cr; A-F only. Prereq-MGTS 3701 or MKTG
3701, LSBE cand or o; §MgtS 3781)
Principles of establishing and operating a retail business. Topics
include retail market analysis and research, store layout, retail
accounting, merchandise selection and financing, pricing, selling, advertising, budgets and current trends. Emphasis on retail
management from a strategic perspective.
MKTG 4781. Marketing Management and Strategy. (3 cr; A-F only. Prereq-MGTS
3701 or MKTG 3701, MGTS 3711 or MKTG 3711, 1 other MKTG course, 90 cr, LSBE
cand or grad or o; §MgtS 4781)
Planning, directing, and controlling an organization’s marketing
activity, including formulating marketing objectives, strategy,
and tactics. Interpretation of information in decision making and
strategy formulation. Case analysis used to develop marketing
problem-solving, communication, and organization skills.
MKTG 4795. Special Topics (Various Topics to be Assigned). (1-3 cr [max 9 cr]; A-F
only. Prereq-LSBE cand, MGTS 3701 or MKTG 3701 or o)
Enables students, working closely with the instructional faculty,
to explore one or more contemporary marketing issues in
substantial depth.
Marketing across national boundaries; effects of foreign
economic, legal/political, and sociocultural environments on
multinational marketing strategies.
MKTG 3791. Independent Study. (1-3 cr [max 3 cr]; A-F only. Prereq-%)
For students wishing to do special work in marketing that extends beyond, or in greater depth than, regular course offerings.
MKTG 3797. Marketing Internship. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-LSBE cand, consent of
internship director; §MGTS 3797)
Work-integrated learning program providing practical experiences within students’ major. Students participate in approved
program within cooperating businesses, governmental agen-
355
Course Descriptions
MKTG 3741. Fundamentals of Selling. (3 cr; A-F only. Prereq-MGTS 3701 or MKTG
3701, LSBE cand or o; §MGTS 3741)
MKTG 4751. Retailing. (3 cr; A-F only. Prereq-3701, LSBE candidate or o, no Grad
School cr)
Course Descriptions
Master in Advocacy and
Political Leadership (MAPL)
College of Liberal Arts
MAPL 5110. Ethics in Politics: Developing a Shared Ethical Code for Involvement in MN Advocacy, Political Life. (3 cr; A-F only. Prereq-MAPL or Collegiate or
Grad School or #)
Develop a shared, rudimentary ethical code for participation in
Minnesota advocacy and political life. The exercise in developing the code will be informed by reading a few of the major
political/ethical theorists, by dialogue with various political/advocacy figures, and by case studies.
MAPL 5111. Labor Organizing. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-MAPL or Grad School or
Collegiate Grad students or #)
Historical overview of the evolution of modern labor movement,
examine the state of organized labor and labor organizing today,
and analyze two emerging models of union leadership--social
movement leadership and institutional leadership.
MAPL 5112. Politics of Labor. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-MAPL or Grad School or
Collegiate Grad student or #)
Overview of labor’s historical involvement in politics, examine
different models for building worker power that compliment
and at times contradict one another, and analyze the evolution of
organized labor’s legislative agenda.
MAPL 5113. Labor and Political Economy. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-MAPL or
collegiate grad student or Grad student or #)
Overview of political economy and labor, examine different economic theories, changing economic policies and their
impact on workers and labor, and examine specific case studies
of political economy: the New Deal/Great Society policies,
deindustrialization, monetary policy, globalization, welfare
reform and taxation.
MAPL 5115. Small Community Leadership. (3 cr; S-N or Aud. Prereq-MAPL or Grad
School or Collegiate Grad student or #)
Engages students in essential questions relating to the practice
of effective small community leadership: What is leadership and
its relationship to community building? What is good leadership
and how do community leaders develop/maintain it?
Course Descriptions
MAPL 5116. Rural Politics and Community Advocacy. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. PrereqMAPL or Grad School or Collegiate Grad Student or #)
Applications to assess operative power structures in rural and
small communities, the sources of community cohesion and
conflict, and the designing and implementing of effective
economic and civic improvement projects and policies.
MAPL 5117. Urban Policy and Community Organizing. (3 cr; A-F only. PrereqMAPL or Collegiate or Grad School students or #)
Focuses on policy issues such as housing, transportation, youth
programs, poverty, and economic development, and models and
practices for community organizing at the neighborhood level
and in urban communities. Students will learn to do research
with local community organizations.
MAPL 5119. Techniques for Nonprofit Advocacy: Nonprofits as Agents of
Democracy. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-MAPL or Grad School or Collegiate Grad student
or #)
Teaches the purpose of nonprofit associations as agents of
democracy to deepen the understanding of the role of nonprofits
in facilitating democratic citizenship.
MAPL 5200. Nonprofits and Civic Engagement. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-MAPL or
Grad School or Collegiate Grad student or #)
History, theory and current practice of nonprofits in educating
and activating citizens to participate in the public dialogue.
Special attention is given to the role of nonprofits as resources
to elected and appointed policy makers.
356
MAPL 5202. Nonprofits and Government: The Public and Private Partnership. (3
cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-MAPL or collegiate grad student or Grad School student or #)
An indepth look at the intersection between non-profits and
government. Addresses the origin, growth and future of the relationship between non-profit organizations and the government
sector, and current and historical partnerships will be reviewed.
Through readings, case studies, and guest lecturers, students
will be exposed to the challenges of these partnerships as well
as success stories. Students will be exposed to the State and
Federal programs related to economic development, housing,
and social services. Students will also discuss the devolution of
government functions to third parties and private organizations,
as well as the associated funding implications.
MAPL 5301. Campaigns and Elections. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-MAPL or Grad
School or Collegiate Grad student or #)
Overview of campaigns and elections, to include both the party
nomination process and general elections, at the national, state,
and local levels.
MAPL 5302. Policy and the Media. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-MAPL or Collegiate
Grad or Grad School student or #)
Examination of the way policy makers use the media and ways
media affects policy. Traditional and new media and media
methods regarding current debates framing political issues,
media consolidation and role in shaping rather than reporting
news are offered.
MAPL 5303. Lobbying and Intergovernmental Relations. (3 cr; A-F or Aud.
Prereq-MAPL or Grad School or Collegiate Grad student or #)
What and why public policy is being set in Minnesota and
Wisconsin, at the statewide, major local and regional levels.
MAPL 5304. Public Opinion Formation and Measurement. (3 cr; A-F or Aud.
Prereq-MAPL or Grad School or Collegiate Grad student or #)
Explores the question of public opinion in a democracy,
examines the public perceptions of U.S. citizens with a focus on
Minnesota and Wisconsin residents, and provides an overview
of the methods of public opinion gathering and analysis.
MAPL 5305. Courts and Public Policy. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-MAPL or Grad
School or Collegiate Grad student or #)
The extent to which courts, or more precisely lawsuits and
court challenges, can be effective agents of social and political
change.
MAPL 5306. Gender and Public Policy. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-MAPL or Collegiate
Grad or Grad School student or #)
Explores the politics of gender and public policy in the U.S. and
is designed to provide students with a historical and theoretical
background on policy formation, and a set of analytical tools
applied to policy case studies.
MAPL 5307. Political and Advocacy Leadership. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-MAPL or
Collegiate Grad or Grad School student or #)
Help advocates strengthen abilities to lead wisely, ethically and
effectively in political settings. Provides an interdisciplinary
framework to explore the principles of power and leadership,
and features effective political leaders from Minnesota and
Wisconsin who discuss their principles of leadership.
MAPL 5308. The Impact of Art on Social Change. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-MAPL
or Collegiate Grad or Grad School student or #)
Analysis and understanding of how art works influence public
perception, political will, social policy. Topics include environmental protection, labor movement, attitudes toward war, civil
rights, and gay and lesbian rights. Art forms examined include
drama, literature, film, music, photography, painting.
MAPL 5395. Special Topics: (Various Titles to be Assigned). (1-3 cr [max 9 cr]; A-F or
Aud. Prereq-MAPL or Grad School or Collegiate Grad student or #)
Opportunity to explore diverse topics in advocacy, to take advantage of new developments in the field and to explore current
issues or events related to advocacy.
Master of Business Administration
MAPL 6001. Political Process and Public Policy. (3 cr; Stdnt Opt. Prereq-MAPL
student or Grad School or Collegiate Grad student or #)
MBA 8333. FTE: Master’s. (1 cr; No grade. Prereq-Master’s student, adviser and
DGS consent)
After allowing students to gain familiarity with the concepts of
agenda setting and policy development, this course will trace
four different policy changes which have been effected; one
nationally, one in Wisconsin and two in Minnesota.
MBA 8411. Policy Formulation and Implementation. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq8311, 8611, 8711, 8811, MBA student or o)
MAPL 6002. Policy Evaluation. (3 cr; Stdnt Opt. Prereq-MAPL or Grad School or
Collegiate Grad student or #)
Prepares students to understand and, in some cases, to perform,
formal evaluations of policy proposals, including cost benefit
analysis and other efficacy-based measures. Students will learn
that neither public policy nor politics are or can be ethically
neutral.
MAPL 6003. Civic Engagement and Political Cultures. (3 cr; Stdnt Opt. PrereqMAPL or Grad School or Collegiate Grad student or #)
Surveying and critiquing the philosophical foundations of
American politics, from Jefferson and Madison to Rawls and
Martin Luther King. It exams the development of the American
political system and the role of social movements and explores
political cultures.
MAPL 6004. Political Organizing and Communication. (3 cr; Stdnt Opt. PrereqMAPL or Grad School or Collegiate Grad student or #)
Offers the history and techniques of political organizing and
communication, particularly at the grassroots level. Students
engage in why and how movements succeed/fail, and apply
theoretical and historical analysis of political communication to
contemporary policy change.
MAPL 6008. Advocacy Internship I. (3 cr; S-N or Aud. Prereq-MAPL student or #,
no Grad School cr)
Internship experiences will be offered in the advocacy and
political leadership program. Students will have supervised
direct experience with an individual or organizational sponsor
in advocacy.
MAPL 6009. Advocacy Internship. (2 cr [max 4 cr]; S-N or Aud. Prereq-MAPL or #,
no Grad School cr)
Internship experiences will be offered in the advocacy and
political leadership program. Students will have supervised
direct experience with an individual or organizational sponsor
in advocacy.
Master of Business
Administration (MBA)
MBA 8111. Business, Government, and Society. (2 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-MBA
student or o)
How cultural, political, global, legal, and economic factors
impact business activities. Issues of business ethics and social
responsibility.
MBA 8211. Data Analysis and Statistics for Managers. (2 cr; A-F or Aud. PrereqEcon 2020 or equiv, MBA student or o)
MBA 8501. Management Accounting. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-Acct 2005 or equiv,
MBA student or o)
Interpreting and using accounting reports and supplementary information for management planning, coordination, and control;
emphasis on using accounting information for decision making
in problems of product mix, cost-volume-profit analysis, and
other profit planning and control areas.
MBA 8512. Managerial Economics. (2 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-Econ 1022, Econ 1023
or equiv, MBA student or o)
Application of economic theory and economic methodology to
managerial decision making. Supply and demand, production,
consumer behavior, business and economic forecasting, pricing
and marketing strategies under differing competitive conditions,
government’s role, and the global market.
MBA 8611. Financial Management. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-FMIS 3601 or equiv,
MBA student or o)
Corporate financial policy. Application of financial theory and
decision-making tools.
MBA 8711. Marketing Management. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-MgtS 3701 or equiv,
MBA student or o)
Planning, implementation, evaluation, and control of organizational marketing activities. This process includes environmental
market analysis in order to achieve competitive advantage and
effective resource allocation.
MBA 8801. Organization Behavior and Human Performance. (3 cr; A-F or Aud.
Prereq-MgtS 3401 or equiv, MBA student or o)
Theoretical models and empirical literature focused on understanding the effects (e.g., performance, motivation, and work-related attitudes--satisfactions and commitment) that organizations have upon their members through environmental factors
such as job/work design, technology, and reward systems.
MBA 8811. Human Resource Challenges. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-MgtS 3801 or
equiv, MBA student or o)
Overview of contemporary human resource issues, human
resource systems, procedures, and decisions that guide effective,
efficient, and equitable management of people in organizations.
MBA 8991. Independent Study. (1-3 cr [max 6 cr]; A-F or Aud. Prereq-o)
Provides opportunity for special study in areas useful to individual programs and objectives in accounting, economics, finance,
information systems, management, human resource management, marketing, and other areas of business administration that
extend beyond, or in greater depth than, regular courses.
Concepts/principles of business statistics, data analysis, and
presentation of results. Research process and design, secondary
and primary data collection, measurement concepts, sampling
design, use and interpretation of statistical techniques, research
ethics, reporting, and evaluating research findings.
MBA 8994. Directed Research. (1-6 cr [max 6 cr]; A-F or Aud. Prereq-MBA student,
o)
MBA 8311. Operations Management. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-FMIS 3301 or equiv,
MBA student or o)
Special topics on or integrative, interdisciplinary study of problems in accounting, economics, and business administration.
Operations management strategies for the organization.
Computer-implemented decision support models introduced
in contexts such as project management, resource allocation,
forecasting, quality management, inventory management, and
simulation.
Directed research.
MBA 8995. Special Topics: (Various Titles to be Assigned). (1-3 cr [max 8 cr]; A-F or
Aud. Prereq-MBA student or o)
357
Course Descriptions
Labovitz School of Business and Economics
Formulation and implementation of organizational strategy
and policy that results in a sustainable competitive advantage.
Develop skills in integrating all functional areas of business as
well as identifying industry and competitive trends to determine
organizational strategy.
Course Descriptions
MBA 8999. Projects in Business. (1-3 cr [max 6 cr]; A-F or Aud. Prereq-MBA
student, o)
Community or campus-based projects involving analysis of
an issue or problem in an organization and proposal of a solution. Provides an opportunity for integrative, interdisciplinary
study of problems in accounting, economics, and business
administration.
Mathematics (MATH)
College of Science and Engineering
MATH 102. Euclidean Geometry. (0 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-High school algebra; the
preparatory course fee is equal to 3 credits of resident tuition)
Plane and solid geometry. Brief introduction to analytic
geometry. Intended for students who have not taken high school
geometry or who need additional background in geometry.
MATH 1005. College Algebra. (5 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-Math placement or %)
Basic concepts of solving equations and inequalities.
Introduction to function concept and graphing. Polynomial,
rational, logarithmic, and exponential functions.
First part of a standard introduction to calculus of functions of
a single variable. Limits, continuity, derivatives, integrals, and
their applications.
MATH 1297. Calculus II. (5 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-A grade of at least C- in 1290 or
1296 or 1596)
Second part of a standard introduction to calculus. Vectors,
applications of integrals, transcendental functions, series, and
multivariable functions and partial derivatives.
MATH 1596. Honors: Calculus I. (5 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-1250 or 3 1/2 years high
school mathematics including trigonometry,%; §1290, 1296 LE 2)
First part of standard introduction to calculus of functions of
single variable. Limits, continuity, derivatives, integrals, and
their applications, indeterminate forms. Same as Math 1296,
but with more depth, rigor, more challenging assignments. For
high-ability students with excellent preparation.
MATH 1597. Honors: Calculus II. (5 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-1596 or a grade of A in
1290 or 1296,%; §1297)
College-level algebra: solving equations and inequalities.
Designed for students who need to review high-school algebra
topics and/or supplement previous courses, such as College
Algebra.
Same as Math 1297, but with more depth, rigor, and challenging assignments. Techniques of integration, transcendental
functions, exponentials and logarithms, infinite sequences and
series, vectors, partial differentiation, and applications. Intended
for high-ability students with excellent preparation.
MATH 1024. Introduction to Contemporary Mathematics. (3 cr; A-F or Aud.
Prereq-1005 or math placement LE 2)
MATH 2326. Introduction to Linear Algebra and Mathematical Reasoning. (3 cr;
A-F or Aud. Prereq-1290 or 1296 or 1596)
MATH 1007. Algebra Review. (1 cr; S-N or Aud)
Increases awareness and appreciation of uses, richness, and
power of mathematics. Sample topics: graph theory for management science, scheduling, linear programming, statistical
sampling and inference, coding information, decision making,
voting theory, game theory, geometric growth, symmetry, and
patterns.
Mathematical reasoning, including direct proofs, indirect
proofs, proofs by contradiction, and counterexamples. Systems
of linear equations; matrix algebra; determinants; an introduction to vector spaces, subspaces, linear independence, span, basis; change of coordinates, matrix transformations, eigenvalues,
eigenvectors, and orthogonal projections.
MATH 1141. Mathematics for Elementary Education. (4 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq1005 or math placement, pre-elementary education major or %)
MATH 3091. Independent Study. (1-3 cr [max 8 cr]; A-F or Aud. Prereq-%)
Subject matter for effective elementary school teaching.
Problem solving, structure of number systems, and properties of
geometric figures. Use of microcomputers in mathematics.
MATH 1160. Finite Mathematics and Introduction to Calculus. (5 cr; A-F or Aud.
Prereq-1005 or math placement; §1290, 1296 LE 2)
Course Descriptions
MATH 1296. Calculus I. (5 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-3 1/2 yrs high school algebra or
trig or geometry or college precalc course, a grade of at least C- in 1250 or math
placement, §1290 or 1596 LE 2)
Directed reading and/or research in mathematics. Must be arranged with instructor and department head before registration.
MATH 3097. Internship. (1-3 cr [max 3 cr]; S-N or Aud. Prereq-Math major, %)
Practical, independent project in commercial, government, or
industrial setting. Department approval required before beginning project.
Elementary functions, matrices, graphical and algebraic methods for solving systems of linear equations and inequalities,
introduction to linear programming, and abbreviated treatment
of calculus with emphasis on business and social science
applications.
MATH 3110. Foundations of Mathematics and Geometry. (4 cr; A-F or Aud.
Prereq-1297or 1597, teaching math major)
MATH 1234. Freshman Seminar: Topics: (Various Titles to be Assigned). (3 cr; A-F
or Aud. Prereq-Freshman, fewer than 30 cr. LE 2)
MATH 3120. Mathematics Tutorial Project. (1-2 cr [max 4 cr]; S-N or Aud. Prereq1290 or 1296 or 1596, SSP 3003, #)
Concepts from mathematics/statistics and their areas of use. See
Class Schedule for topics.
MATH 1250. Precalculus Analysis. (4 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-A grade of at least C- in
1005 or math placement LE 2)
Inequalities, analytical geometry; relations, functions, and
graphs; exponential, logarithmic, and trigonometric functions;
complex numbers and De Moivre’s Theorem; permutations,
combinations, binomial theorem, and mathematical induction.
MATH 1290. Calculus for the Natural Sciences. (5 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-1250 or
math placement; §1296 or 1596 LE 2)
Differential and integral calculus needed for modeling in earth
and life sciences. Computational software. Not intended for
students in mathematics, engineering, or physical sciences.
Introduction to foundations of mathematics. Non-Euclidean
geometries, postulational systems, and models. History of mathematics. Importance and use of mathematics in modern society.
Primarily for 1xxx mathematics courses, under supervision of
mathematics department member.
MATH 3280. Differential Equations with Linear Algebra. (4 cr; A-F or Aud. PrereqA grade of at least C- in 1297 or 1597)
First, second, and higher order equations; series methods;
Laplace transforms; systems; software; modeling applications;
introduction to vectors; matrix algebra, eigenvalues.
MATH 3298. Calculus III. (4 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-A grade of at least C- in 1297
or 1597)
Third part of a standard introduction to calculus. Conic sections,
vectors and vector-valued functions, partial derivatives and
multiple integrals, vector fields, Green’s and Stokes’ theorems.
MATH 3299. Intermediate Analysis. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-1297 or 1597)
In-depth study of fundamental notions such as limit, convergence, continuity, differentiability, and integrability on which all
reflective study of calculus must rest.
358
Mathematics
MATH 3355. Discrete Mathematics. (4 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-1297 or 1597 or #)
Introduction to mathematical logic, predicates and quantifiers,
sets, proof techniques, recursion and mathematical induction,
recursive algorithms, analysis of algorithms, assertions and loop
invariants, complexity measures of algorithms, combinatorial
counting techniques, relations, graph theory.
MATH 3941. Undergraduate Colloquium. (1 cr; S-N or Aud. Prereq-Math major or
minor, %; must regis during sem of 16th point)
Exposure to UMD mathematics-related colloquia. Sixteen
points required: one for attending a colloquium; one for writing
an acceptable report on a colloquium (at least four must be
earned through writing); up to eight for giving a colloquium.
MATH 4230. Applied Mathematics: Complex Variables. (3 cr; A-F or Aud.
Prereq-3280)
Complex numbers and analytic functions; complex integration;
complex power series, Taylor series, and Laurent series; theory
of residues; conformal mapping.
MATH 4240. Applied Mathematics: Operational Methods. (3 cr; A-F or Aud.
Prereq-3280)
Laplace transform; Fourier series, integrals, and transforms;
Sturm-Liouville operator- and boundary-value problems;
orthogonal functions; operator solutions of partial differential
equations.
MATH 4326. Linear Algebra. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-A grade of at least C- in 3280,
[3299 or 3355], 3 cr Math/Stat above 3120; no Grad School cr)
Systems of linear equations, matrix algebra, determinants,
vector spaces, subspaces, linear independence, span, basis,
coordinates, linear transformations, matrix representations of
linear transformations, eigenvalues and eigenvectors, diagonalization, Gram-Schmidt orthogonalization, orthogonal projection
and least squares.
MATH 4371. Introduction to Abstract Algebra. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-3355,
4326 or 3280, teaching math major, cannot be used for math major elective; no Grad
School cr)
tree methods (UPGMA, parsimony, maximum likelihood).
Other topics will be covered as time permits: RNA and protein
structure prediction, microarray analysis, post-translational
modification prediction, gene regulatory dynamics, and wholegenome sequencing techniques.
MATH 5260. Dynamical Systems. (3 cr; Stdnt Opt. Prereq-3280)
Fundamentals of differential equations (existence, uniqueness,
continuation of solutions); linear systems, autonomous systems,
and Poincare-Bendixson theory; periodic systems; discrete
dynamical systems; bifurcation theory; chaos.
MATH 5270. Modeling with Dynamical Systems. (3 cr; Stdnt Opt. Prereq-3280)
Application and analysis of continuous and discrete dynamical
systems. Model construction, simulation, and interpretation.
MATH 5280. Partial Differential Equations. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-A grade of at
least C- in 3280 or grad standing)
Introduction, emphasizing use of Fourier series, Green’s functions, and other classical techniques.
MATH 5327. Advanced Linear Algebra. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-Graduate student
or #)
Vector spaces over fields, subspaces, linear transformations,
matrix representations, change of basis, inner-product spaces,
singular value decomposition, eigenspaces, diagonalizability,
annihilating polynomials, Jordan form.
MATH 5330. Theory of Numbers. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-3355 or #)
Properties of integers, primes, divisibility, congruences, and
quadratic reciprocity. Computational aspects include factoring
algorithms and RSA cryptosystem.
MATH 5365. Graph Theory. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-3355 or #)
Finite graphs, including trees, connectivity, traversability,
planarity, colorability, labeling, and matchings.
MATH 5366. Enumerative Combinatorics. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-3355)
Introduction to groups and rings appropriate for students majoring in teaching mathematics.
Permutations, combinations, binomial coefficients, inclusion-exclusion, recurrence relations, ordinary and exponential
generating functions, Catalan numbers, selected topics from
designs, finite geometries, Polya’s enumeration formula.
MATH 5110. Foundations of Secondary-level Mathematics: Algebra. (3 cr; A-F
or Aud. Prereq-4326 or mathematics teaching license or #)
MATH 5371. Abstract Algebra I. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-3355 or 4326 or grad
standing or #)
Advanced pre-service and in-service secondary mathematics
teachers. Secondary mathematics from a higher perspective:
definitions, history, and machinery of functions; concept of
and solving equations; algebraic structures; congruence transformation; symmetry; similar figures; distances within figures;
relationship among area, volume, and dimension.
Introduction to groups and rings and their applications.
MATH 5120. Foundations of Secondary-level Mathematics: Analysis. (3 cr; A-F
or Aud. Prereq-4326 or mathematics teaching license or #)
Introduction to linear error-correcting codes using binary
vector spaces and finite fields. Hamming codes, Golay codes,
linear codes in general, cyclic codes, BCH codes, and their
encoding/decoding.
MATH 5201. Real Variables. (4 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-3299)
Limits, sequence and series of real numbers, tests for
convergence, rearrangements, summability, and the class LSQUARED. Metric spaces; continuous functions, connectedness, completeness, compactness. Banach fixed-point theorem
and Piccard existence theorem for differential equations.
MATH 5233. Mathematical Foundations of Bioinformatics. (3 cr; A-F or Aud.
Prereq-Any two of the following: Biol 5233, Math 3355, CS 1511, Stat 3611 or #)
Mathematical, algorithmic, and computational foundations
of common tools used in genomics and proteomics. Topics
include: sequence alignment algorithms and implementations
(Needleman-Wunsch, Smith-Waterman, BLAST, Clustal), scoring matrices (PAM, BLOSUM), statistics of DNA sequences
(SNPs, CpG islands, isochores, satellites), and phylogenetic
Polynomial rings, divisibility in integral domains, field extensions, finite fields, special topic, and applications.
MATH 5384. Algebraic Coding Theory. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-3355 or #)
Course Descriptions
Real and complex numbers; natural numbers, induction, and recursion; divisibility properties of the integers and polynomials;
systems of modular arithmetic; number fields; angle measure
and the trigonometric ratios; trigonometric functions and their
connections; cartesian model for Euclidean Geometry.
MATH 5372. Abstract Algebra II. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-3355 or #)
MATH 5810. Linear Programming. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-3280 or 4326)
Motivation problems, modeling, theory of simplex method, duality and sensitivity analysis, large-scale problems, complexity,
and Karmarkar algorithm.
MATH 5830. Numerical Analysis: Approximation and Quadrature. (4 cr; Stdnt
Opt. Prereq-3280 or 4326, proficiency in FORTRAN or C or C++)
Error analysis, interpolation and approximation, numerical
integration, solution of nonlinear systems.
MATH 5840. Numerical Analysis: Systems and Optimization. (4 cr; Stdnt Opt.
Prereq-3280 or 4326, proficiency in FORTRAN or C or C++)
Solution of systems of linear equations; elimination and
factorization methods; iterative methods; error analysis; eigenvalue/eigenvector approximation; unconstrained optimization;
nonlinear least squares.
359
Course Descriptions
MATH 5850. Numerical Differential Equations. (4 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-3280,
proficiency in FORTRAN or C or C++)
ME 3230. Kinematics and Mechatronics. (3 cr; A-F only. Prereq-3140, [P]3230,
§3230 or 4135)
Computational differencing techniques as applied to initial- and
boundary-value problems. Introduction to variational formulations of differential equations and general technique of weighed
residuals.
Classical closed and open form kinematics modeling will be
developed. Use of Denavit Hartenberg structural analysis will
be explored. Kinetic models of structures will be developed.
Explores the design and use of mechatronic devices.
MATH 5991. Independent Study. (1-4 cr [max 8 cr]; A-F or Aud. Prereq-%; Max 6 cr
to a Grad School program)
ME 4112. Heat and Mass Transfer. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-3211, Math 3298,
BSME or BSChE cand or #, §ChE 3112)
Directed individual reading and/or research in mathematics;
must be arranged with instructor and department head before
registration.
Theory and practice of heat and mass transfer. Fundamentals
of diffusion, conduction, convection, and radiation with application to the design of heat and mass transfer equipment and
systems.
MATH 5995. Special Topics: (Various Titles to be Assigned). (1-3 cr [max 6 cr]; A-F
or Aud. Prereq-%)
Topics not available in standard curriculum.
MATH 8201. Real Analysis. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-5201)
Rigorous development of abstract measure spaces, measurable
functions, and corresponding theory of integration. Lebesgue
measure and Lebesgue integral developed as a particular model.
(offered alt yrs)
MATH 8333. FTE: Master’s. (1 cr; No grade. Prereq-Master’s student, adviser and
DGS consent)
MATH 8777. Thesis Credits: Master’s. (1-18 cr [max 50 cr]; No grade. Prereq-Max
18 cr per semester or summer; 10 cr total required (Plan A only))
MATH 8811. Mathematics Seminar. (3 cr; S-N or Aud. Prereq-8980)
Applications of mathematical and computational modeling
methods; high-performance computation, visualization, and
modeling techniques. Case-study analyses of models from areas
such as the sciences, medicine, engineering, and industry.
MATH 8980. Graduate Seminar. (1 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-#)
Survey of applications of discrete, continuous, and stochastic
modeling techniques. For first-year graduate students in applied
and computational mathematics.
MATH 8994. Directed Research. (1-4 cr [max 12 cr]; A-F or Aud. Prereq-#)
Mechanical Engineering (ME)
College of Science and Engineering
Course Descriptions
ME 3111. Fluid Mechanics. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-Engr 2026, BSME or BSChE
cand or #; §ChE 3111)
Mass and energy balances, Bernoulli’s Equation, momentum
balance, laminar and turbulent flow, boundary layer theory, flow
through porous media.
ME 3140. System Dynamics and Control. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-CS 1121 or
1131 or 1211 or 1511 or 2121, ECE 2006, Math 3298, BSME cand or #)
Mathematical modeling of mechanical, electrical, thermal, fluid,
and hybrid systems. System response using numerical integration and Laplace transforms. Fourier transform and convolution.
Transfer functions and frequency response. Classical control
theory.
ME 3211. Thermodynamics. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-Phys 2012, ME 3111, BSME
cand or #)
Thermodynamics, thermodynamic properties of liquids and
gases, 1st and 2nd laws of thermodynamics, irreversibility and
entropy. Carnot systems, work producing systems, combustion
engine cycles, work absorbing systems, refrigeration cycles,
psychrometrics.
ME 3222. Controls and Kinematics Laboratory. (2 cr; A-F only. Prereq-3140 with a
grade of C- or better, IE 3122, [P]3230; §IE 4135 and/or ME 4135)
Perform computer simulations and hands on laboratory
exercises to explore effective control systems design. Robotic
programming exercises using industrial robots will be performed. Design and construction of mechatronic devices will
be completed.
360
ME 4122. Heat Transfer, Thermodynamics and Fluid Mechanics Laboratory. (2
cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-[P]4112 or ChE 3112 or #, BSME cand)
Heat transfer and Thermo-Fluids lab, experimental evaluation of
conductive, convective and radiation heat transfer, and analysis
of performance of various energy systems such as compressors,
turbines, fans, refrigerators and combustion engines.
ME 4135. Robotics and Controls. (4 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-CS 1121 or CS 1511 or
CS 1131 or CS 1211 or CS 2121, ECE 2006,Math 3298, Engr 2026, BSME or BSIE
candidate or #; §IE 4135)
Exploration of Forward and Inverse Kinematics models for individual robots. Study of robot motion trajectories at the microand macroscopic level. Study of PE, PD and PID controllers for
robots. Exploration of efficient methods for developing stable
controllers for various geometric configurations. Laboratory
exercises and final group project to demonstrate mastery of the
subject matter.
ME 4145. CAD/CAM. (4 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-Engr 2016, BSIE International
Engineering, or BSME cand, or #, §IE 4145)
Description of hardware for CAD/CAM, principles of solie
modeling, data structures, visualization, calculation of mass
properties, surface modeling. Introduction to FEM usage, lab
use of CAD/CAM system for solid modeling, cutter path generation, and FEM problems in vibration, stress analysis.
ME 4175. Machine Design. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-Engr 2016, Engr 2110, BSME
cand or #; §IE 4175)
Analysis of mechanical components as used in mechanical
devices. Theories of material failures, lubrication, and corrosion. Design of machinery considering performance, safety,
packaging, wear, and recycling.
ME 4196. Cooperative Education. (1 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-BSME cand, #, no Grad
School credit; §IE 4196)
Practical work experience with employer closely associated
with student’s academic area; arranged by mutual agreement
among student, department, and employer. Biweekly status reports and final written report must be submitted to department.
ME 4245. Machining and Machine Tools. (4 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-IE 1225, Engr
2016, BSIE or BSME cand; §IE 3245)
Metal cutting theory, aspects of tool design, fastener and power
screw threads, machine tool design: mechanical and electrical,
digital control theory for machine tools. Lab experiments in
metal cutting, laser metrology, and manual programming of
CNC machine tools.
ME 4255. Multidisciplinary Senior Design. (4 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-EMgt 4110,
BSME cand, or #; no Grad School credit; §IE 4255)
Capstone design course in mechanical engineering. Project
Management, problem definition, root cause analysis, baseline
analysis, alternative solutions, analysis, reporting. Societal,
economic, ethical, environmental, political considerations. Oral
and written reports. Work is in teams focused on industrial or
competition-based projects.
Medical Microbiology and Immunology
ME 4491. Independent Study in Mechanical Engineering. (1-4 cr [max 4 cr]; Stdnt
Opt. Prereq-Sr standing in engineering discipline, #)
PHSL 5601. Physiology of Organ Systems I. (4 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-Biol 2101 or
Biol 2201 or Chem 3322 or 4341 or #)
Directed study of special interest topics not available in standard
curriculum. Must be arranged with instructor before registration. May include readings, research and/or special projects.
Survey of physiologic functions and interrelationships of organ
systems in mammals (musculoskeletal, cardiovascular, renal,
respiratory, nervous, endocrine, and reproductive). Framework
for understanding physiological processes, allowing students to
integrate knowledge gained at molecular level with functions of
whole organism.
ME 4495. Special Topics: (Various Titles to be Assigned). (1-4 cr [max 12 cr]; A-F or
Aud. Prereq-BSME cand or #)
Topics not available in regular department curriculum. May
involve specialties of department or visiting faculty.
ME 5305. Computational Fluid Dynamics. (3 cr; A-F only. Prereq-[P]4112 or ChE
3112, BSChE, or BSME or BSIE candidate or %)
Finite-difference methods for steady and transient diffusion
and convection-diffusion problems. Finite-volume technique
for the solution of multi-dimensional fluid flow, and heat and
mass transfer problems. Utilize CFD software to solve complex
problems.
ME 5315. Nondestructive Evaluation of Engineering Materials. (3 cr; A-F only.
Prereq-Phys 2012, Engr 2110, Stat 3411)
Fundamentals of Ultrasonic and Acoustic Emission NDE
are considered including wave propagation, experimental
measurement systems, flaw detection and characterization, and
material characterization. Labs are used to support the study of
ultrasonic and acoustic emission NDE. Other NDE techniques
including magnetics, penetrants, eddy currents, thermography,
are surveyed.
ME 5325. Sustainable Energy System. (3 cr; A-F only. Prereq-Min 90 cr, BSChE or
BSECE or BSIE or BSME candidate. pr %)
A comparison of different energy systems will be made in terms
of economic, environmental and political implications. Specific
energy alternatives will include coal, oil, geothermal, bioenergy,
solar, wind, fission, fusion, hydrogen, fuel cell.
ME 5335. Introduction to Finite Element Analysis. (3 cr; A-F only. Prereq-Engr
2016, BSME or BBSIE or MSEM candidate or %)
An introduction to finite element analysis, including theoretical
and applied components in mechanical and thermal systems.
ME 5991. Independent Study in Mechanical Engineering. (1-4 cr [max 6 cr]; Stdnt
Opt. Prereq-MSEM can, %)
Directed study of special interest topics not available in standard
curriculum. Must be arranged with instructor before registration. May include readings, research and/or special projects.
School of Medicine
PHSL 3011. General Physiology. (4 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-Biol 1761 or Chem 1102
or #)
Lectures and demonstrations illustrate key aspects of function
and mechanisms of action of major organ systems. Primarily for
students preparing for nursing, dental hygiene, pre-professional
programs, communication disorders, life science teaching,
majors in natural sciences.
PHSL 5211. Literature Seminar. (1-2 cr [max 2 cr]; S-N or Aud)
Oral presentation of written literature review and research data
reflecting student’s research interests and thesis research results.
PHSL 5292. Readings in Physiology. (1-3 cr [max 3 cr]; Stdnt Opt. Prereq-#)
Topics in physiology selected for each student; written reviews
prepared and discussed.
PHSL 5294. Research in Physiology. (1-15 cr [max 15 cr]; Stdnt Opt. Prereq-#)
Introduction and use of lab techniques and equipment used
for research in various subspecialties of physiology, including
neurophysiology, cardiovascular physiology, endocrinology,
respiratory and transport process, electrophysiology, and renal
physiology.
Advanced study of organ system functions in context of interaction of organism with environment.
PHSL 8333. FTE: Master’s. (1 cr; No grade. Prereq-Master s student, adviser and
DGS consent)
PHSL 8401. Physiology of Aging. (2 cr; Stdnt Opt. Prereq-5601, #)
In-depth study of several theories concerning physiological
processes that appear to set the limits of maximum human life
span.
PHSL 8405. Muscle Physiology. (2 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-5601, #)
In-depth review and discussion of physiological processes
involved in muscle contraction from subcellular events to
neural-controlled function of whole muscle (skeletal, cardiac,
and smooth muscle).
PHSL 8415. Special Topics: (Various Titles to be Assigned). (2 cr; Stdnt Opt.
Prereq-5601, #)
Selected topics of current endocrine research interest examined
in depth; historical background, questions posed by current
research, and implications of current research for future development in the area.
PHSL 8441. Transport Processes. (2 cr; Stdnt Opt. Prereq-5601, #)
In-depth, quantitative approach to transport processes in
biological systems.
PHSL 8444. FTE: Doctoral. (1 cr; No grade. Prereq-Doctoral student, adviser and
DGS consent)
PHSL 8666. Doctoral Pre-Thesis Credits. (1-6 cr [max 12 cr]; No grade. Prereq-Max
6 cr per semester or summer; doctoral student who has not passed prelim oral; no
required consent for the first two registrations up to 12 cr; departmental consent for
the third and fourth registrations up to an additional 12 cr, or 24 cr total (for doctoral
students admitted summer 2007 and beyond; doctoral students admitted prior to
summer 2007 may register up to 4 times totaling 60 cr))
PHSL 8777. Thesis Credits: Master’s. (1-18 cr [max 50 cr]; No grade. Prereq-Max
18 cr per semester or summer; 10 cr total required (Plan A only))
PHSL 8888. Thesis Credits: Doctoral. (1-24 cr [max 100 cr]; No grade. Prereq-Max
18 cr per semester or summer; 24 cr required)
Course Descriptions
Medical and Molecular
Physiology (PHSL)
PHSL 5602. Physiology of Organ Systems II. (2 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-5601 or #)
Medical Microbiology and
Immunology (MICB)
School of Medicine
MICB 5545. Immunobiology. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-%)
The immune system including the cells and molecules which
work cooperatively to resist disease and aberrations resulting in
immune disorders.
MICB 5555. Molecular Pathogenesis: Current Concepts. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. PrereqBiol 2201 or equiv, Biol 4501 or equivalent or #)
Study of current discoveries in microbial pathogenesis and
the molecular techniques used in elucidating pathogenic
mechanisms of viral, bacterial and parasitic agents. A survey of
current literature related to human infectious disease including
malignant transformation.
361
Course Descriptions
MICB 5591. Problems in Medical Microbiology and Immunology. (1-4 cr [max 8
cr]; Stdnt Opt. Prereq-Open to med students or qualified upper div and grad students
with #)
Independent study on tutorial basis. Emphasis on basic and
clinical microbiology problems, including immunology.
Investigative work and appropriate reading arranged with
tutorials consistent with interests and capabilities of individual
students.
MICB 8333. FTE: Master’s. (1 cr; No grade. Prereq-Master s student, adviser and
DGS consent)
MICB 8444. FTE: Doctoral. (1 cr; No grade. Prereq-Doctoral student, adviser and
DGS consent)
MICB 8554. Advanced Immunology and Immunobiology. (2 cr; A-F or Aud.
Prereq-5545 or #)
Detailed study of mechanisms involved in immunologic
defense. Emphasis on concepts and current literature.
MICB 8777. Thesis Credits: Master’s. (1-18 cr [max 50 cr]; No grade. Prereq-Max
18 cr per semester or summer; 10 cr total required (Plan A only))
Basic elements of biostatistics, including descriptive and inferential statistics, study design, probability statistics, and ordering
and interpreting diagnostic tests. Topics in clinical epidemiology and epidemiologic methods.
MED 6420. Introduction to Rural Primary Care Medicine. (2 cr; P-N or Aud.
Prereq-Regis med Student)
Introduces medical students to rural medicine and community
health assessments through lecture, panel discussions, small
group encounters and rural community site visits.
MED 6505. Applied Anatomy. (8 cr; O-N or Aud. Prereq-Regis med student)
Adult gross structure taught using regional approach with strong
emphasis on functional and clinical applications. Basic-clinical
science correlation conferences held frequently to emphasize
applied anatomy of a region.
MED 6510. Histopathology. (6 cr; O-N or Aud. Prereq-Regis med)
MICB 8888. Thesis Credits: Doctoral. (1-24 cr [max 100 cr]; No grade. Prereq-Max
18 cr per semester or summer; 24 cr required)
Integrated course correlating normal structure and function of
cells, tissues, and organs of the body with examples of pathological changes that take place within these cells, tissues, and
organs during disease processes.
Medicine (MED)
MED 6520. Principles of Basic Medical Science. (9 cr [max 12 cr]; O-N only.
Prereq-Regis med student)
School of Medicine
Introduction to cellular homeostatic principles and mechanisms
associated with normal and abnormal structure and function. Basic science principles of integrative medical sciences.
Interdisciplinary sessions emphasize fundamental concepts
of biochemistry, molecular biology, anatomy, microbiology,
physiology, and pharmacology.
MED 601. Basic Science I. (0 cr; P-N or Aud. Prereq-Regis Med Student)
For selected medical students working toward an M.D. who
are doing continuing work in their first year. Students must be
recommended by the Scholastic Standing Committee or associate dean for student affairs. May be repeated.
MED 602. Basic Science II. (0 cr; P-N or Aud. Prereq-Regis Med Student)
For selected students working towards an M.D. who are doing
continuing work in their second year. Students must be recommended by the Scholastic Standing Committee or associate
dean for student affairs. May be repeated.
MED 691. Independent Study. (0 cr; P-N or Aud. Prereq-Regis Med Student)
For selected medical students working toward an M.D. who are
pursuing independent study (e.g., remedial coursework, repeating a course, medical leave). Students must be recommended
by the Scholastic Standing Committee or associate dean for
student affairs.
MED 693. Directed Study. (0 cr; P-N or Aud. Prereq-Regis Med Student)
Course Descriptions
MED 6301. Medical Epidemiology and Biometrics. (2 cr; P-N only. Prereq-§BhSc
6301, regis med student)
For selected medical students working toward an M.D. who
are in a supervised program preparing for the National Boards
Exam. Students must be recommended by the Scholastic
Standing Committee or associate dean for student affairs.
MED 694. Research. (0 cr; P-N or Aud. Prereq-Regis Med Student)
For selected medical students working toward an M.D. who are
doing research over an extended period of time. Students must
be recommended by the Scholastic Standing Committee or
associate dean for student affairs. May be repeated.
MED 3998. Human Biology and Behavior Topics. (1-10 cr [max 12 cr]; Stdnt Opt.
Prereq-#)
Advanced undergraduate or graduate students can study in
depth normal human biology and behavior. During the academic
year, students may elect to enroll in one or several subtopics. No
basic science clinical correlation.
MED 6023. Seminars in Indian Health. (1-2 cr [max 3 cr]; P-N or Aud. Prereq-Regis
med student, social work student with #)
Current issues impacting health of Indian people. Causes
of morbidity and mortality, including social, cultural, and
economic issues. Discussion focuses on solutions to problems
in context of Indian communities.
362
MED 6541. Hematopoiesis and Host Defenses. (9 cr; O-N or Aud. Prereq-Regis
med student)
Introduction to principles of human immunology and hematology. Basic science principles, including pharmacology and
pathology together with clinical aspects of innate and acquired
immunity within context of hemato-lympho-reticular system.
MED 6566. Cardiovascular System. (7 cr; O-N only. Prereq-Regis med student)
Integrated comprehensive overview of cardiovascular system.
Anatomical, biochemical, physiological, pathological, and pharmacologic aspects of heart, blood vessels, and blood, including
histology, embryology, anatomy, gross and microscopic pathology, as well as clinical features, diagnosis, and pharmacological
therapy.
MED 6573. Nervous System. (11 cr; O-N only. Prereq-Regis med student or #)
Interdisciplinary study of human nervous system, including consideration of eye and ear. Basic sciences of anatomy, behavioral
science, biochemistry, microbiology, pathology, pharmacology,
and physiology correlated with clinical material.
MED 6724. Gastrointestinal Hepatobiliary System. (6 cr; O-N only. Prereq-Regis
med student)
Interdisciplinary integrative course discusses fundamental
concepts of anatomy, physiology, nutrition, pathology, clinical
medicine, and microbiology as they relate to issues of gastrointestinal and hepatobiliary system.
MED 6728. Respiratory System. (5 cr; O-N only. Prereq-Regis med student)
Maintenance and regulation of human internal environment by
the respiratory system. Histology of upper airways and lungs;
respiratory gas exchange; introduction to respiratory component
of acid-base balance. Integrative lab covering cardiovascularrespiratory adjustments to exercise.
MED 6746. Fluids and Electrolytes. (4 cr; O-N or Aud. Prereq-Regis med student)
Introduction to principles and mechanisms associated with
human renal and genitourinary function in health and disease.
Integrates anatomical, physiological, pharmacological,
Music
pathological, immunological, and basic clinical aspects of renal
and genitourinary systems in context of fluid and electrolyte
homeostasis.
MU 1111. Tonal Harmony I. (2 cr; A-F only. Prereq-Music major or music minor)
MED 6762. Endocrine and Reproductive System. (5 cr; O-N only. Prereq-Regis
med student)
MU 1112. Ear-Training and Sight-Singing I. (1 cr; A-F only. Prereq-Music major
or music minor)
Structure and function of endocrine and reproductive systems.
Essential background for understanding findings of clinical
medicine related to endocrine regulation of reproduction and
homeostasis.
Introduction to ear-training and sight-singing of tonal music.
MED 6773. Integrated Clinical Medicine. (6 cr; O-N or Aud. Prereq-Regis med
student)
Integration of basic, clinical, and behavioral science principles
to understand the human body and its integrative function and
psychosocial responses, especially in multisystem conditions.
Emphasizing evidence-based medicine principles, health issues
are explored over the life cycle from pediatrics to geriatrics.
MED 6788. Dermatology and Musculoskeletal System. (5 cr; O-N or Aud. PrereqRegis med student)
Introduction to four-part harmony, Common Practice methods
of composition and analysis.
MU 1121. Tonal Harmony II. (2 cr; A-F only. Prereq-1111)
Continued study of four-part harmon, Common Practice
methods of composition and analysis. Introduction to secondary
dominants and modulation.
MU 1122. Ear-Training II. (1 cr; A-F only. Prereq-1112)
Continued study of ear-training and sight-singing of tonal
music.
MU 1311. Voice. (1-3 cr [max 18 cr]; A-F only. Prereq-Music major, %)
Individual and one-hour group lesson weekly. Partial fee waiver
lessons are provided to music majors for a maximum of eight
semesters.
Interdisciplinary study of integument and musculoskeletal
system. Basic sciences of anatomy, microbiology, pathology,
pharmacology, and physiology correlated with clinical material.
MU 1312. Voice. (1 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-Non-music major or music major secondary
instr; may be repeated)
MED 6997. Summer Internship in Medicine. (3-12 cr [max 12 cr]; P-N or Aud.
Prereq-Regis med, satisfactory completion of first year of medical school, #; no Grad
School credit)
MU 1321. Piano. (1-3 cr [max 18 cr]; A-F only. Prereq-Music major, %)
Medical students, typically between their first- and second-year
of medical school, may elect to participate in either directed
clinical experiences in small communities or research studies.
Music (MU)
School of Fine Arts
MU 100. Recital Hour. (0 cr; S-N only. Prereq-Concurrent registration in applied
instruction)
Attendance at scheduled musical events.
MU 1001. Introduction to Music. (3 cr; Stdnt Opt. Prereq-Not for music majors or
minors LEIP 09)
Individual lesson: one-half hour weekly.
Individual and one-hour group lesson weekly. Partial fee waiver
lessons are provided to music majors for a maximum of eight
semesters.
MU 1322. Piano. (1 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-Non-music major or music major sec instr;
may be repeated)
Individual lesson: one-half hour weekly.
MU 1325. Jazz Piano. (1-3 cr [max 18 cr]; A-F only. Prereq-Music major, %)
Individual and one-hour group lesson weekly. Partial fee waiver
lessons are provided to music majors for a maximum of eight
semesters.
MU 1326. Jazz Piano. (1 cr [max 12 cr]; No grade. Prereq-Non-music major or music
major sec instrument)
Individual lesson: one-half hour weekly.
Various historical style periods; listening to develop understanding and enjoyment of music.
MU 1328. Jazz Applied. (1 cr [max 12 cr]; A-F only. Prereq-Non-music major or
music major secondary instrument; #)
MU 1003. Beethoven to the Beatles. (3 cr; Stdnt Opt. LE 9)
Individual lesson; 1/2 hour weekly.
Survey of 19th- and 20th-century classical, jazz, rock, pop, and
ethnic music genres.
MU 1331. Organ. (1-3 cr [max 18 cr]; A-F only. Prereq-Music major, %)
MU 1005. Jazz Studies. (3 cr; A-F only. LECD 09)
MU 1010. Introductory Theory. (2 cr [max 4 cr]; A-F only. Prereq-Music major or
musical theatre major or [T], [P]1011, §Th 1114, Mu 1111)
Introduction to basic Western theoretical concepts: music
reading, key signatures, key signatures, intervals, scale and
chord construction, elementary harmonic analysis, basic
time signatures and rhythms, form, terminology, elementary
keyboard, transposition, and musical communication with other
musicians. Prepares students for successful entry into MU 1111
(Tonal Harmony I).
MU 1011. Introductory Ear-Training and Sight-Singing. (1 cr [max 2 cr]; A-F
only. Prereq-Music major or musical theatre major or [T], [P]1010, §Th 1114, Mu 1112)
Introductory training in hearing and distinguishing musical
rhythms, melodies, harmonies, and nuance. Singing, conducting, written dictation, and active body movement to enhance
musical performance and to prepare for successful entry into
MU 1112 (Ear-Training and Sight Singing I).
MU 1332. Organ. (1 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-Non-music major or music major sec instr;
may be repeated)
Individual lesson: one-half hour weekly.
MU 1351. Strings. (1-3 cr [max 18 cr]; A-F only. Prereq-Music major, %)
Individual and one-hour group lesson weekly. Partial fee waiver
lessons are provided to music majors for a maximum of eight
semesters.
MU 1352. Strings. (1 cr [max 12 cr]; A-F or Aud. Prereq-Non-music major or music
major sec instrument)
Individual lesson: one-half hour weekly.
MU 1357. Harp. (1-3 cr [max 18 cr]; A-F only. Prereq-Music major, %)
Individual and one-hour group lesson weekly. Partial fee waiver
lessons are provided to music majors for a maximum of eight
semesters.
MU 1358. Harp. (1 cr [max 12 cr]; A-F or Aud. Prereq-Non-music major or music
major sec instrument)
Individual lesson: one-half hour weekly.
363
Course Descriptions
Evolution of jazz; social problems in America that fostered its
origin and continues to shape its development.
Individual and one-hour group lesson weekly. Partial fee waiver
lessons are provided to music majors for a maximum of eight
semesters.
Course Descriptions
MU 1361. Woodwinds. (1-3 cr [max 18 cr]; A-F only. Prereq-Music major, %)
MU 1441. Vocal Techniques. (1 cr; Stdnt Opt. Prereq-Music major or #)
Individual and one-hour group lesson weekly. Partial fee waiver
lessons are provided to music majors for a maximum of eight
semesters.
Beginning group instruction in voice and vocal pedagogy;
principles of vocal acoustics.
MU 1362. Woodwinds. (1 cr [max 12 cr]; A-F or Aud. Prereq-Non-music major or
music major sec instrument)
Beginning group instruction and pedagogy on instruments in the
percussion family; principles of percussion acoustics.
Individual lesson: one-half hour weekly.
MU 1371. Brass. (1-3 cr [max 12 cr]; A-F only. Prereq-Music major, %)
Individual and one-hour group lesson weekly. Partial fee waiver
lessons are provided to music majors for a maximum of eight
semesters.
MU 1372. Brass. (1 cr [max 12 cr]; A-F or Aud. Prereq-Non-music major or music
major sec instrument)
Individual lesson: one-half hour weekly.
MU 1381. Percussion. (1-3 cr [max 12 cr]; A-F only. Prereq-Music major, %)
Individual and one-hour group lesson weekly. Partial fee waiver
lessons are provided to music majors for a maximum of eight
semesters.
MU 1382. Percussion. (1 cr [max 12 cr]; A-F or Aud. Prereq-Non-music major or
music major sec instrument)
Individual lesson: one-half hour weekly.
MU 1391. Classical Guitar. (1-3 cr [max 12 cr]; A-F only. Prereq-Music major, %)
MU 1501. Concert Band. (1 cr [max 12 cr]; Stdnt Opt. Prereq-Instructor determines
placement LE 10)
Study and performance of transcribed and original concert
literature.
MU 1502. Symphonic Wind Ensemble. (1 cr [max 12 cr]; Stdnt Opt. Prereq-Instructor determines placement LEIP 10)
Study and performance of symphonic wind ensemble and
contemporary band literature by a select group.
MU 1503. Symphony Orchestra. (1 cr [max 12 cr]; Stdnt Opt. Prereq-Instructor
determines placement LEIP 10)
Rehearsal and performance of representative musical literature
for symphony orchestra.
MU 1504. Chamber Orchestra. (1 cr [max 12 cr]; Stdnt Opt. Prereq-# LE 10)
Rehearsal and performance of chamber orchestra literature.
MU 1505. Jazz Ensemble. (1 cr [max 12 cr]; Stdnt Opt. Prereq-Instructor determines
placement LECD 10)
Individual and one-hour group lesson weekly. Partial fee waiver
lessons are provided to music majors for a maximum of eight
semesters.
Study and performance of large jazz ensemble literature.
MU 1392. Classical Guitar. (1 cr [max 12 cr]; A-F or Aud. Prereq-Non-music major or
music major sec instrument)
Rehearsal and performance of representative choral literature
from a variety of periods and cultures.
Individual lesson: one-half hour weekly.
MU 1395. Jazz Guitar. (1-3 cr [max 12 cr]; A-F only. Prereq-Music major, %)
Individual and one-hour group lesson weekly. Partial fee waiver
lessons are provided to music majors for a maximum of eight
semesters.
MU 1396. Jazz Guitar. (1 cr; A-F or Aud)
Individual lesson: one-half hour weekly.
MU 1398. Pop Styles Guitar. (1 cr [max 12 cr]; A-F only. Prereq-Non-music major or
music major sec instrument)
Individual lesson: one-half hour weekly.
MU 1411. Diction: Italian and English. (1 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-Principal instr
voice or #)
Course Descriptions
MU 1442. Percussion Techniques. (1 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-Music major or #)
Proper enunciation of English and Italian as applied to vocal
literature.
MU 1412. Diction: German. (1 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-1411 or #)
Proper enunciation of German as applied to vocal literature.
MU 1413. Diction: French. (1 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-1411 or #)
Proper enunciation of French as applied to vocal literature.
MU 1421. Piano Class I. (1 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-Music major or #)
MU 1510. Concert Chorale. (1 cr [max 12 cr]; Stdnt Opt. Prereq-Instructor determines
placement LE 10)
MU 1511. University Singers. (1 cr [max 12 cr]; Stdnt Opt. Prereq-Instructor
determines placement LEIP 10)
A select group for study and performance of distinctive
choral literature from diverse historical periods, cultures, and
languages. Regional tour usually taken during spring semester.
Extended domestic or international tours when possible.
MU 1512. Chamber Singers. (1 cr [max 12 cr]; Stdnt Opt. Prereq-[P]1511 or 4511;
instructor determines placement LE 10)
Study and performance of vocal chamber music.
MU 1513. Vocal Jazz Ensemble. (1 cr [max 12 cr]; Stdnt Opt. Prereq-Instructor
determines placement LECD 10)
Study and performance of music for vocal jazz ensemble.
MU 1541. Chamber Music. (.5 cr [max 6 cr]; A-F or Aud. Prereq-Instructor determines
placement)
Study and performance of chamber music literature, classical
and/or jazz.
MU 1601. Music Fundamentals. (1 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-Pre-ElEd major)
Functional music skills for classroom teachers; singing and
playing classroom and accompanying instruments; introduction
to music notation and elements of music.
Basic piano technique; sight reading, harmonizing melodies,
improvisation for music major working toward department
piano proficiency requirement.
MU 1901. Music Technology. (1 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-Music major or #)
MU 1422. Piano Class II. (1 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-Music major or #)
MU 2001. Ethnic and Folk Music of the World. (3 cr; Stdnt Opt. LEIP 09)
Continuation of piano skills introduced in MU 1421: sight-reading, harmonizing meolodies, scale playing, transposition, score
reading, improvisation for the music major working toward the
departmental piano proficiency requirement.
MU 1440. Survey of Instrumental Techniques. (1 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-Music
major or #)
Pedagogical, technical and acoustical principles of percussion,
brass, woodwinds, and strings; direct practical experience with
each instrument group.
364
Introduction to music notation software and ear-training
software.
Survey of music of selected world cultures.
MU 2003. Survey of American Music. (3 cr; Stdnt Opt. LE 9)
American folk, popular, and art music from colonial times to
present.
MU 2005. African Roots of American Music. (3 cr; Stdnt Opt. LECD 09)
Traditional African music and culture and their influence on
American musical styles.
Music
MU 2105. Composition I. (2 cr [max 4 cr]; A-F or Aud. Prereq-1121, 1122 or 1102)
MU 2803. Jazz Improvisation II. (1 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-2101, 2801 or #)
Beginning music composition technique leading to creation of
original works.
Study and development of improvisational facility as used in
the jazz idiom.
MU 2111. Tonal Harmony III. (2 cr; A-F only. Prereq-1102 or 1121)
MU 2901. Recording Techniques and Methods. (2 cr; A-F only. Prereq-Music
major or #)
Continued study of tonal theory with an emphasis on late 18th
and early 19th century methods of composition and analysis.
MU 2112. Ear-Training III. (1 cr; A-F only. Prereq-1102 or 1122)
Continued study of ear-training and sight-singing of tonal
music.
MU 2121. Tonal Harmony IV. (2 cr; A-F only. Prereq-2111)
Continued study of tonal theory with an emphasis on 19th
century methods of composition and an introduction to 20th
century and contemporary modes of musical organization.
MU 2122. Ear-Training and Sight Singing IV. (1 cr; A-F only. Prereq-2112)
Continued study of ear-training and sight-singing of tonal and
an introduction to post-tonal music.
The study of sound, hearing, and the aesthetics of audio recording as applied to recording processes and technologies (microphones, recording systems, digital signal processing, editing,
and synchronization techniques). Recording studio techniques
(mixing, multi-track recording, production), and digital audio
workstation application.
MU 2911. Electronic Composition I. (2 cr; A-F only. Prereq-#)
Introduction to composing using only digital resources.
Understanding the electronic composition workstation environment, basic MIDI sequencing, virtual instruments, electronic
transcription of engraved scores, and synthesis.
MU 2912. Electronic Composition II. (2 cr; A-F only. Prereq-2911 or #)
For students who have completed 1422 or studied piano
privately, this course provides training in specific skills required
by the departmental piano proficiency exam.
Continued study of composition using primarily digital resources. Advanced MIDI sequencing and processing, recording
live-to-virtual instruments, handling complex workflow, and
orchestration with synthetic sound courses. Introduction to scoring of video and computer music.
MU 2443. Woodwind Techniques I. (1 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-Music major or #)
MU 3101. Form and Analysis. (2 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-[2121, 2122] or 2102)
MU 2422. Piano Proficiency Preparation. (1 cr [max 2 cr]; A-F only. Prereq-Music
major, [T])
Beginning group instruction and pedagogy on single reed
instruments; principles of woodwind acoustics.
Overview of form in music; structure from Renaissance through
20th-century.
MU 2444. Woodwind Techniques II. (1 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-Music major or #)
MU 3105. Composition II. (2 cr [max 4 cr]; A-F or Aud. Prereq-2105)
Beginning group instruction and pedagogy on double reed
instruments; principles of double reed acoustics.
Continued study of musical composition techniques leading to
creation of original works.
MU 2445. String Techniques I. (1 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-Music major or #)
MU 3201. Music History I. (4 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-2121, 2122 or 2102 or #)
Beginning group instruction and pedagogy on high string instruments; acoustic principles for strings.
MU 2446. String Techniques II. (1 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-Music major or #)
Beginning group instruction and pedagogy on low string instruments; acoustic principles for strings.
MU 2447. Brass Techniques I. (1 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-Music major or #)
Beginning group instruction and pedagogy on high brass instruments; acoustic principles for brass instruments.
MU 2448. Brass Techniques II. (1 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-Music major or #)
Beginning group instruction and pedagogy on low brass instruments; acoustic principles for brass instruments.
Introduction to the music education profession; includes career
options, history of the profession, professional writings, current
research.
MU 2624. Group Piano Teaching Techniques. (2 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-Music
major or #)
MU 3202. Music History II. (4 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-3201 or #)
Styles in 19th- and 20th-century Western music from romanticism through impressionism, atonality, primitivism, serialism,
neo-classicism, to avant-garde and contemporary composers;
non-Western musics.
MU 3211. Art Song Literature. (2 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-1102 or [1121, 1122],
music major or #)
Survey of art song, emphasizing German, French, and English
compositions and composers.
MU 3212. Opera Literature. (2 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-1102 or [1121, 1122], music
major or #)
Survey of opera solo and ensemble literature from Italian,
German, French, English, and American traditions.
MU 3300. Recital. (1 cr [max 3 cr]; A-F or Aud. Prereq-%, may be repeated)
Preparation and presentation of a solo performance.
Study of recognized group piano curricula and materials;
discussion of significant research. Group keyboard teaching
(various ages) in a lab setting.
MU 3510. Opera Studio. (1 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-#; may be repeated)
MU 2701. Fundamentals of Conducting. (1 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-1102 or
[1121,1122], Music major or #)
MU 3511. Performance Practicum. (1-2 cr [max 2 cr]; A-F or Aud. Prereq-Music
major, #)
Beginning instruction in leading musical ensembles: meter patterns, conventional gestures, instrumental transposition, choral
techniques.
Performance of significant role in a musical production.
MU 3601. Elementary School Music Teaching. (2 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-Elem/
middle educ major)
MU 2801. Improvisation. (1 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-1102 or [1121, 1122])
Methods and materials for teaching music in elementary school
classroom. Philosophy of music education, curriculum design,
lesson planning, implementation, evaluation, integrated arts
experiences.
Introduction to basic principles and techniques.
MU 2802. Jazz Improvisation I. (1 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-2801)
Beginning techniques and concepts.
Course Descriptions
MU 2605. Introduction to Music Education. (1 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-Music Ed
major or #)
Study of Medieval, Renaissance, Baroque, and Classical eras of
Western musical development, emphasizing works of Josquin,
Palestrina, J.S. Bach, Handel, Haydn, Mozart, and Beethoven.
Production techniques and performances of solo and ensemble
opera literature.
365
Course Descriptions
MU 3605. Teaching Classroom Music. (4 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-60 cr, music ed
major or #)
Philosophy, theory, techniques of instruction for general classroom music, grades K-12.
MU 3606. Field Experience: Classroom Music Pre K-8. (1 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq60 cr, music ed major, [P]3605 or #, §ElEd 3425)
Observations and micro-teaching in general music classrooms
grades Pre-K through 8. Supervised by music education faculty
member from the department of music, in cooperation with
general music teachers.
MU 3607. Instrumental Music Methods. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-60 cr, music
major or #)
Methods and materials for teaching instrumental students in the
secondary setting: role and extent of instrumental music in the
school curriculum, philosophies and current trends in instrumental music education, recruiting, scheduling, administrative
tasks, literature, organizing and training athletic bands.
MU 3627. Art of Accompanying: Vocal Music. (2 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-#)
Vocal accompanying (art song, recitative and aria, choral music,
and functional skills (e.g., score reading, keyboard harmony).
Vocal coaching techniques, listening to standard vocal repertoire, performance.
MU 3628. Art of Accompanying: Instrumental Music. (2 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-#)
Instrumental accompanying (strings, brass, and woodwinds)
and functional skills (e.g., score reading, keyboard harmony).
Rehearsal techniques, listening to standard instrumental repertoire, performance.
MU 3701. Choral Conducting and Methods I. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-2701 or #)
Continued study of composition using primarily digital
resources. Integrating live electronics and live performance with
digital music, sampling techniques. Algorithmic composition
introduced as part of the study of computer assisted music
creation.
MU 3991. Independent Study. (1-3 cr [max 6 cr]; A-F or Aud. Prereq-#)
Directed study in area of student interest arranged with instructor before registration.
MU 3995. Topics in Music: (Various Titles to be Assigned). (1-3 cr [max 9 cr]; A-F or
Aud. Prereq-#)
Selected topics defined by type, period, or composer.
MU 3997. Field Study in Music. (1-4 cr [max 4 cr]; A-F or Aud. Prereq-%)
Off-campus travel, research, and creative activities in specialized area. Credit allowed depends on nature and scope of study.
Requires advance planning with faculty sponsor and permission
of department.
MU 4101. Instrumental Arranging. (2 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-1901, 3101 or #)
Idiomatic scoring for instruments; individual assignments in
problems and possibilities of various instrument combinations.
MU 4103. Contrapuntal Techniques. (2 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-2102 or [2121,
2122] or #)
Study of, and practice in, use of polyphonic devices in Western
art music.
MU 4105. Composition III. (2 cr [max 4 cr]; A-F or Aud. Prereq-3105)
Advanced creative composition; individual assignments in
various contexts.
Conducting, vocal pedagogy, and methods and materials related
to choral rehearsal, emphasizing elementary and middle/junior
high.
MU 4201. Piano Literature. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-Music major or #)
MU 3702. Choral Conducting and Methods II. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-3701 or #)
MU 4311. Voice. (1-3 cr [max 12 cr]; A-F only. Prereq-Music major or fee-waiver
student, %)
Continued conducting instruction, with methods and materials
related to high school choral ensembles.
MU 3705. Instrumental Conducting I. (1 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-2701 or #)
Intermediate techniques, reading, and interpretation of full and
condensed orchestral, band, and vocal scores; lab practice in
rehearsal procedures.
Course Descriptions
MU 3911. Electronic Composition III. (2 cr; A-F only. Prereq-2912 or #)
Study of representative piano literature from various periods of
music history.
Individual and one-hour group lesson weekly. Partial fee waiver
lessons are provided to music majors for a maximum of eight
semesters.
MU 4312. Voice. (1 cr [max 12 cr]; A-F or Aud. Prereq-Non-Music major or music
major secondary instrument)
MU 3706. Instrumental Conducting II. (1 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-3705 or #)
Individual lesson: one-half hour weekly.
Advanced techniques, reading, and interpretation of full and
condensed orchestral, band, and vocal scores; lab practice in
rehearsal procedures.
MU 4321. Piano. (1-3 cr [max 12 cr]; A-F only. Prereq-Music major, %)
MU 3801. Jazz Improvisation III. (1 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-2803 or #)
Individual and one-hour group lesson weekly. Partial fee waiver
lessons are provided to music majors for a maximum of eight
semesters.
Study and development of improvisational facility as used in
jazz idiom.
MU 4322. Piano. (1 cr [max 12 cr]; A-F or Aud. Prereq-Non-music major or music
major secondary instrument)
MU 3802. Jazz Improvisation IV. (1 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-3801 or #)
Individual lesson: one-half hour weekly.
Study and development of improvisational facility as used in
jazz idiom.
MU 4325. Jazz Piano. (1-3 cr [max 12 cr]; A-F only. Prereq-Music major, %)
MU 3805. Jazz Writing I. (2 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-2102 or [2121, 2122] or #)
Transpositions, voicings, and arranging concepts for large and
small jazz ensembles; development of composition in jazz
idiom.
MU 3806. Jazz Writing II. (2 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-2102 or [2121, 2122], 3805 or #)
Continuation of arranging concepts for large and small jazz
ensembles; further development of composition in jazz idiom.
MU 3901. Sound Design Techniques of Digital Music in New Media. (3 cr; A-F
only. Prereq-Music major or #)
Application of digital music composition to a variety of media,
including film, video, and the internet. Methods for integrating
and editing music with spoken text, sound effects, and mixing
for visual production. Introduction to Final Cut, Dreamweaver,
and ProTools.
366
Individual and one-hour group lesson weekly. Partial fee waiver
lessons are provided to music majors for a maximum of eight
semesters.
MU 4331. Organ. (1-3 cr [max 12 cr]; A-F only. Prereq-Music major, %)
Individual and one-hour group lesson weekly. Partial fee waiver
lessons are provided to music majors for a maximum of eight
semesters.
MU 4332. Organ. (1 cr [max 12 cr]; A-F or Aud. Prereq-Non-music major or music
major secondary instrument)
Individual lesson; one-half hour weekly.
MU 4351. Strings. (1-3 cr [max 12 cr]; A-F only. Prereq-Music major, %)
Individual and one-hour group lesson weekly. Partial fee waiver
lessons are provided to music majors for a maximum of eight
semesters.
Music
MU 4352. Strings. (1 cr [max 12 cr]; A-F or Aud. Prereq-Non-music major or music
major secondary instrument)
MU 4505. Jazz Ensemble. (1 cr [max 6 cr]; A-F or Aud. Prereq-Instructor determines
placement)
Individual lesson; one-half hour weekly.
Study and performance of large jazz ensemble literature.
MU 4357. Harp. (1-3 cr [max 12 cr]; Stdnt Opt. Prereq-Music major, %)
MU 4510. Concert Chorale. (1 cr [max 6 cr]; A-F or Aud. Prereq-Instructor determines
placement)
Individual and one-hour group lesson weekly. Partial fee waiver
lessons are provided to music majors for a maximum of eight
semesters.
Study and performance of representative choral literature from
various style periods and cultures.
MU 4358. Harp. (1 cr [max 12 cr]; Stdnt Opt. Prereq-Non-music major or music major
secondary instrument)
MU 4511. University Singers. (1 cr [max 6 cr]; A-F or Aud. Prereq-Instructor
determines placement)
Individual lesson; one-half hour weekly.
A select group for study and performance of distinctive
choral literature from diverse historical periods, cultures, and
languages. Regional tour usually taken during spring semester.
Extended domestic or international tours when possible.
MU 4361. Woodwinds. (1-3 cr [max 12 cr]; A-F only. Prereq-Music major, %)
Individual and one-hour group lesson weekly. Partial fee waiver
lessons are provided to music majors for a maximum of eight
semesters.
MU 4362. Woodwinds. (1 cr [max 12 cr]; A-F or Aud. Prereq-Non-music major or
music major secondary instrument)
Individual lesson; one-half hour weekly.
MU 4371. Brass. (1-3 cr [max 12 cr]; A-F only. Prereq-Music major, %)
Individual and one-hour group lesson weekly. Partial fee waiver
lessons are provided to music majors for a maximum of eight
semesters.
MU 4372. Brass. (1 cr [max 12 cr]; A-F or Aud. Prereq-Non-music major or music
major secondary instrument)
Individual lesson; one-half hour weekly.
MU 4381. Percussion. (1-3 cr [max 12 cr]; A-F only. Prereq-Music major, %)
Individual and one-hour group lesson weekly. Partial fee waiver
lessons are provided to music majors for a maximum of eight
semesters.
MU 4382. Percussion. (1 cr [max 12 cr]; A-F or Aud. Prereq-Non-music major or
music major secondary instrument)
Individual lesson; one-half hour weekly.
MU 4391. Classical Guitar. (1-3 cr [max 12 cr]; A-F only. Prereq-Music major, %)
Individual and one-hour group lesson weekly. Partial fee waiver
lessons are provided to music majors for a maximum of eight
semesters.
MU 4392. Classical Guitar. (1 cr [max 12 cr]; A-F or Aud. Prereq-Non-music major or
music major secondary instrument)
Individual lesson; one-half hour weekly.
MU 4395. Jazz Guitar. (1-3 cr [max 12 cr]; A-F only. Prereq-Music major, %)
MU 4512. Chamber Singers. (1 cr [max 6 cr]; A-F or Aud. Prereq-[P]1511 or 4511;
instructor determines placement)
Study and performance of vocal chamber music.
MU 4513. Vocal Jazz Ensemble. (1 cr [max 6 cr]; A-F or Aud. Prereq-Instructor
determines placement)
Study and performance of music for vocal jazz ensemble.
MU 4541. Chamber Music. (.5 cr [max 12 cr]; A-F or Aud. Prereq-#)
Study and performance of chamber music literature, classical
and/or jazz.
MU 4601. Applied Music Teaching. (1 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-#)
Procedures and materials for class and individual instruction in
approved fields of applied music; evaluation of solo literature;
discussion of approved and experimental pedagogical practice;
lesson observation; and supervised student teaching.
MU 4605. Kodaly, Orff, Dalcroze: Classroom Applications. (1 cr; A-F or Aud.
Prereq-Music ed major and #; no Grad School cr)
Study and application of the philosophies and instructional
approaches of Zoltan Kodaly, Carl Orff, and Emile JaquesDalcroze to American music education.
MU 4621. Piano Pedagogy and Practicum I. (2 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-Music major
or #)
Principles and materials for teaching elementary piano students;
supervised practice teaching.
MU 4622. Piano Pedagogy and Practicum II. (2 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-Music
major or #)
Principles and materials for teaching intermediate piano students; supervised practice teaching.
MU 4623. Piano Techniques and Style. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-1321 or #)
MU 4396. Jazz Guitar. (1 cr [max 12 cr]; A-F or Aud. Prereq-Non-music major or
music major secondary instrument)
MU 4801. Evolution and Analysis of Jazz Styles. (2 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-2102
or [2121, 2122])
Individual lesson; one-half hour weekly.
MU 4501. Concert Band. (1 cr [max 6 cr]; A-F or Aud. Prereq-Instructor determines
placement)
Study and performance of transcribed and original concert
literature.
MU 4502. Symphonic Wind Ensemble. (1 cr [max 6 cr]; A-F or Aud. Prereq-Instructor determines placement)
Study and performance of symphonic wind ensemble and
contemporary band literature by a select group.
MU 4503. Symphony Orchestra. (1 cr [max 6 cr]; A-F or Aud. Prereq-Instructor
determines placement)
Rehearsal and performance of representative literature for
symphony orchestra.
MU 4504. Chamber Orchestra. (1 cr [max 6 cr]; A-F or Aud. Prereq-Instructor
determines placement)
Technical and stylistic considerations for teaching and performing advanced piano literature.
Study and analysis of various jazz styles and idioms.
MU 4803. Jazz Pedagogy. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-2102 or [2121, 2122])
Techniques and materials necessary to organize and develop a
jazz band in junior and senior high school.
MU 4807. Music Industry. (2 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-#)
Study of developing commercial applications and trends in
the music industry, including basic concepts of business and
marketing.
MU 4901. Digital Capstone Project. (3 cr; A-F only. Prereq-3911 or #)
One large-scale, semester-long project designed to provide a
cumulative assessment of the student’s development and breadth
of knowledge, including artistic maturation and technical
expertise. Collaboration with a similarly experienced peer from
another SFA discipline is encouraged.
Study and performance of chamber orchestra literature.
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Course Descriptions
Individual and one-hour group lesson weekly. Partial fee waiver
lessons are provided to music majors for a maximum of eight
semesters.
Course Descriptions
MU 4997. Internship in Music. (1-2 cr [max 4 cr]; A-F or Aud. Prereq-%)
Participation in music tutoring or recognized campus/community activity related to student’s musical program and career
objectives.
Half-hour weekly studio lesson; instrument or voice.
MU 5005. African Roots of American Music. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-60 cr or #)
MU 8333. FTE: Master’s. (1 cr; No grade. Prereq-Master’s student, adviser and DGS
consent)
Traditional African music and culture and their influences on
American musical styles.
MU 8401. Graduate Music Pedagogy. (1 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-Graduate Student
or #)
MU 5201. Advanced Music History. (2 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-3201, 3202 or #)
Principles and techniques of music pedagogy with emphasis on
the student’s applied field of study.
Specialized study of selected composers and/or genres.
MU 5203. Advanced Choral Literature. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-3702 or #)
Study of representative choral literature from various periods of
music history.
MU 5204. Instrumental Ensemble Literature. (2 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-Grad
Student or #)
Study of major works for large wind and orchestral ensembles.
MU 5205. Instrumental Solo Literature. (1 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-Grad student or #)
Survey of instrumental solo literature within the student’s applied field of study.
MU 5206. Vocal Solo Literature. (1 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-Grad student or #)
MU 8600. Seminar in Music Education. (2 cr [max 6 cr]; A-F or Aud. Prereq-Grad
student or #)
Survey and analysis of current issues in music education
research and/or practice.
MU 8601. Foundations of Music Education. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-Grad student
or #)
Philosophical, psychological, and historical foundations; principles of school music teaching and learning.
MU 8605. Leadership in Music Education. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-Grad student
or #)
A historical survey of standard repertoire for solo voice in art
song, opera, and oratorio; focus varies by semester.
Techniques, theories, and models of music and arts leadership;
considerations for supervising music personnel, facilities,
budgets, curricular programs, and policies.
MU 5207. Instrumental Chamber Music Literature. (1 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-Grad
student or #)
MU 8701. Graduate Applied Conducting. (1-2 cr [max 12 cr]; A-F or Aud. Prereq3702, 3706 or equivalent; Graduate Student or #)
Study of chamber music literature with emphasis on student’s
major applied area.
MU 5208. Vocal Chamber Literature. (1 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-Grad student or #)
A survey of standard repertoire for solo voice with chamber
ensembles.
MU 5510. Opera Studio. (1 cr [max 6 cr]; A-F or Aud. Prereq-3510 or equivalent,
Grad student or #)
Opera production techniques; performance of solo and ensemble opera literature.
MU 5695. Special Topics: (Various Titles to be Assigned). (1-3 cr [max 9 cr]; A-F or
Aud. Prereq-#; can apply max 6 cr to Grad School program)
Selected topics of interest to music educators concerning philosophy, history, and teaching/learning theory and practice.
MU 5701. Advanced Conducting. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-3702 or #)
Score reading, analysis, styles, and conducting and rehearsal
techniques related to performance.
Course Descriptions
MU 8302. Graduate Applied Music: Secondary Instrument. (1 cr; A-F or Aud.
Prereq-Intermediate proficiency, grad student, #; may be repeated)
MU 5991. Independent Study. (1-3 cr [max 9 cr]; A-F or Aud. Prereq-Min 60 cr or
Grad Student or #; can apply max 6 cr to a Grad School program)
Directed study in areas of student interest arranged with instructor before registration.
MU 5995. Special Topics: (Various Titles to be Assigned). (1-3 cr [max 6 cr]; A-F or
Aud. Prereq-#)
Selected studies in topics defined by type, period, or composer.
MU 8101. Graduate Music Theory. (2 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-Graduate student or #)
Advanced analytical studies of representative historical musical
compositions. Students will utilize multiple analytical processes
and compose model pieces.
MU 8222. Music Bibliography and Research. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-Grad
student or #)
Research methods in music; preparation for writing plan B
project.
MU 8300. Graduate Recital. (1 cr [max 2 cr]; A-F or Aud. Prereq-Grad student, #)
Preparation and presentation of a solo musical performance.
MU 8301. Graduate Applied Music: Major Instrument. (1-2 cr [max 2 cr]; A-F or
Aud. Prereq-Advanced proficiency, grad student, #)
Studio lesson on major instrument or voice; one-half hour per
week per credit.
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Studio lessons in conducting; one half-hour per week per credit.
MU 8899. Directed Project in Music Education. (1-12 cr [max 12 cr]; A-F or Aud.
Prereq-Grad, #)
Directed project, Plan B. Research project on selected theoretical or practical issue/topic in Music Education.
MU 8900. Seminar in Music. (2 cr [max 6 cr]; A-F or Aud. Prereq-Grad student, #)
Survey and analysis of current issues and problems in music
research, performance, and pedagogy.
MU 8991. Independent Study. (1-2 cr [max 6 cr]; A-F or Aud. Prereq-Grad student, #)
Directed study in areas of student interest arranged with instructor before registration; written report required.
Ojibwe Education (OJED)
College of Education and Human Service
Professions
OJED 3100. Advanced Ojibwe Grammar and Narrative. (4 cr; A-F only. Prereq[P]3101, 3102, 3103, 3104, admission to Ojibwe elem/middle school program, two
years college-level Ojibwe or AMIN 2204 or #)
Advanced study of grammatical forms in Ojibwe; identification
and conjugation of major verb types; formation of simple and
complex sentences; language learning styles.
OJED 3101. Circle of Life. (4 cr; A-F only. Prereq-[P]3100, 3102, 3103, 3104, admission to Ojibwe elem/middle school program)
Explores human development from an Anishinaabeg perspective, from birth through death; emphasis on early childhood
through adolescence. Western theories of development and
traditional Anishinaabe development.
OJED 3102. Historical and Contemporary Issues in American Indian Education.
(3 cr; A-F only. Prereq-[P]3100, 3101, 3104, admission to Ojibwe elem/middle school
program)
: Past and present educational experiences of American Indian
people in the U.S.; professional conduct and dispositions for
teachers; best practices in contemporary American Indian
education.
Ojibwe Education
OJED 3103. Teaching American Indian Studies. (3 cr; A-F only. Prereq-[P]3100,
3102, 3104, admission to Ojibwe elem/middle school program)
Contemporary American Indian education; evaluation of attitudes toward American Indian students; identity development in
the middle school years, direct interaction with American Indian
communities; teaching plans reflective of American Indians,
specifically for the middle school.
OJED 3104. College Skills for Pre-service Teachers. (2 cr; S-N only. Prereq[P]3100, 3102, 3103, admission to Ojibwe elem/middle school program)
Familiarizes students with the campus community, resources,
and the tribal college transition, both personally and academically. Successful college student strategies, including: study
skills, balancing life and school, and Praxis test-taking
approaches.
OJED 3200. Ojibwe Language for Teachers. (4 cr; A-F only. Prereq-3100, [P]3201,
3202, 3203, Math 1141, admission to Ojibwe elem/middle school program)
Provides pre-service teachers the requisite knowledge to interact
with students in a classroom. General and specialized language
for each of the core subjects taught, daily routines, and common
classroom discourse. Relevant methods for teaching Ojibwe
language in the classroom.
OJED 3201. Holistic Instruction and Assessment. (3 cr; A-F only. Prereq-[P]3200,
3202, 3203, Math 1141, admission to Ojibwe elem/middle school program)
Student-centered methods of instruction, classroom management, and formal and informal assessments that enhance
the whole child. Draws from the American Indian Learner
Outcomes for methods and materials to guide instruction and
assessment strategies.
OJED 3202. Anishinaabe Art, Music and Dance. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-[P]3200,
3201, 3203, Math 1141, admission to Ojibwe elem/middle school program)
Selecting and evaluating materials appropriate for elementary
classrooms in American Indian art, music, dance, singing &
drumming; developing integrated cross-curriculum elementary
programs.
OJED 3203. Health, Wellness and Movement. (3 cr; A-F only. Prereq-[P]3200,
3201, 3202, Math 1141, admission to Ojibwe elem/middle school program)
Health and wellness from an Anishinaabeg perspective; teaching strategies appropriate for holistic health, physical education
activities, healthy diets, drug education, mental health and
spirituality; comprehensive school health and physical fitness
for elementary and middle school levels.
Applications of Ojibwe language use to interactions between
school and the surrounding community. Key vocabulary,
phrases, and dialogues; strategies through which this material
may be shared with the community at large.
OJED 4101. Language, Literacy and Literature. (4 cr; A-F only. Prereq-[P]4100,
4102, 4103, 4104, admission to Ojibwe elem/middle school program, no Grad School
cr)
Development and instruction in children s literature-based reading, writing and oral language in elementary schools. Methods,
materials, research findings related to teaching integrated
language arts.
OJED 4102. Oral Tradition and Language Acquisition. (4 cr; A-F only. Prereq[P]4100, 4101, 4103, 4104, admission to Ojibwe elem/middle school program, no
Grad School cr)
Elementary school teaching methods and materials for
integrated language arts instruction; understanding of children
s language acquisition skills; role of stories in Anishinaabeg
culture.
Mathematics concepts, classroom methods, curriculum and
materials; exploring the nature of mathematics, how children
learn mathematics; effective mathematics instruction.
OJED 4104. Professional Development. (2 cr; A-F only. Prereq-[P]4100, 4101,
4102, 4103, admission to Ojibwe Elementary/Middle School Program; no Grad School
cr)
Documentation, reflection, synthesis of learning; professional
portfolio, reflective journaling, dialogue, and goal setting. The
Good Path, which reflects personal/ professional growth and
development related to integrity of teaching; analyzing how
internalized oppression affects families, schools, communities
and tribes.
OJED 4200. Ojibwe Language Methods. (4 cr; A-F only. Prereq-4100 or #,[P]4201,
4202, 4203, admission to Ojibwe Elem/Middle School Program, successful completion
of block one, no Grad School cr)
Methods for teaching Ojibwe, an endangered, indigenous
language. Curriculum development to support Ojibwemowin;
grammatical structure of the Ojibwe language; indigenous
language revitalization movement; developmental and cognitive
understanding of children, especially as related to language
learning.
OJED 4201. Understanding Our Environment and Mother Earth. (4 cr; A-F only.
Prereq-[P]4200, 4202, 4203, admission to Ojibwe Elem/Middle School Program;
successful completion of block one courses; no Grad School cr)
Methods and materials for elementary school science instruction based on research, Anishinaabeg culture & traditions.
Integration of theory and practice; understanding our relationship as human beings to the world around us.
OJED 4202. Minnesota Based Treaties, Sovereignty, and Tribal Government.
(4 cr; A-F only. Prereq-[P]4200, 4201, 4203, admission to Ojibwe Elem/Middle School
Program; successful completion of block one courses; no Grad School cr)
Content and organization of social studies; treaties, sovereignty,
and tribal government of Minnesota Ojibwe & Dakota people.
Planning instruction, methods, and assessment; relationships
among humans, the environment, and land.
OJED 4203. The Inclusive Classroom. (4 cr; A-F only. Prereq-[P]4200, 4201, 4202,
admission to Ojibwe Elem/Middle School Program; successful completion of block one
courses; no Grad School cr)
Philosophy and psychology of the inclusive classroom; management, materials and methods; understanding children with
a variety of special needs; FAS/FAE; writing IEPs; making
adaptations and accommodations; working with American
Indian families.
OJED 4600. Student Teaching. (12 cr; S-N only. Prereq-[P]4610, admission to Ojibwe
Elementary/Middle School Program; successful completion of block one and block two
courses; no Grad School cr)
Fifteen weeks of full-time student teaching in a K-8 classroom.
Demonstration of competence in planning, teaching, and
evaluating elementary curriculum, age-appropriate Ojibwe
language, and American Indian Learner Outcomes. Application
of knowledge and skills in assessing and meeting the learning
needs of children.
OJED 4610. Professional Issues. (2 cr; A-F only. Prereq-[P]4600, admission to
Ojibwe Elementary/Middle School Program; successful completion of block one and
block two courses; no Grad School cr)
Reflections on current issues and ethical dilemmas in the fields
of elementary education, American Indian education, and
Ojibwe language education. Preparation for professional jobseeking, interviewing, and continued professional development
as a teacher.
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Course Descriptions
OJED 4100. Conversational Ojibwe for the Classroom and Community. (4 cr;
A-F only. Prereq-3200, [P]4101, 4102, 4103, 4104, admission to Ojibwe elem/middle
school program or #, no Grad School cr)
OJED 4103. Elementary Mathematics Methods. (4 cr; A-F only. Prereq-[P]4100,
4101, 4102, 4104, admission to Ojibwe Elem/Middle School Program; no Grad School
cr)
Course Descriptions
OJED 5110. Teaching and Learning Ojibwe As A Second Language. (2 cr; A-F
only. Prereq-#, no Grad School cr)
PHAR 1003. Non-Prescription Medications and Self-Care: Treating Minor
Conditions. (2 cr; Stdnt Opt)
Study of advanced writing features, grammatical structure of
sentences and paragraphs, and key methodologies of teaching
Ojibwe as a second language. Advanced topics include introduction to narrative structure and dialectology.
Self-study, online course. Nonprescription medications,
appropriate self care. How to become informed customer of
over-the-counter medications and testing devices. Textbook is
supplemented with online coursework. Students use Web CT.
OJED 5120. Ojibwe Language Grammatical Pedagogy. (2 cr; A-F only. Prereq-#,
no Grad School cr)
PHAR 1004. Common Prescription Drugs and Diseases. (2 cr; A-F or Aud)
Provides students with a knowledge of core Ojibwe grammar
structures for use in second language and immersion programs.
Students will investigate the teaching and learning of grammar,
its socio-linguistic application, and how advanced structures are
created. Includes a strong written and oral component.
Self-study, online course. Frequently prescribed medications,
conditions medications are intended to treat. Diagnostic criteria,
disease complications, mechanism-of-action, side effects.
Direct-to-consumer advertising. Students use Vista to view
Power Point presentations, download materials, and complete
study guides.
OJED 5200. Methods in Ojibwe Language Immersion. (2-6 cr [max 12 cr]; A-F
only. Prereq-#, no Grad School cr)
PHAR 3700. Directed Studies: Fundamentals of Pharmacotherapy. (3 cr; A-F
only. Prereq-Medical terminology)
Designed to improve comprehension and oral proficiency in
Ojibwemowin. A total immersion approach will be complemented by structured conversational patterns, language minilessons, and defined situational experiences.
Drug therapy. Emphasizes recognition of brand/generic drug
names, their therapeutic classes and common uses. Use of drug
information resources.
Pharmacology (PHCL)
School of Medicine
PHCL 4001. Introduction to Pharmacology. (2 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-Biol 1011,
Chem 1151,1152, 2521, 2522 or #)
Elementary course in pharmacology. Actions and use of drugs
in selected health conditions.
PHCL 4094. Directed Research in Pharmacology I. (1-10 cr [max 10 cr]; A-F or
Aud. Prereq-Upper div sci major, #)
Directed Research in Pharmacology
PHCL 5204. Pharmacology Seminar. (1 cr [max 4 cr]; A-F or Aud. Prereq-Grad
student, #)
Presentation of selected research problems and current journal
articles.
PHCL 8333. FTE: Master’s. (1 cr; No grade. Prereq-Master s student, adviser and
DGS consent)
Course Descriptions
PHCL 8444. FTE: Doctoral. (1 cr; No grade. Prereq-Doctoral student, adviser and
DGS consent)
PHCL 8666. Doctoral Pre-Thesis Credits. (1-6 cr [max 12 cr]; No grade. Prereq-Max
6 cr per semester or summer; doctoral student who has not passed prelim oral; no
required consent for the first two registrations up to 12 cr; departmental consent for
the third and fourth registrations up to an additional 12 cr, or 24 cr total (for doctoral
students admitted summer 2007 and beyond; doctoral students admitted prior to
summer 2007 may register up to 4 times totaling 60 cr))
PHCL 8777. Thesis Credits: Master’s. (1-18 cr [max 50 cr]; No grade. Prereq-Max
18 cr per semester or summer; 10 cr total required (Plan A only))
PHCL 8888. Thesis Credits: Doctoral. (1-24 cr [max 100 cr]; No grade. Prereq-Max
18 cr per semester or summer; 24 cr required)
Pharmacy (PHAR)
College of Pharmacy
PHAR 1001. Orientation to Pharmacy. (2 cr; Stdnt Opt)
Online (Vista), unlimited enrollment course designed for those
interested in pharmacy as a potential career or those just curious
about the profession. One credit option provides information
on need for pharmacists, work settings and educational process.
Two credit option adds learning materials on the impact of pharmacists, professional challenges and expanding roles. For more
information, including which credit option to select, explore
http://courses.pharmacy.umn.edu/ and/or contact [email protected]
umn.edu, [email protected] or 612-624-7976.
370
PHAR 4200. Drugs and the US Health Care System. (3 cr; A-F only. Prereq-§3200
or 5200)
How to be an informed/responsible user of medications within
U.S. health care system.
PHAR 5101. Pharmacology for Pharmacy Students. (3 cr; A-F only. Prereq-Regis
2nd yr pharmacy student or #, §Phcl 5101; Added every fall (10/12/06))
Action/fate of drugs. Lectures, lab.
PHAR 5102. Pharmacology for Pharmacy Students. (2 cr; A-F only. Prereq-5101
or #, §Phcl 5102)
Action/fate of drugs.
PHAR 5200. Drugs and the US Healthcare System. (3 cr; A-F only. Prereq-§3200
or 4200)
Prepares students to be informed and responsible users of
medications within the US Healthcare system. This is a writing
intensive course.
PHAR 5201. Health Sciences Applied Terminology. (2 cr; Stdnt Opt. Prereq-Basic
knowledge of human anatomy/physiology)
Self-study course. Medical terms, how to apply them when
documenting/reporting patient care procedures.
PHAR 5210. Diminishing Health Disparities Through Cultural Competence. (2
cr; A-F only)
Various dynamics of health disparities, cultural competencies.
Uses sociological framework
PHAR 5270. Therapeutics of Herbal and Other Natural Medicinals. (2 cr; A-F
only. Prereq-Phsl 6051, organic chemistry, pathophysiology of disease states, 3rd or
4th yr pharmacy student)
Herbal products/supplements. Pharmacology, clinical indications, and drug interactions of most commonly used products
in nontraditional complementary health care. Historical significance and evidenced-based role of these products in health care.
Case studies of clinical applications.
PHAR 5620. Drug Metabolism and Disposition. (3 cr; A-F or Aud)
Oxidatative/conjugative enzymes systems involved in human
drug metabolism/disposition. Various in vitro models used to
evaluate drug metabolism or chemical entity, pros/cons of each.
Factors involved in conducting in vivo studies.
PHAR 5700. Directed Studies: Applied Fundamentals of Pharmacotherapy.
(3 cr; A-F only. Prereq-Medical Terminology and admission to a graduate program or
permission of instructor, §3700)
Designed for students pursuing careers that require a basic
familiarity with drug therapy. Offered totally online and will
focus on recognition of brand and generic drug names, their
therapeutic classes and common uses. In addition, participants
will develop a basic proficiency in the use of drug information resources. With the competencies developed, participants
Pharmacy
of the course can expect to better review medication lists and
work with health communication/documentation. Professional
students who will be responsible for routinely and directly
administering medication and monitoring/reporting medication
effectiveness should enroll in PHAR 3800. Credit not allowed if
PHAR 3700 has been completed. As compared to PHAR 3700,
PHAR 5700 participants will complete a paper in a drug-related
topic of their choosing, in addition to completing additional
learning modules.
PHAR 6061. Physiology and Neurophysiology Systems. (5 cr; A-F only. Prereq[Biochemistry, human anatomy] recommended; intended primarily for PharmD students
or grad students in health sciences)
Survey of general physiology, neurophysiology, endocrine,
circulatory, respiratory, digestive, energy metabolism, and renal
physiology at molecular, cellular, and organ level. Emphasizes
homeostasis and basic regulatory aspects of physiological
processes of organ systems.
PHAR 6111. The Practice of Pharmaceutical Care I. (3 cr; A-F only. Prereq-First yr
pharmacy student, [P]6171)
The practice of pharmaceutical care, the pharmacy profession, drug information retrieval, professional communications,
problem-solving skills, introductory clerkship.
PHAR 6112. The Practice of Pharmaceutical Care II. (3 cr; A-F only. Prereq-First yr
pharmacy student, 6111, [P]6172)
Comprehensive pharmaceutical care, health belief model,
legal issues, prescription processing, clerkship continued and
introduction to pharmacotherapy issues
PHAR 6121. Pharmacotherapy I: Patient -Centered Pathophysiologic Approach.
(5 cr; A-F only. Prereq-6111, 6112, [P]5101, 6163, 6154 and 6173)
Pathophysiology/pharmacotherapy of common fluid-electrolyte,
renal, acid-base, immunologic, and hematologic disorders.
PHAR 6122. Pharmacotherapy II: Patient-Centered Pathophysiologic Approach.
(5 cr; A-F only. Prereq-5101, 6121, 6131, 6163, [P]5102, 6154 and 6173)
Pathophysiology/pharmacotherapy of common cardiovascular,
endocrine, and gastrointestinal disorders.
PHAR 6123. Pharmacotherapy III: Patient-Centered Pathophysiologic Approach. (5 cr; A-F only. Prereq-5101, 5102, 6112, 6153, 6163, [P]6175)
PHAR 6135. Pharmacy Outcomes. (2 cr; A-F only. Prereq-6123, 6175)
How to integrate knowledge of basic sciences, pharmacotherapy, pharmacy practice management, pharmaceutical care,
written communication, literature evaluation, drug information retrieval, law/ethics, and pharmacoeconomics to manage
patients with multiple medical conditions.
PHAR 6141. Medical Microbiology and Immunizations. (1 cr; A-F only)
Background knowledge in medical microbiology. Evaluating
information on emerging infectious diseases, recommending
immunization schedules for childhood/adult vaccines.
PHAR 6151. Biochemistry of Medicinals I. (3 cr; A-F only. Prereq-§Chem 4351)
Biochemistry topics required for understanding pharmacodynamic action and therapeutic use of medicinal agents.
PHAR 6152. Biochemistry of Medicinals II. (3 cr; A-F only. Prereq-6151, [P]6172;
§Chem 4352)
Intermediary metabolism of carbohydrates, lipids, amino
acids and nucleic acids and how these pathways are affected
by therapeutic agents. Introduction to bioenergetics and drug
metabolism.
PHAR 6154. Medicinal Agents I. (3 cr; A-F only. Prereq-6152, [P]5101)
Basic principles of drug design, metabolism of action, and
receptor interaction. Chemical/biological properties and
therapeutic uses of autonomic, antihistaminic, renal, and
cardiovascular drugs.
PHAR 6155. Medicinal Agents II. (2 cr; A-F only. Prereq-6154, [P]5102 and 6174)
Chemical/biological properties and therapeutic uses of drugs
affecting central nervous, endocrine, and intermediary metabolism systems.
PHAR 6156. Medicinal Agents III. (4 cr; A-F only. Prereq-6152, 6153, 6154)
Therapeutic properties and uses of antiviral, anti-infective and
antineoplastic agents.
PHAR 6157. Human Nutrition and Drug Therapy. (3 cr; A-F only. Prereq-6152)
Basic concepts of human nutrition and clinical application.
PHAR 6158. Recombinant DNA-Derived Drugs. (1 cr; A-F only. Prereq-6151)
Pathophysiology/pharmacotherapy of common neurologic,
psychiatric, pulmonary, and geriatric disorders.
Biotechnology as it related to basic/clinical pharmaceutical sciences. Emphasizes recombinant DNA techniques and
preparation/use of biotechnology-derived agents in diagnosing/treating disease.
PHAR 6124. Pharmacotherapy IV: Patient-Centered Pathophysiologic Approach. (5 cr; A-F only. Prereq-6121, 6122, 6123, 6155, 6163, [P]5102)
PHAR 6159. Pharmaceutical Immunology and Biotechnology. (3 cr; A-F only.
Prereq-6151)
Pathophysiology and pharmacotherapy of common infectious
diseases, oncologic and toxicologic disorders.
Delivery of pharmaceuticals and pharmacy services in the U.S.
health care system, issues in hospital and community practice,
characteristics of the pharmaceutical industry, economic and
financial issues in delivering pharmaceutical services.
PHAR 6132. Biostatistics and Drug Literature Evaluation. (2 cr; A-F only. Prereq6111, [P]6173)
Biostatistical methods for data analysis and principles of study
design for clinical research. Use of small computers to analyze
and present data. Methods of searching for and evaluating drugrelated information.
PHAR 6133. Pharmacy Practice Management. (3 cr; A-F only. Prereq-Third year
pharmacy student)
Principles of pharmacy management, including inventory
control, purchasing, pricing, financial analysis, and personnel
management.
PHAR 6134. Law and Ethics in Pharmacy Practice. (2 cr; A-F only)
Minnesota and federal laws, rules, regulations and court decisions affecting pharmacy practice. Moral and ethical considerations that affect and influence pharmacy practice.
PHAR 6161. Drug Delivery I. (3 cr; A-F only. Prereq-[P]6171)
Mathematics associated with drug dispensing; technology of
common pharmaceutical dosage forms. Phenomenological
and theoretical basis of equilibrium and steady-state processes
controlling drugs and dosage forms.
PHAR 6162. Drug Delivery II. (3 cr; A-F only. Prereq-6161, [P]6172)
Phenomenological and theoretical basis of kinetic and dynamic
processes controlling drugs and dosage forms.
PHAR 6163. Pharmacokinetics. (3 cr; A-F only. Prereq-Calculus I or equiv, 6162)
Physiological basis for drug absorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion; use of mathematical principles and
equations to describe these processes as well as design dosage
regimens for individual patients.
PHAR 6164. Biopharmaceutics. (3 cr; A-F only. Prereq-6163, [P]6175)
Applied theory of dosage form design for optimal drug activity
and bioavailability for all routes of drug administration.
371
Course Descriptions
PHAR 6131. Pharmacy and Health Care System. (3 cr; A-F only. Prereq-Second
year pharmacy student)
Basic biological mechanisms of immune system. Emphasizes
drug allergies, immunosuppressives, monoclonal antibodies,
and preparation/use of immunologic derived agents in diagnosing/treating disease. Biotechnology as it relates to basic/clinical pharmaceutical sciences. Emphasizes recombinant DNA
techniques and preparation/use of biotechnology-derived agents
in diagnosing/treating disease.
Course Descriptions
PHAR 6165. Pharmaceutical Calculations. (1 cr; A-F only. Prereq-First yr pharmacy
student)
PHAR 6219. Building a Pharmaceutical Practice. (2 cr; A-F only. Prereq-6111,
6112)
Performing pharmaceutical calculations for patient care in all
pharmacy practice environments.
Initiating a pharmaceutical care practice. Building a personal
practice plan.
PHAR 6171. Pharmaceutical Care Skills. (2 cr; A-F only. Prereq-¶ 6151, 6111,
6161)
PHAR 6220. Pediatric Drug Therapy. (2 cr; A-F only. Prereq-3rd or 4th yr pharmacy
student)
Integrating basic and clinical science curriculum in a lab setting.
Pathophysiology/therapeutics of disease states. Common issues
encountered in providing pharmaceutical care to pediatric
patients.
PHAR 6172. Pharmaceutical Care Skills. (2 cr; A-F only. Prereq-6112, 6152, 6162)
Basic/clinical science curriculum in lab setting. Longitudinal
care in lab setting.
PHAR 6173. Pharmaceutical Care Skills. (2 cr; A-F only. Prereq-¶ 6121, 6132)
Integrating basic/clinical science curriculum in a lab setting.
PHAR 6174. Pharmaceutical Care Skills. (2 cr; A-F only. Prereq-6122)
Basic/clinical science curriculum in lab setting. Longitudinal
care in lab setting.
PHAR 6175. Pharmaceutical Care Skills V. (2 cr; A-F only. Prereq-¶ 6123 and 6164
and 6171 and 6172 and 6173 and 6174 or #)
Integrating basic and clinical science curriculum in a lab setting.
PHAR 6177. Patient Assessment. (1 cr; A-F only. Prereq-first yr pharmacy student)
How to obtain accurate health histories and perform systemic
physical assessments of adult patients in pharmacy practice.
PHAR 6181. Pharm.D. Paper & Seminar. (1 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-Third year
pharmacy student)
How to write a research paper. Students present research project
plan. Professional behavior, patient confidentiality, universal
precautions.
PHAR 6182. Pharm.D. IV Seminar. (1 cr; S-N only. Prereq-4th yr pharmacy student,
6181)
Students present thesis topics to peers and faculty evaluators.
PHAR 6183. Pharm.D. IV Paper. (2 cr; S-N only. Prereq-4th yr pharmacy student,
6181)
Pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic changes and their implications in elders. Effects of drug-drug/drug-disease interactions.
Drug adherence barriers to provide optimum pharmacotherapy
to elderly persons.
PHAR 6222. Advanced Pharmaceutical Compounding. (2 cr; A-F only. Prereq-2nd
or 3rd yr pharmacy student)
Expands compounding skills beyond those gained in pharmaceutical care lab.
PHAR 6223. Pharmacokinetics Research Seminar. (1 cr; A-F only. Prereq-6163
with a grade of “B” or better)
Students critically evaluate literature in pharmacokinetics,
pharmacodynamics, and drug metabolism.
PHAR 6224. Pharmacogenomics: Genetic Basis for Variability in Drug
Response. (2 cr; A-F only. Prereq-2nd or 3rd yr pharmacy student or grad student, #)
Theory/practice of pharmacogenomics. Principles of human genetics/genomics. Applications to scientific education, problems
in drug therapy optimization, and patient care.
PHAR 6230. Ambulatory PC Clinic. (2 cr; Stdnt Opt. Prereq-Enrolled pharmacy
student)
How to conduct pharmaceutical care assessments, for patients
with actual drug-related needs, in a controlled clinic setting.
Final paper describing a hypothesis-driven research project,
patient-care oriented project, management project, drug-usage
evaluation, or extensive literature review.
PHAR 6231. Community Pharmacy Management. (2 cr; A-F only. Prereq-6133)
PHAR 6200. Directed Studies: Drug-related Controversies in the U.S. Health
Care System. (2 cr; A-F only. Prereq-Pharmacy student)
PHAR 6232. Institutional Pharmacy Management. (2 cr; A-F only. Prereq-2nd or
3rd year pharmacy student)
Online course. Medication development, regulation, and
distribution in the U.S. Business, political, and legal/ethical
issues involved. Weekly reading/writing assignments, exams,
final paper.
Course Descriptions
PHAR 6221. Geriatric Pharmacotherapy. (2 cr; A-F only. Prereq-3rd or 4th yr
pharmacy student)
PHAR 6210. Immunization Tour. (1 cr; A-F only. Prereq-6175 or [P]6175, third year
pharm student, #)
Role that health care practitioners play with respect to population based disease prevention. Students work collaboratively
with students from another health discipline in planning/delivering influenza vaccination clinics. Student-led collaborative
public health intervention.
PHAR 6211. Non-Prescription Drug Therapy: Focus on Patient Self-Care. (2 cr;
A-F only. Prereq-6112)
Expands on over-the-counter medications presented in 6112.
Diagnostic and durable medical equipment available in community pharmacies as well as the use of alternative medications
is discussed.
PHAR 6212. Dermatology. (1 cr; A-F only. Prereq-2nd or 3rd yr pharmacy student)
Pathophysiology and pharmacotherapy of dermatologic
disorders.
PHAR 6215. Applied Pharmacokinetics. (2 cr; A-F only. Prereq-6163)
Applying clinical pharmacokinetics and assay methodologies to
patient care. Assessing drug therapy outcomes.
372
Management techniques needed in community pharmacy
practice, with emphasis on marketing and service.
Management techniques needed in various institutional pharmacy settings. Integrating distributive and clinical components
of institutional practice
PHAR 6233. Drug Use Review and Management. (2 cr; A-F only. Prereq-3rd yr
pharmacy student, #)
Principles of drug use review in various health care settings.
Optimizing quality, minimizing cost.
PHAR 6236. Survey of Laws Affecting Pharmacy Practice. (2 cr; A-F only)
U.S. Food and Drug (FDA) law, civil liability of malpractice,
duty of pharmacy professionals, implications of intellectual
property rights of others. Business law topics ranging from
contracts to non-compete agreements.
PHAR 6248. Drugs of Abuse. (2 cr; A-F only. Prereq-Organic chemistry I/II or [organic
chemistry I, biochemistry])
Basic medicinal chemistry of substances of abuse, associated
paraphernalia.
PHAR 6250. Honors: Social and Administrative Pharmacy Seminar. (1 cr; A-F
only. Prereq-#)
Current topics in hospital pharmacy
PHAR 6255. Medicating the Soul. (2 cr; A-F only. Prereq-6155)
New developments in study of major psychiatric disorders.
Potential of findings for development of novel pharmacological
treatments.
Pharmacy
PHAR 6270. Honors: Critical Care Seminar. (2 cr; A-F only. Prereq-#)
Research/topics of importance to experimental/clinical
pharmacology.
PHAR 6293. Directed Research I. (1-5 cr [max 5 cr]; Stdnt Opt. Prereq-#)
Directed research in pharmacy practice, pharmaceutics, medicinal chemistry, or experimental and clinical pharmacology.
PHAR 6294. Directed Study I. (1-5 cr [max 5 cr]; Stdnt Opt. Prereq-#)
Directed studies in pharmacy practice, pharmaceutics, medicinal chemistry, and experimental or clinical pharmacology.
PHAR 6393. Directed Research II. (1-5 cr [max 5 cr]; Stdnt Opt. Prereq-#)
Directed research in pharmacy practice, pharmaceutics, medicinal chemistry, or experimental and clinical pharmacology.
PHAR 6394. Directed Study II. (1-5 cr [max 5 cr]; Stdnt Opt. Prereq-#)
Directed studies in pharmacy practice, pharmaceutics, medicinal chemistry, and experimental or clinical pharmacology.
PHAR 6493. Directed Research III. (1-5 cr [max 5 cr]; Stdnt Opt. Prereq-#)
Directed research in pharmacy practice, pharmaceutics, medicinal chemistry, or experimental and clinical pharmacology.
PHAR 6494. Directed Study III. (1-5 cr [max 5 cr]; Stdnt Opt. Prereq-#)
Directed studies in pharmacy, pharmaceutics, medicinal chemistry, and experimental or clinical pharmacology.
PHAR 6501. Ethics in Pharmacy Practice. (2 cr; A-F only. Prereq-2nd or 3rd yr
pharmacy student)
Ethical principles, selected schools of ethical thought. Students
discuss/debate ethical dilemmas in pharmacy practice and
health care.
PHAR 7001. Early Pharmacy Practice Experience I. (1 cr; A-F only. Prereq-Criminal
bkgr chk, BLS CPR cert for infants/chld/adults, [proof of negative Mantoux text or
explanation of positive test], proof of chicken pox immunity)
First in a series of four courses. Focuses on patient’s perspective
in managing and living with chronic conditions and chronic
medication use. Includes community-based instruction, mentor
program
PHAR 7002. Early Pharmacy Practice Experience II. (1 cr; A-F only. Prereq-7001
or #, criminal background check, BLS CPR cert for infants/child/adults, proof of negative
Mantoux test or explanation of positive test, proof of chicken pox immunity)
Second in a series of four courses. Focuses on patient’s perspective in managing and living with chronic conditions and chronic
medication use. Includes community-based instruction, mentor
program.
Third in a series of four courses. Focusing on patient’s perspective in managing and living with chronic conditions and
chronic medication use. Includes community-based instruction.
Emphasizes mentoring.
PHAR 7004. Early Pharmacy Practice Experience IV. (.5 cr; A-F only. Prereq-7003
or #, criminal background check, BLS CPR cert for infants/chld/adults, proof of negative
Mantoux test or explanation of positive test, proof of chicken pox immunity)
Fourth in a series of four courses. Focuses on patient’s perspective in managing and living with chronic conditions and
chronic medication use. Includes community-based instruction.
Emphasizes mentoring. Upcoming patient care opportunities.
PHAR 7120. Community Practice Experience. (4 cr; A-F only. Prereq-Pharm. D. IV,
MN Board of Pharm intern, criminal background check, BLS CPR cert for infants/child/
adults, proof of negative Mantoux test [or explanation of positive test], proof of chicken
pox immunity)
Students assigned to participating community pharmacies and
involved in community practice activities full-time for five
weeks.
Students are assigned to participating hospital pharmacies.
Stuydent participate in drug distribution, IV compounding,
clinical services, and administrative activities. Full-time for five
weeks.
PHAR 7122. Acute Patient Care Practice Experience I. (4 cr; A-F only. PrereqPharm. D. I-III, MN Board of Pharm intern, criminal background check, BLS CPR cert
for infants/child/adults, proof of negative Mantoux test [or explanation of positive test],
proof of chicken pox immunity)
Experience in an inpatient setting. Students are responsible for
all drug-related needs of individual patients. Full-time for five
weeks.
PHAR 7123. Ambulatory Patient Care Practice Experience. (4 cr; A-F only.
Prereq-Pharm. D. IV, MN Board of Pharm intern, criminal background check, BLS CPR
cert for infants/child/adults, proof of negative Mantoux test [or explanation of positive
test], proof of chicken pox immunity)
Experience in an ambulatory setting. Students responsible for
drug-related needs of individual patients. Full-time for five
weeks.
PHAR 7126. Patient Care Practice Experience. (4 cr; A-F only. Prereq-Pharm.
D. I-III, MN Board of Pharm intern, criminal background check, BLS CPR cert for
infants/child/adults, proof of negative Mantoux test [or explanation of positive test],
proof of chicken pox immunity)
Patient care experience in any setting. Students responsible
for drug-related needs of individual patients. Full-time for five
weeks.
PHAR 7128. Acute Patient Care Practice Experience II. (4 cr; A-F only. PrereqPharm. D. I-III, MN Board of Pharm intern, criminal background check, BLS CPR cert
for infants/child/adults, proof of negative Mantoux test [or explanation of positive test],
proof of chicken pox immunity)
Experience in an inpatient setting. Students are responsible for
all drug-related needs of individual patients. Full-time for five
weeks.
PHAR 7211. Elective Practice Experience I. (4 cr; A-F only. Prereq-Pharm. D. I-III,
MN Board of Pharm intern, criminal background check, BLS CPR cert for infants/child/
adults, proof of negative Mantoux test [or explanation of positive test], proof of chicken
pox immunity)
Patient care experience in any patient care setting. Students are
responsible for drug-related needs of individual patients. Fulltime for five weeks.
PHAR 7212. Elective Practice Experience II. (4 cr; A-F only. Prereq-Pharm. D. I-III,
MN Board of Pharm intern, criminal background check, BLS CPR cert for infants/child/
adults, proof of negative Mantoux test [or explanation of positive test], proof of chicken
pox immunity)
Course Descriptions
PHAR 7003. Early Pharmacy Practice Experience III. (.5 cr; A-F only. Prereq-7002
or #, criminal bkgr chk, BLS CPR cert for infants/chld/adults, [proof of negative Mantoux
test or explanation of positive test], proof of chicken pox immunity)
PHAR 7121. Institutional Practice Experience. (4 cr; A-F only. Prereq-Pharm.
D. IV, MN Board of Pharm intern, criminal background check, BLS CPR cert for
infants/child/adults, proof of negative Mantoux test [or explanation of positive test],
proof of chicken pox immunity)
Patient care experience in any setting. Students are responsible
for drug-related needs of individual patients. Full-time for five
weeks.
PHAR 7213. Elective Practice Experience III. (4 cr; A-F only. Prereq-Pharm.
D. I-III, MN Board of Pharm intern, criminal background check, BLS CPR cert for
infants/child/adults, proof of negative Mantoux test [or explanation of positive test],
proof of chicken pox immunity)
Patient care experience in any setting. Students are responsible
for drug-related needs of individual patients. Full-time for five
weeks.
PHAR 7216. Elective Practice Experience IV. (4 cr; A-F only. Prereq-Pharm.
D. I-III, MN Board of Pharm intern, criminal background check, BLS CPR cert for
infants/child/adults, proof of negative Mantoux test [or explanation of positive test],
proof of chicken pox immunity)
Experience in an inpatient setting. Students responsible for
all drug-related needs of individual patients. Full-time for five
weeks.
373
Course Descriptions
PHAR 7231. Research Practice Experience I. (4 cr; A-F only. Prereq-Pharm.
D. I-III, MN Board of Pharm intern, criminal background check, BLS CPR cert for
infants/child/adults, proof of negative Mantoux test [or explanation of positive test],
proof of chicken pox immunity)
PHIL 2001. Existential Literature. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-Comp 1120, 30 cr or #)
Experience using research techniques in basic or clinical sciences or pharmacy practice. Full-time for five weeks.
PHIL 2011. Philosophy of Language. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-Course in logic or
literary analysis or human communication or CS or math or # LE 3)
PHAR 7232. Research Practice Experience II. (4 cr; A-F only. Prereq-Pharm.
D. I-III, MN Board of Pharm intern, criminal background check, BLS CPR cert for
infants/child/adults, proof of negative Mantoux test [or explanation of positive test],
proof of chicken pox immunity)
Experience using research techniques in basic or clinical sciences or pharmacy practice. Full-time for five weeks.
PHAR 7233. Research Practice Experience III. (4 cr; A-F only. Prereq-Pharm.
D. I-III, MN Board of Pharm intern, criminal background check, BLS CPR cert for
infants/child/adults, proof of negative Mantoux test [or explanation of positive test],
proof of chicken pox immunity)
Introduction to theories of meaning and truth and the structure
of language. Relation of language to thought and the world;
semantics and syntax; speech acts and performative utterances;
descriptions and reference; and structuralism and the possibility
of objective knowledge.
PHIL 2021. Science and Pseudo-Science: Thinking about Weird Things. (3 cr;
A-F or Aud. LE 8)
Experience using research techniques in basic or clinical sciences or pharmacy practice. Full-time for five weeks.
A critical introduction to the nature of knowledge and belief by
focusing on contemporary issues, such as UFOs, ESP, mysticism, creationism and evolution, and near-death experiences,
which explains the differences between rational beliefs and
articles of faith and between science and pseudo-science.
Philosophy (PHIL)
PHIL 3118. Special Topics: (Various Titles to be Assigned). (3-9 cr [max 9 cr]; A-F or
Aud. Prereq-1001 or #)
College of Liberal Arts
In-depth examination of a particular philosopher or problem in
philosophy. Specific course announced in [Class Schedule].
PHIL 1001. Introduction to Philosophy. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-§1101 LE 7)
PHIL 3222. Medical Ethics. (4 cr; A-F or Aud)
Introduction to philosophical heritage through examination of
several classic philosophical problems such as the existence of
God, nature of knowledge, free will versus determinism, and the
relation of mind to body.
PHIL 1003. Ethics and Society. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. LEIP 08)
Classic theories addressing questions of whether morality is
subjective or objective, cultural relativism versus universal
rules, how right and wrong should be determined. Moral issues
such as euthanasia, the environment, population and birth
control, nuclear deterrence, alternative life styles, and capital
punishment in their international dimension.
PHIL 1007. Philosophy and World Religions. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. LEIP 07)
Comparative philosophical examination of teachings and
practices of several major world religions selected from ancient
polytheism, Christianity, Judaism, Islam, Taoism, Buddhism,
Hinduism, and various Native American and African religions.
PHIL 1008. Critical Thinking. (4 cr; A-F or Aud. LE 2)
Course Descriptions
Themes of love, death, boredom, and alienation through plays
and novels of such 19th- and 20th-century authors as Kafka,
Dostoyevsky, Barth, Sartre, Camus, Murdoch, and Fowles.
Patterns of reasoning encountered in everyday life, including
advertising, editorials, and politics. Use of language in formulating arguments; differences between deductive and inductive
arguments; how to detect and avoid mistakes in reasoning.
PHIL 1018. Logic. (4 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-§1118 LE 2)
Introduction to symbolic logic. Nature of language, species
of arguments, informal versus formal arguments, techniques
of translation, methods of sentential logic, and methods of
predicate logic.
PHIL 1021. Classical Mythology. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. LE 9)
Readings in Greek and Roman myths, especially in those that
have influenced Western culture.
PHIL 1101. Honors: Introduction to Philosophy. (3 cr; A-F only. Prereq-Honors
student, §1001 LE 7)
Honors introduction to philosophical heritage through
examination of several classic philosophical problems such
as the existence of God, nature of knowledge, free will versus
determinism, and the relation of mind to body.
PHIL 1118. Freshman Seminar: Honors: Logic. (4 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-Freshman,
fewer than 30 credits, honors student, §:1018 LE 2)
Honors introduction to symbolic logic. Formal systems, deductive validity, proofs and translation in sentence and predicate
logics. Introduction to met-theory and extensions of logic.
374
Values underlying the health care professions and ethical dilemmas in medical contexts. Patients’ rights and autonomy, medical
paternalism, confidentiality, truth-telling, euthanasia.
PHIL 3231. Law and Punishment. (4 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-1001 or Soc 1301)
Nature of law, natural law theory, and legal positivism and their
relationship to traditional and contemporary theories of punishment; deterrence, reform, retribution, rehabilitation, social
defense, restitution.
PHIL 3242. Values and Technology. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-60 cr or # LE 8)
Problems related to science and technology. Application of
moral theory to issues raised by technology, such as distribution
of power, effects on environment, labor and social life, privacy,
intellectual property rights, product liability, and professional
codes of ethics.
PHIL 3281. Ethical Theory. (4 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-1001 or 1003 or #)
Characteristics and criteria of value statements; justification of
moral standards; some 20th-century ethical theories.
PHIL 3291. Current Social Political Philosophy. (4 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-1001
or 1003 or #)
Detailed philosophical analysis of recent writings about social
and political concepts such as freedom, democracy, socialism,
communism, fascism, and anarchy.
PHIL 3301. Greek Philosophy. (4 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-30 cr or #)
Greek philosophy from the pre-Socratic era through Socrates,
Plato, and Aristotle to Neoplatonism and the rediscovery of
Aristotle. Philosophy of nature, theories of persons, possibility
of human knowledge, happiness, and the good life.
PHIL 3303. The Birth of Modern Philosophy. (4 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-30 cr, course
in phil, hist, pol sci or lit or #)
Impact of science and secularity on the rationalism of
Descartes, Spinoza, Leibniz and the empiricism of Locke,
Berkeley, and Hume.
PHIL 3305. 19th- and 20th-Century Philosophy. (4 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-3303
or #)
Survey of main issues and philosophers, with emphasis on the
analytic tradition.
Physical Education
PHIL 3325. Environmental Ethics. (4 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-30 cr or #)
PE 1410. Golf. (1 cr; Stdnt Opt. PE)
Moral dimension of relationship between humans and earth’s
natural environment. Pollution, energy policy, economics, law,
and environment; endangered species; rights of nonhumans;
preservation and conservation; obligations toward future generations; ethical theory and environment.
Development of personal golf skills and understandings for
participation in the sport.
PHIL 3570. Philosophy of Psychology. (4 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-1001 or Psy 1003,
60 cr or #)
PE 1414. Bowling. (1 cr; Stdnt Opt. PE)
Development of personal skills in bowling. Understanding of
concepts and strategies for participation in the game.
PE 1500. Cross-Country Skiing. (1 cr; Stdnt Opt. PE)
Current philosophical issues surrounding psychology: behaviorism, dualism, mind/brain identity theories, computer models of
cognition, and functionalism.
Development of personal skills in cross country skiing.
Understanding of the techniques and concepts for participation
in the sport.
PHIL 3900. Colloquium for Majors. (1 cr; S-N or Aud. Prereq-Phil major/minor, %;
attendance at 12 dept-approved lectures/discussions over 4-yr period; regis only during
semester of 10th lect)
PE 1502. Alpine Skiing. (1 cr; A-F or Aud. PE)
Development of personal skills in alpine skiing. Understanding
of the techniques and concepts for participation in the sport.
Lectures and discussion groups on variety of philosophical topics; required reading; places and topics to be announced.
PE 1506. Sailing. (1 cr; Stdnt Opt. PE)
PHIL 4655. Theory of Knowledge. (4 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-1001, 1008 or 1018 or
#; no Grad School credit)
Introduction to theory of knowledge interpreted broadly to
encompass perceptual, deductive, inductive, and other modes of
knowledge. Beginning with standard conception of knowledge
as warranted true belief, explores strengths and weaknesses of
alternative accounts.
PHIL 4900. Seminar in Philosophy. (4 cr [max 12 cr]; A-F or Aud. Prereq-12 cr Phil
or #; no Grad School credit)
Detailed examination of major topics or philosophical works.
See department for details.
PHIL 5245. Aesthetics. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-60 cr)
Possibility of definition of art or of the aesthetic experience
examined through survey of classic aestheticians; philosophy of
art criticism. Research paper required of graduate students.
PHIL 5991. Independent Study. (1-3 cr [max 10 cr]; A-F or Aud. Prereq-#, cannot be
used to satisfy requirements for phil major or minor)
Work in problems of special interest to student arranged with
instructor before registration. Written work required. May be
taken in conjunction with another philosophy course.
PHIL 5997. Intern Teaching Assistantship. (2 cr [max 4 cr]; A-F or Aud. Prereq-#)
Practical experience in assisting teaching of philosophy.
Application deadline one week before beginning of registration
for the following semester.
Development of personal skills in sailing. Understanding of
the techniques and concepts for participation in the activity.
Understanding of the principles of safety on the water.
PE 1507. Introduction to River Kayaking. (1 cr; Stdnt Opt. PE)
River kayaking techniques. History, safety, kayak design, basic
braces, paddle strokes, and maneuvering for river conditions.
PE 1508. Flatwater Canoeing. (1 cr; Stdnt Opt. PE)
Basic skills and terminology relevant for safe canoeing on
flatwater and slow-stream conditions.
PE 1510. Whitewater Kayaking. (2 cr; Stdnt Opt. Prereq-1507, # PE)
Whitewater kayaking on Lake Superior and the St. Louis River
to learn about: cold water paddling equipment, reading rapids,
maneuvering, basic rescues, bracing, rolling, surfing on waves
and in holes, includes leadership skill development related to
trip-prep, communication and river safety.
PE 1511. Sea Kayaking. (1 cr; A-F or Aud)
Sea kayaking techniques; history, safety, kayak design,
basic braces, paddle strokes, and maneuvering in large water
conditions.
PE 1512. Fishing Skills. (1 cr; Stdnt Opt. PE)
Development of personal skills in fishing. Acquisition of
understanding, techniques, and patterns for participation in the
activity.
PE 1530. Rock Climbing. (1 cr; Stdnt Opt. PE)
College of Education and Human Service
Professions
PE 1531. Intermediate Rock Climbing. (1 cr; Stdnt Opt. Prereq-1530 or #)
PE 1220. Intermediate Swimming. (1 cr; Stdnt Opt. PE)
Development of intermediate aquatic skills and techniques for
personal participation. Intermediate principles of safety in and
on the water.
PE 1300. Ballroom Dance. (1 cr; Stdnt Opt. PE)
Development of the basic steps and patterns for ballroom dance.
Development of technical and choreographic skill for personal
expressive communication through movement.
PE 1304. Square Dance. (1 cr; Stdnt Opt. PE)
Development of the basic steps and patterns of square dance.
Development of technical and choreographic skill for personal
expressive communication through movement.
PE 1402. Tennis. (1 cr; Stdnt Opt. PE)
Development of personal skills in tennis. Understanding of
strategies and concepts for participation in the game.
Intermediate rock climbing skills and knowledge including use
of and placement of anchor systems, top rope set-up, introductory lead climbing and climb site risk management. This course
builds upon basic rock climbing skills and techniques which are
prerequisite for this course.
PE 1600. Physical Fitness. (1 cr; Stdnt Opt. PE)
Development of personal skills related to physical fitness.
Understanding and application of factors and participation patterns contributing to enhanced physical fitness.
PE 1601. Aerobics. (1 cr; Stdnt Opt. PE)
Knowledge of cardiovascular fitness, including aerobic exercise
and hydro-aerobics. Physical development through cardiovascular training, muscle strengthening, and stretching.
PE 1612. Karate. (1 cr; Stdnt Opt. PE)
Development of personal skills in karate. Understanding history,
cultural background, patterns, and strategies for participation
in karate.
375
Course Descriptions
Physical Education (PE)
History, techniques and safety, equipment, knots, basic belay
systems, route finding, face and crack climbing, identification of
environmental hazards.
Course Descriptions
PE 1613. Karate: Advanced Belts. (1 cr [max 4 cr]; A-F or Aud. Prereq-1612 or
equivalent or #)
An advanced course for the experienced student who has
achieved the basic competencies in karate.
Students will develop skills for Telemark and back country skiing such as safety, body position, weighting, use of the fall line,
and pole planting. Contemporary telemark/back-country gear
will be used and reviewed.
PE 1614. Self Defense. (1 cr; Stdnt Opt. PE)
PE 3495. Special Topics: (Various Titles to be Assigned). (1-4 cr [max 4 cr]; A-F only)
Development of personal skills related to self defense.
Understanding of concepts, strategies, and skills for developing
a personal system of self defense.
Treatment of topics beyond those included in regular curriculum
or in-depth treatment of topics associated with normal curricular
offering.
PE 1616. Weight Training. (1 cr; Stdnt Opt. PE)
Physical Education
Professional (PEP)
Development of personal skills related to weight training.
Understanding of principles, concepts, and conditioning regimens for participation in weight training.
PE 1620. Aikido. (1 cr; Stdnt Opt. PE)
Development of personal skills in aikido. Understanding of
the history, cultural background, patterns, and strategies for
participation in aikido.
PE 1706. Volleyball. (1 cr; Stdnt Opt. PE)
Development of personal skills in volleyball. Understanding of
strategies, concepts, and skills for participation in volleyball.
PE 1708. Basketball. (1 cr; Stdnt Opt. PE)
Development of personal skills in basketball. Understanding of
strategies, concepts, and skills for participation in the sport.
PE 1901. Varsity Football. (1 cr [max 4 cr]; S-N only. Prereq-#)
Participation in intercollegiate football competition.
PE 1903. Varsity Soccer. (1 cr [max 4 cr]; S-N only. Prereq-#)
Participation in intercollegiate soccer competition.
PE 1905. Varsity Basketball. (1 cr [max 4 cr]; S-N only. Prereq-#)
Participation in intercollegiate basketball competition.
PE 1907. Varsity Ice Hockey. (1 cr [max 4 cr]; S-N only. Prereq-#)
PEP 1001. Introduction to Physical Education. (2 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-Pre-PE
major or #)
Introduction to physical education as a profession. Course will
address professional standards, accrediting procedures, portfolio
development, and an orientation to the disciplines of the field.
PEP 1010. Teaching Elementary Games and Gymnastics. (1 cr; A-F or Aud.
Prereq-PE or rec major or #, §1000)
Basic skills, teaching strategies, practices, and drills for teaching elementary games and gymnastics.
PEP 1020. Teaching Rhythms. (1 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-PE or rec major or #, §1000)
Basic skills, teaching strategies, and practices for teaching
rhythms.
PEP 1310. Teaching Dance. (2 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-Pre PE major or rec major)
Basic skills, teaching strategies, practice drills, and skill analysis for teaching ballroom, folk and square dance.
Participation in intercollegiate ice hockey competition.
PEP 1400. Teaching Tennis and Golf. (1 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-Pre PE major or
rec major)
PE 1913. Varsity Cross Country. (1 cr [max 4 cr]; S-N only. Prereq-#)
Participation in intercollegiate cross country competition.
Basic skills, teaching strategies, practice, drills, and skill analysis for teaching tennis and golf.
PE 1917. Varsity Volleyball. (1 cr [max 4 cr]; S-N only. Prereq-#)
PEP 1504. Teaching Skating. (1 cr; Stdnt Opt. Prereq-Pre PE major or rec major or #)
Participation in intercollegiate volleyball competition.
PE 1919. Varsity Track. (1 cr [max 4 cr]; S-N only. Prereq-#)
Participation in intercollegiate track competition.
PE 1921. Varsity Tennis. (1 cr [max 4 cr]; S-N only. Prereq-#)
Participation in intercollegiate tennis competition.
PE 1925. Varsity Baseball. (1 cr [max 4 cr]; S-N only. Prereq-#)
Course Descriptions
College of Education and Human Service
Professions
Participation in intercollegiate baseball competition.
PE 1927. Varsity Softball. (1 cr [max 4 cr]; S-N only. Prereq-#)
Participation in intercollegiate softball competition.
PE 2001. Sport Ethics and Society. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. LE 7)
Explores ethical issues in sport to develop moral reasoning
skills for a successful life.
PE 2240. Lifeguarding Today. (1 cr; Stdnt Opt. Prereq-Ability to swim 500 yards, #)
Provides knowledge and skills necessary to qualify as a nonsurf lifeguard. Meets current American Red Cross standards.
Includes CPR and first aid instruction.
PE 2244. Water Safety Instructor. (2 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-1240, 17 yrs old,
knowledge and skill based on Emergency Water Safety Standard)
Knowledge, skills, and strategies to teach American Red Cross
swimming and water safety courses.
PE 2500. Advanced Nordic Ski: Telemark and Backcountry Ski Techniques. (2
cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-1500 or #)
Traditional Nordic Techniques of telemark skiing will be
presented. Background on the history of Nordic skiing will set
the foundation for this active physical skill development course.
376
Basic skills, teaching strategies, practice, drills, and skill analysis for teaching skating.
PEP 1600. Teaching Fitness and Weight Training. (2 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-Pre PE
major or rec major or #)
Basic skills, teaching strategies, practice, drills, and skill analysis for teaching physical fitness, weight training, and aerobics.
PEP 1700. Teaching Soccer and Softball. (1 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-Pre PE major
or rec major or #)
Basic skills, teaching strategies, practice, drills, and skill analysis for teaching soccer and softball.
PEP 1710. Teaching Volleyball and Basketball. (1 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-Pre PE
major or rec major or #)
Basic skills, teaching strategies, practice, drills, and skill analysis for teaching volleyball and basketball.
PEP 2000. Foundations of Physical Education. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-Pre PE
major or rec major and min 30 cr or #)
Historical, philosophical, sociological, and scientific foundations within physical education and its subdisciplines.
PEP 3010. Adapted Physical Education. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-PE major or
candidate or #)
Developmental/adapted physical education for children with
disabilities.
PEP 3035. Physiology and Mechanics of Physical Activity. (3 cr; A-F or Aud.
Prereq-Hlth 2040, pre pe major or #)
Physiological and biomechanical concepts as applied to skillful
movement, physical activity and fitness.
Physics
PEP 3126. Elementary School Physical Education. (2 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereqelem/middle schl teach educ pre- or candidate or #)
PEP 3970. Supervised Teaching: College. (1 cr; A-F only. Prereq-Secondary Teacher
Education Program (STEP), #)
Teaching physical education for elementary education majors;
need for physical education for elementary school children,
planning and teaching age appropriate developmental movement experiences.
Supervised teaching experience in a college setting.
PEP 3501. Teaching Cross-Country Skiing. (1 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-PE, exer sci or
rec major or #; §1500)
Basic skills, teaching strategies, practice, drills, and skill analysis for teaching cross-country skiing.
PEP 3505. Teaching Whitewater Kayaking. (1 cr; Stdnt Opt. Prereq-Exer sci or pe
or rec major, pe 1510 or #, §1505)
Basic skills, teaching strategies, practice, drills, and skill analysis for teaching whitewater kayaking. Successful completion
results in American Canoe Association instructor certification.
PEP 3506. Teaching Sea Kayaking. (1 cr; Stdnt Opt. Prereq-Exer sci or pe or rec
major, PE 1507 or #, §1506)
Basic skills, teaching strategies, practice, drills, and skill analysis for teaching sea kayaking. Successful completion results in
American Canoe Association instructor certification.
PEP 3507. Teaching Outdoor Skills. (2 cr; Stdnt Opt. Prereq-Exer sci or pe or rec
major, Rec 1201, Rec 1202 or Rec 1203, Rec 1204 or #, §1507)
Basic skills, teaching strategies, practice, drills, and skill analysis for teaching outdoor recreation skills; includes navigation,
camp craft, backpacking, back country travel, and safety.
PEP 3508. Teaching Rock Climbing. (1 cr; Stdnt Opt. Prereq-Exer sci or pe or rec
major, PE 1530 or #, §1508)
Basic skills, teaching strategies, practice, drills, and skill analysis for teaching rock climbing.
PEP 3509. Teaching Canoeing. (1 cr; Stdnt Opt. Prereq-Exer sci or pe or rec major,
PE 1508 or #, §1509)
Basic skills, teaching strategies, practice, drills, and skill
analysis for teaching canoeing. Successful completion results in
American Canoe Association instructor certification.
PEP 3520. Alpine Ski Instructor’s Course. (1 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-Exer sci or pe
or rec major, §1520)
Instructor training for alpine skiing. Provides a basis of training
for professional development as a skiing instructor.
PEP 3700. Student Assessment in Physical Education. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. PrereqSecondary Teacher Education Program (STEP) or #)
Key components of student assessment for physical education
teacher education candidates.
Methods, instructional techniques and strategies, classroom
management, lesson planning, developmental levels, elementary
curriculum and standards.
PEP 3721. Apprenticeship: Elementary. (2 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-Secondary
Teacher Education Program (STEP), #, [P]PEP 3720)
Supervised clinical teaching experience with responsibilities
that include planning, managing, and implementing instructional experiences for elementary school children.
PEP 3730. Secondary Physical Education Methods. (4 cr; A-F only. Prereq-3720,
PE 2244, Secondary Teacher Education Program (STEP), #, [P]EdSe 3205)
Methods, instructional techniques and strategies, classroom
management, lesson planning, developmental levels, secondary
curriculum and standards.
PEP 3731. Apprenticeship: Secondary. (2 cr; A-F only. Prereq-Secondary Education
Teacher Program, #; [P]3730)
Supervised teaching experience with responsibilities that
include planning, managing, and implementing instructional
experiences for secondary school children.
Research or study in selected noncurricular area of exercise
science or physical education.
PEP 4992. Directed Readings. (1-3 cr [max 6 cr]; A-F or Aud. Prereq-#; no Grad
School credit)
Study of varying topics by reading specific books, journal
articles, etc. Topics selected based on student interests or
academic preparation.
PEP 4997. Practicum. (1-5 cr [max 5 cr]; A-F or Aud. Prereq-PE or exer sci major; no
Grad School credit)
Supervised practical experience related to physical education
teaching or exercise science professional experiences.
PEP 5991. Independent Study. (1-4 cr [max 8 cr]; A-F or Aud. Prereq-Quick enroll or
grad student and #)
Directed research and study in selected area of physical education or exercise science.
PEP 5992. Directed Readings. (1-3 cr [max 6 cr]; A-F or Aud. Prereq-Quick enroll or
grad student or #)
Directed Readings
Physics (PHYS)
College of Science and Engineering
PHYS 1001. Introduction to Physics I. (5 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-Algebra, trig LE 4)
Noncalculus general physics course primarily for certainpreprofessional fields. Topics in mechanics, heat, and sound.
PHYS 1002. Introduction to Physics II. (5 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-1001)
Noncalculus general physics course primarily for certain
preprofessional fields. Topics in light, electricity, magnetism,
and modern physics.
PHYS 1011. Ideas in Physics. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-Will not satisfy major or minor
requirements in phys LE 5)
Descriptive, nonmathematical survey of basic concepts in physics from Newton to present. Instructor has considerable latitude
regarding content. Primarily for liberal arts students; not for
preprofessional preparation.
PHYS 1021. Exploring Current Topics in Physics. (1 cr; A-F or Aud)
Introduction to current topics in the field of physics, with
emphasis on recent research developments and local research
activities.
PHYS 2011. General Physics I. (4 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-Math 1290 or Math 1296 or
Math 1596; §1201 LE 4)
Calculus-based introduction to Newtonian mechanics, fluid
mechanics, and heat.
PHYS 2012. General Physics II. (4 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-2011, Math 1297 or Math
1597; §1202 or 1204)
Calculus-based introduction to electricity, magnetism, and
optics.
PHYS 2021. Relativity and Quantum Physics. (4 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-1202 or
1204 or 2012)
Descriptive course; relativity, quantum mechanics, hydrogen
atom, multielectron atoms, molecular structure, quantum statistics, thermal radiation, solid state physics, nuclear physics.
PHYS 2022. Classical Physics. (4 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-2012, §1203, §1205,
§2001)
Survey of various topics in classical physics: vector angular momentum, AC circuits, oscillatory motion, waves, physical optics.
377
Course Descriptions
PEP 3720. Elementary Physical Education Methods. (4 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq3010, 3700, Secondary Teacher Education Program (STEP), #; [P]PEP 3721)
PEP 4991. Independent Study. (1-4 cr [max 8 cr]; A-F or Aud. Prereq-PE or exer sci
major and #; no Grad School credit)
Course Descriptions
PHYS 2033. Classical and Quantum Physics Lab. (2 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-[P]2021
and 2022, §2031)
PHYS 5043. Environmental Optics. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-2012 or course
containing elementary optics)
Experiments and computer simulations selected to provide
experience with both concepts and techniques in classical and
quantum physics.
Application of optics in environmental measurements of irradiance and radiance, optical remote sensing using ship-borne and
satellite platforms, diffuse spectra, single vs. multiple scattering,
object visibility, inherent vs. apparent optical properties, scattering in Beer’s law, optical algorithms.
PHYS 2111. Solving Physics Problems I. (1 cr; S-N or Aud. Prereq-Math 1296 or
Math 1596, concurrent registration is required in 2011, §1101)
Extended practice in applying basic physics principles and
mathematical reasoning to problems in mechanics and
thermodynamics.
PHYS 2112. Solving Physics Problems II. (1 cr; S-N or Aud. Prereq-Math 1297 or
Math 1597, concurrent registration is required in 2012)
Extended practice in applying basic physics principles and
mathematical reasoning to problems in electricity, magnetism
and optics.
PHYS 2199. Physics Tutoring. (1-2 cr [max 4 cr]; S-N or Aud. Prereq-2012 or %)
Tutoring students in 1xxx- and 2xxx-level physics courses.
PHYS 3061. Instrumentation. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-2022 or 1203 or 1205, 1
sem programming)
Introduction to electronics for scientific applications. DC
and AC circuits, linear and nonlinear devices, integrated
circuits. Analog electronics. Transducers. Digital electronics.
Applications of microcomputers to lab data acquisition.
PHYS 3091. Independent Study. (1-3 cr [max 6 cr]; A-F or Aud. Prereq-%)
Directed individual study.
PHYS 3094. Physics Research. (1-6 cr [max 6 cr]; S-N or Aud. Prereq-%)
Supervised research.
PHYS 3561. Astrophysics. (3 cr; A-F only. Prereq-2021, §5561)
The application of physical laws and processes to the
understanding of astrophysical objects: celestial mechanics,
energy transport, stellar structure and evolution, the interstellar
medium, stellar remnants, galactic structure and dynamics, large
scale structure and cosmology.
PHYS 4001. Classical Mechanics. (4 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-2022 or 2001, Math
3280)
Theoretical mechanics, including Lagrangian and Hamiltonian
functions, symmetries, and conservation laws.
PHYS 4011. Electromagnetic Theory. (4 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-2022 or 1203 or
1205, Math 3280)
Course Descriptions
Electric and magnetic fields, Maxwell’s equations and applications, radiation.
PHYS 4021. Quantum Physics II. (4 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-2021, Math 3280)
Quantum wave mechanics with applications; Schr[o]dinger
equation,angular momentum, hydrogen atom, symmetries,
identical particles.
PHYS 4031. Thermal and Statistical Physics. (4 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-2021)
Elements of thermodynamics; principles of statistical physics
applied to equilibrium properties of classical and quantum
systems.
PHYS 4110. Physics for Science Teachers. (2 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-1002 or 2012,
no Grad School cr)
Preparation for teaching physics at the high school level.
Review of physics concepts important at the high school level.
Methods for effective presentation, including problem solving,
discussions, demonstrations and lab experiments.
PHYS 5041. Optics. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-2022 or 2001)
Fundamentals of physical optics.
378
PHYS 5052. Computational Methods in Physics. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-2021, 1
sem programming, Math 3280)
Applications of numerical methods to problems in classical and
quantum physics, emphasizing ordinary and partial differential
equations. Computer modeling of physical systems and experimentation with simulations of physical systems.
PHYS 5053. Data Analysis Methods in Physics. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-2012, 1
sem programming, lab or field experience beyond 2012)
Problems of data analysis in the context of dynamical models.
Emphasis will be placed on large datasets that arise in
astrophysics, particle dynamics, physical oceanography and
meteorology. (2 hr lect & 2 hr lab)
PHYS 5061. Experimental Methods. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-2033 or 2031, 3061)
Instruction and practice in methods of experimental physics;
microcomputer-based data acquisition; vacuum techniques.
PHYS 5090. Physics Seminar. (1 cr [max 2 cr]; A-F or Aud. Prereq-Sr or grad student)
Preparation and presentation of oral reports on approved physics
topics,research projects, and journal articles.
PHYS 5501. Advanced Classical Mechanics. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-4001)
Hamiltonian and Lagrangian formulations for discrete systems,
canonical transformations, nonlinear dynamics, and chaos
theory.
PHYS 5511. Electrodynamics. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-4011)
Maxwell’s equations, relativity and electrodynamics, radiation
and scattering of electromagnetic waves, relativistic particles in
electromagnetic fields, and radiation reaction.
PHYS 5521. Quantum Mechanics I. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-4021)
Schr[o]dinger equation, operator formulation, angular momentum, symmetries.
PHYS 5522. Quantum Mechanics II. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-5521)
Identical particles, perturbation theory, scattering, interaction
with electromagnetic field.
PHYS 5531. Introduction to Solid State Physics. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-4021,
4031)
Solid structure, thermal, and electronic properties of solids and
solid surfaces.
PHYS 5541. Fluid Dynamics. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-2022 or 2001, Math 3280)
Analytic and numeric treatment of dynamics of fluids. Rotating,
stratified fluids, with applications in limnology, oceanography,
and meteorology.
PHYS 5551. General Relativity. (4 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-4001)
Differential geometry, tensors, metrics, curvature, Einstein’s
equation,Newtonian limit, Killing vectors, cosmology, perfect
fluids, Schwarzschild and Kerr solutions, observational tests,
black holes.
PHYS 5561. Astrophysics. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-2021 and 2022, Math 3280)
The application of physical laws and processes to the
understanding of astrophysical objects: celestial mechanics,
energy transport, stellar structure and evolution, the interstellar
medium, stellar remnants, galactic structure and dynamics, large
scale structure and cosmology.
Political Science
PHYS 5591. Independent Study. (1-3 cr [max 6 cr]; S-N or Aud. Prereq-Consent of
director of graduate studies, #)
Special studies, useful in individual graduate programs, not
availablein regular course offerings.
PHYS 5594. Physics Research. (1-3 cr [max 6 cr]; S-N or Aud. Prereq-#)
Physics Research
PHYS 8333. FTE: Master’s. (1 cr; No grade. Prereq-Master s student, adviser and
DGS consent)
PHYS 8777. Thesis Credits: Master’s. (1-18 cr [max 50 cr]; No grade. Prereq-Max
18 cr per semester or summer; 10 cr total required (Plan A only))
Political Science (POL)
College of Liberal Arts
POL 1011. American Government and Politics. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. LE 6)
Principles of American national government. Survey of
American governmental system, structure, operations, and
services; constitutionalism, federalism, civil liberties, parties,
pressure groups, and elections.
POL 1050. International Relations. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. LEIP 08)
Introduction to contemporary international politics: levels of
analysis; the international system; nation-state behavior; foreign
policy decision making; economic and defense policy issues.
POL 1195. Special Topics: (Various Titles to be Assigned). (1-4 cr [max 8 cr]; A-F
or Aud)
Contemporary topics in American governmental systems and
processes. Specific course announced in [Class Schedule].
POL 1500. Introduction to Comparative Politics. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. LEIP 06)
Survey of the politics of countries selected to reflect alternative
styles of politics and forms of government; examples of Western
liberal democratic, Communist and post-Communist, and Third
World systems.
POL 1610. Introduction to Political Theory. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. LE 7)
Survey of major contemporary political ideologies: liberalism, conservatism, socialism, Marxism, fascism, feminism,
anarchism, ecologism, and liberation ideologies
POL 2700. Methodology and Analysis. (4 cr; A-F or Aud)
Theory and methods of conducting political research: theory
construction, concept formulation, survey research and sampling design, basic statistical analysis, and measurement of
relationships.
Approaches to policy study, context of policy process, and
discussion of policy issues.
POL 3015. State and Local Government. (4 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-1011, 45 cr or
#; §3020)
State and local governments in the United States; governmental
institutions and processes; intergovernmental relations. Special
reference to Minnesota
POL 3025. Popular Culture and Politics. (4 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-45 cr incl 6 cr
soc sci or #)
Evaluation of the presentation of American political institutions,
officials, and policy issues in mass entertainment. How accurate
are the portrayals? How influential is Hollywood’s view of
American government? How do Americans know what they
think they know about politics?
POL 3040. Women and Politics. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-45 cr or #)
Women’s political status; implications of women’s role in
political process; women as political actors; feminist critique
and vision of politics.
American natural resource problems with special attention
to conservation activities on national, state, and local levels;
development of conservation agencies in Minnesota.
POL 3097. Government Internship. (1-12 cr [max 12 cr]; S-N or Aud. Prereq-60
cr; 4 cr max from 3097, 3197, 3297 may be applied toward advanced Pol major
requirements; #)
Scheduled work assignments with direct supervision in
performance of governmental functions; full- or part-time
employment.
POL 3109. Intern Teaching in Political Science. (1-2 cr [max 3 cr]; S-N or Aud. Prereq-90 cr, Pol major; 3 cr max may be applied to upper div Pol major requirements; #)
Practical experience teaching in Department of Political
Science. Application deadline one week before beginning of
registration for the following semester. Before interning in a
course, students must obtain a grade of at least B+ in the course.
POL 3120. Congress and the Presidency. (4 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-1011, 45 cr
or #)
Functioning and structure of the United States Congress and
Presidency. Members of Congress and the Presidency: their
characteristics, their selection, roles they play, how they interact
with each other as well as with others in the policy-making
process.
POL 3141. American Political Parties. (3 cr; A-F only. Prereq-1011 or equivalent,
45 cr)
History of political parties in the U.S.; the role of parties in the
executive, legislative, and judicial branches of government and
their effect on public policy; party organization; parties at the
state and local level; party competition and third parties.
POL 3142. Voting, Campaigning, and Elections. (3 cr; A-F only. Prereq-1011, 45 cr)
Covers theories of voting, including how they explain who votes
and vote choice. Examines how campaign money, policy issues,
the media, and campaign advertising play a role in presidential
and congressional elections
POL 3150. American Constitutional Law I. (4 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-1011, 45 cr
or #)
Institutional powers and civil rights: judicial review; authority
of Congress and President; powers in war and foreign affairs;
power of national and state governments; property rights; civil
rights and equal protection (race, gender, and other groups);
anti-discrimination; affirmative action.
POL 3151. American Constitutional Law II. (4 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-1011, 45
cr or #)
Course Descriptions
POL 3001. American Public Policy. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-1011, min 45 cr or #)
POL 3080. Environment and Politics. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-1011, 45 cr or #)
Civil liberties: incorporation of the Bill of Rights; Due Process
clause; freedom of religion; freedom of speech; freedom of
press; privacy rights; rights of the accused; search and seizure;
rights before the Courts; cruel and unusual punishment.
POL 3170. Political Interest Groups and Individuals. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq1011, 45 cr or #)
Role of interest groups and individuals who lobby government
to influence public policy. Internal dynamics of groups; strategies of lobbying and its regulation.
POL 3195. Special Topics: (Various Titles to Be Assigned). (1-4 cr [max 8 cr]; A-F or
Aud. Prereq-45 cr incl 6 cr in soc sci or #)
Detailed examination of contemporary topics in political science. Specific course announced in [Class Schedule].
POL 3197. Nongovernmental Internship. (1-12 cr [max 12 cr]; S-N or Aud.
Prereq-60 cr; 4 cr max from 3097, 3197, 3297 may be applied toward advanced Pol
major requirements; #)
Supervised, scheduled work assignments in performance of
political functions in nongovernmental organizations; full- or
part-time employment. Not all outside work is eligible; see
department head for requirements.
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Course Descriptions
POL 3222. The Politics of Bureaucracy. (3 cr; A-F only. Prereq-1011 or equivalent,
45 cr, §3221)
Operations of bureaucratic organizations and their role in government policy making. Capability of modern bureaucracy in
meeting own goal of technical efficiency; impact of bureaucratic
forms of organization on democratic society
POL 3311. Public Opinion and Polling Methods. (4 cr; A-F only. Prereq-1011 or
equivalent, 45 cr)
Formation of public opinion; attitudes and nonattitudes; polls in
the media; role of public opinion in democracy; measurement of
opinion; survey methods; questionnaire construction; sampling
techniques.
POL 3400. Contemporary Issues in World Politics. (4 cr [max 8 cr]; A-F or Aud.
Prereq-1050, 45 cr; 4 cr may be applied toward Pol major requirements)
Detailed examination and analysis of selected contemporary
issues in world politics and international relations. Policy
recommendations dealing with each issue.
POL 3403. American Foreign Policy. (3 cr; A-F only. Prereq-1011 or 1050, 45 cr,
§3402)
Various influences on the making of American foreign policy;
understanding why particular foreign policy choices are made
and the effects of a changing international environment on
American foreign policy.
POL 3451. Theories of International Relations. (4 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-45 cr incl
8 cr soc sci or #)
Historical and contemporary theories of international relations.
Views of contending theorists are analyzed and assessed.
POL 3456. International Security: Theory and Policy. (4 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-45
cr incl 6 cr soc sci or #)
Introduces undergraduates to the principal theories used in
international security studies and to the major security issues
faced by the United States in the post-Cold War world.
POL 3457. Understanding Terrorism and the Terrorist Threat to America. (4 cr;
A-F or Aud. Prereq-30 cr incl 6 cr soc sci or #)
Introduces students to the major causes of terrorism in the Cold
War and post-Cold War worlds and the threats terrorist groups
pose to the United States and its interests around the world.
Course Descriptions
POL 3511. Politics of South Asia . (4 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-1500, 45 cr incl 8 cr
soc sci or #)
experiences, of the rise of their state structures; ideologies;
their transition from agrarian toindustrialization; and how has
this transition impacted their indigenous social cultures and
identities.
POL 3570. Politics of Developing Nations. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-1050 or 1500
or 8 cr soc sci, 45 cr or #)
Nature of political development; individual and institutional
causes and consequences of development; political economy of
Third World.
POL 3600. Political Concepts. (4 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-45 cr or #)
Fundamental political themes and concepts in political theory,
including but not limited to justice, liberty, equality, power,
democracy, political obligation, and community. Perspectives of
diverse political philosophies and cultures may be addressed.
POL 3610. Political Economy: An Introduction. (4 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-45 cr incl
6 cr soc sci or econ or bus or #)
Relationship between politics and economics and ways they affect each other, focusing on political and economic values/goals
and their role in shaping public policy; policies and policy making in selected national systems; the international economy.
POL 3651. Classical Political Thought. (4 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-1610 or #)
Justice and the political community; classical Greek thought
and medieval thought, concentrating on Plato, Aristotle,
Augustine, Aquinas, Machiavelli, and More.
POL 3652. Modern Political Thought. (4 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-1610 or #)
Political thought from the Enlightenment to the present. Works
of major political philosophers, including Hobbes, Locke,
Rousseau, Wollstonecraft, Mill, Marx, and 20th-century
philosophers.
POL 3910. Honors Seminar: Landmarks in Political Science.. (4 cr; A-F or Aud.
Prereq-30 cr, 3.10 GPA in pol courses, %)
Selected books and essays considered to be outstanding
contributions to political science. The works’ arguments and
contribution to political science.
POL 4190. The Senior Seminar. (4 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-6 cr in relevant upper div
pol courses, #)
Supervised research and writing in current areas or issues
of politics and political science, subject matter varying with
instructor.
Comparative study of five South Asian countries (namely India,
Pakistan, Bangladesh, Sri Lanka, and Nepal). It analyzes the
history and impact of colonialism in South Asia; state formations in South Asia; and controversies in recent South Asian
politics over issues like globalization; democratization; religious
fundamentalism; nuclearism; and gender. Policy solutions to
these problems will be considered.
POL 4191. Independent Study. (1-4 cr [max 6 cr]; A-F or Aud. Prereq-8 cr in pol, 6
cr in other soc sci, #)
POL 3515. Theories of Comparative Politics. (4 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-1500, 45 cr
incl 8 cr soc sci or #)
Detailed examination of contemporary topics in political science. Specific course announced in Class Schedule.
Introduces the theoretical, methodological, and substantive
debates in the discipline of Comparative Politics.
Psychology (PSY)
POL 3517. Western European Political Systems. (4 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-45 cr
incl 8 cr soc sci or #)
College of Education and Human Service Professions
Comparative analysis of development and operation of political-governmental institutions and processes in selected Western
European countries; political and ideological patterns and
trends; problems of democratic politics; policy issues in advanced industrial societies and the future of the “welfare state.”
POL 3518. Transitional Politics of Asia. (3 cr; A-F only. Prereq-1500, 3570, or
equivalent, 45 cr)
A comparative study of transitional societies in Asia (i.e.,
societies undergoing political, economic, technological, and
socio-cultural changes--in varying degrees and forms--as part of
their state building projects). Addresses the political economy
of transitional states of Asia such as China, Japan, Korea,
Taiwan, and India. Exploration, in the context of their historical
380
Advanced study and research under supervision of a staff member; student must consult with instructor before registration.
POL 4195. Special Topics: (Various Titles to Be Assigned). (1-4 cr [max 6 cr]; A-F or
Aud. Prereq-45 cr incl 8 cr in soc sci or #)
PSY 1003. General Psychology. (4 cr; A-F or Aud. LE 6)
Scientific study of behavior; current knowledge of biological,
social, and cognitive areas of psychology. Assessment, research
methods, human development, personality, mental disorders,
and therapy.
PSY 2003. Psychology: Discipline and Profession. (1 cr; S-N only. Prereq-Prepsychology or psychology major)
Orientation to psychology: the major, discipline, and professions available. Subfields of psychology, ethical issues,
careers, preparation for graduate school, and opportunities for
Psychology
professional development. Introduction to research, available
resources, and preparation for writing assignments required in
upper-division psychology courses.
PSY 2021. Developmental Psychology. (4 cr; A-F or Aud. LECD 06)
Major processes in human development, conception through
lifespan; biological and cultural influences on physical-motor,
cognitive, social, and emotional development; effects of diverse
cultural traditions and values; social policy implications.
PSY 2023. Marriages and Families Worldwide. (4 cr; A-F or Aud. LEIP 08)
Family functions and structures worldwide; impact of expectations, gender roles, race, culture, and values on partner and
parenting; love, sex, communication, power, abuse, stress, and
satisfaction; small group experiences with focus on strengthening families.
PSY 2223. Gender in Society. (4 cr; A-F or Aud. LECD 08)
Sociocultural, historical, and developmental formations of
men’s and women’s roles and experiences in society. Effects on
personality, interpersonal relationships, and life choices.
PSY 3010. Internship Preparation. (2 cr; A-F only. Prereq-Psy major, #)
For psychology majors preparing to complete an internship.
Includes career development, site selection, exploration of community or business organizations and study of ethics.
PSY 3011. Internship in Psychology. (3 cr [max 6 cr]; A-F only. Prereq-3010, #)
Internship with a school, community agency or business. Nine
hours supervised experience on site and one hour on campus
per week. Students complete an internship contract, weekly log,
relevant readings, and paper or presentation. Includes direct
contact with clients and staff.
PSY 3020. Statistical Methods. (4 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-Elem Algebra, Math
placement test)
Descriptive statistics; introduction to correlational analysis and
regression; sampling techniques and statistical inference; applications of simple and factorial design analysis of variance and
other parametric and nonparametric hypothesis-test statistics in
the behavioral sciences.
PSY 3021. Experimental Design and Methodology. (4 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-3020)
Introduction to problems and methods of experimentation
in psychology; logical and scientific basis of experimental
psychology; problems and techniques of designing, conducting,
and reporting experiments. (3 hrs lect, 1 hr lab)
PSY 3022. Applied Methods and Measurement. (4 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-3020,
3021, #)
PSY 3061. Physiological Psychology. (4 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-4 cr Psy or #)
Physiological basis of behavior, including central and peripheral
nervous systems, sensory processes as they relate to perception,
cognition, emotion, motivation, intelligence, and learning.
PSY 3081. History and Systems of Psychology. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-3 cr Psy)
Survey of historical development and current status of contemporary systems and theories in psychology.
PSY 3098. The Psychological Principles of Stress Management. (3 cr; A-F or
Aud)
Examines the psychological principles applicable to stress management and holistic life management. Advanced experiential
application of a wide spectrum of approaches integrating the
mental, physical, and spiritual characteristics of wellbeing.
PSY 3111. Theories of Personality. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-3 cr Psy)
Basic concepts, issues, and methods involved in study of human personality; introduction to selected theories on motives,
dynamics, development, and description of human nature.
Religious beliefs and their functional value in human life.
Varieties of religious experience and behavior.
PSY 3121. Abnormal Psychology. (4 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-3 cr Psy)
Mental disorders, including DSM-IV classification system,
etiology, and treatment.
PSY 3122. Child and Adolescent Abnormal Psychology. (3 cr; A-F only. Prereq1003, 2021)
Overview of psychological disorders common among children
and adolescents, including theoretical approaches, diagnostic
criteria, developmental trajectory and framework, etiology, risk
and protective factors, and treatment. Ethical considerations,
research methodology, and diversity considerations in child
clinical psychology will also be covered.
PSY 3201. Social Psychology. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-3 cr Psy)
How thoughts, feelings, and behavior of individuals are affected
by others. Social influence and interaction. Attitude measurement and change, conformity, impression formation, attribution
theory, aggression, and prosocial behavior.
PSY 3211. Group Dynamics. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-3 cr Psy)
Principles and processes of interaction in groups; structure and
functioning of groups; leadership, communication, decision
making, social influence; aspects of sensitivity training.
PSY 3215. Topics in Human Sexuality. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-§3216; 3 cr Psy)
Biological and psychosocial factors relating to human sexuality,
sexual functioning, gender, and related issues. Group discussion
of societal factors, values, and attitudes and their impact on
behavior.
PSY 3231. Psychology of Drug Use. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-3 cr Psy)
Basic understanding of drug effects: tolerance and withdrawal;
commonality among drugs of abuse; how antischizophrenic,
antimanic, antianxiety, and antidepressant drugs are thought to
work; reward centers in brain.
PSY 3371. Child and Adolescent Psychology. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-1003)
Growth of individual and social forms of human behavior.
Interaction of heredity and environment on physical, intellectual, social, and emotional changes from conception to
adulthood.
PSY 3381. Adult Development and Aging. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-2021 or #)
Change and continuity in physiological, psychological, and
sociocultural development in early, middle, and late adulthood;
theories and research on effects of demographics, cohort, race,
ethnicity, gender, culture, family, friends, work, health, education, housing, public policies; dying, grief, bereavement.
PSY 3445. Transpersonal Psychology. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-1003 or #)
Branch of psychology that studies spiritual and transcendental
experiences. Concerned with the whole of being, it recognizes
potential for a variety of states of consciousness; it acknowledges developmental psychology and draws further insights from
the spiritual dimensions of human beings. Lab fee.
PSY 3450. Dreamwork. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-3 cr Psy)
Historical perspective and theoretical overview of dreamwork.
May include such theorists as Freud, Jung, Perls, Gendlin,
and Ullman. Focuses on creative use of dreams as symbolic
knowledge.
PSY 3520. Introduction to Industrial/Organizational Psychology. (4 cr; A-F or
Aud. Prereq-§Psy 3701 and/or Psy 3707, 3 cr psy or #)
Introduction to the field of industrial/organizational psychology.
Major content areas within the field will be covered, including
selection, training, performance evaluation, motivation, work
stress, organizational culture, teams, and leadership.
381
Course Descriptions
Designing, conducting, and reporting experiments; constructing, choosing, and interpreting psychological instruments;
experimental procedures and research findings from various
areas within psychology. (3 hrs lecture, 1 hr lab)
PSY 3112. Psychology of Religion. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-Upper div standing,
strong interest in scientific study of religious experience and behavior)
Course Descriptions
PSY 3524. Basic Helping Skills. (4 cr; A-F or Aud)
PSY 3760. Work and Self. (4 cr; A-F or Aud)
Rationale for and practice of basic skills needed for effective
interpersonal helping.
Examines how work affects various aspects of the self. Issues
include effects of corporate culture on identity, routinized work,
physical health and safety, emotional labor, organizational ethics and justice, as well as the social and psychological meanings
that work provides.
PSY 3527. Psychology and Social Responsibility. (4 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-3 cr
Psy)
How psychological development and psychological problems
are influenced by political, social, economic, and other global
issues. Designed to increase social and political awareness,
broaden perspective of psychology, and promote social responsibility and activism. Includes field trips. Lab fee.
PSY 3540. Psychology of Food Abuse. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-3 cr Psy)
Concentrated study using original writings on major issue or by
person with historical or theoretical importance within psychology. Bibliography, individual paper, and group project required.
Basic understanding of eating disorders: obesity, binge eating,
anorexia, bulimia, and social, psychological, and physical
influences on normal and abnormal eating. Social evaluation
of obesity.
PSY 3990. Special Topics: (Various Titles to be Assigned). (1-3 cr [max 3 cr]; A-F or
Aud. Prereq-3 cr Psy)
PSY 3601. Psychology of Personal Development. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-3 cr
Psy)
PSY 3991. Projects in Psychology. (1-4 cr [max 4 cr]; S-N or Aud. Prereq-Psy major
or minor, #)
Focuses on discovery of self and spiritual journey. Examines
personal development by exploring ways to change, grow, and
achieve creative potential. Individual and group counseling experiences required to increase self-awareness and
self-knowledge.
Supervised practical experience in University or community
activities to gain experience in application of psychological
principles and techniques; written report required.
PSY 3611. Learning and Behavior. (4 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-3 cr Psy)
Research problem chosen by instructor; written report required.
Study of basic learning and behavior processes including the
evolution of behavior, pavlovian conditioning, instrumental
learning, and elementary cognitive processes.
PSY 3613. Behavior Modification. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-3 cr Psy)
Basic psychological methods, techniques, and findings in applications of operant and respondent conditioning to treatment
of human behavior problems.
PSY 3621. Cognition. (4 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-3 cr Psy)
An overview of cognitive processes, using historical, philosophical, biological and experimental perspectives. Course
topics include attention, perception, knowledge representation
memory, language, thinking, reasoning, and decision-making.
PSY 3631. Cognitive Development: Ways of Knowing. (3 cr; A-F or Aud)
Development of cognitive processes from infancy through
adolescence. Perception in infancy; development of information
processing capacities; constructing understandings; language,
culture and thinking; thinking as theory building; thinking about
self and others. Impact of research on child rearing, education,
public policy.
Course Descriptions
PSY 3985. Honors Seminar in Psychology. (2 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-3021, Psy
major with 60 cr, 3.00 GPA overall, 3.25 GPA in psy, #)
PSY 3661. Psychology of Language. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-3 cr Psy)
Psychological processes underlying comprehension, production,
and acquisition of language(s); cognitive, social, biological, and
educational perspectives on language and their applications.
PSY 3691. Sensation and Perception. (4 cr; A-F or Aud)
Theories, methods, and findings in study of sensory and perceptual processes; psychophysics and psychophysiology of visual,
auditory, gustatory, olfactory, cutaneous, kinesthetic, vestibular,
and pain senses; analysis of perceptions of constancy, illusion,
space, time, motion, and form.
PSY 3701. Personnel Psychology. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-3 cr Psy)
Introduction to personnel psychology. Testing, selection,
performance appraisal, job analysis, job evaluation, validity
issues in organizational settings, discrimination, and affirmative
action programs.
PSY 3707. Organizational Psychology. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-3 cr Psy)
Overview of organizational topics within industrial/organizational psychology. Leadership, job satisfaction, motivation
theories, goal setting, organizational behavior, organizational
development, and industrial relations.
382
Developed by psychology faculty in their expertise areas to
instruct on selected advanced and current topics.
PSY 3994. Directed Research in Psychology. (1-4 cr [max 4 cr]; S-N or Aud.
Prereq-Psy major or minor, #)
PSY 3995. Research in Psychology. (1-4 cr [max 4 cr]; A-F or Aud. Prereq-Psy
major or minor, #)
Intensive independent empirical research on problem in psychology chosen by student; research report required.
PSY 3996. Pre-Professional Field Placement. (1-4 cr [max 4 cr]; S-N only. Prereq3010, [P]3011, #)
Preprofessional field placement. For students wishing additional
internship experience. Requires additional 3 hours per week
of supervised experience on site for each credit. Must be taken
with Psy 3011 Internship in Psychology.
PSY 3997. Honors Project in Psychology. (1-3 cr [max 3 cr]; A-F or Aud. Prereq-Psy
major, #, 3.00 GPA overall, 3.25 GPA in psy)
Advanced individual project demonstrating application of psychological principles based on sound theoretical and research
foundations. A psychology faculty adviser, written report, and
oral examination required.
PSY 3998. Honors Research in Psychology. (1-3 cr [max 3 cr]; A-F or Aud. PrereqPsy major, #, 3.00 GPA overall, 3.25 GPA in psy)
Advanced independent empirical research project proposed and
conducted by student with psychology faculty adviser. Project
must receive Human Use Committee approval and be reported
in American Psychological Association publication style.
PSY 3999. Directed Instruction. (1-4 cr [max 4 cr]; Stdnt Opt. Prereq-#)
Students work with department faculty in planning and helping
teach an undergraduate course.
PSY 4021. Research Methods I. (4 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-3020, #; no Grad School
cr)
Provides an overview of research methods in psychology; logical and scientific basis of experimental psychology; problems
and techniques of designing, conducting and reporting experiments; selecting and constructing psychological instruments, a
review of statistics and how to design a research project.
PSY 4022. Research Methods II. (4 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-4021, #; no Grad School
cr)
Discusses research methodology as it is applied within different
areas of psychology. Reviews statistics and introduces the use of
statistical software (e.g.,SPSS). Provides an overview of testing
and measurement and research ethics.
Psychology
PSY 4023. Research Methods III. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-4022, #; no Grad School
cr)
PSY 5125. Biological Bases of Behavior, Psychopathology, and Pharmacotherapeutics. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-Sr or Grad Student or #)
Emphasizes designing and conducting a study, analyzing data,
and interpreting and reporting the results.
Biological bases of normal cognition, emotionality, social interactions, and motor control; biological reasons for disturbances;
rationale and mode of action of various pharmacotherapeutic
compounds for treatment; areas of interest include schizophrenia, depression, psychomotor epilepsy, drug abuse, and
addiction.
PSY 4121. Foundations of Clinical Psychology. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-3121,
no Grad School cr)
An overview of clinical psychology as well as contemporary
issues and trends within the field. Emphasizes areas in which
clinical psychologists are principally involved, including assessment, treatment, and clinical research.
PSY 4500. Health Psychology. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-1003, 12 sem cr in psy or #)
Concepts, issues, and methods of health psychology; health
maintenance and illness prevention integrating biological,
psychological, and social factors; utilization of health psychological assessments; and interdisciplinary aspects of health
psychology.
PSY 5001. Transpersonal Development. (3 cr; Stdnt Opt)
Transpersonal perspectives of counseling, religions, and
philosophies, including Sufism, Buddhism, Zen, Taoism, Native
American spirituality, and Christianity. Includes experiential
activities such as group interaction, meditation journaling, and
vision quests.
PSY 5051. Research Methods and Measurement in Psychology. (3 cr; A-F or
Aud. Prereq-Grad student or #)
PSY 5130. Evolutionary Psychology. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-1003, 3020 or #)
Evolution and the theory of natural selection as it applies to
behavioral processes, e.g., survival, mating strategies, parenting
and family, cooperation and conflict.
PSY 5131. Mind-Body Connection. (3 cr; A-F or Aud)
Examination of interface between biological and psychological development associated with risks for substance abuse,
depression, and conduct disorders; potential commonality of
mechanisms. Topics may include communication between brain
and endocrine systems, evolution of the brain, homosexuality,
psychoneuroimmunology, and psychopharmacology.
PSY 5155. Forensic Psychology. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-1003 or #)
Examines the application of psychology to the judicial system
in such diverse areas as criminal diversion and rehabilitation;
expert testimony, jury selection; police training; divorce mediation; and custody evaluations.
Research methods and design for the behavioral sciences;
principles and practices of needs assessment, program evaluation, and individual assessment techniques; ethical and legal
considerations in research and assessment.
PSY 5160. Psychology of Hope. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-1003 or #)
PSY 5052. Advanced Statistical Methods. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-3020, 5051
or #)
PSY 5201. Childhood and Adolescence: Advanced Study. (3 cr; A-F or Aud.
Prereq-2021 or 3371, sr or Grad Student or #)
Advanced parametric and nonparametric statistics; application
of variance, covariance, and linear regression analyses to a variety of multilevel and factorial research designs; psychometric
statistics; computer-based data management; ethical and legal
considerations.
Current theories and research on physical, cognitive, social, and
emotional development of children and adolescents in selected
areas worldwide; influences on learning, decision making, academic and career needs, risk, resilience; assessment, advocacy
for problem prevention/intervention, counseling, legal, and
ethical issues.
PSY 5061. Research Problems I. (1-2 cr [max 2 cr]; S-N or Aud)
Application of principles and procedures of research methods,
needs assessments, and program evaluations; integration of
research concepts with counseling problems through guided
study and practice; ethical and legal considerations. Partially
fulfills Plan B requirement.
PSY 5062. Research Problems II. (1-2 cr [max 2 cr]; S-N or Aud. Prereq-5061 or #)
PSY 5098. Psychological Transformation and the Spiritual Journey. (3 cr; A-F or
Aud. Prereq-3445 or 5001 or 3601 or #)
Explores how psychological change develops and proceeds
leading to self-realization and the emergence of the self
including experiential activities designed to deepen the human
experience. May be offered as a retreat.
PSY 5121. Psychopathology Over the Lifespan. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-3121 or
Grad Student or #)
Abnormal behavior in childhood, adolescence, and adulthood;
development, classification, etiology, methods of assessment,
treatment, and prevention; ethical considerations.
PSY 5123. Psychology of Addictive Behaviors. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-Sr or grad
student or #)
PSY 5455. Jungian Psychology. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-1003 or 2021 0r 3081
or #)
Examines the primary theories and research of C. G. Jung. To
include a thorough study of the purposive nature of individual
psychological development, personality typologies, and the
Jung’s structure of the psyche: archetypes, anima/animus,
shadow, collective unconscious.
PSY 5603. Cultural and Family Counseling: Theories and Techniques. (3 cr; A-F
or Aud. Prereq-Couns psy or soc work grad or #)
Theory, practice, and assessment of cultural and family counseling; systems, intergenerational, structural, communication, and
strategic theories. Influences of gender, sexuality, race, ethnicity,
socioeconomic status, age, physical disability, family patterns,
language, intellectual ability, and other micro, macro, and exosystems. Ethical and legal considerations.
PSY 5611. Behavior and Cognitive Therapy Approaches. (3 cr; A-F or Aud.
Prereq-Grad Student or Psy 3611 or #)
Selected therapeutic applications of learning principles to
human behavior, including principles of cognitive therapies
and behavior-based counseling techniques. Ethical, legal, and
cultural considerations.
PSY 5990. Special Topics: (Various Titles to be Assigned). (1-4 cr [max 8 cr]; A-F or
Aud. Prereq-Sr or grad student or #)
Analysis of selected advanced topics in psychology and/or
counseling.
Examination of a wide spectrum of addictive behaviors, including drug addictions and process addictions, such as gambling,
compulsive buying, and compulsive eating. Evaluation and
treatment approaches.
383
Course Descriptions
Advanced application of principles and procedures of research
methods, needs assessment, program evaluation, and statistics;
integration of research concepts with counseling problems;
analysis, conclusions, and dissemination of research. Written
report and oral exam required; completes fulfillment of Plan B
requirement.
Examines human behavior from a positivistic perspective,
examing what works well for individuals, behaviorally, emotionally, psychologically, and how to expand on it.
Course Descriptions
PSY 5992. Directed Reading. (1-4 cr [max 4 cr]; Stdnt Opt. Prereq-Grad student, #)
Readings in student’s area of interest with faculty approval and
direction; study to substantially further student’s knowledge
base of theory, research, and/or professional competencies; written report required.
PSY 5993. Directed Study: Psychology and Counseling. (1-4 cr [max 8 cr]; Stdnt
Opt. Prereq-Grad student, #)
Individual in-depth explorations of psychological and/or counseling theories and principles approved and guided by faculty.
PSY 5994. Directed Research. (1-4 cr [max 4 cr]; Stdnt Opt. Prereq-5051 or equiv,
#)
Advanced individual research with faculty approval and
direction; demonstration of sound theoretical foundations and
research skills resulting in written report.
PSY 8005. Ethical and Professional Issues in School Counseling. (2 cr; A-F or
Aud. Prereq-Couns psy grad major or #)
Ethical and legal considerations in school counseling. History
and philosophy of school counseling, current trends, and professional issues. Role and functions of school counselor contrasted
with those of other professionals such as school psychologist or
social worker. Program planning, management, and evaluation.
PSY 8101. Practicum: Developmental Outreach and Counseling. (2 cr; S-N or
Aud. Prereq-5501, 5601, 5603, couns psy grad major or %)
Practice in individual and group counseling on UMD campus
and other sites. Includes weekly one-to-one supervision and
group supervision. Videotaping required.
PSY 8197. Internship I: Group Counseling in the Community. (3-6 cr [max 6 cr];
S-N or Aud. Prereq-8001, 8101, %)
Supervised practice of counseling skills with focus on group
counseling at a community site. Videotaping required.
PSY 8297. Internship II: Individual Counseling in the Community. (3-6 cr [max 6
cr]; S-N or Aud. Prereq-8101, 8111, %)
Supervised practice of counseling skills with focus on individual counseling at a community site. Videotaping required.
PSY 8333. FTE: Master’s. (1 cr; No grade. Prereq-Master’s student, adviser and
DGS consent)
PSY 8597. Internship I: Group Counseling in Schools, K-8. (3-6 cr [max 6 cr]; S-N
or Aud. Prereq-8101, %)
Supervised practice of counseling skills with focus on group
counseling at a school site in grades K-8. Videotaping required.
Course Descriptions
PSY 8697. Internship II: Individual Counseling in Schools, K-8. (3-6 cr [max 6
cr]; S-N or Aud. Prereq-8005, 8101, 8131, %)
Supervised practice of counseling skills with focus on individual counseling at a school site in grades K-8. Videotaping
required.
PSY 8797. Internship I: Group Counseling in Schools, 5-12. (3-6 cr [max 6 cr];
S-N or Aud. Prereq-8005, 8101, %)
Supervised practice of counseling skills with focus on group
counselingat a school site in grades 5-12. Videotaping required.
PSY 8897. Internship II: Individual Counseling in Schools, 5-12. (3-6 cr [max 6
cr]; S-N or Aud. Prereq-8005, 8101, 8797, %)
Supervised practice of counseling skills with focus on individual counseling at a school site in grades 5-12. Videotaping
required.
Recreation (REC)
College of Education and Human Service Professions
REC 1000. Introduction to Recreation. (4 cr; A-F or Aud)
Overview of recreation and leisure and its impact on modern
society.
REC 1201. Outdoor Skills I. (2 cr; A-F or Aud. PE)
Instruction and practice in skills of fall outdoor activities.
Camping, canoeing, hunting, and climbing; equipment, shelters,
and navigation.
REC 1202. Outdoor Skills II. (2 cr; A-F or Aud. PE)
Instruction and practice in skills of winter and spring outdoor
activities. Camping, backpacking, dogsledding, and fishing;
equipment and navigation.
REC 1203. Outdoor Skills I. (2 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-Pre-rec, rec major or minor)
Instruction and practice in skills of fall outdoor activities.
Camping, canoeing, fishing, hunting, and climbing; equipment,
shelters, and navigation.
REC 1204. Outdoor Skills II. (2 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-Pre rec or rec major or minor
or #)
Instruction and practice in skills of winter and spring outdoor
activities. Camping, backpacking, dogsledding, and fishing;
equipment and navigation.
REC 2300. Recreation Programming. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-1000 or #)
Designing, presenting, and evaluating recreation programs.
Components of planning, such as facilities management and
equipment procurement. Leadership practices pertaining to
outdoor education programs.
REC 3320. Recreational Sports. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-2300 or #)
Organization and administration of intramural and formal sport
programs in a recreational sport agency.
REC 3327. Large Event Management. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-2300 or #)
Organization and administration of life fitness activities and
nonformal instruction in recreational sport programs. Design,
implementation, and evaluation of large-scale recreational
sports events such as triathlons and tournaments.
REC 3330. Outdoor Recreation. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-2300 or #)
Examination of outdoor recreation as a part of natural resource
based agencies as well as in nature centers, commercial operations, and in municipal settings. This course will focus on
outdoor recreation uses in Northeastern Minnesota.
REC 4320. GIS Management for Recreation Professionals. (3 cr; Stdnt Opt.
Prereq-No Grad School credit)
Using G.I.S. mapping techniques for recreation and outdoor
education professionals in resource management decisions. The
use of Arcview and Landview software will be used to visualize
and analyze landscapes. This course is specific to recreation
and/or outdoor education professionals.
REC 4991. Independent Study. (1-4 cr [max 4 cr]; A-F or Aud. Prereq-#; no Grad
School credit)
Independent project that would serve to further the student’s
knowledge base and/or professional competencies.
REC 4992. Readings in Recreation. (1-4 cr [max 4 cr]; A-F or Aud. Prereq-#; no
Grad School credit)
Complementary readings and discussion in student’s area of
interest with faculty supervision.
REC 4997. Recreation Practicum. (3 cr; S-N only. Prereq-1000, rec minor; no Grad
School credit)
Field-based experience through a selected recreation agency.
384
Safety
Russian (RUSS)
SAFE 6121. Epidemiology and Industrial Toxicology. (2 cr; A-F or Aud. PrereqMEHS student or %; can apply credit to MEHS program only)
College of Liberal Arts
Introduction to principles and practice of toxicology as it relates
to chemical hazards in the workplace. Interpretation and assessment of data and potential risk. Derivation and application of
guidelines and regulations concerning toxic chemicals.
RUSS 1101. Beginning Russian I. (4 cr; A-F or Aud. LE 3)
Grammar, reading, and conversation for students with no previous knowledge of Russian.
RUSS 1102. Beginning Russian II. (4 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-1101 or equiv or # LE 3)
Grammar, reading, and conversation.
SAFE 6201. Fire Prevention and Emergency Preparedness. (2 cr; A-F or Aud.
Prereq-MEHS student or %; can apply credit to MEHS program only)
College of Science and Engineering
Hazard analysis and risk assessment as related to prevention
and control of undesired fires; analytical study of flammable
materials and extinguishing systems found in industrial settings;
organization and development of emergency preparedness
programs.
SAFE 6002. Regulatory Standards and Hazard Control. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. PrereqMEHS student or BSIE candidate and % or BSME candidate and % or #)
SAFE 6211. Transportation Safety. (2 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-MEHS student or %;
can apply credit to MEHS program only)
Overview of OSHA and other health and safety standards, codes
and regulations with an emphasis on the recognition and control
of workplace hazards as defined by the standards, codes and
regulations.
Study of health and safety programs used in rail, road, air, and
marine transportation, emphasizing fleet safety programs.
SAFE 6011. System Safety and Loss Control Techniques. (3 cr; A-F or Aud.
Prereq-MEHS student or %; can apply credit to MEHS program only)
A multi-disciplinary approach to a comprehensive introduction to the principles of noise and noise conservation (hygiene,
safety, acoustics, audiology, occupational medicine, engineering, behavioral and legal). Emphasis will be on noise control
engineering protocols. Lab arranged.
Safety (SAFE)
Analytical techniques of data collection, data analysis, and risk
assessment in designing and implementing proactive system
safety processes. Comprehensive approach to cost reduction and
containment processes and programs, which minimize financial
and accidental losses. Lab arranged.
SAFE 6012. Risk Management and Workers’ Compensation. (2 cr; A-F or Aud.
Prereq-MEHS student or %; can apply credit to MEHS program only)
Comprehensive overview of risk management strategies and
insurance system; essential elements of workers’ compensation
cost reduction and containment programs in industry. Workers’
compensation and occupational safety in preventing corporate
financial losses. Lab arranged.
SAFE 6051. Construction Safety. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-MEHS student or BSIE
and % or BSME cand and % or #)
Code of Federal Regulations 1926 and other standards and
regulations that affect construction industry. Emphasis on recognition, analysis, and corrective action. Principles of construction
safety management, project implementation, and subcontractors
management. Lab arranged.
SAFE 6101. Principles of Industrial Hygiene. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-MEHS
student or %; can apply credit to MEHS program only)
SAFE 6102. Advanced Industrial Hygiene and Health Physics. (2 cr; A-F or Aud.
Prereq-6101 or %; can apply credit to MEHS program only)
Recognition, evaluation, and control techniques necessary for
prevention of occupationally related diseases. Introduction
to health hazards of radiated energy such as ionizing nuclear
radiation and x-rays; nonionizing radiation hazards from microwaves, lasers, and infrared and ultraviolet light. Lab arranged.
SAFE 6111. Industrial Noise and Ventilation Control. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. PrereqMEHS student or %; can apply credit to MEHS program only)
Physics of sound, industrial noise sources, effects of noise on
humans, and noise control. Basic principles of ventilation as
applied to control of air contaminants; elementary principles of
design for exhaust ventilation systems; and fan specifications.
Lab applications.
SAFE 6213. Principles of Ventilation and Indoor Air Quality. (3 cr; A-F or Aud.
Prereq-MEHS student or %; can apply credit to MEHS program only)
Comprehensive introduction on design, maintenance, and evaluation of exhaust ventilation systems. Methodology for conducting indoor air quality investigations. Lab arranged.
SAFE 6291. Independent Study in Industrial Safety. (1-3 cr [max 3 cr]; S-N or Aud.
Prereq-MEHS student or %; can apply credit to MEHS program only)
Special projects, field studies, or research in industrial hygiene
or safety topics
SAFE 6295. Special Topics: (Various Titles to be Assigned). (1-3 cr [max 3 cr]; A-F or
Aud. Prereq-MEHS student or %; can apply credit to MEHS program only)
Selected topics in industrial safety or hygiene. Similar topics
may not be repeated for credit.
SAFE 6301. Occupational Biomechanics and Work Physiology. (2 cr; A-F or Aud.
Prereq-MEHS student or %; can apply credit to MEHS program only)
Overview to study physical interaction of workers with their
tools, machines, and materials so as to enhance workers’
performance while minimizing risk of future musculoskeletal
disorders. Lab arranged.
SAFE 6302. Occupational Ergonomics and Injury Management. (3 cr; A-F or Aud.
Prereq-MEHS student or %; can apply credit to MEHS program only)
Overview of occupational ergonomics and related disciplines
such as work physiology, biomechanics, human anatomy,
engineering design, medical management. Hands-on approach,
including ergonomic job analysis, risk factor quantification, and
documentation for demanding tasks. Lab arranged.
SAFE 6401. Environmental Safety and Legal Implications. (2 cr; A-F or Aud.
Prereq-MEHS student or %; can apply credit to MEHS program only)
Federal, state, and local laws and judicial interpretations that
have applications to environmental health and safety programs.
Corporate responsibility regarding environment, employee, and
product.
SAFE 6402. Environmental Control Operations and Design. (2 cr; A-F or Aud.
Prereq-6401 or %, MEHS student; can apply cr to MEHS program only)
Focus is on design and use of equipment used to control
environmental pollution in industry and municipalities. Takes
a multimedia approach looking at applications in air pollution,
water/wastewater and solid/hazardous wastes. Lab arranged.
385
Course Descriptions
Effects of chemical, physical, and biological agents on the body
and typical methods of control; lab use of monitoring and corrective devices.Lab arranged.
SAFE 6212. Noise Control Engineering. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-MEHS student or
%; can apply credit to MEHS program only)
Course Descriptions
SAFE 6802. Leadership, Teamwork, and Behavior in EHS. (3 cr; A-F or Aud.
Prereq-MEHS student or %; can apply credit to MEHS program only)
SW 5032. Child Welfare and the Law. (2 cr; A-F only. Prereq-Jr or sr or grad student
or #)
Behavior-based approach to EHS as characterized by effective
leadership, teamwork, and employment of principles which create a culture in which workers are motivated to promote a safe
and healthful environment. Applied projects and activities based
on actual industrial situations. Lab arranged.
Intensive advanced course in the federal, state, and tribal laws
and court processes regulating child welfare practice. Includes
laws and procedures and the role of the social worker in legal
proceedings.
SAFE 6821. Organization and Administration of Safety Programs. (2 cr; A-F or
Aud. Prereq-MEHS student or %; can apply credit to MEHS program only)
Current administrative practices. Involvement in design and development of safety programs suitable for an industrial facility.
SAFE 6997. Internship in Environmental Health and Safety. (3 cr; S-N or Aud.
Prereq-MEHS student or %; can apply credit to MEHS program only)
Cooperative internship in an industrial, governmental, or other
organization that has an established safety program or is in the
process of implementing one. Requires a significant Plan B-type
project for the firm.
Science (SCI)
College of Science and Engineering
SCI 3351. Chemistry for High School Teachers I. (2 cr; Stdnt Opt. Prereq-%)
Complete participation in Chem 2521--Organic Chemistry I
required. Library research paper and special problems assigned.
Lab includes experiments of particular importance to high
school chemistry. (4 hrs lect, 3 hrs lab; offered summer only)
SCI 3352. Chemistry for High School Teachers II. (2 cr; Stdnt Opt. Prereq-%)
Complete participation in Chem 2522--Organic Chemistry II
required. Library research paper and special problems assigned.
Lab assignments include experiments of particular importance
to high school chemistry. (4 hrs lect, 3 hrs lab; offered summer
only)
Social Work (SW)
College of Education and Human Service Professions
SW 1210. Global Issues. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-§1211 or 1212. LEIP 08)
Course Descriptions
Global problems of war, peace, national security; population,
food, hunger; environmental concerns, global resources; economic and social development; human rights. Examines issues
from a global problem-solving perspective. Value, race, class,
gender differences.
SW 1211. Freshman Seminar: Global Issues. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-Freshman,
fewer than 30 cr, §1210 or 1212 LEIP 08)
Global problems of war, peace, and national security; population, food, and hunger; environmental concerns and global
resources; economic and social development; human rights.
Examination of issues from systems, problem solving, and
futurist perspectives in seminar format. Consideration of value,
race, class, and gender differences.
SW 1212. Global Issues Honors Seminar. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-honors student,
§1210 or 1211 LEIP 08)
Focus on global problems of war, peace, and national security;
population, food, and hunger; environmental concerns and
global resources; economic and social development; human
rights. Examination of issues from systems, problem solving,
and futurist perspectives in honors seminar format.
SW 1619. Race, Class, and Gender in the United States. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. LECD
08)
Race, class, and gender as pivotal dimensions in American society. Similarities and differences between groups, dynamics of
discrimination, and efforts to meet needs and achieve potential
for all groups in America.
386
SW 5061. Computers in the Human Services. (1-2 cr [max 2 cr]; Stdnt Opt. PrereqJr or sr or grad student or #)
Overview of computers in the human services, including word
processing, spreadsheets, databases, communication, and
internet.
SW 5091. Independent Study. (1-4 cr [max 8 cr]; Stdnt Opt. Prereq-#)
Directed reading, research, or other experiences leading to
presentation of a report.
SW 5095. Special Topics: (Various Titles to be Assigned). (1-4 cr [max 12 cr]; Stdnt
Opt)
Proseminar on contemporary topics of concern to students and
faculty. Topics announced in Class Schedule.
SW 5096. Special Project. (1-4 cr [max 8 cr]; S-N or Aud. Prereq-#)
Approval of faculty sponsor and field coordinator required to
do a project in generalist or advanced generalist social work
practice. Project may closely coordinate with another course or
may be an independent area of interest.
SW 5101. Human Behavior in the Social Environment. (3 cr; A-F only. Prereq-Jr
or sr or Grad or #)
Overview of social psychological and social systems concepts.
Applications of concepts to social work and human service
issues. Focus on individuals, human development, families,
groups, organizations, communities, and society/culture.
SW 5111. Grant Writing in the Human Services. (1-2 cr [max 2 cr]; A-F only.
Prereq-Jr or sr or Grad or #)
Step-by-step development of grant planning and grant writing.
Sources of grants: private foundations and public agencies.
Needs assessment methodologies, budgeting, and program
evaluation.
SW 5201. Social Welfare Policy. (3 cr; A-F only. Prereq-Jr or sr or Grad or #)
Historical development of field of social welfare in the United
States and emergence of social work profession. Social policy
analysis techniques and ways to influence social policy and
vulnerable/minority issues.
SW 5222. Intervention in Family Violence. (1-2 cr [max 2 cr]; A-F only. Prereq-Jr or
sr or grad student or #)
Current theory, research, and practice in field of family violence. Multidisciplinary assessment and intervention skills for
working with families with diverse backgrounds.
SW 5235. American Indians and Social Policy. (2 cr; A-F only. Prereq-5201 or
advanced standing MSW program or #)
Informs human service providers of policies affecting American
Indians, including relationships of tribal governments with
the United States and Minnesota governments, the interface
between Indian and non-Indian service delivery systems, and
Indian culture and politics.
SW 5271. Women and Social Policy. (2 cr; A-F only. Prereq-Jr or sr or Grad or #)
Policies affecting the well-being of women; strategies for
better meeting women’s needs. Focuses on policies that affect
women’s roles and statuses within the domestic unit and within
larger economic and political spheres.
Social Work
SW 8021. Methods of Clinical Social Work Practice. (1-2 cr [max 2 cr]; A-F only.
Prereq-8111 or admission to advanced standing MSW program)
SW 8333. FTE: Master’s. (1 cr; No grade. Prereq-Master’s student, adviser and DGS
consent)
Advanced skill development in clinical assessment and intervention. Through an ecologically based framework, students
learn how to address a wide variety of micro-level problems
involving many different populations. Social work applications
of the DSM-IV.
SW 8441. Individual, Family and Group Practice II. (3 cr; A-F only. Prereq-5101,
8112 or advanced standing MSW student)
SW 8031. Advanced Practice in Child Welfare. (2-3 cr [max 3 cr]; A-F only.
Prereq-5032, 8441)
Advanced skill development in assessment, intervention, and
evaluation in relationship to direct child welfare social work
practice.
SW 8051. School Social Work. (1-2 cr [max 2 cr]; A-F only. Prereq-Soc work grad
student or #)
Overview of social work practice in educational settings, roles
and functions of social workers within a complex ecological
system, and skills and knowledge needed by social workers in
a school setting.
SW 8100. Social Work with Diverse Populations. (3 cr; A-F only. Prereq-MSW
students or #)
Examines societal issues generated by systemic discrimination
and explores methods for reducing discrimination. Particular focus on advanced social work practice with diverse populations.
SW 8101. Introduction to Research. (2 cr; A-F only. Prereq-SW Grad School student
or #)
Introduction to social science research and its applications to
social work and social welfare.
SW 8102. Advanced Research. (3 cr; A-F only. Prereq-8101 or admission to
advanced standing MSW program)
Application of social science knowledge and skills to evaluate
practice and to conduct community-based research and program
evaluation projects. Develop a research proposal.
SW 8104. Project Seminar II. (1 cr; S-N only. Prereq-8103)
Application of research knowledge and skills to final stages of
master’s research project. Data collection and analysis procedures applied to the Plan B paper.
SW 8111. Individual, Family and Group Practice I. (3 cr; A-F only. Prereq-SW grad
student or #)
Overview of generalist social work practice, ethics, ecological perspective, and problem-solving model. Application to
individuals, families, and groups and to diverse populations.
Development of counseling skills.
Using a problem-solving model and the ecological and strengths
perspectives, students develop assessment and interventions
skills for effective practice with organizations and community. Topics include using supervision, facilitating meetings,
advocacy, cultural competence, and promoting organizational
and community change.
SW 8331. Organization and Community Practice II. (3 cr; A-F only. Prereq-5101,
8112 or Advanced Standing in MSW program)
Prepares students for advanced practice in organizations and
communities. It provides a framework for assessing and intervening in organizational and communities using an asset-based
and problem-solving approach. Specific strategies and tactics
for strengthening organizations and communities are addressed.
SW 8332. Advanced Practice in Administration and Community Development.
(2-3 cr [max 3 cr]; A-F only. Prereq-8331)
SW 8442. Advanced Group Work. (1-2 cr [max 2 cr]; A-F only. Prereq-8441)
Conceptual knowledge and applied experiences needed to
lead groups in a variety of social work settings serving diverse
populations. Treatment groups and task groups (on both the
organizational and community levels). Builds on the advanced
generalist framework.
SW 8443. Advanced Practice in Mental Health. (2-3 cr [max 3 cr]; A-F only.
Prereq-8441)
Advanced skill development in direct practice social work assessment, intervention, and evaluation in relationship to mental
health issues.
SW 8544. Advanced Practice with Families. (2-3 cr [max 3 cr]; A-F only. Prereq8441)
Advanced skill development in social work assessment, interventions, and evaluations in relationship to families at various
stages across the life span.
SW 8771. Health in American Indian Communities. (2 cr; A-F only. Prereq-5235)
Introduction to historical and contemporary concepts of
American Indian health. Policy issues, cultural and sensitivity knowledge, and practice methods with American Indian
clients and communities at micro, mezzo, and macro levels of
intervention.
SW 8801. Field Placement I. (3-6 cr [max 6 cr]; S-N only. Prereq-8111, 8112; SW
Grad student, #)
Practicum experience with emphasis on developing knowledge
and skill base for “beginning generalist” practice in a community agency. Concurrent seminar assists students in integrating
classroom theories and intervention methodologies with field
experiences. Application to diverse populations.
SW 8802. Field Placement II. (4-8 cr [max 8 cr]; S-N only. Prereq-[P]8031 or 8332
or 8443 or 8544, SW Grad Student and #)
Developing knowledge and skill base for “advanced generalist”
practice in a community agency. Concurrent seminar focuses
on integrating classroom theories and intervention methodologies with experiences with client systems at micro, mezzo,
and macro levels of practice. Attention to vulnerable/minority
issues.
Course Descriptions
SW 8112. Organization and Community Practice I. (3 cr; A-F only. Prereq-8111)
Examines a range of social work practice theories and their
application to practice with individuals, families, and groups.
Advanced skills in assessment and intervention in addressing
complex problems with a focus on micro practice. Application
to diverse populations and settings.
SW 8881. Dynamics of American Indian Families. (2 cr; A-F only. Prereq-5235
or #)
Introduction to traditional and contemporary concepts relating
to American Indian families. Public policy, social problems,
cultural strengths, conflicts, and culturally competent social
work practice.
SW 8991. Practice in the American Indian Community. (2-4 cr [max 4 cr]; S-N
only. Prereq-Soc work grad student, 8771 or 8881, #)
Gives MSW students supervised direct practice experience in
the American Indian community. Application of cultural knowledge and culturally competent practice skills.
This course focuses on application of advanced knowledge and
skills essential for understanding macro practice. Analysis of
organizations and communities is required. Emphasis will be
on analysis of complex social problems and the development of
organizational and community solutions.
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Course Descriptions
Sociology (SOC)
SOC 3156. Qualitative Research Methods and Analysis. (4 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq[[2155 or anth major or urs major or cst minor], at least 60 cr] or #)
College of Liberal Arts
Application of qualitative research methods to study of social
structures. Emphasizes field techniques, secondary data analysis, and interpretation. Lab
SOC 1080. Freshman Seminar: Development of Social Selves. (3 cr; A-F or Aud.
Prereq-Freshman, fewer than 30 credits)
Examines how the self develops. The primary focus is the
socialization process, a process which continues throughout
the life course. Special attention will be given to childhood
and adolescent socialization. How do we learn? How do we
understand behavior? What are the consequences of inadequate
socialization?
SOC 1095. Freshman Seminar: Topics: (Various Titles to be Assigned). (3-4 cr [max
4 cr]; A-F or Aud. Prereq-Freshman, fewer than 30 cr LE 8)
Seminar designed specifically for freshmen.
SOC 1096. Freshman Seminar: Topics (Various Titles to be Assigned). (3-4 cr [max 4
cr]; A-F or Aud. Prereq-Freshman, fewer than 30 cr LECD 08)
Seminar designed specifically for freshmen.
SOC 1101. Introduction to Sociology. (4 cr; A-F or Aud. LECD 06)
Introduction to sociological concepts and their application.
SOC 1201. Sociology of the Family. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. LECD 08)
The family as a basic social institution: similarities and variations in family systems, their interrelationships with other
institutions, and patterns of continuity and change.
SOC 1301. Introduction to Criminology. (4 cr; A-F or Aud. LE 8)
Analysis of social justice with emphasis on criminal justice system in United States. Nature and extent of crime; social factors
related to criminal behavior.
SOC 1400. Alcohol and College Life. (1 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-Freshman status)
Online web class providing first year students with factual information about how alcohol affects college life and reinforces
personal prevention strategies as well as aiming to maximize
student and campus safety. This class cannot count toward a
sociology major or minor.
SOC 2111. Sociological Theory. (4 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-1101, 15 cr)
Analysis of classical and contemporary sociological theory.
Major theorists, including Durkheim, Weber, and Marx; major
paradigms and their importance to sociological thought.
Course Descriptions
SOC 2155. Introduction to Research Methods and Analysis. (4 cr; A-F or Aud.
Prereq-[1101 or 1301], at least 15 cr)
Principles/practice of research design, sampling, data collection
including field observation/surveys. Data management, analysis,
and reporting of quantitative/qualitative data. Ethics/administration in sociological research. Introduction to SPSS statistical
software. Lab
SOC 2311. Criminological Theory. (4 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-1301, 15 cr)
Examination of the major theories of crime causation. Specific
theories include macro and micro sociological explanations, as
well as biological and psychological perspectives. Discussion
includes the history, social context, and policy implications of
each theory.
SOC 3155. Quantitative Research Methods and Analysis. (4 cr; A-F or Aud.
Prereq-2155, [crim major or soc major or URS major], at least 30 cr)
Descriptive statistics. Measures of central tendency, deviation,
association. Inferential statistics focusing on probability and
hypothesis testing. T-tests, Chi-square tests, analysis of variance, measures of association, introduction to statistical control.
Statistical software (SPSS) used to analyze sociological data.
Lab.
SOC 3306. Deviance. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-1101 or 1301, min 15 cr; §2306)
Behaviors, beliefs, and physical characteristics defined as deviant; legal and other formal and informal reactions to deviance;
subjective and objective effects of being defined as deviant.
SOC 3322. Law and Society. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-30 cr or #)
Complexities, organization, and elements of legal systems,
particularly in the United States. Legal theory used to explain
the “working” of the law, historical development of law, current
issues in law, and overall interrelationship between law and
society.
SOC 3324. Sociology of Criminal Law. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-30 cr or #)
Nature, goals, and problems in administration of the American
criminal judicial process.
SOC 3328. Delinquency and Juvenile Justice. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-30 cr or #)
Delinquency in contemporary American society. Major issues
concerning causes, prevention, and treatment of juvenile offenders. Focus on U.S. juvenile justice system.
SOC 3336. Crime and the Media. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-Min 30 cr or #)
Examines the relationship between crime, criminal justice
and the media. It explores how news and entertainment media
portray criminals, crime and the criminal justice system, and the
effects of these portrayals on the justice system and society.
SOC 3338. Sociology of Gangs. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-30 cr or #)
Street and prison gangs in America at the national, state, and
local level. Sociological research and theories relative to gang
formation and the economics related to street and prison gangs.
SOC 3342. Law Enforcement Administration. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-30 cr or #)
Nature, goals, and problems of law enforcement agencies.
Defines management as it relates to law enforcement processes.
SOC 3344. Law Enforcement and Society. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-30 cr or #)
Role of police and relationship of law enforcement to the community; focuses on crime prevention.
SOC 3361. Correctional Continuum. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-1101, Soph or higher
or #)
Analysis of the range of sanctions and programs in corrections.
Topics include both community-based and institutional corrections, as well as juvenile and adult corrections.
SOC 3363. Correctional Organizations. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-3361, 30 cr or #)
Examination of the factors that influence the operation of
correctional organizations. Focus on the impact of organizational and outside actors on correctional policies and everyday
correctional practices (e.g., management of inmates/clients and
programming).
SOC 3369. Correctional Assessment and Intervention. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. PrereqMin 30 cr or #, §3365)
Issues germane to intervention with criminal offenders.
Philosophical (should we intervene?) and pragmatic (what, if
anything “works”) debates are reviewed, and both punishment
oriented and rehabilitative intervention programs are discussed.
SOC 3375. Restorative Justice. (3 cr; A-F only. Prereq-Min 60 cr or #)
Examines the principles and practices of restorative justice.
Covers early and contemporary philosophies and practices, as
well as domestic and international examples.
SOC 3395. Special Topics: (Various Titles to be Assigned). (1-3 cr [max 6 cr]; A-F or
Aud. Prereq-30 cr or #)
Contemporary topics in criminology.
388
Sociology
SOC 3595. Special Topics: (Various Titles to be Assigned). (1-3 cr [max 6 cr]; A-F or
Aud. Prereq-Min 30 cr or #)
SOC 4382. Victimology. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-1101 or 1301, 60 cr; no Grad
School credit)
Contemporary topics in sociology.
Extent, nature, and forms of criminal victimizations; profiles
of crime victims; coping strategies; victims’ rights; impact of
victimizations on victims and nonvictims; victim attitudes about
crime and interactions with justice system; evaluation of victim
service programs.
SOC 3650–3664. Hazelden Program Courses. (2 cr; A-F or Aud)
SOC 3701. Social Psychology. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-2001, 30 cr or #)
Theory and research issues regarding relation of individual to
society. Socialization, effects of social organization and disorganization, and interpersonal interaction.
SOC 3821. Sociology of Community. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-2111, 30 cr or #)
Theoretical orientations and empirical investigations of community structure, processes, conflict, and change. Community
components and types; community development strategies
reviewed and applied.
SOC 3831. Organizations and Society. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-30 cr or #)
Sociological examination of structure and processes of public
and private formal organizations and patterns of adaptation to
external social environments. Role of voluntary organizations
in society.
SOC 3841. Urban Justice Field Experience. (2 cr; S-N or Aud. Prereq-Min 60 cr or
Grad student or #)
Guided tour of large metropolitan courts, correctional facilities,
and social service agencies.
SOC 3901. Social Change and Social Policy. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-2111, 30
cr or #)
Social change and maintenance forces as they affect social life.
Emphasis on social theory and research along with formation
and implementation of social policy leading to both change and
maintenance.
SOC 4384. Child Abuse and Child Protection in Minnesota. (3 cr; A-F or Aud.
Prereq-90 cr or Grad Student or #)
Examine how our legal system and community discovers and
protects neglected or abused children. Provide understanding
of juvenile court, the role of forensic science, social workers,
police, teachers, nurses, physicians, and other professionals
mandated to report suspected abuse.
SOC 4395. Special Topics: (Various Titles to be Assigned). (1-3 cr [max 6 cr]; A-F or
Aud. Prereq-90 cr or Grad Student or #)
Proseminar on contemporary topics. Course announced in Class
Schedule.
SOC 4587. Internship Preparation. (1 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-1101, 1301, 2311,
2155) or (1101, 2111, 2155), soc or crim major, min 60 cr, upper div comp (31xx), no
Grad School cr)
Introduction to internship by learning about internship expectations, developing internship objectives, exploring internship
opportunities, and developing an application for an internship.
SOC 4595. Special Topics: (Various Titles to be Assigned). (1-3 cr [max 6 cr]; A-F or
Aud. Prereq-90 cr or Grad Student or #)
Proseminar on contemporary topics.
SOC 4596. Practicum in Criminology. (3-14 cr; S-N or Aud. Prereq-#)
Structural investigation of effect of social class on people’s
lives. Theories and research on social class; social mobility
theory and effects. Intertwinement of social class, gender, and
race/ethnicities.
Supervised experience in criminal justice agency and concurrent
seminar which focus on identification, application, and evaluation of implementation of concepts, principles, theories and
best practices in criminal justice. Law enforcement agencies,
juvenile courts, probation and parole departments, correctional
institutions, delinquency control programs, and public or voluntary agencies experience.
SOC 3960. Sociology of Sport. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-30 cr or #)
SOC 4597. Internship. (1-9 cr [max 9 cr]; S-N or Aud. Prereq-#; no Grad School cr)
Examination of the sociological phenomena of organized
and not so organized amateur and professional sports. Topics
include culture, socialization, social economics, social organization, inequality, politics, urban stadiums, stratification and
history of sports.
Supervised lab experience in a human service agency or project.
SOC 3945. Social Stratification. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-1101 or 1301 or CSt 1101
or Anth 1604, 30 cr or #)
SOC 4323. Women and Justice. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-1101 or 1301 or CSt 1101
or Anth 1604 or WS 1000, 30 cr, or #; §3326; no Grad School cr)
SOC 4333. Legal Research. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-Min 60 cr or Grad School
student)
Overview of American legal system, including the courts and
legislature; primary and secondary sources of law, judicial
reports, citations and digest; annotated law reports; legal
periodicals and research procedure. Different areas of law and
associated research.
SOC 4340. Minorities, Crime and Justice in the United States. (3 cr; A-F or Aud.
Prereq-1101 or 1301 or Anth 1604 or CSt 1101, 30 cr, or #, §3326, no Grad School
credit)
Examines U.S. criminal justice system in relation to minorities.
Attitudes and perceptions of crime and justice from minority
perspectives. Differential crime rates among majority-minority
groups, police-minority contacts, processing of minorities by
the courts, and disproportionate representations of minorities in
prison system.
Introduction to social conflict as a social process as a basis
for understanding conflict management strategies and tactics.
Emphasis on interpersonal and organizational based conflicts
not regulated by formal structures such as contracts.
Course Descriptions
Women’s involvement in the civil and criminal justice systems
of the United States both historically and currently. Attention
given to women as criminal and civil defendants, issues of
women’s civil rights, and to women practitioners within each
system.
SOC 4735. Social Conflict Management Strategies. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-60
cr or #)
SOC 4860. Environmental Sociology. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-90 cr or Grad
Student or #)
Introduction to environmental sociology--the relationship
between social structure, human social behavior, and the physical environment. Focuses on the “natural” environment, not the
“built” environment.
SOC 4862. Science, Technology and Society. (4 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-90 cr or
Grad Student or #)
Applying cultural analysis to assessing the effects of science
and technology on communities, institutions, organizations,
and individuals. Emphasis on topics involving cross-discipline
effects.
SOC 4911. Alcoholism and other Addictions. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-90 cr or
Grad Student or #)
Addictions considered by way of etiologies, social and behavioral involvement, treatment approaches, helping resources,
outcome research, and public policy.
SOC 4925. Sociology of Rape. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-1101 or 1301 or CSt 1101
or Anth 1604 or WS 1000, 30 cr, or #)
Social, moral, and legal definitions and implications of rape.
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Course Descriptions
SOC 4935. Conflict and Violence. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-60 cr or Grad Student
or #)
SOC 4997. Teaching Assistantship in Sociology/Criminology. (1-3 cr [max 3 cr];
A-F only. Prereq-60 cr, #; no Grad School cr)
Historical and contemporary reality and theoretical explanations
of conflict and violence in society. Criminal justice and other
societal responses to conflict and violence.
Practical experience in teaching-related activities in sociology
or criminology courses.
SOC 4947. Sociology of Gender Identities and Systems. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq1101 or 1301 or CSt 1101 or Anth 1604 or WS 1000, 30 cr, or #)
Status and experiences in society through the exploration of
gender identities, systems and social structures. Topics include
politics, discrimination, family, education, workplace, popular
culture, and changing definitions of gender. Emphasis on the
expectations and performance of masculinity/femininity, and the
intersection of gender, race, and class.
SOC 4949. Race and Ethnic Relations. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-1101 or 1301 or
CSt 1101 or Anth 1604, 30 cr, or #)
Overview of race and ethnic relations in America; conditions
of major racial and ethnic minorities; formation of racial/ethnic
identities, sources of prejudice, discrimination; intergroup conflict; assimilation, persistence of ethnicity; intergroup diversity;
major racial and ethnic groups; the new immigrants.
SOC 4950. International Migration to the United States. (3 cr; A-F or Aud.
Prereq-90 cr or grad or #)
Delineates geopolitical, social, legal, economic and cultural
factors spurring recent migrations from underdeveloped to
developed regions. In-depth analysis of push-pull factors that
trigger transnational movement of population. Trace past and
current immigration policies in immigrant receiving countries
and highlight parallels between old and new migration. Focus
on migration of skilled and unskilled migrants. Identification
of economic models that predict the transnational migration of
labor and policy implications.
SOC 4960. Graveyard Culture. (4 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-30 cr or #)
Structure and cultural traditions surrounding resting places of
the departed with emphasis on stratification, discrimination,
cultural identity, identity tags, community integration as well
as preservation issues, community history, and the business end
of cemeteries. Further emphasis on cemeteries in Duluth and
surrounding areas within the context of broader movements.
Exploring Duluth history becomes an essential part of the
course.
Course Descriptions
SOC 4981. Social Movements, Protest and Change. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-45
cr or #)
Focusing on the origins, dynamics, and consequences of social
movements, this course explores debates about the dilemmas
and challenges facing movement organizations, the relationship between social movements and political institutions, and
the role of social movements in bringing about social change.
Draws on empirical case-studies of a wide variety of social
movements.
SOC 4982. Political Sociology and the Global Economy. (4 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq60 cr or # or Grad School student)
Explores the field of power and economics, understanding the
major theoretical debates and issues both past and present.
Examines the nature of the state and economy, while also
examining how class, race, and gender shape both the political
and economic process. Focuses on how power is constructed,
legimated, and delegitimated concentrating on state formation,
expansion, rebellion, and revolution.
SOC 4991. Independent Study in Sociology. (1-3 cr [max 6 cr]; A-F or Aud.
Prereq-#)
Directed reading, research, or involvement in social action leading to preparation of a paper or other product.
390
SOC 4999. Honors Project. (1-4 cr [max 8 cr]; A-F or Aud. Prereq-90 cr, approval by
dept honors program director; no Grad School credit)
Advanced individual project in any area of sociology, demonstrating sound theoretical and research foundations and resulting
in a written report.
Spanish (SPAN)
College of Liberal Arts
SPAN 1101. Beginning Spanish I. (4 cr; A-F or Aud. LE 3)
Conversation and communicative course for students with little
or no previous study of Spanish. Emphasis on oral and aural
skills; some grammar. Taught primarily in Spanish, with some
English.
SPAN 1102. Beginning Spanish II. (4 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-1-2 yrs high school
Span or 1101 or # LE 3)
Conversation and communicative course for students with
limited previous study of Spanish. Emphasis on oral and aural
skills; some grammar. Taught primarily in Spanish, with some
English.
SPAN 1201. Intermediate Spanish I. (4 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-3-4 yrs high school
Span or 1102 or # LE 3)
Consolidation and enrichment of previously acquired abilities in
speaking and understanding Spanish, set within introduction to
written Spanish and survey of contemporary culture of Spanishspeaking societies. Emphasis on oral, aural, and reading skills;
vocabulary building; some writing. Taught in Spanish.
SPAN 1202. Intermediate Spanish II. (4 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-4 yrs high school
Span or 1201 or # LEIP 03)
Consolidation and enrichment of previously acquired abilities in
speaking and understanding Spanish, set within introduction to
written Spanish and survey of contemporary culture of Spanishspeaking societies. Emphasis on oral, aural, and reading skills;
vocabulary building; some writing. Taught in Spanish.
SPAN 2301. Advanced Spanish. (4 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-5 yrs high school Span or
1202 or # LEIP 03)
Development of Spanish literacy within a culturally authentic
contemporary context. Emphasis on practical writing and formal oral and aural communication skills; vocabulary building;
enhancement of reading skills; review of key grammar. Taught
in Spanish.
SPAN 2540. Latino Literatures and Cultures. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. LECD 08)
Literatures and cultures of Latinos in the United States, with
attention to their particular issues. Some readings in Spanish for
the occasional Spanish major/minor student. Taught in English
(unless entire class composed of students of Spanish).
SPAN 3031–3032. Spanish Language Study Abroad I–II. (1-5 cr [max 10 cr];
Stdnt Opt. Prereq-%)
Advanced language study abroad.
SPAN 3042. Hispanic American Civilization and Culture. (4 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq2301 with C or better or #; offered alt yrs)
Survey of important aspects of Hispanic American civilization
and culture, pre- and post-Encounter. Taught in Spanish.
SPAN 3044. Spanish Civilization and Culture. (4 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-2301 with
C or better or #; offered alt yrs)
Historical survey. Taught in Spanish.
Special Education
SPAN 3045–3048. Spanish Culture and Civilization Study Abroad I–IV. (1-5 cr
[max 10 cr]; Stdnt Opt. Prereq-%)
Special Education (SPED)
Study abroad of Spanish or Hispanic American culture.
College of Education and Human Service Professions
SPAN 4004. Spanish Conversation. (1-4 cr [max 8 cr]; Stdnt Opt. Prereq-2301; use
of 4 credits only toward degree)
Practice in oral conversation skills.
SPAN 4011. Hispanic American Prose. (4 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-2301 with C or
better or #; no Grad School credit; offered every third yr)
Prose fiction with emphasis on 20th and 21st centuries.
Attention also to cultural background. Taught in Spanish.
SPAN 4013. Hispanic American Poetry and Drama. (4 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-2301
with C or better or #; no Grad School credit; offered every third yr)
Emphasis on 20th and 21st centuries. Attention also to cultural
background. Taught in Spanish.
SPAN 4015. Literature and Culture of the Southern Cone. (4 cr; A-F or Aud.
Prereq-2301 with C or better or #; no Grad School credit)
A historical overview of literature, essays, cultural components,
and events of major importance relating to three countries of
Spanish American which form the Southern Cone--Uruguay,
Argentina, Chile. Taught in Spanish.
SPAN 4018. Hispanic America From Within. (4 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-2301 with C
or better or #; no Grad School credit)
Study of selected Hispanic American countries; historical,
political, cultural, and other defining moments, and literary
expressions of those moments, with goal of seeing the country
from within. Taught in Spanish.
SPAN 4022. Medieval and Golden Age Spain. (4 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-2301 with C
or better or #; no Grad School credit; offered every third yr)
Survey of representative literary works, with attention to literature and cultural background. Taught in Spanish.
SPAN 4025. Cervantes. (4 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-2301 with C or better or #; no Grad
School credit; offered every third yr)
Study of representative short works and his masterpiece [Don
Quixote] as literary expressions of the time and with respect to
the modern novel. Taught in Spanish.
SPAN 4027. Modern Spanish Literature and Culture. (4 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq2301 with C or better or #; no Grad School credit)
The study of Spanish peninsular literature and culture during
the twentieth century up to the death of Francisco Franco, 1975.
Taught in Spanish.
Literature and culture (art, film, music, architecture, popular
culture) of contemporary (1975 to the present) Spain, within
historical, political and social context. Works studied will shed
light on the author/composer/artist’s ideology vis-a-vis dominant philosophical and political climates.
SPAN 4090. Aspects of the Hispanic World. (4 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-2301 with C
or better or #; no Grad School credit)
Major types of disabilities and giftedness, including definitions,
causes, characteristics, and educational implications. Disability
perspectives. Social, legal, and educational considerations of
disability issues.
SPED 3103. Infants and Toddlers with Special Needs. (4 cr; A-F or Aud. PrereqUECh major or #, §5103)
Causation and development of disabling conditions in infants
and toddlers. Effective intervention techniques in a variety of
settings involving interagency collaboration and family involvement. Practicum.
SPED 3105. Young Children with Special Needs: Ages Three-Eight. (4 cr; A-F or
Aud. Prereq-#, §5105)
Identification, assessment, and classification of young children
with special needs. Effective intervention techniques for use
in a variety of settings, emphasizing integration and teaming
strategies. Practicum.
SPED 3106. Working with Young Children with Low Incidence Disabilities. (4
cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-Admission to the UECh program)
Skills and information useful in the provision of quality services
for young children with low incidence disabilities. Class sessions and field-based experiences will address supports young
children with low incidence disabilities.
SPED 3109. Working with Challenging Behavior in Young Children. (3 cr; A-F or
Aud. Prereq-Admission to the UECh program)
Provides information needed to evaluate and implement
behavior change programs that are appropriate for young
children who exhibit challenging behaviors. A key element will
be functional behavioral assessment procedures and a range of
preventative behavioral interventions.
SPED 3205. Assessment in Early Childhood Special Education. (4 cr; A-F or Aud.
Prereq-3103, 3105, #, §5205)
Measurement theory, assessment practices, familiarization with
selected instruments, legal and ethical precautions for assessing
preschool and primary age children with disabilities. Practicum.
SPED 3310. Introduction to Special Education for Elementary Education. (1 cr;
A-F or Aud. Prereq-ElEd major)
Introductory course for elementary education majors, emphasizing attitudes and language towards students with disabilities,
focusing on abilities and on understanding differences in
learners, social, legal and educational issues, collaboration and
individual education planning mandates.
SPED 4204. Assessment for Children and Youth with Disabilities. (4 cr; A-F or
Aud. Prereq-§5204, 45 cr, postbac undergrad or sped minor, no Grad School credit)
Sociopolitical, historical, literary, and cultural events of major
importance in Hispanic America, Spain, or among Latinos in
the United States. Taught in Spanish.
Use assessment data for making decisions about exceptionality,
eligibility, and educational programming. Curriculum includes
laws governing assessment in special education, standards of
professional practice, standardized and teacher-developed assessment procedures, and psychometric theory.
SPAN 4091. Independent Study. (1-4 cr [max 8 cr]; A-F or Aud. Prereq-2301 with C
or better or #; no Grad School credit)
SPED 4210. Special Education for Secondary Educators. (3 cr; A-F or Aud.
Prereq-No Grad School credit)
Students devise programs of reading and research in consultation with instructor to expand upon a topic related to one
studied in regular coursework. Taught in Spanish.
SPAN 4095. Special Topics: (Various Titles to be Assigned). (1-4 cr [max 12 cr]; A-F
or Aud. Prereq-2301 with C or better or #; no Grad School credit)
Literature and/or culture of Spanish-speaking populations:
Spaniards, Hispanic Americans, or Latinos in the United States.
Taught in Spanish.
Educator’s role and responsibilities in meeting the diverse needs
of students with disabilities in the general education setting.
Current laws and legislation, characteristics of students with
disabilities, informal assessment, and research-based strategies
and methods for instruction in the areas of reading, math, and
written language.
391
Course Descriptions
SPAN 4029. Contemporary Spanish Literature and Culture. (4 cr; A-F or Aud.
Prereq-2301 with C or better or #; no Grad School credit)
SPED 1357. Individuals with Disabilities in Society. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. LECD 08)
Course Descriptions
SPED 4250. Foundations of Autism Spectrum Disorders. (4 cr; A-F or Aud.
Prereq-§5250, no Grad School cr)
Includes history, definitions, assessment, characteristics, legal
aspects, varying perspectives, and etiology of the Autism
Spectrum Disorders.
SPED 4260. Language and Social Skills for Children and Youth with Autism
Spectrum Disorders. (4 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-§5260, no Grad School credit)
Specialized instruction in the foundation of language development, social stories, augmented and alternative communication
systems, theory of mind, social skill development and play.
SPED 4270. Methods for Teaching Children and Youth with Autism Spectrum
Disorders. (4 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-4250 or 5250 or #, §5270, no Grad School credit)
Indepth assessment, environmental factors, curricular options,
instructional strategies, behavioral programming, material for
teaching, sensory integration strategies, IEP/IIIP development
and implementation, and technology on the continuum of placements for children and youth with ASD.
SPED 4310. Adapting for Diverse Learners in General Education Settings. (4 cr;
A-F or Aud. Prereq-ElEd or EdSe major or #, §5310)
Application of foundational knowledge of special education,
Section 504 requirements, and students with disabilities and
diverse learning needs to school curricula and environments at
all levels. Understanding general educators’ responsibilities in
the special education process. Skills in making adaptations and
accommodations.
SPED 4351. Learning Disabilities Characteristics and Interventions. (4 cr; A-F or
Aud. Prereq-4433, postbac or #; §5351; no Grad School cr)
Characteristics of learning disabilities, emphasizing language
and processing deficits and how they interfere with academic achievement and social relationships; assessment and
intervention approaches for students with learning disabilities.
Practicum.
SPED 4381. Behavior Management Principles and Practices. (4 cr; A-F or Aud.
Prereq-§5381, 45 cr, postbac or sped minor, no Grad School credit)
Models of behavior change for preschool, elementary, and
secondary students; identification and assessment of problem
behaviors; proactive and reactive strategies for managing
disruptive behavior; application of applied behavior analysis
to modifying behaviors; legal and ethical issues in behavior
change.
Course Descriptions
SPED 4382. Advanced Theory and Practice in Emotional, Behavioral Disorders.
(4 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-4433, 4381, postbac or #, §5382, no Grad School cr)
Behavioral and emotional disorders of school-aged children
and youth; assessment approaches, models of instruction, curricula, advanced application of skills to change behaviors, crisis
intervention skills, knowledge of community resources and
services. Practicum.
SPED 4433. Foundations in Special Education. (4 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-Cr will
not be granted if cr received for 5433, 45 cr, postbac grad or sped minor, no Grad
School credit)
Overview of children with disabilities. Special emphasis will
be placed on characteristics of exceptional children; the legal
aspects of educating students with disabilities; and assessment,
instructional, and collaborative strategies.
SPED 4434. Assistive and Computer Technology for Teaching. (2 cr; A-F or Aud.
Prereq-§5433, 4433, postbac or sped minor or #, no Grad School credit)
Introduction for educators to the legal guidelines and required
technology practices governing the use of technology devices
and accommodations for individual with disabilities in school
settings.
392
SPED 4435. Parent and Professional Communication and Collaboration. (4 cr;
A-F or Aud. Prereq-§5435, 4433, 45 cr, postbac or sped minor or #, no Grad School
credit)
Group process, problem solving, decision-making, collaboration, and teamwork applied to the special education
process. Techniques for working with parents, professionals,
paraprofessionals, and community agencies when planning and
implementing Individualized Education Plans.
SPED 4452. Academic Interventions for Students with Disabilities. (4 cr; A-F or
Aud. Prereq-4433, postbac or #, §5452; no Grad School cr)
Understanding various models for teaching students with reading, writing, or math difficulties; development of intervention
plan based on assessment and observation. Practicum.
SPED 4455. Transitional Planning for Adolescents with Disabilities. (4 cr; A-F or
Aud. Prereq-§5455, 4433, postbac or #, no Grad School cr)
Assessment procedures, planning and instructional methods
to help students with disabilities make the transition from
school to postsecondary training, education, and employment.
Practicum.
SPED 4486. Teaching Reading, Writing and Math. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-4433,
§5434, no Grad School cr)
A wide range of strategies for instruction of reading, writing,
and math to students with disabilities. Specific areas of instruction includes: laws, technological and information resources
pertaining to reading, writing, and math instruction as well as
research-based instructional strategies.
SPED 4555. Assessment and Instruction of Culturally and Linguistically
Diverse Exceptional Learners. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-§5555, 4433, postbac or
sped minor or %, no Grad School credit)
Participants learn assessment, instructional and collaboration
models and approaches to address the educational needs of
culturally and linguistically diverse exceptional learners. Core
skills and strategies are designed to meet special education
standards of effective practice in this field.
SPED 4585. Individual Education Plans: Development and Implementation. (3
cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-§5585, no Grad School credit)
Historical perspective of the Individual Education Plan (IEP),
its professional significance in education and the impact of the
IEP on students and teachers in special education. Explores
procedural guidelines, develop an IEP based on best practice
and develop lesson and unit plans.
SPED 4600. Student Teaching. (3-12 cr [max 12 cr]; S-N or Aud. Prereq-Postbac or
#, no Grad School credit)
Observational, evaluative, and instructional experience with
students with disabilities in K-12 settings.
SPED 4610. Professional Issues. (1 cr; S-N or Aud. Prereq-No Grad School credit)
Reflections on current issues and ethical dilemmas in the field
of early childhood special education, birth through age eight.
SPED 5010. Mental Health Issues for Teachers. (1 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-No Grad
School cr)
Devoted to addressing the licensure renewal requirements for
all general education teachers. Focus on understanding key
warning signs and early detection of mental illnesses in children
and adolescents.
SPED 5103. Infants and Toddlers with Special Needs. (3 cr; A-F only. PrereqBachelors degree in a related area of study (early childhood educ, elem educ, comm sci
disorders, social work), §3103)
Addresses the many causes of disabling conditions in infants
and toddlers. Effective intervention techniques and appropriate environments for young children with special needs will
be discussed. Family involvement and community support for
children with special needs will also be addressed.
Special Education
SPED 5105. Young Children with Special Needs: Ages Three to Eight. (4 cr; A-F
or Aud. Prereq-UECh major or #)
Identification, assessment, and classification of young children
with special needs. Effective intervention techniques for use
in a variety of settings, emphasizing integration and teaming
strategies. Practicum.
SPED 5109. Working with Challenging Behavior in Young Children. (3 cr; A-F
only. Prereq-Min 120 cr, no Grad School cr)
Provides information needed to evaluate and implement
behavior change programs that are appropriate for young
children who exhibit challenging behaviors. A key element will
be functional behavioral assessment procedures and a range of
preventative behavioral interventions.
SPED 5204. Assessment for Children and Youth with Disabilities. (4 cr; A-F or
Aud. Prereq-4433 or 5433, postbac grad or #, § 4204)
Theory of assessment of students with mild disabilities; knowledge and practice in selecting and administering standardized
tests and informal assessment instruments and in designing and
conducting behavioral observations; scoring and interpreting
assessment results for eligibility and educational planning
decisions. Practicum. Concurrent with 4202, additional paper,
project or field based practicum required.
SPED 5205. Assessment in Early Childhood Special Education. (3 cr; A-F only.
Prereq-Initial baccalaureate degree in a related area (elem educ, comm disorder, social
work, nursing), §3205)
Measurement theory, assessment practices, familiarization with
selected instruments, legal and ethical precautions for assessing
preschool and primary age children with disabilities. Practicum.
SPED 5250. Foundations of Autism Spectrum Disorders. (4 cr; A-F or Aud.
Prereq-§4250)
Includes history, definitions, assessment, characteristics, legal
aspects, varying perspectives, and etiology of the Autism
Spectrum Disorders.
SPED 5260. Language and Social Skills for Children and Youth with Autism
Spectrum Disorders. (4 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-§4260)
Specialized instruction in the foundation of language development, social stories, augmented and alternative communication
systems, theory of mind, social skill development and play.
SPED 5270. Methods for Teaching Children and Youth with Autism Spectrum
Disorders. (4 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-4250 or 5250 or #, §4270)
SPED 5300. Special Education Seminar. (1 cr [max 6 cr]; Stdnt Opt. Prereq-Postbac
grad or #)
In-depth discussion of practices, trends, issues, and problems
related to student’s selected area in special education.
SPED 5351. Learning Disabilities Characteristics and Interventions. (4 cr; A-F or
Aud. Prereq-4433 or 5433, postbac or #, §4351)
Characteristics of learning disabilities, emphasizing language
and processing deficits and how they interfere with academic achievement and social relationships; assessment and
intervention approaches for students with learning disabilities.
Practicum.
SPED 5381. Behavior Management Principles and Practices. (4 cr; A-F or Aud.
Prereq-4433 or 5433, postbac grad or #; §4381)
Models of behavior change for preschool, elementary, and
secondary students; identification and assessment of problem
behaviors; proactive and reactive strategies for managing
disruptive behavior; application of applied behavior analysis
SPED 5382. Advanced Theory and Practice in Emotional/Behavioral Disorders.
(4 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-4433 or 5433 or #)
Behavioral and emotional disorders of school-aged children
and youth; assessment approaches, models of instruction, curricula, advanced application of skills to change behaviors, crisis
intervention skills, knowledge of community resources and
services. Practicum.
SPED 5433. Foundations in Special Education. (4 cr; Stdnt Opt. Prereq-Postbac
grad student, §4433)
History, philosophy, theories, and issues of special education.
Overview of special education rules and processes. Survey of
exceptionalities, including disability perspectives. Because this
course is taught concurrently with 4433, it will require one or
more of the following: paper, project, or field based practicum.
SPED 5434. Assistive and Computer Technology for Teaching. (2 cr; A-F or Aud.
Prereq-4433 or 5433, postbac grad or #, §4434)
Introduction for educators to the legal guidelines and required
technology practices governing the use of technology devices
and accommodations for individual with disabilities in school
settings.
SPED 5435. Parent and Professional Communication and Collaboration. (4 cr;
Stdnt Opt. Prereq-4433 or 5433, postbac grad or #, §4435)
Group process, problem solving, decision making, collaboration, and teamwork applied to the special education process.
Techniques for working with parents, professionals, paraprofessionals, and community agencies when planning and implementing Individualized Educational Plans. Because this course
is taught concurrently with 4435, it will require one or more of
the following: paper, project or field based practicum.
SPED 5452. Academic Interventions for Students with Disabilities. (4 cr; A-F or
Aud. Prereq-4433 or 5433, postbac grad or #, §4452)
Understanding various models for teaching students with reading, writing, or math difficulties; development of intervention
plan based on assessment and observation. Practicum.
SPED 5455. Transitional Planning for Adolescents With Disabilities. (4 cr; A-F or
Aud. Prereq-5433 or 4433, postbac grad or #, §4455)
Assessment procedures, planning and instructional methods
to help students with disabilities make the transition from
school to postsecondary training, education, and employment.
Practicum.
SPED 5486. Teaching Reading, Writing and Math. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-4433
or 5433, no Grad School cr)
Course Descriptions
Indepth assessment, environmental factors, curricular options,
instructional strategies, behavioral programming, material for
teaching, sensory integration strategies, IEP/IIIP development
and implementation, and technology on the continuum of placements for children and youth with ASD.
to modifying behaviors; legal and ethical issues in behavior
change. Concurrent with 4381, it will require additional paper,
project or field based practicum.
A wide range of strategies for instruction of reading, writing,
and math to students with disabilities. Specific areas of instruction include laws, technological and information resources
pertaining to reading, writing and math instruction as well as
research-based strategies.
SPED 5555. Assessment and Instruction of Culturally and Linguistically
Diverse Exceptional Learners. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-4433 or 5433, postbac
grad or #, §4555)
Participants learn assessment, instructional and collaboration
models and approaches to address the educational needs of
culturally and linguistically diverse exceptional learners. Core
skills and strategies are designed to meet special education
standards of effective practice in this field. Taught concurrently
with 4555, it will require one or more of the following: paper,
project or field based practicum.
393
Course Descriptions
SPED 5585. Individual Education Plans: Development and Implementation. (3
cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-§4585)
SPED 7800. Special Education Law. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-Acceptance into
master’s of special education program)
Historical perspective of the Individual Education Plan (IEP),
its professional significance in education and the impact of the
IEP on students and teachers in special education. Explores
procedural guidelines, develop an IEP based on best practice
and develop lesson and unit plans.
Examination of special education statutory law and case law,
principles of Individuals with Disabilities Act, Americans with
Disabilities Act, and Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of
1973.
SPED 5600. Student Teaching. (1-12 cr [max 12 cr]; S-N or Aud. Prereq-#; no Grad
School credit)
Observational, evaluative, and instructional experience with
students with disabilities in K-12 settings. Seminar included.
SPED 5795. Special Topics: (Various Titles to be Assigned). (.5-4 cr [max 8 cr]; A-F or
Aud. Prereq-No Grad School cr)
Current issues in Special Education to meet needs and interests
of various groups, particularly practicing professionals.
SPED 5991. Independent Study. (1-6 cr [max 6 cr]; A-F or Aud. Prereq-%)
Directed independent study, readings, or projects of interest to
student.
SPED 5993. Special Area Project. (1-4 cr [max 4 cr]; A-F or Aud. Prereq-#; no Grad
School credit)
Independent project for advanced students to substantially further their theoretical knowledge base or professional
competencies.
SPED 5995. Special Topics: (Various Titles to be Assigned). (1-6 cr [max 12 cr];
A-F or Aud)
Current issues to meet needs and interests of various groups,
particularly practicing professionals. Topics vary; specific title
and content announced in [Class Schedule].
SPED 7100. Professional Issues in Special Education. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. PrereqAcceptance into master’s of special education program)
Provides graduate candidates a seminar to write about and
discuss current professional issues raised in recognized sources
within the field of special and general education (e.g., journals,
education news sources, and topical conferences).
SPED 7200. Advanced Behavior Management Principles and Practices. (3 cr;
A-F or Aud. Prereq-Acceptance into M.Sp.Ed. program)
Course Descriptions
Application of theory and techniques in behavior management,
assessment, intervention, monitoring, generalizing, and maintenance in behaviors of individuals with exceptionalities. Focus is
on advanced principles and practices in behavior management
as well as social skill instruction.
SPED 7710. Practice, Research, and Leadership I. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-MEd
student or #)
Analysis of research approaches, preparation standards, leadership skills, and current issues and trends in special education,
leading to a professional development plan. Information technology, professional ethics, and reflective change processes.
SPED 7720. Practice, Research, and Leadership II. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-SpEd
7710 or #)
Synthesis of research methods, special education research in
selected areas, and change processes for groups in order to
increase one’s leadership capacity. Technology-based sources of
educational research, leadership models, and strategic planning
processes.
SPED 7912. Special Education Administration and Supervision. (3 cr; A-F or Aud.
Prereq-Acceptance into master’s of special education program)
Analyze administrative theory that is applicable to special
education, curricula development, fiscal issues, interagency
agreements, role of human resources management and improvement of teaching with emphasis on effective procedures.
Statistics (STAT)
College of Science and Engineering
STAT 1411. Introduction to Statistics. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-A grade of at least
C- in Math 1005 or math placement or % LE 2)
Statistical ideas involved in gathering, describing, and analyzing
observational and experimental data. Experimental design,
descriptive statistics, correlation and regression, probabilistic
models, sampling, and statistical inference.
STAT 2411. Statistical Methods. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-Math 1250 or 1160 LE 2)
Graphical and numerical descriptions of data, elementary probability, sampling distributions, estimations, confidence intervals,
one-sample and two-sample t-test.
STAT 3411. Engineering Statistics. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-1297, cannot be
applied to a math or statistics major)
Statistical considerations in data collection and experimentation.
Descriptive statistics, least squares, elementary probability distributions, confidence intervals, significance tests, and analysis
of variance as applied analysis of engineering data.
STAT 3611. Introduction to Probability and Statistics. (4 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-A
grade of at least C- in Math 1290 or Math 1296)
Basic probability, including combinatorial methods, random
variables, mathematical expectation. Binomial, normal, and
other standard distributions. Moment-generating functions.
Basic statistics, including descriptive statistics and sampling
distributions. Estimation and statistical hypothesis testing.
STAT 4101. Actuarial Probability. (1 cr; S-N or Aud. Prereq-3611, Math 3298; credit
cannot be applied to math major or minor; no Grad School cr)
Problem-solving techniques in probability used in the mathematical foundations of actuarial science.
STAT 5411. Analysis of Variance. (3 cr; Stdnt Opt. Prereq-2411 or 3611)
Analysis of variance techniques as applied to scientific
experiments and studies. Randomized block designs, factorial
designs, nesting. Checking model assumptions. Using statistical
computer software.
STAT 5511. Regression Analysis. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-3611, Math 3280 or
Math 4326)
Simple, polynomial, and multiple regression. Matrix formulation of estimation, testing, and prediction in linear regression
model. Analysis of residuals, model selection, transformations,
and use of computer software.
SPED 7730. Practice, Research, and Leadership III. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-SpEd
7720 or #)
STAT 5515. Multivariate Statistics. (3 cr; Stdnt Opt. Prereq-5411 or 5511, Math
3280 or Math 4326)
Application of research and leadership skills to improve one’s
practice in special education. Educational organizations and
approaches to organizational change. Socialization into leadership roles in special education profession through presentations,
publications, and participation in national discussions.
STAT 5531. Probability Models. (4 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-3611, Math 1297 or
Math 1597)
Multivariate normal distribution, MANOVA, canonical correlation, discriminate analysis, principal components. Use of
computer software.
Development of probability models and their applications to
science and engineering. Classical models such as binomial,
Poisson, and exponential distributions. Random variables, joint
394
Theatre
distributions, expectation, covariance, independence, conditional probability. Markov processes and their applications.
Selected topics in stochastic processes.
STAT 5571. Probability. (4 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-3611, Math 3298)
Axioms of probability. Discrete and continuous random variables and their probability distributions. Joint and conditional
distributions. Mathematical expectation, moments, correlation,
and conditional expectation. Normal and related distributions.
Limit theorems.
STAT 5572. Statistical Inference. (4 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-5571)
Mathematical statistics; Bayes’ and maximum-likelihood estimators, unbiased estimators; confidence intervals; hypothesis
testing, including likelihood ratio tests, most powerful tests, and
goodness-of-fit tests.
STAT 8444. FTE: Doctoral. (1 cr; No grade. Prereq-Doctoral student, adviser and
DGS consent)
STAT 8611. Linear Models. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-5572)
Developing statistical theory of general linear model.
Distribution theory, testing, and estimation. Analysis of variance
and regression. (offered alt yrs)
STAT 8711. Statistics Seminar. (3 cr; S-N or Aud. Prereq-5572)
Applications of probabilistic and statistical modeling methods,
such as linear and nonlinear regression, generalized linear models, Markov chains, and Poisson processes. Case-study analyses
of models from areas such as natural sciences, medicine,
engineering, and industry.
STAT 8888. Thesis Credits: Doctoral. (1-24 cr [max 100 cr]; No grade. Prereq-max
18 cr per semester or summer; 24 cr required)
Supportive Services Program
(SSP)
Academic Support and Student Life
SSP 103. Basic Mathematics and Introductory Algebra. (0 cr; S-N or Aud. Prereq[3 cr equiv]; §Math 1004; cannot apply cr toward a degree. (the prepatory course fee is
equal to 3 credits of resident tuition))
Computational math skills and applications, including arithmetic, introductory geometry, and introductory algebra.
SSP 1000. Introduction to College Learning. (1-2 cr [max 2 cr]; A-F or Aud)
Facilitates the successful transition into college learning and
student life at UMD.
Individualized approach to learning skills necessary for argumentative writing process, including development of individual
writing process, organization of argumentative paragraph and
essay, and beginning research/library skills.
SSP 1054. College Study Strategies. (1 cr; S-N or Aud)
Focuses on the skills necessary to study more efficiently for
college. Topics include: time management, test taking strategies,
note taking, concentration, and library orientation.
SSP 1101. Personal Development. (2 cr; A-F or Aud)
Introduction to some of the components of the human personality and the relationship of the individual to the environment.
Focuses on such topics as human relations, values, interpersonal skills and competencies, decision making, and conflict
resolution.
SSP 1802. English as a Second Language: Writing. (2 cr; S-N or Aud)
Preparation for Comp 1120 for ESL students.
Skills needed to develop and conduct effective small group
learning experiences. Communication processes, leadership
styles and responsibilities, goal setting, social influences,
developmental stages of groups, learning theories, and content
as related to appropriate SSP skills course.
SSP 3002. SSP Teaching Assistantship Practicum. (1-3 cr [max 6 cr]; A-F or
Aud. Prereq-#)
Leading structured small groups in designated SSP courses. TA
responsibilities outlined in contract with faculty supervisor.
SSP 3003. Tutor Training: Individualization of Instruction. (2 cr; A-F only.
Prereq-#)
Introduction to contemporary learning theory and its application
to one-on-one and small group learning situations (tutorials).
Emphasis on philosophy, procedures, and practices known to be
effective in improving learning.
SSP 3004. Tutor Practicum. (1-2 cr [max 3 cr]; A-F only. Prereq-3003 or #)
Supervised practicum for students leading one-on-one and small
group tutorials. Tutor responsibilities outlined in contract with
instructor.
Theatre (TH)
School of Fine Arts
TH 901. B.F.A. Qualifying Presentation. (0 cr; S-N or Aud. Prereq-%)
Presentation of performance audition or technical portfolio for
admission to full B.F.A. candidacy.
TH 1001. Introduction to Theatre Arts. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. LE 9)
Appreciation of theatre arts. Developing sensitivity and critical
sophistication as articulate, discriminating theatregoers. Play
viewing, play reading, critiques, and term projects.
TH 1051. Introduction to Film. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. LE 9)
History and genres of film; how movies are made. Watching
and analyzing films and developing an articulate and discerning
viewpoint. (2 hrs lect, 2.5 hrs lab)
TH 1053. Film and Society. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. LE 9)
An examination of how films influence the moral and cultural
life of our time, and how culture affects film.
TH 1071. Musical Theatre History. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. LE 9)
Musical theatre genre focusing on integration of theatre, music,
and dance. Major librettists, composers, directors, choreographers, and performers.
TH 1099. Theatre Practicum I. (1 cr [max 6 cr]; A-F or Aud. LE 10)
Experience in backstage areas and front-of-house operations or
rehearsal and performance of a minor role in UMD theatrical
or dance productions. Credit can be received for work in one
of the following areas: performance, box office/marketing,
costumes, scenery, properties, lighting/sound, makeup and stage
management before/during performance runs for UMD Theatre
productions (45 hours work per semester).
TH 1111. Acting Fundamentals I. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-Not open to BFA Th
majors LE 10)
Developing the ability to respond to imaginative situations with
sincerity, individuality, and effectiveness; projects in elementary
acting techniques.
TH 1112. Acting I. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-1801 or BFA Th major or #)
Introduction to fundamental skills of acting: objectives, actions, given circumstances, activities. Focus on freeing natural
impulses through imagination and improvisation. For BFA
theatre majors.
395
Course Descriptions
SSP 1052. College Writing Strategies. (2 cr; S-N or Aud. Prereq-§Comp 1120)
SSP 3001. Preparation for SSP Teaching Assistantship. (1-3 cr [max 3 cr]; S-N
or Aud. Prereq-#)
Course Descriptions
TH 1114. Musical Theatre: Theory/Sight Singing. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-#)
TH 2112. Acting II: American Realism. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-#)
Introduction to sight singing, music reading, written music
transposition, and melody-line piano keyboard. For musical
theatre student performers.
Continuation of 1112 with a concentration on American realism,
characterization, and living truthfully in the moment.
TH 1116. Audition Techniques. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-#)
Acting styles from various classical periods, emphasizes
Shakespeare and verse.
Theory, technique, and application of audition skills for the
actor.
TH 1118. Voice and Movement for the Actor. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-#)
Introduction to voice and movement techniques designed to
liberate, develop, and strengthen actor’s body and voice.
TH 1299. Theatre Marketing/Management Practicum. (2 cr [max 6 cr]; A-F or
Aud. Prereq-Th major or minor)
Practical experience working in theatre box office, management,
marketing, and advertising promotion for UMD theatre productions. (90 hrs work)
TH 1301. Stagecraft. (5 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-1801 or #)
Introduction to methods of planning, constructing, painting, rigging, and shifting stage scenery. Lab work required constructing
and painting scenery and properties for theatrical productions. TH 1351. Stage Rendering Techniques. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-1801 or #)
Practical course in study of different rendering mediums, styles,
and techniques for the theatrical designer.
TH 1399. Scenery and Properties Practicum. (2 cr [max 6 cr]; A-F or Aud. PrereqTh major or minor)
Practical experience constructing and painting scenery and
properties for theatrical productions. (90 hrs work)
TH 1401. Costume Construction I. (5 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-1801 or #)
Introduction to study and practice of methods and materials
used in building costumes for theatrical productions. Lab work
required.
TH 1451. Stage Makeup. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-1801 or #)
Introduction to principles and materials of stage makeup and
their application in developing a character makeup for theatrical
productions.
TH 1499. Costume Practicum. (2 cr [max 6 cr]; A-F or Aud. Prereq-Th major or
minor)
Practical experience working on costume construction and
costume crafts for theatrical productions. (90 hrs work)
TH 1501. Stage Lighting I. (4 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-1001 or 1801 or #)
Course Descriptions
Principles and practice of stage lighting.
TH 1551. Sound Design. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-1801 or #)
Principles and practice of choosing, editing, and running sound
cues for theatrical productions.
TH 1599. Lighting/Sound Practicum. (1 cr [max 3 cr]; A-F or Aud. Prereq-Th major
or minor)
Practical experience working on lighting and sound for theatrical productions. (45 hrs work)
TH 1601. Stage Management. (3 cr; A-F or Aud)
Theory and practice of stage management techniques applicable
to a variety of theatre forms and situations.
TH 2113. Acting III: Classical Styles. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-2112 or #)
TH 2114. Acting: Musical Theatre. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-#)
Application of theories and techniques of musical theatre
performance.
TH 2118. Speech for the Actor. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-#)
Ear training and articulation (in anticipation of dialects);
acquisition of nonregional dialect for the stage through use of
phonetics and classical texts.
TH 2119. Stage Dialects. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-#)
Facilitates actor’s acquisition and performance of stage dialects.
TH 2851. Film History. (3 cr; A-F only. Prereq-soph or #)
Survey of American and international cinema from 1870s to
present day, with special focus on filmmakers, genres, and
styles.
TH 2871. Honors: Collective Creation: Creating Theatre as a Group. (3 cr [max 6
cr]; A-F or Aud. Prereq-Honors student LE 10)
Working as a group, course participants will create a play based
on a specific historical event, a book, or a social justice topic.
TH 3099. Theatre Practicum II. (2 cr [max 12 cr]; A-F or Aud)
Experience in backstage areas and front-of-house operations or
rehearsal and performance of a minor role in UMD theatrical
or dance productions. Credit can be received for work in one
of the following areas: performance, box office/marketing,
costumes, scenery, properties, lighting/sound, makeup and stage
management before/during performance runs for UMD Theatre
productions (90 hours per semester).
TH 3111. Acting Fundamentals II. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-1111 or 1112 or #; not
open to BFA th majors)
Continuation of 1111. Development of acting skills beyond the
fundamental level for non-BFA theatre majors. Project work
emphasis on characterization and contemporary scene study.
TH 3112. Improvisation for the Theatre. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-#)
Freeing the actor’s natural impulses through in-depth, hands-on
exploration of improvisational theatre. Emphasis placed on
actor’s learning to create without fear.
TH 3151. Stage Combat/Circus. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-0901 or #)
Intensive study of techniques and principles of stage combat
focusing on armed (rapier/dagger/broadsword) and unarmed
combat. Physical development through various circus skills:
juggling, tumbling, and balancing.
TH 3171. Acting IV: Character/Masks. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-60 cr, BFA Th
major, #)
Using the body to express and develop character through mask
work, improvisation, and selected scene work.
TH 3201. Stage Direction. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-1112, 60 cr, Th major or minor
or #)
Practical experience working backstage during the run of
theatrical productions. (90 hrs work)
Comprehensive, portfolio approach focusing on interpretive role
of director in contemporary theatre. Major tasks facing director
as collaborator; lecture, written assignments, workshops, and
projects.
TH 1801. Elements of Theatre. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-th major)
TH 3331. Scenic Design I. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-1301 or #)
Intensive study in rudimentary theatre vocabulary, research
methods, principles of play production, preproduction script
analyses, performance criticism, and postproduction assessment. Play viewing, play reading, critiques, and term projects.
TH 3351. Theatrical Drafting. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-1301)
TH 1699. Running Crew Practicum. (2 cr [max 6 cr]; A-F or Aud. Prereq-#)
396
Elements of design used in creation of scenery for theatre.
Principles and practice in techniques of drafting traditional and
nontraditional types of stage scenery.
Toxicology
TH 3355. Computer-Aided Theatrical Design. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-1301 or #)
TH 4331. Scenic Design II. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-3331)
Computer-aided drafting and design with technical applications
to scenic design, lighting design, and technical direction.
Advanced study in creating scenic designs for a variety of
theatrical forms, including musical comedy, opera, dance, and
legitimate theatre.
TH 3371. Scene Painting. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-1301)
Advanced work in use of both traditional and modern methods
of painting stage scenery emphasizing practical lab work. (2 hrs
lect, 2 hrs lab)
TH 3381. Theatre Design: Period Styles. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-3331, 3441 or #)
Introduction to historical styles: architecture, painting, and dress
as they influence theatrical design through the ages.
TH 3401. Costume Construction II. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-1401 or #)
Advanced principles and practices of costume construction
techniques emphasizing pattern drafting and draping and a
study of advanced craft techniques.
TH 3441. Costume Design I. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-1401, 1801 or #)
Principles and practice of costume design with emphasis on designing and rendering costumes from various historical periods.
TH 3699. Production Management. (2 cr [max 12 cr]; A-F or Aud. Prereq-#)
Participation in management and leadership in all areas of
theatre production. (90 hrs work)
TH 3801. Drama Titles. (1 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-1801 or #)
Survey of dramatic literature and theatre texts. Playreading,
script analysis, term projects.
TH 3851. Screenwriting. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-#)
TH 4351. Portfolio Preparation and Presentation. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-#; no
Grad School credit)
Capstone course utilizes presentation of student’s work in technical theatre/design to assess design/technical skills. Analysis of
portfolio, job applications, resume development, and portfolio
development techniques.
TH 4399. Theatre: Special Projects. (1-2 cr [max 12 cr]; A-F or Aud. Prereq-#)
Projects in directing, choreography of individual or groups, or
designing of costumes, lighting, scenery, or sound.
TH 4441. Costume Design II. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-3441 or #)
Advanced principles and practice of costume design with
emphasis on designing and rendering costumes from various
historical periods.
TH 4501. Stage Lighting II. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-1501 or #; no Grad School
credit)
Advanced theories and techniques used in designing lights for
traditional and nontraditional theatre works.
TH 4801. History of the Theatre I. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-3801 or #)
Survey of style, theory, performance, and production techniques
of world theatre from theoretical origins through early 19th
century.
Introduction to and practice in fundamentals of screenwriting.
Dialogue, character, structure, story development, writing for a
visual medium, formatting.
TH 4802. History of the Theatre II. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-4801 or #)
TH 3871. Playwriting. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. LE 9)
TH 4851. Dramatic and Performance Theory. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-3801 or #)
Instruction and practice in fundamentals of playwriting, including dialogue, character, and scenario development; traditional
and experimental formal structures; emphasizes theatre format
with peripheral screenplay information.
TH 3881. New Play Development Workshop. (3 cr [max 6 cr]; A-F or Aud. Prereq1001 or 1801 or #)
Intensive work in development of new scripts from initial reading to minimally staged performance.
TH 3991. Independent Study in Theatre. (1-3 cr [max 6 cr]; A-F or Aud. Prereq-#;
undergrads max 6 cr in 3991 and 5991 combined)
Directed readings and projects arranged between student and
faculty mentor.
Intensive study of special topics falling outside usual theatre or
dance courses. Topic announced before course offered.
TH 4112. Acting Scene Study. (3 cr [max 6 cr]; A-F or Aud. Prereq-#, no Grad School
credit)
Survey and analysis of dramatic and performance theory texts,
playscripts, and criticism.
TH 4901. Intern Teaching in Theatre. (3 cr [max 9 cr]; A-F or Aud. Prereq-#, no
Grad School credit)
Practical experience teaching beginning courses in department.
Students serve as intern teachers, assisting instructor in administration of course.
TH 5991. Independent Study in Theatre. (1-3 cr [max 6 cr]; A-F or Aud. Prereq-Sr,
%; undergrads max 6 cr in 3991 and 5991 combined; no Grad School credit)
Directed, advanced readings and projects arranged between
student and faculty mentor.
TH 5997. Internship in Professional Theatre. (1-12 cr [max 12 cr]; S-N or Aud.
Prereq-%; 1 cr for each 45 hrs work; no Grad School credit)
Internship with a cooperating professional, commercial, or
repertory theatre.
Toxicology (TXCL)
Concentrated exploration of realistic acting through use of
scene study and other text work, with special focus on scenes
and characters dealing with heightened emotions and situations.
School of Medicine
TH 4151. Acting V: Senior Studio. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-#; no Grad School credit)
Special project that addresses specific issue in toxicology.
Under guidance of faculty member.
Capstone course utilizes scene study to access actor’s skills,
proficiencies, and artistic growth. Variety of styles make up final
presentation of scenes and monologues rehearsed throughout
semester.
TH 4171. Acting VI: Acting for the Camera. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-4151 or #; no
Grad School credit)
Contemporary acting adjustments necessary for film, television,
and commercials.
Course Descriptions
TH 3995. Special Topics: (Various Titles to be Assigned). (1-3 cr [max 9 cr]; A-F or
Aud. Prereq-#)
Survey of style, theory, performance, and production techniques
of world theatre from 19th century to present.
TXCL 5000. Directed Research in Toxicology. (1-4 cr [max 16 cr]; S-N or Aud.
Prereq-#)
TXCL 5011. Principles of Toxicology. (2 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-Grad Txcl major or #)
Introduction to fundamentals of poisoning in individuals and
the environment, assessment of potential health hazards, and
application of toxicology in various professional careers.
TXCL 5545. Introduction to Regulatory Medicine. (2 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-Grad
School student or #)
Explanation of products requiring a pre-market approval and
those that may be marketed without approval. Post-market surveillance. Adverse reactions, removal of product from market.
397
Course Descriptions
TXCL 8012. Advanced Toxicology I. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-5011, Chem 4341
or #)
Absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion of xenobiotics; toxicokinetics; mechanisms of toxicity or specific classes
of chemical agents.
TXCL 8013. Advanced Toxicology II. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-8012, Chem 4342,
Phsl 5601 or #)
Kinetic and dynamic determinants of target organ toxicity;
pathological alterations in structure/function relationships
for major target organ systems; mechanisms of mutagenesis,
carcinogenesis, and teratogenesis.
TXCL 8100. Investigative Toxicology. (1 cr [max 2 cr]; A-F or Aud. Prereq-8013
or #)
College of Science and Engineering
WRS 8050. Special Topics: (Various Titles to be Assigned). (1-3 cr [max 6 cr]; A-F
or Aud. Prereq-#)
Selected topics in water resources science.
WRS 8060. Directed Studies in Water Resources Science. (1-3 cr [max 6 cr]; A-F
or Aud. Prereq-#)
Directed studies in water resources science.
WRS 8095. Plan B Project. (3 cr; S-N or Aud. Prereq-#)
TXCL 8333. FTE: Master’s. (1 cr; No grade. Prereq-Master s student, adviser and
DGS consent)
Satisfies Plan B project requirement. May appear on master’s
program, but does not count toward credit minimum in major.
Project topic arranged between student and adviser. Written
report required.
TXCL 8444. FTE: Doctoral. (1 cr; No grade. Prereq-Doctoral student, adviser and
DGS consent)
WRS 8100. Interdisciplinary Seminar in Water Resources. (1-3 cr [max 3 cr];
Stdnt Opt)
TXCL 8666. Doctoral Pre-Thesis Credits. (1-6 cr [max 12 cr]; No grade. Prereq-Max
6 cr per semester or summer; doctoral student who has not passed prelim oral; no
required consent for the first two registrations up to 12 cr; departmental consent for
the third and fourth registrations up to an additional 12 cr, or 24 cr total (for doctoral
students admitted summer 2007 and beyond; doctoral students admitted prior to
summer 2007 may register up to 4 times totaling 60 cr))
Seminar in water resources science.
TXCL 8777. Thesis Credits: Master’s. (1-18 cr [max 50 cr]; No grade. Prereq-Max
18 cr per semester or summer; 10 cr total required (Plan A only))
WRS 8666. Doctoral Pre-Thesis Credits. (1-6 cr [max 12 cr]; No grade. Prereq-Max
6 cr per semester or summer; doctoral student who has not passed prelim oral; no
required consent for the first two registrations up to 12 cr; departmental consent for
the third and fourth registrations up to an additional 12 cr, or 24 cr total (for doctoral
students admitted summer 2007 and beyond; doctoral students admitted prior to
summer 2007 may register up to 4 times totaling 60 cr))
Evaluating toxicology research issues and literature.
TXCL 8888. Thesis Credits: Doctoral. (1-24 cr [max 100 cr]; No grade. Prereq-Max
18 cr per semester or summer; 24 cr required)
Urban and Regional Studies
(URS)
WRS 8333. FTE: Master’s. (1 cr; No grade. Prereq-Master s student, adviser and
DGS consent)
WRS 8444. FTE: Doctoral. (1 cr; No grade. Prereq-Doctoral student, adviser and
DGS consent)
WRS 8777. Thesis Credits: Master’s. (1-18 cr [max 50 cr]; No grade. Prereq-Max
18 cr per semester or summer; 10 cr total required (Plan A only))
College of Liberal Arts
WRS 8888. Thesis Credits: Doctoral. (1-24 cr [max 100 cr]; No grade. Prereq-Max
18 cr per semester or summer; 24 cr required)
URS 1001. Introduction to Urban and Regional Studies. (3 cr; A-F only. LE 8)
Women’s Studies (WS)
Interdisciplinary introduction to urban and regional issues.
Political, historical, socioeconomic, and spatial processes in the
United States. Intended for urban and regional studies sophomores and others considering it as a major.
URS 3097. Internship in Urban and Regional Studies. (1-6 cr [max 8 cr]; S-N only.
Prereq-URS major, jr or sr, #)
Course Descriptions
Water Resources Science
(WRS)
Scheduled assignments with direct supervision in public agencies or relevant private firms.
URS 3991. Independent Study in Urban and Regional Studies. (1-4 cr [max 6 cr];
Stdnt Opt. Prereq-#)
For students interested in doing advanced work in urban and
regional studies.
College of Liberal Arts
WS 1000. Introduction to Women’s Studies. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. LECD 07)
Women’s studies as an interdisciplinary field of study; overview
of the many issues related to current and changing role and
status of women. International perspectives.
WS 2101. Women, Race, and Class. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. LECD 08)
Complex influences of gender, race, and class on women’s
lives in the United States. Focuses on experiences, views, and
cultural expression of contemporary women who are not white
or middle class. Cross-cultural perspectives.
WS 3000. Transnational Perspectives on Feminism. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq1000 or 2101 or #)
Focuses on the new Europe, following the demise of the former
Soviet Union and the East Block, and the formation of the
European Union. What are the feminist issues over there? How
are the challenges European women face different from those
faced by women in the United States.
WS 3001. Third World Women. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-1000 or 2101 or #)
A critical examination of how major social-economic, political
and historical factors such as colonialism and imperialism
affected and continue to structure women’s lives in postcolonial
cultures. Examines and compares how Third World women, and
women of color in the U.S., as active and resilient social actors
resisted and continue to resist all forms of oppression.
398
Women’s Studies
WS 3002. Latin American Women: Culture and Politics. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq1000 or 2101 or #)
WS 3897. Internship. (1-9 cr [max 9 cr]; S-N or Aud. Prereq-1000, 2101, 3100, 15 cr
WS or WS-related courses, WS major or minor, 53 cr, #)
Examination of contemporary economic and socio-political
issues affecting Latin American women.
Work in public agency, private organization, or service agency
offering practical application of women’s studies theories and/or
experience not available in classroom. Students must set goals,
fulfill requirements for credit earned, and submit written and
oral evaluations of experience.
WS 3100. Feminist Theory. (4 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-1000, 45 cr or #)
Historical and conceptual examination and analysis of central
ideas and problems within several feminist theories.
WS 3150. Women-Identified Culture. (3 cr; A-F or Aud)
Chronological survey introducing a relatively new body of
knowledge in women’s studies about lesbian cultures. Lesbian
studies in literature, history, law, sociology, aesthetics, and
philosophy; international perspectives.
WS 3200. Women’s Autobiographies. (3 cr; A-F or Aud)
Women’s self-concepts as expressed in autobiographical writings. Meanings women give their lives as women; impact of
race and class; choices for artistic, political, intellectual, and/or
private lives. Autobiographical techniques and style.
WS 3250. Women, Peace and War. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-1000)
A feminist analysis of war and peace; women’s role in warfare
and the effects of war on women; feminism and peace; women’s
efforts at peacemaking.
WS 3300. Women and Spirituality. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-1000 or 2101 or #)
Spirituality in relation to women, theoretical and experiential.
Contemporary and historical issues and practices.
WS 4000. Seminar. (4 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-1000, 2101, 3100, 15 cr WS or WSrelated courses, WS major or minor, or #)
Major issues, concepts, and questions addressed by feminist
scholarship; context of feminist inquiry.
WS 5595. Special Topics: (Various Titles to Be Assigned). (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq1000, 2101, 3100, 90 cr or grad student or #)
Advanced study. Topic announced before course offered.
WS 5897. Teaching Internship in Women’s Studies. (1-2 cr [max 2 cr]; S-N or Aud.
Prereq-1000, 2101, 90cr, WS major, #; no Grad School credit)
Practical experience assisting in teaching in Department of
Women’s Studies. Before interning for a course, students must
obtain a grade of at least B+ in the course.
WS 5991. Independent Study. (1-4 cr [max 4 cr]; A-F or Aud. Prereq-1000, 3100, 15
cr WS or WS related courses or grad student, #)
Readings, research, and/or projects on topics of interest to
graduate students concerning women and women’s issues.
WS 3350. Women and the Law. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-1000 or 2101 or #)
Ways women’s lives and gender relationships are influenced by
laws and the judicial system; how the system can become more
responsive to women’s experience.
WS 3400. Women and Film. (3 cr; A-F or Aud)
American and foreign films screened, analyzed, and reviewed
from a feminist perspective. Role of women in history, economics, and politics of filmmaking.
WS 3450. Motherhood and Mothering: Institution and Experience. (3 cr; A-F
only. Prereq-1000 or 2101 or #)
An examination of the institution, experience, and practices of
motherhood and mothering, including the social, legal, medical,
cultural, and economic factors shaping motherhood in the U.S.
and elsewhere, and feminist analyses of the experience and
practice of mothering across cultures.
WS 3595. Special Topics: (Various Titles to be Assigned). (1-4 cr [max 9 cr]; A-F or
Aud. Prereq-1000 or #)
Course Descriptions
Topics that fall outside current women’s studies courses. Topic
announced before course offered.
WS 3600. Ecofeminist Theories and Practices. (3 cr; A-F or Aud. Prereq-1000 or #)
Theories of ecofeminism; ecofeminist analysis applied to contemporary global ethical, social and environmental issues.
WS 3891. Independent Study. (1-3 cr [max 6 cr]; A-F or Aud. Prereq-1000, 3100, 15
cr WS or WS-related courses, #)
Directed readings, research, and/or projects on topics of interest
to the student.
WS 3896. International Fieldwork in Women’s Studies. (1-3 cr [max 6 cr]; A-F or
Aud. Prereq-1000, #. §Comp 3133)
Travel abroad with an instructor. Live with local families and
learn about local women’s lives through field work involving
community visits, presentations by grassroots women, community-service work, reading, and follow-up writing and discussion. Repeatable once, in two different geographical areas.
399
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